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Sample records for underwent lung volume

  1. Study of the seroma volume changes in the patients who underwent Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Son, Sang Jun; Mun, Jun Ki; Seo, Seok Jin; Lee, Je Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    By analyzing seroma volume changes in the patients who underwent Partial breast radiation therapy after breast conserving surgery, we try to contribute to the improvement of radiotherapy effect. Enrolled 20 patients who underwent partial breast radiation therapy by ViewRay MRIdian System were subject. After seeking for the size of the removed sample in the patients during surgery and obtained seroma volume changes on a weekly basis. On the Basis of acquired volume, it was compared with age, term from start of the first treatment after surgery, BMI (body mass index) and the extracted sample size during surgery. And using the ViewRay MRIdian RTP System, the figure was analyzed by PTV(=seroma volume + margin) to obtain a specific volume of the Partial breast radiation therapy. The changes of seroma volume from MR simulation to the first treatment (a week) is 0~5% in 8, 5~10% in 3, 10 to 15% in 2, and 20% or more in 5 people. Two patients(A, B patient) among subjects showed the biggest change. The A patient's 100% of the prescribed dose volume is 213.08 cc, PTV is 181.93 cc, seroma volume is 15.3 cc in initial plan. However, while seroma volume decreased 65.36% to 5.3 cc, 100% of the prescribed dose volume was reduced to 3.4% to 102.43 cc and PTV also did 43.6% to 102.54 cc. In the case of the B patient, seroma volume decreased 42.57% from 20.2 cc to 11.6 cc. Because of that, 100% of the prescribed dose volume decreased 8.1% and PTV also did to 40%. As the period between the first therapy and surgery is shorter, the patient is elder and the size of sample is smaller than 100 cc, the change grow bigger. It is desirable to establish an adaptive plan according to each patient's changes of seroma volume through continuous observation. Because partial breast patients is more sensitive than WBRT patients about dose conformity in accordance with the volume change.

  2. Planimetric determination of lung volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieber, M.; Maurer, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    The total volume of the lungs was determined by digital planimetry in 102 patients with emphysema and 33 normal controls aged between 30 and 79 years. The results were compared with the findings obtained from spirometric measurements. Mean values showed a significant relationship to age, body size and body surface. Planimetrically determined lung volume did not show a linear relationship with age, but increased after 60 years. Beyong 60 years, spirometric findings were lower because of an increase in the number of patients with emphysema. The results have shown that digital planimetry is a useful addition to spirometry. (orig.) [de

  3. Influence of timing of chest tube removal on early outcome of patients underwent lung resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Labib Dokhan

    2016-05-01

    Conclusion: Early removal of chest tube may have beneficial effect on control of post-thoracotomy pain, improvement of pulmonary functions and decreasing the risk of complications after lung resection.

  4. Lung volume reduction for emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Pallav L; Herth, Felix J; van Geffen, Wouter H; Deslee, Gaetan; Slebos, Dirk-Jan

    2017-02-01

    Advanced emphysema is a lung disease in which alveolar capillary units are destroyed and supporting tissue is lost. The combined effect of reduced gas exchange and changes in airway dynamics impairs expiratory airflow and leads to progressive air trapping. Pharmacological therapies have limited effects. Surgical resection of the most destroyed sections of the lung can improve pulmonary function and exercise capacity but its benefit is tempered by significant morbidity. This issue stimulated a search for novel approaches to lung volume reduction. Alternative minimally invasive approaches using bronchoscopic techniques including valves, coils, vapour thermal ablation, and sclerosant agents have been at the forefront of these developments. Insertion of endobronchial valves in selected patients could have benefits that are comparable with lung volume reduction surgery. Endobronchial coils might have a role in the treatment of patients with emphysema with severe hyperinflation and less parenchymal destruction. Use of vapour thermal energy or a sclerosant might allow focal treatment but the unpredictability of the inflammatory response limits their current use. In this Review, we aim to summarise clinical trial evidence on lung volume reduction and provide guidance on patient selection for available therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Infants with Atypical Presentations of Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia with Misalignment of the Pulmonary Veins Who Underwent Bilateral Lung Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towe, Christopher T; White, Frances V; Grady, R Mark; Sweet, Stuart C; Eghtesady, Pirooz; Wegner, Daniel J; Sen, Partha; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Hamvas, Aaron; Cole, F Sessions; Wambach, Jennifer A

    2018-03-01

    To describe disease course, histopathology, and outcomes for infants with atypical presentations of alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of the pulmonary veins (ACDMPV) who underwent bilateral lung transplantation. We reviewed clinical history, diagnostic studies, explant histology, genetic sequence results, and post-transplant course for 6 infants with atypical ACDMPV who underwent bilateral lung transplantation at St. Louis Children's Hospital. We compared their histology with infants with classic ACDMPV and compared their outcomes with infants transplanted for other indications. In contrast with neonates with classic ACDPMV who present with severe hypoxemia and refractory pulmonary hypertension within hours of birth, none of the infants with atypical ACDMPV presented with progressive neonatal respiratory failure. Three infants had mild neonatal respiratory distress and received nasal cannula oxygen. Three other infants had no respiratory symptoms at birth and presented with hypoxemia and pulmonary hypertension at 2-3 months of age. Bilateral lung transplantation was performed at 4-20 months of age. Unlike in classic ACDMPV, histopathologic findings were not distributed uniformly and were not diffuse. Three subjects had apparent nonmosaic genetic defects involving FOXF1. Two infants had extrapulmonary anomalies (posterior urethral valves, inguinal hernia). Three transplanted children are alive at 5-16 years of age, similar to outcomes for infants transplanted for other indications. Lung explants from infants with atypical ACDMPV demonstrated diagnostic but nonuniform histopathologic findings. The 1- and 5-year survival rates for infants with atypical ACDMPV are similar to infants transplanted for other indications. Given the clinical and histopathologic spectra, ACDMPV should be considered in infants with hypoxemia and pulmonary hypertension, even beyond the newborn period. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Lung volume reduction surgery for severe pulmonary emphysema in Iceland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsson, Sverrir I; Johannsson, Kristinn B; Guðjónsdóttir, Marta; Jónsson, Steinn; Beck, Hans J; Magnusson, Bjorn; Gudbjartsson, Tomas

    2011-12-01

    Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) can benefit patients with severe emphysema. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of LVRS performed in Iceland. A prospective study of 16 consecutive patients who underwent bilateral LVRS through median sternotomy between January 1996 and December 2008. All patients had disabling dyspnea, lung hyperinflation, and emphysema with upper lobe predominance. Preoperatively all patients underwent pulmonary rehabilitation. Spirometry, lung volumes, arterial blood gases and exercise capacity were measured before and after surgery. Mean follow-up time was 8.7 years. Mean age was 59.2 ± 5.9 years. All patients had a history of heavy smoking. There was no perioperative mortality and survival was 100%, 93%, and 63% at 1, 5, and 10 years, respectively. The forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and the forced vital capacity (FVC) improved significantly after surgery by 35% (plung capacity, residual volume and partial pressure of CO2 also showed statistically significant improvements but exercise capacity, O2 consumption and diffusing capacity of the lung for CO did not change. Prolonged air leak (≥ 7 days) was the most common complication (n=7). Five patients required reoperation, most commonly for sternal dehiscence (n=4). In this small prospective study, FEV1 and FVC increased and lung volumes and PaCO2 improved after LVRS. Long term survival was satisfactory although complications such as reoperations for sternal dehiscence were common and hospital stay therefore often prolonged.

  7. Anaesthesia for Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    coplasty, denervation of the lung, and stabilization and fixa- tion of the trachea. None of these techniques resulted in any substantial benefit to the patients. Surgical management. Lung volume reduction surgery as an approach to the man- agement of severe emphysema was first described by Brantigan in 1959.6 In this ...

  8. Lung volumes in giraffes, Giraffa camelopardalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, G; Skinner, J D

    2011-01-01

    We have measured lung mass and trachea dimensions in 46 giraffes of both genders ranging in body mass from 147 kg to 1441 kg, calculated static and dynamic lung volumes, and developed allometric equations that relate changes in them to growth. We found that relative lung mass is 0.6±0.2% of body mass which is significantly less than it is in other mammals (1.1±0.1%). Total lung volume is significantly smaller (46.2±5.9 mL kg⁻¹) than in similar sized mammals (75.0±2.1 mL kg⁻¹). The lung volume:body mass ratio decreases during growth rather than increase as it does in other mammals. Tracheal diameter is significantly narrower than in similar sized mammals but dead space volume (2.9±0.5 mL kg⁻¹) is larger than in similar sized mammals (2.4±0.1 mL kg⁻¹). Our calculations suggest that tidal volume (10.5±0.2 mL kg⁻¹) is increased compared to that in other mammals(10.0±0.2 mL kg⁻¹) so that the dead space:tidal volume ratio is the same as in other mammals. Calculated Functional Residual Capacity is smaller than predicted (53.4±3.5 vs 33.7±0.6 mL kg⁻¹) as is Expiratory Reserve Volume (47.4±2.6 vs 27.2±1.0 mL kg⁻¹, but Residual Volume (6.0±0.4 mL kg⁻¹) is the same as in other similar sized mammals (6.0±0.9 mL kg⁻¹. Our calculations suggest that Inspiratory Reserve Volume is significantly reduced in size (11.6±1.6 vs 3.8±2.4 mL kg⁻¹), and, if so, the capacity to increase tidal volume is limited. Calculated dynamic lung volumes were the same as in similar sized mammals. We have concluded that giraffe morphology has resulted in lung volumes that are significantly different to that of similar sized mammals, but these changes do not compromise ventilatory capacity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Lung volume reduction for emphysema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shah, Pallav L.; Herth, Felix J.; van Geffen, Wouter H.; Deslee, Gaetan; Slebos, Dirk-Jan

    Advanced emphysema is a lung disease in which alveolar capillary units are destroyed and supporting tissue is lost. The combined effect of reduced gas exchange and changes in airway dynamics impairs expiratory airflow and leads to progressive air trapping. Pharmacological therapies have limited

  10. SU-E-J-249: Correlation of Mean Lung Ventilation Value with Ratio of Total Lung Volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, N; Qu, H; Xia, P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Lung ventilation function measured from 4D-CT and from breathing correlated CT images is a novel concept to incorporate the lung physiologic function into treatment planning of radiotherapy. The calculated ventilation functions may vary from different breathing patterns, affecting evaluation of the treatment plans. The purpose of this study is to correlate the mean lung ventilation value with the ratio of the total lung volumes obtained from the relevant CTs. Methods: A ventilation map was calculated from the variations of voxel-to-voxel CT densities from two breathing phases from either 4D-CT or breathing correlated CTs. An open source image registration tool of Plastimatch was used to deform the inhale phase images to the exhale phase images. To calculate the ventilation map inside lung, the whole lung was delineated and the tissue outside the lung was masked out. With a software tool developed in house, the 3D ventilation map was then converted in the DICOM format associated with the planning CT images. The ventilation map was analyzed on a clinical workstation. To correlate ventilation map thus calculated with lung volume change, the total lung volume change was compared the mean ventilation from our method. Results: Twenty two patients who underwent stereotactic body irradiation for lung cancer was selected for this retrospective study. For this group of patients, the ratio of lung volumes for the inhale (Vin ) and exhale phase (Vex ) was shown to be linearly related to the mean of the local ventilation (Vent), Vin/Vex=1.+0.49*Vent (R2=0.93, p<0.01). Conclusion: The total lung volume change is highly correlated with the mean of local ventilation. The mean of local ventilation may be useful to assess the patient's lung capacity

  11. Volume adjustment of lung density by computed tomography scans in patients with emphysema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaker, S B; Dirksen, A; Laursen, Lars Christian

    2004-01-01

    package that detected the lung in contiguous images and subsequently generated a histogram of the pixel attenuation values. The total lung volume (TLV), lung weight, percentile density (PD), and relative area of emphysema (RA) were calculated from this histogram. RA and PD are commonly applied measures......PURPOSE: To determine how to adjust lung density measurements for the volume of the lung calculated from computed tomography (CT) scans in patients with emphysema. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifty patients with emphysema underwent 3 CT scans at 2-week intervals. The scans were analyzed with a software...... of pulmonary emphysema derived from CT scans. These parameters are markedly influenced by changes in the level of inspiration. The variability of lung density due to within-subject variation in TLV was explored by plotting TLV against PD and RA. RESULTS: The coefficients for volume adjustment for PD were...

  12. Percentages of NKT cells in the tissues of patients with non-small cell lung cancer who underwent surgical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyszniak, Maria; Rybojad, Paweł; Pogoda, Katarzyna; Jabłonka, Andrzej; Bojarska-Junak, Agnieszka; Tabarkiewicz, Jacek

    2014-03-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are involved in the antitumor response by direct cytotoxicity and indirectly through activation of effector cells. Recent studies have shown a relationship between the number and function of NKT cells and clinical outcomes. NKT cells seem to represent a promising tool for immunotherapy of cancer. The aim of the study was to evaluate the distribution of NKT cells in peripheral blood, lymph nodes and tumor tissue of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, as well as development of the most efficient set of cytokines stimulating differentiation of NKT cells. We evaluated the percentage of iNKT+CD3+ cells in the tissues collected from patients with NSCLC. For the generation of NKT cells, we cultured cells isolated from the blood of 20 healthy donors and from the tissues of 4 NSCLC patients. Cells were stimulated with α-GalCer in combinations with cytokines. We noted significant differences in the percentages of NKT cells in the patients' tissues. The highest percentage of these cells was observed in the tumor tissue and the lowest in the lymph nodes. In vitro, in healthy donors all α-GalCer-cytokine combinations were effective in stimulation of NKT cells' proliferation. NKT cells' proliferation was the most efficiently stimulated by α-GalCer+IL-2+IL-7 and α-GalCer+IL-2+IFN-γ. Our results suggest that in the course of NSCLC, NKT cells migrate to the primary tumor and accumulate therein. All tested combinations of α-GalCer and cytokines were capable of generation of NKT cells in vitro.

  13. Increased cartilage volume after injection of hyaluronic acid in osteoarthritis knee patients who underwent high tibial osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chareancholvanich, Keerati; Pornrattanamaneewong, Chaturong; Narkbunnam, Rapeepat

    2014-06-01

    High tibial osteotomy (HTO) is a surgical procedure used to correct abnormal mechanical loading of the knee joint; additionally, intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections have been shown to restore the viscoelastic properties of synovial fluid and balance abnormal biochemical processes. It was hypothesized that combining HTO with intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections would have benefit to improve the cartilage volume of knee joints. Forty patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA) were randomly placed into 1 of 2 groups. The study group (n = 20) received 2 cycles (at 6-month intervals) of 5 weekly intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections after HTO operation. The control group (n = 20) did not receive any intra-articular injections after HTO surgery. Cartilage volume (primary outcome) was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pre-operatively and 1 year post-operatively. Treatment efficacy (secondary outcomes) was evaluated with the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities OA Index (WOMAC) and by the comparison of the total rescue medication (paracetamol/diclofenac) used (weeks 6, 12, 24, 48). MRI studies showed a significant increase in total cartilage volume (p = 0.033), lateral femoral cartilage volume (p = 0.044) and lateral tibial cartilage volume (p = 0.027) in the study group. Cartilage volume loss was detected at the lateral tibial plateau in the control group. There were significant improvements after surgery in both groups for all subscales of WOMAC scores (p hyaluronic acid injections may be beneficial for increasing total cartilage volume and preventing the loss of lateral tibiofemoral joint cartilage after HTO. Therapeutic study, Level I.

  14. Emphysema. Imaging for endoscopic lung volume reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storbeck, B.; Oldigs, M.; Rabe, K.F.; Weber, C.; University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by two entities, the more airway-predominant type (''bronchitis'') on the one hand, and emphysema-predominant type on the other. Imaging via high-resolution computed tomography plays an important role in phenotyping COPD. For patients with advanced lung emphysema, new endoscopic lung volume reduction therapies (ELVR) have been developed. Proper selection of suitable patients requires thin-section reconstruction of volumetric CT image data sets also in coronal and sagittal orientation are required. In the current manuscript we will describe emphysema subtypes (centrilobular, paraseptal, panlobular), options for quantifying emphysema and this importance of regional distribution (homogeneous or heterogeneous, target area) as this is crucial for patient selection. Analysis of the interlobular fissures is obligatory despite the lack of standardization, as incomplete fissures indicate collateral ventilation (CV) via parenchymal bridges, which is an important criterion in choosing endoscopic methods of LVR. Every radiologist should be familiar with modern LVR therapies such as valves and coils, and furthermore should know what a lung doctor expects from radiologic evaluation (before and after ELVR). Finally we present a checklist as a quick reference for all steps concerning imaging for ELVR.

  15. Update on Nonsurgical Lung Volume Reduction Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Alberto Neder

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been a surge of interest in endoscopic lung volume reduction (ELVR strategies for advanced COPD. Valve implants, coil implants, biological LVR (BioLVR, bronchial thermal vapour ablation, and airway stents are used to induce lung deflation with the ultimate goal of improving respiratory mechanics and chronic dyspnea. Patients presenting with severe air trapping (e.g., inspiratory capacity/total lung capacity (TLC 225% predicted and thoracic hyperinflation (TLC > 150% predicted have the greatest potential to derive benefit from ELVR procedures. Pre-LVRS or ELVR assessment should ideally include cardiological evaluation, high resolution CT scan, ventilation and perfusion scintigraphy, full pulmonary function tests, and cardiopulmonary exercise testing. ELVR procedures are currently available in selected Canadian research centers as part of ethically approved clinical trials. If a decision is made to offer an ELVR procedure, one-way valves are the first option in the presence of complete lobar exclusion and no significant collateral ventilation. When the fissure is not complete, when collateral ventilation is evident in heterogeneous emphysema or when emphysema is homogeneous, coil implants or BioLVR (in that order are the next logical alternatives.

  16. Lung volume reduction surgery for diffuse emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Agteren, Joseph Em; Carson, Kristin V; Tiong, Leong Ung; Smith, Brian J

    2016-10-14

    Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) performed to treat patients with severe diffuse emphysema was reintroduced in the nineties. Lung volume reduction surgery aims to resect damaged emphysematous lung tissue, thereby increasing elastic properties of the lung. This treatment is hypothesised to improve long-term daily functioning and quality of life, although it may be costly and may be associated with risks of morbidity and mortality. Ten years have passed since the last version of this review was prepared, prompting us to perform an update. The objective of this review was to gather all available evidence from randomised controlled trials comparing the effectiveness of lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) versus non-surgical standard therapy in improving health outcomes for patients with severe diffuse emphysema. Secondary objectives included determining which subgroup of patients benefit from LVRS and for which patients LVRS is contraindicated, to establish the postoperative complications of LVRS and its morbidity and mortality, to determine which surgical approaches for LVRS are most effective and to calculate the cost-effectiveness of LVRS. We identified RCTs by using the Cochrane Airways Group Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) register, in addition to the online clinical trials registers. Searches are current to April 2016. We included RCTs that studied the safety and efficacy of LVRS in participants with diffuse emphysema. We excluded studies that investigated giant or bullous emphysema. Two independent review authors assessed trials for inclusion and extracted data. When possible, we combined data from more than one study in a meta-analysis using RevMan 5 software. We identified two new studies (89 participants) in this updated review. A total of 11 studies (1760 participants) met the entry criteria of the review, one of which accounted for 68% of recruited participants. The quality of evidence ranged from low to moderate owing to an unclear risk

  17. Emphysema lung lobe volume reduction: effects on the ipsilateral and contralateral lobes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Matthew S.; Kim, Hyun J.; Abtin, Fereidoun G.; Galperin-Aizenberg, Maya; Pais, Richard; Da Costa, Irene G.; Ordookhani, Arash; Chong, Daniel; Ni, Chiayi; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Goldin, Jonathan G. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Center for Computer Vision and Imaging Biomarkers, Department of Radiological Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Strange, Charlie [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Columbia, SC (United States); Tashkin, Donald P. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    To investigate volumetric and density changes in the ipsilateral and contralateral lobes following volume reduction of an emphysematous target lobe. The study included 289 subjects with heterogeneous emphysema, who underwent bronchoscopic volume reduction of the most diseased lobe with endobronchial valves and 132 untreated controls. Lobar volume and low-attenuation relative area (RA) changes post-procedure were measured from computed tomography images. Regression analysis (Spearman's rho) was performed to test the association between change in the target lobe volume and changes in volume and density variables in the other lobes. The target lobe volume at full inspiration in the treatment group had a mean reduction of -0.45 L (SE = 0.034, P < 0.0001), and was associated with volume increases in the ipsilateral lobe (rho = -0.68, P < 0.0001) and contralateral lung (rho = -0.16, P = 0.006), and overall reductions in expiratory RA (rho = 0.31, P < 0.0001) and residual volume (RV)/total lung capacity (TLC) (rho = 0.13, P = 0.03). When the volume of an emphysematous target lobe is reduced, the volume is redistributed primarily to the ipsilateral lobe, with an overall reduction. Image-based changes in lobar volumes and densities indicate that target lobe volume reduction is associated with statistically significant overall reductions in air trapping, consistent with expansion of the healthier lung. (orig.)

  18. Emphysema lung lobe volume reduction: effects on the ipsilateral and contralateral lobes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Matthew S.; Kim, Hyun J.; Abtin, Fereidoun G.; Galperin-Aizenberg, Maya; Pais, Richard; Da Costa, Irene G.; Ordookhani, Arash; Chong, Daniel; Ni, Chiayi; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Goldin, Jonathan G.; Strange, Charlie; Tashkin, Donald P.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate volumetric and density changes in the ipsilateral and contralateral lobes following volume reduction of an emphysematous target lobe. The study included 289 subjects with heterogeneous emphysema, who underwent bronchoscopic volume reduction of the most diseased lobe with endobronchial valves and 132 untreated controls. Lobar volume and low-attenuation relative area (RA) changes post-procedure were measured from computed tomography images. Regression analysis (Spearman's rho) was performed to test the association between change in the target lobe volume and changes in volume and density variables in the other lobes. The target lobe volume at full inspiration in the treatment group had a mean reduction of -0.45 L (SE = 0.034, P < 0.0001), and was associated with volume increases in the ipsilateral lobe (rho = -0.68, P < 0.0001) and contralateral lung (rho = -0.16, P = 0.006), and overall reductions in expiratory RA (rho = 0.31, P < 0.0001) and residual volume (RV)/total lung capacity (TLC) (rho = 0.13, P = 0.03). When the volume of an emphysematous target lobe is reduced, the volume is redistributed primarily to the ipsilateral lobe, with an overall reduction. Image-based changes in lobar volumes and densities indicate that target lobe volume reduction is associated with statistically significant overall reductions in air trapping, consistent with expansion of the healthier lung. (orig.)

  19. October 2015 Phoenix pulmonary journal club: lung volume reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew M

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The October 2015 pulmonary journal club focused on the review of older studies evaluating lung volume reduction surgery and how this has transitioned toward the development of non-surgical modes of lung volume reduction. The physiology behind dyspnea in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a complex process. One of the proposed mechanisms has been hyperinflation associated with air trapping. In the mid 1990s studies by Cooper and Peterson (1 offered a promising approach in which lung volume reduction (LVR could improve ventilatory mechanics and improve dyspnea. As the procedure gained more popularity, additional larger scale trials were performed to support its validity. We reviewed 2 studies looking at lung volume reduction. The first was "The Effect of Lung Volume Reduction Surgery In Patients With Severe Emphysema” (2 . This was a smaller, randomized controlled trial (RCT that looked at 2 groups of 24 patients. Once group received LVR while the ...

  20. Radiation dose-volume effects in the lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marks, Lawrence B; Bentzen, Soren M; Deasy, Joseph O

    2010-01-01

    The three-dimensional dose, volume, and outcome data for lung are reviewed in detail. The rate of symptomatic pneumonitis is related to many dosimetric parameters, and there are no evident threshold "tolerance dose-volume" levels. There are strong volume and fractionation effects.......The three-dimensional dose, volume, and outcome data for lung are reviewed in detail. The rate of symptomatic pneumonitis is related to many dosimetric parameters, and there are no evident threshold "tolerance dose-volume" levels. There are strong volume and fractionation effects....

  1. Measurement of lung volume by lung perfusion scanning using SPECT and prediction of postoperative respiratory function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andou, Akio; Shimizu, Nobuyosi; Maruyama, Shuichiro

    1992-01-01

    Measurement of lung volume by lung perfusion scanning using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and its usefulness for the prediction of respiratory function after lung resection were investigated. The lung volumes calculated in 5 patients by SPECT (threshold level 20%) using 99m Tc-macroaggregated albumin (MAA), related very closely to the actually measured lung volumes. This results prompted us to calculate the total lung volume and the volume of the lobe to be resected in 18 patients with lung cancer by SPECT. Based on the data obtained, postoperative respiratory function was predicted. The predicted values of forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume (FEV 1.0 ), and maximum vital volume (MVV) showed closer correlations with the actually measured postoperative values (FVC, FEV 1.0 , MVV : r=0.944, r=0.917, r=0.795 respectively), than the values predicted by the ordinary lung perfusion scanning. This method facilitates more detailed evaluation of local lung function on a lobe-by-lobe basis, and can be applied clinically to predict postoperative respiratory function. (author)

  2. Study of limiting dosimetric parameters on lung pathology. Differences in the use of the lung-gtv and lung-ptv volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granero Cabanero, D.; Almendros Blanco, P.; Garcia Hernanez, T.; Vicedo gonzalez, A.; Brualla, L.; Hernandez, A.; Solera, C.; Serrano, A.; Rosello, J.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work is to study the differences between the use of the volume of lung-GTV and lung-PTV to assess pulmonary toxicity and also to study the relationships between parameters V13, V20, V30, and mean dose of volumes lung, lung-PTV and lung-GTV. It was studied also the possible relationship between volumes of GTV, PTV and volume of lung with the dosimetric parameters described above. (Author)

  3. Effect of increases in lung volume on clearance of aerosolized solute from human lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, J.D.; Luce, J.M.; Lazar, N.M.; Wu, J.N.; Lipavsky, A.; Murray, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    To study the effect of increases in lung volume on solute uptake, we measured clearance of /sup 99m/Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Tc-DTPA) at different lung volumes in 19 healthy humans. Seven subjects inhaled aerosols (1 micron activity median aerodynamic diam) at ambient pressure; clearance and functional residual capacity (FRC) were measured at ambient pressure (control) and at increased lung volume produced by positive pressure [12 cmH 2 O continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)] or negative pressure (voluntary breathing). Six different subjects inhaled aerosol at ambient pressure; clearance and FRC were measured at ambient pressure and CPAP of 6, 12, and 18 cmH 2 O pressure. Six additional subjects inhaled aerosol at ambient pressure or at CPAP of 12 cmH 2 O; clearance and FRC were determined at CPAP of 12 cmH 2 O. According to the results, Tc-DTPA clearance from human lungs is accelerated exponentially by increases in lung volume, this effect occurs whether lung volume is increased by positive or negative pressure breathing, and the effect is the same whether lung volume is increased during or after aerosol administration. The effect of lung volume must be recognized when interpreting the results of this method

  4. Estimation of lung volume and pulmonary blood volume from radioisotopic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Minoru

    1989-01-01

    Lung volume and pulmonary blood volume in man were estimated from the radioisotopic image using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Six healthy volunteers were studied in a supine position with normal and altered lung volumes by applying continuous negative body-surface pressure (CNP) and by positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). 99m Tc labeled human serum albumin was administered as an aerosol to image the lungs. The CNP caused the diaphragm to be lowered and it increased the mean lung tissue volume obtained by SPECT from 3.09±0.49 l for baseline to 3.67±0.62 l for 10 cmH 2 O (p 2 O (p 2 O), respectively. The PEEP also increased the lung tissue volume to 3.68±0.68 l for 10 cmH 2 O as compared with the baseline (p 2 O PEEP. The lung tissue volume obtained by SPECT showed a positive correlation with functional residual capacity measured by the He dilution method (r=0.91, p 99m Tc-labeled red blood cells. The L/H ratio decreased after either the CNP or PEEP, suggesting a decrease in the blood volume per unit lung volume. However, it was suggested that the total pulmonary blood volume increased slightly either on the CNP (+7.4% for 10 cmH 2 O, p 2 O,p<0.05) when we extrapolated the L/H ratio to the whole lungs by multiplying the lung tissue volume obtained by SPECT. We concluded that SPECT could offer access to the estimation of lung volume and pulmonary blood volume in vivo. (author)

  5. Lung lobar volume in patients with chronic interstitial pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Hisao; Koba, Hiroyuki; Saitoh, Tsukasa; Abe, Shosaku.

    1997-01-01

    We measured lung lobar volume by using helical computed tomography (HCT) in 23 patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP), 7 patients with chronic interstitial pneumonia associated with collagen vascular disease (CVD-IP), and 5 healthy volunteers HCT scanning was done at the maximal inspiratory level and the resting end-expiratory level. To measure lung lobar volume, we traced the lobar margin on HCT images with a digitizer and calculated the lobar volume with a personal computer. The lower lobar volume and several factors influencing it in chronic interstitial pneumonia were studied. At the maximal inspiratory level, the lower lobar volume as a percent of the whole lung volume was 46.8±4.13% (mean ± SD) in the volunteers, 39.5±6.19% in the patients with IIP, and 27.7±7. 86% in the patients with CVD-IP. The lower lobar volumes in the patients were significantly lower than in the volunteers. Patients with IIP in whom autoantibody tests were positive had lower lobar volumes that were very low and were similar to those of patients with CVD-IP. These data suggest that collagen vascular disease may develop in patients with interstitial pneumonia. The patients with IIP who had emphysematous changes on the CT scans had smaller decreases in total lung capacity and lower ratios of forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity than did those who had no emphysematous changes, those two groups did not differ in the ratio of lower lobar volume to whole lung volume. This suggests that emphysematous change is not factor influencing lower lobar volume in patients with chronic interstitial pneumonia. We conclude that chronic interstitial pneumonia together with very low values for lower lobar volume may be a pulmonary manifestation of collagen vascular disease. (author)

  6. Lung volume reduction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pathognomonic features of advanced emphysema include a markedly reduced alveolar surface area due to the formation of blebs and bullae and significantly reduced elastic recoil. The aim of lung volume reduction, which can be achieved by either surgery or endoscopic techniques, is volume loss of the targeted, diseased ...

  7. Low Tidal Volume Reduces Lung Inflammation Induced by Liquid Ventilation in Piglets With Severe Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lijun; Feng, Huizhen; Chen, Xiaofan; Liang, Kaifeng; Ni, Chengyao

    2017-05-01

    Total liquid ventilation (TLV) is an alternative treatment for severe lung injury. High tidal volume is usually required for TLV to maintain adequate CO 2 clearance. However, high tidal volume may cause alveolar barotrauma. We aim to investigate the effect of low tidal volume on pulmonary inflammation in piglets with lung injury and under TLV. After the establishment of acute lung injury model by infusing lipopolysaccharide, 12 piglets were randomly divided into two groups, TLV with high tidal volume (25 mL/kg) or with low tidal volume (6 mL/kg) for 240 min, respectively. Extracorporeal CO 2 removal was applied in low tidal volume group to improve CO 2 clearance and in high tidal volume group as sham control. Gas exchange and hemodynamic status were monitored every 30 min during TLV. At the end of the study, pulmonary mRNA expression and plasmatic concentration of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) were measured by collecting lung tissue and blood samples from piglets. Arterial blood pressure, PaO 2 , and PaCO 2 showed no remarkable difference between groups during the observation period. Compared with high tidal volume strategy, low tidal volume resulted in 76% reduction of minute volume and over 80% reduction in peak inspiratory pressure during TLV. In addition, low tidal volume significantly diminished pulmonary mRNA expression and plasmatic level of IL-6 and IL-8. We conclude that during TLV, low tidal volume reduces lung inflammation in piglets with acute lung injury without compromising gas exchange. © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Lung Volume Reduction in Pulmonary Emphysema from the Radiologist's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doellinger, F; Huebner, R H; Kuhnigk, J M; Poellinger, A

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary emphysema causes decrease in lung function due to irreversible dilatation of intrapulmonary air spaces, which is linked to high morbidity and mortality. Lung volume reduction (LVR) is an invasive therapeutical option for pulmonary emphysema in order to improve ventilation mechanics. LVR can be carried out by lung resection surgery or different minimally invasive endoscopical procedures. All LVR-options require mandatory preinterventional evaluation to detect hyperinflated dysfunctional lung areas as target structures for treatment. Quantitative computed tomography can determine the volume percentage of emphysematous lung and its topographical distribution based on the lung's radiodensity. Modern techniques allow for lobebased quantification that facilitates treatment planning. Clinical tests still play the most important role in post-interventional therapy monitoring, but CT is crucial in the detection of postoperative complications and foreshadows the method's high potential in sophisticated experimental studies. Within the last ten years, LVR with endobronchial valves has become an extensively researched minimally-invasive treatment option. However, this therapy is considerably complicated by the frequent occurrence of functional interlobar shunts. The presence of "collateral ventilation" has to be ruled out prior to valve implantations, as the presence of these extraanatomical connections between different lobes may jeopardize the success of therapy. Recent experimental studies evaluated the automatic detection of incomplete lobar fissures from CT scans, because they are considered to be a predictor for the existence of shunts. To date, these methods are yet to show acceptable results. Today, surgical and various minimal invasive methods of lung volume reduction are in use. Radiological and nuclear medical examinations are helpful in the evaluation of an appropriate lung area. Imaging can detect periinterventional complications. Reduction of lung

  9. A comparison of conventional surfactant treatment and partial liquid ventilation on the lung volume of injured ventilated small lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proquitté, Hans; Hartenstein, Sebastian; Wauer, Roland R; Schmalisch, Gerd; Koelsch, Uwe; Rüdiger, Mario

    2013-01-01

    As an alternative to surfactant therapy (ST), partial liquid ventilation (PLV) with perfluorocarbons (PFC) has been considered as a treatment for acute lung injury (ALI) in newborns. The instilled PFC is much heavier than the instilled surfactant and the aim of this study was to investigate whether PLV, compared to ST, increases the end-expiratory volume of the lung (V L ). Fifteen newborn piglets (age <12 h, mean weight 678 g) underwent saline lung lavage to achieve a surfactant depletion. Thereafter animals were randomized to PLV (n = 8), receiving PFC PF5080 (3M, Germany) at 30 mL kg −1 , and ST (n = 7) receiving 120 mg Curosurf®. Blood gases, hemodynamics and static compliance were measured initially (baseline), immediately after ALI, and after 240 min mechanical ventilation with either technique. Subsequently all piglets were killed; the lungs were removed in toto and frozen in liquid N 2 . After freeze-drying the lungs were cut into lung cubes (LCs) with edge lengths of 0.7 cm, to calculate V L . All LCs were weighed and the density of the dried lung tissue was calculated. No statistically significant differences between treatment groups PLV and ST (means ± SD) were noted in body weight (676 ± 16 g versus 679 ± 17 g; P = 0.974) or lung dry weight (1.64 ± 0.29 g versus 1.79 ± 0.48 g; P = 0.48). Oxygenation index and ventilatory efficacy index did not differ significantly between both groups at any time. V L (34.28 ± 6.13 mL versus 26.22 ± 8.1 mL; P < 0.05) and the density of the dried lung tissue (48.07 ± 5.02 mg mL −1 versus 69.07 ± 5.30 mg mL −1 ; P < 0.001), however, differed significantly between the PLV and ST groups. A 4 h PLV treatment of injured ventilated small lungs increased V L by 30% and decreased lung density by 31% compared to ST treatment, indicating greater lung distension after PLV compared to ST. (paper)

  10. Dynamic volume perfusion CT in patients with lung cancer: Baseline perfusion characteristics of different histological subtypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Jingyun; Schmid-Bindert, Gerald; Fink, Christian; Sudarski, Sonja; Apfaltrer, Paul; Pilz, Lothar R.; Liu, Bo; Haberland, Ulrike; Klotz, Ernst

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate dynamic volume perfusion CT (dVPCT) tumor baseline characteristics of three different subtypes of lung cancer in untreated patients. Materials and methods: 173 consecutive patients (131 men, 42 women; mean age 61 ± 10 years) with newly diagnosed lung cancer underwent dVPCT prior to biopsy. Tumor permeability, blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV) and mean transit time (MTT) were quantitatively assessed as well as tumor diameter and volume. Tumor subtypes were histologically determined and compared concerning their dVPCT results. dVPCT results were correlated to tumor diameter and volume. Results: Histology revealed adenocarcinoma in 88, squamous cell carcinoma in 54 and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) in 31 patients. Tumor permeability was significantly differing between adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and SCLC (all p < 0.05). Tumor BF and BV were higher in adenocarcinomathan in SCLC (p = 0.001 and p = 0.0002 respectively). BV was also higher in squamous cell carcinoma compared to SCLC (p = 0.01). MTT was not differing between tumor subtypes. Regarding all tumors, tumor diameter did not correlate with any of the dVPCT parameters, whereas tumor volume was negatively associated with permeability, BF and BV (r = −0.22, −0.24, −0.24, all p < 0.05). In squamous cell carcinoma, tumor diameter und volume correlated with BV (r = 0.53 and r = −0.40, all p < 0.05). In SCLC, tumor diameter und volume correlated with MTT (r = 0.46 and r = 0.39, all p < 0.05). In adenocarcinoma, no association between morphological and functional tumor characteristics was observed. Conclusions: dVPCT parameters are only partially related to tumor diameter and volume and are significantly differing between lung cancer subtypes

  11. Measurement of lung fluid volumes and albumin exclusion in sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pou, N.A.; Roselli, R.J.; Parker, R.E.; Clanton, J.A.; Harris, T.R.

    1989-01-01

    A radioactive tracer technique was used to determine interstitial diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and albumin distribution volume in sheep lungs. 125 I- and/or 131 I-labeled albumin were injected intravenously and allowed to equilibrate for 24 h. 99m Tc-labeled DTPA and 51 Cr-labeled erythrocytes were injected and allowed to equilibrate (2 h and 15 min, respectively) before a lethal dose of thiamylal sodium. Two biopsies (1-3 g) were taken from each lung and the remaining tissue was homogenized for wet-to-dry lung weight and volume calculations. Estimates of distribution volumes from whole lung homogenized samples were statistically smaller than biopsy samples for extravascular water, interstitial 99m Tc-DTPA, and interstitial albumin. The mean fraction of the interstitium (Fe), which excludes albumin, was 0.68 +/- 0.04 for whole lung samples compared with 0.62 +/- 0.03 for biopsy samples. Hematocrit may explain the consistent difference. To make the Fe for biopsy samples match that for homogenized samples, a mean hematocrit, which was 82% of large vessel hematocrit, was required. Excluded volume fraction for exogenous sheep albumin was compared with that of exogenous human albumin in two sheep, and no difference was found at 24 h

  12. Lung Volume Reduction After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy of Lung Tumors: Potential Application to Emphysema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binkley, Michael S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Shrager, Joseph B. [Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Leung, Ann N. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Popat, Rita [Department of Health Research and Policy, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Trakul, Nicholas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Atwood, Todd F.; Chaudhuri, Aadel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Maxim, Peter G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: Diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) improves dyspnea and other outcomes in selected patients with severe emphysema, but many have excessive surgical risk for LVRS. We analyzed the dose-volume relationship for lobar volume reduction after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) of lung tumors, hypothesizing that SABR could achieve therapeutic volume reduction if applied in emphysema. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified patients treated from 2007 to 2011 who had SABR for 1 lung tumor, pre-SABR pulmonary function testing, and ≥6 months computed tomographic (CT) imaging follow-up. We contoured the treated lobe and untreated adjacent lobe(s) on CT before and after SABR and calculated their volume changes relative to the contoured total (bilateral) lung volume (TLV). We correlated lobar volume reduction with the volume receiving high biologically effective doses (BED, α/β = 3). Results: 27 patients met the inclusion criteria, with a median CT follow-up time of 14 months. There was no grade ≥3 toxicity. The median volume reduction of the treated lobe was 4.4% of TLV (range, −0.4%-10.8%); the median expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe was 2.6% of TLV (range, −3.9%-11.6%). The volume reduction of the treated lobe was positively correlated with the volume receiving BED ≥60 Gy (r{sup 2}=0.45, P=.0001). This persisted in subgroups determined by high versus low pre-SABR forced expiratory volume in 1 second, treated lobe CT emphysema score, number of fractions, follow-up CT time, central versus peripheral location, and upper versus lower lobe location, with no significant differences in effect size between subgroups. Volume expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe(s) was positively correlated with volume reduction of the treated lobe (r{sup 2}=0.47, P<.0001). Conclusions: We identified a dose-volume response for treated lobe volume reduction and adjacent lobe compensatory expansion after lung tumor SABR, consistent across

  13. Quantitative study on lung volume and lung perfusion using SPECT and CT in thoracal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer-Enke, S.A.; Goerich, J.; Strauss, L.G.

    1988-01-01

    22 patients with space occupying lesions in the thoracal region were investigated by computer tomography and by perfusion scintigraphy using SPECT. In order to evaluate the CT images quantitatively, the lung volume was determined using approximation method and compared with the perfusion in the SPECT study. For this, anatomically equivalent transaxial SPECT slices had been coordinated to the CT slices. Between the determined lung volumes and the activity in the ocrresponding layers, a statistically significant correlation was found. It could be shown that the stronger perfusion, frequently observed at the right side of the healthy lung, may be explained by an higher volume of the right pulmonary lobe. Whereas in benign displacing processes the relation activity to volume was similar to the one of the healthy lung, a strongly reduced perfusion together with inconspicuous lung volumes became apparent with malignant tumors. In addition to the great morphological evidence of CT and SPECT studies, additional informations regarding the dignity of displacing processes may be derived from the quantitative evaluation of both methods. (orig.) [de

  14. Endoscopic Lung Volume Reduction : An Expert Panel Recommendation - Update 2017

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herth, Felix J. F.; Slebos, Dirk-Jan; Criner, Gerard J.; Shah, Pallav L.

    2017-01-01

    Interest in endoscopic lung volume reduction (ELVR) technologies for emphysema is consistently growing. In the last couple of months, several endoscopic options (e.g., endo-or intrabronchial valves, coil implants, and thermal vapor ablation) that have been evaluated in randomized controlled trials

  15. Time for the Global Rollout of Endoscopic Lung Volume Reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koegelenberg, Coenraad F. N.; Slebos, Dirk-Jan; Shah, Pallav L.; Theron, Johan; Dheda, Keertan; Allwood, Brian W.; Herth, Felix J. F.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease remains one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality globally. The disease is generally managed with pharmacotherapy, as well as guidance about smoking cessation and pulmonary rehabilitation. Endoscopic lung volume reduction (ELVR) has been proposed

  16. Volume/perfusion ratio from lung SPECT/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Wolfgang Michael; Knollmann, Daniela; Avondo, Jerome; Meyer, Andreas

    2018-02-01

    In pulmonary emphysema lung volume reduction procedures (LVRP) can optimize respiratory pump function. Identification of the most affected lobe can be reached using relative lobar volume (relVol) from CT, but this approach disregards the corresponding lobar perfusion. The aim of the study was therefore to establish a new parameter combining relVol from CT and relative perfusion (relPerf) from perfusion SPECT as a single parameter (volume/perfusion ratio (VPR)) to optimize the identification procedure. As a proof of principle VPR was calculated from hybrid V-/P-SPECT/CT scans from 20 patients with severe pulmonary emphysema (SPE) before LVRP. Lung V-/P-SPECT/CT (Siemens SymbiaT) was done with Technegas and 99mTc-MAA. Quantification of lobar perfusion from scintigraphy and volume from CT was performed using "HERMES Hybrid 3D - Lung Lobe Quantification". Using normal ranges - from 12 patients with suspected pulmonary embolism and normal lung structure and perfusion - all lobes were classified as normal or abnormal to identify targets for LVRP. Normal values for VPR: right upper lobe 1.09 ± 0.10, middle lobe 1.31 ± 0.31, right lower lobe 0.87 ± 0.08; left upper lobe 1.09 ± 0.11, left lower lobe 0.87 ± 0.12. In the 20 SPE patients there were only 7 lobes with pathological values for rel- Vol, 14 lobes with pathological values for rel- Perf but 31 lobes with pathological VPR. Estimation of VPR from lung SPECT/CT enables a combined view of lobar volume and perfusion with one parameter. In SPE patients VPR allows identifying possible target structures with much higher sensitivity than when using relPerf or relVol alone. The specificity and the prognostic value of this new parameter have to be tested in a clinical trial. Schattauer GmbH.

  17. Lung Volume, Breathing Pattern and Ventilation Inhomogeneity in Preterm and Term Infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latzin, Philipp; Roth, Stefan; Thamrin, Cindy; Hutten, Gerard J.; Pramana, Isabelle; Kuehni, Claudia E.; Casaulta, Carmen; Nelle, Matthias; Riedel, Thomas; Frey, Urs

    2009-01-01

    Background: Morphological changes in preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) have functional consequences on lung volume, ventilation inhomogeneity and respiratory mechanics. Although some studies have shown lower lung volumes and increased ventilation inhomogeneity in BPD infants,

  18. Comparison of actual tidal volume in neonatal lung model volume control ventilation using three ventilators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, H; Endo, Y; Ejima, Y; Matsubara, M; Kurosawa, S

    2011-07-01

    In neonates, small changes in tidal volumes (V(T)) may lead to complications. Previous studies have shown a significant difference between ventilator-measured tidal volume and tidal volume delivered (actual V(T)). We evaluated the accuracy of three different ventilators to deliver small V(T) during volume-controlled ventilation. We tested Servo 300, 840 ventilator and Evita 4 Neoflow ventilators with lung models simulating normal and injured neonatal lung compliance models. Gas volume delivered from the ventilator into the test circuit (V(TV)) and actual V(T) to the test lung were measured using Ventrak respiration monitors at set V(T) (30 ml). The gas volume increase of the breathing circuit was then calculated. Tidal volumes of the SV300 and PB840 in both lung models were similar to the set V(T) and the actual tidal volumes in the injured model (20.7 ml and 19.8 ml, respectively) were significantly less than that in the normal model (27.4 ml and 23.4 ml). PB840 with circuit compliance compensation could not improve the actual V(T). V(TV) of the EV4N in the normal and the injured models (37.8 ml and 46.6 ml) were markedly increased compared with set V(T), and actual V(T) were similar to set V(T) in the normal and injured model (30.2 ml and 31.9 ml, respectively). EV4N measuring V(T) close to the lung could match actual V(T) to almost the same value as the set V(T) however the gas volume of the breathing circuit was increased. If an accurate value for the patient's actual V(T) is needed, this V(T) must be measured by a sensor located between the Y-piece and the tracheal tube.

  19. Body mass index and dynamic lung volumes in office workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasool, S.A.; Shirwany, A.K.

    2012-01-01

    To measure the association of body mass index (BMI) to lung volumes assessed by spirometer. Study Design: Cross-sectional analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Physiology and Cell Biology, University of Health Sciences, Lahore, from February to August 2009. Methodology: Two hundred and twenty-five apparently healthy adult office workers of either gender aged > 20 years were recruited. Height and weight were measured and BMI was calculated as kg/m2. Subjects were categorized as normal (BMI=18.5 to 24.9 kg/m2); overweight (BMI=25 to 29.9 kg/m2); and obese Class 1 (BMI=30 to 34.9 kg/m2) on the basis of BMI. Lung volumes were measured by digital spirometer and were reported as percentage of predicted values for forced vital capacity (FVC%), forced expiratory volume in first second (FEV1%) and ratio of FEV1 to FVC (FEV1:FVC). Groups were compared using t-test and ANOVA, correlation was assessed by Pearson's 'r'. Results: Significant differences in lung volumes were found in different BMI categories. Obese subjects had significantly lower FVC% (p < 0.0001), as well as significantly lower FEV1% (p = 0.003) as compared to normal subjects. There were significant linear relationships between obesity and PFTs. BMI had significant negative linear association with FVC% in overweight (r = -0.197) and obese (r = - 0.488); and with FEV1% in obese subjects (r = -0.510). Gender and age had no significant effect on mean values of PFTs. Conclusion: Obese individuals in this sample had significant decline in lung volumes. (author)

  20. Maximum static inspiratory and expiratory pressures with different lung volumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Monique M

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maximum pressures developed by the respiratory muscles can indicate the health of the respiratory system, help to determine maximum respiratory flow rates, and contribute to respiratory power development. Past measurements of maximum pressures have been found to be inadequate for inclusion in some exercise models involving respiration. Methods Maximum inspiratory and expiratory airway pressures were measured over a range of lung volumes in 29 female and 19 male adults. A commercial bell spirometry system was programmed to occlude airflow at nine target lung volumes ranging from 10% to 90% of vital capacity. Results In women, maximum expiratory pressure increased with volume from 39 to 61 cmH2O and maximum inspiratory pressure decreased with volume from 66 to 28 cmH2O. In men, maximum expiratory pressure increased with volume from 63 to 97 cmH2O and maximum inspiratory pressure decreased with volume from 97 to 39 cmH2O. Equations describing pressures for both sexes are: Pe/Pmax = 0.1426 Ln( %VC + 0.3402 R2 = 0.95 Pi/Pmax = 0.234 Ln(100 - %VC - 0.0828 R2 = 0.96 Conclusion These results were found to be consistent with values and trends obtained by other authors. Regression equations may be suitable for respiratory mechanics models.

  1. Pneumothorax as a complication of lung volume recruitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik J.A. Westermann

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Lung volume recruitment involves deep inflation techniques to achieve maximum insufflation capacity in patients with respiratory muscle weakness, in order to increase peak cough flow, thus helping to maintain airway patency and improve ventilation. One of these techniques is air stacking, in which a manual resuscitator is used in order to inflate the lungs. Although intrathoracic pressures can rise considerably, there have been no reports of respiratory complications due to air stacking. However, reaching maximum insufflation capacity is not recommended in patients with known structural abnormalities of the lungs or chronic obstructive airway disease. We report the case of a 72-year-old woman who had poliomyelitis as a child, developed torsion scoliosis and post-polio syndrome, and had periodic but infrequent asthma attacks. After performing air stacking for 3 years, the patient suddenly developed a pneumothorax, indicating that this technique should be used with caution or not at all in patients with a known pulmonary pathology

  2. Changes in volume-corrected whole-lung density in smokers and former smokers during the ITALUNG screening trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascalchi, Mario; Sverzellati, Nicola; Falchini, Massimo; Favilli, Giuditta; Lombardo, Simone; Macconi, Letizia; Paci, Eugenio; Pegna, Andrea Lopes; Falaschi, Fabio; Zompatori, Maurizio; Diciotti, Stefano

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate with a volume-corrected whole-lung approach changes in lung density over 2 years consistent with progression of pulmonary emphysema in smokers and former smokers enrolled in the ITALUNG trial of lung cancer screening using low-dose computed tomography (LDCT). A total of 103 subjects (mean age 63±4 y with a pack-year history of at least 20) underwent 2 whole-lung LDCT examinations 2 years apart. Visual assessment was made independently by 2 experienced observers on the initial LDCT examination with a 0 to 4 grading system for each of 6 regions (right and left upper, mid, and lower lung). The whole-lung 15th percentile of attenuation coefficient and relative area (RA) at -910 HU, both corrected to the individual lung volume (Perc15v and RA910v), were measured on the 2 LDCT examinations. The intrasubject variability of Perc15v and RA910v was previously determined in 32 other subjects of the trial examined using the same scanner and technique twice over a 3-month interval for suspicious nodules. The 2 operators agreed on the presence of mild to severe emphysema (visual score ≥1 in at least 1 region) at initial LDCT examination in 24 (23%) of the 103 subjects. Fifteen subjects (15%) showed a Perc15v change between the 2 examinations exceeding the lower 95% limit of agreement, indicating progression of emphysema with a mean difference in lung density of -14.7%±2.6%. Ten of the 15 were identified as showing emphysema progression by RA910v as well. No association was observed between progression of emphysema and visual evidence of emphysema at initial LDCT examination, smoking status, or pack-years at baseline, or intervening changes in smoking habits. Once variations in inspiratory lung volumes are taken into account, changes in lung density over 2 years consistent with progression of pulmonary emphysema in elderly smokers and former smokers are uncommon.

  3. Clinicopathologic Analysis of Microscopic Extension in Lung Adenocarcinoma: Defining Clinical Target Volume for Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grills, Inga S.; Fitch, Dwight L.; Goldstein, Neal S.; Yan Di; Chmielewski, Gary W.; Welsh, Robert J.; Kestin, Larry L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the gross tumor volume (GTV) to clinical target volume margin for non-small-cell lung cancer treatment planning. Methods: A total of 35 patients with Stage T1N0 adenocarcinoma underwent wedge resection plus immediate lobectomy. The gross tumor size and microscopic extension distance beyond the gross tumor were measured. The nuclear grade and percentage of bronchoalveolar features were analyzed for association with microscopic extension. The gross tumor dimensions were measured on a computed tomography (CT) scan (lung and mediastinal windows) and compared with the pathologic dimensions. The potential coverage of microscopic extension for two different lung stereotactic radiotherapy regimens was evaluated. Results: The mean microscopic extension distance beyond the gross tumor was 7.2 mm and varied according to grade (10.1, 7.0, and 3.5 mm for Grade 1 to 3, respectively, p < 0.01). The 90th percentile for microscopic extension was 12.0 mm (13.0, 9.7, and 4.4 mm for Grade 1 to 3, respectively). The CT lung windows correlated better with the pathologic size than did the mediastinal windows (gross pathologic size overestimated by a mean of 5.8 mm; composite size [gross plus microscopic extension] underestimated by a mean of 1.2 mm). For a GTV contoured on the CT lung windows, the margin required to cover microscopic extension for 90% of the cases would be 9 mm (9, 7, and 4 mm for Grade 1 to 3, respectively). The potential microscopic extension dosimetric coverage (55 Gy) varied substantially between the stereotactic radiotherapy schedules. Conclusion: For lung adenocarcinomas, the GTV should be contoured using CT lung windows. Although a GTV based on the CT lung windows would underestimate the gross tumor size plus microscopic extension by only 1.2 mm for the average case, the clinical target volume expansion required to cover the microscopic extension in 90% of cases could be as large as 9 mm, although considerably smaller for high-grade tumors

  4. Effects of lung volume on clearance of solutes from the air spaces of lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, B.T.; James, H.L.; McLarty, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Several investigators have shown that the clearance rate of aerosolized 99mTc-labeled diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA, mol wt = 492, radius = 0.6 nm) from the air spaces of the lungs of humans and experimental animals increases with lung volume. To further investigate this phenomenon we performed a compartmental analysis of the 2-h clearance of DTPA from the lungs of anesthetized sheep using a new method to more accurately correct for the effects of DTPA recirculation. This analysis showed that the DTPA clearance in eight sheep ventilated with zero end-expired pressure was best described by a one-compartment model with a clearance rate of 0.42 +/- 0.15%/min. Ventilating eight sheep with an end-expired pressure of 10 cmH 2 O throughout the study increased the end-expired volume 0.4 +/- 0.1 liter BTPS and created a clearance curve that was best described by a two-compartment model. In these sheep 56 +/- 16% of the DTPA cleared from the lungs at a rate of 7.9 +/- 2.9%/min. The remainder cleared at a rate similar to that measured in the sheep ventilated with zero end-expired pressure (0.35 +/- 0.18%/min). Additional control and lung inflation experiments were performed using /sup 99m/Tc-labeled human serum albumin (mol wt = 66,000, radius = 3.6 nm). In six control sheep ventilated with zero end-expired pressure the albumin clearance was best described by a one-compartment model with a clearance rate of 0.06 +/- 0.02%/min. The clearance rate in six sheep with increased lung volume was slightly larger (0.09 +/- 0.02, P less than 0.05) but was well described by a one-compartment model

  5. Volume-monitored chest CT: a simplified method for obtaining motion-free images near full inspiratory and end expiratory lung volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Kathryn S. [The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH (United States); Long, Frederick R. [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, The Children' s Radiological Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Flucke, Robert L. [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Columbus, OH (United States); Castile, Robert G. [The Research Institute at Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Center for Perinatal Research, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Lung inflation and respiratory motion during chest CT affect diagnostic accuracy and reproducibility. To describe a simple volume-monitored (VM) method for performing reproducible, motion-free full inspiratory and end expiratory chest CT examinations in children. Fifty-two children with cystic fibrosis (mean age 8.8 {+-} 2.2 years) underwent pulmonary function tests and inspiratory and expiratory VM-CT scans (1.25-mm slices, 80-120 kVp, 16-40 mAs) according to an IRB-approved protocol. The VM-CT technique utilizes instruction from a respiratory therapist, a portable spirometer and real-time documentation of lung volume on a computer. CT image quality was evaluated for achievement of targeted lung-volume levels and for respiratory motion. Children achieved 95% of vital capacity during full inspiratory imaging. For end expiratory scans, 92% were at or below the child's end expiratory level. Two expiratory exams were judged to be at suboptimal volumes. Two inspiratory (4%) and three expiratory (6%) exams showed respiratory motion. Overall, 94% of scans were performed at optimal volumes without respiratory motion. The VM-CT technique is a simple, feasible method in children as young as 4 years to achieve reproducible high-quality full inspiratory and end expiratory lung CT images. (orig.)

  6. Pulmonary vascular volume ratio measured by cardiac computed tomography in children and young adults with congenital heart disease: comparison with lung perfusion scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Park, Sang Hyub [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-11-15

    Lung perfusion scintigraphy is regarded as the gold standard for evaluating differential lung perfusion ratio in congenital heart disease. To compare cardiac CT with lung perfusion scintigraphy for estimated pulmonary vascular volume ratio in patients with congenital heart disease. We included 52 children and young adults (median age 4 years, range 2 months to 28 years; 31 males) with congenital heart disease who underwent cardiac CT and lung perfusion scintigraphy without an interim surgical or transcatheter intervention and within 1 year. We calculated the right and left pulmonary vascular volumes using threshold-based CT volumetry. Then we compared right pulmonary vascular volume percentages at cardiac CT with right lung perfusion percentages at lung perfusion scintigraphy by using paired t-test and Bland-Altman analysis. The right pulmonary vascular volume percentages at cardiac CT (66.3 ± 14.0%) were significantly smaller than the right lung perfusion percentages at lung perfusion scintigraphy (69.1 ± 15.0%; P=0.001). Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean difference of -2.8 ± 5.8% and 95% limits of agreement (-14.1%, 8.5%) between these two variables. Cardiac CT, in a single examination, can offer pulmonary vascular volume ratio in addition to pulmonary artery anatomy essential for evaluating peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis in patients with congenital heart disease. However there is a wide range of agreement between cardiac CT and lung perfusion scintigraphy. (orig.)

  7. Lung volume reproducibility under ABC control and self-sustained breath-holding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaza, Evangelia; Dunlop, Alex; Panek, Rafal; Collins, David J; Orton, Matthew; Symonds-Tayler, Richard; McQuaid, Dualta; Scurr, Erica; Hansen, Vibeke; Leach, Martin O

    2017-03-01

    An Active Breathing Coordinator (ABC) can be employed to induce breath-holds during CT imaging and radiotherapy of lung, breast and liver cancer, and recently during lung cancer MRI. The apparatus measures and controls respiratory volume, hence subject lung volume reproducibility is its principal measure of effectiveness. To assess ABC control quality, the intra-session reproducibility of ABC-induced lung volumes was evaluated and compared with that reached by applying the clinical standard of operator-guided self-sustained breath-holds on healthy volunteers during MRI. Inter-session reproducibility was investigated by repeating ABC-controlled breath-holds on a second visit. Additionally, lung volume agreement with ABC devices used with different imaging modalities in the same institution (MR, CT), or for a breast trial treatment, was assessed. Lung volumes were derived from three-dimensional (3D) T1-weighted MRI datasets by three observers employing semiautomatic lung delineation on a radiotherapy treatment planning system. Inter-observer variability was less than 6% of the delineated lung volumes. Lung volume agreement between the different conditions over all subjects was investigated using descriptive statistics. The ABC equipment dedicated for MR application exhibited good intra-session and inter-session lung volume reproducibility (1.8% and 3% lung volume variability on average, respectively). MR-assessed lung volumes were similar using different ABC equipment dedicated to MR, CT, or breast radiotherapy. Overall, lung volumes controlled by the same or different ABC devices agreed better than with self-controlled breath-holds, as suggested by the average ABC variation of 1.8% of the measured lung volumes (99 mL), compared to the 4.1% (226 mL) variability observed on average with self-sustained breath-holding. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in

  8. [Lung volume reduction surgery for emphysema and bullous pulmonary emphysema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pimpec-Barthes, F; Das Neves-Pereira, J-C; Cazes, A; Arame, A; Grima, R; Hubsch, J-P; Zukerman, C; Hernigou, A; Badia, A; Bagan, P; Delclaux, C; Dusser, D; Riquet, M

    2012-04-01

    The improvement of respiratory symptoms for emphysematous patients by surgery is a concept that has evolved over time. Initially used for giant bullae, this surgery was then applied to patients with diffuse microbullous emphysema. The physiological and pathological concepts underlying these surgical procedures are the same in both cases: improve respiratory performance by reducing the high intrapleural pressure. The functional benefit of lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) in the severe diffuse emphysema has been validated by the National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT) and the later studies which allowed to identify prognostic factors. The quality of the clinical, morphological and functional data made it possible to develop recommendations now widely used in current practice. Surgery for giant bullae occurring on little or moderately emphysematous lung is often a simpler approach but also requires specialised support to optimize its results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of heart failure on resting lung volumes in patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Soares de Souza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the influence of chronic heart failure (CHF on resting lung volumes in patients with COPD, i.e., inspiratory fraction-inspiratory capacity (IC/TLC-and relative inspiratory reserve-[1 − (end-inspiratory lung volume/TLC]. Methods: This was a prospective study involving 56 patients with COPD-24 (23 males/1 female with COPD+CHF and 32 (28 males/4 females with COPD only-who, after careful clinical stabilization, underwent spirometry (with forced and slow maneuvers and whole-body plethysmography. Results: Although FEV1, as well as the FEV1/FVC and FEV1/slow vital capacity ratios, were higher in the COPD+CHF group than in the COPD group, all major "static" volumes-RV, functional residual capacity (FRC, and TLC-were lower in the former group (p < 0.05. There was a greater reduction in FRC than in RV, resulting in the expiratory reserve volume being lower in the COPD+CHF group than in the COPD group. There were relatively proportional reductions in FRC and TLC in the two groups; therefore, IC was also comparable. Consequently, the inspiratory fraction was higher in the COPD+CHF group than in the COPD group (0.42 ± 0.10 vs. 0.36 ± 0.10; p < 0.05. Although the tidal volume/IC ratio was higher in the COPD+CHF group, the relative inspiratory reserve was remarkably similar between the two groups (0.35 ± 0.09 vs. 0.44 ± 0.14; p < 0.05. Conclusions: Despite the restrictive effects of CHF, patients with COPD+CHF have relatively higher inspiratory limits (a greater inspiratory fraction. However, those patients use only a part of those limits, probably in order to avoid critical reductions in inspiratory reserve and increases in elastic recoil.

  10. Radionuclide-determined changes in pulmonary blood volume and thallium lung uptake in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.A.; Okada, R.D.; Boucher, C.A.; Strauss, H.W.; Pohost, G.M.

    1983-01-01

    Exercise-induced increases in radionuclide-determined pulmonary blood volume (PBV) and thallium lung uptake have been described in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and have been shown to correlate with transient exercise-induced left ventricular dysfunction. To compare these 2 techniques in the same patients, 74 patients (59 with and 15 without significant CAD) underwent supine bicycle exercise twice on the same day--first for thallium myocardial and lung imaging and then for technetium-99m gated blood pool imaging for the PBV ratio determination. Thallium activity of lung and myocardium was determined to calculate thallium lung/heart ratio. Relative changes in PBV from rest to exercise were expressed as a ratio of pulmonary counts (exercise/rest). Previously reported normal ranges for thallium lung/heart ratio and PBV ratio were used. The PBV ratio and thallium lung/heart ratio were abnormal in 71 and 36%, respectively, of patients with CAD (p less than 0.01). Both ratios were normal in all patients without CAD. Although the resting ejection fractions did not differ significantly in patients with normal versus those with abnormal PBV ratios or thallium lung/heart ratios, abnormal PBV ratios and thallium lung/heart ratios were associated with an exercise-induced decrease in ejection fraction. Propranolol use was significantly higher in patients with abnormal than in those with normal thallium lung/heart ratios (p less than 0.01). No significant difference in propranolol use was present in patients with abnormal or normal PBV ratios. In conclusion: (1) the prevalence of an abnormal thallium lung/heart ratio is less than that of the PBV ratio in patients with CAD; (2) both tests are normal in normal control subjects; (3) propranolol does not cause abnormal results in normal control subjects; however, propranolol may influence lung thallium uptake in patients with CAD; and (4) when both tests are abnormal, there is a high likelihood of multivessel disease

  11. Estimation of lung volume and pressure from electrocardiogram

    KAUST Repository

    Elsayed, Gamal Eldin Fathy Amin

    2011-05-01

    The Electrocardiography (ECG) is a tool measuring the electrical excitation of the heart that is extensively used for diagnosis and monitoring of heart diseases. The ECG signal reflects not only the heart activity but also many other physiological processes. The respiratory activity is a prominent process that affects the ECG signal due to the close proximity of the heart and the lungs and, on the other hand, due to neural regulatory processes. In this paper, several means for the estimation of the respiratory process from the ECG signal are presented. The results show a strong correlation of the voltage difference between the R and S peak of the ECG and the lung\\'s volume and pressure. Correlation was also found for some features of the vector ECG, which is a two dimensional graph of two different ECG signals. The potential benefit of the multiparametric evaluation of the ECG signal is a reduction of the number of sensors connected to patients, which will increase the patients\\' comfort and reduce the costs associated with healthcare. In particular, it is relevant for sleep monitoring, where a reduction of the number of different sensors would facilitate a more natural sleeping environment and hence a higher sensitivity of the diagnosis. © 2011 IEEE.

  12. Comparison of pathological outcomes of active surveillance candidates who underwent radical prostatectomy using contemporary protocols at a high-volume Korean center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Jung, Ha Bum; Lee, Seung Hwan; Rha, Koon Ho; Choi, Young Deuk; Hong, Sung Jun; Yang, Seung Choul; Chung, Byung Ha

    2012-11-01

    We compared contemporary active surveillance protocols based on pathological outcomes in patients who underwent radical prostatectomy. We identified the experimental cohort from prostate cancer patients who underwent radical prostatectomy between 2001 and 2011, and who met the inclusion criteria of five published active surveillance protocols, namely Johns Hopkins Medical Institution, University of California at San Francisco, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, University of Miami and Prostate Cancer Research International: Active Surveillance. To compare each protocol, we evaluated the pathological outcomes and calculated the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for each protocol according to the proportion of organ-confined Gleason≤6 disease. Overall, 376 patients met the inclusion criteria of the active surveillance protocols with 61, 325, 222, 212 and 206 patients meeting the criteria of the Johns Hopkins Medical Institution, University of California at San Francisco, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, University of Miami and Prostate Cancer Research International: Active Surveillance protocols, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity values of the five protocols, respectively, were 0.199 and 0.882 in Johns Hopkins Medical Institution, 0.855 and 0.124 in University of California at San Francisco, 0.638 and 0.468 in Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 0.599 and 0.479 in University of Miami, and 0.609 and 0.527 in Prostate Cancer Research International: Active Surveillance. In terms of both the sensitivity and specificity, Prostate Cancer Research International: Active Surveillance was the most balanced protocol. In addition, Prostate Cancer Research International: Active Surveillance showed a more accurate performance for favourable pathological outcomes than the others. However, using the area under the curve to compare the discriminative ability of each protocol, there were no statistically significant differences. The contemporary

  13. Cross-sectional changes in lung volume measured by electrical impedance tomography are representative for the whole lung in ventilated preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Burg, Pauline S.; Miedema, Martijn; de Jongh, Frans H.; Frerichs, Inez; van Kaam, Anton H.

    2014-01-01

    Electrical impedance tomography measures lung volume in a cross-sectional slice of the lung. Whether these cross-sectional volume changes are representative of the whole lung has only been investigated in adults, showing conflicting results. This study aimed to compare cross-sectional and whole lung

  14. Application of measurement of lung volumes from MSCT images in evaluation of pulmonary function of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shuang; Chen Liang; Du Jimin; Hua Shucheng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the application value of lung volumes from 64 multi-slice CT (MSCT) images in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and study the correlation between lung volumes measured by MSCT and pulmonary function test (PFT) results. Methods: 24 patients clinically diagnosed with COPD (COPD group) and 22 healthy people (control group) were selected and underwent both chest MSCT scans and PFT within one week. The total lung was scanned at full inspiration and full expiration with MSCT, respectively. The total lung volumes were measured by CT Pulmo software (Siemens, Forchheim, Germany). The quantitative total lung volumes from MSCT images were compared with PFT and SPSS13.0 was applied to assess the correlation. Results: Compared with control group, the full inspiration volume (Vin) (P<0.05), the full expiration volume (Vex) (P<0.05), and Vex/Vin (P<0.01) were elevated, while Vin-Vex was declined obviously in COPD group (P<0.05). Vin was in positive correlation with total lung capacity (TLC) (r= 0.923, P<0.01) and Vex was also in positive correlation with residual volume (RV) (r= 0.912, P<0.05), as well as Vin-Vex with vital capacity (VC) (r=0.763, P<0.01) and Vex/Vin with RV/TLC (r= 0.754, P<0.01). The Vex showed best correlation with FEV1% and FEV1/FVC (r=-0.616, P<0.01; r=-0.543, P<0.05). Vin, Vex and Vex/Vin were significantly elevated in patients with COPD compared with those in control group. Conclusion: Lung volumes obtained from MSCT images show a strong correlation with PFT results in patients with COPD. Lung volumes measured from MSCT images can be used to evaluate the pulmonary function in patients with COPD. (authors)

  15. The inspired sine-wave technique: A novel method to measure lung volume and ventilatory heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Richard M; Phan, Phi Anh; Pacpaco, Edmund; Rahman, Najib M; Farmery, Andrew D

    2018-02-19

    What is the central question of this study? We present a new non-invasive medical technology, the inspired sine-wave technique, which involves inhalation of sinusoidally fluctuating concentrations of a tracer gas. The technique requires only passive patient cooperation and can monitor different cardiorespiratory variables, such as end-expired lung volume, ventilatory heterogeneity and pulmonary blood flow. What is the main finding and its importance? In this article, we demonstrate that the measurements of end-expired lung volume are repeatable and accurate, in comparison to whole-body plethysmography, and the technique is sensitive to the changes in ventilatory heterogeneity associated with advancing age. As such, it has the potential to provide clinically valuable information. The inspired sine-wave technique (IST) is a new method that can provide simple, non-invasive cardiopulmonary measurements. Over successive tidal breaths, the concentration of a tracer gas (i.e. nitrous oxide, N 2 O) is sinusoidally modulated in inspired air. Using a single-compartment tidal-ventilation lung model, the resulting amplitude/phase of the expired sine wave allows estimation of end-expired lung volume (ELV), pulmonary blood flow and three indices for ventilatory heterogeneity (VH; ELV 180 /FRC pleth , ELV 180 /FRC pred and ELV 60 /ELV 180 ). This investigation aimed to determine the repeatability and agreement of ELV with FRC pleth and, as normal ageing results in well-established changes in pulmonary structure and function, whether the IST estimates of ELV and VH are age dependent. Forty-eight healthy never-smoker participants (20-86 years) underwent traditional pulmonary function testing (e.g. spirometry, body plethysmography) and the IST test, which consisted of 4 min of quiet breathing through a face mask while inspired N 2 O concentrations were oscillated in a sine-wave pattern with a fixed mean (4%) and amplitude (3%) and a period of either 180 or 60 s. The ELV 180 /FRC

  16. Lung lesion doubling times: values and variability based on method of volume determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenbud Quint, Leslie; Cheng, Joan; Schipper, Matthew; Chang, Andrew C.; Kalemkerian, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine doubling times (DTs) of lung lesions based on volumetric measurements from thin-section CT imaging. Methods: Previously untreated patients with ≥ two thin-section CT scans showing a focal lung lesion were identified. Lesion volumes were derived using direct volume measurements and volume calculations based on lesion area and diameter. Growth rates (GRs) were compared by tissue diagnosis and measurement technique. Results: 54 lesions were evaluated including 8 benign lesions, 10 metastases, 3 lymphomas, 15 adenocarcinomas, 11 squamous carcinomas, and 7 miscellaneous lung cancers. Using direct volume measurements, median DTs were 453, 111, 15, 181, 139 and 137 days, respectively. Lung cancer DTs ranged from 23-2239 days. There were no significant differences in GRs among the different lesion types. There was considerable variability among GRs using different volume determination methods. Conclusions: Lung cancer doubling times showed a substantial range, and different volume determination methods gave considerably different DTs

  17. Analysis of decrease in lung perfusion blood volume with occlusive and non-occlusive pulmonary embolisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yohei; Yoshimura, Norihiko; Hori, Yoshiro; Horii, Yosuke; Ishikawa, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Motohiko; Noto, Yoshiyuki; Aoyama, Hidefumi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The proportion of preserved PE lesions in the non-occlusive group was 76.7% (33/43). • HUs of the iodine map were significantly higher in the non-occlusive group than in the occlusive group. • There was no significant difference in HUs between the non-occlusive and corresponding normal group. - Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine if lung perfusion blood volume (lung PBV) with non-occlusive pulmonary embolism (PE) differs quantitatively and visually from that with occlusive PE and to investigate if lung PBV with non-occlusive PE remains the same as that without PE. Materials and methods: Totally, 108 patients suspected of having acute PE underwent pulmonary dual-energy computed tomography angiography (DECTA) between April 2011 and January 2012. Presence of PE on DECTA was evaluated by one radiologist. Two radiologists visually evaluated the PE distribution (segmental or subsegmental) and its nature (occlusive or non-occlusive) on DECTA and classified perfusion in lung PBV as “decreased,” “slightly decreased,” and “preserved”. Two radiologists used a lung PBV application to set a region of interest (ROI) in the center of the lesion and measured HU values of an iodine map. In the same slice as the ROI of the lesion and close to the lesion, another ROI was set in the normal perfusion area without PE, and HUs were measured. The proportion of lesions was compared between the occlusive and non-occlusive groups. HUs were compared among the occlusive, non-occlusive, and corresponding normal groups. Results: Twenty-five patients had 80 segmental or subsegmental lesions. There were 37 and 43 lesions in the occlusive and non-occlusive groups, respectively. The proportion of decreased lesions was 73.0% (27/37) in the occlusive group, while that of preserved lesions in the non-occlusive group was 76.7% (33/43). There was a significant difference in the proportion of lesions (P < 0.001) between the two groups. HUs of the

  18. The lung volume reduction coil for the treatment of emphysema : a new therapy in development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klooster, Karin; ten Hacken, Nick H. T.; Slebos, Dirk-Jan

    Lung volume reduction (LVR) coil treatment is a novel therapy for patients with severe emphysema. In this bilateral bronchoscopic treatment, approximately 10 LVR coils per lobe are delivered under fluoroscopic guidance in two sequential procedures. The LVR coil reduces lung volume by compressing the

  19. Bronchoscopic Lung Volume Reduction Coil Treatment of Patients With Severe Heterogeneous Emphysema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slebos, Dirk-Jan; Klooster, Karin; Ernst, Armin; Herth, Felix J. F.; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.

    Background: The lung volume reduction coil (LVR-coil), a new experimental device to achieve lung volume reduction by bronchoscopy in patients with severe emphysema, works in a manner unaffected by collateral airflow. We investigated the safety and efficacy of LVR-coil treatment in patients with

  20. Effects of obesity on lung volume and capacity in children and adolescents: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Dill Winck

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To assess the effects of obesity on lung volume and capacity in children and adolescents. Data source: This is a systematic review, carried out in Pubmed, Lilacs, Scielo and PEDro databases, using the following Keywords: Plethysmography; Whole Body OR Lung Volume Measurements OR Total Lung Capacity OR Functional Residual Capacity OR Residual Volume AND Obesity. Observational studies or clinical trials that assessed the effects of obesity on lung volume and capacity in children and adolescents (0-18 years without any other associated disease; in English; Portuguese and Spanish languages were selected. Methodological quality was assessed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Data synthesis: Of the 1,030 articles, only four were included in the review. The studies amounted to 548 participants, predominantly males, with sample size ranging from 45 to 327 individuals. 100% of the studies evaluated nutritional status through BMI (z-score and 50.0% reported the data on abdominal circumference. All demonstrated that obesity causes negative effects on lung volume and capacity, causing a reduction mainly in functional residual capacity in 75.0% of the studies; in the expiratory reserve volume in 50.0% and in the residual volume in 25.0%. The methodological quality ranged from moderate to high, with 75.0% of the studies classified as having high methodological quality. Conclusions: Obesity causes deleterious effects on lung volume and capacity in children and adolescents, mainly by reducing functional residual capacity, expiratory reserve volume and residual volume.

  1. Quantitative measurement of regional lung gas volume by synchrotron radiation computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monfraix, Sylvie [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Bayat, Sam [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Porra, Liisa [Department of Physical Sciences, University of Helsinki, POB 64, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Berruyer, Gilles [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Nemoz, Christian [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Thomlinson, William [Canadian Light Source, 101 Perimeter Road, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0X4 (Canada); Suortti, Pekka [Department of Physical Sciences, University of Helsinki, POB 64, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Sovijaervi, Anssi R A [Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 340, FIN-00029 HUS, Helsinki (Finland)

    2005-01-07

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of a novel respiration-gated spiral synchrotron radiation computed tomography (SRCT) technique for direct quantification of absolute regional lung volumes, using stable xenon (Xe) gas as an inhaled indicator. Spiral SRCT with K-edge subtraction using two monochromatic x-ray beams was used to visualize and directly quantify inhaled Xe concentrations and airspace volumes in three-dimensional (3D) reconstructed lung images. Volume measurements were validated using a hollow Xe-filled phantom. Spiral images spanning 49 mm in lung height were acquired following 60 breaths of an 80% Xe-20% O{sub 2} gas mixture, in two anaesthetized and mechanically ventilated rabbits at baseline and after histamine aerosol inhalation. Volumetric images of 20 mm lung sections were obtained at functional residual capacity (FRC) and at end-inspiration. 3D images showed large patchy filling defects in peripheral airways and alveoli following histamine provocation. Local specific lung compliance was calculated based on FRC/end-inspiration images in normal lung. This study demonstrates spiral SRCT as a new technique for direct determination of regional lung volume, offering possibilities for non-invasive investigation of regional lung function and mechanics, with a uniquely high spatial resolution. An example of non-uniform volume distribution in rabbit lung following histamine inhalation is presented.

  2. Incidental lung volume reduction following fulminant pulmonary hemorrhage in a patient with severe emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzel, Juergen; Spengler, Werner; Horger, Marius; Boeckeler, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Endoscopic lung volume reduction is an emerging technique meant to improve lung function parameters, quality of life, and exercise tolerance in patients with severe lung emphysema. This is the first report of lung volume reduction by autologous blood in a patient with non-bullous lung emphysema. A 74-year-old woman with heterogeneous lung emphysema developed accidentally diffuse lobar bleeding immediately after valve placement. Due to persistent hemorrhage, the valves had to be removed shortly thereafter. Despite extraction of the valves, respiratory function of the patient improved rapidly indicated also by a drop in the COPD assessment test questionnaire, 3 months later. This was consistent with both improvement of lung function tests and six-minute walking test.

  3. Gross tumor volume dependency on phase sorting methods of four-dimensional computed tomography images for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Soo Yong; Lim, Sang Wook; Ma, Sun Young; Yu, Je Sang [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kosin University Gospel Hospital, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    To see the gross tumor volume (GTV) dependency according to the phase selection and reconstruction methods, we measured and analyzed the changes of tumor volume and motion at each phase in 20 cases with lung cancer patients who underwent image-guided radiotherapy. We retrospectively analyzed four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) images in 20 cases of 19 patients who underwent image-guided radiotherapy. The 4D-CT images were reconstructed by the maximum intensity projection (MIP) and the minimum intensity projection (Min-IP) method after sorting phase as 40%–60%, 30%–70%, and 0%–90%. We analyzed the relationship between the range of motion and the change of GTV according to the reconstruction method. The motion ranges of GTVs are statistically significant only for the tumor motion in craniocaudal direction. The discrepancies of GTV volume and motion between MIP and Min-IP increased rapidly as the wider ranges of duty cycles are selected. As narrow as possible duty cycle such as 40%–60% and MIP reconstruction was suitable for lung cancer if the respiration was stable. Selecting the reconstruction methods and duty cycle is important for small size and for large motion range tumors.

  4. Influence of heart failure on resting lung volumes in patients with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Aline Soares de; Sperandio, Priscila Abreu; Mazzuco, Adriana; Alencar, Maria Clara; Arbex, Flávio Ferlin; Oliveira, Mayron Faria de; O'Donnell, Denis Eunan; Neder, José Alberto

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of chronic heart failure (CHF) on resting lung volumes in patients with COPD, i.e., inspiratory fraction-inspiratory capacity (IC)/TLC-and relative inspiratory reserve-[1 - (end-inspiratory lung volume/TLC)]. This was a prospective study involving 56 patients with COPD-24 (23 males/1 female) with COPD+CHF and 32 (28 males/4 females) with COPD only-who, after careful clinical stabilization, underwent spirometry (with forced and slow maneuvers) and whole-body plethysmography. Although FEV1, as well as the FEV1/FVC and FEV1/slow vital capacity ratios, were higher in the COPD+CHF group than in the COPD group, all major "static" volumes-RV, functional residual capacity (FRC), and TLC-were lower in the former group (p espirometria forçada e lenta e pletismografia de corpo inteiro. Os pacientes do grupo DPOC+ICC apresentaram maior VEF1, VEF1/CVF e VEF1/capacidade vital lenta; porém, todos os principais volumes "estáticos" - VR, capacidade residual funcional (CRF) e CPT - foram menores que aqueles do grupo DPOC (p < 0,05). A CRF diminuiu mais do que o VR, determinando assim menor volume de reserva expiratória no grupo DPOC+ICC que no grupo DPOC. Houve redução relativamente proporcional da CRF e da CPT nos dois grupos; logo, a CI também foi similar. Consequentemente, a fração inspiratória no grupo DPOC+ICC foi maior que no grupo DPOC (0,42 ± 0,10 vs. 0,36 ± 0,10; p < 0,05). Embora a razão volume corrente/CI fosse maior no grupo DPOC+ICC, a reserva inspiratória relativa foi notadamente similar entre os grupos (0,35 ± 0,09 vs. 0,44 ± 0,14; p < 0,05). Apesar dos efeitos restritivos da ICC, pacientes com DPOC+ICC apresentam elevações relativas dos limites inspiratórios (maior fração inspiratória). Entretanto, esses pacientes utilizam apenas parte desses limites, com o provável intuito de evitar reduções críticas da reserva inspiratória e maior trabalho elástico.

  5. Cross-sectional changes in lung volume measured by electrical impedance tomography are representative for the whole lung in ventilated preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Burg, Pauline S.; Miedema, Martijn; de Jongh, Franciscus H.C.; Frerichs, Inez; van Kaam, Anton H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Electrical impedance tomography measures lung volume in a cross-sectional slice of the lung. Whether these cross-sectional volume changes are representative of the whole lung has only been investigated in adults, showing conflicting results. This study aimed to compare cross-sectional and

  6. Efficacy of bronchoscopic lung volume reduction: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iftikhar IH

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Imran H Iftikhar,1 Franklin R McGuire,1 Ali I Musani21Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO, USABackground: Over the last several years, the morbidity, mortality, and high costs associated with lung volume reduction (LVR surgery has fuelled the development of different methods for bronchoscopic LVR (BLVR in patients with emphysema. In this meta-analysis, we sought to study and compare the efficacy of most of these methods.Methods: Eligible studies were retrieved from PubMed and Embase for the following BLVR methods: one-way valves, sealants (BioLVR, LVR coils, airway bypass stents, and bronchial thermal vapor ablation. Primary study outcomes included the mean change post-intervention in the lung function tests, the 6-minute walk distance, and the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes included treatment-related complications.Results: Except for the airway bypass stents, all other methods of BLVR showed efficacy in primary outcomes. However, in comparison, the BioLVR method showed the most significant findings and was the least associated with major treatment-related complications. For the BioLVR method, the mean change in forced expiratory volume (in first second was 0.18 L (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.09 to 0.26; P<0.001; in 6-minute walk distance was 23.98 m (95% CI: 12.08 to 35.88; P<0.01; and in St George's Respiratory Questionnaire was −8.88 points (95% CI: −12.12 to −5.64; P<0.001.Conclusion: The preliminary findings of our meta-analysis signify the importance of most methods of BLVR. The magnitude of the effect on selected primary outcomes shows noninferiority, if not equivalence, when compared to what is known for surgical LVR.Keyword: emphysema, endobronchial valves, sealants, stents, coils

  7. Lung volume reduction surgery: an overview Cirurgia redutora de volume pulmonar: uma revisão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Afonso da Silva Sardenberg

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study intends to review the literature on the efficacy, safety and feasibility of lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS in patients with advanced emphysema. Studies on LVRS from January 1995 to December 2009 were included by using Pubmed (MEDLINE and Cochrane Library literature in English. Search words such as lung volume reduction surgery or lung reduction surgery, pneumoplasty or reduction pneumoplasty, COPD or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and surgery, were used. We also compared medical therapy and surgical technique. Studies consisting of randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials (randomized and nonrandomized, reviews and case series were analyzed. Questions regarding validity of the early clinical reports, incomplete follow-up bias, selection criteria and survival, confounded the interpretation of clinical data on LVRS. Patients with upper, lower and diffuse distribution of emphysema were included; we also analyzed as key points perioperative morbidity and mortality and lung function measurement as FEV1. Bullous emphysema was excluded from this review. Surgical approach included median sternotomy, unilateral or bilateral thoracotomy, and videothoracoscopy with stapled or laser ablation. Results of prospective randomized trials between medical management and LVRS are essential before final assessment can be established.O objetivo deste estudo é revisar a literatura acerca da eficácia, segurança e viabilidade da cirurgia redutora de volume pulmonar (CRVP em pacientes com enfisema pulmonar avançado. Estudos de CRVP de janeiro de 1995 a dezembro de 2009 foram incluídos através de pesquisa na Pubmed (MEDLINE e Cochrane Library, na literatura inglesa. Palavras de busca tais como lung volume reduction surgery ou lung reduction surgery, pneumoplasty ou reduction pneumoplasty, COPD ou chronic obstructive pulmonary disease e surgery foram utilizadas. Também realizamos comparação entre terapia médica e cir

  8. Evaluation of Neonatal Lung Volume Growth by Pulmonary Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopper, Melissa A; Walkup, Laura L; Tkach, Jean A; Higano, Nara S; Lim, Foong Yen; Haberman, Beth; Woods, Jason C; Kingma, Paul S

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate postnatal lung volume in infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and determine if a compensatory increase in lung volume occurs during the postnatal period. Using a novel pulmonary magnetic resonance imaging method for imaging neonatal lungs, the postnatal lung volumes in infants with CDH were determined and compared with prenatal lung volumes obtained via late gestation magnetic resonance imaging. Infants with left-sided CDH (2 mild, 9 moderate, and 1 severe) were evaluated. The total lung volume increased in all infants, with the contralateral lung increasing faster than the ipsilateral lung (mean ± SD: 4.9 ± 3.0 mL/week vs 3.4 ± 2.1 mL/week, P = .005). In contrast to prenatal studies, the volume of lungs of infants with more severe CDH grew faster than the lungs of infants with more mild CDH (Spearman's ρ=-0.086, P = .01). Although the contralateral lung volume grew faster in both mild and moderate groups, the majority of total lung volume growth in moderate CDH came from increased volume of the ipsilateral lung (42% of total lung volume increase in the moderate group vs 32% of total lung volume increase in the mild group, P = .09). Analysis of multiple clinical variables suggests that increased weight gain was associated with increased compensatory ipsilateral lung volume growth (ρ = 0.57, P = .05). These results suggest a potential for postnatal catch-up growth in infants with pulmonary hypoplasia and suggest that weight gain may increase the volume growth of the more severely affected lung. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Lung volume reduction of pulmonary emphysema: the radiologist task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanese, Gianluca; Silva, Mario; Sverzellati, Nicola

    2016-03-01

    Several lung volume reduction (LVR) techniques have been increasingly evaluated in patients with advanced pulmonary emphysema, especially in the last decade. Radiologist plays a pivotal role in the characterization of parenchymal damage and, thus, assessment of eligibility criteria. This review aims to discuss the most common LVR techniques, namely LVR surgery, endobronchial valves, and coils LVR, with emphasis on the role of computed tomography (CT). Several trials have recently highlighted the importance of regional quantification of emphysema by computerized CT-based segmentation of hyperlucent parenchyma, which is strongly recommended for candidates to any LVR treatment. In particular, emphysema distribution pattern and fissures integrity are evaluated to tailor the choice of the most appropriate LVR technique. Furthermore, a number of CT measures have been tested for the personalization of treatment, according to imaging detected heterogeneity of parenchymal disease. CT characterization of heterogeneous parenchymal abnormalities provides criteria for selection of the preferable treatment in each patient and improves outcome of LVR as reflected by better quality of life, higher exercise tolerance, and lower mortality.

  10. Can the single-breath helium dilution method predict lung volumes as measured by whole-body plethysmography?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Chaves Coertjens

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare TLC and RV values obtained by the single-breath helium dilution (SBHD method with those obtained by whole-body plethysmography (WBP in patients with normal lung function, patients with obstructive lung disease (OLD, and patients with restrictive lung disease (RLD, varying in severity, and to devise equations to estimate the SBHD results.METHODS: This was a retrospective cross-sectional study involving 169 individuals, of whom 93 and 49 presented with OLD and RLD, respectively, the remaining 27 having normal lung function. All patients underwent spirometry and lung volume measurement by both methods.RESULTS: TLC and RV were higher by WBP than by SBHD. The discrepancy between the methods was more pronounced in the OLD group, correlating with the severity of airflow obstruction. In the OLD group, the correlation coefficient of the comparison between the two methods was 0.57 and 0.56 for TLC and RV, respectively (p < 0.001 for both. We used regression equations, adjusted for the groups studied, in order to predict the WBP values of TLC and RV, using the corresponding SBHD values. It was possible to create regression equations to predict differences in TLC and RV between the two methods only for the OLD group. The TLC and RV equations were, respectively, ∆TLCWBP-SBHD in L = 5.264 − 0.060 × FEV1/FVC (r2= 0.33; adjusted r2 = 0.32 and ∆RVWBP-SBHD in L = 4.862 − 0.055 × FEV1/FVC (r2= 0.31; adjusted r2 = 0.30.CONCLUSIONS: The correction of TLC and RV results obtained by SBHD can improve the accuracy of this method for assessing lung volumes in patients with OLD. However, additional studies are needed in order to validate these equations.

  11. Lung volume recruitment acutely increases respiratory system compliance in individuals with severe respiratory muscle weakness

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    Yannick Molgat-Seon

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine whether lung volume recruitment (LVR acutely increases respiratory system compliance (Crs in individuals with severe respiratory muscle weakness (RMW. Individuals with RMW resulting from neuromuscular disease or quadriplegia (n=12 and healthy controls (n=12 underwent pulmonary function testing and the measurement of Crs at baseline, immediately after, 1 h after and 2 h after a single standardised session of LVR. The LVR session involved 10 consecutive supramaximal lung inflations with a manual resuscitation bag to the highest tolerable mouth pressure or a maximum of 50 cmH2O. Each LVR inflation was followed by brief breath-hold and a maximal expiration to residual volume. At baseline, individuals with RMW had lower Crs than controls (37±5 cmH2O versus 109±10 mL·cmH2O−1, p0.05. LVR had no significant effect on measures of pulmonary function at any time point in either group (all p>0.05. During inflations, mean arterial pressure decreased significantly relative to baseline by 10.4±2.8 mmHg and 17.3±3.0 mmHg in individuals with RMW and controls, respectively (both p<0.05. LVR acutely increases Crs in individuals with RMW. However, the high airway pressures during inflations cause reductions in mean arterial pressure that should be considered when applying this technique.

  12. The Effect of Compartmental Asymmetry on the Monitoring of Pulmonary Mechanics and Lung Volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Joseph C; Cortes-Puentes, Gustavo A; Adams, Alexander B; Dries, David J; Marini, John J

    2016-11-01

    Esophageal pressure measurement for computation of transpulmonary pressure (P tp ) has begun to be incorporated into clinical use for evaluating forces across the lungs. Gaps exist in our understanding of how esophageal pressure (and therefore P tp ), a value measured at a single site, responds when respiratory system compartments are asymmetrically affected by whole-lung atelectasis or unilateral injury as well as changes in chest wall compliance. We reasoned that P tp would track with aerated volume changes as estimated by functional residual capacity (FRC) and tidal volume. We examined this hypothesis in the setting of asymmetric lungs and changes in intra-abdominal pressure. This study was conducted in the animal laboratory of a university-affiliated hospital. Models of unilateral atelectasis and unilateral and bilateral lung injury exposed to intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) in 10 deeply sedated mechanically ventilated swine. Atelectasis was created by balloon occlusion of the left main bronchus. Unilateral lung injury was induced by saline lavage of isolated right lung. Diffuse lung injury was induced by saline lavage of both lungs. The peritoneum was insufflated with air to create a model of pressure-regulated IAH. We measured esophageal pressures, airway pressures, FRC by gas dilution, and oxygenation. FRC was reduced by IAH in normal lungs (P lung pathologies (P lung injury (P = .003) as well as unilateral atelectasis (P = .019). In the setting of both lung injury models, end-expiratory P tp showed a moderate correlation in tracking with FRC. P tp tracks with aerated lung volume in the setting of thoracic asymmetry and changes in intra-abdominal pressure. However, used alone, it cannot distinguish the relative contributions of air-space distention and recruitment of lung units. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  13. Lung volumes related to physical activity, physical fitness, aerobic capacity and body mass index in students

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    Mihailova A.

    2016-01-01

    Reduced lung volumes were associated with lower aerobic fitness, lower physical fitness and lower amount of weekly physical activity. Healthier body mass index was associated with higher aerobic fitness (relative VO2max in both female and male.

  14. High procedure volume is strongly associated with improved survival after lung cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüchtenborg, Margreet; Riaz, Sharma P; Coupland, Victoria H

    2013-01-01

    Studies have reported an association between hospital volume and survival for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We explored this association in England, accounting for case mix and propensity to resect....

  15. Audiovisual biofeedback guided breath-hold improves lung tumor position reproducibility and volume consistency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Lee, PhD

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback can be used to improve the reproducibility and consistency of breath-hold lung tumor position and volume, respectively. These results may provide a pathway to achieve more accurate lung cancer radiation treatment in addition to improving various medical imaging and treatments by using breath-hold procedures.

  16. Numerical simulation of volume-controlled mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan; Zhang, Bolun; Cai, Maolin; Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas

    2017-09-01

    Mechanical ventilation is a key therapy for patients who cannot breathe adequately by themselves, and dynamics of mechanical ventilation system is of great significance for life support of patients. Recently, models of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 1 lung are used to simulate the respiratory system of patients. However, humans have 2 lungs. When the respiratory characteristics of 2 lungs are different, a single-lung model cannot reflect real respiratory system. In this paper, to illustrate dynamic characteristics of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs, we propose a mathematical model of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs and conduct experiments to verify the model. Furthermore, we study the dynamics of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs. This research study can be used for improving the efficiency and safety of volume-controlled mechanical ventilation system. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Severe Emphysema Treated by Endoscopic Bronchial Volume Reduction with Lung Sealant (AeriSeal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. F. Falkenstern-Ge

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic lung volume reduction using lung sealant is a very new and innovative treatment option for patients with severe progressive and irreversible lung emphysema. A 55-year-old ex-smoker (60 pack years referred to our center because of severe lung emphysema with progressive worsening of the obstructive ventilator pattern and clinical condition. We detected collateral channels of this patient by using the Chartis system. Therefore, we decided to treat the advanced emphysema of our patient with endoscopic volume reduction using lung sealant (AeriSeal. The foam of lung sealant AeriSeal is instilled into the peripheral airways and alveoli where it polymerizes and functions as tissue glue on the lung surface in order to seal the target region to cause durable irreversible absorption atelectasis. The follow-up evaluation 12 weeks later showed improved lung function (increased FEV 1/partial oxygen pressure/peripheral oxygen saturation and a reduction of TLC and RV with improved quality of life. Correlation between changes in primary and secondary outcome measures in the lung function parameters and 6-minute-walking test before and 12 weeks after the application of lung sealant revealed significant reduction of hyperinflation and improvement both in the flow rates and in the physical capability of this patient.

  18. Lung and heart dose volume analyses with CT simulator in radiation treatment of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, I J; Cheng, E C; Freedman, G; Fowble, B

    1998-08-01

    Radiation pneumonitis and cardiac effects are directly related to the irradiated lung and heart volumes in the treatment fields. The central lung distance (CLD) from a tangential breast radiograph is shown to be a significant indicator of ipsilateral irradiated lung volume. Retrospective analysis of the pattern of dose volume of lung and heart with actual volume data from a CT simulator in the treatment of breast cancer is presented with respect to CLD. The heart and lung volumes in the tangential treatment fields were analyzed in 108 consecutive cases (52 left and 56 right breast) referred for CT simulation. All patients in this study were immobilized and placed on an inclined breast board in actual treatment setup. Both arms were stretched over head to avoid collision with the scanner aperture. Radiopaque marks were placed on the medial and lateral borders of the tangential fields. All patients were scanned in spiral mode with slice width and thickness of 3 mm each, respectively. The lung and heart structures as well as irradiated areas were delineated on each slice and respective volumes were accurately measured. The treatment beam parameters were recorded and the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were generated for the measurement of the CLD and analysis. Using CT data the mean volume and standard deviation of left and right lungs were 1307.7+/-297.7 cm3 and 1529.6+/-298.5 cm3, respectively. The magnitude of irradiated volume in left and right lung is nearly equal for the same CLD that produces different percent irradiated volumes (PIV). The left and right PIV lungs are 8.3+/-4.7% and 6.6+/-3.7%, respectively. The PIV data have shown to correlate with CLD with second- and third-degree polynomials; however, in this study a simple straight line regression is used to provide better confidence than the higher order polynomials. The regression lines for the left and right breasts are very different based on actual CT data. The slopes of regression lines for

  19. Lung and heart dose volume analyses with CT simulator in radiation treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Indra J.; Cheng, Elizabeth C.; Freedman, Gary; Fowble, Barbara

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation pneumonitis and cardiac effects are directly related to the irradiated lung and heart volumes in the treatment fields. The central lung distance (CLD) from a tangential breast radiograph is shown to be a significant indicator of ipsilateral irradiated lung volume. Retrospective analysis of the pattern of dose volume of lung and heart with actual volume data from a CT simulator in the treatment of breast cancer is presented with respect to CLD. Methods and Materials: The heart and lung volumes in the tangential treatment fields were analyzed in 108 consecutive cases (52 left and 56 right breast) referred for CT simulation. All patients in this study were immobilized and placed on an inclined breast board in actual treatment setup. Both arms were stretched over head to avoid collision with the scanner aperture. Radiopaque marks were placed on the medial and lateral borders of the tangential fields. All patients were scanned in spiral mode with slice width and thickness of 3 mm each, respectively. The lung and heart structures as well as irradiated areas were delineated on each slice and respective volumes were accurately measured. The treatment beam parameters were recorded and the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were generated for the measurement of the CLD and analysis. Results: Using CT data the mean volume and standard deviation of left and right lungs were 1307.7 ± 297.7 cm 3 and 1529.6 ± 298.5 cm 3 , respectively. The magnitude of irradiated volume in left and right lung is nearly equal for the same CLD that produces different percent irradiated volumes (PIV). The left and right PIV lungs are 8.3 ± 4.7% and 6.6 ± 3.7%, respectively. The PIV data have shown to correlate with CLD with second- and third-degree polynomials; however, in this study a simple straight line regression is used to provide better confidence than the higher order polynomials. The regression lines for the left and right breasts are very different based on

  20. Co-registered perfusion SPECT/CT: Utility for prediction of improved postoperative outcome in lung volume reduction surgery candidates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaka, Daisuke; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Nogami, Munenobu; Onishi, Yumiko; Matsumoto, Keiko; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Sumiaki; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To directly compare the capabilities of perfusion scan, SPECT, co-registered SPECT/CT, and quantitatively and qualitatively assessed MDCT (i.e. quantitative CT and qualitative CT) for predicting postoperative clinical outcome for lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) candidates. Materials and methods: Twenty-five consecutive candidates (19 men and six women, age range: 42-72 years) for LVRS underwent preoperative CT and perfusion scan with SPECT. Clinical outcome of LVRS for all subjects was also assessed by determining the difference between pre- and postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1 ) and 6-min walking distance (6MWD). All SPECT examinations were performed on a SPECT scanner, and co-registered to thin-section CT by using commercially available software. On planar imaging, SPECT and SPECT/CT, upper versus lower zone or lobe ratios (U/Ls) were calculated from regional uptakes between upper and lower lung fields in the operated lung. On quantitatively assessed CT, U/L for all subjects was assessed from regional functional lung volumes. On qualitatively assessed CT, planar imaging, SPECT and co-registered SPECT/CT, U/Ls were assessed with a 4-point visual scoring system. To compare capabilities of predicting clinical outcome, each U/L was statistically correlated with the corresponding clinical outcome. Results: Significantly fair or moderate correlations were observed between quantitatively and qualitatively assessed U/Ls obtained with all four methods and clinical outcomes (-0.60 ≤ r ≤ -0.42, p < 0.05). Conclusion: Co-registered perfusion SPECT/CT has better correlation with clinical outcome in LVRS candidates than do planar imaging, SPECT or qualitatively assessed CT, and is at least as valid as quantitatively assessed CT.

  1. Lung and heart dose volume analyses with CT simulator in tangential field irradiation of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Indra J.; Cheng, Elizabeth C.; Fowble, Barbara

    1997-01-01

    Objective: Radiation pneumonitis and cardiac effects are directly related to the irradiated lung and heart volumes in the treatment fields. The central lung distance (CLD) from a tangential breast radiograph is shown to be a significant indicator of ipsilateral irradiated lung volume based on empirically derived functions which accuracy depends on the actual measured volume in treatment position. A simple and accurate linear relationship with CLD and retrospective analysis of the pattern of dose volume of lung and heart is presented with actual volume data from a CT simulator in the treatment of breast cancer. Materials and Methods: The heart and lung volumes in the tangential treatment fields were analyzed in 45 consecutive (22 left and 23 right breast) patients referred for CT simulation of the cone down treatment. All patients in this study were immobilized and placed on an inclined breast board in actual treatment setup. Both arms were stretched over head uniformly to avoid collision with the scanner aperture. Radiopaque marks were placed on the medial and lateral borders of the tangential fields. All patients were scanned in spiral mode with slice width and thickness of 3 mm each, respectively. The lung and heart structures as well as irradiated areas were delineated on each slice and respective volumes were accurately measured. The treatment beam parameters were recorded and the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were generated for the CLD and analysis. Results: Table 1 shows the volume statistics of patients in this study. There is a large variation in the lung and heart volumes among patients. Due to differences in the shape of right and left lungs the percent irradiated volume (PIV) are different. The PIV data have shown to correlate with CLD with 2nd and 3rd degree polynomials; however, in this study a simple straight line regression is used to provide better confidence than the higher order polynomial. The regression lines for the left and right

  2. Effects of obesity on lung volume and capacity in children and adolescents: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winck, Aline Dill; Heinzmann-Filho, João Paulo; Soares, Rafaela Borges; da Silva, Juliana Severo; Woszezenki, Cristhiele Taís; Zanatta, Letiane Bueno

    2016-12-01

    To assess the effects of obesity on lung volume and capacity in children and adolescents. This is a systematic review, carried out in Pubmed, Lilacs, Scielo and PEDro databases, using the following Keywords: Plethysmography; Whole Body OR Lung Volume Measurements OR Total Lung Capacity OR Functional Residual Capacity OR Residual Volume AND Obesity. Observational studies or clinical trials that assessed the effects of obesity on lung volume and capacity in children and adolescents (0-18 years) without any other associated disease; in English; Portuguese and Spanish languages were selected. Methodological quality was assessed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Of the 1,030 articles, only four were included in the review. The studies amounted to 548 participants, predominantly males, with sample size ranging from 45 to 327 individuals. 100% of the studies evaluated nutritional status through BMI (z-score) and 50.0% reported the data on abdominal circumference. All demonstrated that obesity causes negative effects on lung volume and capacity, causing a reduction mainly in functional residual capacity in 75.0% of the studies; in the expiratory reserve volume in 50.0% and in the residual volume in 25.0%. The methodological quality ranged from moderate to high, with 75.0% of the studies classified as having high methodological quality. Obesity causes deleterious effects on lung volume and capacity in children and adolescents, mainly by reducing functional residual capacity, expiratory reserve volume and residual volume. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Tracking Regional Tissue Volume and Function Change in Lung Using Image Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunlin Cao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated the 24-hour redistribution and reabsorption of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid delivered to the lung during a bronchoscopic procedure in normal volunteers. In this work we utilize image-matching procedures to correlate fluid redistribution and reabsorption to changes in regional lung function. Lung CT datasets from six human subjects were used in this study. Each subject was scanned at four time points before and after BAL procedure. Image registration was performed to align images at different time points and different inflation levels. The resulting dense displacement fields were utilized to track tissue volume changes and reveal deformation patterns of local parenchymal tissue quantitatively. The registration accuracy was assessed by measuring landmark matching errors, which were on the order of 1 mm. The results show that quantitative-assessed fluid volume agreed well with bronchoscopist-reported unretrieved BAL volume in the whole lungs (squared linear correlation coefficient was 0.81. The average difference of lung tissue volume at baseline and after 24 hours was around 2%, which indicates that BAL fluid in the lungs was almost absorbed after 24 hours. Regional lung-function changes correlated with the presence of BAL fluid, and regional function returned to baseline as the fluid was reabsorbed.

  4. Dynamic measures of regional lung air volume using phase contrast x-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitchen, M J; Lewis, R A; Morgan, M J; Siu, K K W; Habib, A [School of Physics, Monash University, Melbourne VIC 3800 (Australia); Wallace, M J; Siew, M L; Hooper, S B [Department of Physiology, Monash University, Melbourne VIC 3800 (Australia); Fouras, A [Division of Biological Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne VIC 3800 (Australia); Yagi, N; Uesugi, K [SPring-8/JASRI, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)], E-mail: Marcus.Kitchen@sci.monash.edu.au

    2008-11-07

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging can provide detailed images of lung morphology with sufficient spatial resolution to observe the terminal airways (alveoli). We demonstrate that quantitative functional and anatomical imaging of lung ventilation can be achieved in vivo using two-dimensional phase contrast x-ray images with high contrast and spatial resolution (<100 {mu}m) in near real time. Changes in lung air volume as small as 25 {mu}L were calculated from the images of term and preterm rabbit pup lungs (n = 28) using a single-image phase retrieval algorithm. Comparisons with plethysmography and computed tomography showed that the technique provided an accurate and robust method of measuring total lung air volumes. Furthermore, regional ventilation was measured by partitioning the phase contrast images, which revealed differences in aeration for different ventilation strategies.

  5. Measurement of lung lobar volume of children with funnel chest by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Atsushi

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of funnel chest on lung lobar volume and the correlation of lung lobar volume to the severity of funnel chest, which was measured by using computed tomographic (CT) images. Fifty-one patients with funnel chest (group 1) and 28 children without funnel chest (group 2) were selected for this study. The CT scans were obtained from the apex to the base of the lung at inspiratory phase. The outlines of the lung lobes were traced, and the area of the lung lobes in a cross-sectional plane was calculated. The lobar volume was determined by the thickness of scan space multiplied by the total area of all slices in each lobe. There was no difference between total lung capacity of group 1 and group 2. The left lower lobar volumes of group 1 was significantly smaller than group 2 (362±269 ml vs 539±361 ml). Both the ratios of the left lower lobar and left lung volume to the whole lung volume were significantly smaller group 1 than in group 2 (19.39±2.88% vs 24.01±1.98%, 42.87±2.99% vs 45.91±1.58%, respectively). On the other hand, ratios of the right lower lobar, left upper lobar and right lung volume to the whole lung volume were larger in group 1 (27.71±3.32% vs 25.97±2.03%, 23.47±2.20% vs 21.90±1.44%, 57.14±2.99% vs 54.09±1.58%, respectively). There were correlations between the pectus index (p=0.0109, r=-0.354) and the ratio of the left lower lobar volume to the whole lung volume to the depression rate (p=0.0174, r=-0.332) and between the pectus index (p=0.0053, |r|=0.385) and the ratio of each lung to the depression rate (p=0.0004, |r|=0.476). A new index, the ratio of the left to the right side of the heart, indicating the grade of heart displacement to the left was created and adapted for the study. The left-right ratio of the heart was significantly larger in group 1 than in group 2 (82.0±4.7 vs 67.8±3.0), and there were correlations of the left-right ratio of the heart to the ratio of the right upper

  6. Supine posture changes lung volumes and increases ventilation heterogeneity in cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie J Smith

    Full Text Available Lung Clearance Index (LCI is recognised as an early marker of cystic fibrosis (CF lung disease. The effect of posture on LCI however is important when considering longitudinal measurements from infancy and when comparing LCI to imaging studies.35 children with CF and 28 healthy controls (HC were assessed. Multiple breath washout (MBW was performed both sitting and supine in triplicate and analysed for LCI, Scond, Sacin, and lung volumes. These values were also corrected for the Fowler dead-space to create 'alveolar' indices.From sitting to supine there was a significant increase in LCI and a significant decrease in FRC for both CF and HC (p<0.01. LCI, when adjusted to estimate 'alveolar' LCI (LCIalv, increased the magnitude of change with posture for both LCIalv and FRCalv in both groups, with a greater effect of change in lung volume in HC compared with children with CF. The % change in LCIalv for all subjects correlated significantly with lung volume % changes, most notably tidal volume/functional residual capacity (Vtalv/FRCalv (r = 0.54,p<0.001.There is a significant increase in LCI from sitting to supine, which we believe to be in part due to changes in lung volume and also increasing ventilation heterogeneity related to posture. This may have implications in longitudinal measurements from infancy to older childhood and for studies comparing supine imaging methods to LCI.

  7. Comparison of air sac volume, lung volume, and lung densities determined by use of computed tomography in conscious and anesthetized Humboldt penguins (Spheniscus humboldti) positioned in ventral, dorsal, and right lateral recumbency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevitt, Benjamin N; Langan, Jennifer N; Adkesson, Michael J; Mitchell, Mark A; Henzler, Margaret; Drees, Randi

    2014-08-01

    To determine the effects of recumbency on air sac volume, lung volume, and lung densities in CT images of healthy, conscious and anesthetized spontaneously breathing Humboldt penguins (Spheniscus humboldti). 25 adult (13 male and 12 female) Humboldt penguins. CT images of conscious penguins in ventral recumbency and anesthetized penguins in dorsal, ventral, and right lateral recumbency were obtained. Air sac volume, lung volume, and lung densities in CT images were calculated. A paired samples t test was used to determine whether right and left lung densities differed among recumbencies. Repeated-measures ANOVA (controlled for sex and order of recumbencies during CT) was used to determine whether air sac or lung volumes differed among recumbencies. Recumbency had a significant effect on air sac volume but not lung volume. Air sac volume was largest in conscious penguins in ventral recumbency (mean ± SD, 347.2 ± 103.1 cm(3)) and lowest in anesthetized penguins in dorsal recumbency (median, 202.0 cm(3); 10th to 90th percentile, 129.2 to 280.3 cm(3)). Lung densities were highest in anesthetized penguins in dorsal recumbency (right lung median, 0.522 g/cm(3); left lung median, 0.511 g/cm(3)) and lowest in anesthetized penguins in ventral recumbency (right lung median, 0.488 g/cm(3); left lung median, 0.482 g/cm(3)). Results indicated that anesthetized Humboldt penguins had the lowest air sac volume and highest lung densities in dorsal recumbency. Therefore, this recumbency may not be recommended. Minimal changes in lung volume were detected among recumbencies or between conscious and anesthetized penguins.

  8. Fetal lung volume measurement by MRI with high-speed imaging systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osada, Hisao; Kaku, Kenshi [Chiba Univ. (Japan). Hospital

    2002-08-01

    Although ultrasonography is widely used for fetal morphologic observation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has gained popularity as a new prenatal diagnostic method with recent introduction of high-speed imaging systems. Infants with lung hypoplasia affecting respiratory function require intensive management starting immediately after birth. Therefore, accurate prenatal differential diagnosis and severity evaluation are extremely important for these fetuses. The aim of this study is to measure fetal lung volume using a computer-based, three-dimensional MRI imaging system and to evaluate the possibility of clinical applications of this procedure. A total of 96 fetuses were evaluated, all were morphologically abnormal, and MRI was done for advanced assessment from 24 to 39 weeks gestation. Three-directional views of fetal chest were imaged by Signa Horizon, 1.5 Tesla, version 5.6 (General Electronics) with the following conditions; coil: TORSO coil, sequence: SSFSE (single shot fast spin echo), slice thickness: 5 mm, and imaging speed: 2 seconds/slice. To calculate the lung volume and create three-dimensional image, the lung area in each slice was traced out, then multiplied using computer image processing. Simultaneously, the volumes of all slices were summed to give the volume of each lung. Linear regression analysis and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) were used for statistical analyses. In all cases, clear images were obtained, and were adequate for three-dimensional evaluation of the fetal lung. Thirty-five fetuses had poor outcomes, such as intrauterine fetal death, neonatal death, and intensive respiratory care. Regression lines of lung volume versus gestational week were calculated for these fetuses with poor outcome and 61 other fetuses with good outcome. ANCOVA, with gestational week as a covariant, revealed a significant intergroup difference in the lung volume (p<0.001). Similarly, regression lines of lung volume versus fetal body weight estimated by

  9. Pulmonary blood volume and transit time in cirrhosis: relation to lung function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Burchardt, H; Øgard, CG

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: In cirrhosis a systemic vasodilatation leads to an abnormal distribution of the blood volume with a contracted central blood volume. In addition, the patients have a ventilation/perfusion imbalance with a low diffusing capacity. As the size of the pulmonary blood volume (PBV) has...... in cirrhosis. The relation between PBV and PTT and the low diffusing capacity suggests the pulmonary vascular compartment as an important element in the pathophysiology of the lung dysfunction in cirrhosis....

  10. Experimental estimation of regional lung water volume by histogram of pulmonary CT numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Shiro; Momoki, Shigeru; Asai, Toshihiko; Shimada, Takeshi; Tamano, Masahiro; Nakamoto, Takaaki; Yoshimura, Masaharu

    1989-01-01

    Both in vitro and in vivo experiments were made to assess the ability of pulmonary CT numbers to quantitatively determine regional water volume in cases of pulmonary congestion or edema associated with left heart failure. In vitro experiment revealed a good linear correlation between the volume of injected water and the determined CT number of polyethylene tube packed with sponge. In the subsequent in vivo experiment with 10 adult mongrel dogs, lung water volumes obtained by pulmonary CT numbers were found to be consistent with the actual volumes. Pulmonary CT numbers for water volume proved to become parameters to quantitatively evaluate pulmonary congestion or edema. (Namekawa, K)

  11. Factors affecting the lung perfused blood volume in patients with intrapulmonary clots after anti-coagulation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Munemasa, E-mail: radokada@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine 1-1-1 Minamikogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Masuda, Yu [4th Grade of 6-year Medicine Doctor Program, Department of Medicine, Yamaguchi University Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences 1-1-1 Minamikogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Nakashima, Yoshiteru [Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi Grand Medical Center, Oosaki 77, Hofu, Yamaguchi 747-8511 (Japan); Nomura, Takafumi; Nakao, Sei [Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine 1-1-1 Minamikogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Suga, Kazuyoshi [Department of Radiology, St Hills Hospital, Imamurakita 3-7-18, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-0155 (Japan); Kido, Shoji [Computer-aided Diagnosis and Biomedical Imaging Research Biomedical Engineering, Applied Medical Engineering Science Graduate School of Medicine, Yamaguchi University, Tokiwadai 2-16-1, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8611 (Japan); Matsunaga, Naofumi [Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine 1-1-1 Minamikogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Dual-energy CT can provide morphological and functional lung images in the same examination. • The subsequent dual-energy CT demonstrates the increased whole lung perfused blood volume (V{sub 120}) despite the residual intrapulmonary clots after treatment in one examination. • The increased whole lung perfusion (V{sub 120}) and a decreased low perfusion volume (V{sub 5}) result in the improvement in the low perfusion rate (%V{sub 5}) in the patients with acute pulmonary embolism after treatment. - Abstract: Objectives: Factors affecting the improvement in the lung perfused blood volume (LPBV) were evaluated based on the presence of intrapulmonary clots (IPCs) after anti-coagulation therapy using 64-slice dual-energy CT. Materials and methods: 96 patients exhibiting venous thromboembolism underwent initial and repeated LPBV examinations between December 2008 and July 2014. Fifteen patients were excluded due to pulmonary comorbidities, and a total of 81 patients were included in this study. Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) was diagnosed in 46 of the patients (56.7%). LPBV images were three-dimensionally reconstructed with two threshold ranges: 1–120 HU (V{sub 120}) and 1–5 HU (V{sub 5}), and the relative value of V{sub 5} per V{sub 120} expressed as %V{sub 5}. These values were subsequently compared with indicators of the severity of PE, such as the D-dimer level, heart rate and CT measurements. This study was approved by the local ethics committee. Results: In patients with IPCs, the D-dimer, V{sub 5} and %V{sub 5}values were significantly larger (p ≤ 0.01) in the initial LPBV, although these differences disappeared in subsequent LPBV after treatment. The right ventricular (RV) diameter, RV/left ventricular (RV/LV) diameter ratio and %V{sub 5} values were also significantly reduced, whereas the V{sub 5} value did not significantly decrease (p = 0.07), but V{sub 120} value significantly increased (p < 0.001) after treatment. However, in

  12. Mediastinal staging for lung cancer: the influence of biopsy volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelson, Elof; Pape, Christian; Jørgensen, Ole Dan

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mediastinal staging is of paramount importance prior to surgery for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to identify patients with N2-disease. Mediastinoscopy remains the gold standard, and sampling from at least three lymph node stations is generally recommended. It is unknown whether...

  13. Entropy Production and the Pressure-Volume Curve of the Lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Lucas Oliveira

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigate analytically the production of entropy during a breathing cycle in healthy and diseased lungs. First, we calculate entropy production in healthy lungs by applying the laws of thermodynamics to the well-known transpulmonary pressure-volume (P-V curves of the lung under the assumption that lung tissue behaves as an entropy spring-like rubber. The bulk modulus, $B$, of the lung is also derived from these calculations. Second, we extend this approach to elastic recoil disorders of the lung such as occur in pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema. These diseases are characterized by particular alterations in the P-V relationship. For example, in fibrotic lungs B increases monotonically with disease progression, while in emphysema the opposite occurs. These diseases can thus be mimicked simply by making appropriate adjustments to the parameters of the P-V curve. Using Clausius's formalism, we show that entropy production, Delta_S, is related to the hysteresis area, Delta_A, enclosed by the P-V curve during a breathing cycle, namely, Delta_S = Delta_A/T, where T is the body temperature. Although Delta_A is highly dependent on the disease, such formula applies to healthy as well as diseased lungs, regardless of the disease stage. Finally, we use ansatzs to predict analytically the entropy produced by the fibrotic and emphysematous lungs.

  14. Decreasing Irradiated Rat Lung Volume Changes Dose-Limiting Toxicity From Early to Late Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veen, Sonja J. van der; Faber, Hette; Ghobadi, Ghazaleh; Brandenburg, Sytze; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Coppes, Robert P.; Luijk, Peter van

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Technological developments in radiation therapy result in smaller irradiated volumes of normal tissue. Because the risk of radiation therapy-induced toxicity generally depends on irradiated volume, changing volume could change the dose-limiting toxicity of a treatment. Recently, in our rat model, we found that early radiation-induced lung dysfunction (RILD) was closely related to irradiated volume dependent vascular remodeling besides inflammation. The exact relationship between early and late RILD is still unknown. Therefore, in this preclinical study we investigated the dose-volume relationship of late RILD, assessed its dependence on early and late pathologies and studied if decreasing irradiated volume changed the dose-limiting toxicity. Methods and Materials: A volume of 25%, 32%, 50%, 63%, 88%, or 100% of the rat lung was irradiated using protons. Until 26 weeks after irradiation, respiratory rates were measured. Macrovascular remodeling, pulmonary inflammation, and fibrosis were assessed at 26 weeks after irradiation. For all endpoints dose-volume response curves were made. These results were compared to our previously published early lung effects. Results: Early vascular remodeling and inflammation correlated significantly with early RILD. Late RILD correlated with inflammation and fibrosis, but not with vascular remodeling. In contrast to the early effects, late vascular remodeling, inflammation and fibrosis showed a primarily dose but not volume dependence. Comparison of respiratory rate increases early and late after irradiation for the different dose-distributions indicated that with decreasing irradiated volumes, the dose-limiting toxicity changed from early to late RILD. Conclusions: In our rat model, different pathologies underlie early and late RILD with different dose-volume dependencies. Consequently, the dose-limiting toxicity changed from early to late dysfunction when the irradiated volume was reduced. In patients, early and late

  15. Structural and functional changes in the minipig lung following irradiation of different lung volumes at a constant mean lung dose; Strukturelle und funktionelle Veraenderungen an der Lunge von Minischweinen nach Bestrahlung unterschiedlich grosser Lungenvolumina mit gleicher mittlerer Lungendosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusche, S.; Herrmann, T.; Appold, S.; Hoelscher, T.; Bruechner, K.; Geyer, P.; Baumann, M.; Kumpf, R.

    2004-07-01

    Minipigs were subjected to irradiation of different lung volumes at approximately the same mean lung dose (D{sub m}ean) and examined for structural and morphological changes of the lung. The outcome confirmed earlier findings on the pig lung. While no significant differences between irradiation groups was found in terms of functional lung changes, there was a clear correlation between functional changes observed and the mean lung dose. This is in good agreement with data from clinical studies. It follows that the mean lung dose is of predictive value in considering functional lung damage in the assessment of different irradiation regimes. By contrast structural damage was found to correlate with applied dose. [German] Es wurden an Minischweinen unterschiedliche grosse Lungenvolumina mit vergleichbaren mittleren Lungendosen (mean lung dose, D{sub mean}) bestrahlt und die funktionellen und morphologischen Veraenderungen bestimmt. Die Untersuchungen zu funktionellen und morphologischen Veaenderungen bestaetigen fruehere Untersuchungen an der Schweinelunge. Hinsichtlich funktioneller Lungenveraenderungen fand sich kein signifikanter Unterschied zwischen den Bestrahlungsarmen, aber es konnte eine eindeutige Korrelation dieser Veraenderungen mit der mittleren Lungendosis D{sub mean} nachgewiesen werden. Dies steht in gutem Einklang mit Daten aus klinischen Untersuchungen. Somit bestaetigt sich, dass die mean lung dose eine praediktive Bedeutung zur Abschaetzung funktionaler Schaeden der Lunge bei der Beurteilung unterschiedlicher Bestrahlungsplaene hat. Die strukturellen Schaeden korrelieren hingegen mit der applizierten Dosis. (orig.)

  16. Assessing Respiration-Induced Tumor Motion and Internal Target Volume Using Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography for Radiotherapy of Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H. Helen; Balter, Peter; Tutt, Teresa; Choi, Bum; Zhang, Joy; Wang, Catherine; Chi, Melinda; Luo Dershan; Pan Tinsu; Hunjan, Sandeep; Starkschall, George; Rosen, Isaac; Prado, Karl; Liao Zhongxing; Chang, Joe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Mohan, Radhe; Dong Lei

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess three-dimensional tumor motion caused by respiration and internal target volume (ITV) for radiotherapy of lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Respiration-induced tumor motion was analyzed for 166 tumors from 152 lung cancer patients, 57.2% of whom had Stage III or IV non-small-cell lung cancer. All patients underwent four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) during normal breathing before treatment. The expiratory phase of 4DCT images was used as the reference set to delineate gross tumor volume (GTV). Gross tumor volumes on other respiratory phases and resulting ITVs were determined using rigid-body registration of 4DCT images. The association of GTV motion with various clinical and anatomic factors was analyzed statistically. Results: The proportions of tumors that moved >0.5 cm along the superior-inferior (SI), lateral, and anterior-posterior (AP) axes during normal breathing were 39.2%, 1.8%, and 5.4%, respectively. For 95% of the tumors, the magnitude of motion was less than 1.34 cm, 0.40 cm, and 0.59 cm along the SI, lateral, and AP directions. The principal component of tumor motion was in the SI direction, with only 10.8% of tumors moving >1.0 cm. The tumor motion was found to be associated with diaphragm motion, the SI tumor location in the lung, size of the GTV, and disease T stage. Conclusions: Lung tumor motion is primarily driven by diaphragm motion. The motion of locally advanced lung tumors is unlikely to exceed 1.0 cm during quiet normal breathing except for small lesions located in the lower half of the lung

  17. Interfractional changes in tumour volume and position during entire radiotherapy courses for lung cancer with respiratory gating and image guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhler-Noettrup, Trine; Korreman, Stine S.; Pedersen, Anders N.; Persson, Gi tte F.; Aarup, Lasse R.; Nystroem, Haakan; Olsen, Mikael; Tarnavski, Nikolai; Sp echt, Lena

    2008-01-01

    Introduction. With the purpose of implementing gated radiotherapy for lung cancer patients, this study investigated the interfraction variations in tumour size and internal displacement over entire treatment courses. To explore the potential of image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) the variations were measured using a set-up strategy based on imaging of bony landmarks and compared to a strategy using in room lasers, skin tattoos and cupper landmarks. Materials and methods. During their six week treatment course of 60Gy in 2Gy fractions, ten patients underwent 3 respiratory gated CT scans. The tumours were contoured on each CT scan to evaluate the variations in volumes and position. The lung tumours and the mediastinal tumours were contoured separately. The positional variations were measured as 3D mobility vectors and correlated to matching of the scans using the two different strategies. Results. The tumour size was significantly reduced from the first to the last CT scan. For the lung tumours the reduction was 19%, p=0.03, and for the mediastinal tumours the reduction was 34%, p=0.0007. The mean 3D mobility vector and the SD for the lung tumours was 0.51cm (±0.21) for matching using bony landmarks and 0.85cm (±0.54) for matching using skin tattoos. For the mediastinal tumours the corresponding vectors and SD's were 0.55cm (±0.19) and 0.72cm (±0.43). The differences between the vectors were significant for the lung tumours p=0.004. The interfractional overlap of lung tumours was 80-87% when matched using bony landmarks and 70-76% when matched using skin tattoos. The overlap of the mediastinal tumours were 60-65% and 41-47%, respectively. Conclusions. Despite the use of gating the tumours varied considerably, regarding both position and volume. The variations in position were dependent on the set-up strategy. Set-up using IGRT was superior to set-up using skin tattoos

  18. Interfractional changes in tumour volume and position during entire radiotherapy courses for lung cancer with respiratory gating and image guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juhler-Noettrup, Trine; Korreman, Stine S.; Pedersen, Anders N.; Persson, Gitte F.; Aarup, Lasse R.; Nystroem, Haakan; Olsen, Mikael; Tarnavski, Nikolai; Specht, Lena (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, The Finsen Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    2008-08-15

    Introduction. With the purpose of implementing gated radiotherapy for lung cancer patients, this study investigated the interfraction variations in tumour size and internal displacement over entire treatment courses. To explore the potential of image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) the variations were measured using a set-up strategy based on imaging of bony landmarks and compared to a strategy using in room lasers, skin tattoos and cupper landmarks. Materials and methods. During their six week treatment course of 60Gy in 2Gy fractions, ten patients underwent 3 respiratory gated CT scans. The tumours were contoured on each CT scan to evaluate the variations in volumes and position. The lung tumours and the mediastinal tumours were contoured separately. The positional variations were measured as 3D mobility vectors and correlated to matching of the scans using the two different strategies. Results. The tumour size was significantly reduced from the first to the last CT scan. For the lung tumours the reduction was 19%, p=0.03, and for the mediastinal tumours the reduction was 34%, p=0.0007. The mean 3D mobility vector and the SD for the lung tumours was 0.51cm (+-0.21) for matching using bony landmarks and 0.85cm (+-0.54) for matching using skin tattoos. For the mediastinal tumours the corresponding vectors and SD's were 0.55cm (+-0.19) and 0.72cm (+-0.43). The differences between the vectors were significant for the lung tumours p=0.004. The interfractional overlap of lung tumours was 80-87% when matched using bony landmarks and 70-76% when matched using skin tattoos. The overlap of the mediastinal tumours were 60-65% and 41-47%, respectively. Conclusions. Despite the use of gating the tumours varied considerably, regarding both position and volume. The variations in position were dependent on the set-up strategy. Set-up using IGRT was superior to set-up using skin tattoos.

  19. Observer variation in target volume delineation of lung cancer related to radiation oncologist-computer interaction: a 'Big Brother' evaluation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbakkers, R.J.; Duppen, J.C.; Fitton, I.; Deurloo, K.E.; Zijp, L.; Uitterhoeve, A.L.; Rodrigus, P.T.; Kramer, G.W.P.M.; Bussink, J.; Jaeger, K. de; Belderbos, J.S.; Hart, A.A.M.; Nowak, P.J.; Herk, M. van; Rasch, C.R.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To evaluate the process of target volume delineation in lung cancer for optimization of imaging, delineation protocol and delineation software. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eleven radiation oncologists (observers) from five different institutions delineated the Gross Tumor Volume

  20. Phase contrast imaging reveals low lung volumes and surface areas in the developing marsupial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon J Simpson

    Full Text Available Marsupials are born with immature lungs when compared to eutherian mammals and rely, to various extents, on cutaneous gas exchange in order to meet metabolic requirements. Indeed, the fat-tailed dunnart is born with lungs in the canalicular stage of development and relies almost entirely on the skin for gas exchange at birth; consequently undergoing the majority of lung development in air. Plane radiographs and computed tomography data sets were acquired using phase contrast imaging with a synchrotron radiation source for two marsupial species, the fat-tailed dunnart and the larger tammar wallaby, during the first weeks of postnatal life. Phase contrast imaging revealed that only two lung sacs contain air after the first hour of life in the fat-tailed dunnart. While the lung of the tammar wallaby was comparatively more developed, both species demonstrated massive increases in air sac number and architectural complexity during the postnatal period. In addition, both the tammar wallaby and fat-tailed dunnart had lower lung volumes and parenchymal surface areas than were expected from morphometrically determined allometric equations relating these variables to body mass during the neonatal period. However, lung volume is predicted to scale with mass as expected after the neonatal marsupial reaches a body mass of ∼1 g and no longer relies on the skin for gas exchange. Decreased lung volume in the marsupial neonate further supports the maxim that cutaneous gas exchange occurs in the marsupial neonate because the respiratory apparatus is not yet capable of meeting the gas exchange requirements of the newborn.

  1. The relationships between tracheal index and lung volume parameters in mild-to-moderate COPD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Jung Seop; Lee, Geewon; Lee, Ho Yun; Oh, Jin Young; Woo, Sook-young; Jeon, Kyeongman; Um, Sang-Won; Koh, Won-Jung; Suh, Gee Young

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although elongated morphological changes in the trachea are known to be related to lung function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), whether the tracheal morphological changes are associated with airflow limitations or overinflation of the lung in the early stages of COPD has not yet been determined. Thus, our aim was to investigate the association of tracheal index (TI) with lung function parameters, including lung volume parameters, in COPD patients with mild-to-moderate airflow limitations. Materials and methods: A retrospective study was conducted in 193 COPD patients with GOLD grades 1–2 (post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 s [FEV 1 ] ≥ 50% predicted with FEV 1 /forced vital capacity ratio ≤ 70%; age range, 40–81) and 193 age- and gender-matched subjects with normal lung function as a control group (age range, 40–82). Two independent observers measured TI at three anatomical levels on chest radiographs and CT scans. Results: Compared with the control group, TI was reduced significantly and “saber-sheath trachea” was observed more frequently in COPD patients. Patients with GOLD grade 2 disease had a lower TI than those with GOLD grade 1. TI had apparent inverse correlations with total lung capacity, functional residual capacity, and residual volume, regardless of the anatomical level of the trachea. Even after adjustments for covariates, this association persisted. Conclusions: TI is reduced even in mild-to-moderate COPD patients, and TI measured on chest CT shows significant inverse relationships with all lung volume parameters assessed, suggesting that tracheal morphology may change during the early stages of COPD

  2. The relationships between tracheal index and lung volume parameters in mild-to-moderate COPD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Jung Seop, E-mail: ejs00@hanmail.net [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 81 Irwon-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Geewon, E-mail: rabkingdom@naver.com [Department of Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, 179 Gudeok-ro, Seo-gu, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ho Yun, E-mail: hoyunlee96@gmail.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 81 Irwon-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jin Young, E-mail: indr71@hanmail.net [Division of Pulmonology, Department of Internal Medicine, Dongguk University Ilsan Medical Center, 814 Siksa-dong, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do 410-773 (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Sook-young, E-mail: sookyoung12.woo@samsung.com [Biostatistics Team, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, 81 Irwon-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Kyeongman, E-mail: kjeon@skku.edu [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 81 Irwon-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Um, Sang-Won, E-mail: sangwonum@skku.edu [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 81 Irwon-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Won-Jung, E-mail: wjkoh@skku.edu [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 81 Irwon-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Gee Young, E-mail: suhgy@skku.edu [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 81 Irwon-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2013-12-01

    Background: Although elongated morphological changes in the trachea are known to be related to lung function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), whether the tracheal morphological changes are associated with airflow limitations or overinflation of the lung in the early stages of COPD has not yet been determined. Thus, our aim was to investigate the association of tracheal index (TI) with lung function parameters, including lung volume parameters, in COPD patients with mild-to-moderate airflow limitations. Materials and methods: A retrospective study was conducted in 193 COPD patients with GOLD grades 1–2 (post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 s [FEV{sub 1}] ≥ 50% predicted with FEV{sub 1}/forced vital capacity ratio ≤ 70%; age range, 40–81) and 193 age- and gender-matched subjects with normal lung function as a control group (age range, 40–82). Two independent observers measured TI at three anatomical levels on chest radiographs and CT scans. Results: Compared with the control group, TI was reduced significantly and “saber-sheath trachea” was observed more frequently in COPD patients. Patients with GOLD grade 2 disease had a lower TI than those with GOLD grade 1. TI had apparent inverse correlations with total lung capacity, functional residual capacity, and residual volume, regardless of the anatomical level of the trachea. Even after adjustments for covariates, this association persisted. Conclusions: TI is reduced even in mild-to-moderate COPD patients, and TI measured on chest CT shows significant inverse relationships with all lung volume parameters assessed, suggesting that tracheal morphology may change during the early stages of COPD.

  3. Changes in lung volume and ventilation following transition from invasive to noninvasive respiratory support and prone positioning in preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Burg, Pauline S.; Miedema, Martijn; de Jongh, Frans H.; Frerichs, Inez; van Kaam, Anton H.

    2015-01-01

    To minimize secondary lung injury, ventilated preterm infants are extubated as soon as possible. To maximize extubation success, they are often placed in prone position. The effect of extubation and subsequent prone positioning on lung volumes is currently unknown. Changes in end-expiratory lung

  4. Achieving and maintaining lung volume in the preterm infant: from the first breath to the NICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lista, Gianluca; Maturana, Andrés; Moya, Fernando R

    2017-10-01

    The main goal for the neonatologist is to facilitate the adaptation to extra-uterine life during initial transition, while minimizing lung injury opening and protecting the premature lung from the first breath onwards. An appropriate management from birth should lead to the achievement of an early functional residual capacity (FRC), and the following steps should aim at maintaining an adequate lung volume. To date, different strategies are available to optimize fetal-neonatal transition and promote lung recruitment. New ventilation approaches, such as sustained lung inflation (SLI) and "open lung strategy", well-established ventilation techniques with a more tailored application and less invasive modalities to administer surfactant have been recently introduced in clinical practice with promising results. given the current status of neonatal care, it seems that lung injury and BPD could be reduced with multiple strategies starting early in the delivery room. Literature underlines the importance of a respiratory tailored management of preterm infants from birth and during the whole NICU stay. What is Known: • Experimental and clinical studies have shown that the transition from fetal to adult type cardiorespiratory circulation needs an adequate lung ventilation. An appropriate management in the delivery room should lead to the achievement of an early FRC, and through the following steps, the neonatologist should aim at maintaining an adequate lung volume. • Literature underlines the importance of a respiratory tailored management of preterm infants during the whole NICU stay to maintain the benefits of a successful postnatal adaption. What is New: • Herewith, we describe the most relevant and recent interventions which can be performed from the delivery room to the NICU stay to guarantee an adequate tradition to postnatal life and an effective cardiorespiratory stability.

  5. Inter-Fraction Tumor Volume Response during Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Correlated to Patient Variables.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Salamekh

    Full Text Available Analyze inter-fraction volumetric changes of lung tumors treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT and determine if the volume changes during treatment can be predicted and thus considered in treatment planning.Kilo-voltage cone-beam CT (kV-CBCT images obtained immediately prior to each fraction were used to monitor inter-fraction volumetric changes of 15 consecutive patients (18 lung nodules treated with lung SBRT at our institution (45-54 Gy in 3-5 fractions in the year of 2011-2012. Spearman's (ρ correlation and Spearman's partial correlation analysis was performed with respect to patient/tumor and treatment characteristics. Multiple hypothesis correction was performed using False Discovery Rate (FDR and q-values were reported.All tumors studied experienced volume change during treatment. Tumor increased in volume by an average of 15% and regressed by an average of 11%. The overall volume increase during treatment is contained within the planning target volume (PTV for all tumors. Larger tumors increased in volume more than smaller tumors during treatment (q = 0.0029. The volume increase on CBCT was correlated to the treatment planning gross target volume (GTV as well as internal target volumes (ITV (q = 0.0085 and q = 0.0039 respectively and could be predicted for tumors with a GTV less than 22 mL. The volume increase was correlated to the integral dose (ID in the ITV at every fraction (q = 0.0049. The peak inter-fraction volume occurred at an earlier fraction in younger patients (q = 0.0122.We introduced a new analysis method to follow inter-fraction tumor volume changes and determined that the observed changes during lung SBRT treatment are correlated to the initial tumor volume, integral dose (ID, and patient age. Furthermore, the volume increase during treatment of tumors less than 22mL can be predicted during treatment planning. The volume increase remained significantly less than the overall PTV expansion, and radiation

  6. Optimal dose and volume for postoperative radiotherapy in brain oligometastases from lung cancer: a retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Seung Yeun; Kim, Hye Ryun; Cho, Byoung Chul; Lee, Chang Geol; Suh, Chang Ok [Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Jong Hee [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate intracranial control after surgical resection according to the adjuvant treatment received in order to assess the optimal radiotherapy (RT) dose and volume. Between 2003 and 2015, a total of 53 patients with brain oligometastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) underwent metastasectomy. The patients were divided into three groups according to the adjuvant treatment received: whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) ± boost (WBRT ± boost group, n = 26), local RT/Gamma Knife surgery (local RT group, n = 14), and the observation group (n = 13). The most commonly used dose schedule was WBRT (25 Gy in 10 fractions, equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions [EQD2] 26.04 Gy) with tumor bed boost (15 Gy in 5 fractions, EQD2 16.25 Gy). The WBRT ± boost group showed the lowest 1-year intracranial recurrence rate of 30.4%, followed by the local RT and observation groups, at 66.7%, and 76.9%, respectively (p = 0.006). In the WBRT ± boost group, there was no significant increase in the 1-year new site recurrence rate of patients receiving a lower dose of WBRT (EQD2) <27 Gy compared to that in patients receiving a higher WBRT dose (p = 0.553). The 1-year initial tumor site recurrence rate was lower in patients receiving tumor bed dose (EQD2) of ≥42.3 Gy compared to those receiving <42.3 Gy, although the difference was not significant (p = 0.347). Adding WBRT after resection of brain oligometastases from NSCLC seems to enhance intracranial control. Furthermore, combining lower-dose WBRT with a tumor bed boost may be an attractive option.

  7. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Chapman, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Rao, Aarti [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, Davis, CA (United States); Shen, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine, Irvine, CA (United States); Quinlan-Davidson, Sean [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, McMaster University, Juravinski Cancer Centre, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Filion, Edith J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Departement de Medecine, Service de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios [Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Whyte, Richard I. [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Division of General Thoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); and others

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18-25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume {>=}12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED {>=}100 Gy (total dose, 50-60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  8. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy; Chapman, Christopher; Rao, Aarti; Shen, John; Quinlan-Davidson, Sean; Filion, Edith J.; Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Whyte, Richard I.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18–25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume ≥12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED ≥100 Gy (total dose, 50–60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  9. Study of limiting dosimetric parameters on lung pathology. Differences in the use of the lung-gtv and lung-ptv volumes; Estudio de los parametros dosimetricos limitantes en la patologia de pulmon diferencias en ul uso de los volumenes pulmon-gtv y pulmo-ptv

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granero Cabanero, D.; Almendros Blanco, P.; Garcia Hernanez, T.; Vicedo gonzalez, A.; Brualla, L.; Hernandez, A.; Solera, C.; Serrano, A.; Rosello, J.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this work is to study the differences between the use of the volume of lung-GTV and lung-PTV to assess pulmonary toxicity and also to study the relationships between parameters V13, V20, V30, and mean dose of volumes lung, lung-PTV and lung-GTV. It was studied also the possible relationship between volumes of GTV, PTV and volume of lung with the dosimetric parameters described above. (Author)

  10. Lung volume reduction coil treatment for patients with severe emphysema : a European multicentre trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deslee, Gaetan; Klooster, Karin; Hetzel, Martin; Stanzel, Franz; Kessler, Romain; Marquette, Charles-Hugo; Witt, Christian; Blaas, Stefan; Gesierich, Wolfgang; Herth, Felix J. F.; Hetzel, Juergen; van Rikxoort, Eva M.; Slebos, Dirk-Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background The lung volume reduction (LVR) coil is a minimally invasive bronchoscopic nitinol device designed to reduce hyperinflation and improve elastic recoil in severe emphysema. We investigated the feasibility, safety and efficacy of LVR coil treatment in a prospective multicentre cohort trial

  11. Treatment of emphysema using bronchoscopic lung volume reduction coil technology : an update on efficacy and safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, Jorine E.; Klooster, Karin; ten Hacken, Nick H. T.; Slebos, Dirk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade several promising bronchoscopic lung volume reduction (BLVR) treatments were developed and investigated. One of these treatments is BLVR treatment with coils. The advantage of this specific treatment is that it works independently of collateral flow, and also shows promise for

  12. Patient experience of lung volume reduction procedures for emphysema: a qualitative service improvement project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Buttery

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this service improvement project was to gain understanding of the patient experience of lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS and endobronchial valve (EBV placement, from referral through to post-discharge care. Focus group interviews were carried out in two tertiary centres in London and Leicester, UK. Sixteen patients who had undergone lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS, endobronchial valve (EBV placement, or both, were recruited. Prior to participation in each focus group, participants completed a questionnaire to guide and focus discussion. Thematic analysis identified common themes to the participant experience of receiving lung volume reduction interventions. Themes included patient focus on declining health and the need to “fight” for a referral; consequences of having procedures and potential unexpected complications; and vulnerability post discharge and limited continuity of care. Participants were clear that the benefits of having had either LVRS or EBV procedures outweighed any difficulties experienced. Participants were keen to have further similar interventions if appropriate. These data confirm the need to develop more systematic lung volume reduction pathways, provide appropriate information, and ensure that post-discharge care is optimal.

  13. Effect of Minimally Invasive Surfactant Therapy on Lung Volume and Ventilation in Preterm Infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Burg, Pauline S.; de Jongh, Frans H.; Miedema, Martijn; Frerichs, Inez; van Kaam, Anton H.

    2016-01-01

    To assess the changes in (regional) lung volume and gas exchange during minimally invasive surfactant therapy (MIST) in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. In this prospective observational study, infants requiring a fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) ≥ 0.30 during nasal continuous

  14. Predicting Lung Volume Reduction after Endobronchial Valve Therapy Is Maximized Using a Combination of Diagnostic Tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, T David; van Rikxoort, Eva M; Huebner, Ralf-Harto; Doellinger, Felix; Klooster, Karin; Charbonnier, Jean-Paul; Radhakrishnan, Sri; Herth, Felix J F; Slebos, Dirk-Jan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bronchoscopic lung volume reduction using one-way endobronchial valves (EBVs) has been proven to be effective in patients with severe emphysema. However, the selection of patients without collateral ventilation prior to treatment is critical for procedural success. Collateral ventilation

  15. Lung volumes and airway resistance in patients with a possible restrictive pattern on spirometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Kenia; D'Aquino, Luiz Carlos; Soares, Maria Raquel; Gimenez, Andrea; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Castro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Many patients with proportional reductions in FVC and FEV1 on spirometry show no reduction in TLC. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role that measuring lung volumes and airway resistance plays in the correct classification of patients with a possible restrictive pattern on spirometry. Methods: This was a prospective study involving adults with reduced FVC and FEV1, as well as an FEV1/FV(C) ratio within the predicted range. Restrictive lung disease (RLD) was characterized by TLC below the 5th percentile, as determined by plethysmography. Obstructive lung disease (OLD) was characterized by high specific airway resistance, significant changes in post-bronchodilator FEV1, or an FEF25-75% < 50% of predicted, together with a high RV/TLC ratio. Nonspecific lung disease (NLD) was characterized by TLC within the predicted range and no obstruction. Combined lung disease (CLD) was characterized by reduced TLC and findings indicative of airflow obstruction. Clinical diagnoses were based on clinical suspicion, a respiratory questionnaire, and the review of tests of interest. Results: We included 300 patients in the study, of whom 108 (36%) were diagnosed with RLD. In addition, 120 (40%) and 72 (24%) were diagnosed with OLD/CLD and NLD, respectively. Among the latter, 24 (33%) were clinically diagnosed with OLD. In this sample, 151 patients (50.3%) were obese, and obesity was associated with all patterns of lung disease. Conclusions: Measuring lung volumes and airway resistance is often necessary in order to provide an appropriate characterization of the pattern of lung disease in patients presenting with a spirometry pattern suggestive of restriction. Airflow obstruction is common in such cases. PMID:27812633

  16. Adaptive Support Ventilation May Deliver Unwanted Respiratory Rate-Tidal Volume Combinations in Patients with Acute Lung Injury Ventilated According to an Open Lung Concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dongelmans, Dave A.; Paulus, Frederique; Veelo, Denise P.; Binnekade, Jan M.; Vroom, Margreeth B.; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: With adaptive support ventilation, respiratory rate and tidal volume (V(T)) are a function of the Otis least work of breathing formula. We hypothesized that adaptive support ventilation in an open lung ventilator strategy would deliver higher V(T)s to patients with acute lung injury.

  17. Automated measurements of metabolic tumor volume and metabolic parameters in lung PET/CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orologas, F.; Saitis, P.; Kallergi, M.

    2017-11-01

    Patients with lung tumors or inflammatory lung disease could greatly benefit in terms of treatment and follow-up by PET/CT quantitative imaging, namely measurements of metabolic tumor volume (MTV), standardized uptake values (SUVs) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG). The purpose of this study was the development of an unsupervised or partially supervised algorithm using standard image processing tools for measuring MTV, SUV, and TLG from lung PET/CT scans. Automated metabolic lesion volume and metabolic parameter measurements were achieved through a 5 step algorithm: (i) The segmentation of the lung areas on the CT slices, (ii) the registration of the CT segmented lung regions on the PET images to define the anatomical boundaries of the lungs on the functional data, (iii) the segmentation of the regions of interest (ROIs) on the PET images based on adaptive thresholding and clinical criteria, (iv) the estimation of the number of pixels and pixel intensities in the PET slices of the segmented ROIs, (v) the estimation of MTV, SUVs, and TLG from the previous step and DICOM header data. Whole body PET/CT scans of patients with sarcoidosis were used for training and testing the algorithm. Lung area segmentation on the CT slices was better achieved with semi-supervised techniques that reduced false positive detections significantly. Lung segmentation results agreed with the lung volumes published in the literature while the agreement between experts and algorithm in the segmentation of the lesions was around 88%. Segmentation results depended on the image resolution selected for processing. The clinical parameters, SUV (either mean or max or peak) and TLG estimated by the segmented ROIs and DICOM header data provided a way to correlate imaging data to clinical and demographic data. In conclusion, automated MTV, SUV, and TLG measurements offer powerful analysis tools in PET/CT imaging of the lungs. Custom-made algorithms are often a better approach than the manufacturer

  18. Effect of tidal volume on extravascular lung water content during one-lung ventilation for video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery: a randomised, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qutub, Hatem; El-Tahan, Mohamed R; Mowafi, Hany A; El Ghoneimy, Yasser F; Regal, Mohamed A; Al Saflan, AbdulHadi A

    2014-09-01

    The use of low tidal volume during one-lung ventilation (OLV) has been shown to attenuate the incidence of acute lung injury after thoracic surgery. To test the effect of tidal volume during OLV for video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery on the extravascular lung water content index (EVLWI). A randomised, double-blind, controlled study. Single university hospital. Thirty-nine patients scheduled for elective video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. Patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups (n = 13 per group) to ventilate the dependent lung with a tidal volume of 4, 6 or 8 ml  kg(-1) predicted body weight with I:E ratio of 1:2.5 and PEEP of 5 cm H2O. The primary outcomes were perioperative changes in EVLWI and EVLWI to intrathoracic blood volume index (ITBVI) ratio. Secondary outcomes included haemodynamics, oxygenation indices, incidences of postoperative acute lung injury, atelectasis, pneumonia, morbidity and 30-day mortality. A tidal volume of 4 compared with 6 and 8 ml  kg(-1) after 45 min of OLV resulted in an EVLWI of 4.1 [95% confidence interval (CI) 3.5 to 4.7] compared with 7.7 (95% CI 6.7 to 8.6) and 8.6 (95% CI 7.5 to 9.7) ml  kg(-1), respectively (P tidal volume of 4 ml kg during OLV was associated with less lung water content than with larger tidal volumes of 6 to 8 ml kg(-1), although no patient developed acute lung injury. Further studies are required to address the usefulness of EVLWI as a marker for the development of postoperative acute lung injury after the use of a low tidal volume during OLV in patients undergoing pulmonary resection. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01762709.

  19. Interfractional changes in tumour volume and position during entire radiotherapy courses for lung cancer with respiratory gating and image guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhler-Nøttrup, Trine; Korreman, Stine Sofia; Pedersen, Anders N

    2008-01-01

    measured using a set-up strategy based on imaging of bony landmarks and compared to a strategy using in room lasers, skin tattoos and cupper landmarks. MATERIALS AND METHODS: During their six week treatment course of 60Gy in 2Gy fractions, ten patients underwent 3 respiratory gated CT scans. The tumours...... landmarks and 0.85 cm (+/-0.54) for matching using skin tattoos. For the mediastinal tumours the corresponding vectors and SD's were 0.55 cm (+/-0.19) and 0.72 cm (+/-0.43). The differences between the vectors were significant for the lung tumours p=0.004. The interfractional overlap of lung tumours was 80......-87% when matched using bony landmarks and 70-76% when matched using skin tattoos. The overlap of the mediastinal tumours were 60-65% and 41-47%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the use of gating the tumours varied considerably, regarding both position and volume. The variations in position were...

  20. Static inflation and deflation pressure–volume curves from excised lungs of marine mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlman, Andreas; Loring, Stephen H.; Ferrigno, Massimo; Moore, Colby; Early, Greg; Niemeyer, Misty; Lentell, Betty; Wenzel, Frederic; Joy, Ruth; Moore, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Excised lungs from eight marine mammal species [harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus), harbor seal (Phoca vitulina), gray seal (Halichoerus grypush), Atlantic white-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchus acutus), common dolphin (Delphinus delphis), Risso's dolphin (Grampus griseus), long-finned pilot whale (Globicephala melas) and harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena)] were used to determine the minimum air volume of the relaxed lung (MAV, N=15), the elastic properties (pressure–volume curves, N=24) of the respiratory system and the total lung capacity (TLC). Our data indicate that mass-specific TLC (sTLC, l kg–1) does not differ between species or groups (odontocete vs phocid) and agree with that estimated (TLCest) from body mass (Mb) by applying the equation: TLCest=0.135 Mb0.92. Measured MAV was on average 7% of TLC, with a range from 0 to 16%. The pressure–volume curves were similar among species on inflation but diverged during deflation in phocids in comparison with odontocetes. These differences provide a structural basis for observed species differences in the depth at which lungs collapse and gas exchange ceases. PMID:22031747

  1. MLC tracking for lung SABR reduces planning target volumes and dose to organs at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillet, Vincent; Keall, Paul J; Colvill, Emma; Hardcastle, Nicholas; O'Brien, Ricky; Szymura, Kathryn; Booth, Jeremy T

    2017-07-01

    Assess the dosimetric impact of multi-leaf collimator (MLC) tracking and mid-ventilation (midV) planning compared with the internal target volume (ITV)-based planning approach for lung Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR). Ten lung SABR patients originally treated with an ITV-based plan were re-planned according to MLC tracking and midV planning schemes. All plans were delivered on a linac to a motion phantom in a simulated treatment with real lung motions. Delivered dose was reconstructed in patient planning scans. ITV-based, tracking and midV regimes were compared at the planning and delivered stages based on PTV volume and dose metrics for the GTV and OAR. MLC tracking and midV schemes yielded favourable outcomes compared with ITV-based plans. Average reduction in PTV volume was (MLC tracking/MidV) 33.9%/22%. GTV dose coverage performed better with MLC tracking than the other regimes. Reduction in dose to OAR were for the lung (mean lung dose, 0.8Gy/0.2Gy), oesophagus (D3cc, 1.9Gy/1.4Gy), great vessels (D10cc, 3.2Gy/1.3Gy), trachea (D4cc, 1.1Gy/0.9Gy), heart (D1cc, 2.0Gy/0.5Gy) and spinal cord (D0.03cc, 0.5Gy/-0.1Gy). MLC tracking showed reduction in PTV volume, superior GTV dose coverage and organ dose sparing than MidV and ITV-based strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Does early tetralogy of Fallot total correction give better final lung volumes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Hasan Allah; Miri, Seyed Reza; Bakhshandeh, Hooman; Mirmesdagh, Yalda; Paziraee, Nazita

    2013-06-01

    Pulmonary blood flow may affect lung development in adulthood. Early total correction of tetralogy of Fallot may affect development of final lung volumes. We evaluated the effect of age at total correction on lung volumes years after the operation. In a retrospective cohort study on patients with totally corrected tetralogy of Fallot (mean age, 13.40 years at the time of follow-up), forced vital capacity, slow vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, and other parameters were measured 154.8 ± 46.25 months after the operation. Comparison were made of 3 groups: ≤2-, 2-8-, and >8-years old at the time of total correction surgery. Among 322 enrolled patients, the mean values of the follow-up spirometry results in ≤2-, 2-8-, >8-year-olds and the percentage of predicted values were respectively: vital capacity: 4.46 ± 0.57 L (107% ± 10.96%), 3.89 ± 0.58 L (91.10% ± 12.25%), 3.25 ± 0.48 L (82.35% ± 10.62%), p tetralogy of Fallot before completion of lung development might improve final adulthood lung volumes and capacities. It is better to consider total correction for all tetralogy of Fallot patients below 2-years old, or at least below 8-years old, if it is technically possible.

  3. Radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer: volume definition and patient selection. Annecy 1998 international Association for the study of lung cancer (IASLC) Workshop recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mornex, F.; Loubeyre, P.; Van houtte, P.; Scalliet, P.

    1998-01-01

    Chemo-radiation is the standard treatment of unresectable, locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, with a mean dose of 60-66 Gy, excluding escalation dose schemes. The standard treated volume includes primary tumor, ipsilateral hilar and mediastinal nodes, supraclavicular and contralateral nodes as well, regardless of the node status. This work tries to answer the question of the optimal volume to be treated. Drainage routes analysis is in favor of large volumes, while toxicity analysis favors small volumes. Combined modality treatment may increase the observed toxicity. The optimal volume definition is difficult, and requires available conformal therapy tools. Patients selection is another important issue. A volume definition is then attempted, based on the IASLC (International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer) Annecy workshop experience, highlighting the inter-observers discrepancies, and suggests basic recommendations to harmonize volume definition. (author)

  4. Expiratory flow limitation and operating lung volumes during exercise in older and younger adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joshua R; Kurti, Stephanie P; Meskimen, Kayla; Harms, Craig A

    2017-06-01

    We determined the effect of aging on expiratory flow limitation (EFL) and operating lung volumes when matched for lung size. We hypothesized that older adults will exhibit greater EFL and increases in EELV during exercise compared to younger controls. Ten older (5M/5W; >60years old) and nineteen height-matched young adults (10M/9W) were recruited. Young adults were matched for%predicted forced vital capacity (FVC) (Y-matched%Pred FVC; n=10) and absolute FVC (Y-matched FVC; n=10). Tidal flow-volume loops were recorded during the incremental exercise test with maximal flow-volume loops measured pre- and post-exercise. Compared to younger controls, older adults exhibited more EFL at ventilations of 26, 35, 51, and 80L/min. The older group had higher end-inspiratory lung volume compared to Y-matched%Pred FVC group during submaximal ventilations. The older group increased EELV during exercise, while EELV stayed below resting in the Y-matched%Pred FVC group. These data suggest older adults exhibit more EFL and increase EELV earlier during exercise compared to younger adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Quantitative assessment of irradiated lung volume and lung mass in breast cancer patients treated with tangential fields in combination with deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapp, Karin Sigrid; Zurl, Brigitte; Stranzl, Heidi; Winkler, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Comparison of the amount of irradiated lung tissue volume and mass in patients with breast cancer treated with an optimized tangential-field technique with and without a deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique and its impact on the normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP). Material and Methods: Computed tomography datasets of 60 patients in normal breathing (NB) and subsequently in DIBH were compared. With a Real-Time Position Management Respiratory Gating System (RPM), anteroposterior movement of the chest wall was monitored and a lower and upper threshold were defined. Ipsilateral lung and a restricted tangential region of the lung were delineated and the mean and maximum doses calculated. Irradiated lung tissue mass was computed based on density values. NTCP for lung was calculated using a modified Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model. Results: Mean dose to the ipsilateral lung in DIBH versus NB was significantly reduced by 15%. Mean lung mass calculation in the restricted area receiving ≤ 20 Gy (M 20 ) was reduced by 17% in DIBH but associated with an increase in volume. NTCP showed an improvement in DIBH of 20%. The correlation of individual breathing amplitude with NTCP proved to be independent. Conclusion: The delineation of a restricted area provides the lung mass calculation in patients treated with tangential fields. DIBH reduces ipsilateral lung dose by inflation so that less tissue remains in the irradiated region and its efficiency is supported by a decrease of NTCP. (orig.)

  6. Size matters: Spleen and lung volumes predict performance in human apneic diving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika eSchagatay

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Humans share with e.g. seals the ability to contract the spleen and increase circulating hematocrit, which may improve apneic performance by enhancing gas storage. Seals have large spleens and while human spleen size is small in comparison, it shows great individual variation. Unlike many marine mammals, human divers rely to a great extent on lung oxygen stores, but the impact of lung volume on competitive apnea performance has never been determined. We studied if spleen- and lung size correlated with performance in elite apnea divers. Volunteers were 14 male apnea world championship participants, with a mean(SE of 5.8(1.2 years of previous apnea training. Spleen volume was calculated from spleen length, width and thickness measured via ultrasound during rest, and vital capacity via spirometry. Accumulated competition scores from dives of maximal depth, time and distance were compared to anthropometric measurements and training data. Mean dive performance was 75(4 m for constant weight depth, 5 min 53(39 s for static apnea and 139(13 m for dynamic apnea distance. Subjects’ mean height was 184(2 cm, weight 82(3 kg, vital capacity (VC 7.3(0.3 L and spleen volume 336(32 ml. Spleen volume did not correlate with subject height or weight, but was positively correlated with competition score (r=0.57; P<0.05. Total competition score was also positively correlated with VC (r=0.54; P<0.05. The three highest scoring divers had the greatest spleen volumes, averaging 538(53 ml, while the three lowest scoring divers had a volume of 270(71 ml (P<0.01. VC was also greater in the high-scorers, at 7.9(0.36 L as compared to 6.7(0.19 L in the low-scorers (P<0.01. Spleen volume was reduced to half after 2 min of apnea in the highest scoring divers, and the estimated resting apnea time gain from the difference between high and low scorers was 15 s for spleen volume and 60 s for VC. We conclude that both spleen- and lung volume predict apnea performance in elite

  7. Measurement of Tumor Volumes Improves RECIST-Based Response Assessments in Advanced Lung Cancer1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozley, P David; Bendtsen, Claus; Zhao, Binsheng; Schwartz, Lawrence H; Thorn, Matthias; Rong, Yuanxin; Zhang, Luduan; Perrone, Andrea; Korn, René; Buckler, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to characterize the reproducibility of measurement for tumor volumes and their longest tumor diameters (LDs) and estimate the potential impact of using changes in tumor volumes instead of LDs as the basis for response assessments. METHODS: We studied patients with advanced lung cancer who have been observed longitudinally with x-ray computed tomography in a multinational trial. A total of 71 time points from 10 patients with 13 morphologically complex target lesions were analyzed. A total of 6461 volume measurements and their corresponding LDs were made by seven independent teams using their own work flows and image analysis tools. Interteam agreement and overall interrater concurrence were characterized. RESULTS: Interteam agreement between volume measurements was better than between LD measurements (ı = 0.945 vs 0.734, P = .005). The variability in determining the nadir was lower for volumes than for LDs (P = .005). Use of standard thresholds for the RECIST-based method and use of experimentally determined cutoffs for categorizing responses showed that volume measurements had a significantly greater sensitivity for detecting partial responses and disease progression. Earlier detection of progression would have led to earlier changes in patient management in most cases. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that measurement of changes in tumor volumes is adequately reproducible. Using tumor volumes as the basis for response assessments could have a positive impact on both patient management and clinical trials. More authoritative work to qualify or discard changes in volume as the basis for response assessments should proceed. PMID:22348172

  8. Efficacy of lung volume optimization maneuver monitored by optoelectronic pletismography in the management of congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lista

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of left CDH with severe lung hypoplasia, managed applying open lung strategy in HFOV (pre-surgery period and in Assist-Control with Volume Guarantee (post-surgery period, guided by SpO2 changes, TcPO2 and TcPCO2 monitoring. Opto-electronic plethysmography was used to measure end-expiratory chest wall volume changes (ΔEEcw related to lung volume variations occurring during pressure changes. OEP confirmed the efficacy of using SpO2 and transcutaneous gas monitoring during this recruitment maneuver.

  9. Treatment of chronic respiratory failure: lung volume reduction surgery versus rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decramer, M

    2003-11-01

    Several treatment options are available for end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Respiratory rehabilitation and lung volume reduction surgery are reviewed here. Respiratory rehabilitation can now be considered a prime treatment for COPD. Indeed, it has been clearly shown to improve exercise capacity and health status in these patients. Improvements in the former fell just below the minimal clinically important difference, whereas those in the latter exceeded it. In addition, after a respiratory rehabilitation programme, a reduction in the number of hospital admissions and duration of each admission was demonstrated. It remains, however, difficult to predict accurately which patients will improve after rehabilitation and which will not. Factors that may contribute to this prediction are: baseline peak exercise ventilation/maximal voluntary ventilation, maximal inspiratory pressure, peripheral muscle force, and 6-min walking distance. Several studies have clearly shown that training effects are as pronounced in patients with severe as in those with moderate airflow obstruction. This is the most significant insight in this area of the 1990s. Lung volume reduction surgery may also be of benefit in patients with end-stage COPD. It is clear that lung function, exercise capacity and health status improve after this procedure, although the results of only six randomised studies are currently available. It remains difficult to accurately predict which patients will benefit from the procedure. From a model analysis, the most important action mechanism appears to be resizing of the lungs. Only in patients with an increased residual volume/total lung capacity ratio are beneficial effects expected. The model analysis, however, did not fit the experimental data very well in a recent publication. Emphysema heterogeneity is also likely to be related to the response. The question remains as to whether or not lung volume reduction surgery accelerates the decline

  10. [Prediction of the efficiency of endoscopic lung volume reduction by valves in severe emphysema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocquillon, V; Briault, A; Reymond, E; Arbib, F; Jankowski, A; Ferretti, G; Pison, C

    2016-11-01

    In severe emphysema, endoscopic lung volume reduction with valves is an alternative to surgery with less morbidity and mortality. In 2015, selection of patients who will respond to this technique is based on emphysema heterogeneity, a complete fissure visible on the CT-scan and absence of collateral ventilation between lobes. Our case report highlights that individualized prediction is possible. A 58-year-old woman had severe, disabling pulmonary emphysema. A high resolution thoracic computed tomography scan showed that the emphysema was heterogeneous, predominantly in the upper lobes, integrity of the left greater fissure and no collateral ventilation with the left lower lobe. A valve was inserted in the left upper lobe bronchus. At one year, clinical and functional benefits were significant with complete atelectasis of the treated lobe. The success of endoscopic lung volume reduction with a valve can be predicted, an example of personalized medicine. Copyright © 2016 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Volume-Targeted Ventilation in the Neonate: Benchmarking Ventilators on an Active Lung Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Tobias J; Wald, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Mechanically ventilated neonates have been observed to receive substantially different ventilation after switching ventilator models, despite identical ventilator settings. This study aims at establishing the range of output variability among 10 neonatal ventilators under various breathing conditions. Relative benchmarking test of 10 neonatal ventilators on an active neonatal lung model. Neonatal ICU. Ten current neonatal ventilators. Ventilators were set identically to flow-triggered, synchronized, volume-targeted, pressure-controlled, continuous mandatory ventilation and connected to a neonatal lung model. The latter was configured to simulate three patients (500, 1,500, and 3,500 g) in three breathing modes each (passive breathing, constant active breathing, and variable active breathing). Averaged across all weight conditions, the included ventilators delivered between 86% and 110% of the target tidal volume in the passive mode, between 88% and 126% during constant active breathing, and between 86% and 120% under variable active breathing. The largest relative deviation occurred during the 500 g constant active condition, where the highest output machine produced 147% of the tidal volume of the lowest output machine. All machines deviate significantly in volume output and ventilation regulation. These differences depend on ventilation type, respiratory force, and patient behavior, preventing the creation of a simple conversion table between ventilator models. Universal neonatal tidal volume targets for mechanical ventilation cannot be transferred from one ventilator to another without considering necessary adjustments.

  12. Lung Volume Reduction Coil Treatment in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients with Homogeneous Emphysema : A Prospective Feasibility Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klooster, Karin; ten Hacken, Nick H. T.; Franz, Ina; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; van Rikxoort, Eva M.; Slebos, Dirk-Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background: In patients with heterogeneous emphysema, surgical and bronchoscopic lung volume reduction (LVR) treatments are available. However, for patients with homogeneous emphysema these treatments are hardly investigated and seem less effective. Bronchoscopic LVR coil treatment has been shown to

  13. Volume change determination of metastatic lung tumors in CT images using 3-D template matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosini, Robert D.; Wang, Peng; O'Dell, Walter G.

    2009-02-01

    The ability of a clinician to properly detect changes in the size of lung nodules over time is a vital element to both the diagnosis of malignant growths and the monitoring of the response of cancerous lesions to therapy. We have developed a novel metastasis sizing algorithm based on 3-D template matching with spherical tumor appearance models that were created to match the expected geometry of the tumors of interest while accounting for potential spatial offsets of nodules in the slice thickness direction. The spherical template that best-fits the overall volume of each lung metastasis was determined through the optimization of the 3-D normalized cross-correlation coefficients (NCCC) calculated between the templates and the nodules. A total of 17 different lung metastases were extracted manually from real patient CT datasets and reconstructed in 3-D using spherical harmonics equations to generate simulated nodules for testing our algorithm. Each metastasis 3-D shape was then subjected to 10%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 90% scaling of its volume to allow for 5 possible volume change combinations relative to the original size per each reconstructed nodule and inserted back into CT datasets with appropriate blurring and noise addition. When plotted against the true volume change, the nodule volume changes calculated by our algorithm for these 85 data points exhibited a high degree of accuracy (slope = 0.9817, R2 = 0.9957). Our results demonstrate that the 3-D template matching method can be an effective, fast, and accurate tool for automated sizing of metastatic tumors.

  14. Impact ofin vitrochemosensitivity test-guided platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy on the surgical outcomes of patients with p-stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer that underwent complete resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akazawa, Yuki; Higashiyama, Masahiko; Nishino, Kazumi; Uchida, Jyunji; Kumagai, Toru; Inoue, Takako; Fujiwara, Ayako; Tokunaga, Toshiteru; Okami, Jiro; Imamura, Fumio; Kodama, Ken; Kobayashi, Hisayuki

    2017-09-01

    The impact of in vitro chemosensitivity test-guided platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy on the surgical outcomes of patients undergoing complete resection for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has yet to be elucidated. In the present study, the utility of adjuvant chemotherapy based on the collagen gel droplet embedded culture drug sensitivity test (CD-DST) in patients with p (pathology)-stage IIIA NSCLC was retrospectively analyzed. A series of 39 patients that had received platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy following complete resection between 2007 and 2012 were enrolled. Their surgical specimens were subjected to the CD-DST. The patients were subsequently classified into two groups on the basis of in vitro anti-cancer drug sensitivity data obtained using the CD-DST: The sensitive group (25 patients) were treated with regimens including one or two of the anti-cancer drug(s) that were indicated to be effective by the CD-DST, whereas the non-sensitive group (14 patients) were treated with chemotherapy regimens that did not include any CD-DST-selected anti-cancer drugs. There were no significant differences in the background characteristics of the two groups [including in respect of the pathological TN (tumor-lymph node) stage, tumor histology, epidermal growth factor receptor mutation status, the frequency of each chemotherapy regimen, and the number of administered cycles]. The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate of the sensitive group was 32.3%, whereas that of the non-sensitive group was 14.3% (P=0.037). In contrast, no difference in overall survival (OS) was observed (P=0.76). Multivariate analysis revealed that adjuvant chemotherapy based on the CD-DST had a significant favorable effect on the DFS (P=0.01). Therefore, the present study has demonstrated that CD-DST data obtained from surgical specimens aid the selection of effective platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy regimens for patients undergoing complete resection for p-stage IIIA

  15. Static lung volume should be used to confirm restrictive lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasam SA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Shweta A Rasam, Nitin V Vanjare Department of Pulmonary Function Laboratory, Chest Research Foundation, Pune, Maharashtra, IndiaWe read the study by Hee Jin Park et al1 with great interest. The authors have investigated the prevalence of comorbidities in Korean chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD population. We raise our concern regarding the definition of COPD in this study. The study defines COPD as airflow limitation (only pre-spirometry forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity [FEV1/FVC] <70% in subjects aged ≥40 years. To differentiate, between asthma and COPD, it is essential to do a post bronchodilator spirometry. It would have been wise to report the findings as prevalence of comorbidities in obstructive airway diseases rather than specifically calling it as COPD.View original paper by Park and colleagues.

  16. The Impact of Heart Irradiation on Dose-Volume Effects in the Rat Lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luijk, Peter van; Faber, Hette; Meertens, Harm; Schippers, Jacobus M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Brandenburg, Sytze; Kampinga, Harm H.; Coppes, Robert P. Ph.D.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that heart irradiation increases the risk of a symptomatic radiation-induced loss of lung function (SRILF) and that this can be well-described as a modulation of the functional reserve of the lung. Methods and Materials: Rats were irradiated with 150-MeV protons. Dose-response curves were obtained for a significant increase in breathing frequency after irradiation of 100%, 75%, 50%, or 25% of the total lung volume, either including or excluding the heart from the irradiation field. A significant increase in the mean respiratory rate after 6-12 weeks compared with 0-4 weeks was defined as SRILF, based on biweekly measurements of the respiratory rate. The critical volume (CV) model was used to describe the risk of SRILF. Fits were done using a maximum likelihood method. Consistency between model and data was tested using a previously developed goodness-of-fit test. Results: The CV model could be fitted consistently to the data for lung irradiation only. However, this fitted model failed to predict the data that also included heart irradiation. Even refitting the model to all data resulted in a significant difference between model and data. These results imply that, although the CV model describes the risk of SRILF when the heart is spared, the model needs to be modified to account for the impact of dose to the heart on the risk of SRILF. Finally, a modified CV model is described that is consistent to all data. Conclusions: The detrimental effect of dose to the heart on the incidence of SRILF can be described by a dose dependent decrease in functional reserve of the lung

  17. Comparisons of dose-volume histograms for proton-beam versus 3-D conformal X-ray therapy in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Changlu; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Sugahara, Shinji; Sakae, Takeji; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2009-01-01

    Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were reviewed to determine if there is an advantage of the two modalities when treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). 24 stage I NSCLC patients who underwent proton-beam therapy (PBT) from June 2003 to May 2007 were included in this study. Based on the same clinical target volumes (CTVs), treatment planning was made to cover CTV within 90% isodose lines. Each patient was evaluated by two sets of DVHs, one for PBT and the other for three-dimensional conformal X-ray therapy (3D-CRT). For all patients, the 95% isodose line covered 86.4% of the CTV for PBT, and 43.2% for 3D-CRT. PBT was associated with significantly lower mean doses to the ipsilateral lung, total lung, heart, esophagus, and spinal cord than 3D-CRT. PBT offered reduced radiation doses to the lung when evaluated in terms of percentage lung volumes receiving ≥ 5 Gy (V 5 ), ≥ 10 Gy (V 10 ), and ≥ 20 Gy (V 20 ) when compared to 3D-CRT. PBT is advantageous over 3D-CRT in reducing doses to the lung, heart, esophagus, and spinal cord in treating stage I NSCLC. (orig.)

  18. Longitudinal lung volume changes in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Seung; Kim, Seon Ok; Seo, Joon Beom; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Kim, Woo Jin; Lee, Jin Hwa; Lee, Sang-Min; Lee, Sangyeub; Lim, Seong Yong; Shin, Tae Rim; Yoon, Ho Il; Lee, Sei Won; Huh, Jin Won; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang-Do

    2013-08-01

    The progression of lung hyperinflation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has not been studied in a long-term prospective cohort. We explored the longitudinal changes in lung volume compartments with the aim of identifying predictors of a rapid decline of the inspiratory capacity to total lung capacity ratio (IC/TLC). The study population comprised 324 patients with COPD who were recruited prospectively. Annual rates of changes in pulmonary function, including forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), total lung capacity (TLC), functional residual capacity (FRC), residual volume (RV), vital capacity (VC), IC, and IC/TLC, were estimated using the random coefficient models. The mean annual rates of changes in pre- and post-bronchodilator FEV1 were -23.0 mL/year (p < 0.001) and -26.5 mL/year (p = 0.004). The mean annual rates of changes in VC, IC, TLC, and IC/TLC were -33.7 mL/year (p = 0.007), -53.9 mL/year (p < 0.001), -43.7 mL/year (p = 0.012), and -0.65%/year (p = 0.001), respectively. RV, FRC, and RV/TLC did not change significantly during the study period. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that a high modified Medical Research Council (MMRC) dyspnea scale score, a high Charlson comorbidity index value, and low post-bronchodilator FEV1 were associated with rapid decline in IC/TLC. MMRC dyspnea scale, post-bronchodilator FEV1, and the Charlson comorbidity index at baseline were independent predictors of a rapid decline in IC/TLC.

  19. Clinical utility of computed tomographic lung volumes in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Seung; Lee, Sang-Min; Seo, Joon Beom; Lee, Sei Won; Huh, Jin Won; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang-Do

    2014-01-01

    Published data concerning the utility of computed tomography (CT)-based lung volumes are limited to correlation with lung function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of the CT expiratory-to-inspiratory lung volume ratio (CT Vratio) by assessing the relationship with clinically relevant outcomes. A total of 75 stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients having pulmonary function testing and volumetric CT at full inspiration and expiration were retrospectively evaluated. Inspiratory and expiratory CT lung volumes were measured using in-house software. Correlation of the CT Vratio with patient-centered outcomes, including the modified Medical Research Council (MMRC) dyspnea score, the 6-min walk distance (6MWD), the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) score, and multidimensional COPD severity indices, such as the BMI, airflow obstruction, dyspnea, and exercise capacity index (BODE) and age, dyspnea, and airflow obstruction (ADO), were analyzed. The CT Vratio correlated significantly with BMI (r = -0.528, p < 0.001). The CT Vratio was also significantly associated with MMRC dyspnea (r = 0.387, p = 0.001), 6MWD (r = -0.459, p < 0.001), and SGRQ (r = 0.369, p = 0.001) scores. Finally, the CT Vratio had significant correlations with the BODE and ADO multidimensional COPD severity indices (r = 0.605, p < 0.001; r = 0.411, p < 0.001). The CT Vratio had significant correlations with patient-centered outcomes and multidimensional COPD severity indices. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Microstructural Consequences of Blast Lung Injury Characterized with Digital Volume Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Arora

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on microstructural changes that occur within the mammalian lung when subject to blast and how these changes influence strain distributions within the tissue. Shock tube experiments were performed to generate the blast injured specimens (cadaveric Sprague-Dawley rats. Blast overpressures of 100 and 180 kPa were studied. Synchrotron tomography imaging was used to capture volumetric image data of lungs. Specimens were ventilated using a custom-built system to study multiple inflation pressures during each tomography scan. These data enabled the first digital volume correlation (DVC measurements in lung tissue to be performed. Quantitative analysis was performed to describe the damaged architecture of the lung. No clear changes in the microstructure of the tissue morphology were observed due to controlled low- to moderate-level blast exposure. However, significant focal sites of injury were observed using DVC, which allowed the detection of bias and concentration in the patterns of strain level. Morphological analysis corroborated the findings, illustrating that the focal damage caused by a blast can give rise to diffuse influence across the tissue. It is important to characterize the non-instantly fatal doses of blast, given the transient nature of blast lung in the clinical setting. This research has highlighted the need for better understanding of focal injury and its zone of influence (alveolar interdependency and neighboring tissue burden as a result of focal injury. DVC techniques show great promise as a tool to advance this endeavor, providing a new perspective on lung mechanics after blast.

  1. A case that underwent bilateral video-assisted thoracoscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No Abstract Available A case that underwent bilateral video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical (VATS) biopsy combined with pneumonectomy is presented. The patient developed hypoxia during the contralateral VATS biopsy. His hypoxia was treated with positive expiratory pressure (PEEP) to the dependent lung and apneic ...

  2. Lung volumes and airway resistance in patients with a possible restrictive pattern on spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Kenia; D'Aquino, Luiz Carlos; Soares, Maria Raquel; Gimenez, Andrea; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Castro

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with proportional reductions in FVC and FEV1 on spirometry show no reduction in TLC. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role that measuring lung volumes and airway resistance plays in the correct classification of patients with a possible restrictive pattern on spirometry. This was a prospective study involving adults with reduced FVC and FEV1, as well as an FEV1/FV(C) ratio within the predicted range. Restrictive lung disease (RLD) was characterized by TLC below the 5th percentile, as determined by plethysmography. Obstructive lung disease (OLD) was characterized by high specific airway resistance, significant changes in post-bronchodilator FEV1, or an FEF25-75% espirometria não têm CPT reduzida. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o papel da medida dos volumes pulmonares e da resistência das vias aéreas para a classificação correta de pacientes com possível restrição à espirometria. Estudo prospectivo de adultos com CVF e VEF1 reduzidos e relação VEF1/CV(F) na faixa prevista. Distúrbio ventilatório restritivo (DVR) foi definido por CPT espirometria. A obstrução ao fluxo aéreo é comum nesses casos.

  3. Obesity disproportionately impacts lung volumes, airflow and exhaled nitric oxide in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Tsung-Chieh; Tsai, Hui-Ju; Chang, Su-Wei; Chung, Ren-Hua; Hsu, Jing-Ya; Tsai, Ming-Han; Liao, Sui-Ling; Hua, Man-Chin; Lai, Shen-Hao; Chen, Li-Chen; Yeh, Kuo-Wei; Tseng, Yu-Lun; Lin, Wan-Chen; Chang, Su-Ching; Huang, Jing-Long

    2017-01-01

    The current literature focusing on the effect of obesity and overweight on lung function and fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) in children, particularly among healthy children of non-European descent, remains controversial. Furthermore, whether the relationship of obesity and overweight with lung function and FeNO in children is modified by atopy is unclear. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of excess weight on lung function parameters and FeNO among Asian children, with a particular focus on exploring the potential effect modification by atopy. We investigated the effect of excess weight on lung function and FeNO in a population sample of 1,717 children aged 5 to 18 years and explored the potential modifying effect of atopy. There were positive associations of body mass index (BMI) z-score with forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), peak expiratory flow (PEF), and forced expiratory flow at 25-75% (FEF25-75) (all Pchildren from the general population, independent of atopic status. Excess weight inversely affects FeNO in atopic but not in non-atopic children.

  4. The effect of surgery on lung volume and conventional monitoring parameters in ventilated newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proquitté, H; Freiberger, O; Yilmaz, S; Bamberg, C; Degenhardt, P; Roehr, C C; Wauer, R R; Schmalisch, G

    2010-05-01

    In newborn infants, thoraco-abdominal surgery is a serious intervention with respect to gas exchange and lung mechanics. This prospective clinical study compared surgery-induced changes in functional residual capacity (FRC) and ventilation inhomogeneity (VI) indices with changes in conventional monitoring parameters. Of 29 ventilated newborns (mean weight 2,770+/-864 g at surgery), 13, nine and seven underwent thoracic, abdominal or congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) surgery, respectively. The multiple breath washout (MBWO) technique using heptafluoropropane as tracer gas (Babylog 8000; Dräger, Lübeck, Germany) was performed ventilatory monitoring parameters. FRC decreased in non-CDH infants, while FRC increased and VI indices decreased in CDH infants. Despite improvements, the differences in FRC and VI between CDH and non-CDH infants indicated persistent impaired lung function in CHD infants. MBWO can be advantageously used to measure the effect of surgery on the lung. While FRC and VI indices changed following surgery, conventional monitoring parameters did not.

  5. A Pilot Study on the Feasibility of Interventional Lung Volume Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wansheng; Dong Yonghua; Liu Bin; Zhu Chi; Yu Yongqiang

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of lung volume reduction by transbronchial alcohol and lipiodol suspension infusion with the aid of balloon-tipped catheter occlusion. Twenty-six healthy adult rabbits were divided into four treatment groups: alcohol and lipiodol suspension infusion (n = 8), lipiodol infusion (n = 8), alcohol infusion (n = 5), or bronchial lumen occlusion (n = 5). After selective lobar or segmental bronchial catheterization using a balloon-tipped occlusion catheter, the corresponding drug infusion was performed. Bone cement was used to occlude the bronchial lumen in the occlusion group. The animals were followed up for 10 weeks by chest X-ray and computed tomography (CT), and then the whole lungs were harvested for histological examination. Alcohol and lipiodol suspension or lipiodol could be stably retained in alveoli in the first two groups based on chest X-ray and CT, but obvious collapse only occurred in the group receiving alcohol and lipiodol suspension or the bronchial lumen occlusion group. Histological examination revealed damage and disruption of the alveolar epithelium and fibrosis in related lung tissue in the group receiving alcohol and lipiodol suspension. Similar changes were seen in the bronchial lumen occlusion group, apart from obvious marginal emphysema of the target areas in two animals. Interstitial pneumonia and dilated alveoli existed in some tissue in target areas in the lipiodol group, in which pulmonary fibrosis obliterating alveoli also occurred. Chronic alveolitis and pleural adhesion in target areas occurred in the group infused with alcohol alone, whereas visceral pleura of the other three groups was regular and no pleural effusion or adhesion was found. Alcohol and lipiodol suspension that is stably retained in alveoli can result in significant lung volume reduction. Through alcohol and lipiodol suspension infusion, obstructive emphysema or pneumonia arising from bronchial lumen

  6. First pass dual input volume CT-perfusion of lung lesions: The influence of the CT- value range settings on the perfusion values of benign and malignant entities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlsen, Dennis; Talakic, Emina; Fritz, Gerald A; Quehenberger, Franz; Tillich, Manfred; Schoellnast, Helmut

    2016-06-01

    To assess the influence of the lower threshold for segmentation of the volume of interest on the perfusion values in first-pass dual input volume CT-perfusion of lung lesions. Dual input maximum slope volume CT-perfusion was performed in 48 patients (mean age±standard deviation [SD], 68±10years; range, 46-87 years) who underwent subsequent CT-guided biopsy to evaluate a lung lesion. Using commercial perfusion software, a lower and upper threshold was set for determination of the CT-value range, which again determined the volume of interest for perfusion calculation. The pulmonary arterial flow (PAF), bronchial arterial flow (BAF), and perfusion index (PI; PAF/(PAF+BAF)) were calculated at following pre contrast CT value range settings: -80 to 150HU (setting 1), -200 to 150HU (setting 2), -300 to 150HU (setting 3), and -500 to 150HU (setting 4). Perfusion parameters were compared between benign (n, 15) and malignant (n, 33) lesions for each setting. Intraobserver- and interobserver reliability were calculated for setting 4. Median PAF was significantly higher in malignant lesions than in benign lesions for all settings (53-96 versus 29-62mL/min/100mL, PCT value range setting (PCT perfusion is statistically significantly higher in malignant than in benign lesion, whereas the measurements are influenced by the lower threshold of the CT value range setting. This has to be considered when using cutoff values provided in the literature for differentiation between benign and malignant lung lesions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Effects of volume-controlled ventilation and pressure-controlled volume- guaranteed mode during one-lung ventilation on circulation, pulmonary function and lung injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xukai; Shen, Huachun; Li, Xiaoyu; Chen, Junping

    2014-04-08

    To compare the effects of volume-controlled ventilation (VCV) and pressure-controlled volume-guaranteed (PCV-VG) mode during one-lung ventilation (OLV) on circulation, pulmonary function and lung injury. 2012 February to 2013 March in Ningbo No2. Hospital cardiothoracic surgery, 30 patients aged 52 to 76 years (ASA grade II-III) undergoing elective thoracoscopic lobectomy were randomly divided into VCV group and PCV-VG group, with 15 cases in each group. After anesthesia induction and endotracheal intubation, endobronchial blocker was inserted to start OLV. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), measured tidal volume (TV), peak airway pressure (Ppeak), airway resistance (Raw), chest compliance (Cdyn) and the end-tidal carbon dioxide pressure (PetCO(2)) were recorded at the time point of 15 minutes after turning to the lateral position, 15 minutes and 60 minutes after OLV, and 15 minutes after the resumption of two lung ventilation. In the meanwhile, arterial blood gas analysis was conducted to measure indicators of pH, oxygen tension (PaO(2)) and carbon dioxide partial pressure (PaCO(2)). Blood was drawn before induction, 1 hour after OLV and 1 hour after the end of surgery, and the concentration of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). HR, MAP, TV, PetCO(2), pH and PaCO(2) in two groups at the time point of 15 minutes after turning to the lateral position, 15 minutes and 60 minutes after OLV, and 15 minutes after the resumption of two lung ventilation showed no significant difference (P > 0.05). At the point of 15 minutes after turning to the lateral position and 15 minutes after two lung ventilation, Ppeak and Cdyn of two groups were significantly different (P cmH(2)O, 16 ± 3 cmH(2)O for VCV group and 14 ± 2 cmH(2)O, 14 ± 2 cmH(2)O for PCV-VG group; Cdyn: 43.5 ± 5.9 ml/cmH(2)O, 43.8 ± 6.7 ml/cmH2O for VCV group and 49.7 ± 7.1 ml/cmH(2)O, 53.3 ± 9.6 ml/cmH(2)O for

  8. Lung volumes and distribution of ventilation in survivors to congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) during infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotta, Andrea; Palamides, Sabrina; Braguglia, Annabella; Crescenzi, Francesco; Ronchetti, Maria Paola; Calzolari, Flaminia; Iacobelli, Barbara Daniela; Bagolan, Pietro; Corchia, Carlo; Orzalesi, Marcello

    2007-07-01

    The assessment of lung volumes, particularly functional residual capacity (FRC), is crucial for understanding lung development during infancy in CDH patients. To evaluate changes in lung function during infancy in subjects with CDH treated with a "gentle ventilation" technique and delayed surgery strategy in the neonatal period. 13 CDH infants were studied twice and compared with a population of 28 healthy infants (HI). Tidal-Volume (Vt), respiratory rate (RR) and time to peak expiratory flow/expiratory time ratio (tPTEF/Te) were measured with an ultrasonic flow meter; Compliance (Crs) and Resistance (Rrs) of the respiratory system were studied with the single occlusion technique; FRC and Lung Clearance Index (LCI), were assessed with the sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) wash-in/wash-out technique. The differences between the first (T1) and second (T2) measurement in the CDH group were assessed by the Student's t-test for paired values. For each set of measurement (T1 and T2) the values were compared with HI by Student's t-test. Mean age at test was 7.5 +/- 5.2 months for HI, 4.5 +/- 2.5 at T1 and 11.9 +/- 4.5 months at T2 for CDH infants. At T1 there were no significant differences between CDH infants and HI in Vt, Crs, and FRC, while tPTEF/te ratio was lower and RR, Rrs, and LCI were higher in CDH patients than in HI. At T2 Vt, Crs, and FRC remained normal in CDH patients as well as RR that, at this time was not different between CDH and healthy infants; tPTEF/te remained below and Rrs and LCI remained above normal ranges, indicating a persistent impairment in lower airways patency. Lung function in infants with severe CDH is characterized by a persistent impairment in airways patency and significant inhomogeneity of ventilation, suggesting a peripheral bronchial obstruction even if the other lung function tests are within normal ranges.

  9. Volume Oscillations Delivered to a Lung Model Using 4 Different Bubble CPAP Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Jonathan A; Richardson, C Peter; DiBlasi, Robert M

    2015-03-01

    High-frequency pressure oscillations created by gas bubbling through an underwater seal during bubble CPAP may enhance ventilation and aid in lung recruitment in premature infants. We hypothesized that there are no differences in the magnitude of oscillations in lung volume (ΔV) in a preterm neonatal lung model when different bubble CPAP systems are used. An anatomically realistic replica of an infant nasal airway model was attached to a Silastic test lung sealed within a calibrated plethysmograph. Nasal prongs were affixed to the simulated neonate and supported using bubble CPAP systems set at 6 cm H2O. ΔV was calculated using pressure measurements obtained from the plethysmograph. The Fisher & Paykel Healthcare bubble CPAP system provided greater ΔV than any of the other devices at all of the respective bias flows (P CPAP systems. The magnitude of ΔV increased at bias flows of > 4 L/min in the Fisher & Paykel Healthcare, Airways Development, and homemade systems, but appeared to decrease as bias flow increased with the Babi.Plus system. The major finding of this study is that bubble CPAP can provide measureable ventilation effects in an infant lung model. We speculate that the differences noted in ΔV between the different devices are a combination of the circuit/nasal prong configuration, bubbler configuration, and frequency of oscillations. Additional testing is needed in spontaneously breathing infants to determine whether a physiologic benefit exists when using the different bubble CPAP systems. Copyright © 2015 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  10. Density overwrites of internal tumor volumes in intensity modulated proton therapy plans for mobile lung tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botas, Pablo; Grassberger, Clemens; Sharp, Gregory; Paganetti, Harald

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate internal tumor volume density overwrite strategies to minimize intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plan degradation of mobile lung tumors. Four planning paradigms were compared for nine lung cancer patients. Internal gross tumor volume (IGTV) and internal clinical target volume (ICTV) structures were defined encompassing their respective volumes in every 4DCT phase. The paradigms use different planning CT (pCT) created from the average intensity projection (AIP) of the 4DCT, overwriting the density within the IGTV to account for movement. The density overwrites were: (a) constant filling with 100 HU (C100) or (b) 50 HU (C50), (c) maximum intensity projection (MIP) across phases, and (d) water equivalent path length (WEPL) consideration from beam’s-eye-view. Plans were created optimizing dose-influence matrices calculated with fast GPU Monte Carlo (MC) simulations in each pCT. Plans were evaluated with MC on the 4DCTs using a model of the beam delivery time structure. Dose accumulation was performed using deformable image registration. Interplay effect was addressed applying 10 times rescanning. Significantly less DVH metrics degradation occurred when using MIP and WEPL approaches. Target coverage (D99≥slant 70 Gy(RBE)) was fulfilled in most cases with MIP and WEPL (D{{99}WEPL}=69.2+/- 4.0 Gy (RBE)), keeping dose heterogeneity low (D5-D{{95}WEPL}=3.9+/- 2.0 Gy(RBE)). The mean lung dose was kept lowest by the WEPL strategy, as well as the maximum dose to organs at risk (OARs). The impact on dose levels in the heart, spinal cord and esophagus were patient specific. Overall, the WEPL strategy gives the best performance and should be preferred when using a 3D static geometry for lung cancer IMPT treatment planning. Newly available fast MC methods make it possible to handle long simulations based on 4D data sets to perform studies with high accuracy and efficiency, even prior to individual treatment planning.

  11. High spatiotemporal resolution measurement of regional lung air volumes from 2D phase contrast x-ray images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leong, Andrew F. T.; Islam, M. Sirajul; Kitchen, Marcus J. [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Fouras, Andreas [Division of Biological Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Wallace, Megan J.; Hooper, Stuart B. [Ritchie Centre and Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Monash Institute of Medical Research, Monash University, Victoria 3168 (Australia)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Described herein is a new technique for measuring regional lung air volumes from two-dimensional propagation-based phase contrast x-ray (PBI) images at very high spatial and temporal resolution. Phase contrast dramatically increases lung visibility and the outlined volumetric reconstruction technique quantifies dynamic changes in respiratory function. These methods can be used for assessing pulmonary disease and injury and for optimizing mechanical ventilation techniques for preterm infants using animal models. Methods: The volumetric reconstruction combines the algorithms of temporal subtraction and single image phase retrieval (SIPR) to isolate the image of the lungs from the thoracic cage in order to measure regional lung air volumes. The SIPR algorithm was used to recover the change in projected thickness of the lungs on a pixel-by-pixel basis (pixel dimensions {approx}16.2 {mu}m). The technique has been validated using numerical simulation and compared results of measuring regional lung air volumes with and without the use of temporal subtraction for removing the thoracic cage. To test this approach, a series of PBI images of newborn rabbit pups mechanically ventilated at different frequencies was employed. Results: Regional lung air volumes measured from PBI images of newborn rabbit pups showed on average an improvement of at least 20% in 16% of pixels within the lungs in comparison to that measured without the use of temporal subtraction. The majority of pixels that showed an improvement was found to be in regions occupied by bone. Applying the volumetric technique to sequences of PBI images of newborn rabbit pups, it is shown that lung aeration at birth can be highly heterogeneous. Conclusions: This paper presents an image segmentation technique based on temporal subtraction that has successfully been used to isolate the lungs from PBI chest images, allowing the change in lung air volume to be measured over regions as small as the pixel size. Using

  12. A correlation study on position and volume variation of primary lung cancer during respiration by four-dimensional CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yingjie; Li Jianbin; Tian Shiyu; Li Fengxiang; Fan Tingyong; Shao Qian; Xu Min; Lu Jie

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlation of position movement of primary tumor with interested organs and skin markers, and to investigate the correlation of volume variation of primary tumors and lungs during different respiration phases for patients with lung cancer at free breath condition scanned by four-dimensional CT (4DCT) simulation. Methods: 16 patients with lung cancer were scanned at free breath condition by simulation 4DCT which connected to a respiration-monitoring system. A coordinate system was created based on image of T 5 phase,gross tumor volume (GTV) and normal tissue structures of 10 phases were contoured. The three dimensional position variation of them were measured and their correlation were analyzed, and the same for the volume variation of GTV and lungs of 10 respiratory phases. Results: Movement range of lung cancer in different lobe differed extinct: 0.8 - 5.0 mm in upper lobe, 5.7 -5.9 mm in middle lobe and 10.2 - 13.7 mm in lower lobe, respectively. Movement range of lung cancer in three dimensional direction was different: z-axis 4.3 mm ± 4.3 mm > y-axis 2.2 mm ± 1.0 mm > x-axis 1.7 mm ± 1.5 mm (χ 2 =16.22, P =0.000), respectively. There was no statistical significant correlation for movement vector of GTV and interested structures (r =-0.50 - -0.01, P =0.058 - -0.961), nor for volume variation of tumor and lung (r =0.23, P =0.520). Conclusions: Based on 4DCT, statistically significant differences of GTV centroid movement are observed at different pulmonary lobes and in three dimensional directions. So individual 4DCT measurement is necessary for definition of internal target volume margin for lung cancer. (authors)

  13. Dose-volume analysis of lung complications in the radiation treatment of malignant thymoma: a retrospective review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moiseenko, Vitali; Craig, Tim; Bezjak, Andrea; Dyk, Jake van

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: Radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis are limiting factors in radiation treatment (RT) of thoracic tumors. The objectives of this study were to quantify the influence of irradiated lung volume and dose on lung response, and to evaluate the influence of other prognostic factors. Material and methods: Treatment histories of 55 thymoma patients were evaluated retrospectively for radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Complications were scored as pneumonitis if observed within 6 months of completion of RT, and as fibrosis if observed after 6 months. Complications were classified as 'all pneumonitis' and 'all fibrosis' if a patient either showed symptoms (such as chronic cough and dyspnea) or radiographic changes in lung. The second group scored as 'symptomatic pneumonitis' and 'symptomatic fibrosis' consisted of patients that exhibited clinical symptoms. Dose-volume data were estimated using representative anatomies combined with available individual dose data. The Lyman NTCP model was used to assess the dependence of lung complication incidence on dose and volume. Results: The derived values of the parameters governing dose-volume dependence for symptomatic complications agreed with currently accepted and recently published values within the margins of error. Dose-response curves for complications that included radiographic changes were less steep than for symptomatic complications. The volume dependence for symptomatic fibrosis was more pronounced compared to all fibrosis. A strong correlation was observed between developing pneumonitis and developing fibrosis. Conclusions: The long survival allowed the assessment of lung complication data in thymoma patients for both acute and late response. Mean dose in lung strongly correlated with lung complications that manifest clinically. The determination of the dose-volume dependence is affected by the choice of endpoints (i.e. whether complications are scored based on clinical symptoms or radiographic

  14. Emphysema. Imaging for endoscopic lung volume reduction; Lungenemphysem. Bildgebung bei endoskopischer Lungenvolumenreduktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storbeck, B. [LungenClinic Grosshansdorf (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Schroeder, T.H. [Amalie Sieveking-Hospital, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Oldigs, M.; Rabe, K.F. [LungenClinic Grosshansdorf (Germany). Dept. of Pulmonology; Weber, C. [Amalie Sieveking-Hospital, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2015-07-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by two entities, the more airway-predominant type (''bronchitis'') on the one hand, and emphysema-predominant type on the other. Imaging via high-resolution computed tomography plays an important role in phenotyping COPD. For patients with advanced lung emphysema, new endoscopic lung volume reduction therapies (ELVR) have been developed. Proper selection of suitable patients requires thin-section reconstruction of volumetric CT image data sets also in coronal and sagittal orientation are required. In the current manuscript we will describe emphysema subtypes (centrilobular, paraseptal, panlobular), options for quantifying emphysema and this importance of regional distribution (homogeneous or heterogeneous, target area) as this is crucial for patient selection. Analysis of the interlobular fissures is obligatory despite the lack of standardization, as incomplete fissures indicate collateral ventilation (CV) via parenchymal bridges, which is an important criterion in choosing endoscopic methods of LVR. Every radiologist should be familiar with modern LVR therapies such as valves and coils, and furthermore should know what a lung doctor expects from radiologic evaluation (before and after ELVR). Finally we present a checklist as a quick reference for all steps concerning imaging for ELVR.

  15. Relationship of end-expiratory pressure, lung volume, and /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA clearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, J.A.; van der Zee, H.; Line, B.R.; Malik, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    We investigated the dose-response effect of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and increased lung volume on the pulmonary clearance rate of aerosolized technetium-99m-labeled diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (99mTc-DTPA). Clearance of lung radioactivity was expressed as percent decrease per minute. Base-line clearance was measured while anesthetized sheep (n = 20) were ventilated with 0 cmH 2 O end-expiratory pressure. Clearance was remeasured during ventilation at 2.5, 5, 10, 15, or 20 cmH 2 O PEEP. Further studies showed stepwise increases in functional residual capacity (FRC) (P less than 0.05) measured at 0, 2.5, 5, 10, 15, and 20 cmH 2 O PEEP. At 2.5 cmH 2 O PEEP, the clearance rate was not different from that at base line (P less than 0.05), although FRC was increased from base line. Clearance rate increased progressively with increasing PEEP at 5, 10, and 15 cmH 2 O (P less than 0.05). Between 15 and 20 cmH 2 O PEEP, clearance rate was again unchanged, despite an increase in FRC. The pulmonary clearance of aerosolized /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA shows a sigmoidal response to increasing FRC and PEEP, having both threshold and maximal effects. This relationship is most consistent with the hypothesis that alveolar epithelial permeability is increased by lung inflation

  16. [VENT: International study of bronchoscopic lung volume reduction as a palliative treatment for emphysema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, S; Marquette, C H

    2004-12-01

    Therapeutic options for patients with severe emphysema remain limited. In selected patients, lung volume reduction surgery has been shown to improve pulmonary function, exercise capacity, quality of life and also survival. The technique of inserting one-way valves endoscopically into the airways supplying the most affected areas of lung provides the possibility of achieving similar results to surgery (i.e. volume reduction) in a less invasive way, which is also reversible, since the valves can be removed at any time. This technique has been shown to be safe. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of this technique compared to optimal medical therapy in patients with heterogeneous emphysema defined according to radiological criteria. A prospective, international, multicentre (20 centres) randomised trial is underway to establish the efficacy and safety of endobronchial valve placement in this patient group. This study will enrol 270 patients and be analysed on an intention to treat basis. Patients are randomised either to valve insertion or optimal medical treatment alone in a ratio of 2 to 1. Follow up will be ensured for at least one year. The two principal outcome measures will be improvement at six months in FEV1 and in six minute walk distance. The safety of the technique will be evaluated over the same period. Details of the study are available online for patients and their physicians at www.euroemphysema.com.

  17. Effect of end-expiratory lung volume on upper airway collapsibility in sleeping men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squier, Samuel B; Patil, Susheel P; Schneider, Hartmut; Kirkness, Jason P; Smith, Philip L; Schwartz, Alan R

    2010-10-01

    The relationship between changes in absolute end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) and collapsibility has not been rigorously quantified. We hypothesized that pharyngeal collapsibility varies inversely with absolute lung volume in sleeping humans during 1) conventional and 2) isovolume measurements of passive critical pressure (Pcrit). Eighteen healthy subjects (11 male, 7 female) slept in a negative pressure ventilator for measurements of pharyngeal collapsibility (Pcrit) during non-rapid eye movement sleep. EELV was 1) allowed to vary with changes in nasal pressure for conventional Pcrit measurements and 2) controlled by maintaining a fixed pressure difference across the respiratory system (P(RS)) from the nose to the body surface for isovolume Pcrit measurements at elevated EELV (P(RS) = +10 cmH(2)O), reduced EELV (P(RS) = -5 cmH(2)O), and functional residual capacity (FRC; P(RS) = 0 cmH(2)O). In each condition, the absolute EELV was determined and the corresponding Pcrit was derived from upper airway pressure-flow relationships. In the entire group, Pcrit varied inversely with EELV (P cmH(2)O/l (P cmH(2)O exhibited greater reductions in EELV and correspondingly greater decreases in the FRC isovolume compared with the conventional Pcrit (P cmH(2)O/l (P cmH(2)O, P < 0.05), implying that the men had larger lungs and more collapsible airways than the women. The ΔPcrit/ΔEELV response was independent of sex, conventional Pcrit, body mass index, and neck, waist, and hip circumferences. We conclude that Pcrit varies inversely with absolute EELV, which may lead to 1) an underestimation of the magnitude of quantitative differences in Pcrit across the spectrum from health (negative Pcrit) to disease (positive Pcrit) and 2) increases in sleep apnea susceptibility in obesity.

  18. Definition of gross tumor volume in lung cancer: inter-observer variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van de Steene, Jan; Linthout, Nadine; Mey, Johan de; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Claassens, Cornelia; Noppen, Marc; Bel, Arjan; Storme, Guy

    2002-01-01

    Background and purpose: To determine the inter-observer variation in gross tumor volume (GTV) definition in lung cancer, and its clinical relevance. Material and methods: Five clinicians involved in lung cancer were asked to define GTV on the planning CT scan of eight patients. Resulting GTVs were compared on the base of geometric volume, dimensions and extensions. Judgement of invasion of lymph node (LN) regions was evaluated using the ATS/LCSG classification of LN. Clinical relevance of the variation was studied through 3D-dosimetry of standard conformal plans: volume of critical organs (heart, lungs, esophagus, spinal cord) irradiated at toxic doses, 95% isodose volumes of GTVs, normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) and tumor control probabilities (TCP) were compared for evaluation of observer variability. Results: Before evaluation of observer variability, critical review of planning CT scan led to up- (two cases) and downstaging (one case) of patients as compared to the respective diagnostic scans. The defined GTVs showed an inter-observer variation with a ratio up to more than 7 between maximum and minimum geometric content. The dimensions of the primary tumor had inter-observer ranges of 4.2 (transversal), 7.9 (cranio-caudal) and 5.4 (antero-posterior) cm. Extreme extensions of the GTVs (left, right, cranial, caudal, anterior and posterior) varied with ranges of 2.8-7.3 cm due to inter-observer variation. After common review, only 63% of involved lymph node regions were delineated by the clinicians (i.e. 37% are false negative). Twenty-two percent of drawn in lymph node regions were accepted to be false positive after review. In the conformal plans, inter-observer ranges of irradiated normal tissue volume were on average 12%, with a maximum of 66%. The probability (in the population of all conformal plans) of irradiating at least 95% of the GTV with at least 95% of the nominal treatment dose decreased from 96 to 88% when swapping the matched GTV

  19. Design of the Endobronchial Valve for Emphysema Palliation Trial (VENT): a non-surgical method of lung volume reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Strange, Charlie; Herth, Felix JF; Kovitz, Kevin L; McLennan, Geoffrey; Ernst, Armin; Goldin, Jonathan; Noppen, Marc; Criner, Gerard J; Sciurba, Frank C

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Lung volume reduction surgery is effective at improving lung function, quality of life, and mortality in carefully selected individuals with advanced emphysema. Recently, less invasive bronchoscopic approaches have been designed to utilize these principles while avoiding the associated perioperative risks. The Endobronchial Valve for Emphysema PalliatioN Trial (VENT) posits that occlusion of a single pulmonary lobe through bronchoscopically placed Zephyr® endobronchial val...

  20. SU-G-BRA-04: Simulation of Errors in Maximal Intensity Projection (MIP)-Based Lung Tumor Internal Target Volumes (ITV) Using Real-Time 2D MRI and Deformable Image Registration Based Lung Tumor Tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, D; Kishan, A; Santhanam, A; Min, Y; O’Connell, D; Lamb, J; Cao, M; Agazaryan, N; Yang, Y; Lee, P; Low, D [University of California, Los Angeles, Ca (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of inter- and intra-fractional tumor motion on the error in four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) maximal intensity projection (MIP)–based lung tumor internal target volumes (ITV), using deformable image registration of real-time 2D-sagital cine-mode MRI acquired during lung SBRT treatments. Methods: Five lung tumor patients underwent free breathing SBRT treatment on the ViewRay, with dose prescribed to PTV (4DCT MIP-based ITV+3–6mm margin). Sagittal slice cine-MR images (3.5×3.5mm pixels) were acquired through the center of the tumor at 4 frames per second throughout the treatments (3–4 fractions of 21–32 minutes duration). Tumor GTVs were contoured on the first frame of the cine and tracked throughout the treatment using off-line optical-flow based deformable registration implemented on a GPU cluster. Pseudo-4DCT MIP-based ITVs were generated from MIPs of the deformed GTV contours limited to short segments of image data. All possible pseudo-4DCT MIP-based ITV volumes were generated with 1s resolution and compared to the ITV volume of the entire treatment course. Varying pseudo-4DCT durations from 10-50s were analyzed. Results: Tumors were covered in their entirety by PTV in the patients analysed here. However, pseudo-4DCT based ITV volumes were observed that were as small as 29% of the entire treatment-ITV, depending on breathing irregularity and the duration of pseudo-4DCT. With an increase in duration of pseudo-4DCT from 10–50s the minimum volume acquired from 95% of all pseudo-4DCTs increased from 62%–81% of the treatment ITV. Conclusion: A 4DCT MIP-based ITV offers a ‘snap-shot’ of breathing motion for the brief period of time the tumor is imaged on a specific day. Real time MRI over prolonged periods of time and over multiple treatment fractions shows that the accuracy of this snap-shot varies according to inter- and intra-fractional tumor motion. Further work is required to investigate the dosimetric

  1. Lung Density Changes With Growth and Inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Gregory; Drummond, M. Bradley; Mitzner, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With body growth from childhood, the lungs can enlarge by either increasing the volume of air in the periphery (as would occur with inspiration) or by increasing the number of peripheral acinar units. In the former case, the lung tissue density would decrease with inflation, whereas in the latter case, the lung density would be relatively constant as the lung grows. To address this fundamental structural issue, we measured the CT scan density in human subjects of widely varying size at two different lung volumes. METHODS: Five hundred one subjects were enrolled in the study. They underwent a chest CT scan at full inspiration and another scan at end expiration. Spirometry, body plethysmography, and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide were also measured. RESULTS: There was a strong correlation between the size of the lungs measured at full inspiration on CT scan and the mean lung density (r = −0.72, P = .001). People with larger lungs had significantly lower mean lung density. These density changes among different subjects overlapped the density changes within subjects at different lung volumes. CONCLUSIONS: Lung structure in subjects with larger lungs is different from that in subjects with smaller lungs. Tissue volume does not increase in proportion to lung size, as would be required if larger lungs just had more alveoli. These observations suggest that the growth of the lung into adulthood is not accompanied by new alveoli, but rather by enlargement of existing structures. The presence of greater air spaces in larger lungs could impact the occurrence and pathogenesis of spontaneous pneumothorax or COPD. PMID:25996948

  2. Lung density changes with growth and inflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, H Brown; Robert, A Wise; Kirk, Gregory; Drummond, M Bradley; Mitzner, Wayne

    2015-10-01

    With body growth from childhood, the lungs can enlarge by either increasing the volume of air in the periphery (as would occur with inspiration) or by increasing the number of peripheral acinar units. In the former case, the lung tissue density would decrease with inflation, whereas in the latter case, the lung density would be relatively constant as the lung grows. To address this fundamental structural issue, we measured the CT scan density in human subjects of widely varying size at two different lung volumes. Five hundred one subjects were enrolled in the study. They underwent a chest CT scan at full inspiration and another scan at end expiration. Spirometry, body plethysmography, and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide were also measured. There was a strong correlation between the size of the lungs measured at full inspiration on CT scan and the mean lung density (r = -0.72, P = .001). People with larger lungs had significantly lower mean lung density. These density changes among different subjects overlapped the density changes within subjects at different lung volumes. Lung structure in subjects with larger lungs is different from that in subjects with smaller lungs. Tissue volume does not increase in proportion to lung size, as would be required if larger lungs just had more alveoli. These observations suggest that the growth of the lung into adulthood is not accompanied by new alveoli, but rather by enlargement of existing structures. The presence of greater air spaces in larger lungs could impact the occurrence and pathogenesis of spontaneous pneumothorax or COPD.

  3. Effects of breath holding at low and high lung volumes on amount of exhaled particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, Helene; Gerth, Emilie; Ljungström, Evert; Larsson, Per; Almstrand, Ann-Charlotte; Bake, Björn; Olin, Anna-Carin

    2013-01-15

    Exhaled breath contains particles originating from the respiratory tract lining fluid. The particles are thought to be generated during inhalation, by reopening of airways closed in the preceding expiration. The aim here was to explore processes that control exhaled particle concentrations. The results show that 5 and 10s breath holding at residual volume increased the median concentration of particles in exhaled air by 63% and 110%, respectively, averaged over 10 subjects. An increasing number of closed airways, developing on a timescale of seconds explains this behaviour. Breath holds of 5, 10 and 20s at total lung capacity decreased the concentration to 63%, 45% and 28% respectively, of the directly exhaled concentration. The decrease in particle concentration after breath holding at total lung capacity is caused by gravitational settling in the alveoli and associated bronchioles. The geometry employed here when modelling the deposition is however not satisfactory and ways of improving the description are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Accuracy of near-patient vs. inbuilt spirometry for monitoring tidal volumes in an in-vitro paediatric lung model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenroth, S; Thomas, J; Cannizzaro, V; Weiss, M; Schmidt, A R

    2018-03-01

    Spirometric monitoring provides precise measurement and delivery of tidal volumes within a narrow range, which is essential for lung-protective strategies that aim to reduce morbidity and mortality in mechanically-ventilated patients. Conventional anaesthesia ventilators include inbuilt spirometry to monitor inspiratory and expiratory tidal volumes. The GE Aisys CS 2 anaesthesia ventilator allows additional near-patient spirometry via a sensor interposed between the proximal end of the tracheal tube and the respiratory tubing. Near-patient and inbuilt spirometry of two different GE Aisys CS 2 anaesthesia ventilators were compared in an in-vitro study. Assessments were made of accuracy and variability in inspiratory and expiratory tidal volume measurements during ventilation of six simulated paediatric lung models using the ASL 5000 test lung. A total of 9240 breaths were recorded and analysed. Differences between inspiratory tidal volumes measured with near-patient and inbuilt spirometry were most significant in the newborn setting (p tidal volume measurements with near-patient spirometry were consistently more accurate than with inbuilt spirometry for all lung models (p tidal volumes decreased with increasing tidal volumes, and was smaller with near-patient than with inbuilt spirometry. The variability in measured tidal volumes was higher during expiration, especially with inbuilt spirometry. In conclusion, the present in-vitro study shows that measurements with near-patient spirometry are more accurate and less variable than with inbuilt spirometry. Differences between measurement methods were most significant in the smallest patients. We therefore recommend near-patient spirometry, especially for neonatal and paediatric patients. © 2018 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  5. Beam-specific planning volumes for scattered-proton lung radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flampouri, S.; Hoppe, B. S.; Slopsema, R. L.; Li, Z.

    2014-08-01

    This work describes the clinical implementation of a beam-specific planning treatment volume (bsPTV) calculation for lung cancer proton therapy and its integration into the treatment planning process. Uncertainties incorporated in the calculation of the bsPTV included setup errors, machine delivery variability, breathing effects, inherent proton range uncertainties and combinations of the above. Margins were added for translational and rotational setup errors and breathing motion variability during the course of treatment as well as for their effect on proton range of each treatment field. The effect of breathing motion and deformation on the proton range was calculated from 4D computed tomography data. Range uncertainties were considered taking into account the individual voxel HU uncertainty along each proton beamlet. Beam-specific treatment volumes generated for 12 patients were used: a) as planning targets, b) for routine plan evaluation, c) to aid beam angle selection and d) to create beam-specific margins for organs at risk to insure sparing. The alternative planning technique based on the bsPTVs produced similar target coverage as the conventional proton plans while better sparing the surrounding tissues. Conventional proton plans were evaluated by comparing the dose distributions per beam with the corresponding bsPTV. The bsPTV volume as a function of beam angle revealed some unexpected sources of uncertainty and could help the planner choose more robust beams. Beam-specific planning volume for the spinal cord was used for dose distribution shaping to ensure organ sparing laterally and distally to the beam.

  6. Low tidal volume ventilation ameliorates left ventricular dysfunction in mechanically ventilated rats following LPS-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherpanath, Thomas G V; Smeding, Lonneke; Hirsch, Alexander; Lagrand, Wim K; Schultz, Marcus J; Groeneveld, A B Johan

    2015-10-07

    High tidal volume ventilation has shown to cause ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), possibly contributing to concomitant extrapulmonary organ dysfunction. The present study examined whether left ventricular (LV) function is dependent on tidal volume size and whether this effect is augmented during lipopolysaccharide(LPS)-induced lung injury. Twenty male Wistar rats were sedated, paralyzed and then randomized in four groups receiving mechanical ventilation with tidal volumes of 6 ml/kg or 19 ml/kg with or without intrapulmonary administration of LPS. A conductance catheter was placed in the left ventricle to generate pressure-volume loops, which were also obtained within a few seconds of vena cava occlusion to obtain relatively load-independent LV systolic and diastolic function parameters. The end-systolic elastance / effective arterial elastance (Ees/Ea) ratio was used as the primary parameter of LV systolic function with the end-diastolic elastance (Eed) as primary LV diastolic function. Ees/Ea decreased over time in rats receiving LPS (p = 0.045) and high tidal volume ventilation (p = 0.007), with a lower Ees/Ea in the rats with high tidal volume ventilation plus LPS compared to the other groups (p tidal volume ventilation without LPS (p = 0.223). A significant interaction (p tidal ventilation and LPS for Ees/Ea and Eed, and all rats receiving high tidal volume ventilation plus LPS died before the end of the experiment. Low tidal volume ventilation ameliorated LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction while preventing death following LPS-induced lung injury in mechanically ventilated rats. Our data advocates the use of low tidal volumes, not only to avoid VILI, but to avert ventilator-induced myocardial dysfunction as well.

  7. Lung volume quantified by MRI reflects extracellular-matrix deposition and altered pulmonary function in bleomycin models of fibrosis: effects of SOM230.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, Christine; Gérard, Christelle; Vidotto, Nella; Accart, Nathalie; Cannet, Catherine; Dunbar, Andrew; Tigani, Bruno; Piaia, Alessandro; Jarai, Gabor; Jarman, Elizabeth; Schmid, Herbert A; Beckmann, Nicolau

    2014-06-15

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive and lethal disease, characterized by loss of lung elasticity and alveolar surface area, secondary to alveolar epithelial cell injury, reactive inflammation, proliferation of fibroblasts, and deposition of extracellular matrix. The effects of oropharyngeal aspiration of bleomycin in Sprague-Dawley rats and C57BL/6 mice, as well as of intratracheal administration of ovalbumin to actively sensitized Brown Norway rats on total lung volume as assessed noninvasively by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were investigated here. Lung injury and volume were quantified by using nongated or respiratory-gated MRI acquisitions [ultrashort echo time (UTE) or gradient-echo techniques]. Lung function of bleomycin-challenged rats was examined additionally using a flexiVent system. Postmortem analyses included histology of collagen and hydroxyproline assays. Bleomycin induced an increase of MRI-assessed total lung volume, lung dry and wet weights, and hydroxyproline content as well as collagen amount. In bleomycin-treated rats, gated MRI showed an increased volume of the lung in the inspiratory and expiratory phases of the respiratory cycle and a temporary decrease of tidal volume. Decreased dynamic lung compliance was found in bleomycin-challenged rats. Bleomycin-induced increase of MRI-detected lung volume was consistent with tissue deposition during fibrotic processes resulting in decreased lung elasticity, whereas influences by edema or emphysema could be excluded. In ovalbumin-challenged rats, total lung volume quantified by MRI remained unchanged. The somatostatin analog, SOM230, was shown to have therapeutic effects on established bleomycin-induced fibrosis in rats. This work suggests MRI-detected total lung volume as readout for tissue-deposition in small rodent bleomycin models of pulmonary fibrosis. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  8. The effect of prolonged lateral positioning during routine care on regional lung volume changes in preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Burg, Pauline S.; de Jongh, Frans H.; Miedema, Martijn; Frerichs, Inez; van Kaam, Anton H.

    2016-01-01

    During routine nursing care, preterm infants are often placed in lateral position for several hours, but the effect of this procedure on regional lung volume and ventilation is unknown. In our study we examined this effect during 3 hrs of lateral positioning in stable preterm infants. Preterm

  9. The effect of prolonged lateral positioning during routine care on regional lung volume changes in preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Burg, P.S.; de Jongh, Franciscus H.C.; Miedema, M.; Frerichs, I.; van Kaam, A.H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction During routine nursing care, preterm infants are often placed in lateral position for several hours, but the effect of this­­­­ procedure on regional lung volume and ventilation is unknown. In our study we examined this effect during 3 hrs of lateral positioning in stable preterm

  10. Interventional pulmonology for asthma and emphysema: bronchial thermoplasty and bronchoscopic lung volume reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Russell J; Murgu, Septimiu D

    2014-12-01

    Emphysema and asthma are responsible for economic and social burden. Altering the natural course of these diseases is a field of intense research. The National Emphysema Treatment Trial showed that lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) could significantly reduce both morbidity and mortality in properly selected patients. LVRS is seldom performed, however, due to the high morbidity associated with the surgery. Numerous bronchoscopic interventions have been introduced with the goal of providing the clinical benefits of LVRS without the surgical complications. Thus far, these modalities have not produced the results once hoped. However, through active modification of both technique and patient selection, the role of minimally invasive modalities in the treatment of emphysema continues to evolve. Bronchial thermoplasty (BT) is a method of delivering controlled heat to airway mucosa with the goal of reducing airway smooth muscle mass and hence bronchoconstriction. In patients suffering from asthma who cannot achieve control with standard medical care, BT has been shown to be safe and improves symptoms, with long lasting benefit. BT does not seem to affect traditional markers of asthma severity such as forced expiratory volume in 1 second and questions remain regarding proper patient selection for this therapy and its true physiologic effects. This article is a review of bronchoscopic modalities for emphysema and asthma. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  11. The effect of prolonged lateral positioning during routine care on regional lung volume changes in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Burg, Pauline S; de Jongh, Frans H; Miedema, Martijn; Frerichs, Inez; van Kaam, Anton H

    2016-03-01

    During routine nursing care, preterm infants are often placed in lateral position for several hours, but the effect of this procedure on regional lung volume and ventilation is unknown. In our study we examined this effect during 3 hrs of lateral positioning in stable preterm infants. Preterm infants on non-invasive respiratory support were eligible for the study. Infants were placed in supine position and subsequently transferred to right or left lateral position, according to their individual routine nursing schedule. Changes in end-expiratory lung volume (EELV), tidal volume (VT ) and ventilation distribution were recorded using electrical impedance tomography (EIT), starting 10 min before and up to 180 min after the positional change. Additionally, oxygen requirement, transcutaneous oxygen saturation and respiratory rate were recorded. 15 infants were included (GA 28.9 ± 2.0 wk, BW 1167 ± 290 g). EELV increased significantly after changing to lateral position, stabilizing at a median value of 40.8 (IQR 29.0-99.3) AU/kg at 30 min. This increase could almost be exclusively attributed to the non-dependent lung regions. Tidal volume, oxygenation, and respiratory rate remained stable. Changing to the right, but not the left, lateral position resulted in a rapid but transient shift in ventilation to the dependent lung regions. After 180 min there were no differences in ventilation distribution between lateral and supine positioning. This study shows that lateral position up to 3 hours, as part of normal nursing care of preterm infants, has no adverse effects on lung volumes and its regional distribution. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Utilizing Forced Vital Capacity to Predict Low Lung Compliance and Select Intraoperative Tidal Volume During Thoracic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoftman, Nir; Eikermann, Eric; Shin, John; Buckley, Jack; Navab, Kaveh; Abtin, Fereidoun; Grogan, Tristan; Cannesson, Maxime; Mahajan, Aman

    2017-12-01

    Tidal volume selection during mechanical ventilation utilizes dogmatic formulas that only consider a patient's predicted body weight (PBW). In this study, we investigate whether forced vital capacity (FVC) (1) correlates better to total lung capacity (TLC) than PBW, (2) predicts low pulmonary compliance, and (3) provides an alternative method for tidal volume selection. One hundred thirty thoracic surgery patients had their preoperative TLC calculated via 2 methods: (1) pulmonary function test (PFT; TLCPFT) and (2) computed tomography 3D reconstruction (TLCCT). We compared the correlation between TLC and PBW with the correlation between TLC and FVC to determine which was stronger. Dynamic pulmonary compliance was then calculated from intraoperative ventilator data and logistic regression models constructed to determine which clinical measure best predicted low compliance. Ratios of tidal volume/FVC plotted against peak inspiratory pressure were utilized to construct a new model for tidal volume selection. Calculated tidal volumes generated by this model were then compared with those generated by the standard lung-protective formula Vt = 7 cc/kg. The correlation between FVC and TLC (0.82 for TLCPFT and 0.76 for TLCCT) was stronger than the correlation between PBW and TLC (0.65 for TLCPFT and 0.58 for TLCCT). Patients with very low compliance had significantly smaller lung volumes (forced expiratory volume at 1 second, FVC, TLC) and lower diffusion capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide when compared with patients with normal compliance. An FVC cutoff of 3470 cc was 100% sensitive and 51% specific for predicting low compliance. The proposed equation Vt = FVC/8 significantly reduced calculated tidal volume by a mean of 22.5% in patients with low pulmonary compliance without affecting the mean tidal volume in patients with normal compliance (mean difference 0.9%). FVC is more strongly correlated to TLC than PBW and a cutoff of about 3.5 L can be utilized to predict

  13. A Gaussian mixture model for definition of lung tumor volumes in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aristophanous, Michalis; Penney, Bill C.; Martel, Mary K.; Pelizzari, Charles A.

    2007-01-01

    The increased interest in 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in radiation treatment planning in the past five years necessitated the independent and accurate segmentation of gross tumor volume (GTV) from FDG-PET scans. In some studies the radiation oncologist contours the GTV based on a computed tomography scan, while incorporating pertinent data from the PET images. Alternatively, a simple threshold, typically 40% of the maximum intensity, has been employed to differentiate tumor from normal tissue, while other researchers have developed algorithms to aid the PET based GTV definition. None of these methods, however, results in reliable PET tumor segmentation that can be used for more sophisticated treatment plans. For this reason, we developed a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) based segmentation technique on selected PET tumor regions from non-small cell lung cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using a GMM-based tumor volume definition in a robust, reliable and reproducible way. A GMM relies on the idea that any distribution, in our case a distribution of image intensities, can be expressed as a mixture of Gaussian densities representing different classes. According to our implementation, each class belongs to one of three regions in the image; the background (B), the uncertain (U) and the target (T), and from these regions we can obtain the tumor volume. User interaction in the implementation is required, but is limited to the initialization of the model parameters and the selection of an ''analysis region'' to which the modeling is restricted. The segmentation was developed on three and tested on another four clinical cases to ensure robustness against differences observed in the clinic. It also compared favorably with thresholding at 40% of the maximum intensity and a threshold determination function based on tumor to background image intensities proposed in a recent paper. The parts of the

  14. Maximum-Intensity Volumes for Fast Contouring of Lung Tumors Including Respiratory Motion in 4DCT Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rietzel, Eike; Liu, Arthur K.; Chen, George T.Y.; Choi, Noah C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of maximum-intensity volumes (MIV) for fast contouring of lung tumors including respiratory motion. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) data of 10 patients were acquired. Maximum-intensity volumes were constructed by assigning the maximum Hounsfield unit in all CT volumes per geometric voxel to a new, synthetic volume. Gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were contoured on all CT volumes, and their union was constructed. The GTV with all its respiratory motion was contoured on the MIV as well. Union GTVs and GTVs including motion were compared visually. Furthermore, planning target volumes (PTVs) were constructed for the union of GTVs and the GTV on MIV. These PTVs were compared by centroid position, volume, geometric extent, and surface distance. Results: Visual comparison of GTVs demonstrated failure of the MIV technique for 5 of 10 patients. For adequate GTV MIV s, differences between PTVs were <1.0 mm in centroid position, 5% in volume, ±5 mm in geometric extent, and ±0.5 ± 2.0 mm in surface distance. These values represent the uncertainties for successful MIV contouring. Conclusion: Maximum-intensity volumes are a good first estimate for target volume definition including respiratory motion. However, it seems mandatory to validate each individual MIV by overlaying it on a movie loop displaying the 4DCT data and editing it for possible inadequate coverage of GTVs on additional 4DCT motion states

  15. An evaluation of the feasibility of assessment of volume perfusion for the whole lung by 128-slice spiral CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Haitao [Imaging Center of Taian Central Hospital, Taian, Shandong (China); Gao, Fei; Li, Ning; Liu, Cheng [Shandong Univ., Shandong Medical Imaging Research Inst., CT Room, Shandong (China)], e-mail: liucheng491025@sina.com

    2013-10-15

    Background: Lung perfusion based on dynamic scanning cannot provide a quantitative assessment of the whole lung because of the limited coverage of the current computed tomography (CT) detector designs. Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of dynamic volume perfusion CT (VPCT) of the whole lung using a 128-slice CT for the quantitative assessment and visualization of pulmonary perfusion. Material and Methods: Imaging was performed in a control group of 17 subjects who had no signs of disturbance of pulmonary function or diffuse lung disease, and 15 patients (five patients with acute pulmonary embolism and 10 with emphysema) who constituted the abnormal lung group. Dynamic VPCT was performed in all subjects, and pulmonary blood flow (PBF), pulmonary blood volume (PBV), and mean transit time (MTT) were calculated from dynamic contrast images with a coverage of 20.7 cm. Regional and volumetric PBF, PBV, and MTT were statistically evaluated and comparisons were made between the normal and abnormal lung groups. Results: Regional PBF (94.2{+-}36.5, 161.8 {+-}29.6, 185.7 {+-}38.1 and 125.5 {+-}46.1, 161.9 {+-}31.4, 169.3 {+-}51.7), PBV (6.7 {+-}2.8, 10.9 {+-}3.0, 12.9 {+-}4.5 and 9.9 {+-}4.6, 10.3 {+-}2.9, 11.9 {+-}4.5), and MTT (5.8 {+-}2.4, 4.5 {+-}1.3, 4.7 {+-}2.1 and 5.6 {+-}2.3, 4.3 {+-}1.5, 4.9 {+-}1.5) demonstrated significant differences in the gravitational and isogravitational directions in the normal lung group (P < 0.05). The PBF (154.2 {+-}30.6 vs. 94.9 {+-}15.9) and PBV (11.1 {+-}4.0 vs. 6.6 {+-}1.7) by dynamic VPCT showed significant differences between normal and abnormal lungs (P < 0.05), notwithstanding the four large lungs that had coverage > 20.7 cm. Conclusion: Dynamic VPCT of the whole lung is feasible for the quantitative assessment of pulmonary perfusion by 128-slice CT, and may in future permit the evaluation of both morphological and functional features of the whole lung in a single examination.

  16. Ipsilateral lung dose volume parameters predict radiation pneumonitis in addition to classical dose volume parameters in locally advanced NSCLC treated with combined modality therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Agrawal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose was to determine the correlation of clinical factors and lung dose volume parameters with significant radiation pneumonitis (RP in non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with combined modality therapy. Materials and Methods: Between January 2008 and December 2010, 52 patients of non-small cell lung cancer were treated with combined modality therapy with radical intent. Radiation pneumonitis was correlated with ipsilateral (V 20 ipsi, V 5 ipsi and MLD ipsi and whole lung (V 20 , V 5 , and MLD dose volume parameters. Clinical factors like pulmonary function tests (PFT, site of tumor, planning target volume, and type of treatment were also correlated with incidence of significant pneumonitis. Results: Out of 52 patients, 35.3% developed grade 2 or more pneumonitis. On univariate analysis, factors significantly correlating with radiation pneumonitis were V 5 (P = 0.002, V 5 ipsi (P = 0.000, V 20 (P = 0.019, V 20 ipsi (P = 0.004, MLD (P = 0.008 and MLD ipsi (P = 0.008. On multivariate analysis, V 5 ipsi was retained as the most significant factor. Concurrent chemoradiation caused significantly more RP than neoadjuvant chemoradiation (P = 0.004. A cutoff of 65% for V 5 ipsi had a sensitivity of 65% and a specificity of 91%. Conclusion: The correlation between pneumonitis and dosimetric constraints has been validated. Adding ipsilateral V 20 , V 5 , and MLD to the classical total lung constraints identifies patients likely to develop pulmonary toxicity in patients undergoing chemoradiation.

  17. Tidal Volume Single Breath Washout of Two Tracer Gases - A Practical and Promising Lung Function Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Florian; Stern, Georgette; Thamrin, Cindy; Fuchs, Oliver; Riedel, Thomas; Gustafsson, Per; Frey, Urs; Latzin, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    Background Small airway disease frequently occurs in chronic lung diseases and may cause ventilation inhomogeneity (VI), which can be assessed by washout tests of inert tracer gas. Using two tracer gases with unequal molar mass (MM) and diffusivity increases specificity for VI in different lung zones. Currently washout tests are underutilised due to the time and effort required for measurements. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a simple technique for a new tidal single breath washout test (SBW) of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and helium (He) using an ultrasonic flowmeter (USFM). Methods The tracer gas mixture contained 5% SF6 and 26.3% He, had similar total MM as air, and was applied for a single tidal breath in 13 healthy adults. The USFM measured MM, which was then plotted against expired volume. USFM and mass spectrometer signals were compared in six subjects performing three SBW. Repeatability and reproducibility of SBW, i.e., area under the MM curve (AUC), were determined in seven subjects performing three SBW 24 hours apart. Results USFM reliably measured MM during all SBW tests (n = 60). MM from USFM reflected SF6 and He washout patterns measured by mass spectrometer. USFM signals were highly associated with mass spectrometer signals, e.g., for MM, linear regression r-squared was 0.98. Intra-subject coefficient of variation of AUC was 6.8%, and coefficient of repeatability was 11.8%. Conclusion The USFM accurately measured relative changes in SF6 and He washout. SBW tests were repeatable and reproducible in healthy adults. We have developed a fast, reliable, and straightforward USFM based SBW method, which provides valid information on SF6 and He washout patterns during tidal breathing. PMID:21423739

  18. Changes in lung volume and ventilation following transition from invasive to noninvasive respiratory support and prone positioning in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Burg, Pauline S; Miedema, Martijn; de Jongh, Frans H; Frerichs, Inez; van Kaam, Anton H

    2015-03-01

    To minimize secondary lung injury, ventilated preterm infants are extubated as soon as possible. To maximize extubation success, they are often placed in prone position. The effect of extubation and subsequent prone positioning on lung volumes is currently unknown. Changes in end-expiratory lung volume (ΔEELV), tidal volume (VT), and ventilation distribution were monitored during transition from endotracheal to nasal continuous positive airway pressure and following prone positioning using electrical impedance tomography. In addition, the continuous distending pressure (CDP) and oxygen need (FiO₂) were recorded. Twenty preterm infants (GA 28.7 ± 1.7 wk) were included. Following extubation, the CDP decreased from 7.9 ± 0.5 to 6.0 ± 0.2 cmH₂O, while the FiO₂ remained stable. Both ΔEELV and VT increased significantly (P positioning resulted in a further increase in ΔEELV (P positioning increases EELV and shifts tidal ventilation to the ventral lung regions. The latter suggests that infants should preferably be placed in prone position after extubation.

  19. [Bronchoscopic lung volume reduction (BLVR) in advanced pulmonary emphysema: dreams of the future or much ado about nothing?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanzel, F

    2012-01-01

    Bronchoscopic lung volume reduction (BLVR) is a rapidly developing area and at present it is being intensively evaluated and discussed. There is a great interest in developing new treatment modalities that can reduce lung volume and air trapping without the risk of a surgical intervention. The different techniques of BLVR are characterised by lower morbidity and mortality, but by a more limited effect too. The placement of valves leads to blockade of the airway and sometimes to absorption atelectasis. The valves have been most intensively evaluated and are frequently applied. Beside the blocking devices there are partially blocking or deforming devices available as coils that are introduced in heterogeneous emphysema. Irreversible procedures such as polymeric lung volume reduction or thermal vapour ablation are used too. The creation of airway bypasses to allow trapped air to escape is mainly employed in homogenous emphysema. Following such by-pass creation there is an increase of lung function tests and a reduction of dyspnea, but only for a limited time. The bypass procedure has disappeared from bronchoscopy units completely. We give a review of the recent developments regarding BLVR and the state of the art. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Lung density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garnett, E S; Webber, C E; Coates, G

    1977-01-01

    The density of a defined volume of the human lung can be measured in vivo by a new noninvasive technique. A beam of gamma-rays is directed at the lung and, by measuring the scattered gamma-rays, lung density is calculated. The density in the lower lobe of the right lung in normal man during quiet...

  1. Microbiological airway colonization in COPD patients with severe emphysema undergoing endoscopic lung volume reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trudzinski FC

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Franziska C Trudzinski,1 Frederik Seiler,1 Heinrike Wilkens,1 Carlos Metz,1 Annegret Kamp,1 Robert Bals,1 Barbara Gärtner,2 Philipp M Lepper,1 Sören L Becker2–4 1Department of Internal Medicine V – Pneumology, Allergology and Critical Care Medicine, ECLS Center Saar, University Medical Center Saarland and Saarland University, 2Institute of Medical Microbiology and Hygiene, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar, Germany; 3Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, 4University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland Background: Endoscopic lung volume reduction (eLVR is a therapeutic option for selected patients with COPD and severe emphysema. Infectious exacerbations are serious events in these vulnerable patients; hence, prophylactic antibiotics are often prescribed postinterventionally. However, data on the microbiological airway colonization at the time of eLVR are scarce, and there are no evidence-based recommendations regarding a rational antibiotic regimen.Objective: The aim of this study was to perform a clinical and microbiological analysis of COPD patients with advanced emphysema undergoing eLVR with endobronchial valves at a single German University hospital, 2012–2017.Patients and methods: Bronchial aspirates were obtained prior to eLVR and sent for microbiological analysis. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bacterial isolates was performed, and pathogen colonization was retrospectively compared with clinical parameters.Results: At least one potential pathogen was found in 47% (30/64 of patients. Overall, Gram-negative bacteria constituted the most frequently detected pathogens. The single most prevalent species were Haemophilus influenzae (9%, Streptococcus pneumoniae (6%, and Staphylococcus aureus (6%. No multidrug resistance was observed, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurred in <5% of samples. Patients without microbiological airway colonization showed more severe airflow limitation, hyperinflation, and chronic hypercapnia compared

  2. The safety of dipyridamole in patients undergoing myocardial perfusion scintigraphy prior to lung volume reduction surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, M.R.; Angelides, S.; Parker, M.K.; Silva, I. da; Freeman, A.P.

    2001-01-01

    Patients with end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) undergoing lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) are at high risk of peri-operative cardiac complications, and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) is commonly used for risk stratification. This study prospectively assessed the safety of dipyridamole in these patients and compared the incidence of side-effects (particularly dyspnoea) with that in patients undergoing dipyridamole MPS prior to elective non-cardiothoracic surgery. Fifty patients were enrolled: 25 in the LVRS cohort (13 males, 12 females), with a mean age of 65 years and a mean FEV 1 of 0.79 l, and 25 (with no history of asthma or COPD) in the control cohort (14 males, 11 females), with a mean age of 66 years. Fourteen patients (56%) in each group developed side-effects. Dyspnoea was reported by five patients (20%) in the LVRS and two patients (8%) in the control cohort (P=NS). One patient in each cohort developed severe hypotension and bradycardia. Eight (32%) other patients developed minor side-effects in the LVRS cohort compared with 11 (44%) in the control group. All side-effects responded promptly to intravenous aminophylline. In summary, there was a statistically non-significant increase in the incidence of dyspnoea in patients with end-stage COPD and all side-effects responded to aminophylline. Thus, dipyridamole can be used safely in these patients. (orig.)

  3. Tidal volume lower than 6 ml/kg enhances lung protection: role of extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terragni, Pier Paolo; Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Mascia, Luciana; Urbino, Rosario; Martin, Erica L; Birocco, Alberto; Faggiano, Chiara; Quintel, Michael; Gattinoni, Luciano; Ranieri, V Marco

    2009-10-01

    Tidal hyperinflation may occur in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome who are ventilated with a tidal volume (VT) of 6 ml/kg of predicted body weight develop a plateau pressure (PPLAT) of 28 carbon dioxide removal. PPLAT, lung morphology computed tomography, and pulmonary inflammatory cytokines (bronchoalveolar lavage) were assessed in 32 patients ventilated with a VT of 6 ml/kg. Data are provided as mean +/- SD or median and interquartile (25th and 75th percentile) range. In patients with 28 carbon dioxide removal. Lung function, morphology, and pulmonary inflammatory cytokines were also assessed after 72 h. Extracorporeal assist normalized Paco2 (50.4 +/- 8.2 mmHg) and pH (7.32 +/- 0.03) and allowed use of VT lower than 6 ml/kg for 144 (84-168) h. The improvement of morphological markers of lung protection and the reduction of pulmonary cytokines concentration (P carbon dioxide removal.

  4. Do the number and volume of surgical lung biopsies influence the diagnostic yield in interstitial lung disease? A propensity score analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fibla, Juan J; Brunelli, Alessandro; Allen, Mark S; Wigle, Dennis; Shen, Robert; Nichols, Francis; Deschamps, Claude; Cassivi, Stephen D

    2015-02-01

    Our objective was to evaluate whether the number and volume of surgical lung biopsies (SLB) influence the diagnosis of diffuse interstitial lung disease (ILD). Retrospective study of SLB for suspected ILD in patients from the Mayo Clinic from January 2002 to January 2010. Data were collected in the institution and analyzed. 311 patients were studied. Mean number of biopsies was 2.05 (SD 0.6); 1 biopsy in 50 (16%), 2 in 198 (63.7%), 3 in 59 (19%) and 4 in 4 (1.3%). Histopathologic diagnosis was: definitive (specific): 232 (74.6%), descriptive (non-specific): 76 (24.4%), no diagnosis: 3 (1%). After excluding patients without diagnosis (n=3), there were 50 patients with only 1 biopsy, 196 with 2 and 62 with 3 or 4; the definitive diagnostic yield was similar in all 3 groups (37/50; 74%, 150/196; 77%, and 45/62; 73%) (Chi-square, p value 0.8). The propensity score analysis between patients with 1 SLB and patients with more than 1 SLB also showed no difference in diagnostic yield. Regarding the volume of biopsies, mean total volume was 34.4 cm(3) (SD 46): 41.2 cm(3) (3 cases) in patients with no diagnosis; 33.6 cm(3) (232 cases, SD 47) in patients with specific diagnosis; and 36.6 cm(3) (76 cases, SD 44) in patients with descriptive diagnosis. Biopsy volume had no influence on histopathology yield (ANOVA, p value .8). The number and volume of the biopsy specimens in SLB did not seem to influence diagnosis. Based on our results, we believe a single sample from a representative area may be sufficient for diagnosis. Randomized prospective trials should be performed to optimize SLB for ILD. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Correlation between tumor size and blood volume in lung tumors. A prospective study on dual-energy gemstone spectral CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Takai, Yoshihiro; Narita, Yuichiro

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between tumor size and blood volume for patients with lung tumors, using dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) and a gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) viewer. During the period from March 2011 to March 2013, 50 patients with 57 medically inoperable lung tumors underwent DECT before stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of 50-60 Gy in 5-6 fractions. DECT was taken for pretreatment evaluation. The region-of-interest for a given spatial placement of the tumors was set, and averages for CT value, water density and iodine density were compared with tumor size. The average values for iodine density in tumors of ≤ 2 cm, 2-3 cm, and > 3 cm maximum diameter were 24.7, 19.6 and 16.0 (100 μg/cm 3 ), respectively. The average value of the iodine density was significantly lower in larger tumors. No significant correlation was detected between tumor size and average CT value or between tumor size and average water density. Both the average water density and the average CT value were affected by the amount of air in the tumor, but the average iodine density was not affected by air in the tumor. The average water density and the average CT value were significantly correlated, but the average iodine density and the average CT value showed no significant correlation. The blood volume of tumors can be indicated by the average iodine density more accurately than it can by the average CT value. The average iodine density as assessed by DECT might be a non-invasive and quantitative assessment of the radio-resistance ascribable to the hypoxic cell population in a tumor. (author)

  6. Feasibility of repetitive lung function measurements by raised volume rapid thoracoabdominal compression during methacholine challenge in young infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loland, L.; Bisgaard, H.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of lung function measurements by the raised volume rapid thoracoabdominal compression (RVRTC) technique during bronchial methacholine challenge in young infants. METHOD: Four hundred two healthy infants were tested at 1 month of age...... function by RVRTC during methacholine challenge in young infants in a single center leads us to conclude that the test is feasible and safe to perform in asymptomatic young infants Udgivelsesdato: 2008/1...... with RVRTC during repeated methacholine challenges with quadrupling doses from 0.037 to 16.674 mumol. RESULTS: Measurement of baseline lung function was successful in 99% and the provocative dose (PD) was achieved in 79% of infants by forced expiratory volume in 0.5 s (FEV(0.5)). Additionally, the PD...

  7. The Prognostic Value of Residual Volume/Total Lung Capacity in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Tae Rim; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Park, Joo Hun; Lee, Keu Sung; Oh, Sunghee; Kang, Dae Ryoung; Sheen, Seungsoo; Seo, Joon Beom; Yoo, Kwang Ha; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Lim, Seong Yong; Yoon, Ho Il; Rhee, Chin Kook; Choe, Kang-Hyeon; Lee, Jae Seung; Lee, Sang-Do

    2015-10-01

    The prognostic role of resting pulmonary hyperinflation as measured by residual volume (RV)/total lung capacity (TLC) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remains poorly understood. Therefore, this study aimed to identify the factors related to resting pulmonary hyperinflation in COPD and to determine whether resting pulmonary hyperinflation is a prognostic factor in COPD. In total, 353 patients with COPD in the Korean Obstructive Lung Disease cohort recruited from 16 hospitals were enrolled. Resting pulmonary hyperinflation was defined as RV/TLC ≥ 40%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that older age (P = 0.001), lower forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) (P pulmonary hyperinflation in COPD. RV/TLC is an independent risk factor for all-cause mortality in COPD.

  8. [The clinical application value of dual source CT quantification volume imaging to forecast lung cancer patients' postoperative pulmonary function changing: a prospective study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Liang, Chaoyang; Guo, Juntang; Ma, Yongfu; Zhou, Liang; Yang, Pu; Yang, Gongzheng; Liu, Yang

    2014-10-01

    To probe the clinical application and value of dual source CT quantification volume imaging to forecast lung cancer patients' postoperative pulmonary function changing. Between June 2012 and June 2013, there were 233 patients (121 male patients and 112 female patients, with a mean age of (53 ± 16) years) who accepted the thoracoscope lobectomy or unilateral holo-lungs pneumonectomy accepted pulmonary function test before and after 3 months of the surgery. CT scan was conducted at both inspiration phase and expiration phase before the surgery and the lung volume of the single lobe, the pixel exponential distribution histogram, and the average lung density were measured after CT scan. The discrepancy and correlation between the preoperative lung volume accepted by CT and preoperative, postoperative pulmonary function index were compared. The CT volume scan showed that average lung density of the superior part at decubitus position is -(870 ± 22) HU, the inferior part was -(767 ± 16) HU (t = 3.13, P dual source CT quantification volume imaging to predict lung cancer patients' postoperative pulmonary function alteration, which can provide precise predictive value of these patients. CT quantification volume imaging technology has important clinical application value.

  9. Assessment of bronchodilator response through changes in lung volumes in chronic airflow obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.B. Figueroa-Casas

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Although FEV1 improvement is routinely used to define bronchodilator (BD response, it correlates poorly with clinical effects. Changes in lung volumes (LV have shown better correlation with exercise tolerance and might be more sensitive to detect BD effects. We assessed the additional contribution of measuring LV before and after BD to detect acute improvement in lung function not demonstrated by FEV1, and the influence of the response criteria selected on this contribution. We analyzed 98 spirometries and plethismographies performed pre and post BD in patients with airflow obstruction (FEV1/FVC 10% of baseline (D>5 anD>15% were also analyzed. FEV1 identified as responders 32% of patients. Greater proportions were uncovered by slow vital capacity (51%, p5 anD>15%. Mean change and proportions of responders for each LV varied significantly (pSi bien el aumento del VEF1 es habitualmente utilizado para definir respuesta a broncodilatadores (BD, su correlación con efectos clínicos es pobre. Los cambios en volúmenes pulmonares (VP han demostrado mejor correlación con tolerancia al ejercicio y podrían ser más sensibles para detectar efectos de los BD. Nosotros evaluamos la contribución adicional de medir VP antes y después de BD para detectar mejoría funcional aguda no demostrada por cambios del VEF1, y la influencia del criterio de respuesta seleccionado en esta contribución. Se analizaron 98 espirometrías y pletismografías realizadas pre y post BD en pacientes con obstrucción al flujo aéreo (VEF1/CVF 10% del basal (D>5 y 15% fueron también analizados. El VEF1 identificó como respondedores a 32% de los pacientes. Proporciones mayores fueron identificadas por capacidad vital lenta (51%, p5 y 15%. El cambio promedio y las proporciones de respondedores para cada VP variaron significativamente (p<0.05 según que el cambio fuese expresado como porcentaje del basal o del valor predicho. Una proporción considerable de pacientes con obstrucci

  10. Poor man medical pneumoplasty: Bronchoscopic lung volume reduction with hot saline versus dissolved doxycycline as a neoteric remedy of pulmonary emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Abumossalam

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Bronchoscopic lung volume reduction by hot saline and dissolved doxycycline comes into sight to be a safe and feasible profile with an acceptable outcome that presents an attractive substitute to COPD patients who are physiologically friable.

  11. SU-E-J-75: Importance of 4DCT for Target Volume Definition in Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goksel, E; Cone, D; Kucucuk, H; Senkesen, O; Yilmaz, M; Aslay, I; Tezcanli, E; Garipagaoglu, M; Sengoz, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: We aimed to investigate the importance of 4DCT for lung tumors treated with SBRT and whether maximum intensity projection (MIP) and free breathing (FB) images can compansate for tumor movement. Methods: Six patients with primary lung cancer and 2 patients with lung metastasis with a median age of 69.5 (42–86) were included. Patients were positioned supine on a vacuum bag. In addition to FB planning CT images, 4DCT images were obtained at 3 mm intervals using Varian RPM system with (Siemens Somatom Sensetion 64). MIP series were reconstructed using 4DCT images. PTV-FB and PTV-MIP (GTV+5mm) volumes were contoured using FB and MIP series, respectively. GTVs were defined on each of eight different breathing phase images and were merged to create the ITV. PTV-4D was generated with a 5 mm margin to ITV. PTV-MIP and PTV-4D contours were copied to FB CT series and treatment plans for PTV-MIP and PTV-FB were generated using RapidArc (2 partial arc) technique in Eclipse (version 11, AAA algorithm). The prescription dose was 5600cGy in 7 fractions. ITV volumes receiving prescription dose (%) and V95 for ITV were calculated for each treatment plan. Results: The mean PTV-4B, PTV-MIP and PTV-FB volumes were 23.2 cc, 15.4cc ve 11cc respectively. Median volume of ITV receiving the prescription dose was 34.6% (16.4–70 %) and median V95 dose for ITV was 1699cGy (232cGy-5117cGy) in the plan optimized for PTV-FB as the reference. When the plan was optimized for PTV-MIP, median ITV volume receiving the prescription dose was 67.15% (26–86%) and median V95 dose for ITV was 4231cGy (1735cGy-5290cGy). Conclusion: Images used in lung SBRT are critical for treatment quality; FB and MIP images did not compensate target movement, therefore 4DCT images should be obtained for all patients undergoing lung SBRT or the safety margins should be adjusted

  12. Effects of Dexmedetomidine Infusion on Inflammatory Responses and Injury of Lung Tidal Volume Changes during One-Lung Ventilation in Thoracoscopic Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial

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    Chun-Yu Wu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available One-lung ventilation in thoracic surgery provokes profound systemic inflammatory responses and injury related to lung tidal volume changes. We hypothesized that the highly selective a2-adrenergic agonist dexmedetomidine attenuates these injurious responses. Sixty patients were randomly assigned to receive dexmedetomidine or saline during thoracoscopic surgery. There is a trend of less postoperative medical complication including that no patients in the dexmedetomidine group developed postoperative medical complications, whereas four patients in the saline group did (0% versus 13.3%, p=0.1124. Plasma inflammatory and injurious biomarkers between the baseline and after resumption of two-lung ventilation were particularly notable. The plasma high-mobility group box 1 level decreased significantly from 51.7 (58.1 to 33.9 (45.0 ng.ml−1 (p<0.05 in the dexmedetomidine group, which was not observed in the saline group. Plasma monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 [151.8 (115.1 to 235.2 (186.9 pg.ml−1, p<0.05] and neutrophil elastase [350.8 (154.5 to 421.9 (106.1 ng.ml−1, p<0.05] increased significantly only in the saline group. In addition, plasma interleukin-6 was higher in the saline group than in the dexmedetomidine group at postoperative day 1 [118.8 (68.8 versus 78.5 (58.8 pg.ml−1, p=0.0271]. We conclude that dexmedetomidine attenuates one-lung ventilation-associated inflammatory and injurious responses by inhibiting alveolar neutrophil recruitment in thoracoscopic surgery.

  13. Lung Volume Reduction in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD AND#8211; An Updated Review of Surgical and Endoscopic Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakant Dixit

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The conventional medical management of emphysema using bronchodilators and anti-inflammatory agents has a limited benefit in patients having advanced hyperinflation of lungs due to destruction of elastic tissue. The natural course of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD has been shown to be altered by only smoking cessation and oxygen therapy so far. The lung volume reduction surgery is viewed as another modality to change the natural history of emphysema in recent years. For patients with more generalized emphysema, resection of lung parenchyma improves elastic recoil and chest wall mechanics. An extensive literature search has demonstrated that carefully selected patients of emphysema (i.e. upper lobe predominant disease, low exercise capacity and Forced Expiratory Volume in First Second (FEV1 and DLco and #8804; 20% of predicted receive benefits in terms of symptomatic improvement and physiologic response following Lung Volume Reduction Surgery (LVRS. The resurgent interest in LVRS and National Emphysema Treatment Trial findings for emphysema have stimulated a range of innovative methods, to improve the outcome and reduce complications associated with current LVRS techniques. These novel approaches include surgical resection with compression/banding devices, endobronchial blockers, sealants, obstructing devices and valves and endobronchial bronchial bypass approaches. Experimental data and preliminary results are becoming available for some of these approaches. Most of the published studies so far have been uncontrolled and unblinded. Overall, extensive research in the near future will help to determine the potential clinical applicability of these new approaches to the treatment of emphysema symptoms. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2012; 1(4.000: 249-257

  14. Design of the Endobronchial Valve for Emphysema Palliation Trial (VENT): a non-surgical method of lung volume reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strange, Charlie; Herth, Felix J F; Kovitz, Kevin L; McLennan, Geoffrey; Ernst, Armin; Goldin, Jonathan; Noppen, Marc; Criner, Gerard J; Sciurba, Frank C

    2007-07-03

    Lung volume reduction surgery is effective at improving lung function, quality of life, and mortality in carefully selected individuals with advanced emphysema. Recently, less invasive bronchoscopic approaches have been designed to utilize these principles while avoiding the associated perioperative risks. The Endobronchial Valve for Emphysema PalliatioN Trial (VENT) posits that occlusion of a single pulmonary lobe through bronchoscopically placed Zephyr endobronchial valves will effect significant improvements in lung function and exercise tolerance with an acceptable risk profile in advanced emphysema. The trial design posted on Clinical trials.gov, on August 10, 2005 proposed an enrollment of 270 subjects. Inclusion criteria included: diagnosis of emphysema with forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) 100%; residual volume > 150% predicted), and heterogeneous emphysema defined using a quantitative chest computed tomography algorithm. Following standardized pulmonary rehabilitation, patients were randomized 2:1 to receive unilateral lobar placement of endobronchial valves plus optimal medical management or optimal medical management alone. The co-primary endpoint was the mean percent change in FEV1 and six minute walk distance at 180 days. Secondary end-points included mean percent change in St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire score and the mean absolute changes in the maximal work load measured by cycle ergometry, dyspnea (mMRC) score, and total oxygen use per day. Per patient response rates in clinically significant improvement/maintenance of FEV1 and six minute walk distance and technical success rates of valve placement were recorded. Apriori response predictors based on quantitative CT and lung physiology were defined. If endobronchial valves improve FEV1 and health status with an acceptable safety profile in advanced emphysema, they would offer a novel intervention for this progressive and debilitating disease. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00129584.

  15. Design of the Endobronchial Valve for Emphysema Palliation Trial (VENT: a non-surgical method of lung volume reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noppen Marc

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung volume reduction surgery is effective at improving lung function, quality of life, and mortality in carefully selected individuals with advanced emphysema. Recently, less invasive bronchoscopic approaches have been designed to utilize these principles while avoiding the associated perioperative risks. The Endobronchial Valve for Emphysema PalliatioN Trial (VENT posits that occlusion of a single pulmonary lobe through bronchoscopically placed Zephyr® endobronchial valves will effect significant improvements in lung function and exercise tolerance with an acceptable risk profile in advanced emphysema. Methods The trial design posted on Clinical trials.gov, on August 10, 2005 proposed an enrollment of 270 subjects. Inclusion criteria included: diagnosis of emphysema with forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 100%; residual volume > 150% predicted, and heterogeneous emphysema defined using a quantitative chest computed tomography algorithm. Following standardized pulmonary rehabilitation, patients were randomized 2:1 to receive unilateral lobar placement of endobronchial valves plus optimal medical management or optimal medical management alone. The co-primary endpoint was the mean percent change in FEV1 and six minute walk distance at 180 days. Secondary end-points included mean percent change in St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire score and the mean absolute changes in the maximal work load measured by cycle ergometry, dyspnea (mMRC score, and total oxygen use per day. Per patient response rates in clinically significant improvement/maintenance of FEV1 and six minute walk distance and technical success rates of valve placement were recorded. Apriori response predictors based on quantitative CT and lung physiology were defined. Conclusion If endobronchial valves improve FEV1 and health status with an acceptable safety profile in advanced emphysema, they would offer a novel intervention for this progressive and

  16. Changes in expression of injury after irradiation of increasing volumes in rat lung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novakova-Jiresova, Alena; van Luijk, Peter; van Goor, Harry; Kampinga, Harm H.; Coppes, Robert P.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the cure rates of thoracic malignancies by radiation dose escalation, very accurate insight is required in the dose delivery parameters that maximally spare normal lung function. Radiation-induced lung complications are classically divided into an early pneumonitic and a late

  17. Volume-controlled histographic analysis of pulmonary parenchyma in normal and diffuse parenchymal lung disease: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyo Yong; Lee, Jongmin; Kim, Jong Seob; Won, Chyl Ho; Kang, Duk Sik; Kim, Myoung Nam

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of a home-made histographic analysis system using a lung volume controller. Our study involved ten healthy volunteers, ten emphysema patients, and two idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients. Using a home-made lung volume controller, images were obtained in the upper, middle, and lower lung zones at 70%, 50%, and 20% of vital capacity. Electron beam tomography was used and scanning parameters were single slice mode, 10-mm slice thickness, 0.4-second scan time, and 35-cm field of view. Usinga home-made semi-automated program, pulmonary parenchyma was isolated and a histogrm then obtained. Seven histographic parameters, namely mean density (MD), density at maximal frequency (DMF), maximal ascending gradient (MAG),maximal ascending gradient density (MAGD), maximal sescending gradient (MDG), maximal descending gradient density (MDGD), and full width at half maximum (FWHM) were derived from the histogram. We compared normal controls with abnormal groups including emphysema and IPF patients at the same respiration levels. A normal histographic zone with ± 1 standard deviation was obtained. Histographic curves of normal controls shifted toward the high density level, and the width of the normal zone increased as the level of inspiration decreased. In ten normal controls, MD, DMF, MAG, MAGD, MDG, MDGD, and FWHM readings at a 70% inspiration level were lower than those at 20% (p less than0.05). At the same level of inspiration, histograms of emphysema patients were locatedat a lower density area than those of normal controls. As inspiration status decreased, histograms of emphysema patients showed diminished shift compared with those of normal controls. At 50% and 20% inspiration levels, the MD, DMF, and MAGD readings of emphysema patients were significantly lower than those of normal controls (p less than 0.05). Compared with those of normal controls, histogrms of the two IPF patients obtained at three inspiration levels were

  18. Impact of PET - CT motion correction in minimising the gross tumour volume in non-small cell lung cancer

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    Michael Masoomi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective: To investigate the impact of respiratory motion on localization, and quantification lung lesions for the Gross Tumour Volume utilizing an in-house developed Auto3Dreg programme and dynamic NURBS-based cardiac-torso digitised phantom (NCAT. Methods: Respiratory motion may result in more than 30% underestimation of the SUV values of lung, liver and kidney tumour lesions. The motion correction technique adopted in this study was an image-based motion correction approach using, an in-house developed voxel-intensity-based and a multi-resolution multi-optimisation (MRMO algorithm. All the generated frames were co-registered to a reference frame using a time efficient scheme. The NCAT phantom was used to generate CT attenuation maps and activity distribution volumes for the lung regions. Quantitative assessment including Region of Interest (ROI, image fidelity and image correlation techniques, as well as semi-quantitative line profile analysis and qualitatively overlaying non-motion and motion corrected image frames were performed. Results: the largest transformation was observed in the Z-direction. The greatest translation was for the frame 3, end inspiration, and the smallest for the frame 5 which was closet frame to the reference frame at 67% expiration. Visual assessment of the lesion sizes, 20-60mm at 3 different locations, apex, mid and base of lung showed noticeable improvement for all the foci and their locations. The maximum improvements for the image fidelity were from 0.395 to 0.930 within the lesion volume of interest. The greatest improvement in activity concentration underestimation, post motion correction, was 7% below the true activity for the 20 mm lesion. The discrepancies in activity underestimation were reduced with increasing the lesion sizes. Overlay activity distribution on the attenuation map showed improved localization of the PET metabolic information to the anatomical CT images. Conclusion: The respiratory

  19. Target volume definition for 18F-FDG PET-positive lymph nodes in radiotherapy of patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestle, Ursula; Schaefer-Schuler, Andrea; Kremp, Stephanie; Groeschel, Andreas; Hellwig, Dirk; Rübe, Christian; Kirsch, Carl-Martin

    2007-04-01

    FDG PET is increasingly used in radiotherapy planning. Recently, we demonstrated substantial differences in target volumes when applying different methods of FDG-based contouring in primary lung tumours (Nestle et al., J Nucl Med 2005;46:1342-8). This paper focusses on FDG-positive mediastinal lymph nodes (LN(PET)). In our institution, 51 NSCLC patients who were candidates for radiotherapy prospectively underwent staging FDG PET followed by a thoracic PET scan in the treatment position and a planning CT. Eleven of them had 32 distinguishable non-confluent mediastinal or hilar nodal FDG accumulations (LN(PET)). For these, sets of gross tumour volumes (GTVs) were generated at both acquisition times by four different PET-based contouring methods (visual: GTV(vis); 40% SUVmax: GTV40; SUV=2.5: GTV2.5; target/background (T/B) algorithm: GTV(bg)). All differences concerning GTV sizes were within the range of the resolution of the PET system. The detectability and technical delineability of the GTVs were significantly better in the late scans (e.g. p = 0.02 for diagnostic application of SUVmax = 2.5; p = 0.0001 for technical delineability by GTV2.5; p = 0.003 by GTV40), favouring the GTV(bg) method owing to satisfactory overall applicability and independence of GTVs from acquisition time. Compared with CT, the majority of PET-based GTVs were larger, probably owing to resolution effects, with a possible influence of lesion movements. For nodal GTVs, different methods of contouring did not lead to clinically relevant differences in volumes. However, there were significant differences in technical delineability, especially after early acquisition. Overall, our data favour a late acquisition of FDG PET scans for radiotherapy planning, and the use of a T/B algorithm for GTV contouring.

  20. Target volume definition for 18F-FDG PET-positive lymph nodes in radiotherapy of patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nestle, Ursula; Schaefer-Schuler, Andrea; Hellwig, Dirk; Kirsch, Carl-Martin; Kremp, Stephanie; Ruebe, Christian; Groeschel, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    FDG PET is increasingly used in radiotherapy planning. Recently, we demonstrated substantial differences in target volumes when applying different methods of FDG-based contouring in primary lung tumours (Nestle et al., J Nucl Med 2005;46:1342-8). This paper focusses on FDG-positive mediastinal lymph nodes (LN PET ). In our institution, 51 NSCLC patients who were candidates for radiotherapy prospectively underwent staging FDG PET followed by a thoracic PET scan in the treatment position and a planning CT. Eleven of them had 32 distinguishable non-confluent mediastinal or hilar nodal FDG accumulations (LN PET ). For these, sets of gross tumour volumes (GTVs) were generated at both acquisition times by four different PET-based contouring methods (visual: GTV vis ; 40% SUV max : GTV 40 ; SUV=2.5: GTV 2.5 ; target/background (T/B) algorithm: GTV bg ). All differences concerning GTV sizes were within the range of the resolution of the PET system. The detectability and technical delineability of the GTVs were significantly better in the late scans (e.g. p 0.02 for diagnostic application of SUV max = 2.5; p = 0.0001 for technical delineability by GTV 2.5 ; p = 0.003 by GTV 40 ), favouring the GTV bg method owing to satisfactory overall applicability and independence of GTVs from acquisition time. Compared with CT, the majority of PET-based GTVs were larger, probably owing to resolution effects, with a possible influence of lesion movements. For nodal GTVs, different methods of contouring did not lead to clinically relevant differences in volumes. However, there were significant differences in technical delineability, especially after early acquisition. Overall, our data favour a late acquisition of FDG PET scans for radiotherapy planning, and the use of a T/B algorithm for GTV contouring. (orig.)

  1. Effect of Bra Use during Radiotherapy for Large-Breasted Women: Acute Toxicity and Treated Heart and Lung Volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lanea; Cohen, Randi; Sopka, Dennis M; Li, Tianyu; Li, Linna; Anderson, Penny R; Fowble, Barbara L; Freedman, Gary M

    2013-01-01

    Large breast size presents special problems during radiation simulation, planning and patient treatment, including increased skin toxicity, in women undergoing breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy (BCT). We report our experience using a bra during radiation in large-breasted women and its effect on acute toxicity and heart and lung dosimetry. From 2001 to 2006, 246 consecutive large-breasted women (bra size ≥ 38 and/or ≥ D cup) were treated with BCT using either 3D conformal (3D-CRT) or Intensity Modulated Radiation (IMRT). In 58 cases, at the physicians' discretion, a custom-fit bra was used during simulation and treatment. Endpoints were acute radiation dermatitis, and dosimetric comparison of heart and lung volumes in a subgroup of 12 left-sided breast cancer patients planned with and without a bra. The majority of acute skin toxicities were grade 2 and were experienced by 90% of patients in a bra compared to 70% of patients not in a bra (p=0.003). On multivariate analysis significant predictors of grade 2/3 skin toxicity included 3D-CRT instead of IMRT (OR=3.9, 95% CI:1.8-8.5) and the use of a bra (OR=5.5, 95% CI:1.6-18.8). For left-sided patients, use of a bra was associated with a volume of heart in the treatment fields decreased by 63.4% (p=0.002), a volume of left lung decreased by 18.5% (p=0.25), and chest wall separation decreased by a mean of 1 cm (p=0.03). The use of a bra to augment breast shape and position in large-breasted women is an alternative to prone positioning and associated with reduced chest wall separation and reduced heart volume within the treatment field.

  2. Effect of bra use during radiation therapy for large-breasted women: Acute toxicity and treated heart and lung volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lanea M M; Cohen, Randi; Sopka, Dennis M; Li, Tianyu; Li, Linna; Anderson, Penny R; Fowble, Barbara L; Freedman, Gary M

    2013-01-01

    Large breast size presents special problems during radiation simulation, planning, and patient treatment, including increased skin toxicity, in women undergoing breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy (BCT). We report our experience using a bra during radiation in large-breasted women and its effect on acute toxicity and heart and lung dosimetry. From 2001 to 2006, 246 consecutive large-breasted women (bra size ≥38 or ≥D cup) were treated with BCT using either 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) or intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). In 58 cases, at the physicians' discretion, a custom-fit bra was used during simulation and treatment. Endpoints were acute radiation dermatitis and dosimetric comparison of heart and lung volumes in a subgroup of 12 left-sided breast cancer patients planned with and without a bra. The majority of acute skin toxicities were grade 2 and were experienced by 90% of patients in a bra compared with 70% of patients not in a bra (P = .003). On multivariate analysis significant predictors of grade 2 or 3 skin toxicity included the use of 3DCRT instead of IMRT (odds ratio, 3.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-8.5) and the use of a bra (odds ratio, 5.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-18.8). For left-sided patients, the use of a bra was associated with a volume of heart in the treatment fields decreased by 63.4% (P = .002), a volume of left lung decreased by 18.5% (P = .25), and chest wall separation decreased by a mean of 1 cm (P = .03). The use of a bra to augment breast shape and position in large-breasted women is an alternative to prone positioning and associated with reduced chest wall separation and reduced heart volume within the treatment field. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A proposed framework for consensus-based lung tumour volume auto-segmentation in 4D computed tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Spencer; Rodrigues, George; Gaede, Stewart; Brophy, Mark; Barron, John L; Beauchemin, Steven S; Palma, David; Louie, Alexander V; Yu, Edward; Yaremko, Brian; Ahmad, Belal

    2015-01-01

    This work aims to propose and validate a framework for tumour volume auto-segmentation based on ground-truth estimates derived from multi-physician input contours to expedite 4D-CT based lung tumour volume delineation. 4D-CT datasets of ten non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were manually segmented by 6 physicians. Multi-expert ground truth (GT) estimates were constructed using the STAPLE algorithm for the gross tumour volume (GTV) on all respiratory phases. Next, using a deformable model-based method, multi-expert GT on each individual phase of the 4D-CT dataset was propagated to all other phases providing auto-segmented GTVs and motion encompassing internal gross target volumes (IGTVs) based on GT estimates (STAPLE) from each respiratory phase of the 4D-CT dataset. Accuracy assessment of auto-segmentation employed graph cuts for 3D-shape reconstruction and point-set registration-based analysis yielding volumetric and distance-based measures. STAPLE-based auto-segmented GTV accuracy ranged from (81.51  ±  1.92) to (97.27  ±  0.28)% volumetric overlap of the estimated ground truth. IGTV auto-segmentation showed significantly improved accuracies with reduced variance for all patients ranging from 90.87 to 98.57% volumetric overlap of the ground truth volume. Additional metrics supported these observations with statistical significance. Accuracy of auto-segmentation was shown to be largely independent of selection of the initial propagation phase. IGTV construction based on auto-segmented GTVs within the 4D-CT dataset provided accurate and reliable target volumes compared to manual segmentation-based GT estimates. While inter-/intra-observer effects were largely mitigated, the proposed segmentation workflow is more complex than that of current clinical practice and requires further development. (paper)

  4. The use of phase sequence image sets to reconstruct the total volume occupied by a mobile lung tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagne, Isabelle M.; Robinson, Don M.; Halperin, Ross; Roa, Wilson

    2005-01-01

    The use of phase sequence image (PSI) sets to reveal the total volume occupied by a mobile target is presented. Isocontrast composite clinical target volumes (CCTVs) may be constructed from PSI sets in order to reveal the total volume occupied by a mobile target during the course of its travel. The ability of the CCTV technique to properly account for target motion is demonstrated by comparison to contours of the true total volume occupied (TVO) for a number of experimental phantom geometries. Finally, using real patient data, the clinical utility of the CCTV technique to properly account for internal tumor motion while minimizing the volume of healthy lung tissue irradiated is assessed by comparison to the standard approach of applying safety margins. Results of the phantom study reveal that CCTV cross sections constructed at the 20% isocontrast level yield good agreement with the total cross sections (TXO) of mobile targets. These CCTVs conform well to the TVOs of the moving targets examined whereby the addition of small uniform margins ensures complete circumscription of the TVO with the inclusion of minimal amounts of surrounding external volumes. The CCTV technique is seen to be clearly superior to the common practice of the addition of safety margins to individual CTV contours in order to account for internal target motion. Margins required with the CCTV technique are eight to ten times smaller than those required with individual CTVs

  5. Low tidal volume protects pulmonary vasomotor function from “second-hit” injury in acute lung injury rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Chun

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sepsis could induce indirect acute lung injury(ALI, and pulmonary vasomotor dysfunction. While low tidal volume is advocated for treatment of ALI patients. However, there is no evidence for low tidal volume that it could mitigate pulmonary vasomotor dysfunction in indirect ALI. Our study is to evaluate whether low tidal volume ventilation could protect the pulmonary vascular function in indirect lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced acute lung injury rats. Methods An indirect ALI rat model was induced by intravenous infusion of LPS. Thirty rats (n = 6 in each group were randomly divided into (1Control group; (2 ALI group; (3 LV group (tidal volume of 6mL/kg; (4 MV group (tidal volume of 12mL/kg; (5VLV group (tidal volume of 3mL/kg. Mean arterial pressure and blood gas analysis were monitored every 2 hours throughout the experiment. Lung tissues and pulmonary artery rings were immediately harvested after the rats were bled to be killed to detect the contents of endothelin-1 (ET-1, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and TNF-α. Acetylcholine (Ache-induced endothelium-dependent and sodium nitroprusside (SNP-induced endothelium-independent relaxation of isolated pulmonary artery rings were measured by tensiometry. Results There was no difference within groups concerning blood pressure, PaCO2 and SNP-induced endothelium-independent relaxation of pulmonary artery rings. Compared with MV group, LV group significantly reduced LPS-induced expression of ET-1 level (113.79 ± 7.33pg/mL vs. 152.52 ± 12.75pg/mL, P P P -7mol/L-10-4mol/L-induced vasodilatation was ameliorated 30% more in LV group than in MV group. Conclusions Low tidal volume could protect the pulmonary vasodilative function during indirect ALI by decreasing vasoconstrictor factors, increasing expressions of vasodilator factors in pulmonary endothelial cells, and inhibiting inflammation injuries.

  6. A novel dose-volume metric for optimizing therapeutic ratio through fractionation: retrospective analysis of lung cancer treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Harald; Hope, Andrew; Meier, Gabriel; Davison, Matt

    2013-08-01

    To explore the potential of a novel dose-volume based metric to assist in the selection of optimal fractionation schedules for lung cancer patients. Selecting the dose per fraction that maximizes the therapeutic ratio via a linear-quadratic effect on normal tissue complication probability and tumor cell survival is an optimization problem. The mathematical solution reveals that the optimal fractionation schedule is determined by a generalized dose ratio between the normal tissue and the tumor, here termed the bifurcation number B, that can be derived from the dose-volume histogram of the normal tissue. The bifurcation number characterizes the volume effect of a normal tissue and its dependency on the fractionation schedule. The clinical relevance of the bifurcation number was evaluated in 46 patients previously treated for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) according to various fractionation protocols. Bifurcation numbers were computed for both lung and esophagus as the normal tissues. The value of the bifurcation number determines whether the volume effect reverses the traditional radiobiological advantage of small dose per fraction for the normal tissue. If B is smaller than the ratio of alpha/beta ratios between normal tissue and tumor, then a single fraction is optimal; otherwise the optimal treatment is an infinite number of doses (hence the name "bifurcation" number). These fractionation schedules correspond clinically to hypo- and standard/hyperfractionation, respectively. Compared with traditional dose-volume metrics, the bifurcation number is a unitless ratio and independent of dose fractionation. The B-numbers derived from the clinical treatment plans are also strongly consistent with historically prescribed clinical fractionation protocols for NSCLC treatments. The B-numbers for esophagus and lung for all patients receiving a high dose per fraction protocol (>7.5 Gy/fraction) were all smaller than the B-numbers for the patients receiving standard 2 Gy

  7. Very low tidal volume ventilation with associated hypercapnia--effects on lung injury in a model for acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Fuchs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ventilation using low tidal volumes with permission of hypercapnia is recommended to protect the lung in acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, the most lung protective tidal volume in association with hypercapnia is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of different tidal volumes with associated hypercapnia on lung injury and gas exchange in a model for acute respiratory distress syndrome. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this randomized controlled experiment sixty-four surfactant-depleted rabbits were exposed to 6 hours of mechanical ventilation with the following targets: Group 1: tidal volume = 8-10 ml/kg/PaCO(2 = 40 mm Hg; Group 2: tidal volume = 4-5 ml/kg/PaCO(2 = 80 mm Hg; Group 3: tidal volume = 3-4 ml/kg/PaCO(2 = 120 mm Hg; Group 4: tidal volume = 2-3 ml/kg/PaCO(2 = 160 mm Hg. Decreased wet-dry weight ratios of the lungs, lower histological lung injury scores and higher PaO(2 were found in all low tidal volume/hypercapnia groups (group 2, 3, 4 as compared to the group with conventional tidal volume/normocapnia (group 1. The reduction of the tidal volume below 4-5 ml/kg did not enhance lung protection. However, oxygenation and lung protection were maintained at extremely low tidal volumes in association with very severe hypercapnia and no adverse hemodynamic effects were observed with this strategy. CONCLUSION: Ventilation with low tidal volumes and associated hypercapnia was lung protective. A tidal volume below 4-5 ml/kg/PaCO(2 80 mm Hg with concomitant more severe hypercapnic acidosis did not increase lung protection in this surfactant deficiency model. However, even at extremely low tidal volumes in association with severe hypercapnia lung protection and oxygenation were maintained.

  8. A Temporal Study of Gene Expression in Rat Lung Following Fixed-volume Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-13

    micro-Rena- Pulse catheter; Braintree Scientific, Braintree, MA), coated with 2% tridodecylmethylammonium heparinate solution (Polyscience, War- rington ...electrophoresis. A reference preparation consisting of equal amounts of RNA pooled from nine organs (liver, lung, kidney, spleen, heart, skeletal muscle

  9. Analysis of Lung Tumor Motion in a Large Sample: Patterns and Factors Influencing Precise Delineation of Internal Target Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knybel, Lukas [Department of Oncology, University Hospital Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic); VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic); Cvek, Jakub, E-mail: Jakub.cvek@fno.cz [Department of Oncology, University Hospital Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic); Molenda, Lukas; Stieberova, Natalie; Feltl, David [Department of Oncology, University Hospital Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate lung tumor motion during respiration and to describe factors affecting the range and variability of motion in patients treated with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Log file analysis from online respiratory tumor tracking was performed in 145 patients. Geometric tumor location in the lungs, tumor volume and origin (primary or metastatic), sex, and tumor motion amplitudes in the superior-inferior (SI), latero-lateral (LL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions were recorded. Tumor motion variability during treatment was described using intrafraction/interfraction amplitude variability and tumor motion baseline changes. Tumor movement dependent on the tumor volume, position and origin, and sex were evaluated using statistical regression and correlation analysis. Results: After analysis of >500 hours of data, the highest rates of motion amplitudes, intrafraction/interfraction variation, and tumor baseline changes were in the SI direction (6.0 ± 2.2 mm, 2.2 ± 1.8 mm, 1.1 ± 0.9 mm, and −0.1 ± 2.6 mm). The mean motion amplitudes in the lower/upper geometric halves of the lungs were significantly different (P<.001). Motion amplitudes >15 mm were observed only in the lower geometric quarter of the lungs. Higher tumor motion amplitudes generated higher intrafraction variations (R=.86, P<.001). Interfraction variations and baseline changes >3 mm indicated tumors contacting mediastinal structures or parietal pleura. On univariate analysis, neither sex nor tumor origin (primary vs metastatic) was an independent predictive factor of different movement patterns. Metastatic lesions in women, but not men, showed significantly higher mean amplitudes (P=.03) and variability (primary, 2.7 mm; metastatic, 4.9 mm; P=.002) than primary tumors. Conclusion: Online tracking showed significant irregularities in lung tumor movement during respiration. Motion amplitude was significantly lower in upper lobe

  10. Analysis of Lung Tumor Motion in a Large Sample: Patterns and Factors Influencing Precise Delineation of Internal Target Volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knybel, Lukas; Cvek, Jakub; Molenda, Lukas; Stieberova, Natalie; Feltl, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate lung tumor motion during respiration and to describe factors affecting the range and variability of motion in patients treated with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Log file analysis from online respiratory tumor tracking was performed in 145 patients. Geometric tumor location in the lungs, tumor volume and origin (primary or metastatic), sex, and tumor motion amplitudes in the superior-inferior (SI), latero-lateral (LL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions were recorded. Tumor motion variability during treatment was described using intrafraction/interfraction amplitude variability and tumor motion baseline changes. Tumor movement dependent on the tumor volume, position and origin, and sex were evaluated using statistical regression and correlation analysis. Results: After analysis of >500 hours of data, the highest rates of motion amplitudes, intrafraction/interfraction variation, and tumor baseline changes were in the SI direction (6.0 ± 2.2 mm, 2.2 ± 1.8 mm, 1.1 ± 0.9 mm, and −0.1 ± 2.6 mm). The mean motion amplitudes in the lower/upper geometric halves of the lungs were significantly different (P<.001). Motion amplitudes >15 mm were observed only in the lower geometric quarter of the lungs. Higher tumor motion amplitudes generated higher intrafraction variations (R=.86, P<.001). Interfraction variations and baseline changes >3 mm indicated tumors contacting mediastinal structures or parietal pleura. On univariate analysis, neither sex nor tumor origin (primary vs metastatic) was an independent predictive factor of different movement patterns. Metastatic lesions in women, but not men, showed significantly higher mean amplitudes (P=.03) and variability (primary, 2.7 mm; metastatic, 4.9 mm; P=.002) than primary tumors. Conclusion: Online tracking showed significant irregularities in lung tumor movement during respiration. Motion amplitude was significantly lower in upper lobe

  11. Association Between Use of Lung-Protective Ventilation With Lower Tidal Volumes and Clinical Outcomes Among Patients Without Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome A Meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serpa Neto, Ary; Cardoso, Sérgio Oliveira; Manetta, José Antônio; Pereira, Victor Galvão Moura; Espósito, Daniel Crepaldi; Pasqualucci, Manoela de Oliveira Prado; Damasceno, Maria Cecília Toledo; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2012-01-01

    Context Lung-protective mechanical ventilation with the use of lower tidal volumes has been found to improve outcomes of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). It has been suggested that use of lower tidal volumes also benefits patients who do not have ARDS. Objective To determine

  12. Abdominal organ motion during inhalation and exhalation breath-holds: pancreatic motion at different lung volumes compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lens, Eelco; Gurney-Champion, Oliver J; Tekelenburg, Daniël R; van Kesteren, Zdenko; Parkes, Michael J; van Tienhoven, Geertjan; Nederveen, Aart J; van der Horst, Astrid; Bel, Arjan

    2016-11-01

    Contrary to what is commonly assumed, organs continue to move during breath-holding. We investigated the influence of lung volume on motion magnitude during breath-holding and changes in velocity over the duration of breath-holding. Sixteen healthy subjects performed 60-second inhalation breath-holds in room-air, with lung volumes of ∼100% and ∼70% of the inspiratory capacity, and exhalation breath-holds, with lung volumes of ∼30% and ∼0% of the inspiratory capacity. During breath-holding, we obtained dynamic single-slice magnetic-resonance images with a time-resolution of 0.6s. We used 2-dimensional image correlation to obtain the diaphragmatic and pancreatic velocity and displacement during breath-holding. Organ velocity was largest in the inferior-superior direction and was greatest during the first 10s of breath-holding, with diaphragm velocities of 0.41mm/s, 0.29mm/s, 0.16mm/s and 0.15mm/s during BH 100% , BH 70% , BH 30% and BH 0% , respectively. Organ motion magnitudes were larger during inhalation breath-holds (diaphragm moved 9.8 and 9.0mm during BH 100% and BH 70% , respectively) than during exhalation breath-holds (5.6 and 4.3mm during BH 30% and BH 0% , respectively). Using exhalation breath-holds rather than inhalation breath-holds and delaying irradiation until after the first 10s of breath-holding may be advantageous for irradiation of abdominal tumors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Limits of dose escalation in lung cancer: a dose-volume histogram analysis comparing coplanar and non-coplanar techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derycke, S.; Van Duyse, B.; Schelfhout, J.; De Neve, W.

    1995-12-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of dose escalation in radiotherapy of inoperable lung cancer, a dose-volume histogram analysis was performed comparing standard coplanar (2D) with non-coplanar (3D) beam arrangements on a non-selected group of 20 patients planned by Sherouse`s GRATISTM 3D-planning system. Serial CT-scanning was performed and 2 Target Volumes (Tvs) were defined. Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) defined a high-dose Target Volume (TV-1). GTV plus location of node stations with > 10% probability of invasion (Minet et al.) defined an intermediate-dose Target Volume (TV-2). However, nodal regions which are incompatible with cure were excluded from TV-2. These are ATS-regions 1, 8, 9 and 14 all left and right as well as heterolateral regions. For 3D-planning, Beam`s Eye View selected (by an experienced planner) beam arrangements were optimised using Superdot, a method of target dose-gradient annihilation developed by Sherouse. A second 3D-planning was performed using 4 beam incidences with maximal angular separation. The linac`s isocenter for the optimal arrangement was located at the geometrical center of gravity of a tetraheder, the tetraheder`s comers being the consecutive positions of the virtual source. This ideal beam arrangement was approximated as close as possible, taking into account technical limitations (patient-couch-gantry collisions). Criteria for tolerance were met if no points inside the spinal cord exceeded 50 Gy and if at least 50% of the lung volume received less than 20Gy. If dose regions below 50 Gy were judged acceptable at TV-2, 2D- as well as 3D-plans allow safe escalation to 80 Gy at TV-1. When TV-2 needed to be encompassed by isodose surfaces exceeding 50Gy, 3D-plans were necessary to limit dose at the spinal cord below tolerance. For large TVs dose is limited by lung tolerance for 3D-plans. An analysis (including NTCP-TCP as cost functions) of rival 3D-plans is being performed.

  14. Comparison of internal target volumes defined on 3-dimensional, 4-dimensonal, and cone-beam CT images of non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li F

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fengxiang Li,1 Jianbin Li,1 Zhifang Ma,1 Yingjie Zhang,1 Jun Xing,1 Huanpeng Qi,1 Dongping Shang21Department of Radiation Oncology, 2Department of Big Bore CT Room, Shandong Cancer Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of ChinaPurpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the positional and volumetric differences of internal target volumes defined on three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT, four-dimensional CT (4DCT, and cone-beam CT (CBCT images of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Materials and methods: Thirty-one patients with NSCLC sequentially underwent 3DCT and 4DCT simulation scans of the thorax during free breathing. The first CBCT was performed and registered to the planning CT using the bony anatomy registration during radiotherapy. The gross tumor volumes were contoured on the basis of 3DCT, maximum intensity projection (MIP of 4DCT, and CBCT. CTV3D (clinical target volume, internal target volumes, ITVMIP and ITVCBCT, were defined with a 7 mm margin accounting for microscopic disease. ITV10 mm and ITV5 mm were defined on the basis of CTV3D: ITV10 mm with a 5 mm margin in left–right (LR, anterior–posterior (AP directions and 10 mm in cranial–caudal (CC direction; ITV5 mm with an isotropic internal margin (IM of 5 mm. The differences in the position, size, Dice’s similarity coefficient (DSC and inclusion relation of different volumes were evaluated.Results: The median size ratios of ITV10 mm, ITV5 mm, and ITVMIP to ITVCBCT were 2.33, 1.88, and 1.03, respectively, for tumors in the upper lobe and 2.13, 1.76, and 1.1, respectively, for tumors in the middle-lower lobe. The median DSCs of ITV10 mm, ITV5 mm, ITVMIP, and ITVCBCT were 0.6, 0.66, and 0.83 for all patients. The median percentages of ITVCBCT not included in ITV10 mm, ITV5 mm, and ITVMIP were 0.1%, 1.63%, and 15.21%, respectively, while the median percentages of ITV10 mm, ITV5 mm

  15. Feasibility of repetitive lung function measurements by raised volume rapid thoracoabdominal compression during methacholine challenge in young infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loland, L.; Bisgaard, H.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of lung function measurements by the raised volume rapid thoracoabdominal compression (RVRTC) technique during bronchial methacholine challenge in young infants. METHOD: Four hundred two healthy infants were tested at 1 month of age...... was successfully measured in 87% by transcutaneous oxygen pressure. No serious adverse events were observed during testing or after discharge from the clinic. The methacholine dose range was appropriate as PD could be determined in the majority of infants. FEV(0.5) values in 21% of infants dropped > 40% during...... the test. Short-lasting, self-limiting episodes of hypoxemia of

  16. Comparison of three approaches to delineate internal gross tumor volume based on four-dimensional CT simulation images of non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fengxiang; Li Jianbin; Zhang Yingjie; Shang Dongping; Liu Tonghai; Tian Shiyu; Xu Min; Ma Changsheng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare positional and volumetric differences of internal gross tumor volume (IGTV) delineated separately by three approaches based on four-dimensional CT (4DCT) for the primary tumor of non-small cell lung cancer (NLCLC). Methods: Twenty-one patients with NLCLC underwent big bore 4DCT simulation scan of the thorax. IGTVs of the primary tumor of NSCLC were delineated using three approaches as followed: (1) the gross tumor volume (GTV) on each of the ten the respiratory phases of the 4DCT image set were delineated and the ten GTV were fused to produce IGTV 10 ; (2) the GTV delineated separately based on 0% and 50% phase were fused to produce IGTV EI+EE ; (3) the visible tumor on the MIP images were delineated to produce IGTV MIP . The position of the target center, the volume of target, the degree of inclusion (DI) and the matching index (MI) were compared reciprocally between IGTV 10 , IGTV EI+EE and IGTV MIP . Results: Average differences between the position of the center of IGTVs on direction of x, y and z axes were less than 1 mm, with no statistically significant difference. The volume of IGTV 10 was larger than that of IGTV EI+EE , the difference was statistically significant (t=2.37, P=0.028); the volume of IGTV 10 was larger than that of IGTV MIP , but the difference was not statistically significant (t=1.95, P=0.065). The ratio of IGTV EI+EE with IGTV 10 , IGTV MIP with IGTV 10 were 0.85±0.08 and 0.92±0.11, respectively. DI of IGTV EI+EE in IGTV 10 , IGTV MIP in IGTV 10 were 84.78% ± 8. 95% and 88.47% ±9.04%. MI between IGTV 10 and IGTV EI+EE , IGTV 10 and IGTV MIP were 0.85 ±0.09, 0.86±0.09, respectively. Conclusions: The center displacement of the IGTVs delineated separately by the three different techniques based on 4DCT images are not obvious; IGTV EI+EE and IGTV MIP can not replace IGTV 10 , however, IGTV MIP is more close to IGTV 10 comparing to IGTV EI+EE . The ratio of GTV EI+EE with IGTV 10 is correlated to the tumor motion

  17. High lung cancer surgical procedure volume is associated with shorter length of stay and lower risks of re-admission and death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Henrik; Riaz, Sharma P; Holmberg, Lars

    2016-01-01

    calendar year, and patients were assigned to a hospital volume quintile on the basis of the volume of their hospital. Hospitals with large lung cancer surgical resection volumes were less restrictive in their selection of patients for surgical management and provided a higher resection rate...... for this analysis was based on cancer registration and hospital discharge data and comprised information on 15,738 non-small-cell lung cancer patients resident and diagnosed in England in 2006-2010 and treated by surgical resection. The number of lung cancer resections was computed for each hospital in each......It is debated whether treating cancer patients in high-volume surgical centres can lead to improvement in outcomes, such as shorter length of hospital stay, decreased frequency and severity of post-operative complications, decreased re-admission, and decreased mortality. The dataset...

  18. Effects on Lung Function of Small-Volume Conventional Ventilation and High-Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation in a Model of Meconium Aspiration Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikusiakova, L Tomcikova; Pistekova, H; Kosutova, P; Mikolka, P; Calkovska, A; Mokra, D

    2015-01-01

    For treatment of severe neonatal meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS), lung-protective mechanical ventilation is essential. This study compared short-term effects of small-volume conventional mechanical ventilation and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation on lung function in experimentally-induced MAS. In conventionally-ventilated rabbits, MAS was induced by intratracheal instillation of meconium suspension (4 ml/kg, 25 mg/ml). Then, animals were ventilated conventionally with small-volume (f-50/min; VT-6 ml/kg) or with high frequency ventilation (f-10/s) for 4 h, with the evaluation of blood gases, ventilatory pressures, and pulmonary shunts. After sacrifice, left lung was saline-lavaged and cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were determined. Right lung was used for the estimation of lung edema formation (wet/dry weight ratio). Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), oxidative damage markers, were detected in lung tissue and plasma. Meconium instillation worsened gas exchange, and induced inflammation and lung edema. Within 4 h of ventilation, high frequency ventilation improved arterial pH and CO2 elimination compared with conventional ventilation. However, no other significant differences in oxygenation, ventilatory pressures, shunts, BALF cell counts, TBARS concentrations, or edema formation were observed between the two kinds of ventilation. We conclude that high frequency ventilation has only a slight advantage over small-volume conventional ventilation in the model of meconium aspiration syndrome in that it improves CO2 elimination.

  19. Inflation and deflation pressure-volume loops in anesthetized pinnipeds confirms compliant chest and lungs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eFahlman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We examined structural properties of the marine mammal respiratory system, and tested Scholander’s hypothesis that the chest is highly compliant by measuring the mechanical properties of the respiratory system in five species of pinniped under anesthesia (Pacific harbor seal, Phoca vitulina; northern elephant seal, Mirounga angustirostris; northern fur seal Callorhinus ursinus; California sea lion, Zalophus californianus; and Steller sea lion, Eumetopias jubatus. We found that the chest wall compliance (CCW of all five species was greater than lung compliance (airways and alveoli, CL as predicted by Scholander, which suggests that the chest provides little protection against alveolar collapse or lung squeeze. We also found that specific respiratory compliance was significantly greater in wild animals than in animals raised under human care. While differences in ages between the two groups may affect this incidental finding, it is also possible that lung conditioning in free-living animals may increase pulmonary compliance and reduce the risk of lung squeeze during diving. Overall, our data indicate that compliance of excised pinniped lungs provide a good estimate of total respiratory compliance.

  20. Inflation and deflation pressure-volume loops in anesthetized pinnipeds confirms compliant chest and lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlman, Andreas; Loring, Stephen H; Johnson, Shawn P; Haulena, Martin; Trites, Andrew W; Fravel, Vanessa A; Van Bonn, William G

    2014-01-01

    We examined structural properties of the marine mammal respiratory system, and tested Scholander's hypothesis that the chest is highly compliant by measuring the mechanical properties of the respiratory system in five species of pinniped under anesthesia (Pacific harbor seal, Phoca vitulina; northern elephant seal, Mirounga angustirostris; northern fur seal Callorhinus ursinus; California sea lion, Zalophus californianus; and Steller sea lion, Eumetopias jubatus). We found that the chest wall compliance (CCW) of all five species was greater than lung compliance (airways and alveoli, CL) as predicted by Scholander, which suggests that the chest provides little protection against alveolar collapse or lung squeeze. We also found that specific respiratory compliance was significantly greater in wild animals than in animals raised in an aquatic facility. While differences in ages between the two groups may affect this incidental finding, it is also possible that lung conditioning in free-living animals may increase pulmonary compliance and reduce the risk of lung squeeze during diving. Overall, our data indicate that compliance of excised pinniped lungs provide a good estimate of total respiratory compliance.

  1. Symposium Entitled: Particle Lung Interactions: ’Overload’ Related Phenomena. A Journal of Aerosol Medicine - Deposition, Clearance, and Effects in the Lung. Volume 3, Supplement 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-01

    alveolar macrophages (AMs), tracheobropchial epithelial cells, the progenitor cells of lung cancer (bronchogenic carcinoma ), and lung fibroblasts, a cell...FoIGE .Crontentrows) hrihtseunrat 16he lre (igres 11). Bhe sca n irrdiadton nralonie produe pulmonar depiteosis but the nedreeto resut in afmechtiger...AMs), tracheobronchial epithelial cells, the progenitor cells of lung cancer (bronchogenic carcinoma ), and lung fibroblasts, a cell type affected in

  2. Cirurgia de redução do volume pulmonar em modelo experimental de enfisema em ratos Lung volume reduction surgery in an experimental rat model of emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laerte Brasiliense Fusco

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A cirurgia redutora do volume pulmonar pode ser uma opção para portadores de enfisema com grave limitação ventilatória. OBJETIVO: Avaliar funcional e morfologicamente pulmões enfisematosos antes e depois da cirurgia de redução de volume pulmonar, através de modelo experimental em ratos. MÉTODO: Dois grupos experimentais de ratos Wistar foram estabelecidos (papaína sem cirurgia e papaína com cirurgia, e três grupos controle (solução fisiológica sem cirurgia, solução fisiológica com cirurgia e papaína sem ventilação mecânica. Após cerca de 40 dias da instilação intratraqueal da solução de papaína ou fisiológica, os animais dos grupos papaína com cirurgia e solução fisiológica com cirurgia foram submetidos a bilobectomia média e retrocava através de toracotomia direita. Após uma semana, foram submetidos a mecânica ventilatória, com medidas de elastância e resistência das vias aéreas. O tecido pulmonar de todos os animais foi analisado quanto ao diâmetro alveolar médio e quantidade de fibras elásticas. RESULTADOS: A análise morfométrica revelou médias superiores de diâmetro alveolar médio nos pulmões dos grupos submetidos à papaína em comparação com a solução fisiológica. A quantificação de fibras elásticas de septos alveolares dos animais tratados com papaína foi menor que daqueles com solução fisiológica. A elastância dos animais submetidos à bilobectomia e papaína foi maior que a dos submetidos à papaína sem cirurgia e estatisticamente igual aos submetidos à solução fisiológica com e sem cirurgia. CONCLUSÃO: A capacidade de recolhimento elástico do sistema respiratório dos animais com enfisema pulmonar submetidos à redução de volume pulmonar através da bilobectomia retornou a valores equivalentes aos dos grupos controle.BACKGROUND: Lung volume reduction surgery may be a viable treatment alternative for emphysema patients suffering from severe

  3. Heliox allows for lower minute volume ventilation in an animal model of ventilator-induced lung injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte J Beurskens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helium is a noble gas with a low density, allowing for lower driving pressures and increased carbon dioxide (CO2 diffusion. Since application of protective ventilation can be limited by the development of hypoxemia or acidosis, we hypothesized that therefore heliox facilitates ventilation in an animal model of ventilator-induced lung injury. METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats (N=8 per group were mechanically ventilated with heliox (50% oxygen; 50% helium. Controls received a standard gas mixture (50% oxygen; 50% air. VILI was induced by application of tidal volumes of 15 mL kg(-1; lung protective ventilated animals were ventilated with 6 mL kg(-1. Respiratory parameters were monitored with a pneumotach system. Respiratory rate was adjusted to maintain arterial pCO2 within 4.5-5.5 kPa, according to hourly drawn arterial blood gases. After 4 hours, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF was obtained. Data are mean (SD. RESULTS: VILI resulted in an increase in BALF protein compared to low tidal ventilation (629 (324 vs. 290 (181 μg mL(-1; p<0.05 and IL-6 levels (640 (8.7 vs. 206 (8.7 pg mL(-1; p<0.05, whereas cell counts did not differ between groups after this short course of mechanical ventilation. Ventilation with heliox resulted in a decrease in mean respiratory minute volume ventilation compared to control (123 ± 0.6 vs. 146 ± 8.9 mL min(-1, P<0.001, due to a decrease in respiratory rate (22 (0.4 vs. 25 (2.1 breaths per minute; p<0.05, while pCO2 levels and tidal volumes remained unchanged, according to protocol. There was no effect of heliox on inspiratory pressure, while compliance was reduced. In this mild lung injury model, heliox did not exert anti-inflammatory effects. CONCLUSIONS: Heliox allowed for a reduction in respiratory rate and respiratory minute volume during VILI, while maintaining normal acid-base balance. Use of heliox may be a useful approach when protective tidal volume ventilation is limited by the development of

  4. Effects of preoperative inspiratory muscle training in obese women undergoing open bariatric surgery: respiratory muscle strength, lung volumes, and diaphragmatic excursion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Cangussu Barbalho-Moulim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine whether preoperative inspiratory muscle training is able to attenuate the impact of surgical trauma on the respiratory muscle strength, in the lung volumes, and diaphragmatic excursion in obese women undergoing open bariatric surgery. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Meridional Hospital, Cariacica/ES, Brazil. SUBJECTS: Thirty-two obese women undergoing elective open bariatric surgery were randomly assigned to receive preoperative inspiratory muscle training (inspiratory muscle training group or usual care (control group. MAIN MEASURES: Respiratory muscle strength (maximal static respiratory pressure - maximal inspiratory pressure and maximal expiratory pressure, lung volumes, and diaphragmatic excursion. RESULTS: After training, there was a significant increase only in the maximal inspiratory pressure in the inspiratory muscle training group. The maximal expiratory pressure, the lung volumes and the diaphragmatic excursion did not show any significant change with training. In the postoperative period there was a significant decrease in maximal inspiratory pressure in both the groups. However, there was a decrease of 28% in the inspiratory muscle training group, whereas it was 47% in the control group. The decrease in maximal expiratory pressure and in lung volumes in the postoperative period was similar between the groups. There was a significant reduction in the measures of diaphragmatic excursion in both the groups. CONCLUSION: The preoperative inspiratory muscle training increased the inspiratory muscle strength (maximal inspiratory pressure and attenuated the negative postoperative effects of open bariatric surgery in obese women for this variable, though not influencing the lung volumes and the diaphragmatic excursion.

  5. Effects of preoperative inspiratory muscle training in obese women undergoing open bariatric surgery: respiratory muscle strength, lung volumes, and diaphragmatic excursion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbalho-Moulim, Marcela Cangussu; Miguel, Gustavo Peixoto Soares; Forti, Eli Maria Pazzianotto; Campos, Flavio do Amaral; Costa, Dirceu

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether preoperative inspiratory muscle training is able to attenuate the impact of surgical trauma on the respiratory muscle strength, in the lung volumes, and diaphragmatic excursion in obese women undergoing open bariatric surgery. Randomized controlled trial. Meridional Hospital, Cariacica/ES, Brazil. Thirty-two obese women undergoing elective open bariatric surgery were randomly assigned to receive preoperative inspiratory muscle training (inspiratory muscle training group) or usual care (control group). Respiratory muscle strength (maximal static respiratory pressure--maximal inspiratory pressure and maximal expiratory pressure), lung volumes, and diaphragmatic excursion. After training, there was a significant increase only in the maximal inspiratory pressure in the inspiratory muscle training group. The maximal expiratory pressure, the lung volumes and the diaphragmatic excursion did not show any significant change with training. In the postoperative period there was a significant decrease in maximal inspiratory pressure in both the groups. However, there was a decrease of 28% in the inspiratory muscle training group, whereas it was 47% in the control group. The decrease in maximal expiratory pressure and in lung volumes in the postoperative period was similar between the groups. There was a significant reduction in the measures of diaphragmatic excursion in both the groups. The preoperative inspiratory muscle training increased the inspiratory muscle strength (maximal inspiratory pressure) and attenuated the negative postoperative effects of open bariatric surgery in obese women for this variable, though not influencing the lung volumes and the diaphragmatic excursion.

  6. Observer variation in target volume delineation of lung cancer related to radiation oncologist-computer interaction: A 'Big Brother' evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenbakkers, Roel J.H.M.; Duppen, Joop C.; Fitton, Isabelle; Deurloo, Kirsten E.I.; Zijp, Lambert; Uitterhoeve, Apollonia L.J.; Rodrigus, Patrick T.R.; Kramer, Gijsbert W.P.; Bussink, Johan; Jaeger, Katrien De; Belderbos, Jose S.A.; Hart, Augustinus A.M.; Nowak, Peter J.C.M.; Herk, Marcel van; Rasch, Coen R.N.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the process of target volume delineation in lung cancer for optimization of imaging, delineation protocol and delineation software. Patients and methods: Eleven radiation oncologists (observers) from five different institutions delineated the Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) including positive lymph nodes of 22 lung cancer patients (stages I-IIIB) on CT only. All radiation oncologist-computer interactions were recorded with a tool called 'Big Brother'. For each radiation oncologist and patient the following issues were analyzed: delineation time, number of delineated points and corrections, zoom levels, level and window (L/W) settings, CT slice changes, use of side windows (coronal and sagittal) and software button use. Results: The mean delineation time per GTV was 16 min (SD 10 min). The mean delineation time for lymph node positive patients was on average 3 min larger (P=0.02) than for lymph node negative patients. Many corrections (55%) were due to L/W change (e.g. delineating in mediastinum L/W and then correcting in lung L/W). For the lymph node region, a relatively large number of corrections was found (3.7 corr/cm 2 ), indicating that it was difficult to delineate lymph nodes. For the tumor-atelectasis region, a relative small number of corrections was found (1.0 corr/cm 2 ), indicating that including or excluding atelectasis into the GTV was a clinical decision. Inappropriate use of L/W settings was frequently found (e.g. 46% of all delineated points in the tumor-lung region were delineated in mediastinum L/W settings). Despite a large observer variation in cranial and caudal direction of 0.72 cm (1 SD), the coronal and sagittal side windows were not used in 45 and 60% of the cases, respectively. For the more difficult cases, observer variation was smaller when the coronal and sagittal side windows were used. Conclusions: With the 'Big Brother' tool a method was developed to trace the delineation process. The differences between

  7. Comparison of distinctive models for calculating an interlobar emphysema heterogeneity index in patients prior to endoscopic lung volume reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theilig D

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Dorothea Theilig,1 Felix Doellinger,1 Alexander Poellinger,1 Vera Schreiter,1 Konrad Neumann,2 Ralf-Harto Hubner31Department of Radiology, Charité Campus Virchow Klinikum, Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany; 2Institute of Biometrics and Clinical Epidemiology, Charité Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany; 3Department of Pneumology, Charité Campus Virchow Klinikum, Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, GermanyBackground: The degree of interlobar emphysema heterogeneity is thought to play an important role in the outcome of endoscopic lung volume reduction (ELVR therapy of patients with advanced COPD. There are multiple ways one could possibly define interlobar emphysema heterogeneity, and there is no standardized definition.Purpose: The aim of this study was to derive a formula for calculating an interlobar emphysema heterogeneity index (HI when evaluating a patient for ELVR. Furthermore, an attempt was made to identify a threshold for relevant interlobar emphysema heterogeneity with regard to ELVR.Patients and methods: We retrospectively analyzed 50 patients who had undergone technically successful ELVR with placement of one-way valves at our institution and had received lung function tests and computed tomography scans before and after treatment. Predictive accuracy of the different methods for HI calculation was assessed with receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis, assuming a minimum difference in forced expiratory volume in 1 second of 100 mL to indicate a clinically important change.Results: The HI defined as emphysema score of the targeted lobe (TL minus emphysema score of the ipsilateral nontargeted lobe disregarding the middle lobe yielded the best predicative accuracy (AUC =0.73, P=0.008. The HI defined as emphysema score of the TL minus emphysema score of the lung without the TL showed a similarly good predictive accuracy (AUC =0.72, P=0.009. Subgroup

  8. Noninvasive Evaluation of Metabolic Tumor Volume in Lewis Lung Carcinoma Tumor-Bearing C57BL/6 Mice with Micro-PET and the Radiotracers 18F-Alfatide and 18F-FDG: A Comparative Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chun Wei

    Full Text Available To explore the value of a new simple lyophilized kit for labeling PRGD2 peptide (18F-ALF-NOTA-PRGD2, denoted as 18F-alfatide in the determination of metabolic tumor volume (MTV with micro-PET in lewis lung carcinoma (LLC tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice verified by pathologic examination and compared with those using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG PET.All LLC tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice underwent two attenuation-corrected whole-body micro-PET scans with the radiotracers 18F-alfatide and 18F-FDG within two days. 18F-alfatide metabolic tumor volume (VRGD and 18F-FDG metabolic tumor volume (VFDG were manually delineated slice by slice on PET images. Pathologic tumor volume (VPath was measured in vitro after the xenografts were removed.A total of 37 mice with NSCLC xenografts were enrolled and 33 of them underwent 18F-alfatide PET, and 35 of them underwent 18F-FDG PET and all underwent pathological examination. The mean ± standard deviation of VPath, VRGD, and VFDG were 0.59±0.32 cm3 (range,0.13~1.64 cm3, 0.61±0.37 cm3 (range,0.15~1.86 cm3, and 1.24±0.53 cm3 (range,0.17~2.20 cm3, respectively. VPath vs. VRGD, VPath vs. VFDG, and VRGD vs. VFDG comparisons were t = -0.145, P = 0.885, t = -6.239, P<0.001, and t = -5.661, P<0.001, respectively. No significant difference was found between VPath and VRGD. VFDG was much larger than VRGD and VPath. VRGD seemed more approximate to the pathologic gross tumor volume. Furthermore, VPath was more strongly correlated with VRGD (R = 0.964,P<0.001 than with VFDG (R = 0.584,P<0.001.18F-alfatide PET provided a better estimation of gross tumor volume than 18F-FDG PET in LLC tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice.

  9. Extravascular lung water, B-type natriuretic peptide, and blood volume contraction enable diagnosis of weaning-induced pulmonary edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dres, Martin; Teboul, Jean-Louis; Anguel, Nadia; Guerin, Laurent; Richard, Christian; Monnet, Xavier

    2014-08-01

    We tested whether the changes in extravascular lung water indexed for ideal body weight could detect weaning-induced pulmonary edema. We also studied the diagnostic value of blood volume contraction indices and B-type natriuretic peptide variations. Prospective study. Twenty-one patients who failed a first spontaneous breathing trial. None. We performed a second 60-minute T-tube spontaneous breathing trial. Before and at the end of spontaneous breathing trial, we recorded pulmonary artery occlusion pressure, the extravascular lung water indexed for ideal body weight, plasma B-type natriuretic peptide level, hemoglobin, and plasma protein concentrations. Weaning-induced pulmonary edema was defined by the association of signs of clinical intolerance and a pulmonary artery occlusion pressure greater than or equal to 18 mm Hg at the end of spontaneous breathing trial. Because some patients performed several spontaneous breathing trial, a primary analysis included all spontaneous breathing trial and a secondary analysis included only the first spontaneous breathing trial of each patient. In primary analysis, 36 spontaneous breathing trials were analyzed, 21 spontaneous breathing trial with weaning-induced pulmonary edema and 15 without. During spontaneous breathing trial, extravascular lung water indexed for ideal body weight increased only in cases with weaning-induced pulmonary edema (25% ± 23%). Plasma protein concentration, hemoglobin concentration, and B-type natriuretic peptide also significantly increased only in cases with weaning-induced pulmonary edema (9% ± 3%, 9% ± 4%, 21% ± 23%, respectively). The areas under the receiver operating characteristics curves to detect weaning-induced pulmonary edema were 0.89 (95% CI, 0.78-0.99) for extravascular lung water indexed for ideal body weight, 0.97 (0.93-1.01) for spontaneous breathing trial-induced changes in plasma protein concentration, 0.96 (0.90-1.01) for changes in hemoglobin concentration, and 0.76 (0

  10. Calculation of Lung Cancer Volume of Target Based on Thorax Computed Tomography Images using Active Contour Segmentation Method for Treatment Planning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra Yosandha, Fiet; Adi, Kusworo; Edi Widodo, Catur

    2017-06-01

    In this research, calculation process of the lung cancer volume of target based on computed tomography (CT) thorax images was done. Volume of the target calculation was done in purpose to treatment planning system in radiotherapy. The calculation of the target volume consists of gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV), planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OAR). The calculation of the target volume was done by adding the target area on each slices and then multiply the result with the slice thickness. Calculations of area using of digital image processing techniques with active contour segmentation method. This segmentation for contouring to obtain the target volume. The calculation of volume produced on each of the targets is 577.2 cm3 for GTV, 769.9 cm3 for CTV, 877.8 cm3 for PTV, 618.7 cm3 for OAR 1, 1,162 cm3 for OAR 2 right, and 1,597 cm3 for OAR 2 left. These values indicate that the image processing techniques developed can be implemented to calculate the lung cancer target volume based on CT thorax images. This research expected to help doctors and medical physicists in determining and contouring the target volume quickly and precisely.

  11. Dose–Volume Parameters Predict for the Development of Chest Wall Pain After Stereotactic Body Radiation for Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutter, Robert W.; Liu Fan; Abreu, Andres; Yorke, Ellen; Jackson, Andrew; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Chest wall (CW) pain has recently been recognized as an important adverse effect of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We developed a dose–volume model to predict the development of this toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 126 patients with primary, clinically node-negative NSCLC received three to five fractions of SBRT to doses of 40–60 Gy and were prospectively followed. The dose–absolute volume histograms of two different definitions of the CW as an organ at risk (CW3cm and CW2cm) were examined for all 126 patients. Results: With a median follow-up of 16 months, the 2-year estimated actuarial incidence of Grade ≥ 2 CW pain was 39%. The median time to onset of Grade ≥ 2 CW pain (National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, Version 3.0) was 9 months. There was no predictive advantage for biologically corrected dose over physical dose. Neither fraction number (p = 0.07) nor prescription dose (p = 0.07) were significantly correlated with the development of Grade ≥ 2 CW pain. Cox Proportional Hazards analysis identified significant correlation with a broad range of dose-volume combinations, with the CW volume receiving 30 Gy (V30) as one of the strongest predictors (p 3 of CW2cm, there was a significant correlation with Grade ≥ 2 CW pain (p = 0.004). Conclusions: CW toxicity after SBRT is common and long-term follow-up is needed to identify affected patients. A volume of CW ≥ 70 cm 3 receiving 30 Gy is significantly correlated with Grade ≥ 2 CW pain. We are currently applying this constraint at our institution for patients receiving thoracic SBRT. An actuarial atlas of our data is provided as an electronic supplement to facilitate data-sharing and meta-analysis relating to CW pain.

  12. EFFECTS OF A BASKETBALL ACTIVITY ON LUNG CAPILLARY BLOOD VOLUME AND MEMBRANE DIFFUSING CAPACITY, MEASURED BY NO/CO TRANSFER IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rim Dridi

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In both children and adults, acute exercise increases lung capillary blood volume (Vc and membrane factor (DmCO. We sought to determine whether basketball training affected this adaptation to exercise in children. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of two years sport activity on the components of pulmonary gas transfer in children. Over a 2-yr period, we retested 60 nine year old boys who were initially separated in two groups: 30 basketball players (P (9.0 ± 1.0 yrs; 35.0 ± 5.2 kg; 1.43 ± 0.05 m, and matched non players controls (C (8.9 ± 1.0 yrs; 35.0 ± 6.0 kg; 1.44 ± 0.06 m who did not perform any extracurricular activity, Vc and DmCO were measured by the NO/CO transfer method at rest and during sub-maximal exercise. Maximal aerobic power and peak power output was 12% higher in the trained group compared to matched controls (p < 0.05. Nitric oxide lung transfer (TLNO per unit lung volume and thus, DmCO per unit of lung volume (VA were higher at rest and during exercise in the group which had undergone regular basketball activity compared to matched controls (p < 0.05. Neither lung capillary blood volume nor total lung transfer for carbon monoxide (TLCO were significantly different between groups. These results suggest that active sport can alter the properties of the lung alveolo-capillary membrane by improving alveolar membrane conductance in children

  13. Inclusion of functional information from perfusion SPECT improves predictive value of dose-volume parameters in lung toxicity outcome after radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer: A prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farr, Katherina P; Kallehauge, Jesper F; Møller, Ditte S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To compare functional and standard dose-volume parameters as predictors of postradiation pulmonary toxicity in lung cancer patients undergoing curative chemo-radiotherapy (RT) studied prospectively. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 58 patients treated with Intensity Modula...

  14. Comparison of extravascular lung water volume with radiographic findings in dogs with experimentally increased permeability pulmonary edema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, A.; Okumura, S.; Miyamoto, T.; Hagio, M.; Fujinaga, T.

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between extravascular lung water volume (ELWV) and chest radiographical findings was studied in general-anesthetized beagles. The dogs were experimentally injected with oleic acid to increase pulmonary vascular permeability. When the ELWV value in the dogs increased more than approximately 37% from the control value, their chest radiographs began to show signs of pulmonary edema. At this time, the chest X-ray density increased to 10% above the control level. PaO2 decreased, and PaCO2 increased after the administration of oleic acid. This clearly showed that the pulmonary gas exchange function was reduced following increasing ELWV. This comparison showed that probably the thermal-sodium double indicator dilution measurement of ELWV can detect slight hyperpermeability pulmonary edema that does not show on chest radiographs. The chest radiograph was therefore not suitable for the detection of slight pulmonary edema, because it did not show any changes in the early stages in hyperpermeability pulmonary edema

  15. Visual classification of emphysema heterogeneity compared with objective measurements: HRCT vs spiral CT in candidates for lung volume reduction surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cederlund, K.; Hoegberg, S.; Rasmussen, E.; Svane, B.; Bergstrand, L.; Tylen, U.; Aspelin, P.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether spiral CT is superior to high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in evaluating the radiological morphology of emphysema, and whether the combination of both CT techniques improves the evaluation in patients undergoing lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS). The material consisted of HRCT (with 2-mm slice thickness) and spiral CT (with 10-mm slice thickness) of 94 candidates for LVRS. Selected image pairs from these examinations were evaluated. Each image pair consisted of one image from the cranial part of the lung and one image from the caudal part. The degree of emphysema in the two images was calculated by computer. The difference between the images determined the degree of heterogeneity. Five classes of heterogeneity were defined. The study was performed by visual classification of 95 image pairs (spiral CT) and 95 image pairs (HRCT) into one of five different classes of emphysema heterogeneity. This visual classification was compared with the computer-based classification. Spiral CT was superior to HRCT with 47% correct classifications of emphysema heterogeneity compared with 40% for HRCT-based classification (p<0.05). The combination of the techniques did not improve the evaluation (42%). Spiral CT is superior to HRCT in determining heterogeneity of emphysema visually, and should be included in the pre-operative CT evaluation of LVRS candidates. (orig.)

  16. Visual classification of emphysema heterogeneity compared with objective measurements: HRCT vs spiral CT in candidates for lung volume reduction surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cederlund, K.; Hoegberg, S.; Rasmussen, E.; Svane, B. [Department of Thoracic Radiology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Bergstrand, L. [Department of Radiology, Danderyds Hospital, Danderyd (Sweden); Tylen, U. [Deparment of Radiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenberg (Sweden); Aspelin, P. [Department of Radiology, Huddinge University Hospital, Huddinge (Sweden)

    2002-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether spiral CT is superior to high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in evaluating the radiological morphology of emphysema, and whether the combination of both CT techniques improves the evaluation in patients undergoing lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS). The material consisted of HRCT (with 2-mm slice thickness) and spiral CT (with 10-mm slice thickness) of 94 candidates for LVRS. Selected image pairs from these examinations were evaluated. Each image pair consisted of one image from the cranial part of the lung and one image from the caudal part. The degree of emphysema in the two images was calculated by computer. The difference between the images determined the degree of heterogeneity. Five classes of heterogeneity were defined. The study was performed by visual classification of 95 image pairs (spiral CT) and 95 image pairs (HRCT) into one of five different classes of emphysema heterogeneity. This visual classification was compared with the computer-based classification. Spiral CT was superior to HRCT with 47% correct classifications of emphysema heterogeneity compared with 40% for HRCT-based classification (p<0.05). The combination of the techniques did not improve the evaluation (42%). Spiral CT is superior to HRCT in determining heterogeneity of emphysema visually, and should be included in the pre-operative CT evaluation of LVRS candidates. (orig.)

  17. Prenatal MRI fetal lung volumes and percent liver herniation predict pulmonary morbidity in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Irving J; Olutoye, Oluyinka O; Cass, Darrell L; Fallon, Sara C; Lazar, David A; Cassady, Christopher I; Mehollin-Ray, Amy R; Welty, Stephen E; Ruano, Rodrigo; Belfort, Michael A; Lee, Timothy C

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether prenatal imaging parameters are predictive of postnatal CDH-associated pulmonary morbidity. The records of all neonates with CDH treated from 2004 to 2012 were reviewed. Patients requiring supplemental oxygen at 30 days of life (DOL) were classified as having chronic lung disease (CLD). Fetal MRI-measured observed/expected total fetal lung volume (O/E-TFLV) and percent liver herniation (%LH) were recorded. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and multivariate regression were applied to assess the prognostic value of O/E-TFLV and %LH for development of CLD. Of 172 neonates with CDH, 108 had fetal MRIs, and survival was 76%. 82% (89/108) were alive at DOL 30, 46 (52%) of whom had CLD. Neonates with CLD had lower mean O/E-TFLV (30 vs.42%; p=0.001) and higher %LH (21.3±2.8 vs.7.1±1.8%; p20% (AUC=0.78; p20% were highly associated with indicators of long-term pulmonary sequelae. On multivariate analysis, %LH was the strongest predictor of CLD in patients with CDH (OR: 10.96, 95%CI: 2.5-48.9, p=0.002). Prenatal measurement of O/E-TFLV and %LH is predictive of CDH pulmonary morbidity and can aid in establishing parental expectations of postnatal outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Lung volume reduction in pulmonary emphysema from the radiologist's perspective; Lungenvolumenreduktion beim Lungenemphysem aus der Sicht des Radiologen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doellinger, F.; Poellinger, A. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Huebner, R.H. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Internal Medicine/Infectious and Respiratory Diseases; Kuhnigk, J.M. [Fraunhofer MEVIS, Bremen (Germany). Inst. for Medical Image Computing

    2015-08-15

    Pulmonary emphysema causes decrease in lung function due to irreversible dilatation of intrapulmonary air spaces, which is linked to high morbidity and mortality. Lung volume reduction (LVR) is an invasive therapeutical option for pulmonary emphysema in order to improve ventilation mechanics. LVR can be carried out by lung resection surgery or different minimally invasive endoscopical procedures. All LVR-options require mandatory preinterventional evaluation to detect hyperinflated dysfunctional lung areas as target structures for treatment. Quantitative computed tomography can determine the volume percentage of emphysematous lung and its topographical distribution based on the lung's radiodensity. Modern techniques allow for lobebased quantification that facilitates treatment planning. Clinical tests still play the most important role in post-interventional therapy monitoring, but CT is crucial in the detection of postoperative complications and foreshadows the method's high potential in sophisticated experimental studies. Within the last ten years, LVR with endobronchial valves has become an extensively researched minimally-invasive treatment option. However, this therapy is considerably complicated by the frequent occurrence of functional interlobar shunts. The presence of ''collateral ventilation'' has to be ruled out prior to valve implantations, as the presence of these extraanatomical connections between different lobes may jeopardize the success of therapy. Recent experimental studies evaluated the automatic detection of incomplete lobar fissures from CT scans, because they are considered to be a predictor for the existence of shunts. To date, these methods are yet to show acceptable results.

  19. Prediction of post-operative pulmonary function after lobectomy for primary lung cancer: A comparison among counting method, effective lobar volume, and lobar collapsibility using inspiratory/expiratory CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabuuchi, Hidetake, E-mail: h-yabu@med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Health Sciences, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Kawanami, Satoshi, E-mail: kawanami_01@mac.com [Department of Clinical Radiology, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Kamitani, Takeshi, E-mail: kamitani@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Radiology, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Yonezawa, Masato, E-mail: ymasato@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Radiology, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Yamasaki, Yuzo, E-mail: yyama@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Radiology, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Yamanouchi, Torahiko, E-mail: tora0228jp@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Clinical Radiology, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Nagao, Michinobu, E-mail: minagao@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Radiology, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Okamoto, Tatsuro, E-mail: tatsuro@surg2.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Surgery and Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi, E-mail: honda@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Radiology, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • ΔFEV{sub 1.0} and ppoΔFEV{sub 1.0} using lobar collapsibility were strongly correlated. • ΔVC and ppoΔVC using effective lobar volume were strongly correlated. • Counting method was inferior to lobar collapsibility for prediction of ppoFEV{sub 1.0}. • Inspiratory/expiratory CT is useful to predict post-operative pulmonary function. - Abstract: Purpose: To compare the predictabilities of postoperative pulmonary function after lobectomy for primary lung cancer among counting method, effective lobar volume, and lobar collapsibility. Methods: Forty-nine patients who underwent lobectomy for primary lung cancer were enrolled. All patients underwent inspiratory/expiratory CT and pulmonary function tests 2 weeks before surgery and postoperative pulmonary function tests 6–7 months after surgery. Pulmonary function losses (ΔFEV{sub 1.0} and ΔVC) were calculated from the pulmonary function tests. Predictive postoperative pulmonary function losses (ppoΔFEV{sub 1.0} and ppoΔVC) were calculated using counting method, effective volume, and lobar collapsibility. Correlations and agreements between ΔFEV{sub 1.0} and ppoFEV{sub 1.0} and those between ΔVC and ppoΔVC were tested among three methods using Spearman’s correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman plots. Results: ΔFEV{sub 1.0} and ppoΔFEV{sub 1.0insp-exp} were strongly correlated (r = 0.72), whereas ΔFEV{sub 1.0} and ppoΔFEV{sub 1.0count} and ΔFEV{sub 1.0} and Pred. ΔFEV{sub 1.0eff.vol.} were moderately correlated (r = 0.50, 0.56). ΔVC and ppoΔVC{sub eff.vol.} (r = 0.71) were strongly correlated, whereas ΔVC and ppoΔVC{sub count}, and ΔVC and ppoΔVC {sub insp-exp} were moderately correlated (r = 0.55, 0.42). Conclusions: Volumetry from inspiratory/expiratory CT data could be useful to predict postoperative pulmonary function after lobectomy for primary lung cancer.

  20. A technique of using gated-CT images to determine internal target volume (ITV) for fractionated stereotactic lung radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jianyue; Ajlouni, Munther; Chen Qing; Yin, Fang-Fang; Movsas, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To develop and evaluate a technique and procedure of using gated-CT images in combination with PET image to determine the internal target volume (ITV), which could reduce the planning target volume (PTV) with adequate target coverage. Patients and methods: A skin marker-based gating system connected to a regular single slice CT scanner was used for this study. A motion phantom with adjustable motion amplitude was used to evaluate the CT gating system. Specifically, objects of various sizes/shapes, considered as virtual tumors, were placed on the phantom to evaluate the number of phases of gated images required to determine the ITV while taking into account tumor size, shape and motion. A procedure of using gated-CT and PET images to define ITV for patients was developed and was tested in patients enrolled in an IRB approved protocol. Results: The CT gating system was capable of removing motion artifacts for target motion as large as 3-cm when it was gated at optimal phases. A phantom study showed that two gated-CT scans at the end of expiration and the end of inspiration would be sufficient to determine the ITV for tumor motion less than 1-cm, and another mid-phase scan would be required for tumors with 2-cm motion, especially for small tumors. For patients, the ITV encompassing visible tumors in all sets of gated-CT and regular spiral CT images seemed to be consistent with the target volume determined from PET images. PTV expanded from the ITV with a setup uncertainty margin had less volume than PTVs from spiral CT images with a 10-mm generalized margin or an individualized margin determined at fluoroscopy. Conclusions: A technique of determining the ITV using gated-CT images was developed and was clinically implemented successfully for fractionated stereotactic lung radiotherapy

  1. Measurement of regional extravascular lung density and of pulmonary blood volume with positron emitting isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larock, M.P.; Quaglia, L.; Lamotte, D.; De Landsheere, C.; Del Fiore, G.; Chevigne, M.; Peters, J.M.; Rigo, P. (Universite de Liege (Belgium))

    1982-01-01

    Studies of pulmonary blood volume changes with exercise can be performed after labelling of the blood pool by /sup 11/CO inhalation. Positron transaxial tomography permits the quantitative study of density distribution of the chest and of the pulmonary blood volume. This paper represents our preliminary experience with these techniques on models and control patients. We have first verified the linearity of transmission for density distribution below one. The tomographic examination first records a transmission image, then an emission image on the same section. We next normalize emission and transmission values on a region of unit density corresponding to blood: then we substract the emission from the transmission values to measure the extravascular pulmonary density. With crystal probes we record pulmonary blood volume variations before, during and after exercise. Peripheral hemodynamic variations explain the change recorded at the begining and at the end of exercise. Combination of these two techniques should help us to better study the importance of the acute changes in the ''formation'' of pulmonary oedema and its influence on regional pulmonary blood volume.

  2. Assessment of minute volume of lung in NPP workers for Korean reference man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. J.; Song, S. H.; Lee, J.; Jin, Y. W.; Yim, Y. K.; Kim, J. S.

    2001-01-01

    To formulation of the reference Korean for radiation protection purpose, we measured the forced vital capacity(FVC), forced expiratory volume in second(FEVI), minute ventilation(MV) of Nuclear Power Plant workers using SP-1 Spirometry Unit(Schiller AG. 1998) and eatimated the liters of breathed for working and resting, also compared these data with ICRP 23

  3. Assessment of minute volume of lung in NPP workers for Korean reference man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. J.; Song, S. H.; Lee, J.; Jin, Y. W.; Yim, Y. K.; Kim, J. S. [KNETEC, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    To formulation of the reference Korean for radiation protection purpose, we measured the forced vital capacity(FVC), forced expiratory volume in second(FEVI), minute ventilation(MV) of Nuclear Power Plant workers using SP-1 Spirometry Unit(Schiller AG. 1998) and eatimated the liters of breathed for working and resting, also compared these data with ICRP 23.

  4. Variations in Target Volume Definition for Postoperative Radiotherapy in Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Analysis of an International Contouring Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spoelstra, Femke; Senan, Suresh; Le Pechoux, Cecile; Ishikura, Satoshi; Casas, Francesc; Ball, David; Price, Allan; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Soernsen de Koste, John R. van

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) in patients with completely resected non-small-cell lung cancer with mediastinal involvement is controversial because of the failure of earlier trials to demonstrate a survival benefit. Improved techniques may reduce toxicity, but the treatment fields used in routine practice have not been well studied. We studied routine target volumes used by international experts and evaluated the impact of a contouring protocol developed for a new prospective study, the Lung Adjuvant Radiotherapy Trial (Lung ART). Methods and Materials: Seventeen thoracic radiation oncologists were invited to contour their routine clinical target volumes (CTV) for 2 representative patients using a validated CD-ROM-based contouring program. Subsequently, the Lung ART study protocol was provided, and both cases were contoured again. Variations in target volumes and their dosimetric impact were analyzed. Results: Routine CTVs were received for each case from 10 clinicians, whereas six provided both routine and protocol CTVs for each case. Routine CTVs varied up to threefold between clinicians, but use of the Lung ART protocol significantly decreased variations. Routine CTVs in a postlobectomy patient resulted in V 20 values ranging from 12.7% to 54.0%, and Lung ART protocol CTVs resulted in values of 20.6% to 29.2%. Similar results were seen for other toxicity parameters and in the postpneumectomy patient. With the exception of upper paratracheal nodes, protocol contouring improved coverage of the required nodal stations. Conclusion: Even among experts, significant interclinician variations are observed in PORT fields. Inasmuch as contouring variations can confound the interpretation of PORT results, mandatory quality assurance procedures have been incorporated into the current Lung ART study.

  5. Comparison of primary tumour volumes delineated on four-dimensional computed tomography maximum intensity projection and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography computed tomography images of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Yili; Li, Jianbin; Zhang, Yingjie; Wang, Wei; Fan, Tingyong; Shao, Qian; Xu, Min; Guo, Yanluan; Sun, Xiaorong; Shang, Dongping

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to compare the positional and volumetric differences of tumour volumes based on the maximum intensity projection (MIP) of four-dimensional CT (4DCT) and 18 F-fluorodexyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography CT (PET/CT) images for the primary tumour of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Ten patients with NSCLC underwent 4DCT and 18 F-FDG PET/CT scans of the thorax on the same day. Internal gross target volumes (IGTVs) of the primary tumours were contoured on the MIP images of 4DCT to generate IGTV MIP . Gross target volumes (GTVs) based on PET (GTV PET ) were determined with nine different threshold methods using the auto-contouring function. The differences in the volume, position, matching index (MI) and degree of inclusion (DI) of the GTV PET and IGTV MIP were investigated. In volume terms, GTV PET2.0 and GTV PET20% approximated closely to IGTV MIP with mean volume ratio of 0.93 ± 0.45 and 1.06 ± 0.43, respectively. The best MI was between IGTV MIP and GTV PET20% (0.45 ± 0.23). The best DI of IGTV MIP in GTV PET was IGTV MIP in GTV PET20% (0.61 ± 0.26). In 3D PET images, the GTVPET contoured by standardised uptake value (SUV) 2.0 or 20% of maximal SUV (SUV max ) approximate closely to the IGTV MIP in target size, while the spatial mismatch is apparent between them. Therefore, neither of them could replace IGTV MIP in spatial position and form. The advent of 4D PET/CT may improve the accuracy of contouring the perimeter for moving targets.

  6. Investigation of the relationship between gross tumor volume location and pneumonitis rates using a large clinical database of non-small-cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Tucker, Susan L; Liao, Zhongxing; Martel, Mary K

    2012-04-01

    Studies have suggested that function may vary throughout the lung, and that patients who have tumors located in the base of the lung are more susceptible to radiation pneumonitis. The purpose of our study was to investigate the relationship between gross tumor volume (GTV) location and pneumonitis rates using a large clinical database of 547 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. The GTV centroids of all patients were mapped onto one common coordinate system, in which the boundaries of the coordinate system were defined by the extreme points of each individual patient lung. The data were qualitatively analyzed by graphing all centroids and displaying the data according to the presence of severe pneumonitis, tumor stage, and smoking status. The centroids were grouped according to superior-inferior segments, and the pneumonitis rates were analyzed. In addition, we incorporated the GTV centroid information into a Lyman-Kutcher-Burman normal tissue complication probability model and tested whether adding spatial information significantly improved the fit of the model. Of the 547 patients analyzed, 111 (20.3%) experienced severe radiation pneumonitis. The pneumonitis incidence rates were 16%, 23%, and 21% for the superior, middle, and inferior thirds of the lung, respectively. Qualitatively, the GTV centroids of nonsmokers were notably absent from the superior portion of the lung. In addition, the GTV centroids of patients who had Stage III and IV clinical staging were concentrated toward the medial edge of the lung. The comparison between the GTV centroid model and the conventional dose-volume model did not yield a statistically significant difference in model fit. Lower pneumonitis rates were noted for the superior portion of the lung; however the differences were not statistically significant. For our patient cohort, incorporating GTV centroid information did not lead to a statistically significant improvement in the fit of the pneumonitis model. Copyright

  7. Investigation of the Relationship Between Gross Tumor Volume Location and Pneumonitis Rates Using a Large Clinical Database of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Tucker, Susan L.; Liao Zhongxing; Martel, Mary K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Studies have suggested that function may vary throughout the lung, and that patients who have tumors located in the base of the lung are more susceptible to radiation pneumonitis. The purpose of our study was to investigate the relationship between gross tumor volume (GTV) location and pneumonitis rates using a large clinical database of 547 patients with non–small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: The GTV centroids of all patients were mapped onto one common coordinate system, in which the boundaries of the coordinate system were defined by the extreme points of each individual patient lung. The data were qualitatively analyzed by graphing all centroids and displaying the data according to the presence of severe pneumonitis, tumor stage, and smoking status. The centroids were grouped according to superior–inferior segments, and the pneumonitis rates were analyzed. In addition, we incorporated the GTV centroid information into a Lyman–Kutcher–Burman normal tissue complication probability model and tested whether adding spatial information significantly improved the fit of the model. Results: Of the 547 patients analyzed, 111 (20.3%) experienced severe radiation pneumonitis. The pneumonitis incidence rates were 16%, 23%, and 21% for the superior, middle, and inferior thirds of the lung, respectively. Qualitatively, the GTV centroids of nonsmokers were notably absent from the superior portion of the lung. In addition, the GTV centroids of patients who had Stage III and IV clinical staging were concentrated toward the medial edge of the lung. The comparison between the GTV centroid model and the conventional dose–volume model did not yield a statistically significant difference in model fit. Conclusions: Lower pneumonitis rates were noted for the superior portion of the lung; however the differences were not statistically significant. For our patient cohort, incorporating GTV centroid information did not lead to a statistically significant

  8. Cyclic PaO2 oscillations assessed in the renal microcirculation: correlation with tidal volume in a porcine model of lung lavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Rainer; Möllmann, Christian; Ziebart, Alexander; Liu, Tanghua; David, Matthias; Hartmann, Erik K

    2017-07-11

    Oscillations of the arterial partial pressure of oxygen induced by varying shunt fractions occur during cyclic alveolar recruitment within the injured lung. Recently, these were proposed as a pathomechanism that may be relevant for remote organ injury following acute respiratory distress syndrome. This study examines the transmission of oxygen oscillations to the renal tissue and their tidal volume dependency. Lung injury was induced by repetitive bronchoalveolar lavage in eight anaesthetized pigs. Cyclic alveolar recruitment was provoked by high tidal volume ventilation. Oscillations of the arterial partial pressure of oxygen were measured in real-time in the macrocirculation by multi-frequency phase fluorimetry and in the renal microcirculation by combined white-light spectrometry and laser-Doppler flowmetry during tidal volume down-titration. Significant respiratory-dependent oxygen oscillations were detected in the macrocirculation and transmitted to the renal microcirculation in a substantial extent. The amplitudes of these oscillations significantly correlate to the applied tidal volume and are minimized during down-titration. In a porcine model oscillations of the arterial partial pressure of oxygen are induced by cyclic alveolar recruitment and transmitted to the renal microcirculation in a tidal volume-dependent fashion. They might play a role in organ crosstalk and remote organ damage following lung injury.

  9. Performance of Leak Compensation in All-Age ICU Ventilators During Volume-Targeted Neonatal Ventilation: A Lung Model Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itagaki, Taiga; Bennett, Desmond J; Chenelle, Christopher T; Fisher, Daniel F; Kacmarek, Robert M

    2017-01-01

    Volume-targeted ventilation is increasingly used in low birthweight infants because of the potential for reducing volutrauma and avoiding hypocapnea. However, it is not known what level of air leak is acceptable during neonatal volume-targeted ventilation when leak compensation is activated concurrently. Four ICU ventilators (Servo-i, PB980, V500, and Avea) were compared in available invasive volume-targeted ventilation modes (pressure control continuous spontaneous ventilation [PC-CSV] and pressure control continuous mandatory ventilation [PC-CMV]). The Servo-i and PB980 were tested with (+) and without (-) their proximal flow sensor. The V500 and Avea were tested with their proximal flow sensor as indicated by their manufacturers. An ASL 5000 lung model was used to simulate 4 neonatal scenarios (body weight 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kg). The ASL 5000 was ventilated via an endotracheal tube with 3 different leaks. Two minutes of data were collected after each change in leak level, and the asynchrony index was calculated. Tidal volume (V T ) before and after the change in leak was assessed. The differences in delivered V T between before and after the change in leak were within ±5% in all scenarios with the PB980 (-/+) and V500. With the Servo-i (-/+), baseline V T was ≥10% greater than set V T during PC-CSV, and delivered V T markedly changed with leak. The Avea demonstrated persistent high V T in all leak scenarios. Across all ventilators, the median asynchrony index was 1% (interquartile range 0-27%) in PC-CSV and 1.8% (0-45%) in PC-CMV. The median asynchrony index was significantly higher in the Servo-i (-/+) than in the PB980 (-/+) and V500 in 1 and 2 kg scenarios during PC-CSV and PC-CMV. The PB980 and V500 were the only ventilators to acclimate to all leak scenarios and achieve targeted V T . Further clinical investigation is needed to validate the use of leak compensation during neonatal volume-targeted ventilation. Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  10. Comparison of different degrees of variability in tidal volume to prevent deterioration of respiratory system elastance in experimental acute lung inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, T; Silva, P L; Huhle, R; Moraes, L; Santos, R S; Felix, N S; Santos, C L; Morales, M M; Capelozzi, V L; Kasper, M; Pelosi, P; Gama de Abreu, M; Rocco, P R M

    2016-05-01

    Variable ventilation improves respiratory function, but it is not known whether the amount of variability in tidal volume (VT) can be reduced in recruited lungs without a deterioration of respiratory system elastance. Acute lung inflammation was induced by intratracheal instillation of lipopolysaccharide in 35 Wistar rats. Twenty-eight animals were anaesthetized and ventilated in volume-controlled mode. Lungs were recruited by random variation of VT (mean 6 ml kg(-1), coefficient of variation 30%, normal distribution) for 30 min. Animals were randomly assigned to different amounts of VT variability (n=7 for 90 min per group): 30, 15, 7.5, or 0%. Lung function, diffuse alveolar damage, and gene expression of biological markers associated with cell mechanical stress, inflammation, and fibrogenesis were assessed. Seven animals were not ventilated and served as controls for post-mortem analyses. A VT variability of 30%, but not 15, 7.5, or 0%, prevented deterioration of respiratory system elastance [Mean (SD) -7.5 (8.7%), Prespiratory system elastance and was not associated with lung histological damage. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Localization Accuracy of the Clinical Target Volume During Image-Guided Radiotherapy of Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Badawi, Ahmed; Orton, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the position and shape of the originally defined clinical target volume (CTV) over the treatment course, and to assess the impact of gross tumor volume (GTV)-based online computed tomography (CT) guidance on CTV localization accuracy. Methods and Materials: Weekly breath-hold CT scans were acquired in 17 patients undergoing radiotherapy. Deformable registration was used to propagate the GTV and CTV from the first weekly CT image to all other weekly CT images. The on-treatment CT scans were registered rigidly to the planning CT scan based on the GTV location to simulate online guidance, and residual error in the CTV centroids and borders was calculated. Results: The mean GTV after 5 weeks relative to volume at the beginning of treatment was 77% ± 20%, whereas for the prescribed CTV, it was 92% ± 10%. The mean absolute residual error magnitude in the CTV centroid position after a GTV-based localization was 2.9 ± 3.0 mm, and it varied from 0.3 to 20.0 mm over all patients. Residual error of the CTV centroid was associated with GTV regression and anisotropy of regression during treatment (p = 0.02 and p = 0.03, respectively; Spearman rank correlation). A residual error in CTV border position greater than 2 mm was present in 77% of patients and 50% of fractions. Among these fractions, residual error of the CTV borders was 3.5 ± 1.6 mm (left-right), 3.1 ± 0.9 mm (anterior-posterior), and 6.4 ± 7.5 mm (superior-inferior). Conclusions: Online guidance based on the visible GTV produces substantial error in CTV localization, particularly for highly regressing tumors. The results of this study will be useful in designing margins for CTV localization or for developing new online CTV localization strategies.

  12. Efficacy predictors of lung volume reduction with Zephyr valves in a European cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herth, Felix J F; Noppen, Marc; Valipour, Arschang; Leroy, Sylvie; Vergnon, Jean-Michel; Ficker, Joachim H; Egan, Jim J; Gasparini, Stefano; Agusti, Carlos; Holmes-Higgin, Debby; Ernst, Armin

    2012-06-01

    The Endobronchial Valve for Emphysema Palliation Trial (VENT) was a multi-centre, prospective, randomised, controlled trial conducted to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of unilateral endobronchial valve (EBV) treatment. The purpose of this analysis was to assess outcomes in the previously unreported European VENT study cohort. Patients with advanced emphysema were randomly assigned (2:1) to receive Zephyr® (Pulmonx Inc., Redwood City, CA, USA) EBV treatment (n = 111) or medical management (n = 60). At 6 months, EBV patients demonstrated a significant improvement compared with the controls for mean ± SD change in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (7 ± 20% versus 0.5 ± 19%; p = 0.067), cycle ergometry (2 ± 14 W versus -3 ± 10 W; p = 0.04) and St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (-5 ± 14 points versus 0.3 ± 13 points; p = 0.047). At 12 months, the magnitude of the difference between groups for change from baseline was of similar magnitude to the differences seen at 6 months. Rates for complications did not differ significantly. EBV patients with computed tomography (CT) scans suggestive of complete fissure and lobar occlusion had a mean ± SD lobar volume reduction of -80 ± 30% and >50% met minimal clinical difference thresholds. The degree of emphysema heterogeneity did not preclude excellent outcomes. Unilateral lobar volume reduction using EBV treatment is safe and superior clinical results correlated with CT suggestive of complete fissures and successful lobar occlusion. Emphysema heterogeneity was not critical for determining positive outcomes.

  13. The effect of body mass and sex on the accuracy of respiratory magnetometers for measurement of end-expiratory lung volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avraam, Joanne; Bourke, Rosie; Trinder, John; Nicholas, Christian L; Brazzale, Danny; O'Donoghue, Fergal J; Rochford, Peter D; Jordan, Amy S

    2016-11-01

    Respiratory magnetometers are increasingly being used in sleep studies to measure changes in end-expiratory lung volume (EELV), including in obese obstructive sleep apnea patients. Despite this, the accuracy of magnetometers has not been confirmed in obese patients nor compared between sexes. Thus we compared spirometer-measured and magnetometer-estimated lung volume and tidal volume changes during voluntary end-expiratory lung volume changes of 1.5, 1, and 0.5 l above and 0.5 l below functional respiratory capacity in supine normal-weight [body mass index (BMI) 30 kg/m) men and women. Two different magnetometer calibration techniques proposed by Banzett et al. [Banzett RB, Mahan ST, Garner DM, Brughera A, Loring SH. J Appl Physiol (1985) 79: 2169-2176, 1995] and Sackner et al. [Sackner MA, Watson H, Belsito AS, Feinerman D, Suarez M, Gonzalez G, Bizousky F, Krieger B. J Appl Physiol (1985) 66: 410-420, 1989] were assessed. Across all groups and target volumes, magnetometers overestimated spirometer-measured EELV by ~65 ml (women for all target volumes except +0.5 l, whereas no differences between mass or sex groups were observed for the Sackner technique. The variability of breath-to-breath measures of EELV was significantly higher for obese compared with nonobese subjects and was higher for the Sackner than Banzett technique. On the other hand, for tidal volume, both calibration techniques underestimated spirometer measurements (men than in women (0.003). These results indicate that both body mass and sex affect the accuracy of respiratory magnetometers in measuring EELV and tidal volume. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Impulse oscillometry at preschool age is a strong predictor of lung function by flow-volume spirometry in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauhkonen, Eero; Riikonen, Riikka; Törmänen, Sari; Koponen, Petri; Nuolivirta, Kirsi; Helminen, Merja; Toikka, Jyri; Korppi, Matti

    2018-05-01

    The transition from early childhood wheezing to persistent asthma is linked to lung function impairment over time. Little is known how the methods used to study lung function at different ages correlate longitudinally. Sixty-four children with a history of hospitalization for bronchiolitis before 6 months of age were prospectively studied with impulse oscillometry (IOS) at the mean age of 6.3 years and these preschool IOS results were compared with flow-volume spirometry (FVS) measurements at mean age of 11.4 years. The baseline respiratory system resistance at 5 Hz (Rrs5) showed a modest statistically significant correlation with all baseline FVS parameters except FVC. The post-bronchodilator (post-BD) Rrs5 showed a modest statistically significant correlation with post-BD FEV 1 and FEV 1 /FVC. The bronchodilator-induced decrease in Rrs5 showed a modest statistically significant correlation with the percent increase in FEV 1 . Baseline and post-BD respiratory reactance at 5 Hz (Xrs5) showed a modest statistically significant correlation with baseline and post-BD FVS parameters except post-BD FEV 1 /FVC, respectively, and post-BD Xrs5 showed a strong correlation with post-BD FVC (ρ = 0.61) and post-BD FEV 1 (ρ = 0.59). In adjusted linear regression, preschool Xrs5 remained as a statistically significant independent predictor of FVS parameters in adolescence; the one-unit decrease in the Z-score of preschool post-BD Xrs5 predicted 9.6% lower post-BD FEV 1 , 9.3% lower post-BD FVC, and 9.7% lower post-BD MEF 50 when expressed as %-predicted parameters. Persistent post-BD small airway impairment in children with a history of bronchiolitis detected with IOS at preschool age predicted FVS results measured in early adolescence. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Tidal volume single breath washout of two tracer gases--a practical and promising lung function test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Florian; Stern, Georgette; Thamrin, Cindy; Fuchs, Oliver; Riedel, Thomas; Gustafsson, Per; Frey, Urs; Latzin, Philipp

    2011-03-10

    Small airway disease frequently occurs in chronic lung diseases and may cause ventilation inhomogeneity (VI), which can be assessed by washout tests of inert tracer gas. Using two tracer gases with unequal molar mass (MM) and diffusivity increases specificity for VI in different lung zones. Currently washout tests are underutilised due to the time and effort required for measurements. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a simple technique for a new tidal single breath washout test (SBW) of sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) and helium (He) using an ultrasonic flowmeter (USFM). The tracer gas mixture contained 5% SF(6) and 26.3% He, had similar total MM as air, and was applied for a single tidal breath in 13 healthy adults. The USFM measured MM, which was then plotted against expired volume. USFM and mass spectrometer signals were compared in six subjects performing three SBW. Repeatability and reproducibility of SBW, i.e., area under the MM curve (AUC), were determined in seven subjects performing three SBW 24 hours apart. USFM reliably measured MM during all SBW tests (n = 60). MM from USFM reflected SF(6) and He washout patterns measured by mass spectrometer. USFM signals were highly associated with mass spectrometer signals, e.g., for MM, linear regression r-squared was 0.98. Intra-subject coefficient of variation of AUC was 6.8%, and coefficient of repeatability was 11.8%. The USFM accurately measured relative changes in SF(6) and He washout. SBW tests were repeatable and reproducible in healthy adults. We have developed a fast, reliable, and straightforward USFM based SBW method, which provides valid information on SF(6) and He washout patterns during tidal breathing.

  16. Tidal volume single breath washout of two tracer gases--a practical and promising lung function test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Singer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Small airway disease frequently occurs in chronic lung diseases and may cause ventilation inhomogeneity (VI, which can be assessed by washout tests of inert tracer gas. Using two tracer gases with unequal molar mass (MM and diffusivity increases specificity for VI in different lung zones. Currently washout tests are underutilised due to the time and effort required for measurements. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a simple technique for a new tidal single breath washout test (SBW of sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6 and helium (He using an ultrasonic flowmeter (USFM. METHODS: The tracer gas mixture contained 5% SF(6 and 26.3% He, had similar total MM as air, and was applied for a single tidal breath in 13 healthy adults. The USFM measured MM, which was then plotted against expired volume. USFM and mass spectrometer signals were compared in six subjects performing three SBW. Repeatability and reproducibility of SBW, i.e., area under the MM curve (AUC, were determined in seven subjects performing three SBW 24 hours apart. RESULTS: USFM reliably measured MM during all SBW tests (n = 60. MM from USFM reflected SF(6 and He washout patterns measured by mass spectrometer. USFM signals were highly associated with mass spectrometer signals, e.g., for MM, linear regression r-squared was 0.98. Intra-subject coefficient of variation of AUC was 6.8%, and coefficient of repeatability was 11.8%. CONCLUSION: The USFM accurately measured relative changes in SF(6 and He washout. SBW tests were repeatable and reproducible in healthy adults. We have developed a fast, reliable, and straightforward USFM based SBW method, which provides valid information on SF(6 and He washout patterns during tidal breathing.

  17. New estimates for human lung dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Christine; Sidavasan, Sivalal; Kramer, Gary

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The currently used lung dimensions in dosimetry were originally estimated in the 1940s from Army recruits. This study provides new estimates of lung dimensions based on images acquired from a sample from the general population (varying age and sex). Building accurate models, called phantoms, of the human lung requires that the spatial dimensions (length, width, and depth) be quantified, in addition to volume. Errors in dose estimates may result from improperly sized lungs as the counting efficiency of externally mounted detectors (e.g., in a lung counter) is dependent on the position of internally deposited radioactive material (i.e., the size of the lung). This study investigates the spatial dimensions of human lungs. Lung phantoms have previously been made in one of two sizes. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Torso Phantom (LLNL) has deep, short lungs whose dimensions do not comply well with the data published in Report 23 (Reference Man) issued by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute Torso Phantom(JAERI), has longer, shallower lungs that also deviate from the ICRP values. However, careful examination of the ICRP recommended values shows that they are soft. In fact, they have been dropped from the ICRP's Report 89 which updates Report 23. Literature surveys have revealed a wealth of information on lung volume, but very little data on the spatial dimensions of human lungs. Better lung phantoms need to be constructed to more accurately represent a person so that dose estimates may be quantified more accurately in view of the new, lower, dose limits for occupationally exposed workers and the general public. Retrospective chest images of 60 patients who underwent imaging of the chest- lungs as part of their healthy persons occupational screening for lung disease were chosen. The chosen normal lung images represent the general population). Ages, gender and weight of the

  18. Lung function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorichter, S.

    2009-01-01

    The term lung function is often restricted to the assessment of volume time curves measured at the mouth. Spirometry includes the assessment of lung volumes which can be mobilised with the corresponding flow-volume curves. In addition, lung volumes that can not be mobilised, such as the residual volume, or only partially as FRC and TLC can be measured by body plethysmography combined with the determination of the airway resistance. Body plethysmography allows the correct positioning of forced breathing manoeuvres on the volume-axis, e.g. before and after pharmacotherapy. Adding the CO single breath transfer factor (T LCO ), which includes the measurement of the ventilated lung volume using He, enables a clear diagnosis of different obstructive, restrictive or mixed ventilatory defects with and without trapped air. Tests of reversibility and provocation, as well as the assessment of inspiratory mouth pressures (PI max , P 0.1 ) help to classify the underlying disorder and to clarify treatment strategies. For further information and to complete the diagnostic of disturbances of the ventilation, diffusion and/or perfusion (capillar-)arterial bloodgases at rest and under physical strain sometimes amended by ergospirometry are recommended. Ideally, lung function measurements are amended by radiological and nuclear medicine techniques. (orig.) [de

  19. Bronchoscopic lung volume reduction by endobronchial valve in advanced emphysema: the first Asian report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park TS

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Tai Sun Park,1 Yoonki Hong,2 Jae Seung Lee,1 Sang Young Oh,3 Sang Min Lee,3 Namkug Kim,3 Joon Beom Seo,3 Yeon-Mok Oh,1 Sang-Do Lee,1 Sei Won Lee1 1Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine and Clinical Research Center for Chronic Obstructive Airway Diseases, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea; 2Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon, Korea; 3Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea Purpose: Endobronchial valve (EBV therapy is increasingly being seen as a therapeutic option for advanced emphysema, but its clinical utility in Asian populations, who may have different phenotypes to other ethnic populations, has not been assessed.Patients and methods: This prospective open-label single-arm clinical trial examined the clinical efficacy and the safety of EBV in 43 consecutive patients (mean age 68.4±7.5, forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1] 24.5%±10.7% predicted, residual volume 208.7%±47.9% predicted with severe emphysema with complete fissure and no collateral ventilation in a tertiary referral hospital in Korea.Results: Compared to baseline, the patients exhibited significant improvements 6 months after EBV therapy in terms of FEV1 (from 0.68±0.26 L to 0.92±0.40 L; P<0.001, 6-minute walk distance (from 233.5±114.8 m to 299.6±87.5 m; P=0.012, modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale (from 3.7±0.6 to 2.4±1.2; P<0.001, and St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (from 65.59±13.07 to 53.76±11.40; P=0.028. Nine patients (20.9% had a tuberculosis scar, but these scars did not affect target lobe volume reduction or pneumothorax frequency. Thirteen patients had adverse events, ten (23.3% developed pneumothorax, which included one death due to tension pneumothorax.Conclusion: EBV therapy was as effective and safe in Korean

  20. Relationship between radiation dose and lung function in patients with lung cancer receiving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harsaker, V.; Dale, E.; Bruland, O.S.; Olsen, D.R.

    2003-01-01

    In patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), radical radiotherapy is the treatment of choice. The dose is limited by consequential pneumonitis and lung fibrosis. Hence, a better understanding of the relationship between the dose-volume distributions and normal tissue side effects is needed. CT is a non-invasive method to monitor the development of fibrosis and pneumonitis, and spirometry is an established tool to measure lung function. NSCLC patients were included in a multicenter trial and treated with megavoltage conformal radiotherapy. In a subgroup comprising 16 patients, a total dose of 59-63 Gy with 1.8-1.9 Gy per fraction was given. Dose-volume histograms were calculated and corrected according to the linear-quadratic formula using alpha/beta=3 Gy. The patients underwent repetitive CT examinations (mean follow-up, 133 days) following radiotherapy, and pre and post treatment spirometry (mean follow-up, 240 days). A significant correlation was demonstrated between local lung dose and changes in CT numbers >30 days after treatment (p 40 Gy Gy there was a sudden increase in CT numbers at 70-90 days. Somewhat unexpectedly, the highest mean lung doses were found in patients with the least reductions in lung function (peak expiratory flow; p<0.001). The correlation between CT numbers, radiation dose and time after treatment show that CT may be used to monitor development of lung fibrosis/pneumonitis after radiotherapy for lung cancer. Paradoxically, the patients with the highest mean lung doses experienced the minimum deterioration of lung function. This may be explained by reduction in the volume of existing tumour masses obstructing the airways, leading to relief of symptoms. This finding stresses the role of radiotherapy for lung cancer, especially where the treatment aim is palliative

  1. Spatial fuzzy c-means thresholding for semiautomated calculation of percentage lung ventilated volume from hyperpolarized gas and 1 H MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Paul J C; Horn, Felix C; Collier, Guilhem J; Biancardi, Alberto; Marshall, Helen; Wild, Jim M

    2018-03-01

    To develop an image-processing pipeline for semiautomated (SA) and reproducible analysis of hyperpolarized gas lung ventilation and proton anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan pairs. To compare results from the software for total lung volume (TLV), ventilated volume (VV), and percentage lung ventilated volume (%VV) calculation to the current manual "basic" method and a K-means segmentation method. Six patients were imaged with hyperpolarized 3 He and same-breath lung 1 H MRI at 1.5T and six other patients were scanned with hyperpolarized 129 Xe and separate-breath 1 H MRI. One expert observer and two users with experience in lung image segmentation carried out the image analysis. Spearman (R), Intraclass (ICC) correlations, Bland-Altman limits of agreement (LOA), and Dice Similarity Coefficients (DSC) between output lung volumes were calculated. When comparing values of %VV, agreement between observers improved using the SA method (mean; R = 0.984, ICC = 0.980, LOA = 7.5%) when compared to the basic method (mean; R = 0.863, ICC = 0.873, LOA = 14.2%) nonsignificantly (p R  = 0.25, p ICC  = 0.25, and p LOA  = 0.50 respectively). DSC of VV and TLV masks significantly improved (P < 0.01) using the SA method (mean; DSC VV  = 0.973, DSC TLV  = 0.980) when compared to the basic method (mean; DSC VV  = 0.947, DSC TLV  = 0.957). K-means systematically overestimated %VV when compared to both basic (mean overestimation = 5.0%) and SA methods (mean overestimation = 9.7%), and had poor agreement with the other methods (mean ICC; K-means vs. basic = 0.685, K-means vs. SA = 0.740). A semiautomated image processing software was developed that improves interobserver agreement and correlation of lung ventilation volume percentage when compared to the currently used basic method and provides more consistent segmentations than the K-means method. 3 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018

  2. [Low dose volume histogram analysis of the lungs in prediction of acute radiation pneumonitis in patients with esophageal cancer treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wen-bin; Zhu, Shu-chai; Gao, Hong-mei; Li, You-mei; Liu, Zhi-kun; Li, Juan; Su, Jing-wei; Wan, Jun

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the predictive value of low dose volume of the lung on acute radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients with esophageal cancer treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) only, and to analyze the relation of comprehensive parameters of the dose-volume V5, V20 and mean lung dose (MLD) with acute RP. Two hundred and twenty-two patients with esophageal cancer treated by 3D-CRT have been followed up. The V5-V30 and MLD were calculated from the dose-volume histogram system. The clinical factors and treatment parameters were collected and analyzed. The acute RP was evaluated according to the RTOG toxicity criteria. The acute RP of grade 1, 2, 3 and 4 were observed in 68 (30.6%), 40 (18.0%), 8 (3.6%) and 1 (0.5%) cases, respectively. The univariate analysis of measurement data:The primary tumor length, radiation fields, MLD and lung V5-V30 had a significant relationship with the acute RP. The magnitude of the number of radiation fields, the volume of GTV, MLD and Lung V5-V30 had a significant difference in whether the ≥ grade 1 and ≥ grade 2 acute RP developed or not. Binary logistic regression analysis showed that MLD, Lung V5, V20 and V25 were independent risk factors of ≥ grade 1 acute RP, and the radiation fields, MLD and Lung V5 were independent risk factors of ≥ grade 2 acute RP. The ≥ grade 1 and ≥ grade 2 acute RP were significantly decreased when MLD less than 14 Gy, V5 and V20 were less than 60% and 28%,respectively. When the V20 ≤ 28%, the acute RP was significantly decreased in V5 ≤ 60% group. When the MLD was ≤ 14 Gy, the ≥ 1 grade acute RP was significantly decreased in the V5 ≤ 60% group. When the MLD was >14 Gy, the ≥ grade 2 acute RP was significantly decreased in the V5 ≤ 60% group. The low dose volume of the lung is effective in predicting radiation pneumonitis in patients with esophageal cancer treated with 3D-CRT only. The comprehensive parameters combined with V5, V20 and MLD may increase the

  3. Efficient approach for determining four-dimensional computed tomography-based internal target volume in stereotactic radiotherapy of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, Seung Gu; Kim, Eun Seog

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate efficient approaches for determining internal target volume (ITV) from four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) images used in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). 4D CT images were analyzed for 15 patients who received SBRT for stage I NSCLC. Three different ITVs were determined as follows: combining clinical target volume (CTV) from all 10 respiratory phases (ITV 10Phases ); combining CTV from four respiratory phases, including two extreme phases (0% and 50%) plus two intermediate phases (20% and 70%) (ITV 4Phases ); and combining CTV from two extreme phases (ITV 2Phases ). The matching index (MI) of ITV 4Phases and ITV 2Phases was defined as the ratio of ITV 4Phases and ITV 2Phases , respectively, to the ITV 10Phases . The tumor motion index (TMI) was defined as the ratio of ITV 10Phases to CTV mean , which was the mean of 10 CTVs delineated on 10 respiratory phases. The ITVs were significantly different in the order of ITV 10Phases , ITV 4Phases , and ITV 2Phases (all p 4Phases was significantly higher than that of ITV 2Phases (p 4Phases was inversely related to TMI (r = -0.569, p = 0.034). In a subgroup with low TMI (n = 7), ITV 4Phases was not statistically different from ITV 10Phases (p = 0.192) and its MI was significantly higher than that of ITV 2Phases (p = 0.016). The ITV 4Phases may be an efficient approach alternative to optimal ITV 10Phases in SBRT for early-stage NSCLC with less tumor motion.

  4. Impact of Different Tidal Volume Levels at Low Mechanical Power on Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury in Rats

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    Lillian Moraes

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Tidal volume (VT has been considered the main determinant of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI. Recently, experimental studies have suggested that mechanical power transferred from the ventilator to the lungs is the promoter of VILI. We hypothesized that, as long as mechanical power is kept below a safe threshold, high VT should not be injurious. The present study aimed to investigate the impact of different VT levels and respiratory rates (RR on lung function, diffuse alveolar damage (DAD, alveolar ultrastructure, and expression of genes related to inflammation [interleukin (IL-6], alveolar stretch (amphiregulin, epithelial [club cell secretory protein (CC16] and endothelial [intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1] cell injury, and extracellular matrix damage [syndecan-1, decorin, and metalloproteinase (MMP-9] in experimental acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS under low-power mechanical ventilation. Twenty-eight Wistar rats received Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide intratracheally. After 24 h, 21 animals were randomly assigned to ventilation (2 h with low mechanical power at three different VT levels (n = 7/group: (1 VT = 6 mL/kg and RR adjusted to normocapnia; (2 VT = 13 mL/kg; and 3 VT = 22 mL/kg. In the second and third groups, RR was adjusted to yield low mechanical power comparable to that of the first group. Mechanical power was calculated as [(ΔP,L2/Est,L/2]× RR (ΔP,L = transpulmonary driving pressure, Est,L = static lung elastance. Seven rats were not mechanically ventilated (NV and were used for molecular biology analysis. Mechanical power was comparable among groups, while VT gradually increased. ΔP,L and mechanical energy were higher in VT = 22 mL/kg than VT = 6 mL/kg and VT = 13 mL/kg (p < 0.001 for both. Accordingly, DAD score increased in VT = 22 mL/kg compared to VT = 6 mL/kg and VT = 13 mL/kg [23(18.5–24.75 vs. 16(12–17.75 and 16(13.25–18, p < 0.05, respectively]. VT = 22 mL/kg was associated with higher

  5. Novel muscle and connective tissue design enables high extensibility and controls engulfment volume in lunge-feeding rorqual whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadwick, Robert E; Goldbogen, Jeremy A; Potvin, Jean; Pyenson, Nicholas D; Vogl, A Wayne

    2013-07-15

    Muscle serves a wide variety of mechanical functions during animal feeding and locomotion, but the performance of this tissue is limited by how far it can be extended. In rorqual whales, feeding and locomotion are integrated in a dynamic process called lunge feeding, where an enormous volume of prey-laden water is engulfed into a capacious ventral oropharyngeal cavity that is bounded superficially by skeletal muscle and ventral groove blubber (VGB). The great expansion of the cavity wall presents a mechanical challenge for the physiological limits of skeletal muscle, yet its role is considered fundamental in controlling the flux of water into the mouth. Our analyses of the functional properties and mechanical behaviour of VGB muscles revealed a crimped microstructure in an unstrained, non-feeding state that is arranged in parallel with dense and straight elastin fibres. This allows the muscles to accommodate large tissue deformations of the VGB yet still operate within the known strain limits of vertebrate skeletal muscle. VGB transverse strains in routine-feeding rorquals were substantially less than those observed in dead ones, where decomposition gas stretched the VGB to its elastic limit, evidence supporting the idea that eccentric muscle contraction modulates the rate of expansion and ultimate size of the ventral cavity during engulfment.

  6. Prediction of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome in term pregnancies by assessment of fetal lung volume and pulmonary artery resistance index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laban, Mohamed; Mansour, Ghada M; Elsafty, Mohammed S E; Hassanin, Alaa S; EzzElarab, Sahar S

    2015-03-01

    To develop reference cutoff values for mean fetal lung volume (FLV) and pulmonary artery resistance index (PA-RI) for prediction of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in low-risk term pregnancies. As part of a cross-sectional study, women aged 20-35 years were enrolled and admitted to a tertiary hospital in Cairo, Egypt, for elective repeat cesarean at 37-40 weeks of pregnancy between January 1, 2012, and July 31, 2013. FLV was calculated by virtual organ computer-aided analysis, and PA-RI was measured by Doppler ultrasonography before delivery. A total of 80 women were enrolled. Neonatal RDS developed in 11 (13.8%) of the 80 newborns. Compared with neonates with RDS, healthy neonates had significantly higher FLVs (P<0.001) and lower PA-RIs (P<0.001). Neonatal RDS is less likely with FLV of at least 32 cm(3) or PA-RI less than or equal to 0.74. Combining these two measures improved the accuracy of prediction. The use of either FLV or PA-RI predicted neonatal RDS. The predictive value increased when these two measures were combined. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Image quality of 320-detector row wide-volume computed tomography with diffuse lung diseases: comparison with 64-detector row helical CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Osamu; Takenaka, Daisuke; Matsuki, Mitsuru; Koyama, Mitsuhiro; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Murata, Kiyoshi; Murayama, Sadayuki; Noma, Satoshi; Moriya, Hiroshi; Ohno, Yoshiharu

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate image quality of 320-detector row wide-volume (WV) computed tomography (CT) compared to 64-detector row helical CT from axial images and coronal multiplanar reformation (MPR). Thirty-five patients with diffuse lung diseases were scanned using both 320-detector row WV CT (coneXact and volumeXact+) and 64-detector row helical protocols. Three blinded observers evaluated dislocation and heterogeneity of normal structures on 3 MPR patterns (WV scan with coneXact, WV scan with volumeXact+, and helical scan) using a 3-point scale from 1 (severe dislocation/heterogeneity) to 3 (no dislocation/heterogeneity). They also evaluated axial images of 2 scan patterns (WV with volumeXact+ and helical) using a 5-point scale from 1 (nondiagnostic) to 5 (excellent). Statistical analyses were performed with a post hoc test, Wilcoxon signed rank test, Mann-Whitney U test, or the Kendall W test. The WV scans with the coneXact algorithm had significantly lower quality scores than the WV scans with the volumeXact+ algorithm and the helical scans (P < 0.01) with MPR. Helical scans had significantly lower quality scores than the WV scans with volumeXact+ for heterogeneity on the mediastinal window setting with MPR (P < 0.01). There were no significant differences concerning total image quality of axial images between the WV scans with the volumeXact+ algorithm and the helical scans. The overall image quality of WV scans with the volumeXact+ algorithm was almost comparable to that of the helical scans on the lung window setting, but density homogeneity with helical scans was inferior to that of the WV scans with the volumeXact+ algorithm on the mediastinal window setting with MPR.

  8. Automatic quantitative computed tomography segmentation and analysis of aerated lung volumes in acute respiratory distress syndrome-A comparative diagnostic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapsing, Philipp; Herrmann, Peter; Quintel, Michael; Moerer, Onnen

    2017-12-01

    Quantitative lung computed tomographic (CT) analysis yields objective data regarding lung aeration but is currently not used in clinical routine primarily because of the labor-intensive process of manual CT segmentation. Automatic lung segmentation could help to shorten processing times significantly. In this study, we assessed bias and precision of lung CT analysis using automatic segmentation compared with manual segmentation. In this monocentric clinical study, 10 mechanically ventilated patients with mild to moderate acute respiratory distress syndrome were included who had received lung CT scans at 5- and 45-mbar airway pressure during a prior study. Lung segmentations were performed both automatically using a computerized algorithm and manually. Automatic segmentation yielded similar lung volumes compared with manual segmentation with clinically minor differences both at 5 and 45 mbar. At 5 mbar, results were as follows: overdistended lung 49.58mL (manual, SD 77.37mL) and 50.41mL (automatic, SD 77.3mL), P=.028; normally aerated lung 2142.17mL (manual, SD 1131.48mL) and 2156.68mL (automatic, SD 1134.53mL), P = .1038; and poorly aerated lung 631.68mL (manual, SD 196.76mL) and 646.32mL (automatic, SD 169.63mL), P = .3794. At 45 mbar, values were as follows: overdistended lung 612.85mL (manual, SD 449.55mL) and 615.49mL (automatic, SD 451.03mL), P=.078; normally aerated lung 3890.12mL (manual, SD 1134.14mL) and 3907.65mL (automatic, SD 1133.62mL), P = .027; and poorly aerated lung 413.35mL (manual, SD 57.66mL) and 469.58mL (automatic, SD 70.14mL), P=.007. Bland-Altman analyses revealed the following mean biases and limits of agreement at 5 mbar for automatic vs manual segmentation: overdistended lung +0.848mL (±2.062mL), normally aerated +14.51mL (±49.71mL), and poorly aerated +14.64mL (±98.16mL). At 45 mbar, results were as follows: overdistended +2.639mL (±8.231mL), normally aerated 17.53mL (±41.41mL), and poorly aerated 56.23mL (±100.67mL). Automatic

  9. Significant lung volume reduction with endobronchial valves in a patient despite the presence of microcollaterals masked by low-flow Chartis phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Y

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Yan Yin,1 Gang Hou,1 Felix J Herth,2 Xiao-bo Wang,1 Qiu-yue Wang,1 Jian Kang1 1Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pneumology and Critical Care Medicine, Thoraxklinik, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany Abstract: Satisfactory functional outcomes following bronchoscopic lung volume reduction (BLVR using endobronchial valves (EBVs depend on the absence of collateral ventilation (CV between the target and adjunct lobes. The Chartis system has proven to be useful for determining whether CV is present or absent, but this system can also erroneously indicate the absence of CV, which can lead to BLVR failure. Here, we describe low-flow Chartis phenotype in the target lobe resulted in difficult judgment of existence of CV. Consequently, BLVR with EBVs implanted into the right upper bronchus failed to reduce lung volume or induce atelectasis. Inserting another EBV into the right middle bronchus blocked the latent CV, which led to significant lung volume reduction in the right upper lobe (RUL and right middle lobe (RML and to improve the pulmonary function, 6-min walking distance, and St George respiratory questionnaire scores over a 2-week follow-up period. Low flow in the target lobe is a unique Chartis phenotype and represents the uncertainty of CV, which is a risk factor for the failure of BLVR using EBVs. Clinicians should be aware of this possibility and might be able to resolve the problem by blocking the RUL and RML between which the CV occurs. Keywords: COPD, bronchoscopic lung volume reduction, collateral ventilation, endobronchial valves, Chartis assessment

  10. Extravascular Lung Water Does Not Increase in Hypovolemic Patients after a Fluid-Loading Protocol Guided by the Stroke Volume Variation

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    Carlos Ferrando

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Circulatory failure secondary to hypovolemia is a common situation in critical care patients. Volume replacement is the first option for the treatment of hypovolemia. A possible complication of volume loading is pulmonary edema, quantified at the bedside by the measurement of extravascular lung water index (ELWI. ELWI predicts progression to acute lung injury (ALI in patients with risk factors for developing it. The aim of this study was to assess whether fluid loading guided by the stroke volume variation (SVV, in patients presumed to be hypovolemic, increased ELWI or not. Methods. Prospective study of 17 consecutive postoperative, fully mechanically ventilated patients diagnosed with circulatory failure secondary to presumed hypovolemia were included. Cardiac index (CI, ELWI, SVV, and global end-diastolic volume index (GEDI were determined using the transpulmonary thermodilution technique during the first 12 hours after fluid loading. Volume replacement was done with a strict hemodynamic protocol. Results. Fluid loading produced a significant increase in CI and a decrease in SVV. ELWI did not increase. No correlation was found between the amount of fluids administered and the change in ELWI. Conclusion. Fluid loading guided by SVV in hypovolemic and fully mechanically ventilated patients in sinus rhythm does not increase ELWI.

  11. SU-E-J-123: Assessing Segmentation Accuracy of Internal Volumes and Sub-Volumes in 4D PET/CT of Lung Tumors Using a Novel 3D Printed Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soultan, D; Murphy, J; James, C; Hoh, C; Moiseenko, V; Cervino, L; Gill, B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of internal target volume (ITV) segmentation of lung tumors for treatment planning of simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) radiotherapy as seen in 4D PET/CT images, using a novel 3D-printed phantom. Methods: The insert mimics high PET tracer uptake in the core and 50% uptake in the periphery, by using a porous design at the periphery. A lung phantom with the insert was placed on a programmable moving platform. Seven breathing waveforms of ideal and patient-specific respiratory motion patterns were fed to the platform, and 4D PET/CT scans were acquired of each of them. CT images were binned into 10 phases, and PET images were binned into 5 phases following the clinical protocol. Two scenarios were investigated for segmentation: a gate 30–70 window, and no gating. The radiation oncologist contoured the outer ITV of the porous insert with on CT images, while the internal void volume with 100% uptake was contoured on PET images for being indistinguishable from the outer volume in CT images. Segmented ITVs were compared to the expected volumes based on known target size and motion. Results: 3 ideal breathing patterns, 2 regular-breathing patient waveforms, and 2 irregular-breathing patient waveforms were used for this study. 18F-FDG was used as the PET tracer. The segmented ITVs from CT closely matched the expected motion for both no gating and gate 30–70 window, with disagreement of contoured ITV with respect to the expected volume not exceeding 13%. PET contours were seen to overestimate volumes in all the cases, up to more than 40%. Conclusion: 4DPET images of a novel 3D printed phantom designed to mimic different uptake values were obtained. 4DPET contours overestimated ITV volumes in all cases, while 4DCT contours matched expected ITV volume values. Investigation of the cause and effects of the discrepancies is undergoing

  12. Do Sustained Lung Inflations during Neonatal Resuscitation Affect Cerebral Blood Volume in Preterm Infants? A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study.

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    Bernhard Schwaberger

    Full Text Available Sustained lung inflations (SLI during neonatal resuscitation may promote alveolar recruitment in preterm infants. While most of the studies focus on respiratory outcome, the impact of SLI on the brain hasn't been investigated yet.Do SLI affect cerebral blood volume (CBV in preterm infants?Preterm infants of gestation 28 weeks 0 days to 33 weeks 6 days with requirement for respiratory support (RS were included in this randomized controlled pilot trial. Within the first 15 minutes after birth near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS measurements using 'NIRO-200-NX' (Hamamatsu, Japan were performed to evaluate changes in CBV and cerebral tissue oxygenation. Two groups were compared based on RS: In SLI group RS was given by applying 1-3 SLI (30 cmH2O for 15 s continued by respiratory standard care. Control group received respiratory standard care only.40 infants (20 in each group with mean gestational age of 32 weeks one day (±2 days and birth weight of 1707 (±470 g were included. In the control group ΔCBV was significantly decreasing, whereas in SLI group ΔCBV showed similar values during the whole period of 15 minutes. Comparing both groups within the first 15 minutes ΔCBV showed a tendency toward different overall courses (p = 0.051.This is the first study demonstrating an impact of SLI on CBV. Further studies are warranted including reconfirmation of the present findings in infants with lower gestational age. Future investigations on SLI should not only focus on respiratory outcome but also on the consequences on the developing brain.German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00005161 https://drks-neu.uniklinik-freiburg.de/drks_web/setLocale_EN.do.

  13. A Prospective Randomized Study of the Radiotherapy Volume for Limited-stage Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Preliminary Report

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    Xiao HU

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Controversies exists with regard to target volumes as far as thoracic radiotherapy (TRT is concerned in the multimodality treatment for limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LSCLC. The aim of this study is to prospectively compare the local control rate, toxicity profiles, and overall survival (OS between patients received different target volumes irradiation after induction chemotherapy. Methods LSCLC patients received 2 cycles of etoposide and cisplatin (EP induction chemotherapy and were randomly assigned to receive TRT to either the post- or pre-chemotherapy tumor extent (GTV-T as study arm and control arm, CTV-N included the positive nodal drainage area for both arms. One to 2 weeks after induction chemotherapy, 45 Gy/30 Fx/19 d TRT was administered concurrently with the third cycle of EP regimen. After that, additional 3 cycles of EP consolidation were administered. Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI was administered to patients with a complete response. Results Thirty-seven and 40 patients were randomly assigned to study arm and control arm. The local recurrence rates were 32.4% and 28.2% respectively (P=0.80; the isolated nodal failure (INF rate were 3.0% and 2.6% respectively (P=0.91; all INF sites were in the ipsilateral supraclavicular fossa. Medastinal N3 disease was the risk factor for INF (P=0.02, OR=14.13, 95%CI: 1.47-136.13. During radiotherapy, grade I, II weight loss was observed in 29.4%, 5.9% and 56.4%, 7.7% patients respectively (P=0.04. Grade 0-I and II-III late pulmonary injury was developed in 97.1%, 2.9% and 86.4%, 15.4% patients respectively (P=0.07. Median survival time was 22.1 months and 26.9 months respectively. The 1 to 3-year OS were 77.9%, 44.4%, 37.3% and 75.8%, 56.3%, 41.7% respectively (P=0.79. Conclusion The preliminary results of this study indicate that irradiant the post-chemotherapy tumor extent (GTV-T and positive nodal drainage area did not decrease local control and overall

  14. Volúmenes pulmonares normales en pacientes con fibrosis pulmonar idiopática y enfisema Normal lung volumes in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema

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    Juan Pablo Casas

    2008-08-01

    pattern with hyperinflation results in emphysema by loss of elastic recoil, expiratory collapse of the peripheral airways and air trapping. Previous reports suggest that when both diseases coexist, pulmonary volumes are compensated and a smaller than expected reduction or even normal lung volumes can be found. We report 4 male patients of 64, 60, 73 and 70 years, all with heavy cigarette smoking history and progressive breathlessness. Three of them had severe limitation in their quality of life. All four showed advanced lung interstitial involvement, at high resolution CT scan, fibrotic changes predominantly in the subpleural areas of lower lung fields and concomitant emphysema in the upper lobes. Emphysema and pulmonary fibrosis was confirmed by open lung biopsy in one patient. The four patients showed normal spirometry and lung volumes with severe compromise of gas exchange and poor exercise tolerance evaluated by 6 minute walk test. Severe pulmonary arterial hypertension was also confirmed in three patients. Normal lung volumes does not exclude diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in patients with concomitant emphysema. The relatively preserved lung volumes may underestimate the severity of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and attenuate its effects on lung function parameters.

  15. Left main bronchus compression as a result of tuberculous lymphnode compression of the right-sided airways with right lung volume loss in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronikou, S; Van Wyk, M J; Goussard, P; Gie, R P

    2014-03-01

    The superior mediastinal space is confined by the sterno-manubrium anteriorly and the vertebral column posterior. An abnormal relationship between the superior mediastinal structures may result in compression of the left main bronchus. In patients with right-sided pneumonectomy an exaggerated compensatory response may lead to stretching and compression of the remainder of the intra-thoracic airway. Lymphobronchial TB mimics pneumonectomy when it causes compression of the bronchus intermedius, between nodal lymphnode groups with resultant volume loss in the right lung and displacement of the mediastinum to the right. The left main bronchus may be at risk of compression due to rotation and displacement of the major vessels. To report pediatric cases of right-sided lymphobronchial TB with volume loss, demonstrate the use of angle measurements to quantify mediastinal dynamics and support a pathogenetic theory for left main bronchus compression. CT scans in children with TB and right lung volume loss, were compared retrospectively with controls using angle measurements based on descriptions of the aorta-carinal syndrome and the post-pneumonectomy syndrome. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare groups. The "Pulmonary bifurcation angle" between the main pulmonary arteries reached statistical significance (P = 0.025). The "Pulmonary outflow tract rotation" angle (pulmonary trunk with the mid sagittal plane) approached statistical significance (P = 0.078). The left main bronchus ranged from complete obliteration in two patients to 0.7 cm. In 16 of 30 patients the size was reduced to less than 75% of expected. In children with right lung volume loss from TB, the compression of the contralateral bronchus is due to narrowing of the pulmonary artery bifurcation angle as the main trunk rotates towards the midline. This is comparable to the post-pneumonectomy syndrome. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Improvement of internal tumor volumes of non-small cell lung cancer patients for radiation treatment planning using interpolated average CT in PET/CT.

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    Yao-Ching Wang

    Full Text Available Respiratory motion causes uncertainties in tumor edges on either computed tomography (CT or positron emission tomography (PET images and causes misalignment when registering PET and CT images. This phenomenon may cause radiation oncologists to delineate tumor volume inaccurately in radiotherapy treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to analyze radiology applications using interpolated average CT (IACT as attenuation correction (AC to diminish the occurrence of this scenario. Thirteen non-small cell lung cancer patients were recruited for the present comparison study. Each patient had full-inspiration, full-expiration CT images and free breathing PET images by an integrated PET/CT scan. IACT for AC in PET(IACT was used to reduce the PET/CT misalignment. The standardized uptake value (SUV correction with a low radiation dose was applied, and its tumor volume delineation was compared to those from HCT/PET(HCT. The misalignment between the PET(IACT and IACT was reduced when compared to the difference between PET(HCT and HCT. The range of tumor motion was from 4 to 17 mm in the patient cohort. For HCT and PET(HCT, correction was from 72% to 91%, while for IACT and PET(IACT, correction was from 73% to 93% (*p<0.0001. The maximum and minimum differences in SUVmax were 0.18% and 27.27% for PET(HCT and PET(IACT, respectively. The largest percentage differences in the tumor volumes between HCT/PET and IACT/PET were observed in tumors located in the lowest lobe of the lung. Internal tumor volume defined by functional information using IACT/PET(IACT fusion images for lung cancer would reduce the inaccuracy of tumor delineation in radiation therapy planning.

  17. Stereotactic body radiotherapy and treatment at a high volume facility is associated with improved survival in patients with inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshy, Matthew; Malik, Renuka; Mahmood, Usama; Husain, Zain; Sher, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study examined the comparative effectiveness of no treatment (NoTx), conventional fractionated radiotherapy (ConvRT), and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer. This population based cohort also allowed us to examine what facility level characteristics contributed to improved outcomes. Methods: We included patients in the National Cancer Database from 2003 to 2006 with T1-T2N0M0 inoperable lung cancer (n = 13,036). Overall survival (OS) was estimated using Kaplan–Meier methods and Cox proportional hazard regression. Results: The median follow up was 68 months (interquartile range: 35–83 months) in surviving patients. Among the cohort, 52% received NoTx, 41% received ConvRT and 6% received SBRT. The 3-year OS was 28% for NoTx, 36% for ConvRT radiotherapy, and 48% for the SBRT cohort (p < 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, the hazard ratio for SBRT and ConvRT were 0.67 and 0.77, respectively, as compared to NoTx (1.0 ref) (p < 0.0001). Patients treated at a high volume facility vs. low volume facility had a hazard ratio of 0.94 vs. 1.0 (p = 0.01). Conclusions: Patients with early stage inoperable lung cancer treated with SBRT and at a high volume facility had a survival benefit compared to patients treated with ConvRT or NoTx or to those treated at a low volume facility

  18. Right Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernias: Is There a Correlation between Prenatal Lung Volume and Postnatal Survival, as in Isolated Left Diaphragmatic Hernias?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victoria, Teresa; Danzer, Enrico; Oliver, Edward R; Edgar, J Christopher; Iyoob, Suzanne; Partridge, Emily A; Johnson, Ann M; Peranteau, William H; Coleman, Beverly G; Flake, Alan W; Johnson, Mark P; Hedrick, Holly H; Adzick, N Scott

    2018-01-01

    Whereas left-sided congenital diaphragmatic hernias (L-CDH) have been extensively studied and their prognostic parameters delineated, right-sided hernias (R-CDH) have not. Published results remain inconclusive. The aim of this study is to evaluate if proven prognostic indicators of postnatal survival in the fetus with L-CDH apply to the fetus with R-CDH. Retrospective single-center study of R-CDH fetuses with available prenatal studies assessed for fetal lung volume by means of ultrasound-measured observed versus expected (O/E) lung area to head circumference (LHR) and magnetic resonance-calculated O/E total lung volume (TLV) in a 12-year time period. Percentage of herniated liver volume and postnatal use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) were also evaluated. In a cohort of 24 patients, O/E LHR, O/E TLV, percentage of herniated liver, and postnatal use of ECMO are not prognostic indicators of survival in the fetus with R-CDH. Cut-off values of O/E LHR of ≤45 or O/E TLV ≤25, known to select a population of severe cases for the L-CDH fetus, do not appear to extrapolate to the R-CDH fetus, as survival in both R-CDH groups is 60%. The findings in this study suggest that L- and R-CDH appear to behave differently, and that factors that make L-CDH fatal (low O/E TLV and O/E LHR, high-volume herniated liver) may not apply to the fetus with R-CDH. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. A pilot study to monitor changes in spirometry and lung volume, following an exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), as part of a supported discharge program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushen, Breda; McCormack, Niamh; Hennigan, Kerrie; Sulaiman, Imran; Costello, Richard W; Deering, Brenda

    2016-10-01

    One-third of patients with an exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease(COPD) are re-hospitalised at 90 days. Exacerbation recovery is associated with reductions in lung hyperinflation and improvements in symptoms and physical activity. We assessed the feasibility of monitoring these clinical parameters in the home. We hypothesised that the degree of change in spirometry and lung volumes differs between those who had an uneventful recovery and those who experienced a further exacerbation. Hospitalised patients with an acute exacerbation of COPD referred for a supported discharge program participated in the study. Spirometry and Inspiratory Vital Capacity(IVC) were measured in the home at Days 1, 14 and 42 post-discharge. Patients also completed Medical Research Council(MRC), Borg and COPD Assessment Test(CAT) scores and were provided with a tri-axial accelerometer. Any new exacerbation events were recorded. Sixty-five patients with 72 exacerbation episodes were recruited. Fifty percent experienced a second exacerbation. Adequate IVC measurements were achieved by 90%, while only 70% completed spirometry. Uneventful recovery was accompanied by significant improvements in physiological measurements at day14, improved symptom scores and step count, p spirometry, lung volumes, symptoms and step count following a COPD exacerbation may help to identify patients at risk of re-exacerbation. It is feasible to carry out these assessments in the home as part of a supported discharge programme. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Quantification of gross tumour volume changes between simulation and first day radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced malignancies of the lung and head / neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishan, Amar U.; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Chen, Allen M.; Cui, Jing; Daly, Megan E.; Purdy, James A.

    2014-01-01

    To quantify changes in gross tumour volume (GTV) between simulation and initiation of radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced malignancies of the lung and head/neck. Initial cone beam computed tomography (CT) scans from 12 patients with lung cancer and 12 with head/neck cancer (head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC)) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy with image guidance were rigidly registered to the simulation CT scans. The GTV was demarcated on both scans. The relationship between percent GTV change and variables including time interval between simulation and start, tumour (T) stage, and absolute weight change was assessed. For lung cancer patients, the GTV increased a median of 35.06% (range, −16.63% to 229.97%) over a median interval of 13 days (range, 7–43), while for HNSCC patients, the median GTV increase was 16.04% (range, −8.03% to 47.41%) over 13 days (range, 7–40). These observed changes are statistically significant. The magnitude of this change was inversely associated with the size of the tumour on the simulation scan for lung cancer patients (P 0.1). While the observed changes in GTV were moderate from the time of simulation to start of radiotherapy, these findings underscore the importance of image guidance for target localisation and verification, particularly for smaller tumours. Minimising the delay between simulation and treatment initiation may also be beneficial.

  1. VERTICAL GRADIENTS IN REGIONAL LUNG DENSITY AND PERFUSION IN THE SUPINE HUMAN LUNG: THE SLINKY® EFFECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Susan R.; Henderson, A. Cortney; Levin, David L.; Yamada, Kei; Arai, Tatsuya; Buxton, Richard B.; Prisk., G. Kim

    2008-01-01

    In-vivo radioactive tracer and microsphere studies have differing conclusions as to the magnitude of the gravitational effect on the distribution of pulmonary blood flow. We hypothesized that some of the apparent vertical perfusion gradient in-vivo is due to compression of dependent lung increasing local lung density and therefore perfusion/volume. To test this, 6 normal subjects underwent functional MRI with arterial spin labeling during a breath-hold at functional residual capacity, and perfusion quantified in non-overlapping 15mm sagittal slices covering most of the right lung. Lung proton density was measured in the same slices using a short echo 2D-FLASH sequence. Mean perfusion was 1.7 ± 0.6 ml/min/cm3 and was related to vertical height above the dependent lung (slope = −3%/cm, p Slinky®, a deformable spring distorting under its own weight. The greater density of lung tissue in the dependent regions of the lung is analogous to a greater number of coils in the dependent portion of the vertically oriented spring. This implies that measurements of perfusion in-vivo will be influenced by density distributions and will differ from excised lungs where density gradients are reduced by processing. PMID:17395757

  2. Vertical gradients in regional lung density and perfusion in the supine human lung: the Slinky effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Susan R; Henderson, A Cortney; Levin, David L; Yamada, Kei; Arai, Tatsuya; Buxton, Richard B; Prisk, G Kim

    2007-07-01

    In vivo radioactive tracer and microsphere studies have differing conclusions as to the magnitude of the gravitational effect on the distribution of pulmonary blood flow. We hypothesized that some of the apparent vertical perfusion gradient in vivo is due to compression of dependent lung increasing local lung density and therefore perfusion/volume. To test this, six normal subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging with arterial spin labeling during breath holding at functional residual capacity, and perfusion quantified in nonoverlapping 15 mm sagittal slices covering most of the right lung. Lung proton density was measured in the same slices using a short echo 2D-Fast Low-Angle SHot (FLASH) sequence. Mean perfusion was 1.7 +/- 0.6 ml x min(-1) x cm(-3) and was related to vertical height above the dependent lung (slope = -3%/cm, P Slinky (Slinky is a registered trademark of Poof-Slinky Incorporated), a deformable spring distorting under its own weight. The greater density of lung tissue in the dependent regions of the lung is analogous to a greater number of coils in the dependent portion of the vertically oriented spring. This implies that measurements of perfusion in vivo will be influenced by density distributions and will differ from excised lungs where density gradients are reduced by processing.

  3. Goal-directed fluid optimization based on stroke volume variation and cardiac index during one-lung ventilation in patients undergoing thoracoscopy lobectomy operations: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This pilot study was designed to utilize stroke volume variation and cardiac index to ensure fluid optimization during one-lung ventilation in patients undergoing thoracoscopic lobectomies. METHODS: Eighty patients undergoing thoracoscopic lobectomy were randomized into either a goal-directed therapy group or a control group. In the goal-directed therapy group, the stroke volume variation was controlled at 10%±1%, and the cardiac index was controlled at a minimum of 2.5 L.min-1.m-2. In the control group, the MAP was maintained at between 65 mm Hg and 90 mm Hg, heart rate was maintained at between 60 BPM and 100 BPM, and urinary output was greater than 0.5 mL/kg-1/h-1. The hemodynamic variables, arterial blood gas analyses, total administered fluid volume and side effects were recorded. RESULTS: The PaO2/FiO2-ratio before the end of one-lung ventilation in the goal-directed therapy group was significantly higher than that of the control group, but there were no differences between the goal-directed therapy group and the control group for the PaO2/FiO2-ratio or other arterial blood gas analysis indices prior to anesthesia. The extubation time was significantly earlier in the goal-directed therapy group, but there was no difference in the length of hospital stay. Patients in the control group had greater urine volumes, and they were given greater colloid and overall fluid volumes. Nausea and vomiting were significantly reduced in the goal-directed therapy group. CONCLUSION: The results of this study demonstrated that an optimization protocol, based on stroke volume variation and cardiac index obtained with a FloTrac/Vigileo device, increased the PaO2/FiO2-ratio and reduced the overall fluid volume, intubation time and postoperative complications (nausea and vomiting in thoracic surgery patients requiring one-lung ventilation.

  4. SU-F-J-22: Lung VolumeVariability Assessed by Bh-CBCT in 3D Surface Image Guided Deep InspirationBreath Hold (DIBH) Radiotherapy for Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, A; Stanley, D; Papanikolaou, N; Crownover, R [University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: With the increasing use of DIBH techniques for left-sided breast cancer, 3D surface-image guided DIBH techniques have improved patient setup and facilitated DIBH radiation delivery. However, quantification of the daily separation between the heart and left breast still presents a challenge. One method of assuring separation is to ensure consistent left lung filling. With this in mind, the aim of this study is to retrospectively quantify left lung volume from weekly breath hold-CBCTs (bh-CBCT) of left-sided breast patients treated using a 3D surface imaging system. Methods: Ten patients (n=10) previously treated to the left breast using the C-Rad CatalystHD system (C-RAD AG, Uppsala Sweden) were evaluated. Patients were positioned with CatalystHD and with bh-CBCT. bh-CBCTs were acquired at the validation date, first day of treatment and at subsequent weekly intervals. Total treatment courses spanned from 3 to 5 weeks. bh-CBCT images were exported to VelocityAI and the left lung volume was segmented. Volumes were recorded and analyzed. Results: A total of 41 bh-CBCTs were contoured in VelocityAI for the 10 patients. The mean left lung volume for all patients was 1657±295cc based on validation bh-CBCT. With the subsequent lung volumes normalized to the validation lung volume, the mean relative ratios for all patients were 1.02±0.11, 0.97±0.14, 0.98±0.11, 1.02±0.01, and 0.96±0.02 for week 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. Overall, the mean left lung volume change was ≤4.0% over a 5-week course; however left lung volume variations of up to 28% were noted in a select patient. Conclusion: With the use of the C-RAD CatalystHD system, the mean lung volume variability over a 5-week course of DIBH treatments was ≤4.0%. By minimizing left lung volume variability, heart to left breast separation maybe more consistently maintained. AN Gutierrez has a research grant from C-RAD AG.

  5. Emphysema quantification on low-dose CT using percentage of low-attenuation volume and size distribution of low-attenuation lung regions: Effects of adaptive iterative dose reduction using 3D processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishio, Mizuho, E-mail: nmizuho@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Matsumoto, Sumiaki, E-mail: sumatsu@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Seki, Shinichiro, E-mail: sshin@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Koyama, Hisanobu, E-mail: hkoyama@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Ohno, Yoshiharu, E-mail: yosirad@kobe-u.ac.jp [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Fujisawa, Yasuko, E-mail: yasuko1.fujisawa@toshiba.co.jp [Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, 1385 Shimoishigami, Otawara, Tochigi 324-8550 (Japan); Sugihara, Naoki, E-mail: naoki.sugihara@toshiba.co.jp [Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, 1385 Shimoishigami, Otawara, Tochigi 324-8550 (Japan); and others

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Emphysema quantification (LAV% and D) was affected by image noise on low-dose CT. • For LAV% and D, AIDR 3D improved agreement of quantification on low-dose CT. • AIDR 3D has the potential to quantify emphysema accurately on low-dose CT. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the effects of adaptive iterative dose reduction using 3D processing (AIDR 3D) for quantification of two measures of emphysema: percentage of low-attenuation volume (LAV%) and size distribution of low-attenuation lung regions. Method and materials: : Fifty-two patients who underwent standard-dose (SDCT) and low-dose CT (LDCT) were included. SDCT without AIDR 3D, LDCT without AIDR 3D, and LDCT with AIDR 3D were used for emphysema quantification. First, LAV% was computed at 10 thresholds from −990 to −900 HU. Next, at the same thresholds, linear regression on a log–log plot was used to compute the power law exponent (D) for the cumulative frequency-size distribution of low-attenuation lung regions. Bland–Altman analysis was used to assess whether AIDR 3D improved agreement between LDCT and SDCT for emphysema quantification of LAV% and D. Results: The mean relative differences in LAV% between LDCT without AIDR 3D and SDCT were 3.73%–88.18% and between LDCT with AIDR 3D and SDCT were −6.61% to 0.406%. The mean relative differences in D between LDCT without AIDR 3D and SDCT were 8.22%–19.11% and between LDCT with AIDR 3D and SDCT were 1.82%–4.79%. AIDR 3D improved agreement between LDCT and SDCT at thresholds from −930 to −990 HU for LAV% and at all thresholds for D. Conclusion: AIDR 3D improved the consistency between LDCT and SDCT for emphysema quantification of LAV% and D.

  6. Change in regional pulmonary perfusion as a result of posture and lung volume assessed using technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin single-photon emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosuda, Shigeru; Kusano, Shoichi [Department of Radiology, National Defense Medical College, Tokorozawa (Japan); Kobayashi, Hideo [Department of Internal Medicine, National Defense Medical College, Tokorozawa (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of gravity and lung volume on regional pulmonary perfusion using technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin ({sup 99m}Tc MAA) single-photon emission tomography (SPET). Twenty-five subjects were classified into three groups according to their position during the injection of the tracer [11 subjects sitting, six supine and eight both supine and prone (S+P) positions]. All of these subjects were injected with the tracer during normal tidal breathing. In the S+P group, half of the tracer was injected while the subject was in each position. The remaining 11 subjects were classified into two groups according to their lung volume during the injection. Supine patients were instructed to hold their breath at residual volume (RV) (five subjects) or total lung capacity (TLC) (six subjects) while receiving the tracer injection. A region of interest with a ventrodorsal axis was defined in the centre of each lung. Profile curves were produced by plotting and normalizing the perfusion values as a percentage of the maximum value. The perfusion distributions for the sitting and S+P positions and at RV were relatively uniform. However, the distributions for the supine position and at TLC showed a gravitational influence [sitting vs TLC: 87.8%{+-}10.4% vs 67.3%{+-}8.7% for % maximum perfusion at +5 pixels from the midpoint of the upper lobe (P<0.00002)]. The gravity-related perfusion inhomogeneity was more prominent in the lower lobe than in the upper lobe. It is concluded that the physiological vertical gravitational gradient should be taken into consideration during the interpretation of lung SPET images. Preferably, patients should be injected with the tracer twice, once in the supine position and once in the prone position, while breathing normally. Alternatively, they may be injected with the tracer once while in the supine position and holding their breath at RV. Either of these protocols should ensure a uniform distribution of

  7. Circumferential or sectored beam arrangements for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of primary lung tumors: Effect on target and normal-structure dose-volume metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, Mara W.; Kato, Catherine M.; Carson, Kelly M.P.; Matsunaga, Nathan M.; Arao, Robert F.; Doss, Emily J.; McCracken, Charles L.; Meng, Lu Z.; Chen, Yiyi; Laub, Wolfram U.; Fuss, Martin; Tanyi, James A.

    2013-01-01

    To compare 2 beam arrangements, sectored (beam entry over ipsilateral hemithorax) vs circumferential (beam entry over both ipsilateral and contralateral lungs), for static-gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery techniques with respect to target and organs-at-risk (OAR) dose-volume metrics, as well as treatment delivery efficiency. Data from 60 consecutive patients treated using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for primary non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) formed the basis of this study. Four treatment plans were generated per data set: IMRT/VMAT plans using sectored (-s) and circumferential (-c) configurations. The prescribed dose (PD) was 60 Gy in 5 fractions to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) (maximum PTV dose ∼ 150% PD) for a 6-MV photon beam. Plan conformality, R 50 (ratio of volume circumscribed by the 50% isodose line and the PTV), and D 2 cm (D max at a distance ≥2 cm beyond the PTV) were evaluated. For lungs, mean doses (mean lung dose [MLD]) and percent V 30 /V 20 /V 10 /V 5 Gy were assessed. Spinal cord and esophagus D max and D 5 /D 50 were computed. Chest wall (CW) D max and absolute V 30 /V 20 /V 10 /V 5 Gy were reported. Sectored SBRT planning resulted in significant decrease in contralateral MLD and V 10 /V 5 Gy , as well as contralateral CW D max and V 10 /V 5 Gy (all p max and D 5 /D 50 for the spinal cord with sectored planning did not reach statistical significance for static-gantry IMRT, although VMAT metrics did show a statistically significant decrease (all p 50 significantly improved with IMRT-s/VMAT-c (p 2 cm significantly improved with VMAT-c (p < 0.001). Plan delivery efficiency improved with sectored technique (p < 0.001); mean monitor unit (MU)/cGy of PD decreased from 5.8 ± 1.9 vs 5.3 ± 1.7 (IMRT) and 2.7 ± 0.4 vs 2.4 ± 0.3 (VMAT). The sectored configuration achieves unambiguous dosimetric advantages over circumferential arrangement in terms

  8. Stereologically estimated mean nuclear volume and histopathologic malignancy grading as predictors of disease extent in non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagol, O; Kargi, A; Ozkal, S

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the value of the architectural grade, cytologic atypia, mitotic counts and stereologically estimated mean nuclear volume in predicting the stage of disease in non-small cell lung carcinomas. Hematoxylin-Eosin-stained sections from 53 non-small cell lung carcinomas were evaluated in terms of the morphologic and morphometric features mentioned above. Mean nuclear volume was estimated stereologically. Operable and inoperable tumor stages were compared concerning the parameters examined. There was no significant difference between operable and inoperable tumor stages in terms of the architectural grade in both squamous cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas, although we found a positive correlation between architectural grades and increasing stages in SCC. Significant differences were found concerning atypia, mitosis grades, and the score combining both variables (C2) when comparing operable with inoperable tumor stages in squamous cell carcinomas but not in adenocarcinomas (Chi square, p = 0.013, p = 0.008 and p = 0.008 for squamous cell carcinomas respectively). The mean nuclear volumes of tumor cells in both squamous cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas showed statistically significant differences between operable and inoperable stages (p = 0.05 and 0.02 respectively). We conclude that an assessment of the proliferative activity and the degree of cell atypia, as well as an estimation of mean nuclear volume in conjunction with architectural grade, may contribute to predicting the extent of the disease and outcome, particularly in SCC. On the other hand, only mean nuclear volume appears to be a useful parameter for determining the course of the disease in adenocarcinomas.

  9. Respiratory effects of low versus high tidal volume with or without positive end-expiratory pressure in anesthetized dogs with healthy lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Monte, Valentina; Bufalari, Antonello; Grasso, Salvatore; Ferrulli, Fabienne; Crovace, Alberto Maria; Lacitignola, Luca; Staffieri, Francesco

    2018-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the impact of 2 tidal volumes (T V s) with or without positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on lung mechanics, aeration, and gas exchange in healthy anesthetized dogs. ANIMALS 40 mixed-breed dogs with healthy lungs. PROCEDURES Anesthetized dogs were randomly assigned to 4 groups (n = 10/group) with different ventilatory settings: T V of 8 mL/kg and PEEP of 0 cm H 2 O (low T V group), T V of 8 mL/kg and PEEP of 5 cm H 2 O (low T V plus PEEP group), T V of 15 mL/kg and PEEP of 0 cm H 2 O (high T V group), or T V of 15 mL/kg and PEEP of 5 cm H 2 O (high T V plus PEEP group). Expired CO 2 and respiratory rate were titrated on the basis of a predetermined stepwise protocol. Gas exchange, respiratory mechanics, and pulmonary aeration were evaluated by means of CT 30 minutes after starting mechanical ventilation at the assigned setting. RESULTS Partial pressures of arterial and expired CO 2 were higher in the low T V and low T V plus PEEP groups than in the high T V and high T V plus PEEP groups. Peak and plateau airway pressures were higher in the PEEP group than in the other groups. Static lung compliance was higher in the high T V plus PEEP group than in the low T V group. Relative percentages of atelectatic and poorly aerated lung were lower in the high T V plus PEEP group than in the other groups. Oxygenation was similar among groups. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Differences in T V and PEEP application during mechanical ventilation may affect respiratory function in anesthetized dogs with healthy lungs. Ventilation with a T V of 15 mL/kg and PEEP of 5 cm H 2 O significantly improved lung compliance and reduced the amount of atelectatic and poorly aerated lung.

  10. Thin-section CT vs spiral CT in candidates for lung volume reduction surgery: a comparison based on radiologists' subjective preferences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cederlund, K.; Hoegberg, S.; Rasmussen, E.; Svane, B.; Bergstrand, L.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether high-resolution (HRCT) or spiral CT was preferred in evaluating severe emphysema in patients undergoing lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS), whether there is any difference in this regard between the cranial and caudal part of the lung, and whether the degree of emphysema has an impact on the radiologists' preference. The study was performed by letting four radiologists compare images obtained with the two techniques (film pairs) and decide which technique they preferred or if the techniques were considered as equal in evaluating emphysema. In evaluation of 188 film pairs, the HRCT images were preferred in 56 %, spiral CT in 19 % and the techniques considered as equal in 25 %. Spiral CT images were preferred more often in the caudal part of the lung and in more advanced emphysema compared with the HRCT images. The study confirms our clinical assumption that use of both CT techniques are valuable in evaluating advanced emphysema and there may be technical as well as histopathological reasons for this. (orig.)

  11. Thin-section CT vs spiral CT in candidates for lung volume reduction surgery: a comparison based on radiologists' subjective preferences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cederlund, K.; Hoegberg, S.; Rasmussen, E.; Svane, B. [Dept. of Thoracic Radiology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Bergstrand, L. [Dept. of Radiology, Danderyds Hospital (Sweden)

    2001-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether high-resolution (HRCT) or spiral CT was preferred in evaluating severe emphysema in patients undergoing lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS), whether there is any difference in this regard between the cranial and caudal part of the lung, and whether the degree of emphysema has an impact on the radiologists' preference. The study was performed by letting four radiologists compare images obtained with the two techniques (film pairs) and decide which technique they preferred or if the techniques were considered as equal in evaluating emphysema. In evaluation of 188 film pairs, the HRCT images were preferred in 56 %, spiral CT in 19 % and the techniques considered as equal in 25 %. Spiral CT images were preferred more often in the caudal part of the lung and in more advanced emphysema compared with the HRCT images. The study confirms our clinical assumption that use of both CT techniques are valuable in evaluating advanced emphysema and there may be technical as well as histopathological reasons for this. (orig.)

  12. [Role of quantitative perfusion scintigraphy evaluation in determination of the efficiency of the procedure before lung volume reduction coil treatment for severe emphysema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldız, Fidan

    2017-06-01

    Lung volume reduction coil (LVRC) is a new treatment method which exercise capacities among the patients with severe emphysema. In order to determine the emphysema distribution before LVRC treatment, we examined the contribution of combination of the high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of the lung and the quantitative perfusion scintigraphy to the efficiency of the procedure. The study was conducted retrospectively. The densitometry analysis and scores of emphysema areas of the patients who were found suitable for LVRC treatment in HRCT were determined. Before the procedure, the quantitative lung perfusion scintigraphies were taken. Lobes which had high emphysema score and in which a decrease perfusion was observed in quantitative perfusion scintigraphy were determined as treatment areas. A total of 22 patients were treated. In HRCT it was observed that perfusion decreased in lobes in which the emphysema damage scoring was high. A significant statistical difference was found between pre-and post- procedure measurements in terms of FEV 1 , RV, and TLC (pdifference was found as 45.4 ± 23.9 m (p= 0.000). No significant difference was determined between perfusion ratios before the procedure and perfusion ratios after the procedure. The quantitative perfusion scintigraphy taken before LVRC treatment in severe emphysema patients guides to determine the target lobe for treatment and makes contribution to the efficiency of the procedure.

  13. Risk-stratifying capacity of PET/CT metabolic tumor volume in stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkle, Joshua H.; Jo, Stephanie Y.; Yuan, Cindy; Pu, Yonglin [University of Chicago, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Ferguson, Mark K. [University of Chicago, Department of Surgery, Chicago, IL (United States); Liu, Hai-Yan [First Hospital of Shanxi Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taiyuan, Shanxi (China); Zhang, Chenpeng [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, RenJi Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Xuee [Nanjing Medical University, Department of Radiology, BenQ Medical Center, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2017-08-15

    Stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is heterogeneous in tumor burden, and its treatment is variable. Whole-body metabolic tumor volume (MTV{sub WB}) has been shown to be an independent prognostic index for overall survival (OS). However, the potential of MTV{sub WB} to risk-stratify stage IIIA NSCLC has previously been unknown. If we can identify subgroups within the stage exhibiting significant OS differences using MTV{sub WB}, MTV{sub WB} may lead to adjustments in patients' risk profile evaluations and may, therefore, influence clinical decision making regarding treatment. We estimated the risk-stratifying capacity of MTV{sub WB} in stage IIIA by comparing OS of stratified stage IIIA with stage IIB and IIIB NSCLC. We performed a retrospective review of 330 patients with clinical stage IIB, IIIA, and IIIB NSCLC diagnosed between 2004 and 2014. The patients' clinical TNM stage, initial MTV{sub WB}, and long-term survival data were collected. Patients with TNM stage IIIA disease were stratified by MTV{sub WB}. The optimal MTV{sub WB} cutoff value for stage IIIA patients was calculated using sequential log-rank tests. Univariate and multivariate cox regression analyses and Kaplan-Meier OS analysis with log-rank tests were performed. The optimal MTV{sub WB} cut-point was 29.2 mL for the risk-stratification of stage IIIA. We identified statistically significant differences in OS between stage IIB and IIIA patients (p < 0.01), between IIIA and IIIB patients (p < 0.01), and between the stage IIIA patients with low MTV{sub WB} (below 29.2 mL) and the stage IIIA patients with high MTV{sub WB} (above 29.2 mL) (p < 0.01). There was no OS difference between the low MTV{sub WB} stage IIIA and the cohort of stage IIB patients (p = 0.485), or between the high MTV{sub WB} stage IIIA patients and the cohort of stage IIIB patients (p = 0.459). Similar risk-stratification capacity of MTV{sub WB} was observed in a large range of cutoff values from 15 to 55 mL in

  14. Lung growth in infants and toddlers assessed by multi-slice computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Laxmi; Tiller, Christina; Coates, Cathy; Kimmel, Risa; Applegate, Kimberly E; Granroth-Cook, Janice; Denski, Cheryl; Nguyen, James; Yu, Zhangsheng; Hoffman, Eric; Tepper, Robert S

    2010-09-01

    Postnatal lung growth and development have primarily been evaluated from a very limited number of autopsied lungs, but it remains unclear whether alveolarization of the lung is complete during infancy and whether the conducting airways grow proportionately. The purpose of this study was to evaluate lung growth and development in vivo in infants and toddlers using multislice computed tomography. Thirty-eight subjects (14 male, 24 female) aged 17 to 142 weeks underwent low-dose volumetric high-resolution computed tomographic imaging at an inflation pressure of 20 cm H(2)O during an induced respiratory pause. Lung volume and weight were determined, as well as airway dimensions (inner and outer area and wall area) for the trachea and the next three to four generations. Lung volume, air volume, and tissue volume increased linearly with body length. The air and tissue components of the lung parenchyma increased at a constant rate with each other. In addition, airway caliber decreased with increasing generation from the trachea into each lobe. Airway caliber was also correlated with body length; however, there was no interaction effect between airway generation and body length on transformed airway size. In vivo assessment suggests that the growth of the lung parenchyma in infants and toddlers occurred with a constant relationship between air volume and lung tissue, which is consistent with lung growth occurring primarily by the addition of alveoli rather than the expansion of alveoli. In addition, the central conducting airways grow proportionately in infants and toddlers. This information may be important for evaluating subjects with arrested lung development. Copyright 2010 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Association between use of lung-protective ventilation with lower tidal volumes and clinical outcomes among patients without acute respiratory distress syndrome: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpa Neto, Ary; Cardoso, Sérgio Oliveira; Manetta, José Antônio; Pereira, Victor Galvão Moura; Espósito, Daniel Crepaldi; Pasqualucci, Manoela de Oliveira Prado; Damasceno, Maria Cecília Toledo; Schultz, Marcus J

    2012-10-24

    Lung-protective mechanical ventilation with the use of lower tidal volumes has been found to improve outcomes of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). It has been suggested that use of lower tidal volumes also benefits patients who do not have ARDS. To determine whether use of lower tidal volumes is associated with improved outcomes of patients receiving ventilation who do not have ARDS. MEDLINE, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials up to August 2012. Eligible studies evaluated use of lower vs higher tidal volumes in patients without ARDS at onset of mechanical ventilation and reported lung injury development, overall mortality, pulmonary infection, atelectasis, and biochemical alterations. Three reviewers extracted data on study characteristics, methods, and outcomes. Disagreement was resolved by consensus. Twenty articles (2822 participants) were included. Meta-analysis using a fixed-effects model showed a decrease in lung injury development (risk ratio [RR], 0.33; 95% CI, 0.23 to 0.47; I2, 0%; number needed to treat [NNT], 11), and mortality (RR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.46 to 0.89; I2, 0%; NNT, 23) in patients receiving ventilation with lower tidal volumes. The results of lung injury development were similar when stratified by the type of study (randomized vs nonrandomized) and were significant only in randomized trials for pulmonary infection and only in nonrandomized trials for mortality. Meta-analysis using a random-effects model showed, in protective ventilation groups, a lower incidence of pulmonary infection (RR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.22 to 0.92; I2, 32%; NNT, 26), lower mean (SD) hospital length of stay (6.91 [2.36] vs 8.87 [2.93] days, respectively; standardized mean difference [SMD], 0.51; 95% CI, 0.20 to 0.82; I2, 75%), higher mean (SD) PaCO2 levels (41.05 [3.79] vs 37.90 [4.19] mm Hg, respectively; SMD, -0.51; 95% CI, -0.70 to -0.32; I2, 54%), and lower mean (SD) pH values (7.37 [0.03] vs 7.40 [0

  16. Tumor volume determines the feasibility of cell-free DNA sequencing for mutation detection in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Tatsuo; Sakai, Kazuko; Matsubayashi, Jun; Kajiwara, Naohiro; Kakihana, Masatoshi; Hagiwara, Masaru; Hibi, Masaaki; Yoshida, Koichi; Maeda, Junichi; Ohtani, Keishi; Nagao, Toshitaka; Nishio, Kazuto; Ikeda, Norihiko

    2016-11-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and digital PCR technologies allow analysis of the mutational profile of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in individuals with advanced lung cancer. We have now evaluated the feasibility of cfDNA sequencing for mutation detection in patients with non-small cell lung cancer at earlier stages. A total of 150 matched tumor and serum samples were collected from non-small cell lung cancer patients at stages IA-IIIA. Amplicon sequencing with DNA extracted from tumor tissue detected frequent mutations in EGFR (37% of patients), TP53 (39%), and KRAS (10%), consistent with previous findings. In contrast, NGS of cfDNA identified only EGFR, TP53, and PIK3CA mutations in three, five, and one patient, respectively, even though adequate amounts of cfDNA were extracted (median of 4936 copies/mL serum). Next-generation sequencing showed a high accuracy (98.8%) compared with droplet digital PCR for cfDNA mutation detection, suggesting that the low frequency of mutations in cfDNA was not due to a low assay sensitivity. Whereas the yield of cfDNA did not differ among tumor stages, the cfDNA mutations were detected in seven patients at stages IIA-IIIA and at T2b or T3. Tumor volume was significantly higher in the cfDNA mutation-positive patients than in the negative patients at stages T2b-T4 (159.1 ± 58.0 vs. 52.5 ± 9.9 cm 3 , P = 0.014). Our results thus suggest that tumor volume is a determinant of the feasibility of mutation detection with cfDNA as the analyte. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  17. Effects of smoking and irradiated volume on inflammatory response in the lung of irradiated breast cancer patients evaluated with bronchoalveolar lavage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjermer, L.; Franzen, L.; Littbrand, B.; Nilsson, K.; Angstroem, T.H.; Henriksson, R.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of the effects of irradiation on normal tissues in humans have been hard to obtain because most tissues are inaccessible and/or direct responses are difficult to quantify in a nondestructive manner. Pneumonitis and fibrotic lung disease are adverse effects seen in varying intensity in patients treated with radiotherapy for carcinomas of the thorax, e.g., breast cancer. In the present study the aim was to evaluate the inflammatory reaction in the underlying parenchyma following postoperative irradiation with bronchoalveolar lavage technique. Twenty-one patients with breast cancer stage T1N0M0 received radiotherapy with photons to a target dose of 56 Gy following breast conservative surgery. Nineteen healthy controls were also included. The results showed a clear elevation of neutrophils, mast cells, eosinophils, and lymphocytes in the total irradiated groups, compared to controls. When subclassifying the material according to smoking habit, it was obvious that the smokers displayed a significantly decreased inflammatory reaction, i.e., reduced levels of mast cells and lymphocytes, compared to both nonsmoking controls and patients. Eosinophils were seen in an elevated number in all irradiated patients. Radiological signs of pneumonitis were observed in three patients, all in the nonsmoking group. No correlation was found between the volume of lung irradiated and the inflammatory response. It is concluded that bronchoalveolar lavage is a suitable and sensitive method for investigating radiotherapy-induced reactions in the human lung. Furthermore, ongoing smoking during the treatment depressed the inflammatory response in the lung parenchyma induced by irradiation. The present study as well as earlier observations justify further studies concerning the possibility of interaction of smoking with cancer treatment

  18. NUTRITION SUPPORT COMPLICATIONS IN PATIENT WHO UNDERWENT CARDIAC SURGERY

    OpenAIRE

    Krdžalić, Alisa; Kovčić, Jasmina; Krdžalić, Goran; Jahić, Elmir

    2016-01-01

    Background: The nutrition support complications after cardiac surgery should be detected and treated on time. Aim: To show the incidence and type of nutritional support complication in patients after cardiac surgery. Methods: The prospective study included 415 patients who underwent cardiac surgery between 2010 and 2013 in Clinic for Cardiovascular Disease of University Clinical Center Tuzla. Complications of the delivery system for nutrition support (NS) and nutrition itself were analy...

  19. Surgery in high-volume hospitals not commission on cancer accreditation leads to increased cancer-specific survival for early-stage lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Elizabeth A; Cooke, David T; Chen, Yingjia; Perry, Andrew; Canter, Robert J; Cress, Rosemary

    2015-10-01

    Quality of oncologic outcomes is of paramount importance in the care of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We sought to evaluate the relationship of hospital volume for lobectomy on cancer-specific survival in NSCLC patients treated in California, as well as the influence of Commission on Cancer (CoC) accreditation. The California Cancer Registry was queried from 2004 to 2011 for cases of Stage I NSCLC and 8,345 patients were identified. Statistical analysis was used to determine prognostic factors for cancer-specific survival. A total of 7,587 patients were treated surgically. CoC accreditation was not significant for cancer-specific survival, but treatment in high-volume centers was associated with longer survival when compared with low- and medium-volume centers (hazard ratio 1.77, 1.474 to 2.141 and hazard ratio 1.23, 1.058 to 1.438). These data suggest that surgical treatment in high-volume hospitals is associated with longer cancer-specific survival for early-stage NSCLC, but that CoC accreditation is not. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Comparison of the gross tumor volume in end-expiration/end-inspiration (2 Phase) and summated all phase volume captured in four-dimensional computed tomography in carcinoma lung patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pramod Kumar; Srivastava, Roopam; Munshi, Anusheel; Chomal, Manish; Saini, Gagan; Garg, Madhur; Manjhi, Jayanand; Rai, D V

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the delineation and treatment planning of 2 Phase based (end-expiration and end-inspiration) internal gross tumor volume (IGTV) with 10-phase based (four-dimensional [4D]) IGTV. Patients with lung tumors at different sites were selected for the study. The location of the tumor in Groups A, B, C were at the upper lobe (attached to the chest wall), middle lobe, and lower lobe, respectively. We contoured the GTV on each of the 10 respiratory phases of the 4D computed tomography (4DCT) data set. The combination of these GTVs produced the IGTV "All Phases." GTV was also generated on the extreme respiratory phases. The combination of these two GTVs produced IGTV "2 Phases." Treatment planning was done, and dose to organs at risks (OARs) were compared in both cases. The average volume of IGTV "2 Phases" and IGTV "All Phases" for Group A were nearly same. However, for Group B and Group C, IGTV "2 Phases" were smaller than the IGTV "All Phases." Lung-GTV doses were less in "exp-insp" phases than in "4DCT" for Groups B, C, whereas it was same for "expiration-inspiration" and "4DCT" in Patient A. Patients with tumor upper lobe tumor have no difference in tumor coverage and OARs sparing in the 2 Phase and all phases but middle lobe and lower lobe have a greater excursion during respiration and hence greater all phases IGTV.

  1. WE-AB-207B-12: Prospective Study of the Relationship Between Dose-Volume Clinical Toxicity and Patient Reported Outcomes in Lung Cancer Patients Treated with SBRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayyas, E; Vance, S; Brown, S; Liu, J; Kim, J; Zhen, S; Devpura, S; Ajlouni, M; Salim, S; Chetty, I; Movsas, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine in a prospective study, the correlation between radiation dose/volume, clinical toxicities and patient-reported, quality of life (QOL) resulting from lung SBRT. Methods: For 106 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients receiving SBRT (12 Gy × 4), symptoms including cough, dyspnea, fatigue and pneumonitis were measured at baseline (before treatment), after treatment and 3, 6, and 12 months post-treatment. Toxicity was graded from zero to five. Dosimetric parameters such as the MLD, D10%, D20%, and lung subvolumes (V10 and V20) were obtained from the treatment plan. Dosimetric parameters and number of patients demonstrating toxicity ≥ grade 2 were tabulated. Linear regression analysis was used to calculate correlations between MLD and D10, D20, V10 and V20. Results: The percentages of patients with > grade 2 pneumonitis, fatigue, cough, and dyspnea over 3 to 12 months increased from 0.0% to 3.5%, 3.2% to 10.5%, 4.3% to 8.3%, and 10.8% to 18.8%, respectively. Computed dose indices D10%, D20% were 7.9±4.8 Gy and 3.0±2.3 Gy, respectively. MLD ranged from 0.34 Gy up to 9.9 Gy with overall average 3.0±1.7 Gy. The averages of the subvolumes V10 and V20 were respectively 8.9±5.3% and 3.0±2.4%. The linear regression analysis showed that V10 and D10 demonstrated the strongest correlation to MLD; R2= 0.92 and 0.87, respectively. V20, and D20 were also strongly correlated with MLD; R2 = 0.81 and 0.84 respectively. A correlation was also found to exist between MLD > 2 Gy and ≥ grade 2 cough and dyspnea. Subvolume values for 2Gy MLD were 5.3% for V10 and 2% for V20. Conclusion: Dosimetric indices: MLD ≥ 2Gy, D10 ≥ 5Gy and V10 ≥ 5% of the total lung volume were predictive of > grade 2 cough and dyspnea QOL data. The QOL results are a novel component of this work. acknowledgement of the Varian grant support.

  2. WE-AB-207B-12: Prospective Study of the Relationship Between Dose-Volume Clinical Toxicity and Patient Reported Outcomes in Lung Cancer Patients Treated with SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayyas, E; Vance, S; Brown, S; Liu, J; Kim, J; Zhen, S; Devpura, S; Ajlouni, M; Salim, S; Chetty, I; Movsas, B [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine in a prospective study, the correlation between radiation dose/volume, clinical toxicities and patient-reported, quality of life (QOL) resulting from lung SBRT. Methods: For 106 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients receiving SBRT (12 Gy × 4), symptoms including cough, dyspnea, fatigue and pneumonitis were measured at baseline (before treatment), after treatment and 3, 6, and 12 months post-treatment. Toxicity was graded from zero to five. Dosimetric parameters such as the MLD, D10%, D20%, and lung subvolumes (V10 and V20) were obtained from the treatment plan. Dosimetric parameters and number of patients demonstrating toxicity ≥ grade 2 were tabulated. Linear regression analysis was used to calculate correlations between MLD and D10, D20, V10 and V20. Results: The percentages of patients with > grade 2 pneumonitis, fatigue, cough, and dyspnea over 3 to 12 months increased from 0.0% to 3.5%, 3.2% to 10.5%, 4.3% to 8.3%, and 10.8% to 18.8%, respectively. Computed dose indices D10%, D20% were 7.9±4.8 Gy and 3.0±2.3 Gy, respectively. MLD ranged from 0.34 Gy up to 9.9 Gy with overall average 3.0±1.7 Gy. The averages of the subvolumes V10 and V20 were respectively 8.9±5.3% and 3.0±2.4%. The linear regression analysis showed that V10 and D10 demonstrated the strongest correlation to MLD; R2= 0.92 and 0.87, respectively. V20, and D20 were also strongly correlated with MLD; R2 = 0.81 and 0.84 respectively. A correlation was also found to exist between MLD > 2 Gy and ≥ grade 2 cough and dyspnea. Subvolume values for 2Gy MLD were 5.3% for V10 and 2% for V20. Conclusion: Dosimetric indices: MLD ≥ 2Gy, D10 ≥ 5Gy and V10 ≥ 5% of the total lung volume were predictive of > grade 2 cough and dyspnea QOL data. The QOL results are a novel component of this work. acknowledgement of the Varian grant support.

  3. Clinical Utility of Additional Measurement of Total Lung Capacity in Diagnosing Obstructive Lung Disease in Subjects With Restrictive Pattern of Spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun; Chang, Boksoon; Kim, Kyunga; Song, Won Jun; Chon, Hae Ri; Kang, Hyung Koo; Kim, Jung Soo; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Koh, Won-Jung; Park, Hye Yun

    2016-04-01

    Total lung capacity (TLC), forced expiratory flow between 25 and 75% (FEF25-75%), peak expiratory flow (PEF), or post-bronchodilator volume response is recommended to detect obstructive abnormalities in the lung. The present study was performed to evaluate the usefulness of these pulmonary function test (PFT) parameters to diagnose obstructive lung disease in subjects with a restrictive pattern of spirometry. A retrospective study was conducted in 64 subjects with a restrictive pattern of spirometry (normal FEV1/FVC and low FVC) out of 3,030 patients who underwent all pre- and post-bronchodilator spirometry and lung volume measurement between April 2008 and December 2010. After subjects were clinically classified into those with obstructive lung disease, restrictive lung disease, and mixed lung disease, the agreements between the clinical diagnosis and PFT classification according to TLC, FEF(25-75%), PEF, and post-bronchodilator response criteria were compared. Of 64 subjects, 18 (28.1%) were classified with obstructive lung disease, 39 (60.9%) had restrictive lung disease, 1 (1.6%) had mixed lung disease, and 6 (9.4%) had no clinical lung disease. Among the 58 subjects with clinical lung disease, 22 (37.9%), 37 (63.8%), 33 (56.9%), and 3 (5.2%) were classified as having obstructive pattern based on TLC, FEF25-75%, PEF, and post-bronchodilator response criteria, respectively. The kappa coefficients for the agreement between the clinical classification and PFT classification using TLC, FEF25-75%, PEF, and post-bronchodilator response criteria in 58 subjects were 0.59, 0.18, 0.17, and spirometry, when obstructive lung disease is clinically suspected. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  4. Interstitial Lung disease in Systemic Sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ooi, G.C.; Mok, M.Y.; Tsang, K.W.T.; Khong, P.L.; Fung, P.C.W.; Chan, S.; Tse, H.F.; Wong, R.W.S.; Lam, W.K.; Lau, C.S.; Wong, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate high-resolution CT (HRCT) parameters of inflammation and fibrosis in systemic sclerosis (SSc), for correlation with lung function, skin scores and exercise tolerance. Material and Methods: : 45 SSc patients (40 women, 48.5±13.4 years), underwent thoracic HRCT, lung function assessment, and modified Rodnan skin scores. Exercise tolerance was also graded. HRCT were scored for extent of 4 HRCT patterns of interstitial lung disease (ILD): ground glass opacification (GGO), reticular, mixed and honeycomb pattern in each lobe. Total HRCT score, inflammation index (GGO and mixed score) and fibrosis index (reticular and honeycomb scores) were correlated with lung function and clinical parameters. Results: ILD was present in 39/45 (86.7%) patients. Abnormal (<80% predicted) forced vital capacity (FVC), total lung capacity (TLC) and carbon monoxide diffusion factor (DLco) were detected in 30%, 22% and 46% of patients. Total HRCT score correlated with FVC (r=0.43, p=0.008), FEV1 (forced expiratory volume) (r=-0.37, p=0.03), TLC (r=-0.47, p=0.003), and DLCO (r=-0.43, p=0.008); inflammatory index with DLCO (r=-0.43, p=0.008) and exercise tolerance (r=-0.39, p < 0.05); and fibrosis index with FVC (r=-0.31, p=0.05) and TLC (r=-0.38, p=0.02). Higher total HRCT score, and inflammation and fibrosis indices were found in patients with abnormal lung function. Conclusion: Qualitative HRCT is able to evaluate inflammation and fibrosis, showing important relationships with diffusion capacity and lung volume, respectively

  5. High-Frequency Jet Ventilation for Complete Target Immobilization and Reduction of Planning Target Volume in Stereotactic High Single-Dose Irradiation of Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Lung Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, Peter; Kraus, Hans-Joerg; Muehlnickel, Werner; Sassmann, Volker; Hering, Werner; Strauch, Konstantin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of complete target immobilization by means of high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV); and to show that the saving of planning target volume (PTV) on the stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) under HFJV, compared with SBRT with respiratory motion, can be predicted with reliable accuracy by computed tomography (CT) scans at peak inspiration phase. Methods and Materials: A comparison regarding different methods for defining the PTV was carried out in 22 patients with tumors that clearly moved with respiration. A movement span of the gross tumor volume (GTV) was defined by fusing respiration-correlated CT scans. The PTV enclosed the GTV positions with a safety margin throughout the breathing cycle. To create a PTV from CT scans acquired under HFJV, the same margins were drawn around the immobilized target. In addition, peak inspiration phase CT images (PIP-CTs) were used to approximate a target immobilized by HFJV. Results: The resulting HFJV-PTVs were between 11.6% and 45.4% smaller than the baseline values calculated as respiration-correlated CT-PTVs (median volume reduction, 25.4%). Tentative planning by means of PIP-CT PTVs predicted that in 19 of 22 patients, use of HFJV would lead to a reduction in volume of ≥20%. Using this threshold yielded a positive predictive value of 0.89, as well as a sensitivity of 0.94 and a specificity of 0.5. Conclusions: In all patients, SBRT under HFJV provided a reliable immobilization of the GTVs and achieved a reduction in PTVs, regardless of patient compliance. Tentative planning facilitated the selection of patients who could better undergo radiation in respiratory standstill, both with greater accuracy and lung protection.

  6. Circumferential or sectored beam arrangements for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of primary lung tumors: Effect on target and normal-structure dose-volume metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, Mara W. [Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA (United States); Department of Physics, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA (United States); Kato, Catherine M. [Macalester College, St. Paul, MN (United States); Carson, Kelly M.P. [The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Matsunaga, Nathan M. [Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA (United States); Arao, Robert F. [Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Doss, Emily J. [Department of Internal Medicine, Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Portland, OR (United States); McCracken, Charles L. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Meng, Lu Z. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Chen, Yiyi [Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Laub, Wolfram U.; Fuss, Martin [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Tanyi, James A., E-mail: tanyij@ohsu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2013-01-01

    To compare 2 beam arrangements, sectored (beam entry over ipsilateral hemithorax) vs circumferential (beam entry over both ipsilateral and contralateral lungs), for static-gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery techniques with respect to target and organs-at-risk (OAR) dose-volume metrics, as well as treatment delivery efficiency. Data from 60 consecutive patients treated using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for primary non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) formed the basis of this study. Four treatment plans were generated per data set: IMRT/VMAT plans using sectored (-s) and circumferential (-c) configurations. The prescribed dose (PD) was 60 Gy in 5 fractions to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) (maximum PTV dose ∼ 150% PD) for a 6-MV photon beam. Plan conformality, R{sub 50} (ratio of volume circumscribed by the 50% isodose line and the PTV), and D{sub 2} {sub cm} (D{sub max} at a distance ≥2 cm beyond the PTV) were evaluated. For lungs, mean doses (mean lung dose [MLD]) and percent V{sub 30}/V{sub 20}/V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} Gy were assessed. Spinal cord and esophagus D{sub max} and D{sub 5}/D{sub 50} were computed. Chest wall (CW) D{sub max} and absolute V{sub 30}/V{sub 20}/V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} {sub Gy} were reported. Sectored SBRT planning resulted in significant decrease in contralateral MLD and V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} {sub Gy}, as well as contralateral CW D{sub max} and V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} {sub Gy} (all p < 0.001). Nominal reductions of D{sub max} and D{sub 5}/D{sub 50} for the spinal cord with sectored planning did not reach statistical significance for static-gantry IMRT, although VMAT metrics did show a statistically significant decrease (all p < 0.001). The respective measures for esophageal doses were significantly lower with sectored planning (p < 0.001). Despite comparable dose conformality, irrespective of planning configuration, R{sub 50} significantly improved with IMRT

  7. Effect of using pump on postoperative pleural effusion in the patients that underwent CABG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Özülkü

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The present study investigated effect of using pump on postoperative pleural effusion in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting. Methods: A total of 256 patients who underwent isolated coronary artery bypass grafting surgery in the Cardiovascular Surgery clinic were enrolled in the study. Jostra-Cobe (Model 043213 105, VLC 865, Sweden heart-lung machine was used in on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. Off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting was performed using Octopus and Starfish. Proximal anastomoses to the aorta in both on-pump and off-pump techniques were performed by side clamps. The patients were discharged from the hospital between postoperative day 6 and day 11. Results: The incidence of postoperative right pleural effusion and bilateral pleural effusion was found to be higher as a count in Group 1 (on-pump as compared to Group 2 (off-pump. But the difference was not statistically significant [P>0.05 for right pleural effusion (P=0.893, P>0.05 for bilateral pleural effusion (P=0.780]. Left pleural effusion was encountered to be lower in Group 2 (off-pump. The difference was found to be statistically significant (P<0.05, P=0.006. Conclusion: Under the light of these results, it can be said that left pleural effusion is less prevalent in the patients that underwent off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting when compared to the patients that underwent on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting.

  8. Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis in a Patient who Underwent Hip Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevzat Dabak

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS is a rare, benign, but a locally aggressive tumor. It is characterized by the proliferation of synovial membrane, but it can also be seen in tendon sheaths and bursae. Clinical presentation of solitary lesions include compression and locking of the joint suggesting loose bodies in the joint and a subsequent findings of an effusion, whereas diffuse lesions manifest with pain and chronic swelling. In this article, we presented a curious case of PVNS in a female patient who have been followed up due to an acetabular cystic lesion. She underwent total hip arthroplasty for severe osteoarthritis of the hip joint and associated pain. The diagnosis of PVNS was established intraoperatively. (The Me­di­cal Bul­le­tin of Ha­se­ki 2014; 52: 235-7

  9. ALGORITHM FOR MANAGEMENT OF HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS UNDERWENT UROLOGY INTERVENTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Davydova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the efficacy of cardiovascular non-invasive complex assessment and pre-operative preparation in hypertensive patients needed in surgical treatment of urology dis- eases.Material and methods. Males (n=883, aged 40 to 80 years were included into the study. The main group consisted of patients that underwent laparotomic nephrectomy (LTN group; n=96 and patients who underwent laparoscopic nephrectomy (LSN group; n=53. Dynamics of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM data was analyzed in these groups in the immediate postoperative period. The efficacy of a package of non-invasive methods for cardiovascular system assessment was studied. ABPM was performed after nephrectomy (2-nd and 10-th days after surgery in patients with complaints of vertigo episodes or intense general weakness to correct treatment.Results. In LTN group hypotension episodes or blood pressure (BP elevations were observed in 20 (20.8% and 22 (22.9% patients, respectively, on the 2-nd day after the operation. These complications required antihypertensive treatment correction. Patients with hypotension episodes were significantly older than patients with BP elevation and had significantly lower levels of 24-hour systolic BP, night diastolic BP and minimal night systolic BP. Re-adjustment of antihypertensive treatment on the 10-th postoperative day was required to 2 (10% patients with hypotension episodes and to 1 (4.5% patient with BP elevation. Correction of antihypertensive therapy was required to all patients in LSN group on the day 2, and to 32 (60.4% patients on the 10-th day after the operation. Reduction in the incidence of complications (from 1.2% in 2009 to 0.3% in 2011, p<0.001 was observed during the application of cardiovascular non-invasive complex assessment and preoperative preparation in hypertensive patients.Conclusion. The elaborated management algorithm for patients with concomitant hypertension is recommended to reduce the cardiovascular

  10. ALGORITHM FOR MANAGEMENT OF HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS UNDERWENT UROLOGY INTERVENTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Davydova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the efficacy of cardiovascular non-invasive complex assessment and pre-operative preparation in hypertensive patients needed in surgical treatment of urology dis- eases.Material and methods. Males (n=883, aged 40 to 80 years were included into the study. The main group consisted of patients that underwent laparotomic nephrectomy (LTN group; n=96 and patients who underwent laparoscopic nephrectomy (LSN group; n=53. Dynamics of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM data was analyzed in these groups in the immediate postoperative period. The efficacy of a package of non-invasive methods for cardiovascular system assessment was studied. ABPM was performed after nephrectomy (2-nd and 10-th days after surgery in patients with complaints of vertigo episodes or intense general weakness to correct treatment.Results. In LTN group hypotension episodes or blood pressure (BP elevations were observed in 20 (20.8% and 22 (22.9% patients, respectively, on the 2-nd day after the operation. These complications required antihypertensive treatment correction. Patients with hypotension episodes were significantly older than patients with BP elevation and had significantly lower levels of 24-hour systolic BP, night diastolic BP and minimal night systolic BP. Re-adjustment of antihypertensive treatment on the 10-th postoperative day was required to 2 (10% patients with hypotension episodes and to 1 (4.5% patient with BP elevation. Correction of antihypertensive therapy was required to all patients in LSN group on the day 2, and to 32 (60.4% patients on the 10-th day after the operation. Reduction in the incidence of complications (from 1.2% in 2009 to 0.3% in 2011, p<0.001 was observed during the application of cardiovascular non-invasive complex assessment and preoperative preparation in hypertensive patients.Conclusion. The elaborated management algorithm for patients with concomitant hypertension is recommended to reduce the cardiovascular

  11. Evaluation of Nickel Release from Endobronchial Valves as a Possible Cause of Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis in a Patient Treated with Bronchoscopic Lung Volume Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, Daniel P; Lang, Claudia; Agorastos, Nikos; Freitag, Lutz; Kohler, Malcolm; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Endobronchial valve (EBV) placement is an established lung volume reduction procedure aiming to improve lung function and exercise capacity in patients with severe emphysema. As EBVs consist of silicone and nitinol (a metal alloy of nickel and titanium), there are concerns that nickel ions might be released and could have a clinical impact in patients with a contact allergy to nickel. Based on a case with hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) after treatment with EBVs, we aimed to evaluate the in vitro nickel release from EBVs using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Six EBVs were immersed in artificial saliva for a period of 7 days. At 24-h intervals, the nickel ion concentration was measured using ICP-MS. There was evidence of a significant nickel release from EBV during the first 48 h, which is possibly due to an incomplete silicone layer detected by SEM. The concentration of released nickel was below the toxic limit. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first case of HP after EBV treatment. Our finding of in vitro release of nickel ions from EBVs may contribute to the current understanding on hypersensitivity reactions after nitinol implants in patients with nickel contact allergy. However, it did not confirm a causative relationship. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. An evaluation of an automated 4D-CT contour propagation tool to define an internal gross tumour volume for lung cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaede, Stewart; Olsthoorn, Jason; Louie, Alexander V.; Palma, David; Yu, Edward; Yaremko, Brian; Ahmad, Belal; Chen, Jeff; Bzdusek, Karl; Rodrigues, George

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate an automated 4D-CT contouring propagation tool by its impact on the inter- and intra-physician variability in lung tumour delineation. Materials and methods: In a previous study, six radiation oncologists contoured the gross tumour volume (GTV) and nodes on 10 phases of the 4D-CT dataset of 10 lung cancer patients to examine the intra- and inter-physician variability. In this study, a model-based deformable image registration algorithm was used to propagate the GTV and nodes on each phase of the same 4D-CT datasets. A blind review of the contours was performed by each physician and edited. Inter- and intra-physician variability for both the manual and automated methods was assessed by calculating the centroid motion of the GTV using the Pearson correlation coefficient and the variability in the internal gross tumour volume (IGTV) overlap using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Results: The time for manual delineation was (42.7 ± 18.6) min versus (17.7 ± 5.4) min when the propagation tool was used. A significant improvement in the mean Pearson correlation coefficient was also observed. There was a significant decrease in mean DSC in only 1 out of 10 primary IGTVs and 2 out of 10 nodal IGTVs. Intra-physician variability was not significantly impacted (DSC > 0.742). Conclusions: Automated 4D-CT propagation tools can significantly decrease the IGTV delineation time without significantly decreasing the inter- and intra-physician variability.

  13. The early predictive value of a decrease of metabolic tumor volume in repeated {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for recurrence of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer with concurrent radiochemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Wei, E-mail: weihuang@mcw.com [Department of Radiation Oncology (Chest Section), Shandong' s Key Laboratory of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, 440 Jiyan Road, Jinan 250117 (China); Liu, Bo; Fan, Min [Department of Internal Medicine Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan (China); Zhou, Tao [Department of Radiation Oncology (Chest Section), Shandong' s Key Laboratory of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, 440 Jiyan Road, Jinan 250117 (China); Fu, Zheng [PET/CT center, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan (China); Zhang, Zicheng; Li, Hongsheng [Department of Radiation Oncology (Chest Section), Shandong' s Key Laboratory of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, 440 Jiyan Road, Jinan 250117 (China); Li, Baosheng, E-mail: alvinbird@163.com [Department of Radiation Oncology (Chest Section), Shandong' s Key Laboratory of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, 440 Jiyan Road, Jinan 250117 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •The patients underwent the second FDG PET during the early stage of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). •To our knowledge, this could be the first study showing that the repeated FDG PET during the early stage of CCRT has added value by being a prognostic factor for recurrence of the locally advanced NSCLC patients. •This is a result of continuous research. •The decrease of MTV was the only significant risk factor for recurrence. -- Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this study is to investigate the value of [{sup 18}F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F FDG PET/CT) to predict recurrence of patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during the early stage of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Methods: A total of 53 stage III NSCLC patients without diabetics or undergoing surgery were enrolled in the prospective study. Those patients were evaluated by FDG PET before and following 40 Gy radiotherapy (RT) with a concurrent cisplatin-based heterogeneous chemotherapy regimen. Semiquantitative assessment was used to determine maximum and mean SUVs (SUVmax/SUVmean) and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) of the primary tumor. The prognostic significance of PET/CT parameters and other clinical variables was assessed using Cox regression analyses. The cutoffs of PET/CT parameters which have been determined by the previous study were used to separate the groups with Kaplan–Meier curves. Results: Recurrence rates at 1- and 2-years were 18.9% (10/53) and 50.9% (27/53) for all patients, respectively. Cox regression analysis showed that the only prognostic factor for recurrence was a decrease of MTV. Using the cutoff of 29.7%, a decrease of MTV can separate the patients into 2 groups with Kaplan–Meier curve successfully. Conclusion: The prospective study has reinforced the early predictive value of MTV in repeated {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for recurrence in a subgroup of locally advanced NSCLC who

  14. Frequency of Helicobacter pylori in patients underwent endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Tay

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate thefrequency of Helicobacter pylori in patients underwent endoscopyeastern Anatolia.Materials and methods: The patients whose endoscopicantral biopsies were taken for any reason in our endoscopyunit in February-June 2010 period were includedand retrospectively investigated. The frequency of Helicobacterpylori was determined as separating the patientsaccording to general, sex and the age groups. Antral biopsieswere stained with hematoxylin-eosin and modified giemsamethod and examined under light microscope andreported as (+ mild, (++ moderate, (+++ severe positiveaccording to their intensities.Results: Biopsy specimens of 1298 patients were includedinto the study. The mean age was 47.5 ± 17.5 years(range 14-88 and 607 of these patients (47% were male.Histopathological evaluation revealed that, 918 of the patientswere (71% positive and 379 (29% were negativefor Helicobacter pylori. Approximately 60% of our patientshad mild, 29% had moderate and 11% had severe positivityfor Helicobacter pylori. No significant difference wasfound in the frequency of Helicobacter pylori betweenwomen and men. The frequencies of Helicobacter pyloriwere 73.2%, 71.5%, 68.6% and 70.4%, respectively, inthe age groups of 14-30 years, 31-45 years, 46-60 yearsand 61-88 years.Conclusion: The frequency of Helicobacter pylori was71% in Eastern Anatolia Region. No statistically significantdifference was found between genders and agegroups in term of the frequency of Helicobacter pylori.

  15. Extracorporeal life support as a bridge to lung transplantation-experience of a high-volume transplant center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoetzenecker, Konrad; Donahoe, Laura; Yeung, Jonathan C; Azad, Sassan; Fan, Eddy; Ferguson, Niall D; Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; de Perrot, Marc; Pierre, Andrew; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro; Singer, Lianne; Waddell, Thomas K; Keshavjee, Shaf; Cypel, Marcelo

    2018-03-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) is increasingly used to bridge deteriorating patients awaiting lung transplantation (LTx), however, few systematic descriptions of this practice exist. We therefore aimed to review our institutional experience over the past 10 years. In this case series, we included all adults who received ECLS with the intent to bridge to LTx. Data were retrieved from patient charts and our institutional ECLS and transplant databases. Between January 2006 and September 2016, 1111 LTx were performed in our institution. ECLS was used in 71 adults with the intention to bridge to LTx; of these, 11 (16%) were bridged to retransplantation. The median duration of ECLS before LTx was 10 days (range, 0-95). We used a single dual-lumen venous cannula in 23 patients (32%). Nine of 13 patients (69%) with pulmonary hypertension were bridged by central pulmonary artery to left atrium Novalung. Twenty-five patients (35%) were extubated while on ECLS and 26 patients (37%) were mobilized. Sixty-three patients (89%) survived to LTx. Survival by intention to treat was 66% (1 year), 58% (3 years) and 48% (5 years). Survival was significantly shorter in patients undergoing ECLS bridge to retransplantation compared with first LTx (median survival, 15 months (95% CI, 0-31) versus 60 months (95% CI, 37-83); P = .041). In our center experience, ECLS bridge to first lung transplant leads to good short-term and long-term outcomes in carefully selected patients. In contrast, our data suggest that ECLS as a bridge to retransplantation should be used with caution. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  16. Preserving Functional Lung Using Perfusion Imaging and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Advanced-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Jang, Si Young; Liu, H. Helen; Guerrero, Thomas; Wang, Xuanmin; Gayed, Isis W.; Erwin, William D.; Liao, Zhongxing; Chang, Joe Y.; Jeter, Melenda; Yaremko, Brian P.; Borghero, Yerko O.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Mohan, Radhe

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess quantitatively the impact of incorporating functional lung imaging into intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Sixteen patients with advanced-stage NSCLC who underwent radiotherapy were included in this study. Before radiotherapy, each patient underwent lung perfusion imaging with single-photon-emission computed tomography and X-ray computed tomography (SPECT-CT). The SPECT-CT was registered with simulation CT and was used to segment the 50- and 90-percentile hyperperfusion lung (F50 lung and F90 lung). Two IMRT plans were designed and compared in each patient: an anatomic plan using simulation CT alone and a functional plan using SPECT-CT in addition to the simulation CT. Dosimetric parameters of the two types of plans were compared in terms of tumor coverage and avoidance of normal tissues. Results: In incorporating perfusion information in IMRT planning, the median reductions in the mean doses to the F50 and F90 lung in the functional plan were 2.2 and 4.2 Gy, respectively, compared with those in the anatomic plans. The median reductions in the percentage of volume irradiated with >5 Gy, >10 Gy, and >20 Gy in the functional plans were 7.1%, 6.0%, and 5.1%, respectively, for F50 lung, and 11.7%, 12.0%, and 6.8%, respectively, for F90 lung. A greater degree of sparing of the functional lung was achieved for patients with large perfusion defects compared with those with relatively uniform perfusion distribution. Conclusion: Function-guided IMRT planning appears to be effective in preserving functional lung in locally advanced-stage NSCLC patients

  17. Semiautomatic technique for defining the internal gross tumor volume of lung tumors close to liver/spleen cupola by 4D-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancosu, Pietro; Sghedoni, Roberto; Bettinardi, Valentino; Aquilina, Mark Anthony; Navarria, Piera; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Di Muzio, Nadia; Cozzi, Luca; Scorsetti, Marta

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: It has been shown that in cases of lung tumors close to the liver cupola, the four dimensional (4D)-CT postprocessing maximum intensity projection (MIP) algorithm does not fully recover the radiotherapy internal gross tumor volume (IGTV). In this work, a semiautomatic technique was evaluated by which the residual IGTV that was not included into the IGTV by MIP algorithm was actually added. Methods: A moving phantom and five selected patients were considered. The various IGTVs produced by the semiautomatic approach were compared to those generated by 4D-CT manual contouring. Results: In all cases, the radiation oncologist qualitatively concurred with the semiautomatic IGTV. A quantitative difference in volume of 2.6% was found in the phantom study, whereas a mean difference of 0.1±4.6% was obtained in the patient studies. Conclusions: A semiautomatic technique to include the residual part of IGTV covered by liver/spleen cupola when using MIP algorithm was validated on phantom and on selected patients, revealing the possibility of defining the IGTV for patients with lesions located near liver/spleen cupola by performing only the contours on the MIP series.

  18. Semiautomatic technique for defining the internal gross tumor volume of lung tumors close to liver/spleen cupola by 4D-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancosu, Pietro; Sghedoni, Roberto; Bettinardi, Valentino; Aquilina, Mark Anthony; Navarria, Piera; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Di Muzio, Nadia; Cozzi, Luca; Scorsetti, Marta [Department of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Rozzano, 20089 Milano (Italy); Department of Medical Physics, Arcispedale S. Maria Nuova, Reggio, 42100 Emilia (Italy); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Scientific Institute H. S. Raffaele, 20089 Milan (Italy); Department of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, 20089 Rozzano, Milano (Italy); Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 20133 Milan (Italy); Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 20133 Milan (Italy); Medical Physics Unit, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, 6504 Bellinzona (Switzerland); Department of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, 20089 Rozzano, Milano (Italy)

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: It has been shown that in cases of lung tumors close to the liver cupola, the four dimensional (4D)-CT postprocessing maximum intensity projection (MIP) algorithm does not fully recover the radiotherapy internal gross tumor volume (IGTV). In this work, a semiautomatic technique was evaluated by which the residual IGTV that was not included into the IGTV by MIP algorithm was actually added. Methods: A moving phantom and five selected patients were considered. The various IGTVs produced by the semiautomatic approach were compared to those generated by 4D-CT manual contouring. Results: In all cases, the radiation oncologist qualitatively concurred with the semiautomatic IGTV. A quantitative difference in volume of 2.6% was found in the phantom study, whereas a mean difference of 0.1{+-}4.6% was obtained in the patient studies. Conclusions: A semiautomatic technique to include the residual part of IGTV covered by liver/spleen cupola when using MIP algorithm was validated on phantom and on selected patients, revealing the possibility of defining the IGTV for patients with lesions located near liver/spleen cupola by performing only the contours on the MIP series.

  19. Semiautomatic technique for defining the internal gross tumor volume of lung tumors close to liver/spleen cupola by 4D-CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancosu, Pietro; Sghedoni, Roberto; Bettinardi, Valentino; Aquilina, Mark Anthony; Navarria, Piera; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Di Muzio, Nadia; Cozzi, Luca; Scorsetti, Marta

    2010-09-01

    It has been shown that in cases of lung tumors close to the liver cupola, the four dimensional (4D)-CT postprocessing maximum intensity projection (MIP) algorithm does not fully recover the radiotherapy internal gross tumor volume (IGTV). In this work, a semiautomatic technique was evaluated by which the residual IGTV that was not included into the IGTV by MIP algorithm was actually added. A moving phantom and five selected patients were considered. The various IGTVs produced by the semiautomatic approach were compared to those generated by 4D-CT manual contouring. In all cases, the radiation oncologist qualitatively concurred with the semiautomatic IGTV. A quantitative difference in volume of 2.6% was found in the phantom study, whereas a mean difference of 0.1 +/- 4.6% was obtained in the patient studies. A semiautomatic technique to include the residual part of IGTV covered by liver/spleen cupola when using MIP algorithm was validated on phantom and on selected patients, revealing the possibility of defining the IGTV for patients with lesions located near liver/spleen cupola by performing only the contours on the MIP series.

  20. Data-driven classification of ventilated lung tissues using electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez-Laberge, Camille; Hogan, Matthew J; Elke, Gunnar; Weiler, Norbert; Frerichs, Inéz; Adler, Andy

    2011-01-01

    Current methods for identifying ventilated lung regions utilizing electrical impedance tomography images rely on dividing the image into arbitrary regions of interest (ROI), manually delineating ROI, or forming ROI with pixels whose signal properties surpass an arbitrary threshold. In this paper, we propose a novel application of a data-driven classification method to identify ventilated lung ROI based on forming k clusters from pixels with correlated signals. A standard first-order model for lung mechanics is then applied to determine which ROI correspond to ventilated lung tissue. We applied the method in an experimental study of 16 mechanically ventilated swine in the supine position, which underwent changes in positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and fraction of inspired oxygen (F I O 2 ). In each stage of the experimental protocol, the method performed best with k = 4 and consistently identified 3 lung tissue ROI and 1 boundary tissue ROI in 15 of the 16 subjects. When testing for changes from baseline in lung position, tidal volume, and respiratory system compliance, we found that PEEP displaced the ventilated lung region dorsally by 2 cm, decreased tidal volume by 1.3%, and increased the respiratory system compliance time constant by 0.3 s. F I O 2 decreased tidal volume by 0.7%. All effects were tested at p < 0.05 with n = 16. These findings suggest that the proposed ROI detection method is robust and sensitive to ventilation dynamics in the experimental setting

  1. Quantification of lung fibrosis and emphysema in mice using automated micro-computed tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen De Langhe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In vivo high-resolution micro-computed tomography allows for longitudinal image-based measurements in animal models of lung disease. The combination of repetitive high resolution imaging with fully automated quantitative image analysis in mouse models of lung fibrosis lung benefits preclinical research. This study aimed to develop and validate such an automated micro-computed tomography analysis algorithm for quantification of aerated lung volume in mice; an indicator of pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema severity. METHODOLOGY: Mice received an intratracheal instillation of bleomycin (n = 8, elastase (0.25 U elastase n = 9, 0.5 U elastase n = 8 or saline control (n = 6 for fibrosis, n = 5 for emphysema. A subset of mice was scanned without intervention, to evaluate potential radiation-induced toxicity (n = 4. Some bleomycin-instilled mice were treated with imatinib for proof of concept (n = 8. Mice were scanned weekly, until four weeks after induction, when they underwent pulmonary function testing, lung histology and collagen quantification. Aerated lung volumes were calculated with our automated algorithm. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our automated image-based aerated lung volume quantification method is reproducible with low intra-subject variability. Bleomycin-treated mice had significantly lower scan-derived aerated lung volumes, compared to controls. Aerated lung volume correlated with the histopathological fibrosis score and total lung collagen content. Inversely, a dose-dependent increase in lung volume was observed in elastase-treated mice. Serial scanning of individual mice is feasible and visualized dynamic disease progression. No radiation-induced toxicity was observed. Three-dimensional images provided critical topographical information. CONCLUSIONS: We report on a high resolution in vivo micro-computed tomography image analysis algorithm that runs fully automated and allows quantification of aerated lung volume in mice. This

  2. Early treatment volume reduction rate as a prognostic factor in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy for limited stage small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joo Hwan; Lee, Jeong Shin; Lee, Chang Geol; Cho, Jae Ho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jin Hyun; Kim, Jun Won [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To investigate the relationship between early treatment response to definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and survival outcome in patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC). We retrospectively reviewed 47 patients with LS-SCLC who received definitive CRT between January 2009 and December 2012. Patients were treated with systemic chemotherapy regimen of etoposide/carboplatin (n = 15) or etoposide/cisplatin (n = 32) and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy at a median dose of 54 Gy (range, 46 to 64 Gy). Early treatment volume reduction rate (ETVRR) was defined as the percentage change in gross tumor volume between diagnostic computed tomography (CT) and simulation CT for adaptive RT planning and was used as a parameter for early treatment response. The median dose at adaptive RT planning was 36 Gy (range, 30 to 43 Gy), and adaptive CT was performed in 30 patients (63.8%). With a median follow-up of 27.7 months (range, 5.9 to 75.8 months), the 2-year locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 74.2% and 56.5%, respectively. The mean diagnostic and adaptive gross tumor volumes were 117.9 mL (range, 5.9 to 447 mL) and 36.8 mL (range, 0.3 to 230.6 mL), respectively. The median ETVRR was 71.4% (range, 30 to 97.6%) and the ETVRR >45% group showed significantly better OS (p < 0.0001) and LRPFS (p = 0.009) than the other group. ETVRR as a parameter for early treatment response may be a useful prognostic factor to predict treatment outcome in LS-SCLC patients treated with CRT.

  3. Calculation of the capnographic index based on expiratory molar mass-volume-curves--a suitable tool to screen for cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Susanne I; Junge, Sibylle; Ellemunter, Helmut; Ballmann, Manfred; Gappa, Monika

    2013-05-01

    Volumetric capnography reflecting the course of CO2-exhalation is used to assess ventilation inhomogeneity. Calculation of the slope of expiratory phase 3 and the capnographic index (KPIv) from expirograms allows quantification of extent and severity of small airway impairment. However, technical limitations have hampered more widespread use of this technique. Using expiratory molar mass-volume-curves sampled with a handheld ultrasonic flow sensor during tidal breathing is a novel approach to extract similar information from expirograms in a simpler manner possibly qualifying as a screening tool for clinical routine. The aim of the present study was to evaluate calculation of the KPIv based on molar mass-volume-curves sampled with an ultrasonic flow sensor in patients with CF and controls by assessing feasibility, reproducibility and comparability with the Lung Clearance Index (LCI) derived from multiple breath washout (MBW) used as the reference method. Measurements were performed in patients with CF and healthy controls during a single test occasion using the EasyOne Pro, MBW Module (ndd Medical Technologies, Switzerland). Capnography and MBW were performed in 87/96 patients with CF and 38/42 controls, with a success rate of 90.6% for capnography. Mean age (range) was 12.1 (4-25) years. Mean (SD) KPIv was 6.94 (3.08) in CF and 5.10 (2.06) in controls (p=0.001). Mean LCI (SD) was 8.0 (1.4) in CF and 6.2 (0.4) in controls (p=molar mass-volume-curves is feasible. KPIv is significantly different between patients with CF and controls and correlates with the LCI. However, individual data revealed a relevant overlap between patients and controls requiring further evaluation, before this method can be recommended for clinical use. Copyright © 2012 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Spirometric assessment of lung transplant patients: one year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo M. Pêgo-Fernandes

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to compare spirometry data between patients who underwent single-lung or double-lung transplantation the first year after transplantation. INTRODUCTION: Lung transplantation, which was initially described as an experimental method in 1963, has become a therapeutic option for patients with advanced pulmonary diseases due to improvements in organ conservation, surgical technique, immunosuppressive therapy and treatment of post-operative infections. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the records of the 39 patients who received lung transplantation in our institution between August 2003 and August 2006. Twenty-nine patients survived one year post-transplantation, and all of them were followed. RESULTS: The increase in lung function in the double-lung transplant group was more substantial than that of the single-lung transplant group, exhibiting a statistical difference from the 1st month in both the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 and the forced vital capacity (FVC in comparison to the pre-transplant values (p <0.05. Comparison between double-lung transplant and single lung-transplant groups of emphysema patients demonstrated a significant difference in lung function beginning in the 3rd month after transplantation. DISCUSSION: The analyses of the whole group of transplant recipients and the sub-group of emphysema patients suggest the superiority of bilateral transplant over the unilateral alternative. Although the pre-transplant values of lung function were worse in the double-lung group, this difference was no longer significant in the subsequent months after surgery. CONCLUSION: Although both groups demonstrated functional improvement after transplantation, there was a clear tendency to greater improvement in FVC and FEV1 in the bilateral transplant group. Among our subjects, double-lung transplantation improved lung function.

  5. Optimal gross tumor volume definition in lung-sparing intensity modulated radiotherapy for pleural mesothelioma: an in silico study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botticella, Angela; Defraene, Gilles; Nackaerts, Kristiaan; Deroose, Christophe M; Coolen, Johan; Nafteux, Philippe; Peeters, Stephanie; Ricardi, Umberto; De Ruysscher, Dirk

    2016-12-01

    The gross tumor volume (GTV) definition for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is ill-defined. We therefore investigated which imaging modality is optimal: computed tomography (CT) with intravenous contrast (IVC), positron emission tomography-CT (PET/CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Sixteen consecutive patients with untreated stage I-IV MPM were included. Patients with prior pleurodesis were excluded. CT with IVC, 18FDG-PET/CT and MRI (T2 and contrast-enhanced T1) were obtained. CT was rigidly co-registered with PET/CT and with MRI. Three sets of pleural GTVs were defined: GTV CT , GTV CT+PET/CT and GTV CT+MRI . Quantitative and qualitative evaluations of the contoured GTVs were performed. Compared to CT-based GTV definition, PET/CT identified additional tumor sites (defined as either separate nodules or greater extent of a known tumor) in 12/16 patients. Compared to either CT or PET/CT, MRI identified additional tumor sites in 15/16 patients (p = .7). The mean GTV CT , GTV CT+PET/CT and GTV CT+MRI [±standard deviation (SD)] were 630.1 cm 3 (±302.81), 640.23 cm 3 (±302.83) and 660.8 cm 3 (±290.8), respectively. Differences in mean volumes were not significant. The mean Jaccard Index was significantly lower in MRI-based contours versus all the others. As MRI identified additional pleural disease sites in the majority of patients, it may play a role in optimal target volume definition.

  6. SU-C-BRE-02: BED Vs. Local Control: Radiobiological Effect of Tumor Volume in Monte Carlo (MC) Lung SBRT Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokhrel, D; Badkul, R; Jiang, H; Estes, C; Park, J; Kumar, P; Wang, F [UniversityKansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: SBRT with hypofractionated dose schemata has emerged a compelling treatment modality for medically inoperable early stage lung cancer patients. It requires more accurate dose calculation and treatment delivery technique. This report presents the relationship between tumor control probability(TCP) and size-adjusted biological effective dose(sBED) of tumor volume for MC lung SBRT patients. Methods: Fifteen patients who were treated with MC-based lung SBRT to 50Gy in 5 fractions to PTVV100%=95% were studied. ITVs were delineated on MIP images of 4DCT-scans. PTVs diameter(ITV+5mm margins) ranged from 2.7–4.9cm (mean 3.7cm). Plans were generated using non-coplanar conformal arcs/beams using iPlan XVMC algorithm (BrainLABiPlan ver.4.1.2) for Novalis-TX with HD-MLCs and 6MVSRS(1000MU/min) mode, following RTOG-0813 dosimetric guidelines. To understand the known uncertainties of conventional heterogeneities-corrected/uncorrected pencil beam (PBhete/ PB-homo) algorithms, dose distributions were re-calculated with PBhete/ PB-homo using same beam configurations, MLCs and monitor units. Biologically effective dose(BED10) was computed using LQ-model with α/β=10Gy for meanPTV and meanITV. BED10-c*L, gave size-adjusted BED(sBED), where c=10Gy/cm and L=PTV diameter in centimeter. The TCP model was adopted from Ohri et al.(IJROBP, 2012): TCP = exp[sBEDTCD50]/ k /(1.0 + exp[sBED-TCD50]/k), where k=31Gy corresponding to TCD50=0Gy; and more realistic MC-based TCP was computed for PTV(V99%). Results: Mean PTV PB-hete TCP value was 6% higher, but, mean PTV PB-homo TCP value was 4% lower compared to mean PTV MC TCP. Mean ITV PB-hete/PB-homo TCP values were comparable (within ±3.0%) to mean ITV MC TCP. The mean PTV(V99%)had BED10=90.9±3.7%(median=92.2%),sBED=54.1±8.2%(median=53.5%) corresponding to mean MC TCP value of 84.8±3.3%(median=84.9%) at 2- year local control. Conclusion: The TCP model which incorporates BED10 and tumor diameter indicates that radiobiological

  7. Serial assessment of FDG-PET FDG uptake and functional volume during radiotherapy (RT) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edet-Sanson, Agathe; Dubray, Bernard; Doyeux, Kaya; Back, Adeline; Hapdey, Sebastien; Modzelewski, Romain; Bohn, Pierre; Gardin, Isabelle; Vera, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives were (i) to confirm that diagnostic FDG-PET images could be obtained during thoracic radiotherapy, (ii) to verify that significant changes in FDG uptake or volume could be measured early enough to adapt the radiotherapy plan and (iii) to determine an optimal time window during the radiotherapy course to acquire a single FDG-PET examination that would be representative of tumour response. Methods: Ten non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients with significant PET/CT-FDG tumour radioactivity uptake (versus the background level), candidates for curative radiotherapy (RT, n = 4; 60–70 Gy, 2 Gray per fraction, 5 fractions per week) or RT plus chemotherapy (CT-RT, n = 6), were prospectively evaluated. Using a Siemens Biograph, 5 or 6 PET/CT scans (PET n , n = 0–5) were performed for each patient. Each acquisition included a 15-min thoracic PET with respiratory gating (RG) 60 ± 5 min post-injection of the FDG (3.5 MBq/kg), followed by a standard, 5-min non-gated (STD) thoracic PET. PET 0 was performed before the first RT fraction. During RT, PET 1–5 were performed every 7 fractions, i.e., at 14 Gy total dose increment. FDG uptake was measured as the variation of SUV max,PETn versus SUV max,PET0 . Each lesions’ volume was measured by (i) visual delineation by an experienced nuclear physician, (ii) 40% SUV max fixed threshold and (iii) a semi-automatic adaptive threshold method. Results: A total of 53 FDG-PET scans were acquired. Seventeen lesions (6 tumours and 11 nodes) were visible on PET 0 in the 10 patients. The lesions were located either in or near the mediastinum or in the apex, without significant respiratory displacements at visual inspection of the gated images. Healthy lung did not cause motion artefacts in the PET images. As measured on 89 lesions, both the absolute and relative SUV max values decreased as the RT dose increased. A 50% SUV max decrease was obtained around a total dose of 45 Gy. Out of the 89 lesions, 75

  8. [Significance of extravascular lung water index, pulmonary vascular permeability index, and in- trathoracic blood volume index in the differential diagnosis of burn-induced pulmonary edema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Li; Jiajun, Sheng; Guangyi, Wang; Kaiyang, Lyu; Jing, Qin; Gongcheng, Liu; Bing, Ma; Shichu, Xiao; Shihui, Zhu

    2015-06-01

    To appraise the significance of extravascular lung water index (EVLWI), pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI), and intrathoracic blood volume index (ITBVI) in the differential diagnosis of the type of burn-induced pulmonary edema. The clinical data of 38 patients, with severe burn hospitalized in our burn ICU from December 2011 to September 2014 suffering from the complication of pulmonary edema within one week post burn and treated with mechanical ventilation accompanied by pulse contour cardiac output monitoring, were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were divided into lung injury group ( L, n = 17) and hydrostatic group (H, n = 21) according to the diagnosis of pulmonary edema. EVLWI, PVPI, ITBVI, oxygenation index, and lung injury score ( LIS) were compared between two groups, and the correlations among the former four indexes and the correlations between each of the former three indexes and types of pulmonary edema were analyzed. Data were processed with t test, chi-square test, Mann-Whitney U test, Pearson correlation test, and accuracy test [receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve]. There was no statistically significant difference in EVLWI between group L and group H, respectively (12.9 ± 3.1) and (12.1 ± 2.1) mL/kg, U = 159.5, P > 0.05. The PVPI and LIS of patients in group L were respectively 2.6 ± 0.5 and (2.1 ± 0.6) points, and they were significantly higher than those in group H [1.4 ± 0.3 and (1.0 ± 0.6) points, with U values respectively 4.5 and 36.5, P values below 0.01]. The ITBVI and oxygenation index of patients in group L were respectively (911 197) mL/m2 and (136 ± 69) mmHg (1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa), which were significantly lower than those in group H [(1,305 ± 168) mL/m2 and (212 ± 60) mmHg, with U values respectively 21.5 and 70.5, P values below 0.01]. In group L, there was obviously positive correlation between EVLWI and PVPI, or EVLWI and ITBVI (with r values respectively 0.553 and 0.807, P pulmonary edema was 0

  9. SU-E-T-289: Dose-Volume-Effect Relationships for Lung Cancer Patients Treated with SBRT On a Prospective Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayyas, E; Brown, S; Liu, J; Kim, J; Sun, Z; Devpura, S; Ajlouni, M; Siddiqui, F; Movsas, B; Chetty, I [Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is commonly used to treat early stage lung tumors. This study was designed to evaluate associations between dose, volume and clinical outcomes including analysis of both clinical toxicity scores and quality of life (QOL) data for non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with SBRT. Preliminary results are presented. Methods: Sixty-seven NSCLC patients, 46 primarily with early stage, and 21 with recurrent disease were treated with dose regimens consisting mainly of 12 Gy x 4 fractions, and 3 or 5 fractions at lower dose, for patients with recurrent disease (Table 1). Follow-up data is being collected at baseline, after treatment and at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months post-treatment. Clinical follow-up data acquired to date was assessed using the Charlson Comorbidity Clinical and Toxicity Scoring forms. QOL data was evaluated using the EQ-5D, and FACT-TOI validated surveys. All outcomes surveys are collected within an “in-house” developed outcomes database. Results: The median follow-up was 3.5±0.8 months. Mean lung doses (MLD) were converted to BED-2 Gy using the linear-quadratic model with an alpha/beta=3.0. Average MLD was 3.7+3.1 Gy (range: 0.4–20.9 Gy). The percentages of patients with > grade 2 cough, dyspnea and fatigue were 13.3, 17.0, 6.3%, respectively. Preliminary analyses (at 3 months after SBRT) show a mild correlation between MLD > 2 Gy and > grade 2 cough (borderline significant) and dyspnea (significant, p<0.05). One patient was observed with a grade 3 cough. Given the short follow-up, tumor control is not yet assessable. Conclusion: The SBRT dose fractionation regimen of 12 Gy x 4 was well tolerated at early time points. Additional follow-up is required to assess the long-term clinical outcome efficacy and toxicity profiles of the dose regimen.

  10. SU-E-T-289: Dose-Volume-Effect Relationships for Lung Cancer Patients Treated with SBRT On a Prospective Protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayyas, E; Brown, S; Liu, J; Kim, J; Sun, Z; Devpura, S; Ajlouni, M; Siddiqui, F; Movsas, B; Chetty, I

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is commonly used to treat early stage lung tumors. This study was designed to evaluate associations between dose, volume and clinical outcomes including analysis of both clinical toxicity scores and quality of life (QOL) data for non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with SBRT. Preliminary results are presented. Methods: Sixty-seven NSCLC patients, 46 primarily with early stage, and 21 with recurrent disease were treated with dose regimens consisting mainly of 12 Gy x 4 fractions, and 3 or 5 fractions at lower dose, for patients with recurrent disease (Table 1). Follow-up data is being collected at baseline, after treatment and at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months post-treatment. Clinical follow-up data acquired to date was assessed using the Charlson Comorbidity Clinical and Toxicity Scoring forms. QOL data was evaluated using the EQ-5D, and FACT-TOI validated surveys. All outcomes surveys are collected within an “in-house” developed outcomes database. Results: The median follow-up was 3.5±0.8 months. Mean lung doses (MLD) were converted to BED-2 Gy using the linear-quadratic model with an alpha/beta=3.0. Average MLD was 3.7+3.1 Gy (range: 0.4–20.9 Gy). The percentages of patients with > grade 2 cough, dyspnea and fatigue were 13.3, 17.0, 6.3%, respectively. Preliminary analyses (at 3 months after SBRT) show a mild correlation between MLD > 2 Gy and > grade 2 cough (borderline significant) and dyspnea (significant, p<0.05). One patient was observed with a grade 3 cough. Given the short follow-up, tumor control is not yet assessable. Conclusion: The SBRT dose fractionation regimen of 12 Gy x 4 was well tolerated at early time points. Additional follow-up is required to assess the long-term clinical outcome efficacy and toxicity profiles of the dose regimen

  11. Ventilator-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard, J D; Dreyfuss, D; Saumon, G

    2003-08-01

    During mechanical ventilation, high end-inspiratory lung volume (whether it be because of large tidal volume (VT) and/or high levels of positive end-expiratory pressure) results in a permeability type pulmonary oedema, called ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Previous injury sensitises lung to mechanical ventilation. This experimental concept has recently received a resounding clinical illustration after a 22% reduction of mortality was observed in acute respiratory distress syndrome patients whose VT had been reduced. In addition, it has been suggested that repetitive opening and closing of distal units at low lung volume could induce lung injury but this notion has been challenged both conceptually and clinically after the negative results of the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome clinical Network Assessment of Low tidal Volume and Elevated end-expiratory volume to Obviate Lung Injury (ARDSNet ALVEOLI) study. Experimentally and clinically, involvement of inflammatory cytokines in VILI has not been unequivocally demonstrated. Cellular response to mechanical stretch has been increasingly investigated, both on the epithelial and the endothelial side. Lipid membrane trafficking has been thought to be a means by which cells respond to stress failure. Alterations in the respiratory system pressure/volume curve during ventilator-induced lung injury that include decrease in compliance and position of the upper inflection point are due to distal obstruction of airways that reduce aerated lung volume. Information from this curve could help avoid potentially harmful excessive tidal volume reduction.

  12. Role of lung perfusion scintigraphy in predicting post-operative lung function in lung cancer patients undergoing pneumonectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, Sujith; Shah, S.; Purandare, N.C.; Pramesh, C.S.; George, K.; Rangarajan, V.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Surgery has been the mainstay of treatment for patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer. There is an increased risk of postoperative complications, especially in patients with poor respiratory reserve, with pneumonectomy resulting in an unacceptable quality of life. The high risk of morbidity and mortality makes it mandatory to triage patients with anatomically resectable disease as suitable candidates for surgery. Aim: 1. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the role of lung perfusion scan in predicting postoperative lung function in lung cancer patients undergoing pneumonectomy based on the pre-operative Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 sec (FEV1). 2. The predicted post-operative FEV1 will be compared with the patient's lung function clinically based on a) number of days patient was on ventilation post-operatively, b) post-op respiratory complications/lung collapse. Materials and Methods: Imaging was done on Infinia Hawkeye (GE) dual headed gamma camera on 30 patients of lung cancer undergoing Pneumonectomy. Patients were injected 5 mCi of 99m Tc-MAA and planar and tomographic images were obtained. A predicted postoperative value of FEV1 was calculated by the formula: postop predicted FEV1 = preop FEV1 - (FEV1 % contribution by affected lung/100). Patient's post-operative FEV1 was calculated for pneumonectomy. Patient was observed post-operatively and the following parameters were noted 1) Number of days patient was on ventilation post-operatively 2) Post-operative respiratory complications/lung collapse Pre-operative PFT's and 99m Tc-MAA lung perfusion scan was done on 30 patients (mean age 45 yrs, range 18-64 yrs) and lung function in 1st week post-pneumonectomy based on their number of days on ventilation post-operatively and respiratory complications/lung collapse was noted. Result: 1) 20 patients underwent left pneumonectomy, 10 patients underwent right Pneumonectomy. 2) Predicted FEV1 for pneumonectomy patients was (mean ± SD 1.49

  13. Cirurgia redutora de volume pulmonar: critérios de seleção de pacientes no Hospital Universitário Antônio Pedro, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, RJ Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS: criteria for selecting patient in Antonio Pedro Hospital, Federal Fluminense University, Niterói city, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Fred Behrsin

    2003-09-01

    mais de um fator mórbido a contra-indicar o seu procedimento. A maioria dos pacientes com critérios para CRVP, a recusa, com receio do procedimento ou após programas de reabilitação pulmonar. O critério mais significativo que indicou CRVP em um paciente operado foi a presença de enfisema heterogênio bilateral nos lobos superiores.BACKGROUND: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (CPOD is an important problem in Brazil and other countries. The clinical treatment of ambulatory patients is now reasonably standardized. Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS is an alternative of surgical treatment of emphysema (aside from lung transplantation. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to analyse patient selection criteria for LVRS. METHODS: This study was carried out using a sample of 31 patients referred to and given assistance to at the Smoking and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Outpatient Ward Antonio Pedro Hospital, who were evaluated to check whether or not they could be eligible for LVRS. Aiming at evaluating the major criteria for eligibility for LVRS, the patients underwent a protocol including standardized anamnesis and physical examination, spirometry with maximum inspiratory and expiratory flow volume curves associated with post-bronchodilatator test, room air arterial blood gases, a six-minute walking test, plain chest roentgenograms and left lateral chest roentgenograms, high-resolution chest computed tomographic scans and lung perfusion scans. Statistical analysis was conducted with description of data proportions. RESULTS: Contraindications to surgery included chronic bronchitis (29% or nine patients, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV 1 more than 80 percent predicted (13% or four patients, negative consent for surgery (10% or three patients, fibrosis pattern, severe depression and bronchiectasis (two patients each one, solitary pulmonary nodule, severe obesity, severe bullous emphysema, pulmonary hipertension, pulmonary resection history

  14. Effects of short-term pressure-controlled ventilation on gas exchange, airway pressures, and gas distribution in patients with acute lung injury/ARDS: comparison with volume-controlled ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prella, Maura; Feihl, François; Domenighetti, Guido

    2002-10-01

    The potential clinical benefits of pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) over volume-controlled ventilation (VCV) in patients with acute lung injury (ALI) or ARDS still remain debated. We compared PCV with VCV in patients with ALI/ARDS with respect to the following physiologic end points: (1) gas exchange and airway pressures, and (2) CT scan intrapulmonary gas distribution at end-expiration. Prospective, observational study. A multidisciplinary ICU in a nonuniversity, acute-care hospital. Ten patients with ALI or ARDS (9 men and 1 woman; age range, 17 to 80 years). Sequential ventilation in PCV and VCV with a constant inspiratory/expiratory ratio, tidal volume, respiratory rate, and total positive end-expiratory pressure; measurement of gas exchange and airway pressures; and achievement of CT sections at lung base, hilum, and apex for the quantitative analysis of lung densities and of aerated vs nonaerated zones. PaO(2), PaCO(2), and PaO(2)/fraction of inspired oxygen ratio levels did not differ between PCV and VCV. Peak airway pressure (Ppeak) was significantly lower in PCV compared with VCV (26 +/- 2 cm H(2)O vs 31 +/- 2 cm H(2)O; p mean +/- SEM). The surface areas of the nonaerated zones as well as the total areas at each section level were unchanged in PCV compared with VCV, except at the apex level, where there was a significantly greater nonaerated area in VCV (11 +/- 2 cm(2) vs 9 +/- 2 cm(2); p mean CT number of each lung (20 lungs from 10 patients) was similar in the two modes, as were the density values at the basal and apical levels; the hilum mean CT number was - 442 +/- 28 Hounsfield units (HU) in VCV and - 430 +/- 26 HU in PCV (p lower Ppeaks through the precise titration of the lung distending pressure, and might be applied to avoid regional overdistension by means of a more homogeneous gas distribution.

  15. The features of radiation induced lung fibrosis related with dosimetric parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Young-Taek; Noh, O Kyu; Jang, Hyunsoo; Chun, Mison; Park, Kyung Joo; Park, Kwang Joo; Kim, Mi-Hwa; Park, Hae-Jin

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: Radiation induced lung fibrosis (RILF) is a major complication after lung irradiation and is very important for long term quality of life and could result in fatal respiratory insufficiency. However, there has been little information on dosimetric parameters for radiotherapy planning in the aspect of RILF. The features of RILF related with dosimetric parameters were evaluated. Methods and materials: Forty-eight patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma who underwent post-operative radiation therapy (PORT) without adjuvant chemotherapy were analyzed. The degree of lung fibrosis was estimated by fibrosis volume and the dosimetric parameters were calculated from the plan of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Results: The fibrosis volume and V-dose as dosimetric parameters showed significant correlation and the correlation coefficient ranged from 0.602 to 0.683 (P < 0.01). The degree of the correlation line was steeper as the dose increase and threshold dose was not found. Mean lung dose (MLD) showed strong correlation with fibrosis volume (correlation coefficient = 0.726, P < 0.01). Conclusions: The fibrosis volume is continuously increased with V-dose as the reference dose increases. MLD is useful as a single parameter for comparing rival plans in the aspect of RILF.

  16. Lansoprazole-induced acute lung and liver injury: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Christopher; Maheswaran, Tina; Rushbrook, Simon; Kamath, Ajay

    2014-12-01

    A 61-year old woman was admitted with increasing dyspnea and deranged liver function tests. A chest X-ray revealed small volume lungs with reticulo-nodular shadowing. High resolution computed tomography of the chest revealed interlobular septal thickening. The patient subsequently underwent an open lung biopsy and ultrasound-guided liver biopsy, which were consistent with a hypersensitivity pneumonitis and drug-induced liver injury respectively. The patient had previously been commenced on lansoprazole 10 days before the onset of symptoms; this had been stopped at diagnosis. High dose prednisolone was commenced, and the patient went on to make a full recovery. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis is a form of interstitial lung disease that is rarely associated with lansoprazole; this is the first report of it causing an idiosyncratic reaction affecting the lung and liver simultaneously. This case demonstrates the importance of obtaining a full drug history, as early identification of the offending agent will improve outcomes.

  17. A case of unilateral lung edema after treatment of pulmonary adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Hiromichi; Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Saida, Yukihisa; Ishikawa, Shigemi; Onizuka, Masataka; Noguchi, Masayuki

    2005-01-01

    As HRCT (high resolution computed tomography) has become increased commonly used, it has become apparent that GGA (ground-glass attenuation) is present in a variety of lung diseases. We report a case of unilateral lung edema represented as GGA in an opposite lung field after treatment of pulmonary adenocarcinoma. A 70-year-old man with uncontrolled diabetes was admitted because of an abnormal shadow discovered during a routine chest X-ray in June 2003. In 1994, he underwent a left lower lobectomy and post-operative mediastinal radiation for pulmonary adenocarcinoma (p-Stage IIIA). Chest CT on admission demonstrated widespread GGA in the right hilar lesion of the middle and lower lobes. Detailed examinations including transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB), bacterial culture and a serological test could not confirm bronchioloalveolar carcinoma, interstitial pneumonia, viral pneumonia or alveolar proteinosis. The patient increased his weight by 5 kg and ultrasound examination showed dilatation of the inferior vena cava and a congestive liver. The GGA disappeared one month after the administration of furosemide. The clinical course, HRCT and pathological findings suggested that lung edema caused by volume overload affected as localized unilateral GGA in the chest CT. The decrease in pulmonary vessel beds due to surgical resection, obstruction of lymphatic circulation after mediastinal radiation, and increased permeability of microvessels associated with diabetes are supposed to be linked to lung edema. Localized lung edema should be considered as a possible cause of GGA after lung cancer treatment. (author)

  18. Surgery for lung adenocarcinoma with smokers’ polycythemia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugiura Yasoo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smoking is a cause of cancer and polycythemia. Therefore, surgeons who treat patients with cancer may also encounter patients with polycythemia. However, few cases of surgical patients with polycythemia have been reported; in particular, a surgical case involving smokers’ polycythemia has never been reported. We herein report a patient with lung cancer and smokers’ polycythemia who successfully underwent lobectomy with control of hematocrit based on a modified formula in the perioperative period. Case presentation A 67-year-old man underwent abdominoperineal resection for rectal carcinoma in June 2008. A ground glass opacity had been identified in the upper lobe of the right lung and was gradually enlarging. In March 2012, bronchoscopic cytology for investigation of the mass revealed non-small cell lung cancer, suggesting primary lung non-small cell carcinoma (T1bN0M0, Stage IA. When he was referred to our hospital for surgery, his complete blood count showed a red blood cell level of 6.50×106/μL, hemoglobin of 21.0 g/dL, and hematocrit of 60.1%. The hematologists’ diagnosis was secondary polycythemia due to heavy smoking (smokers’ polycythemia because the white blood cell and platelet counts were within normal limits and the erythropoietin was not increased. We calculated the appropriate phlebotomy and infusion volumes based on a formula that we modified. After 550 g of blood was phlebotomized to reduce the hematocrit to approximately 55%, video-assisted right lung upper lobectomy with lymph node dissection was performed in April 2012. The hematocrit was maintained at Conclusion We experienced a patient with smokers’ polycythemia who underwent right upper lobectomy for adenocarcinoma. The findings in this case report are meaningful for surgeons treating cancer patients because there are few reports discussing the perioperative care of surgical patients with polycythemia.

  19. Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 Second Variability Helps Identify Patients with Cystic Fibrosis at Risk of Greater Loss of Lung Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Wayne J; VanDevanter, Donald R; Pasta, David J; Foreman, Aimee J; Wagener, Jeffrey S; Konstan, Michael W

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate several alternative measures of forced expiratory volume in 1 second percent predicted (FEV1 %pred) variability as potential predictors of future FEV1 %pred decline in patients with cystic fibrosis. We included 13,827 patients age ≥6 years from the Epidemiologic Study of Cystic Fibrosis 1994-2002 with ≥4 FEV1 %pred measurements spanning ≥366 days in both a 2-year baseline period and a 2-year follow-up period. We predicted change from best baseline FEV1 %pred to best follow-up FEV1 %pred and change from baseline to best in the second follow-up year by using multivariable regression stratified by 4 lung-disease stages. We assessed 5 measures of variability (some as deviations from the best and some as deviations from the trend line) both alone and after controlling for demographic and clinical factors and for the slope and level of FEV1 %pred. All 5 measures of FEV1 %pred variability were predictive, but the strongest predictor was median deviation from the best FEV1 %pred in the baseline period. The contribution to explanatory power (R(2)) was substantial and exceeded the total contribution of all other factors excluding the FEV1 %pred rate of decline. Adding the other variability measures provided minimal additional value. Median deviation from the best FEV1 %pred is a simple metric that markedly improves prediction of FEV1 %pred decline even after the inclusion of demographic and clinical characteristics and the FEV1 %pred rate of decline. The routine calculation of this variability measure could allow clinicians to better identify patients at risk and therefore in need of increased intervention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Prenatal MR imaging of congenital diaphragmatic hernias: association of MR fetal lung volume with the need for postnatal prosthetic patch repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagelstein, Claudia; Weidner, Meike; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Buesing, Karen A.; Neff, K.W. [University of Heidelberg, Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Zahn, Katrin [University of Heidelberg, Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Weiss, Christel [University of Heidelberg, Department of Medical Statistics and Biomathematics, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Schaible, Thomas [University of Heidelberg, Department of Pediatrics, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    To assess whether the need for postnatal prosthetic patch repair of the diaphragmatic defect in neonates with a congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is associated with the antenatal measured observed-to-expected magnetic resonance fetal lung volume (o/e MR-FLV). The o/e MR-FLV was calculated in 247 fetuses with isolated CDH. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the prognostic value of the individual o/e MR-FLV for association with the need for postnatal patch repair. Seventy-seven percent (77 %) of patients with a CDH (190/247) required prosthetic patch repair and the defect was closed primarily in 23 % (57/247). Patients requiring a patch had a significantly lower o/e MR-FLV (27.7 ± 10.2 %) than patients with primary repair (40.8 ± 13.8 %, p < 0.001, AUC = 0.786). With an o/e MR-FLV of 20 %, 92 % of the patients required patch repair, compared to only 24 % with an o/e MR-FLV of 60 %. The need for a prosthetic patch was further influenced by the fetal liver position (herniation/no herniation) as determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; p < 0.001). Fetal liver position, in addition to the o/e MR-FLV, improves prognostic accuracy (AUC = 0.827). Logistic regression analysis based on the o/e MR-FLV is useful for prenatal estimation of the prosthetic patch requirement in patients with a CDH. In addition to the o/e MR-FLV, the position of the liver as determined by fetal MRI helps improve prognostic accuracy. (orig.)

  1. Estimation of the mediastinal involvement probability in non-small cell lung cancer: a statistical definition of the clinical target volume for 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, P.; Dubray, B.; Helfre, S.; Dauphinot, C.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Cosset, J.M.; Rycke, Y. de; Minet, P.; Danhier, S.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose. - Conformal irradiation of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is largely based on a precise definition of the nodal clinical target volume (CTVn). The reduction of the number of nodal stations to be irradiated would render tumor dose escalation more achievable. The aim of this work was to design an mathematical tool based on documented data, that would predict the risk of metastatic involvement for each nodal station. Methods and material. - From the large surgical series published in the literature we looked at the main pre-treatment parameters that modify the risk of nodal invasion. The probability of involvement for the 17 nodal stations described by the American Thoracic Society (ATS) was computed from all these publications and then weighted according to the French epidemiological data. Starting from the primitive location of the tumour as the main characteristic, we built a probabilistic tree for each nodal station representing the risk distribution as a function of each tumor feature. From the statistical point of view, we used the inversion of probability trees method described by Weinstein and Feinberg. Results. -Taking into account all the different parameters of I the pre-treatment staging relative to each level of the ATS map brings up to 20,000 different combinations. The first chosen parameters in the tree were, depending on the tumour location, the histological classification, the metastatic stage, the nodal stage weighted in function of the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnostic examination used (PET scan, CAT scan) and the tumoral stage. A software is proposed to compute a predicted probability of involvement of each nodal station for any given clinical presentation.Conclusion. -To better define the CTVn in NSCLC 3DRT, we propose a software that evaluates the mediastinal nodal involvement risk from easily accessible individual pretreatment parameters. (authors)

  2. SU-E-T-177: Clinical Experience with Spirometer Guided Breath Hold Lung SBRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H; Manning, M; Sintay, B; Maurer, J; Hayes, L; Wiant, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Tumor motion in lung SBRT is typically managed by creating an internal target volume (ITV) based on 4D-CT information. Another option, which may reduce lung dose and imaging artifact, is to use a breath hold (BH) during simulation and delivery. Here we evaluate the reproducibility of tumor position at repeated BH using a newly released spirometry system. Methods: Three patients underwent multiple BH CT’s at simulation. All patients underwent a BH cone beam CT (CBCT) prior to each treatment. All image sets were registered to a patient’s first simulation CT based on local bony anatomy. The gross tumor volume (GTV), and the diaphragm or the apex of the lung were contoured on the first image set and expanded in 1 mm increments until the GTVs and diaphragms on all image sets were included inside an expanded structure. The GTV and diaphragm margins necessary to encompass the structures were recorded. Results: The first patient underwent 2 BH CT’s and fluoroscopy at simulation, the remaining patients underwent 3 BH CT’s at simulation. In all cases the GTV’s remained within 1 mm expansions and the diaphragms remained within 2 mm expansions on repeat scans. Each patient underwent 3 daily BH CBCT’s. In all cases the GTV’s remained within a 2 mm expansions, and the diaphragms (or lung apex in one case) remained within 2 mm expansions at daily BH imaging. Conclusions: These case studies demonstrate spirometry as an effective tool for limiting tumor motion (and imaging artifact) and facilitating reproducible tumor positioning over multiple set-ups and BH’s. This work was partially supported by Qfix

  3. SU-E-T-177: Clinical Experience with Spirometer Guided Breath Hold Lung SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H; Manning, M; Sintay, B; Maurer, J; Hayes, L; Wiant, D [Cone Health Cancer Center, Greensboro, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Tumor motion in lung SBRT is typically managed by creating an internal target volume (ITV) based on 4D-CT information. Another option, which may reduce lung dose and imaging artifact, is to use a breath hold (BH) during simulation and delivery. Here we evaluate the reproducibility of tumor position at repeated BH using a newly released spirometry system. Methods: Three patients underwent multiple BH CT’s at simulation. All patients underwent a BH cone beam CT (CBCT) prior to each treatment. All image sets were registered to a patient’s first simulation CT based on local bony anatomy. The gross tumor volume (GTV), and the diaphragm or the apex of the lung were contoured on the first image set and expanded in 1 mm increments until the GTVs and diaphragms on all image sets were included inside an expanded structure. The GTV and diaphragm margins necessary to encompass the structures were recorded. Results: The first patient underwent 2 BH CT’s and fluoroscopy at simulation, the remaining patients underwent 3 BH CT’s at simulation. In all cases the GTV’s remained within 1 mm expansions and the diaphragms remained within 2 mm expansions on repeat scans. Each patient underwent 3 daily BH CBCT’s. In all cases the GTV’s remained within a 2 mm expansions, and the diaphragms (or lung apex in one case) remained within 2 mm expansions at daily BH imaging. Conclusions: These case studies demonstrate spirometry as an effective tool for limiting tumor motion (and imaging artifact) and facilitating reproducible tumor positioning over multiple set-ups and BH’s. This work was partially supported by Qfix.

  4. Systemic Air Embolism After CT-guided Lung Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-27

    Patients Who Underwent Percutaneous Lung Biopsy Under CT Guidance; Patients Who Presented Systemic Air Embolism After Percutaneous Lung Biopsy Under CT Guidance Depicted at the Time of the Procedure on a Whole Thoracic CT

  5. Practical integration of [18F]-FDG-PET and PET-CT in the planning of radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): the technical basis, ICRU-target volumes, problems, perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestle, Ursula; Kremp, Stephanie; Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    2006-11-01

    The value of positron emission tomography using [18F]-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG-PET) for pretherapeutic evaluation of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is beyond doubt. Due to the increasing availability of PET and PET-CT scanners the method is now widely available, and its technical integration has become possible for radiotherapy planning systems. Due to the depiction of malignant tissue with high diagnostic accuracy, the use of FDG-PET in radiotherapy planning of NSCLC is very promising. However, by uncritical application, PET could impair rather than improve the prognosis of patients. Therefore, in the present paper we give an overview of technical factors influencing PET and PET-CT data, and their consequences for radiotherapy planning. We further review the relevant literature concerning the diagnostic value of FDG-PET and on the integration of FDG-PET data in RT planning for NSCLC. We point out the possible impact in gross tumor volume (GTV) definition and describe methods of target volume contouring of the primary tumor, as well as concepts for the integration of diagnostic information on lymph node involvement into the clinical target volume (CTV), and the possible implications of PET data on the definition of the planning target volume (PTV). Finally, we give an idea of the possible future use of tracers other than [18F]-FDG in lung cancer.

  6. Inter-scan and inter-observer tumour volume delineation variability on cone beam computed tomography in patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ying; Lee, Stephanie; Agrawal, Vishesh; Romano, John; Baldini, Elizabeth H; Chen, Aileen B; Kozono, David E; Killoran, Joseph H; Wagar, Matthew; Hacker, Fred L; Aerts, Hugo Jwl; Lewis, John H; Mak, Raymond H

    2017-02-01

    Quantification of volume changes on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) during lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may provide a useful radiological marker for radiation response and for adaptive treatment planning. This study quantifies inter-scan and inter-observer variability in tumour volume delineation on CBCT. Three clinicians independently contoured the primary gross tumour volume (GTV) manually on CBCTs taken immediately before SBRT treatment (pre) and after the same SBRT treatment (post) for 19 NSCLC patients. Relative volume differences (RVD) were calculated between the pre- and post-CBCTs for a given treatment and between any two of three observers for a given CBCT. Coefficient of variation (CV) was used to quantitatively measure and compare the extent of variability. Inter-observer variability had a significantly higher CV of 0.15 ± 0.13 compared to inter-scan CV of 0.03 ± 0.04 with P < 0.0001. The greatest variability was observed with tumours (<2 cm in diameter) versus larger tumours with 95% limit of agreement (LOA) (Mean ± Standard Deviation) of 1.90% ± 19.55% vs. -0.97% ± 12.26% for inter-scan RVD and 29.99% ± 73.84% vs. 9.37% ± 29.95% for inter-observer RVD respectively. Inter-observer variability was greater than inter-scan variability for tumour volume delineation on CBCT with greatest variability for small tumours (<2 cm in diameter). LOA for inter-scan variability (~12%) helps defines a threshold for clinically meaningful tumour volume change during SBRT treatment for tumours with diameter greater than 2 cm, with larger thresholds needed for smaller tumours. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  7. Lung Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Marfan Foundation Marfan & Related Disorders What is Marfan Syndrome? What are Related Disorders? What are the Signs? ... Emergencies Lung Emergencies Surgeries Lung Emergencies People with Marfan syndrome can be at increased risk of sudden lung ...

  8. Reduction in Tumor Volume by Cone Beam Computed Tomography Predicts Overall Survival in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabbour, Salma K.; Kim, Sinae; Haider, Syed A.; Xu, Xiaoting; Wu, Alson; Surakanti, Sujani; Aisner, Joseph; Langenfeld, John; Yue, Ning J.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Zou, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We sought to evaluate whether tumor response using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) performed as part of the routine care during chemoradiation therapy (CRT) could forecast the outcome of unresectable, locally advanced, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We manually delineated primary tumor volumes (TV) of patients with NSCLC who were treated with radical CRT on days 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 36, and 43 on CBCTs obtained as part of the standard radiation treatment course. Percentage reductions in TV were calculated and then correlated to survival and pattern of recurrence using Cox proportional hazard models. Clinical information including histologic subtype was also considered in the study of such associations. Results: We evaluated 38 patients with a median follow-up time of 23.4 months. The median TV reduction was 39.3% (range, 7.3%-69.3%) from day 1 (D1) to day 43 (D43) CBCTs. Overall survival was associated with TV reduction from D1 to D43 (hazard ratio [HR] 0.557, 95% CI 0.39-0.79, P=.0009). For every 10% decrease in TV from D1 to D43, the risk of death decreased by 44.3%. For patients whose TV decreased ≥39.3 or <39.3%, log-rank test demonstrated a separation in survival (P=.02), with median survivals of 31 months versus 10 months, respectively. Neither local recurrence (HR 0.791, 95% CI 0.51-1.23, P=.29), nor distant recurrence (HR 0.78, 95% CI 0.57-1.08, P=.137) correlated with TV decrease from D1 to D43. Histologic subtype showed no impact on our findings. Conclusions: TV reduction as determined by CBCT during CRT as part of routine care predicts post-CRT survival. Such knowledge may justify intensification of RT or application of additional therapies. Assessment of genomic characteristics of these tumors may permit a better understanding of behavior or prediction of therapeutic outcomes

  9. Comparative analysis of pain in patients who underwent total knee replacement regarding the tourniquet pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos George de Souza Leão

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVES: To evaluate through the visual analog scale (VAS the pain in patients undergoing total knee replacement (TKR with different pressures of the pneumatic tourniquet. METHODS: An observational, randomized, descriptive study on an analytical basis, with 60 patients who underwent TKR, divided into two groups, which were matched: a group where TKR was performed with tourniquet pressures of 350 mmHg (standard and the other with systolic blood pressure plus 100 mmHg (P + 100. These patients had their pain assessed by VAS at 48 h, and at the 5th and 15th days after procedure. Secondarily, the following were also measured: range of motion (ROM, complications, and blood drainage volume in each group; the data were subjected to statistical analysis. RESULTS: After data analysis, there was no statistical difference regarding the incidence of complications (p = 0.612, ROM (p = 0.202, bleeding after 24 and 48 h (p = 0.432 and p = 0.254 or in relation to VAS. No correlation was observed between time of ischemia compared to VAS and bleeding. CONCLUSIONS: The use of the pneumatic tourniquet pressure at 350 mmHg or systolic blood pressure plus 100 mmHg did not influence the pain, blood loss, ROM, and complications. Therefore the pressures at these levels are safe and do not change the surgery outcomes; the time of ischemia must be closely observed to avoid major complications.

  10. The analysis of prognostic factors affecting post-radiation acute reaction after conformal radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spych, Michał; Gottwald, Leszek; Klonowicz, Małgorzata; Biegała, Michał; Bibik, Robert; Fijuth, Jacek

    2010-10-01

    The aim was to evaluate the risk of acute side effects in the lung after 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in patients treated for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). An attempt was made to single out clinical factors and factors related to treatment technique which may induce acute post-radiation pneumonitis. The analysis concerned 34 consecutive patients who underwent radical radiation therapy for NSCLC. Intensity of early toxicity was evaluated using modified RTOG/EORTC toxicity score. The endpoint for this analysis was the occurrence of radiation pneumonitis of grade 2 or higher. Factors related to treatment techniques were included in the statistical analysis. Fifty-three percent of patients included in the study suffered from acute post-radiation pneumonitis. The results of the study revealed the existence of lung tissue sensitivity to low doses of ionizing radiation. The multivariate analysis showed that total lung volume receiving a low dose of 10 Gy increased the risk of post-radiation pneumonitis (p = 0.01). Acute post-radiation pneumonitis was a relevant clinical problem in patients who underwent radical radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer. The lung volume receiving a dose of 10 Gy was the most important dosimetric factor which influenced the post-radiation acute pneumonitis.

  11. Cost and effectiveness of lung lobectomy by video-assisted thoracic surgery for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafé, Juan J; Planelles, Beatriz; Asensio, Santos; Cerezal, Jorge; Inda, María-Del-Mar; Lacueva, Javier; Esteban, Maria-Dolores; Hernández, Luis; Martín, Concepción; Baschwitz, Benno; Peiró, Ana M

    2017-08-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) emerged as a minimally invasive surgery for diseases in the field of thoracic surgery. We herein reviewed our experience on thoracoscopic lobectomy for early lung cancer and evaluated Health System use. A cost-effectiveness study was performed comparing VATS vs. open thoracic surgery (OPEN) for lung cancer patients. Demographic data, tumor localization, dynamic pulmonary function tests [forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), diffusion capacity (DLCO) and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max)], surgical approach, postoperative details, and complications were recorded and analyzed. One hundred seventeen patients underwent lung resection by VATS (n=42, 36%; age: 63±9 years old, 57% males) or OPEN (n=75, 64%; age: 61±11 years old, 73% males). Pulmonary function tests decreased just after surgery with a parallel increasing tendency during first 12 months. VATS group tended to recover FEV1 and FVC quicker with significantly less clinical and post-surgical complications (31% vs. 53%, P=0.015). Costs including surgery and associated hospital stay, complications and costs in the 12 months after surgery were significantly lower for VATS (P<0.05). The VATS approach surgery allowed earlier recovery at a lower cost than OPEN with a better cost-effectiveness profile.

  12. Discrepancy between severity of lung impairment and seniority on the lung transplantation list.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travaline, J M; Cordova, F C; Furukawa, S; Criner, G J

    2004-12-01

    Organ allocation for lung transplantation, based mainly on accrued time on a waiting list, may not be an equitable system of organ allocation. To provide an objective view of the current practice concerning lung allocation, and timing for transplantation, we examined illness severity and list seniority in patients on a lung transplantation waiting list. Adult patients awaiting lung transplantation underwent testing for mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPpa), maximum oxygen consumption (VO2 max), 6-minute walk distance (6MWD), forced expiratory volume in 1 second, mean partial pressure of carbon dioxide, partial pressure of oxygen/fractional concentration of inspired oxygen, and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide. Relationships between physiological variables and waiting list rankings were then determined. Thirty-four patients were tested and there was no correlation between time spent waiting on the list and mPpa (r=0.01; P=.94), VO2 max percentage predicted (r=0.07; P=.71), or 6MWD (r=0.15; P=.42). Many patients with functional impairments as indicated by low maximum VO2 or by short 6MWD are scheduled to receive their transplant after patients with levels that indicate a lower degree of risk. When compared with a hypothetical reranking based on mean Ppa, 24 of the 34 patients (71%) on our current waiting list were found to be 5 positions higher or lower than this new risk-based ranking. Sixteen patients (47%) were 10 or more positions away from their hypothetical severity-based ranking, and 9 (26%) were at least 15 positions out of place. Sixteen of the 34 patients were ranked lower than they would be based on a severity of illness using the pulmonary artery pressure alone, 17 were ranked higher than "should be" based on pulmonary artery mean, and only 1 patient (ranked in position 15) was appropriately positioned based on seniority and severity of disease based on PA mean. Rank order for lung transplantation has no relationship with illness

  13. The association between combined non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis and lung cancer in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim YW

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Yeon Wook Kim,1 Kwang-Nam Jin,2 Eun Young Heo,3 Sung Soo Park,3 Hee Soon Chung,3 Deog Kyeom Kim31Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 2Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 3Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of KoreaBackground: Whereas the epidemiological association between lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, a chronic inflammatory respiratory disease, is well known, limited studies have examined the association between lung cancer and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, a representative chronic airway inflammatory disease. This study evaluated the association between bronchiectasis and lung cancer in patients with COPD.Methods: A matched case–control study was conducted in a referral hospital in South Korea. Among COPD patients with moderate to very severe airflow limitation (forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity <0.7 and forced expiratory volume in one second ≤70% [% predicted] who underwent chest computed tomography (CT between January 1, 2010 and May 30, 2013, patients with lung cancer and controls matched for age, sex, and smoking history were selected. The risk of lung cancer was assessed according to the presence of underlying bronchiectasis confirmed by chest CT.Results: The study enrolled 99 cases and 198 controls. Combined bronchiectasis on chest CT was inversely associated with the risk of lung cancer compared with controls (odds ratio [OR] 0.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.12–0.52, P<0.001. Significant associations were found in

  14. 21 CFR 868.2450 - Lung water monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lung water monitor. 868.2450 Section 868.2450 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2450 Lung water monitor. (a) Identification. A lung water monitor is a device used to monitor the trend of fluid volume changes in a patient's lung by...

  15. Increased mean lung density: Another independent predictor of lung cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sverzellati, Nicola, E-mail: nicola.sverzellati@unipr.it [Department of Department of Surgical Sciences, Section of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Parma, Padiglione Barbieri, University Hospital of Parma, V. Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Randi, Giorgia, E-mail: giorgia.randi@marionegri.it [Department of Epidemiology, Mario Negri Institute, Via La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Spagnolo, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.spagnolo@unimore.it [Respiratory Disease Unit, Center for Rare Lung Disease, Department of Oncology, Hematology and Respiratory Disease, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via del Pozzo 71, 44124 Modena (Italy); Marchianò, Alfonso, E-mail: alfonso.marchiano@istitutotumori.mi.it [Department of Radiology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milan (Italy); Silva, Mario, E-mail: mac.mario@hotmail.it [Department of Department of Surgical Sciences, Section of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Parma, Padiglione Barbieri, University Hospital of Parma, V. Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Kuhnigk, Jan-Martin, E-mail: Jan-Martin.Kuhnigk@mevis.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer MEVIS, Universitaetsallee 29, 28359 Bremen (Germany); La Vecchia, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.lavecchia@marionegri.it [Department of Occupational Health, University of Milan, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milan (Italy); Zompatori, Maurizio, E-mail: maurizio.zompatori@unibo.it [Department of Radiology, Cardio-Thoracic Section, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Via Albertoni 15, 40138 Bologna (Italy); Pastorino, Ugo, E-mail: ugo.pastorino@istitutotumori.mi.it [Department of Surgery, Section of Thoracic Surgery, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milan (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    Objectives: To investigate the relationship between emphysema phenotype, mean lung density (MLD), lung function and lung cancer by using an automated multiple feature analysis tool on thin-section computed tomography (CT) data. Methods: Both emphysema phenotype and MLD evaluated by automated quantitative CT analysis were compared between outpatients and screening participants with lung cancer (n = 119) and controls (n = 989). Emphysema phenotype was defined by assessing features such as extent, distribution on core/peel of the lung and hole size. Adjusted multiple logistic regression models were used to evaluate independent associations of CT densitometric measurements and pulmonary function test (PFT) with lung cancer risk. Results: No emphysema feature was associated with lung cancer. Lung cancer risk increased with decreasing values of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV{sub 1}) independently of MLD (OR 5.37, 95% CI: 2.63–10.97 for FEV{sub 1} < 60% vs. FEV{sub 1} ≥ 90%), and with increasing MLD independently of FEV{sub 1} (OR 3.00, 95% CI: 1.60–5.63 for MLD > −823 vs. MLD < −857 Hounsfield units). Conclusion: Emphysema per se was not associated with lung cancer whereas decreased FEV{sub 1} was confirmed as being a strong and independent risk factor. The cross-sectional association between increased MLD and lung cancer requires future validations.

  16. Lung scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalenz, Roberto.

    1994-01-01

    A review of lung scintigraphy, perfusion scintigraphy with SPECT, lung ventilation SPECT, blood pool SPECT. The procedure of lung perfusion studies, radiopharmaceutical, administration and clinical applications, imaging processing .Results encountered and evaluation criteria after Biello and Pioped. Recommendations and general considerations have been studied about relation of this radiopharmaceutical with other pathologies

  17. Lung transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... transplant surgery include: You are placed on the heart-lung machine. One or both of your lungs are removed. For people who are having a double lung transplant, most or all of the steps from the first side are completed before the second side is ...

  18. The aging lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lowery EM

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Erin M Lowery,1 Aleah L Brubaker,2 Erica Kuhlmann,1 Elizabeth J Kovacs31Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine at Loyola University Medical Center, 2Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine, 3Department of Surgery, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL, USAAbstract: There are many age-associated changes in the respiratory and pulmonary immune system. These changes include decreases in the volume of the thoracic cavity, reduced lung volumes, and alterations in the muscles that aid respiration. Muscle function on a cellular level in the aging population is less efficient. The elderly population has less pulmonary reserve, and cough strength is decreased in the elderly population due to anatomic changes and muscle atrophy. Clearance of particles from the lung through the mucociliary elevator is decreased and associated with ciliary dysfunction. Many complex changes in immunity with aging contribute to increased susceptibility to infections including a less robust immune response from both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Considering all of these age-related changes to the lungs, pulmonary disease has significant consequences for the aging population. Chronic lower respiratory tract disease is the third leading cause of death in people aged 65 years and older. With a large and growing aging population, it is critical to understand how the body changes with age and how this impacts the entire respiratory system. Understanding the aging process in the lung is necessary in order to provide optimal care to our aging population. This review focuses on the nonpathologic aging process in the lung, including structural changes, changes in muscle function, and pulmonary immunologic function, with special consideration of obstructive lung disease in the elderly.Keywords: aging, lung, pulmonary immunology, COPD

  19. Differences in the definition of internal target volumes using slow CT alone or in combination with thin-slice CT under breath-holding conditions during the planning of stereotactic radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Satoshi; Kunieda, Etsuo; Takeda, Atsuya; Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Deloar, Hossain M.; Kawase, Takatsugu; Fukada, Junichi; Kawaguchi, Osamu; Uematsu, Minoru; Kubo, Atsushi

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate how the delineations of the internal target volume (ITV) made from 'slow' CT alter with reference to 'thin-slice' CT. Materials and methods: Thin-slice CT images taken under breath-holding conditions and slow CT images taken under shallow-breathing conditions (8 s/image) of 11 lung cancers were used for this study. Five radiation oncologists delineated ITV of the 11 lesions using slow CT images (ITV1), and then redefined them with reference to thin-slice CT images (ITV2). SD-images (standard deviation image) were created for all patients from ITV images in order to visualize the regional variation of the ITVs. Results: The mean value of ITV2 was smaller than that initially defined by ITV1. There was no significant change in ITV1 and ITV2 between operators with regard to standard deviation in volume. There was a significant difference in the distribution of the ratio of ITV1 to ITV2 obtained on thin-slice CTs between cases with and without ground glass opacity. In cases without ground glass opacity there was a tendency for ITV2 to have a smaller volume than ITV1. Conclusions: Combined use of slow CT and thin-slice CT in delineation of ITV contours appeared to be useful in making adjustments for obscured tumor images caused by respiratory movement

  20. Framework for radiation pneumonitis risk stratification based on anatomic and perfused lung dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhami, Gurleen; Zeng, Jing; Patel, Shilpen A.; Rengan, Ramesh [University of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seattle, WA (United States); Vesselle, Hubert J.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Miyaoka, Robert S. [University of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Bowen, Stephen R. [University of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seattle, WA (United States); University of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2017-05-15

    To design and apply a framework for predicting symptomatic radiation pneumonitis in patients undergoing thoracic radiation, using both pretreatment anatomic and perfused lung dose-volume parameters. Radiation treatment planning CT scans were coregistered with pretreatment [{sup 99m}Tc]MAA perfusion SPECT/CT scans of 20 patients who underwent definitive thoracic radiation. Clinical radiation pneumonitis was defined as grade ≥ 2 (CTCAE v4 grading system). Anatomic lung dose-volume parameters were collected from the treatment planning scans. Perfusion dose-volume parameters were calculated from pretreatment SPECT/CT scans. Equivalent doses in 2 Gy per fraction were calculated in the lung to account for differences in treatment regimens and spatial variations in lung dose (EQD2{sub lung}). Anatomic lung dosimetric parameters (MLD) and functional lung dosimetric parameters (pMLD{sub 70%}) were identified as candidate predictors of grade ≥ 2 radiation pneumonitis (AUC > 0.93, p < 0.01). Pairing of an anatomic and functional dosimetric parameter (e.g., MLD and pMLD{sub 70%}) may further improve prediction accuracy. Not all individuals with high anatomic lung dose (MLD > 13.6 GyEQD2{sub lung}, 19.3 Gy for patients receiving 60 Gy in 30 fractions) developed radiation pneumonitis, but all individuals who also had high mean dose to perfused lung (pMLD{sub 70%} > 13.3 GyEQD2) developed radiation pneumonitis. The preliminary application of this framework revealed differences between anatomic and perfused lung dosimetry in this limited patient cohort. The addition of perfused lung parameters may help risk stratify patients for radiation pneumonitis, especially in treatment plans with high anatomic mean lung dose. Further investigations are warranted. (orig.) [German] Erstellung und Anwendung eines Rahmenwerks zur Vorhersage symptomatischer Strahlenpneumonitis bei Patienten mit einer Thorax-Bestrahlung anhand anatomischer und perfundierter Lungendosis-Volumen-Parameter in der

  1. Positron emission tomography of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollmer, P.

    1984-01-01

    Positron emission tomography enables the distribution of positron emitting isotopes to be imaged in a transverse plane through the body and the regional concentration of the isotope to be measured quantitatively. This thesis reports some applications of positron emission tomography to studies of pulmonary pathophysiology. Measurements in lung phantoms showed that regional lung density could be measured from a transmission tomogram obtained with an external source of positron emitting isotope. The regional, fractional blood volume was measured after labelling the blood with carbon-11-monoxide. Regional extravascular lung density (lung tissue and interstitial water per unit thoracic volume) was obtained by subtracting fractional blood volume from lung density. Measurements in normal subjects revealed large regional variations in lung density and fractional blood volume in the supine posture. Extravascular lung density showed a more uniform distribution. The technique has been used to study patients with chronic interstitial pulmonary oedema, pulmonary sarcoidosis and fibrosis, pulmonary arterial hypertension and patients with intracardiac, left-to-right shunt. Tomographic measurements of pulmonary tissue concentration of radionuclides are difficult, since corrections for the blood content and the inflation of the lung must be applied. A simultaneous measurement of lung density and fractional blood volume allows such corrections to be made and the extravascular tracer concentration to be calculated. This has been applied to measurements of the tissue penetration of carbon-11-labelled erythromycin in patients with lobar pneumonia. (author)

  2. Protolichesterinic acid, isolated from the lichen Cetraria islandica, reduces LRRC8A expression and volume-sensitive release of organic osmolytes in human lung epithelial cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur Arna; Thorsteinsdottir, Margret; Lambert, Ian Henry

    2016-01-01

    We have tested the effect of protolichesterinic acid (PA) on the activity of the volume-sensitive release pathway for the organic osmolyte taurine (VSOAC) and the expression of the leucine-rich-repeat-channel 8A (LRRC8A) protein, which constitutes an essential VSOAC component. Exposing human lung...... cancer cells (A549) to PA (20 μg/mL, 24 h) reduces LRRC8A protein expression by 25% and taurine release following osmotic cell swelling (320 → 200 mOsm) by 60%. C75 (20 μg/mL, 24 h), a γ-lactone with a C8 carbon fatty acid chain, reduces VSOAC activity by 30%, i.e. less than PA. Stearic acid (20 μg...

  3. Target volume definition and target conformal irradiation technique for breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiricuta, I.C.; Gotz, U.; Schwab, F.; Fehn, M.; Neumann, H.H. [St. Vincenz-Hospital, Limburg (Germany). Inst. of Radiation Oncology

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this study was to present the target volume and irradiation technique in the most complex situation where the breast or chest wall and the locoregional lymphatics (mammarial internal lymph nodes, axillary and supraclavicular lymph nodes) have to be irradiated. The study comprised 125 breast cancer patients treated with curative intent after primary surgery in the last two years at our institute. In 62 cases the target volume included the breast or chest wall and the locoregional lymphatics, which were treated using our irradiation technique. The target conformal irradiation technique is a multiple non-opposed beams one isocenter technique developed to protect the heart and lungs. This technique, consisting of several rotation beams modulated with wedge filters and individual lung absorbers as well as additional fixed beams, was used in our study to apply a homogeneous dose of 46 to 56 Gy to the target volume; the irradiation technique was optimized by means of dose-volume histograms. After pre-localization, the patients underwent computerized tomographic scanning, with sections at 1.0 cm intervals. Contouring of target volume and organs at risk was carried out with a MULTIDATA workstation for regions of interest (mammarial internal and/or axillary and/or supraclavicular lymphatics and the breast or chest wall) as well as the organs at risk, such as heart and lung parenchyma. Planning target volume coverage was examined by three-dimensional isodose visualization for all CT axial sections for each patient. To determine the incidence of acute or late side effects on the lung parenchyma, conventional chest x-rays and CT studies were carried out at 1 month, 3 months and 6 months after completion of radiotherapy. Dose-volume histogram analysis revealed that this irradiation technique permits the application of a homogeneous dose to the target volume, conforming to the ICRU norms. The maximum dose applied to the ipsilateral lung parenchyma was less than 50

  4. PET-CT-Based Auto-Contouring in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Correlates With Pathology and Reduces Interobserver Variability in the Delineation of the Primary Tumor and Involved Nodal Volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baardwijk, Angela van; Bosmans, Geert; Boersma, Liesbeth; Buijsen, Jeroen; Wanders, Stofferinus; Hochstenbag, Monique; Suylen, Robert-Jan van; Dekker, Andre; Dehing-Oberije, Cary; Houben, Ruud; Bentzen, Soren M.; Kroonenburgh, Marinus van; Lambin, Philippe; Ruysscher, Dirk de

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare source-to-background ratio (SBR)-based PET-CT auto-delineation with pathology in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to investigate whether auto-delineation reduces the interobserver variability compared with manual PET-CT-based gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation. Methods and Materials: Source-to-background ratio-based auto-delineation was compared with macroscopic tumor dimensions to assess its validity in 23 tumors. Thereafter, GTVs were delineated manually on 33 PET-CT scans by five observers for the primary tumor (GTV-1) and the involved lymph nodes (GTV-2). The delineation was repeated after 6 months with the auto-contour provided. This contour was edited by the observers. For comparison, the concordance index (CI) was calculated, defined as the ratio of intersection and the union of two volumes (A intersection B)/(A union B). Results: The maximal tumor diameter of the SBR-based auto-contour correlated strongly with the macroscopic diameter of primary tumors (correlation coefficient = 0.90) and was shown to be accurate for involved lymph nodes (sensitivity 67%, specificity 95%). The median auto-contour-based target volumes were smaller than those defined by manual delineation for GTV-1 (31.8 and 34.6 cm 3 , respectively; p = 0.001) and GTV-2 (16.3 and 21.8 cm 3 , respectively; p 0.02). The auto-contour-based method showed higher CIs than the manual method for GTV-1 (0.74 and 0.70 cm 3 , respectively; p 3 , respectively; p = 0.11). Conclusion: Source-to-background ratio-based auto-delineation showed a good correlation with pathology, decreased the delineated volumes of the GTVs, and reduced the interobserver variability. Auto-contouring may further improve the quality of target delineation in NSCLC patients

  5. Lung and Heart Dose Variability During Radiation Therapy of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Nuzhat; Guy, Christopher; Reshko, Leonid B; Hugo, Geoffrey D; Weiss, Elisabeth

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the hypothesis that positional and anatomic variations during radiation therapy induce changes in lung and heart volumes and associated radiation doses. In this longitudinal investigation, variations in lung and heart volumes and standard dose parameters of mean lung dose, lung V 20Gy , mean heart dose, and heart V 40Gy were analyzed on weekly 4-dimensional CT scans of 15 lung cancer patients during conventionally fractionated radiochemotherapy. Tumor, individual lung lobes, and heart were delineated on the mid-ventilation phase of weekly 4-dimensional CT scans. Lung lobes and heart were also contoured on individual breathing phases of pre-, mid-, and end-of-treatment scans. Planning dose was transferred to consecutive scans via rigid registration. Volume and dose variations were assessed relative to the initial planning scan. Interfraction lung volume variability relative to week 0 was twice as large as tidal volume variability (8.0% ± 5.3% vs 4.0% ± 3.3%, P=.003). Interfraction lung volume variation ranged between 0.8% and 17.1% for individual patient means. Lower lung lobes had larger volume variability compared with upper lobes (13.5% ± 8.1% vs 7.0% ± 5.0%, Pheart volume variation was 7.2% (range, 3.4%-12.6%). Average mean heart dose variation was 1.2 Gy (range, 0.1-3.0 Gy) and average heart V 40Gy variation 1.4% (range, 0%-4.2%). Anatomic and positional variations during radiation therapy induce changes in radiation doses to lung and heart. Repeated lung and heart dose assessment will provide a better estimate of the actual delivered dose and will improve prediction models for normal tissue toxicity, if assessed in larger cohorts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Lung function; Lungenfunktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorichter, S. [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg, Abteilung Pneumologie, Freiburg (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    The term lung function is often restricted to the assessment of volume time curves measured at the mouth. Spirometry includes the assessment of lung volumes which can be mobilised with the corresponding flow-volume curves. In addition, lung volumes that can not be mobilised, such as the residual volume, or only partially as FRC and TLC can be measured by body plethysmography combined with the determination of the airway resistance. Body plethysmography allows the correct positioning of forced breathing manoeuvres on the volume-axis, e.g. before and after pharmacotherapy. Adding the CO single breath transfer factor (T{sub LCO}), which includes the measurement of the ventilated lung volume using He, enables a clear diagnosis of different obstructive, restrictive or mixed ventilatory defects with and without trapped air. Tests of reversibility and provocation, as well as the assessment of inspiratory mouth pressures (PI{sub max}, P{sub 0.1}) help to classify the underlying disorder and to clarify treatment strategies. For further information and to complete the diagnostic of disturbances of the ventilation, diffusion and/or perfusion (capillar-)arterial bloodgases at rest and under physical strain sometimes amended by ergospirometry are recommended. Ideally, lung function measurements are amended by radiological and nuclear medicine techniques. (orig.) [German] Unter dem Begriff Lungenfunktion wird die Bestimmung der Lungenvolumina am Mund verstanden. Dabei werden die mobilisierbaren Lungenvolumina mit den zugehoerigen Fluss-Volumen-Kurven mittels Spirometrie und Ganzkoerperplethysmographie (GKP) und die nicht (RV) und teilweise mobilisierbaren Lungenvolumina (FRC, TLC) einschliesslich der Atemwegswiderstaende bestimmt. Die GKP ermoeglicht zusaetzlich die korrekte (Volumenachsen-)Positionierung der forcierten Atemmanoever. Dieses erlaubt eine uebersichtlichere graphische Darstellung z. B. vor und nach der Applikation pharmakologisch wirksamer Substanzen. Wird die GKP

  7. Factors influencing the decline in lung density in a Danish lung cancer screening cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Shaker, Saher; Dirksen, Asger; Lo, Pechin; Skovgaard, Lene; Bruijne, Marleen; Pedersen, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer screening trials provide an opportunity to study the natural history of emphysema by using computed tomography (CT) lung density as a surrogate parameter. In the Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial, 2,052 participants were included. At screening rounds, smoking habits were recorded and spirometry was performed. CT lung density was measured as the volume-adjusted 15th percentile density (PD15). A mixed effects model was used with former smoking males with,30 pack-yrs and...

  8. Megavoltage conebeam CT cine as final verification of treatment plan in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudithipudi, Vijay; Gayou, Olivier; Colonias, Athanasios

    2016-01-01

    To analyse the clinical impact of megavoltage conebeam computed tomography (MV-CBCT) cine on internal target volume (ITV) coverage in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). One hundred and six patients received lung SBRT. All underwent 4D computed tomography simulation followed by treatment via image guided 3D conformal or intensity modulated radiation. Prior to SBRT, all patients underwent MV-CBCT cine, in which raw projections are displayed as beam's-eye-view fluoroscopic series with the planning target volume (PTV) projected onto each image, enabling verification of tumour motion relative to the PTV and assessment of adequacy of treatment margin. Megavoltage conebeam computed tomography cine was completed 1–2 days prior to SBRT. Four patients (3.8%) had insufficient ITV coverage inferiorly at cine review. All four plans were changed by adding 5 mm on the PTV margin inferiorly. The mean change in PTV volumes was 3.9 cubic centimetres (cc) (range 1.85–6.32 cc). Repeat cine was performed after plan modification to ensure adequate PTV coverage in the modified plans. PTV margin was adequate in the majority of patients with this technique. MV-CBCT cine did show insufficient coverage in a small subset of patients. Insufficient PTV margins may be a function of 4D CT simulation inadequacies or deficiencies in visualizing the ITV inferior border in the full-inhale phase. MV-CBCT cine is a valuable tool for final verification of PTV margins.

  9. Successful 1:1 proportion ventilation with a unique device for independent lung ventilation using a double-lumen tube without complications in the supine and lateral decubitus positions. A pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Kowalczyk

    Full Text Available Adequate blood oxygenation and ventilation/perfusion matching should be main goal of anaesthetic and intensive care management. At present, one of the methods of improving gas exchange restricted by ventilation/perfusion mismatching is independent ventilation with two ventilators. Recently, however, a unique device has been developed, enabling ventilation of independent lungs in 1:1, 2:1, 3:1, and 5:1 proportions. The main goal of the study was to evaluate the device's utility, precision and impact on pulmonary mechanics. Secondly- to measure the gas distribution in supine and lateral decubitus position.69 patients who underwent elective thoracic surgery were eligible for the study. During general anaesthesia, after double lumen tube intubation, the aforementioned control system was placed between the anaesthetic machine and the patient. In the supine and lateral decubitus (left/right positions, measurements of conventional and independent (1:1 proportion ventilation were performed separately for each lung, including the following: tidal volume, peak pressure and dynamic compliance.Our results show that conventional ventilation using Robertshaw tube in the supine position directs 47% of the tidal volume to the left lung and 53% to the right lung. Furthermore, in the left lateral position, 44% is directed to the dependent lung and 56% to the non-dependent lung. In the right lateral position, 49% is directed to the dependent lung and 51% to the non-dependent lung. The control system positively affected non-dependent and dependent lung ventilation by delivering equal tidal volumes into both lungs with no adverse effects, regardless of patient's position.We report that gas distribution is uneven during conventional ventilation using Robertshaw tube in the supine and lateral decubitus positions. However, this recently released control system enables precise and safe independent ventilation in the supine and the left and right lateral decubitus

  10. Early laparotomy after lung transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, Pia; Zemtsovski, Mikhail; Perch, Michael

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gastrointestinal complications after lung transplantation have been reported with incidence rates ranging from 3% to 51%, but the reasons are poorly understood. We aimed to investigate the correlations between pulmonary diseases leading to lung transplantation and early gastrointestinal...... complications requiring laparotomy after transplantation with outcomes for patients at increased risk. METHODS: In this study we performed a retrospective analysis of data of patients who underwent lung transplantation at our institution from 2004 to 2012. The study period was limited to the first 90 days after...... transplantation. RESULTS: Lung transplantation was performed in 258 patients, including 51 patients with α1-anti-trypsin deficiency (A1AD). Seventy-eight patients (30%) had an X-ray of the abdomen, and 23 patients (9%) required laparotomy during the first 90 days after transplantation. Patients with A1AD...

  11. Citrus aurantium Naringenin Prevents Osteosarcoma Progression and Recurrence in the Patients Who Underwent Osteosarcoma Surgery by Improving Antioxidant Capability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lirong Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrus aurantium is rich in flavonoids, which may prevent osteosarcoma progression, but its related molecular mechanism remains unclear. Flavonoids were extracted from C. aurantium and purified by reparative HPLC. Each fraction was identified by using electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS. Three main components (naringin, naringenin, and hesperetin were isolated from C. aurantium. Naringenin inhibited the growth of MG-63 cells, whereas naringin and hesperetin had no inhibitory function on cell growth. ROS production was increased in naringin- and hesperetin-treated groups after one day of culture while the level was always lowest in the naringenin-treated group after three days of culture. 95 osteosarcoma patients who underwent surgery were assigned into two groups: naringenin group (NG, received 20 mg naringenin daily, n=47 and control group (CG, received 20 mg placebo daily, n=48. After an average of two-year follow-up, osteosarcoma volumes were smaller in the NG group than in the CG group (P>0.01. The rate of osteosarcoma recurrence was also lower in the NG group than in CG group. ROS levels were lower in the NG group than in the CG group. Thus, naringenin from Citrus aurantium inhibits osteosarcoma progression and local recurrence in the patients who underwent osteosarcoma surgery by improving antioxidant capability.

  12. Effects of smoking in pregnancy on neonatal lung function

    OpenAIRE

    Milner, A.; Marsh, M.; Ingram, D.; Fox, G.; Susiva, C.

    1999-01-01

    AIMS—To assess the effects of smoking during pregnancy on lung mechanics and lung volumes in the immediate neonatal period, before infants are exposed to passive smoking.
METHODS—Lung function tests were carried out within 72 hours of delivery in infants born to 100 non-smoking and 189 smoking mothers. Lung growth was assessed by plethysmography and lung mechanics using the single breath occlusion technique and oesophageal balloon/ pneumotachography. Antenatal maternal serum cotin...

  13. Comparison of four software packages for CT lung volumetry in healthy individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemec, Stefan F. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Molinari, Francesco [Centre Hospitalier Regional Universitaire de Lille, Department of Radiology, Lille (France); Dufresne, Valerie [CHU de Charleroi - Hopital Vesale, Pneumologie, Montigny-le-Tilleul (Belgium); Gosset, Natacha [CHU Tivoli, Service d' Imagerie Medicale, La Louviere (Belgium); Silva, Mario; Bankier, Alexander A. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-01

    To compare CT lung volumetry (CTLV) measurements provided by different software packages, and to provide normative data for lung densitometric measurements in healthy individuals. This retrospective study included 51 chest CTs of 17 volunteers (eight men and nine women; mean age, 30 ± 6 years), who underwent spirometrically monitored CT at total lung capacity (TLC), functional residual capacity (FRC), and mean inspiratory capacity (MIC). Volumetric differences assessed by four commercial software packages were compared with analysis of variance (ANOVA) for repeated measurements and benchmarked against the threshold for acceptable variability between spirometric measurements. Mean lung density (MLD) and parenchymal heterogeneity (MLD-SD) were also compared with ANOVA. Volumetric differences ranged from 12 to 213 ml (0.20 % to 6.45 %). Although 16/18 comparisons (among four software packages at TLC, MIC, and FRC) were statistically significant (P < 0.001 to P = 0.004), only 3/18 comparisons, one at MIC and two at FRC, exceeded the spirometry variability threshold. MLD and MLD-SD significantly increased with decreasing volumes, and were significantly larger in lower compared to upper lobes (P < 0.001). Lung volumetric differences provided by different software packages are small. These differences should not be interpreted based on statistical significance alone, but together with absolute volumetric differences. (orig.)

  14. Aggravation of dyspnea in stage - non-small cell lung cancer patients following stereotactic body radiotherapy: Is there a dose-volume dependency?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paludan, Merete; Grau, Cai; Hoeyer, Morten; Traberg Hansen, Anders; Petersen, Joergen

    2006-01-01

    In SBRT for NSCLC, highly potent radiation doses are delivered to patients with frequent pre-irradiatory compromise of pulmonary function. For the risk of pulmonary toxicity to be minimized during SBRT planning, data on its dose-volume dependency is needed. In the present study, we analyse the association of dose-volume histogram parameters with changes in dyspnea. The study concerns 28 medically inoperable stage I NSCLC patients that received SBRT at our department between 2000 and 2003. A central dose of 45 Gy/3 fractions was delivered in 5-8 days. WHO toxicity scoring of dyspnea was prospectively performed at baseline and during a 6-month follow-up post-SBRT. DVH parameters for pulmonary tissue were retrieved from the 3-D dose distributions. Aggravated dyspnea was registered in 11 patients (40%). We found no association between DVH parameters and changes in dyspnea. Nor did we find any consistent temporal variations of dyspnea after SBRT. We identified COPD as the factor showing the closest association with aggravation of dyspnea. The observed aggravation of dyspnea following SBRT reflects habitual exacerbations of COPD rather than treatment-related toxicity. Concern about pulmonary toxicity should not be prohibitive for future studies targeting limitations to dose and volume

  15. Aggravation of dyspnea in stage - non-small cell lung cancer patients following stereotactic body radiotherapy: Is there a dose-volume dependency?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paludan, Merete; Grau, Cai; Hoeyer, Morten [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology; Traberg Hansen, Anders; Petersen, Joergen [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Medical Physics

    2006-09-15

    In SBRT for NSCLC, highly potent radiation doses are delivered to patients with frequent pre-irradiatory compromise of pulmonary function. For the risk of pulmonary toxicity to be minimized during SBRT planning, data on its dose-volume dependency is needed. In the present study, we analyse the association of dose-volume histogram parameters with changes in dyspnea. The study concerns 28 medically inoperable stage I NSCLC patients that received SBRT at our department between 2000 and 2003. A central dose of 45 Gy/3 fractions was delivered in 5-8 days. WHO toxicity scoring of dyspnea was prospectively performed at baseline and during a 6-month follow-up post-SBRT. DVH parameters for pulmonary tissue were retrieved from the 3-D dose distributions. Aggravated dyspnea was registered in 11 patients (40%). We found no association between DVH parameters and changes in dyspnea. Nor did we find any consistent temporal variations of dyspnea after SBRT. We identified COPD as the factor showing the closest association with aggravation of dyspnea. The observed aggravation of dyspnea following SBRT reflects habitual exacerbations of COPD rather than treatment-related toxicity. Concern about pulmonary toxicity should not be prohibitive for future studies targeting limitations to dose and volume.

  16. Volume of emphysema.

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, P; Whimster, W F

    1981-01-01

    A method of determining the volume of emphysema in excised lungs is presented, with its validation. This method is based on macroscopic point counting using a perforated grid but only the holes (points) overlying emphysema need be counted to produce results within a percentage standard error of 5%. Application of the method shows that an adequate assessment of emphysema cannot be made from one lung slice alone, and that the amount of emphysema found in one lung cannot be used to predict the a...

  17. Alveolar Tidal recruitment/derecruitment and Overdistension During Four Levels of End-Expiratory Pressure with Protective Tidal Volume During Anesthesia in a Murine Lung-Healthy Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Joao Henrique Neves; Carvalho, Alysson Roncally; Bergamini, Bruno Curty; Gress, Maria Alice Kuster; Jandre, Frederico Caetano; Zin, Walter Araujo; Giannella-Neto, Antonio

    2018-02-12

    We compared respiratory mechanics between the positive end-expiratory pressure of minimal respiratory system elastance (PEEP minErs ) and three levels of PEEP during low-tidal-volume (6 mL/kg) ventilation in rats. Twenty-four rats were anesthetized, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated. Airway pressure (P aw ), flow (F), and volume (V) were fitted by a linear single compartment model (LSCM) P aw (t) = E rs  × V(t) + R rs  × F(t) + PEEP or a volume- and flow-dependent SCM (VFDSCM) P aw (t) = (E 1  + E 2  × V(t)) × V(t) + (K 1  + K 2  × |F(t)|) × F(t) + PEEP, where E rs and R rs are respiratory system elastance and resistance, respectively; E 1 and E 2 × V are volume-independent and volume-dependent E rs , respectively; and K 1 and K 2  × F are flow-independent and flow-dependent R rs , respectively. Animals were ventilated for 1 h at PEEP 0 cmH 2 O (ZEEP); PEEP minErs ; 2 cmH 2 O above PEEP minErs (PEEP minErs+2 ); or 4 cmH 2 O above PEEP minErs (PEEP minErs+4 ). Alveolar tidal recruitment/derecruitment and overdistension were assessed by the index %E 2  = 100 × [(E 2  × V T )/(E 1  + |E 2 | × V T )], and alveolar stability by the slope of E rs (t). %E 2 varied between 0 and 30% at PEEP minErs in most respiratory cycles. Alveolar Tidal recruitment/derecruitment (%E 2   30) were predominant in the absence of PEEP and in PEEP levels higher than PEEP minErs , respectively. The slope of E rs (t) was different from zero in all groups besides PEEP minErs+4 . PEEP minErs presented the best compromise between alveolar tidal recruitment/derecruitment and overdistension, during 1 h of low-V T mechanical ventilation.

  18. Avaliação da influência da idade e do volume do espaçador na deposição pulmonar de aerossóis Evaluation of the influence of patient age and spacer device volume on aerosol lung deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Rocha Filho

    2004-01-01

    devices to deliver aerosol to the lung, and to compare radioaerosol deposition with each device in different age groups. METHODS: Nine healthy, non-smoking volunteers were recruited: three adults and six children, including three toddlers and three school age children. Qualitative and semi-quantitative analysis of radioaerosol deposition in the lung were carried out. Yet, two small-volume devices (Aerochamber® and Inal-Air® and one large-volume device (Flumax® were compared. Each patient inhaled 99m technetium-phytate. The device was filled during 30 seconds with radioaerosol. Oxygen was used as the driving gas. During 10 seconds, the patients inhaled the radioaerosol. The radiation emitted at the front and back of the chest was measured. The radiation inside the device was also measured. RESULTS: The quantitative evaluation of lung deposition revealed that the younger the patient, the less aerosol was deposited in the lung with the large-volume spacer device (Flumax®. The difference between small-volume devices (Aerochamber® and Inal-Air® was not significant. CONCLUSION: Small-volume spacers are the most appropriate for children. Large-volume devices should only be used by adolescents and adults.

  19. Dosimetric comparison of deep inspiration breath hold and free breathing technique in stereotactic body radiotherapy for localized lung tumor using Flattening Filter Free beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Karthick Raj; Bhuiyan, Md. Anisuzzaman; Alam, Md. Mahbub; Ahmed, Sharif; Sumon, Mostafa Aziz; Sengupta, Ashim Kumar; Rahman, Md. Shakilur; Azharul Islam, Md. S. M.

    2018-03-01

    Aim: To compare the dosimetric advantage of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for localized lung tumor between deep inspiration breath hold technique and free breathing technique. Materials and methods: We retrospectively included ten previously treated lung tumor patients in this dosimetric study. All the ten patients underwent CT simulation using 4D-CT free breathing (FB) and deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) techniques. Plans were created using three coplanar full modulated arc using 6 MV flattening filter free (FFF) bream with a dose rate of 1400 MU/min. Same dose constraints for the target and the critical structures for a particular patient were used during the plan optimization process in DIBH and FB datasets. We intend to deliver 50 Gy in 5 fractions for all the patients. For standardization, all the plans were normalized at target mean of the planning target volume (PTV). Doses to the critical structures and targets were recorded from the dose volume histogram for evaluation. Results: The mean right and left lung volumes were inflated by 1.55 and 1.60 times in DIBH scans compared to the FB scans. The mean internal target volume (ITV) increased in the FB datasets by 1.45 times compared to the DIBH data sets. The mean dose followed by standard deviation (x¯ ± σx¯) of ipsilateral lung for DIBH-SBRT and FB-SBRT plans were 7.48 ± 3.57 (Gy) and 10.23 ± 4.58 (Gy) respectively, with a mean reduction of 36.84% in DIBH-SBRT plans. Ipsilateral lung were reduced to 36.84% in DIBH plans compared to FB plans. Conclusion: Significant dose reduction in ipsilateral lung due to the lung inflation and target motion restriction in DIBH-SBRT plans were observed compare to FB-SBRT. DIBH-SBRT plans demonstrate superior dose reduction to the normal tissues and other critical structures.

  20. Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  1. Artifacts in conventional computed tomography (CT) and free breathing four-dimensional CT induce uncertainty in gross tumor volume determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Gitte Fredberg; Nygaard, Ditte Eklund; Af Rosenschöld, Per Munck

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Artifacts impacting the imaged tumor volume can be seen in conventional three-dimensional CT (3DCT) scans for planning of lung cancer radiotherapy but can be reduced with the use of respiration-correlated imaging, i.e., 4DCT or breathhold CT (BHCT) scans. The aim of this study was to com......PURPOSE: Artifacts impacting the imaged tumor volume can be seen in conventional three-dimensional CT (3DCT) scans for planning of lung cancer radiotherapy but can be reduced with the use of respiration-correlated imaging, i.e., 4DCT or breathhold CT (BHCT) scans. The aim of this study...... was to compare delineated gross tumor volume (GTV) sizes in 3DCT, 4DCT, and BHCT scans of patients with lung tumors. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A total of 36 patients with 46 tumors referred for stereotactic radiotherapy of lung tumors were included. All patients underwent positron emission tomography (PET)/CT, 4DCT......, and BHCT scans. GTVs in all CT scans of individual patients were delineated during one session by a single physician to minimize systematic delineation uncertainty. The GTV size from the BHCT was considered the closest to true tumor volume and was chosen as the reference. The reference GTV size...

  2. Risk factors of postoperative pneumonia after lung cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Yeon; Jin, Sang-Man; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Byoung Jun; Kang, Chang-Hyun; Yim, Jae-Joon; Kim, Young Tae; Yang, Seok-Chul; Yoo, Chul-Gyu; Han, Sung Koo; Kim, Joo Hyun; Shim, Young Soo; Kim, Young Whan

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate risk factors of postoperative pneumonia (POP) after lung cancer surgery. The 417 lung cancer patients who underwent surgical resection in a tertiary referral hospital were included. Clinical, radiological and laboratory data were reviewed retrospectively. Male and female ratio was 267:150 (median age, 65 yr). The incidence of POP was 6.2% (26 of 417) and in-hospital mortality was 27% among those patients. By univariate analysis, age ≥ 70 yr (P pneumonia (P = 0.020), forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity (FEV(1)/FVC) risk of POP. Multivariate analysis showed that age ≥ 70 yr (OR = 3.563, P = 0.014), intraoperative RBC transfusion (OR = 4.669, P = 0.033), the presence of postoperative complications other than pneumonia (OR = 3.032, P = 0.046), and FEV(1)/FVC risk factors of POP. In conclusion, patients with advanced age, intraoperative RBC transfusion, postoperative complications other than pneumonia and a decreased FEV(1)/FVC ratio have a higher risk for pneumonia after lung cancer surgery.

  3. Target dose conversion modeling from pencil beam (PB) to Monte Carlo (MC) for lung SBRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Dandan; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Qinghui; Liang, Xiaoying; Zhen, Weining; Lin, Chi; Verma, Vivek; Wang, Shuo; Wahl, Andrew; Lei, Yu; Zhou, Sumin; Zhang, Chi

    2016-01-01

    A challenge preventing routine clinical implementation of Monte Carlo (MC)-based lung SBRT is the difficulty of reinterpreting historical outcome data calculated with inaccurate dose algorithms, because the target dose was found to decrease to varying degrees when recalculated with MC. The large variability was previously found to be affected by factors such as tumour size, location, and lung density, usually through sub-group comparisons. We hereby conducted a pilot study to systematically and quantitatively analyze these patient factors and explore accurate target dose conversion models, so that large-scale historical outcome data can be correlated with more accurate MC dose without recalculation. Twenty-one patients that underwent SBRT for early-stage lung cancer were replanned with 6MV 360° dynamic conformal arcs using pencil-beam (PB) and recalculated with MC. The percent D95 difference (PB-MC) was calculated for the PTV and GTV. Using single linear regression, this difference was correlated with the following quantitative patient indices: maximum tumour diameter (MaxD); PTV and GTV volumes; minimum distance from tumour to soft tissue (dmin); and mean density and standard deviation of the PTV, GTV, PTV margin, lung, and 2 mm, 15 mm, 50 mm shells outside the PTV. Multiple linear regression and artificial neural network (ANN) were employed to model multiple factors and improve dose conversion accuracy. Single linear regression with PTV D95 deficiency identified the strongest correlation on mean-density (location) indices, weaker on lung density, and the weakest on size indices, with the following R 2 values in decreasing orders: shell2mm (0.71), PTV (0.68), PTV margin (0.65), shell15mm (0.62), shell50mm (0.49), lung (0.40), dmin (0.22), GTV (0.19), MaxD (0.17), PTV volume (0.15), and GTV volume (0.08). A multiple linear regression model yielded the significance factor of 3.0E-7 using two independent features: mean density of shell2mm (P = 1.6E-7) and PTV volume

  4. [Evaluation of tidal volume delivered by ventilators during volume-controlled ventilation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Juan; Yan, Yong; Cao, Desen

    2014-12-01

    To study the ways which ensure the delivery of enough tidal volume to patients under various conditions close to the demand of the physician. The volume control ventilation model was chosen, and the simulation lung type was active servo lung ASL 5000 or Michigan lung 1601. The air resistance, air compliance and lung type in simulation lungs were set. The tidal volume was obtained from flow analyzer PF 300. At the same tidal volume, the displaying values of tidal volume of E5, Servo i, Evital 4, and Evital XL ventilators with different lung types of patient, compliance of gas piping, leakage, gas types, etc. were evaluated. With the same setting tidal volume of a same ventilator, the tidal volume delivered to patients was different with different lung types of patient, compliance of gas piping, leakage, gas types, etc. Reducing compliance and increasing resistance of the patient lungs caused high peak airway pressure, the tidal volume was lost in gas piping, and the tidal volume be delivered to the patient lungs was decreased. If the ventilator did not compensate to leakage, the tidal volume delivered to the patient lungs was decreased. When the setting gas type of ventilator did not coincide with that applying to the patient, the tidal volume be delivered to the patient lungs might be different with the setting tidal volume of ventilator. To ensure the delivery of enough tidal volume to patients close to the demand of the physician, containable factors such as the compliance of gas piping, leakage, and gas types should be controlled.

  5. Lung Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Lung Cancer Key Points Lung cancer is a disease in ...

  6. Relationship of serum levels of interleukin 6, interleukin 8, and C-reactive protein with forced expiratory volume in first second in patients with mustard lung and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriary, Alireza; Panahi, Yunes; Shirali, Saeed; Rahmani, Hossein

    2017-06-01

    The chronic systemic inflammation is a result of releasing inflammatory cytokines from the cells relating to the body immunity system and chronic activation of the innate immunity system. To evaluate the relationship among serum levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 8 (IL-8), C-reactive protein (CRP) with forced expiratory volume in 1 st s (FEV 1 ) in patients with mustard lung (ML) and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD). A published literature search was performed through SID, web of science, ISI, Science Direct, Scopus, Medline, and PubMed databases for articles published in English. The correlation coefficient ( r ) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated using random or fixed effects models. Heterogeneity was assessed using χ 2 and I 2 statistics. In total, 4 published studies were included in the final analysis. Using the random-effect model, meta-analysis showed that the r was -0.052 (95% CI: -0.14-0.049, p = 0.28) at serum level of IL-8, serum levels of CRP and FEV 1 in these results were r = -0.13, p = 0.012, serum levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and FEV 1 levels were r = -0.39, p = 0.03 in the conducted studies on mustard lung patients. The IL-6 serum level was explored in COPD patients. The results of the given studies in these patients are r = -0.006, 95% CI: -0.37-0.15, and p = 0.44. In this meta-analysis, there was evidence that serum levels of CRP and TNF have been significantly increased in chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases compared to the healthy control group, which signifies the presence of systemic inflammation in ML and COPD patients.

  7. Effect of Acu-TENS on post-exercise expiratory lung volume in subjects with asthma-A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngai, Shirley P C; Jones, Alice Y M; Hui-Chan, Christina W Y; Ko, Fanny W S; Hui, David S C

    2009-07-31

    This study examined the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation applied over acupoints (Acu-TENS) on forced expiratory volume, in patients with asthma, after exercise. Thirty subjects were randomly assigned to three groups. Group 1 received Acu-TENS over acupuncture points Lieque and Dingchuan for 45 min prior to a symptom-limited treadmill exercise test. Group 2 had Acu-TENS similarly applied prior to and throughout the exercise test. Group 3 mimicked Group 1 but without any electrical output from the device. Forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)) and forced vital capacity (FVC) were recorded before, immediately after and at 20-min intervals post-exercise for 1h. Immediately after exercise, FEV(1) and FVC rose in Group 2 (p=0.015), but decreased in Group 1 and more so in Group 3. The differences became even more marked at 20, 40 and 60 min. Adjunctive Acu-TENS therapy appears to reduce decline of FEV(1) following exercise training in patients with asthma.

  8. Prediction of postoperative pulmonary function using 99mTc-MAA perfusion lung SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosokawa, Nobuyuki; Tanabe, Masatada; Satoh, Katashi; Takashima, Hitoshi; Ohkawa, Motoomi; Maeda, Masazumi; Tamai, Toyosato; Kojima, Kanji.

    1995-01-01

    In order to predict postoperative pulmonary function, 99m Tc-MAA perfusion lung SPECT and spirometry were performed preoperatively in 52 patients with resectable primary lung cancer; 44 underwent lobectomy, eight pneumonectomy. Local pulmonary function (called local effective volume) was evaluated according to the degree of radionuclide distribution of each voxel in the SPECT images. The total effective volume was defined as the sum of the local effective volume, and the residual effective volume was the total effective volume excluding loss after operation. Predicted pulmonary function (VC and FEV 1.0) was calculated by the following formula: Predicted value=preoperative value x percent of the residual effective volume. Postoperative pulmonary function was predicted in the same patients by means of 99m Tc-MAA perfusion lung planar scintigraphy and X-ray CT. The patients were reinvestigated with spirometry at one and four months after surgery, and the values were compared with the predicted values. The correlations between the predicted values using SPECT and measured postoperative pulmonary function were highly significant (VC: r=0.867, FEV1.0: r=0.864 one month after operation; VC: r=0.860, FEV1.0: r=0.907 4 months after operation). The predicted values calculated using SPECT were accurate compared with the predicted values calculated using planar scintigraphy or X-ray CT. The patients with predicted FEV1.0 of less than 0.8 liter required home oxygen therapy. This method is valuable for the prediction of postoperative pulmonary function before the surgical procedure. (author)

  9. Changes in Cross-Sectional Area and Transverse Diameter of the Heart on Inspiratory and Expiratory Chest CT: Correlation with Changes in Lung Size and Influence on Cardiothoracic Ratio Measurement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayato Tomita

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate physiological changes in cardiac area and diameters between inspiratory and expiratory chest computed tomography (CT, and to assess their correlation with lung size change and influence on cardiothoracic ratio (CTR measurements.The institutional review board of our institution approved this study, and informed consent was waived. Forty-three subjects underwent inspiratory and expiratory chest CT as part of routine clinical care. On both inspiratory and expiratory scans, lung volumes and maximum lung diameters (transverse and vertical directions were measured. The maximum cardiac cross-sectional area (CSA and the maximum transverse cardiac diameter were measured on both scans, and the CT-based CTR was calculated. Changes in the lung and cardiac measurements were expressed as the expiratory/inspiratory (E/I ratios. Comparisons between inspiratory and expiratory measurements were made by the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Correlations between the E/I ratios of lung and heart measurements were evaluated by Spearman's rank correlation analysis.Cardiac CSA and transverse cardiac diameter was significantly larger on expiratory than on inspiratory CT (p < 0.0001. Significant negative correlations were found between the E/I ratios of these cardiac measurements and the E/I ratios of lung volume and vertical lung diameter (p < 0.01. CT-based CTR was significantly larger on expiration than on inspiration (p < 0.0001.Heart size on chest CT depends on the phase of ventilation, and is correlated with changes in lung volume and craniocaudal lung diameter. The CTR is also significantly influenced by ventilation.

  10. Dysphagia among Adult Patients who Underwent Surgery for Esophageal Atresia at Birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Huynh-Trudeau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical experiences of adults who underwent surgery for esophageal atresia at birth is limited. There is some evidence that suggests considerable long-term morbidity, partly because of dysphagia, which has been reported in up to 85% of adult patients who undergo surgery for esophageal atresia. The authors hypothesized that dysphagia in this population is caused by dysmotility and/or anatomical anomalies.

  11. Early COPD patients with lung hyperinflation associated with poorer lung function but better bronchodilator responsiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunlan; Jian, Wenhua; Gao, Yi; Xie, Yanqing; Song, Yan; Zheng, Jinping

    2016-01-01

    Background It is unknown whether aggressive medication strategies should be used for early COPD with or without lung hyperinflation. We aimed to explore the characteristics and bronchodilator responsiveness of early COPD patients (stages I and II) with/without lung hyperinflation. Methods Four hundred and six patients with COPD who performed both lung volume and bronchodilation tests were retrospectively analyzed. Residual volume to total lung capacity >120% of predicted values indicated lung hyperinflation. The characteristics and bronchodilator responsiveness were compared between the patients with and without lung hyperinflation across all stages of COPD. Results The percentages of patients with lung hyperinflation were 72.7% in the entire cohort, 19.4% in stage I, 68.5% in stage II, 95.3% in stage III, and 100.0% in stage IV. The patients with lung hyperinflation exhibited poorer lung function but better bronchodilator responsiveness of both forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity than those without lung hyperinflation during early COPD (t=2.21–5.70, P=0.000–0.029), especially in stage I, while age, body mass index, smoking status, smoking history, and disease duration were similar between the two subgroups in the same stages. From stages I to IV of subgroups with lung hyperinflation, stage I patients had the best bronchodilator responsiveness. Use of bronchodilator responsiveness of forced vital capacity to detect the presence of lung hyperinflation in COPD patients showed relatively high sensitivities (69.5%–75.3%) and specificities (70.3%–75.7%). Conclusion We demonstrated the novel finding that early COPD patients with lung hyperinflation are associated with poorer lung function but better bronchodilator responsiveness and established a simple method for detecting lung hyperinflation. PMID:27785008

  12. Evolution of elderly patients who underwent cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Moré Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is a steady increase in the number of elderly patients with severe cardiovascular diseases who require a surgical procedure to recover some quality of life that allows them a socially meaningful existence, despite the risks.Objectives: To analyze the behavior of elderly patients who underwent cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass.Method: A descriptive, retrospective, cross-sectional study was conducted with patients over 65 years of age who underwent surgery at the Cardiocentro Ernesto Che Guevara, in Santa Clara, from January 2013 to March 2014.Results: In the study, 73.1% of patients were men; and there was a predominance of subjects between 65 and 70 years of age, accounting for 67.3%. Coronary artery bypass graft was the most prevalent type of surgery and had the longest cardiopulmonary bypass times. Hypertension was present in 98.1% of patients. The most frequent postoperative complications were renal dysfunction and severe low cardiac output, with 44.2% and 34.6% respectively.Conclusions: There was a predominance of men, the age group of 65 to 70 years, hypertension, and patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft with prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass. Renal dysfunction was the most frequent complication.

  13. Acute myocardial infarctation in patients with critical ischemia underwent lower limb revascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esdras Marques Lins

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atherosclerosis is the main cause of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD of the lower limbs. Patients with PAOD often also have obstructive atherosclerosis in other arterial sites, mainly the coronary arteries. This means that patients who undergo infrainguinal bypass to treat critical ischemia have a higher risk of AMI. There are, however, few reports in the literature that have assessed this risk properly. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of acute myocardial infarction in patients who underwent infrainguinal bypass to treat critical ischemia of the lower limbs caused by PAOD. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 64 patients who underwent 82 infrainguinal bypass operations, from February 2011 to July 2012 were studied. All patients had electrocardiograms and troponin I blood assays during the postoperative period (within 72 hours. RESULTS: There were abnormal ECG findings and elevated blood troponin I levels suggestive of AMI in five (6% of the 82 operations performed. All five had conventional surgery. The incidence of AMI as a proportion of the 52 conventional surgery cases was 9.6%. Two patients died. CONCLUSION: There was a 6% AMI incidence among patients who underwent infrainguinal bypass due to PAOD. Considering only cases operated using conventional surgery, the incidence of AMI was 9.6%.

  14. Aggravation of dyspnea in stage I non-small cell lung cancer patients following stereotactic body radiotherapy: Is there a dose-volume dependency?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paludan, Merete; Hansen, Anders Traberg; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    2006-01-01

    the association of dose-volume histogram parameters with changes in dyspnea. The study concerns 28 medically inoperable stage I NSCLC patients that received SBRT at our department between 2000 and 2003. A central dose of 45 Gy/3 fractions was delivered in 5-8 days. WHO toxicity scoring of dyspnea...... was prospectively performed at baseline and during a 6-month follow-up post-SBRT. DVH parameters for pulmonary tissue were retrieved from the 3-D dose distributions.Aggravated dyspnea was registered in 11 patients (40%). We found no association between DVH parameters and changes in dyspnea. Nor did we find any...... consistent temporal variations of dyspnea after SBRT. We identified COPD as the factor showing the closest association with aggravation of dyspnea. The observed aggravation of dyspnea following SBRT reflects habitual exacerbations of COPD rather than treatment-related toxicity. Concern about pulmonary...

  15. Treatment of intractable interstitial lung injury with alemtuzumab after lung transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohno, M; Perch, M; Andersen, E

    2011-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman underwent left single-lung transplantation for end-stage emphysema due to a1-antitrypsin deficiency in January 2010. Cyclosporine, azathioprine, and prednisolone were administered for immunosuppression and antithymocyte globulin for induction therapy at the time...... of transplantation. Routine examination of a lung biopsy, 4 months after transplantation, showed nonspecific, diffuse interstitial inflammation with alveolar septal fibrosis. The patient's clinical status and imaging studies, consistent with nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis, which was considered as signs......, posttransplant antirejection drug regimen. We have since successfully treated with alemtuzumab three additional patients who developed interstitial lung injury after lung transplantation, who are also summarized in this report....

  16. Treatment of intractable interstitial lung injury with alemtuzumab after lung transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohno, M; Perch, M; Andersen, E

    2011-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman underwent left single-lung transplantation for end-stage emphysema due to α1-antitrypsin deficiency in January 2010. Cyclosporine, azathioprine, and prednisolone were administered for immunosuppression and antithymocyte globulin for induction therapy at the time...... of transplantation. Routine examination of a lung biopsy, 4 months after transplantation, showed nonspecific, diffuse interstitial inflammation with alveolar septal fibrosis. The patient's clinical status and imaging studies, consistent with nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis, which was considered as signs......, posttransplant antirejection drug regimen. We have since successfully treated with alemtuzumab three additional patients who developed interstitial lung injury after lung transplantation, who are also summarized in this report....

  17. [Establishment of A Clinical Prediction Model of Prolonged Air Leak 
after Anatomic Lung Resection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xianning; Xu, Shibin; Ke, Li; Fan, Jun; Wang, Jun; Xie, Mingran; Jiang, Xianliang; Xu, Meiqing

    2017-12-20

    Prolonged air leak (PAL) after anatomic lung resection is a common and challenging complication in thoracic surgery. No available clinical prediction model of PAL has been established in China. The aim of this study was to construct a model to identify patients at increased risk of PAL by using preoperative factors exclusively. We retrospectively reviewed clinical data and PAL occurrence of patients after anatomic lung resection, in department of thoracic surgery, Anhui Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Anhui Medical University, from January 2016 to October 2016. 359 patients were in group A, clinical data including age, body mass index (BMI), gender, smoking history, surgical methods, pulmonary function index, pleural adhesion, pathologic diagnosis, side and site of resected lung were analyzed. By using univariate and multivariate analysis, we found the independent predictors of PAL after anatomic lung resection and subsequently established a clinical prediction model. Then, another 112 patients (group B), who underwent anatomic lung resection in different time by different team, were chosen to verify the accuracy of the prediction model. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve was constructed using the prediction model. Multivariate Logistic regression analysis was used to identify six clinical characteristics [BMI, gender, smoking history, forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity ratio (FEV1%), pleural adhesion, site of resection] as independent predictors of PAL after anatomic lung resection. The area under the ROC curve for our model was 0.886 (95%CI: 0.835-0.937). The best predictive P value was 0.299 with sensitivity of 78.5% and specificity of 93.2%. Our prediction model could accurately identify occurrence risk of PAL in patients after anatomic lung resection, which might allow for more effective use of intraoperative prophylactic strategies.
.

  18. Lung function decline rates according to GOLD group in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joohae; Yoon, Ho Il; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lim, Seong Yong; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Lee, Sang Yeub; Lee, Jin Hwa; Lee, Sang-Do; Lee, Chang-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Since the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) groups A-D were introduced, the lung function changes according to group have been evaluated rarely. We investigated the rate of decline in annual lung function in patients categorized according to the 2014 GOLD guidelines. Patients with COPD included in the Korean Obstructive Lung Disease (KOLD) prospective study, who underwent yearly postbronchodilator spirometry at least three times, were included. The main outcome was the annual decline in postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), which was analyzed by random-slope and random-intercept mixed linear regression. A total 175 participants were included. No significant postbronchodilator FEV1 decline was observed between the groups (-34.4±7.9 [group A]; -26.2±9.4 [group B]; -22.7±16.0 [group C]; and -24.0±8.7 mL/year [group D]) (P=0.79). The group with less symptoms (-32.3±7.2 vs -25.0±6.5 mL/year) (P=0.44) and the low risk group (-31.0±6.1 vs -23.6±7.7 mL/year) (P=0.44) at baseline showed a more rapid decline in the postbronchodilator FEV1, but the trends were not statistically significant. However, GOLD stages classified by FEV1 were significantly related to the annual lung function decline. There was no significant difference in lung function decline rates according to the GOLD groups. Prior classification using postbronchodilator FEV1 predicts decline in lung function better than does the new classification.

  19. TU-H-CAMPUS-TeP2-01: A Comparison of Noninvasive Techniques to Assess Radiation-Induced Lung Damage in Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubinstein, A; Kingsley, C; Melancon, A; Tailor, R; Pollard, J; Guindani, M; Followill, D; Hazle, J; Court, L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of post-irradiation changes in respiratory rate and CBCT-based morphology as predictors of survival in mice. Methods: C57L/J mice underwent whole-thorax irradiation with a Co-60 beam to four different doses [0Gy (n=3), 9Gy (n=5), 11Gy (n=7), and 13Gy (n=5)] in order to induce varying levels of pneumonitis. Respiratory rate measurements, breath-hold CBCTs, and free-breathing CBCTs were acquired pre-irradiation and at six time points between two and seven months post-irradiation. For respiratory rate measurements, we developed a novel computer-vision-based technique. We recorded mice sleeping in standard laboratory cages with a 30 fps, 1080p webcam (Logitech C920). We calculated respiratory rate using corner detection and optical flow to track cyclical motion in the fur in the recorded video. Breath-hold and free-breathing CBCTs were acquired on the X-RAD225Cx system. For breathhold imaging, the mice were intubated and their breath was held at full-inhale for 20 seconds. Healthy lung tissue was delineated in the scans using auto-threshold contouring (0–0.7 g/cm 3 ). The volume of healthy lung was measured in each of the scans. Next, lung density was measured in a 6-mm 2 ROI in a fixed anatomic location in each of the scans. Results: Day-to-day variability in respiratory rate with our technique was 13%. All metrics except for breath-hold lung volume were correlated with survival: lung density on free-breathing (r=−0.7482,p<0.01) and breath-hold images (r=−0.5864,p<0.01), free-breathing lung volume (r=0.7179,p<0.01), and respiratory rate (r= 0.6953,p<0.01). Lung density on free-breathing scans was correlated with respiratory rate (r=0.7142,p<0.01) and lung density on breath-hold scans (r=0.5543,p<0.01). One significant practical hurdle in the CBCT measurements was that at least one lobe of the lung was collapsed in 36% of free-breathing scans and 45% of breath-hold scans. Conclusion: Lung density and lung volume on free

  20. TU-H-CAMPUS-TeP2-01: A Comparison of Noninvasive Techniques to Assess Radiation-Induced Lung Damage in Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubinstein, A; Kingsley, C; Melancon, A; Tailor, R; Pollard, J; Guindani, M; Followill, D; Hazle, J; Court, L [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of post-irradiation changes in respiratory rate and CBCT-based morphology as predictors of survival in mice. Methods: C57L/J mice underwent whole-thorax irradiation with a Co-60 beam to four different doses [0Gy (n=3), 9Gy (n=5), 11Gy (n=7), and 13Gy (n=5)] in order to induce varying levels of pneumonitis. Respiratory rate measurements, breath-hold CBCTs, and free-breathing CBCTs were acquired pre-irradiation and at six time points between two and seven months post-irradiation. For respiratory rate measurements, we developed a novel computer-vision-based technique. We recorded mice sleeping in standard laboratory cages with a 30 fps, 1080p webcam (Logitech C920). We calculated respiratory rate using corner detection and optical flow to track cyclical motion in the fur in the recorded video. Breath-hold and free-breathing CBCTs were acquired on the X-RAD225Cx system. For breathhold imaging, the mice were intubated and their breath was held at full-inhale for 20 seconds. Healthy lung tissue was delineated in the scans using auto-threshold contouring (0–0.7 g/cm{sup 3}). The volume of healthy lung was measured in each of the scans. Next, lung density was measured in a 6-mm{sup 2} ROI in a fixed anatomic location in each of the scans. Results: Day-to-day variability in respiratory rate with our technique was 13%. All metrics except for breath-hold lung volume were correlated with survival: lung density on free-breathing (r=−0.7482,p<0.01) and breath-hold images (r=−0.5864,p<0.01), free-breathing lung volume (r=0.7179,p<0.01), and respiratory rate (r= 0.6953,p<0.01). Lung density on free-breathing scans was correlated with respiratory rate (r=0.7142,p<0.01) and lung density on breath-hold scans (r=0.5543,p<0.01). One significant practical hurdle in the CBCT measurements was that at least one lobe of the lung was collapsed in 36% of free-breathing scans and 45% of breath-hold scans. Conclusion: Lung density and lung volume on free

  1. The deflation limb of the pressure-volume relationship in infants during high-frequency ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingay, David G; Mills, John F; Morley, Colin J; Pellicano, Anastasia; Dargaville, Peter A

    2006-02-15

    The importance of applying high-frequency oscillatory ventilation with a high lung volume strategy in infants is well established. Currently, a lack of reliable methods for assessing lung volume limits clinicians' ability to achieve the optimum volume range. To map the pressure-volume relationship of the lung during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation in infants, to determine at what point ventilation is being applied clinically, and to describe the relationship between airway pressure, lung volume, and oxygenation. In 12 infants, a partial inflation limb and the deflation limb of the pressure-volume relationship were mapped using a quasi-static lung volume optimization maneuver. This involved stepwise airway pressure increments to total lung capacity, followed by decrements until the closing pressure of the lung was identified. Lung volume and oxygen saturation were recorded at each airway pressure. Lung volume was measured using respiratory inductive plethysmography. A distinct deflation limb could be mapped in each infant. Overall, oxygenation and lung volume were improved by applying ventilation on the deflation limb. Maximal lung volume and oxygenation occurred on the deflation limb at a mean airway pressure of 3 and 5 cm H(2)O below the airway pressure approximating total lung capacity, respectively. Using current ventilation strategies, all infants were being ventilated near the inflation limb. It is possible to delineate the deflation limb in infants receiving high-frequency oscillatory ventilation; in doing so, greater lung volume and oxygenation can be achieved, often at lower airway pressures.

  2. Lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... causing chemicals such as uranium, beryllium, vinyl chloride, nickel chromates, coal products, mustard gas, chloromethyl ethers, gasoline, and diesel exhaust Exposure to radon gas Family history of lung cancer ...

  3. Percutaneous cryoablation for the treatment of medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikane Yamauchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To evaluate the midterm results of percutaneous cryoablation for medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Between January 2004 and June 2010, 160 patients underwent computer tomography guided percutaneous cryoablation for lung tumors at our institution. Of these patients, histologically proven stage I lung cancer patients with more than one year of follow-up, were retrospectively reviewed. All of these patients were considered to be medically inoperable with Charlson comorbidity index of 3 or greater. Follow-up was based primarily on computed tomography. There were 22 patients with 34 tumors who underwent 25 sessions of cryoablation treatment. Complications were pneumothoraces in 7 treatments (28%, chest tube required in one treatment, and pleural effusions in 8 treatments (31%. The observation period ranged from 12-68 months, average 29±19 months, median 23 months. Local tumor progression was observed in one tumor (3%. Mean local tumor progression-free interval was 69±2 months. One patient died of lung cancer progression at 68 months. Two patients died of acute exacerbations of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis which were not considered to be directly associated with cryoablation, at 12 and 18 months, respectively. The overall 2- and 3-year survivals were 88% and 88%, respectively. Mean overall survival was 62±4 months. Median overall survival was 68 months. The disease-free 2- and 3-year survivals were 78% and 67%, respectively. Mean disease-free survival was 46±6 months. Pulmonary function tests were done in 16 patients (18 treatments before and after cryoablation. Percentage of predicted vital capacity, and percentage of predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second, did not differ significantly before and after cryoablation (93±23 versus 90±21, and 70±11 versus 70±12, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although further accumulation of data is necessary regarding efficacy

  4. Airway complications following pediatric lung and heart-lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaditis, A G; Gondor, M; Nixon, P A; Webber, S; Keenan, R J; Kaye, R; Kurland, G

    2000-07-01

    Obstruction at the airway anastomosis is a recognized complication of adult heart-lung transplantation (HLT) and lung transplantation (LT). Data for pediatric transplantation have been scarce. We reviewed our experience in pediatric HLT and LT to determine the frequency of airway complications and to document the therapeutic modalities used for their treatment. Fifty-three patients (median age: 13.8 yr; range: 1.3 to 28.2 yr) underwent HLT (n = 25), SLT (n = 3), DLT (n = 25), or repeat DLT (n = 3) and survived for more than 72 h. Major anastomotic airway complications requiring intervention affected one of the 25 HLT (4%) and seven of the 28 LT (SLT + DLT) patients (25%) (p = 0.05). Four patients with granulation tissue occluding the airway were treated with forceps resection, laser ablation, or balloon dilatation. Three patients with fibrotic strictures received silicone stents, laser ablation, or balloon dilatation. Two patients with bronchomalacia or diffuse stricture below the anastomosis underwent metal stent placement. Five of seven patients who were treated for anastomotic complications had satisfactory relief of airway obstruction. As compared with previously studied adults, pediatric heart-lung transplant recipients had the same or a lower frequency, and pediatric lung transplant recipients had a higher frequency of major anastomotic airway complications. A variety of treatment modalities were necessary to achieve adequate relief of airway obstruction.

  5. Progressive multiple cystic changes in both lungs in a patient treated with gefitinib for lung adenocarcinoma with multiple lung metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Yon Ju; Chun, Eun Mi; Lee, Soon Nam; Shim, Sung Shin

    2014-01-01

    Gefitinib is regarded as a relatively safe agent for the treatment of an advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Pulmonary toxicity such as interstitial lung disease associated with gefitinib is uncommon with an estimated all time incidence around 1% worldwide. Moreover, a case of gefitinib associated with pulmonary cystic changes has not been reported yet. In this report we present a case of progressive multiple air cystic changes in both lungs in a patient with NSCLC and intrapulmonary metastases who underwent a gefitinib therapy.

  6. Voiding patterns of adult patients who underwent hypospadias repair in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, Jawdat; Kocherov, Stanislav; Chertin, Leonid; Farkas, Amicur; Chertin, Boris

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the voiding patterns of adult patients who underwent hypospadias repair in childhood. Following IRB approval 103 (22.7%) of 449 adult patients who underwent hypospadias repair between 1978 and 1993 responded to the following questionnaires: International Prostate Symptom Score (I-PSS) and Short Form 12 questionnaire (SF-12). Uroflowmetry (UF) was performed for all patients. The patients were divided into three groups according to the primary meatus localization. Group I had 63 patients (61.5%) treated for glanular hypospadias, group II had 19 patients (18.4%) treated for distal hypospadias, and group III comprised the remaining 21 patients (20.4%) treated for proximal hypospadias. The mean ± SD I-PSS score for all patients who responded to the questionnaire was 2.3 ± 2.4, and UF was 21.1 ± 4.3 mL/s. The patients from groups I and III had fewer urinary symptoms compared with those of the group II: 1.3 ± 1.5, 5.5 ± 2.4, and 1.6 ± 1.4, respectively (p hypospadias repair in childhood had normal or mild voiding disturbance, with no effects on their physical or mental status. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Prognostic Analysis of Breast Cancer Patients Who Underwent Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Using QOL-ACD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Yasuhiro; Kashiwagi, Shinichiro; Takada, Koji; Goto, Wataru; Asano, Yuka; Morisaki, Tamami; Noda, Satoru; Takashima, Tsutomu; Onoda, Naoyoshi; Hirakawa, Kosei; Ohira, Masaichi

    2017-11-01

    We investigated into association of quality of life(QOL)and prognosis of breast cancer patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy(NAC). We retrospectively studied 228 patients with breast cancer who were performed NAC during a period between 2007 and 2015. TheQ OL score was measured with"The QOL Questionnaire for Cancer Patients Treated with Anticancer Drugs(QOL-ACD)". We evaluate association between QOL score with antitumor effect and prognosis. Changes in the QOL score between before and after NAC were compared as well. We divided 2 groups by QOL-ACD scoreinto high and low groups. Therapeautic effect of NAC on 75 patients were pathological complete response(pCR). QOL-ACD score was not significantly associated with pCR rate in both high and low groups(p=0.199). High group was significantly associated with higher survival rate in both of disease free survival(p=0.009, logrank)and overall survival(p=0.040, logrank). QOLACD score decreased after NAC in both of pCR and non-pCR patients. In conclusion, QOL evaluation using QOL-ACD could be an indicator of breast cancer patients' prognosis who underwent NAC.

  8. HLA-G regulatory haplotypes and implantation outcome in couples who underwent assisted reproduction treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Cynthia Hernandes; Gelmini, Georgia Fernanda; Wowk, Pryscilla Fanini; Mattar, Sibelle Botogosque; Vargas, Rafael Gustavo; Roxo, Valéria Maria Munhoz Sperandio; Schuffner, Alessandro; Bicalho, Maria da Graça<