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Sample records for underwent radical prostatectomy

  1. Contemporary Radical Prostatectomy

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    Qiang Fu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Patients diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer have more surgical treatment options than in the past. This paper focuses on the procedures' oncological or functional outcomes and perioperative morbidities of radical retropubic prostatectomy, radical perineal prostatectomy, and robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Materials and Methods. A MEDLINE/PubMed search of the literature on radical prostatectomy and other new management options was performed. Results. Compared to the open procedures, robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy has no confirmed significant difference in most literatures besides less blood loss and blood transfusion. Nerve sparing is a safe means of preserving potency on well-selected patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. Positive surgical margin rates of radical prostatectomy affect the recurrence and survival of prostate cancer. The urinary and sexual function outcomes have been vastly improved. Neoadjuvant treatment only affects the rate of positive surgical margin. Adjuvant therapy can delay and reduce the risk of recurrence and improve the survival of the high risk prostate cancer. Conclusions. For the majority of patients with organ-confined prostate cancer, radical prostatectomy remains a most effective approach. Radical perineal prostatectomy remains a viable approach for patients with morbid obesity, prior pelvic surgery, or prior pelvic radiation. Robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP has become popular among surgeons but has not yet become the firmly established standard of care. Long-term data have confirmed the efficacy of radical retropubic prostatectomy with disease control rates and cancer-specific survival rates.

  2. Radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Sønksen, Jens; Jakobsen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    characteristics, surgeon, nerve sparing, surgical margins and blood loss were recorded prospectively in patients who underwent RRP or RALP between April 2008 and May 2012. Patients filled out the Danish Prostate Symptom Score (DAN-PSS) and International Index of Erectile Function 5 (IIEF-5) questionnaires before...... loss and functional outcomes were compared between groups. RESULTS: Overall, 453 patients were treated with RRP and 585 with RALP. On multivariate logistic regression analyses, the type of surgery did not affect surgical margins (p = 0.96) or potency at 12 months (p = 0.7). Patients who had undergone...... RRP had an increased chance of reporting subjective continence at 12 months (odds ratio 2.6, p = 0.014). There was no difference in the proportion of RRP and RALP patients who underwent surgical treatment for incontinence (p = 0.57). On multivariate linear regression analysis, RALP was an independent...

  3. Orgasm after radical prostatectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koeman, M; VanDriel, MF; Schultz, WCMW; Mensink, HJA

    Objective To evaluate the ability to obtain and the quality of orgasm after radical prostatectomy, Patients and methods The orgasms experienced after undergoing radical prostatectomy were evaluated in 20 men (median age 65 years, range 56-76) using a semi-structured interview and a self-administered

  4. Salvage robotic radical prostatectomy

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    Samuel D Kaffenberger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Failure of non-surgical primary treatment for localized prostate cancer is a common occurrence, with rates of disease recurrence ranging from 20% to 60%. In a large proportion of patients, disease recurrence is clinically localized and therefore potentially curable. Unfortunately, due to the complex and potentially morbid nature of salvage treatment, radical salvage surgery is uncommonly performed. In an attempt to decrease the morbidity of salvage therapy without sacrificing oncologic efficacy, a number of experienced centers have utilized robotic assistance to perform minimally invasive salvage radical prostatectomy. Herein, we critically evaluate the existing literature on salvage robotic radical prostatectomy with a focus on patient selection, perioperative complications and functional and early oncologic outcomes. These results are compared with contemporary and historical open salvage radical prostatectomy series and supplemented with insights we have gained from our experience with salvage robotic radical prostatectomy. The body of evidence by which conclusions regarding the efficacy and safety of robotic salvage radical prostatectomy can be drawn comprises fewer than 200 patients with limited follow-up. Preliminary results are promising and some outcomes have been favorable when compared with contemporary open salvage prostatectomy series. Advantages of the robotic platform in the performance of salvage radical prostatectomy include decreased blood loss, short length of stay and improved visualization. Greater experience is required to confirm the long-term oncologic efficacy and functional outcomes as well as the generalizability of results achieved at experienced centers.

  5. Radical prostatectomy - discharge

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    ... to 6 months. You will learn exercises (called Kegel exercises) that strengthen the muscles in your pelvis. ... Radical prostatectomy Retrograde ejaculation Urinary incontinence Patient Instructions Kegel exercises - self-care Suprapubic catheter care Urinary catheters - ...

  6. Sexuality Following Radical Prostatectomy

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    Fode, Mikkel; Serefoglu, Ege C; Albersen, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Radical prostatectomies can result in urinary incontinence and sexual dysfunction. Traditionally, these issues have been studied separately, and the sexual problem that has received the most focus has been erectile dysfunction. AIM: To summarize the literature on sexually related side...... effects and their consequences after radical prostatectomy and focus on the occurrence and management of problems beyond erectile dysfunction. METHODS: The literature on sexuality after radical prostatectomy was reviewed through a Medline search. Original research using quantitative and qualitative...... methodologies was considered. Priority was given to studies exploring aspects of sexuality other than erectile function. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The prevalence, predictive factors, and management of post-prostatectomy sexual problems beyond erectile dysfunction. RESULTS: Most patients will develop urinary...

  7. Comparison of pathological outcomes of active surveillance candidates who underwent radical prostatectomy using contemporary protocols at a high-volume Korean center.

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    Lee, Dong Hoon; Jung, Ha Bum; Lee, Seung Hwan; Rha, Koon Ho; Choi, Young Deuk; Hong, Sung Jun; Yang, Seung Choul; Chung, Byung Ha

    2012-11-01

    We compared contemporary active surveillance protocols based on pathological outcomes in patients who underwent radical prostatectomy. We identified the experimental cohort from prostate cancer patients who underwent radical prostatectomy between 2001 and 2011, and who met the inclusion criteria of five published active surveillance protocols, namely Johns Hopkins Medical Institution, University of California at San Francisco, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, University of Miami and Prostate Cancer Research International: Active Surveillance. To compare each protocol, we evaluated the pathological outcomes and calculated the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for each protocol according to the proportion of organ-confined Gleason≤6 disease. Overall, 376 patients met the inclusion criteria of the active surveillance protocols with 61, 325, 222, 212 and 206 patients meeting the criteria of the Johns Hopkins Medical Institution, University of California at San Francisco, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, University of Miami and Prostate Cancer Research International: Active Surveillance protocols, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity values of the five protocols, respectively, were 0.199 and 0.882 in Johns Hopkins Medical Institution, 0.855 and 0.124 in University of California at San Francisco, 0.638 and 0.468 in Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 0.599 and 0.479 in University of Miami, and 0.609 and 0.527 in Prostate Cancer Research International: Active Surveillance. In terms of both the sensitivity and specificity, Prostate Cancer Research International: Active Surveillance was the most balanced protocol. In addition, Prostate Cancer Research International: Active Surveillance showed a more accurate performance for favourable pathological outcomes than the others. However, using the area under the curve to compare the discriminative ability of each protocol, there were no statistically significant differences. The contemporary

  8. Penile rehabilitation after radical prostatectomy

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    Fode, Mikkel; Ohl, Dana A; Ralph, David

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy (RP) is believed to include neuropraxia, which leads to temporarily reduced oxygenation and subsequent structural changes in penile tissue. This results in veno-occlusive dysfunction, therefore, penile rehabilitation programmes...

  9. CONTINENT RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

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    Yu. P. Sernyak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the impact of dissection of the dorsal venous complex without pre-ligation, suturing, or coagulation during radical prostatectomy (RPE in patients with localized prostate cancer (PC on the quality of surgery and the function of urinary retention.Subjects and methods. The data of 42 patients who had undergone posterior and anterior anatomical repair and vesicourethral anastomosis using a V-lock suture after prostatectomy were analyzed. All the patients were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 consisted of 22 patients in whom the dorsal venous complex was closed using a 3-0 vicryl suture before urethral dissection. Group 2 included 20 patients in whom the urethra was dissected without suturing the venous complex.Results. In group 1, complete urinary retention after catheter removal was noted in 9 (40.9 % and 15 (68 % patients within 24 hours and after 3 months, respectively. Following 12 months, two (9 % patients were observed to have partial mild urinary incontinence (as many as 2 pads per day. Group 2 patients showed complete urinary retention in 17 (85 % cases on the first day after catheter removal; all the patients retained urine 3 months later.Conclusion. In patients with localized PC, dissection of the dorsal venous complex without presuturing during laparoscopic RPE exerts a considerable impact on the preservation of urinary retention, namely 45% more of the patients reported complete urinary retention in early periods and 10 % more did this in later periods. At the same time, there was no statistically significant increase in intraoperative blood loss (p > 0.05, the number of positive edges, or biochemical recurrences.

  10. CONTINENT RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

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    Yu. P. Sernyak

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the impact of dissection of the dorsal venous complex without pre-ligation, suturing, or coagulation during radical prostatectomy (RPE in patients with localized prostate cancer (PC on the quality of surgery and the function of urinary retention.Subjects and methods. The data of 42 patients who had undergone posterior and anterior anatomical repair and vesicourethral anastomosis using a V-lock suture after prostatectomy were analyzed. All the patients were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 consisted of 22 patients in whom the dorsal venous complex was closed using a 3-0 vicryl suture before urethral dissection. Group 2 included 20 patients in whom the urethra was dissected without suturing the venous complex.Results. In group 1, complete urinary retention after catheter removal was noted in 9 (40.9 % and 15 (68 % patients within 24 hours and after 3 months, respectively. Following 12 months, two (9 % patients were observed to have partial mild urinary incontinence (as many as 2 pads per day. Group 2 patients showed complete urinary retention in 17 (85 % cases on the first day after catheter removal; all the patients retained urine 3 months later.Conclusion. In patients with localized PC, dissection of the dorsal venous complex without presuturing during laparoscopic RPE exerts a considerable impact on the preservation of urinary retention, namely 45% more of the patients reported complete urinary retention in early periods and 10 % more did this in later periods. At the same time, there was no statistically significant increase in intraoperative blood loss (p > 0.05, the number of positive edges, or biochemical recurrences.

  11. Day case laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

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    Hamid Abboudi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate the feasibility of performing laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP as a day case procedure while maintaining patient satisfaction and safety. Herein we report our experience, selection criteria, and discharge criteria for day case LRP. Methods: We performed a prospective study with 32 patients undergoing extraperitoneal LRP. These patients were counselled before the procedure that they would go home the same evening of the procedure. Pain scores and quality of life data were recorded day 1 postoperatively via a telephone consultation. The patients underwent routine blood tests on day 2 and an outpatient review on day 7 and regularly thereafter via an assigned key worker. Socio-demographic data, comorbidities, and outcomes were collected for analysis. Results: All patients were successfully discharged the same day of surgery. Mean patient age was 62 years with a mean body mass index of 25. Mean operative time was 147 minutes, and estimated blood loss was 101 ml. Three patients were treated for post operative urinary tract infections; two patients developed infected lymphoceles which required percutaneous drainage and one patient required re-catheterisation due to a burst catheter balloon. Of these six complications four patients required re-admission. Post-operative pain, nausea and vomiting were low whilst patient satisfaction scores were unanimously high in all patients surveyed. Conclusions: The early experience with extraperitoneal LRP as a same day surgery is promising although patients who are at high risk of lymphocele should be excluded. Preoperative patient counselling and selection is paramount. Patient satisfaction is not adversely affected by the shortened stay. Surgeon experience, a well-motivated patient, meticulous attention to detail through an integrated pathway, a multidisciplinary team and adequate postoperative assessment are essential.

  12. Hernia repair during endoscopic (laparoscopic) radical prostatectomy.

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    Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Rabenalt, Robert; Dietel, Anja; Do, Minh; Pfeiffer, Heidemarie; Schwalbe, Steffen; Dorschner, Wolfgang

    2003-02-01

    We retrospectively reviewed our experience in performing endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy (EERPE) and totally extraperitoneal (TEP) hernia repair in one procedure to evaluate its feasibility and safety. Based on our experience of 70 laparoscopic radical prostatectomies, a total of 60 patients underwent EERPE. Eight of these had 10 hernias repaired with Prolene mesh. The median total operating time for EERPE was 165 minutes. Mesh placement required an additional 15 minutes for a unilateral hernia and 25 minutes for bilateral hernias. The conversion rate and the reoperation rate were 0%. The median duration of vesical catheterization was 8.3 days. One patient required a blood transfusion. The most common minor complications, occurring in eight patients, were edema and hematoma of the penis. No wound infection occurred. The only major complication was a deep venous thrombosis in one patient. No additional complications developed in the hernioplasty group. We conclude that the extraperitoneal approach for radical prostatectomy allows concomitant inguinal hernia repair with a low morbidity rate and within an acceptable operating time.

  13. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: a review

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    Pierluigi Bove

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: We offer an overview of the intra-, peri- and postoperative outcomes of laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP with the endpoint to evaluate potential advantages of this approach. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We conducted an extensive Medline literature search (search terms “laparoscopic radical prostatectomy” and “radical prostatectomy” from 1990 until 2007. Only full-length English language articles identified during this search were considered for this analysis. A preference was given to the articles with large series with more than 100 patients. All pertinent articles concerning localized prostate cancer were reviewed. CONCLUSION:Pure LRP has shown to be feasible and reproducible but it is difficult to learn. Potential advantages over open surgery have to be confirmed by longer-term follow-up and adequately designed clinical studies.

  14. Critical appraisal of management of rectal injury during radical prostatectomy.

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    Roberts, Wilmer B; Tseng, Kenneth; Walsh, Patrick C; Han, Misop

    2010-11-01

    To critically evaluate the perioperative management of rectal injury during radical prostatectomy. Rectal injuries were identified from the departmental morbidity and mortality records and radical prostatectomy databases. The electronic patient records were reviewed for management and outcomes. From January 1997 to August 2007, 11 452 men underwent radical prostatectomy. Of these men, 10 183 underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) and 1269, laparoscopic retropubic prostatectomy (LRP) with or without robotic assistance. Rectal injury occurred in 18 men-12 in the RRP group (0.12%) and 6 in the LRP group (0.47%). Of these rectal injuries, 16 were recognized intraoperatively and primarily repaired in multiple layers without a diverting colostomy. A pedicle of omentum was used as an interposing layer in 4 of these cases. Despite primary repair, 2 patients without omental interposition developed a rectourethral fistula. In 1 man in the RRP group, the fistula closed with prolonged catheterization (9 weeks). In the other patient, in the LRP group, the fistula persisted; thus, a diverting colostomy was performed. Eventually, a transrectal advancement flap was required. Two rectal injuries (1 each in the RRP and LRP groups) were unrecognized during radical prostatectomy but were discovered within 4 days. Despite conservative management, the rectourethral fistulas persisted in both men, requiring subsequent repair with a transrectal advancement flap. Rectal injury is an infrequent complication of radical prostatectomy. When recognized intraoperatively and primarily repaired, rectourethral fistula was prevented in 87.5% of men. Primary repair performed with vascularized tissue interposition prevented rectourethral fistula development. In men with unrecognized rectal injury, the rectourethral fistula tended to persist and eventually required delayed surgical repair. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Transperitoneal versus extraperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: A prospective single surgeon randomized comparative study.

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    Akand, Murat; Erdogru, Tibet; Avci, Egemen; Ates, Mutlu

    2015-10-01

    To compare operative, pathological, and functional results of transperitoneal and extraperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy carried out by a single surgeon. After having experience with 32 transperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomies, 317 extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomies, 30 transperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomies and 10 extraperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomies, 120 patients with prostate cancer were enrolled in this prospective randomized study and underwent either transperitoneal or extraperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. The main outcome parameters between the two study groups were compared. No significant difference was found for age, body mass index, preoperative prostate-specific antigen, clinical and pathological stage, Gleason score on biopsy and prostatectomy specimen, tumor volume, positive surgical margin, and lymph node status. Transperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy had shorter trocar insertion time (16.0 vs 25.9 min for transperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and extraperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy, P robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy had shorter console time (101.5 vs 118.3 min, respectively, P robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy, without statistical significance (200.9 vs 193.2 min; 221.8 vs 213.3 min, respectively). Estimated blood loss was found to be lower for extraperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (P = 0.001). Catheterization and hospitalization times were observed to be shorter in extraperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (7.3 vs 5.8 days and 3.1 vs 2.3 days for transperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and extraperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy, respectively, P robot-assisted laparoscopic

  16. [Early complications following open radical prostatectomy

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    Roder, M.A.; Gruschy, L.; Brasso, K.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Radical prostatectomy has been offered as curative treatment for localized prostate cancer at Rigshospitalet since August 1995. We here report on postoperative complications in 719 patients operated during the 12-year-period from August 1995 to August 2007 with special emphasis...... patients (1,1%). One patient died within 30 days after surgery. CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrate that radical prostatectomy can be performed with a minimal mortality and an acceptable morbidity Udgivelsesdato: 2009/4/27...

  17. Pitfalls of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: a comparison of positive surgical margins between robotic and laparoscopic surgery.

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    Tozawa, Keiichi; Yasui, Takahiro; Umemoto, Yukihiro; Mizuno, Kentaro; Okada, Atsushi; Kawai, Noriyasu; Takahashi, Satoru; Kohri, Kenjiro

    2014-10-01

    To compare the surgical outcomes of laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, including the frequency and location of positive surgical margins. The study cohort comprised 708 consecutive male patients with clinically localized prostate cancer who underwent laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (n = 551) or robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (n = 157) between January 1999 and September 2012. Operative time, estimated blood loss, complications, and positive surgical margins frequency were compared between laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. There were no significant differences in age or body mass index between the laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy patients. Prostate-specific antigen levels, Gleason sum and clinical stage of the robot-assisted radical prostatectomy patients were significantly higher than those of the laparoscopic radical prostatectomy patients. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy patients suffered significantly less bleeding (P robot-assisted radical prostatectomy group. In the laparoscopic radical prostatectomy group, positive surgical margins were detected in the apex (52.0%), anterior (5.3%), posterior (5.3%) and lateral regions (22.7%) of the prostate, as well as in the bladder neck (14.7%). In the robot-assisted radical prostatectomy patients, they were observed in the apex, anterior, posterior, and lateral regions of the prostate in 43.0%, 6.9%, 25.9% and 15.5% of patients, respectively, as well as in the bladder neck in 8.6% of patients. Positive surgical margin distributions after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and laparoscopic radical prostatectomy are significantly different. The only disadvantage of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy is the lack of tactile feedback. Thus, the robotic surgeon needs to take this into account to minimize the risk of positive surgical margins. © 2014 The Japanese Urological

  18. Overactive bladder is a negative predictor of achieving continence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

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    Yamada, Yuta; Fujimura, Tetsuya; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Sugihara, Toru; Miyazaki, Hideyo; Nakagawa, Tohru; Kume, Haruki; Igawa, Yasuhiko; Homma, Yukio

    2017-10-01

    To investigate predictors of continence outcomes after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Clinical records of 272 patients who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy were investigated. Preoperative Overactive Bladder Symptom Score, International Prostate Symptom Score and clinicopathological factors were investigated, and relationships between factors and recovery of continence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy were assessed. The presence of overactive bladder was defined as having urgency for more than once a week and having ≥3 points according to the Overactive Bladder Symptom Score. Age (≤66 years) was significantly associated with continence within 6 months after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (P = 0.033). The absence of overactive bladder and lower Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, Kaplan-Meier curves showed earlier recovery in "age ≤66 years," "prostate weight ≤40 g" and "overactive bladder symptom score robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  19. Optimal pain management for radical prostatectomy surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Grish P; Jaschinski, Thomas; Bonnet, Francis

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increase in the diagnosis of prostate cancer has increased the incidence of radical prostatectomy. However, the literature assessing pain therapy for this procedure has not been systematically evaluated. Thus, optimal pain therapy for patients undergoing radical prostatectomy remains...... controversial. METHODS: Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched for studies assessing the effects of analgesic and anesthetic interventions on pain after radical prostatectomy. All searches were conducted in October 2012 and updated in June 2015. RESULTS: Most...... treatments studied improved pain relief and/or reduced opioid requirements. However, there were significant differences in the study designs and the variables evaluated, precluding quantitative analysis and consensus recommendations. CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review reveals that there is a lack...

  20. Indwelling Urinary Catheter-Related Problems After Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy.

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    Reuvers, Sarah; Zonneveld, Willemijn; Meiland-van Bakel, Marja; Putter, Hein; Nicolai, Melianthe; Pelger, Rob; Elzevier, Henk

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine occurrence rates of catheter-related problems and their association to pertinent clinical characteristics in men with indwelling urinary catheters following laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Descriptive, correlational study. One hundred twelve men who underwent laparoscopic radical prostatectomy between December 2010 and December 2012 at the Leiden University Medical Centre in the Netherlands were included in this study. After surgery, a Charriere 20 (20F) silicone catheter was left indwelling for 1 week. Data were gathered from 2 sources; we reviewed participants' medical records, and participants completed a questionnaire designed for this study. Pearson χ tests were used to analyze associations between dichotomous and ordinal variables and catheter-related problems. Univariate logistic regression analyses were used to analyze the relationships between continuous factors and catheter-related problems. Seventy-five percent of participants reported at least 1 catheter-related problem. Univariate regression analyses revealed correlations between body weight and experiencing catheter-related problems (odds ratio [OR] = 1.050; P = .028) and between body mass index and experiencing catheter-related problems (OR = 1.159; P = .049). Indwelling catheter-related problems after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy are prevalent, and they may occur at any time during the entire period of catheter use. High body mass index and high body weight were associated with an increased likelihood of catheter-related problems following radical prostatectomy.

  1. Gleason Score Correlation Between Prostate Biopsy and Radical Prostatectomy Specimens

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    Erdem Öztürk

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men and the second cause of cancer-related mortality. Prostate biopsy and the Gleason score guide treatment decisions in prostate cancer. Several studies have investigated the correlation between biopsy scores and radical prostatectomy specimen scores. We also evaluated the correlation of Gleason scores of these specimens in our patient series. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the data of 468 men who were diagnosed with prostate cancer and underwent radical prostatectomy between 2008 and 2017. Patients’ age, prostate-specific antigen levels at diagnosis, and prostate biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimen Gleason scores were recorded. Upgrading and downgrading were defined as increase or decrease of Gleason score of radical prostate specimen compared to Gleason score of prostate biopsy. Results: A total of 442 men diagnosed with prostate cancer were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 62.62±6.26 years (44-84 years and mean prostate specific antigen level was 9.01±6.84 ng/mL (1.09-49 ng/mL. Prostate biopsy Gleason score was 7 in 27 (6.1% men. Radical prostatectomy specimen Gleason score was 7 in 62 (14% men. Gleason correlation was highest in the 240 patients (71.6% with score <7 and was lowest in the 31 (38.75% patients with score =7. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the discordance rate between Gleason scores of prostate biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimens was 35.7%.

  2. Open conversion during minimally invasive radical prostatectomy: impact on perioperative complications and predictors from national data.

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    Sharma, Vidit; Meeks, Joshua J

    2014-12-01

    Despite the increased use of minimally invasive radical prostatectomy, open conversion may occur due to surgical complications, surgeon inexperience or failure to progress. We used nationally representative data to quantify the impact of open conversion compared to nonconverted minimally invasive radical prostatectomy and open radical prostatectomy, and identify predictors of open conversion. Years 2004 to 2010 of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample were queried for patients who underwent radical prostatectomy to analyze the association of open conversion during minimally invasive radical prostatectomy with Clavien complications. Multivariate regression models yielded significant predictors of open conversion. From 2004 to 2010, 134,398 (95% CI 111,509-157,287) minimally invasive radical prostatectomies were performed with a 1.8% (95% CI 1.4-2.1) open conversion rate, translating to 2,360 (95% CI 2,001-2,720) conversions. Open conversion cases had a longer length of stay (4.17 vs 1.71 days, p open conversion cases 45.2% experienced a complication vs 7.2% and 12.9% of minimally invasive radical prostatectomy and open radical prostatectomy cases, respectively (p open conversion was associated with significantly increased odds of a Clavien grade 1, 2, 3 and 4 complication compared to nonconverted minimally invasive radical prostatectomy and open radical prostatectomy (OR range 2.913 to 15.670, p open conversion were obesity (OR 1.916), adhesions (OR 3.060), anemia (OR 5.692) and surgeon volume for minimally invasive radical prostatectomy less than 25 cases per year (OR 7.376) (all p Open conversion during minimally invasive radical prostatectomy is associated with a higher than expected increase in complications compared to open radical prostatectomy and minimally invasive radical prostatectomy after adjusting for age and comorbidities. External validation of predictors of open conversion may prove useful in minimizing open conversion during minimally invasive radical

  3. REHABILITATION OF PATIENTS AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

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    V. N. Pavlov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available According to the data obtained by Russian and foreign investigators, the major complication after radical prostatectomy (RPE is urinaryincontinence that is recorded in 20-30% of cases.Objective. To improve the results of surgical treatment in patients with prostate cancer, by developing and introducing a well-rounded post-operative rehabilitation program.Subjects and methods. Seventy-four patients who were treated at the urology clinic, Bashkir State Medical University, and underwent RPEin 2005 to 2007 have been examined; 27 of them were diagnosed as having urinary incontinence (UI. After discharge from the clinic, acontrol group received rehabilitative treatment at the sanatorium “Krasnousolsk” of the Republic of Bashkortostan. Results and discussion. Therapeutic exercises and pelvic floor electrostimulation halve the number of day urinations and paddings used inpatients with UI, by increasing the bladder capacity from 138.2±12.7 to 196±11.2 ml and improving the trophism of the bladder neck andurethra in the sphincteral area. 

  4. Salvage robot-assisted radical prostatectomy after brachytherapy: our experience

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    A. V. Govorov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In case of recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation therapy patient may be offered salvage radical prostatectomy (both open and laparoscopic/robotic, hormone therapy, and a number of alternative techniques such as salvage cryoablation, HIFU-therapy and brachytherapy. Results of monitoring of patients for 10 years after salvage treatment of prostate cancer are known only after salvage prostatectomy. Technically radical prostatectomy after radiation therapy is associated with a large number of complications if compared with primary radical prostatectomy. The most frequent complications after salvage prostatectomy include incontinence, stricture formation of urethrovesical anastomosis, rectal injury, acute urinary retention and infectious complications.

  5. Minimally invasive treatment of vesicourethral leak after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

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    TIAGO RIVELLO ELMOR

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to describe our experience with a minimally invasive approach for persistent vesicourethral anastomotic leak (PVAL after Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy (LRP. Methods: from 2004 to 2011, two surgeons performed LRP in 620 patients. Ten patients had PVAL, with initially indicated conservative treatment, to no avail. These patients underwent a minimally invasive operation, consisting of an endoscopically insertion of two ureteral catheters to direct urine flow, fixed to a new urethral catheter. We maintained the ureteral catheters for seven days on average to complete resolution of urine leakage. The urethral catheter was removed after three weeks of surgery. Results: the correction of urine leakage occurred within a range of one to three days, in all ten patients, without complications. There were no stenosis of the bladder neck and urinary incontinence on long-term follow-up. Conclusion: the study showed that PVAL after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy can be treated endoscopically with safety and excellent results.

  6. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: omitting a pelvic drain

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    David Canes

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Our goal was to assess outcomes of a selective drain placement strategy during laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP with a running urethrovesical anastomosis (RUVA using cystographic imaging in all patients. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed for all patients undergoing LRP between January 2003 and December 2004. The anastomosis was performed using a modified van Velthoven technique. A drain was placed at the discretion of the senior surgeon when a urinary leak was demonstrated with bladder irrigation, clinical suspicion for a urinary leak was high, or a complex bladder neck reconstruction was performed. Routine postoperative cystograms were obtained. RESULTS: 208 patients underwent LRP with a RUVA. Data including cystogram was available for 206 patients. The overall rate of cystographic urine leak was 5.8%. A drain was placed in 51 patients. Of these, 8 (15.6% had a postoperative leak on cystogram. Of the 157 undrained patients, urine leak was radiographically visible in 4 (2.5%. The higher leak rate in the drained vs. undrained cohort was statistically significant (p = 0.002. Twenty-four patients underwent pelvic lymph node dissection (8 drained, 16 undrained. Three undrained patients developed lymphoceles, which presented clinically on average 3 weeks postoperatively. There were no urinomas or hematomas in either group. CONCLUSIONS: Routine placement of a pelvic drain after LRP with a RUVA is not necessary, unless the anastomotic integrity is suboptimal intraoperatively. Experienced clinical judgment is essential and accurate in identifying patients at risk for postoperative leakage. When suspicion is low, omitting a drain does not increase morbidity.

  7. Intraoperative photodynamic control of radical prostatectomy

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    I. V. Chernyshev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the experience of photodynamic diagnosis with a photosensitizer «Alasens» during the execution of open and laparoscopic radical prostatectomy were obtained and analyzed the clinical results of the study. The method of photodynamic diagnostics enables intraoperative detection of tumor-affected areas of the bed of the prostate with subsequent resection. The method is promising for reducing the incidence of positive surgical margins.

  8. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy in the canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, D T; Chari, R S; Neighbors, J D; Eubanks, S; Schuessler, W W; Preminger, G M

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of performing laparoscopic radical prostatectomy in a canine model. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy was performed on six adult male canines. A new endoscopic needle driver was used to construct a secure vesicourethral anastomosis. Average operative time required to complete the procedure was 304 min (range 270-345 min). Dissection of the prostate gland took an average of 67 min (range 35-90 min), and construction of the vesicourethral anastomosis took 154 min (rage 80-240 min). There were no intraoperative complications and only one postoperative complication (anastomotic leak). Five of the six animals recovered uneventfully from the procedure, and their foley catheters were removed 10-14 days postoperatively after a retrograde cystourethrogram demonstrated an intact vesicourethral anastomosis. Four (80%) of the surviving animals were clinically continent within 10 days after catheter removal. Post mortem examination confirmed that the vesicourethral anastomosis was intact with no evidence of urine extravasation. These data demonstrate the feasibility of laparoscopic radical prostatectomy in a canine model, and suggest that additional work with this technique should be continued to develop its potential clinical application.

  9. Incontinence and Erectile Dysfunction Following Radical Prostatectomy: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerasimos Alivizatos

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Radical prostatectomy remains the treatment of choice for localized prostate cancer in age-appropriate and health-appropriate men. Although cancer control is the most important aspect of a radical prostatectomy, minimization of postoperative morbidity, especially urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction, is becoming a greater concern. We reviewed recent data available on Medline regarding the incidence, pathophysiology, evaluation, and treatment of incontinence and sexual dysfunction after radical prostatectomy. Health-related quality of life issues have been specifically addressed. Although low incidences of incontinence and erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy have been reported in the hands of experienced surgeons, the literature review revealed a great variety, with incontinence rates ranging from 0.3–65.6% and potency rates ranging from 11–87%. Several factors contribute to this wide difference, the most important being the application of a meticulous surgical technique. General and cancer-specific health-related quality of life is not being affected after radical prostatectomy. The incidence of incontinence and erectile dysfunction is higher after radical prostatectomy when compared to the incidence observed when other therapies for localized prostate cancer are applied. However, the majority of the patients undergoing radical prostatectomy would vote for the operation again. Today, avoidance of major complications after radical prostatectomy depends mostly on a high-quality surgical technique. When incontinence or erectile dysfunction persists after radical prostatectomy, the majority of the treated patients can be managed effectively by various methods.

  10. Radiotherapy for men with PSA failure following radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiota, Masaki; Noma, Hideya; Yamaguchi, Akito

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of salvage external beam radiotherapy (RT) to the prostate bed for men with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure following radical prostatectomy. Fourteen patients underwent RT for PSA failure following radical prostatectomy between 1999 and 2000. Median follow-up was 24 months. Median PSA level before RT was 0.51 ng/ml. Radiation dose was 60 Gy or 61.4 Gy. The 3-year actuarial biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) rate was 40%. The biochemical effectiveness of RT was better in cases with a PSA level of less than 1 ng/ml compared to that in cases with a level higher than 1 ng/ml. The PSA level before RT and surgical margin involvement were identified as prognostic factors for bDFS. No patients experienced grade 3 toxicity. RT for PSA failure following radical prostatectomy seems to be very effective and was only slightly toxic during a limited follow-up period. (author)

  11. Robotic Salvage Lymph Node Dissection After Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio C. M. Torricelli

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTIntroduction and objective:Radical prostatectomy is a first-line treatment for localized prostate cancer. However, in some cases, biochemical recurrence associated with imaging-detected nodal metastases may happen. Herein, we aim to present the surgical technique for salvage lymph node dissection after radical prostatectomy.Materials and Methods:A 70 year-old asymptomatic man presented with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA of 7.45ng/ mL. Digital rectal examination was normal and trans-rectal prostate biopsy revealed a prostate adenocarcinoma Gleason 7 (3+4. Pre-operative computed tomography scan and bone scintigraphy showed no metastatic disease. In other service, the patient underwent a robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy plus obturador lymphadenectomy. Pathologic examination showed a pT3aN0 tumor. After 6 months of follow-up, serum PSA was 1.45ng/mL. Further investigation with 11C–Choline PET/CT revealed only a 2-cm lymph node close to the left internal iliac artery. The patient was counseled for salvage lymph node dissection.Results:Salvage lymph node dissection was uneventfully performed. Operative time was 1.5 hour, blood loss was minimal, and there were no intra- or postoperative complications. The patient was discharged from hospital in the 1st postoperative day. After 12 months of follow-up, his PSA was undetectable with no other adjuvant therapy.Conclusion:Robotic salvage pelvic lymph node dissection is an effective option for treatment of patients with biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy and only pelvic lymph node metastasis detected by C11-Choline PET/CT.

  12. Survival outcomes in elderly men undergoing radical prostatectomy in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghe, Weranja; Wang, Luke L; Persad, Raj; Bolton, Damien; Lawrentschuk, Nathan; Sengupta, Shomik

    2017-09-18

    To investigate the outcomes of patients older than 75 years of age in Victoria undergoing radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer. Data on all men undergoing radical prostatectomy in Victoria between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2014 were obtained from the Victorian Cancer Registry. Tumour characteristics including Gleason grade, stage of disease and cause of death were obtained. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-squared test, Cox proportional hazards method and Kaplan-Meier analysis. A total of 14 686 men underwent radical prostatectomy during the defined period, with a median follow-up of 58 months. Of these, 332 were men over the age of 75. All parameters are comparisons between patients >75 years of age and men 75 years had a higher proportion of Gleason grade ≥8 disease (16.6% versus 11.4%, P 75 years had lower rates of 5- and 10-year overall survival (67.3% versus 96.3% and 27.7% versus 89.1%) and lower rates of 5- and 10-year prostate cancer-specific survival (96.2% versus 99.3% and 94.3% versus 97.4%), respectively. Age was an independent risk factor for prostate cancer specific and overall mortality on multivariate analysis (hazard ratio 1.49, 95% confidence interval 1.32-1.68; P < 0.001 and hazard ratio 4.26, 95% confidence interval 2.15-8.42; P < 0.001), when adjusted for stage and grade. Older men undergoing radical prostatectomy in Victoria had higher-grade disease but similar stage. Age was an independent risk factor for worse prostate cancer-specific and overall survival. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  13. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy is a safe procedure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Hvarness, Helle

    2013-01-01

    We present our departmental experience with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and describe complications and early results for the first 239 consecutive patients.......We present our departmental experience with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and describe complications and early results for the first 239 consecutive patients....

  14. Transperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: ascending technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassweiler, J; Marrero, R; Hammady, A; Erdogru, T; Teber, D; Frede, T

    2004-09-01

    To demonstrate the operative steps of transperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy with the ascending approach (Heilbronn technique). The technique is based on our experience with more than 1000 cases of clinically localized prostate cancer from March 1999 to April 2004. The technical steps, instrumental requirements, patient data, complications, and reintervention rate were reviewed. The principles of the technique include the routine use of a voice-controlled robot (AESOP) for the camera, exposure of the prostatic apex with 120 degree retracting forceps, free-hand suturing for Santorini plexus control, application of 5-mm clips during the nerve-sparing technique, control of the prostatic pedicles by 12-mm Hem-o-Lock clips, the bladder neck-sparing technique in patients with stage T1c and T2a tumors, and use of interrupted sutures for the urethrovesical anastomosis. A considerable improvement was observed when comparing the first 300 with the most recent 300 cases (mean operating time 280 v 208 minutes; conversion rate 2.7% v 0.3%; reintervention rate 3.7% v 1.0%). Through our experience with more than 1000 cases, transperitoneal access for laparoscopic radical prostatectomy has proven to be feasible and transferable with results comparable to those of the original open approach. Besides the well-known advantages of minimally invasive surgery, the video endoscopic approach may offer further benefits in permitting optimization of the technique by video assessment.

  15. Neglected Side Effects After Radical Prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frey, Anders Ullmann; Sønksen, Jens; Fode, Mikkel

    2014-01-01

    been shown to double the risk of OAP. PS occurs in 15-68% of RP patients. Nerve sparing and preservation of erectile function may help preserve penile length. With regard to all side effects, studies indicate that they are reduced over time. CONCLUSIONS: The sexually related side effects summarized......INTRODUCTION: A series of previously neglected sexually related side effects to radical prostatectomy (RP) has been identified over the recent years. These include orgasm-associated incontinence (OAI), urinary incontinence in relation to sexual stimulation (UISS), altered perception of orgasm......, orgasm-associated pain (OAP), penile shortening (PS), and penile deformity. AIM: The aim of this article is to conduct a systematic review of the literature regarding the above-mentioned side effects. METHODS: A predefined search strategy was applied in a thorough search of Medline, Web of science...

  16. Clinical outcome of radical prostatectomy for stage C prostate cancer. Comparison with other treatment modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Osamu; Meguro, Norio; Saiki, Shigeru; Kinouchi, Toshiaki; Kuroda, Masao; Usami, Michiyuki; Kotake, Toshihiko

    1997-01-01

    Of the 69 patients with clinical stage C prostate cancer under 75 years old and with good performance status between 1986 and 1995, 29 underwent radical prostatectomy combined with endocrine therapy, 21 underwent radiation therapy combined with endocrine therapy and remaining 19 patients were treated by endocrine therapy alone. The median follow-up was 44 months (range 4 to 122). Radical prostatectomy resulted in progression-free rates of 79% and 61% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Progression-free rates were lower in patients with lymph node metastasis or positive surgical margins. In patients with clinical stage T3a-c and well or moderately differentiated tumor, radical prostatectomy resulted in a progression-free rate of 100% at 5 years. However, in patients with clinical stage T4a or poorly differentiated tumor, radiation therapy resulted in a better progression-free rate than radical prostatectomy. These findings suggest that patients with clinical stage T3a-c and well or moderately differentiated tumor will benefit from radical prostatectomy combined with endocrine therapy and that radiation therapy will be effective for advanced diseases. (author)

  17. Initial experience with aspirin use during robotic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowfar, Sepehr; Kopp, Ryan; Palazzi-Churas, Kerrin; Derweesh, Ithaar H; Kane, Christopher J

    2012-04-01

    New cardiology guidelines recommend antiplatelet therapy for some patients with cardiac stents. Aspirin use is relatively contraindicated during urologic surgery because of increased bleeding risk. We sought to review the outcomes of patients who continued aspirin during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Between October 2007 and February 2010, 249 patients underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy by a single surgeon. After consultation with the patients' cardiologists, 6 patients had coronary artery stents and continued aspirin perioperatively (Group 1), and 7 patients had coronary artery stents but did not continue aspirin perioperatively (Group 2). The remaining 236 patients had no coronary artery stents and did not require continued aspirin (Group 3). We analyzed our patients' preoperative characteristics, including age, prostate-specific antigen volume, and D'Amico risk, as well as operative time, blood loss, hematocrit changes, transfusion requirements, length of hospital stay, and complications. We found no differences in operative time, estimated blood loss, changes in hematocrit, or length of hospital stay. No patients with any type of cardiac stent required a postoperative blood transfusion or had complications requiring more than simple anti-emetics, analgesics, or electrolyte correction. Nine patients in Group 3 required interventions for significant complications. Larger studies need to be performed to validate these observations.

  18. Radical prostatectomy. Results and indications; Indications et resultats de la prostatectomie radicale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacqmin, D. [Hopitaux universitaires de Strasbourg, 67 - Strasbourg (France)

    1997-12-31

    Radical prostatectomy is the surgical curative treatment of localized prostate cancer. The survival is good in young patients (<70) with T2 N0M0 tumors and more than 10 year`s life expectancy. Side-effects are urinary incontinence, impotence and anastomosis stricture. Quality of life should be considered as an important factor for the choice of the patient between radical prostatectomy, radiotherapy and follow-up. (author)

  19. A comparative study of complications and outcomes associated with radical retropubic prostatectomy and robot assisted radical prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettman, Matthew T.

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate outcomes among a matched cohort of prostate cancer patients treated with radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) and robot assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). Materials and methods: Between 2002 and 2005, 294 patients underwent RARP at our institution. Comparison RRP patients were matched 2:1 for surgical year, age, PSA, clinical stage, and biopsy grade (n=588). Outcomes among groups were compared. From an oncologic standpoint, pathologic features among groups were assessed and Kaplan-Meier estimates of PSA recurrence free survival were compared. Results: Overall margin positivity was not significantly different between groups (RARP, 15.6%, RRP, 17%), yet risk of apical margin was significantly less with RARP. RARP was associated with significantly shorter hospitalization (ptransfusion (p group (16% vs 10%, pgroup (6.6% pgroups was equivalent (p=0.15). Potency at 1 year was better among RARP patients (p=0.02). At a median followup of 1.3 years, PSA recurrence free estimates were not significantly different (92% vs 92%, p=0.69). Conclusions: Early complications were higher in this RARP group, but this experience includes cases performed in the learning curve. Oncologic, quality of life, and functional data in this study revealed encouraging results for RARP when compared to RRP.

  20. FUNCTIONAL RESULTS OF ENDOSCOPIC EXTRAPERITONEAL RADICAL INTRAFASCIAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Perlin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Endoscopic radical prostatectomy is a highly effective treatment for localized prostate cancer. Intrafascial prostate dissection ensures early recovery of urine continence function and erectile function. This article sums up our own experience of performing intrafascial endoscopic prostatectomy.Materials and methods. 25 patients have undergone this procedure. 12 months after surgery 88.2 % of the patients were fully continent, 11.7 % had symptoms of minimal stress urinary incontinence. We encountered no cases of positive surgical margins and one case of bio-chemical recurrence of the disease.Conclusion. Oncologically, intrafascial endoscopic radical prostatectomy is as effective as other modifications of radical prostatectomy and has the benefits of early recovery of urine continence function and erectile function. 

  1. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy vs laparoscopic and open retropubic radical prostatectomy: functional outcomes 18 months after diagnosis from a national cohort study in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossiter, Julie; Sujenthiran, Arunan; Charman, Susan C; Cathcart, Paul J; Aggarwal, Ajay; Payne, Heather; Clarke, Noel W; van der Meulen, Jan

    2018-02-20

    Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) has been rapidly adopted without robust evidence comparing its functional outcomes against laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) or open retropubic radical prostatectomy (ORP) approaches. This study compared patient-reported functional outcomes following RARP, LRP or ORP. All men diagnosed with prostate cancer in England during April - October 2014 who underwent radical prostatectomy were identified from the National Prostate Cancer Audit and mailed a questionnaire 18 months after diagnosis. Group differences in patient-reported sexual, urinary, bowel and hormonal function (EPIC-26 domain scores) and generic health-related quality of life (HRQoL; EQ-5D-5L scores), with adjustment for patient and tumour characteristics, were estimated using linear regression. In all, 2219 men (77.0%) responded; 1310 (59.0%) had RARP, 487 (21.9%) LRP and 422 (19.0%) ORP. RARP was associated with slightly higher adjusted mean EPIC-26 sexual function scores compared with LRP (3·5 point difference; 95% CI: 1.1-5.9, P=0.004) or ORP (4.0 point difference; 95% CI: 1.5-6.5, P=0.002), which did not meet the threshold for a minimal clinically important difference (10-12 points). There were no significant differences in other EPIC-26 domain scores or HRQoL. It is unlikely that the rapid adoption of RARP in the English NHS has produced substantial improvements in functional outcomes for patients.

  2. Learning curve for radical retropubic prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando J. A. Saito

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The learning curve is a period in which the surgical procedure is performed with difficulty and slowness, leading to a higher risk of complications and reduced effectiveness due the surgeon's inexperience. We sought to analyze the residents' learning curve for open radical prostatectomy (RP in a training program. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a prospective study from June 2006 to January 2008 in the academic environment of the University of São Paulo. Five residents operated on 184 patients during a four-month rotation in the urologic oncology division, mentored by the same physician assistants. We performed sequential analyses according to the number of surgeries, as follows: = 10, 11 to 19, 20 to 28, and = 29. RESULTS: The residents performed an average of 37 RP each. The average psa was 9.3 ng/mL and clinical stage T1c in 71% of the patients. The pathological stage was pT2 (73%, pT3 (23%, pT4 (4%, and 46% of the patients had a Gleason score 7 or higher. In all surgeries, the average operative time and estimated blood loss was 140 minutes and 488 mL. Overall, 7.2% of patients required blood transfusion, and 23% had positive surgical margins. CONCLUSION: During the initial RP learning curve, we found a significant reduction in the operative time; blood transfusion during the procedures and positive surgical margin rate were stable in our series.

  3. Radical prostatectomies in Austria, 1997–2004

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    Schatzl Georg

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The introduction of PSA testing in Austria led to a steep increase of the incidence of prostate cancer. We want to present the course of the number of newly diagnosed cases of prostate cancer in Austria since 1997, and set these numbers in relation to the total of radical prostatectomies (with resection of lymph nodes in the same time period. All numbers were retrieved from health statistics of Statistics Austria. The report period of cancer cases and of RPE comprises the years 1997–2004. All calculations were performed for totals as well as for 5-year age groups (40–89 years of age. Findings The number of prostate cancer cases rose from 1997 to 2004 by 35%, while the number of RPE rose by 94% in the same time period. The proportion of RPE in relation to new cases rose from 41% in 1997 to 59% in 2004. Conclusion A slight decrease of prostate cancer mortality can already be observed in Austria, but the question of over-treatment still awaits analysis.

  4. First Danish single-institution experience with radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrang, Marie-Louise; Røder, Martin Andreas; Vainer, Ben

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate the impact of positive surgical margins (PSMs), stratified by location and extension, on biochemical outcome after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP). MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study included data from 605 consecutive patients treated with RRP...... apical and non-apical PSMs increased the risk of BR (HR = 2.1 and 4.2, p = 0.02 and p prostatectomy Gleason...

  5. Urodynamic assessment of bladder and urethral sphincter function before and after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnoiu, O S; Vozmediano-Chicharro, R; García-Galisteo, E; Soler-Martinez, J; del Rosa-Samaniego, J M; Machuca-Santacruz, J; Baena-Gonzalez, V

    2014-03-01

    Affectation of the bladder after open prostatectomy is demonstrated. Decrease in bladder capacity and bladder compliance, detrusor hyper-or hypo-activity and voiding dysfunction are observed. We propose to investigate the effects of robotic surgery on bladder and sphincter function through the comparative study of preoperative and postoperative urodynamic values 3 months after prostatectomy. Prospective study of 32 consecutive patients undergoing robotic prostatectomy. They all underwent urodynamic study one month before the intervention and 3 months after the radical prostatectomy. Twenty five percent of patients undergoing robotic prostatectomy showed detrusor hyperactivity accompanied by a decrease in bladder compliance of 30.2 to 21.8 ml/cmH2O. Urethral profile showed diminished functional length of 67 to 44 mm and decreased maximum urethral pressure of 48.5 to 29.3 cmH2O. After robotic prostatectomy 21.8% of patients had detrusor hypoactivity, obstruction decreased between 28.1% to 12.5%. Decreased bladder compliance, detrusor hypo- or hyperactivity and obstruction improvement observed in the study of the flow pressure have been associated with sphincter involvement. It is part of the complex of lower urinary tract dysfunction that occurs after robotic prostatectomy. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of metabolic syndrome on early recovery of continence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Masatomo; Watanabe, Hiromitsu; Kurahashi, Toshifumi

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the impact of metabolic syndrome on the early recovery of urinary continence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. The present study included a total of 302 consecutive Japanese patients with clinically localized prostate cancer who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. In this study, postoperative urinary continence was defined as no leak or the use of a security pad. The continence status was assessed by interviews before and 1 and 3 months after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Metabolic syndrome was defined as follows: body mass index ≥25 kg/m 2 and two or more of the following: hypertension, diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia. The effect of the presence of metabolic syndrome on the continence status of these patients was retrospectively examined. A total of 116 (38.4%) and 203 (67.2%) of the 302 patients were continent at 1 and 3 months after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, respectively. A total of 31 (10.3%) patients were judged to have metabolic syndrome. Despite the operative time being longer in patients with metabolic syndrome, no significant differences were observed in the remaining preoperative, intraoperative or postoperative variables between patients with or without metabolic syndrome. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, metabolic syndrome and the duration of hospitalization were significantly correlated with the 1-month continence status. Similarly, metabolic syndrome and estimated blood loss during surgery were independent predictors of continence rates at 3 months after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. These findings suggest that the presence of metabolic syndrome could have a significant impact on the early recovery of urinary continence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  7. [New concept minimizes bleeding in radical retropubic prostatectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schostak, M; Matischak, K; Schäfer, M; Müller, M; Schrader, M; Christoph, F; Miller, K

    2005-11-01

    Radical retropubic prostatectomy is an intervention known to be associated with severe bleeding. Even experienced surgeons report a blood transfusion rate of up to 20%. The perioperative concept for this intervention underwent various modifications in January 2001. This study describes the effect of these modifications on the blood loss in a retrospective analysis comparing approximately 100 operations by a single experienced surgeon before the change (group 1) with 100 operations thereafter (group 2). The new perioperative concept comprised the following points: reducing the intravenously applied volume, employing a peridural catheter (PDC), and maintaining a 25-30 degrees Trendelenburg's position. The difference in pre- and postsurgical hemoglobin (Hb) was analyzed before (group 1) and after the intervention (group 2). If transfusions were performed, this value was corrected according to the following formula: 1 ml of erythrocyte concentrate increases the patient's Hb by 0.003 g/dl. Assessment was possible in 201 of 234 cases, 110 from the first and 91 from the second group. The mean transfusion-corrected Hb difference was 5.3 g/dl in group 1 (20% transfusion rate) and 3.52 g/dl in group 2 (1.09% transfusion rate); p>0.0001. The median intravenous volume applied was 5.960 ml in group 1 and 3.490 ml in group 2 (p>0.0001). The complication rate did not differ between groups. The new perioperative concept minimizes the intraoperative blood loss during radical open retropubic prostatectomy. Transfusions are only necessary in rare cases. The complication rate remains unaltered.

  8. Brachytherapy and radical prostatectomy in patients with early prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Souza Sérgio Ferreira

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: this study analyzes the survival of prostate cancer patients cared for at a hospital in Minas Gerais, Brazil according to one of the following treatments: iodine-125 seed implantation or radical prostatectomy. From January 2002 to December 2005, 129 patients underwent either brachytherapy (64 patients or surgery (65 patients. Methods: all had prostate-specific antigen, Gleason scores and clinical stage recorded prior to treatment. Biochemical relapse was defined as prostate-specific antigen (PSA>0.4ng/mL for radical prostatectomy, and any elevation equal or higher than 2ng/mL over the PSA nadir for implanted patients. To analyze the effect of treatment on biochemical recurrence-free survival (BRFS, Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox regression were generated. Mean follow-up time was 56.1 months for patients with the implant, and 26.6 months for those operated on. BRFS in 5 years was 69% (95% CI: 58.18-77.45 for the whole cohort. Discussion: when stratified according to treatment, survival of patients who had undergone brachytherapy (79.70% was higher to those operated on (44.30%; pvalue= 0.0056. Upon multivariate analysis, independent predictors were iPSA (HR: 2.91, 95% CI: 1,32-6,42, Gleason score (HR: 2.18, 95% CI: 1,00-4,81 and treatment modality (HR: 2.61, 95% CI: 1.18-5,75. Risk of biochemical failure was higher with surgery than brachytherapy, which may be related to the failure criteria adopted, which is different for each therapy, as well as the high rate of histological progression between preoperative prostate biopsy and surgical specimen. Conclusion: it was found that brachytherapy is a good therapeutic option for low risk prostate cancer.

  9. [Open versus laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: a French center experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdier, E; Doré, B; Fromont, G; Pirès, C; Lecoq, B; Dezael, J-C; Irani, J

    2014-03-01

    To compare peri-operative outcomes of open radical prostatectomy (ORP) to laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) in a single French institution. Between 1998 and 2003, 72 patients underwent ORP followed by 279 LRP between 2003 and 2010 for a clinically localized prostate cancer. Demographic, peri-operative and pathological data in the ORP and LRP groups were analyzed and compared. In the ORP group, compared to the LRP group, the following significant differences were found: patients were older (63.1 years versus 65.6), initial PSA was higher (10.2 ng/mL versus 6.7) and the proportion of T1c was higher (62.8 % versus 80.6 %). Operative blood loss (1500 mL versus 500) and length of hospitalization (9.0 days versus 6.3) were higher in the ORP group (P<0.001). Operative time was longer in the LRP group (250 min versus 160; P<0 .001). There was no significant difference regarding length of catheterization (average of 8.5 days). Anastomotic strictures were more frequent following ORP (P<0.001). Positive margins proportion in the ORP group (7.1 %) was lower than that observed in the LRP group (28.7 %) (P=0.001). Patients in the ORP group achieved early continence more frequently (P<0.01) but at 12 months postoperatively there was no significant difference. Patients in the LRP group had lower operative blood losses and a shorter length of hospitalization. However, in the ORP group, operative time was shorter and positive margins rate was lower. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: is it feasible and reasonable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadeddu, J A; Kavoussi, L R

    2001-08-01

    Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy is an extremely challenging procedure for even experienced laparoscopic surgeons, and it is not practical to expect most urologists to learn the technique. Nevertheless, it is a feasible procedure and has short-term results comparable with conventional radical prostatectomy. For LRP to be an acceptable and reasonable alternative, the oncologic results must be equivalent to the results of RRP, and significant advantages is morbidity (hospital stay, pain, incontinence, impotence) must be attained; otherwise, the steep learning curve and the additional expense of the procedure make it difficult to justify as an alternative therapeutic modality. Beside a reduction in the transfusion rate, no other significant advantages of LRP over radical prostatectomy have been demonstrated definitively to date. As a result, the role of LRP in the management of prostate cancer remains investigational, and patients should be informed appropriately. The oncologic results and low morbidity of nerve-sparing RRP set a high standard for a laparoscopic technique to equal.

  11. [Surgical approach and sexual outcomes after radical prostatectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillet, K; Lipsker, A; Alezra, E; De Sousa, P; Pignot, G

    2017-04-01

    Radical prostatectomy is curative surgical treatment of choice for localized prostate cancer. The objectives are cancer control, preservation of continence and preservation of sexuality, the combination of the three constituting the Trifecta. The objective of this study was to assess, through the analysis of the literature, the sexual outcomes according to surgical approach: radical prostatectomy by laparotomy (PRL), laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (PRLa) and laparoscopic robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (PRLaRA), when nerve sparing was practiced. An exhaustive and retrospective review of literature was conducted using the Pubmed search with the following keywords: "Prostatic Neoplasms" [Mesh], "Prostatectomy" [Mesh], "Erectile Dysfunction" [Mesh], "Robotics" [Mesh], "Laparoscopy" [Mesh], Nerve sparing. The selected articles were prospective or retrospective series including more than 200 patients, randomized trials and meta-analyses published between 1990 and 2014. A total of 21 prospective studies (6 on PRL, 4 on PRLa and 11 on PRLaRA), 12 retrospective studies (6 on PRL, 1 on PRLa and 5 on PRLaRA), 2 randomized controlled trial and 3 meta-analyses were selected from 1992 to 2013. There was no evidence of the superiority of one surgical approach compared to others in terms of sexuality. Articles with level 1 of scientific evidence have discordant results, due to heterogeneity in the assessment criteria of postoperative sexual function. According to our knowledge, there is currently no difference in terms of sexual outcomes between PRL, PRLA and PRLaRA approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Novel anatomical identification of nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy: fascial-sparing radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Huri

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Radical prostatectomy (RP became a first choice of treatment for prostate cancer after the advance in nerve-sparing techniques. However, the difficult technical details still involved in nerve-sparing RP (nsRP can invite unwanted complications. Therefore, learning to recognize key anatomical features of the prostate and its surrounding structures is crucial to further improve RP efficacy. Although the anatomical relation between the pelvic nerves and pelvic fascias is still under investigation, this paper characterizes the periprostatic fascias in order to define a novel fascial-sparing approach to RP (fsRP, which will help spare neurovascular bundles. In uroanatomic perspective, it can be stated that nsRP is a functional identification of the surgical technique while fsRP is an anatomic identification as well. The functional and oncological outcomes related to this novel fsRP are also reviewed.

  13. Robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy after heart transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (CaP is the leading visceral malignancy in males. Patients who undergo cardiac transplantation are immune compromised, thus presenting a therapeutic challenge. Immunosuppresion could accelerate tumor growth, while medical intervention may be associated with increased treatment mortality or morbidity. Due to paucity of such cases, there are no randomized trials that address the treatment algorithm for cardiac transplant patients with CaP, with only a few scattered reports in the literature. Treatment options range from hormonal manipulation to radiation therapy to radical prostatectomy. To our knowledge, we report the first successful robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy in a heart transplant patient with CaP.

  14. Hemodynamic changes during robotic radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanlal Darlong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Effect on hemodynamic changes and experience of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP in steep Trendelenburg position (45° with high-pressure CO 2 pneumoperitoneum is very limited. Therefore, we planned this prospective clinical trial to study the effect of steep Tredelenburg position with high-pressure CO 2 pneumoperitoneum on hemodynamic parameters in a patient undergoing RALRP using FloTrac/Vigileo™1.10. Methods: After ethical approval and informed consent, 15 patients scheduled for RALRP were included in the study. In the operation room, after attaching standard monitors, the radial artery was cannulated. Anesthesia was induced with fentanyl (2 μg/kg and thiopentone (4-7 mg/kg, and tracheal intubation was facilitated by vecuronium bromide (0.1 mg/kg. The patient′s right internal jugular vein was cannulated and the Pre Sep™ central venous oximetry catheter was connected to it. Anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane in oxygen and nitrous oxide and intermittent boluses of vecuronium. Intermittent positive-pressure ventilation was provided to maintain normocapnea. After CO 2 pneumoperitoneum, position of the patient was gradually changed to 45° Trendelenburg over 5 min. The robot was then docked and the robot-assisted surgery started. Intraoperative monitoring included central venous pressure (CVP, stroke volume (SV, stroke volume variation (SVV, cardiac output (CO, cardiac index (CI and central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO 2 . Results: After induction of anesthesia, heart rate (HR, SV, CO and CI were decreased significantly from the baseline value (P>0.05. SV, CO and CI further decreased significantly after creating pneumoperitoneum (P>0.05. At the 45° Trendelenburg position, HR, SV, CO and CI were significantly decreased compared with baseline. Thereafter, CO and CI were persistently low throughout the 45° Trendelenburg position (P=0.001. HR at 20 min and 1 h, SV and mean arterial blood pressure

  15. Surgical complications of radical retropubic prostatectomy: A single institutional experience of seven years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj K Goyal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the surgical complications of open retropubic radical prostatectomy. Materials and Methods: Fifty-nine cases of localized prostate cancer underwent retropubic radical prostatectomy in our department in the last seven years. Standard technique of open retropubic radical prostatectomy as described by Walsh was used. During follow-up cancer control and quality of life indices (potency and urinary continence were noted. Result: Postoperative recovery of all patients except one was excellent. This patient required cardio-respiratory support and nine units of blood transfusion. Forty-nine out of 52 patients were continent, two had stress incontinence and one was totally incontinent at one year. Bladder neck contracture was present in eight out of 52 patients at one year. Forty-five patients were impotent at one year with or without oral tablet sildenafil. Cancer control was present in 45 out of 52 cases. Seven cases had biochemical failure at one year. Conclusion: Though retropubic radical prostatectomy is the standard treatment for early prostate cancer it is not without complications. It has a steep learning curve. More number of cases and refinement in technique is required to achieve world-class results.

  16. Intracavernous injection in the treatment of erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim de Almeida Claro

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Despite the recent improvements in performing radical retropubic prostatectomy that have led to a considerable decrease in the complication rate, erectile dysfunction still represents a major problem. Moreover, less invasive treatment options that are emerging for erectile dysfunction have not shown satisfactory results in managing these patients. OBJECTIVE: To study the efficacy and side effects of self-injection therapy in the treatment of men who had become impotent after undergoing radical prostatectomy due to prostate cancer, over a study period of 96 months. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: University Referral Center. PARTICIPANTS: 168 patients with erectile dysfunction, aged 43 to 78 years old, who underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy due to localized prostate cancer. PROCEDURES: The patients were treated with self-injection therapy using papaverine, phentolamine and prostaglandin E1, at home. RESULTS: This study showed an acceptable 94.6% success rate, with no life-threatening complications. In addition to this, our series presented a 13.1% cure rate with this therapy. CONCLUSION: Self-injection therapy with papaverine, phentolamine and prostaglandin E1 is effective and safe in the treatment of erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy.

  17. Mentor-initiated approach in laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skrekas, Thomas; Mochtar, Chaidir A.; Lagerveld, Brunolf W.; de Reijke, Theo M.; van Velthoven, Roland F.; Peltier, Alexandre; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.; Laguna, M. Pilar

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: We evaluated the efficacy and safety of a mentor-initiated program for laparoscopic radical prostatectomy by analyzing its effect on the learning curve. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The mentor performed 16 procedures (group I) and the trainee, assisted by the mentor, 12 (group II). The next 16

  18. Early Experience with Robot-assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Gee Sim

    2004-10-01

    Conclusions: rLRP is feasible in a practice with a low volume of radical prostatectomies. Significant improvement in perioperative parameters occurs after the first eight cases. This technique confers the benefits of enhanced precision and dexterity for complex laparoscopic work in the pelvic cavity.

  19. [Salvage radical prostatectomy for brachytherapy failure: preliminary results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedi, Y; Pop, M; Jacqmin, D

    2014-04-01

    Analysis of preliminary results in six patients operated by second-line (salvage) radical prostatectomy for local recurrence after low-dose brachytherapy. Since January 2009, six patients had an open salvage radical prostatectomy with a lymph node dissection and without neurovascular bundles preservation for a low-dose I125 brachytherapy failure. Local recurrence was confirmed by trans-rectal biopsy or TURP. All the patients had PSA increase or lower urinary tract symptoms. Bone scan and pelvis MRI were performed to detect a locally advanced disease, a lymph node involvement or the presence of bone metastasis. Pathology reports and PSA level at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months were analyzed. Salvage radical prostatectomy with lymph node dissection was performed in all patients without major complications. The PSA level was below 0.1 ng/mL in five out of six patients at 1 and 3 months. The only case of persistent PSA is treated by androgen deprivation in a pT3b N1 patient. Salvage radical prostatectomy after brachytherapy failure was feasible with a limited perioperative morbidity. This second-line curative treatment in a selected group of patients should be kept in mind. Our early results looked promising. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Survival after radical prostatectomy for clinically localised prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Martin Andreas; Brasso, Klaus; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe survival and cause of death in a nationwide cohort of Danish patients with prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP). To describe risk factors associated with prostate cancer mortality. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Observational study of 6489 men with localised prostate...

  1. Handling of radical prostatectomy specimens: total or partial embedding?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vainer, Ben; Toft, Birgitte Grønkaer; Olsen, Karen Ege

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: Proper examination and accurate reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens (RPS) is essential in determining post-surgical treatment and predicting patient outcome. Surveys have demonstrated the absence of consensus on handling of RPS. The aim of this study was to determine whether...

  2. Cystectomy with orthotopic reconstruction following radical retropubic prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Miotto Jr

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of infiltrative bladder carcinoma in patients previously treated with radical prostatectomy due to prostate adenocarcinoma represents a challenging perspective. Radical cystectomy remains the best option for invasive bladder cancer, however, there are few reports about the best approach to such individuals. Nevertheless, despite possible technical difficulties found during surgery, the orthotopic urinary shunt is a reasonable option in selected cases.

  3. Oncologic Outcomes of Patients With Gleason Score 7 and Tertiary Gleason Pattern 5 After Radical Prostatectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Leng, Yi-Hsueh; Lee, Won Jun; Yang, Seung Ok; Lee, Jeong Ki; Jung, Tae Young; Kim, Yun Beom

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated oncologic outcomes following radical prostatectomy (RP) in patients with a Gleason score (GS) of 7 with tertiary Gleason pattern 5 (TGP5). Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 310 patients who underwent RP from 2005 to 2010. Twenty-four patients who received neoadjuvant or adjuvant antiandrogen deprivation or radiation therapy were excluded. Just 239 (GS 6 to 8) of the remaining 286 patients were included in the study. Patients were cla...

  4. Morbidity of laparoscopic extraperitoneal versus transperitoneal radical prostatectomy verus open retropubic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remzi, M; Klingler, H C; Tinzl, M V; Fong, Y K; Lodde, M; Kiss, B; Marberger, M

    2005-07-01

    Morbidity and postoperative pain after extraperitoneal (E-LRPE) and transperitoneal (T-LRPE) laparoscopic radical prostatectomy was compared to open extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy (O-RPE). Between January 2002 and October 2003, we evaluated 41 E-LRPE, 39 T-LRPE and 41 O-RPE prospectively. All operations were performed as standard procedures by the same group of surgeons and perioperative results and complications were evaluated. Pain management was performed with tramadol 50-100 mg on demand, and no other form of anaesthesia was given. Postoperative pain was assessed daily in all patients quantifying analgesic requirement and evaluation of Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). All patients had at least a 12 month follow-up. Mean age, prostate volume, PSA and Gleason score were comparable between all three groups (p>0.05). Mean blood loss was lower with laparoscopy (189+/-140 and 290+/-254 ml), as compared to 385+/-410 ml for O-RPE (p=0.002). However, mean operating times were significantly longer in L-TRPE (279+/-70 min) as compared to E-LRPE (217+/-51 min) and O-RPE (195+/-72 min) (ppain (p=0.029) in all groups, especially for T-LRPE (p=0.007). Likewise, increased operating times (>240 min) were associated with increased post-operative pain (p=0.049). Full continence defined as no pads at one year was achieved in 36/41 (88%, E-LRPE) versus 33/39 (85%, T-LRPE) versus 33/41 (81%, O-RPE), respectively (p=0.2). E-LRPE resulted in a significant subjective (VAS Score, ppain reduction compared to T-LRPE, but only in VAS Score compared to O-RPE (p=0.008). Analgetic consumption during first postoperative week was equal in E-LRPE (290 mg) and O-RPE (300 mg) (p=0.550). Shorter operating times, lower urinary leakage rates, lower stricture rates and lower blood loss in E-LRPE compared to T-LRPE are mainly explained due to the long learning curve in LRPE, which we did not overcome yet, and not due to the approach (extraperitoneal versus transperitoneal).

  5. Initial consecutive 125 cases of robotic assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy performed in Ireland's first robotic radical prostatectomy centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bouchier-Hayes, D M

    2012-03-01

    We examined the patient characteristics, operative proceedings and the outcomes of the initial series of 125 cases of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP) in an independent hospital in Ireland, performed by two surgeons using the da Vinci(®) surgical system.

  6. Minimizing complications during retropubic radical prostatectomy - is ureteral stenting necessary?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlenker B

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives and aims To avoid damage to the ureters during bladder neck preparation in radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer, it may be helpful to insert ureteral stents temporarily or to intravenously administer indigo carmine dye for enhanced visualisation of ureteric orifices. We evaluated our bladder neck preserving technique at radical prostatectomy with regard to ureteric injuries. Patients and methods We analysed 369 consecutive radical prostatectomies operated in our clinic in a bladder neck preserving technique. The following parameters were assessed in this retrospective study: number of prophylactic ureteric stent insertions, application of indigo carmine dye, observed injuries of the ureters by the surgeon, postoperative increase of serum creatinine and postoperative status of kidney ultrasound. Results In 7/369 prostatectomies (1.90% a ureteric stent insertion was performed, indigo carmine was not applied to any patient at all, yet no intraoperative injury of a ureter was observed by a surgeon. No revision was necessary due to a ureteral injury within the observation period of one year after surgery. In 17 patients with preoperative normal creatinine value a pathological value was observed on the first postoperative day (mean 1.4 mg/dl. In these patients no consecutive postrenal acute renal failure was observed, no hydronephrosis was monitored by ultrasound and no further intervention was necessary. Conclusions Bladder neck preserving operation technique does not implicate the need of prophylactic ureteric stent insertions and has no higher incidence of ureteric injuries.

  7. Risk factors predicting the outcome of salvage radiotherapy in patients with biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Hidefumi; Shimizu, Yosuke; Mizowaki, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Salvage radiotherapy is the only curative treatment for patients with prostate cancer showing biochemical progression after radical prostatectomy. In this study, we evaluated the clinicopathological parameters that influence the outcome of salvage radiotherapy. Medical records of 49 patients who underwent salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy from 1997 to 2008 at the Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, were retrospectively reviewed. Radiotherapy was carried out with 66 Gy on the prostatic bed. Biochemical progression-free survival after salvage radiotherapy at 2, 5 and 7 years was 51.0%, 42.2% and 42.2%, respectively. Significant parameters predicting biochemical progression after salvage radiotherapy by Cox regression analysis were prostatectomy Gleason score sum ≥8 (hazard ratio 0.08; 95% confidence interval 0.03-0.22; P=0.001), prostate-specific antigen nadir after radical prostatectomy ≥0.04 ng/mL (hazard ratio 0.30; 95% confidence interval 0.13-0.69; P=0.005) and negative surgical margin (hazard ratio 0.28; 95% confidence interval 0.12-0.70; P=0.006). When the patients were subgrouped by these risk factors, the 5-year progression-free survival rates after salvage radiotherapy were 77.8%, 50.0% and 6.7% in patients with 0, 1 and ≥2 predictors, respectively. In order to discriminate favorable candidates for salvage radiotherapy, Gleason score of prostatectomy, prostate-specific antigen nadir after prostatectomy and positive surgical margin represent independent predictors. Thus, progression-free survival might be more precisely predicted according to the presence/absence of these risk factors. The significance of this risk classification should be confirmed by large prospective studies. (author)

  8. Statin use and risk of disease recurrence and death after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskiväli, Teemu; Kujala, Paula; Visakorpi, Tapio; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Murtola, Teemu J

    2016-04-01

    Statins have been linked with improved prostate cancer survival and lower risk of recurrence in men treated with radiation therapy. However, the association is unclear for surgically-treated men. We studied the risk of prostate cancer recurrence and death by statin usage after radical prostatectomy in a cohort of prostate cancer patients treated with radical prostatectomy. A cohort of 1,314 men who underwent curative-intent radical prostatectomy at the Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland during 1995-2009 were linked to national prescription database to obtain detailed information on statin purchases. The risk of PSA recurrence and death (overall and prostate cancer-specific) by statin use before and after the surgery were evaluated using Cox regression with model adjustment for tumor characteristics, total cholesterol and simultaneous use of antidiabetic and antihypertensive drugs. Tissue expression of putative prognostic markers were measured from a subgroup of 323 men. During the median follow-up of 8.6 years after surgery 484 men recurred, while 244 men died (32 due to prostate cancer). In general statin use before or after prostatectomy was not associated with risk of disease recurrence or death. Tissue expression of Ki-67 and ERG modified the association between statin use and risk of disease recurrence; the risk estimates were lower in men with Ki-67 expression above the median (P for interaction 0.001 and 0.004 for statin use before and after prostatectomy, respectively) and no ERG expression in the tumor tissue (P for interaction 0.006 and 0.011). Statin use generally did not affect prostate cancer prognosis after prostatectomy. The effect on disease recurrence may depend on tumor properties, such as proliferation activity. Thus possible future prospective studies should recognize and enroll subgroups of prostate cancer patients most likely to benefit from statins. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. [Relationship between tumor volume and PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Momose, Akishi; Okamoto, Akiko; Yamamoto, Hayato; Hatakeyama, Shingo; Iwabuchi, Ikuya; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Koie, Takuya; Kamimura, Noritaka; Ohyama, Chikara

    2010-02-01

    We examined whether the tumor volume (TV) is a good predictor of PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Data were collected for 158 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy without neoadjuvant hormonal therapy in our hospital since April 2005 to September 2007. Along with the routine pathological assessment, TV was assessed in all prostatectomy specimens. PSA recurrence was defined as PSA levels of greater than 0.2 ng/ml. The TVs were 1.81+/-1.66 ml (mean +/-SD) ranging from 0.02 to 8.20 ml. The TV in cT1c was 1.77+/-1.64, and 1.89+/-1.72 ml in cT2 (not significant). Significant differences were observed between TV and pT. The TVs in pT2a, pT2b and pT3/4 were 0.54+/-0.54, 1.63+/-1.47 and 2.67+/-1.80 ml, respectively. The median follow-up period was 32.3 months (range from 15 to 45) after radical prostatectomy, and PSA recurrence was observed in 32 cases. Patients with smaller TV (TV TV (TV > or = 1.3 ml, 66.7%) with a significant difference atp TV, pT, Gleason Score (GS), and surgical margins. Significant differences were observed for GS, and surgical margins, but not for TV. Clinically organ-confined disease in Japanese patients with prostate cancer included various cancers from clinically insignificant to locally advanced ones. In our series, TV was not regarded as a predictor of PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy.

  10. Treatment Regret and Quality of Life Following Radical Prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilts, Chelsea D.; Cohen, Lorenzo; Pettaway, Curtis A.; Parker, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Negative physical functioning outcomes including incontinence and erectile dysfunction are relatively common following radical prostatectomy (RP) and are associated with treatment regret and compromised quality of life (QOL). The role that treatment regret may have in influencing the association between prostate-specific QOL (i.e., sexual, urinary, bowl functioning) and general QOL following RP has not been examined. Method This study examined the associations of treatment regret, general QOL (SF-36 Physical (PCS) and Mental Health (MCS) composite scores) and prostate-specific QOL (PCQOL sexual, urinary, bowl functioning, and cancer worry subscales) in 95 men who underwent RP for prostate cancer. Results Multiple regression analyses indicated that poorer sexual and urinary functioning was associated with poorer MCS. Additionally, men with lower sexual and urinary functioning reported greater treatment regret. Treatment regret was also associated with lower MCS. Finally, treatment regret partially mediated the effects of both sexual and urinary functioning on MCS. Conclusions These findings suggest that regardless of a patient’s prostate-specific QOL, reducing treatment regret may improve mental health following RP. Though there are limited options to alter patients’ sexual or urinary functioning following RP, treatment regret may be a modifiable contributor to post-surgical adjustment and QOL. PMID:23907238

  11. Developing a laparoscopic radical prostatectomy service: defining the learning curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasdev, Nikhil; Kass-Iliyya, Antoine; Patel, Ameet; Bedford, Geoff; O'Riordon, Anna; Johnson, Mark I; Durkan, Garrett C; Soomro, Naeem A

    2012-07-01

    Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) is an established treatment for patients with prostate cancer in selected centers with appropriate expertise. We studied our single-center experience of developing a LRP service and subsequent training of two additional surgeons by the initial surgeon. We assessed the learning curve of the three surgeons with regard to perioperative outcomes and oncologic results. Three hundred consecutive patients underwent a LRP between January 2005 and April 2011. Patients were divided into three equal groups (1-100 group 1], 101-200 [group 2], and 201-300 [group 3]). Age, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, preoperative comorbidities, and indications for LRP were comparable for all three patient groups. Perioperative and oncologic outcomes were compared across all three groups to assess the impact of the learning curve for LRP. All surgical complications were classified using the Clavien-Dindo system (CDS). The mean age was 61.9 years (range 46-74 y). There was a significant reduction in the mean operative time (Plearning curve, perioperative parameters and oncologic outcomes improve. Using a carefully mentored approach, LRP can be safely introduced as a new procedure without compromising patient outcomes.

  12. The management of stress urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyromaure, M; Ravery, V; Boccon-Gibod, L

    2002-07-01

    Up to 30% of patients complain about urine leakage after radical prostatectomy, but persistent stress incontinence (beyond 1 year) affects stress urinary incontinence is mainly based on surgery, as this type of incontinence usually does not respond to physiotherapy and anticholinergic medication. While injection therapy is safe and well tolerated, its effect on postoperative continence is limited and decreases with time. The best results are achieved by implanting an artificial urinary sphincter, but with significant complication and revision rates.

  13. Consumerism and its impact on robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhateeb, Sultan; Lawrentschuk, Nathan

    2011-12-01

    • Many experts consider that media coverage, marketing and/or direct-to-consumer advertising, particularly Internet-based forms, are fundamental to the widespread adoption of robotic-assisted prostatectomy (RARP). However, this has not been explored previously. • The primary objective of the present study was to delineate the role of media coverage and marketing of RARP on the Internet, whereas the secondary goal focused on website quality with respect to the presentation of prostatectomy. • Website content was evaluated for direct-to-consumer advertising after the retrieval of the first 50 websites using Google and Yahoo for each of the terms: 'robotic prostatectomy, laparoscopic prostatectomy (LP) and open radical prostatectomy (ORP)'. • A linear regression analysis was performed for the annual number of Internet news hits over the last decade for each procedure. Website quality assessment was performed using WHO Honesty on the Internet (HON) code principles. • Of the retrieved sites, the proportion containing direct-to-consumer advertising for RARP vs LP vs ORP using Google was 64% vs 14% vs 0%, respectively (P 0.05). • Media coverage and marketing of RARP on the Internet is more widespread compared to LP and ORP. • Disturbingly, the quality of websites using any technique for prostatectomy was of poor quality when using principles of honest information presenting and such findings need to be discussed with respect to obtaining informed consent from patients. © 2011 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2011 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  14. Risk of biochemical recurrence and positive surgical margins in patients with pT2 prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Martin Andreas; Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk; Berg, Kasper Drimer

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To investigate risk factors associated with positive surgical margins (PSM) and biochemical recurrence (BR) in organ confined tumors (pT2) after radical prostatectomy (RP) for localized prostate cancer (PCa). METHODS: Between 1995 and 2011, 1,649 patients underwent RP...... trended (P = 0.08) to increase the risk of BR compared to PSM and non-NS surgery. CONCLUSION: Several factors influence the risk of pT2 PSMs in radical prostatectomy. In our cohort pT2 PSM is associated with NS surgery and trend to increase risk of BR compared to non-NS surgery. The optimal selection...

  15. Radical Prostatectomy versus Observation for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilt, Timothy J.; Brawer, Michael K.; Jones, Karen M.; Barry, Michael J.; Aronson, William J.; Fox, Steven; Gingrich, Jeffrey R.; Wei, John T.; Gilhooly, Patricia; Grob, B. Mayer; Nsouli, Imad; Iyer, Padmini; Cartagena, Ruben; Snider, Glenn; Roehrborn, Claus; Sharifi, Roohollah; Blank, William; Pandya, Parikshit; Andriole, Gerald L.; Culkin, Daniel; Wheeler, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The effectiveness of surgery versus observation for men with localized prostate cancer detected by means of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing is not known. METHODS From November 1994 through January 2002, we randomly assigned 731 men with localized prostate cancer (mean age, 67 years; median PSA value, 7.8 ng per milliliter) to radical prostatectomy or observation and followed them through January 2010. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality; the secondary outcome was prostate-cancer mortality. RESULTS During the median follow-up of 10.0 years, 171 of 364 men (47.0%) assigned to radical prostatectomy died, as compared with 183 of 367 (49.9%) assigned to observation (hazard ratio, 0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.71 to 1.08; P = 0.22; absolute risk reduction, 2.9 percentage points). Among men assigned to radical prostatectomy, 21 (5.8%) died from prostate cancer or treatment, as compared with 31 men (8.4%) assigned to observation (hazard ratio, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.36 to 1.09; P = 0.09; absolute risk reduction, 2.6 percentage points). The effect of treatment on all-cause and prostate-cancer mortality did not differ according to age, race, coexisting conditions, self-reported performance status, or histologic features of the tumor. Radical prostatectomy was associated with reduced all-cause mortality among men with a PSA value greater than 10 ng per milliliter (P = 0.04 for interaction) and possibly among those with intermediate-risk or high-risk tumors (P = 0.07 for interaction). Adverse events within 30 days after surgery occurred in 21.4% of men, including one death. CONCLUSIONS Among men with localized prostate cancer detected during the early era of PSA testing, radical prostatectomy did not significantly reduce all-cause or prostate-cancer mortality, as compared with observation, through at least 12 years of follow-up. Absolute differences were less than 3 percentage points. (Funded by the Department of Veterans Affairs Cooperative Studies

  16. Case selection and outcome of radical perineal prostatectomy in localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Holzbeierlein

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Radical prostatectomy continues to play a central role in the management of localized prostate cancer. The majority of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer will undergo radical prostatectomy. A decrease in the morbidity of this surgical procedure has been accomplished through an improved understanding of pelvic anatomy and a greater understanding of the natural history of prostate cancer. Recently, minimally invasive techniques have been applied to radical prostatectomy (laparoscopic prostatectomy in order to further decrease the morbidity of this operation. What remains to be determined is whether this approach confers the same long term surgical outcomes as the open approach. One method which offers known long term outcomes coupled with decreased morbidity is the radical perineal prostatectomy. The purpose of this paper is to review the criteria for patient selection as well as outcomes of the radical perineal prostatectomy.

  17. Robot-Assisted Perineal Radical Prostatectomy in a Post-Kidney Transplant Recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugcu, Volkan; Simsek, Abdulmuttalip; Yigitbasi, Ismail; Yenice, Mustafa Gurkan; Sahin, Selcuk; Tasci, Ali Ihsan

    2018-01-01

    Background: After almost two decades, transabdominal robotic radical prostatectomy techniques have been fully developed and are widely practiced by many robotic urologists. Recently, a transperineal robotic radical prostatectomy, a technique not yet popular to many, was introduced as an alternative approach in patients with previous abdominal surgery. Here, we present our unique experience with robotic perineal radical prostatectomy (r-PRP) on a kidney transplant recipient. Case Presentation: A 71-year-old man who had a kidney transplant 4 months previously was diagnosed with prostate cancer (PCa) and underwent r-PRP using the da Vinci Xi robotic system. The operative time was 110 minutes and blood loss was minimal. After the perineal drain was removed on postoperative day 3, the patient was discharged. The urethral catheter was subsequently removed on postoperative day 8. Pathologic analysis revealed localized PCa with negative surgical margins. Conclusion: The r-PRP offers all the advantages of minimally invasive surgery. Moreover, in a kidney transplant recipient, it provides additional benefits, such as avoidance of allograft vascular and ureteral injuries, while maintaining an equivalent oncologic efficacy and surgical safety compared with its transabdominal counterpart.

  18. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in Brazil: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Roberto Colombo Junior

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report the initial experience on robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in Brazil. Methods: From March 2008 to March 2009, a hundred patients were treated with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Patient’s demographic data, as well as perioperative results of the procedures, are described in this study. Rresults: Patients’ mean age and mean PSA were 58 years and 7.58 ng/ml, respectively. All procedures were performed through transperitoneal approach, with a mean bleeding of 480 mL and surgical time of 298 minutes. A surgical margin affected by cancer was present in 16% of the cases. There were four complications: bleeding requiring transfusion (two cases, rectal perforation corrected on the spot and inadequate functioning of the robot. There was no conversion to another access or obit occurrences in this caseload. Cconclusions: Robot-assisted prostatectomy is a reality in Brazil and the results herein presented demonstrate that this procedure can be safely performed. Long-term follow-up is still necessary to assess the oncological and functional outcomes.

  19. Management of erectile dysfunction post-radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh A

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Alan Saleh, Hamid Abboudi, MB Ghazal-Aswad, Erik K Mayer, Justin A Vale Division of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, St Mary's Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Radical prostatectomy is a commonly performed procedure for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. One of the long-term complications is erectile dysfunction. There is little consensus on the optimal management; however, it is agreed that treatment must be prompt to prevent fibrosis and increase oxygenation of penile tissue. It is vital that patient expectations are discussed, a realistic time frame of treatment provided, and treatment started as close to the prostatectomy as possible. Current treatment regimens rely on phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors as a first-line therapy, with vacuum erection devices and intraurethral suppositories of alprostadil as possible treatment combination options. With nonresponders to these therapies, intracavernosal injections are resorted to. As a final measure, patients undergo the highly invasive penile prosthesis implantation. There is no uniform, objective treatment program for erectile dysfunction post-radical prostatectomy. Management plans are based on poorly conducted and often underpowered studies in combination with physician and patient preferences. They involve the aforementioned drugs and treatment methods in different sequences and doses. Prospective treatments include dietary supplements and gene therapy, which have shown promise with there proposed mechanisms of improving erectile function but are yet to be applied successfully in human patients. Keywords: erectile dysfunction, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, vacuum erection devices, intraurethral suppositories, intracavernosal injections

  20. Radical prostatectomy for locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeratterapillay, R; Goonewardene, S S; Barclay, J; Persad, R; Bach, C

    2017-04-01

    The management of advanced prostate cancer remains challenging. Traditionally, radical prostatectomy was discouraged in patients with locally advanced or node positive disease owing to the increased complication rate and treatment related morbidity. However, technical advances and refinements in surgical techniques have enabled the outcomes for patients with high risk prostate cancer to be improved. More recently, the concept of cytoreductive prostatectomy has been described where surgery (often Combined with an extended lymph node dissection) is performed in the setting of metastatic disease. Indirect evidence suggests an advantage using the cytoreductive approach. Hypothetical explanations for this observed benefit include decreased tumour burden, immune modulation, improved response to secondary treatment and avoidance of secondary complications attributable to local tumour growth. Nevertheless, prospective trials are required to investigate this further.

  1. The problem of early continence recovery after radical prostatectomy

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    A. A. Kachmazov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The highest rate of incontinence after radical prostatectomy (RP is observed in the first 2–6 months after surgery. In order  to decrease the period of incontinence, virous surgical methods aimed at preservation and reconstruction of structures participating  in the mechanism of urine retention has been developed and improved.The study objective is to evaluate effectiveness of an original method of formation of an urethral anastomosis in the early continence recovery.Materials and methods. Data on 126 patients who underwent retropubic RP were analyzed. Depending on the method of urethral anastomosis formation, patients were divided into 2 groups: in the 1st group (n = 52 the patients underwent PR with urethra suspension m. levator ani, in the 2nd (n = 74 – standard RP. In the 1st group, 6 ligatures were applied to the anterior and posterior urethra walls: at the 12 and 6 hour projections through the mucosa, submucosa, and smooth muscle; at the 10, 2, 4, and 8 hour projections – more laterally with capture of the m. levator ani medial margins. Continence recovery was evaluated on days 1, 7, and 14 after urinary catheter removal and then at days 30, 90, 180, and 365 after RP. The criteria of continence were absence of urine leakage at rest and during physical activity and a necessity of using a safety liner.Results. There weren’t any significant differences at day 1 after urinary catheter removal between the two groups (р > 0.05. In the 1st group, continence values at days 30, 90, and 180 after RP were significantly higher (57.7, 69.2, and 71.1 %, respectively compared to the 2nd group (35.1, 41.9, and 51.3 %, respectively (р <0.05.Conclusion. Results of this work show significant benefits of RP with urethra suspension m. levator ani compared to standard RP per continence recovery criteria at days 7, 14, 30, 90, and 180 after the surgery. The technique of urethra suspension m. levator ani is easy to perform and ensures

  2. TECHNICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY FOR EARLY CONTINENCE RECOVERY

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    V. A. Perepechay

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the technical characteristics of radical prostatectomy (RPE for early continence recovery in patients with prostate cancer. Restoration of the fascial structures of the small pelvis after RPE has been found to promote early urinary continence recovery. A method for total restoration of the fascial structures of the small pelvis (an operation after A. Tewari and a procedure for performing posterior suspension of urethrocystic neoanastomosis in Denonvilliers’ fascia length deficit are considered, which show the similar results in the time of continence recovery.

  3. TECHNICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY FOR EARLY CONTINENCE RECOVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Perepechay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the technical characteristics of radical prostatectomy (RPE for early continence recovery in patients with prostate cancer. Restoration of the fascial structures of the small pelvis after RPE has been found to promote early urinary continence recovery. A method for total restoration of the fascial structures of the small pelvis (an operation after A. Tewari and a procedure for performing posterior suspension of urethrocystic neoanastomosis in Denonvilliers’ fascia length deficit are considered, which show the similar results in the time of continence recovery.

  4. Technical evolution of laparoscopic radical prostatectomy after 450 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassweiler, Jens; Seemann, Othmar; Hatzinger, Martin; Schulze, Michael; Frede, Thomas

    2003-04-01

    In 1998, laparoscopic radical prostatectomy with primary access to the seminal vesicles was introduced. In 1999, we developed a laparoscopic technique similar to the classic retropubic radical prostatectomy. We focus here on the continuous technical evolution of our technique. From March 1999 to May 2002, we performed 450 laparoscopic radical prostatectomies. All important data of the patients; data concerning the performance of the procedure, including technical modifications, conversion, reintervention, and complication rate; as well as follow-up information were documented contemporaneously. The patients were divided into three groups of 150 individuals each in order to analyze the influence of the technical evolution of the procedure. Additionally, we studied the transferability of our technique, comparing the learning curves of the three surgeons involved in the program. The technical modifications included the routine use of a voice-controlled robot (AESOP) for the camera, exposure of the apex with 120 degrees retracting forceps, a free-hand suturing technique instead of the Endostitch device for the dorsal vein complex, 5-mm clipping instead of bipolar coagulation for the nerve-sparing technique, initial 6 o'clock suturing of the urethra before complete division, control of the prostatic pedicles by use of 12-mm Hemo-lok clips instead of the Ultracision or Endo-GIA, the bladder neck-sparing technique in cases of T(1c) and T(2a) tumors, and interrupted instead of continuous sutures for the vesicourethral anastomosis. All these modifications resulted in a significant decrease in operating time and the rates of transfusion, open conversion, and reintervention. The introduction of the nerve-sparing technique increased the number of tumor-positive margins. The mean operating time of the third surgeon was significantly less than that of the first surgeon, but the transfusion, conversion, and reintervention rates did not differ significantly among the surgeons

  5. [Half-day case robotic radical prostatectomy. Surgery of the future? A case report].

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    Leclers, F; Dutheil, V; Poupot, D; Moalic, R; Gosseine, P-N; Cormier, L; Bierman, D

    2016-01-01

    Robotics and ambulatory are modern applications of surgery. This case study proves the feasibility of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy as an outpatient procedure. This report highlights the first, half-day, robotic prostatectomy performed on a 57-year-old man with localized prostate cancer. This operation was proposed to the subject because of his excellent physical condition and favorable environmental factors. He chose to undergo the surgery voluntarily. He underwent a nerve sparing radical prostatectomy. Target-controlled infusion propofol was used in perioperative sedation and analgesia. Postoperative evaluation criteria was made with the Visual Analog Scale of Pain Intensity (VASPI), Chung score and a patient satisfaction survey. No perioperative or postoperative complications were reported. Blood loss was low (75 mL). The patient stayed less than 12 hours in the ambulatory unit thanks to a rapid recovery. The patient returned home after reporting a Chung score of 10. No hospital readmission was necessary. Functional results were: a bowel movement on day 1, back to work on day 2, normal urinary continence on day 8, a correct erectile function on day 9. Oncological results revealed negative surgical margins for cancer and PSA postoperativeprostatectomies can be performed on voluntarily-selected patients without affecting the high quality of urological surgery outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Early biochemical recurrence, urinary continence and potency outcomes following robot-assisted radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk; Hvarness, Helle

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe recovery of urinary continence and potency and report oncological and functional outcomes using the survival, continence and potency (SCP) system for patients undergoing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). MATERIAL AND METHODS: From 2009...... to 2012, 232 patients underwent RARP. Self-reported continence, erection sufficient for intercourse (ESI) and scores on the five-item version of the International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5) were registered by questionnaire and physician's interview preoperatively and at 3, 6 and 12 month follow...

  7. Postoperative self-efficacy and psychological morbidity in radical prostatectomy

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    Luciana Regina Ferreira da Mata

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: evaluate the general and perceived self-efficacy, psychological morbidity, and knowledge about postoperative care of patients submitted to radical prostatectomy. Identify the relationships between the variables and know the predictors of self-efficacy.Method: descriptive, cross-sectional study, conducted with 76 hospitalized men. The scales used were the General and Perceived Self-efficacy Scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, in addition to sociodemographic, clinical and knowledge questionnaires.Results: a negative relationship was found for self-efficacy in relation to anxiety and depression. Psychological morbidity was a significant predictor variable for self-efficacy. An active professional situation and the waiting time for surgery also proved to be relevant variables for anxiety and knowledge, respectively.Conclusion: participants had a good level of general and perceived self-efficacy and small percentage of depression. With these findings, it is possible to produce the profile of patients about their psychological needs after radical prostatectomy and, thus, allow the nursing professionals to act holistically, considering not only the need for care of physical nature, but also of psychosocial nature.

  8. Physician social networks and variation in rates of complications after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evan Pollack, Craig; Wang, Hao; Bekelman, Justin E; Weissman, Gary; Epstein, Andrew J; Liao, Kaijun; Dugoff, Eva H; Armstrong, Katrina

    2014-07-01

    Variation in care within and across geographic areas remains poorly understood. The goal of this article was to examine whether physician social networks-as defined by shared patients-are associated with rates of complications after radical prostatectomy. In five cities, we constructed networks of physicians on the basis of their shared patients in 2004-2005 Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare data. From these networks, we identified subgroups of urologists who most frequently shared patients with one another. Among men with localized prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy, we used multilevel analysis with generalized linear mixed-effect models to examine whether physician network structure-along with specific characteristics of the network subgroups-was associated with rates of 30-day and late urinary complications, and long-term incontinence after accounting for patient-level sociodemographic, clinical factors, and urologist patient volume. Networks included 2677 men in five cities who underwent radical prostatectomy. The unadjusted rate of 30-day surgical complications varied across network subgroups from an 18.8 percentage-point difference in the rate of complications across network subgroups in city 1 to a 26.9 percentage-point difference in city 5. Large differences in unadjusted rates of late urinary complications and long-term incontinence across subgroups were similarly found. Network subgroup characteristics-average urologist centrality and patient racial composition-were significantly associated with rates of surgical complications. Analysis of physician networks using Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare data provides insight into observed variation in rates of complications for localized prostate cancer. If validated, such approaches may be used to target future quality improvement interventions. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier

  9. [Functional results and treatment of functional dysfunctions after radical prostatectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, L; Droupy, S; Yiou, R; Soulié, M

    2015-11-01

    To describe the functional results and treatment of functional dysfunctions after radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer. Bibliography search was performed from the database Medline (National Library of Medicine, Pubmed) selected according to the scientific relevance. The research was focused on continence, potency, les dyserections, couple sexuality, incontinence, treatments of postoperative incontinence, dysrection and trifecta. Radical prostatectomy is an elaborate and challenging procedure when carcinological risk balances with functional results. Despite recent developments in surgical techniques, post-radical prostatectomy urinary incontinence (pRP-UI) continues to be one of the most devastating complications, which affects 9-16% of patients. Sphincter injury and bladder dysfunction are the most common causes or pRP-UI. The assessment of severity of pRP-UI that affects the choice of treatment is still not well standardized but should include at least a pad test and self-administered questionnaires. The implantation of an artificial urinary sphincter AMS800 remains the gold standard treatment for patients with moderate to severe pRP-UI. The development of less invasive techniques such as the male sling of Pro-ACT balloons has provided alternative therapeutic options for moderate and slight forms of pRP-UI. Most groups now consider the bulbo-urethral compressive sling as the treatment of choice for patients with non-severe pRP-UI. The most appropriate second-line therapeutic strategy is not clearly determined. Recent therapies such as adjustable artificial urinary sphincters and sling and stem cells injections have been investigated. Maintenance of a satisfying sex life is a major concern of a majority of men facing prostate cancer and its treatments. It is essential to assess the couple's sexuality before treating prostate cancer in order to deliver comprehensive information and consider early therapeutic solutions adapted to the couple

  10. Comprehensive standardized report of complications of retropubic and laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, Farhang; Yunis, Luis Herran; Pinochet, Rodrigo; Nogueira, Lucas; Vora, Kinjal C; Eastham, James A; Guillonneau, Bertrand; Laudone, Vincent; Scardino, Peter T; Touijer, Karim

    2010-03-01

    The lack of standardized reporting of the complications of radical prostatectomy in the literature has made it difficult to compare incidences across institutions and across different surgical approaches. To define comprehensively the incidence, severity, and timing of onset of medical and surgical complications of open retropubic prostatectomy (RP) and laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LP) using a standardized reporting methodology to facilitate comparison. Between January 1999 and June 2007, 4592 consecutive patients underwent RP or LP without prior radiation or hormonal therapy. Median follow-up was 36.9 mo (interquartile range: 20.3-60.6). Open or laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. All medical and surgical complications of radical prostatectomy were captured and graded according to the modified Clavien classification and classified by timing of onset. There were 612 medical complications in 467 patients (10.2%) and 1426 surgical complications in 925 patients (20.1%). The overall incidences of early minor and major medical and surgical complications for RP were 8.5% and 1.5% for medical and 11.4% and 4.9% for surgical complications, respectively. The overall incidences of early minor and major medical and surgical complications for LP were 14.2% and 2.3% for medical and 23.1% and 6.6% for surgical complications, respectively. On multivariate analysis, LP approach was associated with a higher incidence of any grade medical and surgical complications but a lower incidence of major surgical complications than RP. Six hundred fifty-two men (14.2%) visited the emergency department, and 240 men (5.2%) required readmission. The main limitation is the retrospective nature. With standardized reporting, the incidence of some complications is higher than recognized in the literature. Although most complications are minor in severity, medical and surgical complications are observed in approximately 10% and 20% of patients, respectively. Accurate reporting of

  11. Life experiences of Brazilian men with urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction following radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes Lopes, Maria Helena Baena; Higa, Rosângela; Cordeiro, Sílvia Nogueira; Rodrigues Estapê, Nuri Aparecida; Levi D'ancona, Carlos Arturo; Turato, Egberto Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the psychosocial meaning and repercussions on lifestyle associated with erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence (UI) in men following radical prostatectomy. Ten men from Southeastern Brazil who underwent radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer were interviewed. All participants underwent treatment at a urology clinic during the period of September 2007 to February 2009. A clinical-qualitative study was conducted, using semi-structured interviews with open-ended questions. All interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Each man was interviewed once. The average length of the interviews was 37 minutes (range: 16 to 81 minutes). Data from the interviews were subjected to content thematic analysis and development of categories based on psychodynamic references. Three themes were identified: (1) sexuality called into question; (2) a body without governance; and (3) experiencing loss. These men reported difficulties in dealing both with the physical and emotional impotence resulting from the treatment. Urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction affected their body by accentuating conflicts related to masculinity, triggering subjective feelings of powerlessness, and psychological distress. Study respondents assigned multiple psychological meanings to issues related to feelings of powerlessness in general, leading to a narcissistic wound. The men experienced UI as a bodily deficiency, and erectile dysfunction was experienced as a feeling of being devitalized. These results suggest that UI from prostate cancer treatment affects sexuality and self-esteem.

  12. Trends in radical prostatectomy: centralization, robotics, and access to urologic cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitzenberg, Karyn B; Wong, Yu-Ning; Nielsen, Matthew E; Egleston, Brian L; Uzzo, Robert G

    2012-01-01

    Robotic surgery has been widely adopted for radical prostatectomy. We hypothesized that this change is rapidly shifting procedures away from hospitals that do not offer robotics and consequently increasing patient travel. A population-based observational study of all prostatectomies for cancer in New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania from 2000 to 2009 was performed using hospital discharge data. Hospital procedure volume was defined as the number of prostatectomies performed for cancer in a given year. Straight-line travel distance to the treating hospital was calculated for each case. Hospitals were contacted to determine the year of acquisition of the first robot. From 2000 to 2009, the total number of prostatectomies performed annually increased substantially. The increase occurred almost entirely at the very high-volume centers (≥ 106 prostatectomies/year). The number of hospitals performing prostatectomy fell 37% from 2000 to 2009. By 2009, the 9% (21/244) of hospitals that had very high volume performed 57% of all prostatectomies, and the 35% (86/244) of hospitals with a robot performed 85% of all prostatectomies. The median travel distance increased 54% from 2000 to 2009 (Ppast decade, the number of radical prostatectomies performed has risen substantially. These procedures have been increasingly centralized at high-volume centers, leading to longer patient travel distances. Few prostatectomies are now performed at hospitals that do not offer robotic surgery. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  13. Anatomic Considerations for Radical Retropubic Prostatectomy in an Achondroplastic Dwarf

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    Dennis Gyomber

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This is the first report of a radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP in an achondroplastic dwarf. We highlight the pelvic anatomy, precluding laparoscopic or robotic prostatectomy, and making open surgery extremely difficult. We review relevant literature regarding general, urological, and orthopedic abnormalities of achondroplasia (ACH and present a clinical case. No reports of RRP in achondroplastic dwarfs exist, with only one case of an abandoned RRP due to similar pelvic anatomy in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta. Significant lumbar lordosis found in ACH results in a short anteroposterior dimension, severely limiting access to the prostate. We present a case of a 62-year-old achondroplastic dwarf who had Gleason 3+4 disease on transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy in four from 12 cores. Surgery was difficult due to narrow anteroposterior pelvic dimension, but achievable. Histological analysis revealed multifocal prostate cancer, with negative surgical margins and no extraprostatic extension. RRP in ACH patients, although possible, should be approached with caution due to the abnormal pelvic dimensions, and discussions regarding potential abandonment of surgery should be included during informed consent. This case highlights the preoperative use of computed tomography to assist in the surgical planning for patients with difficult pelvic anatomy.

  14. Prostate-specific antigen density as a parameter for the prediction of positive lymph nodes at radical prostatectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Yiakoumos, Theocharis; K?lble, Tilman; Rausch, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to determine the prognostic ability of Partin's tables for a patient collective undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP) and to evaluate the association of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) density (PSAD) and postoperative lymph node status. Methods: From 1999 to 2006, 393 consecutive patients underwent RP at our Urology department. Patients with Gleason scores T2c or neoadjuvant hormonal therapy were excluded. Preoperative PSA, biopsy results, digit...

  15. The surgical procedure is the most important factor affecting continence recovery after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungsoo; Yoon, Chang Jin; Park, Hyun Jun; Lee, Jeong Zoo; Ha, Hong Koo

    2013-08-01

    We analyzed factors associated with early recovery of continence after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Among 467 patients treated with laparoscopic radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer between 2007 and 2012, 249 patients who underwent a preoperative urodynamic study were enrolled. The patients' age, prostate volume, preoperative serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), Gleason score, pathologic stage, and preoperative urodynamic parameters were recorded. The preoperative membranous and prostatic urethral length on magnetic resonance image, nerve sparing technique, and type of surgical procedure (extrafascial and intrafascial) were analyzed. Patients were considered to have early recovery of continence when they needed no pad in 3 months or less after surgery. Ninety-two patients were in the early recovery group and 157 were in the late recovery group. The membranous urethral lengths were 12.06±2.56 and 11.81±2.87 mm, and prostatic urethral lengths were 36.39±6.15 and 37.45±7.55 mm in each group, respectively. The membranous-posterior urethral length ratios were 0.25±0.06 and 0.24±0.06, and prostatic-posterior urethral length ratios were 0.75±0.06 and 0.76±0.06, respectively. In and of themselves, the membranous and prostatic urethral lengths were not associated with recovery duration however, the membranous-total and prostatic-total urethral length ratios were related (p=0.024 and 0.024, respectively). None of the urodynamic parameters correlated with continence recovery time. In the multivariate analysis, the type of surgical procedure (odds ratio [OR], 7.032; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.660 to 18.590; precovery of continence. The current intrafascial surgical procedure is the most important factor affecting early recovery of continence after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

  16. Advances in Robotic-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy over Time

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    Emma F. P. Jacobs

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the introduction of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RALP, robotics has become increasingly more commonplace in the armamentarium of the urologic surgeon. Robotic utilization has exploded across surgical disciplines well beyond the fields of urology and prostate surgery. The literature detailing technical steps, comparison of large surgical series, and even robotically focused randomized control trials are available for review. RALP, the first robot-assisted surgical procedure to achieve widespread use, has recently become the primary approach for the surgical management of localized prostate cancer. As a result, surgeons are constantly trying to refine and improve upon current technical aspects of the operation. Recent areas of published modifications include bladder neck anastomosis and reconstruction, bladder drainage, nerve sparing approaches and techniques, and perioperative and postoperative management including penile rehabilitation. In this review, we summarize recent advances in perioperative management and surgical technique for RALP.

  17. A new nomogram to predict pathologic outcome following radical prostatectomy

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    Alexandre Crippa

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To develop a preoperative nomogram to predict pathologic outcome in patients submitted to radical prostatectomy for clinical localized prostate cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Nine hundred and sixty patients with clinical stage T1 and T2 prostate cancer were evaluated following radical prostatectomy, and 898 were included in the study. Following a multivariate analysis, nomograms were developed incorporating serum PSA, biopsy Gleason score, and percentage of positive biopsy cores in order to predict the risks of extraprostatic tumor extension, and seminal vesicle involvement. RESULTS: In univariate analysis there was a significant association between percentage of positive biopsy cores (p < 0.001, serum PSA (p = 0.001 and biopsy Gleason score (p < 0.001 with extraprostatic tumor extension. A similar pathologic outcome was seen among tumors with Gleason score 7, and Gleason score 8 to 10. In multivariate analysis, the 3 preoperative variables showed independent significance to predict tumor extension. This allowed the development of nomogram-1 (using Gleason scores in 3 categories - 2 to 6, 7 and 8 to 10 and nomogram-2 (using Gleason scores in 2 categories - 2 to 6 and 7 to 10 to predict disease extension based on these 3 parameters. In the validation analysis, 87% and 91.1% of the time the nomograms-1 and 2, correctly predicted the probability of a pathological stage to within 10% respectively. CONCLUSION: Incorporating percent of positive biopsy cores to a nomogram that includes preoperative serum PSA and biopsy Gleason score, can accurately predict the presence of extraprostatic disease extension in patients with clinical localized prostate cancer.

  18. Changes in indications and oncological outcomes of radical prostatectomy after 2000--data from 1268 Japanese patients treated with radical prostatectomy between 2000 and 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuzuka, Koji; Koie, Takuya; Narita, Shintaro; Kaiho, Yasuhiro; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Tsuchiya, Norihiko; Kakoi, Narihiko; Kawamura, Sadafumi; Tochigi, Tatsuo; Ohyama, Chikara; Habuchi, Tomonori; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Arai, Yoichi

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize trends in indications for and oncological outcomes of radical prostatectomy after 2000. Data from 1268 patients undergoing radical prostatectomy without neoadjuvant therapy between 2000 and 2009 at four urological centers in Japan were retrospectively reviewed. Changes in age at radical prostatectomy, prostate-specific antigen level, biopsy Gleason score, clinical T stage, D'Amico risk classification, organ-confined disease and tumor volume in surgical specimens were analyzed over time. The median age at radical prostatectomy decreased from 68 years in 2000-2 to 65 years in 2009 (P 2000-2 to 6.90 ng/ml in 2009 (P 2000-2 to 72.5% in 2009 (P = 0.004). The median tumor volume decreased from 1.70 cc in 2000-2 to 1.28 cc in 2009 (P = 0.017). The proportion of biopsy Gleason score 7 increased from 40.6% in 2000-2 to 60.1% in 2009 (P 2000-2 to 59.5% in 2009 (P < 0.001). Age at radical prostatectomy for men with localized prostate cancer was higher in Japan than in the USA or Europe. Prostate-specific antigen, non-organ-confined disease and tumor volume decreased during the study period, whereas Gleason score 7 and intermediate-risk disease increased during the study period. This information enables comparison of outcomes between various treatments, between various geographic regions and between various time periods.

  19. [Organisation and early outcome after radical prostatectomy in Denmark 2004-2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borre, M.; Iversen, P.; Bendixen, A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The organisation, volume and early morbidity after radical prostatectomy has not been researched in Denmark. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The National Hospital Register was searched for all radical prostatectomies in Denmark from 2004-2007, including mortality and readmissions. RESULTS......: In total, 1469 radical prostatectomies were performed, initially in 9 departments, decreasing to 6 departments in 2007. From 2004 to 2007 the number of operations increased by approximately 60%. Median hospital stay was 4 days (mean 5.1 days) without any differences between departments. Mortality was 0.......2%. CONCLUSION: There is an increasing rate of radical prostatectomies in Denmark. It is proposed that a national database be established to monitor early and long-term outcomes, including the role of surgical technique (nerve sparing, laparoscopic/robotic surgery, etc.) in order to ensure optimal organisation...

  20. Smoking effect on oncological outcome among men with prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Nobuaki; Shiota, Masaki; Shiga, Ken-Ichiro; Takeuchi, Ario; Inokuchi, Junichi; Tatsugami, Katsunori; Yokomizo, Akira; Koga, Hirofumi; Yamaguchi, Akito; Naito, Seiji; Eto, Masatoshi

    2017-05-01

    To analyze the association between smoking and oncological outcome after radical prostatectomy in patients with prostate cancer. This study included men who underwent radical prostatectomy between 2003 and 2013. The association of clinicopathological factors with smoking status and the prognostic significance of clinicopathological factors and smoking status on biochemical recurrence (BCR) were evaluated. Of the 1165 included patients, 226 (19.4%) were current smokers and 939 (80.6%) were nonsmokers. The median observation period was 39 months (interquartile range, 15-75 months). Current smokers were younger than nonsmokers and had higher PSA levels, higher biopsy and pathological Gleason scores, and more frequent lymph-node involvement than nonsmokers. Pathological Gleason score, extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, positive surgical margin, lymph-node involvement, and current smoking (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval]; 1.31 [1.00-1.72], P = 0.046) were identified as significant risk factors of BCR on univariate analysis. However, smoking status was not an independent predictive marker on multivariate analysis. Current smokers had adverse clinicopathological characteristics including high PSA level, high Gleason score, and lymph node involvement, suggesting that smoking promoted the progression of prostate cancer. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  1. Influence of secondary diagnoses in the development of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy

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    Bárbara Padilla-Fernández

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study whether there are factors related to secondary diagnoses (SDg present in patients with prostate cancer that influence the development of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy (RP. Materials and methods: A retrospective multicenter observational study was performed reviewing the medical records of 430 men who underwent RP due to organ-confined prostate cancer in 9 different hospitals. Two study groups were distinguished: Group A (GA: Patients without urinary incontinence after RP; Group B (GB: patients with any degree of post-surgical urinary incontinence. Results: Average age at surgery was 63.42 years (range 45-73. 258 patients were continent after surgery and 172 patients complaint of any degree of incontinence after RP. A higher percentage of healthy patients was found in group A (continent after surgery than in group B (p = 0.001. The most common SDg prior to surgery were hypertension, lower urinary tract symptoms, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus and erectile dysfunction, but none did show a greater trend towards post-surgical incontinence. Conclusions: A better health status prior to surgery is associated to a lower incidence of new-onset urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy. However, no correlation was found between the most common medical disorders and the development of post-surgical urinary incontinence.

  2. Contemporary Trends and Survival Outcomes After Aborted Radical Prostatectomy in Lymph Node Metastatic Prostate Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandini, Marco; Preisser, Felix; Nazzani, Sebastiano; Marchioni, Michele; Tian, Zhe; Fossati, Nicola; Gandaglia, Giorgio; Gallina, Andrea; Abdollah, Firas; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Montorsi, Francesco; Saad, Fred; Tilki, Derya; Briganti, Alberto; Karakiewicz, Pierre I

    2018-01-20

    Aborted radical prostatectomy (aRP) in lymph node (LN) metastatic (pN1) prostate cancer (PCa) patients showed worse survival in European patients. Contemporary rates of aRP are unknown in North America. To examine the rate of aRP and its effect on cancer-specific mortality (CSM) in contemporary North American patients. Within the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database (2004-2014), we identified 3719 pN1 PCa patients. RP. Incidence proportion and median survival of LN metastatic PCa patients who underwent aRP versus completed RP (cRP). Cumulative incidence plots and competing-risks regression (CRR) models tested CSM and other-cause mortality rates according to aRP versus cRP. The effect of selected variables on CSM rate was graphically depicted using LOESS methodology. All analyses were repeated after propensity score matching. Between 2004 and 2014, the rate of aRP decreased from 20.4% to 5.6% (pcontemporary North American patients, 5% are affected by aRP. It confers a significant survival disadvantage that applies to patients with baseline PSA values up to 50ng/ml and in those with up to seven LN metastases. Radical prostatectomy should not be aborted in pN1 prostate cancer individuals. Copyright © 2018 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Artificial urinary sphincter for urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy: a historical cohort from 2004 to 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Cesar Soares dos Santos Junior

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to retrospectively evaluate a cohort of patients with prostate cancer and persistent urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy. From January 2004 to December 2015, eighty-six individuals were identified to have received an AUS implant, provided by a private nonprofit HMO operating in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. On total, there were 91 AUS implants, with a median interval between radical prostatectomy and AUS implant of 3.6 years (IQR 1.9 to 5.5. The rate of AUS cumulative survival, after a median follow-up of 4.1 years (IQR 1.7-7.2 years, was 44% (n=40. The median survival of AUS implants was 2.9 years (IQR 0.5-7.9 years. Thirty-seven AUS implants (40.7% resulted in grade III surgical complications. There were 5 deaths at 2.1, 4.7, 5.7, 5.7 and 6.5 years of follow-up, but none due to causes directly associated to the AUS implant. Persistent severe incontinence was documented in 14 (15.3% additional patients. From the 51 AUS implants which resulted in grade III surgical complications or persistent severe incontinence, 24 (47.1% underwent surgical revisions. Explantation of the sphincter or its components was observed in 6 cases (25.0%. Mechanical failure, described as fluid loss and/or inability to recycle the AUS device, was observed in 4 devices (16.7%. In conclusion, although AUS implants are recommended as the gold-standard treatment of severe urinary incontinence after prostatectomy, the observed high rates of malfunction and grade III adverse events are a matter of concern warranting further assessment on the safety and efficacy of these devices.

  4. Patients undergoing radical prostatectomy have a better survival than the background population.

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    Røder, Martin Andreas; Brasso, Klaus; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk; Gruschy, Lisa; Rusch, Ea; Iversen, Peter

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate standardised relative survival and mortality ratio for patients undergoing radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer at our institution. Between 1995 and 2010, a total of 1,350 consecutive patients underwent radical prostatectomy. Patients were followed prospectively per protocol. No patients were lost to follow-up. Overall and cause-specific survival were described using Kaplan-Meier plots. Standardized relative survival and mortality ratio were calculated based on expected survival in the age-matched Danish population using the methods and macros described by Dickmann. The country-specific population mortality rates used for calculation of the expected survival were based on data from The Human Mortality Database. The median follow-up was 3.4 years (range: 0-14.3 years). A total of 59 (4.4%) patients died during follow-up. In all, 17 (1.3%) patients died of prostate cancer. The estimated ten-year overall survival was 89.3%. The cancer-specific survival was estimated to 96.6% after ten years. Relative survival was 1.04 after five years and 1.14 after ten years. The standardized mortality ratio, i.e. observed mortality/expected mortality, was 0.61 and 0.39 at five and ten years, respectively. The overall and cancer-specific ten-year survival in a consecutive series of patients in a non-screened Danish population is ≥ 89%. The survival and mortality ratio is significantly better than expected in the age-matched background population. This finding is likely explained by selection bias. Although the results indicate an excellent outcome in terms of cancer control, the efficacy of prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer remains at debate. not relevant. not relevant.

  5. Transperitoneal robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and inguinal herniorrhaphy.

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    Finley, David S; Savatta, Dominic; Rodriguez, Esequiel; Kopelan, Adam; Ahlering, Thomas E

    2008-01-01

    Patients undergoing radical prostatectomy are at increased risk of development of post-operative inguinal hernias (IH). We present the largest series of transperitoneal combined robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) and IH. After IRB approval, data from patients undergoing RALP at two centers were prospectively entered into a database and analyzed. IH were repaired robotically via a transperitoneal route with mesh. Between June 2002 and May 2007, 837 RALPs were performed, 80 of which included combined IH repair (9.6%), by two surgeons, T.A. and D.S. Forty-two patients (52.5%) had IH on pre-operative exam. Twenty-four hernias were left, 32 right, and 24 bilateral. Twenty-two patients had prior ipsilateral or contralateral herniorrhaphy. After dissection of the hernia sac, a swatch of flat Marlex mesh (n = 22), a polypropylene mesh plug (n = 19), an Ultrapro hernia system (n = 7), a Proceed coated mesh (n = 19), a 3D-Max (n = 37), a combination of both umbrella and flat mesh (n = 3), or suture alone (n = 2) was used. Inguinal herniorrhaphy added approximately 15 min of operative time in all cases. There was one hernia recurrence over an average follow-up period of 12.5 months (0.2-52 months). There was one complication attributable to IH repair-a urine leak which was attributed to anastomotic stretch due to reperitonealization. Urological surgeons should perform a thorough inguinal exam during preoperative evaluation and intraoperatively to detect subclinical inguinal hernias. Inguinal herniorrhaphy at the time of RALP is safe and should be routinely performed.

  6. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in an initial Japanese series: the impact of prior abdominal surgery on surgical outcomes.

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    Yumioka, Tetsuya; Iwamoto, Hideto; Masago, Toshihiko; Morizane, Shuichi; Yao, Akihisa; Honda, Masashi; Muraoka, Kuniyasu; Sejima, Takehiro; Takenaka, Atsushi

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the influence of prior abdominal surgery on surgical outcomes of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in an early single center experience in Japan. We reviewed medical records of patients with localized prostate cancer who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy from October 2010 to September 2013 at Tottori University Faculty of Medicine, Yonago, Tottori, Japan. Patients with prior abdominal surgery were compared with those with no prior surgery with respect to total operative time, port-insertion time, console time, positive surgical margin and perioperative complication rate. Furthermore, the number of patients requiring minimal adhesion lysis was compared between the two groups. Of 150 patients who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, 94 (63%) had no prior abdominal surgery, whereas 56 patients (37%) did. The mean total operative time was 329 and 333 min (P = 0.340), mean port insertion time was 40 and 34.5 min (P = 0.003), mean console time was 255 and 238 min (P = 0.145), a positive surgical margin was observed in 17.9% and 17.0% patients (P = 0.896), and the incidence of perioperative complications was 25% and 23.4% (P = 0.825), respectively, in those with and without prior abdominal surgery. In the prior abdominal surgery group, 48 patients (80.4%) required adhesion lysis at the time of trocar placement or while operating the robotic console. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy appears to be a safe approach for patients with prior abdominal surgery without increasing total operative time, robotic console time, positive surgical margin or the incidence of perioperative complications. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  7. [Analysis and prognostic factors of the specimen of radical prostatectomy in prostate cancer].

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    Fromont, G; Molinié, V; Soulié, M; Salomon, L

    2015-11-01

    Handling and pathologic analysis of radical prostatectomy specimens are crucial to confirm the diagnosis of prostate cancer and evaluate prognostic criteria. A systematic review of the scientific literature was performed in the Medline database (PubMed), using different associations of the following keywords: prostate cancer; prostatectomy; specimen; handling; pathology; tumor staging; Gleason score; surgical margin; prognosis; frozen section; lymph node; biomarkers. A particular search was done on specimen management and characterization of tissue prognostic factors. Handling of both radical prostatectomy specimen and lymph node dissection is standardized according to international criteria. Although the main histoprognostic factors are still Gleason score, pathologic staging and margin status, these criteria have been refined these last 10 years, allowing to improve the prediction of relapse after surgical treatment. The standardization of handling and pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens will be mandatory for treatment uniformization according to risk stratification in prostate cancer and personalization of therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of Transperineal Mapping Biopsy Results with Whole-Mount Radical Prostatectomy Pathology in Patients with Localized Prostate Cancer

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    Darren J. Katz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We sought to evaluate the accuracy of transperineal mapping biopsy (TMB by comparing it to the pathology specimen of patients who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP for localized prostate cancer. Methods. From March 2007 to September 2009, 78 men at a single center underwent TMB; 17 of 78 subsequently underwent RP. TMB cores were grouped into four quadrants and matched to data from RP whole-mount slides. Gleason score, tumor location and volume, cross-sectional area, and maximal diameter were measured; sensitivity and specificity were assessed. Results. For the 17 patients who underwent RP, TMB revealed 12 (71% had biopsy Gleason grades ≥ 3 + 4 and 13 (76% had bilateral disease. RP specimens showed 14 (82% had Gleason scores ≥ 3 + 4 and 13 (76% had bilateral disease. Sensitivity and specificity of TMB for prostate cancer detection were 86% (95% confidence interval [CI] 72%–94% and 83% (95% CI 62%–95%, respectively. Four quadrants negative for cancer on TMB were positive on prostatectomy, and six positive on TMB were negative on prostatectomy. Conclusion. TMB is a highly invasive procedure that can accurately detect and localize prostate cancer. These findings help establish baseline performance characteristics for TMB and its utility for organ-sparing strategies.

  9. Comparison of transperineal mapping biopsy results with whole-mount radical prostatectomy pathology in patients with localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Darren J; Pinochet, Rodrigo; Richards, Kyle A; Godoy, Guilherme; Udo, Kazuma; Nogueira, Lucas; Cronin, Angel M; Fine, Samson W; Scardino, Peter T; Coleman, Jonathon A

    2014-01-01

    Objective. We sought to evaluate the accuracy of transperineal mapping biopsy (TMB) by comparing it to the pathology specimen of patients who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP) for localized prostate cancer. Methods. From March 2007 to September 2009, 78 men at a single center underwent TMB; 17 of 78 subsequently underwent RP. TMB cores were grouped into four quadrants and matched to data from RP whole-mount slides. Gleason score, tumor location and volume, cross-sectional area, and maximal diameter were measured; sensitivity and specificity were assessed. Results. For the 17 patients who underwent RP, TMB revealed 12 (71%) had biopsy Gleason grades ≥ 3 + 4 and 13 (76%) had bilateral disease. RP specimens showed 14 (82%) had Gleason scores ≥ 3 + 4 and 13 (76%) had bilateral disease. Sensitivity and specificity of TMB for prostate cancer detection were 86% (95% confidence interval [CI] 72%-94%) and 83% (95% CI 62%-95%), respectively. Four quadrants negative for cancer on TMB were positive on prostatectomy, and six positive on TMB were negative on prostatectomy. Conclusion. TMB is a highly invasive procedure that can accurately detect and localize prostate cancer. These findings help establish baseline performance characteristics for TMB and its utility for organ-sparing strategies.

  10. Quality of life in patients submitted to radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Moura Miranda Goluart

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study with a descriptive analysis of 81 patients submitted to radical prostatectomy (RP. Our objective was to correlate quality of life (QL according to the EORTC-QLQ C30 with age group and time after surgery. Mean age was 65.7 years. Most sought the care of urology, asymptomatic. Some referred former smoking (49.9% and high blood pressure (53.1%. Mean preoperative SBP was 8.4 ng/ml. Most participants were in stages T2c to T3, Gleason ?6 and over a year after surgery. Erectile dysfunction presented in 90.1%, and urinary incontinence in 33.3%. Functional and overall health scales presented high QL indexes, and symptomatology, with low ones. Older adults presented higher QL regarding emotional functioning, financial difficulties and overall health, as well as those with over a year after surgery, regarding cognitive functioning and fatigue. Although QL was not greatly affected, there were differences between age groups and time after surgery. doi: 10.5216/ree.v16i3.21589.

  11. Systematic Review of Studies Reporting Positive Surgical Margins After Bladder Neck Sparing Radical Prostatectomy.

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    Bellangino, Mariangela; Verrill, Clare; Leslie, Tom; Bell, Richard W; Hamdy, Freddie C; Lamb, Alastair D

    2017-11-07

    Bladder neck preservation (BNP) during radical prostatectomy (RP) has been proposed as a method to improve early recovery of urinary continence after radical prostatectomy. However, there is concern over a possible increase in the risk of positive surgical margins and prostate cancer recurrence rate. A recent systematic review and meta-analysis reported improved early recovery and overall long-term urinary continence without compromising oncologic control. The aim of our study was to perform a critical review of the literature to assess the impact on bladder neck and base margins after bladder neck sparing radical prostatectomy. We carried out a systematic review of the literature using Pubmed, Scopus and Cochrane library databases in May 2017 using medical subject headings and free-text protocol according to PRISMA guidelines. We used the following search terms: bladder neck preservation, prostate cancer, radical prostatectomy and surgical margins. Studies focusing on positive surgical margins (PSM) in bladder neck sparing RP pertinent to the objective of this review were included. Overall, we found 15 relevant studies reporting overall and site-specific positive surgical margins rate after bladder neck sparing radical prostatectomy. This included two RCTs, seven prospective comparative studies, two retrospective comparative studies and four case series. All studies were published between 1993 and 2015 with sample sizes ranging between 50 and 1067. Surgical approaches included open, laparoscopic and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. The overall and base-specific PSM rates ranged between 7-36% and 0-16.3%, respectively. Mean base PSM was 4.9% in those patients where bladder neck sparing was performed, but only 1.85% in those without sparing. Bladder neck preservation during radical prostatectomy may increase base-positive margins. Further studies are needed to better investigate the impact of this technique on oncological outcomes. A future paradigm could

  12. Radical Prostatectomy is a Valuable Treatment Alternative in Patients with High-Risk Prostate Cancer

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    Naşide Mangır

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To review the high-risk prostate cancer (PCa patient database with special emphasis on the role of radical prostatectomy (RP in comparison to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT. Materials and Methods A total of 102 patients with complete and long-term follow-up data were included. High-risk PCa was defined as: a pre-treatment PSA level of ≥20 ng/mL and/or a primary Gleason score of ≥4 and/or clinical stage ≥T3N0M0 disease. A total of 45 (42.5% patients underwent radical RP with extended pelvic lymphadenectomy for-high risk PCa and a total of 57 (53.8% patients received EBRT. Results The mean overall survival (mean survival 95.2 vs. 129.2 months, log rank p=0.73 and cancer-specific survival (mean survival 104 vs. 151.4 months, log rank p=0.35 were not significantly different between RP and EBRT groups. Univariate analysis of variables that may affect overall survival showed no significant effect of pre-treatment PSA, Gleason score, clinical stage or type of therapy. The only factor which reached statistical significance was patient age (p=0.002. Multivariate analysis of variables also showed no significant effect of pre-treatment PSA, Gleason score, clinical stage or type of therapy and, again, the only factor which reached statistical significance was patient age (p=0.012. Conclusion Radical prostatectomy appears to be an effective and a non-inferior treatment option in patients with high-risk localized PCa with acceptable overall and cancer-specific survival compared to RT. Therefore, as the guidelines suggest, it should be provided as an option during patient consultation for a proper informed decision-making.

  13. Is a wider angle of the membranous urethra associated with incontinence after radical prostatectomy?

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    Soljanik, Irina; Bauer, Ricarda M; Becker, Armin J; Stief, Christian G; Gozzi, Christian; Solyanik, Olga; Brocker, Kerstin A; Kirchhoff, Sonja M

    2014-12-01

    To investigate whether differences in the anatomy and dynamics of the pelvic floor (PF) in patients after radical prostatectomy (RP) depicted on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are associated with continence status. In the prospective designed study, 24 patients with post-prostatectomy stress urinary incontinence were enrolled. Additionally, 10 continent patients after RP were matched for age, body mass index and perioperative parameters. All patients underwent continence assessment and MRI (TrueFISP sequence; TR 4.57 ms; TE 2.29 ms; slice thickness 7 mm; FOV 270 mm) 12 months after RP. Images were analyzed for membranous urethra length (MUL), angle of the membranous urethra (AMU), severity of periurethral/urethral fibrosis, lifting of the levator ani muscle, lowering of the posterior bladder wall (BPW), bladder neck (BN) and external urinary sphincter (EUS), and symphyseal rotation of these structures during the Valsalva maneuver and voiding. Compared to continent controls, incontinent patients showed a significant wider AMU during voiding (p = 0.002) and more pronounced lowering of the BN and EUS (p urethra as a result of anchoring of the BN and EUS in the PF appears to be an important functional factor with an essential impact on continence after RP. Functional MRI seems to be a helpful imaging tool for morphologic and dynamic evaluation of the PF.

  14. Preoperative Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predicts Biochemical Recurrence in Prostate Cancer after Radical Prostatectomy.

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    Richard Ho

    Full Text Available To evaluate the utility of preoperative multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MP-MRI in predicting biochemical recurrence (BCR following radical prostatectomy (RP.From March 2007 to January 2015, 421 consecutive patients with prostate cancer (PCa underwent preoperative MP-MRI and RP. BCR-free survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify clinical and imaging variables predictive of BCR. Logistic regression was performed to generate a nomogram to predict three-year BCR probability.Of the total cohort, 370 patients met inclusion criteria with 39 (10.5% patients experiencing BCR. On multivariate analysis, preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA (p = 0.01, biopsy Gleason score (p = 0.0008, MP-MRI suspicion score (p = 0.03, and extracapsular extension on MP-MRI (p = 0.03 were significantly associated with time to BCR. A nomogram integrating these factors to predict BCR at three years after RP demonstrated a c-index of 0.84, outperforming the predictive value of Gleason score and PSA alone (c-index 0.74, p = 0.02.The addition of MP-MRI to standard clinical factors significantly improves prediction of BCR in a post-prostatectomy PCa cohort. This could serve as a valuable tool to support clinical decision-making in patients with moderate and high-risk cancers.

  15. Physical activity and quality of life after radical prostatectomy.

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    Santa Mina, Daniel; Matthew, Andrew G; Trachtenberg, John; Tomlinson, George; Guglietti, Crissa L; Alibhai, Shabbir M H; Ritvo, Paul

    2010-06-01

    There are significant post-surgical reductions in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in prostate cancer (PCa) patients undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP). Physical activity (PA) interventions have improved treatment outcomes for PCa patients undergoing radiation and hormone therapy, but PA effects have not previously been examined in the RP setting. This study examined the relationship between preoperative PA levels and postoperative HRQOL outcomes in PCa patients treated with RP. Sixty patients were interviewed regarding lifetime PA and completed preoperative (2 weeks prior to surgery) and postoperative (4 weeks after surgery) HRQOL questionnaires. Aerobic fitness testing was conducted on a subsample of 22 patients. Higher levels of total past-year PA and occupational PA significantly correlated with lesser HRQOL declines from presurgery to 4 weeks post-surgery (Beta = -0.364, p = 0.037 and Beta = -0.243, p = 0.089, respectively) in models adjusted for age, postoperative questionnaire completion date, Gleason score and education. Past-year occupational PA was highly positively correlated with past-year total PA (r = 0.785, p < 0.001). Lifetime total PA was correlated with estimated VO(2) max (r = 0.486, p = 0.026) in the 22 patients who were aerobically tested. Lifetime and past-year PA volumes were not correlated with waist circumference or body mass index. Declines in HRQOL after RP may be reduced in patients with higher preoperative levels of self-reported PA. These findings require further study with larger samples to confirm results. If confirmed, findings suggest exercise preoperatively may improve HRQOL outcomes after RP.

  16. Associations between ABO blood groups and biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yoshio; Ohori, Makoto; Nakashima, Jun; Okubo, Hidenori; Satake, Naoya; Takizawa, Issei; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Hamada, Riu; Nakagami, Yoshihiro; Yoshioka, Kunihiko; Tachibana, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated associations between ABO blood groups and prognosis in various types of cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between ABO blood groups and biochemical recurrence (BCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP). A total of 555 patients with prostate cancer who underwent RP were included in the study. No patients received neoadjuvant and/or adjuvant therapy. The effect of ABO blood groups on BCR was examined using univariate and multivariate analyses. During the follow-up period (mean, 52.0 months), 166 patients (29.9%) experienced BCR, with a 5-year BCR-free rate of 67.3%. Although the ABO blood group was not a significantly associated with BCR in the univariate analysis, it was an independent predictor of BCR in the multivariate analysis: blood type O patients had a significantly lower risk of BCR compared to type A patients (Hazard ratio, 0.608; 95% confidence interval, 0.410-0.902; P = 0.014). Further analyses revealed that surgical margin status confounded the assessment of the association between the ABO blood group and BCR. In the analyses of patients with a negative surgical margin, the 5-year BCR-free rate in blood type O patients was a significantly higher than that in type A patients (91.2% vs. 71.0%; P = 0.026). Blood type O is significantly associated with a decreased risk of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Further studies are needed to clarify the nature of this association.

  17. Technical Note: Method to correlate whole-specimen histopathology of radical prostatectomy with diagnostic MR imaging

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    McGrath, Deirdre M., E-mail: d.mcgrath@sheffield.ac.uk; Lee, Jenny; Foltz, Warren D. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Samavati, Navid [Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G9 (Canada); Jewett, Michael A. S. [Departments of Surgery (Urology) and Surgical Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Kwast, Theo van der [Pathology Department, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4 (Canada); Chung, Peter [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Ménard, Cynthia [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Centre Hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal, 1058 Rue Saint-Denis, Montréal, Québec H2X 3J4 (Canada); Brock, Kristy K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48108 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: Validation of MRI-guided tumor boundary delineation for targeted prostate cancer therapy is achieved via correlation with gold-standard histopathology of radical prostatectomy specimens. Challenges to accurate correlation include matching the pathology sectioning plane with the in vivo imaging slice plane and correction for the deformation that occurs between in vivo imaging and histology. A methodology is presented for matching of the histological sectioning angle and position to the in vivo imaging slices. Methods: Patients (n = 4) with biochemical failure following external beam radiotherapy underwent diagnostic MRI to confirm localized recurrence of prostate cancer, followed by salvage radical prostatectomy. High-resolution 3-D MRI of the ex vivo specimens was acquired to determine the pathology sectioning angle that best matched the in vivo imaging slice plane, using matching anatomical features and implanted fiducials. A novel sectioning device was developed to guide sectioning at the correct angle, and to assist the insertion of reference dye marks to aid in histopathology reconstruction. Results: The percentage difference in the positioning of the urethra in the ex vivo pathology sections compared to the positioning in in vivo images was reduced from 34% to 7% through slicing at the best match angle. Reference dye marks were generated, which were visible in ex vivo imaging, in the tissue sections before and after processing, and in histology sections. Conclusions: The method achieved an almost fivefold reduction in the slice-matching error and is readily implementable in combination with standard MRI technology. The technique will be employed to generate datasets for correlation of whole-specimen prostate histopathology with in vivo diagnostic MRI using 3-D deformable registration, allowing assessment of the sensitivity and specificity of MRI parameters for prostate cancer. Although developed specifically for prostate, the method is readily

  18. Technical Note: Method to correlate whole-specimen histopathology of radical prostatectomy with diagnostic MR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Deirdre M.; Lee, Jenny; Foltz, Warren D.; Samavati, Navid; Jewett, Michael A. S.; van der Kwast, Theo; Chung, Peter; Ménard, Cynthia; Brock, Kristy K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Validation of MRI-guided tumor boundary delineation for targeted prostate cancer therapy is achieved via correlation with gold-standard histopathology of radical prostatectomy specimens. Challenges to accurate correlation include matching the pathology sectioning plane with the in vivo imaging slice plane and correction for the deformation that occurs between in vivo imaging and histology. A methodology is presented for matching of the histological sectioning angle and position to the in vivo imaging slices. Methods: Patients (n = 4) with biochemical failure following external beam radiotherapy underwent diagnostic MRI to confirm localized recurrence of prostate cancer, followed by salvage radical prostatectomy. High-resolution 3-D MRI of the ex vivo specimens was acquired to determine the pathology sectioning angle that best matched the in vivo imaging slice plane, using matching anatomical features and implanted fiducials. A novel sectioning device was developed to guide sectioning at the correct angle, and to assist the insertion of reference dye marks to aid in histopathology reconstruction. Results: The percentage difference in the positioning of the urethra in the ex vivo pathology sections compared to the positioning in in vivo images was reduced from 34% to 7% through slicing at the best match angle. Reference dye marks were generated, which were visible in ex vivo imaging, in the tissue sections before and after processing, and in histology sections. Conclusions: The method achieved an almost fivefold reduction in the slice-matching error and is readily implementable in combination with standard MRI technology. The technique will be employed to generate datasets for correlation of whole-specimen prostate histopathology with in vivo diagnostic MRI using 3-D deformable registration, allowing assessment of the sensitivity and specificity of MRI parameters for prostate cancer. Although developed specifically for prostate, the method is readily

  19. Influence of pathologist experience on positive surgical margins following radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallman, Jacob E; Packiam, Vignesh T; Wroblewski, Kristen E; Paner, Gladell P; Eggener, Scott E

    2017-07-01

    A positive surgical margin (PSM) following radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer is associated with increased risk of biochemical recurrence. We sought to examine whether the pathologist is an independent predictor of PSMs. We performed a retrospective review of 3,557 men who underwent RP for localized prostate cancer at our institution from 2003 to 2015. We evaluated 29 separate pathologists. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression were used to test variables previously shown to influence PSM rates. Overall rate of PSM was 18.9%. Compared with patients without PSM, patients with PSM had higher body mass index (mean: 28.8 vs. 28.3), Gleason score≥7 (84% vs. 66%), extracapsular extension (51% vs. 20%), and median prostate-specific antigen (5.9 vs. 5.1ng/ml) (all Pexperience, pathologist experience, and pathologist genitourinary fellowship training were all predictors of PSMs (all Pexperience, increased pathologist experience, higher pathologic Gleason score, higher pathologic stage, and higher prostate-specific antigen were significant predictors of PSMs. Increasing surgeon experience was associated with decreased odds of PSM (odds ratio = 0.79 per 1 standard deviation increase, 95% CI [0.70-0.89]). In contrast, increasing pathologist experience was associated with increased odds of PSM (odds ratio = 1.11 per 1 standard deviation increase, 95% CI [1.03-1.19]). The relationship between pathologist experience and PSM appeared to be nonlinear (Fig. 2). Greater pathologist experience appears to be associated with greater odds of PSMs following radical prostatectomy, even after controlling for case mix, pathologist fellowship training, and surgeon experience. Based on these findings, pathologists with less experience reviewing RP specimens may consider requesting rereview by a dedicated genitourinary pathologist. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. TADALAFIL IN THE TREATMENT OF ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION FOLLOWING RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY: A REVIEW

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    A. V. Govorov

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Erectile dysfunction is a frequent complication of radical prostatectomy despite numerous modifications in surgical technique. The term «penile rehabilitation» refers usually to treatments intended to restore functional penile erection after radical prostatectomy. Selective phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors are the mainstay of this rehabilitation at present. Tadalafil seems a logical choice for recovering of erectile functionafter radical prostatectomy given its prolonged duration of action. The once-daily dose of tadalafil has the theoretical benefit in terms of safety and separation of medication from sexual activity. In this paper we review the published clinical and basic science research studies on the role of tadalafil in patients with postprostatectomy erectile dysfunction.

  1. TADALAFIL IN THE TREATMENT OF ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION FOLLOWING RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Govorov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Erectile dysfunction is a frequent complication of radical prostatectomy despite numerous modifications in surgical technique. The term «penile rehabilitation» refers usually to treatments intended to restore functional penile erection after radical prostatectomy. Selective phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors are the mainstay of this rehabilitation at present. Tadalafil seems a logical choice for recovering of erectile functionafter radical prostatectomy given its prolonged duration of action. The once-daily dose of tadalafil has the theoretical benefit in terms of safety and separation of medication from sexual activity. In this paper we review the published clinical and basic science research studies on the role of tadalafil in patients with postprostatectomy erectile dysfunction.

  2. PROGNOSTIC FACTORS OF BIOCHEMICAL RELAPSE FREE SURVIVAL FOLLOWING SALVAGE RADIOTHERAPY IN MEN WITH BIOCHEMICAL RECURRENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

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    P. D. Demeshko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate influence of clinical, biochemical and histological factors to biochemical relapse free survival (BRFS following salvage radiotherapy (RT in men with biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy.Material and methods. 77 patients with newly diagnosed biochemical recurrence (BR after RPE were included into retrospective study. All of them underwent local salvage RT. Сlinical variables (age, serum prostate-specific antigen [PSA] level and PSA kinetics, time RPE-BR, Gleason grade, stage after RPE and clinical findings were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis.Results. The median, 1- and 3-year BRFS were 19,9 months, 63,8 ± 6,5 % and 24,7 ± 8,5 % respectively. Significant variables in the multivariable model were age, PSA level before RT, prostatectomy T3b stage, PSA doubling time and positive digital rectal examination findings (p < 0,05. Several clinical parameters help predict the outcomes of men with PSA elevation after radical prostatectomy. These data may be useful in counseling men regarding the timing of administration of adjuvant therapies.

  3. Preliminary results of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) after fellowship training and experience in laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolanski, Philippe; Chabert, Charles; Jones, Lee; Mullavey, Tarryn; Walsh, Sharon; Gianduzzo, Troy

    2012-12-01

    • To ascertain whether prior experience in laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) shortens the 'learning curve' and therefore improves early patient outcomes when transitioning to robot-assisted laparoscopic RP (RALP). • Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of the most recent 87 cases of LRP compared with the initial 73 cases of RALP. • LRP was performed via a five-port extraperitoneal approach, while transperitoneal RALP was performed using a four-arm da Vinci S unit. • The median operative duration for RALP (skin-to-skin, including docking time) rapidly reduced, although never exceeded 3.5 h, for each consecutive set of 10 cases. • Oncological outcomes were preserved with no cases of pT2 positive surgical margins (PSMs) in any group. pT3 PSM rates were not significantly different at 50% and 38% for LRP and RALP, respectively. • Penetrative intercourse rates at 3 months for bilateral nerve-sparing procedures in preoperatively potent patients were similar, at 50% for LRP (median Sexual Health Inventory for Men [SHIM] 17) and 48.1% for RALP (median SHIM 18). The pad-free rate at 3 months was significantly better for RALP at 59.7%, compared with 39.8% for LRP (P= 0.043). • Complications were minimal and comparable for the two groups except for a higher LRP radiological anastomotic leak rate of 16 vs 1% (P= 0.004). • In this comparative series fellowship training and prior experience in LRP resulted in no significant RALP learning curve with regards to oncological and functional outcomes, while maintaining a low complication rate. • A short learning curve existed for operative duration but this improved rapidly and there were no prolonged cases. • Differences in early continence and radiological leaks may reflect changing from an interrupted anastomosis (LRP) to a continuous anastomosis with posterior rhabdosphincter reconstruction (RALP). © 2012 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2012 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  4. Two- and three-/four dimensional perineal ultrasonography in men with urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner-Hermanns, Ruth; Najjari, Laila; Brehmer, Bernhard; Blum, Regina; Zeuch, Vikram; Maass, Nicolai; Heidenreich, Axel

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility and inter-investigator reproducibility of perineal ultrasonography in men with and without post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence (PPI). This clinical pilot study involved 33 male patients, with a mean (range) age of 67.8 (51-76) years, who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP) ≥1 year ago. We investigated 21 men with clinically and urodynamically proven grade ≥2 PPI and compared them with 12 men without PPI in objective testing as well as in validated questionnaires. We used an abdominal 3.5-5 MHz ultrasound probe, which was placed at the perineum between scrotum and anus. With the help of three-/four-dimensional (3D/4D) multislice imaging we obtained good visualization of the bladder neck, the urethra and pelvic floor muscle contraction. The data from all 33 men was evaluated by two investigators and archived images and videos were also analysed by two independent investigators not present at the actual investigation. Using perineal ultrasonography we were able to visualize hypermobility of the proximal urethra, funnelling of the bladder neck, voluntary pelvic floor contraction, urethral and paraurethral fibrosis, and suture or sling material. Men with and without PPI differed mainly in the degree of hypermobility of the proximal urethra and opening of the bladder neck. Inter-investigator agreement was 100% in assessing paraurethral tissue and voluntary muscle contraction and 94% in quantifying mobility of the proximal urethra. We were able to evaluate the bladder neck opening in 85% of the men. There was 82% agreement between the initial investigators in evaluation of the bladder neck and 76% in quantifying mobility of the proximal urethra using retrospective analysis of stored images. Two-dimensional and 3D/4D perineal ultrasonography provides more insight into the diagnosis of men with PPI. Perineal ultrasonography can be used further as a visual aid for biofeedback to teach correct muscle contraction of men with stress

  5. Intra-operative prostate motion tracking using surface markers for robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteghamatian, Mehdi; Sarkar, Kripasindhu; Pautler, Stephen E.; Chen, Elvis C. S.; Peters, Terry M.

    2012-02-01

    Radical prostatectomy surgery (RP) is the gold standard for treatment of localized prostate cancer (PCa). Recently, emergence of minimally invasive techniques such as Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy (LRP) and Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy (RARP) has improved the outcomes for prostatectomy. However, it remains difficult for the surgeons to make informed decisions regarding resection margins and nerve sparing since the location of the tumor within the organ is not usually visible in a laparoscopic view. While MRI enables visualization of the salient structures and cancer foci, its efficacy in LRP is reduced unless it is fused into a stereoscopic view such that homologous structures overlap. Registration of the MRI image and peri-operative ultrasound image using a tracked probe can potentially be exploited to bring the pre-operative information into alignment with the patient coordinate system during the procedure. While doing so, prostate motion needs to be compensated in real-time to synchronize the stereoscopic view with the pre-operative MRI during the prostatectomy procedure. In this study, a point-based stereoscopic tracking technique is investigated to compensate for rigid prostate motion so that the same motion can be applied to the pre-operative images. This method benefits from stereoscopic tracking of the surface markers implanted over the surface of the prostate phantom. The average target registration error using this approach was 3.25+/-1.43mm.

  6. Extraperitoneal vs Transperitoneal Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy in the Setting of Prior Abdominal or Pelvic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horovitz, David; Feng, Changyong; Messing, Edward M; Joseph, Jean V

    2017-04-01

    During robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP), the prostate may be approached extraperiteoneally (extraperitoneal robot-assisted radical prostatectomy [eRARP]) or transperitoneally (transperitoneal robot-assisted radical prostatectomy [tRARP]). The former avoids the abdominal cavity, which might be of benefit in patients who have had prior abdominal or pelvic surgery (PAPS). Our objective was to compare the outcomes of patients with PAPS undergoing either technique. A retrospective review of patients treated with RARP from July 1, 2003 to December 31, 2014 with a minimum follow-up of 3 months was undertaken. Of 2927 patients, 620 were identified as having undergone RARP (without concomitant unrelated procedures) and PAPS (excluding patients with prior inguinal hernia repair with mesh or unclear surgical histories) for prostate adenocarcinoma without prior pelvic radiotherapy. Of these, 340 patients underwent eRARP and 280 patients underwent tRARP. Patients in the eRARP group were younger (61.04 years vs 62.32, p = 0.02), had a higher body mass index (29.65 vs 28.98, p = 0.09), lower American Society of Anesthesiologists scores (p = 0.03), and lower D'Amico risk classification disease (p 2 PAPS. On univariate analysis, the eRARP group had lower operative time (188.96 minutes vs 197.92 minutes, p = 0.003), extensive lysis of adhesions (0.9% vs 14.3%, p surgeries. A lower incidence of gastrointestinal complications and a shorter length of stay were noted in the extraperitoneal cohort.

  7. PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION IN PATIENTS AFTER RADICAL NERVESPARING PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Karnaukh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our research is to improve the quality of life of patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. With the increasing frequency of prostate cancer and determining the effectiveness of surgical treatment significantly increased the number of radical prostatectomy. Surgical treatment is definitely in much greater extent when compared to radiation treatments related to the development of impotence, erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence.The incidence of erectile dysfunction after prostatectomy ranges from 10 to 50%. Therefore, the development of new programmes for the rehabilitation of patients can improve their quality of life, due to the greater likelihood of recovery of erectile function after the operation. In our study we observed 84 patient. The incidence of erectile dysfunction was 76%. After applying one of the existing methods of stimulation: FDÈ5 inhibitors, intracavernose injections of prostaglandin, physical therapy, we were able to increase the effectiveness of treatment up to 54.8%, 40% and 70% respectively.

  8. Changing face of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in Melbourne over 12 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathianathen, Niranjan J; Lamb, Alastair D; Lawrentschuk, Nathan L; Goad, Jeremy R; Peters, Justin; Costello, Anthony J; Murphy, Declan G; Moon, Daniel A

    2018-03-01

    This study aims to characterize the trends in disease presentation for robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) over a 12-year period in Melbourne, Australia. All patients undergoing an RARP between 2004 and October 2016 while under the care of six high-volume surgeons were included in this study. Data were collected prospectively regarding patient demographics and clinical details of their cancer. Over the 12-year time span of the study, 3075 men underwent an RARP with a median age of 63.01 years. Temporal analysis demonstrated that the median age of patients undergoing prostatectomy advanced with time with the median age in 2016 being 65.51 years compared with 61.0 years in 2004 (P < 0.001). There was also a significant trend to increased D'Amico risk groups over time with the percentage procedures for high-risk patients increasing from 12.6% to 28.10% from 2004 to 2016 (P < 0.001). Upgrade rates between biopsy and pathological Gleason grade scoring significantly trended down over the period of the study (P < 0.001). There was also a shift to increased pathological stage over the 12 years with 22.1% of men having T3 disease in 2004 compared with 49.8% in 2016. Our analysis demonstrates increasing treatment of older men with higher risk tumours, consistent with international trends. While this largely reflects a shift in case selection, further work is needed to assess whether the stage shift may relate partially to a decline in screening and increased presentation of higher risk disease. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  9. Late urinary morbidity and quality of life after radical prostatectomy and salvage radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ervandian, Maria; Høyer, Morten; Petersen, Stine Elleberg

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is a paucity of knowledge of long-term urinary morbidity in patients treated for prostate cancer (PCa) with radical prostatectomy (RP) and salvage radiotherapy (SRT). Improved long-term survival calls for heightened awareness of late effects from radiotherapy after RP. The purpos...

  10. High-risk prostate cancer: the role of radical prostatectomy for local therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghavamian, Reza; Williams, Steve K; Hakimi, A Ari

    2011-04-01

    The management of high-risk prostate cancer can pose a unique challenge to the urologic oncologist. High-risk prostate cancer remains a real entity, especially in the inner-city urban population centers with high-risk ethnic groups. Although the role of radical prostatectomy is well defined for localized, low-to-intermediate-risk prostate cancer, its role in high-risk disease is more controversial. This is compounded by a lack of a universally accepted definition for 'high-risk' disease and the stage migration that has occurred in prostate cancer in the PSA era, rendering some historical perspectives less relevant. However, what has been accepted is the role of multimodal therapy in the management of this challenging group of patients. This article offers the reader an up-to-date detailed review of this topic, with specific emphasis on the role of radical prostatectomy in this clinical setting, including surgical considerations and outcomes. The advantages in terms of accurate pathologic staging with radical prostatectomy are presented. The role of robotic radical prostatectomy, which is increasingly utilized in the USA for the surgical treatment of prostate cancer in this clinical scenario, is discussed. In addition, we address the shortcomings of adequate clinical staging in this group of patients and discuss advances in imaging that might improve our capabilities in the future.

  11. DNA methylation signatures for prediction of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy of clinically localized prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Christa; Mundbjerg, Kamilla; Vestergaard, Else Marie

    2013-01-01

    Microarray-based screening and bisulfite sequencing of 20 nonmalignant and 29 PC tissue specimens were used to identify new candidate DNA hypermethylation markers for PC. Diagnostic and prognostic potential was evaluated in 35 nonmalignant prostate tissue samples, 293 radical prostatectomy (RP) samples...... independent predictors of time to biochemical recurrence after RP in two PC patient cohorts....

  12. Time from first detectable PSA following radical prostatectomy to biochemical recurrence: A competing risk analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. De Boo (Leonora); M. Pintilie (Melania); P. Yip (Paul); J. Baniel (Jack); N.E. Fleshner (Neil); D. Margel (David)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: In this study, we estimated the time from first detectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) following radical prostatectomy (RP) to commonly used definitions of biochemical recurrence (BCR). We also identified the predictors of time to BCR. Methods: We identified subjects

  13. Transversus abdominis plane block or subcutaneous wound infiltration after open radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjelsager, A; Ruhnau, B; Kistorp, T K

    2013-01-01

    Open radical retropubic prostatectomy (ORRP) is associated with moderate pain. We hypothesized that a transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block would reduce post-operative pain, morphine consumption and opioid-related side effects compared with wound infiltration and placebo in this population....

  14. Multiinstitutional validation of the UCSF cancer of the prostate risk assessment for prediction of recurrence after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperberg, Matthew R; Freedland, Stephen J; Pasta, David J; Elkin, Eric P; Presti, Joseph C; Amling, Christopher L; Terris, Martha K; Aronson, William J; Kane, Christopher J; Carroll, Peter R

    2006-11-15

    The University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment (CAPRA) is a novel preoperative index which predicts the risk of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. The performance of the index is at least as good as the best available instruments based on clinical variables, and the 0 to 10 score is simple to calculate for both clinical and research purposes. This study used a large external dataset to validate CAPRA. Data were abstracted from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) database, a registry of men who underwent radical prostatectomy at 4 Veterans Affairs and 1 active military medical center. Of 2096 men in the database, 1346 (64%) had full data available to calculate the CAPRA score. Performance of the CAPRA score was assessed with proportional hazards regression, survival analysis, and the concordance (c) index. Of the studied patients, 41% were non-Caucasian, and their mean age was 62 years. Twenty-six percent suffered recurrence; median follow-up among patients who did not recur was 34 months. The hazard ratio (HR) for each 1-point increase in CAPRA was 1.39 (95% CI [confidence interval], 1.31-1.46). The 5-year recurrence-free survival rate ranged from 86% for CAPRA 0-1 patients to 21% for CAPRA 7-10 patients. Increasing CAPRA scores were significantly associated with increasing risk of adverse pathologic outcomes. The c-index for CAPRA for the validation set was 0.68, compared with 0.66 for the original development set. The UCSF-CAPRA accurately predicted both biochemical and pathologic outcomes after radical prostatectomy among a large, diverse, cohort of men. These results validated the effectiveness of this powerful and straightforward instrument.

  15. Long-term penile morphometric alterations in patients treated with robot-assisted versus open radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capogrosso, P; Ventimiglia, E; Cazzaniga, W; Stabile, A; Pederzoli, F; Boeri, L; Gandaglia, G; Dehò, F; Briganti, A; Montorsi, F; Salonia, A

    2018-01-01

    Neglected side effects after radical prostatectomy have been previously reported. In this context, the prevalence of penile morphometric alterations has never been assessed in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy series. We aimed to assess prevalence of and predictors of penile morphometric alterations (i.e. penile shortening or penile morphometric deformation) at long-term follow-up in patients submitted to either robot-assisted (robot-assisted radical prostatectomy) or open radical prostatectomy. Sexually active patients after either robot-assisted radical prostatectomy or open radical prostatectomy prospectively completed a 28-item questionnaire, with sensitive issues regarding sexual function, namely orgasmic functioning, climacturia and changes in morphometric characteristics of the penis. Only patients with a post-operative follow-up ≥ 24 months were included. Patients submitted to either adjuvant or salvage therapies or those who refused to comprehensively complete the questionnaire were excluded from the analyses. A propensity-score matching analysis was implemented to control for baseline differences between groups. Logistic regression models tested potential predictors of penile morphometric alterations at long-term post-operative follow-up. Overall, 67 (50%) and 67 (50%) patients were included after open radical prostatectomy or robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, respectively. Self-rated post-operative penile shortening and penile morphometric deformation were reported by 75 (56%) and 29 (22.8%) patients, respectively. Rates of penile shortening and penile morphometric deformation were not different after open radical prostatectomy and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy [all p > 0.5]. At univariable analysis, self-reported penile morphometric alterations (either penile shortening or penile morphometric deformation) were significantly associated with baseline international index of erectile function-erectile function scores, body mass index, post

  16. Management of pelvic lymphoceles following robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer A Raheem

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pelvic lymphocele is a potential complication of radical prostatectomy. Although lymphoceles often regress spontaneously, many may progress, precipitate clinical symptoms, and ultimately require intervention. To date, the best treatment of pelvic lymphoceles has not yet been fully defined. However, laparoscopic marsupialization is a definitive and efficacious surgical alternative to percutaneous drainage. It is effective, results in minimal patient morbidity, and allows for rapid recovery. We report our experience with management of clinically symptomatic pelvic lymphoceles following robotic-assisted prostatectomy using laparoscopic marsupialization.

  17. Effects of hospital procedure volume and resident training on clinical outcomes and resource use in radical retropubic prostatectomy surgery in the Department of Veterans Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Tse-Sun; Kane, Christopher J; Sen, Saunak; Henderson, William G; Dudley, R Adams; Cason, Brian A

    2008-01-01

    In this retrospective cohort study we used data from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program of the Veterans Health Administration to examine the effect of case volume and resident participation on radical retropubic prostatectomy outcomes. The study population included 5,736 patients who underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy in Veterans Administration hospitals between October 1, 2001 and September 30, 2004. Resource related outcomes included operative times and length of stay. Clinical outcomes included blood transfusion, complications, readmissions and reoperations. Hierarchical multivariate regression models were developed to predict outcomes. Risk adjustment was performed using patient chronic health factors and results of preoperative laboratory testing. A total of 5,070 radical retropubic prostatectomy surgeries met inclusion criteria. After adjustment for case mix, academic training institutions had longer operative times (3.2 vs 2.4 hours, p <0.01) but shorter length of stay (3.4 vs 4.2 days, p <0.01). Surgery at academic institutions was not associated with greater risk of transfusion (p = 0.36), reoperation (p = 0.93), complications (p = 0.53) or readmissions (p = 0.97). However, among the academic institutions low vs high hospital radical retropubic prostatectomy volume was associated with longer length of stay (3.7 vs 3.1 days, p = 0.02) and higher transfusion rate (29.6% vs 18.2%, p = 0.02). Substantial clustering of outcomes at the hospital level was observed. Within the Veterans Administration system academic training institutions have longer operative times for radical retropubic prostatectomy, but shorter length of stay. Among the same institutions, high volume hospitals tend to have lower transfusion rates and shorter length of stay. Clustering of outcomes at the hospital level suggests that unmeasured institutional factors are key determinants of clinical and resource related outcomes.

  18. Single-centre evaluation of the extraperitoneal and transperitoneal approach in robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmann, Marcus; Vollmer, Christian; Schwab, Christoph; Kurz, Michael; Padevit, Christian; Horton, Kevin; John, Hubert

    2012-04-01

    Robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) is feasible using either an extraperitoneal (EP) or a transperitoneal (TP) approach. This study reports on the experience of a single hospital using both techniques. From July 2009 to March 2011, 170 patients underwent RARP. EP was chosen in 103 patients and TP in 67. TP was preferred in cases previous mesh hernia repair or if extended lymph-node dissection (LND) was considered necessary. Otherwise, EP was performed; it was preferred in cases of obesity (body mass index (BMI) > 30 kg/m(2)) or previous intra-abdominal surgery. There were no significant differences in preoperative mean age (64.4 vs 65.6 years), BMI (26.5 vs 26.3 kg/m(2)) or prostate size (51.8 vs 55.8 cm(3)) between EP and TP patients. Owing to preoperative selection criteria, prostate-specific antigen levels and the average Gleason score were significantly lower in EP than in TP patients (p groups (EP 276 vs TP 281 ml, p = 0.88). Complication rates were lower in EP (n = 7, 6.8% vs n = 8, 12%, p = 0.024). Time until first defecation and last analgesic treatment were significantly shorter in EP (p advantages of an extraperitoneal approach for RARP. However, a transperitoneal approach is still considered necessary for extended LND or special clinical conditions. Robotic teams should be trained using both approaches.

  19. A single nucleotide polymorphism in ADIPOQ predicts biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy in localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Chengyuan; Qu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Guiming; Sun, LiJiang; Zhu, Yao; Ye, Dingwei

    2015-10-13

    Adiponectin has been implicated in prostate cancer (PCa) aggressiveness. However, the role of genetic variations in the adiponectin (ADIPOQ) gene in PCa progression remains unknown. To determine whether genetic variants in ADIPOQ are associated with the risk of biochemical recurrence (BCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP). We evaluated three common ADIPOQ polymorphisms in 728 men with clinically localized PCa who underwent RP. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models and Kaplan-Meier analysis were used to assess their prognostic significance on BCR. The plasma adiponectin concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. ADIPOQ rs182052 variant allele was associated with both increased risk of BCR [HR: 2.44; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.57-;3.79, P = 6×10-5] and decreased adiponectin level (β = -0.048, P = 0.004). Stratified analyses demonstrated that the association was more pronounced in men with higher visceral adipose tissue. Our data support that the ADIPOQ rs182052 SNP may be a predictive biomarker for BCR after RP by a possible mechanism of altering the adiponectin level. If validated, genetic predictors of outcome may help individualizing treatment for PCa.

  20. [High-risk prostate cancer surgical margins during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duperron, C; Moulin, M; Koutlidis, N; Mourey, E; Cormier, L

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) in high risk prostate cancer (HR). The rate of positive surgical margins (PSM) was compared between anticipated HR cancer according to D'Amico risk classification and discovered postoperative HR cancer. A retrospective study was conducted between 2006 and 2013 on patients who underwent RARP. Before surgery, patients were divided according to the D'Amico risk classification. After surgery, HR was defined as pT3a or pT3b, or Gleason score≥8 or positive lymph nodes. The rate of PSM was compared according to the D'Amico risk classification and postoperative HR. During the study, 485 patients were reviewed. Before surgery, 10 % of cancers were classified as D'Amico 3 (49/485). After surgery, 27.6 % (134/485) were classified as HR. There was a significant difference between the rate of PSM in HR/D'Amico 3 and HR/non D'Amico 3 cancer, respectively 22.9 % and 34.3 % (P<0.001). The RARP is feasible in HR with an average of 30 % of PSM as in open surgery. However, the accurate assessment of preoperative HR will allow a more adapted dissection and a decrease of rate of PSM. So it is necessary to improve the detection of HR and so to select the most suitable cancer for surgery. Level 5. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of serum testosterone and percent tumor volume on extra-prostatic extension and biochemical recurrence after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eu Chang Hwang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have revealed that the preoperative serum testosterone and percent tumor volume (PTV predict extra-prostatic extension (EPE and biochemical recurrence (BCR after radical prostatectomy. This study investigated the prognostic significance of serum testosterone and PTV in relation to EPE and BCR after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP. We reviewed 520 patients who underwent LRP between 2004 and 2012. PTV was determined as the sum of all visually estimated tumor foci in every section. BCR was defined as two consecutive increases in the postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA >0.2 ng ml−1 . The threshold for serum total testosterone was 3.0 ng ml−1 . Multivariate logistic regression was used to define the effect of variables on the risk of EPE and BCR. A low serum testosterone (<3.0 ng ml−1 was associated with a high serum PSA, Gleason score, positive core percentage of the prostate biopsy, PTV, and all pathological variables. On multivariate analysis, similar to previous studies, the serum PSA, biopsy positive core percentage, Gleason score, and pathological variables predicted EPE and BCR. In addition, low serum testosterone (<3.0 ng ml−1 , adjusted OR, 8.52; 95% CI, 5.04-14.4, P= 0.001 predicted EPE and PTV (adjusted OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.05, P= 0.046 predicted BCR. In addition to previous predictors of EPE and BCR, low serum testosterone and PTV are valuable predictors of EPE and BCR after LRP.

  2. Evaluation of pelvic floor muscle strength before and after robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy and early outcomes on urinary continence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, Lauren; Gibson, Luke; Papa, Nathan; Beharry, Bhawanie Koonj; Johnson, Liana; Lawrentschuk, Nathan; Bolton, Damien M

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) assessment and training before and after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RARP) in improving PFM strength and urinary continence. We performed an analysis of a database of patients who underwent robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RARP) performed by two urologists from 2011 to 2013. Pelvic floor muscle (PFM) activation and strength were graded by a trained pelvic floor physiotherapist. Patients were given an exercise program, grouped according to the strength of their pelvic floor as graded by assessment, to complete before and after surgery. PFM strength was recorded preoperatively, 4 days post-catheter removal and 4 weeks post-catheter removal. Continence was recorded at 4 weeks postop and was defined as the requirement of no continence aids. A total of 98 patients had RARP and a preoperative physiotherapy assessment plus postoperative appointments at around 1 and 4 weeks post-RARP. The majority of men improved their PFM strength regardless of preoperative strength with no significant predictors of postoperative strength found. Age was the only significant predictor of postoperative incontinence. In this pilot study, a majority of patients increased their pelvic floor strength with time. Pelvic floor physiotherapy is an important modifiable patient factor, which does have an impact in improving patients' urinary continence by strengthening the pelvic floor muscles. Patient age influences response to pelvic floor physiotherapy.

  3. PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLE TRAINING IN THE TREATMENT OF URINARY INCONTINENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. L. Demidko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy is 0.8 to 87%. This category of patients has pelvic floor muscle weakness and reduced perineal reflex. The treatment of these patients uses a pelvic floor exercise system that is to enhance muscle tone and to develop strong reflex contraction in response to a sudden rise in intraabdominal pressure. Pelvic floor muscle training belongs to first-line therapy for urinary incontinence occurring within 6 to 12 months after prostatectomy. The ability to control pelvic floor muscle knowingly and to train them allows one not only to increase the closing capability of sphincter mechanisms, but also to suppress involuntary detrusor contractions. We used this method in 9 patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy. The duration of pelvic floor muscle training under control was up to 25 weeks. During this period, the symptoms of incontinence were relieved. No contraindications or adverse reactions have put this method in first-line therapy for post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence.

  4. AB003. Erectile dysfunction (ED) after radical prostatectomy: mile stones in development of rehabilitation strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Run; Crigler, Cecil M.

    2015-01-01

    Radical Prostatectomy is a commonly used treatment modality for localized prostate cancer. The nerve-sparing technique was one of the major break-troughs in the last century with the hope to preserve erectile function. Unfortunately, despite the perfection of nerve-sparing surgery with robot, many men still suffer from erectile dysfunction (ED) as a complication of prostatectomy. In the last two decades, the concept of penile rehabilitation was introduced and many therapeutic approaches have been studied with the aim to promote erectile function recovery. Despite the understanding of the mechanisms and well-established rationale for post-prostatectomy penile rehabilitation, there is still no consensus regarding effective rehabilitation programs. This presentation will provide an overview of the mile stones in basic, translational and clinical research aimed at preserving or promoting erectile function after radical prostatectomy. The contemporary series of trials that assess penile rehabilitation and explore treatment modalities that might play a role in the future will also be analyzed. Although recent trials have shown that most therapies are well-tolerated and aid in some degree on EF recovery, we currently do not have tangible evidence to recommend an irrefutable penile rehabilitation algorithm. However, advancements in research and technology will ultimately create and refine management options for penile rehabilitation.

  5. PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLE TRAINING IN THE TREATMENT OF URINARY INCONTINENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. L. Demidko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy is 0.8 to 87%. This category of patients has pelvic floor muscle weakness and reduced perineal reflex. The treatment of these patients uses a pelvic floor exercise system that is to enhance muscle tone and to develop strong reflex contraction in response to a sudden rise in intraabdominal pressure. Pelvic floor muscle training belongs to first-line therapy for urinary incontinence occurring within 6 to 12 months after prostatectomy. The ability to control pelvic floor muscle knowingly and to train them allows one not only to increase the closing capability of sphincter mechanisms, but also to suppress involuntary detrusor contractions. We used this method in 9 patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy. The duration of pelvic floor muscle training under control was up to 25 weeks. During this period, the symptoms of incontinence were relieved. No contraindications or adverse reactions have put this method in first-line therapy for post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence.

  6. Impact of positive surgical margin on biochemical recurrence following radical prostatectomy in locally advanced prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavit Ceylan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the effect of surgical margin positivity on biochemical recurrence (BCR in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer (PCa who underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP. The medical records of all patients with locally advanced PCa that underwent RRP were retrospectively reviewed. Patient demographics, digital rectal examination findings, prostate biopsy Gleason score, prostate volume, pre- and post-treatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA levels, definitive pathology Gleason score, surgical margin status, seminal vesicle invasion, perineural invasion, absence or presence of BCR, and the time to BCR were analyzed. The study included 130 patients. The final pathologic examination showed that seven (5.4% patients had T3a disease and 123 (94.6% had T3b disease. In all, 93 (71.5% patients had a positive surgical margin [SM(+], whereas 37 (28.5% patients had a negative surgical margin [SM(−]. Among the seven patients with pT3a disease, four (57.1% had SM(+, whereas 89 (72.4% of the 123 patients with pT3b disease had SM(−. BCR occurred in 11.8% (11 of 93 of patients with SM(+ and in 45.9% (17 of 37 of those with SM(− (p < 0.001. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that SM(+ was the only significant predictor of BCR following RRP (relative risk, 0.163; 95% confidence interval (0.062–0.433; p < 0.001. SM(+ in RRP specimens is not always indicative of BCR in patients with locally advanced PCa. RRP should be considered an effective treatment choice for selected patients with locally advanced PCa, despite the associated high SM(+ rate.

  7. Does nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy increase the risk of positive surgical margins and biochemical progression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkhateeb Sultan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since the introduction of nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (NSRP, there have been concerns about the increased risks of positive surgical margins (PSM and biochemical progression (BP. We examined the relationship of NSRP with PSM and BP using a large, mature dataset. Materials and Methods: Patients who underwent RP for clinically localized prostate cancer at our center between 1997 and 2008 were identified. Patients who received neoadjuvant therapy were excluded. We examined the relation of NSRP to the rate of PSM and BP in univariate and multivariate analyses adjusting for clinical and pathological variables including age, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA levels and doubling time, and pathological stage and grade. Results: In total, 856 patients were included, 70.9% underwent NSRP and 29.1% had non-NSRP. PSM rates were 13.5% in the NSRP group compared to 17.7% in non-NSRP (P=0.11. In a multivariate analysis, non-NSRP was preformed in patients with a higher pathological stage (HR 1.95, 95% CI 1.25-3.04, P=0.003 and a higher baseline PSA level (HR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01-1.08, P=0.005. With a median follow-up of 41 months, BP-free survival was 88% for non-NSRP compared to 92% for the NSRP group (log rank P=0.018; this difference was not significant in a multivariate Cox regression analysis (HR 0.54, 95% CI 0.28-1.06, P=0.09. Conclusion: When used in properly selected patients, NSRP does not seem to increase the risk of PSM and disease progression. The most effective way of resolving this issue is through a randomized clinical trial; however, such a trial is not feasible.

  8. Postoperative renal function in patients is unaltered after robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jae Hyun; Lim, Choon Hak; Chung, Hye In; Choi, Seong Uk; Youn, Seung Zoo; Lim, Hae Ja

    2011-03-01

    Pneumoperitoneum with an intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) of 14 mmHg is known to decrease renal function. Robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) requires an IAP of more than 15 mmHg for operation. Therefore, we retrospectively investigated whether patients who underwent RARP experienced renal insufficiency during the postoperative period (at postoperative days 7 and 30). One hundred patients who underwent RARP were enrolled in this study. Preoperative serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (Cr) levels were measured. Creatinine clearance (CrCl) was calculated using the Cockcroft and Gault formula. CrCl was calculated at 1 day before surgery (baseline), 2 hr postoperatively, and at 1, 3, 7, and 30 days postoperatively (POD 1, POD 3, POP 7, and POD 30). Patients were assigned to abnormal CrCl (n = 52) or normal CrCl groups (n = 48) on the basis of these measurements. Significant inter-group differences in BUN, Cr, and CrCl were observed at all postoperative time points. BUN and Cr decreased significantly at postoperative 2 hr and POD 1, 3, and 7 versus baseline in both groups, whereas CrCl increased significantly at postoperative 2 hr and POD 1, 3, and 7 versus baseline in both groups. However, BUN, Cr, and CrCl were similar at POD 30 and preoperatively in the two groups. RAPR, which requires an IAP of 15-20 mmHg for more than 4 hr, does not induce renal dysfunction during the postoperative period, and even in those patients with an abnormal CrCl.

  9. Pentafecta rates of three-dimensional laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: our experience after 150 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benelli, Andrea; Varca, Virginia; Simonato, Alchiede; Terrone, Carlo; Gregori, Andrea

    2017-04-28

    Three-dimensional (3D) laparoscopy with a flexible camera was developed to overcome the main limitation of traditional laparoscopic surgery, which is two-dimensional (2D) vision.The aim of our article is to present the largest casistic of 3D laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) available in literature and evaluate our results in terms of pentafecta and compare it with the literature. We retrospectively evaluated consecutive patients who underwent LRP with 3D technology between March 2014 and December 2015. Total operative time (TOT), anasthomosis time (AT), blood loss and complications were registered. All patients presented at least 3 months of follow-up. Surgical outcome was evaluated in terms of Pentafecta. One hundred fifty consecutive patients underwent 3D LRP. Mean follow-up was 16.9 months. Mean age was 67.7 ± 8.3 years (range 50-76). Mean preoperative PSA value was 8.3 ± 5.8 ng/ml and mean bioptic Gleason Score (GS) was 6.6. We had a mean TOT of 158 ± 23 minutes and a mean AT of 25 ± 12.6. Mean blood loss was 240 ± 40 ml. Eighteen (12%) postoperative complications occurred. Pathologic results: pT2 in 91 patients (58%) and pT3 in 59 (39.3%). Pentafecta was reached by 31.3% of patients at 3 months and 51.6% at 12 months. Our oncological and functional results are comparable to those present in literature for laparoscopic and robotic surgery. We believe that our findings can encourage the use of 3D laparoscopy especially considering the increasing attention to healthcare costs.

  10. Radical perineal prostatectomy: cost efficient, outcome effective, minimally invasive prostate cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Michael J

    2003-09-01

    Localized prostate cancer is a common disease for which minimally invasive treatment methods are being explored. Perineal prostatectomy, as a historical open procedure, is modified to incorporate contemporary surgical ideas. There is relatively little in the literature regarding modern adaptations of perineal prostatectomy. This method of anatomic radical perineal prostatectomy has been developed to accomplish a minimally invasive method of achieving goals of disease control and preservation of genito-urinary functions. Prospective outcome data is accumulated on 508 consecutive radical perineal prostatectomies by a single surgeon. Pathologic stage and PSA detectability are measures of cancer control. Pad use and ability to complete intercourse measure urinary and sexual function. General complications and other outcome measures are evaluated. Freedom from PSA detectability by pathologic stage is 96.3%, 79.4%, and 69.4% for organ confined, specimen confined and margin positive in the absence of seminal vesical invasion with an average 4 years follow up (3-114 months). Margins are positive in 18% of cases. The average cancer size is 9.4g and 36% of cases have extracapsular invasion. By the first, third, sixth months and one year, 38%, 65%, 88% and 96% are free of pad use and report being dry. While over 80% of nerve-spared patients enjoy the return of spontaneous erectile function, the men with bilateral nerve preservation note earlier and more complete return of function. There are no cardiopulmonary complications or deaths. Transfusions occurred in 1%, none in the past 400 cases. Average total hospital charges are USD$4889.00 in 1999 and 2000. Anterior urethral strictures, anastomotic strictures and fecal urgency/stress flatus occur 2%, 2% and 2-4%, respectively. This method of prostatectomy is able to achieve complete cancer resection while preserving urinary and sexual function as well as laparoscopic or retropubic prostatectomy. The simplicity and minimally

  11. Effects of adding concentration therapy to Kegel exercise to improve continence after radical prostatectomy, randomized control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongtragul, Jaruwan; Tukhanon, Wanvara; Tudpudsa, Piyanuch; Suedee, Kanita; Tienchai, Supaporn; Leewansangtong, Sunai; Nualgyong, Chaiyong

    2014-05-01

    To compare the efficacy of pelvic floor muscle exercise with the concentration therapy versus pelvic floor muscle exercise alone after radical prostatectomy. One hundred thirty five patients were randomized into the intervention group that concentration therapy was added to Kegel exercise, and control group that was Kegel exercise only, using the stratified randomization (stratified by taking the catheter off before and after discharge) and type of surgery. Incontinence was defined as a loss of urine equal or more than to 2 grams in one-hour pad test, before and after the test in each sample group. Follow-up results were obtained by phone visit at 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, and 12 weeks after surgery In the intervention group, 65 of 68 cases (95.6%) had continence in three months, compared to 48 of 67 (71.6%) in the control group, with significant statistical difference (p-value Kegel exercise had significantly improved continence after radical prostatectomy

  12. Erectile function post robotic radical prostatectomy: technical tips to improve outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonewardene, S S; Persad, R; Gillatt, D

    2016-09-01

    Robotic surgery is becoming more and more commonplace. At the same time, so are complications, especially related to erectile function. The population being diagnosed with cancer is younger, with more aggressive cancers and higher expectations for good erectile function postoperatively. We conduct a retrospective analysis of literature over 20 years for Embase and Medline. Search terms used include (Robotic) AND (prostatectomy) AND (erectile function). There are a variety of multifactorial causes, resulting in worsening ED post-robotic radical prostatectomy; however, there are a number of treatments that can support this. There is much we can do to help prevent patients getting postoperative erectile dysfunction post-radical surgery. However, part of this is management of realistic patient expectations.

  13. Simultaneous Retzius-sparing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and partial nephrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Abdel Raheem

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a 61-year-old man who was diagnosed with synchronous prostate cancer and suspicious renal cell carcinoma of the right kidney, treated with combined Retzius-sparing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RS-RARP and robot-assisted partial nephrectomy (RAPN. The combined approach using RS-RARP and RAPN is technically feasible and safe surgical option for treatment of concomitant prostate cancer and suspicious renal cell carcinoma.

  14. Training in exercises for pelvic floor muscles of patients with an urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Glybochko

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Training of muscles of a pelvic bottom under control of biofeedback is applied at 87 patients with an urinary incontinence after a radical prostatectomy. Biofeedback increases management and control of a pelvic floor. At good ability of management of muscles of a pelvic floor the median of restoration was 4 months. Without opportunity of management of muscles of pelvic floor restoration was 9.4 months.

  15. Preliminary experience with extraperitoneal endoscopic radical prostatectomy through duplication of the open technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tobias-Machado

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe surgical and functional results with extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy with duplication of the open technique, from the experience obtained in the treatment of 28 initial cases. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a 36-month period, we prospectively analyzed 28 patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer undergoing extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. RESULTS: Mean surgical time was 280 min, with mean blood loss of 320 mL. As intraoperative complications, there were 2 rectal lesions repaired with laparoscopic suture in 2 planes. There was no conversion to open surgery. Median hospital stay was 3 days, with return to oral diet in the first post-operative day in patients. As post-operative complications, there were 3 cases of extraperitoneal urinary fistula. Two of these cases were resolved by maintaining a Foley catheter for 21 days, and the other one by late endoscopic reintervention for repositioning the catheter. Five out of 18 previously potent patients evolved with erectile dysfunction. The diagnosis of prostate cancer was confirmed in all patients, with focal positive margin occurring in 3 cases. During a mean follow-up of 18 months, 2 patients presented increased PSA, with no clinical evidence of disease. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy is a laborious and difficult procedure, with a long learning curve. Extraperitoneal access is feasible, and it is possible to practically duplicate the principles of open surgery. The present technique can possibly offer advantages in terms of decreased blood loss, preservation of erectile function and prevention of positive margins.

  16. Predicting Competing Mortality in Patients Undergoing Radical Prostatectomy Aged 70 yr or Older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehner, Michael; Koch, Rainer; Hübler, Matthias; Zastrow, Stefan; Wirth, Manfred P

    2017-05-01

    Estimating the risk of competing mortality is of importance in tailoring optimal individual management strategies in patients with early prostate cancer. Using proportional hazard models for competing risks, we determined which parameters predict competing mortality in patients selected for radical prostatectomy aged 70 yr or older and compared the prognostic impact of individual parameters with that of their younger counterparts. Three common diseases (diabetes mellitus, chronic lung disease, and other cancer) that predicted competing mortality in younger men were not predictors of competing mortality in men selected for radical prostatectomy aged 70 yr or older (hazard ratio [HR]:mortality in patients aged 70 yr or older. Combining these five conditions in a score might provide a superior comorbidity measure in this particular population. Stricter selection may diminish the prognostic significance of several common diseases in men selected for radical prostatectomy aged 70 yr or older whereas other parameters (peripheral vascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status class 3, current smoking, and level of education) sustained their meaningfulness and should be taken into consideration when the risk of competing mortality is estimated. Copyright © 2016 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Retropubic, laparoscopic, and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: surgical, oncological, and functional outcomes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Carlo, Francesco; Celestino, Francesco; Verri, Cristian; Masedu, Francesco; Liberati, Emanuele; Di Stasi, Savino Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Despite the wide diffusion of minimally invasive approaches, such as laparoscopic (LRP) and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RALP), few studies compare the results of these techniques with the retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP) approach. The aim of this study is to compare the surgical, functional, and oncological outcomes and cost-effectiveness of RRP, LRP, and RALP. A systematic review of the literature was performed in the PubMed and Embase databases in December 2013. A 'free-text' protocol using the term 'radical prostatectomy' was applied. A total of 16,085 records were found. The authors reviewed the records to identify comparative studies to include in the review. 44 comparative studies were identified. With regard to the perioperative outcome, LRP and RALP were more time-consuming than RRP, but blood loss, transfusion rates, catheterisation time, hospitalisation duration, and complication rates were the most optimal in the laparoscopic approaches. With regard to the functional and oncological results, RALP was found to have the best outcomes. Our study confirmed the well-known perioperative advantage of minimally invasive techniques; however, available data were not sufficient to prove the superiority of any surgical approach in terms of functional and oncologic outcomes. On the contrary, cost comparison clearly supports RRP.

  18. Prostate cancer-related anxiety in long-term survivors after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Valentin H; Herkommer, Kathleen; Marten-Mittag, Birgitt; Gschwend, Jürgen E; Dinkel, Andreas

    2017-12-01

    Knowledge of the psychological distress of long- and very long-term (>10 years) prostate cancer (PC) survivors is limited. This study intended to examine the parameters influencing anxiety related to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and PC in long-term survivors after radical prostatectomy. We surveyed 4719 PC survivors from the German multicenter prospective database "Familial Prostate Cancer." We evaluated the association of PC-related anxiety (MAX-PC) with sociodemographic characteristics, family history of PC, global health status/quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30), depression and anxiety (PHQ-2; GAD-2), latest PSA level, time since radical prostatectomy, and current therapy. The survey participants' mean age was 75.2 years (SD = 6.5). Median follow-up was 11.5 years, and 19.5% of participants had survived more than 15 years since the initial treatment. The final regression analysis found that younger age, lower global health status/quality of life, higher depression and anxiety scores, higher latest PSA level, and shorter time since radical prostatectomy predicted increased PSA-related anxiety and PC anxiety. Familial PC was predictive only of PSA anxiety (all p anxiety and 24% for PC anxiety. PC-related anxiety remained relevant many years after prostatectomy and was influenced by younger age, psychological status, rising PSA level, and shorter time since initial treatment. Survivors with these characteristics are at increased risk of PC-related anxieties, which should be considered by the treating physician during follow-up.

  19. Feasibility of robotic radical prostatectomy for medication refractory chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: Initial results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Chopra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Four patients diagnosed with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS, met criteria for National Institute of Health (NIH Category III prostatitis, failed multiple medicinal treatments and underwent robotic radical prostatectomy (RRP. Median operative time (range: 157 (127–259 min. Validated functional questionnaires responses and NIH CP symptom index (NIH-CPSI score were collected for each patient's status at different time points pre- and post-operatively. Median decreases (range were: International Prostate Symptom Score - 14 (1–19; Sexual Health Inventory for Men - 6 (−14–22; and NIH-CPSI total - 23.5 (13–33. Median length of follow-up (range was 34 (24–43 months. RRP appears to be an option for carefully selected patients with medication-refractory CP/CPPS who understand that baseline sexual function may not be restored postoperatively.

  20. Feasibility of robotic radical prostatectomy for medication refractory chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: Initial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Sameer; Satkunasivam, Raj; Aron, Monish

    2016-01-01

    Four patients diagnosed with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), met criteria for National Institute of Health (NIH) Category III prostatitis, failed multiple medicinal treatments and underwent robotic radical prostatectomy (RRP). Median operative time (range): 157 (127-259) min. Validated functional questionnaires responses and NIH CP symptom index (NIH-CPSI) score were collected for each patient's status at different time points pre- and post-operatively. Median decreases (range) were: International Prostate Symptom Score - 14 (1-19); Sexual Health Inventory for Men - 6 (-14-22); and NIH-CPSI total - 23.5 (13-33). Median length of follow-up (range) was 34 (24-43) months. RRP appears to be an option for carefully selected patients with medication-refractory CP/CPPS who understand that baseline sexual function may not be restored postoperatively.

  1. Primary Gleason pattern in biopsy Gleason score 7 is predictive of adverse histopathological features and biochemical failure following radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Røder, Martin Andreas; Brasso, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyse whether primary Gleason pattern in biopsy Gleason score (GS) 7 predicted adverse histopathological features and had an impact on the risk of biochemical failure in a consecutive series of patients undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP). MATERIAL...... AND METHODS: Between 2006 and 2010, 441 patients with biopsy GS 7 underwent RP at Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. Favourable histopathological features were defined as pT2 margin-negative cancer, RP specimen GS ≤ 3+4 and no lymph-node metastasis. Adverse histopathological features were defined...... (p features. In univariate analysis, Gleason score 3+4 had a significantly lower biochemical failure rate compared with Gleason score 4+3 (p = 0.0035). PSA (p

  2. Pad use and patient reported bother from urinary leakage after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallerstedt, Anna; Carlsson, Stefan; Nilsson, Andreas E; Johansson, Eva; Nyberg, Tommy; Steineck, Gunnar; Wiklund, N Peter

    2012-01-01

    To better understand clinically significant definitions of urinary incontinence we investigated the relationship between urinary leakage and patient reported bother from urinary leakage. A consecutive series of 1,411 men who underwent radical prostatectomy at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden, from 2002 to 2006 were invited to complete a study specific questionnaire with questions on pad status, urinary leakage and bother from urinary leakage. Questionnaires were received from 1,179 men with a followup of greater than 1 year (median 2.2). Results showed that even a small amount of urinary leakage resulted in a high risk of urinary bother. Of 775 survivors 46 (6%) reporting 0 pads indicated moderate or much bother compared to 38 of 123 (31%) who reported using a security pad. When comparing the 2 groups, the risk of bother from urinary leakage was more than 5 times higher in the safety pad vs the 0 pad group (RR 5.2, 95% CI 3.5-7.7). As the number of pads increased, we noted a higher bother risk. Cross-tabulation of pad use and urinary leakage revealed wide variation in pad requirements despite the same answer to urinary leakage questions. If the definition of continence is based on pad use, for example safety pads, a certain number of men who report moderate or much bother from urinary leakage will be defined as continent. Our results also show that for each stated rate of urinary leakage men prove to have a major variation in the pad requirement. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Radical prostatectomy versus external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Comparison of treatment outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeon-Joo; Cho, Kwan Ho; Lee, Kang Hyun; Moon, Sung Ho; Kim, Tae Hyun; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Joo-Young; Kim, Young-kyung; Lee, Se Byeong; Pyo, Hong Ryull

    2015-01-01

    We retrospectively compared the treatment outcomes of localized prostate cancer between radical prostatectomy (RP) and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). We retrospectively analyzed 738 patients with localized prostate cancer who underwent either RP (n = 549) or EBRT (n = 189) with curative intent at our institution between March 2001 and December 2011. Biochemical failure was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of ≥ 0.2 ng/ml in the RP group and the nadir of + ≥ 2 ng/ml in the EBRT group. The median (range) follow-up duration was 48.8 months (0.7-133.2 months) and 48.7 months (1.0-134.8 months) and the median age was 66 years (45-89 years) and 71 years (51-84 years; p < 0.001) in the RP and EBRT groups, respectively. Overall, 21, 42, and 36 % of patients in the RP group, and 15, 27, and 58 % of patients in the EBRT group were classified as low, intermediate, and high risk, respectively (p < 0.001). Androgen-deprivation therapy was more common in the EBRT group (59 vs. 27 %, respectively; p < 0.001). The 8-year biochemical failure-free survival rates were 44 and 72 % (p < 0.001) and the disease-specific survival rates were 98 % and 97 % (p = 0.543) in the RP and EBRT groups, respectively. Although the EBRT group included more high-risk patients than did the RP group, the outcomes of EBRT were not inferior to those of RP. Our data suggest that EBRT is a viable alternative to RP for treating localized prostate cancer. (orig.) [de

  4. Clinical and biochemical outcomes of men undergoing radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiber, David; Weiss, Jeffrey P.; Safdieh, Joseph; Weiner, Joseph; Rotman, Marvin; Schwartz, David [Veterans Affairs, New York Harbor Healthcare System, Brooklyn (United States); Rineer, Justin [University of Florida Health Cancer Center at Orlando Health, Orlando (United States)

    2015-03-15

    We analyzed outcomes of patients with prostate cancer undergoing either radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) +/- salvage radiation or definitive radiation therapy (RT) +/- androgen deprivation. From 2003-2010 there were 251 patients who underwent RRP and 469 patients who received RT (> or =7,560 cGy) for prostate cancer. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed with the log-rank test to compare biochemical control (bCR), distant metastatic-free survival (DMPFS), and prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS) between the two groups. The median follow-up was 70 months and 61.3% of the men were African American. For low risk disease the 6-year bCR were 90.3% for RT and 85.6% for RRP (p = 0.23) and the 6-year post-salvage bCR were 90.3% vs. 90.9%, respectively (p = 0.84). For intermediate risk disease the 6-year bCR were 82.6% for RT and 59.7% for RRP (p < 0.001) and 82.6% vs. 74.0%, respectively, after including those salvaged with RT (p = 0.06). For high risk disease, the 6-year bCR were 67.4% for RT and 41.3% for RRP (p < 0.001) and after including those salvaged with RT was 67.4% vs. 43.1%, respectively (p < 0.001). However, there were no significant differences between the two groups in regards to DMPFS or PCSS. Treatment approaches utilizing RRP +/- salvage radiation or RT +/- androgen deprivation yielded equivalent DMPFS and PCSS outcomes. Biochemical control rates, using their respective definitions, appeared equivalent or better in those who received treatment with RT.

  5. Gleason sum upgrading between biopsy and radical prostatectomy in Chinese population: Updated nomograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H; Bai, P D; Hu, M B; Mao, S H; Zhu, W H; Hu, J M; Liu, S H; Yang, T; Hou, J Y; Hu, Y; Ding, Q; Jiang, H W

    2017-04-01

    To assess the risk factors of Gleason sum upgrading between biopsy and radical prostatectomy (RP) and update the nomogram for the prediction of Gleason sum upgrading. The study cohort consisted of 237 Chinese prostate adenocarcinoma patients who underwent 10-core prostate biopsy and subsequently received RP in Huashan Hospital from February 2011 to May 2015. The main outcome of our study was Gleason sum upgrading between biopsy and RP pathology. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were conducted to explore the potential predictors, and ultimately to build the nomograms. The prediction model was further evaluated for its ability to predict significant upgrading in patients with biopsy Gleason sum<8. In the main cohort of all the patients, Gleason sum upgrading was observed in 62 (26.16%) patients. The pre-operative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, biopsy Gleason sum, and digital rectal examination were used in building the nomogram, which was validated internally with a bootstrap-corrected concordance index of 0.787. In the sub-cohort of 115 patients with standardized biopsy details, Gleason sum upgrading was observed in 31 (26.96%) patients. The pre-operative PSA level, biopsy Gleason sum, and number of positive cores were used in the nomogram, which was also validated internally with a bootstrap-corrected concordance index of 0.833. These two nomograms both demonstrated satisfactory statistical performance for predicting significant upgrading. Updated nomograms to predict Gleason sum upgrading in Chinese population between biopsy and RP were developed, demonstrating good statistical performance upon internal validation. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Anatomic Boundaries of the Clinical Target Volume (Prostate Bed) After Radical Prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiltshire, Kirsty L.; Brock, Kristy K.; Haider, Masoom A.; Zwahlen, Daniel; Kong, Vickie; Chan, Elisa; Moseley, Joanne; Bayley, Andrew; Catton, Charles; Chung, Peter W.M.; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Milosevic, Michael; Kneebone, Andrew; Warde, Padraig; Menard, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We sought to derive and validate an interdisciplinary consensus definition for the anatomic boundaries of the postoperative clinical target volume (CTV, prostate bed). Methods and Materials: Thirty one patients who had planned for radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy were enrolled and underwent computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) simulation prior to radiotherapy. Through an iterative process of consultation and discussion, an interdisciplinary consensus definition was derived based on a review of published data, patterns of local failure, surgical practice, and radiologic anatomy. In validation, we analyzed the distribution of surgical clips in reference to the consensus CTV and measured spatial uncertainties in delineating the CTV and vesicourethral anastomosis. Clinical radiotherapy plans were retrospectively evaluated against the consensus CTV (prostate bed). Results: Anatomic boundaries of the consensus CTV (prostate bed) are described. Surgical clips (n = 339) were well distributed throughout the CTV. The vesicourethral anastomosis was accurately localized using central sagittal computed tomography reconstruction, with a mean ± standard deviation uncertainty of 1.8 ± 2.5 mm. Delineation uncertainties were small for both MRI and computed tomography (mean reproducibility, 0-3.8 mm; standard deviation, 1.0-2.3); they were most pronounced in the anteroposterior and superoinferior dimensions and at the superior/posterior-most aspect of the CTV. Retrospectively, the mean ± standard deviation CTV (prostate bed) percentage of volume receiving 100% of prescribed dose was only 77% ± 26%. Conclusions: We propose anatomic boundaries for the CTV (prostate bed) and present evidence supporting its validity. In the absence of gross recurrence, the role of MRI in delineating the CTV remains to be confirmed. The CTV is larger than historically practiced at our institution and should be encompassed by a microscopic tumoricidal dose

  7. A risk-adjusted definition of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, T M; Meng, M V; Cooperberg, M R; Cowan, J E; Weinberg, V; Carroll, P R; Lin, D W

    2014-06-01

    To determine whether a variable definition of biochemical recurrence (BCR) based on clincopathologic features facilitates early identification of patients likely to suffer from disease progression. The definition of BCR after radical prostatectomy (RP) bears important implications for patient counseling and management; however, there remains a significant debate regarding the appropriate definition. The study cohort consisted of 3619 men who underwent RP for localized prostate cancer from 1989 to 2007, with data abstracted from the Cancer of the Prostate Strategic Urologic Research Endeavor (CaPSURE) registry. Patients were stratified into three risk groups according to Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment post-Surgical (CAPRA-S) score. Three single threshold PSA cut-points for BCR were evaluated (PSA > or =0.05, > or =0.2 and > or =0.4 ng ml(-1)) as well as a variable cut-point defined by risk group. After reaching the cut-points, patients were followed for further PSA progression. The proportion of patients with BCR differed by cut-point and risk group, ranging from 7 to 37% (low risk), 22 to 58% (intermediate risk) and 60 to 86% (high risk). The positive-predictive value (PPV) for predicting further PSA progression was 49% for the PSA > or =0.05 ng ml(-1), 62% for the PSA > or =0.2 ng ml(-1), 65% for the PSA > or =0.4 ng ml(-1) and 68% for the risk-adjusted definition. Five-year progression-free survival was 39% for the risk-adjusted definition compared with 45-52% for the other definitions of BCR. These data suggest that a variable definition of BCR determined by clinicopathologic risk may improve the identification of early recurrence after RP without increasing the overdiagnosis of BCR. By using a risk-adjusted BCR definition, clinicians can better predict future PSA progression and more appropriately counsel patients regarding salvage therapies.

  8. 4-Ports endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy: preliminary and learning curve results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto do Nascimento Barbosa Junior

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction There is a lack of studies in our national scenario regarding the results obtained by laparoscopic radical prostatectomy technique (LRP. Except for a few series, there are no consistent data on oncological, functional, and perioperative results on LRP held in Brazil. As for the LRP technique performed by extraperitoneal access (ELRP, when performed by a single surgeon, the results are even scarcer. Objective To analyze the early perioperative and oncologic results obtained with the ELRP, throughout the technical evolution of a single surgeon. Patients and methods A non-randomized retrospective study was held in a Brazilian hospital of reference. In the 5-year period, 115 patients underwent the ELRP procedure. Patients were divided into two groups, the first 57 cases (Group 1 and the following 58 cases, (Group 2. A comparative analysis between the groups of efficacy results and ELRP safety was carried out. Results The average age of patients was 62.8 year-old and the PSA of 6.9ng/dl. The total surgery time was 135.8 minutes on average, and the urethral-bladder anastomosis was 21.9 min (23.3 min versus 20.7 min. The positive surgical margins (PSM rate was 17.1%, showing no difference between groups (16.4% versus 17.9%; p=0.835. There was statistical difference between the groups in relation to the anastomosis time, estimated blood loss and the withdrawal time of the urinary catheter. Conclusion The ELRP technique proved to be a safe and effective procedure in the treatment of prostate cancer, with low morbidity.

  9. Time from first detectable PSA following radical prostatectomy to biochemical recurrence: A competing risk analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boo, Leonora; Pintilie, Melania; Yip, Paul; Baniel, Jack; Fleshner, Neil; Margel, David

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In this study, we estimated the time from first detectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) following radical prostatectomy (RP) to commonly used definitions of biochemical recurrence (BCR). We also identified the predictors of time to BCR. Methods: We identified subjects who underwent a RP and had an undetectable PSA after surgery followed by at least 1 detectable PSA between 2000 and 2011. The primary outcome was time to BCR (PSA ≥0.2 and successive PSA ≥0.2) and prediction of the rate of PSA rise. Outcomes were calculated using a competing risk analysis, with univariable and multivariable Fine and Grey models. We employed a mixed effect model to test clinical predictors that are associated with the rate of PSA rise. Results: The cohort included 376 patients. The median follow-up from surgery was 60.5 months (interquartile range [IQR] 40.8–91.5) and from detectable PSA was 18 months (IQR 11–32). Only 45.74% (n = 172) had PSA values ≥0.2 ng/mL, while 15.16% (n = 57) reached the PSA level of ≥0.4 ng/mL and rising. On multivariable analysis, the values of the first detectable PSA and pathologic Gleason grade 8 or higher were consistently independent predictors of time to BCR. In the mixed effect model rate, the PSA rise was associated with time from surgery to first detectable PSA, Gleason score, and prostate volume. The main limitation of this study is the large proportion of patients that received treatment without reaching BCR. It is plausible that shorter estimated median times would occur at a centre that does not use salvage therapy at such an early state. Conclusion: The time from first detectable PSA to BCR may be lengthy. Our analyses of the predictors of the rate of PSA rise can help determine a personalized approach for patients with a detectable PSA after surgery. PMID:25624961

  10. [Salvage radical prostatectomy for recurrent prostate cancer. Morbidity, oncological and functional results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidmar, R; Marcq, G; Flamand, V; Fantoni, J-C; Hénon, F; Villers, A; Ouzzane, A

    Salvage radical prostatectomy (sRP) for radiorecurrent prostate cancer (PCa) is a challenging procedure. To report our experience with sRP for selected patients with local recurrence after primary treatment for localised PCa. From 2005 to 2015, 24 patients underwent sRP for recurrent PCa in our center and were included in this retrospective study. Local recurrence was suspected by PSA increase>nadir+2ng/mL and was confirmed by biopsy. Perioperative complications according to Clavien-Dindo classification, oncological and functional results were analysed. Overall, 24 patients with a median age of 59 years (IQR: 55-60) were included. Median follow-up was 25 months (IQR: 9-26). Procedures were performed with open-retropubic approach in 50 % and robot-assisted laparoscopic approach in 50 %. Overall, 5 (21 %) and 2 (8 %) patients experienced grade≤IIIa and grade≥IIIb postoperative complication, respectively. Surgical margins were positive in 46 % of cases. Three out of 4 patients with postoperatively detectable PSA (>0.2ng/mL) had positive surgical margins. Seven patients experienced biochemical recurrence in a median delay of 19 months (9-62). Seventy-one percent (5) of these patients experienced clinical recurrence in a median delay of 24 months (10-113). Severe urinary incontinence (≥3 pads/day) and erectile dysfunction were reported in 25 % and 63 %, respectively. sRP for patients is a feasible procedure with encouraging local control rate and acceptable morbidity. This technique should be discussed as a treatment option for locally recurrent PCa in well-selected patients. 4. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Salvage radiotherapy for patients with P.S.A. relapse after radical prostatectomy: comparisons among Astro and Phoenix biochemical failure definitions

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    Quero, L.; Hennequin, V.; Maylin, C.; Hennequin, C.; Ravery, V.; Mongiat-Artus, P.; Desgrandchamps, F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Study about the efficacy of salvage radiotherapy (R.T.), in terms of biochemical disease free survival (b.D.F.S.), according to Astro and Phoenix (nadir + 2) definitions, for persistent or rising P.S.A. after radical prostatectomy. Patients and methods Retrospective analysis of 59 patients who underwent R.T. between 1990 and 2003 for P.S.A. recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Patients received a median of 66 Gy to the prostate bed with 3D or 2D R.T.. The main end point was b.D.F.S. according to Astro and Phoenix (nadir + 2) definitions. Different criterion sets were analysed to calculate b.D.F.S. and pretreatment factors that might predict biochemical relapse were sought for each. Results After a 38-month median follow-up, the 3-year b.D.F.S. rates were: 60 and 72% for Astro and Phoenix (nadir + 2 ng/ml) definitions respectively. According to univariate analysis, pre-R.T. P.S.A. = 1 ng/ml and seminal vesicle involvement were associated with biochemical relapse. Multivariate analysis retained only pre-R.T. P.S.A. = 1 ng/ml as an independent predictor of biochemical relapse for the two definitions. Conclusion Salvage R.T. is an effective treatment after radical prostatectomy according to Astro or Phoenix definitions. Only pre-R.T. P.S.A. = 1 ng/ml predicted relapse. (authors)

  12. Sarcopenia: a new predictor of postoperative complications for elderly gastric cancer patients who underwent radical gastrectomy.

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    Zhou, Chong-Jun; Zhang, Feng-Min; Zhang, Fei-Yu; Yu, Zhen; Chen, Xiao-Lei; Shen, Xian; Zhuang, Cheng-Le; Chen, Xiao-Xi

    2017-05-01

    A geriatric assessment is needed to identify high-risk elderly patients with gastric cancer. However, the current geriatric assessment has been considered to be either time-consuming or subjective. The present study aimed to investigate the predictive effect of sarcopenia on the postoperative complications for elderly patients who underwent radical gastrectomy. We conducted a prospective study of patients who underwent radical gastrectomy from August 2014 to December 2015. Computed tomography-assessed lumbar skeletal muscle, handgrip strength, and gait speed were measured to define sarcopenia. Sarcopenia was present in 69 of 240 patients (28.8%) and was associated with lower body mass index, lower serum albumin, lower hemoglobin, and higher nutritional risk screening 2002 scores. Postoperative complications significantly increased in the sarcopenic patients (49.3% versus 24.6%, P sarcopenia (odds ratio: 2.959, 95% CI: 1.629-5.373, P Sarcopenia, presented as a new geriatric assessment factor, was a strong and independent risk factor for postoperative complications of elderly patients with gastric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Robot assisted radical prostatectomy: What are the evidences at the time of a specific funding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, J-A; Poinas, G; Fiard, G; Leprêtre, M; Delaitre-Bonnin, C; Rébillard, X; Descotes, J-L

    2017-03-01

    Despite a decreasing number of radical prostatectomies in France, the number of robot-assisted surgeries increases. The objective of this work is to assess the interest of robotic prostatectomy before asking a specific funding from health authorities. A systematic review of the literature on PubMed was performed. Prospective studies and meta-analyses comparing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP), laparoscopic (LRP) and open surgery (OP) were selected. There are only two randomized clinical trials comparing RARP and LRP. Erectile function was significantly better after RARP than after LRP. Compared to OP, sexuality evaluation, based on meta-analyses, was significantly better at 12 months and the absolute risk of erectile dysfunction significantly decreased. Continence after RARP was significantly better than LRP 3 months after surgery. Compared to OP, continence results were discordant, sometimes significantly in favor of RARP, sometimes similar. The rate of positive margins was similar whatever the technique. The long-term oncological outcomes were similar. In terms of perioperative complications, no significant difference was observed between RARP and LRP or OP. RARP provides same oncological outcomes as the open and laparoscopic approach. Continence and sexuality are better after RARP than after laparoscopic or open surgery. However, no randomized study comparing RARP and OP is available. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. The role of detrusor overactivity in urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Antonio L; Palleschi, Giovanni; Illiano, Ester; Zucchi, Alessandro; Carbone, Antonio; Costantini, Elisabetta

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this review was to assess the evidence provided by literature regarding the role of detrusor overactivity (DO) in determining urinary incontinence in patients submitted to radical prostatectomy. The research was based on the online PubMed database spanning the period from November 1997 to May 2016. The review was conducted in accordance with the systematic review guidelines provided by the Cochrane Collaboration and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA). A total of twenty-three articles met the eligibility criteria for this systematic review. The eligible studies included a total of 812 patients with a mean number of 36 patients per study (range 29-264). The rate of patients with urodynamic DO after radical prostatectomy and reporting urge urinary incontinence ranged from 3 to 63%. The postradical prostatectomy DO was more likely to occur in patients who already had it preoperatively [OR =2.30, 95% CI: 1.39-3.82; studies 9; participants 419]. However, most representative studies accordingly indicate that intrinsic sphincter deficiency is the most common cause of postprostatectomy incontinence (PPI), considered as the sole responsible factor for such patients' incontinence (88-100% of patients evaluated); the same studies report that isolated bladder dysfunction is uncommon and that it occurs in only 3% of patients. The review results suggest that DO could be considered as another possible underlying mechanism for PPI. Although sphincter incompetence and weakness are the most common mechanisms related to incontinence after prostatectomy, DO may coexist or be an isolated cause of PPI. Therefore, urodynamic studies are essential to show which is and/or are the exact cause(s) of incontinence in each individual patient after RP.

  15. Treatment results of adjuvant radiotherapy and salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadasaki, Koichi; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Kenjo, Masahiro; Matsuura, Kanji; Murakami, Yuji; Hashimoto, Yasutoshi; Ito, Katsuhide; Kiriu, Hiroshi; Ito, Atsushi

    2007-01-01

    The indications for and the efficacy of radiation therapy after radical operation for patients with prostate cancer are not clear. We analyzed the treatment results of adjuvant radiotherapy and salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. Between September 1997 and November 2004, 57 patients received adjuvant radiotherapy or salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. Fifteen patients received radiation therapy because of positive margins and/or extracapsular invasion in surgical specimens (adjuvant group). Forty-two patients received radiation therapy because of rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) during follow-up (salvage group). Radiation therapy was delivered to the fossa of the prostate±seminal vesicles by a three-dimensional (3-D) conformal technique to a total dose of 60-66 Gy (median, 60 Gy). Biochemical control was defined as the maintenance of a PSA level of less than 0.2 ng/ml. The median follow-up period after radiation therapy was 33 months (range, 12-98 months). Three-year biochemical control rates were 87% for the adjuvant group and 61% for the salvage group. For patients in the salvage group treated without hormone therapy, the preradiation PSA value was the most significant factor for the biochemical control rate. The 3-year biochemical control rate was 93% in patients whose preradiation PSA was 0.5 ng/ml or less and 29% in patients whose preradiation PSA was more than 0.5 ng/ml. No severe adverse effects (equal to or more than grade 3) were seen in treated patients. Radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy seemed to be effective for adjuvant therapy and for salvage therapy in patients with a preradiation PSA of 0.5 ng/ml or less. Also, radiation to the fossa of the prostate±seminal vesicles, to a total dose of 60-66 Gy, using a three-dimensional (3-D) conformal technique, seemed to be safe. (author)

  16. Effects of Biofeedback in Preventing Urinary Incontinence and Erectile Dysfunction after Radical Prostatectomy

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    Fabiana S. B. Perez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we present a biofeedback method for the strengthening of perineal muscles during the preoperative procedures for radical prostatectomy, and we evaluate this technique as a prevention measure against complications such as urinary incontinence (UI and erectile dysfunction (ED, which affect prostatectomy patients after surgery. In the experimental protocol, the patients performed specific exercises with the help of a device that provided the patient with visual biofeedback, based on a plot of the anal pressure. For the experimental protocol, we selected 20 male patients, with an average age of 64.0 years, and submitted them to ten therapeutic sessions each. A control group consisting of 32 men with an average age of 66.3 years, who were treated with the same surgical procedure but not with the preoperative procedures, also took part in the experiment. To evaluate UI and ED after the surgery in both control and experimental groups, we used two validated questionnaires—to assess UI, we used the King’s Health Questionnaire (KHQ and, for ED, we used the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5 Questionnaire. We compared the variables associated with UI and ED after the surgery for the control and experimental groups. The occurrence of UI after radical prostatectomy in the control group (100% of the patients was higher than that for the experimental group (5% of the patients, with p < 0.0001. Likewise, the occurrence of erectile dysfunction after prostatectomy in the control group (48.6% of the patients was higher than that for the experimental group (5% of the patients, with p < 0.0001. The number of nocturia events also decreased as a consequence of the intervention (p < 0.0001, as did the number of disposable underwear units for urinary incontinence (p < 0.0001. Furthermore, we compared, only for the experimental group, the anal pressure before the biofeedback intervention and after the surgery, and we

  17. Results of tadalafil treatment in patients following an open nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy

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    Erkan Hirik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the effect of postoperatively administering a low daily dose of tadalafil on the erectile function of patients who underwent a nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy(NSRP due to localized prostate cancer (PCa. Materials and Methods: Of 138 patients, who underwent NSRP due to PCa between 2012 and 2014, 55 patients who had not had pre-operative erectile dysfunction (ED were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 64 (54-72. On the 15th day after surgery, after ultrasound evaluation, all 55 patients started on a daily dose of 5 mg tadalafil that was continued for 2.5 months. The erectile function of patients was evaluated pre-operatively, post-operatively, and at the 3rd and 6th month after surgery using the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5 test. None of the patients was treated with hormonal therapy or radiotherapy before or after surgery. Results: Three patients were excluded from the study due to the adverse effects of tadalafil and two patients elected to discontinue the treatment. Of the remaining 50 patients whose pre-operative erectile function had been found normal, at 3 months after surgery, 36 (72% had normal erectile function; of the remaining patients in the study six (12% presented with mild, two (4% with moderate, and six (12% with severe ED. Six months after surgery, 35 patients (70% had normal erectile function while seven (14% had mild, three (6% moderate and five (10% severe ED. There was no statistically significant difference between the results obtained at the 3rd and 6thmonth follow-up (p > 0.05. Three patients reported adverse effects with tadalafil including flushes in 2 (3.6% and a headache in 1 (1.8%. Conclusions: The administration of a 5 mg post-operative dose of tadalafil to patients that had undergone a bilateral NSRP was found to have a positive effect on the recovery and maintenance of erectile function. However, there is still a need to investigate a larger series of

  18. Prostate cancer-specific mortality after radical prostatectomy: value of preoperative MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Sungmin; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Ku, Ja Hyeon; Kim, Sang Youn; Kim, Seung Hyup

    2016-08-01

    Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is currently indispensable in the preoperative setting of biopsy-proven prostate cancer, the value of preoperative MRI for predicting prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) is not well known. To evaluate the value of MRI for predicting PCSM in patients who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP) for localized prostate cancer. A total of 318 patients underwent MRI followed by RP. MRI was assessed for the presence of clinically significant cancer using a five-point Likert scale, where ≥4 was considered positive. Cox proportional hazards regression analyses was used to determine the relationship of preoperative factors with PCSM. PCSM was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared between factors using the log-rank test. After a median follow-up of 104 months, 11 (3.5%) patients died of prostate cancer. One hundred and four (32.7%) patients had clinically significant prostate cancer on MRI. Univariate analysis revealed that Gleason grade, greatest percentage of involved core length (GPCL), and clinically significant cancer on MRI were significantly related to PCSM (P = 0.001-0.003). Multivariate analysis showed that GPCL (hazard ratio [HR], 1.028; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.000-1.057; P = 0.048) and clinically significant cancer on MRI (HR, 10.903; 95% CI, 1.287-92.374; P = 0.028) were independent predictors of PCSM. The 5 - and 10-year PCSM rates were 0.6% and 1.3% in patients with GPCL <50% and 5.1% and 8.6% in those with GPCL ≥50% (P = 0.012). Patients without clinically significant cancer on MRI showed 5 - and 10-year PCSM rates of 0% and 0.5%, respectively, whereas those with clinically significant cancer on MRI showed rates of 8% and 14.2%, respectively (P < 0.001). Preoperative MRI and GPCL may be used to predict PCSM after RP. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015.

  19. Posterior muscolofascial reconstruction incorporated into urethrovescical anastomosis during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficarra, Vincenzo; Gan, Melanie; Borghesi, Marco; Zattoni, Fabio; Mottrie, Alexandre

    2012-12-01

    The rationale of posterior musculofascial plate reconstruction during radical prostatectomy is to shorten the time to reach urinary continence recovery and to reduce the risk of bleeding and anastomosis leakage. We describe our original technique incorporating the posterior muscolofascial reconstruction into urethrovesical anastomosis using robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). For this reconstructive step, we use a 30-cm V-Loc 90 3-0 barbed suture (V-20 tapered needle). Specifically, the free edge of the posterior layer of the Denonvilliers fascia is approximated to the posterior part of the sphincteric apparatus in a running fashion from left to right. The musculature of the urethral wall is incorporated in this first layer of the running suture. This suture is then continued back to the left in a second layer incorporating the anterior layer of the Denonvilliers fascia (or prostatovesical muscle), the bladder neck, and again the urethra, this time also with urethral mucosa. The urethrovesical anastomosis is completed using a second running barbed suture (15-cm V-Loc 90 3-0 barbed suture, V-20 tapered needle). No intraoperative complications were observed during this step of the procedure. Anastomotic leakages were observed only in 2% of cases. Only 12.5% showed urinary incontinence after catheter removal (1-2 pads). At mean follow-up of 9 months, the urinary continence recovery was 95%, and an anastomosis stricture necessitating an endoscopic incision developed in only three (1.5%) patients. Recent systematic reviews of the literature showed only a minimal advantage in favor of posterior musculofascial reconstruction in terms of urinary continence recovery within 1 month after radical prostatectomy. We support the use of this step of RARP because it is simple, reproducible, with a very limited increase in operative time, and with only a slight risk of potential harm to the patient. Moreover, it could improve hemostasis and provide greater support for a

  20. Effect of Sulforaphane in Men with Biochemical Recurrence after Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolla, Bernard G; Mandron, Eric; Lefort, Jean Marc; Coadou, Yves; Della Negra, Emmanuel; Corbel, Luc; Le Scodan, Ronan; Azzouzi, Abdel Rahmene; Mottet, Nicolas

    2015-08-01

    Increases in serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) occur commonly in prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy and are designated "biochemical recurrence." Because the phytochemical sulforaphane has been studied extensively as an anticancer agent, we performed a double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled multicenter trial with sulforaphane in 78 patients (mean age, 69 ± 6 years) with increasing PSA levels after radical prostatectomy. Treatment comprised daily oral administration of 60 mg of a stabilized free sulforaphane for 6 months (M0-M6) followed by 2 months without treatment (M6-M8). The study was designed to detect a 0.012 log (ng/mL)/month decrease in the log PSA slope in the sulforaphane group from M0 to M6. The primary endpoint was not reached. For secondary endpoints, median log PSA slopes were consistently lower in sulforaphane-treated men. Mean changes in PSA levels between M6 and M0 were significantly lower in the sulforaphane group (+0.099 ± 0.341 ng/mL) than in placebo (+0.620 ± 1.417 ng/mL; P = 0.0433). PSA doubling time was 86% longer in the sulforaphane than in the placebo group (28.9 and 15.5 months, respectively). PSA increases >20% at M6 were significantly greater in the placebo group (71.8%) than in the sulforaphane group (44.4%); P = 0.0163. Compliance and tolerance were very good. Sulforaphane effects were prominent after 3 months of intervention (M3-M6). After treatment, PSA slopes from M6 to M8 remained the same in the 2 arms. Daily administration of free sulforaphane shows promise in managing biochemical recurrences in prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Outcome of postoperative radiotherapy following radical prostatectomy: a single institutional experience

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    Lee, Sea Won; Chung, Mi Joo; Jeong, Song Mi; Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Jong Hoon [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, St. Vincent' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Tae Kon; Hong, Sung Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Jang, Hong Seok [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sei Chul [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Bucheon St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    This single institutional study is aimed to observe the outcome of patients who received postoperative radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. A total of 59 men with histologically identified prostate adenocarcinoma who had received postoperative radiation after radical prostatectomy from August 2005 to July 2011 in Seoul St. Mary's Hospital of the Catholic University of Korea, was included. They received 45-50 Gy to the pelvis and boost on the prostate bed was given up to total dose of 63-72 Gy (median, 64.8 Gy) in conventional fractionation. The proportion of patients given hormonal therapy and the pattern in which it was given were analyzed. Primary endpoint was biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) after radiotherapy completion. Secondary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Biochemical relapse was defined as a prostate-specific antigen level above 0.2 ng/mL. After median follow-up of 53 months (range, 0 to 104 months), the 5-year bRFS of all patients was estimated 80.4%. The 5-year OS was estimated 96.6%. Patients who were given androgen deprivation therapy had a 5-year bRFS of 95.1% while the ones who were not given any had that of 40.0% (p < 0.01). However, the statistical significance in survival difference did not persist in multivariate analysis. The 3-year actuarial grade 3 chronic toxicity was 1.7% and no grade 3 acute toxicity was observed. The biochemical and toxicity outcome of post-radical prostatectomy radiotherapy in our institution is favorable and comparable to those of other studies.

  2. Laparoscopic versus robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy: an Australian single-surgeon series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papachristos, Alexander; Basto, Marnique; Te Marvelde, Luc; Moon, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    In Australia, robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) has steadily replaced open and laparoscopic surgery in the management of localized prostate cancer. Given the increased cost of this technology, we aimed to compare the perioperative, pathological, oncological and functional outcomes as well as short-term complications of laparoscopic and RARP. We performed a retrospective review of prospectively collected data on 200 consecutive patients during the transition of a single surgeon (DM) from pure laparoscopic (n = 100) to RARP (n = 100) between September 2007 and March 2011. Median operative time and estimated blood loss were the same for both surgical approaches, 195 min (P = 0.29) and 300 mL (P = 0.88) respectively. Median length of hospital stay was shorter for RARP (P = 0.003). Complication rates were not statistically different between groups. There was no significant difference in positive surgical margin rates in pT2 (P = 0.36) or pT3 disease (0.99) or biochemical recurrence rate between groups (P = 0.14). The 12 months continence rate was improved with RARP compared with laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (93% versus 82%; P = 0.025). The potency rate was 56% and 74% at 12 months after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and RARP respectively (P = 0.12) for a bilateral nerve sparing procedure. We conclude from our single-surgeon comparative series that the robotic approach results in a significantly shorter length of hospital stay and improved 12 months continence rates and demonstrated a trend towards better potency rates. Complications, positive surgical margin rates and the requirement for adjuvant therapy are all improved with the robotic approach but did not show statistically significant differences. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  3. Does index tumor predominant location influence prognostic factors in radical prostatectomies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanase Billis

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose To find any influence on prognostic factors of index tumor according to predominant location. Materials and Methods Prostate surgical specimens from 499 patients submitted to radical retropubic prostatectomy were step-sectioned. Each transverse section was subdivided into 2 anterolateral and 2 posterolateral quadrants. Tumor extent was evaluated by a semi-quantitative point-count method. The index tumor (dominant nodule was recorded as the maximal number of positive points of the most extensive tumor area from the quadrants and the predominant location was considered anterior (anterolateral quadrants, posterior (posterolateral quadrants, basal (quadrants in upper half of the prostate, apical (quadrants in lower half of the prostate, left (left quadrants or right (right quadrants. Time to biochemical recurrence was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier product-limit analysis and prediction of shorter time to biochemical recurrence using univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards model. Results Index tumors with predominant posterior location were significantly associated with higher total tumor extent, needle and radical prostatectomy Gleason score, positive lymph nodes and preoperative prostate-specific antigen. Index tumors with predominant basal location were significantly associated with higher preoperative prostate-specific antigen, pathological stage higher than pT2, extra-prostatic extension, and seminal vesicle invasion. Index tumors with predominant basal location were significantly associated with time to biochemical recurrence in Kaplan-Meier estimates and significantly predicted shorter time to biochemical recurrence on univariate analysis but not on multivariate analysis. Conclusions The study suggests that index tumor predominant location is associated with prognosis in radical prostatectomies, however, in multivariate analysis do not offer advantage over other well-established prognostic factors.

  4. Radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy: for whom and when?; Radiotherapie post-prostatectomie: pour quels patients et quand?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennequin, C.; Maylin, C. [Hopital Saint-Louis, Service de Cancerologie-Radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France); Ravery, V.; Boccon-Gibbod, L. [Hopital Bichat, Service d' Urologie, 75 - Paris (France)

    2002-05-01

    Biochemical relapse after radical prostatectomy is not exceptional, ranging from 10 to 40 % in the literature. To prevent this biochemical failure, adjuvant radiotherapy was proposed to patients with a high risk of relapse. No phase III trial has actually validated this attitude. Best indications for adjuvant irradiation seem to be patients with an extensive extra-capsular extension or multiple positive margins. Historical comparisons seems to confer, in these case, a benefit in biochemical control for adjuvant irradiation versus observation. Others authors prefer immediate post-operative irradiation, a delayed treatment, when biochemical relapse has occurred. This attitude has spared some patients irradiation useless This salvage irradiation lowered the PSA level in 40 to 70% of the cases, but long-term efficiency is obtained only in the case of a low value of the PSA before irradiation. Delayed radiotherapy is, therefore, justified only if a close follow-up is performed, with repeated dosage of PSA. Whatever the case, it is important to differentiate between local and distant relapse: patients with positive nodes at the time of surgery are most likely at risk of distant relapse. It seems that patients with seminal vesicles involvement are also at high risk for distant relapse, but this must be confirmed. (author)

  5. Predictors of Incisional Hernia after Robotic Assisted Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Chennamsetty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. To explore the long term incidence and predictors of incisional hernia in patients that had RARP. Methods. All patients who underwent RARP between 2003 and 2012 were mailed a survey reviewing hernia type, location, and repair. Results. Of 577 patients, 48 (8.3% had a hernia at an incisional site (35 men had umbilical, diagnosed at (median 1.2 years after RARP (mean follow-up of 5.05 years. No statistically significant differences were found in preoperative diabetes, smoking, pathological stage, age, intraoperative/postoperative complications, operative time, blood loss, BMI, and drain type between patients with and without incisional hernias. Incisional hernia patients had larger median prostate weight (45 versus 38 grams; P=0.001 and a higher proportion had prior laparoscopic cholecystectomy (12.5% (6/48 versus 4.6% (22/480; P=0.033. Overall, 4% (23/577 of patients underwent surgical repair of 24 incisional hernias, 22 umbilical and 2 other port site hernias. Conclusion. Incisional hernia is a known complication of RARP and may be associated with a larger prostate weight and history of prior laparoscopic cholecystectomy. There is concern about the underreporting of incisional hernia after RARP, as it is a complication often requiring surgical revision and is of significance for patient counseling before surgery.

  6. Comparison of pathological data between prostate biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimen in patients with low to very low risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendínez-Cano, G; Alonso-Flores, J; Beltrán-Aguilar, V; Cayuela, A; Salazar-Otero, S; Bachiller-Burgos, J

    2015-10-01

    To analyze the correlation between pathological data found in radical prostatectomy and previously performed biopsy in patients at low risk prostate cancer. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the characteristics of radical prostatectomies performed in our center from January 2012 to November 2014. The inclusion criteria were patients with low-risk disease (cT1c-T2a, PSA≤10ng/mL and Gleason score≤6). We excluded patients who had fewer than 8 cores in the biopsy, an unspecified number of affected cores, rectal examinations not reported in the medical history or biopsies performed in another center. Of the 184 patients who underwent prostatectomy during this period, 87 met the inclusion criteria, and 26 of these had<3 affected cores and PSA density≤.15 (very low risk). In the entire sample, the percentage of undergrading (Gleason score≥7) and extracapsular invasion (pT3) was 18.4% (95% CI 10.3-27.6) and 10.35% (95% CI 4.6-17.2), respectively. The percentage of positive margins was 21.8% (95% CI 12.6-29.9). In the very low-risk group, we found no cases of extracapsular invasion and only 1 case of undergrading (Gleason 7 [3+4]), representing 3.8% of the total (95% CI 0-12.5). Predictors of no correlation (stage≥pT3a or undergrading) were the initial risk group, volume, PSA density and affected cores. Prostate volume, PSA density, the number of affected cores and the patient's initial risk group influence the poor pathological prognosis in the radical prostatectomy specimen (extracapsular invasion and Gleason score≥7). Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Best practices in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: recommendations of the Pasadena Consensus Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montorsi, Francesco; Wilson, Timothy G; Rosen, Raymond C; Ahlering, Thomas E; Artibani, Walter; Carroll, Peter R; Costello, Anthony; Eastham, James A; Ficarra, Vincenzo; Guazzoni, Giorgio; Menon, Mani; Novara, Giacomo; Patel, Vipul R; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Van der Poel, Henk; Van Poppel, Hein; Mottrie, Alexandre

    2012-09-01

    Radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) has long been the most common surgical technique used to treat clinically localized prostate cancer (PCa). More recently, robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) has been gaining increasing acceptance among patients and urologists, and it has become the dominant technique in the United States despite a paucity of prospective studies or randomized trials supporting its superiority over RRP. A 2-d consensus conference of 17 world leaders in prostate cancer and radical prostatectomy was organized in Pasadena, California, and at the City of Hope Cancer Center, Duarte, California, under the auspices of the European Association of Urology Robotic Urology Section to systematically review the currently available data on RARP, to critically assess current surgical techniques, and to generate best practice recommendations to guide clinicians and related medical personnel. No commercial support was obtained for the conference. A systematic review of the literature was performed in agreement with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis statement. The results of the systematic literature review were reviewed, discussed, and refined over the 2-d conference. Key recommendations were generated using a Delphi consensus approach. RARP is associated with less blood loss and transfusion rates compared with RRP, and there appear to be minimal differences between the two approaches in terms of overall postoperative complications. Positive surgical margin rates are at least equivalent with RARP, but firm conclusions about biochemical recurrence and other oncologic end points are difficult to draw because the follow-up in existing studies is relatively short and the overall experience with RARP in locally advanced PCa is still limited. RARP may offer advantages in postoperative recovery of urinary continence and erectile function, although there are methodological limitations in most studies to date and a need for

  8. Radical prostatectomy in clinically localized high-risk prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Martin Andreas; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2013-01-01

    ) is regarded as primary therapy by others. This study examined the outcome for high-risk localized PCa patients treated with RP. Material and methods. Of 1300 patients who underwent RP, 231 were identified as high-risk. Patients were followed for biochemical recurrence (BCR) (defined as prostate......-specific antigen ≥ 0.2 ng/ml), metastatic disease and survival. Excluding node-positive patients, none of the patients received adjuvant therapy before BCR was confirmed. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed with Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazard models. Results. Median follow-up was 4.4 years...... and young age were significant predictors of BCR. Conclusion. The results confirm that a significant proportion of patients with high-risk PCa remain biochemically diseasefree and without a need for ET following RP as the primary and only treatment. A large randomized study of RP as primary therapeutic...

  9. Changes in preoperative characteristics in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Martin Andreas; Brasso, Klaus; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2014-01-01

    of a shift in attitude with increasing opportunistic PSA testing. This had led to an increasing number of RPs being performed in Denmark. The objective of this study was to analyze changes in preoperative characteristics over time for the complete cohort of 6489 men who underwent RP between 1995 and 2011....... Our hypothesis was that an increasing amount of men undergo RP for lower risk PCa. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All patients operated from 1995 to 2011 were identified via patient files and registries. Changes over time in age at surgery, preoperative PSA, clinical T-category, biopsy Gleason score (GS......-risk patients increased significantly. The proportion of patients age 70 or above increased from 2% to 13% in the period studies. CONCLUSION: Significant preoperative stage- and Gleason grade migration was found in this complete Danish nationwide cohort of patients undergoing RP during the past 16 years...

  10. Oncologic results, functional outcomes, and complication rates of transperitoneal robotic assisted radical prostatectomy: single centre's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihsan-Tasci, A; Simsek, A; Dogukan-Torer, M B; Sokmen, D; Sahin, S; Bitkin, A; Tugcu, V

    2015-03-01

    We report the operative details and short term oncologic and functional outcome of the first 334 Robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy experiences for organ confined prostate cancer From August 2009 to December 2012, details of 334 consecutive patients were retrospectively analyzed. The analyzed parameters included: preoperative, per-operative characteristics, postoperative minor and major complications, positive surgical margin continence, potency, and biochemical progression at the follow-up period. The classical extrafascial, interfascial, intrafascial and fascia sparing radical prostatectomy were performed in 31, 41, 200, and 62 cases, respectively. The mean operation time was 213.8±90.1minutes, and the mean estimated blood loss was 116.1±58.9cc during operation. A nerve-sparing procedure was performed bilaterally in 198 (59.3%) cases and unilaterally in 126 (37.7%) cases. The catheter was removed on postoperative day 9, 1±1.9. Surgical margin was positive in 36 (10.7%) patients. The overall, pT2, pT3a and pT3b PSM rates were 8 (2.4%), 12 (3.6%), 16 (4.8%) respectively and PSM and BCR rates were not statistically different among four approach (P>.05). At the follow-up period, the continence rates were 74.4%, 80.4%, 80.5%, and 96.7% (P.05), in classic extrafascial, interfascial, intrafascial, and fascia sparing intrafascial prostatectomy, respectively. RARP is a safe and feasible technique in treatment of localized prostate cancer. Fascia sparing approach has better continence rate. This results need to be supported by new prospective, randomized studies. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. What if the hand piece spring disassembles during robotic radical prostatectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbulut, Ziya; Canda, Abdullah Erdem; Atmaca, Ali Fuat; Asil, Erem; Isgoren, Egemen; Balbay, Mevlana Derya

    2011-01-01

    Robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP) is successfully being performed for treating prostate cancer (PCa). However, instrumentation failure associated with robotic procedures represents a unique new problem. We report the successful completion of RALRP in spite of a disassembled hand piece spring during the procedure. A PubMed/Medline search was made concerning robotic malfunction and robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy to discuss our experience. We performed RALRP in a 60-year-old male patient with localized PCa. During the procedure, the spring of the hand piece disassembled, and we were not able to reassemble it. We completed the procedure successfully however without fixing the disassembled hand piece spring. We were able to grasp tissue and needles when we brought our fingers together. The only movement we needed to do was to move fingers apart to release tissue or needles caught by robotic instrument. Although malfunction risk related to the da Vinci Surgical System seems to be very low, it might still occur. Sometimes, simple maneuvers may compensate for the failed function as occurred in our case. However, patients should be informed before the operation about the possibility of converting their procedure to laparoscopic or open due to robotic malfunction.

  12. Multimedia support in preoperative patient education for radical prostatectomy: the physicians' point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihrig, Andreas; Herzog, Wolfgang; Huber, Christian G; Hadaschik, Boris; Pahernik, Sascha; Hohenfellner, Markus; Huber, Johannes

    2012-05-01

    To systematically assess the physicians' point of view of multimedia support in preoperative patient education for radical prostatectomy. We evaluated the view of physicians performing multimedia supported preoperative educations within a randomized controlled trial. Therein 8 physicians educated 203 patients for radical prostatectomy. All physicians rated multimedia supported education better than the standard procedure. Main reasons were better comprehensibility, the visual presentation, and greater ease in explaining complex issues. Objective time measurement showed no difference between both educations. The major disadvantage was the impression, that multimedia supported education lasted longer. Moreover, they had the impression that some details could be further improved. Given the choice, every physician would decide for multimedia support. Physicians appreciate multimedia support in preoperative education and contrary to their impression, multimedia support does not prolong patient education. Therefore, patients and physicians likewise profit from multimedia support for education and counseling. The readiness of physicians is a possible obstacle to this improvement, as their view is a key factor for the transition to everyday routine. Therefore, our results could alleviate this possible barrier for establishing multimedia supported education in clinical routine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Standardizing the definition of adverse pathology for lower risk men undergoing radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozminski, Michael A; Tomlins, Scott; Cole, Adam; Singhal, Udit; Lu, Louis; Skolarus, Ted A; Palapattu, Ganesh S; Montgomery, Jeffrey S; Weizer, Alon Z; Mehra, Rohit; Hollenbeck, Brent K; Miller, David C; He, Chang; Feng, Felix Y; Morgan, Todd M

    2016-09-01

    Numerous definitions of adverse pathology at radical prostatectomy (RP) have been proposed and implemented for both research and clinical care, and there is tremendous variation in the specific criteria used to define adverse pathology in these settings. Given the current landscape in which magnetic resonance imaging criteria and biomarker cutoffs are validated for disparate adverse pathology definitions, we sought to identify which of these is most closely tied to biochemical recurrence (BCR) after RP. A total of 2,837 patients who underwent RP at a single institution for localized prostate cancer (PCa) were included. We evaluated the following existing definitions of adverse pathology at RP: (1) Gleason score ≥7, (2) primary Gleason pattern ≥4, (3) Gleason score ≥7 or pathologic stage T3-4, (4) pathologic stage T3-4, (5) primary Gleason pattern ≥4 or pathologic stage T3-4. The primary outcome measure was BCR. Multiple statistical techniques were used to assess BCR prediction. Of the 5 definitions assessed, 1 (primary Gleason pattern ≥4 or pathologic stage T3-4, 540 patients [19% of cohort]) consistently outperformed the other definitions across all statistical measures. Additionally, a total of only 13 (6.6%) and 34 (10.3%) men with very-low-risk and low-risk cancer per National Comprehensive Cancer Network guideline, respectively, met this definition of adverse pathology at the time of RP. Varying definitions of adverse pathology differ in their prognostic performance. The criteria defined by either primary Gleason pattern ≥4 or pT3-4 disease appears to most accurately predict BCR in this subset of patients with lower risk PCa at the time of diagnosis. Additionally, men with very-low-risk or low-risk PCa per National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines are relatively unlikely to have adverse pathology at the time of surgical resection. These data may help inform the use of imaging and molecular markers as well as the intensity of surveillance in

  14. Evaluation of the Prostate Bed for Local Recurrence After Radical Prostatectomy Using Endorectal Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liauw, Stanley L.; Pitroda, Sean P.; Eggener, Scott E.; Stadler, Walter M.; Pelizzari, Charles A.; Vannier, Michael W.; Oto, Aytek

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To summarize the results of a 4-year period in which endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was considered for all men referred for salvage radiation therapy (RT) at a single academic center; to describe the incidence and location of locally recurrent disease in a contemporary cohort of men with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy (RP), and to identify prognostic variables associated with MRI findings in order to define which patients may have the highest yield of the study. Methods and Materials: Between 2007 and 2011, 88 men without clinically palpable disease underwent eMRI for detectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) after RP. The median interval between RP and eMRI was 32 months (interquartile range, 14-57 months), and the median PSA level was 0.30 ng/mL (interquartile range, 0.19-0.72 ng/mL). Magnetic resonance imaging scans consisting of T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted, and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging were evaluated for features consistent with local recurrence. The prostate bed was scored from 0-4, whereby 0 was definitely normal, 1 probably normal, 2 indeterminate, 3 probably abnormal, and 4 definitely abnormal. Local recurrence was defined as having a score of 3-4. Results: Local recurrence was identified in 21 men (24%). Abnormalities were best appreciated on T2-weighted axial images (90%) as focal hypointense lesions. Recurrence locations were perianastomotic (67%) or retrovesical (33%). The only risk factor associated with local recurrence was PSA; recurrence was seen in 37% of men with PSA >0.3 ng/mL vs 13% if PSA ≤0.3 ng/mL (P 3 and was directly associated with PSA (r=0.5, P=.02). The correlation between MRI-based tumor volume and PSA was even stronger in men with positive margins (r=0.8, P<.01). Conclusions: Endorectal MRI can define areas of local recurrence after RP in a minority of men without clinical evidence of disease, with yield related to PSA. Further study is necessary to determine whether eMRI can

  15. Laparoscopic and robotic-assisted versus open radical prostatectomy for the treatment of localised prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, Dragan; Evans, Sue M; Allan, Christie Ann; Jung, Jae Hung; Murphy, Declan; Frydenberg, Mark

    2017-09-12

    Prostate cancer is commonly diagnosed in men worldwide. Surgery, in the form of radical prostatectomy, is one of the main forms of treatment for men with localised prostate cancer. Prostatectomy has traditionally been performed as open surgery, typically via a retropubic approach. The advent of laparoscopic approaches, including robotic-assisted, provides a minimally invasive alternative to open radical prostatectomy (ORP). To assess the effects of laparoscopic radical prostatectomy or robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy compared to open radical prostatectomy in men with localised prostate cancer. We performed a comprehensive search using multiple databases (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE) and abstract proceedings with no restrictions on the language of publication or publication status, up until 9 June 2017. We also searched bibliographies of included studies and conference proceedings. We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with a direct comparison of laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) and robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) to ORP, including pseudo-RCTs. Two review authors independently classified studies and abstracted data. The primary outcomes were prostate cancer-specific survival, urinary quality of life and sexual quality of life. Secondary outcomes were biochemical recurrence-free survival, overall survival, overall surgical complications, serious postoperative surgical complications, postoperative pain, hospital stay and blood transfusions. We performed statistical analyses using a random-effects model and assessed the quality of the evidence according to GRADE. We included two unique studies with 446 randomised participants with clinically localised prostate cancer. The mean age, prostate volume, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) of the participants were 61.3 years, 49.78 mL, and 7.09 ng/mL, respectively. Primary outcomes We found no study that addressed the outcome of prostate cancer-specific survival. Based on data from one

  16. Gleason score concordance on biopsy-confirmed prostate cancer: is pathological re-evaluation necessary prior to radical prostatectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truesdale, Matthew D; Cheetham, Philippa J; Turk, Andrew T; Sartori, Samantha; Hruby, Gregory W; Dinneen, Eion P; Benson, Mitchell C; Badani, Ketan K

    2011-03-01

    • Gleason sum from prostate biopsy (bGS) is an important tool in classifying severity of disease, ultimately influencing clinical management. • Commonly, pathology specimens are re-evaluated internally prior to surgery. • We evaluate agreement of bGS with prostatectomy Gleason sum (pGS) and the impact of re-grading on prediction of true underlying tumor architecture. • Retrospective analysis of men who underwent robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) by two surgeons from 2005-2009. Initial transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) biopsy demonstrated carcinoma at an outside lab. Specimens were re-evaluated by our GU pathologists prior to surgery. Biopsy data were correlated with pGS. • Kappa (κ) statistics for agreement and linear regression analyses were used for categorical variables. Coefficient of concordance was used for continuous variables. • 100 patients had 331 positive biopsies. Agreement (κ) for bGS between outside labs and our pathologists was 0.55 (p bGS (23% vs. 11%). • When re-evaluation resulted in a change in bGS, agreement with pGS was κ= 0.29, vs. κ=-0.04 for agreement of initial (outside) bGS with pGS. • When no change was made to bGS, agreement with pGS was κ= 0.40 (p bGS. Internal pathology re-reads correlated better with pGS than original community bGS. When re-reads result in a change in bGS, there is a marked improvement in prediction of underlying tumor architecture confirming the value of re-evaluating all external biopsies prior to definitive surgery. © 2010 THE AUTHORS. JOURNAL COMPILATION © 2010 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  17. A Comprehensive Analysis of Cribriform Morphology on Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Ultrasound Fusion Biopsy Correlated with Radical Prostatectomy Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Matthew; Feng, Changyong; Hollenberg, Gary; Weinberg, Eric; Messing, Edward M; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Frye, Thomas P

    2018-01-01

    Recently a large body of evidence has emerged indicating that cribriform morphology is an aggressive prostate cancer morphological pattern associated with higher cancer specific mortality. In a comprehensive analysis we compared traditional and contemporary prostate biopsy techniques to detect prostate cancer with cribriform morphology with radical prostatectomy serving as the reference standard. We queried a retrospectively maintained, single institution, multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging database of 1,001 patients to identify 240 who underwent magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasound fusion targeted biopsy and concurrent systematic biopsy from December 2014 to December 2016. Of the 3,978 biopsy cores obtained 694 positive cores were rereviewed by a genitourinary pathologist for pattern 4 subtype (cribriform, fused and poorly formed glands). Using paired analysis pathological results among 3 biopsy methods (systematic biopsy, targeted biopsy and systematic plus targeted biopsy) were compared. Prostatectomy specimens were also pathologically reviewed. Systematic plus targeted biopsy was superior to systematic biopsy alone or targeted biopsy alone to detect cribriform morphology (all p <0.0001). On final histopathology cribriform tumor foci were associated with an increased percent of pattern 4 involvement and extraprostatic extension (p <0.0001 and 0.003, respectively). Only 17.4% of cribriform tumors in pure form were visible on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging. Based on final histopathology the sensitivity of systematic biopsy, targeted biopsy and systematic plus targeted biopsy for cribriform morphology was 20.7%, 28.6% and 37.1%, respectively. Although systematic plus targeted biopsy was the most accurate biopsy method to detect cribriform morphology, biopsy sensitivity and specificity remained poor. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy in intermediate-risk group men increases with the number of risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuki Furubayashi

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: The number of intermediate risk factors is significantly associated with the PSA failure-free survival rate after radical prostatectomy in the intermediate-risk group. Patients classified into the intermediate-risk group based on all three intermediate risk factors are less likely to achieve a complete cure through surgery alone.

  19. Retrospective evaluation of male slings for patients with urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy--one surgeon's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miodrag, Aćimović; Uroš, Babić; Aleksandar, Argirović; Mirko, Jovanović; Miodrag, Stanić; Boris, Kajmaković; Zoran, Džamić

    2014-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence is one of the main complications after radical prostatectomy (RP) with a significant percentage of patients reporting bothersome incontinence > 1 year after surgery. Assessment of one surgeon's results in surgical treatment of urinary stress incontinence of patients with radical prostatectomy applying transobturator and suprapubic slings. From February 2010-February 2014, 20 patients, age 57-76, with moderate and severe stress urinary incontinence (SUI) were treated surgically. All patients previously had radical prostatectomy due to prostate cancer. All 20 patients with stress urinary incontinence (PRPUI) had Argus slings placement after radical prostatectomy. Patients were followed for a longer period of time, 6 months minimum, 48 months maximum.18 patients (90%) had negative, dry PAD test after surgery, one patient (5%) had positive PAD test, and one patient (5%) who previously had Advance transobturator sling placement with no positive results, had sling removed due to an infection. 6 patients (30%) needed additional sling adjustment, performed between 9-21st day after the surgery. We concluded that Argus sligs, suprapubic or transobturatory are an effective and safe treatment for PRPUI. This procedure is minimal invasive and our results clearly demonstrate that both heavy and moderate incontinence responds well.

  20. Interphase cytogenetics of prostatic adenocarcinoma and precursor lesions: Analysis of 25 radical prostatectomies and 17 adjacent prostatic intraepithelial neoplasias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Alers (Janneke); P-J. Krijtenburg (Pieter-Jaap); K.J. Vissers (Kees); F.T.B. Bosman (Fré); Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo); H. van Dekken (Herman)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractTwenty-five radical prostatectomy specimens were screened for the presence of numerical chromosome changes within the adenocarcinoma as well as in 17 adjacent prostatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PIN) by means of interphase in situ hybridization (ISH) to routinely processed tissue

  1. Penile vibratory stimulation in the recovery of urinary continence and erectile function after nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Borre, Michael; Ohl, Dana A

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of penile vibratory stimulation (PVS) in the preservation and restoration of erectile function and urinary continence in conjunction with nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (RP). PATIENTS AND METHODS: The present study was conducted between July 2010 and March 2013...

  2. A natural language processing program effectively extracts key pathologic findings from radical prostatectomy reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Brian J; Merchant, Madhur; Zheng, Chengyi; Thomas, Anil A; Contreras, Richard; Jacobsen, Steven J; Chien, Gary W

    2014-12-01

    Natural language processing (NLP) software programs have been widely developed to transform complex free text into simplified organized data. Potential applications in the field of medicine include automated report summaries, physician alerts, patient repositories, electronic medical record (EMR) billing, and quality metric reports. Despite these prospects and the recent widespread adoption of EMR, NLP has been relatively underutilized. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of an internally developed NLP program in extracting select pathologic findings from radical prostatectomy specimen reports in the EMR. An NLP program was generated by a software engineer to extract key variables from prostatectomy reports in the EMR within our healthcare system, which included the TNM stage, Gleason grade, presence of a tertiary Gleason pattern, histologic subtype, size of dominant tumor nodule, seminal vesicle invasion (SVI), perineural invasion (PNI), angiolymphatic invasion (ALI), extracapsular extension (ECE), and surgical margin status (SMS). The program was validated by comparing NLP results to a gold standard compiled by two blinded manual reviewers for 100 random pathology reports. NLP demonstrated 100% accuracy for identifying the Gleason grade, presence of a tertiary Gleason pattern, SVI, ALI, and ECE. It also demonstrated near-perfect accuracy for extracting histologic subtype (99.0%), PNI (98.9%), TNM stage (98.0%), SMS (97.0%), and dominant tumor size (95.7%). The overall accuracy of NLP was 98.7%. NLP generated a result in report. This novel program demonstrated high accuracy and efficiency identifying key pathologic details from the prostatectomy report within an EMR system. NLP has the potential to assist urologists by summarizing and highlighting relevant information from verbose pathology reports. It may also facilitate future urologic research through the rapid and automated creation of large databases.

  3. Comparison of mortality outcomes after radical prostatectomy versus radiotherapy in patients with localized prostate cancer. A population-based analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdollah, F.; Schmitges, J.; Sun, M.

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the mortality outcomes of radical prostatectomy and radiotherapy as treatment modalities for patients with localized prostate cancer. Our cohort consisted of 68 665 patients with localized prostate cancer, treated with radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy, between 1992 and 2005. Propensity-score matching was used to minimize potential bias related to treatment assignment. Competing-risks analyses tested the effect of treatment type on cancer-specific mortality, after accounting for other-cause mortality. All analyses were stratified according to prostate cancer risk groups, baseline Charlson Comorbidity Index and age. For patients treated with radical prostatectomy versus radiotherapy, the 10-year cancer-specific mortality rates were 1.4 versus 3.9% in low-intermediate risk prostate cancer and 6.8 versus 11.5% in high-risk prostate cancer, respectively. Rates were 2.4 versus 5.9% in patients with Charlson Comorbidity Index of 0, 2.4 versus 5.1% in patients with Charlson Comorbidity Index of 1, and 2.9 versus 5.2% in patients with Charlson Comorbidity Index of ≥2. Rates were 2.1 versus 5.0% in patients aged 65-69 years, 2.8 versus 5.5% in patients aged 70-74 years, and 2.9 versus 7.6% in patients aged 75-80 years (all P<0.001). At multivariable analyses, radiotherapy was associated with less favorable cancer-specific mortality in all categories (all P<0.001). Patients treated with radical prostatectomy fare substantially better than those treated with radiotherapy. Patients with high-risk prostate cancer benefit the most from radical prostatectomy. Conversely, the lowest benefit was observed in patients with low-intermediate risk prostate cancer and/or multiple comorbidities. An intermediate benefit was observed in the other examined categories. (author)

  4. Radical prostatectomy outcome when performed with PSA above 20 ng/ml.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Connolly, S S

    2012-02-01

    Many centres currently do not offer radical prostatectomy (RP) to men with high-risk localised prostate cancer due to concerns regarding poor outcome, despite evidence to the contrary. We identified 18 men undergoing RP with serum PSA >20 ng\\/ml (high-risk by National Comprehensive Cancer Network definition) and minimum follow-up of 12 years (mean 13.5). Mean preoperative PSA was 37.0 ng\\/ml (Range 21.1-94.0). Prostatectomy pathology reported extracapsular disease in 16 (88.9%), positive surgical margins in 15 (83%) and positive pelvic lymph nodes in 5 (27.8%). Overall and cancer-specific survival at 5 and 10-years was 83.3%, 88.2%, 72% and 76.5% respectively. With complete follow-up 11 (61.1%) are alive, and 5 (27.8%) avoided any adjuvant therapy. Complete continence (defined as no involuntary urine leakage and no use of pads) was achieved in 60%, with partial continence in the remainder. We conclude that surgery for this aggressive variant of localised prostate cancer can result in satisfactory outcome.

  5. Associations of Intraoperative Flow Disruptions and or Teamwork during Robotic Assisted Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigl, Matthias; Weber, Jeannette; Hallett, Elyse; Pfandler, Michael; Schlenker, Boris; Becker, Armin; Catchpole, Ken

    2018-01-22

    To identify type and severity of surgical flow disruptions and to determine their impact on the perception of intraoperative teamwork. 40 radical prostatectomy cases were studied in an academic department for urology. A standardized observational tool for identification of type and severity of flow disruptions was applied during real-time prostatectomy procedures. Additionally, all OR team members evaluated intra-operative teamwork immediately after the procedure. Procedures were divided into four phases: pre-robot, docking, console time, and post-robot. A total of 2012 flow disruptions were observed with an average rate of 16.27 events per hour. The highest rate was during the robot docking phase. Although the frequency of disruption types varied across phases, the most severe disruptions were related to communication and coordination during the pre-robot and docking phase. Equipment- and communication-related disruptions were mostly severe during the time the surgeons were on the console. Among the surgeons, we identified a significant relationship between disruptions and intraoperative teamwork such that during procedures with frequent severe disruptions, surgeons experienced inferior teamwork (β = -.40, p=.01). This was not the case for nurses and anesthetists. Emphasis on improving OR team communication and coordination would help to establish efficient and smooth surgical workflow. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Adjuvant and salvage therapy following radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer: effect of combined transient androgen deprivation and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eulau, Stephen M.; Tate, David J.; Cox, Richard S.; Bagshaw, Malcolm A.; Hancock, Steven L.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant and salvage irradiation have been shown to improve local control after radical prostatectomy for prostatic cancer in patients with high risk pathologic features, rising PSA, or evidence of local failure. Transient androgen deprivation combined with primary irradiation has resulted in improved local control and biochemical disease free survival in patients with locally advanced, unresected, prostate cancer. This retrospective study evaluates whether transient androgen blockade improves the outcome from post-prostatectomy irradiation given as either adjuvant or salvage therapy. Methods: From August, 1985 to December, 1995, 105 patients were treated with radiotherapy to the prostatic fossa following radical prostatectomy for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. No patient had clinically or radiographically evident distant disease. Median follow-up was 4.6 years from the date of surgery and 3.2 years from completion of radiotherapy. Findings at prostatectomy included capsular penetration in 38 patients, seminal vesicle involvement in 42 patients, lymph node involvement in 15 patients, and positive surgical margins in 70 patients. Treatment was administered as adjuvant therapy for high risk pathologic features in 39 patients, for persistent or rising PSA in 52 patients, or for clinically evident local recurrence in 14 patients. Of the 105 patients, 32 received combined androgen deprivation/radiotherapy and 73 received radiotherapy alone. Both groups received 60-70 Gy in 2 Gy daily fractions to the prostatic fossa. Selected patients with poor prognostic features received pelvic irradiation to a median dose of 50 Gy. Androgen deprivation typically consisted of Lupron and Flutamide for 4 to 6 months before, during, and in selected cases, after irradiation. No patients received maintenance androgen deprivation or underwent orchiectomy. Tumor stage, lymph node status, Gleason sum, and indications for treatment did not differ significantly between the two groups

  7. Higher number of transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy cores is associated with higher blood loss and perioperative complications in robot assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, A; Sivaraman, A; Sanchez-Salas, R; Nunes-Silva, I; Baghdadi, M; Srougi, V; di Trapani, E; Uriburu Pizzaro, F; Doizi, S; Barret, E; Rozet, F; Galiano, M; Cathelineau, X

    2017-04-01

    The local inflammatory process after prostate biopsies can have a negative impact on functional outcomes of radical prostatectomy. There is no evidence in literature demonstrating its impact on radical prostatectomy. To evaluate the impact of the number of TRUS core biopsies in the surgical morbidity and rate of positive margin on robot assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). A prospectively maintained database of 2,054 RARPs in a single institution. Patients were further grouped into 2 groups based on the number of TRUS biopsy cores (G1≤12 cores; G2>12 cores). Multivariable logistic regression model was applied to analyze the impact of number of cores on complications. A total number of 1,042 patients in the group 1 (≤12 cores) and 1,012 patients in the group 2 (>12 cores) were included. The rate of perioperative complications increased with higher number of biopsies (G1 6.4 vs. G2 8.5%; P=.03), but high grade complication (Clavien 3-4) were similar (G1 1.4 vs. G2 2.2%; P=.16). Positive surgical margin rates were similar in both groups (G1 11.8 vs. 9.98%; P=.2). At the multivariable logistic regression analysis shown that G2 had a 39% (OR 0.645) higher rate to experience perioperative complications during RARP. Higher number of TRUS biopsy cores (>12) is associated to higher blood loss and perioperative complications during RARP. Careful preoperative evaluation for those patients underwent multiple biopsies or saturation protocols is mandatory. Application of longer intervals (>6 weeks) between biopsy and surgery may be advisable to minimize potential risks of surgical complications in patients may benefit from RARP. Further studies are still necessary to confirm these results. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of tamsulosin on urinary retention following early catheter removal after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, In Gab; You, Dalsan; Yoon, Jong Hyun; Hong, Sungwoo; Lim, Ju Hyun; Hong, Jun Hyuk; Choo, Myung-Soo; Ahn, Hanjong; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2014-02-01

    To examine the impact of tamsulosin on the rate of acute urinary retention following early catheter removal after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. A total of 236 patients who underwent robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer carried out by a single surgeon were enrolled in this randomized study. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: treatment with tamsulosin (0.4 mg) from 1 day before to 14 days after surgery (tamsulosin group), or no tamsulosin treatment (control group). The urethral catheter was removed on the fifth postoperative day. The primary end-point was the acute urinary retention rate. Changes in each domain of the International Continence Society male short-form questionnaire and uroflowmetry parameters were secondary end-points. The primary end-point was assessed in 218 patients (92.4%; n = 109 in each group). It was not assessed in 18 patients because of cystographic leak from the vesicourethral anastomosis. The acute urinary retention rate was lower in the tamsulosin group (7.3%) than in the control group (17.4%, P = 0.018). Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified tamsulosin treatment and the operative experience of the surgeon as independent risk factors for acute urinary retention. Tamsulosin-treated patients had a 0.30-fold lower risk of developing acute urinary retention compared with control patients (95% confidence interval 0.12-0.76; P = 0.011). None of the International Continence Society male questionnaire domain scores showed significant changes between the groups. Perioperative treatment with tamsulosin in patients undergoing robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy reduces the rate of acute urinary retention after early catheter removal, without aggravating urinary incontinence. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  9. [Should we recommend an erectile rehabilitation after radical prostatectomy? Systematic review of the literature by the Sexual Medicine Committee of the French Urology Association].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrier, J-E; Ferretti, L; Journel, N Morel; Ben-Naoum, K; Graziana, J-P; Huyghe, E; Marcelli, F; Methorst, C; Montaigne, O; Savareux, L; Faix, A

    2014-12-01

    Radical prostatectomy has evolved considerably during the last 20 years, with one hand, a thorough knowledge of the anatomy of the prostate, and secondly, the introduction of new conservation techniques of neurovascular bundles. Despite this progress, the rate of post-prostatectomy erectile dysfunction varies between 30 and 90% depending on the series and this element impacts the quality of life after radical prostatectomy. The objective of this work was to conduct a review of the literature in order to evaluate the various protocols of post-radical prostatectomy erectile rehabilitation. A systematic review of the literature from the basic PubMed search was performed using the following keywords. Therapy erectile dysfunction, radical prostatectomy, penile rehabilitation, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor, intracavernous injection. The critical analysis of selected studies highlights the lack of standard protocol that established erectile rehabilitation early after radical prostatectomy. These studies have shown that early treatment, injections or intracavernous PDE5 inhibitors improved recovery of erections as recommended by the French Association of Urology. Management of disorders of post-radical prostatectomy sexuality is essential, it must be organized in a well-established protocol combining pharmacological and therapeutic education assistances delivered by practitioners or nurses. It would need to develop in a clinical trial a standard protocol. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Salvage radical prostatectomy after external radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Indications, morbidity and results. Review from CCAFU prostate section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paparel, P.; Soulie, M.; Mongiat-Artus, P.; Cornud, F.; Borgogno, C.; Les membres du sous-comite prostate du CCAFU

    2010-01-01

    Local recurrence after external radiotherapy for prostate cancer occurs in 30 to 50 % and is often diagnosed by a rising PSA. The absence of local control after radiotherapy is a risk factor of metastases and specific mortality. There are several therapeutic options to treat these patients: surveillance, hormonotherapy and salvage therapies (radical prostatectomy, cysto-prostatectomy, brachytherapy, high intensity focused ultrasound [HIFU] and cryotherapy). Hormonotherapy is not a curative treatment and after a couple of years, the disease will progress again. Local salvage therapies are the only treatment to have the potential to cure these patients with the condition of very strict inclusion criteria. Among these therapies, only radical prostatectomy demonstrated his efficacy with a follow-up of 10 years on specific survival and survival without biological progression respectively from 70 to 77 % and from 30 to 43 %. During last decade, morbidity of RP has strongly decreased with a percentage of rectal and ureteral injury at 3 %. Nevertheless, percentage of urinary incontinence remains high from 29 to 50 %. Salvage mini-invasive therapies (cryotherapy, HIFU and cryotherapy) are under constant evolution due to progress of technology. Functional and oncological results are better with last generation devices but need to be evaluated and compared with radical prostatectomy. (authors)

  11. VACUUM THERAPY – PREVENTION OF HYPOXIA OF CAVERNOUS TISSUE PATIENTS AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Osadchinskii

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients, after radical prostatectomy with the use of nerve-sparing techniques, without carrying out penile rehabilitation, are at risk of forming cavernous fibrosis with the emergence of subsequent persistent erectile dysfunction. In order to minimize damage to cavernous tissue and early restoration of erectile function during the period of neuropraxia, it is necessary to ensure a sufficient level of oxygenation. The role of applying vacuum in penile rehabilitation for the prevention of hypoxia of cavernous tissue is not fully understood, due to the lack of data on the gaseous composition of the blood at the time of reaching the vacuum of erection. The purpose of this work was to review the scientific studies devoted to the study of vacuum induced penile erection in animals or humans, which indicates high results due to increased oxygenation of cavernous tissue.

  12. Anastomotic complications after robot-assisted laparoscopic and open radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, André; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Iversen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective Anastomotic complications are well known after radical prostatectomy (RP). The vesicourethral anastomotic technique is handled differently between open and robotic RP. The aim of the study was to investigate whether the frequency of anastomotic leakages and strictures differed between...... of Urology, Rigshospitalet, Denmark, in a complete 3 year period from 2010 to 2012. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to analyse associations between surgical procedure (RRP vs RARP) and anastomotic complications. Analyses included age, smoking status, diabetes, hypertension......, surgeon, prostate volume and anastomotic leakage as variables. Owing to a low number of events, multivariable analyses only included smoking status, diabetes and prostate volume for anastomotic leakage, and age, smoking status, prostate volume and anastomotic leakage for anastomotic strictures. Results...

  13. Risk factors associated with positive surgical margins following radical prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Martin Andreas; Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of preoperative and surgical parameters, including nerve-sparing technique, on the risk of positive surgical margins (PSM) following radical prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A prospective...... consecutive single-institution Danish cohort of 1148 patients undergoing RP between 1995 and 2011 was investigated. To analyse the impact of covariates on risk of PSM, a multivariate logistic regression model was used, including cT category, biopsy Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), percentage...... positive biopsies for cancer (PPB), surgeon and surgical technique. RESULTS: The overall rate of PSM was 31.4%. The risk of PSM depended (p value for Wald χ(2)) on PSA (p

  14. Risk factors associated with positive surgical margins following radical prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Martin Andreas; Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2014-01-01

    consecutive single-institution Danish cohort of 1148 patients undergoing RP between 1995 and 2011 was investigated. To analyse the impact of covariates on risk of PSM, a multivariate logistic regression model was used, including cT category, biopsy Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), percentage...... positive biopsies for cancer (PPB), surgeon and surgical technique. RESULTS: The overall rate of PSM was 31.4%. The risk of PSM depended (p value for Wald χ(2)) on PSA (p PSA, the risk of PSM...... to the referent surgeon. Nerve-sparing surgery increased the risk of PSM by 50% compared to wide resection (OR = 1.5, 95% CI 1.0-2.1, p = 0.03). CONCLUSION: Both preoperative and surgical parameters affect the risk of PSM after radical prostatectomy. Surgeon and high preoperative PSA, PPB and cT category were...

  15. Surgical planning for radical prostatectomies using three-dimensional visualization and a virtual reality display system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Paul A.; Robb, Richard A.; King, Bernard F.; Myers, R. P.; Camp, Jon J.

    1995-04-01

    Thousands of radical prostatectomies for prostate cancer are performed each year. Radical prostatectomy is a challenging procedure due to anatomical variability and the adjacency of critical structures, including the external urinary sphincter and neurovascular bundles that subserve erectile function. Because of this, there are significant risks of urinary incontinence and impotence following this procedure. Preoperative interaction with three-dimensional visualization of the important anatomical structures might allow the surgeon to understand important individual anatomical relationships of patients. Such understanding might decrease the rate of morbidities, especially for surgeons in training. Patient specific anatomic data can be obtained from preoperative 3D MRI diagnostic imaging examinations of the prostate gland utilizing endorectal coils and phased array multicoils. The volumes of the important structures can then be segmented using interactive image editing tools and then displayed using 3-D surface rendering algorithms on standard work stations. Anatomic relationships can be visualized using surface displays and 3-D colorwash and transparency to allow internal visualization of hidden structures. Preoperatively a surgeon and radiologist can interactively manipulate the 3-D visualizations. Important anatomical relationships can better be visualized and used to plan the surgery. Postoperatively the 3-D displays can be compared to actual surgical experience and pathologic data. Patients can then be followed to assess the incidence of morbidities. More advanced approaches to visualize these anatomical structures in support of surgical planning will be implemented on virtual reality (VR) display systems. Such realistic displays are `immersive,' and allow surgeons to simultaneously see and manipulate the anatomy, to plan the procedure and to rehearse it in a realistic way. Ultimately the VR systems will be implemented in the operating room (OR) to assist the

  16. Role of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in the management of high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay Sood

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to evaluate the role of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP in the management of high-risk prostate cancer (PCa, with a focus on oncological, functional and perioperative outcomes. Further, we also aimed to briefly describe our novel modification to conventional RARP that allows immediate organ retrieval and examination for intra-operative surgical margin assessment. A literature search of PubMed was performed for articles on the management of high-risk PCa. Papers written in English and concerning clinical outcomes following RARP for locally advanced and high-risk PCa were selected. Outcomes data from our own center were also included. A total of 10 contemporary series were evaluated. Biopsy Gleason score ≥ 8 was the most common cause for classification of patients into the high-risk PCa group. Biochemical failure rate, in the few series that looked at long-term follow-up, varied from 9% to 26% at 1 year. The positive surgical margin rate varied from 12% to 53.3%. Urinary continence rates varied from 78% to 92% at 1 year. The overall complication rates varied from 2.4% to 30%, with anastomotic leak and lymphocele being the most common complications. Long-term data on oncological control following RARP in high-risk patients is lacking. Short-term oncological outcomes and functional outcomes are equivalent to open radical prostatectomy (RP. Safety outcomes are better in patients undergoing RARP when compared with open RP. Improved tools for predicting the presence of organ-confined disease (OCD are available. High-risk patients with OCD would be ideal candidates for RARP and would benefit most from surgery alone.

  17. [Minimally invasive radical prostatectomy: Contribution of robotic support, functional and oncological outcomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoepffner, Jean-Luc; Gaston, Richard; Mugnier, Camille; Rey, Denis; Lopez, Laurent; Roche, Jean-Baptiste; Riviere, Julien; Piechaud, Pierre-Thierry

    2016-05-01

    Radical prostatectomy (RP) remains a standard for localized prostate cancer treatment. The objective of this study is to present this operating technique of the robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (PR-RA) and to evaluate oncological and functional results as well as on the surgical safety. A first series of 1679 patients consecutively operated in our institution with this technique from 2005 to 2010 and with a 5-year follow-up evaluated in 2014. The oncology monitoring is ensured with a PSA test every six months during the first three years and once a year the years after if the level remains undetectable. The oncologic outcomes show 17.4% for pT2 stages and 36.9% for pT3 stages positive margins. The level of biological recurrence is 21.27% with an average delay of 88 months as the time needed for the recurrence to occur. At 12 months, urinary continence (0-1pad/day) returned at 94% of all patients and potency with successful penetration for all men is 61.1% and 88.8% for men with sexual activity before surgery. The technique PRRA seems to be a reliable technique whose functional results studied from meta-analysis seem to be superior in terms of rapidity of recovery of the continence and erection in comparison with classical surgical or laparoscopic approach. Copyright © 2016 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Ultrasensitive prostate specific antigen assay following laparoscopic radical prostatectomy--an outcome measure for defining the learning curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viney, R; Gommersall, L; Zeif, J; Hayne, D; Shah, Z H; Doherty, A

    2009-07-01

    Radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) performed laparoscopically is a popular treatment with curative intent for organ-confined prostate cancer. After surgery, prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels drop to low levels which can be measured with ultrasensitive assays. This has been described in the literature for open RRP but not for laparoscopic RRP. This paper describes PSA changes in the first 300 consecutive patients undergoing non-robotic laparoscopic RRP by a single surgeon. To use ultrasensitive PSA (uPSA) assays to measure a PSA nadir in patients having laparoscopic radical prostatectomy below levels recorded by standard assays. The aim was to use uPSA nadir at 3 months' post-prostatectomy as an early surrogate end-point of oncological outcome. In so doing, laparoscopic oncological outcomes could then be compared with published results from other open radical prostatectomy series with similar end-points. Furthermore, this end-point could be used in the assessment of the surgeon's learning curve. Prospective, comprehensive, demographic, clinical, biochemical and operative data were collected from all patients undergoing non-robotic laparoscopic RRP. We present data from the first 300 consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic RRP by a single surgeon. uPSA was measured every 3 months post surgery. Median follow-up was 29 months (minimum 3 months). The likelihood of reaching a uPSA of learning curve for laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and in bench-marking performance. With experience, a surgeon can achieve in excess of an 80% chance of obtaining a uPSA nadir of < or = 0.01 ng/ml at 3 months after laparoscopic RRP for a British population. This is equivalent to most published open series.

  19. Socioeconomic status is an independent predictor of biochemical recurrence among patients with prostate cancer who undergo radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Srougi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Socioeconomic status (SES may influence cancer characteristics and behavior in several aspects. We analyzed PCa characteristics and behavior among low income uninsured men, and compare them to high income patients with health insurance in a developing country. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective case-control study was performed on 934 patients with clinically localized PCa who underwent radical prostatectomy between March, 1999 and July, 2009. Patients were divided in two groups, according to their SES. In group 1 (n=380, all had low income, low educational levels and couldn't afford medical insurance. In group 2 (n=554, all had higher income, higher education and had medical insurance. RESULTS: Patients from group 1 were older, had higher Gleason scores, higher rates of seminal vesicle and bladder neck involvement. The Kaplan Meier disease-free survival curve demonstrated that after a follow-up of four years, about 50% of uninsured patients had biochemical recurrence, versus 21% of insured patients (Log rank test: p < 0.001. A multivariate Cox regression analysis for the risk of disease recurrence demonstrated that only PSA levels, Gleason score, seminal vesicle involvement and SES were statistically significant variables. Patients with a low SES presented 1.8 times the risk of recurrence as compared to patients with a high SES. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with low SES were older, presented more aggressive PCa characteristics and a high rate of disease recurrence. A low SES constituted an independent predictor for disease recurrence.

  20. Impact of a low-volume laparoscopic radical prostatectomy learning curve on perioperative outcomes: is it acceptable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gioia, Ricardo F; Rubinstein, Mauricio; Velasque, Luciane; Rubinstein, Irineu

    2013-10-01

    The reproducibility of high-volume published series of laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) is still debatable. Many questions about its implementation, safety, and number of procedures required to achieve competence and improvement of outcomes with the technique remain unclear, and a learning curve study is crucial to investigate the acceptable performance of this advanced, minimally invasive procedure. Between 2004 and 2011, 240 consecutive patients underwent an LRP performed by a single surgeon and were divided into the first, second, and third groups of 80 patients each. Perioperative and oncologic outcomes were compared across the groups to assess the impact of the learning curve for LRP. All surgical complications were classified using the Clavien-Dindo system (CDS). Mean (range) patient age was 61 (43-78) years. The mean (range) level of prostate-specific antigen was 6.47 (3-18) ng/mL. The mean (range) Gleason sum was 6 (5-9). There was a significant reduction in the mean operative time (Plearning curve (Plearning curve development, in which up to 80 cases were necessary to create a plateau to improve faster perioperative parameters, although, from the plateau created, it requires a very large number of surgeries for slightly better, additional overall benefits. In spite of its complexity and steep learning curve, new surgeons can be encouraged in the LRP technique with mentorship training without compromising overall outcomes, permitting the wide spread of an alternative minimally invasive procedure in low-volume centers.

  1. Role of short-term antibiotic therapy at the moment of catheter removal after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinochet, Rodrigo; Nogueira, Lucas; Cronin, Angel M; Katz, Darren; Rabbani, Farhang; Guillonneau, Bertrand; Touijer, Karim

    2010-01-01

    To assess the role of short-term antibiotic therapy (ABT) in preventing urinary tract infection (UTI) after catheter removal following laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP). 729 consecutive patients underwent LRP by one of two surgeons. One surgeon systematically prescribed a 3-day course of ABT (ciprofloxacin) starting the day before catheter removal; the other surgeon did not. The groups were compared for the incidence of symptomatic UTI occurring within 6 weeks after catheter removal. ABT was given to 261 of 713 patients (37%), while the remaining 452 patients (63%) did not receive ABT. After catheter removal, UTI was observed less frequently among patients receiving ABT: 3.1 vs. 7.3% in those not receiving ABT (p = 0.019). A number needed to treat to prevent 1 UTI is 24. Hospital readmission for febrile UTI was observed only in patients who did not receive ABT (n = 5, 1.1 vs. 0%, p = 0.16). One would need to prescribe ABT for 91 LRP patients to prevent 1 case of febrile UTI. ABT at the time of catheter removal reduced the risk of postoperative UTI after LRP. One would need to prescribe ABT to 24 patients to prevent 1 case of UTI. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Outcome after PSMA PET/CT based radiotherapy in patients with biochemical persistence or recurrence after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Hegemann, Nina-Sophie; Fendler, Wolfgang Peter; Ilhan, Harun; Herlemann, Annika; Buchner, Alexander; Stief, Christian; Eze, Chukwuka; Rogowski, Paul; Li, Minglun; Bartenstein, Peter; Ganswindt, Ute; Belka, Claus

    2018-03-02

    PSMA PET/CT visualises prostate cancer residual disease or recurrence at lower PSA levels compared to conventional imaging and results in a change of treatment in a remarkable high number of patients. Radiotherapy with dose escalation to the former prostate bed has been associated with improved biochemical recurrence-free survival. Thus, it can be hypothesised that PSMA PET/CT-based radiotherapy might improve the prognosis of these patients. One hundred twenty-nine patients underwent PSMA PET/CT due to biochemical persistence (52%) or recurrence (48%) after radical prostatectomy without evidence of distant metastases (February 2014-May 2017) and received PSMA PET/CT-based radiotherapy. Biochemical recurrence free survival (PSA ≤ 0.2 ng/ml) was defined as the study endpoint. Patients with biochemical persistence were significantly more often high-risk patients with significantly shorter time interval before PSMA PET/CT than patients with biochemical recurrence. Patients with biochemical recurrence had significantly more often no evidence of disease or local recurrence only in PSMA PET/CT, whereas patients with biochemical persistence had significantly more often lymph node involvement. Seventy-three patients were started on antiandrogen therapy prior to radiotherapy due to macroscopic disease in PSMA PET/CT. Cumulatively, 70 (66-70.6) Gy was delivered to local macroscopic tumor, 66 (63-66) Gy to the prostate fossa, 61.6 (53.2-66) Gy to PET-positive lymph nodes and 50.4 (45-52.3) Gy to lymphatic pathways. Median PSA after radiotherapy was 0.07 ng/ml with 74% of patients having a PSA ≤ 0.1 ng/ml. After a median follow-up of 20 months, median PSA was 0.07 ng/ml with ongoing antiandrogen therapy in 30 patients. PET-positive patients without antiandrogen therapy at last follow-up (45 patients) had a median PSA of 0.05 ng/ml with 89% of all patients, 94% of patients with biochemical recurrence and 82% of patients with biochemical persistence having a

  3. First case of robotic laparoendoscopic single-site radical prostatectomy with single-site VesPa platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattevi, D; Luciani, L G; Vattovani, V; Chiodini, S; Puglisi, M; Malossini, G

    2017-07-07

    This study aimed at reporting our first experience with robotic laparoendoscopic single-site radical prostatectomy (R-LESS-RP) with single-site VesPa platform (Intuitive Surgical Inc.). A 68-year-old-man presenting with a cT1c adenocarcinoma Gleason Score 3 + 4 = 7 in 4/12 bilateral cores underwent a transperitoneal robotic LESS-RP with a single-site Vespa platform. Initial PSA, prostate weight, and body mass index (BMI) were 4.4 ng/ml, 45 g, and 25, respectively. Instruments and camera cross within the Single-Site port; the da Vinci System software detects and reassigns the user's hands with the instruments position. The single-site port is inserted through a 2-cm intraumbilical incision. The robotic 8.5 mm scope and two surgical curved instruments (fenestrated bipolar forceps and cautery hook) are introduced through the ports and used for most of the procedure, whereas a wristed needle driver on the right hand is used for the reconstructive steps. An additional 12 mm port (Air Seal, SurgiQuest) is placed in a midline between the umbilicus and the right iliac spine in order to facilitate table assistance during surgery and to place a drain at the end of the procedure.Operative time and blood loss were 300 min and 400 mL, respectively. The postoperative course was uneventful. The drain and the catheter were removed on days 1 and 6, respectively. The patient experienced a temporary mild stress incontinence (one pad at sixth month) and erectile dysfunction.Our first robotic laparoendoscopic single-site radical prostatectomy (R-LESS-RP) with the single-site VesPa platform was associated with acceptable operative times and perioperative outcome. This procedure is feasible without complications, provided that a proper patient selection has occurred. Limited movements together with the lack of the fourth robotic arm require a considerable expertise in robotic surgery. Some tricks can help overcome technical limitations. The Robotic LESS-RP reduces in some

  4. Pathological and 3 Tesla Volumetric Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predictors of Biochemical Recurrence after Robotic Assisted Radical Prostatectomy: Correlation with Whole Mount Histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Nelly; Shen, Luyao; Khoshnoodi, Pooria; Alcalá, Héctor E; Yu, Weixia; Hsu, William; Reiter, Robert E; Lu, David Y; Raman, Steven S

    2017-11-08

    We sought to identify the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging variables predictive of biochemical recurrence after robotic assisted radical prostatectomy in patients who underwent multiparametric 3 Tesla prostate magnetic resonance imaging. We performed an institutional review board approved, HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) compliant, single arm observational study of 3 Tesla multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging prior to robotic assisted radical prostatectomy from December 2009 to March 2016. Clinical, magnetic resonance imaging and pathological information, and clinical outcomes were compiled. Biochemical recurrence was defined as prostate specific antigen greater 0.2 ng/cc or greater. Univariate and multivariate regression analysis was performed. Biochemical recurrence had developed in 62 of the 255 men (24.3%) included in the study at a median followup 23.5 months. Compared to the subcohort without biochemical recurrence the subcohort with biochemical recurrence had a greater proportion of patients with a high grade biopsy Gleason score, higher preoperative prostate specific antigen (7.4 vs 5.6 ng/ml), intermediate and high D'Amico classifications, larger tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging (0.66 vs 0.30 ml), higher PI-RADS® (Prostate Imaging-Reporting and Data System) version 2 category lesions, a greater proportion of intermediate and high grade radical prostatectomy Gleason score lesions, higher pathological T3 stage (all p <0.01) and a higher positive surgical margin rate (19.3% vs 7.8%, p = 0.016). On multivariable analysis only tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging (adjusted OR 1.57, p = 0.016), pathological T stage (adjusted OR 2.26, p = 0.02), positive surgical margin (adjusted OR 5.0, p = 0.004) and radical prostatectomy Gleason score (adjusted OR 2.29, p = 0.004) predicted biochemical recurrence. In this cohort tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging and pathological variables, including Gleason

  5. Combined Whole Body and Multiparametric Prostate Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a 1-Step Approach to the Simultaneous Assessment of Local Recurrence and Metastatic Disease after Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Nicola L; Sala, Evis; Benz, Matthias; Landa, Jonathan; Scardino, Peter; Scher, Howard I; Hricak, Hedvig; Vargas, Hebert A

    2017-07-01

    We report our initial experience with whole body and dedicated prostate magnetic resonance imaging as a single examination to assess local recurrence and metastatic disease in patients with suspected recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy. In this institutional review board approved, retrospective, single center study 76 consecutive patients with clinically suspected recurrent prostate cancer following radical prostatectomy underwent combined whole body and dedicated prostate magnetic resonance imaging at a single session from October 2014 to January 2016. Scans were evaluated to detect disease in the prostate bed and regional nodes, and at distant sites. Comparison was made to other imaging tests, and prostate bed, node and bone biopsies performed within 90 days. Whole body and dedicated prostate magnetic resonance imaging was completed successfully in all patients. Median prostate specific antigen was 0.36 ng/ml (range less than 0.05 to 56.12). Whole body and dedicated prostate magnetic resonance imaging identified suspected disease recurrence in 16 of 76 patients (21%), including local recurrence in the radical prostatectomy bed in 6, nodal metastases in 3, osseous metastases in 4 and multifocal metastatic disease in 3. In 43 patients at least 1 standard staging scan was done in addition to whole body and dedicated prostate magnetic resonance imaging. Concordance was demonstrated between the imaging modalities in 36 of 43 cases (84%). All metastatic lesions detected by other imaging tests were detected on magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, the magnetic resonance imaging modality detected osseous metastases in 4 patients with false-negative findings on other imaging tests, including 2 bone scans and 3 computerized tomography scans. It also excluded osseous disease in 1 patient with positive 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computerized tomography and subsequent negative bone biopsy. Combined whole body and dedicated

  6. Does repeat biopsy affect the prognosis of patients with prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy? Analysis by the number of cores taken at initial biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Myungchan; You, Dalsan; Yoon, Jong Hyun; Jeong, In Gab; Song, Cheryn; Hong, Jun Hyuk; Ahn, Hanjong; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2012-05-01

    Study Type - Therapy (case series) Level of Evidence 4 What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? To date, studies to evaluate clinical significance of prostate cancer detected on repeat biopsy in patients who underwent radical prostatectomy have yielded inconsistent results. The present study confirms that prostate cancer diagnosed after repeat biopsies is related to better pathological outcomes after radical prostatectomy, but not predictive of biochemical recurrence. Additionally, we find that the number of cores taken at initial biopsy do not affect the association between the number of previous biopsies and the prognosis. To determine whether repeat prostate biopsies are associated with more favourable prognoses compared with diagnosis at initial biopsy in patients who undergo radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer and to determine if this association is affected by the number of cores taken at initial biopsy. We reviewed 1147 patients with prostate cancer from 1991 to 2008. Patients were stratified into two groups by the number of biopsies before diagnosis (initial biopsy vs repeat biopsy: at least two biopsies). The effects of several variables on pathological outcomes and biochemical recurrence-free and systemic progression-free survivals were assessed. Of the 1147 patients, 1064 (92.8%) were diagnosed with cancer at first biopsy and 83 (7.2%) at repeat biopsy. Compared with patients diagnosed at initial biopsy, those diagnosed at repeat biopsies were more likely to have a lower clinical stage (cT1c: 79.5% vs 55.5%, P number (8.3 vs 8.7, P= 0.373). Five-year biochemical recurrence-free and progression-free survival rates did not show significant differences between the two groups (88.8% vs 82.2%, P= 0.078; 100.0% vs 96.5%, P= 0.105, respectively), and these results were not affected by the number of cores taken at initial biopsy. Although prostate cancer diagnosed after repeat biopsies was related to better pathological outcomes after

  7. Development and validation of 3D printed virtual models for robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and partial nephrectomy: urologists' and patients' perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porpiglia, Francesco; Bertolo, Riccardo; Checcucci, Enrico; Amparore, Daniele; Autorino, Riccardo; Dasgupta, Prokar; Wiklund, Peter; Tewari, Ashutosh; Liatsikos, Evangelos; Fiori, Cristian

    2018-02-01

    To test the face and content validity of 3D virtual-rendered printed models used before robot-assisted prostate cancer and nephron-sparing surgery. Patients who underwent live surgery during an international urological meeting organized in January 2017 were enrolled. Those with organ-confined prostate cancer underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Patients with a single renal tumor underwent minimally invasive nephron-sparing surgery. High-resolution (HR) imaging was obtained for all patients. Those with kidney tumors received contrast-enhanced CT scan with angiography; those with prostate cancer underwent mp-MRI. Images in DICOM format were processed by dedicated software. The first step was the rendering of a 3D virtual model. The models were then printed. They were presented during the live surgery of the urological meeting. All the participants and the operated patients were asked to fill a questionnaire about their opinion expressed in Likert scale (1-10) about the use and application of the 3D printed models. 18 patients were enrolled, including 8 undergoing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and 10 undergoing minimally invasive partial nephrectomy. For each patient, a virtual 3D printed model was created. The attendants rated the utility of printed models in surgical planning, anatomical representation and the role of technology in surgical training as 8/10, 10/10 and 9/10, respectively. All patients reported favorable feedbacks (from 9 to 10/10) about the use of the technology during the case discussion with the surgeon. In our experience, 3D printing technology has been perceived as a useful tool for the purpose of surgical planning, physician education/training and patient counseling. Further researches are expected to increase the level of evidence.

  8. ROBOT-ASSISTED RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY: ANALYSIS OF THE FIRST 80 CASES

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    D. Yu. Pushkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. As a common disease, prostate cancer (PC has taken now first place among all malignancies in many countries of the world.The authors have analyzed the results of their series of robot-assisted radical laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP in patients with PC. They also present a number of surgical techniques that may be useful for novice surgeons. Materials and methods. In November 2008 to November 2009, the Department of Urology, Moscow State University of Medicine and Dentistry, performed 80 RALPs using the da Vinci S surgical robotic system. The patients’ mean age was 63.7 (49–71 years; the mean blood level of total prostate-specific antigen was 6.1 (2.1–20.84 ng/ml; the mean prostate volume was 44 (18–94 cm3, as evidenced by transrectal ultrasound study. The authors analyzed the following indicators: operating time, degree of blood loss, conversion of surgical intervention,degrees of intra- and postoperative complications, and oncological and functional results. Results. In our series, RALP was performed without preserving neurovascular bundles or by using a nerve-sparing procedure in 66 (82.5% and 14 (17.5%, respectively; 22 (27.5% patients underwent lymphadenectomy. The average length of hospital stay was 7 (4–21 days; the mean time of urethral catheter removal was 10 (6–21 days postoperatively. The mean time of surgical intervention was 174 (121–276 min. Mean blood loss was 248 (35–1950 ml. Postmortem study revealed a positive surgical margin in 19 (24% cases and tumor invasion into the seminal vesicles in 5 (6% patients. Stages pT2 and pT3 were found in 56 (70% and 24 (30%, respectively; total Gleason scores were 6 (3+3, 7 (3+4, 7 (4+3, 8 (4+4 in 38 (47.5%, 35 (43.75%, 5 (6.25%, and 2 (2.5% patients, respectively. Among 34 patients examined 3 months after RALP, 28 (82.4% patients completely retained urine; 5 (14.7% applied not more than a pad a day. In patients with preserved erectile function, the

  9. Posterior musculofascial reconstruction after radical prostatectomy: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, Bernardo; Cozzi, Gabriele; Spinelli, Matteo G; Coelho, Rafael F; Patel, Vipul R; Tewari, Ashutosh; Wiklund, Peter; Graefen, Markus; Mottrie, Alex; Gaboardi, Franco; Gill, Inderbir S; Montorsi, Francesco; Artibani, Walter; Rocco, Francesco

    2012-11-01

    In 2001, Rocco et al. described a surgical technique whose aim was the reconstruction of the posterior musculofascial plate after radical prostatectomy (RP) to improve early return to urinary continence. Since then, many surgeons have applied this technique-either as it was described or with some modification-to open, laparoscopic, and robot-assisted RP. To review the outcomes reported in comparative studies analysing the influence of reconstruction of the posterior aspect of the rhabdosphincter after RP. The main outcome evaluated was urinary continence at 3-7 d, 30-45 d, 90 d, 180 d, and 1 yr after catheter removal. A systematic review of the literature was performed in November 2011, searching the Medline, Embase, Scopus, and Web of Science databases. A "free-text" protocol using the terms posterior reconstruction of the rhabdosphincter, posterior rhabdosphincter, and early continence was applied. Studies published only as abstracts and reports from meetings were not included in this review. One thousand seven records were retrieved from the Medline database, 1541 from the Embase database, 1357 from the Scopus database, and 1041 from the Web of Science database. The authors reviewed the records to identify studies comparing cohorts of patients who underwent RP with or without restoration of the posterior aspect of the rhabdosphincter. Only papers evaluating use of this technique as the only technical modification among the groups were included. A cumulative analysis was conducted using Review Manager v.5.1 software (Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, UK). Eleven studies were identified in the literature search, including two randomised controlled trials (RCTs), which were negative studies. The cumulative analysis of comparative studies showed that reconstruction of the posterior musculofascial plate improves early return of continence within the first 30 d after RP (p=0.004), while continence rates 90 d after surgery are not affected by use of the reconstruction

  10. Radical prostatectomy versus external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Comparison of treatment outcomes

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    Kim, Yeon-Joo; Cho, Kwan Ho; Lee, Kang Hyun; Moon, Sung Ho; Kim, Tae Hyun; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Joo-Young; Kim, Young-kyung; Lee, Se Byeong [National Cancer Center, Research Institute and Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Pyo, Hong Ryull [Sungkyunkwan University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-01

    We retrospectively compared the treatment outcomes of localized prostate cancer between radical prostatectomy (RP) and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). We retrospectively analyzed 738 patients with localized prostate cancer who underwent either RP (n = 549) or EBRT (n = 189) with curative intent at our institution between March 2001 and December 2011. Biochemical failure was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of ≥ 0.2 ng/ml in the RP group and the nadir of + ≥ 2 ng/ml in the EBRT group. The median (range) follow-up duration was 48.8 months (0.7-133.2 months) and 48.7 months (1.0-134.8 months) and the median age was 66 years (45-89 years) and 71 years (51-84 years; p < 0.001) in the RP and EBRT groups, respectively. Overall, 21, 42, and 36 % of patients in the RP group, and 15, 27, and 58 % of patients in the EBRT group were classified as low, intermediate, and high risk, respectively (p < 0.001). Androgen-deprivation therapy was more common in the EBRT group (59 vs. 27 %, respectively; p < 0.001). The 8-year biochemical failure-free survival rates were 44 and 72 % (p < 0.001) and the disease-specific survival rates were 98 % and 97 % (p = 0.543) in the RP and EBRT groups, respectively. Although the EBRT group included more high-risk patients than did the RP group, the outcomes of EBRT were not inferior to those of RP. Our data suggest that EBRT is a viable alternative to RP for treating localized prostate cancer. (orig.) [German] Wir vergleichen retrospektiv die Verfahrensergebnisse des lokal begrenzten Prostatakarzinoms zwischen radikaler Prostatektomie (RP) und externer Strahlentherapie (EBRT). Wir analysieren zurueckblickend 738 Patienten mit lokal begrenztem Prostatakarzinom, die zwischen Maerz 2001 und Dezember 2011 in unserem Institut entweder eine RP (n = 549) oder eine EBRT (n = 189) mit kurativer Intention durchliefen. Biochemischer Fehler wurde als prostataspezifisches Antigen (PSA) ≥ 0,2 ng/ml in der RP-Gruppe und ein Nadir +

  11. Concomitant mediastinal and extrarenal retroperitoneal angiomyolipomas in a patient who previously underwent ipsilateral radical nephrectomy

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    Carl Sheng-Chen Wen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The association of the tuberous sclerosis complex with angiomyolipoma (AML arising from the retroperitoneum and mediastinum has not been reported in the literature. We present the first case in which a patient presented with a combined retroperitoneal extrarenal and posterior mediastinal AML. Interestingly, the ipsilateral retroperitoneal AML emerged 15 years after radical nephrectomy for the left renal AML.

  12. Serum lipid profiles: novel biomarkers predicting advanced prostate cancer in patients receiving radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui-Ming Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the role of serum lipid profiles as novel biomarkers in predicting pathological characteristics of prostate cancer (PCa. We retrospectively analyzed 322 consecutive patients with clinically localized PCa receiving radical prostatectomy (RP and extended pelvic lymphadenectomy. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate the prostatectomy Gleason score (pGS, pathological stage and lymph node involvement (LNI in RP specimens. Preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA levels, biopsy GS (bGS, and preoperative tumor, node, metastasis staging were used as basic variables to predict postoperative pathological characteristics. Preoperative serum lipid profiles were introduced as potential predictors. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve was used to determine predictive efficacy. Significant differences in pathological characteristics were observed among patients with normal and abnormal total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL levels, with the exception of pGS in the TG group. Multivariable regression analysis revealed that the odds ratio for high levels of TC for LNI compared with normal TC levels was 6.386 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.510-27.010, 3.270 (95% CI: 1.470-7.278 for high levels of TG for pT3-4 disease, and 2.670 (95% CI: 1.134-6.287 for high levels of LDL for pGS. The area under the ROC curve of the models with dyslipidemia was larger than that in models without dyslipidemia, in predicting pathological characteristics. Abnormal TC, TG, and LDL levels are significantly associated with postoperative pathological status in PCa patients. Together with preoperative PSA levels, bGS, and clinical stage, dyslipidemia is more accurate in predicting pathological characteristics.

  13. [Interest of surgical companionship during the training period of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Pouget, L; Nouhaud, F X; Blah, M; Defortescu, G; Ndangang, M; Grise, P; Pfister, C

    2017-04-01

    Study of the learning curve of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, evaluating intraoperative difficulties and postoperative complications according to Clavien-Dindo classification. Retrospective study of our first 157 consecutive patients treated with robot-assisted prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer between September 2011 and December 2014. Comparison of learning for each group of 50 procedures and then comparison between patients operated on by a pair of two seniors specially trained for robotic surgery and patients operated on by one mixed pair including a surgeon junior coached by one senior of the first group. Only postoperative complications decreased significantly from the 51st patient (P=0.04). The curves showing the evolution of the operative time decreased with a parallel trend between the two pairs, but with more variability in the mixed pair. There was no significant difference in terms of intraoperative difficulties (P=0.59), nor postoperative complications (P=0.56) mainly of grade 2. The blood loss, transfusion rate, duration of hospitalization and readmission rates did not differ. Lymph node dissection did not affect outcomes. For oncological results, the overall rate of positive surgical margins (R+) was 30.6 % in the initial pair against 24.2 % in the mixed group with no significant difference. Nevertheless, the subpopulation study objectified a R+ rate of 12.86 % for pT2 against 42.85 % for pT3. The early involvement of a junior surgeon who did not receive specific training, but benefiting from the guidance of a senior surgeon, did not compromise the results while allowing a faster learning curve with a rate of operative complications close to the one observed by the senior pair. 4. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Vaginal and pelvic recurrence rates based on vaginal cuff length in patients with cervical cancer who underwent radical hysterectomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K; Cho, S Y; Park, S I; Kim, B J; Kim, M H; Choi, S C; Ryu, S Y; Lee, E D

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the association of vaginal cuff length (VCL) with vaginal and pelvic recurrence rates in patients with cervical cancer who underwent radical hysterectomies. The clinicopathologic characteristics were collected from the medical records of 280 patients with cervical cancer who underwent radical hysterectomies. The association of VCL with 3-year vaginal and pelvic recurrence rates was determined using a Z-test. The association of VCL with other clinicopathologic characteristics was also determined. The VCL was not associated with 3-year vaginal and pelvic recurrence rates. The 3-year vaginal recurrence rate was 0%-2% and the 3-year pelvic recurrence rate was 7%-8%, independent of VCL. The VCL and the age of patients had an inverse relationship. However, the VCL was not associated with histologic type, FIGO stage, clinical tumor size, tumor size in the surgical specimen, depth of invasion, lymphovascular space invasion, parametrial involvement, lymph node involvement, and adjuvant therapy. One-hundred ninety of 280 patients (68%) underwent adjuvant therapies following radical hysterectomies. Although it is limited by the high rate of adjuvant therapy, the current study suggested that the VCL following radical hysterectomy in patients with cervical cancer was not associated with vaginal and pelvic recurrence rates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical Significance of Serum Adipokines according to Body Mass Index in Patients with Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Undergoing Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minyong Kang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of 7 circulating adipokines according to body mass index (BMI in Korean men with localized prostate cancer (PCa undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP. Materials and Methods: Sixty-two of 65 prospectively enrolled patients with clinically localized PCa who underwent RP between 2015 and 2016 were evaluated. Patients were classified into 2 groups according to their BMI: non-obese (<25 kg/m2 and obese (≥25 kg/m2. The adipokines evaluated were interleukin-2, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1, chemerin, C-X-C motif chemokine 10, adiponectin, leptin, and resistin. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the independent predictors of advanced tumor stage. Results: We found that obese patients with PCa who underwent RP had a higher incidence of tumors with a high Gleason score (≥8, pathological T3 (pT3 stage, and positive extraprostatic extension than patients with a normal BMI. Additionally, patients with obesity showed significantly lower serum adiponectin and higher serum leptin levels, but did not show differences in other adipokines. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that IGF-1 (odds ratio [OR]=1.03 was identified as a predictor of advanced tumor stage (≥pT3 in the overall population. However, only leptin remained an independent predictive factor for advanced tumor stage (≥pT3 (OR=1.15 in patients with obesity. Conclusions: In conclusion, our results indicate that a higher leptin level in obese men can be considered a risk factor for aggressive PCa. This prospective study provides greater insight into the role of circulating adipokines in Korean patients with PCa undergoing RP, particularly in patients with obesity.

  16. Prostatic fascia and recovery of sexual function after radical prostatectomy: Is it a "Veil of Aphrodite" or "Veil of mystery"!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandhani, Anil

    2009-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is one of the most controversial aspects associated with radical prostatectomy. Since Walsh's description of neurovascular bundle there have been number of articles describing various modification to the technique of bilateral nerve sparing to augment the recovery of sexual function. There is a very thin line between performing an ideal nerve sparing and giving equally good oncological outcome in terms of negative surgical margin. "Veil of Aphrodite" nerve sparing technique was conceptualized by Menon et al. Lately other related terms have emerged in the literature e.g., "high anterior release, "curtain dissection," or "incremental nerve sparing. Does veil technique of radical prostatectomy help improve recovery of sexual function? Do mere presence of nerves in veil account for potency? Are these nerve parasympathetic? This short review tries to find the answer of these questions in contemporary world literature.

  17. Prostatic fascia and recovery of sexual function after radical prostatectomy: Is it a "Veil of Aphrodite" or "Veil of mystery"!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Mandhani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Sexual dysfunction is one of the most controversial aspects associated with radical prostatectomy. Since Walsh′s description of neurovascular bundle there have been number of articles describing various modification to the technique of bilateral nerve sparing to augment the recovery of sexual function. There is a very thin line between performing an ideal nerve sparing and giving equally good oncological outcome in terms of negative surgical margin. ′′Veil of Aphrodite′′ nerve sparing technique was conceptualized by Menon et al. Lately other related terms have emerged in the literature e.g., ′′high anterior release, ′′curtain dissection,′′ or ′′incremental nerve sparing. Does veil technique of radical prostatectomy help improve recovery of sexual function? Do mere presence of nerves in veil account for potency? Are these nerve parasympathetic? This short review tries to find the answer of these questions in contemporary world literature.

  18. Primary Gleason pattern in biopsy Gleason score 7 is predictive of adverse histopathological features and biochemical failure following radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Røder, Martin Andreas; Brasso, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    (p score 3+4 had a significantly lower biochemical failure rate compared with Gleason score 4+3 (p = 0.0035). PSA (p ...OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyse whether primary Gleason pattern in biopsy Gleason score (GS) 7 predicted adverse histopathological features and had an impact on the risk of biochemical failure in a consecutive series of patients undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP). MATERIAL...

  19. Stratified analysis of 800 Asian patients after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy with a median 64 months of follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Raheem, Ali; Kim, Dae Keun; Santok, Glen Denmer; Alabdulaali, Ibrahim; Chung, Byung Ha; Choi, Young Deuk; Rha, Koon Ho

    2016-09-01

    To report the 5-year oncological outcomes of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy from the largest series ever reported from Asia. A retrospective analysis of 800 Asian patients who were treated with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy from July 2005 to May 2010 in the Department of Urology and Urological Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea was carried out. The primary end-point was to evaluate the biochemical recurrence. The secondary end-point was to show the biochemical recurrence-free survival, metastasis-free survival and cancer-specific survival. A total of 197 (24.65%), 218 (27.3%), and 385 (48.1%) patients were classified as low-, intermediate- and high-risk patients according to the D'Amico risk stratification risk criteria, respectively. The median follow-up period was 64 months (interquartile range 28-71 months). The overall incidence of positive surgical margin was 36.6%. There was biochemical recurrence in 183 patients (22.9%), 38 patients (4.8%) developed distant metastasis and 24 patients (3%) died from prostate cancer. Actuarial biochemical recurrence-free survival, metastasis-free survival, and cancer-specific survival rates at 5 years were 76.4%, 94.6% and 96.7%, respectively. Positive lymph node was associated with lower 5-year biochemical recurrence-free survival (9.1%), cancer-specific survival (75.7%) and metastasis-free survival (61.9%) rates (P < 0.001). On multivariable analysis, among all the predictors, positive lymph node was the strongest predictor of biochemical recurrence, cancer-specific survival and metastasis-free survival (P < 0.001). Herein we report the largest robot-assisted radical prostatectomy series from Asia. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy is confirmed to be an oncologically safe procedure that is able to provide effective 5-year cancer control, even in patients with high-risk disease. © 2016 The Japanese Urological Association.

  20. Predictor of response to salvage radiotherapy in patients with PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy. The usefulness of PSA doubling time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numata, Kousaku; Azuma, Koji; Hashine, Katsuyoshi; Sumiyoshi, Yoshiteru

    2005-01-01

    We assessed predictors of response to salvage radiotherapy (sRT) in patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) recurrence after radical prostatectomy. A total of 21 patients receiving sRT for PSA recurrence without systemic progression after radical prostatectomy had medical records available for retrospective review. We defined sRT as external beam radiotherapy for patients with a continuous increase in PSA level≥0.2 ng/ml after radical prostatectomy. Response was defined as achievement of a PSA nadir of ≤0.1 ng/ml. Various pre-treatment parameters were evaluated retrospectively. The median follow-up period after sRT was 38 months. Of the 21 patients, 15 were good responders (71%). The only predictive factor was PSA doubling time (PSADT). Age and PSA level at diagnosis, Gleason score and surgical margin status were not significant predictors of response. The median PSADT in responders was 6.2 months versus 1.9 months in non-responders (P=0.019). The patients with a PSADT of ≥5 months were all responders. PSADT appears to be a good predictor of response to sRT. sRT was especially effective when PSADT was ≥5 months. (author)

  1. Radical prostatectomy for clinical T3 disease: expanding indications while optimizing cancer control and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jennifer R; Fine, Samson W; Zhang, Jingbo; Eastham, James A

    2007-08-01

    A 61-year-old male presented with a history of gradually rising PSA over several years. His PSA had increased from 3.3 to 7 ng/ml over 3 years. Digital rectal examination, prostate biopsy, bone scan, and endorectal MRI were carried out to confirm the diagnosis and evaluate the extent of the cancer, with subsequent histopathologic examination of the radical prostatectomy specimen. Preoperative clinical stage (based on the digital rectal examination alone) was cT3a. Biopsy demonstrated extraprostatic extension in one core (Gleason 9 [4 + 5]). Endorectal MRI suggested a large volume cancer with probable extraprostatic extension in the posterior midline at the apex. Examination of the radical prostatectomy specimen demonstrated a pT3aN0 prostate cancer (Gleason 4 + 3 = 7 with a minor component of Gleason pattern 5). Extraprostatic extension was seen in the right posterior apex in the area of the dominant tumor mass. Surgical margins and seminal vesicles were negative for cancer. Radical retropubic prostatectomy with preservation of both neurovascular bundles plus bilateral pelvic lymph node dissection was performed. Postoperative PSA has been nondetectable. The patient is continent and, with the aid of vardenafil HCl, has erections sufficient for intercourse.

  2. Factors associated with adoption of robotic surgical technology in US hospitals and relationship to radical prostatectomy procedure volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbash, Gabriel I; Friedman, Bernard; Glied, Sherry A; Steiner, Claudia A

    2014-01-01

    Robotic technology has diffused rapidly despite high costs and limited additive reimbursement by major payers. We aimed to identify the factors associated with hospitals' decisions to adopt robotic technology and the consequences of these decisions. This observational study used data on hospitals and market areas from 2005 to 2009. Included were hospitals in census-based statistical areas within states in the State Inpatient Database that participated in the American Hospital Association annual surveys and performed radical prostatectomies. The likelihood that a hospital would acquire a robotic facility and the rates of radical prostatectomy relative to the prevalence of robots in geographic market areas were assessed using multivariable analysis. Hospitals in areas where a higher proportion of other hospitals had already acquired a robot were more likely to acquire one (P=0.012), as were those with more than 300 beds (Phospitals (Ptechnology in the United States. Significantly more radical prostatectomies were performed in hospitals with robots and in market areas of hospitals with robotic technology.

  3. Duration of Androgen Deprivation Therapy Influences Outcomes for Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy Following Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, William C; Schipper, Matthew J; Johnson, Skyler B; Foster, Corey; Li, Darren; Sandler, Howard M; Palapattu, Ganesh S; Hamstra, Daniel A; Feng, Felix Y

    2016-01-01

    Limited data exist to guide the use of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for men treated with radiation therapy (RT) after radical prostatectomy (RP). The optimal duration of ADT in this setting is unknown. To determine if the duration of ADT influences clinical outcomes for men receiving post-RP RT. A total of 680 men who received adjuvant radiation therapy (n=105) or salvage radiation therapy (n=575) between 1986 and 2010 at a single tertiary care institution were reviewed retrospectively. Median follow-up post-RT was 57.8 mo. RT was delivered using three-dimensional conformal or intensity-modulated RT in 1.8-Gy fractions. For patients treated with ADT, >80% were treated with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist with or without a nonsteroidal antiandrogen. Biochemical failure (BF), distant metastasis (DM), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), and overall mortality were assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis and propensity score analysis. Overall, 144 patients (21%) received ADT with post-RP RT, most of whom had high-risk disease features such as Gleason score 8-10, seminal vesicle invasion, or pre-RT prostate-specific antigen >1 ng/ml. Median ADT duration was 12 mo (interquartile range: 6.0-23.7). Patients who received HR]: 2.27; p=0.003) and DM (HR: 2.48; p=0.03) compared with patients receiving ≥12 mo of ADT. The 5-yr rates of DM were 6.0% and 23% for ≥12 and controlling for pretreatment and treatment-related factors, each month of ADT was associated with a decreased risk for BF (HR: 0.95; p=0.0004), DM (HR: 0.88; p=0.0004), and PCSM (HR: 0.90; p=0.037). These findings are limited by the retrospective nature of our analysis. For men with high-risk disease features receiving ADT with post-RP RT, the duration of ADT is associated with clinical outcomes. Our findings suggest that for these men an extended course of ADT ≥12 mo may be preferable. Validation of our findings is needed. We evaluated outcomes for men with high-risk disease features

  4. Ocular parameters before and after steep Trendelenburg positioning for robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizumoto K

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Kyoichi Mizumoto,1 Masahiko Gosho,2 Masayoshi Iwaki,1 Masahiro Zako3 1Department of Ophthalmology, Aichi Medical University, Nagakute, Aichi, Japan; 2Department of Clinical Trial and Clinical Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Asai Hospital, Seto, Aichi, Japan Purpose: Intraocular pressure (IOP increases in patients in a steep Trendelenburg position during robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP. We hypothesized that a steep Trendelenburg position during RALP, an unusual systemic condition involving a transiently increased IOP, may induce ocular pathology that can be detected by detailed evaluations long after the surgery. This study aims to explore ocular structural and functional parameters in patients before and in the long term after the surgery. Patients and methods: A comparative observational study was performed. A total of 44 eyes of 22 male patients scheduled for RALP at Aichi Medical University from August 2012 to July 2013 were included. Clinical parameters before and after RALP were compared. Peri­operative IOP was measured immediately post-induction of anesthesia in the flat supine position (T1, immediately post-steep Trendelenburg position (T2, and prior to returning to a flat supine position while in a steep Trendelenburg position (T3. The thicknesses of the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer, ganglion cell complex (GCC, and central fovea were measured with spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Humphrey perimetry was performed before and at 3 and 6 months after surgery. Results: The average IOPs (mmHg at each stage were T1=10.4, T2=21.7, and T3=29.6, and differed significantly. The mean visual acuity (logarithm of the minimal angle of resolution, IOP, mean deviation, and pattern standard deviation measured by the Humphrey field analyzer showed no statistically significant difference before and after surgery. The ganglion

  5. Vacuum therapy in penile rehabilitation after radical prostatectomy: review of hemodynamic and antihypoxic evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Sheng-Qiang; Gao, Liang; Wei, Qiang; Yuan, Jiuhong

    2016-01-01

    Generally, hypoxia is a normal physiological condition in the flaccid penis, which is interrupted by regular nocturnal erections in men with normal erectile function.1 Lack of spontaneous and nocturnal erections after radical prostatectomy due to neuropraxia results in persistent hypoxia of cavernosal tissue, which leads to apoptosis and degeneration of cavernosal smooth muscle fibers. Therefore, overcoming hypoxia is believed to play a crucial role during neuropraxia. The use of a vacuum erectile device (VED) in penile rehabilitation is reportedly effective and may prevent loss of penile length. The corporal blood after VED use is increased and consists of both arterial and venous blood, as revealed by color Doppler sonography and blood gas analysis. A similar phenomenon was observed in negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). However, NPWT employs a lower negative pressure than VED, and a hypoperfused zone, which increases in response to negative pressure adjacent to the wound edge, was observed. Nonetheless, questions regarding ideal subatmospheric pressure levels, modes of action, and therapeutic duration of VED remain unanswered. Moreover, it remains unclear whether a hypoperfused zone or PO2 gradient appears in the penis during VED therapy. To optimize a clinical VED protocol in penile rehabilitation, further research on the mechanism of VED, especially real-time PO2 measurements in different parts of the penis, should be performed. PMID:26289397

  6. Cranberry intervention in patients with prostate cancer prior to radical prostatectomy. Clinical, pathological and laboratory findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Student, Vladimir; Vidlar, Ales; Bouchal, Jan; Vrbkova, Jana; Kolar, Zdenek; Kral, Milan; Kosina, Pavel; Vostalova, Jitka

    2016-12-01

    Recently, we described an inverse association between cranberry supplementation and serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) in patients with negative biopsy for prostate cancer (PCa) and chronic nonbacterial prostatitis. This double blind placebo controlled study evaluates the effects of cranberry consumption on PSA values and other markers in men with PCa before radical prostatectomy. Prior to surgery, 64 patients with prostate cancer were randomized to a cranberry or placebo group. The cranberry group (n=32) received a mean 30 days of 1500 mg cranberry fruit powder. The control group (n=32) took a similar amount of placebo. Selected blood/urine markers as well as free and total phenolics in urine were measured at baseline and on the day of surgery in both groups. Prostate tissue markers were evaluated after surgery. The serum PSA significantly decreased by 22.5% in the cranberry arm (n=31, Pcranberry supplementation. There were no changes in prostate tissue markers or, composition and concentration of phenolics in urine. Daily consumption of a powdered cranberry fruit lowered serum PSA in patients with prostate cancer. The whole fruit contains constituents that may regulate the expression of androgen-responsive genes.

  7. Vacuum therapy in penile rehabilitation after radical prostatectomy: review of hemodynamic and antihypoxic evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Qiang Qian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Generally, hypoxia is a normal physiological condition in the flaccid penis, which is interrupted by regular nocturnal erections in men with normal erectile function. [1] Lack of spontaneous and nocturnal erections after radical prostatectomy due to neuropraxia results in persistent hypoxia of cavernosal tissue, which leads to apoptosis and degeneration of cavernosal smooth muscle fibers. Therefore, overcoming hypoxia is believed to play a crucial role during neuropraxia. The use of a vacuum erectile device (VED in penile rehabilitation is reportedly effective and may prevent loss of penile length. The corporal blood after VED use is increased and consists of both arterial and venous blood, as revealed by color Doppler sonography and blood gas analysis. A similar phenomenon was observed in negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT. However, NPWT employs a lower negative pressure than VED, and a hypoperfused zone, which increases in response to negative pressure adjacent to the wound edge, was observed. Nonetheless, questions regarding ideal subatmospheric pressure levels, modes of action, and therapeutic duration of VED remain unanswered. Moreover, it remains unclear whether a hypoperfused zone or PO 2 gradient appears in the penis during VED therapy. To optimize a clinical VED protocol in penile rehabilitation, further research on the mechanism of VED, especially real-time PO 2 measurements in different parts of the penis, should be performed.

  8. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy by extraperitoneal access with duplication of the open technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tobias-Machado

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The laparoscopic radical prostatectomy is a continually developing technique. Transperitoneal access has been preferred by the majority of centers that employ this technique. Endoscopic extraperitoneal access is used by a few groups, nevertheless it is currently receiving a higher acceptance. In general, the antegrade technique is used, with dissection from the bladder neck to the prostate apex. The objective of the present paper is to describe the extraperitoneal technique with reproduction of the open surgery's surgical steps. SURGICAL TECHNIQUE: With this technique, the dissection of the prostate apex is performed and, following the section of the urethra while preserving the sphincteric apparatus, the Foley catheter is externally tied and internally recovered, which allows cranial traction, similarly to the way it is performed in conventional surgery. The retroprostatic space is posteriorly dissected and the seminal vesicles are identified by anterior and posterior approach, obtaining with this method an optimal exposure of the posterolateral pedicles and the prostate contour. The initial impression is that this technique does not present higher bleeding rate or difficulty level when compared with antegrade surgery. Potential advantages of this technique would be the greater familiarity with surgical steps, isolated extraperitoneal drainage of urine and secretions and a good definition of prostate limits and lateral pedicles, which are critical factors for preserving the neurovascular bundles and avoiding positive surgical margins. A higher number of cases and a long-term follow-up will demonstrate its actual value as a technical option for endoscopic access to the prostate.

  9. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for prostate cancer-a comparative study including radical prostatectomy specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toner, Liam; Papa, Nathan; Perera, Marlon; Katelaris, Nikolas; Weerakoon, Mahesha; Chin, Kwang; Harewood, Laurence; Bolton, Damien M; Lawrentschuk, Nathan

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic and staging ability of multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) compared to radical prostatectomy (RP) specimens after dissemination of this technology to several centres. mpMRI is an evolving technique aiming to improve upon the diagnostic sensitivity of prostate biopsy for the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Differences in interpretation, expertise and application of mpMRI are responsible for the range of reported results. This retrospective clinical study was conducted with consecutive patients through an electronic database of tertiary hospitals and adjacent private urology practices in Australia. Patients having undergone RP were assessed for the presence of a pre-operative mpMRI performed between 2013 and 2015 which was evaluated against the reference standard of the RP whole-mount specimen. MRI reports were evaluated using the Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS). In our cohort of 152 patients, the sensitivity and specificity of mpMRI (PI-RADS ≥ 4) for prostate cancer (Gleason ≥ 4 + 3) detection were 83 and 47%, respectively. For the identification of extraprostatic disease, the sensitivity and specificity were 29 and 94%, respectively. These results represent a 'real-world' approach to mpMRI and appear comparable to other single-centre studies. MRI staging information should be interpreted in context with other risk factors for extraprostatic disease. mpMRI has a useful role as an adjunct for prostate cancer diagnosis and directing management towards improving patient outcomes.

  10. Effects of Obesity on the Perioperative Results and Continence Status in Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy

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    Onur Kaygısız

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the effects of obesity on the surgical success and perioperative results and continence status in laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP. Materials and Methods: The results of 300 consecutive patients undergoing LRP between April 2004 and January 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. Twenty patients were excluded from the study, thus, 280 patients remained. The patients were separated into 3 groups according to their body mass index. Based on this classification, group 1 (30 kg/m2 was obese. The demographic data, intraoperative results, pathological results, and states of continence were compared among the groups. Results: There were 81 patients in group 1, 152 patients in group 2, and 47 patients in group 3. There were no significant differences when the groups were compared according to age and prostate specific antigen values. The intraoperative blood loss was high in group 3 only. Moreover, the estimated blood loss, transfusion, operative time, bilateral nerve-sparing rate, hospitalization days, and complication rate were similar between the groups. There were no significant differences when the pathological results were compared according to the positive surgical margins and Gleason scores. Although the continence rates in group 3 were significantly low 6 months after the operation (p<0.05, the results were similar at 1 year (p=0.738. Conclusion: LRP can be applied confidently in obese patients as well as normal and overweight patients.

  11. Retropubic radical prostatectomy: Clinicopathological observations and outcome analysis of 428 consecutive patients

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    Jagdeesh N Kulkarni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : We report the outcome analysis of retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP performed in 428 patients in terms of pathological findings, complications, and survival. Materials and Methods : Systematically recorded case reports forms of consecutive 428 RRPs done over a 14-year period were analyzed using the SPSS 14 software. Secondary analysis was done to evaluate era specific (pre and post 2002 changes in clinical features and survivals. Results : Seven-year overall survival (OAS, cancer-specific survival (CSS, and event-free survival (EFS was 83.2%, 82.8%, and 69.8% respectively in our series. Era-specific survival showed higher CSS post 2002, and there was an increase in presentation with organ-confined disease. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed statistically significant impact on era specific outcome. With the improvement in techniques decrease in complications rate and increase in quality of life was noted. Conclusions : Our series spanning over decade demonstrates that RRP is viable option to offer cure to organ-confined carcinoma prostate. Further, there is evidence of stage migration and improvements in outcome in post 2002 patients. Although our series is modest in number, the success rates and outcome data matches those reported in the literature.

  12. Advanced Imaging for the Early Diagnosis of Local Recurrence Prostate Cancer after Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Panebianco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently the diagnosis of local recurrence of prostate cancer (PCa after radical prostatectomy (RT is based on the onset of biochemical failure which is defined by two consecutive values of prostate-specific antigen (PSA higher than 0.2 ng/mL. The aim of this paper was to review the current roles of advanced imaging in the detection of locoregional recurrence. A nonsystematic literature search using the Medline and Cochrane Library databases was performed up to November 2013. Bibliographies of retrieved and review articles were also examined. Only those articles reporting complete data with clinical relevance for the present review were selected. This review article is divided into two major parts: the first one considers the role of PET/CT in the restaging of PCa after RP; the second part is intended to provide the impact of multiparametric-MRI (mp-MRI in the depiction of locoregional recurrence. Published data indicate an emerging role for mp-MRI in the depiction of locoregional recurrence, while the performance of PET/CT still remains unclear. Moreover Mp-MRI, thanks to functional techniques, allows to distinguish between residual glandular healthy tissue, scar/fibrotic tissue, granulation tissue, and tumour recurrence and it may also be able to assess the aggressiveness of nodule recurrence.

  13. Erectile dysfunction post-radical prostatectomy – a challenge for both patient and physician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratu, O; Oprea, I; Marcu, D; Spinu, D; Niculae, A; Geavlete, B; Mischianu, D

    2017-01-01

    Post-radical prostatectomy erectile dysfunction (post RP ED) is a major postoperative complication with a great impact on the quality of life of the patients. Until present, no proper algorithm or guideline based on the clinical trials has been established for the management of post RP ED. According to literature, it is better to initiate a penile rehabilitation program as soon as possible after surgery than doing nothing, in order to prevent and limit the postoperative local hypoxygenation and fibrosis. The results of numerous clinical trials regarding the effectiveness of the phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors therapy on post RP ED have made them the gold standard treatment. Encouraging results have been achieved in studies with vacuum erectile devices, intraurethral suppositories with alprostadil and intracavernosal injections, but due to their side effects, especially in the cases of intracavernosal injections and intraurethral suppositories, their clinical use was limited therefore making them a second line option for the post RP ED treatment. What should not be forgotten is that penile implant prosthesis has proven very effective, numerous studies confirming high rates of satisfaction for both patients and partners. PMID:28255370

  14. Vacuum therapy in penile rehabilitation after radical prostatectomy: review of hemodynamic and antihypoxic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Sheng-Qiang; Gao, Liang; Wei, Qiang; Yuan, Jiuhong

    2016-01-01

    Generally, hypoxia is a normal physiological condition in the flaccid penis, which is interrupted by regular nocturnal erections in men with normal erectile function. [1] Lack of spontaneous and nocturnal erections after radical prostatectomy due to neuropraxia results in persistent hypoxia of cavernosal tissue, which leads to apoptosis and degeneration of cavernosal smooth muscle fibers. Therefore, overcoming hypoxia is believed to play a crucial role during neuropraxia. The use of a vacuum erectile device (VED) in penile rehabilitation is reportedly effective and may prevent loss of penile length. The corporal blood after VED use is increased and consists of both arterial and venous blood, as revealed by color Doppler sonography and blood gas analysis. A similar phenomenon was observed in negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). However, NPWT employs a lower negative pressure than VED, and a hypoperfused zone, which increases in response to negative pressure adjacent to the wound edge, was observed. Nonetheless, questions regarding ideal subatmospheric pressure levels, modes of action, and therapeutic duration of VED remain unanswered. Moreover, it remains unclear whether a hypoperfused zone or PO 2 gradient appears in the penis during VED therapy. To optimize a clinical VED protocol in penile rehabilitation, further research on the mechanism of VED, especially real-time PO 2 measurements in different parts of the penis, should be performed.

  15. Early urinary continence recovery after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in older Australian men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basto, Marnique Y; Vidyasagar, Chinni; te Marvelde, Luc; Freeborn, Helen; Birch, Emma; Landau, Adam; Murphy, Declan G; Moon, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    To compare the recovery of urinary continence (UC) after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) in men aged ≥70 and continent and mean pads/day at 4-6 weeks, and 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after RARP. Of the 262 men, 9% (24) were aged ≥70 years. Older men had higher PSA levels (P = 0.007) and clinical stages (P continent (P = 0.08) than their younger counterparts; however, by 3 months and all time-points thereafter there was no difference. The 12-month UC rates were 89% and 92% for men aged <70 and ≥70 years, respectively. Neither age, body mass index, D'Amico risk group, nerve sparing nor use of Rocco suture were predictors of time to UC recovery. UC recovery after RARP in men aged ≥70 years appears comparable to younger men and therefore not a reason to deny older men with a reasonable life-expectancy curative surgical treatment of localised prostate cancer. © 2014 The Authors. BJU International © 2014 BJU International.

  16. Return to work and sick leave after radical prostatectomy: a prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Sigrun; Steinsvik, Eivind A S; Dahl, Alv A; Loge, Jon Håvard; Cvancarova, Milada; Fosså, Sophie D

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate work status at three months after radical prostatectomy (RP) in patients with prostate cancer (PCa) in relation to socio-demographics, urinary incontinence and bother, medical complications health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and surgical methods. To identify pre-RP available factors that can predict the duration of immediate post-RP sick leave. This prospective questionnaire-based study included 264 men with PCaPatients' work status was defined as either "stable/improved" or "declined" at three months compared to work status at baseline. Duration of immediate post-RP sick leave was considered as prolonged when lasting >6 weeks. Associations were analyzed using logistic regression analyses. Almost 30% of the patients had declined work status three months after RP. Change of physical HRQOL was the only factor remaining significantly associated with declined work status in the multivariate analysis. Half of the patients had prolonged immediate sick leave. Having physically strenuous work was the strongest predictor for this outcome. Long periods of sick leave and reduced workforce participation after RP should be considered potential adverse effects of this treatment.

  17. [Are the patients not carrying protections after radical prostatectomy really continent?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centi, J; Brakbi, Y; Plainard, X; Romain, J; Gardic, S; Dumas, J-P; Descazeaud, A

    2015-12-01

    To analyse urinary continence and related quality of life in patients not wearing any pad after robotic assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). Two hundred and sixteen patients operated consecutively by RARP between January 2009 and June 2011 were evaluated by the ICS (International Continence Society) Male Self-questionnaire. The questionnaires were sent by mail and mailed back by patients with a minimum of 14 months following surgery. The ICS questionnaire contains a symptom score (ICS 1) and a quality of life score (ICS 2). Out of 216 sent questionnaires, 145 (67%) were received. The subgroup of 121 patients who replied that they were not wearing any pad was analysed. Fifty-three (43,8%) of them reported not having leakage when coughing or sneezing, 65 (53,7%) reported not having spontaneous leakage, and 102 (84,3%) reported not having leakage when sleeping. The ICS 1 and ICS 2 scores were strongly correlated (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.96). Within a group of patients not wearing any pad following RARP, the continence as assessed by self-questionnaires remains altered. This analysis might help counselling patients who are about to choose a surgical treatment for their prostate cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. [Impact of obesity on pathologic outcomes and biochemical reccurence after radical prostatectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balssa, L; Pastori, J; Lillaz, J; Panouillères, M; Guichard, G; Bernardini, S; Chabannes, E; Bittard, H; Thiery-Vuillemin, A; Kleinclauss, F

    2015-06-01

    To determine whether obesity is associated with adverse pathologic characteristics, positive surgical margins and the biochemical recurrence free survival (bRFS) after primary treatment with radical prostatectomy (RP). Medical charts of patients managed with RP between 1999 and 2011 for localized prostate cancer (PCa) were retrospectively reviewed. Population study was split into two groups according to the body mass index (BMI): non obese (BMI< 30 kg/m(2)) and obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)). Correlations between obesity and adverse pathological features or bRFS were assessed using univariable and multivariable analyses. Overall, 328 patients were included in the present study: 278 (84.8%) obese and 50 (15.2%) non obese. In multivariable analysis, obesity was associated with positive surgical margins (P=0.014), extracapsular extension (P=0.004) and pathologic Gleason score ≥ 7 (P=0.048). Obesity was not associated with seminal vesicle invasion (P=0.636) and lymph node metastasis (P=0.132). After a mean follow-up of 60.51 ± 28.82 months, no statistical difference in terms of bRFS was observed between the two groups (P=0.186). Furthermore, obesity was not an independent predictor of bFS in multivariable analysis. Obesity was associated with adverse pathologic characteristics and positive surgical margins but no statistical correlation was found with bRFS. 5. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Pelvic lymph node dissection for patients with elevated risk of lymph node invasion during radical prostatectomy: comparison of open, laparoscopic and robot-assisted procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Jonathan L; Vickers, Andrew J; Power, Nicholas E; Parra, Raul O; Coleman, Jonathan A; Pinochet, Rodrigo; Touijer, Karim A; Scardino, Peter T; Eastham, James A; Laudone, Vincent P

    2012-06-01

    Published outcomes of pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) demonstrate significant variability. The purpose of the study was to compare PLND outcomes in patients at risk for lymph node involvement (LNI) who were undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP) by different surgeons and surgical approaches. Institutional policy initiated on January 1, 2010, mandated that all patients undergoing RP receive a standardized PLND with inclusion of the hypogastric region when predicted risk of LNI was ≥ 2%. We analyzed the outcomes of consecutive patients meeting these criteria from January 1 to September 1, 2010 by surgeons and surgical approach. All patients underwent RP; surgical approach (open radical retropubic [ORP], laparoscopic [LRP], RALP) was selected by the consulting surgeon. Differences in lymph node yield (LNY) between surgeons and surgical approaches were compared using multivariable linear regression with adjustment for clinical stage, biopsy Gleason grade, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, and age. Of 330 patients (126 ORP, 78 LRP, 126 RALP), 323 (98%) underwent PLND. There were no significant differences in characteristics between approaches, but the nomogram probability of LNI was slightly greater for ORP than RALP (P=0.04). LNY was high (18 nodes) by all approaches; more nodes were removed by ORP and LRP (median 20, 19, respectively) than RALP (16) after adjusting for stage, grade, PSA level, and age (P=0.015). Rates of LNI were high (14%) with no difference between approaches when adjusted for nomogram probability of LNI (P=0.15). Variation in median LNY among individual surgeons was considerable for all three approaches (11-28) (P=0.005) and was much greater than the variability by approach. PLND, including hypogastric nodal packet, can be performed by any surgical approach, with slightly different yields but similar pathologic outcomes. Individual surgeon commitment to PLND may be more important

  20. Health resource use after robot-assisted surgery vs open and conventional laparoscopic techniques in oncology: analysis of English secondary care data for radical prostatectomy and partial nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, David; Camp, Charlotte; O'Hara, Jamie; Adshead, Jim

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate postoperative health resource utilisation and secondary care costs for radical prostatectomy and partial nephrectomy in National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in England, via a comparison of robot-assisted, conventional laparoscopic and open surgical approaches. We retrospectively analysed the secondary care records of 23 735 patients who underwent robot-assisted (RARP, n = 8 016), laparoscopic (LRP, n = 6 776) or open radical prostatectomy (ORP, n = 8 943). We further analysed 2 173 patients who underwent robot-assisted (RAPN, n = 365), laparoscopic (LPN, n = 792) or open partial nephrectomy (OPN, n = 1 016). Postoperative inpatient admissions, hospital bed-days, excess bed-days and outpatient appointments at 360 and 1 080 days after surgery were reviewed. Patients in the RARP group required significantly fewer inpatient admissions, hospital bed-days and excess bed-days at 360 and 1 080 days than patients undergoing ORP. Patients undergoing ORP had a significantly higher number of outpatient appointments at 1 080 days. The corresponding total costs were significantly lower for patients in the RARP group at 360 days (£1679 vs £2031 for ORP; P surgeries lay at the approximate midpoint of those for robot-assisted and open surgeries. Our analysis provides compelling evidence to suggest that RARP leads to reduced long-term health resource utilisation and downstream cost savings compared with traditional open and laparoscopic approaches. Furthermore, despite the limitations that arise from the inclusion of a small sample, these results also suggest that robot-assisted surgery may represent a cost-saving alternative to existing surgical options in partial nephrectomy. Further exploration of clinical cost drivers, as well as an extension of the analysis into subsequent years, could lend support to the wider commissioning of robot-assisted surgery within the NHS. © 2015 The Authors BJU International © 2015 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons

  1. Salvage radiotherapy for patients with P.S.A. relapse after radical prostatectomy: comparisons among Astro and Phoenix biochemical failure definitions; Radiotherapie de rattrapage pour recidive biochimique apres prostatectomie: comparaison entre les definitions de recidive biochimique de l'Astro et de Phoenix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quero, L.; Hennequin, V.; Maylin, C.; Hennequin, C. [Hopital Saint-Louis, AP-HP, Service de Cancerologie-Radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France); Ravery, V. [Hopital Bichat-Claude-Bernard, AP-HP, Service d' Urologie, 75 - Paris (France); Mongiat-Artus, P.; Desgrandchamps, F. [Hopital Saint-Louis, AP-HP, Service d' Urologie, 75 - Paris (France)

    2009-07-15

    Purpose Study about the efficacy of salvage radiotherapy (R.T.), in terms of biochemical disease free survival (b.D.F.S.), according to Astro and Phoenix (nadir + 2) definitions, for persistent or rising P.S.A. after radical prostatectomy. Patients and methods Retrospective analysis of 59 patients who underwent R.T. between 1990 and 2003 for P.S.A. recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Patients received a median of 66 Gy to the prostate bed with 3D or 2D R.T.. The main end point was b.D.F.S. according to Astro and Phoenix (nadir + 2) definitions. Different criterion sets were analysed to calculate b.D.F.S. and pretreatment factors that might predict biochemical relapse were sought for each. Results After a 38-month median follow-up, the 3-year b.D.F.S. rates were: 60 and 72% for Astro and Phoenix (nadir + 2 ng/ml) definitions respectively. According to univariate analysis, pre-R.T. P.S.A. = 1 ng/ml and seminal vesicle involvement were associated with biochemical relapse. Multivariate analysis retained only pre-R.T. P.S.A. = 1 ng/ml as an independent predictor of biochemical relapse for the two definitions. Conclusion Salvage R.T. is an effective treatment after radical prostatectomy according to Astro or Phoenix definitions. Only pre-R.T. P.S.A. = 1 ng/ml predicted relapse. (authors)

  2. Time course of recovery of erectile function after radical retropubic prostatectomy: does anyone recover after 2 years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, Farhang; Schiff, Jeffrey; Piecuch, Michael; Yunis, Luis Herran; Eastham, James A; Scardino, Peter T; Mulhall, John P

    2010-12-01

    Given the paucity of literature on the time course of recovery of erectile function (EF) after radical prostatectomy (RP), many publications have led patients and clinicians to believe that erections are unlikely to recover beyond 2 years after RP. We sought to determine the time course of recovery of EF beyond 2 years after bilateral nerve sparing (BNS) RP and to determine factors predictive of continued improved recovery beyond 2 years. EF was assessed prospectively on a 5-point scale: (i) full erections; (ii) diminished erections routinely sufficient for intercourse; (iii) partial erections occasionally satisfactory for intercourse; (iv) partial erections unsatisfactory for intercourse; and (v) no erections. From 01/1999 to 01/2007, 136 preoperatively potent (levels 1-2) men who underwent BNS RP without prior treatment and who had not recovered consistently functional erections (levels 1-2) at 24 months had further follow-up regarding EF. Median follow-up after the 2-year visit was 36.0 months. Recovery of improved erections at a later date: recovery of EF level 1-2 in those with level 3 EF at 2 years and recovery of EF level 1-3 in those with level 4-5 EF at 2 years. The actuarial rates of further improved recovery of EF to level 1-2 in those with level 3 EF at 2 years and to level 1-3 in those with level 4-5 EF at 2 years were 8%, 20%, and 23% at 3, 4, and 5 years postoperatively, and 5%, 17%, and 21% at 3, 4, and 5 years postoperatively, respectively. Younger age was predictive of greater likelihood of recovery beyond 2 years. There is continued improvement in EF beyond 2 years after BNS RP. Discussion of this prolonged time course of recovery may allow patients to have a more realistic expectation. © 2010 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  3. Perioperative Blood Transfusion as a Significant Predictor of Biochemical Recurrence and Survival after Radical Prostatectomy in Patients with Prostate Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Kwon Kim

    Full Text Available There have been conflicting reports regarding the association of perioperative blood transfusion (PBT with oncologic outcomes including recurrence rates and survival outcomes in prostate cancer. We aimed to evaluate whether perioperative blood transfusion (PBT affects biochemical recurrence-free survival (BRFS, cancer-specific survival (CSS, and overall survival (OS following radical prostatectomy (RP for patients with prostate cancer.A total of 2,713 patients who underwent RP for clinically localized prostate cancer between 1993 and 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. We performed a comparative analysis based on receipt of transfusion (PBT group vs. no-PBT group and transfusion type (autologous PBT vs. allogeneic PBT. Univariate and multivariate Cox-proportional hazard regression analysis were performed to evaluate variables associated with BRFS, CSS, and OS. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate survival estimates for BRFS, CSS, and OS, and log-rank test was used to conduct comparisons between the groups.The number of patients who received PBT was 440 (16.5%. Among these patients, 350 (79.5% received allogeneic transfusion and the other 90 (20.5% received autologous transfusion. In a multivariate analysis, allogeneic PBT was found to be statistically significant predictors of BRFS, CSS, and OS; conversely, autologous PBT was not. The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed significantly decreased 5-year BRFS (79.2% vs. 70.1%, log-rank, p = 0.001, CSS (98.5% vs. 96.7%, log-rank, p = 0.012, and OS (95.5% vs. 90.6%, log-rank, p < 0.001 in the allogeneic PBT group compared to the no-allogeneic PBT group. In the autologous PBT group, however, none of these were statistically significant compared to the no-autologous PBT group.We found that allogeneic PBT was significantly associated with decreased BRFS, CSS, and OS. This provides further support for the immunomodulation hypothesis for allogeneic PBT.

  4. Prostate-specific antigen density as a parameter for the prediction of positive lymph nodes at radical prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiakoumos, Theocharis; Kälble, Tilman; Rausch, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to determine the prognostic ability of Partin's tables for a patient collective undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP) and to evaluate the association of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) density (PSAD) and postoperative lymph node status. Methods: From 1999 to 2006, 393 consecutive patients underwent RP at our Urology department. Patients with Gleason scores T2c or neoadjuvant hormonal therapy were excluded. Preoperative PSA, biopsy results, digital rectal examination, and prostate size at transrectal ultrasound were recorded. Risk stratification according to the Partin scoring system was performed. Postoperative results were compared with preoperative risk estimation. Univariate and multivariate statistical analysis about prediction of postoperative lymph node status was performed. Results: Lymph node invasion (LNI) was found in 36 patients (9.16%). Kendall's rank correlation analysis revealed a significant association between the number of removed LN and LNI (P = 0.016). Patients with LNI had a significantly higher preoperative PSA and PSAD. Preoperative Gleason score was a significant predictor of LNI. The Partin tables' prediction of organ confined stages, extraprostatic extension, and seminal vesicle invasion was in line with the pathological findings in our collective. PSAD was a significant predictor of LNI in univariate and multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The most widely used nomogram is of high value in therapy decision-making, although it remains an auxiliary means. Considering the performance of lymph node dissection, surgeons should be aware of the specifics of the applied nomogram. PSAD appears as a useful adjunctive parameter for preoperative prostate risk estimation and warrants further evaluation. PMID:26692660

  5. [Preoperative predictive model for biochemical recurrence in patients with localized prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina Escudero, Roberto; Herranz Amo, Felipe; Paez Borda, Alvaro; Hernández Fernández, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    To identify pre-prostatectomy clinical prognostic factors for biochemical recurrence (BR) and to create a predictive model for BR based or predictive clinical variables prior to radical prostatectomy (RP). a retrospective case-records study of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with RPas monotherapy pN0-pNx and monitored at least for 12 months between 1996 and 2007. We considered BR the PSA persistence or elevation after RP greater than 0.4 ng/ml. The clinical variables analyzed were PSA, clinical stage and Gleason score from the biopsy (GS). Univariate and multivariate analysis were carried out using the chi squared test and logistic regression to determine the variables associated with BR. In order to estimate BR based on the variables identified we developed a mathematical model and designed an Excel spreadsheet to apply it. Calibration and discrimination were performed using the Hosmer-Lemeshow test and an ROC curve determining the area under the curve. We included 627 patients. The mean age was 64 years with a mean follow- up of 87 months. The mean PSA was 8 ng/ml. 68.6% of patients had a PSA ≤ 10 ng/ml, 53,1% had a GS ≤ 6 and 61,7% had a clinical stage of cT1a-c. BR was observed in 204 (32,5%) patients, 39 due to biochemical persistence. The mean time to BR was 28 months with 89,7% of instances occurring in the first 8 years. On the multivariate analysis, PSA and GS were independent predictors of BR ( p=0.001), while the cT2c stage had a tendency towards statistical significance ( p=0.06). The three variables were included in the equation for the model with different specific weight. Specificity was 93.6%, sensitivity was 36.8% and an overall precision of 75.1%. The model had a predictive capacity of 73% and a p-value < 0.001. PSA and GS are independent prognostic clinical variables associated with BR-free survival. The predictive model developed allows the risk of BR to be estimated with 73% reliability.

  6. Urinary engrailed-2 (EN2) levels predict tumour volume in men undergoing radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandha, Hardev; Sørensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Ørntoft, Torben Falck

    2012-01-01

    in men who had undergone radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer. To date, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels have not reliably predicted prostate cancer volume. Reliable volume indicator biomarker(s) may aid management decisions, e.g. active treatment vs active surveillance. PATIENTS......What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? There are a lot of potential prostate cancer biomarkers being evaluated. All aim to improve on the sensitivity and specificity of PSA. EN2 was recently shown by our group to have better sensitivity and specificity than PSA. EN2 is a simple...... ELISA test and is not dependent on other parameters, even PSA, unlike all the other current biomarkers under evaluation. To date, no marker correlates with the amount of cancer present - the present study shows this positive correlation with EN2 in men undergoing prostatectomy. The potential utility...

  7. Transumbilical laparoendoscopic single-site radical prostatectomy and cystectomy with the aid of a transurethral port: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jian; Zhu, Qingyi; Yuan, Lin; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Qingling; Wei, Yunfei

    2018-01-01

    To describe the surgical technique and report early outcomes of transurethral assisted laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) radical prostatectomy (RP) and LESS radical cystectomy (RC) in a single institution. Between December 2014 and March 2016, a total of 114 LESS RPs and RCs were performed, comprising 68 LESS RPs, 38 LESS RCs with cutaneous ureterostomy (CU) and eight LESS RCs with orthotopic ileal neobladder (OIN). Access was achieved via a single-port, with four channels placed through a transumblical incision. After the apex of prostate was separated from the urethra, a self-developed port ('Zhu's port') was inserted through the urethra to facilitate resection of prostate and urethrovesical anastomosis. The peri-operative and postoperative data were collected and analysed retrospectively. Patients were followed up postoperatively for evidence of long-term side effects. All the procedures were completed successfully. No conversion to conventional laparoscopic surgery was necessary. For LESS RP, the average operating time was 152 min. Estimated blood loss was 117 mL. The mean hospital stay was 16.4 days after surgery. For LESS RC with CU and LESS RC with OIN, the mean operating times were 215 and 328 min, mean estimated blood loss was 175 and 252 mL, and mean hospital stay was 9.4 and 18.2 days, respectively. Six patients required blood transfusion (5.26%). Intra-operative complications occurred in two patients (1.75%), and postoperative complications in nine (7.89%). Fourteen out of 68 (20.6%) patients who underwent LESS RP had positive surgical margins. Follow-up ranged from 10 to 30.6 months. In the prostate cancer cases, good urinary control was observed in 35.3%, 97.1% and 100% of patients at 1, 6 and 12 months after the operation, respectively, while biochemical recurrence was observed in 11.8% patients. In the bladder cancer cases, two patients had local recurrence and two patients had distant metastasis. Our results showed that LESS RP and LESS RC

  8. Does robot-assisted radical prostatectomy benefit patients with prostate cancer and bone oligometastases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Won Sik; Kim, Myung Soo; Jeong, Won Sik; Chang, Ki Don; Cho, Kang Su; Ham, Won Sik; Rha, Koon Ho; Hong, Sung Joon; Choi, Young Deuk

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the peri-operative and oncological outcomes of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) in patients with oligometastatic prostate cancer (PCa). We retrospectively reviewed the records of 79 patients with oligometastatic PCa treated with RARP or androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) between 2005 and 2015 at our institution. Of these 79 patients, 38 were treated with RARP and 41 were treated with ADT without local therapy. Oligometastatic disease was defined as the presence of five or fewer hot spots detected by preoperative bone scan. We evaluated peri-operative outcomes, progression-free survival (PFS), and cancer-specific survival (CSS). We analysed data using Kaplan-Meier methods, with log-rank tests and multivariate Cox regression models. Patients treated with RARP experienced similar postoperative complications to those previously reported in RP-treated patients, and fewer urinary complications than ADT-treated patients. PFS and CSS were longer in RARP-treated compared with ADT-treated patients (median PFS: 75 vs 28 months, P = 0.008; median CSS: not reached vs 40 months, P = 0.002). Multivariate analysis further identified RARP as a significant predictor of PFS and CSS (PFS: hazard ratio [HR] 0.388, P = 0.003; CSS: HR 0.264, P = 0.004). We showed that RARP in the setting of oligometastatic PCa is a safe and feasible procedure which improves oncological outcomes in terms of PFS and CSS. In addition, our data suggest that RARP effectively prevents urinary tract complications from PCa. The study highlights results from expert surgeons and highly selected patients that cannot be extrapolated to all patients with oligometastatic PCa; to confirm our findings, large, prospective, multicentre studies are required. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Race and risk of metastases and survival after radical prostatectomy: Results from the SEARCH database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedland, Stephen J; Vidal, Adriana C; Howard, Lauren E; Terris, Martha K; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Amling, Christopher L; Kane, Christopher J; Aronson, William J

    2017-11-01

    Black race is associated with prostate cancer (PC) diagnosis and poor outcome. Previously, the authors reported that black men undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP) in equal-access hospitals had an increased risk of biochemical disease recurrence (BCR), but recurrences were equally aggressive as those occurring in white men. The authors examined the association between race and long-term outcomes after RP. Data regarding 1665 black men (37%) and 2791 white men (63%) undergoing RP were analyzed. Using Cox models, the authors tested the association between race and BCR, BCR with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) doubling time black men (all PBlack men were found to have a more recent surgery year (Pblack race was associated with increased BCR (P = .003) and reduced overall death (P = .017). On multivariable analysis, black race was not found to be associated with BCR (hazard ratio [HR], 1.07; P = .26), aggressive recurrence (HR, 1.14; P = .42), metastasis (HR, 1.24; P = .21), PC-specific death (HR, 1.03; P = .91), or overall death (HR, 1.03; P = .67). Among men undergoing RP at equal-access centers, although black men were found to have an increased risk of BCR, they had similar risks of aggressive disease recurrence, metastasis, and PC-specific death compared with white men, and the risk of BCR was found to be similar after controlling for risk parameters. Longer follow-up is needed to confirm these findings. Cancer 2017;123:4199-4206. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  10. Wrong to be Right: Margin Laterality is an Independent Predictor of Biochemical Failure After Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung J; Reiter, Robert E; Kummer, Nicolas; DeKernion, Jean; Steinberg, Michael L; King, Christopher R

    2018-01-01

    To examine the impact of positive surgical margin (PSM) laterality on failure after radical prostatectomy (RP). A PSM can influence local recurrence and outcomes after salvage radiation. Unlike intrinsic risk factors, a PSM is caused by intervention and thus iatrogenic failures may be elucidated by analyzing margin laterality as surgical approach is itself lateralized. We reviewed 226 RP patients between 1991 and 2013 with PSM. Data includes operation type, pre/postoperative PSA, surgical pathology, and margin type (location, focality, laterality). The median follow-up was 47 months. Biochemical recurrence after RP was defined as PSA≥0.1 ng/mL or 2 consecutive rises above nadir. Ninety-two patients received salvage radiation therapy (SRT). Failure after SRT was defined as any PSA≥0.2 ng/mL or greater than presalvage. Kaplan-Meier and Cox multivariate analyses compared relapse rates. The majority of PSM were iatrogenic (58%). Laterality was associated with differences in median relapse: right 20 versus left 51 versus bilateral 14 months (PRight-sided margins were more likely to progress than left (hazard ratio, 1.67; P=0.04). More right-sided margins were referred for SRT (55% right vs. 23% left vs. 22% bilateral), but were equally salvaged. Only T-stage and pre-SRT PSA independently influenced SRT success. Most PSM are iatrogenic, with right-sided more likely to progress (and sooner) than left sided. Margin laterality is a heretofore unrecognized independent predictor of biochemical relapse and hints at the need to modify the traditional unilateral surgical technique.

  11. Neoadjuvant treatment and adjuvant radiotherapy for patients with high risk prostate cancer and radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scorticati, Carlos; Aguilar, Jorge A.; Gonzalez Granda, Pablo; Mendez, Fernando; Montiel, Raul; Rege, Eduardo; Alvarez, Patricio; Lopez, Miguel A.; Rizzi, Alfredo; Mazza, Osvaldo

    2009-01-01

    Introduction and Objectives: To analyze the results of the treatment in patients with cancer of prostate of high risk. Material and Method: Retrospective and observational analysis of 130 patients operated by CAP of high risk (criteria of D'Amico) average 41,48 months, divided in form nonrandomized in three groups 1: radical prostatectomy, 2: neoadjuvant hormonoterapy (BAC) + PR, 3: BAC + PR + x-ray (RT). Statistical analysis: multivaried, test of curved Chi2 and p statistical and of Kaplan Meier. Results: Biochemical relapse 68 patients (52.3%), average 23,37 months. Without differences according to therapeutic modality (p: 0.043). In the multivaried analysis of the 3 factors of presurgical, single risk we found a statistically significant relation in the coexistence of the 3 factors with the presence of positive margin in the PR piece. (p: 0,002). The analysis to make or not, neoadjuvant BAC without significant difference (p: 0,403) evaluating in such the rate of M+, actuarial global survival according to curves of Kaplan Meier to 5 and 10 years (P: 0,5257) and survival 5 actuarial specific cancer to and 10a (P: 0,2165). Conclusions: Without significant differences in: RB, clinical progression, pathological relapse, global and specific survival, rate of positive surgical margins. The 3 criteria of D'Amico were predictive of positive surgical margins and RB, the patients with RB in group 2 presented/displayed greater risk of clinical progression, the PR demonstrated a global survival and specify actuarial to 10 years greater to 50%, considering it therapeutic an option been worth. (authors) [es

  12. Low serum testosterone predicts upgrading and upstaging of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Often, pathological Gleason Score (GS and stage of prostate cancer (PCa were inconsistent with biopsy GS and clinical stage. However, there were no widely accepted methods predicting upgrading and upstaging PCa. In our study, we investigated the association between serum testosterone and upgrading or upstaging of PCa after radical prostatectomy (RP. We enrolled 167 patients with PCa with biopsy GS ≤6, clinical stage ≤T2c, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA <10 ng ml−1 from April 2009 to April 2015. Data including age, body mass index, preoperative PSA level, comorbidity, clinical presentation, and preoperative serum total testosterone level were collected. Upgrading occurred in 62 (37.1% patients, and upstaging occurred in 73 (43.7% patients. Preoperative testosterone was lower in the upgrading than nonupgrading group (3.72 vs 4.56, P< 0.01. Patients in the upstaging group had lower preoperative testosterone than those in the nonupstaging group (3.84 vs 4.57, P= 0.01. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, as both continuous and categorical variables, low serum testosterone was confirmed to be an independent predictor of pathological upgrading (P = 0.01 and P= 0.01 and upstaging (P = 0.01 and P = 0.02 after RP. We suggest that low serum testosterone (<3 ng ml−1 is associated with a high rate of upgrading and upstaging after RP. It is better for surgeons to ensure close monitoring of PSA levels and imaging examination when selecting non-RP treatment, to be cautious in proceeding with nerve-sparing surgery, and to be enthusiastic in performing extended lymph node dissection when selecting RP treatment for patients with low serum testosterone.

  13. Biochemical relapse for prostate cancer following radical prostatectomy: salvage radiotherapy without hormonal therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fede, Angelo B.S. [Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo Andre, SP (Brazil); Jacinto, Alexandre Arthur; Fagundes, Livia A.; Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo Ribeiro dos Santos; Arruda, Gustavo Viani; Castilho, Marcus Simoes; Maia, Maria Aparecida Conte; Silva, Maria Leticia Gobo; Fogaroli, Ricardo Cesar; Salvajoli, Joao Victor [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Radiation Oncology]. E-mail: aajacinto@yahoo.com.br

    2006-07-01

    Objectives: This paper aims to study biochemical control, hormonal therapy-free survival, and prognostic factors related to salvage radiation for prostate cancer patients submitted to radical prostatectomy (RP) without hormonal therapy (HT) before or during radiation. Materials and Methods: from August 2002 to July 2004, 39 prostate cancer patients submitted to RP presented biochemical failure after achieving PSA nadir (<0.2 ng/ml). All patients were submitted to three-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3 DC-EBRT) and no patients had received HT. Median age was 62 years, median preoperative PSA was 9.4 ng/ml, median Gleason Score was 7. We defined PSA rise above 0.2 as biochemical failure after surgery. Median 3 DC-EBRT dose was 70 Gy, and biochemical failure after EBRT was defined as three consecutive rises in PSA or a single rise sufficient to trigger HT. Results: Biochemical non-evidence of disease (BNED) in 3 years was 72%. PSA doubling time (PSADT) lower than 4 months (p=0.04), and delay to salvage EBRT (p=0.05) were associated to worse chance of successful salvage therapy. Late morbidity was acceptable. Conclusion: Expressive PSA control (72% BNED / 3 years) could be achieved with salvage radiotherapy in well-selected patients. The importance of PSADT was confirmed, and radiotherapy should be started as early as possible. Follow-up is somewhat short, but it is possible to conclude that it is possible to achieve a long interval free from hormonal therapy with low rate of toxicity, avoiding or at least delaying morbidity related to hormonal treatment radiotherapy. (author)

  14. Oncological outcomes following radical prostatectomy for patients with pT4 prostate cancer

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    Dharam Kaushik

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: Radical prostatectomy (RP for locally advanced prostate cancer may reduce the risk of metastasis and cancer-specific death. Herein, we evaluated the outcomes for patients with pT4 disease treated with RP. Materials and methods: Among 19,800 men treated with RP at Mayo Clinic from 1987 to 2010, 87 were found to have pT4 tumors. Biochemical recurrence (BCR-free survival, systemic progression (SP free survival and overall survival (OS were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to assess the association of clinic-pathological features with outcome. Results: Median follow-up was 9.8 years (IQR 3.6, 13.4. Of the 87 patients, 50 (57.5% were diagnosed with BCR, 30 (34.5% developed SP, and 38 (43.7% died, with 11 (12.6% dying of prostate cancer. Adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy was administered to 77 men, while 32 received adjuvant external beam radiation therapy. Ten-year BCR-free survival, SP-free survival, and OS was 37%, 64%, and 70% respectively. On multivariate analysis, the presence of positive lymph nodes was marginally significantly associated with patients' risk of BCR (HR: 1.94; p=0.05, while both positive lymph nodes (HR 2.96; p=0.02 and high pathologic Gleason score (HR 1.95; p=0.03 were associated with SP. Conclusions: Patients with pT4 disease may experience long-term survival following RP, and as such, when technically feasible, surgical resection should be considered in the multimodal treatment approach to these men.

  15. Adjuvant Versus Salvage Radiotherapy for Patients With Adverse Pathological Findings Following Radical Prostatectomy: A Decision Analysis

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    Christopher J. D. Wallis MD

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients undergoing surgery for prostate cancer who have adverse pathological findings experience high rates of recurrence. While there are data supporting adjuvant radiotherapy compared to a wait-and-watch strategy to reduce recurrence rates, there are no randomized controlled trials comparing adjuvant radiotherapy with the other standard of care, salvage radiotherapy (radiotherapy administered at the time of recurrence. Methods: We constructed a health state transition (Markov model employing two-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation using a lifetime horizon to compare the quality-adjusted survival associated with postoperative strategies using adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy. Prior to analysis, we calibrated and validated our model using the results of previous randomized controlled trials. We considered clinically important oncological health states from immediately postoperative to prostate cancer–specific death, commonly described complications from prostate cancer treatment, and other causes of mortality. Transition probabilities and utilities for disease states were derived from a literature search of MEDLINE and expert consensus. Results: Salvage radiotherapy was associated with an increased quality-adjusted life expectancy (QALE (58.3 months as compared with adjuvant radiotherapy (53.7 months, a difference of 4.6 months (standard deviation 8.8. Salvage radiotherapy had higher QALE in 53% of hypothetical cohorts. There was a minimal difference in overall life expectancy (-0.1 months. Examining recurrence rates, our model showed validity when compared with available randomized controlled data. Conclusions: A salvage radiotherapy strategy appears to provide improved QALE for patients with adverse pathological findings following radical prostatectomy, compared with adjuvant radiotherapy. As these findings reflect, population averages, specific patient and tumor factors, and patient preferences remain central for individualized

  16. Augmented Reality Using Transurethral Ultrasound for Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy: Preclinical Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanchon, Cecilia; Custillon, Guillaume; Moreau-Gaudry, Alexandre; Descotes, Jean-Luc; Long, Jean-Alexandre; Fiard, Gaelle; Voros, Sandrine

    2016-07-01

    To guide the surgeon during laparoscopic or robot-assisted radical prostatectomy an innovative laparoscopic/ultrasound fusion platform was developed using a motorized 3-dimensional transurethral ultrasound probe. We present what is to our knowledge the first preclinical evaluation of 3-dimensional prostate visualization using transurethral ultrasound and the preliminary results of this new augmented reality. The transurethral probe and laparoscopic/ultrasound registration were tested on realistic prostate phantoms made of standard polyvinyl chloride. The quality of transurethral ultrasound images and the detection of passive markers placed on the prostate surface were evaluated on 2-dimensional dynamic views and 3-dimensional reconstructions. The feasibility, precision and reproducibility of laparoscopic/transurethral ultrasound registration was then determined using 4, 5, 6 and 7 markers to assess the optimal amount needed. The root mean square error was calculated for each registration and the median root mean square error and IQR were calculated according to the number of markers. The transurethral ultrasound probe was easy to manipulate and the prostatic capsule was well visualized in 2 and 3 dimensions. Passive markers could precisely be localized in the volume. Laparoscopic/transurethral ultrasound registration procedures were performed on 74 phantoms of various sizes and shapes. All were successful. The median root mean square error of 1.1 mm (IQR 0.8-1.4) was significantly associated with the number of landmarks (p = 0.001). The highest accuracy was achieved using 6 markers. However, prostate volume did not affect registration precision. Transurethral ultrasound provided high quality prostate reconstruction and easy marker detection. Laparoscopic/ultrasound registration was successful with acceptable mm precision. Further investigations are necessary to achieve sub mm accuracy and assess feasibility in a human model. Copyright © 2016 American Urological

  17. The Impact of Implementation of the European Association of Urology Guidelines Panel Recommendations on Reporting and Grading Complications on Perioperative Outcomes after Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandaglia, Giorgio; Bravi, Carlo Andrea; Dell'Oglio, Paolo; Mazzone, Elio; Fossati, Nicola; Scuderi, Simone; Robesti, Daniele; Barletta, Francesco; Grillo, Luca; Maclennan, Steven; N'Dow, James; Montorsi, Francesco; Briganti, Alberto

    2018-03-12

    The rate of postoperative complications might vary according to the method used to collect perioperative data. We aimed at assessing the impact of the prospective implementation of the European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines on reporting and grading of complications in prostate cancer patients undergoing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). From September 2016, an integrated method for reporting surgical morbidity based on the EAU guidelines was implemented at a single, tertiary center. Perioperative data were prospectively and systematically collected during a patient interview at 30 d after surgery as recommended by the EAU Guidelines Panel Recommendations on Reporting and Grading Complications. The rate and grading of complications of 167 patients who underwent RARP±pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) after the implementation of the prospective collection system (Group 1) were compared with 316 patients treated between January 2015 and August 2016 (Group 2) when a system based on patient chart review was used. No differences were observed in disease characteristics and PLND between the two groups (all p≥0.1). Postoperative complications were graded according to the Clavien-Dindo classification system. Overall, the complication rate was higher when the prospective collection system based on the EAU guidelines was used (29%) than when retrospective chart review (10%; preporting perioperative outcomes roughly doubled the complication rate after RARP and allowed for the detection of complications after discharge in more than 15% of patients that would have been otherwise missed, where patients assessed with the EAU implemented protocol had a threefold higher likelihood of reporting complications. The implementation of the European Association of Urology guidelines on reporting and grading of complications after urologic procedures in prostate cancer patients roughly doubled the complication rate after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy compared

  18. Robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy with early retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle and endopelvic fascia sparing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Augusto Monteiro Lins de Albuquerque

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction Robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RAP is the dominant minimally invasive surgical treatment for patients with localized prostate cancer. The introduction of robotic assistance has the potential to improve surgical outcomes and reduce the steep learning curve associated with conventional laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. The purpose of this video is to demonstrate the early retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle without open the endopelvic fascia during RAP. Materials and Methods A 51-year old male, presenting histological diagnosis of prostate adenocarcinoma, Gleason 6 (3+3, in 4 cores of 12, with an initial PSA=3.41ng/dl and the digital rectal examination demonstrating a prostate with hardened nodule in the right lobe of the prostate base (clinical stage T2a. Surgical treatment with the robot-assisted technique was offered as initial therapeutic option and the critical technical point was the early retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle with endopelvic fascia preservation, during radical prostatectomy. Results The operative time was of 89 minutes, blood loss was 100ml. No drain was left in the peritoneal cavity. The patient was discharged within 24 hours. There were no intraoperative or immediate postoperative complications. The pathological evaluation revealed prostate adenocarcinoma, Gleason 6, with free surgical margins and seminal vesicles free of neoplastic involvement (pathologic stage T2a. At 3-month-follow-up, the patient lies with undetectable PSA, continent and potent. Conclusion This is a feasible technique combining the benefits of retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle, the preservation of the pubo-prostatic collar and the preservation of the antero-lateral cavernous nerves.

  19. A Randomized Study of Intraoperative Autologous Retropubic Urethral Sling on Urinary Control after Robotic Assisted Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hao G; Punnen, Sanoj; Cowan, Janet E; Leapman, Michael; Cary, Clint; Welty, Christopher; Weinberg, Vivian; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Meng, Maxwell V; Greene, Kirsten L; Garcia, Maurice; Carroll, Peter R

    2017-02-01

    We evaluated whether placement of a retropubic urethral sling fashioned from autologous vas deferens during robotic assisted radical prostatectomy would improve recovery of continence. In a phase 2, single blind trial age stratified patients were randomized to undergo robotic assisted radical prostatectomy by multiple surgeons with or without sling placement. The outcomes were complete continence (0 urinary pads of any type) and near continence (0, an occasional or 1 pad per day) at 6 months, which was assessed by the Fisher exact test and logistic regression. The Kaplan-Meier method and the log rank test were used to evaluate time to continence. EPIC-UIN (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite-Urinary Inventory) and I-PSS (International Prostate Symptom Score) 1, 3 and 6 months after catheter removal were evaluated by mixed models for repeated measures. Of 203 patients who were recruited 95 and 100 were randomized to undergo sling and no sling placement, respectively, and completed postoperative interviews. Six months after surgery the proportions reporting complete and near continence (66% and 87%, respectively) and times to complete and near continence were similar in the groups. Younger age was associated with a higher likelihood of complete continence (OR 1.74 per decreasing 5-year interval, 95% CI 1.23-2.48, p <0.01) and near continence (OR 2.18 per decreasing 5-year interval, 95% CI 1.21-3.92, p <0.01) adjusting for clinical, urinary and surgical factors. Adjusted EPIC-UIN and I-PSS scores changed with time but did not differ between the groups. No serious adverse events were observed. This trial failed to demonstrate a benefit of autologous urethral sling placement at robotic assisted radical prostatectomy on early return of continence at 6 months. Continence was related to patient age in adjusted models. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Outcomes of robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy for patients in two extreme age-groups (years vs > 65 years).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coman, Radu-Tudor; Crisan, Nicolae; Andras, Iulia; Bud, Gabriela; Matei, Deliu-Victor; DE Cobelli, Ottavio; Coman, Ioan; Bocsan, Ioan-Stelian

    2018-01-01

    To assess the outcomes of robotic radical prostatectomy in two different age subgroups of pre-operatively potent patients: younger than 50 years and older than 65 years. We included in the present study a number of 202 patients with prostate cancer divided into two groups: 99 patients older than 65 years (group 1) and 103 patients younger than 50 years (group 2). More than half of the younger patients were low-risk vs 57% of the older patients who were high-risk. Overall positive surgical margins rate was 21.2% in group 1 vs 12.1% in group 2. The early biochemical recurrence at 6 months after radical prostatectomy was 4% in group 1 vs 11.6% in group 2. The continence rate at 6 months was similar between the two groups and was not correlated with the patients' age (p=0.72), nerve-sparing (p=0.3 for group 1, p=0.92 for group 2) or pathological staging (overall p=0.81, p=0.89 in group 1 and p=0.63 in group 2). We observed a significantly higher rate of potency for patients in group 2 (91.5% vs 47.2%, p<0.0001). The most important factor associated with the regain of potency at 6 months after the procedure was the age of the patient (p<0.0001), independently of the type of nerve-sparing performed. Age seems to be the most important predictor of the regain of potency after robotic radical prostatectomy. Patients should be counseled accordingly in order to have realistic expectations about the functional results after robotic-assisted surgery.

  1. Results of hospital cancer registry surveys by the American College of Surgeons: outcomes of prostate cancer treatment by radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettlin, C J; Murphy, G P; Sylvester, J; McKee, R F; Morrow, M; Winchester, D P

    1997-11-01

    The number of prostate cancer patients treated by radical prostatectomy has increased. Different data sources have yielded various estimates of the outcomes of this treatment and the need for additional therapy. To provide additional perspective on these issues, the American College of Surgeons conducted surveys of cancer registries and reviewed related data. In 1993, in the first phase of the study, hospital cancer registries and programs were sent survey forms and instructions requesting data on up to 5 patients treated by radical prostatectomy at their institutions in 1990. In 1996, in the second phase of the study, additional data were requested on treatment administered to the 1990 patients up to 5 years after surgery, and hospitals were also invited to submit new data on patients diagnosed in 1993. Responses were received from 482 hospitals concerning 2122 patients for 1990, and 265 hospitals provided data on 1304 patients diagnosed in 1993. Follow-up data on 1076 of the 1990 patients were provided by 258 hospitals. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were calculated to determine the probability of additional treatment after radical prostatectomy. Similar surgical pathology outcomes were reported for the 1990 and 1993 patients. For 1990 and 1993, respectively, it was reported that 27.5% and 29.7% of patients maintained erectile function adequate for intercourse after surgery. For 1990 and 1993, respectively, complete control or only occasional urinary incontinence requiring no pads was reported for 81.3% and 79.8% of patients. The surgical mortality rates were less than 1% for both the 1990 and the 1993 patients. The 5-year cumulative probability of any additional treatment after radical prostatectomy was 10.5%. Seminal vesicle involvement, positive surgical margins, lymph node involvement, capsular penetration, high Gleason score, and high prostate specific antigen were significantly associated with greater probability of additional treatment. Hospital cancer

  2. Radical prostatectomy versus expectant treatment for early carcinoma of the prostate. Twenty-three year follow-up of a prospective randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Madsen, P O; Corle, D K

    1995-01-01

    In a study by the Veterans Administration Cooperative Urological Research Group (VACURG), 142 patients with localized prostate cancer, VACURG stage I and II, were randomized between radical prostatectomy plus placebo versus placebo alone as initial treatment. 111 patients were evaluable for treat......In a study by the Veterans Administration Cooperative Urological Research Group (VACURG), 142 patients with localized prostate cancer, VACURG stage I and II, were randomized between radical prostatectomy plus placebo versus placebo alone as initial treatment. 111 patients were evaluable...... for treatment comparison. Median follow-up for survival is 23 years. The prognostic value of Gleason histologic grading was confirmed. A difference in overall survival in favor of radical prostatectomy was observed in stage I patients. However, after adjustment for imbalance in age distribution...

  3. Oncological and functional results of robotic salvage radical prostatectomy after permanent brachytherapy implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orré, M; Piéchaud, T; Sargos, P; Richaud, P; Roubaud, G; Thomas, L

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of robotic salvage prostatectomy for local recurrence after permanent brachytherapy implants for prostate cancer. Seven patients were operated by robotic salvage prostatectomy with or without pelvic lymph node dissection between October 2007 and March 2012, for a local recurrence after iodine 125 permanent brachytherapy implants. Local recurrence was proved by prostate biopsies, once biochemical relapse was diagnosed and imaging assessment performed. The average age of a patient at the time of diagnosis was 66 years (62-71 years). The median nadir prostate specific antigen (PSA) serum concentration after brachytherapy was 1.29ng/mL (0.6-2.1ng/mL), obtained after a median of 12 months (7-21 months). The average [PSA] before robotic salvage prostatectomy was 6.60ng/mL (4.17-13.80ng/mL). [PSA] at 1 and 3 months after prostatectomy was less than 0.05ng/mL in five patients. [PSA] remained below 0.05ng/mL for six patients at 12 and 24 months. One month after robotic salvage prostatectomy, all patients had at least partial urinary incontinence. At 12 and 24 months after robotic salvage prostatectomy four patients have regained full urinary continence. In terms of erectile function at 24 months, three patients retained erectile function with possible sexual intercourse. Robotic salvage prostatectomy appears to be a reliable treatment in terms of oncological outcome with convincing results both for urinary continence and erectile function for selected patients with local recurrence after permanent brachytherapy implants. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Prediction of biochemical recurrence and prostate cancer specific death in men after radical retropublic prostatectomy: Use of pathology and computer-assisted quantitative nuclear grading information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Masood Ahmed

    Prostate cancer is the most common solid tumour in man. Accordingly, it is expected that 1 in 6 men will experience prostate cancer during their lifetime. Over the past 20 years there have been tremendous advancements in both diagnostic as well as surgical approach to prostate cancer. This has led not only to earlier detection of the disease in its natural history, but also the availability of effective surgical management. Furthermore, the discovery of serum prostate specific antigen as a marker for prostate cancer along with greater acceptance of prostate cancer screening has resulted in an increase in the incidence of prostate cancer in men younger than 50 years of age. This is an age group that has traditionally been associated with a poor prognosis after radical prostatectomy. In addition, despite being able to effectively remove the whole of the gland with limited morbidity, approximately 25% of men after radical prostatectomy will experience biochemical recurrence with time. Moreover, the majority will progress to distant metastases and/or die from prostate cancer. We firstly investigated whether radical prostatectomy is a viable option for men younger than 50 years of age diagnosed with clinically localised prostate cancer. We also determined factors that predict disease recurrence after radical prostatectomy. As many men demonstrate evidence of biochemical recurrence with some showing further progression after radical prostatectomy, we, therefore, investigated whether pathological variables as well as nuclear morphometry could be used to predict those that are at an increased risk for disease recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Our results demonstrated that 1) radical prostatectomy can be safely performed in younger men as it can provide excellent long-term disease-free survival; 2) We determined that there are a number of factors that are associated with an increased risk for disease recurrence after radical prostatectomy; 3) We have constructed a new

  5. Perioperative outcome of initial 190 cases of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy - A single-center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P N Dogra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the perioperative outcome of the first 190 cases of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy performed at our center from July 2006 to December 2010. Materials and Methods: Operative and recovery data for men with localized prostate cancer undergoing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy at our center were reviewed. All surgeries were performed using the 4-arm da Vinci-S surgical robot. Preoperative data included age, body mass index (BMI, prostate specific antigen (PSA level, prostate weight, biopsy Gleason score and TNM staging, while operative and recovery data included total operative time, estimated blood loss, complications, hospital stay and catheter time. These parameters were evaluated for the safety and efficacy of this procedure in our center. Results: The mean age of our patients was 65 ± 1.2 years. The mean BMI was 25.20 ± 2.88 and the median PSA was 14.8 ng/ml. Majority of our patients belonged to clinical stage T2 (51.58%. The mean total operative time was 166.44 ± 11.5 min. Six patients required conversion to open procedure and there was one rectal injury. The median estimated blood loss was 302 ± 14.45 ml and the median duration of hospital stay was 4 days. The overall margin positivity rate was 12.63%. Conclusion: Despite our limited robotic surgery experience, our perioperative outcome and complication rate is comparable to most contemporary series. Robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP is easy to learn and provides the patient with the benefits of minimally invasive surgery with minimal perioperative morbidity.

  6. Radiation therapy for local recurrence of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, T K; Lange, P H

    1994-11-01

    A definitive conclusion about the value of ART is not possible from the data available: Both the methods of radiation therapy and the techniques in the diagnosis of locally persistent disease have evolved over the years. Currently, the data lead to the conclusion that ART decreases local recurrence but does not improve overall survival. Yet the PSA data strongly suggest that only locally persistent disease is a common event after radical prostatectomy (particularly in margin-positive disease only) and that current ART techniques are inadequate in many but not all of these patients. Certainly some men seem to have their local disease eliminated by ART to remain NED, but it is unclear exactly how to select them. Many experts also believe that keeping the PSA as low as possible for as long as possible, with sequential applications of ART and then androgen ablation as necessary, is a good emotional if not medical strategy. For example, all patients now wish to know their PSA level and worry about it. Also, potency can be maintained or regained after ART but becomes improbable after androgen ablation because of loss of libido. Clearly, a study randomizing high-risk postoperative patients into observation versus ART is needed and indeed such a study is under way in the Southwestern and Eastern Cooperative oncology groups, but to date accrual is inadequate (Ian Thompson, Jr, MD, personal communication, May 1994). This study must be supported. When participation in the randomized study is not possible, we believe four tentative recommendations about the application of ART can be made based on the available data (Fig. 1): (1) For high-risk patients (e.g., high Gleason score and/or high pathologic stage) with initially undetectable PSA levels, we recommend instituting ART before any rise in postoperative PSA levels because low-volume disease may best respond to this therapy. (2) For patients with rapidly rising or initially detectable postoperative PSA levels (especially if

  7. The Association of Fatty Acid Levels and Gleason Grade among Men Undergoing Radical Prostatectomy.

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    Zhiguo Zhao

    Full Text Available Epidemiological data suggest that omega-6 (ω-6 fatty acids (FAs may be associated with cancer incidence and/or cancer mortality, whereas ω-3 FAs are potentially protective. We examined the association of the ratio of ω-6 to ω-3 FA (ω-6:ω-3 and individual FA components with pathological results among men with prostate cancer (PCa undergoing radical prostatectomy.Sixty-nine men were included in the study. Components of ω-6 (linoleic acid (LA, arachidonic acid (AA, and dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (DGLA and ω-3 (docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA were analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass selective detector separation. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine association of FA with pathological high grade (Gleason ≥4+3 disease.The were 35 men with low grade disease (Gleason ≤3+4 and 34 men with high grade disease. Men with low grade disease were significantly younger (58y vs 61y, p = 0.012 and had lower D'Amico clinical classification (p = 0.001 compared to men with high grade disease. There was no significant association of ω-6:ω-3 with high grade disease (OR 0.93, p = 0.78, however overall ω-6, ω-3, and individual components of ω-6 and ω-3 FAs except EPA were significantly associated with high grade disease (ω-6: OR 3.37, 95% CI: 1.27,8.98; LA: OR 3.33, 95% CI:1.24,8.94; AA: OR 2.93, 95% CI:1.24,6.94; DGLA: OR 3.21, 95% CI:1.28,8.04; ω-3: OR 3.47, 95% CI:1.22,9.83; DHA: OR 3.13, 95% CI:1.26,7.74. ω-6 and ω-3 FA components were highly correlated (Spearman ρ = 0.77.Higher levels of individual components of ω-6 and ω-3FAs may be associated with higher-grade PCa.Studies into the causative factors/pathways regarding FAs and prostate carcinogenesis may prove a potential association with PCa aggressiveness.

  8. Machine learning approaches to analyze histological images of tissues from radical prostatectomies.

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    Gertych, Arkadiusz; Ing, Nathan; Ma, Zhaoxuan; Fuchs, Thomas J; Salman, Sadri; Mohanty, Sambit; Bhele, Sanica; Velásquez-Vacca, Adriana; Amin, Mahul B; Knudsen, Beatrice S

    2015-12-01

    Computerized evaluation of histological preparations of prostate tissues involves identification of tissue components such as stroma (ST), benign/normal epithelium (BN) and prostate cancer (PCa). Image classification approaches have been developed to identify and classify glandular regions in digital images of prostate tissues; however their success has been limited by difficulties in cellular segmentation and tissue heterogeneity. We hypothesized that utilizing image pixels to generate intensity histograms of hematoxylin (H) and eosin (E) stains deconvoluted from H&E images numerically captures the architectural difference between glands and stroma. In addition, we postulated that joint histograms of local binary patterns and local variance (LBPxVAR) can be used as sensitive textural features to differentiate benign/normal tissue from cancer. Here we utilized a machine learning approach comprising of a support vector machine (SVM) followed by a random forest (RF) classifier to digitally stratify prostate tissue into ST, BN and PCa areas. Two pathologists manually annotated 210 images of low- and high-grade tumors from slides that were selected from 20 radical prostatectomies and digitized at high-resolution. The 210 images were split into the training (n=19) and test (n=191) sets. Local intensity histograms of H and E were used to train a SVM classifier to separate ST from epithelium (BN+PCa). The performance of SVM prediction was evaluated by measuring the accuracy of delineating epithelial areas. The Jaccard J=59.5 ± 14.6 and Rand Ri=62.0 ± 7.5 indices reported a significantly better prediction when compared to a reference method (Chen et al., Clinical Proteomics 2013, 10:18) based on the averaged values from the test set. To distinguish BN from PCa we trained a RF classifier with LBPxVAR and local intensity histograms and obtained separate performance values for BN and PCa: JBN=35.2 ± 24.9, OBN=49.6 ± 32, JPCa=49.5 ± 18.5, OPCa=72.7 ± 14.8 and Ri=60.6

  9. Radical prostatectomy and positive surgical margins: tumor volume and Gleason score predicts cancer outcome

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    La Roca, Ricardo L.R. Felts de, E-mail: Ricardo@delarocaurologia.com.br [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fonseca, Francisco Paula da, E-mail: fpf@uol.com.br [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Divisao de Urologia. Dept. de Cirurgia Pelvica; Cunha, Isabela Werneck da; Bezerra, Stephania Martins, E-mail: iwerneck@gmail.com, E-mail: stephaniab@gmail.com [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Patologia

    2013-07-01

    Introduction: positive surgical margins (PSMs) are common adverse factors to predict the outcome of a patient submitted to radical prostatectomy (PR). However, not all of these men will follow with biochemical (BCR) or clinical (CR) recurrence. Relationship between PSMs with these recurrent events has to be correlated with other clinicopathological findings in order to recognize more aggressive tumors in order to recommend complementary treatment to these selected patients. Materials and methods: we retrospectively reviewed the outcome of 228 patients submitted to open retropubic RP between March 1991 and June 2008, where 161 had and 67 did not have PSMs. Minimum follow-up time was considered 2 years after surgery. BCR was considered when PSA {>=} 0.2 ng/ml. CR was determined when clinical evidence of tumor appeared. Chi-square test was used to correlate clinical and pathologic variables with PSMs. The estimated 5-year risk of BCR and CR in presence of PSMs was determined using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared to log-rank tests. Results: from the total of 228 patients, 161 (71%) had PSMs, while 67 (29%) had negative surgical margins (NSMs). Prostatic circumferential margin was the most common (43.4%) site. Univariate analysis showed statistically significant (p < 0.001) associations between the presence of PSMs and BCR, but not with CR (p = 0.06). Among 161 patients with PSMs, 61 (37.8%) presented BCR, while 100 (62.8%) did not. Predicting progression-free survival for 5 years, BCR was correlated with pathological stage; Gleason score; pre-treatment PSA; tumor volume in specimen; capsular and perineural invasion; presence and number of PSMs. RC correlated only with angiolymphatic invasion and Gleason score. Considering univariate analyses the clinicopathological factors predicting BCR for 5 years, results statistically significant links with prostate weight; pre-treatment PSA; Gleason score; pathological stage; tumor volume; PSMs; capsular and perineural

  10. High-Dose Adjuvant Radiotherapy After Radical Prostatectomy With or Without Androgen Deprivation Therapy

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    Ost, Piet, E-mail: piet.ost@ugent.be [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital (Belgium); Cozzarini, Cesare [Department of Radiotherapy, Hospital San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); De Meerleer, Gert [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital (Belgium); Fiorino, Claudio [Department of Radiotherapy, Hospital San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); De Potter, Bruno [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital (Belgium); Briganti, Alberto [Department of Urology, San Raffaele Hospital, Vita-Salute University, Milan (Italy); Nagler, Evi V.T. [Department of Nephrology, Ghent University Hospital (Belgium); Montorsi, Francesco [Department of Urology, San Raffaele Hospital, Vita-Salute University, Milan (Italy); Fonteyne, Valerie [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital (Belgium); Di Muzio, Nadia [Department of Radiotherapy, Hospital San Raffaele, Milan (Italy)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the outcome and toxicity in patients receiving high-dose (>69 Gy) adjuvant radiotherapy (HD-ART) and the impact of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2008, 225 node-negative patients were referred for HD-ART with or without ADT to two large academic institutions. Indications for HD-ART were extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion (SVI), and/or positive surgical margins at radical prostatectomy (RP). A dose of at least 69.1 Gy was prescribed to the prostate bed and seminal vesicle bed. The ADT consisted of a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analog. The duration and indication of ADT was left at the discretion of the treating physician. The effect of HD-ART and ADT on biochemical (bRFS) and clinical (cRFS) relapse-free survival was examined through univariate and multivariate analysis, with correction for known patient- and treatment-related variables. Interaction terms were introduced to evaluate effect modification. Results: After a median follow-up time of 5 years, the 7-year bRFS and cRFS were 84% and 88%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, the addition of ADT was independently associated with an improved bRFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.4, p = 0.02) and cRFS (HR 0.2, p = 0.008). Higher Gleason scores and SVI were associated with decreased bRFS and cRFS. A lymphadenectomy at the time of RP independently improved cRFS (HR 0.09, p = 0.009). The 7-year probability of late Grade 2-3 toxicity was 29% and 5% for genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, respectively. The absolute incidence of Grade 3 toxicity was <1% and 10% for GI and GU symptoms, respectively. The study is limited by its retrospective design and the lack of a standardized use of ADT. Conclusions: This retrospective study shows significantly improved bRFS and cRFS rates with the addition of ADT to HD-ART, with low Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity and 10% Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity.

  11. Results of preoperative electrical stimulation of pelvic floor muscles in the continence status following radical retropubic prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Elaine Laurienzo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To evaluate preoperative rectal electrical stimulation in the recovery of urinary continence in patients who undergo radical retropubic prostatectomy. Materials and Methods Patients were divided into 3 randomized groups: control, pelvic exercises, and electrical stimulation. A 1 hour pad-test, the ICIQ-SF, and the SF-36 were performed 1, 3, and 6 months after the surgical procedure. Results Of the 58 patients who were initially included in the study, 9 were excluded due to radiotherapy after surgical intervention, an indwelling urethral catheter for more than 30 days, high surgical risk, loss of follow-up, or incomplete participation in the study routines and spontaneous interruption. Forty-nine patients concluded the study (15 in the control group, 17 in the exercise group, and 17 in the electrical stimulation group. We did not observe any significant difference in the pad test (p > 0.05, the 8 domains of the SF-36, or ICIQ-SF score compared with control groups (control, exercise, and electrical stimulation. Conclusion Preoperative rectal electrical stimulation has no impact on continence status in patients who undergo radical retropubic prostatectomy. There is no difference in the three above mentioned groups with regard to urinary leakage and quality of life.

  12. Discordance between location of positive cores in biopsy and location of positive surgical margin following radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Won; Park, Hyoung Keun; Kim, Hyeong Gon; Ham, Dong Yeub; Paick, Sung Hyun; Lho, Yong Soo; Choi, Woo Suk

    2015-10-01

    We compared location of positive cores in biopsy and location of positive surgical margin (PSM) following radical prostatectomy. This retrospective analysis included patients who were diagnosed as prostate cancer by standard 12-core transrectal ultrasonography guided prostate biopsy, and who have PSM after radical prostatectomy. After exclusion of number of biopsy cores location data, 46 patients with PSM were identified. Locations of PSM in pathologic specimen were reported as 6 difference sites (apex, base and lateral in both sides). Discordance of biopsy result and PSM was defined when no positive cores in biopsy was identified at the location of PSM. Most common location of PSM were right apex (n=21) and left apex (n=15). Multiple PSM was reported in 21 specimens (45.7%). In 32 specimens (69.6%) with PSM, one or more concordant positive biopsy cores were identified, but 14 specimens (28%) had no concordant biopsy cores at PSM location. When discordant rate was separated by locations of PSM, right apex PSM had highest rate of discordant (38%). The discordant group had significantly lower prostate volume and lower number of positive cores in biopsy than concordant group. This study showed that one fourth of PSM occurred at location where tumor was not detected at biopsy and that apex PSM had highest rate of discordant. Careful dissection to avoid PSM should be performed in every location, including where tumor was not identified in biopsy.

  13. A NEW METHOD OF BLADDER NECK RECONSTRUCTION DURING THE RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY IN PATIENTS WITH LOCALIZED PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Tolkach

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Radical prostatectomy is a «gold standard» for treatment of the patients with a localized prostate cancer. Urinary incontinence is one of the two most common complications of this operation. In this article we report a study aimed to compare the efficacy parameters linked to postoperative continence in 39 patients with new technique for reconstruction of the bladder neck during the radical prostatectomy using a deep suture of the bladder wall dorsally to the neck aperture with 45 patients in control group with a standard type of reconstruction in the form of tennis racket. According to the results, application of the new technique leads to a significant improvement in continence during the first 6 months after the operation with no difference among groups during follow-up later on. Given the results of the anatomical study, the efficacy of the new method of reconstruction is linked to passive closure mechanism created in the area of the bladder neck.

  14. [Long-term outcomes of prostate cancer patients with lymph nodes metastasis after radical prostatectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vergie, S; Gaschignard, N; Baron, M; Branchereau, J; Luyckx, F; Butel, T; Perrouin-Verbe, M-A; Bouchot, O; Rigaud, J

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate biochemical recurrence-free survival (RFS) and to identify useful predictors of such survival in localized prostate cancer patients (cN0) and pelvic lymph node metastasis (pN+) treated with radical prostatectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection. This multicenter and retrospective study, assessed overall survival (OS), cancer specific survival (CSS) and biochemical recurrence-free survival (RFS), between January 2005 until December 2010 with 5 years of distance. We evaluated factors predicting long-term RFS in node positive prostate cancer patients. Thus, 30 patients were included. Median follow-up was 89.9±27.4 months. After surgery, patients were treated with surveillance (n=4, 13.5%), adjuvant hormone therapy (n=22, 73%) or combination of radio and hormone therapy, (n=4, 13.5%). During the follow-up, 50% of patients had biochemical recurrence, with a mean time period of 38±30 months. Five and 10-year RFS were 57% and 41% respectively. Extra lymph nodes extension (P=0.00021) and pathological margin status (P=0.0065) were independent predictors of 5-year RFS. Biochemical RFS of patients treated with radical prostatectomy and subclinical lymph node metastatic disease is adequate and multifactorial. However, this study identifies pathological margin status and extra lymph node extension as independent factors of b RFS. 4. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. The new era of minimally invasive interventions for prostate cancer: robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and focal therapy

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    Schatloff O

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Oscar Schatloff1, Alyssa S Louis2, Uri Lindner21Global Robotics Institute, Florida Hospital Celebration Health, Celebration, FL, USA; 2Division of Urology, Department of Surgical Oncology, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, CanadaAbstract: Prostate cancer remains a common but highly treatable disease. Innovations in prostate cancer treatment have allowed a transition toward minimally invasive approaches in an attempt to avoid treatment-related morbidities. In the middle of the treatment spectrum between radical open surgeries and active surveillance lies robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP and focal therapy (FT. This review sets out the most current information on RALP and FT (including laser ablation, cryotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, and irreversible electroporation.Keywords: PCa, RALP, FT, laser ablation, cryotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, irreversible electroporation

  16. Radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy reduce prostate cancer mortality in elderly patients: a population-based propensity score adjusted analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandini, Marco; Pompe, Raisa S; Marchioni, Michele; Tian, Zhe; Gandaglia, Giorgio; Fossati, Nicola; Tilki, Derya; Graefen, Markus; Montorsi, Francesco; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Briganti, Alberto; Saad, Fred; Karakiewicz, Pierre I

    2018-01-01

    Contemporary data regarding the effect of local treatment (LT) vs. non-local treatment (NLT) on cancer-specific mortality (CSM) in elderly men with localized prostate cancer (PCa) are lacking. Hence, we evaluated CSM rates in a large population-based cohort of men with cT1-T2 PCa according to treatment type. Within the SEER database (2004-2014), we identified 44,381 men ≥ 75 years with cT1-T2 PCa. Radical prostatectomy and radiotherapy patients were matched and the resulting cohort (LT) was subsequently matched with NLT patients. Cumulative incidence and competing risks regression (CRR) tested CSM according to treatment type. Analyses were repeated after Gleason grade group (GGG) stratification: I (3 + 3), II (3 + 4), III (4 + 3), IV (8), and V (9-10). Overall, 4715 (50.0%) and 4715 (50.0%) men, respectively, underwent NLT and LT. Five and 7-year CSM rates for, respectively, NLT vs. LT patients were 3.0 and 5.4% vs. 1.5 and 2.1% for GGG II, 4.5 and 7.2% vs. 2.5 and 2.8% for GGG III, 7.1 and 10.0% vs. 3.5 and 5.1% for GGG IV, and 20.0 and 26.5% vs. 5.4 and 9.3% for GGG V patients. Separate multivariable CRR also showed higher CSM rates in NLT patients with GGG II [hazard ratio (HR) 3.3], GGG III (HR 2.6), GGG IV (HR 2.4) and GGG V (HR 2.6), but not in GGG I patients (p = 0.5). Despite advanced age, LT provides clinically meaningful and statistically significant benefit relative to NLT. Such benefit was exclusively applied to GGG II to V but not to GGG I patients.

  17. Effect of Preoperative Risk Group Stratification on Oncologic Outcomes of Patients with Adverse Pathologic Findings at Radical Prostatectomy.

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    Won Sik Jang

    Full Text Available Current National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines recommend postoperative radiation therapy based only on adverse pathologic findings (APFs, irrespective of preoperative risk group. We assessed whether a model incorporating both the preoperative risk group and APFs could predict long-term oncologic outcomes better than a model based on APFs alone.We retrospectively reviewed 4,404 men who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP at our institution between 1992 and 2014. After excluding patients receiving neoadjuvant therapy or with incomplete pathological or follow-up data, 3,092 men were included in the final analysis. APFs were defined as extraprostatic extension (EPE, seminal vesicle invasion (SVI, or a positive surgical margin (PSM. The adequacy of model fit to the data was compared using the likelihood-ratio test between the models with and without risk groups, and model discrimination was compared with the concordance index (c-index for predicting biochemical recurrence (BCR and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM. We performed multivariate Cox proportional hazard model and competing risk regression analyses to identify predictors of BCR and PCSM in the total patient group and each of the risk groups.Adding risk groups to the model containing only APFs significantly improved the fit to the data (likelihood-ratio test, p <0.001 and the c-index increased from 0.693 to 0.732 for BCR and from 0.707 to 0.747 for PCSM. A RP Gleason score (GS ≥8 and a PSM were independently associated with BCR in the total patient group and also each risk group. However, only a GS ≥8 and SVI were associated with PCSM in the total patient group (GS ≥8: hazard ratio [HR] 5.39 and SVI: HR 3.36 and the high-risk group (GS ≥8: HR 6.31 and SVI: HR 4.05.The postoperative estimation of oncologic outcomes in men with APFs at RP was improved by considering preoperative risk group stratification. Although a PSM was an independent predictor for BCR, only a RP

  18. The prognostic significance of preoperatively assessed AST/ALT (De Ritis) ratio on survival in patients underwent radical cystectomy.

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    Gorgel, Sacit Nuri; Kose, Osman; Koc, Esra Meltem; Ates, Erhan; Akin, Yigit; Yilmaz, Yuksel

    2017-09-01

    We aimed to evaluate prognostic significance of preoperatively assessed aspartate aminotransaminase (AST)/alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (De Ritis) ratio on survival in bladder cancer (BC) patients underwent radical cystectomy (RC). We, respectively, analysed clinical and pathological data of 153 patients who underwent RC for BC between February 2006 and December 2016 at a tertiary level hospital. The potential prognostic value of De Ritis ratio was assessed by using ROC curve analysis. The effect of the De Ritis ratio was analysed by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression hazard models for patients' disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OAS). We had 149 BC patients, in total. Mean age was 61.65 ± 9.13 years. One hundred and thirty-nine (93.3%) of the patients were men. According to ROC analysis, optimal threshold of De Ritis ratio for DSS was 1.30. In Kaplan-Meier analyses, the high De Ritis ratio group showed worse progression in DSS and OAS (all parameters, p < 0.001). On Cox regression models of clinical and pathological parameters to predict DSS, De Ritis ratio (HR 5.79, 95% CI 2.25-15.13), pathological T stage (HR 15.89, 95% CI 3.92-64.33, in all p < 0.001); and to predict OAS, De Ritis ratio (HR 2.61, 95% CI 1.49-4.56; p < 0.001), pathological T stage (HR 5.42, 95% CI 2.63-11.64; p < 0.001) and age (HR 1.05, 95% CI 1.02-1.08; p = 0.001) were determined as independent prognostic factors. Preoperative elevated De Ritis ratio could be an independent prognostic factor in BC patients underwent RC. Our results should be confirmed by large and properly designed prospective, randomized trials.

  19. Localised adenocarcinoma of prostate: the role of pelvis radiotherapy following radical prostatectomy; Adenocarcinome prostatique localise: place de la radiotherapie pelvienne apres prostatectomie radicale

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    Mazeron, J.J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France); Bolla, M. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1997-12-31

    Radical prostatectomy after pelvic lymphadenectomy is an effective treatment or patients with T1-2 pN0 adenocarcinoma of the prostate. However, pathologic analysis of resected tissue reveals that in 20 to 40 % of clinical stage B lesions, the tumour has extended locally beyond the prostate. This infra-clinical disease may be the origin of local relapse. Radiation oncologists are often asked to deliver post-operative irradiation. There is sufficient evidence in the literature that postoperative radiation therapy can improve local control rate for patients with pT3 pN0 adenocarcinoma of the prostate; however, the effect of this radiotherapy on survival in this category of patients remains unclear. It is the reason why randomized clinical trials have been implemented for investigating the role of pelvic external irradiation with respect to the effects on local control, acute and late morbidity, overall survival and cancer-related survival, and for better defining the selective indications of radiotherapy, regarding pathological data. (author)

  20. Optimal definition of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy depends on pathologic risk factors: identifying candidates for early salvage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Maria C; Li, Jianbo; Klink, Joseph C; Kattan, Michael W; Klein, Eric A; Stephenson, Andrew J

    2014-08-01

    The use of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) thresholds (definitions for patients treated with radical prostatectomy may be useful in the identification of candidates for early salvage therapy with improved outcome; however, the practice risks overtreatment, as the risk of subsequent PSA progression may be low. To analyze 14 BCR definitions for their association with subsequent PSA and treatment progression among subgroups of patients at varying risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality. The subsequent risk of PSA and treatment progression after BCR based on 14 BCR definitions (six standard definitions and eight definitions requiring one or more successive PSA rises ≤0.1 ng/ml) was analyzed according to various clinicopathologic risk criteria among 2348 patients with a detectable PSA ≥0.03 ng/ml at least 6 wk after radical prostatectomy. Radical prostatectomy. Probability of subsequent PSA progression after BCR, defined as a PSA rise >0.1 ng/ml above BCR PSA, initiation of secondary treatment, or clinical progression. Using standard BCR definitions, the risk of PSA progression was >70%, regardless of clinicopathologic features. A single PSA ≤0.1 ng/ml was associated with PSA progression in only 30-55% of patients but ranged from 18-25% to 73-88% for patients without and with adverse pathologic features, respectively. Based on discrimination and calibration analysis, the optimal BCR definition for patients with 5-yr progression-free probability of 90% was a single PSA ≥0.05 ng/ml, two or more rising PSAs ≥0.05 ng/ml, PSA ≥0.2 ng/ml and rising, and PSA ≥0.4 ng/ml and rising. BCR definitions below currently accepted PSA thresholds appear to be valid for selecting patients with adverse clinicopathologic risk factors for secondary therapy. This information may be useful in selecting for early salvage radiotherapy to improve clinical outcome. Copyright © 2013 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Incidence of Second Malignancies in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Radical Prostatectomy

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    Hamilton, Sarah Nicole; Tyldesley, Scott [Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Hamm, Jeremy [Department of Population Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Jiang, Wei Ning [Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Keyes, Mira; Pickles, Tom [Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Lapointe, Vince [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Kahnamelli, Adam [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); McKenzie, Michael [Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Miller, Stacy [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Centre for the North, Prince George, British Columbia (Canada); Morris, W. James, E-mail: jmorris@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To compare the second malignancy incidence in prostate cancer patients treated with brachytherapy (BT) relative to radical prostatectomy (RP) and to compare both groups with the cancer incidence in the general population. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2010, 2418 patients were treated with Iodine 125 prostate BT monotherapy at the British Columbia Cancer Agency, and 4015 referred patients were treated with RP. Cancer incidence was compared with the age-matched general population using standardized incidence ratios (SIRs). Pelvic malignancies included invasive and noninvasive bladder cancer and rectal cancer. Cox multivariable analysis was performed with adjustment for covariates to determine whether treatment (RP vs BT) was associated with second malignancy risk. Results: The median age at BT was 66 years and at RP 62 years. The SIR comparing BT patients with the general population was 1.06 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.91-1.22) for second malignancy and was 1.53 (95% CI 1.12-2.04) for pelvic malignancy. The SIR comparing RP patients with the general population was 1.11 (95% CI 0.98-1.25) for second malignancy and was 1.11 (95% CI 0.82-1.48) for pelvic malignancy. On multivariable analysis, older age (hazard ratio [HR] 1.05) and smoking (HR 1.65) were associated with increased second malignancy risk (P<.0001). Radical prostatectomy was not associated with a decreased second malignancy risk relative to BT (HR 0.90, P=.43), even when excluding patients who received postprostatectomy external beam radiation therapy (HR 1.13, P=.25). Older age (HR 1.09, P<.0001) and smoking (HR 2.17, P=.0009) were associated with increased pelvic malignancy risk. Radical prostatectomy was not associated with a decreased pelvic malignancy risk compared with BT (HR 0.57, P=.082), even when excluding postprostatectomy external beam radiation therapy patients (HR 0.87, P=.56). Conclusions: After adjustment for covariates, BT patients did not have an increased second

  2. Evaluation of predictors of unfavorable pathological features in men eligible for active surveillance using radical prostatectomy specimens: a multi-institutional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Kei; Inoue, Takahiro; Kinoshita, Hidefumi; Yano, Toshifumi; Kawanishi, Hiroaki; Kanda, Hideki; Terada, Naoki; Kobayashi, Takashi; Kamba, Tomomi; Mikami, Yoshiki; Shiraishi, Taizo; Uemura, Yoshiko; Imai, Yukihiro; Honjo, Gen; Shirase, Tomoyuki; Okumura, Kazuhiro; Kawakita, Mutsushi; Ogura, Keiji; Sugimura, Yoshiki; Matsuda, Tadashi; Ogawa, Osamu

    2016-12-01

    Active surveillance has emerged as an alternative to immediate treatment in men with favorable-risk prostate cancer; however, consensus about defining the appropriate candidates is still lacking. To examine the factors predicting unfavorable pathology among active surveillance candidates, we assessed low-risk radical prostatectomy specimens. This retrospective study included 1753 men who had undergone radical prostatectomy at six independent institutions in Japan from 2005 to 2011. Patients who met the active surveillance criteria were categorized depending on the pathological features of the radical prostatectomy specimens. 'Reclassification' was defined as upstaging (≥pT3) or upgrading (radical prostatectomy Gleason score ≥7), and 'adverse pathology' was defined as pathological stage ≥pT3 or radical prostatectomy Gleason score ≥4 + 3. Multivariate analysis was used to analyze the preoperative factors for reclassification and adverse pathology. The rates of reclassification and adverse pathology were evaluated by classifying patients according to biopsy core numbers. The active surveillance criteria were met by 284 cases. Reclassification was identified in 154 (54.2%) cases, while adverse pathology in 60 (21.1%) cases. Prostate-specific antigen density and percentage of positive cores were independently associated with reclassification and adverse pathology. The rates of reclassification and adverse pathology were significantly higher among patients with <10 biopsy cores than among others. Thus, focusing on 149 patients with ≥10 biopsy cores, prostate-specific antigen density was the only independent predictor of unfavorable pathological features. The receiver operating characteristic curve analysis determines an optimal cut-off value of prostate-specific antigen density as 0.15 ng/ml 2 . Prostate-specific antigen density is the most important predictor of unfavorable pathological features in active surveillance candidates. © The Author 2016. Published

  3. Higher Prostate Weight Is Inversely Associated with Gleason Score Upgrading in Radical Prostatectomy Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Reis, Leonardo Oliveira; Zani, Emerson Luis; Freitas, Leandro L. L.; Denardi, Fernandes; Billis, Athanase

    2013-01-01

    Background. Protective factors against Gleason upgrading and its impact on outcomes after surgery warrant better definition. Patients and Methods. Consecutive 343 patients were categorized at biopsy (BGS) and prostatectomy (PGS) as Gleason score, ≤6, 7, and ≥8; 94 patients (27.4%) had PSA recurrence, mean followup 80.2 months (median 99). Independent predictors of Gleason upgrading (logistic regression) and disease-free survival (DFS) (Kaplan-Meier, log-rank) were determined. Results. Gleason...

  4. Augmented reality during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: expert robotic surgeons' on-the-spot insights after live surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porpiglia, Francesco; Bertolo, Riccardo; Amparore, Daniele; Checcucci, Enrico; Artibani, Walter; Dasgupta, Prokar; Montorsi, Francesco; Tewari, Ashutosh; Fiori, Cristian

    2018-04-01

    3D reconstruction of the standard two-dimension cross-sectional imaging has known increasing diffusion. It may represent one of the key points for a tailored treatment planning. Along these lines, we used a novel software for augmented-reality robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (AR-RARP) at our Institution. 3D virtual models of the prostate and the prostate cancer were reconstructed from high resolution (1-mm slices) multi-parametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging (mp-MRI) by M3dics (Turin, Italy). The innovation in the study is represented by the software-based integration of the virtual model inside the Da Vinci (Intuitive, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) robotic console during robotic prostatectomy. In January 2018, the above-described AR-RARP technique has been used during the live surgery sessions of the 6th Techno-Urology Meeting held at San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital (Orbassano, Turin, Italy). During this meeting, 6 experienced robotic surgeons (who have already performed more than 1000 RARP) used the software during nerve-sparing prostatectomy. The use of the technology was standardized to four key steps during the procedure: 1) bladder neck dissection; 2) nerve-sparing technique; 3) apex dissection; and 4) tailoring of eventual selective biopsies of prostatic lodge after prostatectomy). A Face Validity questionnaire was purpose-built aimed to collect the expert surgeons' insights about the eventual help of the technology in guiding the surgeon during the above-described AR-RARP steps. It was administered at the end of the surgeries to the respective surgeons. The questionnaire was made of open-ended questions of ordinal ten-point rating Likert Scale (where 1 corresponded to a strongly negative opinion and 10 to a strongly positive opinion). The median value of Likert scale from the evaluation of each of the aforementioned steps of AR-RARP was 9, (IQR 9-10). These findings are a confirmation of the increasing interest for a new-generation of image-guided surgery

  5. A randomized trial comparing radical prostatectomy plus endocrine therapy versus external beam radiotherapy plus endocrine therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer. Results at median follow-up of 102 months

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akakura, Koichiro; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Ichikawa, Tomohiko

    2006-01-01

    The background of this study was to investigate the optimal treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer, a prospective randomized trial was conducted to compare radical prostatectomy plus endocrine therapy versus external beam radiotherapy plus endocrine therapy. One hundred patients with T2b-3N0M0 prostate cancer were enrolled and 95 were evaluated. Of 95 cases, 46 underwent radical prostatectomy with pelvic lymph node dissection and 49 were treated with external beam radiation by linear accelerator with 40-50 Gy to the whole pelvis and 20-Gy boost to the prostatic area. For all patients, endocrine therapy was initiated 8 weeks before surgery or radiotherapy and continued thereafter. The long-term outcome and morbidity were examined. Median follow-up period was 102 months. At 10 years overall survival rates in the surgery group were better than the radiation group (76.2% versus 71.1% for biochemical progression-free rates; P=0.25, 83.5% versus 66.1% for clinical progression-free rates; P=0.14, 85.7% versus 77.1% for cause-specific survival rates; P=0.06, and 67.9% versus 60.9% for overall survival rates; P=0.30), although none of them reached statistical significance. Erectile dysfunction was recognized in almost all patients as a result of continuous endocrine therapy. Incontinence requiring more than one pad per day was observed more frequently in the surgery group than the radiation group (P<0.01). For the treatment of patients with locally advanced prostate cancer, when combined with endocrine therapy, either radical prostatectomy or external beam radiotherapy demonstrated favorable long-term outcomes. The radiation dose of 60-70 Gy might not be enough for the local treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer. (author)

  6. The use of a bulldog clamp to control the dorsal vein complex during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüfek, Ilter; Atuğ, Fatih; Argun, Burak; Keskin, Selçuk; Obek, Can; Coşkuner, Enis; Kural, Ali Riza

    2012-12-01

    Optimal control of the dorsal venous complex (DVC) is a critical step in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). If DVC is not controlled properly, bleeding may occur during the apical dissection. On the other hand, if it is controlled well, a bloodless field is attained and, thus, a precise apical dissection and urethral division is possible. Suture ligation is the most common technique used for dorsal vein control, while some authors recommend using an endovascular stapler. Recently, athermal division and selective suture ligation technique has been reported for DVC control. We describe a new technique: Use of a bulldog clamp to control the DVC during RARP. The control of the DVC with a bulldog clamp allows a bloodless field with precise apical dissection and provides preservation of maximum urethral length while avoiding sphincteral injury.

  7. FORMATION OF VESICOURETHRAL ANASTOMOSIS DURING ENDOVIDEOSURGICAL EXTRAPERITONEAL RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY: СOMPARATIVE STUDY OF THREE DIFFERENT PROCEDURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Popov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Extraperitoneoscopic (endovideosurgical extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy (ERPE is one of the current surgical treatment procedures in patients with localized prostate cancer. Failure of vesicourethral anastomosis (VUA and the development of its stricture are common surgi-cal complications. This investigation compares the efficiency and safety of different procedures to form VUA during ERPE: an interrupted suture (n = 24, a MVAC suture (n = 23, and a MVAC suture using self-locking suture material (n = 24. The performed comparative analysis of different procedures for forming VUA during ERPE may conclude that there are a number of advantages of the MVAC suture ap-plying the self-locking suture material. These advantages include less time taken to form VUA with the low frequency of complications, such as leakages occurring during control cystography or the development of delayed VUA strictures. 

  8. Systematic review and meta-analysis of studies reporting urinary continence recovery after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficarra, Vincenzo; Novara, Giacomo; Rosen, Raymond C; Artibani, Walter; Carroll, Peter R; Costello, Anthony; Menon, Mani; Montorsi, Francesco; Patel, Vipul R; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Van der Poel, Henk; Wilson, Timothy G; Zattoni, Filiberto; Mottrie, Alexandre

    2012-09-01

    Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) was proposed to improve functional outcomes in comparison with retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP) or laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP). In the initial RARP series, 12-mo urinary continence recovery rates ranged from 84% to 97%. However, the few available studies comparing RARP with RRP or LRP published before 2008 did not permit any definitive conclusions about the superiority of any one of these techniques in terms of urinary continence recovery. The aims of this systematic review were (1) to evaluate the prevalence and risk factors for urinary incontinence after RARP, (2) to identify surgical techniques able to improve urinary continence recovery after RARP, and (3) to perform a cumulative analysis of all available studies comparing RARP versus RRP or LRP in terms of the urinary continence recovery rate. A literature search was performed in August 2011 using the Medline, Embase, and Web of Science databases. The Medline search included only a free-text protocol using the term radical prostatectomy across the title and abstract fields of the records. The following limits were used: humans; gender (male); and publication date from January 1, 2008. Searches of the Embase and Web of Science databases used the same free-text protocol, keywords, and search period. Only comparative studies or clinical series including >100 cases reporting urinary continence outcomes were included in this review. Cumulative analysis was conducted using the Review Manager v.4.2 software designed for composing Cochrane Reviews (Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, UK). We analyzed 51 articles reporting urinary continence rates after RARP: 17 case series, 17 studies comparing different techniques in the context of RARP, 9 studies comparing RARP with RRP, and 8 studies comparing RARP with LRP. The 12-mo urinary incontinence rates ranged from 4% to 31%, with a mean value of 16% using a no pad definition. Considering a no pad or safety pad

  9. FORMATION OF VESICOURETHRAL ANASTOMOSIS DURING ENDOVIDEOSURGICAL EXTRAPERITONEAL RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY: СOMPARATIVE STUDY OF THREE DIFFERENT PROCEDURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Popov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Extraperitoneoscopic (endovideosurgical extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy (ERPE is one of the current surgical treatment procedures in patients with localized prostate cancer. Failure of vesicourethral anastomosis (VUA and the development of its stricture are common surgi-cal complications. This investigation compares the efficiency and safety of different procedures to form VUA during ERPE: an interrupted suture (n = 24, a MVAC suture (n = 23, and a MVAC suture using self-locking suture material (n = 24. The performed comparative analysis of different procedures for forming VUA during ERPE may conclude that there are a number of advantages of the MVAC suture ap-plying the self-locking suture material. These advantages include less time taken to form VUA with the low frequency of complications, such as leakages occurring during control cystography or the development of delayed VUA strictures. 

  10. Long-term morbidity and quality of life in patients with localized prostate cancer undergoing definitive radiotherapy or radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilleby, Wolfgang; Fossaa, Sophie D.; Waehre, Haakon R.; Olsen, Dag Rune

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To assess morbidity, side effects, and quality of life (QoL) in patients treated for localized prostate cancer with curative aim. Methods and Materials: This descriptive cross-sectional study comprises 154 patients who had undergone definitive radiotherapy (RAD) and 108 patients with radical prostatectomy (PRECT) at the Norwegian Radium Hospital during 1987-1995. At least 1 year after treatment the patients completed several questionnaires assessing quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 instrument [EORTC QLQ-C30]), lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS): International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), or sexuality (selected questions from the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale [PAIS]). Urinary incontinence and bowel distress were evaluated by ad hoc constructed questionnaires. A control group (OBS) consisted of 38 patients following the watch-and-wait policy. Results: Twenty percent of the patients from the RAD Group had moderate (14%) or severe (6%) LUTS as compared to 12% in the PRECT group. However, 35% of men from the latter group reported moderate to severe urinary incontinence. 'Overall' sexuality was moderately or severely impaired in 71% of the PRECT and 50% of the RAD patients. In the former group high age was correlated with erectile impotency (p 1 year after definitive radiotherapy or radical prostatectomy with no difference as compared to the age-matched normal population. Clinicians should be aware of the fact that general QoL dimensions (physical function, emotional function, fatigue) are as a rule of greater significance for QoL than sexuality and lower urinary tract symptoms

  11. Technical refinement and learning curve for attenuating neurapraxia during robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy to improve sexual function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemozaffar, Mehrdad; Duclos, Antoine; Hevelone, Nathanael D; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Borza, Tudor; Yu, Hua-Yin; Kowalczyk, Keith J; Hu, Jim C

    2012-06-01

    While radical prostatectomy surgeon learning curves have characterized less blood loss, shorter operative times, and fewer positive margins, there is a dearth of studies characterizing learning curves for improving sexual function. Additionally, while learning curve studies often define volume thresholds for improvement, few of these studies demonstrate specific technical modifications that allow reproducibility of improved outcomes. Demonstrate and quantify the learning curve for improving sexual function outcomes based on technical refinements that reduce neurovascular bundle displacement during nerve-sparing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). We performed a retrospective study of 400 consecutive RARPs, categorized into groups of 50, performed after elimination of continuous surgeon/assistant neurovascular bundle countertraction. Our approach to RARP has been described previously. A single-console robotic system was used for all cases. Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite sexual function was measured within 1 yr of RARP. Linear regression was performed to determine factors influencing the recovery of sexual function. Greater surgeon experience was associated with better 5-mo sexual function (p = 0.007) and a trend for better 12-mo sexual function (p = 0.061), with improvement plateauing after 250-300 cases. Additionally, younger patient age (both p<0.02) and better preoperative sexual function (<0.001) were associated with better 5- and 12-mo sexual function. Moreover, trainee robotic console time during nerve sparing was associated with worse 12-mo sexual function (p=0.021), while unilateral nerve sparing/non-nerve sparing was associated with worse 5-mo sexual function (p = 0.009). Limitations include the retrospective single-surgeon design. With greater surgeon experience, attenuating lateral displacement of the neurovascular bundle and resultant neurapraxia improve postoperative sexual function. However, to maximize outcomes, appropriate patient

  12. Secondary Circulating Prostate Cells Predict Biochemical Failure in Prostate Cancer Patients after Radical Prostatectomy and without Evidence of Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel P. Murray

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Although 90% of prostate cancer is considered to be localized, 20%–30% of patients will experience biochemical failure (BF, defined as serum PSA >0.2 ng/mL, after radical prostatectomy (RP. The presence of circulating prostate cells (CPCs in men without evidence of BF may be useful to predict patients at risk for BF. We describe the frequency of CPCs detected after RP, relation with clinicopathological parameters, and association with biochemical failure. Methods and Patients. Serial blood samples were taken during followup after RP, mononuclear cells were obtained by differential gel centrifugation, and CPCs identified using standard immunocytochemistry using anti-PSA monoclonal antibodies. Age, pathological stage (organ confined, nonorgan confined, pathological grade, margin status (positive, negative, extracapsular extension, perineural, vascular, and lymphatic infiltration (positive, negative were compared with the presence/absence of CPCs and with and without biochemical failure. Kaplan Meier methods were used to compare the unadjusted biochemical failure free survival of patients with and without CPCs. Results. 114 men participated, and secondary CPCs were detected more frequently in patients with positive margins, extracapsular extension, and vascular and lymphatic infiltration and were associated with biochemical failure independent of these clinicopathological variables, and with a shorter time to BF. Conclusions. Secondary CPCs are an independent risk factor associated with increased BF in men with a PSA <0.2 ng/mL after radical prostatectomy, but do not determine if the recurrence is due to local or systemic disease. These results warrant larger studies to confirm the findings.

  13. Randomized, placebo controlled study of electrical stimulation with pelvic floor muscle training for severe urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanishi, Tomonori; Mizuno, Tomoya; Watanabe, Miho; Honda, Mikihiko; Yoshida, Ken-Ichiro

    2010-11-01

    We evaluated electrical stimulation combined with pelvic floor muscle training for urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy in a randomized controlled study. A total of 56 men with severe urinary incontinence (more than 200 gm daily), mean ± SD age 66.6 ± 6.2 years, were randomized to an active treatment group (26) or a sham group (30). All patients performed pelvic floor muscle training preoperatively and continued throughout the study. For active stimulation 50 Hz square waves of 300 μs pulse duration and a 5 seconds on, 5 seconds off duty cycle were applied for 15 minutes twice daily with an anal electrode. Sham stimulation was limited to 3 mA with a 2 seconds on, 13 seconds off duty cycle. In the active group 8 (36%), 14 (63%), 18 (81%) and 19 (86%) patients were continent (22) vs 1 (4%), 4 (16%), 11 (44%) and 17 (86%) in the sham group (25) (leakage less than 8 gm daily) after 1, 3, 6 and 12 months, respectively. There was a significant difference in the number of continent patients between the groups at 1, 3 and 6 months (p = 0.0161, p = 0.0021 and p = 0.0156, respectively). The time to achieve continence was significantly shorter in the active group (2.71 ± 2.6 months) than in the sham group (6.82 ± 3.9 months, p = 0.0006). Changes in the amount of leakage, the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form score and the King's Health Questionnaire score were significantly larger in the active group at 1 month but there was no difference at 12 months. Electrical stimulation resulted in earlier recovery of continence in patients with urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy. Copyright © 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dynamics of pelvic floor muscle functional parameters and their correlations with urinary incontinence in men after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachovajevienė, Brigita; Šiupšinskas, Laimonas; Zachovajevas, Pavelas; Milonas, Daimantas

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the dynamics of pelvic floor muscle strength, endurance, and urinary incontinence in a 6-month period in men after radical prostatectomy and to determine correlations between pelvic floor muscle strength, endurance, and urinary incontinence. Forty-two men with prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy participated in the study. Pelvic floor muscles parameters were evaluated using the anal perineometer. An 8-hour pad test was used with the catheter removed. The greatest change in strength occurred during the last 3 months, i.e., from the third to the sixth month following surgery (P ≤ 0.05). The average amount of urinary incontinence on the day of catheter removal was approximately 311 g per 8 hr. Urinary incontinence decreased by 93.6% from the day of catheter removal 6 months later. A strong correlation (P ≤ 0.001) of reverse dependence was determined between pelvic floor muscle strength before surgery and the amount of urinary incontinence 6 months following surgery. The greatest change of pelvic floor muscles strength and endurance occurred during the third to the sixth month following surgery. The greatest change in urinary incontinence occurred during the first month following surgery. Pelvic floor muscle strength causes a greater decrease in urinary incontinence than endurance. The greater the pelvic floor muscle strength before surgery, the lower the amount of urinary incontinence. Age also affects pelvic floor muscle strength and endurance; this relation gradually weakens and with age disappears. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:126-131, 2017. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. A comparative analysis of primary and secondary Gleason pattern predictive ability for positive surgical margins after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfoungaristos, S; Kavouras, A; Kanatas, P; Polimeros, N; Perimenis, P

    2011-01-01

    To compare the predictive ability of primary and secondary Gleason pattern for positive surgical margins in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer and a preoperative Gleason score ≤ 6. A retrospective analysis of the medical records of patients undergone a radical prostatectomy between January 2005 and October 2010 was conducted. Patients' age, prostate volume, preoperative PSA, biopsy Gleason score, the 1st and 2nd Gleason pattern were entered a univariate and multivariate analysis. The 1st and 2nd pattern were tested for their ability to predict positive surgical margins using receiver operating characteristic curves. Positive surgical margins were noticed in 56 cases (38.1%) out of 147 studied patients. The 2nd pattern was significantly greater in those with positive surgical margins while the 1st pattern was not significantly different between the 2 groups of patients. ROC analysis revealed that area under the curve was 0.53 (p=0.538) for the 1st pattern and 0.60 (p=0.048) for the 2nd pattern. Concerning the cases with PSA <10 ng/ml, it was also found that only the 2nd pattern had a predictive ability (p=0.050). When multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted it was found that the 2nd pattern was the only independent predictor. The second Gleason pattern was found to be of higher value than the 1st one for the prediction of positive surgical margins in patients with preoperative Gleason score ≤ 6 and this should be considered especially when a neurovascular bundle sparing radical prostatectomy is planned, in order not to harm the oncological outcome.

  16. High serum folate is associated with reduced biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy: Results from the SEARCH Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M. Moreira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction To analyze the association between serum levels of folate and risk of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy among men from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH database. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of 135 subjects from the SEARCH database treated between 1991-2009 with available preoperative serum folate levels. Patients' characteristics at the time of the surgery were analyzed with ranksum and linear regression. Uni- and multivariable analyses of folate levels (log-transformed and time to biochemical recurrence were performed with Cox proportional hazards. Results The median preoperative folate level was 11.6ng/mL (reference = 1.5-20.0ng/mL. Folate levels were significantly lower among African-American men than Caucasians (P = 0.003. In univariable analysis, higher folate levels were associated with more recent year of surgery (P < 0.001 and lower preoperative PSA (P = 0.003. In univariable analysis, there was a trend towards lower risk of biochemical recurrence among men with high folate levels (HR = 0.61, 95%CI = 0.37-1.03, P = 0.064. After adjustments for patients characteristics' and pre- and post-operative clinical and pathological findings, higher serum levels of folate were independently associated with lower risk for biochemical recurrence (HR = 0.42, 95%CI = 0.20-0.89, P = 0.023. Conclusion In a cohort of men undergoing radical prostatectomy at several VAs across the country, higher serum folate levels were associated with lower PSA and lower risk for biochemical failure. While the source of the folate in the serum in this study is unknown (i.e. diet vs. supplement, these findings, if confirmed, suggest a potential role of folic acid supplementation or increased consumption of folate rich foods to reduce the risk of recurrence.

  17. Significant Change in Predicted Risk of Biochemical Recurrence After Radical Prostatectomy More Common in Black Than in White Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudano, Melissa A.; Badani, Ketan K.; McCann, Tara R.; Mann, Mark J.; Ritch, Chad; Desai, Manisha; Benson, Mitchell C.; McKiernan, James M.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To examine by race how frequently the data after radical prostatectomy translates into a substantial change in prognosis. Many nomograms exist to predict the survival outcomes using the pretreatment clinical parameters and post-treatment pathologic parameters. Race might be an important factor affecting their predictive ability. METHODS Kattan nomograms were used to calculate the pretreatment and post-radical prostatectomy 5-year progression-free probability for each patient. The difference between the nomogram scores was used to divide the patients into 3 groups. A decrease in probability of ≥15 percentage points was classified as a significant increase in the probability of recurrence, an increase of ≥15 points was classified as a significant decrease in the probability of recurrence, and an absolute change of <15 points was considered no significant change. RESULTS The data from 1709 (132 black and 1577 white) men were analyzed. Among the black men, 26.5% had an increase in the probability of recurrence, 57.6% had no change, and 15.9% had a decrease in the probability of recurrence. Among the white men, 13.8% had an increase in the probability of recurrence, 64.5% had no change, and 21.7% had a decrease in the probability of recurrence. Black men were twice as likely to have a significant increase in the probability of recurrence postoperatively compared with white men after adjusting for preoperative prostate-specific antigen level, clinical stage, and biopsy Gleason sum (odds ratio 2.0, 95% confidence interval 1.3–3.1, P = .002). CONCLUSIONS These data could assist clinicians when counseling black men regarding their treatment options according to their preoperative risk profile. PMID:19589568

  18. [Long term biochemical recurrence free survival after radical prostatectomy for cancer: comparative analysis according to surgical approach and clinicopathological stage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, J; Ouzzane, A; Flamand, V; Fantoni, J-C; Puech, P; Leroy, X; Villers, A

    2015-03-01

    To assess long term biochemical recurrence free survival after radical prostatectomy according to open, laparoscopic and robot-assisted surgical approach and clinicopathological stage. A cohort study of 1313 consecutive patients treated by radical prostatectomy for localized or locally advanced prostate cancer between 2000 and 2013. Open surgery (63.7%), laparoscopy (10%) and robot-assisted laparoscopy (26.4%) were performed. Biochemical recurrence was defined by PSA>0,1ng/mL. The biochemical recurrence free survival was described by Kaplan Meier method and prognostic factors were analysed by multivariable Cox regression. Median follow-up was 57 months (IQR: 31-90). Ten years biochemical recurrence free survival was 88.5%, 71.6% and 53.5% respectively for low, intermediate and high-risk D'Amico groups. On multivariable analysis, the worse prognostic factor was Gleason score (P<0.001). Positive surgical margins rate was 53% in pT3 tumours and 24% in pT2 tumours (P<0.001). Biochemical recurrence free survival (P=0.06) and positive surgical margins rate (P=0.87) were not statistically different between the three surgical approaches. Biochemical recurrence free survival in our study does not differ according to surgical approach and is similar to published series. Ten years biochemical recurrence free survival for high-risk tumours without hormone therapy is 54% justifying the role of surgery in the therapeutic conversations in this group of tumours. 3. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. [Can preoperative prostate MRI before radical prostatectomy predict extracapsular extension and the side of the index lesion?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albisinni, S; De Groote, A; Deneft, F; Thoma, P; Catteau, X; Roumeguère, T; Wildschutz, T

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the role of preoperative multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (MP-MRI) in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. Specifically, the accuracy of MP-MRI in detecting extracapsular extension (ECE) and individuating the side of the index lesion have been explored. Thirty-five consecutive patients undergoing radical prostatectomy have been retrospectively analyzed. The MRI exam incorporated T2-weighted imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast enhancement in all patients. χ(2) test was performed to assess an association between an MP-MRI suggestive of ECE and pathologic ECE; similar tests were performed to study the association between the MRI-detected side of the index lesion and its true localization on final pathology. Univariate logistic regression models were constructed to evaluate possible predictors of ECE, including MP-MRI suspected ECE. Seventeen percent (6/35) of men presented ECE on final pathology. MP-MRI was predictive of pathologic ECE with a negative predictive value and specificity of 93% and 90%, respectively. Global accuracy of MP-MRI in predicting ECE was 86%. MRI-detected ECE was significantly predictive of pathologic ECE on logistic regression (OR: 17.3, 95% CI: 2.2-138.2, P=0.007). Moreover, MRI significantly predicted the side of the index lesion (P=0.012). In this single center cohort, preoperative MP-MRI was significantly predictive of ECE and side of the index lesion. Further studies are necessary to individuate patients who can benefit from preoperative MP-MRI. 5. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Discerning the survival advantage among patients with prostate cancer who undergo radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy: The limitations of cancer registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stephen B; Huo, Jinhai; Chamie, Karim; Smaldone, Marc C; Kosarek, Christopher D; Fang, Justin E; Ynalvez, Leslie A; Kim, Simon P; Hoffman, Karen E; Giordano, Sharon H; Chapin, Brian F

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the overall survival of patients who undergo radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy versus noncancer controls to discern whether there is a survival advantage according to prostate cancer treatment and the impact of selection bias on these results. A matched cohort study was performed using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare-linked database. In total, 34,473 patients ages 66 to 75 years were identified who were without significant comorbidity, were diagnosed with localized prostate cancer, and received treatment treated with surgery or radiotherapy between 2004 and 2011. These patients were matched to a noncancer control cohort. The rates of all-cause mortality that occurred within the study period were compared. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to identify determinants associated with overall survival. Of 34,473 patients who were included in the analysis, 21,740 (63%) received radiation therapy, and 12,733 (37%) underwent surgery. There was improved survival in patients who underwent surgery (hazard ratio, 0.35; 95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.38) and in those who received radiotherapy (hazard ratio, 0.72; 95% confidence interval, 0.68-0.75) compared with noncancer controls. Overall survival improved significantly in both treatment groups, with the greatest benefit observed among patients who underwent surgery (log rank P < .001). Population-based data indicated that patients with prostate cancer who received treatment with either surgery or radiotherapy had improved overall survival compared with a cohort of matched noncancer controls. Surgery produce longer survival compared with radiation therapy. These results suggest an inherent selection-bias because of unmeasured confounding variables. Cancer 2017;123:1617-1624. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  1. Population-Based Validation of the 2014 ISUP Gleason Grade Groups in Patients Treated With Radical Prostatectomy, Brachytherapy, External Beam Radiation, or no Local Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompe, Raisa S; Davis-Bondarenko, Helen; Zaffuto, Emanuele; Tian, Zhe; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Leyh-Bannurah, Sami-Ramzi; Schiffmann, Jonas; Saad, Fred; Huland, Hartwig; Graefen, Markus; Tilki, Derya; Karakiewicz, Pierre I

    2017-05-01

    To test discriminant ability of the 2014 ISUP Gleason grade groups (GGG) for prediction of prostate cancer specific mortality (PCSM) after radical prostatectomy (RP), brachytherapy (BT), external beam radiation (EBRT) or no local treatment (NLT) relative to traditional Gleason grading (TGG). In the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-database (2004-2009), 2,42,531 non-metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) patients were identified, who underwent local treatment (RP, BT, EBRT only) or NLT. Follow-up endpoint was PCSM. Biopsy and/or pathological Gleason score (GS) were categorized as TGG ≤6, 7, 8-10 or GGG: I (≤6), II (3 + 4), III (4 + 3), IV (8), and V (9-10). Kaplan-Meier plots, multivariable Cox regression analyses and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) area under the curve analyses (AUC) were used. Median follow-up was 76 months (IQR: 59-94). For the four examined treatment modalities, all five GGG strata and all three TGG strata independently predicted PCSM. GGG yielded 1.5-fold or greater HR differences between GGG II and GGG III, and twofold or greater HR differences between GGG IV and GGG V. Relative to TGG, GGG added 0.4-1.1% to AUC. This large population-based cohort study confirms the added discriminant properties of the novel GGG strata and confirms a modest gain in predictive accuracy. Prostate 77: 686-693, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Prospective longitudinal comparative study of health-related quality of life in patients treated with radical prostatectomy or permanent brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobuke, Makoto; Saika, Takashi; Nakanishi, Yoshiko

    2009-01-01

    To determine health-related quality of life (HRQOL) after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) or permanent prostate brachytherapy (BT), third party-conducted QOL surveys were prospectively compared. Between 2004 and 2005, 37 patients underwent RRP and 36 were treated with BT. A QOL survey consisting of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form (SF-36), the University of California, Los Angeles, Prostate Cancer Index (UCLA-PCI) and the International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS) was completed prospectively by a research coordinator at baseline, and at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after treatment. The RRP patients scored well in general QOL except at 1 month after surgery, with their mental health better than at baseline by 6 months after surgery. Disease-specific QOL in RRP patients received a low score at 1 month for both urinary and sexual function, though urinary function rapidly recovered to baseline levels. BT patient QOL was not affected by the therapy except in the IPSS score. However, general and mental health scores in BT patients were inferior to those in RRP patients. This prospective study revealed differences in QOL after RRP and BT. These results will be helpful in making treatment decisions. (author)

  3. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor administered immediately after radical prostatectomy temporarily increases the need for incontinence pads, but improves final continence status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Kaiho

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the effects of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor (PDE5i on urinary continence recovery after bilateral nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (BNSRP. Materials and Methods: Between 2002 and 2012, 137 of 154 consecutive patients who underwent BNSRP in our institution retrospectively divided into 3 groups that included patients taking PDE5i immediately after surgery (immediate PDE5i group, n=41, patients starting PDE5i at an outpatient clinic after discharge (PDE5i group, n=56, and patients taking no medication (non-PDE5i group, n=40. Using self-administered questionnaires, the proportion of patients who did not require incontinence pads (pad-free patients was calculated preoperatively and at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after BNSRP. Severity of incontinence was determined based on the pad numbers and then compared among the 3 groups. Results: Proportions of pad-free patients and severity of incontinence initially deteriorated in all of the groups to the lowest values soon after undergoing BNSRP, with gradual improvement noted thereafter. The deterioration was most prominent in the immediate PDE5i group. As compared to the non-PDE5i group, both the PDE5i and immediate PDE5i groups exhibited a better final continence status. Conclusions: PDE5i improves final continence status. However, administration of PDE5i immediately after surgery causes a distinct temporary deterioration in urinary incontinence.

  4. Predictive value of PSA velocity over early clinical and pathological parameters in patients with localized prostate cancer who undergo radical retropubic prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez Carlos A.L.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To analyze the behavior of the prostate specific antigen velocity (PSAV in localized prostate adenocarcinoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study of 500 men who had localized prostate adenocarcinoma, who underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy between January 1986 and December 1999. The PSAV was calculated for each patient and subsequently, the values were correlated with 5 groups: age, initial PSA value, clinical stage, tumor volume and Gleason score. RESULTS: The behavior of PSAV presented statistic significance with an increment between 1.3 ng/mL and 9.6 ng/mL, ranging from 38.6% and 59.8% when compared with the initial PSA value (p < 0.0001, clinical stage (p = 0.0002, tumor volume (p < 0.0001 and Gleason score (p = 0.0009. CONCLUSION: PSAV up to 2.5 ng/mL/year is associated with factors of good prognosis, such as initial PSA below 10 mg/mL, clinical stage T1, tumor volume below 20% and Gleason score lower than 7.

  5. PROGNOSTIC FACTORS OF POSITIVE RESULTS OF MULTIFOCAL TRUS-GUIDED VESICOURETHRAL ANASTOMOSIS BIOPSY IN PATIENTS WITH BIOCHEMICAL RECURRENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D. Demeshko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate influence of clinical, biochemical and histological factors to detection rate of local recurrence following radical prostatectomy (RPE using multifocal TRUS-guided vesicourethral anastomosis (VUA biopsy.Material and methods. 59 patients with newly diagnosed biochemical recurrence (BR after RPE were included into prospective study. All of them underwent multifocal TRUS-guided VUA biopsy. Сlinical variables (serum prostate-specifi c antigen [PSA] level and PSA kinetics, time RPE-BR, Gleason grade, stage after RPE and clinical findings were evaluated. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analyses were performed.Results. The detection rate of local prostate recurrence with TRUS-guided VUA biopsy was 45,8 % (95 % CI 33,7–58,3. At multivariate analysis only PSA level at the moment of biopsy (≤ 1,5 ng/ml vs > 1,5 ng/ml and time RPE-BR (≤ 15 months vs > 15 months were significantly associated with positive results of multifocal TRUS-guided VUA biopsy (p < 0,05.Conclusion The detection rate of local prostate recurrence with TRUS-guided VUA biopsy depends on combination of independent predictors (PSA level at the moment of biopsy and time RPE—BR.

  6. Impact of pathological tumor stage for salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy in patients with prostate-specific antigen < 1.0 ng/ml

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umezawa Rei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate prognostic factors in salvage radiotherapy (RT for patients with pre-RT prostate-specific antigen (PSA Methods Between January 2000 and December 2009, 102 patients underwent salvage RT for biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy (RP. Re-failure of PSA after salvage RT was defined as a serum PSA value of 0.2 ng/ml or more above the postradiotherapy nadir followed by another higher value, a continued rise in serum PSA despite salvage RT, or initiation of systemic therapy after completion of salvage RT. Biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazards regression model. Results The median follow-up period was 44 months (range, 11-103 months. Forty-three patients experienced PSA re-failure after salvage RT. The 4-year bRFS was 50.9% (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 39.4-62.5%. In the log-rank test, pT3-4 (p Conclusions In patients who have received salvage RT after RP with PSA

  7. Preliminary analysis of the feasibility and safety of salvage robot-assisted radical prostatectomy after radiation failure: multi-institutional perioperative and short-term functional outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Sanket; Patel, Manoj B; Coelho, Rafael; Liss, Michael; Rocco, Bernardo; Sivaraman, Ananth K; Palmer, Kenneth J; Coughlin, Geoffrey D; Ferrigni, Robert G; Castle, Erik P; Ahlering, Thomas E; Parra-Davila, Eduard; Patel, Vipul R

    2011-06-01

    Open radical prostatectomy after radiation treatment failure for prostate cancer is associated with significant morbidity. The purpose of the study is to report multi-institutional experiences while performing salvage robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (sRARP). We retrospectively identified 15 patients with biopsy-proven prostate cancer after definitive radiotherapy who underwent sRARP in three academic institutions over a 20-month period. Continence was defined as the use of 0 pads after surgery. Potency was defined as the ability to achieve erections adequate enough for penetration with or without the use of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors. Biochemical recurrence after sRARP was defined as a prostate-specific antigen value of >0.2  ng/mL. Radiation treatment consisted of external-beam radiation therapy (XRT) in five cases, interstitial radioactive 125-iodine brachytherapy (BT) in five cases, proton beam therapy in two cases, and XRT followed by interstitial radioactive 125-iodine BT in three cases. The median operative time, the median estimated blood loss, and the median length of hospital stay were 140.5  min (interquartile range [IQR] 97.5-157  min), 75  mL (IQR 50-100  mL), and 1 day (IQR 1-2 d), respectively. There were no rectal injuries. Two (13.3%) patients had a positive surgical margin. A total of three (20%) patients had postoperative complications. One patient had a deep vein thrombosis (Clavien grade II), one had wound infection (Clavien grade II), and one patient had an anastomotic leak (Clavien gradeId). An anastomotic stricture (Clavien grade IIIa) later developed in this same patient, which was managed by direct visual internal urethrotomy. Of the patients, 71.4% were continent. At a median follow-up of 4.6 months (IQR 3-9.75 mos), four (28.6%) patients presented with biochemical recurrence after sRARP. The challenge during sRALP is the presence of extensive fibrosis and loss of dissection planes secondary to radiation therapy. It is a

  8. Patients undergoing radical prostatectomy have a better survival than the background population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreas Røder, Martin; Brasso, Klaus; Drimer Berg, Kasper

    2013-01-01

    -matched Danish population using the methods and macros described by Dickmann. The country-specific population mortality rates used for calculation of the expected survival were based on data from The Human Mortality Database. RESULTS: The median follow-up was 3.4 years (range: 0-14.3 years). A total of 59 (4...... better than expected in the age-matched background population. This finding is likely explained by selection bias. Although the results indicate an excellent outcome in terms of cancer control, the efficacy of prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer remains at debate....

  9. Defining biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy and timing of early salvage radiotherapy. Informing the debate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budaeus, Lars; Schiffmann, Jonas; Graefen, Markus; Huland, Hartwig; Tennstedt, Pierre [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martini-Clinic, Prostate Cancer Center, Hamburg (Germany); Siegmann, Alessandra; Boehmer, Dirk; Budach, Volker [Charite University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Berlin (Germany); Bartkowiak, Detlef; Wiegel, Thomas [University Hospital Ulm, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ulm (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    The optimal prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level after radical prostatectomy (RP) for defining biochemical recurrence and initiating salvage radiation therapy (SRT) is still debatable. Whereas adjuvant or extremely early SRT irrespective of PSA progression might be overtreatment for some patients, SRT at PSA >0.2 ng/ml might be undertreatment for others. The current study addresses the optimal timing of radiation therapy after RP. Cohort 1 comprised 293 men with PSA 0.1-0.19 ng/ml after RP. Cohort 2 comprised 198 men with SRT. PSA progression and metastases were assessed in cohort 1. In cohort 2, we compared freedom from progression according to pre-SRT PSA (0.03-0.19 vs. 0.2-0.499 ng/ml). Multivariable Cox regression analyses predicted progression after SRT. In cohort 1, 281 (95.9%) men had further PSA progression ≥0.2 ng/ml and 27 (9.2%) men developed metastases within a median follow-up of 74.3 months. In cohort 2, we recorded improved freedom from progression according to lower pre-SRT PSA (0.03-0.19 vs. 0.2-0.499 ng/ml: 69 vs. 53%; log-rank p = 0.051). Patients with higher pre-SRT PSA ≥0.2 ng/ml were at a higher risk of progression after SRT (hazard ratio: 1.8; p < 0.05). The vast majority of patients with PSA ≥0.1 ng/ml after RP will progress to PSA ≥0.2 ng/ml. Additionally, early administration of SRT at post-RP PSA level <0.2 ng/ml might improve freedom from progression. Consequently, we suggest a PSA threshold of 0.1 ng/ml to define biochemical recurrence after RP. (orig.) [German] Der optimale Wert des prostataspezifischen Antigens (PSA) nach radikaler Prostatektomie (RP) zur Definition eines biochemischen Rezidivs und zur Initiierung einer Salvage-Strahlentherapie (SRT) ist noch immer umstritten. Waehrend eine adjuvante oder extrem fruehe SRT unabhaengig vom PSA-Verlauf fuer einige Patienten eine Uebertherapie bedeuten wuerde, waere eine SRT bei einem PSA >0,2 ng/ml fuer andere eine Untertherapie. In der vorliegenden Studie wird der optimale

  10. Multicenter clinical validation of PITX2 methylation as a prostate specific antigen recurrence predictor in patients with post-radical prostatectomy prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañez, Lionel L; Sun, Leon; van Leenders, Geert J; Wheeler, Thomas M; Bangma, Chris H; Freedland, Stephen J; Ittmann, Michael M; Lark, Amy L; Madden, John F; Hartman, Arndt; Weiss, Gunter; Castaños-Vélez, Esmeralda

    2010-07-01

    Radical prostatectomy is potentially curative in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer. However, biochemical recurrence affects 15% to 30% of men who undergo radical prostatectomy. We previously reported the prognostic potential of PITX2 gene promoter methylation using conventional assays. In the current study we validated PITX2 methylation status as a biochemical recurrence predictor after radical prostatectomy using a novel microarray based platform in a multi-institutional setting. PITX2 methylation status was assessed in formalin fixed, paraffin embedded prostatectomy tumor tissue samples from 476 patients from a total of 4 institutions on customized EpiChip PITX2 microarrays. Associations between PITX2 methylation and biochemical recurrence were assessed using the log rank test and Cox regression controlling for prostate cancer features. On multivariate analysis men with high methylation status were at significantly higher risk for biochemical recurrence than those with low methylation status (HR 3.0, 95% CI 2.0-4.5, p PITX2 methylation (HR 2.0, 95% CI 1.2-3.3, p = 0.005). PITX2 methylation status assessed by EpiChip PITX2 identifies patients with prostate cancer who are most likely to have biochemical recurrence. This test independently adds to the prognostic information provided by standard clinicopathological analysis, improving prostatectomy case stratification into those at high and low risk for biochemical recurrence. This new clinical tool would be of particular benefit to assess intermediate risk cases (Gleason 7) in which risk stratification remains a challenge. Copyright (c) 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Erectile Function and Oncologic Outcomes Following Open Retropubic and Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy: Results from the LAParoscopic Prostatectomy Robot Open Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sooriakumaran, Prasanna; Pini, Giovannalberto; Nyberg, Tommy; Derogar, Maryam; Carlsson, Stefan; Stranne, Johan; Bjartell, Anders; Hugosson, Jonas; Steineck, Gunnar; Wiklund, Peter N

    2018-04-01

    Whether surgeons perform better utilising a robot-assisted laparoscopic technique compared with an open approach during prostate cancer surgery is debatable. To report erectile function and early oncologic outcomes for both surgical modalities, stratified by prostate cancer risk grouping. In a prospective nonrandomised trial, we recruited 2545 men with prostate cancer from seven open (n=753) and seven robot-assisted (n=1792) Swedish centres (2008-2011). Clinometrically-validated questionnaire-based patient-reported erectile function was collected before, 3 mo, 12 mo, and 24 mo after surgery. Surgeon-reported degree of neurovascular-bundle preservation, pathologist-reported positive surgical margin (PSM) rates, and 2-yr prostate-specific antigen-relapse rates were measured. Among 1702 preoperatively potent men, we found enhanced erectile function recovery for low/intermediate-risk patients in the robot-assisted group at 3 mo. For patients with high-risk tumours, point estimates for erectile function recovery at 24 mo favoured the open surgery group. The degree of neurovascular bundle preservation and erectile function recovery were greater correlated for robot-assisted surgery. In pT2 tumours, 10% versus 17% PSM rates were observed for open and robot-assisted surgery, respectively; corresponding rates for pT3 tumours were 48% and 33%. These differences were associated with biochemical recurrence in pT3 but not pT2 disease. The study is limited by its nonrandomised design and relatively short follow-up. Earlier recovery of erectile function in the robot-assisted surgery group in lower-risk patients is counterbalanced by lower PSM rates for open surgeons in organ-confined disease; thus, both open and robotic surgeons need to consider this trade-off when determining the plane of surgical dissection. Robot-assisted surgery also facilitates easier identification of nerve preservation planes during radical prostatectomy as well as wider dissection for pT3 cases. For

  12. Can We Predict the Surgical Margin Positivity in Patients Treated with Radical Prostatectomy? A Multicenter Cohort of Turkish Association of Uro-Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Bolat

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the parameters that predict the surgical margin positivity after radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods In this multicenter study, the data of 1607 consecutive patients undergoing radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer in 12 different clinics in Turkey between 1993-2011 were assessed. Patients who had neoadjuvant treatment were excluded. We assessed the relationship between potential predictive factors and surgical margin status after radical prostatectomy such as age, cancer characteristics, history of transurethral prostate resection, surgical experience and nerve-sparing technique by using univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses and t test. Results The overall surgical margin positivity rate was 22.6% (359 patients. In univariate analyses, preoperative prostate specific antigen level, clinical stage, biopsy Gleason score, percentage of tumor involvement per biopsy specimen, transurethral prostate resection history, surgical experience and nerve-sparing technique were significantly associated with positive surgical margin rate. In multivariate analyses, preoperative prostate specific antigen level (OR: 1.03, p=0.06, percentage of tumor involvement per biopsy specimen (OR: 7,14, p<0,001, surgical experience (OR: 2.35, p=0.011 and unilateral nerve-sparing technique (OR: 1.81, p=0.018 were independent predictive factors for surgical margin positivity. Conclusion Preoperative prostate specific antigen level, percentage of tumor involvement per biopsy specimen, surgical experience and nerve-sparing technique are the most important predictive factors of surgical margin positivity in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer.

  13. Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy for Patients with Prostatic Cancer and Factors Promoting Installation of the Robotic Surgical Equipment-Questionnaire Survey

    OpenAIRE

    塚本, 泰司; 田中, 滋

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a questionnaire survey of hospitals with robot-assisted surgical equipment to study changes of the surgical case loads after its installation and the managerial strategies for its purchase. The study included 154 hospitals (as of April 2014) that were queried about their radical prostatectomy case loads from January 2009 to December 2013, strategies for installation of the equipment in their hospitals, and other topics related to the study purpose. The overall response rate of ho...

  14. Effect of preoperative consumption of high carbohydrate drink (Pre-Op) on postoperative metabolic stress reaction in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canbay, Özgür; Adar, Serdar; Karagöz, Ayşe Heves; Çelebi, Nalan; Bilen, Cenk Yücel

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the effects of oral carbohydrate solution consumed until 2 h before the surgery in the patients that would undergo open radical retropubic prostatectomy on postoperative metabolic stress, patient anxiety, and comfort. A total of 50 adult patients, who were in ASA I-II group and would undergo open radical retropubic prostatectomy, were included in the study. While Group 1 = CH (n = 25) received oral glucose solution, Group 2 = FAM (n = 25) was famished starting from 24:00 h. Blood glucose, insulin, and procalcitonin levels of the patients were recorded, and the patients completed state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI) test, which reflects the anxiety level of the patients, both before surgery and on the postoperative 24th hour. In order to evaluate patient comfort, senses of hunger, thirst, nausea, and cold were assessed in the morning prior to the surgery. No difference was observed between the two groups in terms of demographic data and insulin resistance levels (p > 0.05). Comparing with the preoperative levels, insulin resistance showed statistically significant elevation in both groups (p 0.05). With regard to preoperative patient comfort, sense of hunger was present in lesser number of subjects and at lower level in Group 1 (p hunger and thirst in the preoperative period in open radical retropubic prostatectomies.

  15. Five year biochemical recurrence free survival for intermediate risk prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy, external beam radiation therapy or permanent seed implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassil, Andrew D; Murphy, Erin S; Reddy, Chandana A; Angermeier, Kenneth W; Altman, Andrew; Chehade, Nabil; Ulchaker, James; Klein, Eric A; Ciezki, Jay P

    2010-11-01

    To compare biochemical recurrence-free survival (bRFS) for patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated by retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP), laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP), external beam radiation therapy (RT), or permanent seed implantation (PI). Patients treated for intermediate-risk prostate cancer per National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines from 1996 to 2005 were studied. Variables potentially affecting bRFS were examined using univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis. Five-year bRFS rates were calculated by actuarial methods; bRFS was calculated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Nadir +2 definition of biochemical failure was used for RT and PI patients; a PSA ≥ 0.4 ng/mL was used for radical prostatectomy (RP) patients. Time to initiation of salvage therapy was compared for each treatment group using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Nine-hundred seventy-nine patients were analyzed with a median follow-up of 65 months. Five years bRFS rate was 82.8% for all patients (89.5% PI, 85.7% RT, 79.9% RRP, and 60.2% LRP). Patients treated by LRP had significantly worse bRFS than RT (P PI (P PSA tests per year (P PI, 47.8 RT; P PI, RT, or RRP appear to have improved 5-year bRFS and delayed salvage therapy compared with LRP. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Quality of Life, Psychological Functioning, and Treatment Satisfaction of Men Who Have Undergone Penile Prosthesis Surgery Following Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Brindha; Moon, Daniel; Love, Christopher; Meyer, Denny; Ferguson, Emma; Crowe, Helen; Howard, Nicholas; Mann, Sarah; Wootten, Addie

    2017-12-01

    Penile prosthesis surgery is last-line treatment to regaining erectile function after radical prostatectomy (RP) for localized prostate cancer. To assess quality of life, psychological functioning, and treatment satisfaction of men who underwent penile implantation after RP; the psychosocial correlates of treatment satisfaction and sexual function after surgery; and the relation between patients' and partners' ratings of treatment satisfaction. 98 consecutive patients who underwent penile implantation after RP from 2010 and 2015 and their partners were invited to complete a series of measures at a single time point. Of these, 71 patients and 43 partners completed measures assessing sexual function, psychological functioning, and treatment satisfaction. Proportions of patients who demonstrated good sexual function and satisfaction with treatment and clinical levels of anxiety and depression were calculated. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to determine psychosocial factors associated with patient treatment satisfaction and sexual function and patient-partner differences in treatment satisfaction. Patients completed the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite Short Form (EPIC-26), Erectile Dysfunction Inventory of Treatment Satisfaction (EDITS), Prostate Cancer-Related Quality of Life Scale, Self-Esteem and Relationship Questionnaire (SEAR), Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7), and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). Partners completed the GAD-7, PHQ-9, EDITS (partner version), and SEAR. 94% of men reported satisfaction with treatment (EDITS score > 50). 77% of men reported good sexual function (EPIC-26 score > 60). Lower depression scores were associated with higher sexual confidence and sexual intimacy, and these were correlated with better treatment satisfaction and sexual function. Patients experienced higher sexual relationship satisfaction (median score = 90.6) than their partners (median score = 81.2), but there was no difference in

  17. [11C]Choline PET/CT predicts survival in hormone-naive prostate cancer patients with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovacchini, Giampiero; Incerti, Elena; Mapelli, Paola; Gianolli, Luigi; Picchio, Maria; Kirienko, Margarita; Briganti, Alberto; Gandaglia, Giorgio; Montorsi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, PET/CT with radiolabelled choline has been shown to be useful for restaging patients with prostate cancer (PCa) who develop biochemical failure. The limitations of most clinical studies have been poor validation of [ 11 C]choline PET/CT-positive findings and lack of survival analysis. The aim of this study was to assess whether [ 11 C]choline PET/CT can predict survival in hormone-naive PCa patients with biochemical failure. This retrospective study included 302 hormone-naive PCa patients treated with radical prostatectomy who underwent [ 11 C]choline PET/CT from 1 December 2004 to 31 July 2007 because of biochemical failure (prostate-specific antigen, PSA, >0.2 ng/mL). Median PSA was 1.02 ng/mL. PCa-specific survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier curves. Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between clinicopathological variables and PCa-specific survival. The coefficients of the covariates included in the Cox regression analysis were used to develop a novel nomogram. Median follow-up was 7.2 years (1.4 - 18.9 years). [ 11 C]Choline PET/CT was positive in 101 of 302 patients (33 %). Median PCa-specific survival after prostatectomy was 14.9 years (95 % CI 9.7 - 20.1 years) in patients with positive [ 11 C]choline PET/CT. Median survival was not achieved in patients with negative [ 11 C]choline PET/CT. The 15-year PCa-specific survival probability was 42.4 % (95 % CI 31.7 - 53.1 %) in patients with positive [ 11 C]choline PET/CT and 95.5 % (95 % CI 93.5 - 97.5 %) in patients with negative [ 11 C]choline PET/CT. In multivariate analysis, [ 11 C]choline PET/CT (hazard ratio 6.36, 95 % CI 2.14 - 18.94, P < 0.001) and Gleason score >7 (hazard ratio 3.11, 95 % CI 1.11 - 8.66, P = 0.030) predicted PCa-specific survival. An internally validated nomogram predicted 15-year PCa-specific survival probability with an accuracy of 80 %. Positive [ 11 C]choline PET/CT after biochemical failure predicts PCa-specific survival in hormone

  18. [{sup 11}C]Choline PET/CT predicts survival in hormone-naive prostate cancer patients with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovacchini, Giampiero [Stadtspital Triemli, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Incerti, Elena; Mapelli, Paola; Gianolli, Luigi; Picchio, Maria [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Milano (Italy); Kirienko, Margarita [University of Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Briganti, Alberto; Gandaglia, Giorgio; Montorsi, Francesco [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Department of Urology, Milano (Italy)

    2015-05-01

    Over the last decade, PET/CT with radiolabelled choline has been shown to be useful for restaging patients with prostate cancer (PCa) who develop biochemical failure. The limitations of most clinical studies have been poor validation of [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT-positive findings and lack of survival analysis. The aim of this study was to assess whether [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT can predict survival in hormone-naive PCa patients with biochemical failure. This retrospective study included 302 hormone-naive PCa patients treated with radical prostatectomy who underwent [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT from 1 December 2004 to 31 July 2007 because of biochemical failure (prostate-specific antigen, PSA, >0.2 ng/mL). Median PSA was 1.02 ng/mL. PCa-specific survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier curves. Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between clinicopathological variables and PCa-specific survival. The coefficients of the covariates included in the Cox regression analysis were used to develop a novel nomogram. Median follow-up was 7.2 years (1.4 - 18.9 years). [{sup 11}C]Choline PET/CT was positive in 101 of 302 patients (33 %). Median PCa-specific survival after prostatectomy was 14.9 years (95 % CI 9.7 - 20.1 years) in patients with positive [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT. Median survival was not achieved in patients with negative [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT. The 15-year PCa-specific survival probability was 42.4 % (95 % CI 31.7 - 53.1 %) in patients with positive [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT and 95.5 % (95 % CI 93.5 - 97.5 %) in patients with negative [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT. In multivariate analysis, [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT (hazard ratio 6.36, 95 % CI 2.14 - 18.94, P < 0.001) and Gleason score >7 (hazard ratio 3.11, 95 % CI 1.11 - 8.66, P = 0.030) predicted PCa-specific survival. An internally validated nomogram predicted 15-year PCa-specific survival probability with an accuracy of 80 %. Positive [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT after biochemical failure

  19. Role of dose intensification for salvage radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus eBeck

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available For primary radiation therapy of prostate cancer dose intensification is established as standard of care. Less is known on the role of dose intensification in the post-prostatectomy setting for salvage radiation therapy. Thus, we aimed to identify and summarize the existing literature. In retrospective analyses dose intensified salvage radiation therapy showed a superior biochemical control compared to standard dose salvage radiation with favorable acute and late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity rates, especially when modern radiation techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy were applied. We identified one randomized phase III trial addressing the potential benefits of dose intensified salvage radiation therapy (SAKK 09/10. Recently, acute gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicities and early quality of life data of this trial were reported and no significant difference in acute toxicities between both treatment arms were found; however, a significant worsening of genitourinary quality of life was noted in the dose intensified treatment arm. Whereas dose intensified salvage radiation therapy appears to be feasible and well tolerated, the improved biochemical control rates using dose intensified radiation therapy as suggested by retrospective analyses have yet to be validated by prospective trials.

  20. Health-Related Quality of Life 2 Years After Treatment With Radical Prostatectomy, Prostate Brachytherapy, or External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrer, Montserrat; Suarez, Jose Francisco; Guedea, Ferran; Fernandez, Pablo; Macias, Victor; Marino, Alfonso; Hervas, Asuncion; Herruzo, Ismael; Ortiz, Maria Jose; Villavicencio, Humberto; Craven-Bratle, Jordi; Garin, Olatz; Aguilo, Ferran

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare treatment impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in patients with localized prostate cancer, from before treatment to 2 years after the intervention. Methods and Materials: This was a longitudinal, prospective study of 614 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy (134), three-dimensional external conformal radiotherapy (205), and brachytherapy (275). The HRQL questionnaires administered before and after treatment (months 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24) were the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (General and Prostate Specific), the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC), and the American Urological Association Symptom Index. Differences between groups were tested by analysis of variance and within-group changes by univariate repeated-measures analysis of variance. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) models were constructed to assess between-group differences in HRQL at 2 years of follow-up after adjusting for clinical variables. Results: In each treatment group, HRQL initially deteriorated after treatment with subsequent partial recovery. However, some dimension scores were still significantly lower after 2 years of treatment. The GEE models showed that, compared with the brachytherapy group, radical prostatectomy patients had worse EPIC sexual summary and urinary incontinence scores (-20.4 and -14.1; p < 0.001), and external radiotherapy patients had worse EPIC bowel, sexual, and hormonal summary scores (-3.55, -5.24, and -1.94; p < 0.05). Prostatectomy patients had significantly better EPIC urinary irritation scores than brachytherapy patients (+4.16; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Relevant differences between treatment groups persisted after 2 years of follow-up. Radical prostatectomy had a considerable negative effect on sexual functioning and urinary continence. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy had a moderate negative impact on bowel

  1. Clinical map document based on XML (cMDX): document architecture with mapping feature for reporting and analysing prostate cancer in radical prostatectomy specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eminaga, Okyaz; Hinkelammert, Reemt; Semjonow, Axel; Neumann, Joerg; Abbas, Mahmoud; Koepke, Thomas; Bettendorf, Olaf; Eltze, Elke; Dugas, Martin

    2010-11-15

    The pathology report of radical prostatectomy specimens plays an important role in clinical decisions and the prognostic evaluation in Prostate Cancer (PCa). The anatomical schema is a helpful tool to document PCa extension for clinical and research purposes. To achieve electronic documentation and analysis, an appropriate documentation model for anatomical schemas is needed. For this purpose we developed cMDX. The document architecture of cMDX was designed according to Open Packaging Conventions by separating the whole data into template data and patient data. Analogue custom XML elements were considered to harmonize the graphical representation (e.g. tumour extension) with the textual data (e.g. histological patterns). The graphical documentation was based on the four-layer visualization model that forms the interaction between different custom XML elements. Sensible personal data were encrypted with a 256-bit cryptographic algorithm to avoid misuse. In order to assess the clinical value, we retrospectively analysed the tumour extension in 255 patients after radical prostatectomy. The pathology report with cMDX can represent pathological findings of the prostate in schematic styles. Such reports can be integrated into the hospital information system. "cMDX" documents can be converted into different data formats like text, graphics and PDF. Supplementary tools like cMDX Editor and an analyser tool were implemented. The graphical analysis of 255 prostatectomy specimens showed that PCa were mostly localized in the peripheral zone (Mean: 73% ± 25). 54% of PCa showed a multifocal growth pattern. cMDX can be used for routine histopathological reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens and provide data for scientific analysis.

  2. Impact of posterior rhabdosphincter reconstruction during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: retrospective analysis of time to continence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jason R; Shikanov, Sergey; Zorn, Kevin C; Shalhav, Arieh L; Zagaja, Gregory P

    2009-12-01

    Posterior rhabdosphincter (PR) reconstruction during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) was introduced in an attempt to improve postoperative continence. In the present study, we evaluate time to achieve continence in patients who are undergoing RARP with and without PR reconstruction. A prospective RARP database was searched for most recent cases that were accomplished with PR reconstruction (group 1, n = 69) or with standard technique (group 2, n = 63). We performed the analysis applying two definitions of continence: 0 pads per day or 0-1 security pad per day. Patients were evaluated by telephone interview. Statistical analysis was carried out using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. With PR reconstruction, continence was improved when defined as 0-1 security pad per day (median time of 90 vs 150 days; P = 0.01). This difference did not achieve statistical significance when continence was defined as 0 pads per day (P = 0.12). A statistically significant improvement in continence rate and time to achieve continence is seen in patients who are undergoing PR reconstruction during RARP, with continence defined as 0-1 security/safety pad per day. A larger, prospective and randomized study is needed to better understand the impact of this technique on postoperative continence.

  3. Suggestion for the prostatic fossa clinical target volume in adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy after a radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jun Su; Park, Won; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Park, Byung Kwan; Park, Sung Yoon; Choi, Han Yong; Lee, Hyun Moo; Jeon, Seong Soo; Seo, Seong Il; Jeong, Byong Chang; Jeon, Hwang Gyun

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: To assess the location of recurrent tumors and suggest the optimal target volume in adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy (RT) after a radical prostatectomy (RP). Material and methods: From January 2000 to December 2012, 113 patients had been diagnosed with suspected recurrent prostate cancer by MRI scan and received salvage RT in the Samsung Medical Center. This study assessed the location of the suspected tumor recurrences and used the inferior border of the pubic symphysis as a point of reference. Results: There were 118 suspect tumor recurrences. The most common site of recurrence was the anastomotic site (78.8%), followed by the bladder neck (15.3%) and retrovesical area (5.9%). In the cranial direction, 106 (87.3%) lesions were located within 30 mm of the reference point. In the caudal direction, 12 lesions (10.2%) were located below the reference point. In the transverse plane, 112 lesions (94.9%) were located within 10 mm of the midline. Conclusions: A MRI scan acquired before salvage RT is useful for the localization of recurrent tumors and the delineation of the target volume. We suggest the optimal target volume in adjuvant or salvage RT after RP, which includes 97% of suspected tumor recurrences

  4. Preoperative glycemic control status as a significant predictor of biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer patients after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hakmin; Kuk, Harim; Byun, Seok-Soo; Lee, Sang Eun; Hong, Sung Kyu

    2015-01-01

    The effect of diabetes mellitus (DM) on prostate cancer (PCa) outcome remains controversial. Thus, we investigated the association of DM history, glycemic control, and metformin use with oncologic outcomes after radical prostatectomy (RP). We reviewed the records of 746 contemporary patients who had hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measured within the 6 months preceding RP. The associations between clinical variables and risk of adverse pathological features and biochemical recurrence (BCR) were tested using a multivariate logistic regression and multiple Cox-proportional hazards model, respectively. BCR was defined as prostatic specific antigen (PSA) > 0.2 ng/mL in 2 consecutive tests. There were no significant differences in the rates of adverse pathologic features and BCR-free survival between patients with (n = 209) and without (n = 537) a history of DM diagnosis (all p > 0.05). In multivariate analyses, high HbA1c level (≥ 6.5%) was significantly related with high pathologic Gleason score (≥ 4+3; odds ratio [OR] 1.704, p = 0.019) and BCR-free survival (OR 1.853, p = 0.007). Metformin use was not associated with BCR-free survival (OR 0.662, p = 0.125). Poor glycemic control was significantly associated with BCR after RP. Meanwhile, metformin use was not associated with biochemical outcome after RP. Further investigation would be needed to identify exact mechanism underlying the impact of glycemic control on PCa treatment outcome.

  5. Multimedia support for improving preoperative patient education: a randomized controlled trial using the example of radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Johannes; Ihrig, Andreas; Yass, Mohammed; Bruckner, Tom; Peters, Tim; Huber, Christian G; Konyango, Beryl; Lozankovski, Novica; Stredele, Regina J F; Moll, Peter; Schneider, Meike; Pahernik, Sascha; Hohenfellner, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence supports the use of multimedia presentations for informing patients. Therefore, we supported preoperative education by adding a multimedia tool and examined the effects in a randomized controlled trial. We randomized German-speaking patients scheduled for radical prostatectomy at our center to receive either a multimedia-supported (MME) or a standard education (SE). Outcomes were measured in a structured interview. Primary outcome was patient satisfaction. In addition, we applied validated instruments to determine anxiety and measures of decision-making. Results were given by mean and standard deviation. For comparison of groups we used t test and chi-square test. For an explorative analysis we applied multivariate logistic regression. We randomized 203 patients to receive MME (n=102) or SE (n=101). Complete satisfaction with preoperative education was more frequent in the MME group (69 vs 52%, p=.016) and patients after MME reported more questions (5.7 vs 4.2, p=.018). There was no difference concerning the duration of talks and the number of recalled risks. However, perceived knowledge was higher after MME (1.3 vs 1.6, p=.037). Anxiety and measures of decision-making were comparable. Patients judged the multimedia tool very positive, and 74% of the MME group thought that their preoperative education had been superior to SE. Multimedia support should be considered worthwhile for improving the informed consent process before surgery (www.germanctr.de; DRKS00000096).

  6. Transperitoneal versus extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy during the learning curve: does the surgical approach affect the complication rate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiberio M. Siqueira Jr.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the perioperative complication rate obtained with the transperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (TLRP and with the extraperitoneal LRP (ELRP during the learning curve (LC. Materials and Methods: Data of the initial 40 TLRP (Group 1 were retrospectively compared with the initial 40 ELRP (Group 2. Each Group of patients was operated by two different surgeons. Results: The overall surgical time (175 min x 267.6 min; p < 0.001 and estimated blood loss (177.5 mL x 292.4 mL; p < 0.001 were statistically better in the Group 1. Two intraoperative complications were observed in Group 1 (5% represented by one case of bleeding and one case of rectal injury, whereas four complications (10% were observed in Group 2, represented by two cases of bleeding, one bladder and one rectal injuries (p = 0.675. Open conversion occurred once in each Group (2.5%. Overall postoperative complications were similar (52.5% x 35%; p = 0.365. Major early postoperative complications occurred in three and in one case in Group 1 and 2, respectively. Group 1 had two peritonitis (fecal and urinary, leading to one death in this group. Conclusions: No statistical differences in overall complication rates were observed. The transperitoneal approach presented more serious complications during the early postoperative time and this fact is attributed to the potential chance of intraperitoneal peritonitis not observed with the extraperitoneal route.

  7. Noninvasive continuous blood pressure monitoring by the ClearSight system during robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yoko; Yasuo M, Tsutsumi; Oyama, Takuro; Murakami, Chiaki; Kakuta, Nami; Tanaka, Katsuya

    2018-01-01

    Robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP) is commonly performed in the surgical treatment of prostate cancer. However, the steep Trendelenburg position (25) and pneumoperitoneum required for this procedure can sometimes cause hemodynamic changes. Although blood pressure is traditionally monitored invasively during RALRP, the ClearSight system (BMEYE, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) enables a totally noninvasive and simple continuous blood pressure and cardiac output monitoring based on finger arterial pressure pulse contour analysis. We therefore investigated whether noninvasive continuous arterial blood pressure measurements using the ClearSight system were comparable to those obtained invasively in patients undergoing RALRP. Ten patients scheduled for RALRP with American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I-II were included in this study. At each of the seven defined time points, noninvasive and invasive blood pressure measurements were documented and compared in each patient using Bland-Altman analysis. Although the blood pressure measured with the ClearSight system correlated with that measured invasively, a large difference between the values obtained by the two devices was noted. The ClearSight system was unable to detect blood pressure accurately during RALRP, suggesting that blood pressure monitoring using this device alone is not feasible in this small patient population. J. Med. Invest. 65:69-73, February, 2018.

  8. Adverse pathological findings in needle biopsy gleason score 6 prostate cancers with low and intermediate preoperative PSA levels following radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidegger, Isabel; Ladurner, Michael; Skradski, Viktor; Klocker, Helmut; Schäfer, Georg; Horninger, Wolfgang; Bektic, Jasmin

    2012-12-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the risk associated with undergrading Gleason score 6 (GS6) prostate cancer (PCa) at biopsy, in patients with preoperative PSA levels of 2-3,99 and 4-10 ng/ml. A total of 674 patients with needle biopsy-diagnosed GS6 PCa, who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP) between 1995 and 2011, were evaluated. Patients were stratified by preoperative PSA levels into low PSA (2-3,99 ng/ml) and an intermediate PSA of 4-10 ng/ml. Subsequently, the percentage of patients with extracapsular disease (pathological stage ≥pT3a) and/or positive surgical margins was determined among those whose RP GS was still 6 and compared to undergraded cases. Out of 674 patients with needle biopsy-diagnosed GS6 PCa, 36.2% had no difference between biopsy and RP GS while 11.4% had been overgraded and 52.4% of patients were undergraded at biopsy. Stratified according to preoperative PSA levels, there was a significantly higher incidence of undergrading in the intermediate PSA group. Among those with ≥pT3a tumors, 74.1 % were undergraded in needle biopsy, out of which 67.7% had intermediate PSA levels and 32.3% low PSA levels. Among patients with R1 resections 75.1 % were underdiagnosed, out of which 75.9% had intermediate PSA levels. Stratifying these data according to preoperative PSA levels, ≥pT3a tumors and R1 resection were found significantly more often in the intermediate-PSA group. The incidence of adverse pathological findings, including extraprostatic extension and positive surgical margins, is significantly higher in patients with undergraded biopsy GS6. Low preoperative PSA levels improved the correlation between primary and final GS and led to the reduction of unfavorable pathological findings.

  9. Prognostic value of Prostate Imaging and Data Reporting System (PI-RADS) v. 2 assessment categories 4 and 5 compared to histopathological outcomes after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Christopher S; McInnes, Matthew D F; Lim, Robert S; Breau, Rodney H; Flood, Trevor A; Krishna, Satheesh; Morash, Christopher; Shabana, Wael M; Schieda, Nicola

    2017-07-01

    To assess Prostate Imaging and Data Reporting System (PI-RADS) v. 2 score 4/5 lesions compared to Gleason score (GS) and stage after radical prostatectomy (RP) and to validate the proposed 15-mm size threshold that differentiates category 4 versus 5 lesions. With Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, 140 men underwent 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and RP between 2012-2015. Two blinded radiologists: 1) assigned PI-RADS v. 2 scores, 2) measured tumor size on axial T 2 -weighted-MRI, and 3) assessed for extraprostatic extension (EPE). Interobserver agreement was calculated and consensus diagnoses achieved through reference standard (MRI-RP maps). PI-RADS v. 2 scores and tumor size were compared to GS and stage using chi-square, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. In all, 80.7% (113/140) of tumors were category 4 (n = 45) or 5 (n = 68) lesions (κ = 0.45). Overall tumor size was 18.2 ± 7.7 mm and category 5 lesions were larger (22.6 ± 6.8 versus 11.5 ± 1.9 mm, P PI-RADS v. 2 category 5 lesions are associated with higher Gleason scores and EPE. A 15-mm size threshold is reasonably accurate for diagnosis of EPE with increased sensitivity compared to subjective assessment. 3 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;46:257-266. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  10. Predictive Modeling of Two-Year Potency Outcomes via a Novel 90-Day Percent Fullness Scale after Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Linda M; Osann, Kathryn; Skarecky, Douglas; Ahlering, Thomas E

    2018-03-09

    To introduce a patient-reported erection fullness scale (% fullness) following robot-assisted radical prostatectomy as a qualitative adjunct to the IIEF-5 and as a 90-day predictor of two-year potency outcomes. Prospective data was collected from 540 men with preoperative IIEF-5 22-25 who underwent RARP by a single surgeon, of which 299 had complete data at all time points up to 2 years. In addition to standard assessment tools (IIEF-5 and erections sufficient for intercourse), patients were asked to "indicate the fullness you are able to achieve in erections compared to before surgery?" (0-10…100%). The primary outcome was prediction of potency (defined as ESI) at 24 months, based on 90-day % fullness (0-24%, 25-74%, and 75-100%). 299 men with complete follow-up were included. Significant predictors of 24 month potency included age, BMI, pathologic stage, nerve-sparing status, and % fullness tertiles. When men (pre-op IIEF-5 22-25) were assessed at 90 days post-RARP, 181/299 (61%) men had erections inadequate for intercourse. If IIEF-5 scores 1-6 is used, 142/181 (78%) would be targeted for early intervention. In distinction, if 0-24% fullness is used, 88/181 (49%) are targeted. If both the IIEF-5 and % fullness are used, this is reduced to 77/181 (43%). We introduce % fullness as a qualitative adjunct to the IIEF-5 and separately as a 90-day predictor of two-year potency recovery. This initial report is hypothesis-generating such that the use of % fullness enables the identification of men most likely to benefit from early, secondary intervention. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Outcome predictors of radical prostatectomy in patients with prostate-specific antigen greater than 20 ng/ml: a European multi-institutional study of 712 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahn, Martin; Joniau, Steven; Gontero, Paolo; Fieuws, Steffen; Marchioro, Giansilvio; Tombal, Bertrand; Kneitz, Burkhard; Hsu, Chao-Yu; Van Der Eeckt, Katie; Bader, Pia; Frohneberg, Detlef; Tizzani, Alessandro; Van Poppel, Hein

    2010-07-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) patients with pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) >20 ng/ml have a high risk of biochemical and clinical failure and even cancer-related death after local therapy. Pretreatment predictors of outcome after radical prostatectomy (RP) in this patient group are necessary. Our aim was to assess how the use of additional high-risk factors (biopsy Gleason score [bGS] > or = 8 or clinical stage 3-4) can improve prediction of treatment failure and cancer-related death after RP in patients with PSA >20. In a retrospective multicentre cohort study from six European centres between 1987 and 2005, 712 patients with PSA >20 ng/ml underwent RP and bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy. Subgroups were analysed to determine the relationship between the number of high-risk factors and histopathology, biochemical progression-free survival, clinical evidence of progressive disease, prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), and overall mortality. Kaplan-Meier analysis with log-rank test and Cox multivariable analysis were applied. Median follow-up was 77 mo. The number of high-risk factors was significantly associated with unfavourable histopathology. Among patients with only PSA >20 ng/ml, 33% had pT2 PCa, 57.9% had bGS bGS bGS. PSA >20 ng/ml associated with bGS bGS > or =8, PCSM was 35%. The main limitations of the study were retrospective design and varying treatment modalities. PCa patients with PSA >20 ng/ml have varying risk levels of disease progression and PCSM. Considering additional risk factors further stratifies this group into four subgroups that can guide the clinician in preoperative patient counselling. Copyright 2010 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Incidence of positive surgical margins after robotic assisted radical prostatectomy: Does the surgeon's experience have an influence on all pathological stages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamil, A W; Costabel, J I; Billordo Peres, N; Martínez, P F; Giudice, C R; Damia, O H

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the clinical and surgical features of patients who underwent robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) at our institution, and the impact of the surgeon's experience in the oncological results related to pathological stage. An analysis of 300 RARP consecutively performed by the same urologist was conducted. Patients were divided into 3 groups of 100 patients in chronological order, according to surgery date. All patients had organ-confined clinical stage. Variables which could impact in positive margins rates were analyzed. Finally, positive surgical margins (PSM) in regard to pathological stage and surgeon's experience were compared and analyzed. No significant differences were found in variables which could impact in PSM rates. The overall PSM rate was 21%, with 28% in the first group, 20% in the second, and 16% in the third (P = .108). Significant lineal decreasing tendency was observed (P = .024). In pT2 patients, the overall PSM rate was 16.6%, with 27%, 13.8%, and 7.3% in each group respectively (P = .009). A significant difference was found between group 1 and group 3 (P = .004). In pT3 patients, the surgeon's experience was not significantly associated with margin reductions with an overall PSM rate of 27.7% (28.2%, 28.6%, and 26.7% in each group respectively). Clinical and surgical features in our patients did not vary over time. We found a significant reduction of PSM related to surgeon's experience in pT2 patients. Contrariwise, the margin status remained stable despite increasing experience in pT3 patients. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Impact of pathological tumor stage for salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy in patients with prostate-specific antigen < 1.0 ng/ml

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umezawa, Rei; Kubozono, Masaki; Narazaki, Kakutaro; Shimizu, Eiji; Takai, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Shogo; Ariga, Hisanori; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Jingu, Keiichi; Takeda, Ken; Matsushita, Haruo; Fujimoto, Keisuke; Sakayauchi, Toru; Sugawara, Toshiyuki

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate prognostic factors in salvage radiotherapy (RT) for patients with pre-RT prostate-specific antigen (PSA) < 1.0 ng/ml. Between January 2000 and December 2009, 102 patients underwent salvage RT for biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy (RP). Re-failure of PSA after salvage RT was defined as a serum PSA value of 0.2 ng/ml or more above the postradiotherapy nadir followed by another higher value, a continued rise in serum PSA despite salvage RT, or initiation of systemic therapy after completion of salvage RT. Biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazards regression model. The median follow-up period was 44 months (range, 11-103 months). Forty-three patients experienced PSA re-failure after salvage RT. The 4-year bRFS was 50.9% (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 39.4-62.5%). In the log-rank test, pT3-4 (p < 0.001) and preoperative PSA (p = 0.037) were selected as significant factors. In multivariate analysis, only pT3-4 was a prognostic factor (hazard ratio: 3.512 [95% CI: 1.535-8.037], p = 0.001). The 4-year bRFS rates for pT1-2 and pT3-4 were 79.2% (95% CI: 66.0-92.3%) and 31.7% (95% CI: 17.0-46.4%), respectively. In patients who have received salvage RT after RP with PSA < 1.0 ng/ml, pT stage and preoperative PSA were prognostic factors of bRFS. In particular, pT3-4 had a high risk for biochemical recurrence after salvage RT

  14. Impact of penile rehabilitation with low-dose vardenafil on recovery of erectile function in Japanese men following nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzo Nakano

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Erectile dysfunction (ED is a major complication after radical prostatectomy (RP; however, debate continues regarding the efficacy of penile rehabilitation in the recovery of the postoperative erectile function (EF. This study included a total of 103 consecutive sexually active Japanese men with localized prostate cancer undergoing nerve-sparing RP, and analyzed the postoperative EF, focusing on the significance of penile rehabilitation. In this series, 24 and 79 patients underwent bilateral and unilateral nerve-sparing RPs, respectively, and 10 or 20 mg of vardenafil was administered to 35 patients at least once weekly, who agreed to undergo penile rehabilitation. Twelve months after RP, 48 (46.6% of the 103 patients were judged to have recovered EF sufficient for sexual intercourse without any assistance. The proportion of patients who recovered EF in those undergoing penile rehabilitation (60.0% was significantly greater than that in those without penile rehabilitation (38.2%. Of several parameters examined, the preoperative International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5 score and nerve-sparing procedure were significantly associated with the postoperative EF recovery rates in patients with and without management by penile rehabilitation, respectively. Furthermore, univariate analysis identified the preoperative IIEF-5 score, nerve-sparing procedure and penile rehabilitation as significant predictors of EF recovery, among which the preoperative IIEF-5 score and nerve-sparing procedure appeared to be independently associated with EF recovery. Considering these findings, despite the lack of independent significance, penile rehabilitation with low-dose vardenafil could exert a beneficial effect on EF recovery in Japanese men following nerve-sparing RP.

  15. Multiparametric 3T MRI for the prediction of pathological downgrading after radical prostatectomy in patients with biopsy-proven Gleason score 3 + 4 prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondo, Tatsuo; Hricak, Hedvig; Sala, Evis; Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Zheng, Junting; Moskowitz, Chaya S.; Bernstein, Melanie; Eastham, James A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of pre-treatment 3-Tesla (3T) multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) for predicting Gleason score (GS) downgrading after radical prostatectomy (RP) in patients with GS 3 + 4 prostate cancer (PCa) on biopsy. We retrospectively reviewed 304 patients with biopsy-proven GS 3 + 4 PCa who underwent mpMRI before RP. On T2-weighted imaging and three mpMRI combinations (T2-weighted imaging + diffusion-weighted imaging [DWI], T2-weighted imaging + dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI [DCE-MRI], and T2-weighted imaging + DWI + DCE-MRI), two radiologists (R1/R2) scored the presence of a dominant tumour using a 5-point Likert scale (1 = definitely absent to 5 = definitely present). Diagnostic performance in identifying downgrading was evaluated via areas under the curves (AUCs). Predictive accuracies of multivariate models were calculated. In predicting downgrading, T2-weighted imaging + DWI (AUC = 0.89/0.85 for R1/R2) performed significantly better than T2-weighted imaging alone (AUC = 0.72/0.73; p 0.99 for R1/R2). On multivariate analysis, the clinical + mpMRI model incorporating T2-weighted imaging + DWI (AUC = 0.92/0.88 for R1/R2) predicted downgrading significantly better than the clinical model (AUC = 0.73; p < 0.001 for R1/R2). mpMRI improves the ability to identify a subgroup of patients with Gleason 3 + 4 PCa on biopsy who are candidates for active surveillance. DCE-MRI (compared to T2 + DWI) offered no additional benefit to the prediction of downgrading. (orig.)

  16. Factors related to patient-perceived satisfaction after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy based on the expanded prostate cancer index composite survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J H; Ha, Y-S; Jeong, S J; Kim, S; Kim, W-J; Jang, T L; Kim, I Y

    2013-12-01

    Few studies have analyzed factors that influence longitudinal changes in patient-perceived satisfaction during the recovery period following robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) for prostate cancer. We investigated variables that were associated with patient-perceived satisfaction after RARP using the expanded prostate cancer index composite (EPIC) survey. Of 175 men who underwent RARP between 2010 and 2011, 140 men completed the EPIC questionnaire preoperatively and 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively. On the basis of the EPIC question no. 32 (item number 80), patients were divided into four groups according to the pattern of satisfaction change at postoperative 3 and 12 months: satisfied to satisfied (group 1); satisfied to dissatisfied (group 2); dissatisfied to satisfied (group 3); and dissatisfied to dissatisfied (group 4). Longitudinal changes in EPIC scores over time in each group and differences in EPIC scores of each domain subscale between groups at each follow-up were analyzed. A linear mixed model with generalized estimating equation approach was used to identify independent factors that influence overall satisfaction among repeated measures from same patients. On the basis of the pattern of satisfaction change, groups 1, 2, 3 and 4 had 103 (74.3%), 21 (15.0%), 11 (7.9%) and 5 (2.9%) patients, respectively. The factor that was associated with overall satisfaction was urinary bother (UB) (β=0.283, 95% confidence interval (0.024, 0.543 ); P=0.033) adjusted for other factors under consideration. UB was the independent factor influencing patient-perceived satisfaction after RARP. During post-RARP follow-up, physician should have the optimal management for the patient's UB.

  17. The Effect of Ureteral Stent Placement Before Radical Prostatectomy on the Safety of Ureteral Dissection and the Surgeon’s Comfort

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    Fatih Akdemir

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study investigated the role of preoperative ureteral stent placement in reducing the risk of ureteral injury, an intraoperative complication of radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP, and its contribution to the surgeon’s comfort. Materials and Methods: Open RRP was performed in 66 patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer in our clinic between 2010 and 2015. The patients were divided into two groups; group 1 (n=34 underwent surgery without ureteral stent placement and group 2 (n=32 had surgery following the placement of a ureteral stent. The cases were preoperatively evaluated by suprapubic and transrectal ultrasonography. Perioperative and postoperative complications of all cases were determined. Both groups were assessed in terms of ureteral injury, operative time, and surgeon’s comfort. Results: The mean age of the patients in group 1 and group 2 was 61.12±5.92 (50-72 years and 63.58±6.2 (51-75 years, respectively. The mean prostate volume was 76.8±2.41 and 72.4±3.53 cc in groups 1 and 2, respectively. The mean operative time was 143.9±3.06 minutes in group 1 and 136.8±2.83 minutes in group 2. Partial ureteral injury occurred in three patients in group 1 and was repaired intraoperatively. Of these patients, two had previously undergone radiotherapy for prostate cancer and it was difficult to perform prostate dissection intraoperatively. The remaining patient had a history of transurethral resection of the prostate. No ureteral injury was observed in any of the patients in group 2. Conclusion: Preoperative ureteral stent placement in selected patients can facilitate ureteral dissection and reduce ureteral injury risk.

  18. Factors related to patient-perceived satisfaction after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy based on the expanded prostate cancer index composite survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, JH; Ha, Y-S; Jeong, SJ; Kim, S; Kim, W-J; Jang, TL; Kim, IY

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND Few studies have analyzed factors that influence longitudinal changes in patient-perceived satisfaction during the recovery period following robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) for prostate cancer. We investigated variables that were associated with patient-perceived satisfaction after RARP using the expanded prostate cancer index composite (EPIC) survey. METHODS Of 175 men who underwent RARP between 2010 and 2011, 140 men completed the EPIC questionnaire preoperatively and 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively. On the basis of the EPIC question no. 32 (item number 80), patients were divided into four groups according to the pattern of satisfaction change at postoperative 3 and 12 months: satisfied to satisfied (group 1); satisfied to dissatisfied (group 2); dissatisfied to satisfied (group 3); and dissatisfied to dissatisfied (group 4). Longitudinal changes in EPIC scores over time in each group and differences in EPIC scores of each domain subscale between groups at each follow-up were analyzed. A linear mixed model with generalized estimating equation approach was used to identify independent factors that influence overall satisfaction among repeated measures from same patients. RESULTS On the basis of the pattern of satisfaction change, groups 1, 2, 3 and 4 had 103 (74.3%), 21 (15.0%), 11 (7.9%) and 5 (2.9%) patients, respectively. The factor that was associated with overall satisfaction was urinary bother (UB) (β = 0.283, 95% confidence interval (0.024, 0.543); P = 0.033) adjusted for other factors under consideration. CONCLUSIONS UB was the independent factor influencing patient-perceived satisfaction after RARP. During post-RARP follow-up, physician should have the optimal management for the patient’s UB. PMID:23917307

  19. Neoadjuvant Systemic Therapy Before Radical Prostatectomy in High-Risk Prostate Cancer Does Not Increase Surgical Morbidity: Contemporary Results Using the Clavien System.

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    Williams, Stephen B; Davis, John W; Wang, Xuemei; Achim, Mary F; Zurita-Saavedra, Amado; Matin, Surena F; Pisters, Louis L; Ward, John F; Pettaway, Curtis A; Chapin, Brian F

    2016-04-01

    Multimodality therapies for men with high- and very high-risk prostate cancer, including neoadjuvant systemic therapy followed by subsequent radical prostatectomy (RP) are being increasingly explored despite the lack of adequate morbidity data. We analyzed the data from 215 consecutive patients with high- and very high-risk prostate cancer who were previously untreated or had received neoadjuvant systemic therapy. All patients underwent RP with extended pelvic lymph node dissection from 2006 to 2010 at a single tertiary care academic center. All complications within 90 days of surgery were defined and categorized by a 5-grade and 10-domain modification of the Clavien system. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to identify preoperative predictors for complications. Of the 215 patients, 29% experienced a complication of any grade ≤ 90 days after surgery; 6% experienced grade ≥ 3, with no significant difference between either cohort (P = .50). On multivariate analysis, open RP (odds ratio [OR], 2.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11-3.90; P = .02) and preoperative hemoglobin (OR, 1.98; 95% CI, 1.05-3.72; P = .03) were independent predictors of the occurrence of any grade complication. For major complications (Clavien ≥ 3), a Charlson comorbidity index of 6 to 7 versus 3 to 5 (OR, 5.45; 95% CI, 1.57-18.98; P = .008) and the most recent year of surgery (OR, 4.73; 95% CI, 1.36-16.39; P = .01) were significant predictors on multivariable analysis. The use of neoadjuvant systemic therapy did not appear to increase the risk of perioperative complications. These findings support current clinical trials, which might elucidate the oncologic benefit of this multimodality approach. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Higher Prostate Weight Is Inversely Associated with Gleason Score Upgrading in Radical Prostatectomy Specimens

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    Leonardo Oliveira Reis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Protective factors against Gleason upgrading and its impact on outcomes after surgery warrant better definition. Patients and Methods. Consecutive 343 patients were categorized at biopsy (BGS and prostatectomy (PGS as Gleason score, ≤6, 7, and ≥8; 94 patients (27.4% had PSA recurrence, mean followup 80.2 months (median 99. Independent predictors of Gleason upgrading (logistic regression and disease-free survival (DFS (Kaplan-Meier, log-rank were determined. Results. Gleason discordance was 45.7% (37.32% upgrading and 8.45% downgrading. Upgrading risk decreased by 2.4% for each 1 g of prostate weight increment, while it increased by 10.2% for every 1 ng/mL of PSA, 72.0% for every 0.1 unity of PSA density and was 21 times higher for those with BGS 7. Gleason upgrading showed increased clinical stage (P=0.019, higher tumor extent (P=0.009, extraprostatic extension (P=0.04, positive surgical margins (P<0.001, seminal vesicle invasion (P=0.003, less “insignificant” tumors (P<0.001, and also worse DFS, χ2=4.28, df=1, P=0.039. However, when setting the final Gleason score (BGS ≤6 to PGS 7 versus BGS 7 to PGS 7, avoiding allocation bias, DFS impact is not confirmed, χ2=0.40, df=1, P=0.530.Conclusions. Gleason upgrading is substantial and confers worse outcomes. Prostate weight is inversely related to upgrading and its protective effect warrants further evaluation.

  1. A phase 3, placebo controlled study of the safety and efficacy of avanafil for the treatment of erectile dysfunction after nerve sparing radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulhall, John P; Burnett, Arthur L; Wang, Run; McVary, Kevin T; Moul, Judd W; Bowden, Charles H; DiDonato, Karen; Shih, Winnie; Day, Wesley W

    2013-06-01

    We evaluated the safety and efficacy of 100 and 200 mg avanafil for the treatment of adult males with erectile dysfunction after bilateral nerve sparing radical prostatectomy. This was a double-blind, placebo controlled, parallel group, phase 3 study in males age 18 to 70 years with a history of erectile dysfunction of 6 months or more after bilateral nerve sparing radical prostatectomy. Patients were randomized to 100 or 200 mg avanafil or placebo (taken 30 minutes before sexual activity) for 12 weeks. Primary end points included successful vaginal insertion (Sexual Encounter Profile [SEP] question 2), successful intercourse (SEP3) and change in score on the erectile function domain of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-EF) questionnaire. A total of 298 patients were randomized and 84.6% completed the study. At baseline 16.1% were age 65 years or older and 71.5% had severe erectile dysfunction (mean overall IIEF-EF domain score 9.2). After 12 weeks there were significantly greater increases in SEP2 and SEP3 and change in mean IIEF-EF domain score with 100 and 200 mg avanafil vs placebo (p erectile function after prostatectomy. Results suggest a rapid onset of action and sustained duration of effect, with all 3 primary end points being achieved at both dose levels. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. MRI-derived Restriction Spectrum Imaging Cellularity Index is Associated with High Grade Prostate Cancer on Radical Prostatectomy Specimens

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    Michael Andre Liss

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We evaluate a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI technique to improve detection of aggressive prostate cancer. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of presurgical prostate MRI scans using an advanced diffusion weighted imaging technique called Restriction Spectrum Imaging (RSI, which can be presented as a normalized z-score statistic (RSI z-score. Scans were acquired prior to radical prostatectomy. Prostatectomy specimens were processed using whole mount sectioning and regions of interest (ROIs were drawn around individual prostate cancer (PCa tumors. Corresponding ROIs were drawn on the MRI imaging and paired with ROIs in regions with no pathology. RSI z-score and conventional apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC values were recorded for each ROI. Paired t-test, ANOVA and logistic regression analyses were performed.Results: We evaluated 28 patients with 64 regions of interest (28 benign and 36 PCa. The mean difference in RSI z-score (PCa ROI – Benign ROI was 2.17 (SE = 0.11; p <0.001 and in ADC was 551 mm2/sec (SE = 80 mm2/sec; paired t-test, p <0.001. The differences in the means among all groups (benign, primary Gleason 3 and primary Gleason 4 was significant for both RSI z-score (F3,64 = 97.7, p <0.001 and ADC (F3,64 = 13.9, p <0.001. A t-test was performed on only PCa tumor ROIs (n=36 to determine prostate cancer aggressiveness (Gleason 3 vs. Gleason 4 revealing that RSI z-score was still significant (p = 0.03, whereas, ADC values were no longer significant (p = 0.08. In multivariable analysis adjusting for age and race, RSI z-score was associated with PCa aggressiveness (OR 10.3, 95%CI: 1.4-78.0, p=0.02 while ADC trended to significance (p=0.07. Conclusions: The RSI derived normalized cellularity index (RSI z-score is associated with aggressive prostate cancer as determined by pathologic Gleason scores. Further utilization of RSI techniques may serve to enhance standardized reporting systems.

  3. The Validation of a Novel Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy Virtual Reality Module.

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    Harrison, Patrick; Raison, Nicholas; Abe, Takashige; Watkinson, William; Dar, Faizan; Challacombe, Ben; Van Der Poel, Henk; Khan, Muhammad Shamim; Dasgupa, Prokar; Ahmed, Kamran

    2017-09-30

    To perform the first validation of a full procedural virtual reality robotic training module and analysis of novice surgeon's learning curves. Participants completed the bladder neck dissection task and urethrovesical anastomosis task (UVA) as part of the prostatectomy module. Surgeons completed feedback questionnaires assessing the realism, content, acceptability and feasibility of the module. Novice surgeons completed a 5.5-hour training programme using both tasks. King's College London, London. 13 novice, 24 intermediate and 8 expert surgeons completed the validation study. Realism was scored highly for BDN (mean 3.4/5) and UVA (3.74/5), as was importance of BDN (4.32/5) and UVA (4.6/5) for training. It was rated as a feasible (3.95/5) and acceptable (4/5) tool for training. Experts performed significantly better than novice group in 6 metrics in the UVA including time (p = 0.0005), distance by camera (p = 0.0010) and instrument collisions (p = 0.0033), as well as task-specific metrics such as number of unnecessary needle piercing points (p = 0.0463). In novice surgeons, a significant improvement in performance after training was seen in many metrics for both tasks. For bladder neck dissection task, this included time (p instrument collisions (p = 0.0013) and total time instruments are out of view (p = 0.0251). For UVA, this included time (p = 0.0135), instrument collisions (p = 0.0066) and task-specific metrics such as injury to the urethra (p = 0.0032) and bladder (p = 0.0189). Surgeons found this full procedural VR training module to be a realistic, feasible and acceptable component for a robotic surgical training programme. Construct validity was proven between expert and novice surgeons. Novice surgeons have shown a significant learning curve over 5.5 hours of training, suggesting this module could be used in a surgical curriculum for acquisition of technical skills. Further implementation of this module into the curriculum and continued analysis would be

  4. Superior Biochemical Recurrence and Long-term Quality-of-life Outcomes Are Achievable with Robotic Radical Prostatectomy After a Long Learning Curve-Updated Analysis of a Prospective Single-surgeon Cohort of 2206 Consecutive Cases.

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    Thompson, James E; Egger, Sam; Böhm, Maret; Siriwardana, Amila R; Haynes, Anne-Maree; Matthews, Jayne; Scheltema, Matthijs J; Stricker, Phillip D

    2017-12-19

    Our earlier analysis suggested that robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) achieved superiority over open radical prostatectomy (ORP) in terms of positive surgical margin (PSM) rates and functional outcomes. With larger sample size and longer follow-up, the objective of this study update is to assess whether our previous findings are upheld and whether the improved PSM rates for RARP after an initial learning curve compared with ORP-as observed in our earlier analysis-ultimately resulted in improved biochemical control. Prospective observational study comparing two surgical techniques; 2271 consecutive men underwent RARP (1520) or ORP (751) at a single centre from 2006 to 2016. Demographic and clinicopathological data were prospectively collected. The EPIC-QOL questionnaire was administered at baseline and 1.5, 3, 6, 12, and 24 mo. Multivariate linear regression modelled the difference in quality of life (QOL) domains against case number; logistic and Cox regression modelled the differences in PSM and biochemical recurrence (BCR) hazard ratios (HR), respectively. A total of 2206 men were included in BCR/PSM analysis and 1045 consented for QOL analysis. Superior pT2 surgical margins, early and late sexual outcomes, and early urinary outcomes were upheld and became more robust (narrowing of 95% confidence intervals [CIs]). The risk of BCR was initially higher for RARP, improved after 191 RARPs, and was 35% lower (hazard ratio [HR] 0.65, 95% CI 0.47-0.90) at final RARP, plateauing after 226 RARPs. Improved late (12-24 mo) urinary bother scores (adjusted mean difference [AMD]=4.7, 95% CI 1.3-8.0) and irritative-obstructive scores (AMD=3.8, 95% CI 0.9-5.6) at final RARP were demonstrated. Limitations include observational single surgeon data, possible residual confounding, and short follow-up. The results from this updated analysis demonstrate that RARP can be beneficial for patients of high-volume surgeons, although more randomised studies and studies with

  5. A decade of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy training: Time-based metrics and qualitative grading for fellows and residents.

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    Altok, Muammer; Achim, Mary F; Matin, Surena F; Pettaway, Curtis A; Chapin, Brian F; Davis, John W

    2018-01-01

    As modern urology residency and fellowship training in robot-assisted surgery evolves toward standardized curricula (didactics, dry/wet-laboratory exercises, and surgical assistance), additional tools are needed to evaluate on-console performance. At the start of our robotics program in 2006, we set-up a time- and quality-based evaluation program and aim to consolidate this data into a simple set of metrics for self-evaluation. Using our index procedure of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP), we prospectively collected data on 2,215 cases over 10 years from 6 faculty surgeons and 94 trainees (43 urologic oncology fellows and 51 urology residents). The steps of the operation were divided into 11 consistent steps, and the metrics included time to completion and quality using a 6-level grading system. Time metrics were consolidated into quartiles for benchmarking. The median times for trainees to complete each step were 15% to 120% higher than those of the staff (Pstaff results. Steps performed by trainees were carefully chosen for a high success rate, and on our Likert-like scale were graded 4 to 5 in more than 95% of cases. There were no grade 0 (very poor) cases, and grades 1 (multiple technical errors) and 2 (could not be completed but without safety issues) were rare (staff. As a trainee progress through a rotation, these benchmarks can assist in prioritizing the need for more attention to a basic step vs. progression to more advanced steps. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pain, psychological distress and health-related quality of life at baseline and 3 months after radical prostatectomy

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    Johansson Fannie

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inadequate management of postoperative pain is common, and postoperative pain is a risk factor for prolonged pain. In addition to medical and technical factors, psychological factors may also influence the experience of postoperative pain. Methods Pain was measured postoperatively at 24, 48, and 72 hr in hospital and after 3 months at home in 140 patients undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP. Patients answered questionnaires about anxiety and depression (HAD scale and health-related quality of life (SF-36 at baseline and 3 months after surgery. Results In the first 3 postoperative days, mild pain was reported by 45 patients (32%, moderate pain by 64 (45%, and severe pain by 31 (22% on one or more days. High postoperative pain scores were correlated with length of hospital stay and with high pain scores at home. Forty patients (29% reported moderate (n = 35 or severe (n = 5 pain after discharge from hospital. Patients who experienced anxiety and depression preoperatively had higher postoperative pain scores and remained anxious and depressed 3 months after surgery. The scores for the physical domains in the SF-36 were decreased, while the mental health scores were increased at 3 months. Anxiety and depression were negatively correlated with all domains of the SF-36. Conclusion There is a need for nurses to be aware of the psychological status of RP patients and its impact upon patients' experience of postoperative pain and recovery. The ability to identify patients with psychological distress and to target interventions is an important goal for future research.

  7. Early incontinence after radical prostatectomy: a community based retrospective analysis in 911 men and implications for preoperative counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoder, Wael Y; Trottmann, Matthias; Stuber, Andrea; Stief, Christian G; Becker, Armin J

    2013-10-01

    Radical prostatectomy (RP) is curative for localized prostatic cancer. Incontinence after RP (P-RP-I) varies widely (2% to stimulation (AES), lifestyle adjustment, or combination are usually recommended at first for P-RP-I. Between January 2002 and December 2004, a total of 911 patients, median age 63 years (46-78), with different grades of P-RP-I have been retrospectively examined for perioperative risk factors and effect of rehabilitation procedures. These consecutive patients were from 67 clinics with median postoperative interval of 26 days. Incontinence was graded by Stamey classification, number of used pads and pads' consistency (dry, lightly wet, and wet). Therapeutic measures were done by team of specialists in rehabilitation, psycho-oncology, physiotherapy, internal medicine, and urology. Ninety-six percent of patients suffered different grades of incontinence at beginning of hospitalization. This was reported as Stamey first grade (49.4%), second grade (36.4%), and third grade (10.3%). Analysis included patients' age, body mass index (BMI), prostate volume, surgical approach, nerve sparing, pelvic lymphadenectomy, previous therapy, and catheterization time. Analysis showed age, nerve sparing, and BMI as significant risk factors for P-RP-I. Conservative therapy, including PFMT, AES, or combinations has been performed on all patients. Grade of P-RP-I showed significant improvement after 3 weeks rehabilitation period. Preoperative counseling of patients should provide them with realistic expectations for P-RP-I and motivate them to conservative therapy, as it reduces the duration and degree of urinary incontinence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Modified risk stratification grouping using standard clinical and biopsy information for patients undergoing radical prostatectomy: Results from SEARCH.

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    Zumsteg, Zachary S; Chen, Zinan; Howard, Lauren E; Amling, Christopher L; Aronson, William J; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Kane, Christopher J; Terris, Martha K; Spratt, Daniel E; Sandler, Howard M; Freedland, Stephen J

    2017-12-01

    Prostate cancer is a heterogeneous disease, and risk stratification systems have been proposed to guide treatment decisions. However, significant heterogeneity remains for those with unfavorable-risk disease. This study included 3335 patients undergoing radical prostatectomy without adjuvant radiotherapy in the SEARCH database. High-risk patients were dichotomized into standard and very high-risk (VHR) groups based on primary Gleason pattern, percentage of positive biopsy cores (PPBC), number of NCCN high-risk factors, and stage T3b-T4 disease. Similarly, intermediate-risk prostate cancer was separated into favorable and unfavorable groups based on primary Gleason pattern, PPBC, and number of NCCN intermediate-risk factors. Median follow-up was 78 months. Patients with VHR prostate cancer had significantly worse PSA relapse-free survival (PSA-RFS, P < 0.001), distant metastasis (DM, P = 0.004), and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM, P = 0.015) in comparison to standard high-risk (SHR) patients in multivariable analyses. By contrast, there was no significant difference in PSA-RFS, DM, or PCSM between SHR and unfavorable intermediate-risk (UIR) patients. Therefore, we propose a novel risk stratification system: Group 1 (low-risk), Group 2 (favorable intermediate-risk), Group 3 (UIR and SHR), and Group 4 (VHR). The c-index of this new grouping was 0.683 for PSA-RFS and 0.800 for metastases, compared to NCCN-risk groups which yield 0.666 for PSA-RFS and 0.764 for metastases. Patients classified as VHR have markedly increased rates of PSA relapse, DM, and PCSM in comparison to SHR patients, whereas UIR and SHR patients have similar prognosis. Novel therapeutic strategies are needed for patients with VHR, likely involving multimodality therapy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. High Testosterone Preoperative Plasma Levels Independently Predict Biopsy Gleason Score Upgrading in Men with Prostate Cancer Undergoing Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcaro, Antonio Benito; Petroziello, Aldo; Brunelli, Matteo; De Luyk, Nicolò; Cacciamani, Giovanni; Corsi, Paolo; Sebben, Marco; Tafuri, Alessandro; Tamanini, Irene; Caruso, Beatrice; Ghimenton, Claudio; Monaco, Carmelo; Artibani, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to investigate the potential associations between preoperative plasma levels of total testosterone (TT) and biopsy Gleason score (bGS) upgrading in prostate cancer (PCA) patients undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP). Exclusion criteria were treatment with 5α-reductase inhibitors, LH-releasing hormone analogues or testosterone replacement. Criteria of bGS upgrading were as follows: (i) bGS 6 to pathological Gleason score (pGS) >6, (ii) bGS 7 with pattern 3 + 4 to pGS 7 with pattern 4 + 3 or to pGS >7, (iii) bGS 7 with pattern 4 + 3 to pGS >7. Patients who showed bGS >7 were excluded from the cohort. The study included 209 patients. Tumor upgrading was assessed in 76 (36.4%) cases of the entire cohort, in 51 out of 130 cases (39.2%) of the bGS 6 group and 25 out of 79 patients (31.6%) in the bGS 7 cluster. Logistic regression models showed that independent clinical covariates predicting the risk of bGS upgrading included TT (OR 1.058; p = 0.027) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) density (OR 23.3; p = 0.008) as well as TT (OR 1.057; p = 0.029) with PSA (OR 1.061; p = 0.023). The model suggests that 1 unit increase in TT plasma levels increases the odds of bGS upgrading by 5.8 or 5.7%. In summary, we have determined that high TT preoperative plasma levels independently predict bGS upgrading in men with PCA undergoing RP. Preoperative plasma levels of TT might be included as a potential marker for assessing the risk bGS upgrading. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Safe-R: a novel score, accounting for oncological safe nerve-sparing at radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Andreas; Coelius, Carolina; Adam, Meike; Tennstedt, Pierre; Kluth, Luis; Steuber, Thomas; Heinzer, Hans; Graefen, Markus; Schlomm, Thorsten; Michl, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to describe a novel score (safe-R), combining information on surgical margin status (SM) and extend of nerve-sparing (NS) applicable for all patients undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP), and to test the impact of our frozen-section navigated nerve-sparing approach (NeuroSAFE) on safe-R score. We retrospectively analyzed 9,635 RPs performed at our center between 2002 and 2011. Of these, 47 % were conducted with NeuroSAFE. Proportions of NS and SM status were assessed. Subsequently, a score for oncological safe NS (safe-R) was developed; Safe-R was categorized as 3 (for negative SM and bilateral NS), 2 (for negative SM and unilateral NS), 1 (for negative SM without NS), and 0 (for patients with positive SM), respectively. The impact of NeuroSAFE on safe-R was analyzed by chi-square test and confirmed by multinomial logistic regression, adjusting for preoperative risk factors. Applying NeuroSAFE resulted in enhanced safe-R score, indicating lower rates of positive SM and higher rates of NS, across all risk categories (all p R 0 (27.6 vs. 33.6 %) and higher proportions of safe-R 3 (32.4 vs. 17.1 %, p R was confirmed after multinomial logistic adjustment for preoperative risk factors. All results were confirmed in a propensity-matched cohort (matched for preoperative risk factors and year of surgery, data not shown). Safe-R represents a novel tool to assess and report on oncological safe nerve-sparing in RP. NeuroSAFE is associated with enhanced safe-R scores.

  11. Radical Prostatectomy Versus Radiation and Androgen Deprivation Therapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: How Good Is the Evidence?

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    Roach, Mack, E-mail: mroach@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Ceron Lizarraga, Tania L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Lazar, Ann A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Division of Oral Epidemiology and Dental Public Health, Division of Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: The optimal treatment of clinically localized prostate cancer is controversial. Most studies focus on biochemical (PSA) failure when comparing radical prostatectomy (RP) with radiation therapy (RT), but this endpoint has not been validated as predictive of overall survival (OS) or cause-specific survival (CSS). We analyzed the available literature to determine whether reliable conclusions could be made concerning the effectiveness of RP compared with RT with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), assuming current treatment standards. Methods: Articles published between February 29, 2004, and March 1, 2015, that compared OS and CSS after RP or RT with or without ADT were included. Because the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) system emphasis is on randomized controlled clinical trials, a reliability score (RS) was explored to further understand the issues associated with the study quality of observational studies, including appropriateness of treatment, source of data, clinical characteristics, and comorbidity. Lower RS values indicated lower reliability. Results: Fourteen studies were identified, and 13 were completely evaluable. Thirteen of the 14 studies (93%) were observational studies with low-quality evidence. The median RS was 12 (range, 5-18); the median difference in 10-year OS and CSS favored RP over RT: 10% and 4%, respectively. In studies with a RS ≤12 (average RS 9) the 10-year OS and CSS median differences were 17% and 6%, respectively. For studies with a RS >12 (average RS 15.5), the 10-year OS and CSS median differences were 5.5% and 1%, respectively. Thus, we observed an association between low RS and a higher percentage difference in OS and CSS. Conclusions: Reliable evidence that RP provides a superior CSS to RT with ADT is lacking. The most reliable studies suggest that the differences in 10-year CSS between RP and RT are small, possibly <1%.

  12. Analysis of risk factors of involvement of seminal vesicles in patients with prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy

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    Marcos F. Dall'Oglio

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine through preoperative serum PSA level, Gleason score on biopsy and percentage of fragments affected by tumor on biopsy, the probability of involvement of the seminal vesicles. MATERIALS AND METHODS: During the period between March 1991 to December 2002, we selected 899 patients undergoing radical prostatectomy for treatment of localized prostate adenocarcinoma. The analyzed preoperative variables were PSA, percentage of positive fragments and Gleason score on the biopsy. Pre-operative PSA was divided in scales from 0 to 4.0 ng/mL, 4.1 to 10 ng/mL, 10.1 to 20 ng/mL and > 20 ng/mL, Gleason score was categorized in scales from 2 to 6. 7 and 8 to 10, and the percentage of affected fragments was divided in 0 to 25%, 25.1% to 50%, 50.1% to 75%, and 75.1% to 100%. All these variables were correlated with the involvement of seminal vesicles in the surgical specimen. RESULTS: Of the 899 patients under study, approximately 11% (95% CI, [9% - 13%] had involvement of seminal vesicles. On the multivariate analysis, when PSA was < 4, the Gleason score was 2 to 6, and less than 25% of fragments were involved on the biopsy, only 3.6%, 7.6% and 6.2% of patients respectively, had involvement of seminal vesicles. On the multivariate analysis, we observed that PSA, Gleason score and the percentage of involved fragments were independent prognostic factors for invasion of seminal vesicles. CONCLUSION: The preoperative variables used in the present study allow the identification of men with minimal risk (lower than 5% if involvement of seminal vesicles.

  13. Dose-adapted salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy based on an erMRI target definition model: toxicity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilli, Thomas; Jorcano, Sandra; Peguret, Nicolas; Caparrotti, Francesca; Hidalgo, Alberto; Khan, Haleem G; Vees, Hansjorg; Weber, Damien C; Miralbell, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    To assess treatment tolerance by patients treated with a dose-adapted salvage radiotherapy (SRT) protocol based on an multiparametric endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (erMRI) failure definition model after radical prostatectomy (RP). A total of 171 prostate cancer patients recurring after RP undergoing erMRI before SRT were analyzed. A median dose of 64 Gy was delivered to the prostatic bed (PB) with, in addition, a boost of 10 Gy to the suspected relapse as visualized on erMRI in 131 patients (76.6%). Genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were scored using the RTOG scale. Grade ≥ 3 GU and GI acute toxicity were observed in three and zero patients, respectively. The four-year grade ≥ 2 and ≥ 3 late GU and GI toxicity-free survival rates (109 patients with at least two years of follow-up) were 83.9 ± 4.7% and 87.1 ± 4.2%, and 92.1 ± 3.6% and 97.5 ± 1.7%, respectively. Boost (p = 0.048) and grade ≥ 2 acute GU toxicity (p = 0.008) were independently correlated with grade ≥ 2 late GU toxicity on multivariate analysis. A dose-adapted, erMRI-based SRT approach treating the PB with a boost to the suspected local recurrence may potentially improve the therapeutic ratio by selecting patients that are most likely expected to benefit from SRT doses above 70 Gy as well as by reducing the size of the highest-dose target volume. Further prospective trials are needed to investigate the use of erMRI in SRT as well as the role of dose-adapted protocols and the best fractionation schedule.

  14. Results of Dose-adapted Salvage Radiotherapy After Radical Prostatectomy Based on an Endorectal MRI Target Definition Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilli, Thomas; Jorcano, Sandra; Peguret, Nicolas; Caparrotti, Francesca; Hidalgo, Alberto; Khan, Haleem G; Vees, Hansjörg; Miralbell, Raymond

    2017-04-01

    To assess the outcome of patients treated with a dose-adapted salvage radiotherapy (SRT) protocol based on an endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (erMRI) failure definition model after radical prostatectomy (RP). We report on 171 relapsing patients after RP who had undergone an erMRI before SRT. 64 Gy were prescribed to the prostatic bed with, in addition, a boost of 10 Gy to the suspected local relapse as detected on erMRI in 131 patients (76.6%). The 3-year biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS), local relapse-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, cancer-specific survival, and overall survival were 64.2±4.3%, 100%, 85.2±3.2%, 100%, and 99.1±0.9%, respectively. A PSA value >1 ng/mL before salvage (P=0.006) and an absence of biochemical progression during RT (P=0.001) were both independently correlated with bRFS on multivariate analysis. No significant difference in 3-year bRFS was observed between the boost and no-boost groups (68.4±4.6% vs. 49.7±10%, P=0.251). A PSA value >1 ng/mL before salvage and a biochemical progression during RT were both independently correlated with worse bRFS after SRT. By using erMRI to select patients who are most likely expected to benefit from dose-escalated SRT protocols, this dose-adapted SRT approach was associated with good biochemical control and outcome, serving as a hypothesis-generating basis for further prospective trials aimed at improving the therapeutic ratio in the salvage setting.

  15. The number of negative pelvic lymph nodes removed does not affect the risk of biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Alana M.; Berkman, Douglas S.; Desai, Manisha; Benson, Mitchell C.; McKiernan, James M.; Badani, Ketan K.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To assess patients who had radical prostatectomy (RP) and pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) for pT2–4 N0M0 prostate cancer, to determine if LN yield affects the risk of biochemical failure (BCF), as the extent of PLND at the time of RP has become increasingly uncertain with the decreasing trend in tumour stage. PATIENTS AND METHODS We reviewed the Columbia University Urologic Oncology Database for patients with pT2–4 N0M0 prostate cancer treated with RP from 1990 to 2005. Exclusion criteria included <12 months of follow-up, incomplete clinical and pathological data, and neoadjuvant androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) or immediate adjuvant ADT or external beam radiotherapy. Unadjusted and adjusted models were used to determine the ability of clinical and pathological variables to predict BCF. RESULTS The final dataset included 964 patients, with a mean age of 60.5 years and median preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of 6.2 ng/mL. The median (range) LN yield was 7 (1–42) and the median follow-up 59 (12–190) months. In the unadjusted and adjusted models, preoperative PSA, pathological Gleason score, pathological stage, surgical margin status and year of surgery were significant predictors of BCF.The LN group was not a significant predictor of BCF in both the unadjusted and adjusted model ( P = 0.759 and 0.408, respectively). When patients were stratified into highand low-risk groups, LN yield remained an insignificant predictor of BCF. CONCLUSION A higher LN yield at the time of RP does not increase the chance of cure for patients with pT2–4N0M0 prostate cancer. This lack of a survival advantage holds true for patients with high-risk disease. PMID:19549117

  16. The Incidence and Anatomy of Accessory Pudendal Arteries as Depicted on Multidetector-Row CT Angiography: Clinical Implications of Preoperative Evaluation for Laparoscopic and Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Beom Jin; Sung, Deuk Jae; Kim, Min Ju; Cho, Sung Bum; Kim, Yun Hwan; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Kang, Seok Ho; Cheon, Jun

    2009-01-01

    To help preserve accessory pudendal arteries (APAs) and to ensure optimal postoperative sexual function after a laparoscopic or robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, we have evaluated the incidence of APAs as detected on multidetector-row CT (MDCT) angiography and have provided a detailed anatomical description. The distribution of APAs was evaluated in 121 consecutive male patients between February 2006 and July 2007 who underwent 64- channel MDCT angiography of the lower extremities. We defined an APA as any artery located within the periprostatic region running parallel to the dorsal vascular complex. We also subclassified APAs into lateral and apical APAs. Two radiologists retrospectively evaluated the origin, course and number of APAs; the final APA subclassification based on MDCT angiography source data was determined by consensus. We identified 44 APAs in 36 of 121 patients (30%). Two distinct varieties of APAs were identified. Thirty-three APAs (75%) coursed near the anterolateral region of the prostatic apex, termed apical APAs. The remaining 11 APAs (25%) coursed along the lateral aspect of the prostate, termed lateral APAs. All APAs originated from the internal obturator artery and iliac artery or a branch of the iliac artery such as the inferior vesical artery. The majority of apical APAs arose from the internal obturator artery (84%). Seven patients (19%) had multiple APAs. APAs are more frequently detected by the use of MDCT angiography than as suggested by previous surgical studies. The identification of APAs on MDCT angiography may provide useful information for the surgical preservation of APAs during a laparoscopic or robot-assisted radical prostatectomy

  17. [Comparative study of radical prostatectomy versus external beam radiotherapy (75.6 Gy) combined with hormone therapy for prostate cancer of intermediate D'Amico risk classification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissier, R; Karsenty, G; Muracciole, X; Daniel, L; Delaporte, V; Maurin, C; Coulange, C; Lechevallier, E

    2013-09-01

    Thirty-three percent of the localized cancers belongs initially to the group of intermediate risk of D'Amico. The standard treatments validated by the French Association of Urology are the radical prostatectomy and the external beam radiotherapy. We retrospectively compared the carcinologic results of the radical prostatectomy±adjuvant treatment (RP) and the external beam radiotherapy combining high dose (75.6 Gy) and short hormonotherapy (RH), in the treatment of intermediate risk prostate cancer. The series consisted of 143 patients treated between 2000 and 2006 in the department of Urology and Kidney transplantation of the Conception Hospital, Marseilles. The main assessment criteria was the survival without biological recurrence (SBR). The median follow-up was 90 months [59-51]. The 5 years and 8 years SBR were 85% and 73% in the RH group, versus 74% and 65% with RP (P=0.196). There was a significant difference between the series: on the age of diagnosis (63.9 versus 73.3 years, P<0.001), the Charlson score of comorbidity (2 versus 3, P<0.001) and the number of intermediate criteria per patients (one intermediate criteria: RP 74% versus 57%, P<0.01). According to our study, there was no superiority of the radical prostatectomy±adjuvant treatment or the external radiotherapy combining high dose and concomitant short hormonotherapy on the survival without biological recurrence at 5 and 8 years. Many studies confirm that a concomitant hormonotherapy increases the carcinologic control, even with a high rate external beam radiotherapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Radical prostatectomy and postoperative irradiation in patients with pathological stage C (T3) carcinoma of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovich, Zbigniew; Lieskovsky, Gary; Langholz, Bryan; Formenti, Silvia; Baert, Luc; Streeter, Oscar; Skinner, Donald G.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Adenocarcinoma of the prostate is the most common human cancer of internal organs. Radical surgery is regarded by many to be the treatment of choice for capsule confined disease. Since accurate preoperative assessment of tumor stage is difficult to define, many patients are subsequently found to have pathological stage C (T3) disease. These patients should be considered for adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A group of 201 PS C (T3) unselected patients, treated with radical prostatectomy and limited pelvic lymphadenectomy, received postoperative irradiation to the prostate bed. This radiotherapy was given between 42-90 days after surgery and consisted of a median dose of 48 Gy. Patient survival, disease free survival, time to clinical and chemical relapse and the incidence of local and systemic relapse were analyzed. The influence of multiple parameters on the treatment outcome including patient age, treatment period, clinical stage, pathological stage, Gleason's score, prostate specific antigen (PSA), radiotherapy techniques and radiation dose were examined using univariate and multivariate analysis. Follow-up ranged from 3 to 15 years, with a median of 5 years. Results: The overall 5- and 10-year actuarial survival was 92% and 83% (median > 10 years), respectively and the 5- and 10-year disease-free survival (clinical and PSA) was 67% and 53% (median > 10 years), respectively. A total of 61 (30%) patients had a recurrence, including 23 (11%) patients who had clinical and 38 (19%) who had PSA recurrence. Of the 23 patients with clinical recurrence, 10 (5%) had local recurrence, including two patients who had local and systemic recurrence. Pathological stage and Gleason's score were independently predictive of recurrence (each with p 25 ng/ml) was also an important independent factor predicting tumor recurrence, p = 0.05. All other investigated parameters were not significant in predicting tumor recurrence. This treatment program was very well

  19. Hem-o-Lok® clip eroding into the urethra following laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Ganpule

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hem-o-loc clips have been used for vascular control in laparoscopic surgery. We describe a case presenting with lower urinary tract symptoms after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Evaluation revealed migrated hem-o-loc clips causing obstruction and symptoms in bladder neck region. Clip removal with endoscopy relieved the symptoms. Diagnosis warrants high index of suspicion as clips are radiolucent and other more common differential diagnosis like bladder neck contracture may have similar presentation. For the prevention, loose clips should be actively searched for and retrieved from abdomen and clip application near proposed anastomotic site should be avoided.

  20. Larger Maximum Tumor Diameter at Radical Prostatectomy Is Associated With Increased Biochemical Failure, Metastasis, and Death From Prostate Cancer After Salvage Radiation for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Skyler B.; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Jackson, William C.; Zhou, Jessica; Foster, Benjamin; Foster, Corey; Song, Yeohan; Li, Darren; Palapattu, Ganesh S.; Kunju, Lakshmi; Mehra, Rohit; Sandler, Howard; Feng, Felix Y.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the maximum tumor diameter (MTD) of the dominant prostate cancer nodule in the radical prostatectomy specimen as a prognostic factor for outcome in patients treated with salvage external beam radiation therapy (SRT) for a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value after radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: From an institutional cohort of 575 patients treated with SRT, data on MTD were retrospectively collected. The impact of MTD on biochemical failure (BF), metastasis, and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) was assessed on univariate and multivariate analysis using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models. Results: In the 173 patients with MTD data available, median follow-up was 77 months (interquartile range, 47-104 months) after SRT, and median MTD was 18 mm (interquartile range, 13-22 mm). Increasing MTD correlated with increasing pT stage, Gleason score, presence of seminal vesicle invasion, and lymph node invasion. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis identified MTD of >14 mm to be the optimal cut-point. On univariate analysis, MTD >14 mm was associated with an increased risk of BF (P=.02, hazard ratio [HR] 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-2.8), metastasis (P=.002, HR 4.0, 95% CI 2.1-7.5), and PCSM (P=.02, HR 8.0, 95% CI 2.9-21.8). On multivariate analysis MTD >14 mm remained associated with increased BF (P=.02, HR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.2), metastasis (P=.02, HR 3.4, 95% CI 1.2-9.2), and PCSM (P=.05, HR 9.7, 95% CI 1.0-92.4), independent of extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, positive surgical margins, pre-RT PSA value, Gleason score, and pre-RT PSA doubling time. Conclusions: For patients treated with SRT for a rising PSA value after prostatectomy, MTD at time of radical prostatectomy is independently associated with BF, metastasis, and PCSM. Maximum tumor diameter should be incorporated into clinical decision making and future clinical risk assessment tools for those patients

  1. Larger Maximum Tumor Diameter at Radical Prostatectomy Is Associated With Increased Biochemical Failure, Metastasis, and Death From Prostate Cancer After Salvage Radiation for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Skyler B.; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Jackson, William C.; Zhou, Jessica; Foster, Benjamin; Foster, Corey; Song, Yeohan; Li, Darren [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Palapattu, Ganesh S. [Department of Urology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kunju, Lakshmi; Mehra, Rohit [Department of Pathology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Feng, Felix Y., E-mail: ffeng@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the maximum tumor diameter (MTD) of the dominant prostate cancer nodule in the radical prostatectomy specimen as a prognostic factor for outcome in patients treated with salvage external beam radiation therapy (SRT) for a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value after radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: From an institutional cohort of 575 patients treated with SRT, data on MTD were retrospectively collected. The impact of MTD on biochemical failure (BF), metastasis, and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) was assessed on univariate and multivariate analysis using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models. Results: In the 173 patients with MTD data available, median follow-up was 77 months (interquartile range, 47-104 months) after SRT, and median MTD was 18 mm (interquartile range, 13-22 mm). Increasing MTD correlated with increasing pT stage, Gleason score, presence of seminal vesicle invasion, and lymph node invasion. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis identified MTD of >14 mm to be the optimal cut-point. On univariate analysis, MTD >14 mm was associated with an increased risk of BF (P=.02, hazard ratio [HR] 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-2.8), metastasis (P=.002, HR 4.0, 95% CI 2.1-7.5), and PCSM (P=.02, HR 8.0, 95% CI 2.9-21.8). On multivariate analysis MTD >14 mm remained associated with increased BF (P=.02, HR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.2), metastasis (P=.02, HR 3.4, 95% CI 1.2-9.2), and PCSM (P=.05, HR 9.7, 95% CI 1.0-92.4), independent of extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, positive surgical margins, pre-RT PSA value, Gleason score, and pre-RT PSA doubling time. Conclusions: For patients treated with SRT for a rising PSA value after prostatectomy, MTD at time of radical prostatectomy is independently associated with BF, metastasis, and PCSM. Maximum tumor diameter should be incorporated into clinical decision making and future clinical risk assessment tools for those patients

  2. Evaluation of tumor morphologies and association with biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy in grade group 5 prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, Trevor A; Schieda, Nicola; Sim, Jordan; Breau, Rodney H; Morash, Chris; Belanger, Eric C; Robertson, Susan J

    2017-10-03

    We assessed Gleason pattern 5 (GP5) and other prostatic adenocarcinoma (PCa) morphologies to determine their association with biochemical recurrence (BCR). A search for grade group 5 PCa with radical prostatectomy (RP) yielded 49 patients. RPs were reviewed for %GP5 and morphologies (sheets, single cells, cords, small solid cylinders, solid medium to large nests with rosette-like spaces [SMLNRS], comedonecrosis, cribriform glands, glomerulations, intraductal carcinoma of the prostate [IDC-P], and prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma [PDCa]). Prevalence of morphologies was as follows: single cells 100%, cribriform glands 98.7%, cords 85.7%, IDC-P 77.6%, comedonecrosis 53.1%, sheets 49.0%, small solid cylinders 49.0%, PDCa 44.9%, glomerulations 34.7%, and SMLNRS 14.3%. From 28 patients who were treated with RP as monotherapy, 64.3% (18/28) had BCR. Comedonecrosis, sheets, small solid cylinders, IDC-P, and PDCa were significantly associated with BCR. Number of morphologies on RP and %GP5 were higher in patients with BCR (6.8 ± 2.1 versus 3.7 ± 2.9%; P < 0.001 and 26.9 ± 16.8 versus 11.4 ± 14.1%; P = 0.02) with area under ROC curve of 0.89 (confidence intervals [CI] 0.77-1.00). Sensitivity/specificity was 77.8/80.0% for predicting BCR when ≥ 5 morphologies were present and 0.79 (CI 0.60-0.99) with sensitivity/specificity of 66.7/80.0% for predicting BCR when ≥ 15% GP5 was present. Hazard ratio for BCR was higher with increasing number of morphologies (1.23, CI 1.02-1.49; P = 0.034) but not %GP5 (0.99, CI 0.97-1.02, P = 0.622). Our results indicate that GP5 morphologies may represent a biologically heterogeneous group and that an increasing number of PCa morphologies on RP is strongly associated with an increased risk of BCR.

  3. Prognostic Significance of Percentage and Architectural Types of Contemporary Gleason Pattern 4 Prostate Cancer in Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Bonnie; Pearce, Shane M; Anderson, Blake B; Shalhav, Arieh L; Zagaja, Gregory; Eggener, Scott E; Paner, Gladell P

    2016-10-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) 2014 consensus meeting recommended a novel grade grouping for prostate cancer that included dividing Gleason score (GS) 7 into grade groups 2 (GS 3+4) and 3 (GS 4+3). This division of GS 7, essentially determined by the percent of Gleason pattern (GP) 4 (50%), raises the question of whether a more exact quantification of the percent GP 4 within GS 7 will yield additional prognostic information. Modifications were also made by ISUP regarding the definition of GP 4, now including 4 main architectural types: cribriform, glomeruloid, poorly formed, and fused glands. This study was conducted to analyze the prognostic significance of the percent GP 4 and main architectural types of GP 4 according to the 2014 ISUP grading criteria in radical prostatectomies (RPs). The cohort included 585 RP cases of GS 6 (40.2%), 3+4 (49.0%), and 4+3 (10.8%) prostate cancers. Significantly different 5-year biochemical recurrence (BCR)-free survival rates were observed among GS 6 (99%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 97%-100%), 3+4 (81%, 95% CI: 76%-86%), and 4+3 (60%, 95% CI: 45%-71%) cancers (P70% (Parchitectures, cribriform was the most prevalent (43.7%), and combination of architectures with cribriform present was more frequently observed in GS 4+3 (60.3%). Glomeruloid was mostly (67.1%) seen combined with other GP 4 architectures. Unlike the other GP 4 architectures, glomeruloid as the sole GP 4 was observed only as a secondary pattern (ie, 3+4). Among patients with GS 7 cancer, the presence of cribriform architecture was associated with decreased 5-year BCR-free survival when compared with GS 7 cancers without this architecture (68% vs. 85%, Parchitecture was associated with improved 5-year BCR-free survival when compared with GS 7 cancers without this architecture (87% vs. 75%, P=0.01). However, GS 7 disease having only the glomeruloid architecture had significantly lower 5-year BCR-free survival than GS 6 cancers (86% vs. 99

  4. Importance of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) as a predictive factor for concordance between the Gleason scores of prostate biopsies and RADICAL prostatectomy specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Nelson Gianni de; Soares, Daniel de Freitas Gomes; Rhoden, Ernani Luis

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the concordance between the Gleason scores of prostate biopsies and radical prostatectomy specimens, thereby highlighting the importance of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level as a predictive factor of concordance. We retrospectively analyzed 253 radical prostatectomy cases performed between 2006 and 2011. The patients were divided into 4 groups for the data analysis and dichotomized according to the preoperative PSA, PSA level was 9.3±4.9 ng/mL. The overall concordance between the Gleason scores was 52%. Patients presented preoperative PSA levels PSA levels PSA levels ≥10 ng/dL (61% x 23%, p=0.023), which resulted in 77% upgrading after surgery in those patients with PSA levels ≥10 ng/dl. The Gleason scores of needle prostate biopsies and those of the surgical specimens were concordant in approximately half of the global sample. The preoperative PSA level was a strong predictor of discrepancy and might improve the identification of those patients who tended to be upgraded after surgery, particularly in patients with Gleason scores of 3 + 3 in the prostate biopsy and preoperative PSA levels ≥10 ng/mL.

  5. Epidural analgesia during open radical prostatectomy does not improve long-term cancer-related outcome: a retrospective study in patients with advanced prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Y Wuethrich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A beneficial effect of regional anesthesia on cancer related outcome in various solid tumors has been proposed. The data on prostate cancer is conflicting and reports on long-term cancer specific survival are lacking. METHODS: In a retrospective, single-center study, outcomes of 148 consecutive patients with locally advanced prostate cancer pT3/4 who underwent retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP with general anesthesia combined with intra- and postoperative epidural analgesia (n=67 or with postoperative ketorolac-morphine analgesia (n=81 were reviewed. The median observation time was 14.00 years (range 10.87-17.75 yrs. Biochemical recurrence (BCR-free, local and distant recurrence-free, cancer-specific, and overall survival were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier technique. Multivariate Cox proportional-hazards regression models were used to analyze clinicopathologic variables associated with disease progression and death. RESULTS: The survival estimates for BCR-free, local and distant recurrence-free, cancer-specific survival and overall survival did not differ between the two groups (P=0.64, P=0.75, P=0.18, P=0.32 and P=0.07. For both groups, higher preoperative PSA (hazard ratio (HR 1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.01-1.02, P<0.0001, increased specimen Gleason score (HR 1.24, 95% CI 1.06-1.46, P=0.007 and positive nodal status (HR 1.66, 95% CI 1.03-2.67, P=0.04 were associated with higher risk of BCR. Increased specimen Gleason score predicted death from prostate cancer (HR 2.46, 95% CI 1.65-3.68, P<0.0001. CONCLUSIONS: General anaesthesia combined with epidural analgesia did not reduce the risk of cancer progression or improve survival after RRP for prostate cancer in this group of patients at high risk for disease progression with a median observation time of 14.00 yrs.

  6. Comparison of Functional Outcome after Extended versus Super-Extended Pelvic Lymph Node Dissection during Radical Prostatectomy in High-Risk Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikki Seikkula

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundUrinary continence and erectile function (EF are best preserved when meticulous dissection of prostate and nerve sparing technique are used during radical prostatectomy (RP. However, extent of lymph node dissection (LND may also adversely affect functional results.ObjectiveTo determine whether performing a super-extended LND (seLND has a significant effect on recovery of urinary continence and EF after RP.Design, setting, and participantsAll patients who underwent RP from January 2007 until December 2013 were handed questionnaires assessing continence and EF. All patients in whom at least an extended LND (eLND was performed were selected. This search yielded 526 patients. 172 of these patients had filed out 2 or more questionnaires and were included in our analysis.Outcome measurements and statistical analysisAll questionnaires were reviewed. We used Kaplan–Meier analyses and multivariate Cox analysis to assess the difference in recovery of continence and EF over time for eLND/seLND. Primary endpoints were full recovery of continence (no loss of urine and full recovery of EF (successful intercourse possible. Patients who did not reach the endpoint when the last questionnaire was filled out were censored at that time. Median follow-up was 12.43 months for continence, and 18.97 months for EF.Results and limitationsPatients undergoing seLND have a lower chance of regaining both urinary continence [hazard ratio (HR 0.59, 95% CI 0.39–0.90, p = 0.026] and EF (HR 0.28, 95% CI 0.13–0.57, p = 0.009. Age at surgery had a significant influence on both continence and EF in multivariate analysis. Major limitation of the study was that no formal preoperative assessment of continence and potency was done.ConclusionExtending the LND template beyond the eLND template may cause at least a significant delay in recovery of urinary continence and leads to less recovery of EF.

  7. Identifying the Most Informative Prediction Tool for Cancer-specific Mortality After Radical Prostatectomy: Comparative Analysis of Three Commonly Used Preoperative Prediction Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Katharina; Larcher, Alessandro; Beyer, Burkhard; Tian, Zhe; Tilki, Derya; Steuber, Thomas; Karakiewicz, Pierre I; Heinzer, Hans; Graefen, Markus; Budäus, Lars

    2016-06-01

    The D'Amico risk stratification, Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment (CAPRA) score, and Stephenson nomogram are widely used prediction tools for biochemical recurrence and survival after radical prostatectomy (RP). These models have not been compared with respect to cancer-specific mortality (CSM) prediction. To validate and compare the prediction tools for 10-yr CSM. Overall, 2485 prostate cancer patients underwent RP in a European tertiary care center. Three preoperative models (D'Amico, CAPRA, and Stephenson) were compared in terms of their ability to predict 10-yr CSM; therefore, accuracy tests (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC]), calibration plots, and decision curve analysis (DCA) were assessed for each model. CSM at 10 yr was 3.6%. The AUC was 0.76, 0.77, and 0.80 for the D'Amico, CAPRA, and Stephenson models, respectively. In calibration plots, predicted probabilities were close to the observed probabilities for the D'Amico model but showed underestimation of CSM for the Stephenson nomogram and overestimation of CSM for the CAPRA score. DCA identified a benefit for the CAPRA score. These results apply to patients treated at a European tertiary care center. Despite good discriminatory power, all tested models had some shortcomings in terms of prediction of 10-yr CSM. All three models showed good performance in North American cohorts, but our results suggested a lack of generalizability to European patients. To overcome this issue, local recalibration of the variable weights could be performed. Another possibility is the development of more universal markers that are independent of regional practice differences or, alternatively, the development of better tools to quantify clinical practice differences. Prediction tools can predict cancer survival prior surgery, relying on points for age, prostate-specific antigen levels, aggressiveness, and percentage of cancer at biopsy. These tools are reliable in North American patients but

  8. Radical prostatectomy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heering, Mikael; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Brasso, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    treated with RP at six different hospitals in Denmark between 1995 and 2011. Data were extracted from the nationwide DaPCa database. Histopathology reports from the RP specimens were manually reviewed. Date and cause of death were obtained from national registries and cross-checked in patient files...... detection of PCa is indeed undergoing in Denmark despite national recommendations. The Danish national results seem to concur with findings from international single- and multi-institutional reports....

  9. [Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy for Patients with Prostatic Cancer and Factors Promoting Installation of the Robotic Surgical Equipment-Questionnaire Survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Taiji; Tanaka, Shigeru

    2015-08-01

    We conducted a questionnaire survey of hospitals with robot-assisted surgical equipment to study changes of the surgical case loads after its installation and the managerial strategies for its purchase. The study included 154 hospitals (as of April 2014) that were queried about their radical prostatectomy case loads from January 2009 to December 2013, strategies for installation of the equipment in their hospitals, and other topics related to the study purpose. The overall response rate of hospitals was 63%, though it marginally varied according to type and area. The annual case load was determined based on the results of the questionnaire and other modalities. It increased from 3,518 in 2009 to 6,425 in 2013. The case load seemed to be concentrated in hospitals with robot equipment since the increase of their number was very minimal over the 5 years. The hospitals with the robot treated a larger number of newly diagnosed patients with the disease than before. Most of the patients were those having localized cancer that was indicated for radical surgery, suggesting again the concentration of the surgical case loads in the hospitals with robots. While most hospitals believed that installation of a robot was necessary as an option for treatment procedures, the future strategy of the hospital, and other reasons, the action of the hospital to gain prestige may be involved in the process of purchasing the equipment. In conclusion, robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy has become popular as a surgical procedure for prostate cancer in our society. This may lead to a concentration of the surgical case load in a limited number of hospitals with robots. We also discuss the typical action of an acute-care hospital when it purchases expensive clinical medical equipment.

  10. Advanced Reconstruction of Vesicourethral Support (ARVUS) during Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy: One-year Functional Outcomes in a Two-group Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Student, Vladimir; Vidlar, Ales; Grepl, Michal; Hartmann, Igor; Buresova, Eva; Student, Vladimir

    2017-05-01

    The advent of robotics has facilitated new surgical techniques for radical prostatectomy. These allow adjustment of pelvic anatomical and functional relationships after removal of the prostate to ameliorate postprostatectomy incontinence (PPI) and reduce the time to complete continence. To describe the results of a new surgical technique for reconstruction of vesicourethral anastomosis using the levator ani muscle for support during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). A prospective, randomised, single-blind study among 66 consecutive patients with localised prostate cancer (cT1-2N0M0) undergoing RARP from June to September 2014, 32 using the new technique and 34 using the standard posterior reconstruction according to Rocco. In the advanced reconstruction of vesicourethral support (ARVUS) intervention group, the fibres of the levator ani muscle, Denonvilliers fascia, retrotrigonal layer, and median dorsal raphe were used to form the dorsal support for the urethrovesical anastomosis. Suture of the arcus tendineus to the bladder neck served as the anterior fixation. We compared demographic data and preoperative and postoperative functional and oncologic results for the two groups. The primary endpoint was continence evaluated at different time points (24h, 2, 4, and 8 wk, and 6 and 12 mo). The secondary endpoints were perioperative and postoperative complications and erectile function. Using a continence definition of 0 pads/d, the continence rates for the ARVUS versus the control group were 21.9% versus 5.9% at 24h (p=0.079), 43.8% versus 11.8% at 2 wk (p=0.005), 62.5% versus 14.7% at 4 wk (pInternational Index of Erectile Function questionnaire results at 6 and 12 mo after surgery showed similar potency rates for the control group (40.0% and 73.33%) and the ARVUS group (38.8% and 72.22%). There were four postoperative complications (2 in each group): three haematomas requiring transfusion and one lymphocele that needed drainage. No urinary retention

  11. Tissue-Based MicroRNAs as Predictors of Biochemical Recurrence after Radical Prostatectomy: What Can We Learn from Past Studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhongwei; Stephan, Carsten; Weickmann, Sabine; Jung, Monika; Kristiansen, Glen; Jung, Klaus

    2017-09-21

    With the increasing understanding of the molecular mechanism of the microRNAs (miRNAs) in prostate cancer (PCa), the predictive potential of miRNAs has received more attention by clinicians and laboratory scientists. Compared with the traditional prognostic tools based on clinicopathological variables, including the prostate-specific antigen, miRNAs may be helpful novel molecular biomarkers of biochemical recurrence for a more accurate risk stratification of PCa patients after radical prostatectomy and may contribute to personalized treatment. Tissue samples from prostatectomy specimens are easily available for miRNA isolation. Numerous studies from different countries have investigated the role of tissue-miRNAs as independent predictors of disease recurrence, either alone or in combination with other clinicopathological factors. For this purpose, a PubMed search was performed for articles published between 2008 and 2017. We compiled a profile of dysregulated miRNAs as potential predictors of biochemical recurrence and discussed their current clinical relevance. Because of differences in analytics, insufficient power and the heterogeneity of studies, and different statistical evaluation methods, limited consistency in results was obvious. Prospective multi-institutional studies with larger sample sizes, harmonized analytics, well-structured external validations, and reasonable study designs are necessary to assess the real prognostic information of miRNAs, in combination with conventional clinicopathological factors, as predictors of biochemical recurrence.

  12. Tissue-Based MicroRNAs as Predictors of Biochemical Recurrence after Radical Prostatectomy: What Can We Learn from Past Studies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongwei Zhao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing understanding of the molecular mechanism of the microRNAs (miRNAs in prostate cancer (PCa, the predictive potential of miRNAs has received more attention by clinicians and laboratory scientists. Compared with the traditional prognostic tools based on clinicopathological variables, including the prostate-specific antigen, miRNAs may be helpful novel molecular biomarkers of biochemical recurrence for a more accurate risk stratification of PCa patients after radical prostatectomy and may contribute to personalized treatment. Tissue samples from prostatectomy specimens are easily available for miRNA isolation. Numerous studies from different countries have investigated the role of tissue-miRNAs as independent predictors of disease recurrence, either alone or in combination with other clinicopathological factors. For this purpose, a PubMed search was performed for articles published between 2008 and 2017. We compiled a profile of dysregulated miRNAs as potential predictors of biochemical recurrence and discussed their current clinical relevance. Because of differences in analytics, insufficient power and the heterogeneity of studies, and different statistical evaluation methods, limited consistency in results was obvious. Prospective multi-institutional studies with larger sample sizes, harmonized analytics, well-structured external validations, and reasonable study designs are necessary to assess the real prognostic information of miRNAs, in combination with conventional clinicopathological factors, as predictors of biochemical recurrence.

  13. Temporal Trends in Clinical and Pathological Characteristics for Men Undergoing Radical Prostatectomy Between 1995 and 2013 at Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark, and Stanford University Hospital, United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Mathias Dyrberg; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Kjaer, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze how prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening and practice patterns has affected trends in tumor characteristics in men undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP) in the United States and Denmark. Unlike in the United States, PSA screening has not been recommended in Denmark...... according to Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment-Postsurgical (CAPRA-S) risk groups and D'Amico risk classification and were clustered into 4 time periods (1995-1999, 2000-2004, 2005-2009, and 2010-2013). Temporal trends in the proportions of patients of a given variable at the 2 institutions were...... evaluated with Cochran-Armitage test for trends and chi-square testing. Results: A total of 4404 patients were included. Temporal changes in preoperative PSA, age, grade, and stage was found in both cohorts. Median preoperative PSA declined in both cohorts, while median age increased, with the Danish cohort...

  14. Nuclear Stat5a/b predicts early recurrence and prostate cancer-specific death in patients treated by radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtti, Tuomas; Leiby, Benjamin E; Abdulghani, Junaid; Aaltonen, Elina; Pavela, Miia; Mamtani, Anita; Alanen, Kalle; Egevad, Lars; Granfors, Torvald; Josefsson, Andreas; Stattin, Par; Bergh, Anders; Nevalainen, Marja T

    2013-03-01

    There is an urgent need for reliable markers to identify patients whose prostate cancer (PCa) will recur after initial therapy and progress to lethal disease. Gleason score (GS) is considered the most accurate predictive marker for disease-specific mortality after primary treatment of localized PCa. Most PCas cluster into groups of GS 6 and 7 with considerable variation in the disease recurrence and disease-specific death. In preclinical PCa models, Stat5a/b promotes PCa growth and progression. Stat5a/b is critical for PCa cell viability in vitro and for tumor growth in vivo and promotes metastatic dissemination of cancer in nude mice. Here, we analyzed the predictive value of high nuclear Stat5a/b protein levels in 2 cohorts of PCas: Material I (n = 562) PCas treated by radical prostatectomy (RP), and Material II (n = 106) PCas treated by deferred palliative therapy. In intermediate GS PCas treated by radical prostatectomy, high levels of nuclear Stat5a/b predicted both early recurrence (univariable analysis; P nuclear Stat5a/b predicted early disease recurrence in both univariable (P nuclear Stat5a/b expression was associated with early PCa-specific death by univariable Cox regression analysis (HR = 1.59; 95% CI = [1.04, 2.44]; P = .034). If confirmed in future prospective studies, nuclear Stat5a/b may become a useful independent predictive marker of recurrence of lethal PCa after RP for intermediate GS PCas. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Prognostic value of inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) and caspases in prostate cancer: caspase-3 forms and XIAP predict biochemical progression after radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez-Berriguete, Gonzalo; Torrealba, Norelia; Ortega, Miguel Angel; Martínez-Onsurbe, Pilar; Olmedilla, Gabriel; Paniagua, Ricardo; Guil-Cid, Manuel; Fraile, Benito; Royuela, Mar

    2015-01-01

    The expression status of apoptotic regulators, such as caspases and inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs), could reflect the aggressiveness of tumors and, therefore, could be useful as prognostic markers. We explored the associations between tumor expression of caspases and IAPs and clinicopathological features of prostate cancer – clinical and pathological T stage, Gleason score, preoperative serum PSA levels, perineural invasion, lymph node involvement, surgical margin status and overall survival – and evaluated its capability to predict biochemical progression after radical prostatectomy. Protein expression of caspases (procaspase-8, cleaved caspase-8, procaspase-3, cleaved caspase-3, caspase-7 and procaspase-9) and IAPs (cIAP1/2, cIAP2, NAIP, Survivin and XIAP) was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in radical prostatectomy samples from 84 prostate cancer patients. Spearman’s test, Kaplan-Meier curves, and univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analysis were performed. cIAP1/2, cIAP2, Survivin, procaspase-8, cleaved caspase-8, procaspase-3 and caspase-7 expression correlated with at least one clinicopathological feature of the disease. Patients negative for XIAP, procaspase-3 or cleaved caspase-3 had a significantly worse prognosis. Of note, XIAP, procaspase-3 and cleaved caspase-3 were predictors of biochemical progression independent of Gleason score and pathological T stage. Our results indicate that alterations in the expression of IAPs and caspases contribute to the malignant behavior of prostate tumors and suggest that tumor expression of XIAP, procaspase-3 and cleaved caspase-3 may help to identify prostate cancer patients at risk of progression

  16. [Head to head comparison of two currently used nomograms predicting the risk of side specific extra capsular extension to indicate nerve sparing during radical prostatectomy for treatment of prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, C; Maurin, C; Villeret, J; Marcy, M; Salem, N; Brunelle, S; Gravis, G; Garcia, S; Giusiano, S; Bastide, C; Rossi, D; Bladou, F; Walz, J

    2014-07-01

    To perform a head to head comparison of these two nomograms by an external validation combined with an identification of probability cut-offs when to indicate NS. The full models of the nomograms of Ohori et al. and Steuber et al. were used to calculate the risk of ECE based on PSA and side specific information on clinical stage, biopsy Gleason score, % positive cores, and % cancer in cores. A dataset of 968 prostate half lobes was used retrospectively for analysis. All patients underwent laparoscopic robot-assisted or open radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer. The predictive accuracy of the Ohori nomogram was at 0.80 and for the Steuber Nomogram at 0.78 (comparison P > 0.05). In the calibration plot, the Ohori nomogram showed less departures from ideal predictions than the Steuber nomogram. The best probability cut-off to allow NS for the Ohori nomogram seemed to be ≤ 10%, permitting NS in 59.7% of all cases and being associated with a false negative rate of 10%. The best cut-off for the Steuber nomogram seemed to be ≤ 8%, permitting NS in 44% and associated with a false negative rate 12.5%. The Ohori et al. and the Steuber et al. nomograms allow highly accurate and comparable predictions of the risk of side specific ECE. 4. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Superior quality of life and improved surgical margins are achievable with robotic radical prostatectomy after a long learning curve: a prospective single-surgeon study of 1552 consecutive cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James E; Egger, Sam; Böhm, Maret; Haynes, Anne-Maree; Matthews, Jayne; Rasiah, Krishan; Stricker, Phillip D

    2014-03-01

    Comparative studies suggest functional and perioperative superiority of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) over open radical prostatectomy (ORP). To determine whether high-volume experienced open surgeons can improve their functional and oncologic outcomes with RARP and, if so, how many cases are required to surpass ORP outcomes and reach the learning curve plateau. A prospective observational study compared two surgical techniques: 1552 consecutive men underwent RARP (866) or ORP (686) at a single Australian hospital from 2006 to 2012, by one surgeon with 3000 prior ORPs. Demographic and clinicopathologic data were collected prospectively. The Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite quality of life (QoL) questionnaire was administered at baseline, 1.5, 3, 6, 12, and 24 mo. Multivariate linear and logistic regression modelled the difference in QoL domains and positive surgical margin (PSM) odds ratio (OR), respectively, against case number. A total of 1511 men were included in the PSM and 609 in the QoL analysis. RARP sexual function scores surpassed ORP scores after 99 RARPs and increased to a mean difference at 861st case of 11.0 points (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.9-16.1), plateauing around 600-700 RARPs. Early urinary incontinence scores for RARP surpassed ORP after 182 RARPs and increased to a mean difference of 8.4 points (95% CI, 2.1-14.7), plateauing around 700-800 RARPs. The odds of a pT2 PSM were initially higher for RARP but became lower after 108 RARPs and were 55% lower (OR: 0.45; 95% CI, 0.22-0.92) by the 866th RARP. The odds of a pT3/4 PSM were initially higher for RARP but decreased, plateauing around 200-300 RARPs with an OR of 1.15 (0.68-1.95) at the 866th RARP. Limitations include single-surgeon data and residual confounding. RARP had a long learning curve with inferior outcomes initially, and then showed progressively superior sexual, early urinary, and pT2 PSM outcomes and similar pT3 PSM and late urinary outcomes. Learning RARP

  18. Does prostate volume have an impact on the functional and oncological results of Retzius-sparing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galfano, Antonio; Panarello, Daniele; Secco, Silvia; DI Trapani, Dario; Barbieri, Michele; Napoli, Giancarlo; Strada, Elena; Petralia, Giovanni; Bocciardi, Aldo M

    2018-03-28

    The objective of our study is to evaluate the effect of prostatic volume on the outcomes of Retzius-Sparing robot-assisted radical Prostatectomy (RSP). All the consecutive patients undergoing RSP up to January 2015 were included. The series was divided into three groups (60 g). Perioperative, oncological and functional data were prospectively recorded. Potency was defined as erections sufficient for penetration; continence as no pad or 1 safety liner. Oncological results were reported as positive surgical margins (PSMs) and 1-year biochemical disease- free survival (PSA60 g prostates). Median follow-up was 22 months; PSA was higher in larger prostates (6.6 ng/ml vs 6.8 ng/ml vs 8 ng/ml). Nerve-sparing and bladder-neck sparing procedures were in similar percentages. Larger prostates required longer surgeries (90 minutes vs 100 minutes vs 100 minutes, p=0.002). Perioperative results were similar (blood loss, discharge, complications, catheter removal). Larger prostates had more frequently localized disease (pT2 in 49.5% vs 60.7% vs 68.5% - p=0.001); PSMs were similar both in pT2 (15.5% vs 9.4% vs 11.8%) and in pT3 cases (40.1% vs 42% vs 34%). In the 3 groups, immediate continence was reached by 88%, 89.5% and 81.3% (p=0.045), while no differences were observed concerning continence (93.4%, 94.1%, 94.7% - p=0.892) or potency after follow-up. Retzius-sparing prostatectomy is feasible in patients with prostates of any volume, with similar oncological and functional outcomes. Despite being inferior to the figures obtained in low volume prostates, the very high immediate continence rates observed in larger prostates encourage the use of this approach also in larger prostates.

  19. A pilot study of potential pre-operative barriers to couples' sexual recovery after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Daniela; Northouse, Laurel; Crossley, Heather; Miller, David; Dunn, Rodney; Nidetz, Jennifer; Montie, Jeanne; Moyad, Mia; Lavin, Katie; Montie, James E

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer affects couples' sexual intimacy, but men rarely use recommended proerectile aids. This mixed-methods study aimed to identify couples' preprostatectomy barriers to sexual recovery. Interviews about anticipated sexual recovery were paired with surveys: the Dyadic Assessment Scale, the Protective Buffering Scale, the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite, the Sexual Experience Questionnaire (men), and the Female Sexual Function Index. Potential barriers were derived using Grounded Theory. Quantitative data triangulated qualitative findings. Heterosexual couples (N = 28) participated. Men's average age was 62 years and their partners' average age was 58 years. Preexisting and diagnosis-related barriers included aging-related sexual dysfunction, inadequate sexual problem-solving skills, stressors, worry, avoidance of planning for sexual recovery, and dislike of artificially assisted sex. Participants endorsed moderate/high marital satisfaction (DAS: for men, M = 110.0, SD = 11.4; for partners, M = 114.1, SD = 12.1) and communication (PBS: for men, M = 24.5.2, SD = 6.1; for partners, M = 25.1, SD ± 6.2). Men reported mild erectile dysfunction and incontinence (EPIC sexual function M = 76.6, SD = 21.5, urinary incontinence M = 88.4, SD = 18.2). Men's couple sexual satisfaction was lowest (Sexual Experience Questionnaire: M = 60.1, SD = 26.9). Mean total Female Sexual Function Index was low (M = 21.6, SD = 7.8). Heterosexual couples face prostatectomy-related sexual side-effects having experienced developmental sexual losses. Couples use avoidant strategies to defend against worry about cancer and anticipated prostatectomy-related sexual changes. These potential barriers are modifiable if couples can learn to cope with sexual losses and accept sexual rehabilitation strategies.

  20. The role of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection in the management of high-risk prostate cancer: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuh, Bertram; Artibani, Walter; Heidenreich, Axel; Kimm, Simon; Menon, Mani; Novara, Giacomo; Tewari, Ashutosh; Touijer, Karim; Wilson, Timothy; Zorn, Kevin C; Eggener, Scott E

    2014-05-01

    The role of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) for men with high-risk (HR) prostate cancer (PCa) has not been well studied. To evaluate the indications for surgical treatment, technical aspects such as nerve sparing (NS) and lymph node dissection (LND), and perioperative outcomes of men with HR PCa treated with RARP. A systematic expert review of the literature was performed in October 2012, searching the Medline, Web of Science, and Scopus databases. Studies with a precise HR definition, robotic focus, and reporting of perioperative and pathologic outcomes were included. A total of 12 papers (1360 patients) evaluating RARP in HR PCa were retrieved. Most studies (67%) used the D'Amico classification for defining HR. Biopsy Gleason grade 8-10 was the most frequent HR identifier (61%). Length of follow-up ranged from 9.7 to 37.7 mo. Incidence of NS varied, although when performed did not appear to compromise oncologic outcomes. Extended LND (ELND) revealed positive nodes in up to a third of patients. The rate of symptomatic lymphocele after ELND was 3%. Overall mean operative time was 168 min, estimated blood loss was 189 ml, length of hospital stay was 3.2 d, and catheterization time was 7.8 d. The 12-mo continence rates using a no-pad definition ranged from 51% to 95% with potency recovery ranging from 52% to 60%. The rate of organ-confined disease was 35%, and the positive margin rate was 35%. Three-year biochemical recurrence-free survival ranged from 45% to 86%. Although the use of RARP for HR PCa has been relatively limited, it appears safe and effective for select patients. Short-term results are similar to the literature on open radical prostatectomy. Variability exists for NS and the template of LND, although ELND improves staging and removes a higher number of metastatic nodes. Further study is required to assess long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2013 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Metabolic syndrome is associated with advanced prostate cancer in patients treated with radical retropubic prostatectomy: results from a multicentre prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Nunzio, Cosimo; Simone, Giuseppe; Brassetti, Aldo; Mastroianni, Riccardo; Collura, Devis; Muto, Giovanni; Gallucci, Michele; Tubaro, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common non-skin cancer in USA and the second leading cause of cancer death in Western Countries. Despite the high mortality associated with PCa, the only established risk factors are age, race and family history. A possible association between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and PCa was firstly described in 2004 and several subsequent studies in biopsy cohorts have shown conflicting results. Aim of our multicentre prospective study was to investigate the association between MetS and PCa in men undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP). From January 2012 to June 2015, 349 consecutive men undergoing RP for PCa at three centres in Italy were enrolled into a prospective database. Body Mass Index (BMI) as well as waist circumference was measured before RP. Blood samples were also collected and tested for total PSA, fasting glucose, triglycerides and HDLs. Blood pressure was also recorded. We evaluated the association between MetS, defined according to Adult Treatment Panel III, PCa stage (advanced stage defined as pT ≥ 3 or N1) and grade (high grade defined as Gleason Score ≥ 4 + 3) using logistic regression analyses. Median age and preoperative PSA levels were 66 years (IQR: 61-69) and 7 ng/ml (IQR: 5-10), respectively. Median BMI was 26.12 kg/m 2 (IQR 24-29) with 56 (16 %) obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m 2 ) patients and 87 (25 %) patients with MetS. At pathological evaluation, advanced PCa and high-grade disease were present in 126 (36 %) and 145 (41.5 %) patients, respectively. MetS was significantly associated with advanced PCa (45/87, 51 % vs 81/262, 31 %; p = 0.008) and high-grade disease (47/87, 54 % vs 98/262, 37 %; p = 0.001). On multivariable analysis, MetS was an independent predictor of pathological stage ≥ pT3a or N1 (OR: 2.227; CI: 1.273-3.893; p = 0.005) and Gleason score ≥ 4 + 3 (OR: 2.007, CI: 1.175-3.428; p = 0.011). We firstly demonstrated in a European radical retropubic prostatectomy cohort study that MetS is associated with

  2. Trends in immediate perioperative morbidity and delay in discharge after open and minimally invasive radical prostatectomy (RP): a 20-year institutional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierorazio, Phillip M; Mullins, Jeffrey K; Ross, Ashley E; Hyams, Elias S; Partin, Alan W; Han, Misop; Walsh, Patrick C; Schaeffer, Edward M; Pavlovich, Christian P; Allaf, Mohamad E; Bivalacqua, Trinity J

    2013-07-01

    WHAT'S KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT? AND WHAT DOES THE STUDY ADD?: Standard clinical care pathways to discharge have been established for a number of operations including radical prostatectomy (RP). The pathway after RP has changed dramatically over the past two decades due to improvements in surgical technique, anaesthesia and most recently, the introduction of minimally invasive RP (MIRP). This study adds evidence that the emergence of MIRP is associated with a decrease in LOS for all patients undergoing RP. In addition, it catalogues the development of the clinical care pathway over 20 years at a large, tertiary care hospital with extensive experience in RP. Finally, it defines the common reasons patients fall 'off-pathway' (ileus, urine leak, anaemia and re-exploration for bleeding) and defines the immediate perioperative morbidity profile of RP. Specifically, it addresses approach-specific morbidities and indicates that MIRP is associated with higher rates of 'off-pathway' discharge, most often due to ileus. To investigate the development of the clinical care pathway to discharge after radical prostatectomy (RP) at a large, academic medical centre over the past 20 years, focusing on the rates and reasons for deviation. In all, 18 049 men were identified from the Johns Hopkins RP database who had undergone surgery since 1991. Patients in whom the length of stay (LOS) was ≤95th percentile, defined the clinical care pathway to discharge and those in whom LOS was ≥98th percentile were termed 'off-pathway'. The mean LOS decreased from 7.7 days in 1991 to 1.6 days in 2010. Of 7126 patients undergoing RP since 2005, 1803(25.3%), 4881(68.5%) and 312 (4.4%) were discharged on postoperative day (POD) 1, 2 and 3, respectively; 126 (1.8%) patients, discharged on POD4-21 were 'off-pathway'. The most common reasons for delay of discharge were ileus (44, 0.615%), urine leak (12, 0.17%), anaemia requiring blood transfusion (nine, 0.126%) and bleeding requiring re

  3. Beneficial effects of biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training in patients with urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy: A systematic review and metaanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Lan-Fang; Liao, Yuan-Mei; Lai, Fu-Chih; Tsai, Pei-Shan

    2016-08-01

    This systematic review and metaanalysis compared the effects of biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training with those of pelvic floor muscle training alone in patients with urinary incontinence after radical prostetactomy. A review and metaanalysis study design. The metaanalysis was conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and MetaAnalyses guidelines. A systematic search of PubMed/Medline OVID, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Library, BioMed Central, Web of Science, Chinese Electronic Periodical Services, Chinese Journal and Thesis Database, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure was performed for retrieving records. For determining the effects of training type on urinary incontinence, randomized controlled trials on biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training with or without electrical stimulation were compared with those on pelvic floor muscle training with or without electrical stimulation, respectively, in the metaanalysis. The Cochrane Collaboration tool in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Review of Interventions 5.1.0 was used to assess the methodological quality of the included trials. Subjective and objective measurement of urinary incontinence improvement and the quality of life were the primary and secondary outcome measures, respectively. Data were analyzed using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software 2.0. In addition, subgroup analyses and metaregression were performed to explore the possible sources of heterogeneity. Thirteen randomized controlled trials involving 1108 patients with prostatectomy incontinence were included. The immediate-, intermediate-, and long-term effects of objectively measured biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training on urinary incontinence were significant (mean effect size=-0.316, -0.335, and -0.294; 95% CI: -0.589 to -0.043, -0.552 to -0.118 and -0.535 to -0.053; p=0.023, 0.002, and 0.017, respectively) when compared

  4. Positive resection margin and/or pathologic T3 adenocarcinoma of prostate with undetectable postoperative prostate-specific antigen after radical prostatectomy: to irradiate or not?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Richard; Hruby, George; Hong, Julie; Hong, Eugene; DeBoer, Gerrit; Danjoux, Cyril; Morton, Gerard; Klotz, Laurence; Bhak, Edward; Flavin, Aileen

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for positive resection margin and/or pathologic T3 (pT3) adenocarcinoma of the prostate with undetectable postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels. Methods and materials: We retrospectively analyzed 125 patients with a positive resection margin and/or pT3 adenocarcinoma of the prostate who had undetectable postoperative serum PSA levels after radical prostatectomy. Seventy-three patients received postoperative adjuvant RT and 52 did not. Follow-up ranged from 1.5 to 12.0 years (median 4.2 for the irradiated group and 4.9 for the nonirradiated group). PSA outcome was available for all patients. Freedom from failure was defined as the maintenance of a serum PSA level of ≤0.2 ng/mL, as well as the absence of clinical local recurrence and distant metastasis. Results: No difference was found in the 5-year actuarial overall survival between the irradiated and nonirradiated group (94% vs. 95%). However, patients receiving adjuvant RT had a statistically superior 5-year actuarial relapse-free rate, including freedom from PSA failure, compared with those treated with surgery alone (88% vs. 65%, p=0.0013). In the irradiated group, 8 patients had relapse with PSA failure alone. None had local or distant recurrence. In the nonirradiated group, 15, 1, and 2 had PSA failure, local recurrence, and distant metastasis, respectively. On Cox regression analysis, pre-radical prostatectomy PSA level and adjuvant RT were statistically significant predictive factors for relapse, and Gleason score, extracapsular invasion, and resection margin status were not. There was a suggestion that seminal vesicle invasion was associated with an increased risk of relapse. The morbidity of postoperative adjuvant RT was acceptable, with only 2 patients developing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 genitourinary complications. Adjuvant RT had a minimal adverse effect on urinary continence and did not cause

  5. Importance of prostate-specific antigen (PSA as a predictive factor for concordance between the Gleason scores of prostate biopsies and RADICAL prostatectomy specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Gianni de Lima

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the concordance between the Gleason scores of prostate biopsies and radical prostatectomy specimens, thereby highlighting the importance of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA level as a predictive factor of concordance. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 253 radical prostatectomy cases performed between 2006 and 2011. The patients were divided into 4 groups for the data analysis and dichotomized according to the preoperative PSA, <10 ng/mL and ≥10 ng/mL. A p-score <0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: The average patient age was 63.3±7.8 years. The median PSA level was 9.3±4.9 ng/mL. The overall concordance between the Gleason scores was 52%. Patients presented preoperative PSA levels <10 ng/mL in 153 of 235 cases (65% and ≥10 ng/mL in 82 of 235 cases (35%. The Gleason scores were identical in 86 of 153 cases (56% in the <10 ng/mL group and 36 of 82 (44% cases in the ≥10 ng/mL group (p = 0.017. The biopsy underestimated the Gleason score in 45 (30% patients in the <10 ng/mL group and 38 (46% patients in the ≥10 ng/mL (p = 0.243. Specifically, the patients with Gleason 3 + 3 scores according to the biopsies demonstrated global concordance in 56 of 110 cases (51%. In this group, the patients with preoperative PSA levels <10 ng/dL had higher concordance than those with preoperative PSA levels ≥10 ng/dL (61% x 23%, p = 0.023, which resulted in 77% upgrading after surgery in those patients with PSA levels ≥10 ng/dl. CONCLUSION: The Gleason scores of needle prostate biopsies and those of the surgical specimens were concordant in approximately half of the global sample. The preoperative PSA level was a strong predictor of discrepancy and might improve the identification of those patients who tended to be upgraded after surgery, particularly in patients with Gleason scores of 3 + 3 in the prostate biopsy and preoperative PSA levels ≥10 ng/mL.

  6. Retzus-sparing robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: a step–by-step technique description of this first brazilian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Tobias-Machado

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Retzus-sparing robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy(RARP is a newly approach that preserve the Retzus structures and provide better recovery of continence and erectile function. In Brazil, this approach has not yet been previously reported. Objective: Our goal is to describe Step-by-Step the Retzus-sparing RARP surgical technique and report our first Brazilian experience. Methods: We present a case of a 60-year-old white man with low risk prostate cancer. Surgical materials were four arms Da Vinci robotic platform system, six transperitoneal portals, two prolene wires and Polymer Clips. This surgical technique was step-by-step described according to Galfano et al. One additional step was added as a modification of Galfano et al. Primary technique description: The closure of the Denovellier fascia. Results: We have operated one patient with this technique. The operative time was 180minutes, console time was135 min, the blood loss was 150ml, none perioperative or postoperative complications was found, hospital stay of 01 day. The anatomopathological classification revealed a pT2aN0M0 specimen with free surgical margins. The patient achieved continence immediately after bladder stent retrieval. Full erection reported after 30 days of surgery. Conclusion: Retzus-sparing RARP approach is feasible and reproducible. However, further comparative studies are necessary to demonstrate potential benefits in continence and sexual outcomes over the standard approaches.

  7. Exploring Prostate Cancer Genome Reveals Simultaneous Losses of PTEN, FAS and PAPSS2 in Patients with PSA Recurrence after Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinyere Ibeawuchi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The multifocal nature of prostate cancer (PCa creates a challenge to patients’ outcome prediction and their clinical management. An approach that scrutinizes every cancer focus is needed in order to generate a comprehensive evaluation of the disease, and by correlating to patients’ clinico-pathological information, specific prognostic biomarker can be identified. Our study utilized the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 Genome-wide assay to investigate forty-three fresh frozen PCa tissue foci from twenty-three patients. With a long clinical follow-up period that ranged from 2.0–9.7 (mean 5.4 years, copy number variation (CNV data was evaluated for association with patients’ PSA status during follow-up. From our results, the loss of unique genes on 10q23.31 and 10q23.2–10q23.31 were identified to be significantly associated to PSA recurrence (p < 0.05. The implication of PTEN and FAS loss (10q23.31 support previous reports due to their critical roles in prostate carcinogenesis. Furthermore, we hypothesize that the PAPSS2 gene (10q23.2–10q23.31 may be functionally relevant in post-operative PSA recurrence because of its reported role in androgen biosynthesis. It is suggestive that the loss of the susceptible region on chromosome 10q, which implicates PTEN, FAS and PAPSS2 may serve as genetic predictors of PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy.

  8. Prevention of Urethral Retraction with Stay Sutures (PURS) During Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy Improves Early Urinary Control: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argun, Omer Burak; Tuna, Mustafa Bilal; Doganca, Tunkut; Obek, Can; Mourmouris, Panagiotis; Tufek, Ilter; Erdogan, Sarper; Cetinel, Bulent; Kural, Ali Rıza

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate early continence rates with a novel modified vesicourethral anastomosis technique based on prevention of urethral retraction using anastomosis sutures as stay sutures (PURS) during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Sixty patients operated by a single surgeon were enrolled and data collected prospectively. This cohort was compared with another consecutive 60 patients operated with standard anastomosis. The new technique is based on preventing urethral retraction of the posterior urethra with two anastomosis sutures being used as stay sutures. The outcomes were prospectively followed and groups compared regarding early continence. International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form was used to assess incontinence and its impact on the quality of life. Pad use (yes or no pads) was evaluated as a more stringent criterion. Preoperative patient characteristics were similar between the two groups. Anastomosis was completed faster in PURS group (15.1 vs 18.5 min, p = 0.05). At postoperative week 1 and month 1, the severity and bother of incontinence were significantly less in the PURS group (12.7 vs 4.1 and 10.1 vs 2.6, p controlled studies would be required to further test the reproducibility of this technique.

  9. External validation and comparison of two nomograms predicting the probability of Gleason sum upgrading between biopsy and radical prostatectomy pathology in two patient populations: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsumi, Takanobu; Oka, Ryo; Endo, Takumi; Yano, Masashi; Kamijima, Shuichi; Kamiya, Naoto; Fujimura, Masaaki; Sekita, Nobuyuki; Mikami, Kazuo; Hiruta, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to validate and compare the predictive accuracy of two nomograms predicting the probability of Gleason sum upgrading between biopsy and radical prostatectomy pathology among representative patients with prostate cancer. We previously developed a nomogram, as did Chun et al. In this validation study, patients originated from two centers: Toho University Sakura Medical Center (n = 214) and Chibaken Saiseikai Narashino Hospital (n = 216). We assessed predictive accuracy using area under the curve values and constructed calibration plots to grasp the tendency for each institution. Both nomograms showed a high predictive accuracy in each institution, although the constructed calibration plots of the two nomograms underestimated the actual probability in Toho University Sakura Medical Center. Clinicians need to use calibration plots for each institution to correctly understand the tendency of each nomogram for their patients, even if each nomogram has a good predictive accuracy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Is the biopsy Gleason score important in predicting outcomes for patients after radical prostatectomy once the pathological Gleason score is known?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vira, Manish A; Guzzo, Thomas; Heitjan, Daniel F; Tomaszewski, John E; D'Amico, Anthony; Wein, Alan J; Malkowicz, S Bruce

    2008-05-01

    To evaluate whether specific preoperative variables might better predict the concordance between biopsy and radical prostatectomy (RP) Gleason grade, and to assess the effect of the biopsy Gleason score (bGS) when controlling for the pathological GS (pGS) on clinical outcomes in patients undergoing RP. Between 1989 and 1998, 1088 men had RP at our institution, with a median follow-up of 56 months. To evaluate the independent effect of bGS within categories of pGS, we stratified the sample by pGS (three categories; bGS (in the same three categories), assessing the significance of the differences among the three curves by the log-rank test. Overall, only 41.1% of patients had exactly concordant findings between bGS and pGS; concordance rates did not differ significantly when stratified by preoperative variables. On multivariate analysis, a change in the pGS compared with the bGS had a significant, independent effect on recurrence rates, specifically a 15% change in risk for a one-unit change in GS (P = 0.021). There was only modest agreement between the bGS and the pGS; the bGS continued to have independent prognostic influence after RP and assignment of the pGS.

  11. The Role of M1 and M2 Macrophages in Prostate Cancer in relation to Extracapsular Tumor Extension and Biochemical Recurrence after Radical Prostatectomy

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    M. Lanciotti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of our work was to investigate the causal connection between M1 and M2 macrophage phenotypes occurrence and prostate cancer, their correlation with tumor extension (ECE, and biochemical recurrence (BR. Patient and Methods. Clinical and pathological data were prospectively gathered from 93 patients treated with radical prostatectomy. Correlations of commonly used variables were evaluated with uni- and multivariate analysis. The relationship between M1 and M2 occurrence and BR was also assessed with Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Results. Above all in 63.4% there was a M2 prevalence. M1 occurred more frequently in OC disease, while M2 was more represented in ECE. At univariate analysis biopsy and pathologic GS and M2 were statistically correlated with ECE. Only pathologic GS and M2 confirmed to be correlated with ECE. According to macrophage density BCR free survival curves presented a statistically significant difference. When we stratified our population for M1 and M2,we did not find any statistical difference among curves. At univariate analysis GS, pTNM, and positive margins resulted to be significant predictors of BCR, while M1 and M2 did not achieve the statistical significance. At multivariate analysis, only GS and pathologic stage were independent predictors of BR. Conclusion. In our study patients with higher density of M count were associated with poor prognosis; M2 phenotype was significantly associated with ECE.

  12. Exploring Prostate Cancer Genome Reveals Simultaneous Losses of PTEN, FAS and PAPSS2 in Patients with PSA Recurrence after Radical Prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibeawuchi, Chinyere; Schmidt, Hartmut; Voss, Reinhard; Titze, Ulf; Abbas, Mahmoud; Neumann, Joerg; Eltze, Elke; Hoogland, Agnes Marije; Jenster, Guido; Brandt, Burkhard; Semjonow, Axel

    2015-01-01

    The multifocal nature of prostate cancer (PCa) creates a challenge to patients’ outcome prediction and their clinical management. An approach that scrutinizes every cancer focus is needed in order to generate a comprehensive evaluation of the disease, and by correlating to patients’ clinico-pathological information, specific prognostic biomarker can be identified. Our study utilized the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 Genome-wide assay to investigate forty-three fresh frozen PCa tissue foci from twenty-three patients. With a long clinical follow-up period that ranged from 2.0–9.7 (mean 5.4) years, copy number variation (CNV) data was evaluated for association with patients’ PSA status during follow-up. From our results, the loss of unique genes on 10q23.31 and 10q23.2–10q23.31 were identified to be significantly associated to PSA recurrence (p < 0.05). The implication of PTEN and FAS loss (10q23.31) support previous reports due to their critical roles in prostate carcinogenesis. Furthermore, we hypothesize that the PAPSS2 gene (10q23.2–10q23.31) may be functionally relevant in post-operative PSA recurrence because of its reported role in androgen biosynthesis. It is suggestive that the loss of the susceptible region on chromosome 10q, which implicates PTEN, FAS and PAPSS2 may serve as genetic predictors of PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy. PMID:25679447

  13. Temporal trends and predictors of salvage cancer treatment after failure following radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy: an analysis from the CaPSURE registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, K Clint; Paciorek, Alan; Fuldeore, Mahesh J; Carroll, Peter R; Cooperberg, Matthew R

    2014-02-15

    Prostate cancer treatment after failure of primary therapy by either radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy can vary greatly. This study sought to determine trends and predictors of salvage treatment after failure of primary treatment in a community cohort over the past 10 years. From the community-based Cancer of the Prostate Strategic Urologic Research Endeavor (CaPSURE) database, 6275 patients were identified who initiated a form of primary treatment for prostate cancer; 839 of these were identified as failing treatment by biochemical recurrence or initiation of secondary treatment between 2000 and 2010. Salvage therapy was categorized as either systemic, local, or none. Patient characteristics were tested for association with salvage therapy using analysis of variance, Pearson chi-square tests, and multinomial logistic regression analysis. Of the 839 patients identified as failing therapy, 390 (47%), 146 (17%), and 303 (36%) received systemic, local, or no salvage therapy, respectively. Type of primary treatment received was associated with type of salvage therapy (P trend in the use of local salvage therapy over the past 10 years (P = .04). Primary treatment type and biopsy Gleason score were significantly associated with type of salvage therapy. The use of local salvage therapy has increased over the past decade, whereas the use of systemic salvage therapy has declined. Primary treatment is an important factor in determining which type of salvage therapy a patient will receive. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  14. National Trends in Prostate Biopsy and Radical Prostatectomy Volumes Following the US Preventive Services Task Force Guidelines Against Prostate-Specific Antigen Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Joshua A; Shoag, Jonathan E; Artis, Amanda S; Ballman, Karla V; Sedrakyan, Art; Hershman, Dawn L; Wright, Jason D; Shih, Ya Chen Tina; Hu, Jim C

    2017-02-01

    Studies demonstrate that use of prostate-specific antigen screening decreased significantly following the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation against prostate-specific antigen screening in 2012. To determine downstream effects on practice patterns in prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment following the 2012 USPSTF recommendation. Procedural volumes of certifying and recertifying urologists from 2009 through 2016 were evaluated for variation in prostate biopsy and radical prostatectomy (RP) volume. Trends were confirmed using the New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System and Nationwide Inpatient Sample. The study included a representative sample of urologists across practice settings and nationally representative sample of all RP discharges. We obtained operative case logs from the American Board of Urology and identified urologists performing at least 1 prostate biopsy (n = 5173) or RP (n = 3748), respectively. The 2012 USPSTF recommendation against routine population-wide prostate-specific antigen screening. Change in median biopsy and RP volume per urologist and national procedural volume. Following the USPSTF recommendation, median biopsy volume per urologist decreased from 29 to 21 (interquartile range [IQR}, 12-34; P following 2012 (parameter estimate, -0.25; SE, 0.03; P following the USPSTF recommendation, median RP volume per urologist decreased from 7 (IQR, 3-15) to 6 (IQR, 2-12) (P Following the 2012 USPSTF recommendation, prostate biopsy and RP volumes decreased significantly. A panoramic vantage point is needed to evaluate the long-term consequences of the 2012 USPSTF recommendation.

  15. Effect of prostate size on pathological outcome and biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer: is it correlated with serum testosterone level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Taekmin; Jeong, In Gab; You, Dalsan; Park, Myung-Chan; Hong, Jun Hyuk; Ahn, Hanjong; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2010-09-01

    To examine whether prostate size is associated with pathological outcome and biochemical recurrence (BCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP) in patients with prostate cancer, and to evaluate whether it is correlated with serum testosterone level. The study comprised 579 men treated with RP for prostate cancer between June 1991 and March 2008, with a prostate-specific antigen level of cancer (P= 0.044), extracapsular extension (P= 0.011) and BCR (P= 0.016). There was also a positive correlation between serum testosterone level and prostate volume (r= 0.136, P= 0.043). Multivariate analysis showed that lower serum testosterone levels correlated with adverse pathological stage and a pathological Gleason score of ≥ 8 (P= 0.042). However, there was no relationship between serum testosterone level and BCR after adjusting for covariates. Men with smaller prostates had unfavourable pathological findings and were at greater risk of progression after RP. Low serum testosterone levels were not associated with tumour progression. Therefore, another mechanism, aside from hormonal factors, might be involved in unfavourable outcomes in patients with a small prostate. © 2010 THE AUTHORS. JOURNAL COMPILATION © 2010 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  16. Salvage radiotherapy for biochemical relapse after complete PSA response following radical prostatectomy: outcome and prognostic factors for patients who have never received hormonal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novaes Paulo ERS

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To evaluate the results of salvage conformal radiation therapy (3DC-EBRT for patients submitted to radical prostatectomy (RP who have achieved complete PSA response and who have never been treated with hormonal therapy (HT. To present the results of biochemical control, a period free from hormonal therapy and factors related to its prognosis. Materials and methods from August 2002 to December 2004, 43 prostate cancer patients submitted to RP presented biochemical failure after achieving a PSA Results 3-year biochemical non-evidence of disease (BNED was 71%. PSA doubling time lower than 4 months (p = 0.01 and time from recurrence to salvage EBRT (p = 0.04 were associated with worse chance of biochemical control. Biochemical control of 76% was achieved when RT had been introduced with a PSA lower than 1 ng/ml vs. 48% with a PSA higher than 1 (p = 0.19. Late toxicity was acceptable. Conclusion 70% of biochemical control in 3 years can be achieved with salvage radiotherapy in selected patients. The importance of PSADT was confirmed in this study and radiotherapy should be started as early as possible. Longer follow up is necessary, but it is possible to conclude that a long interval free from hormonal therapy was achieved with low rate of toxicity avoiding or at least delaying several important adverse effects related to hormonal treatment.

  17. Retzus-sparing robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: a step-by-step technique description of this first brazilian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias-Machado, Marcos; Nunes-Silva, Igor; Hidaka, Alexandre Kiyoshi; Sato, Leticia Lumy Kanawa; Almeida, Roberto; Colombo, Jose Roberto; Zampolli, Hamilton de Campos; Pompeo, Antonio Carlos Lima

    2016-01-01

    Retzus-sparing robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy(RARP) is a newly approach that preserve the Retzus structures and provide better recovery of continence and erectile function. In Brazil, this approach has not yet been pre¬viously reported. Our goal is to describe Step-by-Step the Retzus-sparing RARP surgical technique and report our first Brazilian experience. We present a case of a 60-year-old white man with low risk prostate cancer. Surgical materials were four arms Da Vinci robotic platform system, six transperitoneal portals, two prolene wires and Polymer Clips. This surgical tech¬nique was step-by-step described according to Galfano et al. One additional step was added as a modification of Galfano et al. Primary technique description: The closure of the Denovellier fascia. We have operated one patient with this technique. The operative time was 180minutes, console time was135 min, the blood loss was 150ml, none perioperative or postoperative complications was found, hospital stay of 01 day. The anatomopathological classification revealed a pT2aN0M0 specimen with free surgical margins. The patient achieved continence immediately after bladder stent retrieval. Full erection reported after 30 days of surgery. Retzus-sparing RARP approach is feasible and reproducible. However, further comparative studies are neces¬sary to demonstrate potential benefits in continence and sexual outcomes over the standard approaches. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  18. Acceptability of dietary and physical activity lifestyle modification for men following radiotherapy or radical prostatectomy for localised prostate cancer: a qualitative investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackshaw-McGeagh, Lucy E; Sutton, Eileen; Persad, Raj; Aning, Jonathan; Bahl, Amit; Koupparis, Anthony; Millett, Chris; Martin, Richard M; Lane, J Athene

    2017-10-10

    The experience and acceptability of lifestyle interventions for men with localised prostate cancer are not well understood, yet lifestyle interventions are increasingly promoted for cancer survivors. We explored the opinions, experiences and perceived acceptability of taking part in nutritional and physical activity interventions amongst men with prostate cancer and their partners; with the ultimate plan to use such information to inform the development of nutritional and physical activity interventions for men with prostate cancer. Semi-structured interviews with 16 men, and seven partners, undergoing curative surgery or radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Interviews explored experiences of lifestyle interventions, acceptable changes participants would make and perceived barriers and facilitators to change. Interviews were thematically analysed using the framework approach. Men were frequently open to lifestyle modification and family support was considered vital to facilitate change. Health beneficial, clinician endorsed, understandable, enjoyable interventions were perceived as attractive. Barriers included 'modern' digital technology, poor weather, competing commitments or physical limitations, most notably incontinence following radical prostatectomy. Men were keen to participate in research, with few negative aspects identified. Men are willing to change behaviour but this needs to be supported by clinicians and health professionals facilitating lifestyle change. An 'intention-behaviour gap', when an intended behaviour does not materialise, may exist. Digital technology for data collection and lifestyle measurement may not be suitable for all, and post-surgery urinary incontinence is a barrier to physical activity. These novel findings should be incorporated into lifestyle intervention development, and implemented clinically.

  19. Towards development and validation of an intraoperative assessment tool for robot-assisted radical prostatectomy training: results of a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Christopher; Hoogenes, Jen; Shayegan, Bobby; Matsumoto, Edward D

    2017-01-01

    As urology training shifts toward competency-based frameworks, the need for tools for high stakes assessment of trainees is crucial. Validated assessment metrics are lacking for many robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). As it is quickly becoming the gold standard for treatment of localized prostate cancer, the development and validation of a RARP assessment tool for training is timely. We recruited 13 expert RARP surgeons from the United States and Canada to serve as our Delphi panel. Using an initial inventory developed via a modified Delphi process with urology residents, fellows, and staff at our institution, panelists iteratively rated each step and sub-step on a 5-point Likert scale of agreement for inclusion in the final assessment tool. Qualitative feedback was elicited for each item to determine proper step placement, wording, and suggestions. Panelist's responses were compiled and the inventory was edited through three iterations, after which 100% consensus was achieved. The initial inventory steps were decreased by 13% and a skip pattern was incorporated. The final RARP stepwise inventory was comprised of 13 critical steps with 52 sub-steps. There was no attrition throughout the Delphi process. Our Delphi study resulted in a comprehensive inventory of intraoperative RARP steps with excellent consensus. This final inventory will be used to develop a valid and psychometrically sound intraoperative assessment tool for use during RARP training and evaluation, with the aim of increasing competency of all trainees. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  20. Towards development and validation of an intraoperative assessment tool for robot-assisted radical prostatectomy training: results of a Delphi study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Morris

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction As urology training shifts toward competency-based frameworks, the need for tools for high stakes assessment of trainees is crucial. Validated assessment metrics are lacking for many robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP. As it is quickly becoming the gold standard for treatment of localized prostate cancer, the development and validation of a RARP assessment tool for training is timely. Materials and methods We recruited 13 expert RARP surgeons from the United States and Canada to serve as our Delphi panel. Using an initial inventory developed via a modified Delphi process with urology residents, fellows, and staff at our institution, panelists iteratively rated each step and sub-step on a 5-point Likert scale of agreement for inclusion in the final assessment tool. Qualitative feedback was elicited for each item to determine proper step placement, wording, and suggestions. Results Panelist’s responses were compiled and the inventory was edited through three iterations, after which 100% consensus was achieved. The initial inventory steps were decreased by 13% and a skip pattern was incorporated. The final RARP stepwise inventory was comprised of 13 critical steps with 52 sub-steps. There was no attrition throughout the Delphi process. Conclusions Our Delphi study resulted in a comprehensive inventory of intraoperative RARP steps with excellent consensus. This final inventory will be used to develop a valid and psychometrically sound intraoperative assessment tool for use during RARP training and evaluation, with the aim of increasing competency of all trainees.

  1. PI-RADS version 2 for prediction of pathological downgrading after radical prostatectomy: a preliminary study in patients with biopsy-proven Gleason Score 7 (3+4) prostate cancer

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    Woo, Sungmin; Kim, Sang Youn [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joongyub [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Medical Research Collaborating Center, Biomedical Research Institution, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung Hyup; Cho, Jeong Yeon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine and Kidney Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    To evaluate PI-RADSv2 for predicting pathological downgrading after radical prostatectomy (RP) in patients with biopsy-proven Gleason score (GS) 7(3+4) PC. A total of 105 patients with biopsy-proven GS 7(3+4) PC who underwent multiparametric prostate MRI followed by RP were included. Two radiologists assigned PI-RADSv2 scores for each patient. Preoperative clinicopathological variables and PI-RADSv2 scores were compared between patients with and without downgrading after RP using the Wilcoxon rank sum test or Fisher's exact test. Logistic regression analyses with Firth's bias correction were performed to assess their association with downgrading. Pathological downgrading was identified in ten (9.5 %) patients. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), PSA density, percentage of cores with GS 7(3+4), and greatest percentage of core length (GPCL) with GS 7(3+4) were significantly lower in patients with downgrading (p = 0.002-0.037). There was no significant difference in age and clinical stage (p = 0.537-0.755). PI-RADSv2 scores were significantly lower in patients with downgrading (3.8 versus 4.4, p = 0.012). At univariate logistic regression analysis, PSA, PSA density, and PI-RADSv2 scores were significant predictors of downgrading (p = 0.003-0.022). Multivariate analysis revealed only PSA density and PI-RADSv2 scores as independent predictors of downgrading (p = 0.014-0.042). The PI-RADSv2 scoring system was an independent predictor of pathological downgrading after RP in patients with biopsy-proven GS 7(3+4) PC. (orig.)

  2. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of PSA and prostate-specific membrane antigen mRNA to detect circulating tumor cells improves recurrence-free survival nomogram prediction after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, David R; Rouprêt, Morgan; Drouin, Sarah J; Comperat, Eva; Ricci, Sylvie; Lacave, Roger; Sèbe, Philippe; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Bitker, Marc-Olivier; Cussenot, Olivier

    2012-09-01

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) analysis is a potential new biomarker in prostate cancer. We hypothesize that quantitative detection of CTCs in patients pre- and post-radical prostatectomy (RP) using quantitative TaqMan® fluorogenic RT-PCR will improve the accuracy of the Kattan nomogram to predict the probability of recurrence-free survival (RFS) post-RP. Ninty-two patients who underwent RP between 2004 and 2009 had venous blood samples taken pre- (Day - 1) and post-operatively (Day + 7). We performed quantitative Taqman® RT-PCR to detect circulating prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) mRNA. We calculated both the logarithmic ratio of Day + 7/Day - 1 for PSA (PSAr) and PSMA (PSMAr) expression (log(Day+7/Day-1) ) and the Kattan nomogram predicted probability of disease recurrence for each patient. We then analyzed how the AUC-ROC analysis for the Kattan nomogram prediction alone (K) compared to the addition of the PSAr and PSMAr in predicting 5-year RFS. The mean age (years), PSA (ng/ml), and follow-up (mo) was 65.1, 9.13, and 72, respectively. The AUCs for K, PSAr + K, and PSMAr + K were 0.752 (95%CI 0.620-0.860), 0.830 (95%CI 0.740-0.911), and 0.837 (95%CI 0.613-0.923), respectively (P = 0.03). The Kattan 5-year PSA RFS was 75%. The actual 5-year PSA RFS survival rate was 77%. Data from modern quantitative RT-PCR to detect circulating prostate-derived PSA and PSM mRNA pre- and post-RP improves the accuracy of the Kattan nomogram to predict biochemical recurrence. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. [Existence of pattern 5 on radical prostatectomy: poor prognostic factor associated with a lower biochemical recurrence-free survival].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastori, J; Balssa, L; Lillaz, J; Guichard, G; Chabannes, E; Bernardini, S; Bittard, H; Thiery-Vuillemin, A; Kleinclauss, F

    2014-06-01

    To analyze the impact of the existence of Gleason grade 5 on the adverse pathology and biochemical recurrence-free survival of patients. Three hundred and seventy-two prostatectomies were performed between 1999 and 2011 in our institution for localised prostate adenocarcinoma. We examined the existence of grade 5 of the specimen to determine the reliability of prostate biopsies in the diagnosis of grade 5 and the association of grade 5 with other histoprognostic factors. Biochemical recurrence-free survival was analyzed according to the presence of grade 5 in the final specimen. In total, all histological data and biochemical recurr