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Sample records for undesirable pharmacokinetics poor

  1. Population pharmacokinetic modeling of glibenclamide in poorly controlled South African type 2 diabetic subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rambiritch V

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Virendra Rambiritch,1 Poobalan Naidoo,2 Breminand Maharaj,1 Goonaseelan Pillai3 1University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, 2Department of Internal Medicine, RK Khan Regional Hospital, Chatsworth, South Africa; 3Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland Aim: The aim of this study was to describe the pharmacokinetics (PK of glibenclamide in poorly controlled South African type 2 diabetic subjects using noncompartmental and model-based methods. Methods: A total of 24 subjects with type 2 diabetes were administered increasing doses (0 mg/d, 2.5 mg/d, 5 mg/d, 10 mg/d, and 20 mg/d of glibenclamide daily at 2-week intervals. Plasma glibenclamide, glucose, and insulin determinations were performed. Blood sampling times were 0 minute, 30 minutes, 60 minutes, 90 minutes, and 120 minutes (post breakfast sampling and 240 minutes, 270 minutes, 300 minutes, 330 minutes, 360 minutes, and 420 minutes (post lunch sampling on days 14, 28, 42, 56, and 70 for doses of 0 mg, 2.5 mg, 5.0 mg, 10 mg, and 20 mg, respectively. Blood sampling was performed after the steady state was reached.  A total of 24 individuals in the data set contributed to a total of 841 observation records. The PK was analyzed using noncompartmental analysis methods, which were implemented in WinNonLin®, and population PK analysis using NONMEM®. Glibenclamide concentration data were log transformed prior to fitting. Results: A two-compartmental disposition model was selected after evaluating one-, two-, and three-compartmental models to describe the time course of glibenclamide plasma concentration data. The one-compartment model adequately described the data; however, the two-compartment model provided a better fit. The three-compartment model failed to achieve successful convergence. A more complex model, to account for enterohepatic recirculation that was observed in the data, was unsuccessful. Conclusion: In South African diabetic subjects, glibenclamide demonstrates linear PK and was best

  2. undesirability , wit h relevance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    banzi

    disciplined environment; they were housed, fed, clothed and gainfully employed. The dissolution of the English monasteries in the late 15th century resulted in the vagrancy problem. This early example of kleptocracy had major social repercussions and led to parliament passing the Poor Laws (vide infra). The feudal system.

  3. Filtering Undesirable Flows in Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polevoy, G.; Trajanovski, S.; Grosso, P.; de Laat, C.; Gao, X.; Du, H.; Han, M.

    2017-01-01

    We study the problem of fully mitigating the effects of denial of service by filtering the minimum necessary set of the undesirable flows. First, we model this problem and then we concentrate on a subproblem where every good flow has a bottleneck. We prove that unless P=NP, this subproblem is

  4. A poor metabolizer of both CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 identified by mechanistic pharmacokinetic simulation in a fatal drug poisoning case involving venlafaxine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jornil, J; Nielsen, T S; Rosendal, I

    2013-01-01

    pharmacokinetic simulations suggested that the low metabolite ratio was the result of combined poor metabolizer (PM) status of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C19 and CYP2D6. This hypothesis was confirmed by genetic analysis. Simulations revealed that it was likely that the combined missing CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 activity...... would cause higher concentrations of VEN, but the simulations also suggested that there could be additional reasons to explain the high VEN concentration found in this case. Thus, it seems likely that the potentially toxic VEN concentration was caused by reduced metabolic capacity. The simulations...... combined with genotyping were considered very useful in this fatal drug poisoning case. Keywords CYP2D6; CYP2C19; Venlafaxine; Poor metabolizer; Drug poisoning; Mechanistic pharmacokinetic simulation --------------------------------------------------------------------------------...

  5. Nanosizing of a poorly soluble drug: technique optimization, factorial analysis, and pharmacokinetic study in healthy human volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsayed I

    2014-06-01

    powder. Techniques utilized in the nanocrystals’ preparation had no effect on DCN crystalline state. The selected formula (F12 showed a higher bioavailability compared to the reference market product with relative bioavailability of 131.4%.Conclusion: The saturation solubility, in vitro dissolution rate and relative bioavailability of DCN were significantly increased after nanocrystallization. Less time and power consumption were applied by the combination of bottom-up and top-down techniques.Keywords: nanocrystals, high pressure homogenization, diacerein, factorial analysis, pharmacokinetic study

  6. Undesirable effects after treatment with dermal fillers.

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    Rodrigues-Barata, Ana Rita; Camacho-Martínez, Francisco M

    2013-04-01

    Soft tissue augmentation is one of the most frequent techniques in cosmetic dermatology. Nowadays, there are a high number of available materials. Nonanimal hyaluronic acid (HA) is one of most useful fillers for lip augmentation and for treating nasolabial folds, marionette lines, and the dynamic wrinkles of the upper face. To evaluate the type and management of undesirable effects of nonanimal reticulated or stabilized HA observed in our cosmetic unit in the past 3 years. The consecutive patients using HA attending to our clinic in the past 3 years were divided into 3 categories, according to the time of presentation of the adverse reactions: immediate, early, and late-onset complications. All patients were treated. Twenty-three patients presented to our clinic complaining of complications after soft tissue augmentation with HA. Ten patients presented immediate-onset complications, 8 showed early-onset complications, and 5 cases complaint of late-onset complications. Treatment of the first group consisted of hyaluronidase injection, massage, and topical antibiotics. Early- and late-onset complications were treated with intralesional triamcinolone acetonide. All patients improved, with the exception of a woman with recurrent granulomas. Generally, undesirable effects of HA (immediate, early, or late onset) are not frequent, and when present, they improve if treated properly. Physicians need to be aware of these possible adverse events in order to establish proper treatment and prevent scarring or other sequelae.

  7. The undesirable effects of neuromuscular blocking drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claudius, C; Garvey, L H; Viby-Mogensen, J

    2009-01-01

    Neuromuscular blocking drugs are designed to bind to the nicotinic receptor at the neuromuscular junction. However, they also interact with other acetylcholine receptors in the body. Binding to these receptors causes adverse effects that vary with the specificity for the cholinergic receptor...... in question. Moreover, all neuromuscular blocking drugs may cause hypersensitivity reactions. Often the symptoms are mild and self-limiting but massive histamine release can cause systematic reactions with circulatory and respiratory symptoms and signs. At the end of anaesthesia, no residual effect...... of a neuromuscular blocking drug should be present. However, the huge variability in response to neuromuscular blocking drugs makes it impossible to predict which patient will suffer postoperative residual curarization. This article discusses the undesirable effects of the currently available neuromuscular blocking...

  8. Treatment of poor-prognosis extensive disease small-cell lung cancer with an all-oral regimen of etoposide and cyclophosphamide - a Southwest Oncology Group clinical and pharmacokinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunberg, S M; Crowley, J; Hande, K R; Giroux, D; Munshi, N; Lau, D H; Schroder, L E; Zangmeister, M H; Balcerzak, S P; Hynes, H E; Gandara, D R

    1999-01-01

    An all-oral regimen of etoposide and cyclophosphamide was developed for use in poor-prognosis extensive disease small-cell lung cancer. Limited pharmacokinetic sampling was used to derive a pharmacodynamic model predictive of myelosuppression early in the course of therapy. Eligible patients were chemotherapy-naive and had extensive disease small-cell lung cancer with either SWOG performance status 2 or serum albumin /=1.49 microg/ml. Oral etoposide and oral cyclophosphamide given days 1-14 every 28 days is well tolerated and results in an acceptable response rate and median survival in poor-prognosis (poor performance status or low serum albumin) extensive disease small-cell lung cancer. A trough etoposide level obtained within 24 h of starting therapy can predict severe granulocytopenia.

  9. Preventing Undesirable Seismic Behaviour of Infill Walls in Design Process

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    Azadeh Noorifard

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Dividing walls are usually considered as non-structural elements, but experiences of past earthquakes show that some buildings designed and constructed by engineers have been damaged during earthquakes because of disregarding the negative effects of walls. Apart from the poor quality of construction and materials, inattention in design process is the main reason for undesirable seismic behaviour of walls.The main aim of this paper is to investigate the measures taken in different stages of architectural and structural design for improving the seismic behaviour of infilled concrete structures. As a general principle, with the further progress of project from basic architectural design to detailed structural design, there is a need to reduce designer authority and increase obligation, furthermore the cost of project increases too. The conclusion of this study implies that, in order to achieve the desirable seismic behaviour of walls, close collaboration between architects and structural engineers is required from the early stages of design. The results of this study are presented in a check list for designing reinforced concrete (RC moment resisting frame and RC shear wall.

  10. A two stage data envelopment analysis model with undesirable output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff Adli Aminuddin, Adam; Izzati Jaini, Nur; Mat Kasim, Maznah; Nawawi, Mohd Kamal Mohd

    2017-09-01

    The dependent relationship among the decision making units (DMU) is usually assumed to be non-existent in the development of Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) model. The dependency can be represented by the multi-stage DEA model, where the outputs from the precedent stage will be the inputs for the latter stage. The multi-stage DEA model evaluate both the efficiency score for each stages and the overall efficiency of the whole process. The existing multi stage DEA models do not focus on the integration with the undesirable output, in which the higher input will generate lower output unlike the normal desirable output. This research attempts to address the inclusion of such undesirable output and investigate the theoretical implication and potential application towards the development of multi-stage DEA model.

  11. A Case of Undesired Bleb Developed After Penetrating Injury

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    Cem Ozgonul

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Eighty-year-old male patient was admitted to our policlinic with stinging, burning and itching in both eyes. Ophthalmological examination revealed avascular undesired bleb that releated with anterior chamber at 2-3 hour quadrant nasal limbus with the surrounding corneal and conjunctival epithelium was vascularized and the dimension was 3x3x3 mm. Towards these findings, we questioned the patient again and we found that, 40 years ago, a broken part of the shaving razor had injured his eye. After penetrating injury of the eye, because of the sutured wound leakage, undesired bleb formations can be seen. We suggest that kind of patient shold be followed up to prevent late complications of penetrating injury.

  12. Cycles of undesirable substances in the food chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The working group ''Carry over of undesirable substances in animal feed'' at the Federal Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Forestry (BMELV) in cooperation with the Institute of Animal Nutrition of the Friedrich-Loeffler-Institute (FLI) performed on 27 and 28 October 2011 in Braunschweig a workshop on ''cycles of undesirable substances in Food Chain ''. The aim of the workshop was to present the latest findings of research and Carry over Recommendations of the Carry over - Working Group on undesirable substances in feed and production processes of the feed industry, to evaluate and discuss about this with representatives from science, business and management and to work out the further research and action need. The focus of the considerations were the pathways, the carry over and the Exposure to dioxins and other halogenated hydrocarbons, the effects of Mycotoxins in feed and starting points for preventive measures, the soil contamination and the exposure of humans and animals by cadmium and case studies on Nitrite in feed, antibiotics in plants and residues of pesticides and radionuclides in feed. Furthermore the risks associated with specified manufacturing processes of feed are considered, especially the used materials that come into contact with animal feed, and the risks from nanotechnology. [de

  13. Role of Fault Attributions and Other Factors in Adults' Attitudes Toward Hypothetical Children With an Undesirable Characteristic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadian, Taylor W; Sonnentag, Tammy L; Jones, Tucker L; Barnett, Mark A

    2018-01-01

    A total of 184 adults read descriptions of six hypothetical children with various undesirable characteristics (i.e., being extremely overweight, extremely aggressive, extremely shy, a poor student, a poor athlete, displaying symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder). Following each description, the participants were asked to rate how much they disagree or agree that the child, the child's parents, and the child's biological condition (i.e., "something wrong inside the child's body or brain") are at fault for the onset and the perpetuation of the undesirable characteristic. In addition, the participants were asked to rate their attitude toward each child using a 100-point "feeling thermometer." Analyses of the participants' various fault attribution ratings revealed that they tended to agree more strongly that a child's parents and his/her biological condition are at fault for the onset and the perpetuation of the child's undesirable characteristic than is the child him/herself. Despite the participants' reluctance to blame a hypothetical child for his/her undesirable characteristic, regression analyses revealed that, in general, the more they blamed the child for the onset of his/her undesirable characteristic, the more negative their attitude was toward the child. However, the participants' ratings of the extent to which the child's parents or biological condition are at fault for the onset and the perpetuation of the child's undesirable characteristic were not found to be associated with their attitude toward any of the children. Similarities and differences between the present findings and those reported in prior studies involving younger individuals are addressed.

  14. Undesirable Effects of Media on Children: Why Limitation is Necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaagac, Aysu Turkmen

    2015-06-01

    Pervasive media environment is a social problem shared by most of the countries around the world. Several studies have been performed to highlight the undesired effects of media on children. Some of these studies have focused on the time spent by children watching television, playing with computers or using mobile media devices while some others have tried to explain the associations between the obesity, postural abnormalities or psychological problems of children, and their media use. This article discusses the recent approaches to curb influence of media on children, and the importance of family media literacy education programs with particular relevance to developing countries.

  15. Undesirable substances in vegetable oils: anything to declare?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacoste Florence

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of undesirable compounds in vegetable and animal oils and fats may have many different origins. Although the potential toxicity of most of these undesirable compounds is real, poisoning risks are rather limited due to the efficient elimination during oil-refining steps, careful conditioning, choice of efficient packaging and industrial quality control management. However the research of contaminants is part of multiple controls conducted by fat and oil industry to verify the conformity of products placed on the market in relation to regulations such as the European commission regulation EC No. 1881/2006 setting maximum levels for some contaminants in food as lead, some mycotoxins, dioxins, polychlorobiphenyls, benzo[a]pyrene. In the absence of regulation, the detection of contaminants must be addressed in partnership with authorities according to the toxicity of molecules. The controls are not confined to environmental contaminants. They also include compounds that can be formed during the production process of vegetable oils such as esters of 3-monochloropropanediol. This article focuses more particularly on heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, mineral oils, phthalates and 3-MCPD or glycidyl esters. Aspects such as methods for analysis, limits fixed by EC regulation and occurrence in vegetable oils are discussed.

  16. Cosmetics Europe Guidelines on the Management of Undesirable Effects and Reporting of Serious Undesirable Effects from Cosmetics in the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Renner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The European Union (EU Cosmetics Regulation (EC No. 1223/2009 requires companies to collect and assess reports of adverse health effects from the cosmetic products (undesirable effects they market. Furthermore, undesirable effects that are considered as serious need to be reported to the national competent authorities. Cosmetics Europe, representing the European cosmetics industry, has developed these guidelines to promote a consistent practical approach for the management of undesirable effects and the notification of serious undesirable effects. Following these guidelines allows companies concerned to demonstrate due diligence and compliance with the legal requirements.

  17. Environmentally Clean Mitigation of Undesirable Plant Life Using Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubenchik, A M; McGrann, T J; Yamamoto, R M; Parker, J M

    2009-07-01

    This concept comprises a method for environmentally clean destruction of undesirable plant life using visible or infrared radiation. We believe that during the blossom stage, plant life is very sensitive to electromagnetic radiation, with an enhanced sensitivity to specific spectral ranges. Small doses of irradiation can arrest further plant growth, cause flower destruction or promote plant death. Surrounding plants, which are not in the blossoming stage, should not be affected. Our proposed mechanism to initiate this effect is radiation produced by a laser. Tender parts of the blossom possess enhanced absorptivity in some spectral ranges. This absorption can increase the local tissue temperature by several degrees, which is sufficient to induce bio-tissue damage. In some instances, the radiation may actually stimulate plant growth, as an alternative for use in increased crop production. This would be dependent on factors such as plant type, the wavelength of the laser radiation being used and the amount of the radiation dose. Practical, economically viable realization of this concept is possible today with the advent of high efficiency, compact and powerful laser diodes. The laser diodes provide an efficient, environmentally clean source of radiation at a variety of power levels and radiation wavelengths. Figure 1 shows the overall concept, with the laser diodes mounted on a movable platform, traversing and directing the laser radiation over a field of opium poppies.

  18. Teaches’ Reactions towards Undesirable Behaviors of Administrators: Whistle-blowing or Keeping Silent?

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    Asiye TOKER GÖKÇE

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to define teachers’ attitudes towards undesired behaviours at school. Therefore, in which possible undesired administrative behaviours teachers would blow a whistle was examined. Second, whether the teachers would prefer whistle-blowing or and the kind of blowing was questioned. Lastly, the reason of keeping silence was examined. This research was designed as qualitative model. The research group was 20 teachers that work at a secondary school in Darica district of Kocaeli. The results revealed that it was put forward that all teachers would react in the case of various undesired behaviours. However it was determined that teachers would mostly react in the case of serious undesired behaviours. Teachers mostly stated that they would prefer to whistle-blow internally, formally and by identifying themselves. Findings of the research are thought to contribute to the literature in terms of revealing teachers’ attitudes towards possible undesired behaviours at school.

  19. Optimal design of pharmacokinetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Leon; Ogungbenro, Kayode

    2010-03-01

    Experimental design is fundamental to successful scientific investigation. Poorly designed experiments lead to the loss of information, which is costly and potentially unethical. Experiments can be designed in an optimal fashion to maximize the amount of information they provide. Optimal design theory uses prior information about the model and parameter estimates to optimize a function of the Fisher information matrix to obtain the best combination of the design factors. In the case of population pharmacokinetic experiments, this involves the selection and a careful balance of a number of design factors, including the number and location of measurement times and the number of subjects to include in the study. It is expected that as the awareness about the benefits of this approach increases, more people will embrace it and ultimately will lead to more efficient population pharmacokinetic experiments and can also help to reduce both cost and time during drug development. This MiniReview provides an introduction to optimal design using examples taken from different pharmacokinetic experiments.

  20. Enhanced DEA model with undesirable output and interval data for rice growing farmers performance assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Sahubar Ali Mohd. Nadhar, E-mail: sahubar@uum.edu.my; Ramli, Razamin, E-mail: razamin@uum.edu.my; Baten, M. D. Azizul, E-mail: baten-math@yahoo.com [School of Quantitative Sciences, UUM College of Arts and Sciences, Universiti Utara Malaysia, 06010 Sintok, Kedah (Malaysia)

    2015-12-11

    Agricultural production process typically produces two types of outputs which are economic desirable as well as environmentally undesirable outputs (such as greenhouse gas emission, nitrate leaching, effects to human and organisms and water pollution). In efficiency analysis, this undesirable outputs cannot be ignored and need to be included in order to obtain the actual estimation of firms efficiency. Additionally, climatic factors as well as data uncertainty can significantly affect the efficiency analysis. There are a number of approaches that has been proposed in DEA literature to account for undesirable outputs. Many researchers has pointed that directional distance function (DDF) approach is the best as it allows for simultaneous increase in desirable outputs and reduction of undesirable outputs. Additionally, it has been found that interval data approach is the most suitable to account for data uncertainty as it is much simpler to model and need less information regarding its distribution and membership function. In this paper, an enhanced DEA model based on DDF approach that considers undesirable outputs as well as climatic factors and interval data is proposed. This model will be used to determine the efficiency of rice farmers who produces undesirable outputs and operates under uncertainty. It is hoped that the proposed model will provide a better estimate of rice farmers’ efficiency.

  1. Distinct oxytocin effects on belief updating in response to desirable and undesirable feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yina; Li, Shiyi; Wang, Chenbo; Liu, Yi; Li, Wenxin; Yan, Xinyuan; Chen, Qiang; Han, Shihui

    2016-01-01

    Humans update their beliefs upon feedback and, accordingly, modify their behaviors to adapt to the complex, changing social environment. However, people tend to incorporate desirable (better than expected) feedback into their beliefs but to discount undesirable (worse than expected) feedback. Such optimistic updating has evolved as an advantageous mechanism for social adaptation. Here, we examine the role of oxytocin (OT)―an evolutionary ancient neuropeptide pivotal for social adaptation―in belief updating upon desirable and undesirable feedback in three studies (n = 320). Using a double-blind, placebo-controlled between-subjects design, we show that intranasally administered OT (IN-OT) augments optimistic belief updating by facilitating updates of desirable feedback but impairing updates of undesirable feedback. The IN-OT–induced impairment in belief updating upon undesirable feedback is more salient in individuals with high, rather than with low, depression or anxiety traits. IN-OT selectively enhances learning rate (the strength of association between estimation error and subsequent update) of desirable feedback. IN-OT also increases participants’ confidence in their estimates after receiving desirable but not undesirable feedback, and the OT effect on confidence updating upon desirable feedback mediates the effect of IN-OT on optimistic belief updating. Our findings reveal distinct functional roles of OT in updating the first-order estimation and second-order confidence judgment in response to desirable and undesirable feedback, suggesting a molecular substrate for optimistic belief updating. PMID:27482087

  2. Enhanced DEA model with undesirable output and interval data for rice growing farmers performance assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sahubar Ali Mohd. Nadhar; Ramli, Razamin; Baten, M. D. Azizul

    2015-12-01

    Agricultural production process typically produces two types of outputs which are economic desirable as well as environmentally undesirable outputs (such as greenhouse gas emission, nitrate leaching, effects to human and organisms and water pollution). In efficiency analysis, this undesirable outputs cannot be ignored and need to be included in order to obtain the actual estimation of firms efficiency. Additionally, climatic factors as well as data uncertainty can significantly affect the efficiency analysis. There are a number of approaches that has been proposed in DEA literature to account for undesirable outputs. Many researchers has pointed that directional distance function (DDF) approach is the best as it allows for simultaneous increase in desirable outputs and reduction of undesirable outputs. Additionally, it has been found that interval data approach is the most suitable to account for data uncertainty as it is much simpler to model and need less information regarding its distribution and membership function. In this paper, an enhanced DEA model based on DDF approach that considers undesirable outputs as well as climatic factors and interval data is proposed. This model will be used to determine the efficiency of rice farmers who produces undesirable outputs and operates under uncertainty. It is hoped that the proposed model will provide a better estimate of rice farmers' efficiency.

  3. Distinct oxytocin effects on belief updating in response to desirable and undesirable feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yina; Li, Shiyi; Wang, Chenbo; Liu, Yi; Li, Wenxin; Yan, Xinyuan; Chen, Qiang; Han, Shihui

    2016-08-16

    Humans update their beliefs upon feedback and, accordingly, modify their behaviors to adapt to the complex, changing social environment. However, people tend to incorporate desirable (better than expected) feedback into their beliefs but to discount undesirable (worse than expected) feedback. Such optimistic updating has evolved as an advantageous mechanism for social adaptation. Here, we examine the role of oxytocin (OT)-an evolutionary ancient neuropeptide pivotal for social adaptation-in belief updating upon desirable and undesirable feedback in three studies (n = 320). Using a double-blind, placebo-controlled between-subjects design, we show that intranasally administered OT (IN-OT) augments optimistic belief updating by facilitating updates of desirable feedback but impairing updates of undesirable feedback. The IN-OT-induced impairment in belief updating upon undesirable feedback is more salient in individuals with high, rather than with low, depression or anxiety traits. IN-OT selectively enhances learning rate (the strength of association between estimation error and subsequent update) of desirable feedback. IN-OT also increases participants' confidence in their estimates after receiving desirable but not undesirable feedback, and the OT effect on confidence updating upon desirable feedback mediates the effect of IN-OT on optimistic belief updating. Our findings reveal distinct functional roles of OT in updating the first-order estimation and second-order confidence judgment in response to desirable and undesirable feedback, suggesting a molecular substrate for optimistic belief updating.

  4. Poor title--poor manuscript?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjersvik, Petter; Gulbrandsen, Pål; Aasheim, Erlend T; Nylenna, Magne

    2013-12-10

    The title of a scientific article is important for several reasons. Does the title of a manuscript submitted for publication in a medical journal reflect the quality of the manuscript itself? We prepared criteria for poor, fair and good titles and tested them in pilot studies. All manuscripts submitted to the Journal of the Norwegian Medical Association during the period 1 September 2009-31 August 2011 as original articles (n = 211) or review articles (n = 110) were recorded. The quality of the titles was scored by two former editors. Primary outcome measures were rejection rates and odds ratio for rejection of manuscripts with a poor title compared to those with a good title. For original articles, the rejection rate for manuscripts with a poor, fair or good title amounted to 88%, 73% and 61% (p = 0.002) respectively, and for review articles 83%, 56% and 38% (p title compared to those with a good title was 4.6 (95% CI: 1.7-12.3) for original articles and 8.2 (95% CI: 2.6-26.4) for review articles. In a logistic regression model, the quality of the title explained 14% and 27% of the variance in outcome for original articles and review articles respectively. In this study, a poor manuscript title was significantly associated with manuscript rejection. This indicates that the quality of the title often reflects the quality of the manuscript itself.

  5. Pharmacokinetics of fexofenadine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappin, Graham; Shishikura, Yoko; Jochemsen, Roeline

    2010-01-01

    A human pharmacokinetic study was performed to assess the ability of a microdose to predict the pharmacokinetics of a therapeutic dose of fexofenadine and to determine its absolute oral bioavailability. Fexofenadine was chosen to represent an unmetabolized transporter substrate (P-gP and OATP). F...

  6. [Methodologic problems of pharmacokinetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gor'kov, V A; Krylov, Iu F

    1989-01-01

    The subject of pharmacokinetics, method of research, aims and tasks of fundamental and applied aspects, place and importance for pharmacology are discussed. Discrepancy between a high scientific potential of pharmacokinetics and a low practical realization are analyzed, priority trends of future research are formulated.

  7. Rapid detection of undesired cosmetic ingredients by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Jie; An, Dongli; Chen, Tengteng; Lin, Zhiwei

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, cosmetic industry profits soared due to the widespread use of cosmetics, which resulted in illicit manufacturers and products of poor quality. Therefore, the rapid and accurate detection of the composition of cosmetics has become crucial. At present, numerous methods, such as gas chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, were available for the analysis of cosmetic ingredients. However, these methods present several limitations, such as failure to perform comprehensive and rapid analysis of the samples. Compared with other techniques, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry offered the advantages of wide detection range, fast speed and high accuracy. In this article, we briefly summarized how to select a suitable matrix and adjust the appropriate laser energy. We also discussed the rapid identification of undesired ingredients, focusing on antibiotics and hormones in cosmetics.

  8. The Differential Mortality of Undesired Infants in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatø, Martin

    2018-02-01

    With high rates of infant mortality in sub-Saharan Africa, investments in infant health are subject to tough prioritizations within the household, in which maternal preferences may play a part. How these preferences will affect infant mortality as African women have ever-lower fertility is still uncertain, as increased female empowerment and increased difficulty in achieving a desired gender composition within a smaller family pull in potentially different directions. I study how being born at a parity or of a gender undesired by the mother relates to infant mortality in sub-Saharan Africa and how such differential mortality varies between women at different stages of the demographic transition. Using data from 79 Demographic and Health Surveys, I find that a child being undesired according to the mother is associated with a differential mortality that is not due to constant maternal factors, family composition, or factors that are correlated with maternal preferences and vary continuously across siblings. As a share of overall infant mortality, the excess mortality of undesired children amounts to 3.3 % of male and 4 % of female infant mortality. Undesiredness can explain a larger share of infant mortality among mothers with lower fertility desires and a larger share of female than male infant mortality for children of women who desire 1-3 children. Undesired gender composition is more important for infant mortality than undesired childbearing and may also lead couples to increase family size beyond the maternal desire, in which case infants of the surplus gender are particularly vulnerable.

  9. Pharmacokinetics: curiosity or cure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notari, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    What is the fate of a drug from the time of its introduction into the body to the end of its duration. Pharmacokinetic studies are often designed to provide an answer to this question. But this question may be asked of any drug and research that is limited to answering it will remain empirical. Pharmacokinetic studies can provide answers to many other drug-related questions. In doing so pharmacokinetic research has the potential of improving drug therapy as well as the design and evaluation of drugs. While significant contributions can be cited, the future of pharmacokinetics depends upon its increased impact on clinical practice and drug design. How can a molecule be tailored for site specificity. Can chemical modification selectively alter absorption, distribution, metabolism, binding or excretion. In what new ways can pharmacokinetic information increase the predictability of drug therapy. Such questions, to which pharmacokinetics should provide answers, are numerous and easily identified. But the definitive studies are difficult both to create and conduct. Whether or not pharmacokinetics can achieve its full potential will depend upon the extent to which it can provide answers to these currently unanswered questions

  10. Desirable and undesirable future thoughts call for different scene construction processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vito, S; Neroni, M A; Gamboz, N; Della Sala, S; Brandimonte, M A

    2015-01-01

    Despite the growing interest in the ability of foreseeing (episodic future thinking), it is still unclear how healthy people construct possible future scenarios. We suggest that different future thoughts require different processes of scene construction. Thirty-five participants were asked to imagine desirable and less desirable future events. Imagining desirable events increased the ease of scene construction, the frequency of life scripts, the number of internal details, and the clarity of sensorial and spatial temporal information. The initial description of general personal knowledge lasted longer in undesirable than in desirable anticipations. Finally, participants were more prone to explicitly indicate autobiographical memory as the main source of their simulations of undesirable episodes, whereas they equally related the simulations of desirable events to autobiographical events or semantic knowledge. These findings show that desirable and undesirable scenarios call for different mechanisms of scene construction. The present study emphasizes that future thinking cannot be considered as a monolithic entity.

  11. Ranking of bank branches with undesirable and fuzzy data: A DEA-based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Kordrostami

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Banks are one of the most important financial sectors in order to the economic development of each country. Certainly, efficiency scores and ranks of banks are significant and effective aspects towards future planning. Sometimes the performance of banks must be measured in the presence of undesirable and vague factors. For these reasons in the current paper a procedure based on data envelopment analysis (DEA is introduced for evaluating the efficiency and complete ranking of decision making units (DMUs where undesirable and fuzzy measures exist. To illustrate, in the presence of undesirable and fuzzy measures, DMUs are evaluated by using a fuzzy expected value approach and DMUs with similar efficiency scores are ranked by using constraints and the Maximal Balance Index based on the optimal shadow prices. Afterwards, the efficiency scores of 25 branches of an Iranian commercial bank are evaluated using the proposed method. Also, a complete ranking of bank branches is presented to discriminate branches.

  12. Risk management of undesirable substances in feed following updated risk assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verstraete, Frans

    2013-01-01

    Directive 2002/32/EC of 7 May 2002 of the European Parliament and of the Council on undesirable substances in animal feed is the framework for the EU action on undesirable substances in feed. This framework Directive provides: ⁎that products intended for animal feed may enter for use in the Union from third countries, be put into circulation and/or used in the Union only if they are sound, genuine and of merchantable quality and therefore when correctly used do not represent any danger to human health, animal health or to the environment or could adversely affect livestock production. ⁎that in order to protect animal and public health and the environment, maximum levels for specific undesirable substances shall be established where necessary. ⁎for mandatory consultation of a scientific body (EFSA) for all provisions which may have an effect upon public health or animal health or on the environment. ⁎that products intended for animal feed containing levels of an undesirable substance that exceed the established maximum level may not be mixed for dilution purposes with the same, or other, products intended for animal feed and may not be used for the production of compound feed. Based on the provisions and principles laid down in this framework Directive, maximum levels for a whole range of undesirable substances have been established at EU level. During the discussions in view of the adoption of Directive 2002/32/EC, the European Commission made the commitment to review all existing provisions on undesirable substances on the basis of updated scientific risk assessments. Following requests of the European Commission, the Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain (CONTAM) from the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has completed a series of 30 risk assessments undertaken over the last 5 years on undesirable substances in animal feed reviewing the possible risks for animal and human health due to the presence of these substances in animal feed. EU legislation

  13. Organophosphorus Insecticide Pharmacokinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timchalk, Charles

    2010-01-01

    This chapter highlights a number of current and future applications of pharmacokinetics to assess organophosphate (OP) insecticide dosimetry, biological response and risk in humans exposed to these agents. Organophosphates represent a large family of pesticides where insecticidal as well as toxicological mode of action is associated with their ability to target and inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Pharmacokinetics entails the quantitative integration of physiological and metabolic processes associated with the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of drugs and xenobiotics. Pharmacokinetic studies provide important data on the amount of toxicant delivered to a target site as well as species-, age-, gender-specific and dose-dependent differences in biological response. These studies have been conducted with organophosphorus insecticides in multiple species, at various dose levels, and across different routes of exposure to understand their in vivo pharmacokinetics and how they contribute to the observed toxicological response. To access human exposure to organophosphorus insecticides, human pharmacokinetic studies have been conducted and used to develop biological monitoring strategies based on the quantitation of key metabolites in biological fluids. Pharmacokinetic studies with these insecticides are also useful to facilitate extrapolation of dosimetry and biological response from animals to humans and for the assessment of human health risk. In this regard, physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models are being utilized to assess risk and understand the toxicological implications of known or suspected exposures to various insecticides. In this chapter a number of examples are presented that illustrate the utility and limitation of pharmacokinetic studies to address human health concerns associated with organophosphorus insecticides.

  14. Pharmacokinetics of Snake Venom

    OpenAIRE

    Suchaya Sanhajariya; Stephen B. Duffull; Geoffrey K. Isbister

    2018-01-01

    Understanding snake venom pharmacokinetics is essential for developing risk assessment strategies and determining the optimal dose and timing of antivenom required to bind all venom in snakebite patients. This review aims to explore the current knowledge of snake venom pharmacokinetics in animals and humans. Literature searches were conducted using EMBASE (1974–present) and Medline (1946–present). For animals, 12 out of 520 initially identified studies met the inclusion criteria. In general, ...

  15. Testosterone for Poor Ovarian Responders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polyzos, Nikolaos P; Davis, Susan R; Drakopoulos, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone, an androgen that directly binds to the androgen receptor, has been shown in previous small randomized controlled trials to increase the reproductive outcomes of poor ovarian responders. In most of these studies, transdermal testosterone in relatively high doses was administered before...... ovarian stimulation with a duration varying from 5 to 21 days. Nevertheless, the key question to be asked is whether, based on ovarian physiology and testosterone pharmacokinetics, a short course of testosterone administration of more than 10 mg could be expected to have any beneficial effect...... stages. In addition, extreme testosterone excess is not only likely to induce adverse events but has also the potential to be ineffective and even detrimental. Thus, evidence from clinical studies is not enough to either "reopen" or "close" the "androgen chapter" in poor responders, mainly because...

  16. Relationships between College Students' Credit Card Debt, Undesirable Academic Behaviors and Cognitions, and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Eileen A.; Bryant, Sarah K.; Overymyer-Day, Leslie E.

    2013-01-01

    The acquisition of credit card debt by college students has long been a topic of concern. This study explores relationships among debt, undesirable academic behaviors and cognitions, and academic performance, through surveys of 338 students in a public university, replicating two past measures of credit card debt and creating new measures of…

  17. A survey on the presence of undesirable botanical substances in feed in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raamsdonk, van L.W.D.; Vancutsem, J.; Jorgensen, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    Directive 2002/32/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 7 May 2002 on undesirable substances in animal feed lists a range of substances from botanical origin (weed seeds) and additionally some chemical compounds directly originating from specific weeds. In order to examine the actual

  18. Array diagnostics, spatial resolution, and filtering of undesired radiation with the 3D reconstruction algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappellin, C.; Pivnenko, Sergey; Jørgensen, E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on three important features of the 3D reconstruction algorithm of DIATOOL: the identification of array elements improper functioning and failure, the obtainable spatial resolution of the reconstructed fields and currents, and the filtering of undesired radiation and scattering...

  19. Rice growing farmers efficiency measurement using a slack based interval DEA model with undesirable outputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sahubar Ali Mohd. Nadhar; Ramli, Razamin; Baten, M. D. Azizul

    2017-11-01

    In recent years eco-efficiency which considers the effect of production process on environment in determining the efficiency of firms have gained traction and a lot of attention. Rice farming is one of such production processes which typically produces two types of outputs which are economic desirable as well as environmentally undesirable. In efficiency analysis, these undesirable outputs cannot be ignored and need to be included in the model to obtain the actual estimation of firm's efficiency. There are numerous approaches that have been used in data envelopment analysis (DEA) literature to account for undesirable outputs of which directional distance function (DDF) approach is the most widely used as it allows for simultaneous increase in desirable outputs and reduction of undesirable outputs. Additionally, slack based DDF DEA approaches considers the output shortfalls and input excess in determining efficiency. In situations when data uncertainty is present, the deterministic DEA model is not suitable to be used as the effects of uncertain data will not be considered. In this case, it has been found that interval data approach is suitable to account for data uncertainty as it is much simpler to model and need less information regarding the underlying data distribution and membership function. The proposed model uses an enhanced DEA model which is based on DDF approach and incorporates slack based measure to determine efficiency in the presence of undesirable factors and data uncertainty. Interval data approach was used to estimate the values of inputs, undesirable outputs and desirable outputs. Two separate slack based interval DEA models were constructed for optimistic and pessimistic scenarios. The developed model was used to determine rice farmers efficiency from Kepala Batas, Kedah. The obtained results were later compared to the results obtained using a deterministic DDF DEA model. The study found that 15 out of 30 farmers are efficient in all cases. It

  20. Experimental investigation of undesired stable equilibria in pumpkin shape super-pressure balloon designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schur, W. W.

    2004-01-01

    Excess in skin material of a pneumatic envelope beyond what is required for minimum enclosure of a gas bubble is a necessary but by no means sufficient condition for the existence of multiple equilibrium configurations for that pneumatic envelope. The very design of structurally efficient super-pressure balloons of the pumpkin shape type requires such excess. Undesired stable equilibria in pumpkin shape balloons have been observed on experimental pumpkin shape balloons. These configurations contain regions with stress levels far higher than those predicted for the cyclically symmetric design configuration under maximum pressurization. Successful designs of pumpkin shape super-pressure balloons do not allow such undesired stable equilibria under full pressurization. This work documents efforts made so far and describes efforts still underway by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Balloon Program Office to arrive on guidance on the design of pumpkin shape super-pressure balloons that guarantee full and proper deployment.

  1. Development of Data Envelopment Analysis for the Performance Evaluation of Green Supply Chain with Undesirable Outputs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Alinezhad

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental problem is the use of DEA in multistep or multilevel processes such as supply chain, lack of attention to processes’ internal communications in a way that the recent studies on DEA in the context of serial processes have focused on closed systems that the outputs of one level become the inputs of the next level and none of the inputs enter the mediator process. The present study aimed to examine the general dimensions of an open multilevel process. Here, some of the data such as inputs and outputs are supposed to leave the system while other outputs turn into the inputs of the next level. The new inputs can enter the next level as well. We expand this mode for network structures. The overall performance of such a structure is considered as a weighted average of sectors’ performance or distinct steps. Therefore, this suggested model in this study, not only provides the possibility to evaluate the performance of the entire network, but creates the performance analysis for each of the sub-processes. On the other hand, considering the data with undesirable structure leads to more correct performance estimation. In the real world, all productive processes do not comprise desirable factors. Therefore, presenting a structure that is capable of taking into account the undesirable structure is of crucial importance. In this study, a new model in the DEA by network structure is offered that can analyze the performance considering undesirable factors.

  2. Assessment of undesirable dose to eye-melanoma patients after proton radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolarczyk, L., E-mail: liliana.stolarczyk@ifj.edu.p [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Olko, P.; Cywicka-Jakiel, T.; Ptaszkiewicz, M.; Swakon, J.; Dulny, B.; Horwacik, T.; Obryk, B. [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Waligorski, M.P.R. [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Institute, Centre of Oncology, Krakow Division, ul. Garncarska 11, 31-115, Krakow (Poland)

    2010-12-15

    Radiotherapy with a proton beam of initial energy 55-80 MeV is presently the clinically recommended therapy for some cases of intraocular melanoma such as large melanomas or tumours adjacent to critical organs. Evaluation and optimization of radiation doses outside the treatment volume may contribute to reducing undesirable side-effects and decreasing the risk of occurrence of secondary cancers, particularly for paediatric patients. In this work the undesired doses to organs were assessed basing on Monte Carlo calculation of secondary radiation transport and on results of measurements of neutron and {gamma}-ray doses at the proton therapy facility of the Institute of Nuclear Physics at Krakow. Dosimetry was performed using a He-3-based FHT 762 neutron monitor (Wendi II), a FH40G proportional counter (for {gamma}-rays), and MTS-7 (LiF:Mg,Ti) thermoluminescence detectors (TLDs). Organ doses were calculated in the ADAM anthropomorphic phantom using the MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code and partly verified, for {gamma}-ray doses, with TLD measurements in the RANDO Anderson anthropomorphic phantom. The effective dose due to undesired radiation, including exposure from scattered radiation during the entire process of proton radiotherapy and patient positioning using X-rays, does not exceed 1 mSv.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of Alternative Administration Routes of Melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zetner, D.; Andersen, L. P.H.; Rosenberg, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Melatonin is traditionally administered orally but has a poor and variable bioavailability. This study aims to present an overview of studies investigating the pharmacokinetics of alternative administration routes of melatonin. Methods: A systematic literature search was performed...... and included experimental or clinical studies, investigating pharmacokinetics of alternative administration routes of melatonin in vivo. Alternative administration routes were defined as all administration routes except oral and intravenous. Results: 10 studies were included in the review. Intranasal...... administration exhibited a quick absorption rate and high bioavailability. Transdermal administration displayed a variable absorption rate and possible deposition of melatonin in the skin. Oral transmucosal administration of melatonin exhibited a high plasma concentration compared to oral administration...

  4. Lumping in pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochot, Céline; Tóth, János; Bois, Frédéric Y

    2005-12-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) models simplify biological complexity by dividing the body into interconnected compartments. The time course of the chemical's amount (or concentration) in each compartment is then expressed as a system of ordinary differential equations. The complexity of the resulting system of equations can rapidly increase if a precise description of the organism is needed. However, difficulties arise when the PK model contains more variables and parameters than comfortable for mathematical and computational treatment. To overcome such difficulties, mathematical lumping methods are new and powerful tools. Such methods aim at reducing a differential system by aggregating several variables into one. Typically, the lumped model is still a differential equation system, whose variables are interpretable in terms of variables of the original system. In practice, the reduced model is usually required to satisfy some constraints. For example, it may be necessary to keep state variables of interest for prediction unlumped. To accommodate such constraints, constrained lumping methods have are also available. After presenting the theory, we study, here, through practical examples, the potential of such methods in toxico/pharmacokinetics. As a tutorial, we first simplify a 2-compartment pharmacokinetic model by symbolic lumping. We then explore the reduction of a 6-compartment physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for 1,3-butadiene with numerical constrained lumping. The lumping methods presented here can be easily automated, and are applicable to first-order ordinary differential equation systems.

  5. SYMBOLS IN PHARMACOKINETICS1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Malcolm; Tucker, Geoffrey

    1982-01-01

    To encourage uniformity in the presentation of pharmacokinetic data, a general nomenclature has been developed. The system has wide application. Flexibility is achieved through the use of general variables, constants, qualifying terms and subscripts. Yet, through the use of implied terms, the symbols describing many common variables and constants are simple.

  6. Symbols in pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, M; Tucker, G

    1980-10-01

    To encourage uniformity in the presentation of pharmacokinetic data, a general nomenclature has been developed. The system has wide application. Flexibility is achieved through the use of general variables, constants, qualifying terms, and subscripts. Yet, through the use of implied terms, the symbols describing many common variables and constants are simple.

  7. Undesirable Behaviors Elementary School Classroom Teachers Encounter in the Classroom and Their Reasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.G. Balcik

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to determine how often elementary school teachers encounter undesirable behaviors in the classroom and what their thoughts regarding possible reasons of these behaviors are. The teachers’ opininon about the prevalence of these behaviors and their possible reasons were evaluated according to gender, marital status, level of class being taught, size of class being taught and it was tried to be determined if there were significant differences between variables. The measurement tool was applied to a total of 54 teachers at 5 schools in Gölcük district of the Kocaeli province. The data collection tool is composed of three sections. The first section is for establishing teachers’ personal information. In this study, as a data collection tool, a questionnaire was used. When preparing questions for the questionnaire, following the examination of resources available, the questionnaire prepared by Aksoy (1999 and used in the thesis study entitled “Classroom Management and Student Discipline in Elementary Schools of Ankara” and also used in the thesis study by Boyraz (2007 entitled “Discipline Problems that Candidate Teachers Servicing at Elementary Schools Encounter in the Classroom” was employed. Although the validity and reliability of the questionnaire was tested by Aksoy (1999 and Boyraz (2007, the reliability study for the questionnaire was retested and found to be 0,9. The questionnaire include 42 items. 19 of them are related to the reasons of undesirable behaviors observed in the classroom and 23 of them are related to undesirable behaviors observed in the classroom.

  8. A survey on the presence of undesirable botanical substances in feed in the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Raamsdonk LWD.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Directive 2002/32/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 7 May 2002 on undesirable substances in animal feed lists a range of substances from botanical origin (weed seeds and additionally some chemical compounds directly originating from specific weeds. In order to examine the actual status of enforcement and of the present occurrence of these botanical substances, a survey was carried out. A questionnaire was sent to 103 laboratories, including official control labs from all member states of the European Union. The results, indicating the frequency of occurrence as far as reported, are compared to the publications of the EU Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed (RASFF. A total of 44 questionnaires was returned (42.7% from 22 member states. Ten member states predominantly from north-western Europe appeared to have an active monitoring of botanical undesirable substances. The questionnaire results did not indicate that the other member states enforce this part of Directive 2002/32/EC. Reports on the frequency of occurrence include: a few to 25-50% of the samples contain traces of ergot (8 member states, a few to 24% contain at least some traces of thorn apple (6 member states, zero to 17% contain some castor oil plant seeds (3 member states, zero to a few samples contain Crotalaria seeds (3 member states, and zero to 6% contain traces of Sareptian mustard (4 member states. One member state conducted extra surveillance since several cases of animal intoxications have been reported. In some cases a coincidence with undesirable botanical substances was found.

  9. Environmental efficiency evaluation of china based on a kind of congestion and undesirable output coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Malin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The production “congestion” phenomenon is widespread in reality although few models nowadays consider its influences. In this study, production congestion is introduced into an environmental efficiency evaluation model and a new data envelopment analysis model that considers both production congestion and undesirable output is established so as to measure environmental efficiency evaluation effectively. On this basis, we divide technological change into productive technological change and energy-savings emission reduction technological change to establish their influences on the congestion phenomenon. The results show that productive technological change cannot relieve the degree of congestion while green technology change that stimulates environmental efficiency improvement can greatly alleviate situations of congestion.

  10. Guidelines used in Japan to prevent the contamination of feed products with undesirable substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuaki Sugiura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As Japan depends on imports for most ingredients used to manufacture feed products, close co-operation is indispensable between importers and manufacturers of feed and feed ingredients to effectively mitigate the risk associated with feed safety. Guidelines were issued by the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (MAFF in March 2008 to prevent feed products from being contaminated with undesirable substances. These guidelines identify the responsibilities of feed ingredient importers, feed manufacturers and distributors, as well as the roles of the MAFF and the Food and Agricultural Materials Inspection Centre.

  11. Distinguishing Technical Inefficiency from Desirable and Undesirable Congestion with an Application to Regional Industries in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Congestion is an important issue that requires the efficiency of decision-making units (DMUs. We first classify conventional congestion into congestion (newly defined and technical inefficiency, based on prior research and real applications. Modified definitions and mathematical expression of congestion, managerial inefficiency, and technical inefficiency are proposed to better illustrate the differences between them. Several modified models are provided to identify and recognize those types of inefficiencies and congestion. We then extend the model by considering the desirable and undesirable types of congestion simultaneously. The proposed approach is applied and verified by identifying resource congestion and environmental inefficiencies in China’s economic development.

  12. A mechanism to compensate undesired stiffness in joints of prosthetic hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Gerwin; Plettenburg, Dick; Van der Helm, Frans

    2014-04-01

    Cosmetic gloves that cover a prosthetic hand have a parasitic positive stiffness that counteracts the flexion of a finger joint. Reducing the required input torque to move a finger of a prosthetic hand by compensating the parasitic stiffness of the cosmetic glove. Experimental, test bench. The parasitic positive stiffness and the required input torques of a polyvinyl chloride glove and a silicone glove were measured when flexing a metacarpophalangeal finger joint for 90°. To compensate this positive stiffness, an adjustable compensation mechanism with a negative stiffness was designed and built. A MATLAB model was created to predict the optimal settings of the mechanism, based on the measured stiffness, in order to minimize the required input torque of the total system. The mechanism was tested in its optimal setting with an applied glove. The mechanism reduced the required input torque by 58% for the polyvinyl chloride glove and by 52% for the silicone glove. The total energy dissipation of the joint did not change significantly. This study shows that the undesired positive stiffness in the joint can be compensated with a relatively simple negative stiffness mechanism, which fits inside a finger of a standard cosmetic glove. Clinical relevance This study presents a mechanism that compensates the undesired stiffness of cosmetic gloves on prosthetic hands. As a result, it requires less input force, torque and energy to move the fingers. Application of this mechanism in body-powered hands will reduce the control effort of the user.

  13. Clinical pharmacokinetics of melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Nathja Groth; Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Gögenur, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of the review was to provide an overview of studies investigating the pharmacokinetics of exogenous melatonin in humans and if possible, to provide recommendations for clinical use. METHODS: The review was conducted in accordance to PRISMA guidelines. A systematic literature search......), and bioavailability. RESULTS: The literature search identified 392 records. Twenty-two studies were included in the review. Melatonin dosages varied between 0.3 and 100 mg and were administered either orally or intravenously. Cmax ranged from 72.1 (10 ml/h; 0.02 mg, IV) to 101,163 pg/ml (100 mg, oral). Tmax ranged......) and 1602 L (4 mg, oral). Bioavailability of oral melatonin ranged from 9 to 33%. Pharmacokinetics was affected by age, caffeine, smoking, oral contraceptives, feeding status, and fluvoxamine. Critically ill patients displayed accelerated absorption and compromised elimination. CONCLUSIONS: Despite...

  14. Fractional calculus in pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopasakis, Pantelis; Sarimveis, Haralambos; Macheras, Panos; Dokoumetzidis, Aristides

    2018-02-01

    We are witnessing the birth of a new variety of pharmacokinetics where non-integer-order differential equations are employed to study the time course of drugs in the body: this is dubbed "fractional pharmacokinetics". The presence of fractional kinetics has important clinical implications such as the lack of a half-life, observed, for example with the drug amiodarone and the associated irregular accumulation patterns following constant and multiple-dose administration. Building models that accurately reflect this behaviour is essential for the design of less toxic and more effective drug administration protocols and devices. This article introduces the readers to the theory of fractional pharmacokinetics and the research challenges that arise. After a short introduction to the concepts of fractional calculus, and the main applications that have appeared in literature up to date, we address two important aspects. First, numerical methods that allow us to simulate fractional order systems accurately and second, optimal control methodologies that can be used to design dosing regimens to individuals and populations.

  15. Pharmacokinetics in older persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, Barry J

    2004-12-01

    Physiologic changes and disease-related alterations in organ function occur with aging. These changes can affect drug pharmacokinetics in older persons. This article reviews age-related changes in pharmacokinetics and their clinical relevance. A PubMed search was conducted using the terms elderly and pharmacokinetics. Other reviews were also included for literature searching. The review includes literature in particular from 1990 through April 2004. Some articles from before 1990 were included to help illustrate principles of age-related pharmacokinetics. There are minor changes in drug absorption with aging. The effect of aging on small-bowel transporter systems is not yet fully established. Bioavailability of highly extracted drugs often is increased with age. Transdermal absorption may be delayed, especially in the case of water-soluble compounds. Fat-soluble drugs may distribute more widely and water-soluble drugs less extensively in older persons. Hepatic drug metabolism shows wide interindividual variation, and in many cases, there is an age-related decline in elimination of metabolized drugs, particularly those eliminated by the cytochrome enzyme system. Any decrement in cytochrome enzyme metabolism appears nonselective. Synthetic conjugation metabolism is less affected by age. Pseudocapillarization of the sinusoidal endothelium in the liver, restricting oxygen diffusion, and the decline in liver size and liver blood flow may influence age-related changes in rate of hepatic metabolism. Frailty, physiological stress, and illness are important predictors of drug metabolism in older individuals. Inhibition of drug metabolism is not altered with aging, but induction is reduced in a minority of studies. Renal drug elimination typically declines with age, commensurate with the fall in creatinine clearance. Renal tubular organic acid transport may decline with age, while the function of the organic base transporter is preserved but may be less responsive to

  16. Cycles of undesirable substances in the food chain; Kreislaeufe unerwuenschter Stoffe in der Lebensmittelkette

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-12-15

    The working group ''Carry over of undesirable substances in animal feed'' at the Federal Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Forestry (BMELV) in cooperation with the Institute of Animal Nutrition of the Friedrich-Loeffler-Institute (FLI) performed on 27 and 28 October 2011 in Braunschweig a workshop on ''cycles of undesirable substances in Food Chain ''. The aim of the workshop was to present the latest findings of research and Carry over Recommendations of the Carry over - Working Group on undesirable substances in feed and production processes of the feed industry, to evaluate and discuss about this with representatives from science, business and management and to work out the further research and action need. The focus of the considerations were the pathways, the carry over and the Exposure to dioxins and other halogenated hydrocarbons, the effects of Mycotoxins in feed and starting points for preventive measures, the soil contamination and the exposure of humans and animals by cadmium and case studies on Nitrite in feed, antibiotics in plants and residues of pesticides and radionuclides in feed. Furthermore the risks associated with specified manufacturing processes of feed are considered, especially the used materials that come into contact with animal feed, and the risks from nanotechnology. [German] Die Arbeitsgruppe ''Carry over unerwuenschter Stoffe in Futtermitteln'' beim Bundesministerium fuer Ernaehrung, Landwirtschaft und Forsten (BMELV) hat in Zusammenarbeit mit dem Institut fuer Tierernaehrung des Friedrich-Loeffler-Instituts (FLI) am 27. und 28. Oktober 2011 in Braunschweig einen Workshop zum Thema ''Kreislaeufe unerwuenschter Stoffe in der Lebensmittelkette'' durchgefuehrt. Ziel des Workshops war es, die aktuellen Erkenntnisse der Carry over Forschung und die Empfehlungen der Carry over - Arbeitsgruppe zu unerwuenschten Stoffen in Futtermitteln und Produktionsverfahren in

  17. Operation condition for continuous anti-solvent crystallization of CBZ-SAC cocrystal considering deposition risk of undesired crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimaru, Momoko; Nakasa, Miku; Kudo, Shoji; Takiyama, Hiroshi

    2017-07-01

    Crystallization operation of cocrystal production has deposition risk of undesired crystals. Simultaneously, continuous manufacturing processes are focused on. In this study, conditions for continuous cocrystallization considering risk reduction of undesired crystals deposition were investigated on the view point of thermodynamics and kinetics. The anti-solvent cocrystallization was carried out in four-component system of carbamazepine, saccharin, methanol and water. From the preliminary batch experiment, the relationships among undesired crystal deposition, solution composition decided by mixing ratio of solutions, and residence time for the crystals were considered, and then the conditions of continuous experiment were decided. Under these conditions, the continuous experiment was carried out. The XRD patterns of obtained crystals in the continuous experiment showed that desired cocrystals were obtained without undesired crystals. This experimental result was evaluated by using multi-component phase diagrams from the view point of the operation point's movement. From the evaluation, it was found that there is a certain operation condition which the operation point is fixed with time in the specific domain without the deposition risk of undesired single component crystals. It means the possibility of continuous production of cocrystals without deposition risk of undesired crystals was confirmed by using multi-component phase diagrams.

  18. Research on China's aquaculture efficiency evaluation and influencing factors with undesirable outputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jianyue; Wang, Pingping

    2015-06-01

    Taking the aquaculture area, the number of farming boats and that of aquaculturist as input variables, the aquaculture production as desirable output variable and polluted economic loss as undesirable output variable, this paper conducts SBM model to evaluate the aquaculture efficiency based on the data of 16 aquaculture-developed provinces in China from 2004 to 2011. The results show the efficiency in China has not changed much in recent years with the efficiency values mainly between 0.39 and 0.53, and the efficiency of marine-aquaculture-dominated provinces is generally higher than that of freshwater-aquaculture-dominated ones. To analyze the difference under the efficiency, the panel Tobit model is used with education level factor, training factor, technology extension factor, technical level factor, scale factor and species factor as the efficiency influencing factors. The results show that technology extension factor and technical level factor have significant positive influence.

  19. The application of game theory and cognitive economy to analyze the problem of undesired location

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villani, S.

    2008-01-01

    The analysts of the processes of public bodies decision - taking have long been discussing on the establishment of proper strategies to manage environmental conflicts - above all the so-called problems of undesired location of public works and facilities - efficiently (i.e. on a short-period basis so as to grant decision and agreement stability) and fairly (the parties' satisfaction is itself a further guarantee of decision and agreement stability). Each strategy, anyway, is still in progress, like a universe to create and explore. Therefore, in this paper, we will focus on the analysis of the problem and provide as well some theoretical proposals to arrange a new interpreting model of public bodies decision-taking processes based on the achievements of two new subject-matters: evolutionary game theory and cognitive economy. Both sciences share their investigation field with law and economic science. [it

  20. Undesirable sulphur and carbonyl flavor compounds in UHT milk: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabbia, Alex; Buys, Elna M; De Kock, Henriette L

    2012-01-01

    Ultra High Temperature (UHT) processing leads to the formation of "cooked" and "flat" flavors in milk. These undesirable notes occur due to the volatile formation of a variety of sulphur containing compounds, methyl ketones and aliphatic aldehydes, derived from the constituents of the milk's matrix during thermal processing and storage. The "cooked" flavor of UHT milk is associated with the presence of a variety of sulphur containing compounds while the "stale" flavor is characterized by the dissipation of these sulphur volatiles and an increase of the formation and presence of both methyl ketones and aliphatic aldehydes over time. The extent to which the individual volatiles contribute to the overall flavor of UHT milk is not clear. The proposed formation of these volatiles, that is, the methods to control the intensity of "cooked" and "stale" flavors associated with UHT milk and extraction techniques for the isolation of these volatiles from milk, have been reviewed.

  1. Removing undesirable color and boosting biological activity in red beet extracts using gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Sik; Lee, Eun Mi; Hong, Sung Hyun; Bai, Hyoung Woo; Chung, Byung Yeoup [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, In Chul [Youngdong University, Youngdong (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) is a traditional and popular vegetable distributed in many part of the world and has been used as a natural colorant in many dairy products, beverages, candies and cattle products. Red beet roots contain two groups of betalain pigments, redviolet betacyanins and yellow betaxanthins. Betalains possess several biological activities such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective, and anticancer properities. Recent trend of using natural products in industries tends toward multifunctional, high quality, and highpriced value foods and cosmetics. To meet the needs of consumers, cosmetics, medicine, and foods should contain the proper amount of natural products. Although the color removal processes such as filtration and absorption by clay are still useful, these procedures are difficult, time-consuming and costly. To overcome this problem, the radiation technology has emerged as a new way. Radiation technology has been applied to the decomposition and decoloration of pigment and is an efficient technique for inactivating pathogens, removing undesirable color in biomaterial extracts and improving or maintaining biological activities. Gamma-irradiation and electron beamirradiation techniques in previous reports were applied in order to remove any undesirable color and to improve or maintain biological activities of various extracts such as green tea leaves, licorice root, and S. chinensis fruits. Latorre et al. reported that betacyanin concentration decreased with the irradiation dose and significantly, in 35%, after 2.0 kGy of gamma-ray, whereas betaxathin concentration increased (about 11%-ratio with respect to control) after 1 kGy but decreased (about 19%) after 2 kGy. However, they did not try to analysis for completed removal of red beet pigments. Therefore, it is necessary to find the optimum irradiation dose for entirely removing red pigments in red beet. The aim of this work was to address the effects of the color removal and

  2. Removing undesirable color and boosting biological activity in red beet extracts using gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Sik; Lee, Eun Mi; Hong, Sung Hyun; Bai, Hyoung Woo; Chung, Byung Yeoup; Lee, In Chul

    2011-01-01

    Red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) is a traditional and popular vegetable distributed in many part of the world and has been used as a natural colorant in many dairy products, beverages, candies and cattle products. Red beet roots contain two groups of betalain pigments, redviolet betacyanins and yellow betaxanthins. Betalains possess several biological activities such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective, and anticancer properities. Recent trend of using natural products in industries tends toward multifunctional, high quality, and highpriced value foods and cosmetics. To meet the needs of consumers, cosmetics, medicine, and foods should contain the proper amount of natural products. Although the color removal processes such as filtration and absorption by clay are still useful, these procedures are difficult, time-consuming and costly. To overcome this problem, the radiation technology has emerged as a new way. Radiation technology has been applied to the decomposition and decoloration of pigment and is an efficient technique for inactivating pathogens, removing undesirable color in biomaterial extracts and improving or maintaining biological activities. Gamma-irradiation and electron beamirradiation techniques in previous reports were applied in order to remove any undesirable color and to improve or maintain biological activities of various extracts such as green tea leaves, licorice root, and S. chinensis fruits. Latorre et al. reported that betacyanin concentration decreased with the irradiation dose and significantly, in 35%, after 2.0 kGy of gamma-ray, whereas betaxathin concentration increased (about 11%-ratio with respect to control) after 1 kGy but decreased (about 19%) after 2 kGy. However, they did not try to analysis for completed removal of red beet pigments. Therefore, it is necessary to find the optimum irradiation dose for entirely removing red pigments in red beet. The aim of this work was to address the effects of the color removal and

  3. BETWEEN THE RIGHT AND THE COMMON. HOW GROUPS REACT TO SOCIALLY UNDESIRABLE BEHAVIOUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komendant-Brodowska Agata

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to analyse the relationship between group characteristics and the scope of reaction of the group to socially undesirable behaviour. Sometimes small groups or communities fail to react to undesirable or violent behaviour and their apathy can have devastating consequences. Such a situation can occur among co-workers witnessing workplace mobbing, or neighbours who do not react to a suspicion of domestic violence. Reasons for their inaction are diverse and can include fear, doubts concerning the necessity of such a reaction, and also conformity. In the paper I examine a seemingly favourable situation: I assume that reaction is costless and all the members of the group would like to react (internalised norm, but they also want to conform. In order to analyse the factors that can influence the scope of group reaction, a structurally embedded sequential coordination game was played for different initial conditions. Computer simulations were conducted for networks of a specific type (Erd¨os-R´enyi random graph. The main aim of the analysis was to identify non-structural and structural features of the group that can impede or even block the intervention of the group. There is a positive relationship between the scope of group reaction and the strength of the internalized norm, whereas the level of conformity affects the chances of group intervention in a negative way. Heterogeneity of the group is an important factor - the scope of reaction is higher when members of the group have different levels of norm internalisation and conformity. There is a non-linear relationship between network density and the scope of reaction. Both low and high density can make it harder for people to act.

  4. Climate Change, Disaster Risk, and the Urban Poor : Cities Building Resilience for a Changing World

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Judy L.

    2012-01-01

    Poor people living in slums are at particularly high risk from the impacts of climate change and natural hazards. They live on the most vulnerable land within cities, typically areas deemed undesirable by others and thus affordable. This study analyzes the key challenges facing the urban poor, given the risks associated with climate change and disasters, particularly with regard to the del...

  5. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Paclitaxel Monotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stage, Tore B; Bergmann, Troels K; Kroetz, Deanna L

    2018-01-01

    Paclitaxel is an anticancer agent efficacious in the treatment of ovarian, breast, and lung cancer. Due to a strong link between the pharmacokinetics and therapeutic efficacy of paclitaxel, we reviewed the literature on paclitaxel pharmacokinetics. Systematic data mining was performed to extract ...

  6. Pharmacokinetics of Melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Gögenur, Ismail; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Despite widespread clinical application of melatonin, several unanswered questions remain regarding the pharmacokinetics of this drug. This lack of knowledge may contribute to the inconsistency of results in previous clinical studies. Currently, a t max value of 30-45 min and a t ½elimination of 45...... min are well established. Several questions relate to what constitutes a clinically effective plasma concentration, the choice of ideal administration route, and the optimal method of analysis. Furthermore, investigations of melatonin metabolites in humans are urgently needed in order to characterize...

  7. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of pemetrexed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2011-01-01

    correlates with renal function and it may be safely used with vitamin supplementation in patients with creatinine clearance ≥ 45 ml/min. The pharmacokinetics of pemetrexed is also largely unchanged in third-space fluids and can be feasibly and safely administered in combination with several other cytotoxic...... or targeted agents. It is the author's opinion that pemetrexed is already a valuable cytotoxic agent which has proved useful in several malignancies. However, future trials might expand on the combined use of pemetrexed with other targeted agents that could be beneficial to other selected patients harboring...

  8. Predicting Drug Concentration-Time Profiles in Multiple CNS Compartments Using a Comprehensive Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamamoto, Yumi; Välitalo, Pyry A; Huntjens, Dymphy R; Proost, Johannes H; Vermeulen, An; Krauwinkel, Walter; Beukers, Margot W; van den Berg, Dirk-Jan; Hartman, Robin; Wong, Yin Cheong; Danhof, Meindert; van Hasselt, John G C; de Lange, Elizabeth C M

    2017-01-01

    Drug development targeting the central nervous system (CNS) is challenging due to poor predictability of drug concentrations in various CNS compartments. We developed a generic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for prediction of drug concentrations in physiologically relevant CNS

  9. Undesired small RNAs originate from an artificial microRNA precursor in transgenic petunia (Petunia hybrida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulong Guo

    Full Text Available Although artificial microRNA (amiRNA technology has been used frequently in gene silencing in plants, little research has been devoted to investigating the accuracy of amiRNA precursor processing. In this work, amiRNAchs1 (amiRchs1, based on the Arabidopsis miR319a precursor, was expressed in order to suppress the expression of CHS genes in petunia. The transgenic plants showed the CHS gene-silencing phenotype. A modified 5' RACE technique was used to map small-RNA-directed cleavage sites and to detect processing intermediates of the amiRchs1 precursor. The results showed that the target CHS mRNAs were cut at the expected sites and that the amiRchs1 precursor was processed from loop to base. The accumulation of small RNAs in amiRchs1 transgenic petunia petals was analyzed using the deep-sequencing technique. The results showed that, alongside the accumulation of the desired artificial microRNAs, additional small RNAs that originated from other regions of the amiRNA precursor were also accumulated at high frequency. Some of these had previously been found to be accumulated at low frequency in the products of ath-miR319a precursor processing and some of them were accompanied by 3'-tailing variant. Potential targets of the undesired small RNAs were discovered in petunia and other Solanaceae plants. The findings draw attention to the potential occurrence of undesired target silencing induced by such additional small RNAs when amiRNA technology is used. No appreciable production of secondary small RNAs occurred, despite the fact that amiRchs1 was designed to have perfect complementarity to its CHS-J target. This confirmed that perfect pairing between an amiRNA and its targets is not the trigger for secondary small RNA production. In conjunction with the observation that amiRNAs with perfect complementarity to their target genes show high efficiency and specificity in gene silencing, this finding has an important bearing on future applications of ami

  10. Pharmacokinetics and the analytical chemist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, A C

    1987-03-01

    A prerequisite in pharmacokinetic studies is the development of analytical methods to assay the parent drug and its metabolites in biological fluids. For method development and application, a detailed knowledge of pharmacokinetics is not essential, but familiarity with its fundamental principles and terminology is necessary and helps in interpreting assay results and in interacting more effectively with colleagues who may be specialists in medical or related fields. The purpose of this article is to introduce the basic concepts of pharmacokinetics and some of the biological processes associated with it. Areas relevant to the needs of analytical chemists are discussed.

  11. The presence of undesirable mould species on the surface of dry sausages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesković-Moračanin Slavica M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Transition from manufacture to the industrial way of meat production and processing, as well as contemporary concept of food quality and safety, have led to the application of starter cultures. Their application leads towards the streamlining of the production process in the desired direction, quality improvement and its harmonization, and thereby to its standardization. Application of moulds in the meat industry is based on positive effects of their proteolytic and lipolytic egzoenzymes which, as a consequence, leads to the creation of characteristic sensory properties ('flavor' of fermented products. Penicillium nalgiovense is a typical representative of moulds used in the production of fermented sausages-salamis from our region. Samples of 'zimska salama' (dry sausage, produced with Penicillium nalgiovense, were evaluated as hygienically unacceptable. Their sensory properties changed due to contamination of this mould during the ripening process. Micological analysis discovered the presence of Penicillium aurantiogriseum, which is a frequent mould contaminant in the meat industry. At the same time, thin layer chromatography revealed no possibility of metabolic activity of this mould in the creation of mycotoxins. However, the presence of this mould on the surface of 'zimska salama' is considered as undesirable due to formation of 'off flavor' in products. Such product is considered as hygienically unacceptable and cannot be used for the human consumption.

  12. Study on Operator Actions during the Occurrences of Undesirable Events in PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tom, P.P.; Nurul Husna Zainal Abidin; Lanyau, T.A.; Zaredah Hashim

    2016-01-01

    Due to the recent Fukushima accident, the potential risks at one and only nuclear research reactor in the country, which is the PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor (RTP), has increasingly gain concerns and an attempt on the development of Level 1 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) for this reactor has been commenced. The preliminary scope of the PSA is to analyse the risk of core degradation during normal daily operation due to the random component failure and human error. SPAR-H and THERP method is used for quantifying human error probability (HEP). However, the scopes of this study only cover the qualitative parts that use interview/questionnaire method. The objectives of the questionnaire are to identify the main action for RTP operators when any undesired incident occurs during full power operation that might be caused by random component failures. From the questionnaires that have been conducted, the respondents consisted of 4 licensed operators and 9 trainee operators. All licensed operators have experience of operating reactor for more than 15 years while the trainee operator have been operate the reactor with experience of less than 10 years. Generally, in the event of an abnormal condition involving the reactor, an operator whether a licensed operator or the trainee does not have to ask permission in advance from the top individuals to carry out scram. This is to prevent the situation becoming increasingly severe if the reactor is still operating. With complete training and knowledge derived from the management, an operator can act efficiently in any emergency case. (author)

  13. On the undesired frequency chirping in photonic time-stretch systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuxiao; Chi, Hao; Jin, Tao; Zheng, Shilie; Jin, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Xianmin

    2017-12-01

    The technique of photonic time stretch (PTS) has been intensively investigated in the past decade due to its potential in the acquisition of ultra-high speed signals. The frequency-related RF power fading in the PTS systems with double sideband (DSB) modulation has been well-known, which limits the maximum modulation frequency. Some solutions have been proposed to solve this problem. In this paper, we report another effect, i.e., undesired frequency chirping, which also relates to the performance degradation of PTS systems with DSB modulation, for the first time to our knowledge. Distinct from the nonlinearities caused by nonlinear modulation and square-law photodetection, which is common in radio frequency analog optical links, this frequency chirping originates from the addition of two beating signals with a relative delay after photodetection. A theoretical model for exactly describing the frequency chirping is presented, and is then verified by simulations. Discussion on the method to avoid the frequency chirping is also presented.

  14. Regime Shifts and Ecosystem Service Generation in Swedish Coastal Soft Bottom Habitats: When Resilience is Undesirable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Troell

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Ecosystems can undergo regime shifts where they suddenly change from one state into another.  This can have important implications for formulation of management strategies, if system characteristics develop that are undesirable from a human perspective, and that have a high resistance to restoration efforts. This paper identifies some of the ecological and economic consequences of increased abundance of filamentous algae on shallow soft bottoms along the Swedish west coast. It is suggested that a successive increase in the sediment nutrient pool has undermined the resilience of these shallow systems. After the regime shift has occurred, self-generation properties evolve keeping the system locked in a high-density algae state. The structural and functional characteristics of the new system state differ significantly from the original one, resulting in less valuable ecosystem goods and services generated for society. In Sweden, loss of value results from the reduced capacity for mitigating further coastal eutrophication, reduced habitat quality for commercial fishery species, and the loss of aesthetic and recreational values.

  15. Tracking Progress in Improving Diagnosis: A Framework for Defining Undesirable Diagnostic Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Andrew P J; Graber, Mark L; Singh, Hardeep

    2018-01-29

    Diagnostic error is a prevalent, harmful, and costly phenomenon. Multiple national health care and governmental organizations have recently identified the need to improve diagnostic safety as a high priority. A major barrier, however, is the lack of standardized, reliable methods for measuring diagnostic safety. Given the absence of reliable and valid measures for diagnostic errors, we need methods to help establish some type of baseline diagnostic performance across health systems, as well as to enable researchers and health systems to determine the impact of interventions for improving the diagnostic process. Multiple approaches have been suggested but none widely adopted. We propose a new framework for identifying "undesirable diagnostic events" (UDEs) that health systems, professional organizations, and researchers could further define and develop to enable standardized measurement and reporting related to diagnostic safety. We propose an outline for UDEs that identifies both conditions prone to diagnostic error and the contexts of care in which these errors are likely to occur. Refinement and adoption of this framework across health systems can facilitate standardized measurement and reporting of diagnostic safety.

  16. Pharmacokinetics of Cannabinoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain J McGilveray

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ-9-THC is the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis (marijuana. The present review focuses on the pharmacokinetics of THC, but also includes known information for cannabinol and cannabidiol, as well as the synthetic marketed cannabinoids, dronabinol (synthetic THC and nabilone. The variability of THC in plant material (0.3% to 30% leads to variability in tissue THC levels from smoking, which is, in itself, a highly individual process. THC bioavailability averages 30%. With a 3.55% THC cigarette, a peak plasma level of 152±86.3 ng/mL occured approximately 10 min after inhalation. Oral THC, on the other hand, is only 4% to 12% bioavailable and absorption is highly variable. THC is eliminated from plasma in a multiphasic manner, with low amounts detectable for over one week after dosing. A major active 11-hydroxy metabolite is formed after both inhalation and oral dosing (20% and 100% of parent, respectively. THC is widely distributed, particularly to fatty tissues, but less than 1% of an administered dose reaches the brain, while the spleen and body fat are long-term storage sites. The elimination of THC and its many metabolites (from all routes occurs via the feces and urine. Metabolites persist in the urine and feces for severalweeks. Nabilone is well absorbed and the pharmacokinetics, although variable, appear to be linear from oral doses of 1 mg to 4 mg (these doses show a plasma elimination half-life of approximately 2 h. As with THC, there is a high first-pass effect, and the feces to urine ratio of excretion is similar to other cannabinoids. Pharmacokineticpharmacodynamic modelling with plasma THC versus cardiac and psychotropic effects show that after equilibrium is reached, the intensity of effect is proportional to the plasma THC profile. Clinical trials have found that nabilone produces less tachycardia and less euphoria than THC for a similar antiemetic response.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of procaterol in thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusano, K; Nomura, M; Toju, K; Ishikawa, Y; Minamijima, Y; Yamashita, S; Nagata, S

    2016-06-01

    Procaterol (PCR) is a beta-2-adrenergic bronchodilator widely used in Japanese racehorses for treating lower respiratory disease. The pharmacokinetics of PCR following single intravenous (0.5 μg/kg) and oral (2.0 μg/kg) administrations were investigated in six thoroughbred horses. Plasma and urine concentrations of PCR were measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Plasma PCR concentration following intravenous administration showed a biphasic elimination pattern. The systemic clearance was 0.47 ± 0.16 L/h/kg, the steady-state volume of the distribution was 1.21 ± 0.23 L/kg, and the elimination half-life was 2.85 ± 1.35 h. Heart rate rapidly increased after intravenous administration and gradually decreased thereafter. A strong correlation between heart rate and plasma concentration of PCR was observed. Plasma concentrations of PCR after oral administration were not quantifiable in all horses. Urine concentrations of PCR following intravenous and oral administrations were quantified in all horses until 32 h after administration. Urine PCR concentrations were not significantly different on and after 24 h between intravenous and oral administrations. These results suggest that the bioavailability of orally administrated PCR in horses is very poor, and the drug was eliminated from the body slowly based on urinary concentrations. This report is the first study to demonstrate the pharmacokinetic character of PCR in thoroughbred horses. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Techniques Use by Science, Technology and Mathematics (STM) Teachers for Controlling Undesirable Classroom Behaviours in Anambra State Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinelo, Okigbo Ebele; Nwanneka, Okoli Josephine

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the techniques used by secondary school Science Technology and Mathematics (STM) teachers in controlling undesirable behaviours in their classrooms. It adopted descriptive survey design in which 178 Anambra State teachers teaching STM subjects in senior secondary were involved in the research. Two sections of questionnaire…

  19. The Emperor’s New Clothing: National Responses to “Undesirable and Unreturnable” Aliens under Asylum and Immigration Law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cantor, David James; van Wijk, J.; Singer, Sarah; Bolhuis, M.P.

    2017-01-01

    The “scandal” of foreign criminals whom our governments cannot send back to their own countries has become something of a tabloid obsession. Yet, while suspected or convicted of serious crimes or considered to pose a danger to society, such “undesirable and unreturnable” aliens equally often

  20. Phosphate binders affect vitamin K concentration by undesired binding, an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neradova, A; Schumacher, S P; Hubeek, I; Lux, P; Schurgers, L J; Vervloet, M G

    2017-05-02

    Vascular calcification is a major contributing factor to mortality in end stage renal disease (ESRD). Despite the efficacy of phosphate binders to improve hyperphosphatemia, data on vascular calcification are less clear. There seems to be a difference in attenuation or delay in progression between different binders. In this in vitro experiment we tested whether phosphate binders could limit bioavailability of vitamin K2 by undesired binding. Vitamin K-deficiency limits activation of the vascular tissue mineralization inhibitor matrix γ-carboxyglutamate (Gla) protein (MGP) thereby exacerbating vascular calcification. In this experiment vitamin K2 (menaquinone-7; MK-7) binding was assessed by adding 1 mg of vitamin K2 to a medium with pH 6 containing 67 mg phosphate binder with either 7 mg of phosphate or no phosphate. Five different phosphate binders were tested. After five and a half hours vitamin K was analyzed by HPLC. All experiments were performed in triplicate. Sucroferric-oxyhydroxide and sevelamer carbonate did not significantly bind vitamin K2, both in solution only containing vitamin K2 or in combination with phosphate. Calcium acetate/magnesium carbonate binds vitamin K2 strongly both in absence (p = 0.001) and presence of phosphate (p = 0.003). Lanthanum carbonate significantly binds vitamin K2 in solution containing only vitamin K2 (p = 0.005) whereas no significant binding of vitamin K2 was observed in the solution containing vitamin K2 and phosphate (p = 0.462). Calcium carbonate binds vitamin K2 significantly in a solution with vitamin K2 and phosphate (p = 0.009) whereas without phosphate no significant binding of vitamin K2 was observed (p = 0.123). Sucroferric-oxyhydroxide and sevelamer carbonate were the only binders of the five binders studied that did not bind vitamin K2 in vitro. The presence or absence of phosphate significantly interferes with vitamin K2 binding so phosphate binders could potentially limit

  1. Pharmacokinetic studies of neuromuscular blocking agents: Good Clinical Research Practice (GCRP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viby-Mogensen, J.; Østergaard, D.; Donati, F.

    2000-01-01

    Good Clinical Research Practice (GCRP), neuromuscular blocking agents, pharmacokinetics, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling, population pharmacokinetics, statistics, study design......Good Clinical Research Practice (GCRP), neuromuscular blocking agents, pharmacokinetics, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling, population pharmacokinetics, statistics, study design...

  2. Raltegravir Pharmacokinetics during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, D. Heather; Stek, Alice; Best, Brookie M.; Wang, Jiajia; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Cressey, Tim R.; Aweeka, Francesca; Lizak, Patty; Kreitchmann, Regis; Burchett, Sandra K.; Shapiro, David E.; Hawkins, Elizabeth; Smith, Elizabeth; Mirochnick, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the pharmacokinetics (pk) of raltegravir in HIV-infected women during pregnancy and postpartum. Methods IMPAACT 1026s is an on-going prospective study of antiretroviral pk during pregnancy (NCT00042289). Women receiving 400 mg raltegravir twice daily in combination antiretroviral therapy had intensive steady state 12-hour pk profiles performed during pregnancy and at 6–12 weeks postpartum. Targets were trough concentration above 0.035 µg/mL, the estimated tenth percentile in non-pregnant historical controls. Results Median raltegravir AUC was 6.6 µg*hr/mL for second trimester (n= 16), 5.4 µg*hr/mL for third trimester (n=41), and 11.6 µg*hr/mL postpartum (n= 38) (p=0.03 pp vs 2nd trimester, p=0.001 pp vs third trimester). Trough concentrations were above the target in 69%, 80%, and 79% of second trimester, third trimester and postpartum subjects respectively, with wide variability (raltegravir concentrations was 1.5. HIV RNA levels were raltegravir AUC was reduced by approximately 50% during pregnancy; trough concentrations were frequently below target both during late pregnancy and postpartum. Raltegravir readily crossed the placenta. High rates of viral suppression at delivery and the lack of a clear relationship between raltegravir concentration and virologic effect in nonpregnant adults suggest that despite the decreased exposure during pregnancy, a higher dose is not necessary. PMID:25162818

  3. Modelling delays in pharmacokinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooqi, Z.H.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    Linear system analysis has come to form the backbone of pharmacokinetics. Natural systems usually involve time delays, thus models incorporating them would be an order closer approximation to the real world compared to those that do not. Delays may be modelled in several ways. The approach considered in this study is to have a discrete-time delay dependent rate with the delay respresenting the duration between the entry of a drug into a compartment and its release in some form (may be as a metabolite) from the compartment. Such a delay may be because of one or more of several physiological reasons, like, formation of a reservoir, slow metabolism, or receptor binding. The mathematical structure this gives rise to is a system of delay-differential equations. Examples are given of simple one and two compartment systems with drugs like bumetanide, carbamazepine, and quinolone-caffeine interaction. In these examples generally a good fit is obtained and the suggested models form a good approximation. 21 refs., 6 figs

  4. Pharmacokinetics of mequindox after intravenous and intramuscular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    Studies on the pharmacokinetics of quinocetone in pigs and chickens. Acta Veterinaria et Zootechnica Sinica. 34: 94-97. Li JY, Zhou XZ, Li JS, Zhao RC, Miao XL, Zhang JY (2005). The pharmacokinetics of quinocetone in pigs. Chin. J. Vet. Drug, 39: 1-3. Liu CX (2003). Practice pharmacokinetics, 1st ed. China Science and.

  5. Exploiting the Poor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp Justesen, Mogens; Bjørnskov, Christian

    2014-01-01

    While extant research has focused on the causes and consequences of corruption at the macro-level, less effort has been devoted to understanding the micro-foundation of corruption. We argue that poor people are more likely to be victims of corrupt behavior by street-level bureaucrats as the poor ...

  6. Inference in `poor` languages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, S.

    1996-10-01

    Languages with a solvable implication problem but without complete and consistent systems of inference rules (`poor` languages) are considered. The problem of existence of finite complete and consistent inference rule system for a ``poor`` language is stated independently of the language or rules syntax. Several properties of the problem arc proved. An application of results to the language of join dependencies is given.

  7. UNDESIRED REACTIONS AT THE UROGRAPHY IN THE CORRELATION OF THE IODIC AND THE NON-TODIC CONTRAST MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rade R. Babić

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the undesired reactions at 6053 urographies (IVU in thecorrelation of the iodic and the non-iodic contrast media (ICM.Depending on the allergological status the ICM (iodic or non-iodic is chosenfor the sake of carrying out an urographic examination as well as the necessarypremedication measures.The undesired reactions to the TCM are registered in 4,87% (1:20 TVU,namely in 5,6% (1:17 TVU to the iodic and in 2,39% (1:41 IVU to the non-iodicICM.At the intravenous application of the iodic ICM at the IVU the undesiredreactions are registered for2,4 times more often than at the application of the non-iodicICM.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of macrolides in foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarino, N; Martín-Jiménez, T

    2013-02-01

    Macrolides are used for treatment of pneumonia and extrapulmonary conditions caused by Rhodococcus equi. In foals, macrolides have an extraordinary capacity to accumulate in different lung tissue compartments. These drugs show unique pharmacokinetic features such as rapid and extensive distribution and long persistence in pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (PELF) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells from foals. This article reviews the pharmacokinetic characteristics of erythromycin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, tulathromycin, telithromycin, gamithromycin, and tilmicosin in foals, with emphasis on PELF and BAL cell concentrations. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Ofloxacin pharmacokinetics in renal failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Fillastre, J P; Leroy, A; Humbert, G

    1987-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of ofloxacin were investigated in 12 normal subjects and 21 uremic patients after the administration of a single oral 200-mg dose. An open three-compartment body model was used to calculate ofloxacin pharmacokinetic parameters. In healthy subjects, the peak plasma level averaged 2.24 +/- 0.90 micrograms/ml and was obtained at 0.83 +/- 0.31 h. The absorption rate constant was 4.22 +/- 1.64 h-1. The terminal half-life was 7.86 +/- 1.81 h. The apparent volume of distribution...

  10. Pharmacokinetics of mitragynine in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trakulsrichai, Satariya; Sathirakul, Korbtham; Auparakkitanon, Saranya; Krongvorakul, Jatupon; Sueajai, Jetjamnong; Noumjad, Nantida; Sukasem, Chonlaphat; Wananukul, Winai

    2015-01-01

    Kratom, known botanically as Mitragyna speciosa (Korth.), is an indigenous tree in Southeast Asia. Kratom is currently easily available worldwide via special shops and the Internet to use as a drug of abuse, opioid alternative, or pain killer. So far, the pharmacokinetics of this plant has been studied only in animals, and there is no such study in humans. The major abundant active alkaloid in Kratom, mitragynine, is one of the promising new chemical substances to be developed as a new drug. The aim of this study was to examine the pharmacokinetics of mitragynine and assess the linearity in pharmacokinetics in chronic users. Since Kratom is illegal in Thailand, studies in healthy subjects would be unethical. We therefore conducted a prospective study by enrolling ten chronic, regular, healthy users. We adjusted the steady state in each subject by giving a known amount of Kratom tea for 7 days before commencement of the experiment. We admitted and gave different oral doses to subjects to confirm linearity in pharmacokinetics. The mitragynine blood concentrations at 17 times points and the urine concentrations during the 24-hour period were collected and measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Ten male subjects completed the study without adverse reactions. The median duration of abuse was 1.75 years. We analyzed one subject separately due to the abnormal behavior of blood concentration. From data of nine subjects, the pharmacokinetic parameters established were time to reach the maximum plasma concentration (0.83±0.35 hour), terminal half-life (23.24±16.07 hours), and the apparent volume of distribution (38.04±24.32 L/kg). The urine excretion of unchanged form was 0.14%. The pharmacokinetics were observed to be oral two-compartment model. This was the first pharmacokinetic study in humans, which demonstrated linearity and was consistent with the oral two-compartment model with a terminal half-life of about 1 day. The pharmacokinetic

  11. Order and control in the environment: Exploring the effects on undesired behaviour and the importance of locus of control

    OpenAIRE

    Jansen, A.M.; Giebels, Ellen; van Rompay, Thomas Johannes Lucas; Austrup, Sebastian; Junger, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed at gaining more insight into the combined influence of environmental factors and personal vulnerability to environmental cues on cheating behaviour in a task-related indoor setting. We propose that a disorderly environment increases cheating as it implicitly signals that undesirable behaviours are common. Camera presence is expected to buffer these effects. We included locus of control (LOC) as a personality variable, as we expected individuals with an external LOC to...

  12. Pharmacokinetic Studies of Oxathio-Heterocycle Fused Chalcones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoniewska, Krystyna; Konieczny, Marek T; Lemke, Krzysztof; Grabowski, Tomasz

    2017-02-01

    Chalcone constitutes one of the most used molecular frameworks in medicinal chemistry and its derivatives exhibit a broad spectrum of biological activities. Low absolute bioavailability, poor distribution, intensive metabolism and elimination of chalcones are the main problems in designing new drugs based on their structure. One of the fundamental steps in evaluation of drug candidates is a comparative analysis of pharmacokinetic parameters. The aim of the studies was the pharmacokinetic characterization of the selected oxathio-heterocycle fused chalcones. The pharmacokinetic parameters of 19 compounds were reported. The analyzed chalcones were examined after a single intravenous administration to forty 7-week-old mature male rats of Wistar stock. Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed independently using SHAM (slopes, highest, amounts, and moments) and the two-compartment model. Basic physiochemical parameters were calculated. The bioanalytical methods were validated in terms of repeatability, linearity, accuracy, precision, and selectivity. The pharmacokinetics of the examined group of chalcones are compatible with the two-compartment model. The physicochemical characteristics of this group are quite homogeneous. The kinetics of the examined chalcones are indicative of a distribution to the tissue compartment with the predominance of a rate constant from central to peripheral compartments (k 12 ) over the rate constant from peripheral to central compartments (k 21 ). The elimination from the central compartment (k 10 ) is higher than the transfer from the central compartment to the tissues (k 10  > k 12 ) in almost all examined cases. The presented group of compounds may form a starting point for studies into drugs treating autoimmune diseases of the gastro-intestinal tract.

  13. A pharmacokinetic comparison of two voriconazole formulations and the effect of CYP2C19 polymorphism on their pharmacokinetic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyewon; Lee, Howard; Han, Hye Kyung; An, Hyungmi; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Yong Jin; Cho, Joo-Youn; Yoon, Seo Hyun; Jang, In-Jin; Yu, Kyung-Sang

    2015-01-01

    SYP-1018 is a lyophilized polymeric nanoparticle formulation of voriconazole that is under development for intravenous dosing. This study compared the pharmacokinetic and tolerability profiles of SYP-1018 with those of Vfend(®), the marketed formulation of voriconazole. The effect of CYP2C19 polymorphism on the voriconazole pharmacokinetics was also evaluated. An open-label, two-treatment, two-period, two-sequence crossover study was conducted in 52 healthy male volunteers, who randomly received a single intravenous infusion of either of the two voriconazole formulations at 200 mg. Blood samples were collected up to 24 hours after drug administration for pharmacokinetic analysis. The plasma concentrations of voriconazole were determined using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, and the pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated using a noncompartmental method. CYP2C19 genotype was identified in 51 subjects. The geometric mean ratio (90% confidence interval) of SYP-1018 to Vfend(®) was 0.99 (0.93-1.04) for the maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax) and 0.97 (0.92-1.01) for the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) from dosing to the last quantifiable concentration (AUClast). Nineteen homozygous extensive metabolizers (EMs, *1/*1), 19 intermediate metabolizers (IMs, *1/*2 or *1/*3), and ten poor metabolizers (PMs, *2/*2, *2/*3, or *3/*3) were identified, and the pharmacokinetic comparability between SYP-1018 and Vfend(®) was also noted when analyzed separately by genotype. The systemic exposure to voriconazole was greatest in the PM group, followed by the IM, and then the EM groups. Furthermore, the intrasubject variability for Cmax and AUClast was greater in IMs and PMs than in EMs. No serious adverse event occurred, and both treatments were well tolerated. SYP-1018 had comparable pharmacokinetic and tolerability profiles to Vfend(®) after a single intravenous infusion. CYP2C19 genotype affected not only the pharmacokinetics of voriconazole

  14. [Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of ceftaroline].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Santiago; Sorlí, Luisa; Luque, Sonia

    2014-03-01

    Ceftaroline is administered intravenously in the form of a prodrug, ceftaroline fosamil, which is rapidly hydrolyzed by plasma phosphatases to its active form, ceftaroline. In general, the pharmacokinetics of ceftaroline differ little from those of other cephalosporins. A proportional increase in both the peak plasma concentration (Cmax) and the area under the curve (AUC) have been observed when the drug is administered in increasing doses, which demonstrates its linear pharmacokinetics. Half the dose of ceftaroline is excreted actively through the kidneys. The pharmacokinetic parameters of ceftaroline administered through the intramuscular route in diverse animal species were similar to those observed when the drug was administered intravenously and consequently clinical research into ceftaroline administered through this alternative route would be appropriate. Patients with moderate-severe alterations of renal function and those undergoing hemodialysis require dose adjustments. There is limited experience of the pharmacokinetics of ceftaroline in children, which has given rise to several schedules stratified by age groups. The pharmacodynamics of the drug have been studied in models of animal infection and in in vitro infections caused mainly by Staphylococcus aureus (including methicillin-resistant S. aureus [MRSA], strains with intermediate vancomycin sensitivity [hVISA or hGISA]) and by Streptococcus pneumoniae strains with distinct sensitivities to penicillin. Because ceftaroline is a time-dependent antibiotic, the most widely studied pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) indicator is the time interval during which drug concentrations are maintained above the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), calculated both as total drug (T > MIC) and as free fraction of the drug (fT > MIC). The PK/PD simulations carried out in these models, developed on the basis of the concentrations obtained with routine doses in humans, have shown that ceftaroline has a good PK

  15. Pharmacokinetic assessment in patients receiving continuous RRT: perspectives from the Kidney Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolin, Thomas D; Aronoff, George R; Fissell, William H; Jain, Lokesh; Madabushi, Rajnikanth; Reynolds, Kellie; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Shiew Mei; Mehrotra, Rajnish; Flessner, Michael F; Leypoldt, John K; Witcher, Jennifer W; Zineh, Issam; Archdeacon, Patrick; Roy-Chaudhury, Prabir; Goldstein, Stuart L

    2015-01-07

    The effect of AKI and modern continuous RRT (CRRT) methods on drug disposition (pharmacokinetics) and response has been poorly studied. Pharmaceutical manufacturers have little incentive to perform pharmacokinetic studies in patients undergoing CRRT because such studies are neither recommended in existing US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidance documents nor required for new drug approval. Action is urgently needed to address the knowledge deficit. The Kidney Health Initiative has assembled a work group composed of clinicians and scientists representing academia, the FDA, and the pharmaceutical and dialysis industries with expertise related to pharmacokinetics, AKI, and/or CRRT. The work group critically evaluated key considerations in the assessment of pharmacokinetics and drug dosing in CRRT, practical constraints related to conducting pharmacokinetic studies in critically ill patients, and the generalizability of observations made in the context of specific CRRT prescriptions and specific patient populations in order to identify efficient study designs capable of addressing the knowledge deficit without impeding drug development. Considerations for the standardized assessment of pharmacokinetics and development of corresponding drug dosing recommendations in critically ill patients with AKI receiving CRRT are proposed. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  16. Evaluation of pharmacokinetics underlies the collaborated usage of lamivudine and oxymatrine in beagle dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenbao Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Combinational therapy of lamivudine and oxymatrine has been employed in the battle against hepatitis B virus in clinical setting. However, the pharmacokinetic behavior of the drug or active metabolism in intravenous/oral co-administration regime is poorly investigated. Herein, we evaluated the pharmacokinetic characteristic through a tailor-designed 3 way crossover-Latin square experiment in adult male beagle dogs. Six dogs were randomly treated by intravenous administration of lamivudine (2.5 mg/kg, oxymatrine (15 mg/kg and combinational dosage, named as intravenous regime. Meanwhile the other six dogs were orally administrated with lamivudine (2.5 mg/kg, oxymatrine (15 mg/kg and combinational dosage, named as oral regime. The pharmacokinetic feature in simultaneous oral treatment appeared to have no significant difference when compared with individual administration, even including matrine, the active metabolite of oxymatrine. In intravenous regime, the main pharmacokinetic parameters of simultaneous administration were nearly consistent with intravenous regime remedy. The collaborated application of lamivudine and oxymatrine contributed to non-distinctive pharmacokinetic fluctuations of beagle dogs in intravenous/oral regime, compared with individual employment, which established a vital base for the clinical co-administration against hepatitis B. Furthermore, the present study demonstrated that the determination of pharmacokinetics between combinational and individual therapy might assist in the development of drug compatibility in clinical therapy.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of mitragynine in man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trakulsrichai S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Satariya Trakulsrichai,1,2 Korbtham Sathirakul,3,4 Saranya Auparakkitanon,5 Jatupon Krongvorakul,5 Jetjamnong Sueajai,5 Nantida Noumjad,5 Chonlaphat Sukasem,5 Winai Wananukul2,6 1Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, 2Ramathibodi Poison Center, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, 3Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 4Center for Drug Research Discovery and Development, Thammasat Univerisity, Prathumthani, Thailand; 5Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, 6Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand Background: Kratom, known botanically as Mitragyna speciosa (Korth., is an indigenous tree in Southeast Asia. Kratom is currently easily available worldwide via special shops and the Internet to use as a drug of abuse, opioid alternative, or pain killer. So far, the pharmacokinetics of this plant has been studied only in animals, and there is no such study in humans. The major abundant active alkaloid in Kratom, mitragynine, is one of the promising new chemical substances to be developed as a new drug. The aim of this study was to examine the pharmacokinetics of mitragynine and assess the linearity in pharmacokinetics in chronic users.Methods: Since Kratom is illegal in Thailand, studies in healthy subjects would be unethical. We therefore conducted a prospective study by enrolling ten chronic, regular, healthy users. We adjusted the steady state in each subject by giving a known amount of Kratom tea for 7 days before commencement of the experiment. We admitted and gave different oral doses to subjects to confirm linearity in pharmacokinetics. The mitragynine blood concentrations at 17 times points and the urine concentrations during the 24-hour period were collected and measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Results: Ten male subjects completed

  18. Using the incidence and impact of behavioural conditions in guide dogs to investigate patterns in undesirable behaviour in dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Caron-Lormier, Geoffrey; Harvey, Naomi D.; England, Gary C.W.; Asher, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    The domestic dog is one of our most popular companions and longest relationships, occupying different roles, from pet to working guide dog for the blind. As dogs age different behavioural issues occur and in some cases dogs may be relinquished or removed from their working service. Here we analyse a dataset on working guide dogs that were removed from their service between 1994 and 2013. We use the withdrawal reasons as a proxy for the manifestation of undesirable behaviour. More than 7,500 d...

  19. 9. Poor medication

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sitwala

    Majority (60%) of the patients were reviewed at least twice in the last 6 months at the time of the interview. 195 (83%) patients reported that drugs prescribed were not available at the hospital pharmacy, but 186 (79%) of. Factors Associated With Poor Medication Adherence. In Hypertensive Patients In Lusaka, Zambia. 1,4. 1.

  20. A poor deal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breman, J.

    2010-01-01

    The proposed upward revision of the poverty line has failed to capture the Janus-faced deprivation experienced by the poor. The methodological foundation of the proposed poverty line fails to overcome the discrepancy between the macro-statistics and the micro-reality. The proposed report on the

  1. Becoming poor in Ghana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    income related, in order to bring their consumption below the poverty line for a short or long time. Keywords: .... Ten short cases of families that have become poor in an urban setting in Ghana will be pre- sented. ..... farm, together with higher prices on both inputs and necessary consumer goods, forced him to sell part of the ...

  2. Morphosyntax in Poor Comprehenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlof, Suzanne M.; Catts, Hugh W.

    2015-01-01

    Children described as "poor comprehenders" (PCs) have reading comprehension difficulties in spite of adequate word reading abilities. PCs are known to display weakness with semantics and higher-level aspects of oral language, but less is known about their grammatical skills, especially with regard to morphosyntax. The purpose of this…

  3. Pharmacokinetics of escin Ia in rats after intravenous administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiu-Jun; Cui, Xiang-Yong; Tian, Lian-tian; Gao, Feng; Guan, Xin; Gu, Jing-Kai

    2014-10-28

    Escin, a natural mixture of triterpene saponins, is commonly utilized for the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency, hemorrhoids, inflammation and edema. Escin Ia is the chief active ingredient in escin and plays key role in mediating its pharmacological effects. Adequate pharmacokinetic data are essential for proper application of escin agent in clinical practice. However, pharmacokinetic properties of escin Ia are still poorly understood and this conflicts with the growing use of escin agent over the years. The goal of this study is to investigate the pharmacokinetic behavior of escin Ia in rats after low, medium and high-dose intravenous administration. Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups (n=6 per group) and escin Ia was administered via the caudal vein at doses of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg, respectively. Subsequently, the concentrations of escin Ia and its metabolite isoescin Ia, a positional isomer of escin Ia, in rats׳ plasma were measured by an established liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method at various time points following the administration of the drug. Main pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by non-compartmental analysis using the TopFit 2.0 software package (Thomae GmbH, Germany). After intravenous administration, the Cmax and AUC of escin Ia increased in a dose-proportional manner at the dose of 0.5 mg/kg and 1.0 mg/kg, while increased in a more than dose-proportional manner at the doses of 1.0 mg/kg and 2.0 mg/kg. The t₁/₂ was significantly longer with increased intravenous doses, while other parameters such as CL and Vd also exhibit disagreement among three doses. Taken together, our data showed dose-dependent pharmacokinetic profile of escin Ia in rats after intravenous administration at the doses of 0.5-2.0 mg/kg. After intravenous administration, escin Ia was rapidly and extensively converted to isoescin Ia. The results suggested dose-dependent pharmacokinetics of escin Ia at the doses of 0.5-2.0 mg

  4. Pharmacokinetics of gamithromycin in pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Wyns, Heidi; Meyer, Evelyne; Plessers, Elke; Watteyn, Anneleen; De Baere, Siegrid; De Backer, Patrick; Croubels, Siska

    2012-01-01

    Objectives : Gamithromycin, a 15-membered semi-synthetic macrolide antibiotic of the azalide subclass, has recently been developed for the treatment and prevention of bovine respiratory disease (BRD). Besides the anti-infectious properties, macrolides have frequently been reported to be able to influence various inflammatory processes, such as the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediators. The aim of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of gamithrom...

  5. Population Pharmacokinetics of Intranasal Scopolamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L.; Chow, D. S. L.; Putcha, L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: An intranasal gel dosage formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness (SMS).The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) was evaluated using data collected in Phase II IND protocols. We reported earlier statistically significant gender differences in PK parameters of INSCOP at a dose level of 0.4 mg. To identify covariates that influence PK parameters of INSCOP, we examined population covariates of INSCOP PK model for 0.4 mg dose. Methods: Plasma scopolamine concentrations versus time data were collected from 20 normal healthy human subjects (11 male/9 female) after a 0.4 mg dose. Phoenix NLME was employed for PK analysis of these data using gender, body weight and age as covariates for model selection. Model selection was based on a likelihood ratio test on the difference of criteria (-2LL). Statistical significance for base model building and individual covariate analysis was set at P less than 0.05{delta(-2LL)=3.84}. Results: A one-compartment pharmacokinetic model with first-order elimination best described INSCOP concentration ]time profiles. Inclusion of gender, body weight and age as covariates individually significantly reduced -2LL by the cut-off value of 3.84(P less than 0.05) when tested against the base model. After the forward stepwise selection and backward elimination steps, gender was selected to add to the final model which had significant influence on absorption rate constant (ka) and the volume of distribution (V) of INSCOP. Conclusion: A population pharmacokinetic model for INSCOP has been identified and gender was a significant contributing covariate for the final model. The volume of distribution and Ka were significantly higher in males than in females which confirm gender-dependent pharmacokinetics of scopolamine after administration of a 0.4 mg dose.

  6. A dosimetric system for the evaluation of undesired neutron dose in radiotherapy treatments with protons: experimental method and MC simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanini, A. [INFN, Torino (Italy); Fasolo, F.; Ongaro, C.; Durisi, E. [Torino Univ., Torino (Italy). Dipartimento di Fisica Sperimentale; Nastasi, U. [Ospedale S. Giovanni, Torino (Italy); Scielzo, G.; Fabris, M. [IRCC, Candiolo (Italy); Burn, K.W. [ENEA ERGSPIEC, Bologna (Italy)

    2002-07-01

    Linear accelerator is nowadays the most used radiotherapy device to treat tumour disease. In a number of cases secondary malignancies, due to the undesired dose delivered to the patient, could arise. The optimization of radiotherapy treatment can be obtained only through an accurate evaluation of the undesired dose. A method is presented to evaluate the photoneutron dose produced by GDR during cancer radiotherapy with energetic proton beams. It consists of a computer simulation code based on MCNP4B, in which the new routine GAMMAN was implemented, for the accurate study of photoneutron production in high Z and low Z elements. An experimental technique, based on a bubble passive spectrometer, allows direct measurements of photoneutron spectra at the patient plane, also inside the treatment zone. For the evaluation of neutron contribution to the dose at clinical organs, a new anthropomorphic phantom has been designed and realized, following ICRP60 recommendations. The results are presented for medical accelerators, equipped both with traditional collimator system and with multi leaf collimators.

  7. Evaluation of input output efficiency of oil field considering undesirable output —A case study of sandstone reservoir in Xinjiang oilfield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuying; Wu, Xuquan; Li, Deshan; Xu, Yadong; Song, Shulin

    2017-06-01

    Based on the input and output data of sandstone reservoir in Xinjiang oilfield, the SBM-Undesirable model is used to study the technical efficiency of each block. Results show that: the model of SBM-undesirable to evaluate its efficiency and to avoid defects caused by traditional DEA model radial angle, improve the accuracy of the efficiency evaluation. by analyzing the projection of the oil blocks, we find that each block is in the negative external effects of input redundancy and output deficiency benefit and undesirable output, and there are greater differences in the production efficiency of each block; the way to improve the input-output efficiency of oilfield is to optimize the allocation of resources, reduce the undesirable output and increase the expected output.

  8. Negative symbolic aspects in destination branding: exploring the role of the 'undesired self' on web-based vacation information search intentions among potential first-time visitors

    OpenAIRE

    Bosnjak, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Tourist destination choices depend, among other factors, on the match between the destination’s personality image and consumers’ self-concept, in line with self-image congruence theory. Motives also mediate this relationship, yet tourism research largely neglects the influence of avoidance motives. This study applies the product-based construct of undesired congruity, or consumers’ tendency to avoid undesired stereotypical images, to the context of web-based vacation destination information s...

  9. Savings for the Poor

    OpenAIRE

    Ignacio Mas

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the relevance of formal financial services – in particular, savings – to poor people, the economic factors that have hindered the mass-scale delivery of such services in developing countries, and the technology-based opportunities that exist today to make massive gains in financial inclusion. It also highlights the benefits to government from universal financial access, as well as the key policy enablers that would need to be put in place to allow the necessary innovati...

  10. Nanofluids and chemical highly retentive hydrogels for controlled and selective removal of overpaintings and undesired graffiti from street art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, Rodorico; Baglioni, Michele; Baglioni, Piero

    2017-06-01

    One of the main problems connected to the conservation of street art is the selective removal of overlying undesired graffiti, i.e., drawings and tags. Unfortunately, selective and controlled removal of graffiti and overpaintings from street art is almost unachievable using traditional methodologies. Recently, the use of nanofluids confined in highly retentive pHEMA/PVP semi-interpenetrated polymer networks was proposed. Here, we report on the selective removal of acrylic overpaintings from a layer of acrylic paint on mortar mockups in laboratory tests. The results of the cleaning tests were characterized by visual and photographic observation, optical microscopy, and FT-IR microreflectance investigation. It was shown that this methodology represents a major advancement with respect to the use of nonconfined neat solvents.

  11. Diamagnetic composite material structure for reducing undesired electromagnetic interference and eddy currents in dielectric wall accelerators and other devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporaso, George J.; Poole, Brian R.; Hawkins, Steven A.

    2015-06-30

    The devices, systems and techniques disclosed here can be used to reduce undesired effects by magnetic field induced eddy currents based on a diamagnetic composite material structure including diamagnetic composite sheets that are separated from one another to provide a high impedance composite material structure. In some implementations, each diamagnetic composite sheet includes patterned conductor layers are separated by a dielectric material and each patterned conductor layer includes voids and conductor areas. The voids in the patterned conductor layers of each diamagnetic composite sheet are arranged to be displaced in position from one patterned conductor layer to an adjacent patterned conductor layer while conductor areas of the patterned conductor layers collectively form a contiguous conductor structure in each diamagnetic composite sheet to prevent penetration by a magnetic field.

  12. Drug Transport and Pharmacokinetics for Chemical Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Laurent; Kanneganti, Kumud; Kim, Kwang Seok

    2010-01-01

    Experiments in continuous-stirred vessels were proposed to introduce methods in pharmacokinetics and drug transport to chemical engineering students. The activities can be incorporated into the curriculum to illustrate fundamentals learned in the classroom. An appreciation for the role of pharmacokinetics in drug discovery will also be gained…

  13. Glipizide Pharmacokinetics in Healthy and Diabetic Volunteers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    11800, Penang, Malaysia, 4Ministry of Health, Government of Pakistan. Abstract. Purpose: Disease state may contribute to alteration in drug pharmacokinetics. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) on the pharmacokinetics of glipizide. Methods: An open ...

  14. Personalized therapeutics for levofloxacin: a focus on pharmacokinetic concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chu-Han; Yu, Lu-Shan; Zeng, Su; Huang, Yu-Wen; Zhou, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Personalized medicine should be encouraged because patients are complex, and this complexity results from biological, medical (eg, demographics, genetics, polypharmacy, and multimorbidities), socioeconomic, and cultural factors. Levofloxacin (LVX) is a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotic. Awareness of personalized therapeutics for LVX seems to be poor in clinical practice, and is reflected in prescribing patterns. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies have raised concerns about suboptimal patient outcomes with the use of LVX for some Gram-negative infections. Meanwhile, new findings in LVX therapeutics have only been sporadically reported in recent years. Therefore, an updated review on personalized LVX treatment with a focus on pharmacokinetic concerns is necessary. Relevant literature was identified by performing a PubMed search covering the period from January 1993 to December 2013. We included studies describing dosage adjustment and factors determining LVX pharmacokinetics, or pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies exploring how best to prevent the emergence of resistance to LVX. The full text of each included article was critically reviewed, and data interpretation was performed. In addition to limiting the use of fluoroquinolones, measures such as reducing the breakpoints for antimicrobial susceptibility testing, choice of high-dose short-course of once-daily LVX regimen, and tailoring LVX dose in special patient populations help to achieve the validated pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic target and combat the increasing LVX resistance. Obese individuals with normal renal function cleared LVX more efficiently than normal-weight individuals. Compared with the scenario in healthy subjects, standard 2-hour spacing of calcium formulations and oral LVX was insufficient to prevent a chelation interaction in cystic fibrosis patients. Inconsistent conclusions were derived from studies of the influence of sex on the pharmacokinetics of LVX, which might be

  15. Pharmacokinetic parameters explain the therapeutic activity of antimicrobial agents in a silkworm infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Atmika; Panthee, Suresh; Urai, Makoto; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Ohwada, Tomohiko; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2018-01-25

    Poor pharmacokinetic parameters are a major reason for the lack of therapeutic activity of some drug candidates. Determining the pharmacokinetic parameters of drug candidates at an early stage of development requires an inexpensive animal model with few associated ethical issues. In this study, we used the silkworm infection model to perform structure-activity relationship studies of an antimicrobial agent, GPI0039, a novel nitrofuran dichloro-benzyl ester, and successfully identified compound 5, a nitrothiophene dichloro-benzyl ester, as a potent antimicrobial agent with superior therapeutic activity in the silkworm infection model. Further, we compared the pharmacokinetic parameters of compound 5 with a nitrothiophene benzyl ester lacking chlorine, compound 7, that exerted similar antimicrobial activity but had less therapeutic activity in silkworms, and examined the metabolism of these antimicrobial agents in human liver fractions in vitro. Compound 5 had appropriate pharmacokinetic parameters, such as an adequate half-life, slow clearance, large area under the curve, low volume of distribution, and long mean residence time, compared with compound 7, and was slowly metabolized by human liver fractions. These findings suggest that the therapeutic effectiveness of an antimicrobial agent in the silkworms reflects appropriate pharmacokinetic properties.

  16. Population pharmacokinetics of pentobarbital in neonates, infants, and children after open heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuppa, Athena F; Nicolson, Susan C; Barrett, Jeffrey S; Gastonguay, Marc R

    2011-09-01

    To determine the pharmacokinetics of pentobarbital in neonates, infants, and young children with congenital heart disease after open-heart surgery. Thirty-five subjects (3.0 days-4.4 years) after open-heart surgery who received pentobarbital as standard of care were enrolled. Serial pharmacokinetic blood samples were obtained. A population-based, nonlinear mixed-effects modeling approach was used to characterize pentobarbital pharmacokinetics. A two-compartment model with weight as a co-variate allometrically expressed on clearance (CL), inter-compartmental clearance, central (V1) and peripheral volume of distributions, bypass grafting time as a co-variate on CL and V1, and age and ventricular physiology as co-variates on CL best described the pharmacokinetics. A typical infant (two-ventricle physiology, 6.9 kg, 5.2 months, and bypass grafting time of 60 minutes) had a CL of 0.12 L/hr/kg, V1 of 0.45 L/kg, and peripheral volume of distributions of 0.98 L/kg. The bypass grafting effect was poorly estimated. For subjects Pentobarbital pharmacokinetics is influenced by age and weight. Subjects with single-ventricle physiology demonstrated a 15% decrease in clearance when compared with subjects with two-ventricle physiology. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Population Pharmacokinetics of Pentobarbital in Neonates, Infants and Children Following Open Heart Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuppa, Athena F; Nicolson, Susan C.; Barrett, Jeffrey S.; Gastonguay, Marc R.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To determine the pharmacokinetics of pentobarbital in neonates, infants and young children with congenital heart disease post-operative from open heart surgery. Study design 35 subjects, (3 days – 4.4 years), following open heart surgery who received pentobarbital as standard of care were enrolled. Serial pharmacokinetic blood samples were obtained. A population-based, nonlinear mixed–effects modeling approach was used to characterize pentobarbital pharmacokinetics. Results A two-compartment model with weight as a covariate allometrically expressed on clearance (CL), inter-compartmental clearance (Q), central (V1) and peripheral volume of distributions (V2), bypass time as a covariate on CL and V1, and age and ventricular physiology as covariates on CL best described the pharmacokinetics.. A typical infant (two-ventricle physiology, 6.9 kg, 5.2 months, and bypass time of 60 minutes) had a CL of 0.12 L/hr/kg, V1 of 0.45 L/kg and V2 of 0.98 L/kg. The bypass effect was poorly estimated. For subjects less than 12 months age, an age effect on CL remained after accounting for weight, and was precisely estimated. Conclusions Pentobarbital pharmacokinetics is influenced by age and weight. Subjects with single-ventricle physiology demonstrated a 15% decrease in clearance when compared with subjects with two-ventricle physiology. PMID:21665222

  18. [Poor insight and psychosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giotakos, O

    2017-01-01

    A variety of phenomena might be considered as reflecting impaired insight in psychosis, like failure to recognize signs, symptoms or disease, failure to derive appropriate cognitive representations, despite recognition of the disease, and misattribution of the source or cause of the disease. The unawareness of tardive dyskinesia symptoms in schizophrenic patients points that self-awareness deficits in schizophrenia may be domain specific. Poor insight is an independent phenomenological and a prevalent feature in psychotic disorders in general, and in schizophrenia in particular, but we don't know yet if delusions in schizophrenia are the result of an entirely normal attempt to account for abnormal perceptual experiences or a product of abnormal experience but of normal reasoning. The theoretical approaches regarding impaired insight include the disturbed perceptual input, the impaired linkage between thought and emotion and the breakdown of the process of self-monitoring and error checking. The inability to distinguish between internally and externally generated mental events has been described by the metarepresentation theory. This theory includes the awareness of ones' goals, which leads to disorders of willed action, the awareness of intention, which leads to movement disorders, and the awareness of intentions of others, which leads to paranoid delusions. The theory of metarepresentation implies mainly output mechanisms, like the frontal cortex, while the input mechanism implies posterior brain systems, including the parietal lobe. There are many similarities between the disturbances of awareness seen in schizophrenia and those seen as a result of known neurological impairment. Neuropsychological models of impaired insight typically attribute the disturbance to any of a variety of core deficits in the processing of information. In this respect, lack of insight is on conceptual par with alogia, apraxia or aphasia in reflecting disturbed cognitive processing. In

  19. Pharmacokinetics and dosimetry, an introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notari, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    Classical pharmacokinetic techniques attempt to quantify the time course for drug in the body by assaying samples of blood or urine as a function of time. The mathematical descriptions that have emerged from this approach have proven extremely valuable to both drug research and drug therapy. Since the monitoring of patients' drug blood levels by obtaining a few small blood samples at key times is clinically practical, individualization of dosage regimens has become a reality. This has dramatically altered certain types of drug therapy. These improvements are limited to cases wherein biological response can be related to drug blood levels since the mathematics are capable only of describing the sampled fluids. Non-sampled fluids are considered as additional compartments or pools and described collectively using kinetic equations for mass balance. This limits progress in those areas of research which require assessment of the relationship of specific organ contents to that of the blood. The author suggests that radiopharmaceutical techniques which can provide the time course in specific organs might be coupled with classical pharmacokinetic approaches to provide insight not previously achieved

  20. Pharmacokinetics of metformin during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyal, Sara; Easterling, Thomas R; Carr, Darcy; Umans, Jason G; Miodovnik, Menachem; Hankins, Gary D V; Clark, Shannon M; Risler, Linda; Wang, Joanne; Kelly, Edward J; Shen, Danny D; Hebert, Mary F

    2010-05-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of metformin during pregnancy. Serial blood and urine samples were collected over one steady-state dosing interval in women treated with metformin during early to late pregnancy (n = 35) and postpartum (n = 16). Maternal and umbilical cord blood samples were obtained at delivery from 12 women. Metformin concentrations were also determined in breast milk samples obtained over one dosing interval in 6 women. Metformin renal clearance increased significantly in mid (723 +/- 243 ml/min, P pregnancy (625 +/- 130 ml/min, P metformin net secretion clearance (480 +/- 190 ml/min, P pregnancy versus postpartum, respectively. Metformin concentrations at the time of delivery in umbilical cord plasma ranged between nondetectable (metformin through breast milk was 0.13 to 0.28 mg, and the relative infant dose was metformin pharmacokinetics are affected by pregnancy-related changes in renal filtration and net tubular transport and can be roughly estimated by the use of creatinine clearance. At the time of delivery, the fetus is exposed to metformin concentrations from negligible to as high as maternal concentrations. In contrast, infant exposure to metformin through the breast milk is low.

  1. Morphosyntax in Poor Comprehenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlof, Suzanne M.; Catts, Hugh W.

    2016-01-01

    Children described as poor comprehenders (PCs) have reading comprehension difficulties in spite of adequate word reading abilities. PCs are known to display weakness with semantics and higher-level aspects of oral language, but less is known about their grammatical skills, especially with regard to morphosyntax. The purpose of this study was to examine morphosyntax in fourth grade PCs and typically developing readers (TDs), using three experimental tasks involving finiteness marking. Participants also completed standardized, norm-referenced assessments of phonological memory, vocabulary, and broader language skills. PCs displayed weakness relative to TDs on all three morphosyntax tasks and on every other assessment of oral language except phonological memory, as indexed by nonword repetition. These findings help to clarify the linguistic profile of PCs, suggesting that their language weaknesses include grammatical weaknesses that cannot be fully explained by semantic factors. Because finiteness markers are usually mastered prior to formal schooling in typical development, we call for future studies to examine whether assessments of morphosyntax could be used for the early identification of children at risk for future reading comprehension difficulty. PMID:27397969

  2. Children's Perceptions of Hypothetical Peers With Undesirable Characteristics: Role of the Peers' Desire to Change, Source of Effort to Change, and Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Mark A; Sonnentag, Tammy L; Wadian, Taylor W; Jones, Tucker L; Langley, Courtney A

    2015-01-01

    The present study, involving sixth- to eighth-grade students, is an extension of a prior investigation (Barnett, Livengood, Sonnentag, Barlett, & Witham, 2010) that examined children's perceptions of hypothetical peers with various undesirable characteristics. Results indicate that children's perceptions of hypothetical peers with an undesirable characteristic are influenced by the peers' desire to change, the source of effort to change, and the peers' success or failure in changing the characteristic. The children anticipated responding more favorably to peers who were successful in overcoming an undesirable characteristic than peers who were unsuccessful. Regardless of the peers' outcome, the children anticipated responding more favorably to peers who tried to change than peers who relied on the effort of adult authorities to motivate change. The children perceived successful peers as experiencing more positive affect than their unsuccessful counterparts, especially if the success was presented as a fulfillment of the peers' desire to change their undesirable characteristic. Finally, the children's ratings reflected the belief that, among peers who failed to change their undesirable characteristic, lacking the desire to change increases the relative likelihood that the characteristic will be permanent.

  3. Antimicrobial Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, John M

    2017-12-01

    Antimicrobial use in older adults requires working knowledge of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of these drugs, and the alterations known to occur with these models as patients age. A summary of pharmacokinetic principles relevant to antimicrobials and an overview of published medical literature describing pharmacokinetic changes known to correlate with age are presented. Pharmacodynamic models that apply to antibacterial agents are reviewed, as are likely effects of aging on these models. The understanding of how older adults respond in terms of efficacy and toxicity is increasing but limited. Further research into the effects of aging on the actions of antimicrobials in the elderly is needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Using the incidence and impact of behavioural conditions in guide dogs to investigate patterns in undesirable behaviour in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron-Lormier, Geoffrey; Harvey, Naomi D; England, Gary C W; Asher, Lucy

    2016-04-14

    The domestic dog is one of our most popular companions and longest relationships, occupying different roles, from pet to working guide dog for the blind. As dogs age different behavioural issues occur and in some cases dogs may be relinquished or removed from their working service. Here we analyse a dataset on working guide dogs that were removed from their service between 1994 and 2013. We use the withdrawal reasons as a proxy for the manifestation of undesirable behaviour. More than 7,500 dogs were in the dataset used, 83% of which were retired (due to old age) and 17% were withdrawn for behavioural issues. We found that the main reasons for behaviour withdrawal were environmental anxiety, training, and fear/aggression. Breed and sex had an effect on the odds of dogs being withdrawn under the different reasons. The age at withdrawal for the different withdrawal reasons suggested that dogs were more likely to develop fear/aggression related issues early on, whilst issues related to training could develop at almost any age. We found no evidence for heterosis effecting behaviour. We believe that this work is relevant to the pet dog population and had implications for understanding ageing and genetic influences on behaviour.

  5. Children's disengagement from cancer care and treatment on the ward: an undesirable social tactic in the long term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løvschal-Nielsen, P; Clausen, N; Meinert, L

    2017-11-01

    This anthropological study explores children's non-social reactions during the active treatment period, the on-treatment, in a paediatric oncology ward in a Danish university hospital. It is argued that, although some children's non-social reactions is a tactical disengagement to manage the on-treatment situation, such non-social tactics might ultimately prove an undesirable strategy with negative long-term social consequences for social survivorship. Data were generated over 7 months of ethnographic fieldwork between May 2011 and January 2013, using qualitative methods such as participant observation and open-ended interviewing. Fifty children of both sexes between 4 and 15 years, their families and hospital staff participated in the study. These data formed the basis for the study. The findings show that children's response to care challenges, including exhaustion from care management, exposure from being in a public space, and the open-ended duration of treatment, configure in tactic forms that we term social disengagement. It is suggested that such tactical social disengagement might expand into long-term social patterns, and, as such, change from an alleviating tactic to a socially isolating and damaging tactic for survivors of cancer in childhood. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Potential conflict between TRIPS and GATT concerning parallel importation of drugs and possible solution to prevent undesirable market segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chang-Fa

    2011-01-01

    From international perspective, parallel importation, especially with respect to drugs, has to do with the exhaustion principle in Article 6 of the TRIPS Agreement and the general exception in Article XX of the GATT 1994. Issues concerning the TRIPS Agreement have been constant topics of discussion. However, parallel importation in relation to the general rules of the GATT 1994 as well as to its exceptions provided in Article XX was not seriously discussed. In the view of the paper, there is a conflict between the provisions in these two agreements. The paper explains such conflict and tries to propose a method of interpretation to resolve the conflict between GATT Article XX and TRIPS Article 6 concerning parallel importation for the purpose of reducing the possible undesirable market segmentation in pharmaceutical sector. The method suggested in the paper is a proper application of good faith principle in the Vienna Convention to interpret GATT Article XX, so that there could be some flexibility for those prohibitions of parallel importation which have positive effect on international trade.

  7. Pharmacokinetics of thiamphenicol in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castells, G; Intorre, L; Franquelo, C; Cristòfol, C; Pérez, B; Martí, G; Arboix, M

    1998-11-01

    To determine pharmacokinetic parameters of thiamphenicol (TAP) after IV and IM administration in dogs. 6 healthy 2- to 3-year-old male Beagles. IN a crossover design study, 3 dogs were given TAP IV, and 3 dogs were given TAP IM, each at a dosage of 40 mg/kg of body weight. Three weeks later, the same dogs were given a second dose by the opposite route. At preestablished times after TAP administration, blood samples were collected through a catheter placed in the cephalic vein, and TAP concentration was determined by use of a high-performance liquid chromatography. Results-Kinetics of TAP administered IV were fitted by a biexponential equation with a rapid first disposition phase followed by a slower disposition phase. Elimination half-life was short (1.7+/-0.3 hours), volume of distribution at steady state was 0.66+/-0.05 L/kg, and plasma clearance was 5.3+/-0.7 ml/min/kg. After IM administration, absorption was rapid. Peak plasma concentration (25.1+/-10.3 microg/ml) was reached about 45 minutes after drug administration. The apparent elimination half-life after IM administration (5.6+/-4.6 hours) was longer than that after IV administration probably because of the slow absorption rate from the muscle. Mean bioavailability after IM administration was 96+/-7%. The pharmacokinetic profile of TAP in dogs suggests that it may be therapeutically useful against susceptible microorganisms involved in the most common infections in dogs, such as tracheobronchitis, enterocolitis, mastitis, and urinary tract infections.

  8. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Systemically Administered Antileishmanial Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kip, Anke E; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H; Dorlo, Thomas P C

    This review describes the pharmacokinetic properties of the systemically administered antileishmanial drugs pentavalent antimony, paromomycin, pentamidine, miltefosine and amphotericin B (AMB), including their absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion and potential drug-drug interactions.

  9. Chiral Pesticide Pharmacokinetics: A Range of Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Approximately 30% of pesticides are chiral and used as mixtures of two or more stereoisomers. In biological systems, these stereoisomers can exhibit significantly different pharmacokinetics (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination). In spite of these differences, th...

  10. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationships of monoclonal antibodies in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlund, Helena; Melin, Johanna; Parra-Guillen, Zinnia P; Kloft, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) constitute a therapeutically and economically important drug class with increasing use in both adult and paediatric patients. The rather complex pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of mAbs have been extensively reviewed in adults. In children, however, limited information is currently available. This paper aims to comprehensively review published pharmacokinetic and pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies of mAbs in children. The current status of mAbs in the USA and in Europe is outlined, including a critical discussion of the dosing strategies of approved mAbs. The pharmacokinetic properties of mAbs in children are exhaustively summarised along with comparisons to reports in adults: for each pharmacokinetic process, we discuss the general principles and mechanisms of the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic characteristics of mAbs, as well as key growth and maturational processes in children that might impact these characteristics. Throughout this review, considerable knowledge gaps are identified, especially regarding children-specific properties that influence pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and immunogenicity. Furthermore, the large heterogeneity in the presentation of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic data limited clinical inferences in many aspects of paediatric mAb therapy. Overall, further studies are needed to fully understand the impact of body size and maturational changes on drug exposure and response. To maximise future knowledge gain, we propose a 'Guideline for Best Practice' on how to report pharmacokinetic and pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic results from mAb studies in children which also facilitates comparisons. Finally, we advocate the use of more sophisticated modelling strategies (population analysis, physiology-based approaches) to appropriately characterise pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationships of mAbs and, thus, allow for a more rational use of mAb in the paediatric population.

  11. Pharmacokinetics of Voriconazole Administered Concomitantly with Fluconazole and Population-Based Simulation for Sequential Use ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Damle, Bharat; Varma, Manthena V.; Wood, Nolan

    2011-01-01

    In clinical practice, antifungal therapy may be switched from fluconazole to voriconazole; such sequential use poses the potential for drug interaction due to cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19)-mediated inhibition of voriconazole metabolism. This open-label, randomized, two-way crossover study investigated the effect of concomitant fluconazole on voriconazole pharmacokinetics in 10 subjects: 8 extensive metabolizers and 2 poor metabolizers of CYP2C19. The study consisted of 4-day voriconazole-onl...

  12. Pharmacokinetics of Botanical Drugs and Plant Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez More, Gina Paola; Cardenas, Paola Andrea; Costa, Geison M; Simoes, Claudia M O; Aragon, Diana Marcela

    2017-01-01

    Botanical drugs contain plant extracts, which are complex mixtures of compounds. As with conventional drugs, it is necessary to validate their efficacy and safety through preclinical and clinical studies. However, pharmacokinetic studies for active constituents or characteristic markers in botanical drugs are rare. The objective of this review was to investigate the global state of the art in pharmacokinetic studies of active ingredients present in plant extracts and botanical drugs. A review of pharmacokinetics studies of chemical constituents of plant extracts and botanical drugs was performed, with a total of 135 studies published between January 2004 and February 2015 available in recognized scientific databases. Botanical preparations were mainly found in the form of aqueous extracts of roots and rhizomes. The most widely studied species was Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, and the compound most frequently used as a pharmacokinetic marker was berberine. Most studies were performed using the Sprague Dawley rat model, and the preparations were mainly administered orally in a single dose. Quantification of plasma concentrations of pharmacokinetic markers was performed mainly by liquid-liquid extraction, followed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry detector. In conclusion, in recent years there has been an increasing interest among researchers worldwide in the study of pharmacokinetics of bioactive compounds in botanical drugs and plant extracts, especially those from the Traditional Chinese Medicine. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Pharmacokinetics of Voriconazole Administered Concomitantly with Fluconazole and Population-Based Simulation for Sequential Use ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damle, Bharat; Varma, Manthena V.; Wood, Nolan

    2011-01-01

    In clinical practice, antifungal therapy may be switched from fluconazole to voriconazole; such sequential use poses the potential for drug interaction due to cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19)-mediated inhibition of voriconazole metabolism. This open-label, randomized, two-way crossover study investigated the effect of concomitant fluconazole on voriconazole pharmacokinetics in 10 subjects: 8 extensive metabolizers and 2 poor metabolizers of CYP2C19. The study consisted of 4-day voriconazole-only and 5-day voriconazole-plus-fluconazole treatments, separated by a 14-day washout. Voriconazole pharmacokinetics were determined by noncompartmental analyses. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was developed in Simcyp (Simcyp Ltd., Sheffield, United Kingdom) to predict the magnitude of drug interaction should antifungal therapy be switched from fluconazole to voriconazole, following various simulated lag times for the switch. In CYP2C19 extensive metabolizers, fluconazole increased the maximum plasma concentration and the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) of voriconazole by 57% and 178%, respectively. In poor metabolizers, however, voriconazole pharmacokinetics were unaffected by fluconazole. The simulations based on pharmacokinetic modeling predicted that if voriconazole was started 6, 12, 24, or 36 h after the last dose of fluconazole, the voriconazole AUC ratios (sequential therapy versus voriconazole only) after the first dose would be 1.51, 1.41, 1.28, and 1.14, respectively. This suggests that the remaining systemic fluconazole would result in a marked drug interaction with voriconazole for ≥24 h. Although no safety issues were observed during coadministration, concomitant use of fluconazole and voriconazole is not recommended. Frequent monitoring for voriconazole-related adverse events is advisable if voriconazole is used sequentially after fluconazole. PMID:21876043

  14. Preformulation and pharmacokinetic studies on antalarmin: a novel stress inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghvi, Ritesh; Mogalian, Erik; Machatha, Stephen G; Narazaki, Ryuichi; Karlage, Kelly L; Jain, Parijat; Tabibi, S Esmail; Glaze, Elizabeth; Myrdal, Paul B; Yalkowsky, Samuel H

    2009-01-01

    The preformulation, solubilization and pharmacokinetic evaluation of antalarmin, a stress inhibitor, have been conducted. Antalarmin has a poor water solubility of less than 1 microg/mL and is weakly basic with an experimentally determined pK(a) of 5.0. Multiple solubilization approaches including pH-control either alone or in combination with cosolvents, surfactants and complexing agents have been investigated. The applicability of lipid-based systems has also been explored. Four formulations, each with a targeted drug loading capacity of 100 mg/mL, show potential for oral administration. Three of these formulations are aqueous solutions (10% ethanol + 40% propylene glycol; 20% cremophor EL; 20% sulfobutylether-beta-cyclodextrin) each buffered at pH 1. The fourth formulation is a lipid-based formulation comprising of 20% oleic acid, 40% cremophor EL and 40% Labrasol. No precipitation was observed following dilution of the four formulations with water and enzyme free simulated gastric fluid. However, only the lipid-based formulation successfully resisted drug precipitation following dilution with enzyme free simulated intestinal fluid. Pharmacokinetic analysis conducted in rats revealed that the 20% cremophor EL solution formulation has a fivefold higher oral bioavailability compared to a suspension formulation. The lipid-based formulation resulted in over 12-fold higher bioavailability as compared to the suspension formulation, the highest amongst the formulations examined. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  15. Personalized therapeutics for levofloxacin: a focus on pharmacokinetic concerns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao CH

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Chu-Han Gao,1 Lu-Shan Yu,2 Su Zeng,2 Yu-Wen Huang,1 Quan Zhou11Department of Pharmacy, the Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis and Drug Metabolism, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: Personalized medicine should be encouraged because patients are complex, and this complexity results from biological, medical (eg, demographics, genetics, polypharmacy, and multimorbidities, socioeconomic, and cultural factors. Levofloxacin (LVX is a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotic. Awareness of personalized therapeutics for LVX seems to be poor in clinical practice, and is reflected in prescribing patterns. Pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic studies have raised concerns about suboptimal patient outcomes with the use of LVX for some Gram-negative infections. Meanwhile, new findings in LVX therapeutics have only been sporadically reported in recent years. Therefore, an updated review on personalized LVX treatment with a focus on pharmacokinetic concerns is necessary.Methods: Relevant literature was identified by performing a PubMed search covering the period from January 1993 to December 2013. We included studies describing dosage adjustment and factors determining LVX pharmacokinetics, or pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic studies exploring how best to prevent the emergence of resistance to LVX. The full text of each included article was critically reviewed, and data interpretation was performed.Results: In addition to limiting the use of fluoroquinolones, measures such as reducing the breakpoints for antimicrobial susceptibility testing, choice of high-dose short-course of once-daily LVX regimen, and tailoring LVX dose in special patient populations help to achieve the validated pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic target and combat the increasing LVX resistance. Obese individuals with normal renal function cleared LVX

  16. A comparative analysis of China’s regional energy and emission performance: Which is the better way to deal with undesirable outputs?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ke; Wei Yiming; Zhang Xian

    2012-01-01

    Measuring and improving the energy performance with considering emission constraints is an important issue for China’s energy conservation, pollutant emissions reduction and environment protection. This study utilizes several data envelopment analysis (DEA) based models to evaluate the total-factor energy and emission performance of China’s 30 regions within a joint production framework of considering desirable and undesirable outputs as well as separated energy and non-energy inputs. DEA window analysis is applied in this study to deal with cross-sectional and time-varying data, so as to measure the performance during the period of 2000–2009. Two treatments for undesirable outputs are combined with DEA models and the associated indicators for simplex energy performance and unified energy and emission performance measurement are proposed and compared. The evaluation results indicate that the treatment of undesirable outputs transformation is more appropriate for China’s regional energy and emission performance evaluation because it has stronger discriminating power and can provide more reasonable evaluation results that characterize China’s regions. The empirical result shows that east China has the highest and the most balanced energy and emission performance. The energy and emission performance of China remained stable during 2000–2003, decreased slightly during 2004–2006, and has continuously increased since 2007. - Highlights: ► We evaluate China’s regional energy and emission performance using DEA based models. ► We compare two undesirable outputs treatments according to the evaluation results. ► To treat undesirable outputs as inputs has weaker discriminating power in evaluation. ► Simplex energy performance, without environmental factors, is a biased evaluation. ► China’s energy and emission performance is approximately stable during study period.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of metformin in patients with gastrointestinal intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mccreight, Laura J.; Stage, Tore B.; Connelly, Paul

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: Metformin intolerance symptoms are gastrointestinal in nature, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to assess potential causes of metformin intolerance including: altered metformin uptake from the intestine; increased anaerobic glucose utilisation...... and subsequent lactate production; altered serotonin uptake; and altered bile acid pool. METHODS: This pharmacokinetic study recruited ten severely intolerant and ten tolerant individuals matched for age, sex and BMI. A single 500mg dose of metformin was administered, with blood sampling at eleven time points...... over 24 hours. Blood samples were analysed for metformin, lactate, serotonin, and bile acid concentrations and compared across the phenotypes. RESULTS: The intolerant individuals were severely intolerant to 500mg metformin. No significant difference was identified between tolerant and intolerant...

  18. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of suxamethonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torda, T A; Graham, G G; Warwick, N R; Donohue, P

    1997-06-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the time constants of elimination and effect compartment equilibration of suxamethonium and for the slope exponent of the Hill equation. Twelve patients were anaesthetized with thiopentone, fentanyl, and isoflurane in nitrous oxide and oxygen. After allowing conditions to become stable, they were administered three small doses of suxamethonium by rapid intravenous injection. The responses to supramaximal stimulation of the ulnar nerve were recorded by EMG in one and by accelerometry in eleven subjects. Because of failure to recover to control conditions, one subject was deleted from analysis. The recorded drug effect was used in a non-linear curve fitting technique to derive estimates of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters. The plasma concentration of suxamethonium was adequately represented by a single compartment model. The mean half-life of elimination was 47 s with a 95% confidence interval of 24 to 70 s; that of effect compartment equilibration, 211 s with a 95% confidence range of 139 to 282 s. The average slope exponent was 6.4 and its 95% confidence range was 4.6 to 8.2. The data from the first two doses were used to predict the time taken for the third dose to recover 50%. The predictions showed a mean bias of prediction error greater than 30%.

  19. Pharmacokinetics of miltefosine in Old World cutaneous leishmaniasis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorlo, Thomas P. C.; van Thiel, Pieter P. A. M.; Huitema, Alwin D. R.; Keizer, Ron J.; de Vries, Henry J. C.; Beijnen, Jos H.; de Vries, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of miltefosine in leishmaniasis patients are, to a great extent, unknown. We examined and characterized the pharmacokinetics of miltefosine in a group of patients with Old World (Leishmania major) cutaneous leishmaniasis. Miltefosine plasma concentrations were determined in

  20. Pharmacokinetics: an analysis of the method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staubus, A E

    1980-01-01

    The field of radiology in general, and gastrointestinal radiology in particular, can and has benefited by the application of pharmacokinetic principles in contrast agent research and development. The application of basic pharmacokinetic principles can aid in the design of new synthetic analogues. In many cases, the presence or the absence of certain functional groups in particular locations on the aromatic ring system can predictively influence the binding, clearance and half-life values of these compounds. Detailed pharmacokinetic understanding of gastrointestinal contrast agents, particularly cholecystopaques, hold the key for unlocking the "black box" aspects of hepatic/biliary functions. Specific agents are currently quantitating and characterizing hepatic uptake, enzyme transformations, and biliary excretion functions of the liver. Pharmacokinetic principles can also be applied within the clinical radiology setting. Studies are currently underway to correlate blood iodine levels following iopanoic acid (Telepaque) administration with the causes of gallbladder nonvisualization. In summary, the use of pharmacokinetics has and will continue to assist the gastrointestinal radiologist interested in developmental, basic, and/or clinical research.

  1. Utility of a single adjusting compartment: a novel methodology for whole body physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Hirotaka; Izawa, Shigeru; Hori, Wataru; Nakagawa, Ippei

    2008-01-01

    Background There are various methods for predicting human pharmacokinetics. Among these, a whole body physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (WBPBPK) model is useful because it gives a mechanistic description. However, WBPBPK models cannot predict human pharmacokinetics with enough precision. This study was conducted to elucidate the primary reason for poor predictions by WBPBPK models, and to enable better predictions to be made without reliance on complex concepts. Methods The primary reasons for poor predictions of human pharmacokinetics were investigated using a generic WBPBPK model that incorporated a single adjusting compartment (SAC), a virtual organ compartment with physiological parameters that can be adjusted arbitrarily. The blood flow rate, organ volume, and the steady state tissue-plasma partition coefficient of a SAC were calculated to fit simulated to observed pharmacokinetics in the rat. The adjusted SAC parameters were fixed and scaled up to the human using a newly developed equation. Using the scaled-up SAC parameters, human pharmacokinetics were simulated and each pharmacokinetic parameter was calculated. These simulated parameters were compared to the observed data. Simulations were performed to confirm the relationship between the precision of prediction and the number of tissue compartments, including a SAC. Results Increasing the number of tissue compartments led to an improvement of the average-fold error (AFE) of total body clearances (CLtot) and half-lives (T1/2) calculated from the simulated human blood concentrations of 14 drugs. The presence of a SAC also improved the AFE values of a ten-organ model from 6.74 to 1.56 in CLtot, and from 4.74 to 1.48 in T1/2. Moreover, the within-2-fold errors were improved in all models; incorporating a SAC gave results from 0 to 79% in CLtot, and from 14 to 93% in T1/2 of the ten-organ model. Conclusion By using a SAC in this study, we were able to show that poor prediction resulted mainly from such

  2. Heritability of metoprolol and torsemide pharmacokinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthaei, Johannes; Brockmöller, Jürgen; Tzvetkov, Mladen

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation in the pharmacokinetics of metoprolol and torsemide due to polymorphisms in CYP2D6, CYP2C9 and OATP1B1 has been extensively studied. However, it is still unknown how much of variation in pharmacokinetics of these two clinically important drugs in total is due to genetic factors....... Metoprolol and torsemide were intravenously administered to 44 monozygotic and 14 dizygotic twin pairs. Metoprolol AUC varied 4.7-fold and torsemide AUC 3.5-fold. A very high fraction of AUC variations, 91% of metoprolol and 86% of torsemide, were found to be due to additive genetic effects. However, known...... of the heritable variability in the pharmacokinetics of metoprolol and torsemide remains to be elucidated. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  3. Pharmacokinetics of bisphosphonates in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luurila, S.; Kautiainnen, S.; Ylitalo, P.; Ylitalo, R. [Univ. of Tamperer, Dept. of Pharmacological Sciences, Tampere (Finland)

    1999-01-01

    Clodronate, pamidronate and etidronate are commonly used bisphosphonates, which accumulate extensively in arteries and some other tissues. We compared their pharmacokinetics in rabbits with those of tiludronate, the drug newly introduced to clinical use. The {sup 14}C-labelled drugs were given intravenously and plasma drug levels were monitored for up to 24 hr. The dose-related plasma concentrations of tiludronate and etidronate were clearly higher and decreased more slowly than those of clodronate and pamidronate (P<0.001). Already at 5 min., the concentrations of tiludronate and etidronate were higher than those of clodronate and pamidronate (P=0.016). At 24 hr, plasma concentration of tiludronate was 12{+-}6.6%, of etidronate 18{+-}2.5%, of clodronate 0.8{+-}0.2%, and of pamidronate 1.4{+-}0.4% of the dose per body weight. With the same dose (25 mg/kg), absolute AUC{sub 0-24hr} for tiludronate and etidronate was 9-11 times larger than for clodronate. AUC{sub 0-24hr} for pamidronate (2.5 mg/kg) was 11% of that for clodronate. Plasma clearance of tiludronate and etidronate was 9-15 times slower than that of clodronate and pamidronate. At 24 hr, the mean tissue-to-plasma ratio of tiludronate for aorta was 1.2-1.6. For bone, spleen, liver and kidneys the ratio varied from 5.4 to 52.6. The results suggest that 1) tiludronate and etidronate are removed from plasma much slower than clodronate and pamidronate, and 2) the potential of tiludronate to concentrate in arteries and bone is generally smaller than previously found with the other bisphosphonates. (au) 26 refs.

  4. Population pharmacokinetic modeling of risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone to estimate CYP2D6 subpopulations in children and adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwin, Catherine M. T.; Saldaña, Shannon N.; Bies, Robert R.; Aman, Michael G.; Vinks, Alexander A.

    2012-01-01

    AIM The study aims were to characterize risperidone and (±)-9-hydroxyrisperidone pharmacokinetic variability in children and adolescents and to evaluate covariate effects on pharmacokinetic parameters. METHODS Steady-state samples were drawn at pre-dose, 1, 2, 4, and 7 hours post-dose; CYP2D6 genotypes were available for 28 subjects. A non-linear mixed-effects model (NONMEM®) modeled the pharmacokinetics of risperidone and (±)-9-hydroxyrisperidone; covariates included age, weight, sex, and CYP2D6 phenotype. The model included 497 observations [risperidone (n=163), (+) and (−) 9-hydroxyrisperidone (n=334)] from 45 subjects aged 3–18.3 (mean 9.6±3.7) years, weighing 16.8–110 (43±20.2) kg. RESULTS A one-compartment mixture model described risperidone and (±)-9-hydroxyrisperidone clearances for three CYP2D6 metabolizer subpopulations: extensive (EM), intermediate (IM), and poor (PM). Weight significantly affected (±)-9-hydroxyrisperidone clearance. Clearance estimates in the mixture model were PM 9.38 L/h, IM 29.2 L/h, and EM 37.4 L/h. CONCLUSION Active moiety [risperidone plus (±)-9-hydroxyrisperidone] pharmacokinetic variability and the covariate effects were better explained with addition of metabolite pharmacokinetic parameters. This model may aid development of individualized risperidone dosing regimens in children and adolescents. PMID:22929407

  5. Are the poor too poor to demand health insurance?

    OpenAIRE

    Rajeev Ahuja; Johannes Jutting

    2004-01-01

    Community based micro insurance has aroused much interest and hope in meeting health care challenges facing the poor. In this paper we explore how institutional rigidities such as credit constraints impinge on demand for health insurance and how insurance could potentially prevent poor households from falling into poverty trap. In this setting, we argue that the appropriate public intervention in generating demand for insurance is not to subsidise premium but to remove these rigidities (easin...

  6. Pharmacokinetic Study and Optimal Formulation of New Anti-Parkinson Natural Compound Schisantherin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Sa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Our recent studies showed that schisantherin A (StA is a promising candidate for PD treatment, but the pharmacokinetic profile of StA is largely unknown. The effects of different formulations on the pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of StA were investigated by HPLC equipped with a vacuum degasser, a quaternary pump, a manual sampler, and an ultraviolet detector. The absolute bioavailability of StA in nanoemulsion formulation was significantly increased from 4.3% to 47.3%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of absolute bioavailability for StA in rats and successful increase of bioavailability of StA by nanoemulsion formulation. The pharmacokinetic profiles of StA could be significantly improved by a safe nanoemulsion formulation. This study provides a successful example of advanced delivery system for improving the bioavailability of potential central nervous system (CNS drug candidate with poor solubility. This novel approach could be an effective alternative solution to overcome the shortcomings of conventional poor drug delivery of CNS drugs. The results of present study not only indicate that StA has potential to be developed as a promising oral therapeutic agent for the management of PD but also shed light on novel way to improve bioavailability of PD drugs.

  7. Curcumin as a clinically-promising anti-cancer agent: pharmacokinetics and drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiwidjaja, Jeffry; McLachlan, Andrew J; Boddy, Alan V

    2017-09-01

    Curcumin has been extensively studied for its anti-cancer properties. While a diverse array of in vitro and preclinical research support the prospect of curcumin use as an anti-cancer therapeutic, most human studies have failed to meet the intended clinical expectation. Poor systemic availability of orally-administered curcumin may account for this disparity. Areas covered: This descriptive review aims to concisely summarise available clinical studies investigating curcumin pharmacokinetics when administered in different formulations. A critical analysis of pharmacokinetic- and pharmacodynamic-based interactions of curcumin with concomitantly administered drugs is also provided. Expert opinion: The encouraging clinical results of curcumin administration are currently limited to people with colorectal cancer, given that sufficient curcumin concentrations persist in colonic mucosa. Higher parent curcumin systemic exposure, which can be achieved by several newer formulations, has important implications for optimal treatment of cancers other than those in gastrointestinal tract. Curcumin-drug pharmacokinetic interactions are also almost exclusively in the enterocytes, owing to extensive first pass metabolism and poor curcumin bioavailability. Greater scope of these interactions, i.e. modulation of the systemic elimination of co-administered drugs, may be expected from more-bioavailable curcumin formulations. Further studies are still warranted, especially with newer formulations to support the inclusion of curcumin in cancer therapy regimens.

  8. Difference and alteration in pharmacokinetic and metabolic characteristics of low-solubility natural medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shenglei; Liu, Yuying; Feng, Jianfang; Zhao, Hua; Yu, Zhongshu; Zhao, Jing; Li, Yao; Zhang, Jingqing

    2018-02-01

    Drug metabolism plays vital roles in the absorption and pharmacological activity of poorly soluble natural medicines. It is important to choose suitable delivery systems to increase the bioavailability and bioactivity of natural medicines with low solubility by regulating their metabolism and pharmacokinetics. This review investigates recent developments about the metabolic and pharmacokinetic behavior of poorly soluble natural medicines and their delivery systems. Delivery systems, dosage, administration route and drug-drug interactions alter the metabolic pathway, and bioavailability of low-solubility natural medicines to different degrees. Influencing factors such as formulation, dosage, and administration route are discussed. The metabolic reactions, metabolic enzymes, metabolites and pharmacokinetic behaviors of low-solubility natural medicines, and their delivery systems are systematically reviewed. There are various metabolic situations in the case of low-solubility natural medicines. CYP3A4 and CYP2C are the most common metabolic enzymes, and hydroxylation is the most common metabolic reaction of low solubility natural medicines. The stereo isomeric configuration can have a large influence on metabolism. This review will be useful for physicians and pharmacists to guide more accurate treatment with low-solubility natural medicines by increasing drug efficacies and protecting patients from toxic side effects.

  9. A review of basic principles of fractals and their application to pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, R E; Riauka, T A; McQuarrie, S A

    2008-09-01

    Pharmacokinetic models play a crucial role in analyzing and assessing the results of in vitro and in vivo studies. In this review, comparative analysis of pharmacokinetic models under homogeneous and heterogeneous conditions is performed, placing special focus on the role of fractal theory. The concept of fractals provides a new perspective from which processes occurring in heterogeneous, confined, or poorly mixed environments can be modeled. Following a brief theoretical overview, the applicability of fractals in characterizing anatomical structures and physiological processes as well as the transport and reaction of drugs within the body is discussed. There is significant evidence that drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion are often anomalous, that is to say their behavior deviates from classical theory, and possible reasons and appropriate models are considered.

  10. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacokinetic variability of heroin and its metabolites: review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rook, Elisabeth J.; Huitema, Alwin D. R.; van den Brink, Wim; van Ree, Jan M.; Beijnen, Jos H.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the pharmacokinetics of heroin after intravenous, oral, intranasal, intramuscular and rectal application and after inhalation in humans, with a special focus on heroin maintenance therapy in heroin dependent patients. In heroin maintenance therapy high doses pharmaceutically

  11. A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Pregnant Women to Predict the Pharmacokinetics of Drugs Metabolized Via Several Enzymatic Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallmann, André; Ince, Ibrahim; Coboeken, Katrin; Eissing, Thomas; Hempel, Georg

    2017-09-18

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling is considered a valuable tool for predicting pharmacokinetic changes in pregnancy to subsequently guide in-vivo pharmacokinetic trials in pregnant women. The objective of this study was to extend and verify a previously developed physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for pregnant women for the prediction of pharmacokinetics of drugs metabolized via several cytochrome P450 enzymes. Quantitative information on gestation-specific changes in enzyme activity available in the literature was incorporated in a pregnancy physiologically based pharmacokinetic model and the pharmacokinetics of eight drugs metabolized via one or multiple cytochrome P450 enzymes was predicted. The tested drugs were caffeine, midazolam, nifedipine, metoprolol, ondansetron, granisetron, diazepam, and metronidazole. Pharmacokinetic predictions were evaluated by comparison with in-vivo pharmacokinetic data obtained from the literature. The pregnancy physiologically based pharmacokinetic model successfully predicted the pharmacokinetics of all tested drugs. The observed pregnancy-induced pharmacokinetic changes were qualitatively and quantitatively reasonably well predicted for all drugs. Ninety-seven percent of the mean plasma concentrations predicted in pregnant women fell within a twofold error range and 63% within a 1.25-fold error range. For all drugs, the predicted area under the concentration-time curve was within a 1.25-fold error range. The presented pregnancy physiologically based pharmacokinetic model can quantitatively predict the pharmacokinetics of drugs that are metabolized via one or multiple cytochrome P450 enzymes by integrating prior knowledge of the pregnancy-related effect on these enzymes. This pregnancy physiologically based pharmacokinetic model may thus be used to identify potential exposure changes in pregnant women a priori and to eventually support informed decision making when clinical trials are designed in this

  12. Ethnic and genetic factors in methadone pharmacokinetics: A population pharmacokinetic study☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bart, Gavin; Lenz, Scott; Straka, Robert J.; Brundage, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment of opiate use disorders with methadone is complicated by wide interindividual variability in pharmacokinetics. To identify potentially contributing covariates in methadone pharmacokinetics, we used population pharmacokinetic modeling to estimate clearance (CL/F) and volume of distribution (V/F) for each methadone enantiomer in an ethnically diverse methadone maintained population. Methods Plasma levels of the opiate-active R-methadone and opiate-inactive S-methadone were measured in 206 methadone maintained subjects approximately two and twenty-three hours after a daily oral dose of racmethadone. A linear one-compartment population pharmacokinetic model with first-order conditional estimation with interaction (FOCE-I) was used to evaluate methadone CL/F and V/F. The influence of covariates on parameter estimates was evaluated using stepwise covariate modeling. Covariates included ethnicity, gender, weight, BMI, age, methadone dose, and 21 single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes implicated in methadone pharmacokinetics. Results In the final model, for each enantiomer, Hmong ethnicity reduced CL/F by approximately 30% and the rs2032582 (ABCB1 2677G > T/A) GG genotype was associated with a 20% reduction in CL/F. The presence of the rs3745274 minor allele (CYP2B6 515G > T) reduced CL/F by up to 20% for S-methadone only. A smaller effect of age was noted on CL/F for R-methadone. Conclusion This is the first report showing the influence of the rs2032582 and rs3745274 variants on methadone pharmacokinetics rather than simply dose requirements or plasma levels. Population pharmacokinetics is a valuable method for identifying the influences on methadone pharmacokinetic variability. PMID:25456329

  13. Are the energy poor also income poor? Evidence from India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khandker, Shahidur R.; Barnes, Douglas F.; Samad, Hussain A.

    2012-01-01

    The energy poverty line is defined as the threshold point at which energy consumption begins to rise with increases in household income. This approach is applied to cross-sectional data from a comprehensive 2005 household survey representative of both urban and rural India. The objective is to determine if the energy poor are also income poor and whether and how energy policies help reduce energy poverty, independent of income. The findings suggest that in rural areas some 57% of households are energy poor, versus 22% that are income poor. But in urban areas the energy poverty rate is 28% compared to 20% that are income poor. That is, energy policies are expected to play some roles in mitigating energy poverty. We find that reducing energy poverty requires not only support for rural electrification, but also more use of modern cooking fuels such as LPG. While income growth matters, a combination of energy related programs can play an independent and substantial role in reducing energy poverty. - Highlights: ► This paper applies a new approach to measuring energy poverty to rural and urban India. ► It also compares and contrasts income poverty with energy poverty in the context of India. ► Findings suggest that income poverty tracks energy poverty in urban India, but not in rural India. ► Income growth is very important in reducing energy poverty. ► In addition, access to and reliability of modern sources (electricity, LPG) are also helpful.

  14. Pharmacokinetics of a telmisartan, amlodipine and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plasma was prepared by centrifugation of the blood samples at 3,000 rpm for 10 min at 4 °C. Samples were stored at −70 °C in polypropylene tubes until analysis. Pharmacokinetic analysis. Analysis of each drug was performed at. Biosuntek Laboratories Co. (Seongnam, Korea), which is certified by the MFDS as employing.

  15. Pharmacokinetics Of Artemether-Lumefantrine Combination ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The therapeutic effects of artemether monotherapy compared to artemether-lumefantrine combined therapy in malaria based on their pharmacokinetic parameters such as absorption, elimination constants, area under the curve, bioavailability, volume of distribution and half-lives were investigated. Methods: ...

  16. Pharmacokinetic comparison of seven 8-methoxypsoralen brands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menne, T; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Larsen, E

    1981-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of seven 8-MOP brands were evaluated in 7 volunteers using an incomplete bloc design. After a single oral dose the 8-MOP plasma level was followed for 3 hours. The plasma concentration was measured with a gas chromatographic - mass spectrometric method, using an isotopic...

  17. Correlation of Lipophilicity Descriptors with Pharmacokinetic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    Correlation of Lipophilicity Descriptors with Pharmacokinetic. Parameters of Selected Benzodiazepines. Adeyemo M.A1 and Idowu S.O1*. 1Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria. ABSTRACT. In early-stage drug discovery science, it is often important to reliably ...

  18. Pharmacokinetics and saliva secretion of paracetamol | Babalola ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A preliminary pharmacokinetic study of paracetamol was carried out in Nigerians for whom it is normal to consume paracetamol or its combination during almost any type of symptoms. After a single oral dose of 1000mg of the drug to eight adult male volunteers, paracetamol was measured in plasma and saliva using ...

  19. Pharmacokinetics of chloroquine in diabetic rabbits | Adelusi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pharmacokinetic parameters derived from diabetic rabbits have been compared to those of normal rabbits. Two sets of rabbits were used, normal rabbits and diabetic rabbits. The diabetic rabbits were obtained by inducing diabetes in rabbits using streptozotocin. Chloroquine at a dose of 10 mg/kg was administered to ...

  20. Pharmacokinetic Studies on Metoprolol - Eudragit Matrix Tablets ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the pharmacokinetics of of a developed metoprolol and a reference standard (Mepressor®). Methods: Metoprolol tartrate-loaded Eudragit® FS microparticles were formulated and compressed into tablets. The tablets were tested for their physicochemical properties according to United States ...

  1. Buspirone pharmacokinetics in patients with cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalhoff, K; Poulsen, H E; Garred, P

    1987-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of buspirone (20 mg) were determined in 12 patients with cirrhosis and 12 normal subjects. The mean AUC of buspirone was 55 +/- 38 s.d. ng ml-1 h in cirrhotics and 3.5 +/- 2.4 s.d. ng ml-1 h in normals. The time until maximum concentration (tmax) attaine...

  2. Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Albiglutide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønden, Andreas; Knop, Filip K; Christensen, Mikkel B

    2017-01-01

    Albiglutide is a long-acting, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist for subcutaneous administration with a recommended dose of 30-50 mg once weekly. The aim of this article is to outline the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of albiglutide including the clinical efficacy and safet...

  3. The disposition and pharmacokinetics of Dioscorea nipponica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-11-19

    Nov 19, 2008 ... tissues. The radioactivity level was measured to be the highest in the liver, adrenal gland, and wall of the gastrointestinal tract. The radioactivity of TSD was still being detected in blood after 96 h. This showed TSD was ... in human body was few (Lin, 2007), the measurements of pharmacokinetics are difficult ...

  4. The disposition and pharmacokinetics of Dioscorea nipponica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was aimed to investigate the disposition and pharmacokinetics of the total saponins of dioscorea (TSD) in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were orally administrated with 3H labeled TSD at a single dose ratio of 80 mg TSD per 1 kg rat. Blood samples and feces were collected at different time points to measure the ...

  5. FIRST REPORTS OF CLINICAL PHARMACOKINETICS IN NIGERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, O S

    2015-06-01

    The German Friedrich Hartmut Dost (1910-1985) introduced the word Pharmacokinetics. Clinical pharmacokinetics is the direct application of knowledge regarding a drug's pharmacokinetics to a therapeutic situation in an individual or a population. It is the basis of therapeutic drug monitoring with the ultimate goal of keeping drugs safe. This branch of pharmacology has become the most relevant to the sub-specialty of clinical pharmacology. First reports of Clinical Pharmacokinetics in Nigeria can be credited to two gifted Nigerians, Prof Ayodele O. Iyun and Prof Lateef A. Salako, both of whom were affiliated to the great institutions- University of Ibadan (UI) and the Teaching Hospital, University College Hospital (UCH). Prof A.O Iyun was Nigeria's first home-trained Clinical Pharmacologist, while Prof L.A. Salako played a most significant role in the creation of the Department of Clinical Pharmacology, UCH. This edition of the Chronicles highlights a few of the first reports of this exciting branch of pharmacology in Nigeria. This historical review is based on publications listed on the United States National Library of Medicine database (PUBMED).

  6. Pharmacokinetics of Chloramphenicol in Sheep after Intramuscular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The animals were bled at pre-determined time intervals and serum chloramphenicol concentrations monitored using chloramphenicol-ELISA for a period of 30 days post drug administration. Pharmacokinetic evaluation was carried out using a non-compartment analysis. The mean Cmax values obtained in the eight sheep ...

  7. Investigation on Strengthening Approaches Adopted for Poorly Detailed RC Corbels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Chandra Neupane

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Poor detailing of the position of bearing pad over reinforced concrete (RC corbel may lead to premature failure, which is undesired and structurally vulnerable. An appropriate retrofitting solution is necessary to ensure the functionality of such RC corbels. Considering the growing popularity of external carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP in retrofitting, this research examines the effectiveness of an externally wrapped unidirectional CFRP sheet and compares its performance against traditional retrofitting methods. Moreover, it is intended to fulfill the lack of extensive research on external CFRP application for corbel strengthening. A total of eight medium-scale corbel specimens were tested on vertical load. Observed premature failure due to placing the bearing pad near the edge of corbel was verified and the effectiveness of the proposed structural strengthening solutions was studied. Experimental results show that although the loading capacity of the damaged corbel due to the poor detailing of bearing pad position could not be fully recovered, the external CFRP wrapping method demonstrated superior performance over RC jacketing and was able to prevent localized failure. Further study based on non-linear 3D finite element analysis (FEA was carried out to identify the governing parameters of each retrofitting solution. Numerical studies suggested important parameters of various retrofitting alternatives for higher capacity assurance.

  8. Efficient CRISPR-Cas9-Mediated Generation of Knockin Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Lacking Undesired Mutations at the Targeted Locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian T. Merkle

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The CRISPR-Cas9 system has the potential to revolutionize genome editing in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs, but its advantages and pitfalls are still poorly understood. We systematically tested the ability of CRISPR-Cas9 to mediate reporter gene knockin at 16 distinct genomic sites in hPSCs. We observed efficient gene targeting but found that targeted clones carried an unexpectedly high frequency of insertion and deletion (indel mutations at both alleles of the targeted gene. These indels were induced by Cas9 nuclease, as well as Cas9-D10A single or dual nickases, and often disrupted gene function. To overcome this problem, we designed strategies to physically destroy or separate CRISPR target sites at the targeted allele and developed a bioinformatic pipeline to identify and eliminate clones harboring deleterious indels at the other allele. This two-pronged approach enables the reliable generation of knockin hPSC reporter cell lines free of unwanted mutations at the targeted locus.

  9. Methotrexate-induced side effects are not due to differences in pharmacokinetics in children with Down syndrome and acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buitenkamp, Trudy D.; Mathôt, Ron A. A.; de Haas, Valerie; Pieters, Rob; Zwaan, C. Michel

    2010-01-01

    Children with Down syndrome have an increased risk of developing acute lymphoblastic leukemia and a poor tolerance of methotrexate. This latter problem is assumed to be caused by a higher cellular sensitivity of tissues in children with Down syndrome. However, whether differences in pharmacokinetics

  10. Use of nanotechnology for improved pharmacokinetics and activity of immunogenic cell death inducers used in cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicka, Martyna; Gubernator, Jerzy

    2017-09-01

    Immunogenic cell death inducers (ICD inducers) are a diverse group of therapeutic molecules capable of eliciting an adaptive immune response against the antigens present on the surface of dying cancer cells. Most of these molecules suffer from low bioavailability, high toxicity and poor pharmacokinetics which limit their application. It is believed that nanotechnology, in particular nano-sized nanocarriers, can address most of the issues that limit the use of ICD inducers. Area covered: The mechanism of action of ICD inducers and their limitations is discussed. In addition, we cover the novel possibilities arising from the use of nanotechnology to improve delivery of ICD inducers to the target tissue as well as the restrictions of modern nanotechnology. Expert opinion: At present, nanocarrier formulations suffer from low bioavailability, poor pharmacokinetics and stability issues. Nonetheless, there is a tremendous future for combinatorial immune-pharmacological treatments of human tumors based on nanocarrier delivery of ICD inducers.

  11. Prospects for the Working Poor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S. M.

    1970-01-01

    Based on a chapter entitled "Barriers to Employment of the Disadvantaged by Martin Deutsch and S. M. Miller in "Manpower Report of the President, 1968. Discusses the Nixon proposals for remediating poverty in relation to the socioeconomic factors operating to maintain the condition of being poor while working. (JM)

  12. Educating Canada's Urban Poor Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynes, Bill; Foster, Rosemary

    2000-01-01

    Presents six critical thoughts and questions about educating poor urban children in Canada. These thoughts were derived from the development of a directory of Canadian educational poverty programs. Findings from that study emphasize the increasing diversity of the student population, the importance of temporary and large-scale funding, and the…

  13. Rapid pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies using cholorotoxin-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles: a novel non-radioactive method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Jeung-Eun Lee

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in nanotechnology have led to the development of biocompatible nanoparticles for in vivo molecular imaging and targeted therapy. Many nanoparticles have undesirable tissue distribution or unacceptably low serum half-lives. Pharmacokinetic (PK and biodistribution studies can help inform decisions determining particle size, coatings, or other features early in nanoparticle development. Unfortunately, these studies are rarely done in a timely fashion because many nanotechnology labs lack the resources and expertise to synthesize radioactive nanoparticles and evaluate them in mice.To address this problem, we developed an economical, radioactivity-free method for assessing serum half-life and tissue distribution of nanoparticles in mice. Iron oxide nanoparticles coated with chitosan and polyethylene glycol that utilize chlorotoxin as a targeting molecule have a serum half-life of 7-8 hours and the particles remain stable for extended periods of time in physiologic fluids and in vivo. Nanoparticles preferentially distribute to spleen and liver, presumably due to reticuloendothelial uptake. Other organs have very low levels of nanoparticles, which is ideal for imaging most cancers in the future. No acute toxicity was attributed to the nanoparticles.We report here a simple near-infrared fluorescence based methodology to assess PK properties of nanoparticles in order to integrate pharmacokinetic data into early nanoparticle design and synthesis. The nanoparticles tested demonstrate properties that are excellent for future clinical imaging strategies and potentially suitable for targeted therapy.

  14. [Feasibility, in general practice, to give to the patients clear, loyal and appropriate information about the undesirable side effects of the medicines prescribed. EICLAT study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnould, Pascale; Raineri, François; Hebbrecht, Gilles; Duhot, Didier

    2011-12-01

    Drug prescription in general practice is present in 78 to 83% of consultations; practitioners must give to their patient clear loyal and appropriate information about the undesirable side effects of the medicines prescribed. The object of the EICLAT study was to give some light on the feasibility to respect this obligation. To that effect the study evaluates, for a normal prescription activity, the average number of potential undesirable side effects (USE) in relation with the number of lines of different medicines prescribed in each doctor's prescription. A total of 8,382 doctor's prescriptions, generating 34,427 lines of prescriptions given by 175 general practitioners, were analysed. Amongst these prescriptions, 11% included only one line, 55% from 2 to 4 lines and 34% 5 lines or more. The average doctor's prescription was of 4 lines of medicines generating 407 potential USE, of which 194 were different (the same undesirable effect may be present twice or more in the same doctor's prescription), and 293 frequent or serious potential USE, of which 166 were different. The patent medicines with a major or important added medical value (AMV), present in 7,840 doctor's prescriptions for a total of 24,127 lines exposed the patient, in the average, to 151 frequent or serious USE different. The patent medicines with an insufficient AMV, present in 2,292 prescriptions for a total of 3,887 lines, exposed the patient to 37 frequent and/or serious potential USE. Supposing that the information provided by the legal authority is sufficiently adequate, precise and exhaustive, the volume of information that must be given to the patient is not compatible with the present conditions of exercise of the profession.

  15. Commercial Bank Efficiency Evaluation in Consideration of the Undesirable Output and Its Link with Stakeholders Relationship: An Application of China’s Commercial Banks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyue Ji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the modern contract theory, expectancy theory, and stakeholder theory, this paper analyzes how stakeholders relationship influences the efficiency of commercial banks and finds that the efficiency is a function of stakeholders relationship. A DEA model with Seiford's linear transformation function is developed to evaluate the efficiency in consideration of the undesirable output. The panel Tobit model is established to conduct empirical research with data of 14 Chinese commercial banks from 2004 to 2012. The study finds that except for business customer relation, stakeholder relationship is the key variable that influences comprehensive efficiency of commercial banks.

  16. Preclinical pharmacokinetics: an approach towards safer and efficacious drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sonu Sundd

    2006-02-01

    developed as drugs with better efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics profile; cannot be denied. Therefore, instead of considering metabolic instability a liability it can be exploited as a tool for discovering better drugs. It is equally important to identify the metabolic pathways of the drug candidates by conducting in-vitro CYP450 reaction phenotyping assays. The identification of drug metabolizing enzymes involved in the major metabolic pathways of a compound helps in predicting the probable drug-drug interactions in human. Compounds with more than one metabolic pathway have less likelihood of clinically significant drug interactions. In-vitro CYP450 inhibition and induction screens are used to evaluate the potential of compound towards drug - drug interactions and the most prone candidates may either be discarded or taken ahead with a caution. It is known that only unbound drug is pharmacologically active and therefore the assessment of bound fraction by the estimation of plasma protein binding of a compound is another important parameter to be explored in-vitro. In addition to the process of 'weeding out' weak candidates early in the drug discovery process, it is equally important to identify the probable causes of poor ADME exhibited by some compounds as this information is useful to medicinal chemists for improving upon backbones that exhibit un favorable pharmacokinetic profile. Toxicity study is the foundation of an INDA (Investigational new drug application) and therefore, the final selection of a compound can be performed only after proper toxicological evaluation in animal models. Toxicokinetics forms an integral part of toxicity study and is used to assess the exposure of candidates in toxicity models and correlate the drug levels in blood and various tissues with the toxicological findings. Although in-vivo screening of compounds in animal models and in-vitro assays in human recombinant CYP-450 enzymes help in drug candidate selection, both approaches have

  17. Population pharmacokinetics of proguanil in patients with acute P. falciparum malaria after combined therapy with atovaquone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Z; Eaves, C J; Hutchinson, D B; Canfield, C J

    1996-11-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics of proguanil were evaluated in patients with acute P. falciparum malaria receiving concomitantly proguanil hydrochloride and atovaquone. The population consisted of 203 Blacks, 112 Orientals and 55 Malays; 274 males and 96 females. Of the 370 patients, 114 and 256 patients were classified as 'poor' and 'extensive' metabolizers of proguanil, respectively. Body weight and age ranged between 11-110 kg and 3-65 years, respectively. 2. A one compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination was fitted to proguanil plasma concentration-time profiles, using non-linear mixed effect modelling (NONMEM). 3. Oral clearance (CLo) showed a 0.785 power relationship with body weight and was 13% higher in Orientals than Blacks and Malays and 17% lower in 'poor' than 'extensive' metabolizers. According to the mean weight of each population, the final population estimates of CLo in Blacks, Orientals and Malays who are 'extensive' metabolizers were 54.0, 61.5 and 64.3 l h-1, respectively. Age, gender and dose had no significant effects on CLo. 4. Apparent volume of distribution (V/F) showed a 0.88 power relationship with body weight. The final population estimates were 562 and 1629 l in children ( 15 years, respectively, who had a mean body weight of 22.6 and 54.8 kg, respectively. The effect of other covariates on V/F was not examined. 5. The final magnitudes of interpatient variability in CLo and V/F were relatively low at 22.5 and 17.0%, respectively. 6. Population pharmacokinetic parameter estimates in Black, Oriental and Malay patients with acute P. falciparum malaria are in good agreement with results of pharmacokinetic studies in healthy Caucasian volunteers. In view of the 30-50% residual variability in proguanil plasma concentrations, the slight effects of Orientals and 'poor' metabolizers on CLo are unlikely to be clinically significant. Hence, dose recommendation will be solely based on body weight.

  18. Pharmacokinetic profile of phytoconstituent(s isolated from medicinal plants—A comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush Mehta

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicine, the backbone of traditional medicine, has played an important role in human health and welfare for a long period. Traditional therapeutic approaches of regional significance are found in Africa, South and Central America, China, India, Tibet, Indonesia, and the Pacific Islands. The considerable scientific significance and commercial potential of traditional medicines have resulted in increased international attention and global market demands for herbal medicines, especially Chinese herbal medicines. Herbal medicines currently are the primary form of health care for the poor in the developing countries, and also are widely used as a supplement or substitute for conventional drugs in developed countries. These traditional medicines have a pivotal role in the treatment of various ailments and more than 50% of drugs used in Western pharmacopoeia are isolated from herbs or derived from modifications of chemicals found in plants. Herbal medicines usually contain a complex mixture of various bioactive molecules, which make its standardization complicated, and there is little information about all compounds responsible for pharmacological activity. Several research papers have been published that claim pharmacological activity of herbal medicines but few are discussing the role of the exact phytoconstituent. Understanding the pharmacokinetic profile of such phytoconstituents is essential. Although there are research papers that deal with pharmacokinetic properties of phytoconstituents, there are a number of phytoconstituents yet to be explored for their kinetic properties. This article reviews the pharmacokinetic profile of 50 different therapeutically effective traditional medicinal plants from the year 2003 onward.

  19. Pharmacokinetic profile of phytoconstituent(s) isolated from medicinal plants—A comprehensive review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Piyush; Shah, Rishi; Lohidasan, Sathiyanarayanan; Mahadik, K.R.

    2015-01-01

    Herbal medicine, the backbone of traditional medicine, has played an important role in human health and welfare for a long period. Traditional therapeutic approaches of regional significance are found in Africa, South and Central America, China, India, Tibet, Indonesia, and the Pacific Islands. The considerable scientific significance and commercial potential of traditional medicines have resulted in increased international attention and global market demands for herbal medicines, especially Chinese herbal medicines. Herbal medicines currently are the primary form of health care for the poor in the developing countries, and also are widely used as a supplement or substitute for conventional drugs in developed countries. These traditional medicines have a pivotal role in the treatment of various ailments and more than 50% of drugs used in Western pharmacopoeia are isolated from herbs or derived from modifications of chemicals found in plants. Herbal medicines usually contain a complex mixture of various bioactive molecules, which make its standardization complicated, and there is little information about all compounds responsible for pharmacological activity. Several research papers have been published that claim pharmacological activity of herbal medicines but few are discussing the role of the exact phytoconstituent. Understanding the pharmacokinetic profile of such phytoconstituents is essential. Although there are research papers that deal with pharmacokinetic properties of phytoconstituents, there are a number of phytoconstituents yet to be explored for their kinetic properties. This article reviews the pharmacokinetic profile of 50 different therapeutically effective traditional medicinal plants from the year 2003 onward. PMID:26587392

  20. Pharmacokinetics of dietary kaempferol and its metabolite 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabela, Volha; Sampath, Chethan; Oufir, Mouhssin; Moradi-Afrapoli, Fahimeh; Butterweck, Veronika; Hamburger, Matthias

    2016-12-01

    Kaempferol is a major flavonoid in the human diet and in medicinal plants. The compound exerts anxiolytic activity when administered orally in mice, while no behavioural changes were observed upon intraperitoneal administration, or upon oral administration in gut sterilized animals. 4-Hydroxyphenylacetic acid (4-HPAA), which possesses anxiolytic effects when administered intraperitoneally, is a major intestinal metabolite of kaempferol. Pharmacokinetic properties of the compounds are currently not clear. UHPLC-MS/MS methods were validated to support pharmacokinetic studies of kaempferol and 4-HPAA in rats. Non-compartmental and compartmental analyses were performed. After intravenous administration, kaempferol followed a one-compartment model, with a rapid clearance (4.40-6.44l/h/kg) and an extremely short half-life of 2.93-3.79min. After oral gavage it was not possible to obtain full plasma concentration-time profiles of kaempferol. Pharmacokinetics of 4-HPAA was characterized by a two-compartment model, consisting of a quick distribution phase (half-life 3.04-6.20min) followed by a fast elimination phase (half-life 19.3-21.1min). Plasma exposure of kaempferol is limited by poor oral bioavailability and extensive metabolism. Both compounds are rapidly eliminated, so that effective concentrations at the site of action do not appear to be reached. At present, it is not clear how the anxiolytic-like effects reported for the compounds can be explained. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. 78 FR 73199 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Bioequivalence Studies With Pharmacokinetic Endpoints for Drugs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-05

    ...] Draft Guidance for Industry on Bioequivalence Studies With Pharmacokinetic Endpoints for Drugs Submitted... guidance for industry entitled ``Bioequivalence Studies With Pharmacokinetic Endpoints for Drugs Submitted... draft guidance for industry entitled ``Bioequivalence Studies With Pharmacokinetic Endpoints for Drugs...

  2. Metabolism and pharmacokinetics of resveratrol and pterostilbene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; Sang, Shengmin

    2018-01-01

    Beneficial properties of resveratrol and pterostilbene, a dimethyl ether analog of resveratrol, have attracted increasing interest in recent years. Resveratrol and pterostilbene exhibit many pharmacological similarities and both of them are generally considered to be safe for human consumption. Beyond the structural and general bioactivity similarities between them, large amounts of data are now available to reveal the metabolic fate and pharmacological differences between them. Pterostilbene was found to be more metabolically stable and usually exhibited stronger pharmacological activities than that of resveratrol. As a contribution to clarify and compare aspects like metabolic stability and pharmacokinetics of resveratrol and pterostilbene, as well as explain the pharmacological similarities and differences between them, this review presents and compares recent data on the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of resveratrol and pterostilbene. © 2018 BioFactors, 44(1):16-25, 2018. © 2018 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  3. Minocycline pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maaland, Marit Gaastra; Guardabassi, Luca; Papich, Mark G.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although minocycline is not licensed for use in dogs, this tetracycline has therapeutic potential against meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius. HYPOTHESIS/OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to establish rational dosage recommendations for minocycline use in dogs....... Specific objectives were to generate and analyse minocycline pharmacokinetic (PK) data on plasma and interstitial fluid (ISF) concentrations, plasma protein binding and pharmacodynamic (PD) data on antimicrobial activity against S. pseudintermedius. ANIMALS: Six healthy dogs from a research colony were....... Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed on plasma and ISF concentrations. PK/PD analysis was completed using in vitro data on plasma protein binding and minocycline susceptibility in 168 S. pseudintermedius isolates. RESULTS: Minocycline distributed to the ISF to a higher degree than predicted by the protein...

  4. Pharmacokinetics of 125I-hirudin in rats and dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, M.; Cyranka, U.; Nowak, G.; Walsmann, P.

    1988-01-01

    Hirudin was 125 I-labelled using a modified chloramine-T method. 125 I-hirudin proved to be a suitable marker in pharmacokinetic studies, if unchanged 125 I-hirudin in body fluids was determined by means of a binding assay using immobilized thrombin. In rats and dogs a study was performed on the pharmacokinetic behaviour of hirudin following intravenous and subcutaneous injection, resp., or one-hour infusion and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. (author)

  5. Preparation and ocular pharmacokinetics of ganciclovir liposomes

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Yan; Tu, Jiasheng

    2007-01-01

    Ophthalmic liposomes of ganciclovir (GCV) were prepared by the reverse phase evaporation method, and their ocular pharmacokinetics in albino rabbits were compared with those obtained after dosing with GCV solution. The in vitro transcorneal permeability of GCV liposomes was found to be 3.9-fold higher than that of the solution. After in vivo instillation in albino rabbits, no difference was found in the precorneal elimination rate of GCV from liposome vs solution dosing. The aqueous humor con...

  6. Gentamicin Pharmacokinetics in the Chicken Inner Ear

    OpenAIRE

    Bunting, Eric C.; Park, Debra L.; Durham, Dianne; Girod, Douglas A.

    2004-01-01

    Avians have the unique ability to regenerate cochlear hair cells that are lost due to ototoxins or excessive noise. Many methodological techniques are available to damage the hair cells for subsequent scientific study. A recent method utilizes topical application of an ototoxic drug to the round window membrane. The current study examines the pharmacokinetics of gentamicin in the inner ear of chickens following topical application to the round window membrane or a single system...

  7. Perioperative Pharmacokinetics of Methadone in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anshuman; Tallchief, Danielle; Blood, Jane; Kim, Thomas; London, Amy; Kharasch, Evan D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Methadone is frequently used in adult anesthesia and pain treatment. Methadone pharmacokinetics in adults are well characterized, including the perioperative period. Methadone is also used in children. There is, however, no information on methadone pharmacokinetics in children of any age. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the pharmacokinetics of intravenous methadone in children undergoing surgery. Perioperative opioid-sparing effects were also assessed. Methods Eligible subjects were children 5–18 yr undergoing general anesthesia and surgery, with an anticipated postoperative inpatient stay exceeding 3d. Three groups of 10–11 patients each received intravenous methadone HCl after anesthetic induction in ascending dose groups of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 mg/kg (up to 20 mg). Anesthetic care was not otherwise changed. Venous blood was obtained for 4d, for stereoselective determination of methadone and metabolites. Pain assessments were made each morning. Daily and total opioid consumption was determined. Perioperative opioid consumption and pain was determined in a second cohort, which was matched to age, sex, race, ethnicity, surgical procedure, and length of stay, but not receiving methadone. Results The final methadone study cohort was 31 adolescents (14 ± 2 yr, range 10–18) undergoing major spine surgery for a diagnosis of scoliosis. Methadone pharmacokinetics were linear over the dose range 0.1–0.3 mg/kg. Disposition was stereoselective. Methadone administration did not dose-dependently affect postoperative pain scores, and did not dose-dependently decrease daily or total postoperative opioid consumption in spinal fusion patients. Conclusions Methadone enantiomers disposition in adolescents undergoing surgery was similar to that in healthy adults. PMID:22037641

  8. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of genetically-engineered antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colcher, D.; Pavlinkova, G.; Beresford, G.; Booth, B.J.M.; Choudhury, A.; Batra, S.K.; Omaha, Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, NE

    1998-01-01

    Genetic manipulations of the immunoglobulin molecules are effective means of altering stability, functional affinity, pharmacokinetics, and biodistribution of the antibodies required for the generation of the 'magic bullet'

  9. Overweight dogs are more likely to display undesirable behaviours: results of a large online survey of dog owners in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Alexander J; Blackwell, Emily; Evans, Mark; Westgarth, Carri

    2017-01-01

    Much of the global canine population is now overweight, and this can adversely affect health, lifespan and quality of life. Undesirable behaviours are also common in pet dogs, and these can adversely affect welfare, as well as being stressful to owners. However, links between obesity and behavioural disorders have never previously been explored. An online survey was conducted between June and August in 2014, coinciding with the broadcast of a National UK television programme, exploring dog health, welfare and behaviour. Information gathered included signalment, overweight status and the prevalence of a range of undesirable behaviours. Fisher's exact test and OR were used to determine associations between overweight status and owner-reported behaviours. A total of 17 028 responses were received. After data verification, the final dataset comprised 11 154 dogs, 1801 (16·1 %) of which were reported by owners to be overweight. Owners of overweight dogs were more likely to see them as 'a baby' ( P  dogs were also more likely to guard food ( P  dogs included barking, growling or snapping at strangers ( P  = 0·0011) and other dogs ( P  = 0·0015), being fearful of outdoors ( P  dog's health ( P  dogs. Further studies are now required to explore the reasons for these associations.

  10. Pegylated interferon fractal pharmacokinetics: individualized dosing for hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Mamta K; Pasipanodya, Jotam G; Alder, Lara; Lee, William M; Gumbo, Tawanda

    2013-03-01

    Despite recent advances in hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapeutics, the combination of pegylated interferon and ribavirin (PEGIFN/RBV) remains the cornerstone of treatment. Optimization and individualization of PEGIFN dosing could improve outcomes. Week one PEGIFN serum concentrations in 42 HCV genotype 1-infected patients treated with conventional PEGIFN/RBV were analyzed using multicompartmental pharmacokinetic models. For each patient, pharmacokinetic parameter estimates, weight, age, interleukin-28B (IL-28B) single-nucleotide polymorphism, CD4 count, baseline HCV RNA, gender, race, and HIV status were examined using classification and regression tree analysis to identify factors predictive of sustained viral response (SVR). Survival analysis was performed to compare the time to undetectable viral load in patients with and without the highest scoring predictor. PEGIFN concentrations varied at least 87-fold. Pharmacokinetics were best described by a two-compartment model with an 8.4-h absorption lag. Patient weight correlated with PEGIFN systemic clearance based on fractal geometry relationships. SVR was achieved in 36% of patients; a PEGIFN cumulative 1-week area under the curve (AUC) of ≤0.79 mg · h/liter scored highest in predicting poor response, followed by a weight of ≥93.7 kg. Patients with a PEGIFN AUC of >0.79 mg · h/liter achieved undetectable viral load more rapidly than those with a lower AUC (hazard ratio, 1.63; 95% confidence interval, 1.21 to 2.04). PEGIFN exhibits wide pharmacokinetic variability, mainly driven by patient weight, so that the standard dose may not reach levels needed to achieve SVR. Optimizing dose to patient weight and PEGIFN AUC in the first week offers a solution to improve SVR and to potentially shorten duration of therapy.

  11. Pharmacokinetic and toxicodynamic evaluation of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy and hematological toxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yukako; Kobuchi, Shinji; Shimizu, Risa; Katsuyama, Yosuke

    2018-01-01

    Oxaliplatin (L-OHP) is a third-generation, platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent and is widely used in gastroenterological cancer regimens. It is important to complete chemotherapy cycles to improve treatment efficacy for cancer patients. However, undesirable side effects, including acute and chronic neuropathies, and myelosuppression, lead to the discontinuation of chemotherapy in some treatment regimens. To predict and prevent the onset of side effects, and to establish appropriate dose adjustment, pharmacokinetic and toxicodynamic studies were performed to investigate the effects of L-OHP in rats. Rats were administered intravenous L-OHP, once a week for 4 weeks, at doses of 3, 5, or 8 mg/kg. Pharmacokinetic profiles were observed on Day 1 and Day 22. Acute and chronic neuropathies were evaluated over 4 weeks; cold allodynia was evaluated using an acetone test and mechanical allodynia using the von Frey test. Hematological parameters were also investigated during the same period. The mean AUC0-∞ values for L-OHP were 0.4 ± 0.2, 2.4 ± 0.4, and 3.5 ± 0.9 ng h/mL, increasing dose-dependently on Day 1. The accumulation of L-OHP on Day 22 was observed after repeated administration of L-OHP, as shown by mean AUC0-∞ values of 0.6 ± 0.2, 4.0 ± 1.0, and 14.1 ± 9.8 ng·h/mL, for the three doses. Cold allodynia was observed from Day 3 in the 5 and 8 mg/kg groups, and the extent of this response was dose-dependent. Mechanical allodynia was also observed from Day 10 in the 5 and 8 mg/kg groups. Moreover, the platelet count was the most sensitive among the hematological parameters. These results provide useful experimental data for clinical cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, to establish a pharmacokinetic and toxicodynamic model of L-OHP for adequate dose adjustment.

  12. Energy poor or fuel poor: What are the differences?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Kang; Lloyd, Bob; Liang, Xiao-Jie; Wei, Yi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Energy poverty and fuel poverty are descriptors of problems of households' energy consumption, they are both distinct problems and have been addressed by many researchers, organizations and governments. Cross use of the terms of energy poverty and fuel poverty in published papers is common. As an accurate descriptor is the presupposition of research and policy development, especially for those who just started to pay attention to this issue, this paper compares the definitions, research priorities, status quo, and problems of these two concepts, and summarizes the relationship between them. The paper suggests that only when the research targets are households who are living in a cold climate and have difficulty in getting access to electricity or modern cooking facilities, and in supplying indoor heating with appropriate cost, the concepts of energy poverty and fuel poverty have the chance to be broadened and mutually integrated. - Highlights: • Address energy poverty and fuel poverty simultaneously. • Compare energy poverty and fuel poverty from 4 perspectives. • Summarize the relationship between energy poverty and fuel poverty. • Divide energy poor and fuel poor into three categories

  13. Pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions with traditional Chinese medicine: progress, causes of conflicting results and suggestions for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Bing-Liang; Ma, Yue-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has a long history of medical use in China and is still used worldwide. Unexpected herb-drug interactions (HDIs) may lead to adverse drug reactions or loss of therapeutic efficacy of the victim drug. Here, based on searches of Medline, EBSCO, Science Direct and Web of Science using various keywords, we summarize the TCM-derived pharmacokinetic HDIs that were reported from 1990 to 2015 and discuss the underlying mechanisms. In general, many pre-clinical and clinical pharmacokinetic HDIs have been reported. Our searches show that TCMs cause pharmacokinetic interactions with therapeutic drugs mainly by inhibiting or inducing drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. However, most of the interactions result from a small number of prescription medications and the actual potential for harm is low. Moreover, such HDIs can be avoided by discontinuing the TCMs. Despite the extensive number of reports on TCM-derived HDIs, the findings are frequently conflicting and can be confusing. The causes of the conflicts vary, but we classified them into three basic categories as follows: (1) complicated nature and poor quality control of TCMs, (2) different responses of various test systems to TCM exposure and (3) diverse study designs. Accordingly, we propose rational study designs for future HDI research. We also propose that a specific authoritative guide be established that provides recommendations for HDI studies. This review provides insights into the progress and challenges in TCM-derived pharmacokinetic HDI research.

  14. Pharmacokinetic properties of 2nd-generation fibroblast growth factor-1 mutants for therapeutic application.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Xia

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor-1 (FGF-1 is an angiogenic factor with therapeutic potential for the treatment of ischemic disease. FGF-1 has low intrinsic thermostability and is characteristically formulated with heparin as a stabilizing agent. Heparin, however, adds a number of undesirable properties that negatively impact safety and cost. Mutations that increase the thermostability of FGF-1 may obviate the need for heparin in formulation and may prove to be useful "2nd-generation" forms for therapeutic use. We report a pharmacokinetic (PK study in rabbits of human FGF-1 in the presence and absence of heparin, as well as three mutant forms having differential effects upon thermostability, buried reactive thiols, and heparin affinity. The results support the hypothesis that heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG in the vasculature of liver, kidney and spleen serves as the principle peripheral compartment in the distribution kinetics. The addition of heparin to FGF-1 is shown to increase endocrine-like properties of distribution. Mutant forms of FGF-1 that enhance thermostability or eliminate buried reactive thiols demonstrate a shorter distribution half-life, a longer elimination half-life, and a longer mean residence time (MRT in comparison to wild-type FGF-1. The results show how such mutations can produce useful 2nd-generation forms with tailored PK profiles for specific therapeutic application.

  15. Pharmacokinetics of selenium after sodium selenite administration to rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natsuhori, Masahiro; Nagaoka, Tamae; Ito, Nobuhiko

    1998-01-01

    Selenium (Se) concentrations in plasma, urine, and feces were determined by PIXE analysis before and after intravenous (iv) / oral (po) administration of sodium selenite (a dose equivalent to 2 mg/kg of selenium) to rats. The concentration-time profiles of Se were analyzed by a pharmacokinetic approach. The plasma Se profile after iv injection was biphasic and well-fit to a 2-compartment open model, showing two half lives (tl/2). The first tl/2 was about 0.3 hr and the second tl/2 was 6.9 hrs. The plasma concentration reached almost basal level after about 80 hrs of injection. On the other hand, plasma profiles after po administration showed absorption rate-limiting elimination. The bioavailability of oral sodium selenite (about 49%) and significantly higher amount of fecal Se excretion indicated relatively poor intestinal absorption of sodium selenite, compared to the previously published data. Urinary Se excretion was almost comparable between iv and po groups. The total recovery of the dose excreted in urine and feces was 30 ± 10% in iv and 56 ± 15% in po group. The renal excretion was considered to be a major route of Se excretion after absorption. Significant amount of Se that was not fully excreted was noted, suggesting Se distribution or accumulation in organs, together with volatile excretion. (author)

  16. Poorly studied phenomena in geoelectrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. С. Могилатов

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Undoubtedly, modern geoelectric technologies emerge in the result of the development of traditional approaches and techniques. However of more interest is the appearance of completely new technologies based on new effects and new models of interaction of geological medium and electromagnetic field. The author does not commit to indicate principally new directions, but only wants to discuss some poorly known facts from the theory and practice of geoelectrics. The outcome of this study could be considered attracting the attention of experts to non-traditional signals in geoelectrics. The reviewed phenomena of interest, not fully implemented in practice in the author’s opinion, are field split into two polarizations: transverse electric (the ТЕ-field and transverse magnetic (the ТМ-field, then some poorly known properties of ТМ-field, the role of bias currents, the anisotropy of horizontal resistances, the role of geomagnetic field in geoelectric sounding, the unique resolution of CSEM (Controlled Source Electro-Magnetic techniques at sea.

  17. 'Direct and Indirect Shadow Price Estimates of Nitrate Pollution Treated as an Undesirable Output and Input', Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics Vol. 27, No. 2 (December 2002) pp: 420-432.

    OpenAIRE

    Saleem Shaik; Glenn A Helmers; Michael Langemeier

    2005-01-01

    The implication of treating environmental pollution as an undesirable output (weak disposability) as well as a normal input (strong disposability) on the direct and indirect shadow price and cost estimates of nitrogen pollution abatement is analyzed using Nebraska agriculture sector data. The shadow price of nitrogen pollution abatement treated as an undesirable output represents the reduced revenue from reducing nitrogen pollution. In contrast, the shadow price of nitrogen pollution abatemen...

  18. 1,3-disubstituted ureas functionalized with ether groups are potent inhibitors of the soluble epoxide hydrolase with improved pharmacokinetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In-Hae; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Nishi, Kosuke; Kasagami, Takeo; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D

    2007-10-18

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a therapeutic target for treating hypertension and inflammation. 1,3-Disubstituted ureas functionalized with an ether group are potent sEH inhibitors. However, their relatively low metabolic stability leads to poor pharmacokinetic properties. To improve their bioavailability, we investigated the effect of incorporating various polar groups on the ether function on the inhibition potencies, physical properties, in vitro metabolic stability, and pharmacokinetic properties. The structure-activity relationship studies showed that a hydrophobic linker between the urea group and the ether function is necessary to keep their potency. In addition, urea-ether inhibitors having a polar group such as diethylene glycol or morpholine significantly improved their physical properties and metabolic stability without any loss of inhibitory potency. Furthermore, improved pharmacokinetic properties in murine and canine models were obtained with the resulting inhibitors. These findings will facilitate the usage of sEH inhibitors in animal models of hypertension and inflammation.

  19. Population pharmacokinetics and relationship between demographic and clinical variables and pharmacokinetics of gentamicin in neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, L M L; Degraeuwe, P L J; Nieman, F H M; de Wolf, M C; de Boer, A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075097346

    Population pharmacokinetic parameter estimates were calculated from 725 routine plasma gentamicin concentrations obtained in 177 neonates of 24 to 42 weeks' gestational age in their first week of life. Kel increases and V/W decreases with increasing gestational age. Almost identical results were

  20. Influence of obesity on propofol pharmacokinetics : derivation of a pharmacokinetic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortinez, L. I.; Anderson, B. J.; Penna, A.; Olivares, L.; Munoz, H. R.; Holford, N. H. G.; Struys, M. M. R. F.; Sepulveda, P.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a pharmacokinetic (PK) model to characterize the influence of obesity on propofol PK parameters. Nineteen obese ASA II patients undergoing bariatric surgery were studied. Patients received propofol 2 mg kg(-1) bolus dose followed by a 5-20-40-120 min,

  1. Prediction of human CNS pharmacokinetics using a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamamoto, Yumi; Valitalo, Pyry A.; Wong, Yin Cheong; Huntjens, Dymphy R.; Proost, Johannes H.; Vermeulen, An; Krauwinkel, Walter; Beukers, Margot W.; Kokki, Hannu; Kokki, Merja; Danhof, Meindert; van Hasselt, Johan G. C.; de Lange, Elizabeth C. M.

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of drug concentration-time profiles at the central nervous system (CNS) target-site is critically important for rational development of CNS targeted drugs. Our aim was to translate a recently published comprehensive CNS physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model from rat to human,

  2. Quinine pharmacokinetics in young children with severe malaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hensbroek, M. B.; Kwiatkowski, D.; van den Berg, B.; Hoek, F. J.; van Boxtel, C. J.; Kager, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    Children less than two years of age represent a substantial proportion of severe malaria cases in Africa. The standard treatment is parenteral quinine, but little is known about the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of quinine in this age group. We have studied the pharmacokinetics of quinine after

  3. Pharmacokinetics of Single Dose Intravenous Paracetamol in Children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A new intravenous formulation containing paracetamol is now available and widely used in chil-dren, but with limited paediatric pharmacokinetic data. This study was aimed at determining the effects of age on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of this formulation of paracetamol in children. Blood samples were obtained from 24 ...

  4. Effect of mixed film coating on pharmacokinetics of paracetamol tablets

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of mixed film coating on pharmacokinetics of paracetamol tablets. ... The main pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using non-compartmental analysis. ... The rate and extent of drug absorption was low in the film-coated tablets compared to the uncoated tablets, demonstrating the ability of the mixed films to ...

  5. Acetaminophen developmental pharmacokinetics in premature neonates and infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Brian J; van Lingen, Richard A; Hansen, Tom G

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe acetaminophen developmental pharmacokinetics in premature neonates through infancy to suggest age-appropriate dosing regimens.......The aim of this study was to describe acetaminophen developmental pharmacokinetics in premature neonates through infancy to suggest age-appropriate dosing regimens....

  6. Analysis of regional total factor energy efficiency in China under environmental constraints: based on undesirable-minds and DEA window model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuying; Li, Deshan; Li, Shuangqiang; Jiang, Hanyu; Shen, Yuqing

    2017-06-01

    With China’s entrance into the new economy, the improvement of energy efficiency has become an important indicator to measure the quality of ecological civilization construction and economic development. According to the panel data of Chinese regions in 1996-2014, the nearest distance to the efficient frontier of Undesirable-MinDS Xeon model and DEA window model have been used to calculate the total factor energy efficiency of China’s regions. Study found that: Under environmental constraints, China’s total factor energy efficiency has increased after the first drop in the overall 1996-2014, and then increases again. And the difference between the regions is very large, showing a characteristic of “the east is the highest, the west is lower, and lowest is in the central” finally, this paper puts forward relevant policy suggestions.

  7. [Advances on pharmacokinetics of traditional Chinese medicine under disease states].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zi-peng; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Rui-jie; Yang, Qing; Zhu, Xiao-xin

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, more and more research shows that the pharmacokinetic parameter of traditional Chinese medicine can be affected by the disease states. It's possible that drug metabolic enzymes, transporters, cell membrane permeability and the change of microbes group could be interfered with physiological and pathological changes, which enables the pharmacokinetics of traditional Chinese medicine in the body to be altered, including the process of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion, and then the pharmacokinetic parameters of traditional chinese medicine are altered. It's found that investigating the pharmacokinetic of traditional Chinese medicine in the pathological state is more useful than that of in normal state because the great part of traditional Chinese medicine is mainly used to treat disease. This article reflects the latest research on the pharmacokinetic of traditional Chinese medicine in the disease state such as diabete, cerebral ischemia, liver injury, inflammatory disease, nervous system disorders and fever in order to provide certain reference for clinicians designing reasonable administration dose.

  8. Serving the world's poor, profitably.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahalad, C K; Hammond, Allen

    2002-09-01

    By stimulating commerce and development at the bottom of the economic pyramid, multi-nationals could radically improve the lives of billions of people and help create a more stable, less dangerous world. Achieving this goal does not require MNCs to spearhead global social-development initiatives for charitable purposes. They need only act in their own self-interest. How? The authors lay out the business case for entering the world's poorest markets. Fully 65% of the world's population earns less than $2,000 per year--that's 4 billion people. But despite the vastness of this market, it remains largely untapped. The reluctance to invest is easy to understand, but it is, by and large, based on outdated assumptions of the developing world. While individual incomes may be low, the aggregate buying power of poor communities is actually quite large, representing a substantial market in many countries for what some might consider luxury goods like satellite television and phone services. Prices, and margins, are often much higher in poor neighborhoods than in their middle-class counterparts. And new technologies are already steadily reducing the effects of corruption, illiteracy, inadequate infrastructure, and other such barriers. Because these markets are in the earliest stages of economic development, revenue growth for multi-nationals entering them can be extremely rapid. MNCs can also lower costs, not only through low-cost labor but by transferring operating efficiencies and innovations developed to serve their existing operations. Certainly, succeeding in such markets requires MNCs to think creatively. The biggest change, though, has to come from executives: Unless business leaders confront their own preconceptions--particularly about the value of high-volume, low-margin businesses--companies are unlikely to master the challenges or reap the rewards of these developing markets.

  9. Low heritability in pharmacokinetics of talinolol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthaei, Johannes; Tzvetkov, Mladen V; Gal, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Efflux transporters like MDR1 and MRP2 may modulate the pharmacokinetics of about 50 % of all drugs. It is currently unknown how much of the variation in the activities of important drug membrane transporters like MDR1 or MRP2 is determined by genetic or by environmental factors...... of talinolol was predefined as the primary parameter. Heritability was analyzed by structural equation modeling and by within- and between-subject variance and talinolol clearance was correlated with polymorphisms in MDR1, MRP2, BCRP, MDR5, OATP1B1, and OCT1. RESULTS: Talinolol clearance varied approximately...

  10. Human pharmacokinetics of proguanil and its metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Ravn, P; Rønn, A

    1987-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of proguanil and its metabolites cycloguanil and p-chlorophenylbiguanide were studied in five healthy volunteers taking 200 mg orally for 14 days. A highly sensitive and specific high-performance liquid chromatographic assay was applied, clearly identifying all three compounds...... of proguanil and cycloguanil appeared after seven hours. Trough concentrations (pre-dose in the morning) of proguanil and cycloguanil were about 200 and 100 nmol/l, respectively. Mean half-life of proguanil was estimated to approximately 20 h. The active metabolite cycloguanil constituted 30% of the total...

  11. Human physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for propofol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schnider Thomas W

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Propofol is widely used for both short-term anesthesia and long-term sedation. It has unusual pharmacokinetics because of its high lipid solubility. The standard approach to describing the pharmacokinetics is by a multi-compartmental model. This paper presents the first detailed human physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK model for propofol. Methods PKQuest, a freely distributed software routine http://www.pkquest.com, was used for all the calculations. The "standard human" PBPK parameters developed in previous applications is used. It is assumed that the blood and tissue binding is determined by simple partition into the tissue lipid, which is characterized by two previously determined set of parameters: 1 the value of the propofol oil/water partition coefficient; 2 the lipid fraction in the blood and tissues. The model was fit to the individual experimental data of Schnider et. al., Anesthesiology, 1998; 88:1170 in which an initial bolus dose was followed 60 minutes later by a one hour constant infusion. Results The PBPK model provides a good description of the experimental data over a large range of input dosage, subject age and fat fraction. Only one adjustable parameter (the liver clearance is required to describe the constant infusion phase for each individual subject. In order to fit the bolus injection phase, for 10 or the 24 subjects it was necessary to assume that a fraction of the bolus dose was sequestered and then slowly released from the lungs (characterized by two additional parameters. The average weighted residual error (WRE of the PBPK model fit to the both the bolus and infusion phases was 15%; similar to the WRE for just the constant infusion phase obtained by Schnider et. al. using a 6-parameter NONMEM compartmental model. Conclusion A PBPK model using standard human parameters and a simple description of tissue binding provides a good description of human propofol kinetics. The major advantage of a

  12. Solid lipid nanoparticles as oral delivery systems of phenolic compounds: Overcoming pharmacokinetic limitations for nutraceutical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Sara; Madureira, Ana Raquel; Campos, Débora; Sarmento, Bruno; Gomes, Ana Maria; Pintado, Manuela; Reis, Flávio

    2017-06-13

    Drug delivery systems, accompanied by nanoparticle technology, have recently emerged as prominent solutions to improve the pharmacokinetic properties, namely bioavailability, of therapeutic and nutraceutical agents. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have received much attention from researchers due to their potential to protect or improve drug properties. SLNs have been reported to be an alternative system to traditional carriers, such as emulsions, liposomes, and polymeric nanoparticles. Phenolic compounds are widespread in plant-derived foodstuffs and therefore abundant in our diet. Over the last decades, phenolic compounds have received considerable attention due to several health promoting properties, mostly related to their antioxidant activity, which can have important implications for health. However, most of these compounds have been associated with poor bioavailability being poorly absorbed, rapidly metabolized and eliminated, which compromises its biological and pharmacological benefits. This paper provides a systematic review of the use of SLNs as oral delivery systems of phenolic compounds, in order to overcome pharmacokinetic limitations of these compounds and improved nutraceutical potential. In vitro studies, as well as works describing topical and oral treatments will be revisited and discussed. The classification, synthesis, and clinical application of these nanomaterials will be also considered in this review article.

  13. Disclosure of pharmacokinetic drug results to understand nonadherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Straten, Ariane; Montgomery, Elizabeth T; Musara, Petina; Etima, Juliane; Naidoo, Sarita; Laborde, Nicole; Hartmann, Miriam; Levy, Lisa; Bennie, Thola; Cheng, Helen; Piper, Jeanna; Grossman, Cynthia I; Marrazzo, Jeanne; Mensch, Barbara

    2015-10-23

    In VOICE, a phase IIB trial of daily oral and vaginal tenofovir for HIV prevention, at least 50% of women receiving active products had undetectable tenofovir in all plasma samples tested. MTN-003D, an ancillary study using in-depth interviews (IDIs) and focus group discussions (FGDs), together with retrospective disclosure of plasma tenofovir pharmacokinetic results, explored adherence challenges during VOICE. We systematically recruited participants with pharmacokinetic data (median six plasma samples), categorized as low (0%, N = 79), inconsistent (1-74%, N = 28) or high (≥75%; N = 20) on the basis of frequency of tenofovir detection. Following disclosure of pharmacokinetic results, reactions were captured and adherence challenges systematically elicited; IDIs and FGDs were audio-recorded, transcribed, coded and thematically analysed. We interviewed 127 participants from South Africa, Uganda and Zimbabwe. The most common reactions to pharmacokinetic results included surprise (41%; low pharmacokinetic), acceptance (39%; inconsistent pharmacokinetic) and happiness (65%; high pharmacokinetic). On the basis of participants' explanations, we developed a typology of adherence patterns: noninitiation, discontinuation, misimplementation (resulting from visit-driven use, variable taking, modified dosing or regimen) and adherence. Fear of product side effects/harm was a frequent concern, fuelled by stories shared among participants. Although women with high pharmacokinetic levels reported similar concerns, several described strategies to overcome challenges. Women at all pharmacokinetic levels suggested real-time drug monitoring and feedback to improve adherence and reporting. Retrospective provision of pharmacokinetic results seemingly promoted candid discussions around nonadherence and study participation. The effect of real-time drug monitoring and feedback on adherence and accuracy of reporting should be evaluated in trials.

  14. Undesirable behavior in forest campgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger N. Clark

    1971-01-01

    A 3-year study indicates that nuisance behaviors, law violations, vandalism, and littering in forest campgrounds are more extensive than is generally believed. All campers share responsibility for the problems. Violations occur because of ignorance of, lack of understanding, or a willingness to disregard rules. Control measures are discussed, including an incentive...

  15. Systematic considerations for a multicomponent pharmacokinetic study of Epimedii wushanensis herba: From method establishment to pharmacokinetic marker selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Caihong; Wu, Caisheng; Zhang, Jinlan; Jin, Ying

    2015-04-15

    Prenylflavonoids are major active components of Epimedii wushanensis herba (EWH). The global pharmacokinetics of prenylflavonoids are unclear, as these compounds yield multiple, often unidentified metabolites. This study successfully elucidated the pharmacokinetic profiles of EWH extract and five EWH-derived prenylflavonoid monomers in rats. The study was a comprehensive analysis of metabolic pathways and pharmacokinetic markers. Major plasma compounds identified after oral administration of EWH-derived prototypes or extract included: (1) prenylflavonoid prototypes, (2) deglycosylated products, and (3) glucuronide conjugates. To select appropriate EWH-derived pharmacokinetic markers, a high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method was established to simultaneously monitor 14 major compounds in unhydrolyzed plasma and 10 potential pharmacokinetic markers in hydrolyzed plasma. The pharmacokinetic profiles indicated that the glucuronide conjugates of icaritin were the principle circulating metabolites and that total icaritin accounted for ∼99% of prenylflavonoid exposure after administration of EWH-derived materials to rats. To further investigate icaritin as a prospective pharmacokinetic marker, correlation analysis was performed between total icaritin and its glucuronide conjugates, and a strong correlation (r > 0.5) was found, indicating that total icaritin content accurately reflected changes in the exposure levels of the glucuronide conjugates over time. Therefore, icaritin is a sufficient pharmacokinetic marker for evaluating dynamic prenylflavonoid exposure levels. Next, a mathematical model was developed based on the prenylflavonoid content of EWH and the exposure levels in rats, using icaritin as the pharmacokinetic marker. This model accurately predicted exposure levels in vivo, with similar predicted vs. experimental area under the curve (AUC)(0-96 h) values for total icaritin (24.1 vs. 32.0 mg/L h). Icaritin in

  16. Pharmacokinetics and drug metabolism in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Aging involves progressive impairments in the functional reserve of multiple organs, which might also affect drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics. In addition, the elderly population will develop multiple diseases and, consequently, often has to take several drugs. As the hepatic first-pass effect of highly cleared drugs could be reduced (due to decreases in liver mass and perfusion), the bioavailability of some drugs can be increased in the elderly. Significant changes in body composition occur with advancing age. Lipophilic drugs may have an increased volume of distribution (Vd) with a prolonged half-life, and water-soluble drugs tend to have a smaller Vd. In the elderly, hepatic drug clearance of some drugs can be reduced by up to 30% and CYP-mediated phase I reactions are more likely to be impaired than phase II metabolism, which is relatively preserved in the elderly. Concerning the most important CYP3A4 studies with human liver microsomes and clinical studies with the validated probe, midazolam, it is indicated that there are no significant differences in CYP3A4 activity between young and old populations. Finally, renal excretion is decreased (up to 50%) in about two thirds of elderly subjects, but confounding factors such as hypertension and coronary heart disease account also for a decline in kidney function. In conclusion, age-related physiological and pharmacokinetic changes as well as the presence of comorbidity and polypharmacy will complicate drug therapy in the elderly.

  17. Preparation and ocular pharmacokinetics of ganciclovir liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yan; Tu, Jiasheng

    2007-12-07

    Ophthalmic liposomes of ganciclovir (GCV) were prepared by the reverse phase evaporation method, and their ocular pharmacokinetics in albino rabbits were compared with those obtained after dosing with GCV solution. The in vitro transcorneal permeability of GCV liposomes was found to be 3.9-fold higher than that of the solution. After in vivo instillation in albino rabbits, no difference was found in the precorneal elimination rate of GCV from liposome vs solution dosing. The aqueous humor concentration-time profiles of both liposomes and solution were well described by 2-compartmental pharmacokinetics with first-order absorption. The area under the curve of the aqueous humor concentration-time profiles of GCV liposomes was found to be 1.7-fold higher than that of GCV solution. Ocular tissue distribution of GCV from liposomes was 2 to 10 times higher in the sclera, cornea, iris, lens, and vitreous humor when compared with those observed after solution dosing. These results suggested that liposomes may hold some promise in ocular GCV delivery.

  18. Drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics: Technological considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wolf, A.P.

    1992-01-01

    Additionally, the use of PET to examine drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacadynamics and the relationship of these properties to the behavioral, therapeutic and toxic properties of drugs and substances of abuse is emerging as a powerful new scientific tool. The pharmacokinetic properties of a drug, which comprises all of the biological processes which determine the fraction of the drug available, can be measured using the labeled drug itself. For example, the labeled drug can be used to measure the absolute uptake, regional distribution and kinetics of a drug at its site of action in the body. Additionally the labeled drug and whole body its labeled metabolites and thus provide information an potential toxic effects as well as tissue half lives. On the other hand, different labeled tracers can be used to assess drug pharmacodynamics which include the biological Processes involved in the drug's effects. For example, with appropriate radiotracers, the effects of a drug on metabolism, neurotransmitter activity, blood flew, enzyme activity or other processes can be probed.

  19. Drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics: Technological considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wolf, A.P.

    1992-12-31

    Additionally, the use of PET to examine drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacadynamics and the relationship of these properties to the behavioral, therapeutic and toxic properties of drugs and substances of abuse is emerging as a powerful new scientific tool. The pharmacokinetic properties of a drug, which comprises all of the biological processes which determine the fraction of the drug available, can be measured using the labeled drug itself. For example, the labeled drug can be used to measure the absolute uptake, regional distribution and kinetics of a drug at its site of action in the body. Additionally the labeled drug and whole body its labeled metabolites and thus provide information an potential toxic effects as well as tissue half lives. On the other hand, different labeled tracers can be used to assess drug pharmacodynamics which include the biological Processes involved in the drug`s effects. For example, with appropriate radiotracers, the effects of a drug on metabolism, neurotransmitter activity, blood flew, enzyme activity or other processes can be probed.

  20. Drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics: Technological considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wolf, A.P.

    1992-01-01

    Additionally, the use of PET to examine drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacadynamics and the relationship of these properties to the behavioral, therapeutic and toxic properties of drugs and substances of abuse is emerging as a powerful new scientific tool. The pharmacokinetic properties of a drug, which comprises all of the biological processes which determine the fraction of the drug available, can be measured using the labeled drug itself. For example, the labeled drug can be used to measure the absolute uptake, regional distribution and kinetics of a drug at its site of action in the body. Additionally the labeled drug and whole body its labeled metabolites and thus provide information an potential toxic effects as well as tissue half lives. On the other hand, different labeled tracers can be used to assess drug pharmacodynamics which include the biological Processes involved in the drug's effects. For example, with appropriate radiotracers, the effects of a drug on metabolism, neurotransmitter activity, blood flew, enzyme activity or other processes can be probed

  1. Physiologic and Pharmacokinetic Changes in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maged eCostantine

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Physiologic changes in pregnancy induce profound alterations to the pharmacokinetic properties of many medications. These changes affect distribution, absorption, metabolism, and excretion of drugs, and thus may impact their pharmacodynamic properties during pregnancy. Pregnant women undergo several adaptations in many organ systems. Some adaptations are secondary to hormonal changes in pregnancy, while others occur to support the gravid woman and her developing fetus. Some of the changes in maternal physiology during pregnancy include, for example, increased maternal fat and total body water, decreased plasma protein concentrations, especially albumin, increased maternal blood volume, cardiac output and blood flow to the kidneys and uteroplacental unit, and decreased blood pressure. The maternal blood volume expansion occurs at a larger proportion than the increase in red blood cell mass, which results in physiologic anemia and hemodilution. Other physiologic changes include increased tidal volume, partially compensated respiratory alkalosis, delayed gastric emptying and gastrointestinal motility, and altered activity of hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes. Understating these changes and their profound impact on the pharmacokinetic properties of drugs in pregnancy is essential to optimize maternal and fetal health.

  2. Intravenous buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine pharmacokinetics in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huestis, M.A.; Cone, E.J.; Pirnay, S.O.; Umbricht, A.; Preston, K.L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prescribed sublingual (SL) buprenorphine is sometimes diverted for intravenous (IV) abuse, but no human pharmacokinetic data are available following high-dose IV buprenorphine. Methods Plasma was collected for 72 h after administration of placebo or 2, 4, 8, 12, or 16 mg IV buprenorphine in escalating order (single-blind, double-dummy) in 5 healthy male non-dependent opioid users. Buprenorphine and its primary active metabolite, norbuprenorphine, were quantified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with limits of quantitation of 0.1 μg/L. Results Maximum buprenorphine concentrations (mean ± SE) were detected 10 min after 2, 4, 8, 12, 16 mg IV: 19.3±1.0, 44.5±4.8, 85.2±7.7, 124.6±16.6, and 137.7±18.8 μg/L, respectively. Maximum norbuprenorphine concentrations occurred 10–15 min (3.7±0.7 μg/L) after 16 mg IV administration. Conclusions Buprenorphine concentrations increased in a significantly linear dose-dependent manner up to 12 mg IV buprenorphine. Thus, previously demonstrated pharmacodynamic ceiling effects (over 2–16 mg) are not due to pharmacokinetic adaptations within this range, although they may play a role at doses higher than 12 mg. PMID:23246635

  3. The Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Iron Preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Burckhardt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Standard approaches are not appropriate when assessing pharmacokinetics of iron supplements due to the ubiquity of endogenous iron, its compartmentalized sites of action, and the complexity of the iron metabolism. The primary site of action of iron is the erythrocyte, and, in contrast to conventional drugs, no drug-receptor interaction takes place. Notably, the process of erythropoiesis, i.e., formation of new erythrocytes, takes 3−4 weeks. Accordingly, serum iron concentration and area under the curve (AUC are clinically irrelevant for assessing iron utilization. Iron can be administered intravenously in the form of polynuclear iron(III-hydroxide complexes with carbohydrate ligands or orally as iron(II (ferrous salts or iron(III (ferric complexes. Several approaches have been employed to study the pharmacodynamics of iron after oral administration. Quantification of iron uptake from radiolabeled preparations by the whole body or the erythrocytes is optimal, but alternatively total iron transfer can be calculated based on known elimination rates and the intrinsic reactivity of individual preparations. Degradation kinetics, and thus the safety, of parenteral iron preparations are directly related to the molecular weight and the stability of the complex. High oral iron doses or rapid release of iron from intravenous iron preparations can saturate the iron transport system, resulting in oxidative stress with adverse clinical and subclinical consequences. Appropriate pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics analyses will greatly assist our understanding of the likely contribution of novel preparations to the management of anemia.

  4. Pro Poor Growth in Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Fambon

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to analyze the relationship between economic growth, poverty and income distribution in Cameroon, using both the data derived from three Cameroonian household surveys and the Poverty Equivalent Growth Rate (PEGR methodology developed by Kakwani et al. (2004, The study found that economic growth in Cameroon was pro poor over the period 1996–2007, which suggests that instead of increasing the economic growth rate alone, the poverty equivalent growth rate should also be maximized to achieve the poverty reduction objective, meaning that on the one hand, the growth rate should be boosted, and on the other, the distribution of income should also be concurrently improved. A decomposition of changes in poverty using the Kakwani (1997 approach reveal that the growth component dominates the redistribution component in the reduction of poverty. This suggests that the fall in absolute poverty over the survey period may be attributed to an increase in average household income, and not to the redistributive policies of the government.

  5. [Discussion about traditional Chinese medicine pharmacokinetics study based on first botanical drug approved by FDA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fanghua

    2010-04-01

    Pharmacokinetics study is one of main components of pharmaceuticals development. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Veregen as the first botanical drug in 2006. This article introduced FDA's requirement on pharmacokinetics study of botanical drug and pharmacokinetics studies of Veregen, summarized current requirement and status quo of pharmacokinetics study on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and natural medicine in China, and discussed about pharmacokinetics study strategy for TCM and natural medicine.

  6. Diferentes métodos de controle de plantas indesejáveis em pastagem nativa Different methods for controlling undesirable plants in native pasture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Giovani de Pellegrini

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available O experimento foi desenvolvido em área de pastagem nativa representativa da transição entre a Serra do Sudeste e a Depressão Central do Rio Grande do Sul, onde as espécies indesejáveis foram representadas especialmente por carqueja (Baccharis trimera (Less. DC., caraguatá (Eryngium horridum (Spreng. Less. e alecrim (Vernonia nudiflora Less.. Foram avaliados os efeitos iniciais de dois métodos de controle de espécies indesejáveis (até 60 dias após aplicação sobre a produção de forragem, a dinâmica da vegetação e a eficiência de controle: sem-controle; controle mecânico; e controle químico (herbicida comercial à base de Picloram [64 g/L] + 2,4-D [240 g/L], na dosagem de 5 L do produto comercial/ha. Os tratamentos foram arranjados em um delineamento em blocos ao acaso, com quatro repetições. A massa gramíneas verdes secas e a massa total de MS não diferiram entre os métodos de controle. Foram obtidos valores de 587,9; 472,0 e 0 kg de MS com o controle mecânico, o controle químico e sem-controle, respectivamente, o que comprova influência do método de controle sobre a massa de forragem de leguminosas. A eficiência de controle das espécies indesejáveis, em comparação à ausência de controle, foi de 76,2% para o controle químico e 27,9% para o controle mecânico. A eficiência de controle de espécies, sob aspectos de freqüência dos componentes da pastagem, evidenciou que o controle mecânico não foi eficiente aos 60 dias após aplicação no controle de plantas de alecrim no segundo toque (-27,7% e plantas de caraguatá no primeiro toque (-30,0%.The study was conducted in a representative native pasture area in the transition between the Serra do Sudeste and Depressão Central of RS. The main undesirable species were represented by: carqueja (Baccharis trimera (Less. DC., caraguatá (Eryngium horridum (Spreng. Less. and alecrim (Vernonia nudiflora Less. It was evaluated the initial effect (until 60 days after

  7. Obesity Does Not Affect Propofol Pharmacokinetics During Hypothermic Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Baraky, Iman A; Abbassi, Maggie M; Marei, Tarek A; Sabry, Nirmeen A

    2016-08-01

    Because of the lack of data regarding the impact of obesity on propofol pharmacokinetics in patients undergoing cardiac surgery using hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), the authors sought to explore propofol pharmacokinetics and develop a predictive pharmacokinetic model that characterizes and predicts propofol pharmacokinetics in this population. A prospective, observational study. A teaching hospital. The study comprised 17 obese and 17 control (nonobese) patients undergoing hypothermic CPB. None. Patients mainly underwent valve surgery. On initiation of hypothermic CPB (28°C-32°C), patients received a propofol (1%) bolus (1 mg/kg) immediately followed by a 2 mg/kg/h infusion. Blood samples were withdrawn at the following times: before dosing; 1, 3, 5, and 7 minutes after the propofol bolus dose; every 20 minutes during infusion; just before discontinuation of the infusion; and at 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 20, 30, and 60 minutes after discontinuation of the infusion. The plasma propofol concentration was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography, and then data were imported into Monolix (Lixoft, Antony, France) for population pharmacokinetic modeling and pharmacokinetic parameters estimation. A 2-compartment pharmacokinetic model with age as a covariate on the peripheral volume of distribution (V2) best described the pooled data. The pooled data was internally evaluated successfully to describe and predict propofol pharmacokinetics in the addressed population. Propofol clearance, intercompartmental clearance, and central volume of distribution were 805 mL/min, 1140 mL/min and 18.8 L, respectively. V2 was calculated as 9.86×exp.(1.88×[age/40]) L. Propofol pharmacokinetic parameters were similar in obese and nonobese patients undergoing hypothermic CPB. Age was the major determinant of propofol V2 in the obese population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Population Pharmacokinetics of Tracers: A New Tool for Medical Imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandia, Peggy; Jaudet, Cyril; Chatelut, Etienne; Concordet, Didier

    2017-02-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography is a medical imaging method measuring the activity of a radiotracer chosen to accumulate in cancer cells. A recent trend of medical imaging analysis is to account for the radiotracer's pharmacokinetic properties at a voxel (three-dimensional-pixel) level to separate the different tissues. These analyses are closely linked to population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modelling. Kineticists possess the cultural background to improve medical imaging analysis. This article stresses the common points with population pharmacokinetics and highlights the methodological locks that need to be lifted.

  9. [Pharmacokinetics of nitrosomethylurea in oncologic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, D B; Kim, O A; Gor'kov, V A

    1988-01-01

    Kinetics of blood-nitrosomethylurea (NMU) was studied in 68 patients with lung cancer, malignant melanoma and lymphoma who had received NMU-based combination chemotherapy. The results were used for computing main pharmacokinetic parameters such as logarithm of calculated initial concentration, time of half-elimination from blood, area under the kinetic curve of concentration, volume of distribution in the body and clearance. All those values were shown to significantly differ with individual patients. A longer retention of the drug in blood flow (as evidenced by increased time of half-elimination and area under kinetic curve matched by decreased volume of distribution and clearance) was registered in responders than in non-responders, the difference sometimes reaching statistical significance.

  10. Pharmacokinetics and metabolism of neurotensin in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J H; Andersen, H O; Olsen, P S

    1989-01-01

    We studied the pharmacokinetics, arteriovenous extraction, and degradation sites of neurotensin (NT) in man during iv infusions of synthetic intact NT [NT-(1-13)] and the NH2-terminal metabolite NT-(1-8) during lipid ingestion and by catheterization of various vascular beds in normal subjects.......6 mL/kg (range, 45.3-281.0). Significant peripheral arteriovenous extraction of NT-(1-13) was found at infusion rates of 144 and 288 pmol/kg.h. Extraction of NH2-terminal immunoreactivity was not significant. Intact NT was identified by gel chromatography in arterial plasma after lipid ingestion...... and iv infusion of NT-(1-13), but postprandially in only low concentrations. In 17 patients with various nonhepatic diseases, plasma intact NT levels were not different in blood sampled from the renal vein, inferior vena cava, brachial artery, or hepatic vein. In contrast, NH2-terminal immunoreactivity...

  11. Species differences in pharmacokinetics and drug teratogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nau, H.

    1986-12-01

    Interspecies differences in regard to the teratogenicity of drugs can be the result of differing pharmacokinetic processes that determine the crucial concentration-time relationships in the embryo. Maternal absorption, as well as distribution, of the drugs does not usually show great species differences. The first-pass effect after oral application is often more pronounced in animals than man (e.g., valproic acid, 13-cis-retinoic acid), although in some cases the reverse was found (e.g., hydrolysis of valpromide). Existing differences can be adjusted by appropriate choice of the administration route and measurements of drug levels. Many variables determine the placental transfer of drugs: developmental stage, type of placenta, properties of the drug. Even closely related drugs (e.g., retinoids) may differ greatly in regard to placental transfer. Maternal protein binding is an important determinant of placental transfer, since only the free concentration in maternal plasma can equilibrate with the embryo during organogenesis; this parameter differs greatly across species. Laboratory animals usually have a much higher rate of drug elimination than man. Drastic drug level fluctuations are therefore present during teratogenicity testing in animals, but not to do the same degree in human therapy. It must, therefore, be investigated if peak concentrations (such as for valproic acid and possibly caffeine) or the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) (such as for cyclophosphamide and possibly retinoids) correlate with the teratogenic response. Only then is a rational and scientific basis for interspecies comparison possible. It is concluded that the prediction of the human response based on animal studies can be improved by consideration of the appropriate pharmacokinetic determinants.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of topically applied sparfloxacin in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satia Milan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Fluoroquinolones are antimicrobial agents that have a broad spectrum of activity and are widely used against many of the ocular pathogens, responsible for conjunctivitis, blepharitis, corneal ulcers etc. The aim of our study was to evaluate the ocular pharmacokinetics of sparfloxacin (0.3% w/v in the aqueous humour of rabbits. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Pharmacokinetics of topically administered sparfloxacin were determined after a single application of 50 µl topically. The aqueous humour samples were collected at 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6 hours after instillation. High Performance Thin Layer Chromatographic method was used to analyse the drug concentration in the aqueous humour samples. RESULTS: Fifteen minutes after the instillation of 50 µl of sparfloxacin 0.3% solution, the mean concentration in aqueous humour was found to be 1.4 µg/ml, which reaches the peak level of 3.7 µg/ml after 1.3 hours. At 6 hours, the sparfloxacin aqueous levels were 0.562 µg/ml. The clinical efficacy was predicted based on the Maximum Concentration (Cmax: Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC and Area Under the Concentration-time curve (AUC:MIC ratios. CONCLUSION: The sparfloxacin levels in aqueous humour of rabbits are sufficiently high up to the 6 hours after instillation in the conjunctival sac to provide bactericidal effect against most of the ocular pathogens. Both Cmax:MIC and AUC:MIC ratios are high enough to provide bactericidal effect against most of the ocular pathogens. Sparfloxacin (0.3% ophthalmic preparation has excellent penetration through cornea.

  13. Drug interactions and clinical pharmacokinetics of flumazenil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, U

    1988-01-01

    Flumazenil (Ro 15-1788) is a specific benzodiazepine antagonist that can selectively prevent or abolish at the receptor level all centrally mediated effects of benzodiazepines. Following oral administration, flumazenil is absorbed rapidly (peak concentrations are achieved after 20-90 min absorption half-life 0.3 h) but bio-availability is low (16%) owing to significant pre-systemic elimination. As less than 0.2% of an i.v. dose is recovered as unchanged drug in the urine, extensive metabolism must occur and so far three metabolites of flumazenil (N-demethylated and/or hydrolysed products and corresponding glucuronides) have been identified. In the clinical use of flumazenil, rapid onset of action is mandatory. This is facilitated by its fast uptake and regional brain distribution, as verified by positron emission tomography (PET). The limited duration of the benzodiazepine-antagonistic action of flumazenil (2-3 h) is due to its rapid hepatic elimination. This can be characterized either by the short half-life of 0.7-1.3 h or, better, by the high plasma and blood clearance of 520-1300 ml min-1. The low plasma protein binding of flumazenil (about 40%) will not limit its wide distribution (apparent distribution volume 0.6-1 kg) or its partly flow-dependent hepatic elimination. In interaction studies with healthy volunteers, with either midazolam, lormetazepam and flunitrazepam or ethanol, it was found that the disposition of flumazenil was not affected by co-administration of these four drugs. Consequently, pharmacokinetic interactions between benzodiazepines (or alcohol) can be ruled out. So far the pharmacokinetics of the antagonist have been evaluated only in healthy volunteers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Pharmacokinetics of terbutaline in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiansen, Anders; Eggert, Sarah; Pedersen, Erland

    2013-11-01

    In healthy individuals upwards of 90 % of an injected dose of terbutaline is excreted in the urine. The purpose of this study is to determine the pharmacokinetic properties of terbutaline in patients with severe renal impairment as defined by a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) below 30 mL/min. Ten patients were included in the study. GFR was measured with Cr-EDTA clearance. They were given an intravenous injection of 0.500 mg of terbutaline. Blood samples were collected at intervals for 60 h and urine samples were collected for 96 h. The concentration of terbutaline in the blood and in the urine was used to calculate pharmacokinetic parameters. In patients with normal renal function the total clearance of terbutaline is 2.23-3 mL/min/kg. In our population the total clearance of terbutaline was found to be 1.72 (SD: 0.49) mL/min/kg of which approximately 15 % (0.25 mL/min/kg) was renal clearance. We calculated a distribution volume at steady state of 0.74 (SD: 0.22) L/kg with a terminal half-life of 7.93 (SD: 4.06) hours. The mean residence time (MRT) was 8.35 (SD: 4.93) hours. In healthy individuals the excretion of terbutaline is foremost renal but this study shows that severe renal impairment does not lower the total clearance of terbutaline to a degree that might be expected from the Cr-EDTA clearance. However, more research is needed to determine if dosage adjustment is warranted in patients with CKD.

  15. Perinatal pharmacokinetics of azithromycin for cesarean prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Amelia L; Acosta, Edward P; Larson, Kajal B; Kerstner-Wood, Corenna D; Tita, Alan T; Biggio, Joseph R

    2015-06-01

    Postpartum infections are polymicrobial and typically include Ureaplasma, an intracellular microbe that is treated by macrolides such as azithromycin. The aim of this study was to evaluate the perinatal pharmacokinetics of azithromycin after a single preincision dose before cesarean delivery. Thirty women who underwent scheduled cesarean delivery were assigned randomly to receive 500 mg of intravenous azithromycin that was initiated 15, 30, or 60 minutes before incision and infused over 1 hour. Serial maternal plasma samples were drawn from the end of infusion up to 8 hours after the infusion. Samples of amniotic fluid, umbilical cord blood, placenta, myometrium, and adipose tissue were collected intraoperatively. Breast milk samples were collected 12-48 hours after the infusion in 8 women who were breastfeeding. Azithromycin was quantified with high performance liquid chromatography separation coupled with tandem mass spectrometry detection. Plasma pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated with the use of noncompartmental analysis and compartmental modeling and simulations. The maximum maternal plasma concentration was reached within 1 hour and exceeded the in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC50) of 250 ng/mL of Ureaplasma spp in all 30 patients. The concentrations were sustained with a half-life of 6.7 hours. The median concentration of azithromycin in adipose tissue was 102 ng/g, which was below the MIC50. The median concentration in myometrium was 402 ng/g, which exceeded the MIC50. Azithromycin was detectable in both the umbilical cord plasma and amniotic fluid after the single preoperative dose. Azithromycin concentrations in breast milk were high and were sustained up to 48 hours after the single dose. Simulations demonstrated accumulation in breast milk after multiple doses. A single dose of azithromycin achieves effective plasma and tissue concentrations and is transported rapidly across the placenta. The tissue concentrations that are achieved

  16. [Pharmacokinetics of cefoperazone in liver diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakiuchi, S; Tagawa, S; Tameda, Y; Kosaka, Y

    1985-08-01

    To obtain useful informations for determining the optimal dosage of drugs in patients with impaired liver function, pharmacokinetics of cefoperazone (CPZ) was studied in healthy adults (normal control group) and 35 patients with liver disease (liver disease group). CPZ is a new third generation cephalosporin which is mainly excreted into the bile and has serum half-life of about 2 hours. After a rapid intravenous injection of CPZ, peripheral blood and urine samples were obtained at the time according to the protocol of this study. Serum and urine concentrations of CPZ were determined by the bioassay method using Micrococcus luteus ATCC 9341 as the test strain. From the concentrations of CPZ in serum and urine, pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by means of a "two-compartment open model". After an administration of CPZ, the serum concentration declined more slowly in the liver disease group as compared to the normal control group. At 1 hour after intravenous injection of CPZ, the difference of the serum level was already observed between these 2 groups. The half-life of elimination (T 1/2) was 2 to 4 times longer in the liver disease group. The elimination rate constant (K10) and total clearance (Clt) of CPZ were much lower in the liver disease group than in the control group except for hepatocellular carcinoma. On the other hand, urinary excretion rate (Ur) was lower in the normal control group than in the liver disease group. There was a close correlation between disappearance rate of indocyanine green (KICG) and parameters such as T1/2, K10, Clt and Cler with coefficients of -0.642, 0.723, 0.690 and 0.682, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Cefazolin pharmacokinetics in cats under surgical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarellos, Gabriela A; Montoya, Laura; Passini, Sabrina M; Lupi, Martín P; Lorenzini, Paula M; Landoni, María F

    2017-10-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the plasma pharmacokinetic profile, tissue concentrations and urine elimination of cefazolin in cats under surgical conditions after a single intravenous dose of 20 mg/kg. Methods Intravenous cefazolin (20 mg/kg) was administered to nine young mixed-breed cats 30 mins before they underwent surgical procedures (ovariectomy or orchiectomy). After antibiotic administration, samples from blood, some tissues and urine were taken. Cefazolin concentrations were determined in all biological matrices and pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated. Results Initial plasma concentrations were high (C p(0) , 134.80 ± 40.54 µg/ml), with fast and moderately wide distribution (distribution half-life [t ½(d) ] 0.16 ± 0.15 h; volume of distribution at steady state [V (d[ss]) ] 0.29 ± 0.10 l/kg) and rapid elimination (body clearance [Cl B ], 0.21 ± 0.06 l/h/kg; elimination half-life [t ½ ], 1.18 ± 0.27 h; mean residence time 1.42 ± 0.36 h). Thirty to 60 mins after intravenous administration, cefazolin tissue concentrations ranged from 9.24 µg/ml (subcutaneous tissue) to 26.44 µg/ml (ovary). The tissue/plasma concentration ratio ranged from 0.18 (muscle) to 0.58 (ovary). Cefazolin urine concentrations were high with 84.2% of the administered dose being eliminated in the first 6 h postadministration. Conclusions and relevance Cefazolin plasma concentrations remained above a minimum inhibitory concentration of ⩽2 µg/ml up to 4 h in all the studied cats. This suggests that a single intravenous dose of 20 mg/kg cefazolin would be adequate for perioperative prophylactic use in cats.

  18. Population pharmacokinetic modelling of the enterohepatic recirculation of diclofenac and rofecoxib in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntjens, D R H; Strougo, A; Chain, A; Metcalf, A; Summerfield, S; Spalding, D J M; Danhof, M; Della Pasqua, O

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Enterohepatic recirculation (EHC) is a common pharmacokinetic phenomenon that has been poorly modelled in animals. The presence of EHC leads to the appearance of multiple peaks in the concentration-time profile and increased exposure, which may have implications for drug effect and extrapolation across species. The aim of this investigation was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model for diclofenac and rofecoxib that describes EHC and to assess its consequence for the pharmacodynamics of both drugs. Experimental approach: The pharmacokinetics of diclofenac and rofecoxib was characterized in male rats following intravenous, intraperitoneal and oral administration. Blood samples were collected at pre-defined time points after dosing to determine plasma concentrations over time. A parametric approach using nonlinear mixed effects modelling was applied to describe EHC, whilst simulations were used to evaluate its impact on PGE2 inhibition. Key results: For diclofenac, EHC was described by a compartmental model with periodic transfer rate and metabolite formation rate. For rofecoxib, EHC modelling required a conversion compartment with first-order recycling rate and lag time. Based on model predictions, EHC causes an increase of 95% in the systemic exposure to diclofenac and of 15% in the exposure to rofecoxib. In addition, EHC prolongs the inhibition of PGE2 and increases the duration of the anti-inflammatory effect (24 h for rofecoxib 10 mg kg−1) without affecting maximum inhibition. Conclusions and implications: Our findings show the relevance of exploring EHC in a quantitative manner to accurately interpret pharmacodynamic findings in vivo, in particular when scaling across species. PMID:18193075

  19. Genetics-Based Population Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Risperidone in a Psychiatric Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberghe, Frederik; Guidi, Monia; Choong, Eva; von Gunten, Armin; Conus, Philippe; Csajka, Chantal; Eap, Chin B

    2015-12-01

    High interindividual variability in plasma concentrations of risperidone and its active metabolite, 9-hydroxyrisperidone, may lead to suboptimal drug concentration. Using a population pharmacokinetic approach, we aimed to characterize the genetic and non-genetic sources of variability affecting risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone pharmacokinetics, and relate them to common side effects. Overall, 150 psychiatric patients (178 observations) treated with risperidone were genotyped for common polymorphisms in NR1/2, POR, PPARα, ABCB1, CYP2D6 and CYP3A genes. Plasma risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone were measured, and clinical data and common clinical chemistry parameters were collected. Drug and metabolite concentrations were analyzed using non-linear mixed effect modeling (NONMEM(®)). Correlations between trough concentrations of the active moiety (risperidone plus 9-hydroxyrisperidone) and common side effects were assessed using logistic regression and linear mixed modeling. The cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 phenotype explained 52% of interindividual variability in risperidone pharmacokinetics. The area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of the active moiety was found to be 28% higher in CYP2D6 poor metabolizers compared with intermediate, extensive and ultrarapid metabolizers. No other genetic markers were found to significantly affect risperidone concentrations. 9-hydroxyrisperidone elimination was decreased by 26% with doubling of age. A correlation between trough predicted concentration of the active moiety and neurologic symptoms was found (p = 0.03), suggesting that a concentration >40 ng/mL should be targeted only in cases of insufficient, or absence of, response. Genetic polymorphisms of CYP2D6 play an important role in risperidone, 9-hydroxyrisperidone and active moiety plasma concentration variability, which were associated with common side effects. These results highlight the importance of a personalized dosage adjustment during risperidone

  20. Distribution and pharmacokinetic analysis of angiostatin radioiodine labeled with high stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Sung Hee; Jung, Kyung-Ho; Paik, Jin-Young; Koh, Bong-Ho; Bae, Joon-Sang; Choe, Yearn Seong; Lee, Kyung-Han; Kim, Byung-Tae

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Radiotracers of anticancer agents provide important information on its in vivo handling. Angiostatin (AST) is a promising anticancer drug with potent antiangiogenic effects, but reported AST radiotracers suffer from poor in vivo stability. In this study, we synthesized an AST probe radioiodinated via the Bolton-Hunter reagent ( 125 I-BH-AST) and investigated its stability and biokinetics in mice. Methods: 125 I-BH-AST and conventional direct radioiodinated 125 I-AST were evaluated for human endothelial cell binding characteristics. In vivo stability of the radiotracers was compared by biodistribution studies in normal ICR mice. Angiostatin pharmacokinetics was analyzed by serial blood sampling after intravenous injection of 125 I-BH-AST with varying AST concentrations in mice. Results: Both 125 I-AST and 125 I-BH-AST retained selective endothelial binding as demonstrated by dose-dependent inhibition by nonradiolabeled AST. 125 I-BH-AST was substantially more stable in mice than 125 I-AST, with 28- and 7-fold lower 24-h thyroid and blood activities, respectively (15.5±1.5 vs. 430.9±32.2 and 0.1±0.0 vs. 0.8±0.0 %ID/g; both P 125 I-BH-AST, we found that 24-h AST accumulation was highest in the kidneys, followed by the liver and lungs. Kinetic analysis of 125 I-BH-AST revealed AST to have linear pharmacokinetics with a T 1/2 of 5.8±2.6 h, volume of distribution (V d ) of 6.8±1.3 ml and clearance of 0.8±0.1 ml/h. Conclusion: Radioiodine-labeled AST prepared by the BH method provides a radioprobe with superior stability and improved in vivo biokinetics that is useful for distribution and pharmacokinetic studies

  1. Preparation of finasteride capsules-loaded drug nanoparticles: formulation, optimization, in vitro, and pharmacokinetic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed TA

    2016-02-01

    technique in enhancing stability, solubility, and in vitro dissolution of poorly water-soluble drugs with possible impact on the drug bioavailability. Keywords: finasteride, nanoparticles, solvent evaporation, optimization, crystal growth, pharmacokinetic

  2. Metabolism, oral bioavailability and pharmacokinetics of chemopreventive kaempferol in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barve, Avantika; Chen, Chi; Hebbar, Vidya; Desiderio, Joseph; Saw, Constance Lay-Lay; Kong, Ah-Ng

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the hepatic and small intestinal metabolism, and examine bioavailability and gastro-intestinal first-pass effects of Kaempferol in the rats. Liver and small intestinal microsomes fortified with either NADPH or UDPGA were incubated with varying concentrations of Kaempferol for upto 120 minutes. Based on the values of the kinetic constants (Km and Vmax), the propensity for UDPGA-dependent conjugation as compared to NADPH-dependent oxidative metabolism was higher for both hepatic and small intestinal microsomes. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered Kaempferol intravenously (IV) (10, 25 mg/kg) or orally (100, 250 mg/kg). Gastro-intestinal first pass effects were observed by collecting portal blood after oral administration of 100 mg/kg Kaempferol. Pharmacokinetic parameters were obtained by Noncompartmental analysis using WinNonlin. After IV administration, the plasma concentration-time profiles for 10 and 25 mg/kg were consistent with high clearance (~ 3 L/hr/kg) and large volumes of distribution (8-12 L/kg). The disposition was characterized by a terminal half-life value of 3-4 hours. After oral administration the plasma concentration-time profiles demonstrated fairly rapid absorption (tmax ~ 1-2 hours). The area under the curve (AUC) values after IV and oral doses increased proportional to the dose. The bioavailability (F) was poor at ~ 2%. Analysis of portal plasma after oral administration revealed low to moderate absorption. Taken together, the low F of Kaempferol is attributed in part to extensive first-pass metabolism by glucuronidation and other metabolic pathways in the gut and in the liver. PMID:19722166

  3. Pharmacokinetically guided dosing of (high-dose) chemotherapeutic agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attema-de Jonge, M.E. (Milly Ellen)

    2004-01-01

    Due to variation in drug distribution, metabolism and elimination processes between patients, systemic exposure to chemotherapeutic agents may be highly variable from patient to patient after administration of similar doses. This pharmacokinetic variability may explain in part the large variability

  4. Developmental pharmacokinetics of gentamicin in preterm and term neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Elisabet I; Sandström, Marie; Honoré, Per Hartvig

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Preterm and term newborn infants show wide interindividual variability (IIV) in pharmacokinetic parameters of gentamicin. More extensive knowledge and use of predictive covariates could lead to faster attainment of therapeutic concentrations and a reduced need for concen...

  5. Pharmacokinetics of Caffeic Acid from Methanol Seed Extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pharmacokinetics of Caffeic Acid from Methanol Seed Extract of Syzygium cumini L in Rats. Muhammad Islam, Naureen Shehzadi, Muhammad Salman, Fakhra Zahid, Humaira M. Khan, Sohail Amjad, Muhammad T. Khan, Muhammad Z. Danish, Nadeem I. Bukhari, Khalid Hussain ...

  6. Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Diltiazem in Chinese Renal Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiao-Feng; Li, Dai-Yang; Yin, Wen-Jun; Ding, Jun-Jie; Zhou, Ling-Yun; Wang, Jiang-Lin; Ma, Rong-Rong; Zuo, Xiao-Cong

    2018-02-01

    Diltiazem is a benzothiazepine calcium blocker and widely used in renal transplant patients since it improves the level of tacrolimus or cyclosporine A concentration. Several population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) models had been established for cyclosporine A and tacrolimus but no specific PopPK model was established for diltiazem. The aim of the study is to develop a PopPK model for diltiazem in renal transplant recipients and provide relevant pharmacokinetic parameters of diltiazem for further pharmacokinetic interaction study. Patients received tacrolimus as primary immunosuppressant agent after renal transplant and started administration of diltiazem 90 mg twice daily on 5th day. The concentration of diltiazem at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 8, and 12 h was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). Genotyping for CYP3A4*1G, CYP3A5*3, and MDR1 3435 was conducted by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). 25 covariates were considered in the stepwise covariate model (SCM) building procedure. One-compartment structural pharmacokinetic model with first-order absorption and elimination was used to describe the pharmacokinetic characteristics of diltiazem. Total bilirubin (TBIL) influenced apparent volume of distribution (V/F) of diltiazem in the forward selection. The absorption rate constant (K a ), V/F, and apparent oral clearance (CL/F) of the final population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) model of diltiazem were 1.96/h, 3550 L, and 92.4 L/h, respectively. A PopPK model of diltiazem is established in Chinese renal transplant recipients and it will provide relevant pharmacokinetic parameters of diltiazem for further pharmacokinetic interaction study.

  7. Population Pharmacokinetic Analyses of Lithium: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methaneethorn, Janthima

    2018-02-01

    Even though lithium has been used for the treatment of bipolar disorder for several decades, its toxicities are still being reported. The major limitation in the use of lithium is its narrow therapeutic window. Several methods have been proposed to predict lithium doses essential to attain therapeutic levels. One of the methods used to guide lithium therapy is population pharmacokinetic approach which accounts for inter- and intra-individual variability in predicting lithium doses. Several population pharmacokinetic studies of lithium have been conducted. The objective of this review is to provide information on population pharmacokinetics of lithium focusing on nonlinear mixed effect modeling approach and to summarize significant factors affecting lithium pharmacokinetics. A literature search was conducted from PubMed database from inception to December, 2016. Studies conducted in humans, using lithium as a study drug, providing population pharmacokinetic analyses of lithium by means of nonlinear mixed effect modeling, were included in this review. Twenty-four articles were identified from the database. Seventeen articles were excluded based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. A total of seven articles were included in this review. Of these, only one study reported a combined population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model of lithium. Lithium pharmacokinetics were explained using both one- and two-compartment models. The significant predictors of lithium clearance identified in most studies were renal function and body size. One study reported a significant effect of age on lithium clearance. The typical values of lithium clearance ranged from 0.41 to 9.39 L/h. The magnitude of inter-individual variability on lithium clearance ranged from 12.7 to 25.1%. Only two studies evaluated the models using external data sets. Model methodologies in each study are summarized and discussed in this review. For future perspective, a population pharmacokinetic

  8. 1,3-Disubstituted Ureas Functionalized with Ether Groups are Potent Inhibitors of the Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase with Improved Pharmacokinetic Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, In-Hae; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Nishi, Kosuke; Kasagami, Takeo; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2007-01-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a therapeutic target for treating hypertension and inflammation. 1,3-Disubstituted ureas functionalized with an ether group are potent sEH inhibitors. However, their relatively low metabolic stability leads to poor pharmacokinetic properties. To improve their bioavailability, we investigated the effect of incorporating various polar groups on the ether function on the inhibition potencies, physical properties, in vitro metabolic stability, and pharmacokineti...

  9. What characterizes persons with poor mental health?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne Illemann; Davidsen, Michael; Kjøller, Mette

    2014-01-01

    analysed by means of logistic regression models. Results: Men and women with poor mental health are characterized by being single, having a long-term illness, not being able to rely on help from others in case of illness and by feeling that family and friends demand too much of them. Men with poor mental...... health were further characterized by being a heavy smoker, and having a BMI below 25. Women with poor mental health were further characterized by being 16-44 years old and sedentary in leisure time. CONCLUSIONS THE PREVALENCE OF POOR MENTAL HEALTH IS HIGHER AMONG WOMEN THAN MEN, AND DIFFERENT FACTORS...... CHARACTERIZE MEN AND WOMEN WITH POOR MENTAL HEALTH THE PRESENT FINDINGS SUPPORT THE NOTION THAT BOTH SOCIO-DEMOGRAPHICS AND LIFESTYLE FACTORS ARE INDEPENDENTLY RELATED WITH POOR MENTAL HEALTH WE SUGGEST TAKING INTO ACCOUNT ALL THESE AREAS OF LIFE WHEN PLANNING ACTIVITIES TO PREVENT POOR MENTAL HEALTH AND WHEN...

  10. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Rifampin in Patients with Tuberculosis and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Association with Biochemical and Immunological Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medellín-Garibay, S E; Cortez-Espinosa, N; Milán-Segovia, R C; Magaña-Aquino, M; Vargas-Morales, J M; González-Amaro, R; Portales-Pérez, D P; Romano-Moreno, S

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major public health issue due to the increasing incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), which exacerbates the clinical course of TB and increases the risk of poor long-term outcomes. The aim of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics of rifampin (RIF) and its relationship with biochemical and immunological parameters in patients with TB and T2DM. The biochemical and immunological parameters were assessed on the same day that the pharmacokinetic evaluation of RIF was performed. Factors related to the metabolic syndrome that is characteristic of T2DM patients were not detected in the TB-T2DM group (where predominant malnutrition was present) or in the TB group. Percentages of CD8(+) T lymphocytes and NK cells were diminished in the TB and TB-T2DM patients, who had high tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and low interleukin-17 (IL-17) levels compared to healthy volunteers. Delayed RIF absorption was observed in the TB and TB-T2DM patients; absorption was poor and slower in the latter group due to poor glycemic control. RIF clearance was also slower in the diabetic patients, thereby prolonging the mean residence time of RIF. There was a significant association between glycemic control, increased TNF-α serum concentrations, and RIF pharmacokinetics in the TB-T2DM patients. These altered metabolic and immune conditions may be factors to be considered in anti-TB therapy management when TB and T2DM are concurrently present. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Preparation and characterization of simvastatin/DMβCD complex and its pharmacokinetics in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Fugen

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Simvastatin is poorly bioavailable because it is practically insoluble in water and shows dissolution rate-limited absorption. Solubilizing effects of several β-cyclodextrin (βCD derivatives such as HPβCD, SBEβCD and DMβCD on simvastatin in aqueous solution were investigated using the phase solubility technique. The solubility diagram of simvastatin with each βCD derivative could be classified as AL-type, indicating soluble complex formation of 1:1 stoichiometry. Among the above βCD derivatives DMβCD was found to be the ideal complexing agent for improving drug solubility. The simvastatin complex with DMβCD was prepared using the co-evaporation method and was then characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and in vitro dissolution. Dissolution and pharmacokinetic studies indicated that the simvastatin/DMβCD complex exhibited an increased dissolution rate, rapid absorption, and improved bioavailability in rats compared to free drug. Maximum plasma concentration (cmax and the time to reach it (tmax were 21.86 μg mL−1 and 1.4 h for the drug complex, 8.25 μg mL−1 and 3.0 h for free drug, respectively. Main pharmacokinetic parameters such as tmax, cmax were significantly different (p < 0.01 between the simvastatin complex and free drug. Bioavailability of the simvastatin complex relative to free drug was up to 167.0 %.

  12. Purifying Sufism: Observations on the Marginalization and Exclusion of Undesirable and Rejected Elements in the Earlier Middle Period (late fourth/tenth to mid-seventh/thirteenth centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ephrat, Daphna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article offers observations on the process of differentiation and purification within premodern Sufism during a seminal period in the institutionalization of the Sufi ṭarīqa as a Path to God and as a community of followers. Drawing on manuals and narratives by prominent articulators and representatives of the emerging mainstream Sufi tradition, the article highlights the discursive and actual mechanisms they employed to delineate the borderlines of affiliation with the communities of the genuine Sufis, disentangle the solid-core from lay affiliates, and exclude undesirable elements wrongly associated with Sufism. The construction of higher barriers between mainstream Sufism and its margins is closely tied to the spread of popular forms of Sufism and a new kind of antinomianism that gained popularity in the public sphere, beginning in the late sixth/twelfth century. The final part of the article considers the involvement of the political rulers of the time in the inner dynamics of Sufism. My main conclusion is that by patronizing mainstream Sufis and supporting arbiters of true religion in the public sphere, the ruling elite of military lords in the Arab Near East played a significant role in marginalizing the undesirable and rejected elements and in strengthening the mainstream Sunni camp against its rivals.Este artículo ofrece una serie de observaciones sobre el proceso de diferenciación y purificación dentro del sufismo pre-moderno durante un periodo crucial para la institucionalización de las ṭarīqa-s sufíes como una Vía hacia Dios y como una comunidad de seguidores. Basándose en manuales y en narraciones de autores prominentes y representantes de la tradición sufí mainstream emergente, este artículo pone de relieve los mecanismos discursivos que emplearon para marcar los bordes de la afiliación con comunidades de sufíes genuinos, separar el núcleo central de los afiliados externos, y excluir a los elementos

  13. Meta-analysis of clinical studies supports the pharmacokinetic variability hypothesis for acquired drug resistance and failure of antituberculosis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasipanodya, Jotam G; Srivastava, Shashikant; Gumbo, Tawanda

    2012-07-01

    Using hollow-fiber tuberculosis studies, we recently demonstrated that nonadherence is not a significant factor for ADR and that therapy failure only occurs after a large proportion of doses are missed. Computer-aided clinical trial simulations have suggested that isoniazid and rifampin pharmacokinetic variability best explained poor outcomes. We were interested in determining whether isoniazid pharmacokinetic variability was associated with either microbiological failure or ADR in the clinic. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines were followed. Prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trials that reported isoniazid acetylation status and microbiological outcomes were selected. The main effects examined were microbiological sputum conversion, ADR, and relapse. Effect size was expressed as pooled risk ratios (RRs) comparing rapid with slow acetylators. Thirteen randomized studies with 1631 rapid acetylators and 1751 slow acetylators met inclusion and exclusion criteria. Rapid acetylators were more likely than slow acetylators to have microbiological failure (RR, 2.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5-2.7), ADR (RR, 2.0; CI, 1.1-3.4), and relapse (RR, 1.3; CI, .9-2.0). Higher failure rates were encountered even in drug regimens comprising >3 antibiotics. No publication bias or small-study effects were observed for the outcomes evaluated. Pharmacokinetic variability to a single drug in the regimen is significantly associated with failure of therapy and ADR in patients. This suggests that individualized dosing for tuberculosis may be more effective than standardized dosing, which is prescribed in directly observed therapy programs.

  14. Nanosizing of a poorly soluble drug: technique optimization, factorial analysis, and pharmacokinetic study in healthy human volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, Ibrahim; Abdelbary, Aly Ahmed; Elshafeey, Ahmed Hassen

    2014-01-01

    Context Diacerein (DCN) has low aqueous solubility (3.197 mg/L) and, consequently, low oral bioavailability (35%–56%). To increase both the solubility and dissolution rate of DCN while maintaining its crystalline nature, high pressure homogenization was used but with only a few homogenization cycles preceded by a simple bottom-up technique. Methods The nanosuspensions of DCN were prepared using a combined bottom-up/top-down technique. Different surfactants – polyvinyl alcohol, sodium deoxycholate, and sodium dodecyl sulfate – with different concentrations were used for the stabilization of the nanosuspensions. Full factorial experimental design was employed to investigate the influence of formulation variables on nanosuspension characteristics using Design-Expert® Software. Particle size (PS), zeta potential, saturation solubility, in vitro dissolution, and drug crystallinity were studied. Moreover, the in vivo performance of the optimized formula was assessed by bioavailability determination in healthy human volunteers. Results The concentration of surfactant had a significant effect on both the PS and polydispersity index values. The 1% surfactant concentration showed the lowest PS and polydispersity index values compared with other concentrations. Both type and concentration of surfactant had significant effects on the zeta potential. Formula F8 (containing 1% sodium deoxycholate) and Formula F12 (containing 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate) had the highest desirability values (0.952 and 0.927, respectively). Hence, they were selected for further characterization. The saturated solubility and mean dissolution time, in the case of F8 and F12, were significantly higher than the coarse drug powder. Techniques utilized in the nanocrystals’ preparation had no effect on DCN crystalline state. The selected formula (F12) showed a higher bioavailability compared to the reference market product with relative bioavailability of 131.4%. Conclusion The saturation solubility, in vitro dissolution rate and relative bioavailability of DCN were significantly increased after nanocrystallization. Less time and power consumption were applied by the combination of bottom-up and top-down techniques. PMID:24971006

  15. A critical assessment for the value of markers to gate-out undesired events in HLA-peptide multimer staining protocols

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    Odunsi Kunle

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The introduction of antibody markers to identify undesired cell populations in flow-cytometry based assays, so called DUMP channel markers, has become a practice in an increasing number of labs performing HLA-peptide multimer assays. However, the impact of the introduction of a DUMP channel in multimer assays has so far not been systematically investigated across a broad variety of protocols. Methods The Cancer Research Institute's Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium (CRI-CIC conducted a multimer proficiency panel with a specific focus on the impact of DUMP channel use. The panel design allowed individual laboratories to use their own protocol for thawing, staining, gating, and data analysis. Each experiment was performed twice and in parallel, with and without the application of a dump channel strategy. Results The introduction of a DUMP channel is an effective measure to reduce the amount of non-specific MULTIMER binding to T cells. Beneficial effects for the use of a DUMP channel were observed across a wide range of individual laboratories and for all tested donor-antigen combinations. In 48% of experiments we observed a reduction of the background MULTIMER-binding. In this subgroup of experiments the median background reduction observed after introduction of a DUMP channel was 0.053%. Conclusions We conclude that appropriate use of a DUMP channel can significantly reduce background staining across a large fraction of protocols and improve the ability to accurately detect and quantify the frequency of antigen-specific T cells by multimer reagents. Thus, use of a DUMP channel may become crucial for detecting low frequency antigen-specific immune responses. Further recommendations on assay performance and data presentation guidelines for publication of MULTIMER experimental data are provided.

  16. Biotransformation and in vivo stability of protein biotherapeutics: impact on candidate selection and pharmacokinetic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michael P

    2014-11-01

    Historically, since the metabolism of administered peptide/protein drugs ("biotherapeutics") has been expected to undergo predictable pathways similar to endogenous proteins, comprehensive biotherapeutic metabolism studies have not been widely reported in the literature. However, since biotherapeutics have rapidly evolved into an impressive array of eclectic modalities, there has been a shift toward understanding the impact of metabolism on biotherapeutic development. For biotherapeutics containing non-native chemical linkers and other moieties besides natural amino acids, metabolism studies are critical as these moieties may impart undesired toxicology. For biotherapeutics that are composed solely of natural amino acids, where end-stage peptide and amino acid catabolites do not generally pose toxicity concerns, the understanding of biotherapeutic biotransformation, defined as in vivo modifications such as peripherally generated intermediate circulating catabolites prior to end-stage degradation or elimination, may impact in vivo stability and potency/clearance. As of yet, there are no harmonized methodologies for understanding biotherapeutic biotransformation and its impact on drug development, nor is there clear guidance from regulatory agencies on how and when these studies should be conducted. This review provides an update on biotherapeutic biotransformation studies and an overview of lessons learned, tools that have been developed, and suggestions of approaches to address issues. Biotherapeutic biotransformation studies, especially for certain modalities, should be implemented at an early stage of development to 1) understand the impact on potency/clearance, 2) select the most stable candidates or direct protein re-engineering efforts, and 3) select the best bioanalytical technique(s) for proper drug quantification and subsequent pharmacokinetic profiling and exposure/response assessment. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and

  17. An albumin-mediated cholesterol design-based strategy for tuning siRNA pharmacokinetics and gene silencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bienk, Konrad; Hvam, Michael Lykke; Pakula, Malgorzata Maria

    2016-01-01

    Major challenges for the clinical translation of small interfering RNA (siRNA) include overcoming the poor plasma half-life, site-specific delivery and modulation of gene silencing. In this work, we exploit the intrinsic transport properties of human serum albumin to tune the blood circulatory ha...... of 28% (rHSA/siRNA) compared to 4% (naked siRNA) 6 days post-injection. This work presents a novel albumin-mediated cholesteryl design-based strategy for tuning pharmacokinetics and systemic gene silencing....

  18. DETERMINATION OF TAMSULOSIN HYDROCHLORIDE RELEASE PHARMACOKINETICS IN PROSTATE GLAND BY A RADIOTRACER METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Grytsenko

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: recently in Ukraine prostate diseases have taken one of the leading places among male urological pathologies. Prostate gland hyperplasia is one of the most common ones. Causes of hyperplasia have not been reliably established so far, however, it has been proved that the poor state of androgen production in men is an integral condition for the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia. One of the urgent tasks of modern pharmaceutical science is to create new high-performance drugs in such dosage forms that provide optimal therapeutic effect with minimal adverse complications. Among a large number of drugs for the treatment of prostate diseases a prominent place is occupied by alpha-adrenoblockers – drugs of the first-line treatments that affect the α1А-adrenergic receptors, reduce or completely eliminate the muscle tone of the prostatic urethra and bladder neck. Tamsulosin hydrochloride is a selective and competitive blocker of postsynaptic α1А-adrenergic receptors. The selectivity of tamsulosin to α1А-adrenergic receptors, which are located in the bladder, is 20 times greater than its ability to interact with α1В-adrenoceptors that are located in vascular smooth muscles. Objective: to study the pharmacokinetics of tamsulosin hydrochloride release into prostate gland after oral and rectal administration by a radioactive-tracer technique. Materials and methods of research: tamsulosin hydrochloride substance and suppositories with this substance labeled by 14С with a specific activity of 3.7× 107Bq/mg. Pharmacokinetic studies of tamsulosin hydrochloride in the prostate were performed after oral and rectal administration. The experiments were carried out on white mature male rats of Wistar line weighing 210 ± 10 g. Pharmacokinetic studies were performed using a radioactive-tracer technique (tracers after oral and rectal administration of tamsulosin. Results and their discussion: after rectal administration the release of

  19. Population pharmacokinetics of artesunate and dihydroartemisinin in pregnant and non-pregnant women with malaria

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    Bose Carl

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The World Health Organization endorses the use of artemisinin-based combination therapy for treatment of acute uncomplicated falciparum malaria in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. However, the effects of pregnancy on the pharmacokinetics of artemisinin derivatives, such as artesunate (AS, are poorly understood. In this analysis, the population pharmacokinetics of oral AS, and its active metabolite dihydroartemisinin (DHA, were studied in pregnant and non-pregnant women at the Kingasani Maternity Clinic in the DRC. Methods Data were obtained from 26 pregnant women in the second (22 - 26 weeks or the third (32 - 36 weeks trimester of pregnancy and from 25 non-pregnant female controls. All subjects received 200 mg AS. Plasma AS and DHA were measured using a validated LC-MS method. Estimates for pharmacokinetic and variability parameters were obtained through nonlinear mixed effects modelling. Results A simultaneous parent-metabolite model was developed consisting of mixed zero-order, lagged first-order absorption of AS, a one-compartment model for AS, and a one-compartment model for DHA. Complete conversion of AS to DHA was assumed. The model displayed satisfactory goodness-of-fit, stability, and predictive ability. Apparent clearance (CL/F and volume of distribution (V/F estimates, with 95% bootstrap confidence intervals, were as follows: 195 L (139-285 L for AS V/F, 895 L/h (788-1045 L/h for AS CL/F, 91.4 L (78.5-109 L for DHA V/F, and 64.0 L/h (55.1-75.2 L/h for DHA CL/F. The effect of pregnancy on DHA CL/F was determined to be significant, with a pregnancy-associated increase in DHA CL/F of 42.3% (19.7 - 72.3%. Conclusions In this analysis, pharmacokinetic modelling suggests that pregnant women have accelerated DHA clearance compared to non-pregnant women receiving orally administered AS. These findings, in conjunction with a previous non-compartmental analysis of the modelled data, provide further evidence that

  20. Traditional uses, phytochemistry, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics and quality control of Polyporus umbellatus (Pers.) Fries: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying-Yong

    2013-08-26

    Polyporus umbellatus (Pers.) Fries (Polyporaceae, Zhuling ) has been commonly used in medicine for a wide range of ailments related to the edema, scanty urine, vaginal discharge, urinary dysfunction, as well as jaundice and diarrhea. The present paper reviewed the traditional uses, propagation, phytochemistry, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics and quality control of Polyporus umbellatus. All the available information on Polyporus umbellatus was collected via a library and electronic search (using Web of Science, Pubmed, ScienceDirect, Splinker, Google Scholar, etc.). Phytochemical studies showed the presence of many valuable secondary metabolites such as steroids, polysaccharides, anthraquinones and nucleosides. Crude extracts and isolated compounds showed a wide spectrum of pharmacological activities including diuretic, nephroprotective, anti-cancer, immuno-enhancing, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory and antioxidative activities. The pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated that the ergosterol and ergone had a high distribution and absorption in the plasma and the two main components of Polyporus umbellatus were mainly excreted by faeces. The determination of multiple chemical components was successfully applied to the quality control of Polyporus umbellatus. Modern phytochemical, pharmacological and metabonomic investigations showed that the crude extracts and isolated compounds from Polyporus umbellatus possess many kinds of biological functions, especially in the diuretic activities and the treatment of kidney diseases as well as anti-cancer, immuno-enhancing and hepatoprotective activities. The pathways of the distribution, absorption, metabolism and excretion of main steroidal compounds were clarified by pharmacokinetic studies. Most of the pharmacological studies were conducted using crude and poorly characterized extracts of Polyporus umbellatus in animals especially in case of diuretic activities and the treatment of kidney diseases. Thus, more bioactive

  1. Population Pharmacokinetic Analysis of Voriconazole from a Pharmacokinetic Study with Immunocompromised Japanese Pediatric Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Satoshi; Tomono, Yoshiro; Liu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    A population pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis was conducted to characterize the voriconazole pharmacokinetic profiles in immunocompromised Japanese pediatric subjects and to compare them to those in immunocompromised non-Japanese pediatric subjects. A previously developed two-compartment pharmacokinetic model with first-order absorption and mixed linear and nonlinear elimination adequately described the voriconazole intravenous and oral data from Japanese pediatric subjects with few modifications. Bayesian priors were applied to this analysis by using the NONMEM routine NWPRI, which allowed priors for the fixed-effect parameter vector and variance matrix of the random-effect parameters to be a normal distribution and an inverse Wishart distribution, respectively. Large intersubject variabilities in oral bioavailability and voriconazole exposure were observed in these pediatric subjects. The mean oral bioavailability estimated in Japanese pediatric subjects was 73% (range, 17% to 99%), which is consistent with the reported estimates of 64% in the previous model and less than what was originally estimated for healthy adults—96%. Voriconazole exposures in Japanese pediatric subjects were generally comparable to those in non-Japanese pediatric subjects receiving the same dosing regimens, given the large intersubject variability. Consistent with the previous findings, the CYP2C19 genotyping status did not have a clinically relevant effect on voriconazole exposure in Japanese pediatric subjects, although it was identified as a covariate in the model to help explain the intersubject variability in voriconazole exposure. The CYP2C19 genotyping status alone does not warrant dose adjustment of voriconazole. No other factors besides age and weight were identified to explain the PK variability of voriconazole. PMID:25801557

  2. Pharmacokinetics of the First-Line Antituberculosis Drugs in Ghanaian Children with Tuberculosis with or without HIV Coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antwi, Sampson; Yang, Hongmei; Enimil, Anthony; Sarfo, Anima M; Gillani, Fizza S; Ansong, Daniel; Dompreh, Albert; Orstin, Antoinette; Opoku, Theresa; Bosomtwe, Dennis; Wiesner, Lubbe; Norman, Jennifer; Peloquin, Charles A; Kwara, Awewura

    2017-02-01

    Although human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection is the most important risk factor for a poor antituberculosis (anti-TB) treatment response, its effect on the pharmacokinetics of the first-line drugs in children is understudied. This study examined the pharmacokinetics of the four first-line anti-TB drugs in children with TB with and without HIV coinfection. Ghanaian children with TB on isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol for at least 4 weeks had blood samples collected predose and at 1, 2, 4, and 8 hours postdose. Drug concentrations were determined by validated liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry methods and pharmacokinetic parameters calculated using noncompartmental analysis. The area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 8 h (AUC 0-8 ), maximum concentration (C max ), and apparent oral clearance divided by bioavailability (CL/F) for each drug were compared between children with and without HIV coinfection. Of 113 participants, 59 (52.2%) had HIV coinfection. The baseline characteristics were similar except that the coinfected patients were more likely to have lower weight-for-age and height-for-age Z scores (P children than in those with TB alone. In the multivariate analysis, drug dose and HIV coinfection jointly influenced the apparent oral clearance and AUC 0-8 for rifampin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol. Isoniazid pharmacokinetics were not different by HIV coinfection status. HIV coinfection was associated with lower plasma exposure of three of the four first-line anti-TB drugs in children. Whether TB/HIV-coinfected children need higher dosages of rifampin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol requires further investigation. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under identifier NCT01687504.). Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  3. The Undesirable Behaviors of Students in Academic Classrooms, and the Discipline Strategies Used by Faculty Members to Control Such Behaviors from the Perspective of the College of Education Students in King Saud University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Qahtani, Norah Saad Sultan

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the undesirable students' behaviors in academic classrooms, and the disciplinary, preventive and therapeutic strategies that will be used by faculty members to control those behaviors from the perspective of the College of Education's students in King Saud University. The results of the study has shown that the…

  4. Pharmacokinetic Variability of Drugs Used for Prophylactic Treatment of Migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Ågesen, Frederik Nybye; Pavbro, Agniezka; Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob

    2017-05-01

    In this review, we evaluate the variability in the pharmacokinetics of 11 drugs with established prophylactic effects in migraine to facilitate 'personalized medicine' with these drugs. PubMed was searched for 'single-dose' and 'steady-state' pharmacokinetic studies of these 11 drugs. The maximum plasma concentration was reported in 248 single-dose and 115 steady-state pharmacokinetic studies, and the area under the plasma concentration-time curve was reported in 299 single-dose studies and 112 steady-state pharmacokinetic studies. For each study, the coefficient of variation was calculated for maximum plasma concentration and area under the plasma concentration-time curve, and we divided the drug variability into two categories; high variability, coefficient of variation >40%, or low or moderate variability, coefficient of variation pharmacokinetic variability: propranolol in 92% (33/36), metoprolol in 85% (33/39), and amitriptyline in 60% (3/5) of studies. The following drugs have low or moderate variability: atenolol in 100% (2/2), valproate in 100% (15/15), topiramate in 88% (7/8), and naproxen and candesartan in 100% (2/2) of studies. For drugs with low or moderate pharmacokinetic variability, treatment can start without initial titration of doses, whereas titration is used to possibly enhance tolerability of topiramate and amitriptyline. The very high pharmacokinetic variability of metoprolol and propranolol can result in very high plasma concentrations in a small minority of patients, and those drugs should therefore be titrated up from a low initial dose, depending mainly on the occurrence of adverse events.

  5. Population pharmacokinetics of olprinone in healthy male volunteers

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    Kunisawa T

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Takayuki Kunisawa,1 Hidefumi Kasai,2 Makoto Suda,2 Manabu Yoshimura,3 Ami Sugawara,3 Yuki Izumi,3 Takafumi Iida,3 Atsushi Kurosawa,3 Hiroshi Iwasaki3 1Surgical Operation Department, Asahikawa Medical University Hospital, Hokkaido, Japan; 2Clinical Study Management Division, Bell Medical Solutions Inc, Tokyo, Japan; 3Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, Hokkaido, Japan Background: Olprinone decreases the cardiac preload and/or afterload because of its vasodilatory effect and increases myocardial contractility by inhibiting phosphodiesterase III. Purpose: The objective of this study was to characterize the population pharmacokinetics of olprinone after a single continuous infusion in healthy male volunteers. Methods: We used 500 plasma concentration data points collected from nine healthy male volunteers for the study. The population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using the nonlinear mixed effect model (NONMEM® software. Results: The time course of plasma concentration of olprinone was best described using a two-compartment model. The final pharmacokinetic parameters were total clearance (7.37 mL/minute/kg, distribution volume of the central compartment (134 mL/kg, intercompartmental clearance (7.75 mL/minute/kg, and distribution volume of the peripheral compartment (275 mL/kg. The interindividual variability in the total clearance was 12.4%, and the residual error variability (exponential and additive were 22.2% and 0.129 (standard deviation. The final pharmacokinetic model was assessed using a bootstrap method and visual predictive check. Conclusion: We developed a population pharmacokinetic model of olprinone in healthy male adults. The bootstrap method and visual predictive check showed that this model was appropriate. Our results might be used to develop the population pharmacokinetic model in patients. Keywords: phosphodiesterase III inhibitor, men, pharmacokinetic model

  6. Inflight Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Responses to Medications Commonly Used in Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotring, V. E.; Derendorf, H.; Kast, J.; Barger, L.; Basner, M.

    2016-01-01

    Researchers do not know if medications act the same in the spaceflight environment as they do on Earth. Aspects of the spaceflight environment (low gravity, radiation exposure, closed environment, stress) have been shown to alter human physiology. Some of these physiological changes could be expected to alter either pharmacokinetics (PK, how the body absorbs, distributes, metabolizes and excretes administered medications) or pharmacodynamics (PD, receptors or signaling systems that are the targets of medication action). Anecdotal data has suggested that, at least for certain medications or indications, inflight medication efficacy is poor. In order to prepare for exploration missions where speedy evacuation to Earth may not be a possibility, the likelihood of unexpected medication action must be determined.

  7. A review on estimation of stochastic differential equations for pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnet, Sophie; Samson, Adeline

    2013-06-30

    This paper is a survey of existing estimation methods for pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) models based on stochastic differential equations (SDEs). Most parametric estimation methods proposed for SDEs require high frequency data and are often poorly suited for PK/PD data which are usually sparse. Moreover, PK/PD experiments generally include not a single individual but a group of subjects, leading to a population estimation approach. This review concentrates on estimation methods which have been applied to PK/PD data, for SDEs observed with and without measurement noise, with a standard or a population approach. Besides, the adopted methodologies highly differ depending on the existence or not of an explicit transition density of the SDE solution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Nicotinamide pharmacokinetics in humans and mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horsman, M.R.; Hoyer, M.; Overgaard, J.; Honess, D.J.; Dennis, A.F.

    1993-01-01

    Healthy human volunteers orally ingested escalating doses of up to 6 g nicotinamide in capsule form on an empty stomach. Some side-effects were seen although these were mild and transient. HPLC analysis of blood samples showed peak plasma levels, typically within 45 min after ingestion, which were linearly dependent on dose ingested. The elimination half-life and AUC were also found to increase with drug dose, although these increases were non-linear. Pharmacokinetic studies were also performed to female CDF1 mice with C3H mammary carcinomas grown in the right rear foot. Analysis of blood and tumour samples taken from mice injected i.p. with nicotinamide doses between 100-1000 mg/kg showed similar characteristics as the human data, although the elimination half-lives were not dose-dependent. The average peak plasma concentration of 160 μg/ml measured in humans after taking 6 g of nicotinamide was equivalent to that seen in mice after injecting 171 mg/kg. Using a regrowth delay assay the enhancement of radiation damage by nicotinamide in this mouse tumour was found to be independent of drug dose from 100-1000 mg/kg, resulting in a constant 1.3-fold increase in radiation response. Doses of nicotinamide that can be tolerated clinically should therefore produce adequate enhancements of radiation damage in human tumours. (author)

  9. Virtual pharmacokinetic model of human eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotha, Sreevani; Murtomäki, Lasse

    2014-07-01

    A virtual pharmacokinetic 3D model of the human eye is built using Comsol Multiphysics® software, which is based on the Finite Element Method (FEM). The model considers drug release from a polymer patch placed on sclera. The model concentrates on the posterior part of the eye, retina being the target tissue, and comprises the choroidal blood flow, partitioning of the drug between different tissues and active transport at the retina pigment epithelium (RPE)-choroid boundary. Although most straightforward, in order to check the mass balance, no protein binding or metabolism is yet included. It appeared that the most important issue in obtaining reliable simulation results is the finite element mesh, while time stepping has hardly any significance. Simulations were extended to 100,000 s. The concentration of a drug is shown as a function of time at various points of retina, as well as its average value, varying several parameters in the model. This work demonstrates how anybody with basic knowledge of calculus is able to build physically meaningful models of quite complex biological systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Gentamicin pharmacokinetics in the chicken inner ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunting, Eric C; Park, Debra L; Durham, Dianne; Girod, Douglas A

    2004-06-01

    Avians have the unique ability to regenerate cochlear hair cells that are lost due to ototoxins or excessive noise. Many methodological techniques are available to damage the hair cells for subsequent scientific study. A recent method utilizes topical application of an ototoxic drug to the round window membrane. The current study examines the pharmacokinetics of gentamicin in the inner ear of chickens following topical application to the round window membrane or a single systemic high dose given intraperitoneally. Chickens were given gentamicin topically or systemically and survived for 1, 4, 12, 24, or 120 h (controls at 4 and 120 h). Serum and perilymph samples were obtained prior to sacrifice and measured for gentamicin levels. Results revealed higher levels of gentamicin in the perilymph of topically treated chickens than systemically treated chickens, with significant amounts of gentamicin still present in both at the latest survival time of 5 days. As expected, systemically treated chickens had much higher levels of gentamicin in the serum than topically treated chickens. Advantages and disadvantages to each method of drug administration are discussed.

  11. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Modeling of ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Quantitative estimation of toxicokinetic variability in the human population is a persistent challenge in risk assessment of environmental chemicals. Traditionally, inter-individual differences in the population are accounted for by default assumptions or, in rare cases, are based on human toxicokinetic data.Objectives: To evaluate the utility of genetically diverse mouse strains for estimating toxicokinetic population variability for risk assessment, using trichloroethylene (TCE) metabolism as a case study. Methods: We used data on oxidative and glutathione conjugation metabolism of TCE in 16 inbred and one hybrid mouse strains to calibrate and extend existing physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models. We added one-compartment models for glutathione metabolites and a two-compartment model for dichloroacetic acid (DCA). A Bayesian population analysis of inter-strain variability was used to quantify variability in TCE metabolism. Results: Concentration-time profiles for TCE metabolism to oxidative and glutathione conjugation metabolites varied across strains. Median predictions for the metabolic flux through oxidation was less variable (5-fold range) than that through glutathione conjugation (10-fold range). For oxidative metabolites, median predictions of trichloroacetic acid production was less variable (2-fold range) than DCA production (5-fold range), although uncertainty bounds for DCA exceeded the predicted variability. Conclusions:

  12. Pharmacokinetic properties of mezlocillin in newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odio, C; Threlkeld, N; Thomas, M L; McCraken, G H

    1984-05-01

    The pharmacokinetic properties of mezlocillin were evaluated in newborn infants. Mean peak and trough concentrations of drug in plasma, after 75 mg of mezlocillin per kg given intravenously, were 252 and 72 micrograms/ml, respectively, in infants who were less than 38 weeks gestation and less than or equal to 7 days old, compared with 139 and 9 micrograms/ml, respectively, in infants greater than or equal to 38 weeks gestation and greater than 7 days old. The mean elimination half-life values were from 4.5 h in preterm infants who were less than or equal to 7 days old to 1.8 h in term infants greater than or equal to 7 days old. Median peak and trough bactericidal titers of drug in plasma from neonates treated with mezlocillin were 1:8 and 1:4, respectively, against a resistant (minimal bactericidal concentration, 512 micrograms/ml) Escherichia coli strain and 1:64 and 1:32, respectively, against a susceptible (minimal bactericidal concentration, 2 micrograms/ml) E. coli strain. We propose a dosage schedule of 75 mg of mezlocillin per kg administered every 12 h to preterm (gestational age less than 38 weeks) infants less than or equal to 7 days old, every 8 h to preterm infants greater than 7 days old or term infants less than or equal to 7 days old, and every 6 h to term infants greater than 7 days old.

  13. Buspirone pharmacokinetics in patients with cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalhoff, K; Poulsen, H E; Garred, P

    1987-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of buspirone (20 mg) were determined in 12 patients with cirrhosis and 12 normal subjects. The mean AUC of buspirone was 55 +/- 38 s.d. ng ml-1 h in cirrhotics and 3.5 +/- 2.4 s.d. ng ml-1 h in normals. The time until maximum concentration (tmax) attained...... was similar in the two groups (0.6 vs 0.7 h), but mean maximum concentration Cmax was higher in patients (18.8 +/- 16.3 s.d. ng ml-1) than in normals (1.2 +/- 0.8 s.d. ng ml-1). Mean elimination half-life of buspirone was greater in cirrhotics, but this difference was marginally significant statistically...... (cirrhotics, 6.1 +/- 3.5 s.d. h, normals 3.2 +/- 1.5 s.d. h, P = 0.05). Eight of 12 patients and seven of 12 normal subjects had a second peak in the plasma concentrations of buspirone. In patients this occurred at 10.8 +/- 7.4 s.d. h after the dose, and its mean concentration was 3.1 +/- 6.6 ng ml-1...

  14. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation of ceftaroline fosamil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merker, Andrew; Danziger, Larry H; Rodvold, Keith A; Glowacki, Robert C

    2014-12-01

    Ceftaroline fosamil is a 5th generation cephalosporin with an in vitro spectrum of activity including Streptococcus agalactiae, penicillin- and cephalosporin-resistant S. pneumoniae, S. pyogenes, methicillin-susceptible S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Haemophilus influenzae, Klebsiella oxytoca, K. pneumoniae and Moraxella catarrhalis. It is currently approved by the FDA for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) in adults. This review covers the mechanism of action; bacterial resistance; pharmacokinetic characteristics in various patient populations; pharmacodynamic data in animal and in vitro models as well as human studies; efficacy observed in clinical trials for ABSSSI and CABP; and adverse effects. Ceftaroline provides in vitro bactericidal activity against methicillin-, vancomycin-, daptomycin-, and linezolid-resistant Gram-positive organisms and select Gram-negative pathogens. The pharmacodynamics of ceftaroline is similar to other β-lactam agents. Ceftaroline exhibits a favorable adverse effect profile and is generally well tolerated. There is little data on clinical success of ceftaroline in patients with bacteremia or endocarditis other than what has been published in a small series of case reports. Randomized-control studies are needed to establish clinical outcomes and safety in these patient populations.

  15. Use of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Models ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Use of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Models to Quantify the Impact of Human Age and Interindividual Differences in Physiology and Biochemistry Pertinent to Risk Final Report for Cooperative Agreement. This report describes and demonstrates techniques necessary to extrapolate and incorporate in vitro derived metabolic rate constants in PBPK models. It also includes two case study examples designed to demonstrate the applicability of such data for health risk assessment and addresses the quantification, extrapolation and interpretation of advanced biochemical information on human interindividual variability of chemical metabolism for risk assessment application. It comprises five chapters; topics and results covered in the first four chapters have been published in the peer reviewed scientific literature. Topics covered include: Data Quality ObjectivesExperimental FrameworkRequired DataTwo example case studies that develop and incorporate in vitro metabolic rate constants in PBPK models designed to quantify human interindividual variability to better direct the choice of uncertainty factors for health risk assessment. This report is intended to serve as a reference document for risk assors to use when quantifying, extrapolating, and interpretating advanced biochemical information about human interindividual variability of chemical metabolism.

  16. Modulating antibody pharmacokinetics using hydrophilic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Constantinou, Antony; Deonarain, Mahendra

    2011-09-01

    The use of hydrophilic polymers as a substitute for the Fc-domain in immuno- or non-immuno-based binding proteins is accelerating. Chemical PEGylation has led the way and is still the most advanced and clinically-approved approach. Hydrophilic polymers act by maintaining a flexible conformation and hydrogen bonding to a network of water molecules to acquire a larger hydrodynamic volume and apparent mass than their actual molecular mass suggest. The benefits are increased blood half-life and bioavailability, stability and reduced immunogenicity. In the case of PEG, there is also evidence of enhanced targeting and reduced side effects, but drawbacks include the fact that PEG is non-biodegradable. This report reviews the state of the art for antibody PEGylation in terms of approaches and effects. Additionally, non-biological (such as N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide) and potentially superior biological alternatives (such as polysialylation) are described, ending with recombinant approaches (such as hydrophilic peptides and glyco-engineering), which promise to circumvent the need for chemical modification altogether. The emergence of many small, antibody fragment-like mimics will drive the need for such technologies, and PEGylation is still the choice polymer due to its established use and track record. However, there will be a place for many alternative technologies if they can match the pharmacokinetics of PEG-conjugates and bring addition beneficial features such as easier production.

  17. Pharmacokinetics and toxicology of continuously infused nitroimidazoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eifel, P.J.; Brown, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and toxicology of misonidazole (MISO) and SR-2508 given by continuous intraperitoneal infusion were studied in female C 3 H mice. The survival (time to death) of animals receiving continuous infusions of SR-2508 and MISO was compared and related to plasma concentration, rate of infusion and total amount of drug delivered. Brain and plasma concentrations were determined by HPLC. For SR-2508, plasma concentration was directly proportional to the infusion rate. However, as the infusion rate of MISO was doubled, the plasma concentration of MISO increased approximately 6-fold, reflecting a substantial increase in the apparent half-life. The brain/plasma concentration ratio in animals infused for up to 6 days with SR-2508 remained constant, at approximately 0.09. At plasma concentrations of 0.08-1.5 mM, animals receiving SR-2508 survived approximately 3 times as long as animals exposed to a comparable plasma concentration of MISO. Even at the lowest infusion rates employed in this study, the survival of mice receiving SR-2508 was much shorter than would have been predicted if the toxicity of these two drugs were solely related to the integral brain exposure. The low brain/plasma concentration ratio of SR-2508 was maintained throughout long continuous exposures

  18. Role of metabolism in furazolidone pharmacokinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotun, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of the antimicrobial, 14 C-furazolidone (N-[5-nitro-2-furfurylidene]-3-amino-2-oxazolidinone), in the male Wistar rat was defined and related to the agent's in vitro bacterial and hepatic metabolism. The parmacokinetic profiles after intravenous and oral administration (5 mg/kg) were deemed irregular because of the presence of transient rises in blood levels of the drug over time. The drug was also rapidly cleared from the body. Within 48 hours, 100% of the total administered radioactivity was excreted. Approximately 90% was excreted in the urine and 10% was excreted in the feces. The irregular profiles were not attributable to metabolism by the blood enzymes. Incubation of the drug in rat blood for 2 hours did not result in any significant degradation of the drug. The irregular profiles were not due to enterohepatic recirculation. The kinetics profiles were still irregular after catheterizing the bile duct and no furazolidone was detected in the bile. Metabolism of 14 C-furazolidone in microsomal and cytosolic fractions of rat liver was very rapid. Maximum metabolism was achieved within five minutes. Pretreating the rats or the incubates with unlabelled furazolidone increased the rate and extent of metabolism. In microsomes, addition of allopurinol as a pretreatment decreased the production of polar metabolites. In the cytosol, addition of allopurinol to the incubate as a pretreatment resulted in an increased production of lipophilic metabolites. Pretreating the rats with allopurinol resulted in inconsistent findings in the in vitro metabolism

  19. Pharmacokinetics of oxytetracycline hydrochloride in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, D E; Ravis, W R; Clark, C H

    1987-08-01

    Pharmacokinetics of oxytetracycline HCl (OTC) was studied in rabbits. After 10 mg of OTC/kg of body weight was administered IV, the distribution half-life was 0.06 hour, terminal half-life was 1.32 hours, volume of distribution area was 0.861 L/kg, and total body clearance was 0.434 L/kg/h. After 10 mg of OTC/kg was given IM, the absorption half-life was 2.09 hours, extent of absorption was 71.4%, and total body clearance of the absorbed fraction was 0.576 L/kg/h. Based on these kinetic data, a dosage of 15 mg of OTC/kg, every 8 hours was developed. This dose given IM for 7 consecutive days resulted in observed steady-state maximum and minimum concentrations (mean +/- SD) of 4.7 +/- 0.3 micrograms/ml and 3.2 +/- 0.6 micrograms/ml, respectively. Twice this dose (30 mg of OTC/kg, every 8 hours) given IM caused anorexia and diarrhea.

  20. Mães avaliam comportamentos socialmente "desejados" e "indesejados" de pré-escolares Mothers assess socially "desirable" and "undesirable" behavior of kindergarteners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Turini Bolsoni-Silva

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Comportamentos socialmente habilidosos promovem o desenvolvimento, ao passo que problemas de comportamento dificultam o acesso a novas contingências de reforçamento, facilitadoras da aquisição de repertórios de aprendizagem. Esta pesquisa investiga avaliações maternas de repertórios socialmente "desejados" e "indesejados" de crianças que, segundo o professor, apresentam problemas de comportamento. Participaram mães de 24 crianças indicadas pelo professor como tendo problemas de comportamento e mães de 24 crianças indicadas como tendo comportamentos socialmente "desejados". O Questionário de Comportamentos Socialmente Desejados e a Escala Comportamental Infantil de Rutter foram aplicados nas residências das participantes. Os resultados indicaram mais problemas de comportamento externalizante no grupo previamente indicado como tendo problemas; os grupos não diferiram quanto a comportamentos "desejados". Em ambos os grupos, as crianças obtiveram altos escores de comportamentos socialmente desejados, apontando reservas comportamentais. Também em ambos foram identificadas crianças que poderiam ser beneficiadas com programas para a promoção de interações sociais mais equilibradas, prevenindo problemas de comportamento.Socially desirable behaviors promote development but behavior problems prevent the access to new reinforcement contingencies that could facilitate the acquisition of relevant learning repertoires. This work investigated assessments of mothers concerning socially "desirable" and "undesirable" behaviors in children whose teachers identified as having behavior problems. The sample consisted of 24 mothers of children indicated as having behavioral problems, and 24 mothers of children indicated as presenting socially desirable behaviors. Data about children's behaviors were collected during a home interview, when the Socially Desired Behavior Questionnaire and the Rutter Scale for Parents were filled out. Results

  1. Effect of age on the pharmacokinetics of polymorphic nimodipine in rats after oral administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wenli; Wang, Xiaona; Chen, Ruilian

    2016-01-01

    The previous investigation has proved that their existed pharmacokinetic difference between the different crystal forms of the polymorphic drugs after oral administration. However, no systemic investigations have been made on the change of this pharmacokinetic difference, resulted either from...

  2. Azithromycin in cystic fibrosis : pharmacokinetic and therapeutic aspects of maintenance therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilms, E.B.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes the pharmacokinetics of azithromycin in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients during maintenance therapy, azithromycin drug-drug interactions and the effects of long term use of azithromycin on pulmonary function and microbial resistance. We studied pharmacokinetic parameters of

  3. Review on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and the aging kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aymanns, Christian; Keller, Frieder; Maus, Sebastian; Hartmann, Bertram; Czock, David

    2010-02-01

    In people who are aged >65 years, pharmacokinetics are influenced more by the loss of kidney function than by the aging process of any other organ. A GFR of 30 to 60 ml/min, suggestive of stage 3 kidney disease, is observed in 15 to 30% of elderly people. Drug dosing must be adjusted to both changing pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics; the pharmacodynamics might be influenced by the aging of other organs, too. Using our NEPharm database, we extracted abstracts with pharmacokinetic parameters since 1999 from a weekly PubMed search. The recorded data were analyzed and compared with published recommendations on drug dosage and use in the elderly. Purely age-related changes in pharmacokinetic parameters were recorded from publications on 127 drugs. The analysis of our NEPharm records revealed an average (mean +/- SD) age-related prolongation of half-life of 1.39-fold (corresponding to +39 +/- 61%). Contrasting to common opinion, mean changes in clearance (-1 +/- 54%) and volume of distribution (+24 +/- 56%) were even less. The modest changes in pharmacokinetics do not suggest general dosage modifications in the elderly for most drugs. Changes in pharmacodynamics justify the common medication rule in the elderly-"start low + go slow"-especially for drugs that act on the central nervous system; however, in the case of anti-infective and anticancer therapy, the rule should be "hit hard = start high + go fast" to produce the target effect also in the elderly.

  4. [Clinico-pharmacokinetic aspects of the optimization of psychopharmacotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gor'kov, V A; Panteleeva, G P; Minsker, E I

    1986-01-01

    One of the main problems of psychopharmacotherapy is high variability of therapeutic effects. The traditional clinical approach to the optimization of psychopharmacotherapy based on the characterization of the spectrum of drug action and individual characteristics of the disease has certain limitations. When the clinical approach is supplemented with pharmacokinetic measurements it becomes possible to specify the choice of drug and to select an individual regimen of administration ensuring an effective level of active forms of the drug in the blood. A successful development of the clinico-pharmacokinetic direction at the present stage is due to improvement and standardization of methods of clinical and pharmacokinetic examination which help to ensure a reliable pretreatment identification of patients potentially sensitive to pharmacotherapy, to determine all active forms of drugs in biomedia, to establish the correlation between therapeutic and side effects on the one hand and the active concentrations of these forms on the other, as well as to select the most informative clinical and pharmacokinetic parameters. The general theoretical and practical value of clinico-pharmacokinetic studies is confirmed by the findings accumulated by now.

  5. Vancomycin Pharmacokinetic Parameters in Patients with Hemorrhagic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbitzer, Kathryn A; Jordan, J Dedrick; Sullivan, Kelly A; Durr, Emily A; Olm-Shipman, Casey M; Rhoney, Denise H

    2016-10-01

    Infections are a common medical complication in hemorrhagic stroke patients, with vancomycin commonly used as empiric therapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic parameters of vancomycin in hemorrhagic stroke patients. This was a retrospective study of adult patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) or intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) admitted between May 2010 and February 2015 who received vancomycin. Predicted pharmacokinetic parameters based on population data were compared with calculated pharmacokinetic parameters based on serum trough concentrations. Eighty aSAH patients and 66 ICH patients met inclusion criteria. In the aSAH group, the mean dosing regimen was 17.6 ± 4 mg/kg every 12 (8-12) h. The mean measured trough concentration was lower than the predicted trough concentration (9.9 ± 4.1 vs. 19 ± 8.7 μg/mL; p hemorrhagic stroke exhibited pharmacokinetic alterations favoring increased elimination of vancomycin when compared to predicted pharmacokinetic parameters based on population data. This may result in underexposure to vancomycin, leading to treatment failure and other medical complications.

  6. Pharmacokinetics of BMEDA after Intravenous Administration in Beagle Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hsien Chang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacokinetics of N,N-bis(2-mercapatoethly-N',N'-diethylenediamine (BMEDA, a molecule that can form a chelate with rhenium-188 (188Re to produce the 188Re-BMEDA-liposomes, was studied. In this work, beagles received a single injection of BMEDA, at doses of 1, 2, or 5 mg/kg; the concentration of BMEDA in the beagles’ plasma was then analyzed and determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. Based on the pharmacokinetic parameters of BMEDA, we found that male and female animals shared similar patterns indicating that the pharmacokinetics of BMEDA is independent of gender differences. In addition, the pharmacokinetics of BMEDA was seen to be non-linear because the increase of mean AUC0–t and AUC0–∞ values tend to be greater than dose proportional while the mean Vss and CL values of BMEDA appeared to be dose dependent. The information on the pharmacokinetics of BMEDA generated from this study will serve as a basis to design appropriate pharmacology and toxicology studies for future human use.

  7. Time estimation in good and poor sleepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichten, Catherine S; Creti, Laura; Amsel, Rhonda; Bailes, Sally; Libman, Eva

    2005-12-01

    Time estimation was examined in 148 older good and poor sleepers in analogue and naturalistic sleep settings. On analogue tasks, both "empty" time and time listening to an audiobook were overestimated by both good and poor sleepers. There were no differences between groups. "Empty" time was experienced as "dragging." In the sleep setting, most poor sleepers underestimated nocturnal sleep and overestimated awake times related to their own sleep problem: sleep onset vs. sleep maintenance insomnia. Good sleepers did the opposite. Severity of sleep problem and size of time estimation errors were unrelated. Greater night-to-night wake time variability was experienced by poor than by good sleepers. Psychological adjustment was unrelated to time estimations and to magnification or minimization of sleep problems. The results suggest that for poor sleepers who magnify their sleep problem, self-monitoring can be of benefit by demonstrating that the sleep problem is not as severe as believed.

  8. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of mivacurium in young adult and elderly patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Doris; Viby-Mogensen, Jørgen; Pedersen, N.A.

    2002-01-01

    age factors; butyrylcholinesterase; cholinesterase; dose-response curves; enzymes; metabolites; mivacurium; neuromuscular relaxants; pharmacodynamics; pharmacokinetics; pharmacology; pseudocholinesterase; stereoisomers...

  9. Pharmacokinetics of ractopamine and its organ distribution in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jing-Kai; Huo, Teh-Ia; Lin, Lie-Chwen; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2014-09-24

    Ractopamine, a β-agonist, is used to increase the proportion of lean meat in livestock. However, due to potential cardiovascular risks, ractopamine has been banned for use in food-producing animals in many countries. Nevertheless, pharmacokinetic studies of ractopamine have not been completed. The aim of this study was to develop a high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method for the determination of ractopamine. This validated method was used to investigate the pharmacokinetics and organ distribution of ractopamine in rats. The validation results complied with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's standards. The oral bioavailability of ractopamine was 2.99%. After intravenous administration, ractopamine concentrations varied as follows: kidney > lung > spleen > heart > liver > muscle > plasma > brain. Nonlinear pharmacokinetics and strong partitioning into tissues were observed after intravenous administration of ractopamine. These effects may be due to nonlinear elimination via the kidney.

  10. Pharmacokinetics of oral and intravenous melatonin in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Werner, Mads Utke; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of oral and iv melatonin in healthy volunteers. METHODS: The study was performed as a cohort crossover study. The volunteers received either 10 mg oral melatonin or 10 mg intravenous melatonin on two separate study days. Blood samples were...... collected at different time points following oral administration and short iv infusion, respectively. Plasma melatonin concentrations were determined by RIA technique. Pharmacokinetic analyses were performed by "the method of residuals" and compartmental analysis. The pharmacokinetic variables: k a, t 1....../2 absorption, t max, C max, t 1/2 elimination, AUC 0-∞, and bioavailability were determined for oral melatonin. C max, t 1/2 elimination, V d, CL and AUC 0-∞ were determined for intravenous melatonin. RESULTS: Twelve male volunteers completed the study. Baseline melatonin plasma levels did not differ...

  11. Pharmacokinetics of high-dose intravenous melatonin in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars P H; Werner, Mads U; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2016-01-01

    This crossover study investigated the pharmacokinetics and adverse effects of high-dose intravenous melatonin. Volunteers participated in 3 identical study sessions, receiving an intravenous bolus of 10 mg melatonin, 100 mg melatonin, and placebo. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 0, 60......, 120, 180, 240, 300, 360, and 420 minutes after the bolus. Quantitative determination of plasma melatonin concentrations was performed using a radioimmunoassay technique. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated by a compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis. Adverse effects included assessments...... of sedation and registration of other symptoms. Sedation, evaluated as simple reaction times, was measured at baseline and 120, 180, 300, and 420 minutes after the bolus. Twelve male volunteers completed the study. Median (IQR) Cmax after the bolus injections of 10 mg and 100 mg of melatonin were 221...

  12. Modeling in biopharmaceutics, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics homogeneous and heterogeneous approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Macheras, Panos

    2016-01-01

    The state of the art in Biopharmaceutics, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics Modeling is presented in this new second edition book. It shows how advanced physical and mathematical methods can expand classical models in order to cover heterogeneous drug-biological processes and therapeutic effects in the body. The book is divided into four parts; the first deals with the fundamental principles of fractals, diffusion and nonlinear dynamics; the second with drug dissolution, release, and absorption; the third with epirical, compartmental, and stochastic pharmacokinetic models, with two new chapters, one on fractional pharmacokinetics and one on bioequivalence; and the fourth mainly with classical and nonclassical aspects of pharmacodynamics. The classical models that have relevance and application to these sciences are also considered throughout. This second edition has new information on reaction limited models of dissolution, non binary biopharmaceutic classification system, time varying models, and interf...

  13. Pharmacokinetics of heparin and related polysaccharides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boneu, B.; Dol, F.; Caranobe, C.; Sie, P.; Houin, G.

    1989-01-01

    The pharmacodynamic profile of standard heparin (SH), a low molecular weight derivative (CY 216) and of dermatan sulfate (DS), a new potential antithrombotic drug, was investigated in the rabbit over a large range of doses. After bolus i.v. injection of low doses, the biological activity of SH disappeared exponentially; however, its half-life was prolonged when the dose injected increased, and over 158 micrograms/kg (100 anti-factor Xa U/kg) the biological activity disappeared as a concave-convex curve. CY 216 disappeared more slowly than SH at low doses but faster than SH at higher doses. More than 90% of the DS biological activity present 1 minute after the i.v. injection disappeared exponentially without dose-dependent effects. Increasing doses of the three drugs were then delivered for 5 h under continuous infusions. Below 500 micrograms/kg/h the DS and CY 216 plateau concentrations were higher than that of SH while above this dose the SH concentration was higher than that of DS and CY 216. These observations may be explained by the results of pharmacokinetics experiments where 125 I-labeled compounds were delivered by bolus i.v. injection in association with increasing doses of their unlabeled counterparts. For SH there was a 10-fold difference between the half-life of the lower dose (32 micrograms/kg or 5 anti-factor Xa U/kg) and that of the higher dose (3200 micrograms/kg); it was demonstrated that the half-life of SH continuously shortened as its plasma concentration decreased. In contrast the CY 216 and DS half-lives were very close, independent of the dose delivered, and therefore longer than that of SH at low doses and shorter than that of SH at higher doses

  14. Pharmacokinetics of iothalamate in endstage renal disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, J.R.; Cutler, R.E.; Forland, S.C.

    1988-09-01

    Some nephrologists make alterations in routine peritoneal and hemodialysis schedules after diagnostic studies that use radiographic contrast agents. A study to determine the pharmacokinetics of one contrast agent, iothalamate, is reported. The plasma (total body) clearance of iothalamate was measured in seven patients who had endstage renal disease (ESRD) and who received maintenance hemodialysis. During an interdialytic period, plasma clearance of iothalamate varied from 0.7 to 5.2 mL/min (3.1 +/- 1.8 mL/min, mean +/- SD) with an elimination rate constant (beta) of 0.0164 +/- 0.01 hr-1, a terminal half-life of 61 +/- 42 hours, and an estimated distribution volume of 11 +/- 3.9 L. Hemodialysis clearance of iothalamate was 104 +/- 54 mL/min. With the assumption that iothalamate is mainly distributed in the extracellular fluid (ECF) compartment, the theoretical fluid shift from the intracellular fluid (ICF) compartment to the ECF compartment was 323 mL after administration of the largest dose (2.1 mL/kg or 1.6 mmol/kg of body weight) of 60% meglumine iothalamate solution. The average maximum serum osmolarity change was less than expected, suggesting some type of internal buffering of meglumine iothalamate. In the first few hours after radiocontrast administration in four patients, the average change in serum osmolarity was 5 mmol/L; the average change in serum sodium concentration during this same time was a decrease of 0.5 mmol/L. The minor increase in ECF volume induced by hyperosmolar contrast agents does not require immediate dialysis in most patients. When needed, however, for contrast-related adverse effects, hemodialysis is efficient in rapidly removing iothalamate.

  15. Pharmacokinetic Interaction between Telaprevir and Methadone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verboven, Peter; Vandevoorde, Ann; Vinck, Petra; Snoeys, Jan; Boogaerts, Griet; De Paepe, Els; Van Solingen-Ristea, Rodica; Witek, James; Garg, Varun

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody is present in most patients enrolled in methadone maintenance programs. Therefore, interactions between the HCV protease inhibitor telaprevir and methadone were investigated. The pharmacokinetics of R- and S-methadone were measured after administration of methadone alone and after 7 days of telaprevir (750 mg every 8 h [q8h]) coadministration in HCV-negative subjects on stable, individualized methadone therapy. Unbound R-methadone was measured in predose plasma samples before and during telaprevir coadministration. Safety and symptoms of opioid withdrawal were evaluated throughout the study. In total, 18 subjects were enrolled; 2 discontinued prior to receiving telaprevir. The minimum plasma concentration in the dosing interval (Cmin), the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), and the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from h 0 (time of administration) to 24 h postdose (AUC0–24) for R-methadone were reduced by 31%, 29%, and 29%, respectively, in the presence of telaprevir. The AUC0–24 ratio of S-methadone/R-methadone was not altered. The median unbound percentage of R-methadone increased by 26% in the presence of telaprevir. The R-methadone median (absolute) unbound Cmin values in the absence (10.63 ng/ml) and presence (10.45 ng/ml) of telaprevir were similar. There were no symptoms of opioid withdrawal and no discontinuations due to adverse events. In summary, exposure to total R-methadone was reduced by approximately 30% in the presence of telaprevir, while the exposure to unbound R-methadone was unchanged. No symptoms of opioid withdrawal were observed. These results suggest that dose adjustment of methadone is not required when initiating telaprevir treatment. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00933283.) PMID:23478952

  16. Pharmacokinetics and allometric analysis of spectinomycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Dinev

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study were compared microbiological and HPLC methods for determination of spectinomycin pharmacokinetics in goats. The goats were subject to intravenous administration of spectinomycin at 20 mg/kg body weight. For the microbiological assay was used test microorganism Sarcina lutea ATCC 9341. Limit of quantification in the microbiological assay was 6.25 μg/mL and in the HPLC method was 0.1 μg/mL. Spectinomycin concentrations following microbiological assay were initially higher than HPLC-determined and gradually the differences decreased. During HPLC analysis spectinomycin was found until 12 h and during microbiological assay until 4 h. As a result in HPLC analysis the values of Vd(area (0.527 L/kg , t1/2β (1.74 h and ClB (3.512 mL/kg/min were considerably higher in comparison with microbiological method (Vd(area - 0.147 L/kg , t1/2β - 0.8 h and ClB - 2.174 mL/kg/min. The data from method validation also showed the advantage of HPLC method. Because of that can be concluded that HPLC is more sensitive and accurate method for spectinomycin determination. Regarding the allometric equation for elimination half-life (t1/2 = 1.19.W0.02 the values are showing lack of correlation to body weight. Volume of distribution allometric equation (Vd(area = 0.37.W0.96 and total body clearance allometric equation (ClB = 1.92.W1.09 have high level of correlation to body weight (<0.001 and therefore can be used.

  17. Biopharmaceutics, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antituberculosis drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budha, Nageshwar R; Lee, Richard E; Meibohm, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of mortality due to a single infectious agent. The currently used combination drug regimens produce cure rates that exceed 95%, given good patient adherence during the multiple months treatment period. However the recent surge in HIV infections and the synergy between HIV and TB as well as the emergence of resistance resulted in an unforeseen increase in the number of TB cases, including multi-drug resistant (MDR) and extensively-drug resistant (XDR) forms of TB. Consequently, there is an urgent need to develop novel, fast acting antituberculosis drugs with high potency that can provide treatment options for all forms of TB. It is well known that the current TB drugs exhibit differences in their in vivo activity profile and these differences are largely determined by their pharmacodynamics (PD), i.e. intrinsic antibacterial activity, biopharmaceutical properties such as solubility and permeability, and pharmacokinetic (PK) properties such as drug exposure, tissue distribution, and protein binding. An understanding of the relationships among these properties is considered key for a rational use of antituberculosis therapeutics. The current review provides a comprehensive summary of physicochemical/biopharmaceutical, PK, and PD properties of currently used antituberculosis drugs and novel agents under development. Also, a brief review of PK/PD parameters of current TB drugs is given and properties of a desirable TB drug target and drug molecule are outlined. The information provided herewith may be useful in the optimization of biopharmaceutical and PK/PD characteristics in the development of novel TB therapeutics and in the design of optimal treatment regimens.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of tedizolid in subjects with renal or hepatic impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, S; Minassian, S L; Morris, D; Ponnuraj, R; Marbury, T C; Alcorn, H W; Fang, E; Prokocimer, P

    2014-11-01

    Two open-label, single-dose, parallel-group studies were conducted to characterize the pharmacokinetics of the novel antibacterial tedizolid and the safety of tedizolid phosphate, its prodrug, in renally or hepatically impaired subjects. Tedizolid pharmacokinetics in subjects with severe renal impairment without dialysis support was compared with that of matched control subjects with normal renal function. Effects of hemodialysis on tedizolid pharmacokinetics were determined in a separate cohort of subjects undergoing long-term hemodialysis. Effects of hepatic impairment on tedizolid pharmacokinetics were determined in subjects with moderate or severe hepatic impairment and compared with those of matched control subjects with normal hepatic function. Each participant received a single oral (hepatic impairment) or intravenous (renal impairment) dose of tedizolid phosphate at 200 mg; hemodialysis subjects received two doses (separated by 7 days), before and after dialysis, in a crossover fashion. The pharmacokinetics of tedizolid was similar in subjects with severe renal impairment and controls (∼8% lower area under the concentration-time curve [AUC], with a nearly identical peak concentration) and in subjects undergoing hemodialysis before and after tedizolid phosphate administration (∼9% lower AUC, with a 15% higher peak concentration); Tedizolid pharmacokinetics was only minimally altered in subjects with moderate or severe hepatic impairment; the AUC was increased approximately 22% and 34%, respectively, compared with that of subjects in the control group. Tedizolid phosphate was generally well tolerated in all participants. These results suggest that tedizolid phosphate dose adjustments are not necessary in patients with any degree of renal or hepatic impairment. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration numbers NCT01452828 [renal study] and NCT01431833 [hepatic study].). Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology

  19. Population pharmacokinetics of bevacizumab in cancer patients with external validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kelong; Peyret, Thomas; Marchand, Mathilde; Quartino, Angelica; Gosselin, Nathalie H; Girish, Sandhya; Allison, David E; Jin, Jin

    2016-08-01

    Bevacizumab is approved for various cancers. This analysis aimed to comprehensively evaluate bevacizumab pharmacokinetics and the influence of patient variables on bevacizumab pharmacokinetics. Rich and sparse bevacizumab serum concentrations were collected from Phase I through IV studies in early and metastatic cancers. Bevacizumab was given intravenously as single agent or in combination with chemotherapy for single- and multiple-dose schedules. Model-building used 8943 bevacizumab concentrations from 1792 patients with colon/colorectal, non-small cell lung, kidney, pancreatic, breast, prostate and brain cancer. Bevacizumab doses ranged from 1 to 20 mg/kg given once every 1, 2 or 3 weeks. A two-compartment model best described the data. The population estimates of clearance (CL), central volume of distribution (V1) and half-life for a typical 70-kg patient were 9.01 mL/h, 2.88 L and 19.6 days. CL and V1 increased with body weight and were higher in males than females by 14 and 18 %, respectively. CL decreased with increasing albumin and decreasing alkaline phosphatase. The final model was externally validated using 1670 concentrations from 146 Japanese patients that were not used for model-building. Mean prediction errors were -2.1, 3.1 and 1.0 % for concentrations, CL and V1, respectively, confirming adequate predictive performance. A robust bevacizumab pharmacokinetic model was developed and externally validated, which may be used to simulate bevacizumab exposure to optimize dosing strategies. Asian and non-Asian patients exhibited similar bevacizumab pharmacokinetics. Given the similarity in pharmacokinetics among monoclonal antibodies, this may inform pharmacokinetic studies in different ethnic groups for other therapeutic antibodies.

  20. ADVAN-style analytical solutions for common pharmacokinetic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuhelwa, Ahmad Y; Foster, David J R; Upton, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    The analytical solutions to compartmental pharmacokinetic models are well known, but have not been presented in a form that easily allows for complex dosing regimen and changes in covariate/parameter values that may occur at discrete times within and/or between dosing intervals. Laplace transforms were used to derive ADVAN-style analytical solutions for 1, 2, and 3 compartment pharmacokinetic linear models of intravenous and first-order absorption drug administration. The equations calculate the change in drug amounts in each compartment of the model over a time interval (t; t = t2 - t1) accounting for any dose or covariate events acting in the time interval. The equations were coded in the R language and used to simulate the time-course of drug amounts in each compartment of the systems. The equations were validated against commercial software [NONMEM (Beal, Sheiner, Boeckmann, & Bauer, 2009)] output to assess their capability to handle both complex dosage regimens and the effect of changes in covariate/parameter values that may occur at discrete times within or between dosing intervals. For all tested pharmacokinetic models, the time-course of drug amounts using the ADVAN-style analytical solutions were identical to NONMEM outputs to at least four significant figures, confirming the validity of the presented equations. To our knowledge, this paper presents the ADVAN-style equations for common pharmacokinetic models in the literature for the first time. The presented ADVAN-style equations overcome obstacles to implementing the classical analytical solutions in software, and have speed advantages over solutions using differential equation solvers. The equations presented in this paper fill a gap in the pharmacokinetic literature, and it is expected that these equations will facilitate the investigation of useful open-source software for modelling pharmacokinetic data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Nanocrystals for enhancement of oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varaporn Buraphacheep Junyaprasert

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystals, a carrier-free colloidal delivery system in nano-sized range, is an interesting approach for poorly soluble drugs. Nanocrystals provide special features including enhancement of saturation solubility, dissolution velocity and adhesiveness to surface/cell membranes. Several strategies are applied for nanocrystals production including precipitation, milling, high pressure homogenization and combination methods such as NanoEdge™, SmartCrystal and Precipitation-lyophilization-homogenization (PLH technology. For oral administration, many publications reported useful advantages of nanocrystals to improve in vivo performances i.e. pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, safety and targeted delivery which were discussed in this review. Additionally, transformation of nanocrystals to final formulations and future trends of nanocrystals were also described.

  2. Pharmacokinetic Variability of Drugs Used for Prophylactic Treatment of Migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Ågesen, Frederik Nybye; Pavbro, Agniezka

    2017-01-01

    -time curve in steady-state studies, the following drugs have high pharmacokinetic variability: propranolol in 92% (33/36), metoprolol in 85% (33/39), and amitriptyline in 60% (3/5) of studies. The following drugs have low or moderate variability: atenolol in 100% (2/2), valproate in 100% (15/15), topiramate...... pharmacokinetic variability of metoprolol and propranolol can result in very high plasma concentrations in a small minority of patients, and those drugs should therefore be titrated up from a low initial dose, depending mainly on the occurrence of adverse events....

  3. Dosing antibiotics in neonates: review of the pharmacokinetic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Chaparro, Nazario D; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Greenberg, Rachel G

    2017-09-01

    Antibiotics are often used in neonates despite the absence of relevant dosing information in drug labels. For neonatal dosing, clinicians must extrapolate data from studies for adults and older children, who have strikingly different physiologies. As a result, dosing extrapolation can lead to increased toxicity or efficacy failures in neonates. Driven by these differences and recent legislation mandating the study of drugs in children and neonates, an increasing number of pharmacokinetic studies of antibiotics are being performed in neonates. These studies have led to new dosing recommendations with particular consideration for neonate body size and maturation. Herein, we highlight the available pharmacokinetic data for commonly used systemic antibiotics in neonates.

  4. A Three-Pulse Release Tablet for Amoxicillin: Preparation, Pharmacokinetic Study and Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Chai, Hongyu; Li, Yang; Chai, Xuyu; Zhao, Yan; Zhao, Yunfan; Tao, Tao; Xiang, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Amoxicillin is a commonly used antibiotic which has a short half-life in human. The frequent administration of amoxicillin is often required to keep the plasma drug level in an effective range. The short dosing interval of amoxicillin could also cause some side effects and drug resistance, and impair its therapeutic efficacy and patients' compliance. Therefore, a three-pulse release tablet of amoxicillin is desired to generate sustained release in vivo, and thus to avoid the above mentioned disadvantages. The pulsatile release tablet consists of three pulsatile components: one immediate-release granule and two delayed release pellets, all containing amoxicillin. The preparation of a pulsatile release tablet of amoxicillin mainly includes wet granulation craft, extrusion/spheronization craft, pellet coating craft, mixing craft, tablet compression craft and film coating craft. Box-Behnken design, Scanning Electron Microscope and in vitro drug release test were used to help the optimization of formulations. A crossover pharmacokinetic study was performed to compare the pharmacokinetic profile of our in-house pulsatile tablet with that of commercial immediate release tablet. The pharmacokinetic profile of this pulse formulation was simulated by physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model with the help of Simcyp®. Single factor experiments identify four important factors of the formulation, namely, coating weight of Eudragit L30 D-55 (X1), coating weight of AQOAT AS-HF (X2), the extrusion screen aperture (X3) and compression forces (X4). The interrelations of the four factors were uncovered by a Box-Behnken design to help to determine the optimal formulation. The immediate-release granule, two delayed release pellets, together with other excipients, namely, Avicel PH 102, colloidal silicon dioxide, polyplasdone and magnesium stearate were mixed, and compressed into tablets, which was subsequently coated with Opadry® film to produce pulsatile tablet of

  5. Hydrogen-Poor Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pian, Elena; Mazzali, Paolo A.

    Hydrogen-poor core-collapse supernovae (SNe) signal the explosive death of stars more massive than the progenitors of hydrogen-rich core-collapse supernovae, i.e., approximately in the range 15-50 M⊙ in main sequence. Since hydrogen-poor core-collapse supernovae include those that accompany gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which were all rigorously identified with type Ic supernovae, their explosion energies cover almost two decades. The light curves and spectra are consequently very heterogeneous and often bear the signature of an asymmetric, i.e., aspherical, explosion. Asphericity is best traced by early-time (within days of the explosion) optical spectropolarimetry and by late-epoch (more than ˜ 100 days after explosion) low-resolution spectroscopy. While the relationship between hydrogen-poor core-collapse supernovae to hydrogen-poor super-luminous supernovae is not understood, a known case of association between an ultra-long gamma-ray burst and a very luminous hydrogen-poor supernova may help unraveling the connection. This is tantalizingly pointing to a magnetar powering source for both phenomena, although this scenario is still highly speculative. Host galaxies of hydrogen-poor supernovae are always star forming; in those of completely stripped supernovae and gamma-ray burst supernovae, the spatial distribution of the explosions follows the blue/ultraviolet light, with a correlation that is more than linear.

  6. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Relationships of Etravirine in HIV-1-Infected, Treatment-Experienced Children and Adolescents in PIANO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuda, Thomas N; Brochot, Anne; Green, Bruce; Nijs, Steven; Vis, Peter; Opsomer, Magda; Tomaka, Frank L; Hoetelmans, Richard M W

    2016-11-01

    PIANO (NCT00665847) investigated etravirine pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety in children and adolescents. Treatment-experienced, HIV-1-infected patients (≥6 to <18 years) received etravirine 5.2 mg/kg twice daily (maximum 200 mg twice daily) plus background antiretrovirals. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed, and etravirine C 0h and AUC 0-12h were estimated. Relationships among intrinsic/extrinsic factors and etravirine pharmacokinetics and pharmacokinetics with pharmacodynamics were assessed. The best model describing etravirine pharmacokinetics consisted of a single compartment with sequential zero- and first-order absorption following a lag time. Interindividual variability terms were included on clearance (CL/F) and the first-order input rate constant (KA). The final model estimates (coefficient of variation, %) for CL/F and KA were 46.3 (11) L/h and 1.07 (34) h -1 , respectively. Overall, median (range) estimated etravirine C 0h and AUC 0-12h were 287 (2-2276) ng/mL and 4560 (62-28,865) ng · h/mL, respectively. Exposure was slightly lower in adolescents vs children. Sex and adherence did not affect etravirine pharmacokinetics. Factors significantly affecting etravirine exposure were body weight (higher with lower weight), race (lower in Asians than in white or black patients), and the use of certain HIV protease inhibitors. Virologic response (<50 copies/mL at week 48) was lower in the lowest etravirine AUC 0-12h quartile vs the upper 3 quartiles (41% vs 67% to 76%). Rash occurred more frequently in the highest quartile than in the lower 3 quartiles (52% versus 8% to 20%). Etravirine 5.2 mg/kg twice daily in treatment-experienced, HIV-1-infected children and adolescents provides comparable exposure to that in adults receiving etravirine 200 mg twice daily and is the recommended dose for children and adolescents. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  7. [Diagnostic value of quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters and relative quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters in breast lesions with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, T T; Liu, W H; Zhang, Y Q; Li, L H; Wang, R; Ye, Y Y

    2017-08-01

    Objective: To explore the differential between the value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters and relative pharmacokinetic quantitative parameters in breast lesions. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 255 patients(262 breast lesions) who was obtained by clinical palpation , ultrasound or full-field digital mammography , and then all lessions were pathologically confirmed in Zhongda Hospital, Southeast University from May 2012 to May 2016. A 3.0 T MRI scanner was used to obtain the quantitative MR pharmacokinetic parameters: volume transfer constant (K(trans)), exchange rate constant (k(ep))and extravascular extracellular volume fraction (V(e)). And measured the quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters of normal glands tissues which on the same side of the same level of the lesions; and then calculated the value of relative pharmacokinetic parameters: rK(rans)、rk(ep) and rV(e).To explore the diagnostic value of two pharmacokinetic parameters in differential diagnosis of benign and malignant breast lesions using receiver operating curves and model of logistic regression. Results: (1)There were significant differences between benign lesions and malignant lesions in K(trans) and k(ep) ( t =15.489, 15.022, respectively, P 0.05). The areas under the ROC curve(AUC)of K(trans), k(ep) and V(e) between malignant and benign lesions were 0.933, 0.948 and 0.387, the sensitivity of K(trans), k(ep) and V(e) were 77.1%, 85.0%, 51.0% , and the specificity of K(trans), k(ep) and V(e) were 96.3%, 93.6%, 60.8% for the differential diagnosis of breast lesions if taken the maximum Youden's index as cut-off. (2)There were significant differences between benign lesions and malignant lesions in rK(trans), rk(ep) and rV(e) ( t =14.177, 11.726, 2.477, respectively, P pharmacokinetic parameters and the prediction probability of relative quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters( Z =0.867, P =0.195). Conclusion: There was no significant difference between the

  8. 'Undesirable inhabitant of the union ... supplying liquor to natives': D. F. Malan and the deportation of South Africa's British and Irish lumpen proletarians 1924-1933

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Hyslop

    Full Text Available Between 1924 and 1933 scores of British and Irish immigrants were deported from South Africa for crimes that were mainly of a petty character. Prominent in their records was the offence of supplying alcohol to black people, which had been criminalised under the country's racial forms of prohibition. These deportations took place under the direction of the minister of the Interior, D. F. Malan, later notorious as the initiator of the apartheid policy. The article contends that the process of deportation is revealing of both the social trajectory of some metropolitan migrants to the Empire and of the character of the South African state. While turn-of-the-century British immigrants to southern Africa are generally thought of as upwardly socially mobile, a minority took a downward path. As 'poor whites' they constituted a threat to racial boundaries. Malan, concerned to police these boundaries, sought to remove them from society. But he was constrained by his political alliance with the British immigrant labour movement and in the end was selective in his strategy, deporting the most marginalised or lumpen proletarian, while allowing those who could claim some shreds of respectability to remain. The organisational and bureaucratic processes of deportation are traced in detail. The article endorses Robert Bickers' view that imperial history has given too little attention to poor and working class British immigrants in the Empire.

  9. Pharmacokinetics of formulated tenoxicam transdermal delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taekyung; Kang, Eunyoung; Chun, Inkoo; Gwak, Hyesun

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of developing a new tenoxicam transdermal delivery system (TDS), the pharmacokinetics of tenoxicam from various formulated TDS were evaluated and compared with values following oral administration of tenoxicam and with application of a piroxicam plaster (Trast) marketed in Korea. Based on previous in-vitro study results, a mixture of diethylene glycol monoethyl ether (DGME) and propylene glycol monolaurate (PGML) (40:60) was used as a vehicle, and caprylic acid, capric acid, lauric acid, oleic acid or linoleic acid (each at 3%) was added as an enhancer. Triethanolamine (5%) was used as a solubilizer, and Duro-Tak 87-2510 as a pressure-sensitive adhesive. Among these fatty acids used for the formulation of tenoxicam TDS, caprylic acid showed the greatest enhancing effect; the area under the plasma concentration-time profile (AUC) decreased in the order of caprylic acid>linoleic acid>or=oleic acid>lauric acid>capric acid. Compared with oral administration, maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) was significantly lower, and time to reach Cmax (Tmax) delayed with all formulated tenoxicam TDS. All formulated TDS resulted in a lower AUC than with the oral formulation, except for TDS containing caprylic acid, although the difference was statistically significant only with capric acid. The AUC for all the formulated tenoxicam TDS was significantly higher than that of the piroxicam plaster; TDS with caprylic acid increased AUC 8.53-fold compared with the piroxicam plaster. Even though the Tmax of tenoxicam TDS was not significantly different from that of the piroxicam plaster, Cmax was higher; formulations containing caprylic acid and linoleic acid increased Cmax by 7.39- and 8.76-fold, respectively. In conclusion, a formulation containing 1.5 mL DGME-PGML (40:60) with 3% caprylic acid and 5% triethanolamine mixed with 6 g Duro-Tak 87-2510 could be a good candidate for developing a new tenoxicam TDS to maintain a comparable extent of absorption

  10. Poor sleep in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøe Lunde, Hanne Marie; Aae, Tommy F; Indrevåg, William; Aarseth, Jan; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Bø, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Poor sleep is a frequent symptom in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Sleep may be influenced by MS-related symptoms and adverse effects from immunotherapy and symptomatic medications. We aimed to study the prevalence of poor sleep and the influence of socio-demographic and clinical factors on sleep quality in MS- patients. A total of 90 MS patients and 108 sex-and age- matched controls were included in a questionnaire survey. Sleep complaints were evaluated by Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and a global PSQI score was used to separate good sleepers (≤ 5) from poor sleepers (>5). Excessive daytime sleepiness, the use of immunotherapy and antidepressant drugs, symptoms of pain, depression, fatigue and MS-specific health related quality of life were registered. Results were compared between patients and controls and between good and poor sleepers among MS patients. MS patients reported a higher mean global PSQI score than controls (8.6 vs. 6.3, p = 0.001), and 67.1% of the MS patients compared to 43.9% of the controls (p = 0.002) were poor sleepers. Pain (p = 0.02), fatigue (p = 0.001), depression (p = 0.01) and female gender (p = 0.04) were associated with sleep disturbance. Multivariate analyses showed that female gender (p = 0.02), use of immunotherapy (p = 005) and a high psychological burden of MS (p = 0.001) were associated with poor sleep among MS patients. Poor sleep is common in patients with MS. Early identification and treatment of modifiable risk factors may improve sleep and quality of life in MS.

  11. Poor sleep in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanne Marie Bøe Lunde

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Poor sleep is a frequent symptom in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Sleep may be influenced by MS-related symptoms and adverse effects from immunotherapy and symptomatic medications. We aimed to study the prevalence of poor sleep and the influence of socio-demographic and clinical factors on sleep quality in MS- patients. METHODS: A total of 90 MS patients and 108 sex-and age- matched controls were included in a questionnaire survey. Sleep complaints were evaluated by Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI and a global PSQI score was used to separate good sleepers (≤ 5 from poor sleepers (>5. Excessive daytime sleepiness, the use of immunotherapy and antidepressant drugs, symptoms of pain, depression, fatigue and MS-specific health related quality of life were registered. Results were compared between patients and controls and between good and poor sleepers among MS patients. RESULTS: MS patients reported a higher mean global PSQI score than controls (8.6 vs. 6.3, p = 0.001, and 67.1% of the MS patients compared to 43.9% of the controls (p = 0.002 were poor sleepers. Pain (p = 0.02, fatigue (p = 0.001, depression (p = 0.01 and female gender (p = 0.04 were associated with sleep disturbance. Multivariate analyses showed that female gender (p = 0.02, use of immunotherapy (p = 005 and a high psychological burden of MS (p = 0.001 were associated with poor sleep among MS patients. CONCLUSIONS: Poor sleep is common in patients with MS. Early identification and treatment of modifiable risk factors may improve sleep and quality of life in MS.

  12. Pharmacokinetic Interaction between Magnolol and Piperine in Rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the pharmacokinetic mechanism of interaction between magnolol and piperine when co-administered to rats. Methods: The rats were divided into five groups as follows: magnolol group (625 mg/kg); low dose of piperine group (20 mg/kg); high dose of piperine group (40 mg/kg); low dose of piperine ...

  13. Isoniazid Pharmacokinetics in the Presence of Ofloxacin and Norfloxacin Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sinyeofori A; Ezejiofor, Ndidi A; Barikpoar, Ebenezer; Orisakwe, Orish E

    2014-01-21

    The in vivo effects of norfloxacin (NXC) and ofloxacin (OXC) on isoniazid (INH) pharmacokinetics were investigated in 5 apparently healthy volunteers aged 18-39 years after an informed consent. The study was carried out in 3 phases with an interval drug wash out period of at least 1 week in between the phases. In phase 1 (INH alone), subject received 300 mg (usual adult dose) of INH. In phase 2 (INH + OXC), 300 mg of INH was coadministered with 200 mg of OXC, and in phase 3 (INH + NXC) each received 300 mg of INH together with 400 mg of NXC after 1-week drug wash period. Drugs were taken orally with 350 mL of water after an overnight fast, and the subject fasted 3 hours after drug. Plasma, saliva, and urine concentration of INH were predetermined at zero hour, then hourly until the eighth hour, 12 hours, 24 hours, and finally at 48 hours. The urine samples were further collected at 72 hours after drug(s) administration using validated methods. Various pharmacokinetics parameters were calculated. Various pharmacokinetic parameters of INH significantly differed when administered alone or in combination with OXC or with NXC. The mean saliva to plasma ratio of INH concentration was 0.14. The bioavailability indices of INH in the saliva and plasma were similar in all the groups. NXC and OXC reduced the extent and rate of absorption of INH. The determination of INH levels in saliva may be useful in therapeutic drug monitoring and pharmacokinetic studies.

  14. Pharmacokinetics of a pyrethroid insecticide mixture in the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrethroid insecticides are used and co-occur in the environment, in residences and day care facilities. Pharmacokinetic models of pyrethroids and assessment of risk from their exposure would be better informed if data are derived from studies using chemical mixtures. The objecti...

  15. Pharmacokinetic aspects of the anti-epileptic drug substance vigabatrin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøhr, Martha Kampp; Frølund, Sidsel; Holm, René

    2014-01-01

    are discussed in detail. Special focus is on the contribution of the proton-coupled amino acid transporter 1 (PAT1) for intestinal vigabatrin absorption. Furthermore, the review gives an overview of the pharmacokinetic parameters of vigabatrin across different species and drug-food and drug-drug interactions...

  16. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic (PKPD) Analysis with Drug Discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negus, S Stevens; Banks, Matthew L

    2016-08-30

    Discriminative stimulus and other drug effects are determined by the concentration of drug at its target receptor and by the pharmacodynamic consequences of drug-receptor interaction. For in vivo procedures such as drug discrimination, drug concentration at receptors in a given anatomical location (e.g., the brain) is determined both by the dose of drug administered and by pharmacokinetic processes of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion that deliver drug to and from that anatomical location. Drug discrimination data are often analyzed by strategies of dose-effect analysis to determine parameters such as potency and efficacy. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic (PKPD) analysis is an alternative to conventional dose-effect analysis, and it relates drug effects to a measure of drug concentration in a body compartment (e.g., venous blood) rather than to drug dose. PKPD analysis can yield insights on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic determinants of drug action. PKPD analysis can also facilitate translational research by identifying species differences in pharmacokinetics and providing a basis for integrating these differences into interpretation of drug effects. Examples are discussed here to illustrate the application of PKPD analysis to the evaluation of drug effects in rhesus monkeys trained to discriminate cocaine from saline.

  17. Pharmacokinetic Interaction between Magnolol and Piperine in Rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    component of black pepper and long pepper, has been reported to enhance drug bioavailability and interactions by altering the pharmacokinetics. [13]. In view of popular use of magnolol and piperine for the promotion of digestive function in dietaries and medicines, their concomitant intake should be paid attention to. In the ...

  18. Pharmacokinetics of Caffeic Acid from Methanol Seed Extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    4.00 and 12.00 h. The plasma was collected after centrifugation of blood at 2700rpm for 10 min at. 25 oC, which was then processed and analyzed as mentioned above. Determination of pharmacokinetic parameters. Analytical data of each rat were used to plot a curve between plasma concentration of caffeic acid and time.

  19. Pharmacokinetics of antiretroviral drugs in infancy | McIlleron ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dosing in infancy is complicated by inadequate characterisation of pharmacokinetics, unpredictable drug concentrations and a lack of suitable dosage forms. Additional challenges are presented by the concomitant administration of interacting drugs (e.g. rifampicin in antituberculosis treatment) and disease conditions that ...

  20. 40 CFR 795.228 - Oral/dermal pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... animals. For pharmacokinetics testing and dermal studies, adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats, 7 to 9 weeks of age, shall be used. For dermal studies, young adult mini-pigs shall also be used. The... substance. (b) Definitions. (1) Bioavailability refers to the rate and relative amount of administered test...

  1. Two-Compartment Pharmacokinetic Models for Chemical Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanneganti, Kumud; Simon, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    The transport of potassium permanganate between two continuous-stirred vessels was investigated to help chemical and biomedical engineering students understand two-compartment pharmacokinetic models. Concepts of modeling, mass balance, parameter estimation and Laplace transform were applied to the two-unit process. A good agreement was achieved…

  2. chronicles of medical history first reports of clinical pharmacokinetics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Early Years of Clinical Pharmacokinetics. (1910 – 1976). Science is largely close and reproducible examination of relationships between physical phenomena. It was by looking at the relationship between electricity and magnetism and the relativity of their effects that scientists created a whole revolution in scientific.

  3. Single dose pharmacokinetics of mefloquine in healthy Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Single dose pharmacokinetics of mefloquine was determined in SJ ic healthy Nigerian male subjects. Mefloquine 500mg single dose was administered and blood sa mples were collected 11t intervals. Plasma concentrations were determined by RP-HPLC method after sample pretreated step by solid phase extraction ...

  4. Studies on pharmacokinetic drug interaction potential of vinpocetine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Vinpocetine, a semi-synthetic derivative of vincamine, is a popular dietary supplement used for the treatment of several central nervous system related disorders. Despite its wide use, no pharmacokinetic drug interaction studies are reported in literature. Due to increasing use of dietar...

  5. Effects of Storage Conditions on Pharmacokinetics of Paracetamol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of storage condition on the pharmacokinetics of paracetamol tablets were studied under several storage conditions. Three storage sites which were considered suboptimal were selected. Freshly purchased 1000-tablets tins of paracetamol were bought and stored in each of these sites for not less than two ...

  6. Grey-Box Modelling of Pharmacokinetic /Pharmacodynamic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornøe, Christoffer Wenzel; Jacobsen, Judith L.; Pedersen, Oluf

    2004-01-01

    Grey-box pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modelling is presented as a promising way of modelling PK/PD systems. The concept behind grey-box modelling is based on combining physiological knowledge along with information from data in the estimation of model parameters. Grey-box modelling...

  7. single dose pharmacokinetics of mefloquine in healthy nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    Single dose pharmacokinetics of mefloquine was determined in SJ ic healthy Nigerian male subjects. Mefloquine 500mg single dose was administered and blood samples were collected. 11t intervals. Plasma concentrations were determined by RP-HPLC method after sample pre- treated step by solid phase extraction ...

  8. In vitro metabolism and pharmacokinetic studies on methylone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Just; Petersen, Trine Hedebrink; Linnet, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Abuse of the stimulant designer drug methylone (methylenedioxymethcathinone) has been documented in most parts of the world. As with many of the new designer drugs that continuously appear in the illicit drug market, little is known about the pharmacokinetics of methylone. Using in vitro studies...

  9. Comparison of paracetamol pharmacokinetics in Panadol ® and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The influence of caffeine (60mg) was studied on the pharmacokinetic characteristics of paracetamol (1000mg single dose) in six healthy male human volunteers. A double beam spectrophotometer was used to analyse salivary paracetamol concentrations. Caffeine caused a significant (p< 0.05) decrease in the saliva ...

  10. Effect of Smoking on Pharmacokinetics of Clopidogrel, an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Smoking behavior may not be a significant determinant of the pharmacokinetics of clopidogrel following oral administration .... LDH, lactate dehydrogenase; RBC, red blood cell;. WBC, white blood cell; Hgb, hemoglobin ..... Montalescot G, Hacke W, Fox KA, Lincoff AM, Topol. EJ et al. Smoking, clopidogrel, and ...

  11. Formulation and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Controlled-Release ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A coating layer was then applied with a mixture of HPMC, ethylcellulose, shellac, and HPMC phthalate. The effect of several formulation variables on in vitro drug release was studied; furthermore, the drug release kinetics of the optimized formulation was evaluated. The in vivo pharmacokinetics of the optimized formulation ...

  12. Formulation and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Controlled-Release ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mixture of HPMC, ethylcellulose, shellac, and HPMC phthalate. The effect of several formulation variables on in vitro drug release was studied; furthermore, the drug release kinetics of the optimized formulation was evaluated. The in vivo pharmacokinetics of the optimized formulation was compared with those of commercial ...

  13. Pharmacokinetics of ifosfamide and some metabolites in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaijser, G. P.; de Kraker, J.; Bult, A.; Underberg, W. J.; Beijnen, J. H.

    1998-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of ifosfamide and some metabolites in children was investigated. The patients received various doses of ifosfamide, mostly by continuous infusion, over several days. The penetration of ifosfamide and its metabolites into the cerebrospinal fluid was also studied in four cases.

  14. Radioreceptor assay analysis of tamsulosin and terazosin pharmacokinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taguchi, K.; Schäfers, R. F.; Michel, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    AIMS: A radioreceptor assay has been developed for alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes and applied to a pharmacokinetic analysis of tamsulosin and terazosin. METHODS: Young, male, healthy volunteers received 0.4 mg tamsulosin (as Omnic modified release capsules) or 5 mg terazosin (as Flotrin tablets) in a

  15. Evaluation of Pharmacokinetic Assumptions Using a 443 Chemical Library (IVIVE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the increasing availability of high-throughput and in vitro data for untested chemicals, there is a need for pharmacokinetic (PK) models for in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE). Though some PBPK models have been created for individual compounds us...

  16. Evaluation of Pharmacokinetic Assumptions Using a 443 Chemical Library (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the increasing availability of high-throughput and in vitro data for untested chemicals, there is a need for pharmacokinetic (PK) models for in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE). Though some PBPK models have been created for individual compounds using in vivo data, we ...

  17. 40 CFR 795.231 - Pharmacokinetics of isopropanal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... pharmacokinetics testing, adult male and female rats (Fischer 344 or strain used for major toxicity testing), 7 to... radioactivity in blood and in various tissues, including bone, brain, fat, gastrointestinal tract, gonads, heart... quantity of radioactivity in blood and in various tissues, including bone, brain, fat, gastrointestinal...

  18. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic guided trial design in oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kesteren, Ch; Mathôt, R. A. A.; Beijnen, J. H.; Schellens, J. H. M.

    2003-01-01

    The application of pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) modeling in drug development has emerged during the past decades and it is has been suggested that the investigation of PK-PD relationships during drug development may facilitate and optimize the design of subsequent clinical

  19. A comparison of the pharmacokinetics of Aspen Ceftriaxone and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intravenous ceftriaxone, of which Rocephin (ROC) is the originator brand, is recommended as first-line therapy in South Africa. Despite concerns regarding therapeutic equivalence with generic agents, this is the first study that has been conducted comparing clinical pharmacokinetics (PK) of a generic ceftriaxone ...

  20. Pharmacokinetic interactions between topiramate and diltiazem, hydrochlorothiazide, or propranolol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manitpisitkul, Prasarn; Curtin, Christopher R; Shalayda, Kevin; Wang, Shean-Sheng; Ford, Lisa; Heald, Donald

    2014-09-01

    Drug-drug interactions between topiramate and diltiazem, hydrochlorothiazide, or propranolol were evaluated along with safety/tolerability in three open-label studies. Healthy participants (aged 18-45 years) received topiramate 75 mg every 12 hours (q12h) and diltiazem 240 mg/day (study 1); topiramate 96 mg q12h and hydrochlorothiazide 25 mg/day (study 2); topiramate 100 mg q12h and propranolol 40-80 mg q12h (study 3). The pharmacokinetic parameters for topiramate, diltiazem (and active metabolites, desacetyldiltiazem [DEA], N-demethyl diltiazem [DEM]), hydrochlorothiazide, and propranolol (and its active metabolite) were assessed at steady state. Results showed no effect of diltiazem on topiramate pharmacokinetics. However, a modest reduction in systemic exposures of diltiazem and DEA (10-27%) occurred during coadministration with topiramate. Systemic exposure of DEM was unaffected. Furthermore, oral and renal clearance of topiramate decreased (22-30%) significantly (P hydrochlorothiazide, while systemic exposure increased by 27-29%. Topiramate had no effect on hydrochlorothiazide pharmacokinetics. The results demonstrated lack of pharmacokinetic interaction between topiramate and propranolol. Overall, no new safety concerns emerged when topiramate was coadministered with diltiazem, hydrochlorothiazide, or propranolol. © 2014, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  1. Pharmacokinetic interaction between scutellarin and valsartan in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ming-Yu; Tian, Chong-Chong; Ju, Ai-Xia; Zhang, Chun-Ting; Li, Qiu-Hong

    2013-04-01

    Scutellarin is the main effective constituent of breviscapine, a flavonoid mixture isolated from the dried whole plant of Erigeron breviscapus (Vant.) Hand-Mazz, and valsartan is used as an antihypertensive drug. These two drugs have already been clinically used together to treat diabetic nephropathy (DN) in China, and the combined medications showed some enhanced protection against DN. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential pharmacokinetic interaction between scutellarin and valsartan in rats. Breviscapine injection (20 mg x kg(-1), i.v.) and valsartan (15 mg x kg-, i.g.), either alone or together were given to 18 male Sprague-Dawley rats. Concentrations of scutellarin and valsartan were quantified by HPLC, and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by non-compartmental methods. We found that the pharmacokinetic parameters of scutellarin altered significantly after co-administration of oral valsartan. The plasma clearance (CL(p)) and the bile clearance (CL(b)) of scutellarin were reduced significantly in the presence of valsartan. After oral administration of valsartan with or without intravenous scutellarin, however, the pharmacokinetic parameters of valsartan were comparable. In conclusion, our data suggests that the concurrent use of valsartan reduces the biliary excretion of scutellarin, and this may be due to the inhibitory effect of valsartan on the biliary excretion of scutellarin mediated by Mrp2 (Multidrug resistance-associated protein 2).

  2. Pharmacokinetics of mesalazine pellets in children with inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersma, Heleen; Escher, Johanna C.; Dilger, Karin; Trenk, Dietmar; Benninga, Marc A.; van Boxtel, Chris J.; Taminiau, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Mesalazine is a first-line drug in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and is customarily used to induce and maintain remission in mild to moderate disease. In children, pharmacokinetic data are scarce, and dosage recommendations are largely extrapolated from studies in adults. Aim of the

  3. Bioavailability and Pharmacokinetics of Genistein: Mechanistic Studies on its ADME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Kulkarni, Kaustubh; Zhu, Wei; Hu, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Genistein, one of the most active natural flavonoids, exerts various biological effects including chemoprevention, antioxidation, antiproliferation and anticancer. More than 30 clinical trials of genistein with various disease indications have been conducted to evaluate its clinical efficacy. Based on many animals and human pharmacokinetic studies, it is well known that the most challenge issue for developing genistein as a chemoprevention agent is the low oral bioavailability, which may be the major reason relating to its ambiguous therapeutic effects and large interindividual variations in clinical trials. In order to better correlate pharmacokinetic to pharmacodynamics results in animals and clinical studies, an in-depth understanding of pharmacokinetic behavior of genistein and its ADME properties are needed. Numerous in vitro/in vivo ADME studies had been conducted to reveal the main factors contributing to the low oral bioavailability of genistein. Therefore, this review focuses on summarizing the most recent progress on mechanistic studies of genistein ADME and provides a systemic view of these processes to explain genistein pharmacokinetic behaviors in vivo. The better understanding of genistein ADME property may lead to development of proper strategy to improve genistein oral bioavailability via mechanism-based approaches. PMID:22583407

  4. Pediatric Pharmacokinetic Data: Implications for Environmental Risk Assessment for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharmacology and toxicology share a common interest in pharmacokinetic data, especially as it is available in pediatric populations. These data have been critical to the clinical pharmacologist for many years in designing age-specific dosing regimens. Now they are being used incr...

  5. First reports of clinical pharmacokinetics in Nigeria | Michael ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is the basis of therapeutic drug monitoring with the ultimate goal of keeping drugs safe. This branch of pharmacology has become the most relevant to the sub-specialty of clinical pharmacology. First reports of Clinical Pharmacokinetics in Nigeria can be credited to two gifted Nigerians, Prof Ayodele O. Iyun and Prof Lateef ...

  6. A Comparative Study of the Pharmacokinetics of Conventional and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To examine the pharmacokinetics of a formulated aceclofenac sustained release tablet formulation and determine if it is bioequivalent to a commercial brand of aceclofenac immediate release tablet (Zerodol® 100 mg). Methods: Each of two groups of twelve fasting volunteers received either the reference standard ...

  7. single dose pharmacokinetics of mefloquine in healthy nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    University of Jos, Jos Nigeria. Single dose pharmacokinetics of mefloquine was determined in SJ ic healthy Nigerian male subjects. ... INTRODUCTION. Mefloquine is a quinolinemethanol antimalarial found to be effective as single dose therapy for all species ..... ·ographic using electron capture. LB. a'"lrl Rcmbo L., (1993).

  8. Molecular pharmacokinetic determinants of anticancer kinase inhibitors in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Scholler

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This review presents the published data regarding the molecular determinants (drug metabolizing enzymes, drug transporters and orphan nuclear receptors of approved anticancer kinase inhibitors pharmacokinetics in humans. The clinical impact of these determinants (drug disposition and drug–drug interactions is also discussed.

  9. Population pharmacokinetics of phenytoin in critically ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Stefanie; Norris, Ross; Tu, Quyen; van Breda, Karin; Riney, Kate; Foster, Kelly; Lister, Bruce; Charles, Bruce

    2015-03-01

    The objective was to study the population pharmacokinetics of bound and unbound phenytoin in critically ill children, including influences on the protein binding profile. A population pharmacokinetic approach was used to analyze paired protein-unbound and total phenytoin plasma concentrations (n = 146 each) from 32 critically ill children (0.08-17 years of age) who were admitted to a pediatric hospital, primarily intensive care unit. The pharmacokinetics of unbound and bound phenytoin and the influence of possible influential covariates were modeled and evaluated using visual predictive checks and bootstrapping. The pharmacokinetics of protein-unbound phenytoin was described satisfactorily by a 1-compartment model with first-order absorption in conjunction with a linear partition coefficient parameter to describe the binding of phenytoin to albumin. The partitioning coefficient describing protein binding and distribution to bound phenytoin was estimated to be 8.22. Nonlinear elimination of unbound phenytoin was not supported in this patient group. Weight, allometrically scaled for clearance and volume of distribution for the unbound and bound compartments, and albumin concentration significantly influenced the partition coefficient for protein binding of phenytoin. The population model can be applied to estimate the fraction of unbound phenytoin in critically ill children given an individual's albumin concentration. © 2014, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  10. The pharmacokinetics of intravenous fenoldopam in healthy, awake cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, K E; Labato, M A; Court, M H

    2016-04-01

    Fenoldopam is a selective dopamine-1 receptor agonist that improves diuresis by increasing renal blood flow and perfusion and causing peripheral vasodilation. Fenoldopam has been shown to induce diuresis and be well-tolerated in healthy cats. It is used clinically in cats with oliguric kidney injury at doses extrapolated from human medicine and canine studies. The pharmacokinetics in healthy beagle dogs has been reported; however, pharmacokinetic data in cats are lacking. The goal of this study was to determine pharmacokinetic data for healthy, awake cats receiving an infusion of fenoldopam. Six healthy, awake, client-owned cats aged 2-6 years old received a 120-min constant rate infusion of fenoldopam at 0.8 μg/kg/min followed by a 20-min washout period. Ascorbate stabilized plasma samples were collected during and after the infusion for the measurement of fenoldopam concentration by HPLC with mass spectrometry detection. This study showed that the geometric mean of the volume of distribution, clearance, and half-life (198 mL/kg, 46 mL/kg/min, and 3.0 mins) is similar to pharmacokinetic parameters for humans. No adverse events were noted. Fenoldopam at a constant rate infusion of 0.8 μg/kg per min was well tolerated in healthy cats. Based on the results, further evaluation of fenoldopam in cats with kidney disease is recommended. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Ibuprofen pharmacokinetics in preterm infants with patent ductus arteriosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Overmeire, B; Touw, D; Schepens, P J; Kearns, G L; van den Anker, J N

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to study the pharmacokinetics of ibuprofen in premature infants with patent ductus arteriosus on day 3 and day 5 after birth. METHODS: Ibuprofen was administered on days 3, 4, and 5 by a 15-minute intravenous infusion of 10, 5, and 5 mg/kg, respectively, with the aim of

  12. Effect of Smoking on Pharmacokinetics of Clopidogrel, an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To assess the influence of smoking cigarettes on the pharmacokinetics of the antiplatelet drug, clopidogrel. Methods: Thirty four male patients, mean age and weight of 59.3 years and 81.1 kg, respectively, who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), took part in the study. Each subject received an ...

  13. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolder, Patrick C; Schmid, Yasmin; Steuer, Andrea E; Kraemer, Thomas; Rentsch, Katharina M; Hammann, Felix; Liechti, Matthias E

    2017-10-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is used recreationally and in clinical research. The aim of the present study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics and exposure-response relationship of oral LSD. We analyzed pharmacokinetic data from two published placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over studies using oral administration of LSD 100 and 200 µg in 24 and 16 subjects, respectively. The pharmacokinetics of the 100-µg dose is shown for the first time and data for the 200-µg dose were reanalyzed and included. Plasma concentrations of LSD, subjective effects, and vital signs were repeatedly assessed. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using compartmental modeling. Concentration-effect relationships were described using pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling. Geometric mean (95% confidence interval) maximum plasma concentration values of 1.3 (1.2-1.9) and 3.1 (2.6-4.0) ng/mL were reached 1.4 and 1.5 h after administration of 100 and 200 µg LSD, respectively. The plasma half-life was 2.6 h (2.2-3.4 h). The subjective effects lasted (mean ± standard deviation) 8.2 ± 2.1 and 11.6 ± 1.7 h for the 100- and 200-µg LSD doses, respectively. Subjective peak effects were reached 2.8 and 2.5 h after administration of LSD 100 and 200 µg, respectively. A close relationship was observed between the LSD concentration and subjective response within subjects, with moderate counterclockwise hysteresis. Half-maximal effective concentration values were in the range of 1 ng/mL. No correlations were found between plasma LSD concentrations and the effects of LSD across subjects at or near maximum plasma concentration and within dose groups. The present pharmacokinetic data are important for the evaluation of clinical study findings (e.g., functional magnetic resonance imaging studies) and the interpretation of LSD intoxication. Oral LSD presented dose-proportional pharmacokinetics and first-order elimination up to 12 h. The effects of LSD were related

  14. Gut Microbiota-Regulated Pharmacokinetics of Berberine and Active Metabolites in Beagle Dogs After Oral Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ru; Zhao, Zhen-Xiong; Ma, Shu-Rong; Guo, Fang; Wang, Yan; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2018-01-01

    describe gut microbiota-regulated pharmacokinetics in beagle dogs after oral administration of BBR, which is beneficial for discovery of drugs with poor absorption but good therapeutic efficacy.

  15. Rehmanniae Radix in osteoporosis: A review of traditional Chinese medicinal uses, phytochemistry, pharmacokinetics and pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chenyue; Ma, Rufeng; Wang, Lili; Zhu, Ruyuan; Liu, Haixia; Guo, Yubo; Zhao, Baosheng; Zhao, Shangang; Tang, Jinfa; Li, Yu; Niu, Jianzhao; Fu, Min; Zhang, Dongwei; Gao, Sihua

    2017-02-23

    Emerging clinical usage and pharmacological effects have been achieved in using Rehmanniae Radix either singly or in combination with other herbs to treat skeletal diseases in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in the recent years. This study is aimed to provide a comprehensive review about the historical TCM interpretation of the action of Rehmanniae Radix in osteoporosis, its usage in clinical trials and osteoporotic models, its main phytochemical constituents, and its pharmacokinetics. Several databases included PubMed, China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database, China Science and Technology Journal Database, National Science and Technology Library and the Web of Science Database were consulted to locate the publications pertaining to Rehmanniae Radix. The initial inquiry was conducted for the presence of the following terms combinations in the abstracts: Rehmanniae Radix, Dihuang, phytochemistry, pharmacokinetics, osteoporosis, bone, osteoclast and osteoblast. About 330 research papers and reviews were consulted. In TCM, Rehmanniae Radix exerts the anti-osteoporotic effect via regulating the functions of kidney and liver as well as improving blood circulation. 107 clinical trials are identified that used Rehmanniae Radix in combination with other herbs to treat post-menopausal, senile and secondary osteoporosis. Most of the clinical trials are characterized by high efficacy and no obvious adverse effects. However, the efficacies of these clinical trials are limited because of small patient sample size, short treatment duration and poor clinical design. In addition, TCM herbs under the clinical study are not clear because of a lack of standardization and authentication. The pharmacokinetics data demonstrate that the ingredients of Rehmanniae Radix are widely distributed after administration, and that catalpol and ajugol as well as acetoside are supposed to be the active constituents. More than 140 individual compounds have been currently isolated from this

  16. The poorly explored impact of uncontrolled asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Byrne, Paul M; Pedersen, Søren; Schatz, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The goal of asthma management is to achieve disease control; however, despite the availability of effective and safe medications, for many patients asthma remains uncontrolled. One reason for this is the fear of long-term side effects from the regular use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs). Advers...... in the pregnancies of women with asthma. The maintenance of asthma control has significant advantages to patients and greatly outweighs the potential risks of treatment side effects....... effects of poorly controlled asthma (for example, obesity, pneumonia, and risks to the fetus) can be perceived as side effects of ICSs. Poorly controlled asthma adversely affects children's cardiovascular fitness, while children with well-controlled asthma perform at the same level as their peers....... Children with uncontrolled asthma also have a higher frequency of obesity than children with controlled asthma. Stress can affect asthma control, and children with poorly controlled asthma are more likely to have learning disabilities compared with those with good control. In adults, focused attention...

  17. Poor housing quality: Prevalence and health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Emma; Lester, Laurence H; Bentley, Rebecca; Beer, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Housing is a central component of productive, healthy, and meaningful lives, and a principle social determinant of health and well-being. Surprisingly, though, evidence on the ways that housing influences health in Australia is poorly developed. This stems largely from the fact that the majority of the population are accommodated in good quality housing. The dominance of a "good housing paradigm" means that households living in poor quality and unhealthy housing are doubly disadvantaged-by the quality of their housing and because policy makers in Australia do not acknowledge the health effects of housing. In this article, we examine the relationship between health outcomes and quality of housing. We base our analysis on data from the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey, a panel dataset that is representative across Australia. We find a sizeable, policy-important, and to date under-acknowledged cohort of Australians whose health is influenced by poor-condition dwellings.

  18. Effect of ofloxacin and norfloxacin on rifampicin pharmacokinetics in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezejiofor, Ndidi A; Brown, Sinyeofori; Barikpoar, Ebenezer; Orisakwe, Orish E

    2015-01-01

    The in vivo effects of norfloxacin (NXC) and ofloxacin (OXC) on rifampicin (RIF) pharmacokinetics were investigated in 5 apparently healthy volunteers aged 18-39 years after informed consent. The study was carried out in 3 phases with an interval drug washout period of at least 1 week in between the phases. In phase 1 (RIF alone), the subject received 600 mg of RIF. In phase 2 (RIF + OXC), 600 mg of RIF was coadministered with 200 mg of OXC. In phase 3 (RIF + NXC), each subject received 600 mg of RIF together with 400 mg of NXC after 1 week drug washout period. Drugs were taken orally with 350 mL of water after an overnight fast, and the subjects fasted 3 hours after the administration of drug. Plasma, saliva, and urine concentration of RIF were predetermined at 0 hour and then hourly until the 8th, 12th, 24th, and 48th hour. The urine samples were further collected at 72 hours after drug(s) administration using validated methods. Various pharmacokinetics parameters were calculated. NXC reduced the extent and rate of absorption of RIF. Various pharmacokinetic parameters of RIF significantly differ when administered alone or in combination with OXC and NXC. The mean saliva to plasma ratio of RIF concentration was approximately 0.15. The bioavailability indices of RIF in the saliva and plasma were similar in all the groups. Several pharmacokinetic parameters could be calculated using different body fluid concentrations of RIF. The determination of RIF levels in saliva may be useful in therapeutic drug monitoring and pharmacokinetic studies.

  19. Morphine Pharmacokinetics in Children With Down Syndrome Following Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goot, Benjamin H; Kaufman, Jon; Pan, Zhaoxing; Bourne, David W A; Hickey, Francis; Twite, Mark; Galinkin, Jeffrey; Christians, Uwe; Zuk, Jeannie; da Cruz, Eduardo M

    2018-03-15

    To assess if morphine pharmacokinetics are different in children with Down syndrome when compared with children without Down syndrome. Prospective single-center study including subjects with Down syndrome undergoing cardiac surgery (neonate to 18 yr old) matched by age and cardiac lesion with non-Down syndrome controls. Subjects were placed on a postoperative morphine infusion that was adjusted as clinically necessary, and blood was sampled to measure morphine and its metabolites concentrations. Morphine bolus dosing was used as needed, and total dose was tracked. Infusions were continued for 24 hours or until patients were extubated, whichever came first. Postinfusion, blood samples were continued for 24 hours for further evaluation of kinetics. If patients continued to require opioid, a nonmorphine alternative was used. Morphine concentrations were determined using a unique validated liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry assay using dried blood spotting as opposed to large whole blood samples. Morphine concentration versus time data was modeled using population pharmacokinetics. A 16-bed cardiac ICU at an university-affiliated hospital. Forty-two patients (20 Down syndrome, 22 controls) were enrolled. None. The pharmacokinetics of morphine in pediatric patients with and without Down syndrome following cardiac surgery were analyzed. No significant difference was found in the patient characteristics or variables assessed including morphine total dose or time on infusion. Time mechanically ventilated was longer in children with Down syndrome, and regarding morphine pharmacokinetics, the covariates analyzed were age, weight, presence of Down syndrome, and gender. Only age was found to be significant. This study did not detect a significant difference in morphine pharmacokinetics between Down syndrome and non-Down syndrome children with congenital heart disease.

  20. Pharmacokinetics of a modified-release estrogen tablet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhamra, Rupinder; Kaercher, Uwe; Oleary, Christine M

    2010-01-01

    To determine steady-state plasma concentrations and the pharmacokinetic profile of the essential components of synthetic conjugated estrogens, B (SCE-B), particularly total estrone and delta8,9-dehydroestrone (DHE), after oral administration of a modified-released tablet. A randomized, multiple-dose, pharmacokinetic study of 28 healthy, postmenopausal women randomly assigned to receive two SCE-B 0.3-mg tablets or one 1.25-mg tablet daily for 14 days. Blood samples were obtained before and after dosing at designated times. Total (conjugated and free) and unconjugated estrogens, namely estrone, equilin, and delta8,9-DHE, were determined, and pharmacokinetic analysis was performed. Steady-state plasma levels of total estrone and total delta8,9-DHE measured on day 14 over a 24-hour period showed minor fluctuations and a similar time to maximum concentration (Tmax): mean Tmax of total estrone = 7.94 and 8.36 hours for 0.3-mg and 1.25-mg tablets, respectively; mean Tmax of total delta8,9-DHE = 7.08 and 8.36 hours for 0.3-mg and 1.25-mg tablets, respectively. Consistency in pharmacokinetic parameters was seen between the two doses of SCE-B. SCE-B 0.3-mg and SCE-B 1.25-mg tablets achieved consistent pharmacokinetic parameters and steady-state levels when administered to healthy postmenopausal women. Achieving smooth, predictable levels of component estrogens may result in more consistent relief of menopausal symptoms.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of a Standardized Extract of Centella asiatica ECa 233 in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anukunwithaya, Tosapol; Tantisira, Mayuree H; Tantisira, Boonyong; Khemawoot, Phisit

    2017-05-01

    ECa 233, a standardized extract of Centella asiatica , has been found to exhibit various positive neurological effects and to have a good safety profile. The present study aimed to explore the disposition kinetics of ECa 233, containing madecassoside (53.1 %) and asiaticoside (32.3 %), in rats. The extract was intravenously or orally administered at doses from 50 to 200 mg/kg. Plasma, tissues, urine, and feces were collected at time points from 0 to 48 h after dosing. The levels of madecassoside and asiaticoside, as well as their postulated triterpenic metabolites, madecassic acid and asiatic acid, in biological samples, were simultaneously measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The results showed that all animals had a good tolerability for ECa 233, whereas madecassic and asiatic acids were found in negligible amounts after pharmacokinetic assessment. Madecassoside and asiaticoside demonstrated rather similar absorption and tissue distribution profiles. They were rapidly absorbed, reaching maximum levels within 5-15 min after oral administration, but they had poor oral bioavailability, less than 1 %. Both triterpenoids were extensively distributed in the brain, stomach, and skin within 1 h and remained there for at least 4 h after dosing. Madecassoside and asiaticoside in ECa 233 were mainly excreted as an unchanged form after being injected, and exclusively as triterpenic acid metabolites in feces after oral administration. The pharmacokinetic results obtained could provide some guidance for an appropriate dosing regimen of ECa 233 in future studies. This study also provided the first evidence demonstrating the presence of madecassoside and asiaticoside in their target tissues. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Polymer micelle formulation for the proteasome inhibitor drug carfilzomib: Anticancer efficacy and pharmacokinetic studies in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Eun Park

    Full Text Available Carfilzomib (CFZ is a peptide epoxyketone proteasome inhibitor approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM. Despite the remarkable efficacy of CFZ against MM, the clinical trials in patients with solid cancers yielded rather disappointing results with minimal clinical benefits. Rapid degradation of CFZ in vivo and its poor penetration to tumor sites are considered to be major factors limiting its efficacy against solid cancers. We previously reported that polymer micelles (PMs composed of biodegradable block copolymers poly(ethylene glycol (PEG and poly(caprolactone (PCL can improve the metabolic stability of CFZ in vitro. Here, we prepared the CFZ-loaded PM, PEG-PCL-deoxycholic acid (CFZ-PM and assessed its in vivo anticancer efficacy and pharmacokinetic profiles. Despite in vitro metabolic protection of CFZ, CFZ-PM did not display in vivo anticancer efficacy in mice bearing human lung cancer xenograft (H460 superior to that of the clinically used cyclodextrin-based CFZ (CFZ-CD formulation. The plasma pharmacokinetic profiles of CFZ-PM were also comparable to those of CFZ-CD and the residual tumors that persisted in xenograft mice receiving CFZ-PM displayed an incomplete proteasome inhibition. In summary, our results showed that despite its favorable in vitro performances, the current CFZ-PM formulation did not improve in vivo anticancer efficacy and accessibility of active CFZ to solid cancer tissues over CFZ-CD. Careful consideration of the current results and potential confounding factors may provide valuable insights into the future efforts to validate the potential of CFZ-based therapy for solid cancer and to develop effective CFZ delivery strategies that can be used to treat solid cancers.

  3. In vitro bidirectional permeability studies identify pharmacokinetic limitations of NKCC1 inhibitor bumetanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Maria D; Schellekens, Harriët; Boylan, Geraldine B; Cryan, John F; Griffin, Brendan T

    2016-01-05

    Recently, it has been suggested that bumetanide, an inhibitor of the Na-K-2Cl co-transporter (NKCC1), may be useful in the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. However, from a physicochemical perspective, bumetanide may not cross the blood-brain barrier to the extent that is necessary for it to be an effective brain NKCC1 inhibitor in vivo. High plasma-protein binding, potentially high brain-tissue binding and putative efflux transporters including organic anion transporter 3 (OAT3) contribute to the poor pharmacokinetic profile of bumetanide. Bidirectional permeability assays are an in vitro method to determine the impact of plasma-protein/brain tissue binding, as well as efflux transport, on the permeability of a compound. We established and validated a cell line stably overexpressing human OAT3 using lentiviral cloning techniques for use in in vitro bidirectional permeability assays. Using efflux transport studies, we show that bumetanide is a transported substrate of human OAT3, exhibiting a transport ratio of ≥1.5, which is attenuated by OAT3 inhibitors. Bidirectional permeability assays were carried out in the presence and absence of either albumin or brain homogenate to elucidate the effect of plasma-protein/brain tissue binding. These tests confirmed the pharmacokinetic limitations for brain delivery of bumetanide. In this experiment, bumetanide is 53% bound to albumin, 77% bound to brain tissue and accumulates in brain cells. Moreover, we conclusively established that bumetanide is a transported substrate of OAT3. Taken together, these bidirectional permeability studies highlight the potential of efflux transporter inhibition as an augmentation strategy for enhanced delivery of bumetanide to the CNS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of two 6-mercaptopurine liquid formulations in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbert, Jaszianne A; Bai, Shasha; Abdel-Rahman, Susan M; August, Keith J; Weir, Scott J; Kearns, Gregory L; Neville, Kathleen A

    2017-08-01

    A liquid formulation of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (Purixan®) based on bioavailability (BA) data from healthy adults. We examined the pharmacokinetics (PK) and BA of 6-MP in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) comparing a marketed tablet, two extemporaneously prepared liquid formulations, and data from the approved liquid formulation. Twenty-two children (6-17 years) participated in a randomized two-way, crossover study of two cohorts. Group 1 (n = 11; five males) received a 5 mg/ml liquid formulation and the marketed 50 mg 6-MP tablet on separate occasions, and Group 2 (n = 11; five males) received a 50 mg/ml liquid formulation and the marketed tablet. The usual prescribed 6-MP dose (25-115 mg/m 2 ) was given after an 8-hr fast. Serial blood samples were collected over 8 hr postdose. Plasma 6-MP concentrations were determined using a good laboratory practice (GLP)-validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. PK parameters were calculated using noncompartmental analysis and compared within and between cohorts, and thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) genotype was analyzed. No patient had a TPMT genotype reflective of a poor metabolizer phenotype. Comparison of PK parameters between 5 and 50 mg/ml treatments revealed significant differences (P <0.05) in AUC N (where AUC is area under the curve), C maxN , and T max . Comparisons within each group revealed significant differences in AUC 0-∞ and T max in the 5 mg/ml group. Pharmacokinetic profiles of 6-MP established in healthy adults with the approved liquid formulation may not reflect the PK profile in children with ALL. Formulation-specific differences in PK may significantly impact the dose-exposure profile in these children and must be considered. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Gap analysis of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in burn patients: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Amanda N; Grimsrud, Kristin N; Sen, Soman; Palmieri, Tina L; Greenhalgh, David G; Tran, Nam K

    2015-01-01

    Severe burn injury results in a multifaceted physiological response that significantly alters drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (PK/PD). This response includes hypovolemia, increased vascular permeability, increased interstitial hydrostatic pressure, vasodilation, and hypermetabolism. These physiologic alterations impact drug distribution and excretion-thus varying the drug therapeutic effect on the body or microorganism. To this end, in order to optimize critical care for the burn population it is essential to understand how burn injury alters PK/PD parameters. The purpose of this article is to describe the relationship between burn injury and drug PK/PD. We conducted a literature review via PubMed and Google to identify burn-related PK/PD studies. Search parameters included "pharmacokinetics," "pharmacodynamics," and "burns." Based on our search parameters, we located 38 articles that studied PK/PD parameters specifically in burns. Twenty-seven articles investigated PK/PD of antibiotics, 10 assessed analgesics and sedatives, and one article researched an antacid. Out of the 37 articles, there were 19 different software programs used and eight different control groups. The mechanisms behind alterations in PK/PD in burns remain poorly understood. Dosing techniques must be adapted based on burn injury-related changes in PK/PD parameters in order to ensure drug efficacy. Although several PK/PD studies have been undertaken in the burn population, there is wide variation in the analytical techniques, software, and study sample sizes used. In order to refine dosing techniques in burns and consequently improve patient outcomes, there must be harmonization among PK/PD analyses.

  6. Preparation of finasteride capsules-loaded drug nanoparticles: formulation, optimization, in vitro, and pharmacokinetic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Tarek A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, optimized freeze-dried finasteride nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared from drug nanosuspension formulation that was developed using the bottom-up technique. The effects of four formulation and processing variables that affect the particle size and solubility enhancement of the NPs were explored using the response surface optimization design. The optimized formulation was morphologically characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Physicochemical interaction among the studied components was investigated. Crystalline change was investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). Crystal growth of the freeze-dried NPs was compared to the corresponding aqueous drug nanosuspension. Freeze-dried NPs formulation was subsequently loaded into hard gelatin capsules that were examined for in vitro dissolution and pharmacokinetic behavior. Results revealed that in most of the studied variables, some of the quadratic and interaction effects had a significant effect on the studied responses. TEM image illustrated homogeneity and shape of the prepared NPs. No interaction among components was noticed. XRPD confirmed crystalline state change in the optimized NPs. An enhancement in the dissolution rate of more than 2.5 times from capsules filled with optimum drug NPs, when compared to capsules filled with pure drug, was obtained. Crystal growth, due to Ostwald ripening phenomenon and positive Gibbs free energy, was reduced following lyophilization of the nanosuspension formulation. Pharmacokinetic parameters from drug NPs were superior to that of pure drug and drug microparticles. In conclusion, freeze-dried NPs based on drug nanosuspension formulation is a successful technique in enhancing stability, solubility, and in vitro dissolution of poorly water-soluble drugs with possible impact on the drug bioavailability.

  7. The costs of poor data quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Haug

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The technological developments have implied that companies store increasingly more data. However, data quality maintenance work is often neglected, and poor quality business data constitute a significant cost factor for many companies. This paper argues that perfect data quality should not be the goal, but instead the data quality should be improved to only a certain level. The paper focuses on how to identify the optimal data quality level.Design/methodology/approach: The paper starts with a review of data quality literature. On this basis, the paper proposes a definition of the optimal data maintenance effort and a classification of costs inflicted by poor quality data. These propositions are investigated by a case study.Findings: The paper proposes: (1 a definition of the optimal data maintenance effort and (2 a classification of costs inflicted by poor quality data. A case study illustrates the usefulness of these propositions.Research limitations/implications: The paper provides definitions in relation to the costs of poor quality data and the data quality maintenance effort. Future research may build on these definitions. To further develop the contributions of the paper, more studies are needed.   Practical implications: As illustrated by the case study, the definitions provided by this paper can be used for determining the right data maintenance effort and costs inflicted by poor quality data. In many companies, such insights may lead to significant savings.Originality/value: The paper provides a clarification of what are the costs of poor quality data and defines the relation to data quality maintenance effort. This represents an original contribution of value to future research and practice.

  8. Retracted: Physiologically based pharmacokinetic predictions of intestinal BCRP-mediated effect of telmisartan on the pharmacokinetics of rosuvastatin in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Soo Hyeon; Park, Wan-Su; Han, Seunghoon; Park, Gab-Jin; Lee, Jongtae; Hong, Taegon; Jeon, Sangil; Yim, Dong-Seok

    2017-07-01

    'Physiologically based pharmacokinetic predictions of intestinal BCRP-mediated effect of telmisartan on the pharmacokinetics of rosuvastatin in humans' by Soo Hyeon Bae, Wan-Su Park, Seunghoon Han, Gab-jin Park, Jongtae Lee, Taegon Hong, Sangil Jeon and Dong-Seok Yim The above article, published online on 06 February 2017 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor in Chief, K. Sandy Pang, and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. The authors retracted the paper due to errors associated with use of log D vs. log P of telmisartan as inputs of the PBPK model. The authors concluded that there are too many changes in the article to be resolved by an Erratum, and had requested a retraction. Reference Bae, S. H., Park, W.-S., Han, S., Park, G., Lee, J., Hong, T., Jeon, S., and Yim, D.-S. (2016) Physiologically based pharmacokinetic predictions of intestinal BCRP-mediated effect of telmisartan on the pharmacokinetics of rosuvastatin in humans. Biopharm. Drug Dispos., doi: 10.1002/bdd.2060. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Development of a Web-Accessible Population Pharmacokinetic Service-Hemophilia (WAPPS-Hemo): Study Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Alfonso; Keepanasseril, Arun; Foster, Gary; Navarro-Ruan, Tamara; McEneny-King, Alanna; Edginton, Andrea N; Thabane, Lehana

    2016-12-15

    Individual pharmacokinetic assessment is a critical component of tailored prophylaxis for hemophilia patients. Population pharmacokinetics allows using individual sparse data, thus simplifying individual pharmacokinetic studies. Implementing population pharmacokinetics capacity for the hemophilia community is beyond individual reach and requires a system effort. The Web-Accessible Population Pharmacokinetic Service-Hemophilia (WAPPS-Hemo) project aims to assemble a database of patient pharmacokinetic data for all existing factor concentrates, develop and validate population pharmacokinetics models, and integrate these models within a Web-based calculator for individualized pharmacokinetic estimation in patients at participating treatment centers. Individual pharmacokinetic studies on factor VIII and IX concentrates will be sourced from pharmaceutical companies and independent investigators. All factor concentrate manufacturers, hemophilia treatment centers (HTCs), and independent investigators (identified via a systematic review of the literature) having on file pharmacokinetic data and willing to contribute full or sparse pharmacokinetic data will be eligible for participation. Multicompartmental modeling will be performed using a mixed-model approach for derivation and Bayesian forecasting for estimation of individual sparse data. NONMEM (ICON Development Solutions) will be used as modeling software. The WAPPS-Hemo research network has been launched and is currently joined by 30 HTCs from across the world. We have gathered dense individual pharmacokinetic data on 878 subjects, including several replicates, on 21 different molecules from 17 different sources. We have collected sparse individual pharmacokinetic data on 289 subjects from the participating centers through the testing phase of the WAPPS-Hemo Web interface. We have developed prototypal population pharmacokinetics models for 11 molecules. The WAPPS-Hemo website (available at www.wapps-hemo.org, version

  10. Getting to Know L2 Poor Comprehenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoghi, Masoud; Mustapha, Ramlee; Maasum, Tengku Nor Rizan BT Tengku Mohamad

    2011-01-01

    Among the plethora of studies conducted thus far to explore the factors affecting EFL reading effectiveness, scant attention seems to be paid to the why of poor reading comprehension of most EFL learners. In this regard, the present article capitalized on qualitative research on a small scale, for the purpose of addressing the not-so-often debated…

  11. University Students with Poor Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, George K.; Das, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the nature of the working memory and general cognitive ability deficits experienced by university students with a specific reading comprehension deficit. A total of 32 university students with poor reading comprehension but average word-reading skills and 60 age-word-matched controls with no comprehension…

  12. Enterprise Characteristics Affecting Resource Poor Women Food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... included insufficient finance, indiscriminate demands for tax from government officials, high cost of foodstuff, levies from local government, illegal collectors of levies, difficulty in buying cooking fuel. Keywords: Enterprise characteristics, resource poor women food vendors. Global Approaches to Extension Practice Vol.

  13. Planning Behaviour in Good and Poor Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Shamita

    2016-01-01

    A group of 50 good readers and a group of 50 poor readers of Grade 5 matched for age and intelligence and selected on the basis of their proficiency in reading comprehension were tested for their competence in word reading and the process of planning at three different levels, namely, perceptual, memory and conceptual in order to study the…

  14. Mongo Beti's The Poor Christ of Bomba

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-28

    Mar 28, 2016 ... promote abolition, this essay explores The Poor Christ of Bomba as a fictional slave narrative that exposes French imperialism by constructing .... inaugural article explores the knotty issue of assimilation as an imperialist strategy. .... assessments of Wheatley seem to ignore her social and historical realities.

  15. Direct multiangle solution for poorly stratified atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimir Kovalev; Cyle Wold; Alexander Petkov; Wei Min Hao

    2012-01-01

    The direct multiangle solution is considered, which allows improving the scanning lidar-data-inversion accuracy when the requirement of the horizontally stratified atmosphere is poorly met. The signal measured at zenith or close to zenith is used as a core source for extracting optical characteristics of the atmospheric aerosol loading. The multiangle signals are used...

  16. Correcting Poor Posture without Awareness or Willpower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernik, Uri

    2012-01-01

    In this article, a new technique for correcting poor posture is presented. Rather than intentionally increasing awareness or mobilizing willpower to correct posture, this approach offers a game using randomly drawn cards with easy daily assignments. A case using the technique is presented to emphasize the subjective experience of living with poor…

  17. Text comprehension strategy instruction with poor readers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Bos, K.P.; Aarnoudse, C.C.; Brand-Gruwel, S.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of teaching text comprehension strategies to children with decoding and reading comprehension problems and with a poor or normal listening ability. Two experiments are reported. Four text comprehension strategies, viz., question generation,

  18. Modeling of corneal and retinal pharmacokinetics after periocular drug administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrite, Aniruddha C; Edelhauser, Henry F; Kompella, Uday B

    2008-01-01

    To develop pharmacokinetics models to describe the disposition of small lipophilic molecules in the cornea and retina after periocular (subconjunctival or posterior subconjunctival) administration. Compartmental pharmacokinetics analysis was performed on the corneal and retinal data obtained after periocular administration of 3 mg of celecoxib (a selective COX-2 inhibitor) to Brown Norway (BN) rats. Berkeley Madonna, a differential and difference equation-based modeling software, was used for the pharmacokinetics modeling. The data were fit to different compartment models with first-order input and disposition, and the best fit was selected on the basis of coefficient of regression and Akaike information criteria (AIC). The models were validated by using the celecoxib data from a prior study in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The corneal model was also fit to the corneal data for prednisolone at a dose of 2.61 mg in albino rabbits, and the model was validated at two other doses of prednisolone (0.261 and 26.1 mg) in these rabbits. Model simulations were performed with the finalized model to understand the effect of formulation on corneal and retinal pharmacokinetics after periocular administration. Celecoxib kinetics in the BN rat cornea can be described by a two-compartment (periocular space and cornea, with a dissolution step for periocular formulation) model, with parallel elimination from the cornea and the periocular space. The inclusion of a distribution compartment or a dissolution step for celecoxib suspension did not lead to an overall improvement in the corneal data fit compared with the two-compartment model. The more important parameter for enhanced fit and explaining the apparent lack of an increase phase in the corneal levels is the inclusion of the initial leak-back of the dose from the periocular space into the precorneal area. The predicted celecoxib concentrations from this model also showed very good correlation (r = 0.99) with the observed values in

  19. Preliminary physiologically based pharmacokinetic models for benzo[a]pyrene and dibenzo[def,p]chrysene in rodents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowell, Susan Ritger; Amin, Shantu G.; Anderson, Kim A.; Krishnegowda, Gowdahalli; Sharma, Arun K.; Soelberg, Jolen J.; Williams, David E.; Corley, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants generated as byproducts of natural and anthropogenic combustion processes. Despite significant public health concern, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling efforts for PAHs have so far been limited to naphthalene, plus simpler PK models for pyrene, nitropyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P). The dearth of published models is due in part to the high lipophilicity, low volatility, and myriad metabolic pathways for PAHs, all of which present analytical and experimental challenges. Our research efforts have focused upon experimental approaches and initial development of PBPK models for the prototypic PAH, B[a]P, and the more potent, albeit less studied transplacental carcinogen, dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC). For both compounds, model compartments included arterial and venous blood, flow limited lung, liver, richly perfused and poorly perfused tissues, diffusion limited fat, and a two compartment theoretical gut (for oral exposures). Hepatic and pulmonary metabolism was described for both compounds, as were fractional binding in blood and fecal clearance. Partition coefficients for parent PAH along with their diol and tetraol metabolites were estimated using published algorithms and verified experimentally for the hydroxylated metabolites. The preliminary PBPK models were able to describe many, but not all, of the available data sets, comprising multiple routes of exposure (oral, intravenous) and nominal doses spanning several orders of magnitude. Supported by Award Number P42 ES016465 from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. -- Highlights: ► We present PBPK models for benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC). ► B[a]P model accurately predicts data from multiple sources over a wide dose range. ► DBC model was based on the B[a]P model as less chemical specific data is available. ► DBC model accurately predicted preliminary

  20. Poor Semen Quality Predicts Increased Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tina Kold; Bostofte, Erik; Jacobsen, Rune

    is not increased. The long-term survival of men with poor semen quality is, however, unknown. We therefore studied the associations between semen characteristics and subsequent mortality. Back to Top Material and Methods: The Copenhagen Sperm Analysis Laboratory is one of several public semen analysis laboratories......Objective: Over recent decades a possible decrease in semen quality and an increase in the incidence of testicular cancer have been reported. In addition, men with poor semen quality have been reported to be at increased risk of developing testicular cancer whereas the risk of other cancers...... occurred first. Standardized mortality ratios (SMR) compared with total population of Danish men were calculated according to sperm concentration, motility, and morphology. Back to Top Results: Men with a sperm concentration between 1 and 9 and 10 and 19 million/mL had SMRs of 1.57 (95% CI 1.35–1.81) and 1...

  1. Altering ethanol pharmacokinetics to treat alcohol use disorder: Can you teach an old dog new tricks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haass-Koffler, Carolina L; Akhlaghi, Fatemeh; Swift, Robert M; Leggio, Lorenzo

    2017-07-01

    Disulfiram was the first pharmacotherapy approved to treat alcohol use disorder in the 1950s. Disulfiram alters ethanol pharmacokinetics and causes uncomfortable reactions (e.g. headache, tachycardia, nausea, flushing and hypotension) when alcohol is consumed. Subsequently, a better understanding of the neurobiological pathways involved in alcohol use disorder led to the development of other medications (e.g. naltrexone and acamprosate). These neurobiological-based medications act on alcohol use disorder-related phenotypes including craving, stress, and/or withdrawal. The original approach to treat alcohol use disorder, by altering ethanol pharmacokinetics has been much less investigated. Recent research on ethanol pharmacokinetics has shed light on the mechanisms of action underlying alcohol use disorder and how some medications that alter ethanol pharmacokinetics may be helpful in treating alcohol use disorder. This review summarizes and discusses the complex pharmacokinetics of ethanol, and proposes that altering ethanol pharmacokinetics via novel pharmacological approaches may be a viable approach to treat alcohol use disorder.

  2. Current stress and poor oral health

    OpenAIRE

    Vasiliou, A.; Shankardass, K.; Nisenbaum, R.; Qui?onez, C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Psychological stress appears to contribute to poor oral health systemically in combination with other chronic diseases. Few studies directly examine this relationship. Methods Data from a cross-sectional study of 2,412 participants between the ages of 25?64 years old living in the City of Toronto between 2009 and 2012 were used to examine the relationship between current stress and two self-rated oral health outcomes (general oral health and oral pain). Dental care utilization and ...

  3. CERN - FATE MAPS - ENTANGLEMENTS - I Poor Orphan

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, Kathleen

    2017-01-01

    I Poor Orphan, forms part of a photographic series, film essay and experimental writing made in response to visits to the site of the Large Hadron Collider, at CERN in Meyrin, Geneva in 2017 (The European Laboratory for Particle Physics). The folio offers poetic, conceptual and philosophical approaches to subatomic/high energy physics research within the Atlas experiment collision detector on the ground visitor site. This highly poetic folio integrates on-going thematic interests aligned with...

  4. Quantification of mesembrine and mesembrenone in mouse plasma using UHPLC-QToF-MS: Application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manda, Vamshi K; Avula, Bharathi; Ashfaq, Mohammad K; Abe, Naohito; Khan, Ikhlas A; Khan, Shabana I

    2017-03-01

    Sceletium tortuosum, is an indigenous herb of South Africa which is widely used as an herbal supplement in the treatment of anxiety and stress. Mesembrenone and mesembrine are the two main pharmacologically active alkaloids present in the extract. Despite the wide therapeutic applications of Sceletium extract, there are no reports of in vivo pharmacokinetic properties or analytical methods to quantify these two important alkaloids in plasma. Therefore, the current study aimed to develop and validate a simple and sensitive analytical method for simultaneous quantification of mesembrenone and mesembrine in mouse plasma. Ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UHPLC/QToF-MS) was employed to achieve our objectives. The compounds were extracted using protein precipitation by methanol (100%) with quinine as an internal standard. The lower limit of quantification for both the compounds was 10 ng/mL. The extraction recovery was between 87 and 93% for both compounds with no matrix effects on the analysis. The accuracy was between 89.5 and 106% and precision was <12.6% for all quality control samples. This validated method was successfully applied to evaluate the i.v. plasma pharmacokinetics of mesembrine and mesembrenone in mouse. However, the oral bioavailability of these alkaloids was poor and the plasma levels were below the detection limits. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. TXA709, an FtsZ-Targeting Benzamide Prodrug with Improved Pharmacokinetics and Enhanced In Vivo Efficacy against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Malvika; Mark, Lilly; Zhang, Yongzheng; Parhi, Ajit K; Lyu, Yi Lisa; Pawlak, Joan; Saravolatz, Stephanie; Saravolatz, Louis D; Weinstein, Melvin P; LaVoie, Edmond J; Pilch, Daniel S

    2015-08-01

    The clinical development of FtsZ-targeting benzamide compounds like PC190723 has been limited by poor drug-like and pharmacokinetic properties. Development of prodrugs of PC190723 (e.g., TXY541) resulted in enhanced pharmaceutical properties, which, in turn, led to improved intravenous efficacy as well as the first demonstration of oral efficacy in vivo against both methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Despite being efficacious in vivo, TXY541 still suffered from suboptimal pharmacokinetics and the requirement of high efficacious doses. We describe here the design of a new prodrug (TXA709) in which the Cl group on the pyridyl ring has been replaced with a CF3 functionality that is resistant to metabolic attack. As a result of this enhanced metabolic stability, the product of the TXA709 prodrug (TXA707) is associated with improved pharmacokinetic properties (a 6.5-fold-longer half-life and a 3-fold-greater oral bioavailability) and superior in vivo antistaphylococcal efficacy relative to PC190723. We validate FtsZ as the antibacterial target of TXA707 and demonstrate that the compound retains potent bactericidal activity against S. aureus strains resistant to the current standard-of-care drugs vancomycin, daptomycin, and linezolid. These collective properties, coupled with minimal observed toxicity to mammalian cells, establish the prodrug TXA709 as an antistaphylococcal agent worthy of clinical development. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Prediction of Human Pharmacokinetics of Ulixertinib, a Novel ERK1/2 Inhibitor from Mice, Rats, and Dogs Pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Ponnayyan Sulochana; Jairam, Ravi Kumar; Chandrasekhar, Devaraj V; Vinod, Anera Balakrishna; Hiremath, Rakesh A; Raj, Anusha; Zainuddin, Mohd; Bhamidipati, Ravi Kanth; Mullangi, Ramesh

    2018-02-22

    Ulixertinib (BVD-523) is a novel and selective reversible inhibitor of ERK1/ERK2. The primary objectives of the study were to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of ulixertinib in mice, rats, and dogs followed by prediction of human pharmacokinetic profile by allometric equations with/without correction factors. Oral and intravenous pharmacokinetic profiles of ulixertinib were generated in mice, rats, and dogs. The human intravenous pharmacokinetics profiles [volume of distribution (V ss ) and clearance (CL)] were predicted employing simple allometry and using correction factors [maximum life span potential (MLP) and brain weight (BW)]. Pharmacokinetic data obtained from dogs were used to simulate human oral profile [area under the curve (AUC) and maximum plasma concentrations (C max )]. Post-intravenous administration the CL was moderate in dogs (15.5 mL/min/kg) and low in mice (6.24 mL/min/kg) and rats (1.67 mL/min/kg). V ss was 0.56, 0.36, and 1.61 L/kg in mice, rats, and dogs, respectively. The half-life (t ½ ) of ulixertinib ranged between 1.0 and 2.5 h across the animal species. Following oral administration ulixertinib attained maximum concentration in plasma (T max ) within 0.50-0.75 h in mice and rats, indicating that absorption was rapid; however, in dogs, T max attained at 2 h. Absolute oral bioavailability in mice and rats was > 92%; however, in dogs, it was 34%. By different allometric approaches, simple method and brain weight correction factor shown clear improvement in the prediction efficiency of allometric scaling for V ss (1.34-1.70 L/kg) and CL (4.18-6.09 mL/min/kg), respectively, comparing with the MLP method and simple method for CL. Similarly, simulation of oral human profile was attained from scaled values and dog data to predict reported human profile (AUC and C max ). The derived pharmacokinetic parameters (AUC and C max at 600 mg dose) and simulated plasma concentration-time profiles of ulixertinib in humans were predicted with good

  7. Effect of diclofenac on the pharmacokinetics of moxifloxacin in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L; Guo, S; Xu, M; Wu, L-X; Zhang, J-H

    2014-07-01

    A sensitive and specific method was developed and validated for the determination of moxifloxacin in plasma using HPLC. The effect of diclofenac (12.5, 25, 50 mg/kg) on the pharmacokinetics of orally administered moxifloxacin (40 mg/kg) in rats was investigated. Pharmacokinetic parameters of moxifloxacin were determined in rats following oral administration to rats in the presence and absence of diclofenac. The coadministration of the 2 drugs resulted in 10~29.5% decrease of the AUC and a 24.7~34% decrease of t1/2 for moxifloxacin; Tmax for moxifloxacin was 1.41~1.9-fold higher than that after the administration of moxifloxacin alone; Cmax for moxifloxacin decreased by 20.5~49%, as compared to that after the administration of moxifloxacin alone. Consequently, moxifloxacin and diclofenac should be monitored closely for potential drug interactions. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Comparative pharmacokinetics of chlorogenic acid after oral administration in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wei; Zhao, Ting; Yang, Wen-Wen; Wang, Guang-Hou; Yu, Hua; Zhao, Hai-Xiao; Yang, Chen; Sun, Li-Xin

    2011-01-01

    The present study was aimed at the comparison of the pharmacokinetics of pure chlorogenic acid and extract of Solanum lyratum Thunb. The animals were allocated to two groups, and were administered chlorogenic acid or extract of S. lyratum Thunb. at a dose of 50.0 mg/kg orally. Blood samples were collected up to 8 h post-dosing. Plasma chlorogenic acid analyses were performed using an HPLC method with UV detector. The pharmacokinetic parameters were evaluated using non-compartmental assessment. Significant differences existed in the two groups for AUC0−t, AUC0−∞ and CLz/F. The reliable HPLC method was successfully applied to the determination of chlorogenic acid in rat plasma at dosage of 50.0 mg/kg. PMID:29403709

  9. Pharmacokinetics of inhaled anesthetics in green iguanas (Iguana iguana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Robert J; Pypendop, Bruno H; Barter, Linda S; Hawkins, Michelle G

    2006-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that differences in anesthetic uptake and elimination in iguanas would counter the pharmacokinetic effects of blood:gas solubility and thus serve to minimize kinetic differences among inhaled agents. 6 green iguanas (Iguana iguana). Iguanas were anesthetized with isoflurane, sevoflurane, or desflurane in a Latin-square design. Intervals from initial administration of an anesthetic agent to specific induction events and from cessation of administration of an anesthetic agent to specific recovery events were recorded. End-expired gas concentrations were measured during anesthetic washout. Significant differences were not detected for any induction or recovery events for any inhalation agent in iguanas. Washout curves best fit a 2-compartment model, but slopes for both compartments did not differ significantly among the 3 anesthetics. Differences in blood:gas solubility for isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane did not significantly influence differences in pharmacokinetics for the inhalation agents in iguanas.

  10. Modeling in biopharmaceutics, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics homogeneous and heterogeneous approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Macheras, Panos

    2006-01-01

    The state of the art in Biopharmaceutics, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics Modeling is presented in this book. It shows how advanced physical and mathematical methods can expand classical models in order to cover heterogeneous drug-biological processes and therapeutic effects in the body. The book is divided into four parts; the first deals with the fundamental principles of fractals, diffusion and nonlinear dynamics; the second with drug dissolution, release, and absorption; the third with empirical, compartmental, and stochastic pharmacokinetic models, and the fourth mainly with nonclassical aspects of pharmacodynamics. The classical models that have relevance and application to these sciences are also considered throughout. Many examples are used to illustrate the intrinsic complexity of drug administration related phenomena in the human, justifying the use of advanced modeling methods. This timely and useful book will appeal to graduate students and researchers in pharmacology, pharmaceutical scienc...

  11. A review of body composition and pharmacokinetics in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Jessica J; Sawyer, Michael B

    2017-09-01

    Body surface area dosing of chemotherapeutic agents is based on limited scientific data, and often results in unpredictable plasma drug levels. Cross-sectional computed tomography (CT) imaging provides an accurate measurement of lean mass. This review summarizes emerging roles of lean mass in predicting pharmacokinetics and drug toxicities in cancer patients. Areas covered: A concise review of body composition measurement with CT cross-sectional imaging and its relationship to drug pharmacokinetics and toxicities. A comprehensive review of the predictive value of low lean mass (sarcopenia) in dose-limiting toxicities is also included. Expert commentary: Drug dosing in medical oncology faces many challenges, including heterogeneous body composition profiles. The emerging role of sarcopenia in predicting lean mass may provide the tool needed to more accurately dose patients and prevent dose-limiting toxicities.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of amikacin during hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regeur, L; Colding, H; Jensen, H

    1977-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of amikacin were examined in six bilaterally nephrectomized patients undergoing hemodialysis and in four patients with a minimal residual renal function undergoing peritoneal dialysis. The mean elimination half-life before the dialysis was 86.5 h in the anephric patients and 44...... renal function. During hemodialysis the half-life decreased to less than 10% (5.6 h) of the pretreatment value. The effectiveness of peritoneal dialysis was less as the half-life decreased to only about 30% (17.9 h) of the pretreatment value. During the dialyses a significant correlation between...... the half-life of amikacin and the decrease in blood urea and serum creatinine was demonstrated. The pharmacokinetic data were used to make dosage regimen recommendations for the treatment of patients undergoing intermittent hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis....

  13. PKgraph: an R package for graphically diagnosing population pharmacokinetic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoyong; Wu, Kai; Cook, Dianne

    2011-12-01

    Population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) modeling has become increasing important in drug development because it handles unbalanced design, sparse data and the study of individual variation. However, the increased complexity of the model makes it more of a challenge to diagnose the fit. Graphics can play an important and unique role in PopPK model diagnostics. The software described in this paper, PKgraph, provides a graphical user interface for PopPK model diagnosis. It also provides an integrated and comprehensive platform for the analysis of pharmacokinetic data including exploratory data analysis, goodness of model fit, model validation and model comparison. Results from a variety of modeling fitting software, including NONMEM, Monolix, SAS and R, can be used. PKgraph is programmed in R, and uses the R packages lattice, ggplot2 for static graphics, and rggobi for interactive graphics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. An electrochemical biosensor for clenbuterol detection and pharmacokinetics investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Bing; Zhu, Xuejun; Miao, Peng; Pei, Dong; Jiang, Bo; Lou, Yue; Shu, Yongqian; Li, Genxi

    2013-09-15

    Clenbuterol is a member of β2 adrenergic agonists, which is widely used not only as a food additive for livestocks, but also a kind of stimulant for athletes; however, the abuse of clenbuterol may pose a significant negative impact on human health. Since it is highly required to develop fast, sensitive and cost-effective method to determine clenbuterol level in the suspected urine or blood, we herein have fabricated an electrochemical biosensor for the determination of clenbuterol. Measurement of the species with the proposed biosensor can also have the advantages of simplicity, high sensitivity and selectivity. Moreover, the sensor can be directly used for clenbuterol determination in rat urine. We have further studied the pharmacokinetics of clenbuterol by using this proposed electrochemical biosensor, so a new tool to investigate pharmacokinetic is developed in this work. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Nonstandard Finite Difference Method Applied to a Linear Pharmacokinetics Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwaseun Egbelowo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We extend the nonstandard finite difference method of solution to the study of pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic models. Pharmacokinetic (PK models are commonly used to predict drug concentrations that drive controlled intravenous (I.V. transfers (or infusion and oral transfers while pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PD interaction models are used to provide predictions of drug concentrations affecting the response of these clinical drugs. We structure a nonstandard finite difference (NSFD scheme for the relevant system of equations which models this pharamcokinetic process. We compare the results obtained to standard methods. The scheme is dynamically consistent and reliable in replicating complex dynamic properties of the relevant continuous models for varying step sizes. This study provides assistance in understanding the long-term behavior of the drug in the system, and validation of the efficiency of the nonstandard finite difference scheme as the method of choice.

  16. Comparative pharmacokinetics and the bioavailability of escin Ib and isoescin Ib following the administration of escin, pure escin Ib and isoescin Ib in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiu-Jun; Zhang, Meng-Liang; Cui, Xiang-Yong; Paul Fawcett, J; Gu, Jing-Kai

    2014-02-03

    Adequate pharmacokinetic data of escin, a natural mixture of triterpene saponins used for the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency, hemorrhoids, inflammation and edema, is of special interest in view of the growing use of escin agent in clinical medicine. However, pharmacokinetic data are inadequate to support their clinical indication. Escin Ib and isoescin Ib are the chief active ingredients in escin, pharmacokinetics study of them would be helpful for improving the practice of escin application. The goals of this study are to determine the plasma concentration of escin Ib and isoescin Ib using an established liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method and to compare the pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of these compounds in rats when administered as pure isomers or as sodium escinate. Five groups of Wistar rats (n=6 per group) were treated with either an intravenous (IV) dose (2.78mg/kg) of sodium escinate (corresponding to 0.5mg/kg of escin Ib and 0.5mg/kg of isoescin Ib), an IV dose (0.5mg/kg) and an oral dose (4mg/kg) of pure escin Ib or isoescin Ib. The concentrations of escin Ib and isoescin Ib in rat plasma were determined by LC-MS/MS at various times following the administration of the drugs. The pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated by a non-compartmental analysis and then subjected to statistical analysis. The administration of sodium escinate, which contains the two isomers, gave rise to higher terminal phase half-life (t1/2) and mean residence time (MRT) values for both escin Ib and isoescin Ib compared to the corresponding compounds administered alone. The absorption of escin Ib and isoescin Ib was very poor, with the oral bioavailability (F) values of escin Ib to isoescin Ib was much easier than that of isoescin Ib to escin Ib. A comparison of the pharmacokinetics of escin Ib and isoescin Ib administered alone and together in rats suggests that the administration of herbal preparations of escin in a clinical setting

  17. Pharmacokinetics of bevacizumab after topical and intravitreal administration in human eyes

    OpenAIRE

    Moisseiev, Elad; Waisbourd, Michael; Ben-Artsi, Elad; Levinger, Eliya; Barak, Adiel; Daniels, Tad; Csaky, Karl; Loewenstein, Anat; Barequet, Irina S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Topical bevacizumab is a potential treatment modality for corneal neovascularization, and several recent studies have demonstrated its efficacy. No previous study of the pharmacokinetics of topical bevacizumab has been performed in human eyes. The purpose of this study is to investigate the pharmacokinetics of topical administration of bevacizumab in human eyes, and also to compare the pharmacokinetics of intravitreal bevacizumab injections with previously reported data. Methods Tw...

  18. Methotrexate Dose in Patients With Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Impacts Methotrexate Polyglutamate Pharmacokinetics, Adalimumab Pharmacokinetics, and Efficacy: Pharmacokinetic and Exposure-response Analysis of the CONCERTO Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Sandra L; Klein, Cheri E; Jin, Ziyi; Locke, Charles S; Rodila, Ramona C; Kupper, Hartmut; Burmester, Gerd-Rudiger; Awni, Walid M

    2018-02-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) and adalimumab are well-recognized treatments of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the efficacy of which may be driven by intracellular polyglutamates (PGs). The aim of this analysis was to characterize MTX PG concentrations and adalimumab pharmacokinetics in the CONCERTO trial. In addition, the relationships between MTX dose/pharmacokinetics, adalimumab pharmacokinetics, and efficacy were evaluated. CONCERTO was a double-blind, parallel-arm study in patients with early RA randomized to adalimumab 40 mg SC every other week plus blinded MTX 2.5, 5, 10, or 20 mg PO once weekly, for 26 weeks. Blood samples were obtained through week 26 for the determination of concentrations of MTX PG, adalimumab, and anti-adalimumab antibody (AAA). Clinical outcomes were also assessed. A total of 395 patients were included in the analysis (MTX, 329; adalimumab, 395). The mean time to steady-state MTX PG concentration was increased with MTX dose, from 8 to >26 weeks, depending on PG chain length. Dose proportionality changed with PG chain length. As MTX dose was increased, the percentage of short-chain PGs increased less than dose proportionally, while the percentage of long-chain PGs increased more than dose proportionally. For very-long-chain PGs, dose proportionality could not be assessed due to the nonmeasurable concentrations in the 2.5- and 5-mg MTX dose groups. As MTX dose increased, mean adalimumab concentrations also increased (P < 0.001). The percentage of patients with AAA decreased with increasing MTX dose, and at week 26, AAA + status was significantly correlated with MTX dose level (P = 0.005). In general, rates of response, defined using the 28-joint count disease activity score based on C-reactive protein (DAS28[CRP]; response, <3.2), were greater in the subgroup without AAA. The likelihood of a patient achieving a DAS28(CRP) response was related to the baseline measurement (P < 0.001) and to the concentration of adalimumab (P = 0.001), but not to the MTX

  19. Population Pharmacokinetics of Fentanyl in the Critically Ill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Leena; Ferrell, Benjamin A; Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Pandharipande, Pratik P; Heltsley, Rebecca; Ely, E Wesley; Stein, C Michael; Girard, Timothy D

    2016-01-01

    Objective To characterize fentanyl population pharmacokinetics in patients with critical illness and identify patient characteristics associated with altered fentanyl concentrations. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Medical and surgical ICUs in a large tertiary care hospital in the United States. Patients Patients with acute respiratory failure and/or shock who received fentanyl during the first five days of their ICU stay. Measurements and Main Results We collected clinical and hourly drug administration data and measured fentanyl concentrations in plasma collected once daily for up to five days after enrollment. Among 337 patients, the mean duration of infusion was 58 hours at a median rate of 100 µg/hr. Using a nonlinear mixed-effects model implemented by NONMEM, we found fentanyl pharmacokinetics were best described by a two-compartment model in which weight, severe liver disease, and congestive heart failure most affected fentanyl concentrations. For a patient population with a mean weight of 92 kg and no history of severe liver disease or congestive heart failure, the final model, which performed well in repeated 10-fold cross-validation, estimated total clearance (CL), intercompartmental clearance (Q), and volumes of distribution for the central (V1) and peripheral compartments (V2) to be 35 (95% confidence interval: 32 to 39) L/hr, 55 (42 to 68) L/hr, 203 (140 to 266) L, and 523 (428 to 618) L, respectively. Severity of illness was marginally associated with fentanyl pharmacokinetics but did not improve the model fit after liver and heart disease were included. Conclusions In this study, fentanyl pharmacokinetics during critical illness were strongly influenced by severe liver disease, congestive heart failure, and weight, factors that should be considered when dosing fentanyl in the ICU. Future studies are needed to determine if data-driven fentanyl dosing algorithms can improve outcomes for ICU patients. PMID:26491862

  20. Transplacental pharmacokinetics of diclofenac in perfused human placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintaku, Kyohei; Hori, Satoko; Tsujimoto, Masayuki; Nagata, Hideaki; Satoh, Shoji; Tsukimori, Kiyomi; Nakano, Hitoo; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Taketani, Yuji; Ohtani, Hisakazu; Sawada, Yasufumi

    2009-05-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the transplacental transfer properties of diclofenac and to determine the effect of L-lactic acid on the transplacental transfer of diclofenac. The maternal and fetal vessels of human placenta were perfused in a single-pass mode with a solution containing diclofenac and antipyrine. The transplacental pharmacokinetic model was fitted to the time profiles of the drug concentrations in the effluent and placenta to obtain transplacental pharmacokinetic parameters. In addition, chloride ion in the perfusate was partially replaced with L-lactic acid to see the change in the transplacental transfer properties of diclofenac. The TPT(ss) value (ratio of the rate of amount transferred across the placenta to that infused in the steady state) of diclofenac was 2.22%, which was approximately one-third that of antipyrine and was significantly reduced in the presence of L-lactic acid. The transplacental pharmacokinetic model could adequately explain the transplacental transfer of diclofenac with influx clearances from maternal and fetal perfusates to placental tissue of 0.276 and 0.0345 ml/min/g cotyledon and efflux rate constants from placental tissue to maternal and fetal perfusates of 0.406 and 0.0337 min(-1), respectively. By taking into account protein binding, the placental tissue/plasma concentration ratio in humans for diclofenac was estimated to be 0.108 ml/g of cotyledon and was smaller than that of antipyrine. In conclusion, human placental perfusion and transplacental pharmacokinetic modeling allowed us to determine the transplacental transfer properties of diclofenac quantitatively. Diclofenac may share transplacental transfer system(s) with L-lactic acid.

  1. Evaluation Of The Pharmacokinetic Interaction Between Candesartan Cilexetil And Felodipine

    OpenAIRE

    Junior E.A.; Duarte L.F.; Oliveira L.; Barros F.P.

    2011-01-01

    The study was performed to evaluate the pharmacokinetic interaction of test formulation of candesartan 16 mg tablet and felodipine extended release 5 mg tablet together in a combination package, comparing with the fasting period intake of commercial formulations of both Atacand® 16 mg tablet and Splendil® extended release 5 mg tablet (Test formulation and reference formulation from AstraZeneca, Brazil) in 36 volunteers of both sexes. The study was conducted open with randomized three period c...

  2. Tedizolid Population Pharmacokinetics, Exposure Response, and Target Attainment

    OpenAIRE

    Flanagan, S.; Passarell, J.; Lu, Q.; Fiedler-Kelly, J.; Ludwig, E.; Prokocimer, P.

    2014-01-01

    Tedizolid phosphate is a novel antibacterial prodrug that is rapidly and extensively converted to its active moiety, tedizolid. We developed a population pharmacokinetics (PK) model for tedizolid using pooled data from seven densely and sparsely sampled clinical trials evaluating oral and intravenous tedizolid. Model-derived exposure estimates were evaluated for relationships to select efficacy and safety outcomes. A two-compartment model with sigmoidal absorption, absolute bioavailability, a...

  3. Nanomedicine for improved efficacy of tuberculosis drugs – Pharmacokinetic importance

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hayeshi, R

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Efficacy of Tuberculosis Drugs ? Pharmacokinetic importance Emerging Researcher Symposium Dr. Rose Hayeshi 10 October 2012 Outline ? Challenges in TB treatment ? Nanomedicine as proposed solution ? Results ? Conclusions ? CSIR 2012 Slide 2... ? 1 x 106 cfu/lung 3 x 103 cfu/spleen Effects of the Nanodrug on Mycobacaterium tuberculosis replication ? Nanodrug once a week vs conventional drug daily ? Treatment with nanoencapsulated TB drugs once a week, comparable to daily treatment...

  4. Pharmacokinetics of pirfenidone after topical administration in rabbit eye

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Guoying; Lin, Xianchai; Zhong, Hua; Yang, Yangfan; Qiu, Xuan; Ye, Chengtian; Wu, Kaili; Yu, Minbin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Pirfenidone (5-methyl-1-phenyl-2-[1H]-pyridone) is a new, broad-spectrum agent that has an inhibition effect on the proliferation, migration, and collagen contraction of human Tenon’s fibroblasts, and thus modulating the wound healing process of glaucoma filtering surgical site. This study investigated the pharmacokinetics of topically administered pirfenidone (0.5%) in rabbit eyes. Methods Pirfenidone solution (50 μl) was instilled into the rabbit’s conjunctival sac. The rabbits were...

  5. Pharmacokinetics of a 5-fluorouracil liposomal delivery system.

    OpenAIRE

    Simmons, S T; Sherwood, M B; Nichols, D A; Penne, R B; Sery, T; Spaeth, G L

    1988-01-01

    A liposomal delivery system was developed in an attempt to prolong ocular levels of 5-fluorouracil for glaucoma filtering surgery. The pharmacokinetics of the 5-fluorouracil liposomal delivery system were studied in normal pigmented rabbits with 5-fluorouracil labelled with carbon-14 (C-14). 14C 5-fluorouracil was incorporated into the liposomes at a concentration of 10 g/l and injected subconjunctivally in doses of 5 and 10 mg. Concentrations of 5-fluorouracil were assayed at 10 time interva...

  6. Atropine Pharmacokinetics are Affected by Moderate Hemorrhage and Hypothyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    Moderate Hemorrhage and Hypothyroidism 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) R.C. Smallridge, B. Chernow, S. Teich, C. Kinzer, C. Umstott, G. Geelhoed, _ Ppmnl i n 13a...moderate hemorrhage and hypothyroidism ROBERT C. SMALLRIDGE, MD: BART CHERNOW, MD: STEVEN TEICH, MD, CAROL KINZER: CAROLYN UMSTOTT: GLEN GEELHOED. MD...under resting conditions. logic responses (heart rate, mydriasis, inhibition of Pharmacokinetic studies were performed in mongrel logi reo (a rat . dogs

  7. Grey-box modelling of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornøe, Christoffer Wenzel; Jacobsen, Judith L; Pedersen, Oluf

    2004-01-01

    Grey-box pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modelling is presented as a promising way of modelling PK/PD systems. The concept behind grey-box modelling is based on combining physiological knowledge along with information from data in the estimation of model parameters. Grey-box modelling con...... in order to describe the complicated in vivo system of insulin and glucose following an IVGTT....

  8. Pharmacokinetic modeling of therapies for systemic lupus erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xiaoyan; Sherwin, Catherine MT; Yu, Tian; Yellepeddi, Venkata K; Brunner, Hermine I; Vinks, Alexander A

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing use of different types of therapies in treating autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), there is a need to utilize pharmacokinetic (PK) strategies to optimize the clinical outcome of these treatments. Various PK analysis approaches, including population PK modeling and physiologically based PK modeling, have been used to evaluate drug PK characteristics and population variability or to predict drug PK profiles in a mechanistic manner. This review ou...

  9. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interactions with ethanol (alcohol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lingtak-Neander; Anderson, Gail D

    2014-12-01

    Ethanol (alcohol) is one of the most widely used legal drugs in the world. Ethanol is metabolized by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 drug-metabolizing enzyme that is also responsible for the biotransformation of xenobiotics and fatty acids. Drugs that inhibit ADH or CYP2E1 are the most likely theoretical compounds that would lead to a clinically significant pharmacokinetic interaction with ethanol, which include only a limited number of drugs. Acute ethanol primarily alters the pharmacokinetics of other drugs by changing the rate and extent of absorption, with more limited effects on clearance. Both acute and chronic ethanol use can cause transient changes to many physiologic responses in different organ systems such as hypotension and impairment of motor and cognitive functions, resulting in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions. Evaluating drug interactions with long-term use of ethanol is uniquely challenging. Specifically, it is difficult to distinguish between the effects of long-term ethanol use on liver pathology and chronic malnutrition. Ethanol-induced liver disease results in decreased activity of hepatic metabolic enzymes and changes in protein binding. Clinical studies that include patients with chronic alcohol use may be evaluating the effects of mild cirrhosis on liver metabolism, and not just ethanol itself. The definition of chronic alcohol use is very inconsistent, which greatly affects the quality of the data and clinical application of the results. Our study of the literature has shown that a significantly higher volume of clinical studies have focused on the pharmacokinetic interactions of ethanol and other drugs. The data on pharmacodynamic interactions are more limited and future research addressing pharmacodynamic interactions with ethanol, especially regarding the non-central nervous system effects, is much needed.

  10. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic alterations in older people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Emily; Trenaman, Shanna C; Rockwood, Kenneth; Hilmer, Sarah N

    2017-06-01

    The number of people with dementia internationally is increasing. Older adults with dementia are prescribed multiple medications, both to treat dementia symptoms and to manage their other medical conditions. Dementia is correlated with increasing age and frailty; this provides insight into how the efficacy and toxicity of medications may be altered in people with dementia. Areas covered: This review discusses the current evidence of the alterations in pharmacokinetics that can occur with aging, frailty and in people with dementia. The evidence is presented via the four primary pharmacokinetic processes (absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination). Additionally, distribution into the brain, sex considerations and potential pharmacodynamic alterations in older people with dementia are discussed. Expert opinion: While the evidence is limited, people with dementia appear to be at a higher risk of toxicity of some medications due to altered pharmacokinetic processes and pharmacodynamics. There are a number of limitations to the research and there are still significant gaps in knowledge in this field. Proactive, ongoing review of the appropriateness of choice of medication, dose and whether or not a medication is required at all is necessary for achieving quality use of medications in people living with dementia.

  11. Population pharmacokinetics of oseltamivir when coadministered with probenecid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Craig R; Chanu, Pascal; Gieschke, Ronald; Boak, Lauren M; Jonsson, E Niclas

    2008-08-01

    Oseltamivir is a potent, selective, oral neuraminidase inhibitor for the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza. Plasma concentrations of the active metabolite, oseltamivir carboxylate, are increased in the presence of probenecid, suggesting that the combination could allow for the use of reduced doses of oseltamivir. To investigate this proposal, we developed a population pharmacokinetic model and simulated the pharmacokinetics of candidate combination regimens of oral oseltamivir (45 mg and 30 mg twice a day) plus oral probenecid (500 mg/6 hourly). Probenecid plus oseltamivir 45 mg achieved all the pharmacokinetic parameters expected of oseltamivir alone, but combination with oseltamivir 30 mg and dose interval extension approaches did not. An oseltamivir-probenecid combination may compromise tolerability and enhance the potential for drug interactions. In addition, increased dosing requirements may affect compliance and attainment of optimal oseltamivir exposure, potentially facilitating the emergence of viral strains with reduced susceptibility to oseltamivir. These factors, set alongside increased capacity for oseltamivir production, should be carefully considered before an oseltamivir-probenecid combination is used.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of gamithromycin after intravenous and subcutaneous administration in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyns, H; Meyer, E; Plessers, E; Watteyn, A; De Baere, S; De Backer, P; Croubels, S

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic properties of gamithromycin in pigs after an intravenous (i.v.) or subcutaneous (s.c.) bolus injection of 6 mg/kg body weight. The plasma concentrations of gamithromycin were determined using a validated high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method, and the pharmacokinetics were noncompartmentally analysed. Following i.v. administration, the mean area under the plasma concentration-time curve extrapolated to infinity (AUCinf) and the mean elimination half-life (t1/2λz) were 3.67 ± 0.75 μg.h/mL and 16.03 h, respectively. The volume of distribution at steady state (Vss) and the plasma clearance were 31.03 ± 6.68 L/kg and 1.69 ± 0.33 L/h.kg, respectively. The mean residence time (MRTinf) was 18.84 ± 4.94 h. Gamithromycin administered subcutaneously to pigs demonstrated a rapid and complete absorption, with a mean maximal plasma concentration (Cmax) of 0.41 ± 0.090 μg/ml at 0.63 ± 0.21 h and a high absolute bioavailability of 118%. None of the reported pharmacokinetic variables significantly differed between both administration routes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Preparation and In Vivo Pharmacokinetics of the Tongshu Suppository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Astragalus polysaccharide (APS (used for intestinal protection was added to formulate the Tongshu suppository to improve the pharmacokinetics of Aceclofenac, which were assessed in New Zealand rabbits using an orthogonal experimental design. The single-agent Aceclofenac was taken as the control formulation. The concentration-time and drug release curves were drawn, and Tmax (min, Cmax (μg·mL−1, AUC0→∞, and MRT were compared using a pharmacokinetic systems program. The formulated Tongshu suppository had moderate hardness, a smooth surface with uniform color, and theoretical drug-loading rate of 8%. Its release rate was in accordance with the drug preparation requirements. The concentration-time curves and drug release curves revealed that the maximum concentrations (Cmax were 4.18±1.03 μg·mL−1 and 3.34±0.41 μg·mL−1 for the Tongshu and Aceclofenac suppositories, respectively, showing statistically insignificant difference, while the peak times were 34.87±4.69 min and 34.76±6.34 min, respectively, also showing statistically insignificant difference. Compared with the Aceclofenac suppository, the relative bioavailability of the Tongshu suppository was 104.4%, and the difference between them was statistically insignificant. In this experiment, the Tongshu suppository was prepared using the hot-melt method. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies confirmed it had higher bioavailability than the Aceclofenac suppository.

  14. Preparation and In Vivo Pharmacokinetics of the Tongshu Suppository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Leilei; Lu, Kuan; Liu, Sisi; Zheng, Yingying

    2016-01-01

    Astragalus polysaccharide (APS) (used for intestinal protection) was added to formulate the Tongshu suppository to improve the pharmacokinetics of Aceclofenac, which were assessed in New Zealand rabbits using an orthogonal experimental design. The single-agent Aceclofenac was taken as the control formulation. The concentration-time and drug release curves were drawn, and T max (min), C max (μg·mL−1), AUC0→∞, and MRT were compared using a pharmacokinetic systems program. The formulated Tongshu suppository had moderate hardness, a smooth surface with uniform color, and theoretical drug-loading rate of 8%. Its release rate was in accordance with the drug preparation requirements. The concentration-time curves and drug release curves revealed that the maximum concentrations (C max) were 4.18 ± 1.03 μg·mL−1 and 3.34 ± 0.41 μg·mL−1 for the Tongshu and Aceclofenac suppositories, respectively, showing statistically insignificant difference, while the peak times were 34.87 ± 4.69 min and 34.76 ± 6.34 min, respectively, also showing statistically insignificant difference. Compared with the Aceclofenac suppository, the relative bioavailability of the Tongshu suppository was 104.4%, and the difference between them was statistically insignificant. In this experiment, the Tongshu suppository was prepared using the hot-melt method. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies confirmed it had higher bioavailability than the Aceclofenac suppository. PMID:27610366

  15. Effects of pathological conditions on ocular pharmacokinetics of antimicrobial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Kayoko; Ohtori, Akira; Tojo, Kakuji

    2010-10-01

    A diffusion model of ocular pharmacokinetics was used to estimate the effects of pathological conditions on ocular pharmacokinetics. In vivo rabbit data after topical instillation of ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin were compared with the simulated concentrations in the aqueous and vitreous humors. The barrier capacity of the surrounding membranes such as the retina/choroid/sclera (RCS) membrane and the cornea was characterized by dimensionless Sherwood number derived by the pseudo-steady state approach (PSSA). We assumed the barrier capacity decreased by inflammation; when the barrier capacity of the RCS membrane and the cornea was assumed to be one-tenth for the RCS membrane and a half for the cornea respectively, the in vivo data agreed with the simulated profile without contradiction. The drug concentration gradient simulated in the vitreous body near the RCS membrane was more significant in the inflamed eyes than in the normal eyes, suggesting that the elimination of the drugs from the RCS membrane was enhanced by inflammation. The present diffusion model can better describe the ocular pharmacokinetics in both normal and diseased conditions.

  16. Predicting Pharmacokinetic Stability by Multiple Oral Administration of Atypical Antipsychotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Kazuo; Sakiyama, Yojiro; Ohnishi, Takashi; Sugita, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Lower fluctuation, i.e., lower peak-to-trough plasma-concentration variation at steady-state pharmacokinetics, has several advantages for the treatment of schizophrenia with antipsychotics. The reduction of peak concentration can decrease the risk of dose-dependent side effects, such as extrapyramidal symptom and somnolence, and by contrast the increase in trough concentration can decrease the incidence of lack of efficacy due to subtherapeutic drug concentration. Using a one-compartment simulation technique with pharmacokinetic parameters of each atypical antipsychotic collected from package inserts, the fluctuation index was calculated. Among the antipsychotics, the indices varied from 0.018 to 1.9, depending on dosing regimens, formulations and several pharmacokinetic properties. The order of simulated fluctuation index is active-moiety aripiprazole (b.i.d.) blonanserin (b.i.d.)

  17. A decade of experience with a clinical pharmacokinetics service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, P J; Smith, W E; Palarea, E R

    1988-09-01

    The development, operation, and functions of the pharmacokinetics service at Memorial Medical Center of Long Beach (MMCLB) are described, and the data used to determine the quality and cost-effectiveness of the service are presented. Current functions of the pharmacokinetics service at MMCLB include making brief written comments about the interpretations of serum drug concentrations (SDCs) and oral recommendations to physicians on dosage adjustment; provision of written consultations with dosage recommendations; provision of drug information, education, and research; and development of drug dosing guidelines for the pharmacy and medical staff. During the 10-year existence of this service, costs have been justified on the basis of not only revenue generated by the service (in the form of "drug concentration scheduling" and "drug concentration evaluation" fees charged to patients) but also by cost savings resulting from the prevention of inappropriate, misleading, and potentially dangerous SDCs. An audit conducted in 1986 showed that the policy of having pharmacists schedule the sampling times for SDCs saves about $500,000 annually. Quality assurance has been documented by auditing compliance with and therapeutic effectiveness of dosing guidelines and by working with laboratory personnel to identify and prevent spurious SDC results and assay errors. The methods used by the pharmacokinetics service at MMCLB to document the benefits of the service have been vital in proving both its cost-effectiveness and its positive effect on patient care.

  18. Influence of Differing Analgesic Formulations of Aspirin on Pharmacokinetic Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunal Kanani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aspirin has been used therapeutically for over 100 years. As the originator and an important marketer of aspirin-containing products, Bayer’s clinical trial database contains numerous reports of the pharmacokinetics of various aspirin formulations. These include evaluations of plain tablets, effervescent tablets, granules, chewable tablets, and fast-release tablets. This publication seeks to expand upon the available pharmacokinetic information concerning aspirin formulations. In the pre-systemic circulation, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA is rapidly converted into its main active metabolite, salicylic acid (SA. Therefore, both substances are measured in plasma and reported in the results. The 500 mg strength of each formulation was chosen for analysis as this is the most commonly used for analgesia. A total of 22 studies were included in the analysis. All formulations of 500 mg aspirin result in comparable plasma exposure to ASA and SA as evidenced by AUC. Tablets and dry granules provide a consistently lower Cmax compared to effervescent, granules in suspension and fast release tablets. Effervescent tablets, fast release tablets, and granules in suspension provide a consistently lower median Tmax compared to dry granules and tablets for both ASA and SA. This report reinforces the importance of formulation differences and their impact on pharmacokinetic parameters.

  19. Availability, Pharmaceutics, Security, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacological Activities of Patchouli Alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanying Hu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patchouli alcohol (PA, a tricyclic sesquiterpene, is one of the critical bioactive ingredients and is mainly isolated from aerial part of Pogostemon cablin (known as guanghuoxiang in China belonging to Labiatae. So far, PA has been widely applied in perfume industries. This review was written with the use of reliable information published between 1974 and 2016 from libraries and electronic researches including NCKI, PubMed, Reaxys, ACS, ScienceDirect, Springer, and Wiley-Blackwell, aiming at presenting comprehensive outline of security, pharmacokinetics, and bioactivities of PA and at further providing a potential guide in exploring the PA and its use in various medical fields. We found that PA maybe was a low toxic drug that was acquired numerously through vegetable oil isolation and chemical synthesis and its stability and low water dissolution were improved in pharmaceutics. It also possessed specific pharmacokinetic characteristics, such as two-compartment open model, first-order kinetic elimination, and certain biometabolism and biotransformation process, and was shown to have multiple biological activities, that is, immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, antitumor, antimicrobial, insecticidal, antiatherogenic, antiemetic, whitening, and sedative activity. However, the systematic evaluations of preparation, pharmaceutics, toxicology, pharmacokinetics, and bioactivities underlying molecular mechanisms of action also required further investigation prior to practices of PA in clinic.

  20. A pharmacokinetic model of styrene inhalation with the fugacity approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, S; Mackay, D

    1986-03-15

    The physiologically based pharmacokinetic model of J. C. Ramsey and M. E. Andersen (1984, Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 73, 159-175) of styrene inhalation in rats, with extrapolation to humans, was reformulated with the chemical equilibrium criterion of fugacity instead of concentration to describe compartment partitioning. Fugacity models have been used successfully to describe environmental partitioning processes which are similar in principle to pharmacokinetic processes. The fugacity and concentration models are mathematically equivalent and produce identical results. The use of fugacity provides direct insights into the relative chemical equilibrium partitioning status of compartments, thus facilitating interpretation of experimental and model data. It can help to elucidate dominant processes of transfer, reaction and accumulation, and the direction of diffusion. Certain model simplifications become apparent in which compartments which remain close to equilibrium may be grouped. Maximum steady-state tissue concentrations for a known exposure may be calculated readily. It is suggested that pharmacokinetic fugacity models can complement conventional concentration models and may facilitate linkage to fugacity models describing environmental sources, pathways, and exposure routes.

  1. Optimisation of sampling windows design for population pharmacokinetic experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogungbenro, Kayode; Aarons, Leon

    2008-08-01

    This paper describes an approach for optimising sampling windows for population pharmacokinetic experiments. Sampling windows designs are more practical in late phase drug development where patients are enrolled in many centres and in out-patient clinic settings. Collection of samples under the uncontrolled environment at these centres at fixed times may be problematic and can result in uninformative data. Population pharmacokinetic sampling windows design provides an opportunity to control when samples are collected by allowing some flexibility and yet provide satisfactory parameter estimation. This approach uses information obtained from previous experiments about the model and parameter estimates to optimise sampling windows for population pharmacokinetic experiments within a space of admissible sampling windows sequences. The optimisation is based on a continuous design and in addition to sampling windows the structure of the population design in terms of the proportion of subjects in elementary designs, number of elementary designs in the population design and number of sampling windows per elementary design is also optimised. The results obtained showed that optimal sampling windows designs obtained using this approach are very efficient for estimating population PK parameters and provide greater flexibility in terms of when samples are collected. The results obtained also showed that the generalized equivalence theorem holds for this approach.

  2. The Brain and Propranolol Pharmacokinetics in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy R. Eugene

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Propranolol, a non-selective β-blocker, has been found to have a tremendous array of indications. Recent evidence has suggested that propranolol may be effective in patients suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder by suppressing activity in the amygdala and thereby inhibiting emotional memory formation. Dosage requirements have been well established in the pediatric and adult population, however, there has been no definitive geriatric dose recommended in the package inserts made available to the public. The aim of this paper is to use pharmacokinetic simulations in order to establish a pharmacokinetic profile dosage equivalent for the elderly as has been found in young patients. After completing the Monte-Carlo simulations for the elderly and young patients, a single 10mg dose in the elderly has shown comparable pharmacokinetic profiles as found in young patients administered a 40mg single dose.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of testosterone cream applied to scrotal skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, R; Mok, S F; Savkovic, S; Turner, L; Fraser, G; Desai, R; Jayadev, V; Conway, A J; Handelsman, D J

    2017-07-01

    Scrotal skin is thin and has high steroid permeability, but the pharmacokinetics of testosterone via the scrotal skin route has not been studied in detail. The aim of this study was to define the pharmacokinetics of testosterone delivered via the scrotal skin route. The study was a single-center, three-phase cross-over pharmacokinetic study of three single doses (12.5, 25, 50 mg) of testosterone cream administered in random sequence on different days with at least 2 days between doses to healthy eugonadal volunteers with endogenous testosterone suppressed by administration of nandrolone decanoate. Serum testosterone, DHT and estradiol concentrations were measured by liquid chromatograpy, mass spectrometry in extracts of serum taken before and for 16 h after administration of each of the three doses of testosterone cream to the scrotal skin. Testosterone administration onto the scrotal skin produced a swift (peak 1.9-2.8 h), dose-dependent (p testosterone with the 25 mg dose maintaining physiological levels for 16 h. Serum DHT displayed a time- (p testosterone. There were no significant changes in serum estradiol over time after testosterone administration. We conclude that testosterone administration to scrotal skin is well tolerated and produces dose-dependent peak serum testosterone concentration with a much lower dose relative to the non-scrotal transdermal route. © 2017 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  4. A model to resolve organochlorine pharmacokinetics in migrating humpback whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropp, Roger; Nash, Susan Bengtson; Hawker, Darryl

    2014-07-01

    Humpback whales are iconic mammals at the top of the Antarctic food chain. Their large reserves of lipid-rich tissues such as blubber predispose them to accumulation of lipophilic contaminants throughout their lifetime. Changes in the volume and distribution of lipids in humpback whales, particularly during migration, could play an important role in the pharmacokinetics of lipophilic contaminants such as the organochlorine pesticide hexachlorobenzene (HCB). Previous models have examined constant feeding and nonmigratory scenarios. In the present study, the authors develop a novel heuristic model to investigate HCB dynamics in a humpback whale and its environment by coupling an ecosystem nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) model, a dynamic energy budget (DEB) model, and a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. The model takes into account the seasonal feeding pattern of whales, their energy requirements, and fluctuating contaminant burdens in the supporting plankton food chain. It is applied to a male whale from weaning to maturity, spanning 20 migration and feeding cycles. The model is initialized with environmental HCB burdens similar to those measured in the Southern Ocean and predicts blubber HCB concentrations consistent with empirical concentrations observed in a southern hemisphere population of male, migrating humpback whales. Results show for the first time some important details of the relationship between energy budgets and organochlorine pharmacokinetics. © 2014 SETAC.

  5. Melatonin Pharmacokinetics Following Oral Administration in Preterm Neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Carloni

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin possesses potential efficacy in perinatal brain injuries, and has been proposed as adjunctive pharmacological therapy in combination with hypothermia in the clinical setting. However, the pharmacokinetics of melatonin in preterm and term newborns is still unknown. The aim of this study was to analyze the pharmacokinetics of melatonin after intragastric administration in preterm infants. Preterm newborns were enrolled 24–72 h after birth, and randomly assigned to three groups receiving a single bolus of 0.5 mg·kg−1 melatonin, or 3 boluses of 1 or 5 mg·kg−1 of melatonin at 24-h intervals. Blood samples were collected before and at selective times after melatonin administration. The half-life of melatonin in plasma ranged from 7.98 to 10.94 h, and the area under the curve (AUC from 10.48 to 118.17 µg·mL−1·h−1. Our results indicate a different pharmacokinetic profile in premature newborns, compared to adults and experimental animals. The high peak plasma concentrations and the long half-life indicate that in the neonatal clinical setting, it is possible to obtain and maintain high serum concentrations using a single administration of melatonin repeated every 12/24 h.

  6. Topics in xenobiochemistry--application of microdialysis techniques in pharmacokinetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fettweis, G; Borlak, J

    1996-05-01

    The principle of the microdialysis technique, the microdialysis system and its application to pharmacokinetic studies is discussed. By applying the microdialysis technique to pharmacokinetic studies the number of animals needed can be substantially reduced, because the technique involves a sampling technique which does not withdraw body fluid and so does not disturb blood homeostasis. Therefore, there are no limiting factors to the amount of samples taken from one animal. The utility offered by the microdialysis technique will have a bearing on future pharmacokinetic studies and it is to be expected that the importance of microdialysis in pharmacokinetic studies will grow in the future.

  7. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic modelling approach to predict buprenorphine pharmacokinetics following intravenous and sublingual administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalluri, Hari V; Zhang, Hongfei; Caritis, Steve N; Venkataramanan, Raman

    2017-11-01

    Opioid dependence is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Buprenorphine (BUP) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat opioid dependence. There is a lack of clear consensus on the appropriate dosing of BUP due to interpatient physiological differences in absorption/disposition, subjective response assessment and other patient comorbidities. The objective of the present study was to build and validate robust physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for intravenous (IV) and sublingual (SL) BUP as a first step to optimizing BUP pharmacotherapy. BUP-PBPK modelling and simulations were performed using SimCyp® by incorporating the physiochemical properties of BUP, establishing intersystem extrapolation factors-based in vitro-in-vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) methods to extrapolate in vitro enzyme activity data, and using tissue-specific plasma partition coefficient estimations. Published data on IV and SL-BUP in opioid-dependent and non-opioid-dependent patients were used to build the models. Fourteen model-naïve BUP-PK datasets were used for inter- and intrastudy validations. The IV and SL-BUP-PBPK models developed were robust in predicting the multicompartment disposition of BUP over a dosing range of 0.3-32 mg. Predicted plasma concentration-time profiles in virtual patients were consistent with reported data across five single-dose IV, five single-dose SL and four multiple dose SL studies. All PK parameter predictions were within 75-137% of the corresponding observed data. The model developed predicted the brain exposure of BUP to be about four times higher than that of BUP in plasma. The validated PBPK models will be used in future studies to predict BUP plasma and brain concentrations based on the varying demographic, physiological and pathological characteristics of patients. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  8. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling to predict concentrations and actions of sodium-dependent glucose transporter 2 inhibitor canagliflozin in human intestines and renal tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kazumi; Saito, Ryuta; Nakamaru, Yoshinobu; Shimizu, Makiko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    Canagliflozin is a recently developed sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT) 2 inhibitor that promotes renal glucose excretion and is considered to inhibit renal SGLT2 from the luminal side of proximal tubules. Canagliflozin reportedly inhibits SGLT1 weakly and suppresses postprandial plasma glucose, suggesting that it also inhibits intestinal SGLT1. However, it is difficult to measure the drug concentrations of these assumed sites of action directly. The pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) relationships of canagliflozin remain poorly characterized. Therefore, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of canagliflozin was developed based on clinical data from healthy volunteers and it was used to simulate luminal concentrations in intestines and renal tubules. In small intestine simulations, the inhibition ratios for SGLT1 were predicted to be 40%-60% after the oral administration of clinical doses (100-300 mg/day). In contrast, inhibition ratios of canagliflozin for renal SGLT2 and SGLT1 were predicted to be approximately 100% and 0.2%-0.4%, respectively. These analyses suggest that canagliflozin only inhibits SGLT2 in the kidney. Using the simulated proximal tubule luminal concentrations of canagliflozin, the urinary glucose excretion rates in canagliflozin-treated diabetic patients were accurately predicted using the renal glucose reabsorption model as a PD model. Because the simulation of canagliflozin pharmacokinetics was successful, this PBPK methodology was further validated by successfully simulating the pharmacokinetics of dapagliflozin, another SGLT2 inhibitor. The present results suggest the utility of this PBPK/PD model for predicting canagliflozin concentrations at target sites and help to elucidate the pharmacological effects of SGLT1/2 inhibition in humans. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. A 'Scottish Poor Law of Lunacy'? Poor Law, Lunacy Law and Scotland's parochial asylums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, Lauren

    2017-03-01

    Scotland's parochial asylums are unfamiliar institutional spaces. Representing the concrete manifestation of the collision between two spheres of legislation, the Poor Law and the Lunacy Law, six such asylums were constructed in the latter half of the nineteenth century. These sites expressed the enduring mandate of the Scottish Poor Law 1845 over the domain of 'madness'. They were institutions whose very existence was fashioned at the directive of the local arm of the Poor Law, the parochial board, and they constituted a continuing 'Scottish Poor Law of Lunacy'. Their origins and operation significantly subverted the intentions and objectives of the Lunacy Act 1857, the aim of which had been to institute a public district asylum network with nationwide coverage.

  10. Pharmacokinetics of dimemorfan phosphate tablets in healthy Chinese volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yali; Luo, Zhu; Yu, Qin; Wang, Ying; Xiang, Jin; Miao, Jia

    2017-06-01

    Investigate the pharmacokinetic properties of the antitussive dimemorfan phosphate tablets in healthy male and female Chinese volunteers after single and multiple-dose administration; and to evaluate the food-effect on pharmacokinetics of dimemorfan. 12 subjects received a single dose of 10 mg and 40 mg dimemorfan phosphate tablets, respectively in study stage 1. Another 12 subjects received a single dose of 20 mg dimemorfan phosphate tablets under fed conditions, a single dose of 20 mg dimemorfan phosphate tablets under fasting conditions and multiple-dosing of 20 mg dimemorfan phosphate tablets 3 times per day, respectively in study stage 2. The washout between each treatment was 1 week. Plasma dimemorfan was quantified by a high pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method. After single-dosing of 10 mg, 20 mg and 40 mg dimemorfan phosphate tablets, C max , AUC 0-t and AUC 0-∞ were dose proportional, which achievd 6.19 ± 7.61 ng·mL -1 , 101 ± 171 and 117 ± 210 ng·mL -1 ·h, respectively after single-dosing of 40 mg dimemorfan phosphate tablets. T max ranged from 2.75 to 3.96 h and t 1/2 ranged from 10.6 to 11.4 h. After multiple-dosing of 20 mg dimemorfan phosphate tablets, the Accumulation Index (AI) was 2.65 ± 1.11. The pharmacokinetic parameters after single-dosing of 20 mg dimemorfan phosphate tablets under fed conditions were similar with those under fasting conditions. Sex did not affect the pharmacokinetics of dimemorfan phosphate tablets. Single-dosing of dimemorfan phosphate tablets exhibited linear kinetic characteristics. Multiple-dosing of 20 mg dimemorfan phosphate tablets 3 times per day caused obvious accumulation. No food effect or sex effect on the pharmacokinetics of dimemorfan phosphate tablets was observed. Chictr.org identifier: ChiCTR-ONC-14004851.

  11. Pharmacokinetic Study of Piracetam in Focal Cerebral Ischemic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwal, Pankaj; Dash, Debabrata; Krishnamurthy, Sairam

    2018-04-01

    Cerebral ischemia affects hepatic enzymes and brain permeability extensively. Piracetam was investigated up to phase III of clinical trials and there is lack of data on brain penetration in cerebral ischemic condition. Thus, knowledge of the pharmacokinetics and brain penetration of piracetam during ischemic condition would aid to improve pharmacotherapeutics in ischemic stroke. Focal cerebral ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion for 2 h in male Wistar rats followed by reperfusion. After 24 h of middle cerebral artery occlusion or 22 h of reperfusion, piracetam was administered for pharmacokinetic, brain penetration, and pharmacological experiments. In pharmacokinetic study, blood samples were collected at different time points after 200-mg/kg (oral) and 75-mg/kg (intravenous) administration of piracetam through right external jugular vein cannulation. In brain penetration study, the cerebrospinal fluid, systemic blood, portal blood, and brain samples were collected at pre-designated time points after 200-mg/kg oral administration of piracetam. In a separate experiment, the pharmacological effect of the single oral dose of piracetam in middle cerebral artery occlusion was assessed at a dose of 200 mg/kg. All the pharmacokinetic parameters of piracetam including area under curve (AUC 0-24 ), maximum plasma concentration (C max ), time to reach the maximum plasma concentration (t max ), elimination half-life (t 1/2 ), volume of distribution (V z ), total body clearance, mean residence time, and bioavailability were found to be similar in ischemic stroke condition except for brain penetration. Piracetam exposure (AUC 0-2 ) in brain and CSF were found to be 2.4- and 3.1-fold higher, respectively, in ischemic stroke compared to control rats. Piracetam significantly reduced infarct volume by 35.77% caused by middle cerebral artery occlusion. There was no change in the pharmacokinetic parameters of piracetam in the ischemic stroke model except for

  12. EXTREMELY METAL-POOR GALAXIES: THE ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filho, M. E. [Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria–Universidad de La Laguna, CIE Canarias: Tri-Continental Atlantic Campus, Canary Islands (Spain); Almeida, J. Sánchez; Muñoz-Tuñón, C. [Instituto Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Nuza, S. E.; Kitaura, F.; Heß, S., E-mail: mfilho@astro.up.pt [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    We have analyzed bibliographical observational data and theoretical predictions, in order to probe the environment in which extremely metal-poor dwarf galaxies (XMPs) reside. We have assessed the H i component and its relation to the optical galaxy, the cosmic web type (voids, sheets, filaments and knots), the overdensity parameter and analyzed the nearest galaxy neighbors. The aim is to understand the role of interactions and cosmological accretion flows in the XMP observational properties, particularly the triggering and feeding of the star formation. We find that XMPs behave similarly to Blue Compact Dwarfs; they preferably populate low-density environments in the local universe: ∼60% occupy underdense regions, and ∼75% reside in voids and sheets. This is more extreme than the distribution of irregular galaxies, and in contrast to those regions preferred by elliptical galaxies (knots and filaments). We further find results consistent with previous observations; while the environment does determine the fraction of a certain galaxy type, it does not determine the overall observational properties. With the exception of five documented cases (four sources with companions and one recent merger), XMPs do not generally show signatures of major mergers and interactions; we find only one XMP with a companion galaxy within a distance of 100 kpc, and the H i gas in XMPs is typically well-behaved, demonstrating asymmetries mostly in the outskirts. We conclude that metal-poor accretion flows may be driving the XMP evolution. Such cosmological accretion could explain all the major XMP observational properties: isolation, lack of interaction/merger signatures, asymmetric optical morphology, large amounts of unsettled, metal-poor H i gas, metallicity inhomogeneities, and large specific star formation.

  13. Current stress and poor oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliou, A; Shankardass, K; Nisenbaum, R; Quiñonez, C

    2016-09-02

    Psychological stress appears to contribute to poor oral health systemically in combination with other chronic diseases. Few studies directly examine this relationship. Data from a cross-sectional study of 2,412 participants between the ages of 25-64 years old living in the City of Toronto between 2009 and 2012 were used to examine the relationship between current stress and two self-rated oral health outcomes (general oral health and oral pain). Dental care utilization and access to dental insurance were examined as effect modifiers. A positive relationship between current stress and poor oral health was observed for both outcomes (oral pain coefficient 0.32, 95 % CI 0.26-0.38; general oral health coefficient 0.28, 95 % CI 0.19-0.36). Effects on oral pain were stronger for the uninsured, while effects on general oral health were stronger with decreasing socioeconomic position. Our findings suggest that individuals with greater perceived stress also report poorer oral health, and that this relationship is modified by dental insurance and socioeconomic position. These findings warrant a greater focus on the role of psychological stress in the development of oral disease, including how perceived stress contributes to health inequities in self-reported oral health status. Patients experiencing stressful lives may differentially require closer monitoring and more vigilant maintenance of their oral health, above and beyond that which is needed to achieve a state of health in the oral environment of less stressed individuals. There may be health promoting effects of addressing psychosocial concerns related to dental care - particularly for the poor and uninsured.

  14. Access to energy for the poor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huntjens, E.; Van Bussel, F.; Raats, M.

    2005-01-01

    Paper dealing with the topic E nergy consumption and economic development (in developed / wealthy and undeveloped / poor regions; energy price, social influence and energy efficiency. 'Brothers and sisters, I want to tell you this. The greatest thing on earth is to have the love of God in your heart, and the next greatest thing is to have electricity in your house.' In the early 1940s a farmer, who had just been connected to the electric grid, gave witness in a rural church in the United States of America(author)

  15. Justice, Work, and the Ghetto Poor

    OpenAIRE

    Shelby, Tommie

    2012-01-01

    In view of the explanatory significance of joblessness, some social scientists, policymakers,and commentators have advocated strong measures to ensure that the ghetto poor work, includingmandating work as a condition of receiving welfare benefits. Indeed, across the ideological po-litical spectrum, work is often seen as a moral or civic duty and as a necessary basis for personaldignity. And this normative stance is now instantiated in federal and state law, from the tax schemeto public benefits....

  16. Bureaucracy and Pro-poor Change

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Cheema; Asad Sayeed

    2006-01-01

    Based on the premise that a functioning state is a necessary pre-requisite for pro-poor change, it is critical to investigate the role of the bureaucracy as a key catalyst in this process. Weber (1968) ascribes bureaucracies to be anchors of the modern nation state as their conduct is based on rational-legal norms. Bureaucracies, according to this ideal type, temper the populist urges of politicians who wish to execute policy unencumbered by rules and procedures. State success or failure in m...

  17. PLGA-soya lecithin based micelles for enhanced delivery of methotrexate: Cellular uptake, cytotoxic and pharmacokinetic evidences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anupama; Thotakura, Nagarani; Kumar, Rajendra; Singh, Bhupinder; Sharma, Gajanand; Katare, Om Prakash; Raza, Kaisar

    2017-02-01

    Biocompatible and biodegradable polymers like PLGA have revolutionized the drug delivery approaches. However, poor drug loading and substantially high lipophilicity, pave a path for further tailing of this promising agent. In this regard, PLGA was feathered with biocompatible phospholipid and polymeric micelles were developed for delivery of Methotrexate (MTX) to cancer cells. The nanocarriers (114.6nm±5.5nm) enhanced the cytotoxicity of MTX by 2.13 folds on MDA-MB-231 cells. Confocal laser scanning microscopy confirmed the increased intracellular delivery. The carrier decreased the protein binding potential and enhanced the bioavailable fraction of MTX. Pharmacokinetic studies vouched substantial enhancement in AUC and bioresidence time, promising an ideal carrier to effectively deliver the drug to the site of action. The developed nanocarriers offer potential to deliver the drug in the interiors of cancer cells in an effective manner for improved therapeutic action. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of cytochrome P450 2C19 polymorphisms on the pharmacokinetics of tacrolimus when coadministered with voriconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Chiyo K; Furihata, Kenichi; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Tanigawara, Yusuke

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the effects of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C19 polymorphisms on tacrolimus pharmacokinetics when coadministered with voriconazole. Eighteen healthy volunteers, including 6 individuals in each CYP2C19 genotype (extensive metabolizers [EMs], intermediate metabolizers [IMs], and poor metabolizers [PMs]), received a single oral dose of 3 mg tacrolimus alone or in combination with 200 mg voriconazole twice daily at steady state. When tacrolimus was coadministered with voriconazole, a significant increase in area under its concentration-time curve (AUC0-24 ) was observed for all genotypes. AUC0-12 of voriconazole in IMs and PMs were significantly higher than that in EMs (P voriconazole in IMs and PMs were also significantly higher than that in EMs (P voriconazole, although tacrolimus is mainly metabolized by CYP3A. © 2015, The Authors. The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  19. Association of diarrhoea, poor hygiene and poor social conditions in childhood with blood pressure in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauhanen, L; Lynch, J W; Lakka, H-M; Kauhanen, J; Smith, G D

    2010-05-01

    Previous research has suggested that dehydration in infancy may lead to high blood pressure in later life because of sodium retention. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of poor hygiene of the child, poor social and poor housing conditions at home and diarrhoea in childhood as proxies for dehydration on high blood pressure in later life. Data were from a subset of participants in the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study, a population-based cohort study in eastern Finland. Information on childhood factors was collected from school health records (n=952), from the 1930s to the 1950s. Adult data were obtained from baseline examinations of the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study cohort (n=2682) in 1984-1989. Men who had poor hygiene in childhood had on average 4.07 mm Hg (95% CI 0.53 to 7.61) higher systolic blood pressure than men who had good or satisfactory hygiene in childhood in the age-adjusted analysis. Reports of diarrhoea were not associated with adult blood pressure. The authors' findings suggest that poor hygiene and living in poor social conditions in childhood are associated with higher systolic blood pressure in adulthood. Reported childhood diarrhoea did not explain the link between hygiene and high blood pressure in adulthood.

  20. Alleviating energy poverty for the world's poor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagar, Ambuj D.

    2005-01-01

    Improving energy services for poor households in developing countries remains one of the most pressing challenges facing the development community. The dependence of these households on traditional forms of energy leads to significant health impacts as well as other major disbenefits, yet there has been little progress in meeting this challenge. This viewpoint argues for an 'energy-poverty alleviation' fund to help provide modern energy services to these households. It also proposes an approach through which to create such a fund, namely by introducing an incremental levy on petroleum. Notably, this scheme does not need a global agreement since a levy could be introduced by major oil-exporting countries. The implementation of this mechanism would result in a climate-friendly outcome (even before taking into account the elimination of products of incomplete combustion resulting from the traditional household use of biomass-based fuels) while providing immense socio-economic benefits to the world's poor. Such an approach would allow significant progress on the sustainable development front while reducing global greenhouse gas emissions, and therefore is very much consistent with the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

  1. Mesoporous systems for poorly soluble drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wujun; Riikonen, Joakim; Lehto, Vesa-Pekka

    2013-08-30

    Utilization of inorganic mesoporous materials in formulations of poorly water-soluble drugs to enhance their dissolution and permeation behavior is a rapidly growing area in pharmaceutical materials research. The benefits of mesoporous materials in drug delivery applications stem from their large surface area and pore volume. These properties enable the materials to accommodate large amounts of payload molecules, protect them from premature degradation, and promote controlled and fast release. As carriers with various morphologies and chemical surface properties can be produced, these materials may even promote adsorption from the gastrointestinal tract to the systemic circulation. The main concern regarding their clinical applications is still the safety aspect even though most of them have been reported to be safely excreted, and a rather extensive toxicity screening has already been conducted with the most frequently studied mesoporous materials. In addition, the production of the materials on a large scale and at a reasonable cost may be a challenge when considering the utilization of the materials in industrial processes. However, if mesoporous materials could be employed in the industrial crystallization processes to produce hybrid materials with poorly soluble compounds, and hence to enhance their oral bioavailability, this might open new avenues for the pharmaceutical industry to employ nanotechnology in their processes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder with Poor Insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkut Bulut

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a mental disorder that may cause severe disability. Insight in obsessive-compulsive disorder has been an issue of debate since the disorder was described for the first time. Formerly, obsessive-compulsive disorder was regarded as one of the neurotic disorders and patients were supposed to find their symptoms as totally senseless and exaggerated. However, the idea that obsessions have to be regarded egodystonic has changed recently. Firstly in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th edition (DSM-IV, the term \\"with poor insight and rdquo; was used as a specifier for obsessive-compulsive disorder. Obsessive-compulsive disorder with low or no insight may differ from obsessive-compulsive disorder with good insight in terms of sociodemographic, clinical and treatment features. Along with types of obsessions, the levels of insight are subject to change. Obsessive-compulsive disorder with poor insight can either be a subtype with different features or a severe form of Obsessive-compulsive disorder. Along with DSM-5 insight in obsessive-compulsive disorder is no longer classified as absent or present. Insight in obsessive-compulsive disorder needs to be conceptualized as a spectrum or continuity. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(2.000: 126-141

  3. Crisis and Communication among Rural Poor People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Ganjar Runtiko

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the crisis is often multiple on people in rural poverty that secluded and away from the reach of government. Main factor cannot be ignored in crisis is communication. Prolonged crisis will occur when the channels of communication in society clogged. This study establishes three specific targets: (1 To obtain a comprehensive overview of the rural poor people’s knowledge about the crisis and the potential impact, (2 To discover crisis problems faced by the rural people poor, (3 To enlist communication problems in a crisis situation. This study used a qualitative method with a case study approach. Research data collect by conducting FGD of 40 informants selected based on purposive sampling, furthermore eight people were interviewed in depth, plus other supporting informant. The results of the research show people on those two locations have understood the crisis based on their experience of dealing with it. They believe the economic crisis as the first aspect that must be resolved. The completion of crisis should consider indigenous wisdom to avoid a new crisis.

  4. Melt extrusion with poorly soluble drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sejal; Maddineni, Sindhuri; Lu, Jiannan; Repka, Michael A

    2013-08-30

    Melt extrusion (ME) over recent years has found widespread application as a viable drug delivery option in the drug development process. ME applications include taste masking, solid-state stability enhancement, sustained drug release and solubility enhancement. While ME can result in amorphous or crystalline solid dispersions depending upon several factors, solubility enhancement applications are centered around generating amorphous dispersions, primarily because of the free energy benefits they offer. In line with the purview of the current issue, this review assesses the utility of ME as a means of enhancing solubility of poorly soluble drugs/chemicals. The review describes major processing aspects of ME technology, definition and understanding of the amorphous state, manufacturability, analytical characterization and biopharmaceutical performance testing to better understand the strength and weakness of this formulation strategy for poorly soluble drugs. In addition, this paper highlights the potential advantages of employing a fusion of techniques, including pharmaceutical co-crystals and spray drying/solvent evaporation, facilitating the design of formulations of API exhibiting specific physico-chemical characteristics. Finally, the review presents some successful case studies of commercialized ME based products. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of granulation technologies for an API with poor physical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalziel, Gena; Nauka, Ewa; Zhang, Feng; Kothari, Sanjeev; Xie, Minli

    2013-07-01

    Granulation technologies are widely used in solid oral dosage forms to improve the physical properties during manufacture. Wet, dry, and melt granulation techniques were assessed for Compound A, a BCS class II compound. Characterization techniques were used to quantify physical property limitations inherent for Compound A including hygroscopicity, low solubility and bulk density, and poor powder flowability. High shear aqueous wet granulation induced an undesirable water mediated phase transition of the solid form. A formulation and process for dry granulation by roller compaction was developed and scaled to 10 kg batch size. Roll force, and roll gap parameters were assessed. Porosity of compacted ribbons was analyzed by mercury intrusion porosimetry, and particle size distributions of milled ribbons by sieve analysis. A roll force of 15 kN/cm produced granules with higher density and improved flow properties compared to the pre-blend. Fines content (granulation to 26% post-granulation. Cohesive properties of Compound A limited drug loading (API:excipient ratio) in roller compaction to 0.6:1 or less. Hot melt granulation by extrusion assessed with four polymers. A vast improvement in drug loading of 4:1 was achieved via melt processes using low molecular weight thermo-binders (glyceryl behenate and Polyethylene glycol 4000). Granules produced by melt processing contained less fines compared to wet and dry granulation. Both roller compaction and melt extrusion are viable granulation process alternatives for scale up to overcome the physical property limitations of Compound A.

  6. Influence of the dopamine agonist alpha-dihydroergocryptine on the pharmacokinetics of levodopa in patients with Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minea, D; Varga, [No Value; Falup-Pecurariu, C; de Mey, C; Retzow, A; Althaus, M

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated whether chronic coadministration of alpha -dihydroergocryptine (DHEC) altered the plasma pharmacokinetics of individualized treatments with levodopa in 12 patients with Parkinson's disease. Steady-state pharmacokinetics of plasma levodopa (L-Dopa) under combined treatment

  7. An Evaluation of Using Population Pharmacokinetic Models to Estimate Pharmacodynamic Parameters for Propofol and Bispectral Index in Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppens, Marc J.; Eleveld, Douglas J.; Proost, Johannes H.; Marks, Luc A. M.; Van Bocxlaer, Jan F. P.; Vereecke, Hugo; Absalom, Anthony R.; Struys, Michel M. R. F.

    Background: To study propofol pharmacodynamics in a clinical setting a pharmacokinetic model must be used to predict drug plasma concentrations. Some investigators use a population pharmacokinetic model from existing literature and minimize the pharmacodynamic objective function. The purpose of the

  8. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Levornidazole in Elderly Subjects and Dosing Regimen Evaluation Using Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Beining; He, Gaoli; Wu, Xiaojie; Yu, Jicheng; Cao, Guoying; Li, Yi; Fan, Yaxin; Chen, Yuancheng; Shi, Yaoguo; Zhang, Yingyuan; Zhang, Jing

    2017-07-01

    Levornidazole, the levo-isomer of ornidazole, is a third-generation nitroimidazole derivative newly developed after metronidazole, tinidazole, and ornidazole. An open-label, parallel-controlled, single-dose study was conducted for the investigation of the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of levornidazole and its metabolites in healthy elderly Chinese subjects, and for the evaluation of 2 dosing regimens in the elderly. Levornidazole was intravenously administered at 500 mg to healthy elderly (aged 60-80 years) or young subjects (aged 19-45 years). The PK profiles of levornidazole and its metabolites in elderly subjects were evaluated and compared with those in the young group. WinNonlin software was used for simulating the PK profile of levornidazole in the elderly population following the dosing regimens of 500 mg BID and 750 mg once daily for 7 days. Monte Carlo simulation was used for estimating the cumulative fraction of response and probability of target attainment of both dosing regimens against Bacteroides spp. The C max , AUC 0-24, and AUC 0-∞ values of levornidazole in the elderly group were 11.98 μg/mL, 131.36 μg·h/mL, and 173.61 μg·h/mL, respectively. The t 1/2 , CL t , and mean residence time from time 0 to infinity were 12.21 hours, 2.91 L/h, and 16.46 hours. The metabolic ratios of metabolites (M) 1, 2, 4, and 6 were 90% against B fragilis and other Bacteroides spp, and the probability of target attainment was >90% when the minimum inhibitory concentration was ≤1 μg/mL, in both groups. No dosing regimen adjustment is suggested when levornidazole is used in elderly patients with normal hepatic functioning and mild renal dysfunction. The findings from the PK/PD analysis imply that both regimens may achieve satisfactory clinical and microbiological efficacy against anaerobic infections in elderly patients. Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (http://www.chictr.org.cn) identifier: ChiCTR-OPC-16007938. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All

  9. Soya phospholipid complex of mangiferin enhances its hepatoprotectivity by improving its bioavailability and pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sauvik; Ahmmed, Sk Milan; Saha, Bishnu Pada; Mukherjee, Pulok K

    2014-05-01

    Mangiferin is a xanthonoid present in Mangifera indica. It has been reported for a variety of pharmacological activities, including hepatoprotection. However, the major disadvantage of mangiferin is its reduced biological activity due to poor absorption, low bioavailability and rapid elimination from the body after administration. The aim of this study was to prepare a phospholipid complex of mangiferin to overcome these limitations and to investigate the impact of the complex on hepatoprotective activity and bioavailability. The results showed that the complex has an enhanced hepatoprotective and in vivo antioxidant activity as compared to pure mangiferin at the same dose level (30 and 60 mg kg⁻¹). The complex restored the levels of serum hepatic marker enzymes and liver antioxidant enzymes with respect to carbon tetrachloride-treated animals. The complex also increased the bioavailability of mangiferin in rat serum by 9.75-fold compared to pure mangiferin at the same dose level and enhanced the elimination half-life (t(1/2 el)) from 1.71 ± 0.12 h⁻¹ to 3.52 ± 0.27 h⁻¹. The results suggested that the complexation of mangiferin with soya phospholipid enhanced the hepatoprotection and in vivo antioxidant activity, which may be due to the improved bioavailability and pharmacokinetics of mangiferin in rat serum. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Voriconazole Intravenous-to-Oral Switch Regimens in Immunocompromised Japanese Pediatric Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Ryoji; Kato, Koji; Maeda, Naoko; Fukushima, Keitaro; Goto, Hiroaki; Inoue, Masami; Muto, Chieko; Okayama, Akifumi; Watanabe, Kenichi; Liu, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of voriconazole following intravenous-to-oral switch regimens used with immunocompromised Japanese pediatric subjects (age 2 to voriconazole every 12 h (q12h), and 9 mg/kg (maximum, 350 mg) of oral voriconazole q12h (for patients age 2 to voriconazole q12h and 200 mg of oral voriconazole q12h (for patients age 12 to voriconazole exposures were comparable between these two groups due to large interindividual variability. The exposures in the 2 cytochrome P450 2C19 poor metabolizers were among the highest. Voriconazole was well tolerated. The most common treatment-related adverse events were photophobia and abnormal hepatic function. These recommended doses derived from the modeling appear to be appropriate for Japanese pediatric patients, showing no additional safety risks compared to those with adult patients. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01383993.) PMID:25451051

  11. Physicochemical, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluations of novel ternary solid dispersion of rebamipide with poloxamer 407.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chun-Woong; Tung, Nguyen-Thach; Rhee, Yun-Seok; Kim, Ju-Young; Oh, Tack-Oon; Ha, Jung-Myung; Chi, Sang-Cheol; Park, Eun-Seok

    2013-06-01

    This study was conducted primarily to improve the solubility of rebamipide, a poorly water-soluble anti-ulcer drug, using novel ternary solid dispersion (SD) systems and secondly to evaluate the effect of solubility enhancement on its pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) profile. After dissolving the three components in aqueous medium, ternary SD containing the drug, sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and PVP-VA 64 was achieved by spray drying method, which was used as primary SD. Poloxamer 407, a surfactant polymer, was incorporated in this primary SD by four different methods: co-grinding, physical mixing, melting or spray drying. SD was then characterized by dissolution test, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The spray dried SD of poloxamer 407 together with primary SD displayed highest dissolution rate of the drug of about 70% after 2 h. DSC, PXRD and FT-IR characterized the amorphous state and molecular dispersion of the drug in the SD. PK and PD studies in Sprague-Dawley rats revealed that the bioavailability of the drug using optimal SD was about twofold higher than that of reference product, and the irritation area of stomach was significantly reduced in the ulcer-induced rat model using optimal SD as compared to the reference product.

  12. Pharmacokinetic study and bioavailability of a novel synthetic trioxane antimalarial compound 97/63 in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Hari Narayan; Mohan, Neel Kamal; Sharma, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Shio Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Single dose pharmacokinetics study of 97/63 (IND191710, 2004), a trioxane antimalarial developed by Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow, India, was studied in rats following intravenous and oral administration. Serum samples were analysed by HPLC-UV assay. Separation was achieved on a RP-18 column attached with a guard using acetonitrile : phosphate buffer (70 : 30% v/v) with UV detector at wavelength 244 nm. Serum samples were extracted with n-hexane. Two-compartment model without lag time and first-order elimination rate was considered to be the best fit to explain the generated oral and intravenous data. Method was sensitive with limit of quantification of 10 ng mL(-1). Recovery was >74%. Terminal half-life and area under curve (AUC) after administering single oral (72 mg kg(-1)) and intravenous (18 mg kg(-1)) doses were 10.61 h, 10.57 h, and 1268.97 ng h mL(-1), 2025.75 ng h mL(-1), respectively. After oral dose, 97/63 was rapidly absorbed attaining maximum concentration 229.24 ng mL(-1) at 1 h. Bioavailability of 97/63 was ~16%. The lower bioavailability of drug may be due to poor solubility and first-pass metabolism and can be improved by prodrug formation of 97/63.

  13. How poor are women in rural India?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajuladevi, A K

    1992-07-01

    The assessment of poor women in India as dependent and exploited regardless of poverty focused strategies is reflected in this review of relevant literature. The scholarly approaches to the problems of poor women involve redirection and expansion of resources to women (increase bank credit) through policy and institutional changes, and involve improving women's welfare through changes in class and gender hierarchies; both pertain to restructuring power groups. A little ascribed to belief is that the organization of women's numbers will empower women; the constraints are stated. There is also some argument over whether to design women-specific programs or integrate women into existing programs; some examples are given of successes and difficulties. The regionalization of poverty in eastern and central India is discussed. The growth of the poor has been among the landless, wage-dependent households. 9.6% of households (7.5 million) are headed by women. Women work fewer hours and at lower wage scales and have fewer employment opportunities. Lower earnings are coupled with differentials in demand for female and male labor in agriculture and a crowded labor market. There is a concentration of women in less visible, nonmonetary subsistence production and domestic work. Women are undercounted in employment studies. Women predominate in agricultural activity. Women's status is influenced by economic status, caste, and ethnic background. Domestic work increases status for women and households. The poorer households have greater labor force participation, particularly as wage laborers rather than unpaid family workers. Regional factors affecting rural household strategies are factors affecting the economy (topography, rainfall, climate) and the degree of development, plus sociocultural variables (kinship and religious beliefs which affect the social domain of women), and the degree of dependence on hired vs. family labor. There are sharp contrasts in the value and survival

  14. The Nordic version of working poor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilsøe, Anna

    ) and 2014 (after the financial crisis). We examine the changes in worker profiles (age, sex, ethnicity, education) to identify new groups of workers and the changes in working conditions (pay, working hours, contract, tenure) to locate trends of erosion. Focus is on workers in retail and hotels......The development of service economies in the Western world has led to a debate on the quality of new service jobs as many are low-wage jobs with poor working conditions and career opportunities (Westergaard-Nielsen 2008; Gautié & Schmitt 2009; Kalleberg 2011). Empirical and theoretical work has...... identified new segments of workers in private services at the bottom of the labour market like the ‘emergent service workers’ or the ‘precariat’ in the UK or the ‘working poor’ in the US and Germany (Klein & Rones 1989; Palier & Thelen 2010; Savage et al. 2013; Standing 2011). Although the incidence of low...

  15. Detonation velocity in poorly mixed gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokhorov, E. S.

    2017-10-01

    The technique for computation of the average velocity of plane detonation wave front in poorly mixed mixture of gaseous hydrocarbon fuel and oxygen is proposed. Here it is assumed that along the direction of detonation propagation the chemical composition of the mixture has periodic fluctuations caused, for example, by layered stratification of gas charge. The technique is based on the analysis of functional dependence of ideal (Chapman-Jouget) detonation velocity on mole fraction (with respect to molar concentration) of the fuel. It is shown that the average velocity of detonation can be significantly (by more than 10%) less than the velocity of ideal detonation. The dependence that permits to estimate the degree of mixing of gas mixture basing on the measurements of average detonation velocity is established.

  16. Poor Metacognitive Awareness of Belief Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Michael B; Williams, Todd J

    2017-09-12

    When people change beliefs as a result of reading a text, are they aware of these changes? This question was examined for beliefs about spanking as an effective means of discipline. In two experiments, subjects reported beliefs about spanking effectiveness during a prescreening session. In a subsequent experimental session, subjects read a one-sided text that advocated a belief consistent or inconsistent position on the topic. After reading, subjects reported their current beliefs and attempted to recollect their initial beliefs. Subjects reading a belief inconsistent text were more likely to change their beliefs than those who read a belief consistent text. Recollections of initial beliefs tended to be biased in the direction of subjects' current beliefs. In addition, the relationship between the belief consistency of the text read and accuracy of belief recollections was mediated by belief change. This belief memory bias was independent of on-line text processing and comprehension measures, and indicates poor metacognitive awareness of belief change.

  17. Management of poor quality irrigation water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Change, M.H.; Leghari, A.M.; Sipio, Q.A.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of poor quality drainage effluent on moderately saline sodic, medium textured soil at different growth stages of wheat and cotton is reported. The irrigation treatments were: I) All canal irrigations, II) one irrigation of 75 mm with saline drainage effluent (EC = 3 dS m1) after four weeks sowing of the crop, III) one irrigation of 75 mm with saline drainage effluent after seven weeks sowing of the crop, and IV) one irrigation of 75 mm with saline drainage effluent after ten weeks sowing of the crop. The treatments receiving saline water gave significant decrease in crop yields as compared to canal irrigation treatment. The higher yield of wheat and seed cotton was recorded T1 followed by T2, T3 and T4. The trend of produce was T1< T2< T3< T4 respectively. Electrical conductivity of the soil (Ece) in T1 was decreased and in other three treatments was increased, whereas, pH decreased in T1 and T2. The SAR of soil decreased in all the treatments as compared with initial values. Treatment receiving an irrigation with saline water after four weeks of sowing (T2) was better in reducing soil salinity as compared to treatments receiving such water after 7 or 10 weeks os sowing. Poor quality water (EC = 3 d Sm/sup -1/) can be managed for irrigation after four weeks of swing of crops provided certain soil and water management practices like good seed bed preparation and proper drainage measures are adopted. (author)

  18. Breastfeeding Practices among Poor Women in Mesoamerica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombara, Danny V; Hernández, Bernardo; Gagnier, Marielle C; Johanns, Casey; Desai, Sima S; Haakenstad, Annie; McNellan, Claire R; Palmisano, Erin B; Ríos-Zertuche, Diego; Schaefer, Alexandra; Zúñiga-Brenes, Paola; Zyznieuski, Nicholas; Iriarte, Emma; Mokdad, Ali H

    2015-08-01

    Breastfeeding is an effective intervention to reduce pediatric morbidity and mortality. The prevalence of practices and predictors of breastfeeding among the poor in Mesoamerica has not been well described. We estimated the prevalence of ever breastfeeding, early initiation of breastfeeding, exclusive breastfeeding, and breastfeeding between 6 mo and 2 y of age using household survey data for the poorest quintile of families living in 6 Mesoamerican countries. We also assessed the predictors of breastfeeding behaviors to identify factors amenable to policy interventions. We analyzed data from 12,529 children in Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico (Chiapas State), Nicaragua, Panama, and El Salvador using baseline survey data from the Salud Mesoamérica 2015 Initiative. We created multivariable Poisson regression models with robust variance estimates to calculate adjusted risk ratios (aRRs) and 95% CIs for breastfeeding outcomes and to control for sociodemographic and healthcare-related factors. Approximately 97% of women in all countries breastfed their child at least once, and 65.1% (Nicaragua) to 79.0% (Panama) continued to do so between 6 mo and 2 y of age. Breastfeeding in the first hour of life varied by country (P < 0.001), with the highest proportion reported in Panama (89.8%) and the lowest in El Salvador (65.6%). Exclusive breastfeeding also varied by country (P = 0.037), ranging from 44.5% in Panama to 76.8% in Guatemala. For every 20% increase in the proportion of peers who exclusively breastfed, there was an 11% (aRR: 1.11, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.18) increase in the likelihood of exclusive breastfeeding. Our study revealed significant variation in the prevalence of breastfeeding practices by poor women across countries surveyed by the Salud Mesoamérica 2015 initiative. Future interventions to promote exclusive breastfeeding should consider ways to leverage the role of the community in supporting individual women. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  19. Individual and population pharmacokinetic compartment analysis: a graphic procedure for quantification of predictive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eksborg, Staffan

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic studies are important for optimizing of drug dosing, but requires proper validation of the used pharmacokinetic procedures. However, simple and reliable statistical methods suitable for evaluation of the predictive performance of pharmacokinetic analysis are essentially lacking. The aim of the present study was to construct and evaluate a graphic procedure for quantification of predictive performance of individual and population pharmacokinetic compartment analysis. Original data from previously published pharmacokinetic compartment analyses after intravenous, oral, and epidural administration, and digitized data, obtained from published scatter plots of observed vs predicted drug concentrations from population pharmacokinetic studies using the NPEM algorithm and NONMEM computer program and Bayesian forecasting procedures, were used for estimating the predictive performance according to the proposed graphical method and by the method of Sheiner and Beal. The graphical plot proposed in the present paper proved to be a useful tool for evaluation of predictive performance of both individual and population compartment pharmacokinetic analysis. The proposed method is simple to use and gives valuable information concerning time- and concentration-dependent inaccuracies that might occur in individual and population pharmacokinetic compartment analysis. Predictive performance can be quantified by the fraction of concentration ratios within arbitrarily specified ranges, e.g. within the range 0.8-1.2.

  20. The pharmacokinetic profile of inhaled and oral salbutamol in elite athletes with asthma and nonasthmatic subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elers, Jimmi; Pedersen, Lars; Henninge, John

    2012-01-01

    Data on pharmacokinetics of inhaled and oral salbutamol in elite athletes with asthma are needed to differentiate between therapeutic use and doping in doping control.......Data on pharmacokinetics of inhaled and oral salbutamol in elite athletes with asthma are needed to differentiate between therapeutic use and doping in doping control....

  1. Influence of Bariatric Surgery on the Use and Pharmacokinetics of Some Major Drug Classes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yska, Jan Peter; van der Linde, Susanne; Tapper, Veronique V.; Apers, Jan A.; Emous, Marloes; Totte, Erik R.; Wilffert, Bob; van Roon, Eric N.

    The purpose of this review is to evaluate the influence of bariatric surgery on the use and pharmacokinetics of some frequently used drugs. A PubMed literature search was conducted. Literature was included on influence of bariatric surgery on pharmacoepidemiology and pharmacokinetics. Drug classes

  2. Impact of Sample Size on the Performance of Multiple-Model Pharmacokinetic Simulations▿

    OpenAIRE

    Tam, Vincent H.; Kabbara, Samer; Yeh, Rosa F.; Leary, Robert H.

    2006-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are increasingly used to predict pharmacokinetic variability of antimicrobials in a population. We investigated the sample size necessary to provide robust pharmacokinetic predictions. To obtain reasonably robust predictions, a nonparametric model derived from a sample population size of ≥50 appears to be necessary as the input information.

  3. Influence of amifostine on the pharmacokinetics of cisplatin in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korst, A.E.C.; Sterre, M.L.T. van der; Gall, H.E.; Fichtinger-Schepman, A.M.J.; Vermorken, J.B.; Vijgh, W.J.F. van der

    1998-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of cisplatin was investigated in 13 patients receiving 18 courses of cisplatin alone or in combination with amifostine to investigate the influence of amifostine (WR 2721; Ethyol) on the pharmacokinetics of cisplatin. Cisplatin was administered as a 1-h i.v. infusion, whereas

  4. Plasma paracetamol concentrations and pharmacokinetics following rectal administration in neonates and young infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom Giedsing; O'Brien, K; Morton, N S

    1999-01-01

    Despite widespread use in children pharmacokinetic data about paracetamol are relatively scarce, not the least in the youngest age groups. This study aimed to describe plasma paracetamol concentrations and pharmacokinetics of a single rectal paracetamol dose in neonates and young infants....

  5. 40 CFR 795.232 - Inhalation and dermal pharmacokinetics of commercial hexane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... nonenzymatic processes by which a particular substance is handled in the body. (3) Pharmacokinetics means the... for all pharmacokinetics and metabolism studies described in this rule, except for the bioavailability...”, published in the 1986 Annual Book of ASTM Standards: Petroleum Products and Lubricants, ASTM D 1836-83, pp...

  6. "Managing" the poor: neoliberalism, Medicaid HMOs and the triumph of consumerism among the poor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskovsky, J

    2000-10-01

    In order to explore the contradictions of neoliberal health policy, this article examines Medicaid managed care in Philadelphia. At the federal and state levels, government is increasingly promoting private-sector market-based strategies over policies formerly associated with the welfare state, arguing that the former are the most effective means of achieving economic growth and guaranteeing social welfare. A prime example of this shift, Medicaid managed care is a policy by which states contract with private-sector health maintenance organizations to provide health coverage to the poor. Drawing on ethnographic and historical data, this paper shows how Pennsylvania's Medicaid managed care program has created access barriers for poor Philadelphians. It also illustrates how ideologies that justify this policy shift serve to mask its detrimental effects on the poor. By contrasting the state's consumerist model with one group's protest efforts, this article calls into question the neoliberal ideology that undergirds health and welfare "reform."

  7. Poor mental health status and aggression are associated with poor driving behavior among male traffic offenders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdoli N

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Nasrin Abdoli,1,2 Vahid Farnia,3 Ali Delavar,4 Alirez Esmaeili,5 Fariborz Dortaj,4 Noorali Farrokhi,4 Majid Karami,6 Jalal Shakeri,3 Edith Holsboer-Trachsler,7 Serge Brand7,8 1International University of Imam Reza, Mashhad, 2Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, 3Substance Abuse Prevention Research Center, Psychiatry Department, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, 4Allameh Tabataba’i University, Tehran, 5Police University, Tehran, 6Baharestan Research Center, Kermanshah Transportation Terminal, Kermanshah, Iran, 7Center for Affective, Stress and Sleep Disorders, Psychiatric Clinics of the University of Basel, Basel, 8Department of Sport and Health Science, Sport Science Section, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland Background: In Iran, traffic accidents and deaths from traffic accidents are among the highest in the world, and generally driver behavior rather than either technical failures or environmental conditions are responsible for traffic accidents. In the present study, we explored the extent to which aggressive traits, health status, and sociodemographic variables explain driving behavior among Iranian male traffic offenders. Method: A total of 443 male driving offenders (mean age: M =31.40 years, standard deviation =9.56 from Kermanshah (Iran took part in the study. Participants completed a questionnaire booklet covering sociodemographic variables, traits of aggression, health status, and driving behavior. Results: Poor health status, such as symptoms of depression, anxiety, insomnia, and social dysfunction, and also higher levels of trait aggression explained poor driving behavior. Multiple regressions indicated that poor health status, but not aggression, independently predicted poor driving behavior. Conclusion: Results suggest that health status concerns are associated with poor driving behavior. Prevention and intervention might therefore focus on drivers reporting poor mental health status

  8. Understanding the Hysteresis Loop Conundrum in Pharmacokinetic / Pharmacodynamic Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louizos, Christopher; Yáñez, Jaime A.; Forrest, Laird; Davies, Neal M.

    2015-01-01

    Hysteresis loops are phenomena that sometimes are encountered in the analysis of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic relationships spanning from pre-clinical to clinical studies. When hysteresis occurs it provides insight into the complexity of drug action and disposition that can be encountered. Hysteresis loops suggest that the relationship between drug concentration and the effect being measured is not a simple direct relationship, but may have an inherent time delay and disequilibrium, which may be the result of metabolites, the consequence of changes in pharmacodynamics or the use of a non-specific assay or may involve an indirect relationship. Counter-clockwise hysteresis has been generally defined as the process in which effect can increase with time for a given drug concentration, while in the case of clockwise hysteresis the measured effect decreases with time for a given drug concentration. Hysteresis loops can occur as a consequence of a number of different pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms including tolerance, distributional delay, feedback regulation, input and output rate changes, agonistic or antagonistic active metabolites, uptake into active site, slow receptor kinetics, delayed or modified activity, time-dependent protein binding and the use of racemic drugs among other factors. In this review, each of these various causes of hysteresis loops are discussed, with incorporation of relevant examples of drugs demonstrating these relationships for illustrative purposes. Furthermore, the effect that pharmaceutical formulation has on the occurrence and potential change in direction of the hysteresis loop, and the major pharmacokinetic / pharmacodynamic modeling approaches utilized to collapse and model hysteresis are detailed. PMID:24735761

  9. Population pharmacokinetics of adefovir dipivoxil tablets in healthy Chinese volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jihan; Zhang, Yaping; Huang, Xiaohui; Li, Lujin; Li, Yunfei; Wang, Kun; Yang, Juan; He, Yingchun; Lv, Yinghua; Zheng, Qingshan

    2014-01-01

    To develop a population pharmacokinetic model of adefovir dipivoxil in healthy volunteers and evaluate the effect of individual factors on the pharmacokinetics of adefovir dipivoxil. Plasma concentration data collected from 32 healthy Chinese subjects in a Phase I clinical study was pooled. Subjects received a single oral dose of 10 mg, 20 mg, or 30 mg adefovir dipivoxil, or multiple doses of 10 mg once a day for 9 days. Plasma concentrations of adefovir dipivoxil were measured using a validated liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric method. A nonlinear mixed-effect model was used to analyze the plasma concentration data of adefovir dipivoxil in healthy volunteers and to calculate the relevant parameters as well as inter- and intra-individual variability. The time course of adefovir dipivoxil concentration is best described by a first-order absorption and first-order elimination two-compartment model with lag time. The final estimate of total body clearance (CL) is 56.9 L/h and 78.7 L/h for single and multiple dosing regimen, respectively; the volume distribution of the central compartment (V2) is 106 L; inter-compartmental clearance (Q) is 220 L/h; volume distribution of the peripheral compartment (V3) is 498 L and 800 L for single and multiple dosing regimen, respectively; absorption rate is 0.509 h-1; and lag time is 0.315 hours. The inter-individual variabilities of CL and V2 were 22.4% and 58.9%, respectively. The proportional error of residual variability is 14.1% and the additive error is 0.30 ng/L. The final pharmacokinetic model was evaluated using a bootstrap method. A nonlinear mixed effect model for oral adefovir dipivoxil formulations was developed in healthy Chinese subjects. A multiple dosing regimen may significantly increase the body clearance and volume distribution of the peripheral compartment compared to a single dosing regimen. *These authors contribute equally to this work.

  10. Developmental pharmacokinetics of propylene glycol in preterm and term neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cock, Roosmarijn F W; Knibbe, Catherijne A J; Kulo, Aida; de Hoon, Jan; Verbesselt, Rene; Danhof, Meindert; Allegaert, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Propylene glycol (PG) is often applied as an excipient in drug formulations. As these formulations may also be used in neonates, the aim of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics of propylene glycol, co-administered intravenously with paracetamol (800 mg PG/1000 mg paracetamol) or phenobarbital (700 mg PG/200 mg phenobarbital) in preterm and term neonates. A population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed based on 372 PG plasma concentrations from 62 (pre)term neonates (birth weight (bBW) 630-3980 g, postnatal age (PNA) 1-30 days) using NONMEM 6.2. The model was subsequently used to simulate PG exposure upon administration of paracetamol or phenobarbital in neonates (gestational age 24-40 weeks). In a one compartment model, birth weight and PNA were both identified as covariates for PG clearance using an allometric function (CL(i) = 0.0849 × {(bBW/2720)(1.69) × (PNA/3)(0.201)}). Volume of distribution scaled allometrically with current bodyweight (V(i) = 0.967 × {(BW/2720)(1.45)}) and was estimated 1.77 times higher when co-administered with phenobarbital compared with paracetamol. By introducing these covariates a large part of the interindividual variability on clearance (65%) as well as on volume of distribution (53%) was explained. The final model shows that for commonly used dosing regimens, the population mean PG peak and trough concentrations range between 33-144 and 28-218 mg l(-1) (peak) and 19-109 and 6-112 mg l(-1) (trough) for paracetamol and phenobarbital formulations, respectively, depending on birth weight and age of the neonates. A pharmacokinetic model was developed for PG co-administered with paracetamol or phenobarbital in neonates. As such, large variability in PG exposure may be expected in neonates which is dependent on birth weight and PNA. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  11. Human pharmacokinetics of ethynyl estradiol 3-sulfate and 17-sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldzieher, J W; Mileikowsky, G; Newburger, J; Dorantes, A; Stavchansky, S A

    1988-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters of ethynyl estradiol 3-sulfate (EE-3) and 17-sulfate (EE-17) were estimated. Each sulfate was administered orally and intravenously to five ovariectomized volunteer women. Blood samples were taken over a period of 24 h. Radioimmunoassay for free and sulfoconjugated ethynyl estradiol (EE) was performed. The analysis of the plasma concentrations obtained after administration of EE-3 and EE-17 indicates significant differences in their pharmacokinetic profiles. EE-3 is cleared more rapidly from the central compartment (systemic circulation), which may indicate that differences in protein binding, tissue binding, metabolism, and distribution exist between EE-3 and EE-17. It has been suggested that these conjugates are a slow-release reservoir for maintenance of blood levels of free EE itself. However, previous studies in baboons have shown that the half-lives of the free and sulfoconjugated EE are similar (ranging from 8.8 to 11.2 h), which is not consistent with this hypothesis. The t1/2 beta (mean 9.28 h) of the 17-sulfate after IV administration was almost identical in women and baboons, and similar to the t1/2 beta of free EE, confirming the previous observation. Only 3.4% of IV and 11.4% of the orally administered 17-sulfate appeared in the blood as free EE; with the 3-sulfate, the conversions were 13.7 and 20.7%, respectively, suggesting that these sulfates are not important slow-release reservoirs. The similarity of pharmacokinetic parameters between women and baboons suggests that this species of nonhuman primate is, in important respects, a suitable animal model for clinical pharmacology.

  12. Pharmacokinetics Interaction between Imatinib and Genistein in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of orally administered genistein on the pharmacokinetics of imatinib and N-desmethyl imatinib in rats. Twenty-five healthy male SD (Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups: A group (control group, B group (multiple dose of 100 mg/kg genistein for consecutive 15 days, C group (multiple dose of 50 mg/kg genistein for consecutive 15 days, D group (a single dose of 100 mg/kg genistein, and E group (a single dose of 50 mg/kg genistein. A single dose of imatinib is administered orally 30 min after administration of genistein (100 mg/kg or 50 mg/kg. The pharmacokinetic parameters of imatinib and N-desmethyl imatinib were calculated by DAS 3.0 software. The multiple dose of 100 mg/kg or 50 mg/kg genistein significantly (P<0.05 decreased the AUC0-t and Cmax of imatinib. AUC0-t and the Cmax of N-desmethyl imatinib were also increased, but without any significant difference. However, the single dose of 100 mg/kg or 50 mg/kg genistein has no effect on the pharmacokinetics of imatinib and N-desmethyl imatinib. Those results indicated that multiple dose of genistein (100 mg/kg or 50 mg/kg induces the metabolism of imatinib, while single dose of genistein has no effect.

  13. Steady-state pharmacokinetics and metabolism of voriconazole in patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Marcus J P; Egerer, Gerlinde; Burhenne, Jürgen; Riedel, Klaus-Dieter; Weiss, Johanna; Mikus, Gerd

    2013-11-01

    Voriconazole exhibits non-linear pharmacokinetics in adults and is said to be mainly metabolized by CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 to voriconazole-N-oxide. The aim of this study was to obtain data on steady-state pharmacokinetics after dosing for at least 14 days in patients taking additional medication and in vivo data on metabolites other than voriconazole-N-oxide. Thirty-one patients receiving voriconazole as regular therapeutic drug treatment during hospitalization participated in this prospective study. Pharmacokinetic profiles were obtained for the 12 h (dosing interval) after the first orally administered dose (400 mg) or (if possible and) after an orally administered maintenance dose (200 mg) following intake for at least 14 days (n = 14 after first dose; n = 23 after maintenance dose). Blood and urine samples were collected and the concentrations of voriconazole and three of its metabolites (the N-oxide, hydroxy-voriconazole and dihydroxy-voriconazole) were determined, as well as the CYP2C19 genotype of the patients. All other drugs taken by the participating patients were evaluated. A high variability of exposure (AUC) after the first dose was slightly reduced during steady-state dosing for voriconazole (82% to 71%) and the N-oxide (86% to 56%), remained high for hydroxy-voriconazole (79%) and even increased for dihydroxy-voriconazole (97% to 127%). In 16 of the 22 steady-state patients, trough plasma concentrations were steady state stayed almost constant. Hydroxylations of voriconazole seem to be quantitatively more important in its metabolism than N-oxidation. High variability in voriconazole exposure, as well as low steady-state trough plasma concentrations, suggest that the suggested steady-state dosage of 200 mg twice a day has to be increased to prevent disease progression. Therapeutic drug monitoring is probably necessary to optimize the voriconazole dose for individual patients.

  14. Pharmacokinetics and Bioavailability of Inhaled Esketamine in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonkman, Kelly; Duma, Andreas; Olofsen, Erik; Henthorn, Thomas; van Velzen, Monique; Mooren, René; Siebers, Liesbeth; van den Beukel, Jojanneke; Aarts, Leon; Niesters, Marieke; Dahan, Albert

    2017-10-01

    Esketamine is traditionally administered via intravenous or intramuscular routes. In this study we developed a pharmacokinetic model of inhalation of nebulized esketamine with special emphasis on pulmonary absorption and bioavailability. Three increasing doses of inhaled esketamine (dose escalation from 25 to 100 mg) were applied followed by a single intravenous dose (20 mg) in 19 healthy volunteers using a nebulizer system and arterial concentrations of esketamine and esnorketamine were obtained. A multicompartmental pharmacokinetic model was developed using population nonlinear mixed-effects analyses. The pharmacokinetic model consisted of three esketamine, two esnorketamine disposition and three metabolism compartments. The inhalation data were best described by adding two absorption pathways, an immediate and a slower pathway, with rate constant 0.05 ± 0.01 min (median ± SE of the estimate). The amount of esketamine inhaled was reduced due to dose-independent and dose-dependent reduced bioavailability. The former was 70% ± 5%, and the latter was described by a sigmoid EMAX model characterized by the plasma concentration at which absorption was impaired by 50% (406 ± 46 ng/ml). Over the concentration range tested, up to 50% of inhaled esketamine is lost due to the reduced dose-independent and dose-dependent bioavailability. We successfully modeled the inhalation of nebulized esketamine in healthy volunteers. Nebulized esketamine is inhaled with a substantial reduction in bioavailability. Although the reduction in dose-independent bioavailability is best explained by retention of drug and particle exhalation, the reduction in dose-dependent bioavailability is probably due to sedation-related loss of drug into the air.

  15. Pharmacokinetics of radioiodinated growth hormones in the turtle Chrysemys dorbigni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turyn, D; Da Silva, R S; Marques, M

    1999-04-01

    Growth hormone binding proteins (GHBP) have been identified in the blood of many species. The aim of the present work is to study the physiological role of the GHBP in the turtle serum which we recently described. Binding studies were carried out using in vivo pharmacokinetic and chromatographic techniques as well as in vitro methods. When (125)I-GH was injected in physiological concentration into Chrysemys dorbigni turtles, the first step of pharmacokinetics was the binding of a significant fraction of the labeled GH by the GHBPs present in serum. The decay curve followed a three compartments model and gave the equation: Ae(-alphat) + Be(-betat) + Ce(-gammat). The fast compartment with t(1/2) of 14.4 min or 25.2 min, for hGH and bGH represents 30.3% and 18.9% of total radioactivity, respectively, at hypothetical time zero (not experi mental). Chromatographic studies reveal that this rapid compartment represents free GH. The second and third compartments represent complex forms between GH and GHBPs present in the turtle serum, and represent 70% and 80% of total radioactivity for hGH and bGH, respectively. In vitro chromatographic studies showed direct evidence of the presence of GHBPs in the turtle serum. The presence of these GHBPs changed the pharmacokinetics of labeled GH in plasma and the subsequent liver uptake of GH. The labeled hGH or bGH binds to turtle serum in similar proportion, but maximal liver uptake of these hormones are completely different (L/B ratio of 9.2 +/- 0.6 (n = 5) for ( 125)I-hGH and 4.8 +/- 0.3 (n = 7) for (125)I-bGH). The reasons for these differences could be that human GH binds to lactogenic and somatotropic receptors and bovine GH binds only to somatotropic receptors.

  16. Formulation and pharmacokinetics of diclofenac lipid nanoemulsions for parenteral application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramreddy, Srividya; Kandadi, Prabhakar; Veerabrahma, Kishan

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to formulate and determine the pharmacokinetics of stable o/w parenteral lipid nanoemulsions (LNEs) of diclofenac acid used to treat arthritic conditions. The LNEs of diclofenac acid with a mean size ranging from 200 to 240 nm and a zeta potential of -29.4 ± 1.04 mV (negatively charged LNEs) and 62.1 ± 3.5 (positively charged LNEs) emulsions were prepared by hot homogenization and ultrasonication process. The influence of formulation variables, such as the change in proportion of cholesterol, was studied, and optimized formulations were developed. The optimized formulations were relatively stable during centrifugal stress, dilution stress, and storage. The drug content and entrapment efficiency were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. The in vitro drug release was carried out in phosphate-buffered saline pH 7.4 and cumulative amount of drug released was estimated using a UV-visible spectro-photometer. During in vivo pharmacokinetic studies in male Wistar rats, diclofenac serum concentration from LNEs was higher than that of Voveran injection and was detectable up to 12 h. Diclofenac in LNEs showed improved pharmacokinetic profile with increase in area under the curve, elimination half-life and mean residence time in comparison to Voveran. Our aim was to prepare and determine the pharmacokinetics of injectable lipid nanoemulsions of diclofenac acid for treating arthritic conditions by reducing the frequency of dosing and pain at site of injection. The nanoemulsions of diclofenac acid were prepared by homogenization and ultrasonication process. The sizes and charges of oil globules were determined. The effect of cholesterol on stability of emulsion was studied, and an optimized preparation was developed. The optimized formulations were stable during centrifugation, dilution, and storage. The total amount of drug in emulsion and percentage amount of drug present in emulsion globules were determined using

  17. Effect of orally administered probenecid on the pharmacokinetics of cefoxitin.

    OpenAIRE

    Vlasses, P H; Holbrook, A M; Schrogie, J J; Rogers, J D; Ferguson, R K; Abrams, W B

    1980-01-01

    To characterize the effect of orally administered probenecid on the pharmacokinetics of cefoxitin in healthy male volunteers, we administered to one group of six subjects 2 g of cefoxitin by intravenous (i.v.) bolus either alone, with 1 g of probenecid concomitantly, or when 1 g of probenecid was administered 1 h previously by using a crossover design. Likewise, we administered to a second group of six subjects 2 g of cefoxitin intramuscularly (i.m.) together with 1 and 2 g of probenecid. Pro...

  18. Interaction between tylosin and bentonite clay from a pharmacokinetic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devreese, Mathias; Osselaere, Ann; Goossens, Joline; Vandenbroucke, Virginie; De Baere, Siegrid; De Backer, Patrick; Croubels, Siska

    2012-12-01

    The interaction between bentonite and tylosin was investigated in broiler chickens, based on pharmacokinetic characteristics obtained in vivo. Simultaneous oral administration of bentonite and tylosin significantly lowered plasma levels of tylosin and reduced the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC(0-inf)), maximal plasma concentration (C(max)), time to maximal plasma concentration (T(max)) and relative oral bioavailability. The results prove unambiguously the binding of tylosin by bentonite. Simultaneous administration of tylosin (in the drinking water or feed) and bentonite (mixed in the feed as a mycotoxin binder) should therefore be avoided. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. CARVEDILOL POPULATION PHARMACOKINETIC ANALYSIS – APPLIED VALIDATION PROCEDURE

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    Aleksandra Catić-Đorđević

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Carvedilol is a nonselective beta blocker/alpha-1 blocker, which is used for treatment of essential hypertension, chronic stable angina, unstable angina and ischemic left ventricular dysfunction. The aim of this study was to describe carvedilol population pharmacokinetic (PK analysis as well as the validation of analytical procedure, which is an important step regarding this approach. In contemporary clinical practice, population PK analysis is often more important than standard PK approach in setting a mathematical model that describes the PK parameters. Also, it includes the variables that have particular importance in the drugs pharmacokinetics such as sex, body mass, dosage, pharmaceutical form, pathophysiological state, disease associated with the organism or the presence of a specific polymorphism in the isoenzyme important for biotransformation of the drug. One of the most frequently used approach in population PK analysis is the Nonlinear Modeling of Mixed Effects - NONMEM modeling. Analytical methods used in the data collection period is of great importance for the implementation of a population PK analysis of carvedilol in order to obtain reliable data that can be useful in clinical practice. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC analysis of carvedilol is used to confirm the identity of a drug and provide quantitative results and also to monitor the efficacy of the therapy. Analytical procedures used in other studies could not be fully implemented in our research as it was necessary to perform certain modification and validation of the method with the aim of using the obtained results for the purpose of a population pharmacokinetic analysis. Validation process is a logical terminal phase of analytical procedure development that provides applicability of the procedure itself. The goal of validation is to ensure consistency of the method and accuracy of results or to confirm the selection of analytical method for a given sample

  20. A pharmacokinetic study of diclofenac sodium in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing; Ma, He; Cen, Nannan; Zhou, Ai; Tao, Hengxun

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the pharmacokinetics of a single intravenous injection (i.v.) and oral administration (p.o.) of diclofenac sodium (DIC) in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Twelve male SD rats were divided into 2 groups (n=6 per group); one group was injected intravenously with 2 mg/kg DIC, whereas the other group was lavaged with 2 mg/kg DIC. Blood samples were collected prior to DIC delivery (0 h) and 0.033, 0.083, 0.167, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 h post-administration. Blood plasma samples were analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) following pretreatment to induce protein precipitation. Pharmacokinetics software was applied to calculate relevant pharmacokinetic parameters using a non-compartmental model. Following i.v. administration of DIC, the terminal elimination rate constant (λ z ), apparent terminal elimination half-life (t ½ ), area under the concentration-time curve from time 0 extrapolated to infinity (AUC0 -∞ ), clearance (CL), apparent volume of distribution (V z ), mean residence time (MRT), and apparent volume of distribution at steady state (V ss ) were 0.57±0.05 l/h, 1.22±0.11 h, 3356±238 h × ng/ml, 0.60±0.04 l/h, 1.05±0.10 l, 1.05±0.07 h and 0.63±0.07 l, respectively. Following p.o. administration of DIC, the λ z , t ½ , C max , t max , AUC 0-∞ , CL, V z , MRT were: 0.63±0.12 l/h, 1.12±0.18 h, 1272±112 ng/ml, 0.19±0.04 h, 2501±303 h × ng/ml, 0.81±0.10 l/h, 1.29±0.12 l, and 2.70±0.18 h, respectively. The pharmacokinetic parameters of i.v. and p.o. DIC in rats show that the drug is rapidly absorbed, distributed, and eliminated.

  1. A review on dronedarone: Pharmacological, pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Iram

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Dronedarone, a benzofuran containing chemical compound, is a derivative of amiodarone which is classified as a Class III antiarrhythmic agent. It is prescribed to the cardiovascular patients who have paroxysmal or persistent atrial fibrillation to lower the chances of hospitalization. Amiodarone, sotalol, procainamide dofetilide, quinidine, ibutilide, flecainide, and propafenone are the other useful medicinal products used to treat atrial fibrillation or cardiac arrhythmia. Dronedarone was approved for clinical use in atrial fibrillation by the Food and Drug Administration in 2009. The generic name for dronedarone is Multaq (Sanofi Aventis. This article briefly highlights the important pharmacological, pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of dronedarone.

  2. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of radiolabeled avidin, streptavidin and biotin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosebrough, S.F.

    1993-01-01

    The extraordinarily high affinity of avidin and streptavidin for biotin may be exploited in a two-step approach for delivering radiolabeled biotin derivatives suitable for imaging and therapy to target-bound streptavidin or avidin conjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). The in vivo pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of radiolabeled avidin, streptavidin (SA) and DTPA-biocytinamide (DTPA-biotin) were studied in the rabbit and dog. SA circulated in the blood similar to other 60 kDa proteins, avidin cleared immediately and DTPA-biotin exhibited plasma clearance by glomerular filtration. (author)

  3. Pharmacokinetics, efficacy prediction indexes and residue depletion of antibacterial drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Anadón

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacokinetics behaviour of the antibacterial in food producing animals, provides information on the rates of absorption and elimination, half-life in plasma and tissue, elimination pathways and metabolism. The dose and the dosing interval of the antimicrobial can be justified by considering the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD relationship, if established, as well as the severity of the disease, whereas the number of administrations should be in line with the nature of the disease. The target population for therapy should be well defined and possible to identify under field conditions. Based on in vitro susceptibility data, and target animal PK data, an analysis for the PK/PD relationship may be used to support dose regimen selection and interpretation criteria for a clinical breakpoint. Therefore, for all antibacterials with systemic activity, the MIC data collected should be compared with the concentration of the compound at the relevant biophase following administration at the assumed therapeutic dose as recorded in the pharmacokinetic studies. Currently, the most frequently used parameters to express the PK/PD relationship are Cmax/MIC (maximum serum concentration/MIC, %T > MIC (fraction of time in which concentration exceeds MIC and AUC/MIC (area under the inhibitory concentration– time curve/MIC. Furthermore, the pharmacokinetic parameters provide the first indication of the potential for persistent residues and the tissues in which they may occur. The information on residue depletion in food-producing animals, provides the data on which MRL recommendations will be based. A critical factor in the antibacterial medication of all food-producing animals is the mandatory withdrawal period, defined as the time during which drug must not be administered prior to the slaughter of the animal for consumption. The withdrawal period is an integral part of the regulatory authorities’ approval process and is designed to ensure that no

  4. The intravenous and oral pharmacokinetics of lotilaner in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline E. Toutain

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lotilaner is a new oral ectoparasiticide from the isoxazoline class developed for the treatment of flea and tick infestations in dogs. It is formulated as pure S-enantiomer in flavoured chewable tablets (Credelio™. The pharmacokinetics of lotilaner were thoroughly determined after intravenous and oral administration and under different feeding regimens in dogs. Methods Twenty-six adult beagle dogs were enrolled in a pharmacokinetic study evaluating either intravenous or oral administration of lotilaner. Following the oral administration of 20 mg/kg, under fed or fasted conditions, or intravenous administration of 3 mg/kg, blood samples were collected up to 35 days after treatment. The effects of timing of offering food and the amount of food consumed prior or after dosing on bioavailability were assessed in a separate study in 25 adult dogs. Lotilaner blood concentrations were measured using a validated liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS method. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by non-compartmental analysis. In addition, in vivo enantiomer stability was evaluated in an analytical study. Results Following oral administration in fed animals, lotilaner was readily absorbed and peak blood concentrations reached within 2 hours. The terminal half-life was 30.7 days. Food enhanced the absorption, providing an oral bioavailability above 80% and reduced the inter-individual variability. Moreover, the time of feeding with respect to dosing (fed 30 min prior, fed at dosing or fed 30 min post-dosing or the reduction of the food ration to one-third of the normal daily ration did not impact bioavailability. Following intravenous administration, lotilaner had a low clearance of 0.18 l/kg/day, large volumes of distribution Vz and Vss of 6.35 and 6.45 l/kg, respectively and a terminal half-life of 24.6 days. In addition, there was no in vivo racemization of lotilaner. Conclusions The pharmacokinetic

  5. Dolutegravir pharmacokinetics in pregnant and postpartum women living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Nikki; Best, Brookie M; Wang, Jiajia; Capparelli, Edmund V; Stek, Alice; Barr, Emily; Buschur, Shelley L; Acosta, Edward P; Smith, Elizabeth; Chakhtoura, Nahida; Burchett, Sandra; Mirochnick, Mark

    2018-03-27

    To evaluate dolutegravir pharmacokinetics during pregnancy compared with postpartum and in infant washout samples after delivery. Ongoing, nonrandomized, open-label, parallel-group, multicenter phase-IV prospective study of antiretroviral pharmacokinetics in HIV-infected pregnant women and infants. Intensive steady-state 24 h pharmacokinetic profiles after dolutegravir 50 mg once-daily were performed during the second trimester (2T), third trimester (3T) and postpartum. Maternal delivery and postnatal infant samples were collected after birth. Dolutegravir was measured by validated LC-MS/MS; quantitation limit was 0.005 μg/ml. A two-tailed Wilcoxon signed-rank test (α = 0.10) was employed for paired within-subject comparisons. Twenty-nine enrolled participants had a median age of 32 years (range 21-42). Pharmacokinetic data were available for 15 (2T), 28 (3T) and 23 (postpartum) women. Median dolutegravir AUC0-24,Cmax and C24 were 25-51% lower in the 2T and 3T compared with postpartum. The median cord blood/maternal plasma concentration ratio was 1.25 (n = 18). In 21 infants, median elimination half-life was 32.8 h after in utero exposure. Viral load at delivery was less than 50 copies/ml for 27/29 women (93%). Twenty-nine infants were HIV-negative. Renal abnormalities noted on ultrasound in two infants were deemed possibly related to dolutegravir. Dolutegravir exposure is lower in pregnancy compared with postpartum in the same women on once-daily dosing. Median AUC0-24 during pregnancy was similar to, whereas trough concentrations were lower than, those seen in nonpregnant adults. Trough concentrations in pregnancy were well above dolutegravir EC90 (0.064 μg/ml). Dolutegravir readily crosses the placenta. Infant elimination is prolonged, with half-life over twice that of historical adult controls.

  6. Pharmacokinetic of antimony in mice with cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borborema, Samanta E.T.; Nascimento, Nanci do [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares IPEN/CNEN-SP, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Biologia Molecular]. E-mails: samanta@usp.br; nnascime@ipen.br; Andrade Junior, Heitor F. de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares IPEN/CNEN-SP, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Biologia Molecular; Instituto de Medicina Tropical de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); E-mail: hfandrad@usp.br; Osso Junior, Joao A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares IPEN/CNEN-SP, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Radiofarmacia]. E-mail: jaosso@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL) remains a major world health problem, with about 1.5 million new cases each year. Caused by protozoa Leishmania, in South America, this infection can vary from a chronic skin ulcer, to an erosive mucosal disease and severe facial disfigurement. Pentavalent antimony (Sb{sup +5}) as sodium stibogluconate (Pentostam) or meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime) are main drugs for treating most forms of human leishmaniasis. For six decades, despite the recent developments, the effective therapy to cutaneous leishmaniasis has been based on long parenteral courses of such drugs, even though these are fairly costly, toxic and inconvenient to use, without adequate knowledge on their pharmacokinetics or mechanism of action. Pharmacokinetics studies could be based on bioactive traceable drugs, usually with radioactive isotopes, but antimony radioisotopes are unavailable commercially. Neutron irradiation is a powerful tool in the analysis of mineral content of samples, for antimony, there are at least two main isotopes that could be formed after neutron irradiation in nuclear reactor. The aim of the present study was to construct antimony salts with those radioisotopes to obtain tracers to compare the pharmacokinetic and the tissue distribution of neutron irradiated meglumine antimoniate in healthy and cutaneous leishmaniasis experimentally infected mice. Meglumine antimoniate, (Glucantime, Aventis, S.P, Brazil), was neutron irradiated inside the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor (IPEN/CNEN-SP), producing two radioisotopes {sup 122}Sb and {sup 124}Sb. Its biodistribution was verified in BALB/c mice experimentally infected with Leishmania (Leishmania) Amazonensis, which received a single intraperitoneal dose of the drug. At different times after injection, the tissues and blood were excised and activity measured in a NaI (Tl) scintillation counter. Compared with the healthy mice, experimentally infected mice had significantly lower maximum concentration of antimony

  7. Triprotic acid-base microequilibria and pharmacokinetic sequelae of cetirizine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marosi, Attila; Kovács, Zsuzsanna; Béni, Szabolcs; Kökösi, József; Noszál, Béla

    2009-06-28

    (1)H NMR-pH titrations of cetirizine, the widely used antihistamine and four related compounds were carried out and the related 11 macroscopic protonation constants were determined. The interactivity parameter between the two piperazine amine groups was obtained from two symmetric piperazine derivatives. Combining these two types of datasets, all the 12 microconstants and derived tautomeric constants of cetirizine were calculated. Upon this basis, the conflicting literature data of cetirizine microspeciation were clarified, and the pharmacokinetic absorption-distribution properties could be interpreted. The pH-dependent distribution of the microspecies is provided.

  8. A novel phenylphthalimide derivative, pegylated TC11, improves pharmacokinetic properties and induces apoptosis of high-risk myeloma cells via G2/M cell-cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aida, Shuji; Hozumi, Masashi; Ichikawa, Daiju; Iida, Kazuki; Yonemura, Yuko; Tabata, Noriko; Yamada, Taketo; Matsushita, Maiko; Sugai, Takeshi; Yanagawa, Hiroshi; Hattori, Yutaka

    2017-11-04

    Despite the development of new drugs for multiple myeloma (MM), the prognosis of MM patients with high-risk cytogenetic abnormalities such as t (4; 14) and del17p remains poor. We reported that a novel phenylphthalimide derivative, TC11, induced apoptosis of MM cells in vitro and in vivo, and TC11 directly bound to α-tubulin and nucleophosmin-1 (NPM1). However, TC11 showed low water solubility and poor pharmacokinetic properties. Here we synthesized a water-soluble TC11-derivative, PEG(E)-TC11, in which HOEtO-TC11 is pegylated with PEG through an ester bond, and we examined its anti-myeloma activity. We observed that PEG(E)-TC11 and its hydrolyzed product, HOEtO-TC11, induced G2/M arrest and the apoptosis of MM cells. Intraperitoneal administration of PEG(E)-TC11 to xenografted mice revealed improved pharmacokinetic properties and significantly delayed tumor growth. TC11 and its derivatives did not bind to cereblon (CRBN), which is a responsible molecule for thalidomide-induced teratogenicity. These results suggest that PEG(E)-TC11 is a good candidate drug for treating high-risk MM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of new Saccharomyces cerevisiae variants of the MET2 and SKP2 genes controlling the sulfur assimilation pathway and the production of undesirable sulfur compounds during alcoholic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Jessica; Sanchez, Isabelle; Blondin, Bruno

    2015-05-08

    Wine yeasts can produce undesirable sulfur compounds during alcoholic fermentation, such as SO2 and H2S, in variable amounts depending mostly on the yeast strain but also on the conditions. However, although sulfur metabolism has been widely studied, some of the genetic determinants of differences in sulfite and/or sulfide production between wine yeast strains remain to be identified. In this study, we used an integrated approach to decipher the genetic determinants of variation in the production of undesirable sulfur compounds. We examined the kinetics of SO2 production by two parental strains, one high and one low sulfite producer. These strains displayed similar production profiles but only the high-sulfite producer strain continued to produce SO2 in the stationary phase. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that the low-sulfite producer strain overexpressed genes of the sulfur assimilation pathway, which is the mark of a lower flux through the pathway consistent with a lower intracellular concentration in cysteine. A QTL mapping strategy then enabled us to identify MET2 and SKP2 as the genes responsible for these phenotypic differences between strains and we identified new variants of these genes in the low-sulfite producer strain. MET2 influences the availability of a metabolic intermediate, O-acetylhomoserine, whereas SKP2 affects the activity of a key enzyme of the sulfur assimilation branch of the pathway, the APS kinase, encoded by MET14. Furthermore, these genes also affected the production of propanol and acetaldehyde. These pleiotropic effects are probably linked to the influence of these genes on interconnected pathways and to the chemical reactivity of sulfite with other metabolites. This study provides new insight into the regulation of sulfur metabolism in wine yeasts and identifies variants of MET2 and SKP2 genes, that control the activity of both branches of the sulfur amino acid synthesis pathway and modulate sulfite/sulfide production and other

  10. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the reverse transcriptase inhibitor tenofovir and prophylactic efficacy against HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulav Duwal

    Full Text Available Antiviral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP through daily drug administration can protect healthy individuals from HIV-1 infection. While PrEP was recently approved by the FDA, the potential long-term consequences of PrEP implementation remain entirely unclear. The aim of this study is to predict the efficacy of different prophylactic strategies with the pro-drug tenofovir-disoproxil-fumarate (TDF and to assess the sensitivity towards timing- and mode of TDF administration (daily- vs. single dose, adherence and the number of transmitted viruses. We developed a pharmacokinetic model for TDF and its active anabolite tenofovir-diphosphate (TFV-DP and validated it with data from 4 different trials, including 4 distinct dosing regimes. Pharmacokinetics were coupled to an HIV model and viral decay following TDF mono-therapy was predicted, consistent with available data. Subsequently, a stochastic approach was used to estimate the % infections prevented by (i daily TDF-based PrEP, (ii one week TDF started either shortly before, or -after viral exposure and (iii a single dose oral TDF before viral challenge (sd-PrEP. Analytical solutions were derived to assess the relation between intracellular TFV-DP concentrations and prophylactic efficacy. The predicted efficacy of TDF was limited by a slow accumulation of active compound (TFV-DP and variable TFV-DP half-life and decreased with increasing numbers of transmitted viruses. Once daily TDF-based PrEP yielded [Formula: see text]80% protection, if at least 40% of pills were taken. Sd-PrEP with 300 mg or 600 mg TDF could prevent [Formula: see text]50% infections, when given at least before virus exposure. The efficacy dropped to [Formula: see text]10%, when given 1 h before 24 h exposure. Efficacy could not be increased with increasing dosage or prolonged administration. Post-exposure prophylaxis poorly prevented infection. The use of drugs that accumulate more rapidly, or local application of tenofovir gel may

  11. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of the Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor Tenofovir and Prophylactic Efficacy against HIV-1 Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duwal, Sulav; Schütte, Christof; von Kleist, Max

    2012-01-01

    Antiviral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) through daily drug administration can protect healthy individuals from HIV-1 infection. While PrEP was recently approved by the FDA, the potential long-term consequences of PrEP implementation remain entirely unclear. The aim of this study is to predict the efficacy of different prophylactic strategies with the pro-drug tenofovir-disoproxil-fumarate (TDF) and to assess the sensitivity towards timing- and mode of TDF administration (daily- vs. single dose), adherence and the number of transmitted viruses. We developed a pharmacokinetic model for TDF and its active anabolite tenofovir-diphosphate (TFV-DP) and validated it with data from 4 different trials, including 4 distinct dosing regimes. Pharmacokinetics were coupled to an HIV model and viral decay following TDF mono-therapy was predicted, consistent with available data. Subsequently, a stochastic approach was used to estimate the % infections prevented by (i) daily TDF-based PrEP, (ii) one week TDF started either shortly before, or -after viral exposure and (iii) a single dose oral TDF before viral challenge (sd-PrEP). Analytical solutions were derived to assess the relation between intracellular TFV-DP concentrations and prophylactic efficacy. The predicted efficacy of TDF was limited by a slow accumulation of active compound (TFV-DP) and variable TFV-DP half-life and decreased with increasing numbers of transmitted viruses. Once daily TDF-based PrEP yielded 80% protection, if at least 40% of pills were taken. Sd-PrEP with 300 mg or 600 mg TDF could prevent 50% infections, when given at least before virus exposure. The efficacy dropped to 10%, when given 1 h before 24 h exposure. Efficacy could not be increased with increasing dosage or prolonged administration. Post-exposure prophylaxis poorly prevented infection. The use of drugs that accumulate more rapidly, or local application of tenofovir gel may overcome the need for drug administration long before virus

  12. A novel engineered VEGF blocker with an excellent pharmacokinetic profile and robust anti-tumor activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Lily; Yu, Haijia; Huang, Xin; Tan, Hongzhi; Li, Song; Luo, Yan; Zhang, Li; Jiang, Sumei; Jia, Huifeng; Xiong, Yao; Zhang, Ruliang; Huang, Yi; Chu, Charles C; Tian, Wenzhi

    2015-01-01

    Relatively poor penetration and retention in tumor tissue has been documented for large molecule drugs including therapeutic antibodies and recombinant immunoglobulin constant region (Fc)-fusion proteins due to their large size, positive charge, and strong target binding affinity. Therefore, when designing a large molecular drug candidate, smaller size, neutral charge, and optimal affinity should be considered. We engineered a recombinant protein by molecular engineering the second domain of VEGFR1 and a few flanking residues fused with the Fc fragment of human IgG1, which we named HB-002.1. This recombinant protein was extensively characterized both in vitro and in vivo for its target-binding and target-blocking activities, pharmacokinetic profile, angiogenesis inhibition activity, and anti-tumor therapeutic efficacy. HB-002.1 has a molecular weight of ~80 kDa, isoelectric point of ~6.7, and an optimal target binding affinity of <1 nM. The pharmacokinetic profile was excellent with a half-life of 5 days, maximal concentration of 20.27 μg/ml, and area under the curve of 81.46 μg · days/ml. When tested in a transgenic zebrafish embryonic angiogenesis model, dramatic inhibition in angiogenesis was exhibited by a markedly reduced number of subintestinal vessels. When tested for anti-tumor efficacy, HB-002.1 was confirmed in two xenograft tumor models (A549 and Colo-205) to have a robust tumor killing activity, showing a percentage of inhibition over 90% at the dose of 20 mg/kg. Most promisingly, HB-002.1 showed a superior therapeutic efficacy compared to bevacizumab in the A549 xenograft model (tumor inhibition: 84.7% for HB-002.1 versus 67.6% for bevacizumab, P < 0.0001). HB-002.1 is a strong angiogenesis inhibitor that has the potential to be a novel promising drug for angiogenesis-related diseases such as tumor neoplasms and age-related macular degeneration

  13. Pharmacokinetic Studies in Neonates: The Utility of an Opportunistic Sampling Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, Stéphanie; Turner, Mark A; Guellec, Chantal Barin-Le; Hill, Helen; van den Anker, Johannes N; Kearns, Gregory L; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne; Zhao, Wei

    2015-12-01

    The use of an opportunistic (also called scavenged) sampling strategy in a prospective pharmacokinetic study combined with population pharmacokinetic modelling has been proposed as an alternative strategy to conventional methods for accomplishing pharmacokinetic studies in neonates. However, the reliability of this approach in this particular paediatric population has not been evaluated. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the performance of an opportunistic sampling strategy for a population pharmacokinetic estimation, as well as dose prediction, and compare this strategy with a predetermined pharmacokinetic sampling approach. Three population pharmacokinetic models were derived for ciprofloxacin from opportunistic blood samples (SC model), predetermined (i.e. scheduled) samples (TR model) and all samples (full model used to previously characterize ciprofloxacin pharmacokinetics), using NONMEM software. The predictive performance of developed models was evaluated in an independent group of patients. Pharmacokinetic data from 60 newborns were obtained with a total of 430 samples available for analysis; 265 collected at predetermined times and 165 that were scavenged from those obtained as part of clinical care. All datasets were fit using a two-compartment model with first-order elimination. The SC model could identify the most significant covariates and provided reasonable estimates of population pharmacokinetic parameters (clearance and steady-state volume of distribution) compared with the TR and full models. Their predictive performances were further confirmed in an external validation by Bayesian estimation, and showed similar results. Monte Carlo simulation based on area under the concentration-time curve from zero to 24 h (AUC24)/minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) using either the SC or the TR model gave similar dose prediction for ciprofloxacin. Blood samples scavenged in the course of caring for neonates can be used to estimate

  14. [Pharmacokinetic research strategies of compatibilities and synergistic effects of classical Danshen herb pairs based on pharmacokinetics of "Danshen-Bingpian" and "Danshen-Honghua"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cui-Ying; Ren, Wei-Guang

    2017-06-01

    Herb pairs are usual clinical compatibility forms and one of compound prescription sources in Chinese medicine. Pharmacokinetic research in vivo is one of the important items in elucidating the mechanism for synergistic and attenuated mechanisms of herb pairs. The paper comprehensively summarized and systemized the pharmacokinetic researches of marker-ingredients about Danshen-Honghua and Danshen-Bingpian in order to elucidate the rationality and scientificity of herb pairs and provide some feasible suggestions on the pharmacokinetics of drugs in the future. In view of complicated system of Traditional Chinese medicines and a chemical system that is not separated from its natural state, comparative pharmacokinetic researches on marker-ingredients from the herb pairs are reasonable to elucidate the synergistic and attenuated mechanisms of monarch-subjects compatible herbs and monarch-guide compatible herbs. Such pharmacokinetic research can better explain the mechanism of drug compatibility, while the pharmacokinetic researches based on the monomer chemical compositions and marker-ingredients that have been separated from complex chemical environment of traditional Chinese Medicine are still unreasonable and should be discussed deeply. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  15. Poor education linked with teen pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westall, J

    1997-02-22

    Two reports concerning socioeconomic factors associated with adolescent pregnancy have been released: a study from the NHS Centre for Reviews and Dissemination at the University of York; and a survey from the Alan Guttmacher Institute, a non-profit reproductive health analysis organization in New York. The first report associates truancy, low academic achievement and poor sex education with the high pregnancy rate in Britain among women 15-19 years old. The rate is the highest in western Europe, although the rate of conceptions in Britain among women 16-19 years old has declined since 1990 and is currently 56.8 per 1000. For girls under 16 years old, a group targeted by the British government's Health of the Nation strategy to achieve a conception rate of 4.8 per 1000 by the year 2000, the rate has remained steady for the last 20 years and stands at 8.3 per 1000. The report calls for better school-based sex education and for improved access to confidential contraceptive services for young people. The second report, an international survey, shows that the number of teenage pregnancies worldwide is declining (although 15 million babies, 10% unplanned, are born annually to teenage mothers), and that women with a higher education level tend to delay marriage and childbearing. A figure compares the percentages of women 20-24 years old who gave birth by age 20 for 4 educational levels (less than 7 years, greater than or equal to 7 years, less than 12 years, greater than or equal to 12 years) for Ghana, Kenya, Zimbabwe, Bangladesh, Egypt, Indonesia, the Philippines, Bolivia, Brazil, Columbia, Mexico, France, Japan, and the United States. Teenage pregnancy in both reports was associated with poor social, economic, and health outcomes for mother and child. According to the second report, the risk of maternal death during childbirth is 2-4 times greater for mothers 17 and younger, in comparison to mothers age 20 and older. Dr. Kathleen Kiernan, a senior research fellow at

  16. Fabrication of surfactant-stabilized nanosuspension of naringenin to surpass its poor physiochemical properties and low oral bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mayank Kumar; Pooja, Deep; Ravuri, Halley Gora; Gunukula, Anusha; Kulhari, Hitesh; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2018-02-01

    Nanosuspension is a biphasic system consisting of native drug particles dispersed in an aqueous surfactant or polymeric solution with a particle size between 10 to 1000 nm. In contrast to other drug delivery systems, nanosuspension offer the unique advantage of increasing solubility of the native drug resulting into faster drug absorption and hence achieving faster maximum plasma concentration. The present study aims to evaluate surfactants/polymer stabilized nanosuspensions of naringenin (NN), a phytomedicine, to surpass its poor physiochemical properties and low oral bioavailability. Optimization and characterization (DLS, SEM, PXRD and DSC) of nanosuspensions followed by in-vitro drug dissolution studies and pharmacokinetic study in male Sprague-Dawley rats were performed. Nanosuspensions were prepared by precipitation-ultrasonication method with varying concentrations of different surfactants and polymer such as sodium cholate (SC), sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), poly ethylene glycol 4000 (PEG), polysorbate 80 (Tween ® 80), poloxomer-188 and D-α-Tocopherol polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS or Vitamin E-TPGS). Nanosuspension prepared with 0.5% w/v d-α-Tocopherol polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPNS) and 7.5 mg NN, showed the smallest size of 118.1 ± 2.7 nm. TPNS showed increase in drug dissolution in simulated gastric fluid pH 1.2 (SGF) and phosphate buffer pH 6.8 (PB). TPNS demonstrated an improved pharmacokinetic profile compared to pure NN resulting 2.14 and 3.76 folds increase in C max and AUC, respectively. In addition, TPNS were stable over a period of six months. The developed formulation strategy of nanosuspension could be exploited to improve the solubility and bio-availability of poorly soluble NN and other phytomedicines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. The Affordable Housing Crisis: Residential Mobility of Poor Families and School Mobility of Poor Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Sheila

    2003-01-01

    Helping poor families increase their residential stability can have direct bearing on school stability and student academic achievement. Discusses the role of housing in child and family wellbeing; residential mobility and school performance; residential mobility and housing problems; housing affordability; (federal housing policy); homeownership;…

  18. Poorly Understood Aspects of Striated Muscle Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alf Månsson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle contraction results from cyclic interactions between the contractile proteins myosin and actin, driven by the turnover of adenosine triphosphate (ATP. Despite intense studies, several molecular events in the contraction process are poorly understood, including the relationship between force-generation and phosphate-release in the ATP-turnover. Different aspects of the force-generating transition are reflected in the changes in tension development by muscle cells, myofibrils and single molecules upon changes in temperature, altered phosphate concentration, or length perturbations. It has been notoriously difficult to explain all these events within a given theoretical framework and to unequivocally correlate observed events with the atomic structures of the myosin motor. Other incompletely understood issues include the role of the two heads of myosin II and structural changes in the actin filaments as well as the importance of the three-dimensional order. We here review these issues in relation to controversies regarding basic physiological properties of striated muscle. We also briefly consider actomyosin mutation effects in cardiac and skeletal muscle function and the possibility to treat these defects by drugs.

  19. Poor, Old “Physical Education”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Earle F. Zeigler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of physical activity (and related health education (“poor, old ‘PE’” needs to assert its "will to win" more vigorously then ever before. Scholarly and scientific investigation of the past 60 years since Sputnik was launched in 1957 has identified a wide variety of findings proving that a quality program can provide highly important benefits to the growing child and youth. Societal developments, including other curricular demands, have undoubtedly created uneasiness within the overall field of education. In North America the time and attention devoted to the relatively few involved in external highly competitive sport for the few has been a negative factor. At the same time intramural athletics for the large majority of children and youth has not been available to the extent it should be. There is now doubt as to the field’s ability to achieve high status within education. Therefore, we must pledge ourselves to make still greater efforts to become vibrant and stirring through absolute dedication and commitment in our professional endeavors. Ours is a high calling since we seek to improve the quality of life for all people on earth through the finest type of human motor performance in exercise, sport, and related expressive movement.

  20. Isolated microalbuminuria indicates a poor medical prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheven, Lieneke; Van der Velde, Marije; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J; De Jong, Paul E; Gansevoort, Ron T

    2013-07-01

    Microalbuminuria is often regarded as a sign of end-organ damage due to diabetes and/or hypertension, and as such to be associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular events. It has been questioned whether isolated microalbuminuria, that is microalbuminuria in the absence of a cardiovascular disease (CVD) history, hypertension and diabetes has clinical relevance. Included were 8356 subjects who participated in the first four screening rounds of the PREVEND study, a prospective, community-based, observational cohort study. Isolated microalbuminuria was defined as microalbuminuria (30-300 mg/24 h), in the absence of a CVD history, hypertension (blood pressuredefinition of isolated microalbuminuria, in which 2250 person-years of follow-up were available. In subjects with isolated microalbuminuria, the incidence rates of cardiovascular events and mortality, hypertension and diabetes were 15.3, 28.9 and 8.9 per 1000 person-year follow-up, respectively. Subjects with isolated microalbuminuria had an increased risk for cardiovascular events and mortality [crude HR 2.23 (1.63-3.07); Phypertension [OR 1.95 (1.47-2.59); Phypertension and/or diabetes. This increased risk remained significant after adjustment for age and gender. The relative risk held by isolated microalbuminuria was similar to the relative risk held by microalbuminuria in subjects that did have a CVD history, hypertension and/or diabetes. Isolated microalbuminuria indicates a poor prognosis and warrants medical attention.