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Sample records for undifferentiated mesenchymal cells

  1. Expression of Neural Markers by Undifferentiated Mesenchymal-Like Stem Cells from Different Sources

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    Dana Foudah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The spontaneous expression of neural markers, already demonstrated in bone marrow (BM mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, has been considered as evidence of the MSCs’ predisposition to differentiate toward neural lineages, supporting their use in stem cell-based therapy for neural repair. In this study we have evaluated, by immunocytochemistry, immunoblotting, and flow cytometry experiments, the expression of neural markers in undifferentiated MSCs from different sources: human adipose stem cells (hASCs, human skin-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hS-MSCs, human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs, and human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs. Our results demonstrate that the neuronal markers βIII-tubulin and NeuN, unlike other evaluated markers, are spontaneously expressed by a very high percentage of undifferentiated hASCs, hS-MSCs, hPDLSCs, and hDPSCs. Conversely, the neural progenitor marker nestin is expressed only by a high percentage of undifferentiated hPDLSCs and hDPSCs. Our results suggest that the expression of βIII-tubulin and NeuN could be a common feature of stem cells and not exclusive to neuronal cells. This could result in a reassessment of the use of βIII-tubulin and NeuN as the only evidence proving neuronal differentiation. Further studies will be necessary to elucidate the relevance of the spontaneous expression of these markers in stem cells.

  2. Expression of the chitinase family glycoprotein YKL-40 in undifferentiated, differentiated and trans-differentiated mesenchymal stem cells.

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    Daniel J Hoover

    Full Text Available The glycoprotein YKL-40 (CHI3L1 is a secreted chitinase family protein that induces angiogenesis, cell survival, and cell proliferation, and plays roles in tissue remodeling and immune regulation. It is expressed primarily in cells of mesenchymal origin, is overexpressed in numerous aggressive carcinomas and sarcomas, but is rarely expressed in normal ectodermal tissues. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can be induced to differentiate into various mesenchymal tissues and trans-differentiate into some non-mesenchymal cell types. Since YKL-40 has been used as a mesenchymal marker, we followed YKL-40 expression as undifferentiated MSCs were induced to differentiate into bone, cartilage, and neural phenotypes. Undifferentiated MSCs contain significant levels of YKL-40 mRNA but do not synthesize detectable levels of YKL-40 protein. MSCs induced to differentiate into chondrocytes and osteocytes soon began to express and secrete YKL-40 protein, as do ex vivo cultured chondrocytes and primary osteocytes. In contrast, MSCs induced to trans-differentiate into neurons did not synthesize YKL-40 protein, consistent with the general absence of YKL-40 protein in normal CNS parenchyma. However, these trans-differentiated neurons retained significant levels of YKL-40 mRNA, suggesting the mechanisms which prevented YKL-40 translation in undifferentiated MSCs remained in place, and that these trans-differentiated neurons differ in at least this way from neurons derived from neuronal stem cells. Utilization of a differentiation protocol containing β-mercaptoethanol resulted in cells that expressed significant amounts of intracellular YKL-40 protein that was not secreted, which is not seen in normal cells. Thus the synthesis of YKL-40 protein is a marker for MSC differentiation into mature mesenchymal phenotypes, and the presence of untranslated YKL-40 mRNA in non-mesenchymal cells derived from MSCs reflects differences between differentiated and

  3. Long term culture of mesenchymal stem cells in hypoxia promotes a genetic program maintaining their undifferentiated and multipotent status

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    de Carvalho Marcelo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the bone marrow, hematopietic and mesenchymal stem cells form a unique niche in which the oxygen tension is low. Hypoxia may have a role in maintaining stem cell fate, self renewal and multipotency. However, whereas most studies addressed the effect of transient in vitro exposure of MSC to hypoxia, permanent culture under hypoxia should reflect the better physiological conditions. Results Morphologic studies, differentiation and transcriptional profiling experiments were performed on MSC cultured in normoxia (21% O2 versus hypoxia (5% O2 for up to passage 2. Cells at passage 0 and at passage 2 were compared, and those at passage 0 in hypoxia generated fewer and smaller colonies than in normoxia. In parallel, MSC displayed (>4 fold inhibition of genes involved in DNA metabolism, cell cycle progression and chromosome cohesion whereas transcripts involved in adhesion and metabolism (CD93, ESAM, VWF, PLVAP, ANGPT2, LEP, TCF1 were stimulated. Compared to normoxic cells, hypoxic cells were morphologically undifferentiated and contained less mitochondrias. After this lag phase, cells at passage 2 in hypoxia outgrew the cells cultured in normoxia and displayed an enhanced expression of genes (4-60 fold involved in extracellular matrix assembly (SMOC2, neural and muscle development (NOG, GPR56, SNTG2, LAMA and epithelial development (DMKN. This group described herein for the first time was assigned by the Gene Ontology program to "plasticity". Conclusion The duration of hypoxemia is a critical parameter in the differentiation capacity of MSC. Even in growth promoting conditions, hypoxia enhanced a genetic program that maintained the cells undifferentiated and multipotent. This condition may better reflect the in vivo gene signature of MSC, with potential implications in regenerative medicine.

  4. Repair of Torn Avascular Meniscal Cartilage Using Undifferentiated Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells: From In Vitro Optimization to a First‐in‐Human Study

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    Whitehouse, Michael R.; Howells, Nicholas R.; Parry, Michael C.; Austin, Eric; Kafienah, Wael; Brady, Kyla; Goodship, Allen E.; Eldridge, Jonathan D.; Blom, Ashley W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Meniscal cartilage tears are common and predispose to osteoarthritis (OA). Most occur in the avascular portion of the meniscus where current repair techniques usually fail. We described previously the use of undifferentiated autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) seeded onto a collagen scaffold (MSC/collagen‐scaffold) to integrate meniscal tissues in vitro. Our objective was to translate this method into a cell therapy for patients with torn meniscus, with the long‐term goal of delaying or preventing the onset of OA. After in vitro optimization, we tested an ovine‐MSC/collagen‐scaffold in a sheep meniscal cartilage tear model with promising results after 13 weeks, although repair was not sustained over 6 months. We then conducted a single center, prospective, open‐label first‐in‐human safety study of patients with an avascular meniscal tear. Autologous MSCs were isolated from an iliac crest bone marrow biopsy, expanded and seeded into the collagen scaffold. The resulting human‐MSC/collagen‐scaffold implant was placed into the meniscal tear prior to repair with vertical mattress sutures and the patients were followed for 2 years. Five patients were treated and there was significant clinical improvement on repeated measures analysis. Three were asymptomatic at 24 months with no magnetic resonance imaging evidence of recurrent tear and clinical improvement in knee function scores. Two required subsequent meniscectomy due to retear or nonhealing of the meniscal tear at approximately 15 months after implantation. No other adverse events occurred. We conclude that undifferentiated MSCs could provide a safe way to augment avascular meniscal repair in some patients. Registration: EU Clinical Trials Register, 2010‐024162‐22. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1237–1248 PMID:28186682

  5. The osteogenic response of undifferentiated human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to mechanical strain is inversely related to body mass index of the donor.

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    Friedl, Gerald; Windhager, Reinhard; Schmidt, Helena; Aigner, Reingard

    2009-08-01

    While the importance of physical factors in the maintenance and regeneration of bone tissue has been recognized for many years and the mechano-sensitivity of bone cells is well established, there is increasing evidence that body fat constitutes an independent risk factor for complications in bone fracture healing and aseptic loosening of implants. Although mechanical causes have been widely suggested, we hypothesized that the osteogenic mechano-response of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) may be altered in obese patients. We determined the phenotypic and genotypic response of undifferentiated hMSCs of 10 donors to cyclic tensile strain (CTS) under controlled in vitro conditions and analyzed the potential relationship relevant to the donor's anthropomorphometric and biochemical parameters related to donor's fat and bone metabolism. The osteogenic marker genes were all statistically significantly upregulated by CTS, which was accompanied by a significant increase in cell-based ALP activity. Linear correlation analysis revealed that there was a significant correlation between phenotypic CTS response and the body mass index of the donor (r = -0.91, p < 0.001) and phenotypic CTS response was also significantly related to leptin levels (r = -0.68) and estradiol levels (r = 0.67) within the bone marrow microenvironment of the donor. Such an upstream imprinting process mediated by factors tightly related to the donor's fat metabolism, which hampers the mechanosensitivity of hMSCs in obese patients, may be of pathogenetic relevance for the complications associated with obesity that are seen in orthopedic surgery.

  6. Possibility of Undifferentiated Human Thigh Adipose Stem Cells Differentiating into Functional Hepatocytes

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    Jong Hoon Lee

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThis study aimed to investigate the possibility of isolating mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from human thigh adipose tissue and the ability of human thigh adipose stem cells (HTASCs to differentiate into hepatocytes.MethodsThe adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs were isolated from thigh adipose tissue. Growth factors, cytokines, and hormones were added to the collagen coated dishes to induce the undifferentiated HTASCs to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells. To confirm the experimental results, the expression of hepatocyte-specific markers on undifferentiated and differentiated HTASCs was analyzed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemical staining. Differentiation efficiency was evaluated using functional tests such as periodic acid schiff (PAS staining and detection of the albumin secretion level using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA.ResultsThe majority of the undifferentiated HTASCs were changed into a more polygonal shape showing tight interactions between the cells. The differentiated HTASCs up-regulated mRNA of hepatocyte markers. Immunocytochemical analysis showed that they were intensely stained with anti-albumin antibody compared with undifferentiated HTASCs. PAS staining showed that HTASCs submitted to the hepatocyte differentiation protocol were able to more specifically store glycogen than undifferentiated HTASCs, displaying a purple color in the cytoplasm of the differentiated HTASCs. ELISA analyses showed that differentiated HTASCs could secrete albumin, which is one of the hepatocyte markers.ConclusionsMSCs were islolated from human thigh adipose tissue differentiate to heapatocytes. The source of ADSCs is not only abundant abdominal adipose tissue, but also thigh adipose tissue for cell therapy in liver regeneration and tissue regeneration.

  7. Promoter DNA hypermethylation and gene repression in undifferentiated Arabidopsis cells.

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    María Berdasco

    Full Text Available Maintaining and acquiring the pluripotent cell state in plants is critical to tissue regeneration and vegetative multiplication. Histone-based epigenetic mechanisms are important for regulating this undifferentiated state. Here we report the use of genetic and pharmacological experimental approaches to show that Arabidopsis cell suspensions and calluses specifically repress some genes as a result of promoter DNA hypermethylation. We found that promoters of the MAPK12, GSTU10 and BXL1 genes become hypermethylated in callus cells and that hypermethylation also affects the TTG1, GSTF5, SUVH8, fimbrin and CCD7 genes in cell suspensions. Promoter hypermethylation in undifferentiated cells was associated with histone hypoacetylation and primarily occurred at CpG sites. Accordingly, we found that the process specifically depends on MET1 and DRM2 methyltransferases, as demonstrated with DNA methyltransferase mutants. Our results suggest that promoter DNA methylation may be another important epigenetic mechanism for the establishment and/or maintenance of the undifferentiated state in plant cells.

  8. Human mesenchymal stem cells

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    Abdallah, Basem; Kassem, Moustapha

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a group of clonogenic cells present among the bone marrow stroma and capable of multilineage differentiation into mesoderm-type cells such as osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. Due to their ease of isolation and their differentiation potential, MSC are being...... introduced into clinical medicine in variety of applications and through different ways of administration. Here, we discuss approaches for isolation, characterization and directing differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). An update of the current clinical use of the cells is also provided....

  9. Mesenchymal Stem Cells

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    Horwood, Nicole J.; Dazzi, Francesco; Zaher, Walid

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are stem cell populations present among the bone marrow stroma and a number of other tissues that are capable of multi-lineage differentiation into mesoderm-type cells such as osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. MSC provide supportive stroma for growth...... and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and hematopoiesis. These cells have been described as important immunoregulators due to their ability to suppress T cells proliferation. MSC can also directly contribute to tissue repair by migrating to sites of injury and providing a source of cells...

  10. Are mesenchymal stromal cells immune cells?

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    M.J. Hoogduijn (Martin)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractMesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are considered to be promising agents for the treatment of immunological disease. Although originally identified as precursor cells for mesenchymal lineages, in vitro studies have demonstrated that MSCs possess diverse immune regulatory capacities.

  11. Mesenchymal Stem Cells

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    Horwood, Nicole J.; Dazzi, Francesco; Zaher, Walid

    2012-01-01

    and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and hematopoiesis. These cells have been described as important immunoregulators due to their ability to suppress T cells proliferation. MSC can also directly contribute to tissue repair by migrating to sites of injury and providing a source of cells......Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are stem cell populations present among the bone marrow stroma and a number of other tissues that are capable of multi-lineage differentiation into mesoderm-type cells such as osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. MSC provide supportive stroma for growth...... for differentiation and/or providing bystander support for resident stromal cells. This chapter discusses the cellular and molecular properties of MSC, the mechanisms by which they can modulate immune responses and the clinical applications of MSC in disorders such as graft-versus-host disease and aplastic anaemia...

  12. Spindle and Giant Cell Type Undifferentiated Carcinoma of the Proximal Bile Duct

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    Ide, Takao; Miyoshi, Atsushi; Kitahara, Kenji; Kai, Keita; Noshiro, Hirokazu

    2012-01-01

    Undifferentiated spindle and giant cell carcinoma is an extremely rare malignant neoplasm arising in the extrahepatic bile duct. We herein present the case of a 67-year-old male who developed an undifferentiated spindle and giant cell carcinoma of the proximal bile duct. A nodular infiltrating tumor was located at the proximal bile duct, resulting in obstructive jaundice. Histologically, the tumor was composed of mainly spindle-shaped and giant cells and showed positive immunoreactivity for b...

  13. Mesenchymal Cells in Colon Cancer.

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    Koliaraki, Vasiliki; Pallangyo, Charles K; Greten, Florian R; Kollias, George

    2017-04-01

    Mesenchymal cells in the intestine comprise a variety of cell types of diverse origins, functions, and molecular markers. They provide mechanical and structural support and have important functions during intestinal organogenesis, morphogenesis, and homeostasis. Recent studies of the human transcriptome have revealed their importance in the development of colorectal cancer, and studies from animal models have provided evidence for their roles in the pathogenesis of colitis-associated cancer and sporadic colorectal cancer. Mesenchymal cells in tumors, called cancer-associated fibroblasts, arise via activation of resident mesenchymal cell populations and the recruitment of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and fibrocytes. Cancer-associated fibroblasts have a variety of activities that promote colon tumor development and progression; these include regulation of intestinal inflammation, epithelial proliferation, stem cell maintenance, angiogenesis, extracellular matrix remodeling, and metastasis. We review the intestinal mesenchymal cell-specific pathways that regulate these processes, with a focus on their roles in mediating interactions between inflammation and carcinogenesis. We also discuss how increasing our understanding of intestinal mesenchymal cell biology and function could lead to new strategies to identify and treat colitis-associated cancers. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Expansion on stromal cells preserves the undifferentiated state of human hematopoietic stem cells despite compromised reconstitution ability.

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    Magnusson, Mattias; Sierra, Maria I; Sasidharan, Rajkumar; Prashad, Sacha L; Romero, Melissa; Saarikoski, Pamela; Van Handel, Ben; Huang, Andy; Li, Xinmin; Mikkola, Hanna K A

    2013-01-01

    Lack of HLA-matched hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) limits the number of patients with life-threatening blood disorders that can be treated by HSC transplantation. So far, insufficient understanding of the regulatory mechanisms governing human HSC has precluded the development of effective protocols for culturing HSC for therapeutic use and molecular studies. We defined a culture system using OP9M2 mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) stroma that protects human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) from differentiation and apoptosis. In addition, it facilitates a dramatic expansion of multipotent progenitors that retain the immunophenotype (CD34+CD38-CD90+) characteristic of human HSPC and proliferative potential over several weeks in culture. In contrast, transplantable HSC could be maintained, but not significantly expanded, during 2-week culture. Temporal analysis of the transcriptome of the ex vivo expanded CD34+CD38-CD90+ cells documented remarkable stability of most transcriptional regulators known to govern the undifferentiated HSC state. Nevertheless, it revealed dynamic fluctuations in transcriptional programs that associate with HSC behavior and may compromise HSC function, such as dysregulation of PBX1 regulated genetic networks. This culture system serves now as a platform for modeling human multilineage hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell hierarchy and studying the complex regulation of HSC identity and function required for successful ex vivo expansion of transplantable HSC.

  15. Expansion on stromal cells preserves the undifferentiated state of human hematopoietic stem cells despite compromised reconstitution ability.

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    Mattias Magnusson

    Full Text Available Lack of HLA-matched hematopoietic stem cells (HSC limits the number of patients with life-threatening blood disorders that can be treated by HSC transplantation. So far, insufficient understanding of the regulatory mechanisms governing human HSC has precluded the development of effective protocols for culturing HSC for therapeutic use and molecular studies. We defined a culture system using OP9M2 mesenchymal stem cell (MSC stroma that protects human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC from differentiation and apoptosis. In addition, it facilitates a dramatic expansion of multipotent progenitors that retain the immunophenotype (CD34+CD38-CD90+ characteristic of human HSPC and proliferative potential over several weeks in culture. In contrast, transplantable HSC could be maintained, but not significantly expanded, during 2-week culture. Temporal analysis of the transcriptome of the ex vivo expanded CD34+CD38-CD90+ cells documented remarkable stability of most transcriptional regulators known to govern the undifferentiated HSC state. Nevertheless, it revealed dynamic fluctuations in transcriptional programs that associate with HSC behavior and may compromise HSC function, such as dysregulation of PBX1 regulated genetic networks. This culture system serves now as a platform for modeling human multilineage hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell hierarchy and studying the complex regulation of HSC identity and function required for successful ex vivo expansion of transplantable HSC.

  16. Undifferentiated Embryonic Cell Transcription Factor 1 Regulates ESC Chromatin Organization and Gene Expression

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    Kooistra, Susanne M.; van den Boom, Vincent; Thummer, Rajkumar P.; Johannes, Frank; Wardenaar, Rene; Tesson, Bruno M.; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.; Fusetti, Fabrizia; O'Neill, Laura P.; Turner, Bryan M.; de Haan, Gerald; Eggen, Bart J. L.; O’Neill, Laura P.

    2010-01-01

    Previous reports showed that embryonic stem (ES) cells contain hyperdynamic and globally transcribed chromatin-properties that are important for ES cell pluripotency and differentiation. Here, we demonstrate a role for undifferentiated embryonic cell transcription factor 1 (UTF1) in regulating ES

  17. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

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    Varga, Nora [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Vereb, Zoltan; Rajnavoelgyi, Eva [Department of Immunology, Medical and Health Science Centre, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Nemet, Katalin; Uher, Ferenc; Sarkadi, Balazs [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Apati, Agota, E-mail: apati@kkk.org.hu [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  18. The effects of X-irradiation on the chondrogensis of mesenchymal cells

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    Ha, Jong Ryeol

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that X-irradiation affects on maturing process of differentiated chondrocytes. Nevertheless, It has been remained elusively whether X-irradiation affects the process of differentiation of mesenchymal cells which differentiate into chondrocyte, fibroblast, or muscle cells. In this study, we examined the effect of X-irradiation (with 1 to 10 Gy) on chondrogenesis using mesenchymal cells of chick limb bud. Our results show that X-irradiation dose-dependently inhibited chondrogenesis. This result suggests that immature chondroblast-like mesenchymal cells are sensitive to X-irradiation, Moreover, X-irradiation affects not only maturing process of chondrocytes, but also inhibits the chondrogenesis. Taken together, we demonstrate that the whole process of differentiation of mature chondrocytes from mesenchymal cells is affected by X-irradiation and undifferentiated cells were more affected by X-irradiation than mature cells

  19. A monoclonal antibody recognizes undifferentiation-specific carbohydrate moieties expressed on cell surface of the human dental pulp cells.

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    Kang, Kyung-Jung; Ko, Seon-Yle; Ryu, Chun-Jeih; Jang, Young-Joo

    2017-05-01

    Human dental pulp cells are obtained from dental pulp tissue, and have the ability to form dentin and a pulp-like complex. Although adult stem cells have been identified from the primary culture by using specific cell surface markers, the identity of surface markers for the purification of stem cells within the dental pulp population are still unclear. Previously, we had constructed monoclonal antibodies against the undifferentiated cell-specific surface markers of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) by performing decoy immunization. Among them, a monoclonal antibody against the cell surface antigen of the undifferentiated hDPCs (named UPSA-1) was purified and its heavy and light chain consensus regions were analyzed. The cell surface binding affinity of UPSA-1 mAb on the undifferentiated hDPCs was stronger than that on the differentiated cells. When tunicamycin was applied to hDPSCs during culture, the cell surface binding affinity of the antibody was dramatically decreased, and dentinogenic differentiation was reduced. The purified UPSA-1 antigen band resulting from immunoprecipitation disappeared or shifted down on the SDS-PAGE by deglycosylation. These data suggested that glycosylation on the cell surface might be a marker of an undifferentiated state, and that UPSA-1 mAb might be useful for identifying the carbohydrate moiety on the cell surface of undifferentiated pulp cells. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Undifferentiated salivary gland carcinomas

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    Herbst, H.; Hamilton-Dutoit, S.; Jakel, K.T.

    2004-01-01

    Undifferentiated salivary gland carcinomas may be divided into small cell and large cell types. Among large cell undifferentiated carcinomas, lymphoepithelial carcinomas have to be distinguished, the latter of which are endemic in the Arctic regions and southern China where virtually all cases of...... at other primary sites, particularly when expressing the thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) Udgivelsesdato: 2004...

  1. Primary CNS anaplastic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma mimicking undifferentiated metastatic tumors: a case report.

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    Yang, Tianyu; Belverud, Shawn; Yeh, Albert Y; Bandovic, Jela; Farmer, Peter; Woldenberg, Rona F; Demopoulos, Alexis; Schulder, Michael; Li, Jian Yi

    2010-02-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare intracranial tumor, with an annual incidence of six per million population. Anaplastic variant of primary CNS diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is less common; to our knowledge, there is only one other case report in the world literature. We describe a 71 year old immunocompetent female without significant past medical history who presented with confusion and a homogeneously enhancing midline mass. The patient underwent craniotomy for tumor biopsy, followed by high-dose methotrexate-based chemotherapy despite a remarkably low performance status. Histologically, this tumor was composed of undifferentiated polymorphic tumor cells, multi-nucleated giant cells, extensive necrosis, and conspicuous mitotic activity, mimicking undifferentiated metastatic tumors. Immunohistochemical stains demonstrated immunopositivity of tumor cells for CD20, MUM-1, and BCL-6, and negative staining for CD3, CD10, and CD30. The clinical course, diagnostic workup, pathologic correlates, and treatment outcomes are described.

  2. Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

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    Aldahmash, Abdullah; Zaher, Walid; Al-Nbaheen, May

    2012-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC) represent a group of non-hematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow stroma and the stroma of other organs including subcutaneous adipose tissue, placenta, and muscles. They exhibit the characteristics of somatic stem cells of self......-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation into mesoderm-type of cells, e.g., to osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and possibly other cell types including hepatocytes and astrocytes. Due to their ease of culture and multipotentiality, hMSC are increasingly employed as a source for cells suitable for a number...

  3. The Effect of Valproic Acid on Mesenchymal Pluripotent Cell Proliferation and Differentiation in Extracellular Matrices

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    Yuji Hatakeyama

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Valproic acid (2- n -propylpentanoic acid, VPA is a widely used antiepileptic and anticonvulsant drug. Previous studies have reported that VPA effects osteogenesis in vivo and in vitro, yet it remains unclear whether VPA promotes cell differentiation of osteoblasts derived from mesenchymal cells. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of VPA on undifferentiated pluripotent mesenchymal cell proliferation and differentiation into osteoblasts while analyzing the impact of the absence or presence of extracellular matrices (ECMs. Mouse mesenchymal cells were cultured on non-coated plastic, type I collagen-coated, and fibronectin-coated plates in the absence or presence of VPA. A cell proliferation assay was performed in which modified formazan dye content was analyzed and proliferation nuclear antigen (PCNA-positive cells were counted at various concentrations of VPA. A high concentration of VPA did not clearly alter cell morphology, but large numbers of stress fibers were observed in these cells and the cell proliferation ratio was decreased with positive PCNA counts. In the presence of matrices, the cell proliferation ratio decreased at low VPA concentrations compared with the ratio obtained in the absence of these ECMs. On the other hand, VPA promoted osteoblastic differentiation in the presence of type I collagen. These findings indicate that for undifferentiated mesenchymal cells, VPA promotes a decrease in the cell proliferation rate in the presence of ECMs and promotes osteoblastic differentiation, both of which could provide insight into additional mechanisms of osteoblastic cell differentiation caused by VPA.

  4. Comparison of periodontal ligament and gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells for regenerative therapies.

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    Santamaría, Silvia; Sanchez, Nerea; Sanz, Mariano; Garcia-Sanz, Jose A

    2017-05-01

    Tissue-engineering therapies using undifferentiated mesenchymal cells (MSCs) from intra-oral origin have been tested in experimental animals. This experimental study compared the characteristics of undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells from either periodontal ligament or gingival origin, aiming to establish the basis for the future use of these cells on regenerative therapies. Gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) were obtained from de-epithelialized gingival biopsies, enzymatically digested and expanded in conditions of exponential growth. Their growth characteristics, phenotype, and differentiation ability were compared with those of periodontal ligament-derived mesenchymal stem cells (PDLMSCs). Both periodontal ligament- and gingiva-derived cells displayed a MSC-like phenotype and were able to differentiate into osteoblasts, chondroblasts, and adipocytes. These cells were genetically stable following in vitro expansion and did not generate tumors when implanted in immunocompromised mice. Furthermore, under suboptimal growth conditions, GMSCs proliferated with higher rates than PDLMSCs. Stem cells derived from gingival biopsies represent bona fide MSCs and have demonstrated genetic stability and lack of tumorigenicity. Gingiva-derived MSCs may represent an accessible source of messenchymal stem cells to be used in future periodontal regenerative therapies.

  5. Sustained levels of FGF2 maintain undifferentiated stem cell cultures with biweekly feeding.

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    Steven Lotz

    Full Text Available An essential aspect of stem cell culture is the successful maintenance of the undifferentiated state. Many types of stem cells are FGF2 dependent, and pluripotent stem cells are maintained by replacing FGF2-containing media daily, while tissue-specific stem cells are typically fed every 3rd day. Frequent feeding, however, results in significant variation in growth factor levels due to FGF2 instability, which limits effective maintenance due to spontaneous differentiation. We report that stabilization of FGF2 levels using controlled release PLGA microspheres improves expression of stem cell markers, increases stem cell numbers and decreases spontaneous differentiation. The controlled release FGF2 additive reduces the frequency of media changes needed to maintain stem cell cultures, so that human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells can be maintained successfully with biweekly feedings.

  6. Can Villin be Used to Identify Malignant and Undifferentiated Normal Digestive Epithelial Cells?

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    Robine, S.; Huet, C.; Moll, R.; Sahuquillo-Merino, C.; Coudrier, E.; Zweibaum, A.; Louvard, D.

    1985-12-01

    We have investigated the presence of villin (a Ca2+-regulated actin binding protein) in various tissues (normal or malignant) and in established cell lines by using sensitive immunochemical techniques on cell extracts and immunofluorescence analysis on frozen sections. Our results show that villin is a marker that can be used to distinguish normal differentiated epithelial cells from the simple epithelia lining the gastrointestinal tract and renal tubules. Villin is found in the absorptive cells of the small and large intestines, in the duct cells of pancreas and biliary system, and in the cells of kidney proximal tubules. Furthermore, undifferentiated normal and tumoral cells of intestinal origin in vivo and in cell culture express villin. Therefore, expression of villin is seen in cells that do not necessarily display the morphological features characteristic of their terminally differentiated state, such as the microvilli-lined brush border. We suggest the possible clinical implications of using villin as a marker in the diagnosis of metastatic adenocarcinomas.

  7. Epigenetic regulation of osteogenesis: human embryonic palatal mesenchymal cells.

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    Barkhordarian, Andre; Sison, Jay; Cayabyab, Riana; Mahanian, Nicole; Chiappelli, Francesco

    2011-01-06

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) provide an appropriate model to study epigenetic changes during osteogenesis and bone regeneration due to their differentiation potential. Since there are no unique markers for MSCs, methods of identification are limited. The complex morphology of human embryonic palatal mesenchyme stem cell (HEPM) requires analysis of fractal dimensions to provide an objective quantification of self-similarity, a statistical transformation of cellular shape and border complexity. We propose the hypothesis of a study to compare and contrast sequential steps of osteogenic differentiation in HEPMs both phenotypically using immunocytochemistry, and morphometrically using fractal analysis from undifferentiated passage 1 (P1) to passage 7 (P7) cells. The proof-of-concept is provided by results we present here that identify and compare the modulation of expression of certain epigenetic biomarkers (alkaline phosphatase, ALP; stromal interaction molecule-1, STRO-1; runt-related transcription factor-2, RUNX2), which are established markers of osteogenesis in bone marrow studies, of osteoblastic/skeletal morphogenesis, and of osteoblast maturation. We show that Osteoinductive medium (OIM) modulates the rate of differentiation of HEPM into Run-2+ cells, the most differentiated subpopulation, followed by ALP+ and STRO-1+ cells. Taken together, our phenotypical and morphometric data demonstrate the feasibility of using HEPM to assess osteogenic differentiation from an early undifferentiated to a differentiated stage. This research model may lay the foundation for future studies aimed at characterizing the epigenetic characteristics of osteoimmunological disorders and dysfunctions (e.g., osteoarthritis, temporomandibular joint disorders), so that proteomic profiling can aid the diagnosis and monitor the prognosis of these and other osteoimmunopathologies.

  8. Tissue engineering approaches to develop decellularized tendon matrices functionalized with progenitor cells cultured under undifferentiated and tenogenic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele D’Arrigo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Tendon ruptures and retractions with an extensive tissue loss represent a major clinical problem and a great challenge in surgical reconstruction. Traditional approaches consist in autologous or allogeneic grafts, which still have some drawbacks. Hence, tissue engineering strategies aimed at developing functionalized tendon grafts. In this context, the use of xenogeneic tissues represents a promising perspective to obtain decellularized tendon grafts. This study is focused on the identification of suitable culture conditions for the generation of reseeded and functional decellularized constructs to be used as tendon grafts. Equine superficial digital flexor tendons were decellularized, reseeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from bone marrow and statically cultured in two different culture media to maintain undifferentiated cells (U-MSCs or to induce a terminal tenogenic differentiation (T-MSCs for 24 hours, 7 and 14 days. Cell viability, proliferation, morphology as well as matrix deposition and type I and III collagen production were assessed by means of histological, immunohistochemical and semi-quantitative analyses. Results showed that cell viability was not affected by any culture conditions and active proliferation was maintained 14 days after reseeding. However, seeded MSCs were not able to penetrate within the dense matrix of the decellularized tendons. Nevertheless, U-MSCs synthesized a greater amount of extracellular matrix rich in type I collagen compared to T-MSCs. In spite of the inability to deeply colonize the decellularized matrix in vitro, reseeding tendon matrices with U-MSCs could represent a suitable method for the functionalization of biological constructs, considering also any potential chemoattractant capability of the newly deposed extracellular matrix to recruit resident cells. This bioengineering approach can be exploited to produce functionalized tendon constructs for the substitution of large tendon defects.

  9. Undifferentiated embryonic cell transcription factor 1 regulates ESC chromatin organization and gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kooistra, Susanne M; van den Boom, Vincent; Thummer, Rajkumar P

    2010-01-01

    Previous reports showed that embryonic stem (ES) cells contain hyperdynamic and globally transcribed chromatin-properties that are important for ES cell pluripotency and differentiation. Here, we demonstrate a role for undifferentiated embryonic cell transcription factor 1 (UTF1) in regulating ES...... cell chromatin structure. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip analysis, we identified >1,700 UTF1 target genes that significantly overlap with previously identified Nanog, Oct4, Klf-4, c-Myc, and Rex1 targets. Gene expression profiling showed that UTF1 knock down results in increased expression...... of a large set of genes, including a significant number of UTF1 targets. UTF1 knock down (KD) ES cells are, irrespective of the increased expression of several self-renewal genes, Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) dependent. However, UTF1 KD ES cells are perturbed in their differentiation in response...

  10. Glucosamine-Based Supramolecular Nanotubes for Human Mesenchymal Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talloj, Satish Kumar; Cheng, Bill; Weng, Jen-Po; Lin, Hsin-Chieh

    2018-04-23

    Herein, we demonstrate an example of glucosamine-based supramolecular hydrogels that can be used for human mesenchymal cell therapy. We designed and synthesized a series of amino acid derivatives based on a strategy of capping d-glucosamine moiety at the C-terminus and fluorinated benzyl group at the N-terminus. From a systematic study on chemical structures, we discovered that the glucosamine-based supramolecular hydrogel [pentafluorobenzyl (PFB)-F-Glu] self-assembled with one-dimensional nanotubular structures at physiological pH. The self-assembly of a newly discovered PFB-F-Glu motif is attributed to the synergistic effect of π-π stacking and extensive intermolecular hydrogen bonding network in aqueous medium. Notably, PFB-F-Glu nanotubes are proven to be nontoxic to human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and have been shown to enhance hMSC proliferation while maintaining their pluripotency. Retaining of pluripotency capabilities provides potentially unlimited source of undifferentiated cells for the treatment of future cell therapies. Furthermore, hMSCs cultured on PFB-F-Glu are able to secrete paracrine factors that downregulate profibrotic gene expression in lipopolysaccharide-treated human skin fibroblasts, which demonstrates that PFB-F-Glu nanotubes have the potential to be used for wound healing applications. Overall, this article addresses the importance of chemical design to generate supramolecular biomaterials for stem cell therapy.

  11. Mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage repair in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pawan K; Das, Anjan K; Chullikana, Anoop; Majumdar, Anish S

    2012-07-09

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease of the connective tissue and progresses with age in the older population or develops in young athletes following sports-related injury. The articular cartilage is especially vulnerable to damage and has poor potential for regeneration because of the absence of vasculature within the tissue. Normal load-bearing capacity and biomechanical properties of thinning cartilage are severely compromised during the course of disease progression. Although surgical and pharmaceutical interventions are currently available for treating OA, restoration of normal cartilage function has been difficult to achieve. Since the tissue is composed primarily of chondrocytes distributed in a specialized extracellular matrix bed, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), also known as bone marrow-derived 'mesenchymal stem cells' or 'mesenchymal stromal cells', with inherent chondrogenic differentiation potential appear to be ideally suited for therapeutic use in cartilage regeneration. BMSCs can be easily isolated and massively expanded in culture in an undifferentiated state for therapeutic use. Owing to their potential to modulate local microenvironment via anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive functions, BMSCs have an additional advantage for allogeneic application. Moreover, by secreting various bioactive soluble factors, BMSCs can protect the cartilage from further tissue destruction and facilitate regeneration of the remaining progenitor cells in situ. This review broadly describes the advances made during the last several years in BMSCs and their therapeutic potential for repairing cartilage damage in OA.

  12. Intensive combined modality therapy of small round cell and undifferentiated sarcomas in children and young adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bader, J.L.; Dewan, R.; Watkins, E.; Kinsella, T.J.; Glatstein, E.; STeinberg, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    Seventy-five patients (ages 4-35 years) with the following small round cell tumors and undifferentiated sarcoma were treated at the National Cancer Institute: Ewing's sarcome (n=32), peripheral neuroepithelioma (n=14), rhabdomyosarcoma (n=24), undifferentiated sarcoma (n=5). Most patients had poor prognostic features including 36 (48%) with metastatic disease, and 42 (56%) with central (truncal) tumors (22 in the pelvis). Treatment included 5 cycles of intensive induction chemotherapy with vincristine, cyclophosphamide and adriamycin, plus aggressive local radiation therapy using simulation and computerized treatment planning for all patients. Thereafter, complete clinical responses were consolidated with intensive chemotherapy, total body irradiation and autologous bone marrow transplantation. There were three local only failures, 10 local plus distant failures, 36 distant only failures, 3 treatment-related deaths, and one intercurrent death. Overall actuarial survival and event-free survival at 4 years are 49 and 29%, respectively. Actuarial freedom from local progression was seen in 74% of patients at 4 years, quite remarkable considering the bulk and location of most of these tumors. Without aggressive surgery, many of these high risk patients had satisfactory outcomes, but better systemic treatments are still needed.(author). 44 refs.; 8 figs.; 6 tabs

  13. Proteomic analysis of plasma membranes isolated from undifferentiated and differentiated HepaRG cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokolowska Izabela

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Liver infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV, a DNA virus of the Hepadnaviridae family, leads to severe disease, such as fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The early steps of the viral life cycle are largely obscure and the host cell plasma membrane receptors are not known. HepaRG is the only proliferating cell line supporting HBV infection in vitro, following specific differentiation, allowing for investigation of new host host-cell factors involved in viral entry, within a more robust and reproducible environment. Viral infection generally begins with receptor recognition at the host cell surface, following highly specific cell-virus interactions. Most of these interactions are expected to take place at the plasma membrane of the HepaRG cells. In the present study, we used this cell line to explore changes between the plasma membrane of undifferentiated (− and differentiated (+ cells and to identify differentially-regulated proteins or signaling networks that might potentially be involved in HBV entry. Our initial study identified a series of proteins that are differentially expressed in the plasma membrane of (− and (+ cells and are good candidates for potential cell-virus interactions. To our knowledge, this is the first study using functional proteomics to study plasma membrane proteins from HepaRG cells, providing a platform for future experiments that will allow us to understand the cell-virus interaction and mechanism of HBV viral infection.

  14. Endocrine disrupting chemicals affect the adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in distinct ontogenetic windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biemann, Ronald; Navarrete Santos, Anne; Navarrete Santos, Alexander; Riemann, Dagmar; Knelangen, Julia; Blüher, Matthias; Koch, Holger; Fischer, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Endocrine disrupting chemicals affect adipogenesis in mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). ► The adipogenic impact depends strongly on the window of exposure. ► Bisphenol A reduces the potential of MSC to differentiate into adipocytes. ► DEHP and TBT trigger the adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. ► BPA, DEHP and TBT did not affect adipogenesis in embryonic stem cells. -- Abstract: Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) like bisphenol A (BPA), bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) and tributyltin (TBT) are ubiquitously present in the environment and in human tissues. They bind to nuclear hormone receptors and affect cellular and developmental processes. In this study, we show that BPA, DEHP and TBT affect the adipogenic differentiation of murine mesenchymal stem cells (MSC, C3H/10T1/2) in a concentration-, stage- and compound-specific manner. C3H/10T1/2 cells and embryonic stem cells (CGR8) were exposed to BPA, DEHP or TBT at different stages of cell determination and differentiation (undifferentiated growth, adipogenic induction and terminal adipogenic differentiation). The final amount of differentiated adipocytes, cellular triglyceride content and mRNA expression of adipogenic marker genes (adiponectin, FABP4, PPARγ2, LPL) were quantified and compared with corresponding unexposed cells. BPA (10 μM) decreased subsequent adipogenic differentiation of MSC, when cells were exposed during undifferentiated growth. In contrast, DEHP (100 μM) during the hormonal induction period, and TBT (100 nM) in all investigated stages, enhanced adipogenesis. Importantly, exposure of undifferentiated murine embryonic stem cells did not show any effect of the investigated EDC on subsequent adipogenic differentiation.

  15. Endocrine disrupting chemicals affect the adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in distinct ontogenetic windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biemann, Ronald, E-mail: ronald.biemann@medizin.uni-halle.de [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Martin Luther University, Faculty of Medicine, Halle (Germany); Navarrete Santos, Anne [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Martin Luther University, Faculty of Medicine, Halle (Germany); Navarrete Santos, Alexander [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Martin Luther University, Faculty of Medicine, Halle (Germany); Riemann, Dagmar [Department of Immunology, Martin Luther University, Faculty of Medicine, Halle (Germany); Knelangen, Julia [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Martin Luther University, Faculty of Medicine, Halle (Germany); Blueher, Matthias [Department of Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Koch, Holger [Institute for Prevention and Occupational Medicine of the German Social Accident Insurance, Institute of the Ruhr-University Bochum (IPA), Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Fischer, Bernd [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Martin Luther University, Faculty of Medicine, Halle (Germany)

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endocrine disrupting chemicals affect adipogenesis in mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adipogenic impact depends strongly on the window of exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bisphenol A reduces the potential of MSC to differentiate into adipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DEHP and TBT trigger the adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BPA, DEHP and TBT did not affect adipogenesis in embryonic stem cells. -- Abstract: Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) like bisphenol A (BPA), bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) and tributyltin (TBT) are ubiquitously present in the environment and in human tissues. They bind to nuclear hormone receptors and affect cellular and developmental processes. In this study, we show that BPA, DEHP and TBT affect the adipogenic differentiation of murine mesenchymal stem cells (MSC, C3H/10T1/2) in a concentration-, stage- and compound-specific manner. C3H/10T1/2 cells and embryonic stem cells (CGR8) were exposed to BPA, DEHP or TBT at different stages of cell determination and differentiation (undifferentiated growth, adipogenic induction and terminal adipogenic differentiation). The final amount of differentiated adipocytes, cellular triglyceride content and mRNA expression of adipogenic marker genes (adiponectin, FABP4, PPAR{gamma}2, LPL) were quantified and compared with corresponding unexposed cells. BPA (10 {mu}M) decreased subsequent adipogenic differentiation of MSC, when cells were exposed during undifferentiated growth. In contrast, DEHP (100 {mu}M) during the hormonal induction period, and TBT (100 nM) in all investigated stages, enhanced adipogenesis. Importantly, exposure of undifferentiated murine embryonic stem cells did not show any effect of the investigated EDC on subsequent adipogenic differentiation.

  16. Undifferentiated and differentiated PC12 cells protected by huprines against injury induced by hydrogen peroxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Pera

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 plays a central role in the stress. Huprines, a group of potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs, have shown a broad cholinergic pharmacological profile. Recently, it has been observed that huprine X (HX improves cognition in non transgenic middle aged mice and shows a neuroprotective activity (increased synaptophysin expression in 3xTg-AD mice. Consequently, in the present experiments the potential neuroprotective effect of huprines (HX, HY, HZ has been analyzed in two different in vitro conditions: undifferentiated and NGF-differentiated PC12 cells. Cells were subjected to oxidative insult (H2O2, 200 µM and the protective effects of HX, HY and HZ (0.01 µM-1 µM were analyzed after a pre-incubation period of 24 and 48 hours. All huprines showed protective effects in both undifferentiated and NGF-differentiated cells, however only in differentiated cells the effect was dependent on cholinergic receptors as atropine (muscarinic antagonist, 0.1 µM and mecamylamine (nicotinic antagonist, 100 µM reverted the neuroprotection action of huprines. The decrease in SOD activity observed after oxidative insult was overcome in the presence of huprines and this effect was not mediated by muscarinic or nicotinic receptors. In conclusion, huprines displayed neuroprotective properties as previously observed in in vivo studies. In addition, these effects were mediated by cholinergic receptors only in differentiated cells. However, a non-cholinergic mechanism, probably through an increase in SOD activity, seems to be also involved in the neuroprotective effects of huprines.

  17. Undifferentiated and Differentiated PC12 Cells Protected by Huprines Against Injury Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pera, Marta; Camps, Pelayo; Muñoz-Torrero, Diego; Perez, Belen; Badia, Albert; Clos Guillen, M Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) plays a central role in the stress. Huprines, a group of potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs), have shown a broad cholinergic pharmacological profile. Recently, it has been observed that huprine X (HX) improves cognition in non transgenic middle aged mice and shows a neuroprotective activity (increased synaptophysin expression) in 3xTg-AD mice. Consequently, in the present experiments the potential neuroprotective effect of huprines (HX, HY, HZ) has been analyzed in two different in vitro conditions: undifferentiated and NGF-differentiated PC12 cells. Cells were subjected to oxidative insult (H2O2, 200 µM) and the protective effects of HX, HY and HZ (0.01 µM–1 µM) were analyzed after a pre-incubation period of 24 and 48 hours. All huprines showed protective effects in both undifferentiated and NGF-differentiated cells, however only in differentiated cells the effect was dependent on cholinergic receptors as atropine (muscarinic antagonist, 0.1 µM) and mecamylamine (nicotinic antagonist, 100 µM) reverted the neuroprotection action of huprines. The decrease in SOD activity observed after oxidative insult was overcome in the presence of huprines and this effect was not mediated by muscarinic or nicotinic receptors. In conclusion, huprines displayed neuroprotective properties as previously observed in in vivo studies. In addition, these effects were mediated by cholinergic receptors only in differentiated cells. However, a non-cholinergic mechanism, probably through an increase in SOD activity, seems to be also involved in the neuroprotective effects of huprines. PMID:24086337

  18. Mesenchymal stem cells in regenerative rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurkovic, Jasmin; Dolicanin, Zana; Mustafic, Fahrudin; Mujanovic, Rifat; Memic, Mensur; Grbovic, Vesna; Skevin, Aleksandra Jurisic; Nurkovic, Selmina

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] Regenerative medicine and rehabilitation contribute in many ways to a specific plan of care based on a patient's medical status. The intrinsic self-renewing, multipotent, regenerative, and immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stem cells offer great promise in the treatment of numerous autoimmune, degenerative, and graft-versus-host diseases, as well as tissue injuries. As such, mesenchymal stem cells represent a therapeutic fortune in regenerative medicine. The aim of this review is to discuss possibilities, limitations, and future clinical applications of mesenchymal stem cells. [Subjects and Methods] The authors have identified and discussed clinically and scientifically relevant articles from PubMed that have met the inclusion criteria. [Results] Direct treatment of muscle injuries, stroke, damaged peripheral nerves, and cartilage with mesenchymal stem cells has been demonstrated to be effective, with synergies seen between cellular and physical therapies. Over the past few years, several researchers, including us, have shown that there are certain limitations in the use of mesenchymal stem cells. Aging and spontaneous malignant transformation of mesenchymal stem cells significantly affect the functionality of these cells. [Conclusion] Definitive conclusions cannot be made by these studies because limited numbers of patients were included. Studies clarifying these results are expected in the near future.

  19. Conditionally replicating adenovirus prevents pluripotent stem cell–derived teratoma by specifically eliminating undifferentiated cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoru Mitsui

    Full Text Available Incomplete abolition of tumorigenicity creates potential safety concerns in clinical trials of regenerative medicine based on human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs. Here, we demonstrate that conditionally replicating adenoviruses that specifically target cancers using multiple factors (m-CRAs, originally developed as anticancer drugs, may also be useful as novel antitumorigenic agents in hPSC-based therapy. The survivin promoter was more active in undifferentiated hPSCs than the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT promoter, whereas both promoters were minimally active in differentiated normal cells. Accordingly, survivin-responsive m-CRA (Surv.m-CRA killed undifferentiated hPSCs more efficiently than TERT-responsive m-CRAs (Tert.m-CRA; both m-CRAs exhibited efficient viral replication and cytotoxicity in undifferentiated hPSCs, but not in cocultured differentiated normal cells. Pre-infection of hPSCs with Surv.m-CRA or Tert.m-CRA abolished in vivo teratoma formation in a dose-dependent manner following hPSC implantation into mice. Thus, m-CRAs, and in particular Surv.m-CRAs, represent novel antitumorigenic agents that could facilitate safe clinical applications of hPSC-based regenerative medicine.

  20. Mesenchymal stem cells avoid allogeneic rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy J Mary

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Adult bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells offer the potential to open a new frontier in medicine. Regenerative medicine aims to replace effete cells in a broad range of conditions associated with damaged cartilage, bone, muscle, tendon and ligament. However the normal process of immune rejection of mismatched allogeneic tissue would appear to prevent the realisation of such ambitions. In fact mesenchymal stem cells avoid allogeneic rejection in humans and in animal models. These finding are supported by in vitro co-culture studies. Three broad mechanisms contribute to this effect. Firstly, mesenchymal stem cells are hypoimmunogenic, often lacking MHC-II and costimulatory molecule expression. Secondly, these stem cells prevent T cell responses indirectly through modulation of dendritic cells and directly by disrupting NK as well as CD8+ and CD4+ T cell function. Thirdly, mesenchymal stem cells induce a suppressive local microenvironment through the production of prostaglandins and interleukin-10 as well as by the expression of indoleamine 2,3,-dioxygenase, which depletes the local milieu of tryptophan. Comparison is made to maternal tolerance of the fetal allograft, and contrasted with the immune evasion mechanisms of tumor cells. Mesenchymal stem cells are a highly regulated self-renewing population of cells with potent mechanisms to avoid allogeneic rejection.

  1. CD133-expressing thyroid cancer cells are undifferentiated, radioresistant and survive radioiodide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ke, Chien-Chih [National Yang Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (China); Liu, Ren-Shyan [National Yang Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (China); NRPGM, Molecular and Genetic Imaging Core, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National PET/Cyclotron Center, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Taipei (China); Yang, An-Hang [Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Liu, Ching-Sheng [National Yang-Ming University Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Chi, Chin-Wen [National Yang-Ming University, Institute of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei (China); Tseng, Ling-Ming [National Yang Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Surgery, Taipei (China); Tsai, Yi-Fan [Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Surgery, Taipei (China); Ho, Jennifer H. [Taipei Medical University, Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Medical Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Taipei (China); Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Medical Center, Center for Stem Cell Research, Taipei (China); Lee, Chen-Hsen [NRPGM, Molecular and Genetic Imaging Core, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Surgery, Taipei (China); Lee, Oscar K. [Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, Stem Cell Research Center, Taipei (China); Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei (China)

    2013-01-15

    {sup 131}I therapy is regularly used following surgery as a part of thyroid cancer management. Despite an overall relatively good prognosis, recurrent or metastatic thyroid cancer is not rare. CD133-expressing cells have been shown to mark thyroid cancer stem cells that possess the characteristics of stem cells and have the ability to initiate tumours. However, no studies have addressed the influence of CD133-expressing cells on radioiodide therapy of the thyroid cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate whether CD133{sup +} cells contribute to the radioresistance of thyroid cancer and thus potentiate future recurrence and metastasis. Thyroid cancer cell lines were analysed for CD133 expression, radiosensitivity and gene expression. The anaplastic thyroid cancer cell line ARO showed a higher percentage of CD133{sup +} cells and higher radioresistance. After {gamma}-irradiation of the cells, the CD133{sup +} population was enriched due to the higher apoptotic rate of CD133{sup -} cells. In vivo {sup 131}I treatment of ARO tumour resulted in an elevated expression of CD133, Oct4, Nanog, Lin28 and Glut1 genes. After isolation, CD133{sup +} cells exhibited higher radioresistance and higher expression of Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, Lin28 and Glut1 in the cell line or primarily cultured papillary thyroid cancer cells, and lower expression of various thyroid-specific genes, namely NIS, Tg, TPO, TSHR, TTF1 and Pax8. This study demonstrates the existence of CD133-expressing thyroid cancer cells which show a higher radioresistance and are in an undifferentiated status. These cells possess a greater potential to survive radiotherapy and may contribute to the recurrence of thyroid cancer. A future therapeutic approach for radioresistant thyroid cancer may focus on the selective eradication of CD133{sup +} cells. (orig.)

  2. Mesenchymal stem cell derived hematopoietic cells are permissive to HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mondal Debasis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent, self-renewing cells known for their differentiation potential into cells of mesenchymal lineage. The ability of single cell clones isolated from adipose tissue resident MSCs (ASCs to differentiate into cells of hematopoietic lineage has been previously demonstrated. In the present study, we investigated if the hematopoietic differentiated (HD cells derived from ASCs could productively be infected with HIV-1. Results HD cells were generated by differentiating clonally expanded cultures of adherent subsets of ASCs (CD90+, CD105+, CD45-, and CD34-. Transcriptome analysis revealed that HD cells acquire a number of elements that increase their susceptibility for HIV-1 infection, including HIV-1 receptor/co-receptor and other key cellular cofactors. HIV-1 infected HD cells (HD-HIV showed elevated p24 protein and gag and tat gene expression, implying a high and productive infection. HD-HIV cells showed decreased CD4, but significant increase in the expression of CCR5, CXCR4, Nef-associated factor HCK, and Vpu-associated factor BTRC. HIV-1 restricting factors like APOBEC3F and TRIM5 also showed up regulation. HIV-1 infection increased apoptosis and cell cycle regulatory genes in HD cells. Although undifferentiated ASCs failed to show productive infection, HIV-1 exposure increased the expression of several hematopoietic lineage associated genes such as c-Kit, MMD2, and IL-10. Conclusions Considering the presence of profuse amounts of ASCs in different tissues, these findings suggest the possible role that could be played by HD cells derived from ASCs in HIV-1 infection. The undifferentiated ASCs were non-permissive to HIV-1 infection; however, HIV-1 exposure increased the expression of some hematopoietic lineage related genes. The findings relate the importance of ASCs in HIV-1 research and facilitate the understanding of the disease process and management strategies.

  3. Radiation-induced apoptosis in undifferentiated cells of the developing brain as a biological defense mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inouye, Minioru; Tamaru, Masao.

    1994-01-01

    Undifferentiated neural (UN) cells of the developing mammalian brain are highly sensitive to the lethal effects of ionizing radiation. Nuclear and cytoplasmic condensation, transglutaminase activation, and internucleosomal DNA cleavage reveal radiation-induced cell death in the ventricular zone of the cerebral mantle and external granular layer of the cerebellum to be due to apoptosis. A statistically significant increase of cell mortality can be induced by 0.03 Gy X-irradiation, and the mortality increases linearly with increasing doses. It is not changed by split doses, probably because of the very slow repair of cellular damage and a lack of adaptive response. Although extensive apoptosis in the UN cell population results in microcephaly and mental retardation, it possesses the ability to recover from a considerable cell loss and to form the normal structure of the central nervous system. The number of cell deaths needed to induce tissue adnormalities in the adult murine brain rises in the range of 15-25% of the germinal cell population; with the threshold doses at about 0.3 Gy for cerebral anomalies and 1 Gy for cerebellar abnormalities. Threshold level is similarly suggested in prenatally exposed A-bomb survivors. High radiosensitivity of UN cells is assumed to be a manifestation of the ability of the cell to commit suicide when injured. Repeated replication of DNA and extensive gene expression are required in future proliferation and differentiation. Once an abnormality in DNA was induced and fixed in the UN cell, it would be greatly amplified and prove a danger in producing malformations and tumors. These cells would thus commit suicide for the benefit of the individual to eliminate their acquired genetic abnormalities rather than make DNA repair. UN cells in the developing brain are highly radiosensitive and readily involved in apoptosis. Paradoxically, however, this may be to protect individuals against teratogenesis and tumorigenesis. (J.P.N.)

  4. Inhibition by pectic oligosaccharides of the invasion of undifferentiated and differentiated Caco-2 cells by Campylobacter jejuni

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of pectic oligosaccharides (POS) to inhibit adherence to and invasion of undifferentiated (UC) and differentiated (DC) Caco-2 cells by Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) was investigated. It was observed that both adherence and invasion were significantly higher in UC than in DC. POS (2.5 ...

  5. Inactivated Mesenchymal Stem Cells Maintain Immunomodulatory Capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luk, Franka; de Witte, Samantha F. H.; Korevaar, Sander S.; Roemeling, Marieke; Franquesa, Marcella; Strini, Tanja; van den Engel, Sandra; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Roy, Debashish; Dor, Frank J. M. F.; Horwitz, Edwin M.; de Bruin, Ron W. F.; Betjes, Michiel G. H.; Baan, Carla C.; Hoogduijn, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are studied as a cell therapeutic agent for treatment of various immune diseases. However, therapy with living culture-expanded cells comes with safety concerns. Furthermore, development of effective MSC immunotherapy is hampered by lack of knowledge of the mechanisms of

  6. Squamous cell carcinoma and undifferentiated carcinoma of the inner nose and the paranasal sinuses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wustrow, J.; Rudert, H.; Diercks, M.; Beigel, A.

    1989-01-01

    272 patients with tumours of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses were followed up from 1949 until 1982. 53% of the tumours were classified as squamous cell or undifferentiated carcinomata. The most common site of squamous cell carcinoma is the maxillary sinus (50%). Distant metastases and regional lymph node metastases are rarely seen at presentation regardless of the size of the primary tumour. Metastases usually indicate a tumour dependent death in the near future. The main prognostic indicators are the size of the tumour (significantly worse prognosis for T4 in comparison to T2 or T3 tumours) and the localisation (significantly better prognosis for tumours of the floor of the nasal cavity or the nasal septum compared to tumours of the paranasal sinuses). The age of the patient or the degree of differentiation of the tumour did not influence on the survival rate. Tumour dependent deaths rarely occur after more than five years. Patients were assigned to two treatment groups and matched according to the tumour stage. One group received surgery only, whereas the second group received a combined treatment of surgery with subsequent radiotherapy. There was a significant difference between the two groups in favour of the surgical treatment. According to these data we recommend surgical excision without postoperative irradiation in cases where complete removal of the tumor has been histologically proven. (orig./MG) [de

  7. ARG1 Functions in the Physiological Adaptation of Undifferentiated Plant Cells to Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupanska, Agata K.; Schultz, Eric R.; Yao, JiQiang; Sng, Natasha J.; Zhou, Mingqi; Callaham, Jordan B.; Ferl, Robert J.; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2017-11-01

    Scientific access to spaceflight and especially the International Space Station has revealed that physiological adaptation to spaceflight is accompanied or enabled by changes in gene expression that significantly alter the transcriptome of cells in spaceflight. A wide range of experiments have shown that plant physiological adaptation to spaceflight involves gene expression changes that alter cell wall and other metabolisms. However, while transcriptome profiling aptly illuminates changes in gene expression that accompany spaceflight adaptation, mutation analysis is required to illuminate key elements required for that adaptation. Here we report how transcriptome profiling was used to gain insight into the spaceflight adaptation role of Altered response to gravity 1 (Arg1), a gene known to affect gravity responses in plants on Earth. The study compared expression profiles of cultured lines of Arabidopsis thaliana derived from wild-type (WT) cultivar Col-0 to profiles from a knock-out line deficient in the gene encoding ARG1 (ARG1 KO), both on the ground and in space. The cell lines were launched on SpaceX CRS-2 as part of the Cellular Expression Logic (CEL) experiment of the BRIC-17 spaceflight mission. The cultured cell lines were grown within 60 mm Petri plates in Petri Dish Fixation Units (PDFUs) that were housed within the Biological Research In Canisters (BRIC) hardware. Spaceflight samples were fixed on orbit. Differentially expressed genes were identified between the two environments (spaceflight and comparable ground controls) and the two genotypes (WT and ARG1 KO). Each genotype engaged unique genes during physiological adaptation to the spaceflight environment, with little overlap. Most of the genes altered in expression in spaceflight in WT cells were found to be Arg1-dependent, suggesting a major role for that gene in the physiological adaptation of undifferentiated cells to spaceflight.

  8. Cryopreservation and revival of mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Kastrup, Jens

    2011-01-01

    initiated. As there has been a precedent for the use of bone marrow stem cells in the treatment of hematological malignancies and ischemic heart diseases through randomized clinical safety and efficacy trials, the development of new therapies based on culture-expanded human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs...

  9. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Perichondrium Express Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule and Participate in Bone Marrow Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Fumio; Ohneda, Osamu; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Zhang, Xiu Qin; Suda, Toshio

    2002-01-01

    Perichondrium in fetal limb is composed of undifferentiated mesenchymal cells. However, the multipotency of cells in this region and the role of perichondrium in bone marrow formation are not well understood. In this report, we purified and characterized perichondrial cells using a monoclonal antibody against activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) and investigated the role of perichondrial cells in hematopoietic bone marrow formation. ALCAM is expressed on hematopoietic cells, endothelial cells, bone marrow stromal cells, and mesenchymal stem cells and mediates homophilic (ALCAM–ALCAM)/heterophilic (ALCAM-CD6) cell adhesion. Here we show by immunohistochemical staining that ALCAM is expressed in perichondrium. ALCAM+ perichondrial cells isolated by FACS® exhibit the characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells. ALCAM+ cells can differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes, and stromal cells, which can support osteoclastogenesis, hematopoiesis, and angiogenesis. Furthermore, the addition of ALCAM-Fc or CD6-Fc to the metatarsal culture, the invasion of the blood vessels to a cartilage was inhibited. Our findings indicate that ALCAM+ perichondrial cells participate in vascular invasion by recruiting osteoclasts and vessels. These findings suggest that perichondrium might serve as a stem cell reservoir and play an important role in the early development of a bone and bone marrow. PMID:12070283

  10. Transcription profiling by array of the response of Arabidopsis cultivar Columbia etiolated seedlings and undifferentiated tissue culture cells to the spaceflight environment

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We address a key baseline question of whether gene expression changes are induced by the orbital environment and then we ask whether undifferentiated cells cells...

  11. Mesenchymal dental stem cells in regenerative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Lozano, Francisco-Javier; Insausti, Carmen-Luisa; Iniesta, Francisca; Blanquer, Miguel; Ramírez, María-del-Carmen; Meseguer, Luis; Meseguer-Henarejos, Ana-Belén; Marín, Noemí; Martínez, Salvador; Moraleda, José-María

    2012-11-01

    In the last decade, tissue engineering is a field that has been suffering an enormous expansion in the regenerative medicine and dentistry. The use of cells as mesenchymal dental stem cells of easy access for dentist and oral surgeon, immunosuppressive properties, high proliferation and capacity to differentiate into odontoblasts, cementoblasts, osteoblasts and other cells implicated in the teeth, suppose a good perspective of future in the clinical dentistry. However, is necessary advance in the known of growth factors and signalling molecules implicated in tooth development and regeneration of different structures of teeth. Furthermore, these cells need a fabulous scaffold that facility their integration, differentiation, matrix synthesis and promote multiple specific interactions between cells. In this review, we give a brief description of tooth development and anatomy, definition and classification of stem cells, with special attention of mesenchymal stem cells, commonly used in the cellular therapy for their trasdifferentiation ability, non ethical problems and acceptable results in preliminary clinical trials. In terms of tissue engineering, we provide an overview of different types of mesenchymal stem cells that have been isolated from teeth, including dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), dental follicle progenitor stem cells (DFPCs), and stem cells from apical papilla (SCAPs), growth factors implicated in regeneration teeth and types of scaffolds for dental tissue regeneration.

  12. Comparison of the gene expression profile of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cell lines and differentiating embryoid bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Mahendra S

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of molecular pathways of differentiation of embryonic stem cells (hESC is critical for the development of stem cell based medical therapies. In order to identify biomarkers and potential regulators of the process of differentiation, a high quality microarray containing 16,659 seventy base pair oligonucleotides was used to compare gene expression profiles of undifferentiated hESC lines and differentiating embryoid bodies. Results Previously identified "stemness" genes in undifferentiated hESC lines showed down modulation in differentiated cells while expression of several genes was induced as cells differentiated. In addition, a subset of 194 genes showed overexpression of greater than ≥ 3 folds in human embryoid bodies (hEB. These included 37 novel and 157 known genes. Gene expression was validated by a variety of techniques including another large scale array, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, focused cDNA microarrays, massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS analysis and immunocytochemisty. Several novel hEB specific expressed sequence tags (ESTs were mapped to the human genome database and their expression profile characterized. A hierarchical clustering analysis clearly depicted a distinct difference in gene expression profile among undifferentiated and differentiated hESC and confirmed that microarray analysis could readily distinguish them. Conclusion These results present a detailed characterization of a unique set of genes, which can be used to assess the hESC differentiation.

  13. Comparison of the gene expression profile of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cell lines and differentiating embryoid bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Bhaskar; Cai, Jingli; Luo, Youngquan; Miura, Takumi; Mejido, Josef; Brimble, Sandii N; Zeng, Xianmin; Schulz, Thomas C; Rao, Mahendra S; Puri, Raj K

    2005-10-05

    The identification of molecular pathways of differentiation of embryonic stem cells (hESC) is critical for the development of stem cell based medical therapies. In order to identify biomarkers and potential regulators of the process of differentiation, a high quality microarray containing 16,659 seventy base pair oligonucleotides was used to compare gene expression profiles of undifferentiated hESC lines and differentiating embryoid bodies. Previously identified "stemness" genes in undifferentiated hESC lines showed down modulation in differentiated cells while expression of several genes was induced as cells differentiated. In addition, a subset of 194 genes showed overexpression of greater than > or = 3 folds in human embryoid bodies (hEB). These included 37 novel and 157 known genes. Gene expression was validated by a variety of techniques including another large scale array, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, focused cDNA microarrays, massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) analysis and immunocytochemisty. Several novel hEB specific expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were mapped to the human genome database and their expression profile characterized. A hierarchical clustering analysis clearly depicted a distinct difference in gene expression profile among undifferentiated and differentiated hESC and confirmed that microarray analysis could readily distinguish them. These results present a detailed characterization of a unique set of genes, which can be used to assess the hESC differentiation.

  14. Mesenchymal stromal cells: misconceptions and evolving concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phinney, Donald G; Sensebé, Luc

    2013-02-01

    Nearly half a century has passed since the publication of the first articles describing plastic-adherent cells from bone marrow, referred to initially as colony-forming unit fibroblasts, then marrow stromal cells, mesenchymal stem cells and most recently multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). As expected, our understanding of the nature and biologic functions of MSCs has undergone major paradigm shifts over this time. Despite significant advances made in deciphering their complex biology and therapeutic potential in both experimental animal models and human clinical trials, numerous misconceptions regarding the nature and function of MSCs have persisted in the field. Continued propagation of these misconceptions in some cases may significantly impede the advancement of MSC-based therapies in clinical medicine. We have identified six prevalent misconceptions about MSCs that we believe affect the field, and we attempt to rectify them based on current available data. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The interplay of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of migration of mesenchymal stem cells during early stages of bone fracture healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, C-H; Deng, Y-S; Yang, X-J; Liu, J; Liu, R; Hou, F-Y; Li, S-S; Zhen, P

    2017-12-01

    Bone fractures are a medical condition where the continuity of the bone is broken due to a fall or accident. The fracture may also be the result of medical conditions such as osteoporosis, cancers of bone or osteogenesis imperfect. During the bone fracture healing process, the mesenchymal stem cells (undifferentiated connective tissue cells) are recruited from local and systemic sources. The modulation of mesenchymal cell migration to the fractured site is the desired goal. Still, there are many processes that are still required to be studied and analyzed. We aimed to consolidate and review the available information on this topic.

  16. Cell proliferation, viability, and in vitro differentiation of equine mesenchymal stem cells seeded on bacterial cellulose hydrogel scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favi, Pelagie M.; Benson, Roberto S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Neilsen, Nancy R. [Department of Biomedical and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Hammonds, Ryan L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Bates, Cassandra C. [Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Stephens, Christopher P. [Department of Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Center for Materials Processing, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Dhar, Madhu S., E-mail: mdhar@utk.edu [Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The culture of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells on natural biopolymers holds great promise for treatments of connective tissue disorders such as osteoarthritis. The safety and performance of such therapies relies on the systematic in vitro evaluation of the developed stem cell-biomaterial constructs prior to in vivo implantation. This study evaluates bacterial cellulose (BC), a biocompatible natural polymer, as a scaffold for equine-derived bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (EqMSCs) for application in bone and cartilage tissue engineering. An equine model was chosen due to similarities in size, load and types of joint injuries suffered by horses and humans. Lyophilized and critical point dried BC hydrogel scaffolds were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to confirm nanostructure morphology which demonstrated that critical point drying induces fibre bundling unlike lyophilisation. EqMSCs positively expressed the undifferentiated pluripotent mesenchymal stem cell surface markers CD44 and CD90. The BC scaffolds were shown to be cytocompatible, supporting cellular adhesion and proliferation, and allowed for osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of EqMSCs. The cells seeded on the BC hydrogel were shown to be viable and metabolically active. These findings demonstrate that the combination of a BC hydrogel and EqMSCs are promising constructs for musculoskeletal tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: ► Critical point drying induces fibre bundling unlike lyophilisation. ► Cells positively expressed undifferentiated pluripotent stem cell markers. ► BCs were cytocompatible, supported cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation ► Cells seeded on BC scaffolds were viable and metabolically active. ► Findings demonstrate that BC and EqMSCs are promising tissue engineered constructs.

  17. Mesenchymal stem cells: cell biology and potential use in therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha; Kristiansen, Malthe; Abdallah, Basem M

    2004-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells are clonogenic, non-haematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow and are able to differentiate into multiple mesoderm-type cell lineages e.g. osteoblasts, chondrocytes, endothelial-cells and also non-mesoderm-type lineages e.g. neuronal-like cells. Several methods...

  18. Blastema from rabbit ear contains progenitor cells comparable to marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamadreza Baghaban Eslaminejad

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Rabbits have the capacity to regenerate holes in their ears by forming a blastema, a tissue that is made up of a group of undifferentiated cells. The purpose of the present study was to isolate and characterize blastema progenitor cells and compare them with marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. Five New Zealand white male rabbits were used in the present study. A 2-mm hole was created in the animal ears. After 4 days, the blastema ring formed in the periphery of the hole was removed and cultivated. The cells were expanded through several subcultures and compared with the MSCs derived from the marrow of same animal in terms of in vitro differentiation capacity, growth kinetics and culture requirements for optimal proliferation. The primary cultures from both cells tended to be heterogeneous. Fibroblastic cells became progressively dominant with advancing passages. Similar to MSCs blastema passaged-3 cells succeeded to differentiate into bone, cartilage and adipose cell lineages. Even lineage specific genes tended to express in higher level in blastema cells compared to MSCs (p < 0.05. Moreover blastema cells appeared more proliferative; producing more colonies (p < 0.05. While blastema cells showed extensive proliferation in 15% fetal bovine serum (FBS, MSCs displayed higher expansion rate at 10% FBS. In conclusion, blastema from rabbit ear contains a population of fibroblastic cells much similar in characteristic to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. However, the two cells were different in the level of lineage-specific gene expression, the growth curve characteristics and the culture requirements.

  19. Células-tronco mesenquimais Mesenchymal stem cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betânia Souza Monteiro

    2010-02-01

    understanding the biology of these cells is still under construction. The aim of the article is to conduct a short review of these undifferentiated mesenchymal cells.

  20. Viability of mesenchymal stem cells during electrospinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zanatta

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering is a technique by which a live tissue can be re-constructed and one of its main goals is to associate cells with biomaterials. Electrospinning is a technique that facilitates the production of nanofibers and is commonly used to develop fibrous scaffolds to be used in tissue engineering. In the present study, a different approach for cell incorporation into fibrous scaffolds was tested. Mesenchymal stem cells were extracted from the wall of the umbilical cord and mononuclear cells from umbilical cord blood. Cells were re-suspended in a 10% polyvinyl alcohol solution and subjected to electrospinning for 30 min under a voltage of 21 kV. Cell viability was assessed before and after the procedure by exclusion of dead cells using trypan blue staining. Fiber diameter was observed by scanning electron microscopy and the presence of cells within the scaffolds was analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. After electrospinning, the viability of mesenchymal stem cells was reduced from 88 to 19.6% and the viability of mononuclear cells from 99 to 8.38%. The loss of viability was possibly due to the high viscosity of the polymer solution, which reduced the access to nutrients associated with electric and mechanical stress during electrospinning. These results suggest that the incorporation of cells during fiber formation by electrospinning is a viable process that needs more investigation in order to find ways to protect cells from damage.

  1. Highly sensitive in vitro methods for detection of residual undifferentiated cells in retinal pigment epithelial cells derived from human iPS cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Kuroda

    Full Text Available Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs possess the capabilities of self-renewal and differentiation into multiple cell types, and they are free of the ethical problems associated with human embryonic stem cells (hESCs. These characteristics make hiPSCs a promising choice for future regenerative medicine research. There are significant obstacles, however, preventing the clinical use of hiPSCs. One of the most obvious safety issues is the presence of residual undifferentiated cells that have tumorigenic potential. To locate residual undifferentiated cells, in vivo teratoma formation assays have been performed with immunodeficient animals, which is both costly and time-consuming. Here, we examined three in vitro assay methods to detect undifferentiated cells (designated an in vitro tumorigenicity assay: soft agar colony formation assay, flow cytometry assay and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay (qRT-PCR. Although the soft agar colony formation assay was unable to detect hiPSCs even in the presence of a ROCK inhibitor that permits survival of dissociated hiPSCs/hESCs, the flow cytometry assay using anti-TRA-1-60 antibody detected 0.1% undifferentiated hiPSCs that were spiked in primary retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells. Moreover, qRT-PCR with a specific probe and primers was found to detect a trace amount of Lin28 mRNA, which is equivalent to that present in a mixture of a single hiPSC and 5.0×10⁴ RPE cells. Our findings provide highly sensitive and quantitative in vitro assays essential for facilitating safety profiling of hiPSC-derived products for future regenerative medicine research.

  2. Restoring physiological cell heterogeneity in the mesenchyme during tooth engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Laetitia-Véronique; Kuchler-Bopp, Sabine; Lesot, Hervé

    2012-01-01

    Tooth development is controlled by reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Complete teeth can form when culturing and implanting re-associations between single embryonic dental epithelial and mesenchymal cells. Although epithelial histogenesis is clear, very little is known about cell diversity and patterning in the mesenchyme. The aim of this work was to compare the situation in engineered and developing teeth at similar developmental stages. To this end, the expression of cell surface markers in the mesenchyme was investigated by immunostaining in: 1) embryonic mouse molars at embryonic day 14, as the initial cell source for re-associations, 2) cultured cell re-associations just before their implantation and 3) cultured cell re-associations implanted for two weeks. Surface markers allowed visualization of the complex patterning of different cell types and the differential timing in their appearance. The phenotype of mesenchymal cells rapidly changed when they were grown as a monolayer, even without passage. This might explain the rapid loss of their potential to sustain tooth formation after re-association. Except for markers associated with vascularization, which is not maintained in vitro, the staining pattern in the mesenchyme of cultured re-associations was similar to that observed in situ. After implantation, vascularization and the cellular heterogeneity in the mesenchyme were similar to what was observed in developing molars. Besides tissue oxygenation and its role in mineralization of dental matrices, vascularization is involved in the progressive increase in mesenchymal cell heterogeneity, by allowing external cells to enter the mesenchyme.

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells induce dermal fibroblast responses to injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Andria N.; Willis, Elise; Chan, Vincent T.; Muffley, Lara A.; Isik, F. Frank; Gibran, Nicole S.; Hocking, Anne M.

    2010-01-01

    Although bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to promote repair when applied to cutaneous wounds, the mechanism for this response remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of paracrine signaling from mesenchymal stem cells on dermal fibroblast responses to injury including proliferation, migration and expression of genes important in wound repair. Dermal fibroblasts were co-cultured with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells grown in inserts, which allowed for paracrine interactions without direct cell contact. In this co-culture model, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells regulate dermal fibroblast proliferation, migration and gene expression. When co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells, dermal fibroblasts show increased proliferation and accelerated migration in a scratch assay. A chemotaxis assay also demonstrated that dermal fibroblasts migrate towards bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. A PCR array was used to analyze the effect of mesenchymal stem cells on dermal fibroblast gene expression. In response to mesenchymal stem cells, dermal fibroblasts up-regulate integrin alpha 7 expression and down-regulate expression of ICAM1, VCAM1 and MMP11. These observations suggest that mesenchymal stem cells may provide an important early signal for dermal fibroblast responses to cutaneous injury.

  4. Microscale versus nanoscale scaffold architecture for mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugasundaram, Shobana; Chaudhry, Hans; Arinzeh, Treena Livingston

    2011-03-01

    Nanofiber scaffolds, produced by the electrospinning technique, have gained widespread attention in tissue engineering due to their morphological similarities to the native extracellular matrix. For cartilage repair, studies have examined their feasibility; however these studies have been limited, excluding the influence of other scaffold design features. This study evaluated the effect of scaffold design, specifically examining a range of nano to micron-sized fibers and resulting pore size and mechanical properties, on human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from the adult bone marrow during chondrogenesis. MSC differentiation was examined on these scaffolds with an emphasis on temporal gene expression of chondrogenic markers and the pluripotent gene, Sox2, which has yet to be explored for MSCs during chondrogenesis and in combination with tissue engineering scaffolds. Chondrogenic markers of aggrecan, chondroadherin, sox9, and collagen type II were highest for cells on micron-sized fibers (5 and 9 μm) with pore sizes of 27 and 29 μm, respectively, in comparison to cells on nano-sized fibers (300 nm and 600 to 1400 nm) having pore sizes of 2 and 3 μm, respectively. Undifferentiated MSCs expressed high levels of the Sox2 gene but displayed negligible levels on all scaffolds with or without the presence of inductive factors, suggesting that the physical features of the scaffold play an important role in differentiation. Micron-sized fibers with large pore structures and mechanical properties comparable to the cartilage ECM enhanced chondrogenesis, demonstrating architectural features as well as mechanical properties of electrospun fibrous scaffolds enhance differentiation.

  5. Labeling and Imaging Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells with the potential to differentiate into bone, cartilage, adipose and muscle cells. Adult derived MSCs are being actively investigated because of their potential to be utilized for therapeutic cell-based transplantation. Methods...

  6. Therapeutic Potential of Differentiated Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Treatment of Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Onju; Lee, Chang Youn; Kim, Ran; Lee, Jihyun; Oh, Sekyung; Lee, Min Young; Kim, Jongmin; Hwang, Ki-Chul; Maeng, Lee-So; Chang, Woochul

    2015-07-02

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic, progressive, and irreversible degenerative joint disease. Conventional OA treatments often result in complications such as pain and limited activity. However, transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has several beneficial effects such as paracrine effects, anti-inflammatory activity, and immunomodulatory capacity. In addition, MSCs can be differentiated into several cell types, including chondrocytes, osteocytes, endothelia, and adipocytes. Thus, transplantation of MSCs is a suggested therapeutic tool for treatment of OA. However, transplanted naïve MSCs can cause problems such as heterogeneous populations including differentiated MSCs and undifferentiated cells. To overcome this problem, new strategies for inducing differentiation of MSCs are needed. One possibility is the application of microRNA (miRNA) and small molecules, which regulate multiple molecular pathways and cellular processes such as differentiation. Here, we provide insight into possible strategies for cartilage regeneration by transplantation of differentiated MSCs to treat OA patients.

  7. Therapeutic Potential of Differentiated Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Treatment of Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onju Ham

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a chronic, progressive, and irreversible degenerative joint disease. Conventional OA treatments often result in complications such as pain and limited activity. However, transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs has several beneficial effects such as paracrine effects, anti-inflammatory activity, and immunomodulatory capacity. In addition, MSCs can be differentiated into several cell types, including chondrocytes, osteocytes, endothelia, and adipocytes. Thus, transplantation of MSCs is a suggested therapeutic tool for treatment of OA. However, transplanted naïve MSCs can cause problems such as heterogeneous populations including differentiated MSCs and undifferentiated cells. To overcome this problem, new strategies for inducing differentiation of MSCs are needed. One possibility is the application of microRNA (miRNA and small molecules, which regulate multiple molecular pathways and cellular processes such as differentiation. Here, we provide insight into possible strategies for cartilage regeneration by transplantation of differentiated MSCs to treat OA patients.

  8. Activation and Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Pravin J; Banerjee, Debabrata

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells and exhibit two main characteristics that define stem cells: self-renewal and differentiation. MSCs can migrate to sites of injury, inflammation, and tumor. Moreover, MSCs undergo myofibroblast like differentiation, including increased production of α-SMA in response to transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), a growth factor commonly secreted by tumor cells to evade immune surveillance. Based on our previous finding hMSCs become activated and resemble carcinoma-associated myofibroblasts upon prolonged exposure to conditioned medium from MDAMB231 human breast cancer cells. Here, we show that keratinocyte conditioned medium (KCM) induces differentiation of MSCs to resemble dermal myofibroblast like cells using immunofluorescence techniques demonstrating punctate vinculin staining, and F-actin filaments.

  9. Cryopreservation and revival of mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Kastrup, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Over the past few years, the pace of preclinical stem cell research is astonishing and adult stem cells have become the subject of intense research. Due to the presence of promising supporting preclinical data, human clinical trials for stem cell regenerative treatment of various diseases have been...... initiated. As there has been a precedent for the use of bone marrow stem cells in the treatment of hematological malignancies and ischemic heart diseases through randomized clinical safety and efficacy trials, the development of new therapies based on culture-expanded human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs......) opens up new possibilities for cell therapy. To facilitate these applications, cryopreservation and long-term storage of MSCs becomes an absolute necessity. As a result, optimization of this cryopreservation protocol is absolutely critical. The major challenge during cellular cryopreservation...

  10. Histone signature of metanephric mesenchyme cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Nathan; Yao, Xiao; Li, Yuwen; Saifudeen, Zubaida; El-Dahr, Samir S

    2013-09-01

    The metanephric mesenchyme (MM) gives rise to nephrons, the filtering units of the mature kidney. The MM is composed of uninduced (Six2(high)/Lhx1(low)) and induced (Wnt-stimulated, Six2(low)/Lhx1(high)) cells. The global epigenetic state of MM cells is unknown, partly due to technical difficulty in isolating sufficient numbers of homogenous cell populations. We therefore took advantage of two mouse clonal cell lines representing the uninduced (mK3) and induced (mK4) metanephric mesenchyme (based on gene expression profiles and ability to induce branching of ureteric bud). ChIP-Seq revealed that whereas H3K4me3 active region "peaks" are enriched in metabolic genes, H3K27me3 peaks decorate mesenchyme and epithelial cell fate commitment genes. In uninduced mK3 cells, promoters of "stemness" genes (e.g., Six2, Osr1) are enriched with H3K4me3 peaks; these are lost in induced mK4 cells. ChIP-qPCR confirmed this finding and further demonstrated that G9a/H3K9me2 occupy the promoter region of Six2 in induced cells, consistent with the inactive state of transcription. Conversely, genes that mark the induced epithelialized state (e.g., Lhx1, Pax8), transition from a non-permissive to an active chromatin signature in mK3 vs. mK4 cells, respectively. Importantly, stimulation of Wnt signaling in uninduced mK3 cells provokes an active chromatin state (high H3K4me3, low H3K27me3), recruitment of β-catenin, and loss of pre-bound histone methyltransferase Ezh2 in silent induced genes followed by activation of transcription. We conclude that the chromatin signature of uninduced and induced cells correlates strongly with their gene expression states, suggesting a role of chromatin-based mechanisms in MM cell fate.

  11. Tooth engineering: searching for dental mesenchymal cells sources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia eKeller

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The implantation of cultured re-associations between embryonic dental mesenchymal cells and epithelial cells from mouse molars at ED14 allowed making full teeth with crown, root, periodontal ligament fibers and bone. Although representing valuable tools to set up methodologies embryonic cells are not easily available. This work thus aimed to replace the embryonic cells by dental mesenchymal cell lines or cultured expanded embryonic cells, and to test their ability to mediate tooth development in vitro when re-associated with a competent dental epithelium. Histology, immunostaining and RT-PCR allowed getting complementary sets of results. Two different immortalized cell lines from ED18 dental mesenchyme failed in mediating tooth formation. The potentialities of embryonic dental mesenchymal cells decreased from ED14 to ED16 and were lost at ED18. This is likely related to a change in the mesenchymal cell phenotype and/or populations during development. Attempts to cultivate ED14 or ED16 embryonic dental mesenchymal cells prior to re-association led to the loss of their ability to support tooth development. This was accompanied by a down-regulation of Fgf3 transcription. Supplementation of the culture medium with FGF2 allowed restoring Fgf3 expression, but not the ability of mesenchymal cells to engage in tooth formation. Altogether, these observations suggest that a competent cell population exists in the dental mesenchyme at ED14, progressively decreases during development, and cannot as such be maintained in vitro. This study evidenced the need for specific conditions to maintain the ability of dental mesenchymal cells to initiate whole tooth formation, when re-associated with an odontogenic epithelium. Efforts to improve the culture conditions will have to be combined with attempts to characterize the competent cells within the dental mesenchyme.

  12. In Vivo and In Vitro Dynamics of Undifferentiated Embryonic Cell Transcription Factor 1

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    Christina Galonska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent stem cells retain the ability to differentiate into the three germ layers and germline. As a result, there is a major interest in characterizing regulators that establish and maintain pluripotency. The network of transcription factors continues to expand in complexity, and one factor, undifferentiated embryonic cell transcription factor 1 (UTF1, has recently moved more into the limelight. To facilitate the study of UTF1, we report the generation and characterization of two reporter lines that enable efficient tracking, mapping, and purification of endogenous UTF1. In particular, we include a built-in biotinylation system in our targeted locus that allows efficient and reliable pulldown. We also use this reporter to show the dynamic regulation of Utf1 in distinct stem cell conditions and demonstrate its utility for reprogramming studies. The multipurpose design of the reporter lines enables many directions of future study and should lead to a better understanding of UTF1’s diverse roles.

  13. Isolation, expansion and differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells from rabbits' bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato B. Eleotério

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Tissue engineering has been a fundamental technique in the regenerative medicine field, once it permits to build tri-dimensional tissue constructs associating undifferentiated mesenchymal cells (or mesenchymal stromal cells - MSCs and scaffolds in vitro. Therefore, many studies have been carried out using these cells from different animal species, and rabbits are often used as animal model for in vivo tissue repair studies. However, most of the information available about MSCs harvesting and characterization is about human and murine cells, which brings some doubts to researchers who desire to work with a rabbit model in tissue repair studies based on MSCs. In this context, this study aimed to add and improve the information available in the scientific literature providing a complete technique for isolation, expansion and differentiation of MSCs from rabbits. Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs from humerus and femur of rabbits were obtained and to evaluate their proliferation rate, three different culture media were tested, here referred as DMEM-P, DMEM´S and α-MEM. The BMMCs were also cultured in osteogenic, chondrogenic and adipogenic induction media to prove their multipotentiality. It was concluded that the techniques suggested in this study can provide a guideline to harvest and isolate MSCs from bone marrow of rabbits in enough amount to allow their expansion and, based on the laboratory experience where the study was developed, it is also suggested a culture media formulation to provide a better cell proliferation rate with multipotentiality preservation.

  14. Adipose Stem Cells as Alternatives for Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Oral Ulcer Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz Aly, Lobna Abdel; Menoufy, Hala El-; Ragae, Alyaa; Rashed, Laila Ahmed; Sabry, Dina

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Adipose tissue is now recognized as an accessible, abundant, and reliable site for the isolation of adult stem cells suitable for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. Methods and Results Oral ulcers were induced by topical application of formocresol in the oral cavity of dogs. Transplantation of undifferentiated GFP-labeled Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cell (BMSCs), Adipose Derived Stem Cell (ADSCs) or vehicle (saline) was injected around the ulcer in each group. The healing process of the ulcer was monitored clinically and histopathologically. Gene expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was detected in MSCs by Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). Expression of VEGF and collagen genes was detected in biopsies from all ulcers. Results: MSCs expressed mRNA for VEGF MSCs transplantation significantly accelerated oral ulcer healing compared with controls. There was increased expression of both collagen and VEGF genes in MSCs-treated ulcers compared to controls. Conclusions MSCs transplantation may help to accelerate oral ulcer healing, possibly through the induction of angiogenesis by VEGF together with increased intracellular matrix formation as detected by increased collagen gene expression. This body of work has provided evidence supporting clinical applications of adipose-derived cells in safety and efficacy trials as an alternative for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in oral ulcer healing. PMID:24298363

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Angels or Demons?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca S. Y. Wong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been used in cell-based therapy in various disease conditions such as graft-versus-host and heart diseases, osteogenesis imperfecta, and spinal cord injuries, and the results have been encouraging. However, as MSC therapy gains popularity among practitioners and researchers, there have been reports on the adverse effects of MSCs especially in the context of tumour modulation and malignant transformation. These cells have been found to enhance tumour growth and metastasis in some studies and have been related to anticancer-drug resistance in other instances. In addition, various studies have also reported spontaneous malignant transformation of MSCs. The mechanism of the modulatory behaviour and the tumorigenic potential of MSCs, warrant urgent exploration, and the use of MSCs in patients with cancer awaits further evaluation. However, if MSCs truly play a role in tumour modulation, they can also be potential targets of cancer treatment.

  16. Comparison of Alternative Mesenchymal Stem Cell Sources for Cell Banking and Musculoskeletal Advanced Therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavallo, Carola; Cuomo, Carmela; Fantini, Sara; Ricci, Francesca; Tazzari, Pier Luigi; Lucarelli, Enrico; Donati, Davide; Facchini, Andrea; Lisignoli, Gina; Fornasari, Pier Maria; Grigolo, Brunella; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    With the continuous discovery of new alternative sources containing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), regenerative medicine therapies may find tailored applications in the clinics. Although these cells have been demonstrated to express specific mesenchymal markers and are able to differentiate into

  17. Protons Sensitize Epithelial Cells to Mesenchymal Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minli; Hada, Megumi; Saha, Janapriya; Sridharan, Deepa M.; Pluth, Janice M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2012-01-01

    Proton radiotherapy has gained more favor among oncologists as a treatment option for localized and deep-seated tumors. In addition, protons are a major constituent of the space radiation astronauts receive during space flights. The potential for these exposures to lead to, or enhance cancer risk has not been well studied. Our objective is to study the biological effects of low energy protons on epithelial cells and its propensity to enhance transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1)-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process occurring during tumor progression and critical for invasion and metastasis. Non-transformed mink lung epithelial cells (Mv1Lu) and hTERT- immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells (EPC) were used in this study. EMT was identified by alterations in cell morphology, EMT-related gene expression changes determined using real-time PCR, and EMT changes in specific cellular markers detected by immunostaining and western blotting. Although TGFβ1 treatment alone is able to induce EMT in both Mv1Lu and EPC cells, low energy protons (5 MeV) at doses as low as 0.1 Gy can enhance TGFβ1 induced EMT. Protons alone can also induce a mild induction of EMT. SD208, a potent TGFβ Receptor 1 (TGFβR1) kinase inhibitor, can efficiently block TGFβ1/Smad signaling and attenuate EMT induction. We suggest a model for EMT after proton irradiation in normal and cancerous tissue based on our results that showed that low and high doses of protons can sensitize normal human epithelial cells to mesenchymal transition, more prominently in the presence of TGFβ1, but also in the absence of TGFβ1. PMID:22844446

  18. SIGNALING PATHWAYS ASSOCIATED WITH VX EXPOSURE IN MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    administrative support. iv  Blank v  CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION...M.J.; Cheng, A.; Genever, P.G. Functional Nicotinic and Muscarinic Receptors on Mesenchymal Stem Cells. Stem Cells Dev. 2009, 18, 103–112. 12

  19. Cryopreservation and revival of human mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Ekblond, Annette; Kastrup, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based therapy is a promising and innovative new treatment for different degenerative and autoimmune diseases, and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from the bone marrow have demonstrated great therapeutic potential due to their immunosuppressive and regenerative capacities. The establishment...

  20. Treatment of osteoarthritis with mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Cao, Wei

    2014-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most prevalent joint diseases with prominent symptoms affecting the daily life of millions of middle aged and elderly people. Despite this, there are no successful medical interventions that can prevent the progressive destruction of OA joints. The onset of pathological changes in OA is associated with deviant activity of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), the multipotent precursors of connective tissue cells that reside in joints. Current therapies for OA have resulted in poor clinical outcomes without repairing the damaged cartilage. Intra-articular delivery of culture-expanded MSCs has opened new avenues of OA treatment. Pre-clinical and clinical trials demonstrated the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of MSC therapy. The Wnt/β-catenin, bone morphogenetic protein 2, Indian hedgehog, and Mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways have been demonstrated to be involved in OA and the mechanism of action of MSC therapies.

  1. Receptor control in mesenchymal stem cell engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalby, Matthew J.; García, Andrés J.; Salmeron-Sanchez, Manuel

    2018-03-01

    Materials science offers a powerful tool to control mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) growth and differentiation into functional phenotypes. A complex interplay between the extracellular matrix and growth factors guides MSC phenotypes in vivo. In this Review, we discuss materials-based bioengineering approaches to direct MSC fate in vitro and in vivo, mimicking cell-matrix-growth factor crosstalk. We first scrutinize MSC-matrix interactions and how the properties of a material can be tailored to support MSC growth and differentiation in vitro, with an emphasis on MSC self-renewal mechanisms. We then highlight important growth factor signalling pathways and investigate various materials-based strategies for growth factor presentation and delivery. Integrin-growth factor crosstalk in the context of MSC engineering is introduced, and bioinspired material designs with the potential to control the MSC niche phenotype are considered. Finally, we summarize important milestones on the road to MSC engineering for regenerative medicine.

  2. Effect of silver nanoparticles on human mesenchymal stem cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Sengstock

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP are one of the fastest growing products in nano-medicine due to their enhanced antibacterial activity at the nanoscale level. In biomedicine, hundreds of products have been coated with Ag-NP. For example, various medical devices include silver, such as surgical instruments, bone implants and wound dressings. After the degradation of these materials, or depending on the coating technique, silver in nanoparticle or ion form can be released and may come into close contact with tissues and cells. Despite incorporation of Ag-NP as an antibacterial agent in different products, the toxicological and biological effects of silver in the human body after long-term and low-concentration exposure are not well understood. In the current study, we investigated the effects of both ionic and nanoparticulate silver on the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs into adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages and on the secretion of the respective differentiation markers adiponectin, osteocalcin and aggrecan.Results: As shown through laser scanning microscopy, Ag-NP with a size of 80 nm (hydrodynamic diameter were taken up into hMSCs as nanoparticulate material. After 24 h of incubation, these Ag-NP were mainly found in the endo-lysosomal cell compartment as agglomerated material. Cytotoxicity was observed for differentiated or undifferentiated hMSCs treated with high silver concentrations (≥20 µg·mL−1 Ag-NP; ≥1.5 µg·mL−1 Ag+ ions but not with low-concentration treatments (≤10 µg·mL−1 Ag-NP; ≤1.0 µg·mL−1 Ag+ ions. Subtoxic concentrations of Ag-NP and Ag+ ions impaired the adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas chondrogenic differentiation was unaffected after 21 d of incubation. In contrast to aggrecan, the inhibitory effect of adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation was confirmed by a decrease in the secretion of

  3. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Nerve Regeneration and Immunomodulation after Composite Tissue Allotransplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    10-1-0927 TITLE: Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Nerve Regeneration and Immunomodulation after Composite Tissue Allotransplantation...immunosuppression. Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are pluripotent cells, capable of differentiation along multiple mesenchymal lineages into...As part of implemented transition from University of Pittsburgh to Johns Hopkins University, we optimized our mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) isolation

  4. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for nonmusculoskeletal diseases: emerging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tom K; Ho, Jennifer H; Lee, Oscar K

    2009-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells are stem/progenitor cells originated from the mesoderm and can different into multiple cell types of the musculoskeletal system. The vast differentiation potential and the relative ease for culture expansion have established mesenchymal stem cells as the building blocks in cell therapy and tissue engineering applications for a variety of musculoskeletal diseases, including repair of fractures and bone defects, cartilage regeneration, treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head, and correction of genetic diseases such as osteogenesis imperfect. However, research in the past decade has revealed differentiation potentials of mesenchymal stem cells beyond lineages of the mesoderm, suggesting broader applications than originally perceived. In this article, we review the recent developments in mesenchymal stem cell research with respect to their emerging properties and applications in nonmusculoskeletal diseases.

  5. Reciprocal upregulation of Notch signaling molecules in hematopoietic progenitor and mesenchymal stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikuchi Y

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs play pivotal supportive roles in hematopoiesis, how they interact with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs is not well understood. We investigated the interaction between HSCs and surrogate MSCs (C3H10T1/2 stromal cells, focusing on the molecular events induced by cell contact of these bipartite populations. C3H10T1/2 is a mesenchymal stromal cell line that can be induced to differentiate into preadipocytes (A54 and myoblasts (M1601. The stromal cell derivatives were cocultured with murine HSCs (Lineage-Sca1+, and gene expression profiles in stromal cells and HSCs were compared before and after the coculture. HSCs gave rise to cobblestone areas only on A54 cells, with ninefold more progenitors than on M1601 or undifferentiated C3H10T1/2 cells. Microarray-based screening and a quantitative reverse transcriptase directed-polymerase chain reaction showed that the levels of Notch ligands (Jagged1 and Delta-like 3 were increased in A54 cells upon interaction with HSCs. On the other hand, the expression of Notch1 and Hes1 was upregulated in the HSCs cocultured with A54 cells. A transwell assay revealed that the reciprocal upregulation was dependent on cell-to-cell contact. The result suggested that in the hematopoietic niche, HSCs help MSCs to produce Notch ligands, and in turn, MSCs help HSCs to express Notch receptor. Such a reciprocal upregulation would reinforce the downstream signaling to determine the fate of hematopoietic cell lineage. Clarification of the initiating events on cell contact should lead to the identification of specific molecular targets to facilitate HSC engraftment in transplantation therapy.

  6. Mesenchymal stem cells in multiple sclerosis - translation to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulamea, A

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, characterized by an aberrant activation of the immune system and combining demyelination with neurodegeneration. Studies on experimental models of multiple sclerosis revealed immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stem cells. Clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells therapy in multiple sclerosis patients showed tolerability, safety on short term, some immunomodulatory properties reducing the Th1 proinflammatory response and the inflammatory MRI parameters. The author reviews the data about experimental studies and clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

  7. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for laryngotracheal stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Kathrine Kronberg; Grønhøj, Christian; Jensen, David H

    2017-01-01

    studies addressing the effect of MSC therapy on the airway. We assessed effect on inflammation, fibrosis, and MSC as a component in tissue engineering for treating defects in the airway. RESULTS: We identified eleven studies (n = 256 animals) from eight countries evaluating the effect of MSCs......BACKGROUND: Laryngotracheal stenosis (LTS) can be either congenital or acquired. Laryngeal stenosis is most often encountered after prolonged intubation. The mechanism for stenosis following intubation is believed to be hypertrophic scarring. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) therapy has shown...... promising results in regenerative medicine. We aimed to systematically review the literature on MSC therapy for stenosis of the conductive airways. METHODS: PubMed, EMBASE, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Library were systematically searched from January 1980-January 2017 with the purpose of identifying all...

  8. Application of mesenchymal stem cells in paediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wawryk-Gawda Ewelina

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC were described by Friedenstein in the 1970s as being a group of bone marrow non-hematopoietic cells that are the source of fibroblasts. Since then, knowledge about the therapeutic potential of MSCs has significantly increased. MSCs are currently used for the treatment of many diseases, both in adults and children. MSCs are used successfully in the case of autoimmune diseases, including rheumatic diseases, diabetes mellitus type 1, gastroenterological and neurological diseases. Moreover, treatment of such organ disorders as damage or hypoxia through application of MSC therapy has shown to be satisfactory. In addition, there are some types of congenital disorders, including osteogenesis imperfecta and Spinal Muscular Atrophy, that may be treated with cellular therapy. Most studies showed no other adverse effects than fever. Our study is an analysis that particularly focuses on the registered trials and results of MSCs application to under 18 patients with acute, chronic, recurrent, resistance and corticosteroids types of Graft-versus-Host Disease (GvHD. Stem cells currently play an important role in the treatment of many diseases. Long-term studies conducted on animals have shown that cell therapy is both effective and safe. The number of indications for use of these cells in the course of treatment of people is constantly increasing. The results of subsequent studies provide important data justifying the application of MSCs in the course of treatment of many diseases whose treatment is ineffective when utilizing other approaches.

  9. Gene expression profiling of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from Osteogenesis Imperfecta patients during osteoblast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneto, Carla Martins; Pereira Lima, Patrícia S; Prata, Karen Lima; Dos Santos, Jane Lima; de Pina Neto, João Monteiro; Panepucci, Rodrigo Alexandre; Noushmehr, Houtan; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; de Paula, Francisco José Alburquerque; Silva, Wilson Araújo

    2017-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are precursors present in adult bone marrow that are able to differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondroblasts that have gained great importance as a source for cell therapy. Recently, a number of studies involving the analysis of gene expression of undifferentiated MSCs and of MSCs in the differentiation into multiple lineage processes were observed but there is no information concerning the gene expression of MSCs from Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) patients. Osteogenesis Imperfecta is characterized as a genetic disorder in which a generalized osteopenia leads to excessive bone fragility and severe bone deformities. The aim of this study was to analyze gene expression profile during osteogenic differentiation from BMMSCs (Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells) obtained from patients with Osteogenesis Imperfecta and from control subjects. Bone marrow samples were collected from three normal subjects and five patients with OI. Mononuclear cells were isolated for obtaining mesenchymal cells that had been expanded until osteogenic differentiation was induced. RNA was harvested at seven time points during the osteogenic differentiation period (D0, D+1, D+2, D+7, D+12, D+17 and D+21). Gene expression analysis was performed by the microarray technique and identified several differentially expressed genes. Some important genes for osteoblast differentiation had lower expression in OI patients, suggesting a smaller commitment of these patient's MSCs with the osteogenic lineage. Other genes also had their differential expression confirmed by RT-qPCR. An increase in the expression of genes related to adipocytes was observed, suggesting an increase of adipogenic differentiation at the expense osteogenic differentiation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. Gut Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Messina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, first found in bone marrow (BM, are the structural architects of all organs, participating in most biological functions. MSCs possess tissue-specific signatures that allow their discrimination according to their origin and location. Among their multiple functions, MSCs closely interact with immune cells, orchestrating their activity to maintain overall homeostasis. The phenotype of tissue MSCs residing in the bowel overlaps with myofibroblasts, lining the bottom walls of intestinal crypts (pericryptal or interspersed within intestinal submucosa (intercryptal. In Crohn’s disease, intestinal MSCs are tightly stacked in a chronic inflammatory milieu, which causes their enforced expression of Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC. The absence of Class II MHC is a hallmark for immune-modulator and tolerogenic properties of normal MSCs and, vice versa, the expression of HLA-DR is peculiar to antigen presenting cells, that is, immune-activator cells. Interferon gamma (IFNγ is responsible for induction of Class II MHC expression on intestinal MSCs. The reversal of myofibroblasts/MSCs from an immune-modulator to an activator phenotype in Crohn’s disease results in the formation of a fibrotic tube subverting the intestinal structure. Epithelial metaplastic areas in this context can progress to dysplasia and cancer.

  11. Mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid increase after meniscus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukura, Yu; Muneta, Takeshi; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Koga, Hideyuki; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2014-05-01

    Although relatively uncommon, spontaneous healing from a meniscus injury has been observed even within the avascular area. This may be the result of the existence of mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether mesenchymal stem cells existed in the synovial fluid of the knee after meniscus injury. Synovial fluid was obtained from the knees of 22 patients with meniscus injury just before meniscus surgery and from 8 volunteers who had no history of knee injury. The cellular fraction of the synovial fluid was cultured for 14 days followed by analysis for multilineage potential and presentation of surface antigens characteristic of mesenchymal stem cells. Colony-forming efficiency and proliferation potential were also compared between the two groups. Cells with characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells were observed in the synovial fluid of injured knees to a much greater degree than in uninjured knees. The colony-forming cells derived from the synovial fluid of the knee with meniscus injury had multipotentiality and surface epitopes identical to mesenchymal stem cells. The average number of colony formation, obtained from 1 mL of synovial fluid, in meniscus-injured knees was 250, higher than that from healthy volunteers, which was 0.5 (p < 0.001). Total colony number per synovial fluid volume was positively correlated with the postinjury period (r = 0.77, p < 0.001). Mesenchymal stem cells were found to exist in synovial fluid from knees after meniscus injury. Mesenchymal stem cells were present in higher numbers in synovial fluid with meniscus injury than in normal knees. Total colony number per synovial fluid volume was positively correlated with the postinjury period. Our current human study and previous animal studies suggest the possibility that mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid increase after meniscus injury contributing to spontaneous meniscus healing.

  12. Glucocorticoids induce autophagy in rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, L.; Fan, J.; Lin, Y. S.

    2015-01-01

    and their responses to diverse stimuli, however, the role of autophagy in glucocorticoidinduced damage to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) remains unclear. The current study confirmed that glucocorticoid administration impaired the proliferation of BMSCs. Transmission electron microscopy...

  13. Mesenchymal cells for skeletal tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panetta, N J; Gupta, D M; Quarto, N; Longaker, M T

    2009-03-01

    Today, surgical intervention remains the mainstay of treatment to intervene upon a multitude of skeletal deficits and defects attributable to congenital malformations, oncologic resection, pathologic degenerative bone destruction, and post-traumatic loss. Despite this significant demand, the tools with which surgeons remain equipped are plagued with a surfeit of inadequacies, often resulting in less than ideal patient outcomes. The failings of current techniques largely arise secondary to their inability to produce a regenerate which closely resembles lost tissue. As such, focus has shifted to the potential of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based skeletal tissue engineering. The successful development of such techniques would represent a paradigm shift from current approaches, carrying with it the potential to regenerate tissues which mimic the form and function of endogenous bone. Lessons learned from investigations probing the endogenous regenerative capacity of skeletal tissues have provided direction to early studies investigating the osteogenic potential of MSC. Additionally, increasing attention is being turned to the role of targeted molecular manipulations in augmenting MSC osteogenesis, as well as the development of an ideal scaffold ''vehicle'' with which to deliver progenitor cells. The following discussion presents the authors' current working knowledge regarding these critical aspects of MSC application in cell-based skeletal tissue engineering strategies, as well as provides insight towards what future steps must be taken to make their clinical translation a reality.

  14. Epigenetic regulation of osteogenesis: human embryonic palatal mesenchymal cells

    OpenAIRE

    Barkhordarian, Andre; Sison, Jay; Cayabyab, Riana; Mahanian, Nicole; Chiappelli, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) provide an appropriate model to study epigenetic changes during osteogenesis and bone regeneration due to their differentiation potential. Since there are no unique markers for MSCs, methods of identification are limited. The complex morphology of human embryonic palatal mesenchyme stem cell (HEPM) requires analysis of fractal dimensions to provide an objective quantification of self-similarity, a statistical transformation of cellular shape and border complexity...

  15. Effect of hypoxia on equine mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow and adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranera Beatriz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs derived from bone marrow (BM-MSCs and adipose tissue (AT-MSCs are being applied to equine cell therapy. The physiological environment in which MSCs reside is hypoxic and does not resemble the oxygen level typically used in in vitro culture (20% O2. This work compares the growth kinetics, viability, cell cycle, phenotype and expression of pluripotency markers in both equine BM-MSCs and AT-MSCs at 5% and 20% O2. Results At the conclusion of culture, fewer BM-MSCs were obtained in hypoxia than in normoxia as a result of significantly reduced cell division. Hypoxic AT-MSCs proliferated less than normoxic AT-MSCs because of a significantly higher presence of non-viable cells during culture. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the immunophenotype of both MSCs was maintained in both oxygen conditions. Gene expression analysis using RT-qPCR showed that statistically significant differences were only found for CD49d in BM-MSCs and CD44 in AT-MSCs. Similar gene expression patterns were observed at both 5% and 20% O2 for the remaining surface markers. Equine MSCs expressed the embryonic markers NANOG, OCT4 and SOX2 in both oxygen conditions. Additionally, hypoxic cells tended to display higher expression, which might indicate that hypoxia retains equine MSCs in an undifferentiated state. Conclusions Hypoxia attenuates the proliferative capacity of equine MSCs, but does not affect the phenotype and seems to keep them more undifferentiated than normoxic MSCs.

  16. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Tissue Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M DiMarino

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The advent of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC based therapies for clinical therapeutics has been an exciting and new innovation for the treatment of a variety of diseases associated with inflammation, tissue damage and subsequent regeneration and repair. Application-based ability to measure MSC potency and fate of the cells post-MSC therapy are the variables that confound the use of MSCs therapeutics in human diseases. An evaluation of MSC function and applications with attention to detail in the preparation as well as quality control (QC and quality assurance (QA are only as good as the assays that are developed. In vivo measures of efficacy and potency require an appreciation of the overall pathophysiology of the model and standardization of outcome measures. The new concepts of how MSC’s participate in the tissue regeneration and wound repair process and further, how this is impacted by estimates of efficacy and potency Are important new topics. In this regard,,, this chapter will review some of the in vitro and in vivo assays for MSC function and activity and their application to the clinical arena.

  17. p75 neurotrophin receptor is involved in proliferation of undifferentiated mouse embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moscatelli, Ilana; Pierantozzi, Enrico; Camaioni, Antonella; Siracusa, Gregorio [Department of Public Health and Cell Biology, Section of Histology and Embryology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Campagnolo, Luisa, E-mail: campagno@med.uniroma2.it [Department of Public Health and Cell Biology, Section of Histology and Embryology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier 1, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2009-11-01

    Neurotrophins and their receptors are known to play a role in the proliferation and survival of many different cell types of neuronal and non-neuronal lineages. In addition, there is much evidence in the literature showing that the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75{sup NTR}), alone or in association with members of the family of Trk receptors, is expressed in a wide variety of stem cells, although its role in such cells has not been completely elucidated. In the present work we have investigated the expression of p75{sup NTR} and Trks in totipotent and pluripotent cells, the mouse pre-implantation embryo and embryonic stem and germ cells (ES and EG cells). p75{sup NTR} and TrkA can be first detected in the blastocyst from which ES cell lines are derived. Mouse ES cells retain p75{sup NTR}/TrkA expression. Nerve growth factor is the only neurotrophin able to stimulate ES cell growth in culture, without affecting the expression of stem cell markers, alkaline phosphatase, Oct4 and Nanog. Such proliferation effect was blocked by antagonizing either p75{sup NTR} or TrkA. Interestingly, immunoreactivity to anti-p75{sup NTR} antibodies is lost upon ES cell differentiation. The expression pattern of neurotrophin receptors in murine ES cells differs from human ES cells, that only express TrkB and C, and do not respond to NGF. In this paper we also show that, while primordial germ cells (PGC) do not express p75{sup NTR}, when they are made to revert to an ES-like phenotype, becoming EG cells, expression of p75{sup NTR} is turned on.

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Application for Immunomodulation and Tissue Repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horwood, Nicole J.; Dazzi, Francesco; Zaher, Walid

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are stem cell populations present among the bone marrow stroma and a number of other tissues that are capable of multi-lineage differentiation into mesoderm-type cells such as osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. MSC provide supportive stroma for growth and diffe......Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are stem cell populations present among the bone marrow stroma and a number of other tissues that are capable of multi-lineage differentiation into mesoderm-type cells such as osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. MSC provide supportive stroma for growth...

  19. Microencapsulation of Hepatocytes and Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Therapeutic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Raphael P H; Montanari, Elisa; Morel, Philippe; Pimenta, Joël; Schuurman, Henk-Jan; Wandrey, Christine; Gerber-Lemaire, Sandrine; Mahou, Redouan; Bühler, Leo H

    2017-01-01

    Encapsulated hepatocyte transplantation and encapsulated mesenchymal stem cell transplantation are newly developed potential treatments for acute and chronic liver diseases, respectively. Cells are microencapsulated in biocompatible semipermeable alginate-based hydrogels. Microspheres protect cells against antibodies and immune cells, while allowing nutrients, small/medium size proteins and drugs to diffuse inside and outside the polymer matrix. Microencapsulated cells are assessed in vitro and designed for experimental transplantation and for future clinical applications.Here, we describe the protocol for microencapsulation of hepatocytes and mesenchymal stem cells within hybrid poly(ethylene glycol)-alginate hydrogels.

  20. Cytomegalovirus Replicates in Differentiated but not in Undifferentiated Human Embryonal Carcinoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonczol, Eva; Andrews, Peter W.; Plotkin, Stanley A.

    1984-04-01

    To study the mode of action of human cytomegalovirus, an important teratogenic agent in human populations, the susceptibility of a pluripotent human embryonal carcinoma cell line to the virus was investigated. Viral antigens were not expressed nor was infectious virus produced by human embryonal carcinoma cells after infection, although the virus was able to penetrate these cells. In contrast, retinoic acid-induced differentiated derivatives of embryonal carcinoma cells were permissive for antigen expression and infectious virus production. Replication of human cytomegalovirus in human teratocarcinoma cells may therefore depend on cellular functions associated with differentiation.

  1. Can villin be used to identify malignant and undifferentiated normal digestive epithelial cells?

    OpenAIRE

    Robine, S; Huet, C; Moll, R; Sahuquillo-Merino, C; Coudrier, E; Zweibaum, A; Louvard, D

    1985-01-01

    We have investigated the presence of villin (a Ca2+-regulated actin binding protein) in various tissues (normal or malignant) and in established cell lines by using sensitive immunochemical techniques on cell extracts and immunofluorescence analysis on frozen sections. Our results show that villin is a marker that can be used to distinguish normal differentiated epithelial cells from the simple epithelia lining the gastrointestinal tract and renal tubules. Villin is found in the absorptive ce...

  2. Mesenchymal stem cells: biological characteristics and potential clinical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha

    2004-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are clonogenic, non-hematpoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow and are able to differentiate into multiple mesoderm-type cell lineages, for example, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, endothelial-cells and also non-mesoderm-type lineages, for example, neuronal...

  3. L-carnitine significantly decreased aging of rat adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobarak, Halimeh; Fathi, Ezzatollah; Farahzadi, Raheleh; Zarghami, Nosratollah; Javanmardi, Sara

    2017-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells are undifferentiated cells that have the ability to divide continuously and tissue regeneration potential during the transplantation. Aging and loss of cell survival, is one of the main problems in cell therapy. Since the production of free radicals in the aging process is effective, the use of antioxidant compounds can help in scavenging free radicals and prevent the aging of cells. The aim of this study is evaluate the effects of L-carnitine (LC) on proliferation and aging of rat adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rADSC). rADSCs were isolated from inguinal region of 5 male Rattus rats. Oil red-O, alizarin red-S and toluidine blue staining were performed to evaluate the adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of rADSCs, respectively. Flow cytometric analysis was done for investigating the cell surface markers. The methyl thiazol tetrazolium (MTT) method was used to determine the cell proliferation of rADSCs following exposure to different concentrations of LC. rADSCs aging was evaluated by beta-galactosidase staining. The results showed significant proliferation of rADSCs 48 h after treatment with concentrations of 0.2 mM LC. In addition, in the presence of 0.2 mM LC, rADSCs appeared to be growing faster than control group and 0.2 mM LC supplementation could significantly decrease the population doubling time and aging of rADSCs. It seems that LC would be a good antioxidant to improve lifespan of rADSCs due to the decrease in aging.

  4. [Differential effects on bone and mesenchymal stem cells caused by intermittent and continuous PTH administration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L X; Balani, Y M; Trinh, Sophia; Kronenberg, Henry M; Mu, Yiming

    2018-03-13

    Objective: To investigate the distinct effects of intermittent and continuous administration of parathyroid hormone (PTH) on bone and mesenchymal stem cell (MSC). Methods: Six weeks old mice with C57/BL6J background and SOX9-creERT/Td-tomato/Osteocalcin-GFP genotype were divided into 6 groups: intermittent administration and withdraw group (subcutaneous injection with PTH 500 μg·kg -1 ·d -1 ), continuous administration and withdraw group (subcutaneous implantation of PTH pump, 80 μg·kg -1 ·d -1, with a rate of 0.25 μl/h), control administration and withdraw group, with 8 mice in each group. Serum calcium level and bone mineral density (BMD) were measured after two weeks' treatment and two weeks after drug withdraw. Histopathology and immunofluorescence analyses were performed to assess the effects of PTH on bone and mesenchymal stem cell. Results: Serum calcium level increased transiently in intermittent group[(1.36±0.03) mmol/L]and increased gradually in continuous group[up to (2.33±0.03) mmol/L], but reduced to normal level (1.12-1.27 mmol/L) 14 days after drug withdraw. BMD of both intermittent[(0.047±0.002) g/cm 2 ]and continuous[(0.046±0.001) g/cm 2 ]PTH administration groups increased compared with control group[(0.044±0.001) g/cm 2 ], but there was no significant difference among three groups 2 weeks after drug withdraw. Femoral histopathology showed that bone mass, trabecular number and little fibrous tissue hyperplasia in intermittent PTH group increased. Osteoblasts number increased, but lining cells decreased. There was no significant difference in osteocyte and osteoclast numbers. After withdrawing of intermittent PTH, osteocyte and osteoblast number declined significantly, but there was an increased number of lining cells. Continuous PTH caused very high amount of fibrosis, and osteoclast number increased significantly, while osteoblast and osteocyte number increased slightly. After withdrawing of continuous PTH, fibrosis disappeared

  5. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Updates and Therapeutic Outlook in Rheumatic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Jorgensen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are adult stem cells exhibiting functional properties that have opened the way for cell-based clinical therapies. MSCs have been reported to exhibit immunosuppressive as well as healing properties, improving angiogenesis and preventing apoptosis or fibrosis through the secretion of paracrine mediators. This review summarizes recent progress on the clinical application of stem cells therapy in some inflammatory and degenerative rheumatic diseases. To date, most of the available data have been obtained in preclinical models and clinical efficacy needs to be evaluated through controlled randomized double-blind trials.

  6. β-Catenin overexpression in the metanephric mesenchyme leads to renal dysplasia genesis via cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarin, Sanjay; Boivin, Felix; Li, Aihua; Lim, Janice; Svajger, Bruno; Rosenblum, Norman D; Bridgewater, Darren

    2014-05-01

    Renal dysplasia, a developmental disorder characterized by defective ureteric branching morphogenesis and nephrogenesis, ranks as one of the major causes of renal failure among the pediatric population. Herein, we demonstrate that the levels of activated β-catenin are elevated in the nuclei of ureteric, stromal, and mesenchymal cells within dysplastic human kidney tissue. By using a conditional mouse model of mesenchymal β-catenin overexpression, we identify two novel signaling pathways mediated by β-catenin in the development of renal dysplasia. First, the overexpression of β-catenin within the metanephric mesenchyme leads to ectopic and disorganized branching morphogenesis caused by β-catenin directly binding Tcf/lef consensus binding sites in the Gdnf promoter and up-regulating Gdnf transcription. Second, β-catenin overexpression in the metanephric mesenchyme leads to elevated levels of transcriptionally active β-catenin in the ureteric epithelium. Interestingly, this increase of β-catenin-mediated transcription results from a novel Ret/β-catenin signaling pathway. Consistent with these findings, analysis of human dysplastic renal tissue demonstrates that undifferentiated mesenchymal cells expressing high levels of β-catenin also express increased GDNF. Furthermore, dysplastic ureteric tubules that were surrounded by high levels of GDNF also exhibited increased levels of activated β-catenin. Together, these data support a model in which the elevation of β-catenin in the metanephric mesenchyme results in cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous events that lead to the genesis of renal dysplasia. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Developing Novel Therapeutics Targeting Undifferentiated and Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES...cell numbers compared to the time-matched control LNCaP-GFP cells (Figure 1F). We further characterized LNCaP-GFP and LNCaP-MDV cells at crisis point...cadherin, SLUG , and vimentin), and CSCs (i.e., CD44, integrin α2β1, and ABCG2) [2-4, 20, 25-33] (Figure 3B; Supplementary Figure S3). Flow

  8. Developing Novel Therapeutics Targeting Undifferentiated and Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    in vivo cytotoxicities of the conjugated JRM2 peptide and finishing up screening and validating the kinase inhibitor library screening. 15. SUBJECT...cells were purified out and then lysed to infect bacteria K91, from which 960 and 704 tet/kan- resistant bacterial colonies were generated from GFP+ and...Figure 2A; data not shown). To determine whether JRM2 can preferentially bind to the PSA-/lo LNCaP cells, we made several versions of JRM2 conjugates

  9. Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Chronic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashu Bhasin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cell transplantation is a ‘hype and hope’ in the current scenario. It is in the early stage of development with promises to restore function in chronic diseases. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC transplantation in stroke patients has shown significant improvement by reducing clinical and functional deficits. They are feasible and multipotent and have homing characteristics. This study evaluates the safety, feasibility and efficacy of autologous MSC transplantation in patients with chronic stroke using clinical scores and functional imaging (blood oxygen level-dependent and diffusion tensor imaging techniques. Methods: Twelve chronic stroke patients were recruited; inclusion criteria were stroke lasting 3 months to 1 year, motor strength of hand muscles of at least 2, and NIHSS of 4–15, and patients had to be conscious and able to comprehend. Fugl Meyer (FM, modified Barthel index (mBI, MRC, Ashworth tone grade scale scores and functional imaging scans were assessed at baseline, and after 8 and 24 weeks. Bone marrow was aspirated under aseptic conditions and expansion of MSC took 3 weeks with animal serum-free media (Stem Pro SFM. Six patients were administered a mean of 50–60 × 106 cells i.v. followed by 8 weeks of physiotherapy. Six patients served as controls. This was a non-randomized experimental controlled trial. Results: Clinical and radiological scanning was normal for the stem cell group patients. There was no mortality or cell-related adverse reaction. The laboratory tests on days 1, 3, 5 and 7 were also normal in the MSC group till the last follow-up. The FM and mBI showed a modest increase in the stem cell group compared to controls. There was an increased number of cluster activation of Brodmann areas BA 4 and BA 6 after stem cell infusion compared to controls, indicating neural plasticity. Conclusion: MSC therapy aiming to restore function in stroke is safe and feasible. Further randomized controlled trials are needed

  10. Efficient recovery of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cell cryopreserved with hydroxyethyl starch, dimethyl sulphoxide and serum replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, Maristela Delgado; De Santis, Gil Cunha; Abraham, Kuruvilla Joseph; Fontes, Aparecida Maria; Magalhães, Danielle Aparecida Rosa; Oliveira, Viviane de Cássia; Costa, Everton de Brito Oliveira; Palma, Patrícia Vianna Bonini; Covas, Dimas Tadeu

    2015-08-01

    The therapeutic use of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is dependent on an efficient cryopreservation protocol for long-term storage. The aim of this study was to determine whether the combination of three cryoprotecting reagents using two freezing systems might improve hESC recovery rates with maintenance of hESC pluripotency properties for potential cell therapy application. Recovery rates of hESC colonies which were frozen in three cryoprotective solutions: Me2SO/HES/SR medium, Defined-medium® and Me2SO/SFB in medium solution were evaluated in ultra-slow programmable freezing system (USPF) and a slow-rate freezing system (SRF). The hESC pluripotency properties after freezing-thawing were evaluated. We estimated the distribution frequency of survival colonies and observed that independent of the freezing system used (USPF or SRF) the best results were obtained with Me2SO/HES/SR as cryopreservation medium. We showed a significant hESC recovery colonies rate after thawing in Me2SO/HES/SR medium were 3.88 and 2.9 in USPF and SRF, respectively. The recovery colonies rate with Defined-medium® were 1.05 and 1.07 however in classical Me2SO medium were 0.5 and 0.86 in USPF and SRF, respectively. We showed significant difference between Me2SO/HES/SR medium×Defined-medium® and between Me2SO/HES/SR medium×Me2SO medium, for two cryopreservation systems (Psystem which resulted in hESC colonies that remain undifferentiated, maintain their in vitro and in vivo pluripotency properties and genetic stability. This approach may be suitable for cell therapy studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Subcellular Distribution of S-Nitrosylated H-Ras in Differentiated and Undifferentiated PC12 Cells during Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbakadze, Tamar; Goloshvili, Galina; Narmania, Nana; Zhuravliova, Elene; Mikeladze, David

    2017-10-01

    Hypoxia or exposure to excessive reactive oxygen or nitrogen species could induce S-nitrosylation of various target proteins, including GTPases of the Ras-superfamily. Under hypoxic conditions, the Ras-protein is translocated to the cytosol and interacts with the Golgi complex, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria. The mobility/translocation of Ras depend on the cells oxidative status. However, the importance of relocated Snitrosylated- H-Ras (NO-H-Ras) in proliferation/differentiation processes is not completely understood. We have determined the content of soluble- and membrane-bound-NO-HRas in differentiated (D) and undifferentiated (ND) rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. In our experimental study, we analyzed NO-H-Ras levels under hypoxic/normoxic conditions in membrane and soluble fractions of ND and D PC12 cells with/without nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) treatment. Cells were analyzed by the S-nitrosylated kit, immunoprecipitation, and Western blot. We assessed the action of NO-H-Ras on oxidative metabolism of isolated mitochondria by determining mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide generation via the scopoletin oxidation method and ATPproduction as estimated by the luminometric method. Hypoxia did not influence nitrosylation of soluble H-Ras in ND PC12 cells. Under hypoxic conditions, the nitrosylation of soluble-H-Ras greatly decreased in D PC12 cells. SNP didn't change the levels of nitrosylation of soluble-H-Ras, in either hypoxic or normoxic conditions. On the other hand, hypoxia, per se, did not affect the nitrosylation of membrane-bound-H-Ras in D and ND PC12 cells. SNP-dependent nitrosylation of membrane-bound-H-Ras greatly increased in D PC12 cells. Both unmodified normal and mutated H-Ras enhanced the mitochondrial synthesis of ATP, whereas the stimulatory effects on ATP synthesis were eliminated after S-nitrosylation of H-Ras. According to the results, it may be proposed that hypoxia can decrease S

  12. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Improve Healing of Diabetic Foot Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Cao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, an ideal cell source for regenerative therapy with no ethical issues, play an important role in diabetic foot ulcer (DFU. Growing evidence has demonstrated that MSCs transplantation can accelerate wound closure, ameliorate clinical parameters, and avoid amputation. In this review, we clarify the mechanism of preclinical studies, as well as safety and efficacy of clinical trials in the treatment of DFU. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs, compared with MSCs derived from other tissues, may be a suitable cell type that can provide easy, effective, and cost-efficient transplantation to treat DFU and protect patients from amputation.

  13. [Differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells of adipose tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salyutin, R V; Zapohlska, K M; Palyanytsya, S S; Sirman, V M; Sokolov, M F

    2015-03-01

    Experimental investigation were conducted with the objective to determine a stem cells, capacity to differentiate in adipogenic direction, if they were obtained from adipose tissue. The investigation results have witnessed, that the cells, obtained from adipose tissue, are capable for a tissue-speciphic differentiation in osteogenic, chondrogenic, and, principally--in adipogenic direction, what confirms a multypotent nature of mesenchymal stem cells of adipose tissue. Adipose tissue constitutes an alternative to the bone marrow, as a source of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells, which may be applied in further investigations, concerning determination of their defense possibility for the transplanted autologous adipose tissue from the tissue resorption, made in a lipophiling way.

  14. Survival of human mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow and adipose tissue after xenogenic transplantation in immunocompetent mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemeyer, P; Vohrer, J; Schmal, H

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) represent an attractive cell population for tissue engineering purposes. As MSC are described as immunoprivileged, non-autologous applications seem possible. A basic requirement is the survival of MSC after transplantation in the host. The purpose...... of the current paper was to evaluate the survival of undifferentiated and osteogenically induced human MSC from different origins after transplantation in immunocompetent mice. METHODS: Human MSC were isolated from bone marrow (BMSC) and adipose tissue (ASC). After cultivation on mineralized collagen, MSC were...... osteogenic-induced MSC (group B) could be detected in only three of 24 cases. Quantification of lymphocytes and macrophages revealed significantly higher cell numbers in group B compared with group A (Pcell...

  15. Adult Stromal (Skeletal, Mesenchymal) Stem Cells: Advances Towards Clinical Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kermani, Abbas Jafari; Harkness, Linda; Zaher, Walid

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) are non-hematopoietic adult stromal cells that reside in a perivascular niche in close association with pericytes and endothelial cells and possess self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation capacity. The origin, unique properties, and therapeutic benefits of MSC ...

  16. Tumourigenicity and radiation resistance of mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Andrea, Filippo P; Horsman, Michael Robert; Kassem, Moustapha

    2011-01-01

    . Nontumourigenic (TERT4) and tumourigenic (TRET20) cell lines, from an immortalised mesenchymal stem cell line, were grown in culture prior to irradiation and gene expression analysis. Radiation resistance was measured using a clonogenic assay. Differences in gene expression between the two cell lines, both under...

  17. Undifferentiated pulmonary adenocarcinoma of clear cells associated to hypertrophic osteopathy in a dog

    OpenAIRE

    Rossetto, Victor José Vieira [UNESP; Rahal, Sheila Canevese [UNESP; Pardini, Luciana Moura Campos [UNESP; Fabris, Viciany Erique [UNESP; Mamprim, Maria Jaqueline [UNESP; Ribeiro, Sergio Marrone [UNESP

    2015-01-01

    Background: Most of the primary pulmonary tumors in dogs are malignant and from epithelial origin, being bronchioalveolar tumors more prevalent. Adenocarcinoma of clear cells, however, is a very rare pulmonary tumor and its origin is still unknown. It is related to several clinical abnormalities, including hypertrophic osteopathy, an unusual paraneoplastic syndrome characterized by a periosteal reaction along the shaft of long bones. Because of the unusual presentation of the pulmonary adenoc...

  18. Collagen cross-linking by adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells and scar-derived mesenchymal cells: Are mesenchymal stromal cells involved in scar formation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaerdt, van den A.J.; Veen, van der A.G.; Zuijlen, van P.P.; Reijnen, L.; Verkerk, M.; Bank, R.A.; Middelkoop, E.; Ulrich, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, different fibroblast-like (mesenchymal) cell populations that might be involved in wound healing were characterized and their involvement in scar formation was studied by determining collagen synthesis and processing. Depending on the physical and mechanical properties of the tissues,

  19. Collagen cross-linking by adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells and scar-derived mesenchymal cells : Are mesenchymal stromal cells involved in scar formation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bogaerdt, Antoon J.; van der Veen, Vincent C.; van Zuijlen, Paul P. M.; Reijnen, Linda; Verkerk, Michelle; Bank, Ruud A.; Middelkoop, Esther; Ulrich, Magda M. W.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, different fibroblast-like (mesenchymal) cell populations that might be involved in wound healing were characterized and their involvement in scar formation was studied by determining collagen synthesis and processing. Depending on the physical and mechanical properties of the tissues,

  20. Effects of dexamethasone on palate mesenchymal cell phospholipase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulleit, R.F.; Zimmerman, E.F.

    1984-01-01

    Corticosteroids will induce cleft palate in mice. One suggested mechanism for this effect is through inhibition of phospholipase activity. This hypothesis was tested by measuring the effects of dexamethasone, a synthetic corticosteroid, on phospholipase activity in cultures of palate mesenchymal cells. Palate mesenchymal cells were prelabeled with [3H]arachidonic acid. The cells were subsequently treated with various concentrations of dexamethasone. Concurrently, cultures of M-MSV-transformed 3T3 cells were prepared identically. After treatment, phospholipase activity was stimulated by the addition of serum or epidermal growth factor (EGF), and radioactivity released into the medium was taken as a measure of phospholipase activity. Dexamethasone (1 X 10(-5) or 1 X 10(-4) M) could inhibit serum-stimulated phospholipase activity in transformed 3T3 cells after 1 to 24 hr of treatment. However, no inhibition of activity was measured in palate mesenchymal cells following this period of treatment. Not until 120 hr of treatment with dexamethasone (1 X 10(-4) M) was any significant inhibition of serum-stimulated phospholipase activity observed in palate mesenchymal cells. When EGF was used to stimulate phospholipase activity, dexamethasone (1 X 10(-5) M) caused an increase in phospholipase activity in palate mesenchymal cells. These observations suggested that phospholipase in transformed 3T3 cells was sensitive to inhibition by dexamethasone. However, palate mesenchymal cell phospholipase is only minimally sensitive to dexamethasone, and in certain instances can be enhanced. These results cannot support the hypothesis that corticosteroids mediate their teratogenic effect via inhibition of phospholipase activity

  1. Effects of intra-articular injection of mesenchymal stem cells associated with platelet-rich plasma in a rabbit model of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermeto, L C; DeRossi, R; Oliveira, R J; Pesarini, J R; Antoniolli-Silva, A C M B; Jardim, P H A; Santana, A E; Deffune, E; Rinaldi, J C; Justulin, L A

    2016-09-02

    The current study aims to evaluate the macroscopic and histological effects of autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and platelet-rich plasma on knee articular cartilage regeneration in an experimental model of osteoarthritis. Twenty-four rabbits were randomly divided into four groups: control group, platelet-rich plasma group, autologous MSC undifferentiated group, and autologous MSC differentiated into chondrocyte group. Collagenase solution was used to induce osteoarthritis, and treatments were applied to each group at 6 weeks following osteoarthritis induction. After 60 days of therapy, the animals were euthanized and the articular surfaces were subjected to macroscopic and histological evaluations. The adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic differentiation potentials of MSCs were evaluated. Macroscopic and histological examinations revealed improved tissue repair in the MSC-treated groups. However, no difference was found between MSC-differentiated and undifferentiated chondrocytes. We found that MSCs derived from adipose tissue and platelet-rich plasma were associated with beneficial effects in articular cartilage regeneration during experimental osteoarthritis.

  2. Osteogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: A Comparative Analysis Between Human Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue and Dental Pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alimonte, Iolanda; Mastrangelo, Filiberto; Giuliani, Patricia; Pierdomenico, Laura; Marchisio, Marco; Zuccarini, Mariachiara; Di Iorio, Patrizia; Quaresima, Raimondo; Caciagli, Francesco; Ciccarelli, Renata

    2017-06-01

    White adipose tissue is a source of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) that are actively studied for their possible therapeutic use in bone tissue repair/remodeling. To better appreciate the osteogenic potential of these cells, we compared some properties of MSCs from human subcutaneous adipose tissue [subcutaneous-adipose stromal cells (S-ASCs)] and dental pulp stem cell (DPSCs) of third-impacted molars, the latter representing a well-established MSC source. Both undifferentiated cell types showed similar fibroblast-like morphology and mesenchymal marker expression. However, undifferentiated S-ASCs displayed a faster doubling time coupled to greater proliferation and colony-forming ability than DPSCs. Also, the osteogenic differentiation of S-ASCs was greater than that of DPSCs, as evaluated by the higher levels of expression of early osteogenic markers Runt-related transcription factor-2 (RUNX2) and alkaline phosphatase at days 3-14 and of extracellular matrix mineralization at days 14-21. Moreover, S-ASCs showed a better colonization of the titanium scaffold. In addition, we investigated whether S-ASC osteogenic commitment was enhanced by adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) stimulation, as previously shown for DPSCs. Although A1R expression was constant during DPSC differentiation, it increased in S-ASC at day 21 from osteogenesis induction. Accordingly, A1R stimulation by the agonist 2-chloro-N 6 -cyclopentyl-adenosine, added to the cultures at each medium change, stimulated proliferation only in differentiating DPSC and enhanced the osteogenic differentiation earlier in DPSCs than in S-ASCs. These effects were counteracted by cell pretreatment with a selective A1R antagonist. Thus, our findings suggest that S-ASCs could be advantageously used in regenerative orthopedics/dentistry, and locally released or exogenously added purines may play a role in bone repair/remodeling, even though this aspect should be more thoroughly evaluated.

  3. Telomere stability and telomerase in mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Graakjaer, Jesper; Kølvrå, Steen

    2008-01-01

    Telomeres are repetitive genetic material that cap and thereby protect the ends of chromosomes. Each time a cell divides, telomeres get shorter. Telomere length is mainly maintained by telomerase. This enzyme is present in high concentrations in the embryonic stem cells and in fast growing...... embryonic cells, and declines with age. It is still unclear to what extent there is telomerase in adult stem cells, but since these are the founder cells of cells of all the tissues in the body, understanding the telomere dynamics and expression of telomerase in adult stem cells is very important....... In the present communication we focus on telomere expression and telomere length in stem cells, with a special focus on mesenchymal stem cells. We consider different mechanisms by which stem cells can maintain telomeres and also focus on the dynamics of telomere length in mesenchymal stem cells, both the overall...

  4. Glial origin of mesenchymal stem cells in a tooth model system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaukua, Nina; Shahidi, Maryam Khatibi; Konstantinidou, Chrysoula; Dyachuk, Vyacheslav; Kaucka, Marketa; Furlan, Alessandro; An, Zhengwen; Wang, Longlong; Hultman, Isabell; Ahrlund-Richter, Lars; Blom, Hans; Brismar, Hjalmar; Lopes, Natalia Assaife; Pachnis, Vassilis; Suter, Ueli; Clevers, Hans; Thesleff, Irma; Sharpe, Paul; Ernfors, Patrik; Fried, Kaj; Adameyko, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells occupy niches in stromal tissues where they provide sources of cells for specialized mesenchymal derivatives during growth and repair. The origins of mesenchymal stem cells have been the subject of considerable discussion, and current consensus holds that perivascular cells

  5. Hyaline globule-like structures in undifferentiated sarcoma cells of malignant müllerian mixed tumor of the fallopian tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Naoto; Inui, Yasunobu; Ohara, Masahiko; Hirouchi, Takashi; Mizuno, Keiko; Kubo, Ayumi; Hayashi, Yoshihiro; Enzan, Hideaki; Lee, Gang-Hong

    2007-03-01

    Malignant müllerian mixed tumors (MMMTs) of the fallopian tube are very rare neoplasms, and we present such a case with unusual findings here. A 57-year-old Japanese woman, after she received a medical checkup, underwent salpingo-oophorectomy on the suspicion of ovarian cancer. At the time of operation, the main tumor was present predominantly in the fallopian tube. Microscopically, the tumor consisted of carcinoma and sarcoma components. The carcinoma showed moderately to poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. The sarcoma consisted of predominantly undifferentiated sarcoma and focally rhabdomyosarcomatous cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm. Immunohistochemically, the differentiation toward rhabdomyosarcoma was confirmed. Interestingly, the cytoplasm of undifferentiated sarcoma cells contained hyaline globule-like structures. These structures showed a positive reaction for PAS, and these structures were not digested by the diastase pretreatment. Ultrastructurally, hyaline globule-like structures corresponded to lysosomes. Finally, pathologists should keep in mind that undifferentiated sarcoma cells in MMMT of the fallopian tube may contain hyaline globule-like structures in the cytoplasm.

  6. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induce Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition in Colon Cancer Cells through Direct Cell-to-Cell Contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takigawa, Hidehiko; Kitadai, Yasuhiko; Shinagawa, Kei; Yuge, Ryo; Higashi, Yukihito; Tanaka, Shinji; Yasui, Wataru; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2017-05-01

    We previously reported that in an orthotopic nude mouse model of human colon cancer, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) migrated to the tumor stroma and promoted tumor growth and metastasis. Here, we evaluated the proliferation and migration ability of cancer cells cocultured with MSCs to elucidate the mechanism of interaction between cancer cells and MSCs. Proliferation and migration of cancer cells increased following direct coculture with MSCs but not following indirect coculture. Thus, we hypothesized that direct contact between cancer cells and MSCs was important. We performed a microarray analysis of gene expression in KM12SM colon cancer cells directly cocultured with MSCs. Expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related genes such as fibronectin (FN), SPARC, and galectin 1 was increased by direct coculture with MSCs. We also confirmed the upregulation of these genes with real-time polymerase chain reaction. Gene expression was not elevated in cancer cells indirectly cocultured with MSCs. Among the EMT-related genes upregulated by direct coculture with MSCs, we examined the immune localization of FN, a well-known EMT marker. In coculture assay in chamber slides, expression of FN was seen only at the edges of cancer clusters where cancer cells directly contacted MSCs. FN expression in cancer cells increased at the tumor periphery and invasive edge in orthotopic nude mouse tumors and human colon cancer tissues. These results suggest that MSCs induce EMT in colon cancer cells via direct cell-to-cell contact and may play an important role in colon cancer metastasis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Enhanced expression of extracellular calcium sensing receptor in monocyte-differentiated versus undifferentiated HL-60 cells: potential role in regulation of a nonselective cation channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, T; Ye, C; Chattopadhyay, N; Sanders, J L; Vassilev, P M; Brown, E M

    2000-05-01

    Human promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60) have been used widely as a model for studying the differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells in vitro. After treatment with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1,25(OH)(2)D(3)], HL-60 cells differentiate into cells with the phenotype of monocytes/macrophages. We previously showed that peripheral blood monocytes and the murine J774 monocytic cell line express the CaR, and myeloid progenitors in the bone marrow and myeloid cells in peripheral blood other than monocytes express lower levels of the CaR. Therefore, we investigated whether undifferentiated HL-60 cells express a functional G protein-coupled, extracellular calcium (Ca(2+)(o))-sensing receptor (CaR) and if the expression of the CaR increases as these cells differentiate along the monocytic lineage. The use of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with CaR-specific primers, followed by sequencing of the amplified products, identified an authentic CaR transcript in undifferentiated HL-60 cells. Both immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis using a CaR-specific antiserum detected low levels of CaR protein expression in undifferentiated HL-60 cells. The levels of CaR protein increased considerably following treatment of the cells with PMA (50 nM) or 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) (100 nM) for 5 days. Northern analysis using a CaR-specific riboprobe identified CaR transcripts in undifferentiated HL-60 cells, but CaR mRNA levels did not change appreciably after treatment with either agent, suggesting that upregulation of CaR protein occurs at a translational level. PMA-treated HL-60 cells expressed a nonselective cation channel (NCC), and the calcimimetic CaR activator, NPS R-467, but not its less active stereoisomer, NPS S-467, as well as the polycationic CaR agonist, neomycin, activated this NCC, demonstrating that the CaR expressed in these cells is functionally active. Therefore, HL-60 cells exhibit an increase in Ca

  8. The effect of caffeine on p53-dependent radioresponses in undifferentiated mouse embryonal carcinoma cells after X-ray and UV-irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taga, Masataka; Shiraishi, Kazunori; Shimura, Tsutomu; Uematsu, Norio; Kato, Tomohisa; Niwa, Ohtsura; Nishimune, Yoshitake; Aizawa, Shinichi; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2000-01-01

    The effect of caffeine was studied on the radioresponses of undifferentiated mouse embryonal carcinoma cells (EC cells) with or without the functional p53. The radioresponses studied included radiosensitivity, the activation of p53, apoptosis with characteristic DNA ladder formation and cell cycle progression. An undifferentiated mouse EC cell line, ECA2, and a newly established p53-deficient EC cell line, p53δ, were used in the present study. The status of the p53 gene did not significantly affect the colony survivals of undifferentiated EC cells to X-rays and UV. Although a post-irradiation treatment with caffeine sensitized both lines to X-rays marginally, the sensitization was prominent for UV regardless of the p53 status of the cells. The activation of a p53 responsible lacZ reporter construct was observed in stably transfected ECA2 cells after X-ray and UV irradiations. Caffeine suppressed the X-ray induced activation of the lacZ reporter, while it drastically enhanced the activation after UV irradiation. X-rays and UV readily triggered the apoptosis of ECA2 cells with the characteristic DNA ladder. Although UV-induced DNA ladder formation was enhanced by caffeine, that induced by X-rays was unaffected. Therefore, the effects of caffeine on the p53-dependent radioresponses were found to be agent specific: suppression for the X-ray induced and augmentation for the UV induced. In contrast to p53-proficient ECA2 cells, smear-like DNA degradation was observed for irradiated p53δ cells, suggesting the presence of a mode of cell death without DNA ladder formation. UV induction of the smear-like DNA degradation was enhanced in the presence of caffeine. Regardless of the state of the p53 gene, G1/S arrest was not observed in X-ray and UV irradiated EC cells. X-rays induced G2/M arrest in both lines, which was abrogated by caffeine, while G2/M arrest after UV was unaffected by a caffeine treatment. These results indicate that the radioresponses of undifferentiated

  9. Combination cell therapy with mesenchymal stem cells and neural stem cells for brain stroke in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Mojtaba; Farahmandnia, Mohammad; Razi, Zahra; Delavari, Somayeh; Shakibajahromi, Benafsheh; Sarvestani, Fatemeh Sabet; Kazemi, Sepehr; Semsar, Maryam

    2015-05-01

    Brain stroke is the second most important events that lead to disability and morbidity these days. Although, stroke is important, there is no treatment for curing this problem. Nowadays, cell therapy has opened a new window for treating central nervous system disease. In some previous studies the Mesenchymal stem cells and neural stem cells. In this study, we have designed an experiment to assess the combination cell therapy (Mesenchymal and Neural stem cells) effects on brain stroke. The Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from adult rat bone marrow and the neural stem cells were isolated from ganglion eminence of rat embryo 14 days. The Mesenchymal stem cells were injected 1 day after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and the neural stem cells transplanted 7 day after MCAO. After 28 days, the neurological outcomes and brain lesion volumes were evaluated. Also, the activity of Caspase 3 was assessed in different groups. The group which received combination cell therapy had better neurological examination and less brain lesion. Also the combination cell therapy group had the least Caspase 3 activity among the groups. The combination cell therapy is more effective than Mesenchymal stem cell therapy and neural stem cell therapy separately in treating the brain stroke in rats.

  10. Engraftment Outcomes after HPC Co-Culture with Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Osteoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew M. Cook

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Haematopoietic stem cell (HSC transplantation is an established cell-based therapy for a number of haematological diseases. To enhance this therapy, there is considerable interest in expanding HSCs in artificial niches prior to transplantation. This study compared murine HSC expansion supported through co-culture on monolayers of either undifferentiated mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs or osteoblasts. Sorted Lineage− Sca-1+ c-kit+ (LSK haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HPC demonstrated proliferative capacity on both stromal monolayers with the greatest expansion of LSK shown in cultures supported by osteoblast monolayers. After transplantation, both types of bulk-expanded cultures were capable of engrafting and repopulating lethally irradiated primary and secondary murine recipients. LSKs co-cultured on MSCs showed comparable, but not superior, reconstitution ability to that of freshly isolated LSKs. Surprisingly, however, osteoblast co-cultured LSKs showed significantly poorer haematopoietic reconstitution compared to LSKs co-cultured on MSCs, likely due to a delay in short-term reconstitution. We demonstrated that stromal monolayers can be used to maintain, but not expand, functional HSCs without a need for additional haematopoietic growth factors. We also demonstrated that despite apparently superior in vitro performance, co-injection of bulk cultures of osteoblasts and LSKs in vivo was detrimental to recipient survival and should be avoided in translation to clinical practice.

  11. Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Emerging Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Markert, Chad; Atala, Anthony; Cann, Jennifer K.; Christ, George; Furth, Mark; Ambrosio, Fabrisia; Childers, Martin K.

    2009-01-01

    Multipotent cells that can give rise to bone, cartilage, fat, connective tissue, skeletal and cardiac muscle are termed mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). These cells were first identified in the bone marrow, distinct from blood-forming stem cells. Based on the embryologic derivation, availability, and various pro-regenerative characteristics, research exploring their use in cell therapy shows great promise for patients with degenerative muscle diseases and a number of other conditions. In this r...

  12. Biomaterials Influence Macrophage-Mesenchymal Stem Cell Interaction In Vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Grotenhuis (Nienke); S.F. De Witte (Samantha Fh); G.J.V.M. van Osch (Gerjo); Y. Bayon (Yves); J.F. Lange (Johan); Y.M. Bastiaansen-Jenniskens (Yvonne)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Macrophages and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are important cells in wound healing. We hypothesized that the cross-talk between macrophages and adipose tissue-derived MSCs (ASCs) is biomaterial dependent, thereby influencing processes involved in wound healing. Materials and

  13. Mesenchymal stem cell ingrowth and differentiation on coralline hydroxyapatite scaffolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Tina; Stiehler, Maik; Baatrup, Anette

    2007-01-01

    Culture of osteogenic cells on a porous scaffold could offer a new solution to bone grafting using autologous human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) from the patient. We compared coralline hydroxyapatite scaffolds with pore sizes of 200 and 500 microm for expansion and differentiation of hMSCs. We...

  14. The role of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stroke is the third most common cause of death, and a leading cause of physical disability in adults. Recovery after a major stroke is usually limited, but cell therapy, especially by application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is emerging with fixed neurologic deficits. The aim of the current study was directed to isolation ...

  15. Research on human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PCR) technology, amplified hVEGF165 gene fragments from human leukemia cells HL-60. hVEGF165 gene was reconstructed in pIRES2-EGFP and transferred into the human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HPMSCs) by ...

  16. Identification of Pathways in Liver Repair Potentially Targeted by Secretory Proteins from Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Winkler

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The beneficial impact of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC on both acute and chronic liver diseases has been confirmed, although the molecular mechanisms behind it remain elusive. We aim to identify factors secreted by undifferentiated and hepatocytic differentiated MSC in vitro in order to delineate liver repair pathways potentially targeted by MSC. Methods: Secreted factors were determined by protein arrays and related pathways identified by biomathematical analyses. Results: MSC from adipose tissue and bone marrow expressed a similar pattern of surface markers. After hepatocytic differentiation, CD54 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1, ICAM-1 increased and CD166 (activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule, ALCAM decreased. MSC secreted different factors before and after differentiation. These comprised cytokines involved in innate immunity and growth factors regulating liver regeneration. Pathway analysis revealed cytokine-cytokine receptor interactions, chemokine signalling pathways, the complement and coagulation cascades as well as the Januskinase-signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STAT and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor (NOD-like receptor signalling pathways as relevant networks. Relationships to transforming growth factor β (TGF-β and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF1-α signalling seemed also relevant. Conclusion: MSC secreted proteins, which differed depending on cell source and degree of differentiation. The factors might address inflammatory and growth factor pathways as well as chemo-attraction and innate immunity. Since these are prone to dysregulation in most liver diseases, MSC release hepatotropic factors, potentially supporting liver regeneration.

  17. Chemical Activation of the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Reversibly Reduces Tendon Stem Cell Proliferation, Inhibits Their Differentiation, and Maintains Cell Undifferentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Menon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult stem cell-based therapeutic approaches for tissue regeneration have been proposed for several years. However, adult stem cells are usually limited in number and difficult to be expanded in vitro, and they usually tend to quickly lose their potency with passages, as they differentiate and become senescent. Culturing stem cells under reduced oxygen tensions (below 21% has been proposed as a tool to increase cell proliferation, but many studies reported opposite effects. In particular, cell response to hypoxia seems to be very stem cell type specific. Nonetheless, it is clear that a major role in this process is played by the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF, the master regulator of cell response to oxygen deprivation, which affects cell metabolism and differentiation. Herein, we report that a chemical activation of HIF in human tendon stem cells reduces their proliferation and inhibits their differentiation in a reversible and dose-dependent manner. These results support the notion that hypoxia, by activating HIF, plays a crucial role in preserving stem cells in an undifferentiated state in the “hypoxic niches” present in the tissue in which they reside before migrating in more oxygenated areas to heal a damaged tissue.

  18. Characterization and Evaluation of Neuronal Trans-Differentiation with Electrophysiological Properties of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Isolated from Porcine Endometrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra Baregundi Subbarao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial stromal cells (EMSCs obtained from porcine uterus (n = 6 were positive for mesenchymal stem cell markers (CD29, CD44 and CD90, and negative for epithelial marker CD9 and hematopoietic markers CD34, CD45 analyzed by flow cytometry. Further the cells were positive for expression of mesenchymal markers, CD105, CD140b, and CD144 by PCR. Pluripotent markers OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG were positively expressed in EMSCs analyzed by Western blotting and PCR. Further, differentiation into adipocytes and osteocytes was confirmed by cytochemical staining and lineage specific gene expression by quantitative realtime-PCR. Adipocyte (FABP, LPL, AP2 and osteocyte specific genes (ON, BG, RUNX2 in differentiated EMSCs showed significant (p < 0.05 increase in expression compared to undifferentiated control cells. Neurogenic transdifferentiation of EMSCs exhibited distinctive dendritic morphology with axon projections and neuronal specific genes, NFM, NGF, MBP, NES, B3T and MAP2 and proteins, B3T, NFM, NGF, and TRKA were positively expressed in neuronal differentiated cells. Functional analysis of neuronal differentiated EMSCs displayed voltage-dependence and kinetics for transient outward K+ currents (Ito, at holding potential of −80 mV, Na+ currents and during current clamp, neuronal differentiated EMSCs was more negative than that of control EMSCs. Porcine EMSCs is a suitable model for studying molecular mechanism of transdifferentiation, assessment of electrophysiological properties and their efficiency during in vivo transplantation.

  19. Monoclonal Antibodies against Differentiating Mesenchyme Cells in Larvae of the Ascidian Halocynthia roretzi

    OpenAIRE

    Gil Jung, Kim; Hiroki, Nishida; Department of Life Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta; Department of Life Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta

    1998-01-01

    Mechanisms of cell specification of mesenchyme during ascidian embryogenesis are poorly understood. This is because no good molecular markers have been available to evaluate differentiation of the mesenchyme cells. To obtain molecular markers of mesenchyme differentiation, we established monoclonal antibodies, Mch-1 and Mch-3, that recognize antigens present in the mesenchyme cells of the larva of Halocynthia roretzi. The antigens recognized by both antibodies start to be detectable in the me...

  20. Immunomodulatory effect of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on B cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella eFranquesa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The research on T cell immunosuppression therapies has attracted most of the attention in clinical transplantation. However, B cells and humoral immune responses are increasingly acknowledged as crucial mediators of chronic allograft rejection. Indeed, humoral immune responses can lead to renal allograft rejection even in patients whose cell-mediated immune responses are well controlled. On the other hand, newly studied B cell subsets with regulatory effects have been linked to tolerance achievement in transplantation. Better understanding of the regulatory and effector B cell responses may therefore lead to new therapeutic approaches.Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC are arising as a potent therapeutic tool in transplantation due to their regenerative and immunomodulatory properties. The research on MSCs has mainly focused on their effects on T cells and although data regarding the modulatory effects of MSCs on alloantigen-specific humoral response in humans is scarce, it has been demonstrated that MSCs significantly affect B cell functioning. In the present review we will analyze and discuss the results in this field.

  1. Biology and clinical utilization of mesenchymal progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.J. Minguell

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Within the complex cellular arrangement found in the bone marrow stroma there exists a subset of nonhematopoietic cells referred to as mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPC. These cells can be expanded ex vivo and induced, either in vitro or in vivo, to terminally differentiate into at least seven types of cells: osteocytes, chondrocytes, adipocytes, tenocytes, myotubes, astrocytes and hematopoietic-supporting stroma. This broad multipotentiality, the feasibility to obtain MPC from bone marrow, cord and peripheral blood and their transplantability support the impact that the use of MPC will have in clinical settings. However, a number of fundamental questions about the cellular and molecular biology of MPC still need to be resolved before these cells can be used for safe and effective cell and gene therapies intended to replace, repair or enhance the physiological function of the mesenchymal and/or hematopoietic systems.

  2. Raman spectroscopy uncovers biochemical tissue-related features of extracellular vesicles from mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualerzi, Alice; Niada, Stefania; Giannasi, Chiara; Picciolini, Silvia; Morasso, Carlo; Vanna, Renzo; Rossella, Valeria; Masserini, Massimo; Bedoni, Marzia; Ciceri, Fabio; Bernardo, Maria Ester; Brini, Anna Teresa; Gramatica, Furio

    2017-08-29

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) from mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are emerging as valuable therapeutic agents for tissue regeneration and immunomodulation, but their clinical applications have so far been limited by the technical restraints of current isolation and characterisation procedures. This study shows for the first time the successful application of Raman spectroscopy as label-free, sensitive and reproducible means of carrying out the routine bulk characterisation of MSC-derived vesicles before their use in vitro or in vivo, thus promoting the translation of EV research to clinical practice. The Raman spectra of the EVs of bone marrow and adipose tissue-derived MSCs were compared with human dermal fibroblast EVs in order to demonstrate the ability of the method to distinguish the vesicles of the three cytotypes automatically with an accuracy of 93.7%. Our data attribute a Raman fingerprint to EVs from undifferentiated and differentiated cells of diverse tissue origin, and provide insights into the biochemical characteristics of EVs from different sources and into the differential contribution of sphingomyelin, gangliosides and phosphatidilcholine to the Raman spectra themselves.

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of tendon disorders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machová-Urdzíková, Lucia; Lesný, Petr; Syková, Eva; Jendelová, Pavla

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 6, 8A (2013), s. 14-23 ISSN 1937-6871 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/10/0326 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : Tendinophaty * Mesenchymal Stem Cells * Tendon Rupture Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines

  4. Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells | Nasef ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have elicited a great clinical interest, particularly in the areas of regenerative medicine and induction of tolerance in allogeneic transplantation. Previous reports demonstrated the feasibility of transplanting MSCs, which generates new prospects in cellular therapy. Recently, injection of ...

  5. Proteomic techniques for characterisation of mesenchymal stem cell secretome.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kupcová Skalníková, Helena

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 12 (2013), s. 2196-2211 ISSN 0300-9084 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124; GA TA ČR TA01011466 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : mesenchymal stem cells * secretome * exosome * conditioned medium * proteomics Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.123, year: 2013

  6. Mesenchymal cells reactivate Snail1 expression to drive three-dimensional invasion programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rowe, R.G.; Li, X.Y.; Hu, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is required for mesodermal differentiation during development. The zinc-finger transcription factor, Snail1, can trigger EMT and is sufficient to transcriptionally reprogram epithelial cells toward a mesenchymal phenotype during neoplasia and fibrosis. Whet...

  7. Gravity, a regulation factor in the differentiation of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Yu-Min

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stem cell therapy has emerged as a potential therapeutic option for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, but many issues remain to be resolved, such as the amount of seed cells, committed differentiation and the efficiency. Several previous studies have focused on the study of chemical inducement microenvironments. In the present study, we investigated the effects of gravity on the differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs into force-sensitive or force-insensitive cells. Methods and results Rat BMSCs (rBMSCs were cultured under hypergravity or simulated microgravity (SMG conditions with or without inducement medium. The expression levels of the characteristic proteins were measured and analyzed using immunocytochemical, RT-PCR and Western-blot analyses. After treatment with 5-azacytidine and hypergravity, rBMSCs expressed more characteristic proteins of cardiomyocytes such as cTnT, GATA4 and β-MHC; however, fewer such proteins were seen with SMG. After treating rBMSCs with osteogenic inducer and hypergravity, there were marked increases in the expression levels of ColIA1, Cbfa1 and ALP. Reverse results were obtained with SMG. rBMSCs treated with adipogenic inducer and SMG expressed greater levels of PPARgamma. Greater levels of Cbfa1- or cTnT-positive cells were observed under hypergravity without inducer, as shown by FACS analysis. These results indicate that hypergravity induces differentiation of rBMSCs into force-sensitive cells (cardiomyocytes and osteoblasts, whereas SMG induces force-insensitive cells (adipocytes. Conclusion Taken together, we conclude that gravity is an important factor affecting the differentiation of rBMSCs; this provides a new avenue for mechanistic studies of stem cell differentiation and a new approach to obtain more committed differentiated or undifferentiated cells.

  8. Isolation of mesenchymal stem cells from equine umbilical cord blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Heerkens, Tammy; Thomsen, Preben Dybdahl

    2007-01-01

    . The hypothesis of this study was that equine MSCs could be isolated from fresh whole equine cord blood. Results: Cord blood was collected from 7 foals immediately after foaling. The mononuclear cell fraction was isolated by Ficoll density centrifugation and cultured in a DMEM low glucose based media at 38.5o......Background: There are no published studies on stem cells from equine cord blood although commercial storage of equine cord blood for future autologous stem cell transplantations is available. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been isolated from fresh umbilical cord blood of humans collected non......-invasively at the time of birth and from sheep cord blood collected invasively by a surgical intrauterine approach. Mesenchymal stem cells isolation percentage from frozen-thawed human cord blood is low and the future isolation percentage of MSCs from cryopreserved equine cord blood is therefore expectedly low...

  9. Cinnamtannin B-1 Promotes Migration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Accelerates Wound Healing in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Fujita

    Full Text Available Substances that enhance the migration of mesenchymal stem cells to damaged sites have the potential to improve the effectiveness of tissue repair. We previously found that ethanol extracts of Mallotus philippinensis bark promoted migration of mesenchymal stem cells and improved wound healing in a mouse model. We also demonstrated that bark extracts contain cinnamtannin B-1, a flavonoid with in vitro migratory activity against mesenchymal stem cells. However, the in vivo effects of cinnamtannin B-1 on the migration of mesenchymal stem cells and underlying mechanism of this action remain unknown. Therefore, we examined the effects of cinnamtannin B-1 on in vivo migration of mesenchymal stem cells and wound healing in mice. In addition, we characterized cinnamtannin B-1-induced migration of mesenchymal stem cells pharmacologically and structurally. The mobilization of endogenous mesenchymal stem cells into the blood circulation was enhanced in cinnamtannin B-1-treated mice as shown by flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood cells. Whole animal imaging analysis using luciferase-expressing mesenchymal stem cells as a tracer revealed that cinnamtannin B-1 increased the homing of mesenchymal stem cells to wounds and accelerated healing in a diabetic mouse model. Additionally, the cinnamtannin B-1-induced migration of mesenchymal stem cells was pharmacologically susceptible to inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, phospholipase C, lipoxygenase, and purines. Furthermore, biflavonoids with similar structural features to cinnamtannin B-1 also augmented the migration of mesenchymal stem cells by similar pharmacological mechanisms. These results demonstrate that cinnamtannin B-1 promoted mesenchymal stem cell migration in vivo and improved wound healing in mice. Furthermore, the results reveal that cinnamtannin B-1-induced migration of mesenchymal stem cells may be mediated by specific signaling pathways, and the flavonoid skeleton may be

  10. Cell therapy of congenital corneal diseases with umbilical mesenchymal stem cells: lumican null mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongshan Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Keratoplasty is the most effective treatment for corneal blindness, but suboptimal medical conditions and lack of qualified medical personnel and donated cornea often prevent the performance of corneal transplantation in developing countries. Our study aims to develop alternative treatment regimens for congenital corneal diseases of genetic mutation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human mesenchymal stem cells isolated from neonatal umbilical cords were transplanted to treat thin and cloudy corneas of lumican null mice. Transplantation of umbilical mesenchymal stem cells significantly improved corneal transparency and increased stromal thickness of lumican null mice, but human umbilical hematopoietic stem cells failed to do the same. Further studies revealed that collagen lamellae were re-organized in corneal stroma of lumican null mice after mesenchymal stem cell transplantation. Transplanted umbilical mesenchymal stem cells survived in the mouse corneal stroma for more than 3 months with little or no graft rejection. In addition, these cells assumed a keratocyte phenotype, e.g., dendritic morphology, quiescence, expression of keratocyte unique keratan sulfated keratocan and lumican, and CD34. Moreover, umbilical mesenchymal stem cell transplantation improved host keratocyte functions, which was verified by enhanced expression of keratocan and aldehyde dehydrogenase class 3A1 in lumican null mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Umbilical mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is a promising treatment for congenital corneal diseases involving keratocyte dysfunction. Unlike donated corneas, umbilical mesenchymal stem cells are easily isolated, expanded, stored, and can be quickly recovered from liquid nitrogen when a patient is in urgent need.

  11. Neural differentiation potential of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells: misleading marker gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montzka Katrin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In contrast to pluripotent embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells have been considered to be multipotent, being somewhat more restricted in their differentiation capacity and only giving rise to cell types related to their tissue of origin. Several studies, however, have reported that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are capable of transdifferentiating to neural cell types, effectively crossing normal lineage restriction boundaries. Such reports have been based on the detection of neural-related proteins by the differentiated MSCs. In order to assess the potential of human adult MSCs to undergo true differentiation to a neural lineage and to determine the degree of homogeneity between donor samples, we have used RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry to investigate the basal expression of a range of neural related mRNAs and proteins in populations of non-differentiated MSCs obtained from 4 donors. Results The expression analysis revealed that several of the commonly used marker genes from other studies like nestin, Enolase2 and microtubule associated protein 1b (MAP1b are already expressed by undifferentiated human MSCs. Furthermore, mRNA for some of the neural-related transcription factors, e.g. Engrailed-1 and Nurr1 were also strongly expressed. However, several other neural-related mRNAs (e.g. DRD2, enolase2, NFL and MBP could be identified, but not in all donor samples. Similarly, synaptic vesicle-related mRNA, STX1A could only be detected in 2 of the 4 undifferentiated donor hMSC samples. More significantly, each donor sample revealed a unique expression pattern, demonstrating a significant variation of marker expression. Conclusion The present study highlights the existence of an inter-donor variability of expression of neural-related markers in human MSC samples that has not previously been described. This donor-related heterogeneity might influence the reproducibility of transdifferentiation protocols as

  12. Obesity Determines the Immunophenotypic Profile and Functional Characteristics of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells From Adipose Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachón-Peña, Gisela; Serena, Carolina; Ejarque, Miriam; Petriz, Jordi; Duran, Xevi; Oliva-Olivera, W; Simó, Rafael; Tinahones, Francisco J; Fernández-Veledo, Sonia; Vendrell, Joan

    2016-04-01

    Adipose tissue is a major source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which possess a variety of properties that make them ideal candidates for regenerative and immunomodulatory therapies. Here, we compared the immunophenotypic profile of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) from lean and obese individuals, and explored its relationship with the apparent altered plasticity of hASCs. We also hypothesized that persistent hypoxia treatment of cultured hASCs may be necessary but not sufficient to drive significant changes in mature adipocytes. hASCs were obtained from subcutaneous adipose tissue of healthy, adult, female donors undergoing abdominal plastic surgery: lean (n=8; body mass index [BMI]: 23±1 kg/m2) and obese (n=8; BMI: 35±5 kg/m2). Cell surface marker expression, proliferation and migration capacity, and adipogenic differentiation potential of cultured hASCs at two different oxygen conditions were studied. Compared with lean-derived hASCs, obese-derived hASCs demonstrated increased proliferation and migration capacity but decreased lipid droplet accumulation, correlating with a higher expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-II and cluster of differentiation (CD) 106 and lower expression of CD29. Of interest, adipogenic differentiation modified CD106, CD49b, HLA-ABC surface protein expression, which was dependent on the donor's BMI. Additionally, low oxygen tension increased proliferation and migration of lean but not obese hASCs, which correlated with an altered CD36 and CD49b immunophenotypic profile. In summary, the differences observed in proliferation, migration, and differentiation capacity in obese hASCs occurred in parallel with changes in cell surface markers, both under basal conditions and during differentiation. Therefore, obesity is an important determinant of stem cell function independent of oxygen tension. The obesity-related hypoxic environment may have latent effects on human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs) with

  13. Absence of maternal cell contamination in mesenchymal stromal cell cultures derived from equine umbilical cord tissue

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vacková, Irena; Czerneková, V.; Tománek, M.; Navrátil, J.; Moško, Tibor; Nováková, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 8 (2014), s. 655-657 ISSN 0143-4004 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : maternal cell contamination * mesenchymal stromal cells * umbilical cord tissue Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.710, year: 2014

  14. Stem cell factor supports migration in canine mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enciso, Nathaly; Ostronoff, Luciana L K; Mejías, Guillermo; León, Leticia G; Fermín, María Luisa; Merino, Elena; Fragio, Cristina; Avedillo, Luis; Tejero, Concepción

    2018-03-01

    Adult Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) are cells that can be defined as multipotent cells able to differentiate into diverse lineages, under appropriate conditions. These cells have been widely used in regenerative medicine, both in preclinical and clinical settings. Initially discovered in bone marrow, MSC can now be isolated from a wide spectrum of adult and foetal tissues. Studies to evaluate the therapeutic potential of these cells are based on their ability to arrive to damaged tissues. In this paper we have done a comparative study analyzing proliferation, surface markers and OCT4, SOX9, RUNX2, PPARG genes expression in MSC cells from Bone marrow (BMMSC) and Adipose tissue (ASC). We also analyzed the role of Stem Cell Factor (SCF) on MSC proliferation and on ASCs metalloproteinases MMP-2, MMP-9 secretion. Healthy dogs were used as BMMSC donors, and ASC were collected from omentum during elective ovariohysterectomy surgery. Both cell types were cultured in IMDM medium with or without SCF, 10% Dog Serum (DS), and incubated at 38 °C with 5% CO2. Growth of BMMSCs and ASCs was exponential until 25-30 days. Flow citometry of MSCs revealed positive results for CD90 and negative for CD34, CD45 and MCH-II. Genes were evaluated by RT-PCR and metalloproteinases by zymografy. Our findings indicate morphological and immunological similarities as well as expression of genes from both origins on analyzed cells. Furthermore, SCF did not affect proliferation of MSCs, however it up-regulated MMP-2 and MMP-9 secretion in ASCs. These results suggest that metalloproteinases are possibly essential molecules pivoting migration.

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Nanofiber Scaffolds and Ocular Surface Reconstruction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holáň, Vladimír; Javorková, Eliška

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 5 (2013), s. 609-619 ISSN 1550-8943 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/11/0653; GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/1568 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) UK668012; GA MŠk(CZ) SVV 265211 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : mesenchymal stem cell s * limbal stem cell s * ocular surface injuries Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.214, year: 2013

  16. Implantation of undifferentiated and pre-differentiated human neural stem cells in the R6/2 transgenic mouse model of Huntington’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Akabawy Gehan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell therapy is a potential therapeutic approach for several neurodegenetative disease, including Huntington Disease (HD. To evaluate the putative efficacy of cell therapy in HD, most studies have used excitotoxic animal models with only a few studies having been conducted in genetic animal models. Genetically modified animals should provide a more accurate representation of human HD, as they emulate the genetic basis of its etiology. Results In this study, we aimed to assess the therapeutic potential of a human striatal neural stem cell line (STROC05 implanted in the R6/2 transgenic mouse model of HD. As DARPP-32 GABAergic output neurons are predominately lost in HD, STROC05 cells were also pre-differentiated using purmorphamine, a hedgehog agonist, to yield a greater number of DARPP-32 cells. A bilateral injection of 4.5x105 cells of either undifferentiated or pre-differentiated DARPP-32 cells, however, did not affect outcome compared to a vehicle control injection. Both survival and neuronal differentiation remained poor with a mean of only 161 and 81 cells surviving in the undifferentiated and differentiated conditions respectively. Only a few cells expressed the neuronal marker Fox3. Conclusions Although the rapid brain atrophy and short life-span of the R6/2 model constitute adverse conditions to detect potentially delayed treatment effects, significant technical hurdles, such as poor cell survival and differentiation, were also sub-optimal. Further consideration of these aspects is therefore needed in more enduring transgenic HD models to provide a definite assessment of this cell line’s therapeutic relevance. However, a combination of treatments is likely needed to affect outcome in transgenic models of HD.

  17. Potential uses for cord blood mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrabi, Morteza; Mousavi, Seyed Hadi; Abroun, Saeid; Sadeghi, Bahareh

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is a powerful technique for the treatment of a number of diseases. Stem cells are derived from different tissue sources, the most important of which are the bone marrow (BM), umbilical cord (UC) blood and liver. Human UC mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) are multipotent, non-hematopoietic stem cells that have the ability to self-renew and differentiate into other cells and tissues such as osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondroblasts. In a number of reports, human and mouse models of disease have hUC-MSCs treatments. In this article, we review studies that pertain to the use of hUC-MSCs as treatment for diseases.

  18. Isolation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Adipose Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Andi Asadul

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In searching for the best source of stem cells, researcher found adipose stem cells as one of the ideal source due to its easiness in harvesting and its potential for differentiating into other cell lineage. METHODS: We isolated stem cells from adipose tissue, cultured and confirmed its immunophenotype using polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Cluster of differentiation (CD)44, CD73, CD90, CD105 were expressed, which represent immunophenotype of mesenchymal stem cells.  CONCLUSION...

  19. Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated functional tooth regeneration in swine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Sonoyama

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration is a promising approach for regenerative medicine for a wide range of applications. Here we report a new population of stem cells isolated from the root apical papilla of human teeth (SCAP, stem cells from apical papilla. Using a minipig model, we transplanted both human SCAP and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs to generate a root/periodontal complex capable of supporting a porcelain crown, resulting in normal tooth function. This work integrates a stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration strategy, engineered materials for structure, and current dental crown technologies. This hybridized tissue engineering approach led to recovery of tooth strength and appearance.

  20. Mesenchymal stem cells as therapeutic delivery vehicles targeting tumor stroma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Christensen, Rikke; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2011-01-01

    better understanding and in vivo supporting data. The homing ability of hMSCs was investigated by creating a human xenograft model by transplanting an ovarian cancer cell line into immunocompromised mice. Then, genetically engineered hMSC-telo1 cells were injected through the tail vein......The field of stem cell biology continues to evolve by characterization of further types of stem cells and by exploring their therapeutic potential for experimental and clinical applications. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are one of the most promising candidates simply because...

  1. Nuclear organization during in vitro differentiation of porcine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachecka, Joanna; Walczak, Agnieszka; Kociucka, Beata; Ruszczycki, Błażej; Wilczyński, Grzegorz; Szczerbal, Izabela

    2018-02-01

    showed no significant changes when compared to undifferentiated and mature fat cells. In addition, the presence of a low number of PML bodies was characteristic of the studied porcine mesenchymal stem cell adipogenesis system. It has been shown that the arrangement of selected components of nuclear architecture was very similar in MSCs derived from different sources, whereas adipocyte differentiation involves nuclear reorganization. This study adds new data on nuclear organization during adipogenesis using the pig as a model organism.

  2. Impact of copper oxide nanomaterials on differentiated and undifferentiated Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells; assessment of cytotoxicity, barrier integrity, cytokine production and nanomaterial penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ude, Victor C; Brown, David M; Viale, Luca; Kanase, Nilesh; Stone, Vicki; Johnston, Helinor J

    2017-08-23

    Copper oxide nanomaterials (CuO NMs) are exploited in a diverse array of products including antimicrobials, inks, cosmetics, textiles and food contact materials. There is therefore a need to assess the toxicity of CuO NMs to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract since exposure could occur via direct oral ingestion, mucocillary clearance (following inhalation) or hand to mouth contact. Undifferentiated Caco-2 intestinal cells were exposed to CuO NMs (10 nm) at concentrations ranging from 0.37 to 78.13 μg/cm 2 Cu (equivalent to 1.95 to 250 μg/ml) and cell viability assessed 24 h post exposure using the alamar blue assay. The benchmark dose (BMD 20), determined using PROAST software, was identified as 4.44 μg/cm 2 for CuO NMs, and 4.25 μg/cm 2 for copper sulphate (CuSO 4 ), which informed the selection of concentrations for further studies. The differentiation status of cells and the impact of CuO NMs and CuSO 4 on the integrity of the differentiated Caco-2 cell monolayer were assessed by measurement of trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER), staining for Zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and imaging of cell morphology using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The impact of CuO NMs and CuSO 4 on the viability of differentiated cells was performed via assessment of cell number (DAPI staining), and visualisation of cell morphology (light microscopy). Interleukin-8 (IL-8) production by undifferentiated and differentiated Caco-2 cells following exposure to CuO NMs and CuSO 4 was determined using an ELISA. The copper concentration in the cell lysate, apical and basolateral compartments were measured with Inductive Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) and used to calculate the apparent permeability coefficient (P app ); a measure of barrier permeability to CuO NMs. For all experiments, CuSO 4 was used as an ionic control. CuO NMs and CuSO 4 caused a concentration dependent decrease in cell viability in undifferentiated cells. CuO NMs and CuSO 4

  3. Comparative Quantification of the Surfaceome of Human Multipotent Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca J. Holley

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal progenitor cells have great therapeutic potential, yet incomplete characterization of their cell-surface interface limits their clinical exploitation. We have employed subcellular fractionation with quantitative discovery proteomics to define the cell-surface interface proteome of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs and human umbilical cord perivascular cells (HUCPVCs. We compared cell-surface-enriched fractions from MSCs and HUCPVCs (three donors each with adult mesenchymal fibroblasts using eight-channel isobaric-tagging mass spectrometry, yielding relative quantification on >6,000 proteins with high confidence. This approach identified 186 upregulated mesenchymal progenitor biomarkers. Validation of 10 of these markers, including ROR2, EPHA2, and PLXNA2, confirmed upregulated expression in mesenchymal progenitor populations and distinct roles in progenitor cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Our approach has delivered a cell-surface proteome repository that now enables improved selection and characterization of human mesenchymal progenitor populations.

  4. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition in human endocrine islet cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Moreno-Amador

    Full Text Available β-cells undergo an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT when expanded in monolayer culture and give rise to highly proliferative mesenchymal cells that retain the potential to re-differentiate into insulin-producing cells.To investigate whether EMT takes place in the endocrine non-β cells of human islets.Human islets isolated from 12 multiorgan donors were dissociated into single cells, purified by magnetic cell sorting, and cultured in monolayer.Co-expression of insulin and the mesenchymal marker vimentin was identified within the first passage (p1 and increased subsequently (insulin+vimentin+ 7.2±6% at p1; 43±15% at p4. The endocrine non-β-cells did also co-express vimentin (glucagon+vimentin+ 59±1.5% and 93±6%, somatostatin+vimentin+ 16±9.4% and 90±10% at p1 and p4 respectively; PP+vimentin+ 74±14% at p1; 88±12% at p2. The percentage of cells expressing only endocrine markers was progressively reduced (0.6±0.2% insulin+, 0.2±0.1% glucagon+, and 0.3±0.2% somatostatin+ cells at p4, and 0.7±0.3% PP+ cells at p2. Changes in gene expression were also indicated of EMT, with reduced expression of endocrine markers and the epithelial marker CDH-1 (p<0.01, and increased expression of mesenchymal markers (CDH-2, SNAI2, ZEB1, ZEB2, VIM, NT5E and ACTA2; p<0.05. Treatment with the EMT inhibitor A83-01 significantly reduced the percentage of co-expressing cells and preserved the expression of endocrine markers.In adult human islets, all four endocrine islet cell types undergo EMT when islet cells are expanded in monolayer conditions. The presence of EMT in all islet endocrine cells could be relevant to design of strategies aiming to re-differentiate the expanded islet cells towards a β-cell phenotype.

  5. Applications of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Oral and Craniofacial Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakoori, Pasha; Zhang, Quanzhou; Le, Anh D

    2017-02-01

    The field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine has been rapidly expanded through multidisciplinary integration of research and clinical practice in response to unmet clinical needs for reconstruction of dental, oral, and craniofacial structures. The significance of the various types of stem cells, specifically mesenchymal stem cells derived from the orofacial tissues, ranging from dental pulp stem cells to periodontal ligament stem cells to mucosa/gingiva has been thoroughly investigated and their applications in tissue regeneration are outlined in this article. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of mesenchymal stem cell secreted PAI-1 on colon cancer cell migration and proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Niamh M; Joyce, Myles R; Murphy, J Mary; Barry, Frank P; O'Brien, Timothy; Kerin, Michael J; Dwyer, Roisin M

    2013-06-14

    Mesenchymal Stem Cells are known to engraft and integrate into the architecture of colorectal tumours, with little known regarding their fate following engraftment. This study aimed to investigate mediators of Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) and colon cancer cell (CCC) interactions. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and colon cancer cells (HT29 and HCT-116) were cultured individually or in co-culture on 3-dimensional scaffolds. Conditioned media containing all secreted factors was harvested at day 1, 3 and 7. Chemokine secretion and expression were analyzed by Chemi-array, ELISA (Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1)) and RQ-PCR. Colon cancer cell migration and proliferation in response to recombinant PAI-1, MSCs and MSCs+antibody to PAI-1 was analyzed using Transwell inserts and an MTS proliferation assay respectively. Chemi-array revealed secretion of a wide range of factors by each cell population, including PAI-1 and MIF. ELISA analysis revealed Mesenchymal Stem Cells to secrete the highest levels of PAI-1 (MSC mean 10.6 ng/mL, CCC mean 1.01 ng/mL), while colon cancer cells were the principal source of MIF. MSC-secreted PAI-1 stimulated significant migration of both CCC lines, with an antibody to the chemokine shown to block this effect (67-88% blocking,). A cell-line dependant effect on CCC proliferation was shown for Mesenchymal Stem Cell-secreted PAI-1 with HCT-116 cells showing decreased proliferation at all concentrations, and HT29 cells showing increased proliferation in the presence of higher PAI-1 levels. This is the first study to identify PAI-1 as an important mediator of Mesenchymal Stem Cell/colon cancer cell interactions and highlights the significant functional impact of Mesenchymal Stem Cell-secreted PAI-1 on colon cancer cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Uneven distribution pattern and increasing numbers of mesenchyme cells during development in the starfish, Asterina pectinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamanaka, Gen; Hosaka, Eri; Kuraishi, Ritsu; Hosoya, Natsumi; Matsumoto, Midori; Kaneko, Hiroyuki

    2011-04-01

    During development, the embryos and larvae of the starfish Asterina pectinifera possess a single type of mesenchyme cell. The aim of this study was to determine the patterns of behavior of mesenchyme cells during the formation of various organs. To this end, we used a monoclonal antibody (mesenchyme cell marker) to identify the distribution patterns and numbers of mesenchyme cells. Our results revealed the following: (i) mesenchyme cell behavior differs in the formation of different organs, showing temporal variations and an uneven pattern of distribution; and (ii) mesenchyme cells continue to be generated throughout development, and their numbers are tightly regulated in proportion to total cell numbers. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  8. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John Isaacs; Jeffrey Karp ...clinical trials for CRPC. The team is composed of Drs. Jeffrey Karp Co-Director of Regenerative Therapeutics at the Brigham & Women’s Hospital...encapsulating a PSA-activated thapsigargin-based prodrug (G115, Fig. 5) were generated by the Karp lab with the properties outlined in Table 7. These

  9. Induction of mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenesis by polyacrylate substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Glennon-Alty, Laurence; Williams, Rachel; Dixon, Simon; Murray, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can generate chondrocytes in vitro, but typically need to be cultured as aggregates in the presence of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-?), which makes scale-up difficult. Here we investigated if polyacrylate substrates modelled on the functional group composition and distribution of the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) integrin-binding site could induce MSCs to undergo chondrogenesis in the absence of exogenous TGF-?. Within a few days of culture on the biomimetic polyacry...

  10. The Alliance of Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Bone, and Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Napoli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone fragility has emerged as a new complication of diabetes. Several mechanisms in diabetes may influence bone homeostasis by impairing the action between osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes and/or changing the structural properties of the bone tissue. Some of these mechanisms can potentially alter the fate of mesenchymal stem cells, the initial precursor of the osteoblast. In this review, we describe the main factors that impair bone health in diabetic patients and their clinical impact.

  11. Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have elicited a great clinical interest, particularly in the areas of regenerative medicine and induction of tolerance in allogeneic transplantation. Previous reports demonstrated the feasibility of transplanting MSCs, which generates new prospects in cellular therapy. Recently, injection of MSCs induced remission of steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. This review summarizes the knowledge and possible future clinical uses of MSCs.

  12. Establishment of mesenchymal cell line derived from human developing odontoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatano, H; Kudo, Y; Ogawa, I; Shimasue, H; Shigeishi, H; Ohta, K; Higashikawa, K; Takechi, M; Takata, T; Kamata, N

    2012-11-01

    An odontoma, which shows proliferating odontogenic epithelium and mesenchymal tissue, is one of the most common odontogenic tumors encountered. These are commonly found in tooth-bearing regions, although the etiology remains unknown. There are no previous reports of an established line of immortalized human odontoma cells. Using odontoma fragments obtained from a girl treated at our department, we established an immortalized human odontoma cell line and investigated cell morphology, dynamic proliferation, the presence of contamination, and karyotype. Moreover, cell characterization was examined using osteogenic and odontogenic markers. We successfully established a mesenchymal odontoma cell (mOd cells). The cells were found to be fibroblastic and had a high level of telomerase activity. Cell growth was confirmed after more than 200 population doublings without significant growth retardation. mOd cells expressed mRNA for differentiation markers, including collagen type I (COLI), alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, osteopontin, osteocalcin, cementum-derived protein (CP-23), dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), and distal-less homeobox 3 (DLX3), as well as bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). In addition, they showed a high level of calcified nodule formation activity in vitro. We successfully established a cell line that may be useful for investigating the mechanisms of normal odontogenesis as well as characteristics of odontoma tumors. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Mesenchymal cells recruit and regulate T regulatory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ianni, Mauro; Del Papa, Beatrice; De Ioanni, Maria; Moretti, Lorenzo; Bonifacio, Elisabetta; Cecchini, Debora; Sportoletti, Paolo; Falzetti, Franca; Tabilio, Antonio

    2008-03-01

    Despite much investigation into T regulatory cells (Tregs), little is known about the mechanism controlling their recruitment and function. Because multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) exert an immune regulatory function and suppress T-cell proliferation, this in vitro study investigated their role in Treg recruitment and function. Human MSCs and different T cell populations (CD3(+), CD3(+)/CD45RA(+), CD3(+)/CD45RO(+), CD4(+)/CD25(+), CD4(+)/CD25(+)/CD45RO(+), CD4(+)/CD25(+)/CD45RA(+)) from healthy donors were cocultured for up to 15 days. Harvested lymphocytes were analyzed by flow cytometry and FoxP3 and CD127 expressions were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Their regulatory activity was assessed. We demonstrate MSC recruit Tregs from a fraction of CD3(+) and from immunoselected CD3(+)/CD45RA(+) and CD3(+)/CD45RO(+) fractions. After culture with MSCs both immunoselected fractions registered increases in the CD4(+)/CD25(bright)/FoxP3 subset and CD127 expression was downregulated. When purified Treg populations (CD4/CD25(+), CD4/CD25(+)/CD45RA(+), and CD4/CD25(+)/CD45RO(+)) are used in MSC cocultures, they maintain FoxP3 expression and CD127 expression is downregulated. Treg suppressive capacity was maintained in Treg populations that were layered on MSC for up to 15 days while control Tregs lost all suppressive activity after 5 days culture. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that MSCs recruit, regulate, and maintain T-regulatory phenotype and function over time.

  14. Surface-Functionalized Silk Fibroin Films as a Platform To Guide Neuron-like Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchineella, Shivaprasad; Thrivikraman, Greeshma; Basu, Bikramjit; Govindaraju, T

    2016-09-07

    Surface interactions at the biomaterial-cellular interface determine the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells. Manipulating such interactions through the surface chemistry of scaffolds renders control over directed stem cell differentiation into the cell lineage of interest. This approach is of central importance for stem cell-based tissue engineering and regenerative therapy applications. In the present study, silk fibroin films (SFFs) decorated with integrin-binding laminin peptide motifs (YIGSR and GYIGSR) were prepared and employed for in vitro adult stem cell-based neural tissue engineering applications. Functionalization of SFFs with short peptides showcased the peptide sequence and nature of functionalization-dependent differentiation of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Intriguingly, covalently functionalized SFFs with GYIGSR hexapeptide (CL2-SFF) supported hMSC proliferation and maintenance in an undifferentiated pluripotent state and directed the differentiation of hMSCs into neuron-like cells in the presence of a biochemical cue, on-demand. The observed morphological changes were further corroborated by the up-regulation of neuronal-specific marker gene expression (MAP2, TUBB3, NEFL), confirmed through semiquantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. The enhanced proliferation and on-demand directed differentiation of adult stem cells (hMSCs) by the use of an economically viable short recognition peptide (GYIGSR), as opposed to the integrin recognition protein laminin, establishes the potential of SFFs for neural tissue engineering and regenerative therapy applications.

  15. Effect of antibiotics against Mycoplasma sp. on human embryonic stem cells undifferentiated status, pluripotency, cell viability and growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Romorini

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are self-renewing pluripotent cells that can differentiate into specialized cells and hold great promise as models for human development and disease studies, cell-replacement therapies, drug discovery and in vitro cytotoxicity tests. The culture and differentiation of these cells are both complex and expensive, so it is essential to extreme aseptic conditions. hESCs are susceptible to Mycoplasma sp. infection, which is hard to detect and alters stem cell-associated properties. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the efficacy and cytotoxic effect of Plasmocin(TM and ciprofloxacin (specific antibiotics used for Mycoplasma sp. eradication on hESCs. Mycoplasma sp. infected HUES-5 884 (H5 884, stable hESCs H5-brachyury promoter-GFP line cells were effectively cured with a 14 days Plasmocin(TM 25 µg/ml treatment (curative treatment while maintaining stemness characteristic features. Furthermore, cured H5 884 cells exhibit the same karyotype as the parental H5 line and expressed GFP, through up-regulation of brachyury promoter, at day 4 of differentiation onset. Moreover, H5 cells treated with ciprofloxacin 10 µg/ml for 14 days (mimic of curative treatment and H5 and WA09 (H9 hESCs treated with Plasmocin(TM 5 µg/ml (prophylactic treatment for 5 passages retained hESCs features, as judged by the expression of stemness-related genes (TRA1-60, TRA1-81, SSEA-4, Oct-4, Nanog at mRNA and protein levels. In addition, the presence of specific markers of the three germ layers (brachyury, Nkx2.5 and cTnT: mesoderm; AFP: endoderm; nestin and Pax-6: ectoderm was verified in in vitro differentiated antibiotic-treated hESCs. In conclusion, we found that Plasmocin(TM and ciprofloxacin do not affect hESCs stemness and pluripotency nor cell viability. However, curative treatments slightly diminished cell growth rate. This cytotoxic effect was reversible as cells regained normal growth rate upon antibiotic withdrawal.

  16. Effect of antibiotics against Mycoplasma sp. on human embryonic stem cells undifferentiated status, pluripotency, cell viability and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romorini, Leonardo; Riva, Diego Ariel; Blüguermann, Carolina; Videla Richardson, Guillermo Agustin; Scassa, Maria Elida; Sevlever, Gustavo Emilio; Miriuka, Santiago Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are self-renewing pluripotent cells that can differentiate into specialized cells and hold great promise as models for human development and disease studies, cell-replacement therapies, drug discovery and in vitro cytotoxicity tests. The culture and differentiation of these cells are both complex and expensive, so it is essential to extreme aseptic conditions. hESCs are susceptible to Mycoplasma sp. infection, which is hard to detect and alters stem cell-associated properties. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the efficacy and cytotoxic effect of Plasmocin(TM) and ciprofloxacin (specific antibiotics used for Mycoplasma sp. eradication) on hESCs. Mycoplasma sp. infected HUES-5 884 (H5 884, stable hESCs H5-brachyury promoter-GFP line) cells were effectively cured with a 14 days Plasmocin(TM) 25 µg/ml treatment (curative treatment) while maintaining stemness characteristic features. Furthermore, cured H5 884 cells exhibit the same karyotype as the parental H5 line and expressed GFP, through up-regulation of brachyury promoter, at day 4 of differentiation onset. Moreover, H5 cells treated with ciprofloxacin 10 µg/ml for 14 days (mimic of curative treatment) and H5 and WA09 (H9) hESCs treated with Plasmocin(TM) 5 µg/ml (prophylactic treatment) for 5 passages retained hESCs features, as judged by the expression of stemness-related genes (TRA1-60, TRA1-81, SSEA-4, Oct-4, Nanog) at mRNA and protein levels. In addition, the presence of specific markers of the three germ layers (brachyury, Nkx2.5 and cTnT: mesoderm; AFP: endoderm; nestin and Pax-6: ectoderm) was verified in in vitro differentiated antibiotic-treated hESCs. In conclusion, we found that Plasmocin(TM) and ciprofloxacin do not affect hESCs stemness and pluripotency nor cell viability. However, curative treatments slightly diminished cell growth rate. This cytotoxic effect was reversible as cells regained normal growth rate upon antibiotic withdrawal.

  17. Transplantation of neuronal-primed human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in hemiparkinsonian rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa L M Khoo

    Full Text Available Bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs have shown promise in in vitro neuronal differentiation and in cellular therapy for neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson' disease. However, the effects of intracerebral transplantation are not well defined, and studies do not agreed on the optimal neuronal differentiation method. Here, we investigated three growth factor-based neuronal differentiation procedures (using FGF-2/EGF/PDGF/SHH/FGF-8/GDNF, and found all to be capable of eliciting an immature neural phenotype, in terms of cell morphology and gene/protein expression. The neuronal-priming (FGF-2/EGF method induced neurosphere-like formation and the highest NES and NR4A2 expression by hMSCs. Transplantation of undifferentiated and neuronal-primed hMSCs into the striatum and substantia nigra of 6-OHDA-lesioned hemiparkinsonian rats revealed transient graft survival of 7 days, despite the reported immunosuppressive properties of MSCs and cyclosporine-immunosuppression of rats. Neither differentiation of hMSCs nor induction of host neurogenesis was observed at injection sites, and hMSCs continued producing mesodermal fibronectin. Strategies for improving engraftment and differentiation post-transplantation, such as prior in vitro neuronal-priming, nigral and striatal grafting, and co-transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells that promote neural regeneration, were unable to provide advantages. Innate inflammatory responses (Iba-1-positive microglia/macrophage and GFAP-positive astrocyte activation and accumulation were detected around grafts within 7 days. Our findings indicate that growth factor-based methods allow hMSC differentiation toward immature neuronal-like cells, and contrary to previous reports, only transient survival and engraftment of hMSCs occurs following transplantation in immunosuppressed hemiparkinsonian rats. In addition, suppression of host innate inflammatory responses may be a key factor for

  18. Comparison of different culture conditions for human mesenchymal stromal cells for clinical stem cell therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sorensen, M.; Friis, T.; Bindslev, L.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from adult bone marrow (BM) are considered potential candidates for therapeutic neovascularization in cardiovascular disease. When implementing results from animal trials in clinical treatment, it is essential to isolate and expand the MSCs under...

  19. Role of cell-matrix contacts in cell migration and epithelial-mesenchymal transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, E D

    1990-12-02

    Epithelial cells make contact with extracellular matrix via receptors on the basal surface that interact with the basal actin cortex. In 3D matrix, the mesenchymal cell makes contact with matrix all around its circumference via similar receptors. When moving, the fibroblasts is constantly constructing a new front end. We postulate in a 'fixed cortex' theory of cell motility that the circumferential actin cortex is firmly attached to matrix and that the myosin-rich endoplasm slides past it into the continually forming new front end. During epithelial-mesenchymal transformation, the presumptive mesenchymal cell seems to turn on the new front end mechanism as a way of emigrating from the epithelium into the underlying matrix with which it makes 'fixed' contacts. Master genes may exist that regulate the expression of epithelial genes on the one hand, and mesenchymal genes on the other.

  20. Implications of mesenchymal stem cells in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariminekoo, Saber; Movassaghpour, Aliakbar; Rahimzadeh, Amirbahman; Talebi, Mehdi; Shamsasenjan, Karim; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-05-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a population of multipotent progenitors which reside in bone marrow, fat, and some other tissues and can be isolated from various adult and fetal tissues. Self-renewal potential and multipotency are MSC's hallmarks. They have the capacity of proliferation and differentiation into a variety of cell lineages like osteoblasts, condrocytes, adipocytes, fibroblasts, cardiomyocytes. MSCs can be identified by expression of some surface molecules like CD73, CD90, CD105, and lack of hematopoietic specific markers including CD34, CD45, and HLA-DR. They are hopeful tools for regenerative medicine for repairing injured tissues. Many studies have focused on two significant features of MSC therapy: (I) systemically administered MSCs home to sites of ischemia or injury, and (II) MSCs can modulate T-cell-mediated immunological responses. MSCs express chemokine receptors and ligands involved in cells migration and homing process. MSCs induce immunomedulatory effects on the innate (dendritic cells, monocyte, natural killer cells, and neutrophils) and the adaptive immune system cells (T helper-1, cytotoxic T lymphocyte, and B lymphocyte) by secreting soluble factors like TGF-β, IL-10, IDO, PGE-2, sHLA-G5, or by cell-cell interaction. In this review, we discuss the main applications of mesenchymal stem in Regenerative Medicine and known mechanisms of homing and Immunomodulation of MSCs.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells in diabetes treatment: progress and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu CHENG

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disorder caused by relative or absolute insulin deficient or reduced sensitivity of target cells to insulin. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are adult stem cells with multiple differentiation potential, self-renewable and immunoregulatory properties. Accumulating evidences from clinic or animal experiments recent years showed that MSCs infusion could ameliorate hyperglycemia in diabetes. The research progress of MSCs in diabetes treatment is summarized and a corresponding perspective is herewith proposed in present paper. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.07.16

  2. Human bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha; Abdallah, Basem M

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a group of cells present in bone-marrow stroma and the stroma of various organs with the capacity for mesoderm-like cell differentiation into, for example, osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. MSC are being introduced in the clinic for the treatment...... of a variety of clinical conditions. The aim of this review is to provide an update regarding the biology of MSC, their identification and culture, and mechanisms controlling their proliferation and differentiation. We also review the current status of their clinical use. Areas in which research is needed...

  3. Mesenchymal stromal cell therapy in ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Jens; Mygind, Naja Dam; Ali Qayyum, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    is very costly for the health care system. Therefore, new treatment options and strategies are being researched intensely. Stem cell therapy to improve myocardial perfusion and stimulate growth of new cardiomyocytes could be a new way to go. Nevertheless, the results from clinical studies have varied...... considerably, probably due to the use of many different cell lines obtained from different tissues and the different patient populations. The present review will focus on treatment with the mesenchymal stromal cell from bone marrow and adipose tissue in animal and patients with acute and chronic IHD (CIHD)....

  4. The mechanosensor of mesenchymal stem cells: mechanosensitive channel or cytoskeleton?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, E; Chen, Chider; Zhang, Yi

    2016-09-20

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent adult stem cells. MSCs and their potential for use in regenerative medicine have been investigated extensively. Recently, the mechanisms by which MSCs detect mechanical stimuli have been described in detail. As in other cell types, both mechanosensitive channels, such as transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7), and the cytoskeleton, including actin and actomyosin, have been implicated in mechanosensation in MSCs. This review will focus on discussing the precise role of TRPM7 and the cytoskeleton in mechanosensation in MSCs.

  5. Cell Fate and Differentiation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoichiro Kokabu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoblasts and bone marrow adipocytes originate from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs and there appears to be a reciprocal relationship between adipogenesis and osteoblastogenesis. Alterations in the balance between adipogenesis and osteoblastogenesis in BMMSCs wherein adipogenesis is increased relative to osteoblastogenesis are associated with decreased bone quality and quantity. Several proteins have been reported to regulate this reciprocal relationship but the exact nature of the signals regulating the balance between osteoblast and adipocyte formation within the bone marrow space remains to be determined. In this review, we focus on the role of Transducin-Like Enhancer of Split 3 (TLE3, which was recently reported to regulate the balance between osteoblast and adipocyte formation from BMMSCs. We also discuss evidence implicating canonical Wnt signalling, which plays important roles in both adipogenesis and osteoblastogenesis, in regulating TLE3 expression. Currently, there is demand for new effective therapies that target the stimulation of osteoblast differentiation to enhance bone formation. We speculate that reducing TLE3 expression or activity in BMMSCs could be a useful approach towards increasing osteoblast numbers and reducing adipogenesis in the bone marrow environment.

  6. Comparison of different culture conditions for human mesenchymal stromal cells for clinical stem cell therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sorensen, M.; Friis, T.; Bindslev, L.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from adult bone marrow (BM) are considered potential candidates for therapeutic neovascularization in cardiovascular disease. When implementing results from animal trials in clinical treatment, it is essential to isolate and expand the MSCs under...... compliant medium for MSC cultivation, expansion and differentiation. The expanded and differentiated MSCs can be used in autologous mesenchymal stromal cell therapy in patients with ischaemic heart disease Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  7. TrkAIII Promotes Microtubule Nucleation and Assembly at the Centrosome in SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells, Contributing to an Undifferentiated Anaplastic Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Antonietta R.; Di Ianni, Natalia; Cappabianca, Lucia; Ruggeri, Pierdomenico; Ragone, Marzia; Ianni, Giulia; Gulino, Alberto; Mackay, Andrew R.

    2013-01-01

    The alternative TrkAIII splice variant is expressed by advanced stage human neuroblastomas (NBs) and exhibits oncogenic activity in NB models. In the present study, employing stable transfected cell lines and assays of indirect immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, Western blotting, microtubule regrowth, tubulin kinase, and tubulin polymerisation, we report that TrkAIII binds α-tubulin and promotes MT nucleation and assembly at the centrosome. This effect depends upon spontaneous TrkAIII activity, TrkAIII localisation to the centrosome and pericentrosomal area, and the capacity of TrkAIII to bind, phosphorylate, and polymerise tubulin. We propose that this novel role for TrkAIII contributes to MT involvement in the promotion and maintenance of an undifferentiated anaplastic NB cell morphology by restricting and augmenting MT nucleation and assembly at the centrosomal MTOC. PMID:23841091

  8. TrkAIII Promotes Microtubule Nucleation and Assembly at the Centrosome in SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells, Contributing to an Undifferentiated Anaplastic Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonietta R. Farina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The alternative TrkAIII splice variant is expressed by advanced stage human neuroblastomas (NBs and exhibits oncogenic activity in NB models. In the present study, employing stable transfected cell lines and assays of indirect immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, Western blotting, microtubule regrowth, tubulin kinase, and tubulin polymerisation, we report that TrkAIII binds α-tubulin and promotes MT nucleation and assembly at the centrosome. This effect depends upon spontaneous TrkAIII activity, TrkAIII localisation to the centrosome and pericentrosomal area, and the capacity of TrkAIII to bind, phosphorylate, and polymerise tubulin. We propose that this novel role for TrkAIII contributes to MT involvement in the promotion and maintenance of an undifferentiated anaplastic NB cell morphology by restricting and augmenting MT nucleation and assembly at the centrosomal MTOC.

  9. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell therapy in ischemic stroke: mechanisms of action and treatment optimization strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guihong Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal and clinical studies have confirmed the therapeutic effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cerebral ischemia, but their mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. Here, we summarize the transplantation approaches, directional migration, differentiation, replacement, neural circuit reconstruction, angiogenesis, neurotrophic factor secretion, apoptosis, immunomodulation, multiple mechanisms of action, and optimization strategies for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of ischemic stroke. We also explore the safety of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation and conclude that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is an important direction for future treatment of cerebral ischemia. Determining the optimal timing and dose for the transplantation are important directions for future research.

  10. Origins and Properties of Dental, Thymic, and Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Cells and Their Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komada, Yukiya; Yamane, Toshiyuki; Kadota, Daiji; Isono, Kana; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi; Yamazaki, Hidetoshi

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal cells arise from the neural crest (NC) or mesoderm. However, it is difficult to distinguish NC-derived cells from mesoderm-derived cells. Using double-transgenic mouse systems encoding P0-Cre, Wnt1-Cre, Mesp1-Cre, and Rosa26EYFP, which enabled us to trace NC-derived or mesoderm-derived cells as YFP-expressing cells, we demonstrated for the first time that both NC-derived (P0- or Wnt1-labeled) and mesoderm-derived (Mesp1-labeled) cells contribute to the development of dental, thymic, and bone marrow (BM) mesenchyme from the fetal stage to the adult stage. Irrespective of the tissues involved, NC-derived and mesoderm-derived cells contributed mainly to perivascular cells and endothelial cells, respectively. Dental and thymic mesenchyme were composed of either NC-derived or mesoderm-derived cells, whereas half of the BM mesenchyme was composed of cells that were not derived from the NC or mesoderm. However, a colony-forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F) assay indicated that CFU-Fs in the dental pulp, thymus, and BM were composed of NC-derived and mesoderm-derived cells. Secondary CFU-F assays were used to estimate the self-renewal potential, which showed that CFU-Fs in the teeth, thymus, and BM were entirely NC-derived cells, entirely mesoderm-derived cells, and mostly NC-derived cells, respectively. Colony formation was inhibited drastically by the addition of anti-platelet–derived growth factor receptor-β antibody, regardless of the tissue and its origin. Furthermore, dental mesenchyme expressed genes encoding critical hematopoietic factors, such as interleukin-7, stem cell factor, and cysteine-X-cysteine (CXC) chemokine ligand 12, which supports the differentiation of B lymphocytes and osteoclasts. Therefore, the mesenchymal stem cells found in these tissues had different origins, but similar properties in each organ. PMID:23185234

  11. Mesenchymal dental pulp cells attenuate dentin resorption in homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y; Chen, M; He, L; Marão, H F; Sun, D M; Zhou, J; Kim, S G; Song, S; Wang, S L; Mao, J J

    2015-06-01

    Dentin in permanent teeth rarely undergoes resorption in development, homeostasis, or aging, in contrast to bone that undergoes periodic resorption/remodeling. The authors hypothesized that cells in the mesenchymal compartment of dental pulp attenuate osteoclastogenesis. Mononucleated and adherent cells from donor-matched rat dental pulp (dental pulp cells [DPCs]) and alveolar bone (alveolar bone cells [ABCs]) were isolated and separately cocultured with primary rat splenocytes. Primary splenocytes readily aggregated and formed osteoclast-like cells in chemically defined osteoclastogenesis medium with 20 ng/mL of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and 50 ng/mL of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL). Strikingly, DPCs attenuated osteoclastogenesis when cocultured with primary splenocytes, whereas ABCs slightly but significantly promoted osteoclastogenesis. DPCs yielded ~20-fold lower RANKL expression but >2-fold higher osteoprotegerin (OPG) expression than donor-matched ABCs, yielding a RANKL/OPG ratio of 41:1 (ABCs:DPCs). Vitamin D3 significantly promoted RANKL expression in ABCs and OPG in DPCs. In vivo, rat maxillary incisors were atraumatically extracted (without any tooth fractures), followed by retrograde pulpectomy to remove DPCs and immediate replantation into the extraction sockets to allow repopulation of the surgically treated root canal with periodontal and alveolar bone-derived cells. After 8 wk, multiple dentin/root resorption lacunae were present in root dentin with robust RANKL and OPG expression. There were areas of dentin resoprtion alternating with areas of osteodentin formation in root dentin surface in the observed 8 wk. These findings suggest that DPCs of the mesenchymal compartment have an innate ability to attenuate osteoclastogenesis and that this innate ability may be responsible for the absence of dentin resorption in homeostasis. Mesenchymal attenuation of dentin resorption may have implications in internal

  12. Importance of mesenchymal stem cells in autologous fat grafting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trojahn Kølle, Stig-Frederik; Oliveri, Roberto S; Glovinski, Peter Viktor

    2012-01-01

    the fat graft with adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASC) before transplantation. We have reviewed original studies published on fat transplantation enriched with ASC. We found four murine and three human studies that investigated the subject after a sensitive search of publications....... In the human studies, so-called cell assisted lipotransfer (CAL) increased the ASC concentration 2-5 times compared with non-manipulated fat grafts, which caused a questionable improvement in survival of fat grafts, compared with that of traditional lipofilling. In contrast, in two of the murine studies ASC...

  13. Human Thymus Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Augment Force Production in Self-Organized Cardiac Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondergaard, Claus S.; Hodonsky, Chani J.; Khait, Luda; Shaw, John; Sarkar, Bedabrata; Birla, Ravi; Bove, Edward; Nolta, Jan; Si, Ming-Sing

    2011-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stromal cells have been recently isolated from thymus gland tissue discarded after surgical procedures. The role of this novel cell type in heart regeneration has yet to be defined. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of human thymus-derived mesenchymal stromal cells using self-organized cardiac tissue as an in vitro platform for quantitative assessment. Methods Mesenchymal stromal cells were isolated from discarded thymus tissue from neonates undergoing heart surgery and were incubated in differentiation media to demonstrate multipotency. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes self-organized into cardiac tissue fibers in a custom culture dish either alone or in combination with varying numbers of mesenchymal stromal cells. A transducer measured force generated by spontaneously contracting self-organized cardiac tissue fibers. Work and power outputs were calculated from force tracings. Immunofluorescence was performed to determine the fate of the thymus-derived mesenchymal stromal cells. Results Mesenchymal stromal cells were successfully isolated from discarded thymus tissue. After incubation in differentiation media, mesenchymal stromal cells attained the expected phenotypes. Although mesenchymal stromal cells did not differentiate into mature cardiomyocytes, addition of these cells increased the rate of fiber formation, force production, and work and power outputs. Self-organized cardiac tissue containing mesenchymal stromal cells acquired a defined microscopic architecture. Conclusions Discarded thymus tissue contains mesenchymal stromal cells, which can augment force production and work and power outputs of self-organized cardiac tissue fibers by several-fold. These findings indicate the potential utility of mesenchymal stromal cells in treating heart failure. PMID:20732499

  14. In vitro and in vivo neurogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Clinical trials; mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs); neuronal differentiation; self-renewal. Abstract. Regenerative medicine is an evolving interdisciplinary topic of research involving numerous technological methods that utilize stem cells to repair damaged tissues. Particularly, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a ...

  15. Osteogenic differentiation of human dental papilla mesenchymal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Etsuko; Hirose, Motohiro; Kotobuki, Noriko; Shimaoka, Hideki; Tadokoro, Mika; Maeda, Masahiko; Hayashi, Yoshiko; Kirita, Tadaaki; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2006-01-01

    We isolated dental papilla from impacted human molar and proliferated adherent fibroblastic cells after collagenase treatment of the papilla. The cells were negative for hematopoietic markers but positive for CD29, CD44, CD90, CD105, and CD166. When the cells were further cultured in the presence of β-glycerophosphate, ascorbic acid, and dexamethasone for 14 days, mineralized areas together with osteogenic differentiation evidenced by high alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin contents were observed. The differentiation was confirmed at both protein and gene expression levels. The cells can also be cryopreserved and, after thawing, could show in vivo bone-forming capability. These results indicate that mesenchymal type cells localize in dental papilla and that the cells can be culture expanded/utilized for bone tissue engineering

  16. AKI Recovery Induced by Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles Carrying MicroRNAs

    OpenAIRE

    Collino, Federica; Bruno, Stefania; Incarnato, Danny; Dettori, Daniela; Neri, Francesco; Provero, Paolo; Pomatto, Margherita; Oliviero, Salvatore; Tetta, Ciro; Quesenberry, Peter J.; Camussi, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic changes induced by extracellular vesicles have been implicated in mesenchymal stromal cell–promoted recovery of AKI. MicroRNAs are potential candidates for cell reprogramming toward a proregenerative phenotype. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether microRNA deregulation inhibits the regenerative potential of mesenchymal stromal cells and derived extracellular vesicles in a model of glycerol-induced AKI in severe combined immunodeficient mice. We generated mesenchymal stroma...

  17. Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    growth and metastasis. 1 Body. Methods: Isolation of mASC. Perirenal , pelvine and subcutaneous fat tissue were dissected from EGFP...tumor invasion in the inter- play of tissue resident stem cells from the fat tissue and breast cancer cells. 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights...Herfarth, Secretion of RANTES (CCL5) and interleukin-10 from mesenteric adipose tissue and from creeping fat in Crohn’s disease: regulation by steroid

  18. Potential Effect of CD271 on Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Proliferation and Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Calabrese

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Low-Affinity Nerve Growth Factor Receptor (LNGFR, also known as CD271, is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily. The CD271 cell surface marker defines a subset of multipotential mesenchymal stromal cells and may be used to isolate and enrich cells derived from bone marrow aspirate. In this study, we compare the proliferative and differentiation potentials of CD271+ and CD271− mesenchymal stromal cells. Mesenchymal stromal cells were isolated from bone marrow aspirate and adipose tissue by plastic adherence and positive selection. The proliferation and differentiation potentials of CD271+ and CD271− mesenchymal stromal cells were assessed by inducing osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic in vitro differentiation. Compared to CD271+, CD271− mesenchymal stromal cells showed a lower proliferation rate and a decreased ability to give rise to osteocytes, adipocytes and chondrocytes. Furthermore, we observed that CD271+ mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from adipose tissue displayed a higher efficiency of proliferation and trilineage differentiation compared to CD271+ mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from bone marrow samples, although the CD271 expression levels were comparable. In conclusion, these data show that both the presence of CD271 antigen and the source of mesenchymal stromal cells represent important factors in determining the ability of the cells to proliferate and differentiate.

  19. Potential Effect of CD271 on Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Proliferation and Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Giovanna; Giuffrida, Raffaella; Lo Furno, Debora; Parrinello, Nunziatina Laura; Forte, Stefano; Gulino, Rosario; Colarossi, Cristina; Schinocca, Luciana Rita; Giuffrida, Rosario; Cardile, Venera; Memeo, Lorenzo

    2015-07-09

    The Low-Affinity Nerve Growth Factor Receptor (LNGFR), also known as CD271, is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily. The CD271 cell surface marker defines a subset of multipotential mesenchymal stromal cells and may be used to isolate and enrich cells derived from bone marrow aspirate. In this study, we compare the proliferative and differentiation potentials of CD271+ and CD271- mesenchymal stromal cells. Mesenchymal stromal cells were isolated from bone marrow aspirate and adipose tissue by plastic adherence and positive selection. The proliferation and differentiation potentials of CD271+ and CD271- mesenchymal stromal cells were assessed by inducing osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic in vitro differentiation. Compared to CD271+, CD271- mesenchymal stromal cells showed a lower proliferation rate and a decreased ability to give rise to osteocytes, adipocytes and chondrocytes. Furthermore, we observed that CD271+ mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from adipose tissue displayed a higher efficiency of proliferation and trilineage differentiation compared to CD271+ mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from bone marrow samples, although the CD271 expression levels were comparable. In conclusion, these data show that both the presence of CD271 antigen and the source of mesenchymal stromal cells represent important factors in determining the ability of the cells to proliferate and differentiate.

  20. Therapeutic Potential of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devang M. Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are stromal cells that have the ability to self-renew and also exhibit multilineage differentiation into both mesenchymal and nonmesenchymal lineages. The intrinsic properties of these cells make them an attractive candidate for clinical applications. MSCs are of keen interest because they can be isolated from a small aspirate of bone marrow or adipose tissues and can be easily expanded in vitro. Moreover, their ability to modulate immune responses makes them an even more attractive candidate for regenerative medicine as allogeneic transplant of these cells is feasible without a substantial risk of immune rejection. MSCs secrete various immunomodulatory molecules which provide a regenerative microenvironment for a variety of injured tissues or organ to limit the damage and to increase self-regulated tissue regeneration. Autologous/allogeneic MSCs delivered via the bloodstream augment the titers of MSCs that are drawn to sites of tissue injury and can accelerate the tissue repair process. MSCs are currently being tested for their potential use in cell and gene therapy for a number of human debilitating diseases and genetic disorders. This paper summarizes the current clinical and nonclinical data for the use of MSCs in tissue repair and potential therapeutic role in various diseases.

  1. Multilineage Potential Research of Bovine Amniotic Fluid Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhua Gao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of amnion and amniotic fluid (AF are abundant sources of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs that can be harvested at low cost and do not pose ethical conflicts. In human and veterinary research, stem cells derived from these tissues are promising candidates for disease treatment, specifically for their plasticity, their reduced immunogenicity, and high anti-inflammatory potential. This work aimed to obtain and characterize bovine amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells (AFMSC. The bovine AF from the amniotic cavity of pregnant gilts in the early stages of gestation (3- and 4-m-old bovine embryos was collected. AFMSCs exhibit a fibroblastic-like morphology only starting from the fourth passage, being heterogeneous during the primary culture. Immunofluorescence results showed that AFMSCs were positive for β-integrin, CD44, CD73 and CD166, but negative for CD34, CD45. Meanwhile, AFMSCs expressed ES cell markers, such as Oct4, and when appropriately induced, are capable of differentiating into ectodermal and mesodermal lineages. This study reinforces the emerging importance of these cells as ideal tools in veterinary medicine; future studies aimed at a deeper evaluation of their immunological properties will allow a better understanding of their role in cellular therapy.

  2. Titanium phosphate glass microcarriers induce enhanced osteogenic cell proliferation and human mesenchymal stem cell protein expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilay J Lakhkar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have developed 50- to 100-µm-sized titanium phosphate glass microcarriers (denoted as Ti5 that show enhanced proliferation of human mesenchymal stem cells and MG63 osteosarcoma cells, as well as enhanced human mesenchymal stem cell expression of bone differentiation markers, in comparison with commercially available glass microspheres at all time points. We also demonstrate that these microcarriers provide superior human mesenchymal stem cell proliferation with conventional Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle medium than with a specially developed commercial stem cell medium. The microcarrier proliferative capacity is revealed by a 24-fold increase in MG63 cell numbers in spinner flask bioreactor studies performed over a 7-day period, versus only a 6-fold increase in control microspheres under the same conditions; the corresponding values of Ti5 and control microspheres under static culture are 8-fold and 7-fold, respectively. The capability of guided osteogenic differentiation is confirmed by ELISAs for bone morphogenetic protein-2 and osteopontin, which reveal significantly greater expression of these markers, especially osteopontin, by human mesenchymal stem cells on the Ti5 microspheres than on the control. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy images reveal favorable MG63 and human mesenchymal stem cell adhesion on the Ti5 microsphere surfaces. Thus, the results demonstrate the suitability of the developed microspheres for use as microcarriers in bone tissue engineering applications.

  3. Cryopreservation and revival of mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Kastrup, Jens

    2011-01-01

    ) opens up new possibilities for cell therapy. To facilitate these applications, cryopreservation and long-term storage of MSCs becomes an absolute necessity. As a result, optimization of this cryopreservation protocol is absolutely critical. The major challenge during cellular cryopreservation...... is the lethality associated with the cooling and thawing processes. The major objective is to minimize damage to cells during low temperature freezing and storage and the use of a suitable cryoprotectant. The detrimental effects of cellular cryopreservation can be minimized by controlling the cooling rate, using...... better cryoprotective agents, maintaining appropriate storage temperatures, and controlling the cell thawing rate. As is described in this chapter, human MSCs can either be frozen in cryovials or in freezing bags together with cryopreserve solutions containing dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)....

  4. Effect of in vitro chondrogenic differentiation of autologous mesenchymal stem cells on cartilage and subchondral cancellous bone repair in osteoarthritis of temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K; Man, C; Zhang, B; Hu, J; Zhu, S S

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of in vitro chondrogenic differentiated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on cartilage and subchondral cancellous bone in temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJOA). Four weeks after induction of osteoarthritis (OA), the joints received hylartin solution, non-chondrogenic MSCs or in vitro chondrogenic differentiated MSCs. The changes in cartilage and subchondral cancellous bone were evaluated by histology, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and micro-computed tomography (CT). Implanted cells were tracked using Adeno-LacZ labelling. The differentiated MSC-treated group had better histology than the MSC-treated group at 4 and 12 weeks, but no difference at 24 weeks. Increased mRNA expression of collegan II, aggeran, Sox9 and decreased matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13) were observed in differentiated MSC-treated groups compared to the undifferentiated MSC-treated group at 4 weeks. The differentiated MSC-treated group had decreased bone volume fraction, trabecular thickness and bone surface density, and increased trabecular spacing in the subchondral cancellous bone than the undifferentiated MSC-treated group. Transplanted cells were observed at cartilage, subchondral bone, and the synovial membrane lining at 4 weeks. Intra-articular injection of MSCs could delay the progression of TMJOA, and in vitro chondrogenic induction of MSCs could enhance the therapeutic effects. This provides new insights into the role of MSCs in cell-based therapies for TMJOA. Copyright © 2012 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Their Clinical Applications in Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Hsun; Liu, Hwan-Wun; Wu, Kun-Chi; Ding, Dah-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a chronic degenerative joint disorder characterized by articular cartilage destruction and osteophyte formation. Chondrocytes in the matrix have a relatively slow turnover rate, and the tissue itself lacks a blood supply to support repair and remodeling. Researchers have evaluated the effectiveness of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering for treating osteoarthritis. All sources of stem cells, including embryonic, induced pluripotent, fetal, and adult stem cells, have potential use in stem cell therapy, which provides a permanent biological solution. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from bone marrow, adipose tissue, and umbilical cord show considerable promise for use in cartilage repair. MSCs can be sourced from any or all joint tissues and can modulate the immune response. Additionally, MSCs can directly differentiate into chondrocytes under appropriate signal transduction. They also have immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory paracrine effects. This article reviews the current clinical applications of MSCs and future directions of research in osteoarthritis.

  6. Separation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Through a Strategic Centrifugation Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlin, Kimberly M; Kaplan, David S; Fisher, John P

    2016-04-01

    Despite great promise surrounding mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), their implementation for tissue engineering strategies remains in the development phases. Many of the concerns regarding the clinical use of MSCs originate from population heterogeneity, during both isolation and differentiation. In this study, we utilize our previously developed centrifugation cell adhesion protocol for the separation of MSCs. Our findings reveal that MSCs can be isolated from whole bone marrow using a 200 g (700 pN) centrifugal force after 24 h of culture on polystyrene with cell surface marker expression equivalent to positive controls. During differentiation, a centrifugation protocol with identical force parameters could be applied 14 days into chondrogenic differentiation to isolate differentiated chondrocytes, which exhibited increased expression of chondrogenic markers compared to controls. In summary, the use of our developed centrifugation cell adhesion protocol has proven to be an effective means to separate MSC populations, decreasing the heterogeneity of subsequent cell therapy products.

  7. Systemic administration of a novel human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells population accelerates the resolution of acute liver injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burra Patrizia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatocytes and stem cells transplantation may be an alternative to liver transplantation in acute or chronic liver disease. We aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells from human umbilical cord (UCMSCs, a readily available source of mesenchymal stem cells, in the CCl4-induced acute liver injury model. Methods Mesenchymal stem cells profile was analyzed by flow cytometry. In order to evaluate the capability of our UCMSCs to differentiate in hepatocytes, cells were seeded on three different supports, untreated plastic support, MatrigelTM and human liver acellular matrix. Cells were analyzed by immunocitochemistry for alpha-fetoprotein and albumin expression, qPCR for hepatocyte markers gene expression, Periodic Acid-Schiff staining for glycogen storage, ELISA for albumin detection and colorimetric assay for urea secretion. To assess the effects of undifferentiated UCMSCs in hepatic regeneration after an acute liver injury, we transplanted them via tail vein in mice injected intraperitoneally with a single dose of CCl4. Livers were analyzed by histological evaluation for damage quantification, immunostaining for Kupffer and stellate cells/liver myofibroblasts activation and for UCMSCs homing. Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines gene expression was evaluated by qPCR analysis and antioxidant enzyme activity was measured by catalase quantification. Data were analyzed by Mann–Whitney U-test, Kruskal-Wallis test and Cuzick’s test followed by Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. Results We have standardized the isolation procedure to obtain a cell population with hepatogenic properties prior to in vivo transplantation. When subjected to hepatogenic differentiation on untreated plastic support, UCMSCs differentiated in hepatocyte-like cells as demonstrated by their morphology, progressive up-regulation of mature hepatocyte markers, glycogen storage, albumin and urea secretion. However

  8. Role of Mesenchymal Derived Stem Cells in Stimulating Dormant Tumor Cells to Proliferate and Form Clinical Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    stroma; cytokines; chemokines; mesenchymal stem cells; hematologic stem cells; metastasis; quiescence; animal models; fibrosis; basement membrane extract...chemokines; mesenchymal stem cells; hematologic stem cells; metastasis; quiescence; animal models; fibrosis; basement membrane extract; 3D culture...will publish our findings once these studies have been completed. The Kaplan and Green labs meet regularly to share data and discuss experimental

  9. Mesenchymal stem cell in venous leg ulcer: An intoxicating therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanerey, Anjali; Patra, Pradeep Kumar; Kumar, Awanish

    2017-08-01

    Venous leg ulcers (VLU) are a prevalent and reoccurring type of complicated wound, turning as a considerable public healthcare issue, with critical social and economic concern. There are both medical and surgical therapies to treat venous leg ulcers; however, a cure does not yet exist. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are capable and proved of accelerating wound healing in vivo and their study with human chronic wounds is currently awaited. MSCs are a promising source of adult progenitor cells for cellular therapy and have been demonstrated to differentiate into various mesenchymal cell lineages. They have a crucial and integral role in native wound healing by regulating immune response and inflammation. Improved understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms at work in delayed wound healing compels to the development of cellular therapy in VLU. This review focuses on the current treatment option of VLU and further emphasizing the role of MSCs in accelerating the healing process. With further understanding of the mechanism of action of these cells in wound improvement and, the involvement of cytokines can also be revealed that could be used for the therapeutic purpose for VLU healing. Clinical uses of MSCs have been started already, and induced MSCs are surely a promising tool or compelling therapy for VLU. Copyright © 2017 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mesenchymal stem cell and osteoarthritis: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaleh Shariati Sarabi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The most common disease in the aged population is osteoarthritis (OA that is resulting in progressive dysfunction following isolated cartilage injuries, subchondral bone remodeling, tissue loss, marginal osteophytes, and loss of joint space. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent stem cells; they are able to produce many or all joint tissues. Bone marrow and adipose tissue are rich sources of mesenchymal cells that are useful for the reconstruction of injured tissues such as bone, cartilage, or cardiac muscle. Recently, some studies have been performed on the use of the direct intra-articular injection of mononuclear cells (MNCs and MSCs as potential therapeutic targets in OA. In this review, the history of MSCs in the treatment of OA are explained. Injection of Bone Marrow Aspirates Concentrate (BMAC has significantly improved both joint pain and function in radiologic findings; some studies suggested that the injection would be even more effective in early to moderate phases of OA. Injection of MSCs in combination with growth factors may be better solution for the treatment.

  11. Isolation of mesenchymal stem cells from human vermiform appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Coppi, Paolo; Pozzobon, Michela; Piccoli, Martina; Gazzola, Maria Vittoria; Boldrin, Luisa; Slanzi, Elisa; Destro, Roberta; Zanesco, Luigi; Zanon, Giovanni Franco; Gamba, Piergiorgio

    2006-09-01

    Recent findings have shown that pluripotent stem cells exist in areas outside the bone marrow (BM). Moreover, it has been demonstrated that the appendix is important for the development of mucosal gut immunity, and hematopoietic progenitors have been isolated from animal and human appendices. Non-inflamed appendices removed during laparotomy were processed and cultured until the appearance of adherent cells. Differentiations (performed under osteogenic, adipogenic, and myogenic conditions) were confirmed by immunohistochemistry and cytochemistry. Polymerase chain reaction and cytofluorimetric analyses were performed to evidence the presence of genes and protein specific lineages in appendix-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMCs). ADMCs were present in non-inflamed appendices. ADMCs under osteogenic conditions differentiated in osteoblasts and showed increased alkaline phosphatase expression; at the gene level, we observed the expression of Core binding factor alpha 1 (Cbfa1) and osteocalcin in osteogenic induced ADMCs. Under adipogenic conditions, lipidic drops in the cytoplasm, expression of lipoprotein lipase (LpL), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma were observed; under myogenic conditions, myotubes expressing muscle specific proteins like desmin were formed. Myogenic regulatory factor 4 and MyoD were selectively induced in the ADMCs under myogenic conditions. This study shows for the first time that mesenchymal stem cells can be isolated from normal appendices obtained from a pediatric and adult age group (0-18 years of age). This finding not only may further knowledge of the maturation of the intestinal immunesystem but also could indicate a new physiological role of the human vermiform appendix.

  12. [Effect of metanephric mesenchyme cells on podocytes apoptosis induced by high glucose].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Xin; Ren, Xiaojun; Yu, Weimin

    2016-05-10

    To study the effect of metanephric mesenchyme cells on podocytes apoptosis induced by high glucose. Mice's podocyte was cultured in vitro,and apoptosis and injury model of podocyte was then established by high glucose (30 mmol/L) induction. Metanephric mesenchyme cells were extracted from E13.5 mouse embryos and used to make conditioned medium which was used to treat podocytes apoptosis. The flow cytometry and confocal fluorescence imaging were used to detect the apoptosis ratio and cytoskeletal protein (synaptopodin) expression of podocyte at several time points (24, 48, 72 h), in order to explore the effect of high glucose on podocytes and the treatment effect of metanephric mesenchyme cell conditioned medium. Significant increasing of podocyte apoptosis ratio and decreasing in synaptopodin expression contrast to control group was observed after induction of high glucose, with a statistical difference. Metanephric mesenchyme cells could be isolated from E13.5 mouse embryos successfully, and had the capacity of osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation. Metanephric mesenchyme cell conditioned medium and high glucose stimulations was used to generate podocytes cells. Compared to the group treated with high glucose stimulation, the flow cytometry detection result suggested that metanephric mesenchyme cell could reduce podocytes apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner: with increasing in the concentration of metanephric mesenchyme cell conditioned medium, the treatment effect was better. Metanephric mesenchyme cells could prevent apoptosis and injury of podocyte induced by high glucose.

  13. Human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets accelerate liver regeneration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itaba, Noriko; Matsumi, Yoshiaki; Okinaka, Kaori; Ashla, An Afida; Kono, Yohei; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Morimoto, Minoru; Sugiyama, Naoyuki; Ohashi, Kazuo; Okano, Teruo; Shiota, Goshi

    2015-11-10

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive cell source for cell therapy. Based on our hypothesis that suppression of Wnt/β-catenin signal enhances hepatic differentiation of human MSCs, we developed human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets by a small molecule compound. Screening of 10 small molecule compounds was performed by WST assay, TCF reporter assay, and albumin mRNA expression. Consequently, hexachlorophene suppressed TCF reporter activity in time- and concentration-dependent manner. Hexachlorophene rapidly induced hepatic differentiation of human MSCs judging from expression of liver-specific genes and proteins, PAS staining, and urea production. The effect of orthotopic transplantation of human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets against acute liver injury was examined in one-layered to three-layered cell sheets system. Transplantation of human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets enhanced liver regeneration and suppressed liver injury. The survival rates of the mice were significantly improved. High expression of complement C3 and its downstream signals including C5a, NF-κB, and IL-6/STAT-3 pathway was observed in hepatic cell sheets-grafted tissues. Expression of phosphorylated EGFR and thioredoxin is enhanced, resulting in reduction of oxidative stress. These findings suggest that orthotopic transplantation of hepatic cell sheets manufactured from MSCs accelerates liver regeneration through complement C3, EGFR and thioredoxin.

  14. Inflammatory conditions dictate the effect of mesenchymal stem or stromal cells on B cell function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Luk (Franka); Carreras-Planella, L. (Laura); S.S. Korevaar (Sander); S.F. De Witte (Samantha Fh); F.E. Borràs (Francesc); M.G.H. Betjes (Michiel); C.C. Baan (Carla); M.J. Hoogduijn (Martin); M. Franquesa (Marcella)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe immunomodulatory capacity of mesenchymal stem or stromal cells (MSC) makes them a promising tool for treatment of immune disease and organ transplantation. The effects of MSC on B cells are characterized by an abrogation of plasmablast formation and induction of regulatory B cells

  15. Interaction between adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells and regulatory T-cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.U. Engela (Anja); C.C. Baan (Carla); A. Peeters (Anna); W. Weimar (Willem); M.J. Hoogduijn (Martin)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractMesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) exhibit immunosuppressive capabilities, which have evoked interest in their application as cell therapy in transplant patients. So far it has been unclear whether allogeneic MSCs and host regulatory T-cells (Tregs) functionally influence each other. We

  16. Cell-based delivery of glucagon-like peptide-1 using encapsulated mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallrapp, Christine; Thoenes, Eric; Thürmer, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) CellBeads are cell-based implants for the sustained local delivery of bioactive factors. They consist of GLP-1 secreting mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in a spherically shaped immuno-isolating alginate matrix. A highly standardized and reproducible encapsulati...

  17. Therapeutic Implications of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Liver Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ausiliatrice Puglisi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, represent an attractive tool for the establishment of a successful stem-cell-based therapy of liver diseases. A number of different mechanisms contribute to the therapeutic effects exerted by MSCs, since these cells can differentiate into functional hepatic cells and can also produce a series of growth factors and cytokines able to suppress inflammatory responses, reduce hepatocyte apoptosis, regress liver fibrosis, and enhance hepatocyte functionality. To date, the infusion of MSCs or MSC-conditioned medium has shown encouraging results in the treatment of fulminant hepatic failure and in end-stage liver disease in experimental settings. However, some issues under debate hamper the use of MSCs in clinical trials. This paper summarizes the biological relevance of MSCs and the potential benefits and risks that can result from translating the MSC research to the treatment of liver diseases.

  18. Therapeutic Implications of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Liver Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, Maria Ausiliatrice; Tesori, Valentina; Lattanzi, Wanda; Piscaglia, Anna Chiara; Gasbarrini, Giovanni Battista; D'Ugo, Domenico M.; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), represent an attractive tool for the establishment of a successful stem-cell-based therapy of liver diseases. A number of different mechanisms contribute to the therapeutic effects exerted by MSCs, since these cells can differentiate into functional hepatic cells and can also produce a series of growth factors and cytokines able to suppress inflammatory responses, reduce hepatocyte apoptosis, regress liver fibrosis, and enhance hepatocyte functionality. To date, the infusion of MSCs or MSC-conditioned medium has shown encouraging results in the treatment of fulminant hepatic failure and in end-stage liver disease in experimental settings. However, some issues under debate hamper the use of MSCs in clinical trials. This paper summarizes the biological relevance of MSCs and the potential benefits and risks that can result from translating the MSC research to the treatment of liver diseases. PMID:22228987

  19. Mesenchymal stem cells homing to improve bone healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiping Lin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapy continues to attract growing interest as a promising approach to treat a variety of diseases. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been one of the most intensely studied candidates for cell therapy. Since the homing capacity of MSCs is an important determinant of effective MSC-based therapy, the enhancement of homing efficiency is essential for optimizing the therapeutic outcome. Furthermore, trafficking of endogenous MSCs to damaged tissues, also referred to as endogenic stem cell homing, and the subsequent participation of MSCs in tissue regeneration are considered to be a natural self-healing response. Therefore, strategies to stimulate and reinforce the mobilisation and homing of MSCs have become a key point in regenerative medicine. The current review focuses on advances in the mechanisms and factors governing trafficking of MSCs, and the relationship between MSC mobilisation and skeletal diseases, providing insights into strategies for their potential translational implications.

  20. Molecular and environmental cues in cardiac differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramkisoensing, Arti Anushka

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis molecular and environmental cues in cardiac differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells were investigated. The main conclusions were that the cardiac differentiation potential of human mesenchymal stem cells negatively correlates with donor age. This in its own shows a negative

  1. Design and development of a magnetic device for mesenchymal stem cell retaining in deep targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banis, G. C.

    2017-12-01

    This paper focuses on the retaining of mesenchymal stem cells in blood flow conditions using the appropriate magnetic field. Mesenchymal stem cells can be tagged with magnetic nanoparticles and thus, they can be manipulated from distance, through the application of an external magnetic field. In this paper the case of kidney as target of the therapy is being studied.

  2. Immunosuppressive and remodelling properties of mesenchymal stem cells in a model of chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Semedo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the role of mesenchymal stem cells in fibrogenesis using a model of chronic renal insufficiency. Methods: Mesenchymal stem cells  were obtained from tibias and femurs of Wistar-EPM rats. After three to five passages, the cells were submitted to phenotypic analyses and differentiation. Wistar rats were submitted to the 5/6 nephrectomy model, and 2.105 mesenchymal stem cells  were administered intravenously to each rat every two weeks until the eighth week. Rresults: Sex-determining region Y was observed in female rats treated with stem cells. Serum and urine analyses showed improvement of functional parameters in mesenchymal stem cells treated animals, such as creatinine, serum urea, and proteinuria. Moreover, hemocrit analysis showed improvement of anemia in mesenchymal stem cells treated animals. Masson’s Trichromium and Picrosirius Red staining demonstrated reduced levels of fibrosis in mesenchymal stem cells treated in animals. These results were corroborated by reduced vimentin, collagen I, TGFβ, FSP-1, MCP-1 and Smad3 mRNA expression. Renal IL-6 and TNFα mRNA expression levels were significantly decreased after mesenchymal stem cells treatment, while IL-4 and IL-10 expression were increased. Serum expression of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-10 was decreased in mesenchymal cell-treated animals. Cconclusions: Altogether, these results suggest that mesenchymal stem cells therapy can indeed modulate the inflammatory response that follows the initial phase of a chronic renal lesion. The immunosuppresive and remodeling properties of the mesenchymal stem cells  may be involved in the improved fibrotic outcome.

  3. Ion Channels in Hematopoietic and Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Pillozzi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs reside in bone marrow niches and give rise to hematopoietic precursor cells (HPCs. These have more restricted lineage potential and eventually differentiate into specific blood cell types. Bone marrow also contains mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, which present multilineage differentiation potential toward mesodermal cell types. In bone marrow niches, stem cell interaction with the extracellular matrix is mediated by integrin receptors. Ion channels regulate cell proliferation and differentiation by controlling intracellular Ca2+, cell volume, release of growth factors, and so forth. Although little evidence is available about the ion channel roles in true HSCs, increasing information is available about HPCs and MSCs, which present a complex pattern of K+ channel expression. K+ channels cooperate with Ca2+ and Cl− channels in regulating calcium entry and cell volume during mitosis. Other K+ channels modulate the integrin-dependent interaction between leukemic progenitor cells and the niche stroma. These channels can also regulate leukemia cell interaction with MSCs, which also involves integrin receptors and affects the MSC-mediated protection from chemotherapy. Ligand-gated channels are also implicated in these processes. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors regulate cell proliferation and migration in HSCs and MSCs and may be implicated in the harmful effects of smoking.

  4. Composition of Mineral Produced by Dental Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volponi, A A; Gentleman, E; Fatscher, R; Pang, Y W Y; Gentleman, M M; Sharpe, P T

    2015-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells isolated from different dental tissues have been described to have osteogenic/odontogenic-like differentiation capacity, but little attention has been paid to the biochemical composition of the material that each produces. Here, we used Raman spectroscopy to analyze the mineralized materials produced in vitro by different dental cell populations, and we compared them with the biochemical composition of native dental tissues. We show that different dental stem cell populations produce materials that differ in their mineral and matrix composition and that these differ from those of native dental tissues. In vitro, BCMP (bone chip mass population), SCAP (stem cells from apical papilla), and SHED (stem cells from human-exfoliated deciduous teeth) cells produce a more highly mineralized matrix when compared with that produced by PDL (periodontal ligament), DPA (dental pulp adult), and GF (gingival fibroblast) cells. Principal component analyses of Raman spectra further demonstrated that the crystallinity and carbonate substitution environments in the material produced by each cell type varied, with DPA cells, for example, producing a more carbonate-substituted mineral and with SCAP, SHED, and GF cells creating a less crystalline material when compared with other dental stem cells and native tissues. These variations in mineral composition reveal intrinsic differences in the various cell populations, which may in turn affect their specific clinical applications. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  5. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Epithelial Transition Induced by Renal Tubular Cells-Derived Extracellular Vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Chiabotto

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal-epithelial interactions play an important role in renal tubular morphogenesis and in maintaining the structure of the kidney. The aim of this study was to investigate whether extracellular vesicles (EVs produced by human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (RPTECs may induce mesenchymal-epithelial transition of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs. To test this hypothesis, we characterized the phenotype and the RNA content of EVs and we evaluated the in vitro uptake and activity of EVs on MSCs. MicroRNA (miRNA analysis suggested the possible implication of the miR-200 family carried by EVs in the epithelial commitment of MSCs. Bone marrow-derived MSCs were incubated with EVs, or RPTEC-derived total conditioned medium, or conditioned medium depleted of EVs. As a positive control, MSCs were co-cultured in a transwell system with RPTECs. Epithelial commitment of MSCs was assessed by real time PCR and by immunofluorescence analysis of cellular expression of specific mesenchymal and epithelial markers. After one week of incubation with EVs and total conditioned medium, we observed mesenchymal-epithelial transition in MSCs. Stimulation with conditioned medium depleted of EVs did not induce any change in mesenchymal and epithelial gene expression. Since EVs were found to contain the miR-200 family, we transfected MSCs using synthetic miR-200 mimics. After one week of transfection, mesenchymal-epithelial transition was induced in MSCs. In conclusion, miR-200 carrying EVs released from RPTECs induce the epithelial commitment of MSCs that may contribute to their regenerative potential. Based on experiments of MSC transfection with miR-200 mimics, we suggested that the miR-200 family may be involved in mesenchymal-epithelial transition of MSCs.

  6. Propofol promotes spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ya-Jing; Liu, Jian-Min; Wei, Shu-Ming; Zhang, Yun-Hao; Qu, Zhen-Hua; Chen, Shu-Bo

    2015-08-01

    Propofol is a neuroprotective anesthetic. Whether propofol can promote spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells remains poorly understood. We used rats to investigate spinal cord injury repair using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation combined with propofol administration via the tail vein. Rat spinal cord injury was clearly alleviated; a large number of newborn non-myelinated and myelinated nerve fibers appeared in the spinal cord, the numbers of CM-Dil-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and fluorogold-labeled nerve fibers were increased and hindlimb motor function of spinal cord-injured rats was markedly improved. These improvements were more prominent in rats subjected to bone marrow mesenchymal cell transplantation combined with propofol administration than in rats receiving monotherapy. These results indicate that propofol can enhance the therapeutic effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on spinal cord injury in rats.

  7. Propofol promotes spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ya-jing; Liu, Jian-min; Wei, Shu-ming; Zhang, Yun-hao; Qu, Zhen-hua; Chen, Shu-bo

    2015-01-01

    Propofol is a neuroprotective anesthetic. Whether propofol can promote spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells remains poorly understood. We used rats to investigate spinal cord injury repair using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation combined with propofol administration via the tail vein. Rat spinal cord injury was clearly alleviated; a large number of newborn non-myelinated and myelinated nerve fibers appeared in the spinal cord, the numbers of CM-Dil-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and fluorogold-labeled nerve fibers were increased and hindlimb motor function of spinal cord-injured rats was markedly improved. These improvements were more prominent in rats subjected to bone marrow mesenchymal cell transplantation combined with propofol administration than in rats receiving monotherapy. These results indicate that propofol can enhance the therapeutic effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on spinal cord injury in rats. PMID:26487860

  8. A case of intracranial mesenchymal chondrosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Masami; Tanji, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masakazu

    1981-01-01

    Intracranial mesenchymal chondrosarcoma is very rare, only 14 cases being reported in Europe and in the United States of America. Recently we experienced a case in which the follow-up indicating computed tomograms (CT) demonstrated interesting data on the radiosensitivity of this tumor. The patient, a 14-year-old female was admitted to our hospital with the complaint of left hemiplegia which had gradually progressed. CT revealed an area spreading upward from the right median base of the skull and consisted of two components showing (A) a density as high as that of calcium and (B) a density higher than that of surrounding brain tissue, but much lower than that of calcium. Temporoparietal craniotomy was performed to resect approximately one-half of the tumor. Histological finding revealed mesenchymal chondrosarcoma. The component-A was though to be a cartilaginous tissue, and-B to be an undifferentiated mesenchymal tissue. Postoperative irradiation of 7,000 rad was initiated. The effect of radiotherapy as seen on computed tomograms is as follows, (1) decrease in the volume of the tumor by 26%, (2) decrease in density and enhancement of the area which is considered to be the undifferentiated mesenchymal cells, (3) mild reduction of the area which is considered to be the caltilaginous tissue, and (4) a very high density of the entire tumor similar in degree to that of the bone one year later. These results suggested that radiotherapy is effective for this tumor. (author)

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  9. Novel supplier of mesenchymal stem cell: subacromial bursa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhee, S-H; Jo, Y H; Kim, B Y; Nam, B M; Nemeno, J G; Lee, S; Yang, W; Lee, J I

    2013-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stromal elements that can differentiate into a variety of cell types. MSCs are good sources of therapeutic cells for degenerative diseases. For these reason, many researchers have focused on searching for other sources of MSCs. To obtain MSCs for clinical use requires surgery of the donor that therefore can induce donor morbidity, since the common sources at present are bone marrow and adipose tissues. In this study, we investigated the existence of MSCs in postoperative discarded tissues. Subacromial bursal tissues were obtained from the shoulders of 3 injured patients. The cells from the bursa tissues were isolated through treatment with collagenase. The isolated cells were then seeded and expanded by serial passaging under normal culture system. To evaluate MSC characteristics of the cells, their MSC markers were confirmed by mRNA and protein expression. Multipotent ability was assessed using differentiation media and immunohistochemistry. Cells from the bursa expressed MSCs markers-CD29, CD73, CD90, and PDGFRB (platelet-derived growth factor receptor-beta). Moreover, as to their multipotency, bursal cells differentiated into adipocytes (fat cells), osteocytes (bone cells), and chondrocytes (cartilage cells). In summary, we showed that MSCs could be generated from the subacromial bursa, which is medical waste after surgery. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of Mesenchymal Stem Cell secreted PAI-1 on colon cancer cell migration and proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, Niamh M.; Joyce, Myles R.; Murphy, J. Mary; Barry, Frank P.; O’Brien, Timothy; Kerin, Michael J.; Dwyer, Roisin M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •MSCs were directly co-cultured with colorectal cancer (CRC) cells on 3D scaffolds. •MSCs influence CRC protein/gene expression, proliferation and migration. •We report a significant functional role of MSC-secreted PAI-1 in colon cancer. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal Stem Cells are known to engraft and integrate into the architecture of colorectal tumours, with little known regarding their fate following engraftment. This study aimed to investigate mediators of Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) and colon cancer cell (CCC) interactions. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and colon cancer cells (HT29 and HCT-116) were cultured individually or in co-culture on 3-dimensional scaffolds. Conditioned media containing all secreted factors was harvested at day 1, 3 and 7. Chemokine secretion and expression were analyzed by Chemi-array, ELISA (Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1)) and RQ-PCR. Colon cancer cell migration and proliferation in response to recombinant PAI-1, MSCs and MSCs + antibody to PAI-1 was analyzed using Transwell inserts and an MTS proliferation assay respectively. Chemi-array revealed secretion of a wide range of factors by each cell population, including PAI-1and MIF. ELISA analysis revealed Mesenchymal Stem Cells to secrete the highest levels of PAI-1 (MSC mean 10.6 ng/mL, CCC mean 1.01 ng/mL), while colon cancer cells were the principal source of MIF. MSC-secreted PAI-1 stimulated significant migration of both CCC lines, with an antibody to the chemokine shown to block this effect (67–88% blocking,). A cell-line dependant effect on CCC proliferation was shown for Mesenchymal Stem Cell-secreted PAI-1 with HCT-116 cells showing decreased proliferation at all concentrations, and HT29 cells showing increased proliferation in the presence of higher PAI-1 levels. This is the first study to identify PAI-1 as an important mediator of Mesenchymal Stem Cell/colon cancer cell interactions and highlights the

  11. Feasibility of mesenchymal stem cell culture expansion for a phase I clinical trial in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planchon, Sarah M; Lingas, Karen T; Reese Koç, Jane; Hooper, Brittney M; Maitra, Basabi; Fox, Robert M; Imrey, Peter B; Drake, Kylie M; Aldred, Micheala A; Lazarus, Hillard M; Cohen, Jeffrey A

    2018-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory, neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system for which therapeutic mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is under study. Published experience of culture-expanding multiple sclerosis patients' mesenchymal stem cells for clinical trials is limited. To determine the feasibility of culture-expanding multiple sclerosis patients' mesenchymal stem cells for clinical use. In a phase I trial, autologous, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from 25 trial participants with multiple sclerosis and eight matched controls, and culture-expanded to a target single dose of 1-2 × 10 6 cells/kg. Viability, cell product identity and sterility were assessed prior to infusion. Cytogenetic stability was assessed by single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of mesenchymal stem cells from 18 multiple sclerosis patients and five controls. One patient failed screening. Mesenchymal stem cell culture expansion was successful for 24 of 25 multiple sclerosis patients and six of eight controls. The target dose was achieved in 16-62 days, requiring two to three cell passages. Growth rate and culture success did not correlate with demographic or multiple sclerosis disease characteristics. Cytogenetic studies identified changes on one chromosome of one control (4.3%) after extended time in culture. Culture expansion of mesenchymal stem cells from multiple sclerosis patients as donors is feasible. However, culture time should be minimized for cell products designated for therapeutic administration.

  12. Mesenchymal Stem Cells after Polytrauma: Actor and Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Huber-Lang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent cells that are considered indispensable in regeneration processes after tissue trauma. MSCs are recruited to damaged areas via several chemoattractant pathways where they function as “actors” in the healing process by the secretion of manifold pro- and anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, pro- and anticoagulatory, and trophic/angiogenic factors, but also by proliferation and differentiation into the required cells. On the other hand, MSCs represent “targets” during the pathophysiological conditions after severe trauma, when excessively generated inflammatory mediators, complement activation factors, and damage- and pathogen-associated molecular patterns challenge MSCs and alter their functionality. This in turn leads to complement opsonization, lysis, clearance by macrophages, and reduced migratory and regenerative abilities which culminate in impaired tissue repair. We summarize relevant cellular and signaling mechanisms and provide an up-to-date overview about promising future therapeutic MSC strategies in the context of severe tissue trauma.

  13. Cardioprotective Effects of Wharton Jelly Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation in a Rodent Model of Myocardial Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaafar, Taghrid; Attia, Wael; Mahmoud, Shereen; Sabry, Dina; Aziz, Osama Abdel; Rasheed, Dina; Hamza, Hala

    2017-05-30

    Whartons jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells are a valuable alternative source that possess multipotent properties, easy to obtain and available in large scale compared to BMMSCs. We investigated the possibility of cardiac function improvement post isoproterenol induced cardiac injury in a rat model following human WJMSCs transplantation. MSCs were extracted and cultured from cord WJ, characterized by morphology, Immunophenotyping and differentiation to osteoblast and adipocytes. WJMSCs were labeled with PKH2 linker dye. Wistar rats were divided into control group, ISO group (injected with 2 doses of isoproterenol) to induce myocardial injury and ISO group transplanted with labelled WJMSCs. ECG, electrocardiographic patterns, cardiac marker enzymes, tracing of labeled MSCs and immunohistochemical analysis of myocardial cryosections were studied. WJ derived MSCs were expanded for more than 14 passages while maintaining their undifferentiated state, were positive for MSC markers and were able to differentiate into adipocyte and osteoblast. We demonstrated that intravenously administered WJMSCs were capable of homing predominently in the ischemic myocardium. Cardiac markers were positively altered in stem cell treated group compared to ISO group. ECG and ECHO changes were improved with higher survival rate. WJMSCs could differentiate into cardiac-like cells (positive for cardiac specific proteins) in vivo. WJMSCs infusion promoted cardiac protection and reduced mortality, emphasizing a promising therapeutic role for myocardial insufficiency.

  14. Guidance of mesenchymal stem cells on fibronectin structured hydrogel films.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Kasten

    Full Text Available Designing of implant surfaces using a suitable ligand for cell adhesion to stimulate specific biological responses of stem cells will boost the application of regenerative implants. For example, materials that facilitate rapid and guided migration of stem cells would promote tissue regeneration. When seeded on fibronectin (FN that was homogeneously immmobilized to NCO-sP(EO-stat-PO, which otherwise prevents protein binding and cell adhesion, human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC revealed a faster migration, increased spreading and a more rapid organization of different cellular components for cell adhesion on fibronectin than on a glass surface. To further explore, how a structural organization of FN controls the behavior of MSC, adhesive lines of FN with varying width between 10 µm and 80 µm and spacings between 5 µm and 20 µm that did not allow cell adhesion were generated. In dependance on both line width and gaps, cells formed adjacent cell contacts, were individually organized in lines, or bridged the lines. With decreasing sizes of FN lines, speed and directionality of cell migration increased, which correlated with organization of the actin cytoskeleton, size and shape of the nuclei as well as of focal adhesions. Together, defined FN lines and gaps enabled a fine tuning of the structural organization of cellular components and migration. Microstructured adhesive substrates can mimic the extracellular matrix in vivo and stimulate cellular mechanisms which play a role in tissue regeneration.

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy in Diabetes Mellitus: Progress and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagwa El-Badri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with significant morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular, nervous, and renal complications. Attempts to cure diabetes mellitus using islet transplantation have been successful in providing a source for insulin secreting cells. However, limited donors, graft rejection, the need for continued immune suppression, and exhaustion of the donor cell pool prompted the search for a more sustained source of insulin secreting cells. Stem cell therapy is a promising alternative for islet transplantation in type 2 diabetic patients who fail to control hyperglycemia even with insulin injection. Autologous stem cell transplantation may provide the best outcome for those patients, since autologous cells are readily available and do not entail prolonged hospital stays or sustained immunotoxic therapy. Among autologous adult stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs therapy has been applied with varying degrees of success in both animal models and in clinical trials. This review will focus on the advantages of MSCs over other types of stem cells and the possible mechanisms by which MSCs transplant restores normoglycemia in type 2 diabetic patients. Sources of MSCs including autologous cells from diabetic patients and the use of various differentiation protocols in relation to best transplant outcome will be discussed.

  16. Induction of mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenesis by polyacrylate substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennon-Alty, Laurence; Williams, Rachel; Dixon, Simon; Murray, Patricia

    2013-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can generate chondrocytes in vitro, but typically need to be cultured as aggregates in the presence of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), which makes scale-up difficult. Here we investigated if polyacrylate substrates modelled on the functional group composition and distribution of the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) integrin-binding site could induce MSCs to undergo chondrogenesis in the absence of exogenous TGF-β. Within a few days of culture on the biomimetic polyacrylates, both mouse and human MSCs, and a mesenchymal-like mouse-kidney-derived stem cell line, began to form multi-layered aggregates and started to express the chondrocyte-specific markers, Sox9, collagen II and aggrecan. Moreover, collagen II tended to be expressed in the centre of the aggregates, similarly to developing limb buds in vivo. Surface analysis of the substrates indicated that those with the highest surface amine content were most effective at promoting MSC chondrogenesis. These results highlight the importance of surface group functionality and the distribution of those groups in the design of substrates to induce MSC chondrogenesis. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. IL-17 inhibits chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kondo

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can differentiate into cells of mesenchymal lineages, such as osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Here we investigated the effects of IL-17, a key cytokine in chronic inflammation, on chondrogenic differentiation of human MSCs. METHODS: Human bone marrow MSCs were pellet cultured in chondrogenic induction medium containing TGF-β3. Chondrogenic differentiation was detected by cartilage matrix accumulation and chondrogenic marker gene expression. RESULTS: Over-expression of cartilage matrix and chondrogenic marker genes was noted in chondrogenic cultures, but was inhibited by IL-17 in a dose-dependent manner. Expression and phosphorylation of SOX9, the master transcription factor for chondrogenesis, were induced within 2 days and phosphorylated SOX9 was stably maintained until day 21. IL-17 did not alter total SOX9 expression, but significantly suppressed SOX9 phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner. At day 7, IL-17 also suppressed the activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA, which is known to phosphorylate SOX9. H89, a selective PKA inhibitor, also suppressed SOX9 phosphorylation, expression of chondrogenic markers and cartilage matrix, and also decreased chondrogenesis. CONCLUSIONS: IL-17 inhibited chondrogenesis of human MSCs through the suppression of PKA activity and SOX9 phosphorylation. These results suggest that chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs can be inhibited by a mechanism triggered by IL-17 under chronic inflammation.

  18. Regenerative Potential of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Age-Related Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna, Flavia; Contador, David; Conget, Paulette; Erranz, Benjamín; Sossa, Claudia L; Arango-Rodríguez, Martha L

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that a therapeutic effect results from mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) transplant. No systematic information is currently available regarding whether donor age modifies MSC regenerative potential on cutaneous wound healing. Here, we evaluate whether donor age influences this potential. Two different doses of bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) from young, adult, or old mouse donors or two doses of their acellular derivatives mesenchymal stromal cells (acd-MSCs) were intradermally injected around wounds in the midline of C57BL/6 mice. Every two days, wound healing was macroscopically assessed (wound closure) and microscopically assessed (reepithelialization, dermal-epidermal junction, skin appendage regeneration, granulation tissue, leukocyte infiltration, and density dermal collagen fibers) after 12 days from MSC transplant. Significant differences in the wound closure kinetic, quality, and healing of skin regenerated were observed in lesions which received BM-MSCs from different ages or their acd-MSCs compared to lesions which received vehicle. Nevertheless, our data shows that adult's BM-MSCs or their acd-MSCs were the most efficient for recovery of most parameters analyzed. Our data suggest that MSC efficacy was negatively affected by donor age, where the treatment with adult's BM-MSCs or their acd-MSCs in cutaneous wound promotes a better tissue repair/regeneration. This is due to their paracrine factors secretion.

  19. Regenerative Potential of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Age-Related Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Bruna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that a therapeutic effect results from mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs transplant. No systematic information is currently available regarding whether donor age modifies MSC regenerative potential on cutaneous wound healing. Here, we evaluate whether donor age influences this potential. Two different doses of bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs from young, adult, or old mouse donors or two doses of their acellular derivatives mesenchymal stromal cells (acd-MSCs were intradermally injected around wounds in the midline of C57BL/6 mice. Every two days, wound healing was macroscopically assessed (wound closure and microscopically assessed (reepithelialization, dermal-epidermal junction, skin appendage regeneration, granulation tissue, leukocyte infiltration, and density dermal collagen fibers after 12 days from MSC transplant. Significant differences in the wound closure kinetic, quality, and healing of skin regenerated were observed in lesions which received BM-MSCs from different ages or their acd-MSCs compared to lesions which received vehicle. Nevertheless, our data shows that adult’s BM-MSCs or their acd-MSCs were the most efficient for recovery of most parameters analyzed. Our data suggest that MSC efficacy was negatively affected by donor age, where the treatment with adult’s BM-MSCs or their acd-MSCs in cutaneous wound promotes a better tissue repair/regeneration. This is due to their paracrine factors secretion.

  20. Mesenchymal stem cell injections improve symptoms of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Yong-Gon; Jo, Seung-Bae; Kwon, Oh-Ryong; Suh, Dong-Suk; Lee, Seung-Woo; Park, Sung-Ho; Choi, Yun-Jin

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and imaging results of patients who received intra-articular injections of autologous mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. The study group comprised 18 patients (6 men and 12 women), among whom the mean age was 54.6 years (range, 41 to 69 years). In each patient the adipose synovium was harvested from the inner side of the infrapatellar fat pad by skin incision extension at the arthroscopic lateral portal site after the patient underwent arthroscopic debridement. After stem cells were isolated, a mean of 1.18 × 10(6) stem cells (range, 0.3 × 10(6) to 2.7 × 10(6) stem cells) were prepared with approximately 3.0 mL of platelet-rich plasma (with a mean of 1.28 × 10(6) platelets per microliter) and injected into the selected knees of patients. Clinical outcome was evaluated with the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, the Lysholm score, and the visual analog scale (VAS) for grading knee pain. We also compared magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data collected both preoperatively and at the final follow-up. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index scores decreased significantly (P stem cells injected. The results of our study are encouraging and show that intra-articular injection of infrapatellar fat pad-derived mesenchymal stem cells is effective for reducing pain and improving knee function in patients being treated for knee osteoarthritis. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular fingerprinting of TGFbeta-treated embryonic maxillary mesenchymal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, M M; Mukhopadhyay, P; Greene, R M

    2003-11-01

    The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF(beta)) family represents a class of signaling molecules that plays a central role in normal embryonic development, specifically in development of the craniofacial region. Members of this family are vital to development of the secondary palate where they regulate maxillary and palate mesenchymal cell proliferation and extracellular matrix synthesis. The function of this growth factor family is particularly critical in that perturbation of either process results in a cleft of the palate. While the cellular and phenotypic effects of TGF(beta) on embryonic craniofacial tissue have been extensively cataloged, the specific genes that function as downstream mediators of TGF(beta) in maxillary/palatal development are poorly defined. Gene expression arrays offer the ability to conduct a rapid, simultaneous assessment of hundreds to thousands of differentially expressed genes in a single study. Inasmuch as the downstream sequelae of TGF(beta) action are only partially defined, a complementary DNA (cDNA) expression array technology (Clontech's Atlas Mouse cDNA Expression Arrays), was utilized to delineate a profile of differentially expressed genes from TGF(beta)-treated primary cultures of murine embryonic maxillary mesenchymal cells. Hybridization of a membrane-based cDNA array (1178 genes) was performed with 32P-labeled cDNA probes synthesized from RNA isolated from either TGF(beta)-treated or vehicle-treated embryonic maxillary mesenchymal cells. Resultant phosphorimages were subject to AtlasImage analysis in order to determine differences in gene expression between control and TGF(beta)-treated maxillary mesenchymal cells. Of the 1178 arrayed genes, 552 (47%) demonstrated detectable levels of expression. Steady state levels of 22 genes were up-regulated, while those of 8 other genes were down-regulated, by a factor of twofold or greater in response to TGF(beta). Affected genes could be grouped into three general functional

  2. The plasticity of human breast carcinoma cells is more than epithelial to mesenchymal conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole William; Nielsen, Helga Lind; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn

    2001-01-01

    . It has also become clear that conversions towards the mesenchymal lineage actually occur, referred to as epithelial to mesenchymal transitions. Indeed, some of the so-called myofibroblasts surrounding the tumor may have an epithelial origin rather than a mesenchymal origin. Because myoepithelial cells......The human breast comprises three lineages: the luminal epithelial lineage, the myoepithelial lineage, and the mesenchymal lineage. It has been widely accepted that human breast neoplasia pertains only to the luminal epithelial lineage. In recent years, however, evidence has accumulated......, epithelial to mesenchymal transition-derived cells, genuine stromal cells and myofibroblasts share common markers, we now need to define a more ambitious set of markers to distinguish these cell types in the microenvironment of the tumors. This is necessary because the different microenvironments may confer...

  3. Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Human Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and their Differentiation towards the Osteoblastic Lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konda, Bikash; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Hellweg, Christine; Reitz, Guenther; Lau, Patrick

    Radiation exposure and musculoskeletal disuse are among the major challenges during space missions. Astronauts face the problem to lose bone calcium due to uncoupling of bone formation and resorption. Bone forming osteoblasts can be derived from the undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cell compartment (MSC). In this study, the ability of human adipose tissue derived stem cells (ATSC) to differentiate into the osteoblastic lineage was examined after radiation exposure in presence of medium supplementation with osteogenic additives (ß-glycerophosphate, ascorbic acid and dexamethasone). The SAOS-2 cell line (human osteosarcoma cell line) was used as control for osteoblastic differentiation. Changes in cellular morphology, cell cycle progression, as well as cellular radiation sensitivity were characterized after ionizing radiation exposure with X-rays and heavy ions (Ti). Rapidly proliferating SAOS-2 cells are less radiation-sensitive than slowly proliferating ATSC cells after X-ray (CFA: dose effect curves show D0 values of 1 Gy and 0.75 Gy for SAOS-2 and ATSC, respectively) exposure. Heavy ion (Ti) exposure resulted in a greater extent of cells accumulating in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle in a dose-dependent manner when compared to X-ray exposure. Differentiation of cells towards the osteoblastic lineage was quantified by hydroxyapatite (HA) deposition using Lonza OsteoImageTM mineralization assay. The deposition of HA after X- and Ti-irradiation for highly proliferating SAOS-2 cells showed a dose-dependent time delay while slowly proliferating ATSC showed no effect from radiation exposure. More detailed investigation is required to reveal the radiation dependent mechanism of bone loss in astronauts.

  4. Mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage regeneration in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjánsson, Baldur; Honsawek, Sittisak

    2017-09-18

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a slowly progressive disease where cartilage of the synovial joint degenerates. It is most common in the elderly where patients experience pain and reduce physical activity. In combination with lack of conventional treatment, patients are often left with no other choices than arthroplasty. Over the last years, multipotent stromal cells have been used in efforts to treat OA. Mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs) are stromal cells that can differentiate into bone, fat, and cartilage cells. They reside within bone marrow and fat. MSCs can also be found in synovial joints where they affect the progression of OA. They can be isolated and proliferated in an incubator before being applied in clinical trials. When it comes to treatment, emphasis has hitherto been on autologous MSCs, but allogenic cells from healthy donors are emerging as another source of the cells. The first adaptations of MSCs revolved in the use of cell-rich matrix, delivered as invasive surgical procedure, which resulted in production of hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage. However, the demand for less invasive delivery of cells has prompted the use of direct intra-articular injections, wherein a large amount of suspended cells are implanted in the cartilage defect.

  5. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Attenuating Age-Related Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation towards the bone forming osteoblastic lineage decreases as a function of age and may contribute to age-related...problem of age-related reduced availability of MSC we propose to examine the bone anabolic potential of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) derived MSC

  6. Controversial issue: is it safe to employ mesenchymal stem cells in cell-based therapies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lepperdinger, Günter; Brunauer, Regina; Jamnig, Angelika

    2008-01-01

    The prospective clinical use of multipotent mesenchymal stromal stem cells (MSC) holds enormous promise for the treatment of a large number of degenerative and age-related diseases. However, the challenges and risks for cell-based therapies are multifaceted. The risks for patients receiving stem...

  7. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for osteoarthritis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wyles CC

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cody C Wyles,1 Matthew T Houdek,2 Atta Behfar,3 Rafael J Sierra,21Mayo Medical School, 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, 3Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Osteoarthritis (OA is a painful chronic condition with a significant impact on quality of life. The societal burden imposed by OA is increasing in parallel with the aging population; however, no therapies have demonstrated efficacy in preventing the progression of this degenerative joint disease. Current mainstays of therapy include activity modification, conservative pain management strategies, weight loss, and if necessary, replacement of the affected joint. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are a multipotent endogenous population of progenitors capable of differentiation to musculoskeletal tissues. MSCs have a well-documented immunomodulatory role, managing the inflammatory response primarily through paracrine signaling. Given these properties, MSCs have been proposed as a potential regenerative cell therapy source for patients with OA. Research efforts are focused on determining the ideal source for derivation, as MSCs are native to several tissues. Furthermore, optimizing the mode of delivery remains a challenge both for appropriate localization of MSCs and for directed guidance toward stemming the local inflammatory process and initiating a regenerative response. Scaffolds and matrices with growth factor adjuvants may prove critical in this effort. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current state of MSC-based therapeutics for OA and discuss potential barriers that must be overcome for successful implementation of cell-based therapy as a routine treatment strategy in orthopedics.Keywords: mesenchymal stem cell, osteoarthritis, treatment, regenerative medicine, cell therapy

  8. Starfish ApDOCK protein essentially functions in larval defense system operated by mesenchyme cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Ryohei; Funabashi, Hiromi; Matsumoto, Midori; Kaneko, Hiroyuki

    2012-11-01

    In larvae of the starfish, Asterina pectinifera, mesenchyme cells operate in the defense system through various behaviors. We have investigated mesenchyme cell dynamics during the immune response by identifying ApDOCK, a new member of the DOCK180 superfamily protein. In 4-day-old bipinnaria larvae processed for morpholino oligonucleotide-mediated knockdown of ApDOCK, injection of inorganic foreign substances revealed that (1) mesenchyme cells fail to undergo either directed migration toward a large oil-droplet or persistent spreading on the oil-droplet after contact; (2) neither uptake of micro-beads nor cell-to-cell fusion on the large oil-droplet differed from that of mesenchyme cells from control larvae. Similar behaviors were also recorded in experiments where bacteria were injected. Under culture conditions, the expression level of ApDOCK mRNA was significantly associated with the immunological behavior of mesenchyme cells. Apparently, the mesenchyme cells from ApDOCK loss-of-function larvae exhibited insufficient lamellipodium formation via lack of fibrous form of actin organization at the leading edge. These results suggest that the migratory congregation and persistence of encapsulation of larval mesenchyme cells are intracellularly regulated by ApDOCK protein, and this regulation is associated with organization of cytoskeletal actin.

  9. Myogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells for muscle regeneration in urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Zheng, Jun-hua; Zhang, Yuan-yuan

    2013-01-01

    This article was to review the current status of adult mesenchymal stem cells transplantation for muscle regeneration in urinary tract and propose the future prospect in this field. The data used in this review were mainly obtained from articles listed in Medline and PubMed (2000-2013). The search terms were "mesenchymal stem cells", "bladder", "stress urinary incontinence" and "tissue engineering". Articles regarding the adult mesenchymal stem cells for tissue engineering of bladder and stress urinary incontinence were selected and reviewed. Adult mesenchymal stem cells had been identified and well characterized in human bone marrow, adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and urine, and demonstrated the capability of differentiating into smooth muscle cells and skeletal muscle cells under myogenic differentiation conditions in vitro. Multiple preclinical and clinical studies indicated that adult mesenchymal stem cells could restore and maintain the structure and function of urinary muscle tissues after transplanted, and potentially improve the quality of life in patients. Smooth or skeletal myogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells with regenerative medicine technology may provide a novel approach for muscle regeneration and tissue repair in urinary tract. The long-term effect and safety of mesenchymal stem cell transplantation should be further evaluated before this approach becomes widely used in patients.

  10. Application of human amniotic mesenchymal cells as an allogeneic transplantation cell source in bone regenerative therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuno, Hiroaki [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Yoshida, Toshiko [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Nogami, Makiko [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Koike, Chika; Okabe, Motonori [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Noto, Zenko [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Arai, Naoya; Noguchi, Makoto [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Nikaido, Toshio, E-mail: tnikaido@med.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Autogenous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have therapeutic applications in bone regenerative therapy due to their pluripotency. However, the ability of MSCs to proliferate and differentiate varies between donors. Furthermore, alternative sources of MSCs are required for patients with contraindications to autogenous cell therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of mesenchymal cells from the human amniotic membrane (HAM) as a source of cells for allogeneic transplantation in bone regenerative therapy. Cells that retained a proliferative capacity of more than 50 population doubling level were distinguished from other HAM cells as HAM{alpha} cells and induced to osteogenic status-their in vivo osteogenesis was subsequently investigated in rats. It was found that HAM{alpha} cells were spindle shaped and were positive for MSC markers and negative for hematopoietic stem cell markers. Alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition increased with osteogenic status of HAM{alpha} cells. The expression of osteocalcin mRNA was increased in HAM{alpha} cells cultured on calcium phosphate scaffolds. Moreover, xenografted HAM{alpha} cells remained viable and produced extracellular matrix for several weeks. Thus, this study suggests that human amniotic mesenchymal cells possess osteogenic differentiation potential and could be applied to allogeneic transplantation in bone regenerative therapy. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human amniotic mesenchymal cells include cells (HAM{alpha} cells) that have the properties of MSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HAM{alpha} cells have excellent osteogenic differentiation potential. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Osteogenic differentiation ability of HAM{alpha} was amplified by calcium phosphate scaffolds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HAM{alpha} cells can be applicable to allogeneic cell transplantation in bone regenerative therapy.

  11. Engraftment of donor mesenchymal stem cells in chimeric BXSB includes vascular endothelial cells and hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones OY

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Olcay Y Jones1, Faysal Gok2, Elisabeth J Rushing3, Iren Horkayne-Szakaly4, Atif A Ahmed51Department of Pediatrics, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Department of Pediatrics, Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Ankara, Turkey; 3Institut für Neuropathologie, Universitäts Spital Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland; 4Department of Neuropathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, DC, USA; 5Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Kansas City, MO, USAAbstract: Somatic tissue engraftment was studied in BXSB mice treated with mesenchymal stem cell transplantation. Hosts were conditioned with nonlethal radiation prior to introducing donor cells from major histocompatibility complex-matched green fluorescent protein transgenic mice. Transplant protocols differed for route of injection, ie, intravenous (i.v. versus intraperitoneal (i.p., and source of mesenchymal stem cells, ie, unfractionated bone marrow cells, ex vivo expanded mesenchymal stem cells, or bone chips. Tissue chimerism was determined after short (10–12 weeks or long (62 weeks posttransplant follow-up by immunohistochemistry for green fluorescent protein. Engraftment of endothelial cells was seen in several organs including liver sinusoidal cells in i.v. treated mice with ex vivo expanded mesenchymal stem cells or with unfractionated bone marrow cells. Periportal engraftment of liver hepatocytes, but not engraftment of endothelial cells, was found in mice injected i.p. with bone chips. Engraftment of adipocytes was a common denominator in both i.v. and i.p. routes and occurred during early phases post-transplant. Disease control was more robust in mice that received both i.v. bone marrow and i.p. bone chips compared to mice that received i.v. bone marrow alone. Thus, the data support potential use of mesenchymal stem cell transplant for treatment of severe lupus. Future studies are needed to optimize

  12. Chondrogenic potential of human adult mesenchymal stem cells is independent of age or osteoarthritis etiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scharstuhl, A.; Schewe, B.; Benz, K.; Gaissmaier, C.; Bühring, H.J.; Stoop, R.

    2007-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial disease strongly correlated with history of joint trauma, joint dysplasia, and advanced age. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising cells for biological cartilage regeneration. Conflicting data have been published concerning the availability of MSCs from

  13. Chondrogenic potential of human adult mesenchymal stem cells is independent of age or osteoarthritis etiology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scharstuhl, A.; Schewe, B.; Benz, K.; Gaissmaier, C.; Buhring, H.J.; Stoop, R.

    2007-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial disease strongly correlated with history of joint trauma, joint dysplasia, and advanced age. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising cells for biological cartilage regeneration. Conflicting data have been published concerning the availability of MSCs from

  14. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy: Two steps forward, one step back

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankrum, James; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2010-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy is poised to establish a new clinical paradigm; however, recent trials have produced mixed results. Although MSC were originally considered to treat connective tissue defects, preclinical studies revealed potent immunomodulatory properties that prompted the use of MSC to treat numerous inflammatory conditions. Unfortunately, although clinical trials have met safety endpoints, efficacy has not been demonstrated. We believe the challenge to demonstrate efficacy can be attributed in part to an incomplete understanding of the fate of MSC following infusion. Here, we highlight the clinical status of MSC therapy and discuss the importance of cell-tracking techniques, which have advanced our understanding of the fate and function of systemically infused MSC and might improve clinical application. PMID:20335067

  15. The Modulatory Effects of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Osteoclastogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharaf-Eldin, Wessam E.; Abu-Shahba, Nourhan; Mahmoud, Marwa; El-Badri, Nagwa

    2016-01-01

    The effect of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on bone formation has been extensively demonstrated through several in vitro and in vivo studies. However, few studies addressed the effect of MSCs on osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. Under physiological conditions, MSCs support osteoclastogenesis through producing the main osteoclastogenic cytokines, RANKL and M-CSF. However, during inflammation, MSCs suppress osteoclast formation and activity, partly via secretion of the key anti-osteoclastogenic factor, osteoprotegerin (OPG). In vitro, co-culture of MSCs with osteoclasts in the presence of high concentrations of osteoclast-inducing factors might reflect the in vivo inflammatory pathology and prompt MSCs to exert an osteoclastogenic suppressive effect. MSCs thus seem to have a dual effect, by stimulating or inhibiting osteoclastogenesis, depending on the inflammatory milieu. This effect of MSCs on osteoclast formation seems to mirror the effect of MSCs on other immune cells, and may be exploited for the therapeutic potential of MSCs in bone loss associated inflammatory diseases. PMID:26823668

  16. Osteoarthritis and Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Gusti Ayu Putri Purwanthi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is the most common form of arthritis that affects cartilage joints and leads to disability. OA becomes the major public health problem, as it is the most leading cause of disability and morbidity worldwide. Treatment choices for OA can be classified into several categories such as non-pharmacologic, pharmacologic, surgical therapy, and cell-based therapy. There is no curative treatment for OA, while conventional treatments that are commonly used focus on alleviating the pain as the main symptom of the disease. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs that can be found in several tissues of human body offer a new strategy for OA treatment owing to their ability to differentiate into chondrocytes. This article provides an overview about the basic concept of osteoarthritis as well as an insight about the MSCs therapy, including their basic characteristics, source, and transplantation strategies in the OA area.

  17. Circulating mesenchymal stem cells and their clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangliang Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulating mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs is a new cell source for tissue regeneration and tissue engineering. The characteristics of circulating MSCs are similar to those of bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs, but they exist at a very low level in healthy individuals. It has been demonstrated that MSCs are able to migrate to the sites of injury and that they have some distinct genetic profiles compared to BM-MSCs. The current review summaries the basic knowledge of circulating MSCs and their potential clinical applications, such as mobilizing the BM-MSCs into circulation for therapy. The application of MSCs to cure a broad spectrum of diseases is promising, such as spinal cord injury, cardiovascular repair, bone and cartilage repair. The current review also discusses the issues of using of allogeneic MSCs for clinical therapy.

  18. Genetically engineered mesenchymal stem cells: applications in spine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Hadi; Sheyn, Dima; Gazit, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Spine disorders and intervertebral disc degeneration are considered the main causes for the clinical condition commonly known as back pain. Spinal fusion by implanting autologous bone to produce bony bridging between the two vertebrae flanking the degenerated-intervertebral disc is currently the most efficient treatment for relieving the symptoms of back pain. However, donor-site morbidity, complications and the long healing time limit the success of this approach. Novel developments undertaken by regenerative medicine might bring more efficient and available treatments. Here we discuss the pros and cons of utilizing genetically engineered mesenchymal stem cells for inducing spinal fusion. The combination of the stem cells, gene and carrier are crucial elements for achieving optimal spinal fusion in both small and large animal models, which hopefully will lead to the development of clinical applications.

  19. Evidence for Kaposi Sarcoma Originating from Mesenchymal Stem Cell through KSHV-induced Mesenchymal-to-Endothelial Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuqing; Zhong, Canrong; Liu, Dawei; Yu, Wenjing; Chen, Weikang; Wang, Yan; Shi, Songtao; Yuan, Yan

    2018-01-01

    The major transmission route for Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection is the oral cavity through saliva. Kaposi sarcoma (KS) frequently occurs in the oral cavity in HIV-positive individuals and is often the first presenting sign of AIDS. However, the oral target cells for KSHV infection and the cellular origin of Kaposi sarcoma remain unknown. Here we present clinical and experimental evidences that Kaposi sarcoma spindle cells may originate from virally modified oral mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). AIDS-KS spindle cells expressed neuroectodermal stem cell marker (Nestin) and oral MSC marker CD29, suggesting an oral/craniofacial MSC lineage of AIDS-associated Kaposi sarcoma. Furthermore, oral MSCs were highly susceptible to KSHV infection, and infection promoted multilineage differentiation and mesenchymal-to-endothelial transition (MEndT). KSHV infection of oral MSCs resulted in expression of a large number of cytokines, a characteristic of Kaposi sarcoma, and upregulation of Kaposi sarcoma signature and MEndT-associated genes. These results suggest that Kaposi sarcoma may originate from pluripotent MSC and KSHV infection transforms MSC to Kaposi sarcoma-like cells through MEndT. Significance: These findings indicate that Kaposi sarcomas, which arise frequently in AIDS patients, originate from neural crest-derived mesenchymal stem cells, with possible implications for improving the clnical treatment of this malignancy. Cancer Res; 78(1); 230-45. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Calcium-containing scaffolds induce bone regeneration by regulating mesenchymal stem cell differentiation and migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Aquino-Martínez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoinduction and subsequent bone formation rely on efficient mesenchymal stem cell (MSC recruitment. It is also known that migration is induced by gradients of growth factors and cytokines. Degradation of Ca2+-containing biomaterials mimics the bone remodeling compartment producing a localized calcium-rich osteoinductive microenvironment. The aim of our study was to determine the effect of calcium sulfate (CaSO4 on MSC migration. In addition, to evaluate the influence of CaSO4 on MSC differentiation and the potential molecular mechanisms involved. Methods A circular calvarial bone defect (5 mm diameter was created in the parietal bone of 35 Balb-C mice. We prepared and implanted a cell-free agarose/gelatin scaffold alone or in combination with different CaSO4 concentrations into the bone defects. After 7 weeks, we determined the new bone regenerated by micro-CT and histological analysis. In vitro, we evaluated the CaSO4 effects on MSC migration by both wound healing and agarose spot assays. Osteoblastic gene expression after BMP-2 and CaSO4 treatment was also evaluated by qPCR. Results CaSO4 increased MSC migration and bone formation in a concentration-dependent manner. Micro-CT analysis showed that the addition of CaSO4 significantly enhanced bone regeneration compared to the scaffold alone. The histological evaluation confirmed an increased number of endogenous cells recruited into the cell-free CaSO4-containing scaffolds. Furthermore, MSC migration in vitro and active AKT levels were attenuated when CaSO4 and BMP-2 were in combination. Addition of LY294002 and Wortmannin abrogated the CaSO4 effects on MSC migration. Conclusions Specific CaSO4 concentrations induce bone regeneration of calvarial defects in part by acting on the host’s undifferentiated MSCs and promoting their migration. Progenitor cell recruitment is followed by a gradual increment in osteoblast gene expression. Moreover, CaSO4 regulates BMP-2-induced

  1. Calcium-containing scaffolds induce bone regeneration by regulating mesenchymal stem cell differentiation and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino-Martínez, Rubén; Angelo, Alcira P; Pujol, Francesc Ventura

    2017-11-16

    Osteoinduction and subsequent bone formation rely on efficient mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) recruitment. It is also known that migration is induced by gradients of growth factors and cytokines. Degradation of Ca 2+ -containing biomaterials mimics the bone remodeling compartment producing a localized calcium-rich osteoinductive microenvironment. The aim of our study was to determine the effect of calcium sulfate (CaSO 4 ) on MSC migration. In addition, to evaluate the influence of CaSO 4 on MSC differentiation and the potential molecular mechanisms involved. A circular calvarial bone defect (5 mm diameter) was created in the parietal bone of 35 Balb-C mice. We prepared and implanted a cell-free agarose/gelatin scaffold alone or in combination with different CaSO 4 concentrations into the bone defects. After 7 weeks, we determined the new bone regenerated by micro-CT and histological analysis. In vitro, we evaluated the CaSO 4 effects on MSC migration by both wound healing and agarose spot assays. Osteoblastic gene expression after BMP-2 and CaSO 4 treatment was also evaluated by qPCR. CaSO 4 increased MSC migration and bone formation in a concentration-dependent manner. Micro-CT analysis showed that the addition of CaSO 4 significantly enhanced bone regeneration compared to the scaffold alone. The histological evaluation confirmed an increased number of endogenous cells recruited into the cell-free CaSO 4 -containing scaffolds. Furthermore, MSC migration in vitro and active AKT levels were attenuated when CaSO 4 and BMP-2 were in combination. Addition of LY294002 and Wortmannin abrogated the CaSO 4 effects on MSC migration. Specific CaSO 4 concentrations induce bone regeneration of calvarial defects in part by acting on the host's undifferentiated MSCs and promoting their migration. Progenitor cell recruitment is followed by a gradual increment in osteoblast gene expression. Moreover, CaSO 4 regulates BMP-2-induced MSC migration by differentially activating the PI3

  2. Protective Role of Hypothermia Against Heat Stress in Differentiated and Undifferentiated Human Neural Precursor Cells: A Differential Approach for the Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar Vishwakarma

    2017-11-01

    Conclusion: Mild-hypothermia treatment induces attenuated heat shock response against heat stress resulting in induced HSP-70 expression that significantly improves structure and function of both undifferentiated human NPCs and differentiated neurons.

  3. Engineered cartilage regeneration from adipose tissue derived-mesenchymal stem cells: A morphomolecular study on osteoblast, chondrocyte and apoptosis evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Nsir, Houda; Di Rosa, Michelino; Guglielmino, Claudia; Parenti, Rosalba; Calabrese, Giovanna; Pricoco, Elisabetta; Salvatorelli, Lucia; Magro, Gaetano; Imbesi, Rosa; Mobasheri, Ali; Musumeci, Giuseppe

    2017-08-15

    The poor self-repair capacity of cartilage tissue in degenerative conditions, such as osteoarthritis (OA), has prompted the development of a variety of therapeutic approaches, such as cellular therapies and tissue engineering based on the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The aim of this study is to demonstrate, for the first time, that the chondrocytes differentiated from rat adipose tissue derived-MSCs (AMSCs), are able to constitute a morphologically and biochemically healthy hyaline cartilage after 6 weeks of culture on a Collagen Cell Carrier (CCC) scaffold. In this study we evaluated the expression of some osteoblasts (Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and osteocalcin), chondrocytes (collagen I, II and lubricin) and apoptosis (caspase-3) biomarkers in undifferentiated AMSCs, differentiated AMSCs in chondrocytes cultured in monolayer and AMSCs-derived chondrocytes seeded on CCC scaffolds, by different techniques such as immunohistochemistry, ELISA, Western blot and gene expression analyses. Our results showed the increased expression of collagen II and lubricin in AMSCs-derived chondrocytes cultured on CCC scaffolds, whereas the expression of collagen I, RUNX2, osteocalcin and caspase-3 resulted decreased, when compared to the controls. In conclusion, this innovative basic study could be a possible key for future therapeutic strategies for articular cartilage restoration through the use of CCC scaffolds, to reduce the morbidity from acute cartilage injuries and degenerative joint diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Isolation of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Cryopreserved Human Umbilical Cord Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, Yu A; Balashova, E E; Volgina, N E; Kabaeva, N V; Dugina, T N; Sukhikh, G T

    2016-02-01

    Umbilical cord stroma is an easily available, convenient, and promising source of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells for regenerative medicine. Cryogenic storage of umbilical cord tissue provides more possibilities for further isolation of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells for autologous transplantation or scientific purposes. Here we developed a protocol for preparation of the whole umbilical cord tissue for cryogenic storage that in combination with the previously described modified method of isolation of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells allowed us to isolate cells with high proliferative potential, typical phenotype, and preserved differentiation potencies.

  5. Umbilical Cord as Prospective Source for Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents current evidence on the properties of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells, including origin, proliferative potential, plasticity, stability of karyotype and phenotype, transcriptome, secretome, and immunomodulatory activity. A review of preclinical studies and clinical trials using this cell type is performed. Prospects for the use of mesenchymal stem cells, derived from the umbilical cord, in cell transplantation are associated with the need for specialized biobanking and transplant standardization criteria. PMID:27651799

  6. Human testis-derived embryonic stem cell-like cells are not pluripotent, but possess potential of mesenchymal progenitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chikhovskaya, J. V.; Jonker, M. J.; Meissner, A.; Breit, T. M.; Repping, S.; van Pelt, A. M. M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spontaneous in vitro transition of undifferentiated spermatogonia into the pluripotent cell state has been achieved using neonatal and adult mouse testis tissue. In an effort to establish an analogous source of human patient-specific pluripotent stem cells, several research groups have

  7. In vitro cultivation of canine multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells on collagen membranes treated with hyaluronic acid for cell therapy and tissue regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wodewotzky, T.I.; Lima-Neto, J.F.; Pereira-Júnior, O.C.M.; Sudano, M.J.; Lima, S.A.F.; Bersano, P.R.O.; Yoshioka, S.A.; Landim-Alvarenga, F.C.

    2012-01-01

    Support structures for dermal regeneration are composed of biodegradable and bioresorbable polymers, animal skin or tendons, or are bacteria products. The use of such materials is controversial due to their low efficiency. An important area within tissue engineering is the application of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to reparative surgery. The combined use of biodegradable membranes with stem cell therapy may lead to promising results for patients undergoing unsuccessful conventional treatments. Thus, the aim of this study was to test the efficacy of using membranes composed of anionic collagen with or without the addition of hyaluronic acid (HA) as a substrate for adhesion and in vitro differentiation of bone marrow-derived canine MSCs. The benefit of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on the differentiation of cells in culture was also tested. MSCs were collected from dog bone marrow, isolated and grown on collagen scaffolds with or without HA. Cell viability, proliferation rate, and cellular toxicity were analyzed after 7 days. The cultured cells showed uniform growth and morphological characteristics of undifferentiated MSCs, which demonstrated that MSCs successfully adapted to the culture conditions established by collagen scaffolds with or without HA. This demonstrates that such scaffolds are promising for applications to tissue regeneration. bFGF significantly increased the proliferative rate of MSCs by 63% when compared to groups without the addition of the growth factor. However, the addition of bFGF becomes limiting, since it has an inhibitory effect at high concentrations in culture medium

  8. In vitro cultivation of canine multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells on collagen membranes treated with hyaluronic acid for cell therapy and tissue regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.I. Wodewotzky

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Support structures for dermal regeneration are composed of biodegradable and bioresorbable polymers, animal skin or tendons, or are bacteria products. The use of such materials is controversial due to their low efficiency. An important area within tissue engineering is the application of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs to reparative surgery. The combined use of biodegradable membranes with stem cell therapy may lead to promising results for patients undergoing unsuccessful conventional treatments. Thus, the aim of this study was to test the efficacy of using membranes composed of anionic collagen with or without the addition of hyaluronic acid (HA as a substrate for adhesion and in vitro differentiation of bone marrow-derived canine MSCs. The benefit of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF on the differentiation of cells in culture was also tested. MSCs were collected from dog bone marrow, isolated and grown on collagen scaffolds with or without HA. Cell viability, proliferation rate, and cellular toxicity were analyzed after 7 days. The cultured cells showed uniform growth and morphological characteristics of undifferentiated MSCs, which demonstrated that MSCs successfully adapted to the culture conditions established by collagen scaffolds with or without HA. This demonstrates that such scaffolds are promising for applications to tissue regeneration. bFGF significantly increased the proliferative rate of MSCs by 63% when compared to groups without the addition of the growth factor. However, the addition of bFGF becomes limiting, since it has an inhibitory effect at high concentrations in culture medium.

  9. In vitro cultivation of canine multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells on collagen membranes treated with hyaluronic acid for cell therapy and tissue regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wodewotzky, T.I.; Lima-Neto, J.F. [Departamento de Reprodução Animal e Radiologia Veterinária, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade Estadual de São Paulo, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Pereira-Júnior, O.C.M. [Departamento de Reprodução Animal e Radiologia Veterinária, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade Estadual de São Paulo, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Cirurgia e Anestesiologia Veterinária, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade Estadual de São Paulo, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Sudano, M.J.; Lima, S.A.F. [Departamento de Reprodução Animal e Radiologia Veterinária, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade Estadual de São Paulo, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Bersano, P.R.O. [Departamento de Patologia Veterinária, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade Estadual de São Paulo, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Yoshioka, S.A. [Instituto de Química de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Landim-Alvarenga, F.C. [Departamento de Reprodução Animal e Radiologia Veterinária, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade Estadual de São Paulo, Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2012-09-21

    Support structures for dermal regeneration are composed of biodegradable and bioresorbable polymers, animal skin or tendons, or are bacteria products. The use of such materials is controversial due to their low efficiency. An important area within tissue engineering is the application of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to reparative surgery. The combined use of biodegradable membranes with stem cell therapy may lead to promising results for patients undergoing unsuccessful conventional treatments. Thus, the aim of this study was to test the efficacy of using membranes composed of anionic collagen with or without the addition of hyaluronic acid (HA) as a substrate for adhesion and in vitro differentiation of bone marrow-derived canine MSCs. The benefit of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on the differentiation of cells in culture was also tested. MSCs were collected from dog bone marrow, isolated and grown on collagen scaffolds with or without HA. Cell viability, proliferation rate, and cellular toxicity were analyzed after 7 days. The cultured cells showed uniform growth and morphological characteristics of undifferentiated MSCs, which demonstrated that MSCs successfully adapted to the culture conditions established by collagen scaffolds with or without HA. This demonstrates that such scaffolds are promising for applications to tissue regeneration. bFGF significantly increased the proliferative rate of MSCs by 63% when compared to groups without the addition of the growth factor. However, the addition of bFGF becomes limiting, since it has an inhibitory effect at high concentrations in culture medium.

  10. Tumorigenic hybrids between mesenchymal stem cells and gastric cancer cells enhanced cancer proliferation, migration and stemness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jianguo; Zhu, Yuan; Sun, Zixuan; Ji, Runbi; Zhang, Xu; Xu, Wenrong; Yuan, Xiao; Zhang, Bin; Yan, Yongmin; Yin, Lei; Xu, Huijuan; Zhang, Leilei; Zhu, Wei; Qian, Hui

    2015-10-24

    Emerging evidence indicates that inappropriate cell-cell fusion might contribute to cancer progression. Similarly, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can also fuse with other cells spontaneously and capable of adopting the phenotype of other cells. The aim of our study was to investigate the role of MSCs participated cell fusion in the tumorigenesis of gastric cancer. We fused human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hucMSCs) with gastric cancer cells in vitro by polyethylene glycol (PEG), the hybrid cells were sorted by flow cytometer. The growth and migration of hybrids were assessed by cell counting, cell colony formation and transwell assays. The proteins and genes related to epithelial- mesenchymal transition and stemness were tested by western blot, immunocytochemistry and real-time RT-PCR. The expression of CD44 and CD133 was examined by immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry. The xenograft assay was used to evaluation the tumorigenesis of the hybrids. The obtained hybrids exhibited epithelial- mesenchymal transition (EMT) change with down-regulation of E-cadherin and up-regulation of Vimentin, N-cadherin, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and fibroblast activation protein (FAP). The hybrids also increased expression of stemness factors Oct4, Nanog, Sox2 and Lin28. The expression of CD44 and CD133 on hybrid cells was stronger than parental gastric cancer cells. Moreover, the migration and proliferation of heterotypic hybrids were enhanced. In addition, the heterotypic hybrids promoted the growth abilities of gastric xenograft tumor in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that cell fusion between hucMSCs and gastric cancer cells could contribute to tumorigenic hybrids with EMT and stem cell-like properties, which may provide a flexible tool for investigating the roles of MSCs in gastric cancer.

  11. Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Determines the Vasculogenic Fate of Postnatal Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaocheng; Nör, Felipe; Oh, Min; Cucco, Carolina; Shi, Songtao; Nör, Jacques E

    2016-06-01

    Vasculogenesis is the process of de novo blood vessel formation observed primarily during embryonic development. Emerging evidence suggest that postnatal mesenchymal stem cells are capable of recapitulating vasculogenesis when these cells are engaged in tissue regeneration. However, the mechanisms underlining the vasculogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells remain unclear. Here, we used stem cells from human permanent teeth (dental pulp stem cells [DPSC]) or deciduous teeth (stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth [SHED]) as models of postnatal primary human mesenchymal stem cells to understand mechanisms regulating their vasculogenic fate. GFP-tagged mesenchymal stem cells seeded in human tooth slice/scaffolds and transplanted into immunodeficient mice differentiate into human blood vessels that anastomize with the mouse vasculature. In vitro, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induced the vasculogenic differentiation of DPSC and SHED via potent activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Further, activation of Wnt signaling is sufficient to induce the vasculogenic differentiation of postnatal mesenchymal stem cells, while Wnt inhibition blocked this process. Notably, β-catenin-silenced DPSC no longer differentiate into endothelial cells in vitro, and showed impaired vasculogenesis in vivo. Collectively, these data demonstrate that VEGF signaling through the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway defines the vasculogenic fate of postnatal mesenchymal stem cells. Stem Cells 2016;34:1576-1587. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  12. Comparative epigenetic influence of autologous versus fetal bovine serum on mesenchymal stem cells through in vitro osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fani, Nesa; Ziadlou, Reihane; Shahhoseini, Maryam; Baghaban Eslaminejad, Mohamadreza

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from bone marrow (BM) represents a useful source of adult stem cells for cell therapy and tissue engineering. MSCs are present at a low frequency in the BM; therefore expansion is necessary before performing clinical studies. Fetal bovine serum (FBS) as a nutritional supplement for in vitro culture of MSCs is a suitable additive for human cell culture, but not regarding subsequent use of these cells for clinical treatment of human patients due to the risk of viral and prion transmission as well as xenogeneic immune responses after transplantation. Recently, autologous serum (AS) has been as a supplement to replace FBS in culture medium. We compared the effect of FBS versus AS on the histone modification pattern of MSCs through in vitro osteogenesis and adipogenesis. Differentiation of stem cells under various serum conditions to a committed state involves global changes in epigenetic patterns that are critically determined by chromatin modifications. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) coupled with real-time PCR showed significant changes in the acetylation and methylation patterns in lysine 9 (Lys9) of histone H3 on the regulatory regions of stemness (Nanog, Sox2, Rex1), osteogenic (Runx2, Oc, Sp7) and adipogenic (Ppar-γ, Lpl, adiponectin) marker genes in undifferentiated MSCs, FBS and AS. All epigenetic changes occurred in a serum dependent manner which resulted in higher expression level of stemness genes in undifferentiated MSCs compared to differentiated MSCs and increased expression levels of osteogenic genes in AS compared to FBS. Adipogenic genes showed greater expression in FBS compared to AS. These findings have demonstrated the epigenetic influence of serum culture conditions on differentiation potential of MSCs, which suggest that AS is possibly more efficient serum for osteogenic differentiation of MSCs in cell therapy purposes. - Highlights: • Bone marrow derived MSC could proliferate in AS as well as in FBS

  13. Comparative epigenetic influence of autologous versus fetal bovine serum on mesenchymal stem cells through in vitro osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fani, Nesa [Department of Genetics, Reproductive Biomedicine Research Center, Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Cell Science Research Center, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Tissue Engineering and Applied Cell Sciences, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ziadlou, Reihane [Department of Genetics, Reproductive Biomedicine Research Center, Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Cell Science Research Center, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahhoseini, Maryam, E-mail: m.shahhoseini@royaninstitute.org [Department of Genetics, Reproductive Biomedicine Research Center, Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Baghaban Eslaminejad, Mohamadreza, E-mail: eslami@royaninstitute.org [Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Cell Science Research Center, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-06-10

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from bone marrow (BM) represents a useful source of adult stem cells for cell therapy and tissue engineering. MSCs are present at a low frequency in the BM; therefore expansion is necessary before performing clinical studies. Fetal bovine serum (FBS) as a nutritional supplement for in vitro culture of MSCs is a suitable additive for human cell culture, but not regarding subsequent use of these cells for clinical treatment of human patients due to the risk of viral and prion transmission as well as xenogeneic immune responses after transplantation. Recently, autologous serum (AS) has been as a supplement to replace FBS in culture medium. We compared the effect of FBS versus AS on the histone modification pattern of MSCs through in vitro osteogenesis and adipogenesis. Differentiation of stem cells under various serum conditions to a committed state involves global changes in epigenetic patterns that are critically determined by chromatin modifications. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) coupled with real-time PCR showed significant changes in the acetylation and methylation patterns in lysine 9 (Lys9) of histone H3 on the regulatory regions of stemness (Nanog, Sox2, Rex1), osteogenic (Runx2, Oc, Sp7) and adipogenic (Ppar-γ, Lpl, adiponectin) marker genes in undifferentiated MSCs, FBS and AS. All epigenetic changes occurred in a serum dependent manner which resulted in higher expression level of stemness genes in undifferentiated MSCs compared to differentiated MSCs and increased expression levels of osteogenic genes in AS compared to FBS. Adipogenic genes showed greater expression in FBS compared to AS. These findings have demonstrated the epigenetic influence of serum culture conditions on differentiation potential of MSCs, which suggest that AS is possibly more efficient serum for osteogenic differentiation of MSCs in cell therapy purposes. - Highlights: • Bone marrow derived MSC could proliferate in AS as well as in FBS

  14. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells as Therapies for Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Xiao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic, autoimmune, inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system that leads to permanent neurological deficits. Current MS treatment regimens are insufficient to treat the irreversible neurological disabilities. Tremendous progress in the experimental and clinical applications of cell-based therapies has recognized stem cells as potential candidates for regenerative therapy for many neurodegenerative disorders including MS. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSCs derived precursor cells can modulate the autoimmune response in the central nervous system (CNS and promote endogenous remyelination and repair process in animal models. This review highlights studies involving the immunomodulatory and regenerative effects of mesenchymal stem cells and iPSCs derived cells in animal models, and their translation into immunomodulatory and neuroregenerative treatment strategies for MS.

  15. Intra-arterial delivery of mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuyoshi Watanabe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While treatments have been developed to combat stroke, such as intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator and endovascular recanalization therapies, their ability to decrease the long-term disability that accompanies stroke is limited. Currently, stem cell research focused on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. MSCs are multipotent, nonhematopoietic stem cells found in the stromal fraction of the bone marrow, along with the connective tissue of most organs. MSCs are an increasingly appealing cell source due to the relative ease in which they can be retrieved, developed, and handled in vitro. Despite the fact that numerous paths of stem cell transport to the brain in acute ischemic stroke (AIS exist, the intra-arterial (IA route of stem cell transport is most attractive. This is due to its great potential for clinical translation, especially considering the growing clinical application of endovascular treatment for AIS. Here, we evaluate research examining IA delivery of MSCs to the stroke region. The results of the study revealed the maximum tolerated dose and that the optimal time for administration was 24 h, following cerebral ischemia. It is important that future translational studies are performed to establish IA administration of MSCs as a widely used treatment for AIS.

  16. Adhesion of mesenchymal stem cells to biomimetic polymers: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shotorbani, Behnaz Banimohamad; Alizadeh, Effat; Salehi, Roya; Barzegar, Abolfazl

    2017-01-01

    The mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising candidates for cell therapy due to the self-renewal, multi-potency, ethically approved state and suitability for autologous transplantation. However, key issue for isolation and manipulation of MSCs is adhesion in ex-vivo culture systems. Biomaterials engineered for mimicking natural extracellular matrix (ECM) conditions which support stem cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation represent a main area of research in tissue engineering. Some of them successfully enhanced cells adhesion and proliferation because of their biocompatibility, biomimetic texture, and chemistry. However, it is still in its infancy, therefore intensification and optimization of in vitro, in vivo, and preclinical studies is needed to clarify efficacies as well as applicability of those bioengineered constructs. The aim of this review is to discuss mechanisms related to the in-vitro adhesion of MSCs, surfaces biochemical, biophysical, and other factors (of cell's natural and artificial micro-environment) which could affect it and a review of previous research attempting for its bio-chemo-optimization. - Highlights: • The main materials utilized for fabrication of biomimetic polymers are presented. • MSCs cell-material adhesion mechanism and involved molecules are reviewed. • Surface modifications of polymers in terms of MSC adhesion improving are discussed.

  17. Advances of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow and dental tissue in craniofacial tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Maobin; Zhang, Hongming; Gangolli, Riddhi

    2014-05-01

    Bone and dental tissues in craniofacial region work as an important aesthetic and functional unit. Reconstruction of craniofacial tissue defects is highly expected to ensure patients to maintain good quality of life. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have been developed in the last two decades, and been advanced with the stem cell technology. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells are one of the most extensively studied post-natal stem cell population, and are widely utilized in cell-based therapy. Dental tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells are a relatively new stem cell population that isolated from various dental tissues. These cells can undergo multilineage differentiation including osteogenic and odontogenic differentiation, thus provide an alternative source of mesenchymal stem cells for tissue engineering. In this review, we discuss the important issues in mesenchymal stem cell biology including the origin and functions of mesenchymal stem cells, compare the properties of these two types of mesenchymal cells, update recent basic research and clinic applications in this field, and address important future challenges.

  18. Low-level laser irradiation induces in vitro proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barboza, Carlos Augusto Galvão; Ginani, Fernanda [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil); Soares, Diego Moura [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Henriques, Águida Cristina Gomes; Freitas, Roseana de Almeida [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of low-level laser irradiation on the proliferation and possible nuclear morphological changes of mouse mesenchymal stem cells. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow and adipose tissue were submitted to two applications (T0 and T48 hours) of low-level laser irradiation (660nm; doses of 0.5 and 1.0J/cm{sup 2}). The trypan blue assay was used to evaluate cell viability, and growth curves were used to analyze proliferation at zero, 24, 48, and 72 hours. Nuclear alterations were evaluated by staining with DAPI (4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) at 72 hours. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells responded to laser therapy in a dose-dependent manner. Higher cell growth was observed when the cells were irradiated with a dose of 1.0J/cm{sup 2}, especially after 24 hours (p<0.01). Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells responded better to a dose of 1.0J/cm{sup 2}, but higher cell proliferation was observed after 48 hours (p<0.05) and 72 hours (p<0.01). Neither nuclear alterations nor a significant change in cell viability was detected in the studied groups. Low-level laser irradiation stimulated the proliferation of mouse mesenchymal stem cells without causing nuclear alterations. The biostimulation of mesenchymal stem cells using laser therapy might be an important tool for regenerative therapy and tissue engineering.

  19. Low-level laser irradiation induces in vitro proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barboza, Carlos Augusto Galvão; Ginani, Fernanda; Soares, Diego Moura; Henriques, Águida Cristina Gomes; Freitas, Roseana de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of low-level laser irradiation on the proliferation and possible nuclear morphological changes of mouse mesenchymal stem cells. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow and adipose tissue were submitted to two applications (T0 and T48 hours) of low-level laser irradiation (660nm; doses of 0.5 and 1.0J/cm 2 ). The trypan blue assay was used to evaluate cell viability, and growth curves were used to analyze proliferation at zero, 24, 48, and 72 hours. Nuclear alterations were evaluated by staining with DAPI (4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) at 72 hours. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells responded to laser therapy in a dose-dependent manner. Higher cell growth was observed when the cells were irradiated with a dose of 1.0J/cm 2 , especially after 24 hours (p<0.01). Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells responded better to a dose of 1.0J/cm 2 , but higher cell proliferation was observed after 48 hours (p<0.05) and 72 hours (p<0.01). Neither nuclear alterations nor a significant change in cell viability was detected in the studied groups. Low-level laser irradiation stimulated the proliferation of mouse mesenchymal stem cells without causing nuclear alterations. The biostimulation of mesenchymal stem cells using laser therapy might be an important tool for regenerative therapy and tissue engineering

  20. Optimized Protocol for Isolation of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Human Umbilical Cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, Yu A; Balashova, E E; Volgina, N E; Kabaeva, N V; Dugina, T N; Sukhikh, G T

    2015-11-01

    Extraembryonic tissues, in particular, umbilical cord stroma are promising sources of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells for regenerative medicine. In recent years, methods for isolation of mesenchymal stromal cells from different compartments of the umbilical cords based on enzymatic disaggregation of the tissue or on tissue explants have been proposed. Here we propose a protocol of isolation of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells from the whole umbilical cord that combines the advantages of each approach and ensures sufficient cell yield for further experimental and clinical applications. A combination of short-term incubation of tissue fragments on cold collagenase solution followed by their culturing in the form of explants significantly increased the yield of cells with high proliferative activity, typical pluripotent mesenchymal stromal cell phenotype, and preserved differentiation capacity.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells promote formation of colorectal tumors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kuo-Shu; Yang, Shung-Haur; Lei, Yen-Ping; Tsai, Chih-Chien; Chen, Hsin-Wei; Hsu, Chih-Yuan; Chen, Ling-Lan; Wang, Hsei-Wei; Miller, Stephanie A; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Hung, Mien-Chie; Hung, Shih-Chieh

    2011-09-01

    Tumor-initiating cells are a subset of tumor cells with the ability to form new tumors; however, they account for less than 0.001% of the cells in colorectal or other types of tumors. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) integrate into the colorectal tumor stroma; we investigated their involvement in tumor initiation. Human colorectal cancer cells, MSCs, and a mixture of both cell types were injected subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice. We compared the ability of each injection to form tumors and investigated the signaling pathway involved in tumor initiation. A small number (≤ 10) of unsorted, CD133⁻, CD166⁻, epithelial cell adhesion molecule⁻(EpCAM⁻), or CD133⁻/CD166⁻/EpCAM⁻ colorectal cancer cells, when mixed with otherwise nontumorigenic MSCs, formed tumors in mice. Secretion of interleukin (IL)-6 by MSCs increased the expression of CD133 and activation of Janus kinase 2-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in the cancer cells, and promoted sphere and tumor formation. An antibody against IL-6 or lentiviral-mediated transduction of an interfering RNA against IL-6 in MSCs or STAT3 in cancer cells prevented the ability of MSCs to promote sphere formation and tumor initiation. IL-6, secreted by MSCs, signals through STAT3 to increase the numbers of colorectal tumor-initiating cells and promote tumor formation. Reagents developed to disrupt this process might be developed to treat patients with colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2011 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Factors Restore Function to Human Frataxin-Deficient Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Kevin; Dey, Rimi; Cook, Amelia; Scolding, Neil; Wilkins, Alastair

    2017-08-01

    Friedreich's ataxia is an inherited neurological disorder characterised by mitochondrial dysfunction and increased susceptibility to oxidative stress. At present, no therapy has been shown to reduce disease progression. Strategies being trialled to treat Friedreich's ataxia include drugs that improve mitochondrial function and reduce oxidative injury. In addition, stem cells have been investigated as a potential therapeutic approach. We have used siRNA-induced knockdown of frataxin in SH-SY5Y cells as an in vitro cellular model for Friedreich's ataxia. Knockdown of frataxin protein expression to levels detected in patients with the disorder was achieved, leading to decreased cellular viability, increased susceptibility to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress, dysregulation of key anti-oxidant molecules and deficiencies in both cell proliferation and differentiation. Bone marrow stem cells are being investigated extensively as potential treatments for a wide range of neurological disorders, including Friedreich's ataxia. The potential neuroprotective effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were therefore studied using our frataxin-deficient cell model. Soluble factors secreted by mesenchymal stem cells protected against cellular changes induced by frataxin deficiency, leading to restoration in frataxin levels and anti-oxidant defences, improved survival against oxidative stress and stimulated both cell proliferation and differentiation down the Schwann cell lineage. The demonstration that mesenchymal stem cell-derived factors can restore cellular homeostasis and function to frataxin-deficient cells further suggests that they may have potential therapeutic benefits for patients with Friedreich's ataxia.

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells enhance the metastasis of 3D-cultured hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chang; Liu, Yang; Xu, Xiao-xi; Guo, Xin; Sun, Guang-wei; Ma, Xiao-jun

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidences have demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) could be recruited to the tumor microenvironment. Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSC) were attractive vehicles for delivering therapeutic agents against cancer. Nevertheless, the safety of UCMSC in the treatment of tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was still undetermined. In this study, an in vitro co-culture system was established to evaluate the effect of UCMSC on the cell growth, cancer stem cell (CSC) characteristics, drug resistance, metastasis of 3D-cultured HCC cells, and the underlying mechanism was also investigated. It was found that after co-cultured with UCMSC, the metastatic ability of 3D-cultured HCC cells was significantly enhanced as indicated by up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related genes, and migration ability. However, cell growth, drug resistance and CSC-related gene expression of HCC cells were not affected by UCMSC. Moreover, EMT was reversed, MMP-2 expression was down-regulated, and migration ability of HCC cell was significantly inhibited when TGF-β receptor inhibitor SB431542 was added into the co-culture system. Therefore, these data indicated that UCMSC could significantly enhance the tumor cell metastasis, which was due to the EMT of HCC cells induced by TGF-β. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2595-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  4. High Fat Diet-Induced Skeletal Muscle Wasting Is Decreased by Mesenchymal Stem Cells Administration: Implications on Oxidative Stress, Ubiquitin Proteasome Pathway Activation, and Myonuclear Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Abrigo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity can lead to skeletal muscle atrophy, a pathological condition characterized by the loss of strength and muscle mass. A feature of muscle atrophy is a decrease of myofibrillar proteins as a result of ubiquitin proteasome pathway overactivation, as evidenced by increased expression of the muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases atrogin-1 and MuRF-1. Additionally, other mechanisms are related to muscle wasting, including oxidative stress, myonuclear apoptosis, and autophagy. Stem cells are an emerging therapy in the treatment of chronic diseases such as high fat diet-induced obesity. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are a population of self-renewable and undifferentiated cells present in the bone marrow and other mesenchymal tissues of adult individuals. The present study is the first to analyze the effects of systemic MSC administration on high fat diet-induced skeletal muscle atrophy in the tibialis anterior of mice. Treatment with MSCs reduced losses of muscle strength and mass, decreases of fiber diameter and myosin heavy chain protein levels, and fiber type transitions. Underlying these antiatrophic effects, MSC administration also decreased ubiquitin proteasome pathway activation, oxidative stress, and myonuclear apoptosis. These results are the first to indicate that systemically administered MSCs could prevent muscle wasting associated with high fat diet-induced obesity and diabetes.

  5. Role of fibronectin in primary mesenchyme cell migration in the sea urchin

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    We studied the effect of fibronectin (FN) on the behavior of primary mesenchyme cells isolated from sea urchin mesenchyme blastulae in vitro using a time-lapse technique. The migration of isolated primary mesenchyme cells reconstituted in seawater and horse serum is dependent on the presence or absence of exogenous FN in the culture media. The cells in FN, 4 and 40 micrograms/ml, show a high percentage of migration and migrate long distances, whereas a higher concentration of FN at 400 microg...

  6. Restoration of Corneal Transparency by Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad K. Mittal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Transparency of the cornea is indispensable for optimal vision. Ocular trauma is a leading cause of corneal opacity, leading to 25 million cases of blindness annually. Recently, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have gained prominence due to their inflammation-suppressing and tissue repair functions. Here, we investigate the potential of MSCs to restore corneal transparency following ocular injury. Using an in vivo mouse model of ocular injury, we report that MSCs have the capacity to restore corneal transparency by secreting high levels of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF. Interestingly, our data also show that HGF alone can restore corneal transparency, an observation that has translational implications for the development of HGF-based therapy.

  7. [Immunomodulatory properties of stem mesenchymal cells in autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Berná, Isabel; Santiago-Díaz, Carlos; Jiménez-Alonso, Juan

    2015-01-20

    Autoimmune diseases are a cluster of disorders characterized by a failure of the immune tolerance and a hyperactivation of the immune system that leads to a chronic inflammation state and the damage of several organs. The medications currently used to treat these diseases usually consist of immunosuppressive drugs that have significant systemic toxic effects and are associated with an increased risk of opportunistic infections. Recently, several studies have demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells have immunomodulatory properties, a feature that make them candidates to be used in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. In the present study, we reviewed the role of this therapy in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic sclerosis, Crohn's disease and multiple sclerosis, as well as the potential risks associated with its use. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Mesenchymal stem cells promote cell invasion and migration and autophagy-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Dan; Hu, Shiyuan; Tang, Chunlan; Liu, Guoxiang

    2018-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are recruited into the tumour microenvironment and promote tumour growth and metastasis. Tumour microenvironment-induced autophagy is considered to suppress primary tumour formation by impairing migration and invasion. Whether these recruited MSCs regulate tumour autophagy and whether autophagy affects tumour growth are controversial. Our data showed that MSCs promote autophagy activation, reactive oxygen species production, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) as well as increased migration and invasion in A549 cells. Decreased expression of E-cadherin and increased expression of vimentin and Snail were observed in A549 cells cocultured with MSCs. Conversely, MSC coculture-mediated autophagy positively promoted tumour EMT. Autophagy inhibition suppressed MSC coculture-mediated EMT and reduced A549 cell migration and invasion slightly. Furthermore, the migratory and invasive abilities of A549 cells were additional increased when autophagy was further enhanced by rapamycin treatment. Taken together, this work suggests that microenvironments containing MSCs can promote autophagy activation for enhancing EMT; MSCs also increase the migratory and invasive abilities of A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells. Mesenchymal stem cell-containing microenvironments and MSC-induced autophagy signalling may be potential targets for blocking lung cancer cell migration and invasion. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Mesenchymal stem cells are highly resistant to sulfur mustard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Annette; Scherer, Michael; Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk

    2013-12-05

    The effect of sulfur mustard (SM) to the direct injured tissues of the skin, eyes and airways is well investigated. Little is known about the effect of SM to mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). However, this is an interesting aspect. Comparing the clinical picture of SM it is known today that MSC play an important role e.g. in chronic impaired wound healing. Therefore we wanted to get an understanding about how SM affects MSC and if these findings might become useful to get a better understanding of the effect of sulfur mustard gas with respect to skin wounds. We used mesenchymal stem cells, isolated from femoral heads from healthy donors and treated them with a wide range of SM to ascertain the dose-response-curve. With the determined inhibitory concentrations IC1 (1μM), IC5 (10μM), IC10 (20μM) and IC25 (40μM) we did further investigations. We analyzed the migratory ability and the differentiation capacity under influence of SM. Already very low concentrations of SM demonstrated a strong effect to the migratory activity whereas the differentiation capacity seemed not to be affected. Putting these findings together it seems to be likely that a link between MSC and the impaired wound healing after SM exposure might exist. Same as in patients with chronic impaired wound healing MSC had shown a reduced migratory activity. The fact that MSC are able to tolerate very high concentrations of SM and still do not lose their differentiation capacity may reveal new ways of treating wounds caused by sulfur mustard. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical Applications of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Farini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Extraordinary progress in understanding several key features of stem cells has been made in the last ten years, including definition of the niche, and identification of signals regulating mobilization and homing as well as partial understanding of the mechanisms controlling self-renewal, commitment, and differentiation. This progress produced invaluable tools for the development of rational cell therapy protocols that have yielded positive results in preclinical models of genetic and acquired diseases and, in several cases, have entered clinical experimentation with positive outcome. Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are nonhematopoietic cells with multilineage potential to differentiate into various tissues of mesodermal origin. They can be isolated from bone marrow and other tissues and have the capacity to extensively proliferate in vitro. Moreover, MSCs have also been shown to produce anti-inflammatory molecules which can modulate humoral and cellular immune responses. Considering their regenerative potential and immunoregulatory effect, MSC therapy is a promising tool in the treatment of degenerative, inflammatory, and autoimmune diseases. It is obvious that much work remains to be done to increase our knowledge of the mechanisms regulating development, homeostasis, and tissue repair and thus to provide new tools to implement the efficacy of cell therapy trials.

  11. Oxidative stress induces senescence in human mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandl, Anita [Department of Anesthesiology, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany); Meyer, Matthias; Bechmann, Volker [Department of Trauma Surgery, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany); Nerlich, Michael [Department of Anesthesiology, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany); Angele, Peter, E-mail: Peter.Angele@klinik.uni-regensburg.de [Department of Trauma Surgery, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) contribute to tissue repair in vivo and form an attractive cell source for tissue engineering. Their regenerative potential is impaired by cellular senescence. The effects of oxidative stress on MSCs are still unknown. Our studies were to investigate into the proliferation potential, cytological features and the telomere linked stress response system of MSCs, subject to acute or prolonged oxidant challenge with hydrogen peroxide. Telomere length was measured using the telomere restriction fragment assay, gene expression was determined by rtPCR. Sub-lethal doses of oxidative stress reduced proliferation rates and induced senescent-morphological features and senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase positivity. Prolonged low dose treatment with hydrogen peroxide had no effects on cell proliferation or morphology. Sub-lethal and prolonged low doses of oxidative stress considerably accelerated telomere attrition. Following acute oxidant insult p21 was up-regulated prior to returning to initial levels. TRF1 was significantly reduced, TRF2 showed a slight up-regulation. SIRT1 and XRCC5 were up-regulated after oxidant insult and expression levels increased in aging cells. Compared to fibroblasts and chondrocytes, MSCs showed an increased tolerance to oxidative stress regarding proliferation, telomere biology and gene expression with an impaired stress tolerance in aged cells.

  12. Musculoskeletal tissue engineering with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Limin; Ott, Lindsey; Seshareddy, Kiran; Weiss, Mark L; Detamore, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) hold tremendous promise for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, yet with so many sources of MSCs, what are the primary criteria for selecting leading candidates? Ideally, the cells will be multipotent, inexpensive, lack donor site morbidity, donor materials should be readily available in large numbers, immunocompatible, politically benign and expandable in vitro for several passages. Bone marrow MSCs do not meet all of these criteria and neither do embryonic stem cells. However, a promising new cell source is emerging in tissue engineering that appears to meet these criteria: MSCs derived from Wharton’s jelly of umbilical cord MSCs. Exposed to appropriate conditions, umbilical cord MSCs can differentiate in vitro along several cell lineages such as the chondrocyte, osteoblast, adipocyte, myocyte, neuronal, pancreatic or hepatocyte lineages. In animal models, umbilical cord MSCs have demonstrated in vivo differentiation ability and promising immunocompatibility with host organs/tissues, even in xenotransplantation. In this article, we address their cellular characteristics, multipotent differentiation ability and potential for tissue engineering with an emphasis on musculoskeletal tissue engineering. PMID:21175290

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Nanette; Annett, Geralyn; Wirthlin, Louisa; Olson, Scott; Bauer, Gerhard; Nolta, Jan A

    2010-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells/marrow stromal cells (MSCs) present a promising tool for cell therapy, and are currently being tested in US FDA-approved clinical trials for myocardial infarction, stroke, meniscus injury, limb ischemia, graft-versus-host disease and autoimmune disorders. They have been extensively tested and proven effective in preclinical studies for these and many other disorders. There is currently a great deal of interest in the use of MSCs to treat neurodegenerative diseases, in particular for those that are fatal and difficult to treat, such as Huntington's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Proposed regenerative approaches to neurological diseases using MSCs include cell therapies in which cells are delivered via intracerebral or intrathecal injection. Upon transplantation into the brain, MSCs promote endogenous neuronal growth, decrease apoptosis, reduce levels of free radicals, encourage synaptic connection from damaged neurons and regulate inflammation, primarily through paracrine actions. MSCs transplanted into the brain have been demonstrated to promote functional recovery by producing trophic factors that induce survival and regeneration of host neurons. Therapies will capitalize on the innate trophic support from MSCs or on augmented growth factor support, such as delivering brain-derived neurotrophic factor or glial-derived neurotrophic factor into the brain to support injured neurons, using genetically engineered MSCs as the delivery vehicles. Clinical trials for MSC injection into the CNS to treat traumatic brain injury and stroke are currently ongoing. The current data in support of applying MSC-based cellular therapies to the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders are discussed.

  14. Cryopreservation and Revival of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Ekblond, Annette; Kastrup, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based therapy is a promising and innovative new treatment for different degenerative and autoimmune diseases, and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from the bone marrow have demonstrated great therapeutic potential due to their immunosuppressive and regenerative capacities.The establishment of methods for large-scale expansion of clinical-grade MSCs in vitro has paved the way for their therapeutic use in clinical trials. However, the clinical application of MSCs also requires cryopreservation and banking of the cell products. To preserve autologous or allogeneic MSCs for future clinical applications, a reliable and effective cryopreservation method is required.Developing a successful cryopreservation protocol for clinical stem cell products, cryopreservation media, cryoprotectant agents (CPAs), the freezing container, the freezing temperature, and the cooling and warming rate are all aspects which should be considered.A major challenge is the selection of a suitable cryoprotectant which is able to penetrate the cells and yet has low toxicity.This chapter focuses on recent technological developments relevant for the cryopreservation of MSCs using the most commonly used cryopreservation medium containing DMSO and animal serum or human-derived products for research use and the animal protein-free cryopreservation media CryoStor (BioLife Solutions) for clinical use.

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cells for the Treatment of Skin Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Hasegawa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC-based therapy involving both autologous and allogeneic MSCs shows great promise in treating several conditions. MSCs promote wound healing, and can differentiate into multiple cell lineages, including keratinocytes. Therefore, MSCs can be used for the treatment of congenital or acquired skin defects. Because of their immunomodulatory properties, MSCs may be useful for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune skin diseases. In particular, MSCs might be effective for the treatment of large vitiligo lesions as immunosuppressant or cultured grafts. MSCs can also be a novel cell source for regenerating hair in the treatment of scarring alopecia and androgenic alopecia. MSCs might also be an effective treatment for alopecia areata, which is associated with autoimmunity. Stem cell therapies with topical administration of MSCs and bone marrow transplantation were shown to alleviate recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa in both animal models and human subjects. In addition to cell transplantation, the mobilization of endogenous MSCs has been attempted for skin regeneration. Overall, this review highlights the great potential of MSCs for the treatment of skin diseases in the near future.

  16. Roles of hesC and gcm in echinoid larval mesenchyme cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Atsuko; Minokawa, Takuya

    2016-04-01

    To understand the roles of hesC and gcm during larval mesenchyme specification and differentiation in echinoids, we performed perturbation experiments for these genes in two distantly related euechinoids, Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus and Scaphechinus mirabilis. The number of larval mesenchyme cells increased when the translation of hesC was inhibited, thereby suggesting that hesC has a general role in larval mesenchyme development. We confirmed previous results by demonstrating that gcm is involved in pigment cell differentiation. Simultaneous inhibition of the translation of hesC and gcm induced a significant increase in the number of skeletogenic cells, which suggests that gcm functions in skeletogenic fate repression. Based on these observations, we suggest that: (i) hesC participates in some general aspects of mesenchymal cell development; and (ii) gcm is involved in the mechanism responsible for the binary specification of skeletogenic and pigment cell fates. © 2016 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  17. Evidences of early senescence in multiple myeloma bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibaud André

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In multiple myeloma, bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells support myeloma cell growth. Previous studies have suggested that direct and indirect interactions between malignant cells and bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells result in constitutive abnormalities in the bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells. DESIGN AND METHODS: The aims of this study were to investigate the constitutive abnormalities in myeloma bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells and to evaluate the impact of new treatments. RESULTS: We demonstrated that myeloma bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells have an increased expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase, increased cell size, reduced proliferation capacity and characteristic expression of senescence-associated secretory profile members. We also observed a reduction in osteoblastogenic capacity and immunomodulatory activity and an increase in hematopoietic support capacity. Finally, we determined that current treatments were able to partially reduce some abnormalities in secreted factors, proliferation and osteoblastogenesis. CONCLUSIONS: We showed that myeloma bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells have an early senescent profile with profound alterations in their characteristics. This senescent state most likely participates in disease progression and relapse by altering the tumor microenvironment.

  18. Clinical Trials With Mesenchymal Stem Cells: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squillaro, Tiziana; Peluso, Gianfranco; Galderisi, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    In the last year, the promising features of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), including their regenerative properties and ability to differentiate into diverse cell lineages, have generated great interest among researchers whose work has offered intriguing perspectives on cell-based therapies for various diseases. Currently the most commonly used adult stem cells in regenerative medicine, MSCs, can be isolated from several tissues, exhibit a strong capacity for replication in vitro, and can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. However, heterogeneous procedures for isolating and cultivating MSCs among laboratories have prompted the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) to issue criteria for identifying unique populations of these cells. Consequently, the isolation of MSCs according to ISCT criteria has produced heterogeneous, nonclonal cultures of stromal cells containing stem cells with different multipotent properties, committed progenitors, and differentiated cells. Though the nature and functions of MSCs remain unclear, nonclonal stromal cultures obtained from bone marrow and other tissues currently serve as sources of putative MSCs for therapeutic purposes, and several findings underscore their effectiveness in treating different diseases. To date, 493 MSC-based clinical trials, either complete or ongoing, appear in the database of the US National Institutes of Health. In the present article, we provide a comprehensive review of MSC-based clinical trials conducted worldwide that scrutinizes biological properties of MSCs, elucidates recent clinical findings and clinical trial phases of investigation, highlights therapeutic effects of MSCs, and identifies principal criticisms of the use of these cells. In particular, we analyze clinical trials using MSCs for representative diseases, including hematological disease, graft-versus-host disease, organ transplantation, diabetes, inflammatory diseases, and diseases in the liver, kidney

  19. Mesenchymal stem cell secretome and regenerative therapy after cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerlin, Ludovic; Park, Tea Soon; Zambidis, Elias T; Donnenberg, Vera S; Donnenberg, Albert D

    2013-12-01

    Cancer treatment generally relies on tumor ablative techniques that can lead to major functional or disfiguring defects. These post-therapy impairments require the development of safe regenerative therapy strategies during cancer remission. Many current tissue repair approaches exploit paracrine (immunomodulatory, pro-angiogenic, anti-apoptotic and pro-survival effects) or restoring (functional or structural tissue repair) properties of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC). Yet, a major concern in the application of regenerative therapies during cancer remission remains the possible triggering of cancer recurrence. Tumor relapse implies the persistence of rare subsets of tumor-initiating cancer cells which can escape anti-cancer therapies and lie dormant in specific niches awaiting reactivation via unknown stimuli. Many of the components required for successful regenerative therapy (revascularization, immunosuppression, cellular homing, tissue growth promotion) are also critical for tumor progression and metastasis. While bi-directional crosstalk between tumorigenic cells (especially aggressive cancer cell lines) and MSC (including tumor stroma-resident populations) has been demonstrated in a variety of cancers, the effects of local or systemic MSC delivery for regenerative purposes on persisting cancer cells during remission remain controversial. Both pro- and anti-tumorigenic effects of MSC have been reported in the literature. Our own data using breast cancer clinical isolates have suggested that dormant-like tumor-initiating cells do not respond to MSC signals, unlike actively dividing cancer cells which benefited from the presence of supportive MSC. The secretome of MSC isolated from various tissues may partially diverge, but it includes a core of cytokines (i.e. CCL2, CCL5, IL-6, TGFβ, VEGF), which have been implicated in tumor growth and/or metastasis. This article reviews published models for studying interactions between MSC and cancer cells with a focus

  20. In vitro cardiomyogenic potential of human umbilical vein-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadivar, Mehdi; Khatami, Shohreh; Mortazavi, Yousef; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Taghikhani, Mohammad; Soleimani, Masoud

    2006-01-01

    Cardiomyocyte loss in the ischemically injured human heart often leads to irreversible defects in cardiac function. Recently, cellular cardiomyoplasty with mesenchymal stem cells, which are multipotent cells with the ability to differentiate into specialized cells under appropriate stimuli, has emerged as a new approach for repairing damaged myocardium. In the present study, the potential of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells to differentiate into cells with characteristics of cardiomyocyte was investigated. Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from endothelial/subendothelial layers of the human umbilical cords using a method similar to that of human umbilical vein endothelial cell isolation. Isolated cells were characterized by transdifferentiation ability to adipocytes and osteoblasts, and also with flow cytometry analysis. After treatment with 5-azacytidine, the human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells were morphologically transformed into cardiomyocyte-like cells and expressed cardiac differentiation markers. During the differentiation, cells were monitored by a phase contrast microscope and their morphological changes were demonstrated. Immunostaining of the differentiated cells for sarcomeric myosin (MF20), desmin, cardiac troponin I, and sarcomeric α-actinin was positive. RT-PCR analysis showed that these differentiated cells express cardiac-specific genes. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a cardiomyocyte-like ultrastructure and typical sarcomers. These observations confirm that human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells can be chemically transformed into cardiomyocytes and can be considered as a source of cells for cellular cardiomyoplasty

  1. Mesenchymal stromal cells induce epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in human colorectal cancer cells through the expression of surface-bound TGF-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele, Valentina; Muraro, Manuele G; Calabrese, Diego; Pfaff, Dennis; Amatruda, Nunzia; Amicarella, Francesca; Kvinlaug, Brynn; Bocelli-Tyndall, Chiara; Martin, Ivan; Resink, Therese J; Heberer, Michael; Oertli, Daniel; Terracciano, Luigi; Spagnoli, Giulio C; Iezzi, Giandomenica

    2014-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent precursors endowed with the ability to home to primary and metastatic tumor sites, where they can integrate into the tumor-associated stroma. However, molecular mechanisms and outcome of their interaction with cancer cells have not been fully clarified. In this study, we investigated the effects mediated by bone marrow-derived MSC on human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells in vitro and in vivo. We found that MSC triggered epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in tumor cells in vitro, as indicated by upregulation of EMT-related genes, downregulation of E-cadherin and acquisition of mesenchymal morphology. These effects required cell-to-cell contact and were mediated by surface-bound TGF-β newly expressed on MSC upon coculture with tumor cells. In vivo tumor masses formed by MSC-conditioned CRC cells were larger and characterized by higher vessel density, decreased E-cadherin expression and increased expression of mesenchymal markers. Furthermore, MSC-conditioned tumor cells displayed increased invasiveness in vitro and enhanced capacity to invade peripheral tissues in vivo. Thus, by promoting EMT-related phenomena, MSC appear to favor the acquisition of an aggressive phenotype by CRC cells. © 2013 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of UICC.

  2. Genetic Engineering of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Adam; Walczak, Piotr; Janowski, Miroslaw; Lukomska, Barbara

    2015-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which can be obtained from various organs and easily propagated in vitro, are one of the most extensively used types of stem cells and have been shown to be efficacious in a broad set of diseases. The unique and highly desirable properties of MSCs include high migratory capacities toward injured areas, immunomodulatory features, and the natural ability to differentiate into connective tissue phenotypes. These phenotypes include bone and cartilage, and these properties predispose MSCs to be therapeutically useful. In addition, MSCs elicit their therapeutic effects by paracrine actions, in which the metabolism of target tissues is modulated. Genetic engineering methods can greatly amplify these properties and broaden the therapeutic capabilities of MSCs, including transdifferentiation toward diverse cell lineages. However, cell engineering can also affect safety and increase the cost of therapy based on MSCs; thus, the advantages and disadvantages of these procedures should be discussed. In this review, the latest applications of genetic engineering methods for MSCs with regenerative medicine purposes are presented.

  3. Focal adhesion protein abnormalities in myelodysplastic mesenchymal stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aanei, Carmen Mariana, E-mail: caanei@yahoo.com [Laboratoire Hematologie, CHU de Saint-Etienne, 42055, Saint-Etienne (France); Department of Immunology, Gr. T. Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 700115, Iasi (Romania); Eloae, Florin Zugun [Department of Immunology, Gr. T. Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 700115, Iasi (Romania); Flandrin-Gresta, Pascale [Laboratoire Hematologie, CHU de Saint-Etienne, 42055, Saint-Etienne (France); CNRS UMR 5239, Universite de Lyon, 42023, Saint-Etienne (France); Tavernier, Emmanuelle [Service Hematologie Clinique, Institut de Cancerologie de la Loire, 42270, Saint-Priest-en-Jarez (France); CNRS UMR 5239, Universite de Lyon, 42023, Saint-Etienne (France); Carasevici, Eugen [Department of Immunology, Gr. T. Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 700115, Iasi (Romania); Guyotat, Denis [Service Hematologie Clinique, Institut de Cancerologie de la Loire, 42270, Saint-Priest-en-Jarez (France); CNRS UMR 5239, Universite de Lyon, 42023, Saint-Etienne (France); Campos, Lydia [Laboratoire Hematologie, CHU de Saint-Etienne, 42055, Saint-Etienne (France); CNRS UMR 5239, Universite de Lyon, 42023, Saint-Etienne (France)

    2011-11-01

    Direct cell-cell contact between haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) and their cellular microenvironment is essential to maintain 'stemness'. In cancer biology, focal adhesion (FA) proteins are involved in survival signal transduction in a wide variety of human tumours. To define the role of FA proteins in the haematopoietic microenvironment of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), CD73-positive mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) were immunostained for paxillin, pFAK [Y{sup 397}], and HSP90{alpha}/{beta} and p130CAS, and analysed for reactivity, intensity and cellular localisation. Immunofluorescence microscopy allowed us to identify qualitative and quantitative differences, and subcellular localisation analysis revealed that in pathological MSCs, paxillin, pFAK [Y{sup 397}], and HSP90{alpha}/{beta} formed nuclear molecular complexes. Increased expression of paxillin, pFAK [Y{sup 397}], and HSP90{alpha}/{beta} and enhanced nuclear co-localisation of these proteins correlated with a consistent proliferative advantage in MSCs from patients with refractory anaemia with excess blasts (RAEB) and negatively impacted clonogenicity of HPCs. These results suggest that signalling via FA proteins could be implicated in HPC-MSC interactions. Further, because FAK is an HSP90{alpha}/{beta} client protein, these results suggest the utility of HSP90{alpha}/{beta} inhibition as a target for adjuvant therapy for myelodysplasia.

  4. Soluble Factors on Stage to Direct Mesenchymal Stem Cells Fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Sobacchi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent stromal cells that are identified by in vitro plastic adherence, colony-forming capacity, expression of a panel of surface molecules, and ability to differentiate at least toward osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic lineages. They also produce trophic factors with immunomodulatory, proangiogenic, and antiapoptotic functions influencing the behavior of neighboring cells. On the other hand, a reciprocal regulation takes place; in fact, MSCs can be isolated from several tissues, and depending on the original microenvironment and the range of stimuli received from there, they can display differences in their essential characteristics. Here, we focus mainly on the bone tissue and how soluble factors, such as growth factors, cytokines, and hormones, present in this microenvironment can orchestrate bone marrow-derived MSCs fate. We also briefly describe the alteration of MSCs behavior in pathological settings such as hematological cancer, bone metastasis, and bone marrow failure syndromes. Overall, the possibility to modulate MSCs plasticity makes them an attractive tool for diverse applications of tissue regeneration in cell therapy. Therefore, the comprehensive understanding of the microenvironment characteristics and components better suited to obtain a specific MSCs response can be extremely useful for clinical use.

  5. Chloride channels regulate chondrogenesis in chicken mandibular mesenchymal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Meiyu; Duan, Yinzhong; Duan, Xiaohong

    2010-12-01

    Voltage gated chloride channels (ClCs) play an important role in the regulation of intracellular pH and cell volume homeostasis. Mutations of these genes result in genetic diseases with abnormal bone deformation and body size, indicating that ClCs may have a role in chondrogenesis. In the present study, we isolated chicken mandibular mesenchymal cells (CMMC) from Hamburg-Hamilton (HH) stage 26 chick embryos and induced chondrocyte maturation by using ascorbic acid and β-glycerophosphate (AA-BGP). We also determined the effect of the chloride channel inhibitor NPPB [5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid] on regulation of growth, differentiation, and gene expression in these cells using MTT and real-time PCR assays. We found that CLCN1 and CLCN3-7 mRNA were expressed in CMMC and NPPB reduced expression of CLCN3, CLCN5, and CLCN7 mRNA in these cells. At the same time, NPPB inhibited the growth of the CMMC, but had no effect on the mRNA level of cyclin D1 and cyclin E (P>0.05) with/without AA-BGP treatment. AA-BGP increased markers for early chondrocyte differentiation including type II collagen, aggrecan (Ptype X collagen. NPPB antagonized AA-BGP-induced expression of type II collagen and aggrecan (Ptype X collagen (PType X collagen might function as a target of chloride channel inhibitors during the differentiation process. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Mesenchymal stem cells: potential in treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanna, Tanmay; Sachan, Vatsal

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal Stem Cells or Marrow Stromal Cells (MSCs) have long been viewed as a potent tool for regenerative cell therapy. MSCs are easily accessible from both healthy donor and patient tissue and expandable in vitro on a therapeutic scale without posing significant ethical or procedural problems. MSC based therapies have proven to be effective in preclinical studies for graft versus host disease, stroke, myocardial infarction, pulmonary fibrosis, autoimmune disorders and many other conditions and are currently undergoing clinical trials at a number of centers all over the world. MSCs are also being extensively researched as a therapeutic tool against neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Huntington's disease (HD) and Multiple Sclerosis (MS). MSCs have been discussed with regard to two aspects in the context of neurodegenerative diseases: their ability to transdifferentiate into neural cells under specific conditions and their neuroprotective and immunomodulatory effects. When transplanted into the brain, MSCs produce neurotrophic and growth factors that protect and induce regeneration of damaged tissue. Additionally, MSCs have also been explored as gene delivery vehicles, for example being genetically engineered to over express glial-derived or brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the brain. Clinical trials involving MSCs are currently underway for MS, ALS, traumatic brain injuries, spinal cord injuries and stroke. In the present review, we explore the potential that MSCs hold with regard to the aforementioned neurodegenerative diseases and the current scenario with reference to the same.

  7. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Therapy for Pancreatitis: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara M. Ahmed

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Based on animal studies, adult mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are promising for the treatment of pancreatitis. However, the best type of this form of cell therapy and its mechanism of action remain unclear. Methods. We searched the PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, Google Scholar, and Clinical Trials.gov websites for studies using MSCs as a therapy for both acute and chronic pancreatitis published until September 2017. Results. We identified 276 publications; of these publications, 18 met our inclusion criteria. In animal studies, stem cell therapy was applied more frequently for acute pancreatitis than for chronic pancreatitis. No clinical trials were identified. MSC therapy ameliorated pancreatic inflammation in acute pancreatitis and pancreatic fibrosis in chronic pancreatitis. Bone marrow and umbilical cord MSCs were the most frequently administered cell types. Due to the substantial heterogeneity among the studies regarding the type, source, and dose of MSCs used, conducting a meta-analysis was not feasible to determine the best type of MSCs. Conclusion. The available data were insufficient for determining the best type of MSCs for the treatment of acute or chronic pancreatitis; therefore, clinical trials investigating the use of MSCs as therapy for pancreatitis are not warranted.

  8. Characterization of mesenchymal stem cells derived from equine adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Carvalho

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy has shown promising results in tendinitis and osteoarthritis in equine medicine. The purpose of this work was to characterize the adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AdMSCs in horses through (1 the assessment of the capacity of progenitor cells to perform adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation; and (2 flow cytometry analysis using the stemness related markers: CD44, CD90, CD105 and MHC Class II. Five mixed-breed horses, aged 2-4 years-old were used to collect adipose tissue from the base of the tail. After isolation and culture of AdMSCs, immunophenotypic characterization was performed through flow cytometry. There was a high expression of CD44, CD90 and CD105, and no expression of MHC Class II markers. The tri-lineage differentiation was confirmed by specific staining: adipogenic (Oil Red O, osteogenic (Alizarin Red, and chondrogenic (Alcian Blue. The equine AdMSCs are a promising type of adult progenitor cell for tissue engineering in veterinary medicine.

  9. Spontaneous transformation of adult mesenchymal stem cells from cynomolgus macaques in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Zhenhua; Wang, Jiayin; Zhu, Wanwan; Guan, Yunqian; Zou, Chunlin; Chen, Zhiguo; Zhang, Y. Alex

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown potential clinical utility in cell therapy and tissue engineering, due to their ability to proliferate as well as to differentiate into multiple lineages, including osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic specifications. Therefore, it is crucial to assess the safety of MSCs while extensive expansion ex vivo is a prerequisite to obtain the cell numbers for cell transplantation. Here we show that MSCs derived from adult cynomolgus monkey can undergo spontaneous transformation following in vitro culture. In comparison with MSCs, the spontaneously transformed mesenchymal cells (TMCs) display significantly different growth pattern and morphology, reminiscent of the characteristics of tumor cells. Importantly, TMCs are highly tumorigenic, causing subcutaneous tumors when injected into NOD/SCID mice. Moreover, no multiple differentiation potential of TMCs is observed in vitro or in vivo, suggesting that spontaneously transformed adult stem cells may not necessarily turn into cancer stem cells. These data indicate a direct transformation of cynomolgus monkey MSCs into tumor cells following long-term expansion in vitro. The spontaneous transformation of the cultured cynomolgus monkey MSCs may have important implications for ongoing clinical trials and for models of oncogenesis, thus warranting a more strict assessment of MSCs prior to cell therapy. -- Highlights: ► Spontaneous transformation of cynomolgus monkey MSCs in vitro. ► Transformed mesenchymal cells lack multipotency. ► Transformed mesenchymal cells are highly tumorigenic. ► Transformed mesenchymal cells do not have the characteristics of cancer stem cells.

  10. Spontaneous transformation of adult mesenchymal stem cells from cynomolgus macaques in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Zhenhua [Cell Therapy Center, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Key Laboratory of Neurodegeneration, Ministry of Education, Beijing (China); Department of Anatomy, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, 230032 (China); Wang, Jiayin; Zhu, Wanwan; Guan, Yunqian; Zou, Chunlin [Cell Therapy Center, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Key Laboratory of Neurodegeneration, Ministry of Education, Beijing (China); Chen, Zhiguo, E-mail: chenzhiguo@gmail.com [Cell Therapy Center, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Key Laboratory of Neurodegeneration, Ministry of Education, Beijing (China); Stanford Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine and Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford, CA (United States); Zhang, Y. Alex, E-mail: yaz@bjsap.org [Cell Therapy Center, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Key Laboratory of Neurodegeneration, Ministry of Education, Beijing (China)

    2011-12-10

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown potential clinical utility in cell therapy and tissue engineering, due to their ability to proliferate as well as to differentiate into multiple lineages, including osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic specifications. Therefore, it is crucial to assess the safety of MSCs while extensive expansion ex vivo is a prerequisite to obtain the cell numbers for cell transplantation. Here we show that MSCs derived from adult cynomolgus monkey can undergo spontaneous transformation following in vitro culture. In comparison with MSCs, the spontaneously transformed mesenchymal cells (TMCs) display significantly different growth pattern and morphology, reminiscent of the characteristics of tumor cells. Importantly, TMCs are highly tumorigenic, causing subcutaneous tumors when injected into NOD/SCID mice. Moreover, no multiple differentiation potential of TMCs is observed in vitro or in vivo, suggesting that spontaneously transformed adult stem cells may not necessarily turn into cancer stem cells. These data indicate a direct transformation of cynomolgus monkey MSCs into tumor cells following long-term expansion in vitro. The spontaneous transformation of the cultured cynomolgus monkey MSCs may have important implications for ongoing clinical trials and for models of oncogenesis, thus warranting a more strict assessment of MSCs prior to cell therapy. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spontaneous transformation of cynomolgus monkey MSCs in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformed mesenchymal cells lack multipotency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformed mesenchymal cells are highly tumorigenic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformed mesenchymal cells do not have the characteristics of cancer stem cells.

  11. Low calcium culture condition induces mesenchymal cell-like phenotype in normal human epidermal keratinocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Murakami, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Hiroaki; Okano, Teruo

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Normal human epidermal keratinocytes serially cultured under low calcium concentration were cytokeratin and vimentin double positive cells. → The human keratinocytes expressed some epithelial stem/progenitor cell makers, mesenchymal cell markers, and markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. → Mesenchymal cell-like phenotype in the keratinocytes was suppressed under high-calcium condition. -- Abstract: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important cellular phenomenon in organ developments, cancer invasions, and wound healing, and many types of transformed cell lines are used for investigating for molecular mechanisms of EMT. However, there are few reports for EMT in normal human epithelial cells, which are non-transformed or non-immortalized cells, in vitro. Therefore, normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) serially cultured in low-calcium concentration medium (LCM) were used for investigating relations between differentiation and proliferation and mesenchymal-like phenotype in the present study, since long-term cultivation of NHEK is achieved in LCM. Interestingly, NHEK serially cultured in LCM consisted essentially of cytokeratin-vimentin double positive cells (98%), although the NHEK exhibited differentiation under high-calcium culture condition with 3T3 feeder layer. The vimentin expression was suppressed under high-calcium condition. These results may indicate the importance of mesenchymal-like phenotype for serially cultivation of NHEK in vitro.

  12. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) induced by inflammatory priming elicits mesenchymal stromal cell-like immune-modulatory properties in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi, M; Zanotto, M; Malpeli, G; Bassi, G; Perbellini, O; Chilosi, M; Bifari, F; Krampera, M

    2015-03-17

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has a central role in cancer progression and metastatic dissemination and may be induced by local inflammation. We asked whether the inflammation-induced acquisition of mesenchymal phenotype by neoplastic epithelial cells is associated with the onset of mesenchymal stromal cell-like immune-regulatory properties that may enhance tumour immune escape. Cell lines of lung adenocarcinoma (A549), breast cancer (MCF7) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) were co-cultured with T, B and NK cells before and after EMT induction by either the supernatant of mixed-lymphocyte reactions or inflammatory cytokines. EMT occurrence following inflammatory priming elicited multiple immune-regulatory effects in cancer cells resulting in NK and T-cell apoptosis, inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation and stimulation of regulatory T and B cells. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, but not Fas ligand pathway, was involved at least in part in these effects, as shown by the use of specific inhibitors. EMT induced by inflammatory stimuli confers to cancer cells some mesenchymal stromal cell-like immune-modulatory properties, which could be a cue for cancer progression and metastatic dissemination by favouring immune escape.

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells as a therapeutic tool in tissue and organ regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bajek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering is an interdisciplinary field that offers new opportunities for regeneration of diseased and damaged tissue with the use of many different cell types,including adult stem cells. In tissue engineering and regenerative medicine the most popular are mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs isolated from bone marrow. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells are a potential source of progenitor cells for osteoblasts, chondroblasts, adipocytes, skeletal muscles and cardiomyocytes. It has also been shown that these cells can differentiate into ecto- and endodermal cells, e.g. neuronal cells, glial cells, keratinocytes and hepatocytes. The availability of autologous MSCs, their proliferative potential and multilineage differentiation capacity make them an excellent tool for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The aim of this publication is to present characteristic and biological properties of mesenchymal stem cells isolated from bone marrow.

  14. The role of Inositol Phosphoglycan as a possible mediator of the radiation effects on undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma (UTC) cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagrosa, Maria A.; Crivello, M.; Perona, Marina; Thorp, Silvia; Pozzi, Emiliano; Juvenal, Guillermo J.; Pisarev, Mario A.; Krawiec, Leon

    2007-01-01

    Full text: In our laboratory we demonstrated that the Inositol Phosphoglycan (IPG) inhibits thyroperoxidase (TPO) activity and other oxidoreductases in normal bovine thyroid gland cultures, thus increasing the H 2 O 2 levels. On the other hand, when a cell is irradiated, damage is caused either by an increase of free radicals (H 2 O 2 and other reactive oxygen species (ROS)) or by the direct ionization of molecules, depending on the radiation quality. With the purpose to establish if the IPG participates in damage mechanisms by radiation, UTC cells of the tumoral line (ARO) in proliferation, were exposed to high and low LET radiation: gamma, neutrons, He and 7 Li nucleus (the lasts ones produced through Boron Neutron Capture Reaction). In each group, the total physical absorbed doses were 3 and 8 Gy (Ra-3 reactor neutrons flux = 7.5 109 n/cm 2 s). The results show a significant increase in the IPG activity in cells irradiated with gamma and neutrons in comparison with control cultures (p 2 O 2 levels (p [es

  15. Hepatoma SK Hep-1 cells exhibit characteristics of oncogenic mesenchymal stem cells with highly metastatic capacity.

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    Jong Ryeol Eun

    Full Text Available SK Hep-1 cells (SK cells derived from a patient with liver adenocarcinoma have been considered a human hepatoma cell line with mesenchymal origin characteristics, however, SK cells do not express liver genes and exhibit liver function, thus, we hypothesized whether mesenchymal cells might contribute to human liver primary cancers. Here, we characterized SK cells and its tumourigenicity.We found that classical mesenchymal stem cell (MSC markers were presented on SK cells, but endothelial marker CD31, hematopoietic markers CD34 and CD45 were negative. SK cells are capable of differentiate into adipocytes and osteoblasts as adipose-derived MSC (Ad-MSC and bone marrow-derived MSC (BM-MSC do. Importantly, a single SK cell exhibited a substantial tumourigenicity and metastatic capacity in immunodefficient mice. Metastasis not only occurred in circulating organs such as lung, liver, and kidneys, but also in muscle, outer abdomen, and skin. SK cells presented greater in vitro invasive capacity than those of Ad-MSC and BM-MSC. The xenograft cells from subcutaneous and metastatic tumors exhibited a similar tumourigenicity and metastatic capacity, and showed the same relatively homogenous population with MSC characteristics when compared to parental SK cells. SK cells could unlimitedly expand in vitro without losing MSC characteristics, its tumuorigenicity and metastatic capacity, indicating that SK cells are oncogenic MSC with enhanced self-renewal capacity. We believe that this is the first report that human MSC appear to be transformed into cancer stem cells (CSC, and that their derivatives also function as CSCs.Our findings demonstrate that SK cells represent a transformation mechanism of normal MSC into an enhanced self-renewal CSC with metastasis capacity, SK cells and their xenografts represent a same relative homogeneity of CSC with substantial metastatic capacity. Thus, it represents a novel mechanism of tumor initiation, development and

  16. Imaging gene expression in human mesenchymal stem cells: from small to large animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willmann, Jürgen K; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Rodriguez-Porcel, Martin

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of reporter gene imaging in implanted human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in porcine myocardium by using clinical positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) scanning....

  17. Expanded cryopreserved mesenchymal stromal cells as an optimal source for graft-versus-host disease treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holubová, M.; Lysák, D.; Vlas, T.; Vannucci, Luca; Jindra, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 3 (2014), s. 139-144 ISSN 1045-1056 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Mesenchymal stromal cells * Cryopreservation * Immunomodulation Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 1.209, year: 2014

  18. Radiation rescue: mesenchymal stromal cells protect from lethal irradiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Lange

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Successful treatment of acute radiation syndromes relies on immediate supportive care. In patients with limited hematopoietic recovery potential, hematopoietic stem cell (HSC transplantation is the only curative treatment option. Because of time consuming donor search and uncertain outcome we propose MSC treatment as an alternative treatment for severely radiation-affected individuals. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Mouse mesenchymal stromal cells (mMSCs were expanded from bone marrow, retrovirally labeled with eGFP (bulk cultures and cloned. Bulk and five selected clonal mMSCs populations were characterized in vitro for their multilineage differentiation potential and phenotype showing no contamination with hematopoietic cells. Lethally irradiated recipients were i.v. transplanted with bulk or clonal mMSCs. We found a long-term survival of recipients with fast hematopoietic recovery after the transplantation of MSCs exclusively without support by HSCs. Quantitative PCR based chimerism analysis detected eGFP-positive donor cells in peripheral blood immediately after injection and in lungs within 24 hours. However, no donor cells in any investigated tissue remained long-term. Despite the rapidly disappearing donor cells, microarray and quantitative RT-PCR gene expression analysis in the bone marrow of MSC-transplanted animals displayed enhanced regenerative features characterized by (i decreased proinflammatory, ECM formation and adhesion properties and (ii boosted anti-inflammation, detoxification, cell cycle and anti-oxidative stress control as compared to HSC-transplanted animals. CONCLUSIONS: Our data revealed that systemically administered MSCs provoke a protective mechanism counteracting the inflammatory events and also supporting detoxification and stress management after radiation exposure. Further our results suggest that MSCs, their release of trophic factors and their HSC-niche modulating activity rescue endogenous hematopoiesis

  19. Role of mesenchymal stem cells in osteoarthritis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Kong

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available As the most common form of joint disorder, osteoarthritis (OA imposes a tremendous burden on health care systems worldwide. Without effective cure, OA represents a unique opportunity for innovation in therapeutic development. In contrast to traditional treatments based on drugs, proteins, or antibodies, stem cells are poised to revolutionize medicine as they possess the capacity to replace and repair tissues and organs such as osteoarthritic joints. Among different types of stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are of mesoderm origin and have been shown to generate cells for tissues of the mesoderm lineage, thus, raising the hope for them being used to treat diseases such as OA. However, given their ability to differentiate into other cell types, MSCs have also been tested in treating a myriad of conditions from diabetes to Parkinson's disease, apparently of the ectoderm and endoderm lineages. There are ongoing debates whether MSCs can differentiate into lineages outside of the mesoderm and consequently their effectiveness in treating conditions from the ectoderm and endoderm lineages. In this review, we discuss the developmental origin of MSCs, their differentiation potential and immunomodulatory effects, as well as their applications in treating OA. We suggest further investigations into new therapies or combination therapies that may provide more effective treatment for bone and joint diseases. Furthermore, cell-based therapy and its associated safety and effectiveness should be carefully evaluated before clinical translation. This review provides updated information on recent approval of clinical trials and related applications of MSCs, and discusses additional efforts on cell-based therapy for treating OA and other joint and bone diseases.

  20. Mesenchymal stem cells cancel azoxymethane-induced tumor initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasuno, Masanao; Arimura, Yoshiaki; Nagaishi, Kanna; Isshiki, Hiroyuki; Onodera, Kei; Nakagaki, Suguru; Watanabe, Shuhei; Idogawa, Masashi; Yamashita, Kentaro; Naishiro, Yasuyoshi; Adachi, Yasushi; Suzuki, Hiromu; Fujimiya, Mineko; Imai, Kohzoh; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2014-04-01

    The role of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in tumorigenesis remains controversial. Therefore, our goal was to determine whether exogenous MSCs possess intrinsic antineoplastic or proneoplastic properties in azoxymethane (AOM)-induced carcinogenesis. Three in vivo models were studied: an AOM/dextran sulfate sodium colitis-associated carcinoma model, an aberrant crypt foci model, and a model to assess the acute apoptotic response of a genotoxic carcinogen (AARGC). We also performed in vitro coculture experiments. As a result, we found that MSCs partially canceled AOM-induced tumor initiation but not tumor promotion. Moreover, MSCs inhibited the AARGC in colonic epithelial cells because of the removal of O(6)-methylguanine (O(6) MeG) adducts through O(6) MeG-DNA methyltransferase activation. Furthermore, MSCs broadly affected the cell-cycle machinery, potentially leading to G1 arrest in vivo. Coculture of IEC-6 rat intestinal cells with MSCs not only arrested the cell cycle at the G1 phase, but also induced apoptosis. The anti-carcinogenetic properties of MSCs in vitro required transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling because such properties were completely abrogated by absorption of TGF-β under indirect coculture conditions. MSCs inhibited AOM-induced tumor initiation by preventing the initiating cells from sustaining DNA insults and subsequently inducing G1 arrest in the initiated cells that escaped from the AARGC. Furthermore, tumor initiation perturbed by MSCs might potentially dysregulate WNT and TGF-β-Smad signaling pathways in subsequent tumorigenesis. Obtaining a better understanding of MSC functions in colon carcinogenesis is essential before commencing the broader clinical application of promising MSC-based therapies for cancer-prone patients with inflammatory bowel disease. © AlphaMed Press.

  1. Identification of regulatory factors for mesenchymal stem cell-derived salivary epithelial cells in a co-culture system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Jong Park

    Full Text Available Patients with Sjögren's syndrome or head and neck cancer patients who have undergone radiation therapy suffer from severe dry mouth (xerostomia due to salivary exocrine cell death. Regeneration of the salivary glands requires a better understanding of regulatory mechanisms by which stem cells differentiate into exocrine cells. In our study, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were co-cultured with primary salivary epithelial cells from C57BL/6 mice. Co-cultured bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells clearly resembled salivary epithelial cells, as confirmed by strong expression of salivary gland epithelial cell-specific markers, such as alpha-amylase, muscarinic type 3 receptor, aquaporin-5, and cytokeratin 19. To identify regulatory factors involved in this differentiation, transdifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells were analyzed temporarily by two-dimensional-gel-electrophoresis, which detected 58 protein spots (>1.5 fold change, p<0.05 that were further categorized into 12 temporal expression patterns. Of those proteins only induced in differentiated mesenchymal stem cells, ankryin-repeat-domain-containing-protein 56, high-mobility-group-protein 20B, and transcription factor E2a were selected as putative regulatory factors for mesenchymal stem cell transdifferentiation based on putative roles in salivary gland development. Induction of these molecules was confirmed by RT-PCR and western blotting on separate sets of co-cultured mesenchymal stem cells. In conclusion, our study is the first to identify differentially expressed proteins that are implicated in mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into salivary gland epithelial cells. Further investigation to elucidate regulatory roles of these three transcription factors in mesenchymal stem cell reprogramming will provide a critical foundation for a novel cell-based regenerative therapy for patients with xerostomia.

  2. Mesenchymal stem cells cultured on magnetic nanowire substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Jose E.; Ravasi, Timothy; Kosel, Jürgen

    2017-02-01

    Stem cells have been shown to respond to extracellular mechanical stimuli by regulating their fate through the activation of specific signaling pathways. In this work, an array of iron nanowires (NWs) aligned perpendicularly to the surface was fabricated by pulsed electrodepositon in porous alumina templates followed by a partial removal of the alumina to reveal 2-3 μm of the NWs. This resulted in alumina substrates with densely arranged NWs of 33 nm in diameter separated by 100 nm. The substrates were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) energy dispersive x-ray analysis and vibrating sample magnetometer. The NW array was then used as a platform for the culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The cells were stained for the cell nucleus and actin filaments, as well as immuno-stained for the focal adhesion protein vinculin, and then observed by fluorescence microscopy in order to characterize their spreading behavior. Calcein AM/ethidium homodimer-1 staining allowed the determination of cell viability. The interface between the cells and the NWs was studied using SEM. Results showed that hMSCs underwent a re-organization of actin filaments that translated into a change from an elongated to a spherical cell shape. Actin filaments and vinculin accumulated in bundles, suggesting the attachment and formation of focal adhesion points of the cells on the NWs. Though the overall number of cells attached on the NWs was lower compared to the control, the attached cells maintained a high viability (>90%) for up to 6 d. Analysis of the interface between the NWs and the cells confirmed the re-organization of F-actin and revealed the adhesion points of the cells on the NWs. Additionally, a net of filopodia surrounded each cell, suggesting the probing of the array to find additional adhesion points. The cells maintained their round shape for up to 6 d of culture. Overall, the NW array is a promising nanostructured platform for studying and influencing h

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells cultured on magnetic nanowire substrates

    KAUST Repository

    Perez, Jose E.

    2016-12-28

    Stem cells have been shown to respond to extracellular mechanical stimuli by regulating their fate through the activation of specific signaling pathways. In this work, an array of iron nanowires (NWs) aligned perpendicularly to the surface was fabricated by pulsed electrodepositon in porous alumina templates followed by a partial removal of the alumina to reveal 2-3 μm of the NWs. This resulted in alumina substrates with densely arranged NWs of 33 nm in diameter separated by 100 nm. The substrates were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) energy dispersive x-ray analysis and vibrating sample magnetometer. The NW array was then used as a platform for the culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The cells were stained for the cell nucleus and actin filaments, as well as immuno-stained for the focal adhesion protein vinculin, and then observed by fluorescence microscopy in order to characterize their spreading behavior. Calcein AM/ethidium homodimer-1 staining allowed the determination of cell viability. The interface between the cells and the NWs was studied using SEM. Results showed that hMSCs underwent a re-organization of actin filaments that translated into a change from an elongated to a spherical cell shape. Actin filaments and vinculin accumulated in bundles, suggesting the attachment and formation of focal adhesion points of the cells on the NWs. Though the overall number of cells attached on the NWs was lower compared to the control, the attached cells maintained a high viability (>90%) for up to 6 d. Analysis of the interface between the NWs and the cells confirmed the re-organization of F-actin and revealed the adhesion points of the cells on the NWs. Additionally, a net of filopodia surrounded each cell, suggesting the probing of the array to find additional adhesion points. The cells maintained their round shape for up to 6 d of culture. Overall, the NW array is a promising nanostructured platform for studying and influencing h

  4. Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Cartilage Regeneration of TMJ Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dixin Cui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ OA is a degenerative disease, characterized by progressive cartilage degradation, subchondral bone remodeling, synovitis, and chronic pain. Due to the limited self-healing capacity in condylar cartilage, traditional clinical treatments have limited symptom-modifying and structure-modifying effects to restore impaired cartilage as well as other TMJ tissues. In recent years, stem cell-based therapy has raised much attention as an alternative approach towards tissue repair and regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, derived from the bone marrow, synovium, and even umbilical cord, play a role as seed cells for the cartilage regeneration of TMJ OA. MSCs possess multilineage differentiation potential, including chondrogenic differentiation as well as osteogenic differentiation. In addition, the trophic modulations of MSCs exert anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects under aberrant conditions. Furthermore, MSCs combined with appropriate scaffolds can form cartilaginous or even osseous compartments to repair damaged tissue and impaired function of TMJ. In this review, we will briefly discuss the pathogenesis of cartilage degeneration in TMJ OA and emphasize the potential sources of MSCs and novel approaches for the cartilage regeneration of TMJ OA, particularly focusing on the MSC-based therapy and tissue engineering.

  5. Mesenchymal stromal cells ameliorate acute allergic rhinitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunlei; Fu, Yanxia; Wang, Yinyin; Kong, Yanhua; Li, Mengdi; Ma, Danhui; Zhai, Wanli; Wang, Hao; Lin, Yuting; Liu, Sihan; Ren, Fangli; Li, Jun; Wang, Yi

    2017-10-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been extensively investigated as a potential antiinflammatory treatment in many inflammatory-related diseases; however, it remains unclear whether MSCs could be used to treat acute allergic rhinitis. A rat model of allergic rhinitis was treated with MSCs. The effect of MSCs on the inflammation of allergic rhinitis was evaluated by sneezing, nose rubbing, the pathology of the nasal mucosa, and the expression of interleukin 4, tumour necrosis factor alpha, and immunoglobulin E in the serum of rats. Also, the population of MSCs isolated from umbilical cords of humans was evaluated to determine if they could inhibit the symptoms and inflammation of acute allergic rhinitis in a rat model. We observed that this population of cells inhibited sneezing, nose rubbing, and changes in the pathology of the nasal mucosa. Intriguingly, we observed that MSCs reduced the expression of interleukin 4, tumour necrosis factor alpha, and immunoglobulin E in the serum. Furthermore, MSCs reduced the expression of histamine and the recruitment of macrophages in the nasal mucosa of allergic rhinitis rats. We reasoned that the effect of MSCs on allergic rhinitis might be through its regulation of the secretion of related cytokines from macrophages during the process of acute allergic rhinitis. This work suggested that MSCs from the umbilical cords of humans could be used as a positive clinical therapy for the human disease. Copyright © 2017 The Authors Cell Biochemistry & Function Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Treating Articular Cartilage Defects and Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Yuan, Mei; Guo, Quan-yi; Lu, Shi-bi; Peng, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage damage and osteoarthritis are the most common joint diseases. Joints are prone to damage caused by sports injuries or aging, and such damage regularly progresses to more serious joint disorders, including osteoarthritis, which is a degenerative disease characterized by the thinning and eventual wearing out of articular cartilage, ultimately leading to joint destruction. Osteoarthritis affects millions of people worldwide. Current approaches to repair of articular cartilage damage include mosaicplasty, microfracture, and injection of autologous chondrocytes. These treatments relieve pain and improve joint function, but the long-term results are unsatisfactory. The long-term success of cartilage repair depends on development of regenerative methodologies that restore articular cartilage to a near-native state. Two promising approaches are (i) implantation of engineered constructs of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-seeded scaffolds, and (ii) delivery of an appropriate population of MSCs by direct intra-articular injection. MSCs may be used as trophic producers of bioactive factors initiating regenerative activities in a defective joint. Current challenges in MSC therapy are the need to overcome current limitations in cartilage cell purity and to in vitro engineer tissue structures exhibiting the required biomechanical properties. This review outlines the current status of MSCs used in cartilage tissue engineering and in cell therapy seeking to repair articular cartilage defects and related problems. MSC-based technologies show promise when used to repair cartilage defects in joints.

  7. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Dental Pulp: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma-Martínez, Edgar; Mendoza-Núñez, Víctor Manuel; Santiago-Osorio, Edelmiro

    2016-01-01

    The mesenchymal stem cells of dental pulp (DPSCs) were isolated and characterized for the first time more than a decade ago as highly clonogenic cells that were able to generate densely calcified colonies. Now, DPSCs are considered to have potential as stem cell source for orthopedic and oral maxillofacial reconstruction, and it has been suggested that they may have applications beyond the scope of the stomatognathic system. To date, most studies have shown that, regardless of their origin in third molars, incisors, or exfoliated deciduous teeth, DPSCs can generate mineralized tissue, an extracellular matrix and structures type dentin, periodontal ligament, and dental pulp, as well as other structures. Different groups worldwide have designed and evaluated new efficient protocols for the isolation, expansion, and maintenance of clinically safe human DPSCs in sufficient numbers for various therapeutics protocols and have discussed the most appropriate route of administration, the possible contraindications to their clinical use, and the parameters to be considered for monitoring their clinical efficacy and proper biological source. At present, DPSC-based therapy is promising but because most of the available evidence was obtained using nonhuman xenotransplants, it is not a mature technology.

  8. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Dental Pulp: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Ledesma-Martínez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mesenchymal stem cells of dental pulp (DPSCs were isolated and characterized for the first time more than a decade ago as highly clonogenic cells that were able to generate densely calcified colonies. Now, DPSCs are considered to have potential as stem cell source for orthopedic and oral maxillofacial reconstruction, and it has been suggested that they may have applications beyond the scope of the stomatognathic system. To date, most studies have shown that, regardless of their origin in third molars, incisors, or exfoliated deciduous teeth, DPSCs can generate mineralized tissue, an extracellular matrix and structures type dentin, periodontal ligament, and dental pulp, as well as other structures. Different groups worldwide have designed and evaluated new efficient protocols for the isolation, expansion, and maintenance of clinically safe human DPSCs in sufficient numbers for various therapeutics protocols and have discussed the most appropriate route of administration, the possible contraindications to their clinical use, and the parameters to be considered for monitoring their clinical efficacy and proper biological source. At present, DPSC-based therapy is promising but because most of the available evidence was obtained using nonhuman xenotransplants, it is not a mature technology.

  9. Impairment of mesenchymal stem cells derived from oral leukoplakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhihui; Song, Jiangyuan; Han, Ying; Mu, Dongdong; Su, Sha; Ji, Xiaoli; Liu, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Oral leukoplakia is one of the common precancerous lesions in oral mucosa. To compare the biological characteristics and regenerative capacities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from oral leukoplakia (epithelial hyperplasia and dysplasia) and normal oral mucosa, MSCs were isolated by enzyme digestion. Then these cells were identified by the expression of MSC related markers, STRO-1, CD105 and CD90, with the absent for the hematopoietic stem cell marker CD34 by flow cytometric detection. The self-renewal ability of MSCs from oral leukoplakia was enhanced, while the multipotent differentiation was descended, compared with MSCs from normal oral mucosa. Fibrin gel was used as a carrier for MSCs transplanted into immunocompromised mice to detect their regenerative capacity. The regenerative capacities of MSCs from oral leukoplakia became impaired partly. Collagen IV (Col IV) and matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9) were selected to analyze the potential mechanism for the functional changes of MSCs from oral leukoplakia by immunochemical and western blot analysis. The expression of Col IV was decreased and that of MMP-9 was increased by MSCs with the progression of oral leukoplakia, especially in MSCs from epithelial dysplasia. The imbalance between regenerative and metabolic self-regulatory functions of MSCs from oral leukoplakia may be related to the progression of this premalignant disorder.

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells: environmentally responsive therapeutics for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Matthew B; Moncivais, Kathryn; Caplan, Arnold I

    2013-11-15

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are partially defined by their ability to differentiate into tissues including bone, cartilage and adipose in vitro, but it is their trophic, paracrine and immunomodulatory functions that may have the greatest therapeutic impact in vivo. Unlike pharmaceutical treatments that deliver a single agent at a specific dose, MSCs are site regulated and secrete bioactive factors and signals at variable concentrations in response to local microenvironmental cues. Significant progress has been made in understanding the biochemical and metabolic mechanisms and feedback associated with MSC response. The anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory capacity of MSC may be paramount in the restoration of localized or systemic conditions for normal healing and tissue regeneration. Allogeneic MSC treatments, categorized as a drug by regulatory agencies, have been widely pursued, but new studies demonstrate the efficacy of autologous MSC therapies, even for individuals affected by a disease state. Safety and regulatory concerns surrounding allogeneic cell preparations make autologous and minimally manipulated cell therapies an attractive option for many regenerative, anti-inflammatory and autoimmune applications.

  11. Implant Surface Design Regulates Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation and Maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyan, B D; Cheng, A; Olivares-Navarrete, R; Schwartz, Z

    2016-03-01

    Changes in dental implant materials, structural design, and surface properties can all affect biological response. While bulk properties are important for mechanical stability of the implant, surface design ultimately contributes to osseointegration. This article reviews the surface parameters of dental implant materials that contribute to improved cell response and osseointegration. In particular, we focus on how surface design affects mesenchymal cell response and differentiation into the osteoblast lineage. Surface roughness has been largely studied at the microscale, but recent studies have highlighted the importance of hierarchical micron/submicron/nanosurface roughness, as well as surface roughness in combination with surface wettability. Integrins are transmembrane receptors that recognize changes in the surface and mediate downstream signaling pathways. Specifically, the noncanonical Wnt5a pathway has been implicated in osteoblastic differentiation of cells on titanium implant surfaces. However, much remains to be elucidated. Only recently have studies been conducted on the differences in biological response to implants based on sex, age, and clinical factors; these all point toward differences that advocate for patient-specific implant design. Finally, challenges in implant surface characterization must be addressed to optimize and compare data across studies. An understanding of both the science and the biology of the materials is crucial for developing novel dental implant materials and surface modifications for improved osseointegration. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2016.

  12. AKI Recovery Induced by Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles Carrying MicroRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collino, Federica; Bruno, Stefania; Incarnato, Danny; Dettori, Daniela; Neri, Francesco; Provero, Paolo; Pomatto, Margherita; Oliviero, Salvatore; Tetta, Ciro; Quesenberry, Peter J; Camussi, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    Phenotypic changes induced by extracellular vesicles have been implicated in mesenchymal stromal cell-promoted recovery of AKI. MicroRNAs are potential candidates for cell reprogramming toward a proregenerative phenotype. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether microRNA deregulation inhibits the regenerative potential of mesenchymal stromal cells and derived extracellular vesicles in a model of glycerol-induced AKI in severe combined immunodeficient mice. We generated mesenchymal stromal cells depleted of Drosha to alter microRNA expression. Drosha-knockdown cells produced extracellular vesicles that did not differ from those of wild-type cells in quantity, surface molecule expression, and internalization within renal tubular epithelial cells. However, these vesicles showed global downregulation of microRNAs. Whereas wild-type mesenchymal stromal cells and derived vesicles administered intravenously induced morphologic and functional recovery in AKI, the Drosha-knockdown counterparts were ineffective. RNA sequencing analysis showed that kidney genes deregulated after injury were restored by treatment with mesenchymal stromal cells and derived vesicles but not with Drosha-knockdown cells and vesicles. Gene ontology analysis showed in AKI an association of downregulated genes with fatty acid metabolism and upregulated genes with inflammation, matrix-receptor interaction, and cell adhesion molecules. These alterations reverted after treatment with wild-type mesenchymal stromal cells and extracellular vesicles but not after treatment with the Drosha-knockdown counterparts. In conclusion, microRNA depletion in mesenchymal stromal cells and extracellular vesicles significantly reduced their intrinsic regenerative potential in AKI, suggesting a critical role of microRNAs in recovery after AKI. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  13. Endothelial-mesenchymal transition and its contribution to the emergence of stem cell phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Damian; Kalluri, Raghu

    2012-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells can demonstrate considerable plasticity to generate other cell types during embryonic development and disease progression. This process occurs through a cell differentiation mechanism known as endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EndMT). The generation of mesenchymal cells from endothelium is a crucial step in endothelial cell differentiation to several lineages including fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, mural cells, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. Such differentiation patterns have been observed in systems of cardiac development, fibrosis, diabetic nephropathy, heterotopic ossification and cancer. Here we describe the EndMT program and discuss the current evidence of EndMT-mediated acquisition of stem cell characteristics and multipotent differentiation capabilities. PMID:22554794

  14. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy in osteoarthritis: advanced tissue repair or intervention with smouldering synovial activation?

    OpenAIRE

    van Lent, Peter LEM; van den Berg, Wim B

    2013-01-01

    Although it is generally accepted that osteoarthritis is a degenerative condition of the cartilage, other tissues such as synovium in which immunological and inflammatory reactions occur contribute to the development of joint pathology. This sheds new light on the potential mechanism of action of mesenchymal stem cell therapy in osteoarthritis. Rather than tissue repair due to local transformation of injected mesenchymal stem cells to chondrocytes and filling defects in cartilage, such treatm...

  15. Propofol promotes spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Ya-jing; Liu, Jian-min; Wei, Shu-ming; Zhang, Yun-hao; Qu, Zhen-hua; Chen, Shu-bo

    2015-01-01

    Propofol is a neuroprotective anesthetic. Whether propofol can promote spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells remains poorly understood. We used rats to investigate spinal cord injury repair using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation combined with propofol administration via the tail vein. Rat spinal cord injury was clearly alleviated; a large number of newborn non-myelinated and myelinated nerve fibers appeared in the spinal cord, the numbers of CM-Dil-l...

  16. Deciduous and permanent dental pulp mesenchymal cells acquire hepatic morphologic and functional features in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishkitiev, Nikolay; Yaegaki, Ken; Calenic, Bogdan; Nakahara, Taka; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Mitiev, Vanyo; Haapasalo, Markus

    2010-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells display extensive proliferative capacity of multilineage differentiation. The stromal compartment of mesenchymal tissues is considered to harbor stem cells. We assessed the endodermal differentiation of mesenchymal cells from deciduous and wisdom tooth pulp. Dental mesenchymal cells were isolated and expanded in vitro. After cell cultures had been established, cells were characterized using known stem cell markers. For hepatic differentiation the media was supplemented with hepatic growth factor, dexamethasone, Insulin-Transferrin-Selenium-X, and oncostatin. Both cultures showed a number of cells positive for specific hepatic markers including alpha-fetoprotein, albumin, and hepatic nuclear factor 4alpha after differentiation. Also, small clusters of cells positive for insulin-like growth factor 1 were found. The concentration of urea increased significantly in the media. Moreover, a significant amount of glycogen was found in the cells. Because the cells proved to produce specific hepatic proteins and to start functions specific for hepatocytes, such as storing glycogen and urea production, we may state that the mesenchymal cell cultures from wisdom and deciduous tooth pulp acquired morphologic and functional characteristics of hepatocytes. Copyright (c) 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Stem cell antigen 1-positive mesenchymal cells are the origin of follicular cells during thyroid regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Minoru; Hayase, Suguru; Miyakoshi, Masaaki; Murata, Tsubasa; Kimura, Shioko

    2013-01-01

    Many tissues are thought to contain adult stem/progenitor cells that are responsible for repair of the tissue where they reside upon damage and/or carcinogenesis, conditions when cellular homeostasis becomes uncontrolled. While the presence of stem/progenitor cells of the thyroid has been suggested, how these cells contribute to thyroid regeneration remains unclear. Here we show the origin of thyroid follicular cells and the process of their maturation to become follicular cells during regeneration. By using β-galactosidase (β-gal) reporter mice in conjunction with partial thyroidectomy as a model for thyroid regeneration, and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) long label-retaining cell analysis, we demonstrated that stem cell antigen 1 (Sca1) and BrdU-positive, but β-gal and NKX2-1 negative cells were found in the non-follicular mesenchymal area 7 days after partial thyroidectomy. They temporarily co-expressed cytokeratin 14, and were observed in part of follicles by day 35 post-partial thyroidectomy. Sca1, BrdU, β-gal, and NKX2-1-positive cells were found 120 days post-partial thyroidectomy. These results suggested that Sca1 and BrdU positive cells may participate in the formation of new thyroid follicles after partial thyroidectomy. The process of thyroid follicular cell regeneration was recapitulated in ex vivo thyroid slice collagen gel culture studies. These studies will facilitate research on thyroid stem/progenitor cells and their roles in thyroid diseases, particularly thyroid carcinomas.

  18. Eccentric exercise facilitates mesenchymal stem cell appearance in skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Carmen Valero

    Full Text Available Eccentric, or lengthening, contractions result in injury and subsequently stimulate the activation and proliferation of satellite stem cells which are important for skeletal muscle regeneration. The discovery of alternative myogenic progenitors in skeletal muscle raises the question as to whether stem cells other than satellite cells accumulate in muscle in response to exercise and contribute to post-exercise repair and/or growth. In this study, stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1 positive, non-hematopoetic (CD45⁻ cells were evaluated in wild type (WT and α7 integrin transgenic (α7Tg mouse muscle, which is resistant to injury yet liable to strain, 24 hr following a single bout of eccentric exercise. Sca-1⁺CD45⁻ stem cells were increased 2-fold in WT muscle post-exercise. The α7 integrin regulated the presence of Sca-1⁺ cells, with expansion occurring in α7Tg muscle and minimal cells present in muscle lacking the α7 integrin. Sca-1⁺CD45⁻ cells isolated from α7Tg muscle following exercise were characterized as mesenchymal-like stem cells (mMSCs, predominantly pericytes. In vitro multiaxial strain upregulated mMSC stem cells markers in the presence of laminin, but not gelatin, identifying a potential mechanistic basis for the accumulation of these cells in muscle following exercise. Transplantation of DiI-labeled mMSCs into WT muscle increased Pax7⁺ cells and facilitated formation of eMHC⁺DiI⁻ fibers. This study provides the first demonstration that mMSCs rapidly appear in skeletal muscle in an α7 integrin dependent manner post-exercise, revealing an early event that may be necessary for effective repair and/or growth following exercise. The results from this study also support a role for the α7 integrin and/or mMSCs in molecular- and cellular-based therapeutic strategies that can effectively combat disuse muscle atrophy.

  19. Osteogenic Potency of Nacre on Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David W.; Kwon, Hyuk-Jae; Jung, Han-Sung

    2015-01-01

    Nacre seashell is a natural osteoinductive biomaterial with strong effects on osteoprogenitors, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts during bone tissue formation and morphogenesis. Although nacre has shown, in one study, to induce bridging of new bone across large non-union bone defects in 8 individual human patients, there have been no succeeding human surgical studies to confirm this outstanding potency. But the molecular mechanisms associated with nacre osteoinduction and the influence on bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC’s), skeletal stem cells or bone marrow stromal cells remain elusive. In this study we highlight the phenotypic and biochemical effects of Pinctada maxima nacre chips and the global nacre soluble protein matrix (SPM) on primary human bone marrow-derived stromal cells (hBMSCs) in vitro. In static co-culture with nacre chips, the hBMSCs secreted Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) at levels that exceeded bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP-2) treatment. Concentrated preparation of SPM applied to Stro-1 selected hBMSC’s led to rapid ALP secretions, at concentrations exceeding the untreated controls even in osteogenic conditions. Within 21 days the same population of Stro-1 selected hBMSCs proliferated and secreted collagens I–IV, indicating the premature onset of an osteoblast phenotype. The same SPM was found to promote unselected hBMSC differentiation with osteocalcin detected at 7 days, and proliferation increased at 7 days in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, nacre particles and nacre SPM induced the early stages of human bone cell differentiation, indicating that they may be promising soluble factors with osteoinductive capacity in primary human bone cell progenitors such as, hBMSC’s. PMID:25666352

  20. Sodium Tungstate for Promoting Mesenchymal Stem Cell Chondrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khader, Ateka; Sherman, Lauren S; Rameshwar, Pranela; Arinzeh, Treena L

    2016-12-15

    Articular cartilage has a limited ability to heal. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from the bone marrow have shown promise as a cell type for cartilage regeneration strategies. In this study, sodium tungstate (Na 2 WO 4 ), which is an insulin mimetic, was evaluated for the first time as an inductive factor to enhance human MSC chondrogenesis. MSCs were seeded onto three-dimensional electrospun scaffolds in growth medium (GM), complete chondrogenic induction medium (CCM) containing insulin, and CCM without insulin. Na 2 WO 4 was added to the media leading to final concentrations of 0, 0.01, 0.1, and 1 mM. Chondrogenic differentiation was assessed by biochemical analyses, immunostaining, and gene expression. Cytotoxicity using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCS) was also investigated. The chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs was enhanced in the presence of low concentrations of Na 2 WO 4 compared to control, without Na 2 WO 4 . In the induction medium containing insulin, cells in 0.01 mM Na 2 WO 4 produced significantly higher sulfated glycosaminoglycans, collagen type II, and chondrogenic gene expression than all other groups at day 28. Cells in 0.1 mM Na 2 WO 4 had significantly higher collagen II production and significantly higher sox-9 and aggrecan gene expression compared to control at day 28. Cells in GM and induction medium without insulin containing low concentrations of Na 2 WO 4 also expressed chondrogenic markers. Na 2 WO 4 did not stimulate PBMC proliferation or apoptosis. The results demonstrate that Na 2 WO 4 enhances chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs, does not have a toxic effect, and may be useful for MSC-based approaches for cartilage repair.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy in the treatment of hip osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardones, Rodrigo; Jofré, Claudio M.; Tobar, L.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This study was performed to investigate the safety and efficacy of the intra-articular infusion of ex vivo expanded autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC) to a cohort of patients with articular cartilage defects in the hip. The above rationale is sustained by the notion that MSCs express a chondrocyte differential potential and produce extracellular matrix molecules as well as regulatory signals, that may well contribute to cure the function of the damaged hip joint. A cohort of 10 patients with functional and radiological evidences of hip osteoarthritis, either in one or both legs, was included in the study. BM-MSC (the cell product) were prepared and infused into the damaged articulation(s) of each patient (60 × 106 cells in 3 weekly/doses). Before and after completion of the cell infusion scheme, patients were evaluated (hip scores for pain, stiffness, physical function, range of motion), to assess whether the infusion of the respective cell product was beneficial. The intra-articular injection of three consecutive weekly doses of ex vivo expanded autologous BM-MSC to patients with articular cartilage defects in the hip and proved to be a safe and clinically effective treatment in the restoration of hip function and range of motion. In addition, the statistical significance of the above data is in line with the observation that the radiographic scores (Tönnis Classification of Osteoarthritis) of the damaged leg(s) remained without variation in 9 out of 10 patients, after the administration of the cell product. PMID:28630737

  2. Photobiomodulation of Dental Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Márcia Martins; Diniz, Ivana Márcia Alves; de Cara, Sueli Patricia Harumi Miyagi; Pedroni, Ana Clara Fagundes; Abe, Gabriela Laranjeira; D'Almeida-Couto, Roberta Souza; Lima, Paula Loures Valle; Tedesco, Tamara Kerber; Moreira, Maria Stella

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to conduct a systematic review of the literature published from 2000 to August 2015, to investigate the effect of photobiomodulation (PBM) therapy on dentoalveolar-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ddMSCs), assessing whether a clear conclusion can be reached from the data presented. Systematic reviews provide the best evidence on the effectiveness of a procedure and permit investigation of factors that may influence the performance of a method. To the best of our knowledge, no previous systematic review has evaluated the effects of PBM only on ddMSCs. The search was conducted in PubMed /MEDLINE ® , Scopus and Web of Science databases, and reported according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Metaanalyses (PRISMA Statement). Original research articles investigating the effects of PBM therapy on ddMSCs, published from 2000 to August 2015, were retrieved and used for this review according to the following eligibility criteria: evaluating PBM therapy, assessing stem cells of dentoalveolar origin, published in English, dealing with cells characterized as stem cells, and using light that did not need external chromophores. From the initial 3467 potentially relevant articles identified, 6 were excluded because they were duplicates, and 3453 were considered ineligible based on the inclusion criteria. Therefore, eight articles remained, and these were fully analyzed in order to closely check exclusion criteria items. Only one of them was excluded because the cultured cells studied were not characterized as stem cells. Finally, seven articles served as the basis for this systematic review. PBM therapy has no deleterious effects on ddMSCs. Although no other clear conclusion was obtained because of the scarce number of publications, the results of these studies are pointing to an important tendency of PBM therapy to improve ddMSCs' viability and proliferation.

  3. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Attenuate the Adverse Effects of Immunosuppressive Drugs on Distinct T Cell Subopulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hájková, Michaela; Heřmánková, Barbora; Javorková, Eliška; Boháčová, Pavla; Zajícová, Alena; Holáň, Vladimír; Krulová, Magdaléna

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 1 (2017), s. 104-115 ISSN 1550-8943 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12580S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1508; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : mesenchymal stem cells * immunosuppressive drugs * stem cell therapy Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry OBOR OECD: Immunology Impact factor: 2.967, year: 2016

  4. Unique CCT repeats mediate transcription of the TWIST1 gene in mesenchymal cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkuma, Mizue; Funato, Noriko; Higashihori, Norihisa; Murakami, Masanori; Ohyama, Kimie; Nakamura, Masataka

    2007-01-01

    TWIST1, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, plays critical roles in embryo development, cancer metastasis and mesenchymal progenitor differentiation. Little is known about transcriptional regulation of TWIST1 expression. Here we identified DNA sequences responsible for TWIST1 expression in mesenchymal lineage cell lines. Reporter assays with TWIST1 promoter mutants defined the -102 to -74 sequences that are essential for TWIST1 expression in human and mouse mesenchymal cell lines. Tandem repeats of CCT, but not putative CREB and NF-κB sites in the sequences substantially supported activity of the TWIST1 promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that the DNA sequences with the CCT repeats formed complexes with nuclear factors, containing, at least, Sp1 and Sp3. These results suggest critical implication of the CCT repeats in association with Sp1 and Sp3 factors in sustaining expression of the TWIST1 gene in mesenchymal cells

  5. Mesenchymal cells reactivate Snail1 expression to drive three-dimensional invasion programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rowe, R.G.; Li, X.Y.; Hu, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is required for mesodermal differentiation during development. The zinc-finger transcription factor, Snail1, can trigger EMT and is sufficient to transcriptionally reprogram epithelial cells toward a mesenchymal phenotype during neoplasia and fibrosis....... Whether Snail1 also regulates the behavior of terminally differentiated mesenchymal cells remains unexplored. Using a Snai1 conditional knockout model, we now identify Snail1 as a regulator of normal mesenchymal cell function. Snail1 expression in normal fibroblasts can be induced by agonists known...... to promote proliferation and invasion in vivo. When challenged within a tissue-like, three-dimensional extracellular matrix, Snail1-deficient fibroblasts exhibit global alterations in gene expression, which include defects in membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP)-dependent invasive activity...

  6. Mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... failure was induced in vitro into hepatocytes-like cells by three cell culture media (serum-free medium (group 1), auto serum-containing medium (group 2) and medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum (FBS) (group 3)). Cell morphology, cell growth curve, amount of urea and glycogen and mRNA expressions of ALB, ...

  7. Isolation of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs from Human Adenoid Tissue

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    Yoon Se Lee

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are multipotent progenitor cells that originally derived from bone marrow. Clinical use of bone marrow-derived MSC is difficult due to morbidity and low MSC abundance and isolation efficiency. Recently, MSCs have been isolated from various adult tissues. Here we report the isolation of adenoid tissue-derived MSCs (A-MSCs and their characteristics. Methods: We compared the surface markers, morphologies, and differentiation and proliferation capacities of previously established tonsil-derived MSCs (T-MSCs and bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs with cells isolated from adenoid tissue. The immunophenotype of A-MSCs was investigated upon interferon (IFN-γ stimulation. Results: A-MSCs, T-MSCs, and BM-MSCs showed negative CD45, CD31 HLA-DR, CD34, CD14, CD19 and positive CD 90, CD44, CD73, CD105 expression. A-MSCs were fibroblast-like, spindle-shaped non-adherent cells, similar to T-MSCs and BM-MSCs. Adipogenesis was observed in A-MSCs by the formation of lipid droplets after Oil Red O staining. Osteogenesis was observed by the formation of the matrix mineralization in Alizarin Red staining. Chondrogenesis was observed by the accumulation of sulfated glycosaminoglycan-rich matrix in collagen type II staining. These data were similar to those of T-MSCs and BM-MSCs. Expression of marker genes (i.e., adipogenesis; lipoprotein lipase, proliferator-activator receptor-gamma, osteogenesis; osteocalcin, alkaline phasphatase, chondrogenesis; aggrecan, collagen type II α1 in A-MSCs were not different from those in T-MSCs and BM-MSCs. Conclusions: A-MSCs possess the characteristics of MSCs in terms of morphology, multipotent differentiation capacity, cell surface markers, and immunogeneity. Therefore, A-MSCs fulfill the definition of MSCs and represent an alternate source of MSCs.

  8. Tracking mesenchymal stem cells using magnetic resonance imaging

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    Jens T Rosenberg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent translational studies in the fields of tissue regeneration and cell therapy have characterized mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs as a potentially effective and accessible measure for treating ischemic cerebral and neurodegenerative disorders such as stroke, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Developing more efficient cell tracking techniques bear the potential to optimize MSC transplantation therapies by providing a more accurate picture of the fate and area of effect of implanted cells. Currently, determining the location of transplanted MSCs involves a histological approach, but magnetic resonance imaging (MRI presents a noninvasive paradigm that permits repeat evaluations. To visualize MSCs using MRI, the implanted cells must be treated with an intracellular contrast agent. These are commonly paramagnetic compounds, many of which are based on superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO nanoparticles. Recent research has set out characterize the effects of SPIO-uptake on the cellular activity of in vitro human MSCs and the resultant influence that respective SPIO concentration has on MRI sensitivity. As these studies reveal, SPIO-uptake has no effect on the cellular processes of proliferation and differentiation while producing high contrast MRI signals. Moreover, transplantation of SPIO-labeled MSCs in animal models encouragingly showed no loss in MRI contrast, suggesting that SPIO labeling may be an appealing regime for lasting MRI detection. This study is a review article. Referred literature in this study has been listed in the reference part. The datasets supporting the conclusions of this article are available online by searching the PubMed. Some original points in this article come from the laboratory practice in our research centers and the authors' experiences.

  9. Equine Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Retain a Pericyte-Like Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Cristina L; Sheldrake, Tara A; Dawson, Lucy; Menghini, Timothy; Rink, Burgunde Elisabeth; Amilon, Karin; Khan, Nusrat; Péault, Bruno; Donadeu, Francesc Xavier

    2017-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have been used in human and equine regenerative medicine, and interest in exploiting their potential has increased dramatically over the years. Despite significant effort to characterize equine MSCs, the actual origin of these cells and how much of their native phenotype is maintained in culture have not been determined. In this study, we investigated the relationship between MSCs, derived from adipose tissue (AT) and bone marrow (BM), and pericytes in the horse. Both pericyte (CD146, NG2, and αSMA) and MSC (CD29, CD90, and CD73) markers were detected in equine AT and colocalized around blood vessels. Importantly, as assessed by flow cytometry, both pericyte (CD146, NG2, and αSMA) and MSC (CD29, CD44, CD90, and CD105) markers were present in a majority (≥90%) of cells in cultures of AT-MSCs and BM-MSCs; however, levels of pericyte markers were variable within each of those populations. Moreover, the expression of pericyte markers was maintained for at least eight passages in both AT-MSCs and BM-MSCs. Hematopoietic (CD45) and endothelial (CD144) markers were also detected at low levels in MSCs by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Finally, in coculture experiments, AT-MSCs closely associated with networks produced by endothelial cells, resembling the natural perivascular location of pericytes in vivo. Our results indicate that equine MSCs originate from perivascular cells and moreover maintain a pericyte-like phenotype in culture. Therefore, we suggest that, in addition to classical MSC markers, pericyte markers such as CD146 could be used when assessing and characterizing equine MSCs.

  10. The Short-Stature Homeobox-Containing Gene (shox/SHOX Is Required for the Regulation of Cell Proliferation and Bone Differentiation in Zebrafish Embryo and Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

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    Tomoaki Yokokura

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The short-stature homeobox-containing gene (SHOX was originally discovered as one of genes responsible for idiopathic short-stature syndromes in humans. Previous studies in animal models have shown the evolutionarily conserved link between this gene and skeletal formation in early embryogenesis. Here, we characterized developmental roles of shox/SHOX in zebrafish embryos and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs using loss-of-function approaches. Morpholino oligo-mediated knockdown of zebrafish shox markedly hindered cell proliferation in the anterior region of the pharyngula embryos, which was accompanied by reduction in the dlx2 expression at mesenchymal core sites for future pharyngeal bones. In addition, the impaired shox expression transiently increased expression levels of skeletal differentiation genes in early larval stage. In cell culture studies, we found that hMSCs expressed SHOX; the siRNA-mediated blockade of SHOX expression significantly blunted cell proliferation in undifferentiated hMSCs but the loss of SHOX expression did augment the expressions of subsets of early osteogenic genes during early osteoblast differentiation. These data suggest that shox/SHOX maintains the population of embryonic bone progenitor cells by keeping its proliferative status and by repressing the onset of early osteogenic gene expression. The current study for the first time shows cellular and developmental responses caused by shox/SHOX deficiency in zebrafish embryos and hMSCs, and it expands our understanding of the role of this gene in early stages of skeletal growth.

  11. Therapeutic application of mesenchymal stem cells in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Maxime; Cosenza, Stella; Maumus, Marie; Jorgensen, Christian; Noël, Danièle

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease characterized by cartilage degradation and subchondral bone alterations. This disease represents a global public health problem whose prevalence is rapidly growing with the increasing aging of the population. With the discovery of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) as possible therapeutic agents, their potential for repairing cartilage damage in OA is under investigation. Characterization of MSCs and their functional properties are mentioned with an insight into their trophic function and secretory profile. We present a special focus on the types of extracellular vesicles (EVs) that are produced by MSCs and their role in the paracrine activity of MSCs. We then discuss the therapeutic approaches that have been evaluated in pre-clinical models of OA and the results coming out from the clinical trials in patients with OA. MSC-based therapy seems a promising approach for the treatment of patients with OA. Further research is still needed to demonstrate their efficacy in clinical trials using controlled, prospective studies. However, the emergence of MSC-derived EVs as possible therapeutic agents could be an alternative to cell-based therapy.

  12. The Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cell in Cancer Development

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    Hiroshi eYagi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The role of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in cancer development is still controversial. MSCs may promote tumor progression through immune modulation, but other tumor suppressive effects of MSCs have also been described. The discrepancy between these results may arise from issues related to different tissue sources, individual donor variability, and injection timing of MSCs. The expression of critical receptors such as Toll-like receptor (TLR is variable at each time point of treatment, which may also determine the effects of MSCs on tumor progression. However, factors released from malignant cells, as well as surrounding tissues and the vasculature, are still regarded as a black box. Thus, it is still difficult to clarify the specific role of MSCs in cancer development. Whether MSCs support or suppress tumor progression is currently unclear, but it is clear that systemically administered MSCs can be recruited and migrate toward tumors. These findings are important because they can be used as a basis for initiating studies to explore the incorporation of engineered MSCs as novel anti-tumor carriers, for the development of tumor-targeted therapies.

  13. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Therapy in Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

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    Pascal Rowart

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI represents a worldwide public health issue of increasing incidence. IRI may virtually affect all organs and tissues and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Particularly, the duration of blood supply deprivation has been recognized as a critical factor in stroke, hemorrhagic shock, or myocardial infarction, as well as in solid organ transplantation (SOT. Pathophysiologically, IRI causes multiple cellular and tissular metabolic and architectural changes. Furthermore, the reperfusion of ischemic tissues induces both local and systemic inflammation. In the particular field of SOT, IRI is an unavoidable event, which conditions both short- and long-term outcomes of graft function and survival. Clinically, the treatment of patients with IRI mostly relies on supportive maneuvers since no specific target-oriented therapy has been validated thus far. In the present review, we summarize the current literature on mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC and their potential use as cell therapy in IRI. MSC have demonstrated immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, and tissue repair properties in rodent studies and in preliminary clinical trials, which may open novel avenues in the management of IRI and SOT.

  14. The Modulatory Effects of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Osteoclastogenesis

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    Wessam E. Sharaf-Eldin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs on bone formation has been extensively demonstrated through several in vitro and in vivo studies. However, few studies addressed the effect of MSCs on osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. Under physiological conditions, MSCs support osteoclastogenesis through producing the main osteoclastogenic cytokines, RANKL and M-CSF. However, during inflammation, MSCs suppress osteoclast formation and activity, partly via secretion of the key anti-osteoclastogenic factor, osteoprotegerin (OPG. In vitro, co-culture of MSCs with osteoclasts in the presence of high concentrations of osteoclast-inducing factors might reflect the in vivo inflammatory pathology and prompt MSCs to exert an osteoclastogenic suppressive effect. MSCs thus seem to have a dual effect, by stimulating or inhibiting osteoclastogenesis, depending on the inflammatory milieu. This effect of MSCs on osteoclast formation seems to mirror the effect of MSCs on other immune cells, and may be exploited for the therapeutic potential of MSCs in bone loss associated inflammatory diseases.

  15. [Effects of catalase on human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lin-Ping; Gao, Ying-Dai; Zheng, Guo-Guang; Shi, Ying-Xu; Xie, Yin-Liang; Liu, Yong-Jun; Yuan, Wei-Ping; Cheng, Tao

    2010-04-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the growth and multiple differentiation potential of human umbilical cord tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) transfected by a retroviral vector with catalase (CAT) gene. The UC-MSCs cultured in vitro were transfected by using pMSCV carrying GFP (pMSCV-GFP) and pMSCV carrying CAT (pMSCV-GFP-CAT) respectively, then the MSC-GFP cell line and MSC-GFP-CAT cell line were obtained by sorting of flow cytometry. The GFP expression was observed by a fluorescent microscopy at 48 hours after CAT gene transfection. The GFP+ cells were sorted by flow cytometry. The activity of CAT in GFP+ cells was detected by catalase assay kit. The proliferative capacity of transfected UC-MSCs was determined by cell counting kit-8. The differentiation ability of gene-transfected GFP+ cells into osteogenesis and adipogenesis was observed by von Kossa and oil red O staining. The results indicated that green fluorescence in UC-MSCs was observed at 48 hours after transfection, and the fluorescence gradually enhanced to a steady level on day 3. The percentage of MSCs-GFP was (25.54+/-8.65)%, while the percentage of MSCs-GFP-CAT was (35.4+/-18.57)%. The activity of catalase in UC-MSCs, MSCs-GFP, MSCs-GFP-CAT cells were 19.5, 20.3, 67.2 U, respectively. The transfected MSCs-GFP-CAT could be induced into osteoblasts and adipocytes. After 21 days, von Kossa staining showed induced osteoblasts. Many lipid droplets with high refractivity occurred in cytoplasm of the transfected UC-MSCs, and showed red fat granules in oil red O staining cells. There were no significant differences between transfected and non-transfected UC-MSCs cells (p>0.05). It is concluded that UC-MSCs are successfully transfected by retrovirus carrying GFP or CAT gene, the activity of catalase increased by 3.4-fold. The transfected UC-MSCs maintain proliferation potential and ability of differentiation into osteoblasts and adipocytes.

  16. Adult-derived human liver mesenchymal-like cells as a potential progenitor reservoir of hepatocytes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najimi, Mustapha; Khuu, Dung Ngoc; Lysy, Philippe Antoine; Jazouli, Nawal; Abarca, Jorge; Sempoux, Christine; Sokal, Etienne Marc

    2007-01-01

    It is currently accepted that adult tissues may develop and maintain their own stem cell pools. Because of their higher safety profile, adult stem cells may represent an ideal candidate cell source to be used for liver cell therapies. We therefore evaluated the differentiation potential of mesenchymal-like cells isolated from adult human livers. Mesenchymal-like cells were isolated from enzymatically digested adult human liver and expanded in vitro. Cell characterization was performed using flow cytometry, RT-PCR, and immunofluorescence, whereas the differentiation potential was evaluated both in vitro after incubation with specific media and in vivo after intrasplenic transplantation of uPA(+/+)-SCID and SCID mice. Adult-derived human liver mesenchymal-like cells expressed both hepatic and mesenchymal markers among which albumin, CYP3A4, vimentin, and alpha-smooth muscle actin. In vitro differentiation studies demonstrated that these mesenchymal-like cells are preferentially determined to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells. Ten weeks following intrasplenic transplantation into uPA(+/+)-SCID mice, recipient livers showed the presence of human hepatocytic cell nodules positive for human albumin, prealbumin, and alpha-fetoprotein. In SCID transplanted liver mice, human hepatocyte-like cells were mostly found near vascular structures 56 days posttransplantation. In conclusion, the ability of isolated adult-derived liver mesenchymal stem-like cells to proliferate and differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells both in vitro and in vivo leads to propose them as an attractive expandable cell source for stem cell therapy in human liver diseases.

  17. Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma and the Importance of Considering the Oncogenic and Immune-Suppressant Role of the Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1: A Case Report

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    Sergio Lupo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionSoft-tissue sarcomas account for 0.7% of all malignant tumors, with an incidence rate of 3 per 100,000 persons/year. The undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (UPS with giant cells, a high grade tumor of soft tissue, is very unusual, especially in young adults before the age of 40. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is a human retrovirus, classified as group 1 human carcinogens by The International Agency for Research on Cancer, that causes an aggressive malignancy known as adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia and a progressive chronic inflammatory neurological disease named HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. HTLV-1 causes accumulation of genetic mutations in the host genome that could contribute to cellular transformation, one of the oncogenic features of HTLV-1.Case reportWe describe a case of a young woman with UPS who suffered from HAM/TSP with 3 years of evolution. In 2013, the patient started with neurological symptoms: weakness in the legs and bladder dysfunction. One year later, the patient developed a mild paraparesis in both extremities, anti-HTLV-1 antibodies were detected in plasma and in cerebrospinal fluid, and HAM/TSP was confirmed. In November 2015, a benign ganglion cyst was first suspected without intervention and by March 2016 a sarcoma was diagnosed. Three weeks after surgical resection, the tumor aroused in deep tissue and behaved aggressively, implicating a curative wide resection of the fibula, joint reconstruction, and soft-tissue graft. Histopathological examination confirmed UPS with giant cells.Concluding remarksThe unapparent subclinical immunodeficiency state due to HTLV-1 infection deserves to be considered in order to carefully monitor the possibility of developing any type of cancer. Besides, reaching an accurate and timely diagnosis of UPS can be challenging due to the difficulty in diagnosis/classification and delayed consultation. In this particular case

  18. Pancreatic stellate cells promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition in pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Masamune, Atsushi; Watanabe, Takashi; Ariga, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Hiromichi; Hamada, Shin; Satoh, Kennichi; Egawa, Shinichi; Unno, Michiaki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Recent studies have shown that pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. → Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. → PSCs decreased the expression of epithelial markers but increased that of mesenchymal markers, along with increased migration. → This study suggests epithelial-mesenchymal transition as a novel mechanism by which PSCs contribute to the aggressive behavior of pancreatic cancer cells. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Because epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in the progression of pancreatic cancer, we hypothesized that PSCs promote EMT in pancreatic cancer cells. Panc-1 and SUIT-2 pancreatic cancer cells were indirectly co-cultured with human PSCs isolated from patients undergoing operation for pancreatic cancer. The expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers was examined by real-time PCR and immunofluorescent staining. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was examined by scratch and two-chamber assays. Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and a scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. The expression of E-cadherin, cytokeratin 19, and membrane-associated β-catenin was decreased, whereas vimentin and Snail (Snai-1) expression was increased more in cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs than in mono-cultured cells. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was increased by co-culture with PSCs. The PSC-induced decrease of E-cadherin expression was not altered by treatment with anti

  19. Epigenetic dysregulation in mesenchymal stem cell aging and spontaneous differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhilong Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs hold great promise for the treatment of difficult diseases. As MSCs represent a rare cell population, ex vivo expansion of MSCs is indispensable to obtain sufficient amounts of cells for therapies and tissue engineering. However, spontaneous differentiation and aging of MSCs occur during expansion and the molecular mechanisms involved have been poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human MSCs in early and late passages were examined for their expression of genes involved in osteogenesis to determine their spontaneous differentiation towards osteoblasts in vitro, and of genes involved in self-renewal and proliferation for multipotent differentiation potential. In parallel, promoter DNA methylation and hostone H3 acetylation levels were determined. We found that MSCs underwent aging and spontaneous osteogenic differentiation upon regular culture expansion, with progressive downregulation of TERT and upregulation of osteogenic genes such as Runx2 and ALP. Meanwhile, the expression of genes associated with stem cell self-renewal such as Oct4 and Sox2 declined markedly. Notably, the altered expression of these genes were closely associated with epigenetic dysregulation of histone H3 acetylation in K9 and K14, but not with methylation of CpG islands in the promoter regions of most of these genes. bFGF promoted MSC proliferation and suppressed its spontaneous osteogenic differentiation, with corresponding changes in histone H3 acetylation in TERT, Oct4, Sox2, Runx2 and ALP genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that histone H3 acetylation, which can be modulated by extrinsic signals, plays a key role in regulating MSC aging and differentiation.

  20. Role of Slug transcription factor in human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torreggiani, Elena; Lisignoli, Gina; Manferdini, Cristina; Lambertini, Elisabetta; Penolazzi, Letizia; Vecchiatini, Renata; Gabusi, Elena; Chieco, Pasquale; Facchini, Andrea; Gambari, Roberto; Piva, Roberta

    2012-04-01

    The pathways that control mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiation are not well understood, and although some of the involved transcription factors (TFs) have been characterized, the role of others remains unclear. We used human MSCs from tibial plateau (TP) trabecular bone, iliac crest (IC) bone marrow and Wharton's jelly (WJ) umbilical cord demonstrating a variability in their mineral matrix deposition, and in the expression levels of TFs including Runx2, Sox9, Sox5, Sox6, STAT1 and Slug, all involved in the control of osteochondroprogenitors differentiation program. Because we reasoned that the basal expression level of some TFs with crucial role in the control of MSC fate may be correlated with osteogenic potential, we considered the possibility to affect the hMSCs behaviour by using gene silencing approach without exposing cells to induction media. In this study we found that Slug-silenced cells changed in morphology, decreased in their migration ability, increased Sox9 and Sox5 and decreased Sox6 and STAT1 expression. On the contrary, the effect of Slug depletion on Runx2 was influenced by cell type. Interestingly, we demonstrated a direct in vivo regulatory action of Slug by chromatin immunoprecipitation, showing a specific recruitment of this TF in the promoter of Runx2 and Sox9 genes. As a whole, our findings have important potential implication on bone tissue engineering applications, reinforcing the concept that manipulation of specific TF expression levels may elucidate MSC biology and the molecular mechanisms, which promote osteogenic differentiation. © 2011 The Authors Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine © 2011 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Direct Genesis of Functional Rodent and Human Schwann Cells from Skin Mesenchymal Precursors

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    Matthew P. Krause

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports of directed reprogramming have raised questions about the stability of cell lineages. Here, we have addressed this issue, focusing upon skin-derived precursors (SKPs, a dermally derived precursor cell. We show by lineage tracing that murine SKPs from dorsal skin originate from mesenchymal and not neural crest-derived cells. These mesenchymally derived SKPs can, without genetic manipulation, generate functional Schwann cells, a neural crest cell type, and are highly similar at the transcriptional level to Schwann cells isolated from the peripheral nerve. This is not a mouse-specific phenomenon, since human SKPs that are highly similar at the transcriptome level can be made from neural crest-derived facial and mesodermally derived foreskin dermis and the foreskin SKPs can make myelinating Schwann cells. Thus, nonneural crest-derived mesenchymal precursors can differentiate into bona fide peripheral glia in the absence of genetic manipulation, suggesting that developmentally defined lineage boundaries are more flexible than widely thought.

  2. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Protection and Repair of Injured Vital Organs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Poll, D.; Parekkadan, B.; Rinkes, I. H. M. Borel; Tilles, A. W.; Yarmush, M. L.

    Recently there has been a paradigm shift in what is considered to be the therapeutic promise of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in diseases of vital organs. Originally, research focused on MSCs as a source of regenerative cells by differentiation of transplanted cells into lost cell types. It is now

  3. Plasticity between Epithelial and Mesenchymal States Unlinks EMT from Metastasis-Enhancing Stem Cell Capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerling, Evelyne; Seinstra, Daniëlle; de Wit, Elzo; Kester, Lennart; van der Velden, Daphne; Maynard, Carrie; Schäfer, Ronny; van Diest, Paul; Voest, Emile; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Vrisekoop, Nienke; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2016-01-01

    Forced overexpression and/or downregulation of proteins regulating epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been reported to alter metastasis by changing migration and stem cell capacity of tumor cells. However, these manipulations artificially keep cells in fixed states, while in vivo cells

  4. Data on isolating mesenchymal stromal cells from human adipose tissue using a collagenase-free method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wassim Shebaby

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present dataset describes a detailed protocol to isolate mesenchymal cells from human fat without the use of collagenase. Human fat specimen, surgically cleaned from non-fat tissues (e.g., blood vessels and reduced into smaller fat pieces of around 1–3 mm size, is incubated in complete culture media for five to seven days. Then, cells started to spread out from the fat explants and to grow in cultures according to an exponential pattern. Our data showed that primary mesenchymal cells presenting heterogeneous morphology start to acquire more homogenous fibroblastic-like shape when cultured for longer duration or when subcultured into new flasks. Cell isolation efficiency as well as cell doubling time were also calculated throughout the culturing experimentations and illustrated in a separate figure thereafter. This paper contains data previously considered as an alternative protocol to isolate adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell published in “Proliferation and differentiation of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs into osteoblastic lineage are passage dependent” [1]. Keywords: Adipose tissue, mesenchymal stromal cell, cell culture, doubling time

  5. 12 hours after cerebral ischemia is the optimal time for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation

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    Seyed Mojtaba Hosseini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapy using stem cell transplantation against cerebral ischemia has been reported. However, it remains controversial regarding the optimal time for cell transplantation and the transplantation route. Rat models of cerebral ischemia were established by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. At 1, 12 hours, 1, 3, 5 and 7 days after cerebral ischemia, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were injected via the tail vein. At 28 days after cerebral ischemia, rat neurological function was evaluated using a 6-point grading scale and the pathological change of ischemic cerebral tissue was observed by hematoxylin-eosin staining. Under the fluorescence microscope, the migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells was examined by PKH labeling. Caspase-3 activity was measured using spectrophotometry. The optimal neurological function recovery, lowest degree of ischemic cerebral damage, greatest number of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells migrating to peri-ischemic area, and lowest caspase-3 activity in the ischemic cerebral tissue were observed in rats that underwent bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation at 12 hours after cerebral ischemia. These findings suggest that 12 hours after cerebral ischemia is the optimal time for tail vein injection of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation against cerebral ischemia, and the strongest neuroprotective effect of this cell therapy appears at this time.

  6. Concise Review: Cancer Cells, Cancer Stem Cells, and Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Influence in Cancer Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaccio, Federica; Paino, Francesca; Regad, Tarik; Desiderio, Vincenzo; Tirino, Virginia

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Tumors are composed of different types of cancer cells that contribute to tumor heterogeneity. Among these populations of cells, cancer stem cells (CSCs) play an important role in cancer initiation and progression. Like their stem cells counterpart, CSCs are also characterized by self‐renewal and the capacity to differentiate. A particular population of CSCs is constituted by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that differentiate into cells of mesodermal characteristics. Several studies have reported the potential pro‐or anti‐tumorigenic influence of MSCs on tumor initiation and progression. In fact, MSCs are recruited to the site of wound healing to repair damaged tissues, an event that is also associated with tumorigenesis. In other cases, resident or migrating MSCs can favor tumor angiogenesis and increase tumor aggressiveness. This interplay between MSCs and cancer cells is fundamental for cancerogenesis, progression, and metastasis. Therefore, an interesting topic is the relationship between cancer cells, CSCs, and MSCs, since contrasting reports about their respective influences have been reported. In this review, we discuss recent findings related to conflicting results on the influence of normal and CSCs in cancer development. The understanding of the role of MSCs in cancer is also important in cancer management. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:2115–2125 PMID:29072369

  7. Factors affecting directional migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to the injured spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Peng; Pan, Su; Cheng, Jieping; Yang, Maoguang; Qi, Zhiping; Hou, Tingting; Yang, Xiaoyu

    2014-09-15

    Microtubule-associated protein 1B plays an important role in axon guidance and neuronal migration. In the present study, we sought to discover the mechanisms underlying microtubule-associated protein 1B mediation of axon guidance and neuronal migration. We exposed bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to okadaic acid or N-acetyl-D-erythro-sphingosine (an inhibitor and stimulator, respectively, of protein phosphatase 2A) for 24 hours. The expression of the phosphorylated form of type I microtubule-associated protein 1B in the cells was greater after exposure to okadaic acid and lower after N-acetyl-D-erythro-sphingosine. We then injected the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells through the ear vein into rabbit models of spinal cord contusion. The migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells towards the injured spinal cord was poorer in cells exposed to okadaic acid- and N-acetyl-D-erythro-sphingosine than in non-treated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Finally, we blocked phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) pathways in rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells using the inhibitors LY294002 and U0126, respectively. LY294002 resulted in an elevated expression of phosphorylated type I microtubule-associated protein 1B, whereas U0126 caused a reduction in expression. The present data indicate that PI3K and ERK1/2 in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells modulate the phosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein 1B via a cross-signaling network, and affect the migratory efficiency of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells towards injured spinal cord.

  8. Down-regulation of Wnt10a affects odontogenesis and proliferation in mesenchymal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yang, E-mail: Ly10160624@163.com; Han, Dong, E-mail: Donghan@bjmu.edu.cn; Wang, Lei, E-mail: wanglei_dentist@163.com; Feng, Hailan, E-mail: kqfenghl@bjmu.edu.cn

    2013-05-17

    Highlights: •Down-regulation of Wnt10a in dental mesenchymal cells impairs odontogenesis of reassociated tooth germs. •Dspp is down- and up-regulated after Wnt10a-knockdown and overexpression in dental mesenchymal cells. •Down-regulation of Wnt10a inhibits proliferation of dental mesenchymal cells. -- Abstract: The WNT10a mutation has been found in patients with abnormal odontogenesis. In mice, Wnt10a expression is found in the tooth germ, but its role has not yet been elucidated. We aimed to investigate the role of Wnt10a in odontogenesis. Mesenchymal cells of the first mandibular molar germ at the bell stage were isolated, transfected with Wnt10a SiRNA or plasmid, and reassociated with epithelial part of the molar germ. Scrambled SiRNA or empty vector was used in the control group. The reassociated tooth germs were transplanted into mice subrenal capsules. After gene modification, dental mesenchymal cells cultured in vitro were checked for cell proliferation and the expression of Dspp was examined. All 12 reassociated tooth germs in the control group resumed odontogenesis, while only 5 of 12 in the Wnt10a knockdown group developed into teeth. After Wnt10a knockdown, the mesenchymal cells cultured in vitro presented repressed proliferation. Wnt10a knockdown and overexpression led to both down- and up-regulation of Dspp. We conclude that the down-regulation of Wnt10a impairs odontogensis and cell proliferation, and that Wnt10a regulates Dspp expression in mesenchymal cells. These findings help to elucidate the mechanism of abnormal tooth development in patients with the WNT10A mutation.

  9. Down-regulation of Wnt10a affects odontogenesis and proliferation in mesenchymal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yang; Han, Dong; Wang, Lei; Feng, Hailan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Down-regulation of Wnt10a in dental mesenchymal cells impairs odontogenesis of reassociated tooth germs. •Dspp is down- and up-regulated after Wnt10a-knockdown and overexpression in dental mesenchymal cells. •Down-regulation of Wnt10a inhibits proliferation of dental mesenchymal cells. -- Abstract: The WNT10a mutation has been found in patients with abnormal odontogenesis. In mice, Wnt10a expression is found in the tooth germ, but its role has not yet been elucidated. We aimed to investigate the role of Wnt10a in odontogenesis. Mesenchymal cells of the first mandibular molar germ at the bell stage were isolated, transfected with Wnt10a SiRNA or plasmid, and reassociated with epithelial part of the molar germ. Scrambled SiRNA or empty vector was used in the control group. The reassociated tooth germs were transplanted into mice subrenal capsules. After gene modification, dental mesenchymal cells cultured in vitro were checked for cell proliferation and the expression of Dspp was examined. All 12 reassociated tooth germs in the control group resumed odontogenesis, while only 5 of 12 in the Wnt10a knockdown group developed into teeth. After Wnt10a knockdown, the mesenchymal cells cultured in vitro presented repressed proliferation. Wnt10a knockdown and overexpression led to both down- and up-regulation of Dspp. We conclude that the down-regulation of Wnt10a impairs odontogensis and cell proliferation, and that Wnt10a regulates Dspp expression in mesenchymal cells. These findings help to elucidate the mechanism of abnormal tooth development in patients with the WNT10A mutation

  10. Factors affecting directional migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to the injured spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Peng; Pan, Su; Cheng, Jieping; Yang, Maoguang; Qi, Zhiping; Hou, Tingting; Yang, Xiaoyu

    2014-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein 1B plays an important role in axon guidance and neuronal migration. In the present study, we sought to discover the mechanisms underlying microtubule-associated protein 1B mediation of axon guidance and neuronal migration. We exposed bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to okadaic acid or N-acetyl-D-erythro-sphingosine (an inhibitor and stimulator, respectively, of protein phosphatase 2A) for 24 hours. The expression of the phosphorylated form of type I microtubule-associated protein 1B in the cells was greater after exposure to okadaic acid and lower after N-acetyl-D-erythro-sphingosine. We then injected the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells through the ear vein into rabbit models of spinal cord contusion. The migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells towards the injured spinal cord was poorer in cells exposed to okadaic acid- and N-acetyl-D-erythro-sphingosine than in non-treated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Finally, we blocked phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) pathways in rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells using the inhibitors LY294002 and U0126, respectively. LY294002 resulted in an elevated expression of phosphorylated type I microtubule-associated protein 1B, whereas U0126 caused a reduction in expression. The present data indicate that PI3K and ERK1/2 in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells modulate the phosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein 1B via a cross-signaling network, and affect the migratory efficiency of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells towards injured spinal cord. PMID:25374590

  11. Strategies to improve homing of mesenchymal stem cells for greater efficacy in stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi-Meshkin, Hojjat; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza; Bidkhori, Hamid Reza; Mirahmadi, Mahdi; Ahmadiankia, Naghmeh

    2015-01-01

    Stem/progenitor cell-based therapeutic approach in clinical practice has been an elusive dream in medical sciences, and improvement of stem cell homing is one of major challenges in cell therapy programs. Stem/progenitor cells have a homing response to injured tissues/organs, mediated by interactions of chemokine receptors expressed on the cells and chemokines secreted by the injured tissue. For improvement of directed homing of the cells, many techniques have been developed either to engineer stem/progenitor cells with higher amount of chemokine receptors (stem cell-based strategies) or to modulate the target tissues to release higher level of the corresponding chemokines (target tissue-based strategies). This review discusses both of these strategies involved in the improvement of stem cell homing focusing on mesenchymal stem cells as most frequent studied model in cellular therapies. © 2014 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  12. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Like Cells Derived from Mouse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Ameliorate Diabetic Polyneuropathy in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Himeno, Tatsuhito; Kamiya, Hideki; Naruse, Keiko; Cheng, Zhao; Ito, Sachiko; Kondo, Masaki; Okawa, Tetsuji; Fujiya, Atsushi; Kato, Jiro; Suzuki, Hirohiko; Kito, Tetsutaro; Hamada, Yoji; Oiso, Yutaka; Isobe, Kenichi; Nakamura, Jiro

    2013-01-01

    Background. Although pathological involvements of diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) have been reported, no dependable treatment of DPN has been achieved. Recent studies have shown that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) ameliorate DPN. Here we demonstrate a differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) into MSC-like cells and investigate the therapeutic potential of the MSC-like cell transplantation on DPN. Research Design and Methods. For induction into MSC-like cells, GFP-expressing iPSC...

  13. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Obtained from Synovial Fluid Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells on a Matrigel Coating Exhibited Enhanced Proliferation and Differentiation Potential

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Yu-Liang; Sun, Yang-Peng; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Wen-Jing; Jiang, Rui; Li, Wen-Yu; Zheng, You-Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (iPSC-MSCs) serve as a promising source for cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine. However, optimal methods for transforming iPSCs into MSCs and the characteristics of iPSC-MSCs obtained from different methods remain poorly understood. In this study, we developed a one-step method for obtaining iPSC-MSCs (CD146+STRO-1+ MSCs) from human synovial fluid MSC-derived induced iPSCs (SFMSC-iPSCs). CD146-STRO-1-SFMSCs were reprogram...

  14. Transplantation of neurotrophin-3-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for the repair of spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Yuzhen; Yang, Libin; Yang, Lin; Zhao, Hongxing; Zhang, Chao; Wu, Dapeng

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation has been shown to be therapeutic in the repair of spinal cord injury. However, the low survival rate of transplanted bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vivo remains a problem. Neurotrophin-3 promotes motor neuron survival and it is hypothesized that its transfection can enhance the therapeutic effect. We show that in vitro transfection of neurotrophin-3 gene increases the number of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the region of spinal ...

  15. Mesenchymal stromal cells for cardiovascular repair: current status and future challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Kastrup, Jens

    2009-01-01

    of treatments in patients with heart failure, the 1-year mortality is still approximately 20% after the diagnosis has been established. Treatment with stem cells with the potential to regenerate the damaged myocardium is a relatively new approach. Mesenchymal stromal cells are a promising source of stem cells...... studies are promising, but there are still many unanswered questions. In this review, we explore present preclinical and clinical knowledge regarding the use of stem cells in cardiovascular regenerative medicine, with special focus on mesenchymal stromal cells. We take a closer look at sources of stem...

  16. Visual bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in the repair of spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui-Ping; Xu, Cheng; Liu, Yin; Li, Jian-Ding; Xie, Jun

    2015-03-01

    An important factor in improving functional recovery from spinal cord injury using stem cells is maximizing the number of transplanted cells at the lesion site. Here, we established a contusion model of spinal cord injury by dropping a weight onto the spinal cord at T7-8. Superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were transplanted into the injured spinal cord via the subarachnoid space. An outer magnetic field was used to successfully guide the labeled cells to the lesion site. Prussian blue staining showed that more bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells reached the lesion site in these rats than in those without magnetic guidance or superparamagnetic iron oxide labeling, and immunofluorescence revealed a greater number of complete axons at the lesion site. Moreover, the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale scores were the highest in rats with superparamagnetic labeling and magnetic guidance. Our data confirm that superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles effectively label bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and impart sufficient magnetism to respond to the external magnetic field guides. More importantly, superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can be dynamically and non-invasively tracked in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging. Superparamagnetic iron oxide labeling of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells coupled with magnetic guidance offers a promising avenue for the clinical treatment of spinal cord injury.

  17. Transcriptomic comparisons between cultured human adipose tissue-derived pericytes and mesenchymal stromal cells

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    Lindolfo da Silva Meirelles

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, sometimes called mesenchymal stem cells, are cultured cells able to give rise to mature mesenchymal cells such as adipocytes, osteoblasts, and chondrocytes, and to secrete a wide range of trophic and immunomodulatory molecules. Evidence indicates that pericytes, cells that surround and maintain physical connections with endothelial cells in blood vessels, can give rise to MSCs (da Silva Meirelles et al., 2008 [1]; Caplan and Correa, 2011 [2]. We have compared the transcriptomes of highly purified, human adipose tissue pericytes subjected to culture-expansion in pericyte medium or MSC medium, with that of human adipose tissue MSCs isolated with traditional methods to test the hypothesis that their transcriptomes are similar (da Silva Meirelles et al., 2015 [3]. Here, we provide further information and analyses of microarray data from three pericyte populations cultured in pericyte medium, three pericyte populations cultured in MSC medium, and three adipose tissue MSC populations deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus under accession number GSE67747. Keywords: Mesenchymal stromal cells, Mesenchymal stem cells, Pericytes, Microarrays

  18. Suitability of human mesenchymal stem cells for gene therapy depends on the expansion medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apel, Anja; Groth, Ariane; Schlesinger, Sabine; Bruns, Helge; Schemmer, Peter; Buechler, Markus W.; Herr, Ingrid

    2009-01-01

    Great hope is set in the use of mesenchymal stem cells for gene therapy and regenerative medicine. Since the frequency of this subpopulation of stem cells in bone marrow is low, mesenchymal stem cells are expanded ex vivo and manipulated prior to experimental or clinical use. Different methods for isolation and expansion are available, but the particular effect on the stem cell character is unclear. While the isolation of mesenchymal stem cells by density centrifugation followed by selection of the plastic adherent fraction is frequently used, the composition of expansion media differs. Thus, in the present study we cultured mesenchymal stem cells isolated from five healthy young volunteers in three widely used expansion media and performed a detailed analysis of the effect on morphology, proliferation, clonogenicity, passaging, differentiation and senescence. By this way we clearly show that the type of expansion medium used determines the stem cell character and time of senescence which is critical for future gene therapeutic and regenerative approaches using mesenchymal stem cells

  19. Towards Personalized Regenerative Cell Therapy: Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Bolund, Lars; Luo, Yonglun

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells with the capacity of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation, and can be isolated from several adult tissues. However, isolating MSCs from adult tissues for cell therapy is hampered by the invasive procedure, the rarity of the cells and their attenuated proliferation capacity when cultivated and expanded in vitro. Human MSCs derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC-MSCs) have now evolved as a promising alternative cell source for MSCs and regenerative medicine. Several groups, including ours, have reported successful derivation of functional iPSC-MSCs and applied these cells in MSC-based therapeutic testing. Still, the current experience and understanding of iPSC-MSCs with respect to production methods, safety and efficacy are primitive. In this review, we highlight the methodological progress in iPSC-MSC research, describing the importance of choosing the right sources of iPSCs, iPSC reprogramming methods, iPSC culture systems, embryoid body intermediates, pathway inhibitors, basal medium, serum, growth factors and culture surface coating. We also highlight some progress in the application of iPSC-MSCs in direct cell therapy, tissue engineering and gene therapy.

  20. The HPB-AML-I cell line possesses the properties of mesenchymal stem cells

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    Tatsumi Eiji

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In spite of its establishment from the peripheral blood of a case with acute myeloid leukemia (AML-M1, HPB-AML-I shows plastic adherence with spindle-like morphology. In addition, lipid droplets can be induced in HPB-AML-I cells by methylisobutylxanthine, hydrocortisone, and indomethacin. These findings suggest that HPB-AML-I is similar to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs or mesenchymal stromal cells rather than to hematopoietic cells. Methods To examine this possibility, we characterized HPB-AML-I by performing cytochemical, cytogenetic, and phenotypic analyses, induction of differentiation toward mesenchymal lineage cells, and mixed lymphocyte culture analysis. Results HPB-AML-I proved to be negative for myeloperoxidase, while surface antigen analysis disclosed that it was positive for MSC-related antigens, such as CD29, CD44, CD55, CD59, and CD73, but not for CD14, CD19, CD34, CD45, CD90, CD105, CD117, and HLA-DR. Karyotypic analysis showed the presence of complicated abnormalities, but no reciprocal translocations typically detected in AML cases. Following the induction of differentiation toward adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteocytes, HPB-AML-I cells showed, in conjunction with extracellular matrix formation, lipid accumulation, proteoglycan synthesis, and alkaline phosphatase expression. Mixed lymphocyte culture demonstrated that CD3+ T-cell proliferation was suppressed in the presence of HPB-AML-I cells. Conclusions We conclude that HPB-AML-I cells appear to be unique neoplastic cells, which may be derived from MSCs, but are not hematopoietic progenitor cells.

  1. Cellular Therapeutics for Heart Failure: Focus on Mesenchymal Stem Cells

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    Amitabh C. Pandey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Resulting from a various etiologies, the most notable remains ischemia; heart failure (HF manifests as the common end pathway of many cardiovascular processes and remains among the top causes for hospitalization and a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Current pharmacologic treatment for HF utilizes pharmacologic agents to control symptoms and slow further deterioration; however, on a cellular level, in a patient with progressive disease, fibrosis and cardiac remodeling can continue leading to end-stage heart failure. Cellular therapeutics have risen as the new hope for an improvement in the treatment of HF. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have gained popularity given their propensity of promoting endogenous cellular repair of a myriad of disease processes via paracrine signaling through expression of various cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules resulting in activation of signal transduction pathways. While the exact mechanism remains to be completely elucidated, this remains the primary mechanism identified to date. Recently, MSCs have been incorporated as the central focus in clinical trials investigating the role how MSCs can play in the treatment of HF. In this review, we focus on the characteristics of MSCs that give them a distinct edge as cellular therapeutics and present results of clinical trials investigating MSCs in the setting of ischemic HF.

  2. Concave microwell plate facilitates chondrogenesis from mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ji-Yun; Im, Gun-Il

    2016-11-01

    To compare in vitro chondrogenesis from bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells using concave microwell plates with those obtained using culture tubes. Pellets cultured in concave microwell plates had a significantly higher level of GAG per DNA content and greater proteoglycan content than those cultured in tubes at day 7 and 14. Three chondrogenic markers, SOX-9, COL2A1 and aggrecan, showed significantly higher expression in pellets cultured in concave microwell plates than those cultured in tubes at day 7 and 14. At day 21, there was not a significant difference in the expression of these markers. COL10A1, the typical hypertrophy marker, was significantly lower in concave microwell plates during the whole culture period. Runx-2, a marker of hypertrophy and osteogenesis, was significantly lower at day 7 in pellets cultured in concave microwell plates than those cultured in tubes. Concave microwell plates provide a convenient and effective tool for the study of in vitro chondrogenesis and may replace the use of propylene culture tube.

  3. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Mitigate Cirrhosis through BMP7

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    Bing Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs has therapeutic effects on various diseases, while its effect on developing cirrhosis as well as the underlying mechanism remained largely unknown. Methods: Twenty C57BL/6 mice were randomly separated into 2 groups of ten each. One group received transplantation of MSCs, while the other group received saline as control. The mice then received intraperitoneal injection of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 twice per week for 8 weeks to develop cirrhosis. After another 4 weeks, the levels of cirrhosis in these mice were evaluated by liver fibrosis area, portal pressure, sodium balance and excretion. Transcripts of transforming growth factor β 1 (TGFβ1 and bone morphogenic protein 7 (BMP7 in the mouse livers were quantified by RT-qPCR. BMP7-depleted MSCs were prepared and applied in this model, and compared to MSCs. Results: Liver fibrosis, portal hypertension and sodium retention that were developed by CCl4, were all significantly alleviated by MSCs transplantation, which decreased TGFβ1 levels and increased BMP7 levels in the injured liver. MSCs were found to express extremely high levels of BMP7. Knockdown of BMP7 in MSCs completely abolished the protective effect of MSCs against CCl4-induced cirrhosis. Conclusions: MSCs mitigate cirrhosis through their production of BMP7 against the fibrogenic effect of TGFβ1 in the injured liver.

  4. Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cell Treatment Induces Specific Alloantibodies in Horses

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    Sean D. Owens

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is unknown whether horses that receive allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs injections develop specific humoral immune response. Our goal was to develop and validate a flow cytometric MSC crossmatch procedure and to determine if horses that received allogeneic MSCs in a clinical setting developed measurable antibodies following MSC administration. Methods. Serum was collected from a total of 19 horses enrolled in 3 different research projects. Horses in the 3 studies all received unmatched allogeneic MSCs. Bone marrow (BM or adipose tissue derived MSCs (ad-MSCs were administered via intravenous, intra-arterial, intratendon, or intraocular routes. Anti-MSCs and anti-bovine serum albumin antibodies were detected via flow cytometry and ELISA, respectively. Results. Overall, anti-MSC antibodies were detected in 37% of the horses. The majority of horses (89% were positive for anti-bovine serum albumin (BSA antibodies prior to and after MSC injection. Finally, there was no correlation between the amount of anti-BSA antibody and the development of anti-MSC antibodies. Conclusion. Anti allo-MSC antibody development was common; however, the significance of these antibodies is unknown. There was no correlation between either the presence or absence of antibodies and the percent antibody binding to MSCs and any adverse reaction to a MSC injection.

  5. Effects of maternal obesity on Wharton's Jelly mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badraiq, Heba; Cvoro, Aleksandra; Galleu, Antonio; Simon, Marisa; Miere, Cristian; Hobbs, Carl; Schulz, Reiner; Siow, Richard; Dazzi, Francesco; Ilic, Dusko

    2017-12-14

    We investigated whether maternal metabolic environment affects mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) from umbilical cord's Wharton's Jelly (WJ) on a molecular level, and potentially render them unsuitable for clinical use in multiple recipients. In this pilot study on umbilical cords post partum from healthy non-obese (BMI = 19-25; n = 7) and obese (BMI ≥ 30; n = 7) donors undergoing elective Cesarean section, we found that WJ MSC from obese donors showed slower population doubling and a stronger immunosuppressive activity. Genome-wide DNA methylation of triple positive (CD73 + CD90 + CD105 + ) WJ MSCs found 67 genes with at least one CpG site where the methylation difference was ≥0.2 in four or more obese donors. Only one gene, PNPLA7, demonstrated significant difference on methylome, transcriptome and protein level. Although the number of analysed donors is limited, our data suggest that the altered metabolic environment related to excessive body weight might bear consequences on the WJ MSCs.

  6. A relativity concept in mesenchymal stromal cell manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ivan; De Boer, Jan; Sensebe, Luc

    2016-05-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are being experimentally tested in several biological systems and clinical settings with the aim of verifying possible therapeutic effects for a variety of indications. MSCs are also known to be heterogeneous populations, with phenotypic and functional features that depend heavily on the individual donor, the harvest site, and the culture conditions. In the context of this multidimensional complexity, a recurrent question is whether it is feasible to produce MSC batches as "standard" therapeutics, possibly within scalable manufacturing systems. Here, we provide a short overview of the literature on different culture methods for MSCs, including those employing innovative technologies, and of some typically assessed functional features (e.g., growth, senescence, genomic stability, clonogenicity, etc.). We then offer our perspective of a roadmap on how to identify and refine manufacturing systems for MSCs intended for specific clinical indications. We submit that the vision of producing MSCs according to a unique standard, although commercially attractive, cannot yet be scientifically substantiated. Instead, efforts should be concentrated on standardizing methods for characterization of MSCs generated by different groups, possibly covering a vast gamut of functionalities. Such assessments, combined with hypotheses on the therapeutic mode of action and associated clinical data, should ultimately allow definition of in-process controls and measurable release criteria for MSC manufacturing. These will have to be validated as predictive of potency in suitable pre-clinical models and of therapeutic efficacy in patients. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Mesenchymal stem cells in obesity: insights for translational applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Kenichi; Dzau, Victor J

    2017-10-01

    Obesity is now a major public health problem worldwide. Lifestyle modification to reduce the characteristic excess body adiposity is important in the treatment of obesity, but effective therapeutic intervention is still needed to control what has become an obesity epidemic. Unfortunately, many anti-obesity drugs have been withdrawn from market due to adverse side effects. Bariatric surgery therefore remains the most effective therapy for severe cases, although such surgery is invasive and researchers continue to seek new control strategies for obesity. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a major source of adipocyte generation, and studies have been conducted into the potential roles of MSCs in treating obesity. However, despite significant progress in stem cell research and its potential applications for obesity, adipogenesis is a highly complex process and the molecular mechanisms governing MSC adipogenesis remain ill defined. In particular, successful clinical application of MSCs will require extensive identification and characterization of the transcriptional regulators controlling MSC adipogenesis. Since obesity is associated with the incidence of multiple important comorbidities, an in-depth understanding of the relationship between MSC adipogenesis and the comorbidities of obesity is also necessary to evaluate the potential of effective and safe MSC-based therapies for obesity. In addition, brown adipogenesis is an attractive topic from the viewpoint of therapeutic innovation and future research into MSC-based brown adipogenesis could lead to a novel breakthrough. Ongoing stem cell studies and emerging research fields such as epigenetics are expected to elucidate the complicated mechanisms at play in MSC adipogenesis and develop novel MSC-based therapeutic options for obesity. This review discusses the current understanding of MSCs in adipogenesis and their potential clinical applications for obesity.

  8. Human dental pulp mesenchymal stem cells isolation and osteoblast differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moustafa Alkhalil

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim This study was focused on the isolation and characterization of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from human dental pulp (DPSC. Methods The study was performed in the Department for Oral and Cranio-Maxillo- Facial Surgey Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar and Weill Cornell Medical Colleague Doha, Qatar, in period 2010-2011. Dental pulp was extracted from premolars and third molars of 19 healthy patients. The pulp was digested in a solution of 3 mg/mL collagenase type I and 4 mg/mL dispase for 1 hour at 37C. After filtration, cells were cultured in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM Low Glucoses with 20% Fetal Bovine Serum (FBS, 2mM L-glutamine and antibiotics (100 U/mL penicillin, 100 ug/mL streptomycin at 37 °C under 5% CO2. Cultures were treated with osteoinductive medium for differentiation MSC in to the osteoblast cell line. Staining with Alizarin red were used for the detection of the osteoblast production and calcification new formed tissue. Results On the total of three out of 19 patients it was possible to isolate DPMSCs after 2 to 3 weeks: in one patient it was not possible to expand MSCs because of infection, and in other two patients positive Alizarin red staining reaction showed osteogenic differentiation capability and strong mineralization in vitro. Conclusion The main advantage of using DPSC is absence of morbidity. MSCs could be isolated noninvasively from teeth, routinely extracted in the clinic and discarded as medical waste. Standardization of clinical and laboratory protocols for DPMSCs isolation and team work coordination could lead to significantly improved result.

  9. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Enhance Allogeneic Islet Engraftment in Nonhuman Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Dora M.; Willman, Melissa A.; Han, Dongmei; Kleiner, Gary; Kenyon, Norman M.; Cabrera, Over; Karl, Julie A.; Wiseman, Roger W.; O'Connor, David H.; Bartholomew, Amelia M.; Kenyon, Norma S.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To test the graft-promoting effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in a cynomolgus monkey model of islet/bone marrow transplantation. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Cynomolgus MSCs were obtained from iliac crest aspirate and characterized through passage 11 for phenotype, gene expression, differentiation potential, and karyotype. Allogeneic donor MSCs were cotransplanted intraportally with islets on postoperative day (POD) 0 and intravenously with donor marrow on PODs 5 and 11. Recipients were followed for stabilization of blood glucose levels, reduction of exogenous insulin requirement (EIR), C-peptide levels, changes in peripheral blood T regulatory cells, and chimerism. Destabilization of glycemia and increases in EIR were used as signs of rejection; additional intravenous MSCs were administered to test the effect on reversal of rejection. RESULTS MSC phenotype and a normal karyotype were observed through passage 11. IL-6, IL-10, vascular endothelial growth factor, TGF-β, hepatocyte growth factor, and galectin-1 gene expression levels varied among donors. MSC treatment significantly enhanced islet engraftment and function at 1 month posttransplant (n = 8), as compared with animals that received islets without MSCs (n = 3). Additional infusions of donor or third-party MSCs resulted in reversal of rejection episodes and prolongation of islet function in two animals. Stable islet allograft function was associated with increased numbers of regulatory T-cells in peripheral blood. CONCLUSIONS MSCs may provide an important approach for enhancement of islet engraftment, thereby decreasing the numbers of islets needed to achieve insulin independence. Furthermore, MSCs may serve as a new, safe, and effective antirejection therapy. PMID:20622174

  10. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Dependent Regression of Pulmonary Metastasis from Ewing's

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    Andrea Anita Hayes-Jordan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ewing’s sarcoma (ES is the second most common bone tumor in children. Survival has not improved over the last decade and once pulmonary metastatic disease is present, survival is dismal. Mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC therapy has shown potential benefit for Kaposi's sarcoma; however, the role of progenitor cell therapies for cancer remains controversial. MSC treatment of ES or pulmonary metastatic disease has not been demonstrated. We have developed an orthotopic xenograft model of ES in which animals develop spontaneous pulmonary metastases. Within this model, we demonstrate the use of MSCs to target ES lung metastasis. Materials and MethodsHuman ES cells were transfected with luciferase and injected into the rib of nude mice. Development of pulmonary metastases was confirmed by imaging. After flow cytometry based characterization, MSC’s were injected into the tail vein of nude mice with established local ES tumor or pulmonary metastasis. Mice were treated with intravenous MSCs weekly followed by bioluminescent imaging.ResultsThe intravenous injection of MSCs in an ES model decreases the volume of pulmonary metastatic lesions; however, no effect on primary chest wall tumor size is observed. Thus verifying the MSC preferential homing to the lung. MSCs are found to ‘home to’ the pulmonary parenchyma and remain engrafted up to 5 days after delivery. DiscussionMSC treatment of ES slows growth of pulmonary metastasis. MSC’s have more affinity for pulmonary metastasis and can effect a greater decrease in tumor growth in the lungs compared to the primary tumor site

  11. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Induced DDR2 Mediates Stromal-Breast Cancer Interactions and Metastasis Growth

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    Maria E. Gonzalez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased collagen deposition by breast cancer (BC-associated mesenchymal stem/multipotent stromal cells (MSC promotes metastasis, but the mechanisms are unknown. Here, we report that the collagen receptor discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2 is essential for stromal-BC communication. In human BC metastasis, DDR2 is concordantly upregulated in metastatic cancer and multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells. In MSCs isolated from human BC metastasis, DDR2 maintains a fibroblastic phenotype with collagen deposition and induces pathological activation of DDR2 signaling in BC cells. Loss of DDR2 in MSCs impairs their ability to promote DDR2 phosphorylation in BC cells, as well as BC cell alignment, migration, and metastasis. Female ddr2-deficient mice homozygous for the slie mutation show inefficient spontaneous BC metastasis. These results point to a role for mesenchymal stem cell DDR2 in metastasis and suggest a therapeutic approach for metastatic BC.

  12. Comparative analysis of human UCB and adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells for their differentiation potential into brown and white adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashnonejad, Afrooz; Ercan, Gulinnaz; Gunduz, Cumhur; Akdemir, Ali; Tiftikcioglu, Yigit Ozer

    2018-02-16

    The differentiation potential of umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCB-MSCs) into brown and white adipocytes in comparison to Adipose tissue derived MSCs (AD-MSCs) were investigated in order to characterize their potency for future cell therapies. MSCs were isolated from ten UCB samples and six liposuction materials. MSCs were differentiated into white and brown adipocytes after characterization by flow cytometry. Differentiated adipocytes were stained with Oil Red O and hematoxylin/eosin. The UCP1 protein levels in brown adipocytes were investigated by immunofluoresence and western blot analysis. Cells that expressed mesenchymal stem cells markers (CD34-, CD45-, CD90+ and CD105+) were successfully isolated from UCB and adipose tissue. Oil Red O staining demonstrated that white and brown adipocytes obtained from AD-MSCs showed 85 and 61% of red pixels, while it was 3 and 1.9%, respectively for white and brown adipocytes obtained from UCB-MSCs. Fluorescence microscopy analysis showed strong uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) signaling in brown adipocytes, especially which were obtained from AD-MSCs. Quantification of UCP1 protein amount showed 4- and 10.64-fold increase in UCP1 contents of brown adipocytes derived from UCB-MSCs and AD-MSCs, respectively in comparison to undifferentiated MSCs (P stem cell type to be differentiated into these cell types. In contrast, high differentiation efficiency of AD-MSCs into brown and white adipocytes make it appropriate stem cell type to use in future regenerative medicine of soft tissue disorders or fighting with obesity and its related disorders.

  13. Larval mesenchyme cell specification in the primitive echinoid occurs independently of the double-negative gate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Atsuko; Kidachi, Yumi; Yamaguchi, Masaaki; Minokawa, Takuya

    2014-07-01

    Echinoids (sea urchins) are divided into two major groups - cidaroids (a 'primitive' group) and euechinoids (a 'derived' group). The cidaroids are a promising model species for understanding the ancestral developmental mechanisms in echinoids, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms of cidaroid development. In euechinoids, skeletogenic mesenchyme cell specification is regulated by the double-negative gate (DNG), in which hesC represses the transcription of the downstream mesenchyme specification genes (alx1, tbr and ets1), thereby defining the prospective mesenchyme region. To estimate the ancestral mechanism of larval mesenchyme cell specification in echinoids, the expression patterns and roles of mesenchyme specification genes in the cidaroid Prionocidaris baculosa were examined. The present study reveals that the expression pattern and function of hesC in P. baculosa were inconsistent with the DNG model, suggesting that the euechinoid-type DNG is not utilized during cidaroid mesenchyme specification. In contrast with hesC, the expression patterns and functions of alx1, tbr and ets1 were similar between P. baculosa and euechinoids. Based on these results, we propose that the roles of alx1, tbr and ets1 in mesenchyme specification were established in the common ancestor of echinoids, and that the DNG system was acquired in the euechinoid lineage after divergence from the cidaroid ancestor. The evolutionary timing of the establishment of the DNG suggests that the DNG was originally related to micromere and/or primary mesenchyme cell formation but not to skeletogenic cell differentiation. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Differentiation of Umbilical Cord Lining Membrane-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Endothelial-Like Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung Doan, Chinh; Long Le, Thanh; Son Hoang, Nghia; Trung Doan, Ngoc; Dong Le, Van; Si Do, Minh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Stem cell therapy for the treatment of vascular-related diseases through functional revascularization is one of the most important research areas in tissue engineering. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro differentiation of umbilical CL-MSC into endothelial lineage cells. Methods: In this study, isolated cells were characterized for expression of MSC-specific markers and osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation. They were induced to differentiate into endothelial-like cells and then examined for expression of the endothelial-specific markers, karyotype, and functional behavior of cells. Results: Isolated cells expressed MSC-specific markers and differentiated into adipocytes and osteoblasts. After endothelial differentiation, they expressed CD31, vWF, VE-cadherin, VEGFR1, and VEGFR2 at both mRNA and protein level, but their morphological changes were not apparent when compared with those of undifferentiated cells. There were no significant changes in karyotype of differentiated cells. Furthermore, angiogenesis assay and LDL uptake assay showed that differentiated cells were able to form the capillary-like structures and uptake LDL, respectively. Conclusion: The results indicated that umbilical CL-MSC could differentiate into functional endothelial-like cells. Also, they are suitable for basic and clinical studies to cure several vascular-related diseases. PMID:24518546

  15. Mesenchymal stromal cells induce epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in human colorectal cancer cells through the expression of surface-bound TGF-?

    OpenAIRE

    Mele, Valentina; Muraro, Manuele G; Calabrese, Diego; Pfaff, Dennis; Amatruda, Nunzia; Amicarella, Francesca; Kvinlaug, Brynn; Bocelli-Tyndall, Chiara; Martin, Ivan; Resink, Therese J; Heberer, Michael; Oertli, Daniel; Terracciano, Luigi; Spagnoli, Giulio C; Iezzi, Giandomenica

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent precursors endowed with the ability to home to primary and metastatic tumor sites, where they can integrate into the tumor-associated stroma. However, molecular mechanisms and outcome of their interaction with cancer cells have not been fully clarified. In this study, we investigated the effects mediated by bone marrow-derived MSC on human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells in vitro and in vivo. We found that MSC triggered epithelial-to-mesenchy...

  16. Differentiation within autologous fibrin scaffolds of porcine dermal cells with the mesenchymal stem cell phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puente, Pilar de la; Ludeña, Dolores; López, Marta; Ramos, Jennifer; Iglesias, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Porcine mesenchymal stem cells (pMSCs) are an attractive source of cells for tissue engineering because their properties are similar to those of human stem cells. pMSCs can be found in different tissues but their dermal origin has not been studied in depth. Additionally, MSCs differentiation in monolayer cultures requires subcultured cells, and these cells are at risk of dedifferentiation when implanting them into living tissue. Following this, we attempted to characterize the MSCs phenotype of porcine dermal cells and to evaluate their cellular proliferation and differentiation in autologous fibrin scaffolds (AFSs). Dermal biopsies and blood samples were obtained from 12 pigs. Dermal cells were characterized by flow cytometry. Frozen autologous plasma was used to prepare AFSs. pMSC differentiation was studied in standard structures (monolayers and pellets) and in AFSs. The pMSCs expressed the CD90 and CD29 markers of the mesenchymal lineage. AFSs afforded adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. The porcine dermis can be proposed to be a good source of MSCs with adequate proliferative capacity and a suitable expression of markers. The pMSCs also showed optimal proliferation and differentiation in AFSs, such that these might serve as a promising autologous and implantable material for use in tissue engineering. -- Highlights: ► Low fibrinogen concentration provides a suitable matrix for cell migration and differentiation. ► Autologous fibrin scaffolds is a promising technique in tissue engineering. ► Dermal cells are an easily accessible mesenchymal stem cell source. ► Fibrin scaffolds afforded adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation.

  17. Differentiation within autologous fibrin scaffolds of porcine dermal cells with the mesenchymal stem cell phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puente, Pilar de la, E-mail: pilardelapuentegarcia@gmail.com [Tissue Bank, San Francisco Clinic Foundation, Av./Facultad 51, 5°, 24004 León (Spain); Ludeña, Dolores [Pathology Service, University Hospital of Salamanca, P/San Vicente 58-182, 37007 Salamanca (Spain); López, Marta; Ramos, Jennifer; Iglesias, Javier [Tissue Bank, San Francisco Clinic Foundation, Av./Facultad 51, 5°, 24004 León (Spain)

    2013-02-01

    Porcine mesenchymal stem cells (pMSCs) are an attractive source of cells for tissue engineering because their properties are similar to those of human stem cells. pMSCs can be found in different tissues but their dermal origin has not been studied in depth. Additionally, MSCs differentiation in monolayer cultures requires subcultured cells, and these cells are at risk of dedifferentiation when implanting them into living tissue. Following this, we attempted to characterize the MSCs phenotype of porcine dermal cells and to evaluate their cellular proliferation and differentiation in autologous fibrin scaffolds (AFSs). Dermal biopsies and blood samples were obtained from 12 pigs. Dermal cells were characterized by flow cytometry. Frozen autologous plasma was used to prepare AFSs. pMSC differentiation was studied in standard structures (monolayers and pellets) and in AFSs. The pMSCs expressed the CD90 and CD29 markers of the mesenchymal lineage. AFSs afforded adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. The porcine dermis can be proposed to be a good source of MSCs with adequate proliferative capacity and a suitable expression of markers. The pMSCs also showed optimal proliferation and differentiation in AFSs, such that these might serve as a promising autologous and implantable material for use in tissue engineering. -- Highlights: ► Low fibrinogen concentration provides a suitable matrix for cell migration and differentiation. ► Autologous fibrin scaffolds is a promising technique in tissue engineering. ► Dermal cells are an easily accessible mesenchymal stem cell source. ► Fibrin scaffolds afforded adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation.

  18. Stem cell transplantation and mesenchymal cells to treat autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tyndall, Alan; van Laar, Jacob M.

    2016-01-01

    Since the start of the international stem cell transplantation project in 1997, over 2000 patients have received a haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), mostly autologous, as treatment for a severe autoimmune disease, the majority being multiple sclerosis (MS), systemic sclerosis (SSc) and

  19. Plasticity between Epithelial and Mesenchymal States Unlinks EMT from Metastasis-Enhancing Stem Cell Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyne Beerling

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Forced overexpression and/or downregulation of proteins regulating epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT has been reported to alter metastasis by changing migration and stem cell capacity of tumor cells. However, these manipulations artificially keep cells in fixed states, while in vivo cells may adapt transient and reversible states. Here, we have tested the existence and role of epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity in metastasis of mammary tumors without artificially modifying EMT regulators. In these tumors, we found by intravital microscopy that the motile tumor cells have undergone EMT, while their epithelial counterparts were not migratory. Moreover, we found that epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity renders any EMT-induced stemness differences, as reported previously, irrelevant for metastatic outgrowth, because mesenchymal cells that arrive at secondary sites convert to the epithelial state within one or two divisions, thereby obtaining the same stem cell potential as their arrived epithelial counterparts. We conclude that epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity supports migration but additionally eliminates stemness-enhanced metastatic outgrowth differences.

  20. Research of TGF-beta1 Inducing Lung Adencarcinoma PC9 Cells to Mesenchymal Cells Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng CHEN

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT not only correlated with embryonic development but also could promote tumor invasion and metastasis. Transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1 has been identified as the main inducer of tumor EMT. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of TGF-β1 on EMT and PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in lung adencarcinoma PC9 cells. Methods Cultured PC9 cells were treated with different concentrations of TGF-β1 for 48 h. The morphological changes were observed under phase-contrast microscopy; EMT relative marker protein changes were assessed by Western blot and immunoflurescence staining. In addition, the expression of AKT and P-AKT were also measured by Western blot. Results The data showed that TGF-β1 could induce PC9 morphological alteration from epithelial to mesenchymal and upregulate the expression of mesenchymal maker protein Fibronectin. Obviously, the expression of P-AKT was downregulated by TGF-β1 treatment for 48 h. Conclusion TGF-β1 might induce EMT of PC9 cells , accompanied by the changes of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles attenuate kidney inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eirin, Alfonso; Zhu, Xiang-Yang; Puranik, Amrutesh S; Tang, Hui; McGurren, Kelly A; van Wijnen, Andre J; Lerman, Amir; Lerman, Lilach O

    2017-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have distinct capability for renal repair, but may have safety concerns. MSC-derived extracellular vesicles emerged as a novel noncellular alternative. Using a porcine model of metabolic syndrome and renal artery stenosis we tested whether extracellular vesicles attenuate renal inflammation, and if this capacity is mediated by their cargo of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL) 10. Pigs with metabolic syndrome were studied after 16 weeks of renal artery stenosis untreated or treated four weeks earlier with a single intrarenal delivery of extracellular vesicles harvested from adipose tissue-derived autologous MSCs. Lean and sham metabolic syndrome animals served as controls (seven each). Five additional pigs with metabolic syndrome and renal artery stenosis received extracellular vesicles with pre-silenced IL10 (IL10 knock-down). Single-kidney renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, and oxygenation were studied in vivo and renal injury pathways ex vivo. Retention of extracellular vesicles in the stenotic kidney peaked two days after delivery and decreased thereafter. Four weeks after injection, extracellular vesicle fragments colocalized with stenotic-kidney tubular cells and macrophages, indicating internalization or fusion. Extracellular vesicle delivery attenuated renal inflammation, and improved medullary oxygenation and fibrosis. Renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate fell in metabolic syndrome and renal artery stenosis compared to metabolic syndrome, but was restored in pigs treated with extracellular vesicles. These renoprotective effects were blunted in pigs treated with IL10-depleted extracellular vesicles. Thus, extracellular vesicle-based regenerative strategies might be useful for patients with metabolic syndrome and renal artery stenosis. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Alkali-treated titanium selectively regulating biological behaviors of bacteria, cancer cells and mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhua; Wang, Guifang; Wang, Donghui; Wu, Qianju; Jiang, Xinquan; Liu, Xuanyong

    2014-12-15

    Many attentions have been paid to the beneficial effect of alkali-treated titanium to bioactivity and osteogenic activity, but few to the other biological effect. In this work, hierarchical micro/nanopore films were prepared on titanium surface by acid etching and alkali treatment and their biological effects on bacteria, cancer cells and mesenchymal stem cells were investigated. Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, Gram-negative Escherichia coli, and human cholangiocarcinoma cell line RBE were used to investigate whether alkali-treated titanium can influence behaviors of bacteria and cancer cells. Responses of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) to alkali-treated titanium were also subsequently investigated. The alkali-treated titanium can potently reduce bacterial adhesion, inhibit RBE and BMMSCs proliferation, while can better promote BMMSCs osteogenesis and angiogenesis than acid-etched titanium. The bacteriostatic ability of the alkali-treated titanium is proposed to result from the joint effect of micro/nanotopography and local pH increase at bacterium/material interface due to the hydrolysis of alkali (earth) metal titanate salts. The inhibitory action of cell proliferation is thought to be the effect of local pH increase at cell/material interface which causes the alkalosis of cells. This alkalosis model reported in this work will help to understand the biologic behaviors of various cells on alkali-treated titanium surface and design the intended biomedical applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of Wnt signaling on proliferation and differntiationof human mesenchymal stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Jan; Wang, Hongjun; van Blitterswijk, Clemens

    2004-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells are pluripotent cells from bone marrow, which can be differentiated into the osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic lineages in vitro and are a source of cells in bone and cartilage tissue engineering. An improvement in current tissue-engineering protocols requires more

  4. The Origin of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Dictates Their Reparative Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naftali-Shani, Nili; Itzhaki-Alfia, Ayelet; Landa-Rouben, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) from adipose cardiac tissue have attracted considerable interest in regard to cell-based therapies. We aimed to test the hypothesis that hMSCs from the heart and epicardial fat would be better cells for infarct repair....

  5. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Phenotype is not Influenced by Confluence during Culture Expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Hansen, Susanne Kofoed; Hansen, Louise

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Accumulating preclinical and clinical evidence indicates that human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are good candidates for cell therapy. For clinical applications of MSCs extensive in vitro expansion is required to obtain an adequate number of cells. It is evident that the pursuit...

  6. β1 Integrins Mediate Attachment of Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Cartilage Lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Zwolanek (Daniela); M. Flicker (Magdalena); E. Kirstätter (Elisabeth); F. Zaucke (Frank); G.J.V.M. van Osch (Gerjo); R.G. Erben (Reinhold)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractMesenchymal stem cells (MSC) may have great potential for cell-based therapies of osteoarthritis. However, after injection in the joint, only few cells adhere to defective articular cartilage and contribute to cartilage regeneration. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms of MSC

  7. MicroRNA Levels as Prognostic Markers for the Differentiation Potential of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgi, Nicole; Taipaleenmaeki, H.; Raiss, C.C.; Groen, N.; Portalska, K.K.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan; Post, Janine Nicole; van Wijnen, A.; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The ability of human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (hMSCs) to differentiate into various mesenchymal cell lineages makes them a promising cell source for the use in tissue repair strategies. Because the differentiation potential of hMSCs differs between donors, it is necessary to establish

  8. Wnt is necessary for mesenchymal to epithelial transition in colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Renate H M; Amin, Nancy; Flanagan, Dustin J; Johanson, Timothy M; Phesse, Toby J; Vincan, Elizabeth

    2018-03-01

    Metastasis underlies most colorectal cancer mortality. Cancer cells spread through the body as single cells or small clusters of cells that have an invasive, mesenchymal, nonproliferative phenotype. At the secondary site, they revert to a proliferative "tumor constructing" epithelial phenotype to rebuild a tumor. We previously developed a unique in vitro three-dimensional model, called LIM1863-Mph, which faithfully recapitulates these reversible transitions that underpin colorectal cancer metastasis. Wnt signaling plays a key role in these transitions and is initiated by the coupling of extracellular Wnt to Frizzled (FZD). Using the LIM1863-Mph model system we demonstrated that the Wnt receptor FZD7 is necessary for mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET). Here we investigate the role of Wnt in MET. Wnt secretion is dependent on palmitoylation by Porcupine (PORC). A PORC inhibitor (IWP2) that prevents Wnt secretion, blocked the epithelial transition of mesenchymal LIM1863-Mph cells. Wnt gene array analysis identified several Wnts that are upregulated in epithelial compared with mesenchymal LIM1863-Mph cells, suggesting these ligands in MET. Wnt2B was the most abundant differentially expressed Wnt gene. Indeed, recombinant Wnt2B could overcome the IWP2-mediated block in epithelial transition of mesenchymal LIM1863-Mph cells. Wnt2B co-operates with Frizzled7 to mediate MET in colorectal cancer. Developmental Dynamics 247:521-530, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Apolar and polar transitions drive the conversion between amoeboid and mesenchymal shapes in melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Sam; Sadok, Amine; Bousgouni, Vicky; Bakal, Chris

    2015-11-05

    Melanoma cells can adopt two functionally distinct forms, amoeboid and mesenchymal, which facilitates their ability to invade and colonize diverse environments during the metastatic process. Using quantitative imaging of single living tumor cells invading three-dimensional collagen matrices, in tandem with unsupervised computational analysis, we found that melanoma cells can switch between amoeboid and mesenchymal forms via two different routes in shape space--an apolar and polar route. We show that whereas particular Rho-family GTPases are required for the morphogenesis of amoeboid and mesenchymal forms, others are required for transitions via the apolar or polar route and not amoeboid or mesenchymal morphogenesis per se. Altering the transition rates between particular routes by depleting Rho-family GTPases can change the morphological heterogeneity of cell populations. The apolar and polar routes may have evolved in order to facilitate conversion between amoeboid and mesenchymal forms, as cells are either searching for, or attracted to, particular migratory cues, respectively. © 2015 Cooper et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  10. Noninvasive Assessment of Cell Fate and Biology in Transplanted Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi, Federico; Rodriguez-Porcel, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Recently, molecular imaging has become a conditio sine qua non for cell-based regenerative medicine. Developments in molecular imaging techniques, such as reporter gene technology, have increasingly enabled the noninvasive assessment of the fate and biology of cells after cardiovascular applications. In this context, bioluminescence imaging is the most commonly used imaging modality in small animal models of preclinical studies. Here, we present a detailed protocol of a reporter gene imaging approach for monitoring the viability and biology of Mesenchymal Stem Cells transplanted in a mouse model of myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury.

  11. Histamine prevents radiation-induced mesenchymal changes in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galarza, Tamara E; Mohamad, Nora A; Táquez Delgado, Mónica A; Vedoya, Guadalupe M; Crescenti, Ernesto J; Bergoc, Rosa M; Martín, Gabriela A; Cricco, Graciela P

    2016-09-01

    Radiotherapy is a prime option for treatment of solid tumors including breast cancer though side effects are usually present. Experimental evidence shows an increase in invasiveness of several neoplastic cell types through conventional tumor irradiation. The induction of epithelial to mesenchymal transition is proposed as an underlying cause of metastasis triggered by gamma irradiation. Experiments were conducted to investigate the role of histamine on the ionizing radiation-induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition events in breast cancer cells with different invasive phenotype. We also evaluated the potential involvement of Src phosphorylation in the migratory capability of irradiated cells upon histamine treatment. MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 mammary tumor cells were exposed to a single dose of 2Gy of gamma radiation and five days after irradiation mesenchymal-like phenotypic changes were observed by optical microscope. The expression and subcellular localization of E-cadherin, β-catenin, vimentin and Slug were determined by immunoblot and indirect immunofluorescence. There was a decrease in the epithelial marker E-cadherin expression and an increase in the mesenchymal marker vimentin after irradiation. E-cadherin and β-catenin were mainly localized in cytoplasm. Slug positive nuclei, matrix metalloproteinase-2 activity and cell migration and invasion were significantly increased. In addition, a significant enhancement in Src phosphorylation/activation could be determined by immunoblot in irradiated cells. MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells also received 1 or 20μM histamine during 24h previous to be irradiated. Notably, pre-treatment of breast cancer cells with 20μM histamine prevented the mesenchymal changes induced by ionizing radiation and also reduced the migratory behavior of irradiated cells decreasing phospho-Src levels. Collectively, our results suggest that histamine may block events related to epithelial to mesenchymal transition in irradiated mammary cancer

  12. Human Liver Cells Expressing Albumin and Mesenchymal Characteristics Give Rise to Insulin-Producing Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irit Meivar-Levy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the pancreatic lineage in the liver has been suggested as a potential autologous cell replacement therapy for diabetic patients. Transcription factors-induced liver-to-pancreas reprogramming has been demonstrated in numerous species both in vivo and in vitro. However, human-derived liver cells capable of acquiring the alternate pancreatic repertoire have never been characterized. It is yet unknown whether hepatic-like stem cells or rather adult liver cells give rise to insulin-producing cells. Using an in vitro experimental system, we demonstrate that proliferating adherent human liver cells acquire mesenchymal-like characteristics and a considerable level of cellular plasticity. However, using a lineage-tracing approach, we demonstrate that insulin-producing cells are primarily generated in cells enriched for adult hepatic markers that coexpress both albumin and mesenchymal markers. Taken together, our data suggest that adult human hepatic tissue retains a substantial level of developmental plasticity, which could be exploited in regenerative medicine approaches.

  13. Effects of sulfur mustard on mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Annette; Steinritz, Dirk; Rothmiller, Simone; Thiermann, Horst; Scherer, A Michael

    2017-08-14

    Chronic wound healing disorders that occur as a result of a sulfur mustard (SM) exposure present a particular challenge. These chronic wounds are similar to other chronic wounds. In the past, it has been shown that mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) play an important role in the healing of chronic wounds. An important property to support wound healing is their ability to migrate. However, we were able to show that SM leads to a reduction in MSC migration even at low concentrations. Currently, exposed MSCs are still able to differentiate. Further alterations are not known. The current investigation therefore focused onto the question how SM affects MSC. The effect of SM on MSC was investigated. Here, the alkylation of DNA was considered, and DNA adducts were quantified over a period of 48h. The modification of the nuclei under the influence of SM was analyzed as well as proliferation of the cells by immunohistochemical staining with Ki-67 and quantification. For the quantification of the apoptosis rate, antibodies against cleaved Caspase-3, 8, and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) were used. The senescence analysis was performed after histological staining against β-galactosidase. Quantifications were carried out by using the TissueQuest System and the software TissueFAX. SM exposure of MSC results in a dose dependent formation of nuclear DNA adducts. 4h after exposure the cells display a decreasing concentration of DNA adducts. This process is accompanied by a change of nuclei shape but without an increase of apoptosis induction. In parallel the number of cells undergoing senescence increases as a function of the SM concentration. SM exposure of MSC leads to adduct formation on chromosomal DNA. These DNA adducts can be reduced without MSC are undergoing apoptosis. This indicates an active DNA damage response (DDR) pathway in combination with the formation of persistent nuclear DNA damage foci. This process is accompanied by a reduced capability of proliferation and a

  14. mTOR Overactivation in Mesenchymal cells Aggravates CCl4- Induced liver Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Lanlan; Ding, Yan; Fu, You; Zhou, Ling; Dong, Xiaoying; Chen, Shunzhi; Wu, Hongyuan; Nai, Wenqing; Zheng, Hang; Xu, Wanfu; Bai, Xiaochun; Jia, Chunhong; Dai, Meng

    2016-11-07

    Hepatic stellate cells are of mesenchymal cell type located in the space of Disse. Upon liver injury, HSCs transactivate into myofibroblasts with increase in expression of fibrillar collagen, especially collagen I and III, leading to liver fibrosis. Previous studies have shown mTOR signaling is activated during liver fibrosis. However, there is no direct evidence in vivo. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of conditional deletion of TSC1 in mesenchymal on pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. Crossing mice bearing the floxed TSC1 gene with mice harboring Col1α2-Cre-ER(T) successfully generated progeny with a conditional knockout of TSC1 (TSC1 CKO) in collagen I expressing mesenchymal cells. TSC1 CKO and WT mice were subjected to CCl 4 , oil or CCl 4 + rapamycin treatment for 8 weeks. TSC1 CKO mice developed pronounced liver fibrosis relative to WT mice, as examined by ALT, hydroxyproline, histopathology, and profibrogenic gene. Absence of TSC1 in mesenchymal cells induced proliferation and prevented apoptosis in activated HSCs. However, there were no significant differences in oil-treated TSC1 CKO and WT mice. Rapamycin, restored these phenotypic changes by preventing myofibroblasts proliferation and enhancing their apoptosis. These findings revealed mTOR overactivation in mesenchymal cells aggravates CCl 4 - induced liver fibrosis and the rapamycin prevent its occurance.

  15. The plasticity of human breast carcinoma cells is more than epithelial to mesenchymal conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Ole William; Nielsen, Helga Lind; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Villadsen, Ren& #233; ; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J.

    2001-05-12

    The human breast comprises three lineages: the luminal epithelial lineage, the myoepithelial lineage, and the mesenchymal lineage. It has been widely accepted that human breast neoplasia pertains only to the luminal epithelial lineage. In recent years, however, evidence has accumulated that neoplastic breast epithelial cells may be substantially more plastic in their differentiation repertoire than previously anticipated. Thus, along with an increasing availability of markers for the myoepithelial lineage, at least a partial differentiation towards this lineage is being revealed frequently. It has also become clear that conversions towards the mesenchymal lineage actually occur, referred to as epithelial to mesenchymal transitions. Indeed, some of the so-called myofibroblasts surrounding the tumor may indeed have an epithelial origin rather than a mesenchymal origin. Because myoepithelial cells, epithelial to mesenchymal transition-derived cells, genuine stromal cells and myofibroblasts share common markers, we now need to define a more ambitious set of markers to distinguish these cell types in the microenvironment of the tumors. This is necessary because the different microenvironments may confer different clinical outcomes. The aim of this commentary is to describe some of the inherent complexities in defining cellular phenotypes in the microenvironment of breast cancer and to expand wherever possible on the implications for tumor suppression and progression.

  16. The plasticity of human breast carcinoma cells is more than epithelial to mesenchymal conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    William Petersen, Ole; Lind Nielsen, Helga; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Villadsen, René; Rønnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J

    2001-01-01

    The human breast comprises three lineages: the luminal epithelial lineage, the myoepithelial lineage, and the mesenchymal lineage. It has been widely accepted that human breast neoplasia pertains only to the luminal epithelial lineage. In recent years, however, evidence has accumulated that neoplastic breast epithelial cells may be substantially more plastic in their differentiation repertoire than previously anticipated. Thus, along with an increasing availability of markers for the myoepithelial lineage, at least a partial differentiation towards this lineage is being revealed frequently. It has also become clear that conversions towards the mesenchymal lineage actually occur, referred to as epithelial to mesenchymal transitions. Indeed, some of the so-called myofibroblasts surrounding the tumor may have an epithelial origin rather than a mesenchymal origin. Because myoepithelial cells, epithelial to mesenchymal transition-derived cells, genuine stromal cells and myofibroblasts share common markers, we now need to define a more ambitious set of markers to distinguish these cell types in the microenvironment of the tumors. This is necessary because the different microenvironments may confer different clinical outcomes. The aim of this commentary is to describe some of the inherent complexities in defining cellular phenotypes in the microenvironment of breast cancer and to expand wherever possible on the implications for tumor suppression and progression

  17. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy in the treatment of osteoarthritis: reparative pathways, safety and efficacy - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Julien; Bates, Dan; Boyd, Richard; Shah, Kiran; Barnard, Adele; Huguenin, Leesa; Tenen, Abi

    2016-05-26

    Osteoarthritis is a leading cause of pain and disability across the world. With an aging population its prevalence is likely to further increase. Current accepted medical treatment strategies are aimed at symptom control rather than disease modification. Surgical options including joint replacement are not without possible significant complications. A growing interest in the area of regenerative medicine, led by an improved understanding of the role of mesenchymal stem cells in tissue homeostasis and repair, has seen recent focused efforts to explore the potential of stem cell therapies in the active management of symptomatic osteoarthritis. Encouragingly, results of pre-clinical and clinical trials have provided initial evidence of efficacy and indicated safety in the therapeutic use of mesenchymal stem cell therapies for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. This paper explores the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis and how mesenchymal stem cells may play a role in future management strategies of this disabling condition.

  18. Does mesenchymal stem cell improve the liver regeneration after the 70% hepatectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Ana Karina Soares; Lanzoni, Valéria; Fuziy, Rogério Aoki; Franco, Rita Maria Aparecida Monteiro Moura; Maeda, Carlos Toshinori; Lopes, Gaspar de Jesus; Linhares, Marcelo Moura

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the effects of mesenchymal stem cells on liver regeneration in rats following a 70% hepatectomy. Forty rats were subjected to 70% hepatectomy and then ~106 mesenchymal stem cells (test group), or saline solution (control group), were infused into their livers via the portal vein. Each treatment group was divided into early and late subgroups (euthanized 3 d and 5 d following the operation, respectively). Group comparisons of Albumin, aminotransaminases (AST, ALT), and Alcaline Phosphatase (AP) levels, proliferative index (ki-67+ straining), and mitotic cell counts were conducted. No significant differences in liver regeneration rate, number of mitoses, proliferative index, or serum levels of albumin, AST, or AP were observed. ALT levels were higher in the test group than in the control group (p<.05). Mesenchymal stem-cell therapy did not improve liver regeneration rate 3 d or 5 d after 70% hepatectomy in rats. Likewise, the therapy appeared not to affect liver function, proliferative index, or number of mitoses significantly.

  19. Uniaxial cyclic strain of human adipose–derived mesenchymal stem cells and C2C12 myoblasts in coculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M Dugan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering skeletal muscle in vitro is of great importance for the production of tissue-like constructs for treating tissue loss due to traumatic injury or surgery. However, it is essential to find new sources of cells for muscle engineering as efficient in vitro expansion and culture of primary myoblasts are problematic. Mesenchymal stem cells may be a promising source of myogenic progenitor cells and may be harvested in large numbers from adipose tissue. As skeletal muscle is a mechanically dynamic tissue, we have investigated the effect of cyclic mechanical strain on the myogenic differentiation of a coculture system of murine C2C12 myoblasts and human adipose–derived mesenchymal stem cells. Fusion of mesenchymal stem cells with nascent myotubes and expression of human sarcomeric proteins was observed, indicating the potential for myogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells. Cyclic mechanical strain did not affect the fusion of mesenchymal stem cells, but maturation of myotubes was perturbed.

  20. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells versus adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells for peripheral nerve regeneration

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    Marcela Fernandes

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have confirmed that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can be used for treatment of several nervous system diseases. However, isolation of bone marrow-derived MSCs (BMSCs is an invasive and painful process and the yield is very low. Therefore, there is a need to search for other alterative stem cell sources. Adipose-derived MSCs (ADSCs have phenotypic and gene expression profiles similar to those of BMSCs. The production of ADSCs is greater than that of BMSCs, and ADSCs proliferate faster than BMSCs. To compare the effects of venous grafts containing BMSCs or ADSCs on sciatic nerve injury, in this study, rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham (only sciatic nerve exposed, Matrigel (MG; sciatic nerve injury + intravenous transplantation of MG vehicle, ADSCs (sciatic nerve injury + intravenous MG containing ADSCs, and BMSCs (sciatic nerve injury + intravenous MG containing BMSCs groups. Sciatic functional index was calculated to evaluate the function of injured sciatic nerve. Morphologic characteristics of nerves distal to the lesion were observed by toluidine blue staining. Spinal motor neurons labeled with Fluoro-Gold were quantitatively assessed. Compared with sham-operated rats, sciatic functional index was lower, the density of small-diameter fibers was significantly increased, and the number of motor neurons significantly decreased in rats with sciatic nerve injury. Neither ADSCs nor BMSCs significantly improved the sciatic nerve function of rats with sciatic nerve injury, increased fiber density, fiber diameters, axonal diameters, myelin sheath thickness, and G ratios (axonal diameter/fiber diameter ratios in the sciatic nerve distal to the lesion site. There was no significant difference in the number of spinal motor neurons among ADSCs, BMSCs and MG groups. These results suggest that neither BMSCs nor ADSCs provide satisfactory results for peripheral nerve repair when using MG as the conductor for

  1. Isolation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Human Deciduous Teeth Pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aileen I. Tsai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify predictors of success rate of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC isolation from human deciduous teeth pulp. A total of 161 deciduous teeth were extracted at the dental clinic of Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. The MSCs were isolated from dental pulps using a standard protocol. In total, 128 colonies of MSCs were obtained and the success rate was 79.5%. Compared to teeth not yielding MSCs successfully, those successfully yielding MSCs were found to have less severe dental caries (no/mild-to-moderate/severe: 63.3/24.2/12.5% versus 12.5/42.4/42.4%, P<0.001 and less frequent pulpitis (no/yes: 95.3/4.7% versus 51.5/48.5%, P<0.001. In a multivariate regression model, it was confirmed that the absence of dental caries (OR = 4.741, 95% CI = 1.564–14.371, P=0.006 and pulpitis (OR = 9.111, 95% CI = 2.921–28.420, P<0.001 was significant determinants of the successful procurement of MSCs. MSCs derived from pulps with pulpitis expressed longer colony doubling time than pulps without pulpitis. Furthermore, there were higher expressions of proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin- (IL- 6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein- (MCP- 1, P<0.01, and innate immune response [toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1 and TLR8, P<0.05; TLR2, TLR3, and TLR6, P<0.01] in the inflamed than noninflamed pulps. Therefore, a carious deciduous tooth or tooth with pulpitis was relatively unsuitable for MSC processing and isolation.

  2. Lipopolysaccharides priming mesenchymal stem cells accelerate diabetic wound healing viaexosomes

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    Dong-dong TI

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To study the therapeutic effect of exosome derived from lipopolysaccharides (LPS priming mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs for diabetic wound healing. Methods  Human umbilical cord MSCs were treated with LPS (100ng/ml for 2 days, the supernatant were then collected, and exosomes were harvested by density gradient centrifugation and identified. Diabetic cutaneous wounds were prepared and the animals were divided into the following three groups: control group, untreated MSCs derived exosome (un-exosome treatment group and LPS primed MSCs derived exosome (LPS-exosome treatment group. Exosomes (60μg were injected dispersively into the wound edge daily for 10 days. After treatment, the therapeutic results were evaluated by gross observation of the wounds, the expression levels of inflammation related factors and macrophage subtype markers in the injured sites were detected by qRT-PCR at day 3, 7 and 14 after treatment. Results  Compared with control group, the diabetic wound healing was obviously improved in LPS-exosome treatment group after treatment for 7 and 14 days, with faster wound close, depressed expression of pro-inflammatory factors IL -1, IL -12 and M1 macrophage surface marker iNOS, and up-regulation of anti-inflammatory factors IL-10, TGF-βand M2 macrophage surface marker CD163, the differences were significant (P<0.05. Conclusions  LPS-exosome may balance macrophage plasticity, restrain chronic inflammation and accelerate diabetic cutaneous wound healing. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.07.02

  3. Endocytosis in primary mesenchyme cells during sea urchin larval skeletogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killian, Christopher E; Wilt, Fred H

    2017-10-01

    The sea urchin larval embryo elaborates two calcitic endoskeletal elements called spicules. Spicules are synthesized by the primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs) and begin to form at early gastrula stage. It is known that the calcium comprising the spicules comes from the seawater and we wish to further consider the mode of calcium transport from the extracellular seawater to the PMCs and then onto the forming spicules. We used PMC in vitro cultures, calcein, fluorescently labeled dextran, and fluorescently labeled Wheat Germ Agglutinin (WGA) to track calcium transport from the seawater into PMCs and spicules and to determine how molecules from the surface of PMCs interact with the incoming calcium. Labeling of PMC endocytic vesicles and forming spicules by both calcein and fluorescently tagged dextran indicate that calcium is taken up from the seawater by endocytosis and directly incorporated into spicules. Calcein labeling studies also indicate that calcium from the extracellular seawater begins to be incorporated into spicules within 30min of uptake. In addition, we demonstrate that fluorescently labeled WGA and calcein are taken up by many of the same endocytic vesicles and are incorporated into growing spicules. These findings suggest that PMC specific surface molecules accompany calcium ions as they enter PMCs via endocytosis and are incorporated together in the growing spicule. Using anti-spicule matrix protein antibodies, we pinpoint a subset of spicule matrix proteins that may accompany calcium ions from the surface of the PMCs until they are incorporated into spicules. Msp130 is identified as one of these spicule matrix proteins. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Treatment of Inflammation-Induced Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Monica D; Miller, Sarah; Randall-Demllo, Sarron; Nurgali, Kulmira

    2016-11-01

    Cancer development is often associated with chronic inflammation. To date, research into inflammation-induced cancer has largely focused on chemokines, cytokines, and their downstream targets. These inflammatory mediators may promote tumor growth, invasion, metastasis, and facilitate angiogenesis. However, the exact mechanisms by which inflammation promotes neoplasia remain unclear. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by recurrent, idiopathic intestinal inflammation, the complications of which are potentially fatal. IBD incidence in Australia is 24.2 per 100,000 and its peak onset is in people aged 15 to 24 years. Symptoms include abdominal pain, cramps, bloody stool, and persistent diarrhoea or constipation and so seriously compromise quality of life. However, due to its unknown etiology, current treatment strategies combat the symptoms rather than the disease and are limited by inefficacy, toxicity, and adverse side-effects. IBD is also associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer, for which treatment options are similarly limited. In recent years, there has been much interest in the therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). However, whether MSCs suppress or promote tumor development is still contentious within the literature. Many studies indicate that MSCs exert anti-tumor effects and suppress tumor growth, whereas other studies report pro-tumor effects. Studies using MSCs as treatment for IBD have shown promising results in both animal models and human trials. However, as MSC treatment is still novel, the long-term risks remain unknown. This review aims to summarize the current literature on MSC treatment of inflammation-induced cancer, with a focus on colorectal cancer resulting from IBD.

  5. Defining human mesenchymal stem cell efficacy in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennon Donald P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs can suppress graft versus host disease (GvHD and have profound anti-inflammatory and regenerative capacity in stroke, infarct, spinal cord injury, meniscus regeneration, tendinitis, acute renal failure, and heart disease in human and animal models of disease. There is significant clinical hMSC variability in efficacy and the ultimate response in vivo. The challenge in hMSC based therapy is defining the efficacy of hMSC in vivo. Models which may provide insight into hMSC bioactivity in vivo would provide a means to distinguish hMSCs for clinical utility. hMSC function has been described as both regenerative and trophic through the production of bioactive factors. The regenerative component involves the multi-potentiality of hMSC progenitor differentiation. The secreted factors generated by the hMSCs are milieu and injury specific providing unique niches for responses in vivo. These bioactive factors are anti-scarring, angiogenic, anti-apoptotic as well as regenerative. Further, from an immunological standpoint, hMSC's can avoid host immune response, providing xenographic applications. To study the in vivo immuno-regulatory effectiveness of hMSCs, we used the ovalbumin challenge model of acute asthma. This is a quick 3 week in vivo pulmonary inflammation model with readily accessible ways of measuring effectiveness of hMSCs. Our data show that there is a direct correlation between the traditional ceramic cube score to hMSCs attenuation of cellular recruitment due to ovalbumin challenge. The results from these studies verify the in vivo immuno-modulator effectiveness of hMSCs and support the potential use of the ovalbumin model as an in vivo model of hMSC potency and efficacy. Our data also support future directions toward exploring hMSCs as an alternative therapeutic for the treatment of airway inflammation associated with asthma.

  6. Label-free morphology-based prediction of multiple differentiation potentials of human mesenchymal stem cells for early evaluation of intact cells.

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    Hiroto Sasaki

    Full Text Available Precise quantification of cellular potential of stem cells, such as human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs, is important for achieving stable and effective outcomes in clinical stem cell therapy. Here, we report a method for image-based prediction of the multiple differentiation potentials of hBMSCs. This method has four major advantages: (1 the cells used for potential prediction are fully intact, and therefore directly usable for clinical applications; (2 predictions of potentials are generated before differentiation cultures are initiated; (3 prediction of multiple potentials can be provided simultaneously for each sample; and (4 predictions of potentials yield quantitative values that correlate strongly with the experimental data. Our results show that the collapse of hBMSC differentiation potentials, triggered by in vitro expansion, can be quantitatively predicted far in advance by predicting multiple potentials, multi-lineage differentiation potentials (osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic and population doubling potential using morphological features apparent during the first 4 days of expansion culture. In order to understand how such morphological features can be effective for advance predictions, we measured gene-expression profiles of the same early undifferentiated cells. Both senescence-related genes (p16 and p21 and cytoskeleton-related genes (PTK2, CD146, and CD49 already correlated to the decrease of potentials at this stage. To objectively compare the performance of morphology and gene expression for such early prediction, we tested a range of models using various combinations of features. Such comparison of predictive performances revealed that morphological features performed better overall than gene-expression profiles, balancing the predictive accuracy with the effort required for model construction. This benchmark list of various prediction models not only identifies the best morphological feature

  7. Not single but periodic injections of synovial mesenchymal stem cells maintain viable cells in knees and inhibit osteoarthritis progression in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeki, N; Muneta, T; Koga, H; Nakagawa, Y; Mizuno, M; Tsuji, K; Mabuchi, Y; Akazawa, C; Kobayashi, E; Matsumoto, K; Futamura, K; Saito, T; Sekiya, I

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the effects of single or repetitive intra-articular injections of synovial mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on a rat osteoarthritis (OA) model, and elucidated the behaviors and underlying mechanisms of the stem cells after the injection. One week after the transection of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of wild type Lewis rats, one million synovial MSCs were injected into the knee joint every week. Cartilage degeneration was evaluated with safranin-o staining after the first injection. To analyze cell kinetics or MSC properties, luciferase, LacZ, and GFP expressing synovial MSCs were used. To confirm the role of MSCs, species-specific microarray and PCR analyses were performed using human synovial MSCs. Histological analysis for femoral and tibial cartilage showed that a single injection was ineffective but weekly injections had significant chondroprotective effects for 12 weeks. Histological and flow-cytometric analyses of LacZ and GFP expressing synovial MSCs revealed that injected MSCs migrated mainly into the synovium and most of them retained their undifferentiated MSC properties though the migrated cells rapidly decreased. In vivo imaging analysis revealed that MSCs maintained in knees while weekly injection. Species-specific microarray and PCR analyses showed that the human mRNAs on day 1 for 21 genes increased over 50-fold, and increased the expressions of PRG-4, BMP-2, and BMP-6 genes encoding chondroprotective proteins, and TSG-6 encoding an anti-inflammatory one. Not single but periodic injections of synovial MSCs maintained viable cells without losing their MSC properties in knees and inhibited osteoarthritis (OA) progression by secretion of trophic factors. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Co-culture with Sertoli cells promotes proliferation and migration of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fenxi, E-mail: fxzhang0824@gmail.com [Department of Anatomy, Sanquan College, Xinxiang Medical University, Henan 453003, People' s Republic of China (China); Hong, Yan; Liang, Wenmei [Department of Histology and Embryology, Guiyang Medical University, Guizhou 550004, People' s Republic of China (China); Ren, Tongming [Department of Anatomy, Sanquan College, Xinxiang Medical University, Henan 453003, People' s Republic of China (China); Jing, Suhua [ICU Center, The Third Hospital of Xinxiang Medical University, Henan 453003, People' s Republic of China (China); Lin, Juntang [Stem Cell Center, Xinxiang Medical University, Henan 453003, People' s Republic of China (China)

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-culture of Sertoli cells (SCs) with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of SCs dramatically increased proliferation and migration of UCMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of SCs stimulated expression of Mdm2, Akt, CDC2, Cyclin D, CXCR4, MAPKs. -- Abstract: Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) have been recently used in transplant therapy. The proliferation and migration of MSCs are the determinants of the efficiency of MSC transplant therapy. Sertoli cells are a kind of 'nurse' cells that support the development of sperm cells. Recent studies show that Sertoli cells promote proliferation of endothelial cells and neural stem cells in co-culture. We hypothesized that co-culture of UCMSCs with Sertoli cells may also promote proliferation and migration of UCMSCs. To examine this hypothesis, we isolated UCMSCs from human cords and Sertoli cells from mouse testes, and co-cultured them using a Transwell system. We found that UCMSCs exhibited strong proliferation ability and potential to differentiate to other cell lineages such as osteocytes and adipocytes. The presence of Sertoli cells in co-culture significantly enhanced the proliferation and migration potential of UCMSCs (P < 0.01). Moreover, these phenotypic changes were accompanied with upregulation of multiple genes involved in cell proliferation and migration including phospho-Akt, Mdm2, phospho-CDC2, Cyclin D1, Cyclin D3 as well as CXCR4, phospho-p44 MAPK and phospho-p38 MAPK. These findings indicate that Sertoli cells boost UCMSC proliferation and migration potential.

  9. Co-culture with Sertoli cells promotes proliferation and migration of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Fenxi; Hong, Yan; Liang, Wenmei; Ren, Tongming; Jing, Suhua; Lin, Juntang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Co-culture of Sertoli cells (SCs) with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSCs). ► Presence of SCs dramatically increased proliferation and migration of UCMSCs. ► Presence of SCs stimulated expression of Mdm2, Akt, CDC2, Cyclin D, CXCR4, MAPKs. -- Abstract: Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) have been recently used in transplant therapy. The proliferation and migration of MSCs are the determinants of the efficiency of MSC transplant therapy. Sertoli cells are a kind of “nurse” cells that support the development of sperm cells. Recent studies show that Sertoli cells promote proliferation of endothelial cells and neural stem cells in co-culture. We hypothesized that co-culture of UCMSCs with Sertoli cells may also promote proliferation and migration of UCMSCs. To examine this hypothesis, we isolated UCMSCs from human cords and Sertoli cells from mouse testes, and co-cultured them using a Transwell system. We found that UCMSCs exhibited strong proliferation ability and potential to differentiate to other cell lineages such as osteocytes and adipocytes. The presence of Sertoli cells in co-culture significantly enhanced the proliferation and migration potential of UCMSCs (P < 0.01). Moreover, these phenotypic changes were accompanied with upregulation of multiple genes involved in cell proliferation and migration including phospho-Akt, Mdm2, phospho-CDC2, Cyclin D1, Cyclin D3 as well as CXCR4, phospho-p44 MAPK and phospho-p38 MAPK. These findings indicate that Sertoli cells boost UCMSC proliferation and migration potential.

  10. Mesenchymal Stem Cells as a Potent Cell Source for Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Zomorodian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While small bone defects heal spontaneously, large bone defects need surgical intervention for bone transplantation. Autologous bone grafts are the best and safest strategy for bone repair. An alternative method is to use allogenic bone graft. Both methods have limitations, particularly when bone defects are of a critical size. In these cases, bone constructs created by tissue engineering technologies are of utmost importance. Cells are one main component in the manufacture of bone construct. A few cell types, including embryonic stem cells (ESCs, adult osteoblast, and adult stem cells, can be used for this purpose. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, as adult stem cells, possess characteristics that make them good candidate for bone repair. This paper discusses different aspects of MSCs that render them an appropriate cell type for clinical use to promote bone regeneration.

  11. Metabolic re-wiring of isogenic breast epithelial cell lines following epithelial to mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halldorsson, Skarphedinn; Rohatgi, Neha; Magnusdottir, Manuela; Choudhary, Kumari Sonal; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Knutsen, Erik; Barkovskaya, Anna; Hilmarsdottir, Bylgja; Perander, Maria; Mælandsmo, Gunhild M; Gudmundsson, Steinn; Rolfsson, Óttar

    2017-06-28

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) has implications in tumor progression and metastasis. Metabolic alterations have been described in cancer development but studies focused on the metabolic re-wiring that takes place during EMT are still limited. We performed metabolomics profiling of a breast epithelial cell line and its EMT derived mesenchymal phenotype to create genome-scale metabolic models descriptive of both cell lines. Glycolysis and OXPHOS were higher in the epithelial phenotype while amino acid anaplerosis and fatty acid oxidation fueled the mesenchymal phenotype. Through comparative bioinformatics analysis, PPAR-γ1, PPAR- γ2 and AP-1 were found to be the most influential transcription factors associated with metabolic re-wiring. In silico gene essentiality analysis predicts that the LAT1 neutral amino acid transporter is essential for mesenchymal cell survival. Our results define metabolic traits that distinguish an EMT derived mesenchymal cell line from its epithelial progenitor and may have implications in cancer progression and metastasis. Furthermore, the tools presented here can aid in identifying critical metabolic nodes that may serve as therapeutic targets aiming to prevent EMT and inhibit metastatic dissemination. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Accelerated Functional Recovery after Skeletal Muscle Ischemia-reperfusion Injury using Freshly Isolated Bone Marrow Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-03

    Invest 2010;90(5):685. [12] van Ramshorst J, Bax JJ, Beeres SL, et al. Intramyocardial bone marrow cell injection for chronic myocardial ischemia: a...Cell Transpl 2010;19(2):193. [31] Lamoury FM, Croitoru Lamoury J, Brew BJ. Undifferentiated mouse mesenchymal stem cells spontaneously express neural and

  13. Carica papaya induces in vitro thrombopoietic cytokines secretion by mesenchymal stem cells and haematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Jazli; Abu Kassim, Noor Lide; Abu Kasim, Noor Hayaty; Haque, Nazmul; Rahman, Mohammad Tariqur

    2015-07-08

    Use of Carica papaya leaf extracts, reported to improve thrombocyte counts in dengue patients, demands further analysis on the underlying mechanism of its thrombopoietic cytokines induction In vitro cultures of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) were treated with unripe papaya pulp juice (UPJ) to evaluate its potential to induce thrombopoietic cytokines (IL-6 and SCF) RESULTS: In vitro scratch gap closure was significantly faster (p papaya to induce thrombopoietic cytokines synthesis in cells of hematopoietic and mesenchymal origin.

  14. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Tissue-Specific Progenitor Cells: Their Role in Tissue Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Klimczak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multipotent mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs reside in many human organs and comprise heterogeneous population of cells with self-renewal ability. These cells can be isolated from different tissues, and their morphology, immunophenotype, and differentiation potential are dependent on their tissue of origin. Each organ contains specific population of stromal cells which maintain regeneration process of the tissue where they reside, but some of them have much more wide plasticity and differentiate into multiple cells lineage. MSCs isolated from adult human tissues are ideal candidates for tissue regeneration and tissue engineering. However, MSCs do not only contribute to structurally tissue repair but also MSC possess strong immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties and may influence in tissue repair by modulation of local environment. This paper is presenting an overview of the current knowledge of biology of tissue-resident mesenchymal stromal and progenitor cells (originated from bone marrow, liver, skeletal muscle, skin, heart, and lung associated with tissue regeneration and tissue homeostasis.

  15. Microvesicles released from human embryonic stem cell derived-mesenchymal stem cells inhibit proliferation of leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yuan; Ma, Yongbin; Chen, Xiang; Ji, Xianyan; Gao, Jianyi; Zhang, Lei; Ye, Kai; Qiao, Fuhao; Dai, Yao; Wang, Hui; Wen, Xiangmei; Lin, Jiang; Hu, Jiabo

    2017-08-01

    Human embryonic stem cell derived-mesenchymal stem cells (hESC‑MSCs) are able to inhibit proliferation of leukemia cells. Microvesicles released from human embryonic stem cell derived-mesenchymal stem cells (hESC‑MSC‑MVs) might play an important part in antitumor activity. Microvesicles were isolated by ultracentrifugation and identified under a scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope separately. After 48-h cocultured with hESC‑MSCs and hESC‑MSC‑MVs, the number of K562 and HL60 was counted and tumor cell viability was measured by CCK8 assay. The expression of proteins Bcl-2 and Bax were estimated by western blotting. Transmission electron microscope and western blot analysis were adopted to evaluate the autophagy level. Results showed that both hESC‑MSCs and hESC‑MSC‑MVs inhibited proliferation of leukemia cells in a concentration-dependent manner. hESC‑MSC‑MVs reduced the ratio of Bcl/Bax, enhanced the protein level of Beclin-1 and LC3-II conversion, thus upregulating autophagy and apoptosis. In conclusion, microvesicles released from human embryonic stem cell derived-mesenchymal stem cells inhibited tumor growth and stimulated autophagy and excessive autophagy might induce apoptosis.

  16. Intracellular surface-enhanced Raman scattering probes based on TAT peptide-conjugated Au nanostars for distinguishing the differentiation of lung resident mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chaowen; Cao, Xiaowei; Chen, Xiang; Sun, Zhaorui; Xiang, Zou; Zhao, Hang; Qian, Weiping; Han, Xiaodong

    2015-07-01

    Lung resident mesenchymal stem cells (LR-MSCs) are important regulators of pathophysiological processes including tissue repair and fibrosis, inflammation, angiogenesis and tumor formation. Therefore, increasing attention has focused on the functional differentiation of LR-MSCs. However, the distinction between the undifferentiated and differentiated LR-MSCs, which are closely related and morphologically similar, is difficult to achieve by conventional methods. In this study, by employing the TAT Peptide-conjugated Au nanostars (AuNSs) as an intracellular probe, we developed a method for the identification of LR-MSC differentiation by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. SERS spectra were analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA) that allowed unambiguous distinction of subtypes and monitoring of component changes during cellular differentiation. Furthermore, to ascertain whether co-culture with alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cells and incubation with transform growth factor (TGF)-β were involved in regulating the differentiation of LR-MSCs, we investigated the protein expression levels of epithelial markers and fibroblastic markers on LR-MSCs. Our results demonstrated that co-culture with ATII cells or incubation with TGF-β could induce the differentiation of LR-MSCs as confirmed by SERS analysis, a method that is capable of noninvasive characterization of and distinction between subtypes of LR-MSCs during differentiation. We have provided a new tool that may facilitate stem cell research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Long-Term Safety Issues of iPSC-Based Cell Therapy in a Spinal Cord Injury Model: Oncogenic Transformation with Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Nori

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we described the safety and therapeutic potential of neurospheres (NSs derived from a human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC clone, 201B7, in a spinal cord injury (SCI mouse model. However, several safety issues concerning iPSC-based cell therapy remain unresolved. Here, we investigated another iPSC clone, 253G1, that we established by transducing OCT4, SOX2, and KLF4 into adult human dermal fibroblasts collected from the same donor who provided the 201B7 clone. The grafted 253G1-NSs survived, differentiated into three neural lineages, and promoted functional recovery accompanied by stimulated synapse formation 47 days after transplantation. However, long-term observation (for up to 103 days revealed deteriorated motor function accompanied by tumor formation. The tumors consisted of Nestin+ undifferentiated neural cells and exhibited activation of the OCT4 transgene. Transcriptome analysis revealed that a heightened mesenchymal transition may have contributed to the progression of tumors derived from grafted cells.

  18. Isolation and characterization of CD276+/HLA-E+ human subendocardial mesenchymal stem cells from chronic heart failure patients: analysis of differentiative potential and immunomodulatory markers expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzalone, Rita; Corrao, Simona; Lo Iacono, Melania; Loria, Tiziana; Corsello, Tiziana; Cappello, Francesco; Di Stefano, Antonino; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo; Zummo, Giovanni; Farina, Felicia; La Rocca, Giampiero

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are virtually present in all postnatal organs as well as in perinatal tissues. MSCs can be differentiated toward several mature cytotypes and interestingly hold potentially relevant immunomodulatory features. Myocardial infarction results in severe tissue damage, cardiomyocyte loss, and eventually heart failure. Cellular cardiomyoplasty represents a promising approach for myocardial repair. Clinical trials using MSCs are underway for a number of heart diseases, even if their outcomes are hampered by low long-term improvements and the possible presence of complications related to cellular therapy administration. Therefore, elucidating the presence and role of MSCs that reside in the post-infarct human heart should provide essential alternatives for therapy. In the current article we show a novel method to reproducibly isolate and culture MSCs from the subendocardial zone of human left ventricle from patients undergoing heart transplant for post-infarct chronic heart failure (HSE-MSCs, human subendocardial mesenchymal stem cells). By using both immunocytochemistry and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), we demonstrated that these cells do express key MSCs markers and do express heart-specific transcription factors in their undifferentiated state, while lacking strictly cardiomyocyte-specific proteins. Moreover, these cells do express immunomodulatory molecules that should disclose their further potential in immune modulation processes in the post-infarct microenvironment. Another novel datum of potentially relevant interest is the expression of cardiac myosin heavy chain at nucclear level in HSE-MSCs. Standard MSCs trilineage differentiation experiments were also performed. The present paper adds new data on the basic biological features of heart-resident MSCs that populate the organ following myocardial infarction. The use of heart-derived MSCs to promote in-organ repair or as a cellular source for cardiomyoplasty

  19. Generation of Breast Cancer Stem Cells through Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition

    OpenAIRE

    Morel, Anne-Pierre; Lièvre, Marjory; Thomas, Clémence; Hinkal, George; Ansieau, Stéphane; Puisieux, Alain

    2008-01-01

    Recently, two novel concepts have emerged in cancer biology: the role of so-called "cancer stem cells" in tumor initiation, and the involvement of an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the metastatic dissemination of epithelial cancer cells. Using a mammary tumor progression model, we show that cells possessing both stem and tumorigenic characteristics of "cancer stem cells" can be derived from human mammary epithelial cells following the activation of the Ras-MAPK pathway. The acquis...

  20. Gastrocnemius tendon strain in a dog treated with autologous mesenchymal stem cells and a custom orthosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, J Brad; Palmer, Ross; Valdes-Martinez, Alex; Egger, Erick L; Haussler, Kevin K

    2013-05-01

    To report clinical findings and outcome in a dog with gastrocnemius tendon strain treated with autologous mesenchymal stem cells and a custom orthosis. Clinical report. A 4-year-old spayed female Border Collie. Bone-marrow derived, autologous mesenchymal stem cells were transplanted into the tendon core lesion. A custom, progressive, dynamic orthosis was fit to the tarsus. Serial orthopedic examinations and ultrasonography as well as long-term force-plate gait analysis were utilized for follow up. Lameness subjectively resolved and peak vertical force increased from 43% to 92% of the contralateral pelvic limb. Serial ultrasonographic examinations revealed improved but incomplete restoration of normal linear fiber pattern of the gastrocnemius tendon. Findings suggest that autologous mesenchymal stem cell transplantation with custom, progressive, dynamic orthosis may be a viable, minimally invasive technique for treatment of calcaneal tendon injuries in dogs. © Copyright 2013 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  1. Dose-related estrogen effects on gene expression in fetal mouse prostate mesenchymal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A Taylor

    Full Text Available Developmental exposure of mouse fetuses to estrogens results in dose-dependent permanent effects on prostate morphology and function. Fetal prostatic mesenchyme cells express estrogen receptor alpha (ERα and androgen receptors and convert stimuli from circulating estrogens and androgens into paracrine signaling to regulate epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation. To obtain mechanistic insight into the role of different doses of estradiol (E2 in regulating mesenchymal cells, we examined E2-induced transcriptomal changes in primary cultures of fetal mouse prostate mesenchymal cells. Urogenital sinus mesenchyme cells were obtained from male mouse fetuses at gestation day 17 and exposed to 10 pM, 100 pM or 100 nM E2 in the presence of a physiological concentration of dihydrotestosterone (0.69 nM for four days. Gene ontology studies suggested that low doses of E2 (10 pM and 100 pM induce genes involved in morphological tissue development and sterol biosynthesis but suppress genes involved in growth factor signaling. Genes involved in cell adhesion were enriched among both up-regulated and down-regulated genes. Genes showing inverted-U-shape dose responses (enhanced by E2 at 10 pM E2 but suppressed at 100 pM were enriched in the glycolytic pathway. At the highest dose (100 nM, E2 induced genes enriched for cell adhesion, steroid hormone signaling and metabolism, cytokines and their receptors, cell-to-cell communication, Wnt signaling, and TGF- β signaling. These results suggest that prostate mesenchymal cells may regulate epithelial cells through direct cell contacts when estrogen level is low whereas secreted growth factors and cytokines might play significant roles when estrogen level is high.

  2. Derivation of Stromal (Skeletal, Mesenchymal) Stem-like cells from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmood, Amer; Harkness, Linda; Abdallah, Basem

    2012-01-01

    Derivation of bone forming cells (osteoblasts) from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) is a pre-requisite for their use in clinical applications. However, there is no standard protocol for differentiating hESC into osteoblastic cells. The aim of this study was to identify the emergence of a human...... stromal (mesenchymal, skeletal) stem cell (hMSC)-like population, known to be osteoblastic cell precursors and to test their osteoblastic differentiation capacity in ex vivo cultures and in vivo. We cultured hESC in a feeder-free environment using serum replacement and as suspension aggregates (embryoid...... bodies; hEBs). Over a 20 day developmental period, the hEBs demonstrated increasing enrichment for cells expressing hMSC markers: CD29, CD44, CD63, CD56, CD71, CD73, CD105, CD106 and CD166 as revealed by immunohistochemical staining and flow cytometry (FACS) analysis. Ex vivo differentiation of h...

  3. Arachidonic acid promotes epithelial-to-mesenchymal-like transition in mammary epithelial cells MCF10A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Orozco, Raul; Navarro-Tito, Napoleon; Soto-Guzman, Adriana; Castro-Sanchez, Luis; Perez Salazar, Eduardo

    2010-06-01

    Epidemiological studies and animal models suggest an association between high levels of dietary fat intake and an increased risk of breast cancer. Cancer progression requires the development of metastasis, which is characterized by an increase in cell motility and invasion. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process, by which epithelial cells are transdifferentiated to a more mesenchymal state. A similar process takes place during tumor progression, when carcinoma cells stably or transiently lose epithelial polarities and acquire a mesenchymal phenotype. Arachidonic acid (AA) is a fatty acid that mediates cellular processes, such as cell survival, angiogenesis, chemotaxis, mitogenesis, migration and apoptosis. However, the role of AA on the EMT process in human mammary epithelial cells remains to be studied. We demonstrate here that AA promotes an increase in vimentin and N-cadherin expression, MMP-9 secretion, a decrease in E-cadherin junctional levels, and the activation of FAK, Src and NF-kappaB in MCF10A cells. Furthermore, AA also promotes cell migration in an Src kinase activity-dependent fashion. In conclusion, our results demonstrate, for the first time, that AA promotes an epithelial-to-mesenchymal-like transition in MCF10A human mammary non-tumorigenic epithelial cells. 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Perfusion bioreactor-based cryopreservation of 3D human mesenchymal stromal cell tissue grafts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrenko, Yuriy; Petrenko, A.; Martin, I.; Wendt, D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 76, jun. (2017), s. 150-153 ISSN 0011-2240 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : cryopreservation * tissue engineering * mesenchymal stromal cells Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 1.996, year: 2016

  5. Human osteoarthritic synovium impacts chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells via macrophage polarisation state

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fahy, N.; Vries-van Melle, M.L. de; Lehmann, J.; Wei, W.; Grotenhuis, N.; Farrell, E.; Kraan, P.M. van der; Murphy, J.M.; Bastiaansen-Jenniskens, Y.M.; Osch, G.J.V.M. van

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising cell type for the repair of damaged cartilage in osteoarthritis (OA). However, OA synovial fluid and factors secreted by synovium impede chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs, and the mechanism responsible for this effect remains unclear. In

  6. Tissue distribution and engraftment of human mesenchymal stem cells immortalized by human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzon, J.F.; Stenderup, K.; Hansen, F.D.

    2005-01-01

    Engraftment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in peripheral tissues for replenishing of local stem cell function has been proposed as a therapeutic approach to degenerative diseases. We have previously reported the development of an immortalized human telomerase reverse transcriptase transduced MSC...

  7. Development of novel monoclonal antibodies that define differentiation stages of human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte Caroline; Kortesidis, Angela; Zannettino, Andrew C W

    2011-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) are currently being introduced for cell therapy, yet, antibodies specific for native and differentiated MSCs are required for their identification prior to clinical use. Herein, high quality antibodies against MSC surface proteins were developed by immunizing...

  8. Morphology, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells cultured on titanium, tantalum, and chromium surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiehler, Maik; Lind, M.; Mygind, Tina

    2007-01-01

    the interactions between human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and smooth surfaces of titanium (Ti), tantalum (Ta), and chromium (Cr). Mean cellular area was quantified using fluorescence microscopy (4 h). Cellular proliferation was assessed by (3)H-thymidine incorporation and methylene blue cell counting assays (4...

  9. Mechanism of divergent growth factor effects in mesenchymal stem cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kratchmarova, Irina; Blagoev, Blagoy; Haack-Sorensen, M.

    2005-01-01

    Closely related signals often lead to very different cellular outcomes. We found that the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells into bone-forming cells is stimulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF) but not platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). We used mass spectrometry-based proteomics...

  10. Adeno-associated viral vector transduction of human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Stefan; Murphy, Mary; O'Brien, Tim

    2007-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have received considerable attention in the emerging field of regenerative medicine. One aspect of MSC research focuses on genetically modifying the cells with the aim of enhancing their regenerative potential. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) holds promise as a vector...