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Sample records for underwent genetic testing

  1. Evaluation of BRCAPRO Risk Assessment Model in Patients with Ductal Carcinoma In situ Who Underwent Clinical BRCA Genetic Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayegh, Nisreen; Barrera, Angelica M Gutierrez; Muse, Kimberly I; Lin, Heather; Kuerer, Henry M; Helm, Monica; Litton, Jennifer K; Arun, Banu K

    2016-01-01

    The authors retrospectively aimed to determine which of the following three scenarios, related to DCIS entry into BRCAPRO, predicted BRCA mutation status more accurately: (1) DCIS as an invasive breast cancer (IBC) entered using the actual age of diagnosis, (2) DCIS as IBC entered with 10 years added to the actual age of diagnosis, and (3) DCIS entered as no cancer. Of the 85 DCIS patients included in the study, 19% (n = 16) tested positive for a BRCA mutation, and 81% (n = 69) tested negative. DCIS patients who tested positive for a BRCA mutation had a higher BRCAPRO risk estimation (34.61%) than patients who tested negative (11.4%) when DCIS was entered at the actual age of diagnosis. When DCIS was entered with 10 years added to the actual age at diagnosis, the BRCAPRO estimate was still higher amongst BRCA positive patients (25.4%) than BRCA negative patients (7.1%). When DCIS was entered as no cancer, the BRCAPRO estimate remained higher among BRCA positive patients (2.56%) than BRCA negative patents (1.98%). In terms of accuracy of BRCA positivity, there was no statistically significant difference between DCIS at age at diagnosis, DCIS at 10 years later than age at diagnosis, and DCIS entered as no cancer (AUC = 0.77, 0.784, 0.75, respectively: p = 0.60). Our results indicate that regardless of entry approach into BRCAPRO, there were no significant differences in predicting BRCA mutation in patients with DCIS.

  2. Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risk factor for the development of celiac disease, genetic predisposition. Without this factor, it is impossible that the ... with antibody testing in the future. When the genetic predisposition for celiac disease was detected (on Chromosome 6) ...

  3. Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on to their children Screening embryos for disease Testing for genetic diseases in adults before they cause ... provide information about the pros and cons of testing. NIH: National Human Genome Research Institute

  4. Prenatal Genetic Screening Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FAQs Prenatal Genetic Screening Tests Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy Book Prenatal Genetic Screening Tests Patient Education FAQs Prenatal Genetic Screening Tests Patient Education Pamphlets - ...

  5. Prenatal Genetic Testing Chart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Prenatal Genetic Testing Chart (Infographic) Home For Patients Search FAQs Prenatal Genetic Testing Chart (Infographic) PFSI010 ››› Weeks 1–4 ...

  6. What Is Genetic Ancestry Testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What is genetic ancestry testing? What is genetic ancestry testing? Genetic ancestry testing, or genetic genealogy, is ... with other groups. For more information about genetic ancestry testing: The University of Utah provides video tutorials ...

  7. Genetic Testing for ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... In Your Community Advocate Get Involved Donate Familial Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (FALS) and Genetic Testing By Deborah Hartzfeld, MS, CGC, Certified Genetic Counselor Familial ALS Most of the time ALS is not inherited. ...

  8. How Is Genetic Testing Done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing How is genetic testing done? How is genetic testing done? Once a person decides to proceed ... is called informed consent . For more information about genetic testing procedures: The National Society of Genetic Counselors ...

  9. Pitfalls in genetic testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djémié, Tania; Weckhuysen, Sarah; von Spiczak, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sanger sequencing, still the standard technique for genetic testing in most diagnostic laboratories and until recently widely used in research, is gradually being complemented by next-generation sequencing (NGS). No single mutation detection technique is however perfect in identifying...

  10. Physicians' knowledge of genetics and genetic tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, K J; Tambor, E S; Chase, G A; Geller, G; Faden, R R; Holtzman, N A

    1993-08-01

    To assess primary care physicians' and psychiatrists' knowledge of genetics and genetic tests and the factors associated with differences in these physicians' knowledge. Questionnaires were mailed in 1991 to 1,795 primary care physicians (family physicians, internists, pediatricians, obstetrician-gynecologists) and psychiatrists who had graduated from medical school between 1950 and 1985 (67.6% of the sample had graduated after 1970) and who were members of professional societies. The questions elicited demographic and practice characteristics as well as knowledge of genetics concepts and facts and awareness of the availability of genetic tests. To validate the questionnaire, 360 medical geneticists and genetic counselors received questionnaires. Statistical analysis involved arc-sine function transformation, t-tests, analyses of variance, F-tests, Tukey's HSD, and stepwise multiple regression. A total of 1,140 (64.8%) of the non-geneticist physicians responded. They correctly answered an average of 73.9%, SD, 13.9%, of the knowledge items, compared with 94.6%, SD, 4.2%, for the genetics professionals (p < .001). The most significant predictors of knowledge were recency of graduation from medical school and practicing in primary care specialties in which exposure to genetics problems is likely. Other significant predictors (from most to least important) were graduation from a U.S. medical school, willingness to adopt a new predictive test before it becomes standard practice, not using pharmaceutical companies as a source of information about new medical practices, and taking a required genetics course in medical school. The results suggest that knowledge of genetics and genetic tests is increasing among physicians, particularly among more recent graduates and physicians who are exposed to genetics problems in their practices, but deficiencies remain. Although a medical school course in genetics may improve knowledge, it is not sufficient. Greater emphasis is needed

  11. Feline genetics: clinical applications and genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Leslie A

    2010-11-01

    DNA testing for domestic cat diseases and appearance traits is a rapidly growing asset for veterinary medicine. Approximately 33 genes contain 50 mutations that cause feline health problems or alterations in the cat's appearance. A variety of commercial laboratories can now perform cat genetic diagnostics, allowing both the veterinary clinician and the private owner to obtain DNA test results. DNA is easily obtained from a cat via a buccal swab with a standard cotton bud or cytological brush, allowing DNA samples to be easily sent to any laboratory in the world. The DNA test results identify carriers of the traits, predict the incidence of traits from breeding programs, and influence medical prognoses and treatments. An overall goal of identifying these genetic mutations is the correction of the defect via gene therapies and designer drug therapies. Thus, genetic testing is an effective preventative medicine and a potential ultimate cure. However, genetic diagnostic tests may still be novel for many veterinary practitioners and their application in the clinical setting needs to have the same scrutiny as any other diagnostic procedure. This article will review the genetic tests for the domestic cat, potential sources of error for genetic testing, and the pros and cons of DNA results in veterinary medicine. Highlighted are genetic tests specific to the individual cat, which are a part of the cat's internal genome. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Regulation of Genetic Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links for Patient Care Education All About the Human Genome Project Fact Sheets Genetic Education Resources for Teachers Genomic Careers National DNA Day Online Education Kit Online Genetics Education ... Subjects Research Informed Consent for Genomics Research Intellectual ...

  13. Genetic Testing in Pediatric Ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ishwar Chander; Paliwal, Preeti; Singh, Kanika

    2018-03-01

    The authors review the utility of genetic testing in ophthalmic disorders - precise diagnosis, accurate prognosis, genetic counseling, prenatal diagnosis, and entry into gene-specific therapeutic trials. The prerequisites for a successful outcome of a genetic test are an accurate clinical diagnosis, a careful family history that guides which genes to study, and genetic counseling (both pre-test and post-test). The common eye disorders for which genetic testing is commonly requested are briefly discussed - anophthalmia, microphthalmia, coloboma, anterior segment dysgenesis, corneal dystrophies, cataracts, optic atrophy, congenital glaucoma, congenital amaurosis, retinitis pigmentosa, color blindness, juvenile retinoshisis, retinoblastoma etc. A protocol for genetic testing is presented. If specific mutations in a gene are common, they should form the first tier test, as the mutations in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy. If mutations in one gene are likely, sequencing of that gene should be carried out, e.g. GALT gene in galactosemia, RS1 gene in retinoshisis. Disorders with genetic heterogeneity require multi-gene panel tests, and if these show no abnormality, then deletion / duplication or microarray studies are recommended, followed in sequence by clinical exome (5000 to 6000 genes), full exome (about 20,000 genes or whole genome studies (includes all introns). It is fortunate that most genetic tests in ophthalmology are available in India, including gene panel and whole exome/genome sequencing tests.

  14. Genetic Testing (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... many more genetic cures will be found. The Human Genome Project, which was completed in 2003, identified and mapped out all of the genes (about 25,000) carried in our human chromosomes. The map is just the start, but ...

  15. Genetic Testing Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Expression Omnibus (GEO) Datasets Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) Profiles Genome Workbench HomoloGene Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) RefSeqGene UniGene All Genes & Expression Resources... Genetics & Medicine Bookshelf Database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP) ...

  16. Genetic testing in cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Anne-Karin; MacRae, Calum A

    2014-05-01

    The review is designed to outline the major developments in genetic testing in the cardiovascular arena in the past year or so. This is an exciting time in genetic testing as whole exome and whole genome approaches finally reach the clinic. These new approaches offer insight into disease causation in families in which this might previously have been inaccessible, and also bring a wide range of interpretative challenges. Among the most significant recent findings has been the extent of physiologic rare coding variation in the human genome. New disease genes have been identified through whole exome studies in neonatal arrhythmia, congenital heart disease and coronary artery disease that were simply inaccessible with other techniques. This has not only shed light on the challenges of genetic testing at this scale, but has also sharply defined the limits of prior gene-panel focused testing. As novel therapies targeting specific genetic subsets of disease become available, genetic testing will become a part of routine clinical care. The pace of change in sequencing technologies has begun to transform clinical medicine, and cardiovascular disease is no exception. The complexity of such studies emphasizes the importance of real-time communication between the genetics laboratory and genetically informed clinicians. New efforts in data and knowledge management will be central to the continued advancement of genetic testing.

  17. Genetics and Genetic Testing in Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, David C; Shelton, Celeste A; Brand, Randall E

    2015-10-01

    Genetic testing of germline DNA is used in patients suspected of being at risk of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) to better define the individual's risk and to determine the mechanism of risk. A high genetic risk increases the pretest probability that a biomarker of early cancer is a true positive and warrants further investigation. The highest PDAC risk is generally associated with a hereditary predisposition. However, the majority of PDAC results from complex, progressive gene-environment interactions that currently fall outside the traditional risk models. Over many years, the combination of inflammation, exposure to DNA-damaging toxins, and failed DNA repair promote the accumulation of somatic mutations in pancreatic cells; PDAC risk is further increased by already present oncogenic germline mutations. Predictive models and new technologies are needed to classify patients into more accurate and mechanistic PDAC risk categories that can be linked to improved surveillance and preventative strategies. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Prenatal Genetic Diagnostic Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are available for many inherited disorders. The main disadvantage is that diagnostic testing carries a very small ... chromosomes, arranged in order of size. Microarray: A technology that examines all of a person’s genes to ...

  19. Genetic testing in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberts, Steven W J; Uitterlinden, André G

    2009-01-01

    In the practice of internal medicine, the value of genetic testing in common (mono)genetic diseases such as familial hemochromatosis, hypercholesterolemia, Mediterranean fever, and thrombophilia is limited. The genotype insufficiently predicts the phenotype because of the powerful effects of other modifying genes, environmental influences, and lifestyle factors. Many common diseases, including diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, and cardiovascular disease, have strong genetic influences but are called complex genetic traits. The underlying genetic factors are currently investigated using new molecular tools such as genome-wide association studies, analyzing up to 500,000 markers in huge numbers of patients. Many new (often unexpected) markers have been identified, and in many instances their functional significance is unknown. Genomic profiles play a rapidly growing role in the field of pharmacogenomics. A number of recently identified pharmacogenomic biomarkers are helpful to predict drug-related toxic effects.

  20. Mantel test in population genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz-Filho, José Alexandre F; Soares, Thannya N; Lima, Jacqueline S; Dobrovolski, Ricardo; Landeiro, Victor Lemes; de Campos Telles, Mariana Pires; Rangel, Thiago F; Bini, Luis Mauricio

    2013-12-01

    The comparison of genetic divergence or genetic distances, estimated by pairwise FST and related statistics, with geographical distances by Mantel test is one of the most popular approaches to evaluate spatial processes driving population structure. There have been, however, recent criticisms and discussions on the statistical performance of the Mantel test. Simultaneously, alternative frameworks for data analyses are being proposed. Here, we review the Mantel test and its variations, including Mantel correlograms and partial correlations and regressions. For illustrative purposes, we studied spatial genetic divergence among 25 populations of Dipteryx alata ("Baru"), a tree species endemic to the Cerrado, the Brazilian savannas, based on 8 microsatellite loci. We also applied alternative methods to analyze spatial patterns in this dataset, especially a multivariate generalization of Spatial Eigenfunction Analysis based on redundancy analysis. The different approaches resulted in similar estimates of the magnitude of spatial structure in the genetic data. Furthermore, the results were expected based on previous knowledge of the ecological and evolutionary processes underlying genetic variation in this species. Our review shows that a careful application and interpretation of Mantel tests, especially Mantel correlograms, can overcome some potential statistical problems and provide a simple and useful tool for multivariate analysis of spatial patterns of genetic divergence.

  1. Impact of a genetic counseling requirement prior to genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenehjem, David D; Au, Trang; Sainski, Amy M; Bauer, Hillevi; Brown, Krystal; Lancaster, Johnathan; Stevens, Vanessa; Brixner, Diana I

    2018-03-07

    Genetic counseling by a Genetic Counselor (GC) is a requirement prior to genetic testing for cancer susceptibility genes (GC-mandate policy) for some insurers. This study evaluated the impact of this policy from the patient perspective. Surveys were sent to individuals for whom their insurer ordered genetic testing for the cancer susceptibility genes BCRA1 and BRCA2 over a 1 year time period that spanned the introduction of a GC-mandate policy. Responses were assessed by time period (before/after policy introduction) and genetic test completion. The surveys were completed by 1247/4950 (25.7%) eligible individuals. After policy introduction, there was no change in the proportion of respondents who completed genetic testing (p = 0.13) or had a mutation (p = 0.55). Overall decisional conflict (uncertainty or feeling uninformed) around genetic testing did not change after policy introduction (p = 0.16), but was significantly higher among respondents who did not complete genetic testing (p test results (p tested after policy introduction or who did not complete genetic testing (p testing. A GC-mandate policy did not improve decisional conflict or increase the number of deleterious mutations identified and low-income respondents were less likely to complete testing. On the contrary, insurance requirements and time constraints may be preventing individuals at risk from receiving appropriate testing.

  2. Attitudes towards genetic testing: analysis of contradictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jallinoja, P; Hakonen, A; Aro, A R

    1998-01-01

    and on the confidence in control of the process of genetic testing and its implications. Our analysis indicated that some of the respondents have contradictory attitudes towards genetic testing. It is proposed that contradictory attitudes towards genetic testing should be given greater significance both in scientific...

  3. GENETIC TESTING AND RELATED ETHICAL ISSUES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    GENETIC TESTING AND RELATED. ETHICAL ISSUES. WHAT IS GENETIC TESTING AND HOW DOES IT WORK? Scanning an individual's DNA is quick, ... Public health costs are already significant. An additional charge for genetic tests, counselling, follow-up clinical screening and frequent monitoring now needs to be ...

  4. What Are the Types of Genetic Tests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... screening tests during pregnancy, and diagnostic tests during pregnancy . EuroGentest provides fact sheets about predictive testing and carrier testing . The University of Pennsylvania offers an explanation of preimplantation genetic ...

  5. Confronting Science: The Dilemma of Genetic Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zallen, Doris T.

    1997-01-01

    Considers the opportunities and ethical issues involved in genetic testing. Reviews the history of genetics from the first discoveries of Gregor Mendel, through the spurious pseudo-science of eugenics, and up to the discovery of DNA by James Watson and Francis Crick. Explains how genetic tests are done. (MJP)

  6. [Quality assurance in human genetic testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhrmann-Spangenberg, Manfred

    2015-02-01

    Advances in technical developments of genetic diagnostics for more than 50 years, as well as the fact that human genetic testing is usually performed only once in a lifetime, with additional impact for blood relatives, are determining the extraordinary importance of quality assurance in human genetic testing. Abidance of laws, directives, and guidelines plays a major role. This article aims to present the major laws, directives, and guidelines with respect to quality assurance of human genetic testing, paying careful attention to internal and external quality assurance. The information on quality assurance of human genetic testing was obtained through a web-based search of the web pages that are referred to in this article. Further information was retrieved from publications in the German Society of Human Genetics and through a PubMed-search using term quality + assurance + genetic + diagnostics. The most important laws, directives, and guidelines for quality assurance of human genetic testing are the gene diagnostics law (GenDG), the directive of the Federal Medical Council for quality control of clinical laboratory analysis (RiliBÄK), and the S2K guideline for human genetic diagnostics and counselling. In addition, voluntary accreditation under DIN EN ISO 15189:2013 offers a most recommended contribution towards quality assurance of human genetic testing. Legal restraints on quality assurance of human genetic testing as mentioned in § 5 GenDG are fulfilled once RiliBÄK requirements are followed.

  7. Impact of subsidies on cancer genetic testing uptake in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shao-Tzu; Yuen, Jeanette; Zhou, Ke; Binte Ishak, Nur Diana; Chen, Yanni; Met-Domestici, Marie; Chan, Sock Hoai; Tan, Yee Pin; Allen, John Carson; Lim, Soon Thye; Soo, Khee Chee; Ngeow, Joanne

    2017-04-01

    Previous reports cite high costs of clinical cancer genetic testing as main barriers to patient's willingness to test. We report findings of a pilot study that evaluates how different subsidy schemes impact genetic testing uptake and total cost of cancer management. We included all patients who attended the Cancer Genetics Service at the National Cancer Centre Singapore (January 2014-May 2016). Two subsidy schemes, the blanket scheme (100% subsidy to all eligible patients), and the varied scheme (patients received 50%-100% subsidy dependent on financial status) were compared. We estimated total spending on cancer management from government's perspective using a decision model. 445 patients were included. Contrasting against the blanket scheme, the varied scheme observed a higher attendance of patients (34 vs 8 patients per month), of which a higher proportion underwent genetic testing (5% vs 38%), while lowering subsidy spending per person (S$1098 vs S$1161). The varied scheme may potentially save cost by reducing unnecessary cancer surveillance when first-degree relatives uptake rate is above 36%. Provision of subsidy leads to a considerable increase in genetic testing uptake rate. From the government's perspective, subsidising genetic testing may potentially reduce total costs on cancer management. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Testing for Genetically Modified Foods Using PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ann; Sajan, Samin

    2005-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a Nobel Prize-winning technique that amplifies a specific segment of DNA and is commonly used to test for the presence of genetic modifications. Students use PCR to test corn meal and corn-muffin mixes for the presence of a promoter commonly used in genetically modified foods, the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S…

  9. Personalized Genetic Testing and Norovirus Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Prystajecky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The availability of direct-to-consumer personalized genetic testing has enabled the public to access and interpret their own genetic information. Various genetic traits can be determined including resistance to norovirus through a nonsense mutation (G428A in the FUT2 gene. Although this trait is believed to confer resistance to the most dominant norovirus genotype (GII.4, the spectrum of resistance to other norovirus strains is unknown. The present report describes a cluster of symptomatic norovirus GI.6 infection in a family identified to have norovirus resistance through personalized genetic testing.

  10. Genetic testing for Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaid, Kimberly A

    2017-01-01

    In 1983, Huntington disease (HD) became the first disease to be mapped to a previously unknown location on chromosome 4. This discovery meant that we could now identify whether some individuals at risk for HD would develop HD in the future using a method called linkage testing. Testing was first offered through research protocols designed to assess whether testing could be done safely in this population. Testing guidelines were soon developed by the Huntington's Disease Society of America and the International Huntington Association in collaboration with the World Federation of Neurology. The gene for HD was found in 1993, allowing for direct gene testing for the mutant HTT allele. This chapter will discuss the development of guidelines and recent revisions to the guidelines, prenatal testing, and testing in three complicated situations: (1) the testing of minors; (2) anonymous testing; and (3) testing individuals at 25% risk. Studies examining the outcomes of predictive testing will also be discussed. Outcome studies have shown that testing can be done safely in the context of testing protocols that include neurologic examinations, pretest counseling, psychiatric/psychologic assessment, results in person, and available follow-up support. It appears that anxiety and depression prior to testing are better predictors of psychologic status after testing than the test result itself. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Public Perceptions of Genetic Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Ha, Dung

    2014-01-01

    There are many risks and concerns accompanied with the benefits of big data in genomics science. In a recent poll conducted by the Huntington Post and YouGov organization on the DNA breakthroughs, the majority of Americans (38%) is excited about the main scientific breakthroughs on human, plant and animal DNA (YouGov, 2014). However, many of them are concerned about the privacy and ethics of genetic research. 34% of the surveyors strongly disapproved of scientists using DNA and cloning techno...

  12. Genetic testing for inheritable cardiac channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szepesváry, Eszter; Kaski, Juan Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Cardiac channelopathies are linked to an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmia and sudden death. This article reviews the clinical characteristics and genetic basis of common cardiac ion-channel diseases, highlights some genotype-phenotype correlations, and summarizes genetic testing for inheritable cardiac channelopathies.

  13. Predictive value of preoperative tests in estimating difficult intubation in patients who underwent direct laryngoscopy in ear, nose, and throat surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Karakus

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Predictive value of preoperative tests in estimating difficult intubation may differ in the laryngeal pathologies. Patients who had undergone direct laryngoscopy (DL were reviewed, and predictive value of preoperative tests in estimating difficult intubation was investigated. METHODS: Preoperative, and intraoperative anesthesia record forms, and computerized system of the hospital were screened. RESULTS: A total of 2611 patients were assessed. In 7.4% of the patients, difficult intubations were detected. Difficult intubations were encountered in some of the patients with Mallampati scoring (MS system Class 4 (50%, Cormack-Lehane classification (CLS Grade 4 (95.7%, previous knowledge of difficult airway (86.2%, restricted neck movements (cervical ROM (75.8%, short thyromental distance (TMD (81.6%, vocal cord mass (49.5% as indicated in parentheses (p < 0.0001. MS had a low sensitivity, while restricted cervical ROM, presence of a vocal cord mass, short thyromental distance, and MS each had a relatively higher positive predictive value. Incidence of difficult intubations increased 6.159 and 1.736-fold with each level of increase in CLS grade and MS class, respectively. When all tests were considered in combination difficult intubation could be classified accurately in 96.3% of the cases. CONCLUSION: Test results predicting difficult intubations in cases with DL had observedly overlapped with the results provided in the literature for the patient populations in general. Differences in some test results when compared with those of the general population might stem from the concomitant underlying laryngeal pathological conditions in patient populations with difficult intubation.

  14. Genetic Testing for Wolfram Syndrome Mutations in a Sample of 71 Patients with Hereditary Optic Neuropathy and Negative Genetic Test Results for OPA1/OPA3/LHON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez-Ruiz, Alberto; Galindo-Ferreiro, Alicia; Schatz, Patrik

    2018-04-01

    In this study, the authors present a sample of 71 patients with hereditary optic neuropathy and negative genetic test results for OPA1/OPA3/LHON. All of these patients later underwent genetic testing to rule out WFS. As a result, 53 patients (74.7%) were negative and 18 patients (25.3%) were positive for some type of mutation or variation in the WFS gene. The authors believe that this study is interesting because it shows that a sizeable percentage (25.3%) of patients with hereditary optic 25 neuropathy and negative genetic test results for OPA1/OPA3/LHON had WFS mutations or variants.

  15. Presymptomatic ALS genetic counseling and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislaw, Christine; Reyes, Eliana; Hussain, Sumaira; Cooley, Anne; Fernandez, Maria Catalina; Dauphin, Danielle D.; Michon, Sara-Claude; Andersen, Peter M.; Wuu, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Remarkable advances in our understanding of the genetic contributions to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) have sparked discussion and debate about whether clinical genetic testing should routinely be offered to patients with ALS. A related, but distinct, question is whether presymptomatic genetic testing should be offered to family members who may be at risk for developing ALS. Existing guidelines for presymptomatic counseling and testing are mostly based on small number of individuals, clinical judgment, and experience from other neurodegenerative disorders. Over the course of the last 8 years, we have provided testing and 317 genetic counseling sessions (including predecision, pretest, posttest, and ad hoc counseling) to 161 first-degree family members participating in the Pre-Symptomatic Familial ALS Study (Pre-fALS), as well as testing and 75 posttest counseling sessions to 63 individuals with familial ALS. Based on this experience, and the real-world challenges we have had to overcome in the process, we recommend an updated set of guidelines for providing presymptomatic genetic counseling and testing to people at high genetic risk for developing ALS. These recommendations are especially timely and relevant given the growing interest in studying presymptomatic ALS. PMID:27194384

  16. Genetic testing for autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Sarah C; Msall, Michael E

    2011-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have unique developmental and behavioral phenotypes, and they have specific challenges with communication, social skills, and repetitive behaviors. At this time, no single etiology for ASD has been identified. However, evidence from family studies and linkage analyses suggests that genetic factors play a pivotal role in the etiology of ASD. However, ASD appear to be influenced by complex genetic and environmental factors, and evidence suggests that this is not a single gene disorder. In particular, ASD has a complex behavioral phenotype, and this variation reflects complex genotypes under the influence of external factors. With these considerations in mind, it is important to recognize that genetic testing is a vital component of the diagnostic evaluation of children with ASD. For example, children with ASD who have definitive etiologies may be able to access more specific resources, they may be spared long, emotionally and financially exhausting diagnostic journeys, and associated medical conditions and comorbidities can be managed proactively. Most importantly, children with disabilities of unknown origin should have an ongoing evaluation of potential etiologies for their symptoms (Crocker, 1987). Our purpose is to describe current trends in genetic testing for ASD, potential genetic etiologies of ASD, known genetic disorders associated with ASD, and recommendations for genetic testing in ASD. We will also emphasize the importance of access to informed health professionals, especially in the contexts of stigma and community supports. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Family Secrets: The Bioethics of Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, Dina G.; DuPre, Michael J.; Holt, Susan; Chen, Shaw-Ree; Wischnowski, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses "Family Secrets," a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum module that focuses on the bioethical implications of genetic testing. In high school biology classrooms throughout New York State, students are using "Family Secrets" to learn about DNA testing; Huntington's disease (HD); and the ethical, legal,…

  18. Genetic Testing in Pediatric Left Ventricular Noncompaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Erin M; Hinton, Robert B; Czosek, Richard; Lorts, Angela; Parrott, Ashley; Shikany, Amy R; Ittenbach, Richard F; Ware, Stephanie M

    2017-12-01

    Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) can occur in isolation or can co-occur with a cardiomyopathy phenotype or cardiovascular malformation. The yield of cardiomyopathy gene panel testing in infants, children, and adolescents with a diagnosis of LVNC is unknown. By characterizing a pediatric population with LVNC, we sought to determine the yield of cardiomyopathy gene panel testing, distinguish the yield of testing for LVNC with or without co-occurring cardiac findings, and define additional factors influencing genetic testing yield. One hundred twenty-eight individuals diagnosed with LVNC at ≤21 years of age were identified, including 59% with idiopathic pathogenesis, 32% with familial disease, and 9% with a syndromic or metabolic diagnosis. Overall, 75 individuals had either cardiomyopathy gene panel (n=65) or known variant testing (n=10). The yield of cardiomyopathy gene panel testing was 9%. The severity of LVNC by imaging criteria was not associated with positive genetic testing, co-occurring cardiac features, pathogenesis, family history, or myocardial dysfunction. Individuals with isolated LVNC were significantly less likely to have a positive genetic testing result compared with those with LVNC and co-occurring cardiomyopathy (0% versus 12%, respectively; P testing should be considered in individuals with cardiomyopathy co-occurring with LVNC. These data do not suggest an indication for cardiomyopathy gene panel testing in individuals with isolated LVNC in the absence of a family history of cardiomyopathy. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Genetic testing and counselling for male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krausz, Csilla; Chianese, Chiara

    2014-06-01

    Genetic disorders can be identified in about 15% of cases of male infertility. With the widespread application of assisted reproductive technology, infertile patients are now given the possibility of having their biological children; however, a genetic risk exists for assisted reproductive technology-born offspring, implying the necessity for future parents to be appropriately informed about potential consequences. In this review, we provide current recommendations on clinical genetic testing and genetic counselling. New insights are presented concerning Klinefelter syndrome, X and Y chromosome-linked deletions, monogenic diseases and pharmacogenetics. As for Klinefelter patients, novel preventive measures to preserve fertility have been proposed although they are not yet applicable in the routine setting. Y-chromosome deletions have both diagnostic and prognostic values and their testing is advised to be performed according to the new European Academy of Andrology/European Molecular Genetics Quality Network guidelines. Among monogenic diseases, major advances have been obtained in the identification of novel genes of hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. Pharmacogenetic approaches of hormonal treatment in infertile men with normal values of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) are promising and based on FSHR and FSHB polymorphisms. X chromosome-linked deletions are relevant for impaired spermatogenesis. In about 40% of male infertility, the cause is unknown and novel genetic factors are expected to be discovered in the near future.

  20. Knowledge of Genetics and Attitudes toward Genetic Testing among College Students in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olwi, Duaa; Merdad, Leena; Ramadan, Eman

    2016-01-01

    Genetic testing has been gradually permeating the practice of medicine. Health-care providers may be confronted with new genetic approaches that require genetically informed decisions which will be influenced by patients' knowledge of genetics and their attitudes toward genetic testing. This study assesses the knowledge of genetics and attitudes toward genetic testing among college students. A cross-sectional study was conducted using a multistage stratified sample of 920 senior college students enrolled at King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia. Information regarding knowledge of genetics, attitudes toward genetic testing, and sociodemographic data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire. In general, students had a good knowledge of genetics but lacked some fundamentals of genetics. The majority of students showed positive attitudes toward genetic testing, but some students showed negative attitudes toward certain aspects of genetic testing such as resorting to abortion in the case of an untreatable major genetic defect in an unborn fetus. The main significant predictors of knowledge were faculty, gender, academic year, and some prior awareness of 'genetic testing'. The main significant predictors of attitudes were gender, academic year, grade point average, and some prior awareness of 'genetic testing'. The knowledge of genetics among college students was higher than has been reported in other studies, and the attitudes toward genetic testing were fairly positive. Genetics educational programs that target youths may improve knowledge of genetics and create a public perception that further supports genetic testing. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Recommendations for reporting results of diagnostic genetic testing (biochemical, cytogenetic and molecular genetic)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claustres, Mireille; Kozich, Viktor; Dequeker, Els; Fowler, Brain; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y.; Miller, Konstantin; Oosterwijk, Cor; Peterlin, Borut; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny; Zimmermann, Uwe; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Hastings, Ros J.; Barton, David E.

    Genetic test results can have considerable importance for patients, their parents and more remote family members. Clinical therapy and surveillance, reproductive decisions and genetic diagnostics in family members, including prenatal diagnosis, are based on these results. The genetic test report

  2. Genetic testing by cancer site: endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilarski, Robert; Nagy, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Numerous hereditary syndromes, caused by mutations in multiple tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes, can cause tumors in organs of the endocrine system. The primary syndromes (and genes) addressed here include multiple endocrine neoplasia types 1 and 2 (MEN1 and RET genes), Cowden syndrome (PTEN), hereditary pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma syndromes (multiple genes), and von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL). Clinical genetic testing is available for each of these syndromes and is generally directed to individuals with endocrine or other tumors and additional features suggestive of a hereditary syndrome. However, for some endocrine tumors, the proportion because of heredity is so high that genetic testing may be appropriate for all affected individuals. Management for hereditary cases typically involves aggressive screening and/or surgical protocols, starting at young ages to minimize morbidity and mortality. Endocrine tumors can be less commonly seen in a number of other hereditary syndromes (eg, neurofibromatosis), which are not reviewed in this section.

  3. Genetic counseling and testing for gynecological cancers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of cancer prevention.[1] However, genetic testing raises a lot of ethical issues as it is only ethical and useful if combined with counseling and implementation of risk .... Type of diet. Yes. 496 (52.6). No. 447 (47.4). Exposure to radiation. Yes. 636 (67.4). No. 307 (32.6). Superstitious beliefs. Yes. 109 (11.6). No. 834 (88.4).

  4. Genes and Genetic Testing in Hereditary Ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Sandford

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ataxia is a neurological cerebellar disorder characterized by loss of coordination during muscle movements affecting walking, vision, and speech. Genetic ataxias are very heterogeneous, with causative variants reported in over 50 genes, which can be inherited in classical dominant, recessive, X-linked, or mitochondrial fashion. A common mechanism of dominant ataxias is repeat expansions, where increasing lengths of repeated DNA sequences result in non-functional proteins that accumulate in the body causing disease. Greater understanding of all ataxia genes has helped identify several different pathways, such as DNA repair, ubiquitination, and ion transport, which can be used to help further identify new genes and potential treatments. Testing for the most common mutations in these genes is now clinically routine to help with prognosis and treatment decisions, but next generation sequencing will revolutionize how genetic testing will be done. Despite the large number of known ataxia causing genes, however, many individuals with ataxia are unable to obtain a genetic diagnosis, suggesting that more genes need to be discovered. Utilization of next generation sequencing technologies, expression studies, and increased knowledge of ataxia pathways will aid in the identification of new ataxia genes.

  5. Precision Cardiovascular Medicine: State of Genetic Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudicessi, John R; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Ackerman, Michael J

    2017-04-01

    In the 15 years following the release of the first complete human genome sequences, our understanding of rare and common genetic variation as determinants of cardiovascular disease susceptibility, prognosis, and therapeutic response has grown exponentially. As such, the use of genomics to enhance the care of patients with cardiovascular diseases has garnered increased attention from clinicians, researchers, and regulatory agencies eager to realize the promise of precision genomic medicine. However, owing to a large burden of "complex" common diseases, emphasis on evidence-based practice, and a degree of unfamiliarity/discomfort with the language of genomic medicine, the development and implementation of genomics-guided approaches designed to further individualize the clinical management of a variety of cardiovascular disorders remains a challenge. In this review, we detail a practical approach to genetic testing initiation and interpretation as well as review the current state of cardiovascular genetic and pharmacogenomic testing in the context of relevant society and regulatory agency recommendations/guidelines. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Adolescents, Graduated Autonomy, and Genetic Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Fox

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomy takes many shapes. The concept of “graduated autonomy” is conceived as comprising several unique features: (1 it is incremental, (2 it is proportional, and (3 it is related to the telos of the life stage during which it occurs. This paper focuses on graduated autonomy in the context of genetic testing during adolescence. Questions can be raised about other life stages as well, and some of these questions will be addressed by discussing a possible fourth characteristic of graduated autonomy, that is, its elasticity. Further scholarship and analysis is needed to refine the concept of graduated autonomy and examine its applications.

  7. Patenting and licensing in genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aymé, S; Matthijs, G; Soini, S

    2008-04-01

    Patents for inventions can be beneficial for society, if they drive innovation and promote progress. In most areas, the patenting system works satisfactorily. However, it must be recognized that in some instances it can also be problematic; this is the case in the field of genetics, and particularly in the area of genetic testing. As patents should serve their original purpose (promoting innovation through a fair reward system for the inventors), the European Society of Human Genetics (ESHG) suggests ways to improve the mechanisms that already form part of the patents system as a whole. In brief, the ESHG recommends limiting the breadth of the claims in genetic patents and, more practically, to reduce the number of patents by limiting the patentable subject matter, thereby improving the quality of the patents that will eventually be granted. There is also a suggestion to redefine the concept of utility in patent law, by taking account of downstream clinical experience. The ESHG sees no harm in the patenting of novel technical tools for genetic testing (eg PCR or chip technologies), as they can promote investment and still allow for invention around them. Many disputes between supporters of the patenting system and the public revolve around ethical issues. The European Patent Office should consider the benefit of having an ethics committee to consider issues of major interest, such as patents applied to genes. The problem of licensing should also be addressed. Practically, this means supporting the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development guidelines, which prescribe that licenses should be non-exclusive and easily obtainable, both in practical and in financial terms. To promote this, the practical exploration of alternative models for licensing, like patent pools and clearinghouses, is a prerequisite. To better track developments in this field, the establishment of a voluntary reporting system, whereby geneticists could report on any issues related to

  8. Genetic Testing and Its Implications: Human Genetics Researchers Grapple with Ethical Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabino, Isaac

    2003-01-01

    Contributes systematic data on the attitudes of scientific experts who engage in human genetics research about the pros, cons, and ethical implications of genetic testing. Finds that they are highly supportive of voluntary testing and the right to know one's genetic heritage. Calls for greater genetic literacy. (Contains 87 references.) (Author/NB)

  9. Impact of Clinical Genetics Attendance at a Gynecologic Oncology Tumor Board on Referrals for Genetic Counseling and BRCA Mutation Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Paul A; Nichols, Cassandra B; Schofield, Lyn; Van Der Werf, Steven; Pachter, Nicholas

    2016-06-01

    The objectives of this work were to determine the proportion of eligible patients with ovarian cancer discussed at a gynecologic oncology tumor board who were referred for counseling and BRCA mutation testing; to compare referral rates before genetics attendance at the tumor board to referral rates after genetics attendance; and to ascertain the proportions of women with germline BRCA mutations. Eligible cases were identified from the minutes of the weekly Western Australian gynecologic oncology tumor board from July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2015.Patients with ovarian cancer who met eligibility criteria for genetics referral were identified and checked against the records of the genetic services database to ascertain whether a referral was received. Outcomes including attendance for counseling and results of mutation testing were analyzed. Two hundred sixty-one patients were eligible for referral during the 24-month study period. One hundred six patients (40.6%) were referred for counseling and germline mutation testing. Of the eligible patients, 26.7% were referred in the 12 months before genetics attendance at the tumor board compared to 51.7% of the eligible patients in the 12 months after genetics attendance (P ≤ 0.0001). Ninety-seven patients were offered BRCA mutation testing, and 73 underwent testing with 65 results reported to date. Twenty-two patients (33.8 %) tested positive for a germline BRCA mutation. Patients with ovarian cancer had a high rate of BRCA mutations. Attendance of a genetics service at a tumor board was associated with an improved rate of referral of patients for genetic counseling and BRCA mutation testing.

  10. Genetic counseling and the ethical issues around direct to consumer genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Alice K; Ho, Anita

    2012-06-01

    Over the last several years, direct to consumer(DTC) genetic testing has received increasing attention in the public, healthcare and academic realms. DTC genetic testing companies face considerable criticism and scepticism,particularly from the medical and genetic counseling community. This raises the question of what specific aspects of DTC genetic testing provoke concerns, and conversely,promises, for genetic counselors. This paper addresses this question by exploring DTC genetic testing through an ethic allens. By considering the fundamental ethical approaches influencing genetic counseling (the ethic of care and principle-based ethics) we highlight the specific ethical concerns raised by DTC genetic testing companies. Ultimately,when considering the ethics of DTC testing in a genetic counseling context, we should think of it as a balancing act. We need careful and detailed consideration of the risks and troubling aspects of such testing, as well as the potentially beneficial direct and indirect impacts of the increased availability of DTC genetic testing. As a result it is essential that genetic counselors stay informed and involved in the ongoing debate about DTC genetic testing and DTC companies. Doing so will ensure that the ethical theories and principles fundamental to the profession of genetic counseling are promoted not just in traditional counseling sessions,but also on a broader level. Ultimately this will help ensure that the public enjoys the benefits of an increasingly genetic based healthcare system.

  11. Counseling Customers: Emerging Roles for Genetic Counselors in the Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing Market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harris, A.; Kelly, S.; Wyatt, S.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals now have access to an increasing number of internet resources offering personal genomics services. As the direct-to-consumer genetic testing (DTC GT) industry expands, critics have called for pre- and post-test genetic counseling to be included with the product. Several genetic testing

  12. [Issues on business of genetic testing in near future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Fumio

    2009-06-01

    Since 1990's, a business condition that company sells genetic testing services directly to consumers without through medical facility, so called "direct-to-consumers (DTC) genetic testing", has risen. They provide genetic testing for obesity, disease susceptibility or paternity, etc. There are serious problems in this kind of business. Most of the providers do not make sales with face-to-face selling, and do through internet instead. They do not provide genetic counseling by certified genetic counselor or clinical geneticist. Most DTC genetic testing services for disease susceptibility or predispositions including obesity, lack scientific validity, clinical validity and clinical utility. And also including paternity genetic testing, they all have risks of ethical legal and social issues (ELSI) in genetic discrimination and/or eugenics. The specific problem in Japan is that the healthcare section of the government still has not paid attention and not taken seriously the requirement to deploy safety net.

  13. Genetics educational needs in China: physicians' experience and knowledge of genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Xu, Tengda; Yashar, Beverly M

    2015-09-01

    The aims of this study were to explore the relationship between physicians' knowledge and utilization of genetic testing and to explore genetics educational needs in China. An anonymous survey about experience, attitudes, and knowledge of genetic testing was conducted among physicians affiliated with Peking Union Medical College Hospital during their annual health evaluation. A personal genetics knowledge score was developed and predictors of personal genetics knowledge score were evaluated. Sixty-four physicians (33% male) completed the survey. Fifty-eight percent of them had used genetic testing in their clinical practice. Using a 4-point scale, mean knowledge scores of six common genetic testing techniques ranged from 1.7 ± 0.9 to 2.4 ± 1.0, and the average personal genetics knowledge score was 2.1 ± 0.8. In regression analysis, significant predictors of higher personal genetics knowledge score were ordering of genetic testing, utilization of pedigrees, higher medical degree, and recent genetics training (P education. This study demonstrated a sizable gap between Chinese physicians' knowledge and utilization of genetic testing. Participants had high self-perceived genetics educational needs. Development of genetics educational platforms is both warranted and desired in China.Genet Med 17 9, 757-760.

  14. Diagnostic, carrier and prenatal genetic testing for fragile X ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) and FMR-1-related primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) – at the Division of Human Genetics,. Johannesburg, for diagnostic, carrier and prenatal genetic testing. Methods. The records of 2 690 patients with ID and suspected FXS (ID/?FXS) who had genetic testing for FMR-1 between 1992 and ...

  15. Counseling customers: emerging roles for genetic counselors in the direct-to-consumer genetic testing market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Anna; Kelly, Susan E; Wyatt, Sally

    2013-04-01

    Individuals now have access to an increasing number of internet resources offering personal genomics services. As the direct-to-consumer genetic testing (DTC GT) industry expands, critics have called for pre- and post-test genetic counseling to be included with the product. Several genetic testing companies offer genetic counseling. There has been no examination to date of this service provision, whether it meets critics' concerns and implications it may have for the genetic counseling profession. Considering the increasing relevance of genetics in healthcare, the complexity of genetic information provided by DTC GT, the mediating role of the internet in counseling, and potential conflicts of interest, this is a topic which deserves further attention. In this paper we offer a discourse analysis of ways in which genetic counseling is represented on DTC GT websites, blogs and other online material. This analysis identified four types of genetic counseling represented on the websites: the integrated counseling product; discretionary counseling; independent counseling; and product advice. Genetic counselors are represented as having the following roles: genetics educator; mediator; lifestyle advisor; risk interpreter; and entrepreneur. We conclude that genetic counseling as represented on DTC GT websites demonstrates shifting professional roles and forms of expertise in genetic counseling. Genetic counselors are also playing an important part in how the genetic testing market is taking shape. Our analysis offers important and timely insights into recent developments in the genetic counseling profession, which have relevance for practitioners, researchers and policy makers concerned with the evolving field of personal genomics.

  16. Prenatal genetic carrier testing using triple disease screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, C M; Schechter, C; Robinowitz, J; Fulop, G; Burgert, T; Levy, B; Zinberg, R; Desnick, R J

    1997-10-15

    Rapid progress in gene discovery has dramatically increased diagnostic capabilities for carrier screening and prenatal testing for genetic diseases. However, simultaneous prenatal carrier screening for prevalent genetic disease has not been evaluated, and patient acceptance and attitudes toward this testing strategy remain undefined. To evaluate an educational, counseling, and carrier testing program for 3 genetic disorders: Tay-Sachs disease (TSD), type 1 Gaucher disease (GD), and cystic fibrosis (CF) that differ in detectability, severity, and availability of therapy. Potential participants received education and genetic counseling, gave informed consent, chose screening tests, and completed pre-education and posteducation questionnaires that assessed knowledge, attitudes toward genetic testing, and disease testing preferences. Medical genetics referral center. Volunteer sample of 2824 Ashkenazi Jewish individuals enrolled as couples who were referred for TSD testing. Genetic counseling, education, and if chosen, genetic testing for any or all 3 disorders. Acceptance of screening for each of the 3 disorders. Secondary outcomes include attitudes toward genetic testing and reproductive considerations. Of the 2824 individuals tested for TSD, 97% and 95% also chose testing for CF and GD, respectively. The frequency of detected carriers was 1:21 for TSD, 1 :25 for CF, and 1:18 for GD. Twenty-one carriercoupleswere identified, counseled, and all postconception couples opted for prenatal diagnosis. Pre-education and posteducation questionnaires revealed that patients initially knew little about the diseases, but acquired disease information and increased knowledge of genetic concepts. Education and genetic counseling increased understanding and retention of genetic concepts and disease-related information, and minimized test-related anxiety. Although individuals sought screening for all 3 diseases, reproductive attitudes and decisions varied directly with disease

  17. Genetic Testing in the Workplace: A Caste System for Workers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Sheldon W.

    1999-01-01

    "Authorized" genetic testing may be obtained from employees with coercion or threat. Unless protections are put in place, employers and health insurers will use genetic screening to hire and fire. (JOW)

  18. Genetic testing and counselling in inherited eye disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen; Jensen, Hanne; Timshel, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Advances in genetics have made genetic testing in patients with inherited eye disease increasingly accessible, and the initiation of clinical intervention trials makes it increasingly clinically relevant. Based on a multidisciplinary collaboration between ophthalmologists and clinical geneticists...

  19. Reliability of genetic bottleneck tests for detecting recent population declines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peery, M. Zachariah; Kirby, Rebecca; Reid, Brendan N.; Stoelting, Ricka; Doucet-Beer, Elena; Robinson, Stacie; Vasquez-Carrillo, Catalina; Pauli, Jonathan N.; Palsboll, Per J.

    The identification of population bottlenecks is critical in conservation because populations that have experienced significant reductions in abundance are subject to a variety of genetic and demographic processes that can hasten extinction. Genetic bottleneck tests constitute an appealing and

  20. Mainstreaming cancer genetics: A model integrating germline BRCA testing into routine ovarian cancer clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentwell, Maira; Dow, Eryn; Antill, Yoland; Wrede, C David; McNally, Orla; Higgs, Emily; Hamilton, Anne; Ananda, Sumitra; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Scott, Clare L

    2017-04-01

    Owing to the rapid increase in clinical need, we aimed to implement and review the performance of a mainstreaming model of germline BRCA1/2 genetic testing in eligible women with high grade non-mucinous epithelial ovarian cancer via a Genetic Counselor embedded in the gynecology oncology clinic. The model implemented involved a specialized referral form, weekly genetics-lead multidisciplinary review of referrals, and pre- and post-test genetic counseling provided by an embedded genetic counselor during chemotherapy chair time. Performance and outcomes were retrospectively audited over the following two consecutive one year periods, including survey data on medical specialist comfort with mainstreaming and the model. Sixty-four women underwent mainstreamed BRCA1/2 testing over the two year post-implementation period with a rate of detection of BRCA1/2 pathogenic variants of 17%. The referral rate for eligible women significantly increased to over 90% (pgenetic testing results was less than five months, with >90% of patients receiving results during first line chemotherapy. Genetic counseling time decreased from 120 to 54min. Cancer specialists were comfortable with the model. The mainstreaming model proved effective, increasing uptake of genetic testing in eligible patients to over 90%; it was efficient for patients, genetic counselors and cancer specialists and acceptable to cancer specialists. It facilitated co-location of genetic and oncology service delivery but separation of clinical responsibility for genetic testing to a specialist genetics service, ensuring accurate and robust patient-centred care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Deaf Adults' Reasons for Genetic Testing Depend on Cultural Affiliation: Results from a Prospective, Longitudinal Genetic Counseling and Testing Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreault, Patrick; Baldwin, Erin E.; Fox, Michelle; Dutton, Loriel; Tullis, LeeElle; Linden, Joyce; Kobayashi, Yoko; Zhou, Jin; Sinsheimer, Janet S.; Sininger, Yvonne; Grody, Wayne W.; Palmer, Christina G. S.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between cultural affiliation and deaf adults' motivations for genetic testing for deafness in the first prospective, longitudinal study to examine the impact of genetic counseling and genetic testing on deaf adults and the deaf community. Participants (n = 256), classified as affiliating with hearing, Deaf,…

  2. Risk Assessment, Genetic Counseling, and Genetic Testing for BRCA-Related Cancer in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Risk Assessment, Genetic Counseling, and Genetic Testing for BRCA-related Cancer in Women The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final recommendation ...

  3. Application of Next Generation Sequencing on Genetic Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jian

    developed a targeted sequencing based preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) method for monogenic diseases and tested it in a family suffering from β-thalassaemia major undergoing PGD. Moreover, we developed a method which can achieve detection of point mutation and copy number variation simultaneously......The discovery of genetic factors behind increasing number of human diseases and the growth of education of genetic knowledge to the public make demands for genetic testing increase rapidly. However, traditional genetic testing methods cannot meet all kinds of the requirements. Next generation...... sequencing (NGS) featured with high throughput and low cost of sequencing capacity develops fast, especially with the improvement of its read length, read accuracy and the immergence of small-sized machines, making it a powerful genetic testing tool. In this study, we applied NGS to develop novel genetic...

  4. [Analysis of 14 individuals who requested predictive genetic testing for hereditary neuromuscular diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kunihiro; Tamai, Mariko; Kubota, Takeo; Kawame, Hiroshi; Amano, Naoji; Ikeda, Shu-ichi; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu

    2002-02-01

    Predictive genetic testing for hereditary neuromuscular diseases is a delicate issue for individuals at risk and their families, as well as for medical staff because these diseases are often late-onset and intractable. Therefore careful pre- and post-test genetic counseling and psychosocial support should be provided along with such genetic testing. The Division of Clinical and Molecular Genetics was established at our hospital in May 1996 to provide skilled professional genetic counseling. Since its establishment, 14 individuals have visited our clinic to request predictive genetic testing for hereditary neuromuscular diseases (4 for myotonic dystrophy, 6 for spinocerebellar ataxia, 3 for Huntington's disease, and 1 for Alzheimer's disease). The main reasons for considering testing were to remove uncertainty about the genetic status and to plan for the future. Nine of 14 individuals requested testing for making decisions about a forthcoming marriage or pregnancy (family planning). Other reasons raised by the individuals included career or financial planning, planning for their own health care, and knowing the risk for their children. At the first genetic counseling session, all of the individuals expressed hopes of not being a gene carrier and of escaping from fear of disease, and seemed not to be mentally well prepared for an increased-risk result. To date, 7 of the 14 individuals have received genetic testing and only one, who underwent predictive genetic testing for spinocerebellar ataxia, was given an increased-risk result. The seven individuals including the one with an increased-risk result, have coped well with their new knowledge about their genetic status after the testing results were disclosed. None of them has expressed regret. In pre-test genetic counseling sessions, we consider it quite important not only to determine the psychological status of the individual, but also to make the individual try to anticipate the changes in his/her life upon

  5. Commercial Genetic Testing and Its Governance in Chinese Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Suli; Sleeboom-Faulkner, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an empirical account of commercial genetic testing in China. Commercial predictive genetic testing has emerged and is developing rapidly in China, but there is no strict and effective governance. This raises a number of serious social and ethical issues as a consequence of the enormous potential market for such tests. The paper…

  6. Recent advances in genetic testing and counseling for inherited arrhythmias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Mizusawa, MD

    2016-10-01

    This article discusses indications for genetic testing of patients with inherited arrhythmias. Further, it describes the benefits and challenges that we face in the era of next generation sequencing. Finally, it briefly discusses genetic counseling, in which a multidisciplinary approach is required due to the increased complexity of the genetic information related to inherited arrhythmias.

  7. [Discussion on the standard of clinical genetic testing report and the consensus of gene testing industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui; Shen, Yiping; Gu, Weihong; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yiming; Qi, Ming; Shen, Jun; Qiu, Zhengqing; Yu, Shihui; Zhou, Zaiwei; Chen, Baixue; Chen, Lei; Chen, Yundi; Cui, Huanhuan; Du, Juan; Gao, Yong; Guo, Yiran; Hu, Chanjuan; Hu, Liang; Huang, Yi; Li, Peipei; Li, Xiaorong; Li, Xiurong; Liu, Yaping; Lu, Jie; Ma, Duan; Ma, Yongyi; Peng, Mei; Song, Fang; Sun, Hongye; Wang, Liang; Wang, Dawei; Wang, Jingmin; Wang, Ling; Wang, Zhengyuan; Wang, Zhinong; Wu, Jihong; Wu, Jing; Wu, Jian; Xu, Yimin; Yao, Hong; Yang, Dongsheng; Yang, Xu; Yang, Yanling; Zhang, Ying; Zhou, Yulin; Zhu, Baosheng; Zeng, Sicong; Peng, Zhiyu; Huang, Shangzhi

    2018-02-10

    The widespread application of next generation sequencing (NGS) in clinical settings has enabled testing, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of genetic diseases. However, many issues have arisen in the meanwhile. One of the most pressing issues is the lack of standards for reporting genetic test results across different service providers. The First Forum on Standards and Specifications for Clinical Genetic Testing was held to address the issue in Shenzhen, China, on October 28, 2017. Participants, including geneticists, clinicians, and representatives of genetic testing service providers, discussed problems of clinical genetic testing services across in China and shared opinions on principles, challenges, and standards for reporting clinical genetic test results. Here we summarize expert opinions presented at the seminar and report the consensus, which will serve as a basis for the development of standards and guidelines for reporting of clinical genetic testing results, in order to promote the standardization and regulation of genetic testing services in China.

  8. Impact of presymptomatic genetic testing for hereditary ataxia and neuromuscular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Corrine O; Lipe, Hillary P; Bird, Thomas D

    2004-06-01

    With the exception of Huntington disease, the psychological and psychosocial impact of DNA testing for neurogenetic disorders has not been well studied. To evaluate the psychosocial impact of genetic testing for autosomal dominant forms of hereditary ataxia and neuromuscular disorders. Patients Fifty subjects at risk for autosomal dominant forms of spinocerebellar ataxia (n = 11), muscular dystrophy (n = 28), and hereditary neuropathy (n = 12). A prospective, descriptive, observational study in a university setting of individuals who underwent genetic counseling and DNA testing. Participants completed 3 questionnaires before testing and at regular intervals after testing. The questionnaire set included the Revised Impact of Event Scale, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, demographic information, and an assessment of attitudes and feelings about genetic testing. Thirty-nine subjects (78%) completed 6 months to 5 years of posttest follow-up. Common reasons for pursuing genetic testing were to provide an explanation for symptoms, emotional relief, and information for future planning. Thirty-four (68%) had positive and 16 (32%) had negative genetic results. In those with a positive result, 26 (76%) had nonspecific signs or symptoms of the relevant disorder. Forty-two participants (84%) felt genetic testing was beneficial. Groups with positive and negative test results coped well with results. However, 13 subjects (10 with positive and 3 with negative results) reported elevated anxiety levels, and 3 (1 with positive and 2 with negative results) expressed feelings of depression during the follow-up period. The test result was not predictive of anxiety or depression. Most individuals find neurogenetic testing to be beneficial, regardless of the result. Anxiety or depression may persist in some persons with positive or negative test results. Testing can have a demonstrable impact on family planning and interpersonal relationships. Further studies are needed to

  9. Genetic testing in asymptomatic minors: background considerations towards ESHG Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borry, Pascal; Evers-Kiebooms, Gerry; Cornel, Martina C

    2009-01-01

    Although various guidelines and position papers have discussed, in the past, the ethical aspects of genetic testing in asymptomatic minors, the European Society of Human Genetics had not earlier endorsed any set of guidelines exclusively focused on this issue. This paper has served as a background...... document in preparation of the development of the policy recommendations of the Public and Professional Committee of the European Society of Human Genetics. This background paper first discusses some general considerations with regard to the provision of genetic tests to minors. It discusses the concept...... of best interests, participation of minors in health-care decisions, parents' responsibilities to share genetic information, the role of clinical genetics and the health-care system in communication within the family. Second, it discusses, respectively, the presymptomatic and predictive genetic testing...

  10. Genetic testing in the workplace: the employer's coin toss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Samantha

    2002-09-05

    A toss of the coin by the modern-day employer reveals two options regarding genetic testing in the workplace. The employer may choose to take advantage of increasingly precise, available, and affordable genetic testing in order to ascertain the genetic characteristics--and deficiencies--of its employees. This outcome exposes the employer to a vast array of potential litigation and liability relating to the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Fourth Amendment, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, and state legislation designed to protect genetic privacy. Alternatively, the employer may neglect to indulge in this trend of genetic testing and may face liability for employer negligence, violations of federal legislation such as OSHA regulations, and increased costs associated with insuring the health of genetically endangered employees. In the rapidly developing universe of genetic intelligence, the employer is faced with a staggering dilemma.

  11. Genetic Testing for Hereditary Cancer Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... complaints about false or misleading health claims in advertisements. The American Society of Human Genetics, a membership ... at the National Institutes of Health FOLLOW US Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Google+ LinkedIn GovDelivery RSS CONTACT ...

  12. Ancestry Testing and the Practice of Genetic Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Brianne E; Rashkin, Misha D

    2017-02-01

    Ancestry testing is a home DNA test with many dimensions; in some cases, the implications and outcomes of testing cross over into the health sphere. Common reasons for seeking ancestry testing include determining an estimate of customer's ethnic background, identifying genetic relatives, and securing a raw DNA data file that can be used for other purposes. As the ancestry test marketplace continues to grow, and third-party vendors empower the general public to analyze their own genetic material, the role of the genetic counselor is likely to evolve dramatically. Roles of the genetic counselor may include assisting clients with the interpretation of and adaptation to these results, as well as advising the companies involved in this sector on the ethical, legal, and social issues associated with testing. This paper reviews the history, fundamentals, intended uses, and unintended consequences of ancestry genetic testing. It also discusses the types of information in an ancestry testing result, situations that might involve a clinical genetic counselor, and the benefits, limitations, and functions that ancestry genetic testing can play in a clinical genetics setting.

  13. Examining the Psychosocial Impact of Genetic Testing for Cardiomyopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Julia; Holland, David T; Duong, Jimmy; Ahimaz, Priyanka; Chung, Wendy K

    2017-12-15

    Inherited cardiomyopathies, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), are the most common monogenic cause of cardiac disease and can rarely lead to sudden cardiac death (SCD). They are characterized by incomplete and age-dependent penetrance and are usually initially symptomatic in adulthood yet can present in childhood as well. Over 20 genes have been identified to cause HCM, and more than 40 genes are known to cause DCM. Genetic testing for these genes has been integrated into medical care; however, the psychological impact of genetic testing and the impact of the uncertainty that comes with receiving these results have not been well studied. This study surveyed 90 adult probands and relatives with a personal or family history of cardiomyopathy from a single hospital-based cardiac genetic program to determine the psychosocial impact of genetic testing for cardiomyopathies. Standardized psychological instruments including an adapted Multidimensional Impact of Cancer Risk Assessment (aMICRA), Impact of Event Scale (IES), and Satisfaction with Decision (SWD) scales were utilized. Patients with positive genetic test results had higher scores for intrusive thoughts, avoidance, and distress when compared to those with negative genetic test results and were also more likely to make or plan to make life changes because of the results of their genetic testing. Satisfaction with the decision to undergo genetic testing was similar regardless of genetic test results. The results of this study provide insight into the patient experience of genetic testing for cardiomyopathies and how these experiences are associated with genetic test results and cardiac history.

  14. Perceived genetic knowledge, attitudes towards genetic testing, and the relationship between these among patients with a chronic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morren, M.; Rijken, M.; Baanders, A.N.; Bensing, J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Genetics increasingly permeate everyday medicine. When patients want to make informed decisions about genetic testing, they require genetic knowledge. This study examined the genetic knowledge and attitudes of patients with chronic diseases, and the relationship between both. In addition,

  15. Perceived genetic knowledge, attitudes toward genetic testing, and the relationship between these among patients with a chronic disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morren, M.; Rijken, M.; Baanders, A.N.; Bensing, J.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Genetics increasingly permeate everyday medicine. When patients want to make informed decisions about genetic testing, they require genetic knowledge. This study examined the genetic knowledge and attitudes of patients with chronic diseases, and the relationship between both. In addition,

  16. Advances in Genetic Testing for Hereditary Cancer Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ellen; Mohammed, Shehla

    2016-01-01

    The ability to identify genetic mutations causing an increased risk of cancer represents the first widespread example of personalised medicine, in which genetic information is used to inform patients of their cancer risks and direct an appropriate strategy to minimise those risks. Increasingly, an understanding of the genetic basis of many cancers also facilitates selection of the most effective therapeutic options. The technology underlying genetic testing has been revolutionised in the years since the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2001. This has advanced knowledge of the genetic factors underlying familial cancer risk, and has also improved genetic testing capacity allowing a larger number of patients to be tested for a constitutional cancer predisposition. To use these tests safely and effectively, they must be assessed for their ability to provide accurate and useful results, and be requested and interpreted by health professionals with an understanding of their strengths and limitations. Genetic testing is increasing in its scope and ambition with each year that passes, requiring a greater proportion of the healthcare workforce to acquire a working knowledge of genetics and genetic testing to manage their patients safely and sensitively.

  17. Implementation and utilization of genetic testing in personalized medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abul-Husn NS

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Noura S Abul-Husn,1,* Aniwaa Owusu Obeng,2,3,* Saskia C Sanderson,1 Omri Gottesman,2 Stuart A Scott11Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, 2The Charles Bronfman Institute for Personalized Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 3Department of Pharmacy, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY, USA*These authors contributed equally to this manuscriptAbstract: Clinical genetic testing began over 30 years ago with the availability of mutation detection for sickle cell disease diagnosis. Since then, the field has dramatically transformed to include gene sequencing, high-throughput targeted genotyping, prenatal mutation detection, preimplantation genetic diagnosis, population-based carrier screening, and now genome-wide analyses using microarrays and next-generation sequencing. Despite these significant advances in molecular technologies and testing capabilities, clinical genetics laboratories historically have been centered on mutation detection for Mendelian disorders. However, the ongoing identification of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA sequence variants associated with common diseases prompted the availability of testing for personal disease risk estimation, and created commercial opportunities for direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies that assay these variants. This germline genetic risk, in conjunction with other clinical, family, and demographic variables, are the key components of the personalized medicine paradigm, which aims to apply personal genomic and other relevant data into a patient's clinical assessment to more precisely guide medical management. However, genetic testing for disease risk estimation is an ongoing topic of debate, largely due to inconsistencies in the results, concerns over clinical validity and utility, and the variable mode of delivery when returning genetic results to patients in the absence of traditional counseling. A related class of genetic testing with analogous issues of clinical utility and

  18. Channelopathies, genetic testing and risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Arthur A M; Amin, Ahmad

    2017-06-15

    The cardiac channelopathies are a group of diseases with (disease-) specific electrocardiographic (ECG) characteristics and a disease-specific risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD). This group includes the Long QT Syndromes (LQTS), Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia (CPVT), Brugada Syndrome (BrS), Short QT Syndromes (SQTS), and Early Repolarization Syndrome (ERS). In the past 2 decades the genetic basis for these disease entities has largely been unraveled and that, together with the identification of the genetic basis of the cardiomyopathies, has paved the way for the complete new field of Cardiogenetics. By virtue of the identification of the genetic underpinning of a given disease, presymptomatic carriers of the genetic aberrancy can be identified and timely treatment can be installed. In addition, it has become clear that the pathophysiological substrate of some diseases previously considered to be one disease is not identical, and this has led to gene-specific treatment in some and complete new treatment, based on the newly developed insight, in others. Finally, the genetic information proved to be important in the prediction of risk on lethal ventricular arrhythmias of affected individuals and that is the topic of this brief review. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison between ultrasound and genetic testing for the early diagnosis of polycystic kidney disease in Persian and Exotic Shorthair cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonazzi, Mattia; Volta, Antonella; Gnudi, Giacomo; Cozzi, Maria C; Strillacci, Maria G; Polli, Michele; Longeri, Maria; Manfredi, Sabrina; Bertoni, Giorgio

    2009-06-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (AD-PKD) is common in Persians and Persians-related breeds. The aims of this study were to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of early ultrasound examination and to compare ultrasound and genetic testing for early diagnosis. Sixty-three Persians and seven Exotic Shorthairs were considered. All underwent ultrasonographic and genetic testing (polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR/RFLP) assay) between 2.5 and 3.5 months of age (10-14 weeks). With ultrasound, 41.4% showed renal cysts, while 37.1% were PKD positive by genetic testing and DNA sequencing. Six cats with at least one renal cyst were negative by genetic testing, while only one cat negative at ultrasound resulted positive at genetic test. DNA sequencing of three polycystic cats, negative by genetic test, revealed they were heterozygous for the mutation. Agreement was described by Cohen's kappa that resulted 0.85, considering genetic test and DNA sequencing. Sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound were 96.2% and 91%, respectively. Sensitivity was higher and specificity lower than reported previously. The higher sensitivity could be due to improved technical capabilities of ultrasound machines and transducers. Other causes of PKD could explain the lower specificity. In conclusion, ultrasound resulted in a reliable diagnostic method for feline AD-PKD1 at early age and it should always be used with genetic testing, in order to reach a complete screening programme and eventually to identify other genetic mutations.

  20. WHO HAS TO UNDERGO CANCER GENETIC TESTING? A PERSPECTIVE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Rinaldi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Genetic testing is a medical tool employed to screen changes in genes linked to cancer and other genetic diseases. Genetic tests are available for breast, ovarian, colon, thyroid, and some other cancers and they represent the main tool for early identification of the “risk” subjects. The choice to undergo genetic testing by a healthy or affected cancer patient with family history of the cancer has to be the fruit of a careful and prudent assessment of the advantages and disadvantages discussed during oncogenetic counselling. The latter, in turn, in the case of a patient's positive and informed choice, must constantly affiliate the genetic testing, in order to preserve the prediction and information role of the test as much as possible.

  1. LEGAL ASPECTS OF DIRECT-TO-CONSUMER GENETIC TESTS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariela Yaneva – Deliverska

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetic testing is a type of medical test that identifies changes in chromosomes, genes, or proteins. Most of the time, testing is used to find changes that are associated with inherited disorders. The results of a genetic test can confirm or rule out a suspected genetic condition or help determine a person’s chance of developing or passing on a genetic disorder. The main difference between direct-to-consumer genetic testing and the standard genetic testing is the way informational support is provided in internet offers of testing. Counselling may be offered as an additional special service at extra costs and at the customer's request. It may also be that a recommendation or at least an offer is given for the customer to contact a doctor or health practitioner from the company via phone for counselling.In a liberal society the fundamental individual rights can be considered to include access to medical treatment and diagnostics that may be helpful for improving one's health condition or that can help an individual make decisions regarding life style and health. At the European level, there are no binding legal regulations that specifically apply for genetic testing. In some European counties, national laws, require a responsible medical person to be involved before a genetic test is provided. The Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine was adopted by the Committee of Ministers on 19 November 1996, while an Additional Protocol to the Convention, concerning Genetic Testing for Health Purposes, was adopted by the Committee of Ministers on 7 May 2008.Direct-to-consumer genetic testing is closely watched by the community of medical genetics and counsellors, and the EU funded Eurogentest Network of Excellence.In 2010, the European Society of Human Genetics has releaseda statement on direct-to-consumer gene testing for health-related purposes. The European Society of Human Genetics is concerned about the way in which commercial companies are

  2. Controlling futures? Online Genetic Testing and Neurodegenerative Disease : Comment on "Personal Genomic Testing, Genetic Inheritance, and Uncertainty".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Narelle; Gardner, John

    2017-12-01

    Online personalized genetic testing services offer accessible and convenient options for satisfying personal curiosity about health and obtaining answers about one's genetic provenance. They are especially attractive to healthy people who wish to learn about their future risk of disease, as Paul Mason's (2017) case study of "Jordan" illustrates. In this response, we consider how online genetic testing services are used by people diagnosed with a common neurodegenerative disease, Parkinson's disease, to gain a sense of certainty regarding the future.

  3. Acceptance of genetic testing in a general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aro, A R; Hakonen, A; Hietala, M

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze effects of age, education and gender on acceptance of genetic testing. Subjects, n = 1967 aged 15-69, were a stratified random sample of the Finnish population. One thousand, one hundred and sixty nine subjects, 530 men and 639 women, returned the questionnaire....... The majority of the respondents approved of the availability of genetic testing. Young, aged 15-24, were more favourable towards testing and more willing to undergo suggested tests, but they were also more worried than others about the misuse of test results. Men aged 45-69 with only basic education were more...... in favour of mandatory genetic testing than other respondents. Respondents with university education were more critical towards genetic testing and expressed their worry about eugenics more often than other education groups. In conclusion, there are age, education and gender related differences...

  4. Genetic testing and sports medicine ethics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McNamee, M.J.; Muller, A.J.; van Hilvoorde, I.M.; Holm, S.

    2009-01-01

    Sports medicine ethics is neither a well established branch of sports medicine nor of medical ethics. It is therefore important to raise to more general awareness some of the significant ethical implications of sports medicine practices. The field of genetics in sports is likewise in its infancy and

  5. Testing quantum dynamics in genetic information processing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    genetic information is organized in a base-4 language, and not in the base-2 language of our classical digital com- puters (Patel 2000b). My study of the molecular structure of DNA showed that .... In reality, the quantum algorithm is unlikely to work with 100% efficiency. Disturbances from the environ- ment, i.e. decoherence ...

  6. Uptake of Predictive Genetic Testing and Cardiac Evaluation for Children at Risk for an Inherited Arrhythmia or Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Susan; Atallah, Joseph; Clegg, Robin; Giuffre, Michael; Huculak, Cathleen; Dzwiniel, Tara; Parboosingh, Jillian; Taylor, Sherryl; Somerville, Martin

    2018-02-01

    Predictive genetic testing in minors should be considered when clinical intervention is available. Children who carry a pathogenic variant for an inherited arrhythmia or cardiomyopathy require regular cardiac screening and may be prescribed medication and/or be told to modify their physical activity. Medical genetics and pediatric cardiology charts were reviewed to identify factors associated with uptake of genetic testing and cardiac evaluation for children at risk for long QT syndrome, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. The data collected included genetic diagnosis, clinical symptoms in the carrier parent, number of children under 18 years of age, age of children, family history of sudden cardiac arrest/death, uptake of cardiac evaluation and if evaluated, phenotype for each child. We identified 97 at risk children from 58 families found to carry a pathogenic variant for one of these conditions. Sixty six percent of the families pursued genetic testing and 73% underwent cardiac screening when it was recommended. Declining predictive genetic testing was significantly associated with genetic specialist recommendation (p testing (p = 0.007). This study provides a greater understanding of factors associated with uptake of genetic testing and cardiac evaluation in children at risk of an inherited arrhythmia or cardiomyopathy. It also identifies a need to educate families about the importance of cardiac evaluation even in the absence of genetic testing.

  7. Genetic testing in the epilepsies—Report of the ILAE Genetics Commission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottman, Ruth; Hirose, Shinichi; Jain, Satish; Lerche, Holger; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; Noebels, Jeffrey L.; Serratosa, José; Zara, Federico; Scheffer, Ingrid E.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY In this report, the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Genetics Commission discusses essential issues to be considered with regard to clinical genetic testing in the epilepsies. Genetic research on the epilepsies has led to the identification of more than 20 genes with a major effect on susceptibility to idiopathic epilepsies. The most important potential clinical application of these discoveries is genetic testing: the use of genetic information, either to clarify the diagnosis in people already known or suspected to have epilepsy (diagnostic testing), or to predict onset of epilepsy in people at risk because of a family history (predictive testing). Although genetic testing has many potential benefits, it also has potential harms, and assessment of these potential benefits and harms in particular situations is complex. Moreover, many treating clinicians are unfamiliar with the types of tests available, how to access them, how to decide whether they should be offered, and what measures should be used to maximize benefit and minimize harm to their patients. Because the field is moving rapidly, with new information emerging practically every day, we present a framework for considering the clinical utility of genetic testing that can be applied to many different syndromes and clinical contexts. Given the current state of knowledge, genetic testing has high0020clinical utility in few clinical contexts, but in some of these it carries implications for daily clinical practice. PMID:20100225

  8. Understanding why negative genetic test results sometimes fail to reassure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michie, Susan; Smith, Jonathan A; Senior, Victoria; Marteau, Theresa M

    2003-06-15

    A proportion of those receiving negative results following predictive genetic testing desire future bowel screening. This is despite a negative result meaning a general population risk of 1:7500 and despite bowel screening being experienced as aversive and clinically unnecessary. This study aimed to investigate perceptions of risk, illness, and tests amongst those receiving negative results following predictive genetic testing. Interviews with nine people receiving negative genetic test results for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) were analyzed using the qualitative method, interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). Those not reassured by negative genetic test results perceived a continuing risk to themselves and to their children. Two sets of perceptions emerged that might explain this: (1). perceptions of the genetic basis of the condition (FAP). Although the condition was perceived to be genetic, genetic status was seen as transient, so a result today could not predict the future. The condition was also seen as caused by factors other than genes, so information about only one risk factor could not be reassuring. (2). Perceptions of the genetic test. There was a lack of conviction in the ability of the genetic test, based on a blood sample, to predict a disease located in the bowel. These results suggest that some individuals receiving negative test results are not reassured because of their representations of the cause of their condition and the nature of the tests they undergo. It may be that eliciting and, when appropriate, changing people's representations prior to testing may enable those receiving negative results to be more reassured about their residual risk. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Genetic Testing for Dilated Cardiomyopathy in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakdawala, Neal K.; Funke, Birgit H.; Baxter, Samantha; Cirino, Allison L.; Roberts, Amy E.; Judge, Daniel P.; Johnson, Nicole; Mendelsohn, Nancy J.; Morel, Chantal; Care, Melanie; Chung, Wendy K.; Jones, Carolyn; Psychogios, Apostolos; Duffy, Elizabeth; Rehm, Heidi L.; White, Emily; Seidman, J.G.; Seidman, Christine E.; Ho, Carolyn Y.

    2013-01-01

    Background Familial involvement is common in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and >40 genes have been implicated in causing disease. However, the role of genetic testing in clinical practice is not well defined. We examined the experience of clinical genetic testing in a diverse DCM population to characterize the prevalence and predictors of gene mutations. Methods and Results We studied 264 unrelated adult and pediatric DCM index patients referred to 1 reference lab for clinical genetic testing. Up to 10 genes were analyzed (MYH7, TNNT2, TNNI3, TPM1, MYBPC3, ACTC, LMNA, PLN, TAZ, and LDB3), and 70% of patients were tested for all genes. The mean age was 26.6 ± 21.3 years, and 52% had a family history of DCM. Rigorous criteria were used to classify DNA variants as clinically relevant (mutations), variants of unknown clinical significance (VUS), or presumed benign. Mutations were found in 17.4% of patients, commonly involving MYH7, LMNA, or TNNT2 (78%). An additional 10.6% of patients had VUS. Genetic testing was rarely positive in older patients without a family history of DCM. Conversely in pediatric patients, family history did not increase the sensitivity of genetic testing. Conclusions Using rigorous criteria for classifying DNA variants, mutations were identified in 17% of a diverse group of DCM index patients referred for clinical genetic testing. The low sensitivity of genetic testing in DCM reflects limitations in both current methodology and knowledge of DCM-associated genes. However, if mutations are identified, genetic testing can help guide family management. PMID:22464770

  10. [Study on tests of genetics experiments in universities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, He; Hao, Zhang; Lili, Zhang

    2015-03-01

    Based on the present situation and the development of experiment tests in universities, we introduced a reform in tests of genetics experiments. According to the teaching goals and course contents of genetics experiment, the tests of genetics experiments contain four aspects on the performance of students: the adherence to the experimental procedures, the depth of participation in experiment, the quality of experiment report, and the mastery of experiment principles and skills, which account for 10 %, 20 %, 40 % and 30 % in the total scores, respectively. All four aspects were graded quantitatively. This evaluation system has been tested in our experiment teaching. The results suggest that it has an effect on the promotion of teaching in genetics experiments.

  11. Preimplantation genetic testing in the 21st century: uncharted territory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezina, Paul R

    2013-02-10

    The past hundred years have given birth to arguably the most profound changes in society, medicine, and technology the world has ever witnessed. Genetics is one such field that has enjoyed a meteoric rise during this time. Progressing from Mendelian genetics to the discovery of DNA to the ability to sequence the human genome, perhaps no other discipline holds more promise to affect future change than genetics. Technology currently exists to evaluate some of the genetic information held by developing embryos in the context of an in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle. This information is then used to determine which embryos are selected for uterine transfer. Many societies have enacted legislation to protect against possible abuses utilizing this technology. However, it is incumbent upon society to continue ensuring that preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD)-and genetic testing in general-is applied in a way that utilizes its potential in a responsible manner to improve health care.

  12. Preimplantation Genetic Testing in the 21st Century: Uncharted Territory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul R. Brezina MD, MBA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The past hundred years have given birth to arguably the most profound changes in society, medicine, and technology the world has ever witnessed. Genetics is one such field that has enjoyed a meteoric rise during this time. Progressing from Mendelian genetics to the discovery of DNA to the ability to sequence the human genome, perhaps no other discipline holds more promise to affect future change than genetics. Technology currently exists to evaluate some of the genetic information held by developing embryos in the context of an in vitro fertilization (IVF cycle. This information is then used to determine which embryos are selected for uterine transfer. Many societies have enacted legislation to protect against possible abuses utilizing this technology. However, it is incumbent upon society to continue ensuring that preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD–-and genetic testing in general–-is applied in a way that utilizes its potential in a responsible manner to improve health care.

  13. Health and genetic ancestry testing: time to bridge the gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Andrew; Bolnick, Deborah A; Tutton, Richard

    2017-01-09

    It is becoming increasingly difficult to keep information about genetic ancestry separate from information about health, and consumers of genetic ancestry tests are becoming more aware of the potential health risks associated with particular ancestral lineages. Because some of the proposed associations have received little attention from oversight agencies and professional genetic associations, scientific developments are currently outpacing governance regimes for consumer genetic testing. We highlight the recent and unremarked upon emergence of biomedical studies linking markers of genetic ancestry to disease risks, and show that this body of scientific research is becoming part of public discourse connecting ancestry and health. For instance, data on genome-wide ancestry informative markers are being used to assess health risks, and we document over 100 biomedical research articles that propose associations between mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosome markers of genetic ancestry and a wide variety of disease risks. Taking as an example an association between coronary heart disease and British men belonging to Y chromosome haplogroup I, we show how this science was translated into mainstream and online media, and how it circulates among consumers of genetic tests for ancestry. We find wide variations in how the science is interpreted, which suggests the potential for confusion or misunderstanding. We recommend that stakeholders involved in creating and using estimates of genetic ancestry reconsider their policies for communicating with each other and with the public about the health implications of ancestry information.

  14. Genetic Testing for Rare Cancer: The Wider Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Chris; Pichert, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Identification of a potential genetic susceptibility to cancer and confirmation of a pathogenic gene mutation raises a number of challenging issues for the patient with cancer, their relatives and the health professionals caring for them. The specific risks and management issues associated with rare cancer types have been addressed in the earlier chapters. This chapter considers the wider issues involved in genetic counselling and genetic testing for a genetic susceptibility to cancer for patients, families and health professionals. The first part of the chapter will present the issues raised by the current practice in genetic counselling and genetic testing for cancer susceptibility. The second part of the chapter will address some of the issues raised by the advances in genetic testing technology and the future opportunities provided by personalised medicine and targeted cancer therapy. Facilitating these developments requires closer integration of genomics into mainstream cancer care, challenging the existing paradigm of genetic medicine, adding additional layers of complexity to the risk assessment and management of cancer and presenting wider issues for patients, families, health professionals and clinical services.

  15. Correlates of genetic counseling and testing among Orthodox Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Shulamis Juni

    2011-12-01

    One hundred and thirty-six Orthodox Jews responded to questions about their family background, disability attitudes, and their participation in genetic counseling and testing. Findings showed that only birth order and the presence of a disabled family member correlated with increased chances of an individual going for genetic counseling/testing. Results are discussed in the context of the contemporary sociology of Orthodox Judaism, with a particular focus on better understanding the experience of having a disabled family member.

  16. Genetic Testing in Psychiatry: A Review of Attitudes and Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Ryan E; Appelbaum, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    The advent of genetic testing for psychiatric conditions raises difficult questions about when and how the tests should be used. Development of policies regarding these issues may be informed in a variety of ways by the views of key stakeholders: patients, family members, healthcare professionals, and the general public. Here we review empirical studies of attitudes towards genetic testing among these groups. Patients and family members show strong interest in diagnostic and predictive genetic testing, and to a considerable extent psychiatrists share their enthusiasm. Prenatal test utilization seems likely to depend both on parental views on abortion and the seriousness of the disorder. Parents show a surprising degree of interest in predictive testing of children, even when there are no preventive interventions available. Many persons report themselves ready to alter their lifestyles and plans for marriage and family in response to test results. Respondents also fear negative consequences, from discrimination to being unable to cope with knowledge of their “genetic fate.” Empirical studies of beliefs about genetic testing suggest tests are likely to be embraced widely, but the studies have methodologic limitations, reducing the certainty of their conclusions, and indicating a need for further research with more representative samples. PMID:22168293

  17. Testing of genetically modified organisms in foods

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ahmed, Farid E

    2004-01-01

    ... their background knowledge on the effectiveness of tests, and of course, laboratory personnel of all levels who are involved in carrying out tests. The chapters on molecular and immunological methods are authoritative and detailed in their scope and application. They are ably supported for the less-experienced reader by the basic inTeam struction provided ...

  18. Test Anxiety and a High-Stakes Standardized Reading Comprehension Test: A Behavioral Genetics Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Sarah G.; Hart, Sara A.; Little, Callie W.; Phillips, Beth M.

    2016-01-01

    Past research suggests that reading comprehension test performance does not rely solely on targeted cognitive processes such as word reading, but also on other nontarget aspects such as test anxiety. Using a genetically sensitive design, we sought to understand the genetic and environmental etiology of the association between test anxiety and…

  19. Genetic Testing for Breast Cancer: Psychological and Social Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the small minority of women for whom the test may be helpful. The psychological, emotional and social implications of genetic testing also ... decision to have preventive (prophylactic) surgery if you test positive for the ... eases psychological and emotional distress. They can be proactive and ...

  20. Views of Black nurses toward genetic research and testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell-Young, Yolanda M; Spruill, Ida J

    2013-06-01

    To describe views and beliefs that Black nurses hold regarding several conceptual areas of genetic research and testing. Data were generated using a descriptive, cross-sectional design. The sample consisted of 384 Black nurses attending the 2009 annual conference of the National Black Nurses Association in Las Vegas, Nevada. The chi-squared test was used to evaluate group differences by education level, functional area, age, and gender. One half of the Black nurses surveyed believed the potential for the discriminative misuse of genetic information against minority populations exists. However, 84% of these nurses believed the possibility of information misuse should not be used as a barrier to participation in genetic research and testing by the Black populace. Black nurses expressed concerns about the potential for discriminatory use of genetic information gleaned from research and testing. Yet, Black nurses recognize the importance of racial-ethnic minority participation in genetic research and testing. Participation in genetic research and testing by diverse populations will provide opportunities to improve the healthcare delivery system and aid the eradication of health disparities. More research is needed to clarify factors that contribute to the bifurcation of importance for participation, reluctance to participate, and what interventions might reduce reluctance. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  1. Clinical Practice: Direct-to-consumer genetic testing: To test or not to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing, laboratory-based genetic services are offered directly to the public without an independent healthcare professional being involved. The committee of the Southern African Society for Human Genetics (SASHG) appeals to the public and clinicians to be cautious when considering ...

  2. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: frequency of genetic subtypes and guidelines for genetic testing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Sinead M

    2012-07-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of diseases with approximately 45 different causative genes described. The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of different genes in a large cohort of patients with CMT and devise guidelines for genetic testing in practice.

  3. Testing quantum dynamics in genetic information processing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    . Centre for Theoretical Studies, and Supercomputer Education and Research Centre,. Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India. Abstract. Does quantum dynamics play a role in DNA replication? What type of tests would reveal that ...

  4. Next generation sequencing for preimplantation genetic testing of blastocysts aneuploidies in women of different ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Lukaszuk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Most of the current preimplantation genetic screening of aneuploidies tests are based on the low quality and low density comparative genomic hybridization arrays. The results are based on fewer than 2,700 probes. Our main outcome was the association of aneuploidy rates and the women’s age. Between August–December 2013, 198 blastocysts from women (mean age 36.3+-4.6 undergoing in vitro fertilization underwent routine trophectoderm biopsy. NGS was performed on Ion Torrent PGM (Life Technologies. The results were analyzed in five age groups ( 40. 85 blastocysts were normal according to NGS results. The results in the investigated groups were (% of normal blastocyst in each group: 40 (38.5%. Our study suggests that NGS PGD is applicable for routine preimplantation genetic testing. It allows also for easy customization of the procedure for each individual patient making personalized diagnostics a reality.

  5. Paternity Testing Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics: recommendations on genetic investigations in paternity cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, Niels; Allen, Robert W; Carracedo, Angel

    2002-01-01

    The International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG) has established a Paternity Testing Commission (PTC) with the purpose of formulating international recommendations concerning genetic investigations in paternity testing. The PTC recommends that paternity testing be performed in accordance...

  6. Genetic testing in congenital heart disease: A clinical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaix, Marie A; Andelfinger, Gregor; Khairy, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common type of birth defect. Traditionally, a polygenic model defined by the interaction of multiple genes and environmental factors was hypothesized to account for different forms of CHD. It is now understood that the contribution of genetics to CHD extends beyond a single unified paradigm. For example, monogenic models and chromosomal abnormalities have been associated with various syndromic and non-syndromic forms of CHD. In such instances, genetic investigation and testing may potentially play an important role in clinical care. A family tree with a detailed phenotypic description serves as the initial screening tool to identify potentially inherited defects and to guide further genetic investigation. The selection of a genetic test is contingent upon the particular diagnostic hypothesis generated by clinical examination. Genetic investigation in CHD may carry the potential to improve prognosis by yielding valuable information with regards to personalized medical care, confidence in the clinical diagnosis, and/or targeted patient follow-up. Moreover, genetic assessment may serve as a tool to predict recurrence risk, define the pattern of inheritance within a family, and evaluate the need for further family screening. In some circumstances, prenatal or preimplantation genetic screening could identify fetuses or embryos at high risk for CHD. Although genetics may appear to constitute a highly specialized sector of cardiology, basic knowledge regarding inheritance patterns, recurrence risks, and available screening and diagnostic tools, including their strengths and limitations, could assist the treating physician in providing sound counsel. PMID:26981213

  7. Predictive genetic testing for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia: genetic counselling considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Ashley; Williams, Kelly; Adams, Lorel; Blair, Ian; Rowe, Dominic B

    2017-11-01

    Once a gene mutation that is causal of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and/or frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is identified in a family, relatives may decide to undergo predictive genetic testing to determine whether they are at risk of developing disease. Recent advances in gene discovery have led to a pressing need to better understand the implications of predictive genetic testing. Here we review the uptake of genetic counselling, predictive and reproductive testing, and the factors that impact the decision to undergo testing, for consideration in clinical practice. The literature suggests that the factors impacting the decision to undergo testing are complex due to the nature of these diseases, absence of available preventative medical treatment and variable age of onset in mutation carriers. Gaining further insight into the decision-making process and the impact of testing is critical as we seek to develop best-practice guidelines for predictive testing for familial ALS and FTD.

  8. [Forensic hematology genetics--paternity testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzer, A; Bär, W

    1997-05-01

    In Switzerland paternity investigations are carried out using DNA analysis only since 1991. DNA patterns are inherited and only with the exception of genetically identical twins they are different in everyone and therefore unique to an individual. Hence DNA-systems are an excellent tool to resolve paternity disputes. DNA polymorphisms used for paternity diagnosis are length polymorphisms of the highly polymorphic VNTR loci [variable number of tandem repeats]. The most frequently applied systems are the DNA single locus systems. In addition to the DNA single locus systems the application of PCR (PCR = polymerase chain reaction) based DNA systems has increased particularly in difficult deficiency cases or in cases where only small evidential samples or partially degraded DNA are available. Normally four independent DNA single probes are used to produce a DNA profile from the mother, the child and the alleged father. A child inherits half the DNA patterns from its mother and the other half from its true biological father. If an alleged father doesn't possess the paternal specific DNA pattern in his DNA profile he is excluded from the paternity. In case of non-exclusion the probability for paternity is calculated according to Essen-Möller. When applying four highly polymorphic DNA single locus systems the biostatistical evaluation leads always to W-values exceeding 99.8% [= required value for positive proof of paternity]. DNA analysis is currently the best available method to achieve such effective conclusions in paternity investigations.

  9. Genetic testing for clinically suspected spinocerebellar ataxias ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahesh

    Key words: SCA, Genotyping, CAG repeats, India. Introduction. The ataxia .... 2014), we also identified one SCA 12 positive case from southern India (Table 2). Out of the patients that tested positive for FRDA, 75% (N=15) were from southern India and 25% (N=5) from northern and eastern India. FRDA has been reported to ...

  10. Pulmonary arterial hypertension: Specialists’ knowledge, practices, and attitudes of genetic counseling and genetic testing in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacher, Joseph E.; Martin, Lisa J.; Chung, Wendy K.; Loyd, James E.; Nichols, William C.

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by obstruction of pre-capillary pulmonary arteries, which leads to sustained elevation of pulmonary arterial pressure. Identifying those at risk through early interventions, such as genetic testing, may mitigate disease course. Current practice guidelines recommend genetic counseling and offering genetic testing to individuals with heritable PAH, idiopathic PAH, and their family members. However, it is unclear if PAH specialists follow these recommendations. Thus, our research objective was to determine PAH specialists’ knowledge, utilization, and perceptions about genetic counseling and genetic testing. A survey was designed and distributed to PAH specialists who primarily work in the USA to assess their knowledge, practices, and attitudes about the genetics of PAH. Participants’ responses were analyzed using parametric and non-parametric statistics and groups were compared using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. PAH specialists had low perceived and actual knowledge of the genetics of PAH, with 13.2% perceiving themselves as knowledgeable and 27% actually being knowledgeable. Although these specialists had positive or ambivalent attitudes about genetic testing and genetic counseling, they had poor utilization of these genetic services, with almost 80% of participants never or rarely ordering genetic testing or referring their patients with PAH for genetic counseling. Physicians were more knowledgeable, but had lower perceptions of the value of genetic testing and genetic counseling compared to non-physicians (P genetics of PAH as well as the benefits of genetic testing and genetic counseling for individuals who treat patients with PAH. PMID:28597770

  11. The ethical implications of genetic testing in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ann T S; Rogers, Jill Cellars

    2011-07-01

    The development of classroom experiments where students examine their own DNA is frequently described as an innovative teaching practice. Often these experiences involve students analyzing their genes for various polymorphisms associated with disease states, like an increased risk for developing cancer. Such experiments can muddy the distinction between classroom investigation and medical testing. Although the goals and issues surrounding classroom genotyping do not directly align with those of clinical testing, instructors can use the guidelines and standards established by the medical genetics community when evaluating the ethics of human genotyping. We developed a laboratory investigation and discussion which allowed undergraduate science students to explore current DNA manipulation techniques to isolate their p53 gene, followed by a dialogue probing the ethical implications of examining their sample for various polymorphisms. Students never conducted genotyping on their samples because of the ethical concerns presented in this paper, so the discussion replaced the actual genetic testing in the class. A science faculty member led the laboratory portion, while a genetic counselor facilitated the discussion of the ethical concepts underlying genetic counseling: autonomy, beneficence, confidentiality, and justice. In their final papers, students demonstrated an understanding of the practice guidelines established by the genetics community and acknowledged the ethical considerations inherent in p53 genotyping. Given the burgeoning market for personalized medicine, teaching undergraduates about the psychosocial and ethical dimensions of human genetic testing is important and timely. Moreover, incorporating a genetic counselor in the classroom discussion provided a rich and dynamic discussion of human genetic testing. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Role of genetic testing in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jae Youn; Franchi, Francesco; Rollini, Fabiana; Rivas Rios, Jose R; Kureti, Megha; Cavallari, Larisa H; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2018-02-01

    Variability in individual response profiles to antiplatelet therapy, in particular clopidogrel, is a well-established phenomenon. Genetic variations of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C19 enzyme, a key determinant in clopidogrel metabolism, have been associated with clopidogrel response profiles. Moreover, the presence of a CYP2C19 loss-of-function allele is associated with an increased risk of atherothrombotic events among clopidogrel-treated patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI), prompting studies evaluating the use of genetic tests to identify patients who may be potential candidates for alternative platelet P2Y 12 receptor inhibiting therapies (prasugrel or ticagrelor). Areas covered: The present manuscript provides an overview of genetic factors associated with response profiles to platelet P2Y 12 receptor inhibitors and their clinical implications, as well as the most recent developments and future considerations on the role of genetic testing in patients undergoing PCI. Expert commentary: The availability of more user-friendly genetic tests has contributed towards the development of many ongoing clinical trials and personalized medicine programs for patients undergoing PCI. Results of pilot investigations have shown promising results, which however need to be confirmed in larger-scale studies to support the routine use of genetic testing as a strategy to personalize antiplatelet therapy and improve clinical outcomes.

  13. A missing ancestry - Genetic Testing | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing: A Missing Ancestry Follow us A Missing Ancestry Filling in a genetic background Many adopted children ... genetic testing became available, Hale decided to have ancestry-focused genetic testing to learn more about his ...

  14. Genetic Gains Through Testing and Crossing Longleaf Pine Plus Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvin F. Bey; E. Bayne Snyder

    1978-01-01

    A progeny test of 226 superior tree selections from nine geographic sources across the South confirmed earlier results that showed the Gulf Coast source superior in survival and growth. Family variation within a region was large and provided additional genetic gain. Control-pollinated tests of elite x elite trees yielded even more gains. Progeny of the elite x elite...

  15. Prognostic Factors for Distress After Genetic Testing for Hereditary Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorwinden, Jan S.; Jaspers, Jan P C

    The psychological impact of an unfavorable genetic test result for counselees at risk for hereditary cancer seems to be limited: only 10-20 % of counselees have psychological problems after testing positive for a known familial mutation. The objective of this study was to find prognostic factors

  16. Genetic Testing Accounts of Autonomy, Responsibility and Blame

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arribas-Ayllon, M.; Sarangi, Srikant; Clarke, Angus

    as well as genetic professionals. This book explores the ways in which genetic testing generates not only probabilities of potential futures, but also enjoys new forms of social, individual and professional responsibility. Concerns about confidentiality and informed consent involving children......, the assessment of competence and maturity, the ability to engage in shared decision-making through acts of disclosure and choice, are just some of the issues that are examined in detail....

  17. Psychobehavioral Impact of Genetic Counseling and Breast Cancer Gene Testing in Healthy Women of African Descent

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Offit, Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    .... Cross- sectional and longitudinal studies examined factors influencing interest in and readiness to undergo genetic testing, whether genetic counseling increased knowledge, and the psychosocial impact of DNA testing...

  18. Genetic susceptibility testing for beryllium: worker knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Ken; Kukulka, Gary; Gorniewicz, John; Rayman, Kathleen; Sharp, Richard

    2011-07-01

    We sought to gain insight into workers' knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes on the subject of testing for genetic susceptibility to beryllium. Five focus groups were held with 30 current and former beryllium workers and nine family members. Audio recordings were transcribed and assessed by hierarchical coding using an inductive approach. Some workers were unclear about the distinction between genotoxicity and heritability. A key finding is that they perceived the benefits of a positive test result to be related to enhanced autonomous decision-making. The major concern cited by participants was potential abuse of genetic information by employers. Complete financial separation of a prospective testing entity from the employer was seen as crucial. A window of opportunity exists to create regional partnerships for translational research on genetic susceptibility testing. Such partnerships would involve labor, management, public health scientists, primary care professionals, and other stakeholders. They would be critical to identifying testing strategies that maximize worker autonomy along with the public health advantages of genetic testing. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Genetic testing and counseling for hereditary forms of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, G M; Brensinger, J D; Johnson, K A; Giardiello, F M

    1999-12-01

    The discovery of genes responsible for inherited forms of colorectal cancer have the potential to improve cancer risk assessment and counseling. Germline mutations (nonsense, frameshift) of APC are associated with familial adenomatous polyposis, an autosomal dominant syndrome, clinically characterized by young onset, hundreds of adenomatous polyps in the colon, and increased risk for extracolonic tumors. Mutations in APC are also associated with forms of attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis. Germline mutations in five mismatch repair related genes (hMSH2, hMLH1, hMSH6, hPMS1, and hPMS2) cause hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer and are associated with increased risk of somatic genetic alterations and high DNA microsatellite instability. Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is characterized by young onset colorectal cancer, proximal colon location, and increased risk of extracolonic cancers. A missense mutation in APC (I1307K) is associated with some familial colorectal cancer in Ashkenazic Jews. For persons at risk for hereditary forms of colorectal cancer, testing algorithms and gene test interpretations depend on identification of the pedigree germline gene mutation. Careful evaluation of the kindred for characteristic aggregation of tumor types among affected individuals and the availability of affected persons for testing are important issues in implementing genetic testing and follow-up management. Case reports illustrate the importance of genetic counseling as a component of cancer genetic risk assessment. The genetic counseling process includes exploration of patient risk perception, sources of anxiety related to cancer risk, patient education (specific cancer-related issues, prevention/intervention options), discussion of possible gene test options, test limitations, and consequences of various gene test outcomes.

  20. Impact of Genetic Counseling and Testing on Altruistic Motivations to Test: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Rahul; Vogelgesang, Joseph; Kelly, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of altruism in an individual’s participation in genetic counseling and testing, little research has explored the change in altruistic motivations to test over time. This study analyzed altruistic motivations to test and change in altruistic motivations after genetic counseling and testing among individuals (N=120) at elevated risk for BRCA1/2 mutations. The perceived benefits of genetic testing were assessed and utilized in a mixed-methods, repeated measures design at three time points: pre-counseling, counseling and post-genetic testing, along with transcripts of genetic counseling sessions. Qualitative analysis using an immersion/crystallization method resulted in six common perceived benefits of testing: cancer prevention, awareness, family’s survival, relief from anxiety, for science, and future planning. Perceived benefits were then coded into three categories according to Hamilton’s kin selection theory: altruistic motivation, personal motivation, and motivation for mutual benefit. At pre-counseling, those with a personal cancer history (p=0.003) and those with one or more children (p=.013), were significantly more likely to cite altruistic motivations to test. Altruistic motivations significantly increased post-counseling (p=0.01) but declined post-testing (pGenetic counseling may have increased altruistic motivations to help family and may be a prime opportunity to discuss other forms of altruism. PMID:26578231

  1. Recent advances in prenatal genetic screening and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Veyver, Ignatia B.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of new technologies has dramatically changed the current practice of prenatal screening and testing for genetic abnormalities in the fetus. Expanded carrier screening panels and non-invasive cell-free fetal DNA-based screening for aneuploidy and single-gene disorders, and more recently for subchromosomal abnormalities, have been introduced into prenatal care. More recently introduced technologies such as chromosomal microarray analysis and whole-exome sequencing can diagnose more genetic conditions on samples obtained through amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling, including many disorders that cannot be screened for non-invasively. All of these options have benefits and limitations, and genetic counseling has become increasingly complex for providers who are responsible for guiding patients in their decisions about screening and testing before and during pregnancy. PMID:27853526

  2. Impact ofin vitrochemosensitivity test-guided platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy on the surgical outcomes of patients with p-stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer that underwent complete resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akazawa, Yuki; Higashiyama, Masahiko; Nishino, Kazumi; Uchida, Jyunji; Kumagai, Toru; Inoue, Takako; Fujiwara, Ayako; Tokunaga, Toshiteru; Okami, Jiro; Imamura, Fumio; Kodama, Ken; Kobayashi, Hisayuki

    2017-09-01

    The impact of in vitro chemosensitivity test-guided platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy on the surgical outcomes of patients undergoing complete resection for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has yet to be elucidated. In the present study, the utility of adjuvant chemotherapy based on the collagen gel droplet embedded culture drug sensitivity test (CD-DST) in patients with p (pathology)-stage IIIA NSCLC was retrospectively analyzed. A series of 39 patients that had received platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy following complete resection between 2007 and 2012 were enrolled. Their surgical specimens were subjected to the CD-DST. The patients were subsequently classified into two groups on the basis of in vitro anti-cancer drug sensitivity data obtained using the CD-DST: The sensitive group (25 patients) were treated with regimens including one or two of the anti-cancer drug(s) that were indicated to be effective by the CD-DST, whereas the non-sensitive group (14 patients) were treated with chemotherapy regimens that did not include any CD-DST-selected anti-cancer drugs. There were no significant differences in the background characteristics of the two groups [including in respect of the pathological TN (tumor-lymph node) stage, tumor histology, epidermal growth factor receptor mutation status, the frequency of each chemotherapy regimen, and the number of administered cycles]. The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate of the sensitive group was 32.3%, whereas that of the non-sensitive group was 14.3% (P=0.037). In contrast, no difference in overall survival (OS) was observed (P=0.76). Multivariate analysis revealed that adjuvant chemotherapy based on the CD-DST had a significant favorable effect on the DFS (P=0.01). Therefore, the present study has demonstrated that CD-DST data obtained from surgical specimens aid the selection of effective platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy regimens for patients undergoing complete resection for p-stage IIIA

  3. Impact of Payer Constraints on Access to Genetic Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitworth, Pat; Beitsch, Peter; Arnell, Christopher; Cox, Hannah C; Brown, Krystal; Kidd, John; Lancaster, Johnathan M

    2017-01-01

    With increased demand for hereditary cancer genetic testing, some large national health-care insurance payers (LNHPs) have implemented policies to minimize inappropriate testing by mandating consultation with a geneticist or genetic counselor (GC). We hypothesized such a restriction would reduce access and appropriate testing. Test cancellation rates (ie, tests ordered that did not result in a reported test result), mutation-positive rates, and turnaround times for comprehensive BRCA1/2 testing for a study LNHP that implemented a GC-mandate policy were determined over the 12 months before and after policy implementation (excluding a 4-month transition period). Cancellation rates were evaluated based on the reason for cancellation, National Comprehensive Cancer Network testing criteria, and self-identified ancestry. A control LNHP was evaluated over the same period for comparison. The study LNHP cancellation rate increased from 13.3% to 42.1% ( P testing were considered (9.5% to 37.7%; P testing, disproportionately impacting minority populations without any evidence that inappropriate testing was decreased.

  4. Eddy current testing probe optimization using a parallel genetic algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolapchiev Ivaylo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses the developed parallel version of Michalewicz's Genocop III Genetic Algorithm (GA searching technique to optimize the coil geometry of an eddy current non-destructive testing probe (ECTP. The electromagnetic field is computed using FEMM 2D finite element code. The aim of this optimization was to determine coil dimensions and positions that improve ECTP sensitivity to physical properties of the tested devices.

  5. Do patents impede the provision of genetic tests in Australia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Dianne; Liddicoat, John

    2013-06-01

    Health policy and law reform agencies lack a sound evidence base of the impacts of patents on innovation and access to healthcare to assist them in their deliberations. This paper reports the results of a survey of managers of Australian genetic testing laboratories that asked a series of questions relating to the tests they perform, whether they pay to access patented inventions and whether they have received notifications from patent holders about patents associated with particular tests. Some diagnostics facilities are exposed to patent costs, but they are all located in the private sector. No public hospitals reported paying licence fees or royalties beyond those included in the price of commercial test kits. Some respondents reported having received enforcement notices from patent holders, but almost all related to the widely known breast cancer-associated patents. Respondents were also asked for their views on the most effective mechanisms to protect their ability to provide genetic tests now and in the future. Going to the media, paying licence fees, ignoring patent rights and relying on the government to take action were widely seen as most effective. Litigation and applications for compulsory licences were seen as some of the least effective mechanisms. These results provide an evidence base for development of health policy and law reform. What is known about the topic? The impact of patents on the delivery of genetic testing services remains unclear in Australia. What does this paper add? The survey reported in this paper suggests that, aside from well-known enforcement actions relating to the breast cancer associated patents, there is little evidence that providers of genetic testing services are being exposed to aggressive patent-enforcement practices. What are the implications for practitioners? Although patent-enforcement actions may increase in the future, a range of strategies are available to providers of testing services to protect them against

  6. Prenatal genetic testing and geneticization: mother matters for all.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippman, A

    1993-04-01

    Prenatal genetic testing represents the most widespread human application of reproductive technology, and its use is necessarily gendered. Moreover, its application both reflects and generates the process of 'geneticization' that increasingly orients contemporary western-world stories of health and disease. Taking a woman-centered approach, this paper examines some of the stories being told about testing; questions their themes of 'reassurance' and 'choice', their construction of 'risk', and their assumptions about disability; and explores the 'life-style' testing creates for (pregnant) women. Testing itself, and its power to control how we live and the children we bear, raises complex and troubling matters that require continued and fresh examination.

  7. Utility of Genetic Testing in Elite Volleyball Players with Aortic Root Dilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, Nicole; Davis, Christopher; Vargas, Lisa; Dietz, Hal; Grossfeld, Paul

    2017-07-01

    Basketball and volleyball attract individuals with a characteristic biophysical profile, mimicking features of Marfan syndrome. Consequently, identification of these abnormalities can be lifesaving. To determine how physical examination, echocardiography, and genetic screening can identify elite volleyball players with a previously undiagnosed aortopathy. We have performed cardiac screening on 90 US Volleyball National Team members and identified four individuals with dilated sinuses of Valsalva. This case series reports on three individuals who underwent a comprehensive genetics evaluation, including gene sequencing. Cardiac screening combined with genetic testing can identify previously undiagnosed tall athletes with an aortopathy, in the absence of noncardiac findings of a connective tissue disorder. Subject 1 had a revised Ghent systems (RGS) score of 2 and a normal aortopathy gene panel. Subject 2 had a RGS score of 1 and genetic testing revealed a de novo disease causing mutation in the gene encoding fibrillin-1 (FBN1). Subject 3 had an RGS score of 4.0 and had a normal aortopathy gene panel. Despite variable clinical features of Marfan syndrome, dilated sinuses of Valsalva were found in 4.9% of the athletes. A disease-causing mutation in the FBN1 gene was identified in subject 2, who had the lowest RGS but the largest aortic root measurement. Subjects 1 and 3, with the highest RGS, had a normal aortopathy gene panel. Our findings provide further evidence suggesting that a cardiac evaluation, including a screening echocardiogram, should be performed on all elite tall adult athletes independent of other physical findings. Genetic testing should be considered for athletes with dilated sinuses of Valsalva (male, >4.2 cm; female, >3.4 cm), regardless of other extracardiac findings.

  8. FDA Approval of PARP Inhibitors and the Impact on Genetic Counseling and Genetic Testing Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchtel, Kathryn M; Vogel Postula, Kristen J; Weiss, Shelly; Williams, Carmen; Pineda, Mario; Weissman, Scott M

    2018-02-01

    In December 2014, the FDA approved olaparib, a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor (PARPi) for ovarian cancer patients who have failed three or more lines of chemotherapy and have a germline BRCA1/2 mutation identified through a companion diagnostic test (BRACAnalysis CDx™ (CDx™)) offered exclusively by Myriad Genetic Laboratories. This study explored the impact of PARPi/CDx™ on genetic counselors' (GCs) counseling and testing practices. One hundred twenty three GCs responded to an online survey regarding pre- and post-FDA approval referral patterns, testing strategies/influences, and anecdotal experiences with insurance coverage of PARPi for BRCA1/2 positive patients through a non-CDx™ platform. Following PARPi approval, 40% of respondents reported an increase in overall referrals of ovarian cancer patients and 20% had an increase in post-test counseling only referrals. The majority (61.9%) of respondents reported no change in genetic testing strategy, and there was no change in factors influencing choice of testing laboratory. Nearly all (98.1%) respondents who had experience with insurance covering PARPi indicated approval with mutations identified via non-CDx™ testing. Respondents indicated an increase in referral volume following FDA approval of PARPi/CDx™, but did not report changes in testing practices. Respondents were not aware of PARPi insurance coverage denial in the absence of CDx™.

  9. Genetic testing in the European Union: does economic evaluation matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoñanzas, Fernando; Rodríguez-Ibeas, R; Hutter, M F; Lorente, R; Juárez, C; Pinillos, M

    2012-10-01

    We review the published economic evaluation studies applied to genetic technologies in the EU to know the main diseases addressed by these studies, the ways the studies were conducted and to assess the efficiency of these new technologies. The final aim of this review was to understand the possibilities of the economic evaluations performed up to date as a tool to contribute to decision making in this area. We have reviewed a set of articles found in several databases until March 2010. Literature searches were made in the following databases: PubMed; Euronheed; Centre for Reviews and Dissemination of the University of York-Health Technology Assessment, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, NHS Economic Evaluation Database; and Scopus. The algorithm was "(screening or diagnosis) and genetic and (cost or economic) and (country EU27)". We included studies if they met the following criteria: (1) a genetic technology was analysed; (2) human DNA must be tested for; (3) the analysis was a real economic evaluation or a cost study, and (4) the articles had to be related to any EU Member State. We initially found 3,559 papers on genetic testing but only 92 articles of economic analysis referred to a wide range of genetic diseases matched the inclusion criteria. The most studied diseases were as follows: cystic fibrosis (12), breast and ovarian cancer (8), hereditary hemochromatosis (6), Down's syndrome (7), colorectal cancer (5), familial hypercholesterolaemia (5), prostate cancer (4), and thrombophilia (4). Genetic tests were mostly used for screening purposes, and cost-effectiveness analysis is the most common type of economic study. The analysed gene technologies are deemed to be efficient for some specific population groups and screening algorithms according to the values of their cost-effectiveness ratios that were below the commonly accepted threshold of 30,000€. Economic evaluation of genetic technologies matters but the number of published studies is still

  10. [Advantages and disadvantages of direct-to-consumer genetic tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Camilla Worm; Gerdes, Anne-Marie Axø

    2017-03-13

    Direct-to-consumer genetic tests are sold over the internet to consumers all over the world - including Denmark. No regulation of these tests has been introduced neither in Denmark nor in Europe, even though they have been on the market since 2007. Such tests have several advantages, but indeed also a long list of potential disadvantages, which are most often ignored, and among these is insufficient training of general practitioners in performing the necessary counselling but also the risk of increased expenses to unnecessary follow-up consultations.

  11. Genetic testing facilitates prepubertal diagnosis of congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C; Lang-Muritano, M; Phan-Hug, F; Dwyer, A A; Sykiotis, G P; Cassatella, D; Acierno, J; Mohammadi, M; Pitteloud, N

    2017-08-01

    Neonatal micropenis and cryptorchidism raise the suspicion of congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH), a rare genetic disorder caused by gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency. Low plasma testosterone levels and low gonadotropins during minipuberty provide a clinical diagnostic clue, yet these tests are seldomly performed in general practice. We report a male neonate with no family history of reproductive disorders who was born with micropenis and cryptorchidism. Hormonal testing at age 2.5 months showed low testosterone (0.3 nmol/L) and undetectable gonadotropins (luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone both <0.5 U/L), suggestive of CHH. Genetic testing identified a de novo, heterozygous mutation in fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1 p.L630P). L630 resides on the ATP binding cleft of the FGFR1 tyrosine kinase domain, and L630P is predicted to cause a complete loss of receptor function. Cell-based assays confirmed that L630P abolishes FGF8 signaling activity. Identification of a loss-of-function de novo FGFR1 mutation in this patient confirms the diagnosis of CHH, allowing for a timely hormonal treatment to induce pubertal development. Therefore, genetic testing can complement clinical and hormonal assessment for a timely diagnosis of CHH in childhood. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Consumer preferences for the predictive genetic test for Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Yi; Huston, Sally A; Perri, Matthew

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess consumer preferences for predictive genetic testing for Alzheimer disease in the United States. A rating conjoint analysis was conducted using an anonymous online survey distributed by Qualtrics to a general population panel in April 2011 in the United States. The study design included three attributes: Accuracy (40%, 80%, and 100%), Treatment Availability (Cure is available/Drug for symptom relief but no cure), and Anonymity (Anonymous/Not anonymous). A total of 12 scenarios were used to elicit people's preference, assessed by an 11-point scale. The respondents also indicated their highest willingness-to-pay (WTP) for each scenario through open-ended questions. A total of 295 responses were collected over 4 days. The most important attribute for the aggregate model was Accuracy, contributing 64.73% to the preference rating. Treatment Availability and Anonymity contributed 20.72% and 14.59%, respectively, to the preference rating. The median WTP for the highest-rating scenario (Accuracy 100%, a cure is available, test result is anonymous) was $100 (mean = $276). The median WTP for the lowest-rating scenario (40% accuracy, no cure but drugs for symptom relief, not anonymous) was zero (mean = $34). The results of this study highlight attributes people find important when making the hypothetical decision to obtain an AD genetic test. These results should be of interests to policy makers, genetic test developers and health care providers.

  13. Genetically Defined Strains in Drug Development and Toxicity Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festing, Michael F W

    2016-01-01

    There is growing concern about the poor quality and lack of repeatability of many pre-clinical experiments involving laboratory animals. According to one estimate as much as $28 billion is wasted annually in the USA alone in such studies. A decade ago the FDA's "Critical path" white paper noted that "The traditional tools used to assess product safety-animal toxicology and outcomes from human studies-have changed little over many decades and have largely not benefited from recent gains in scientific knowledge. The inability to better assess and predict product safety leads to failures during clinical development and, occasionally, after marketing." Repeat-dose 28-days and 90-days toxicity tests in rodents have been widely used as part of a strategy to assess the safety of drugs and chemicals but their repeatability and power to detect adverse effects have not been formally evaluated.The guidelines (OECD TG 407 and 408) for these tests specify the dose levels and number of animals per dose but do not specify the strain of animals which should be used. In practice, almost all the tests are done using genetically undefined "albino" rats or mice in which the genetic variation, a major cause of inter-individual and strain variability, is unknown and uncontrolled. This chapter suggests that a better strategy would be to use small numbers of animals of several genetically defined strains of mice or rats instead of the undefined animals used at present. Inbred strains are more stable providing more repeatable data than outbred stocks. Importantly their greater phenotypic uniformity should lead to more powerful and repeatable tests. Any observed strain differences would indicate genetic variation in response to the test substance, providing key data. We suggest that the FDA and other regulators and funding organizations should support research to evaluate this alternative.

  14. Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing and Orphan Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Matthew; Levenson, James; Quillin, John

    2017-08-01

    Since the introduction of the Orphan Drug Act (ODA) in 1983, orphan drug approvals in the United States have jumped from growth is widely attributed to the financial incentives the ODA gives to companies that develop these medicines, and it is likely to continue for a unique reason: partnerships between pharmaceutical firms and direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing companies. This emerging trend is the subject of this article, which begins by considering how rare-disease drugs are regulated and the rising interest in nonclinical genetic testing. It then outlines how DTC companies analyze DNA and how their techniques benefit researchers and drug developers. Then, after an overview of the current partnerships between DTCs and drug developers, it examines concerns about privacy and cost brought up by these partnerships. The article concludes by contrasting the enormous positive potential of DTC-pharma relationships and their concomitant dangers, especially to consumer privacy and cost to the healthcare system.

  15. Recommendations for quality improvement in genetic testing for cystic fibrosis European Concerted Action on Cystic Fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dequeker, E; Cuppens, H; Dodge, J; Estivill, [No Value; Goossens, M; Pignatti, PF; Scheffer, H; Schwartz, M; Schwarz, M; Tummler, B; Cassiman, JJ

    These recommendations for quality improvement of cystic fibrosis genetic diagnostic testing provide general guidelines for the molecular genetic testing of cystic fibrosis in patients/individuals. General strategies for testing as well as guidelines for laboratory procedures, internal and external

  16. Reproductive health and genetic testing in the Third World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penchaszadeh, V B

    1993-09-01

    New reproductive genetics means recently developed techniques to prevent the birth of children with specific defects or genetic diseases by testing individuals for sickle cell anemia, the thalassemias, Tay-Sachs disease, cystic fibrosis, or Down syndrome. Third World health services have many deficiencies with high maternal mortality rates (30-40 fold higher than in developed countries), the low percentage of births delivered by health personnel, the high rates of low birth weight babies, and high child malnutrition and infant mortality rates. The main issues in women's reproductive health are fertility regulation, abortion, maternal mortality, sexually transmitted diseases, and infertility. As a result of expansion in contraceptive use worldwide, the total fertility rate in developing countries has declined from 6.1 in 1965 to 3.9 in 1990. It is estimated that, worldwide, 36-53 million induced abortions are performed each year, most of them in developing nations. WHO estimates that more than 500,000 women die each year because of complications of pregnancy, most in developing countries. More than 95% of the 13 million estimated deaths of children under 5 years of age have occurred in these countries. Approximately 200 million people carry a potentially pathologic hemoglobinopathy gene, and about 250,000 children are born every year with hemoglobinopathy, most of them in the developing world. Reproductive genetic testing in big cities and in private for-profit ventures cater to the socioeconomic elite. Amniocentesis is often misused for fetal sex determination to abort female fetuses in India. Currently, in Cuba virtually every pregnant woman is tested for sickle cell trait and maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein levels between 15 and 20 weeks of gestation. It is predicted that the judicious use of reproductive genetic testing will be possible when health and quality of life issues are addressed properly.

  17. Perception of Genetic Testing for Deafness and Factors Associated with Interest in Genetic Testing Among Deaf People in a Selected Population in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedokun, Babatunde O; Yusuf, Bidemi O; Lasisi, J Taye; Jinadu, A A; Sunmonu, M T; Ashanke, A F; Lasisi, O Akeem

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the perceptions of genetic testing by members of the deaf community may help in planning deafness genetics research, especially so in the context of strong adherence to cultural values as found among native Africans. Among Yorubas in Nigeria, deafness is perceived to be caused by some offensive actions of the mother during pregnancy, spiritual attack, and childhood infections. We studied attitudes towards, and acceptance of genetic testing by the deaf community in Nigeria. Structured questionnaires were administered to individuals sampled from the Vocational Training Centre for the Deaf, the religious Community, and government schools, among others. The main survey items elicited information about the community in which the deaf people participate, their awareness of genetic testing, whether or not they view genetic testing as acceptable, and their understanding of the purpose of genetic testing. There were 150 deaf participants (61.3 % males, 38.7 % females) with mean age of 26.7 years ±9.8. A majority of survey respondents indicated they relate only with other members of the deaf community (78 %) and reported believing genetic testing does more good than harm (79.3 %); 57 % expressed interest in genetic testing. Interest in genetic testing for deafness or in genetic testing in pregnancy was not related to whether respondents relate primarily to the deaf or to the hearing community. However, a significantly higher number of male respondents and respondents with low education reported interest in genetic testing.

  18. Genetic line comparisons and genetic parameters for endoparasite infections and test-day milk production traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Katharina; Brügemann, Kerstin; Yin, Tong; Scheper, Carsten; Strube, Christina; König, Sven

    2017-09-01

    Keeping dairy cows in grassland systems relies on detailed analyses of genetic resistance against endoparasite infections, including between- and within-breed genetic evaluations. The objectives of this study were (1) to compare different Black and White dairy cattle selection lines for endoparasite infections and (2) the estimation of genetic (co)variance components for endoparasite and test-day milk production traits within the Black and White cattle population. A total of 2,006 fecal samples were taken during 2 farm visits in summer and autumn 2015 from 1,166 cows kept in 17 small- and medium-scale organic and conventional German grassland farms. Fecal egg counts were determined for gastrointestinal nematodes (FEC-GIN) and flukes (FEC-FLU), and fecal larvae counts for the bovine lungworm Dictyocaulus viviparus (FLC-DV). The lowest values for gastrointestinal nematode infections were identified for genetic lines adopted to pasture-based production systems, especially selection lines from New Zealand. Heritabilities were low for FEC-GIN (0.05-0.06 ± 0.04) and FLC-DV (0.05 ± 0.04), but moderate for FEC-FLU (0.33 ± 0.06). Almost identical heritabilities were estimated for different endoparasite trait transformations (log-transformation, square root). The genetic correlation between FEC-GIN and FLC-DV was 1.00 ± 0.60, slightly negative between FEC-GIN and FEC-FLU (-0.10 ± 0.27), and close to zero between FLC-DV and FEC-FLU (0.03 ± 0.30). Random regression test-day models on a continuous time scale [days in milk (DIM)] were applied to estimate genetic relationships between endoparasite and longitudinal test-day production traits. Genetic correlations were negative between FEC-GIN and milk yield (MY) until DIM 85, and between FEC-FLU and MY until DIM 215. Genetic correlations between FLC-DV and MY were negative throughout lactation, indicating improved disease resistance for high-productivity cows. Genetic relationships between FEC-GIN and FEC-FLU with milk

  19. Genetic tests in lymphatic vascular malformations and lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelini, Sandro; Paolacci, Stefano; Manara, Elena; Eretta, Costantino; Mattassi, Raul; Lee, Byung-Boong; Bertelli, Matteo

    2018-04-01

    Syndromes with lymphatic malformations show phenotypic variability within the same entity, clinical features that overlap between different conditions and allelic as well as locus heterogeneity. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive clinical genetic description of lymphatic malformations and the techniques used for their diagnosis, and to propose a flowchart for genetic testing. Literature and database searches were performed to find conditions characterised by lymphatic malformations or the predisposition to lymphedema after surgery, to identify the associated genes and to find the guidelines and genetic tests currently used for the molecular diagnosis of these disorders. This search allowed us to identify several syndromes with lymphatic malformations that are characterised by a great heterogeneity of phenotypes, alleles and loci , and a high frequency of sporadic cases, which may be associated with somatic mutations. For these disorders, we found many diagnostic tests, an absence of harmonic guidelines for molecular diagnosis and well-established clinical guidelines. Targeted sequencing is the preferred method for the molecular diagnosis of lymphatic malformations. These techniques are easy to implement and have a good diagnostic success rates. In addition, they are relatively inexpensive and permit parallel analysis of all known disease-associated genes. The targeted sequencing approach has improved the diagnostic process, giving patients access to better treatment and, potentially, to therapy personalised to their genetic profiles. These new techniques will also facilitate the prenatal and early postnatal diagnosis of congenital lymphatic conditions and the possibility of early intervention. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Establishing the offense of non-consensual genetic testing in Australia: a call for action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otlowski, Margaret

    2013-12-01

    A criminal offence should be created in Australia for non-consensual genetic testing. This has been recommended in several law reform inquiries due to the sensitive and personal nature of genetic information, and the real potential for harm that non-consensual genetic testing can cause. Since those recommendations were made, the potential for misuse of genetic information has increased, with new methods to easily access large quantities of genetic material and information, such as whole genome sequencing and the increasing availability of direct-to-consumer genetic testing. Some countries have already created an offence of non-consensual genetic testing and their provisions are considered and compared.

  1. Non-genetic health professionals' attitude towards, knowledge of and skills in discussing and ordering genetic testing for hereditary cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, Kirsten F. L.; Smets, Ellen M. A.; Allain, Dawn C.

    2016-01-01

    Non-genetic health professionals (NGHPs) have insufficient knowledge of cancer genetics, express educational needs and are unprepared to counsel their patients regarding their genetic test results. So far, it is unclear how NGHPs perceive their own communication skills. This study was undertaken to

  2. Testing evolutionary hypotheses for phenotypic divergence using landscape genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, W Chris; Murphy, Melanie A

    2010-02-01

    Understanding the evolutionary causes of phenotypic variation among populations has long been a central theme in evolutionary biology. Several factors can influence phenotypic divergence, including geographic isolation, genetic drift, divergent natural or sexual selection, and phenotypic plasticity. But the relative importance of these factors in generating phenotypic divergence in nature is still a tantalizing and unresolved problem in evolutionary biology. The origin and maintenance of phenotypic divergence is also at the root of many ongoing debates in evolutionary biology, such as the extent to which gene flow constrains adaptive divergence (Garant et al. 2007) and the relative importance of genetic drift, natural selection, and sexual selection in initiating reproductive isolation and speciation (Coyne & Orr 2004). In this issue, Wang & Summers (2010) test the causes of one of the most fantastic examples of phenotypic divergence in nature: colour pattern divergence among populations of the strawberry poison frog (Dendrobates pumilio) in Panama and Costa Rica (Fig. 1). This study provides a beautiful example of the use of the emerging field of landscape genetics to differentiate among hypotheses for phenotypic divergence. Using landscape genetic analyses, Wang & Summers were able to reject the hypotheses that colour pattern divergence is due to isolation-by-distance (IBD) or landscape resistance. Instead, the hypothesis left standing is that colour divergence is due to divergent selection, in turn driving reproductive isolation among populations with different colour morphs. More generally, this study provides a wonderful example of how the emerging field of landscape genetics, which has primarily been applied to questions in conservation and ecology, now plays an essential role in evolutionary research.

  3. Current problems regarding abortion, prenatal genetic testing and managing pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klajn-Tatić Vesna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Current ethical and legal issues with regard to abortion, prenatal genetic testing and managing pregnancy are discussed in this paper. These problems are considered from the legal theory point of view as well as from the standpoint of the Serbian Law, the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, European Court of Human Rights, legal regulations of several EU countries, the USA, Japan, and their judicial practice. First, the pregnancy termination standards that exist in Serbia are introduced. Then the following issues are explained separately: the pro life and pro choice approaches to abortion; abortion according to the legal approach as a way of survival; the moral and legal status of the fetus; prenatal genetic testing, and finally matters regarding managing pregnancy today. Moral and legal principals of autonomy, namely freedom of choice of the individual, privacy and self-determination give women the right to terminate unwanted pregnancies. In addition, the basic question is whether the right of the woman to abortion clashes with the rights of others. Firstly, with the right of the "fetus to life". Secondly, with the right of the state to intervene in the interest of protecting "the life of the fetus". Third, with the rights of the woman’s partner. The fetus has the moral right to life, but less in relation to the same right of the woman as well as in relation to her right to control her life and her physical and moral integrity. On the other hand, the value of the life of the fetus increases morally and legally with the maturity of gestation; from the third trimester, the interest of the state prevails in the protection of the "life of the fetus" except when the life or health of the pregnant woman are at risk. As regards the rights of the woman’s partner, namely the husband’s opinion, there is no legal significance. The law does not request his participation in the decision on abortion because

  4. Significance testing in ridge regression for genetic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Iorio Maria

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Technological developments have increased the feasibility of large scale genetic association studies. Densely typed genetic markers are obtained using SNP arrays, next-generation sequencing technologies and imputation. However, SNPs typed using these methods can be highly correlated due to linkage disequilibrium among them, and standard multiple regression techniques fail with these data sets due to their high dimensionality and correlation structure. There has been increasing interest in using penalised regression in the analysis of high dimensional data. Ridge regression is one such penalised regression technique which does not perform variable selection, instead estimating a regression coefficient for each predictor variable. It is therefore desirable to obtain an estimate of the significance of each ridge regression coefficient. Results We develop and evaluate a test of significance for ridge regression coefficients. Using simulation studies, we demonstrate that the performance of the test is comparable to that of a permutation test, with the advantage of a much-reduced computational cost. We introduce the p-value trace, a plot of the negative logarithm of the p-values of ridge regression coefficients with increasing shrinkage parameter, which enables the visualisation of the change in p-value of the regression coefficients with increasing penalisation. We apply the proposed method to a lung cancer case-control data set from EPIC, the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Conclusions The proposed test is a useful alternative to a permutation test for the estimation of the significance of ridge regression coefficients, at a much-reduced computational cost. The p-value trace is an informative graphical tool for evaluating the results of a test of significance of ridge regression coefficients as the shrinkage parameter increases, and the proposed test makes its production computationally feasible.

  5. Significance testing in ridge regression for genetic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cule, Erika; Vineis, Paolo; De Iorio, Maria

    2011-09-19

    Technological developments have increased the feasibility of large scale genetic association studies. Densely typed genetic markers are obtained using SNP arrays, next-generation sequencing technologies and imputation. However, SNPs typed using these methods can be highly correlated due to linkage disequilibrium among them, and standard multiple regression techniques fail with these data sets due to their high dimensionality and correlation structure. There has been increasing interest in using penalised regression in the analysis of high dimensional data. Ridge regression is one such penalised regression technique which does not perform variable selection, instead estimating a regression coefficient for each predictor variable. It is therefore desirable to obtain an estimate of the significance of each ridge regression coefficient. We develop and evaluate a test of significance for ridge regression coefficients. Using simulation studies, we demonstrate that the performance of the test is comparable to that of a permutation test, with the advantage of a much-reduced computational cost. We introduce the p-value trace, a plot of the negative logarithm of the p-values of ridge regression coefficients with increasing shrinkage parameter, which enables the visualisation of the change in p-value of the regression coefficients with increasing penalisation. We apply the proposed method to a lung cancer case-control data set from EPIC, the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. The proposed test is a useful alternative to a permutation test for the estimation of the significance of ridge regression coefficients, at a much-reduced computational cost. The p-value trace is an informative graphical tool for evaluating the results of a test of significance of ridge regression coefficients as the shrinkage parameter increases, and the proposed test makes its production computationally feasible.

  6. Genetic testing for cystic fibrosis in adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Mencinger

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cystic fibrosis (CF is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in gene encoding cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR protein. Over 1400 mutations found in the gene contribute to the complexity of the CF phenotypes ranging from a classic multiorgan disease commonly involving respiratory, gastrointestinal and reproductive tract to mild and monosymptomatic presentations. Pilocarpine iontophoresis is considered as standard diagnostic test for CF, but it often fails in atypical forms of CF.Methods: In order to provide an additional diagnostic test to assure the diagnosis and provide patients with a proper medical care, we performed a genetic testing on 16 adults suspected to have atypical form of CF. Following counselling, parents of patients with possible homozygote variant of mutations were tested. On a personal request testing was also performed in an adult sibling of a patient with two known mutations to investigate possible carrier hood. The allele specific polymerase chain reaction method (PCR was used to detect 29 most common mutations in the cftr gene.Results: The diagnosis was proved in 3 individuals, a homozygote for Δ F508, and two compound heterozygotes Δ F508/R1162X and Δ F508/3849+10kbC>T. In three cases only one mutation was found: I148T, 2789+5G>A and Δ F508 in a heterozygote form.Conclusions: The genetic testing for CF is a valuable diagnostic tool in atypical forms of CF. Exclusion of possible differential diagnosis is warranted because of a variable CF phenotype. In cases where only one or no mutation was detected a necessity of whole gene sequencing is indicated to exclude rare mutations and polymorphisms that could be implicated in the pathogenesis of atypical CF.

  7. A Case of Fundus Oculi Albinoticus Diagnosed as Angelman Syndrome by Genetic Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurie Fukiyama

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report a case of fundus oculi albinoticus diagnosed as Angelman syndrome (AS via genetic testing. Case Report: This study reports on a 4-year-old boy. Since he had been having respiratory disturbance since birth, he underwent a complete physical examination to investigate the cause. The results indicated that he had various brain congenital abnormalities, such as a thin corpus callosum, as well as hydronephrosis, an atrial septal defect, and skin similar to patients with fundus oculi albinoticus. Examination revealed bilateral fundus oculi albinoticus, mild iridic hypopigmentation, optic atrophy, and poor visual tracking. Genetic testing revealed a deletion in the Prader-Willi syndrome/AS region on chromosome 15, and together with the results of methylation analysis, his condition was diagnosed as AS. Follow-up examinations revealed no change in the fundus oculi albinoticus and optic atrophy, nor did they indicate poor visual tracking. Conclusions: When fundus oculi albinoticus and optic atrophy are observed in patients with multiple malformations, AS should be considered as a differential diagnosis.

  8. Genetic Testing: What It Means for Your Health and Your Family's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... increased risk to have a baby born with Tay-Sachs disease. How is genetic testing done? Genetic tests are ... or not there are ways to prevent or treat the disease for which you (or your child) are being ...

  9. [Population genetic study of Russian cosmonauts and test subjects: genetic demographic parameters and immunogenetic markers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbatova, O L; Pobedonostseva, E Iu; Prokhorovskaia, V D; Kholod, O N; Evsiukov, A N; Bogomolov, V V; Voronkov, Iu I; Filatova, L M; Larina, O N; Sidorenko, L A; Morgun, V V; Kasparanskiĭ, R R; Altukhov, Iu P

    2006-10-01

    Genetic demographic characteristics and immunogenetic markers (blood groups ABO, Rhesus, MNSs, P, Duffy, Kidd, and Kell) have been studied in a group of 132 Russian cosmonauts and test subjects (CTSG). Analysis of pedigrees has shown a high exogamy in the preceding generations: almost half of the subjects have mixed ethnic background. According to the results of genetic demographic analysis, a sample from the Moscow population was used as control group (CG). Comparison between the CTSG and CG has demonstrated significant differences in genotype frequencies for several blood group systems. The CTSG is characterized by a decreased proportion of rare interlocus genotypic combinations and an increased man heterozygosity. Analysis of the distributions of individual heterozygosity for loci with codominant expression of alleles has shown that highly heterozygous loci are more frequent in the CTSG. Taking into account that the CTSG has been thoroughly selected from the general population, it is concluded that heterozygosity is related to successful adaptation to a space flight.

  10. Ethical and clinical practice considerations for genetic counselors related to direct-to-consumer marketing of genetic tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Christopher H; Wilfond, Benjamin S

    2006-11-15

    Several companies utilize direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising for genetic tests and some, but not all, bypass clinician involvement by offering DTC purchase of the tests. This article examines how DTC marketing strategies may affect genetic counselors, using available cardiovascular disease susceptibility tests as an illustration. The interpretation of these tests is complex and includes consideration of clinical validity and utility, and the further complications of gene-environment interactions and pleiotropy. Although it is unclear to what extent genetic counselors will encounter clients who have been exposed to DTC marketing strategies, these strategies may influence genetic counseling interactions if they produce directed interest in specific tests and unrealistic expectations for the tests' capacity to predict disease. Often, a client's concern about risk for cardiovascular diseases is best addressed by established clinical tests and a family history assessment. Ethical dilemmas may arise for genetic counselors who consider whether to accept clients who request test interpretation or to order DTC-advertised tests that require a clinician's authorization. Genetic counselors' obligations to care for clients extend to interpreting DTC tests, although this obligation may be fulfilled by referral or consultation with specialists. Genetic counselors do not have an obligation to order DTC-advertised tests that have minimal clinical validity and utility at a client's request. This can be a justified restriction on autonomy based on consideration of risks to the client, the costs, and the implications for society. Published 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Designing optimal degradation tests via multi-objective genetic algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marseguerra, Marzio; Zio, Enrico; Cipollone, Maurizio

    2003-01-01

    The experimental determination of the failure time probability distribution of highly reliable components, such as those used in nuclear and aerospace applications, is intrinsically difficult due to the lack, or scarce significance, of failure data which can be collected during the relatively short test periods. A possibility to overcome this difficulty is to resort to the so-called degradation tests, in which measurements of components' degradation are used to infer the failure time distribution. To design such tests, parameters like the number of tests to be run, their frequency and duration, must be set so as to obtain an accurate estimate of the distribution statistics, under the existing limitations of budget. The optimisation problem which results is a non-linear one. In this work, we propose a method, based on multi-objective genetic algorithms for determining the values of the test parameters which optimise both the accuracy in the estimate of the failure time distribution percentiles and the testing costs. The method has been validated on a degradation model of literature

  12. Health-related direct-to-consumer genetic testing: a review of companies' policies with regard to genetic testing in minors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borry, Pascal; Howard, Heidi C; Sénécal, Karine; Avard, Denise

    2010-03-01

    More and more companies are advertising and selling genetic tests directly to consumers. Considering the ethical, legal, and psychological concerns surrounding genetic testing in minors, a study of companies' websites was performed in order to describe and analyze their policies with respect to this issue. Of the 29 companies analyzed, 13 did not provide any information about this matter, eight companies allowed genetic testing upon parental request, four companies stated that their website is not directed to children under 18 years, and four companies suggested that in order to be tested, applicants should have reached the age of legal majority. If private companies offer genetic tests which are also offered in a clinical setting, can they be expected to adhere to the existing clinical guidelines with regard to these tests? If so, a certain ambiguity exists. Many companies are emphasizing in their disclaimers that their services are not medical services and should not be used as a basis for making medical decisions. Nonetheless, it remains debatable whether genetic testing in minors would be appropriate in this context. In line with the Advisory Committee on Genetic Testing, the Human Genetics Commission addressed the problem of non-consensual testing and recommended not to supply genetic testing services directly to those under the age of 16 or to those not able to make a competent decision regarding testing.

  13. Genetic Tests for Ability?: Talent Identification and the Value of an Open Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Andy; Rich, Emma

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the prospect of genetic tests for performance in physical activity and sports practices. It investigates the terminology associated with genetics, testing, selection and ability as a means towards a socio-ethical analysis of its value within sport, education and society. Our argument suggests that genetic tests need not even be…

  14. Patenting and licensing in genetic testing: recommendations of the European Society of Human Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aymé, S; Matthijs, Gert; Soini, S

    2008-05-01

    Patents for inventions can be beneficial for society, if they drive innovation and promote progress. In most areas, the patenting system works satisfactorily. However, it must be recognized that in some instances it can also be problematic; this is the case in the field of genetics, and particularly in the area of genetic testing. As patents should serve their original purpose (promoting innovation through a fair reward system for the inventors), the European Society of Human Genetics (ESHG) suggests ways to improve the mechanisms that already form part of the patents system as a whole. In brief, the ESHG recommends limiting the breadth of the claims in genetic patents and, more practically, to reduce the number of patents by limiting the patentable subject matter, thereby improving the quality of the patents that will eventually be granted. There is also a suggestion to redefine the concept of utility in patent law, by taking account of downstream clinical experience. The ESHG sees no harm in the patenting of novel technical tools for genetic testing (eg PCR or chip technologies), as they can promote investment and still allow for invention around them. Many disputes between supporters of the patenting system and the public revolve around ethical issues. The European Patent Office should consider the benefit of having an ethics committee to consider issues of major interest, such as patents applied to genes. The problem of licensing should also be addressed. Practically, this means supporting the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development guidelines, which prescribe that licences should be non-exclusive and easily obtainable, both in practical and in financial terms. To promote this, the practical exploration of alternative models for licensing, like patent pools and clearinghouses, is a prerequisite. To better track developments in this field, the establishment of a voluntary reporting system, whereby geneticists could report on any issues related to

  15. Essential elements of genetic cancer risk assessment, counseling, and testing: updated recommendations of the National Society of Genetic Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Bronson D; Culver, Julie O; Skrzynia, Cécile; Senter, Leigha A; Peters, June A; Costalas, Josephine W; Callif-Daley, Faith; Grumet, Sherry C; Hunt, Katherine S; Nagy, Rebecca S; McKinnon, Wendy C; Petrucelli, Nancie M; Bennett, Robin L; Trepanier, Angela M

    2012-04-01

    Updated from their original publication in 2004, these cancer genetic counseling recommendations describe the medical, psychosocial, and ethical ramifications of counseling at-risk individuals through genetic cancer risk assessment with or without genetic testing. They were developed by members of the Practice Issues Subcommittee of the National Society of Genetic Counselors Familial Cancer Risk Counseling Special Interest Group. The information contained in this document is derived from extensive review of the current literature on cancer genetic risk assessment and counseling as well as the personal expertise of genetic counselors specializing in cancer genetics. The recommendations are intended to provide information about the process of genetic counseling and risk assessment for hereditary cancer disorders rather than specific information about individual syndromes. Essential components include the intake, cancer risk assessment, genetic testing for an inherited cancer syndrome, informed consent, disclosure of genetic test results, and psychosocial assessment. These recommendations should not be construed as dictating an exclusive course of management, nor does use of such recommendations guarantee a particular outcome. These recommendations do not displace a health care provider's professional judgment based on the clinical circumstances of a client.

  16. Genetic Testing in Intellectual Disability Psychiatry: Opinions and Practices of UK Child and Intellectual Disability Psychiatrists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Kate; Stueber, Kerstin; McQuillin, Andrew; Jichi, Fatima; Patch, Christine; Flinter, Frances; Strydom, André; Bass, Nick

    2018-01-01

    Background: An increasing number of genetic causes of intellectual disabilities (ID) are identifiable by clinical genetic testing, offering the prospect of bespoke patient management. However, little is known about the practices of psychiatrists and their views on genetic testing. Method: We undertook an online survey of 215 psychiatrists, who…

  17. Genetic Counseling and Evaluation for BRCA1/2 Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Options Talking to Family Family Stories Diseases Genetic Counseling for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Recommend on ... inherited mutation, your doctor may refer you for genetic counseling. Understanding and dealing with a strong family health ...

  18. Pathways and barriers to genetic testing and screening: Molecular genetics meets the high-risk family. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duster, T.

    1998-11-01

    The proliferation of genetic screening and testing is requiring increasing numbers of Americans to integrate genetic knowledge and interventions into their family life and personal experience. This study examines the social processes that occur as families at risk for two of the most common autosomal recessive diseases, sickle cell disease (SC) and cystic fibrosis (CF), encounter genetic testing. Each of these diseases is found primarily in a different ethnic/racial group (CF in Americans of North European descent and SC in Americans of West African descent). This has permitted them to have a certain additional lens on the role of culture in integrating genetic testing into family life and reproductive planning. A third type of genetic disorder, the thalassemias was added to the sample in order to extent the comparative frame and to include other ethnic and racial groups.

  19. Preimplantation Genetic Testing in the 21st Century: Uncharted Territory

    OpenAIRE

    Paul R. Brezina MD, MBA

    2013-01-01

    The past hundred years have given birth to arguably the most profound changes in society, medicine, and technology the world has ever witnessed. Genetics is one such field that has enjoyed a meteoric rise during this time. Progressing from Mendelian genetics to the discovery of DNA to the ability to sequence the human genome, perhaps no other discipline holds more promise to affect future change than genetics. Technology currently exists to evaluate some of the genetic information held by dev...

  20. Genetic testing and human autonomy | Beckmann | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The author inquires into the relation between the production of genetic knowledge on the one hand, and human autonomy and self-determination on the other. He does so by specifying the notions of “genetic test” and “human autonomy”; by discussing the epistemic status of genetic knowledge, given its importance for the ...

  1. Hypothesis testing in genetic linkage analysis via Gibbs sampling ( )

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hope&shola

    2010-12-06

    Dec 6, 2010 ... Genetic linkage analysis involves estimating parameters in a genetic model in which a genetic trait is regressed on some factors such as ... Key words: Gibbs sampling, pedigree, linkage analysis, likelihood. INTRODUCTION ..... Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, 6: 721-741. Guo SW, Thompson EA ...

  2. [A survey of willingness about genetic counseling and tests in patients of epithelial ovarian cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L; Qiu, L; Wu, M

    2017-11-21

    Objective: To analyze patients' tendency towards genetics counseling and tests based on a prospective cohort study on hereditary ovarian cancer. Methods: From February 2017 to June 2017, among 220 cases of epithelial ovarian cancer in Peking Union Medical College Hospital, we collected epidemiological, pathological and tendency towards genetics counseling and tests via medical records and questionnaire.All patients would get education about hereditary ovarian cancer by pamphlets and WeChat.If they would receive further counseling, a face to face interview and tests will be given. Results: Among all 220 patients, 10 (4.5%) denied further counseling.For 210 patients receiving genetic counseling, 170 (81%) accepted genetic tests.In multivariate analysis, risk factors relevant to acceptance of genetic tests included: being charged by physicians of gynecologic oncology for diagnosis and treatment, receiving counseling in genetic counseling clinics, and having family history of breast cancer.For patients denying genetic tests, there were many subjective reasons, among which, "still not understanding genetic tests" (25%) and "unable bear following expensive targeting medicine" . Conclusions: High proportion patients of epithelial ovarian cancer would accept genetic counseling and tests.Genetic counseling clinics for gynecologic oncology would further improve genetic tests for patients.

  3. Hopefulness predicts resilience after hereditary colorectal cancer genetic testing: a prospective outcome trajectories study

    OpenAIRE

    Chu Annie TW; Bonanno George A; Ho Judy WC; Ho Samuel MY; Chan Emily MS

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background - Genetic testing for hereditary colorectal cancer (HCRC) had significant psychological consequences for test recipients. This prospective longitudinal study investigated the factors that predict psychological resilience in adults undergoing genetic testing for HCRC. Methods - A longitudinal study was carried out from April 2003 to August 2006 on Hong Kong Chinese HCRC family members who were recruited and offered genetic testing by the Hereditary Gastrointestinal Cancer R...

  4. Psychiatric genetic testing: Attitudes and intentions among future users and providers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laegsgaard, Mett Marri; Mors, Ole

    2008-01-01

    as a guide in this field, but the optimal utilization of genetic testing has also been recognized to depend on knowledge of the potential consumers' attitudes. To provide knowledge to inform the public debate on mental illness and genetics, and the future conducting of psychiatric genetic testing...... and counseling, we surveyed attitudes toward psychiatric genetic testing among 397 patients with a psychiatric diagnosis, 164 of their relatives and 100 medical and psychology students. The results showed widespread interest in psychiatric genetic testing of self and child, but less support for prenatal testing...... contradictions mirroring the bioethical dilemmas recognized in the field and variations in attitudes between groups with different levels of knowledge of genetics, different kinds of experience with mental illness, and different motives and preconceptions regarding psychiatric genetics. The contradictions...

  5. Direct-to-consumer genetic testing in Slovenia: availability, ethical dilemmas and legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrecar, Irena; Peterlin, Borut; Teran, Natasa; Lovrecic, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few years, many private companies are advertising direct-to-consumer genetic testing (DTC GT), mostly with no or only minor clinical utility and validity of tests and without genetic counselling. International professional community does not approve provision of DTC GT and situation in some EU countries has been analysed already. The aim of our study was to analyse current situation in the field of DTC GT in Slovenia and related legal and ethical issues. Information was retrieved through internet search, performed independently by two authors, structured according to individual private company and the types of offered genetic testing. Five private companies and three Health Insurance Companies offer DTC GT and it is provided without genetic counselling. Available tests include testing for breast cancer, tests with other health-related information (complex diseases, drug responses) and other tests (nutrigenetic, ancestry, paternity). National legislation is currently being developed and Council of Experts in Medical Genetics has issued an opinion about Genetic Testing and Commercialization of Genetic Tests in Slovenia. Despite the fact that Slovenia has signed the Additional protocol to the convention on human rights and biomedicine, concerning genetic testing for health purposes, DTC GT in Slovenia is present and against all international recommendations. There is lack of or no medical supervision, clinical validity and utility of tests and inappropriate genetic testing of minors is available. There is urgent need for regulation of ethical, legal, and social aspects. National legislation on DTC GT is being prepared.

  6. Covariance Association Test (CVAT) Identifies Genetic Markers Associated with Schizophrenia in Functionally Associated Biological Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Palle Duun; Demontis, Ditte; Castro Dias Cuyabano, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    power to detect genetic markers with small effects. Instead, aggregating genetic markers based on biological information might increase the power to identify sets of genetic markers of etiological significance. Several set test methods have been proposed: Here we propose a new set test derived from......Schizophrenia is a psychiatric disorder with large personal and social costs, and understanding the genetic etiology is important. Such knowledge can be obtained by testing the association between a disease phenotype and individual genetic markers; however, such single-marker methods have limited...

  7. Role of Genetic Testing for Inherited Prostate Cancer Risk: Philadelphia Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Veda N; Knudsen, Karen E; Kelly, William K; Abida, Wassim; Andriole, Gerald L; Bangma, Chris H; Bekelman, Justin E; Benson, Mitchell C; Blanco, Amie; Burnett, Arthur; Catalona, William J; Cooney, Kathleen A; Cooperberg, Matthew; Crawford, David E; Den, Robert B; Dicker, Adam P; Eggener, Scott; Fleshner, Neil; Freedman, Matthew L; Hamdy, Freddie C; Hoffman-Censits, Jean; Hurwitz, Mark D; Hyatt, Colette; Isaacs, William B; Kane, Christopher J; Kantoff, Philip; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Karsh, Lawrence I; Klein, Eric A; Lin, Daniel W; Loughlin, Kevin R; Lu-Yao, Grace; Malkowicz, S Bruce; Mann, Mark J; Mark, James R; McCue, Peter A; Miner, Martin M; Morgan, Todd; Moul, Judd W; Myers, Ronald E; Nielsen, Sarah M; Obeid, Elias; Pavlovich, Christian P; Peiper, Stephen C; Penson, David F; Petrylak, Daniel; Pettaway, Curtis A; Pilarski, Robert; Pinto, Peter A; Poage, Wendy; Raj, Ganesh V; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Robson, Mark E; Rosenberg, Matt T; Sandler, Howard; Sartor, Oliver; Schaeffer, Edward; Schwartz, Gordon F; Shahin, Mark S; Shore, Neal D; Shuch, Brian; Soule, Howard R; Tomlins, Scott A; Trabulsi, Edouard J; Uzzo, Robert; Vander Griend, Donald J; Walsh, Patrick C; Weil, Carol J; Wender, Richard; Gomella, Leonard G

    2018-02-01

    Purpose Guidelines are limited for genetic testing for prostate cancer (PCA). The goal of this conference was to develop an expert consensus-driven working framework for comprehensive genetic evaluation of inherited PCA in the multigene testing era addressing genetic counseling, testing, and genetically informed management. Methods An expert consensus conference was convened including key stakeholders to address genetic counseling and testing, PCA screening, and management informed by evidence review. Results Consensus was strong that patients should engage in shared decision making for genetic testing. There was strong consensus to test HOXB13 for suspected hereditary PCA, BRCA1/2 for suspected hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, and DNA mismatch repair genes for suspected Lynch syndrome. There was strong consensus to factor BRCA2 mutations into PCA screening discussions. BRCA2 achieved moderate consensus for factoring into early-stage management discussion, with stronger consensus in high-risk/advanced and metastatic setting. Agreement was moderate to test all men with metastatic castration-resistant PCA, regardless of family history, with stronger agreement to test BRCA1/2 and moderate agreement to test ATM to inform prognosis and targeted therapy. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive, multidisciplinary consensus statement to address a genetic evaluation framework for inherited PCA in the multigene testing era. Future research should focus on developing a working definition of familial PCA for clinical genetic testing, expanding understanding of genetic contribution to aggressive PCA, exploring clinical use of genetic testing for PCA management, genetic testing of African American males, and addressing the value framework of genetic evaluation and testing men at risk for PCA-a clinically heterogeneous disease.

  8. The impact of predictive genetic testing for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer: three years after testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Veronica R; Meiser, Bettina; Ukoumunne, Obioha C; Gaff, Clara; St John, D James; Halliday, Jane L

    2007-05-01

    To fully assess predictive genetic testing programs, it is important to assess outcomes over periods of time longer than the 1-year follow-up reported in the literature. We conducted a 3-year study of individuals who received predictive genetic test results for previously identified familial mutations in Australian Familial Cancer Clinics. Questionnaires were sent before attendance at the familial cancer clinic and 2 weeks, 4 months, 1 year, and 3 years after receiving test results. Psychological measures were included each time, and preventive behaviors were assessed at baseline and 1 and 3 years. Psychological measures were adjusted for age, gender, and baseline score. The study included 19 carriers and 54 non-carriers. We previously reported an increase in mean cancer-specific distress in carriers at 2 weeks with a return to baseline levels by 12 months. This level was maintained until 3 years. Non-carriers showed sustained decreases after testing with a significantly lower level at 3 years compared with baseline (P depression and anxiety scores did not differ between carriers and non-carriers and, at 3 years, were similar to baseline. All carriers and 7% of non-carriers had had a colonoscopy by 3 years, and 69% of 13 female carriers had undergone gynecological screening in the previous 2 years. Prophylactic surgery was rare. This report of long-term data indicates appropriate screening and improved psychological measures for non-carriers with no evidence of undue psychological distress in carriers of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer mutations.

  9. Uptake of BRCA1/2 Genetic Testing in a Randomized Trial of Telephone Counseling

    OpenAIRE

    Butrick, Morgan; Kelly, Scott; Peshkin, Beth N.; Luta, George; Nusbaum, Rachel; Hooker, Gillian W.; Graves, Kristi; Feeley, Lisa; Isaacs, Claudine; B.Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis; Jandorf, Lina; DeMarco, Tiffani; Wood, Marie; McKinnon, Wendy; Garber, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Purpose As genetic counseling and testing become more fully-integrated into clinical care, alternative delivery models are increasingly prominent. This study examines predictors of genetic testing for hereditary breast/ovarian cancer among high-risk women in a randomized trial of in-person vs. telephone-based genetic counseling. Methods Methods include multivariable logistic regression and interaction analyses. Results Of the 669 participants, 600 completed counseling and 523 received test re...

  10. Regulation of Internet-based Genetic Testing: Challenges for Australia and Other Jurisdictions

    OpenAIRE

    Jane Tiller; Paul Lacaze

    2018-01-01

    The Internet currently enables unprecedented ease of access for direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing, with saliva collection kits posted directly to consumer homes from anywhere in the world. This poses new challenges for local jurisdictions in regulating genetic testing, traditionally a tightly-regulated industry. Some Internet-based genetic tests have the capacity to cause significant confusion or harm to consumers who are unaware of the risks or potential variability in quality. The em...

  11. It's what's expected: genetic testing for inherited conditions, CHERE Discussion Paper No 46

    OpenAIRE

    Marion Haas; Jane Hall; Richard De Abreu Lourenco

    2001-01-01

    The development of new genetic technology brings with it responsibility for evaluating the effectiveness and efficiency of testing programs, including gaining an understanding of the value of information. This study examined the factors individuals took into account when making decisions about having a genetic test for Tay Sachs Disease. Fifteen people participated in an in-depth interview as they attended a clinic for genetic testing. A thematic analysis of the data was undertaken. Participa...

  12. Difficult Questions and Ambivalent Answers on Genetic Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Wiszmeg

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A qualitative pilot study on the attitudes of some citizens in southern Sweden toward predictive genetic testing – and a quantitative nation wide opinion poll targeting the same issues, was initiated by the Cultural Scientific Research Team of BAGADILICO. The latter is an international biomedical research environment on neurological disease at Lund University. The data of the two studies crystallized through analysis into themes around which the informants’ personal negotiations of opinions and emotions in relation to the topic centred: Concept of Risk,‘Relations and Moral Multi-layers, Worry, Agency and Autonomy, Authority, and Rationality versus Emotion. The studies indicate that even groups of people that beforehand are non-engaged in the issue, harbour complex and ambivalent emotions and opinions toward questions like this. A certain kind of situation bound pragmatism that with difficulty could be shown by quantitative methods alone emerges. This confirms our belief that methodological consideration of combining quantitative and qualitative methods is crucial for gaining a more complex representation of attitudes, as well as for problematizing the idea of a unified public open to inquiry.

  13. Patients with sporadic and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis found value in genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Karin N; Nagaraja, Haikady N; Allain, Dawn C; Quick, Adam; Kolb, Stephen J; Roggenbuck, Jennifer

    2017-12-20

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is increasingly recognized as a genetic disease. There is no consensus, however, as to the role of genetic testing in the care of the ALS patient. We conducted a survey to study patient access, attitudes, and experience with ALS genetic testing among patients enrolled in a US ALS registry. Among 449 survey respondents, 156 (34.7%) were offered testing and 105 of 156 (67.3%) completed testing. The majority of respondents with familial ALS (fALS) (31/45, 68.9%) were offered testing, while a minority of respondents with sporadic ALS (sALS) (111/404, 27.5%) were offered testing (p = .00001). Comparison of mean test experience scores between groups revealed that respondents with fALS were no more likely to report a favorable experience with genetic testing than those with sALS (p = .51). Respondents who saw a genetic counselor did not have significantly different test experience scores, compared to those who did not (p = .14). In addition, no differences in test experience scores were observed between those who received positive or negative genetic test results (p = .98). These data indicate that patients with ALS found value in clinical genetic testing. © 2017 The Authors. Molecular Genetics & Genomic Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Combined clinical and genetic testing algorithm for cervical cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Yu-Ligh; Zhang, Tao-Lan; Yan, Tian; Yeh, Ching-Tung; Kang, Ya-Nan; Cao, Lanqin; Wu, Nayiyuan; Chang, Chi-Feng; Wang, Huei-Jen; Yen, Carolyn; Chu, Tang-Yuan; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Honghao

    2016-01-01

    Opportunistic screening in hospitals is widely used to effectively reduce the incidence rate of cervical cancer in China and other developing countries. This study aimed to identify clinical risk factor algorithms that combine gynecologic examination and molecular testing (paired box gene 1 (PAX1) or zinc finger protein 582 (ZNF582) methylation or HPV16/18) results to improve diagnostic accuracy. The delta Cp of methylated PAX1 and ZNF582 was obtained via quantitative methylation-specific PCR in a training set (57 CIN2- and 43 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia ≥grade 3 (CIN3+) women), and the individual and combination gene sensitivities and specificities were determined. The detection accuracy of three algorithms combining gynecologic findings and genetic test results was then compared in a randomized case-control study comprising 449 women referred for colposcopic examination by gynecologists in the outpatient department of Xiangya Hospital between November 2011 and March 2013. Significant association was observed between CIN3+ and methylated PAX1 or ZNF582 in combination with HPV16/18 (OR:15.52, 95 % CI:7.73-31.18). The sensitivities and specificities of methylated PAX1 or ZNF582 combined with HPV16/18 for CIN3+ women were 89.2 and 76.0 %, or 85.4 and 80.1 %, respectively. Of the three algorithms applied to cohort data and validated in the study, two indicated 100 % sensitivity in detecting cervical cancer and a low rate of referrals for colposcopy. These algorithms might contribute to precise and objective cervical cancer diagnostics in the outpatient departments of hospitals in countries with high mortality and low screening rates or areas with uneven resource distribution.

  15. Expertise for Teaching Biology Situated in the Context of Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zande, Paul; Akkerman, Sanne F.; Brekelmans, Mieke; Waarlo, Arend Jan; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary genomics research will impact the daily practice of biology teachers who want to teach up-to-date genetics in secondary education. This article reports on a research project aimed at enhancing biology teachers' expertise for teaching genetics situated in the context of genetic testing. The increasing body of scientific knowledge…

  16. A Knowledge Base for Teaching Biology Situated in the Context of Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zande, Paul; Waarlo, Arend Jan; Brekelmans, Mieke; Akkerman, Sanne F.; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of genomics will impact the daily practice of biology teachers who teach genetics in secondary education. This study reports on the first results of a research project aimed at enhancing biology teacher knowledge for teaching genetics in the context of genetic testing. The increasing body of scientific knowledge…

  17. Counseling Psychology in the Era of Genetic Testing: Considerations for Practice, Research, and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaut, Kevin P.

    2006-01-01

    The field of genetics and the process of testing for genetic disorders have advanced considerably over the past half century, ushering in significant improvements in certain areas of medical diagnosis and disease prediction. However, genetic discoveries are accompanied by many social, emotional, and psychological implications, and counseling…

  18. Technology assessment and resource allocation for predictive genetic testing: A study of the perspectives of Canadian genetic health care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einsiedel Edna

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With a growing number of genetic tests becoming available to the health and consumer markets, genetic health care providers in Canada are faced with the challenge of developing robust decision rules or guidelines to allocate a finite number of public resources. The objective of this study was to gain Canadian genetic health providers' perspectives on factors and criteria that influence and shape resource allocation decisions for publically funded predictive genetic testing in Canada. Methods The authors conducted semi-structured interviews with 16 senior lab directors and clinicians at publically funded Canadian predictive genetic testing facilities. Participants were drawn from British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and Nova Scotia. Given the community sampled was identified as being relatively small and challenging to access, purposive sampling coupled with snowball sampling methodologies were utilized. Results Surveyed lab directors and clinicians indicated that predictive genetic tests were funded provincially by one of two predominant funding models, but they themselves played a significant role in how these funds were allocated for specific tests and services. They also rated and identified several factors that influenced allocation decisions and patients' decisions regarding testing. Lastly, participants provided recommendations regarding changes to existing allocation models and showed support for a national evaluation process for predictive testing. Conclusion Our findings suggest that largely local and relatively ad hoc decision making processes are being made in relation to resource allocations for predictive genetic tests and that a more coordinated and, potentially, national approach to allocation decisions in this context may be appropriate.

  19. BRCA1 and BRCA2: Cancer Risk and Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MR imaging in women with a familial or genetic predisposition. Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 2010; 119(2):399–407. [PubMed Abstract] Evans DG, Gaarenstroom KN, Stirling D, et al. Screening for familial ovarian cancer: Poor ... Genetics 2009; 46(9):593–597. [PubMed Abstract] Domchek ...

  20. Proposal for a Test Protocol for Genetically Modified Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandberg, B.; Kjær, C.

    1999-01-01

    The report contains the proceedings from the conference Genetically Modified Organisms in Nordic Habitats - Sustainable Use or Loss of Diversity? in Helsinki, 1998......The report contains the proceedings from the conference Genetically Modified Organisms in Nordic Habitats - Sustainable Use or Loss of Diversity? in Helsinki, 1998...

  1. Tests for genetic interactions in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morahan, Grant; Mehta, Munish; James, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between genetic and environmental factors lead to immune dysregulation causing type 1 diabetes and other autoimmune disorders. Recently, many common genetic variants have been associated with type 1 diabetes risk, but each has modest individual effects. Familial clustering of type 1 ...

  2. Ethical and Social Implications of Genetic Testing for Communication Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnos, Kathleen S.

    2008-01-01

    Advances in genetics and genomics have quickly led to clinical applications to human health which have far-reaching consequences at the individual and societal levels. These new technologies have allowed a better understanding of the genetic factors involved in a wide range of disorders. During the past decade, incredible progress has been made in…

  3. Diagnostic yield of genetic testing in epileptic encephalopathy in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, Saadet; Patel, Jaina; Cordeiro, Dawn; Hewson, Stacy; Callen, David; Donner, Elizabeth J; Hahn, Cecil D; Kannu, Peter; Kobayashi, Jeff; Minassian, Berge A; Moharir, Mahendranath; Siriwardena, Komudi; Weiss, Shelly K; Weksberg, Rosanna; Snead, O Carter

    2015-05-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurologic disorder of childhood. To determine the genetic diagnostic yield in epileptic encephalopathy, we performed a retrospective cohort study in a single epilepsy genetics clinic. We included all patients with intractable epilepsy, global developmental delay, and cognitive dysfunction seen between January 2012 and June 2014 in the Epilepsy Genetics Clinic. Electronic patient charts were reviewed for clinical features, neuroimaging, biochemical investigations, and molecular genetic investigations including targeted next-generation sequencing of epileptic encephalopathy genes. Genetic causes were identified in 28% of the 110 patients: 7% had inherited metabolic disorders including pyridoxine dependent epilepsy caused by ALDH7A1 mutation, Menkes disease, pyridox(am)ine-5-phosphate oxidase deficiency, cobalamin G deficiency, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency, glucose transporter 1 deficiency, glycine encephalopathy, and pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency; 21% had other genetic causes including genetic syndromes, pathogenic copy number variants on array comparative genomic hybridization, and epileptic encephalopathy related to mutations in the SCN1A, SCN2A, SCN8A, KCNQ2, STXBP1, PCDH19, and SLC9A6 genes. Forty-five percent of patients obtained a genetic diagnosis by targeted next-generation sequencing epileptic encephalopathy panels. It is notable that 4.5% of patients had a treatable inherited metabolic disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to combine inherited metabolic disorders and other genetic causes of epileptic encephalopathy. Targeted next-generation sequencing panels increased the genetic diagnostic yield from 25% in patients with epileptic encephalopathy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  4. Achieving high rates of consent for genetic testing among African American smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Lisa Sanderson; Bronars, Carrie A; Thomas, Janet L; Okuyemi, Kolawole S; King, Gary; Mayo, Matthew S; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S

    2007-06-01

    Genetic factors play an important role in smoking behavior. Although African Americans are at disproportionately increased risk for tobacco-related morbidity and mortality, limited attention has been given to genetic investigation of tobacco use in this population. The present study examined consent for genetic testing among African American smokers enrolled in a smoking cessation clinical trial. African American light smokers (genetic analysis related to smoking. Participants completed assessment of demographic, psychosocial, and tobacco-related variables. Of 755 clinical trial participants, 745 (99%) responded to the genetic consent form. Of participants who responded, 620 (83%) provided consent for blood collection for genetic analysis. No significant differences were identified between individuals who consented to genetic analysis and those who denied consent. This study demonstrated the feasibility of obtaining consent for genetic analysis for smoking-related investigation among African American smokers. Findings support the inclusion of African Americans within genetic investigation of tobacco use and treatment.

  5. Genetic Testing between Private and Public Interests: Some Legal and Ethical Reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sándor, Judit

    2018-01-01

    In Europe, there is a wide variety of genetic tests that various private companies offer to patients or to consumers. More and more people have become curious about their genetic predisposition and susceptibility. Most public health-care systems, however, are not adequately prepared for responding to these new demands and to the results of these genetic tests as, quite often, there is no available therapy for the identified genetic condition. This discrepancy between the newly emerging expectations and the insufficient responses contributes to a further rift between the public and private sectors of health care. Individual genetic test results may also trigger the need for personalized medicine and may open up a competition between the two fields in offering further genetic tests and medical exams. Pro-active patients may need a different kind of information on genetic tests and their implications. In this context, how should the public health system deal with the challenges of private testing? Will private genetic testing transform health care from a solidarity-based system to an individualistic one? In this paper, I would like to explore the emerging legal and ethical issues related to genetic testing and the relevant legal framework that has developed so far. In the conclusion, I will examine the possibilities of further legal development.

  6. Genetic Testing between Private and Public Interests: Some Legal and Ethical Reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Sándor

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In Europe, there is a wide variety of genetic tests that various private companies offer to patients or to consumers. More and more people have become curious about their genetic predisposition and susceptibility. Most public health-care systems, however, are not adequately prepared for responding to these new demands and to the results of these genetic tests as, quite often, there is no available therapy for the identified genetic condition. This discrepancy between the newly emerging expectations and the insufficient responses contributes to a further rift between the public and private sectors of health care. Individual genetic test results may also trigger the need for personalized medicine and may open up a competition between the two fields in offering further genetic tests and medical exams. Pro-active patients may need a different kind of information on genetic tests and their implications. In this context, how should the public health system deal with the challenges of private testing? Will private genetic testing transform health care from a solidarity-based system to an individualistic one? In this paper, I would like to explore the emerging legal and ethical issues related to genetic testing and the relevant legal framework that has developed so far. In the conclusion, I will examine the possibilities of further legal development.

  7. Genetic tests obtainable through pharmacies: the good, the bad, and the ugly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrinos, George P; Baker, Darrol J; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Cooper, David N

    2013-07-08

    Genomic medicine seeks to exploit an individual's genomic information in the context of guiding the clinical decision-making process. In the post-genomic era, a range of novel molecular genetic testing methodologies have emerged, allowing the genetic testing industry to grow at a very rapid pace. As a consequence, a considerable number of different private diagnostic testing laboratories now provide a wide variety of genetic testing services, often employing a direct-to-consumer (DTC) business model to identify mutations underlying (or associated with) common Mendelian disorders, to individualize drug response, to attempt to determine an individual's risk of a multitude of complex (multifactorial) diseases, or even to determine a person's identity. Recently, we have noted a novel trend in the provision of private molecular genetic testing services, namely saliva and buccal swab collection kits (for deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) isolation) being offered for sale over the counter by pharmacies. This situation is somewhat different from the standard DTC genetic testing model, since pharmacists are healthcare professionals who are supposedly qualified to give appropriate advice to their clients. There are, however, a number of issues to be addressed in relation to the marketing of DNA collection kits for genetic testing through pharmacies, namely a requirement for regulatory clearance, the comparative lack of appropriate genetics education of the healthcare professionals involved, and most importantly, the lack of awareness on the part of both the patients and the general public with respect to the potential benefits or otherwise of the various types of genetic test offered, which may result in confusion as to which test could be beneficial in their own particular case. We believe that some form of genetic counseling should ideally be integrated into, and made inseparable from, the genetic testing process, while pharmacists should be obliged to receive some basic

  8. Genetic test feedback with weight control advice: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meisel Susanne F

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic testing for risk of weight gain is already available over the internet despite uncertain benefits and concerns about adverse emotional or behavioral effects. Few studies have assessed the effect of adding genetic test feedback to weight control advice, even though one of the proposed applications of genetic testing is to stimulate preventive action. This study will investigate the motivational effect of adding genetic test feedback to simple weight control advice in a situation where weight gain is relatively common. Methods/design First-year university students (n = 800 will be randomized to receive either 1 their personal genetic test result for a gene (FTO related to weight gain susceptibility in addition to a leaflet with simple weight control advice (‘Feedback + Advice’ group, FA, or 2 only the leaflet containing simple weight control advice (‘Advice Only’ group, AO. Motivation to avoid weight gain and active use of weight control strategies will be assessed one month after receipt of the leaflet with or without genetic test feedback. Weight and body fat will be measured at baseline and eight months follow-up. We will also assess short-term psychological reactions to the genetic test result. In addition, we will explore interactions between feedback condition and gene test status. Discussion We hope to provide a first indication of the clinical utility of weight-related genetic test feedback in the prevention context. Trial registration Current controlled trials ISRCTN91178663

  9. Should Australia Ban the Use of Genetic Test Results in Life Insurance?

    OpenAIRE

    Tiller, Jane; Otlowski, Margaret; Lacaze, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Under current Australian regulation, life insurance companies can require applicants to disclose all genetic test results, including results from research or direct-to-consumer tests. Life insurers can then use this genetic information in underwriting and policy decisions for mutually rated products, including life, permanent disability, and total income protection insurance. Over the past decade, many countries have implemented moratoria or legislative bans on the use of genetic information ...

  10. Genetic testing in intellectual disability psychiatry: Opinions and practices of UK child and intellectual disability psychiatrists.

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfe, K.; Stueber, K.; McQuillin, A.; Jichi, F.; Patch, C.; Flinter, F.; Strydom, A.; Bass, N.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An increasing number of genetic causes of intellectual disabilities (ID) are identifiable by clinical genetic testing, offering the prospect of bespoke patient management. However, little is known about the practices of psychiatrists and their views on genetic testing. METHOD: We undertook an online survey of 215 psychiatrists, who were contacted via the Royal College of Psychiatrist's Child and Adolescent and Intellectual Disability Psychiatry mailing lists. RESULTS: In compariso...

  11. Pre-and Post-test Genetic Counseling for Chromosomal and Mendelian Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jill Fonda; Stoll, Katie; Bernhardt, Barbara A

    2016-01-01

    Genetic carrier screening, prenatal screening for aneuploidy and prenatal diagnostic testing have expanded dramatically over the past two decades. Driven in part by powerful market forces, new complex testing modalities have become available after limited clinical research. The responsibility for offering these tests lies primarily on the obstetrical care provider, and has become more burdensome as the number of testing options expands. Genetic testing in pregnancy is optional, and decisions about undergoing tests, as well as follow-up testing, should be informed and based on individual patients’ values and needs. Careful pre- and post-test counseling is central to supporting informed decision-making. This article explores three areas of technical expansion in genetic testing: expanded carrier screening, non-invasive prenatal screening for fetal aneuploidies using cell-free DNA, and diagnostic testing using fetal chromosomal microarray testing, and provides insights aimed at enabling the obstetrical practitioner to better support patients considering these tests. PMID:26718445

  12. Familial effects of BRCA1 genetic mutation testing: changes in perceived family functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroup, Antoinette M; Smith, Ken R

    2007-01-01

    This study expands recent research that examines how the receipt of BRCA1 genetic test results affects family adaptability and cohesion 1 year after genetic risk notification. Study participants were members of a large Utah-based kindred with an identified mutation at the BRCA1 locus. The final sample, 90 men and 132 women, contributed information before genetic testing (baseline) and 4 months and/or 1 year after receipt of genetic test results. After controlling for other factors such as family coping resources (Family Crises-Oriented Personal Evaluation Scale) and strains (Family Strains Index) and the tested individual's anxiety levels before genetic testing (state anxiety subscale), men and women reported significant declines in family cohesion 1 year after genetic risk notification (P adaptability 1 year after risk notification (+0.21 points per month; P family cohesion and adaptability levels, whereas a personal history of cancer, having a great deal of caregiving involvement for a female relative with cancer, anxiety, and some types of coping resources had a negative effect on men's perceived family cohesion and adaptability levels. Although results showed that tested parents are perceiving a decline in family functioning after genetic risk notification, there is no evidence to suggest that the decline is due to carrier status. In fact, it is other life circumstances that exist at the time of the genetic testing process that seem to influence the degree to which families adjust to the experience and test results.

  13. Genetic Testing for Long-QT Syndrome Distinguishing Pathogenic Mutations From Benign Variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapa, Suraj; Tester, David J.; Salisbury, Benjamin A.; Harris-Kerr, Carole; Pungliya, Manish S.; Alders, Marielle; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Background-Genetic testing for long-QT syndrome (LQTS) has diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic implications. Hundreds of causative mutations in 12 known LQTS-susceptibility genes have been identified. Genetic testing that includes the 3 most commonly mutated genes is available clinically.

  14. Medical and lay attitudes towards genetic screening and testing in Finland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toiviainen, Hanna; Jallinoja, Piia; Aro, Arja R

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare physicians', midwives' and lay people's attitudes towards genetic screening and testing to find out whether medical education and experience influence attitudes of genetic screening and testing. The study was based on comparison of answers to joint questio...

  15. Psychosocial aspects of hereditary cancer (PAHC) questionnaire: development and testing of a screening questionnaire for use in clinical cancer genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eijzenga, W; Bleiker, E M A; Hahn, D E E; Kluijt, I; Sidharta, G N; Gundy, C; Aaronson, N K

    2014-08-01

    Up to three-quarters of individuals who undergo cancer genetic counseling and testing report psychosocial problems specifically related to that setting. The objectives of this study were to develop and evaluate the screening properties of a questionnaire designed to assess specific psychosocial problems related to cancer genetic counseling. We adopted the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Group guidelines to develop the Psychosocial Aspects of Hereditary Cancer (PAHC) questionnaire, a 26-item questionnaire organized into six problem domains: genetics, practical issues, family, living with cancer, emotions, and children. The Distress Thermometer and a question per domain on the perceived need for extra psychosocial services were included as well. We administered the questionnaire and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale to 127 counselees at the time of genetic counseling and 3 weeks after DNA test disclosure. As a gold standard to evaluate the screening properties of the questionnaire, participants underwent a semi-structured interview with an experienced social worker who assessed the presence and severity of problems per domain. A cutoff score representing responses of 'quite a bit' or 'very much' to one or more items within a given problem domain yielded moderate to high sensitivity across domains. A cutoff of 4 on the Distress Thermometer yielded high sensitivity. The questions regarding the perceived need for extra psychosocial services yielded high specificity and negative predictive values. The Psychosocial Aspects of Hereditary Cancer questionnaire in combination with the Distress Thermometer can be used as a first-line screener for psychosocial problems within the cancer genetic counseling setting. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Confidentiality in genetic testing: legal and ethical issues in an international context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoppers, B M

    1993-01-01

    This comparative legal study on confidentiality in genetic testing examines three levels of communication of genetic information: the personal; the familial; and the institutional third parties. At the first two levels, it is argued that the approach is one that recognizes genetic individuality and reciprocity within the physician-patient relationship without legislative interference. This stands in contrast to the possible use of genetic information by economic third parties or, even, that of the state with respect to the DNA profiling of the genetic identity of criminals, the approach for both areas being the promulgation of 'genetic-specific' or human rights legislation with the hope of preventing discrimination. This rush to constrain the impact of genetic information through legislation is criticized since it may well lead to further stigmatization. The author proposes the promotion of the concept of genetic privacy within the broader rubric of informational self-determination.

  17. Direct to consumer genetic testing-law and policy concerns in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paor, Aisling

    2017-11-25

    With rapid scientific and technological advances, the past few years has witnessed the emergence of a new genetic era and a growing understanding of the genetic make-up of human beings. These advances have propelled the introduction of companies offering direct to consumer (DTC) genetic testing, which facilitates the direct provision of such tests to consumers, (for example, via the internet). Although DTC genetic testing offers benefits by enhancing consumer accessibility to such technology, promoting proactive healthcare and increasing genetic awareness, it presents a myriad of challenges, from an ethical, legal and regulatory perspective. As DTC genetic testing usually eliminates the need for a medical professional in accessing genetic tests, this lack of professional guidance and counselling may result in misinterpretation and confusion regarding results. In addition, an evident concern relates to the scientific validity and quality of these tests. A further problem arising is the lack or inadequacy of regulation in this field. Despite the increasing accessibility of DTC genetic testing, this legislative vacuum is apparent in Ireland, where there is no concrete legislation. This article explores the main ethical, legal and regulatory issues arising with the advent of rapid advances in DTC genetic testing in Ireland. Further, with inevitable future advances in genetic science, as well as increasing internet accessibility, the challenges presented are likely to become more amplified. In consideration of the ethical and legal challenges, this paper highlights the regulation of DTC genetic testing as a growing concern in Ireland, recognising its importance to both the scientific community as well as in respect of enhancing consumer confidence in such technologies.

  18. Evaluating online direct-to-consumer marketing of genetic tests: informed choices or buyers beware?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geransar, Rose; Einsiedel, Edna

    2008-03-01

    Commercialization of genetic technologies is expanding the horizons for the marketing and sales of genetic tests direct-to-consumers (DTCs). This study assesses the information provision and access requirements that are in place for genetic tests that are being advertised DTC over the Internet. Sets of key words specific to DTC genetic testing were entered into popular Internet search engines to generate a list of 24 companies engaging in DTC advertising. Company requirements for physician mediation, genetic counseling arrangements, and information provision were coded to develop categories for quantitative analysis within each variable. Results showed that companies offering risk assessment and diagnostic testing were most likely to require that testing be mediated by a clinician, and to recommend physician-arranged counseling. Companies offering enhancement testing were less likely to require physician mediation of services and more likely to provide long-distance genetic counseling. DTC advertisements often provided information on disease etiology; this was most common in the case of multifactorial diseases. The majority of companies cited outside sources to support the validity of claims about clinical utility of the tests being advertised; companies offering risk assessment tests most frequently cited all information sources. DTC advertising for genetic tests that lack independent professional oversight raises troubling questions about appropriate use and interpretation of these tests by consumers and carries implications for the standards of patient care. These implications are discussed in the context of a public healthcare system.

  19. Impact of Genetic Counseling and Connexin-26 and Connexin-30 Testing on Deaf Identity and Comprehension of Genetic Test Results in a Sample of Deaf Adults: A Prospective, Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Christina G. S.; Boudreault, Patrick; Baldwin, Erin E.; Sinsheimer, Janet S.

    2014-01-01

    Using a prospective, longitudinal study design, this paper addresses the impact of genetic counseling and testing for deafness on deaf adults and the Deaf community. This study specifically evaluated the effect of genetic counseling and Connexin-26 and Connexin-30 genetic test results on participants' deaf identity and understanding of their genetic test results. Connexin-26 and Connexin-30 genetic testing was offered to participants in the context of linguistically and culturally appropriate genetic counseling. Questionnaire data collected from 209 deaf adults at four time points (baseline, immediately following pre-test genetic counseling, 1-month following genetic test result disclosure, and 6-months after result disclosure) were analyzed. Four deaf identity orientations (hearing, marginal, immersion, bicultural) were evaluated using subscales of the Deaf Identity Development Scale-Revised. We found evidence that participants understood their specific genetic test results following genetic counseling, but found no evidence of change in deaf identity based on genetic counseling or their genetic test results. This study demonstrated that culturally and linguistically appropriate genetic counseling can improve deaf clients' understanding of genetic test results, and the formation of deaf identity was not directly related to genetic counseling or Connexin-26 and Connexin-30 genetic test results. PMID:25375116

  20. Direct-to-consumer Genetic Testing: Changes in the EU Regulatory Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slokenberga, Santa

    2015-12-01

    Rapid advances in genomics and technology have rendered genetic testing services easily accessible to consumers over the Internet in the form of direct-to-consumer genetic testing. In the EU, the IVD Directive has been animadverted for its inability to tackle the challenges direct-to-consumer genetic testing has posed. Currently, the EU legislation is in a transition state. It is thus, timely to assess, to what extent the proposed IVD Regulation is intended to address the performance requirements and utility of direct-to-consumer genetic tests, which are made available to consumers within the EU over the Internet, and discuss the developments vis-à-vis the IVD Directive. To compare with the IVD Directive, the IVD Regulation presents a major shift in how direct-to-consumer genetic testing is treated in the E U. It remains unclear, whether and how the EU requirements can be applied beyond the EU market.

  1. Provider Discussions of Genetic Tests With U.S. Women at Risk for a BRCA Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Leland E; Haas, Jennifer S; Simon, Steven R

    2018-02-01

    The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends that primary care providers screen unaffected women with a family history of BRCA mutation-associated cancers, but without a personal history of BRCA-related cancer, for referral to genetic counseling and potential genetic testing. The 2015 National Health Interview Survey was analyzed in January 2017 to determine the rates at which unaffected adult women with a positive family history of BRCA-related cancers, assessed using the Family History Screen-7, reported discussing genetic testing with a provider, using genetic counseling services, and having genetic testing for increased cancer risk. Clinical correlates associated with these outcomes were assessed using multivariable logistic regression (AOR with 95% CI). Among unaffected Family History Screen-7 screen-positive women, 9.5% reported discussing genetic testing with a provider, 5.1% reported genetic counseling, and 2.7% reported uptake of genetic testing. Younger women (aged 18-39 and 40-49 years) were more likely to discuss genetic testing than women aged ≥60 years (AOR=1.50, 95% CI=1.09, 2.06 and AOR=1.64, 95% CI=1.15, 2.33, respectively). Women of black race (AOR=1.50, 95% CI=1.09, 2.07) and women with greater than a high school education (AOR=1.85, 95% CI=1.41, 2.43) were more likely to discuss genetic testing than women of white race and women with a high school education or less, respectively. Among a higher risk subgroup with an even stronger family history of BRCA-associated cancers, 18.5% of women reported discussions. Despite a decade-old U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation, few unaffected women at risk for BRCA-associated cancer report discussing genetic testing with a provider. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Bio science: genetic genealogy testing and the pursuit of African ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Alondra

    2008-10-01

    This paper considers the extent to which the geneticization of 'race' and ethnicity is the prevailing outcome of genetic testing for genealogical purposes. The decoding of the human genome precipitated a change of paradigms in genetics research, from an emphasis on genetic similarity to a focus on molecular-level differences among individuals and groups. This shift from lumping to splitting spurred ongoing disagreements among scholars about the significance of 'race' and ethnicity in the genetics era. I characterize these divergent perspectives as 'pragmatism' and 'naturalism'. Drawing upon ethnographic fieldwork and interviews, I argue that neither position fully accounts for how understandings of 'race' and ethnicity are being transformed with genetic genealogy testing. While there is some acquiescence to genetic thinking about ancestry, and by implication, 'race', among African-American and black British consumers of genetic genealogy testing, test-takers also adjudicate between sources of genealogical information and from these construct meaningful biographical narratives. Consumers engage in highly situated 'objective' and 'affiliative' self-fashioning, interpreting genetic test results in the context of their 'genealogical aspirations'. I conclude that issues of site, scale, and subjectification must be attended to if scholars are to understand whether and to what extent social identities are being transformed by recent developments in genetic science.

  3. Points to consider for prioritizing clinical genetic testing services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severin, Franziska; Borry, Pascal; Cornel, Martina C

    2015-01-01

    of prioritization criteria would be desirable. A decision process following the accountability for reasonableness framework was undertaken, including a multidisciplinary EuroGentest/PPPC-ESHG workshop to develop shared prioritization criteria. Resources are currently too limited to fund all the beneficial genetic......, following the principles of accountability for reasonableness. We provide points to consider to stimulate this debate across the EU and to serve as a reference for improving patient management.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 24 September 2014; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2014.190....

  4. Genetic Testing for Respiratory Disease: Are We There Yet?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter D Paré

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The human genome project promised a revolution in health care – the development of ‘personalized medicine’, where knowledge of an individual’s genetic code enables the prediction of risk for specific diseases and the potential to alter that risk based on preventive measures and lifestyle modification. The present brief review provides a report card on the progress toward that goal with respect to respiratory disease. Should generalized population screening for genetic risk factors for respiratory disease be instituted? Or not?

  5. Genetic test utilization and diagnostic yield in adult patients with neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardakjian, Tanya M; Helbig, Ingo; Quinn, Colin; Elman, Lauren B; McCluskey, Leo F; Scherer, Steven S; Gonzalez-Alegre, Pedro

    2018-03-28

    To determine the diagnostic yield of different genetic test modalities in adult patients with neurological disorders, we evaluated all adult patients seen for genetic diagnostic evaluation in the outpatient neurology practice at the University of Pennsylvania between January 2016 and April 2017 as part of the newly created Penn Neurogenetics Program. Subjects were identified through our electronic medical system as those evaluated by the Program's single clinical genetic counselor in that period. A total of 377 patients were evaluated by the Penn Neurogenetics Program in different settings and genetic testing recommended. Of those, 182 (48%) were seen in subspecialty clinic setting and 195 (52%) in a General Neurogenetics Clinic. Genetic testing was completed in over 80% of patients in whom it was recommended. The diagnostic yield was 32% across disease groups. Stratified by testing modality, the yield was highest with directed testing (50%) and array comparative genomic hybridization (45%), followed by gene panels and exome testing (25% each). In conclusion, genetic testing can be successfully requested in clinic in a large majority of adult patients. Age is not a limiting factor for a genetic diagnostic evaluation and the yield of clinical testing across phenotypes (almost 30%) is consistent with previous phenotype-focused or research-based studies. These results should inform the development of specific guidelines for clinical testing and serve as evidence to improve reimbursement by insurance payers.

  6. The psychological impact of predictive genetic testing for Huntington's disease: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozier, S; Robertson, N; Dale, M

    2015-02-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative genetic condition for which a predictive genetic test by mutation analysis has been available since 1993. However, whilst revealing the future presence of the disease, testing may have an adverse psychological impact given that the disease is progressive, incurable and ultimately fatal. This review seeks to systematically explore the psychological impact of genetic testing for individuals undergoing pre-symptomatic mutation analysis. Three databases (Medline, PsycInfo and Scopus) were interrogated for studies utilising standardised measures to assess psychological impact following predictive genetic testing for HD. From 100 papers initially identified, eight articles were eligible for inclusion. Psychological impact of predictive genetic testing was not found to be associated with test result. No detrimental effect of predictive genetic testing on non-carriers was found, although the process was not found to be psychologically neutral. Fluctuation in levels of distress was found over time for carriers and non-carriers alike. Methodological weaknesses of published literature were identified, notably the needs of individuals not requesting genetic testing, as well as inadequate support for individuals registering elevated distress and declining post-test follow-up. Further assessment of these vulnerable individuals is warranted to establish the extent and type of future psychological support.

  7. An investigation of the statistical power of neutrality tests based on comparative and population genetic data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhai, Weiwei; Nielsen, Rasmus; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2009-01-01

    is low. Tests based solely on the distribution of allele frequencies or the site frequency spectrum, such as the Ewens-Watterson test or Tajima's D, have less power in detecting both positive and negative selection because of the transient nature of positive selection and the weak signal left by negative......In this report, we investigate the statistical power of several tests of selective neutrality based on patterns of genetic diversity within and between species. The goal is to compare tests based solely on population genetic data with tests using comparative data or a combination of comparative...... and population genetic data. We show that in the presence of repeated selective sweeps on relatively neutral background, tests based on the d(N)/d(S) ratios in comparative data almost always have more power to detect selection than tests based on population genetic data, even if the overall level of divergence...

  8. American chestnut: A test case for genetic engineering?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leila. Pinchot

    2014-01-01

    The thought of genetically engineered (GE) trees might conjure images of mutant trees with unnatural and invasive tendencies, but there is much more to the story. GE trees are a new reality that, like it or not, will probably be part of the future of forestry. The basic inclination of most Forest Guild stewards is to reject GE trees as violating our principle to...

  9. Chronic disease risk management: Combining genetic testing with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutrigenetics has been used for decades to prevent rare monogenic disorders such as phenylketonuria. Gene-diet interaction can now also be targeted to prevent or reduce the risk of many chronic conditions long before clinical manifestation. This multidisciplinary approach unites conventional medicine with genetics and ...

  10. Diagnostic, carrier and prenatal genetic testing for fragile X ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common inherited cause of intellectual disability (ID) worldwide, is caused by the expansion of a CGG repeat in the fragile X mental retardation gene (FMR-1) gene. Objectives. To review, retrospectively, the genetic services for FXS and other FMR-1-related disorders ...

  11. Field testing genetically modified organisms: framework for decisions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    National Research Council Staff

    1989-01-01

    ... on Scientific Evaluation of the Introduction of Genetically Modified Microoganisms and Plants into the Environment Board on Biology Commission on Life Sciences National Research Council NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. 1989 i Copyrightthe cannot be not from book, paper however, version for formatting, original authoritative the typesetting-s...

  12. Was I Right? Testing Observations against Predictions in Mendelian Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hursch, Thomas Mercer

    1979-01-01

    Two statistical tools, the Chi-square and standard error approaches, are compared for use in Mendelian genetics experiments. Although the Chi-square technique is more often used, the standard error approach is to be preferred for both research investigations and student experiments. (BB)

  13. Preventing organ damage by genetic testing for hereditary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haemochromatosis can be prevented by regular blood donation or phlebotomy and therefore detection of a genetic predisposition at an early age, before irreversible damage to cardiac, hepatic and endocrine tissue occurs, represents an important clinical goal. South African Family Practice Vol. 47(2) 2005: 44-45 ...

  14. Ovine Reference Materials and Assays for Prion Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Genetic predisposition to scrapie in sheep is associated with variation in the peptide sequence of the ovine prion protein encoded by Prnp. Codon variants implicated in scrapie susceptibility or disease progression include those at amino acid positions 112, 136, 141, 154, and 171. Nin...

  15. Genetic testing for Lynch syndrome: family communication and motivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H.M. Leenen (Celine); M.D. Heijer (Mariska den); C.A. van der Meer (Conny); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); M.E. van Leerdam (Monique); A. Wagner (Anja)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractCurrent genetic counselling practice for Lynch syndrome (LS) relies on diagnosed index patients to inform their biological family about LS, referred to as the family-mediated approach. The objective of this study was to evaluate this approach and to identify factors influencing the

  16. Expertise for Teaching Biology Situated in the Context of Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Zande, Paul; Akkerman, Sanne F.; Brekelmans, Mieke; Waarlo, Arend Jan; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2012-07-01

    Contemporary genomics research will impact the daily practice of biology teachers who want to teach up-to-date genetics in secondary education. This article reports on a research project aimed at enhancing biology teachers' expertise for teaching genetics situated in the context of genetic testing. The increasing body of scientific knowledge concerning genetic testing and the related consequences for decision-making indicate the societal relevance of an educational approach based on situated learning. What expertise do biology teachers need for teaching genetics in the personal health context of genetic testing? This article describes the required expertise by exploring the educational practice. Nine experienced teachers were interviewed about the pedagogical content, moral and interpersonal expertise areas concerning how to teach genetics in the personal health context of genetic testing, and the lessons of five of them were observed. The findings showed that the required teacher expertise encompasses specific pedagogical content expertise, interpersonal expertise and a preference for teacher roles and teaching approaches for the moral aspects of teaching in this context. A need for further development of teaching and learning activities for (reflection on) moral reasoning came to the fore. Suggestions regarding how to apply this expertise into context-based genetics education are discussed.

  17. An investigation of the genetic toxicology of irradiated foodstuffs using short-term test systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, B.J.; Kranz, E.; Elias, P.S.

    1980-01-01

    As part of a programme of short-term tests used to detect possible genetic toxicity in irradiated foodstuffs, cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells were exposed to extracts and digests of irradiated and unirradiated dates, fish and chicken and subjected to tests for cytotoxicity, sister chromatid exchange induction and mutation to thioguanine resistance. The results showed no evidence of genetic toxicity induced in food by irradiation. The general applicability of cell culture tests to the detection of mutagens in food is discussed. (author)

  18. Regulation of Internet-based Genetic Testing: Challenges for Australia and Other Jurisdictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiller, Jane; Lacaze, Paul

    2018-01-01

    The Internet currently enables unprecedented ease of access for direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing, with saliva collection kits posted directly to consumer homes from anywhere in the world. This poses new challenges for local jurisdictions in regulating genetic testing, traditionally a tightly-regulated industry. Some Internet-based genetic tests have the capacity to cause significant confusion or harm to consumers who are unaware of the risks or potential variability in quality. The emergence of some online products of questionable content, unsupported by adequate scientific evidence, is a cause for concern. Proliferation of such products in the absence of regulation has the potential to damage public trust in accredited and established clinical genetic testing during a critical period of evidence generation for genomics. Here, we explore the challenges arising from the emergence of Internet-based DTC genetic testing. In particular, there are challenges in regulating unaccredited or potentially harmful Internet-based DTC genetic testing products. In Australia, challenges exist for the Therapeutic Goods Administration, which oversees regulation of the genetic testing sector. Concerns and challenges faced in Australia are likely to reflect those of other comparable non-US jurisdictions. Here, we summarize current Australian regulation, highlight concerns, and offer recommendations on how Australia and other comparable jurisdictions might be more proactive in addressing this emerging public health issue.

  19. Attitudes toward prenatal genetic testing for Treacher Collins syndrome among affected individuals and families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rebecca L; Lawson, Cathleen S; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Sanderson, Saskia C

    2012-07-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is a craniofacial syndrome that is both phenotypically variable and heterogeneous, caused by mutations in the TCOF1, POLR1C, and POLR1D genes. We examined attitudes towards TCS prenatal genetic testing among affected families using a telephone questionnaire. Participants were 31 affected adults and relatives recruited primarily through families cared for in the mid-Atlantic region. Nineteen participants (65%) reported that they would take a TCS prenatal genetic test which could not predict degree of disease severity. Interest in TCS genetic testing was associated with higher income, higher concern about having a child with TCS, lower religiosity, lower concern about genetic testing procedures, and having a sporadic rather than familial mutation. Over half reported that their decision to have TCS genetic testing would be influenced a great deal by their desire to relieve anxiety and attitudes toward abortion. Ten participants (32%) reported that they would be likely to end the pregnancy upon receiving a positive test result; this was lower amongst TCS affected individuals and higher amongst participants with children with TCS. Genetics healthcare providers need to be aware of affected individuals' and families' attitudes and interest in prenatal genetic testing for TCS, and the possible implications for other craniofacial disorders, so that patients' information needs can be met. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Genetic counseling and testing for Alzheimer disease: Joint practice guidelines of the American College of Medical Genetics and the National Society of Genetic Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Jill S.; Hahn, Susan E.; Catania, Jennifer Williamson; LaRusse-Eckert, Susan; Butson, Melissa Barber; Rumbaugh, Malia; Strecker, Michelle N.; Roberts, J. Scott; Burke, Wylie; Mayeux, Richard; Bird, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is the most common cause of dementia. It occurs worldwide and affects all ethnic groups. The incidence of Alzheimer disease is increasing due, in part, to increased life expectancy and the aging baby boomer generation. The average lifetime risk of developing Alzheimer disease is 10–12%. This risk at least doubles with the presence of a first-degree relative with the disorder. Despite its limited utility, patients express concern over their risk and, in some instances, request testing. Furthermore, research has demonstrated that testing individuals for apoli-poprotein E can be valuable and safe in certain contexts. However, because of the complicated genetic nature of the disorder, few clinicians are prepared to address the genetic risks of Alzheimer disease with their patients. Given the increased awareness in family history thanks to family history campaigns, the increasing incidence of Alzheimer disease, and the availability of direct to consumer testing, patient requests for information is increasing. This practice guideline provides clinicians with a framework for assessing their patients’ genetic risk for Alzheimer disease, identifying which individuals may benefit from genetic testing, and providing the key elements of genetic counseling for AD. PMID:21577118

  1. Attitudes toward genetic testing among the general population and relatives of patients with a severe genetic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hietala, M; Hakonen, A; Aro, A R

    1995-01-01

    In the present study we explore the attitudes of the Finnish population toward genetic testing by conducting a questionnaire study of a stratified sample of the population as well as of family members of patients with a severe hereditary disease, aspartylglucosaminuria (AGU). The questionnaire ev...

  2. Genetic testing in patients with global developmental delay / intellectual disabilities. A review

    OpenAIRE

    MICLEA, DIANA; PECA, LOREDANA; CUZMICI, ZINA; POP, IOAN VICTOR

    2015-01-01

    Genetic factors are responsible for up to 40% developmental disability cases, such as global developmental delay/intellectual disability (GDD/DI). The American and more recently the European guidelines on this group of diseases state that genetic testing is essential and should become a standardized diagnostic practice. The main arguments for the necessity of implementing such a practice are: (1) the high prevalence of developmental disabilities (3% of the population); (2) the high genetic co...

  3. The Changing Age of Individuals Seeking Presymptomatic Genetic Testing for Huntington Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Melissa A; Quillin, John; York, Timothy P; Testa, Claudia M; Rosen, Ami R; Norris, Virginia W

    2018-02-20

    Huntington disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Presymptomatic genetic testing allows at-risk individuals to clarify their risk status. Understanding the characteristics and motivations of individuals seeking HD presymptomatic genetic testing better equips genetic counselors and other healthcare professionals to provide comprehensive and personalized care. The aims of this study were to (1) determine whether the average age when individuals seek presymptomatic HD genetic testing has decreased over time, (2) assess motivations for seeking testing, (3) explore whether there is a relationship between age and motivations, and (4) explore genetic counselors' perceptions of the shift in age. Data from the US HD testing centers (N = 4) were analyzed. A small but statistically significant decrease in age of individuals seeking presymptomatic testing was observed (p = 0.045). HD community members (N = 77) were surveyed regarding presymptomatic testing motivations. Younger individuals were more likely than older individuals to cite "To learn whether or not you would develop HD" and "To make choices about further education or a career" compared to older individuals (p age of testing. All of these respondents had provided HD testing for ten or more years and anecdotally believed the age at testing has decreased over time. Study results help providers personalize counseling based on patient's age and serve as a starting point for more research into the relationship between age at testing and motivations for testing.

  4. A case that underwent bilateral video-assisted thoracoscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No Abstract Available A case that underwent bilateral video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical (VATS) biopsy combined with pneumonectomy is presented. The patient developed hypoxia during the contralateral VATS biopsy. His hypoxia was treated with positive expiratory pressure (PEEP) to the dependent lung and apneic ...

  5. Parents' interest in genetic testing of their offspring in multiplex epilepsy families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminiti, Courtney B; Hesdorffer, Dale C; Shostak, Sara; Goldsmith, Jeff; Sorge, Shawn T; Winawer, Melodie R; Phelan, Jo C; Chung, Wendy K; Ottman, Ruth

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate parents' interest in genetic testing of their offspring in families containing multiple individuals with epilepsy. Seventy-seven parents with affected offspring and 173 parents without affected offspring from families containing multiple individuals with epilepsy completed a questionnaire asking about their interest in genetic testing of their offspring. Interest in testing was ascertained in four scenarios defined by clinical utility and penetrance of the gene in the test (100% vs. 50%). Pairwise agreement in interest was assessed between parents for testing themselves versus their offspring, and between mothers and fathers for their offspring. Among parents with affected offspring, the proportion interested in genetic testing of offspring ("diagnostic testing") was 86% in the 100% penetrance, clinical utility scenario, and 71% in the 100% penetrance, no clinical utility scenario (p = 0.007). Among parents without affected offspring, comparable proportions interested in genetic testing of offspring ("predictive testing") were 74% and 53% (p < 0.001), and were significantly lower than in parents with affected offspring (clinical utility, p = 0.02; no clinical utility, p = 0.01). Interest in testing did not differ by gene penetrance. Parents' agreement in testing interest for themselves versus their offspring was "substantial" (90% agreement, κ = 0.72) for a test with clinical utility, and "almost perfect" for a test without clinical utility (94% agreement, κ = 0.88). Agreement in testing interest between mothers and fathers was "moderate" for a test with clinical utility (85% agreement, κ = 0.48,), and "fair" for a test without clinical utility (67% agreement, κ = 0.30). Interest in diagnostic genetic testing is strong among parents with offspring with epilepsy, particularly when the test offers clinical utility. Testing interest is lower for a diagnostic test without clinical utility, or for a predictive test in offspring at risk of developing

  6. Current perspectives on recommendations for BRCA genetic testing in ovarian cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergote, Ignace; Banerjee, Susana; Gerdes, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, BRCA genetic testing has been undertaken to identify patients and family members at future risk of developing cancer and patients have been referred for testing based on family history. However, the now recognised risk of ovarian cancer (OC) patients, even those with no known family...... OC (excluding borderline or mucinous), including those with fallopian tube and peritoneal cancers, should be considered as candidates for referral for BRCA genetic testing, irrespective of age; genetic testing should ideally be offered at diagnosis, although patients can be referred at any stage...... of the existing data and guidelines in the European Union, relating to recommendations, as well as considerations, for the referral of OC patients for BRCA genetic testing. Based on this review of newly updated guidance and up-to-date evidence, the following is recommended: all patients with invasive epithelial...

  7. Critical overview of applications of genetic testing in sport talent identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Stephen M

    2012-12-01

    Talent identification for future sport performance is of paramount interest for many groups given the challenges of finding and costs of training potential elite athletes. Because genetic factors have been implicated in many performance- related traits (strength, endurance, etc.), a natural inclination is to consider the addition of genetic testing to talent identification programs. While the importance of genetic factors to sport performance is generally not disputed, whether genetic testing can positively inform talent identification is less certain. The present paper addresses the science behind the genetic tests that are now commercially available (some under patent protection) and aimed at predicting future sport performance potential. Also discussed are the challenging ethical issues that emerge from the availability of these tests. The potential negative consequences associated with genetic testing of young athletes will very likely outweigh any positive benefit for sport performance prediction at least for the next several years. The paper ends by exploring the future possibilities for genetic testing as the science of genomics in sport matures over the coming decade(s).

  8. Cost-effectiveness analysis of carrier and prenatal genetic testing for X-linked hemophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Che Tsai

    2015-08-01

    Conclusion: Carrier and prenatal genetic testing for hemophilia is a cost-effective investment in healthcare allocation. A case management system should be integrated in the current practice to facilitate patient care (e.g., collecting family pedigrees and providing genetic counseling.

  9. 76 FR 72424 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Information Program on the Genetic Testing Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-23

    ... more than 2,000 genetic conditions are available; however, there is no centralized public resource that... of making this information easily accessible to health care providers, patients, consumers, and... functions, including (1) Encouraging providers of genetic tests to enhance transparency by publicly sharing...

  10. Utility of Post-Mortem Genetic Testing in Cases of Sudden Arrhythmic Death Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lahrouchi, Najim; Raju, Hariharan; Lodder, Elisabeth M.; Papatheodorou, Efstathios; Ware, James S.; Papadakis, Michael; Tadros, Rafik; Cole, Della; Skinner, Jonathan R.; Crawford, Jackie; Love, Donald R.; Pua, Chee J.; Soh, Bee Y.; Bhalshankar, Jaydutt D.; Govind, Risha; Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob; Winkel, Bo G.; van der Werf, Christian; Wijeyeratne, Yanushi D.; Mellor, Greg; Till, Jan; Cohen, Marta C.; Tome-Esteban, Maria; Sharma, Sanjay; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Cook, Stuart A.; Bezzina, Connie R.; Sheppard, Mary N.; Behr, Elijah R.

    2017-01-01

    Sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS) describes a sudden death with negative autopsy and toxicological analysis. Cardiac genetic disease is a likely etiology. This study investigated the clinical utility and combined yield of post-mortem genetic testing (molecular autopsy) in cases of SADS and

  11. Genetic analysis of Test Day Milk Yields of Brown Swiss cattle raised ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 3696 Test Day Milk Yield (TDMY) records of Brown Swiss cows raised at Konuklar State Farm in the Konya Province of Turkey were used for estimating phenotypic and genetic parameters for TDMY. The phenotypic and genetic parameters were estimated by an MTDFREML programme using a Single Trait Animal ...

  12. Learners in dialogue. Teacher experise and learning in the context of genetic testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zande, P.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Learners in Dialogue; this thesis aims at the exploration of teacher expertise for teachers who want to teach genetics in the context of genetic testing and at finding ways to foster teacher learning concerning this expertise. Recent developments in the field of genomics will impact the daily

  13. Utility of Post-Mortem Genetic Testing in Cases of Sudden Arrhythmic Death Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lahrouchi, Najim; Raju, Hariharan; Lodder, Elisabeth M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS) describes a sudden death with negative autopsy and toxicological analysis. Cardiac genetic disease is a likely etiology. OBJECTIVES: This study investigated the clinical utility and combined yield of post-mortem genetic testing (molecular autopsy...

  14. EMQN/CMGS best practice guidelines for the molecular genetic testing of Huntington disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losekoot, Monique; van Belzen, Martine J; Seneca, Sara; Bauer, Peter; Stenhouse, Susan A R; Barton, David E

    2013-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by the expansion of an unstable polymorphic trinucleotide (CAG)n repeat in exon 1 of the HTT gene, which translates into an extended polyglutamine tract in the protein. Laboratory diagnosis of HD involves estimation of the number of CAG repeats. Molecular genetic testing for HD is offered in a wide range of laboratories both within and outside the European community. In order to measure the quality and raise the standard of molecular genetic testing in these laboratories, the European Molecular Genetics Quality Network has organized a yearly external quality assessment (EQA) scheme for molecular genetic testing of HD for over 10 years. EQA compares a laboratory's output with a fixed standard both for genotyping and reporting of the results to the referring physicians. In general, the standard of genotyping is very high but the clarity of interpretation and reporting of the test result varies more widely. This emphasizes the need for best practice guidelines for this disorder. We have therefore developed these best practice guidelines for genetic testing for HD to assist in testing and reporting of results. The analytical methods and the potential pitfalls of molecular genetic testing are highlighted and the implications of the different test outcomes for the consultand and his or her family members are discussed. PMID:22990145

  15. Barriers to participating in genetic counseling and BRCA testing during primary treatment for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlich-Bakker, Kathryn J; ten Kroode, Herman F J; Wárlám-Rodenhuis, Carla C; van den Bout, Jan; Ausems, Margreet G E M

    2007-11-01

    Little is known about reasons why eligible breast cancer patients decline BRCA mutation testing. They may withdraw at different stages during genetic counseling for different reasons. We prospectively studied perceived benefits and barriers to genetic counseling and BRCA testing in 102 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients approached for genetic counseling at the start of radiotherapy. Patients completed questionnaires and participated in interviews at different stages of the counseling protocol. Participation was not influenced by distress, knowledge about hereditary breast cancer, previous genetic testing in relatives, or perceived risks and barriers. Immediate decliners (n = 23) do not believe genetic testing is relevant for them. Patients who decline after pedigree compilation (n = 14) are more hesitant and anxious about the influence of the test result on their future often wishing to postpone further testing. Late decliners (n = 7) withdraw afraid of the test result and/or after a relative's objection. These decliners are not easily identified upon approach because they are similar to patients who receive a DNA test result (n = 58). Notwithstanding their decline, 81% agreed to the timing or would have preferred an earlier approach for genetic counseling. Decliners may make more informed decisions after tailored health education, including adequate risk information.

  16. A report template for molecular genetic tests designed to improve communication between the clinician and laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuner, Maren T; Hilborne, Lee; Brown, Julie; Lubin, Ira M

    2012-07-01

    Errors are most likely to occur during the pre- and postanalytic phases of the genetic testing process, which can contribute to underuse, overuse, and misuse of genetic tests. To mitigate these errors, we created a template for molecular genetic test reports that utilizes the combined features of synoptic reporting and narrative interpretation. A variation of the Delphi consensus process with an expert panel was used to create a draft report template, which was further informed by focus group discussions with primary care physicians. There was agreement that molecular genetic test reports should present information in groupings that flow in a logical manner, and most participants preferred the following order of presentation: patient and physician information, test performed, test results and interpretation, guidance on next steps, and supplemental information. We define data elements for the report as "required," "optional," "possible," and "not necessary"; provide recommendations regarding the grouping of these data elements; and describe the ideal design of the report template, including the preferred order of the report sections, formatting of data, and length of the report. With input from key stakeholders and building upon prior work, we created a template for molecular genetic test reports designed to improve clinical decision making at the point of care. The template design should lead to more effective communication between the laboratory and ordering clinician. Studies are needed to assess the usefulness and effectiveness of molecular genetic test reports generated using this template.

  17. Utilization of genetic testing among children with developmental disabilities in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiely B

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bridget Kiely, Sujit Vettam, Andrew Adesman Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Steven and Alexandra Cohen Children’s Medical Center of New York, New Hyde Park, NY, USA Purpose: Several professional societies recommend that genetic testing be routinely included in the etiologic workup of children with developmental disabilities. The aim of this study was to determine the rate at which genetic testing is performed in this population, based on data from a nationally representative survey.Methods: Data were analyzed from the Survey of Pathways to Diagnosis and Services, a telephone-based survey of parents and guardians of US school-age children with current or past developmental conditions. This study included 3,371 respondents who indicated that their child had an autism spectrum disorder (ASD, intellectual disability (ID, and/or developmental delay (DD at the time of survey administration. History of genetic testing was assessed based on report by the parent/s. Children were divided into the following five mutually exclusive condition groups: ASD with ID; ASD with DD, without ID; ASD only, without ID or DD; ID without ASD; and DD only, without ID or ASD. Logistic regression was used to assess the demographic correlates of genetic testing, to compare the rates of genetic testing across groups, and to examine associations between genetic testing and use of other health-care services.Results: Overall, 32% of this sample had a history of genetic testing, including 34% of all children with ASD and 43% of those with ID. After adjusting for demographics, children with ASD + ID were more than seven times as likely as those with ASD only, and more than twice as likely as those who had ID without ASD, to have undergone genetic testing. Prior specialist care (developmental pediatrician or neurologist and access to all needed providers within the previous year were associated with higher odds of genetic testing

  18. Genetic Testing for Sports Performance, Responses to Training and Injury Risk: Practical and Ethical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Alun G; Wackerhage, Henning; Day, Stephen H

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses practical and ethical considerations regarding genetic tests to predict performance and/or risk of exercise-related injury or illness. Various people might wish to conduct sport-related genetic tests for a variety of reasons. For example, an individual might seek personal genetic information to help guide their own sport participation. A sports coach might wish to test young athletes to aid team selection or individualize training. A physician might want to predict the risk of injury or illness in athletes and advise regarding selection or preventative measures. An insurance company might seek to estimate the risk of career-threatening injury for athletes based partly on genetic information. Whilst this information is, in part, encoded in our DNA sequence, the available tests allow generally only a poor prediction of the aforementioned variables. In other words, the current genetic tests and analysis methods are not powerful enough to inform important decisions in sport to a substantial degree. It is particularly disappointing that more than half of the commercially available genetic tests related to exercise and sport do not appear to identify publicly the genetic variants they assess, making scrutiny by academic scholars and consumers (or their representatives) impossible. There are also challenging ethical issues to consider. For example, the imposition of genetic tests on individuals (especially young people) by third parties is potentially susceptible to abuse. Scientists and practitioners should understand the limitations of the tests currently available, the ethical concerns and the importance of counselling before and after testing so that they are only used in a responsible manner. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Attitudes Toward Breast Cancer Genetic Testing in Five Special Population Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Amelie G; Chalela, Patricia; Gallion, Kipling J; Muñoz, Edgar; Holden, Alan E; Burhansstipanov, Linda; Smith, Selina A; Wong-Kim, Evaon; Wyatt, Stephen W; Suarez, Lucina

    2015-01-01

    This study examined interest in and attitudes toward genetic testing in 5 different population groups. The survey included African American, Asian American, Latina, Native American, and Appalachian women with varying familial histories of breast cancer. A total of 49 women were interviewed in person. Descriptive and nonparametric statistical techniques were used to assess ethnic group differences. Overall, interest in testing was high. All groups endorsed more benefits than risks. There were group differences regarding endorsement of specific benefits and risks: testing to "follow doctor recommendations" (p=0.017), "concern for effects on family" (p=0.044), "distrust of modern medicine" (p=0.036), "cost" (p=0.025), and "concerns about communication of results to others" (p=0.032). There was a significant inverse relationship between interest and genetic testing cost (p<0.050), with the exception of Latinas, who showed the highest level of interest regardless of increasing cost. Cost may be an important barrier to obtaining genetic testing services, and participants would benefit by genetic counseling that incorporates the unique cultural values and beliefs of each group to create an individualized, culturally competent program. Further research about attitudes toward genetic testing is needed among Asian Americans, Native Americans, and Appalachians for whom data are severely lacking. Future study of the different Latina perceptions toward genetic testing are encouraged.

  20. Attitudes about regulation among direct-to-consumer genetic testing customers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollinger, Juli Murphy; Green, Robert C; Kaufman, David

    2013-05-01

    The first regulatory rulings by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing services are expected soon. As the process of regulating these and other genetic tests moves ahead, it is important to understand the preferences of DTC genetic testing customers about the regulation of these products. An online survey of customers of three DTC genetic testing companies was conducted 2-8 months after they had received their results. Participants were asked about the importance of regulating the companies selling DTC genetic tests. Most of the 1,046 respondents responded that it would be important to have a nongovernmental (84%) or governmental agency (73%) monitor DTC companies' claims to ensure the consistency with scientific evidence. However, 66% also felt that it was important that DTC tests be available without governmental oversight. Nearly, all customers favored a policy to ensure that insurers and law enforcement officials could not access their information. Although many DTC customers want access to genetic testing services without restrictions imposed by the government regulation, most also favor an organization operating alongside DTC companies that will ensure that the claims made by the companies are consistent with sound scientific evidence. This seeming contradiction may indicate that DTC customers want to ensure that they have unfettered access to high-quality information. Additionally, policies to help ensure privacy of data would be welcomed by customers, despite relatively high confidence in the companies.

  1. Family system characteristics and psychological adjustment to cancer susceptibility genetic testing : a prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oostrom, I.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; Duivenvoorden, H. J.; Brocker-Vriends, A. H. J. T.; van Asperen, C. J.; Sijmons, R. H.; Seynaeve, C.; Van Gool, A. R.; Klijn, J. G. M.; Tibben, A.

    This study examined prospectively the contribution of family functioning, differentiation to parents, family communication and support from relatives to psychological distress in individuals undergoing genetic susceptibility testing for a known familial pathogenic BRCA1/2 or Hereditary nonpolyposis

  2. Are Adolescents with ADHD Interested in Genetic Testing for Nicotine Addiction Susceptibility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda J. Herbert

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been well-established that some adolescents diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD are at increased risk for cigarette smoking. Current research on the genetic basis of this association could ultimately translate into genetic tests capable of identifying smoking-prone adolescents with ADHD. In this study we examined 81 ADHD affected adolescents’ (age 13–21 interest in genetic testing for nicotine addiction susceptibility. Fifty-seven percent of adolescents indicated a fair amount of interest or more in testing. Most adolescents indicated that the personal information revealed from testing would be either useful (29% or interesting (37%. Implications for genetically-informed smoking prevention and cessation interventions in high risk adolescents with ADHD are discussed.

  3. Psychobehavioral Impact of Genetic Counseling and Breast Cancer Gene Testing in Healthy Women of African Descent

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Offit, Kenneth

    1999-01-01

    ...% cumulative risk of developing ovarian cancer (Struewing et al., 1997; Whittemore et al., 1997; Schrag et al., 1997). There are several benefits associated with genetic testing for breast cancer susceptibility...

  4. Integrating social science and behavioral genetics: testing the origin of socioeconomic disparities in depression using a genetically informed design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezuk, Briana; Myers, John M; Kendler, Kenneth S

    2013-10-01

    We tested 3 hypotheses-social causation, social drift, and common cause-regarding the origin of socioeconomic disparities in major depression and determined whether the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and major depression varied by genetic liability for major depression. Data were from a sample of female twins in the baseline Virginia Adult Twin Study of Psychiatric and Substance Use Disorders interviewed between 1987 and 1989 (n = 2153). We used logistic regression and structural equation twin models to evaluate these 3 hypotheses. Consistent with the social causation hypothesis, education (odds ratio [OR] = 0.78; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.66, 0.93; P social mobility was associated with lower risk of depression. There was no evidence that childhood SES was related to development of major depression (OR = 0.98; 95% CI = 0.89, 1.09; P > .1). Consistent with a common genetic cause, there was a negative correlation between the genetic components of major depression and education (r(2) = -0.22). Co-twin control analyses indicated a protective effect of education and income on major depression even after accounting for genetic liability. This study utilized a genetically informed design to address how social position relates to major depression. Results generally supported the social causation model.

  5. Testing the role of ancient and contemporary landscapes on structuring genetic variation in a specialist grasshopper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguerales, Víctor; Cordero, Pedro J; Ortego, Joaquín

    2017-05-01

    Understanding the processes underlying spatial patterns of genetic diversity and structure of natural populations is a central topic in evolutionary biogeography. In this study, we combine data on ancient and contemporary landscape composition to get a comprehensive view of the factors shaping genetic variation across the populations of the scrub-legume grasshopper ( Chorthippus binotatus binotatus ) from the biogeographically complex region of southeast Iberia. First, we examined geographical patterns of genetic structure and employed an approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) approach to compare different plausible scenarios of population divergence. Second, we used a landscape genetic framework to test for the effects of (1) Late Miocene paleogeography, (2) Pleistocene climate fluctuations, and (3) contemporary topographic complexity on the spatial patterns of population genetic differentiation. Genetic structure and ABC analyses supported the presence of three genetic clusters and a sequential west-to-east splitting model that predated the last glacial maximum (LGM, c . 21 Kya). Landscape genetic analyses revealed that population genetic differentiation was primarily shaped by contemporary topographic complexity, but was not explained by any paleogeographic scenario or resistance distances based on climate suitability in the present or during the LGM. Overall, this study emphasizes the need of integrating information on ancient and contemporary landscape composition to get a comprehensive view of their relative importance to explain spatial patterns of genetic variation in organisms inhabiting regions with complex biogeographical histories.

  6. NUTRITION SUPPORT COMPLICATIONS IN PATIENT WHO UNDERWENT CARDIAC SURGERY

    OpenAIRE

    Krdžalić, Alisa; Kovčić, Jasmina; Krdžalić, Goran; Jahić, Elmir

    2016-01-01

    Background: The nutrition support complications after cardiac surgery should be detected and treated on time. Aim: To show the incidence and type of nutritional support complication in patients after cardiac surgery. Methods: The prospective study included 415 patients who underwent cardiac surgery between 2010 and 2013 in Clinic for Cardiovascular Disease of University Clinical Center Tuzla. Complications of the delivery system for nutrition support (NS) and nutrition itself were analy...

  7. Perceptions of genetic testing for personalized nutrition: a randomized trial of DNA-based dietary advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Daiva E; Shih, Sarah; El-Sohemy, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic tests have facilitated easy access to personal genetic information related to health and nutrition; however, consumer perceptions of the nutritional information provided by these tests have not been evaluated. The objectives of this study were to assess individual perceptions of personalized nutrition and genetic testing and to determine whether a personalized nutrition intervention modifies perceptions. A double-blind, parallel-group, randomized controlled trial was conducted among healthy men and women aged 20-35 years (n = 138). Participants in the intervention group (n = 92) were given a report of DNA-based dietary advice and those in the control group (n = 46) were given a general dietary advice report. A survey was completed at baseline and 3 and 12 months after distributing the reports to assess perceptions between the two groups. No significant differences in perceptions of personalized nutrition and genetic testing were observed between the intervention and control group, so responses of both groups were combined. As compared to baseline, participant responses increased significantly toward the positive end of a Likert scale at 3 months for the statement 'I am interested in the relationship between diet and genetics' (mean change ± SD: 0.28 ± 0.99, p = 0.0002). The majority of participants indicated that a university research lab (47%) or health care professional (41%) were the best sources for obtaining accurate personal genetic information, while a DTC genetic testing company received the fewest selections (12%). Most participants (56%) considered dietitians to be the best source of personalized nutrition followed by medical doctors (27%), naturopaths (8%) and nurses (6%). These results suggest that perceptions of personalized nutrition changed over the course of the intervention. Individuals view a research lab or health care professional as better providers of genetic information than a DTC genetic testing company

  8. Genetic Testing in Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Valentina; Hasserjian, Robert P

    2016-03-01

    Cytogenetic analysis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is essential for disease diagnosis, classification, prognostic stratification, and treatment guidance. Molecular genetic analysis of CEBPA, NPM1, and FLT3 is already standard of care in patients with AML, and mutations in several additional genes are assuming increasing importance. Mutational analysis of certain genes, such as SF3B1, is also becoming an important tool to distinguish subsets of MDS that have different biologic behaviors. It is still uncertain how to optimally combine karyotype with mutation data in diagnosis and risk-stratification of AML and MDS, particularly in cases with multiple mutations and/or several mutationally distinct subclones. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison between Genetic Algorithms and Particle Swarm Optimization Methods on Standard Test Functions and Machine Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nica, Florin Valentin Traian; Ritchie, Ewen; Leban, Krisztina Monika

    2013-01-01

    , genetic algorithm and particle swarm are shortly presented in this paper. These two algorithms are tested to determine their performance on five different benchmark test functions. The algorithms are tested based on three requirements: precision of the result, number of iterations and calculation time...

  10. Creating IRT-Based Parallel Test Forms Using the Genetic Algorithm Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Koun-Tem; Chen, Yu-Jen; Tsai, Shu-Yen; Cheng, Chien-Fen

    2008-01-01

    In educational measurement, the construction of parallel test forms is often a combinatorial optimization problem that involves the time-consuming selection of items to construct tests having approximately the same test information functions (TIFs) and constraints. This article proposes a novel method, genetic algorithm (GA), to construct parallel…

  11. Direct-to-consumer genetic testing for predicting sports performance and talent identification: Consensus statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webborn, Nick; Williams, Alun; McNamee, Mike; Bouchard, Claude; Pitsiladis, Yannis; Ahmetov, Ildus; Ashley, Euan; Byrne, Nuala; Camporesi, Silvia; Collins, Malcolm; Dijkstra, Paul; Eynon, Nir; Fuku, Noriyuki; Garton, Fleur C; Hoppe, Nils; Holm, Søren; Kaye, Jane; Klissouras, Vassilis; Lucia, Alejandro; Maase, Kamiel; Moran, Colin; North, Kathryn N; Pigozzi, Fabio; Wang, Guan

    2015-01-01

    The general consensus among sport and exercise genetics researchers is that genetic tests have no role to play in talent identification or the individualised prescription of training to maximise performance. Despite the lack of evidence, recent years have witnessed the rise of an emerging market of direct-to-consumer marketing (DTC) tests that claim to be able to identify children's athletic talents. Targeted consumers include mainly coaches and parents. There is concern among the scientific community that the current level of knowledge is being misrepresented for commercial purposes. There remains a lack of universally accepted guidelines and legislation for DTC testing in relation to all forms of genetic testing and not just for talent identification. There is concern over the lack of clarity of information over which specific genes or variants are being tested and the almost universal lack of appropriate genetic counselling for the interpretation of the genetic data to consumers. Furthermore independent studies have identified issues relating to quality control by DTC laboratories with different results being reported from samples from the same individual. Consequently, in the current state of knowledge, no child or young athlete should be exposed to DTC genetic testing to define or alter training or for talent identification aimed at selecting gifted children or adolescents. Large scale collaborative projects, may help to develop a stronger scientific foundation on these issues in the future. PMID:26582191

  12. Accepting adoption's uncertainty: the limited ethics of pre-adoption genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, Kimberly J

    2014-06-01

    An increasing number of children are adopted in the United States from countries where both medical care and environmental conditions are extremely poor. In response to worries about the accuracy of medical histories, prospective adoptive parents increasingly request genetic testing of children prior to adoption. Though a general consensus on the ethics of pre-adoption genetic testing (PAGT) argues against permitting genetic testing on children available for adoption that is not also permitted for children in general, a view gaining traction argues for expanding the tests permitted. The reasoning behind this view is that the State has a duty to provide a child with parents who are the best "match," and thus all information that advances this end should be obtained. While the matching argument aims to promote the best interests of children, I show how it rests on the claim that what is in the best interests of children available for adoption is for prospective adoptive parents to have their genetic preferences satisfied such that the "genetics" of the children they end up adopting accurately reflects those preferences. Instead of protecting a vulnerable population, I conclude, PAGT contributes to the risks of harm such children face as it encourages people with strong genetic preferences to adopt children whose genetic backgrounds will always be uncertain.

  13. Cancer-Related Genetic Testing and Personalized Medicine for Adolescents: A Narrative Review of Impact and Understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetsch, Janine; Wakefield, Claire E; Warby, Meera; Tucker, Katherine; Patterson, Pandora; McGill, Brittany C; Metcalfe, Alison; Cohn, Richard J; Fardell, Joanna E

    2018-01-16

    Genetic testing is becoming increasingly available for adolescents who are undergoing cancer treatment or at risk of cancer predisposition syndromes. With this narrative review, we aimed to synthesize the evidence on psychosocial outcomes and adolescents' understanding of genetic testing-thus far, an underresearched topic. Both psychological benefits and harms of predictive testing were reported in adolescents from high-risk families. Harms were mainly related to cancer-specific distress and increased worries. Findings on genetic understanding were sparse. Future studies should focus on psychosocial outcomes and adolescents' understanding undergoing genetic testing and enabling access to genetic counseling pre-testing and post-testing.

  14. Genetic and environmental sources of covariance between reading tests used in neuropsychological assessment and IQ subtests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, Mark; Wright, Margaret J; Geffen, Gina M; Geffen, Laurie B; Luciano, Michelle; Martin, Nicholas G

    2004-07-01

    In this study, we examined genetic and environmental influences on covariation among two reading tests used in neuropsychological assessment (Cambridge Contextual Reading Test [CCRT], [Beardsall, L., and Huppert, F. A. (1994). J. Clin. Exp. Neuropsychol. 16:232-242], Schonell Graded Word Reading Test [SGWRT], [Schonell, F. J., and Schonell, P. E. (1960). Diagnostic and attainment testing. Edinburgh: Oliver and Boyd.]) and among a selection of IQ subtests from the Multidimensional Aptitude Battery (MAB), [Jackson, D. N. (1984). Multidimensional aptitude battery, Ontario: Research Psychologists Press.] and the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) [Wechsler, D. (1981). Manual for the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R). San Antonio: The Psychological Corporation]. Participants were 225 monozygotic and 275 dizygotic twin pairs aged from 15 years to 18 years (mean, 16 years). For Verbal IQ subtests, phenotypic correlations with the reading tests ranged from 0.44 to 0.65. For Performance IQ subtests, phenotypic correlations with the reading tests ranged from 0.23 to 0.34. Results of Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) supported a model with one genetic General factor and three genetic group factors (Verbal, Performance, Reading). Reading performance was influenced by the genetic General factor (accounting for 13% and 20% of the variance for the CCRT and SGWRT, respectively), the genetic Verbal factor (explaining 17% and 19% of variance for the CCRT and SGWRT), and the genetic Reading factor (explaining 21% of the variance for both the CCRT and SGWRT). A common environment factor accounted for 25% and 14% of the CCRT and SGWRT variance, respectively. Genetic influences accounted for more than half of the phenotypic covariance between the reading tests and each of the IQ subtests. The heritabilities of the CCRT and SGWRT were 0.54 and 0.65, respectively. Observable covariance between reading assessments used by neuropsychologists to estimate IQ

  15. Primary care patient willingness for genetic testing for salt-sensitive hypertension: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okayama, Masanobu; Takeshima, Taro; Ae, Ryusuke; Harada, Masanori; Kajii, Eiji

    2013-10-09

    The current research into single nucleotide polymorphisms has extended the role of genetic testing to the identification of increased risk for common medical conditions. Advances in genetic research may soon necessitate preparation for the role of genetic testing in primary care medicine. This study attempts to determine what proportion of patients would be willing to undergo genetic testing for salt-sensitive hypertension in a primary care setting, and what factors are related to this willingness. A cross-sectional study using a self-report questionnaire was conducted among outpatients in primary care clinics and hospitals in Japan. The main characteristics measured were education level, family medical history, personal medical history, concern about hypertension, salt preference, reducing salt intake, and willingness to undergo genetic testing for salt-sensitive hypertension. Of 1,932 potential participants, 1,457 (75%) responded to the survey. Of the respondents, 726 (50%) indicated a willingness to undergo genetic testing. Factors related to this willingness were being over 50 years old (adjusted odds ratio [ad-OR] = 1.42, 95% Confidence interval = 1.09 - 1.85), having a high level of education (ad-OR: 1.83, 1.38 - 2.42), having a family history of hypertension (ad-OR: 1.36, 1.09 - 1.71), and worrying about hypertension (ad-OR: 2.06, 1.59 - 2.68). Half of the primary care outpatients surveyed in this study wanted to know their genetic risk for salt-sensitive hypertension. Those who were worried about hypertension or had a family history of hypertension were more likely to be interested in getting tested. These findings suggest that primary care physicians should provide patients with advice on genetic testing, as well as address their anxieties and concerns related to developing hypertension.

  16. What Is Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are marketed directly to consumers via television, print advertisements, or the Internet. This form of testing, which ... history also affect a person’s risk of developing many disorders. These factors are discussed during a consultation ...

  17. What factors impact upon a woman’s decision to undertake genetic cancer testing?

    OpenAIRE

    Julie Anne Quinlivan; Julie Anne Quinlivan; Zain eBattikhi; Rodney Waldemar Petersen; Rodney Waldemar Petersen

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The advent of human genome project has lead to genetic tests that identify high-risk states for certain cancers. Many are privately marketed on the Internet. Despite the availability of tests, limited data has evaluated factors that lead to test uptake. The aim of the present study was to explore the attitudes of a cohort of new mothers towards uptake of a genetic cancer test with a 50% predictive value of cancer.Methods: A cross-sectional survey was undertaken. The project targ...

  18. Lactose Malabsorption Testing in Daily Clinical Practice: A Critical Retrospective Analysis and Comparison of the Hydrogen/Methane Breath Test and Genetic Test (C/T-13910 Polymorphism Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietmar Enko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to establish a retrospective evaluation and comparison of the hydrogen/methane (H2/CH4 breath test and genetic test (C/T−13910 polymorphism results in lactose malabsorption testing. In total 263 consecutive patients with suspected lactose malabsorption were included in this study. They underwent the H2/CH4 breath test following the ingestion of 50 g lactose and were tested for the C/T−13910 polymorphism. In total 51 patients (19.4% had a C/C−13910 genotype, indicating primary lactose malabsorption. Only 19 patients (7.2% also had a positive H2/CH4 breath test. All in all 136 patients (51.69% had a C/T−13910 and 76 patients (28.91% a T/T−13910 genotype, indicating lactase persistence. Four patients (1.5% with the C/T−13910 genotype and one patient (0.4% with the T/T−13910 genotype had a positive H2/CH4 breath test result, indicating secondary lactose malabsorption. Cohen's Kappa measuring agreement between the two methods was 0.44. Twenty patients (7.6% with a positive H2/CH4 peak within 60 minutes after lactose ingestion were classified as patients with lactose-dependent small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO. In conclusion, only moderate agreement between the breath test and the genetic test was shown. Secondary lactose malabsorption as well as preanalytical limitations of the combined H2/CH4 breath test procedure can cause discrepant results. This trial is registered with K-42-13.

  19. Genetic Testing and Neuroimaging: Trading off Benefit and Risk for Youth with Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Grace; Mizgalewicz, Ania; Borgelt, Emily; Illes, Judy

    According to the World Health Organization, mental illness is one of the leading causes of disability worldwide. The first onset of mental illness usually occurs during childhood or adolescence. Neuroimaging and genetic testing have been invaluable in research on behavioral and intentional disorders, particularly with their potential to lead to improved diagnostic and predictive capabilities and to decrease the associated burdens of disease. The present study focused specifically the perspectives of mental health providers on the role of neuroimaging and genetic testing in clinical practice with children and adolescents. We interviewed 38 psychiatrists, psychologists, and allied mental health professionals who work primarily with youth about their receptivity towards either the use of neuroimaging or genetic testing. Interviews probed the role they foresee for these modalities for prediction, diagnosis, and treatment planning, and the benefits and risks they anticipate. Practitioners anticipated three major benefits associated with clinical introduction of imaging and genetic testing in the mental health care for youth: (1) improved understanding of illness, (2) more accurate diagnosis than available through conventional clinical examination, and (3) validation of treatment plans. They also perceived three major risks: (1) potential adverse impacts on employment and insurance as adolescents reach adulthood, (2) misuse or misinterpretation of the imaging or genetic data, and (3) infringements on self-esteem or self-motivation. Movement of brain imaging and genetic testing into clinical care will require a delicate balance of biology and respect for autonomy in the still-evolving cognitive and affective world of young individuals.

  20. Teaching about genetic testing issues in the undergraduate classroom: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jill Cellars; Taylor, Ann T S

    2011-06-01

    Educating undergraduates about current genetic testing and genomics can involve novel and creative teaching practices. The higher education literature describes numerous pedagogical approaches in the laboratory designed to engage science and liberal arts students. Often these experiences involve students analyzing their own genes for various polymorphisms, some of which are associated with disease states such as an increased risk for developing cancer. While the literature acknowledges possible ethical ramifications of such laboratory exercises, authors do not present recommendations or rubrics for evaluating whether or not the testing is, in fact, ethical. In response, we developed a laboratory investigation and discussion which allowed undergraduate science students to explore current DNA manipulation techniques to isolate their p53 gene, followed by a dialogue probing the ethical implications of examining their sample for various polymorphisms. Students never conducted genotyping on their samples because of ethical concerns, so the discussion served to replace actual genetic testing in the class. A basic scientist led the laboratory portion of the assignment. A genetic counselor facilitated the discussion, which centered around existing ethical guidelines for clinical genetic testing and possible challenges of human genotyping outside the medical setting. In their final papers, students demonstrated an understanding of the practice guidelines established by the genetics community and acknowledged the ethical considerations inherent in p53 genotyping. Given the burgeoning market for personalized medicine, teaching undergraduates about the psychosocial and ethical dimensions of human gene testing seems important and timely, and introduces an additional role genetic counselors can play in educating consumers about genomics.

  1. [Direct to consumer genetic testing: is it the moment?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoril, Jérôme; Bogard, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Since the development of new human genome sequencing technologies at the beginning of the 2000, commercial companies have developped direct to consumer genomic services, which means without medical prescription. From 2007 to 2013, many companies have offered services assesing associated risk with human public health in the world especially in the United States. This kind of company is forbidden in France. From 2009 to 2013, in United States, under the pressure of national or state health administrations, these companies have been progressively forbidden. However, in certain parts of the world, companies are still offering such services. The latter raise many different questions such as ethical, juridical, medical, scientific, educative, professional one. Many studies and debates have demonstrated their limit and the lack of usefulness and advantage in the field of human health for the time being. The commercialization of this type of services has arrived all too soon et is not yet ripe. In our time of globalization, with the lack of international rules controlling direct access to genetic services in the field of human health, there is an urgent need to regulate. International administrations and politicians must act fast. Inevitably, under the pressure of lobbies and citizens, companies (multinational or not) will develop especially as 1) new sequencing technologies evolve rapidly, 2) are cheaper from year to year, 3) scientific and medical knowledges are progressing quickly, 4) services are spreading faster through the web and other networks.

  2. Motivating factors for physician ordering of Factor V Leiden genetic tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindorff, Lucia A.; Burke, Wylie; Laberge, Anne-Marie; Rice, Kenneth M.; Lumley, Thomas; Leppig, Kathleen; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Larson, Eric B.; Psaty, Bruce M.

    2009-01-01

    Background The Factor V Leiden (FVL) genetic test is used by many physicians despite its uncertain clinical utility. This study investigated whether self-reported motivations and behaviors concerning FVL genetic testing differed between two groups of primary care physicians defined by frequency of prior FVL test use. Methods In January 2007, 112 primary care physicians (60 frequent, 52 infrequent FVL test users) at Group Health, a large health care delivery system, were surveyed. Survey content areas included: primary reasons and motivating factors for ordering FVL; likelihood of ordering FVL for hypothetical patients; potential barriers to genetic testing, and practices and skills regarding FVL test ordering. Results Responses between groups agreed concerning most clinical- or patient-related factors. Frequent-FVL physicians were more likely than infrequent-FVL physicians to report ordering FVL for hypothetical patients with mesenteric venous thrombosis (adjusted OR 4.57, 95% CI 1.55, 13.53) or venous thrombosis following hospital discharge (adjusted OR 3.42, 95% CI 1.30, 8.95). Frequent-FVL physicians were also less likely to agree with several potential barriers to genetic testing and more likely to report high confidence in interpreting and explaining FVL test results. Conclusions Generally, both groups of physicians reported similar motivating factors for ordering FVL, and reported behaviors were consistent with existing guidelines. More striking differences were observed for measures such as barriers to and confidence in using genetic tests. Though additional research is necessary to evaluate their impact, these results inform several knowledge-to-practice translation issues that are important to the successful integration of genetic testing into primary care. PMID:19139326

  3. Environmental Contamination Genetic Consequences Monitoring on the Former Semipalatinsk Test Site: General Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seisebaev, A.T.; Bakhtin, M.M.; Zhapbasov, R.Zh.

    1998-01-01

    For an objective assessment of nuclear test consequences for the environment it is necessary, together with the investigation of radiation situation, to study live biological systems, particularly the genetic effects of chronic ionizing radiation. The long staying of plants and animals on the territories with the elevated radiation background level can lead to the change of organism genetic system. In this connection the monitoring of chronically exposed natural populations is of particular interest and can serve as the objective indicator of the scale of natural biota genetic damage. Basing on the results obtained during plant and animal studies one can indirectly assess the hazard of people genetic damage. Besides, studying the mutational process on natural populations exposed to the chronic ionizing radiation one can reveal new regularities, which are impossible to be detected in the laboratory conditions, and new aspects of radiation genetics. The issue of radiation adaptation of organisms affected by the various doses of ionizing radiation is very acute. The prerequisite of organism adaptation to the certain radiation background is genetic heterogeneity of individuals comprising the population and selection of radiation-induced individuals, which are the carriers of the mutation of high radioresistance. The uniqueness of the Semipalatinsk Test site and the necessity of long-term investigations of the nuclear test consequences for the environment demand the elaboration of principles for organization and utilization of natural population genetic monitoring. Radiation-genetic monitoring is the long-term observation of palpitation gene pool conditions, assessment and forecast of their spatial and time alteration, determination of limits of changes admitted under the condition of environmental radioactive contamination. It includes a series of the main research directions and has quite certain methodological peculiarities. In this paper we discuss the tasks of

  4. Current landscape and new paradigms of proficiency testing and external quality assessment for molecular genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalman, Lisa V; Lubin, Ira M; Barker, Shannon; du Sart, Desiree; Elles, Rob; Grody, Wayne W; Pazzagli, Mario; Richards, Sue; Schrijver, Iris; Zehnbauer, Barbara

    2013-07-01

    Participation in proficiency testing (PT) or external quality assessment (EQA) programs allows the assessment and comparison of test performance among different clinical laboratories and technologies. In addition to the approximately 2300 tests for individual genetic disorders, recent advances in technology have enabled the development of clinical tests that quickly and economically analyze the entire human genome. New PT/EQA approaches are needed to ensure the continued quality of these complex tests. To review the availability and scope of PT/EQA for molecular genetic testing for inherited conditions in Europe, Australasia, and the United States; to evaluate the successes and demonstrated value of available PT/EQA programs; and to examine the challenges to the provision of comprehensive PT/EQA posed by new laboratory practices and methodologies. The available literature on this topic was reviewed and supplemented with personal experiences of several PT/EQA providers. Proficiency testing/EQA schemes are available for common genetic disorders tested in many clinical laboratories but are not available for most genetic tests offered by only one or a few laboratories. Provision of broad, method-based PT schemes, such as DNA sequencing, would allow assessment of many tests for which formal PT is not currently available. Participation in PT/EQA improves the quality of testing by identifying inaccuracies that laboratories can trace to errors in their testing processes. Areas of research and development to ensure that PT/EQA programs can meet the needs of new and evolving genetic tests and technologies are identified and discussed.

  5. Evaluating stakeholder's perspective on referred out genetic testing in Canada: a discrete choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenschein, P; Lilley, M; Bakal, J A; Christian, S

    2016-01-01

    The expanding number and increasing utility of clinical genetic tests is creating a growing burden on the Canadian healthcare system. Administrators are faced with the challenge of determining which genetic tests should be publicly funded. A discrete choice experiment (DCE) was utilized to assess the importance stakeholders place on five attributes of a genetic test. One hundred ninety individuals completed the DCE questions. Analysis of the data revealed that medical benefit of a test had the greatest impact on a respondent's decision to select a test for funding. The detection rate of the test ranked second in importance followed by severity of the condition, aim of the test, and cost. With limited resources available for referred out molecular genetic testing within a public healthcare setting such as Canada's, funding guidelines are critical. Our findings provide further evidence for the value of a decision-making framework and the relative importance of specific test attributes within such a framework. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The effect of cardiac genetic testing on psychological well-being and illness perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Kathleen T; Sciacca, Robert R; Biviano, Angelo B; Whang, William; Dizon, Jose M; Garan, Hasan; Chung, Wendy K

    2014-01-01

    To assess the effects of positive cardiac genetic diagnoses, ICD discharges, and arrhythmias on measures of psychological well-being. Fifty-eight adults with prior cardiac genetic testing were enrolled. Patient well-being was determined using the SF-36 (QoL), HADS-A and HADS-D (anxiety/depression), and IPQ-R (patients' perceptions of illness). Patients with positive and negative cardiac genetic test results were compared using non-parametric statistics. Genetic testing yielded 76% with a positive diagnosis and 29% reported an ICD shock. QoL assessments (n = 33) were within normal ranges (mean of 50) with the exceptions of general health (44.1 ± 12.2, p < 0.01) and bodily pain (55.1 ± 9.1, p < 0.01) domains, but only the bodily pain domain showed differences between those with positive and negative cardiac genetic test results. Subjects with ICD discharges had higher scores than those without shocks in consequential and emotional IPQR subscales as well as greater perceived risks of experiencing a serious cardiac event, developing additional symptoms, or limitations in daily activities. Positive genetic results did not negatively impact patient well-being with the exception of the bodily pain domain of the SF-36. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ethical, legal and social implications of prenatal and preimplantation genetic testing for cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C-W; Hui, E C

    2009-01-01

    With the progress in cancer genetics and assisted reproductive technologies, it is now possible for cancer gene mutation carriers not only to reduce cancer mortality through the targeting of surveillance and preventive therapies, but also to avoid the birth of at-risk babies through the choice of different means of reproduction. Thus, the incidence of hereditary cancer syndromes may be decreased in the future. The integration of cancer genetic testing and assisted reproductive technologies raises certain ethical, legal and social issues beyond either genetic testing or assisted reproductive technology itself. In this paper, the reproductive decisions/choices of at-risk young couples and the ethical, legal and social concerns of prenatal genetic testing and preimplantation genetic diagnosis for susceptibility to hereditary cancer syndromes are discussed. Specifically, three ethical principles related to the integration of cancer genetic testing and assisted reproductive technologies, i.e. informed choice, beneficence to children and social justice, and their implications for the responsible translation of these medical techniques into common practice of preventive medicine are highlighted.

  8. A review of statistical methods for testing genetic anticipation: looking for an answer in Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonstra, Philip S; Gruber, Stephen B; Raymond, Victoria M

    2010-01-01

    Anticipation, manifested through decreasing age of onset or increased severity in successive generations, has been noted in several genetic diseases. Statistical methods for genetic anticipation range from a simple use of the paired t-test for age of onset restricted to affected parent-child pairs...... to a recently proposed random effects model which includes extended pedigree data and unaffected family members [Larsen et al., 2009]. A naive use of the paired t-test is biased for the simple reason that age of onset has to be less than the age at ascertainment (interview) for both affected parent and child...... the issue of multiplex ascertainment and its effect on the different methods. We then focus on exploring genetic anticipation in Lynch syndrome and analyze new data on the age of onset in affected parent-child pairs from families seen at the University of Michigan Cancer Genetics clinic with a mutation...

  9. Pre- and post-test genetic counseling for chromosomal and Mendelian disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonda Allen, Jill; Stoll, Katie; Bernhardt, Barbara A

    2016-02-01

    Genetic carrier screening, prenatal screening for aneuploidy, and prenatal diagnostic testing have expanded dramatically over the past 2 decades. Driven in part by powerful market forces, new complex testing modalities have become available after limited clinical research. The responsibility for offering these tests lies primarily on the obstetrical care provider and has become more burdensome as the number of testing options expands. Genetic testing in pregnancy is optional, and decisions about undergoing tests, as well as follow-up testing, should be informed and based on individual patients' values and needs. Careful pre- and post-test counseling is central to supporting informed decision-making. This article explores three areas of technical expansion in genetic testing: expanded carrier screening, non-invasive prenatal screening for fetal aneuploidies using cell-free DNA, and diagnostic testing using fetal chromosomal microarray testing, and provides insights aimed at enabling the obstetrical practitioner to better support patients considering these tests. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Risks associated with genetic testing: health insurance discrimination or simply business as usual?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, K K

    2000-01-01

    Doctors can test patients for mutations that put them at high risk for hereditary forms of such diseases as breast and ovarian cancer. Even though the opportunities for disease prevention using genetic testing will increase with time, the risks of testing, which include insurance loss and employment discrimination, currently make testing problematic. Some have proposed making use of genetic information in health insurance underwriting illegal. But in the current system of risk-based underwriting, it is hard to imagine that insurance companies will willingly forego access to a growing body of information on risk. If the American public chooses to limit the use of genetic information, a reassessment of current laws or methods of paying for health care will be needed.

  11. Genetic testing in patients with global developmental delay / intellectual disabilities. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miclea, Diana; Peca, Loredana; Cuzmici, Zina; Pop, Ioan Victor

    2015-01-01

    Genetic factors are responsible for up to 40% developmental disability cases, such as global developmental delay/intellectual disability (GDD/DI). The American and more recently the European guidelines on this group of diseases state that genetic testing is essential and should become a standardized diagnostic practice. The main arguments for the necessity of implementing such a practice are: (1) the high prevalence of developmental disabilities (3% of the population); (2) the high genetic contribution to this type of pathology; (3) insufficient referral for genetic consultation. In an attempt to address these issues, the purpose of this paper is to present the genetic etiology of global developmental delay / intellectual disability with emphasis on the need to implement a genetic testing protocol for the patients with GDD/DI, as indicated by the current guidelines. Chromosomal abnormalities and fragile X syndrome are the most frequent causes of developmental disabilities and the techniques employed to detect such genetic disorders should be used as first line investigations of GDD/DI.

  12. Are indirect genetic benefits associated with polyandry? Testing predictions in a natural population of lemon sharks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBattista, Joseph D; Feldheim, Kevin A; Gruber, Samuel H; Hendry, Andrew P

    2008-02-01

    Multiple mating has clear fitness benefits for males, but uncertain benefits and costs for females. We tested for indirect genetic benefits of polyandry in a natural population, by using data from a long-term genetic and demographic study of lemon sharks (Negaprion brevirostris) at Bimini, Bahamas. To do so, we followed the fates of individuals from six cohorts (450 age-0 and 254 age-1 fish) in relation to their individual level of genetic variation, and whether they were from polyandrous or monoandrous litters. We find that offspring from polyandrous litters did not have a greater genetic diversity or greater survival than did the offspring of monoandrous litters. We also find no evidence of positive associations between individual offspring genetic diversity metrics and our surrogate measure of fitness (i.e. survival). In fact, age-1 individuals with fewer heterozygous microsatellite loci and more genetically similar parents were more likely to survive to age-2. Thus, polyandry in female lemon sharks does not appear to be adaptive from the perspective of indirect genetic benefits to offspring. It may instead be the result of convenience polyandry, whereby females mate multiply to avoid harassment by males. Our inability to find indirect genetic benefits of polyandry despite detailed pedigree and survival information suggests the need for similar assessments in other natural populations.

  13. Genetic Counseling and Cardiac Care in Predictively Tested Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Mutation Carriers: The Patients' Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christiaans, Imke; van Langen, Irene M.; Birnie, Erwin; Bonsel, Gouke J.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Smets, Ellen M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common hereditary heart disease associated with sudden cardiac death. predictive genetic counseling and testing are performed using adapted Huntington guidelines, that is, psychosocial care and time for reflection are not obligatory and the test result can be

  14. Socioeconomic influences on the effects of a genetic testing direct-to-consumer marketing campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, D J; Harris, J; Jorgensen, C M; Myers, M F; Kuniyuki, A

    2010-01-01

    Direct-to-consumer marketing of genetic tests is beginning to appear in select markets, and little independent evaluation has been conducted on the effects of this marketing on consumer attitudes or behavior. The purpose of this paper is to identify the effects of socioeconomic status on women's reactions to such a campaign, including knowledge of the test, perceptions of personal risk, communications with others about the test, and interest in pursuing the test. The only United States provider of genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility (BRCA1/2 testing) conducted a pilot marketing campaign that targeted women aged 25-54 and their health care providers in 2 cities, Atlanta, Ga., and Denver, Colo. The design for the evaluation was a post campaign consumer survey, based on a cross-sectional stratified random sample of women in the 2 intervention sites and 2 comparison sites. The campaign had no differential impact by socioeconomic status. However, there was a consistent relationship between socioeconomic status and several outcome variables, including knowledge of the test, beliefs about the test, and desire to know about genetic risk. These data indicate that socioeconomic status may play a role in uptake of genetic services, regardless of response to a media campaign. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Genetic counseling and cardiac care in predictively tested hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation carriers: The patients' perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christiaans, Imke; Van Langen, Irene M.; Birnie, Erwin; Bonsel, Gouke J.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Smets, Ellen M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common hereditary heart disease associated with sudden cardiac death. Predictive genetic counseling and testing are performed using adapted Huntington guidelines, that is, psychosocial care and time for reflection are not obligatory and the test result can be

  16. Developing national guidance on genetic testing for breast cancer predisposition: the role of economic evidence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sullivan, W.; Evans, D.G.; Newman, W.G.; Ramsden, S.C.; Scheffer, H.; Payne, K.

    2012-01-01

    Advancements in genetic testing to identify predisposition for hereditary breast cancer (HBC) mean that it is important to understand the incremental costs and benefits of the new technologies compared with current testing strategies. This study aimed to (1) identify and critically appraise existing

  17. Estimation of genetic parameters of test day fat and protein yields in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was aimed to estimate variance components and genetic parameters for daily fat and protein yields of Brazilian Holstein cattle, using an autoregressive test day multiple lactations (AR) animal model. Data consisted of test day (TD) records produced by Holstein cows under milk recording supervised by the ...

  18. Sequence variant classification and reporting: recommendations for improving the interpretation of cancer susceptibility genetic test results.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plon, S.E.; Eccles, D.M.; Easton, D.F.; Foulkes, W.D.; Genuardi, M.; Greenblatt, M.S.; Hogervorst, F.B.L.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Spurdle, A.B.; Tavtigian, S.V.

    2008-01-01

    Genetic testing of cancer susceptibility genes is now widely applied in clinical practice to predict risk of developing cancer. In general, sequence-based testing of germline DNA is used to determine whether an individual carries a change that is clearly likely to disrupt normal gene function.

  19. Parents' responses to disclosure of genetic test results of their children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grosfeld, FJM; Beemer, FA; Lips, CJM; ten Kroode, HFJ

    2000-01-01

    The psychological reactions of 22 parental couples and 3 single parents were investigated after disclosure of genetic test results of their children. The children were tested for the early-onset, monogenetic cancer disorder multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2. Participants came from 13 different

  20. Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis in a Patient who Underwent Hip Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevzat Dabak

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS is a rare, benign, but a locally aggressive tumor. It is characterized by the proliferation of synovial membrane, but it can also be seen in tendon sheaths and bursae. Clinical presentation of solitary lesions include compression and locking of the joint suggesting loose bodies in the joint and a subsequent findings of an effusion, whereas diffuse lesions manifest with pain and chronic swelling. In this article, we presented a curious case of PVNS in a female patient who have been followed up due to an acetabular cystic lesion. She underwent total hip arthroplasty for severe osteoarthritis of the hip joint and associated pain. The diagnosis of PVNS was established intraoperatively. (The Me­di­cal Bul­le­tin of Ha­se­ki 2014; 52: 235-7

  1. ALGORITHM FOR MANAGEMENT OF HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS UNDERWENT UROLOGY INTERVENTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Davydova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the efficacy of cardiovascular non-invasive complex assessment and pre-operative preparation in hypertensive patients needed in surgical treatment of urology dis- eases.Material and methods. Males (n=883, aged 40 to 80 years were included into the study. The main group consisted of patients that underwent laparotomic nephrectomy (LTN group; n=96 and patients who underwent laparoscopic nephrectomy (LSN group; n=53. Dynamics of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM data was analyzed in these groups in the immediate postoperative period. The efficacy of a package of non-invasive methods for cardiovascular system assessment was studied. ABPM was performed after nephrectomy (2-nd and 10-th days after surgery in patients with complaints of vertigo episodes or intense general weakness to correct treatment.Results. In LTN group hypotension episodes or blood pressure (BP elevations were observed in 20 (20.8% and 22 (22.9% patients, respectively, on the 2-nd day after the operation. These complications required antihypertensive treatment correction. Patients with hypotension episodes were significantly older than patients with BP elevation and had significantly lower levels of 24-hour systolic BP, night diastolic BP and minimal night systolic BP. Re-adjustment of antihypertensive treatment on the 10-th postoperative day was required to 2 (10% patients with hypotension episodes and to 1 (4.5% patient with BP elevation. Correction of antihypertensive therapy was required to all patients in LSN group on the day 2, and to 32 (60.4% patients on the 10-th day after the operation. Reduction in the incidence of complications (from 1.2% in 2009 to 0.3% in 2011, p<0.001 was observed during the application of cardiovascular non-invasive complex assessment and preoperative preparation in hypertensive patients.Conclusion. The elaborated management algorithm for patients with concomitant hypertension is recommended to reduce the cardiovascular

  2. ALGORITHM FOR MANAGEMENT OF HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS UNDERWENT UROLOGY INTERVENTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Davydova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the efficacy of cardiovascular non-invasive complex assessment and pre-operative preparation in hypertensive patients needed in surgical treatment of urology dis- eases.Material and methods. Males (n=883, aged 40 to 80 years were included into the study. The main group consisted of patients that underwent laparotomic nephrectomy (LTN group; n=96 and patients who underwent laparoscopic nephrectomy (LSN group; n=53. Dynamics of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM data was analyzed in these groups in the immediate postoperative period. The efficacy of a package of non-invasive methods for cardiovascular system assessment was studied. ABPM was performed after nephrectomy (2-nd and 10-th days after surgery in patients with complaints of vertigo episodes or intense general weakness to correct treatment.Results. In LTN group hypotension episodes or blood pressure (BP elevations were observed in 20 (20.8% and 22 (22.9% patients, respectively, on the 2-nd day after the operation. These complications required antihypertensive treatment correction. Patients with hypotension episodes were significantly older than patients with BP elevation and had significantly lower levels of 24-hour systolic BP, night diastolic BP and minimal night systolic BP. Re-adjustment of antihypertensive treatment on the 10-th postoperative day was required to 2 (10% patients with hypotension episodes and to 1 (4.5% patient with BP elevation. Correction of antihypertensive therapy was required to all patients in LSN group on the day 2, and to 32 (60.4% patients on the 10-th day after the operation. Reduction in the incidence of complications (from 1.2% in 2009 to 0.3% in 2011, p<0.001 was observed during the application of cardiovascular non-invasive complex assessment and preoperative preparation in hypertensive patients.Conclusion. The elaborated management algorithm for patients with concomitant hypertension is recommended to reduce the cardiovascular

  3. [Genetic predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer: importance of test results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian-Reynier, Claire

    2011-01-01

    Oncogenetic consultations and predictive BRCA1/2 testing are intertwined processes and the specific impact of these genetic tests if performed alone through direct-to-consumer offers remains unknown. Noteworthy, the expectations of patients vary with their own status, whether they are affected or not by breast cancer at the time genetic testing is performed. The prescription of genetic tests for BCRA mutations has doubled in France between 2003 and 2009. There is a consensus on the fact that genetic results disclosure led to a significant increase in the knowledge and understanding that the patients have of the genetic risk and also changed the medical follow-up of these patients. Evaluating the psychological burden of tests disclosure did not reveal any major distress in patients who are followed by high-quality multidisciplinary teams. Longitudinal cohorts studies have now evaluated the perception and behaviour of these patients, and observed sociodemographic as well as geographic and psychosocial differences both in the acceptation of prophylactic strategies such as surgery, and time to surgery. © 2011 médecine/sciences - Inserm / SRMS.

  4. Exploring dispositional tendencies to seek online information about direct-to-consumer genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquin, Ryan S; Richards, Adam S; Koehly, Laura M; McBride, Colleen M

    2012-12-01

    Varying perspectives exist regarding the implications of genetic susceptibility testing for common disease, with some anticipating adverse effects and others expecting positive outcomes; however, little is known about the characteristics of people who are most likely to be interested in direct-to-consumer genetic testing. To that end, this study examines the association of individual dispositional differences with health risk perceptions and online information seeking related to a free genetic susceptibility test. Healthy adults enrolled in a large health maintenance organization were surveyed by telephone. Eligible participants (N = 1,959) were given access to a secure website that provided risk and benefit information about a genetic susceptibility test and given the option to be tested. Neuroticism was associated with increased perceptions of disease risk but not with logging on. Those scoring high in conscientiousness were more likely to log on. We found no evidence that neuroticism, a dispositional characteristic commonly linked to adverse emotional response, was predictive of online genetic information seeking in this sample of healthy adults.

  5. Should Australia Ban the Use of Genetic Test Results in Life Insurance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Tiller

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Under current Australian regulation, life insurance companies can require applicants to disclose all genetic test results, including results from research or direct-to-consumer tests. Life insurers can then use this genetic information in underwriting and policy decisions for mutually rated products, including life, permanent disability, and total income protection insurance. Over the past decade, many countries have implemented moratoria or legislative bans on the use of genetic information by life insurers. The Australian government, by contrast, has not reviewed regulation since 2005 when it failed to ensure implementation of recommendations made by the Australian Law Reform Commission. In that time, the Australian life insurance industry has been left to self-regulate its use of genetic information. As a result, insurance fears in Australia now are leading to deterred uptake of genetic testing by at-risk individuals and deterred participation in medical research, both of which have been documented. As the potential for genomic medicine grows, public trust and engagement are critical for successful implementation. Concerns around life insurance may become a barrier to the development of genomic health care, research, and public health initiatives in Australia, and the issue should be publicly addressed. We argue a moratorium on the use of genetic information by life insurers should be enacted while appropriate longer term policy is determined and implemented.

  6. Should Australia Ban the Use of Genetic Test Results in Life Insurance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiller, Jane; Otlowski, Margaret; Lacaze, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Under current Australian regulation, life insurance companies can require applicants to disclose all genetic test results, including results from research or direct-to-consumer tests. Life insurers can then use this genetic information in underwriting and policy decisions for mutually rated products, including life, permanent disability, and total income protection insurance. Over the past decade, many countries have implemented moratoria or legislative bans on the use of genetic information by life insurers. The Australian government, by contrast, has not reviewed regulation since 2005 when it failed to ensure implementation of recommendations made by the Australian Law Reform Commission. In that time, the Australian life insurance industry has been left to self-regulate its use of genetic information. As a result, insurance fears in Australia now are leading to deterred uptake of genetic testing by at-risk individuals and deterred participation in medical research, both of which have been documented. As the potential for genomic medicine grows, public trust and engagement are critical for successful implementation. Concerns around life insurance may become a barrier to the development of genomic health care, research, and public health initiatives in Australia, and the issue should be publicly addressed. We argue a moratorium on the use of genetic information by life insurers should be enacted while appropriate longer term policy is determined and implemented.

  7. Review of dissertation The Genetics of Schizophrenia: Possible Uses and Outcomes of Testing by Lisa Karger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florova N.B.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available At the time of the release of this publication in 2013 its author Lisa Karger was a private undergraduate student of Sarah Lawrence College (New York, United States and specialized in "human genetics". The publication highlighted the empirical part of the thesis, namely, an experiment carried out within the framework of the Human Genetics Program, supported by the Grant Special Interest Group (SIG-Prenatal SIG + SIG-Psychiatric from the national professional society in the field of genetic psychiatry NCGC (National Society of Genetic Counselors. Referring to the professionals of this community, the author explains: ".. I study the possibility of clinical genetic testing of patients with schizophrenia in finding the drivers for such testing ... I've prepared a 20-minute questionnaire to discuss your current work and your point of view on this issue, ... in order to assess the selected positions from the point of view of clinical perspectives". Description of the experiment and its results is accompanied by in-depth analysis of various aspects of the problem of genetic testing and the treatment (psychotherapeutic support of persons with diagnosed schizophrenia and persons at risk of the disease.

  8. Impact of gene patents and licensing practices on access to genetic testing for hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Fiffer, Melissa

    2010-04-01

    Genetic testing for heritable hearing loss involves a mix of patented and unpatented genes, mutations and testing methods. More than half of all hearing loss is linked to inherited mutations, and five genes are most commonly tested for in the United States. There are no patents on three of these genes, but Athena Diagnostics holds exclusive licenses to test for a common mutation in the GJB2 gene associated with about 50% of all cases as well as mutations in the MTRNR1 gene. This fragmented intellectual property landscape made hearing loss a useful case study to assess whether patent rights in genetic testing can proliferate or overlap, and whether it is possible to gather the rights necessary to perform testing. Testing for hearing loss is widely available, primarily from academic medical centers. Based on literature reviews and interviews with researchers, research on the genetics of hearing loss has generally not been impeded by patents. There is no consistent evidence of a premium in testing prices attributable to patent status. Athena Diagnostics has, however, used its intellectual property to discourage other providers from offering some tests. There is no definitive answer about the suitability of current patenting and licensing of commonly tested genes because of continuing legal uncertainty about the extent of enforcement of patent rights. Clinicians have also expressed concerns that multiplex tests will be difficult to develop because of overlapping intellectual property and conflict with Athena's sole provider business model.

  9. A population-based survey in Australia of men's and women's perceptions of genetic risk and predictive genetic testing and implications for primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, S

    2011-01-01

    Community attitudes research regarding genetic issues is important when contemplating the potential value and utilisation of predictive testing for common diseases in mainstream health services. This article aims to report population-based attitudes and discuss their relevance to integrating genetic services in primary health contexts. Men's and women's attitudes were investigated via population-based omnibus telephone survey in Queensland, Australia. Randomly selected adults (n = 1,230) with a mean age of 48.8 years were interviewed regarding perceptions of genetic determinants of health; benefits of genetic testing that predict 'certain' versus 'probable' future illness; and concern, if any, regarding potential misuse of genetic test information. Most (75%) respondents believed genetic factors significantly influenced health status; 85% regarded genetic testing positively although attitudes varied with age. Risk-based information was less valued than certainty-based information, but women valued risk information significantly more highly than men. Respondents reported 'concern' (44%) and 'no concern' (47%) regarding potential misuse of genetic information. This study contributes important population-based data as most research has involved selected individuals closely impacted by genetic disorders. While community attitudes were positive regarding genetic testing, genetic literacy is important to establish. The nature of gender differences regarding risk perception merits further study and has policy and service implications. Community concern about potential genetic discrimination must be addressed if health benefits of testing are to be maximised. Larger questions remain in scientific, policy, service delivery, and professional practice domains before predictive testing for common disorders is efficacious in mainstream health care. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Identifying genetic marker sets associated with phenotypes via an efficient adaptive score test

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, T.

    2012-06-25

    In recent years, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and gene-expression profiling have generated a large number of valuable datasets for assessing how genetic variations are related to disease outcomes. With such datasets, it is often of interest to assess the overall effect of a set of genetic markers, assembled based on biological knowledge. Genetic marker-set analyses have been advocated as more reliable and powerful approaches compared with the traditional marginal approaches (Curtis and others, 2005. Pathways to the analysis of microarray data. TRENDS in Biotechnology 23, 429-435; Efroni and others, 2007. Identification of key processes underlying cancer phenotypes using biologic pathway analysis. PLoS One 2, 425). Procedures for testing the overall effect of a marker-set have been actively studied in recent years. For example, score tests derived under an Empirical Bayes (EB) framework (Liu and others, 2007. Semiparametric regression of multidimensional genetic pathway data: least-squares kernel machines and linear mixed models. Biometrics 63, 1079-1088; Liu and others, 2008. Estimation and testing for the effect of a genetic pathway on a disease outcome using logistic kernel machine regression via logistic mixed models. BMC bioinformatics 9, 292-2; Wu and others, 2010. Powerful SNP-set analysis for case-control genome-wide association studies. American Journal of Human Genetics 86, 929) have been proposed as powerful alternatives to the standard Rao score test (Rao, 1948. Large sample tests of statistical hypotheses concerning several parameters with applications to problems of estimation. Mathematical Proceedings of the Cambridge Philosophical Society, 44, 50-57). The advantages of these EB-based tests are most apparent when the markers are correlated, due to the reduction in the degrees of freedom. In this paper, we propose an adaptive score test which up- or down-weights the contributions from each member of the marker-set based on the Z-scores of

  11. Concerns about Genetic Testing for Schizophrenia among Young Adults at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Ryan E; Friesen, Phoebe; Brucato, Gary; Girgis, Ragy R; Dixon, Lisa

    Genetic tests for schizophrenia may introduce risks and benefits. Among young adults at clinical high-risk for psychosis, little is known about their concerns and how they assess potential risks. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 15 young adults at clinical high-risk for psychosis to ask about their concerns. Participants expressed concerns about test reliability, data interpretation, stigma, psychological harm, family planning, and privacy. Participants' responses showed some departure from the ethics literature insofar as participants were primarily interested in reporting their results to people to whom they felt emotionally close, and expressed little consideration of biological closeness. Additionally, if tests showed an increased genetic risk for schizophrenia, four clinical high-risk persons felt obligated to tell an employer and another three would "maybe" tell an employer, even in the absence of clinical symptoms. These findings suggest opportunities for clinicians and genetic counselors to intervene with education and support.

  12. The impact of human gene patents on genetic testing in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Naomi

    2011-04-01

    This article reports the results of an empirical study examining the impact of human gene patents on the development and delivery of genetic tests in the public sector in the United Kingdom. Semi-structured qualitative interviews. The study found that, despite the potential for gene patents to have significant negative consequences for genetic testing, in fact, human gene patents have little or no impact on practice for those developing genetic tests in the public sector in the United Kingdom. This is not because patents are managed optimally; rather, gene patents are essentially ignored. This article reports the factors that motivate this behavior. At least insofar as there seems to be no apparent problem of lack of patient access, there is no significant public health problem. However, there is divergence between the legal and the practical situation. Complacency about the lack of impact of patents on access to diagnostics is risky, and concerns about patents should be addressed proactively, rather than reactively.

  13. The Impact of Human Gene Patents on Genetic Testing in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Naomi

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an empirical study examining the impact of human gene patents on the development and delivery of genetic tests in the public sector in the UK. The study found that, despite the potential for gene patents to have significant negative consequences for genetic testing, in fact, human gene patents have little or no impact on practice for those developing genetic tests in the public sector in the UK. This is not because patents are managed optimally; rather, gene patents are essentially ignored. This paper reports the factors that motivate this behavior. At least insofar as there seems to be no apparent problem of lack of patient access, there is no significant public health problem. However, there is divergence between the legal and the practical situation. Complacency about the lack of impact of patents on access to diagnostics is risky, and concerns about patents should be addressed proactively, rather than reactively. PMID:21150786

  14. Direct-to-consumer genetic testing for predicting sports performance and talent identification: Consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webborn, Nick; Williams, Alun; McNamee, Mike; Bouchard, Claude; Pitsiladis, Yannis; Ahmetov, Ildus; Ashley, Euan; Byrne, Nuala; Camporesi, Silvia; Collins, Malcolm; Dijkstra, Paul; Eynon, Nir; Fuku, Noriyuki; Garton, Fleur C; Hoppe, Nils; Holm, Søren; Kaye, Jane; Klissouras, Vassilis; Lucia, Alejandro; Maase, Kamiel; Moran, Colin; North, Kathryn N; Pigozzi, Fabio; Wang, Guan

    2015-12-01

    The general consensus among sport and exercise genetics researchers is that genetic tests have no role to play in talent identification or the individualised prescription of training to maximise performance. Despite the lack of evidence, recent years have witnessed the rise of an emerging market of direct-to-consumer marketing (DTC) tests that claim to be able to identify children's athletic talents. Targeted consumers include mainly coaches and parents. There is concern among the scientific community that the current level of knowledge is being misrepresented for commercial purposes. There remains a lack of universally accepted guidelines and legislation for DTC testing in relation to all forms of genetic testing and not just for talent identification. There is concern over the lack of clarity of information over which specific genes or variants are being tested and the almost universal lack of appropriate genetic counselling for the interpretation of the genetic data to consumers. Furthermore independent studies have identified issues relating to quality control by DTC laboratories with different results being reported from samples from the same individual. Consequently, in the current state of knowledge, no child or young athlete should be exposed to DTC genetic testing to define or alter training or for talent identification aimed at selecting gifted children or adolescents. Large scale collaborative projects, may help to develop a stronger scientific foundation on these issues in the future. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. The Current Landscape of Genetic Testing in Cardiovascular Malformations: Opportunities and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin John Landis

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Human cardiovascular malformations (CVMs frequently have a genetic contribution. Through the application of novel technologies such as next generation sequencing, DNA sequence variants associated with CVMs are being identified at a rapid pace. While clinicians are now able to offer testing with next generation sequencing gene panels or whole exome sequencing to any patient with a CVM, the interpretation of genetic variation remains problematic. Variable phenotypic expression, reduced penetrance, inconsistent phenotyping methods, and the lack of high throughput functional testing of variants, contribute to these challenges. This article elaborates critical issues that impact the decision to broadly implement clinical molecular genetic testing in CVMs. Major benefits of testing include establishing a genetic diagnosis, facilitating cost-effective screening of family members who may have subclinical disease, predicting recurrence risk in offspring, enabling early diagnosis and anticipatory management of CV and non-CV disease phenotypes, predicting long term outcomes, and facilitating the development of novel therapies aimed at disease improvement or prevention. Limitations include financial cost, psychosocial cost, and ambiguity of interpretation of results. Multiplex families and patients with syndromic features are two groups where disease causation could potentially be firmly established. However, these account for the minority of the overall CVM population, and there is increasing recognition that genotypes previously associated with syndromes also exist in patients who lack non-CV findings. In all circumstances, ongoing dialogue between cardiologists and clinical geneticists will be needed to accurately interpret genetic testing and improve these patients’ health. This may be most effectively implemented by the creation and support of CV genetics services at centers committed to pursuing testing for patients.

  16. A fast multilocus test with adaptive SNP selection for large-scale genetic-association studies

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Han

    2013-09-11

    As increasing evidence suggests that multiple correlated genetic variants could jointly influence the outcome, a multilocus test that aggregates association evidence across multiple genetic markers in a considered gene or a genomic region may be more powerful than a single-marker test for detecting susceptibility loci. We propose a multilocus test, AdaJoint, which adopts a variable selection procedure to identify a subset of genetic markers that jointly show the strongest association signal, and defines the test statistic based on the selected genetic markers. The P-value from the AdaJoint test is evaluated by a computationally efficient algorithm that effectively adjusts for multiple-comparison, and is hundreds of times faster than the standard permutation method. Simulation studies demonstrate that AdaJoint has the most robust performance among several commonly used multilocus tests. We perform multilocus analysis of over 26,000 genes/regions on two genome-wide association studies of pancreatic cancer. Compared with its competitors, AdaJoint identifies a much stronger association between the gene CLPTM1L and pancreatic cancer risk (6.0 × 10(-8)), with the signal optimally captured by two correlated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Finally, we show AdaJoint as a powerful tool for mapping cis-regulating methylation quantitative trait loci on normal breast tissues, and find many CpG sites whose methylation levels are jointly regulated by multiple SNPs nearby.

  17. Metabologenomics of Phaeochromocytoma and Paraganglioma: An Integrated Approach for Personalised Biochemical and Genetic Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhofer, Graeme; Klink, Barbara; Richter, Susan; Lenders, Jacques Wm; Robledo, Mercedes

    2017-04-01

    The tremendous advances over the past two decades in both clinical genetics and biochemical testing of chromaffin cell tumours have led to new considerations about how these aspects of laboratory medicine can be integrated to improve diagnosis and management of affected patients. With germline mutations in 15 genes now identified to be responsible for over a third of all cases of phaeochromocytomas and paragangliomas, these tumours are recognised to have one of the richest hereditary backgrounds among all neoplasms. Depending on the mutation, tumours show distinct differences in metabolic pathways that relate to or even directly impact clinical presentation. At the same time, there has been improved understanding about how catecholamines are synthesised, stored, secreted and metabolised by chromaffin cell tumours. Although the tumours may not always secrete catecholamines it has become clear that almost all continuously produce and metabolise catecholamines. This has not only fuelled changes in laboratory medicine, but has also assisted in recognition of genotype-biochemical phenotype relationships important for diagnostics and clinical care. In particular, differences in catecholamine and energy pathway metabolomes can guide genetic testing, assist with test interpretation and provide predictions about the nature, behaviour and imaging characteristics of the tumours. Conversely, results of genetic testing are important for guiding how routine biochemical testing should be employed and interpreted in surveillance programmes for at-risk patients. In these ways there are emerging needs for modern laboratory medicine to seamlessly integrate biochemical and genetic testing into the diagnosis and management of patients with chromaffin cell tumours.

  18. Frequency of Helicobacter pylori in patients underwent endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Tay

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate thefrequency of Helicobacter pylori in patients underwent endoscopyeastern Anatolia.Materials and methods: The patients whose endoscopicantral biopsies were taken for any reason in our endoscopyunit in February-June 2010 period were includedand retrospectively investigated. The frequency of Helicobacterpylori was determined as separating the patientsaccording to general, sex and the age groups. Antral biopsieswere stained with hematoxylin-eosin and modified giemsamethod and examined under light microscope andreported as (+ mild, (++ moderate, (+++ severe positiveaccording to their intensities.Results: Biopsy specimens of 1298 patients were includedinto the study. The mean age was 47.5 ± 17.5 years(range 14-88 and 607 of these patients (47% were male.Histopathological evaluation revealed that, 918 of the patientswere (71% positive and 379 (29% were negativefor Helicobacter pylori. Approximately 60% of our patientshad mild, 29% had moderate and 11% had severe positivityfor Helicobacter pylori. No significant difference wasfound in the frequency of Helicobacter pylori betweenwomen and men. The frequencies of Helicobacter pyloriwere 73.2%, 71.5%, 68.6% and 70.4%, respectively, inthe age groups of 14-30 years, 31-45 years, 46-60 yearsand 61-88 years.Conclusion: The frequency of Helicobacter pylori was71% in Eastern Anatolia Region. No statistically significantdifference was found between genders and agegroups in term of the frequency of Helicobacter pylori.

  19. Experimental test of genetic rescue in isolated populations of brook trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Zachary L.; Coombs, Jason A.; Hudy, Mark; Nislow, Keith H.; Letcher, Benjamin H.; Whiteley, Andrew R.

    2017-01-01

    Genetic rescue is an increasingly considered conservation measure to address genetic erosion associated with habitat loss and fragmentation. The resulting gene flow from facilitating migration may improve fitness and adaptive potential, but is not without risks (e.g., outbreeding depression). Here, we conducted a test of genetic rescue by translocating ten (five of each sex) brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) from a single source to four nearby and isolated stream populations. To control for the demographic contribution of translocated individuals, ten resident individuals (five of each sex) were removed from each recipient population. Prior to the introduction of translocated individuals, the two smallest above-barrier populations had substantially lower genetic diversity, and all populations had reduced effective number of breeders relative to adjacent below-barrier populations. In the first reproductive bout following translocation, 31 of 40 (78%) translocated individuals reproduced successfully. Translocated individuals contributed to more families than expected under random mating and generally produced larger full-sibling families. We observed relatively high (>20%) introgression in three of the four recipient populations. The translocations increased genetic diversity of recipient populations by 45% in allelic richness and 25% in expected heterozygosity. Additionally, strong evidence of hybrid vigour was observed through significantly larger body sizes of hybrid offspring relative to resident offspring in all recipient populations. Continued monitoring of these populations will test for negative fitness effects beyond the first generation. However, these results provide much-needed experimental data to inform the potential effectiveness of genetic rescue-motivated translocations.

  20. Estimation of genetic parameters for test day records of dairy traits in the first three lactations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ducrocq Vincent

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Application of test-day models for the genetic evaluation of dairy populations requires the solution of large mixed model equations. The size of the (covariance matrices required with such models can be reduced through the use of its first eigenvectors. Here, the first two eigenvectors of (covariance matrices estimated for dairy traits in first lactation were used as covariables to jointly estimate genetic parameters of the first three lactations. These eigenvectors appear to be similar across traits and have a biological interpretation, one being related to the level of production and the other to persistency. Furthermore, they explain more than 95% of the total genetic variation. Variances and heritabilities obtained with this model were consistent with previous studies. High correlations were found among production levels in different lactations. Persistency measures were less correlated. Genetic correlations between second and third lactations were close to one, indicating that these can be considered as the same trait. Genetic correlations within lactation were high except between extreme parts of the lactation. This study shows that the use of eigenvectors can reduce the rank of (covariance matrices for the test-day model and can provide consistent genetic parameters.

  1. Genetic testing for inherited ocular disease: delivering on the promise at last?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Rachel L; Hall, Georgina; Black, Graeme C

    2014-01-01

    Genetic testing is of increasing clinical utility for diagnosing inherited eye disease. Clarifying a clinical diagnosis is important for accurate estimation of prognosis, facilitating genetic counselling and management of families, and in the future will direct gene-specific therapeutic strategies. Often, precise diagnosis of genetic ophthalmic conditions is complicated by genetic heterogeneity, a difficulty that the so-called 'next-generation sequencing' technologies promise to overcome. Despite considerable counselling and ethical complexities, next-generation sequencing offers to revolutionize clinical practice. This will necessitate considerable adjustment to standard practice but has the power to deliver a personalized approach to genomic medicine for many more patients and enhance the potential for preventing vision loss. © 2013 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  2. A test sheet generating algorithm based on intelligent genetic algorithm and hierarchical planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Peipei; Niu, Zhendong; Chen, Xuting; Chen, Wei

    2013-03-01

    In recent years, computer-based testing has become an effective method to evaluate students' overall learning progress so that appropriate guiding strategies can be recommended. Research has been done to develop intelligent test assembling systems which can automatically generate test sheets based on given parameters of test items. A good multisubject test sheet depends on not only the quality of the test items but also the construction of the sheet. Effective and efficient construction of test sheets according to multiple subjects and criteria is a challenging problem. In this paper, a multi-subject test sheet generation problem is formulated and a test sheet generating approach based on intelligent genetic algorithm and hierarchical planning (GAHP) is proposed to tackle this problem. The proposed approach utilizes hierarchical planning to simplify the multi-subject testing problem and adopts genetic algorithm to process the layered criteria, enabling the construction of good test sheets according to multiple test item requirements. Experiments are conducted and the results show that the proposed approach is capable of effectively generating multi-subject test sheets that meet specified requirements and achieve good performance.

  3. Progress with genetic cardiomyopathies: Screening, counseling, and testing in dilated, hypertrophic and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershberger, Ray E.; Cowan, Jason; Morales, Ana; Siegfried, Jill D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary This review focuses on the genetic cardiomyopathies: principally dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), with salient features of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C), regarding genetic etiology, genetic testing, and genetic counseling. Enormous progress has recently been made in identifying genetic causes for each cardiomyopathy, and key phenotype and genotype information is reviewed. Clinical genetic testing is rapidly emerging with a principal rationale of identifying at-risk asymptomatic or disease-free relatives. Knowledge of a disease-causing mutation can guide clinical surveillance for disease onset, thereby enhancing preventive and treatment interventions. Genetic counseling is also indicated for patients and their family members regarding the symptoms of their cardiomyopathy, its inheritance pattern, family screening recommendations, and genetic testing options and possible results. PMID:19808347

  4. Improving Decision Making about Genetic Testing in the Clinic: An Overview of Effective Knowledge Translation Interventions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    France Légaré

    Full Text Available Knowledge translation (KT interventions are attempts to change behavior in keeping with scientific evidence. While genetic tests are increasingly available to healthcare consumers in the clinic, evidence about their benefits is unclear and decisions about genetic testing are thus difficult for all parties.We sought to identify KT interventions that involved decisions about genetic testing in the clinical context and to assess their effectiveness for improving decision making in terms of behavior change, increased knowledge and wellbeing.We searched for trials assessing KT interventions in the context of genetic testing up to March 2014 in all systematic reviews (n = 153 published by two Cochrane review groups: Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC and Consumers and Communication.We retrieved 2473 unique trials of which we retained only 28 (1%. Two EPOC reviews yielded two trials of KT interventions: audit and feedback (n = 1 and educational outreach (n = 1. Both targeted health professionals and the KT intervention they assessed was found to be effective. Four Consumers and Communication reviews yielded 26 trials: decision aids (n = 15, communication of DNA-based disease risk estimates (n = 7, personalized risk communication (n = 3 and mobile phone messaging (n = 1. Among these, 25 trials targeted only health consumers or patients and the KT interventions were found to be effective in four trials, partly effective in seven, and ineffective in four. Lastly, only one trial targeted both physicians and patients and was found to be effective.More research on the effectiveness of KT interventions regarding genetic testing in the clinical context may contribute to patients making informed value-based decisions and drawing the maximum benefit from clinical applications of genetic and genomic innovations.

  5. Testing the Relations Among Family Disorganization, Delay Discounting, and Adolescent Alcohol Use: A Genetically Informed Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Frances L; Pandika, Danielle; Chassin, Laurie; Lee, Matthew; King, Kevin

    2016-04-01

    Delay discounting is a potential etiological factor in adolescents' alcohol use, making it important to understand its antecedents. Family disorganization might contribute to delay discounting, but few studies have tested this relation. Moreover, because delay discounting is heritable, the effects of family disorganization on delay discounting might be moderated by adolescents' genetic risk for delay discounting. Thus, the current study examined the role of family disorganization, in interaction with genetic risk, in predicting adolescents' delay discounting and subsequent alcohol use. Adolescents participated in 4 waves of data collection. Adolescents self-reported their family disorganization at T1, completed a delay discounting questionnaire at T3, and self-reported their alcohol use both at T2 (covariate) and T4 (outcome). Using results from an independent sample, we created a polygenic risk score consisting of dopaminergic genes to index genetic risk for delay discounting. Greater family disorganization predicted adolescents' greater delay discounting, but only for adolescents with low levels of genetic risk for delay discounting. Adolescents with high and mean levels of genetic risk for delay discounting showed elevated delay discounting regardless of their family's disorganization. Greater delay discounting prospectively predicted adolescents' greater alcohol use. Finally, the effects of family disorganization on adolescents' alcohol use were mediated through delay discounting, but only for adolescents with low levels of genetic risk. Results suggest multiple pathways to delay discounting. Although there are genetically influenced pathways to delay discounting, family disorganization might represent an environmental pathway to delay discounting (and subsequent alcohol use) for a subset of adolescents at low genetic risk. These findings reinforce the utility of family interventions for reducing adolescents' delay discounting and alcohol use, at least for a

  6. Screening for hereditary cancer and genetic testing, epitomized by breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eeles, R A

    1999-12-01

    The new genetics is having an impact on many areas of healthcare. Diversity in the genetic code accounts for differences in phenotypes between populations and it is becoming apparent that genetic differences may have a role in predisposition to and behaviour of disease. Genetic models suggest that there are two types of genetic predisposition to disease: the so-called high and low penetrance genes. At present, most of the impact on medicine has been from highly penetrant genes, and genetic testing for disease predisposition, particularly for diseases of late onset (e.g. certain cancers) is in its infancy. As a general statement, approximately 5-10% of common cancers are due to such highly penetrant genes. The category of genes that will become of increasing interest is that of the low penetrance genes. Often these are normal variations in genes that result in a slightly increased risk of disease. These are analogous to high blood pressure carrying an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Once rapid genetic analysis is available for these types of genes, such analysis would be analogous to taking someone's blood pressure in a general practitioner's (GP's) surgery to identify individuals at increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This will produce a revolutionary change in the way we practise medicine. Genetic analysis will become faster and may therefore be more commonplace. It is possible to envisage an era when genetic analysis will become a routine part of primary care to identify changes in low penetrance genes that will confer a 'risk profile' for patients. This will then enable their primary care physicians to advise about primary prevention and even prescribe certain preventive drugs to decrease the risk of certain diseases occurring. This proactive rather than reactive style of practising medicine is potentially exciting, however it carries with it ethical, legal and social implications for how we deal with this new knowledge.

  7. Autobiologies on YouTube: Narratives of Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Anna; Kelly, Susan E.; Wyatt, Sally

    2014-01-01

    Despite a growing personal genomics market, little is known about how people engage with the possibilities offered by direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing. In order to help address this gap, this study deploys narrative analysis of YouTube videos posted by individuals who have purchased DTC genetic testing for disease. Genetic testing is said to be contributing to new states of illness, where individuals may become “patients-in-waiting.” In the videos analyzed, we found a new form of storytelling about this ambiguous state of illness, which we refer to as autobiology. Autobiology – the study of, and story about, one's own biology – concerns narratives of sense-making through forms of biological practice, as well as wayfaring narratives which interweave genetic markers and family histories of disease. These autobiologies – part of a broader shift toward public stories about genetics and other healthcare technologies – exhibit playfulness, as well as being bound with consumerist practices. PMID:24772003

  8. Against Genetic Tests for Athletic Talent: The Primacy of the Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loland, Sigmund

    2015-09-01

    New insights into the genetics of sport performance lead to new areas of application. One area is the use of genetic tests to identify athletic talent. Athletic performances involve a high number of complex phenotypical traits. Based on the ACCE model (review of Analytic and Clinical validity, Clinical utility, and Ethical, legal and social implications), a critique is offered of the lack of validity and predictive power of genetic tests for talent. Based on the ideal of children's right to an open future, a moral argument is given against such tests on children and young athletes. A possible role of genetic tests in sport is proposed in terms of identifying predisposition for injury. In meeting ACCE requirements, such tests could improve individualised injury prevention and increase athlete health. More generally, limitations of science are discussed in the identification of talent and in the understanding of complex human performance phenotypes. An alternative approach to talent identification is proposed in terms of ethically sensitive, systematic and evidence-based holistic observation over time of relevant phenotypical traits by experienced observers. Talent identification in sport should be based on the primacy of the phenotype.

  9. Sulfonylurea Treatment Before Genetic Testing in Neonatal Diabetes: Pros and Cons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, David; Bell, Charles D.; Hwang, Jessica L.; Dickens, Jazzmyne T.; Sima, Daniela I.; Felipe, Dania L.; Zimmer, Carrie A.; Davis, Ajuah O.; Kotlyarevska, Kateryna; Naylor, Rochelle N.; Philipson, Louis H.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Diabetes in neonates nearly always has a monogenic etiology. Earlier sulfonylurea therapy can improve glycemic control and potential neurodevelopmental outcomes in children with KCNJ11 or ABCC8 mutations, the most common gene causes. Objective: Assess the risks and benefits of initiating sulfonylurea therapy before genetic testing results become available. Design, Setting, and Patients: Observational retrospective study of subjects with neonatal diabetes within the University of Chicago Monogenic Diabetes Registry. Main Outcome Measures: Response to sulfonylurea (determined by whether insulin could be discontinued) and treatment side effects in those treated empirically. Results: A total of 154 subjects were diagnosed with diabetes before 6 months of age. A genetic diagnosis had been determined in 118 (77%), with 73 (47%) having a mutation in KCNJ11 or ABCC8. The median time from clinical diagnosis to genetic diagnosis was 10.4 weeks (range, 1.6 to 58.2 wk). In nine probands, an empiric sulfonylurea trial was initiated within 28 days of diabetes diagnosis. A genetic cause was subsequently found in eight cases, and insulin was discontinued within 14 days of sulfonylurea initiation in all of these cases. Conclusions: Sulfonylurea therapy appears to be safe and often successful in neonatal diabetes patients before genetic testing results are available; however, larger numbers of cases must be studied. Given the potential beneficial effect on neurodevelopmental outcome, glycemic control, and the current barriers to expeditious acquisition of genetic testing, an empiric inpatient trial of sulfonylurea can be considered. However, obtaining a genetic diagnosis remains imperative to inform long-term management and prognosis. PMID:25238204

  10. Carrier testing for Ashkenazi Jewish disorders in the prenatal setting: navigating the genetic maze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Jose Carlos P; Schreiber-Agus, Nicole; Carter, Suzanne M; Klugman, Susan; Gregg, Anthony R; Gross, Susan J

    2014-09-01

    Exciting developments in the fields of genetics and genomics have facilitated the identification of the etiological basis of many Mendelian disorders. Several of the methods used in gene discovery have focused initially on homogeneous populations, including the Ashkenazi Jewish population. The founder effect is well recognized in this community, in which historical events and cultural behaviors have resulted in a limited number of mutations underlying genetic disorders with substantial health impact. New technologies have made it possible to rapidly expand the test panels, changing testing paradigms, and thereby creating challenges for the physician in deciphering the appropriate approach to genetic screening in this population. The goal of this review is to help primary obstetric health care providers navigate through this quickly moving field so as to better counsel and support their patients of Ashkenazi Jewish heritage. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Chloe's Law: A Powerful Legislative Movement Challenging a Core Ethical Norm of Genetic Testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur L Caplan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Since the early 1970s, the ethical norm governing counselors involved in testing and screening for genetic conditions related to reproduction has been strict neutrality. Counseling about reproductive genetics was to be patient centered but nondirective. Many advocates for people with Down syndrome believe that high abortion rates following a diagnosis of this condition show an unfounded bias against those with Down syndrome. These advocates have succeeded in enacting federal and state legislation that requires women who receive a prenatal diagnosis of Down syndrome to receive positive information about the condition, thereby ending the nominal goal of value-neutral counseling and setting the stage for further normative shifts in clinical reproductive genetics as counseling expands because of cell-free testing.

  12. A review of statistical methods for testing genetic anticipation: looking for an answer in Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonstra, Philip S; Gruber, Stephen B; Raymond, Victoria M

    2010-01-01

    the issue of multiplex ascertainment and its effect on the different methods. We then focus on exploring genetic anticipation in Lynch syndrome and analyze new data on the age of onset in affected parent-child pairs from families seen at the University of Michigan Cancer Genetics clinic with a mutation...... to a recently proposed random effects model which includes extended pedigree data and unaffected family members [Larsen et al., 2009]. A naive use of the paired t-test is biased for the simple reason that age of onset has to be less than the age at ascertainment (interview) for both affected parent and child......, and this right truncation effect is more pronounced in children than in parents. In this study, we first review different statistical methods for testing genetic anticipation in affected parent-child pairs that address the issue of bias due to right truncation. Using affected parent-child pair data, we compare...

  13. Recent advances in prenatal genetic screening and testing [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignatia B. Van den Veyver

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of new technologies has dramatically changed the current practice of prenatal screening and testing for genetic abnormalities in the fetus. Expanded carrier screening panels and non-invasive cell-free fetal DNA-based screening for aneuploidy and single-gene disorders, and more recently for subchromosomal abnormalities, have been introduced into prenatal care. More recently introduced technologies such as chromosomal microarray analysis and whole-exome sequencing can diagnose more genetic conditions on samples obtained through amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling, including many disorders that cannot be screened for non-invasively. All of these options have benefits and limitations, and genetic counseling has become increasingly complex for providers who are responsible for guiding patients in their decisions about screening and testing before and during pregnancy.

  14. Health care providers and direct-to-consumer access and advertising of genetic testing in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Melanie F

    2011-12-28

    Marketing pressures, regulatory policies, clinical guidelines, and consumer demand all affect health care providers' knowledge and use of health-related genetic tests that are sold and/or advertised to consumers. In addition, clinical guidelines, regulatory policies, and educational efforts are needed to promote the informed use of genetic tests that are sold and advertised to consumers and health care providers. A shift in culture regarding the regulation of genetic tests that are sold directly to consumers is suggested: by recent actions taken by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), including letters sent to direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing companies stating that their tests meet the definition of medical devices; by public meetings held by the FDA to discuss laboratory developed tests; and by the convening of the Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel to gather input on scientific issues concerning DTC genetic tests that make medical claims. This review provides a brief overview of DTC advertising and the regulation of pharmaceuticals and genetic tests in the United States. It highlights recent changes in the regulatory culture regarding genetic tests that are sold to consumers, and discusses the impact on health care providers of selling and advertising genetic tests directly to consumers.

  15. Health Orientation, Knowledge, and Attitudes toward Genetic Testing and Personalized Genomic Services: Preliminary Data from an Italian Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Oliveri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The study aims at assessing personality tendencies and orientations that could be closely correlated with knowledge, awareness, and interest toward undergoing genetic testing. Methods. A sample of 145 subjects in Italy completed an online survey, investigating demographic data, health orientation, level of perceived knowledge about genetic risk, genetic screening, and personal attitudes toward direct to consumer genetic testing (DTCGT. Results. Results showed that respondents considered genetic assessment to be helpful for disease prevention, but they were concerned that results could affect their life planning with little clinical utility. Furthermore, a very high percentage of respondents (67% had never heard about genetic testing directly available to the public. Data showed that personality tendencies, such as personal health consciousness, health internal control, health esteem, and confidence, motivation to avoid unhealthiness and motivation for healthiness affected the uptake of genetic information and the interest in undergoing genetic testing. Conclusions. Public knowledge and attitudes toward genetic risk and genetic testing among European countries, along with individual personality and psychological tendencies that could affect these attitudes, remain unexplored. The present study constitutes one of the first attempts to investigate how such personality tendencies could motivation to undergo genetic testing and engagement in lifestyle changes.

  16. Impact of gene patents and licensing practices on access to genetic testing for long QT syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angrist, Misha; Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Heaney, Christopher; Cook-Deegan, Robert

    2010-04-01

    Genetic testing for long QT syndrome exemplifies patenting and exclusive licensing with different outcomes at different times. Exclusive licensing from the University of Utah changed the business model from sole provider to two US providers of long QT syndrome testing. Long QT syndrome is associated with mutations in many genes, 12 of which are now tested by two competing firms in the United States, PGxHealth and GeneDx. Until 2009, PGxHealth was the sole provider, based largely on exclusive rights to patents from the University of Utah and elsewhere. University of Utah patents were initially licensed to DNA Sciences, whose patent rights were acquired by Genaissance, and then by Clinical Data, Inc., which owns PGxHealth. In 2002, DNA Sciences, Inc., "cleared the market" by sending cease-and-desist patent enforcement letters to university and reference laboratories offering long QT syndrome genetic testing. There was no test on the market for a 1- to 2-year period. From 2005-2008, most long QT syndrome-related patents were controlled by Clinical Data, Inc., and its subsidiary PGxHealth. Bio-Reference Laboratories, Inc., secured countervailing exclusive patent rights starting in 2006, also from the University of Utah, and broke the PGxHealth monopoly in early 2009, creating a duopoly for genetic testing in the United States and expanding the number of genes for which commercial testing is available from 5 to 12.

  17. American Society of Clinical Oncology Policy Statement Update: Genetic and Genomic Testing for Cancer Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Mark E; Bradbury, Angela R; Arun, Banu; Domchek, Susan M; Ford, James M; Hampel, Heather L; Lipkin, Stephen M; Syngal, Sapna; Wollins, Dana S; Lindor, Noralane M

    2015-11-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has long affirmed that the recognition and management of individuals with an inherited susceptibility to cancer are core elements of oncology care. ASCO released its first statement on genetic testing in 1996 and updated that statement in 2003 and 2010 in response to developments in the field. In 2014, the Cancer Prevention and Ethics Committees of ASCO commissioned another update to reflect the impact of advances in this area on oncology practice. In particular, there was an interest in addressing the opportunities and challenges arising from the application of massively parallel sequencing-also known as next-generation sequencing-to cancer susceptibility testing. This technology introduces a new level of complexity into the practice of cancer risk assessment and management, requiring renewed effort on the part of ASCO to ensure that those providing care to patients with cancer receive the necessary education to use this new technology in the most effective, beneficial manner. The purpose of this statement is to explore the challenges of new and emerging technologies in cancer genetics and provide recommendations to ensure their optimal deployment in oncology practice. Specifically, the statement makes recommendations in the following areas: germline implications of somatic mutation profiling, multigene panel testing for cancer susceptibility, quality assurance in genetic testing, education of oncology professionals, and access to cancer genetic services. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  18. Automated Test Assembly for Cognitive Diagnosis Models Using a Genetic Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelman, Matthew; Kim, Wonsuk; Roussos, Louis A.

    2009-01-01

    Much recent psychometric literature has focused on cognitive diagnosis models (CDMs), a promising class of instruments used to measure the strengths and weaknesses of examinees. This article introduces a genetic algorithm to perform automated test assembly alongside CDMs. The algorithm is flexible in that it can be applied whether the goal is to…

  19. Quality assurance practices in Europe: a survey of molecular genetic testing laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berwouts, Sarah; Fanning, Katrina; Morris, Michael A; Barton, David E; Dequeker, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    In the 2000s, a number of initiatives were taken internationally to improve quality in genetic testing services. To contribute to and update the limited literature available related to this topic, we surveyed 910 human molecular genetic testing laboratories, of which 291 (32%) from 29 European countries responded. The majority of laboratories were in the public sector (81%), affiliated with a university hospital (60%). Only a minority of laboratories was accredited (23%), and 26% was certified. A total of 22% of laboratories did not participate in external quality assessment (EQA) and 28% did not use reference materials (RMs). The main motivations given for accreditation were to improve laboratory profile (85%) and national recognition (84%). Nearly all respondents (95%) would prefer working in an accredited laboratory. In accredited laboratories, participation in EQA (Pquality assurance (Pquality implementation score (QIS), we showed that accredited laboratories (average score 92) comply better than certified laboratories (average score 69, Pquality indicators. We conclude that quality practices vary widely in European genetic testing laboratories. This leads to a potentially dangerous situation in which the quality of genetic testing is not consistently assured. PMID:22739339

  20. Genetic testing in Li-Fraumeni Syndrome: uptake and psychosocial consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammens, C.R.M.; Aaronson, N.K.; Wagner, A.; Sijmons, R.H.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.; Vriends, A.H.J.T.; Ruijs, M.W.G.; van Os, T.A.M.; Spruijt, L.; Gómez García, E.B.; Kluijt, I.; Nagtegaal, T.; Verhoef, S.; Bleiker, E.M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a hereditary cancer syndrome, characterized by a high risk of developing cancer at various sites and ages. To date, limited clinical benefits of genetic testing for LFS have been demonstrated, and there are concerns about the potential adverse psychosocial

  1. Measured dose to ovaries and testes from Hodgkin's fields and determination of genetically significant dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niroomand-Rad, A.; Cumberlin, R.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the genetically significant dose from therapeutic radiation exposure with Hodgkin's fields by estimating the doses to ovaries and testes. Phantom measurements were performed to verify estimated doses to ovaries and testes from Hodgkin's fields. Thermoluminescent LiF dosimeters (TLD-100) of 1 x 3 x 3 mm 3 dimensions were embedded in phantoms and exposed to standard mantle and paraaortic fields using Co-60, 4 MV, 6 MV, and 10 MV photon beams. The results show that measured doses to ovaries and testes are about two to five times higher than the corresponding graphically estimated doses for Co-60 and 4 MVX photon beams as depicted in ICRP publication 44. In addition, the measured doses to ovaries and testes are about 30% to 65% lower for 10 MV photon beams than for their corresponding Co-60 photon beams. The genetically significant dose from Hodgkin's treatment (less than 0.01 mSv) adds about 4% to the genetically significant dose contribution to medical procedures and adds less than 1% to the genetically significant dose from all sources. Therefore, the consequence to society is considered to be very small. The consequences for the individual patient are, likewise, small. 28 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  2. Attitudes toward genetic testing in childhood and reproductive decision-making for familial adenomatous polyposis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, K.F.L.; Aaronson, N.K.; Vasen, H.F.A.; Verhoef, S.; Gundy, C.M.; Bleiker, E.M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Childhood DNA testing, prenatal diagnosis (PND) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) are available for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). However, the use of PND and PGD is controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate attitudes toward, and experiences with, childhood DNA

  3. Pitfalls in genetic testing : the story of missed SCN1A mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Djémié, Tania; Weckhuysen, Sarah; von Spiczak, Sarah; Carvill, Gemma L; Jaehn, Johanna; Anttonen, Anna-Kaisa; Brilstra, Eva; Caglayan, Hande S; de Kovel, Carolien G; Depienne, Christel; Gaily, Eija; Gennaro, Elena; Giraldez, Beatriz G; Gormley, Padhraig; Guerrero-López, Rosa; Guerrini, Renzo; Hämäläinen, Eija; Hartmann, Corinna; Hernandez-Hernandez, Laura; Hjalgrim, Helle; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Leguern, Eric; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Lemke, Johannes R; Leu, Costin; Marini, Carla; McMahon, Jacinta M; Mei, Davide; Møller, Rikke S; Muhle, Hiltrud; Myers, Candace T; Nava, Caroline; Serratosa, Jose M; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Stephani, Ulrich; Striano, Pasquale; van Kempen, Marjan J A; Verbeek, Nienke E; Usluer, Sunay; Zara, Federico; Palotie, Aarno; Mefford, Heather C; Scheffer, Ingrid E; De Jonghe, Peter; Helbig, Ingo; Suls, Arvid

    BACKGROUND: Sanger sequencing, still the standard technique for genetic testing in most diagnostic laboratories and until recently widely used in research, is gradually being complemented by next-generation sequencing (NGS). No single mutation detection technique is however perfect in identifying

  4. Beliefs about Cancer and Diet among Those Considering Genetic Testing for Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmquist, Aunchalee E. L.; Upton, Rachel; Lee, Seungjin; Panter, Abby T.; Hadley, Don W.; Koehly, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess beliefs about the role of diet in cancer prevention among individuals considering genetic testing for Lynch Syndrome. Design: Family-centered, cascade recruitment; baseline assessment of a longitudinal study. Setting: Clinical research setting. Participants: Participants were 390 persons, ages 18 and older, including persons…

  5. A clinical utility study of exome sequencing versus conventional genetic testing in pediatric neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissers, Lisenka E L M; van Nimwegen, Kirsten J M; Schieving, Jolanda H; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Yntema, Helger G; Pfundt, Rolph; van der Wilt, Gert Jan; Krabbenborg, Lotte; Brunner, Han G; van der Burg, Simone; Grutters, Janneke; Veltman, Joris A; Willemsen, Michèl A A P

    2017-09-01

    Implementation of novel genetic diagnostic tests is generally driven by technological advances because they promise shorter turnaround times and/or higher diagnostic yields. Other aspects, including impact on clinical management or cost-effectiveness, are often not assessed in detail prior to implementation. We studied the clinical utility of whole-exome sequencing (WES) in complex pediatric neurology in terms of diagnostic yield and costs. We analyzed 150 patients (and their parents) presenting with complex neurological disorders of suspected genetic origin. In a parallel study, all patients received both the standard diagnostic workup (e.g., cerebral imaging, muscle biopsies or lumbar punctures, and sequential gene-by-gene-based testing) and WES simultaneously. Our unique study design allowed direct comparison of diagnostic yield of both trajectories and provided insight into the economic implications of implementing WES in this diagnostic trajectory. We showed that WES identified significantly more conclusive diagnoses (29.3%) than the standard care pathway (7.3%) without incurring higher costs. Exploratory analysis of WES as a first-tier diagnostic test indicates that WES may even be cost-saving, depending on the extent of other tests being omitted. Our data support such a use of WES in pediatric neurology for disorders of presumed genetic origin.Genet Med advance online publication 23 March 2017.

  6. Ethnicity, educational level and attitudes contribute to parental intentions about genetic testing for child obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kocken, P.L.; Theunissen, M.H.C.; Schonbeck, Y.; Henneman, L.; Janssens, A.C.; Detmar, S.B.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess parental beliefs and intentions about genetic testing for their children in a multi-ethnic population with the aim of acquiring information to guide interventions for obesity prevention and management. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in parents of

  7. Consumers report lower confidence in their genetics knowledge following direct-to-consumer personal genomic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carere, Deanna Alexis; Kraft, Peter; Kaphingst, Kimberly A; Roberts, J Scott; Green, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure changes to genetics knowledge and self-efficacy following personal genomic testing (PGT). New customers of 23andMe and Pathway Genomics completed a series of online surveys. We measured genetics knowledge (nine true/false items) and genetics self-efficacy (five Likert-scale items) before receipt of results and 6 months after results and used paired methods to evaluate change over time. Correlates of change (e.g., decision regret) were identified using linear regression. 998 PGT customers (59.9% female; 85.8% White; mean age 46.9 ± 15.5 years) were included in our analyses. Mean genetics knowledge score was 8.15 ± 0.95 (out of 9) at baseline and 8.25 ± 0.92 at 6 months (P = 0.0024). Mean self-efficacy score was 29.06 ± 5.59 (out of 35) at baseline and 27.7 ± 5.46 at 6 months (P perceived control over one's health (P perceived value of PGT (P consumers in response to receiving complex genetic information.Genet Med 18 1, 65-72.

  8. The development of Metacognition test in genetics laboratory for undergraduate students

    Science.gov (United States)

    A-nongwech, Nattapong; Pruekpramool, Chaninan

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a Metacognition test in a Genetics Laboratory for undergraduate students. The participants were 30 undergraduate students of a Rajabhat university in Rattanakosin group in the second semester of the 2016 academic year using purposive sampling. The research instrument consisted of 1) Metacognition test and 2) a Metacognition test evaluation form for experts focused on three main points which were an accurate evaluation form of content, a consistency between Metacognition experiences and questions and the appropriateness of the test. The quality of the test was analyzed by using the Index of Consistency (IOC), discrimination and reliability. The results of developing Metacognition test were summarized as 1) The result of developing Metacognition test in a Genetics Laboratory for undergraduate students found that the Metacognition test contained 56 items of open - ended questions. The test composed of 1) four scientific situations, 2) fourteen items of open - ended questions in each scientific situation for evaluating components of Metacognition. The components of Metacognition consisted of Metacognitive knowledge, which were divided into person knowledge, task knowledge and strategy knowledge and Metacognitive experience, which were divided into planning, monitoring and evaluating, and 3) fourteen items of scoring criteria divided into four scales. 2) The results of the item analysis of Metacognition in Genetics Laboratory for undergraduate students found that Index of Consistency between Metacognitive experiences and questions were in the range between 0.75 - 1.00. An accuracy of content equaled 1.00. The appropriateness of the test equaled 1.00 in all situations and items. The discrimination of the test was in the range between 0.00 - 0.73. Furthermore, the reliability of the test equaled 0.97.

  9. Consumers' use of web-based information and their decisions about multiplex genetic susceptibility testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaphingst, Kimberly A; McBride, Colleen M; Wade, Christopher; Alford, Sharon Hensley; Brody, Lawrence C; Baxevanis, Andreas D

    2010-09-29

    Few data exist to inform concerns raised by online direct-to-consumer marketing of genetic susceptibility tests, such as those offered by commercial entities like 23andme, Navigenics, and DNA Direct. The Multiplex Initiative, a population-based study of healthy adults, provides the first opportunity to evaluate how use of a Web-based decision tool that conveyed information about a genetic susceptibility test influenced individuals' test decisions. To inform the ongoing debate over whether individuals offered genetic susceptibility testing without the involvement of a health care provider (eg, through direct-to-consumer testing) can make informed decisions about testing when guided by online decision aids. Participants were 526 members of a large health maintenance organization aged 25 to 40 years old who visited a study website. Multivariate logistic regression models were tested to examine the association of website usage with downstream test decisions. Participants viewed an average of 2.9 of the 4 pages introducing the multiplex test, 2.2 of the 8 pages describing the health conditions, and 3.2 of the 15 pages describing the genes. For each page viewed, participants were more likely to describe their decision-making as easy (odds ratio [OR] 1.04, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.07) and to decide to be tested (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.05-1.11). Healthy adults in this study perceived Web-based genomic information presented using evidence-based communications approaches to be helpful in supporting both decisions to test and not to test. Continued research is needed to ensure that these results generalize to target groups with lower literacy and less Internet savvy.

  10. Inter-embodiment and the experience of genetic testing for familial hypercholesterolaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Nicholas; Lawton, Julia; Douglas, Margaret; Hallowell, Nina

    2013-05-01

    In this article we explore the concept of inter-embodiment and its potential for advancing sociological research into illness biography and genetic identity. Inter-embodiment theory views embodied knowledge as produced through relations between bodies, as opposed to originating from within the body or as the product of relations between disembodied selves. Drawing on a qualitative study in which we interviewed 38 individuals about their experiences of discovering they had high cholesterol and undergoing genetic testing for familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH), we discuss how their narratives may be understood from an inter-embodiment perspective. The participants frequently talked at length about their family histories of high cholesterol and cardiovascular disease. Through these accounts, we develop the concept of the family corpus in order to highlight the role body networks play in shaping lay constructions of genetic identity and a familial disease biography. The notion of a family corpus, we argue, is useful in understanding why genetic testing for FH was experienced as either biographical re-enforcement or as biographical disruption. We conclude by discussing the implications of our findings for future sociological research into illness biography and genetic identity. © 2012 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2012 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Quality issues concerning genetic counselling for presymptomatic testing: a European Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paneque, Milena; Sequeiros, Jorge; Skirton, Heather

    2015-11-01

    Genetic counselling for presymptomatic testing is complex, bringing both ethical and practical questions. There are protocols for counselling but a scarcity of literature regarding quality assessment of such counselling practice. Generic quality assessment tools for genetic services are not specific to presymptomatic testing (PST). Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify aspects of effective counselling practice in PST for late-onset neurological disorders. We used the Delphi method to ascertain the views of relevant European experts in genetic counselling practice, ascertained via published literature and nomination by practitioners. Ethical approval was obtained. Questionnaires were sent electronically to a list of 45 experts, (Medical Doctors, Geneticists, Genetic Counsellors and Genetic Nurses), who each contributed to one to three rounds. In the first round, we provided a list of relevant indicators of quality of practice from a literature review. Experts were requested to evaluate topics in four domains: (a) professional standards; (b) service standards; (c) the consultant's perspective; and (d) protocol standards. We then removed items receiving less than 65% approval and added new issues suggested by experts. The second round was performed for the refinement of issues and the last round was aimed at achieving final consensus on high-standard indicators of quality, for inclusion in the assessment tool. The most relevant indicators were related to (1) consultant-centred practice and (2) advanced counselling and interpersonal skills of professionals. Defined high-standard indicators can be used for the development of a new tool for quality assessment of PST counselling practice.

  12. Preparing Individuals to Communicate Genetic Test Results to Their Relatives: Report of a Randomized Control Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Susan V.; Barsevick, Andrea M.; Egleston, Brian L.; Bingler, Ruth; Ruth, Karen; Miller, Suzanne M.; Malick, John; Cescon, Terrence P.; Daly, Mary B.

    2013-01-01

    Background This study reports a randomized clinical trial evaluating the efficacy of an intervention to prepare individuals to communicate BRCA1/BRCA2 results to family members. Methods Women aged 18 years and older, who had genetic testing, and who had adult first-degree relatives (FDRs), were randomly assigned to a communication skills-building intervention or a wellness control session. Primary outcomes were the percentage of probands sharing test results, and the level of distress associated with sharing. The ability of the Theory of Planned Behavior variables to predict the outcomes was explored. Results Four hundred twenty-two women were enrolled in the study, 219 (intervention) and 203 (control). Data from 137 in the intervention group and 112 in the control group were analyzed. Two hundred forty-nine probands shared test results with 838 relatives (80.1%). There were no significant differences between study groups in the primary outcomes. Combining data from both arms revealed that perceived control and specific social influence were associated with sharing. Probands were more likely to share genetic test results with their children, female relatives and relatives who they perceived had a favorable opinion about learning the results. Conclusion The communication skills intervention did not impact sharing of test results. The proband’s perception of her relative’s opinion of genetic testing and her sense of control in relaying this information influenced sharing. Communication of test results is selective, with male relatives and parents less likely to be informed. Impact Prevalent psychosocial factors play a role in the communication of genetic test results within families. PMID:23420550

  13. [Willingness of Students of Economics to Pay for Predictive Oncological Genetic Testing - An Empirical Analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siol, V; Lange, A; Prenzler, A; Neubauer, S; Frank, M

    2017-05-01

    Objectives: The present study aims to investigate the interest of young adults in predictive oncological genetic testing and their willingness to pay for such a test. Furthermore, major determinants of the 2 variables of interest were identified. Methods: 348 students of economics from the Leibniz University of Hanover were queried in July 2013 using an extensive questionnaire. Among other things, the participants were asked if they are interested in information about the probability to develop cancer in the future and their willingness to pay for such information. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and ordinal probit regressions. Additionally marginal effects were calculated. Results: About 50% of the students were interested in predictive oncological genetic testing and were willing to pay for the test. Moreover, the participants who were willing to pay for the test partly attach high monetary values to the information that could so be obtained. The study shows that the interest of the students and their willingness to pay were primarily influenced by individual attitudes and perceptions. Conclusions: The study proves that young adults were interested in predictive genetic testing and appreciate information about their probability of develop cancer someday. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Attitudes Towards Prenatal Genetic Counseling, Prenatal Genetic Testing, and Termination of Pregnancy among Southeast and East Asian Women in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ginger J; Cameron, Carrie A; Czerwinski, Jennifer L; Mendez-Figueroa, Hector; Peterson, Susan K; Noblin, Sarah Jane

    2017-10-01

    Recognizing the heterogeneity of the Asian population with regards to acculturation, education, health awareness, and cultural values is vital for tailoring culturally sensitive and appropriate care. Prior studies show that cultural values influence perceptions of genetics within Asian populations. The reputation of the family unit factors into decisions such as pregnancy termination and disclosure of family medical history, and the nondirective model of American genetic counseling may conflict with the historical Asian model of paternalistic health care. Previous studies also provide conflicting evidence regarding correlations between education, acculturation, age, and awareness and perceptions of genetic testing. The aims of this study were to describe attitudes towards prenatal genetics among Southeast and East Asian women living in the United States for varying amounts of time and to explore sociocultural factors influencing those attitudes. Twenty-three Asian women who were members of Asian cultural organizations in the United States were interviewed via telephone about their attitudes towards prenatal genetic counseling, prenatal genetic testing, and termination of pregnancy. Responses were transcribed and coded for common themes using a thematic analysis approach. Four major themes emerged. In general, participants: (1) had diverse expectations for genetic counselors; (2) tended to weigh risks and benefits with regards to genetic testing decisions; (3) had mixed views on termination for lethal and non-lethal genetic conditions; and (4) identified cultural factors which influenced testing and termination such as lack of available resources, societal shame and stigma, and family pressure. These findings may allow prenatal genetic counselors to gain a richer, more nuanced understanding of their Asian patients and to offer culturally tailored prenatal genetic counseling.

  15. Knowledge, attitudes and preferences regarding genetic testing for smoking cessation. A cross-sectional survey among Dutch smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaak, Marieke; Smerecnik, Chris; van Schooten, Frederik J; de Vries, Hein; van Schayck, Constant P

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Recent research strongly suggests that genetic variation influences smokers' ability to stop. Therefore, the use of (pharmaco) genetic testing may increase cessation rates. This study aims to assess the intention of smokers concerning undergoing genetic testing for smoking cessation and their knowledge, attitudes and preferences about this subject. Design Online cross-sectional survey. Setting Database internet research company of which every inhabitant of the Netherlands of ≥12 years with an email address and capable of understanding Dutch can become a member. Participants 587 of 711 Dutch smokers aged ≥18 years, daily smokers for ≥5 years and smoke on average ≥10 cigarettes/day (response rate=83%). Primary and secondary outcome measures Smokers' knowledge, attitudes and preferences and their intention to undergo genetic testing for smoking cessation. Results Knowledge on the influence of genetic factors in smoking addiction and cessation was found to be low. Smokers underestimated their chances of having a genetic predisposition and the influence of this on smoking cessation. Participants perceived few disadvantages, some advantages and showed moderate self-efficacy towards undergoing a genetic test and dealing with the results. Smokers were mildly interested in receiving information and participating in genetic testing, especially when offered by their general practitioner (GP). Conclusions For successful implementation of genetic testing for smoking in general practice, several issues should be addressed, such as the knowledge on smoking cessation, genetics and genetic testing (including advantages and disadvantages) and the influence of genetics on smoking addiction and cessation. Furthermore, smokers allocate their GPs a crucial role in the provision of information and the delivery of a genetic test for smoking; however, it is unclear whether GPs will be able and willing to take on this role.

  16. Novel variants in Nordic patients referred for genetic testing of telomere-related disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norberg, Anna; Rosén, Anna; Raaschou-Jensen, Klas

    2018-01-01

    referred for genetic testing due to suspected telomere-related disorder. We performed Sanger sequencing of the genes TERT, TERC, DKC1, and TINF2 on 135 unrelated index patients and measured telomere length by qPCR on DNA from peripheral blood leukocytes. We identified pathogenic or likely pathogenic...... variants identified in our study highlights the need for solid interpretation of new variants that may be detected. Measurement of telomere length is a useful approach for evaluating pathogenicity of genetic variants associated with telomere-related disorders....

  17. Internet-Based Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinelli, Sara; Ceretti, Elisabetta; Gelatti, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    Background Direct-to-consumer genetic tests (DTC-GT) are easily purchased through the Internet, independent of a physician referral or approval for testing, allowing the retrieval of genetic information outside the clinical context. There is a broad debate about the testing validity, their impact on individuals, and what people know and perceive about them. Objective The aim of this review was to collect evidence on DTC-GT from a comprehensive perspective that unravels the complexity of the phenomenon. Methods A systematic search was carried out through PubMed, Web of Knowledge, and Embase, in addition to Google Scholar according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) checklist with the key term “Direct-to-consumer genetic test.” Results In the final sample, 118 articles were identified. Articles were summarized in five categories according to their focus on (1) knowledge of, attitude toward use of, and perception of DTC-GT (n=37), (2) the impact of genetic risk information on users (n=37), (3) the opinion of health professionals (n=20), (4) the content of websites selling DTC-GT (n=16), and (5) the scientific evidence and clinical utility of the tests (n=14). Most of the articles analyzed the attitude, knowledge, and perception of DTC-GT, highlighting an interest in using DTC-GT, along with the need for a health care professional to help interpret the results. The articles investigating the content analysis of the websites selling these tests are in agreement that the information provided by the companies about genetic testing is not completely comprehensive for the consumer. Given that risk information can modify consumers’ health behavior, there are surprisingly few studies carried out on actual consumers and they do not confirm the overall concerns on the possible impact of DTC-GT. Data from studies that investigate the quality of the tests offered confirm that they are not informative, have little predictive

  18. Life insurance and genetic test results: a mutation carrier's fight to achieve full cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Louise A; Otlowski, Margaret F A

    2013-09-02

    Currently, there is debate about life insurance companies' use of genetic information for assessing applicants. In his early 20s, James (pseudonym) was denied full life insurance cover because he revealed that he had discussed genetic testing with a genetic counsellor. He was later tested and found to carry a mutation in the MSH6 gene; after disclosing this, he was denied cover for cancer by two other life insurance companies. Unsatisfied with the insurance companies' risk assessments, and based on his understanding that regular colonoscopy significantly reduced his risk of cancer, James made a complaint to the Australian Human Rights Commission. After informing the third insurance company that he had done so, he was offered full coverage, which suggests that the company did not have actuarial data to justify its decision. This case provides evidence of the high level of initiative and proactivity required for a consumer to achieve a fair result. Few Australians would be in a position to pursue the level of research and advocacy undertaken by James (a professional with scientific training). We call on a collaborative approach between industry, government and researchers to address the issues that James's case raises about genetic testing and life insurance.

  19. Population-based, risk-stratified genetic testing for ovarian cancer risk: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisel, S F; Side, L; Fraser, L; Gessler, S; Wardle, J; Lanceley, A

    2013-01-01

    A population-based risk stratification programme for ovarian cancer (OC) may improve OC survival by identifying women at increased risk and implementing an appropriate risk management strategy. The present study explored attitudes towards an OC risk stratification programme incorporating predictive genetic testing and risk-stratified screening as part of a larger study investigating OC screening. Focus groups consisting of 56 members of the general public (mean age 45 years; 34% non-white) were conducted using a hypothetical scenario. The group sessions were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using Framework Analysis. There was strong support for the proposed programme. Genetic testing and risk-stratified screening was thought to raise awareness, offer reassurance and offer opportunities for early intervention. Anxiety was only mentioned in relation to receiving a diagnosis of OC and not with screening per se. Perhaps because lay models of cancer already embrace both environmental and genetic factors, a low-risk result was not anticipated to result in a false sense of immunity. Unexpectedly, participants also wanted to receive cancer prevention advice in conjunction with genetic testing; screening alone was not regarded as sufficient. The encouraging results from this small study warrant further large-scale research into risk-stratified OC screening. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Direct-to-consumer genetic testing: a systematic review of european guidelines, recommendations, and position statements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Muhammad; Ianuale, Carolina; Ricciardi, Walter; Boccia, Stefania

    2015-10-01

    Personalized healthcare is expected to yield promising results, with a paradigm shift toward more personalization in the practice of medicine. This emerging field has wide-ranging implications for all the stakeholders. Commercial tests in the form of multiplex genetic profiles are currently being provided to consumers, without the physicians' consultation, through the Internet, referred to as direct-to-consumer genetic tests (DTC GT). The objective was to review all the existing European guidelines on DTC GT, and its associated interventions, to list all the supposed benefits and harms, issues and concerns, and recommendations. We conducted a systematic review of position statements, policies, guidelines, and recommendations, produced by professional organizations or other relevant bodies for use of DTC GT in Europe. Seventeen documents met the inclusion criteria, which were subjected to thematic analysis, and the texts were coded for statements related to use of DTC GT. Professional societies and associations are currently more suggestive of potential disadvantages of DTC GT, recommending improved genetic literacy of both populations and health professionals, and implementation research on the genetic tests to integrate public health genomics into healthcare systems.

  1. The changing landscape of genetic testing and its impact on clinical and laboratory services and research in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Ros; de Wert, Guido; Fowler, Brian; Krawczak, Michael; Vermeulen, Eric; Bakker, Egbert; Borry, Pascal; Dondorp, Wybo; Nijsingh, Niels; Barton, David; Schmidtke, Jörg; van El, Carla G; Vermeesch, Joris; Stol, Yrrah; Carmen Howard, Heidi; Cornel, Martina C

    2012-09-01

    The arrival of new genetic technologies that allow efficient examination of the whole human genome (microarray, next-generation sequencing) will impact upon both laboratories (cytogenetic and molecular genetics in the first instance) and clinical/medical genetic services. The interpretation of analytical results in terms of their clinical relevance and the predicted health status poses a challenge to both laboratory and clinical geneticists, due to the wealth and complexity of the information obtained. There is a need to discuss how to best restructure the genetic services logistically and to determine the clinical utility of genetic testing so that patients can receive appropriate advice and genetic testing. To weigh up the questions and challenges of the new genetic technologies, the European Society of Human Genetics (ESHG) held a series of workshops on 10 June 2010 in Gothenburg. This was part of an ESHG satellite symposium on the 'Changing landscape of genetic testing', co-organized by the ESHG Genetic Services Quality and Public and Professional Policy Committees. The audience consisted of a mix of geneticists, ethicists, social scientists and lawyers. In this paper, we summarize the discussions during the workshops and present some of the identified ways forward to improve and adapt the genetic services so that patients receive accurate and relevant information. This paper covers ethics, clinical utility, primary care, genetic services and the blurring boundaries between healthcare and research.

  2. Comprehension and Data-Sharing Behavior of Direct-To-Consumer Genetic Test Customers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Scott P; Coleman, Jason; Najjar, Lotfollah; Fruhling, Ann; Bastola, Dhundy R

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate current direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic customers' ability to interpret and comprehend test results and to determine if honest brokers are needed. One hundred and twenty-two customers of the DTC genetic testing company 23andMe were polled in an online survey. The subjects were asked about their personal test results and to interpret the results of two mock test cases (type 2 diabetes and multiple sclerosis), where results were translated into disease probability for an individual compared to the public. When asked to evaluate the risk, 72.1% correctly assessed the first case and 77% were correct on the second case. Only 23.8% of those surveyed were able to interpret both cases correctly. x03C7;2 and logistic regression were used to interpret the results. Participants who took the time to read the DTC test-provided supplemental material were 3.93 times (p = 0.040) more likely to correctly interpret the test results than those who did not. The odds for correctly interpreting the test cases were 3.289 times (p = 0.011) higher for those who made more than USD 50,000 than those who made less. Survey results were compared to the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) phase 4 cycle 3 data to evaluate national trends. Most of the subjects were able to correctly interpret the test cases, yet a majority did not share their results with a health-care professional. As the market for DTC genetic testing grows, test comprehension will become more critical. Involving more health professionals in this process may be necessary to ensure proper interpretations. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Likelihood of getting certain diseases Mental abilities Natural talents An abnormal trait (anomaly) that is passed down ... one of them has a genetic disorder. Information Human beings have cells with 46 chromosomes . These consist ...

  4. The Changing Landscape of Genetic Testing for Inherited Breast Cancer Predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afghahi, Anosheh; Kurian, Allison W

    2017-05-01

    The advent of multiple-gene germline panel testing has led to significant advances in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer risk assessment. These include guideline-specific cancer risk management recommendations for patients and their families, such as screening with breast magnetic resonance imaging and risk-reducing surgeries, which have the potential to reduce substantially the morbidity and mortality associated with a hereditary cancer predisposition. However, controversy remains about the clinical validity and actionability of genetic testing in a broader patient population. We discuss events leading to the wider availability of commercialized multiple-gene germline panel testing, the recent data that support using this powerful tool to improve cancer risk assessment and reduction strategies, and remaining challenges to clinical optimization of this new genetic technology.

  5. [Direct-to-consumer genetic testing through Internet: marketing, ethical and social issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducournau, Pascal; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Rial-Sebbag, Emmanuelle; Bulle, Alexandre; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne

    2011-01-01

    We probably did not anticipate all the consequences of the direct to consumer genetic tests on Internet, resulting from the combined skills of communication and genomic advances. What are the commercial strategies used by the companies offering direct-to-consumer genetic tests on Internet and what are the different social expectations on which they focus? Through a quantitative and qualitative analysis of the web sites offering such tests, it seems that these companies target a triple market based on: the "healthism" which raises health and hygiene to the top of the social values; the contemporary demands of the users to become actual actors of health decisions; and finally on the need for bio-social relationships. These three commercial strategies underlie various ethical and societal issues justifying a general analysis.

  6. Field of Genes: An Investigation of Sports-Related Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jennifer K.; Royal, Charmaine D.

    2012-01-01

    Sports-related genetic testing is a sector of the diverse direct-to-consumer (DTC) industry that has not yet been examined thoroughly by academic scholars. A systematic search was used to identify companies in this sector and content analysis of online information was performed. More than a dozen companies were identified. Marketing practices observed generally did not target parents for child testing, and marketing images were mild compared to images used in popular media. Information was provided at a high reading level (industry-wide Flesh-Kincaid Grade Levels > 11). While ~75% of companies provide privacy policies and terms of service prior to purchase and ~40% provide scientific citations for their tests, e-commerce generally may adequately protect DTC genetics consumers without new federal legislation or regulation. PMID:25562204

  7. Approaches to quality management and accreditation in a genetic testing laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berwouts, Sarah; Morris, Michael A; Dequeker, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    Medical laboratories, and specifically genetic testing laboratories, provide vital medical services to different clients: clinicians requesting a test, patients from whom the sample was collected, public health and medical-legal instances, referral laboratories and authoritative bodies. All expect results that are accurate and obtained in an efficient and effective manner, within a suitable time frame and at acceptable cost. There are different ways of achieving the end results, but compliance with International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 15189, the international standard for the accreditation of medical laboratories, is becoming progressively accepted as the optimal approach to assuring quality in medical testing. We present recommendations and strategies designed to aid genetic testing laboratories with the implementation of a quality management system, including key aspects such as document control, external quality assessment, internal quality control, internal audit, management review, validation, as well as managing the human side of change. The focus is on pragmatic approaches to attain the levels of quality management and quality assurance required for accreditation according to ISO 15189, within the context of genetic testing. Attention is also given to implementing efficient and effective quality improvement. PMID:20720559

  8. Hopefulness predicts resilience after hereditary colorectal cancer genetic testing: a prospective outcome trajectories study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Samuel M Y; Ho, Judy W C; Bonanno, George A; Chu, Annie T W; Chan, Emily M S

    2010-06-11

    Genetic testing for hereditary colorectal cancer (HCRC) had significant psychological consequences for test recipients. This prospective longitudinal study investigated the factors that predict psychological resilience in adults undergoing genetic testing for HCRC. A longitudinal study was carried out from April 2003 to August 2006 on Hong Kong Chinese HCRC family members who were recruited and offered genetic testing by the Hereditary Gastrointestinal Cancer Registry to determine psychological outcomes after genetic testing. Self-completed questionnaires were administered immediately before (pre-disclosure baseline) and 2 weeks, 4 months and 1 year after result disclosure. Using validated psychological inventories, the cognitive style of hope was measured at baseline, and the psychological distress of depression and anxiety was measured at all time points. Of the 76 participating subjects, 71 individuals (43 men and 28 women; mean age 38.9 +/- 9.2 years) from nine FAP and 24 HNPCC families completed the study, including 39 mutated gene carriers. Four patterns of outcome trajectories were created using established norms for the specified outcome measures of depression and anxiety. These included chronic dysfunction (13% and 8.7%), recovery (0% and 4.3%), delayed dysfunction (13% and 15.9%) and resilience (76.8% and 66.7%). Two logistic regression analyses were conducted using hope at baseline to predict resilience, with depression and anxiety employed as outcome indicators. Because of the small number of participants, the chronic dysfunction and delayed dysfunction groups were combined into a non-resilient group for comparison with the resilient group in all subsequent analysis. Because of low frequencies, participants exhibiting a recovery trajectory (n = 3 for anxiety and n = 0 for depression) were excluded from further analysis. Both regression equations were significant. Baseline hope was a significant predictor of a resilience outcome trajectory for depression

  9. Hopefulness predicts resilience after hereditary colorectal cancer genetic testing: a prospective outcome trajectories study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu Annie TW

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background - Genetic testing for hereditary colorectal cancer (HCRC had significant psychological consequences for test recipients. This prospective longitudinal study investigated the factors that predict psychological resilience in adults undergoing genetic testing for HCRC. Methods - A longitudinal study was carried out from April 2003 to August 2006 on Hong Kong Chinese HCRC family members who were recruited and offered genetic testing by the Hereditary Gastrointestinal Cancer Registry to determine psychological outcomes after genetic testing. Self-completed questionnaires were administered immediately before (pre-disclosure baseline and 2 weeks, 4 months and 1 year after result disclosure. Using validated psychological inventories, the cognitive style of hope was measured at baseline, and the psychological distress of depression and anxiety was measured at all time points. Results - Of the 76 participating subjects, 71 individuals (43 men and 28 women; mean age 38.9 ± 9.2 years from nine FAP and 24 HNPCC families completed the study, including 39 mutated gene carriers. Four patterns of outcome trajectories were created using established norms for the specified outcome measures of depression and anxiety. These included chronic dysfunction (13% and 8.7%, recovery (0% and 4.3%, delayed dysfunction (13% and 15.9% and resilience (76.8% and 66.7%. Two logistic regression analyses were conducted using hope at baseline to predict resilience, with depression and anxiety employed as outcome indicators. Because of the small number of participants, the chronic dysfunction and delayed dysfunction groups were combined into a non-resilient group for comparison with the resilient group in all subsequent analysis. Because of low frequencies, participants exhibiting a recovery trajectory (n = 3 for anxiety and n = 0 for depression were excluded from further analysis. Both regression equations were significant. Baseline hope was a significant

  10. The influence of health care policies and health care system distrust on willingness to undergo genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Katrina; Putt, Mary; Halbert, Chanita Hughes; Grande, David; Schwartz, Jerome Sanford; Liao, Kaijun; Marcus, Noora; Demeter, Mirar Bristol; Shea, Judy

    2012-05-01

    As the potential role of genetic testing in disease prevention and management grows, so does concern about differences in uptake of genetic testing across social and racial groups. Characteristics of how genetic tests are delivered may influence willingness to undergo testing and, if they affect population subgroups differently, alter disparities in testing. Conjoint analysis study of the effect of 3 characteristics of genetic test delivery (ie, attributes) on willingness to undergo genetic testing for cancer risk. Data were collected using a random digit dialing survey of 128 African American and 209 white individuals living in the United States. Measures included conjoint scenarios, the Revised Health Care System Distrust Scale (including the values and competence subscales), health insurance coverage, and sociodemographic characteristics. The 3 attributes studied were disclosure of test results to the health insurer, provision of the test by a specialist or primary care doctor, and race-specific or race-neutral marketing. In adjusted analyses, disclosure of test results to insurers, having to get the test from a specialist, and race-specific marketing were all inversely associated with willingness to undergo the genetic test, with the greatest effect for the disclosure attribute. Racial differences in willingness to undergo testing were not statistically significant (P=0.07) and the effect of the attributes on willingness to undergo testing did not vary by patient race. However, the decrease in willingness to undergo testing with insurance disclosure was greater among individuals with high values distrust (P=0.03), and the decrease in willingness to undergo testing from specialist access was smaller among individuals with high competence distrust (P=0.03). Several potentially modifiable characteristics of how genetic tests are delivered are associated with willingness to undergo testing. The effect of 2 of these characteristics vary according to the level of

  11. Genetic counseling and presymptomatic testing programs for Machado-Joseph Disease: lessons from Brazil and Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler-Faccini, Lavínia; Osorio, Claudio Maria; Romariz, Flavia; Paneque, Milena; Sequeiros, Jorge; Jardim, Laura Bannach

    2014-03-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is an autosomal dominant, late-onset neurological disorder and the most common form of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) worldwide. Diagnostic genetic testing is available to detect the disease-causing mutation by direct sizing of the CAG repeat tract in the ataxin 3 gene. Presymptomatic testing (PST) can be used to identify persons at risk of developing the disease. Genetic counseling provides patients with information about the disease, genetic risks, PST, and the decision-making process. In this study, we present the protocol used in PST for MJD and the relevant observations from two centers: Brazil (Porto Alegre) and Portugal (Porto). We provide a case report that illustrates the significant ethical and psychological issues related to PST in late-onset neurological disorders. In both centers, counseling and PST are performed by a multidisciplinary team, and genetic testing is conducted at the same institutions. From 1999 to 2012, 343 individuals sought PST in Porto Alegre; 263 (77%) of these individuals were from families with MJD. In Porto, 1,530 individuals sought PST between 1996 and 2013, but only 66 (4%) individuals were from families with MJD. In Brazil, approximately 50% of the people seeking PST eventually took the test and received their results, whereas 77% took the test in Portugal. In this case report, we highlight several issues that might be raised by the consultand and how the team can extract significant information. Literature about PST testing for MJD and other SCAs is scarce, and we hope this report will encourage similar studies and enable the implementation of PST protocols in other populations, mainly in Latin America.

  12. Genetic counseling and presymptomatic testing programs for Machado-Joseph disease: lessons from Brazil and Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavínia Schuler-Faccini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Machado-Joseph disease (MJD is an autosomal dominant, late-onset neurological disorder and the most common form of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA worldwide. Diagnostic genetic testing is available to detect the disease-causing mutation by direct sizing of the CAG repeat tract in the ataxin 3 gene. Presymptomatic testing (PST can be used to identify persons at risk of developing the disease. Genetic counseling provides patients with information about the disease, genetic risks, PST, and the decision-making process. In this study, we present the protocol used in PST for MJD and the relevant observations from two centers: Brazil (Porto Alegre and Portugal (Porto. We provide a case report that illustrates the significant ethical and psychological issues related to PST in late-onset neurological disorders. In both centers, counseling and PST are performed by a multidisciplinary team, and genetic testing is conducted at the same institutions. From 1999 to 2012, 343 individuals sought PST in Porto Alegre; 263 (77% of these individuals were from families with MJD. In Porto, 1,530 individuals sought PST between 1996 and 2013, but only 66 (4% individuals were from families with MJD. In Brazil, approximately 50% of the people seeking PST eventually took the test and received their results, whereas 77% took the test in Portugal. In this case report, we highlight several issues that might be raised by the consultand and how the team can extract significant information. Literature about PST testing for MJD and other SCAs is scarce, and we hope this report will encourage similar studies and enable the implementation of PST protocols in other populations, mainly in Latin America.

  13. Pilot Study on the Genetic Background of an Active Matrix Metalloproteinase-8 Test in Finnish Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Anna Maria; Raivisto, Teija; Kettunen, Kaisa; Kovanen, Leena; Haukka, Jari; Pakbaznejad Esmaeili, Elmira; Elg, Jessica; Gieselmann, Dirk-Rolf; Rathnayake, Nilminie; Ruokonen, Hellevi; Tervahartiala, Taina; Sorsa, Timo

    2017-05-01

    In periodontitis, genetics and smoking play important roles in host immune system response. The aim of this study is to determine whether the genetic background of initial periodontitis and caries could be detected using an active matrix metalloproteinase (aMMP)-8 chairside test in Finnish adolescents. Forty-seven participants gave approval for analysis of both oral fluid collection and DNA. An aMMP-8 chairside test was performed on participants (adolescents aged 15 to 17 years), and full-mouth clinical parameters of oral health were assessed including periodontal, oral mucosal, and caries status in Eastern Finland from 2014 to 2015. DNA was extracted from oral fluid samples and genotyped for 71 polymorphisms in 29 candidate genes for periodontitis. Results were analyzed using a logistic regression model. P values were corrected for multiple testing using false discovery rate (<0.05). aMMP-8 chairside test positivity and three or more ≥4 mm pockets were associated with vitamin D receptor (VDR) (rs2228570, P = 0.002, q = 0.04) and MMP3 (rs520540, rs639752, rs679620, P = 0.0009, 0.003, 0.003, q = 0.04, respectively). None of the other single-nucleotide polymorphisms studied showed a significant association with the aMMP-8 chairside test and at least one caries lesion positivity. Genetic polymorphisms of MMP3 and VDR are linked to initial periodontitis in Finnish adolescents, and the aMMP-8 chairside test can eventually detect initial periodontitis in young patients with predisposing genetic background.

  14. Using Zebrafish to Test the Genetic Basis of Human Craniofacial Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, R Grecco; Eames, B Frank

    2017-10-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) opened an innovative and productive avenue to investigate the molecular basis of human craniofacial disease. However, GWASs identify candidate genes only; they do not prove that any particular one is the functional villain underlying disease or just an unlucky genomic bystander. Genetic manipulation of animal models is the best approach to reveal which genetic loci identified from human GWASs are functionally related to specific diseases. The purpose of this review is to discuss the potential of zebrafish to resolve which candidate genetic loci are mechanistic drivers of craniofacial diseases. Many anatomic, embryonic, and genetic features of craniofacial development are conserved among zebrafish and mammals, making zebrafish a good model of craniofacial diseases. Also, the ability to manipulate gene function in zebrafish was greatly expanded over the past 20 y, enabling systems such as Gateway Tol2 and CRISPR-Cas9 to test gain- and loss-of-function alleles identified from human GWASs in coding and noncoding regions of DNA. With the optimization of genetic editing methods, large numbers of candidate genes can be efficiently interrogated. Finding the functional villains that underlie diseases will permit new treatments and prevention strategies and will increase understanding of how gene pathways operate during normal development.

  15. A quantitative test of population genetics using spatiogenetic patterns in bacterial colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, Kirill S; Xavier, João B; Nelson, David R; Foster, Kevin R

    2011-10-01

    It is widely accepted that population-genetics theory is the cornerstone of evolutionary analyses. Empirical tests of the theory, however, are challenging because of the complex relationships between space, dispersal, and evolution. Critically, we lack quantitative validation of the spatial models of population genetics. Here we combine analytics, on- and off-lattice simulations, and experiments with bacteria to perform quantitative tests of the theory. We study two bacterial species, the gut microbe Escherichia coli and the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and show that spatiogenetic patterns in colony biofilms of both species are accurately described by an extension of the one-dimensional stepping-stone model. We use one empirical measure, genetic diversity at the colony periphery, to parameterize our models and show that we can then accurately predict another key variable: the degree of short-range cell migration along an edge. Moreover, the model allows us to estimate other key parameters, including effective population size (density) at the expansion frontier. While our experimental system is a simplification of natural microbial community, we argue that it constitutes proof of principle that the spatial models of population genetics can quantitatively capture organismal evolution.

  16. Closure of population biobanks and direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawati, Ma'n H; Borry, Pascal; Howard, Heidi Carmen

    2011-09-01

    Genetic research gained new momentum with the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003. Formerly centered on the investigation of single-gene disorders, genetic research is increasingly targeting common complex diseases and in doing so is studying the whole genome, the environment and its impact on genomic variation. Consequently, biobanking initiatives have emerged around the world as a tool to sustain such progress. Whether they are small scale or longitudinal, public or private, commercial or non-commercial, biobanks should consider the possibility of closure. Interestingly, while raising important ethical issues, this topic has hardly been explored in the literature. Indeed, ethical issues associated with sale, insolvency, end of funding, or transfer of materials to other entities (which are all issues either related to or possible consequences of closure) are seldom the subject of discussion. In an attempt to fill this gap, this paper will discuss-using population and direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing companies' biobanks as case studies-(1) international and national normative documents addressing the issue of closure and (2) the internal policies of population biobanks and DTC genetic testing companies. The analysis will inform the debate on biobank closure and elucidate the underlying ethical issues, which include, but are not limited to informed consent, storage and privacy.

  17. Sexual systems and population genetic structure in an annual plant: testing the metapopulation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obbard, Darren J; Harris, Stephen A; Pannell, John R

    2006-03-01

    The need for reproductive assurance during dispersal, along with the pressure of local mate competition, means that the importance of frequent or repeated colonization is implicit in the literature on sexual system evolution. However, there have been few empirical tests of the association between colonization history and sexual system in plants, and none within a single species. Here we use patterns of genetic diversity to provide such a test in the Mercurialis annua species complex, which spans the range of systems from self-compatible monoecy through androdioecy to dioecy. This variation has been hypothesized to result from differing patterns of metapopulation turnover and recolonization. Because monoecy should be favored during colonization, androdioecy and dioecy will be maintained only in regions with low rates of local extinction and recolonization, and these differences should also be reflected in patterns of neutral genetic diversity. We show that monoecious populations of M. annua display lower within-population genetic diversity than androdioecious populations and higher genetic differentiation than dioecious and androdioecious populations, as predicted by metapopulation models. In contrast, regional diversity in M. annua appears to be primarily a product of postglacial range expansion from two refugia in the eastern and western Mediterranean Basin.

  18. Predictive genetic testing in children and adults: a study of emotional impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michie, S; Bobrow, M; Marteau, T M

    2001-08-01

    To determine whether, following predictive genetic testing for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), children or adults receiving positive results experience clinically significant levels of anxiety or depression, and whether children receiving positive results experience higher levels of anxiety or depression than adults receiving positive results. Two studies, one cross sectional and one prospective. 208 unaffected subjects (148 adults and 60 children) at risk for FAP who have undergone genetic testing since 1990. anxiety, depression; independent variables: test results, demographic measures, psychological resources (optimism, self-esteem). Study 1. In children receiving positive results, mean scores for anxiety and depression were within the normal range. There was a trend for children receiving positive results to be more anxious and depressed than those receiving negative results. In adults, mean scores for anxiety were within the normal range for those receiving negative results, but were in the clinical range for those receiving positive results, with 43% (95% CI 23-65) of the latter having scores in this range. Regardless of test result, adults were more likely to be clinically anxious if they were low in optimism or self-esteem. Children receiving positive or negative results did not experience greater anxiety or depression than adults. Study 2. For children receiving a positive test result, mean scores for anxiety, depression, and self-esteem were unchanged over the year following the result, while mean anxiety scores decreased and self-esteem increased after receipt of a negative test result over the same period of time. Children, as a group, did not show clinically significant distress over the first year following predictive genetic testing. Adults were more likely to be clinically anxious if they received a positive result or were low in optimism or self-esteem, with interacting effects. The association between anxiety, self-esteem, and optimism

  19. Public attitudes towards preventive genomics and personal interest in genetic testing to prevent disease: a survey study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, E.; Henneman, L.; van El, C.G.; Cornel, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Genetic testing and family history assessment can be used as an aid in the prevention of common chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to determine public attitudes and interests towards offering genetic testing and family history-based risk assessment for common chronic disease

  20. A prospective study of the impact of genetic susceptibility testing for BRCA1/2 or HNPCC on family relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oostrom, Iris; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J.; Brocker-Vriends, Annette H. J. T.; van Asperen, Chhstl J.; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Gool, Arthur R.; Klijn, Jan G. M.; Riedijk, Samantha R.; van Dooren, Silvia; Tibben, Aad

    This study assessed the impact of genetic testing for cancer susceptibility on family relationships and determinants of adverse consequences for family relationships. Applicants for genetic testing of a known familial pathogenic mutation in BRCA1/2 or a HNPCC related gene (N = 271) rated the

  1. A prospective study of the impact of genetic susceptibility testing for BRCA1/2 or HNPCC on family relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oostrom, Iris; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J.; Bröcker-Vriends, Annette H. J. T.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Seynaeve, Caroline; van Gool, Arthur R.; Klijn, Jan G. M.; Riedijk, Samantha R.; van Dooren, Silvia; Tibben, Aad

    2007-01-01

    This study assessed the impact of genetic testing for cancer susceptibility on family relationships and determinants of adverse consequences for family relationships. Applicants for genetic testing of a known familial pathogenic mutation in BRCA1/2 or a HNPCC related gene (N=271) rated the

  2. A prospective study of the impact of genetic susceptibility testing for BRCA1/2 or HNPCC on family relationships.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostrom, I.I.H. van; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; Duivenvoorden, H.J.; Brocker-Vriends, A.H.; Asperen, C.J. van; Sijmons, R.H.; Seynaeve, C.; Gool, A.R. van; Klijn, J.G.M.; Riedijk, S.R.; Dooren, S. van; Tibben, A.

    2007-01-01

    This study assessed the impact of genetic testing for cancer susceptibility on family relationships and determinants of adverse consequences for family relationships. Applicants for genetic testing of a known familial pathogenic mutation in BRCA1/2 or a HNPCC related gene (N=271) rated the

  3. Behavioral stress response of genetically selected aggressive and nonaggressive wild house mice in the shock-probe/defensive burying test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluyter, F; Korte, SM; Bohus, B; VanOortmerssen, GA

    Genetically selected aggressive and nonaggressive male wild house mice were tested in the shock-probe/defensive burying test. Five distinct behaviors (burying, immobility, rearing, grooming, and exploration) were recorded in two environmental situations: fresh and home cage sawdust. Nonaggressive

  4. BRCA testing of breast cancer patients: medical specialists' referral patterns, knowledge and attitudes to genetic testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Riel, E.; Wárlám-Rodenhuis, C. C.; Verhoef, S.; Rutgers, E. J. T. H.; Ausems, M. G. E. M.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores knowledge about hereditary breast cancer, attitudes about BRCA testing and referral pattern to a family cancer clinic among medical specialists. A total of 92 questionnaires were completed by surgeons (38), medical oncologists (29), radiation oncologists (13) and radiologists

  5. Medical And Genetic Monitoring of Population Around Semipalatinsk Test-site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayupova, N.A.; Svyatova, G.S.; Abildinova, G.Zh.

    1998-01-01

    Up to present, there is no one positive opinion about the effect of a small amount of ionizing radiation doses on the genetic system of a human being. In connection with it, the all-round medical and genetic researches conducted by a united methodical basis and intended to study general mutagen and teratogen radiation effects are of a certain significance. With that end in view, the medical and genetic testing of a number of rural population around Semipalatinsk test-site (STS) was conducted. The all-round methods of medical and genetic consequences evaluation were developed, and 'active revealing of the congenital fetation disease (CFD)' method was submitted for consideration. Aside from analysis of the general genetic and demographic data, outcomes of more than 160.000 confinements were studied, and a high frequency rate of the CFD of 'the strict recording' (6.11 per 1000 new-born children in areas of extreme radiation hazard) was discovered, that surely exceeded the similar index for the monitored areas (2.92 per 1000 new-born children). A higher frequency rate of the Down's syndrome and numerous CFD (1.66 and 1.07 per 1000 new-born children accordingly) were revealed as well. As a result of the cytogenetic monitoring of the tested population, it was ascertained that a total frequency rate of the aberrant cell emergence was equal to 4.9 per 100 cells, that is 3.9 times as much than the similar index for the monitored area. A high frequency rate of the markers induced by radiation was discovered, which proved the increased mutagen effect of the environment. Biological presentation of the radiation effect on population was conducted in two methods of the biological monitoring, and according to the frequency rate of the chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of peripheral blood, that are induced by radiation, and electro paramagnetic resonance of teeth enamel (Kazakhstan national Nuclear Center). The results of the medical and genetic research conducted were an

  6. Genetic testing of the FBN1 gene in Chinese patients with Marfan/Marfan-like syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hang; Luo, Mingyao; Chen, Qianlong; Fu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Jing; Qian, Xiangyang; Sun, Xiaogang; Fan, Yuxin; Zhou, Zhou; Chang, Qian

    2016-08-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder typically involving the ocular, skeletal and cardiovascular systems, and aortic aneurysms/dissection mainly contributes to its mortality. Here, we performed genetic testing of the FBN1 gene in 39 Chinese probands with Marfan/Marfan-like syndrome and their related family members by Sanger sequencing. In total, 29 pathogenic/likely pathogenic FBN1 mutations, including 17 novel ones, were identified. In addition, most MFS patients with aortic disease (62%) had a truncating or splicing mutation. These results expand the FBN1 mutation spectrum and enrich our knowledge of genotype-phenotype correlations. Genetic testing for MFS and its related aortic diseases is increasingly important for early intervention and treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic implications of genetic testing for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, J Martijn; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Ackerman, Michael J

    2009-07-14

    Over the last 2 decades, the pathogenic basis for the most common heritable cardiovascular disease, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), has been investigated extensively. Affecting approximately 1 in 500 individuals, HCM is the most common cause of sudden death in young athletes. In recent years, genomic medicine has been moving from the bench to the bedside throughout all medical disciplines including cardiology. Now, genomic medicine has entered clinical practice as it pertains to the evaluation and management of patients with HCM. The continuous research and discoveries of new HCM susceptibility genes, the growing amount of data from genotype-phenotype correlation studies, and the introduction of commercially available genetic tests for HCM make it essential that the modern-day cardiologist understand the diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic implications of HCM genetic testing.

  8. Genetic testing for hereditary melanoma and pancreatic cancer: a longitudinal study of psychological outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspinwall, Lisa G; Taber, Jennifer M; Leaf, Samantha L; Kohlmann, Wendy; Leachman, Sancy A

    2013-02-01

    CDKN2A/p16 mutations confer 76% lifetime risk of melanoma and up to 17% lifetime risk of pancreatic cancer. Our objective was to determine the short- and long-term impact of CDKN2A/p16 genetic counseling and test reporting on psychological distress, cancer worry, and perceived costs and benefits of testing. Prospective changes in anxiety, depression, and cancer worry following CDKN2A/p16 counseling and test reporting were evaluated at multiple assessments over 2 years among 60 adult members of melanoma-prone families; 37 participants completed the 2-year follow-up. Quantitative and qualitative assessments of the costs and benefits of testing were carried out. Outcomes were evaluated among unaffected noncarriers (n = 27), unaffected carriers (n = 15), and affected carriers (n = 18). Reported anxiety and depression were low. For carriers and noncarriers, anxiety decreased significantly throughout the 2-year period, whereas depression and melanoma worry showed short-term decreases. Worry about pancreatic cancer was low and decreased significantly. In all groups, test-related distress and uncertainty were low, regret was absent, and positive experiences were high. All participants (>93% at each assessment) reported at least one perceived benefit of genetic testing; only 15.9% listed any negative aspect. Carriers reported increased knowledge about melanoma risk and prevention (78.3%) and increased prevention and screening behaviors for self and family (65.2%). Noncarriers reported increased knowledge (95.2%) and emotional benefits (71.4%). Among US participants familiar with their hereditary melanoma risk through prior epidemiological research participation, CDKN2A/p16 genetic testing provides multiple perceived benefits to both carriers and noncarriers without inducing distress in general or worry about melanoma or pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Dynamics and ethics of comprehensive preimplantation genetic testing: a review of the challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hens, Kristien; Dondorp, Wybo; Handyside, Alan H; Harper, Joyce; Newson, Ainsley J; Pennings, Guido; Rehmann-Sutter, Christoph; de Wert, Guido

    2013-01-01

    Genetic testing of preimplantation embryos has been used for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) and preimplantation genetic screening (PGS). Microarray technology is being introduced in both these contexts, and whole genome sequencing of blastomeres is also expeted to become possible soon. The amount of extra information such tests will yield may prove to be beneficial for embryo selection, will also raise various ethical issues. We present an overview of the developments and an agenda-setting exploration of the ethical issues. The paper is a joint endeavour by the presenters at an explorative 'campus meeting' organized by the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology in cooperation with the department of Health, Ethics & Society of the Maastricht University (The Netherlands). The increasing amount and detail of information that new screening techniques such as microarrays and whole genome sequencing offer does not automatically coincide with an increasing understanding of the prospects of an embryo. From a technical point of view, the future of comprehensive embryo testing may go together with developments in preconception carrier screening. From an ethical point of view, the increasing complexity and amount of information yielded by comprehensive testing techniques will lead to challenges to the principle of reproductive autonomy and the right of the child to an open future, and may imply a possible larger responsibility of the clinician towards the welfare of the future child. Combinations of preconception carrier testing and embryo testing may solve some of these ethical questions but could introduce others. As comprehensive testing techniques are entering the IVF clinic, there is a need for a thorough rethinking of traditional ethical paradigms regarding medically assisted reproduction.

  10. Genetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubitschek, H.E.

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: genetic effects of high LET radiations; genetic regulation, alteration, and repair; chromosome replication and the division cycle of Escherichia coli; effects of radioisotope decay in the DNA of microorganisms; initiation and termination of DNA replication in Bacillus subtilis; mutagenesis in mouse myeloma cells; lethal and mutagenic effects of near-uv radiation; effect of 8-methoxypsoralen on photodynamic lethality and mutagenicity in Escherichia coli; DNA repair of the lethal effects of far-uv; and near uv irradiation of bacterial cells

  11. Decision-making about prenatal genetic testing among pregnant Korean-American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Myunghee; Thongpriwan, Vipavee; Choi, Jeeyae; Sook Choi, Kyung; Anderson, Gwen

    2018-01-01

    to understand the prenatal genetic testing decision-making processes among pregnant Korean-American women. a qualitative, descriptive research design. referrals and snowball sampling techniques were used to recruit 10 Korean-American women who had been recommended for amniocentesis during pregnancy in the United States (U.S.). All participants were born in Korea and had immigrated to the U.S. The number of years living in the U.S. ranged from 4 to 11 (M=5.7). various regional areas of the U.S. the researchers conducted face-to-face or phone interviews using semi-structured interview guides. The interviews were conducted in the Korean language and lasted approximately 50-100minutes. The interview guides focused on the decision-making process and experiences with prenatal genetic testing, as well as reflections on the decisions. Four core themes emerged related to the participants' decision-making processes, according to their descriptions. These themes are (1) facing the challenges of decision-making, (2) seeking support, (3) determining one's preferred role in the decision-making process, and (4) feeling uncomfortable with the degree of patient autonomy in U.S. health care. researchers concluded that many distinctive factors influence the decision-making processes used by pregnant Korean-American women. The results have the potential to improve shared decision-making practices regarding prenatal genetic testing. clinicians need to understand the sociocultural underpinnings of pregnant Korean-American immigrants regarding prenatal genetic screening and testing as an initial step to engage these patients in shared decision-making. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Estimation of Genetic Parameters for First Lactation Monthly Test-day Milk Yields using Random Regression Test Day Model in Karan Fries Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Singh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A single trait linear mixed random regression test-day model was applied for the first time for analyzing the first lactation monthly test-day milk yield records in Karan Fries cattle. The test-day milk yield data was modeled using a random regression model (RRM considering different order of Legendre polynomial for the additive genetic effect (4th order and the permanent environmental effect (5th order. Data pertaining to 1,583 lactation records spread over a period of 30 years were recorded and analyzed in the study. The variance component, heritability and genetic correlations among test-day milk yields were estimated using RRM. RRM heritability estimates of test-day milk yield varied from 0.11 to 0.22 in different test-day records. The estimates of genetic correlations between different test-day milk yields ranged 0.01 (test-day 1 [TD-1] and TD-11 to 0.99 (TD-4 and TD-5. The magnitudes of genetic correlations between test-day milk yields decreased as the interval between test-days increased and adjacent test-day had higher correlations. Additive genetic and permanent environment variances were higher for test-day milk yields at both ends of lactation. The residual variance was observed to be lower than the permanent environment variance for all the test-day milk yields.

  13. Commercialization of genetic testing services: the FDA, market forces, and biological tarot cards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowski, M J; Blatt, R J R

    1997-03-01

    Many women fear being diagnosed with breast cancer, and rightfully so. Despite the capabilities of modern medicine, the cumulative lifetime risk of getting the disease has risen to one in eight and, despite decades of research, no cures exist. In this Article, the authors explore the commercialization of so-called breast cancer gene tests, based upon genetic alterations linked to the disease. Although the authors fully address this specific technology, they use what constitutes the seminal case of predictive genetic testing to analyze the adequacy of the existing regulatory framework. The authors conclude that the present regulatory system is inadequate and places a dangerous amount of reliance on primary care physicians. Their conclusion is grounded in the observation that most primary care physicians lack sufficient knowledge about this evolving investigative technology--which is highly subject to misinterpretation, and, though potentially helpful to some "high risk" patients, offers questionable clinical value for the general public. The authors set forth numerous proposals to promote both the quality and clinical value of predictive genetic testing so that it conforms to public health standards and can be properly integrated as a reliable component of medical care in specific situations.

  14. Psychologic distress after disclosure of genetic test results regarding hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yoshie; Okamura, Hitoshi; Sugano, Kokichi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Kazuma, Keiko; Akechi, Tatsuo; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2004-07-15

    To the authors' knowledge, there have been few studies of the psychologic distress after disclosure of genetic test results for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma (HNPCC). The objectives of this study were to identify the prevalence rates and predictors of psychologic distress and to evaluate the feelings of guilt after disclosure of the test results in Japanese probands and unaffected relatives. Probands and unaffected relatives were interviewed immediately after the first genetic counseling session for HNPCC and again 1 month after disclosure of the genetic test results. The prevalence of major and minor depression, acute stress disorder (ASD), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) were assessed using the Structured Clinical Interview based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 3rd edition revised (DSM-III-R) or the DSM-IV; feelings of guilt were investigated using a numeric scale and a semistructured interview. Among 47 participants who completed the baseline interview, 42 participants (89%) completed the 1-month follow-up interview. Although none of the participants met the criteria for major depression, ASD, or PTSD at the follow-up interview, 3 of 42 participants (7%) met the criteria for minor depression and 2 participants (5%) had PTSS. The only predictor of psychologic distress found was the presence of a history of major or minor depression (odds ratio, 19.41; 95% confidence interval, 1.42-264.95; P depression and PTSS. Copyright 2004 American Cancer Society.

  15. The UK National External Quality Assessment Scheme (UK NEQAS) for molecular genetic testing in haemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, David J; Goodeve, Anne; Hill, Marian; Jennings, Ian; Kitchen, Steve; Walker, Isobel

    2006-11-01

    Molecular genetic analysis of families with haemophilia and other inherited bleeding disorders is now a common laboratory investigation. In contrast to phenotypic testing in which strict quality control is adhered to, in haemophilia molecular genetic testing there has been a lack of any external quality assurance schemes. In 1998 the UK National External Quality Assessment Scheme (UK NEQAS) established a pilot quality assurance scheme for molecular genetic testing in haemophilia. Results from three initial surveys highlighted problems with the quality of samples when used to screen for the intron 22 inversion within the F8 gene. The scheme was re-launched in 2003, and since that time there have been five exercises involving whole blood or immortalised cell line DNA. The results together with an overall summary of the exercise are subsequently returned to participants. Exercises to date have focused exclusively on haemophilia A and QA, material has included screening for the intron 1 and intron 22 inversions as well as sequence analysis. A paper exercise circulated in 2003 highlighted problems with the format of reports and, following feedback to participants, only a single error has been made in the subsequent four exercises. Participating laboratories now receive QA material every six months. Immortalised cell line material was introduced in 2005 and was shown to perform well. This will allow expansion of the scheme and a reduction in the dependence on blood donation.

  16. How is genetic testing evaluated? A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitini, Erica; De Vito, Corrado; Marzuillo, Carolina; D'Andrea, Elvira; Rosso, Annalisa; Federici, Antonio; Di Maria, Emilio; Villari, Paolo

    2018-02-08

    Given the rapid development of genetic tests, an assessment of their benefits, risks, and limitations is crucial for public health practice. We performed a systematic review aimed at identifying and comparing the existing evaluation frameworks for genetic tests. We searched PUBMED, SCOPUS, ISI Web of Knowledge, Google Scholar, Google, and gray literature sources for any documents describing such frameworks. We identified 29 evaluation frameworks published between 2000 and 2017, mostly based on the ACCE Framework (n = 13 models), or on the HTA process (n = 6), or both (n = 2). Others refer to the Wilson and Jungner screening criteria (n = 3) or to a mixture of different criteria (n = 5). Due to the widespread use of the ACCE Framework, the most frequently used evaluation criteria are analytic and clinical validity, clinical utility and ethical, legal and social implications. Less attention is given to the context of implementation. An economic dimension is always considered, but not in great detail. Consideration of delivery models, organizational aspects, and consumer viewpoint is often lacking. A deeper analysis of such context-related evaluation dimensions may strengthen a comprehensive evaluation of genetic tests and support the decision-making process.

  17. Cluster-randomised non-inferiority trial comparing DVD-assisted and traditional genetic counselling in systematic population testing for BRCA1/2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchanda, Ranjit; Burnell, Matthew; Loggenberg, Kelly; Desai, Rakshit; Wardle, Jane; Sanderson, Saskia C; Gessler, Sue; Side, Lucy; Balogun, Nyala; Kumar, Ajith; Dorkins, Huw; Wallis, Yvonne; Chapman, Cyril; Tomlinson, Ian; Taylor, Rohan; Jacobs, Chris; Legood, Rosa; Raikou, Maria; McGuire, Alistair; Beller, Uziel; Menon, Usha; Jacobs, Ian

    2016-07-01

    Newer approaches to genetic counselling are required for population-based testing. We compare traditional face-to-face genetic counselling with a DVD-assisted approach for population-based BRCA1/2 testing. A cluster-randomised non-inferiority trial in the London Ashkenazi Jewish population. Ashkenazi Jewish men/women >18 years; exclusion criteria: (a) known BRCA1/2 mutation, (b) previous BRCA1/2 testing and (c) first-degree relative of BRCA1/2 carrier. Ashkenazi Jewish men/women underwent pre-test genetic counselling prior to BRCA1/2 testing in the Genetic Cancer Prediction through Population Screening trial (ISRCTN73338115). Genetic counselling clinics (clusters) were randomised to traditional counselling (TC) and DVD-based counselling (DVD-C) approaches. DVD-C involved a DVD presentation followed by shorter face-to-face genetic counselling. Outcome measures included genetic testing uptake, cancer risk perception, increase in knowledge, counselling time and satisfaction (Genetic Counselling Satisfaction Scale). Random-effects models adjusted for covariates compared outcomes between TC and DVD-C groups. One-sided 97.5% CI was used to determine non-inferiority. relevance, satisfaction, adequacy, emotional impact and improved understanding with the DVD; cost-minimisation analysis for TC and DVD-C approaches. 936 individuals (clusters=256, mean-size=3.6) were randomised to TC (n=527, clusters=134) and DVD-C (n=409, clusters=122) approaches. Groups were similar at baseline, mean age=53.9 (SD=15) years, women=66.8%, men=33.2%. DVD-C was non-inferior to TC for increase in knowledge (d=-0.07; lower 97.5% CI=-0.41), counselling satisfaction (d=-0.38, 97.5% CI=1.2) and risk perception (d=0.08; upper 97.5% CI=3.1). Group differences and CIs did not cross non-inferiority margins. DVD-C was equivalent to TC for uptake of genetic testing (d=-3%; lower/upper 97.5% CI -7.9%/1.7%) and superior for counselling time (20.4 (CI 18.7 to 22.2) min reduction (pgenetic testing. 95

  18. Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; McGue, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The sequenced genomes of individuals aged ≥80 years, who were highly educated, self-referred volunteers and with no self-reported chronic diseases were compared to young controls. In these data, healthy ageing is a distinct phenotype from exceptional longevity and genetic factors that protect...

  19. The development and standardization of testing methods for genetically modified organisms and their derived products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dabing; Guo, Jinchao

    2011-07-01

    As the worldwide commercialization of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) increases and consumers concern the safety of GMOs, many countries and regions are issuing labeling regulations on GMOs and their products. Analytical methods and their standardization for GM ingredients in foods and feed are essential for the implementation of labeling regulations. To date, the GMO testing methods are mainly based on the inserted DNA sequences and newly produced proteins in GMOs. This paper presents an overview of GMO testing methods as well as their standardization. © 2011 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  20. Huntington Disease: The Complexities of Making and Disclosing a Clinical Diagnosis After Premanifest Genetic Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, Elizabeth A; Loy, Clement T

    2017-01-01

    The management of patients and families affected by Huntington disease (HD) is complicated by several factors, both practical and ethical. It can be difficult to determine the onset of clinically manifest HD (mHD). In addition, it can be challenging to decide when to disclose the diagnosis to the affected individual. Firstly, the features of HD, an incurable, inherited, neurocognitive disorder that often manifests in young adulthood, influence how the person presents and accepts a diagnosis. Secondly, a positive genetic test for HD may result in a genetic diagnosis, sometimes years before the development of clinical features and the diagnosis of mHD. Thirdly, observational studies of unaffected gene expansion carriers documented HD manifestations up to 10 years before the typical presentation for diagnosis. These developments may permit earlier genetic diagnosis and information regarding the patient's likely status with respect to the development of clinical disease. Making the genetic diagnosis of HD and providing information regarding disease status, earlier rather than later, respects the person's right to know and preserves honesty in the doctor/patient relationship. Conversely, delaying the diagnosis respects the right not to know, avoids potential discrimination, and permits the person to live a "normal" life for longer, in the context of a disease without cure. This discussion has implications for other inherited and neurocognitive disorders.

  1. Testing for a genetic response to sexual selection in a wild Drosophila population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosden, T P; Thomson, J R; Blows, M W; Schaul, A; Chenoweth, S F

    2016-06-01

    In accordance with the consensus that sexual selection is responsible for the rapid evolution of display traits on macroevolutionary scales, microevolutionary studies suggest sexual selection is a widespread and often strong form of directional selection in nature. However, empirical evidence for the contemporary evolution of sexually selected traits via sexual rather than natural selection remains weak. In this study, we used a novel application of quantitative genetic breeding designs to test for a genetic response to sexual selection on eight chemical display traits from a field population of the fly, Drosophila serrata. Using our quantitative genetic approach, we were able to detect a genetically based difference in means between groups of males descended from fathers who had either successfully sired offspring or were randomly collected from the same wild population for one of these display traits, the diene (Z,Z)-5,9-C27 : 2 . Our experimental results, in combination with previous laboratory studies on this system, suggest that both natural and sexual selection may be influencing the evolutionary trajectories of these traits in nature, limiting the capacity for a contemporary evolutionary response. © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  2. Genetic parameters for test day somatic cell score in Brazilian Holstein cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, C N; Santos, G G; Cobuci, J A; Thompson, G; Carvalheira, J G V

    2015-12-29

    Selection for lower somatic cell count has been included in the breeding objectives of several countries in order to increase resistance to mastitis. Genetic parameters of somatic cell scores (SCS) were estimated from the first lactation test day records of Brazilian Holstein cows using random-regression models with Legendre polynomials (LP) of the order 3-5. Data consisted of 87,711 TD produced by 10,084 cows, sired by 619 bulls calved from 1993 to 2007. Heritability estimates varied from 0.06 to 0.14 and decreased from the beginning of the lactation up to 60 days in milk (DIM) and increased thereafter to the end of lactation. Genetic correlations between adjacent DIM were very high (>0.83) but decreased to negative values, obtained with LP of order four, between DIM in the extremes of lactation. Despite the favorable trend, genetic changes in SCS were not significant and did not differ among LP. There was little benefit of fitting an LP of an order >3 to model animal genetic and permanent environment effects for SCS. Estimates of variance components found in this study may be used for breeding value estimation for SCS and selection for mastitis resistance in Holstein cattle in Brazil.

  3. Forward Genetic Screening Using Behavioral Tests in Zebrafish: A Proof of Concept Analysis of Mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlai, Robert; Poshusta, Tanya L; Rampersad, Mindy; Fernandes, Yohaan; Greenwood, Tammy M; Cousin, Margot A; Klee, Eric W; Clark, Karl J

    2017-01-01

    The zebrafish enjoys several advantages over other model organisms. It is small, easy to maintain, prolific, and numerous genetic tools are available for it. For example, forward genetic screens have allowed investigators to identify important genes potentially involved in a variety of functions from embryogenesis to cancer. However, despite its sophisticated behavioral repertoire, behavioral methods have rarely been utilized in forward genetic screens. Here, we employ a two-tiered strategy, a proof of concept study, to explore the feasibility of behavioral screens. We generated mutant lines using transposon-based insertional mutagenesis, allowing us to bias mutant selection with target genes expressed within the brain. Furthermore, we employed an efficient and fast behavioral pre-selection in which we investigated the locomotory response of 5-day post-fertilization old larval fish to hyperosmotic shock. Based on this assay, we selected five lines for our lower throughput secondary adult behavioral screen. The latter screen utilized tests in which computer animated image presentation and video-tracking-based automated quantification of behavior allowed us to compare heterozygous zebrafish with their wild-type siblings on their responses to a variety of stimuli. We found significant mutation induced adult behavioral alterations in 4 out of the 5 lines analyzed, including changes in response to social or fear inducing stimuli, to handling and novelty, or in habituation to novelty. We discuss the pros and cons of behavioral phenotyping and of the use of different forward genetic methods in biomedical research with zebrafish.

  4. Utilization of genetic tests: analysis of gene-specific billing in Medicare claims data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Julie A; Berse, Brygida; Dotson, W David; Khoury, Muin J; Coomer, Nicole; Kautter, John

    2017-08-01

    We examined the utilization of precision medicine tests among Medicare beneficiaries through analysis of gene-specific tier 1 and 2 billing codes developed by the American Medical Association in 2012. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study. The primary source of data was 2013 Medicare 100% fee-for-service claims. We identified claims billed for each laboratory test, the number of patients tested, expenditures, and the diagnostic codes indicated for testing. We analyzed variations in testing by patient demographics and region of the country. Pharmacogenetic tests were billed most frequently, accounting for 48% of the expenditures for new codes. The most common indications for testing were breast cancer, long-term use of medications, and disorders of lipid metabolism. There was underutilization of guideline-recommended tumor mutation tests (e.g., epidermal growth factor receptor) and substantial overutilization of a test discouraged by guidelines (methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase). Methodology-based tier 2 codes represented 15% of all claims billed with the new codes. The highest rate of testing per beneficiary was in Mississippi and the lowest rate was in Alaska. Gene-specific billing codes significantly improved our ability to conduct population-level research of precision medicine. Analysis of these data in conjunction with clinical records should be conducted to validate findings.Genet Med advance online publication 26 January 2017.

  5. PedGenie: meta genetic association testing in mixed family and case-control designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen-Brady Kristina

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background- PedGenie software, introduced in 2006, includes genetic association testing of cases and controls that may be independent or related (nuclear families or extended pedigrees or mixtures thereof using Monte Carlo significance testing. Our aim is to demonstrate that PedGenie, a unique and flexible analysis tool freely available in Genie 2.4 software, is significantly enhanced by incorporating meta statistics for detecting genetic association with disease using data across multiple study groups. Methods- Meta statistics (chi-squared tests, odds ratios, and confidence intervals were calculated using formal Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel techniques. Simulated data from unrelated individuals and individuals in families were used to illustrate meta tests and their empirically-derived p-values and confidence intervals are accurate, precise, and for independent designs match those provided by standard statistical software. Results- PedGenie yields accurate Monte Carlo p-values for meta analysis of data across multiple studies, based on validation testing using pedigree, nuclear family, and case-control data simulated under both the null and alternative hypotheses of a genotype-phenotype association. Conclusion- PedGenie allows valid combined analysis of data from mixtures of pedigree-based and case-control resources. Added meta capabilities provide new avenues for association analysis, including pedigree resources from large consortia and multi-center studies.

  6. Potencial fitotóxico de Dicranopteris flexuosa (Schrad. Underw. (Gleicheniaceae Phytotoxic potential of Dicranopteris flexuosa (Schrad. Underw. (Gleicheniaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerí Schmidt da Silva

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar o potencial fitotóxico do extrato etanólico bruto e das frações semipurificadas de Dicranopteris flexuosa por meio de bioensaios de germinação e crescimento de Lactuca sativa L. (alface, Lycopersicon esculentum L. (tomate, Allium cepa L. (cebola e Triticum aestivum L. (trigo em laboratório e casa de vegetação e quantificar o teor total de fenóis e flavonóides dos extratos e frações. Nos bioensaios realizados em laboratório foram utilizadas quatro concentrações (0, 250, 500, 1000 mg L-1, com quatro repetições de 50 sementes. A análise dos resultados indica redução da velocidade e/ou inibição da germinação, estímulo do crescimento da raiz das eudicotiledôneas e inibição da raiz adventícia das monocotiledôneas estudadas. Nos bioensaios realizados em casa de vegetação foram utilizadas as mesmas concentrações dos bioensaios em laboratório, com oito repetições de cinco sementes por vaso. A análise dos resultados indica que o comprimento da raiz foi afetado pelo extrato etanólico bruto, ocorrendo estímulo em tomate e inibição em cebola e trigo. A produção de massa seca da parte aérea foi estimulada na menor concentração em alface e trigo. A fração acetato de etila foi a que apresentou os maiores teores de fenóis e flavonóides totais. Embora os resultados sejam preliminares, observa-se que o extrato etanólico e as frações semipurificadas de D. flexuosa também contêm substâncias que interferem no crescimento das plântulas de alface, tomate, cebola e trigo.This work aimed to determine the phytotoxic potential of crude ethanol extract and semipurified fractions of Dicranopteris flexuosa on the germination and growth of Lactuca sativa L. (lettuce, Lycopersicon esculentum L. (tomato, Allium cepa L. (onion and Triticum aestivum L. (wheat in laboratory and greenhouse bioassays and determine total phenolic and flavonoid content. For the tests carried out in

  7. Primary care patients' views and decisions about, experience of and reactions to direct-to-consumer genetic testing: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, Katherine; Sanders, Tonya Nashay; Hogan, Nancy S; Cherny, Sara; Helzlsouer, Kathy J

    2013-10-01

    Little is known about the decisions and perspectives of participants undergoing direct-to-consumer genetic testing (DTCGT). The aims of this study were to examine the views, attitudes and decision-making factors of primary care patients regarding DTCGT. Their experience of and reactions to testing also emerged during the study. In this longitudinal, qualitative study, 20 primary care patients participated in DTCGT and individual interviews: (1) prior to testing after the informed consent session, (2) after receiving results, (3) 3 months post-test, and (4) 12 months post-test. Interviews included open-ended questions and all transcripts were analyzed using grounded theory, constant comparison methods. Five key themes emerged from data analysis as participants underwent DTCGT and reflected on their decision over time: (1) limited concerns about DTCGT, (2) motivations for testing, (3) expectations of testing, (4) understanding of results, and (5) impact of testing and results. While a few participants expressed concerns before testing, participants were motivated to test by curiosity, gaining actionable knowledge, and altruism. Most were uncertain of what to expect from DTCGT and needed assistance in understanding results. While many reported testing had no significant impact on them, being relieved or pleased after testing was the most common emotional effect. Notably, a few participants made positive health changes in response to testing. Given the paucity of information about primary care patients and DTCGT, this study adds more in-depth information to the emerging research on how such participants' view, make decisions about, experience and react to DTCGT over time. Because uncertainty remains about the accuracy of DTCGT, the response of primary care patients to this testing requires further investigation.

  8. Testing for direct genetic effects using a screening step in family-based association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon M Lutz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In genome wide association studies (GWAS, families based studies tend to have less power to detect genetic associations than population based studies, such as case-control studies. This can be an issue when testing if genes in a family based GWAS have a direct effect on the phenotype of interest or if the genes act indirectly through a secondary phenotype. When multiple SNPs are tested for a direct effect in the family based study, a screening step can be used to minimize the burden of multiple comparisons in the causal analysis. We propose a 2-stage screening step that can be incorporated into the family based association test (FBAT approach similar to the conditional mean model approach in the VanSteen-algorithm [1]. Simulations demonstrate that the type 1 error is preserved and this method is advantageous when multiple markers are tested. This method is illustrated by an application to the Framingham Heart Study.

  9. Analyses of fixed effects for genetic evaluation of dairy cattle using test day records in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asep Anang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Season, rainfall, day of rain, temperature, humidity, year and farm are fixed effects, which have been reported to influence milk yield. Those factors are often linked together to contribute to the variation of milk production. This research is addressed to study the fixed effect factors, including lactation curve, which should be considered for genetic evaluation of milk yield based on test day records of dairy cattle. The data were taken from four different farms, which were PT. Taurus Dairy Farm, BPPT Cikole, Bandang Dairy Farm, and BBPTU Baturraden. In total of 16806 test day records were evaluated, consisting of 9,302 at first and 7,504 at second lactation, respectively. The results indicated that fixed effects were very specific and the influences had different patterns for each farm. Consequently, in a genetic evaluation, these factors such as lactation, temperature, year, day of rain, and humidity need to be evaluated first. Ali-Schaeffer curve represented the most appropriate curve to use in the genetic evaluation of dairy cattle in Indonesia.

  10. Rural-urban and racial-ethnic differences in awareness of direct-to-consumer genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salloum, Ramzi G; George, Thomas J; Silver, Natalie; Markham, Merry-Jennifer; Hall, Jaclyn M; Guo, Yi; Bian, Jiang; Shenkman, Elizabeth A

    2018-02-23

    Access to direct-to-consumer genetic testing services has increased in recent years. However, disparities in knowledge and awareness of these services are not well documented. We examined awareness of genetic testing services by rural/urban and racial/ethnic status. Analyses were conducted using pooled cross-sectional data from 4 waves (2011-2014) of the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS). Descriptive statistics compared sample characteristics and information sources by rural/urban residence. Logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between geography, racial/ethnic status, and awareness of genetic testing, controlling for sociodemographic characteristics. Of 13,749 respondents, 16.7% resided in rural areas, 13.8% were Hispanic, and 10.1% were non-Hispanic black. Rural residents were less likely than urban residents to report awareness of genetic testing (OR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.63-0.87). Compared with non-Hispanic whites, racial/ethnic minorities were less likely to be aware of genetic testing: Hispanic (OR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.56-0.82); and non-Hispanic black (OR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.61-0.90). Rural-urban and racial-ethnic differences exist in awareness of direct-to-consumer genetic testing. These differences may translate into disparities in the uptake of genetic testing, health behavior change, and disease prevention through precision and personalized medicine.

  11. Individual and family characteristics associated with BRCA1/2 genetic testing in high-risk families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katapodi, Maria C; Northouse, Laurel L; Milliron, Kara J; Liu, Guipeng; Merajver, Sofia D

    2013-06-01

    Little is known about family members' interrelated decisions to seek genetic testing for breast cancer susceptibility. The specific aims of this cross-sectional, descriptive, cohort study were (i) to examine whether individual and family characteristics have a direct effect on women's decisions to use genetic testing for hereditary susceptibility to breast cancer and (ii) to explore whether family characteristics moderate the relationships between individual characteristics and the decision to use genetic testing. Participants were women (>18 years old) who (i) received genetic testing for hereditary breast cancer and who agreed to invite one of their female relatives into the study and (ii) female relatives who had NOT obtained genetic testing and were identified by pedigree analysis as having >10% chances of hereditary susceptibility to breast cancer. The final sample consisted of 168 English-speaking, family dyads who completed self-administered, mailed surveys with validated instruments. Multivariate conditional logistic regression analyses showed that the proposed model explained 62% of the variance in genetic testing. The factors most significantly associated with genetic testing were having a personal history of cancer; perceiving genetic testing to have more benefits than barriers; having greater family hardiness; and perceiving fewer negative consequences associated with a breast cancer diagnosis. No significant interaction effects were observed. Findings suggest that both individual and family characteristics are associated with the decision to obtain genetic testing for hereditary breast cancer; hence, there is a need for interventions that foster a supportive family environment for patients and their high-risk relatives. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Evidence-based genetic counselling implications for Huntington disease intermediate allele predictive test results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semaka, A; Hayden, M R

    2014-04-01

    Intermediate alleles (IAs) for Huntington disease (HD) contain 27-35 CAG repeats, a range that falls just below the disease threshold of 36 repeats. While there is no firm evidence that IAs confer the HD phenotype, they are prone to germline CAG repeat instability, particularly repeat expansion when paternally transmitted. Consequently, offspring may inherit a new mutation and develop the disease later in life. Over the last 5 years there has been a renewed interest in IAs. This article provides an overview of the latest research on IAs, including their clinical implications, frequency, haplotype, and likelihood of CAG repeat expansion, as well as patient understanding and current genetic counselling practices. The implications of this growing evidence base for clinical practice are also highlighted. These evidence-based genetic counselling implications may help ensure individuals with an IA predictive test result receive appropriate support, education, and counselling. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Managing genetic tests, surveillance, and preventive medicine under a public health insurance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipova-Neumann, Lilia; Hoy, Michael

    2014-03-01

    There is a prospect in the medium to long term future of substantial advancements in the understanding of the relationship between disease and genetics. We consider the implications of increased information from genetic tests about predisposition to diseases from the perspective of managing health care provision under a public health insurance scheme. In particular, we consider how such information may potentially improve the targeting of medical surveillance (or prevention) activities to improve the chances of early detection of disease onset. We show that the moral hazard implications inherent in surveillance and prevention decisions that are chosen to be privately rather than socially optimal may be exacerbated by increased information about person-specific predisposition to disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. What should we want to know about our future? A Kantian view on predictive genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, Bert

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in genomic research have led to the development of new diagnostic tools, including tests which make it possible to predict the future occurrence of monogenetic diseases (e.g. Chorea Huntington) or to determine increased susceptibilities to the future development of more complex diseases (e.g. breast cancer). The use of such tests raises a number of ethical, legal and social issues which are usually discussed in terms of rights. However, in the context of predictive genetic tests a key question arises which lies beyond the concept of rights, namely, What should we want to know about our future? In the following I shall discuss this question against the background of Kant's Doctrine of Virtue. It will be demonstrated that the system of duties of virtue that Kant elaborates in the second part of his Metaphysics of Morals offers a theoretical framework for addressing the question of a proper scope of future knowledge as provided by genetic tests. This approach can serve as a source of moral guidance complementary to a justice perspective. It does, however, not rest on the-rather problematic--claim to be able to define what the "good life" is.

  15. Ethics of genetic testing and research in sport: a position statement from the Australian Institute of Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahovich, Nicole; Fricker, Peter A; Brown, Matthew A; Hughes, David

    2017-01-01

    As Australia's peak high-performance sport agency, the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) has developed this position statement to address the implications of recent advances in the field of genetics and the ramifications for the health and well-being of athletes. Genetic testing has proven of value in the practice of clinical medicine. There are, however, currently no scientific grounds for the use of genetic testing for athletic performance improvement, sport selection or talent identification. Athletes and coaches should be discouraged from using direct-to-consumer genetic testing because of its lack of validation and replicability and the lack of involvement of a medical practitioner in the process. The transfer of genetic material or genetic modification of cells for performance enhancement is gene doping and should not be used on athletes. There are, however, valid roles for genetic research and the AIS supports genetic research which aims to enhance understanding of athlete susceptibility to injury or illness. Genetic research is only to be conducted after careful consideration of a range of ethical concerns which include the provision of adequate informed consent. The AIS is committed to providing leadership in delivering an ethical framework that protects the well-being of athletes and the integrity of sport, in the rapidly changing world of genomic science. PMID:27899345

  16. The effect of direct-to-consumer genetic tests on anticipated affect and health-seeking behaviors: a pilot survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansback, Nick; Sizto, Sonia; Guh, Daphne; Anis, Aslam H

    2012-10-01

    Numerous websites offer direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing, yet it is unknown how individuals will react to genetic risk profiles online. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of using a web-based survey and conjoint methods to elicit individuals' interpretations of genetic risk profiles by their anticipated worry/anxiousness and health-seeking behaviors. A web-based survey was developed using conjoint methods. Each survey presented 12 hypothetical genetic risk profiles describing genetic test results for four diseases. Test results were characterized by the type of disease (eight diseases), individual risk (five levels), and research confidence (three levels). After each profile, four questions were asked regarding anticipated worry and health-seeking behaviors. Probabilities of response outcomes based on attribute levels were estimated from logistic regression models, adjusting for covariates. Overall, 319 participants (69%) completed 3828 unique genetic risk profiles. Across all profiles, most participants anticipated making doctor's appointments (63%), lifestyle changes (57%), and accessing screening (57%); 40% anticipated feeling more worried and anxious. Higher levels of disease risk were significantly associated with affirmative responses. Conjoint methods may be used to elicit reactions to genetic information online. Preliminary results suggest that genetic information may increase worry/anxiousness and health-seeking behaviors among consumers of DTC tests. Further research is planned to determine the appropriateness of these affects and behaviors.

  17. Intention to Obtain Genetic Testing for Melanoma among Individuals at Low to Moderate Risk for Hereditary Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadaparampil, Susan T.; Azzarello, Lora; Pickard, Jennifer; Jacobsen, Paul B.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Melanoma is a serious skin cancer that has been on the rise in the United States. Some genetic component is apparent. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify demographic, clinical, attitudinal, and health belief factors associated with intention to obtain genetic testing for hereditary melanoma among unaffected first-degree…

  18. A decade of genetic counseling in frontotemporal dementia affected families: Few counseling requests and much familial opposition to testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.R. Riedijk (Samantha); M.F. Niermeijer (Martinus); D. Dooijes (Dennis); A. Tibben (Arend)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractA decade of genetic counseling of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) affected families has generated two important observations. First, the uptake rate for presymptomatic testing for FTD is low in our department of Clinical Genetics at the Erasmus Medical Center in the Netherlands. Second,

  19. Genetic testing for Lynch syndrome in the first year of colorectal cancer: a review of the psychological impact.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landsbergen, K.M.; Prins, J.B.; Brunner, H.G.; Kraaimaat, F.W.; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.

    2009-01-01

    An increasing number of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) receive genetic counselling within 1 year after diagnosis. Little is known whether specific subgroups are more vulnerable for genetic testing related distress. A literature review was conducted to identify the psychological impact of CRC

  20. Uptake of genetic testing and long-term tumor surveillance in von Hippel-Lindau disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chávez Mireya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background von Hippel-Lindau (VHL disease is a hereditary cancer syndrome caused by germline mutations in the VHL gene. Patients have significant morbidity and mortality secondary to vascular tumors. Disease management is centered on tumor surveillance that allows early detection and treatment. Presymptomatic genetic testing is therefore recommended, including in at-risk children. Methods We tested 17 families (n = 109 individuals for VHL mutations including 43 children under the age of 18. Personalized genetic counseling was provided pre and post-test and the individuals undergoing presymptomatic testing filled out questionnaires gathering socio-demographic, psychological and psychiatric data. Mutation analysis was performed by direct sequencing of the VHL gene. Mutation-carriers were screened for VHL disease-related tumors and were offered follow-up annual examinations. Results Mutations were identified in 36 patients, 17 of whom were asymptomatic. In the initial screening, we identified at least one tumor in five of 17 previously asymptomatic individuals. At the end of five years, only 38.9% of the mutation-carriers continued participating in our tumor surveillance program. During this time, 14 mutation carriers developed a total of 32 new tumors, three of whom died of complications. Gender, education, income, marital status and religiosity were not found to be associated with adherence to the surveillance protocol. Follow-up adherence was also independent of pre-test depression, severity of disease, or number of affected family members. The only statistically significant predictor of adherence was being symptomatic at the time of testing (OR = 5; 95% CI 1.2 - 20.3; p = 0.02. Pre-test anxiety was more commonly observed in patients that discontinued follow-up (64.7% vs. 35.3%; p = 0.01. Conclusions The high initial uptake rate of genetic testing for VHL disease, including in minors, allowed the discontinuation of unnecessary screening

  1. A Simple Test of Class-Level Genetic Association Can Reveal Novel Cardiometabolic Trait Loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Qian

    Full Text Available Characterizing the genetic determinants of complex diseases can be further augmented by incorporating knowledge of underlying structure or classifications of the genome, such as newly developed mappings of protein-coding genes, epigenetic marks, enhancer elements and non-coding RNAs.We apply a simple class-level testing framework, termed Genetic Class Association Testing (GenCAT, to identify protein-coding gene association with 14 cardiometabolic (CMD related traits across 6 publicly available genome wide association (GWA meta-analysis data resources. GenCAT uses SNP-level meta-analysis test statistics across all SNPs within a class of elements, as well as the size of the class and its unique correlation structure, to determine if the class is statistically meaningful. The novelty of findings is evaluated through investigation of regional signals. A subset of findings are validated using recently updated, larger meta-analysis resources. A simulation study is presented to characterize overall performance with respect to power, control of family-wise error and computational efficiency. All analysis is performed using the GenCAT package, R version 3.2.1.We demonstrate that class-level testing complements the common first stage minP approach that involves individual SNP-level testing followed by post-hoc ascribing of statistically significant SNPs to genes and loci. GenCAT suggests 54 protein-coding genes at 41 distinct loci for the 13 CMD traits investigated in the discovery analysis, that are beyond the discoveries of minP alone. An additional application to biological pathways demonstrates flexibility in defining genetic classes.We conclude that it would be prudent to include class-level testing as standard practice in GWA analysis. GenCAT, for example, can be used as a simple, complementary and efficient strategy for class-level testing that leverages existing data resources, requires only summary level data in the form of test statistics, and

  2. Parental Attitudes to Genetic Testing Differ by Ethnicity and Immigration in Childhood Nephrotic Syndrome: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlota Borges

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies in the USA report differences in opinion among parents of different ethnic groups toward genetic testing for their child; however, there are no studies that address this issue in the diverse ethnic and immigrant population in Canada. Objective: This study aims to determine whether ethnicity and immigration status influences parental interest in clinical genetic testing for a potentially progressive kidney disease. Design: This is a cross-sectional study. Setting: Participants were recruited from the Greater Toronto Area, Canada. Participants: The study included 320 parents of children ages 1–18 years with nephrotic syndrome enrolled in the Insight into Nephrotic Syndrome: Investigating Genes, Health and Therapeutics (INSIGHT observational cohort study. Measurements: Demographic, ethnicity, immigration, and child specific factors as well as interest in genetic testing were collected through self-reported questionnaires administered at baseline study visit. Methods: Logistic regression models were used to examine association of ethnicity and immigration status with interest in genetic testing. Results: The majority of parents (85 % were interested in genetic testing for their child. South Asian and East/Southeast Asian parents had 74 and 76 % lower odds of agreeing to genetic testing when compared to Europeans (odds ratio (OR 0.26, 95 % confidence interval (CI 0.10–0.68; OR 0.24, 95 % CI 0.07–0.79, respectively after controlling for age and sex of child, age and education level of parent, initial steroid resistance, and duration of time in Canada. Immigrants to Canada also had significantly lower odds (OR 0.29, 95 % CI 0.12–0.72 of agreeing to genetic testing after similar adjustment. Higher education level was not associated with greater interest in genetic testing (OR 1.24, 95 % CI 0.64–2.42. Limitations: Participants have already agreed to aggregate genetic testing for research purposes as part of enrolment in

  3. Parental attitudes to genetic testing differ by ethnicity and immigration in childhood nephrotic syndrome: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Karlota; Vasilevska-Ristovska, Jovanka; Hussain-Shamsy, Neesha; Patel, Viral; Banh, Tonny; Hebert, Diane; Pearl, Rachel J; Radhakrishnan, Seetha; Piscione, Tino D; Licht, Christoph P B; Langlois, Valerie; Levin, Leo; Strug, Lisa; Parekh, Rulan S

    2016-01-01

    Studies in the USA report differences in opinion among parents of different ethnic groups toward genetic testing for their child; however, there are no studies that address this issue in the diverse ethnic and immigrant population in Canada. This study aims to determine whether ethnicity and immigration status influences parental interest in clinical genetic testing for a potentially progressive kidney disease. This is a cross-sectional study. Participants were recruited from the Greater Toronto Area, Canada. The study included 320 parents of children ages 1-18 years with nephrotic syndrome enrolled in the Insight into Nephrotic Syndrome: Investigating Genes, Health and Therapeutics (INSIGHT) observational cohort study. Demographic, ethnicity, immigration, and child specific factors as well as interest in genetic testing were collected through self-reported questionnaires administered at baseline study visit. Logistic regression models were used to examine association of ethnicity and immigration status with interest in genetic testing. The majority of parents (85 %) were interested in genetic testing for their child. South Asian and East/Southeast Asian parents had 74 and 76 % lower odds of agreeing to genetic testing when compared to Europeans (odds ratio (OR) 0.26, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.10-0.68; OR 0.24, 95 % CI 0.07-0.79, respectively) after controlling for age and sex of child, age and education level of parent, initial steroid resistance, and duration of time in Canada. Immigrants to Canada also had significantly lower odds (OR 0.29, 95 % CI 0.12-0.72) of agreeing to genetic testing after similar adjustment. Higher education level was not associated with greater interest in genetic testing (OR 1.24, 95 % CI 0.64-2.42). Participants have already agreed to aggregate genetic testing for research purposes as part of enrolment in INSIGHT study. While majority of parents were interested in genetic testing for their child, immigrants, particularly

  4. [Detection of genetic modification in maize and maize products by ELISA-test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanek-Karłowska, Bogumiła; Sawilska-Rautenstrauch, Dorota; Jedra, Małgorzata; Badowski, Paweł

    2003-01-01

    Enzyme immunoassay methods--TRAIT Test--was applied for detection of genetic modification in maize seeds and foodstuffs, which have been produced from this crop. TRAIT Test is based on the identification GMO protein Cry 1Ab produced by a gene derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) incorporated into insect resistant corn grain. The experiment was carried out on maize standards and foodstuffs from Warsaw market. The positive result was obtained for one maize product, which was not labelled as GMO. The presence of GMO material was approximately equal to 1%. In conclusion, this test is proper for fast routine qualitative (yes/no) determination GMO material in maize seeds and unprocessed food products.

  5. Field of Genes: An Investigation of Sports-Related Genetic Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer K. Wagner

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sports-related genetic testing is a sector of the diverse direct-to-consumer (DTC industry that has not yet been examined thoroughly by academic scholars. A systematic search was used to identify companies in this sector and content analysis of online information was performed. More than a dozen companies were identified. Marketing practices observed generally did not target parents for child testing, and marketing images were mild compared to images used in popular media. Information was provided at a high reading level (industry-wide Flesh-Kincaid Grade Levels > 11. While ~75% of companies provide privacy policies and terms of service prior to purchase and ~40% provide scientific citations for their tests,

  6. Targeted genetic testing for familial hypercholesterolaemia using next generation sequencing: a population-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is a common Mendelian condition which, untreated, results in premature coronary heart disease. An estimated 88% of FH cases are undiagnosed in the UK. We previously validated a method for FH mutation detection in a lipid clinic population using next generation sequencing (NGS), but this did not address the challenge of identifying index cases in primary care where most undiagnosed patients receive healthcare. Here, we evaluate the targeted use of NGS as a potential route to diagnosis of FH in a primary care population subset selected for hypercholesterolaemia. Methods We used microfluidics-based PCR amplification coupled with NGS and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to detect mutations in LDLR, APOB and PCSK9 in three phenotypic groups within the Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study including 193 individuals with high total cholesterol, 232 with moderately high total cholesterol despite cholesterol-lowering therapy, and 192 normocholesterolaemic controls. Results Pathogenic mutations were found in 2.1% of hypercholesterolaemic individuals, in 2.2% of subjects on cholesterol-lowering therapy and in 42% of their available first-degree relatives. In addition, variants of uncertain clinical significance (VUCS) were detected in 1.4% of the hypercholesterolaemic and cholesterol-lowering therapy groups. No pathogenic variants or VUCS were detected in controls. Conclusions We demonstrated that population-based genetic testing using these protocols is able to deliver definitive molecular diagnoses of FH in individuals with high cholesterol or on cholesterol-lowering therapy. The lower cost and labour associated with NGS-based testing may increase the attractiveness of a population-based approach to FH detection compared to genetic testing with conventional sequencing. This could provide one route to increasing the present low percentage of FH cases with a genetic diagnosis. PMID:24956927

  7. Genetic Testing for TMEM154 Mutations Associated with Lentivirus Susceptibility in Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrik, Dustin T.; Simpson, Barry; Kijas, James W.; Clawson, Michael L.; Chitko-McKown, Carol G.; Harhay, Gregory P.; Leymaster, Kreg A.

    2013-01-01

    In sheep, small ruminant lentiviruses cause an incurable, progressive, lymphoproliferative disease that affects millions of animals worldwide. Known as ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) in the U.S., and Visna/Maedi virus (VMV) elsewhere, these viruses reduce an animal’s health, productivity, and lifespan. Genetic variation in the ovine transmembrane protein 154 gene (TMEM154) has been previously associated with OPPV infection in U.S. sheep. Sheep with the ancestral TMEM154 haplotype encoding glutamate (E) at position 35, and either form of an N70I variant, were highly-susceptible compared to sheep homozygous for the K35 missense mutation. Our current overall aim was to characterize TMEM154 in sheep from around the world to develop an efficient genetic test for reduced susceptibility. The average frequency of TMEM154 E35 among 74 breeds was 0.51 and indicated that highly-susceptible alleles were present in most breeds around the world. Analysis of whole genome sequences from an international panel of 75 sheep revealed more than 1,300 previously unreported polymorphisms in a 62 kb region containing TMEM154 and confirmed that the most susceptible haplotypes were distributed worldwide. Novel missense mutations were discovered in the signal peptide (A13V) and the extracellular domains (E31Q, I74F, and I102T) of TMEM154. A matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization–time-of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) assay was developed to detect these and six previously reported missense and two deletion mutations in TMEM154. In blinded trials, the call rate for the eight most common coding polymorphisms was 99.4% for 499 sheep tested and 96.0% of the animals were assigned paired TMEM154 haplotypes (i.e., diplotypes). The widespread distribution of highly-susceptible TMEM154 alleles suggests that genetic testing and selection may improve the health and productivity of infected flocks. PMID:23408992

  8. Genetic testing for TMEM154 mutations associated with lentivirus susceptibility in sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Heaton

    Full Text Available In sheep, small ruminant lentiviruses cause an incurable, progressive, lymphoproliferative disease that affects millions of animals worldwide. Known as ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV in the U.S., and Visna/Maedi virus (VMV elsewhere, these viruses reduce an animal's health, productivity, and lifespan. Genetic variation in the ovine transmembrane protein 154 gene (TMEM154 has been previously associated with OPPV infection in U.S. sheep. Sheep with the ancestral TMEM154 haplotype encoding glutamate (E at position 35, and either form of an N70I variant, were highly-susceptible compared to sheep homozygous for the K35 missense mutation. Our current overall aim was to characterize TMEM154 in sheep from around the world to develop an efficient genetic test for reduced susceptibility. The average frequency of TMEM154 E35 among 74 breeds was 0.51 and indicated that highly-susceptible alleles were present in most breeds around the world. Analysis of whole genome sequences from an international panel of 75 sheep revealed more than 1,300 previously unreported polymorphisms in a 62 kb region containing TMEM154 and confirmed that the most susceptible haplotypes were distributed worldwide. Novel missense mutations were discovered in the signal peptide (A13V and the extracellular domains (E31Q, I74F, and I102T of TMEM154. A matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS assay was developed to detect these and six previously reported missense and two deletion mutations in TMEM154. In blinded trials, the call rate for the eight most common coding polymorphisms was 99.4% for 499 sheep tested and 96.0% of the animals were assigned paired TMEM154 haplotypes (i.e., diplotypes. The widespread distribution of highly-susceptible TMEM154 alleles suggests that genetic testing and selection may improve the health and productivity of infected flocks.

  9. Final Progress Report: Developing Ethical Practices for Genetics Testing in the Workplace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laura Roberts, MD; Teddy Warner, PhD

    2008-05-14

    Our multidisciplinary research team for this project involved collaboration between the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine at the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) and the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center (UNM HSC). Our research team in Wisconsin was led by Laura Roberts, M.D., Principal Investigator, and included Scott Helberg, MLS (Project Coordinator), Kate Green Hammond, Ph.D. (Consultant), Krisy Edenharder (Research Coordinator), and Mark Talatzko (Research Assistant). Our New Mexico-based team was led by Teddy Warner, Ph.D., Co-Principal Investigator and UNM Site Principal Investigator, and included Suzanne Roybal (Project Assistant), Darlyn Mabon (Project Assistant), Kate Green Hammond, PhD (Senior Research Scientist on the UNM team from 2004 until January, 2007), and Paulette Christopher (Research Assistant). In addition, computer technical and web support for the web-based survey conducted on a secure server at the University of New Mexico was provided by Kevin Wiley and Kim Hagen of the Systems and Programming Team of the Health Sciences Center Library and Information Center. We stated 3 aims in the grant proposal: (1) To collect web survey reports of the ethical perspectives, concerns, preferences and decision-making related to genetic testing using surveys from employees at: (a) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); (b) Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); and (c) the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center (UNMHSC); (2) To perform an extensive literature search and the extant survey data to develop evidence-based policy recommendations for ethically sound genetic testing associated with research and occupational health activities in the workplace; and, (3) To host a conference at the Medical College of Wisconsin to provide employers, workers, health professionals, researchers, the public, and the media an opportunity to consider ethical issues involved in genetic

  10. Molecular genetic testing of uveal melanoma from routinely processed and stained cytology specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Benjamin N.; Cebulla, Colleen M.; Wakely, Paul E.; Davidorf, Frederick H.; Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed H.

    2013-01-01

    In the following study we investigated the utility of molecular genetic testing of the DNA extracted from routinely stained and processed smears from uveal melanoma (UM). Smears from five uveal melanoma cell lines and 12 primary tumors were prepared and stained with Papanicolaou and Romanowsky stains. Genotyping was carried out utilizing 14 microsatellite markers on chromosomes 3, 6 and 8. Mutational screening for alterations in GNAQ and GNA11 genes was carried out by restriction fragment length polymorphism. The results were compared to those obtained through direct sequencing of frozen tumor tissues. High quality DNA was extracted from the stained slides with no difference in the efficiency of DNA extraction between the two staining techniques. The extracted DNA was of adequate quality for genotyping and mutational screening. DNA extracted from approximately 200 tumor cells is sufficient for reproducible testing of allelic imbalances and for studying the common somatic mutations in GNAQ and GNA11 genes. In conclusion, we presented the feasibility of utilizing routinely stained cytology smears from UM for molecular genetic testing. The DNA obtained is of sufficient quality to carry out genotyping for markers on chromosome 3, 6 and 8, as well as screening for somatic mutations in GNAQ and GNA11 genes. PMID:21945171

  11. Ethical issues in the use of genetic testing of patients with schizophrenia and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLisi, Lynn E

    2014-05-01

    This review outlines the positive and negative aspects of DNA testing and provides an account of the issues particularly relevant to schizophrenia. Modern technology has changed the field of medicine so rapidly that patients and their families have become much more independent in their healthcare decisions than in the previous decade. Simply by finding information on the Internet, they gain knowledge about disease diagnosis, treatment options and their side-effects. No medical field likely has been more affected and more controversial than that of genetics. It is now possible to sequence the individual human genome and detect single nucleotide variations, microdeletions and duplications within it. Commercial companies have sprung up in a similar manner to the software or electronic industries and have begun to market direct-to-consumer DNA testing. Much of this may be performed to satisfy curiosity about one's ancestry; but commercially available results that appear incidentally can also be distributed to the consumer. Ethicists, genetics researchers, clinicians and government agencies are currently in discussion about concerns raised about commercially available DNA testing, while at the same time recognizing its value in some instances to be able to predict very serious disabilities.

  12. Measuring physicians' tolerance for ambiguity and its relationship to their reported practices regarding genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, G; Tambor, E S; Chase, G A; Holtzman, N A

    1993-11-01

    Despite uncertainties in medicine, attempts to study physicians' tolerance for uncertainty have been few, and limited by the measurement instruments available. This paper describes development of a modified tolerance for ambiguity (TFA) scale, and correlates it with several physician characteristics and reported behaviors. Eighteen TFA items were included in a national survey of physicians' knowledge and attitudes about genetic testing. Sixty-five percent (n = 1,140) of 1,759 obstetricians, pediatricians, internists, family practitioners, and psychiatrists responded. After psychometric analyses, the scale was reduced to 7 items, demonstrating an acceptable reliability (Cronbach's alpha = .75). TFA was higher among psychiatrists than other specialties, among those who were older when they graduated from medical school, and among those willing to offer a new low-cost, accurate predictive test when none of their colleagues do. TFA was lower among those who indicated that attendance at religious services was important, among those who would make a recommendation to their patients regarding pregnancy termination after prenatal diagnosis, and among those who would withhold negative genetic test results. Future research is needed on the scale itself, and to assess factors affecting TFA, such as its susceptibility to modification, and its potential association with clinical practice in other areas of medicine that are characterized by ambiguity.

  13. The future (r)evolution of preimplantation genetic diagnosis/human leukocyte antigen testing: ethical reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wert, Guido; Liebaers, Inge; Van de Velde, Hilde

    2007-09-01

    There has been increasing support for combining preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for specific diseases with a test for human leukocyte antigens (HLA) because the generation of HLA-matched umbilical cord blood cells may save the life of a diseased sibling. To date, this procedure has taken place in the context of conceiving another child--PGD/HLA testing type 1. However, it may well become possible to perform PGD/HLA testing outside this context, that is, to select matched embryos from which embryonic stem cells could be derived and used in cell therapy--PGD/HLA testing type 2. A proactive ethical analysis is needed and is presented in this article. Although PGD/HLA testing type 1 can be morally justified, the risks, pitfalls, and practical limitations of this procedure make it necessary to develop alternative strategies. PGD/HLA testing type 2 may provide an alternative strategy. From an ethical point of view, the controversial issue is that this procedure creates embryos purely for instrumental use. However, given the dominant view that the preimplantation embryo has only limited moral value, this alternative may be as morally justified as PGD/HLA testing type 1.

  14. Estimates of genetic parameters for Holstein cows for test-day yield traits with a random regression cubic spline model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGroot, B J; Keown, J F; Van Vleck, L D; Kachman, S D

    2007-06-30

    Genetic parameters were estimated with restricted maximum likelihood for individual test-day milk, fat, and protein yields and somatic cell scores with a random regression cubic spline model. Test-day records of Holstein cows that calved from 1994 through early 1999 were obtained from Dairy Records Management Systems in Raleigh, North Carolina, for the analysis. Estimates of heritability for individual test-days and estimates of genetic and phenotypic correlations between test-days were obtained from estimates of variances and covariances from the cubic spline analysis. Estimates were calculated of genetic parameters for the averages of the test days within each of the ten 30-day test intervals. The model included herd test-day, age at first calving, and bovine somatropin treatment as fixed factors. Cubic splines were fitted for the overall lactation curve and for random additive genetic and permanent environmental effects, with five predetermined knots or four intervals between days 0, 50, 135, 220, and 305. Estimates of heritability for lactation one ranged from 0.10 to 0.15, 0.06 to 0.10, 0.09 to 0.15, and 0.02 to 0.06 for test-day one to test-day 10 for milk, fat, and protein yields and somatic cell scores, respectively. Estimates of heritability were greater in lactations two and three. Estimates of heritability increased over the course of the lactation. Estimates of genetic and phenotypic correlations were smaller for test-days further apart.

  15. Awareness, knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes towards genetic testing for cancer risk among ethnic minority groups: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie E. J. Hann

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic testing for risk of hereditary cancer can help patients to make important decisions about prevention or early detection. US and UK studies show that people from ethnic minority groups are less likely to receive genetic testing. It is important to understand various groups’ awareness of genetic testing and its acceptability to avoid further disparities in health care. This review aims to identify and detail awareness, knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes towards genetic counselling/testing for cancer risk prediction in ethnic minority groups. Methods A search was carried out in PsycInfo, CINAHL, Embase and MEDLINE. Search terms referred to ethnicity, genetic testing/counselling, cancer, awareness, knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions. Quantitative and qualitative studies, written in English, and published between 2000 and 2015, were included. Results Forty-one studies were selected for review: 39 from the US, and two from Australia. Results revealed low awareness and knowledge of genetic counselling/testing for cancer susceptibility amongst ethnic minority groups including African Americans, Asian Americans, and Hispanics. Attitudes towards genetic testing were generally positive; perceived benefits included positive implications for personal health and being able to inform family. However, negative attitudes were also evident, particularly the anticipated emotional impact of test results, and concerns about confidentiality, stigma, and discrimination. Chinese Australian groups were less studied, but of interest was a finding from qualitative research indicating that different views of who close family members are could impact on reported family history of cancer, which could in turn impact a risk assessment. Conclusion Interventions are needed to increase awareness and knowledge of genetic testing for cancer risk and to reduce the perceived stigma and taboo surrounding the topic of cancer in ethnic minority groups

  16. Awareness, knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes towards genetic testing for cancer risk among ethnic minority groups: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hann, Katie E J; Freeman, Madeleine; Fraser, Lindsay; Waller, Jo; Sanderson, Saskia C; Rahman, Belinda; Side, Lucy; Gessler, Sue; Lanceley, Anne

    2017-05-25

    Genetic testing for risk of hereditary cancer can help patients to make important decisions about prevention or early detection. US and UK studies show that people from ethnic minority groups are less likely to receive genetic testing. It is important to understand various groups' awareness of genetic testing and its acceptability to avoid further disparities in health care. This review aims to identify and detail awareness, knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes towards genetic counselling/testing for cancer risk prediction in ethnic minority groups. A search was carried out in PsycInfo, CINAHL, Embase and MEDLINE. Search terms referred to ethnicity, genetic testing/counselling, cancer, awareness, knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions. Quantitative and qualitative studies, written in English, and published between 2000 and 2015, were included. Forty-one studies were selected for review: 39 from the US, and two from Australia. Results revealed low awareness and knowledge of genetic counselling/testing for cancer susceptibility amongst ethnic minority groups including African Americans, Asian Americans, and Hispanics. Attitudes towards genetic testing were generally positive; perceived benefits included positive implications for personal health and being able to inform family. However, negative attitudes were also evident, particularly the anticipated emotional impact of test results, and concerns about confidentiality, stigma, and discrimination. Chinese Australian groups were less studied, but of interest was a finding from qualitative research indicating that different views of who close family members are could impact on reported family history of cancer, which could in turn impact a risk assessment. Interventions are needed to increase awareness and knowledge of genetic testing for cancer risk and to reduce the perceived stigma and taboo surrounding the topic of cancer in ethnic minority groups. More detailed research is needed in countries other than the US and

  17. Informed Choice in Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing for Alzheimer and Other Diseases: Lessons from Two Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messner, Donna A

    2011-01-01

    Health-related direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing has been a controversial practice. Especially problematic is predictive testing for Alzheimer disease (AD), since the disease is incurable, prevention is inconclusive, and testing does not definitively predict an individual's future disease status. In this paper, I examine two contrasting cases of subjects who learn through genetic testing that they have an elevated risk of developing AD later in life. In these cases, the subject's emotional response to the result is related to how well prepared she was for the real-life personal implications of possible test results. Analysis leads to the conclusion that when groups of health-related genetic tests are offered as packages by DTC companies, informed consumer choice is rendered impossible. Moreover, I argue, this marketing approach contravenes U.S. Federal Trade Commission policies for non-deceptive commercial communications. I conclude by suggesting ways to improve the prospects for informed consumer choice in DTC testing.

  18. [Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer - indications for genetic testing, counseling and options for mutation carriers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürki, Nicole

    2010-07-01

    Nowadays, women develop breast and ovarian cancer more and more early. Therefore, gynecologists and primary care physicians encounter the question, whether one of their patients has a genetic predisposition for cancer. They are crucial in initiating a referral for genetic counseling as well as in caring for high risk individuals coming up with questions concerning intensified cancer screening, chemoprevention or prophylactic surgery.This review presents the actual knowledge in these topics and delivers the molecular basis of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer mainly due to mutations in the genes BRCA1 and BRCA2. Problematic aspects of the penetrance of these gene mutations are shown and its role in counseling. The important details of the personal and family history, which influence the risk assessment, are pointed out. Tools for the risk calculation are presented as well as criteria for referral for genetic counseling. The important questions, which have to be addressed in pre- and post-test counseling, are discussed. Finally, the options for women with an inherited predisposition in order to reduce their cancer risk are presented. Each of the three management options 'intensified cancer screening', 'chemoprevention' and 'prophylactic surgery' is discussed thoroughly. Recommended cancer screening in male mutation carriers are mentioned as well.

  19. Bringing together linguistic and genetic evidence to test the Bantu expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Filippo, Cesare; Bostoen, Koen; Stoneking, Mark; Pakendorf, Brigitte

    2012-01-01

    The expansion of Bantu languages represents one of the most momentous events in the history of Africa. While it is well accepted that Bantu languages spread from their homeland (Cameroon/Nigeria) approximately 5000 years ago (ya), there is no consensus about the timing and geographical routes underlying this expansion. Two main models of Bantu expansion have been suggested: The ‘early-split’ model claims that the most recent ancestor of Eastern languages expanded north of the rainforest towards the Great Lakes region approximately 4000 ya, while the ‘late-split’ model proposes that Eastern languages diversified from Western languages south of the rainforest approximately 2000 ya. Furthermore, it is unclear whether the language dispersal was coupled with the movement of people, raising the question of language shift versus demic diffusion. We use a novel approach taking into account both the spatial and temporal predictions of the two models and formally test these predictions with linguistic and genetic data. Our results show evidence for a demic diffusion in the genetic data, which is confirmed by the correlations between genetic and linguistic distances. While there is little support for the early-split model, the late-split model shows a relatively good fit to the data. Our analyses demonstrate that subsequent contact among languages/populations strongly affected the signal of the initial migration via isolation by distance. PMID:22628476

  20. Estimation of genetic parameters for test-day milk yield in Holstein cows using a random regression model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Araujo Cobuci

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Test-day milk yield records of 11,023 first-parity Holstein cows were used to estimate genetic parameters for milk yield during different lactation periods. (Covariance components were estimated using two random regression models, RRM1 and RRM2, and the restricted maximum likelihood method, compared by the likelihood ratio test. Additive genetic variances determined by RRM1 and additive genetic and permanent environmental variances estimated by RRM2 were described, using the Wilmink function. Residual variance was constant throughout lactation for the two models. The heritability estimates obtained by RRM1 (0.34 to 0.56 were higher than those obtained by RRM2 (0.15 to 0.31. Due to the high heritability estimates for milk yield throughout lactation and the negative genetic correlation between test-day yields during different lactation periods, the RRM1 model did not fit the data. Overall, genetic correlations between individual test days tended to decrease at the extremes of the lactation trajectory, showing values close to unity for adjacent test days. The inclusion of random regression coefficients to describe permanent environmental effects led to a more precise estimation of genetic and non-genetic effects that influence milk yield.

  1. The importance to update the guidelines for the use of genetic testing in noncancer patients in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirzah Braz Petta Lajus

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian National Regulatory Agency for Private Health Insurance and Plans has recently published a technical note defining the criteria for the coverage of genetic testing to diagnose hereditary cancer. In this study we show the case of a patient with a breast lesion and an extensive history of cancer referred to a private service of genetic counseling. The patient met both criteria for hereditary breast and colorectal cancer syndrome screening. Her private insurance denied coverage for genetic testing because she lacks current or previous cancer diagnosis. After she appealed by lawsuit, the court was favorable and the test was performed using next-generation sequencing. A deletion of MLH1 exon 8 was found. We highlight the importance to offer genetic testing using multigene analysis for noncancer patients.

  2. Genetic tests for ecological and allopatric speciation in anoles on an island archipelago.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger S Thorpe

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available From Darwin's study of the Galapagos and Wallace's study of Indonesia, islands have played an important role in evolutionary investigations, and radiations within archipelagos are readily interpreted as supporting the conventional view of allopatric speciation. Even during the ongoing paradigm shift towards other modes of speciation, island radiations, such as the Lesser Antillean anoles, are thought to exemplify this process. Geological and molecular phylogenetic evidence show that, in this archipelago, Martinique anoles provide several examples of secondary contact of island species. Four precursor island species, with up to 8 mybp divergence, met when their islands coalesced to form the current island of Martinique. Moreover, adjacent anole populations also show marked adaptation to distinct habitat zonation, allowing both allopatric and ecological speciation to be tested in this system. We take advantage of this opportunity of replicated island coalescence and independent ecological adaptation to carry out an extensive population genetic study of hypervariable neutral nuclear markers to show that even after these very substantial periods of spatial isolation these putative allospecies show less reproductive isolation than conspecific populations in adjacent habitats in all three cases of subsequent island coalescence. The degree of genetic interchange shows that while there is always a significant genetic signature of past allopatry, and this may be quite strong if the selection regime allows, there is no case of complete allopatric speciation, in spite of the strong primae facie case for it. Importantly there is greater genetic isolation across the xeric/rainforest ecotone than is associated with any secondary contact. This rejects the development of reproductive isolation in allopatric divergence, but supports the potential for ecological speciation, even though full speciation has not been achieved in this case. It also explains the

  3. Utilization and Outcomes of BRCA Genetic Testing and Counseling in a National Commercially Insured Population: The ABOUT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Joanne; Toscano, Michele; Kotchko, Nancy; Friedman, Sue; Schwartz, Marc D; Virgo, Katherine S; Lynch, Kristian; Andrews, James E; Aguado Loi, Claudia X; Bauer, Joseph E; Casares, Carolina; Bourquardez Clark, Elizabeth; Kondoff, Matthew R; Molina, Ashley D; Abdollahian, Mehrnaz; Walker, Gregg; Sutphen, Rebecca

    2015-12-01

    BRCA genetic testing has substantial public health impact, yet little is known of the real-world experiences of the more than 100 000 Americans undergoing testing annually. To identify factors associated with use of BRCA testing, assess whether delivery of genetic counseling and testing services adheres to professional guidelines, and measure the impact on patient-reported outcomes. The American BRCA Outcomes and Utilization of Testing (ABOUT) Study analyzed data from a consecutive national series of 11 159 women whose clinicians ordered BRCA testing between December 2011 and December 2012. Aetna mailed recruitment information across the United States to commercial health plan members whose clinicians had ordered BRCA testing. A total of 3874 women (34.7%) completed questionnaires. Deidentified clinician-reported data from all respondents and a random sample of 2613 nonrespondents were also analyzed. The proportion of eligible participants who met testing criteria and respondents' report of receiving genetic counseling by a genetics clinician and its association with BRCA knowledge, understanding, and satisfaction were assessed. Among 3628 women respondents whose clinicians ordered comprehensive BRCA testing, most were white non-Hispanic (2502 [69.0%]), college educated (2953 [81.4%]), married (2751 [75.8%]), and had higher incomes (2011 [55.4%]). Approximately 16.4% (596) did not meet testing criteria. Mutations were identified in 161 (5.3%) of these women who received comprehensive testing. Only 1334 (36.8%) reported receiving genetic counseling from a genetics clinician prior to testing; the lowest rates (130 [12.3%]) were among patients of obstetrician/gynecologists. The most commonly reported reason for not receiving this clinical service was lack of clinician recommendation. Those who received it demonstrated greater knowledge about BRCA (mean score difference adjusted for demographics and clinician specialty, β = 0.99 [95% CI, 0.83-1.14]; P BRCA genetic

  4. Development of the Harlem Witness Program for Educating Urban African American Women about Genetic Testing for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis

    2001-01-01

    ... %. As the vast majority of research in this area has focused on White women, it is not clear what hinders African American women in undergoing-genetic counseling and testing. In addition, most of the published studies that included African American women in their samples did not focus on culture-specific factors that may affect African American women's decisions to undergo genetic counseling/testing.

  5. Direct-to-consumer online genetic testing and the four principles: an analysis of the ethical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, Katherine; Cook, E David; Helzlsouer, Kathy

    2006-01-01

    The development of genetic tests marketed and sold direct-to-consumers (DTC) via the internet raises moral concerns and debate about their appropriateness and ethical and clinical significance. These tests are offered for a wide range of diseases and conditions, and the mutations have variable penetrance and associated risk. A number of these tests lack data on their accuracy and reliability, making interpretation of results difficult. DTC genetic testing is undertaken outside the context of the physician-patient relationship and may lack appropriate individual and family genetic counseling, leaving the consumer vulnerable to potential harms, such as misinterpretation of results, including false positive or false reassurance, with limited or no benefits. Beauchamp and Childress's four principles of biomedical ethics provide a framework for analyzing the ethical issues raised by DTC genetic testing. We argue that the potential harms outweigh the potential benefits of such tests, that respect for autonomy should be limited in light of potential harm from DTC testing, and that the availability of genetic testing over the internet may be considered unfair and unjust and affect resource allocation by placing an unfair burden on primary care physicians. In light of the moral issues posed by these tests, practical responses are suggested in the areas of consumer education, medical education, and interaction with commercial companies.

  6. Properties of global- and local-ancestry adjustments in genetic association tests in admixed populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Eden R; Tunc, Ilker; Liu, Zhi; Slifer, Susan H; Beecham, Ashley H; Beecham, Gary W

    2018-03-01

    Population substructure can lead to confounding in tests for genetic association, and failure to adjust properly can result in spurious findings. Here we address this issue of confounding by considering the impact of global ancestry (average ancestry across the genome) and local ancestry (ancestry at a specific chromosomal location) on regression parameters and relative power in ancestry-adjusted and -unadjusted models. We examine theoretical expectations under different scenarios for population substructure; applying different regression models, verifying and generalizing using simulations, and exploring the findings in real-world admixed populations. We show that admixture does not lead to confounding when the trait locus is tested directly in a single admixed population. However, if there is more complex population structure or a marker locus in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with the trait locus is tested, both global and local ancestry can be confounders. Additionally, we show the genotype parameters of adjusted and unadjusted models all provide tests for LD between the marker and trait locus, but in different contexts. The local ancestry adjusted model tests for LD in the ancestral populations, while tests using the unadjusted and the global ancestry adjusted models depend on LD in the admixed population(s), which may be enriched due to different ancestral allele frequencies. Practically, this implies that global-ancestry adjustment should be used for screening, but local-ancestry adjustment may better inform fine mapping and provide better effect estimates at trait loci. © 2017 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  7. Fluorescence in situ hybridization in combination with the comet assay and micronucleus test in genetic toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hovhannisyan Galina G

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Comet assay and micronucleus (MN test are widely applied in genotoxicity testing and biomonitoring. While comet assay permits to measure direct DNA-strand breaking capacity of a tested agent MN test allows estimating the induced amount of chromosome and/or genome mutations. The potential of these two methods can be enhanced by the combination with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH techniques. FISH plus comet assay allows the recognition of targets of DNA damage and repairing directly. FISH combined with MN test is able to characterize the occurrence of different chromosomes in MN and to identify potential chromosomal targets of mutagenic substances. Thus, combination of FISH with the comet assay or MN test proved to be promising techniques for evaluation of the distribution of DNA and chromosome damage in the entire genome of individual cells. FISH technique also permits to study comet and MN formation, necessary for correct application of these methods. This paper reviews the relevant literature on advantages and limitations of Comet-FISH and MN-FISH assays application in genetic toxicology.

  8. Genetic analysis of results of a Swedish behavior test on German Shepherd Dogs and Labrador Retrievers1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waaij, van der E.H.; Wilsson, E.; Strandberg, E.

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate genetic parameters and the influence of systematic effects on behavior test results in dogs. Behavior test results on 1,813 Labrador Retrievers (LR) and 2,757 German Shepherd Dogs (GSD) were analyzed. The behavior test included observations on courage,

  9. Knowledge and attitudes towards genetic testing: a two year follow-up study in patients with asthma, diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calsbeek, Hiske; Morren, M.; Rijken, M.; Bensing, J.

    Adequate knowledge and personal attitudes towards DNA-testing are major determinants of optimal utilization of genetic testing. This study aims to (1) assess the genetic knowledge and attitude towards genetic testing of patients with asthma, diabetes mellitus type II and cardiovascular diseases,

  10. Genetic testing of aetiology of intellectual disability in a dedicated physical healthcare outpatient clinic for adults with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, R A

    2016-02-01

    No guidelines exist for assessment of aetiology of intellectual disability in adults with intellectual disability by adult physicians, although robust guidelines exist for paediatric populations. It was speculated that the paediatric guidelines would also be suitable for adults. In rural/regional setting with limited clinical genetics, to perform a quality assurance evaluation on genetics assessment of aetiology of developmental disability in adults attending a dedicated healthcare clinic for adults with intellectual disability, compared results with paediatric standards, speculates if these seem appropriate for adults and speculates on a role for clinical genetics services. Retrospective chart audit of eligible patients looking at genetic clinical assessment, tests selected (molecular karyotype, G banding, metabolics), and yields of positive results. The results were compared with the recommended paediatric guidelines. Of 117 eligible adult patients, ideal genetic history was incomplete for 40% of patients without Down syndrome because of physician cause and lack of information. The number of abnormal genetic results increased from 46% to 66%, mainly from the molecular karyotype, though not all may have been clinically relevant. The improved yield from this test was similar to that in paediatric studies. Use of G banding and metabolic testing could be refined. Improvement can be made in clinical genetic assessment, but results generally support use of molecular karyotyping as first tier testing of cause of unknown intellectual disability in adults, as in the case for paediatric populations. The study highlights a necessary complementary role for clinical geneticists to interpret abnormal results. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  11. Genetic testing of canine degenerative myelopathy in the South African Boxer dog population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth E. Zeiler

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Canine degenerative myelopathy (DM is a progressive disease process that is diagnosed late in life and mainly affects the pelvic limbs. Factors that make an ante-mortem definitive diagnosis of DM include: an insidious onset and clinical manifestation that mimics other disease processes of the pelvic limbs (hip dysplasia, cranial cruciate ligament rupture, etc. or there may even be concurrent disease processes, old-age onset and lack of reliable diagnostic methods. Until recently, South African dog owners had to submit samples to laboratories overseas for genetic testing in order to confirm an affected dog (homozygous A/A and to aid in the ante-mortem diagnosis of DM. Only affected dogs have been confirmed to manifest the clinical signs of DM. This study aimed to verify whether genetic testing by a local genetic laboratory was possible in order to detect a missense mutation of the superoxide dismutase gene (SOD1 that is implicated in causing the clinical signs of DM. The study also aimed to detect and map the inheritance of this disease process in a local Boxer dog population where the pedigree of the sampled population was known. Venous blood collected from Boxer dogs using a simple random sampling technique. The samples were genotyped for the SOD1:c.118G>A polymorphism. Carrier and affected Boxer dogs were detected. A pedigree that demonstrated the significance of inheriting a carrier or affected state in the population was mapped. The present study concludes that genotyping of the missense mutation in Boxer dogs is possible in South Africa. There are carrier and affected Boxer dogs in the local population, making DM a plausible diagnosis in aged dogs presenting with pelvic limb pathology.

  12. Genetic testing for breast cancer susceptibility: awareness and interest among women in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambor, E S; Rimer, B K; Strigo, T S

    1997-01-10

    Previous research has suggested that demand for genetic testing for breast cancer susceptibility may be quite high, even among those at relatively low risk of carrying a mutation. This study examined the extent to which a group of female HMO enrollees were aware of the discovery of the BRCA1 gene and, without having received detailed information about the test, whether they would be interested in being tested to find out if they have the gene. Factors associated with awareness of and interest in testing were also examined. Four hundred seventy-three women age 50 and over, almost all of whom did not have an increased risk of breast cancer based on family history, were surveyed by telephone. Fifty-one percent of respondents had heard about the discovery of a breast cancer gene. In logistic regression analysis, women who described themselves as comfortable financially, had at least some college education, and were premenopausal were more likely to have heard of the gene discovery than women who were not comfortable financially, had no more than a high school education, and were postmenopausal. Sixty-nine percent of the respondents said that they would be interested in being tested to find out if they had a breast cancer gene. Women who were younger than 60, white, believed their family would benefit if they had a mammogram, and believed that regular mammograms give them a feeling of control over their health, were more likely to be interested in testing than those who were 60 or older, African-American or other, and did not believe that their family would benefit if they had a mammogram or that mammograms give them a feeling of control over their health. These findings have implications for education and counseling. Women who express an interest in being tested must be made fully aware of the limitations and possible consequences of testing. Special efforts may be needed to make information about testing available to women who have low levels of education.

  13. Efficacy of clinical diagnostic criteria for familial hypercholesterolemia genetic testing in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickiewicz, Agnieszka; Chmara, Magdalena; Futema, Marta; Fijalkowski, Marcin; Chlebus, Krzysztof; Galaska, Rafał; Bandurski, Tomasz; Pajkowski, Marcin; Zuk, Monika; Wasag, Bartosz; Limon, Janusz; Rynkiewicz, Andrzej; Gruchala, Marcin

    2016-06-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), which leads to premature cardiovascular events, still remains underrecognized and undertreated in most countries. Untreated FH individuals aged 20-39 years are at 100-fold higher risk of mortality from coronary heart disease compared to those of a general population. Therefore, special efforts should be implemented to diagnose FH patients at early stages of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the revised Dutch Lipid Clinic Network (DLCN) criteria proposed by the Polish Lipid Experts Forum to select index FH patients for DNA mutational analysis in Poland. The study included 193 unrelated adult patients (mean age 48 ± 13 years) with clinical diagnosis of FH based on the revised DLCN score, tested sequentially for mutations in LDLR and APOB genes using bidirectional Sanger sequencing and MLPA techniques. The cut-off points of the clinical FH criteria score were assessed by ROC statistics to identify patients with the highest probability of carrying an FH-causing mutation. The causal heterozygous LDLR or APOB mutation was identified in 41% (80/193) of probands. Adults aged <40 years were more likely to carry an FH-causing mutation compared to subjects aged ≥40 years (65% vs. 33%; p < 0.001). LDL-C thresholds for the molecular diagnosis of FH were 5.79 mmol/l for individuals aged<40 and 6.7 mmol/l for subjects ≥40 years old. The threshold values of the clinical diagnostic score for efficient selection of patients for genetic testing were 5 and 7 points for individuals aged <40 and ≥40 years, respectively. The study validated the efficacy of proposed clinical FH criteria for the disease diagnosis in Poland. The clinical criteria score thresholds for positive FH molecular diagnosis differ depending on age (<40 and ≥40 years). We propose that in the healthcare systems with limited genetic testing resources individuals younger than 40 years, who fulfill the clinical criteria for possible

  14. Psychological impact of genetic testing for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiser, B; Collins, V; Warren, R; Gaff, C; St John, D J B; Young, M-A; Harrop, K; Brown, J; Halliday, J

    2004-12-01

    The psychological impact of predictive genetic testing for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) was assessed in 114 individuals (32 carriers and 82 non-carriers) attending familial cancer clinics, using mailed self-administered questionnaires prior to, 2 weeks, 4 months and 12 months after carrier status disclosure. Compared to baseline, carriers showed a significant increase in mean scores for intrusive and avoidant thoughts about colorectal cancer 2 weeks (t = 2.49; p = 0.014) and a significant decrease in mean depression scores 2 weeks post-notification of result (t = -3.98; p depression scores 2 weeks, 4 months and 12 months post-notification. Significant decreases from baseline for mean state anxiety scores were also observed for non-carriers 2 weeks post-notification (t = -3.99; p < 0.001). These data indicate that predictive genetic testing for HNPCC leads to psychological benefits amongst non-carriers, and no adverse psychological outcomes were observed amongst carriers.

  15. Retrospective Binary-Trait Association Test Elucidates Genetic Architecture of Crohn Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Duo; Zhong, Sheng; McPeek, Mary Sara

    2016-01-01

    In genetic association testing, failure to properly control for population structure can lead to severely inflated type 1 error and power loss. Meanwhile, adjustment for relevant covariates is often desirable and sometimes necessary to protect against spurious association and to improve power. Many recent methods to account for population structure and covariates are based on linear mixed models (LMMs), which are primarily designed for quantitative traits. For binary traits, however, LMM is a misspecified model and can lead to deteriorated performance. We propose CARAT, a binary-trait association testing approach based on a mixed-effects quasi-likelihood framework, which exploits the dichotomous nature of the trait and achieves computational efficiency through estimating equations. We show in simulation studies that CARAT consistently outperforms existing methods and maintains high power in a wide range of population structure settings and trait models. Furthermore, CARAT is based on a retrospective approach, which is robust to misspecification of the phenotype model. We apply our approach to a genome-wide analysis of Crohn disease, in which we replicate association with 17 previously identified regions. Moreover, our analysis on 5p13.1, an extensively reported region of association, shows evidence for the presence of multiple independent association signals in the region. This example shows how CARAT can leverage known disease risk factors to shed light on the genetic architecture of complex traits. PMID:26833331

  16. The genetic basis of female reproductive disorders: Etiology and clinical testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layman, Lawrence C.

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of improved molecular biology techniques, the genetic basis of an increasing number of reproductive disorders has been elucidated. Mutations in at least 20 genes cause hypogonadotropic hypogonadism including Kallmann syndrome in about 35–40% of patients. The two most commonly involved genes are FGFR1 and CHD7. When combined pituitary hormone deficiency includes hypogonadotropic hypogonadism as a feature, PROP1 mutations are the most common of the six genes involved. For hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, mutations in 14 genes cause gonadal failure in 15% of affected females, most commonly in FMR1. In eugonadal disorders, activating FSHR mutations have been identified for spontaneous ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome; and WNT4 mutations have been described in mullerian aplasia. For other eugonadal disorders, such as endometriosis, polycystic ovary syndrome, and leiomyomata, specific germline gene mutations have not been identified, but some chromosomal regions are associated with the corresponding phenotype. Practical genetic testing is possible to perform in both hypogonadotropic and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and spontaneous ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. However, clinical testing for endometriosis, polycystic ovary syndrome, and leiomyomata is not currently practical for the clinician. PMID:23499866

  17. Cumulative BRCA mutation analysis in the Greek population confirms that homogenous ethnic background facilitates genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigginou, Alexandra; Vlachopoulos, Fotios; Arzimanoglou, Iordanis; Zagouri, Flora; Dimitrakakis, Constantine

    2015-01-01

    Screening for BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 mutations has long moved from the research lab to the clinic as a routine clinical genetic testing. BRCA molecular alteration pattern varies among ethnic groups which makes it already a less straightforward process to select the appropriate mutations for routine genetic testing on the basis of known clinical significance. The present report comprises an in depth literature review of the so far reported BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 molecular alterations in Greek families. Our analysis of Greek cumulative BRCA 1 and 2 molecular data, produced by several independent groups, confirmed that six recurrent deleterious mutations account for almost 60 % and 70 % of all BRCA 1 and 2 and BRCA 1 mutations, respectively. As a result, it makes more sense to perform BRCA mutation analysis in the clinic in two sequential steps, first conventional analysis for the six most prevalent pathogenic mutations and if none identified, a second step of New Generation Sequencing-based whole genome or whole exome sequencing would follow. Our suggested approach would enable more clinically meaningful, considerably easier and less expensive BRCA analysis in the Greek population which is considered homogenous.

  18. Genetic testing in infantile spasms identifies a chromosome 13q deletion and retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kevin; Minassian, Berge A

    2014-05-01

    Infantile spasms is an epileptic encephalopathy and the common final manifestation of numerous disparate insults to the developing brain during infancy. The varied etiologies may be structural, metabolic, genetic, or unknown. Etiological diagnosis is important as it may lead to specific therapy, which may affect developmental outcome. We report a case of infantile spasms of unknown etiology with dysmorphic features, in which genetic copy number variation microarray testing was included in the investigation of the cause of the disease. A large deletion of chromosome 13 was identified in the region 13q13 to 13q21.3 encompassing the retinoblastoma gene (13q14.2). Urgent ophthalmological evaluation revealed an asymptomatic retinoblastoma of the left eye, leading to early treatment. This is the first case report of infantile spasms specifically associated with a chromosome 13q deletion. Chromosomal region 13q13 to 13q21.3 may contain one or more genes whose hemizygous loss leads to infantile spasms. Copy number variation testing for cryptogenic infantile spasms led to the discovery of a mutation responsible for retinoblastoma, enabling early diagnosis and treatment of a potentially life-threatening cancer. High-sensitivity molecular diagnosis improves health care and substantially reduces expenses. This shift in diagnostic evaluation is broadly relevant to health care. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Non-invasive prenatal genetic testing: a study of public attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, S E; Farrimond, H R

    2012-01-01

    Non-invasive prenatal genetic diagnostic (NIPD) tests are being developed using cell-free fetal DNA in the maternal circulation. NIPD tests avoid or reduce the need for invasive diagnostic procedures for conditions like Down syndrome. Discussion of ethical and social implications of these techniques is increasing. We report findings from a study of public attitudes relevant to the introduction of NIPD. A key aim was to examine the range of attitudes relevant to NIPD within a diverse sample. Qualitative analysis of written free text 'first responses' to a written neutral description of NIPD as part of a Q-methodology study conducted with a purposive sample of the UK population (n = 71). The majority (63%) of respondents described their first response as positive. However, respondents displayed ambivalence, expressing positive views of individual/medical rationale for NIPD and unease concerning public health rationale and societal implications. Unease related to eugenic reasoning underlying existing prenatal testing, 'too much control' in reproduction, commercial provision, information and support requirements for expanded testing, and limiting the use of testing. These findings suggest that regulating and monitoring commercial provision of NIPD services, and monitoring introduction and clinical use, are a public preference. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Adaptive Test Selection for Factorization-based Surrogate Fitness in Genetic Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krawiec Krzysztof

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Genetic programming (GP is a variant of evolutionary algorithm where the entities undergoing simulated evolution are computer programs. A fitness function in GP is usually based on a set of tests, each of which defines the desired output a correct program should return for an exemplary input. The outcomes of interactions between programs and tests in GP can be represented as an interaction matrix, with rows corresponding to programs in the current population and columns corresponding to tests. In previous work, we proposed SFIMX, a method that performs only a fraction of interactions and employs non-negative matrix factorization to estimate the outcomes of remaining ones, shortening GP’s runtime. In this paper, we build upon that work and propose three extensions of SFIMX, in which the subset of tests drawn to perform interactions is selected with respect to test difficulty. The conducted experiment indicates that the proposed extensions surpass the original SFIMX on a suite of discrete GP benchmarks.

  1. Genetic analysis of somatic cell score in Danish dairy cattle using ramdom regression test-day model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsaid, Reda; Sabry, Ayman; Lund, Mogens Sandø

    2011-01-01

    and heterosis) and stage of lactation as a fifth order normalized Legendre polynomial (LP) combined with a Wilmink term (exp(− 0.09*DIM)). Random effects were co-variance functions for PE and additive genetic effects. The first and second data sets were analyzed using two classes of models. In the first class......The objective of this study was to estimate the genetic and permanent environmental (PE) covariance functions for test-day records of logarithm of somatic cell count (SCS) of the first lactation for Danish Holstein cattle, and to test the hypotheses that: genetic and environmental variances change...... over first lactation, genetic correlations are near unity between any time points in first lactation, and including a Wilmink term will improve the likelihood of more than an extra order Legendre polynomial. Ten data sets, consisting of 1,190,584 test day somatic cell count (SCC) records from 149...

  2. Comparison of Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization and Chromogenic In Situ Hybridization for Low and High Throughput HER2 Genetic Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Tim S; Espersen, Maiken Lise Marcker; Kofoed, Vibeke

    2013-01-01

    cancer patients with HER2 immunohistochemistry (IHC) results scored as 0/1+, 2+, and 3+. HER2 genetic status was analysed using chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Scoring results were documented through digital image analysis. The cancer region...... of interest was identified from a serial H&E stained slide following tissue cores were transferred to a tissue microarrays (TMA). When using TMA in a routine flow, all patients will be tested for HER2 status with IHC followed by CISH or FISH, thereby providing individual HER2 results. In conclusion, our...... results show that the differences between the HER2 genetic assays do not have an effect on the analytic performance and the CISH technology is superior to high throughput HER2 genetic testing due to scanning speed, while the IQ-FISH may still be a choice for fast low throughput HER2 genetic testing....

  3. A Systematic Review of Genetic Testing and Lifestyle Behaviour Change: Are We Using High-Quality Genetic Interventions and Considering Behaviour Change Theory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Justine; Madill, Janet; O'Connor, Colleen; Shelley, Jacob; Gilliland, Jason

    2018-04-10

    Studying the impact of genetic testing interventions on lifestyle behaviour change has been a priority area of research in recent years. Substantial heterogeneity exists in the results and conclusions of this literature, which has yet to be explained using validated behaviour change theory and an assessment of the quality of genetic interventions. The theory of planned behaviour (TPB) helps to explain key contributors to behaviour change. It has been hypothesized that personalization could be added to this theory to help predict changes in health behaviours. This systematic review provides a detailed, comprehensive identification, assessment, and summary of primary research articles pertaining to lifestyle behaviour change (nutrition, physical activity, sleep, and smoking) resulting from genetic testing interventions. The present review further aims to provide in-depth analyses of studies conducted to date within the context of the TPB and the quality of genetic interventions provided to participants while aiming to determine whether or not genetic testing facilitates changes in lifestyle habits. This review is timely in light of a recently published "call-to-action" paper, highlighting the need to incorporate the TPB into personalized healthcare behaviour change research. Three bibliographic databases, one key website, and article reference lists were searched for relevant primary research articles. The PRISMA Flow Diagram and PRISMA Checklist were used to guide the search strategy and manuscript preparation. Out of 32,783 titles retrieved, 26 studies met the inclusion criteria. Three quality assessments were conducted and included: (1) risk of bias, (2) quality of genetic interventions, and (3) consideration of theoretical underpinnings - primarily the TPB. Risk of bias in studies was overall rated to be "fair." Consideration of the TPB was "poor," with no study making reference to this validated theory. While some studies (n = 11; 42%) made reference to other

  4. An Efficient Stepwise Statistical Test to Identify Multiple Linked Human Genetic Variants Associated with Specific Phenotypic Traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iksoo Huh

    Full Text Available Recent advances in genotyping methodologies have allowed genome-wide association studies (GWAS to accurately identify genetic variants that associate with common or pathological complex traits. Although most GWAS have focused on associations with single genetic variants, joint identification of multiple genetic variants, and how they interact, is essential for understanding the genetic architecture of complex phenotypic traits. Here, we propose an efficient stepwise method based on the Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test (for stratified categorical data to identify causal joint multiple genetic variants in GWAS. This method combines the CMH statistic with a stepwise procedure to detect multiple genetic variants associated with specific categorical traits, using a series of associated I × J contingency tables and a null hypothesis of no phenotype association. Through a new stratification scheme based on the sum of minor allele count criteria, we make the method more feasible for GWAS data having sample sizes of several thousands. We also examine the properties of the proposed stepwise method via simulation studies, and show that the stepwise CMH test performs better than other existing methods (e.g., logistic regression and detection of associations by Markov blanket for identifying multiple genetic variants. Finally, we apply the proposed approach to two genomic sequencing datasets to detect linked genetic variants associated with bipolar disorder and obesity, respectively.

  5. Simple Algorithms to Calculate Asymptotic Null Distributions of Robust Tests in Case-Control Genetic Association Studies in R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wing Kam Fung

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The case-control study is an important design for testing association between genetic markers and a disease. The Cochran-Armitage trend test (CATT is one of the most commonly used statistics for the analysis of case-control genetic association studies. The asymptotically optimal CATT can be used when the underlying genetic model (mode of inheritance is known. However, for most complex diseases, the underlying genetic models are unknown. Thus, tests robust to genetic model misspecification are preferable to the model-dependant CATT. Two robust tests, MAX3 and the genetic model selection (GMS, were recently proposed. Their asymptotic null distributions are often obtained by Monte-Carlo simulations, because they either have not been fully studied or involve multiple integrations. In this article, we study how components of each robust statistic are correlated, and find a linear dependence among the components. Using this new finding, we propose simple algorithms to calculate asymptotic null distributions for MAX3 and GMS, which greatly reduce the computing intensity. Furthermore, we have developed the R package Rassoc implementing the proposed algorithms to calculate the empirical and asymptotic p values for MAX3 and GMS as well as other commonly used tests in case-control association studies. For illustration, Rassoc is applied to the analysis of case-control data of 17 most significant SNPs reported in four genome-wide association studies.

  6. Development of a genomic DNA reference material panel for Rett syndrome (MECP2-related disorders) genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalman, Lisa V; Tarleton, Jack C; Percy, Alan K; Aradhya, Swaroop; Bale, Sherri; Barker, Shannon D; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Bridges, Christina; Buller-Burckle, Arlene M; Das, Soma; Iyer, Ramaswamy K; Vo, Timothy D; Zvereff, Val V; Toji, Lorraine H

    2014-03-01

    Rett syndrome is a dominant X-linked disorder caused by point mutations (approximately 80%) or by deletions or insertions (approximately 15% to 18%) in the MECP2 gene. It is most common in females but lethal in males, with a distinctly different phenotype. Rett syndrome patients have severe neurological and behavioral problems. Clinical genetic testing laboratories commonly use characterized genomic DNA reference materials to assure the quality of the testing process; however, none are commercially available for MECP2 genetic testing. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Genetic Testing Reference Material Coordination Program, in collaboration with the genetic testing community and the Coriell Cell Repositories, established 27 new cell lines and characterized the MECP2 mutations in these and in 8 previously available cell lines. DNA samples from the 35 cell lines were tested by eight clinical genetic testing laboratories using DNA sequence analysis and methods to assess copy number (multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, semiquantitative PCR, or array-based comparative genomic hybridization). The eight common point mutations known to cause approximately 60% of Rett syndrome cases were identified, as were other MECP2 variants, including deletions, duplications, and frame shift and splice-site mutations. Two of the 35 samples were from males with MECP2 duplications. These MECP2 and other characterized genomic DNA samples are publicly available from the NIGMS Repository at the Coriell Cell Repositories. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of genomic DNA reference materials for genetic testing of disorders common in people of ashkenazi jewish descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalman, Lisa; Wilson, Jean Amos; Buller, Arlene; Dixon, John; Edelmann, Lisa; Geller, Louis; Highsmith, William Edward; Holtegaard, Leonard; Kornreich, Ruth; Rohlfs, Elizabeth M; Payeur, Toby L; Sellers, Tina; Toji, Lorraine; Muralidharan, Kasinathan

    2009-11-01

    Many recessive genetic disorders are found at a higher incidence in people of Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) descent than in the general population. The American College of Medical Genetics and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists have recommended that individuals of AJ descent undergo carrier screening for Tay Sachs disease, Canavan disease, familial dysautonomia, mucolipidosis IV, Niemann-Pick disease type A, Fanconi anemia type C, Bloom syndrome, and Gaucher disease. Although these recommendations have led to increased test volumes and number of laboratories offering AJ screening, well-characterized genomic reference materials are not publicly available. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-based Genetic Testing Reference Materials Coordination Program, in collaboration with members of the genetic testing community and Coriell Cell Repositories, have developed a panel of characterized genomic reference materials for AJ genetic testing. DNA from 31 cell lines, representing many of the common alleles for Tay Sachs disease, Canavan disease, familial dysautonomia, mucolipidosis IV, Niemann-Pick disease type A, Fanconi anemia type C, Bloom syndrome, Gaucher disease, and glycogen storage disease, was prepared by the Repository and tested in six clinical laboratories using three different PCR-based assay platforms. A total of 33 disease alleles was assayed and 25 different alleles were identified. These characterized materials are publicly available from Coriell and may be used for quality control, proficiency testing, test development, and research.

  8. A novel automated behavioral test battery assessing cognitive rigidity in two genetic mouse models of autism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja ePuścian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive behaviors are a key feature of many pervasive developmental disorders, such as autism. As a heterogeneous group of symptoms, repetitive behaviors are conceptualized into two main subgroups: sensory/motor (lower-order and cognitive rigidity (higher-order. Although lower-order repetitive behaviors are measured in mouse models in several paradigms, so far there have been no high-throughput tests directly measuring cognitive rigidity. We describe a novel approach for monitoring repetitive behaviors during reversal learning in mice in the automated IntelliCage system. During the reward-motivated place preference reversal learning, designed to assess cognitive abilities of mice, visits to the previously rewarded places were recorded to measure cognitive flexibility. Thereafter, emotional flexibility was assessed by measuring conditioned fear extinction. Additionally, to look for neuronal correlates of cognitive impairments, we measured CA3-CA1 hippocampal long term potentiation (LTP. To standardize the designed tests we used C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice, representing two genetic backgrounds, for induction of autism by prenatal exposure to the sodium valproate. We found impairments of place learning related to perseveration and no LTP impairments in C57BL/6 valproate-treated mice. In contrast, BALB/c valproate-treated mice displayed severe deficits of place learning not associated with perseverative behaviors and accompanied by hippocampal LTP impairments. Alterations of cognitive flexibility observed in C57BL/6 valproate-treated mice were related to neither restricted exploration pattern nor to emotional flexibility. Altogether, we showed that the designed tests of cognitive performance and perseverative behaviors are efficient and highly replicable. Moreover, the results suggest that genetic background is crucial for the behavioral effects of prenatal valproate treatment.

  9. Detection limits of the strip test and PCR for genetically modified corn in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, V E; Von Pinho, É V R; Von Pinho, R G; do Nascimento, A D

    2012-08-16

    Brazilian legislation establishes a labeling limit for products that contain more than 1% material from genetically modified organisms (GMOs). We assessed the sensitivity of the lateral flow strip test in detection of the GMO corn varieties Bt11 and MON810 and the specificity and sensitivity of PCR techniques for their detection. For the strip test, the GMO seeds were mixed with conventional seeds at levels of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8% for Bt11, and 0.4, 0.8 and 1.6% for MON810. Three different methodologies were assessed and whole seeds, their endosperm and embryonic axis were used. For the PCR technique, the GMO seeds of each of the two varieties were mixed with conventional seeds at levels of 20, 10, 5, 2, 1, and 0.5%. The seeds were ground and the DNA extracted. For detection of the GMO material, specific primers were used for MON810 and Bt11 and maize zein as an endogenous control. The sensitivity of the strip test varied for both maize varieties and methodologies. The test was positive for Bt11 only at 0.8%, in contrast with the detection limit of 0.4% indicated by the manufacturer. In the multiplex PCR, the primers proved to be specific for the different varieties. These varieties were detected in samples with one GMO seed in 100. Thus, this technique proved to be efficient in detecting contaminations equal to or greater than 1%.

  10. The discourse around usefulness, morality, risk and trust: a focus group study on prenatal genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivetti, Monica; Montali, Lorenzo; Simonetti, Giorgia

    2012-12-01

    This study explores the underlying values and beliefs that guide women's reasoning on prenatal genetic test (PGT) uptake, as framed by their own words, during a group discussion, in a Catholic country such as Italy. Women's reasoning was explored by means of five focus group consisting of seven pregnant women and 13 new mothers. The focus group material content was analysed using the Nudist software. The discourse around PGT was rooted into four frames of reference: The usefulness dimension was used to express the positions in favour of PGT, whereas morality, risk and trust were used to express negative evaluations on such a technology. Participants advocated for themselves the choice of being tested, besides giving some credit to the partner's opinion. Moreover, participants reported little knowledge on PGT. The research shed some light on the frames of reference used by participants to build their positions on PGT uptake, confirming the public's ability to translate scientific accounts into personally meaningful information. A more complete understanding of the reasons for decisions to test would help counsellors to better communicate with women and couples, and to better assist them to make a better informed testing decision. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Examining the impact of genetic testing for type 2 diabetes on health behaviors: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voils Corrine I

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We describe the study design, procedures, and development of the risk counseling protocol used in a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the impact of genetic testing for diabetes mellitus (DM on psychological, health behavior, and clinical outcomes. Methods/Design Eligible patients are aged 21 to 65 years with body mass index (BMI ≥27 kg/m2 and no prior diagnosis of DM. At baseline, conventional DM risk factors are assessed, and blood is drawn for possible genetic testing. Participants are randomized to receive conventional risk counseling for DM with eye disease counseling or with genetic test results. The counseling protocol was pilot tested to identify an acceptable graphical format for conveying risk estimates and match the length of the eye disease to genetic counseling. Risk estimates are presented with a vertical bar graph denoting risk level with colors and descriptors. After receiving either genetic counseling regarding risk for DM or control counseling on eye disease, brief lifestyle counseling for prevention of DM is provided to all participants. Discussion A standardized risk counseling protocol is being used in a randomized trial of 600 participants. Results of this trial will inform policy about whether risk counseling should include genetic counseling. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01060540

  12. Responses to FTO genetic test feedback for obesity in a sample of overweight adults: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisel, S F; Wardle, J

    2014-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that genetic testing for obesity risk has limited affective or behavioral impact, but few studies have explored the effects among individuals who self-identify as having weight problems. Here, we report findings from in-depth telephone interviews with seven overweight or obese volunteers who were genotyped for one weight-related gene (FTO), which may offer interesting insights into motivations to seek out genetic testing and immediate reactions to it. All participants had a BMI > 25. The gene test identified one participant as homozygous for the 'higher-risk' variant (AA), three heterozygous (AT), and three homozygous for the 'lower-risk' variant (TT) of FTO. All participants said they took part to find an explanation for their personal struggle with weight control. Those with one or two higher-risk variants experienced relief and saw the result as confirming their private assumption that they were susceptible to weight gain for reasons perceived as 'external' to them. However, at the same time, they described themselves as more motivated to overcome their genetic predisposition. Those with lower-risk variants reported brief disappointment, but then focused on alternative explanations, reinforcing the multifactorial nature of obesity. Despite objectively low 'information value,' all individuals derived some 'personal' benefit from FTO genetic test feedback. However, improving education about the multifactorial nature of complex conditions is important to decrease polarized thinking and associated genetic determinism and stigma to derive the greatest benefits of novel genetic technologies for individuals and their health.

  13. Genealogical tree study as screening method in the Lynch syndrome prior to genetic test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Plasencia, Luciano; Medina-Arana, Vicente; Barrios Del Pino, Ysamar; Fernández-Peralta, Antonia; González-Aguilera, Juan J

    2010-08-01

    Despite genetic advances in the study of Lynch syndrome (LS), difficulties remain in the diagnosis of the syndrome. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of a detailed genealogical tree as a screening method to identify Tenerife island families with a high probability of LS. We elaborated complete genealogical trees of the families. According to the degree of fulfillment of the Amsterdam Criteria II, the genealogical trees were classified as high or low probability of LS. Additionally, we analyzed the level of tumor microsatellite instability (MSI+) and identified a mutation in exon 13 of the MSH2 gene by single-strand conformation polymorphism, sequencing, and PCR-RFLP. According the genealogical trees, we found 10 families with high probability of LS and 30 families with low probability of LS. The families with high probability of LS showed high MSI+ in all cases. Conversely, families with low probability were MSS (microsatellite stable). In 5 of the 10 families with high probability, we discovered a T-->G mutation in position 688 of exon 13 of MSH2, which appeared in all the family members with the tumor, except 1 patient with a retinoblastoma. Our results indicate that genealogical tree is a highly effective tool for classifying families with a high probability of Lynch Syndrome prior to genetic test.

  14. Near infrared spectrometric technique for testing fruit quality: optimisation of regression models using genetic algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isingizwe Nturambirwe, J. Frédéric; Perold, Willem J.; Opara, Umezuruike L.

    2016-02-01

    Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has gained extensive use in quality evaluation. It is arguably one of the most advanced spectroscopic tools in non-destructive quality testing of food stuff, from measurement to data analysis and interpretation. NIR spectral data are interpreted through means often involving multivariate statistical analysis, sometimes associated with optimisation techniques for model improvement. The objective of this research was to explore the extent to which genetic algorithms (GA) can be used to enhance model development, for predicting fruit quality. Apple fruits were used, and NIR spectra in the range from 12000 to 4000 cm-1 were acquired on both bruised and healthy tissues, with different degrees of mechanical damage. GAs were used in combination with partial least squares regression methods to develop bruise severity prediction models, and compared to PLS models developed using the full NIR spectrum. A classification model was developed, which clearly separated bruised from unbruised apple tissue. GAs helped improve prediction models by over 10%, in comparison with full spectrum-based models, as evaluated in terms of error of prediction (Root Mean Square Error of Cross-validation). PLS models to predict internal quality, such as sugar content and acidity were developed and compared to the versions optimized by genetic algorithm. Overall, the results highlighted the potential use of GA method to improve speed and accuracy of fruit quality prediction.

  15. Measurement of psychological factors associated with genetic testing for hereditary breast, ovarian and colon cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadaparampil, Susan T; Ropka, Mary; Stefanek, Michael E

    2005-01-01

    Despite numerous individual studies of psychological factors (depression, anxiety, distress) related to genetic testing for inherited cancer syndromes (CGT), there has been no systematic review of the psychological factors are measured among individuals at increased risk for hereditary breast, ovarian, or colon cancer. Our review provides an analysis of psychological factors in studies of CGT and discusses the instruments most commonly used to measure them. We performed a literature search using three major OVID databases from 1993 to January 2003. In the 19 studies that met our inclusion criteria, the most commonly assessed psychological factors were distress, anxiety, and depression. These factors were most often measured by the impact of event scale (IES), the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI), and the Centers for Epidemiologic Studies and Depression scale (CES-D), respectively. Our results show deficits in the existing body of literature on psychological factors associated with CGT including limited documentation of psychometrics and variability in instrumentation.

  16. PRESAGE: PRivacy-preserving gEnetic testing via SoftwAre Guard Extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Wang, Chenghong; Dai, Wenrui; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Mohammed, Noman; Al Aziz, Md Momin; Sadat, Md Nazmus; Sahinalp, Cenk; Lauter, Kristin; Wang, Shuang

    2017-07-26

    Advances in DNA sequencing technologies have prompted a wide range of genomic applications to improve healthcare and facilitate biomedical research. However, privacy and security concerns have emerged as a challenge for utilizing cloud computing to handle sensitive genomic data. We present one of the first implementations of Software Guard Extension (SGX) based securely outsourced genetic testing framework, which leverages multiple cryptographic protocols and minimal perfect hash scheme to enable efficient and secure data storage and computation outsourcing. We compared the performance of the proposed PRESAGE framework with the state-of-the-art homomorphic encryption scheme, as well as the plaintext implementation. The experimental results demonstrated significant performance over the homomorphic encryption methods and a small computational overhead in comparison to plaintext implementation. The proposed PRESAGE provides an alternative solution for secure and efficient genomic data outsourcing in an untrusted cloud by using a hybrid framework that combines secure hardware and multiple crypto protocols.

  17. Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test: Proxy for Verbal IQ in Genetic Studies of Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasileva, Kate E; Sanders, Stephan J; Bal, Vanessa Hus

    2017-04-01

    This study assessed the utility of a brief assessment (the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-4th Edition; PPVT4) as a proxy for verbal IQ (VIQ) in large-scale studies of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In a sample of 2,420 proband with ASD, PPVT4:IQ correlations were strong. PPVT4 scores were, on average, 5.46 points higher than VIQ; 79% of children had PPVT4 scores within one standard deviation (+/-15) of their VIQ and 90% were similarly classified as having abilities above or below 70 on both measures. Distributions of PPVT4 and VIQ by de novo mutation status were highly similar. These results strongly support the utility of PPVT4 as a proxy for VIQ in large-scale ASD studies, particularly for genetic investigations.

  18. Application of carrier testing to genetic counseling for X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, R.C.; Nachtman, R.G.; Belmont, J.W.; Rosenblatt, H.M.

    1994-01-01

    Bruton X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a phenotypically recessive genetic disorder of B lymphocyte development. Female carriers of XLA, although asymptomatic, have a characteristic B cell lineage-specific skewing of the pattern of X inactivation. Skewing apparently results from defective growth and maturation of B cell precursors bearing a mutant active X chromosome. In this study, carrier status was tested in 58 women from 22 families referred with a history of agammaglobulinemia. Primary carrier analysis to examine patterns of X inactivation in CD19[sup +] peripheral blood cells (B lymphocytes) was conducted using quantitative PCR at the androgen-receptor locus. Obligate carriers of XLA demonstrated >95% skewing of X inactivation in peripheral blood CD19[sup +] cells but not in CD19[sup [minus

  19. TESTING BAYESIAN ALGORITHMS TO DETECT GENETIC STRUCTURE IN TWO CLOSELY RELATED OAK TAXA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Mihai Enescu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to test the Bayesian algorithm implemented in the software STRUCTURE in order to detect the number of clusters, by using microsatellite data from four oak species. Several assignment models, with or without a priori grouping of individuals to species, were proposed. Better results were obtained by using the sampling location information and when only two taxa were analyzed. Particularly, pedunculate oak and sessile oak formed distinct clusters whatever the assignment model we use. By contrast, no separation between the two oaks from series Lanuginosae was observed. This can be explained, on one hand, by the small sampling size for Italian oak, or by the genetic similarities of the two pubescent oaks, namely Quercus pubescens and Q. virgiliana, on the other hand. Our findings support the hypothesis according which Italian oak is an intraspecific taxonomic unit of pubescent oak.

  20. Danish retinoblastoma patients 1943-2013 - genetic testing and clinical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Pernille A; Urbak, Steen F; Funding, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In heritable retinoblastoma there is a 50% risk of transmitting the RB1 mutation, and offspring carriers have more than 90% risk of developing retinoblastoma. Today, all newly diagnosed retinoblastoma patients in Denmark are screened for mutations in RB1, as opposed to only a minority...... of patients diagnosed before DNA testing was offered. Knowledge of heredity increases the chance of early diagnosis in offspring, leading to improved prognosis. We present data from the Danish retinoblastoma patients that emphasize the need for genetic counseling and RB1 screening in all untested...... retinoblastoma survivors. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data are extracted from The Danish Ocular Oncology Group Database, a national population database containing data on all Danish retinoblastoma patients since 1943. RESULTS: In total 323 retinoblastoma patients have been diagnosed between 1943 and 2013. Since 1963...

  1. Regulating the advertising of genetic tests in Europe: a balancing act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalokairinou, Louiza; Borry, Pascal; Howard, Heidi Carmen

    2017-10-01

    Direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic tests (GT) have provoked criticism over their potential adverse impact on public health. The European Parliament called for a ban on DTC advertising of GT during the debate for the adoption of a European Regulation on in vitro diagnostic medical devices. This proposal, however, was not ultimately retained in the final text. Instead, the regulation includes an article prohibiting misleading claims for this kind of advertising. These two different approaches raise questions about the optimal degree of regulation. Herein, we provide an overview of the ways GT have been advertised and related ethical issues. Subsequently, the laws regulating the advertising of GT at the European Union and national level are examined. Finally, recent regulatory developments are discussed. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Expert and Advocacy Group Consensus Findings on the Horizon of Public Health Genetic Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Modell

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Description: Among the two leading causes of death in the United States, each responsible for one in every four deaths, heart disease costs Americans $300 billion, while cancer costs Americans $216 billion per year. They also rank among the top three causes of death in Europe and Asia. In 2012 the University of Michigan Center for Public Health and Community Genomics and Genetic Alliance, with the support of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Office of Public Health Genomics, hosted a conference in Atlanta, Georgia to consider related action strategies based on public health genomics. The aim of the conference was consensus building on recommendations to implement genetic screening for three major heritable contributors to these mortality and cost figures: hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC, familial hypercholesterolemia (FH, and Lynch syndrome (LS. Genetic applications for these three conditions are labeled with a “Tier 1” designation by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention because they have been fully validated and clinical practice guidelines based on systematic review support them. Methodology: The conference followed a deliberative sequence starting with nationally recognized clinical and public health presenters for each condition, followed by a Patient and Community Perspectives Panel, working group sessions for each of the conditions, and a final plenary session. The 74 conference participants represented disease research and advocacy, public health, medicine and nursing, genetics, governmental health agencies, and industry. Participants drew on a public health framework interconnecting policy, clinical intervention, surveillance, and educational functions for their deliberations. Results: Participants emphasized the importance of collaboration between clinical, public health, and advocacy groups in implementing Tier 1 genetic screening. Advocacy groups could help with individual and institutional

  3. Results of the 2007 Paternity Testing Workshop of the English Speaking Working Group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallenberg, C.; Langkjær, Rikke B.; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of the 2007 Paternity Testing Workshop of the English Speaking Working Group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics. The exercise included paternity testing of blood samples from a mother, a child and an alleged father. The laboratories were encouraged to answer...

  4. Results of the 2009 Paternity Testing Workshop of the English Speaking Working Group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Susanne Lunøe; Hallenberg, Charlotte; Simonsen, Bo Thisted

    2009-01-01

    Here we present the results of the 2009 Paternity Testing Workshop of the English Speaking Working Group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics. The exercise included paternity testing of blood samples from a mother, a child and two alleged fathers. The laboratories were encouraged...

  5. More breast cancer patients prefer BRCA-mutation testing without prior face-to-face genetic counseling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sie, A.S.; Zelst-Stams, W.A.G. van; Spruijt, L.; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Brunner, H.G.; Prins, J.B.; Hoogerbrugge, N.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, most breast cancer (BC) patients receive face-to-face genetic counseling (DNA-intake) prior to BRCA-mutation testing, with generic information regarding hereditary BC and BRCA-mutation testing. This prospective study evaluated a novel format: replacing the intake consultation with

  6. Results of the 2007 Paternity Testing Workshop of the English Speaking Working Group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallenberg, C.; Langkjær, Rikke B.; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of the 2007 Paternity Testing Workshop of the English Speaking Working Group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics. The exercise included paternity testing of blood samples from a mother, a child and an alleged father. The laboratories were encouraged to answer...... systems investigated with RFLP. The rate of typing and reporting errors was 0.2%...

  7. Distress in unaffected individuals who decline, delay or remain ineligible for genetic testing for hereditary diseases: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiniger, Louise; Butow, Phyllis N; Price, Melanie A; Charles, Margaret

    2013-09-01

    Reviews on the psychosocial aspects of genetic testing for hereditary diseases typically focus on outcomes for carriers and non-carriers of genetic mutations. However, the majority of unaffected individuals from high-risk families do not undergo predictive testing. The aim of this review was to examine studies on psychosocial distress in unaffected individuals who delay, decline or remain ineligible for predictive genetic testing. Systematic searches of Medline, CINAHL, PsychINFO, PubMed and handsearching of related articles published between 1990 and 2012 identified 23 articles reporting 17 different studies that were reviewed and subjected to quality assessment. Findings suggest that definitions of delaying and declining are not always straightforward, and few studies have investigated psychological distress among individuals who remain ineligible for testing. Findings related to distress in delayers and decliners have been mixed, but there is evidence to suggest that cancer-related distress is lower in those who decline genetic counselling and testing, compared with testers, and that those who remain ineligible for testing experience more anxiety than tested individuals. Psychological, personality and family history vulnerability factors were identified for decliners and individuals who are ineligible for testing. The small number of studies and methodological limitations preclude definitive conclusions. Nevertheless, subgroups of those who remain untested appear to be at increased risk for psychological morbidity. As the majority of unaffected individuals do not undergo genetic testing, further research is needed to better understand the psychological impact of being denied the option of testing, declining and delaying testing. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Procedure to select test organisms for environmental risk assessment of genetically modified crops in aquatic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbeck, Angelika; Bundschuh, Rebecca; Bundschuh, Mirco; Hofmann, Frieder; Oehen, Bernadette; Otto, Mathias; Schulz, Ralf; Trtikova, Miluse

    2017-11-01

    For a long time, the environmental risk assessment (ERA) of genetically modified (GM) crops focused mainly on terrestrial ecosystems. This changed when it was scientifically established that aquatic ecosystems are exposed to GM crop residues that may negatively affect aquatic species. To assist the risk assessment process, we present a tool to identify ecologically relevant species usable in tiered testing prior to authorization or for biological monitoring in the field. The tool is derived from a selection procedure for terrestrial ecosystems with substantial but necessary changes to adequately consider the differences in the type of ecosystems. By using available information from the Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC), the procedure can draw upon existing biological data on aquatic systems. The proposed procedure for aquatic ecosystems was tested for the first time during an expert workshop in 2013, using the cultivation of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) maize as the GM crop and 1 stream type as the receiving environment in the model system. During this workshop, species executing important ecological functions in aquatic environments were identified in a stepwise procedure according to predefined ecological criteria. By doing so, we demonstrated that the procedure is practicable with regard to its goal: From the initial long list of 141 potentially exposed aquatic species, 7 species and 1 genus were identified as the most suitable candidates for nontarget testing programs. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:974-979. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  9. Challenges in testing genetically modified crops for potential increases in endogenous allergen expression for safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, R; Ariyarathna, H; Amnuaycheewa, P; Tetteh, A; Pramod, S N; Taylor, S L; Ballmer-Weber, B K; Goodman, R E

    2013-02-01

    Premarket, genetically modified (GM) plants are assessed for potential risks of food allergy. The major risk would be transfer of a gene encoding an allergen or protein nearly identical to an allergen into a different food source, which can be assessed by specific serum testing. The potential that a newly expressed protein might become an allergen is evaluated based on resistance to digestion in pepsin and abundance in food fractions. If the modified plant is a common allergenic source (e.g. soybean), regulatory guidelines suggest testing for increases in the expression of endogenous allergens. Some regulators request evaluating endogenous allergens for rarely allergenic plants (e.g. maize and rice). Since allergic individuals must avoid foods containing their allergen (e.g. peanut, soybean, maize, or rice), the relevance of the tests is unclear. Furthermore, no acceptance criteria are established and little is known about the natural variation in allergen concentrations in these crops. Our results demonstrate a 15-fold difference in the major maize allergen, lipid transfer protein between nine varieties, and complex variation in IgE binding to various soybean varieties. We question the value of evaluating endogenous allergens in GM plants unless the intent of the modification was production of a hypoallergenic crop. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Changes to perceptions of the pros and cons of genetic susceptibility testing after APOE genotyping for Alzheimer disease risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Kurt D.; Roberts, J. Scott; Uhlmann, Wendy R.; Green, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Perceptions about the pros and cons of genetic susceptibility testing are among the best predictors of test utilization. How actual testing changes such perceptions has yet to be examined. Methods In a clinical trial, first-degree relatives of patients with Alzheimer disease received genetic risk assessments for Alzheimer disease including APOE disclosure. Participants rated 11 possible benefits associated with genetic testing (pros) and 10 risks or limitations (cons) before genetic risk disclosure and again 12 months afterward. Results Pros were rated higher than cons at baseline (3.53 vs. 1.83, P cons did not change (1.88 vs. 1.83, P = 0.199) except for a three-item discrimination subscale which increased (2.07 vs. 1.92, P = 0.012). Among specific pros and cons, three items related to prevention and treatment changed the most. Conclusion The process of APOE genetic risk assessment for Alzheimer disease sensitizes some to its limitations and the risks of discrimination; however, 1-year after disclosure, test recipients still consider the pros to strongly outweigh the cons. PMID:21270636

  11. Genetic susceptibility to Gilbert's syndrome in a valencian population; efficacy of the fasting test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, A K; Escartín, N; Monzó, C; Guzmán, C; Ferrer, I; González-Muñoz, C; Peña, P; Monzó, V; Marcaida, G; Rodríguez-López, R

    To describe the populational distribution of the UGT1A1*28 variant (genetic variant code rs8175347) located in the promotor of the UGT gene and correlate its genotypes with the results of the fasting test, as well as its relationship with the biochemical disorder of Gilbert's syndrome (GS) in a Valencian population. We studied the prevalence of the genotypes (TA) 6/6 (TA) 6/7 and (TA) 7/7 of the deleterious variant rs8175347 in 144 patients with hyperbilirubinemia, 38 of whom had previously undergone the fasting test to diagnose GS, and in 150 control patients. By analysing the genomic region of the TATA box of the UGT1A1 gene promotor using Sanger sequencing, we established the correlation between the rs8175347 genotypes and the fasting test results and with the patients' biochemical disorders. The rate of heterozygosity of allele (TA) 7 in the control population was 32% and increased to 87.59% among the patients with suspected GS. The rate of genotype TA 7/7 was 81.94% among the patients with hyperbilirubinemia, compared with 11.33% in the control patients. The fasting test showed a 15.79% rate of false negatives and a 5.26% rate of false positives. The high frequency of allele (TA) 7 among the Valencian control population, almost double the 5% reported for European control patients, confirms the high rate of GS reported in the Spanish population, without observing significant differences between the geographical ends of the country. The efficacy and reliability of the fasting test for the diagnosis of GS is questionable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  12. Search for major genes with progeny test data to accelerate the development of genetically superior loblolly pine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NCSU

    2003-12-30

    This research project is to develop a novel approach that fully utilized the current breeding materials and genetic test information available from the NCSU-Industry Cooperative Tree Improvement Program to identify major genes that are segregating for growth and disease resistance in loblolly pine. If major genes can be identified in the existing breeding population, they can be utilized directly in the conventional loblolly pine breeding program. With the putative genotypes of parents identified, tree breeders can make effective decisions on management of breeding populations and operational deployment of genetically superior trees. Forest productivity will be significantly enhanced if genetically superior genotypes with major genes for economically important traits could be deployed in an operational plantation program. The overall objective of the project is to develop genetic model and analytical methods for major gene detection with progeny test data and accelerate the development of genetically superior loblolly pine. Specifically, there are three main tasks: (1) Develop genetic models for major gene detection and implement statistical methods and develop computer software for screening progeny test data; (2) Confirm major gene segregation with molecular markers; and (3) Develop strategies for using major genes for tree breeding.

  13. Genetic variation of Lymnaea stagnalis tolerance to copper: A test of selection hypotheses and its relevance for ecological risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Côte, Jessica; Bouétard, Anthony; Pronost, Yannick; Besnard, Anne-Laure; Coke, Maïra; Piquet, Fabien; Caquet, Thierry; Coutellec, Marie-Agnès

    2015-01-01

    The use of standardized monospecific testing to assess the ecological risk of chemicals implicitly relies on the strong assumption that intraspecific variation in sensitivity is negligible or irrelevant in this context. In this study, we investigated genetic variation in copper sensitivity of the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis, using lineages stemming from eight natural populations or strains found to be genetically differentiated at neutral markers. Copper-induced mortality varied widely among populations, as did the estimated daily death rate and time to 50% mortality (LT50). Population genetic divergence in copper sensitivity was compared to neutral differentiation using the Q ST -F ST approach. No evidence for homogenizing selection could be detected. This result demonstrates that species-level extrapolations from single population studies are highly unreliable. The study provides a simple example of how evolutionary principles could be incorporated into ecotoxicity testing in order to refine ecological risk assessment. - Highlights: • Genetic variation in copper tolerance occurs between Lymnaea stagnalis populations. • We used the Q ST -F ST approach to test evolutionary patterns in copper tolerance. • No evidence for uniform selection was found. • Results suggest that extrapolations to the species level are not safe. • A method is proposed to refine ecological risk assessment using genetic parameters. - Genetic variation in copper tolerance occurs in Lymnaea stagnalis. A method is proposed for considering evolutionary parameters in ecological risk assessment

  14. A knowledge base for teaching biology situated in the context of genetic testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zande, P.A.M.; Waarlo, A.J.; Brekelmans, M.; Akkerman, S.F.; Vermunt, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of genomics will impact the daily practice of biology teachers who teach genetics in secondary education. This study reports on the first results of a research project aimed at enhancing biology teacher knowledge for teaching genetics in the context of genetic

  15. Development of a genomic DNA reference material panel for myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalman, Lisa; Tarleton, Jack; Hitch, Monica; Hegde, Madhuri; Hjelm, Nick; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Zhou, Lili; Hilbert, James E; Luebbe, Elizabeth A; Moxley, Richard T; Toji, Lorraine

    2013-07-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by expansion of a CTG triplet repeat in the 3' untranslated region of the DMPK gene that encodes a serine-threonine kinase. Patients with larger repeats tend to have a more severe phenotype. Clinical laboratories require reference and quality control materials for DM1 diagnostic and carrier genetic testing. Well-characterized reference materials are not available. To address this need, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-based Genetic Testing Reference Material Coordination Program, in collaboration with members of the genetic testing community, the National Registry of Myotonic Dystrophy and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Patients and Family Members, and the Coriell Cell Repositories, has established and characterized cell lines from patients with DM1 to create a reference material panel. The CTG repeats in genomic DNA samples from 10 DM1 cell lines were characterized in three clinical genetic testing laboratories using PCR and Southern blot analysis. DMPK alleles in the samples cover four of five DM1 clinical categories: normal (5 to 34 repeats), mild (50 to 100 repeats), classical (101 to 1000 repeats), and congenital (>1000 repeats). We did not identify or establish Coriell cell lines in the premutation range (35 to 49 repeats). These samples are publicly available for quality control, proficiency testing, test development, and research and should help improve the accuracy of DM1 testing. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparative safety testing of genetically modified foods in a 90-day rat feeding study design allowing the distinction between primary and secondary effects of the new genetic event

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Ib; Poulsen, Morten

    2007-01-01

    -349]. The overall objective of the project has been to develop and validate the scientific methodology necessary for assessing the safety of foods from genetically modified plants in accordance with the present EU regulation. The safety assessment in the project is combining the results of the 90-day rat feeding......., Frenzel, T., Danier, J., Rychlik, M., Shu, Q., Emami, K., Taylor, M., Gatehouse, A., Engel, K.-H., Knudsen, I., 2007a. Safety testing of GM-rice expressing PHA-E lectin using a new animal test design. Food Chem. Toxicol. 45, 364-377; Poulsen, M., Kroghsbo, S., Schroder, M., Wilcks, A., Jacobsen, H......., Miller, A., Frenzel, T., Danier, J., Rychlik, M., Shu, Q., Emami, K., Sudhakar, D., Gatehouse, A., Engel, K.-H., Knudsen, I., 2007b. A 90-day safety in Wistar rats fed genetically modified rice expressing snowdrop lectin Galanthus nivalis (GNA). Food Chem. Toxicol. 45, 350-363; Schroder, M., Poulsen, M...

  17. Increasing Public Awareness of Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Tests: Health Care Access, Internet Use, and Population Density Correlates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutten, L. J. F.; Gollust, S. E.; Naveed, S.; Moser, R. P.

    2012-01-01

    Uncertainty around the value of and appropriate regulatory models for direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing underscores the importance of tracking public awareness of these services. We analyzed nationally representative, cross-sectional data from the Health Information National Trends Survey in 2008 (n=7, 674) and 2011 (n=3, 959) to assess population-level changes in awareness of DTC genetic testing in the U.S. and to explore socio demographic, health care, Internet use, and population density correlates. Overall, awareness increased significantly from 29% in 2008 to 37% in 2011. The observed increase in awareness from 2008 to 2011 remained significant (OR=1.39) even when adjusted for socio demographic variables, health care access, Internet use, and population density. Independent of survey year, the odds of awareness of DTC genetic tests were significantly higher for those aged 50-64 (OR=1.64), and 65-74 (O R=1.60); college graduates (OR=2.02 ); those with a regular source of health care (OR=1.27); those with a prior cancer diagnosis (OR=1.24); those who use the Internet (OR=1.27); and those living in urban areas ( OR=1.25). Surveillance of awareness-along with empirical data on use of and response to genetic risk information-can inform public health and policy efforts to maximize benefits and minimize risks of DTC genetic testing.

  18. Role of advanced neuroimaging, fluid biomarkers and genetic testing in the assessment of sport-related concussion: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrea, Michael; Meier, Timothy; Huber, Daniel; Ptito, Alain; Bigler, Erin; Debert, Chantel T; Manley, Geoff; Menon, David; Chen, Jen-Kai; Wall, Rachel; Schneider, Kathryn J; McAllister, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    To conduct a systematic review of published literature on advanced neuroimaging, fluid biomarkers and genetic testing in the assessment of sport-related concussion (SRC). Computerised searches of Medline, PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PsycINFO, Scopus and Cochrane Library from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2016 were done. There were 3222 articles identified. In addition to medical subject heading terms, a study was included if (1) published in English, (2) represented original research, (3) involved human research, (4) pertained to SRC and (5) involved data from neuroimaging, fluid biomarkers or genetic testing collected within 6 months of injury. Ninety-eight studies qualified for review (76 neuroimaging, 16 biomarkers and 6 genetic testing). Separate reviews were conducted for neuroimaging, biomarkers and genetic testing. A standardised data extraction tool was used to document study design, population, tests employed and key findings. Reviewers used a modified quality assessment of studies of diagnostic accuracy studies (QUADAS-2) tool to rate the risk of bias, and a modified Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system to rate the overall level of evidence for each search. Results from the three respective reviews are compiled in separate tables and an interpretive summary of the findings is provided. Advanced neuroimaging, fluid biomarkers and genetic testing are important research tools, but require further validation to determine their ultimate clinical utility in the evaluation of SRC. Future research efforts should address current gaps that limit clinical translation. Ultimately, research on neurobiological and genetic aspects of SRC is predicted to have major translational significance to evidence-based approaches to clinical management of SRC, much like applied clinical research has had over the past 20 years. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise

  19. Analysis of pfhrp2 genetic diversity in Senegal and implications for use of rapid diagnostic tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The Senegalese National Malaria Control Programme has recommended use of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) that target the histidine-rich protein 2 (HRP2), specific to Plasmodium falciparum, to diagnose malaria cases. The target antigen has been shown to be polymorphic, which may explain the variability in HRP2-based RDT results reported in field studies. The genetic diversity of the pfhrp2 gene has not been investigated in depth in many African countries. The goal of this study is to determine the extent of polymorphism in pfhrp2 among Senegal, Mali and Uganda parasite populations, and discuss the implications of these findings on the utility of RDTs that are based on HRP2 detection. Methods Sequencing data from the pfhrp2 locus were used to analyze the genetic diversity of this gene among three populations, with different transmission dynamics and malaria parasite ecologies. Nucleotide diversity (π) and non-synonymous nucleotide diversity (πNS) were studied in the pfhrp2 gene from isolates obtained in Senegal. Amino acid repeat length polymorphisms in the PfHRP2 antigen were characterized and parameters of genetic diversity, such as frequency and correlation between repeats in these populations, were assessed. Results The diversity survey of the pfhrp2 gene identified 29 SNPs as well as insertion and deletion polymorphisms within a 918 bp region. The Senegal pfhrp2 exhibited a substantial level of diversity [π = 0.00559 and πNS = 0.014111 (πS = 0.0291627)], similar to several polymorphic genes, such as msp1, involved in immune responses, and the gene encoding the SURFIN polymorphic antigen, which are surface exposed parasite proteins. Extensive repeat length polymorphisms in PfHRP2, as well as similar patterns in the number, organization and the type of predicted amino acid repeats were observed among the three populations, characterized by an occurrence of Type 2, Type 4 and Type 7 repeats. Conclusions These results warrant deeper

  20. BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic test in high risk patients and families: counselling and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchina, Eleonora; Fontana, Maria Grazia; Speziani, Michela; Salvi, Alessandro; Ricca, Giuseppe; Di Lorenzo, Diego; Gervasi, Maria; Caimi, Luigi; Barlati, Sergio

    2010-12-01

    Hereditary breast cancer accounts for 5-10% of all cases of breast cancer and 10-15% of ovarian cancer and is characterised by dominant inheritance, early onset, the severity of the disease and bilaterality. About 30% of cases with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer have mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Women with a mutation in the BRCA1 gene have a 80-90% lifetime risk of developing breast cancer, and 40-65% chance of developing ovarian cancer. Most studies carried out throughout the world indicate that the prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation is lower than originally suggested by early studies on large families with several affected members. Studies performed in Italy have reported different prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, probably due to different selection criteria and to the variability of the techniques used. In this study, we performed a screening of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in families from northern Italy with familial recurrence of breast cancer or ovarian cancer in which the individual risk of patients of being carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation was evaluated using BRCAPRO (CAGene) software. We enrolled 27 patients of 101 unrelated families selected when they fulfilled the inclusion criteria of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). Specific risk evaluation, genetic test administration if needed, and discussion of the results were offered during multi-disciplinary genetic, surgical and psychological counselling. Seven probands (35%) found BRCA1/2 sequence variation carriers; no BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations were detected in the remaining 13 probands. Two (15%) patients had BRCA1 mutations and 5 (25%) patients had BRCA2 mutations. In the latter case, BRCA2 delA 9158fs+29stop mutation in exon 22, never previously described and a new sequence variation (T703N) in exon 11 were identified.

  1. Psychological Impact of Predictive Genetic Testing in VCP Inclusion Body Myopathy, Paget Disease of Bone and Frontotemporal Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surampalli, Abhilasha; Khare, Manaswitha; Kubrussi, Georgette; Wencel, Marie; Tanaja, Jasmin; Donkervoort, Sandra; Osann, Kathryn; Simon, Mariella; Wallace, Douglas; Smith, Charles; M McInerney-Leo, Aideen; Kimonis, Virginia

    2015-10-01

    Inclusion Body Myopathy associated with Paget's disease of bone and Fronto-temporal Dementia, also known as multisystem proteinopathy is an autosomal dominant, late onset neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in Valosin containing protein (VCP) gene. This study aimed to assess uptake and decision making for predictive genetic testing and the impact on psychological well-being. Individuals who had participated in the gene discovery study with a 50 % a priori risk of inheriting VCP disease were sent a letter of invitation offering genetic counseling and testing and were also invited to participate in this psychosocial study. A total of 102 individuals received an invitation and 33 individuals participated in genetic counseling and testing (32.3 %) with 29 completing baseline questionnaires. Twenty completed the follow-up post-test Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale questionnaire including 13 of the 18 who had tested positive. Mean risk perception at baseline was 50.1 %. Reasons for testing included planning for the future, relieving uncertainty, informing children and satisfying curiosity. At baseline, one quarter of the participants had high levels of anxiety. However, scores were normal one year following testing. In this small cohort, one third of individuals at 50 % risk chose pre-symptomatic testing. Although one quarter of those choosing testing had high anxiety at baseline, this was not evident at follow-up.

  2. A rapid genetic counselling and testing in newly diagnosed breast cancer is associated with high rate of risk-reducing mastectomy in BRCA1/2-positive Italian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortesi, L; Razzaboni, E; Toss, A; De Matteis, E; Marchi, I; Medici, V; Tazzioli, G; Andreotti, A; De Santis, G; Pignatti, M; Federico, M

    2014-01-01

    Risk-reducing mastectomy (RRM) decreases breast cancer (BC) risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers by up to 95%, but the Italian attitude towards this procedure is reluctant. This is an observational study with retrospective design, using quantitative and qualitative research methods, aimed at evaluating the attitude towards RRM by rapid genetic counselling and testing (RGCT), at the time of BC diagnosis, compared with traditional genetic counselling and testing (TGCT), after previous BC surgery. Secondary aims were to investigate patient satisfaction after RRM and the rate of occult tumour in healthy breasts. A total of 1168 patients were evaluated: 1058 received TGCT, whereas 110 underwent RGCT. In TGCT, among 1058 patients, 209 (19.7%) mutation carriers were identified, with the rate of RRM being 4.7% (10 of 209). Conversely in RGCT, among 110 patients, 36 resulted positive, of which, 15 (41.7%) underwent bilateral mastectomy at the BC surgery time, showing an overall good satisfaction, measured by interpretative phenomenological analysis 12 months after the intervention. Our study shows that RGCT in patients with a hereditary profile is associated with a high rate of RRM at the BC surgery time, this being the pathway offered within a multidisciplinary organization.

  3. Genetic analysis of milk production traits of Tunisian Holsteins using random regression test-day model with Legendre polynomials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Zaabza, Hafedh; Ben Gara, Abderrahmen; Rekik, Boulbaba

    2017-08-16

    The objective of this study was to estimate genetic parameters of milk, fat, and protein yields within and across lactations in Tunisian Holsteins using a random regression test-day model. A random regression multiple trait multiple lactation test-day (TD) model was used to estimate genetic parameters in the Tunisian dairy cattle population. Data were TD yields of milk, fat, and protein from the first three lactations. Random regressions were modeled with third-order Legendre polynomials for the additive genetic, and permanent environment effects. Heritabilities, and genetic correlations were estimated by Bayesian techniques using the Gibbs sampler. All variance components tended to be high in the beginning and the end of lactations. Additive genetic variances for milk, fat, and protein yields were the lowest and were the least variable compared to permanent variances. Heritability values tended to increase with parity. Estimates of heritabilities for 305-d yield-traits were low to moderate, 0.14 to 0.2, 0.12 to 0.17, and 0.13 to 0.18 for milk, fat, and protein yields, respectively. Within-parity, genetic correlations among traits were up to 0.74. Genetic correlations among lactations for the yield traits were relatively high and ranged from 0.78 0.01 to 0.82 0.03, between the first and second parities, from 0.73 0.03 to 0.8 0.04 between the first and third parities, and from 0.82 0.02 to 0.84 0.04 between the second and third parities. These results are comparable to previously reported estimates on the same population, indicating that the adoption of a random regression TD model as the official genetic evaluation for production traits in Tunisia, as developed by most Interbull countries, is possible in the Tunisian Holsteins.

  4. Expanding primary cells from mucoepidermoid and other salivary gland neoplasms for genetic and chemosensitivity testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad M. Alamri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Restricted availability of cell and animal models is a rate-limiting step for investigation of salivary gland neoplasm pathophysiology and therapeutic response. Conditionally reprogrammed cell (CRC technology enables establishment of primary epithelial cell cultures from patient material. This study tested a translational workflow for acquisition, expansion and