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Sample records for underwent valve replacement

  1. [Evaluation of the antithrombotic strategy in low thrombotic risk patients who underwent aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceves-Velázquez, Eduardo; Vieyra-Herrera, Gerardo; Rodríguez-Chávez, Laura; Herrera-Alarcón, Valentín

    2017-07-16

    According to current guidelines, in patients without additional risk factors who have undergone aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis, anticoagulation in the first 3 months after surgery is still a matter of debate. According to current evidence, aspirin in low doses is a reasonable alternative to vitamin K antagonists (VKA). A comparison is made between the incidence of thrombotic and haemorrhagic complications in patients with low thrombotic risk who underwent aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis in the National Institute of Cardiology of Ignacio Chávez of Mexico. The hypothesis: aspirin as monotherapy has a beneficial effect compared to VKA. The studied patients were the low thrombotic risk patients who underwent aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis in the National Institute of Cardiology of Ignacio Chávez of Mexico from 2011 to 2015. The groups studied were: aspirin only, VKA only, and the combination of VKA plus aspirin. The patients were retrospectively followed-up for 12 months, and the thrombotic and haemorrhagic complications were documented. Of the 231 patients included in the study, only one patient in the VKA only group presented with a haemorrhagic complication. No thrombotic complications were observed. In the present study no thrombotic complications were observed in patients who did not receive anticoagulation in the first 3 months after an aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis after a follow up period of 12 months. This suggests that the use of aspirin only is safe during this period. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  2. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/007684.htm Transcatheter aortic valve replacement To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is surgery to replace the aortic valve. ...

  3. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foghsgaard, Signe; Schmidt, Thomas Andersen; Kjaergard, Henrik K

    2009-01-01

    In this descriptive prospective study, we evaluate the outcomes of surgery in 98 patients who were scheduled to undergo minimally invasive aortic valve replacement. These patients were compared with a group of 50 patients who underwent scheduled aortic valve replacement through a full sternotomy...... operations were completed as mini-sternotomies, 4 died later of noncardiac causes. The aortic cross-clamp and perfusion times were significantly different across all groups (P replacement...... is an excellent operation in selected patients, but its true advantages over conventional aortic valve replacement (other than a smaller scar) await evaluation by means of randomized clinical trial. The "extended mini-aortic valve replacement" operation, on the other hand, is a risky procedure that should...

  4. Mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement in Octogenarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Tasoglu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study analyzes the long-term outcomes of mechanical aortic valve replacement in octogenarian patients. Material and Method: A retrospective review was performed on 23 octogenarian patients who underwent mechanical aortic valve replacement. Hospital mortality, postoperative intensive care unit stay, hospital stay and long-term results was examined. Estimates of the cumulative event mortality rate were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The mean age of all patients was 82.9±2.3 years and most were men (65.22%. The median ejection fraction was 45%. 73.91% of patients were in New York Heart Association class III-IV. Thirteen patients (56.52% in this study underwent combined procedure, the remaining 10 (43.48% patients underwent isolated aortic valve replacement. The most common valve size was 23 mm. The mean intensive care unit stay was 1.76±1.14 days. The mean hospital stay was 9.33±5.06 days. No complications were observed in 56.52% patients during their hospital stay. The overall hospital mortality was 8.7%. Follow-up was completed for all 23 patients. Median follow-up time was 33 months (1-108 months. Actuarial survival among discharged from hospital was 59% at 5 years. Discussion: Mechanical aortic valve replacement is a safe procedure in octogenarian patients and can be performed safely even in combined procedure.

  5. Aortic valve replacement in octogenarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dark John H

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Aims As our population ages and life expectancy increases the number of people aged over 80 and more referred for cardiac surgery is growing. This study sought to identify the outcome of aortic valve replacement (AVR in octogenarians. Methods 68 patients aged 80 years or more underwent AVR at the Freeman Hospital, between April 2001 and April 2004. A retrospective review of the notes and outcomes from the patients' GP and the NHS strategic tracking service was performed. 54% (37 underwent isolated AVR whilst 46% (31 underwent combined AVR and CABG. Results Follow up was 100% complete. The mean age was 83.1 ± s.d. 2.9 years, a mean gradient of 83 ± s.d. 31 mmHg and mean AVA of 0.56 cm2. The mean additive EuroSCORE was 8.6 ± s.d. 1.2, the logistic EuroSCORE mean 12.0 ± s.d. 5.9. In hospital 30 day mortality was 13 %. Survival was 80% at 1 year and 78% at 2 years. Median follow up was for 712 days. Stepwise logistic regression identified chronic obstructive airways disease as an independent predictor of mortality (p Conclusion Our study demonstrates that the operative mortality for AVR in the over eighties is good, whilst the mid to long term outcome is excellent There is a very low attrition rate with those undergoing the procedure living as long than their age matched population. This study confirms AVR is a safe, acceptable treatment for octogenarians with excellent mid term outcomes.

  6. Aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Athanasiou, Thanos; Mestres, Carlos A

    2008-01-01

    mortality were collected. Group analysis by patient geographic distribution and by annular diameter of the prosthesis utilized was conducted. Patients with a manufacturer's labeled prosthesis size > or = 21 mm were assigned to the 'large' aortic size subset, while those with a prosthesis size ... differences in the distribution of either gender or BSA. In the multivariable model, south European patients were seven times more likely to receive a smaller-sized aortic valve (OR = 6.5, 95% CI = 4.82-8.83, p

  7. Aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis caused by alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroyoshi, Junko; Saito, Aya; Panthee, Nirmal; Imai, Yasushi; Kawashima, Dai; Motomura, Noboru; Ono, Minoru

    2013-03-01

    We report a case of aortic stenosis associated with ochronosis in a 70-year-old man who underwent biologic aortic valve replacement. Intraoperative findings included ochronosis of a severely calcified pigmented aortic valve along with pigmentation of the intima of the aorta. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Leaving Moderate Tricuspid Valve Regurgitation Alone at the Time of Pulmonary Valve Replacement: A Worthwhile Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogon, Brian; Mori, Makoto; Alsoufi, Bahaaldin; Kanter, Kirk; Oster, Matt

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary valve disruption in patients with tetralogy of Fallot and congenital pulmonary stenosis often results in pulmonary insufficiency, right ventricular dilation, and tricuspid valve regurgitation. Management of functional tricuspid regurgitation at the time of subsequent pulmonary valve replacement remains controversial. Our aims were to (1) analyze tricuspid valve function after pulmonary valve replacement through midterm follow-up and (2) determine the benefits, if any, of concomitant tricuspid annuloplasty. Thirty-five patients with tetralogy of Fallot or congenital pulmonary stenosis were analyzed. All patients had been palliated in childhood by disrupting the pulmonary valve, and all patients had at least moderate tricuspid valve regurgitation at the time of subsequent pulmonary valve replacement. Preoperative and serial postoperative echocardiograms were analyzed. Pulmonary and tricuspid regurgitation, along with right ventricular dilation and dysfunction were scored as 0 (none), 1 (mild), 2 (moderate), and 3 (severe). Right ventricular volume and area were also calculated. Comparisons were made between patients who underwent pulmonary valve replacement alone and those who underwent concomitant tricuspid valve annuloplasty. At 1 month after pulmonary valve replacement, there were significant reductions in pulmonary valve regurgitation (mean 3 vs 0.39, p tricuspid valve regurgitation (mean 2.33 vs 1.3, p tricuspid regurgitation 1 month postoperatively between patients who underwent concomitant tricuspid annuloplasty and those who underwent pulmonary valve replacement alone (mean 1.31 vs 1.29, p = 0.81). However, at latest follow-up (mean 7.0 ± 2.8 years), the degree of tricuspid regurgitation was significantly higher in the concomitant annuloplasty group (mean 1.87 vs 1.12, p = 0.005). In patients with at least moderate tricuspid valve regurgitation, significant improvement in tricuspid valve function and right ventricular size occurs in the first

  9. Análise da evolução tardia de 291 pacientes submetidos a substituição valvar por próteses metálicas Late follow-up of 291 patients who underwent heart valve replacement with mechanical valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M. A Brandão

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available No período de janeiro de 1980 a dezembro de 1993, 291 pacientes foram submetidos a substituição valvar por próteses metálicas, no Instituto do Coração do HCFMUSP. Cento e oitenta e sete (64,3% pacientes eram do sexo masculino, com idade variando de 2 meses a 78 anos (média de 38,3 +/-18,5. A etiologia das lesões foi reumática em 132 (45,4% pacientes. Foram realizadas 201 substituições da valva aórtica, 77 da valva mitral, 15 duplas substituições mitro-aórticas, 2 substituições da valva tricúspide, 1 dupla substituição mitro-tricuspídea e 1 tríplice substituição mitro-aórtico-tricuspídea, totalizando 315 substituições valvares. Cirurgias associadas foram realizadas em 164 (56,4% pacientes, sendo a mais freqüente a correção de aneurisma de aorta ascendente em 49 (16,8% pacientes Cento e quarenta e um (48,4% pacientes foram submetidos anteriormente a cirurgias valvares. Os pacientes foram avaliados clinicamente no pós-operatório tardio, segundo a classe funcional (NYHA e o aparecimento de complicações relacionadas às próteses e à anticoagulação. A mortalidade imediata foi de 36 (12,4% pacientes. Foram estudados 159 pacientes no pós-operatório tardio, com um tempo médio de evolução de 40,6 meses (10078 meses/paciente. As taxas linearizadas para tromboembolismo, hemorragia relacionada à anticoagulação, óbito tardio, endocardite, escape paravalvar e hemólise no pós-operatório tardio foram, respectivamente, 1,33%, 0,95%, 1,9%, 0,19%, 0,57% e 0,57% pacientes/ano. A curva actuarial de sobrevida em 14 anos é de 63,8%. Oitenta e dois porcento dos pacientes encontram-se em classe funcional I no pós-operatório tardio. Podemos concluir que os nossos resultados foram bastante satisfatórios com a utilização de próteses metálicas.Between January 1980 and December 1993, 291 patients underwent valve replacement with mechanical valves in the Heart Institute of HCFMUSP. One hundred and eighty seven (64

  10. Infective endocarditis following percutaneous pulmonary valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheung, Gary; Vejlstrup, Niels; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2013-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) following percutaneous pulmonary valve replacement (PPVR) with the Melody valve is rarely reported. Furthermore, there are challenges in this diagnosis; especially echocardiographic evidence of vegetation within the prosthesis may be difficult.......Infective endocarditis (IE) following percutaneous pulmonary valve replacement (PPVR) with the Melody valve is rarely reported. Furthermore, there are challenges in this diagnosis; especially echocardiographic evidence of vegetation within the prosthesis may be difficult....

  11. Aortic valve replacement and the stentless Freedom SOLO valve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wollersheim, L.W.L.M.

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis has become the most prevalent valvular heart disease in Europe and North America, and is generally caused by age-related calcification of the aortic valve. For most patients, severe symptomatic aortic stenosis needs effective mechanical relief in the form of valve replacement

  12. Factors influencing mortality after bioprosthetic valve replacement; a midterm outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadzadegan, Hassan; Javadzadegan, Amir; Mehdizadeh Baghbani, Jafar

    2013-01-01

    Although valve repair is applied routinely nowadays, particularly for mitral regurgitation (MR) or tricuspid regurgitation (TR), valve replacement using prosthetic valves is also common especially in adults. Unfortunately the valve with ideal hemodynamic performance and long-term durability without increasing the risk of bleeding due to long-term anticoagulant therapy has not been introduced. Therefore, patients and physicians must choose either bioprosthetic or mechanical valves. Currently, there is an increasing clinical trend of using bioprosthetic valves instead of mechanical valves even in young patients apparently because of their advantages. Seventy patients undergone valvular replacement using bioprosthetic valves were evaluated by ECG and Echocardiography to assess the rhythm and ejection fracture. Mean follow-up time was 33 months (min 9, max 92). Mortality rate was 25.9% (n=18) within 8 years of follow-up. Statistical analysis showed a significant relation between atrial fibrillation rhythm and mortality (P=0.02). Morbidities occurred in 30 patients (42.8%). Significant statistical relation was found between the morbidities and age over 65 years old (P=0.005). In follow-up period, 4 cases (5.7%) underwent re-operation due to global valve dysfunction. Our study shows that using biprosthetic valve could reduce the risk of morbidity occurrence in patient who needs valve replacement. However, if medical treatments fail, patients should be referred for surgery. This would reduce the risk of mortality because of lower incident of complications such as atrial fibrillation and morbidities due to younger patients' population.

  13. [Valve-sparing Replacement in Patients with Aortic Root Dilatation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Kazuhiro; Minatoya, Kenji; Ueda, Ryoma; Takehara, Masato; Sakamoto, Kazuhisa; Ide, Yujiro; Kanemitsu, Hideo; Ueyama, Koji; Ikeda, Tadashi

    2018-01-01

    Valve-sparing root replacement is increasingly used to overcome drawbacks associated with valvular prostheses. In our institution, 7 patients underwent valve-sparing root replacement from August 2016 to July 2017. The mean age was 45 years (range, 14~69 years). Three patients had Marfan syndrome and 1 had Loeys-Dietz syndrome with acute aortic dissection. All patients underwent surgery with reimplantation technique using a Valsalva graft. Two patients required repair of aortic valve leaflet prolapse. All patients had an excellent clinical course, with mild or no aortic regurgitation and a decrease in end-diastolic volume on echocardiography. These results support the continued use of valve-sparing root replacement in selected patients.

  14. A comparison of minimally invasive and standard aortic valve replacement.

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    Stoliński, Jarosław; Plicner, Dariusz; Grudzień, Grzegorz; Wąsowicz, Marcin; Musiał, Robert; Andres, Janusz; Kapelak, Bogusław

    2016-10-01

    The study objective was to compare aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy with aortic valve replacement through a median sternotomy. With propensity score matching, we selected 211 patients after aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy and 211 patients after aortic valve replacement who underwent operation between January 2010 and December 2013. Perioperative outcomes were analyzed, and multivariable logistic regression analysis of risk factors of postoperative morbidity was performed. For propensity score-matched patients, hospital mortality was 1.0% in the aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy group and 1.4% in the aortic valve replacement group (P = 1.000). Stroke occurred in 0.5% versus 1.4% (P = .615), myocardial infarction occurred in 1.4% versus 1.9% (P = 1.000), and new onset of atrial fibrillation occurred in 12.8% versus 24.2% (P = .003) of patients in the aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy and aortic valve replacement groups, respectively. Postoperative drainage was 353.5 ± 248.6 mL versus 544.3 ± 324.5 mL (P replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy and aortic valve replacement groups, respectively. Mediastinitis occurred in 2.8% of patients after aortic valve replacement and in 0.0% of patients after aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy surgery (P = .040). Intensive care unit stay (1.3 ± 1.2 days vs 2.6 ± 2.6 days) and hospital stay (5.7 ± 1.6 days vs 8.7 ± 4.4 days) were statistically significantly shorter in the aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy group. Aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy surgery resulted in reduced postoperative morbidity (odds ratio, 0.4; P replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy surgery resulted in a reduced infection rate, diminished postoperative bleeding and blood

  15. Valve assembly having remotely replaceable bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.R.; Tanner, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    A valve assembly having remotely replaceable bearings is disclosed wherein a valve disc is supported within a flow duct for rotation about a pair of axially aligned bearings, one of which is carried by a spindle received within a diametral bore in the valve disc, and the other of which is carried by a bearing support block releasably mounted on the duct circumferentially of an annular collar on the valve disc coaxial with its diametrical bore. The spindle and bearing support block are adapted for remote removal to facilitate servicing or replacement of the valve disc support bearings

  16. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mylotte, Darren; Osnabrugge, Ruben L J; Windecker, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The authors sought to examine the adoption of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in Western Europe and investigate factors that may influence the heterogeneous use of this therapy.......The authors sought to examine the adoption of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in Western Europe and investigate factors that may influence the heterogeneous use of this therapy....

  17. Bioprosthetic Valve Fracture Improves the Hemodynamic Results of Valve-in-Valve Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhatriwalla, Adnan K; Allen, Keith B; Saxon, John T; Cohen, David J; Aggarwal, Sanjeev; Hart, Anthony J; Baron, Suzanne J; Dvir, Danny; Borkon, A Michael

    2017-07-01

    Valve-in-valve (VIV) transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) may be less effective in small surgical valves because of patient/prosthesis mismatch. Bioprosthetic valve fracture (BVF) using a high-pressure balloon can be performed to facilitate VIV TAVR. We report data from 20 consecutive clinical cases in which BVF was successfully performed before or after VIV TAVR by inflation of a high-pressure balloon positioned across the valve ring during rapid ventricular pacing. Hemodynamic measurements and calculation of the valve effective orifice area were performed at baseline, immediately after VIV TAVR, and after BVF. BVF was successfully performed in 20 patients undergoing VIV TAVR with balloon-expandable (n=8) or self-expanding (n=12) transcatheter valves in Mitroflow, Carpentier-Edwards Perimount, Magna and Magna Ease, Biocor Epic and Biocor Epic Supra, and Mosaic surgical valves. Successful fracture was noted fluoroscopically when the waist of the balloon released and by a sudden drop in inflation pressure, often accompanied by an audible snap. BVF resulted in a reduction in the mean transvalvular gradient (from 20.5±7.4 to 6.7±3.7 mm Hg, P valve effective orifice area (from 1.0±0.4 to 1.8±0.6 cm 2 , P valves to facilitate VIV TAVR with either balloon-expandable or self-expanding transcatheter valves and results in reduced residual transvalvular gradients and increased valve effective orifice area. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Aortic valve replacement for Libman-Sacks endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Jack B; Janardhanan, Rajesh; Larsen, Brandon T; Khalpey, Zain

    2016-10-04

    A 24-year-old man with systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid syndrome complicated by lupus nephritis presented with acute limb ischaemia secondary to an embolus. Following embolectomy, the patient underwent a transthoracic echocardiogram which revealed a large vegetation on all three cusps of the aortic valve. The patient was taken for an urgent aortic valve replacement with a mechanical valve. Cultures of one cusp remained sterile. Histopathological examination of the remaining two cusps revealed sterile fibrin-rich thrombotic vegetations characteristic of non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  19. Heart valve replacements with regenerative capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkman, P.E.; Fioretta, E.S.; Frese, L.; Pasqualini, F.S.; Hoerstrup, S.P.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of severe valvular dysfunctions (e.g., stenosis and insufficiency) is increasing, leading to over 300,000 valves implanted worldwide yearly. Clinically used heart valve replacements lack the capacity to grow, inherently requiring repetitive and high-risk surgical interventions during

  20. Mechanical versus bioprosthetic aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Stuart J; Çelik, Mevlüt; Kappetein, A Pieter

    2017-07-21

    Mechanical valves used for aortic valve replacement (AVR) continue to be associated with bleeding risks because of anticoagulation therapy, while bioprosthetic valves are at risk of structural valve deterioration requiring reoperation. This risk/benefit ratio of mechanical and bioprosthetic valves has led American and European guidelines on valvular heart disease to be consistent in recommending the use of mechanical prostheses in patients younger than 60 years of age. Despite these recommendations, the use of bioprosthetic valves has significantly increased over the last decades in all age groups. A systematic review of manuscripts applying propensity-matching or multivariable analysis to compare the usage of mechanical vs. bioprosthetic valves found either similar outcomes between the two types of valves or favourable outcomes with mechanical prostheses, particularly in younger patients. The risk/benefit ratio and choice of valves will be impacted by developments in valve designs, anticoagulation therapy, reducing the required international normalized ratio, and transcatheter and minimally invasive procedures. However, there is currently no evidence to support lowering the age threshold for implanting a bioprosthesis. Physicians in the Heart Team and patients should be cautious in pursuing more bioprosthetic valve use until its benefit is clearly proven in middle-aged patients. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Options for Heart Valve Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Guide: Understanding Your Heart Valve Problem | Spanish Symptom Tracker | Spanish Pre-surgery Checklist | Spanish What Is Heart ... Cardiac Arrest: How Are They Different? 7 Warning Signs of a Heart Attack 8 Low Blood Pressure - ...

  2. Aorta-atria-septum combined incision for aortic valve re-replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yiwei; Ye, Xiaofeng; Li, Zhaolong

    2018-01-01

    This case report illustrates a patient who underwent supra-annular mechanical aortic valve replacement then suffered from prosthesis dysfunction, increasing pressure gradient with aortic valve. She was successfully underwent aortic valve re-replacement, sub-annular pannus removing and aortic annulus enlargement procedures through combined cardiac incision passing through aortic root, right atrium (RA), and upper atrial septum. This incision provides optimal visual operative field and simplifies dissection. PMID:29850170

  3. Imaging techniques in transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quaife RA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Robert A Quaife, Jennifer Dorosz, John C Messenger, Ernesto E Salcedo Division of Cardiology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: Calcific aortic stenosis is now understood as a complex valvular degenerative process sharing many risk factors with atherosclerosis. Once patients develop symptomatic calcific aortic stenosis, the only effective treatment is aortic valve replacement. In the past decade, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR has been developed as an alternative to surgery to treat severe calcific aortic stenosis. Cardiac imaging plays a pivotal role in the contemporary management of patients with calcific aortic stenosis, and particularly in patients being considered for TAVR, who demand detailed imaging of the aortic valve apparatus. In this review, we highlight the role of cardiac imaging for patient selection, procedural guidance, and evaluation of results of TAVR. Keywords: aortic stenosis, cardiovascular imaging, transcutaneous aortic valve replacement

  4. Preoperative computer tomography evaluation in transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groudeva, V.; Stoynova, V.; Trendafilova, D.; Dzhorgova, Y.; Nachev, G.

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement is rapidly emerging technique alternative to surgery in high risk patients. Imaging and especially computer tomography is important in preoperative assessment of the aortic ring and the prosthetic valve choice. The aim of this study is to share authors initial experience in CT assessment of the aortic ring prior to Transcatheter aortic valve replacement. 49 patients (mean age 76,55) underwent 320 rows MDCT (Acquilon One) prior TAVI. Protocol involved scanning from thoracic inlet to common femoral arteries. Aortic root size, aortic diameter at the level of coronary sinuses and the sinotubular junction and distance to coronary ostia were evaluated on a Vitrea work station. MDCT established maximal aortic ring diameter from 18 to 31 mm mean 25,04 mm while the lesser rate was from 16 to 21 mm. Accordingly positioned prostheses were in 34,75% No. 23, in 49% - No. 26 and in16,3% - No. 29. MDCT is crucial in aortic valve assessment prior to TAVI in experienced hands and multidisciplinary team. (authors) Key words: TRANSCATHETER AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT (TAVI). MDCT AORTIC VALVE ASSESSMENT

  5. Infective endocarditis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement-

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loh, Poay Huan; Bundgaard, Henning; S�ndergaard, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) can improve the symptoms and prognosis of patients with severe aortic stenosis who, due to a high expected operative risk, would not have otherwise been treated surgically. If these patients develop prosthetic valve endocarditis, their presentations may...... be atypical causing a delay in the diagnosis and treatment. The management is also complicated by their comorbidities, and surgical treatment may not be feasible leading to a significant morbidity and mortality. We describe a case of an 85-year-old man with TAVI prosthetic valve endocarditis successfully...

  6. [Reoperative valve replacement in patients undergoing cardiac reoperation: a report of 104 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Liang-jian; Xu, Zhi-yun; Wang, Zhi-nong; Lang, Xi-long; Han, Lin; Lu, Fang-lin; Xu, Ji-bin; Tang, Hao; Ji, Guang-yu; Wang, Er-song; Wang, Jun; Qu, Yi

    2010-08-15

    To review the experience of reoperative valve replacement for 104 patients. From January 2002 to December 2009, 104 patients underwent heart valve replacement in reoperations, accounting for 2.92% of the total patient population (3557 cases) who had valve replacement during this period. In this group, 53 male and 51 female patients were included with a median age of 46 years (ranged from 13 to 72 years). The reasons of reoperation included 28 cases suffered from another valve lesion after valve replacement, 10 cases suffered from valve lesion after mitral valvuloplasty, 19 cases suffered from perivalvular leakage after valve replacement, 18 cases suffered from valve lesion after previous correction of congenital heart defect, 7 cases suffered from bioprosthetic valve decline, 10 cases suffered from prosthetic valve endocarditis, 9 cases suffered from dysfunction of machine valve, and 3 cases suffered from other causes. The re-operations were mitral and aortic valve replacement in 2 cases, mitral valve replacement in 59 cases, aortic valve replacement in 24 cases, tricuspid valve replacement in 16 cases, and Bentall's operation in 3 cases. The interval from first operation to next operation was 1 month-19 years. There were 8 early deaths from heart failure, renal failure and multiple organ failure (early mortality 7.69%). Major complications were intraoperative hemorrhage in 2 cases, re-exploration for mediastinal bleeding in 2 cases and sternotomy surgical site infection in 1 case. Complete follow-up (3 months-7 years and 2 months) was available for all patients. Two patients died, one patient died of intracranial hemorrhage, and another cause was unknown. Satisfactory short-term and long-term results can be obtained in reoperative valve replacement with appropriate timing of operation control, satisfactory myocardial protection, accurate surgical procedure and suitable perioperative treatment.

  7. Valve-sparing and valve-replacing techniques for aortic root replacement in patients with Marfan syndrome: Analysis of early outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volguina, Irina V; Miller, D Craig; LeMaire, Scott A; Palmero, Laura C; Wang, Xing Li; Connolly, Heidi M; Sundt, Thoralf M; Bavaria, Joseph E; Dietz, Harry C; Milewicz, Dianna M; Coselli, Joseph S

    2009-05-01

    A prospective, international registry study was initiated to provide contemporary comparative data on short-term clinical outcomes after aortic valve-sparing and aortic valve-replacing root operations in patients with Marfan syndrome. The purpose of this initial report is to describe the study design and to compare early outcomes in the first 151 enrolled patients. We assessed 30-day outcomes in 151 patients who met strict Ghent diagnostic criteria for Marfan syndrome and underwent aortic root replacement with either valve-replacing (n = 46) or valve-sparing techniques (n = 105) at one of 18 participating centers. In the valve replacement group, a mechanical composite valve graft was used in 39 (85%) patients and a bioprosthetic valve in 7 (15%). In the valve-sparing group, David V procedures were performed in 57 (54%) patients, David I in 38 (36%), David IV in 8 (8%), Florida sleeve in 1 (1%), and Yacoub remodeling in 1 (1%). No in-hospital or 30-day deaths occurred. Despite longer crossclamp and cardiopulmonary bypass times in the valve-sparing group, there were no significant between-group differences in postoperative complications. Thirty-day valve-related complications occurred in 2 (4%) patients undergoing valve replacement and in 3 (3%) undergoing valve-sparing procedures (P = .6). The analysis of early outcomes revealed that valve-sparing techniques were the most common approach to root replacement in patients with Marfan syndrome in these centers. The complexity of valve-sparing root replacement did not translate into any demonstrable adverse early outcomes. Subsequent analysis will compare the 3-year durability of these two surgical approaches.

  8. Mitral valve replacement in a 12 year old boy with Marfan syndrome and severe mitral regurgitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Alauddin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A 12 year old boy with Marfan syndrome associated with severe mitral regurgitation underwent successful mitral valve replacement. Careful evaluation of the cardiovascular system and specific surgical intervention help long-term survival of  patients.

  9. Transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis surgically replaced 4 months after implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Lund, Jens Teglgaard; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a new and rapidly evolving treatment option for high-risk surgical patients with degenerative aortic valve stenosis. Long-term results with these new valve prostheses are lacking, and potential valve dysfunction and failure would require valve replacemen....... We report the first case of surgical valve replacement in a patient with a dysfunctional transcatheter-implanted aortic valve prosthesis 4 months after implantation....

  10. Thrombocytosis following splenectomy and aortic valve replacement for idiopathic thrombocytopaenic purpura with bicuspid aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarika Katiyar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic thrombocytopaenic purpura (ITP patients are at high risk for complications during and after cardiac surgeries involving cardiopulmonary bypass. The main clinical problem of primary ITP is an increased risk of bleeding although bleeding may not always be present. More recently, thrombosis has become appreciated as another potential complication of the procedure. We report a 22-year-old female patient with ITP with bicuspid aortic valve and splenomegaly, who underwent uncomplicated aortic valve replacement and splenectomy simultaneously. She was readmitted with chest pain due to coronary thrombosis following splenectomy which made the management difficult. We describe our experience in managing this patient who presented with thrombotic complication rather than bleeding in post-operative period and the challenges met in maintaining appropriate anticoagulation for aortic valve replacement as well as thrombosis, post-splenectomy

  11. Delirium After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuseffi, Jennifer L; Borges, Nyal E; Boehm, Leanne M; Wang, Li; McPherson, John A; Fredi, Joseph L; Ahmad, Rashid M; Ely, E Wesley; Pandharipande, Pratik P

    2017-07-01

    Postoperative delirium is associated with increased mortality. Patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement are at risk for delirium because of comorbid conditions. To compare the incidence, odds, and mortality implications of delirium between patients undergoing transcatheter replacement and patients undergoing surgical replacement. The Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale and the Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit were used to assess arousal level and delirium prospectively in all patients with severe aortic stenosis who had transcatheter or surgical aortic valve replacement at an academic medical center. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between procedure type and occurrence of delirium. Cox regression was used to assess the association between postoperative delirium and 6-month mortality. A total of 105 patients had transcatheter replacement and 121 had surgical replacement. Patients in the transcatheter group were older (median age, 81 vs 68 years; P replacement. Delirium is less likely to develop in the transcatheter group but is associated with higher mortality in both groups. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  12. Missed aortic valve endocarditis resulting in complete atrioventricular block and redo mechanical valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harky, Amer; Garner, Megan; Popa, Miruna; Shipolini, Alex

    2017-08-03

    Infective endocarditis is a rare disease associated with high morbidity and mortality. As a result, early diagnosis and prompt antibiotic treatment with or without surgical intervention is crucial in the management of such condition.We report a case of missed infective endocarditis of the aortic valve. The patient underwent mechanical aortic valve replacement, with the native valve being sent for histopathological examination. On re-admission 16 months later, he presented with syncope, shortness of breathing and complete heart block. On review of the histopathology of native aortic valve, endocarditis was identified which had not been acted on. The patient underwent redo aortic valve replacement for severe aortic regurgitation.We highlight the importance of following up histopathological results as well as the need for multidisciplinary treatment of endocarditis with a combination of surgical and antibiotic therapy. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Coronary artery disease in patients undergoing valve replacement at a tertiary care cardiac centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, A.H.; Hanif, B.; Hasan, K.; Hashmani, S.

    2011-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of coronary artery disease in patients undergoing valve surgery at a tertiary care cardiac centre. The medical records of 144 consecutive patients who underwent mitral, aortic or dual (mitral and aortic) valve replacement surgery at the Tabba Heart Institute between January 2006 to December 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent coronary angiogram. Significant coronary artery disease (CAD) is defined as coronary stenosis of > 50%. There were 74 (51.4%) males and 70 (48.6%) females in the study. The mean age was 51.64 +- 11 years. Of all, 73 (50.7%) underwent mitral valve replacement, 47 (32.6%) had aortic and 24 (16.7%) had dual valve replacement. Out of 144 patients, 99 (68.8%) had 50% stenosis. In patients who had undergone mitral valve replacement (MVR), significant coronary disease was found in 32.9%, whereas in patients who had undergone aortic valve replacement (AVR) and dual valve replacement (DVR) the prevalence of coronary disease was 31.9% and 25% respectively. Our results suggest that the overall prevalence of coronary artery disease in patients undergoing valve surgery in our population is comparable with prevalence reported in international data. (author)

  14. Aortic valve replacement during acute rheumatic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A; Chi, S; Gonzalez-Lavin, L

    1978-07-01

    Emergency aortic valve replacement was performed during an attack of acute rheumatic fever in a 12-year-old black boy. He had an uneventful recovery and has remained asymptomatic 27 months after operation. In the light of this experience and that of others, one might conclude that the decision to operate on these patients should be based on the severity of the haemodynamic derangement rather than on the state of activity in the rheumatic process.

  15. [Pannus Formation Six-years after Aortic and Mitral Valve Replacement with Tissue Valves;Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Makoto; Muraoka, Arata; Aizawa, Kei; Akutsu, Hirohiko; Kurumisawa, Soki; Misawa, Yoshio

    2015-07-01

    A 77-year-old man presented with exertional dyspnea. He had undergone aortic and mitral valve replacement with tissue valves 6-years earlier. The patient's hemoglobin level was 9.8 g/dl and serum aspartate aminotransferase (70 mU/ml) and lactate dehydrogenase (1,112 mU/ml) were elevated. Echocardiography revealed stenosis of the prosthetic valve in the aortic position with peak flow velocity of 3.8 m/second and massive mitral regurgitation. The patient underwent repeat valve replacement. Pannus formation around both implanted valves was observed. The aortic valve orifice was narrowed by the pannus, and one cusp of the prosthesis in the mitral position was fixed and caused the regurgitation, but they were free from cusp laceration or calcification. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and he continues to do well 14 months after surgery.

  16. Aortic Valve Replacement for Infective Endocarditis in a Renal Transplant Recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masmoudi Sayda

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal transplant recipients are more prone to developing infections. We report a 37-year old renal transplant recipient who developed infective endocarditis of the aortic valve, heart failure and renal allograft dysfunction. He underwent aortic valve replacement which was followed by improvement in cardiac as well as allograft function.

  17. Optimal results of aortic valve replacement with small mechanical valves (< 19 mm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yasuyuki; Hattori, Koji; Motoki, Manabu; Takahashi, Yosuke; Kotani, Shinsuke; Nishimura, Shinsuke; Shibata, Toshihiko

    2013-07-01

    Controversy exists regarding the optimal operative method or type of prosthesis for patients with a small aortic root. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the early and mid-term outcomes of standard aortic valve replacement (AVR) using 16 mm or 18 mm ATS Advanced Performance (AP) or 17 mm St. Jude Medical (SJM) Regent valves for a small aortic root. Between April 2003 and August 2009, 78 patients (age range: 50-86 years; 86% aged > or = 65 years) underwent AVR with 16 mm or 18 mm ATS AP valves (16AP group: n = 21, 18AP group: n = 32), or a 17 mm SJM Regent valve (17Regent group: n = 25). Fifty-six patients (72%) had a body surface area (BSA) of regression was similar among the groups (-30%, -25% and -28% in the 16AP, 17Regent and 18AP groups, respectively; p = 0.844). The early and mid-term results of AVR with 16 mm or 18 mm ATS AP valves, or with a 17 mm SJM Regent valve, were satisfactory. Therefore, standard AVR using these small mechanical prostheses, which avoids the need to enlarge the annulus or to conduct stentless bioprosthesis implantation, might represent an acceptable method, especially in elderly patients with a small aortic root.

  18. Early outcome of mini aortic valve replacement surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawky Fareed

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery (MIAVS has evolved into a well-tolerated, efficient surgical treatment option in experienced centers, providing greater patient satisfaction and lower complication rates. Potential advantages of MIAVR arise from the concept that patient morbidity and potential mortality could be reduced without compromising the excellent results of the conventional procedure which include improved cosmetic results, safer access in the case of reoperation, less postoperative bleeding, lower intensive care unit (ICU and in-hospital stays, as well as the absence of sternal wound infection. These results were achievable also in high-risk patients. Reduced pain and hospital length of stay, decreased time until return to full activity and decreased blood product use have also been demonstrated. Methods: Sixty patients with aortic valve disease randomized into two equal groups; group “A” underwent aortic valve surgery through a minimally invasive limited upper sternotomy. Group “B” underwent aortic valve surgery through a full median sternotomy. The Pain was evaluated on 2nd, 3rd day post-operatively and at the 3rd, 6th month after discharge. Echocardiographic data were performed preoperatively and at the 3rd, 6th month after discharge in all patients. Standard aortic and bicaval cannulation with cold antegrade crystalloid cardioplegia was adopted in group“B”, while in group “A” femoral vein with ascending aortic cannulation was adopted with antegrade blood cardioplegia. Results: There was no statistical difference between the two groups preoperatively regarding their age, sex, NYHA class, EF%, LA dimension, spirometric study. There was no operative mortality in both groups but few postoperative complications occurred in both groups. Total hospital stay, ICU stay, postoperative bleeding, inotropic requirement, ventilatory support, blood transfusion was less in group “A”, with better cosmetic

  19. Outcomes of Reoperative Valve Replacement in Patients with Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis: A 20-Year Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Woong Kim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE is a serious complication of cardiac valve replacement, and many p atients with P VE r equire r eoperation. The aim of t his study was to r eview our institutional 2 0 -year experience of surgical reoperative valve replacement in patients with PVE. Methods: A retrospective study was performed on 84 patients (mean age, 54.8±12.7 years; 51 males who were diagnosed with PVE and underwent reoperative valve replacement from January 1995 to December 2016. Results: PVE was found in 1 valve in 61 cases (72.6%, and in 2 or more valves in 23 cases (27.4%. The median follow-up duration was 47.3 months (range, 0 to 250 months. Postoperative complications occurred in 39 patients (46.4%. Reinfection occurred in 6 cases, all within 1 year. The freedom from reinfection rate at 5 years was 91.0%±3.5%. The overall survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 64.4%±5.8% and 54.3%±7.3%, respectively. In stepwise multivariable Cox proportional hazard models, older age (hazard ratio [HR], 1.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05 to 2.10; p=0.027 and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB time (HR, 1.03; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.0 1; p =0 . 0 33 e merged a s independent risk f actors f or d eath. Conclusion: Older age and a longer CPB time were associated with an increased risk of overall mortality in PVE patients.

  20. Left ventricular rupture postmitral valve replacement: Surviving a catastrophe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samarjit Bisoyi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the dreaded mechanical complications of mitral valve replacement (MVR is rupture of the left ventricle (LV. This report describes the early diagnosis and successful repair of rupture of posterior wall of LV in an elderly patient who underwent MVR. We have discussed the risk factors and perioperative issues implicated in such complication. The anesthesiologist as an intra-operative echocardiographer can aid in identifying the patient at risk. Though important surgical steps are necessary to prevent the complication; nonetheless, the anesthesiologist needs to take key measures in the perioperative period.

  1. Aortic valve replacement in a patient with severe nickel allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusini, Mario; Barbato, Raffaele; Spadaccio, Cristiano; Chello, Massimo

    2011-11-01

    Nickel allergy can raise clinical problems in patients undergoing cardiac surgery who require sternal closure with stainless steel wire. We describe the case of a 51-year-old woman with severe nickel allergy who underwent aortic valve replacement with a nickel-free ON-X prosthesis and sternal closure by Fiberwire # 2 suture without complications. Considering its biocompatibility and its mechanical characteristics including optimal strength and knot resistance, this suture might be a viable alternative in patients in which the use of stainless steel wire is contraindicated. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Aortic Annular Enlargement during Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selman Dumani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the surgery of aortic valve replacement is always attempted, as much as possible, to implant the larger prosthesis with the mains goals to enhance the potential benefits, to minimise transvalvular gradient, decrease left ventricular size and avoid the phenomenon of patient-prosthesis mismatch. Implantation of an ideal prosthesis often it is not possible, due to a small aortic annulus. A variety of aortic annulus enlargement techniques is reported to avoid patient-prosthesis mismatch. We present the case that has submitted four three times open heart surgery. We used Manouguian technique to enlarge aortic anulus with excellent results during the fourth time of surgery.

  3. Hemolytic Anemia after Aortic Valve Replacement: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feridoun Sabzi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic anemia is exceedingly rare and an underestimated complication after aortic valve replacement (AVR.The mechanism responsible for hemolysis most commonly involves a regurgitated flow or jet that related to paravalvar leak or turbulence of subvalvar stenosis. It appears to be independent of its severity as assessed by echocardiography. We present a case of a 24-year-old man with a history of AVR in 10 year ago that developed severe hemolytic anemia due to a mild subvalvar stenosis caused by pannus formation and mild hypertrophic septum. After exclusion of other causes of hemolytic anemia and the lack of clinical and laboratory improvement, the patient underwent redo valve surgery with pannus and subvalvar hypertrophic septum resection. Anemia and heart failure symptoms gradually resolved after surgery

  4. Factors Influencing Mortality after Bioprosthetic Valve Replacement; A Midterm Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan Javadzadegan; Amir Javadzadegan; Jafar Mehdizadeh Baghbani

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Although valve repair is applied routinely nowadays, particularly for mitral regurgitation (MR) or tricuspid regurgitation (TR), valve replacement using prosthetic valves is also common especially in adults. Unfortunately the valve with ideal hemodynamic performance and long-term durability without increasing the risk of bleeding due to long-term anticoagulant therapy has not been introduced. Therefore, patients and physicians must choose either bioprosthetic or mechanical valve...

  5. Pannus Formation Leads to Valve Malfunction in the Tricuspid Position 19 Years after Triple Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alskaf, Ebraham; McConkey, Hannah; Laskar, Nabila; Kardos, Attila

    2016-06-20

    The Medtronic ATS Open Pivot mechanical valve has been successfully used in heart valve surgery for more than two decades. We present the case of a patient who, 19 years following a tricuspid valve replacement with an ATS prosthesis as part of a triple valve operation following infective endocarditis, developed severe tricuspid regurgitation due to pannus formation.

  6. Analysis of Mitral Valve Replacement Outcomes is Enhanced by Meaningful Clinical Use of Electronic Health Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, John C; Pfeffer, Thomas; Johnstone, Shelley; Chen, Yuexin; Kiley, Mary-Lou; Richter, Richard; Lee, Hon

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Cardiac surgical mortality has improved during the last decade despite the aging of the population. An integrated US health plan developed a heart valve registry to track outcomes and complications of heart valve operations. This database was used for longitudinal evaluation of mitral valve (MV) outcomes from 1999 to 2008 at four affiliated hospitals. Methods: We identified 3130 patients in the Apollo database who underwent 3180 initial MV procedures. Internal administrative and Social Security Administration databases were merged to determine survival rates. Electronic health records were searched to ascertain demographics, comorbidities, and postoperative complications. Cox regression was used to evaluate mean survival and identify risk factors. Results: The procedures included 1160 mechanical valve replacements, 1159 tissue valve replacements, and 861 annuloplasties. The mean age of patients undergoing these procedures was 58 ± 11 years, 69 ± 12 years, and 62 ± 12 years, respectively. Mean survival was 8.9 ± 0.1 years for mechanical valve replacement, 7.0 ± 0.1 years for tissue valve replacement, and 7.7 ± 0.1 years for annuloplasty. Early in the study, there was a preference for implanting mechanical MVs. Beginning in 2003, more patients received tissue valve replacements rather than mechanical valves. Over time, there was an increasing trend of annuloplasty. Cox regression analysis identified the following risk factors for increased ten-year mortality: tissue valve implantation; advanced age; female sex; nonelective, nonisolated procedure; diabetes; postoperative use of banked blood products; previous cardiovascular intervention; dialysis; and longer perfusion time. Hospital location, reoperation, preoperative anticoagulation, and cardiogenic shock were not statistically significant risk factors. Conclusions: When controlling for other risk factors, we observed a lower long-term survival rate for tissue valve replacement compared with

  7. Prevalence of pannus formation after aortic valve replacement: clinical aspects and surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Yoshimasa; Hashimoto, Kazuhiro; Okuyama, Hiroshi; Ishii, Shinichi; Shingo, Taguchi; Kagawa, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    Pannus formation after aortic valve replacement is not common, but obstruction due to chronic pannus is one of the most serious complications of valve replacement. The causes of pannus formation are still unknown and effective preventive methods have not been fully elucidated. We reviewed our clinical experience of all patients who underwent reoperation for prosthetic aortic valve obstruction due to pannus formation between 1973 and 2004. We compared the initial 18-year period of surgery, when the Björk-Shiley tilting-disk valve was used, and the subsequent 13-year period of surgery, when the St. Jude Medical valve was used. Seven of a total of 390 patients (1.8%) required reoperation for prosthetic aortic valve obstruction due to pannus formation. All seven patients were women; four patients underwent resection of the pannus and three patients needed replacement of the valve. The frequency of pannus formation in the early group was 2.4% (6/253), whereas it was 0.73% (1/137) in the late group (P Pannus was localized at the minor orifice of the Björk-Shiley valve in the early group and turbulent transvalvular blood flow was considered to be one of the important factors triggering its growth. We also consider that small bileaflet valves have the possibility of promoting pannus formation and that the implantation of a larger prosthesis can contribute to reducing the occurrence of pannus.

  8. Perioperative management of patient with Bombay blood group undergoing mitral valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shio Priye

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bombay red blood cell phenotype is an extremely rare blood type for which patients can receive only autologous or Bombay phenotype red blood cells. We report a case of stenotic mitral valve with Bombay phenotype who underwent minimal invasive right lateral thoracotomy for the replacement of the mitral valve. A male patient from Bangladesh presented to the hospital with New York Heart Association III symptoms. His medical evaluation revealed severe mitral valve stenosis and mild aortic valve regurgitation. The patient received erythropoietin, intravenous iron succinate and folic acid tablets. Autologous blood transfusion was carried out. The mitral valve was replaced with a prosthetic valve successfully. After weaning off from cardiopulmonary bypass, heparinisation was corrected with protamine. Post-operatively, the patient received autologous red blood cells. The patient recovered after 1-day of inotropic support with adrenaline and milrinone, and diuretics and was discharged on the 5 th post-operative day.

  9. Mitral Valve Replacement with a Pulmonary Autograft in an Infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Ho Jeong

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A 76-day-old infant weighing 3.4 kg was referred for surgical intervention for severe mitral valve stenoinsufficiency caused by leaflet fibrosis and calcification. He had experienced a cerebral infarction in the left middle cerebral artery territory, which was deemed attributable to an embolism of a calcified particle from the dysmorphic mitral valve. Because mitral valve replacement using a prosthetic valve was not feasible in this small baby, mitral valve replacement with a pulmonary autograft was performed. After a brief period of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO support, he was weaned from ECMO and was discharged home without further cardiovascular complications.

  10. Incidence and factors associated with infective endocarditis in patients undergoing left-sided heart valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Lauge; Valeur, Nana; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2018-01-01

    Aims: Patients with left-sided heart valve replacement are considered at high-risk of infective endocarditis (IE). However, data on the incidence and risk factors associated with IE are sparse. Methods and results: Through Danish administrative registries, we identified patients who underwent left.......35-2.15), and cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) (HR = 1.57, 95% CI 1.19-2.06) were among factors associated with an increased risk of IE. Conclusion: Infective endocarditis after left-sided heart valve replacement is not uncommon and occurs in about 1/20 over 10 years. Male, bioprosthetic valve, and heart...

  11. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Degenerative Bioprosthetic Surgical Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvir, Danny; Webb, John; Brecker, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation is an emerging therapeutic alternative for patients with a failed surgical bioprosthesis and may obviate the need for reoperation. We evaluated the clinical results of this technique using a large, worldwide registry....

  12. Vascular complications associated with transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardar, M Rizwan; Goldsweig, Andrew M; Abbott, J Dawn; Sharaf, Barry L; Gordon, Paul C; Ehsan, Afshin; Aronow, Herbert D

    2017-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is now an accepted pathway for aortic valve replacement for patients who are at prohibitive, severe and intermediate risk for traditional aortic valve surgery. However, with this rising uptrend and adaptation of this new technology, vascular complications and their management remain an Achilles heel for percutaneous aortic valve replacement. The vascular complications are an independent predictor of mortality for patients undergoing TAVR. Early recognition of these complications and appropriate management is paramount. In this article, we review the most commonly encountered vascular complications associated with currently approved TAVR devices and their optimal percutaneous management techniques.

  13. Valve Repair Is Superior to Replacement in Most Patients With Coexisting Degenerative Mitral Valve and Coronary Artery Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadikasgari, Hoda; Gillinov, A Marc; Idrees, Jay J; Mihaljevic, Tomislav; Suri, Rakesh M; Raza, Sajjad; Houghtaling, Penny L; Svensson, Lars G; Navia, José L; Mick, Stephanie L; Desai, Milind Y; Sabik, Joseph F; Blackstone, Eugene H

    2017-06-01

    For mitral regurgitation (MR) from degenerative mitral disease in patients with coexisting coronary artery disease, the appropriate surgical strategy remains controversial. From 1985 to 2011, 1,071 adults (age 70 ± 9.3 years, 77% men) underwent combined coronary artery bypass grafting and either mitral valve repair (n = 872, 81%) or replacement (n=199, 19%) for degenerative MR. Propensity matching (177 patient pairs, 89% of possible matches) was used to compare early outcomes and time-related recurrence of MR after mitral valve repair, mitral valve reoperation, and mortality. Risk factors for death were identified with multivariable, multiphase hazard-function analysis. Patients undergoing valve replacement were older, with more valve calcification and a higher prevalence of preoperative atrial fibrillation and heart failure (all p < .0001). Among matched pairs, mitral replacement versus repair was associated with higher hospital mortality (5.0% vs 1.0%, p = .0001) and more postoperative renal failure (7.0% vs 3.2%, p = .01), reexplorations for bleeding (6.0% vs 3.1%, p = .05), and respiratory failure (14% vs 4.7%, p < .0001). Of matched patients undergoing repair, 18% had MR above 3+ by 5 years. Mitral valve durability was similar between matched groups, but survival at 15 years was 18% after replacement versus 52% after repair. Nomograms from the multivariable equation revealed that in 94% of cases, 10-year survival was calculated to be higher after repair than after replacement. In patients with coexisting degenerative mitral valve and coronary artery diseases, mitral valve repair is expected to confer a long-term survival advantage over replacement despite some recurrence of MR. When feasible, it is the procedure of choice for these patients. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Risk Factors for Late Aortic Valve Dysfunction After the David V Valve-Sparing Root Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esaki, Jiro; Leshnower, Bradley G; Binongo, Jose N; Lasanajak, Yi; McPherson, LaRonica; Guyton, Robert A; Chen, Edward P

    2017-11-01

    Valve-sparing root replacement (VSRR) is an established therapy for aortic root pathology. However, late aortic valve dysfunction requiring reoperation remains a primary concern of this procedure. This study examines risk factors for late aortic insufficiency (AI) and aortic stenosis (AS) after David V VSRR. A retrospective review from 2005 to 2015 at a US academic center identified 282 patients who underwent VSRR. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to identify risk factors for late AI and AS after VSRR. The mean age was 46.4 years. Sixty-four patients (22.7%) had bicuspid valves, and 41 patients (14.5%) had Marfan syndrome. The incidence of reoperations was 27 (9.6%), and 42 cases (14.9%) presented with acute type A dissection. Operative mortality was 8 (2.8%). Seven-year survival was 90.9%. Seven-year cumulative incidence of reoperation, greater than 2+ AI and greater than moderate AS were 3.1%, 2.2%, and 0.8%, respectively. Multivariable analysis showed aortic root size 55 mm or larger (hazard ratio 3.44, 95% confidence interval: 1.27 to 9.29, p = 0.01) to be a risk factor for late AI whereas bicuspid valve (hazard ratio 16.07, 95% confidence interval: 3.12 to 82.68, p = 0.001) and cusp repair were found to be risk factors (hazard ratio 5.91, 95% confidence interval: 1.17 to 29.86, p = 0.03) for late AS. Valve-sparing root replacement can be performed with low operative risk and good overall long-term survival even in complex clinical settings. Durable valve function can be expected; however, aortic root size 55 cm or more, bicuspid valve anatomy, and cusp repair represent independent risk factors for late aortic valve dysfunction after these procedures. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Outcome of pregnancy in women after pulmonary autograft valve replacement for congenital aortic valve disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yap, Sing-Chien; Drenthen, Willem; Pieper, Petronella G.; Moons, Philip; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Klieverik, Loes M.; Vliegen, Hubert W.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.

    Background and aim of the study: The pulmonary autograft has been recommended as the valve of choice for aortic valve replacement (AVR) in young women contemplating pregnancy. However, current information on maternal and perinatal outcome of pregnancy in women with pulmonary autograft valve

  16. Outcome of pregnancy in women after pulmonary autograft valve replacement for congenital aortic valve disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yap, Sing-Chien; Drenthen, Willem; Pieper, Petronella G.; Moons, Philip; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Klieverik, Loes M.; Vliegen, Hubert W.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.

    2007-01-01

    Background and aim of the study: The pulmonary autograft has been recommended as the valve of choice for aortic valve replacement (AVR) in young women contemplating pregnancy. However, current information on maternal and perinatal outcome of pregnancy in women with pulmonary autograft valve

  17. Outcome of pregnancy in women after pulmonary autograft valve replacement for congenital aortic valve disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yap, S.C.; Drenthen, W.; Pieper, P.G.; Moons, P.; Mulder, B.J.M.; Klieverik, L.M.; Vliegen, H.W.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Meijboom, F.J.; Roos-Hesselink, J.W.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: The pulmonary autograft has been recommended as the valve of choice for aortic valve replacement (AVR) in young women contemplating pregnancy. However, current information on maternal and perinatal outcome of pregnancy in women with pulmonary autograft valve

  18. Small valve area index: its influence on early mortality after mitral valve replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yazdanbakhsh, A. P.; van den Brink, R. B.; Dekker, Egbert; de Mol, B. A.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that mitral valve prosthesis-patient mismatch increases postoperative mortality. METHODS AND RESULTS: The effect of mitral valve prosthesis-patient mismatch on survival in a cohort of consecutive patients after mitral valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis

  19. Aortic valve insufficiency in the teenager and young adult: the role of prosthetic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Scott M

    2013-10-01

    The contents of this article were presented in the session "Aortic insufficiency in the teenager" at the congenital parallel symposium of the 2013 Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) annual meeting. The accompanying articles detail the approaches of aortic valve repair and the Ross procedure.(1,2) The current article focuses on prosthetic valve replacement. For many young patients requiring aortic valve surgery, either aortic valve repair or a Ross procedure provides a good option. The advantages include avoidance of anticoagulation and potential for growth. In other patients, a prosthetic valve is an appropriate alternative. This article discusses the current state of knowledge regarding mechanical and bioprosthetic valve prostheses and their specific advantages relative to valve repair or a Ross procedure. In current practice, young patients requiring aortic valve surgery frequently undergo valve replacement with a prosthetic valve. In STS adult cardiac database, among patients ≤30 years of age undergoing aortic valve surgery, 34% had placement of a mechanical valve, 51% had placement of a bioprosthetic valve, 9% had aortic valve repair, and 2% had a Ross procedure. In the STS congenital database, among patients 12 to 30 years of age undergoing aortic valve surgery, 21% had placement of a mechanical valve, 18% had placement of a bioprosthetic valve, 30% had aortic valve repair, and 24% had a Ross procedure. In the future, the balance among these options may be altered by design improvements in prosthetic valves, alternatives to warfarin, the development of new patch materials for valve repair, and techniques to avoid Ross autograft failure.

  20. Midterm Results of Aortic Valve Replacement with Cryopreserved Homografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Özker

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the midterm clinical results of aortic valve replacement with cryopreserved homografts.Materials and Methods: Aortic valve replacement was performed in 40 patients with cryopreserved homograft. The indications were aortic valve endocarditis in 20 patients (50%, truncus arteriosus in 6 patients (15%, and re-stenosis or regurtitation after aortic valve reconstruction in 14 (35% patients. The valve sizes ranged from 10 to 27mm. A full root replacement technique was used for homograft replacement in all patients.Results: The 30-day postoperative mortality rate was 12.5% (5 patients. There were four late deaths. Only one of them was related to cardiac events. Overall mortality was 22.5%. Thirty-three patients were followed up for 67±26 months. Two patients needed reoperation due to aortic aneurysm caused by endocarditis. The mean transvalvular gradient significantly decreased after valve replacement (p<0.003. The last follow up showed that the 27 (82% patients had a normal left ventricular function.Conclusion: Cryopreserved homografts are safe alternatives to mechanical valves that can be used when there are proper indications. Although it has a high perioperative mortality rate, cryopreserved homograft implantation is an alternative for valve replacement, particularly in younger patients and for complex surgical problems such as endocarditis that must be minimalized.

  1. Consequence of patient substitution of nattokinase for warfarin after aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahi, Maqsood M; Choi, Charles H; Konda, Subbareddy; Shake, Jay G

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a patient's self-substitution of nattokinase for the vitamin K antagonist warfarin after aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis. Nattokinase is an enzyme derived from a popular fermented soybean preparation in Japan (natto), which has fibrinolytic properties and is gaining popularity in nontraditional health journals and nonmedical health websites as an over-the-counter thrombolytic. After nearly a year of use of nattokinase without warfarin, the patient developed thrombus on the mechanical valve and underwent successful repeat valve replacement. We believe this is the first documented case of nattokinase being used as a substitute for warfarin after valve replacement, and we strongly discourage its use for this purpose.

  2. Management of mitral regurgitation in Marfan syndrome: Outcomes of valve repair versus replacement and comparison with myxomatous mitral valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helder, Meghana R K; Schaff, Hartzell V; Dearani, Joseph A; Li, Zhuo; Stulak, John M; Suri, Rakesh M; Connolly, Heidi M

    2014-09-01

    The study objective was to evaluate patients with Marfan syndrome and mitral valve regurgitation undergoing valve repair or replacement and to compare them with patients undergoing repair for myxomatous mitral valve disease. We reviewed the medical records of consecutive patients with Marfan syndrome treated surgically between March 17, 1960, and September 12, 2011, for mitral regurgitation and performed a subanalysis of those with repairs compared with case-matched patients with myxomatous mitral valve disease who had repairs (March 14, 1995, to July 5, 2013). Of 61 consecutive patients, 40 underwent mitral repair and 21 underwent mitral replacement (mean [standard deviation] age, 40 [18] vs 31 [19] years; P = .09). Concomitant aortic surgery was performed to a similar extent (repair, 45% [18/40] vs replacement, 43% [9/21]; P = .87). Ten-year survival was significantly better in patients with Marfan syndrome with mitral repair than in those with replacement (80% vs 41%; P = .01). Mitral reintervention did not differ between mitral repair and replacement (cumulative risk of reoperation, 27% vs 15%; P = .64). In the matched cohort, 10-year survival after repair was similar for patients with Marfan syndrome and myxomatous mitral disease (84% vs 78%; P = .63), as was cumulative risk of reoperation (17% vs 12%; P = .61). Patients with Marfan syndrome and mitral regurgitation have better survival with repair than with replacement. Survival and risk of reoperation for patients with Marfan syndrome were similar to those for patients with myxomatous mitral disease. These results support the use of mitral valve repair in patients with Marfan syndrome and moderate or more mitral regurgitation, including those having composite replacement of the aortic root. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Fate of remnant sinuses of Valsalva in patients with bicuspid and trileaflet valves undergoing aortic valve, ascending aorta, and aortic arch replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, Rita Karianna; Habertheuer, Andreas; Bavaria, Joseph E; Siki, Mary; Szeto, Wilson Y; Krause, Eric; Korutla, Varun; Desai, Nimesh D; Vallabhajosyula, Prashanth

    2017-08-01

    In patients presenting with aortic valvulopathy with concomitant ascending aortic aneurysm, surgical management of the sinus of Valsalva segment remains undefined, especially for moderately dilated aortic roots. In patients with this pathology undergoing aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement, we assessed the fate of the remnant preserved sinus of Valsalva segment stratified by aortic valve morphology and pathology. From 2002 to 2015, 428 patients underwent elective aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement. Patients were stratified on the basis of valvular morphology (bicuspid aortic valve [n = 254] and tricuspid aortic valve [n = 174]), valvular pathology (bicuspid aortic valve with aortic stenosis [n = 178], bicuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency [n = 76], tricuspid aortic valve with aortic stenosis [n = 61], tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency [n = 113]), and preoperative sinus of Valsalva dimensions (45 mm). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed no significant difference in freedom from reoperation in tricuspid aortic valve versus bicuspid aortic valve (P = .576). Multivariable Cox regression model performed with sinus of Valsalva dimensions at baseline and follow-up as time-varying covariates did not adversely affect survival. A repeated-measure, mixed-effects model constructed to assess longitudinal sinus of Valsalva trends revealed that the retained sinus of Valsalva dimensions remain stable over long-term follow-up (discharge to ≥10 years), irrespective of valvular morphology/pathology (bicuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency, tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency, tricuspid aortic valve with aortic stenosis) and preoperative sinus of Valsalva groups (45 mm). In patients with nonaneurysmal sinuses of Valsalva undergoing aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement, the sinus segment can be preserved irrespective of

  4. Embrella embolic deflection device for cerebral protection during transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samim, Mariam; Agostoni, Pierfrancesco; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Budde, Ricardo P J; Nijhoff, Freek; Kluin, Jolanda; Ramjankhan, Faiz; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Stella, Pieter R.

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: To compare the extent of cerebral ischemic injury after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) with the use of an Embrella Embolic Deflector System versus unprotected TAVR. METHODS: Fifteen patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis underwent TAVR with use of the Embrella Embolic

  5. Embrella embolic deflection device for cerebral protection during transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samim, Mariam; Agostoni, Pierfrancesco; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Budde, Ricardo P. J.; Nijhoff, Freek; Kluin, Jolanda; Ramjankhan, Faiz; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Stella, Pieter R.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To compare the extent of cerebral ischemic injury after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) with the use of an Embrella Embolic Deflector System versus unprotected TAVR. Methods: Fifteen patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis underwent TAVR with use of the Embrella Embolic

  6. Factors Influencing Mortality after Bioprosthetic Valve Replacement; A Midterm Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Javadzadegan

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: Our study shows that using biprosthetic valve could reduce the risk of morbidity occurrence in patient who needs valve replacement. However, if medical treatments fail, patients should be referred for surgery. This would reduce the risk of mortality because of lower incident of complications such as atrial fibrillation and morbidities due to younger patients’ population.

  7. Recurrent pannus formation causing prosthetic aortic valve dysfunction: Is excision without valve re-replacement applicable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darwazah Ahmad K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prosthetic valve dysfunction at aortic position is commonly caused by pannus formation. The exact etiology is not known. It arises from ventricular aspect of the prosthesis encroaching its leaflets causing stenosis or it may remain localized causing left ventricular outflow tract obstruction without affecting valve function. The difference in location entails different approaches in management. Such a pathology requires surgical excision of the pannus with or without valve re-replacement. A recurrent pannus was observed in a female patient who needed repeated surgical intervention to excise a localized pannus without re-replacement of a well functioning prosthetic valve. Management of our case presents several questions, whether recurrence of pannus is caused by sparing the prosthetic valve, is it simply an exaggeration of an inflammatory healing process in certain individuals or is it ideal to re-replace the valve despite a well preserved function.

  8. Recurrent pannus formation causing prosthetic aortic valve dysfunction: is excision without valve re-replacement applicable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwazah, Ahmad K

    2012-06-29

    Prosthetic valve dysfunction at aortic position is commonly caused by pannus formation. The exact etiology is not known. It arises from ventricular aspect of the prosthesis encroaching its leaflets causing stenosis or it may remain localized causing left ventricular outflow tract obstruction without affecting valve function.The difference in location entails different approaches in management. Such a pathology requires surgical excision of the pannus with or without valve re-replacement.A recurrent pannus was observed in a female patient who needed repeated surgical intervention to excise a localized pannus without re-replacement of a well functioning prosthetic valve.Management of our case presents several questions, whether recurrence of pannus is caused by sparing the prosthetic valve, is it simply an exaggeration of an inflammatory healing process in certain individuals or is it ideal to re-replace the valve despite a well preserved function.

  9. The use of transcatheter aortic valve replacement vs surgical aortic valve replacement for the treatment of aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen HA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hanna A Jensen, Lillian L Tsai, Vinod H Thourani Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Joseph B Whitehead Department of Surgery, Structural Heart and Valve Center, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Severe aortic stenosis (AS is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality and is increasing in prevalence as the global population increases. Since AS primarily affects the elderly, many of these patients have comorbidities that make them poor candidates for the gold standard treatment for AS, surgical aortic valve replacement. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement has emerged as a novel technology for the management of AS in higher risk patients over the past decade. Randomized trials have established the safety and efficacy of transcatheter aortic valve replacement, and the medical community has rallied to identify the patients who are most suitable for this transformative treatment. This review focuses on outlining the key procedural differences, describing the unique challenges of both operations, and finally assessing and comparing outcomes both on a general level and in challenging patient subgroups. Keywords: aortic valve replacement, transcatheter aortic valve replacement, surgical aortic valve replacement 

  10. Delayed Presentation of a Giant Ascending Aortic Aneurysm following Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tugrul Göncü

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant ascending aortic aneurysm formation following aortic valve replacement is rare. A 28-year-old man who underwent aortic valve replacement with a prosthetic valve for aortic regurgitation secondary to congenital bicuspid aortic valve about 10 years ago was diagnosed with a giant ascending aortic aneurysm about 16 cm in diameter in follow-up. The aneurysm was resected leaving the functional old mechanical prosthesis in place and implanted a 34-mm Hemashield woven graft, associated with the left and right coronary artery button implantation. Histological findings of the aortic aneurysm wall showed cystic medial necrosis. The postoperative course was uneventful and postoperative examination demonstrated good surgical results.

  11. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement by a Novel Suprasternal Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codner, Pablo; Pugliese, Daniel; Kouz, Rémi; Patel, Amisha; Chen, Cheng-Han; Terre, Juan; Eudailey, Kyle W; Nazif, Tamim; Vahl, Torsten P; George, Isaac; Khalique, Omar K; Hahn, Rebecca T; Leon, Martin B; Kodali, Susheel; Borger, Michael

    2018-04-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) provides therapy for patients with severe aortic stenosis at extreme, high, or intermediate surgical risk. Transfemoral access has been the preferred access route; however, this approach is not suitable for many TAVR candidates. A suprasternal approach may allow for earlier ambulation and shorter hospital stay as compared with other, nontransfemoral approaches. A total of 11 patients with unsuitable transfemoral access underwent suprasternal TAVR. Propensity matching was used to compare suprasternal patients to patients undergoing transaortic, transapical, and trans-subclavian TAVR. Groups were well matched for baseline characteristics. A self-expanding valve device was used in 6 (54.5%) and a balloon-expandable valve in 5 (45.5%) of the 11 patients treated by the suprasternal route. Suprasternal and trans-subclavian patients were able to ambulate earlier than patients treated by the transaortic route, a median 1.6 days (interquartile range [IQR]: 0.9 to 1.8), 1.6 days (IQR: 0.9 to 2.7), and 3.9 days (IQR: 1.9 to 4.5) after the procedure for suprasternal, trans-subclavian, and transaortic patients, respectively (p = 0.001). Length of hospitalization was shorter for patients treated by suprasternal or trans-subclavian access in comparison with patients treated by the transaortic or transapical approach: median 4 days (IQR: 3 to 8) and 4 days (IQR: 4 to 8) versus 8 days (IQR: 6 to 14) and 6 days (IQR: 7 to 11) for suprasternal and trans-subclavian versus transaortic and transapical, respectively (p = 0.01). Suprasternal and trans-subclavian access are associated with earlier ambulation and shorter hospitalization than other nontransfemoral TAVR routes, without an increase in complications. Further study is required to determine if suprasternal is the alternative access of choice for TAVR patients with poor transfemoral vasculature. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  12. Outcomes of Pulmonary Valve Replacement for Correction Pulmonary Insufficiency after Primary Repair of Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF)

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Abbassi Teshnisi; Aliasghar Moeinipour; Hamid Hoseinikhah; Seyedeh Zahra Aemmi; Shahla Shirin Bahador; Nahid Zirak

    2016-01-01

    Background Total correction of Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) anomaly in early childhood has been practiced in many centers with good results, but in some of patients after few years sever Pulmonary valve insufficiency occurred. Materials and Methods At a cross- sectional study from January 2015 to January 2016, 10 patients who had history of primary repair of TOF with free pulmonary insufficiency (PI) that underwent of pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) with bioprosthetic valves were evaluated. Re...

  13. Heart valve replacement with the Sorin tilting-disc prosthesis. A 10-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, A; Bortolotti, U; Mazzucco, A; Mossuto, E; Testolin, L; Thiene, G; Gallucci, V

    1992-02-01

    From 1978 to 1988, 697 patients with a mean age of 48 +/- 11 years (range 5 to 75 years) received a Sorin tilting-disc prosthesis; 358 had had aortic valve replacement, 247 mitral valve replacement, and 92 mitral and aortic valve replacement. Operative mortality rates were 7.8%, 11.3%, and 10.8%, respectively, in the three groups. Cumulative duration of follow-up is 1650 patient-years for aortic valve replacement (maximum follow-up 11.4 years), 963 patient-years for mitral valve replacement (maximum follow-up 9.9 years) and 328 patient-years for mitral and aortic valve replacement (maximum follow-up 9.4 years). Actuarial survival at 9 years is 72% +/- 4% after mitral valve replacement, 70% +/- 3% after aortic valve replacement, and 50% +/- 12% after mitral and aortic valve replacement, and actuarial freedom from valve-related deaths is 97% +/- 2% after mitral valve replacement, 92% +/- 2% after aortic valve replacement, and 62% +/- 15% after mitral and aortic valve replacement. Thromboembolic events occurred in 21 patients with aortic valve replacement (1.3% +/- 0.2%/pt-yr), in 12 with mitral valve replacement (1.2% +/- 0.3% pt-yr), and in seven with mitral and aortic valve replacement (2.1% +/- 0.8%), with one case of prosthetic thrombosis in each group; actuarial freedom from thromboembolism at 9 years is 92% +/- 3% after mitral valve replacement, 91% +/- 3% after aortic valve replacement, and 74% +/- 16% after mitral and aortic valve replacement. Anticoagulant-related hemorrhage was observed in 15 patients after aortic valve replacement (0.9% +/- 0.2%/pt-yr), in 9 after mitral valve replacement (0.9% +/- 0.3%/pt-yr), and in 6 with mitral and aortic valve replacement (0.9% +/- 0.5%/pt-yr); actuarial freedom from this complication at 9 years is 94% +/- 2% after aortic valve replacement, 91% +/- 4% after mitral valve replacement, and 68% +/- 16% after mitral and aortic valve replacement. Actuarial freedom from reoperation at 9 years is 97% +/- 2% after mitral and

  14. Long-Term Mortality Effect of Early Pacemaker Implantation After Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greason, Kevin L; Lahr, Brian D; Stulak, John M; Cha, Yong-Mei; Rea, Robert F; Schaff, Hartzell V; Dearani, Joseph A

    2017-10-01

    The need for pacemaker implantation is a well-described complication of aortic valve replacement. Not so well described is the effect such an event has on long-term outcome. This study reviewed a 21-year experience at the Mayo Clinic (Rochester, Minnesota) with aortic valve replacement to understand the influence of early postoperative pacemaker implantation on long-term mortality rates more clearly. This study retrospectively reviewed the records of 5,842 patients without previous pacemaker implantation who underwent surgical aortic valve replacement from January 1993 through June 2014. The median age of these patients was 73 years (range, 65 to 79 years), the median ejection fraction was 62% (range, 53% to 68%), 3,853 patients were male (66%), and coronary artery bypass graft operation was performed in 2,553 (44%) of the patients studied. Early pacemaker implantation occurred in 146 patients (2.5%) within 30 days of surgical aortic valve replacement. The median follow-up of patients was 11.1 years (range, 5.8 to 16.5 years), and all-cause mortality rates were 2.4% at 30 days, 6.4% at 1 year, 23.1% at 5 years, 48.3% at 10 years, and 67.9% at 15 years postoperatively. Early pacemaker implantation was associated with an increased risk of death after multivariable adjustment for baseline patients' characteristics (hazard ratio, 1.49; 95% confidence interval, 1.20, 1.84; p pacemaker implantation as a complication of surgical aortic valve replacement is associated with an increased risk of long-term death. Valve replacement-related pacemaker implantation rates should be important considerations with respect to new valve replacement paradigms, especially in younger and lower-risk patients. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Recurrent pannus formation causing prosthetic aortic valve dysfunction: Is excision without valve re-replacement applicable?

    OpenAIRE

    Darwazah Ahmad K

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Prosthetic valve dysfunction at aortic position is commonly caused by pannus formation. The exact etiology is not known. It arises from ventricular aspect of the prosthesis encroaching its leaflets causing stenosis or it may remain localized causing left ventricular outflow tract obstruction without affecting valve function. The difference in location entails different approaches in management. Such a pathology requires surgical excision of the pannus with or without valve re-replace...

  16. Compact UHV valve with field replaceable windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.D.; Freeman, J.; Powell, F.

    1991-01-01

    There are many applications in synchrotron radiation research where window valves can be usefully employed. Examples include gas cells for monochromator calibration, filters for high order light rejection, and as vacuum isolation elements between machine and experimental vacua. Often these devices are fairly expensive, and have only fixed (ie non-removable) windows. The development of a new type of seal technology by VAT for their series 01 valves provides a gate surface which is free from obstructions due to internal mechanical elements. This feature allows a threaded recess to be machined into the gate to receive a removable window frame which can carry standard size Luxel thin film windows. The combination of these features results in a DN 40 (2.75in. conflat flange) valve which provides a clear aperture of 21mm diameter for the window material. 8 refs., 2 figs

  17. Transcatheter Replacement of Failed Bioprosthetic Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonato, Matheus; Webb, John; Kornowski, Ran

    2016-01-01

    postprocedural gradients (mean >= 20 mm Hg). Optimal implantation depths were defined by receiver operating characteristic curve. A total of 292 consecutive patients (age, 78.9 +/- 8.7 years; 60.3% male; 157 CoreValve Evolut and 135 Sapien XT) were evaluated. High implantation was associated with significantly...... lower rates of elevated gradients in comparison with low implantation (CoreValve Evolut, 15% versus 34.2%; P=0.03 and Sapien XT, 18.5% versus 43.5%; P=0.03, respectively). Optimal implantation depths were defined: CoreValve Evolut, 0 to 5 mm; Sapien XT, 0 to 2 mm (0-10% frame height); sensitivities, 91...

  18. Full-root aortic valve replacement with stentless xenograft achieves superior regression of left ventricular hypertrophy compared to pericardial stented aortic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Reza; Auf der Maur, Christoph; Mueller, Xavier; Schläpfer, Reinhard; Jamshidi, Peiman; Daubeuf, François; Frossard, Nelly

    2015-02-03

    Full-root aortic valve replacement with stentless xenografts has potentially superior hemodynamic performance compared to stented valves. However, a number of cardiac surgeons are reluctant to transform a classical stented aortic valve replacement into a technically more demanding full-root stentless aortic valve replacement. Here we describe our technique of full-root stentless aortic xenograft implantation and compare the early clinical and midterm hemodynamic outcomes to those after aortic valve replacement with stented valves. We retrospectively compared the pre-operative characteristics of 180 consecutive patients who underwent full-root replacement with stentless aortic xenografts with those of 80 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement with stented valves. In subgroups presenting with aortic stenosis, we further analyzed the intra-operative data, early postoperative outcomes and mid-term regression of left ventricular mass index. Patients in the stentless group were younger (62.6 ± 13 vs. 70.3 ± 11.8 years, p regression of the left ventricular mass index in the stentless (p replacement can be performed without adversely affecting the early morbidity or mortality in patients operated on for aortic valve stenosis provided that the coronary ostia are not heavily calcified. The additional time necessary for the full-root stentless compared to the classical stented aortic valve replacement is therefore not detrimental to the early clinical outcomes and is largely rewarded in patients with aortic stenosis by lower transvalvular gradients at mid-term and a better regression of their left ventricular mass index.

  19. Comparative analysis of pain in patients who underwent total knee replacement regarding the tourniquet pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos George de Souza Leão

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVES: To evaluate through the visual analog scale (VAS the pain in patients undergoing total knee replacement (TKR with different pressures of the pneumatic tourniquet. METHODS: An observational, randomized, descriptive study on an analytical basis, with 60 patients who underwent TKR, divided into two groups, which were matched: a group where TKR was performed with tourniquet pressures of 350 mmHg (standard and the other with systolic blood pressure plus 100 mmHg (P + 100. These patients had their pain assessed by VAS at 48 h, and at the 5th and 15th days after procedure. Secondarily, the following were also measured: range of motion (ROM, complications, and blood drainage volume in each group; the data were subjected to statistical analysis. RESULTS: After data analysis, there was no statistical difference regarding the incidence of complications (p = 0.612, ROM (p = 0.202, bleeding after 24 and 48 h (p = 0.432 and p = 0.254 or in relation to VAS. No correlation was observed between time of ischemia compared to VAS and bleeding. CONCLUSIONS: The use of the pneumatic tourniquet pressure at 350 mmHg or systolic blood pressure plus 100 mmHg did not influence the pain, blood loss, ROM, and complications. Therefore the pressures at these levels are safe and do not change the surgery outcomes; the time of ischemia must be closely observed to avoid major complications.

  20. Bentall operation, total aortic replacement and mitral valve replacement for a young adult with Marfan syndrome: a case of three-staged operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, K; Shimazaki, Y; Watanabe, T; Kuraoka, S; Minowa, T; Miura, M; Oshikiri, S; Toyama, H

    1998-08-01

    In Marfan syndrome, the most common cardiovascular abnormalities are dilatation of the aorta and aortic valve regurgitation in adult patients. Mitral valve dysfunction is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in infants and children with Marfan syndrome, and is not frequently operated on in adult Marfan patients who undergo surgery for diseases of the aortic root and total aorta. This report describes a successfully three-staged operation for a 24 year-old man with Marfan syndrome who underwent an emergent Bentall operation and aortic arch replacement, total aortic replacement and mitral valve replacement over 2 years. Mitral valve regurgitation was mild but increased after the second operation. The graft was tightly adhesive and invasive to the sternum. Endoscopic view was helpful to avoid graft damage at resternotomy. The postoperative course was uneventful in each operation. Microscopic examination of the mitral valve leaflets showed abnormal increase of mucopolysaccharides, and disruption and fragmentation of elastic fibers.

  1. Latest-Generation Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Devices and Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamandi, Chekrallah; Puri, Rishi; Rodriguez-Gabella, Tania; Rodés-Cabau, Josep

    2017-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a well-established treatment for patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who are at high or prohibitive surgical risk. More recently, TAVR has emerged as a valid alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement for treating intermediate-risk patients, and several studies are currently evaluating the role of TAVR in low-risk patients. Transcatheter heart valve (THV) technologies have evolved considerably over time, and important iterations have been implemented in many of the latest-generation devices to (1) reduce the size and improve delivery system properties; (2) improve valve deployment, repositioning, and retrievability; and (3) reduce paravalvular leaks. This article reviews the main characteristics of, and clinical results associated with, the newer-generation THVs while providing an overview of novel TAVR indications. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Intracardiac echocardiography to diagnose pannus formation after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yoshiya; Ohara, Takahiro; Funada, Akira; Takahama, Hiroyuki; Amaki, Makoto; Hasegawa, Takuya; Sugano, Yasuo; Kanzaki, Hideaki; Anzai, Toshihisa

    2016-03-01

    A 66-year-old female, under regular follow-up for 20 years after aortic valve replacement (19-mm Carbomedics), presented dyspnea on effort and hypotension during hemodialysis. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed elevation of transvalvular velocity up to 4 m/s, but the structure around the aortic prosthesis was difficult to observe due to artifacts. Fluoroscopy revealed normal motion of the leaflets of the mechanical valve. Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) revealed a pannus-like structure in the left ventricular outflow tract. Transesophageal echocardiogram also revealed this structure. ICE can visualize structural abnormalities around a prosthetic valve after cardiac surgery even in patients in whom conventional imaging modalities failed.

  3. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement and vascular complications definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Mieghem, Nicolas M; Généreux, Philippe; van der Boon, Robert M A; Kodali, Susheel; Head, Stuart; Williams, Matthew; Daneault, Benoit; Kappetein, Arie-Pieter; de Jaegere, Peter P; Leon, Martin B; Serruys, Patrick W

    2014-03-20

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) requires large calibre catheters and is therefore associated with increased vascular complications. The aim of this study was to illustrate the impact of the different definitions of major vascular complications on their incidence and to underscore the importance of uniform reporting. We pooled dedicated databases of consecutive patients undergoing TAVR from two tertiary care facilities and looked for the incidence of major vascular complications using various previously reported definitions. The level of agreement (Kappa statistic) between the respective definitions and the Valve Academic Research Consortium (VARC) consensus definition of vascular complications was assessed. A total of 345 consecutive patients underwent transfemoral TAVR and were included in this analysis. A completely percutaneous access and closure technique was applied in 96% of cases. Arterial sheath size ranged between 18 and 24 Fr, the majority being 18 Fr (60%). Procedural success was reached in 94.5%. Depending on the definition used, major vascular complications occurred in 5.2-15.9% of patients. According to the VARC definitions, the rate of major and minor vascular complications was 9.0% and 9.6%, respectively. Major vascular complications according to VARC criteria demonstrated at least a substantial level of agreement with the SOURCE registry (k 0.80), the UK registry (k 0.82) the Italian registry (k 0.72) and "FRANCE" registry (k 0.70) definitions, compared to a moderate level of agreement with the definitions used in the German registry ( 0.47) and the 18 Fr Safety and Efficacy study (k 0.42). Minor complications according to VARC demonstrated a moderate agreement only with vascular complications using the German registry definition (k 0.54). Non-uniformity in how vascular complications are defined precludes any reliable comparison between previously reported TAVR registries. The VARC consensus document offers standardised endpoint

  4. Long-Term Risk for Aortic Complications After Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With Bicuspid Aortic Valve Versus Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itagaki, Shinobu; Chikwe, Joanna P; Chiang, Yuting P; Egorova, Natalia N; Adams, David H

    2015-06-09

    Bicuspid aortic valves are associated with valve dysfunction, ascending aortic aneurysm and dissection. Management of the ascending aorta at the time of aortic valve replacement (AVR) in these patients is controversial and has been extrapolated from experience with Marfan syndrome, despite the absence of comparative long-term outcome data. This study sought to assess whether the natural history of thoracic aortopathy after AVR in patients with bicuspid aortic valve disease is substantially different from that seen in patients with Marfan syndrome. In this retrospective comparison, outcomes of 13,205 adults (2,079 with bicuspid aortic valves, 73 with Marfan syndrome, and 11,053 control patients with acquired aortic valve disease) who underwent primary AVR without replacement of the ascending aorta in New York State between 1995 and 2010 were compared. The median follow-up time was 6.6 years. The long-term incidence of thoracic aortic dissection was significantly higher in patients with Marfan syndrome (5.5 ± 2.7%) compared with those with bicuspid valves (0.55 ± 0.21%) and control group patients (0.41 ± 0.08%, p Marfan syndrome (10.8 ± 4.4%) compared with those with bicuspid valves (4.8 ± 0.8%) and control group patients (1.4 ± 0.2%) (p Marfan syndrome were significantly more likely to undergo thoracic aortic surgery in late follow-up (10.4 ± 4.3%) compared with those with bicuspid valves (2.5 ± 0.6%) and control group patients (0.50 ± 0.09%) (p Marfan syndrome compared with those with bicuspid aortic valves confirm that operative management of patients with bicuspid aortic valves should not be extrapolated from Marfan syndrome and support discrete treatment algorithms for these different clinical entities. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The impact of the metabolic syndrome on the outcome after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadic, Marijana; Vukadinovic, Davor; Cvijanovic, Dane; Celic, Vera; Kocica, Mladen; Putnik, Svetozar; Ivanovic, Branislava

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the influence of the metabolic syndrome on the left ventricular geometry as well as on the early and mid-time outcome in patients with aortic stenosis who underwent aortic valve replacement. The study included 182 patients who underwent aortic valve replacement due to aortic stenosis. The metabolic syndrome was defined by the presence of at least three AHA-NHLB (American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute) criteria. All the patients were followed for at least 2 years after the surgery. The metabolic syndrome did not influence the severity of aortic stenosis (mean gradient and aortic valve area). However, the metabolic syndrome was associated with the reduced prevalence of the normal left ventricular geometry and the increased risk of concentric left ventricular hypertrophy in patients with aortic stenosis. Among the metabolic syndrome criteria, only increased blood pressure was simultaneously associated with the short-term and mid-term outcome, independently of other risk factors. Increased fasting glucose level was an independent predictor of the only 30-day outcome after the valve replacement. The metabolic syndrome and left ventricular hypertrophy were, independently of hypertension and diabetes, associated with the 30-day outcome, as well as incidence of major cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events in the 2-year postoperative period. The metabolic syndrome does not change severity of the aortic stenosis, but significantly impacts the left ventricular remodeling in these patients. The metabolic syndrome and left ventricular hypertrophy, irrespective of hypertension and diabetes, are predictors of the short-term and mid-term outcome of patients with aortic stenosis who underwent aortic valve replacement.

  6. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement in Loeys-Dietz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nishant D; Arnaoutakis, George J; George, Timothy J; Allen, Jeremiah G; Alejo, Diane E; Dietz, Harry C; Cameron, Duke E; Vricella, Luca A

    2011-08-01

    Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is a recently recognized aggressive aortic disorder characterized by root aneurysm, arterial tortuosity, hypertelorism, and bifid uvula or cleft palate. The results of prophylactic root replacement using valve-sparing procedures (valve-sparing root replacement [VSRR]) in patients with LDS is not known. We reviewed all patients with clinical and genetic (transforming growth factor-β receptor mutations) evidence of LDS who underwent VSRR at our institution. Echocardiographic and clinical data were obtained from hospital and follow-up clinic records. From 2002 to 2009, 31 patients with a firm diagnosis of LDS underwent VSRR for aortic root aneurysm. Mean age was 15 years, and 24 (77%) were children. One (3%) patient had a bicuspid aortic valve. Preoperative sinus diameter was 3.9±0.8 cm (z score 7.0±2.9) and 2 (6%) had greater than 2+ aortic insufficiency. Thirty patients (97%) underwent reimplantation procedures using a Valsalva graft. There were no operative deaths. Mean follow-up was 3.6 years (range, 0 to 7 years). One patient required late repair of a pseudoaneurysm at the distal aortic anastomosis, and 1 had a conversion to a David reimplantation procedure after a Florida sleeve operation. No patient suffered thromboembolism or endocarditis, and 1 (3%) patient experienced greater than 2+ late aortic insufficiency. No patient required late aortic valve repair or replacement. Loeys-Dietz syndrome is an aggressive aortic aneurysm syndrome that can be addressed by prophylactic aortic root replacement with low operative risk. Valve-sparing procedures have encouraging early and midterm results, similar to those in Marfan syndrome, and are an attractive option for young patients. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Mitral valve replacement in infants and children 5 years of age or younger: Evolution in practice and outcome over three decades with a focus on supra-annular prosthesis implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Elif Seda Selamet; Pigula, Frank A.; Berul, Charles I.; Lock, James E.; del Nido, Pedro J.; McElhinney, Doff B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Successful mitral valve replacement in young children is limited by the lack of small prosthetic valves. Supra-annular prosthesis implantation can facilitate mitral valve replacement with a larger prosthesis in children with a small annulus, but little is known about its effect on the outcomes of mitral valve replacement in young children. Methods One hundred eighteen children underwent mitral valve replacement at 5 years of age or younger from 1976–2006. Mitral valve replacement was supra-annular in 37 (32%) patients. Results Survival was 74% ± 4% at 1 year and 56% ± 5% at 10 years but improved over time (10-year survival of 83% ± 7% from 1994–2006). Factors associated with worse survival included earlier mitral valve replacement date, age less than 1 year, complete atrioventricular canal, and additional procedures at mitral valve replacement, but not supra-annular mitral valve replacement. As survival improved during our more recent experience, the risks of supra-annular mitral valve replacement became apparent; survival was worse among patients with a supra-annular prosthesis after 1991. A pacemaker was placed in 18 (15%) patients within 1 month of mitral valve replacement and was less likely in patients who had undergone supra-annular mitral valve replacement. Among early survivors, freedom from redo mitral valve replacement was 72% ± 5% at 5 years and 45% ± 7% at 10 years. Twenty-one patients with a supra-annular prosthesis underwent redo mitral valve replacement. The second prosthesis was annular in 15 of these patients and upsized in all but 1, but 5 required pacemaker placement for heart block. Conclusions Supra-annular mitral valve replacement was associated with worse survival than annular mitral valve replacement in our recent experience. Patients with supra-annular mitral valve replacement were less likely to have operative complete heart block but remained at risk when the prosthesis was subsequently replaced. PMID:18954636

  8. Aortic valve replacement with the Biocor PSB stentless xenograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolini, P; Luciani, G B; Vecchi, B; Pugliese, P; Mazzucco, A

    1998-08-01

    The midterm clinical results after aortic valve replacement with the Biocor PSB stentless xenograft on all patients operated between October 1992 and October 1996 were reviewed. One hundred six patients, aged 70+/-6 years, had aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis (67%), regurgitation (11%), or both (22%). Associated procedures were done in 49 patients (46%), including coronary artery bypass in 30 patients, mitral valve repair/replacement in 16, and ascending aorta replacement in 5 patients. Aortic cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass times were 96+/-24 and 129+/-31 minutes, respectively. There were 3 (3%) early deaths due to low output (2 patients) and cerebrovascular accident (1 patient). Follow-up of survivors ranged from 6 to 66 months (mean, 39+/-14 months). Survival was 94%+/-2% and 90%+/-3% at 1 and 5 years. There were 5 late deaths due to cardiac cause (2), cancer (2), and pulmonary embolism (1 patient). No patient had structural valve deterioration, whereas 100% and 95%+/-3% were free from valve-related events at 1 and 5 years. There were two reoperations due to narrowing of the left coronary ostium and endocarditis, with an actuarial freedom from reoperation of 99%+/-1% and 98+/-1% at 1 and 5 years, respectively. Functional results demonstrated a mean peak transprosthetic gradient of 16+/-12 mm Hg, with only 1 patient (1%) with a 55 mm Hg gradient. No cases of valve regurgitation greater than mild were recorded at follow-up. Assessment of New York Heart Association functional class demonstrated a significant improvement (2.9+/-0.6 versus 1.4+/-0.7; p=0.01). All patients were free from anticoagulation. Aortic valve replacement using the Biocor PSB stentless xenograft offers excellent midterm survival, negligible valve deterioration, and a very low rate of valve-related events, which are comparable to estimates reported with other models of stentless xenografts and currently available stented xenografts. Hemodynamic performance is favorable and

  9. Immediate and long term evolution of valve replacement in children less than 12 years old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atik Fernando Antibas

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this work was the follow-up and evaluation of valve replacement in children under 12 years of age. METHODS: Forty-four children less than 12 years old were underwent valve replacement at INCOR-HCFMUSP between January 1986 and December 1992. Forty (91% were rheumatic, 39 (88.7% were in functional classes II or IV, 19 (43.2% were operated upon on an emergency basis, and 6 (13.6% had atrial fibrillation. Biological prostheses (BP were employed in 26 patients (59.1%, and mechanical prostheses (MP in 18 (40.9%. Mitral valves were replaced in 30 (68.7%, aortic valves in 8 (18.2%, a tricuspid valve in 1 (2.3%, and double (aortic and mitral valves in 5 (11.4 of the patients. RESULTS: Hospital mortality was of 4.5% (2 cases. The mean follow-up period was 5.8 years. Re-operations occurred in 63.3% of the patients with BP and in 12.5% of those with MP (p=0.002. Infectious endocarditis was present in 26.3% of the BP, but in none of the cases of MP (p=0.049. Thrombosis occurred in 2 (12.5% and hemorrhage in one (6.5% of the patients with a MP. Delayed mortality occurred in 5 (11.9% of the patients over a mean period of 2.6 years; four had had BP and one had a MP (NS. Actuarial survival and re-operation-free curves after 10 years were respectively, 82.5±7.7 (SD% and 20.6±15.9%. CONCLUSION: Patients with MP required fewer re-operation, had less infectious endocarditis and lower late mortality rates compared with patients with bioprostheses. The former, therefore, appear to be the best valve replacement for pediatric patients.

  10. Midterm outcome of valve-sparing aortic root replacement in inherited connective tissue disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Ogino, Hitoshi; Matsuda, Hitoshi; Minatoya, Kenji; Sasaki, Hiroaki; Iba, Yutaka

    2011-11-01

    This study determined the midterm outcome of valve-sparing aortic root replacement for patients with inherited connective tissue disorders. From 1993 to 2008, 94 patients underwent valve-sparing aortic root replacement. Sixty patients (64%), average age 33 years (range, 15 to 61 years), had inherited connective tissue disorders: Marfan syndrome, 54 (92%); Loeys-Dietz syndrome, 5 (8%); and smooth muscle α-actin (ACTA2) mutation in 1. Median preoperative sinus diameter was 52 mm (range, 42 to 76 mm), and moderate/severe aortic regurgitation was present in 14 (23%). Seven (12%, 1993 to 1999) underwent remodeling procedures, and 53 had reimplantation procedures. Cusp repair was performed in 4. Median follow-up was 55 months (range, 1 to 149 months). There were 15 patients in the early term (1993 to 2000) and 45 in the late term (2001 to 2008). Four late deaths occurred (cardiac, 3; aortic, 1), with 10-year survival of 86%. Rates of freedom from aortic valve replacement at 5 and 10 years were 85% and 58% in remodeling and 96% and 58% in reimplantation. Risk factors for reoperations were postprocedure intraoperative aortic insufficiency greater than mild (p = 0.046), remodeling procedure (p = 0.016), and early term (p = 0.0002). One patient (2%) with none/trivial postprocedure aortic insufficiency required aortic valve replacement. Freedom from reoperation in patients with none/trivial postprocedure aortic insufficiency at 5 and 10 years was 100% and 67%. Meticulous control of aortic insufficiency during operation would bring favorable midterm durability in valve-sparing aortic root replacement using a reimplantation technique, even in patients with inherited connective tissue disorders. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Mitral valve disease in patients with Marfan syndrome undergoing aortic root replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkala, Meghana R; Schaff, Hartzell V; Li, Zhuo; Volguina, Irina; Dietz, Harry C; LeMaire, Scott A; Coselli, Joseph S; Connolly, Heidi

    2013-09-10

    Cardiac manifestations of Marfan syndrome include aortic root dilation and mitral valve prolapse (MVP). Only scant data exist describing MVP in patients with Marfan syndrome undergoing aortic root replacement. We retrospectively analyzed data from 166 MFS patients with MVP who were enrolled in a prospective multicenter registry of patients who underwent aortic root aneurysm repair. Of these 166 patients, 9% had mitral regurgitation (MR) grade >2, and 10% had MR grade 2. The severity of MVP and MR was evaluated by echocardiography preoperatively and ≤ 3 years postoperatively. Forty-one patients (25%) underwent composite graft aortic valve replacement, and 125 patients (75%) underwent aortic valve-sparing procedures; both groups had similar prevalences of MR grade >2 (P=0.7). Thirty-three patients (20%) underwent concomitant mitral valve (MV) intervention (repair, n=29; replacement, n=4), including all 15 patients with MR grade >2. Only 1 patient required MV reintervention during follow-up (mean clinical follow-up, 31 ± 10 months). Echocardiography performed 21 ± 13 months postoperatively revealed MR >2 in only 3 patients (2%). One early death and 2 late deaths occurred. Although the majority of patients with Marfan syndrome who undergo elective aortic root replacement have MVP, only 20% have concomitant MV procedures. These concomitant procedures do not seem to increase operative risk. In patients with MR grade ≤ 2 who do not undergo a concomitant MV procedure, the short-term incidence of progressive MR is low; however, more follow-up is needed to determine whether patients with MVP and MR grade ≤ 2 would benefit from prophylactic MV intervention.

  12. Aortic regurgitation after valve-sparing aortic root replacement: modes of failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Takanori; Okita, Yutaka; Matsumori, Masamichi; Okada, Kenji; Minami, Hitoshi; Munakata, Hiroshi; Inoue, Takeshi; Tanaka, Akiko; Sakamoto, Toshihito; Omura, Atsushi; Nomura, Takuo

    2011-11-01

    Despite the positive clinical results of valve-sparing aortic root replacement, little is known about the causes of reoperations and the modes of failure. From October 1999 to June 2010, 101 patients underwent valve-sparing aortic root replacement using the David reimplantation technique. The definition of aortic root repair failure included the following: (1) intraoperative conversion to the Bentall procedure; (2) reoperation performed because of aortic regurgitation; and (3) aortic regurgitation equal to or greater than a moderate degree at the follow-up. Sixteen patients were considered to have repair failure. Three patients required intraoperative conversion to valve replacement, 3 required reoperation within 3 months, and another 8 required reoperation during postoperative follow-up. At initial surgery 5 patients had moderate to severe aortic regurgitation, 6 patients had acute aortic dissections, 3 had Marfan syndrome, 2 had status post Ross operations, 3 had bicuspid aortic valves, and 1 had aortitis. Five patients had undergone cusp repair, including Arantius plication in 3 and plication at the commissure in 2. The causes of early failure in 6 patients included cusp perforation (3), cusp prolapse (3), and severe hemolysis (1). The causes of late failure in 10 patients included cusp prolapse (4), commissure dehiscence (3), torn cusp (2), and cusp retraction (1). Patients had valve replacements at a mean of 23 ± 20.9 months after reimplantation and survived. Causes of early failure after valve-sparing root replacement included technical failure, cusp lesions, and steep learning curve. Late failure was caused by aortic root wall degeneration due to gelatin-resorcin-formalin glue, cusp degeneration, or progression of cusp prolapse. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Valve-sparing root replacement for freestanding pulmonary autograft aneurysm after the Ross procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratschiller, Thomas; Eva, Sames-Dolzer; Schimetta, Wolfgang; Paulus, Patrick; Müller, Hannes; Zierer, Andreas; Mair, Rudolf

    2018-02-20

    Autograft dilatation is the main long-term complication following the Ross procedure using the freestanding root replacement technique. We reviewed our 25-year experience with the Ross procedure with a special emphasis on valve-sparing reoperations. From 1991 to 2016, 153 patients (29.6 ± 16.6 years; 29.4% pediatric) underwent a Ross operation at our institution with implantation of the autograft as freestanding root replacement. The follow-up is 98.7% complete with a mean of 12.2 ± 5.5 years. Mortality at 30-days was 2.0%. Echocardiography documented no or trivial aortic regurgitation in 99.3% of the patients at discharge. Survival probability at 20 years was 85.4%. No case of autograft endocarditis occurred. Autograft deterioration rate was 2.01% per patient-year, and freedom from autograft reoperation was 75.3% at 15 years. A reoperation for autograft aneurysm was required in 35 patients (22.9%) at a mean interval of 11.1 ± 4.6 years after the Ross procedure. A valve-sparing root replacement was performed in 77% of patients, including 10 David and 17 Yacoub procedures with no early mortality. Three patients required prosthetic valve replacement within 2 years after a Yacoub operation. At latest follow-up, 92% of all surviving patients still carry the pulmonary autograft valve. Freedom from autograft valve replacement was 92.1% at 15 years. Using the David or Yacoub techniques, the autograft valve can be preserved in the majority of patients with root aneurysms after the Ross procedure. Reoperations can be performed with no early mortality, a good functional midterm result, and an acceptable reintervention rate. Copyright © 2018 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. MANAGEMENT OF FAILED MITRAL VALVE REPLACEMENT. THE DURBAN EXPERIENCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistan, D; Booysen, M; Alexander, G; Madiba, T E

    2017-06-01

    Mitral valve replacement is the procedure of choice in patients with severe mitral valve disease. However, these patients are surviving longer and are thus at an increased risk of prosthesis failure or valve-related complications. Study setting: Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital, a tertiary referral Hospital in Durban. Study population: All patients undergoing redo mechanical mitral valve replacement surgery between January 2005 and December 2014. Study design: Retrospective analysis of patients undergoing redo mitral valve replacement. Patients were identified from theatre record books, their files were electronically accessed and pertinent information extracted onto a data capture sheet. Information documented included demographics, duration to failure, INR, Albumin, HIV status, clinical findings and outcome. The data was stored on an Excel datasheet. Fifty-eight patients were documented (mean age 32 ± 15.81 years; M:F 1:3). Ten patients (17%) were HIV positive (median CD4 count 478). Mean duration between first surgery and redo was 8.8 years. Thirty-five patients (60%) had no co-morbidities. Presenting features at redo surgery were congestive cardiac failure (27), chest pain (11) and palpitations (17). Mean preoperative Ejection Fraction was 51.65 %. Twenty-nine patients (55%) had emergency redo surgery. Twenty-two patients (75%) had acute prosthetic valve thrombosis. Thirty-two patients had tricuspid regurgitation. Original pathology was documented in 23 patients (40%) as Rheumatic valve disease. Prosthetic valve thrombosis was documented in 31 patients (54%). The most commonly used valve was the On-X. Mean presenting INR was 1.96 + 1.2 and mean presenting serum albumin was 36.7 + 7.8 g/l. Forty-one patients (71%) were found to be compliant to Warfarin therapy prior to redo surgery. Mean ICU stay was 6 +9 days. Two patients died postoperatively. Mean followup was 32 + 26.6 months. Twelve patients (20.7%) developed postoperative complications. Patients

  15. New-Onset Atrial Fibrillation After Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Troels Højsgaard; Thygesen, Julie Bjerre; Thyregod, Hans Gustav

    2015-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have been shown to be the only treatments that can improve the natural cause of severe aortic valve stenosis. However, after SAVR and TAVI, the incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation...... (NOAF) is 31%-64% and 4%-32%, respectively. NOAF is independently associated with adverse events such as stroke, death, and increased length of hospital stay. Increasing the knowledge of predisposing factors, optimal postprocedural monitoring, and prophylactic antiarrhythmic and antithrombotic therapy...

  16. New-onset atrial fibrillation after surgical aortic valve replacement and transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Troels Højsgaard; Thygesen, Julie Bjerre; Thyregod, Hans Gustav

    2015-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have been shown to be the only treatments that can improve the natural cause of severe aortic valve stenosis. However, after SAVR and TAVI, the incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation...... (NOAF) is 31%-64% and 4%-32%, respectively. NOAF is independently associated with adverse events such as stroke, death, and increased length of hospital stay. Increasing the knowledge of predisposing factors, optimal postprocedural monitoring, and prophylactic antiarrhythmic and antithrombotic therapy...

  17. Acute Right Coronary Ostial Stenosis during Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarwar Umran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of acute right coronary artery stenosis developing in a patient undergoing aortic valve replacement. We present a case report with a brief overview of the literature relating to coronary artery occlusion associated with cardiac valve surgery - the theories and treatments are discussed. A 85 year-old female was admitted under the care of the cardiothoracic team with signs and symptoms of heart failure. Investigations, including cardiac echocardiography and coronary angiography, indicated a critical aortic valve stenosis. Intraoperative right ventricular failure ensued post aortic valve replacement. Subsequent investigations revealed an acute occlusion of the proximal right coronary artery with resultant absence of distal flow supplying the right ventricle. An immediate right coronary artery bypass procedure was performed with resolution of the right ventricular failure. Subsequent weaning off cardiopulmonary bypass was uneventful and the patient continued to make excellent recovery in the postoperative phase. To our knowledge this is one of the few documented cases of intraoperative acute coronary artery occlusion developing during valve surgery. However, surgeons should be aware of the potential for acute occlusion so that early recognition and rapid intervention can be instituted.

  18. Physical activity in the elderly who underwent joint replacement surgery in the course of rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Prusinowska

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available According to the forecasts of the Central Statistical Office of Poland, in 2030 people at the age of 65 and older will account for 23.8%, i.e. their number will amount to approx. 8.5 m people. Geriatric rheumatic patients more often decide to undergo surgical joint replacement. According to the National Health Fund, the number of joint replacement services provided in 2014 increased by 93%, as compared to 2005. Improving the physical performance of this constantly expanding group of patients requires taking into account many factors to raise their functional status, reduce the risk of falling, teach rules of proper functioning with an artificial joint and encourage unassisted physical activity. Restoring fitness and independence is a difficult but necessary task due to an increasing number of seniors with replaced joint.

  19. Reoperative aortic valve replacement in the octogenarians-minimally invasive technique in the era of transcatheter valve replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaneko, Tsuyoshi; Loberman, Dan; Gosev, Igor; Rassam, Fadi; McGurk, Siobhan; Leacche, Marzia; Cohn, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Reoperative aortic valve replacement (re-AVR) in octogenarians is considered high risk and therefore might be indicated for transcatheter AVR. The minimally invasive technique for re-AVR limits dissection and might benefit this patient population. We report the outcomes of re-AVR in

  20. Outcomes in nonagenarians after heart valve replacement operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Maria-Benedicta; Taylor, Kenneth M

    2003-03-01

    Changes in the age profile of the United Kingdom population and improvements in preoperative and postoperative care have resulted in increasing numbers of very elderly patients undergoing heart valve replacement (HVR) operations. Although HVR operations in nonagenarians are relatively uncommon, the demand for cardiac operations in this age group may increase over time. Outcomes after HVR operations in nonagenarians have not been well described yet. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine outcomes in terms of early mortality and long-term survival in 35 nonagenarians after HVR operation. Data from the United Kingdom Heart Valve Registry were analyzed and nonagenarian patients were identified. Additional analyzed data include gender, valve position, valve type, valve size, operative priority, follow-up time, and date and cause of death. Kaplan-Meier actuarial curves were calculated to determine accurate 30-day mortality and long-term survival. On average five HVR operations are performed annually in the United Kingdom in nonagenarians with equal numbers of males and females. Aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthetic valve was the most common operation and 86% were elective admissions. Fourteen patients died within the review period; mean time to death was 402 days. Overall 30-day mortality was 17%, which was higher for males compared with females; females also displayed better long-term survival. HVR operations in nonagenarians carry a significantly higher risk of early mortality and reduced long-term survival. Despite increases in the age profile of the population, elective HVR operation with patients aged 90 years or older is likely to remain an infrequent surgical procedure reserved for very carefully selected patients.

  1. Valve-sparing root and ascending aorta replacement after heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhenawy, Abdelsalam M; Feindel, Christopher M; Ross, Heather; Butany, Jagdish; Yau, Terrence M

    2012-12-01

    A 45-year-old female underwent heart transplantation 17 years ago, with a heart from a 15-year-old donor. Recently, she had developed an aneurysm of the donor aortic root and ascending aorta, with severe aortic insufficiency. Two surgical options were considered; retransplantation versus replacement of the aortic root and ascending aorta. A valve-sparing replacement of the aortic root and ascending aortic aneurysm was performed. The donor aorta showed pathologic changes typical of Marfan syndrome. Nineteen months postoperatively, the patient remains in functional class I, with trivial aortic insufficiency. Copyright © 2012 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. THE RESULTS OF SURGICAL TREATMENT OF TRICUSPID VALVE INFECTIVE ENDOCARDITIS USING VALVE REPAIR AND VALVE REPLACEMENT OPERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Kovalev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate in-hospital and long-term results of surgical treatment of patients with infective endocarditis of the tricuspid valve, to compare the effectiveness of valve repair and valve replacement techniques, and to identify risk factors of mortality and reoperations. Materials and methods. 31 surgical patients with tricuspid valve infective endocarditis were evaluated. Patients were divided into 2 groups. In Group 1 (n = 14 repairs of the tricuspid valve were performed, in Group 2 (n = 17 patients had undergone tricuspid valve replacements. Epidemiological, clinical, microbiological and echocardiographic data were studied. Methods of comparative analysis, the Kaplan–Meier method, and Cox risk models were applied. Results. The most common complication of in-hospital stay was atrioventricular block (17.7% of cases in Group 2. In Group 1, this type of complication was not found. Hospital mortality was 7.14% in Group 1, and 0% in Group 2. Long-term results have shown the significant reduction of heart failure in general cohort and in both groups. In Group 1 the severity of heart failure in the long term was less than in Group 2. No significant differences in the severity of tricuspid regurgitation were found between the groups. In 7-year follow up no cases of death were registered in Group 1. Cumulative survival rate in Group 2 within 60 months was 67.3 ± 16.2%. No reoperations were performed in patients from Group 1. In Group 2, the freedom from reoperation within 60 months was 70.9 ± 15.3%. Combined intervention was found as predictor of postoperative mortality. Prosthetic valve endocarditis was identified as risk factor for reoperation. Conclusion. Valve repair and valve replacement techniques of surgical treatment of tricuspid valve endocarditis can provide satisfactory hospital and long-term results. Tricuspid valve repair techniques allowed reducing the incidence of postoperative atrioventricular block. In the long-term, patients

  3. Left main coronary artery obstruction by dislodged native-valve calculus after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmaz, Tahir; Ayhan, Huseyin; Keles, Telat; Aslan, Abdullah Nabi; Erdogan, Kemal Esref; Sari, Cenk; Bilen, Emine; Akcay, Murat; Bozkurt, Engin

    2014-08-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement can be an effective, reliable treatment for severe aortic stenosis in surgically high-risk or ineligible patients. However, various sequelae like coronary artery obstruction can occur, not only in the long term, but also immediately after the procedure. We present the case of a 78-year-old woman whose left main coronary artery became obstructed with calculus 2 hours after the transfemoral implantation of an Edwards Sapien XT aortic valve. Despite percutaneous coronary intervention in that artery, the patient died. This case reminds us that early recognition of acute coronary obstruction and prompt intervention are crucial in patients with aortic stenosis who have undergone transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

  4. Society of Thoracic Surgeons Risk Score predicts hospital charges and resource use after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaoutakis, George J; George, Timothy J; Alejo, Diane E; Merlo, Christian A; Baumgartner, William A; Cameron, Duke E; Shah, Ashish S

    2011-09-01

    The impact of Society of Thoracic Surgeons predicted mortality risk score on resource use has not been previously studied. We hypothesize that increasing Society of Thoracic Surgeons risk scores in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement are associated with greater hospital charges. Clinical and financial data for patients undergoing aortic valve replacement at The Johns Hopkins Hospital over a 10-year period (January 2000 to December 2009) were reviewed. The current Society of Thoracic Surgeons formula (v2.61) for in-hospital mortality was used for all patients. After stratification into risk quartiles, index admission hospital charges were compared across risk strata with rank-sum and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Linear regression and Spearman's coefficient assessed correlation and goodness of fit. Multivariable analysis assessed relative contributions of individual variables on overall charges. A total of 553 patients underwent aortic valve replacement during the study period. Average predicted mortality was 2.9% (±3.4) and actual mortality was 3.4% for aortic valve replacement. Median charges were greater in the upper quartile of patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (quartiles 1-3, $39,949 [interquartile range, 32,708-51,323] vs quartile 4, $62,301 [interquartile range, 45,952-97,103], P < .01]. On univariate linear regression, there was a positive correlation between Society of Thoracic Surgeons risk score and log-transformed charges (coefficient, 0.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.05-0.07; P < .01). Spearman's correlation R-value was 0.51. This positive correlation persisted in risk-adjusted multivariable linear regression. Each 1% increase in Society of Thoracic Surgeons risk score was associated with an added $3000 in hospital charges. This is the first study to show that increasing Society of Thoracic Surgeons risk score predicts greater charges after aortic valve replacement. As competing therapies, such as percutaneous valve replacement, emerge to

  5. Transcatheter aortic-valve replacement with a self-expanding prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David H; Popma, Jeffrey J; Reardon, Michael J; Yakubov, Steven J; Coselli, Joseph S; Deeb, G Michael; Gleason, Thomas G; Buchbinder, Maurice; Hermiller, James; Kleiman, Neal S; Chetcuti, Stan; Heiser, John; Merhi, William; Zorn, George; Tadros, Peter; Robinson, Newell; Petrossian, George; Hughes, G Chad; Harrison, J Kevin; Conte, John; Maini, Brijeshwar; Mumtaz, Mubashir; Chenoweth, Sharla; Oh, Jae K

    2014-05-08

    We compared transcatheter aortic-valve replacement (TAVR), using a self-expanding transcatheter aortic-valve bioprosthesis, with surgical aortic-valve replacement in patients with severe aortic stenosis and an increased risk of death during surgery. We recruited patients with severe aortic stenosis who were at increased surgical risk as determined by the heart team at each study center. Risk assessment included the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Predictor Risk of Mortality estimate and consideration of other key risk factors. Eligible patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to TAVR with the self-expanding transcatheter valve (TAVR group) or to surgical aortic-valve replacement (surgical group). The primary end point was the rate of death from any cause at 1 year, evaluated with the use of both noninferiority and superiority testing. A total of 795 patients underwent randomization at 45 centers in the United States. In the as-treated analysis, the rate of death from any cause at 1 year was significantly lower in the TAVR group than in the surgical group (14.2% vs. 19.1%), with an absolute reduction in risk of 4.9 percentage points (upper boundary of the 95% confidence interval, -0.4; P<0.001 for noninferiority; P = 0.04 for superiority). The results were similar in the intention-to-treat analysis. In a hierarchical testing procedure, TAVR was noninferior with respect to echocardiographic indexes of valve stenosis, functional status, and quality of life. Exploratory analyses suggested a reduction in the rate of major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events and no increase in the risk of stroke. In patients with severe aortic stenosis who are at increased surgical risk, TAVR with a self-expanding transcatheter aortic-valve bioprosthesis was associated with a significantly higher rate of survival at 1 year than surgical aortic-valve replacement. (Funded by Medtronic; U.S. CoreValve High Risk Study ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01240902.).

  6. High patient satisfaction in 445 patients who underwent fast-track hip or knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Kirsten; Kjaersgaard-Andersen, Per; Kehlet, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Patient satisfaction is important in fast-track total hip and knee replacement (THR, TKR). We assessed: (1) how satisfied patients were with the treatment; (2) factors related to overall satisfaction; and (3) whether there was a difference between THR and TKR regarding...... length of stay (LOS) and patient satisfaction. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In this follow-up study, a consecutive series of 445 patients undergoing THR and TKR completed a questionnaire 2 weeks after discharge. LOS and short-term patient satisfaction with the fast-track management were measured. Patient...... satisfaction was measured using a numerical rating scale (NRS; 0-10). RESULTS: For THR, the median satisfaction score was 9-10 and for TKR it was 8.5-10 in all parameters. Older THR patients had higher overall satisfaction. No association was found between overall satisfaction following THR or TKR and sex...

  7. Patient-prosthesis mismatch has no influence on in-hospital mortality after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yottasurodom, Chaiwut; Namthaisong, Kriengkrai; Porapakkham, Pramote; Kasemsarn, Choosak; Chotivatanapong, Taweesak; Chaiseri, Pradistchai; Wongdit, Suwannee; Yasotarin, Suwanna

    2012-08-01

    To analyze the relationship between prosthetic aortic valve orifice and body surface area (Effective Orifice Area Index, EOAI) and in-hospital mortality after aortic valve replacement. A prospective study was conducted between October 2007 to September 2010, 536 patients underwent isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR) was recorded on preoperative, operative and postoperative data. Patient Prosthesis Mismatch (PPM) was classified by Effective Orifice Area Indexed (EOAI) by prosthetic valve area divided by body surface area as mild or no significance if the EOAI is greater than 0.85 cm2/m2, moderate if between 0.65 cm2/m2 and 0.85 cm2/m2, and severe if less than 0.65 cm2/m2. Statistical differences were analyzed by Chi-square and student t-test with p-value less than 0.05 considered significant. There were 304 men, mean age was 60.98 years, mean valve orifice area 1.69 cm2, body surface area 1.60 m2, cross clamp time 1.13 hrs., bypass time 1.67 hrs. Mechanical valves were used in 274 patients (51.2%) and Bioprosthesis were used in 181 patients (48.8%). PPM was found in 33.7%, 6.7% was severe PPM, 27% was moderate PPM and 66.3% has no significant PPM Over all in-hospital mortality was 1.5%. There was no significant difference in hospital mortality between no PPM group, moderate PPM and severe PPM group (1.4% vs. 1.4% vs. 5.4%, p-value = 0.86). In a large aortic valve surgery population, moderate and severe patient prosthesis mismatch occurred in 35.6% of patients but had no influence on in-hospital mortality.

  8. Incidence and progression of mild aortic regurgitation after Tirone David reimplantation valve-sparing aortic root replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Elizabeth H; Liang, David H; Kvitting, John-Peder Escobar; Kari, Fabian A; Fischbein, Michael P; Mitchell, R Scott; Miller, D Craig

    2014-01-01

    The study objective was to determine whether recurrent or residual mild aortic regurgitation, which occurs after valve-sparing aortic root replacement, progresses over time. Between 2003 and 2008, 154 patients underwent Tirone David-V valve-sparing aortic root replacement; 96 patients (62%) had both 1-year (median, 12 ± 4 months) and mid-term (62 ± 22 months) transthoracic echocardiograms available for analysis. Age of patients averaged 38 ± 13 years, 71% were male, 31% had a bicuspid aortic valve, 41% had Marfan syndrome, and 51% underwent aortic valve repair, predominantly cusp free margin shortening. Forty-one patients (43%) had mild aortic regurgitation on 1-year echocardiogram. In 85% of patients (n = 35), mild aortic regurgitation remained stable on the most recent echocardiogram (median, 57 ± 20 months); progression to moderate aortic regurgitation occurred in 5 patients (12%) at a median of 28 ± 18 months and remained stable thereafter; severe aortic regurgitation developed in 1 patient, eventually requiring reoperation. Five patients (5%) had moderate aortic regurgitation at 1 year, which did not progress subsequently. Two patients (2%) had more than moderate aortic regurgitation at 1 year, and both ultimately required reoperation. Although mild aortic regurgitation occurs frequently after valve-sparing aortic root replacement, it is unlikely to progress over the next 5 years and should not be interpreted as failure of the valve-preservation concept. Further, we suggest that mild aortic regurgitation should not be considered nonstructural valve dysfunction, as the 2008 valve reporting guidelines would indicate. We need 10- to 15-year follow-up to learn the long-term clinical consequences of mild aortic regurgitation early after valve-sparing aortic root replacement. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Postoperative Reverse Remodeling and Symptomatic Improvement in Normal-Flow Low-Gradient Aortic Stenosis After Aortic Valve Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter-Storch, Rasmus; Møller, Jacob E; Christensen, Nicolaj L

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe aortic stenosis (AS) most often presents with reduced aortic valve area (benefit of aortic valve...... replacement (AVR) among NFLG patients is controversial. We compared the impact of NFLG condition on preoperative left ventricular (LV) remodeling and myocardial fibrosis and postoperative remodeling and symptomatic benefit. METHODS AND RESULTS: Eighty-seven consecutive patients with reduced aortic valve area...... and normal stroke volume index undergoing AVR underwent echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, a 6-minute walk test, and measurement of natriuretic peptides before and 1 year after AVR. Myocardial fibrosis was assessed from magnetic resonance imaging. Patients were stratified as NFLG or normal...

  10. David valve-sparing aortic root replacement: equivalent mid-term outcome for different valve types with or without connective tissue disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvitting, John-Peder Escobar; Kari, Fabian A; Fischbein, Michael P; Liang, David H; Beraud, Anne-Sophie; Stephens, Elizabeth H; Mitchell, R Scott; Miller, D Craig

    2013-01-01

    Although implicitly accepted by many that the durability of valve-sparing aortic root replacement in patients with bicuspid aortic valve disease and connective tissue disorders will be inferior, this hypothesis has not been rigorously investigated. From 1993 to 2009, 233 patients (27% bicuspid aortic valve, 40% Marfan syndrome) underwent Tirone David valve-sparing aortic root replacement. Follow-up averaged 4.7 ± 3.3 years (1102 patient-years). Freedom from adverse outcomes was determined using log-rank calculations. Survival at 5 and 10 years was 98.7% ± 0.7% and 93.5% ± 5.1%, respectively. Freedom from reoperation (all causes) on the aortic root was 92.2% ± 3.6% at 10 years; 3 reoperations were aortic valve replacement owing to structural valve deterioration. Freedom from structural valve deterioration at 10 years was 96.1% ± 2.1%. No significant differences were found in survival (P = .805, P = .793, respectively), reoperation (P = .179, P = .973, respectively), structural valve deterioration (P = .639, P = .982, respectively), or any other functional or clinical endpoints when patients were stratified by valve type (tricuspid aortic valve vs bicuspid aortic valve) or associated connective tissue disorder. At the latest echocardiographic follow-up (95% complete), 202 patients (94.8%) had none or trace aortic regurgitation, 10 (4.7%) mild, 0 had moderate to severe, and 1 (0.5%) had severe aortic regurgitation. Freedom from greater than 2+ aortic regurgitation at 10 years was 95.3% ± 2.5%. Six patients sustained acute type B aortic dissection (freedom at 10 years, 90.4% ± 5.0%). Tirone David reimplantation valve-sparing aortic root replacement in carefully selected young patients was associated with excellent clinical and echocardiographic outcome in patients with either a tricuspid aortic valve or bicuspid aortic valve. No demonstrable adverse influence was found for Marfan syndrome or connective tissue disorder on durability, clinical outcome

  11. Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve Replacement: Current State of Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkashkari, Wail; Alsubei, Amani; Hijazi, Ziyad M

    2018-03-15

    The past couple of decades have brought tremendous advances to the field of pediatric and adult congenital heart disease (CHD). Percutaneous valve interventions are now a cornerstone of not just the congenital cardiologist treating patients with congenital heart disease, but also-and numerically more importantly-for adult interventional cardiologists treating patients with acquired heart valve disease. Transcatheter pulmonary valve replacement (tPVR) is one of the most exciting recent developments in the treatment of CHD and has evolved to become an attractive alternative to surgery in patients with right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) dysfunction. This review aims to summarize (1) the current state of the art for tPVR, (2) the expanding indications, and (3) the technological obstacles to optimizing tPVR. Since its introduction in 2000, more than ten thousands tPVR procedures have been performed worldwide. Although the indications for tPVR have been adapted earlier from those accepted for surgical intervention, they remain incompletely defined. The new imaging modalities give better assessment of cardiac anatomy and function and determine candidacy for the procedure. The procedure has been shown to be feasible and safe when performed in patients who received pulmonary conduit and or bioprosthetic valves between the right ventricle and the pulmonary artery. Fewer selected patients post trans-annular patch repair for tetralogy of Fallot may also be candidates for this technology. Size restrictions of the currently available valves limit deployment in the majority of patients post trans-annular patch repair. Newer valves and techniques are being developed that may help such patients. Refinements and further developments of this procedure hold promise for the extension of this technology to other patient populations.

  12. Impact of anticoagulation therapy on valve haemodynamic deterioration following transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Trigo, María; Muñoz-García, Antonio J; Latib, Azeem; Auffret, Vincent; Wijeysundera, Harindra C; Nombela-Franco, Luis; Gutierrez, Enrique; Cheema, Asim N; Serra, Vicenç; Amat-Santos, Ignacio J; Kefer, Joelle; Benitez, Luis Miguel; Leclercq, Florence; Mangieri, Antonio; Le Breton, Hervé; Jiménez-Quevedo, Pilar; Garcia Del Blanco, Bruno; Dager, Antonio; Abdul-Jawad Altisent, Omar; Puri, Rishi; Pibarot, Philippe; Rodés-Cabau, Josep

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the changes in transvalvular gradients and the incidence of valve haemodynamic deterioration (VHD) following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), according to use of anticoagulation therapy. This multicentre study included 2466 patients (46% men; mean age 81±7 years) who underwent TAVR with echocardiography performed at 12-month follow-up. Anticoagulation therapy was used in 707 patients (28.7%) following TAVR (AC group). A total of 663 patients received vitamin K antagonists, and 44 patients received direct oral anticoagulants. A propensity score matching analysis was performed to adjust for intergroup (AC vs non-AC post-TAVR) differences. A total of 622 patients per group were included in the propensity-matched analysis. VHD was defined as a ≥10 mm Hg increase in the mean transprosthetic gradient at follow-up (vs hospital discharge). The mean clinical follow-up was 29±18 months. The mean transvalvular gradient significantly increased at follow-up in the non-AC group within the global cohort (P=0.003), whereas it remained stable over time in the AC group (P=0.323). The incidence of VHD was significantly lower in the AC group (0.6%) compared with the non-AC group (3.7%, P<0.001), and these significant differences remained within the propensity-matched populations (0.6% vs 3.9% in the AC and non-AC groups, respectively, P<0.001). The occurrence of VHD did not associate with an increased risk of all-cause death (P=0.468), cardiovascular death (P=0.539) or stroke (P=0.170) at follow-up. The lack of anticoagulation therapy post-TAVR was associated with significant increments in transvalvular gradients and a greater risk of VHD. VHD was subclinical in most cases and did not associate with major adverse clinical events. Future randomised trials are needed to determine if systematic anticoagulation therapy post-TAVR would reduce the incidence of VHD. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article

  13. Limited versus full sternotomy for aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmani, Bilal H; Jones, Sion G; Malaisrie, S C; Chung, Darryl A; Williams, Richard Jnn

    2017-04-10

    Aortic valve disease is a common condition that is easily treatable with cardiac surgery. This is conventionally performed by opening the sternum longitudinally down the centre ("median sternotomy") and replacing the valve under cardiopulmonary bypass. Median sternotomy is generally well tolerated, but as less invasive options have become available, the efficacy of limited incisions has been called into question. In particular, the effects of reducing the visibility and surgical access has raised safety concerns with regards to the placement of cannulae, venting of the heart, epicardial wire placement, and de-airing of the heart at the end of the procedure. These difficulties may increase operating times, affecting outcome. The benefits of smaller incisions are thought to include decreased pain; improved respiratory mechanics; reductions in wound infections, bleeding, and need for transfusion; shorter intensive care stay; better cosmesis; and a quicker return to normal activity. To assess the effects of minimally invasive aortic valve replacement via a limited sternotomy versus conventional aortic valve replacement via median sternotomy in people with aortic valve disease requiring surgical replacement. We performed searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, clinical trials registries, and manufacturers' websites from inception to July 2016, with no language limitations. We reviewed references of identified papers to identify any further studies of relevance. Randomised controlled trials comparing aortic valve replacement via a median sternotomy versus aortic valve replacement via a limited sternotomy. We excluded trials that performed other minimally invasive incisions such as mini-thoracotomies, port access, trans-apical, trans-femoral or robotic procedures. Although some well-conducted prospective and retrospective case-control and cohort studies exist, these were not included in this review. Two review authors independently assessed trial papers to extract data

  14. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Duke E; Vricella, Luca A

    2005-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is the most common inherited connective tissue disorder, affecting approximately 1 in 10,000 live births. The cardinal features of Marfan syndrome are the abnormalities of the skeleton (tall stature, arachnodactyly, and joint hyperelasticity), eye (lens subluxation), and aorta (root aneurysm with proclivity toward rupture and dissection). Aortic catastrophe accounts for most of the premature mortality among Marfan patients, a risk that climbs steeply during adolescence and results in death of half of Marfan patients by the age of 40 years. Most of the improvement in life expectancy that has been achieved in Marfan syndrome is attributable to early recognition of aortic root aneurysms and prophylactic replacement with composite grafts (mechanical valve prostheses within Dacron conduits) before rupture or dissection occurs. Despite the excellent early and late results with composite grafts, there has been growing interest in operative procedures that replace the sinuses but preserve the aortic valve leaflets, to avoid anticoagulation and minimize the risk of prosthesis-related endocarditis. These procedures are still in evolution and late results are not yet known, but as with mitral repair in the setting of myxomatous disease, valve-sparing procedures in Marfan syndrome have weathered a storm of initial criticism and skepticism and are steadily gaining acceptance.

  15. Percutaneous Closure of 2 Paravalvular Leaks and a Gerbode Defect after Mitral Valve Replacement for Infective Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñalver, Jorge; Shatila, Wassim; Silva, Guilherme V

    2017-04-01

    Surgical valve replacement after infective endocarditis can result in local destructive paravalvular lesions. A 30-year-old woman with infective endocarditis underwent mitral valve replacement that was complicated postoperatively by 2 paravalvular leaks. During percutaneous closure of the leaks, a Gerbode defect was also found and closed. We discuss our patient's case and its relation to others in the relevant medical literature. To our knowledge, we are the first to describe the use of a percutaneous approach to close concomitant paravalvular leaks and a Gerbode defect.

  16. Pulmonary heart valve replacement using stabilized acellular xenogeneic scaffolds; effects of seeding with autologous stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpa Marius Mihai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: We hypothesized that an ideal heart valve replacement would be acellular valve root scaffolds seeded with autologous stem cells. To test this hypothesis, we prepared porcine acellular pulmonary valves, seeded them with autologous adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs and implanted them in sheep and compared them to acellular valves.

  17. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With Early- and New-Generation Devices in Bicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoon, Sung Han; Lefèvre, Thierry; Ahn, Jung Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies have evaluated the clinical outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis (AS). Particularly, limited data exist comparing the results of TAVR with new-generation devices versus early-generation devices.  Objectives...... This study sought to evaluate the clinical outcomes of TAVR for bicuspid AS with early- and new-generation devices.  Methods The Bicuspid TAVR Registry is an international multicenter study enrolling consecutive patients with bicuspid AS undergoing TAVR between April 2005 and May 2015.  Results Of 301...... patients, 199 patients (71.1%) were treated with early-generation devices (Sapien XT [Edwards Lifesciences Corporation, Irvine, California]: n = 87; CoreValve [Medtronic, Minneapolis, Minnesota]: n = 112) and 102 with new-generation devices (Sapien 3 [Edwards Lifesciences Corporation]: n = 91; Lotus...

  18. Prosthetic valve sparing aortic root replacement: an improved technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leacche, Marzia; Balaguer, Jorge M; Umakanthan, Ramanan; Byrne, John G

    2008-10-01

    We describe a modified surgical technique to treat patients with a previous history of isolated aortic valve replacement who now require aortic root replacement for an aneurysmal or dissected aorta. This technique consists of replacing the aortic root with a Dacron conduit, leaving intact the previously implanted prosthesis, and re-implanting the coronary arteries in the Dacron graft. Our technique differs from other techniques in that we do not leave behind any aortic tissue remnant and also in that we use a felt strip to obliterate any gap between the old sewing ring and the newly implanted graft. In our opinion, this promotes better hemostasis. We demonstrate that this technique is safe, feasible, and results in acceptable outcomes.

  19. Double Valve Replacement (Mitral and Aortic for Rheumatic Heart Disease: A 20-year experience with 300 patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Mishra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rheumatic heart disease still remains one of the leading causes of congestive heart failure and death owing to valvular pathologies, in developing countries. Valve replacement still remains the treatment of choice in such patients.The aim of this study wasto analyze the postoperative outcome of  double valve replacement (Mitral and Aortic in patients of rheumatic heart disease. Materials and Methods: Between 1988 and 2008, 300 patients of rheumatic heart disease underwent double (Mitral and Aortic valve replacement with Starr Edwards valve or St Jude mechanical valve prosthesis were implanted. These patients were studied retrospectively for preoperative data and postoperative outcome including causes of early and late deaths and the data was analyzed statistically. Results: The 30-day hospital death rate was 11.3% andlate death occurred in 11.6%. Anticoagulant regimen was followed to maintain the target pro-thrombin time at 1.5 times the control value. The actuarial survival (exclusive of hospital mortality was 92.4%, 84.6%, and 84.4%, per year at 5, 10, and 20 years, respectively Conclusions: In view of the acknowledged advantageof superior durability, increased thromboresistance in our patient population, and its cost effectiveness the Starr-Edwards ball valve or St. Jude valve is the mechanical prosthesis of choice for advanced combined valvular disease. The low-intensity anticoagulant regimen has offered suffcient protection against thromboembolism as well as hemorrhage.

  20. The effect of postoperative medical treatment on left ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helder, Meghana R K; Ugur, Murat; Bavaria, Joseph E; Kshettry, Vibhu R; Groh, Mark A; Petracek, Michael R; Jones, Kent W; Suri, Rakesh M; Schaff, Hartzell V

    2015-03-01

    The study objective was to analyze factors associated with left ventricular mass regression in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement with a newer bioprosthesis, the Trifecta valve pericardial bioprosthesis (St Jude Medical Inc, St Paul, Minn). A total of 444 patients underwent aortic valve replacement with the Trifecta bioprosthesis from 2007 to 2009 at 6 US institutions. The clinical and echocardiographic data of 200 of these patients who had left ventricular hypertrophy and follow-up studies 1 year postoperatively were reviewed and compared to analyze factors affecting left ventricular mass regression. Mean (standard deviation) age of the 200 study patients was 73 (9) years, 66% were men, and 92% had pure or predominant aortic valve stenosis. Complete left ventricular mass regression was observed in 102 patients (51%) by 1 year postoperatively. In univariate analysis, male sex, implantation of larger valves, larger left ventricular end-diastolic volume, and beta-blocker or calcium-channel blocker treatment at dismissal were significantly associated with complete mass regression. In the multivariate model, odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) indicated that male sex (3.38 [1.39-8.26]) and beta-blocker or calcium-channel blocker treatment at dismissal (3.41 [1.40-8.34]) were associated with increased probability of complete left ventricular mass regression. Patients with higher preoperative systolic blood pressure were less likely to have complete left ventricular mass regression (0.98 [0.97-0.99]). Among patients with left ventricular hypertrophy, postoperative treatment with beta-blockers or calcium-channel blockers may enhance mass regression. This highlights the need for close medical follow-up after operation. Labeled valve size was not predictive of left ventricular mass regression. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Use of an Automated Suture Fastening Device in Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beute, Tyler J; Orem, Matthew D; Schiller, Timothy M; Goehler, Matthew; Parker, Jessica; Willekes, Charles L; Timek, Tomasz

    2018-03-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (mAVR) is gaining clinical acceptance, however, it is associated with increased operative times due to limited surgical field and access. The Cor-Knot is an automated fastening device designed to facilitate suture fastening, but clinical data in mAVR are lacking. From May 2014 to February 2017, 92 patients underwent mAVR at our center with 39 valves secured with manually-tied (MT) sutures and 53 valves entirely secured with the Cor-Knot (CK). Pre-operative characteristics and 30-day outcomes data were extracted from our local Society of Thoracic Surgeons database and the electronic medical record. Survival data were obtained from the Michigan State Social Security Death Index. No significant difference in pre-operative characteristics were noted between the two groups. Aortic cross-clamp time (72±12 min vs 82±15 min, p=0.001) was significantly shorter with CK. There was no difference in post-operative mortality (0% vs 0%), stroke (0% vs 1.9%), atrial fibrillation (28% vs 33%), renal failure (0% vs 3.8%), or pacemaker implantation (5.1% vs 5.7%) between MT and CK. Valve function on post-operative echocardiography and 1-year patient survival were similar. In minimally invasive aortic valve replacement, the Cor-Knot device was associated with reduced aortic cross-clamp time while providing equivalent clinical outcomes. Larger studies are needed to confirm efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of the Cor-Knot device in minimally invasive aortic valve surgery. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cost-Effectiveness of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With a Self-Expanding Prosthesis Versus Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Matthew R; Lei, Yang; Wang, Kaijun; Chinnakondepalli, Khaja; Vilain, Katherine A; Magnuson, Elizabeth A; Galper, Benjamin Z; Meduri, Christopher U; Arnold, Suzanne V; Baron, Suzanne J; Reardon, Michael J; Adams, David H; Popma, Jeffrey J; Cohen, David J

    2016-01-05

    Previous studies of the cost-effectiveness of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) have been based primarily on a single balloon-expandable system. The goal of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of TAVR with a self-expanding prosthesis compared with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) for patients with severe aortic stenosis and high surgical risk. We performed a formal economic analysis on the basis of individual, patient-level data from the CoreValve U.S. High Risk Pivotal Trial. Empirical data regarding survival and quality of life over 2 years, and medical resource use and hospital costs through 12 months were used to project life expectancy, quality-adjusted life expectancy, and lifetime medical costs in order to estimate the incremental cost-effectiveness of TAVR versus SAVR from a U.S. Relative to SAVR, TAVR reduced initial length of stay an average of 4.4 days, decreased the need for rehabilitation services at discharge, and resulted in superior 1-month quality of life. Index admission and projected lifetime costs were higher with TAVR than with SAVR (differences $11,260 and $17,849 per patient, respectively), whereas TAVR was projected to provide a lifetime gain of 0.32 quality-adjusted life-years ([QALY]; 0.41 LY) with 3% discounting. Lifetime incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were $55,090 per QALY gained and $43,114 per LY gained. Sensitivity analyses indicated that a reduction in the initial cost of TAVR by ∼$1,650 would lead to an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio <$50,000/QALY gained. In a high-risk clinical trial population, TAVR with a self-expanding prosthesis provided meaningful clinical benefits compared with SAVR, with incremental costs considered acceptable by current U.S. With expected modest reductions in the cost of index TAVR admissions, the value of TAVR compared with SAVR in this patient population would become high. (Safety and Efficacy Study of the Medtronic CoreValve System in the Treatment of

  3. Thrombocytopenia after aortic valve replacement with freedom solo bioprosthesis: a propensity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccardo, Alessandro; Rusinaru, Dan; Petitprez, Benoit; Marticho, Paul; Vaida, Ioana; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Caus, Thierry

    2010-05-01

    The incidence of postoperative thrombocytopenia after aortic valve replacement with the Freedom Solo bioprosthesis remains unclear. This propensity-matched study was carried out to evaluate the incidence and clinical impact of thrombocytopenia in patients receiving the Freedom Solo bioprosthesis. Patients who underwent aortic valve replacement with a Freedom Solo or Carpentier-Edwards Perimount pericardial prosthesis at our institution between 2006 and 2008 were screened retrospectively. Exclusion criteria included double valve replacement, redo surgery, and active endocarditis. Two hundred six patients were considered eligible for this analysis. Using propensity scores 36 matched pairs of patients with a Freedom Solo or Perimount bioprosthesis were obtained. The primary end point was the occurrence of postoperative thrombocytopenia. Secondary end points were postoperative thromboembolic or hemorrhagic events and 30-day mortality. Before matching, severe thrombocytopenia (Solo bioprosthesis and 1% with a Perimount bioprosthesis (p Solo (p Solo and Perimount bioprostheses, respectively (p Solo implantation. However, this complication was not related to any deleterious events in our study population. Copyright (c) 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Prosthetic Aortic Valve Fixation Study: 48 Replacement Valves Analyzed Using Digital Pressure Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Candice Y; Wong, Joshua K; Ross, Ronald E; Liu, David C; Khabbaz, Kamal R; Martellaro, Angelo J; Gorea, Heather R; Sauer, Jude S; Knight, Peter A

    Prostheses attachment is critical in aortic valve replacement surgery, yet reliable prosthetic security remains a challenge. Accurate techniques to analyze prosthetic fixation pressures may enable the use of fewer sutures while reducing the risk of paravalvular leaks (PVL). Customized digital thin film pressure transducers were sutured between aortic annulus models and 21-mm bioprosthetic valves with 15 × 4-mm, 12 × 4-mm, or 9 × 6-mm-wide pledgeted mattress sutures. Simulating open and minimally invasive access, 4 surgeons, blinded to data acquisition, each secured 12 valves using manual knot-tying (hand-tied [HT] or knot-pusher [KP]) or automated titanium fasteners (TFs). Real-time pressure measurements and times were recorded. Two-dimensional (2D) and 3D pressure maps were generated for all valves. Pressures less than 80 mm Hg were considered at risk for PVL. Pressures under each knot (intrasuture) fell less than 80 mm Hg for 12 of 144 manual knots (5/144 HT, 7/144 KP) versus 0 of 288 TF (P prosthetic valve security.

  5. Should patients with Björk-Shiley valves undergo prophylactic replacement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkmeyer, J D; Marrin, C A; O'Connor, G T

    1992-08-29

    About 85,000 patients have undergone replacement of diseased heart valves with prosthetic Björk-Shiley convexo-concave (CC) valves. These valves are prone to fracture of the outlet strut, which leads to acute valve failure that is usually fatal. Should patients with these valves undergo prophylactic replacement to avoid fracture? The incidence of strut fracture varies between 0% and 1.5% per year, depending on valve opening angle (60 degrees or 70 degrees), diameter (less than 29 mm or greater than or equal to 29 mm), and location (aortic or mitral). Other factors include the patient's life expectancy and the expected morbidity and mortality associated with reoperation. We have used decision analysis to identify the patients most likely to benefit from prophylactic reoperation. The incidence of outlet strut fracture was estimated from the data of three large studies on CC valves, and stratified by opening angle, diameter, and location. A Markov decision analysis model was used to estimate life expectancy for patients undergoing prophylactic valve replacement and for those not undergoing reoperation. Prophylactic valve replacement does not benefit patients with CC valves that have low strut fracture risks (60 degrees aortic valves and less than 29 mm, 60 degrees mitral valves). For most patients with CC valves that have high strut fracture risks (greater than or equal to 29 mm, 70 degrees CC), prophylactic valve replacement increases life expectancy. However, elderly patients with such valves benefit from prophylactic reoperation only if the risk of operative mortality is low. Patient age and operative risk are most important in recommendations for patients with CC valves that have intermediate strut fracture risks (less than 29 mm, 70 degrees valves and greater than or equal to 29 mm, 60 degrees mitral valves). For all patients and their doctors facing the difficult decision on whether to replace CC valves, individual estimates of operative mortality risk that

  6. Reimplantation valve-sparing aortic root replacement in Marfan syndrome using the Valsalva conduit: an intercontinental multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settepani, Fabrizio; Szeto, Wilson Y; Pacini, Davide; De Paulis, Ruggero; Chiariello, Luigi; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto; Gallotti, Roberto; Bavaria, Joseph E

    2007-02-01

    Introduced by DePaulis in 2000, the Gelweave Valsalva graft (Sulzer Vascutek, Refrewshire, Scotland) is a modified Dacron conduit (DuPont, Wilmington, DE), with prefashioned sinuses of Valsalva. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mid-term results of the reimplantation valve-sparing aortic root replacement using the Gelweave Valsalva prosthesis in Marfan syndrome patients. A retrospective review was performed of 35 patients with Marfan syndrome in four centers who underwent the reimplantation valve-sparing aortic root replacement using the Gelweave Valsalva prosthesis. The patients were predominantly men, with a mean age of 36.5 +/- 12.6 years (range, 14 to 62 years). Two patients presented with acute type A dissections and underwent emergent operations. Elective hemiarch reconstruction using hypothermic circulatory arrest was required in 11 patients. Aortic valve cusp repair was performed in 2 patients. There were no operative or hospital deaths, and no patients died during follow-up. The mean follow-up was 19 months (range, 1 to 60 months). Significant (>2+) aortic insufficiency (AI), requiring aortic valve replacement, developed in 3 patients during follow-up that requiring aortic valve replacement. The 5-year freedom from reoperation owing to structural valve deterioration was 88.9% +/- 8.1%. There were no episodes of clinically significant thromboembolism. Reimplantation valve-sparing aortic root replacement with the Gelweave Valsalva prosthesis in Marfan patients provides satisfactory mid-term results, thus encouraging further use of this type of repair. However, long-term results are needed in order to define the durability of this technique.

  7. Aortic valve replacement with sutureless prosthesis: better than root enlargement to avoid patient-prosthesis mismatch?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Erik; Martens, Andreas; Alhadi, Firas; Hoeffler, Klaus; Umminger, Julia; Kaufeld, Tim; Sarikouch, Samir; Koigeldiev, Nurbol; Cebotari, Serghei; Schmitto, Jan Dieter; Haverich, Axel; Shrestha, Malakh

    2016-06-01

    Aortic valve replacement in patients with a small aortic annulus may result in patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM). Aortic root enlargement (ARE) can reduce PPM, but leads to extended cardiac ischaemia times. Sutureless valves have the potential to prevent PPM while reducing cardiac ischaemia times. Between January 2007 and December 2011, a total of 128 patients with a small aortic annulus underwent surgery for aortic valve stenosis at our centre. Thirty-six (17% male, n = 6) patients received conventional valve replacement with ARE and 92 (16% male, n = 18) subjects received sutureless valve implantation (Sorin Perceval). We conducted a comparative, retrospective study with follow-up. The sutureless group showed a significantly higher age (79 years) than the ARE patients (62 years, P body surface area was 0.91 ± 0.2 cm(2)/m(2) in ARE patients and 0.83 ± 0.14 cm(2)/m(2) in sutureless patients (P = 0.040). The rate of patients with severe PPM was 6% (n = 2) in ARE patients and 11% (n = 8%) in sutureless patients (not significant, n.s.). The 30-day mortality rates were 2% (n = 2) in sutureless patients and 6% (n = 2) in ARE patients (n.s.). The 1- and 5-year survival rates of the sutureless group were 92 and 54% years, respectively, whereas the 1- and 5-year survival rates of the ARE group were 76% (n.s.). Although the sutureless valve patients received significantly more concomitant procedures, all operation-associated times were significantly shorter. Despite sutureless valve patients being older, the 30-day mortality and survival rates were comparable in the two groups. Since the indexed EOA was only slightly lower and the incidence of severe PPM was not significantly higher in the sutureless valve patients, we conclude that sutureless valve implantation is an alternative to conventional ARE to treat a small aortic annulus and avoid PPM, especially in geriatric patients who benefit from the quick implantation process. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford

  8. Valve-sparing root replacement in children with aortic root aneurysm: mid-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Rüdiger; Badiu, Catalin C; Vogt, Manfred; Voss, Bernhard; Hörer, Jürgen; Prodan, Zsolt; Schreiber, Christian; Mazzitelli, Domenico

    2013-05-01

    We aimed at evaluating the results of aortic valve-sparing root replacement (AVSRR) in children with aortic root aneurysm (ARA) due to genetic disorders in terms of mortality, reoperation and recurrent aortic valve regurgitation (AVR). Thirteen patients (mean age 9.7 ± 6.5 years, 10 months-18 years) underwent AVSRR for ARA between 2002 and 2011. Six of the 13 patients had Marfan syndrome, 3 Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS), 2 bicuspid aortic valve syndrome and 2 an unspecified connective tissue disorder. AVR was graded as none/trace, mild and severe in 5, 7 and 1 patient, respectively. The mean pre-operative root diameter was 45 ± 10 mm (mean Z-score 10.3 ± 2.0). Remodelling of the aortic root was performed in 4 patients, reimplantation of the aortic valve in 9 and a concomitant cusp repair in 4. The diameter of the prostheses used for root replacement varied from 22 to 30 mm (mean Z-score = 2.3 ± 3). The follow-up was 100% complete with a mean follow-up time of 3.7 years. There was no operative mortality. One patient with LDS died 2.5 years after the operation due to spontaneous rupture of the descending aorta. Root re-replacement with mechanical conduit was necessary in 1 patient for severe recurrent AVR 8 days after remodelling of the aortic root. At final follow-up, AVR was graded as none/trace and mild in all patients. Eleven patients presented in New York Heart Association functional Class I and 1 in Class II. In paediatric patients with ARA, valve-sparing root replacement can be performed with low operative risk and excellent mid-term valve durability. Hence, prosthetic valve-related morbidity may be avoided. Due to the large diameters of the aortic root and the ascending aorta, the size of the implanted root prostheses will not limit later growth of the native aorta.

  9. Swan ganz catheter for diagnosis of transient central diabetes insipidus after mitral valve replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarwar, I.; Sinha, L.M.; Younus, A.

    2012-01-01

    Transient Diabetes Insipidus (DI) occurring in a patient undergoing open heart surgery is a rare occurrence. In this case report, we are presenting a 30 years old female patient with past history of stroke who underwent redo mitral valve replacement developed polyuria. The diagnosis of hypovolemia was made with the help of swan ganz catheter. The patient responded to desmopressin and completely recovered seven days after surgery. It is possible that transient cerebral ischemia given her history of Stroke resulted in the dysfunction of osmotic receptors in the hypothalamus or hypothalamus - pituitary axis during Cardiopulmonary Bypass (CPB). Therefore, we concluded that central DI is a probable cause of polyuria after CPB. (author)

  10. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement in children: intermediate-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nishant D; Arnaoutakis, George J; George, Timothy J; Allen, Jeremiah G; Alejo, Diane E; Dietz, Harry C; Cameron, Duke E; Vricella, Luca A

    2011-03-01

    Valve-sparing root replacement (VSRR) is an attractive option for aortic aneurysm in children with low-operative risk, but mid- and late-term results are not yet known. Between 1997 and 2009, 56 children (mean age 11.5 years) underwent VSRR at our institution. Twenty-six (46.4%) had Marfan syndrome and 24 (42.8%) had Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Mean preoperative max sinus diameter was 4.2±0.8 cm (Z-score 7.7±2.9). Five (8.9%) had >2+ aortic insufficiency (AI). Two (3.6%) underwent David I reimplantation with a straight-tube, 12 (21.4%) had a Yacoub remodeling procedure, and 42 (75.0%) had reimplantation using a Valsalva-graft. There were one (1.8%) operative and three (5.4%) late deaths. One patient required reoperation for bleeding and one required late repair of a distal pseudoaneurysm. Mean follow-up was 5.2 years (range 0-12 years). No patients suffered thromboembolic events or had endocarditis. Of the 12 remodeling patients, four (33.3%) developed >2+ AI and required aortic valve repair or replacement. No patient developed >2+ AI after reimplantation. VSRR in children is a safe alternative to aortic root replacement with mechanical or biological prostheses. In this particular group of patients with connective tissue disorders and proclivity toward annular dilation and late AI, reimplantation is superior to remodeling.

  11. Repair or Replacement for Isolated Tricuspid Valve Pathology? Insights from a Surgical Analysis on Long-Term Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Mina; Arif, Rawa; Sabashnikov, Anton; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Ruhparwar, Arjang; Schmack, Bastian; Dohmen, Pascal M.; Szabó, Gábor; Karck, Matthias; Weymann, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Background Long-term follow-up data concerning isolated tricuspid valve pathology after replacement or reconstruction is limited. Current American Heart Association guidelines equally recommend repair and replacement when surgical intervention is indicated. Our aim was to investigate and compare operative mortality and long-term survival in patients undergoing isolated tricuspid valve repair surgery versus replacement. Material/Methods Between 1995 and 2011, 109 consecutive patients underwent surgical correction of tricuspid valve pathology at our institution for varying structural pathologies. A total of 41 (37.6%) patients underwent tricuspid annuloplasty/repair (TAP) with or without ring implantation, while 68 (62.3%) patients received tricuspid valve replacement (TVR) of whom 36 (53%) were mechanical and 32 (47%) were biological prostheses. Results Early survival at 30 days after surgery was 97.6% in the TAP group and 91.1% in the TVR group. After 6 months, 89.1% in the TAP group and 87.8% in the TVR group were alive. In terms of long-term survival, there was no further mortality observed after one year post surgery in both groups (Log Rank p=0.919, Breslow p=0.834, Tarone-Ware p=0.880) in the Kaplan-Meier Survival analysis. The 1-, 5-, and 8-year survival rates were 85.8% for TAP and 87.8% for TVR group. Conclusions Surgical repair of the tricuspid valve does not show survival benefit when compared to replacement. Hence valve replacement should be considered generously in patients with reasonable suspicion that regurgitation after repair will reoccur. PMID:28236633

  12. Aortic Valve Predilatation with a Small Balloon, without Rapid Pacing, prior to Transfemoral Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupama Shivaraju

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of this study is to assess the feasibility and clinical outcome of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR using aortic valve predilatation (AVPD with a small, nonocclusive balloon. Background. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV under rapid pacing is generally performed in TAVR to ensure the passage and sufficient deployment of the prosthesis in the stenotic AV. BAV may cause serious complications, such as left ventricular stunning or cerebrovascular embolism. Methods. A cohort of 50 consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis underwent transfemoral TAVR with the Edwards Sapien 3-heart valve. All patients underwent AVPD with a small, nonocclusive balloon (12 × 60 or 14 × 60 mm without rapid pacing. Procedural data and clinical outcomes were analyzed. Results. The mean age of the cohort was 81±6 years and the mean logistic EuroSCORE (European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation was 13±9. Crossing the AV and prosthesis implantation was successful in all cases. The postprocedural mean AV gradient was 12±5 mmHg. There were no cases of aortic regurgitation ≥ grade 2. No periprocedural stroke occurred. One patient (2% with chronic atrial fibrillation displayed a transient Wernicke aphasia occurring more than 24 hours after TAVR. Mortality was 0% at 30 days after procedure. Conclusion. In TAVR, AVPD with a small, nonocclusive balloon can be safely performed. By avoiding rapid pacing, this technique may be a valid alternative to traditional BAV. Whether or not the use of APVD without rapid pacing translates into less periprocedural complications needs to be assessed in future studies.

  13. Transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis surgically replaced 4 months after implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Lund, Jens Teglgaard; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a new and rapidly evolving treatment option for high-risk surgical patients with degenerative aortic valve stenosis. Long-term results with these new valve prostheses are lacking, and potential valve dysfunction and failure would require valve replacemen...

  14. Immediate Outcomes of Aortic Valve Replacement with Sutureless versus Stentless Bioprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihsan Parlar, Ali; Onur Hanedan, Muhammet; Mataraci, Ilker; Ali Yuruk, Mehmet; Sayar, Ufuk; Kemal Arslan, Ali; Ozer, Tanil

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement (AVR) with a sutureless valve is an innovative therapy in high-risk elderly patients. The study aim was to compare the early results of AVR using sutureless aortic valves or stentless aortic bioprostheses. A retrospective analysis was conducted of 55 patients who underwent AVR with either a sutureless valve (Perceval S; n = 24 or Edwards Intuity; n = 9) or a stentless valve (Sorin Freedom SOLO™; n = 22). Baseline patient characteristics were similar in both groups, except for NYHA class. Concomitant procedures were performed in 17 patients (51.5%) of the sutureless group and in nine patients (40.9%) of the stentless group (p = 0.44). The aortic cross-clamp time was 55 ± 23 min in the sutureless group and 102 ± 36 min in the stentless group (p <0.0001), while the postoperative peak aortic gradient was 19.5 ± 5.0 mmHg and 29.3 ± 15.4 mmHg for the sutureless group and stentless group, respectively (p = 0.037). The postoperative mean gradient was 9.3 ± 3.4 mmHg for the sutureless group and 15.1 ± 10.5 mmHg for the stentless group (p = 0.06). Blood product transfusion was required less frequently by the sutureless group, but drainage and bleeding was similar in both groups. The intensive care unit and hospital stays were significantly shorter in favor of the sutureless group. One sutureless patient (3.0%) and two stentless patients (9.1%) died in hospital (p = 0.557). Early results of the present study suggested that surgical AVR with a sutureless valve is associated with a good hemodynamic performance and an improved early outcome.

  15. Complementary role of cardiac CT in the assessment of aortic valve replacement dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Alastair J; Dweck, Marc R; Dreisbach, John G; Williams, Michelle C; Mak, Sze Mun; Cartlidge, Timothy; Nicol, Edward D; Morgan-Hughes, Gareth J

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement is the second most common cardiothoracic procedure in the UK. With an ageing population, there are an increasing number of patients with prosthetic valves that require follow-up. Imaging of prosthetic valves is challenging with conventional echocardiographic techniques making early detection of valve dysfunction or complications difficult. CT has recently emerged as a complementary approach offering excellent spatial resolution and the ability to identify a range of aortic valve replacement complications including structural valve dysfunction, thrombus development, pannus formation and prosthetic valve infective endocarditis. This review discusses each and how CT might be incorporated into a multimodal cardiovascular imaging pathway for the assessment of aortic valve replacements and in guiding clinical management. PMID:27843568

  16. Surgery of the aortic root: should we go for the valve-sparing root reconstruction or the composite graft-valve replacement is still the first choice of treatment for these patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamana, Fernando de Azevedo; Dias, Ricardo Ribeiro; Duncan, Jose Augusto; Faria, Leandro Batisti de; Malbouisson, Luiz Marcelo Sa; Borges, Luciano de Figueiredo; Mady, Charles; Jatene, Fábio Biscegli

    2015-01-01

    To compare the results of the root reconstruction with the aortic valve-sparing operation versus composite graft-valve replacement. From January 2002 to October 2013, 324 patients underwent aortic root reconstruction. They were 263 composite graft-valve replacement and 61 aortic valve-sparing operation (43 reimplantation and 18 remodeling). Twenty-six percent of the patients were NYHA functional class III and IV; 9.6% had Marfan syndrome, and 12% had bicuspid aortic valve. There was a predominance of aneurysms over dissections (81% vs. 19%), with 7% being acute dissections. The complete follow-up of 100% of the patients was performed with median follow-up time of 902 days for patients undergoing composite graft-valve replacement and 1492 for those undergoing aortic valve-sparing operation. In-hospital mortality was 6.7% and 4.9%, respectively for composite graft-valve replacement and aortic valve-sparing operation (ns). During the late follow-up period, there was 0% moderate and 15.4% severe aortic regurgitation, and NYHA functional class I and II were 89.4% and 94%, respectively for composite graft-valve replacement and aortic valve-sparing operation (ns). Root reconstruction with aortic valve-sparing operation showed lower late mortality (P=0.001) and lower bleeding complications (P=0.006). There was no difference for thromboembolism, endocarditis, and need of reoperation. The aortic root reconstruction with preservation of the valve should be the operation being performed for presenting lower late mortality and survival free of bleeding events.

  17. Mitral-valve repair versus replacement for severe ischemic mitral regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, Michael A; Parides, Michael K; Perrault, Louis P; Moskowitz, Alan J; Gelijns, Annetine C; Voisine, Pierre; Smith, Peter K; Hung, Judy W; Blackstone, Eugene H; Puskas, John D; Argenziano, Michael; Gammie, James S; Mack, Michael; Ascheim, Deborah D; Bagiella, Emilia; Moquete, Ellen G; Ferguson, T Bruce; Horvath, Keith A; Geller, Nancy L; Miller, Marissa A; Woo, Y Joseph; D'Alessandro, David A; Ailawadi, Gorav; Dagenais, Francois; Gardner, Timothy J; O'Gara, Patrick T; Michler, Robert E; Kron, Irving L

    2014-01-02

    Ischemic mitral regurgitation is associated with a substantial risk of death. Practice guidelines recommend surgery for patients with a severe form of this condition but acknowledge that the supporting evidence for repair or replacement is limited. We randomly assigned 251 patients with severe ischemic mitral regurgitation to undergo either mitral-valve repair or chordal-sparing replacement in order to evaluate efficacy and safety. The primary end point was the left ventricular end-systolic volume index (LVESVI) at 12 months, as assessed with the use of a Wilcoxon rank-sum test in which deaths were categorized below the lowest LVESVI rank. At 12 months, the mean LVESVI among surviving patients was 54.6±25.0 ml per square meter of body-surface area in the repair group and 60.7±31.5 ml per square meter in the replacement group (mean change from baseline, -6.6 and -6.8 ml per square meter, respectively). The rate of death was 14.3% in the repair group and 17.6% in the replacement group (hazard ratio with repair, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.42 to 1.47; P=0.45 by the log-rank test). There was no significant between-group difference in LVESVI after adjustment for death (z score, 1.33; P=0.18). The rate of moderate or severe recurrence of mitral regurgitation at 12 months was higher in the repair group than in the replacement group (32.6% vs. 2.3%, P<0.001). There were no significant between-group differences in the rate of a composite of major adverse cardiac or cerebrovascular events, in functional status, or in quality of life at 12 months. We observed no significant difference in left ventricular reverse remodeling or survival at 12 months between patients who underwent mitral-valve repair and those who underwent mitral-valve replacement. Replacement provided a more durable correction of mitral regurgitation, but there was no significant between-group difference in clinical outcomes. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Canadian Institutes of

  18. Pulmonary Valve Replacement : Twenty-Six Years of Experience With Mechanical Valvar Prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freling, Hendrik G.; van Slooten, Ymkje J.; van Melle, Joost P.; Ebels, Tjark; Hoendermis, Elke S.; Berger, Rolf M. F.; Hillege, Hans L.; Waterbolk, Tjalling W.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Willems, Tineke P.; Pieper, Petronella G.

    BACKGROUND: Although the thromboembolic risk after pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) with mechanical valves is presumed to be high, recent studies suggest promising short-term and mid-term results. However, large studies reporting long-term mortality and valve-related complications are missing.

  19. Surgery of the aortic root: should we go for the valve-sparing root reconstruction or the composite graft-valve replacement is still the first choice of treatment for these patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando de Azevedo Lamana

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective:To compare the results of the root reconstruction with the aortic valve-sparing operation versus composite graftvalve replacement.Methods:From January 2002 to October 2013, 324 patients underwent aortic root reconstruction. They were 263 composite graft-valve replacement and 61 aortic valve-sparing operation (43 reimplantation and 18 remodeling. Twenty-six percent of the patients were NYHA functional class III and IV; 9.6% had Marfan syndrome, and 12% had bicuspid aortic valve. There was a predominance of aneurysms over dissections (81% vs. 19%, with 7% being acute dissections. The complete follow-up of 100% of the patients was performed with median follow-up time of 902 days for patients undergoing composite graft-valve replacement and 1492 for those undergoing aortic valve-sparing operation.Results:In-hospital mortality was 6.7% and 4.9%, respectively for composite graft-valve replacement and aortic valve-sparing operation (ns. During the late follow-up period, there was 0% moderate and 15.4% severe aortic regurgitation, and NYHA functional class I and II were 89.4% and 94%, respectively for composite graft-valve replacement and aortic valve-sparing operation (ns. Root reconstruction with aortic valve-sparing operation showed lower late mortality (P=0.001 and lower bleeding complications (P=0.006. There was no difference for thromboembolism, endocarditis, and need of reoperation.Conclusion:The aortic root reconstruction with preservation of the valve should be the operation being performed for presenting lower late mortality and survival free of bleeding events.

  20. Replica sizing strategy for aortic valve replacement improves haemodynamic outcome of the epic supra valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Lopez, David; Faerber, Gloria; Diab, Mahmoud; Amorim, Paulo; Zeynalov, Natig; Doenst, Torsten

    2017-10-01

    Current sizing strategies suggest valve selection based on annulus diameter despite supra-annular placement of biological prostheses potentially allowing placement of a larger size. We assessed the frequency of selecting a larger prosthesis if prosthesis size was selected using a replica (upsizing) and evaluated its impact on haemodynamics. We analysed all discharge echocardiograms between June 2012 and June 2014, where a replica sizer was used for isolated aortic valve replacement (Epic Supra: 266 patients, Trifecta: 49 patients). Upsizing was possible in 71% of the Epic Supra valves (by 1 size: 168, by 2 sizes: 20) and in 59% of the Trifectas (by 1 size: 26, by 2 sizes: 3). Patients for whom upsizing was possible had the lowest pressure gradients within their annulus size groups. The difference was significant in annulus diameters of 21-22 or 25-26 mm (Epic Supra) and 23-24 mm (Trifecta). Trifecta gradients were the lowest. However, the ability to upsize the Epic Supra by 2 sizes eliminated the differences between Epic Supra and Trifecta. Upsizing did not cause intraoperative complications. Using replica sizers for aortic prosthesis size selection allows the implantation of bigger prostheses than recommended in most cases and reduces postoperative gradients, specifically for Epic Supra. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  1. Coronary artery bypass grafting associated to aortic valve replacement in the elderly: survival and quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicchio Mariano

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Myocardial ischemia is often associated to aortic valve stenosis in the elderly. Aim of this study was to evaluate the impact on survival and quality of life of CABG associated to aortic valve replacement in the septuagenarians and octogenarians. Between January 1991 and January 2010, 520 patients ageing > 70 years underwent aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis in two Institutions. They were divided into 2 groups: Group A included 406 patients undergoing isolated aortic valve replacement; Group B 114 patients receiving aortic valve replacement and CABG. A comparative analysis of long-term survival and quality of life (SF-36 test was performed. Mean age was 74.2 ± 3.6 years (74.3 ± 3.6 in Group A, 74 ± 3.3 in Group B; p = 0.33. Hospital mortality was 9.5% (46 patients. Twenty-nine (7.8% in Group A and 17 in Group B (15.2%(p = 0.019. Actuarial survival was 88.5% ± 0.015 at 1 year, 81.9% ± 0.02 at 5 years, 76.6% ± 0.032 at 10 and 57.3 ± 0.1 at 15 years. Ten-year survival was 77% ± 0.034 in Group A and 77.8% ± 0.045 in Group B (p = 0.2. Multivariate analysis did not reveal associated CABG as a predictor of long term mortality. The scores obtained in the SF-36 test were similar in the two groups and significantly higher than those of the general population matched for country, age and sex (p Associated CABG determines a significant increase of hospital mortality in the elderly undergoing aortic valve replacement. Survivors did not show differences in long-term outcome and quality of life according to the presence of associated CABG.

  2. Survival and freedom from aortic valve-related reoperation after valve-sparing aortic root replacement in 1015 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kari, Fabian A; Doll, Kai-Nicolas; Hemmer, Wolfgang; Liebrich, Markus; Sievers, Hans-Hinrich; Richardt, Doreen; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Detter, Christian; Siepe, Matthias; Czerny, Martin; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize mortality and aortic valve replacement after valve-sparing aortic root replacement (V-SARR) in a multicentre cohort. Between 1994 and 2014, 1015 patients had V-SARR with (n = 288, 28%) or without cusp/commissure repair (n = 727, 72%) at the centres of Lübeck (n = 343, 34%), Stuttgart (n = 346, 34%), Hamburg (n = 109, 11%) and Freiburg (n = 217, 21%), Germany. Comparative survival of an age- and gender-matched general population was calculated. Log-rank tests and multiple logistic regression were used to identify risk factors. The mean follow-up was 5.2 ± 3.9 years. Cumulative follow-up comprised 2933 patient-years. Early survival was 98%. NYHA status and aneurysm size were predictive of death during mid-term follow-up (P = 0.025). Freedom from aortic valve replacement was 90% at 8 years, with the type of V-SARR (root remodelling, David II) being a risk factor (P = 0.015). Bicuspid aortic valve (P = 0.26) and initial valve function (P = 0.4) did not impact reoperation. The need of additional valve repair (cusps/commissures) was not linked to reoperation: freedom from aortic valve replacement at 8 years was 84% if cusp repair was performed versus 90% if V-SARR alone was performed (P = 0.218). Marfan syndrome had no impact on survival or on aortic valve replacement. Mid-term survival of patients after V-SARR is comparable with that of a matched general population. The regurgitant bicuspid aortic valve is a favourable substrate for V-SARR. Prophylactic surgery should be performed before symptoms or large aneurysms are present to achieve optimal mid-term outcomes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  3. Single-Dose Lignocaine-Based Blood Cardioplegia in Single Valve Replacement Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaydip Ramani

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE: Myocardial protection is the most important in cardiac surgery. We compared our modified single-dose long-acting lignocaine-based blood cardioplegia with short-acting St Thomas 1 blood cardioplegia in patients undergoing single valve replacement. METHODS: A total of 110 patients who underwent single (aortic or mitral valve replacement surgery were enrolled. Patients were divided in two groups based on the cardioplegia solution used. In group 1 (56 patients, long-acting lignocaine based-blood cardioplegia solution was administered as a single dose while in group 2 (54 patients, standard St Thomas IB (short-acting blood-based cardioplegia solution was administered and repeated every 20 minutes. All the patients were compared for preoperative baseline parameters, intraoperative and all the postoperative parameters. RESULTS: We did not find any statistically significant difference in preoperative baseline parameters. Cardiopulmonary bypass time were 73.8±16.5 and 76.4±16.9 minutes (P=0.43 and cross clamp time were 58.9±10.3 and 66.3±11.2 minutes (P=0.23 in group 1 and group 2, respectively. Mean of maximum inotrope score was 6.3±2.52 and 6.1±2.13 (P=0.65 in group 1 and group 2, respectively. We also did not find any statistically significant difference in creatine-phosphokinase-MB (CPK-MB, Troponin-I levels, lactate level and cardiac functions postoperatively. CONCLUSION: This study proves the safety and efficacy of long-acting lignocaine-based single-dose blood cardioplegia compared to the standard short-acting multi-dose blood cardioplegia in patients requiring the single valve replacement. Further studies need to be undertaken to establish this non-inferiority in situations of complex cardiac procedures especially in compromised patients.

  4. Three-dimensional prototyping for procedural simulation of transcatheter mitral valve replacement in patients with mitral annular calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sabbagh, Abdallah; Eleid, Mackram F; Matsumoto, Jane M; Anavekar, Nandan S; Al-Hijji, Mohammed A; Said, Sameh M; Nkomo, Vuyisile T; Holmes, David R; Rihal, Charanjit S; Foley, Thomas A

    2018-01-23

    Three-dimensional (3D) prototyping is a novel technology which can be used to plan and guide complex procedures such as transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR). Eight patients with severe mitral annular calcification (MAC) underwent TMVR. 3D digital models with digital balloon expandable valves were created from pre-procedure CT scans using dedicated software. Five models were printed. These models were used to assess prosthesis sizing, anchoring, expansion, paravalvular gaps, left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction, and other potential procedure pitfalls. Results of 3D prototyping were then compared to post procedural imaging to determine how closely the achieved procedural result mirrored the 3D modeled result. 3D prototyping simulated LVOT obstruction in one patient who developed it and in another patient who underwent alcohol septal ablation prior to TMVR. Valve sizing correlated with actual placed valve size in six out of the eight patients and more than mild paravalvular leak (PVL) was simulated in two of the three patients who had it. Patients who had mismatch between their modeled valve size and post-procedural imaging were the ones that had anterior leaflet resection which could have altered valve sizing and PVL simulation. 3D printed model of one of the latter patients allowed modification of anterior leaflet to simulate surgical resection and was able to estimate the size and location of the PVL after inserting a valve stent into the physical model. 3D prototyping in TMVR for severe MAC is feasible for simulating valve sizing, apposition, expansion, PVL, and LVOT obstruction. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Aortic valve replacement: is there an implant size variation across Europe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Athanasiou, Thanos; Mestres, Carlos A; Nashef, Samer A M; Aagaard, Jan; Moritz, Anton; Van Ingen, Gerrit; Chronidou, Fany; Palatianos, George; Alivizatos, Peter A; Stavridis, George T

    2008-03-01

    Prompted by anecdotal evidence and observations by surgeons, an investigation was undertaken into the potential differences in implanted aortic valve prosthesis sizes, during aortic valve replacement (AVR) procedures, between northern and southern European countries. A multi-institutional, non-randomized, retrospective analysis was conducted among 2,932 patients who underwent AVR surgery at seven tertiary cardiac surgery centers throughout Europe. Demographic and perioperative variables including valve size and type, body surface area (BSA) and early mortality were collected. Group analysis by patient geographic distribution and by annular diameter of the prosthesis utilized was conducted. Patients with a manufacturer's labeled prosthesis size > or = 21 mm were assigned to the 'large' aortic size subset, while those with a prosthesis size < 21 mm were assigned to the 'small' aortic size subset. Effective orifice area indices were calculated for all patients to assess the geographic distribution of patient-prosthesis mismatch. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses adjusting for possible confounding variables were performed. Prostheses with diameter < 21 mm were implanted at almost twice the rate in southern Europe compared to the north (56.4% versus 26.7%, p < 0.01). The mean valve size was also smaller in southern compared to northern European patients (21.6 +/- 2.1 mm versus 23.4 +/- 2.2 mm, p < 0.01). There were no regional differences in the distribution of either gender or BSA. In the multivariable model, south European patients were seven times more likely to receive a smaller-sized aortic valve (OR = 6.5, 95% CI = 4.82-8.83, p < 0.01), and thus the odds of developing patient-prosthesis mismatch were increased two-fold in southern European patients (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.25-2.80, p = 0.02). However, neither geographic distribution nor valve size were significantly associated with operative mortality. The study results demonstrated

  6. Replacement of outboard main steam isolation valves in a boiling water reactor plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlereth, J.R.; Pennington, D.

    1996-12-01

    Most Boiling Water Reactor plants utilize wye pattern globe valves for main steam isolation valves for both inboard and outboard isolation. These valves have required a high degree of maintenance attention in order to pass the plant local leakage rate testing (LLRT) requirements at each outage. Northern States Power made a decision in 1993 to replace the outboard valves at it`s Monticello plant with double disc gate valves. The replacement of the outboard valves was completed during the fall outage in 1994. During the spring outage in April of 1996 the first LLRT testing was performed with excellent results. This presentation will address the decision process, time requirements and planning necessary to accomplish the task as well as the performance results and cost effectiveness of replacing these components.

  7. Replacement of outboard main steam isolation valves in a boiling water reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlereth, J.R.; Pennington, D.

    1996-01-01

    Most Boiling Water Reactor plants utilize wye pattern globe valves for main steam isolation valves for both inboard and outboard isolation. These valves have required a high degree of maintenance attention in order to pass the plant local leakage rate testing (LLRT) requirements at each outage. Northern States Power made a decision in 1993 to replace the outboard valves at it's Monticello plant with double disc gate valves. The replacement of the outboard valves was completed during the fall outage in 1994. During the spring outage in April of 1996 the first LLRT testing was performed with excellent results. This presentation will address the decision process, time requirements and planning necessary to accomplish the task as well as the performance results and cost effectiveness of replacing these components

  8. [Late complications following Björk-Shiley and St. Jude Medical heart valve replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstkotte, D; Körfer, R; Budde, T; Haerten, K; Schulte, H D; Bircks, W; Loogen, F

    1983-05-01

    Valve-related complications after Björk-Shiley mitral (n = 475), aortic (n = 424), or mitral-aortic implantation (n = 119) were compared to complications after St. Jude mitral (n = 173), aortic (n = 152), and St. Jude mitral and aortic (n = 63) replacements. The 1,018 consecutive patients with Björk-Shiley valves had been operated upon between 1974 and 1982, those with St. Jude valves between 1978 and 1982. All patients were placed on anticoagulant therapy with phenprocoumon early after operation and no significant intergroup differences in the effectiveness of the anticoagulant therapy were found. At a comparable follow-up time of approximately 23 months, 24 major thromboembolic episodes were observed after Björk-Shiley mitral (BSM) and 3 after St. Jude mitral valve implantation (SJM), corresponding to a thromboembolic rate of 2.82/100 patient years with BSM and 0.93/100 patient years with SJM. After aortic valve replacements, 1.93 events in 100 patient years occurred after Björk-Shiley aortic (BSA) and 0.73 after St. Jude aortic implantation (SJA). In patients with double valve replacements, these rates were 3.2 (BSM + BSA) and 0.88 (SJM + SJA), respectively. The cerebral vessels were involved in 52% and the arteries of the extremities in 22% of these major events. Six Björk-Shiley prostheses had to be replaced because of valve thrombosis. The overall incidence of severe hemorrhagic complications was 2.94/100 patient years in BSM and 1.79 in SJM. After aortic valve replacement, we found rates of 1.80/100 patient years (BSA) and 2.57/100 patient years (SJA), respectively. Intravascular hemolysis no longer seems to be a significant clinical problem. However, indications of red cell damage after heart valve replacement were significantly greater in patients with perivalvular leakage, valve thrombosis, or dysfunction than in those with normally functioning prostheses. Reoperations were necessary because of valve thrombosis (0.46%), perivalvular leakage (2

  9. Hypoxic encephalopathy after heart valve replacement: etiology and pathogenesis, diagnostic criteria and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. Г. Постнов

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Reviewed in this paper are modern approaches in the intensive therapy of acute hypoxic encephalopathy developing in a number of occasions after the heart valve replacement surgery. The study is based on the results of neurological, neuropsychological and neurophysiological (EEG examinations of 240 patients who underwent heart valve replacement surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass conditions complicated later by the development of hypoxic encephalopathies of varying severity and who received complex intensive care. Relying on many years of experience in the treatment of heart surgery patients in whom manifestations of encephalopathy developed in the early postoperative period, or were delayed, we have formulated the following algorithms of therapy. (1 Maintenance of normal blood gas: Hb>100 g/L, pH 7.45, PaCO2 35 mmHg. (2 Maintenance of hemodynamics: ABPsystolic>90 mmHg. (3 Supplying fluids and electrolytes: isoosmolar infusion solutions, adding of KCl and MgSO4 to the infusion. (4 Antiedemic therapy: 15% mannitol or 40% glycerol solution. (5 If necessary (in case of psychomotor agitation, seizures, short-acting barbiturates (sodium thiopental, neuroleptics (haloperidol, propofol. No benzodiazepines in case of psychoses (6 Cerebral metabolism stimulation (not earlier than 48 hours after surgery with cholinomimetics, nootropics, cerebral blood flow protectors. Cholinomimetics are allowed on the first day after surgery. This algorithm and the above-mentioned groups of drugs, especially central cholinomimetics, allow for correcting the neurocognitive impairment in the discussed group of patients quickly and effectively.

  10. Cardiac Tamponade following Mitral Valve Replacement for Active Infective Endocarditis with Ring Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ranjan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Periannular extension and abscess formation are rare but deadly complications of infective endocarditis (IE with high mortality. Multimodality cardiac imaging, invasive and noninvasive, is needed to accurately define the extent of the disease. Debridement, reconstruction, and valve replacement, often performed in an emergent setting, remain the treatment of choice. Here we present a case of severe IE in a 29-year-old intravenous drug user who after undergoing debridement of the abscess, annular reconstruction, and mitral valve replacement (MVR presented with recurrence of shortness of breath and pedal edema. Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE showed a 6.2×5.5 cm cavity, posterior to and communicating with the left ventricle through a 3 cm wide fistulous opening, in proximity of the reconstructed mitral annulus. The patient underwent a redo MVR with patch closure of the fistulous opening, with good clinical outcome. This case highlights the classic TTE findings and the necessity for close follow-up in the perioperative period in patients undergoing surgery for periannular extension of infection. A cardiac magnetic resonance imaging can be considered, preoperatively, in such cases to identify the extent of myocardial involvement and surgical planning.

  11. Advanced age and incidence of atrial fibrillation in the postoperative period of aortic valve replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivatto Júnior, Fernando; Teixeira Filho, Guaracy Fernandes; Sant'anna, João Ricardo Michelin; Py, Pablo Mondim; Prates, Paulo Roberto; Nesralla, Ivo Abrahão; Kalil, Renato Abdala Karam

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aims to describe the correlation between age and occurrence of atrial fibrillation after aortic stenosis surgery in the elderly as well as evaluate the influence of atrial fibrillation on the incidence of strokes, hospital length of stay, and hospital mortality. Methods Cross-sectional retrospective study of > 70 year-old patients who underwent isolated aortic valve replacement. Results 348 patients were included in the study (mean age 76.8±4.6 years). Overall, post-operative atrial fibrillation was 32.8% (n=114), but it was higher in patients aged 80 years and older (42.9% versus 28.8% in patients aged 70-79 years, P=0.017). There was borderline significance for linear correlation between age and atrial fibrillation (P=0.055). Intensive Care Unit and hospital lengths of stay were significantly increased in atrial fibrillation (Patrial fibrillation. Conclusion Post-operative atrial fibrillation incidence in aortic valve replacement is high and correlates with age in patients aged 70 years and older and significantly more pronounced in patients aged 80 years. There was increased length of stay at Intensive Care Unit and hospital, but there was no increase in mortality or stroke. These data are important for planning prophylaxis and early treatment for this subgroup. PMID:24896162

  12. Aortic or Mitral Valve Replacement With the Biocor and Biocor Supra

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-26

    Aortic Valve Insufficiency; Aortic Valve Regurgitation; Aortic Valve Stenosis; Aortic Valve Incompetence; Mitral Valve Insufficiency; Mitral Valve Regurgitation; Mitral Valve Stenosis; Mitral Valve Incompetence

  13. Impact of energy loss index on left ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Terumasa; Okura, Hiroyuki; Kume, Teruyoshi; Fukuhara, Kenzo; Imai, Koichiro; Hayashida, Akihiro; Neishi, Yoji; Kawamoto, Takahiro; Tanemoto, Kazuo; Yoshida, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the energy loss index (ELI) has been proposed as a new functional index to assess the severity of aortic stenosis (AS). The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of the ELI on left ventricular mass (LVM) regression in patients after aortic valve replacement (AVR) with mechanical valves. A total of 30 patients with severe AS who underwent AVR with mechanical valves was studied. Echocardiography was performed to measure the LVM before AVR (pre-LVM) (n = 30) and repeated 12 months later (post-LVM) (n = 19). The ELI was calculated as [effective orifice area (EOA) × aortic cross sectional area]/(aortic cross sectional area - EOA) divided by the body surface area. The LVM regression rate (%) was calculated as 100 × (post-LVM - pre-LVM)/(pre-LVM). A cardiac event was defined as a composite of cardiac death and heart failure requiring hospitalization. LVM regressed significantly (245.1 ± 84.3 to 173.4 ± 62.6 g, P regression rate negatively correlated with the ELI (R = -0.67, P regression rates (area under the curve = 0.825; P = 0.030). Patients with ELI regression after AVR with mechanical valves. Whether the ELI is a stronger predictor of clinical events than EOAI is still unclear, and further large-scale study is necessary to elucidate the clinical impact of the ELI in patients with AVR.

  14. Transcatheter pulmonary valve replacement by hybrid approach using a novel polymeric prosthetic heart valve: proof of concept in sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Zhang

    Full Text Available Since 2000, transcatheter pulmonary valve replacement has steadily advanced. However, the available prosthetic valves are restricted to bioprosthesis which have defects like poor durability. Polymeric heart valve is thought as a promising alternative to bioprosthesis. In this study, we introduced a novel polymeric transcatheter pulmonary valve and evaluated its feasibility and safety in sheep by a hybrid approach.We designed a novel polymeric trileaflet transcatheter pulmonary valve with a balloon-expandable stent, and the valve leaflets were made of 0.1-mm expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE coated with phosphorylcholine. We chose glutaraldehyde-treated bovine pericardium valves as control. Pulmonary valve stents were implanted in situ by a hybrid transapical approach in 10 healthy sheep (8 for polymeric valve and 2 for bovine pericardium valve, weighing an average of 22.5±2.0 kg. Angiography and cardiac catheter examination were performed after implantation to assess immediate valvular functionality. After 4-week follow-up, angiography, echocardiography, computed tomography, and cardiac catheter examination were used to assess early valvular function. One randomly selected sheep with polymeric valve was euthanized and the explanted valved stent was analyzed macroscopically and microscopically.Implantation was successful in 9 sheep. Angiography at implantation showed all 9 prosthetic valves demonstrated orthotopic position and normal functionality. All 9 sheep survived at 4-week follow-up. Four-week follow-up revealed no evidence of valve stent dislocation or deformation and normal valvular and cardiac functionality. The cardiac catheter examination showed the peak-peak transvalvular pressure gradient of the polymeric valves was 11.9±5.0 mmHg, while that of two bovine pericardium valves were 11 and 17 mmHg. Gross morphology demonstrated good opening and closure characteristics. No thrombus or calcification was seen macroscopically

  15. Basal longitudinal strain predicts future aortic valve replacement in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Helle Gervig; Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Hassager, Christian

    2016-01-01

    analysis and coronary angiography by MDCT. The combined endpoint was indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR) and sudden cardiac death. During a median follow-up of 2.3 years (interquartile range 1.7-3.6) 43 patients (41%) met the endpoint of indication for AVR. The basal (13.4 ± 3.1% vs. 15.7 ± 3.......1%) and mid-ventricular segments (14.9 ± 2.7% vs. 16.2 ± 2.9%) were significantly reduced, but with sparing of the apical segments, in patients who later underwent AVR. In various multivariable Cox regression models, including only BLS, but not GLS, remained an independent predictor of AVR. CONCLUSION...

  16. Impact of obesity on long-term survival after aortic valve replacement with a small prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Biao; Yang, Hongyang; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Xiquan; Zhu, Wenjie; Cao, Guangqing; Wu, Shuming

    2013-07-01

    Although many studies have evaluated the impact of obesity on various medical treatments, it is not known whether obesity is related to late mortality with implantation of small aortic prostheses. This study evaluated the effect of obesity on the late survival of patients after aortic valve replacement (AVR) with implantation of a small aortic prosthesis (size ≤ 21 mm). From January 1998 to December 2008, 307 patients in our institution who underwent primary AVR with smaller prostheses survived 30 days after surgery. Patients were categorized as normal weight if body mass index (BMI) was prosthesis. Obesity or/and overweight may also affect the NYHA classification, even in the longer term. EOAI should be improved where possible, as it may reduce late mortality and improve quality of life in obese or overweight patients.

  17. Subprosthetic Pannus after Aortic Valve Replacement Surgery: Cardiac CT Findings and Clinical Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kichang; Yang, Dong Hyun; Shin, So Youn; Kim, Namkug; Kang, Joon-Won; Kim, Dae-Hee; Song, Jong-Min; Kang, Duk-Hyun; Song, Jae-Kwan; Kim, Joon Bum; Jung, Sung-Ho; Choo, Suk Jung; Chung, Cheol Hyun; Lee, Jae Won; Lim, Tae-Hwan

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the cardiac computed tomographic (CT) findings and clinical implications of subprosthetic pannus in patients who have undergone aortic valve replacement. The institutional review board approved this retrospective study, and the need to obtain written informed consent was waived. From April 2011 to March 2012, 88 patients (mean age, 63 years; 45 men) with a prosthetic aortic valve who underwent cardiac CT were retrospectively selected. Dynamic cardiac CT images were analyzed by using a multiplanar reformatted technique. The presence or absence of subprosthetic pannus and its extent were evaluated at cardiac CT. The geometric orifice area and the effective orifice area of each prosthetic valve were measured to enable analysis of the pannus encroachment ratio in the systolic phase. Hemodynamic parameters at echocardiography, including mean transprosthetic pressure gradient (MTPG), were compared between patients with and those without pannus. The encroachment ratio and the MTPG were correlated by using the Spearman test to evaluate the relationship between the two variables. Seventeen patients (19%) had subprosthetic pannus at cardiac CT. In patients with subprosthetic pannus, MTPG, peak pressure gradient, transvalvular peak velocity, and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were significantly higher than in patients without pannus (MTPG: 28.1 mm Hg ± 19.8 [standard deviation] vs 14.0 mm Hg ± 6.5, P = .004; peak pressure gradient: 53.1 mm Hg ± 38.4 vs 26.1 mm Hg ± 11.4, P = .004; transvalvular peak velocity: 3.3 m/sec ± 1.3 vs 2.5 m/sec ± 0.5; and LVEF: 64.7% ± 7.4 vs 56.8% ± 10.5, P = .004). A high MTPG (≥40 mm Hg) was observed in four patients at echocardiography, and subprosthetic panni were identified at CT in all four patients. In patients with increased MTPGs, the encroachment ratio by subprosthetic pannus at CT was significantly higher than that in patients with MTPGs of less than 40 mm Hg (42.7 ± 13.3 vs 7.6 ± 3, P = .012

  18. Radial Force: An Underestimated Parameter in Oversizing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Prostheses: In Vitro Analysis with Five Commercialized Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egron, Sandrine; Fujita, Buntaro; Gullón, Lucía; Désirée, Pott; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Ensminger, Stephan; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2017-09-05

    The goal is to inform in depth on transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) prosthesis mechanical behavior, depending on frame type, design, and size, and how it crucially impacts the oversizing issue in clinical use, and ultimately the procedure outcome. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement is an established therapy for high-risk patients suffering from aortic stenosis, and the indication for TAVR is progressively expanding to intermediate-risk patients. Choosing the optimal oversizing degree is crucial to safely anchor the TAVR valve-which involves limiting the risks for embolism, aortic regurgitation, conductance disturbance, or annulus rupture-and to increase the valve prosthesis performance. The radial force (RF) profiles of five TAVR prostheses were measured in vitro: the CoreValve 23 and 26 (Medtronic, MN), the Acurate neo S (Symetis, Switzerland), and the SAPIEN XT 23 and 26 (Edwards Lifesciences, CA). Measurements were run with the RX Machine equipment (Machine Solutions Inc., AZ), which is used in ISO standard tests for intravascular stents. Test protocols were adapted for TAVR prostheses. With the prostheses RF profiles' results, mechanical behavior differences could be described and discussed in terms of oversizing strategy and clinical impact for all five valves. Besides, crossing the prostheses' RF profiles with their recommended size windows made the assessment of borderline size cases possible and helped analyze the risks when accurate measurement of patient aortic annulus proves difficult. The prostheses' RF profiles bring new support in clinical decision-making for valve type and size in patients.

  19. Late complications in patients with Björk-Shiley and St. Jude Medical heart valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstkotte, D; Körfer, R; Seipel, L; Bircks, W; Loogen, F

    1983-09-01

    Valve-related complications after Björk-Shiley mitral valve implantation (n = 475), aortic valve implantation (n = 424), or mitral-aortic valve implantation (n = 119) were compared with those after St. Jude Medical mitral valve replacement (n = 173), aortic valve replacement (n = 152), or mitral-aortic valve replacement (n = 69). All patients were placed on anticoagulant therapy with phenprocoumon early after operation. All patients had a comparable follow-up time of approximately 23 months, which showed that cumulative thromboembolic rates were significantly higher after St. Jude valve implantation than after Björk-Shiley valve implantation. Reoperations were necessary because of valve thrombosis (0.46%), perivalvular leakage (2.2%), or prosthetic valve endocarditis with perivalvular regurgitation (0.46%). One Björk-Shiley mitral valve prosthesis had to be replaced because of fracture of the outlet strut. Without significant intergroup differences, hemorrhage due to anticoagulant treatment was the most frequent complication. Thromboembolic complications were significantly more frequent after Björk-Shiley mitral, aortic, and double valve replacements than after St. Jude valve implantation. This may lead to consideration of changes in the prophylaxis of thrombus formations in the St. Jude valve, especially in aortic valve replacements, in patients with sinus rhythm.

  20. Thrombocytopenia in Moderate- to High-Risk Sutureless Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puwadon Thitivaraporn

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Background : This study aimed to compare preliminary data on the outcomes of sutureless aortic valve replacement (SU-AVR with those of aortic valve replacement (AVR. Methods : We conducted a retrospective study of SU-AVR in moderate- to high-risk patients from 2013 to 2016. Matching was performed at a 1:1 ratio using the Society of Thoracic Surgeons predicted risk of mortality score with sex and age. The primary outcome was 30-day mortality. The secondary outcomes were operative outcomes and complications. Results : A total of 277 patients were studied. Ten patients (50% males; median age, 81.5 years underwent SU-AVR. Postoperative echocardiography showed impressive outcomes in the SU-AVR group. The 30-day mortality was 10% in both groups. In our study, the patients in the SU-AVR group developed postoperative thrombocytopenia. Platelet counts decreased from 225X103 /μL preoperatively to 94.5, 54.5, and 50.1X10 3/μL on postoperative days 1, 2, and 3, respectively, showing significant differences compared with the AVR group (p=0.04, p=0.16, and p=0.20, respectively. The median amount of platelet transfusion was higher in the AVR group (12.5 vs. 0 units, p=0.052. Conclusion : There was no difference in the 30-day mortality of moderate- to high-risk patients depending on whether they underwent SU-AVR or AVR. Although SU-AVR is associated with favorable cardiopulmonary bypass and cross-clamp times, it may be associated with postoperative thrombocytopenia.

  1. Heart valve surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... replacement; Valve repair; Heart valve prosthesis; Mechanical valves; Prosthetic valves ... surgery. Your heart valve has been damaged by infection ( endocarditis ). You have received a new heart valve ...

  2. The flaws in the detail of an observational study on transcatheter aortic valve implantation versus surgical aortic valve replacement in intermediate-risks patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barili, Fabio; Freemantle, Nick; Folliguet, Thierry; Muneretto, Claudio; de Bonis, Michele; Czerny, Martin; Obadia, Jean Francois; Al-Attar, Nawwar; Bonaros, Nikolaos; Kluin, Jolanda; Lorusso, Roberto; Punjabi, Prakash; Sadaba, Rafael; Suwalski, Piotr; Benedetto, Umberto; Böning, Andreas; Falk, Volkmar; Sousa-Uva, Miguel; Kappetein, Pieter A.; Menicanti, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    The PARTNER group recently published a comparison between the latest generation SAPIEN 3 transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) system (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in intermediate-risk patients, apparently demonstrating superiority of

  3. Long-term results of aortic valve replacement with Edwards Prima Plus stentless bioprosthesis: eleven years' follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auriemma, Stefano; D'Onofrio, Augusto; Brunelli, Massimo; Magagna, Paolo; Paccanaro, Mariemma; Rulfo, Fanny; Fabbri, Alessandro

    2006-09-01

    The Edwards Lifesciences Prima Plus stentless valve (ELSV) is a bioprosthesis manufactured from a porcine aortic root. The study aim was to evaluate late clinical outcomes after aortic valve replacement (AVR) with ELSV implanted as a miniroot in patients with aortic valve disease. Between 1993 and 2004, 318 patients (232 males, 86 females; mean age 69 +/- 9 years; range: 37-83 years) underwent AVR with the ELSV. Preoperatively, 102 patients (32%), 162 (51%) and 54 (17%) were in NYHA classes I/II, III and IV, respectively. Aortic stenosis, aortic regurgitation and combined lesions were present in 124 patients (39%), 114 (36%) and 41 (13%), respectively. Twenty patients (6%) were referred for an acute aortic dissection, 20 (6%) for an aortic root aneurysm, and 139 (44%) had an associated aneurysmal dilatation of the ascending aorta. The ascending aorta was replaced in 159 patients (50%); aortic arch replacement was required in 10 (3%). Coronary artery bypass graft was performed in 86 patients (27%). The follow up was based on clinical data. Operative mortality was 5% (n = 17). There were 49 late deaths (5.2%/pt-yr). Valve-related mortality occurred in 10 patients (1%/pt-yr). Actuarial survival at five and 10 years was 78% and 33%, respectively. Actuarial freedom from valve reoperation and structural valve deterioration at 10 years were 100% and 64%. Actuarial freedom from embolic events and endocarditis at 10 years were 84% and 81%, respectively. The ELSV, when implanted as a miniroot, provided good early and long-term results in terms of survival and freedom from major complications.

  4. Sutureless versus Conventional Aortic Valve Replacement: Outcomes in 70 High-Risk Patients Undergoing Concomitant Cardiac Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanedan, Muhammet Onur; Yuruk, Mehmet Ali; Parlar, Ali Ihsan; Ziyrek, Ugur; Arslan, Ali Kemal; Sayar, Ufuk; Mataraci, Ilker

    2018-02-01

    In elderly, high-risk surgical patients, sutureless aortic valve replacement (AVR) can often be an alternative to conventional AVR; shorter aortic cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass times are the chief advantages. We compared the outcomes of sutureless AVR with those of conventional AVR in 70 elderly patients who underwent concomitant cardiac surgical procedures. We retrospectively analyzed the cases of 42 men and 28 women (mean age, 70.4 ± 10.3 yr; range, 34-93 yr) who underwent cardiac operations plus AVR with either a sutureless valve (group 1, n=38) or a conventional bioprosthetic or mechanical valve (group 2, n=32). Baseline patient characteristics were similar except for worse New York Heart Association functional status and the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in group 1. In group 1, the operative, cross-clamp, and cardiopulmonary bypass times were shorter (all P =0.001), postoperative drainage amounts were lower ( P =0.009), hospital stays were shorter ( P =0.004), and less red blood cell transfusion was needed ( P =0.037). Echocardiograms before patients' discharge from the hospital showed lower peak and mean aortic gradients in group 1 (mean transvalvular gradient, 8.4 ± 2.8 vs 12.2 ± 5.2 mmHg; P =0.012). We found that elderly, high-risk patients who underwent multiple cardiac surgical procedures and sutureless AVR had better hemodynamic outcomes and shorter ischemic times than did patients who underwent conventional AVR.

  5. Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation with Concomitant Aortic Valve and Ascending Aortic Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huenges, Katharina; Panholzer, Bernd; Cremer, Jochen; Haneya, Assad

    2018-01-01

    Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is nowadays a routine therapy for patients with advanced heart failure. We present the case of a 74-year-old male patient who was admitted to our center with terminal heart failure in dilated cardiomyopathy and ascending aortic aneurysm with aortic valve regurgitation. The LVAD implantation with simultaneous aortic valve and supracoronary ascending aortic replacement was successfully performed.

  6. Impact of Valvuloarterial Impedance on Concentric Remodeling in Aortic Stenosis and Its Regression after Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jeong Yoon; Seo, Jeong-Sook; Sun, Byung Joo; Kim, Dae-Hee; Song, Jong-Min; Kang, Duk-Hyun; Song, Jae-Kwan

    2016-09-01

    Left ventricle (LV) in patients with aortic stenosis (AS) faces a double hemodynamic load incorporating both valvular stenosis and reduced systemic arterial compliance (SAC). This study aimed to evaluate the impact of global LV afterload on LV hypertrophy (LVH) before and after aortic valve replacement (AVR). The study cohort included 453 patients (247 males; mean age, 64 ± 11 years) who underwent AVR. Pre- and post-AVR echocardiographic examinations were retrospectively analyzed including an index of valvuloarterial impedance (Z VA ) and LV mass index/LV end-diastolic volume index (LVMI/LVEDVI) as a parameter of LVH. Pre-AVR LVMI/LVEDVI was 2.7 ± 0.9 g/mL with an aortic valve area (AVA) of 0.6 ± 0.2 cm 2 . Z VA was 5.9 ± 1.9 mm Hg/mL/m 2 and showed a stronger correlation (β = 0.601, p regression in 322 patients with follow-up duration >1 year after AVR. Z VA is a major determinant of concentric remodeling in AS before AVR and LVH regression after AVR, which should be incorporated in routine evaluation of AS.

  7. Process and device for in situ replacing sealing faces in large valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, M.; Garit, J.; Mantes, G.

    1995-01-01

    A milling machine is fitted in the interior of the valve and first machines the sealing face of the opposite seat of the seat to be replaced so that this face can act as a reference for the tool and then machines out the seat ending up by machining a new recess for the replacement seat which is then inserted in position and fixed to the body of the valve by a circular welded joint. 23 figs

  8. [Cox/maze III procedure combined with mitral valve replacement in treatment of rheumatic mitral valve disease with atrial fibrilation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rukun; Wang, Yongqing; Chen, Yongbing; Chen, Suocheng

    2002-06-25

    To compare the curative effect of Cox/maze III procedure combined with mitral replacement and that of mitral valve replacement (MVR). Fifty-six patients suffering from rheumatic heart disease with atrial fibrillation (AF) were treated by Cox/maze III procedure combined with MVR (maze group). Another 56 age, sex, and heart function-matched patients with the same diagnosis underwent MVR alone during the same period. Warfarin was administered after operation in both groups. Comparison of operative complication and curative effects was made. The aortic cross-clamp time and cardio pulmonary bypass time (CPB) were longer in maze group than in MVT group (75 +/- 22 min vs 41 +/- 11 min, P Atrial contractility was restored in all patients with sinus rhythm. One year after operation, 98.18% patients' cardiac function changed to grade and 1.82% changed to grade II. In MVR group AF disappeared after operation temporarily for 24 hours in 7 patients and re-appeared, and AF disappeared in one patients for 2 years so far. One year after operation, the cardiac function of 94.6% patients in MVR group changed to grade I, of 3.6% patients to grade II, and of 1.8% patients to grade III. No serious hemorrhage relate d to anticoagulant therapy happened. One patient in MVR group suffered from hemiplegia due to cerebral embolism. The late mortality was 1.8% on maze group amd 3.6% in MVR group. Cox/maze III procedure combined with NVR is safe and effective in treating rheumatic heart disease with AF.

  9. 3D echocardiographic analysis of aortic annulus for transcatheter aortic valve replacement using novel aortic valve quantification software: Comparison with computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediratta, Anuj; Addetia, Karima; Medvedofsky, Diego; Schneider, Robert J; Kruse, Eric; Shah, Atman P; Nathan, Sandeep; Paul, Jonathan D; Blair, John E; Ota, Takeyoshi; Balkhy, Husam H; Patel, Amit R; Mor-Avi, Victor; Lang, Roberto M

    2017-05-01

    With the increasing use of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients with aortic stenosis (AS), computed tomography (CT) remains the standard for annulus sizing. However, 3D transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has been an alternative in patients with contraindications to CT. We sought to (1) test the feasibility, accuracy, and reproducibility of prototype 3DTEE analysis software (Philips) for aortic annular measurements and (2) compare the new approach to the existing echocardiographic techniques. We prospectively studied 52 patients who underwent gated contrast CT, procedural 3DTEE, and TAVR. 3DTEE images were analyzed using novel semi-automated software designed for 3D measurements of the aortic root, which uses multiplanar reconstruction, similar to CT analysis. Aortic annulus measurements included area, perimeter, and diameter calculations from these measurements. The results were compared to CT-derived values. Additionally, 3D echocardiographic measurements (3D planimetry and mitral valve analysis software adapted for the aortic valve) were also compared to the CT reference values. 3DTEE image quality was sufficient in 90% of patients for aortic annulus measurements using the new software, which were in good agreement with CT (r-values: .89-.91) and small (software can accurately measure aortic annulus in patients with severe AS undergoing TAVR, in better agreement with CT than the existing methodology. Accordingly, intra-procedural TEE could potentially replace CT in patients where CT carries significant risk. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Anticoagulation After Biological Aortic Valve Replacement: Is There An Optimal Regimen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owais, Tamer; Rouman, Mina; Breuer, Martin; Hüter, Lars; Fuchs, Jürgen; Lauer, Bernward; Kuntze, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    The anticoagulation of biological heart valves remains a 'hot spot' of discussion in various domains due to the risk of developing valve thrombosis and arterial thromboembolism. The situation has always been controversial, especially during the early postoperative phase. The American College of Cardiology/ American Heart Association and European Society of Cardiology guidelines recommend the use of warfarin for the first three months after biological aortic valve replacement (BAVR), although the American College of Chest Physicians guidelines suggest that these recommendations are experience-based and that the risk/benefit is unclear. The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of aspirin and warfarin in patients after BAVR. A total of 863 patients who underwent BAVR between 2008 and 2015 was allocated to two groups. Each group was managed with a specific anticoagulation regimen, with 430 patients receiving warfarin during the first three postoperative months, and 433 receiving aspirin. The major study end points were bleeding, cerebral ischemic events, and survival. In total, 10 and 15 postoperative cerebral ischemic events occurred between 24 h and three months after surgery in patients treated with aspirin and warfarin, respectively. After three months the incidence of cerebral ischemic events did not differ greatly between the two groups. The rate of major bleeding events and rates of stroke-free survival and overall survival were not statistically significant between the warfarin and aspirin groups. Plasma anticoagulation with warfarin during the early postoperative phase was shown statistically to be inferior to platelet aggregation inhibition by aspirin with regards to postoperative bleeding risk, cerebral ischemic events, and survival.

  11. Changes in Mitral Annular Geometry after Aortic Valve Replacement: A Three-Dimensional Transesophageal Echocardiographic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Feroze; Warraich, Haider J.; Gorman, Joseph H.; Gorman, Robert C.; Chen, Tzong-Huei; Panzica, Peter; Maslow, Andrew; Khabbaz, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Background and aim of the study Intraoperative real-time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (RT-3D TEE) was used to examine the geometric changes that occur in the mitral annulus immediately after aortic valve replacement (AVR). Methods A total of 35 patients undergoing elective surgical AVR under cardiopulmonary bypass was enrolled in the study. Intraoperative RT-3D TEE was used prospectively to acquire volumetric echocardiographic datasets immediately before and after AVR. The 3D echocardiographic data were analyzed offline using TomTec® Mitral Valve Assessment software to assess changes in specific mitral annular geometric parameters. Results Datasets were successfully acquired and analyzed for all patients. A significant reduction was noted in the mitral annular area (-16.3%, p <0.001), circumference (-8.9% p <0.001) and the anteroposterior (-6.3%, p = 0.019) and anterolateral-posteromedial (-10.5%, p <0.001) diameters. A greater reduction was noted in the anterior annulus length compared to the posterior annulus length (10.5% versus 62%, p <0.05) after AVR. No significant change was seen in the non-planarity angle, coaptation depth, and closure line length. During the period of data acquisition before and after AVR, no significant change was noted in the central venous pressure or left ventricular end-diastolic diameter. Conclusion The mitral annulus undergoes significant geometric changes immediately after AVR Notably, a 16.3% reduction was observed in the mitral annular area. The anterior annulus underwent a greater reduction in length compared to the posterior annulus, which suggested the existence of a mechanical compression by the prosthetic valve. PMID:23409347

  12. Comparison of Warfarin Requirements in Post-cardiac Surgery Patients: Valve Replacement Versus Non-valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Logan M; Nei, Andrea M; Joyce, David L; Ou, Narith N; Dierkhising, Ross A; Nei, Scott D

    2018-01-11

    Anticoagulation with warfarin affects approximately 140,000 post-cardiac surgery patients every year, yet there remains limited published data in this patient population. Dosing remains highly variable due to intrinsic risk factors that plague cardiac surgery candidates and a lack of diverse literature that can be applied to those who have undergone a cardiac surgery alternative to heart valve replacement (HVR). In the present study, our aim was to compare the warfarin requirements between HVR and non-HVR patients. This was a single-center, retrospective study of post-cardiac surgery patients initiated on warfarin at Mayo Clinic Hospital, Rochester, from January 1st, 2013 to October 31st, 2016. The primary outcome was the maintenance warfarin dose at the earliest of discharge or warfarin day 10 between patients with HVR and non-HVR cardiac surgeries. A total of 683 patients were assessed during the study period: 408 in the HVR group and 275 in the non-HVR group. The mean warfarin maintenance doses in the HVR and non-HVR groups were 2.55 mg [standard deviation (SD) 1.52] and 2.43 mg (SD 1.21), respectively (adjusted p = 0.65). A multivariable analysis was performed to adjust for gender, age, body mass index and drug interactions. This was the largest study to evaluate warfarin dose requirements in post-cardiac surgery patients and is the first to compare warfarin requirements between HVR and non-HVR patients during the immediate post-operative period. Both groups had similar warfarin requirements, which supports expanding the initial warfarin dosing recommendations of the 9th edition Chest guideline to include non-HVR patients as well as HVR patients.

  13. Regression in left ventricular mass after aortic valve replacement for chronic aortic regurgitation is unrelated to prosthetic valve size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Morgan L; Schaff, Hartzell V; Suri, Rakesh M; Li, Zhuo; Sundt, Thoralf M; Dearani, Joseph A; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2011-08-01

    We examined the role of prosthesis-patient mismatch on left ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement for chronic aortic valve regurgitation. We selected patients who had complete preoperative and follow-up echocardiograms with measurement of left ventricular mass. Patients were excluded who had moderate or greater aortic valve stenosis, concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting, or mitral valve procedures. Patients' mean age was 55 ± 17 years; 21% were female. The mean preoperative indexed left ventricular mass was 150 ± 45 g/m(2). Patients with mildly (n = 44; mean indexed mass, 126 ± 15 g/m(2)), moderately (n = 31; mean indexed mass, 168 ± 11 g/m(2)), or severely (n = 15; mean indexed mass, 241 ± 34 g/m(2)) increased preoperative indexed left ventricular mass, were similar, except for lower ejection fractions, larger end-diastolic dimensions, and larger ventricular wall thicknesses in the severely enlarged group (P regression was unrelated to labeled valve size, prosthesis-patient mismatch, or measured indexed effective aortic valve area. A greater preoperative indexed left ventricular mass (P regression. Despite having greater left ventricular mass regression, patients with severe preoperative indexed left ventricular mass did not return to normal values (mean, 142 ± 25 g/m(2)). Left ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement for chronic aortic regurgitation is unrelated to indexed prosthetic valve area. Although incomplete, regression is greatest in patients with the largest preoperative indexed left ventricular mass. Copyright © 2011 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Periodontal microbiota and microorganisms isolated from heart valves in patients undergoing valve replacement surgery in a clinic in Cali, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Sandra; Parra, Beatriz; Botero, Javier E; Moreno, Freddy; Vásquez, Daniel; Fernández, Hugo; Alba, Sandra; Gallego, Sara; Castillo, Gilberto; Contreras, Adolfo

    2017-12-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious disease that affects the support tissue of the teeth and it is associated with different systemic diseases, including cardiovascular disease. Microbiological studies facilitate the detection of microorganisms from subgingival and cardiovascular samples. To describe the cultivable periodontal microbiota and the presence of microorganisms in heart valves from patients undergoing valve replacement surgery in a clinic in Cali. We analyzed 30 subgingival and valvular tissue samples by means of two-phase culture medium, supplemented blood agar and trypticase soy agar with antibiotics. Conventional PCR was performed on samples of valve tissue. The periodontal pathogens isolated from periodontal pockets were: Fusobacterium nucleatum (50%), Prevotella intermedia/ nigrescens (40%), Campylobacter rectus (40%), Eikenella corrodens (36.7%), Gram negative enteric bacilli (36.7%), Porphyromonas gingivalis (33.3%), and Eubacterium spp. (33.3%). The pathogens isolated from the aortic valve were Propionibacterium acnes (12%), Gram negative enteric bacilli (8%), Bacteroides merdae (4%), and Clostridium bifermentans (4%), and from the mitral valve we isolated P. acnes and Clostridium beijerinckii. Conventional PCR did not return positive results for oral pathogens and bacterial DNA was detected only in two samples. Periodontal microbiota of patients undergoing surgery for heart valve replacement consisted of species of Gram-negative bacteria that have been associated with infections in extraoral tissues. However, there is no evidence of the presence of periodontal pathogens in valve tissue, because even though there were valve and subgingival samples positive for Gram-negative enteric bacilli, it is not possible to maintain they corresponded to the same phylogenetic origin.

  15. A comparison of conventional surgery, transcatheter aortic valve replacement, and sutureless valves in "real-world" patients with aortic stenosis and intermediate- to high-risk profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muneretto, Claudio; Alfieri, Ottavio; Cesana, Bruno Mario; Bisleri, Gianluigi; De Bonis, Michele; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto; Savini, Carlo; Folesani, Gianluca; Di Bacco, Lorenzo; Rambaldini, Manfredo; Maureira, Juan Pablo; Laborde, Francois; Tespili, Maurizio; Repossini, Alberto; Folliguet, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    We sought to investigate the clinical outcomes of patients with isolated severe aortic stenosis and an intermediate- to high-risk profile treated by means of conventional surgery (surgical aortic valve replacement), sutureless valve implantation, or transcatheter aortic valve replacement in a multicenter evaluation. Among 991 consecutive patients with isolated severe aortic stenosis and an intermediate- to high-risk profile (Society of Thoracic Surgeons score >4 and logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation I >10), a propensity score analysis was performed on the basis of the therapeutic strategy: surgical aortic valve replacement (n = 204), sutureless valve implantation (n = 204), and transcatheter aortic valve replacement (n = 204). Primary end points were 30-day mortality and overall survival at 24-month follow-up; the secondary end point was survival free from a composite end point of major adverse cardiac events (defined as cardiac-related mortality, myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accidents, and major hemorrhagic events) and periprosthetic regurgitation greater than 2. Thirty-day mortality was significantly higher in the transcatheter aortic valve replacement group (surgical aortic valve replacement = 3.4% vs sutureless = 5.8% vs transcatheter aortic valve replacement = 9.8%; P = .005). The incidence of postprocedural was 3.9% in asurgical aortic valve replacement vs 9.8% in sutureless vs 14.7% in transcatheter aortic valve replacement (Prisk factor for overall mortality hazard ratio (hazard ratio, 2.5; confidence interval, 1.1-4.2; P = .018). The use of transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients with an intermediate- to high-risk profile was associated with a significantly higher incidence of perioperative complications and decreased survival at short- and mid-term when compared with conventional surgery and sutureless valve implantation. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by

  16. Preventative valve-sparing aortic root replacement and pregnancy outcome in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, Vesna; Zlopasa, Gordan; Herman, Mislav; Planinić, Pavao; Micevska, Ana

    2012-06-01

    In Marfan syndrome, with dilatation of the aortic root secondary to an underlying connective tissue defect, pregnancy can cause hemodynamic stress leading to the development of an aortic aneurysm and even a fatal aortic dissection. In the presence of existing aortic root enlargement and a family history of aortic dissection, preventative elective surgery is suggested. Aortic root replacement with or without a valve-sparing procedure is superior to total aortic root replacement with prosthetic valve/tube graft. It provides excellent survival with low rates of aortic - valve related complications.

  17. Left ventricular mass regression after porcine versus bovine aortic valve replacement: a randomized comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Rakesh M; Zehr, Kenton J; Sundt, Thoralf M; Dearani, Joseph A; Daly, Richard C; Oh, Jae K; Schaff, Hartzell V

    2009-10-01

    It is unclear whether small differences in transprosthetic gradient between porcine and bovine biologic aortic valves translate into improved regression of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy after aortic valve replacement. We investigated transprosthetic gradient, aortic valve orifice area, and LV mass in patients randomized to aortic valve replacement with either the Medtronic Mosaic (MM) porcine or an Edwards Perimount (EP) bovine pericardial bioprosthesis. One hundred fifty-two patients with aortic valve disease were randomly assigned to receive either the MM (n = 76) or an EP prosthesis. There were 89 men (59%), and the mean age was 76 years. Echocardiograms from preoperative, postoperative, predismissal, and 1-year time points were analyzed. Baseline characteristics and preoperative echocardiograms were similar between the two groups. The median implant size was 23 mm for both. There were no early deaths, and 10 patients (7%) died after dismissal. One hundred seven of 137 patients (78%) had a 1-year echocardiogram, and none required aortic valve reoperation. The mean aortic valve gradient at dismissal was 19.4 mm Hg (MM) versus13.5 mm Hg (EP; p regression of LV mass index (MM, -32.4 g/m(2) versus EP, -27.0 g/m(2); p = 0.40). Greater preoperative LV mass index was the sole independent predictor of greater LV mass regression after surgery (p regression of LV mass during the first year after aortic valve replacement.

  18. Sickle cell anemia and mitral valve replacement. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomfim, V; Ribeiro, A; Gouvea, F; Pereira, J; Björk, V

    1989-01-01

    An 8-year-old black boy with sickle cell disease and severe hemolytic anemia crisis (95% hemoglobin S) also had mitral incompetence due to rheumatic valve disease. A 27 mm monostrut Björk-Shiley valve prosthesis was implanted after partial exchange transfusions had reduced the hemoglobin S to less than 40%. High-flow normothermic perfusion was used during extracorporeal circulation, with care taken to avoid hypoxia and acidosis. Postoperative recovery was uneventful.

  19. Which valve is which?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin Saxena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 25-year-old man presented with a history of breathlessness for the past 2 years. He had a history of operation for Tetralogy of Fallot at the age of 5 years and history suggestive of Rheumatic fever at the age of 7 years. On echocardiographic examination, all his heart valves were severely regurgitating. Morphologically, all the valves were irreparable. The ejection fraction was 35%. He underwent quadruple valve replacement. The aortic and mitral valves were replaced by metallic valve and the tricuspid and pulmonary by tissue valve.

  20. Reoperative Aortic Root Replacement in Patients with Previous Aortic Root or Aortic Valve Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Kwon Chong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Generalization of standardized surgical techniques to treat aortic valve (AV and aortic root diseases has benefited large numbers of patients. As a consequence of the proliferation of patients receiving aortic root surgeries, surgeons are more frequently challenged by reoperative aortic root procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of redo-aortic root replacement (ARR. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 66 patients (36 male; mean age, 44.5±9.5 years who underwent redo-ARR following AV or aortic root procedures between April 1995 and June 2015. Results: Emergency surgeries comprised 43.9% (n=29. Indications for the redo-ARR were aneurysm (n=12, pseudoaneurysm (n=1, or dissection (n=6 of the residual native aortic sinus in 19 patients (28.8%, native AV dysfunction in 8 patients (12.1%, structural dysfunction of an implanted bioprosthetic AV in 19 patients (28.8%, and infection of previously replaced AV or proximal aortic grafts in 30 patients (45.5%. There were 3 early deaths (4.5%. During follow- up (median, 54.65 months; quartile 1–3, 17.93 to 95.71 months, there were 14 late deaths (21.2%, and 9 valve-related complications including reoperation of the aortic root in 1 patient, infective endocarditis in 3 patients, and hemorrhagic events in 5 patients. Overall survival and event-free survival rates at 5 years were 81.5%±5.1% and 76.4%±5.4%, respectively. Conclusion: Despite technical challenges and a high rate of emergency conditions in patients requiring redo-ARR, early and late outcomes were acceptable in these patients.

  1. Trends in pulmonary valve replacement in children and adults with tetralogy of fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Byrne, Michael L; Glatz, Andrew C; Mercer-Rosa, Laura; Gillespie, Matthew J; Dori, Yoav; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Kawut, Steven; Rome, Jonathan J

    2015-01-01

    Operative correction of tetralogy of Fallot frequently results in pulmonary insufficiency and chronic volume overload, which have been linked to increased risk for adverse outcomes. No consensus recommendations for the timing of pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) exist. The aim of this study was to examine the pattern of PVR in the United States from 2004 to 2012. The Pediatric Health Information Systems database was used to perform an observational study of children and adults ≥10 years of age with diagnoses of tetralogy of Fallot who underwent PVR at 35 centers in the United States from 2004 and 2012, to assess the rate of PVR and the age at which is performed. Mixed-effects multivariate regression was used to account for patient-level covariates and center-level covariance. Additional analyses assessed for trends in cost, hospital length of stay (LOS), intensive care unit LOS, and in-hospital mortality over the study period. In total, 799 subjects at 35 centers underwent PVR over the study period. The number of PVRs performed per year increased significantly over the study period. There was significant between-center heterogeneity in age at PVR (p optimal timing of PVR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Risk stratification using lean body mass in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hioki, Hirofumi; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kozuma, Ken; Yamamoto, Masanori; Naganuma, Toru; Araki, Motoharu; Tada, Norio; Shirai, Shinichi; Yamanaka, Futoshi; Higashimori, Akihiro; Mizutani, Kazuki; Tabata, Minoru; Takagi, Kensuke; Ueno, Hiroshi; Hayashida, Kentaro

    2018-02-22

    The prognostic impact of skeletal muscle mass, assessed using lean body mass (LBM), remain unclear in patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). The aim of this study to assess prognostic impact of LBM on mortality after TAVR. We assessed 1,613 patients (median age 85 years, 70% female) who underwent TAVI from October 2013 to April 2016 using OCEAN (Optimized transCathEter vAlvular interveNtion)-TAVI registry data. LBM was calculated using the James formula. The primary endpoint was all-cause death after TAVR. Median follow-up period was 287 days (interquartile range 110-462). The Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that patients with low LBM had significantly higher incidence of all-cause death than those with high LBM in male (32.3% vs. 9.9%, log rank P LBM was an independent predictor of all-cause death in male (Hazard ratio [HR] 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.89-0.98) and female (HR 0.94; 95% CI 0.89-0.99). Inversely, the assessment using BMI could not identify the high-risk population in a female. The patients with low LBM had the higher incidence of all-cause death after TAVR than those with high LBM, regardless of gender. Thus, the risk stratification using LBM might provide further insight to identify the high-risk TAVR population, compared to conventional risk stratification using BMI. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Transcatheter versus surgical valve replacement for a failed pulmonary homograft in the Ross population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alassas, Khadija; Mohty, Dania; Clavel, Marie Annick; Husain, Aysha; Hijji, Talal; Aljoufan, Mansour; Alhalees, Zohair; Fadel, Bahaa M

    2018-04-01

    Patients who undergo the Ross procedure are at increased risk of pulmonary valve (PV) homograft dysfunction. For those who require reintervention on the homograft, transcatheter PV replacement (tPVR) provides a less invasive therapeutic option than surgical PVR (sPVR). We examined the outcomes following tPVR versus sPVR in a cohort of patients who underwent the Ross procedure. We performed a retrospective analysis of Ross patients age ≥14 years who underwent tPVR (n = 47) or sPVR (n = 41) at our institution. The patients' clinical and echocardiographic data were reviewed. Baseline parameters, including demographic data and left ventricular and right ventricular (RV) systolic function, were similar in the 2 groups. The mean follow-up was 56 ± 24 months for the tPVR group and 89 ± 46 months for the sPVR group (P Ross patients who require reintervention on the PV homograft, both tPVR and sPVR provide low procedural mortality and comparable midterm outcome with no significant difference in mortality or PV reintervention. However, IE is more common following tPVR. A larger randomized study is needed to determine the role of each procedure in patient management. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Is the femoral cannulation for minimally invasive aortic valve replacement necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, J; Rodriguez-Delgadillo, M A; Valle, J V; Campos, V; Herrera, J M; Rodriguez, F; Portela, F; Sorribas, F; Juffe, A

    1998-10-01

    Minimally invasive cardiac surgery through a small transverse sternotomy is a new promising technique that can be considered an alternative in most cases to aortic valve replacement thus reducing surgical trauma and subsequent time of hospitalization. The need to avoid the risks associated with femoro-femoral bypass has lead to the interest in aortic valve replacement (AVR) operations without femoral vessels cannulation. We want to emphasize a few important points of our technique, which differs somewhat from the one applied by Cosgrove and associates. This study details the approach to the minimally invasive AVR as first described by. Cosgrove et al. without standard femoral cannulation and points out our preliminary clinical experience. From October 1996 to May 1997 we have operated on 25 patients using minimally invasive AVR (MI-AVR) In 23 cases, access through transverse sternotomy as described by Cosgrove et al., was performed. In two additional cases the chest is opened via a mini-median sternotomy with an 'L'-shape extending from the sternal notch to the superior edge of the third interspace. Twenty-three patients underwent AVR through transverse sternotomy. The male/female ratio was 13:10. The mean age was 67 years (range 45-78 years). Seventy-four percent of the patients were over 65. Predominantly, in 43% of cases aortic valve stenosis and in 25% of cases aortic valve regurgitation isolated is presented. In 19 cases, a 10-cm transverse incision is performed over the second interspace. Likewise, in four cases over the third interspace according to the thorax morphology and length of the ascending aorta assessed by chest X-ray films. By convention, cannulation of the ascending aorta and right atrial appendage was performed as usual. In contrast, in one patient (5.5%), cannulation was placed in the superior vena cava and right common femoral vein into the inferior vena cava. In the present series, 15 mechanical prostheses and eight bioprostheses whose used

  5. Use of a novel drainage flow servo-controlled CPB for mitral valve replacement in a Jehovah's Witness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimi, Yoshinari; Murata, Seiichiro; Mitou, Yumi; Ohno, Yusuke

    2018-03-01

    We developed a novel open cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) system, a drainage flow servo-controlled CPB system (DS-CPB), in which rotational speed of the main roller pump is servo-controlled to generate the same amount of flow as the systemic venous drainage. It was designed to safely decrease the priming volume while maintaining a constant reservoir level, even during fluctuations of the drainage flow. We report a successful use of a novel DS-CPB system in an elderly Jehovah's Witness patient with dehydration who underwent mitral valve replacement.

  6. Emergency heart valve replacement: an analysis of 170 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw, J W; Kinsley, R H; Dion, R A; Colsen, P R; Girdwood, R W

    1980-05-01

    The results of 170 emergency heart valve procedures performed during a 4 1/2-year period were analyzed. Five pathological groups of patients were recognized: those with infective endocarditis (Group 1, 28 patients); acute rheumatic carditis (Group 2, 43 patients); previous valve operation (Group 3, 29 patients); acute-on-chronic cardiac disease (Group 4, 67 patients); and miscellaneous conditions (Group 5, 3 patients). Mitral, aortic, and multiple valve procedures were performed on 58, 65, and 44 patients, respectively. The most common functional lesion was regurgitation. Hospital mortality was highest in Groups 3 (34%) and 4 (31%). By contrast, among the hospital survivors, the highest rate of attrition was in Group 2. Myocardial failure was the predominat cause of death. In view of the hopeless prognosis without operation, the 52% overall 3-year actuarial survival is a gratifying salvage. Unnecessary procrastination can only jeopardize the prospects for surgical cure.

  7. Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery: Transapical Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive cardiac surgery is less traumatic and therefore leads to quicker recovery. With the assistance of engineering technologies on devices, imaging, and robotics, in conjunction with surgical technique, minimally invasive cardiac surgery will improve clinical outcomes and expand the cohort of patients that can be treated. We used transapical aortic valve implantation as an example to demonstrate that minimally invasive cardiac surgery can be implemented with the integration of surgical techniques and engineering technologies. Feasibility studies and long-term evaluation results prove that transapical aortic valve implantation under MRI guidance is feasible and practical. We are investigating an MRI compatible robotic surgical system to further assist the surgeon to precisely deliver aortic valve prostheses via a transapical approach. Ex vivo experimentation results indicate that a robotic system can also be employed in in vivo models.

  8. Earlier Pulmonary Valve Replacement in Down Syndrome Patients Following Tetralogy of Fallot Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Rachel T; Frommelt, Peter C; Hill, Garick D

    2017-08-01

    The association between Down syndrome and pulmonary hypertension could contribute to more severe pulmonary regurgitation after tetralogy of Fallot repair and possibly earlier pulmonary valve replacement. We compared cardiac magnetic resonance measures of pulmonary regurgitation and right ventricular dilation as well as timing of pulmonary valve replacement between those with and without Down syndrome after tetralogy of Fallot repair. Review of our surgical database from 2000 to 2015 identified patients with tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary stenosis. Those with Down syndrome were compared to those without. The primary outcome of interest was time from repair to pulmonary valve replacement. Secondary outcomes included pulmonary regurgitation and indexed right ventricular volume on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. The cohort of 284 patients included 35 (12%) with Down syndrome. Transannular patch repair was performed in 210 (74%). Down syndrome showed greater degree of pulmonary regurgitation (55 ± 14 vs. 37 ± 16%, p = 0.01) without a significantly greater rate of right ventricular dilation (p = 0.09). In multivariable analysis, Down syndrome (HR 2.3, 95% CI 1.2-4.5, p = 0.02) and transannular patch repair (HR 5.5, 95% CI 1.7-17.6, p = 0.004) were significant risk factors for valve replacement. Those with Down syndrome had significantly lower freedom from valve replacement (p = 0.03). Down syndrome is associated with an increased degree of pulmonary regurgitation and earlier pulmonary valve replacement after tetralogy of Fallot repair. These patients require earlier assessment by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to determine timing of pulmonary valve replacement and evaluation for and treatment of preventable causes of pulmonary hypertension.

  9. High Risk Aortic Valve Replacement - The Challenges of Multiple Treatment Strategies with an Evolving Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, K; Beattie, R; McBride, M; Manoharan, G; Spence, M; Jones, J M

    2016-01-01

    Deciding on the optimal treatment strategy for high risk aortic valve replacement is challenging. Transcatheter Aortic Valve implantation (TAVI) has been available in our centre as an alternative treatment modality for patients since 2008. We present our early experience of TAVI and SAVR (surgical Aortic Valve Replacement) in high risk patients who required SAVR because TAVI could not be performed. The database for Surgical aortic valve and Transcatheter aortic valve replacement referrals was interrogated to identify relevant patients. Survival to hospital discharge was 95.5% in the forty five patients who had SAVR when TAVI was deemed technically unsuitable. One year survival was 86%. Defining who is appropriate for TAVI or high risk SAVR is challenging and multidisciplinary team discussion has never been more prudent in this field of evolving technology with ever decreasing risks of surgery. The introduction of TAVI at our institution has seen a rise in our surgical caseload by approximately by 25%. Overall, the option of aortic valve intervention is being offered to more patients in general which is a substantial benefit in the treatment of aortic valve disease.

  10. Three-year hemodynamic performance, left ventricular mass regression, and prosthetic-patient mismatch after rapid deployment aortic valve replacement in 287 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverich, Axel; Wahlers, Thorsten C; Borger, Michael A; Shrestha, Malakh; Kocher, Alfred A; Walther, Thomas; Roth, Matthias; Misfeld, Martin; Mohr, Friedrich W; Kempfert, Joerg; Dohmen, Pascal M; Schmitz, Christoph; Rahmanian, Parwis; Wiedemann, Dominik; Duhay, Francis G; Laufer, Günther

    2014-12-01

    Superior aortic valve hemodynamic performance can accelerate left ventricular mass regression and enhance survival and functional status after surgical aortic valve replacement. This can be achieved by rapid deployment aortic valve replacement using a subannular balloon-expandable stent frame, which functionally widens and reshapes the left ventricular outflow tract, to ensure a larger effective orifice area compared with conventional surgical valves. We report the intermediate-term follow-up data from a large series of patients enrolled in the Surgical Treatment of Aortic Stenosis With a Next Generation Surgical Aortic Valve (TRITON) trial. In a prospective, multicenter (6 European hospitals), single-arm study, 287 patients with aortic stenosis underwent rapid deployment aortic valve replacement using a stented trileaflet bovine pericardial bioprosthesis. Core laboratory echocardiography was performed at baseline, discharge, and 3 months, 1 year, and 3 years after rapid deployment aortic valve replacement. The mean patient age was 75.7 ± 6.7 years (range, 45-93; 49.1% women). The mean aortic valve gradient significantly decreased from discharge to 3 years of follow-up. The mean effective orifice area remained stable from discharge to 3 years. At 1 year, the left ventricular mass index had decreased by 14% (P replacement using a subannular balloon-expandable stent frame demonstrated excellent hemodynamic performance and significant left ventricular mass regression. With continued follow-up, future studies will establish whether these favorable structural changes correlate with improvement in long-term survival and functional status. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Over 20 years experience with aortic homograft in aortic valve replacement during acute infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solari, Silvia; Mastrobuoni, Stefano; De Kerchove, Laurent; Navarra, Emiliano; Astarci, Parla; Noirhomme, Philippe; Poncelet, Alain; Jashari, Ramadan; Rubay, Jean; El Khoury, Gebrine

    2016-12-01

    Despite the controversy, the aortic homograft is supposedly the best option in acute infective endocarditis (AIE), due to its resistance to reinfection. However, the technical complexity and the risk of structural deterioration over time have limited its utilization. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term results of aortic homograft for the treatment of infective endocarditis in our institution with particular attention to predictors of survival and homograft reoperation. The cohort includes 112 patients who underwent aortic valve replacement with an aortic homograft for AIE between January 1990 and December 2014. Fifteen patients (13.4%) died during the first 30 days after the operation. Two patients were lost to follow-up after discharge from the hospital; therefore, 95 patients were available for long-term analysis. The median duration of follow-up was 7.8 years (IQR 4.7-17.6). Five patients (5.3%) suffered a recurrence of infective endocarditis (1 relapse and 4 new episodes). Sixteen patients (16.8%) were reoperated for structural valve degeneration (SVD; n = 14, 87.5%) or for infection recurrence (n = 2, 12.5%). Freedom from homograft reoperation for infective endocarditis or structural homograft degeneration at 10 and 15 years postoperatively was 86.3 ± 5.5 and 47.3 ± 11.0%, respectively. For patients requiring homograft reoperation, the median interval to reintervention was 11.6 years (IQR 8.3-14.5). Long-term survival was 63.6% (95% CI 52.4-72.8%) and 53.8% (95% CI 40.6-65.3%) at 10 and 15 years, respectively. The use of aortic homograft in acute aortic valve endocarditis is associated with a remarkably low risk of relapsing infection and very acceptable long-term survival. The risk of reoperation due to SVD is significant after one decade especially in young patients. The aortic homograft seems to be ideally suited for reconstruction of the aortic valve and cardiac structures damaged by the infective process especially in early surgery.

  12. Impact of Aortic Insufficiency on Ascending Aortic Dilatation and Adverse Aortic Events After Isolated Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With a Bicuspid Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongshi; Wu, Boting; Li, Jun; Dong, Lili; Wang, Chunsheng; Shu, Xianhong

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant flow pattern and congenital fragility bestows bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) with a propensity toward ascending aorta dilatation, aneurysm, and dissection. Whether isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR) can prevent further dilatation in BAV ascending aorta and what indicates concurrent aortic intervention in the case of valve operation remain controversial. From June 2006 to January 2009, patients with a BAV who underwent isolated AVR were consecutively included and categorized into aortic insufficiency (BAV-AI, n = 84) and aortic stenosis (n = 112) groups, and another population of patients with a tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency (n = 149) was also recruited during the same period for comparison of annual aortic dilatation rate and adverse aortic events after isolated AVR. With a median follow-up period of 72 months (interquartile range, 66 to 78 months), ascending aorta dilatation rates were faster in the BAV-AI group than the BAV plus aortic stenosis and tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency groups (both p regression analysis identified aortic insufficiency (hazard ratio, 3.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.2 to 11.1; p = 0.019) as an independent risk factor for adverse aortic events among patients with BAV in general, whereas preoperative ascending aortic diameter larger than 45 mm (hazard ratio, 13.8; 95% confidence interval, 3.0 to 63.3; p = 0.001) served as a prognostic indicator in the BAV-AI group. An aggressive policy of preventive aortic interventions seemed appropriate in patients with BAV-AI during AVR, and BAV phenotype presenting as either insufficiency or stenosis should be taken into consideration when contemplating optimal surgical strategies for BAV aortopathy. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. High-risk Trans-Catheter Aortic Valve Replacement in a Failed Freestyle Valve with Low Coronary Height: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Karimi, Ashkan; Pourafshar, Negiin; Dibu, George; Beaver, Thomas M.; Bavry, Anthony A.

    2017-01-01

    A 55-year-old male with a history of two prior cardiac surgeries presented with decompensated heart failure due to severe bioprosthetic aortic valve insufficiency. A third operation was viewed prohibitively high risk and valve-in-valve trans-catheter aortic valve replacement was considered. There were however several high-risk features and technically challenging aspects including low coronary ostia height, poor visualization of the aortic sinuses, and difficulty in identification of the copl...

  14. Is tricuspid annuloplasty increasing surgical mortality and morbidity during mitral valve replacement? A single-centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdonk, Constance; Darmon, Arthur; Cimadevilla, Claire; Lepage, Laurent; Raffoul, Richard; Nataf, Patrick; Vahanian, Alec; Messika-Zeitoun, David

    2017-12-06

    Performance of tricuspid annuloplasty (TA) in patients undergoing mitral valve surgery is recommended based on the degree of tricuspid regurgitation and tricuspid annulus size, but is often underused. To evaluate the impact of combined TA on in-hospital outcome in patients undergoing mitral valve replacement (MVR). We selected all consecutive patients who underwent MVR for native valve disease. Clinical, echocardiographic and in-hospital complications were obtained from chart review. We identified 287 patients (mean age 62±17 years; 44% men). Combined TA was performed in 165 patients (57%), who had more rheumatic disease (71% vs. 24%; P<0.0001) and mitral stenosis (55% vs. 22%; P<0.0001), but less endocarditis (4% vs. 31%; P<0.0001), were more often in atrial fibrillation (54% vs. 22%; P<0.0001), were more severely symptomatic (80% vs. 57%; P<0.0001), presented with a higher systolic pulmonary artery pressure (SPAP) (53±16 vs. 45±15mmHg; P=0.0002) and were less likely to have required emergency surgery (17% vs. 38%; P<0.0001). Despite this higher risk profile, in-hospital mortality was slightly lower (5% vs. 13%; P=0.02) and complication rates were similar (redo surgery 22% vs. 16% [P=0.18] and tamponade 20% vs. 15% [P=0.15]). After adjustment for age, sex, functional class, SPAP, emergency surgery and concomitant coronary artery bypass graft or aortic valve replacement surgery, combined TA was not associated with an increased rate of in-hospital death (P=0.08) or major complications (P=0.89). In a consecutive series of patients who underwent MVR, TA did not seem to have a negative impact on immediate outcome. Hence, additional performance of TA at the time of MVR should not be declined on the basis of an increased surgical risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Mitral valve repair or replacement in hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy: a prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogachev-Prokophiev, Alexander; Afanasyev, Alexander; Zheleznev, Sergey; Fomenko, Michael; Sharifulin, Ravil; Kretov, Eugenie; Karaskov, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    The optimal surgical strategy for concomitant mitral valve intervention during myectomy remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to compare the results of mitral valve replacement versus repair in patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and severe mitral regurgitation. Between 2010 and 2013, a total of 88 patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and severe mitral regurgitation were randomly assigned to undergo either mitral valve replacement or repair in addition to extended myectomy. Three patients from the repair group were switched to mitral valve replacement after repair failure. There was 1 early death (2.4%) in the replacement group. The resting left ventricular outflow tract gradient was reduced from 89.1 ± 20.4 to 18.3 ± 5.7 mmHg (P replacement and repair groups, respectively; there was no significant difference between the groups (P = 0.458). At 2-year follow-up, overall survival was 87.2 ± 4.9% and 96.7 ± 3.3% (P = 0.034); freedom from sudden cardiac death was 95.6 ± 3.1% and 96.7 ± 3.3% (P = 0.615); and freedom from thromboembolic events was 91.2 ± 4.2% and 100%, respectively (P = 0.026). Both mitral valve repair and valve replacement in addition to extended myectomy are effective methods of surgical treatment in patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy who have severe mitral regurgitation. The benefits of mitral valve repair are better overall survival and a lower rate of thromboembolic events. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02054221. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  16. Anesthetic management for combined mitral valve replacement and aortic valve repair in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Jiapeng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis imperfecta is a rare disorder of connective tissues and presents multiple challenges, including difficult airway, hyperthermia, coagulopathy and respiratory dysfunction, for anesthesiologists, especially during cardiac surgery. We present anesthetic management of a patient with osteogenesis impertecta during double valve surgery. Dexmedetomidine infusion minimized the risks of malignant hyperthermia. Glidescope and in-line stabilization facilitated endotracheal intubation and protected his oral structures and cervical spine. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE diagnosed a flail A3 segment and redundant left coronary cusp causing mitral and aortic regurgitation. The mitral valve was replaced and the aortic valve repaired. Coagulopathy was corrected according to comprehensive coagulation analysis. Glidescope, dexmedetomidine, coagulation analysis and TEE could facilitate anesthetic management in these patients.

  17. Outcomes of pulmonary valve replacement in 170 patients with chronic pulmonary regurgitation after relief of right ventricular outflow tract obstruction: implications for optimal timing of pulmonary valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheul; Kim, Yang Min; Lee, Chang-Ha; Kwak, Jae Gun; Park, Chun Soo; Song, Jin Young; Shim, Woo-Sup; Choi, Eun Young; Lee, Sang Yun; Baek, Jae Suk

    2012-09-11

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate outcomes of pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) in patients with chronic pulmonary regurgitation (PR) and to better define the optimal timing of PVR. Although PVR is effective in reducing right ventricular (RV) volume overload in patients with chronic PR, the optimal timing of PVR is not well defined. A total of 170 patients who underwent PVR between January 1998 and March 2011 for chronic PR were retrospectively analyzed. To define the optimal timing of PVR, pre-operative and post-operative cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data (n = 67) were analyzed. The median age at the time of PVR was 16.7 years. Follow-up completeness was 95%, and the median follow-up duration was 5.9 years. Overall and event-free survival at 10 years was 98% and 70%, respectively. Post-operative MRI showed significant reduction in RV volumes and significant improvement in biventricular function. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis revealed a cutoff value of 168 ml/m(2) for non-normalization of RV end-diastolic volume index (EDVI) and 80 ml/m(2) for RV end-systolic volume index (ESVI). Cutoff values for optimal outcome (normalized RV volumes and function) were 163 ml/m(2) for RV EDVI and 80 ml/m(2) for RV ESVI. Higher pre-operative RV ESVI was identified as a sole independent risk factor for suboptimal outcome. Midterm outcomes of PVR in patients with chronic PR were acceptable. PVR should be considered before RV EDVI exceeds 163 ml/m(2) or RV ESVI exceeds 80 ml/m(2), with more attention to RV ESVI. Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Valve-sparing aortic root replacement for young female patients with Marfan syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawata, Kan; Morota, T

    2009-10-01

    Annuloaortic ectasia is frequently related with Marfan syndrome, and Bentall procedure or aortic root replacement with valved conduit has been the conventional standard operation for this disease. Recently, some institutes have adopted valve-sparing aortic root replacement (VSARR) instead of Bentall procedure. Young female patients with Marfan syndrome who wishes for childbearing seem to be a group of good candidates of this type of operation, because it let them free from morbidities after artificial valve implantation. Valve-sparing operation should be taken into consideration when the size of Valsalva sinus reaches 45 mm for patients with Marfan syndrome and when it reaches 40 mm for patients with past histories or family histories of aortic dissection or aortic rupture. Since pregnancy is one of the most serious risk factors for aortic events, Valsalva sinus of 40 mm or larger could be the new standard for surgical indication if VSARR is applicable.

  19. Risk-adjusted survival after tissue versus mechanical aortic valve replacement: a 23-year assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaca, Jeffrey G; Clare, Robert M; Rankin, J Scott; Daneshmand, Mani A; Milano, Carmelo A; Hughes, G Chad; Wolfe, Walter G; Glower, Donald D; Smith, Peter K

    2013-11-01

    Detailed analyses of risk-adjusted outcomes after mitral valve surgery have documented significant survival decrements with tissue valves at any age. Several recent studies of prosthetic aortic valve replacement (AVR) also have suggested a poorer performance of tissue valves, although analyses have been limited to small matched series. The study aim was to test the hypothesis that AVR with tissue valves is associated with a lower risk-adjusted survival, as compared to mechanical valves. Between 1986 and 2009, primary isolated AVR, with or without coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), was performed with currently available valve types in 2148 patients (1108 tissue valves, 1040 mechanical). Patients were selected for tissue valves to be used primarily in the elderly. Baseline and operative characteristics were documented prospectively with a consistent variable set over the entire 23-year period. Follow up was obtained with mailed questionnaires, supplemented by National Death Index searches. The average time to death or follow up was seven years, and follow up for survival was 96.2% complete. Risk-adjusted survival characteristics for the two groups were evaluated using a Cox proportional hazards model with stepwise selection of candidate variables. Differences in baseline characteristics between groups were (tissue versus mechanical): median age 73 versus 61 years; non-elective surgery 32% versus 28%; CABG 45% versus 35%; median ejection fraction 55% versus 55%; renal failure 6% versus 1%; diabetes 18% versus 7% (pvalves; however, after risk adjustment for the adverse profiles of tissue valve patients, no significant difference was observed in survival after tissue or mechanical AVR. Thus, the hypothesis did not hold, and risk-adjusted survival was equivalent, of course qualified by the fact that selection bias was evident. With selection criteria that employed tissue AVR more frequently in elderly patients, tissue and mechanical valves achieved similar survival

  20. Early versus late pulmonary valve replacement in patients with transannular patch-repaired tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbels, Bieke; Herregods, Marie-Christine; Troost, Els; Van De Bruaene, Alexander; Rega, Filip; Budts, Werner; De Meester, Pieter

    2017-09-01

    Although the effects of pulmonary regurgitation after tetralogy of Fallot repair are detrimental, timing of pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) is unclear. Our goal was to evaluate the midterm efficacy and safety of early PVR. Patients with tetralogy of Fallot who underwent repair from 1962 to 2015 were included from the local database. Statistical analyses compared patients who underwent early PVR (age ≤16 years), late PVR and no PVR. The timing of the intervention was compared for efficacy-all-cause mortality and the combined end-point of all-cause mortality, ventricular tachycardia and defibrillator implantation-and for safety-the combined end-point of 1-year postoperative mortality after PVR, endocarditis and reintervention. Echocardiographic and electrocardiographic data at the last follow-up examination were compared across the 3 groups. Two hundred seventy-three patients (age 21 ± 5 years; 52% female) were included. The mean follow-up was 24 (95% confidence interval 22.7-26.2) years; the observed median was 21 years (interquartile range 11-31). No significant difference in survival was found between the early PVR (n = 106; 39%), the late PVR (n = 47; 17%) and the no PVR groups (n = 120; 44%) (P = 0.990). No significant difference in the combined efficacy end-point was noted between patients who underwent early PVR compared with patients who underwent late PVR (P = 0.247). Worse event-free survival for the 3-point safety end-point was observed after early PVR (P < 0.001). Right ventricular morphology (P < 0.001) and function (P < 0.001) were better preserved in the patient group that underwent PVR before the age of 16 years. As expected, PVR-related morbidity was higher in patients who underwent early PVR but the midterm outcome was similar. Nevertheless, better preservation of right ventricular morphology and function in the early PVR group might result in better long-term survival. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford

  1. Rare early prosthesis obstruction after mitral valve replacement: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Jun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As a dreadful complication after the mechanical heart valve replacement, prosthetic valve obstruction caused by pannus formation occurs increasingly with time. The authors here present a case of 42-year-old woman who was urgently admitted to hospital with acute heart failure symptoms due to the mechanical mitral valve failure only 3 months after surgery. Transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography demonstrated that the bileaflet of the mitral prosthesis were completely immobilized with only a small transvalvular jet remained. During the reoperation, the reason of the prosthetic valve obstruction was attributed to the noncircular pannus ingrowth extending from the atrioventricular side. For a better understanding of the prosthetic valve dysfunction caused by pannus formation, the authors then compile a literature review to briefly discuss the status quo of the clinical characteristics of this uncommon complication.

  2. Postoperative Reverse Remodeling and Symptomatic Improvement in Normal-Flow Low-Gradient Aortic Stenosis After Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter-Storch, Rasmus; Møller, Jacob E; Christensen, Nicolaj L; Irmukhadenov, Akhmadjon; Rasmussen, Lars M; Pecini, Redi; Øvrehus, Kristian A; Søndergård, Eva V; Marcussen, Niels; Dahl, Jordi S

    2017-12-01

    Severe aortic stenosis (AS) most often presents with reduced aortic valve area (gradient (≥40 mm Hg; normal-flow high-gradient AS) or low mean gradient (normal-flow low-gradient [NFLG] AS). The benefit of aortic valve replacement (AVR) among NFLG patients is controversial. We compared the impact of NFLG condition on preoperative left ventricular (LV) remodeling and myocardial fibrosis and postoperative remodeling and symptomatic benefit. Eighty-seven consecutive patients with reduced aortic valve area and normal stroke volume index undergoing AVR underwent echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, a 6-minute walk test, and measurement of natriuretic peptides before and 1 year after AVR. Myocardial fibrosis was assessed from magnetic resonance imaging. Patients were stratified as NFLG or normal-flow high-gradient. In total, 33 patients (38%) had NFLG. Before AVR, they were characterized by similar symptom burden but less severe AS measured by aortic valve area index (0.50±0.09 versus 0.40±0.08 cm 2 /m 2 ; P gradient condition independently predicted change in LV mass index. Patients with NFLG had less severe AS and LV remodeling than patients with normal-flow high-gradient. Furthermore, NFLG patients experienced less reverse remodeling but the same symptomatic benefit. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02316587. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Reimplantation valve-sparing aortic root replacement with the Valsalva graft: what have we learnt after 100 cases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settepani, Fabrizio; Bergonzini, Marcello; Barbone, Alessandro; Citterio, Enrico; Basciu, Alessio; Ornaghi, Diego; Gallotti, Roberto; Tarelli, Giuseppe

    2009-07-01

    Reimplantation valve-sparing aortic root replacement has been increasingly performed with improving perioperative and mid-term results. The success of this operation primarily depends on preserving the highly sophisticated dynamic function of the aortic valve by recreating an anatomical three-dimensional configuration similar to the normal aortic root, thus minimizing the mechanical stress and strain on the cusps. Over the years several techniques have been proposed to reproduce the sinuses of Valsalva. We reviewed our experience with aortic valve reimplantation by means of a modified Dacron graft that incorporates sinuses of Valsalva, in a series of 100 consecutive patients. During a 60-month period, 100 patients with aortic root aneurysm underwent aortic valve reimplantation using the Gelweave Valsalva prosthesis. There were 74 males and the mean age was 60+/-12 years (range 28-83 years). Five patients had the Marfan's syndrome, 15 had a bicuspid aortic valve. Cusp repair was performed in five patients. The mean follow-up time was 28.6 months (range 1-60). Transesophageal echocardiogram was performed at the end of each procedure to assess the aortic valve in terms of competence, dynamic motion and level of coaptation within the graft. There was one hospital death and two late deaths. Overall survival at 60 months was 91.7+/-5.1%. Five patients developed severe aortic incompetence (AI) during follow-up requiring aortic valve replacement (AVR). The 60 months freedom from re-operation due to AI was 90.9+/-4.4%. One patient had moderate AI at latest echocardiographic study. The 60 months freedom from AI>2+ was 91.6+/-7.9%. Cox regression identified cusp's repair as independent risk factor (P=0.001) for late reimplantation failure (AVR or AI>2+). There were no episodes of endocarditis and the majority of the patients (88%) were in New York Heart Association functional class I. The aortic valve reimplantation with the Gelweave Valsalva prosthesis provided satisfactory

  4. Impact of prosthesis-patient mismatch on the regression of secondary mitral regurgitation after isolated aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthetic valve in patients with severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeloni, Emiliano; Melina, Giovanni; Pibarot, Philippe; Benedetto, Umberto; Refice, Simone; Ciavarella, Giuseppino M; Roscitano, Antonino; Sinatra, Riccardo; Pepper, John R

    2012-01-01

    Secondary mitral regurgitation (SMR) is generally reduced after isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR), but there is important interindividual variability in the magnitude of this reduction. Prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) may hinder normalization of left ventricular geometry and pressure overload following AVR, therefore we aimed to investigate the relationship between PPM and regression of SMR following AVR for aortic valve stenosis. A total of 419 patients with AS who underwent isolated AVR at 2 institutions and presenting moderate SMR (mitral regurgitant volume 30 to 45 mL/beat) not considered for surgical correction were included in this study. Clinical and echocardiographic follow-up were completed at a median follow-up time of 37 months. PPM was defined as an indexed effective orifice area ≤0.85 cm(2)/m(2) and was found in 170/419 patients (40.6%). There were no significant differences in baseline and operative characteristics between patients with or without PPM. Patients with PPM had less regression of SMR following AVR compared with those with no PPM (change in mitral regurgitant volume: -11±4 versus -17±5 mL, respectively; Pregression model, which showed indexed effective orifice area (Pregression of SMR following AVR. This unfavorable effect was associated with worse functional capacity. These findings emphasize the importance of operative strategies aiming to prevent PPM in patients with aortic valve stenosis and concomitant SMR.

  5. Pulmonary valve replacement in patients with corrected tetralogy of Fallot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fotios M. Mitropoulos

    2017-06-01

    Results: There were 2 perioperative deaths (2%. One patient developed sternal dehiscence requiring rewiring. Median ICU and hospital stay was 1 and 7 days respectively. Postoperative echocardiography at 6 and 12 months showed excellent bioprosthetic valve performance, significant decrease in size of the right cardiac chambers and reduction of tricuspid regurgitation (TR in the majority of the patients. At mean follow-up of 3.6 ± 2 years, all surviving patients remain in excellent clinical condition. Conclusion: Probability of reoperation for pulmonary insufficiency in patients with surgically corrected TOF increases with time and timely PVR by preventing the development of right heart failure is crucial for long-term survival. Current bioprosthetic valve technology in combination with the beating heart technique provides excellent immediate and short-term results. Further follow-up is necessary to evaluate long-term outcome.

  6. Mechanical versus bioprosthetic mitral valve replacement in patients <65 years old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Tsuyoshi; Aranki, Sary; Javed, Quratulain; McGurk, Siobhan; Shekar, Prem; Davidson, Michael; Cohn, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Because of its durability, the mechanical valve is typically chosen for young patients undergoing mitral valve replacement (MVR). However, a bioprosthetic valve might have the benefit of valve-in-valve transcatheter valve replacement when valve failure occurs. We examined the outcomes in patients who had undergone mechanical valve MVR (MVRm) versus bioprosthetic valve MVR (MVRb) in patients aged Security Death Index. The postoperative and long-term outcomes of interest included combined stroke and embolic events, reoperations, and mortality. Of 768 consecutive patients, 627 were in the MVRm and 141 in the MVRb group. Propensity score matching yielded a cohort of 125 MVRb (89%) and 125 control MVRm patients with similar etiology mixes. The groups were similar in age (MVRm, 53.2 ± 9.0 years; MVRb, 53.8 ± 10.6 years; P = .617) and other preoperative characteristics. The postoperative outcomes were also similar between the 2 groups, including reoperation for bleeding, stroke, deep sternal infection, sepsis, and length of hospital stay. The operative mortality was also similar (MVRm, 5.6%; MVRb, 8.0%; P = .617). However, Kaplan-Meier analysis showed the MVRb group had a greater reoperation rate (P = .001) and shorter estimated survival (11.3 vs 13.5 years, P = .004). The incidence of bleeding and stroke or embolic events between the 2 groups was similar. In the present report, MVRb for patients safety of mechanical valves in this group. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Multidetector CT predictors of prosthesis-patient mismatch in transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Melanie; Webb, John G; Willson, Alexander B; Wheeler, Miriam; Blanke, Philipp; Moss, Robert R; Thompson, Christopher R; Munt, Brad; Norgaard, Bjarne L; Yang, Tae-Hyun; Min, James K; Poulsen, Steen; Hansson, Nicolaj C; Binder, Ronald K; Toggweiler, Stefan; Hague, Cameron; Wood, David A; Pibarot, Philippe; Leipsic, Jonathon

    2013-01-01

    Prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) is a predictor of mortality after aortic valve replacement (AVR). We examined whether accurate 3-dimensional annular sizing with multidetector CT (MDCT) is predictive of PPM after transcatheter AVR (TAVR). One hundred twenty-eight patients underwent MDCT then TAVR. Moderate PPM was defined as an indexed effective orifice area ≤0.85 cm²/m² and severe ≤0.65 cm²/m². MDCT annular measurements (area, short and long axis) were compared with the size of the selected transcatheter heart valve (THV) to obtain (1) the difference between prosthesis size and CT-measured mean annular diameter and (2) the percentage of undersizing or oversizing (calculated as 100 × [MDCT annular area--THV nominal area]/THV nominal area). In addition, the MDCT annular area was indexed to body surface area. These measures were evaluated as potential PPM predictors. We found that 42.2% of patients had moderate PPM and 9.4% had severe PPM. Procedural characteristics and in-hospital outcomes were similar between patients with or without PPM. THV undersizing of the mean aortic annulus diameter was not predictive of PPM (odds ratio [OR], 0.84; 95% CI, 0.65-1.07; P = .16; area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve [AUC], 0.58). THV undersizing of annular area was not predictive of PPM (OR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.80-1.16; P = .69; AUC, 0.52). Indexed MDCT annular area was, however, predictive of PPM (OR, 0.24; 95% CI, 0.10-0.59; P < .001; AUC, 0.66). PPM is frequent after TAVR. Appropriate annular oversizing does not reduce the rate or severity of PPM. Patient annulus size mismatch, identified by indexed MDCT annular area, is a significant predictor of PPM. Copyright © 2013 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement and aortic valve repair in a patient with acromegaly and aortic root dilatation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Van Praet

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aortic regurgitation and dilatation of the aortic root and ascending aorta are severe complications of acromegaly. The current trend for management of an aortic root aneurysm is valve-sparing root replacement as well as restoring the diameter of the aortic sinotubular junction (STJ and annulus. Our case report supports the recommendation that in patients with acromegaly, severe aortic root involvement may indicate the need for surgery.

  9. Optimal elastomeric scaffold leaflet shape for pulmonary heart valve leaflet replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Rong; Bayoumi, Ahmed S; Chen, Peter; Hobson, Christopher M; Wagner, William R; Mayer, John E; Sacks, Michael S

    2013-02-22

    Surgical replacement of the pulmonary valve (PV) is a common treatment option for congenital pulmonary valve defects. Engineered tissue approaches to develop novel PV replacements are intrinsically complex, and will require methodical approaches for their development. Single leaflet replacement utilizing an ovine model is an attractive approach in that candidate materials can be evaluated under valve level stresses in blood contact without the confounding effects of a particular valve design. In the present study an approach for optimal leaflet shape design based on finite element (FE) simulation of a mechanically anisotropic, elastomeric scaffold for PV replacement is presented. The scaffold was modeled as an orthotropic hyperelastic material using a generalized Fung-type constitutive model. The optimal shape of the fully loaded PV replacement leaflet was systematically determined by minimizing the difference between the deformed shape obtained from FE simulation and an ex-vivo microCT scan of a native ovine PV leaflet. Effects of material anisotropy, dimensional changes of PV root, and fiber orientation on the resulting leaflet deformation were investigated. In-situ validation demonstrated that the approach could guide the design of the leaflet shape for PV replacement surgery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. High-risk Trans-Catheter Aortic Valve Replacement in a Failed Freestyle Valve with Low Coronary Height: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Ashkan; Pourafshar, Negiin; Dibu, George; Beaver, Thomas M; Bavry, Anthony A

    2017-06-01

    A 55-year-old male with a history of two prior cardiac surgeries presented with decompensated heart failure due to severe bioprosthetic aortic valve insufficiency. A third operation was viewed prohibitively high risk and valve-in-valve trans-catheter aortic valve replacement was considered. There were however several high-risk features and technically challenging aspects including low coronary ostia height, poor visualization of the aortic sinuses, and difficulty in identification of the coplanar view due to severe aortic insufficiency, and a highly mobile aortic valve mass. After meticulous peri-procedural planning, trans-catheter aortic valve replacement was carried out with a SAPIEN 3 balloon-expandable valve without any complication. Strategies undertaken to navigate the technically challenging aspects of the case are discussed.

  11. The optimal management of anti-thrombotic therapy after valve replacement: certainties and uncertainties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iung, Bernard; Rodés-Cabau, Josep

    2014-11-07

    Anti-thrombotic therapy after valve replacement encompasses a number of different situations. Long-term anticoagulation of mechanical prostheses uses vitamin K antagonists with a target international normalized ratio adapted to the characteristics of the prosthesis and the patient. The association of low-dose aspirin is systematic in the American guidelines and more restrictive in the European guidelines. Early heparin therapy is frequently used early after mechanical valve replacement, although there are no precise recommendations regarding timing, type, and dose of drug. Direct oral anticoagulants are presently contraindicated in patients with mechanical prosthesis. The main advantage of bioprostheses is the absence of long-term anticoagulant therapy. Early anticoagulation is indicated after valve replacement for mitral bioprostheses, whereas aspirin is now favoured early after bioprosthetic valve replacement in the aortic position. Early dual antiplatelet therapy is indicated after transcatheter aortic valve implantation, followed by single antiplatelet therapy. However, this relies on low levels of evidence and optimization of anti-thrombotic therapy is warranted in these high-risk patients. Although guidelines are consistent in most instances, discrepancies and the low-level of evidence of certain recommendations highlight the need for further controlled trials, in particular with regard to the combination of antiplatelet therapy with oral anticoagulant and the early post-operative anti-thrombotic therapy following the procedure. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Acute gastrointestinal bleeding following aortic valve replacement in a patient with Heyde's sindrome. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Palma, G D; Salvatori, F; Masone, S; Simeoli, I; Rega, M; Celiento, M; Persico, G

    2007-09-01

    A 58-year old man was admitted to the hospital because of melena. He had a 1-year history of mechanical aortic valve replacement and coronary stent placement because of myocardial infarction and he was taking warfarin and clopidogrel. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy were negative for bleeding. Capsule endoscopy showed bleeding diffuse angiodysplasia of the small bowel. The patient was treated with octreotide 20 mg, at monthly interval. After 25 months there had been no recurrence of gastrointestinal bleeding. The case suggests that mechanical valve replacement may not prevent gastrointestinal bleeding in Heyde syndrome and that octreotide treatment should be considered in these cases.

  13. Aortic Regurgitation in Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With the Self-Expanding CoreValve Versus the Balloon-Expandable SAPIEN XT Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiramijyan, Sarkis; Magalhaes, Marco A; Koifman, Edward; Didier, Romain; Escarcega, Ricardo O; Baker, Nevin C; Negi, Smita I; Minha, Sa'ar; Torguson, Rebecca; Jiaxiang, Gai; Asch, Federico M; Wang, Zuyue; Okubagzi, Petros; Gaglia, Michael A; Ben-Dor, Itsik; Satler, Lowell F; Pichard, Augusto D; Waksman, Ron

    2016-05-01

    The incidence of aortic regurgitation (AR) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in a self-expanding and a balloon-expandable system is controversial. This study aimed to examine the incidence and severity of post-TAVR AR with the CoreValve (CV) versus the Edwards XT Valve (XT). Baseline, procedural, and postprocedural inhospital outcomes were compared. The primary end point was the incidence of post-TAVR AR of any severity, assessed with a transthoracic echocardiogram, in the CV versus XT groups. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was completed to evaluate for correlates of the primary end point. The secondary end points included the change in severity of AR at 30-day and 1-year follow-up. A total of 223 consecutive patients (53% men, mean age 82 years) who had transfemoral TAVR with either a CV (n = 119) or XT (n = 104) were evaluated. The rates of post-TAVR AR in the groups were similar, and there was no evidence of more-than-moderate AR in either group. There were significant differences in the rates of intraprocedural balloon postdilation with the CV (17.1%) versus XT valve (5.8%; p = 0.009) and in the rates of intraprocedural implantation of a second valve-in-valve prosthesis with the CV (9.9%) versus XT valve (2.2%; p = 0.036). There were no significant differences in inhospital safety outcomes between the 2 groups. In conclusion, the incidence of post-TAVR AR is similar between the CV and the XT valve when performed by experienced operators using optimal intraprocedural strategies, as deemed appropriate, to mitigate the severity of AR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Fibrin glue on an aortic cusp detected by transesophageal echocardiography after valve-sparing aortic valve replacement: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahira, Junko; Ishii, Hisanari; Sawai, Toshiyuki; Minami, Toshiaki

    2015-03-07

    Fibrin glue is used commonly during cardiac surgery but can behave as an intracardiac abnormal foreign body following surgery. There have been few such cases reported, and they were typically noticed only because of the resulting catastrophic cardiac conditions, such as valvular malfunction. We report a case where, for the first time, transesophageal echocardiography was used to detected fibrin glue that was adherent to the ventricular side of a patient's aortic valve immediately after aortic declamping. A 45-year-old Japanese man with Marfan syndrome underwent an aortic valve-sparing operation to treat moderate aortic valve regurgitation resulting from enlargement of his right coronary cusp. Fibrin glue was lightly applied to the suture line between the previous and new grafts. Transesophageal echocardiography performed prior to weaning from the cardiopulmonary bypass revealed mild aortic valve regurgitation in addition to a mobile membranous structure attached to the ventricular side of his aortic valve. It was identified as fibrin glue. We resolved the regurgitation by removing the fibrin glue and repeating the aortic cusp plication. The patient had no complications during recovery. Fibrin glue can act as an intracardiac foreign body and lead to a potentially fatal embolism. We demonstrated the use of transesophageal echocardiography to detect a fibrin glue-derived intracardiac abnormal foreign body and to confirm its removal. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case where fibrin glue adherent to the aortic valve was detected by transesophageal echocardiography. These findings demonstrate the importance of using transesophageal echocardiography during cardiac surgery that involves using biological glues.

  15. Optimal timing of aortic valve replacement in elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marumoto, Akira; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Kishimoto, Yuichiro; Saiki, Munehiro; Nishimura, Motonobu

    2014-01-01

    The elderly population with severe aortic stenosis (AS) requiring aortic valve replacement (AVR) is increasing. The optimal timing of AVR in these patients has been under discussion. We retrospectively reviewed the data from severe AS patients (n = 84) who underwent AVR with/without concomitant procedures from 2005 to 2010. The symptom status, preoperative data, operative outcome, late survival and freedom from cardiac events were compared between elderly patients (age ≥80 years [n = 31]) and younger patients (age <80 years [n = 53]). The operative mortality in elderly patients (3.2 %) and younger patients (3.8 %) was comparable. The symptoms in elderly patients were more severe and hospitalized heart failure (HF) was more frequently noted as the primary symptom (p = 0.017). Patients with and without hospitalized HF differed significantly in late survival and freedom from cardiac events (p = 0.001), but advanced age had no significant effect. The results of a Cox proportional hazards analysis revealed that hospitalized HF was a significant predictor for cardiac events after AVR, irrespective of age (hazard ratio 6.93, 95 % confidence interval 1.83-26.26, p < 0.004). In elderly patients with severe AS, surgery should be recommended even in the presence of minimal symptoms and should be performed before the onset of life-threatening HF.

  16. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding following transcatheter aortic valve replacement: A retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanger, Dylan E; Abdulla, Alym H; Wong, Frank T; Alipour, Sina; Bressler, Brian L; Wood, David A; Webb, John G

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in the postprocedural period following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). As TAVR moves into intermediate- and low-risk patients, it has become increasingly important to understand its extracardiac complications. The patient population undergoing TAVR have clinical and demographic characteristics that place them at significant risk of UGIB. Practical aspects of TAVR, including use of antithrombotic therapy, further increase risk of UGIB. A retrospective single-center evaluation of 841 patients who underwent TAVR between January 2005 and August 2014 was performed in conjunction with analysis of referral patterns to the gastroenterology service for UGIB at the same site. The overall risk of UGIB following TAVR was found to be 2.0% (n = 17/841). Additionally, the risk of UGIB in patients receiving triple antithrombotic therapy was found to be 10-fold greater than patients not receiving triple antithrombotic therapy (11.8% vs 1.0%). Endoscopy findings demonstrated five high-risk esophageal lesions including erosive esophageal ulcers, visible vessels at the GE junction, erosions at distal esophagus, and an actively bleeding esophageal ring that had been intubated through by the transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) probe. This large cohort study demonstrates that TAVR is associated with a moderate risk of severe UGIB. The results of this study suggest that patients on triple antithrombotic therapy are at highest risk for severe UGIB. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Optimal timing of valve replacement in asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilen, Emine; Ipek, Gökürk; Ayhan, Huseyin; Nacar, Alper Bugra; Kasapkara, Haci Ahmet; Sani, Cenk; Basbug, Serdar; Kurt, Mustafa; Bozkurt, Engin

    2014-09-01

    Patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS) constitute a heterogeneous group which includes not only certain cases who are at high risk of sudden death and valve-related heart failure, but also those at low risk for these events. Degenerative AS, which includes a majority of patients with AS, is characterized by stricture of the valve, increased arterial stiffness, and diverse left ventricular response to the valvular plus arterial vascular load. In addition to using traditional primary parameters, the severity of AS and the total left ventricular load should be assessed using new measures such as energy loss index and valvulo-arterial impedance. Natriuretic peptide levels and global longitudinal strain imaging may also be used as secondary parameters to obtain information about left ventricular systolic function, although these parameters do not correlate with the severity of AS. Exercise stress testing and exercise echocardiography are also beneficial when assessing the patient if they are symptomatic, and for determining valvular and left ventricular contractile reserves. The aim of this review was to emphasize the importance of risk stratifications in asymptomatic severe AS cases, and to assess the severity of AS using not only conventional methods but also new methods on which much emphasis has been placed during recent years.

  18. Aortic root replacement after previous surgical intervention on the aortic valve, aortic root, or ascending aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, E W Matthias; Radu, N Costin; Mekontso-Dessap, Armand; Hillion, Marie-Line; Loisance, Daniel

    2006-03-01

    Aortic root replacement after a previous operation on the aortic valve, aortic root, or ascending aorta remains a major challenge. Records of 56 consecutive patients (44 men; mean age, 56.4 +/- 13.6 years) undergoing reoperative aortic root replacement between June 1994 and June 2005 were reviewed retrospectively. Reoperation was performed 9.4 +/- 6.7 years after the last cardiac operation. Indications for reoperation were true aneurysm (n = 14 [25%]), false aneurysm (n = 10 [18%]), dissection or redissection (n = 9 [16%]), structural or nonstructural valve dysfunction (n = 10 [18%]), prosthetic valve-graft infection (n = 12 [21%]), and miscellaneous (n = 1 [2%]). Procedures performed were aortic root replacement (n = 47 [84%]), aortic root replacement plus mitral valve procedure (n = 5 [9%]), and aortic root replacement plus arch replacement (n = 4 [7%]). In 14 (25%) patients coronary artery bypass grafting had to be performed unexpectedly during the same procedure or immediately after the procedure to re-establish coronary perfusion. Hospital mortality reached 17.9% (n = 10). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed the need for unplanned perioperative coronary artery bypass grafting as the sole independent risk factor for hospital death (P = .005). Actuarial survival was 83.8% +/- 4.9% at 1 month, 73.0% +/- 6.3% at 1 year, and 65.7% +/- 9.0% at 5 years after the operation. One patient had recurrence of endocarditis 6.7 months after the operation and required repeated homograft aortic root replacement. Reoperative aortic root replacement remains associated with a high postoperative mortality. The need to perform unplanned coronary artery bypass grafting during reoperative aortic root replacement is a major risk factor for hospital death. The optimal technique for coronary reconstruction in this setting remains to be debated.

  19. Aortic valve replacement with 17-mm St. Jude Medical prostheses for a small aortic root in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaseya, Tohru; Kawara, Takemi; Tokunaga, Shigehiko; Kohno, Michitaka; Oishi, Yasuhisa; Morita, Shigeki

    2007-06-01

    There are few reports about the optimal prosthesis for elderly patients who have small aortic roots with an aortic annular size of less than 19 mm. From October 2004 to October 2006, 11 women aged 70 years or older (mean age, 74.9 +/- 3.5 years) underwent aortic valve replacement with a 17-mm Regent prosthesis (St. Jude Medical, St. Paul, MN), with the size determined using the manufacturer's sizer. Clinical status and the results of preoperative and postoperative echocardiography were evaluated. The patients had a mean body surface area of 1.33 +/- 0.13 m2. Preoperative average New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class was 2.5 +/- 0.7. Preoperative echocardiography showed a mean indexed effective orifice area of 0.33 +/- 0.14 cm2/m2 and a left ventricular mass index of 175 +/- 63 g/m2. Seven patients underwent associated procedures. Postoperative ventilation time was 14 +/- 5.6 hours, and the intensive care unit stay was 1.0 +/- 0.4 days. No patients died perioperatively. The NYHA functional class improved to class I in 9 patients. No obstruction of valve opening was observed. A significant increase in the mean indexed effective orifice area (0.87 +/- 0.10 cm2/m2) and regression of left ventricular mass index were found (114 +/- 46 cm2/m2) on postoperative echocardiography. Aortic valve replacement in elderly patients with small aortic roots (less than 19 mm) using a 17-mm Regent prosthesis showed satisfactory clinical and hemodynamic results.

  20. Comparative study between CardiaMed valves (freely floating valve leaflets versus St. Jude Medical (fixed valve leaflets in mitral valve replacement surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Ahmed

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: CardiaMed freely floating leaflet prostheses showed good hemodynamic characteristics. The prosthesis adequately corrects hemodynamics and is safe and no worse than the St. Jude Medical valve in the mitral valve position.

  1. Preventative Valve-Sparing Aortic Root Replacement and Pregnancy Outcome in Marfan Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Sokol, Vesna; Zlopaša, Gordan; Herman, Mislav; Planinić, Pavao; Micevska, Ana

    2012-01-01

    In Marfan syndrome, with dilatation of the aortic root secondary to an underlying connective tissue defect, pregnancy can cause hemodynamic stress leading to the development of an aortic aneurysm and even a fatal aortic dissection. In the presence of existing aortic root enlargement and a family history of aortic dissection, preventative elective surgery is suggested. Aortic root replacement with or without a valve-sparing procedure is superior to total aortic root replacement with ...

  2. Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve Replacement for Right Ventricular Outflow Tract Conduit Dysfunction After the Ross Procedure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillespie, Matthew J; McElhinney, Doff B; Kreutzer, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) conduit dysfunction is a limitation of the Ross procedure. Transcatheter pulmonary valve replacement (TPVR) could alter the impact of conduit dysfunction and the risk-benefit balance for the Ross procedure. METHODS: Retrospective review of databa......BACKGROUND: Right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) conduit dysfunction is a limitation of the Ross procedure. Transcatheter pulmonary valve replacement (TPVR) could alter the impact of conduit dysfunction and the risk-benefit balance for the Ross procedure. METHODS: Retrospective review....... Of these, 56 (84%) received a Melody valve; in 5 of the 11 patients who did not, the implant was aborted due to concern for coronary artery compression, and 1 implanted patient required emergent surgery for left coronary compression. The RVOT gradient decreased from a median 38 mm Hg to 13.5 mm Hg (p

  3. Use of intraventricular ribbon gauze to reduce particulate emboli during aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loubani Mahmoud

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of cerebrovascular accidents following aortic valve surgery remains a devastating complication. The aim of this study was to determine the number of potential embolic material arising during aortic valve replacement and to examine the efficacy of using ribbon gauze in the left ventricle during removal of the native valve and decalcification of the aortic annulus. Methods Ribbon gauze was inserted into the left ventricular cavity prior to aortic valve excision in an unselected, prospectively studied series of 30 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement. A further 30 lengths of ribbon gauze were soaked in the pericardiotomy blood of the same patients and all were subjected to histological analysis. Results The median number of tissue fragments from the aortic valve replacement group was significantly higher than in the control group 5 (0–18 versus 0 (0–1 (p = 3.6 × 10-5. The size of tissue fragments varied between 0.1 and 9.0 mm with a mean of 0.61 ± 1.12 mm and a median of 0.2 mm. There was a significantly higher number of tissue fragments associated with patients having surgery for aortic stenosis when compared with patients who had aortic regurgitation with median of 5 (0–18 versus 0 (0–3 (p = 0.8 × 10-3. Conclusion Significant capture of particulate debris by the intraventricular ribbon gauze suggests that the technique of left ventricular ribbon gauze insertion during aortic valve excision has merit.

  4. Technique and Patient Selection Criteria of Right Anterior Mini-Thoracotomy for Minimal Access Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Reza; Leprince, Pascal; Gassmann, Max; Jamshidi, Peiman; Yamani, Nassrin; Amour, Julien; Lebreton, Guillaume

    2018-03-26

    Aortic valve stenosis has become the most prevalent valvular heart disease in developed countries, and is due to the aging of these populations. The incidence of the pathology increases with growing age after 65 years. Conventional surgical aortic valve replacement through median sternotomy has been the gold standard of patient care for symptomatic aortic valve stenosis. However, as the risk profile of patients worsens, other therapeutic strategies have been introduced in an attempt to maintain the excellent results obtained by the established surgical treatment. One of these approaches is represented by transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Although the outcomes of high-risk patients undergoing treatment for symptomatic aortic valve stenosis have improved with transcatheter aortic valve replacement, many patients with this condition remain candidates for surgical aortic valve replacement. In order to reduce the surgical trauma in patients who are candidates for surgical aortic valve replacement, minimally invasive approaches have garnered interest during the past decade. Since the introduction of right anterior thoracotomy for aortic valve replacement in 1993, right anterior mini-thoracotomy and upper hemi-sternotomy have become the predominant incisional approaches among cardiac surgeons performing minimal access aortic valve replacement. Beside the location of the incision, the arterial cannulation site represents the second major landmark of minimal access techniques for aortic valve replacement. The two most frequently used arterial cannulation sites include central aortic and peripheral femoral approaches. With the purpose of reducing surgical trauma in these patients, we have opted for a right anterior mini-thoracotomy approach with a central aortic cannulation site. This protocol describes in detail a technique for minimally invasive aortic valve replacement and provides recommendations for patient selection criteria, including cardiac computer

  5. Clinical Outcomes of the David V Valve-Sparing Root Replacement Compared With Bioprosthetic Valve-Conduits for Aortic Root Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esaki, Jiro; Leshnower, Bradley G; Binongo, Jose N; Lasanajak, Yi; McPherson, LaRonica; Halkos, Michael E; Guyton, Robert A; Chen, Edward P

    2017-06-01

    Valve-sparing root replacement (VSRR) is an established therapy for aortic root pathology. Limited insight exists when the results of VSRR are compared with those of conventional root replacement with use of a bioprosthetic composite conduit (BIO). This study compares the operative and midterm results of VSRR and BIO. A retrospective review from 2002 to 2015 at a United States academic center identified 282 patients who underwent VSRR and 425 patients who underwent BIO. Propensity-score matching was performed based on 20 preoperative characteristics, and 123 matched pairs were identified. The mean age (VSRR 53.5 ± 11.1, BIO 53.0 ± 13.0; p = 0.74) and left ventricular ejection fraction (VSRR 54.5 ± 9.2%, BIO 54.4 ± 9.4%; p = 0.99) were equivalent in both groups. The incidence of bicuspid valves (VSRR 26.0%, BIO 27.6%; p = 0.77), Marfan syndrome (VSRR 6.5%, BIO 4.9%; p = 0.58), type A dissection (VSRR 13.0%, BIO 13.0%; p = 0.99), reoperation (VSRR 15.4%, BIO 20.3%; p = 0.32) and arch replacement (VSRR 60.2%, BIO 63.4%; p = 0.60) were similar between the groups. Operative mortality was 5.7% in VSRR and 0.8% in BIO (p = 0.07). There were no significant differences in postoperative renal failure (VSRR 0.8%, BIO 0.0%; p = 0.99) or stroke (VSRR 3.3%, BIO 0.8%; p = 0.37) between the groups. The 7-year survival (VSSR 82.4%, BIO 83.0%; p = 0.53), 7-year freedom from reoperation (VSRR 97.4%, BIO 95.8%; p = 0.48), and 7-year freedom from greater than moderate aortic insufficiency (AI) (VSRR 98.1%, BIO 100.0%; p = 0.47) were similar between groups. VSRR and BIO result in equivalent operative mortality and morbidity with similar midterm survival and valve durability. VSRR is an effective alternative to BIO for aortic root pathologic conditions; however, careful patient selection is paramount. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Systematic review of the outcome of aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharma, Umesh C.; Barenbrug, Paul; Pokharel, Saraswati; Dassen, Willem R. M.; Pinto, Yigal M.; Maessen, Jos G.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After the establishment of aortic valve replacement procedure for aortic stenosis, there are heterogeneous studies and varying reports on outcome. An analysis that compares individual studies to summarize the overall effect is still lacking. This study systematically analyzes the change

  7. Can postoperative mean transprosthetic pressure gradient predict survival after aortic valve replacement?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koene, Bart M.; Hamad, Mohamed A. Soliman; Bouma, Wobbe; Mariani, Massimo A.; Peels, Kathinka C.; van Dantzig, Jan-Melle; van Straten, Albert H.

    In this study, we sought to determine the effect of the mean transprosthetic pressure gradient (TPG), measured at 6 weeks after aortic valve replacement (AVR) or AVR with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) on late all-cause mortality. Between January 1998 and March 2012, 2,276 patients (mean age

  8. Impact of prosthesis-patient mismatch on early and late mortality after aortic valve replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koene, Bart M.; Hamad, Mohamed A. Soliman; Bouma, Wobbe; Mariani, Massimo A.; Peels, Kathinka C.; van Dantzig, Jan-Melle; van Straten, Albert H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The influence of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) on survival after aortic valve replacement (AVR) remains controversial. In this study, we sought to determine the effect of PPM on early (30 days) after AVR or AVR combined with coronary artery bypass grafting (AVR with CABG). Methods:

  9. Silent ischemic brain lesions after transcatheter aortic valve replacement : lesion distribution and predictors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samim, Mariam; Hendrikse, Jeroen; van der Worp, H. Bart; Agostoni, Pierfrancesco; Nijhoff, Freek; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Stella, Pieter R.

    Silent ischemic brain lesions and ischemic stroke are known complications of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). We aimed to investigate the occurrence and distribution of TAVR-related silent ischemic brain lesions using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI). Consecutive

  10. Surgical or Transcatheter Aortic-Valve Replacement in Intermediate-Risk Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reardon, Michael J; Van Mieghem, Nicolas M; Popma, Jeffrey J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although transcatheter aortic-valve replacement (TAVR) is an accepted alternative to surgery in patients with severe aortic stenosis who are at high surgical risk, less is known about comparative outcomes among patients with aortic stenosis who are at intermediate surgical risk. METHO...

  11. Cardiac implantable electronic device and associated risk of infective endocarditis in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Lauge; Valeur, Nana; Bundgaard, Henning

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR) are at increased risk of infective endocarditis (IE) as are patients with a cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED). However, few data exist on the IE risk after AVR surgery in patients with a CIED. Methods and results: Using the Danish...

  12. Effect of candesartan treatment on left ventricular remodeling after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbaek, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K

    2010-01-01

    In hypertension, angiotensin receptor blockers can augment regression of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. It is not known whether this also is the case after aortic valve replacement (AVR) for severe aortic stenosis (AS). To test the hypothesis that treatment with candesartan in addition to con...

  13. Early results of valve-sparing ascending aortic replacement in type A aortic dissection and aortic insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М. Л. Гордеев

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study was designed to investigate predictors of effective valve-sparing ascending aortic replacement in patients with Stanford type A aortic dissection combined with aortic insufficiency and to analyze efficacy and safety of this kind of surgery.Methods: From January 2010 to December 2015, 49 patients with Stanford type A aortic dissection combined with aortic insufficiency underwent ascending aortic replacement. All patients were divided into 3 groups: valve-sparing procedures (group 1, n = 11, combined aortic valve and supracoronary ascending aortic replacement (group 2, n = 12, and Bentall procedure (group 3, n = 26. We assessed the initial status of patients, incidence of complications and efficacy of valve-sparing ascending aortic replacement.Results: The hospital mortality rate was 8.2% (4/49 patients. The amount of surgical correction correlated with the initial diameter of the aorta at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva. During the hospital period, none of patients from group 1 developed aortic insufficiency exceeding Grade 2 and the vast majority of patients had trivial aortic regurgitation. The parameters of cardiopulmonary bypass, cross-clamp time and circulatory arrest time did not correlate with the initial size of the ascending aorta and aortic valve blood flow impairment, neither did they influence significantly the incidence and severity of neurological complications. The baseline size of the ascending aorta and degree of aortic regurgitation did not impact the course of the early hospital period.Conclusions: Supracoronary ascending aortic replacement combined with aortic valve repair in ascending aortic dissection and aortic regurgitation is effective and safe. The initial size of the ascending aorta and aortic arch do not influence immediate results. The diameter of the aorta at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva and the condition of aortic valve leaflets could be considered as the limiting factors. Further long

  14. Serum beta-2 microglobulin levels for predicting acute kidney injury complicating aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleska-Kociecka, Marta; Skrobisz, Anna; Wojtkowska, Izabela; Grabowski, Maciej; Dabrowski, Maciej; Kusmierski, Krzysztof; Piotrowska, Katarzyna; Imiela, Jacek; Stepinska, Janina

    2017-10-01

    Acute kidney injury complicating both transcatheter and surgical aortic valve replacement is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of serum beta 2 (β2) microglobulin, cystatin C and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin levels in detecting periprocedural acute kidney injury. Eighty consecutive patients who were 70 years of age or older and who were having surgical (n = 40) or transcatheter (n = 40) aortic valve replacement were recruited in a prospective study. The biomarkers were tested before the procedure, 6 times afterwards, at discharge and at a 6-month follow-up visit. The baseline β2-microglobulin level was the strongest predictor of acute kidney injury as a complication of transcatheter aortic valve replacement [odds ratio (OR) 5.277, P = 0.009]. Its level 24 h after the procedure reached the largest area under the curve (AUC) of 0.880 (P regression analysis, the levels of β2-microglobulin and cystatin C 24 h after the procedure were significantly associated with acute kidney injury after transcatheter valve replacement (OR 38.15, P = 0.044; OR 1782, P = 0.019, respectively). In the surgical aortic valve replacement group, the highest AUCs belonged to β2-microglobulin and cystatin C at 24 h (AUC = 0.808, P = 0.003 and AUC = 0.854, P = 0.001, respectively). Their higher values were also associated with acute kidney injury (OR 17.2, P = 0.018; OR 965.6, P = 0.02, respectively). A persistent increase in the postoperative levels of β2-microglobulin following acute kidney injury was associated with the progression of chronic kidney disease for 6 months after both transcatheter (OR 6.56, P = 0.030) and surgical (OR 7.67, P = 0.03) aortic valve replacements. Serum β2-microglobulin had the potential to predict acute kidney injury complicating transcatheter valve replacement and to diagnose it as early as 24 h after both the

  15. Aortic valve replacement and prosthesis-patient mismatch in the era of trans-catheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Shigeki

    2016-08-01

    The treatment strategy for aortic stenosis (AS) has been changing due to newly developed valvular prostheses and trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). To determine the role of new modalities for AS with a small aortic root, papers using the concept of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) were reviewed. First, to determine the cut-off value of the indexed effective orifice area (IEOA) for defining PPM, the studies of surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) with a follow-up longer than 5 years and a patient number larger than 500 were reviewed. Second, the papers comparing TAVI and SAVR were reviewed. Furthermore, the prevalence of PPM was reviewed, with the addition of papers on aortic root enlargement, sutureless AVR, and aortic valve reconstruction with autologous pericardium. The results of the long-term survival after aortic valve replacement (AVR) have indicated that an IEOA less than 0.65 cm(2)/m(2) should be avoided in all cases, whereas the indications for patients with an IEOA between 065 and 0.85 cm(2)/m(2) should be determined by considering multiple factors. A large body size and younger age have a significantly negative influence on the long-term survival. In Asian population, the prevalence of PPM was low, despite the fact that the size of the aortic annulus was small. The IEOA after TAVI was larger than after surgical AVR in population-matched studies. To evaluate the role of TAVI and other modalities for a small aortic root, studies with a longer follow-up and larger volume are thus warranted.

  16. 16-Detector row computed tomographic coronary angiography in patients undergoing evaluation for aortic valve replacement: comparison with catheter angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manghat, N.E.; Morgan-Hughes, G.J.; Broadley, A.J.; Undy, M.B.; Wright, D.; Marshall, A.J.; Roobottom, C.A.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of 16-detector row computed tomography (CT) in assessing haemodynamically significant coronary artery stenoses in patients under evaluation for aortic stenosis pre-aortic valve replacement. Subjects and methods: Forty consecutive patients under evaluation for severe aortic stenosis and listed for cardiac catheterization before potential aortic valve replacement underwent coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring and retrospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated multi-detector row computed tomographic coronary angiography (MDCTA) using a GE Lightspeed 16-detector row CT within 1 month of invasive coronary angiography (ICA) for comparative purposes. All 13 major coronary artery segments of the American Heart Association model were evaluated for the presence of ≥50% stenosis and compared to the reference standard. Data were analysed on a segment-by-segment basis and also in 'whole patient' terms. Results: A total of 412/450 segments from 35 patients were suitable for analysis. The overall accuracy of MDCTA for detection of segments with ≥50% stenosis was high, with a sensitivity of 81.3%, specificity 95.0%, positive predictive value (PPV) 57.8%, and negative predictive value (NPV) 98.4%. On a 'whole-patient' basis, 100% (19/19) of patients with significant coronary disease were correctly identified and there were no false-negatives. Excluding patients with CAC >1000 from the analysis improved the accuracy of MDCTA to: sensitivity 90%, specificity 98.1%, PPV 60%, NPV 99.7%. Conclusion: Non-invasive 16-detector row MDCTA accurately excludes significant coronary disease in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing evaluation before aortic valve replacement and in whom ICA can therefore be avoided. Its segment-by-segment accuracy is improved further if CAC > 1000 is used as a gatekeeper to MDCTA

  17. Biological aortic valve replacement: advantages and optimal indications of stentless compared to stented valve substitutes. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Reza; Danial, Pichoy; Oudjana, Ahmed Hamid; Jamshidi, Peiman; Gassmann, Max; Leprince, Pascal; Lebreton, Guillaume

    2018-05-01

    Controversy still surrounds the optimal biological valve substitute for aortic valve replacement. In light of the current literature, we review advantages and optimal indications of stentless compared to stented aortic bio-prostheses. Recent meta-analyses, prospective randomized controlled trials and retrospective studies comparing the most frequently used stentless and stented aortic bio-prostheses were analyzed. In the present review, the types and implantation techniques of the bio-prosthesis that are seldom taken into account by most studies and reviews were integrated in the interpretation of the relevant reports. For stentless aortic root bio-prostheses, full-root vs. sub-coronary implantation offered better early transvalvular gradients, effective orifice area and left ventricular mass regression as well as late freedom from structural valve deterioration in retrospective studies. Early mortality and morbidity did not differ between the stentless and stented aortic bio-prostheses. Early transvalvular gradients, effective orifice area and regression of left ventricular hypertrophy were significantly better for stentless, especially as full-root, compared to stented bio-prostheses. The long-term valve-related survival for stentless aortic root and Toronto SPV bio-prosthesis was as good as that for stented pericardial aortic bio-prostheses. For full-root configuration this survival advantage was statistically significant. There seems to be not one but different ideal biological valve substitutes for different subgroups of patients. In patients with small aortic root or exposed to prosthesis-patient mismatch full-root implantation of stentless bio-prostheses may better meet functional needs of individual patients. Longer follow-ups on newer generation of stented bio-prostheses are needed for comparison of their hemodynamic performance with stentless counterparts especially in full-root configuration.

  18. Outcomes of Pulmonary Valve Replacement for Correction Pulmonary Insufficiency after Primary Repair of Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abbassi Teshnisi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Total correction of Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF anomaly in early childhood has been practiced in many centers with good results, but in some of patients after few years sever Pulmonary valve insufficiency occurred. Materials and Methods At a cross- sectional study from January 2015 to January 2016, 10 patients who had history of primary repair of TOF with free pulmonary insufficiency (PI that underwent of pulmonary valve replacement (PVR with bioprosthetic valves were evaluated. Results Themean age of patients was 6.5 + 0.753 years old (ranged 8-12 years old and male to female ratio was 6/4. The mean of Intensive care unit (ICU stay and Hospital stay was 4.5+ 0.712 days (ranged 3-8 and 11.5+ 0.357 days (ranged 9- 16. Mean of cardiopulmonary bypass time and operation time was 45 + 0.684 min (ranged 32-60 and 83 + 0.317 min (ranged 65-112. In this study we did not find any mortality and ventricular arrhythmia and Heart block. There was only one case (10% with superficial wound infection that was controlled. At 6 months follow up, all of patients were alive, but Echocardiography sign of Right Ventricular (RV failure was present in 2 patients (20% recently. Conclusion Although for Pulmonary insufficiency after primary TOF repair there is controversial in studies, but we had good results of PVR with Bioprosthesis in TOF patients.

  19. Pregnancy after Prosthetic Aortic Valve Replacement: How Do We Monitor Prosthetic Valvular Function during Pregnancy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Sahasrabudhe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. With modern medicine, many women after structural heart repair are deciding to experience pregnancy. There is a need for further study to identify normal echocardiographic parameters to better assess prosthetic valvular function in pregnancy. In addition, a multidisciplinary approach is essential in managing pregnant patients with complex cardiac conditions. Case. A 22-year-old nulliparous woman with an aortic valve replacement 18 months prior to her pregnancy presented to prenatal care at 20-week gestation. During her prenatal care, serial echocardiography showed a significant increase in the mean gradient across the prosthetic aortic valve. Multidisciplinary management and a serial echocardiography played an integral role in her care that resulted in a successful spontaneous vaginal delivery without complications. Conclusion. Further characterization of the normal echocardiographic parameters in pregnant patients with prosthetic valves is critical to optimize prenatal care for this patient population. This case report is novel in that serial echocardiograms were obtained throughout prenatal care, which showed significant changes across the prosthetic aortic valve. Teaching Points. (1 Further study is needed to identify normal echocardiographic parameters to best assess prosthetic valvular function in pregnancy. (2 Multidisciplinary management is encouraged to optimize prenatal care for women with prosthetic aortic valve replacements.

  20. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement: historical perspectives, current evidence, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Aaron; Reineck, Elizabeth A; Hasan, Rani K; Resar, Jon R; Chacko, Matthews

    2014-10-01

    Severe aortic stenosis (AS) results in considerable morbidity and mortality without aortic valve replacement and is expected to increase in prevalence with the aging population. Because AS primarily affects the elderly, many patients with comorbidities are poor candidates for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and may not be referred. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as transformative technology for the management of AS over the past decade. Randomized trials have established the safety and efficacy of TAVR with improved mortality and quality of life compared with medical therapy in inoperable patients, while demonstrating noninferiority and even superiority to SAVR among high-risk operative candidates. However, early studies demonstrated an early penalty of stroke and vascular complications with TAVR as well as increased paravalvular leak as compared with SAVR. Two device platforms have been evaluated and approved for use in the United States: the Edwards SAPIEN and the Medtronic CoreValve. Early studies also suggest cost-effectiveness for TAVR. Ongoing studies are evaluating new iterations of the aforementioned TAVR devices, novel device designs, and applications of TAVR in expanded populations of patients including those with lower risk profiles as well as those with comorbidities that were excluded from early clinical trials. Future improvements in TAVR technology will likely reduce periprocedural and long-term complications. Further studies are needed to confirm device durability over long-term follow-up and explore the applicability of TAVR to broader AS patient populations. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Diabetes Mellitus Impairs Left Ventricular Mass Regression after Surgical or Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Teruya; Toda, Koichi; Kuratani, Toru; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Yoshikawa, Yasushi; Fukushima, Satsuki; Saito, Shunsuke; Yoshioka, Daisuke; Kashiyama, Noriyuki; Daimon, Takashi; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    It is well-documented that persistent myocardial hypertrophy in patients with aortic stenosis is related to suboptimal postoperative outcomes after aortic valve replacement. Although diabetes is known to potentially exacerbate myocardial hypertrophy, it has yet to be examined if it affects postoperative left ventricular mass regression (LVMR). A single-centre, retrospective analysis was performed on 183 consecutive patients who underwent either surgical or transcatheter aortic valve replacement between 2010 and May 2013. Patient demographics, postoperative outcomes and echocardiographic data were obtained preoperatively and a year after surgery. There were 42 diabetic and 141 non-diabetic patients. Preoperative characteristics of diabetic patients were statistically similar to those of non-diabetic patients, except for higher prevalence of hyperlipidaemia (p regression analysis demonstrated that diabetes (standardised partial regression coefficient (SPRC)=-0.187, p=0.018), female gender (SPRC=0.245, p=0.026) and age (SPRC=0.203, p=0.018) were associated with poor postoperative LVMR. Patients with diabetes showed suboptimal postoperative LVMR, and the disease was a prognostic factor that was associated with poor LVMR. These findings suggest that diabetes may predispose the particular group of patients to worse postoperative outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Outcome of double vs. single valve replacement for rheumatic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhtar, R.P.; Abid, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    To compare the follow-up results of double valve replacement (DVR) i.e. mitral valve replacement (MVR) and aortic valve replacement (AVR) vs. isolated MVR or AVR for rheumatic heart disease. Study Design: An interventional qausi-experimental study. Prospective follow-up of 493 patients with mechanical heart valves was carried out using clinical assessment, international normalized ratio and echocardiography. Patients were divided into three groups: group I having MVR, group II having AVR and group III having DVR. Survival, time and causes of mortality, and frequency of valve thrombosis, haemorrhage and cerebrovascular haemorrhage was noted in the three groups and described as proportions. Actuarial survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier method. There were 493 with 287 (58.3%) in group I, 87 (17.6%) in group II and 119 (24.1%) in group III. Total follow-up was 2429.2 patient (pt)-years. Of 77 (15.6%) deaths, 19 (3.8%) were in-hospital and 58 (11.8%) were late. In-hospital mortality was highest 4 (4.6%) in group II followed by 5 (4.2%) group III and 10 (3.5%) group I. Late deaths were 39 (13.4%) in group I, 9 (10.2%) in group II and 10 (8.3%) in group III. The total actuarial survival was 84.4% with survival of 83%, 85.1%, 87.4% in groups I, II and III respectively. On follow-up valve thrombosis occurred in 12 (0.49%/pt-years) patients; 9 (0.67%/pt-years) group I, 1 (0.22%/pt-years) in group II and 2 (0.31%/pt-years) in group III. Severe haemorrhage occurred in 19 (0.78%/pt-years); 14 in (1.04%/pt-years) in group I, 3 (0.66%/pt-years) group II and 2 (0.31%/pt-years) in group III. Cerebrovascular accidents occurred in 34 (1.3%/pt-years); 26 (1.95%/pt-years) in group I and 4 in groups II (0.89%/pt-years) and III (0.62%/pt-years) each. In patients with rheumatic heart disease having combined mitral and aortic valve disease DVR should be performed whenever indicated as it has similar in-hospital mortality and better late survival as compared to isolated aortic or mitral

  3. Reducing Prosthesis-Patient Mismatch With Edwards Magna Prosthesis for Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Yuta; Fujita, Tomoyuki; Fukushima, Satsuki; Hata, Hiroki; Shimahara, Yusuke; Matsumoto, Yorihiko; Yamashita, Kizuku; Kobayashi, Junjiro

    2017-03-24

    Prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) is associated with increased mid-term and long-term mortality rates after aortic valve replacement (AVR). This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of the Carpentier-Edwards Perimount Magna and Magna Ease (CEPMs) aortic bioprostheses to reduce the incidence of PPM.Methods and Results:Altogether, 282 consecutive patients (113 women, mean age 69.9±9.9 years) underwent AVR with a CEPMs between 2008 and 2015. They were divided into 3 groups based on the risk of PPM as a result of their body surface area and aortic annular diameter (BSA/AnnD ratio): low-risk (LR) group: 0.64±0.05 m 2 /cm (n=94); medium-risk (MR) group: 0.73±0.02 m 2 /cm (n=94); high-risk (HR) group: 0.83±0.05 m 2 /cm (n=94). The 30-day mortality rate was 0.4%. The 5-year actuarial survival rates were 93.2%, 92.3%, and 94.8% for groups LR, MR, and HR, respectively. No explants as a result of structural valve deterioration occurred. No patients showed severe PPM, defined as a measured effective orifice area index (EOAI) <0.65 cm 2 /m 2 . Although there were significant (P<0.05) differences in EOAI (0.98±0.2, 0.90±0.21, and 0.88±0.1 cm 2 /m 2 among the LR, MR, and HR groups, respectively), the corresponding transvalvular mean pressure gradients (13.0±5.5, 12.3±4.0, 12.7±5.3 mmHg) and regression rates of the left ventricular mass (29.8%, 28.7%, 28.9%) were similar among groups. CEPMs provide low surgical risk and reduce the risks of PPM, even in HR patients, with excellent hemodynamics.

  4. Aortic Valve Replacement and the Ross Operation in Children and Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharabiani, Mansour T A; Dorobantu, Dan M; Mahani, Alireza S; Turner, Mark; Peter Tometzki, Andrew J; Angelini, Gianni D; Parry, Andrew J; Caputo, Massimo; Stoica, Serban C

    2016-06-21

    There are several options available for aortic valve replacement (AVR), with few comparative reports in the literature. The optimal choice for AVR in each age group is not clear. The study sought to report and compare outcomes after AVR in the young using data from a national database. AVR procedures were compared after advanced matching, both in pairs and in a 3-way manner, using a Bayesian dynamic survival model. A total of 1,501 patients who underwent AVR in the United Kingdom between 2000 and 2012 were included. Of these, 47.8% had a Ross procedure, 37.8% a mechanical AVR, 10.9% a bioprosthesis AVR, and 3.5% a homograft AVR, with Ross patients being significantly younger when compared to the other groups. Overall survival at 12 years was 94.6%. In children, the Ross procedure had a 12.7% higher event-free probability (death or any reintervention) at 10 years when compared to mechanical AVR (p = 0.05). We also compared all procedures except the homograft in a matched population of young adults, where the bioprosthesis had the lowest event-free probability of 78.8%, followed by comparable results in mechanical AVR and Ross, with 86.3% and 89.6%, respectively. Younger age was associated with mortality and pulmonary reintervention in the Ross group and with aortic reintervention in the mechanical AVR. Of all 3 options, only the patients undergoing the Ross procedure approached the survival of the general population. AVR in the young achieves good results, with the Ross being overall better suited for this age group, especially in children. Although freedom from aortic valve reintervention is superior after the Ross procedure, the need for homograft reinterventions is an issue to take into account. All methods have advantages and limitations, with reinterventions being an issue in the long term for all, more crucially in smaller children. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Quantified degree of eccentricity of aortic valve calcification predicts risk of paravalvular regurgitation and response to balloon post-dilation after self-expandable transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun-Bean; Hwang, In-Chang; Lee, Whal; Han, Jung-Kyu; Kim, Chi-Hoon; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Yang, Han-Mo; Park, Eun-Ah; Kim, Hyung-Kwan; Chiam, Paul T L; Kim, Yong-Jin; Koo, Bon-Kwon; Sohn, Dae-Won; Ahn, Hyuk; Kang, Joon-Won; Park, Seung-Jung; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2018-05-15

    Limited data exist regarding the impact of aortic valve calcification (AVC) eccentricity on the risk of paravalvular regurgitation (PVR) and response to balloon post-dilation (BPD) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). We investigated the prognostic value of AVC eccentricity in predicting the risk of PVR and response to BPD in patients undergoing TAVR. We analyzed 85 patients with severe aortic stenosis who underwent self-expandable TAVR (43 women; 77.2±7.1years). AVC was quantified as the total amount of calcification (total AVC load) and as the eccentricity of calcium (EoC) using calcium volume scoring with contrast computed tomography angiography (CTA). The EoC was defined as the maximum absolute difference in calcium volume scores between 2 adjacent sectors (bi-partition method) or between sectors based on leaflets (leaflet-based method). Total AVC load and bi-partition EoC, but not leaflet-based EoC, were significant predictors for the occurrence of ≥moderate PVR, and bi-partition EoC had a better predictive value than total AVC load (area under the curve [AUC]=0.863 versus 0.760, p for difference=0.006). In multivariate analysis, bi-partition EoC was an independent predictor for the risk of ≥moderate PVR regardless of perimeter oversizing index. The greater bi-partition EoC was the only significant parameter to predict poor response to BPD (AUC=0.775, p=0.004). Pre-procedural assessment of AVC eccentricity using CTA as "bi-partition EoC" provides useful predictive information on the risk of significant PVR and response to BPD in patients undergoing TAVR with self-expandable valves. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Long-Term Outcomes of the Ross Procedure Versus Mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement: Propensity-Matched Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazine, Amine; David, Tirone E; Rao, Vivek; Hickey, Edward J; Christie, Shakira; Manlhiot, Cedric; Ouzounian, Maral

    2016-08-23

    The ideal aortic valve substitute in young and middle-aged adults remains unknown. We sought to compare the long-term outcomes of patients undergoing the Ross procedure and those receiving a mechanical aortic valve replacement (AVR). From 1990 to 2014, 258 patients underwent a Ross procedure and 1444 had a mechanical AVR at a single institution. Patients were matched into 208 pairs through the use of a propensity score. Mean age was 37.2±10.2 years, and 63% were male. Mean follow-up was 14.2±6.5 years. Overall survival was equivalent (Ross versus AVR: hazard ratio, 0.91, 95% confidence interval, 0.38-2.16; P=0.83), although freedom from cardiac- and valve-related mortality was improved in the Ross group (Ross versus AVR: hazard ratio, 0.22; 95% confidence interval, 0.034-0.86; P=0.03). Freedom from reintervention was equivalent after both procedures (Ross versus AVR: hazard ratio, 1.86; 95% confidence interval, 0.76-4.94; P=0.18). Long-term freedom from stroke or major bleeding was superior after the Ross procedure (Ross versus AVR: hazard ratio, 0.09; 95% confidence interval, 0.02-0.31; PRoss procedure and mechanical AVR. However, the Ross procedure was associated with improved freedom from cardiac- and valve-related mortality and a significant reduction in the incidence of stroke and major bleeding. In specialized centers, the Ross procedure represents an excellent option and should be considered for young and middle-aged adults undergoing AVR. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Complete filter-based cerebral embolic protection with transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gils, Lennart; Kroon, Herbert; Daemen, Joost; Ren, Claire; Maugenest, Anne-Marie; Schipper, Marguerite; De Jaegere, Peter P; Van Mieghem, Nicolas M

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the value of left vertebral artery filter protection in addition to the current filter-based embolic protection technology to achieve complete cerebral protection during TAVR. The occurrence of cerebrovascular events after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has fueled concern for its potential application in younger patients with longer life expectancy. Transcatheter cerebral embolic protection (TCEP) devices may limit periprocedural cerebrovascular events by preventing macro and micro-embolization to the brain. Conventional filter-based TCEP devices cover three extracranial contributories to the brain, yet leave the left vertebral artery unprotected. Patients underwent TAVR with complete TCEP. A dual-filter system was deployed in the brachiocephalic trunk and left common carotid artery with an additional single filter in the left vertebral artery. After TAVR all filters were retrieved and sent for histopathological evaluation by an experienced pathologist. Eleven patients received a dual-filter system and nine of them received an additional left vertebral filter. In the remaining two patients, the left vertebral filter could not be deployed. No periprocedural strokes occurred. We found debris in all filters, consisting of thrombus, tissue derived debris, and foreign body material. The left vertebral filter contained debris in an equal amount of patients as the Sentinel filters. The size of the captured particles was similar between all filters. The left vertebral artery is an important entry route for embolic material to the brain during TAVR. Selective filter protection of the left vertebral artery revealed embolic debris in all patients. The clinical value of complete filter-based TCEP during TAVR warrants further research. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Left atrial appendage obliteration in atrial fibrillation patients undergoing bioprosthetic mitral valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, X P; Zhu, T Y; Han, J; Li, Y; Meng, X

    2016-02-01

    Left atrial appendage (LAA) obliteration is a proven stroke-preventive measure for patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the efficacy of LAA obliteration for patients with AF after bioprosthetic mitral valve replacement (MVR) remains unclear. This study aimed to estimate the efficacy of LAA obliteration in preventing embolism and to investigate the predictors of thromboembolism after bioprosthetic MVR. We retrospectively studied 173 AF subjects with bioprosthetic MVR; among them, 81 subjects underwent LAA obliteration using an endocardial running suture method. The main outcome measure was the occurrence of thrombosis events (TEs). The mean follow-up time was 40 ± 17 months. AF rhythm was observed in 136 patients postoperatively. The incidence rate of TEs was 13.97 % for postoperative AF subjects; a dilated left atrium (LA; > 49.5 mm) was identified as an independent risk factor of TEs (OR = 10.619, 95 % CI = 2.754-40.94, p = 0.001). For postoperative AF patients with or without LAA, the incidence rate of TEs was 15.8 % (9/57) and 12.7 % (10/79; p = 0.603), respectively. The incidence rate of TEs was 2.7 % (1/36) and 4.2 % (2/48) for the subgroup patients with a left atrial diameter of  49.5 mm (p = 0.346). Surgical LAA obliteration in patients with valvular AF undergoing bioprosthetic MVR did not reduce TEs, even when the CHA2DS2-VASc score (a score for estimating the risk of stroke in AF) was ≥ 2 points.

  9. Early beneficial effect of preservation of papillo-annular continuity in mitral valve replacement on left ventricular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilip, D; Chandra, A; Rajashekhar, D; Padmanabhan, M

    2001-05-01

    Impairment of left ventricular (LV) function after mitral valve replacement (MVR) has been the most important factor to determine morbidity and mortality. With this in mind, LV performance in the postoperative period was assessed with and without preservation of papillo-annular continuity in MVR. Between March 1994 and August 1998, a total of 383 valve prostheses (202 MVR, 65 AVR, 58 MVR+AVR) were implanted in 325 patients, 177 of whom underwent MVR with Starr Edwards ball cage prostheses (the study group). Of these 177 patients, 105 had MVR with preservation of the posterior mitral leaflet (group I), and 72 had conventional MVR (group II). Predominant lesions were mitral stenosis in 81, mitral regurgitation in 42, and mixed mitral lesion (MS/MR) in 54. Concomitant tricuspid valve annuloplasty was performed in 13, and atrial septal defect repair in five. Sixteen patients underwent MVR for mitral restenosis. In-vivo performance of the prostheses and LV function was evaluated by M-mode and Doppler echocardiography. At 3-6 months clinical improvement was seen in NYHA class, with reduction in cardiothoracic ratio among patients with preserved papillo-annular continuity, irrespective of lesion type. Significant reductions (p versus 44.64 +/- 8.54 postop.; p versus 41.21 +/- 7.16 postop.; p versus 28.81 +/- 5.79 postop.; p versus 64.47 +/- 7.93; p <0.05). Further analysis of data in group I patients showed significant reductions in left atrial dimensions, LVESD and peak gradient, along with improved ejection fraction compared with conventional (group II) patients. Deterioration in LV function in patients undergoing conventional MVR indicates chordal resection as a putative mechanism. This study supports the concept that maintenance of continuity between the mitral annulus and papillary muscles has a beneficial effect on postoperative LV function, and is particularly important in patients with mitral stenosis with depressed preoperative LV systolic function.

  10. Contemporary Costs Associated With Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: A Propensity-Matched Cost Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailawadi, Gorav; LaPar, Damien J; Speir, Alan M; Ghanta, Ravi K; Yarboro, Leora T; Crosby, Ivan K; Lim, D Scott; Quader, Mohammed A; Rich, Jeffrey B

    2016-01-01

    The Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valve (PARTNER) trial suggested an economic advantage for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) for high-risk patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cost effectiveness of TAVR in the "real world" by comparing TAVR with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in intermediate-risk and high-risk patients. A multiinstitutional database of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) (2011 to 2013) linked with estimated cost data was evaluated for isolated TAVR and SAVR operations (n = 5,578). TAVR-treated patients (n = 340) were 1:1 propensity matched with SAVR-treated patients (n = 340). Patients undergoing SAVR were further stratified into intermediate-risk (SAVR-IR: predicted risk of mortality [PROM] 4% to 8%) and high-risk (SAVR-HR: PROM >8%) cohorts. Median STS PROM for TAVR was 6.32% compared with 6.30% for SAVR (SAVR-IR 4.6% and SAVR-HR 12.4%). A transfemoral TAVR approach was most common (61%). Mortality was higher for TAVR (10%) compared with SAVR (6%, p costs compared with SAVR ($69,921 vs $33,598, p cost of TAVR was largely driven by the cost of the valve (all p cost savings versus TAVR. TAVR was associated with greater total costs and mortality compared with SAVR in intermediate-risk and high-risk patients while conferring lower major morbidity and improved resource use. Increased cost of TAVR appears largely related to the cost of the valve. Until the price of TAVR valves decreases, these data suggest that TAVR may not provide the most cost-effective strategy, particularly for intermediate-risk patients. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Posterior leaflet preservation during mitral valve replacement for rheumatic mitral stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djukić, P L; Obrenović-Kirćanski, B B; Vranes, M R; Kocica, M J; Mikić, A Dj; Velinović, M M; Kacar, S M; Kovacević, N S; Parapid, B J

    2006-01-01

    Mitral valve replacement with posterior leaflet preservation was shown beneficial for postoperative left vetricular (LV) performance in patients with mitral regurgitation. Some authors find it beneficial even for the long term LV function. We investigated a long term effect of this technique in patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis. We studied 20 patents with mitral valve replacement due to rheumatic mitral stenosis, in the period from January 1988 to December 1989. In group A (10 patients) both leaflets and coresponding chordal excision was performed, while in group B (10 patients) the posterior leaflet was preserved. In all patients a Carbomedics valve was inserted. We compared clinical pre and postoperative status, as well as hemodynamic characteristics of the valve and left ventricle in both groups. Control echocardiographyc analysis included: maximal (PG) and mean (MG) gradients; effective valve area (AREA); telediastolic (TDV) and telesystolic (TSV) LV volume; stroke volume (SV); ejection fraction (EF); fractional shortening (FS) and segmental LV motion. The mean size of inserted valve was 26.6 in group A and 27.2 in group B. Hemodynamic data: PG (10.12 vs 11.1); MG (3.57 vs 3.87); AREA (2.35 vs 2.30); TDV 126.0 vs 114.5); TSV (42.2 vs 36.62); SV (83.7 vs 77.75); EF (63.66 vs 67.12); FS (32.66 vs 38.25). Diaphragmal segmental hypokinesis was evident in one patient from group A and in two patients from group B. In patients with rheumatic stenosis, posterior leaflet preservation did not have increased beneficial effect on left ventricular performance during long-term follow-up. An adequate posterior leaflet preservation does not change hemodynamic valvular characteristics even after long-term follow-up.

  12. Recent Development in Pulmonary Valve Replacement after Tetralogy of Fallot Repair: The Emergence of Hybrid Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq eSuleiman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the current era approximately 90% of infants born with tetralogy of Fallot (ToF are expected to live beyond 40 years of age making it the fastest growing population amongst patients with congenital heart disease. One of the most common late consequences after repair of ToF, is pulmonary valve regurgitation (PVR. Significant PVR results in progressive dilatation and dysfunction of the right ventricle, decrease in exercise tolerance, arrhythmias, heart failure, and increased risk of sudden death. The conventional approach of dealing with this problem is to perform pulmonary valve replacement using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB and cardioplegic arrest. However, this approach is associated not only with long operative times but also side effects related to the use of CPB. Development of percutaneous approaches to valve disease is one of the most exciting areas of research and clinical innovation in cardiovascular research. The main development has been that of transcatheter pulmonary valve replacement for the rehabilitation of conduits between the right ventricle and pulmonary artery in patients after surgery for ToF. However, with the percutaneous technique, a limited size of prosthesis can be inserted. Moreover, the technique does not offer the opportunity of treating additional defects that are frequently associated with severe PR, such as pulmonary artery dilatation, and it cannot be used in the significantly dilated native right ventricular outlet tract (RVOT. The advent of the hybrid surgical options for treating cardiac disease has integrated the techniques of interventional cardiology with the techniques of cardiac surgery to provide a form of therapy that combines the respective strengths of both fields.In this review, we present and compare recent advances in procedures to replace the pulmonary valve in patients with ToF presenting with severe PVR and dilated RVOT.

  13. The David V Valve-Sparing Root Replacement Provides Improved Survival Compared With Mechanical Valve-conduits in the Treatment of Young Patients With Aortic Root Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esaki, Jiro; Leshnower, Bradley G; Binongo, Jose N; Lasanajak, Yi; McPherson, LaRonica; Halkos, Michael E; Guyton, Robert A; Chen, Edward P

    2016-11-01

    Valve-sparing root replacement (VSRR) is an attractive therapy for aortic root aneurysms; however, there is a paucity of data comparing VSRR with conventional root replacement using a mechanical valve-conduit (MECH). This study evaluates and compares outcomes of VSRR and MECH. A retrospective review from 2002 to 2015 at a US academic center identified 444 patients who underwent VSRR (282 patients) or MECH (162 patients). Propensity score matching was performed, based on 22 preoperative and intraoperative characteristics, and 87 matched pairs were identified. There was no difference in mean age between the groups (VSRR 45.0 years, MECH 44.2 years, p = 0.59). The incidence of Marfan syndrome (VSRR 10.3%, MECH 12.6%, p = 0.63), type A acute aortic dissection (VSRR 25.3%, MECH 27.6%, p = 0.73), reoperation (VSRR 23.0%, MECH 21.8%, p = 0.86), and arch replacement (VSRR 54.0%, MECH 52.9%, p = 0.88) were similar in both groups. Ejection fraction was similar (VSRR 52.8% ± 10.9%, MECH 52.4% ± 11.7%, p = 0.83). Operative mortality was 2.3% with VSRR and 8.0% with MECH (p = 0.10). There were no significant differences in renal failure requiring dialysis (VSRR 1.1%, MECH 4.6%, p = 0.24), permanent neurologic dysfunction (VSRR 2.3%, MECH 6.9%, p = 0.16), and pacemaker implantation (VSRR 1.1%, MECH 1.1%, p = 0.99) between the groups. Survival at 7 years was significantly improved in patients who underwent VSSR (VSRR 85.5%, MECH 73.6%, p = 0.03). In comparison with patients undergoing MECH, there is improved midterm survival among patients undergoing VSRR, with similar operative mortality and morbidity. For appropriately selected patients, VSRR provides an attractive and potentially superior alternative to MECH. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 3D printed cardiac phantom for procedural planning of a transcatheter native mitral valve replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Richard L.; O'Hara, Ryan P.; Iyer, Vijay; Hansen, Rose; Meess, Karen M.; Nagesh, S. V. Setlur; Rudin, Stephen; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Springer, Michael; Ionita, Ciprian N.

    2016-03-01

    3D printing an anatomically accurate, functional flow loop phantom of a patient's cardiac vasculature was used to assist in the surgical planning of one of the first native transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR) procedures. CTA scans were acquired from a patient about to undergo the first minimally-invasive native TMVR procedure at the Gates Vascular Institute in Buffalo, NY. A python scripting library, the Vascular Modeling Toolkit (VMTK), was used to segment the 3D geometry of the patient's cardiac chambers and mitral valve with severe stenosis, calcific in nature. A stereolithographic (STL) mesh was generated and AutoDesk Meshmixer was used to transform the vascular surface into a functioning closed flow loop. A Stratasys Objet 500 Connex3 multi-material printer was used to fabricate the phantom with distinguishable material features of the vasculature and calcified valve. The interventional team performed a mock procedure on the phantom, embedding valve cages in the model and imaging the phantom with a Toshiba Infinix INFX-8000V 5-axis Carm bi-Plane angiography system. Results: After performing the mock-procedure on the cardiac phantom, the cardiologists optimized their transapical surgical approach. The mitral valve stenosis and calcification were clearly visible. The phantom was used to inform the sizing of the valve to be implanted. Conclusion: With advances in image processing and 3D printing technology, it is possible to create realistic patientspecific phantoms which can act as a guide for the interventional team. Using 3D printed phantoms as a valve sizing method shows potential as a more informative technique than typical CTA reconstruction alone.

  15. Will Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR be the Primary Therapy for Aortic Stenosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose F. Condado, MD, MS

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR is increasingly used for the treatment of high or very high surgical risk patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS or failing surgical bioprosthesis (valve-in-valve, VIV-TAVR. In TAVR, the collapsed transcatheter heart valve (THV is introduced using the delivery system inserted from the femoral artery (preferred or other alternative accesses (transapical, transaortic, transcarotid, subclavian/transinnominate or transcaval. The delivery system is then advanced until coaxially aligned with the aortic annulus, where the THV is deployed. This procedure can be associated with complications such as access site injury (vascular complication, paravalvar leak, cerebrovascular events and conduction disturbances. However, the rapid acceptance and successes observed with TAVR have been made possible through careful patient selection, preprocedural planning (i.e. MDCT annular sizing, THV technology (i.e. new generation valves, and procedural techniques (i.e. minimalist TF-TAVR and alternative percutaneous access options, as well as a decrease in complications as TAVR experience grows. Though the results or ongoing clinical trials evaluating TAVR in intermediate surgical risk patients are pending, it is likely that TAVR will soon be approved for lower risk patients as well.

  16. Von Willebrand Factor as a Novel Player in Valvular Heart Disease: From Bench to Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gragnano, Felice; Crisci, Mario; Bigazzi, Maurizio Cappelli; Bianchi, Renatomaria; Sperlongano, Simona; Natale, Francesco; Fimiani, Fabio; Concilio, Claudia; Cesaro, Arturo; Pariggiano, Ivana; Diana, Vincenzo; Limongelli, Giuseppe; Cirillo, Plinio; Russo, Mariagiovanna; Golia, Enrica; Calabrò, Paolo

    2018-02-01

    von Willebrand Factor (vWF) is a well-known mediator of hemostasis and vascular inflammation. Its dynamic modulation in the bloodstream, according to hemodynamic conditions, makes it an appealing biomarker in patients with valvular heart disease (VHD). Recent studies highlight the close connection between vWF and VHD, with possible implications in the pathogenesis of VHD, promoting valve aging and calcification or favoring the development of infective endocarditis. Moreover, vWF has been recently proposed as a new diagnostic and prognostic tool in patients with valve stenosis or regurgitation, showing a strict correlation with severity of valve disease, outcome, and bleeding (Heyde syndrome). A novel role for vWF is also emerging in patients undergoing percutaneous or surgical valve repair/replacement to select and stratify patients, evaluate periprocedural bleeding risk, and detect procedural complications. We also report our single-center experience, suggesting, for the first time, possible clinical implications for vWF in percutaneous mitral valve repair (MitraClip). This review summarizes recent advances in the role of vWF in VHD with an updated overview going from bench to operating room.

  17. Association Between Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement and Subsequent Infective Endocarditis and In-Hospital Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regueiro, Ander; Linke, Axel; Latib, Azeem

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Limited data exist on clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients who had infective endocarditis after undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). OBJECTIVE: To determine the associated factors, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of patients who had infective...... endocarditis after TAVR. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: The Infectious Endocarditis after TAVR International Registry included patients with definite infective endocarditis after TAVR from 47 centers from Europe, North America, and South America between June 2005 and October 2015. EXPOSURE: Transcatheter...... aortic valve replacement for incidence of infective endocarditis and infective endocarditis for in-hospital mortality. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Infective endocarditis and in-hospital mortality after infective endocarditis. RESULTS: A total of 250 cases of infective endocarditis occurred in 20...

  18. Dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction complicating aortic valve replacement: A hidden malefactor revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panduranga Prashanth

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that a dynamic left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT obstruction exists in patients, following aortic valve replacement (AVR and is usually considered to be benign. We present a patient with dynamic LVOT obstruction following AVR, who developed refractory cardiogenic shock and expired inspite of various treatment strategies. This phenomenon must be diagnosed early and should be considered as a serious and potentially fatal complication following AVR. The possible mechanisms and treatment options are reviewed.

  19. Consequence of patient substitution of nattokinase for warfarin after aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Elahi, Maqsood M.; Choi, Charles H.; Konda, Subbareddy; Shake, Jay G.

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a patient's self-substitution of nattokinase for the vitamin K antagonist warfarin after aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis. Nattokinase is an enzyme derived from a popular fermented soybean preparation in Japan (natto), which has fibrinolytic properties and is gaining popularity in nontraditional health journals and nonmedical health websites as an over-the-counter thrombolytic. After nearly a year of use of nattokinase without warfarin, the patient d...

  20. Illness Perception Profiles and Their Association with 10-Year Survival Following Cardiac Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawshaw, Jacob; Rimington, Helen; Weinman, John; Chilcot, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether profiles of illness perceptions are associated with 10-year survival following cardiac valve replacement surgery. Illness perceptions were evaluated in 204 cardiac patients awaiting first-time valve replacement and again 1 year post-operatively using cluster analysis. All-cause mortality was recorded over a 10-year period. At 1 year, 136 patients were grouped into one of four profiles (stable positive, stable negative, changed from positive to negative, changed from negative to positive). The median follow-up was 3063 days (78 deaths). After controlling for clinical covariates, including markers of function, patients who changed illness perceptions from positive to negative beliefs 1 year post-surgery had an increased mortality risk (hazard ratio (HR) = 3.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-8.3, p = .02) compared to patients who held positive stable perceptions. Following cardiac valve replacement, developing negative illness perceptions over the first post-operative year predicts long-term mortality. Early screening and intervention to alter this pattern of beliefs may be beneficial.

  1. Anesthetic implication of tricuspid valve replacement in a patient with acute intermittent porphyria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kianoush Saberi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Facing a patient with acute intermittent porphyria (AIP, there is narrow safety margin which circumscribe all the therapeutic actions including choice of drugs. This would become even more complicated when it comes to a stressful and drug-dependent process like a cardiopulmonary bypass. According to author′s researches, no specific AIP case of tricuspid valve (TV replacement is reported recently. Furthermore, fast-track anesthesia was safely used in this 37-year-old male known the case of AIP, who was a candidate for TV replacement and removing the port catheter. The patient was extubated subsequently, only 3 h after entering the Intensive Care Unit.

  2. Successful Tricuspid Valve Replacement in a Patient with Severe Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension and Preserved Right Ventricular Systolic Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamil A. Aboulhosn

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A 56-year-old patient with severe pulmonary hypertension developed severe tricuspid regurgitation, right-sided heart failure, and congestive hepatopathy. She was transferred for possible lung transplant and/or tricuspid valve surgery. Clinical and echocardiographic assessment provided confidence that acute tricuspid valve failure was responsible for the decompensation and that tricuspid valve replacement despite pulmonary hypertension could be performed.

  3. Comparative evaluation of left ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement: a prospective randomized analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiessling Arndt H

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We assessed the hemodynamic performance of various prostheses and the clinical outcomes after aortic valve replacement, in different age groups. Methods One-hundred-and-twenty patients with isolated aortic valve stenosis were included in this prospective randomized randomised trial and allocated in three age-groups to receive either pulmonary autograft (PA, n = 20 or mechanical prosthesis (MP, Edwards Mira n = 20 in group 1 (age 75. Clinical outcomes and hemodynamic performance were evaluated at discharge, six months and one year. Results In group 1, patients with PA had significantly lower mean gradients than the MP (2.6 vs. 10.9 mmHg, p = 0.0005 with comparable left ventricular mass regression (LVMR. Morbidity included 1 stroke in the PA population and 1 gastrointestinal bleeding in the MP subgroup. In group 2, mean gradients did not differ significantly between both populations (7.0 vs. 8.9 mmHg, p = 0.81. The rate of LVMR and EF were comparable at 12 months; each group with one mortality. Morbidity included 1 stroke and 1 gastrointestinal bleeding in the stentless and 3 bleeding complications in the MP group. In group 3, mean gradients did not differ significantly (7.8 vs 6.5 mmHg, p = 0.06. Postoperative EF and LVMR were comparable. There were 3 deaths in the stented group and no mortality in the stentless group. Morbidity included 1 endocarditis and 1 stroke in the stentless compared to 1 endocarditis, 1 stroke and one pulmonary embolism in the stented group. Conclusions Clinical outcomes justify valve replacement with either valve substitute in the respective age groups. The PA hemodynamically outperformed the MPs. Stentless valves however, did not demonstrate significantly superior hemodynamics or outcomes in comparison to stented bioprosthesis or MPs.

  4. Blood Pressure and Arterial Load After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindman, Brian R; Otto, Catherine M; Douglas, Pamela S; Hahn, Rebecca T; Elmariah, Sammy; Weissman, Neil J; Stewart, William J; Ayele, Girma M; Zhang, Feifan; Zajarias, Alan; Maniar, Hersh S; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Blackstone, Eugene; Chinnakondepalli, Khaja M; Tuzcu, E Murat; Leon, Martin B; Pibarot, Philippe

    2017-07-01

    After aortic valve replacement, left ventricular afterload is often characterized by the residual valve obstruction. Our objective was to determine whether higher systemic arterial afterload-as reflected in blood pressure, pulsatile and resistive load-is associated with adverse clinical outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Total, pulsatile, and resistive arterial load were measured in 2141 patients with severe aortic stenosis treated with TAVR in the PARTNER I trial (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valve) who had systolic blood pressure (SBP) and an echocardiogram obtained 30 days after TAVR. The primary end point was 30-day to 1-year all-cause mortality. Lower SBP at 30 days after TAVR was associated with higher mortality (20.0% for SBP 100-129 mm Hg versus 12.0% for SBP 130-170 mm Hg; P <0.001). This association remained significant after adjustment, was consistent across subgroups, and confirmed in sensitivity analyses. In adjusted models that included SBP, higher total and pulsatile arterial load were associated with increased mortality ( P <0.001 for all), but resistive load was not. Patients with low 30-day SBP and high pulsatile load had a 3-fold higher mortality than those with high 30-day SBP and low pulsatile load (26.1% versus 8.1%; hazard ratio, 3.62; 95% confidence interval, 2.36-5.55). Even after relief of valve obstruction in patients with aortic stenosis, there is an independent association between post-TAVR blood pressure, systemic arterial load, and mortality. Blood pressure goals in patients with a history of aortic stenosis may need to be redefined. Increased pulsatile arterial load, rather than blood pressure, may be a target for adjunctive medical therapy to improve outcomes after TAVR. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00530894. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Impact of Annular Size on Outcomes After Surgical or Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeb, G Michael; Chetcuti, Stanley J; Yakubov, Steven J; Patel, Himanshu J; Grossman, P Michael; Kleiman, Neal S; Heiser, John; Merhi, William; Zorn, George L; Tadros, Peter N; Petrossian, George; Robinson, Newell; Mumtaz, Mubashir; Gleason, Thomas G; Huang, Jian; Conte, John V; Popma, Jeffrey J; Reardon, Michael J

    2018-04-01

    This analysis evaluates the relationship of annular size to hemodynamics and the incidence of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) in surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) patients. The CoreValve US Pivotal High Risk Trial, described previously, compared TAVR using a self-expanding valve with SAVR. Multislice computed tomography was used to categorize TAVR and SAVR subjects according to annular perimeter-derived diameter: large (≥26 mm), medium (23 to <26 mm), and small (<23 mm). Hemodynamics, PPM, and clinical outcomes were assessed. At all postprocedure visits, mean gradients were significantly lower for TAVR compared with SAVR in small and medium size annuli (p < 0.001). Annular size was significantly associated with mean gradient after SAVR, with small annuli having the highest gradients (p < 0.05 at all timepoints); gradients were similar across all annular sizes after TAVR. In subjects receiving SAVR, the frequency of PPM was significantly associated with annular size, with small annuli having the greatest incidence. No difference in PPM incidence by annular sizing was observed with TAVR. In addition, TAVR subjects had significantly less PPM than SAVR subjects in small and medium annuli (p < 0.001), with no difference in the incidence of PPM between TAVR and SAVR in large annuli (p = 0.10). Annular size has a significant effect on hemodynamics and the incidence of PPM in SAVR subjects, not observed in TAVR subjects. With respect to annular size, TAVR results in better hemodynamics and less PPM for annuli less than 26 mm and should be strongly considered when choosing a tissue valve for small and medium size annuli. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of ECG criteria for left ventricular hypertrophy before and after aortic valve replacement using magnetic resonance Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beyerbacht, Hugo P.; Bax, Jeroen J.; Lamb, Hildo J.; van der Laarse, Arnoud; Vliegen, Hubert W.; de Roos, Albert; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; van der Wall, Ernst E.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: Evaluation of different electrocardiographic criteria for left ventricular hypertrophy (ECG-LVH criteria) using left ventricular mass index (LVMI) determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In addition, the relation between LVMI regression after aortic valve replacement and

  7. Left Ventricular Function Improves after Pulmonary Valve Replacement in Patients with Previous Right Ventricular Outflow Tract Reconstruction and Biventricular Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Colin; Kogon, Brian; Pernetz, Maria; McConnell, Michael; Kirshbom, Paul; Rodby, Katherine; Book, Wendy M.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart defects that have a component of right ventricular outflow tract obstruction, such as tetralogy of Fallot, are frequently palliated in childhood by disruption of the pulmonary valve. Although this can provide an initial improvement in quality of life, these patients are often left with severe pulmonary valve insufficiency. Over time, this insufficiency can lead to enlargement of the right ventricle and to the deterioration of right ventricular systolic and diastolic function. Pulmonary valve replacement in these patients decreases right ventricular volume overload and improves right ventricular performance. To date, few studies have examined the effects of pulmonary valve replacement on left ventricular function in patients with biventricular dysfunction. We sought to perform such an evaluation. Records of adult patients who had undergone pulmonary valve replacement from January 2003 through November 2006 were analyzed retrospectively. We reviewed preoperative and postoperative echocardiograms and calculated left ventricular function in 38 patients. In the entire cohort, the mean left ventricular ejection fraction increased by a mean of 0.07 after pulmonary valve replacement, which was a statistically significant change (P < 0.01). In patients with preoperative ejection fractions of less than 0.50, mean ejection fractions increased by 0.10. We conclude that pulmonary valve replacement in patients with biventricular dysfunction arising from severe pulmonary insufficiency and right ventricular enlargement can improve left ventricular function. Prospective studies are needed to verify this finding. PMID:21720459

  8. Isolated mitral valve replacement with the Kay-Shiley disc. valve. Acturial analysis of the long term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellons, H A; Strauch, R S; Nolan, S P; Muller, W H

    1975-11-01

    During a five-year period the Kay-Shiley (K and T series) prosthesis was used for 83 isolated mitral valve replacements. There were 14 early deaths, for a 17.28 per cent mortality rate. Survival determined by the actuarial method revealed a 6 year cumulative survival rate of 39.8 per cent. Thromboembolism was a significant problem in this series, with 33 patients experiencing a total of 55 embolic events. This represented a rate of 24.7 emboli per 1,000 patient months at risk. From our experience, it is concluded that the Kay-Shiley prosthesis is associated with a high incidence of thromboembolism and late death.

  9. 3D printing based on cardiac CT assists anatomic visualization prior to transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripley, Beth; Kelil, Tatiana; Cheezum, Michael K; Goncalves, Alexandra; Di Carli, Marcelo F; Rybicki, Frank J; Steigner, Mike; Mitsouras, Dimitrios; Blankstein, Ron

    2016-01-01

    3D printing is a promising technique that may have applications in medicine, and there is expanding interest in the use of patient-specific 3D models to guide surgical interventions. To determine the feasibility of using cardiac CT to print individual models of the aortic root complex for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) planning as well as to determine the ability to predict paravalvular aortic regurgitation (PAR). This retrospective study included 16 patients (9 with PAR identified on blinded interpretation of post-procedure trans-thoracic echocardiography and 7 age, sex, and valve size-matched controls with no PAR). 3D printed models of the aortic root were created from pre-TAVR cardiac computed tomography data. These models were fitted with printed valves and predictions regarding post-implant PAR were made using a light transmission test. Aortic root 3D models were highly accurate, with excellent agreement between annulus measurements made on 3D models and those made on corresponding 2D data (mean difference of -0.34 mm, 95% limits of agreement: ± 1.3 mm). The 3D printed valve models were within 0.1 mm of their designed dimensions. Examination of the fit of valves within patient-specific aortic root models correctly predicted PAR in 6 of 9 patients (6 true positive, 3 false negative) and absence of PAR in 5 of 7 patients (5 true negative, 2 false positive). Pre-TAVR 3D-printing based on cardiac CT provides a unique patient-specific method to assess the physical interplay of the aortic root and implanted valves. With additional optimization, 3D models may complement traditional techniques used for predicting which patients are more likely to develop PAR. Copyright © 2016 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Long-term results of heart valve replacement with the Edwards Duromedics bileaflet prosthesis: a prospective ten-year clinical follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podesser, B K; Khuenl-Brady, G; Eigenbauer, E; Roedler, S; Schmiedberger, A; Wolner, E; Moritz, A

    1998-05-01

    The Edwards Duromedics valve (Baxter Healthcare Corp., Edwards Division, Santa Ana, Calif.) was designed with a self-irrigating hinge mechanism to reduce thromboembolic complications. After good initial clinical results, distribution was suspended in 1988 after reports of valve fracture after 20,000 valves had been implanted. The manufacturer conducted extensive studies to improve the Edwards Duromedics and reintroduced a modified version, which is available as Edwards Tekna. The purpose of the study was the evaluation of long-term results of the original Edwards Duromedics that might be important for the current version, the Edwards Tekna valve. A prospective clinical 10-year follow-up was performed of 508 patients who underwent valve replacement with the Edwards Duromedics valve in the aortic (n = 268), mitral (n = 183), and aortic and mitral (n = 56) position. The perioperative mortality rate was 6.9%; follow-up was 98% complete, comprising 3648 patient-years for a mean follow-up of 86 months (range: 33 to 144 months). The actuarial freedom from complications at the 10-year follow-up and the incidence rate (percent per patient-year) were as follows: late mortality rate, 69.2% +/- 2.4% (3.5% per patient-year); thromboembolism, 90.7% +/- 1.6% (0.96% per patient-year); anticoagulation-related hemorrhage, 87.7% +/- 1.7% (1.34% per patient-year); prosthetic valve endocarditis, 96.7% +/- 0.09% (0.38% per patient-year); valve-related mortality rate, 89.3% +/- 1.6% (1.21% per patient-year); valve failure, 86.2% +/- 1.85% (1.54% per patient-year); and valve-related morbidity and mortality rate, 71.1% +/- 2.3% (3.2% per patient-year). Three leaflet escapes were observed (one lethal, two successful reoperations; 99.1% +/- 0.05% freedom, 0.08% per patient-year). All patients functionally improved (86% in New York Heart Association classes I and II), and incidence of anemia was insignificant. These results confirm that the Edwards Duromedics valve shows excellent performance

  11. Impact of secondary hyperparathyroidism on ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis in hemodialysis-dependent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takami, Yoshiyuki; Tajima, Kazuyoshi

    2015-07-01

    In hemodialysis (HD)-dependent patients, secondary hyperparathyroidism induces cardiac hypertrophy. This study investigated whether parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels affect the degree of left ventricular (LV) mass regression in HD patients after aortic valve replacement (AVR) for aortic stenosis (AS). We retrospectively obtained preoperative and 2-year postoperative echocardiography and intact PTH measurements in 88 HD patients who underwent AVR, with bioprostheses (n = 35, 40%) and mechanical valves (n = 53, 60%) of effective orifice area >0.80 cm2/m2, between January 1997 and December 2010. The LV mass decreased significantly from 308 ± 88 to 217 ± 68 g at follow-up of 28 ± 4 months after AVR (p regression at follow-up was inversely related to preoperative PTH values (R = 0.44, p = 0.001). The LV mass regression at follow-up was significantly smaller in the patients (n = 47) with PTH ≥100 pg/mL than in those (n = 41) with PTH regression at 2-year follow-up (β = 0.23, r2 = 0.24, p = 0.02). In conclusion, the HD patients with high levels of PTH presented with less LV mass regression after AVR for AS without patient-prosthesis mismatch. Secondary hyperparathyroidism may impair regression of cardiac hypertrophy after AVR in HD patients with AS.

  12. Survival after aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis with low transvalvular gradients and severe left ventricular dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jeremy J.; Lauer, Michael S.; Bashir, Mohammad; Afridi, Imran; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Stewart, William J.; McCarthy, Patrick M.; Thomas, James D.; Asher, Craig R.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We sought to assess whether aortic valve replacement (AVR) among patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS), severe left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and a low transvalvular gradient (TVG) is associated with improved survival. BACKGROUND: The optimal management of patients with severe AS with severe LV dysfunction and a low TVG remains controversial. METHODS: Between 1990 and 1998, we evaluated 68 patients who underwent AVR at our institution (AVR group) and 89 patients who did not undergo AVR (control group), with an aortic valve area < or = 0.75 cm(2), LV ejection fraction < or = 35% and mean gradient < or = 30 mm Hg. Using propensity analysis, survival was compared between a cohort of 39 patients in the AVR group and 56 patients in the control group. RESULTS: Despite well-matched baseline characteristics among propensity-matched patients, the one- and four-year survival rates were markedly improved in patients in the AVR group (82% and 78%), as compared with patients in the control group (41% and 15%; p < 0.0001). By multivariable analysis, the main predictor of improved survival was AVR (adjusted risk ratio 0.19, 95% confidence interval 0.09 to 0.39; p < 0.0001). The only other predictors of mortality were age and the serum creatinine level. CONCLUSIONS: Among select patients with severe AS, severe LV dysfunction and a low TVG, AVR was associated with significantly improved survival.

  13. Quality of Life After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Prospective Data From GARY (German Aortic Valve Registry).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Rüdiger; Beckmann, Andreas; Neumann, Till; Krane, Markus; Deutsch, Marcus-André; Landwehr, Sandra; Kötting, Joachim; Welz, Armin; Zahn, Ralf; Cremer, Jochen; Figulla, Hans R; Schuler, Gerhard; Holzhey, David M; Funkat, Anne-Kathrin; Heusch, Gerd; Sack, Stefan; Pasic, Miralem; Meinertz, Thomas; Walther, Thomas; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Böhm, Michael; Möllmann, Helge; Hamm, Christian W; Mohr, Friedrich W

    2016-12-26

    This study sought to analyze health-related quality-of-life (HrQoL) outcomes of patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) based on data from GARY (German Aortic Valve Registry). Typically, patients currently referred for and treated by TAVR are elderly with a concomitant variable spectrum of multiple comorbidities, disabilities, and limited life expectancy. Beyond mortality and morbidity, the assessment of HrQoL is of paramount importance not only to guide patient-centered clinical decision-making but also to judge this new treatment modality in this high-risk patient population. In 2011, 3,875 patients undergoing TAVR were included in the GARY registry. HrQoL was prospectively measured using the EuroQol 5 dimensions questionnaire self-complete version on paper at baseline and 1 year. Complete follow-up EuroQol 5 dimensions questionnaire evaluation was available for 2,288 patients (transvascular transcatheter aortic valve replacement [TAVR-TV]: n = 1,626 and transapical TAVR [TAVR-TA]: n = 662). In-hospital mortality was 5.9% (n = 229) and the 1-year mortality was 23% (n = 893). The baseline visual analog scale score for general health status was 52.6% for TAVR-TV and 55.8% for TAVR-TA and, in parallel to an improvement in New York Heart Association functional class, improved to 59.6% and 58.5% at 1 year, respectively (p regression analysis several pre- and post-operative factors were predictive for less pronounced HrQoL benefits. TAVR treatment led to improvements in HrQoL, especially in terms of mobility and usual activities. The magnitude of improvements was higher in the TAVR-TV group as compared to the TAVR-TA group. However, there was a sizable group of patients who did not derive any HrQoL benefits. Several independent pre- and post-operative factors were identified being predictive for less pronounced HrQoL benefits. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Incidence of Renal Failure Requiring Hemodialysis Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladia, Vatsal; Panchal, Hemang B; O׳Neil, Terrence J; Sitwala, Puja; Bhatheja, Samit; Patel, Rakeshkumar; Ramu, Vijay; Mukherjee, Debabrata; Mahmud, Ehtisham; Paul, Timir K

    2016-09-01

    Studies have shown that iodinated radiocontrast use is associated with acute renal failure especially in the presence of chronic kidney disease and multiple factors modulate this risk. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to compare the incidence of renal failure requiring hemodialysis between transfemoral (TF) and transapical (TA) transcatheter aortic valve replacement using the Edwards valve. The PubMed database was searched from January 2000 through December 2014. A total of 10 studies (n = 2,459) comparing TF (n = 1,268) and TA (n = 1,191) TAVR procedures using the Edwards valve were included. Variables of interest were baseline logistic EuroSCORE, prevalence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, peripheral arterial disease, chronic kidney disease and amount of contrast used. The primary endpoint was incidence of renal failure requiring hemodialysis. The odds ratio and 95% CI were computed and P renal failure requiring hemodialysis was higher with the Edwards valve. This suggests that the incidence of renal failure requiring hemodialysis after TAVR is associated with baseline comorbidities in the TA-TAVR group rather than the volume of contrast used. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mitral valve repair versus replacement in elderly patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Xiaoke; Lu, Rong; Liu, Mei; Xiao, Shuna; Dong, Nianguo

    2017-09-01

    Although mitral valve repair (MVP) is generally accepted as the standard treatment for mitral valve disease, in older patients, there is increasing debate about whether MVP is superior to mitral valve replacement (MVR). We, therefore, performed a meta-analysis to compare MVP vs. MVR in the elderly population. We systematically searched PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and Scopus up to February 2017 and scrutinized the references of relevant literatures. Only studies of MVP vs. MVR in the elderly patients (aged 70 years or older) that were published after 2000 were included. The retrieval process yielded seven observational clinical studies with 1,809 patients. Compared with MVR, MVP was associated with a significantly reduced 30-day mortality [risk ratio (RR): 0.40, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.25-0.64], with shorter duration of postoperative hospital stay (days) (weighted mean difference: -1.47, 95% CI: -2.47--0.48) and less postoperative complications (RR: 0.69, 95% CI: 0.56-0.86). In addition, our study also demonstrated improved 1-year (RR: 1.16, 95% CI: 1.08-1.24) and 5-year (RR: 1.26, 95% CI: 1.13-1.41) survival rates following MVP. There was no difference in reoperations between these two surgery approaches. The present meta-analysis indicates that elderly patients who receive MVP have better early and late outcomes than those undergoing MVR. MVP may be the preferred strategy for mitral valve surgery in the elderly population.

  16. The Ross procedure offers excellent survival compared with mechanical aortic valve replacement in a real-world setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreas, Martin; Wiedemann, Dominik; Seebacher, Gernot; Rath, Claus; Aref, Tandis; Rosenhek, Raphael; Heinze, Georg; Eigenbauer, Ernst; Simon, Paul; Ruetzler, Kurt; Hiesmayr, Joerg-Michael; Moritz, Anton; Laufer, Guenther; Kocher, Alfred

    2014-09-01

    The ideal prosthesis for young patients requiring aortic valve replacement has not been defined to date. Although the Ross procedure provides excellent survival, its application is still limited. We compared the long-term survival after the Ross procedure with mechanical aortic valve replacement. All consecutive Ross procedures and mechanical aortic valve replacements performed between 1991 and 2008 at a single centre were analysed. Only adult patients between 18 and 50 years of age were included in the study. Survival and valve-related complications were evaluated. Furthermore, survival was compared with the age- and sex-matched Austrian population. A total of 159 Ross patients and 173 mechanical valve patients were included. The cumulative survival for the Ross procedure was significantly better, with survival rates of 96, 94 and 93% at 5, 10 and 15 years, respectively, in comparison to 90, 84 and 75% (P Ross group but was significantly reduced in the mechanical valve group. In a real-world setting, the Ross procedure is associated with a long-term survival benefit in young adults in comparison to mechanical aortic valve replacement. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  17. Catheterization Laboratory: Structural Heart Disease, Devices, and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorilli, Paul N; Anwaruddin, Saif; Zhou, Elizabeth; Shah, Ronak

    2017-12-01

    The cardiac catheterization laboratory is advancing medicine by performing procedures on patients who would usually require sternotomy and cardiopulmonary bypass. These procedures are done percutaneously, allowing them to be performed on patients considered inoperable. Patients have compromised cardiovascular function or advanced age. An anesthesiologist is essential for these procedures in case of hemodynamic compromise. Interventionalists are becoming more familiar with transcatheter aortic valve replacement and the device has become smaller, both contributing to less complications. Left atrial occlusion and the endovascular edge-to-edge mitral valve repair devices were approved. Although these devices require general anesthesia, an invasive surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass machine are not necessary for deployment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Pannus overgrowth after mitral valve replacement with a Carpentier-Edwards pericardial bioprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Takeshi; Kato, Seiya; Tayama, Eiki; Fukunaga, Shuji; Akashi, Hidetoshi; Aoyagi, Shigeaki

    2009-01-01

    A Carpentier-Edwards pericardial (CEP) bioprosthesis was explanted from an 81-year-old woman due to nonstructural dysfunction 9 years after mitral valve replacement. The nonstructural dysfunction produced severe regurgitation in the mitral position. During the surgery, excessive pannus overgrowth was seen on the left ventricular side of the CEP bioprosthesis. Pannus overgrowth was prominent on one leaflet. That leaflet was stiff and shortened due to the excessive overgrowth of pannus. In this patient, the distortion of one leaflet was the main reason for transvalvular leakage of the CEP bioprosthesis in the mitral position. A new CEP bioprosthesis was implanted in the mitral position. Pathological analysis revealed fibrotic pannus with a small amount of cellular material over the leaflets of the resected CEP valve. This change was marked on the distorted leaflet.

  19. Clinical value of regression of electrocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamabe, Sayuri; Dohi, Yoshihiro; Higashi, Akifumi; Kinoshita, Hiroki; Sada, Yoshiharu; Hidaka, Takayuki; Kurisu, Satoshi; Shiode, Nobuo; Kihara, Yasuki

    2016-09-01

    Electrocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy (ECG-LVH) gradually regressed after aortic valve replacement (AVR) in patients with severe aortic stenosis. Sokolow-Lyon voltage (SV1 + RV5/6) is possibly the most widely used criterion for ECG-LVH. The aim of this study was to determine whether decrease in Sokolow-Lyon voltage reflects left ventricular reverse remodeling detected by echocardiography after AVR. Of 129 consecutive patients who underwent AVR for severe aortic stenosis, 38 patients with preoperative ECG-LVH, defined by SV1 + RV5/6 of ≥3.5 mV, were enrolled in this study. Electrocardiography and echocardiography were performed preoperatively and 1 year postoperatively. The patients were divided into ECG-LVH regression group (n = 19) and non-regression group (n = 19) according to the median value of the absolute regression in SV1 + RV5/6. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess determinants of ECG-LVH regression among echocardiographic indices. ECG-LVH regression group showed significantly greater decrease in left ventricular mass index and left ventricular dimensions than Non-regression group. ECG-LVH regression was independently determined by decrease in the left ventricular mass index [odds ratio (OR) 1.28, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.69, p = 0.048], left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (OR 1.18, 95 % CI 1.03-1.41, p = 0.014), and left ventricular end-systolic dimension (OR 1.24, 95 % CI 1.06-1.52, p = 0.0047). ECG-LVH regression could be a marker of the effect of AVR on both reducing the left ventricular mass index and left ventricular dimensions. The effect of AVR on reverse remodeling can be estimated, at least in part, by regression of ECG-LVH.

  20. The impact of age on the postoperative response of the diastolic function and left ventricular mass regression after surgical or transcatheter aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Teruya; Toda, Koichi; Kuratani, Toru; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Yoshikawa, Yasushi; Fukushima, Satsuki; Saito, Shunsuke; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2017-06-01

    We examined the impact of advanced age on left ventricular mass regression and the change in the diastolic function after aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis. The present study included 129 patients who underwent either surgical or transcatheter aortic valve replacement and 1-year postoperative echocardiography. The patient characteristics and echocardiographic findings were compared between patients who were regression was significantly greater (p = 0.02) and diastolic dysfunction was less prevalent in group Y (p = 0.02) in comparison to group O. The change in E/e' was significantly correlated with the left ventricular mass regression in group Y (p = 0.02), but not in Group O (p = 0.21). The patients in group O were less susceptible to improvements in myocardial remodeling and the diastolic function in comparison to those in group Y. The altered physiological response to aortic valve replacement might help to determine the appropriate timing of surgery in elderly patients.

  1. Technical Approach Determines Inflammatory Response after Surgical and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabor Erdoes

    Full Text Available To investigate the periprocedural inflammatory response in patients with isolated aortic valve stenosis undergoing surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI with different technical approaches.Patients were prospectively allocated to one of the following treatments: SAVR using conventional extracorporeal circulation (CECC, n = 47 or minimized extracorporeal circulation (MECC, n = 15, or TAVI using either transapical (TA, n = 15 or transfemoral (TF, n = 24 access. Exclusion criteria included infection, pre-procedural immunosuppressive or antibiotic drug therapy and emergency indications. We investigated interleukin (IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR, white blood cell count, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP and soluble L-selectin (sCD62L levels before the procedure and at 4, 24, and 48 h after aortic valve replacement. Data are presented for group interaction (p-values for inter-group comparison as determined by the Greenhouse-Geisser correction.SAVR on CECC was associated with the highest levels of IL-8 and hs-CRP (p<0.017, and 0.007, respectively. SAVR on MECC showed the highest descent in levels of HLA-DR and sCD62L (both p<0.001 in the perioperative period. TA-TAVI showed increased intraprocedural concentration and the highest peak of IL-6 (p = 0.017. Significantly smaller changes in the inflammatory markers were observed in TF-TAVI.Surgical and interventional approaches to aortic valve replacement result in inflammatory modulation which differs according to the invasiveness of the procedure. As expected, extracorporeal circulation is associated with the most marked pro-inflammatory activation, whereas TF-TAVI emerges as the approach with the most attenuated inflammatory response. Factors such as the pre-treatment patient condition and the extent of myocardial injury also significantly affect inflammatory biomarker patterns. Accordingly, TA-TAVI is to be classified not

  2. Predictors and Outcomes of Prosthesis-Patient Mismatch After Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, Victor; Vignolo, Gustavo; Soca, Gerardo; Paganini, Juan Jose; Brusich, Daniel; Pibarot, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    This study sought to evaluate predictors of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) and its association with the risk of perioperative and overall mortality. PPM is associated with increased mid- and long-term mortality after surgical aortic valve replacement. Conflicting results have been reported with regard to its association with perioperative mortality. Databases were searched for studies published between 1965 and 2014. Main outcomes of interest were perioperative mortality and overall mortality. The search yielded 382 studies for inclusion. Of these, 58 articles were analyzed and their data extracted. The total number of patients included was 40,381 (39,568 surgical aortic valve replacement and 813 transcatheter aortic valve replacement). Perioperative (odds ratio: 1.54; 95% confidence interval: 1.25 to 1.91) and overall (i.e., perioperative and post-operative) mortality (hazard ratio: 1.26; 95% confidence interval: 1.16 to 1.36) was increased in patients with PPM. The impact of PPM on mortality was higher in those studies in which the mean age of the patients was body mass index (>28 kg/m(2)) compared with those with lower index. Predictors of PPM were older age, female sex, hypertension, diabetes, renal failure, larger body surface area, larger body mass index, and the utilization of a bioprosthesis. PPM increases perioperative and overall mortality proportionally to its severity. The identification of predictors for PPM may be useful to identify patients who are at higher risk for PPM. The findings of this study support the implementation of strategies to prevent PPM especially in patients <70 years of age and/or with concomitant coronary artery bypass graft. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Trial design: Rivaroxaban for the prevention of major cardiovascular events after transcatheter aortic valve replacement: Rationale and design of the GALILEO study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windecker, Stephan; Tijssen, Jan; Giustino, Gennaro; Guimarães, Ana H. C.; Mehran, Roxana; Valgimigli, Marco; Vranckx, Pascal; Welsh, Robert C.; Baber, Usman; van Es, Gerrit-Anne; Wildgoose, Peter; Volkl, Albert A.; Zazula, Ana; Thomitzek, Karen; Hemmrich, Melanie; Dangas, George D.

    2017-01-01

    Optimal antithrombotic treatment after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is unknown and determined empirically. The direct factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban may potentially reduce TAVR-related thrombotic complications and premature valve failure. GALILEO is an international, randomized,

  4. Long QT syndrome and torsades de pointes complicating mitral valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shegu Gilbert

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Severe QT interval prolongation >500 ms occurs in one quarter of cardiac surgical patients in the perioperative period while moderate prolongation occurs in most of them. Prolonged QT interval may be associated with torsades de pointes and lead to sudden cardiac death. Because of the high incidence of prolonged QT in cardiac surgery patients and its perioperative adverse outcomes, it is vital to identify it early and take necessary precautions. We report and discuss the catastrophic events and management of two patients with long QT syndrome complicating mitral valve replacement.

  5. Surgical repair of a pseudoaneurysm of the ascending aorta after aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Rui Manuel Sequeira de

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a patient with a pseudoaneurysm of the ascending aortic clinically diagnosed 5 months after surgical replacement of the aortic valve. Diagnosis was confirmed with the aid of two-dimensional echocardiography and helicoidal angiotomography. The corrective surgery, which consisted of a reinforced suture of the communication with the ascending aorta after opening and aspiration of the cavity of the pseudoaneurysm, was successfully performed through a complete sternotomy using extracorporeal circulation, femorofemoral cannulation, and moderate hypothermia, with no aortic clamping.

  6. Emergency mitral valve replacement and cesarean section in parturients: Two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Nagaraja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac surgery during pregnancy using cardiopulmonary bypass has a maternal mortality rate (MMR of about 3-15%. Cardiopulmonary bypass, in addition, alters placental perfusion, which can increase infant mortality. Here, we report two cases of parturients with severe mitral stenosis, who developed acute mitral regurgitation (MR after percutaneous transluminal mitral commissurotomy (PTMC due to anterior mitral leaflet tear. They were posted for emergency mitral valve replacement (MVR followed by cesarean section. Altering the routine cardiopulmonary bypass and anesthesia protocol resulted in a favorable maternal and fetal outcome.

  7. Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part XXXII: Additional Outcome Predictors for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A

    2018-02-01

    Mortality 12 months after a transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is partly due to a number of reasons in addition to the usual preprocedural medical patient risk factors. In patients who need a permanent pacemaker placed after the procedure, the mortality risk goes up. The death rate following a TAVR varies considerably at different institutions, and the past death rate of TAVR patients at an institution is predictive of the mortality rate of new patients having this procedure. In addition, the quality of life of the individual before the procedure is predictive of the 12-month mortality outcome after the TAVR is done.

  8. Effect of Patient-Prosthesis Mismatch in Aortic Position on Late-Onset Tricuspid Regurgitation and Clinical Outcomes after Double Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Youn, Young Nam; Chang, Byung Chul; Joo, Hyun Chel; Lee, Sak; Yoo, Kyung Jong

    2017-09-01

    Significant late-onset tricuspid regurgitation (TR) is unfortunately common after double valve replacement (DVR); however, its underlying factors remain undefined. We evaluated the effect of aortic patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) on late-onset TR and clinical outcomes after DVR. Of the 2392 consecutive patients who underwent aortic valve replacement between January 1990 and May 2014 at our institution, we retrospectively studied 462 patients who underwent DVR (excluding concomitant tricuspid valvular annuloplasty or replacement). Survival and freedom from grade >3 TR were compared between PPM (n=152) and non-PPM (n=310) groups using the Kaplan-Meier method. Although the overall survival rates were similar between the two groups at 5 and 10 years (95%, 91% vs. 96%, 93%, p=0.412), grade >3 TR-free survival was significantly lower in the PPM group (98%, 91% vs. 99%, 95%, p=0.014). Small body-surface area, atrial fibrillation, PPM, and subaortic pannus were risk factors for TR progression. However, aortic prosthesis size and trans-valvular pressure gradient were not significant factors for either TR progression or overall survival. Aortic PPM in DVR, regardless of mitral prosthesis size, was associated with late TR progression, but was not significantly correlated with overall survival. Therefore, we recommend careful echocardiographic follow-up for the early detection of TR progression in patients with aortic PPM in DVR. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2017

  9. Efficacy of posterior pericardiotomy in prevention of atrial fibrillation and pericardial effusion after aortic valve replacement: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Kaleda

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Postoperative atrial fibrillation is one of the most frequent complications in cardiac surgery. The aim of this trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of posterior pericardiotomy in the prevention of postoperative atrial fibrillation and pericardial effusion in patients undergoing isolated primary aortic valve replacement.Methods. The trial was approved by the local ethics committee. It included adult patients under 70 y.o. who had signed the informed consent for participation in the study and who were planned to undergo isolated primary aortic valve replacement. Exclusion criteria were a history of atrial fibrillation, hyperthyroidism, amiodarone intake, severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, left ventricle ejection fraction less than 30%, the size of the left atrium exceeding 50 mm, active infective endocarditis, the presence of adhesions in the pericardium and/or left pleural cavity and mini-sternotomy. From October 2013 to April 2015 607 patients in our clinic underwent different aortic valve procedures. 507 patients were excluded from the study because of the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The remaining 100 patients were randomized into two groups: 49 patients underwent posterior pericardiotomy and 51 patients made up the control group. In both groups the frequency of postoperative atrial fibrillation, pericardial effusion greater than 5 mm, surgery-discharge time, as well as posterior-pericardiotomy-related complications were studied. Trial number: ISRCTN11129539.Results. There were no deaths, stroke or cardiac tamponade during the postoperative stay. Neither were there any complications associated with the performance of posterior pericardiotomy. The incidence of atrial fibrillation, pericardial effusion and average duration of the postoperative stay were similar in both groups: 16% in posterior pericardiotomy group vs 14% in the control group (p=0.71, 10% in posterior pericardiotomy group vs 12% in the control group (p=0

  10. Prediction of optimal deployment projection for transcatheter aortic valve replacement: angiographic 3-dimensional reconstruction of the aortic root versus multidetector computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Ronald K; Leipsic, Jonathon; Wood, David; Moore, Teri; Toggweiler, Stefan; Willson, Alex; Gurvitch, Ronen; Freeman, Melanie; Webb, John G

    2012-04-01

    Identifying the optimal fluoroscopic projection of the aortic valve is important for successful transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Various imaging modalities, including multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), have been proposed for prediction of the optimal deployment projection. We evaluated a method that provides 3-dimensional angiographic reconstructions (3DA) of the aortic root for prediction of the optimal deployment angle and compared it with MDCT. Forty patients undergoing transfemoral TAVR at St Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada, were evaluated. All underwent preimplant 3DA and 68% underwent preimplant MDCT. Three-dimensional angiographic reconstructions were generated from images of a C-arm rotational aortic root angiogram during breath-hold, rapid ventricular pacing, and injection of 32 mL contrast medium at 8 mL/s. Two independent operators prospectively predicted perpendicular valve projections. The implant angle was chosen at the discretion of the physician performing TAVR. The angles from 3DA, from MDCT, the implant angle, and the postdeployment perpendicular prosthesis view were compared. The shortest distance from the postdeployment perpendicular prosthesis projection to the regression line of predicted perpendicular projections was calculated. All but 1 patient had adequate image quality for reproducible angle predictions. There was a significant correlation between 3DA and MDCT for prediction of perpendicular valve projections (r=0.682, Pregression line of predicted angles to the postdeployment prosthesis view was 5.1±4.6° for 3DA and 7.9±4.9° for MDCT (P=0.01). Three-dimensional angiographic reconstructions and MDCT are safe, practical, and accurate imaging modalities for identifying the optimal perpendicular valve deployment projection during TAVR.

  11. Comparison of valvar and right ventricular function following transcatheter and surgical pulmonary valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wendy F; Pollard, Heidi; Karimi, Mohsen; Asnes, Jeremy D; Hellenbrand, William E; Shabanova, Veronika; Weismann, Constance G

    2018-01-01

    Trans-catheter (TC) pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) has become common practice for patients with right ventricular outflow tract obstruction (RVOTO) and/or pulmonic insufficiency (PI). Our aim was to compare PVR and right ventricular (RV) function of patients who received TC vs surgical PVR. Retrospective review of echocardiograms obtained at three time points: before, immediately after PVR, and most recent. Sixty-two patients (median age 19 years, median follow-up 25 months) following TC (N = 32) or surgical (N = 30) PVR at Yale-New Haven Hospital were included. Pulmonary valve and right ventricular function before, immediately after, and most recently after PVR. At baseline, the TC group had predominant RVOTO (74% vs 10%, P function was good throughout. At last follow-up, the TC group had preserved valve function, but the surgical group did not (moderate RVOTO: 6% vs 41%, P mild PI: 0% vs 24%, P = .003). Patients younger than 17 years at surgical PVR had the highest risk of developing PVR dysfunction, while PVR function in follow-up was similar in adults. Looking at RV size and function, both groups had a decline in RV size following PVR. However, while RV function remained stable in the TC group, there was a transient postoperative decline in the surgical group. TC PVR in patients age function in follow-up compared to surgical valves. There was a transient decline in RV function following surgical but not TC PVR. TC PVR should therefore be the first choice in children who are considered for PVR, whenever possible. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. A randomized multicenter trial of minimally invasive rapid deployment versus conventional full sternotomy aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borger, Michael A; Moustafine, Vadim; Conradi, Lenard; Knosalla, Christoph; Richter, Markus; Merk, Denis R; Doenst, Torsten; Hammerschmidt, Robert; Treede, Hendrik; Dohmen, Pascal; Strauch, Justus T

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgical procedures (MIS) may offer several advantages over conventional full sternotomy (FS) aortic valve replacement (AVR). A novel class of aortic valve prostheses has been developed for rapid-deployment AVR (RDAVR). We report a randomized, multicenter trial comparing the outcomes for MIS-RDAVR with those of conventional FS-AVR. A total of 100 patients with aortic stenosis were enrolled in a prospective, multicenter, randomized comparison trial (CADENCE-MIS). Exclusion criteria included ejection fraction below 25%, AVR requiring concomitant procedures, and recent myocardial infarction or stroke. Patients were randomized to undergo MIS-RDAVR through an upper hemisternotomy (n = 51) or AVR by FS with a conventional stented bioprosthesis (n = 49). Three patients were excluded before the procedure, and 3 more patients who were randomized to undergo RDAVR were excluded because of their anatomy. Procedural, early clinical outcomes, and functional outcomes were assessed for the remaining 94 patients. Hemodynamic performance was assessed by an echocardiography core laboratory. Implanted valve sizes were similar between groups (22.9 ± 2.1 vs 23.0 ± 2.1 mm, p = 0.9). MIS-RDAVR was associated with significantly reduced aortic cross-clamp times compared with FS-AVR (41.3 ± 20.3 vs 54.0 ± 20.3 minutes, p quality of life measures. The RDAVR patients had a significantly lower mean transvalvular gradient (8.5 vs 10.3 mm Hg, p = 0.044) and a lower prevalence of patient-prosthesis mismatch (0% vs 15.0%, p = 0.013) 3 months postoperatively compared with the FS-AVR patients. RDAVR by the MIS approach is associated with significantly reduced myocardial ischemic time and better valvular hemodynamic function than FS-AVR with a conventional stented bioprosthesis. Rapid deployment valves may facilitate the performance of MIS-AVR. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Computed Tomography Helps to Plan Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoliński, Jarosław; Plicner, Dariusz; Grudzień, Grzegorz; Kruszec, Paweł; Fijorek, Kamil; Musiał, Robert; Andres, Janusz

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated the role of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in preparation for minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR). An analysis of 187 patients scheduled for MIAVR between June 2009 and December 2014 was conducted. In the study group (n = 86), MDCT of the thorax, aorta, and femoral arteries was performed before the operation. In the control group (n = 101), patients qualified for MIAVR without receiving preoperative MDCT. The surgical strategy was changed preoperatively in 12.8% of patients from the study group and in 2.0% of patients from the control group (p = 0.010) and intraoperatively in 9.9% of patients from the control group and in none from the study group (p = 0.002). No conversion to median sternotomy was necessary in the study group; among the controls, there were 4.0% conversions. On the basis of the MDCT measurements, optimal access to the aortic valve was achieved when the angle between the aortic valve plane and the line to the second intercostal space was 91.9 ± 10.0 degrees and to the third intercostal space was 94.0 ± 1.4 degrees, with the distance to the valve being 94.8 ± 13.8 mm and 84.5 ± 9.9 mm for the second and third intercostal spaces, respectively. The right atrium covering the site of the aortotomy was present in 42.9% of cases when MIAVR had been performed through the third intercostal space and in 1.3% when through the second intercostal space (p = 0.001). Preoperative MDCT of the thorax, aorta, and femoral arteries makes it possible to plan MIAVR operations. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Residual glycosaminoglycan accumulation in mitral and aortic valves of a patient with attenuated MPS I (Scheie syndrome after 6 years of enzyme replacement therapy: Implications for early diagnosis and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Sato

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS is an inherited metabolic disease caused by deficiency of the enzymes needed for glycosaminoglycan (GAG degradation. MPS type I is caused by the deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-l-iduronidase and is classified into Hurler syndrome, Scheie syndrome, and Hurler–Scheie syndrome based on disease severity and onset. Cardiac complications such as left ventricular hypertrophy, cardiac valve disease, and coronary artery disease are often observed in MPS type I. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT has been available for MPS type I, but the efficacy of this treatment for cardiac valve disease is unknown. We report on a 56-year-old female patient with attenuated MPS I (Scheie syndrome who developed aortic and mitral stenosis and coronary artery narrowing. The cardiac valve disease progressed despite ERT and she finally underwent double valve replacement and coronary artery bypass grafting. The pathology of the cardiac valves revealed GAG accumulation and lysosomal enlargement in both the mitral and aortic valves. Zebra body formation was also confirmed using electron microscopy. Our results suggest that ERT had limited efficacy in previously established cardiac valve disease. Early diagnosis and initiation of ERT is crucial to avoid further cardiac complications in MPS type I.

  15. Longitudinal strain predicts left ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis and preserved left ventricular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelsomino, Sandro; Lucà, Fabiana; Parise, Orlando; Lorusso, Roberto; Rao, Carmelo Massimiliano; Vizzardi, Enrico; Gensini, Gian Franco; Maessen, Jos G

    2013-11-01

    We explored the influence of global longitudinal strain (GLS) measured with two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography on left ventricular mass regression (LVMR) in patients with pure aortic stenosis (AS) and normal left ventricular function undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR). The study population included 83 patients with severe AS (aortic valve area regression (all P regression in patients with pure AS undergoing AVR. Our findings must be confirmed by further larger studies.

  16. Acute myocardial ischemia after aortic valve replacement: A comprehensive diagnostic evaluation using dynamic multislice spiral computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lembcke, Alexander [Department of Radiology, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Freie Universitaet Berlin and Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany)]. E-mail: alexander.lembcke@gmx.de; Hein, Patrick A. [Department of Radiology, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Freie Universitaet Berlin and Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Enzweiler, Christian N.H. [Department of Radiology, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Freie Universitaet Berlin and Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Hoffmann, Udo [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Klessen, Christian [Department of Radiology, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Freie Universitaet Berlin and Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Dohmen, Pascal M. [Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Freie Universitaet Berlin and Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    We describe the case of a 72-year-old man presenting with endocarditis and clinical signs of acute myocardial ischemia after biological aortic valve replacement. A comprehensive cardiac dynamic multislice spiral computed tomography demonstrated: (1) an endocarditic vegetation of the aortic valve; (2) a subvalvular leakage feeding a paravalvular pseudoaneurysm based on an aortic root abscess with subsequent compromise of the systolic blood flow in the left main coronary artery and the resulting myocardial perfusion deficit.

  17. Acute myocardial ischemia after aortic valve replacement: A comprehensive diagnostic evaluation using dynamic multislice spiral computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lembcke, Alexander; Hein, Patrick A.; Enzweiler, Christian N.H.; Hoffmann, Udo; Klessen, Christian; Dohmen, Pascal M.

    2006-01-01

    We describe the case of a 72-year-old man presenting with endocarditis and clinical signs of acute myocardial ischemia after biological aortic valve replacement. A comprehensive cardiac dynamic multislice spiral computed tomography demonstrated: (1) an endocarditic vegetation of the aortic valve; (2) a subvalvular leakage feeding a paravalvular pseudoaneurysm based on an aortic root abscess with subsequent compromise of the systolic blood flow in the left main coronary artery and the resulting myocardial perfusion deficit

  18. Repaired tetralogy of Fallot: the roles of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in evaluating pathophysiology and for pulmonary valve replacement decision support

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Surgical management of tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) results in anatomic and functional abnormalities in the majority of patients. Although right ventricular volume load due to severe pulmonary regurgitation can be tolerated for many years, there is now evidence that the compensatory mechanisms of the right ventricular myocardium ultimately fail and that if the volume load is not eliminated or reduced by pulmonary valve replacement the dysfunction might be irreversible. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has evolved during the last 2 decades as the reference standard imaging modality to assess the anatomic and functional sequelae in patients with repaired TOF. This article reviews the pathophysiology of chronic right ventricular volume load after TOF repair and the risks and benefits of pulmonary valve replacement. The CMR techniques used to comprehensively evaluate the patient with repaired TOF are reviewed and the role of CMR in supporting clinical decisions regarding pulmonary valve replacement is discussed. PMID:21251297

  19. Optimal implantation depth and adherence to guidelines on permanent pacing to improve the results of transcatheter aortic valve replacement with the medtronic corevalve system: The CoreValve prospective, international, post-market ADVANCE-II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.S. Petronio (Anna); J.-M. Sinning (Jan-Malte); N.M. van Mieghem (Nicolas); G. Zucchelli (Giulio); G. Nickenig (Georg); R. Bekeredjian (Raffi); J. Bosmans (Johan); F. Bedogni (Francesco); M. Branny (Marian); K. Stangl (Karl); J. Kovac (Jan); M. Schiltgen (Molly); S. Kraus (Stacia); P.P.T. de Jaegere (Peter)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives The aim of the CoreValve prospective, international, post-market ADVANCE-II study was to define the rates of conduction disturbances and permanent pacemaker implantation (PPI) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement with the Medtronic CoreValve System (Minneapolis,

  20. Effect of tricuspid regurgitation and the right heart on survival after transcatheter aortic valve replacement: insights from the Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves II inoperable cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindman, Brian R; Maniar, Hersh S; Jaber, Wael A; Lerakis, Stamatios; Mack, Michael J; Suri, Rakesh M; Thourani, Vinod H; Babaliaros, Vasilis; Kereiakes, Dean J; Whisenant, Brian; Miller, D Craig; Tuzcu, E Murat; Svensson, Lars G; Xu, Ke; Doshi, Darshan; Leon, Martin B; Zajarias, Alan

    2015-04-01

    Tricuspid regurgitation (TR) and right ventricular (RV) dysfunction adversely affect outcomes in patients with heart failure or mitral valve disease, but their impact on outcomes in patients with aortic stenosis treated with transcatheter aortic valve replacement has not been well characterized. Among 542 patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis treated in the Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves (PARTNER) II trial (inoperable cohort) with a Sapien or Sapien XT valve via a transfemoral approach, baseline TR severity, right atrial and RV size and RV function were evaluated by echocardiography according to established guidelines. One-year mortality was 16.9%, 17.2%, 32.6%, and 61.1% for patients with no/trace (n=167), mild (n=205), moderate (n=117), and severe (n=18) TR, respectively (Pright atrial and RV enlargement were also associated with increased mortality (Pright atrial and RV enlargement, but not RV dysfunction. There was an interaction between TR and mitral regurgitation severity (P=0.04); the increased hazard of death associated with moderate/severe TR only occurred in those with no/trace/mild mitral regurgitation. In inoperable patients treated with transcatheter aortic valve replacement, moderate or severe TR and right heart enlargement are independently associated with increased 1-year mortality; however, the association between moderate or severe TR and an increased hazard of death was only found in those with minimal mitral regurgitation at baseline. These findings may improve our assessment of anticipated benefit from transcatheter aortic valve replacement and support the need for future studies on TR and the right heart, including whether concomitant treatment of TR in operable but high-risk patients with aortic stenosis is warranted. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01314313. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Cost-effectiveness of transcatheter aortic valve replacement compared with surgical aortic valve replacement in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis: results of the PARTNER (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves) trial (Cohort A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Matthew R; Magnuson, Elizabeth A; Lei, Yang; Wang, Kaijun; Vilain, Katherine; Li, Haiyan; Walczak, Joshua; Pinto, Duane S; Thourani, Vinod H; Svensson, Lars G; Mack, Michael J; Miller, D Craig; Satler, Lowell E; Bavaria, Joseph; Smith, Craig R; Leon, Martin B; Cohen, David J

    2012-12-25

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) compared with surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) for patients with severe aortic stenosis and high surgical risk. TAVR is an alternative to AVR for patients with severe aortic stenosis and high surgical risk. We performed a formal economic analysis based on cost, quality of life, and survival data collected in the PARTNER A (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves) trial in which patients with severe aortic stenosis and high surgical risk were randomized to TAVR or AVR. Cumulative 12-month costs (assessed from a U.S. societal perspective) and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were compared separately for the transfemoral (TF) and transapical (TA) cohorts. Although 12-month costs and QALYs were similar for TAVR and AVR in the overall population, there were important differences when results were stratified by access site. In the TF cohort, total 12-month costs were slightly lower with TAVR and QALYs were slightly higher such that TF-TAVR was economically dominant compared with AVR in the base case and economically attractive (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio economically dominated by AVR in the base case and economically attractive in only 7.1% of replicates. In the PARTNER trial, TAVR was an economically attractive strategy compared with AVR for patients suitable for TF access. Future studies are necessary to determine whether improved experience and outcomes with TA-TAVR can improve its cost-effectiveness relative to AVR. Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mechanical stress is associated with right ventricular response to pulmonary valve replacement in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Dalin; Yang, Chun; Del Nido, Pedro J; Zuo, Heng; Rathod, Rahul H; Huang, Xueying; Gooty, Vasu; Tang, Alexander; Billiar, Kristen L; Wu, Zheyang; Geva, Tal

    2016-03-01

    Patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot account for a substantial proportion of cases with late-onset right ventricular failure. The current surgical approach, which includes pulmonary valve replacement/insertion, has yielded mixed results. Therefore, it may be clinically useful to identify parameters that can be used to predict right ventricular function response to pulmonary valve replacement. Cardiac magnetic resonance data before and 6 months after pulmonary valve replacement were obtained from 16 patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (8 male, 8 female; median age, 42.75 years). Right ventricular ejection fraction change from pre- to postpulmonary valve replacement was used as the outcome. The patients were divided into group 1 (n = 8, better outcome) and group 2 (n = 8, worst outcome). Cardiac magnetic resonance-based patient-specific computational right ventricular/left ventricular models were constructed, and right ventricular mechanical stress and strain, wall thickness, curvature, and volumes were obtained for analysis. Our results indicated that right ventricular wall stress was the best single predictor for postpulmonary valve replacement outcome with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.819. Mean values of stress, strain, wall thickness, and longitudinal curvature differed significantly between the 2 groups with right ventricular wall stress showing the largest difference. Mean right ventricular stress in group 2 was 103% higher than in group 1. Computational modeling and right ventricular stress may be used as tools to identify right ventricular function response to pulmonary valve replacement. Large-scale clinical studies are needed to validate these preliminary findings. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. When operable patients become inoperable: conversion of a surgical aortic valve replacement into transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lene Kjaer; Arendrup, Henrik; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    . On extracorporal circulation it was reconized that the aortic annulus, the coronary ostiae and the proximal part of the ascending aorta were severely calcified making valve implantation impossible. Surgical closure without valve substitution was estimated to be associated with a high risk of mortality due...

  4. Association of Tricuspid Regurgitation With Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Outcomes: A Report From The Society of Thoracic Surgeons/American College of Cardiology Transcatheter Valve Therapy Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Fenton H; Vemulapalli, Sreekanth; Li, Zhuokai; Thourani, Vinod; Matsouaka, Roland A; Desai, Nimesh D; Kirtane, Ajay; Anwaruddin, Saif; Williams, Matthew L; Giri, Jay; Vallabhajosyula, Prashanth; Li, Robert H; Herrmann, Howard C; Bavaria, Joseph E; Szeto, Wilson Y

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the association of tricuspid regurgitation (TR) severity with outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). We analyzed data from 34,576 patients who underwent TAVR at 365 US hospitals from November 2011 through March 2015 submitted to The Society of Thoracic Surgeon/American College of Cardiology Transcatheter Valve Therapy Registry. We examined unadjusted mortality and heart failure readmission stratified by degree of preoperative TR and used multivariable models for 1-year mortality and heart failure readmission. Tricuspid regurgitation was present in 80% (n = 27,804) of TAVR patients, with mild TR in 56% (n = 19,393), moderate TR in 19% (n = 6687), and severe TR in 5% (n = 1,724). Increasing TR severity was associated with a number of comorbidities and The Society of Thoracic Surgeons predicted risk of mortality increased (p < 0.001): no TR (7.3 ± 5.4); mild TR (8.0 ± 5.7); moderate TR (9.6 ± 6.8); and severe TR (10.7 ± 7.4). In unadjusted analysis, moderate and severe TR were associated with increased use of cardiopulmonary bypass, longer intensive care unit and hospital stays, new dialysis, inhospital major adverse cardiac event, inhospital mortality, observed-to-expected inhospital mortality ratio, long-term heart failure readmission, and mortality (p < 0.001). Adjusted mortality at 1 year was significantly worse for patients with severe TR when left ventricular ejection fraction greater than 30% (hazard ratio 1.29, 95% confidence interval: 1.11 to 1.50) as was heart failure readmission (hazard ratio 1.27, 95% confidence interval: 1.04 to 1.54). Tricuspid regurgitation was common among patients undergoing TAVR. Increasing TR severity was associated with higher risk patients and increased mortality and readmission-particularly for patients with severe TR and left ventricular ejection fraction greater than 30%. The effectiveness of TAVR alone in patients with aortic stenosis and concomitant

  5. Gender-linked impact of epicardial adipose tissue volume in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgery or non-coronary valve surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Maimaituxun, Gulinu; Shimabukuro, Michio; Salim, Hotimah Masdan; Tabata, Minoru; Yuji, Daisuke; Morimoto, Yoshihisa; Akasaka, Takeshi; Matsuura, Tomomi; Yagi, Shusuke; Fukuda, Daiju; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Soeki, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Takaki; Tanaka, Masashi; Takanashi, Shuichiro

    2017-01-01

    Background Traditional and non-traditional risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) are different between men and women. Gender-linked impact of epicardial adipose tissue volume (EATV) in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) remains unknown. Methods Gender-linked impact of EATV, abdominal fat distribution and other traditional ASCVD risk factors were compared in 172 patients (men: 115; women: 57) who underwent CABG or non-coronary valvular surgery ...

  6. Hereditary spherocytosis and elliptocytosis associated with prosthetic heart valve replacement: rheological study of erythrocyte modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprari, Patrizia; Tarzia, Anna; Mojoli, Giorgio; Cianciulli, Paolo; Mannella, Emilio; Martorana, Maria Cristina

    2009-04-01

    The implantation of a prosthetic heart valve (HVP) in patients with hereditary spherocytosis (HS) and hereditary elliptocytosis (HE) is rare, and the changes in the structure and deformability of erythrocytes that follow implantation in these patients have been poorly described. In the present study, the erythrocytes in HS and HE patients with mechanical HVP were compared to the erythrocytes in patients with only congenital membrane defects, in terms of biochemical modifications and rheological behaviour. Integral and cytoskeletal erythrocyte membrane proteins were studied, and blood viscosity (shear rate/shear stress ratio), aggregation ratio [eta(1 s(-1))/eta(200 s(-1))], and red cell visco-elasticity were determined. Valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis worsened anaemia and resulted in a change in haemolysis, from sub-clinical to evident. The rheological investigation of erythrocytes from HS patients confirmed the characteristic increased viscosity and aggregation ratio and the decreased deformability. The rheological behaviour of erythrocytes from patients with HVP showed a decrease in viscosity and an increase in elastic modulus. In these patients, the prosthesis seems to have induced traumatic damage to the erythrocyte membrane, leading to fragmentation and lysis, which in turn modified rheological parameters. The biochemical and rheological investigation allowed us to understand the clinical and haematological pictures of the patients and to describe the role played by different factors in haemolytic anaemia.

  7. Risk Prediction in Aortic Valve Replacement: Incremental Value of the Preoperative Echocardiogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Timothy C; Flynn, Aidan W; Chen-Tournoux, Annabel; Rudski, Lawrence G; Mehrotra, Praveen; Nunes, Maria C; Rincon, Luis M; Shahian, David M; Picard, Michael H; Afilalo, Jonathan

    2015-10-26

    Risk prediction is a critical step in patient selection for aortic valve replacement (AVR), yet existing risk scores incorporate very few echocardiographic parameters. We sought to evaluate the incremental predictive value of a complete echocardiogram to identify high-risk surgical candidates before AVR. A cohort of patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing surgical AVR with or without coronary bypass was assembled at 2 tertiary centers. Preoperative echocardiograms were reviewed by independent observers to quantify chamber size/function and valve function. Patient databases were queried to extract clinical data. The cohort consisted of 432 patients with a mean age of 73.5 years and 38.7% females. Multivariable logistic regression revealed 3 echocardiographic predictors of in-hospital mortality or major morbidity: E/e' ratio reflective of elevated left ventricular (LV) filling pressure; myocardial performance index reflective of right ventricular (RV) dysfunction; and small LV end-diastolic cavity size. Addition of these echocardiographic parameters to the STS risk score led to an integrated discrimination improvement of 4.1% (Pvalue to the STS risk score and should be integrated in prediction when evaluating the risk of AVR. In addition, findings of small hypertrophied LV cavities and/or low mean aortic gradients confer a higher risk of 2-year mortality. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  8. Efficacy of the Stonehenge Technique for Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement via Right Infraaxillary Thoracotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Masataka; Kin, Hajime; Kitamoto, Shohei; Yamanaka, Shota; Nishida, Hidefumi; Nishigawa, Kosaku; Takanashi, Shuichiro

    2017-02-20

    Minimally invasive cardiac surgeries for aortic valve replacement (AVR) are still a technical challenge for surgeons because these procedures are undertaken through small incisions and deep surgical fields. Although AVR via vertical infraaxillary thoracotomy can be a cosmetically superior option, a disadvantage of this approach is the distance between the thoracotomy incision and the ascending aorta. Therefore, we devised a technique to perform all manipulations using the fingertips without the aid of a knot pusher or long-shafted surgical instruments. This was achieved by particular placement of several retracted sutures to the right chest wall. We named placement of these sutures the "Stonehenge technique." In conclusion, AVR via vertical infraaxillary thoracotomy with our Stonehenge technique can be safely and simply performed with superior cosmetic advantages.

  9. Novel thoughts on patient-prosthesis mismatch in aortic valve replacement: the rationale for the PAR I trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doenst, Torsten; Amorim, Paulo A; Diab, Mahmoud; Hagendorff, Andreas; Faerber, Gloria; Graff, Jürgen; Rastan, Ardawan; Deutsch, Oliver; Eichinger, Walter

    2014-09-01

    The hemodynamic performance of prosthetic tissue valves is influenced by valve design and valve-specific sizing strategies. Design determines the actual geometric opening area (GOA) of the prosthetic valve and sizing strategy its actual chosen size. Currently, hemodynamic performance is assessed by determining the effective orifice area (EOA; derived from the continuity equation by relating flow velocities with the area of the left ventricular outflow tract [LVOTA]). The question whether a valve is too small (patient-prosthesis mismatch [PPM]) is currently addressed by relating EOA to body surface area (EOA index [EOAi]). However, this relation may not be appropriate because the EOAi relates flow velocity to patient-specific anatomic parameters twice (i.e., LVOTA and body surface area). This potential confounder may explain the controversies regarding PPM. However, intuitively, leaving a gradient behind after aortic valve replacement cannot be irrelevant. PPM becomes even more relevant with transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation, where a second prosthesis is taking up inner space of a valve that may have already been too small initially. Thus, a reliable method to determine the presence of PPM is needed. The Prosthesis-to-Annulus Relation I (PAR I) trial is a German multicenter study assessing the relation between the prosthetic GOA and the LVOTA as a potentially new parameter for the prediction of hemodynamic outcome. The results may possibly guide future valve size selection and may allow prediction of functionally relevant PPM. Here, we will demonstrate the shortcomings of the currently applied EOAi for the assessment of hemodynamic relevance and present the rationale for the PARI trial, which recently started recruiting patients. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Causes of Death Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Tian-Yuan; Liao, Yan-Biao; Zhao, Zhen-Gang; Xu, Yuan-Ning; Wei, Xin; Zuo, Zhi-Liang; Li, Yi-Jian; Cao, Jia-Yu; Tang, Hong; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Feng, Yuan; Chen, Mao

    2015-09-21

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an effective alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement in patients at high surgical risk. However, there is little published literature on the exact causes of death. The PubMed database was systematically searched for studies reporting causes of death within and after 30 days following TAVR. Twenty-eight studies out of 3934 results retrieved were identified. In the overall analysis, 46.4% and 51.6% of deaths were related to noncardiovascular causes within and after the first 30 days, respectively. Within 30 days of TAVR, infection/sepsis (18.5%), heart failure (14.7%), and multiorgan failure (13.2%) were the top 3 causes of death. Beyond 30 days, infection/sepsis (14.3%), heart failure (14.1%), and sudden death (10.8%) were the most common causes. All possible subgroup analyses were made. No significant differences were seen for proportions of cardiovascular deaths except the comparison between moderate (mean STS score 4 to 8) and high (mean STS score >8) -risk patients after 30 days post-TAVR (56.0% versus 33.5%, P=0.005). Cardiovascular and noncardiovascular causes of death are evenly balanced both in the perioperative period and at long-term follow-up after TAVR. Infection/sepsis and heart failure were the most frequent noncardiovascular and cardiovascular causes of death. This study highlights important areas of clinical focus that could further improve outcomes after TAVR. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  11. Noninvasive predictors of perioperative atrial arrhythmias in patients with tetralogy of Fallot undergoing pulmonary valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Daniel; Barham, Waseem; Ruckdeschel, Emily; Sharma, Nandita; McCanta, Anthony C; von Alvensleben, Johannes; Sauer, William H; Collins, Kathryn K; Kay, Joseph; Patel, Sonali; Nguyen, Duy T

    2017-08-01

    Patients with tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) have increased risk of atrial arrhythmias. A measure of atrial dispersion, the P-wave vector magnitude (Pvm), can identify patients at risk for perioperative atrial flutter (AFL) or intra-atrial re-entrant tachycardia (IART) in a large TOF cohort. We performed a blinded, retrospective analysis of 158 TOF patients undergoing pulmonary valve replacement between 1997 and 2015. History of AFL/IART was documented using electrocardiogram, Holter monitor, exercise stress test, implanted cardiac device, and electrophysiology study. P-R intervals, Pvm, QRS duration, and QRS vector magnitude were assessed from resting sinus-rhythm 12-lead electrocardiograms and identification of those with AFL/IART was determined. Fourteen patients (8.9%) were found to have AFL/IART. Pvm, QRS duration, and QRS vector magnitude significantly differentiated those with AFL/IART from those without on univariate analysis: 0.09 ± 0.04 vs 0.18 ± 0.07 mV, 161.3 ± 21.9 vs 137.7 ± 31.4 ms, and 1.2 (interquartile range, 1.0-1.2) vs 1.6 mV (1.0-2.3), respectively (P < 0.05 for each). The Pvm had the highest area under the ROC curve (0.88) and was the only significant predictor on multivariate analysis, with odds ratio of 0.02 (95% confidence interval: 0.01-0.53). P-R duration, MRI volumes, and right-heart hemodynamics did not significantly differentiate those with vs those without AFL/IART. In TOF patients undergoing pulmonary valve replacement, Pvm has significant value in predicting those with perioperative AFL/IART. These clinical features may help further evaluate TOF patients at risk for perioperative atrial arrhythmias. Prospective studies are warranted. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. CT angiography for planning transcatheter aortic valve replacement using automated tube voltage selection: Image quality and radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangold, Stefanie [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); De Cecco, Carlo N. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Kuhlman, Taylor S.; Varga-Szemes, Akos [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Caruso, Damiano [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, University of Rome “Sapienza”, Rome (Italy); Duguay, Taylor M. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Tesche, Christian [Department of Cardiology, Heart Centre Munich-Bogenhausen, Munich (Germany); Vogl, Thomas J. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Nikolaou, Konstantin [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); and others

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • TAVR-planning CT was performed with automated tube voltage selection. • Automated tube voltage selection enables individual tube voltage adaptation. • Image quality was diagnostic while radiation exposure was significantly decreased. - Abstract: Purpose: To assess image quality and accuracy of CT angiography (CTA) for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) planning performed with 3rd generation dual-source CT (DSCT). Material and methods: We evaluated 125 patients who underwent TAVR-planning CTA on 3rd generation DSCT. A two-part protocol was performed including retrospectively ECG-gated coronary CTA (CCTA) and prospectively ECG-triggered aortoiliac CTA using 60 mL of contrast medium. Automated tube voltage selection and advanced iterative reconstruction were applied. Effective dose (ED), signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were calculated. Five-point scales were used for subjective image quality analysis. In patients who underwent TAVR, sizing parameters were obtained. Results: Image quality was rated good to excellent in 97.6% of CCTA and 100% of aortoiliac CTAs. CTA studies at >100 kV showed decreased objective image quality compared to 70–100 kV (SNR, all p ≤ 0.0459; CNR, all p ≤ 0.0462). Mean ED increased continuously from 70 to >100 kV (CCTA: 4.5 ± 1.7 mSv–13.6 ± 2.9 mSv, all p ≤ 0.0233; aortoiliac CTA: 2.4 ± 0.9 mSv–6.8 ± 2.7 mSv, all p ≤ 0.0414). In 39 patients TAVR was performed and annulus diameter was within the recommended range in all patients. No severe cardiac or vascular complications were noted. Conclusion: 3rd generation DSCT provides diagnostic image quality in TAVR-planning CTA and facilitates reliable assessment of TAVR device and delivery option while reducing radiation dose.

  13. CT angiography for planning transcatheter aortic valve replacement using automated tube voltage selection: Image quality and radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangold, Stefanie; De Cecco, Carlo N.; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Kuhlman, Taylor S.; Varga-Szemes, Akos; Caruso, Damiano; Duguay, Taylor M.; Tesche, Christian; Vogl, Thomas J.; Nikolaou, Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • TAVR-planning CT was performed with automated tube voltage selection. • Automated tube voltage selection enables individual tube voltage adaptation. • Image quality was diagnostic while radiation exposure was significantly decreased. - Abstract: Purpose: To assess image quality and accuracy of CT angiography (CTA) for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) planning performed with 3rd generation dual-source CT (DSCT). Material and methods: We evaluated 125 patients who underwent TAVR-planning CTA on 3rd generation DSCT. A two-part protocol was performed including retrospectively ECG-gated coronary CTA (CCTA) and prospectively ECG-triggered aortoiliac CTA using 60 mL of contrast medium. Automated tube voltage selection and advanced iterative reconstruction were applied. Effective dose (ED), signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were calculated. Five-point scales were used for subjective image quality analysis. In patients who underwent TAVR, sizing parameters were obtained. Results: Image quality was rated good to excellent in 97.6% of CCTA and 100% of aortoiliac CTAs. CTA studies at >100 kV showed decreased objective image quality compared to 70–100 kV (SNR, all p ≤ 0.0459; CNR, all p ≤ 0.0462). Mean ED increased continuously from 70 to >100 kV (CCTA: 4.5 ± 1.7 mSv–13.6 ± 2.9 mSv, all p ≤ 0.0233; aortoiliac CTA: 2.4 ± 0.9 mSv–6.8 ± 2.7 mSv, all p ≤ 0.0414). In 39 patients TAVR was performed and annulus diameter was within the recommended range in all patients. No severe cardiac or vascular complications were noted. Conclusion: 3rd generation DSCT provides diagnostic image quality in TAVR-planning CTA and facilitates reliable assessment of TAVR device and delivery option while reducing radiation dose.

  14. Emergency aortic valve replacement and Caesarian section in a primigravida with severe aortic stenosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochhar, Puneet K; Zutshi, V; Shamsunder, S; Batra, S; Ghosh, P

    2011-01-01

    Congenital bicuspid aortic valve with severe aortic stenosis (AS) is a rare condition (3-6% of patients with congenital heart disease). Pregnancy in these patients carries a high risk of maternal and fetal mortality. With advancing gestational age, these women may develop cardiac failure due to increased cardiorespiratory requirements. When medical therapy proves insufficient, cardiac surgery becomes mandatory to save the patient's life. Balloon valvuloplasty is only palliative treatment, the duration of benefit being only 6 months. Valve replacement is thus recommended. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery with valve replacement has been reported to carry a lower risk of maternal mortality (1.5-13%) but a very high fetal risk (16-40%). This paper reports the case of a 30-year-old primigravida with severe AS with bicuspid aortic valve and pulmonary congestion clinically uncontrolled, in whom CPB surgery and aortic valve replacement was performed as an emergency procedure, along with a lower segment Caesarian section. The outcome of unrelieved severe symptomatic AS in pregnancy is poor. Multidisciplinary management is important to avoid deterioration in cardiac performance in parturients with severe AS. CPB during pregnancy carries a high risk to the fetus. Therefore, open heart surgery during pregnancy should be advised only in extreme emergencies (ie, heart failure refractory to conventional therapy).

  15. Vortex dynamics in Patient-Specific Stenotic Tricuspid and Bicuspid Aortic Valves pre- and post- Trans-catheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatoum, Hoda; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2017-11-01

    Understanding blood flow related adverse complications such as leaflet thrombosis post-transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) requires a deeper understanding of how patient-specific anatomic and hemodynamic factors, and relative valve positioning dictate sinus vortex flow and stasis regions. High resolution time-resolved particle image velocimetry measurements were conducted in compliant and transparent 3D printed patient-specific models of stenotic bicuspid and tricuspid aortic valve roots from patients who underwent TAVI. Using Lagrangian particle tracking analysis of sinus vortex flows and probability distributions of residence time and blood damage indices we show that (a) patient specific modeling provides a more realistic assessment of TAVI flows, (b) TAVI deployment alters sinus flow patterns by significantly decreasing sinus velocity and vorticity, and (c) relative valve positioning can control critical vortex structures that may explain preferential leaflet thrombosis corresponding to separated flow recirculation, secondary to valve jet vectoring relative to the aorta axis. This work provides new methods and understanding of the spatio-temporal aortic sinus vortex dynamics in post TAVI pathology. This study was supported by the Ohio State University DHLRI Trifit Challenge award.

  16. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and Laser Doppler Anemometry velocity measurements downstream of replacement heart valves: implications for in vivo assessment of prosthetic valve function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, A A; Heinrich, R S; Walker, P G; Pedersen, E M; Scheidegger, M B; Boesiger, P; Walton, S P; Yoganathan, A P

    1996-01-01

    The non-invasive, in-vivo assessment of prosthetic valve function is compromised by the lack of accurate measurements of the transvalvular flow fields or hemodynamics by current techniques. Short echo time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may provide a method for the non-invasive, in vivo assessment of prosthetic valve function by accurately measuring changes in the transvalvular flow fields associated with normal and dysfunctional prosthetic valves. The objectives of these in vitro experiments were to investigate the potential for using MRI as a tool to measure the complex flow fields distal to replacement heart valves, and to assess the accuracy of MRI velocity measurements by comparison with Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA), a gold standard. The velocity fields downstream of tilting disc, bileaflet, ball and cage, and pericardial tissue valves were measured using both three-component LDA and MRI phase velocity encoding under a steady flow rate of 22.8 l/min, simulating peak systolic flow. The valves were tested under normal and stenotic conditions to assess the MRI capabilities under a wide range of local flow conditions, velocities and turbulence levels. A new short echo time MRI technique (FAcE), which allowed velocity measurements in stenotic jets with high turbulence, was tested. Good overall agreement was obtained between the MRI velocity measurements and the LDA data. The MRI velocity measurements adequately reproduced the spatial structure of the flow fields. In most cases peak velocities were accurately measured to within 15%. The results indicate that the FAcE MRI method has the potential to be used as a diagnostic tool to assess prosthetic valve function.

  17. Impact of Prosthesis-Patient Mismatch on Long-term Functional Capacity After Mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petit-Eisenmann, H.; Epailly, E.; Velten, M.; Radojevic, J.; Eisenmann, B.; Kremer, H.; Kindo, M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) after aortic valve replacement (AVR) for aortic stenosis on exercise capacity remains controversial. The aim of this study was to analyze the long-term impact of PPM after mechanical AVR on maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). METHODS: The study

  18. Preoperative thresholds for pulmonary valve replacement in patients with corrected tetralogy of Fallot using cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhof, T.; Straten, A. van; Vliegen, H.W.; Meijboom, F.J.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Spijkerboer, A.M.; Bouma, B.J.; Zwinderman, A.H.; Hazekamp, M.G.; Roos, A.; Mulder, B.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To facilitate the optimal timing of pulmonary valve replacement, we analyzed preoperative thresholds of right ventricular (RV) volumes above which no decrease or normalization of RV size takes place after surgery. METHODS AND RESULTS: Between 1993 and 2006, 71 adult patients with

  19. Preoperative thresholds for pulmonary valve replacement in patients with corrected tetralogy of Fallot using cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhof, Thomas; van Straten, Alexander; Vliegen, Hubert W.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Spijkerboer, Anje M.; Bouma, Berto J.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Hazekamp, Mark G.; de Roos, Albert; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Background - To facilitate the optimal timing of pulmonary valve replacement, we analyzed preoperative thresholds of right ventricular ( RV) volumes above which no decrease or normalization of RV size takes place after surgery. Methods and Results - Between 1993 and 2006, 71 adult patients with

  20. Understanding the requirements of self-expandable stents for heart valve replacement : radial force, hoop force and equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cabrera, M.S.; Oomens, C.W.J.; Baaijens, F.P.T.

    2017-01-01

    A proper interpretation of the forces developed during stent crimping and deployment is of paramount importance for a better understanding of the requirements for successful heart valve replacement. The present study combines experimental and computational methods to assess the performance of a

  1. Mitral valve repair and bioprosthetic replacement without postoperative anticoagulation does not increase the risk of stroke or mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwann, Thomas A; Engoren, Milo; Bonnell, Mark; Clancy, Christopher; Khouri, Samer; Kabour, Ameer; Jamil, Tahir; Habib, Robert H

    2013-07-01

    The study aimed to determine if mitral valve repair (MVRR) or bioprosthetic mitral valve replacement (BMVR) without postoperative anticoagulation is associated with a similar risk of thromboembolism and death as anticoagulation. We retrospectively reviewed our 2004-09 experience in 249 MVRR and bioprosthetic replacement patients (53% female; 63 year mean age). Concurrent procedures principally included antiarrhythmic surgery, aortic valve replacement, tricuspid valve repair and coronary bypass grafting. Warfarin therapy was instituted at the discretion of the surgeon. Thirty-day, a period known to have the highest risk of valve-related thromboembolism, outcomes were compared relying on the incidence of stroke and death as surrogates of thromboembolic complications. Intermediate-term survival was compared between the groups using Cox proportional hazard models. The mean follow-up was 2.9 years. Given the non-randomized warfarin use, a propensity score using patient comorbidities and concurrent procedures was created and added to the Cox models. One hundred and ninety-two (77%) patients were discharged on warfarin and 57 (23%) were discharged without warfarin. Thirty-day mortality in patients discharged from the index hospitalization was 1.2% and was similar for the two groups (P = 0.99). Four ischaemic perioperative strokes were detected; 3 in the warfarin group and 1 in the no warfarin group (P = 0.99). Overall survival was 84%, with 84% survival in the warfarin group and 86% in the no warfarin group (P = 0.79). Bleeding complications were comparable between the two groups (P = 0.72). In a multivariate analysis, warfarin was not related to mortality. Despite current guidelines recommending postoperative anticoagulation following MVRR or bioprosthetic replacement, the avoidance of warfarin does not increase perioperative complications and has no impact on intermediate survival. Accordingly, a prospective randomized study to adjudicate the role of extended warfarin

  2. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation for a failed bio-bentall in patients with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigel, Roy; Siegel, Robert J; Kahlon, Ravi S; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Cheng, Wen; Makkar, Raj R

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Marfan syndrome are at risk for ascending aortic dilation and dissection at the level of the aortic sinuses, making aortic root and valve replacement common. Patients undergoing an aortic root replacement with concomitant replacement of the aortic valve with a bioprosthesis (Bio-Bentall) are predisposed to bioprosthesis failure. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become an option for aortic valve replacement, avoiding cardiopulmonary bypass and/or median sternotomy. We present the first 2 reported patients with Marfan syndrome who underwent a valve-in-valve TAVI in the setting of a prior Bio-Bentall. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Trans-apical aortic valve implantation in a patient with stentless valve degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; MacCarthy, Philip; Monaghan, Mark; Wendler, Olaf

    2011-06-01

    Trans-apical valve-in-valve trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has successfully been performed in selected, high-risk patients, who suffered prosthetic degeneration after aortic valve replacement using stented xenografts. We report the case of a 79-year-old male patient who underwent one of the first successful TAVIs in a failing stentless bioprosthesis. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Poor performances of EuroSCORE and CARE score for prediction of perioperative mortality in octogenarians undergoing aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhor, Vibol; Merceron, Sybille; Ricome, Sylvie; Baron, Gabriel; Daoud, Omar; Dilly, Marie-Pierre; Aubier, Benjamin; Provenchere, Sophie; Philip, Ivan

    2010-08-01

    Although results of cardiac surgery are improving, octogenarians have a higher procedure-related mortality and more complications with increased length of stay in ICU. Consequently, careful evaluation of perioperative risk seems necessary. The aims of our study were to assess and compare the performances of EuroSCORE and CARE score in the prediction of perioperative mortality among octogenarians undergoing aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis and to compare these predictive performances with those obtained in younger patients. This retrospective study included all consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgery in our institution between November 2005 and December 2007. For each patient, risk assessment for mortality was performed using logistic EuroSCORE, additive EuroSCORE and CARE score. The main outcome measure was early postoperative mortality. Predictive performances of these scores were assessed by calibration and discrimination using goodness-of-fit test and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, respectively. During this 2-year period, we studied 2117 patients, among whom 134/211 octogenarians and 335/1906 nonoctogenarians underwent an aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis. When considering patients with aortic stenosis, discrimination was poor in octogenarians and the difference from nonoctogenarians was significant for each score (0.58, 0.59 and 0.56 vs. 0.82, 0.81 and 0.77 for additive EuroSCORE, logistic EuroSCORE and CARE score in octogenarians and nonoctogenarians, respectively, P performances of these scores are poor in octogenarians undergoing cardiac surgery, especially aortic valve replacement. Risk assessment and therapeutic decisions in octogenarians should not be made with these scoring systems alone.

  5. Effect of the prosthesis-patient mismatch on long-term clinical outcomes after isolated aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Soonchang; Yi, Gijong; Youn, Young-Nam; Lee, Sak; Yoo, Kyung-Jong; Chang, Byung-Chul

    2013-11-01

    The effect of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) on clinical outcomes after aortic valve replacement remains controversial. We evaluated effect of PPM on long-term clinical outcomes after isolated aortic valve replacement in patients with predominant aortic stenosis. We analyzed data from patients with predominant aortic stenosis who underwent isolated aortic valve replacement between January 1995 and July 2010. The indexed effective orifice area, obtained by dividing the in vivo effective orifice area by the patient's body surface area, was used to define PPM as clinically nonsignificant (group I, 224 patients), mild (group II, 52 patients), moderate (group III, 39 patients), and severe (group IV, 36 patients). Early survival was not significantly different among the groups, but overall survival was decreased gradually in group IV. Overall survival at 12 years was lower in group IV than in group I (92.8% ± 2.7% vs 67.0 ± 10.1, respectively; P = .001). Cardiac-related-death-free survival at 12 years was lower in patients with severe PPM. Left ventricular mass index decreased during the follow-up period in all groups. But left ventricular mass index was less decreased in group IV compared with groups I, II, and III. Age, severe PPM, and ejection fraction <40%, and New York Heart Association Functional Class IV were independent risk factors of overall survival on multivariate analysis. Severe PPM was an independent risk factor for cardiac-related death. Severe PPM showed an adverse effect on long-term survival, and was an independent risk factor for cardiac-related death. In addition, patients with severe PPM showed less decreasing left ventricular mass index during follow-up. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pericardial tissue valves and Gore-Tex conduits as an alternative for right ventricular outflow tract replacement in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Bradley S; El-Zein, Chawki; Cuneo, Betina; Cava, Joseph P; Barth, Mary Jane; Ilbawi, Michel N

    2002-09-01

    There is still no perfect conduit for reconstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) in children. Homografts are not always available in the appropriate size, and degenerate in a few years. This study evaluates the pericardial valve with Gore-Tex conduit as an alternative for RVOT construction. From January 1, 1993, to September 30, 1999, a pericardial tissue valve was inserted in all patients undergoing RVOT reconstruction or pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) who were large enough to accommodate a tissue valve. In patients without a native main pulmonary artery, a new technique was used to construct an RV-PA conduit out of a flat sheet of Gore-Tex, as Dacron frequently leads to stenosis. Data were collected by retrospective review, follow-up echocardiograms, and assessment by a single cardiologist. There were 48 patients, 22 undergoing a PVR alone and 26 a RV-PA valved Gore-Tex conduit. Diagnosis included tetralogy of Fallot (n = 25); truncus arteriosis (n = 9); ventricular septal defect with PA (n = 5); DORV (n = 4); D-TGA with PS (n = 2); and 1 each IAA with sub AS, VSD with PI, and PS s/p Ross procedure. Patient age ranged from 3 to 33 years and 98% were reoperations. The valve sizes ranged from 19 to 33 mm and the median hospital length of stay was 4 days. There were 2 (4.2%) perioperative and 1 (2.1%) late deaths, none related to the valve or Gore-Tex conduit. At a follow-up of 15 to 86 months (mean 43 +/- 16 months), all remaining 45 patients are New York Heart Association class I, all valves are functional, and no patient has required valve or conduit replacement or revision; more importantly, echocardiogram revealed no significant valve or conduit stenosis (mean gradient 16 +/- 8 mm Hg) and no evidence of regurgitation or structural degeneration. A pericardial tissue valve and Gore-Tex conduit provides a reliable alternative for RVOT reconstruction in pediatric patients. It is readily available, molds in the limited retrosternal space, and

  7. Valve-Sparing Root Replacement Compared With Composite Valve Graft Procedures in Patients With Aortic Root Dilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounian, Maral; Rao, Vivek; Manlhiot, Cedric; Abraham, Nachum; David, Carolyn; Feindel, Christopher M; David, Tirone E

    2016-10-25

    Although aortic valve-sparing (AVS) operations are established alternatives to composite valve graft (CVG) procedures for patients with aortic root aneurysms, comparative long-term outcomes are lacking. This study sought to compare the results of patients undergoing AVS procedures with those undergoing CVG operations. From 1990 to 2010, a total of 616 patients age Marfan syndrome and lower rates of bicuspid aortic valve than those undergoing bio-CVG or m-CVG procedures. In-hospital mortality (0.3%) and stroke rate (1.3%) were similar among groups. After adjusting for clinical covariates, both bio-CVG and m-CVG procedures were associated with increased long-term major adverse valve-related events compared with patients undergoing AVS (hazard ratio [HR]: 3.4, p = 0.005; and HR: 5.2, p valve-related complications when compared with bio-CVG and m-CVG. AVS is the treatment of choice for young patients with aortic root aneurysm and normal or near-normal aortic cusps. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Systematic review and meta-analysis of surgical outcomes in Marfan patients undergoing aortic root surgery by composite-valve graft or valve sparing root replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Campbell D; Tian, David H; Wilson-Smith, Ashley; David, Tirone; Matalanis, George; Misfeld, Martin; Mastrobuoni, Stefano; El Khoury, Gebrine; Yan, Tristan D

    2017-11-01

    A major, life-limiting feature of Marfan syndrome (MFS) is the presence of aneurysmal disease. Cardiovascular intervention has dramatically improved the life expectancy of Marfan patients. Traditionally, the management of aortic root disease has been undertaken with composite-valve graft replacing the aortic valve and proximal aorta; more recently, valve sparing procedures have been developed to avoid the need for anticoagulation. This meta-analysis assesses the important surgical outcomes of the two surgical techniques. A systematic review and meta-analysis of 23 studies reporting the outcomes of aortic root surgery in Marfan patients with data extracted for outcomes of early and late mortality, thromboembolic events, late bleeding complications and surgical reintervention rates. The outcomes of 2,976 Marfan patients undergoing aortic root surgery were analysed, 1,624 patients were treated with composite valve graft (CVG) and 1,352 patients were treated with valve sparing root replacement (VSRR). When compared against CVG, VSRR was associated with reduced risk of thromboembolism (OR =0.32; 95% CI, 0.16-0.62, P=0.0008), late hemorrhagic complications (OR =0.18; 95% CI, 0.07-0.45; P=0.0003) and endocarditis (OR =0.27; 95% CI, 0.10-0.68; P=0.006). Importantly there was no significant difference in reintervention rates between VSRR and CVG (OR =0.89; 95% CI, 0.35-2.24; P=0.80). There is an increasing body of evidence that VSRR can be reliably performed in Marfan patients, resulting in a durable repair with no increased risk of re-operation compared to CVG, thus avoiding the need for systemic anticoagulation in selected patients.

  9. Gender-linked impact of epicardial adipose tissue volume in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgery or non-coronary valve surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulinu Maimaituxun

    Full Text Available Traditional and non-traditional risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD are different between men and women. Gender-linked impact of epicardial adipose tissue volume (EATV in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG remains unknown.Gender-linked impact of EATV, abdominal fat distribution and other traditional ASCVD risk factors were compared in 172 patients (men: 115; women: 57 who underwent CABG or non-coronary valvular surgery (non-CABG.In men, EATV, EATV index (EATV/body surface area and the markers of adiposity such as body mass index, waist circumference and visceral fat area were higher in the CABG group than in the non-CABG group. Traditional ASCVD risk factors were also prevalent in the CABG group. In women, EATV and EATV index were higher in the CABG group, but other adiposity markers were comparable between CABG and non-CABG groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that in men, CABG was determined by EATV Index and other ASCVD risk factors including hypertension, dyslipidemia, adiponectin, high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP and type 2 diabetes mellitus (Corrected R2 = 0.262, p < 0.0001, while in women, type 2 diabetes mellitus is a single strong predictor for CABG, excluding EATV Index (Corrected R2 = 0.266, p = 0.005.Our study found that multiple risk factors, including epicardial adipose tissue volume and traditional ASCVD factors are determinants for CABG in men, but type 2 diabetes mellitus was the sole determinant in women. Gender-specific disparities in risk factors of CABG prompt us to evaluate new diagnostic and treatment strategies and to seek underlying mechanisms.

  10. Gender-linked impact of epicardial adipose tissue volume in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgery or non-coronary valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimaituxun, Gulinu; Shimabukuro, Michio; Salim, Hotimah Masdan; Tabata, Minoru; Yuji, Daisuke; Morimoto, Yoshihisa; Akasaka, Takeshi; Matsuura, Tomomi; Yagi, Shusuke; Fukuda, Daiju; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Soeki, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Takaki; Tanaka, Masashi; Takanashi, Shuichiro; Sata, Masataka

    2017-01-01

    Traditional and non-traditional risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) are different between men and women. Gender-linked impact of epicardial adipose tissue volume (EATV) in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) remains unknown. Gender-linked impact of EATV, abdominal fat distribution and other traditional ASCVD risk factors were compared in 172 patients (men: 115; women: 57) who underwent CABG or non-coronary valvular surgery (non-CABG). In men, EATV, EATV index (EATV/body surface area) and the markers of adiposity such as body mass index, waist circumference and visceral fat area were higher in the CABG group than in the non-CABG group. Traditional ASCVD risk factors were also prevalent in the CABG group. In women, EATV and EATV index were higher in the CABG group, but other adiposity markers were comparable between CABG and non-CABG groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that in men, CABG was determined by EATV Index and other ASCVD risk factors including hypertension, dyslipidemia, adiponectin, high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (Corrected R2 = 0.262, p EATV Index (Corrected R2 = 0.266, p = 0.005). Our study found that multiple risk factors, including epicardial adipose tissue volume and traditional ASCVD factors are determinants for CABG in men, but type 2 diabetes mellitus was the sole determinant in women. Gender-specific disparities in risk factors of CABG prompt us to evaluate new diagnostic and treatment strategies and to seek underlying mechanisms.

  11. Outcomes of Patients With Severe Chronic Lung Disease Who Are Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Rakesh M; Gulack, Brian C; Brennan, J Matthew; Thourani, Vinod H; Dai, Dadi; Zajarias, Alan; Greason, Kevin L; Vassileva, Christina M; Mathew, Verghese; Nkomo, Vuyisile T; Mack, Michael J; Rihal, Charanjit S; Svensson, Lars G; Nishimura, Rick A; O'Gara, Patrick T; Holmes, David R

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we sought to determine the clinical outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) among patients with chronic lung disease (CLD) and to evaluate the safety of transaortic versus transapical alternate access approaches in patients with varying severities of CLD. Clinical records for patients undergoing TAVR from 2011 to 2014 in The Society of Thoracic Surgeons/American College of Cardiology Transcatheter Valve Therapy Registry were linked to Medicare hospital claims (n = 11,656). Clinical outcomes were evaluated across strata of CLD severity, and the risk-adjusted association between access route and post-TAVR mortality was determined among patients with severe CLD. In this cohort (median age, 84 years; 51.7% female), moderate to severe CLD was present in 27.7% (14.3%, moderate; 13.4%, severe). Compared with patients with no or mild CLD, patients with severe CLD had a higher rate of post-TAVR mortality to 1-year (32.3% versus 21.0%; adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.31 to 1.66), as did those with moderate CLD (25.5%; adjusted HR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.30). The adjusted rate of mortality was similar for transapical versus transaortic approaches to 1 year (adjusted HR, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.83 to 1.65). Moderate or severe CLD is associated with an increased risk of death to 1-year after TAVR, and among patients with severe CLD, the risk of death appears to be similar with either transapical or transaortic alternate-access approaches. Further study is necessary to understand strategies to mitigate risk associated with CLD and the long-term implications of these findings. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Closed-bore XMR (CBXMR) systems for aortic valve replacement: X-ray tube imaging performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracken, John A.; Komljenovic, Philip; Lillaney, Prasheel V.; Fahrig, Rebecca; Rowlands, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    A hybrid closed-bore x-ray/MRI system (CBXMR) is proposed to improve the safety and efficacy of percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedures. In this system, an x-ray C-arm will be positioned about 1 m from the entrance of a 1.5 T MRI scanner. The CBXMR system will harness the complementary strengths of both modalities to guide and deploy a bioprosthetic valve into the aortic annulus of the heart without coronary artery obstruction. A major challenge in constructing this system is ensuring proper operation of a rotating-anode x-ray tube in the MRI magnetic fringe field environment. The electron beam in the x-ray tube responsible for producing x rays can be deflected by the fringe field. However, the clinical impact of electron beam deflection in a magnetic field has not yet been studied. Here, the authors investigated changes in focal spot resolving power, field of view shift, and field of view truncation in x-ray images as a result of electron beam deflection. The authors found that in the fringe field acting on the x-ray tube at the clinical location for the x-ray C-arm (4 mT), focal spot size increased by only 2%, so the fringe field did not limit the resolving power of the x-ray system. The magnetic field also caused the field of view to shift by 3 mm. This shift must be corrected to avoid unnecessary primary radiation exposure to the patient and the staff in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. The fringe field was too weak to cause field of view truncation.

  13. Hemodynamic function of the standard St. Jude bileaflet disc valve has no clinical impact 10 years after aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Dorup, Inge; Emmertsen, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    in the survivors of a prospective series 10 years after AVR for aortic stenosis. DESIGN: Forty-three survivors aged 32-90 years from a prospective series attended a follow-up study with Doppler echo and radionuclide cardiography 10 years after AVR for aortic stenosis. Six patients with significant left sided valve...... to St. Jude valve geometric orifice area (GOA) indexed for either body surface area or left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (LVEDD). The gradients correlated directly with LVEDD but not with LVEF or LVMi. Eleven patients with hypertension had higher peak gradients (31+/-13 versus 22+/-8 mmHg, p

  14. Society of Thoracic Surgeons Risk Score Predicts Hospital Charges and Resource Utilization After Aortic Valve Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaoutakis, George J.; George, Timothy J.; Alejo, Diane E.; Merlo, Christian A.; Baumgartner, William A.; Cameron, Duke E.; Shah, Ashish S.

    2011-01-01

    Context The impact of Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) predicted mortality risk score on resource utilization after aortic valve replacement (AVR) has not been previously studied. Objective We hypothesize that increasing STS risk scores in patients having AVR are associated with greater hospital charges. Design, Setting, and Patients Clinical and financial data for patients undergoing AVR at a tertiary care, university hospital over a ten-year period (1/2000–12/2009) were retrospectively reviewed. The current STS formula (v2.61) for in-hospital mortality was used for all patients. After stratification into risk quartiles (Q), index admission hospital charges were compared across risk strata with Rank-Sum tests. Linear regression and Spearman’s coefficient assessed correlation and goodness of fit. Multivariable analysis assessed relative contributions of individual variables on overall charges. Main Outcome Measures Inflation-adjusted index hospitalization total charges Results 553 patients had AVR during the study period. Average predicted mortality was 2.9% (±3.4) and actual mortality was 3.4% for AVR. Median charges were greater in the upper Q of AVR patients [Q1–3,$39,949 (IQR32,708–51,323) vs Q4,$62,301 (IQR45,952–97,103), p=<0.01]. On univariate linear regression, there was a positive correlation between STS risk score and log-transformed charges (coefficient: 0.06, 95%CI 0.05–0.07, p<0.01). Spearman’s correlation R-value was 0.51. This positive correlation persisted in risk-adjusted multivariable linear regression. Each 1% increase in STS risk score was associated with an added $3,000 in hospital charges. Conclusions This study showed increasing STS risk score predicts greater charges after AVR. As competing therapies such as percutaneous valve replacement emerge to treat high risk patients, these results serve as a benchmark to compare resource utilization. PMID:21497834

  15. Outcomes of patients with chronic lung disease and severe aortic stenosis treated with transcatheter versus surgical aortic valve replacement or standard therapy: insights from the PARTNER trial (placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER Valve).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvir, Danny; Waksman, Ron; Barbash, Israel M; Kodali, Susheel K; Svensson, Lars G; Tuzcu, E Murat; Xu, Ke; Minha, Sa'ar; Alu, Maria C; Szeto, Wilson Y; Thourani, Vinod H; Makkar, Raj; Kapadia, Samir; Satler, Lowell F; Webb, John G; Leon, Martin B; Pichard, Augusto D

    2014-01-28

    The study aimed to evaluate the impact of chronic lung disease (CLD) on outcomes of severe aortic stenosis patients across all treatment modalities. Outcomes of patients with CLD undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) have not been systematically examined. All patients who underwent TAVR in the PARTNER (Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER Valve) trial, including the continued access registry (n = 2,553; 1,108 with CLD), were evaluated according to CLD clinical severity. Additionally, outcomes of CLD patients included in the randomization arms of the PARTNER trial were compared: Cohort A patients (high-risk operable) treated by either TAVR (n = 149) or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR); (n = 138); and Cohort B patients (inoperable) treated by either TAVR (n = 72) or standard therapy only (n = 95). Among all TAVR-treated patients, at 1-year follow-up, patients with CLD had higher mortality than those without it (23.4% vs. 19.6%, p = 0.02). Baseline characteristics of CLD patients who underwent TAVR were similar to respective controls. In Cohort A, 2-year all-cause death rates were similar (TAVR 35.2% and SAVR 33.6%, p = 0.92), whereas in Cohort B, the death rate was lower after TAVR (52.0% vs. 69.6% after standard therapy only, p = 0.04). Independent predictors for mortality in CLD patients undergoing TAVR included poor mobility (6-min walk test CLD patients undergoing TAVR have worse outcomes than patients without CLD, TAVR is better in these patients than standard therapy and is similar to SAVR. Although patients with CLD undergoing TAVR had worse outcomes than patients without CLD, TAVR performed better in these patients than standard therapy and was similar to SAVR. However, CLD patients who were either poorly mobile or oxygen-dependent had poor outcomes. (THE PARTNER TRIAL: Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER Valve Trial; NCT00530894). Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  16. Impact of Aortic Valve Replacement on Left Ventricular Remodeling in Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis and Severe Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abderrahmane Bakkali

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of aortic valve replacement on left ventricular function and remodeling among patients with severe aortic stenosis and severe left ventricular dysfunction. Methods: In this retrospective bicentric study extended over a 15-year period, 61 consecutive patients underwent isolated AVR for severe AS associated to reduced LV function. The mean age was 58.21 ± 12.50 years and 83.60 % were men. 70.50% of patients were in class III or IV NYHA. The mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF was 32.9 ± 5.6.The mean LVEDD and LVESD were respectively 63.6 ± 9.2 and 50.2 ± 8.8 mm. The mean calculated logistic EuroScore was 12.2 ±4.5. Results: The hospital mortality was 11.5%. Morbidity was marked mainly by low output syndrome in 40.8% of cases. After a median follow-up of 38 months we have recorded 3 deaths. Almost all survivors were in class I and II of NYHA. The mean LV end-diastolic and end-systolic diameters decreased significantly at late postoperative stage. The mean LV ejection fraction increased significantly from 32.9 ± 5.6 to 38.2 ± 9.3 and to 50.3 ± 9.6 in early and late postoperative stages, respectively. Multivariate linear regression analysis found that increased early postoperative LVEF (β= 0.44, 95% CI [0.14; 0.75], p=0.006 and low mean transprosthesis gradient (β=-0.72, 95% CI [-1.42; -0.02], p= 0.04 were the independent predictors of left ventricular systolic function recovery. Conclusion: Patients with aortic valve stenosis and impaired LV systolic function benefited from AVR as regard improvement of LV function parameters and regression of the LV diameters .This improvement depends mainly on early postoperative LVEF and mean transprosthesis gradient.

  17. Global longitudinal strain and its dynamics after replacement of aortal valve in patients with severe aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Ponych

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim – to determine factors that may influence the global longitudinal strain (GLS and its dynamics after replacement aortic valve (RAV in patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS. Materials and methods. In a one-center prospective study, 30 patients with severe AS were sequentially screened for RAV surgery. Among them there were 16 (53,3 % men and 14 (46,7 % women. The median age was 63 (range from 46 to 77, quartiles 57–69 years. All patients underwent clinical and instrumental study, including transthoracic echocardiography (TTE and coronary angiography. In the early postoperative period and 6–12 months after surgery, all patients performed a repeat TTE according to a standard protocol that included an assessment of the GLS. GLS data and their dynamics was performed in the groups of patients with preserved (n = 18 and low (n = 12 left ventricular ejection fraction (LV EF. Results. In patients with preserved LV EF, the median of the preoperative GLS was –12 % (in the quartiles from –15 to –11 %, postoperative GLS –11 % (quartiles from –11 to –9 %. In patients with reduced LV EF, the median of the preoperative GLS was –6 % (from –8.5 to –4 % for quartiles, –8.5 % for postoperative GLS (from –10 to –6 % for quartiles (p < 0.001 for comparison of baseline and p < 0.05 relative to differences in dynamics of GLS in comparable groups. In the examined patients, significant correlations were found between baseline GLS with functional class of heart failure, concomitant tricuspid insufficiency, atrial fibrillation, duration of QRS complex, LV EF, end-diastolic, endsystolic volume index (EDV, ESV and volume left atrium (LA, left ventricular myocardial mass index, aortic valve orifice area index, E/A ratio, and Thei index. In turn, the positive dynamics of GLS significantly depended on the initial functional class of heart failure, the stage of arterial hypertension, the degree of tricuspid insufficiency, LV EF, the index

  18. Incidence, Prognostic Impact, and Predictive Factors of Readmission for Heart Failure After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Eric; Doutriaux, Maxime; Bettinger, Nicolas; Tron, Christophe; Fauvel, Charles; Bauer, Fabrice; Dacher, Jean-Nicolas; Bouhzam, Najime; Litzler, Pierre-Yves; Cribier, Alain; Eltchaninoff, Hélène

    2017-12-11

    The aim of this study was to assess the incidence, prognostic impact, and predictive factors of readmission for congestive heart failure (CHF) in patients with severe aortic stenosis treated by transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). TAVR is indicated in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis in whom surgery is considered high risk or is contraindicated. Readmission for CHF after TAVR remains a challenge, and data on prognostic and predictive factors are lacking. All patients who underwent TAVR from January 2010 to December 2014 were included. Follow-up was achieved for at least 1 year and included clinical and echocardiographic data. Readmission for CHF was analyzed retrospectively. This study included 546 patients, 534 (97.8%) of whom were implanted with balloon-expandable valves preferentially via the transfemoral approach in 87.8% of cases. After 1 year, 285 patients (52.2%) had been readmitted at least once, 132 (24.1%) for CHF. Patients readmitted for CHF had an increased risk for death (p < 0.0001) and cardiac death (p < 0.0001) compared with those not readmitted for CHF. On multivariate analysis, aortic mean gradient (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.79 to 0.99; p = 0.03), post-procedural blood transfusion (HR: 2.27; 95% CI: 1.13 to 5.56; p = 0.009), severe post-procedural pulmonary hypertension (HR: 1.04; 95% CI: 1.00 to 1.07; p < 0.0001), and left atrial diameter (HR: 1.47; 95% CI: 1.08 to 2.01; p = 0.02) were independently associated with CHF readmission at 1 year. Readmission for CHF after TAVR was frequent and was strongly associated with 1-year mortality. Low gradient, persistent pulmonary hypertension, left atrial dilatation, and transfusions were predictive of readmission for CHF. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Trial design: Rivaroxaban for the prevention of major cardiovascular events after transcatheter aortic valve replacement: Rationale and design of the GALILEO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windecker, Stephan; Tijssen, Jan; Giustino, Gennaro; Guimarães, Ana H C; Mehran, Roxana; Valgimigli, Marco; Vranckx, Pascal; Welsh, Robert C; Baber, Usman; van Es, Gerrit-Anne; Wildgoose, Peter; Volkl, Albert A; Zazula, Ana; Thomitzek, Karen; Hemmrich, Melanie; Dangas, George D

    2017-02-01

    Optimal antithrombotic treatment after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is unknown and determined empirically. The direct factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban may potentially reduce TAVR-related thrombotic complications and premature valve failure. GALILEO is an international, randomized, open-label, event-driven, phase III trial in more than 1,520 patients without an indication for oral anticoagulation who underwent a successful TAVR (ClinicalTrials.govNCT02556203). Patients are randomized (1:1 ratio), 1 to 7days after a successful TAVR, to either a rivaroxaban-based strategy or an antiplatelet-based strategy. In the experimental arm, subjects receive rivaroxaban (10mg once daily [OD]) plus acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, 75-100mg OD) for 90days followed by rivaroxaban alone. In the control arm, subjects receive clopidogrel (75mg OD) plus ASA (as above) for 90days followed by ASA alone. In case new-onset atrial fibrillation occurs after randomization, full oral anticoagulation will be implemented with maintenance of the original treatment assignment. The primary efficacy end point is the composite of all-cause death, stroke, myocardial infarction, symptomatic valve thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, deep venous thrombosis, and systemic embolism. The primary safety end point is the composite of life-threatening, disabling, and major bleeding, according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium definitions. GALILEO will test the hypothesis that a rivaroxaban-based antithrombotic strategy reduces the risk of thromboembolic complications post-TAVR with an acceptable risk of bleeding compared with the currently recommended antiplatelet therapy-based strategy in subjects without need of chronic oral anticoagulation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Three-dimensional thoracic aorta principal strain analysis from routine ECG-gated computerized tomography: feasibility in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satriano, Alessandro; Guenther, Zachary; White, James A; Merchant, Naeem; Di Martino, Elena S; Al-Qoofi, Faisal; Lydell, Carmen P; Fine, Nowell M

    2018-05-02

    Functional impairment of the aorta is a recognized complication of aortic and aortic valve disease. Aortic strain measurement provides effective quantification of mechanical aortic function, and 3-dimenional (3D) approaches may be desirable for serial evaluation. Computerized tomographic angiography (CTA) is routinely performed for various clinical indications, and offers the unique potential to study 3D aortic deformation. We sought to investigate the feasibility of performing 3D aortic strain analysis in a candidate population of patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Twenty-one patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (AS) referred for TAVR underwent ECG-gated CTA and echocardiography. CTA images were analyzed using a 3D feature-tracking based technique to construct a dynamic aortic mesh model to perform peak principal strain amplitude (PPSA) analysis. Segmental strain values were correlated against clinical, hemodynamic and echocardiographic variables. Reproducibility analysis was performed. The mean patient age was 81±6 years. Mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 52±14%, aortic valve area (AVA) 0.6±0.3 cm 2 and mean AS pressure gradient (MG) 44±11 mmHg. CTA-based 3D PPSA analysis was feasible in all subjects. Mean PPSA values for the global thoracic aorta, ascending aorta, aortic arch and descending aorta segments were 6.5±3.0, 10.2±6.0, 6.1±2.9 and 3.3±1.7%, respectively. 3D PSSA values demonstrated significantly more impairment with measures of worsening AS severity, including AVA and MG for the global thoracic aorta and ascending segment (panalysis is clinically feasible from routine ECG-gated CTA. Appropriate reductions in PSSA were identified with increasing AS hemodynamic severity. Expanded study of 3D aortic PSSA for patients with various forms of aortic disease is warranted.

  1. Low contrast medium-volume third-generation dual-source computed tomography angiography for transcatheter aortic valve replacement planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felmly, Lloyd M. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Charleston, SC (United States); De Cecco, Carlo N.; Varga-Szemes, Akos; McQuiston, Andrew D. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Schoepf, U.J.; Litwin, Sheldon E.; Bayer, Richard R. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Charleston, SC (United States); Mangold, Stefanie [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University Hospital of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Vogl, Thomas J. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Wichmann, Julian L. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    To investigate feasibility, image quality and safety of low-tube-voltage, low-contrast-volume comprehensive cardiac and aortoiliac CT angiography (CTA) for planning transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Forty consecutive TAVR candidates prospectively underwent combined CTA of the aortic root and vascular access route (270 mgI/ml iodixanol). Patients were assigned to group A (second-generation dual-source CT [DSCT], 100 kV, 60 ml contrast, 4.0 ml/s flow rate) or group B (third-generation DSCT, 70 kV, 40 ml contrast, 2.5 ml/s flow rate). Vascular attenuation, noise, signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were compared. Subjective image quality was assessed by two observers. Estimated glomerular filtration (eGFR) at CTA and follow-up were measured. Besides a higher body-mass-index in group B (24.8±3.8 kg/m{sup 2} vs. 28.1±5.4 kg/m{sup 2}, P=0.0339), patient characteristics between groups were similar (P≥0.0922). Aortoiliac SNR (P=0.0003) was higher in group B. Cardiac SNR (P=0.0003) and CNR (P=0.0181) were higher in group A. Subjective image quality was similar (P≥0.213) except for aortoiliac image noise (4.42 vs. 4.12, P=0.0374). TAVR-planning measurements were successfully obtained in all patients. There were no significant changes in eGFR among and between groups during follow-up (P≥0.302). TAVR candidates can be safely and effectively evaluated by a comprehensive CTA protocol with low contrast volume using low-tube-voltage acquisition. (orig.)

  2. Effect of prophylactic non-invasive mechanical ventilation on functional capacity after heart valve replacement: a clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaro Afrânio de Araújo-Filho

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: During cardiac surgery, several factors contribute to the development of postoperative pulmonary complications. Non-invasive ventilation is a promising therapeutic tool for improving the functionality of this type of patient. The aim of this study is to evaluate the functional capacity and length of stay of patients in a nosocomial intensive care unit who underwent prophylactic non-invasive ventilation after heart valve replacement. METHOD: The study was a controlled clinical trial, comprising 50 individuals of both sexes who were allocated by randomization into two groups with 25 patients in each group: the control group and experimental group. After surgery, the patients were transferred to the intensive care unit and then participated in standard physical therapy, which was provided to the experimental group after 3 applications of non-invasive ventilation within the first 26 hours after extubation. For non-invasive ventilation, the positive pressure was 10 cm H2O, with a duration of 1 hour. The evaluation was performed on the 7th postoperative day/discharge and included a 6-minute walk test. The intensive care unit and hospitalization times were monitored in both groups. Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials (REBeC: RBR number 8bxdd3. RESULTS: Analysis of the 6-minute walk test showed that the control group walked an average distance of 264.34±76 meters and the experimental group walked an average distance of 334.07±71 meters (p=0.002. The intensive care unit and hospitalization times did not differ between the groups. CONCLUSION: Non-invasive ventilation as a therapeutic resource was effective toward improving functionality; however, non-invasive ventilation did not influence the intensive care unit or hospitalization times of the studied cardiac patients.

  3. Low contrast medium-volume third-generation dual-source computed tomography angiography for transcatheter aortic valve replacement planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felmly, Lloyd M.; De Cecco, Carlo N.; Varga-Szemes, Akos; McQuiston, Andrew D.; Schoepf, U.J.; Litwin, Sheldon E.; Bayer, Richard R.; Mangold, Stefanie; Vogl, Thomas J.; Wichmann, Julian L.

    2017-01-01

    To investigate feasibility, image quality and safety of low-tube-voltage, low-contrast-volume comprehensive cardiac and aortoiliac CT angiography (CTA) for planning transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Forty consecutive TAVR candidates prospectively underwent combined CTA of the aortic root and vascular access route (270 mgI/ml iodixanol). Patients were assigned to group A (second-generation dual-source CT [DSCT], 100 kV, 60 ml contrast, 4.0 ml/s flow rate) or group B (third-generation DSCT, 70 kV, 40 ml contrast, 2.5 ml/s flow rate). Vascular attenuation, noise, signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were compared. Subjective image quality was assessed by two observers. Estimated glomerular filtration (eGFR) at CTA and follow-up were measured. Besides a higher body-mass-index in group B (24.8±3.8 kg/m 2 vs. 28.1±5.4 kg/m 2 , P=0.0339), patient characteristics between groups were similar (P≥0.0922). Aortoiliac SNR (P=0.0003) was higher in group B. Cardiac SNR (P=0.0003) and CNR (P=0.0181) were higher in group A. Subjective image quality was similar (P≥0.213) except for aortoiliac image noise (4.42 vs. 4.12, P=0.0374). TAVR-planning measurements were successfully obtained in all patients. There were no significant changes in eGFR among and between groups during follow-up (P≥0.302). TAVR candidates can be safely and effectively evaluated by a comprehensive CTA protocol with low contrast volume using low-tube-voltage acquisition. (orig.)

  4. Optimal thromboprophylaxis following bioprosthetic aortic valve replacement: still a matter of debate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mydin, Muhammad I; Dimitrakakis, Georgios; Younis, Jenan; Nowell, Justin; Athanasiou, Thanos; Kourliouros, Antonios

    2012-07-01

    Optimal thromboprophylaxis following bioprosthetic aortic valve replacement (AVR) remains controversial. The main objective, which is the effective prevention of central nervous or peripheral embolic events, especially in the early postoperative period, will have to be weighed against the haemorrhagic risk that is associated with the utilization of different antithrombotic regimes. Most governing bodies in cardiovascular medicine have issued recommendations on thromboprophylaxis after the surgical implantation of aortic bioprostheses. However, the level of evidence to support these recommendations remains low, largely due to the inherent limitations of conducting appropriately randomized and adequately powered clinical research in this area. It is apparent from the recent surveys and large registries that there is a great variability in antithrombotic practice at an institutional or individual-clinician level reflecting this controversy and the lack of robust evidence. While organizational, financial or conceptual limitations could hinder the conduct and availability of conclusive research on optimal thromboprophylaxis after aortic bioprosthesis, it is imperative that all evidence is presented in a systematic way in order to assist the decision-making for the modern clinician. In this review, we provide an outline of the current recommendations for thromboprophylaxis, followed by a comprehensive and analytical presentation of all comparative studies examining anticoagulation vs. antiplatelet therapy after bioprosthetic AVR.

  5. Low permanent pacemaker rates following Lotus device implantation for transcatheter aortic valve replacement due to modified implantation protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krackhardt, Florian; Kherad, Behrouz; Krisper, Maximilian; Pieske, Burkert; Laule, Michael; Tschöpe, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Conduction disturbances requiring permanent pacemaker implantation following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) are a common problem. Pacemaker implantation rates after TAVR appear to be higher compared to conventional aortic valve replacement. The aim of this study was to analyze whether a high annulus implantation conveys the benefit of a decreased rate of permanent pacemaker implantation while being safe and successful according to Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 (VARC2)-criteria. A total of 23 patients with symptomatic severe aortic valve stenosis, an aortic annulus of 19-27 mm and at high risk for surgery were treated with the Lotus valve. In all patients the valve was implanted in a high annulus position via femoral access. The primary device performance endpoint was VARC2-defined device success after 30 days and the primary safety endpoint was the need for permanent pacemaker implantation. The mean age was 73.23 ± 7.65 years, 46% were female, 38% were New York Heart Association class III/IV at baseline. Thirty-day follow-up data were available for all patients. The VARC2-defined device success rate after 30 days was 22/23 (96%). 2/21 (10%) patients required a newly implanted pacemaker due to 3rd degree atrioventricular block. 25% of the patients developed a new left bundle branch block after valvuloplasty or device implantation. 21 of the 23 patients (96%) had no other signs of conduction disturbances after 30 days. The approach of the modified implantation technique of Lotus TAVR device was safe and effective. The incidence of need for a permanent pacemaker following TAVR could be significantly reduced due to adopted implantation protocol.

  6. International normalized ratio self-management lowers the risk of thromboembolic events after prosthetic heart valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitz, Thomas; Schenk, Soren; Fritzsche, Dirk; Bairaktaris, Andreas; Wagner, Otto; Koertke, Heinrich; Koerfer, Reiner

    2008-03-01

    Although prosthetic valves are durable and easy to implant, the need for lifetime warfarin-based anticoagulation restricts their exclusive usage. We investigated if anticoagulation self-management improves outcome in a single-center series. Between 1994 and 1998, 765 patients with prosthetic valve replacements were prospectively enrolled and randomized to receive conventional anticoagulation management by their primary physician (group 1, n = 295) or to pursue anticoagulation self-management (group 2, n = 470). A study head office was implemented to coordinate and monitor anticoagulation protocols, international normalized ratios (INR), and adverse events. Patients were instructed on how to obtain and test their own blood samples and to adjust warfarin dosages according to the measured INR (target range, 2.5 to 4). Mean INR values were slightly yet significantly smaller in group 1 than in group 2 (2.8 +/- 0.7 vs 3.0 +/- .6, p events were similar in both groups. Time-related multivariate analysis identified INR self-management and higher INR as independent predictors for better outcome. Anticoagulation self-management can improve INR profiles up to 2 years after prosthetic valve replacement and reduce adverse events. Current indications of prosthetic rather than biologic valve implantations may be extended if the benefit of INR self-management is shown by future studies with longer follow-up.

  7. Clinical efficacy of transcatheter aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis in high-risk patients: the PREVAIL JAPAN trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawa, Yoshiki; Takayama, Morimasa; Mitsudo, Kazuaki; Nanto, Shinsuke; Takanashi, Shuichiro; Komiya, Tatsuhiko; Kuratani, Toru; Tobaru, Tetsuya; Goto, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is suggested to be less invasive and/or equally effective in comparison to conventional aortic valve replacement for high-risk symptomatic aortic stenosis patients. We herein report the initial results of a pivotal clinical trial of TAVR in Japan (the PREVAIL JAPAN). Sixty-four aortic stenosis patients (mean age 84.3 ± 6.1 years) not suitable for surgery were enrolled at three centers in Japan, with a primary composite endpoint of the 6-month post-procedure improvements in the aortic valve area and New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classification. A transfemoral approach was used in 37 patients and a transapical approach was used in 27. The device success rate was 91.9 %. After 30 days and 6 months, the rates of mortality from any cause were 8.1 and 11.3 %, respectively. At 6 months, symptomatic stroke was found in 3.1 % of the patients, and silent infarction in 7.8 %. The aortic valve area and mean pressure gradient were significantly improved over time with both approaches (p < 0.001). At 6 months, the NYHA functional classification based on a conventional physician's assessment was improved in 87.9 % of the patients. We found results that were equivalent to those in other major TAVR trials, such as an acceptable 30-day survival (91.9 %), suggesting that balloon-expandable TAVR is effective for small Japanese AS patients classified as high-risk or inoperable.

  8. [A re-operative case of bentall operation and aortic arch replacement using a stent graft for a Marfan syndrome, post sternum turnover and post mitral valve replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, H; Aomi, S; Noji, S; Uwabe, K; Kihara, S; Kurihara, H; Koyanagi, H

    2001-09-01

    A 36-year-old male with Marfan syndrome succesfully underwent Bentall operation and aortic arch replacement using a stent graft as an elephant trunk. He had received MVR with sternum turn over 14 years previously. Median sternotomy was performed. Under circulatory arrest with rertograde cerebral perfusion we performed Bentall operation and aortic arch replacement using a stent graft. The sternum was cured well. Retractive breathing was not detected. This surgical procedure was effective for cardiovascular disease with Marfan syndrome.

  9. Practical considerations for optimizing cardiac computed tomography protocols for comprehensive acquisition prior to transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalique, Omar K; Pulerwitz, Todd C; Halliburton, Sandra S; Kodali, Susheel K; Hahn, Rebecca T; Nazif, Tamim M; Vahl, Torsten P; George, Isaac; Leon, Martin B; D'Souza, Belinda; Einstein, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is performed frequently in patients with severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis who are at high risk or inoperable for open surgical aortic valve replacement. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) has become the gold standard imaging modality for pre-TAVR cardiac anatomic and vascular access assessment. Traditionally, cardiac CTA has been most frequently used for assessment of coronary artery stenosis, and scanning protocols have generally been tailored for this purpose. Pre-TAVR CTA has different goals than coronary CTA and the high prevalence of chronic kidney disease in the TAVR patient population creates a particular need to optimize protocols for a reduction in iodinated contrast volume. This document reviews details which allow the physician to tailor CTA examinations to maximize image quality and minimize harm, while factoring in multiple patient and scanner variables which must be considered in customizing a pre-TAVR protocol. Copyright © 2016 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mitral valve replacement complicated by iatrogenic left ventricular outflow obstruction and paravalvular leak: case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Justin Z; Tey, Kai R; Mizyed, Ahmad; Hennemeyer, Charles T; Janardhanan, Rajesh; Lotun, Kapildeo

    2015-10-09

    Left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction and paravalvular leak (PVL) are relatively uncommon, but are serious complications of prosthetic valve replacement. We present a case that displays the unique therapeutic challenges of treating a patient who developed both LVOT obstruction and mitral PVL after undergoing surgical aortic and mitral valve replacement (MVR). We also describe the use of alcohol septal ablation and albumin-glutaraldehyde (BioGlue) for septal ablation to percutaneously treat the patient's LVOT obstruction, followed by use of an Amplatzer vascular plug for percutaneous closure of an antero-medial mitral PVL associated with severe regurgitation. Percutaneous interventional management of these entities may be considered as an initial therapeutic option, especially in high-risk patients with significant morbidity and mortality of repeat surgical operations.

  11. Approaches for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayak Nagaraja

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Retrograde transfemoral and antegrade transapical approaches are mostly used for transcatheter aortic valve replacement. This meta-analysis is designed to assess the performance of the transfemoral and transapical approach. Methods: A systematic search was conducted using MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, Current Contents Connect, Cochrane library, Google Scholar, Science Direct, and Web of Science. Original data was abstracted from each study and used to calculate a pooled odd ratio (OR and 95% confidence interval (95% CI. Results: Only 14 studies comprising of 6965 patients met full criteria for analysis. The mean duration of hospitalisation and procedure duration were similar among the 2 cohorts. The 30 days mortality (OR: 0.70, 95% CI: 0.531-0.921, the need for haemodialysis (OR: 0.29, 95% CI: 0.157-0.525 and one year mortality (OR: 0.72, 95% CI: 0.564-0.927 were lower in the transfemoral cohort. The frequency of stroke at 30 days and new pacemaker insertion were comparable. However, the prevalence of vascular complication (OR: 2.88, 95% CI: 1.821-4.563 was higher in the transfemoral group. The incidence of aortic regurgitation (OR: 1.25, 95% CI: 0.844-1.855, valve embolization (OR: 2.00, 95% CI: 0.622-6.448, major bleeding incidence rates (OR:0.77, 95% CI: 0.488-1.225, coronary obstruction (OR:0.74, 95% CI:0.234-2.311, myocardial infarction (OR: 0.75, 95% CI: 0.28-2.00, conversion to open cardiac surgery (OR: 0.29, 95% CI: 0.062-1.343 and successful implantation (OR: 0.67, 95% CI: 0.394-1.149 were comparable in the two cohorts. Conclusions: In the absence of a randomized controlled study, the ability to discriminate true differences is challenging. Even though the complications rate was much lower in transfemoral group as compared to transapical group, the current literature does not support a clear superiority of one approach to TAVR over the other.

  12. Comparison of four contemporary risk models at predicting mortality after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tom Kai Ming; Choi, David H M; Stewart, Ralph; Gamble, Greg; Haydock, David; Ruygrok, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Risk stratification for aortic valve replacement (AVR) is desirable given the increased demand for intervention and the introduction of transcatheter aortic valve implantation. We compared the prognostic utility of the European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE), EuroSCORE II, Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) score, and an Australasian model (Aus-AVR score) for AVR. We retrospectively calculated the 4 risk scores for patients undergoing isolated AVR at Auckland City Hospital from 2005 to 2012 and assessed their discrimination and calibration for short- and long-term mortality. A total of 620 patients were followed up for 3.8 ± 2.4 years, with an operative mortality of 2.9% (n = 18). The mean EuroSCORE, EuroSCORE II, STS score, and Aus-AVR score was 8.7% ± 8.3%, 3.8% ± 4.7%, 2.8% ± 2.7%, and 3.2% ± 4.8%, respectively. The corresponding C-statistics for operative mortality were 0.752 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.652-0.852), 0.711 (95% CI, 0.607-0.815), 0.716 (95% CI, 0.593-0.837), and 0.684 (95% CI, 0.557-0.811). The corresponding Hosmer-Lemeshow test P and chi-square values for calibration were .007 and 21.1, .125 and 12.6, .753 and 5.0, and .468 and 7.7. The corresponding Brier scores were 0.0348, 0.0278, 0.0276, and 0.0294. Independent predictors of operative mortality included critical preoperative state, atrial fibrillation, extracardiac arteriopathy, and mitral stenosis. The log-rank test P values were all <.001 for mortality during follow-up for all 4 scores, stratified by quintile. All 4 risk scores discriminated operative mortality after isolated AVR. The EuroSCORE had poor calibration, overestimating operative mortality, although the other 3 scores fitted well with contemporary outcomes. The STS score was the best calibrated in the highest quintile of operative risk. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical and Echocardiographic Outcomes Following Permanent Pacemaker Implantation After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Meta-Analysis and Meta-Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohananey, Divyanshu; Jobanputra, Yash; Kumar, Arnav; Krishnaswamy, Amar; Mick, Stephanie; White, Jonathon M; Kapadia, Samir R

    2017-07-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement has become the procedure of choice for inoperable, high-risk, and many intermediate-risk patients with aortic stenosis. Conduction abnormalities are a common finding after transcatheter aortic valve replacement and often result in permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation. Data pertaining to the clinical impact of PPM implantation are controversial. We used meta-analysis techniques to summarize the effect of PPM implantation on clinical and echocardiographic outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve replacement. Data were summarized as Mantel-Haenszel relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for dichotomous variables and as standardized mean difference and 95% CI for continuous variables We used the Higgins I 2 statistic to evaluate heterogeneity. We found that patients with and without PPM have similar all-cause mortality (RR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.70-1.03), cardiovascular mortality (RR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.59-1.18), myocardial infarction (RR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.20-1.11), and stroke (RR, 1.26; 95% CI, 0.70-2.26) at 30 days. The groups were also comparable in all-cause mortality (RR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.92-1.16), cardiovascular mortality (RR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.39-1.24), myocardial infarction (RR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.30-1.13), and stroke (RR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.47-1.04) at 1 year. We observed that the improvement in left ventricular ejection fraction was significantly greater in the patients without PPM (standardized mean difference, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.12-0.32). PPM implantation is not associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, stroke, or myocardial infarction both at short- and long-term follow-up. However, PPM is associated with impaired left ventricular ejection fraction recovery post-transcatheter aortic valve replacement. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Optimal Implantation Depth and Adherence to Guidelines on Permanent Pacing to Improve the Results of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With the Medtronic CoreValve System: The CoreValve Prospective, International, Post-Market ADVANCE-II Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petronio, Anna S; Sinning, Jan-Malte; Van Mieghem, Nicolas; Zucchelli, Giulio; Nickenig, Georg; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Bosmans, Johan; Bedogni, Francesco; Branny, Marian; Stangl, Karl; Kovac, Jan; Schiltgen, Molly; Kraus, Stacia; de Jaegere, Peter

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the CoreValve prospective, international, post-market ADVANCE-II study was to define the rates of conduction disturbances and permanent pacemaker implantation (PPI) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement with the Medtronic CoreValve System (Minneapolis, Minnesota) using optimized implantation techniques and application of international guidelines on cardiac pacing. Conduction disturbances are a frequent complication of transcatheter aortic valve replacement. The rates of PPI in the published reports vary according to bioprosthesis type and the indications for PPI. The primary endpoint was the 30-day incidence of PPI with Class I/II indications when the Medtronic CoreValve System was implanted at an optimal depth (≤6 mm below the aortic annulus). The timing and resolution of all new-onset conduction disturbances were analyzed. A total of 194 patients were treated. The overall rate of PPI for Class I/II indications was 18.2%. An optimal depth was reached in 43.2% of patients, with a nonsignificantly lower incidence of PPI in patients with depths ≤6 mm, compared with those with deeper implants (13.3% vs. 21.1%; p = 0.14). In a paired analysis, new-onset left bundle branch block and first-degree atrioventricular block occurred in 45.4% and 39.0% of patients, respectively, and resolved spontaneously within 30 days in 43.2% and 73.9%, respectively. In patients with new PPI, the rate of intrinsic sinus rhythm increased from 25.9% at 7 days to 59.3% at 30 days (p = 0.004). Optimal Medtronic CoreValve System deployment and adherence to international guidelines on cardiac pacing are associated with a lower rate of new PPI after transcatheter aortic valve replacement, compared with results reported in previous studies. (CoreValve Advance-II Study: Prospective International Post-Market Study [ADVANCE II]; NCT01624870). Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Intra-operative Vector Flow Imaging Using Ultrasound of the Ascending Aorta among 40 Patients with Normal, Stenotic and Replaced Aortic Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse; Kjaergaard, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Stenosis of the aortic valve gives rise to more complex blood flows with increased velocities. The angleindependent vector flow ultrasound technique transverse oscillation was employed intra-operatively on the ascending aorta of (I) 20 patients with a healthy aortic valve and 20 patients with aor...... replacement corrects some of these changes. Transverse oscillation may be useful for assessment of aortic stenosis and optimization of valve surgery. (E-mail: lindskov@gmail.com) 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology...... with aortic stenosis before (IIa) and after (IIb) valve replacement. The results indicate that aortic stenosis increased flow complexity (p , 0.0001), induced systolic backflow (p , 0.003) and reduced systolic jet width (p , 0.0001). After valve replacement, the systolic backflow and jet width were normalized...

  16. Effect of permanent pacemaker on mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engborg, Jonathan; Riechel-Sarup, Casper; Gerke, Oke

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an established treatment for high-grade aortic valve stenosis in patients found unfit for open heart surgery. The method may cause cardiac conduction disorders requiring permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation, and the long-term effect...

  17. Patient experiences of recovery after heart valve replacement: suffering weakness, struggling to resume normality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kikkenborg Berg, Selina; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Pedersen, Birthe D.

    2013-01-01

    Heart valve disease is becoming a public health problem due to increasing life expectancy and new treatment methods. Patients are at risk of developing depression, anxiety or post-traumatic stress disorder after heart valve surgery. To better plan proper care, describing and understanding patients...

  18. Association Between Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement and Subsequent Infective Endocarditis and In-Hospital Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regueiro, Ander; Linke, Axel; Latib, Azeem; Ihlemann, Nikolaj; Urena, Marina; Walther, Thomas; Husser, Oliver; Herrmann, Howard C; Nombela-Franco, Luis; Cheema, Asim N; Le Breton, Hervé; Stortecky, Stefan; Kapadia, Samir; Bartorelli, Antonio L; Sinning, Jan Malte; Amat-Santos, Ignacio; Munoz-Garcia, Antonio; Lerakis, Stamatios; Gutiérrez-Ibanes, Enrique; Abdel-Wahab, Mohamed; Tchetche, Didier; Testa, Luca; Eltchaninoff, Helene; Livi, Ugolino; Castillo, Juan Carlos; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Webb, John G; Barbanti, Marco; Kodali, Susheel; de Brito, Fabio S; Ribeiro, Henrique B; Miceli, Antonio; Fiorina, Claudia; Dato, Guglielmo Mario Actis; Rosato, Francesco; Serra, Vicenç; Masson, Jean-Bernard; Wijeysundera, Harindra C; Mangione, Jose A; Ferreira, Maria-Cristina; Lima, Valter C; Carvalho, Luiz A; Abizaid, Alexandre; Marino, Marcos A; Esteves, Vinicius; Andrea, Julio C M; Giannini, Francesco; Messika-Zeitoun, David; Himbert, Dominique; Kim, Won-Keun; Pellegrini, Costanza; Auffret, Vincent; Nietlispach, Fabian; Pilgrim, Thomas; Durand, Eric; Lisko, John; Makkar, Raj R; Lemos, Pedro A; Leon, Martin B; Puri, Rishi; San Roman, Alberto; Vahanian, Alec; Søndergaard, Lars; Mangner, Norman; Rodés-Cabau, Josep

    2016-09-13

    Limited data exist on clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients who had infective endocarditis after undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). To determine the associated factors, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of patients who had infective endocarditis after TAVR. The Infectious Endocarditis after TAVR International Registry included patients with definite infective endocarditis after TAVR from 47 centers from Europe, North America, and South America between June 2005 and October 2015. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement for incidence of infective endocarditis and infective endocarditis for in-hospital mortality. Infective endocarditis and in-hospital mortality after infective endocarditis. A total of 250 cases of infective endocarditis occurred in 20 006 patients after TAVR (incidence, 1.1% per person-year; 95% CI, 1.1%-1.4%; median age, 80 years; 64% men). Median time from TAVR to infective endocarditis was 5.3 months (interquartile range [IQR], 1.5-13.4 months). The characteristics associated with higher risk of progressing to infective endocarditis after TAVR was younger age (78.9 years vs 81.8 years; hazard ratio [HR], 0.97 per year; 95% CI, 0.94-0.99), male sex (62.0% vs 49.7%; HR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.13-2.52), diabetes mellitus (41.7% vs 30.0%; HR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.02-2.29), and moderate to severe aortic regurgitation (22.4% vs 14.7%; HR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.28-3.28). Health care-associated infective endocarditis was present in 52.8% (95% CI, 46.6%-59.0%) of patients. Enterococci species and Staphylococcus aureus were the most frequently isolated microorganisms (24.6%; 95% CI, 19.1%-30.1% and 23.3%; 95% CI, 17.9%-28.7%, respectively). The in-hospital mortality rate was 36% (95% CI, 30.0%-41.9%; 90 deaths; 160 survivors), and surgery was performed in 14.8% (95% CI, 10.4%-19.2%) of patients during the infective endocarditis episode. In-hospital mortality was associated with a higher logistic EuroSCORE (23.1% vs 18.6%; odds ratio

  19. The flaws in the detail of an observational study on transcatheter aortic valve implantation versus surgical aortic valve replacement in intermediate-risks patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barili, Fabio; Freemantle, Nick; Folliguet, Thierry; Muneretto, Claudio; De Bonis, Michele; Czerny, Martin; Obadia, Jean Francois; Al-Attar, Nawwar; Bonaros, Nikolaos; Kluin, Jolanda; Lorusso, Roberto; Punjabi, Prakash; Sadaba, Rafael; Suwalski, Piotr; Benedetto, Umberto; Böning, Andreas; Falk, Volkmar; Sousa-Uva, Miguel; Kappetein, Pieter A; Menicanti, Lorenzo

    2017-06-01

    The PARTNER group recently published a comparison between the latest generation SAPIEN 3 transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) system (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in intermediate-risk patients, apparently demonstrating superiority of the TAVI and suggesting that TAVI might be the preferred treatment method in this risk class of patients. Nonetheless, assessment of the non-randomized methodology used in this comparison reveals challenges that should be addressed in order to elucidate the validity of the results. The study by Thourani and colleagues showed several major methodological concerns: suboptimal methods in propensity score analysis with evident misspecification of the propensity scores (PS; no adjustment for the most significantly different covariates: left ventricular ejection fraction, moderate-severe mitral regurgitation and associated procedures); use of PS quintiles rather than matching; inference on not-adjusted Kaplan-Meier curves, although the authors correctly claimed for the need of balancing score adjusting for confounding factors in order to have unbiased estimates of the treatment effect; evidence of poor fit; lack of data on valve-related death.These methodological flaws invalidate direct comparison between treatments and cannot support authors' conclusions that TAVI with SAPIEN 3 in intermediate-risk patients is superior to surgery and might be the preferred treatment alternative to surgery. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of Risk Scores for Prediction of Complications following Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tom Kai Ming; Choi, David Hyun-Min; Haydock, David; Gamble, Greg; Stewart, Ralph; Ruygrok, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Risk models play an important role in stratification of patients for cardiac surgery, but their prognostic utilities for post-operative complications are rarely studied. We compared the EuroSCORE, EuroSCORE II, Society of Thoracic Surgeon's (STS) Score and an Australasian model (Aus-AVR Score) for predicting morbidities after aortic valve replacement (AVR), and also evaluated seven STS complications models in this context. We retrospectively calculated risk scores for 620 consecutive patients undergoing isolated AVR at Auckland City Hospital during 2005-2012, assessing their discrimination and calibration for post-operative complications. Amongst mortality scores, the EuroSCORE was the best at discriminating stroke (c-statistic 0.845); the EuroSCORE II at deep sternal wound infection (c=0.748); and the STS Score at composite morbidity or mortality (c=0.666), renal failure (c=0.634), ventilation>24 hours (c=0.732), return to theatre (c=0.577) and prolonged hospital stay >14 days post-operatively (c=0.707). The individual STS complications models had a marginally higher c-statistic (c=0.634-0.846) for all complications except mediastinitis, and had good calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow test P-value 0.123-0.915) for all complications. The STS Score was best overall at discriminating post-operative complications and their composite for AVR. All STS complications models except for deep sternal wound infection had good discrimination and calibration for post-operative complications. Copyright © 2014 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of Marfan patients status post valve-sparing aortic root replacement with 4D flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Thomas A; Kvitting, John-Peder Escobar; Hope, Michael D; Miller, D Craig; Markl, Michael; Herfkens, Robert J

    2013-11-01

    Over the past two decades elective valve-sparing aortic root replacement (V-SARR) has become more common in the treatment of patients with aortic root and ascending aortic aneurysms. Currently there are little data available to predict complications in the post-operative population. The study goal was to determine if altered flow patterns in the thoracic aorta, as measured by MRI, are associated with complications after V-SARR. Time-resolved three-dimensional phase-contrast MRI (4D flow) was used to image 12 patients with Marfan syndrome after V-SARR. The patients were followed up for an average of 5.8 years after imaging and 8.2 years after surgery. Additionally 5 volunteers were imaged for comparison. Flow profiles were visualized during peak systole using streamlines. Wall shear stress estimates and normalized flow displacement were evaluated at multiple planes in the thoracic aorta. During the follow-up period, a single patient developed a Stanford Type B aortic dissection. At initial imaging, prior to the development of the dissection, the patient had altered flow patterns, wall shear stress estimates, and increased normalized flow displacement in the thoracic aorta in comparison to the remaining V-SARR patients and volunteers. This is the first follow-up study of patients after 4D flow imaging. An aortic dissection developed in one patient with altered flow patterns and hemodynamic stresses in the thoracic aorta. These results suggest that flow and altered hemodynamics may play a role in the development of post-operative intramural hematomas and dissections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Application of the ALARA principle to the bleed condenser relief valve replacement project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, T.; Kraft, J.

    1997-01-01

    Darlington Nuclear Generating Division's achievements in radiation dose performance can be attributed, in part, to adherence to the ALARA principle. The station's ALARA program, which is an integral part of the safety culture, derives its strength from a strong and unwavering commitment by the site Vice President. This commitment is supported by performance standards and an accountability system which holds managers and supervisors responsible for dose performance. A LAN-based hazard and dose information system with site-wide accessibility was established to facilitate work planning and exposure control. The principle of dose optimization is fully integrated into the work management process and includes work planning, progress monitoring and post-job review. An integrated performance assessment and reporting system also provides timely feedback to management on dose performance. An example of the ALARA program was the bleed condenser relieve valve replacement project. Pre-job ALARA review meetings for the project were held with supervisory staff and technicians to discuss job details and dose reduction measures. All work groups were required to prepare a detailed step be step task safety analysis (TSA). The trades and engineering staff were requested to critique the TSA and suggest ways of reducing dose. Over 30 practical ALARA suggestions were received and adopted for implementation. Daily meetings were held to review job progress and the effectiveness exposure control. A post-job ALARA review was held at the conclusion of each project to obtain feedback and lessons learned. All improvement suggestions were reviewed for implementation during subsequent installations. As a result of the ALARA initiatives, significant dose savings were achieved. The normalized dose expenditure has been reduced from 9.6 rem for the first installation to 6.9 rem for the fourth and last installation. (author)

  3. What Is Heart Valve Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... working correctly. Most valve replacements involve the aortic Tricuspid valve and mitral valves. The aortic valve separates ... where it shouldn’t. This is called incompetence, insufficiency or regurgitation. • Prolapse — mitral valve flaps don’t ...

  4. What Is Heart Valve Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and replacing it with a man-made or biological valve. Biological valves are made from pig, cow, or human ... the valve. Man-made valves last longer than biological valves and usually don’t have to be ...

  5. Stentless vs. stented bioprosthesis for aortic valve replacement: A case matched comparison of long-term follow-up and subgroup analysis of patients with native valve endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Andreas; Dickow, Jannis; Schoen, Gerhard; Westhofen, Sumi; Kloss, Lisa; Al-Saydali, Tarik; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Philipp, Sebastian A; Detter, Christian

    2018-01-01

    Current retrospective evidence suggests similar clinical and superior hemodynamic outcomes of the Sorin Freedom Solo stentless aortic valve (SFS) (LivaNova PLC, London, UK) compared to the Carpentier Edwards Perimount stented aortic valve (CEP) (Edwards Lifesciences Inc., Irvine, California, USA). To date, no reports exist describing case-matched long-term outcomes and analysis for treatment of native valve endocarditis (NVE). From 2004 through 2014, 77 consecutive patients (study group, 59.7% male, 68.9 ± 12.5 years, logEuroSCORE II 7.6 ± 12.3%) received surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) with the SFS. A control group of patients after SAVR with the CEP was retrieved from our database and matched to the study group regarding 15 parameters including preoperative endocarditis. Acute perioperative outcomes and follow-up data (mean follow-up time 48.7±29.8 months, 95% complete) were retrospectively analyzed. No differences in early mortality occurred during 30-day follow up (3/77; 3.9% vs. 4/77; 5.2%; p = 0.699). Echocardiographic findings revealed lower postprocedural transvalvular pressure gradients (max. 17.0 ± 8.2 vs. 24.5 ± 9.2 mmHg, pendocarditis (PVE) (9.1% vs. 1.3%; p = 0.04) was more frequent in the SFS group. All-cause mortality during follow-up was 20.8% vs. 14.3% (p = 0.397). When patients were divided into subgroups of NVE and respective utilized bioprosthesis, the SFS presented impaired outcomes regarding mortality in NVE cases (p = 0.031). The hemodynamic superiority of the SFS was confirmed in this comparison. However, clinical outcomes in terms of SVD and PVE rates, as well as survival after NVE, were inferior in this study. Therefore, we are reluctant to recommend utilization of the SFS for treatment of NVE.

  6. Efficacy and safety of transcatheter aortic valve replacement in aortic stenosis patients at low to moderate surgical risk: a comprehensive meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Elmaraezy, Ahmed; Ismail, Ammar; Abushouk, Abdelrahman Ibrahim; Eltoomy, Moutaz; Saad, Soha; Negida, Ahmed; Abdelaty, Osama Mahmoud; Abdallah, Ahmed Ramadan; Aboelfotoh, Ahmed Magdy; Hassan, Hossam Mahmoud; Elmaraezy, Aya Gamal; Morsi, Mahmoud; Althaher, Farah; Althaher, Moath; AlSafadi, Ammar M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Recently, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has become the procedure of choice in high surgical risk patients with aortic stenosis (AS). However, its value is still debated in operable AS cases. We performed this meta-analysis to compare the safety and efficacy of TAVR to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in low-to-moderate surgical risk patients with AS. Methods A systematic search of five authentic databases retrieved 11 eligible studies (20,056 patients). Rele...

  7. Recurrent infective endocarditis causing heart valve failure: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria McIntyre, BASc Chemical Engineering (2018 candidate

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis (IE is an infection that does not usually respond rapidly to treatment, often because its early symptoms are non-specific. The diseased valves (native or bioprosthetic may be calcified and the thrombotic vegetations on them typically friable and embolize easily. Left untreated IE leads to damage to the infected valve and to congestive heart failure (CHF. Its treatment usually requires heart valve replacement. Our 69-year-old patient had IE, and underwent aortic valve replacement (AVR with a bioprosthesis. This case stresses the complications of IE and its tendency to recur in patients with bioprosthetic heart valves (BHV who previously had IE.

  8. Aortic valve replacement with or without coronary artery bypass graft surgery: the risk of surgery in patients > or =80 years old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Andrew; Casey, Paula; Poppas, Athena; Schwartz, Carl; Singh, Arun

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes for elderly (> or =80 years) patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR) with or without coronary artery bypass graft surgery (AVR/CABG). The authors hypothesized that the mortalities of AVR and AVR/CABG are lower than that predicted by published risk scores. A retrospective analysis of data from a single-hospital database. Single tertiary care, private practice. Consecutive patients undergoing AVR or AVR/CABG. Two hundred sixty-one elderly (> or =80 years) patients undergoing isolated AVR (145) or AVR/CABG (116) were evaluated. The majority (94.6%) underwent AVR for aortic valve stenosis. Outcomes were recorded and compared between the 2 surgical procedures with predicted mortalities based on published risk assessment scoring systems. The overall short-term mortality for the elderly group was 6.1% (AVR 5.5% and AVR/CABG 6.9%). The median long-term survival was 6.8 years. There were no significant differences in either morbidity or mortality between the AVR and AVR/CABG groups. Although predicted mortalities were similar for each surgical procedure, they overestimated observed outcome by up to 4-fold. Short- and long-term mortality was low for this group of elderly patients undergoing AVR or AVR/CABG and not significantly different between the 2 surgical groups. Predicted outcomes were worse than that observed, consistent with the hypothesis, and supportive of a more aggressive surgical treatment for aortic valve disease in the elderly patient. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Replacement screws valve operating under Trunnion; Substituicao de parafusos de valvulas Trunnion em regime de operacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza Netto, Charles de; Santos, Rogerio Andre Zolin dos; Arnhold, Diego [Companhia de Gas do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul (SULGAS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Jacques, Rodrigo das Neves [Guidotti e Vieira Manutencao Industrial Ltda., Canoas, RS (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    The report shows the process created for the substitution and extraction of bearing screws of the Trunnion valves, in operation. The methodology was developed at the 'Companhia de Gas do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul - SULGAS', with the objective of avoiding failure emergency situations, and or sudden breaking of the screws of fixation of the lid of the inferior bearing of the Trunnion valves. it is a preventive process of substitution of these screws, that after a great period of use in atmospheres with high potential of oxidation present structural failure. The breaking of these components creates a leaking process by the inferior lid of the valves, fact that is intended to be avoided with the application of the technical procedure of this report, guaranteeing the integrity of the valves that are vital components for the continuous operation of the gas pipe line. (author)

  10. Acute Aortic Arch Perforation During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Bicuspid Aortic Stenosis and a Gothic Aortic Arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan-Iturbe, Oscar; Sawaya, Fadi J; Bieliauskas, Gintautas; Chow, Danny H F; De Backer, Ole; Søndergaard, Lars

    2017-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has evolved from a novel technology to an established therapy for high/intermediate-risk patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS). Although TAVR is used to treat bicuspid severe AS, the large randomized trials typically excluded bicuspid AS because of its unique anatomic features. This case report describes an acute aortic perforation during delivery of a transcatheter heart valve to treat a severe bicuspid AS with a "gothic aortic arch"; more careful evaluation of the preprocedural multislice computed tomographic scan would have unveiled a sharply angulated aortic arch. This life-threatening complication was successfully treated by thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Understanding the requirements of self-expandable stents for heart valve replacement: Radial force, hoop force and equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, María Sol; Oomens, Cees W J; Baaijens, Frank P T

    2017-04-01

    A proper interpretation of the forces developed during stent crimping and deployment is of paramount importance for a better understanding of the requirements for successful heart valve replacement. The present study combines experimental and computational methods to assess the performance of a nitinol stent for tissue-engineered heart valve implantation. To validate the stent model, the mechanical response to parallel plate compression and radial crimping was evaluated experimentally. Finite element simulations showed good agreement with the experimental findings. The computational models were further used to determine the hoop force on the stent and radial force on a rigid tool during crimping and self-expansion. In addition, stent deployment against ovine and human pulmonary arteries was simulated to determine the hoop force on the stent-artery system and the equilibrium diameter for different degrees of oversizing. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of frailty markers on outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve replacement: insights from a Japanese multicenter registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimura, Tetsuro; Yamamoto, Masanori; Kano, Seiji; Kagase, Ai; Kodama, Atsuko; Koyama, Yutaka; Otsuka, Toshiaki; Kohsaka, Shun; Tada, Norio; Yamanaka, Futoshi; Naganuma, Toru; Araki, Motoharu; Shirai, Shinichi; Mizutani, Kazuki; Tabata, Minoru; Ueno, Hiroshi; Takagi, Kensuke; Higashimori, Akihiro; Watanabe, Yusuke; Hayashida, Kentaro

    2017-09-01

    There are no standardized criteria for measuring patients' frailty. We examined prognosis based on four frailty markers [serum albumin level, grip strength, gait speed, and clinical frailty scale (CFS)] in patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) between October 2013 and April 2016 and were recorded in the Optimized CathEter vAlvular iNtervention (OCEAN) Japanese multicenter registry. Serum albumin level was assessed by dividing patients into two groups: hypoalbuminemia or non-hypoalbuminemia according to their serum albumin level. Clinical outcomes including all-cause, cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular mortality rates after TAVR were compared. During the follow-up period cumulative all-cause, cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular mortality rates were significantly higher in the hypoalbuminemia group than in the non-hypoalbuminemia group. This result remained unchanged even after a propensity-matched model was used in terms of cumulative all-cause and non-cardiovascular mortality; however, differences in cardiovascular mortality rates were attenuated. To consider the impact of grip strength patients were divided into a low or high peak grip strength group based on classification and regression tree (CART) survival analysis. The clinical outcomes for each sex were compared between the two groups. In both sexes the cumulative 1-year mortality rates were significantly different between the two groups. To investigate gait speed patients were classified into two gait speed groups (low or high gait speed group) based on CART survival analysis. Clinical outcomes were compared between the two groups. The cumulative 1-year mortality rate was significantly different between the two gait speed groups. The effect of CFS on prognosis after TAVR was assessed. Patients were categorized into five groups based on the following CFS scores: CFS1-3, CFS4, CFS5, CFS6, and CFS ≥7. We evaluated the relationship between the CFS score and other indicators

  13. Long-term results after aortic valve replacement with the Biocor PSB stentless xenograft in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciani, G B; Santini, F; Auriemma, S; Barozzi, L; Bertolini, P; Mazzucco, A

    2001-05-01

    This study seeks to define the long-term results after Biocor PSB stentless aortic valve replacement (AVR) in elderly patients, including the effects of No-React treatment. We reviewed the outcomes of 106 consecutive patients, aged 70+/-6 years, having Biocor PSB (93 standard, 13 No-React) AVR between October 1992 and October 1996. There were three early deaths (3%) and 15 late deaths (15%), during a mean follow-up of 5.8+/-1.6 years. At 8 years, survival was 82%+/-4% and freedom from cardiac death was 94%+/-3%. Freedom from valve failure was 92%+/-4% at 8 years (No-React: 92%+/-8% at 4 years). Replacement of the xenograft was required in 5 patients. Freedom from reoperation was 91%+/-4% at 8 years (No-React: 92%+/-8% at 4 years). Four bleeding and two embolic events were recorded: overall valve-related event-free survival was 81%+/-7% at 8 years (No-React: 76%+/-12% at 4 years). Age of long-term survivors averaged 77+/-5 years and their New York Heart Association status was 1.3+/-0.6 (versus 2.9+/-0.6 preoperatively, p = 0.01). Satisfactory freedom from cardiac events and from valve deterioration added to uniform improvement in functional status despite advanced age and high prevalence of comorbid conditions make AVR with the Biocor PSB xenograft a valid long-term therapy for the elderly. No-React treatment does not influence xenograft durability.

  14. Mitral valve-sparing procedures and prosthetic heart valve failure: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nasir A; Butany, Jagdish; Leong, Shaun W; Rao, Vivek; Cusimano, Robert J; Ross, Heather J

    2009-01-01

    Prosthetic heart valve dysfunction due to thrombus or pannus formation can be a life-threatening complication. The present report describes a 47-year-old woman who developed valvular cardiomyopathy after chorda-sparing mitral valve replacement, and subsequently underwent heart transplantation for progressive heart failure. The explanted mitral valve prosthesis showed significant thrombus and pannus leading to reduced leaflet mobility and valvular stenosis. The present report illustrates the role of the subvalvular apparatus and pannus in prosthesis dysfunction. PMID:19279993

  15. Spontaneous Thrombosis of a Bicuspid Aortic valve due to Primary Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Farrell

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 51-year-old man who was admitted as an emergency with spontaneous thrombosis of the aortic valve and ascending aorta. At operation he was found to have a congenitally bicuspid aortic valve and subsequent investigation revealed primary antiphospholipid syndrome. He underwent successful removal of the thrombus combined with mechanical replacement of the aortic valve.

  16. Patients' self-reported function, symptoms and health-related quality of life before and 6 months after transcatheter aortic valve implantation and surgical aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Karin; Nilsson, Johan; Hörnsten, Åsa; Näslund, Ulf

    2017-03-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common valve disease in western countries and has poor prognosis without treatment. Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) is the gold standard, and transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a new method that is used in high-risk patients who are denied surgery. The purpose of treatment is not only to save life, but also to reduce symptoms and increase health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The aim of this study was to describe patients' self-reported outcomes in terms of physical function, symptoms, dependence, HRQoL, and cognitive function after TAVI and SAVR. All patients treated with TAVI during 1 year ( n = 24) and age-matched patients treated with SAVR ( n = 24) were included. Data were collected on the day before and at 6 months after treatment using structural questionnaires. Self-rated function was low before treatment and increased at follow-up. A quarter of all patients reported syncope at baseline, and none reported this at follow-up. Breathlessness was reported by all patients to be the most limiting cardiac symptom, but the TAVI patients reported more severe symptoms. At 6 months' follow-up, symptoms were reduced, but breathlessness and fatigue were still common, especially in the TAVI group. HRQoL, which was very low in the TAVI group at baseline, increased in all dimensions except social function. We found no change in cognitive function or dependence at follow-up. There was no difference in the size of improvement between groups. The results could be helpful when informing future patients in order to give them realistic expectations.

  17. Impact of patient-prosthesis mismatch following aortic valve replacement on short-term survival: a retrospective single center analysis of 632 consecutive patients with isolated stented biological aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Grischa; Ogbamicael, Selam Abraham; Jochens, Arne; Frank, Derk; Lutter, Georg; Cremer, Jochen; Petzina, Rainer

    2014-09-01

    The impact of patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) after aortic valve replacement (AVR) on short-term and long-term mortality remains controversial. The objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence and severity of PPM and its impact on short-term survival in a large cohort of patients treated with isolated stented biological AVR in a single institution. We analyzed retrospectively data of 632 consecutive patients with aortic stenosis undergoing isolated stented biological AVR between January 2007 and February 2012 at our institution. PPM was defined as an indexed effective orifice area ≤ 0.85 cm(2)/m(2). Statistical analyses were performed to identify influencing variables on valve size implanted. Of the 632 patients investigated, 46% were females and mean age was 71.9 ± 10.4 years. PPM was observed in 93.8% (593 of 632 patients). In 71% of the patients, moderate (0.65-0.85 cm(2)/m(2)) PPM was present and in 22.8% severe (body mass index, and body surface area as simultaneous predictors of the valve size implanted (R(2)= 0.39). PPM had no discernable impact on short-term survival, although it was present in 93.8% of our patients following isolated stented biological AVR. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Verification of pharmacogenetics-based warfarin dosing algorithms in Han-Chinese patients undertaking mechanic heart valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Chen, Chunxia; Li, Bei; Dong, Li; Guo, Yingqiang; Xiao, Xijun; Zhang, Eryong; Qin, Li

    2014-01-01

    To study the performance of pharmacogenetics-based warfarin dosing algorithms in the initial and the stable warfarin treatment phases in a cohort of Han-Chinese patients undertaking mechanic heart valve replacement. We searched PubMed, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure and Wanfang databases for selecting pharmacogenetics-based warfarin dosing models. Patients with mechanic heart valve replacement were consecutively recruited between March 2012 and July 2012. The predicted warfarin dose of each patient was calculated and compared with the observed initial and stable warfarin doses. The percentage of patients whose predicted dose fell within 20% of their actual therapeutic dose (percentage within 20%), and the mean absolute error (MAE) were utilized to evaluate the predictive accuracy of all the selected algorithms. A total of 8 algorithms including Du, Huang, Miao, Wei, Zhang, Lou, Gage, and International Warfarin Pharmacogenetics Consortium (IWPC) model, were tested in 181 patients. The MAE of the Gage, IWPC and 6 Han-Chinese pharmacogenetics-based warfarin dosing algorithms was less than 0.6 mg/day in accuracy and the percentage within 20% exceeded 45% in all of the selected models in both the initial and the stable treatment stages. When patients were stratified according to the warfarin dose range, all of the equations demonstrated better performance in the ideal-dose range (1.88-4.38 mg/day) than the low-dose range (pharmacogenetics-based warfarin dosing regimens performed similarly in our cohort. However, the algorithms of Wei, Huang, and Miao showed a better potential for warfarin prediction in the initial and the stable treatment phases in Han-Chinese patients undertaking mechanic heart valve replacement.

  19. Verification of Pharmacogenetics-Based Warfarin Dosing Algorithms in Han-Chinese Patients Undertaking Mechanic Heart Valve Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Chen, Chunxia; Li, Bei; Dong, Li; Guo, Yingqiang; Xiao, Xijun; Zhang, Eryong; Qin, Li

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the performance of pharmacogenetics-based warfarin dosing algorithms in the initial and the stable warfarin treatment phases in a cohort of Han-Chinese patients undertaking mechanic heart valve replacement. Methods We searched PubMed, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure and Wanfang databases for selecting pharmacogenetics-based warfarin dosing models. Patients with mechanic heart valve replacement were consecutively recruited between March 2012 and July 2012. The predicted warfarin dose of each patient was calculated and compared with the observed initial and stable warfarin doses. The percentage of patients whose predicted dose fell within 20% of their actual therapeutic dose (percentage within 20%), and the mean absolute error (MAE) were utilized to evaluate the predictive accuracy of all the selected algorithms. Results A total of 8 algorithms including Du, Huang, Miao, Wei, Zhang, Lou, Gage, and International Warfarin Pharmacogenetics Consortium (IWPC) model, were tested in 181 patients. The MAE of the Gage, IWPC and 6 Han-Chinese pharmacogenetics-based warfarin dosing algorithms was less than 0.6 mg/day in accuracy and the percentage within 20% exceeded 45% in all of the selected models in both the initial and the stable treatment stages. When patients were stratified according to the warfarin dose range, all of the equations demonstrated better performance in the ideal-dose range (1.88–4.38 mg/day) than the low-dose range (warfarin dose prediction and in the low-dose and the ideal-dose ranges. Conclusions All of the selected pharmacogenetics-based warfarin dosing regimens performed similarly in our cohort. However, the algorithms of Wei, Huang, and Miao showed a better potential for warfarin prediction in the initial and the stable treatment phases in Han-Chinese patients undertaking mechanic heart valve replacement. PMID:24728385

  20. Initial non-opioid based anesthesia in a parturient having severe aortic stenosis undergoing cesarean section with aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata Podder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy in presence of severe aortic stenosis (AS causes worsening of symptoms needing further intervention. In the advanced stages of pregnancy, some patients may even require aortic valve replacement (AVR and cesarean delivery in the same sitting. Opioid based general anesthesia for combined lower segment cesarean section (LSCS with AVR has been described. However, the use of opioid may lead to fetal morbidity and need of respiratory support for the baby. We describe successful anesthetic management for LSCS with AVR in a >33 week gravida with severe AS and congestive heart failure. We avoided opioids till delivery of the baby AVR; the delivered neonate showed a normal APGAR score.

  1. Iatrogenic coronary ostial stenosis of left main stem following aortic valve replacement: Visualization with optical coherence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Muhammad A. [Department of Cardiology, Manchester Heart Centre, Manchester Royal Infirmary, M13 9WL Manchester (United Kingdom); Prati, Francesco [Interventional Cardiology, San Giovanni Hospital, Via dell’Amba Aradam 8, 00184 Rome (Italy); El-Omar, Magdi, E-mail: magdi.el-omar@cmft.nhs.uk [Department of Cardiology, Manchester Heart Centre, Manchester Royal Infirmary, M13 9WL Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-15

    Iatrogenic coronary ostial stenosis following aortic valve replacement (AVR) occurs in up to 3.4% of cases and usually presents within the first 6 months following surgery. We present the case of an 85 year old man who developed an acute coronary syndrome 2 months following AVR. Coronary angiography revealed a severe de novo lesion in the left main stem, which, on optical coherence tomography, was shown to be due to severe intimal hyperplasia. The most likely underlying mechanism is vessel wall trauma caused by the rigid tip cannula used for administration of cardioplegia solution. Surgeons should be aware of this possibility when administering this solution via the antegrade approach.

  2. Increased hsCRP is associated with higher risk of aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blyme, Adam; Nielsen, Olav W.; Asferg, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate relations between inflammation and aortic valve stenosis (AS) by measuring high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, at baseline (hsCRP0) and after 1 year (hsCRP1) and exploring associations with aortic valve replacement (AVR). Design We examined 1423 patients from...... the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study. Results During first year of treatment, hsCRP was reduced both in patients later receiving AVR (2.3 [0.9–4.9] to 1.8 [0.8–5.4] mg/l, p CRP1...... predicted later AVR (HR = 1.17, p CRP0 (HR = 0.96, p = 0.33), aortic valve area (AVA) and other risk factors. A higher rate of AVR was observed in the group with high hsCRP0 and an increase during the first year (AVRhighCRP0CRP1inc=47.3% versus AVRhighCRP0CRP1dec=27.5%, p

  3. Hemodynamic outcomes of the Ross procedure versus other aortic valve replacement: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Kevin J; McCLURE, Graham R; Belley-Cote, Emilie P; Gupta, Saurabh; Bouhout, Ismail; Lortie, Hugo; Alraddadi, Hatim; Alsagheir, Ali; Bossard, Matthias; McINTYRE, William F; Lengyel, Alexandra; Eikelboom, John W; Ouzounian, Maral; Chu, Michael W; Parry, Dominic; El-Hamamsy, Ismail; Whitlock, Richard P

    2018-01-09

    Life expectancy in young adults undergoing mechanical or bioprosthetic aortic valve replacement (AVR) may be reduced by up to 20 years compared to age matched controls. The Ross procedure is a durable, anticoagulation-sparing alternative. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the valve hemodynamics of the Ross procedure versus other AVR. We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE from inception to February 2017 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies (n≥10 Ross). Independently and in duplicate, we performed title and abstract screening, full-text eligibility assessment, and data collection. We evaluated the risk of bias with the Cochrane and CLARITY tools, and the quality of evidence with the GRADE framework. We identified 2 RCTs and 13 observational studies that met eligibility criteria (n=1,412). In observational studies, the Ross procedure was associated with a lower mean aortic gradient at discharge (MD -9 mmHg, 95% CI [-13, -5], pRoss procedure was associated with a lower mean gradient at latest follow-up (MD -15 mmHg, 95% CI [-32, 2], p=0.08, I2=99%). The mean pulmonic gradient for the Ross procedure was 18.0 mmHg (95% CI [16, 20], pRoss procedure was associated with better aortic valve hemodynamics. Future studies should evaluate the impact of the Ross procedure on exercise capacity and quality of life.

  4. Outcomes for the Commercial Use of Self-Expanding Prostheses in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: A Report From the STS/ACC TVT Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorajja, Paul; Kodali, Susheel; Reardon, Michael J; Szeto, Wilson Y; Chetcuti, Stanley J; Hermiller, James; Chenoweth, Sharla; Adams, David H; Popma, Jeffrey J

    2017-10-23

    The authors sought to compare the outcomes of commercial transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) with the repositionable Evolut R platform to those observed with the CoreValve device in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS)/American College of Cardiology (ACC) Transcatheter Valve Therapy (TVT) Registry. TAVR continues to evolve, with rapid adoption of iterative changes for commercial practice. Insight into the outcomes of this adoption is needed. Patients in the TVT Registry who had TAVR using a 23-, 26-, or 29-mm self-expanding prosthesis were enrolled. Site-reported events for procedural, in-hospital, and 30-day outcomes were examined. Between January 2014 and April 2016, 9,616 patients underwent TAVR with a self-expanding prosthesis with data entered in the TVT Registry. Compared with patients treated with CoreValve TAVR, those who received Evolut R TAVR had a lower STS-PROM score (8.0 ± 5.4% vs. 8.7 ± 5.3%; p < 0.001), more iliofemoral access (91.6% vs. 89.2%; p < 0.001), and more frequently had conscious sedation (27.4% vs. 12.7%; p < 0.001). With Evolut R TAVR, there was less need for a second prosthesis (2.2% vs. 4.5%; p < 0.001), less device migration (0.2% vs. 0.6%; p = 0.01), a lower incidence of moderate/severe paravalvular regurgitation (post-procedure, 4.4% vs. 6.2%; p < 0.001), and shorter median hospital stay (4.0 vs. 5.0 days; p < 0.001). Patients treated with Evolut R TAVR had greater device success (96.3% vs. 94.9%; p = 0.001). At 30 days, Evolut R patients had both lower mortality (3.7% vs. 5.3%; p < 0.001) and less need for a pacemaker (18.3% vs. 20.1%; p = 0.03). Commercial adoption of the Evolut R platform is associated with significant improvements in acute outcomes for patients undergoing TAVR for aortic stenosis. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Valve assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandling, M.

    1981-01-01

    An improved valve assembly, used for controlling the flow of radioactive slurry, is described. Radioactive contamination of the air during removal or replacement of the valve is prevented by sucking air from the atmosphere through a portion of the structure above the valve housing. (U.K.)

  6. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients with severe mitral or tricuspid regurgitation at extreme risk for surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Stephen H; Popma, Jeffrey J; Kleiman, Neal S; Deeb, G Michael; Gleason, Thomas G; Yakubov, Steven J; Checuti, Stan; O'Hair, Daniel; Bajwa, Tanvir; Mumtaz, Mubashir; Maini, Brijeshwar; Hartman, Alan; Katz, Stanley; Robinson, Newell; Petrossian, George; Heiser, John; Merhi, William; Moore, B Jane; Li, Shuzhen; Adams, David H; Reardon, Michael J

    2018-05-01

    Patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis and severe mitral regurgitation or severe tricuspid regurgitation were excluded from the major transcatheter aortic valve replacement trials. We studied these 2 subgroups in patients at extreme risk for surgery in the prospective, nonrandomized, single-arm CoreValve US Expanded Use Study. The primary end point was all-cause mortality or major stroke at 1 year. A favorable medical benefit was defined as a Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire overall summary score greater than 45 at 6 months and greater than 60 at 1 year and with a less than 10-point decrease from baseline. There were 53 patients in each group. Baseline characteristics for the severe mitral regurgitation and severe tricuspid regurgitation cohorts were age 84.2 ± 6.4 years and 84.9 ± 6.5 years; male, 29 (54.7%) and 22 (41.5%), and mean Society of Thoracic Surgeons score 9.9% ± 5.0% and 9.2% ± 4.0%, respectively. Improvement in valve regurgitation from baseline to 1 year occurred in 72.7% of the patients with severe mitral regurgitation and in 61.8% of patients with severe tricuspid regurgitation. A favorable medical benefit occurred in 31 of 47 patients (66.0%) with severe mitral regurgitation and 33 of 47 patients (70.2%) with severe tricuspid regurgitation at 6 months, and in 25 of 44 patients (56.8%) with severe mitral regurgitation and 24 of 45 patients (53.3%) with severe tricuspid regurgitation at 1 year. All-cause mortality or major stroke for the severe mitral regurgitation and severe tricuspid regurgitation cohorts were 11.3% and 3.8% at 30 days and 21.0% and 19.2% at 1 year, respectively. There were no major strokes in either group at 1 year. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients with severe mitral regurgitation or severe tricuspid regurgitation is reasonable and safe and leads to improvement in atrioventricular valve regurgitation. Copyright © 2018 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery

  7. Five-year results after valve replacement with the Björk-Shiley 70 degrees convexo-concave prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koldsland, S; Svennevig, J L; Abdelnoor, M; Aas, H; Semb, G

    1992-01-01

    In the 18 months up to July 1983, 120 Björk-Shiley convexo-concave prostheses with 70 degrees opening angle were implanted in 47 women and 61 men aged 19-78 (mean 58.6) years. The prosthetic valves were aortic in 65 cases, mitral in 23 and both aortic and mitral in 20 cases. Emergency operation was required in ten cases, and concomitant surgery was performed in 43 (39.8%). The early mortality was 5.5%. A follow-up study, comprising 498 patient years, revealed 73.1% 5-year survival. There were three mechanical failures of prosthesis, in one of which re-replacement was successful. Elective prosthesis replacement was performed in four other cases judged to be at high risk of strut fracture.

  8. Practical determination of aortic valve calcium volume score on contrast-enhanced computed tomography prior to transcatheter aortic valve replacement and impact on paravalvular regurgitation: Elucidating optimal threshold cutoffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettinger, Nicolas; Khalique, Omar K; Krepp, Joseph M; Hamid, Nadira B; Bae, David J; Pulerwitz, Todd C; Liao, Ming; Hahn, Rebecca T; Vahl, Torsten P; Nazif, Tamim M; George, Isaac; Leon, Martin B; Einstein, Andrew J; Kodali, Susheel K

    The threshold for the optimal computed tomography (CT) number in Hounsfield Units (HU) to quantify aortic valvular calcium on contrast-enhanced scans has not been standardized. Our aim was to find the most accurate threshold to predict paravalvular regurgitation (PVR) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). 104 patients who underwent TAVR with the CoreValve prosthesis were studied retrospectively. Luminal attenuation (LA) in HU was measured at the level of the aortic annulus. Calcium volume score for the aortic valvular complex was measured using 6 threshold cutoffs (650 HU, 850 HU, LA × 1.25, LA × 1.5, LA+50, LA+100). Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to assess the predictive value for > mild PVR (n = 16). Multivariable analysis was performed to determine the accuracy to predict > mild PVR after adjustment for depth and perimeter oversizing. ROC analysis showed lower area under the curve (AUC) values for fixed threshold cutoffs (650 or 850 HU) compared to thresholds relative to LA. The LA+100 threshold had the highest AUC (0.81), and AUC was higher than all studied protocols, other than the LA x 1.25 and LA + 50 protocols, where the difference approached statistical significance (p = 0.05, and 0.068, respectively). Multivariable analysis showed calcium volume determined by the LAx1.25, LAx1.5, LA+50, and LA+ 100 HU protocols to independently predict PVR. Calcium volume scoring thresholds which are relative to LA are more predictive of PVR post-TAVR than those which use fixed cutoffs. A threshold of LA+100 HU had the highest predictive value. Copyright © 2017 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Impact of Obesity on Postoperative Outcomes in Adults with Congenital Heart Disease Undergoing Pulmonary Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buelow, Matthew W; Earing, Michael G; Hill, Garick D; Cohen, Scott B; Bartz, Peter J; Tweddell, James S; Ginde, Salil

    2015-01-01

    The impact of obesity on surgical morbidity in adults with congenital heart disease is currently unknown. The aim of our study was to investigate the impact of obesity on postoperative outcomes in adults with congenital heart disease undergoing reoperation for pulmonary valve replacement. A retrospective analysis was performed assessing the influence of obesity on surgical outcomes. Obesity was defined as a body mass index ≥30 kg/m2. The mean body mass index of the cohort was 25.9 ± 6.9 kg/m2 . The cohort included 71 patients with 17 patients (24%) being obese. There was no postoperative mortality. Obese patients had a longer hospital length of stay (6.6 vs. 4.7 days; P obesity was independently associated with hospital length of stay >5 days (odds ratio [OR] = 5.2; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5-18.2, P = .01) and with increased postoperative arrhythmias (OR = 4.2; 95% CI: 1.7-40, P Obesity is associated with increased morbidity in adults with congenital heart disease undergoing pulmonary valve replacement, including longer hospitalization and higher risk for postoperative arrhythmias. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Prediction of optimal deployment projection for transcatheter aortic valve replacement: angiographic 3-dimensional reconstruction of the aortic root versus multidetector computed tomography.

    OpenAIRE

    Binder Ronald K; Leipsic Jonathon; Wood David; Moore Teri; Toggweiler Stefan; Willson Alex; Gurvitch Ronen; Freeman Melanie; Webb John G

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Identifying the optimal fluoroscopic projection of the aortic valve is important for successful transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Various imaging modalities including multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) have been proposed for prediction of the optimal deployment projection. We evaluated a method that provides 3 dimensional angiographic reconstructions (3DA) of the aortic root for prediction of the optimal deployment angle and compared it with MDCT. METHODS AND RES...

  11. Mitral regurgitation jet around neoannulus: Mitral valve replacement in erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Basu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old male presented with erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae (ER endocarditis of the mitral valve, severe mitral regurgitation, and heart failure. The ER endocarditis destroyed the native mitral annulus therefore a new annulus was created for the suspension of the mitral bioprosthesis. Postoperative neoannulus dehiscence and leak prompted to redo surgery where transesophageal echocardiography (TEE played an important role in pointing out the exact location of perineoannular leaks for repair.

  12. Comparison of Manual and Automated Preprocedural Segmentation Tools to Predict the Annulus Plane Angulation and C-Arm Positioning for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Veulemans

    Full Text Available Preprocedural manual multi-slice-CT-segmentation tools (MSCT-ST define the gold standard for planning transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR. They are able to predict the perpendicular line of the aortic annulus (PPL and to indicate the corresponding C-arm angulation (CAA. Fully automated planning-tools and their clinical relevance have not been systematically evaluated in a real world setting so far.The study population consists of an all-comers cohort of 160 consecutive TAVR patients with a drop out of 35 patients for technical and anatomical reasons. 125 TAVR patients underwent preprocedural analysis by manual (M-MSCT and fully automated MSCT-ST (A-MSCT. Method-comparison was performed for 105 patients (Cohort A. In Cohort A, CAA was defined for each patient, and accordance within 10° between M-MSCT and A-MSCT was considered adequate for concept-proof (95% in LAO/RAO; 94% in CRAN/CAUD. Intraprocedural CAA was defined by repetitive angiograms without utilizing the preprocedural measurements. In Cohort B, intraprocedural CAA was established with the use of A-MSCT (20 patients. Using preprocedural A-MSCT to indicate the corresponding CAA, the levels of contrast medium (ml and radiation exposure (cine runs were reduced in Cohort B compared to Cohort A significantly (23.3±10.3 vs. 35.3 ±21.1 ml, p = 0.02; 1.6±0.7 vs. 2.4±1.4 cine runs; p = 0.02 and trends towards more safety in valve-positioning could be demonstrated.A-MSCT-analysis provides precise preprocedural information on CAA for optimal visualization of the aortic annulus compared to the M-MSCT gold standard. Intraprocedural application of this information during TAVR significantly reduces the levels of contrast and radiation exposure.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01805739.

  13. Pharmacogenetics-Based Warfarin Dosing in Patients With Cardiac Valve Replacement: The Effects of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 Gene Polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzamikia, Negin; Sakhinia, Ebrahim; Afrasiabirad, Abbas

    2017-12-22

    Many lines of evidence suggest that warfarin dosing variability is significantly associated with cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9) and vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 (VKORC1) variant alleles. Therefore, we investigated the influence of CYP2C9*2 (430C/T), *3 (1075A/C) and VKORC1 (-1639G/A) polymorphisms on warfarin dose requirements in patients who underwent cardiac valve surgery during the postoperative period.A total of 100 patients with heart valve replacement who had a prescribed target international normalized ratio (INR) range of 2-3 were enrolled in the study. Genotyping of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 was carried out using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique. The demographic and clinical data were collected using a precodified questionnaire and clinical examination and then were analyzed.Our findings revealed that the prevalence of CYP2C9 *2, *3 and VKORC1 -1639A alleles in patients were 10.5%, 39%, and 48%, respectively. We also found that patients with CYP2C9 *1 and VKORC1 -1639G alleles required the highest dosages of warfarin, while the carriers of CYP2C9 variant *2 and *3 alleles and VKORC1 -1639A required less warfarin. Univariate regression analysis showed that age and presence of CYP2C9 *2 allele significantly influenced the daily warfarin dose requirement. Our findings provide additional evidence to support the hypothesis that CYP2C9*2 (430C/T), *3 (1075A/C) and VKORC1 (-1639G/A) polymorphisms explain a considerable proportion of interindividual variability in warfarin dose. Therefore, testing for these variants might be helpful for adjusting patient warfarin dosage to an effective and safe level. © American Society for Clinical Pathology 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Impact of valve prosthesis-patient mismatch estimated by echocardiographic-determined effective orifice area on long-term outcome after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florath, Ines; Albert, Alexander; Rosendahl, Ulrich; Ennker, Ina Carolin; Ennker, Jrgen

    2008-06-01

    The impact of valve prosthesis-patient mismatch on long-term outcome after aortic valve replacement estimated by various variables such as projected indexed effective orifice area and internal geometric orifice area obtained from in vivo or in vitro published data is still controversial. The effective orifice area was measured by echocardiography in 533 patients. The mean age of the patients was 71 +/- 9 years; mean follow-up time was 4.7 +/- 2.2 years. The impact of severe (indexed effective orifice area regression. Severe mismatch (hazard ratio: 1.9 [1.08-3.21]) was a significant predictor of survival time after adjustment for age, left ventricular ejection fraction, atrial fibrillation, New York Heart Association class, serum creatinine, and hemoglobin level. The 5- and 7-year survival rates were 71% +/- 4% and 54% +/- 8% for patients with severe mismatch and 83% +/- 4% and 80% +/- 8% for patients with mild mismatch, respectively. The correlation between projected and measured indexed effective orifice area was of medium strength (r = 0.49), and the frequency of observed mismatch depended linearly on the projected indexed effective orifice area. Although projected indexed effective orifice area and indexed internal geometric orifice area were significant predictors of severe mismatch, the sensitivity and specificity for severe prosthesis-patient mismatch were only 75% and 52%, using an optimal threshold of projected indexed effective orifice area defined by the Youden index. Severe prosthesis-patient mismatch estimated by effective orifice area measured within 10 days was an independent risk factor of survival time. Projected indexed effective orifice area determined at surgery does not sufficiently predict mismatch.

  15. Association of body mass index and visceral fat with aortic valve calcification and mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement: the obesity paradox in severe aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Mancio

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies showed that metabolic syndrome is associated with aortic valve calcification (AVC and poor outcomes in aortic stenosis (AS. However, if these associations change and how body fat impacts the prognosis of patients in late stage of the disease have been not yet explored. Aims To determine the association of body mass index (BMI and visceral fat with AVC and mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR. Methods This was a prospective cohort of 170 severe AS patients referred to TAVR. We quantified AVC mass score and fat depots including epicardial adipose tissue, intrathoracic fat, and abdominal visceral (VAF and subcutaneous fats by computed tomography. Fat depots were indexed to body surface area. All-cause and cardiovascular-related deaths after TAVR were recorded over a median follow-up of 1.2 years. Results Higher AVC mass was independently associated with low BMI and low VAF. All-cause mortality risk increased with the decrease of BMI and increment of VAF. A stratified analysis by obesity showed that in non-obese, VAF was inversely associated with mortality, whereas in obese, high VAF was associated with higher mortality (p value for interaction < 0.05. At long-term, hazard ratio [HR] with non-obese/low VAF was 2.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1–4.9; p = 0.021 and HR with obese/high VAF was 2.5 (95% CI 1.1–5.8; p = 0.031 compared with obese/low VAF patients. Conclusions In AS patients submitted to TAVR, BMI and VAF were inversely associated with AVC. Pre-intervention assessment of VAF by computed tomography may provide a better discrimination of mortality than BMI alone.

  16. Association of body mass index and visceral fat with aortic valve calcification and mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement: the obesity paradox in severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancio, Jennifer; Fonseca, Paulo; Figueiredo, Bruno; Ferreira, Wilson; Carvalho, Monica; Ferreira, Nuno; Braga, Pedro; Rodrigues, Alberto; Barros, Antonio; Falcao-Pires, Ines; Leite-Moreira, Adelino; Ribeiro, Vasco Gama; Bettencourt, Nuno

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies showed that metabolic syndrome is associated with aortic valve calcification (AVC) and poor outcomes in aortic stenosis (AS). However, if these associations change and how body fat impacts the prognosis of patients in late stage of the disease have been not yet explored. To determine the association of body mass index (BMI) and visceral fat with AVC and mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). This was a prospective cohort of 170 severe AS patients referred to TAVR. We quantified AVC mass score and fat depots including epicardial adipose tissue, intrathoracic fat, and abdominal visceral (VAF) and subcutaneous fats by computed tomography. Fat depots were indexed to body surface area. All-cause and cardiovascular-related deaths after TAVR were recorded over a median follow-up of 1.2 years. Higher AVC mass was independently associated with low BMI and low VAF. All-cause mortality risk increased with the decrease of BMI and increment of VAF. A stratified analysis by obesity showed that in non-obese, VAF was inversely associated with mortality, whereas in obese, high VAF was associated with higher mortality (p value for interaction < 0.05). At long-term, hazard ratio [HR] with non-obese/low VAF was 2.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-4.9; p = 0.021) and HR with obese/high VAF was 2.5 (95% CI 1.1-5.8; p = 0.031) compared with obese/low VAF patients. In AS patients submitted to TAVR, BMI and VAF were inversely associated with AVC. Pre-intervention assessment of VAF by computed tomography may provide a better discrimination of mortality than BMI alone.

  17. Is transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) a cost-effective treatment in patients who are ineligible for surgical aortic valve replacement? A systematic review of economic evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, James; Mealing, Stuart; Thompson, Juliette; Moat, Neil; Kappetein, Pieter; Piazza, Nicolo; Busca, Rachele; Osnabrugge, Ruben

    2014-05-01

    Health Technology Assessment (HTA) agencies often undertake a review of economic evaluations of an intervention during an appraisal in order to identify published estimates of cost-effectiveness, to elicit comparisons with the results of their own model, and to support local reimbursement decision-making. The aim of this research is to determine whether Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) compared to medical management (MM) is cost-effective in patients ineligible for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), across different jurisdictions and country-specific evaluations. A systematic review of the literature from 2007-2012 was performed in the MEDLINE, MEDLINE in-process, EMBASE, and UK NHS EED databases according to standard methods, supplemented by a search of published HTA models. All identified publications were reviewed independently by two health economists. The British Medical Journal (BMJ) 35-point checklist for economic evaluations was used to assess study reporting. To compare results, incremental cost effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were converted to 2012 dollars using purchasing power parity (PPP) techniques. Six studies were identified representing five reimbursement jurisdictions (England/Wales, Scotland, the US, Canada, and Belgium) and different modeling techniques. The identified economic evaluations represent different willingness-to-pay thresholds, discount rates, medical costs, and healthcare systems. In addition, the model structures, time horizons, and cycle lengths varied. When adjusting for differences in currencies, the ICERs ranged from $27K-$65K per QALY gained. Despite notable differences in modeling approach, under the thresholds defined by using either the local threshold value or that recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) threshold value, each study showed that TAVI was likely to be a cost-effective intervention for patients ineligible for SAVR.

  18. Cardioprotection of Electroacupuncture for Enhanced Recovery after Surgery on Patients Undergoing Heart Valve Replacement with Cardiopulmonary Bypass: A Randomized Control Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangxiang Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We attempted to investigate cardioprotection of electroacupuncture (EA for enhanced recovery after surgery on patients undergoing heart valve replacement with cardiopulmonary bypass. Forty-four patients with acquired heart valve replacement were randomly allocated to the EA group or the control group. Patients in the EA group received EA stimulus at bilateral Neiguan (PC6, Ximen (PC4, Shenting (GV24, and Baihui (GV20 acupoints twenty minutes before anesthesia induction to the end of surgery. The primary end point was cardioprotection effect of electroacupuncture postoperatively and the secondary endpoints were quality of recovery and cognitive functioning postoperatively. The present study demonstrated that electroacupuncture reduced the occurrence of complications and played a role of cardioprotective effect on patients after heart valve replacement surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, and it benefits patients more comfortable and contributes to recovery after surgery. This trial is registered with ChiCTR-IOC-16009123.

  19. Quality of life among elderly patients undergoing transcatheter or surgical aortic valve replacement- a model-based longitudinal data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaier, Klaus; Gutmann, Anja; Baumbach, Hardy; von Zur Mühlen, Constantin; Hehn, Philip; Vach, Werner; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Zehender, Manfred; Bode, Christoph; Reinöhl, Jochen

    2016-07-26

    Quality of life (QoL) measurements reported in observational studies are often biased, since patients who failed to improve are more likely to be unable to respond due to death or impairment. In order to observe the development of QoL in patients close to death, we analyzed a set of monthly QoL measurements for a cohort of elderly patients treated for aortic valve stenosis (AS) with special consideration of the effect of distance to death. QoL in 169 elderly patients (age ≥ 75 years), treated either with transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR; n = 92), surgical aortic-valve replacement (n = 70), or drug-based therapy (n = 7), was evaluated using the standardized EQ-5D questionnaire. Over a two-year period, patients were consulted using monthly telephone interviews or outpatient visits, leading to a total of 2463 time points at which QoL values, New York Heart Association (NYHA) Functional Classification and their status of assistance were assessed. Furthermore, post-procedural clinical events and complications were monitored. Linear and ordered logistic regression analyses with random intercept were carried out, taking into account overall trends and distance to death. QoL measures decreased slightly over time, were temporarily impaired at month 1 after the initial episode of hospitalization and decreased substantially at the end of life with a measurable effect starting at the sixth from last follow-up (month) before death. Many clinical complications (bleeding complications, stroke, acute kidney injury) showed an impairment of QoL measurements, but the inclusion of lagged variables demonstrated medium term (three months) QoL impairments for access site bleeding only. All other complications are associated with event-related impairments that decreased dramatically at the second and third follow-up interviews (month) after event. Distance to death shows clear effects on QoL and should be taken into account when analyzing QoL measures in the

  20. Long-Term Health Benefit of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With Chronic Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crestanello, Juan A; Popma, Jeffrey J; Adams, David H; Deeb, G Michael; Mumtaz, Mubashir; George, Barry; Huang, Jian; Reardon, Michael J

    2017-11-27

    This study sought to characterize the long-term effect of chronic lung disease (CLD) on mortality, clinical outcomes, quality of life, and health benefits after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) with a self-expanding bioprosthesis. The long-term effect of CLD after TAVR is unknown. Prevalence and severity of CLD was determined at baseline in high- and extreme-risk patients with aortic stenosis from the CoreValve US Pivotal Trial. Clinical outcomes and health status were assessed using the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire overall summary score (KCCQ-OS). A favorable health benefit was defined as alive with a KCCQ-OS ≥60 and stability (CLD was present in 55% (20% mild, 13% moderate, 22% severe) of the 1,030 patients studied. All-cause mortality was higher in patients with moderate and severe CLD at 1 year (19.6% mild, 28.1% moderate, 26.9% severe CLD vs. 19.2% non-CLD; p = 0.030) and 3 years (44.8% mild, 53.0% moderate, 51.9% severe vs. 37.7% non-CLD; p CLD at 1 and 3 years. All patients had a nearly 20-point improvement in KCCQ-OS at 1 and 3 years. However, only 43.3% of patients with CLD had a favorable health benefit at 1 year and 22.5% at 3 years. Moderate and severe CLD increases 1- and 3-year mortality after TAVR. Although functional status and quality of life were improved in CLD at 1 and 3 years after TAVR, a favorable health benefit was only achieved in selected patients. (Safety and Efficacy Study of the Medtronic CoreValve System in the Treatment of Symptomatic Severe Aortic Stenosis in High Risk and Very High Risk Subjects Who Need Aortic Valve Replacement; NCT01240902). Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevalence and Outcomes of Mitral Stenosis in Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Findings From the Society of Thoracic Surgeons/American College of Cardiology Transcatheter Valve Therapies Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Lee; Bashir, Mohammad; Xiang, Qun; Yerokun, Babatunde A; Matsouaka, Roland Albert; Vemulapalli, Sreekanth; Kapadia, Samir; Cigarroa, Joaquin E; Zahr, Firas

    2018-04-09

    This study sought to examine the prevalence of mitral stenosis (MS) and its impact on in-hospital and 1-year clinical outcomes among patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Patients with coexisting severe aortic stenosis and MS are increasingly being considered for TAVR. The study cohort included 44,755 patients (age ≥18 years) who underwent TAVR during November 1, 2011, to September 30, 2015, and were registered in Society of Thoracic Surgeons/American College of Cardiology Transcatheter Valve Therapies (TVT) Registry. One-year outcomes were assessed by linking TVT registry data of this cohort to patient-specific Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services administrative claims data (n = 31,453). The primary outcome was the composite of death, stroke, heart failure-related hospitalization, and mitral valve intervention at 1 year. MS was present in 11.6% of cohort (mean age, 82 years; 52% males), being severe in 2.7%. Severe MS was associated with higher in-hospital mortality rates (5.6% vs. 3.9% for nonsevere MS and 4.1% for no MS; p = 0.02). In contrast to those without MS, severe MS group had significantly higher risk for the primary outcome, mortality (1 year), and heart failure-related hospitalization (1 year) (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.2 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1 to 1.4], 1.2 [95% CI: 1.0 to 1.4], and 1.3 [95% CI: 1.1 to 1.5], respectively; p < 0.05 for all). Approximately one-tenth of patients undergoing TAVR have concomitant MS. Severe MS is an independent predictor of 1-year adverse clinical outcomes following TAVR. The higher risk for long-term adverse events must be considered when evaluating patients with combined aortic stenosis and MS for TAVR. Copyright © 2018 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Ross Versus Non-Ross Aortic Valve Replacement in Children: A 22-Year Single Institution Comparison of Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, John W; Patel, Parth M; Ivy Lin, Jiuann-Huey; Habib, Asma S; Rodefeld, Mark D; Turrentine, Mark W

    2016-05-01

    The Ross aortic valve replacement (AVR) has been the AVR of choice for children at our center since 1993. Absence or inadequate quality of the pulmonary valve or, less commonly, family or surgeon preference caused us to select an alternative AVR prosthesis for some children. This review compares the outcomes of 42 children who received a non-Ross AVR with 115 children undergoing Ross root replacement at our institution during the most recent 22 years. A retrospective chart review of the 42 pediatric non-Ross AVRs was compared with 115 Ross AVRs. The mean age at AVR was 11.0 ± 6.5 years (range, 1 month to 18 years) for the non-Ross and 11.4 ± 5.5 years (range, 6 weeks to 18 years) for the Ross groups. Follow-up was 7.8 ± 6.2 years for the Ross group and 8.7 ± 6.5 years for the non-Ross group. The Ross AVR technique was modified in 2000; these modifications were applied to 72 patients (63%) of the total Ross AVR group. All-cause early and late mortality of the non-Ross AVR group was 17% compared with 4% for the Ross cohort (p = 0.017). The actuarial survival rate at 20 years for the non-Ross AVR group was 81% compared with 94% for the Ross group (p = 0.018). Reintervention rate was 29% (12/38) in the non-Ross group and 28% (32/115) in the entire Ross group (60% [26/43] before 2000, and 8% [6/72] after 2000). Thromboemboli, bleeding, and endocarditis occurred in 2.4%, 1.4%, and 10% in the non-Ross group compared with 0.9%, 2.6%, and 1.7% in the Ross AVR group (p = 0.46, 0.01, and 0.02), respectively. Patients in the non-Ross group had a significantly higher recurrent or persistent aortic valve gradient (>20 mm Hg) than did patients in the Ross group at most recent follow-up (p Ross AVR than with other types of AVR prostheses. The Ross AVR remains the treatment of choice for children who have an adequate pulmonary valve. Reoperation for Ross root dilatation, regurgitation, or both (only 6% since our modifications in 2000) has markedly reduced the main drawbacks

  3. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide measurement is useful in predicting left ventricular hypertrophy regression after aortic valve replacement in patients with severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mirae; Choi, Jin-Oh; Park, Sung-Ji; Kim, Eun Young; Park, PyoWon; Oh, Jae K; Jeon, Eun-Seok

    2015-01-01

    The predictive factors for early left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) regression after aortic valve replacement (AVR) have not been fully elucidated. This study was conducted to investigate which preoperative parameters predict early LVH regression after AVR. 87 consecutive patients who underwent AVR due to isolated severe aortic stenosis (AS) were analysed. Patients with ejection fraction regression of LVH at the midterm follow-up was determined. In multivariate analysis, including preoperative echocardiographic parameters, only E/e' ratio was associated with midterm LVH regression (OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.22; p=0.035). When preoperative NT-proBNP was added to the analysis, logNT-proBNP was found to be the single significant predictor of midterm LVH regression (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.08 to 3.71; p=0.028). By receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, a cut-off value of 440 pg/mL for NT-proBNP yielded a sensitivity of 72% and a specificity of 77% for the prediction of LVH regression after AVR. Preoperative NT-proBNP was an independent predictor for early LVH regression after AVR in patients with isolated severe AS.

  4. Value of a noise-optimized virtual monoenergetic reconstruction technique in dual-energy CT for planning of transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Simon S.; Albrecht, Moritz H.; Wichmann, Julian L.; Huesers, Kristina; Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Booz, Christian; Bodelle, Boris; Bauer, Ralf W.; Metzger, Sarah C.; Vogl, Thomas J.; Lehnert, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate objective and subjective image quality of a noise-optimized virtual monoenergetic imaging (VMI+) reconstruction technique in dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) angiography prior to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Datasets of 47 patients (35 men; 64.1 ± 10.9 years) who underwent DECT angiography of heart and vascular access prior to TAVR were reconstructed with standard linear blending (F_0.5), VMI+, and traditional monoenergetic (VMI) algorithms in 10-keV intervals from 40-100 keV. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of 564 arterial segments were evaluated. Subjective analysis was rated by three blinded observers using a Likert scale. Mean SNR and CNR were highest in 40 keV VMI+ series (SNR, 27.8 ± 13.0; CNR, 26.3 ± 12.7), significantly (all p 0.05), significantly superior to all VMI and standard linearly-blended images (all p < 0.01). Low-keV VMI+ reconstructions significantly increase CNR and SNR compared to VMI and standard linear-blending image reconstruction and improve subjective image quality in preprocedural DECT angiography in the context of TAVR planning. (orig.)

  5. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement in patients with Marfan syndrome enrolled in the National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Howard K; Preiss, Liliana R; Maslen, Cheryl L; Kroner, Barbara; Devereux, Richard B; Roman, Mary J; Holmes, Kathryn W; Tolunay, H Eser; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Asch, Federico M; Milewski, Rita K; Bavaria, Joseph; LeMaire, Scott A

    2014-05-01

    The long-term outcomes of aortic valve-sparing (AVS) root replacement in Marfan syndrome (MFS) patients remain uncertain. The study aim was to determine the utilization and outcomes of AVS root replacement in MFS patients enrolled in the Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions (GenTAC). At the time of this analysis, 788 patients with MFS were enrolled in the GenTAC Registry, of whom 288 had undergone aortic root replacement. Patients who had undergone AVS procedures were compared to those who had undergone aortic valve replacement (AVR). AVS root replacement was performed in 43.5% of MFS patients, and the frequency of AVS was increased over the past five years. AVS patients were younger at the time of surgery (31.0 versus 36.3 years, p = 0.006) and more likely to have had elective rather than emergency surgery compared to AVR patients, in whom aortic valve dysfunction and aortic dissection was the more likely primary indication for surgery. After a mean follow up of 6.2 +/- 3.6 years, none of the 87 AVS patients had required reoperation; in contrast, after a mean follow up of 10.5 +/- 7.6 years, 11.5% of AVR patients required aortic root reoperation. Aortic valve function has been durable, with 95.8% of AVS patients having aortic insufficiency that was graded as mild or less. AVS root replacement is performed commonly among the MFS population, and the durability of the aortic repair and aortic valve function have been excellent to date. These results justify a continued use of the procedure in an elective setting. The GenTAC Registry will be a useful resource to assess the long-term durability of AVS root replacement in the future.

  6. Valve Sparing Aortic Root Replacement in Patients with Marfan Syndrome Enrolled in the National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Howard K.; Preiss, Liliana R.; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Kroner, Barbara; Devereux, Richard B.; Roman, Mary J.; Holmes, Kathryn W.; Tolunay, H. Eser; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Asch, Federico M.; Milewski, Rita K.; Bavaria, Joseph; LeMaire, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The long-term outcomes of aortic valve sparing (AVS) root replacement in Marfan syndrome (MFS) patients remain uncertain. We sought to determine the utilization and outcomes of AVS root replacement in MFS patients enrolled in the Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions (GenTAC). Methods At the time of this analysis, 788 patients with MFS were enrolled in the GenTAC Registry, of whom 288 have undergone aortic root replacement. Patients who have undergone AVS procedures were compared to those who have undergone aortic valve replacing (AVR) procedures. Results AVS root replacement was performed in 43.5% of MFS patients and the frequency of AVS increased over the past 5 years. AVS patients were younger at the time of surgery (31.0 vs. 36.3 years, p=0.006) and more likely to have had elective rather than emergency surgery compared to AVR patients. AVR patients were more likely to have had aortic valve dysfunction and aortic dissection as a primary indication for surgery. After mean follow-up of 6.2 (SD=3.6) years, none of the 87 AVS patients have required reoperation; in contrast, after mean follow up of 10.5 (SD=7.6) years, 11.5% of AVR patients have required aortic root reoperation. Aortic valve function has been durable with 95.8% of AVS patients with aortic insufficiency graded as mild or less. Conclusions AVS root replacement is performed commonly in the MFS population. The durability of the aortic repair and aortic valve function have been excellent to date. These results justify the continued use of the procedure in the elective setting. The GenTAC Registry will be a useful resource to assess the long-term durability of AVS root replacement in the future. PMID:25296451

  7. Resurgery for recurrent heart valve diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong-lei REN

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To summarize the experience with resurgery for recurrent valvular heart diseases. Methods From June 2004 to June 2015, 28 patients (15 males and 13 females with ages ranging from 44 to 67 years (55.6±6.5 years with recurrent heart valve disease underwent resurgery. The reasons for resurgery included perivalvular leakage (7 cases, bioprosthetic valve decline (6 cases in mitral valve and 3 in tricuspid valve, mechanical prostheses dysfunction (2cases, infective endocarditis after valve replacement (2 cases, restenosis of repaired native valve (1 case, and severe tricuspid insufficiency after left-side valve surgery (7 cases. Resurgery included mitral valve replacement in 18 patients and tricuspid valve replacement in 10. All the patients underwent third or fourth or even fifth cardiac surgery for valve replacement. Results There were 2 hospital deaths with a mortality of 7.1% (2/28. The main causes of early-stage deaths were low cardiac output syndrome. The main postoperative complications were respiratory failure in 3, low cardiac output syndrome in 2, reexploration for bleeding in 2 and serious infectious shock in 1. All the patients were found with the great improvement in heart function and the re-implanted prostheses worked well during follow-up. Conclusions Although resurgery for recurrent heart valve disease poses a continuing challenge to cardiac surgeon, it could be performed with the satisfactory results. The keys to a successful cardiac resurgery include appropriate operational timing, refined surgical technique and reasonable perioperative managements. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.01.11

  8. Life-threatening subdural hematoma after aortic valve replacement in a patient with Heyde syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Tetsuro; Hamasaki, Azumi; Ohba, Eiichi; Yamashita, Atsushi; Hayashi, Jun; Sadahiro, Mitsuaki

    2017-08-08

    Heyde syndrome is known as a triad of calcific aortic stenosis, anemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding from angiodysplasia, and acquired type 2A von Willebrand disease. This acquired hemorrhagic disorder is characterized by the loss of the large von Willebrand factor multimers due to the shear stress across the diseased aortic valve. The most frequently observed type of bleeding in these patients is mucosal or skin bleeding, such as epistaxis, followed by gastrointestinal bleeding. On the other hand, intracranial hemorrhage complicating Heyde syndrome is extremely rare. A 77-year-old woman presented to our hospital with severe aortic stenosis and severe anemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding and was diagnosed with Heyde syndrome. Although aortic valve replacement was performed without recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding, postoperative life-threatening acute subdural hematoma occurred with a marked midline shift. Despite prompt surgical evacuation of the hematoma, she did not recover consciousness and she died 1 month after the operation. Postoperative subdural hematoma is rare, but it should be kept in mind as a devastating hemorrhagic complication, especially in patients with Heyde syndrome.

  9. Analysis of Outcomes of the Nutritional Status in Patients Qualified for Aortic Valve Replacement in Comparison to Healthy Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Wernio

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Severe aortic stenosis (AS is associated with the reduction of muscle mass and may be associated with deterioration of nutritional status. Furthermore, malnourished cardiac patients are characterized by a higher risk of postoperative complications and mortality. The aim of this study was the evaluation and comparison of nutritional status, appetite and body composition in older people with severe aortic stenosis before aortic valve replacement and healthy elderly volunteers. One hundred and one patients, aged >65 years old with severe AS were included in the study. Nutritional status was assessed. Body composition was estimated using bioelectrical impedance analysis. Concentrations of albumin, prealbumin, triglycerides, total cholesterol and C-reactive protein were measured, and a complete blood count was done. About 40% of AS patients were at risk of malnutrition. They had decreased hand grip strength and they lost more body mass than the control group. Malnourished AS patients were older, had lower body mass indexes (BMIs and lower aortic valve areas in comparison to well-nourished patients. Older AS patients, like their peers, show excessive body mass and, at the same time, the features of malnutrition. They have additional factors such as unintentional weight lost and decreased muscle strength which may be associated with worse outcomes.

  10. Endocarditis is not an Independent Predictor of Blood Transfusion in Aortic Valve Replacement Patients With Severe Aortic Regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahn, Hannah; Buth, Karen; Legare, Jean-Francois; Mingo, Heather; Kent, Blaine; Whynot, Sara; Scheffler, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    This study sought to evaluate if the presence of endocarditis was independently associated with increased perioperative blood transfusion in patients undergoing aortic valve replacements (AVR) with aortic regurgitation. This was a retrospective study. Large Canadian tertiary care hospital. Six hundred sixty-two consecutive patients with aortic regurgitation score of 3 or higher undergoing AVR from 1995 to 2012. No interventions were performed in this retrospective study. After REB approval, data were obtained from a center-specific database. Univariate analysis was performed to identify variables that may be associated with transfusion of any allogeneic blood product perioperatively. A multivariate logistic regression was generated to identify independent predictors of perioperative transfusion. Unadjusted transfusion rates in patients with no endocarditis and with endocarditis were 32% and 70% (p70, urgent/emergent surgery, BMIEndocarditis was not an independent predictor of transfusion (OR = 0.748; 95% CI = 0.35-1.601). In patients undergoing AVR, unadjusted perioperative transfusion rates were higher when endocarditis was present. However, after adjustment, aortic valve endocarditis was not independently associated with blood transfusion. The authors' observation could be explained by the higher prevalence of many independent predictors of transfusion, such as comorbidities or more complex surgery, within the endocarditis group. Thus, AV endocarditis, in the absence of other risk factors, was not associated with increased perioperative transfusion risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Aspirin Versus Aspirin Plus Clopidogrel as Antithrombotic Treatment Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With a Balloon-Expandable Valve: The ARTE (Aspirin Versus Aspirin + Clopidogrel Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation) Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodés-Cabau, Josep; Masson, Jean-Bernard; Welsh, Robert C; Garcia Del Blanco, Bruno; Pelletier, Marc; Webb, John G; Al-Qoofi, Faisal; Généreux, Philippe; Maluenda, Gabriel; Thoenes, Martin; Paradis, Jean-Michel; Chamandi, Chekrallah; Serra, Vicenç; Dumont, Eric; Côté, Mélanie

    2017-07-10

    The aim of this study was to compare aspirin plus clopidogrel with aspirin alone as antithrombotic treatment following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) for the prevention of ischemic events, bleeding events, and death. Few data exist on the optimal antithrombotic therapy following TAVR. This was a randomized controlled trial comparing aspirin (80 to 100 mg/day) plus clopidogrel (75 mg/day) (dual antiplatelet therapy [DAPT]) versus aspirin alone (single-antiplatelet therapy [SAPT]) in patients undergoing TAVR with a balloon-expandable valve. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of death, myocardial infarction (MI), stroke or transient ischemic attack, or major or life-threatening bleeding (according to Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 definitions) within the 3 months following the procedure. The trial was prematurely stopped after the inclusion of 74% of the planned study population. A total of 222 patients were included, 111 allocated to DAPT and 111 to SAPT. The composite of death, MI, stroke or transient ischemic attack, or major or life-threatening bleeding tended to occur more frequently in the DAPT group (15.3% vs. 7.2%, p = 0.065). There were no differences between groups in the occurrence of death (DAPT, 6.3%; SAPT, 3.6%; p = 0.37), MI (DAPT, 3.6%; SAT, 0.9%; p = 0.18), or stroke or transient ischemic attack (DAPT, 2.7%; SAPT, 0.9%; p = 0.31) at 3 months. DAPT was associated with a higher rate of major or life-threatening bleeding events (10.8% vs. 3.6% in the SAPT group, p = 0.038). There were no differences between groups in valve hemodynamic status post-TAVR. This small trial showed that SAPT (vs. DAPT) tended to reduce the occurrence of major adverse events following TAVR. SAPT reduced the risk for major or life-threatening events while not increasing the risk for MI or stroke. Larger studies are needed to confirm these results. (Aspirin Versus Aspirin + Clopidogrel Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: The ARTE

  12. Ventricular arrhythmia risk stratification in patients with tetralogy of Fallot at the time of pulmonary valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabate Rotes, Anna; Connolly, Heidi M; Warnes, Carole A; Ammash, Naser M; Phillips, Sabrina D; Dearani, Joseph A; Schaff, Hartzell V; Burkhart, Harold M; Hodge, David O; Asirvatham, Samuel J; McLeod, Christopher J

    2015-02-01

    Most patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot require pulmonary valve replacement (PVR), but the evaluation for and management of ventricular arrhythmia remain unclear. This study is aimed at clarifying the optimal approach to this potentially life-threatening issue at the time of PVR. A retrospective analysis was performed on 205 patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot undergoing PVR at our institution between 1988 and 2010. Median age was 32.9 (range, 25.6) years. Previous ventricular tachycardia occurred in 16 patients (8%) and 37 (16%) had left ventricular dysfunction, defined as left ventricular ejection fraction tetralogy of Fallot undergoing PVR with history of ventricular tachycardia or left ventricular dysfunction appear to be associated with a higher risk of arrhythmic events after operation. Events in the first year after PVR are rare, and in select high-risk patients, surgical cryoablation does not seem to increase arrhythmic events and may be protective. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Aortoplastia redutora com contenção externa associada à troca valvar aórtica em pacientes de alto risco Reduction aortoplasty with external wrapping associated with aortic valve replacement in high-risk patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Haddad

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a evolução de pacientes de alto risco submetidos a aortoplastia redutora com contenção externa associada a troca valvar aórtica. MÉTODOS: Seis pacientes portadores de aneurisma de aorta ascendente e valvopatia aórtica, sendo quatro do sexo masculino, foram incluídos no estudo. Um paciente apresentava insuficiência mitral importante. A idade variou de 61 a 70 anos (média de 65,7 anos. A insuficiência aórtica foi a indicação de troca valvar em 83,3% dos pacientes e a estenose aórtica, em 16,7%. Os critérios de inclusão foram: pacientes portadores de valvopatia aórtica com indicação cirúrgica, aorta ascendente com diâmetro > 5,5 cm, EuroSCORE > 6 e idade acima de 60 anos. O diâmetro da aorta ascendente variou de 57 a 68 mm (média de 63,7 mm. Análise estatística foi realizada utilizando o teste t pareado para as variáveis estudadas, com nível de significância menor que 5%. RESULTADOS: Todos os pacientes foram submetidos a aortoplastia redutora com contenção externa associada a troca valvar aórtica. Não houve mortalidade hospitalar na série estudada. Um (16,7% paciente apresentou fibrilação atrial no pós-operatório. O diâmetro médio da aorta ascendente foi de 37,0 +4,5 mm aos 6 meses de pós-operatório (P OBJECTIVE: To assess the midterm follow-up of reduction aortoplasty with external wrapping associated with aortic valve replacement in high risk patients. METHODS: Six patients with ascending aortic aneurysm and aortic valve disease were included in this study. Four of them were male. The age ranged from 61 to 70 years (mean 65.7 years. One patient presented severe mitral valve insufficiency. All patients underwent aortic valve replacement (83.3% with aortic insufficiency and 16.7% with aortic stenosis. The inclusion criteria were: surgical aortic valve disease, ascending aortic aneurysm > 5.5 cm, EuroSCORE > 6 and age above 60 years. The ascending aortic diameter ranged from 57 to 68 mm

  14. Haemodynamic improvement of older, previously replaced mechanical mitral valves by removal of the subvalvular pannus in redo cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Tae Youn; Choi, Jong Bum; Kuh, Ja Hong

    2017-01-01

    Patients requiring redo cardiac surgery for diseased heart valves other than mitral valves may show increased pressure gradients and reduced valve areas of previously placed mechanical mitral valves due to subvalvular pannus formation. We treated four women who had mechanical mitral valves inserted greater than or equal to 20 years earlier and who presented with circular pannus that protruded into the lower margin of the valve ring but did not impede leaflet motion. Pannus removal improved the haemodynamic function of the mitral valve. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  15. Decision-making in aortic root surgery in Marfan syndrome: bleeding, thromboembolism and risk of reintervention after valve-sparing or mechanical aortic root replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenhoff, Florian S; Langhammer, Bettina; Wustmann, Kerstin; Reineke, David; Kadner, Alexander; Carrel, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Valve-sparing root replacement (VSRR) is thought to reduce the rate of thromboembolic and bleeding events compared with aortic root replacement using a mechanical aortic root replacement (MRR) with a composite graft by avoiding oral anticoagulation. But as VSRR carries a certain risk for subsequent reinterventions, decision-making in the individual patient can be challenging. Of 100 Marfan syndrome (MFS) patients who underwent 169 aortic surgeries and were followed at our institution since 1995, 59 consecutive patients without a history of dissection or prior aortic surgery underwent elective VSRR or MRR and were retrospectively analysed. VSRR was performed in 29 (David n = 24, Yacoub n = 5) and MRR in 30 patients. The mean age was 33 ± 15 years. The mean follow-up after VSRR was 6.5 ± 4 years (180 patient-years) compared with 8.8 ± 9 years (274 patient-years) after MRR. Reoperation rates after root remodelling (Yacoub) were significantly higher than after the reimplantation (David) procedure (60 vs 4.2%, P = 0.01). The need for reinterventions after the reimplantation procedure (0.8% per patient-year) was not significantly higher than after MRR (P = 0.44) but follow-up after VSRR was significantly shorter (P = 0.03). There was neither significant morbidity nor mortality associated with root reoperations. There were no neurological events after VSRR compared with four stroke/intracranial bleeding events in the MRR group (log-rank, P = 0.11), translating into an event rate of 1.46% per patient-year following MRR. The calculated annual failure rate after VSRR using the reimplantation technique was lower than the annual risk for thromboembolic or bleeding events. Since the perioperative risk of reinterventions following VSRR is low, patients might benefit from VSRR even if redo surgery may become necessary during follow-up. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  16. Relative Expression of PBMC MicroRNA-133a Analysis in Patients Receiving Warfarin After Mechanical Heart Valve Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabiri Rad, Hamid; Mazaheri, Mahta; Dehghani Firozabadi, Ali

    Background: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are implicated in various biological processes including anticoagulation. However, the modulation of miRNA by pharmacological intervention such as warfarin treatment in patients receiving warfarin has not been disclosed yet. The aim of this study work was to assess the effect of warfarin drug on expression level of mir-133a-3p in patients with mechanical heart valve replacement. Methods: In this research, the expression level of miRNA-133a-3p was analyzed in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) from mechanical valve replacement patients who had received warfarin for at least 3 months continuously. Quantitative RT-PCR method was used for this assay. Results: Our findings indicated a significant diffrence between the rate of miR-133a-3p expression in individuals receiving warfarin and the control group (p<0.01). There was also a statistically significant difference in miR-133a-3p expression in patients with different ages (p<0.05) suggesting that the rate of miR-133a-3p expression in persons receiving warfarin is related to age. However, other variables like warfarin dose, International Normalized Ratio (INR), gender, and Body Mass Index (BMI) were not significantly effective on the miR-133a-3p experssion rate in individuals receving warfarin. Conclusion: Based on our results, it can be concluded that miR-133a-3p is involved in the coagulation pathway. The recent result indicates that warfarin affects the expression of miR-133a. This expression may be potentially important for treatment by anticoagulants. Awareness of the time course of miRNA expression profile can improve efficiency of response to warfarin. PMID:29296264

  17. LV reverse remodeling imparted by aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis; is it durable? A cardiovascular MRI study sponsored by the American Heart Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caruppannan Ketheswaram

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS, long-term data tracking surgically induced effects of afterload reduction on reverse LV remodeling are not available. Echocardiographic data is available short term, but in limited fashion beyond one year. Cardiovascular MRI (CMR offers the ability to serially track changes in LV metrics with small numbers due to its inherent high spatial resolution and low variability. Hypothesis We hypothesize that changes in LV structure and function following aortic valve replacement (AVR are detectable by CMR and once triggered by AVR, continue for an extended period. Methods Tweny-four patients of which ten (67 ± 12 years, 6 female with severe, but compensated AS underwent CMR pre-AVR, 6 months, 1 year and up to 4 years post-AVR. 3D LV mass index, volumetrics, LV geometry, and EF were measured. Results All patients survived AVR and underwent CMR 4 serial CMR's. LVMI markedly decreased by 6 months (157 ± 42 to 134 ± 32 g/m2, p 2. Similarly, EF increased pre to post-AVR (55 ± 22 to 65 ± 11%,(p 2. LV stroke volume increased rapidly from pre to post-AVR (40 ± 11 to 44 ± 7 ml, p Conclusion After initial beneficial effects imparted by AVR in severe AS patients, there are, as expected, marked improvements in LV reverse remodeling. Via CMR, surgically induced benefits to LV structure and function are durable and, unexpectedly express continued, albeit markedly incomplete improvement through 4 years post-AVR concordant with sustained improved clinical status. This supports down-regulation of both mRNA and MMP activity acutely with robust suppression long term.

  18. Comparison of clinical outcomes with the utilization of monitored anesthesia care vs. general anesthesia in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiramijyan, Sarkis; Ben-Dor, Itsik; Koifman, Edward; Didier, Romain; Magalhaes, Marco A.; Escarcega, Ricardo O.; Negi, Smita I.; Baker, Nevin C.; Gai, Jiaxiang; Torguson, Rebecca; Okubagzi, Petros; Asch, Federico M.; Wang, Zuyue; Gaglia, Michael A.; Satler, Lowell F.; Pichard, Augusto D.; Waksman, Ron, E-mail: ron.waksman@medstar.net

    2016-09-15

    Background: There is no clear consensus in regard to the optimal anesthesia utilization during transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). The aim was to compare outcomes of transfemoral (TF) TAVR under monitored anesthesia care (MAC) vs. general anesthesia (GA) and evaluate the rates and causes of intra-procedural MAC failure. Methods: All consecutive patients who underwent TF TAVR from April 2007 through March 2015 were retrospectively analyzed and dichotomized into two groups: TAVR under MAC vs. GA. The main endpoints of the study included 30-day and 1-year mortality, the rates and reasons for failure of MAC, in-hospital clinical safety outcomes, and post-procedural hospital and intensive care unit length-of-stays. Results: A total of 533 patients (51% male, mean-age 83 years) underwent TF TAVR under MAC (n = 467) or GA (n = 66). Fifty-six patients (12%) in the MAC group required conversion to GA. The MAC group had significantly shorter post-procedural hospital (6.0 vs. 7.9, p = 0.023) and numerically shorter ICU (2.4 vs. 2.8, p = 0.355) mean length-of-stays in days. The clinical safety outcomes were similar in both groups. Kaplan–Meier unadjusted cumulative in-hospital and 30-day mortality rates were higher in the GA group but similar in both groups at 1-year. Conclusions: TF TAVR under MAC is feasible and safe, results in shorter hospital stays, can be performed in the majority of cases, and should be utilized as the default strategy. Trans-esophageal echocardiography utilization during TAVR with MAC is safe and feasible. The most common cause for conversion of MAC to GA is cardiac instability and hypotension. The complete heart team should be available at all times in case the need arises for a rapid conversion to GA.

  19. Maximizing prosthetic valve size with the Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jan; Geha, Alexander S.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: The CarboMedics Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve allows a one-size (and often two-size) increase over the standard intra-annular valve. This advantage should minimize the risk of patient-prosthesis mismatch, where the effective prosthetic valve orifice area....... This study evaluates the authors' clinical experience with Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve size selection, and the technical aspects of implantation. METHODS: Between January 1999 and October 2005, a total of 251 consecutive patients underwent 252 aortic valve replacements with Top Hat supra...... required unplanned coronary bypass, and 30-day mortality was 2.0% (5/251), indicating a good safety profile for the valves implanted in this series. CONCLUSION: The general distribution of implant sizes in the US indicates that cardiac surgeons may be under-sizing the Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve...

  20. Aortic valve bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jens T; Jensen, Maiken Brit; Arendrup, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In aortic valve bypass (AVB) a valve-containing conduit is connecting the apex of the left ventricle to the descending aorta. Candidates are patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis rejected for conventional aortic valve replacement (AVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). ...

  1. Procedural Experience for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement and Relation to Outcomes: The STS/ACC TVT Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, John D; Vemulapalli, Sreekanth; Dai, Dadi; Matsouaka, Roland; Blackstone, Eugene; Edwards, Fred; Masoudi, Frederick A; Mack, Michael; Peterson, Eric D; Holmes, David; Rumsfeld, John S; Tuzcu, E Murat; Grover, Frederick

    2017-07-04

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been introduced into U.S. clinical practice with efforts to optimize outcomes and minimize the learning curve. The goal of this study was to assess the degree to which increasing experience during the introduction of this procedure, separated from other outcome determinants including patient and procedural characteristics, is associated with outcomes. The authors evaluated the association of hospital TAVR volume and patient outcomes for TAVR by using data from 42,988 commercial procedures conducted at 395 hospitals submitting to the Transcatheter Valve Therapy Registry from 2011 through 2015. Outcomes assessed included adjusted and unadjusted in-hospital major adverse events. Increasing site volume was associated with lower in-hospital risk-adjusted outcomes, including mortality (p < 0.02), vascular complications (p < 0.003), and bleeding (p < 0.001) but was not associated with stroke (p = 0.14). From the first case to the 400th case in the volume-outcome model, risk-adjusted adverse outcomes declined, including mortality (3.57% to 2.15%), bleeding (9.56% to 5.08%), vascular complications (6.11% to 4.20%), and stroke (2.03% to 1.66%). Vascular and bleeding volume-outcome associations were nonlinear with a higher risk of adverse outcomes in the first 100 cases. An association of procedure volume with risk-adjusted outcomes was also seen in the subgroup having transfemoral access. The initial adoption of TAVR into practice in the United States showed that increasing experience was associated with better outcomes. This association, whether deemed a prolonged learning curve or a manifestation of a volume-outcome relationship, suggested that concentrating experience in higher volume heart valve centers might be a means of improving outcomes. (STS/ACC Transcatheter Valve Therapy Registry [TVT Registry]; NCT01737528). Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  2. Early regression of severe left ventricular hypertrophy after transcatheter aortic valve replacement is associated with decreased hospitalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindman, Brian R; Stewart, William J; Pibarot, Philippe; Hahn, Rebecca T; Otto, Catherine M; Xu, Ke; Devereux, Richard B; Weissman, Neil J; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice; Szeto, Wilson Y; Makkar, Raj; Miller, D Craig; Lerakis, Stamatios; Kapadia, Samir; Bowers, Bruce; Greason, Kevin L; McAndrew, Thomas C; Lei, Yang; Leon, Martin B; Douglas, Pamela S

    2014-06-01

    This study sought to examine the relationship between left ventricular mass (LVM) regression and clinical outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). LVM regression after valve replacement for aortic stenosis is assumed to be a favorable effect of LV unloading, but its relationship to improved clinical outcomes is unclear. Of 2,115 patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis at high surgical risk receiving TAVR in the PARTNER (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves) randomized trial or continued access registry, 690 had both severe LV hypertrophy (left ventricular mass index [LVMi] ≥ 149 g/m(2) men, ≥ 122 g/m(2) women) at baseline and an LVMi measurement at 30-day post-TAVR follow-up. Clinical outcomes were compared for patients with greater than versus lesser than median percentage change in LVMi between baseline and 30 days using Cox proportional hazard models to evaluate event rates from 30 to 365 days. Compared with patients with lesser regression, patients with greater LVMi regression had a similar rate of all-cause mortality (14.1% vs. 14.3%, p = 0.99), but a lower rate of rehospitalization (9.5% vs. 18.5%, hazard ratio [HR]: 0.50, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.32 to 0.78; p = 0.002) and a lower rate of rehospitalization specifically for heart failure (7.3% vs. 13.6%, p = 0.01). The association with a lower rate of rehospitalization was consistent across subgroups and remained significant after multivariable adjustment (HR: 0.53, 95% CI: 0.34 to 0.84; p = 0.007). Patients with greater LVMi regression had lower B-type natriuretic peptide (p = 0.002) and a trend toward better quality of life (p = 0.06) at 1-year follow-up than did those with lesser regression. In high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis and severe LV hypertrophy undergoing TAVR, those with greater early LVM regression had one-half the rate of rehospitalization over the subsequent year compared to those with lesser regression. Copyright © 2014 American College of

  3. Clinical predictors of prosthesis-patient mismatch after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M Astudillo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We sought to ascertain predictors of Patient Prosthesis Mismatch, an independent predictor of mortality, in patients with aortic stenosis using bioprosthetic valves. METHOD: We analyzed 2,107 sequential surgeries. Patient Prosthesis Mismatch was calculated using the effective orifice area of the prosthesis divided by the patient's body surface area. We defined nonsignificant, moderate, and severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch as effective orifice area indexes of .0.85 cm²/m, 0.85-0.66 cm²/m², and <0.65 cm²/m², respectively. RESULTS: A total of 311 bioprosthetic patients were identified. The incidence of nonsignificant, moderate, and severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch was 41%, 42, and 16%, respectively. Severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch was significantly more prevalent in females (82%. In severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch, the perfusion and the crossclamp times were considerably lower when compared with nonsignificant Patient Prosthesis Mismatch and moderate Patient Prosthesis Mismatch. Patients with severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch had a significantly higher likelihood of spending time in the intensive care unit and a significantly longer length of stay in the hospital. Body surface area was not different in severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch when compared with nonsignificant Patient Prosthesis Mismatch. In-hospital mortality in patients with nonsignificant, moderate, and severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch was 2.3%, 6.1%, and 8%, respectively. Minimally invasive surgery was significantly associated with moderate Patient Prosthesis Mismatch in 49% of the patients, but not with severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch. CONCLUSION: Severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch is more common in females, but not in those with minimal available body surface area. Though operative times were shorter in these patients, intensive care unit and hospital lengths of stay were longer. Surgeons and cardiologists should be cognizant of these clinical

  4. Survival comparison of the Ross procedure and mechanical valve replacement with optimal self-management anticoagulation therapy: propensity-matched cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhles, M Mostafa; Körtke, Heinrich; Stierle, Ulrich; Wagner, Otto; Charitos, Efstratios I; Bogers, Ad J J C; Gummert, Jan; Sievers, Hans-Hinrich; Takkenberg, Johanna J M

    2011-01-04

    It is suggested that in young adults the Ross procedure results in better late patient survival compared with mechanical prosthesis implantation. We performed a propensity score-matched study that assessed late survival in young adult patients after a Ross procedure versus that after mechanical aortic valve replacement with optimal self-management anticoagulation therapy. We selected 918 Ross patients and 406 mechanical valve patients 18 to 60 years of age without dissection, aneurysm, or mitral valve replacement who survived an elective procedure (1994 to 2008). With the use of propensity score matching, late survival was compared between the 2 groups. Two hundred fifty-three patients with a mechanical valve (mean follow-up, 6.3 years) could be propensity matched to a Ross patient (mean follow-up, 5.1 years). Mean age of the matched cohort was 47.3 years in the Ross procedure group and 48.0 years in the mechanical valve group (P=0.17); the ratio of male to female patients was 3.2 in the Ross procedure group and 2.7 in the mechanical valve group (P=0.46). Linearized all-cause mortality rate was 0.53% per patient-year in the Ross procedure group compared with 0.30% per patient-year in the mechanical valve group (matched hazard ratio, 1.86; 95% confidence interval, 0.58 to 5.91; P=0.32). Late survival was comparable to that of the general German population. In comparable patients, there is no late survival difference in the first postoperative decade between the Ross procedure and mechanical aortic valve implantation with optimal anticoagulation self-management. Survival in these selected young adult patients closely resembles that of the general population, possibly as a result of highly specialized anticoagulation self-management, better timing of surgery, and improved patient selection in recent years.

  5. Value of the regurgitant volume to end diastolic volume ratio to predict the regression of left ventricular dimensions after valve replacement in aortic insufficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M. Fioretti (Paolo); C. Tirtaman; E. Bos (Egbert); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); J.R.T.C. Roelandt (Jos)

    1987-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this study was to assess the value of regurgitant stroke volume (RSV) to end-diastolic volume (EDV) ratio to predict the regression of left ventricular (LV) dimensions after uncomplicated valve replacement in 34 patients with severe pure aortic insufficiency. The RSV/EDV ratio

  6. A Korean Multi-Center Survey about Warfarin Management before Gastroenterological Endoscopy in Patients with a History of Mechanical Valve Replacement Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuk Hui Son

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Guidelines for esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD in the West allow the continued use of warfarin under therapeutic international normalized ratio (INR level. In Korea, no guidelines have been issued regarding warfarin treatment before EGD. The authors surveyed Korean cardiac surgeons about how Korean cardiac surgeons handle warfarin therapy before EGD using a questionnaire. Participants were requested to make decisions regarding the continuation of warfarin therapy in two hypothetical cases. Methods: The questionnaire was administered to cardiac surgeons and consisted of eight questions, including two case scenarios. Results: Thirty- six cardiac surgeons at 28 hospitals participated in the survey, and 52.7% of the participants chose to stop warfarin before EGD in aortic valve replacement patients without risk factors for thromboembolism. When the patient’s INR level was 2, 31% of the participants indicated that they would choose to continue warfarin therapy. For EGD with biopsy, 72.2% of the participants chose warfarin withdrawal, and 25% of the participants chose heparin replacement. In mitral valve replacement patients, 47.2% of the participants chose to discontinue warfarin, and 22.2% of the participants chose heparin replacement. For EGD with biopsy in patients with a mitral valve replacement, 58.3% of the participants chose to stop warfarin, and 41.7% of the participants chose heparin replacement. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that attitudes regarding warfarin treatment for EGD are very different among Korean surgeons. Guidelines specific to the Korean population are required.

  7. Percutaneous implantation of the CoreValve aortic valve prosthesis in patients at high risk or rejected for surgical valve replacement: Clinical evaluation and feasibility of the procedure in the first 30 patients in the AMC-UvA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baan, J.; Yong, Z. Y.; Koch, K. T.; Henriques, J. P. S.; Bouma, B. J.; de Hert, S. G.; van der Meulen, J.; Tijssen, J. G. P.; Piek, J. J.; de Mol, B. A. J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To report the feasibility, safety and efficacy of percutaneous aortic valve implantation (PAVI) with the CoreValve self-expanding aortic valve bioprosthesis in elderly patients with aortic valve stenosis who are rejected for surgery or have a high surgical risk.Methods. PAVI using the

  8. Leaflet escape in a new bileaflet mechanical valve: TRI technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottio, Tomaso; Casarotto, Dino; Thiene, Gaetano; Caprili, Luca; Angelini, Annalisa; Gerosa, Gino

    2003-05-13

    Leaflet escape is a mode of structural valve failure for mechanical prostheses. This complication previously has been reported for both monoleaflet and bileaflet valve models. We report 2 leaflet escape occurrences observed in 2 patients who underwent valve replacement with a TRI Technologies valve prosthesis. At the University of Padua, between November 2000 and February 2002, 36 TRI Technologies valve prostheses (26 aortic and 10 mitral) were implanted in 34 patients (12 women and 22 men) with a mean age of 59.9+/-10.3 years (range, 30 to 75 years). There were 5 deaths: 3 in hospital, 1 early after discharge, and 1 late. Two patients experienced a catastrophic prosthetic leaflet escape; the first patient was a 52-year-old man who died 10 days after aortic valve and ascending aorta replacement, and the second was a 58-year-old man who underwent a successful emergency reoperation 20 months after mitral valve replacement. Examination of the explanted prostheses showed in both cases a leaflet escape caused by a leaflet's pivoting system fracture. Prophylactic replacement was then successfully accomplished so far in 12 patients, without evidence of structural valve failure in any of them. Among other significant postoperative complications, we observed 3 major thromboembolisms, 1 hemorrhage, and 1 paravalvular leak. These catastrophes prompted us to interrupt the implantation program, and they cast a shadow on the durability of the TRI Technologies valve prosthesis because of its high risk of structural failure.

  9. Prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by Staphylococcus capitis: report of 4 cases

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    Wada Yuko

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although Staphylococcus capitis is considered to be a rare causative organism for prosthetic valve endocarditis, we report 4 such cases that were encountered at our hospital over the past 2 years. Case 1 was a 79-year-old woman who underwent aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthetic valve and presented with fever 24 days later. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed an annular abscess in the aorto-mitral continuity and mild perivalvular regurgitation. We performed emergency surgery 5 days after the diagnosis of prosthetic valve endocarditis was made. Case 2 was a 79-year-old woman presenting with fever 40 days after aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis. Transesophageal echocardiography showed vegetation on the valve, and she underwent urgent surgery 2 days after prosthetic valve endocarditis was diagnosed. In case 3, a 76-year-old man presented with fever 53 days after aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis. Vegetation on the prosthetic leaflet could be seen by transesophageal echocardiography. He underwent emergency surgery 2 days after the diagnosis of prosthetic valve endocarditis was made. Case 4 was a 68-year-old woman who collapsed at her home 106 days after aortic and mitral valve replacement with bioprosthetic valves. Percutaneous cardiopulmonary support was started immediately after massive mitral regurgitation due to prosthetic valve detachment was revealed by transesophageal echocardiography. She was transferred to our hospital by helicopter and received surgery immediately on arrival. In all cases, we re-implanted another bioprosthesis after removal of the infected valve and annular debridement. All patients recovered without severe complications after 2 months of antibiotic treatment, and none experienced re-infection during 163 to 630 days of observation. Since the time interval between diagnosis of prosthetic valve endocarditis and valve re-replacement ranged from 0 to 5 days, early surgical removal

  10. The effects of contrast media volume on acute kidney injury after transcatheter aortic valve replacement: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongprayoon, Charat; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Podboy, Alexander J; Gillaspie, Erin A; Greason, Kevin L; Kashani, Kianoush B

    2016-11-01

    The goal of this systematic review was to assess the effects of contrast media volume on transcatheter aortic valve replacement-related acute kidney injury. A literature search was performed using Medline, EMbase, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and clinicaltrials.gov from the inception of these databases through December 2015. Studies that reported relative risk, odds ratio, or hazard ratio comparing the risks of acute kidney injury following transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients who received high contrast media volume were included. Pooled risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using a random-effect, generic inverse variance method. Four cohort studies composed of 891 patients were included in the analyses to assess the risk of acute kidney injury after transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients who received high contrast media volume. The pooled RR of acute kidney injury after transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients who received a large volume of contrast media was 1.41 (95% CI, 0.87 to 2.28) compared with low contrast media volume. The meta-analysis was limited to studies using standard acute kidney injury definitions, and the pooled RR of acute kidney injury in patients who received high contrast media volume is 1.12 (95% CI, 0.78 to 1.62). Our meta-analysis shows no significant association between contrast media volume and risk of acute kidney injury after transcatheter aortic valve replacement. © 2016 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Ultrasound-targeted transfection of tissue-type plasminogen activator gene carried by albumin nanoparticles to dog myocardium to prevent thrombosis after heart mechanical valve replacement

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    Ji J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Ji Jun, Ji Shang-Yi, Yang Jian-An, He Xia, Yang Xiao-Han, Ling Wen-Ping, Chen Xiao-LingDepartment of Pathology and Cardiovascular Surgery, Shenzhen Sun Yat-Sen Cardiovascular Hospital, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: There are more than 300,000 prosthetic heart valve replacements each year worldwide. These patients are faced with a higher risk of thromboembolic events after heart valve surgery and long-term or even life-long anticoagulative and antiplatelet therapies are necessary. Some severe complications such as hemorrhaging or rebound thrombosis can occur when the therapy ceases. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA is a thrombolytic agent. One of the best strategies is gene therapy, which offers a local high expression of t-PA over a prolonged time period to avoid both systemic hemorrhaging and local rebound thrombosis. There are some issues with t-PA that need to be addressed: currently, there is no up-to-date report on how the t-PA gene targets the heart in vivo and the gene vector for t-PA needs to be determined.Aims: To fabricate an albumin nano-t-PA gene ultrasound-targeted agent and investigate its targeting effect on prevention of thrombosis after heart mechanic valve replacement under therapeutic ultrasound.Methods: A dog model of mechanical tricuspid valve replacement was constructed. A highly expressive t-PA gene plasmid was constructed and packaged by nanoparticles prepared with bovine serum albumin. This nanopackaged t-PA gene plasmid was further cross-linked to ultrasonic microbubbles prepared with sucrose and bovine serum albumin to form the ultrasonic-targeted agent for t-PA gene transfection. The agent was given intravenously followed by a therapeutic ultrasound treatment (1 MHz, 1.5 w/cm2, 10 minutes of the heart soon after valve replacement had been performed. The expression of t-PA in myocardium was detected with multiclonal antibodies to t-PA by the indirect immunohistochemical method

  12. Optimal sizing for SAPIEN 3 transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients with or without left ventricular outflow tract calcification.

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    Maeno, Yoshio; Abramowitz, Yigal; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Israr, Sharjeel; Yoon, Sunghan; Sharma, Rahul P; Kazuno, Yoshio; Kawamori, Hiroyuki; Miyasaka, Masaki; Rami, Tanya; Mangat, Geeteshwar; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Okuyama, Kazuaki; Kashif, Mohammad; Chakravarty, Tarun; Nakamura, Mamoo; Cheng, Wen; Makkar, Raj R

    2017-04-07

    The impact of left ventricular outflow tract calcification (LVOT-CA) on SAPIEN 3 transcatheter aortic valve replacement (S3-TAVR) is not well understood. The aims of the present study were to determine optimal device sizing for S3-TAVR in patients with or without LVOT-CA and to evaluate the influence of residual paravalvular leak (PVL) on survival after S3-TAVR in these patients. This study analysed 280 patients (LVOT-CA=144, no LVOT-CA=136) undergoing S3-TAVR. Optimal annular area sizing was defined as % annular area sizing related to lower rates of ≥mild PVL. Annular area sizing was determined as follows: (prosthesis area/CT annulus area-1)×100. Overall, ≥mild PVL was present in 25.7%. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis for prediction of ≥mild PVL in patients with LVOT-CA showed that 7.2% annular area sizing was identified as the optimal threshold (area under the curve [AUC] 0.71). Conversely, annular area sizing for no LVOT-CA appeared unrelated to PVL (AUC 0.58). Aortic annular injury was seen in four patients (average 15.5% annular area oversizing), three of whom had LVOT-CA. Although there was no difference in one-year survival between patients with ≥mild PVL and without PVL (log-rank p=0.91), subgroup analysis demonstrated that patients with ≥moderate LVOT-CA who had ≥mild PVL had lower survival compared to patients with ≥mild PVL and none or mild LVOT-CA (log-rank p=0.010). In the setting of LVOT-CA, an optimally sized S3 valve is required to reduce PVL and to increase survival following TAVR.

  13. Clinical and ultrasound results after aortic valve replacement: intermediate-term follow-up with the St. Jude Medical prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalescot, G; Thomas, D; Drobinski, G; Evans, J I; Vicaut, E; Chatellier, G; Whyte, R I; Busquet, P; Bejean-Lebuisson, A; Grosgogeat, Y

    1989-07-01

    Mortality, morbidity, quality of life, and left ventricular (LV) function were evaluated in 49 patients after aortic valve replacement with the St. Jude prosthesis. Total follow-up was 2577 patient-months; survivors were followed-up for 4 to 7 years by clinical examination and echocardiography. The actuarial survival rate at 6 years was 79.6%, and there were no valve-related deaths. The linearized rates for thromboembolism and hemorrhage were 0.93% and 3.26% per patient-year, respectively. In 34% of the survivors the quality of life was poor. In the first three postoperative months, patients with aortic stenosis (n = 12) had a significant decrease in the muscle cross-sectional area (p less than 0.01) and patients with aortic regurgitation (n = 11) had decreases in both LV end-diastolic diameter (p less than 0.05) and cross-sectional area (p less than 0.001). All of these results were maintained at 5 years without modification of LV systolic function. Despite the good overall results, six patients deteriorated and had major LV dilatation. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified two independent preoperative variables associated with a poor outcome defined as death of LV dysfunction (p less than 0.05): age and end-diastolic diameter. Thus meticulous follow-up showed a high incidence of hemorrhage and a poor quality of life in many of the survivors. It was concluded that in high-risk patients (age and end-diastolic diameter) surgery should probably be considered earlier.

  14. Enhanced left ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis is associated with improved long-term survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ayyaz; Patel, Amit; Ali, Ziad; Abu-Omar, Yasir; Saeed, Amber; Athanasiou, Thanos; Pepper, John

    2011-08-01

    Aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis is usually followed by regression of left ventricular hypertrophy. More complete resolution of left ventricular hypertrophy is suggested to be associated with superior clinical outcomes; however, its translational impact on long-term survival after aortic valve replacement has not been investigated. Demographic, operative, and clinical data were obtained retrospectively through case note review. Transthoracic echocardiography was used to measure left ventricular mass preoperatively and at annual follow-up visits. Patients were classified according to their reduction in left ventricular mass at 1 year after the operation: group 1, less than 25 g; group 2, 25 to 150 g; and group 3, more than 150 g. Kaplan-Meier and multivariable Cox regression were used. A total of 147 patients were discharged from the hospital after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis between 1991 and 2001. Preoperative left ventricular mass was 279 ± 98 g in group 1 (n = 47), 347 ± 104 g in group 2 (n = 62), and 491 ± 183 g in group 3 (n = 38) (P regression such as ischemic heart disease or hypertension, valve type, or valve size used. Ten-year actuarial survival was not statistically different in patients with enhanced left ventricular mass regression when compared with the log-rank test (group 1, 51% ± 9%; group 2, 54% ± 8%; and group 3, 72% ± 10%) (P = .26). After adjustment, left ventricular mass reduction of more than 150 g was demonstrated as an independent predictor of improved long-term survival on multivariate analysis (P = .02). Our study is the first to suggest that enhanced postoperative left ventricular mass regression, specifically in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis, may be associated with improved long-term survival. In view of these findings, strategies purported to be associated with superior left ventricular mass regression should be considered when undertaking

  15. Elevation of B-Type Natriuretic Peptide at Discharge is Associated With 2-Year Mortality After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With Severe Aortic Stenosis: Insights From a Multicenter Prospective OCEAN-TAVI (Optimized Transcatheter Valvular Intervention-Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation) Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Kazuki; Hara, Masahiko; Iwata, Shinichi; Murakami, Takashi; Shibata, Toshihiko; Yoshiyama, Minoru; Naganuma, Toru; Yamanaka, Futoshi; Higashimori, Akihiro; Tada, Norio; Takagi, Kensuke; Araki, Motoharu; Ueno, Hiroshi; Tabata, Minoru; Shirai, Shinichi; Watanabe, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Masanori; Hayashida, Kentaro

    2017-07-14

    In this study, we sought to investigate the 2-year prognostic impact of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels at discharge, following transcatheter aortic valve replacement. We enrolled 1094 consecutive patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement between 2013 and 2016. Study patients were stratified into 2 groups according to survival classification and regression tree analysis (high versus low BNP groups). We evaluated the impact of high BNP on 2-year mortality compared with that of low BNP using a multivariable Cox model, and assessed whether this stratification would improve predictive accuracy for determining 2-year mortality by assessing time-dependent net reclassification improvement and integrated discrimination improvement. The median age of patients was 85 years (quartile 82-88), and 29.2% of the study population were men. The median Society of Thoracic Surgeons score was 6.8 (4.7-9.5), and BNP at discharge was 186 (93-378) pg/mL. All-cause mortality following discharge was 7.9% (95% CI, 5.8-9.9%) at 1 year and 15.4% (95% CI, 11.6-19.0%) at 2 years. The survival classification and regression tree analysis revealed that the discriminating BNP level to discern 2-year mortality was 202 pg/mL, and that elevated BNP had a statistically significant impact on outcomes, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 2.28 (1.36-3.82, P =0.002). The time-dependent net reclassification improvement ( P =0.047) and integrated discrimination improvement ( P =0.029) analysis revealed that the incorporation of BNP stratification with other clinical variables significantly improved predictive accuracy for 2-year mortality. Elevation of BNP at discharge is associated with 2-year mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  16. Long-term follow-up in repaired tetralogy of fallot: can deformation imaging help identify optimal timing of pulmonary valve replacement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabate Rotes, Anna; Bonnichsen, Crystal R; Reece, Chelsea L; Connolly, Heidi M; Burkhart, Harold M; Dearani, Joseph A; Eidem, Benjamin W

    2014-12-01

    Novel echocardiographic techniques based on myocardial deformation have not been extensively evaluated to assess right ventricular (RV) and left ventricular (LV) response after pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot. Between 2003 and 2012, 133 patients undergoing first-time PVR after tetralogy of Fallot repair underwent echocardiographic assessment at Mayo Clinic. The last echocardiogram before PVR and 1 year after surgery were retrospectively analyzed with Velocity Vector Imaging. Mean age at PVR was 35.5 ± 16.2 years (54% women). Longitudinal peak systolic strain and strain rate before PVR were low: for the left ventricle, -14.8 ± 3.5% and -0.8 ± 0.2 sec(-1), and for the right ventricle, -16.2 ± 4.1% and -0.9 ± 0.3 sec(-1), respectively. There was no significant change in either parameter after surgery. A close correlation between LV and RV deformational parameters was found before PVR and was maintained after surgery. In the multivariate analysis, patients with better LV and RV peak systolic strain preoperatively were found to have better LV and RV peak systolic strain after surgery (P = .004 and P = .006, respectively). However, patients with the most improvement in deformation were those with worse RV function preoperatively (P = .002). Mean New York Heart Association class at early follow-up improved from 2.2 ± 0.8 to 1.2 ± 0.6 (P tetralogy of Fallot undergoing PVR, and there was no significant change after surgery. However, preoperative systolic deformational parameters were predictive of postoperative ventricular function and New York Heart Association class after PVR and may be helpful to identify optimal timing for surgical intervention in this cohort. Copyright © 2014 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Value of a noise-optimized virtual monoenergetic reconstruction technique in dual-energy CT for planning of transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Simon S.; Albrecht, Moritz H.; Wichmann, Julian L.; Huesers, Kristina; Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Booz, Christian; Bodelle, Boris; Bauer, Ralf W.; Metzger, Sarah C.; Vogl, Thomas J.; Lehnert, Thomas [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    To evaluate objective and subjective image quality of a noise-optimized virtual monoenergetic imaging (VMI+) reconstruction technique in dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) angiography prior to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Datasets of 47 patients (35 men; 64.1 ± 10.9 years) who underwent DECT angiography of heart and vascular access prior to TAVR were reconstructed with standard linear blending (F{sub 0}.5), VMI+, and traditional monoenergetic (VMI) algorithms in 10-keV intervals from 40-100 keV. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of 564 arterial segments were evaluated. Subjective analysis was rated by three blinded observers using a Likert scale. Mean SNR and CNR were highest in 40 keV VMI+ series (SNR, 27.8 ± 13.0; CNR, 26.3 ± 12.7), significantly (all p < 0.001) superior to all VMI series, which showed highest values at 70 keV (SNR, 18.5 ± 7.6; CNR, 16.0 ± 7.4), as well as linearly-blended F{sub 0}.5 series (SNR, 16.8 ± 7.3; CNR, 13.6 ± 6.9). Highest subjective image quality scores were observed for 40, 50, and 60 keV VMI+ reconstructions (all p > 0.05), significantly superior to all VMI and standard linearly-blended images (all p < 0.01). Low-keV VMI+ reconstructions significantly increase CNR and SNR compared to VMI and standard linear-blending image reconstruction and improve subjective image quality in preprocedural DECT angiography in the context of TAVR planning. (orig.)

  18. Safety and performance of a novel embolic deflection device in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement: results from the DEFLECT I study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbach, Andreas; Mullen, Michael; Brickman, Adam M; Aggarwal, Suneil K; Pietras, Cody G; Forrest, John K; Hildick-Smith, David; Meller, Stephanie M; Gambone, Louise; den Heijer, Peter; Margolis, Pauliina; Voros, Szilard; Lansky, Alexandra J

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the safety and performance of the TriGuard™ Embolic Deflection Device (EDD), a nitinol mesh filter positioned in the aortic arch across all three major cerebral artery take-offs to deflect emboli away from the cerebral circulation, in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). The prospective, multicentre DEFLECT I study (NCT01448421) enrolled 37 consecutive subjects undergoing TAVR with the TriGuard EDD. Subjects underwent clinical and cognitive follow-up to 30 days; cerebral diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) was performed pre-procedure and at 4±2 days post procedure. The device performed as intended with successful cerebral coverage in 80% (28/35) of cases. The primary safety endpoint (in-hospital EDD device- or EDD procedure-related cardiovascular mortality, major stroke disability, life-threatening bleeding, distal embolisation, major vascular complications, or need for acute cardiac surgery) occurred in 8.1% of subjects (VARC-defined two life-threatening bleeds and one vascular complication). The presence of new cerebral ischaemic lesions on post-procedure DW-MRI (n=28) was similar to historical controls (82% vs. 76%, p=NS). However, an exploratory analysis found that per-patient total lesion volume was 34% lower than reported historical data (0.2 vs. 0.3 cm3), and 89% lower in patients with complete (n=17) versus incomplete (n=10) cerebral vessel coverage (0.05 vs. 0.45 cm3, p=0.016). Use of the first-generation TriGuard EDD during TAVR is safe, and device performance was successful in 80% of cases during the highest embolic-risk portions of the TAVR procedure. The potential of the TriGuard EDD to reduce total cerebral ischaemic burden merits further randomised investigation.

  19. The evaluation of the predictors of left ventricular systolic function improvement in patients with severe aortic stenosis after aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Ponych

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim – to evaluate clinical and echocardiographic predictors of the systolic function improvement in patients with aortic stenosis (AS and low left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF after aortic valve replacement (AVR. Material and methods. One-center study analyzed data received at clinical and instrumental examination of 72 consecutively examined patients with severe aortic stenosis and systolic dysfunction (LVEF less than 45 % selected for AVR with or without coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG. The average age of patients was 62 (lower-upper quartiles 34–79 years. All patients underwent clinical and instrumental investigations, including transthoracic echocardiography and coronary angiography. Patients were retrospectively divided into two groups: 48 (66.76 % patients with left ventricular ejection fraction increased more than 30 % in the early post-surgery period, and 24 (33.3 % – less than 30 %. In 21 (29.2 % patients AVR was combined with CABG. Results. Group of patients with greater growth of LVEF was characterized by lower body mass index (p = 0.016, greater initial signs of heart failure (p = 0.019, less frequent arterial hypertension. In addition, patients with LVEF growth over 30 % had more pronounced decrease of initial EF, greater end-systolic volume (ESV index and changes of some indices of diastolic LV function. The smaller increase in LVEF was associated with greater rate of atrial fibrillation (p = 0.028 and aortic regurgitation I degree (p = 0.012. Conclusions. The median LVEF in patients with AS and systolic dysfunction after AVR increased from 29 to 43 %. Under proper selection of patients with AS and reduced LVEF for surgery more than 30 % improvement of LVEF may be expected at early postoperative period. Critical AS with reduced LVEF, including low-flow, low gradient AS should not be regarded as an independent restriction to AVR.

  20. Tackling the Issue of High Postoperative Pacemaker Implantation Rates in Sutureless Aortic Valve Replacement: Should Balloon Inflation be Removed from the Implantation Method of the Perceval Prosthesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles Blouin, Mathieu; Bouhout, Ismail; Demers, Philippe; Carrier, Michel; Perrault, Louis; Lamarche, Yoan; El-Hamamsy, Ismail; Bouchard, Denis

    2017-05-01

    Sutureless aortic valve replacement (AVR) is an emerging alternative to standard AVR in elderly and high-risk patients. This procedure is associated with a high rate of postoperative permanent pacemaker implantation (PPI). The study aim was to assess the impact on the rate of PPI of implanting the Perceval prosthesis without using balloon inflation. A total of 159 patients who underwent sutureless AVR using the Perceval prosthesis was included. Balloon inflation was used in 132 patients (Balloon group) and not used in the remaining 27 (No-Balloon group). Clinical, echocardiographic and electrocardiographic outcomes were assessed. There was no significant difference in PPI rate between the two groups (26% for Balloon group versus 22% in No-Balloon group; p = 0.700). Balloon inflation had no significant impact on the incidence of paravalvular leaks (p = 0.839), or on the need to return to cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) intraoperatively due to paravalvular leak or unsatisfactory deployment (p >0.999). Mean and peak transaortic pressure gradients were similar between the two groups (p = 0.417 and p = 0.522, respectively). Cross-clamp and CPB times were shorter in the No-Balloon group (49.6 ± 15.9 min versus 61.1 ± 25.6 min and 64.1 ± 26.3 min versus 79.6 ± 35.4 min, respectively; p = 0.027 and p = 0.012, respectively). The two groups had similar postoperative PPI rates. Implanting the Perceval prosthesis without balloon inflation is safe and had no impact on paravalvular leaks, intraoperative complications or hemodynamic results. Reductions in aortic cross-clamp time and CPB time were observed when the balloon was not used.