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  1. Enhanced sympathetic arousal in response to FMRI scanning correlates with task induced activations and deactivations.

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    Markus Muehlhan

    Full Text Available It has been repeatedly shown that functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI triggers distress and neuroendocrine response systems. Prior studies have revealed that sympathetic arousal increases, particularly at the beginning of the examination. Against this background it appears likely that those stress reactions during the scanning procedure may influence task performance and neural correlates. However, the question how sympathetic arousal elicited by the scanning procedure itself may act as a potential confounder of fMRI data remains unresolved today. Thirty-seven scanner naive healthy subjects performed a simple cued target detection task. Levels of salivary alpha amylase (sAA, as a biomarker for sympathetic activity, were assessed in samples obtained at several time points during the lab visit. SAA increased two times, immediately prior to scanning and at the end of the scanning procedure. Neural activation related to motor preparation and timing as well as task performance was positively correlated with the first increase. Furthermore, the first sAA increase was associated with task induced deactivation (TID in frontal and parietal regions. However, these effects were restricted to the first part of the experiment. Consequently, this bias of scanner related sympathetic activation should be considered in future fMRI investigations. It is of particular importance for pharmacological investigations studying adrenergic agents and the comparison of groups with different stress vulnerabilities like patients and controls or adolescents and adults.

  2. Estimation of absorbed dose of radiosensitive organs and effective sose in patients underwent abdominopelvic spiral CT scan using impact CT patient dosimetry

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    Ayoub Amirnia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to the presence of radiosensitive organs in the abdominopelvic region and increasing the number of requests for CT scan examinations, concerns about increasing radiation doses in patients has been greatly elevated. Therefore, the goal of this study was to determine the absorbed dose of radiosensitive organs and the effective dose in patients underwent abdominopelvic CT scan using ImPACT CT patient dosimetry Calculator (version 1.0.4, Imaging Performance Assessment on Computed Tomography, www.impactscan.org. Methods: This prospective cross-sectional study was conducted in Imam Reza Hospital from November to February 2015 February 2015 in the Imam Reza Hospital, in Urmia, Iran. The demographic and dosimetric information of 100 patients who underwent abdominopelvic CT scan in a 6-slice CT scanner were obtained through the data collection forms. The demographic data of the patients included age, weight, gender, and BMI. The dosimetric parameters included pitch value, CT dose volume index (CTDIvol, dose-length product (DLP, tube voltage, tube current, exposure time, collimation size, scan length, and scan time. To determine the absorbed dose of radiosensitive organs and also the effective dose in patients, ImPACT CT patient dosimetry calculator was used. Results: The results of this study demonstrated that the mean and standard deviation (SD of patients' effective dose in abdominopelvic CT scan was 4.927±0.164 mSv. The bladder in both genders had the greatest mean organ dose, which was 64.71±17.15 mGy for men and 77.56±18.48 mGy for women (P<0.001. Conclusion: The effective dose values of this examination are in the same range as previous studies, as well as International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP recommendations. However, the radiation dose from CT scan has the largest contribution to the medical imaging. According to the ALARA principle, it is recommended that the scan parameters, especially mAs, should be

  3. ICA-based artifact removal diminishes scan site differences in multi-center resting-state fMRI.

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    Rogier Alexander Feis

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Resting-state fMRI (R-fMRI has shown considerable promise in providing potential biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and drug response across a range of diseases. Incorporating R-fMRI into multi-center studies is becoming increasingly popular, imposing technical challenges on data acquisition and analysis, as fMRI data is particularly sensitive to structured noise resulting from hardware, software and environmental differences. Here, we investigated whether a novel clean up tool for structured noise was capable of reducing center-related R-fMRI differences between healthy subjects.We analyzed 3 Tesla R-fMRI data from 72 subjects, half of whom were scanned with eyes closed in a Philips Achieva system in The Netherlands, and half of whom were scanned with eyes open in a Siemens Trio system in the UK. After pre-statistical processing and individual Independent Component Analysis (ICA, FMRIB’s ICA-based X-noiseifier (FIX was used to remove noise components from the data. GICA and dual regression were run and non-parametric statistics were used to compare spatial maps between groups before and after applying FIX.Large significant differences were found in all resting-state networks between study sites before using FIX, most of which were reduced to non-significant after applying FIX. The between-center difference in the medial/primary visual network, presumably reflecting a between-center difference in protocol, remained statistically different.FIX helps facilitate multi-center R-fMRI research by diminishing structured noise from R-fMRI data. In doing so, it improves combination of existing data from different centers in new settings and comparison of rare diseases and risk genes for which adequate sample size remains a challenge.

  4. ICA-based artifact removal diminishes scan site differences in multi-center resting-state fMRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Feis (Rogier A.); S.M. Smith (Stephen); N. Filippini (Nicola); G. Douaud (Gwenaëlle); E.G.P. Dopper (Elise); V. Heise (Verena); A.J. Trachtenberg (Aaron J.); J.C. van Swieten (John); M.A. van Buchem (Mark); S.A.R.B. Rombouts (Serge); C.E. Mackay (Clare E.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractResting-state fMRI (R-fMRI) has shown considerable promise in providing potential biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and drug response across a range of diseases. Incorporating R-fMRI into multi-center studies is becoming increasingly popular, imposing technical challenges on data

  5. Cue-Elicited Craving in Heroin Addicts at Different Abstinent Time: An fMRI Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Lou, Mingwu; Wang, Erlei; Shen, Yunxia; Wang, Jiping

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the effect of short-term and long-term heroin abstinence on brain responses to heroin-related cues using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Methods: Eighteen male heroin addicts following short-term abstinence and 19 male heroin addicts following long-term abstinence underwent fMRI scanning while viewing heroin-related and neutral images. Cue-elicited craving and withdrawal symptoms in the subjects were measured. Results: Following short-term abstinence, gre...

  6. Gender differences in brain areas involved in silent counting by means of fMRI

    OpenAIRE

    ?veljo, Olivera B; Kopriv?ek, Katarina M; Lu?i?, Milo? A; Prvulovi?, Mladen B; ?uli?, Milka

    2010-01-01

    Background Pattern of brain asymmetries varies with handedness, gender, age, and with variety of genetic and social factors. Large-scale neuroimaging analyses can optimize the detection of asymmetric features and confirm the factors that might modulate pattern of brain asymmetries. We attempted to evaluate eventual differences between genders in hemodynamic responses to a simple language task. Methods 12 healthy right-handed volunteers (age 24-46), 6 men and 6 women underwent fMRI scanning wh...

  7. Comparison of PET and fMRI activation patterns during declarative memory processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottaghy, F.M.; Krause, B.J.; Schmidt, D.; Hautzel, H.; Mueller-Gaertner, H.-W.; Herzog, H.; Shah, N.J.; Halsband, U.

    2000-01-01

    Aim: In this study neuronal correlates of encoding and retrieval in paired association learning were compared using two different neuroimaging methods: Positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Methods: 6 right-handed normal male volunteers took part in the study. Each subject underwent six 0-15-butanol PET scans and an fMRI study comprising four single epochs on a different day. The subjects had to learn and retrieve 12 word pairs which were visually presented (highly imaginable words, not semantically related). Results: Mean recall accuracy was 93% in the PET as well as in the fMRI experiment. During encoding and retrieval we found anterior cingulate cortex activation, and bilateral prefrontal cortex activation in both imaging modalities. Furthermore, we demonstrate the importance of the precuneus in episodic memory. With PET the results demonstrate frontopolar activations whereas fMRI fails to show activations in this area probably due to susceptibility artifacts. In fMRI we found additionally parahippocampal activation and due to the whole-brain coverage cerebellar activation during encoding. The distance between the center-of-mass activations in both modalities was 7.2±6.5 mm. Conclusion: There is a preponderance of commonalities in the activation patterns yielded with fMRI and PET. However, there are also important differences. The decision to choose one or the other neuroimaging modality should among other aspects depend on the study design (single subject vs. group study) and the task of interest. (orig.) [de

  8. Functional connectivity analysis of resting-state fMRI networks in nicotine dependent patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Aria; Ehtemami, Anahid; Fratte, Daniel; Meyer-Baese, Anke; Zavala-Romero, Olmo; Goudriaan, Anna E.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schulte, Mieke H. J.

    2016-03-01

    Brain imaging studies identified brain networks that play a key role in nicotine dependence-related behavior. Functional connectivity of the brain is dynamic; it changes over time due to different causes such as learning, or quitting a habit. Functional connectivity analysis is useful in discovering and comparing patterns between functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans of patients' brains. In the resting state, the patient is asked to remain calm and not do any task to minimize the contribution of external stimuli. The study of resting-state fMRI networks have shown functionally connected brain regions that have a high level of activity during this state. In this project, we are interested in the relationship between these functionally connected brain regions to identify nicotine dependent patients, who underwent a smoking cessation treatment. Our approach is on the comparison of the set of connections between the fMRI scans before and after treatment. We applied support vector machines, a machine learning technique, to classify patients based on receiving the treatment or the placebo. Using the functional connectivity (CONN) toolbox, we were able to form a correlation matrix based on the functional connectivity between different regions of the brain. The experimental results show that there is inadequate predictive information to classify nicotine dependent patients using the SVM classifier. We propose other classification methods be explored to better classify the nicotine dependent patients.

  9. Brain Network Response to Acupuncture Stimuli in Experimental Acute Low Back Pain: An fMRI Study

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    Yu Shi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that acupuncture can significantly modulate brain activation patterns in healthy subjects, while only a few studies have examined clinical pain. In the current study, we combined an experimental acute low back pain (ALBP model and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to explore the neural mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia. All ALBP subjects first underwent two resting state fMRI scans at baseline and during a painful episode and then underwent two additional fMRI scans, once during acupuncture stimulation (ACUP and once during tactile stimulation (SHAM pseudorandomly, at the BL40 acupoint. Our results showed that, compared with the baseline, the pain state had higher regional homogeneity (ReHo values in the pain matrix, limbic system, and default mode network (DMN and lower ReHo values in frontal gyrus and temporal gyrus; compared with the OFF status, ACUP yielded broad deactivation in subjects, including nearly all of the limbic system, pain status, and DMN, and also evoked numerous activations in the attentional and somatosensory systems; compared with SHAM, we found that ACUP induced more deactivations and fewer activations in the subjects. Multiple brain networks play crucial roles in acupuncture analgesia, suggesting that ACUP exceeds a somatosensory-guided mind-body therapy for ALBP.

  10. The intersubject and intrasubject reproducibility of FMRI activation during three encoding tasks: implications for clinical applications

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    Harrington, Greg S. [Virginia Commonwealth University, Department of Radiology, Richmond, VA (United States); Tomaszewski Farias, Sarah [University of California at Davis, Department of Neurology, Sacramento (United States); Buonocore, Michael H. [University of California at Davis, Department of Radiology, Sacramento (United States); Yonelinas, Andrew P. [University of California at Davis, Department of Psychology, Davis (United States)

    2006-07-15

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate the inter- and intrasubject reproducibility of FMRI activation for three memory encoding tasks previously used in the context of presurgical functional mapping. The primary region of interest (ROI) was the medial temporal lobe (MTL). Comparative ROIs included the inferior frontal and fusiform gyri which are less affected by susceptibility-induced signal losses than the MTL regions. Eighteen subjects were scanned using three memory encoding paradigms: word-pair, pattern, and scene encoding. Nine subjects underwent repeat scanning. Intersubject reproducibility of FMRI activation was evaluated by examining the percent of subjects who showed activation within a given ROI and the range to which individual laterality indices (LIs) varied from the mean. Intrasubject test-retest reproducibility was evaluated by examining the LI test-retest correlation, the average difference between LIs from two separate imaging sessions, and concordance ratios of activation volumes (R{sub volume} and R{sub overlap}). For scene encoding the reproducibility of activation volume and LIs within the MTL were as good as or better than the reproducibility within the fusiform and inferior frontal ROIs. For pattern encoding and word-pair encoding, the reproducibility of activation volume and LIs within the MTL tended to be worse compared to the fusiform and inferior frontal ROIs. The differences in FMRI reproducibility appeared more dependent on the task than the susceptibility effects. The results of this study suggest that FMRI-based assessment of the neural substrates of memory using a scene encoding task may be a useful clinical tool. (orig.)

  11. The intersubject and intrasubject reproducibility of FMRI activation during three encoding tasks: implications for clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, Greg S.; Tomaszewski Farias, Sarah; Buonocore, Michael H.; Yonelinas, Andrew P.

    2006-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate the inter- and intrasubject reproducibility of FMRI activation for three memory encoding tasks previously used in the context of presurgical functional mapping. The primary region of interest (ROI) was the medial temporal lobe (MTL). Comparative ROIs included the inferior frontal and fusiform gyri which are less affected by susceptibility-induced signal losses than the MTL regions. Eighteen subjects were scanned using three memory encoding paradigms: word-pair, pattern, and scene encoding. Nine subjects underwent repeat scanning. Intersubject reproducibility of FMRI activation was evaluated by examining the percent of subjects who showed activation within a given ROI and the range to which individual laterality indices (LIs) varied from the mean. Intrasubject test-retest reproducibility was evaluated by examining the LI test-retest correlation, the average difference between LIs from two separate imaging sessions, and concordance ratios of activation volumes (R volume and R overlap ). For scene encoding the reproducibility of activation volume and LIs within the MTL were as good as or better than the reproducibility within the fusiform and inferior frontal ROIs. For pattern encoding and word-pair encoding, the reproducibility of activation volume and LIs within the MTL tended to be worse compared to the fusiform and inferior frontal ROIs. The differences in FMRI reproducibility appeared more dependent on the task than the susceptibility effects. The results of this study suggest that FMRI-based assessment of the neural substrates of memory using a scene encoding task may be a useful clinical tool. (orig.)

  12. Pre-chemotherapy differences in visuospatial working memory in breast cancer patients compared to controls: An fMRI study.

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    Carole Susan Scherling

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionCognitive deficits are a side-effect of chemotherapy, however pre-treatment research is limited. This study examines neurofunctional differences during working memory between breast cancer (BC patients and controls, prior to chemotherapy. MethodsEarly stage BC females (23, scanned after surgery but before chemotherapy, were individually matched to non-cancer controls. Participants underwent fMRI while performing a Visuospatial N-back task and data was analyzed by multiple group comparisons. fMRI task performance, neuropsychological tests, hospital records and salivary biomarkers were also collected.ResultsThere were no significant group differences on neuropsychological tests, estrogen or cortisol. Patients made significantly fewer commission errors but had less overall correct responses and were slower than controls during the task. Significant group differences were observed for the fMRI data, yet results depended on the type of analysis. BC patients presented with increased activations during working memory compared to controls in areas such as the inferior frontal gyrus, insula, thalamus, and midbrain. Individual group regressions revealed a reverse relationship between brain activity and commission errors. ConclusionsThis is the first fMRI investigation to reveal neurophysiological differences during visuospatial working memory between BC patients pre-chemotherapy and controls.SignificanceThis highlights the need to better understand the pre-chemotherapy BC patient and the effects of associated confounding variables.

  13. Surface EMG measurements during fMRI at 3T : Accurate EMG recordings after artifact correction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duinen, Hiske; Zijdewind, Inge; Hoogduin, H; Maurits, N

    2005-01-01

    In this experiment, we have measured surface EMG of the first dorsal interosseus during predefined submaximal isometric contractions (5, 15, 30, 50, and 70% of maximal force) of the index finger simultaneously with fMRI measurements. Since we have used sparse sampling fMRI (3-s scanning; 2-s

  14. Functional Correlates of Cognitive Dysfunction in Multiple Sclerosis: A Multicenter fMRI Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rocca, M.A.; Valsasina, P.; Hulst, H.E.; Abdel-Aziz, K.; Enzinger, C.; Gallo, A.; Pareto, D.; Riccitelli, G.; Muhlert, N.; Ciccarelli, O.; Barkhof, F.; Fazekas, F.; Tedeschi, G.; Arevalo, M.J.; Filippi, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this multicenter study, we applied functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to define the functional correlates of cognitive dysfunction in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). fMRI scans during the performance of the N-back task were acquired from 42 right-handed relapsing remitting (RR)

  15. Simple fMRI postprocessing suffices for normal clinical practice.

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    González-Ortiz, S; Oleaga, L; Pujol, T; Medrano, S; Rumiá, J; Caral, L; Boget, T; Capellades, J; Bargalló, N

    2013-01-01

    Whereas fMRI postprocessing tools used in research are accurate but unwieldy, those used for clinical practice are user-friendly but are less accurate. We aimed to determine whether commercial software for fMRI postprocessing is accurate enough for clinical practice. Ten volunteers underwent fMRI while performing motor and language tasks (hand, foot, and orolingual movements; verbal fluency; semantic judgment; and oral comprehension). We compared visual concordance, image quality (noise), voxel size, and radiologist preference for the activation maps obtained by using Neuro3D software (provided with our MR imaging scanner) and by using the SPM program commonly used in research. Maps obtained with the 2 methods were classified as "partially overlapping" for 70% for motor and 72% for language paradigm experiments and as "overlapping" in 30% of motor and in 15% of language paradigm experiments. fMRI is a helpful and robust tool in clinical practice for planning neurosurgery. Widely available commercial fMRI software can provide reliable information for therapeutic management, so sophisticated, less widely available software is unnecessary in most cases.

  16. Resting-state fMRI revealed different brain activities responding to valproic acid and levetiracetam in benign epilepsy with central-temporal spikes

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    Zhang, Qirui; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Xu, Qiang; Wu, Han; Li, Zhipeng; Lu, Guangming [Nanjing University School of Medicine, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing (China); Yang, Fang; Li, Qian [Nanjing University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing (China); Hu, Zheng [Nanjing Children' s Hospital, Department of Neurology, Nanjing (China); Dante, Mantini [Faculty of Kinesiology and Rehabilitation Sciences, KU Leuven (Belgium); Li, Kai [Suzhou University, Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Suzhou (China)

    2017-05-15

    Our aim was to investigate regional difference in brain activities in response to antiepileptic drug (AED) medications in benign epilepsy with central-temporal spikes (BECTS) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Fifty-seven patients with BECTS underwent resting-state fMRI scans after receiving either valproic acid (VPA) (n = 15), levetiracetam (LEV) (n = 21), or no medication (n = 21). fMRI regional homogeneity (ReHo) parameter among the three groups of patients were compared and were correlated with total doses of AED in the two medicated groups. Compared with patients on no-medication, patients receiving either VPA or LEV showed decreased ReHo in the central-temporal region, frontal cortex, and thalamus. In particular, the VPA group showed greater ReHo decrease in the thalamus and milder in cortices and caudate heads compared with the LEV group. In addition, the VPA group demonstrated a negative correlation between ReHo values in the central-temporal region and medication dose. Both VPA and LEV inhibit resting-state neural activity in the central-temporal region, which is the main epileptogenic focus of BECTS. VPA reduced brain activity in the cortical epileptogenic regions and thalamus evenly, whereas LEV reduced brain activity predominantly in the cortices. Interestingly, VPA showed a cumulative effect on inhibiting brain activity in the epileptogenic regions in BECTS. (orig.)

  17. Effects of active music therapy on the normal brain: fMRI based evidence.

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    Raglio, Alfredo; Galandra, Caterina; Sibilla, Luisella; Esposito, Fabrizio; Gaeta, Francesca; Di Salle, Francesco; Moro, Luca; Carne, Irene; Bastianello, Stefano; Baldi, Maurizia; Imbriani, Marcello

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the neurophysiological bases of Active Music Therapy (AMT) and its effects on the normal brain. Twelve right-handed, healthy, non-musician volunteers were recruited. The subjects underwent 2 AMT sessions based on the free sonorous-music improvisation using rhythmic and melodic instruments. After these sessions, each subject underwent 2 fMRI scan acquisitions while listening to a Syntonic (SP) and an A-Syntonic (AP) Production from the AMT sessions. A 3 T Discovery MR750 scanner with a 16-channel phased array head coil was used, and the image analysis was performed with Brain Voyager QX 2.8. The listening to SP vs AP excerpts mainly activated: (1) the right middle temporal gyrus and right superior temporal sulcus, (2) the right middle frontal gyrus and in particular the right precentral gyrus, (3) the bilateral precuneus, (4) the left superior temporal sulcus and (5) the left middle temporal gyrus. These results are consistent with the psychological bases of the AMT approach and with the activation of brain areas involved in memory and autobiographical processes, and also in personal or interpersonal significant experiences. Further studies are required to confirm these findings and to explain possible effects of AMT in clinical settings.

  18. Cue-elicited craving in heroin addicts at different abstinent time: an fMRI pilot study.

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    Lou, Mingwu; Wang, Erlei; Shen, Yunxia; Wang, Jiping

    2012-05-01

    We evaluated the effect of short-term and long-term heroin abstinence on brain responses to heroin-related cues using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Eighteen male heroin addicts following short-term abstinence and 19 male heroin addicts following long-term abstinence underwent fMRI scanning while viewing heroin-related and neutral images. Cue-elicited craving and withdrawal symptoms in the subjects were measured. Following short-term abstinence, greater activation was found in response to heroin cues compared to neutral cues in bilateral temporal, occipital, posterior cingulate, anterior cingulate, thalamus, cerebellum, and left hippocampus. In contrast, activations in bilateral temporal and occipital and deactivations in bilateral frontal, bilateral parietal, left posterior cingulate, insula, thalamus, dorsal striatum, and bilateral cerebellum were observed following long-term abstinence. Direct comparisons between conditions showed greater brain reactivity in response to smoking cues following short-term abstinence. In addition, short-term abstinence had more serious withdrawal symptoms than the long-term. The present findings indicate that compared to short-term, long-term abstinence manifests less serious withdrawal symptoms and significantly decreases neural responses to heroin-related cues in brain regions subserving visual sensory processing, attention, memory, and action planning. These findings suggest that long-term abstinence can decrease the salience of conditioned cues, thereby reducing the risk of relapses. The study's limitations are noted.

  19. The analgesic effect of electroacupuncture on acute thermal pain perception-a central neural correlate study with fMRI

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    Leung Albert

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electrical acupuncture (EA has been utilized in acute pain management. However, the neuronal mechanisms that lead to the analgesic effect are still not well defined. The current study assessed the intensity [optimal EA (OI-EA vs. minimal EA (MI-EA] effect of non-noxious EA on supraspinal regions related to noxious heat pain (HP stimulation utilizing an EA treatment protocol for acute pain and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI with correlation in behavioral changes. Subjects underwent five fMRI scanning paradigms: one with heat pain (HP, two with OI-EA and MI-EA, and two with OI-EA and HP, and MI-EA and HP. Results While HP resulted in activations (excitatory effect in supraspinal areas known for pain processing and perception, EA paradigms primarily resulted in deactivations (suppressive effect in most of these corresponding areas. In addition, OI-EA resulted in a more robust supraspinal sedative effect in comparison to MI-EA. As a result, OI-EA is more effective than MI-EA in suppressing the excitatory effect of HP in supraspinal areas related to both pain processing and perception. Conclusion Intensities of EA plays an important role in modulating central pain perception.

  20. A case that underwent bilateral video-assisted thoracoscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No Abstract Available A case that underwent bilateral video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical (VATS) biopsy combined with pneumonectomy is presented. The patient developed hypoxia during the contralateral VATS biopsy. His hypoxia was treated with positive expiratory pressure (PEEP) to the dependent lung and apneic ...

  1. NUTRITION SUPPORT COMPLICATIONS IN PATIENT WHO UNDERWENT CARDIAC SURGERY

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    Krdžalić, Alisa; Kovčić, Jasmina; Krdžalić, Goran; Jahić, Elmir

    2016-01-01

    Background: The nutrition support complications after cardiac surgery should be detected and treated on time. Aim: To show the incidence and type of nutritional support complication in patients after cardiac surgery. Methods: The prospective study included 415 patients who underwent cardiac surgery between 2010 and 2013 in Clinic for Cardiovascular Disease of University Clinical Center Tuzla. Complications of the delivery system for nutrition support (NS) and nutrition itself were analy...

  2. Unique functional abnormalities in youth with combined marijuana use and depression: an fMRI study

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    Kristen A Ford

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Prior research has shown a relationship between early onset marijuana (MJ use and depression, however this relationship is complex and poorly understood. Here, we utilized passive music listening and fMRI to examine functional brain activation to a rewarding stimulus in 75 participants (healthy controls (HC, patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD, frequent MJ users (MJ, and the combination of MDD and MJ (MDD+MJ. For each participant a preferred and neutral piece of instrumental music was determined (utilizing ratings on a standardized scale, and each completed two 6-minute fMRI scans of a passive music listening task. Data underwent preprocessing and 61 participants were carried forward for analysis (17 HC, 15 MDD, 15 MJ, 14 MDD+MJ. Two statistical analyses were performed using SPM8, an ANCOVA with two factors (group x music-type and a whole brain, multiple regression analysis incorporating two predictors of interest (MJ use in past 28 days; and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI score. We identified a significant group x music-type interaction. Post hoc comparisons showed the preferred music had significantly greater activation in the MDD+MJ group in areas including the right middle and inferior frontal gyri extending into the claustrum and putamen and the anterior cingulate. No significant differences were identified in MDD, MJ or HC groups. Multiple regression analysis showed that activation in medial frontal cortex was positively correlated with amount of MJ use, and activation in areas including the insula was negatively correlated with BDI score. Results showed modulation in brain activation during passive music listening specific to MDD, frequent MJ users. This supports the suggestion that frequent MJ use, when combined with MDD, is associated with changes in neurocircuitry involved in reward-processing in ways that are absent with either frequent marijuana use or MDD alone. This could help inform clinical recommendations for youth with

  3. Sensory-motor networks involved in speech production and motor control: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behroozmand, Roozbeh; Shebek, Rachel; Hansen, Daniel R; Oya, Hiroyuki; Robin, Donald A; Howard, Matthew A; Greenlee, Jeremy D W

    2015-04-01

    Speaking is one of the most complex motor behaviors developed to facilitate human communication. The underlying neural mechanisms of speech involve sensory-motor interactions that incorporate feedback information for online monitoring and control of produced speech sounds. In the present study, we adopted an auditory feedback pitch perturbation paradigm and combined it with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) recordings in order to identify brain areas involved in speech production and motor control. Subjects underwent fMRI scanning while they produced a steady vowel sound /a/ (speaking) or listened to the playback of their own vowel production (playback). During each condition, the auditory feedback from vowel production was either normal (no perturbation) or perturbed by an upward (+600 cents) pitch-shift stimulus randomly. Analysis of BOLD responses during speaking (with and without shift) vs. rest revealed activation of a complex network including bilateral superior temporal gyrus (STG), Heschl's gyrus, precentral gyrus, supplementary motor area (SMA), Rolandic operculum, postcentral gyrus and right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Performance correlation analysis showed that the subjects produced compensatory vocal responses that significantly correlated with BOLD response increases in bilateral STG and left precentral gyrus. However, during playback, the activation network was limited to cortical auditory areas including bilateral STG and Heschl's gyrus. Moreover, the contrast between speaking vs. playback highlighted a distinct functional network that included bilateral precentral gyrus, SMA, IFG, postcentral gyrus and insula. These findings suggest that speech motor control involves feedback error detection in sensory (e.g. auditory) cortices that subsequently activate motor-related areas for the adjustment of speech parameters during speaking. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Age-Dependent Mesial Temporal Lobe Lateralization in Language FMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepeta, Leigh N.; Berl, Madison M.; Wilke, Marko; You, Xiaozhen; Mehta, Meera; Xu, Benjamin; Inati, Sara; Dustin, Irene; Khan, Omar; Austermuehle, Alison; Theodore, William H.; Gaillard, William D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective FMRI activation of the mesial temporal lobe (MTL) may be important for epilepsy surgical planning. We examined MTL activation and lateralization during language fMRI in children and adults with focal epilepsy. Methods 142 controls and patients with left hemisphere focal epilepsy (Pediatric: epilepsy, n = 17, mean age = 9.9 ± 2.0; controls, n = 48; mean age = 9.1 ± 2.6; Adult: epilepsy, n = 20, mean age = 26.7 ± 5.8; controls, n = 57, mean age = 26.2 ± 7.5) underwent 3T fMRI using a language task (auditory description decision task). Image processing and analyses were conducted in SPM8; ROIs included MTL, Broca’s area, and Wernicke’s area. We assessed group and individual MTL activation, and examined degree of lateralization. Results Patients and controls (pediatric and adult) demonstrated group and individual MTL activation during language fMRI. MTL activation was left lateralized for adults but less so in children (p’s < 0.005). Patients did not differ from controls in either age group. Stronger left-lateralized MTL activation was related to older age (p = 0.02). Language lateralization (Broca’s and Wernicke’s) predicted 19% of the variance in MTL lateralization for adults (p = 0.001), but not children. Significance Language fMRI may be used to elicit group and individual MTL activation. The developmental difference in MTL lateralization and its association with language lateralization suggests a developmental shift in lateralization of MTL function, with increased left lateralization across the age span. This shift may help explain why children have better memory outcomes following resection compared to adults. PMID:26696589

  5. An fMRI study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    fMRI data analysis revealed that while performing the task, the alcoholics showed enhanced activations in left supramarginal gyrus, precuneus bilaterally, left angular gyrus, and left middle temporal gyrus as compared to control subjects. The extensive activations observed in alcoholics as compared to controls suggest that ...

  6. fMRI Validation of fNIRS Measurements During a Naturalistic Task.

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    Noah, J Adam; Ono, Yumie; Nomoto, Yasunori; Shimada, Sotaro; Tachibana, Atsumichi; Zhang, Xian; Bronner, Shaw; Hirsch, Joy

    2015-06-15

    We present a method to compare brain activity recorded with near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) in a dance video game task to that recorded in a reduced version of the task using fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging). Recently, it has been shown that fNIRS can accurately record functional brain activities equivalent to those concurrently recorded with functional magnetic resonance imaging for classic psychophysical tasks and simple finger tapping paradigms. However, an often quoted benefit of fNIRS is that the technique allows for studying neural mechanisms of complex, naturalistic behaviors that are not possible using the constrained environment of fMRI. Our goal was to extend the findings of previous studies that have shown high correlation between concurrently recorded fNIRS and fMRI signals to compare neural recordings obtained in fMRI procedures to those separately obtained in naturalistic fNIRS experiments. Specifically, we developed a modified version of the dance video game Dance Dance Revolution (DDR) to be compatible with both fMRI and fNIRS imaging procedures. In this methodology we explain the modifications to the software and hardware for compatibility with each technique as well as the scanning and calibration procedures used to obtain representative results. The results of the study show a task-related increase in oxyhemoglobin in both modalities and demonstrate that it is possible to replicate the findings of fMRI using fNIRS in a naturalistic task. This technique represents a methodology to compare fMRI imaging paradigms which utilize a reduced-world environment to fNIRS in closer approximation to naturalistic, full-body activities and behaviors. Further development of this technique may apply to neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, late states of dementia, or those with magnetic susceptibility which are contraindicated for fMRI scanning.

  7. Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis in a Patient who Underwent Hip Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevzat Dabak

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS is a rare, benign, but a locally aggressive tumor. It is characterized by the proliferation of synovial membrane, but it can also be seen in tendon sheaths and bursae. Clinical presentation of solitary lesions include compression and locking of the joint suggesting loose bodies in the joint and a subsequent findings of an effusion, whereas diffuse lesions manifest with pain and chronic swelling. In this article, we presented a curious case of PVNS in a female patient who have been followed up due to an acetabular cystic lesion. She underwent total hip arthroplasty for severe osteoarthritis of the hip joint and associated pain. The diagnosis of PVNS was established intraoperatively. (The Me­di­cal Bul­le­tin of Ha­se­ki 2014; 52: 235-7

  8. ALGORITHM FOR MANAGEMENT OF HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS UNDERWENT UROLOGY INTERVENTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Davydova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the efficacy of cardiovascular non-invasive complex assessment and pre-operative preparation in hypertensive patients needed in surgical treatment of urology dis- eases.Material and methods. Males (n=883, aged 40 to 80 years were included into the study. The main group consisted of patients that underwent laparotomic nephrectomy (LTN group; n=96 and patients who underwent laparoscopic nephrectomy (LSN group; n=53. Dynamics of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM data was analyzed in these groups in the immediate postoperative period. The efficacy of a package of non-invasive methods for cardiovascular system assessment was studied. ABPM was performed after nephrectomy (2-nd and 10-th days after surgery in patients with complaints of vertigo episodes or intense general weakness to correct treatment.Results. In LTN group hypotension episodes or blood pressure (BP elevations were observed in 20 (20.8% and 22 (22.9% patients, respectively, on the 2-nd day after the operation. These complications required antihypertensive treatment correction. Patients with hypotension episodes were significantly older than patients with BP elevation and had significantly lower levels of 24-hour systolic BP, night diastolic BP and minimal night systolic BP. Re-adjustment of antihypertensive treatment on the 10-th postoperative day was required to 2 (10% patients with hypotension episodes and to 1 (4.5% patient with BP elevation. Correction of antihypertensive therapy was required to all patients in LSN group on the day 2, and to 32 (60.4% patients on the 10-th day after the operation. Reduction in the incidence of complications (from 1.2% in 2009 to 0.3% in 2011, p<0.001 was observed during the application of cardiovascular non-invasive complex assessment and preoperative preparation in hypertensive patients.Conclusion. The elaborated management algorithm for patients with concomitant hypertension is recommended to reduce the cardiovascular

  9. ALGORITHM FOR MANAGEMENT OF HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS UNDERWENT UROLOGY INTERVENTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Davydova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the efficacy of cardiovascular non-invasive complex assessment and pre-operative preparation in hypertensive patients needed in surgical treatment of urology dis- eases.Material and methods. Males (n=883, aged 40 to 80 years were included into the study. The main group consisted of patients that underwent laparotomic nephrectomy (LTN group; n=96 and patients who underwent laparoscopic nephrectomy (LSN group; n=53. Dynamics of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM data was analyzed in these groups in the immediate postoperative period. The efficacy of a package of non-invasive methods for cardiovascular system assessment was studied. ABPM was performed after nephrectomy (2-nd and 10-th days after surgery in patients with complaints of vertigo episodes or intense general weakness to correct treatment.Results. In LTN group hypotension episodes or blood pressure (BP elevations were observed in 20 (20.8% and 22 (22.9% patients, respectively, on the 2-nd day after the operation. These complications required antihypertensive treatment correction. Patients with hypotension episodes were significantly older than patients with BP elevation and had significantly lower levels of 24-hour systolic BP, night diastolic BP and minimal night systolic BP. Re-adjustment of antihypertensive treatment on the 10-th postoperative day was required to 2 (10% patients with hypotension episodes and to 1 (4.5% patient with BP elevation. Correction of antihypertensive therapy was required to all patients in LSN group on the day 2, and to 32 (60.4% patients on the 10-th day after the operation. Reduction in the incidence of complications (from 1.2% in 2009 to 0.3% in 2011, p<0.001 was observed during the application of cardiovascular non-invasive complex assessment and preoperative preparation in hypertensive patients.Conclusion. The elaborated management algorithm for patients with concomitant hypertension is recommended to reduce the cardiovascular

  10. Preoperative amygdala fMRI in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonelli, Silvia B; Powell, Robert; Yogarajah, Mahinda; Thompson, Pamela J; Symms, Mark R; Koepp, Matthias J; Duncan, John S

    2009-02-01

    Anterior temporal lobe resections (ATLR) benefit 70% of patients with refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), but may be complicated by emotional disturbances. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the role of the amygdala in processing emotions in TLE and whether this may be a potential preoperative predictive marker for emotional disturbances following surgery. We studied 54 patients with refractory mesial TLE due to hippocampal sclerosis (28 right, 26 left) and 21 healthy controls using a memory encoding fMRI paradigm, which included viewing fearful and neutral faces. Twenty-one TLE patients (10 left, 11 right) subsequently underwent ATLR. Anxiety and depression were assessed preoperatively and 4 months postoperatively using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. On viewing fearful faces, healthy controls demonstrated left lateralized, while right TLE patients showed bilateral amygdala activation. Left TLE patients had significantly reduced activation in left and right amygdalae compared to controls and right TLE patients. In right TLE patients, left and right amygdala activation was significantly related to preoperative anxiety and depression levels, and preoperative right amygdala activation correlated significantly with postoperative change of anxiety and depression scores, characterized by greater increases in anxiety and depression in patients with greater preoperative activation. No such correlations were seen for left TLE patients. The fearful face fMRI paradigm is a reliable method for visualizing amygdala activation in controls and patients with mesial TLE. Activation of the right amygdala preoperatively was predictive of emotional disturbances following right ATLR.

  11. Nuclear Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  12. An fMRI investigation of the cognitive reappraisal of negative memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Alisha C.; Kensinger, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Episodic memory retrieval can be influenced by individuals’ current goals, including those that are emotional in nature. Participants underwent an fMRI scan while reappraising, or changing the way they thought about aversive images they had previously encoded, to down-regulate (i.e., decrease), up-regulate (i.e., increase), or maintain the emotional intensity associated with their recall. A conjunction analysis between down- and up-regulation during the entire 12-sec recall period revealed that both commonly activated reappraisal-related regions, particularly in the lateral and medial prefrontal cortex (PFC). However, when we analyzed a reappraisal instruction phase prior to recall and then divided the recall phase into the time when individuals were first searching for their memories and later elaborating on their details, we found that down- and up-regulation engaged greater neural activity at different time points. Up-regulation engaged greater PFC activity than down-regulation or maintenance during the reappraisal instruction phase. In contrast, down-regulation engaged greater lateral PFC activity as images were being searched for and retrieved. Maintaining the emotional intensity associated with the aversive images engaged similar regions to a greater extent than either reappraisal condition as participants elaborated on the details of the images they were holding in mind. Our findings suggest that down- and up-regulation engage similar neural regions during memory retrieval, but differ in the timing of this engagement. PMID:23500898

  13. Frequency of Helicobacter pylori in patients underwent endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Tay

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate thefrequency of Helicobacter pylori in patients underwent endoscopyeastern Anatolia.Materials and methods: The patients whose endoscopicantral biopsies were taken for any reason in our endoscopyunit in February-June 2010 period were includedand retrospectively investigated. The frequency of Helicobacterpylori was determined as separating the patientsaccording to general, sex and the age groups. Antral biopsieswere stained with hematoxylin-eosin and modified giemsamethod and examined under light microscope andreported as (+ mild, (++ moderate, (+++ severe positiveaccording to their intensities.Results: Biopsy specimens of 1298 patients were includedinto the study. The mean age was 47.5 ± 17.5 years(range 14-88 and 607 of these patients (47% were male.Histopathological evaluation revealed that, 918 of the patientswere (71% positive and 379 (29% were negativefor Helicobacter pylori. Approximately 60% of our patientshad mild, 29% had moderate and 11% had severe positivityfor Helicobacter pylori. No significant difference wasfound in the frequency of Helicobacter pylori betweenwomen and men. The frequencies of Helicobacter pyloriwere 73.2%, 71.5%, 68.6% and 70.4%, respectively, inthe age groups of 14-30 years, 31-45 years, 46-60 yearsand 61-88 years.Conclusion: The frequency of Helicobacter pylori was71% in Eastern Anatolia Region. No statistically significantdifference was found between genders and agegroups in term of the frequency of Helicobacter pylori.

  14. Restructuring Reward Mechanisms in Nicotine Addiction: A Pilot fMRI Study of Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement for Cigarette Smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Froeliger

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary goal of this pilot feasibility study was to examine the effects of Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement (MORE, a behavioral treatment grounded in dual-process models derived from cognitive science, on frontostriatal reward processes among cigarette smokers. Healthy adult (N=13; mean (SD age 49 ± 12.2 smokers provided informed consent to participate in a 10-week study testing MORE versus a comparison group (CG. All participants underwent two fMRI scans: pre-tx and after 8-weeks of MORE. Emotion regulation (ER, smoking cue reactivity (CR, and resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC were assessed at each fMRI visit; smoking and mood were assessed throughout. As compared to the CG, MORE significantly reduced smoking (d=2.06 and increased positive affect (d=2.02. MORE participants evidenced decreased CR-BOLD response in ventral striatum (VS; d=1.57 and ventral prefrontal cortex (vPFC; d=1.7 and increased positive ER-BOLD in VS (dVS=2.13 and vPFC (dvmPFC=2.66. Importantly, ER was correlated with smoking reduction (r’s = .68 to .91 and increased positive affect (r’s = .52 to .61. These findings provide preliminary evidence that MORE may facilitate the restructuring of reward processes and play a role in treating the pathophysiology of nicotine addiction.

  15. Decoding Overlapping Memories in the Medial Temporal Lobes Using High-Resolution fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Martin J.; Hassabis, Demis; Maguire, Eleanor A.

    2011-01-01

    The hippocampus is proposed to process overlapping episodes as discrete memory traces, although direct evidence for this in human episodic memory is scarce. Using green-screen technology we created four highly overlapping movies of everyday events. Participants were scanned using high-resolution fMRI while recalling the movies. Multivariate…

  16. Becoming a pianist. An fMRI study of musical literacy acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Lauren; Henson, Rik; Kampe, Knut; Walsh, Vincent; Turner, Robert; Frith, Uta

    2003-11-01

    Musically naïve subjects were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) before and after they had been taught to read music and play keyboard. When subjects played melodies from musical notation after training, activation was seen in a cluster of voxels within the right superior parietal cortex consistent with the view that music reading involves spatial sensorimotor mapping.

  17. Interactions between head motion and coil sensitivity in accelerated fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji-Dana, Z; Tam, F; Chen, J J; Graham, S J

    2016-09-01

    Parallel imaging is widely adopted to accelerate functional MRI (fMRI) data acquisition, through various strategies that involve multi-channel receiver coils. However, the non-uniform spatial sensitivity of multi-channel receiver coils may introduce unwanted artifacts when head motion occurs during the few-minute long fMRI scans. Although prospective correction provides a promising solution for alleviating the head motion artifacts in fMRI, the relative position of the fixed multi-channel receiver coils moves in the moving reference frame, potentially resulting in artifactual signal. We used numerical simulations to investigate this effect on fMRI using two parallel imaging schemes: sensitivity encoding (SENSE) and generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions (GRAPPA) with acceleration factors 2 and 4, towards characterizing the regime over which parallel-imaging fMRI with prospective motion correction will benefit from updating coil sensitivities to reflect relative positional change between the head and the receiver coil. Moreover, six subjects were scanned with acceleration factors 2 and 4 while performing a simple finger-tapping task with and without overt head motion. Updating coil sensitivities showed significant positive impact on standard deviation and activation maps in presence of overt head motion compared to that obtained with no overt head motion. The parallel imaging fMRI with updated coil sensitivity maps were compared to that with the coil sensitivity maps acquired at the reference position. Head motion in relation to a fixed multi-channel coil can adversely affect the quality of parallel imaging fMRI data; and updating coil sensitivity map can mitigate this effect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Improving fMRI reliability in presurgical mapping for brain tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, M Tynan R; Clarke, David B; Stroink, Gerhard; Beyea, Steven D; D'Arcy, Ryan Cn

    2016-03-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is becoming increasingly integrated into clinical practice for presurgical mapping. Current efforts are focused on validating data quality, with reliability being a major factor. In this paper, we demonstrate the utility of a recently developed approach that uses receiver operating characteristic-reliability (ROC-r) to: (1) identify reliable versus unreliable data sets; (2) automatically select processing options to enhance data quality; and (3) automatically select individualised thresholds for activation maps. Presurgical fMRI was conducted in 16 patients undergoing surgical treatment for brain tumours. Within-session test-retest fMRI was conducted, and ROC-reliability of the patient group was compared to a previous healthy control cohort. Individually optimised preprocessing pipelines were determined to improve reliability. Spatial correspondence was assessed by comparing the fMRI results to intraoperative cortical stimulation mapping, in terms of the distance to the nearest active fMRI voxel. The average ROC-r reliability for the patients was 0.58±0.03, as compared to 0.72±0.02 in healthy controls. For the patient group, this increased significantly to 0.65±0.02 by adopting optimised preprocessing pipelines. Co-localisation of the fMRI maps with cortical stimulation was significantly better for more reliable versus less reliable data sets (8.3±0.9 vs 29±3 mm, respectively). We demonstrated ROC-r analysis for identifying reliable fMRI data sets, choosing optimal postprocessing pipelines, and selecting patient-specific thresholds. Data sets with higher reliability also showed closer spatial correspondence to cortical stimulation. ROC-r can thus identify poor fMRI data at time of scanning, allowing for repeat scans when necessary. ROC-r analysis provides optimised and automated fMRI processing for improved presurgical mapping. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  19. Assessment of language lateralization with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salagierska-Barwinska, A.; Goraj, B.

    2004-01-01

    fMRI offers powerful methods to delineate which brain regions are engaged in language processing in the intact brain. Until now hemisphere dominance for language has been usually assessed by means of the intraoperative methods: the Wada test or electrocortical stimulation mapping. Recently functional MRI becomes the valuable method in determining hemisphere dominance for language. fMRI study was proved to be concordant with invasive measures. fMRI was carried out in 30 healthy selected participants (15 females: 10 strongly right-handed and 5 strongly left-handed; 15 males: 10 strongly right-handed and 5 strongly left-handed). The subject's handedness was assessed by standardized psychological tests inter alia the 'lateralization inventory'. Two different language tasks were used: a verb generation task and a phonological task. Subjects were scanned,while performing experimental block. The block contained alternately 8 active (language task) and 8 control conditions. Statistical analysis of evoked blood oxygenation level-dependent BOLD) responses, measured with echo planar imagining (1.5 T) were used. During a verb generation task in strongly right or left handed subjects the inferior frontal region was activated on the side opposite to the subject's handedness determined by the psychological test. Our fMRI studies demonstrated no gender effects on brain during these language tasks. Our study suggests that fMRI is a good device for the study of the language organization. The advantage of fMRI is its capacity for exact localization of activated areas. fMRI together with adequate neurolinguistic test could be promising routine preoperative tool in identification hemisphere dominance for language. These results encourage to further investigation for evaluating correlation in patients with brain injuries. (author)

  20. Functional correlates of cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis: A multicenter fMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Maria A; Valsasina, Paola; Hulst, Hanneke E; Abdel-Aziz, Khaled; Enzinger, Christian; Gallo, Antonio; Pareto, Debora; Riccitelli, Gianna; Muhlert, Nils; Ciccarelli, Olga; Barkhof, Frederik; Fazekas, Franz; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Arévalo, Maria J; Filippi, Massimo

    2014-12-01

    In this multicenter study, we applied functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to define the functional correlates of cognitive dysfunction in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). fMRI scans during the performance of the N-back task were acquired from 42 right-handed relapsing remitting (RR) MS patients and 52 sex-matched right-handed healthy controls, studied at six European sites using 3.0 Tesla scanners. Patients with at least two abnormal (function of increasing task difficulty, CI MS patients had reduced activations of several areas located in the fronto-parieto-temporal lobes as well as reduced deactivations of regions which are part of the default mode network compared to the other two groups. Significant correlations were found between abnormal fMRI patterns of activations and deactivations and behavioral measures, cognitive performance, and brain T2 and T1 lesion volumes. This multicenter study supports the theory that a preserved fMRI activity of the frontal lobe is associated with a better cognitive profile in MS patients. It also indicates the feasibility of fMRI to monitor disease evolution and treatment effects in future studies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A human brain atlas derived via n-cut parcellation of resting-state and task-based fMRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, George Andrew; Hazaroglu, Onder; Bush, Keith A

    2016-02-01

    The growth of functional MRI has led to development of human brain atlases derived by parcellating resting-state connectivity patterns into functionally independent regions of interest (ROIs). All functional atlases to date have been derived from resting-state fMRI data. But given that functional connectivity between regions varies with task, we hypothesized that an atlas incorporating both resting-state and task-based fMRI data would produce an atlas with finer characterization of task-relevant regions than an atlas derived from resting-state alone. To test this hypothesis, we derived parcellation atlases from twenty-nine healthy adult participants enrolled in the Cognitive Connectome project, an initiative to improve functional MRI's translation into clinical decision-making by mapping normative variance in brain-behavior relationships. Participants underwent resting-state and task-based fMRI spanning nine cognitive domains: motor, visuospatial, attention, language, memory, affective processing, decision-making, working memory, and executive function. Spatially constrained n-cut parcellation derived brain atlases using (1) all participants' functional data (Task) or (2) a single resting-state scan (Rest). An atlas was also derived from random parcellation for comparison purposes (Random). Two methods were compared: (1) a parcellation applied to the group's mean edge weights (mean), and (2) a two-stage approach with parcellation of individual edge weights followed by parcellation of mean binarized edges (two-stage). The resulting Task and Rest atlases had significantly greater similarity with each other (mean Jaccard indices JI=0.72-0.85) than with the Random atlases (JI=0.59-0.63; all p<0.001 after Bonferroni correction). Task and Rest atlas similarity was greatest for the two-stage method (JI=0.85), which has been shown as more robust than the mean method; these atlases also better reproduced voxelwise seed maps of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during

  2. Cooperative scans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Zukowski (Marcin); P.A. Boncz (Peter); M.L. Kersten (Martin)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractData mining, information retrieval and other application areas exhibit a query load with multiple concurrent queries touching a large fraction of a relation. This leads to individual query plans based on a table scan or large index scan. The implementation of this access path in most

  3. fMRI. Basics and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulmer, Stephan; Jansen, Olav (eds.) [University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Inst. of Neuroradiology, Neurocenter

    2010-07-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) and the basic method of BOLD imaging were introduced in 1993 by Seiji Ogawa. From very basic experiments, fMRI has evolved into a clinical application for daily routine brain imaging. There have been various improvements in both the imaging technique as such as well as in the statistical analysis. In this volume, experts in the field share their knowledge and point out possible technical barriers and problems explaining how to solve them. Starting from the very basics on the origin of the BOLD signal, the book covers technical issues, anatomical landmarks, presurgical applications, and special issues in various clinical fields. Other modalities for brain mapping such as PET, TMS, and MEG are also compared with fMRI. This book is intended to give a state-of-the-art overview and to serve as a reference and guide for clinical applications of fMRI. (orig.)

  4. fMRI of retina-originated phosphenes experienced by patients with Leber congenital amaurosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzar Ashtari

    Full Text Available A phenomenon characterized by the experience of seeing light without any light actually entering the eye is called phosphenes or photopsias. Phosphenes can occur spontaneously or via induction by external stimuli. Previous reports regarding phosphenes have primarily focused on externally induced phosphenes such as by applying alternating or direct current to the cortex. A few of these reports used functional magnetic resonance (fMRI to study activations induced by cortical phosphenes. However, there are no fMRI reports on spontaneous phosphenes originating from the retina and the resulting pattern of cortical activations. We performed fMRI during a reversing checkerboard paradigm in three LCA patients who underwent unilateral gene therapy and reported experiencing frequent phosphene on a daily basis. We observed bilateral cortical activation covering the entire visual cortices when patients reported experiencing phosphenes. In contrast, in the absence of phosphenes, activation was regulated by patient's visual ability and demonstrated improved cortical activation due to gene therapy. These fMRI results illustrate the potential impact of phosphene perception on visual function and they may explain some of the variability that clinicians find in visual function testing in retinal degeneration. Although we did not perform correlations between visual function and phosphenes, we hope data presented here raises awareness of this phenomenon and its potential effect on visual function and the implications for clinical testing. We recommend a thorough history for phosphene experiences be taken in patients with retinal disease who are candidates for gene or molecular therapy. Lastly, these data illustrate the potential power of fMRI as an outcome measure of gene therapy and the negative impact phosphenes may have on vision testing. fMRI has proven to be a sensitive, non-invasive, and reproducible test paradigm for these purposes and can complement

  5. Effect of fMRI acoustic noise on non-auditory working memory task: comparison between continuous and pulsed sound emitting EPI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Sven; Bartsch, Andreas J; Radue, Ernst W; Klarhöfer, Markus; Seifritz, Erich; Scheffler, Klaus

    2005-11-01

    Conventional blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is accompanied by substantial acoustic gradient noise. This noise can influence the performance as well as neuronal activations. Conventional fMRI typically has a pulsed noise component, which is a particularly efficient auditory stimulus. We investigated whether the elimination of this pulsed noise component in a recent modification of continuous-sound fMRI modifies neuronal activations in a cognitively demanding non-auditory working memory task. Sixteen normal subjects performed a letter variant n-back task. Brain activity and psychomotor performance was examined during fMRI with continuous-sound fMRI and conventional fMRI. We found greater BOLD responses in bilateral medial frontal gyrus, left middle frontal gyrus, left middle temporal gyrus, left hippocampus, right superior frontal gyrus, right precuneus and right cingulate gyrus with continuous-sound compared to conventional fMRI. Conversely, BOLD responses were greater in bilateral cingulate gyrus, left middle and superior frontal gyrus and right lingual gyrus with conventional compared to continuous-sound fMRI. There were no differences in psychomotor performance between both scanning protocols. Although behavioral performance was not affected, acoustic gradient noise interferes with neuronal activations in non-auditory cognitive tasks and represents a putative systematic confound.

  6. Language exposure induced neuroplasticity in the bilingual brain: a follow-up fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Liu; Wang, Junjing; Abutalebi, Jubin; Jiang, Bo; Pan, Ximin; Li, Meng; Gao, Wei; Yang, Yuchen; Liang, Bishan; Lu, Zhi; Huang, Ruiwang

    2015-03-01

    Although several studies have shown that language exposure crucially influence the cerebral representation of bilinguals, the effects of short-term change of language exposure in daily life upon language control areas in bilinguals are less known. To explore this issue, we employed follow-up fMRI to investigate whether differential exposure induces neuroplastic changes in the language control network in high-proficient Cantonese (L1)-Mandarin (L2) early bilinguals. The same 10 subjects underwent twice BOLD-fMRI scans while performing a silent narration task which corresponded to two different language exposure conditions, CON-1 (L1/L2 usage percentage, 50%:50%) and CON-2 (L1/L2 usage percentage, 90%:10%). We report a strong effect of language exposure in areas related to language control for the less exposed language. Interestingly, these significant effects were present after only a 30-day period of differential language exposure. In detail, we reached the following results: (1) the interaction effect of language and language exposure condition was found significantly in the left pars opercularis (BA 44) and marginally in the left MFG (BA 9); (2) in CON-2, increases of activation values in L2 were found significantly in bilateral BA 46 and BA 9, in the left BA44, and marginally in the left caudate; and (3) in CON-2, we found a significant negative correlation between language exposure to L2 and the BOLD activation value specifically in the left ACC. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that even short periods of differential exposure to a given language may induce significant neuroplastic changes in areas responsible for language control. The language which a bilingual is less exposed to and is also less used will be in need of increased mental control as shown by the increased activity of language control areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Drug-related cue induced craving and the correlation between the activation in nucleus accumbens and drug craving: a fMRI study on heroin addicts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yarong; Yang Lanying; Li Qiang; Yang Weichuan; Du Pang; Wang Wei

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the neural mechanism underlying the craving of heroin addicts induced by picture-cue and the correlation between the brain activation degree in nucleus accumbens (NAc)/ the ventral striatum and the scores of patients self-report craving. Methods: Twelve active heroin addicts and 12 matched healthy controls underwent fMRI scan while viewing drug-related pictures and neutral pictures presented in a block design paradigm after anatomical scanning in GE 3.0 T scanner. The fMRI data were analyzed with SPM 5. The change of craving scores was tested by Wilcoxon signed rank test. The Pearson correlation between the activation of NAc/the ventral striatum and the heroin craving score was tested by SPSS 13.0. Results: The craving scores of heroin addicts ranged from 0 to 3.70 (median 0.15) before exposed to drug cue and 0 to 5.10 (median 3.25) after viewing drug-related pictures and showed statistical significance (Z=-2.666, P<0.05). There were 16 activated brain areas when heroin dependent patients exposed to visual drug-related cue vs. neutral visual stimuli. The activation brain regions belonged to two parts, one was limbic system (amygdale, hippocampus, putamen, anterior cingulate cortex and caudate), another was brain cortex (middle frontal cortex, inferior frontal cortex, precentral gyrus, middle temporal cortex, inferior temporal cortex, fusiform gyrus, precuneus and middle occipital gyrus). The MR signal activation magnitude of heroin addicts ranged from 0.19 to 3.50. The result displayed a significant positive correlation between the cue-induced fMRI activation in NAc/the ventral striatum and heroin craving severity (r=0.829, P<0.05). Conclusion: Heroin shared the same neural circuitry in part with other drugs of abuse for cue-induced craving, including brain reward circuitry, visualspatial attention circuit and working memory region. In addition, the dysfunction of NAc/the ventral striatum may attribute to heroin-related cue induced craving

  8. Bone Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... posts Join Mayo Clinic Connect Bone scan About Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  9. MRI Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from ...

  10. When We like What We Know--A Parametric fMRI Analysis of Beauty and Familiarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohrn, Isabel C.; Altmann, Ulrike; Lubrich, Oliver; Menninghaus, Winfried; Jacobs, Arthur M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a neuroscientific study of aesthetic judgments on written texts. In an fMRI experiment participants read a number of proverbs without explicitly evaluating them. In a post-scan rating they rated each item for familiarity and beauty. These individual ratings were correlated with the functional data to investigate the neural…

  11. Mental Time Travel into the Past and the Future in Healthy Aged Adults: An fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viard, Armelle; Chetelat, Gael; Lebreton, Karine; Desgranges, Beatrice; Landeau, Brigitte; de La Sayette, Vincent; Eustache, Francis; Piolino, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    Remembering the past and envisioning the future rely on episodic memory which enables mental time travel. Studies in young adults indicate that past and future thinking share common cognitive and neural underpinnings. No imaging data is yet available in healthy aged subjects. Using fMRI, we scanned older subjects while they remembered personal…

  12. Agreement and repeatability of vascular reactivity estimates based on a breath-hold task and a resting state scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipp, Ilona; Murphy, Kevin; Caseras, Xavier; Wise, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    FMRI BOLD responses to changes in neural activity are influenced by the reactivity of the vasculature. By complementing a task-related BOLD acquisition with a vascular reactivity measure obtained through breath-holding or hypercapnia, this unwanted variance can be statistically reduced in the BOLD responses of interest. Recently, it has been suggested that vascular reactivity can also be estimated using a resting state scan. This study aimed to compare three breath-hold based analysis approaches (block design, sine–cosine regressor and CO2 regressor) and a resting state approach (CO2 regressor) to measure vascular reactivity. We tested BOLD variance explained by the model and repeatability of the measures. Fifteen healthy participants underwent a breath-hold task and a resting state scan with end-tidal CO2 being recorded during both. Vascular reactivity was defined as CO2-related BOLD percent signal change/mm Hg change in CO2. Maps and regional vascular reactivity estimates showed high repeatability when the breath-hold task was used. Repeatability and variance explained by the CO2 trace regressor were lower for the resting state data based approach, which resulted in highly variable measures of vascular reactivity. We conclude that breath-hold based vascular reactivity estimations are more repeatable than resting-based estimates, and that there are limitations with replacing breath-hold scans by resting state scans for vascular reactivity assessment. PMID:25795342

  13. sucralfate scan?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty-nine patients with carcinoma of the oesophagus selected for radiation therapy underwent the 99mTc sucralfate scintimaging prior to radiation therapy. Patients were asked to ... MD, DNB. Tata Memorial Hospital and Radiation Medicine Centre. Mumbai, India .... radioisotope in cases with non-ulcerative disease at ...

  14. An FMRI-compatible Symbol Search task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebel, Spencer W; Clark, Uraina S; Xu, Xiaomeng; Riskin-Jones, Hannah H; Hawkshead, Brittany E; Schwarz, Nicolette F; Labbe, Donald; Jerskey, Beth A; Sweet, Lawrence H

    2015-03-01

    Our objective was to determine whether a Symbol Search paradigm developed for functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) is a reliable and valid measure of cognitive processing speed (CPS) in healthy older adults. As all older adults are expected to experience cognitive declines due to aging, and CPS is one of the domains most affected by age, establishing a reliable and valid measure of CPS that can be administered inside an MR scanner may prove invaluable in future clinical and research settings. We evaluated the reliability and construct validity of a newly developed FMRI Symbol Search task by comparing participants' performance in and outside of the scanner and to the widely used and standardized Symbol Search subtest of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS). A brief battery of neuropsychological measures was also administered to assess the convergent and discriminant validity of the FMRI Symbol Search task. The FMRI Symbol Search task demonstrated high test-retest reliability when compared to performance on the same task administered out of the scanner (r=.791; pSymbol Search (r=.717; pSymbol Search task were also observed. The FMRI Symbol Search task is a reliable and valid measure of CPS in healthy older adults and exhibits expected sensitivity to the effects of age on CPS performance.

  15. Functional brain activation differences in stuttering identified with a rapid fMRI sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Shelly Jo; Choo, Ai Leen; Sharma, Harish; Ambrose, Nicoline G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether brain activity related to the presence of stuttering can be identified with rapid functional MRI (fMRI) sequences that involved overt and covert speech processing tasks. The long-term goal is to develop sensitive fMRI approaches with developmentally appropriate tasks to identify deviant speech motor and auditory brain activity in children who stutter closer to the age at which recovery from stuttering is documented. Rapid sequences may be preferred for individuals or populations who do not tolerate long scanning sessions. In this report, we document the application of a picture naming and phoneme monitoring task in three minute fMRI sequences with adults who stutter (AWS). If relevant brain differences are found in AWS with these approaches that conform to previous reports, then these approaches can be extended to younger populations. Pairwise contrasts of brain BOLD activity between AWS and normally fluent adults indicated the AWS showed higher BOLD activity in the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), right temporal lobe and sensorimotor cortices during picture naming and and higher activity in the right IFG during phoneme monitoring. The right lateralized pattern of BOLD activity together with higher activity in sensorimotor cortices is consistent with previous reports, which indicates rapid fMRI sequences can be considered for investigating stuttering in younger participants. PMID:22133409

  16. Multivariate detrending of fMRI signal drifts for real-time multiclass pattern classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongha; Jang, Changwon; Park, Hae-Jeong

    2015-03-01

    Signal drift in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is an unavoidable artifact that limits classification performance in multi-voxel pattern analysis of fMRI. As conventional methods to reduce signal drift, global demeaning or proportional scaling disregards regional variations of drift, whereas voxel-wise univariate detrending is too sensitive to noisy fluctuations. To overcome these drawbacks, we propose a multivariate real-time detrending method for multiclass classification that involves spatial demeaning at each scan and the recursive detrending of drifts in the classifier outputs driven by a multiclass linear support vector machine. Experiments using binary and multiclass data showed that the linear trend estimation of the classifier output drift for each class (a weighted sum of drifts in the class-specific voxels) was more robust against voxel-wise artifacts that lead to inconsistent spatial patterns and the effect of online processing than voxel-wise detrending. The classification performance of the proposed method was significantly better, especially for multiclass data, than that of voxel-wise linear detrending, global demeaning, and classifier output detrending without demeaning. We concluded that the multivariate approach using classifier output detrending of fMRI signals with spatial demeaning preserves spatial patterns, is less sensitive than conventional methods to sample size, and increases classification performance, which is a useful feature for real-time fMRI classification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Regional homogeneity changes in prelingually deafened patients: a resting-state fMRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjing; He, Huiguang; Xian, Junfang; Lv, Bin; Li, Meng; Li, Yong; Liu, Zhaohui; Wang, Zhenchang

    2010-03-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a technique that measures the intrinsic function of brain and has some advantages over task-induced fMRI. Regional homogeneity (ReHo) assesses the similarity of the time series of a given voxel with its nearest neighbors on a voxel-by-voxel basis, which reflects the temporal homogeneity of the regional BOLD signal. In the present study, we used the resting state fMRI data to investigate the ReHo changes of the whole brain in the prelingually deafened patients relative to normal controls. 18 deaf patients and 22 healthy subjects were scanned. Kendall's coefficient of concordance (KCC) was calculated to measure the degree of regional coherence of fMRI time courses. We found that regional coherence significantly decreased in the left frontal lobe, bilateral temporal lobes and right thalamus, and increased in the postcentral gyrus, cingulate gyrus, left temporal lobe, left thalamus and cerebellum in deaf patients compared with controls. These results show that the prelingually deafened patients have higher degree of regional coherence in the paleocortex, and lower degree in neocortex. Since neocortex plays an important role in the development of auditory, these evidences may suggest that the deaf persons reorganize the paleocortex to offset the loss of auditory.

  18. Scanning table

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    Before the invention of wire chambers, particles tracks were analysed on scanning tables like this one. Today, the process is electronic and much faster. Bubble chamber film - currently available - (links can be found below) was used for this analysis of the particle tracks.

  19. Scanning holograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natali, S.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter reports on the scanning of 1000 holograms taken in HOBC at CERN. Each hologram is triggered by an interaction in the chamber, the primary particles being pions at 340 GeV/c. The aim of the experiment is the study of charm production. The holograms, recorded on 50 mm film with the ''in line'' technique, can be analyzed by shining a parallel expanded laser beam through the film, obtaining immediately above it the real image of the chamber which can then be scanned and measured with a technique half way between emulsions and bubble chambers. The results indicate that holograms can be analyzed as quickly and reliably as in other visual techniques and that to them is open the same order of magnitude of large scale experiments

  20. Improving language mapping in clinical fMRI through assessment of grammar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Połczyńska, Monika; Japardi, Kevin; Curtiss, Susan; Moody, Teena; Benjamin, Christopher; Cho, Andrew; Vigil, Celia; Kuhn, Taylor; Jones, Michael; Bookheimer, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Brain surgery in the language dominant hemisphere remains challenging due to unintended post-surgical language deficits, despite using pre-surgical functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) and intraoperative cortical stimulation. Moreover, patients are often recommended not to undergo surgery if the accompanying risk to language appears to be too high. While standard fMRI language mapping protocols may have relatively good predictive value at the group level, they remain sub-optimal on an individual level. The standard tests used typically assess lexico-semantic aspects of language, and they do not accurately reflect the complexity of language either in comprehension or production at the sentence level. Among patients who had left hemisphere language dominance we assessed which tests are best at activating language areas in the brain. We compared grammar tests (items testing word order in actives and passives, wh -subject and object questions, relativized subject and object clauses and past tense marking) with standard tests (object naming, auditory and visual responsive naming), using pre-operative fMRI. Twenty-five surgical candidates (13 females) participated in this study. Sixteen patients presented with a brain tumor, and nine with epilepsy. All participants underwent two pre-operative fMRI protocols: one including CYCLE-N grammar tests (items testing word order in actives and passives, wh-subject and object questions, relativized subject and object clauses and past tense marking); and a second one with standard fMRI tests (object naming, auditory and visual responsive naming). fMRI activations during performance in both protocols were compared at the group level, as well as in individual candidates. The grammar tests generated more volume of activation in the left hemisphere (left/right angular gyrus, right anterior/posterior superior temporal gyrus) and identified additional language regions not shown by the standard tests (e.g., left anterior

  1. Response inhibition in pedophilia: an FMRI pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habermeyer, Benedikt; Esposito, Fabrizio; Händel, Nadja; Lemoine, Patrick; Kuhl, Hans Christian; Klarhöfer, Markus; Mager, Ralph; Mokros, Andreas; Dittmann, Volker; Seifritz, Erich; Graf, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The failure to inhibit pleasurable but inappropriate urges is associated with frontal lobe pathology and has been suggested as a possible cause of pedophilic behavior. However, imaging and neuropsychological findings about frontal pathology in pedophilia are heterogeneous. In our study we therefore address inhibition behaviorally and by means of functional imaging, aiming to assess how inhibition in pedophilia is related to a differential recruitment of frontal brain areas. Eleven pedophilic subjects and 7 nonpedophilic controls underwent fMRI while performing a go/no-go task composed of neutral letters. Pedophilic subjects showed a slower reaction time and less accurate visual target discrimination. fMRI voxel-level ANOVA revealed as a main effect of the go/no-go task an activation of prefrontal and parietal brain regions in the no-go condition, while the left anterior cingulate, precuneus and gyrus angularis became more activated in the go condition. In addition, a group × task interaction was found in the left precuneus and gyrus angularis. This interaction was based on an attenuated deactivation of these brain regions in the pedophilic group during performance of the no-go condition. The positive correlation between blood oxygen level-dependent imaging signal and reaction time in these brain areas indicates that attenuated deactivation is related to the behavioral findings. Slower reaction time and less accurate visual target discrimination in pedophilia was accompanied by attenuated deactivation of brain areas belonging to the default mode network. Our findings thus support the notion that behavioral differences might also derive from self-related processes and not necessarily from frontal lobe pathology. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. The lie of fMRI: an examination of the ethics of a market in lie detection using functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Amy E

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, I argue that companies who use functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scans for lie detection encounter the same basic ethical stumbling blocks as commercial companies that market traditional polygraphs. Markets in traditional voluntary polygraphs are common and fail to elicit much uproar among ethicists. Thus, for consistency, if markets in polygraphs are ethically unproblematic, markets using fMRIs for lie detection are equally as acceptable. Furthermore, while I acknowledge two substantial differences between the ethical concerns involving polygraphs and fMRI lie detection, I argue that these concerns can be overcome and do not lead to the conclusion that markets in fMRI lie detection are ethically dubious. It is my conclusion that voluntary markets in fMRI lie detection can be justified by consumer autonomy and should be allowed to persist.

  3. On clustering fMRI time series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutte, Cyril; Toft, Peter Aundal; Rostrup, E.

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of fMRI time series is often performed by extracting one or more parameters for the individual voxels. Methods based, e.g., on various statistical tests are then used to yield parameters corresponding to probability of activation or activation strength. However, these methods do not indi...

  4. POBE: A Computer Program for Optimal Design of Multi-Subject Blocked fMRI Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bärbel Maus

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies, researchers can use multi-subject blocked designs to identify active brain regions for a certain stimulus type of interest. Before performing such an experiment, careful planning is necessary to obtain efficient stimulus effect estimators within the available financial resources. The optimal number of subjects and the optimal scanning time for a multi-subject blocked design with fixed experimental costs can be determined using optimal design methods. In this paper, the user-friendly computer program POBE 1.2 (program for optimal design of blocked experiments, version 1.2 is presented. POBE provides a graphical user interface for fMRI researchers to easily and efficiently design their experiments. The computer program POBE calculates the optimal number of subjects and the optimal scanning time for user specified experimental factors and model parameters so that the statistical efficiency is maximised for a given study budget. POBE can also be used to determine the minimum budget for a given power. Furthermore, a maximin design can be determined as efficient design for a possible range of values for the unknown model parameters. In this paper, the computer program is described and illustrated with typical experimental factors for a blocked fMRI experiment.

  5. Unsupervised learning of functional network dynamics in resting state fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eavani, Harini; Satterthwaite, Theodore D; Gur, Raquel E; Gur, Ruben C; Davatzikos, Christos

    2013-01-01

    Research in recent years has provided some evidence of temporal non-stationarity of functional connectivity in resting state fMRI. In this paper, we present a novel methodology that can decode connectivity dynamics into a temporal sequence of hidden network "states" for each subject, using a Hidden Markov Modeling (HMM) framework. Each state is characterized by a unique covariance matrix or whole-brain network. Our model generates these covariance matrices from a common but unknown set of sparse basis networks, which capture the range of functional activity co-variations of regions of interest (ROIs). Distinct hidden states arise due to a variation in the strengths of these basis networks. Thus, our generative model combines a HMM framework with sparse basis learning of positive definite matrices. Results on simulated fMRI data show that our method can effectively recover underlying basis networks as well as hidden states. We apply this method on a normative dataset of resting state fMRI scans. Results indicate that the functional activity of a subject at any point during the scan is composed of combinations of overlapping task-positive/negative pairs of networks as revealed by our basis. Distinct hidden temporal states are produced due to a different set of basis networks dominating the covariance pattern in each state.

  6. Preoperative therapeutic neuroscience education for lumbar radiculopathy: a single-case fMRI report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw, Adriaan; Puentedura, Emilio J; Diener, Ina; Peoples, Randal R

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic neuroscience education (TNE) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of mainly chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions. This case study aims to describe the changes in brain activation on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning, before and after the application of a newly-designed preoperative TNE program. A 30-year-old female with a current acute episode of low back pain (LBP) and radiculopathy participated in a single preoperative TNE session. She completed pre- and post-education measures including visual analog scale (VAS) for LBP and leg pain; Oswestry Disability Index (ODI); Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ); Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) and a series of Likert-scale questions regarding beliefs and attitudes to lumbar surgery (LS). After a 30-minute TNE session, ODI decreased by 10%, PCS decreased by 10 points and her beliefs and attitudes shifted positively regarding LS. Immediately following TNE straight leg raise increased by 7° and forward flexion by 8 cm. fMRI testing following TNE revealed 3 marked differences compared to pre-education scanning: (1) deactivation of the periaqueductal gray area; (2) deactivation of the cerebellum; and (3) increased activation of the motor cortex. The immediate positive fMRI, psychometric and physical movement changes may indicate a cortical mechanism of TNE for patients scheduled for LS.

  7. Classification of fMRI resting-state maps using machine learning techniques: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallos, Ioannis; Siettos, Constantinos

    2017-11-01

    We compare the efficiency of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and nonlinear learning manifold algorithms (ISOMAP and Diffusion maps) for classifying brain maps between groups of schizophrenia patients and healthy from fMRI scans during a resting-state experiment. After a standard pre-processing pipeline, we applied spatial Independent component analysis (ICA) to reduce (a) noise and (b) spatial-temporal dimensionality of fMRI maps. On the cross-correlation matrix of the ICA components, we applied PCA, ISOMAP and Diffusion Maps to find an embedded low-dimensional space. Finally, support-vector-machines (SVM) and k-NN algorithms were used to evaluate the performance of the algorithms in classifying between the two groups.

  8. Non-invasive Access to the Vagus Nerve Central Projections via Electrical Stimulation of the External Ear: fMRI Evidence in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangos, Eleni; Ellrich, Jens; Komisaruk, Barry R

    2015-01-01

    Tract-tracing studies in cats and rats demonstrated that the auricular branch of the vagus nerve (ABVN) projects to the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS); it has remained unclear as to whether or not the ABVN projects to the NTS in humans. To ascertain whether non-invasive electrical stimulation of the cymba conchae, a region of the external ear exclusively innervated by the ABVN, activates the NTS and the "classical" central vagal projections in humans. Twelve healthy adults underwent two fMRI scans in the same session. Electrical stimulation (continuous 0.25ms pulses, 25Hz) was applied to the earlobe (control, scan #1) and left cymba conchae (scan #2). Statistical analyses were performed with FSL. Two region-of-interest analyses were performed to test the effects of cymba conchae stimulation (compared to baseline and control, earlobe, stimulation) on the central vagal projections (corrected; brainstem P < 0.01, forebrain P < 0.05), followed by a whole-brain analysis (corrected, P < 0.05). Cymba conchae stimulation, compared to earlobe (control) stimulation, produced significant activation of the "classical" central vagal projections, e.g., widespread activity in the ipsilateral NTS, bilateral spinal trigeminal nucleus, dorsal raphe, locus coeruleus, and contralateral parabrachial area, amygdala, and nucleus accumbens. Bilateral activation of the paracentral lobule was also observed. Deactivations were observed bilaterally in the hippocampus and hypothalamus. These findings provide evidence in humans that the central projections of the ABVN are consistent with the "classical" central vagal projections and can be accessed non-invasively via the external ear. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Brain activity modification produced by a single radioelectric asymmetric brain stimulation pulse: a new tool for neuropsychiatric treatments. Preliminary fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castagna A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Salvatore Rinaldi1,2, Vania Fontani1, Alessandro Castagna1 1Department of Neuro-Psycho-Physio Pathology, Rinaldi Fontani Institute, Florence, Italy; 2Medical School of Occupational Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy Purpose: Radioelectric asymmetric brain stimulation technology with its treatment protocols has shown efficacy in various psychiatric disorders. The aim of this work was to highlight the mechanisms by which these positive effects are achieved. The current study was conducted to determine whether a single 500-millisecond radioelectric asymmetric conveyor (REAC brain stimulation pulse (BSP, applied to the ear, can effect a modification of brain activity that is detectable using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Methods: Ten healthy volunteers, six females and four males, underwent fMRI during a simple finger-tapping motor task before and after receiving a single 500-millisecond REAC-BSP. Results: The fMRI results indicate that the average variation in task-induced encephalic activation patterns is lower in subjects following the single REAC pulse. Conclusion: The current report demonstrates that a single REAC-BSP is sufficient to modulate brain activity in awake subjects, able to be measured using fMRI. These initial results open new perspectives into the understanding of the effects of weak and brief radio pulses upon brain activity, and provide the basis for further indepth studies using REAC-BSP and fMRI. Keywords: fMRI, brain stimulation, brain modulation, REAC, neuropsychiatric treatments

  10. Normalized cut group clustering of resting-state FMRI data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn van den Heuvel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Functional brain imaging studies have indicated that distinct anatomical brain regions can show coherent spontaneous neuronal activity during rest. Regions that show such correlated behavior are said to form resting-state networks (RSNs. RSNs have been investigated using seed-dependent functional connectivity maps and by using a number of model-free methods. However, examining RSNs across a group of subjects is still a complex task and often involves human input in selecting meaningful networks. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report on a voxel based model-free normalized cut graph clustering approach with whole brain coverage for group analysis of resting-state data, in which the number of RSNs is computed as an optimal clustering fit of the data. Inter-voxel correlations of time-series are grouped at the individual level and the consistency of the resulting networks across subjects is clustered at the group level, defining the group RSNs. We scanned a group of 26 subjects at rest with a fast BOLD sensitive fMRI scanning protocol on a 3 Tesla MR scanner. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: An optimal group clustering fit revealed 7 RSNs. The 7 RSNs included motor/visual, auditory and attention networks and the frequently reported default mode network. The found RSNs showed large overlap with recently reported resting-state results and support the idea of the formation of spatially distinct RSNs during rest in the human brain.

  11. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Thyroid Scan and Uptake Thyroid scan and uptake uses ... the Thyroid Scan and Uptake? What is a Thyroid Scan and Uptake? A thyroid scan is a ...

  12. A fMRI evaluation of lamotrigine for the treatment of trigeminal neuropathic pain: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrivani, Steven; Wallin, Diana; Moulton, Eric A; Cole, Sadie; Wasan, Ajay D; Lockerman, Larry; Bajwa, Zahid; Upadhyay, Jaymin; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2010-06-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) methods, we evaluated the effects of lamotrigine vs placebo in a double-blind 1:1 randomized trial. Six patients with neuropathic pain were recruited for the study. All subjects had baseline pain >4/10 on a visual analog scale (VAS) and allodynia to brush as inclusion criteria for the study. Patients underwent two fMRI sessions, with half of the subjects receiving placebo first and half receiving drug first (based on the blinding protocol). Lamotrigine decreased their average pain intensity level from 5.6 to 3.5 on a VAS. All subjects had brush, cold, and heat applied to the affected and mirror-unaffected sides of their face. The results show: 1) in a small cohort, lamotrigine had a significant effect on heat VAS but not on the other stimuli; and 2) contrast analysis of fMRI results for heat stimuli applied to the affected face for lamotrigine vs placebo produced an overall decrease in blood oxygen dependent level signal, suggesting a potential inhibitory effect of the drug on predominantly cortical regions (frontal, parietal, and temporal).

  13. Case-control resting-state fMRI study of brain functioning among adolescents with first-episode major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yun; Hao, Lili; Zhang, Xiyan; Zhou, Yan; Li, Jianqi; Zhao, Zhimin; Jiang, Wenqing; DU, Yasong

    2014-08-01

    Adolescent depression results in severe and protracted suffering for affected individuals and their family members, but the underlying mechanism of this disabling condition remains unclear. Compare resting-state brain functioning between first-episode, drug-naïve adolescents with major depressive disorder and matched controls. Fifteen adolescents with major depressive disorder and 16 controls underwent a resting-state fMRI scan performed using a 3T magnetic resonance scanner. The amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF) was used to assess resting-state brain function. Adolescents with depression had higher mean (sd) scores on the Children Depression Inventory (CDI) than controls (22.13 [9.21] vs. 9.37 [5.65]). Compared with controls, adolescents with depression had higher ALFF in the posterior cingulate gyrus, left inferior temporal gyrus, right superior temporal gyrus, right insula, right parietal lobe, and right fusiform gyrus; they also exhibited lower ALFF in the bilateral cuneus, the left occipital lobe, and the left medial frontal lobe. Adolescent depression is associated with significant changes in the functioning of several regions of the brain.

  14. Decreased subcortical and increased cortical degree centrality in a nonclinical college student sample with subclinical depressive symptoms: a resting-state fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuihua Gao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal functional connectivity (FC at rest has been identified in clinical depressive disorder. However, very few studies have been conducted to understand the underlying neural substrates of subclinical depression. The newly proposed centrality analysis approach has been increasingly used to explore the large-scale brain network of mental diseases. This study aimed to identify the degree centrality (DC alteration of the brain network in subclinical depressive subjects. Thirty-seven candidates with subclinical depression and 34 well-matched healthy controls (HCs were recruited from the same sample of college students. All subjects underwent a resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI scan to assess the DC of the whole brain. Compared with controls, subclinical depressive subjects displayed decreased DC in the right parahippocampal gyrus (PHG, left PHG/amygdala, and left caudate and elevated DC in the right posterior parietal lobule (PPL, left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG and left middle frontal gyrus (MFG. In addition, by using receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis, we determined that the DC values in the regions with altered FC between the two groups can be used to differentiate subclinical depressive subjects from HCs. We suggest that decreased DC in subcortical and increased DC in cortical regions might be the neural substrates of subclinical depression.

  15. Imaging speech production using fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracco, Vincent L; Tremblay, Pascale; Pike, Bruce

    2005-05-15

    Human speech is a well-learned, sensorimotor, and ecological behavior ideal for the study of neural processes and brain-behavior relations. With the advent of modern neuroimaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the potential for investigating neural mechanisms of speech motor control, speech motor disorders, and speech motor development has increased. However, a practical issue has limited the application of fMRI to issues in spoken language production and other related behaviors (singing, swallowing). Producing these behaviors during volume acquisition introduces motion-induced signal changes that confound the activation signals of interest. A number of approaches, ranging from signal processing to using silent or covert speech, have attempted to remove or prevent the effects of motion-induced artefact. However, these approaches are flawed for a variety of reasons. An alternative approach, that has only recently been applied to study single-word production, uses pauses in volume acquisition during the production of natural speech motion. Here we present some representative data illustrating the problems associated with motion artefacts and some qualitative results acquired from subjects producing short sentences and orofacial nonspeech movements in the scanner. Using pauses or silent intervals in volume acquisition and block designs, results from individual subjects result in robust activation without motion-induced signal artefact. This approach is an efficient method for studying the neural basis of spoken language production and the effects of speech and language disorders using fMRI.

  16. Behavior, neuropsychology and fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Maxwell R; Hatton, Sean; Hermens, Daniel F; Lagopoulos, Jim

    Cognitive neuroscientists in the late 20th century began the task of identifying the part(s) of the brain concerned with normal behavior as manifest in the psychological capacities as affective powers, reasoning, behaving purposively and the pursuit of goals, following introduction of the 'functional magnetic resonance imaging' (fMRI) method for identifying brain activity. For this research program to be successful two questions require satisfactory answers. First, as the fMRI method can currently only be used on stationary subjects, to what extent can neuropsychological tests applicable to such stationary subjects be correlated with normal behavior. Second, to what extent can correlations between the various neuropsychological tests on the one hand, and sites of brain activity determined with fMRI on the other, be regarded as established. The extent to which these questions have yet received satisfactory answers is reviewed, and suggestions made both for improving correlations of neuropsychological tests with behavior as well as with the results of fMRI-based observations. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. [Anesthetic Management of an Infant who Underwent Awake-intubation for Her Pharyngeal Injury Caused by a Toothbrush].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Yoko; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Arai, Takero; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Okuda, Yasuhisa

    2016-04-01

    A 2-year-and-4-month-old female infant, 12 kg in weight and 90 cm in height fell off from a table, which was about 1 m height with a toothbrush in her mouth without her parents noticing. Urgent CT scan showed that it penetrated the left side of her oropharyngeal wall to the bifurcation of her right carotid artery. According to the initial assessment, carotid artery seemed intact and there seemed to be no sign of CNS involvement. She underwent general anesthesia for further investigation and operation. We could detect vocal code with ease by inserting Glidescope between her tongue and the toothbrush. After the intubation, we administered fentanyl 25 μg rocuronium 15 mg and sevoflulane 3-5% to her, and then she underwent arteriography. The neurosurgeon found no sign of major arterial injury nor traumatic aneurysm nor CNS involvement. She went to the ICU intubated after the removal of the toothbrush. She was extubated 5 days after operation. One of the benefits of the Glidescope is that we can share the visual image, and we chose it this time. When we expect a difficult airway during management for oropharyngeal trauma, we have to consider the way to manage the airway.

  18. The spinning dancer illusion and spontaneous brain fluctuations: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Byron; Guillen, Magno; Marquez, Juan Camilo

    2014-01-01

    The brain activation associated with the Spinning Dancer Illusion, a cognitive visual illusion, is not entirely known. Inferences from other study modalities point to the involvement of the dorso-parieto-occipital areas in the spontaneous switchings of perception in other bistable non-kinetic illusions. fMRI is a mature technique used to investigate the brain responses associated with mental changes. Resting-state fMRI is a novel technique that may help ascertain the effects of spontaneous brain changes in the top-down regulation of visual perception. The purpose of this report is to describe the brain activation associated with the subjective illusory changes of perception of a kinetic bistable stimulus. We hypothesize that there is a relationship between the perception phases with the very slow cortical spontaneous fluctuations, recently described. A single normal subject who was trained to produce voluntarily perception phase switches underwent a series of fMRI studies whose blocks were either defined post-hoc or accordingly with a predefined timeline to assess spontaneous and voluntarily evoked visual perception switches, respectively. Correlation of findings with resting-state fMRI and independent component analysis of the task series was sought. Phases of the rotation direction were found associated with right parietal activity. Independent component analysis of the task series and their comparison with basal resting-state components suggest that this activity is related to one of the very slow spontaneous brain fluctuations. The spontaneous fluctuations of the cortical activity may explain the subjective changes in perception of direction of the Spinning Dancer Illusion. This observation is a proof-of-principle, suggesting that the spontaneous brain oscillations may influence top-down sensory regulation.

  19. Improving diagnosis of appendicitis. Early autologous leukocyte scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaney, A R; Raviola, C A; Weber, P N; McDonald, P T; Navarro, D A; Jasko, I

    1989-10-01

    A prospective nonrandomized study investigating the accuracy and utility of autologous leukocyte scanning in the diagnosis of apendicitis was performed. One hundred patients in whom the clinical diagnosis of appendicitis was uncertain underwent indium 111 oxyquinoline labelling of autologous leukocytes and underwent scanning 2 hours following reinjection. Of 32 patients with proved appendicitis, three scans revealed normal results (false-negative rate, 0.09). Of 68 patients without appendicitis, three scans had positive results (false-positive rate, 0.03; sensitivity, 0.91; specificity, 0.97; predictive value of positive scan, 0.94; predictive value of negative scan, 0.96; and overall accuracy, 0.95). Scan results altered clinical decisions in 19 patients. In 13 cases, the scan produced images consistent with diagnoses other than appendicitis, expediting appropriate management. Early-imaging111 In oxyquinoline autologous leukocyte scanning is a practical and highly accurate adjunct for diagnosing appendicitis.

  20. O7.10CORRELATION OF PRE-OPERATIVE LANGUAGE FMRI WITH INTRA-OPERATIVE DIRECT CORTICAL STIMULATION FINDINGS IN GLIOMA SURGERY IDENTIFIES POTENTIAL FALSE POSITIVE FMRI ACTIVATIONS WITH CONVENTIONAL ANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coope, D.J.; Karabatsou, K.; Green, S.; Wall, G.; Bambrough, J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Functional MRI (fMRI) has an increasingly established role in surgical planning for glioma patients. However, the presence of neuro-vascular decoupling in the vicinity of the tumor, along with other tumor specific phenomena, raises at least theoretical concerns of potential inaccuracies. Several studies have attempted to correlate fMRI findings with cortical mapping performed using direct cortical stimulation (DCS). Results with respect to language mapping in particular have not been consistent and have focused upon investigating the sensitivity of fMRI to detect eloquent tissue. The possibility of false positive activations that could lead to regions of tumor being incorrectly labeled as inoperable has not been fully explored, in part due to the challenge of accurately recording DCS findings. METHODS: Ten patients with suspected primary or recurrent low-grade gliomas underwent pre-operative fMRI including 3-4 language paradigms on a Phillips 3T Achieva scanner. Comprehensive neuropsychological assessment was also completed prior to awake craniotomy. fMRI data processed using Phillips proprietary IViewBOLD was made available using the BrainLab VectorVision neuro-navigation system for planning of the craniotomy. The surgeon was blinded to fMRI outcomes for the duration of cortical mapping to minimize bias. DCS was completed using a bipolar stimulator tracked continuously using the BrainLab system networked via the VVLink interface to a research system running 3D Slicer. DCS outcomes were recorded by the surgeon using a panel of footswitches to trigger a custom logging module. fMRI data was re-processed using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) 8 to generate t-statistic maps with a simple threshold of 3 applied analogous to the standard clinical implementation. DCS outcomes within 10mm of a cluster of ≥10 voxels above the threshold were analyzed. RESULTS: A mean of 125.4 [range 64-178] unique DCS outcomes were recorded per subject with 60 [32

  1. Multilingualism and fMRI: Longitudinal Study of Second Language Acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Wright

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BOLD fMRI is often used for the study of human language. However, there are still very few attempts to conduct longitudinal fMRI studies in the study of language acquisition by measuring auditory comprehension and reading. The following paper is the first in a series concerning a unique longitudinal study devoted to the analysis of bi- and multilingual subjects who are: (1 already proficient in at least two languages; or (2 are acquiring Russian as a second/third language. The focus of the current analysis is to present data from the auditory sections of a set of three scans acquired from April, 2011 through April, 2012 on a five-person subject pool who are learning Russian during the study. All subjects were scanned using the same protocol for auditory comprehension on the same General Electric LX 3T Signa scanner in Duke University Hospital. Using a multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA for statistical analysis, proficiency measurements are shown to correlate significantly with scan results in the Russian conditions over time. The importance of both the left and right hemispheres in language processing is discussed. Special attention is devoted to the importance of contextualizing imaging data with corresponding behavioral and empirical testing data using a multivariate analysis of variance. This is the only study to date that includes: (1 longitudinal fMRI data with subject-based proficiency and behavioral data acquired in the same time frame; and (2 statistical modeling that demonstrates the importance of covariate language proficiency data for understanding imaging results of language acquisition.

  2. Multilingualism and fMRI: Longitudinal Study of Second Language Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Edna; Frigau, Luca; Voyvodic-Casabo, Clara; Voyvodic, James; Wright, John

    2013-01-01

    BOLD fMRI is often used for the study of human language. However, there are still very few attempts to conduct longitudinal fMRI studies in the study of language acquisition by measuring auditory comprehension and reading. The following paper is the first in a series concerning a unique longitudinal study devoted to the analysis of bi- and multilingual subjects who are: (1) already proficient in at least two languages; or (2) are acquiring Russian as a second/third language. The focus of the current analysis is to present data from the auditory sections of a set of three scans acquired from April, 2011 through April, 2012 on a five-person subject pool who are learning Russian during the study. All subjects were scanned using the same protocol for auditory comprehension on the same General Electric LX 3T Signa scanner in Duke University Hospital. Using a multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) for statistical analysis, proficiency measurements are shown to correlate significantly with scan results in the Russian conditions over time. The importance of both the left and right hemispheres in language processing is discussed. Special attention is devoted to the importance of contextualizing imaging data with corresponding behavioral and empirical testing data using a multivariate analysis of variance. This is the only study to date that includes: (1) longitudinal fMRI data with subject-based proficiency and behavioral data acquired in the same time frame; and (2) statistical modeling that demonstrates the importance of covariate language proficiency data for understanding imaging results of language acquisition. PMID:24961428

  3. Multilingualism and fMRI: Longitudinal Study of Second Language Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Edna; Frigau, Luca; Voyvodic-Casabo, Clara; Voyvodic, James; Wright, John

    2013-05-28

    BOLD fMRI is often used for the study of human language. However, there are still very few attempts to conduct longitudinal fMRI studies in the study of language acquisition by measuring auditory comprehension and reading. The following paper is the first in a series concerning a unique longitudinal study devoted to the analysis of bi- and multilingual subjects who are: (1) already proficient in at least two languages; or (2) are acquiring Russian as a second/third language. The focus of the current analysis is to present data from the auditory sections of a set of three scans acquired from April, 2011 through April, 2012 on a five-person subject pool who are learning Russian during the study. All subjects were scanned using the same protocol for auditory comprehension on the same General Electric LX 3T Signa scanner in Duke University Hospital. Using a multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) for statistical analysis, proficiency measurements are shown to correlate significantly with scan results in the Russian conditions over time. The importance of both the left and right hemispheres in language processing is discussed. Special attention is devoted to the importance of contextualizing imaging data with corresponding behavioral and empirical testing data using a multivariate analysis of variance. This is the only study to date that includes: (1) longitudinal fMRI data with subject-based proficiency and behavioral data acquired in the same time frame; and (2) statistical modeling that demonstrates the importance of covariate language proficiency data for understanding imaging results of language acquisition.

  4. Effect of scanner acoustic background noise on strict resting-state fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Rondinoni

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Functional MRI (fMRI resting-state experiments are aimed at identifying brain networks that support basal brain function. Although most investigators consider a ‘resting-state' fMRI experiment with no specific external stimulation, subjects are unavoidably under heavy acoustic noise produced by the equipment. In the present study, we evaluated the influence of auditory input on the resting-state networks (RSNs. Twenty-two healthy subjects were scanned using two similar echo-planar imaging sequences in the same 3T MRI scanner: a default pulse sequence and a reduced “silent” pulse sequence. Experimental sessions consisted of two consecutive 7-min runs with noise conditions (default or silent counterbalanced across subjects. A self-organizing group independent component analysis was applied to fMRI data in order to recognize the RSNs. The insula, left middle frontal gyrus and right precentral and left inferior parietal lobules showed significant differences in the voxel-wise comparison between RSNs depending on noise condition. In the presence of low-level noise, these areas Granger-cause oscillations in RSNs with cognitive implications (dorsal attention and entorhinal, while during high noise acquisition, these connectivities are reduced or inverted. Applying low noise MR acquisitions in research may allow the detection of subtle differences of the RSNs, with implications in experimental planning for resting-state studies, data analysis, and ergonomic factors.

  5. The effect of fMRI task combinations on determining the hemispheric dominance of language functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niskanen, Eini [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Applied Physics, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); Koenoenen, Mervi [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio (Finland); Villberg, Ville; Aeikiae, Marja [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Kuopio (Finland); Nissi, Mikko; Ranta-aho, Perttu; Karjalainen, Pasi [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Applied Physics, Kuopio (Finland); Saeisaenen, Laura; Mervaala, Esa [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio (Finland); University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio (Finland); Kaelviaeinen, Reetta [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Kuopio (Finland); University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Neurology, Kuopio (Finland); Vanninen, Ritva [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland)

    2012-04-15

    The purpose of this study is to establish the most suitable combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) language tasks for clinical use in determining language dominance and to define the variability in laterality index (LI) and activation power between different combinations of language tasks. Activation patterns of different fMRI analyses of five language tasks (word generation, responsive naming, letter task, sentence comprehension, and word pair) were defined for 20 healthy volunteers (16 right-handed). LIs and sums of T values were calculated for each task separately and for four combinations of tasks in predefined regions of interest. Variability in terms of activation power and lateralization was defined in each analysis. In addition, the visual assessment of lateralization of language functions based on the individual fMRI activation maps was conducted by an experienced neuroradiologist. A combination analysis of word generation, responsive naming, and sentence comprehension was the most suitable in terms of activation power, robustness to detect essential language areas, and scanning time. In general, combination analyses of the tasks provided higher overall activation levels than single tasks and reduced the number of outlier voxels disturbing the calculation of LI. A combination of auditory and visually presented tasks that activate different aspects of language functions with sufficient activation power may be a useful task battery for determining language dominance in patients. (orig.)

  6. The effect of fMRI task combinations on determining the hemispheric dominance of language functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niskanen, Eini; Koenoenen, Mervi; Villberg, Ville; Aeikiae, Marja; Nissi, Mikko; Ranta-aho, Perttu; Karjalainen, Pasi; Saeisaenen, Laura; Mervaala, Esa; Kaelviaeinen, Reetta; Vanninen, Ritva

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to establish the most suitable combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) language tasks for clinical use in determining language dominance and to define the variability in laterality index (LI) and activation power between different combinations of language tasks. Activation patterns of different fMRI analyses of five language tasks (word generation, responsive naming, letter task, sentence comprehension, and word pair) were defined for 20 healthy volunteers (16 right-handed). LIs and sums of T values were calculated for each task separately and for four combinations of tasks in predefined regions of interest. Variability in terms of activation power and lateralization was defined in each analysis. In addition, the visual assessment of lateralization of language functions based on the individual fMRI activation maps was conducted by an experienced neuroradiologist. A combination analysis of word generation, responsive naming, and sentence comprehension was the most suitable in terms of activation power, robustness to detect essential language areas, and scanning time. In general, combination analyses of the tasks provided higher overall activation levels than single tasks and reduced the number of outlier voxels disturbing the calculation of LI. A combination of auditory and visually presented tasks that activate different aspects of language functions with sufficient activation power may be a useful task battery for determining language dominance in patients. (orig.)

  7. Test–Retest and Between-Site Reliability in a Multicenter fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Lee; Stern, Hal; Brown, Gregory G.; Mathalon, Daniel H.; Turner, Jessica; Glover, Gary H.; Gollub, Randy L.; Lauriello, John; Lim, Kelvin O.; Cannon, Tyrone; Greve, Douglas N.; Bockholt, Henry Jeremy; Belger, Aysenil; Mueller, Bryon; Doty, Michael J.; He, Jianchun; Wells, William; Smyth, Padhraic; Pieper, Steve; Kim, Seyoung; Kubicki, Marek; Vangel, Mark; Potkin, Steven G.

    2013-01-01

    In the present report, estimates of test–retest and between-site reliability of fMRI assessments were produced in the context of a multicenter fMRI reliability study (FBIRN Phase 1, www.nbirn.net). Five subjects were scanned on 10 MRI scanners on two occasions. The fMRI task was a simple block design sensorimotor task. The impulse response functions to the stimulation block were derived using an FIR-deconvolution analysis with FMRISTAT. Six functionally-derived ROIs covering the visual, auditory and motor cortices, created from a prior analysis, were used. Two dependent variables were compared: percent signal change and contrast-to-noise-ratio. Reliability was assessed with intraclass correlation coefficients derived from a variance components analysis. Test–retest reliability was high, but initially, between-site reliability was low, indicating a strong contribution from site and site-by-subject variance. However, a number of factors that can markedly improve between-site reliability were uncovered, including increasing the size of the ROIs, adjusting for smoothness differences, and inclusion of additional runs. By employing multiple steps, between-site reliability for 3T scanners was increased by 123%. Dropping one site at a time and assessing reliability can be a useful method of assessing the sensitivity of the results to particular sites. These findings should provide guidance to others on the best practices for future multicenter studies. PMID:17636563

  8. Optimal compressed sensing reconstructions of fMRI using 2D deterministic and stochastic sampling geometries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeromin Oliver

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compressive sensing can provide a promising framework for accelerating fMRI image acquisition by allowing reconstructions from a limited number of frequency-domain samples. Unfortunately, the majority of compressive sensing studies are based on stochastic sampling geometries that cannot guarantee fast acquisitions that are needed for fMRI. The purpose of this study is to provide a comprehensive optimization framework that can be used to determine the optimal 2D stochastic or deterministic sampling geometry, as well as to provide optimal reconstruction parameter values for guaranteeing image quality in the reconstructed images. Methods We investigate the use of frequency-space (k-space sampling based on: (i 2D deterministic geometries of dyadic phase encoding (DPE and spiral low pass (SLP geometries, and (ii 2D stochastic geometries based on random phase encoding (RPE and random samples on a PDF (RSP. Overall, we consider over 36 frequency-sampling geometries at different sampling rates. For each geometry, we compute optimal reconstructions of single BOLD fMRI ON & OFF images, as well as BOLD fMRI activity maps based on the difference between the ON and OFF images. We also provide an optimization framework for determining the optimal parameters and sampling geometry prior to scanning. Results For each geometry, we show that reconstruction parameter optimization converged after just a few iterations. Parameter optimization led to significant image quality improvements. For activity detection, retaining only 20.3% of the samples using SLP gave a mean PSNR value of 57.58 dB. We also validated this result with the use of the Structural Similarity Index Matrix (SSIM image quality metric. SSIM gave an excellent mean value of 0.9747 (max = 1. This indicates that excellent reconstruction results can be achieved. Median parameter values also gave excellent reconstruction results for the ON/OFF images using the SLP sampling geometry

  9. Head CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - ... Head CT is done in the hospital or radiology center. You lie on a narrow table that ...

  10. Pelvic CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAT scan - pelvis; Computed axial tomography scan - pelvis; Computed tomography scan - pelvis; CT scan - pelvis ... Abnormal results may be due to: Abscess (collection of pus) Bladder stones Broken bone Cancer Diverticulitis

  11. Kernel regression for fMRI pattern prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Carlton; Ni, Yizhao; Tan, Geoffrey; Saunders, Craig J; Ashburner, John

    2011-05-15

    This paper introduces two kernel-based regression schemes to decode or predict brain states from functional brain scans as part of the Pittsburgh Brain Activity Interpretation Competition (PBAIC) 2007, in which our team was awarded first place. Our procedure involved image realignment, spatial smoothing, detrending of low-frequency drifts, and application of multivariate linear and non-linear kernel regression methods: namely kernel ridge regression (KRR) and relevance vector regression (RVR). RVR is based on a Bayesian framework, which automatically determines a sparse solution through maximization of marginal likelihood. KRR is the dual-form formulation of ridge regression, which solves regression problems with high dimensional data in a computationally efficient way. Feature selection based on prior knowledge about human brain function was also used. Post-processing by constrained deconvolution and re-convolution was used to furnish the prediction. This paper also contains a detailed description of how prior knowledge was used to fine tune predictions of specific "feature ratings," which we believe is one of the key factors in our prediction accuracy. The impact of pre-processing was also evaluated, demonstrating that different pre-processing may lead to significantly different accuracies. Although the original work was aimed at the PBAIC, many techniques described in this paper can be generally applied to any fMRI decoding works to increase the prediction accuracy. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. An fMRI study of Agency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charalampaki, Angeliki

    2017-01-01

    Sense of Agency comprises the experience of authorship over voluntarily executed movements. Research related to this phenomenon is substantial, considering altered Sense of Agency has been linked with neurological disorders like Cerebral palsy, Apraxia and Anosognosia for hemiplegia. Previous...... displays. For the purposes of our study twenty participants were recruited. The experimental procedure we considered appropriate to study the Sense of Agency, involved participants laying inside the fMRI scanner and while they had no visual feedback of their hand, they were instructed to draw straight...

  13. Combining task-evoked and spontaneous activity to improve pre-operative brain mapping with fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Michael D.; Qian, Tianyi; Madsen, Joseph R.; Wang, Danhong; Li, Meiling; Ge, Manling; Zuo, Huan-cong; Groppe, David M.; Mehta, Ashesh D.; Hong, Bo; Liu, Hesheng

    2016-01-01

    Noninvasive localization of brain function is used to understand and treat neurological disease, exemplified by pre-operative fMRI mapping prior to neurosurgical intervention. The principal approach for generating these maps relies on brain responses evoked by a task and, despite known limitations, has dominated clinical practice for over 20 years. Recently, pre-operative fMRI mapping based on correlations in spontaneous brain activity has been demonstrated, however this approach has its own limitations and has not seen widespread clinical use. Here we show that spontaneous and task-based mapping can be performed together using the same pre-operative fMRI data, provide complimentary information relevant for functional localization, and can be combined to improve identification of eloquent motor cortex. Accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of our approach are quantified through comparison with electrical cortical stimulation mapping in eight patients with intractable epilepsy. Broad applicability and reproducibility of our approach is demonstrated through prospective replication in an independent dataset of six patients from a different center. In both cohorts and every individual patient, we see a significant improvement in signal to noise and mapping accuracy independent of threshold, quantified using receiver operating characteristic curves. Collectively, our results suggest that modifying the processing of fMRI data to incorporate both task-based and spontaneous activity significantly improves functional localization in pre-operative patients. Because this method requires no additional scan time or modification to conventional pre-operative data acquisition protocols it could have widespread utility. PMID:26408860

  14. Safety and EEG data quality of concurrent high-density EEG and high-speed fMRI at 3 Tesla.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette Thrane Foged

    Full Text Available Concurrent EEG and fMRI is increasingly used to characterize the spatial-temporal dynamics of brain activity. However, most studies to date have been limited to conventional echo-planar imaging (EPI. There is considerable interest in integrating recently developed high-speed fMRI methods with high-density EEG to increase temporal resolution and sensitivity for task-based and resting state fMRI, and for detecting interictal spikes in epilepsy. In the present study using concurrent high-density EEG and recently developed high-speed fMRI methods, we investigate safety of radiofrequency (RF related heating, the effect of EEG on cortical signal-to-noise ratio (SNR in fMRI, and assess EEG data quality.The study compared EPI, multi-echo EPI, multi-band EPI and multi-slab echo-volumar imaging pulse sequences, using clinical 3 Tesla MR scanners from two different vendors that were equipped with 64- and 256-channel MR-compatible EEG systems, respectively, and receive only array head coils. Data were collected in 11 healthy controls (3 males, age range 18-70 years and 13 patients with epilepsy (8 males, age range 21-67 years. Three of the healthy controls were scanned with the 256-channel EEG system, the other subjects were scanned with the 64-channel EEG system. Scalp surface temperature, SNR in occipital cortex and head movement were measured with and without the EEG cap. The degree of artifacts and the ability to identify background activity was assessed by visual analysis by a trained expert in the 64 channel EEG data (7 healthy controls, 13 patients.RF induced heating at the surface of the EEG electrodes during a 30-minute scan period with stable temperature prior to scanning did not exceed 1.0° C with either EEG system and any of the pulse sequences used in this study. There was no significant decrease in cortical SNR due to the presence of the EEG cap (p > 0.05. No significant differences in the visually analyzed EEG data quality were found between

  15. fMRI brain response during sentence reading comprehension in children with benign epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malfait, D; Tucholka, A; Mendizabal, S; Tremblay, J; Poulin, C; Oskoui, M; Srour, M; Carmant, L; Major, P; Lippé, S

    2015-11-01

    Children with benign epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes (BECTS) often have language problems. Abnormal epileptic activity is found in central and temporal brain regions, which are involved in reading and semantic and syntactic comprehension. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we examined reading networks in BECTS children with a new sentence reading comprehension task involving semantic and syntactic processing. Fifteen children with BECTS (age=11y 1m ± 16 m; 12 boys) and 18 healthy controls (age=11 y 8m ± 20 m; 11 boys) performed an fMRI reading comprehension task in which they read a pair of syntactically complex sentences and decided whether the target sentence (the second sentence in the pair) was true or false with respect to the first sentence. All children also underwent an exhaustive neuropsychological assessment. We demonstrated weaknesses in several cognitive domains in BECTS children. During the sentence reading fMRI task, left inferior frontal regions and bilateral temporal areas were activated in BECTS children and healthy controls. However, additional brain regions such as the left hippocampus and precuneus were activated in BECTS children. Moreover, specific activation was found in the left caudate and putamen in BECTS children but not in healthy controls. Cognitive results and accuracy during the fMRI task were associated with specific brain activation patterns. BECTS children recruited a wider network to perform the fMRI sentence reading comprehension task, with specific activation in the left dorsal striatum. BECTS cognitive performance differently predicted functional activation in frontal and temporal regions compared to controls, suggesting differences in brain network organisation that contribute to reading comprehension. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Autotransplantation of spleen tissue in children with mansonic schistosomiasis who underwent splenectomy: Evaluation of splenic residual functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandt Carlos Teixeira

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Autotransplantation of spleen tissue is an attempt for maintenance of splenic functions when splenectomy is indicated in children. It minimizes the risks of overwhelming postsplenectomy infection and it has been done in children with severe portal hypertension due to hepatosplenic mansonic schistosomiasis that underwent splenectomy. The purposes of this investigation were to study the morphology of the residual splenic tissue; to evaluate the residual filtration function of this splenosis; and to assess the immune response to polyvalent pneumococcal vaccine of these patients. Twenty-three children with portal hypertension from mansonic schistosomiasis who underwent splenectomy, ligature of the left gastric vein, autotransplantation of spleen tissue into an omental pouch were evaluated for residual splenic parenchyma and functions. Tc-99m sulfur colloid liver-spleen scans were used for detection of splenic nodules. The search for Howell Jolly bodies were used for assessing the filtration function and Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used for measuring the relative rise in titter of specific pneumococcal antibodies. Splenosis was evident in all children; however, in two there were less than five splenic nodules in the greater omentum, which was considered insufficient. Howell-Jolly bodies were found in the peripheral blood only in these two patients with less evident splenosis. The immune response was adequate in 15 patients; it was intermediate in 4 patients and inadequate in 4 patients. Autotransplantation of spleen tissue into an omental pouch is efficient in maintaining the filtration splenic function in more than 90% of the cases and the immune response to pneumococcal vaccination in approximately 65% of the children.

  17. Effect of using pump on postoperative pleural effusion in the patients that underwent CABG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Özülkü

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The present study investigated effect of using pump on postoperative pleural effusion in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting. Methods: A total of 256 patients who underwent isolated coronary artery bypass grafting surgery in the Cardiovascular Surgery clinic were enrolled in the study. Jostra-Cobe (Model 043213 105, VLC 865, Sweden heart-lung machine was used in on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. Off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting was performed using Octopus and Starfish. Proximal anastomoses to the aorta in both on-pump and off-pump techniques were performed by side clamps. The patients were discharged from the hospital between postoperative day 6 and day 11. Results: The incidence of postoperative right pleural effusion and bilateral pleural effusion was found to be higher as a count in Group 1 (on-pump as compared to Group 2 (off-pump. But the difference was not statistically significant [P>0.05 for right pleural effusion (P=0.893, P>0.05 for bilateral pleural effusion (P=0.780]. Left pleural effusion was encountered to be lower in Group 2 (off-pump. The difference was found to be statistically significant (P<0.05, P=0.006. Conclusion: Under the light of these results, it can be said that left pleural effusion is less prevalent in the patients that underwent off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting when compared to the patients that underwent on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting.

  18. Dysphagia among Adult Patients who Underwent Surgery for Esophageal Atresia at Birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Huynh-Trudeau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical experiences of adults who underwent surgery for esophageal atresia at birth is limited. There is some evidence that suggests considerable long-term morbidity, partly because of dysphagia, which has been reported in up to 85% of adult patients who undergo surgery for esophageal atresia. The authors hypothesized that dysphagia in this population is caused by dysmotility and/or anatomical anomalies.

  19. Evolution of elderly patients who underwent cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Moré Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is a steady increase in the number of elderly patients with severe cardiovascular diseases who require a surgical procedure to recover some quality of life that allows them a socially meaningful existence, despite the risks.Objectives: To analyze the behavior of elderly patients who underwent cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass.Method: A descriptive, retrospective, cross-sectional study was conducted with patients over 65 years of age who underwent surgery at the Cardiocentro Ernesto Che Guevara, in Santa Clara, from January 2013 to March 2014.Results: In the study, 73.1% of patients were men; and there was a predominance of subjects between 65 and 70 years of age, accounting for 67.3%. Coronary artery bypass graft was the most prevalent type of surgery and had the longest cardiopulmonary bypass times. Hypertension was present in 98.1% of patients. The most frequent postoperative complications were renal dysfunction and severe low cardiac output, with 44.2% and 34.6% respectively.Conclusions: There was a predominance of men, the age group of 65 to 70 years, hypertension, and patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft with prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass. Renal dysfunction was the most frequent complication.

  20. Acute myocardial infarctation in patients with critical ischemia underwent lower limb revascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esdras Marques Lins

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atherosclerosis is the main cause of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD of the lower limbs. Patients with PAOD often also have obstructive atherosclerosis in other arterial sites, mainly the coronary arteries. This means that patients who undergo infrainguinal bypass to treat critical ischemia have a higher risk of AMI. There are, however, few reports in the literature that have assessed this risk properly. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of acute myocardial infarction in patients who underwent infrainguinal bypass to treat critical ischemia of the lower limbs caused by PAOD. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 64 patients who underwent 82 infrainguinal bypass operations, from February 2011 to July 2012 were studied. All patients had electrocardiograms and troponin I blood assays during the postoperative period (within 72 hours. RESULTS: There were abnormal ECG findings and elevated blood troponin I levels suggestive of AMI in five (6% of the 82 operations performed. All five had conventional surgery. The incidence of AMI as a proportion of the 52 conventional surgery cases was 9.6%. Two patients died. CONCLUSION: There was a 6% AMI incidence among patients who underwent infrainguinal bypass due to PAOD. Considering only cases operated using conventional surgery, the incidence of AMI was 9.6%.

  1. Brain PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... results on a PET scan. Blood sugar or insulin levels may affect the test results in people with diabetes . PET scans may be done along with a CT scan. This combination scan is called a PET/CT. Alternative Names Brain positron emission tomography; PET scan - brain References Chernecky ...

  2. ADHD-200 Global Competition: Diagnosing ADHD using personal characteristic data can outperform resting state fMRI measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R G Brown

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging-based diagnostics could potentially assist clinicians to make more accurate diagnoses resulting in faster, more effective treatment. We participated in the 2011 ADHD-200 Global Competition which involved analyzing a large dataset of 973 participants including ADHD patients and healthy controls. Each participant's data included a resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI scan as well as personal characteristic and diagnostic data. The goal was to learn a machine learning classifier that used a participant's resting state fMRI scan to diagnose (classify that individual into one of three categories: healthy control, ADHD combined type, or ADHD inattentive type. We used participants' personal characteristic data (site of data collection, age, gender, handedness, performance IQ, verbal IQ, and full scale IQ, without any fMRI data, as input to a logistic classifier to generate diagnostic predictions. Surprisingly, this approach achieved the highest diagnostic accuracy (62.52% as well as the highest score (124 of 195 of any of the 21 teams participating in the competition. These results demonstrate the importance of accounting for differences in age, gender, and other personal characteristics in imaging diagnostics research. We discuss further implications of these results for fMRI-based diagnosis as well as fMRI-based clinical research. We also document our tests with a variety of imaging-based diagnostic methods, none of which performed as well as the logistic classifier using only personal characteristic data.

  3. Accuracy of bone SPECT/CT for identifying hardware loosening in patients who underwent lumbar fusion with pedicle screws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudyana, Hendrah; Maes, Alex [AZ Groeninge, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); University Hospital Leuven, Department of Morphology and Medical Imaging, Leuven (Belgium); Vandenberghe, Thierry; Fidlers, Luc [AZ Groeninge, Department of Neurosurgery, Kortrijk (Belgium); Sathekge, Mike [University of Pretoria, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); Nicolai, Daniel [AZ Groeninge, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); Wiele, Christophe van de [AZ Groeninge, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); University Ghent, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium)

    2016-02-15

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the accuracy of bone SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography)/CT (computed tomography) in diagnosing loosening of fixation material in patients with recurrent or persistent back pain that underwent lumbar arthrodesis with pedicle screws using surgery and clinical follow-up as gold standard A total of 48 patients (median age 49 years, range 21-81 years; 17 men) who had undergone lumbar spinal arthrodesis were included in this retrospective analysis. SPECT/CT results were compared to the gold standard of surgical evaluation or clinical follow-up. Positive SPECT/CT results were considered true positives if findings were confirmed by surgery or if clinical and other examinations were completely consistent with the positive SPECT/CT finding. They were considered false positives if surgical evaluation did not find any loose pedicle screws or if symptoms subsided with non-surgical therapy. Negative SPECT/CT scans were considered true negatives if symptoms either improved without surgical intervention or remained stable over a minimum follow-up period of 6 months. Negative SPECT/CT scans were determined to be false negatives if surgery was still required and loosening of material was found. The median length of time from primary surgery to bone SPECT/CT referral was 29.5 months (range 12-192 months). Median follow-up was 18 months (range 6-57) for subjects who did not undergo surgery. Thirteen of the 48 patients were found to be positive for loosening on bone SPECT/CT. Surgical evaluation (8 patients) and clinical follow-up (5 patients) showed that bone SPECT/CT correctly predicted loosening in 9 of 13 patients, while it falsely diagnosed loosening in 4 patients. Of 35 negative bone SPECT/CT scans, 12 were surgically confirmed. In 18 patients, bone SPECT/CT revealed lesions that could provide an alternative explanation for the symptoms of pain (active facet degeneration in 14 patients, and disc and sacroiliac

  4. Heart PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... A PET scan requires a small amount of radioactive material (tracer). This tracer is given through a vein (IV), ...

  5. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the Thyroid Scan and Uptake? What is a Thyroid Scan and Uptake? A thyroid scan is ... taking our brief survey: Survey Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story ...

  6. Age differences in the motor control of speech: An fMRI study of healthy aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Pascale; Sato, Marc; Deschamps, Isabelle

    2017-05-01

    Healthy aging is associated with a decline in cognitive, executive, and motor processes that are concomitant with changes in brain activation patterns, particularly at high complexity levels. While speech production relies on all these processes, and is known to decline with age, the mechanisms that underlie these changes remain poorly understood, despite the importance of communication on everyday life. In this cross-sectional group study, we investigated age differences in the neuromotor control of speech production by combining behavioral and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Twenty-seven healthy adults underwent fMRI while performing a speech production task consisting in the articulation of nonwords of different sequential and motor complexity. Results demonstrate strong age differences in movement time (MT), with longer and more variable MT in older adults. The fMRI results revealed extensive age differences in the relationship between BOLD signal and MT, within and outside the sensorimotor system. Moreover, age differences were also found in relation to sequential complexity within the motor and attentional systems, reflecting both compensatory and de-differentiation mechanisms. At very high complexity level (high motor complexity and high sequence complexity), age differences were found in both MT data and BOLD response, which increased in several sensorimotor and executive control areas. Together, these results suggest that aging of motor and executive control mechanisms may contribute to age differences in speech production. These findings highlight the importance of studying functionally relevant behavior such as speech to understand the mechanisms of human brain aging. Hum Brain Mapp 38:2751-2771, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Role of emotional processing in depressive responses to sex-hormone manipulation: a pharmacological fMRI study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsson, S.; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Pinborg, A.

    2015-01-01

    sessions, fMRI-scans during exposure to faces expressing fear, anger, happiness or no emotion, depressive symptom scores and estradiol levels were acquired. The fMRI analyses focused on regions of interest for emotional processing. As expected, GnRHa initially increased and subsequently reduced estradiol......Sex-hormone fluctuations may increase risk for developing depressive symptoms and alter emotional processing as supported by observations in menopausal and pre- to postpartum transition. In this double-blinded, placebo-controlled study, we used blood-oxygen level dependent functional magnetic...... resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate if sex-steroid hormone manipulation with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) influences emotional processing. Fifty-six healthy women were investigated twice: at baseline (follicular phase of menstrual cycle) and 16 +/- 3 days post intervention. At both...

  8. Virtual visual reminiscing pain stimulation of allodynia patients activates cortical representation of pain and emotions. fMRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikemoto, Tatsunori; Ushida, Takahiro; Taniguchi, Shinichirou; Tania, Toshikazu; Zinchuk, V.; Morio, Kazuo; Sasaki, Toshikazu

    2004-01-01

    It is widely known that sensation of the pain is derived from sensory-discriminative factor and emotional factor. Especially in chronic pain, emotional factors and psychosocial backgrounds are more likely to contribute for the patients' discomfort. The aim of this study is to investigate how emotional factor of pain participates in intractable pain. We employed functional MRI (fMRI) to compare the brain activations occurring in the orthopaedic neuropathic pain patients with allodynia and normal individuals in response to the visual virtual painful experience. During fMRI scanning, a video demonstrating an actual tactile stimulation of the palm and its imitation were shown to participants. In contrast to normal individuals, allodynia patients also displayed activation of the areas reflecting emotions: frontal lobe and anterior cingulate. These findings suggest that brain have important role in the development and maintaining of peripheral originated chronic painful condition. (author)

  9. Cortical Reorganization in Patients Recovered from Bell's Palsy: An Orofacial and Finger Movements Task-State fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaeyoun; Yuan, Aihong; Wu, Hongli; Wang, Anqin; Xue, Qiuju; Wang, Tao; Wang, Linying; Gao, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To explore cortical reorganization of patients recovered from Bell's palsy (BP) by task-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during finger and orofacial movements and provide more evidence for acupuncture clinical treatment of BP. Methods. We collected 17 BP patients with complete clinical recovery (BP group) and 20 healthy volunteers (control group) accepted the task-state fMRI scans with lip pursing movements and finger movements, respectively. Results. It was found that there were significant differences of brain functional status between the two groups. Conclusions. The results showed that there was cortical reorganization in the brain of patients recovered from BP after acupuncture treatment, which also suggested the relationship between the hand motor areas and facial motor areas of BP patients. PMID:28116170

  10. Voiding patterns of adult patients who underwent hypospadias repair in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, Jawdat; Kocherov, Stanislav; Chertin, Leonid; Farkas, Amicur; Chertin, Boris

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the voiding patterns of adult patients who underwent hypospadias repair in childhood. Following IRB approval 103 (22.7%) of 449 adult patients who underwent hypospadias repair between 1978 and 1993 responded to the following questionnaires: International Prostate Symptom Score (I-PSS) and Short Form 12 questionnaire (SF-12). Uroflowmetry (UF) was performed for all patients. The patients were divided into three groups according to the primary meatus localization. Group I had 63 patients (61.5%) treated for glanular hypospadias, group II had 19 patients (18.4%) treated for distal hypospadias, and group III comprised the remaining 21 patients (20.4%) treated for proximal hypospadias. The mean ± SD I-PSS score for all patients who responded to the questionnaire was 2.3 ± 2.4, and UF was 21.1 ± 4.3 mL/s. The patients from groups I and III had fewer urinary symptoms compared with those of the group II: 1.3 ± 1.5, 5.5 ± 2.4, and 1.6 ± 1.4, respectively (p hypospadias repair in childhood had normal or mild voiding disturbance, with no effects on their physical or mental status. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Prognostic Analysis of Breast Cancer Patients Who Underwent Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Using QOL-ACD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Yasuhiro; Kashiwagi, Shinichiro; Takada, Koji; Goto, Wataru; Asano, Yuka; Morisaki, Tamami; Noda, Satoru; Takashima, Tsutomu; Onoda, Naoyoshi; Hirakawa, Kosei; Ohira, Masaichi

    2017-11-01

    We investigated into association of quality of life(QOL)and prognosis of breast cancer patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy(NAC). We retrospectively studied 228 patients with breast cancer who were performed NAC during a period between 2007 and 2015. TheQ OL score was measured with"The QOL Questionnaire for Cancer Patients Treated with Anticancer Drugs(QOL-ACD)". We evaluate association between QOL score with antitumor effect and prognosis. Changes in the QOL score between before and after NAC were compared as well. We divided 2 groups by QOL-ACD scoreinto high and low groups. Therapeautic effect of NAC on 75 patients were pathological complete response(pCR). QOL-ACD score was not significantly associated with pCR rate in both high and low groups(p=0.199). High group was significantly associated with higher survival rate in both of disease free survival(p=0.009, logrank)and overall survival(p=0.040, logrank). QOLACD score decreased after NAC in both of pCR and non-pCR patients. In conclusion, QOL evaluation using QOL-ACD could be an indicator of breast cancer patients' prognosis who underwent NAC.

  12. HLA-G regulatory haplotypes and implantation outcome in couples who underwent assisted reproduction treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Cynthia Hernandes; Gelmini, Georgia Fernanda; Wowk, Pryscilla Fanini; Mattar, Sibelle Botogosque; Vargas, Rafael Gustavo; Roxo, Valéria Maria Munhoz Sperandio; Schuffner, Alessandro; Bicalho, Maria da Graça

    2012-09-01

    The role of HLA-G in several clinical conditions related to reproduction has been investigated. Important polymorphisms have been found within the 5'URR and 3'UTR regions of the HLA-G promoter. The aim of the present study was to investigate 16 SNPs in the 5'URR and 14-bp insertion/deletion (ins/del) polymorphism located in the 3'UTR region of the HLA-G gene and its possible association with the implantation outcome in couples who underwent assisted reproduction treatments (ART). The case group was composed of 25 ART couples. Ninety-four couples with two or more term pregnancies composed the control group. Polymorphism haplotype frequencies of the HLA-G were determined for both groups. The Haplotype 5, Haplotype 8 and Haplotype 11 were absolute absence in ART couples. The HLA-G*01:01:02a, HLA-G*01:01:02b alleles and the 14-bp ins polymorphism, Haplotype 2, showed an increased frequency in case women and similar distribution between case and control men. However, this susceptibility haplotype is significantly presented in case women and in couple with failure implantation after treatment, which led us to suggest a maternal effect, associated with this haplotype, once their presence in women is related to a higher number of couples who underwent ART. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Sarcopenia: a new predictor of postoperative complications for elderly gastric cancer patients who underwent radical gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chong-Jun; Zhang, Feng-Min; Zhang, Fei-Yu; Yu, Zhen; Chen, Xiao-Lei; Shen, Xian; Zhuang, Cheng-Le; Chen, Xiao-Xi

    2017-05-01

    A geriatric assessment is needed to identify high-risk elderly patients with gastric cancer. However, the current geriatric assessment has been considered to be either time-consuming or subjective. The present study aimed to investigate the predictive effect of sarcopenia on the postoperative complications for elderly patients who underwent radical gastrectomy. We conducted a prospective study of patients who underwent radical gastrectomy from August 2014 to December 2015. Computed tomography-assessed lumbar skeletal muscle, handgrip strength, and gait speed were measured to define sarcopenia. Sarcopenia was present in 69 of 240 patients (28.8%) and was associated with lower body mass index, lower serum albumin, lower hemoglobin, and higher nutritional risk screening 2002 scores. Postoperative complications significantly increased in the sarcopenic patients (49.3% versus 24.6%, P sarcopenia (odds ratio: 2.959, 95% CI: 1.629-5.373, P Sarcopenia, presented as a new geriatric assessment factor, was a strong and independent risk factor for postoperative complications of elderly patients with gastric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Circulating S100B and Adiponectin in Children Who Underwent Open Heart Surgery and Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Varrica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. S100B protein, previously proposed as a consolidated marker of brain damage in congenital heart disease (CHD newborns who underwent cardiac surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB, has been progressively abandoned due to S100B CNS extra-source such as adipose tissue. The present study investigated CHD newborns, if adipose tissue contributes significantly to S100B serum levels. Methods. We conducted a prospective study in 26 CHD infants, without preexisting neurological disorders, who underwent cardiac surgery and CPB in whom blood samples for S100B and adiponectin (ADN measurement were drawn at five perioperative time-points. Results. S100B showed a significant increase from hospital admission up to 24 h after procedure reaching its maximum peak (P0.05 have been found all along perioperative monitoring. ADN/S100B ratio pattern was identical to S100B alone with the higher peak at the end of CPB and remained higher up to 24 h from surgery. Conclusions. The present study provides evidence that, in CHD infants, S100B protein is not affected by an extra-source adipose tissue release as suggested by no changes in circulating ADN concentrations.

  15. Effect of different pneumoperitoneum pressure on stress state in patients underwent gynecological laparoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Yun Shen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the effect of different CO2 pneumoperitoneum pressure on the stress state in patients underwent gynecological laparoscopy. Methods: A total of 90 patients who were admitted in our hospital from February, 2015 to October, 2015 for gynecological laparoscopy were included in the study and divided into groups A, B, and C according to different CO2 pneumoperitoneum pressure. The changes of HR, BP, and PetCO2 during the operation process in the three groups were recorded. The changes of stress indicators before operation (T0, 30 min during operation (T1, and 12 h after operation (T2 were compared. Results: The difference of HR, BP, and PetCO2 levels before operation among the three groups was not statistically significant (P>0.05. HR, BP, and PetCO2 levels 30 min after pneumoperitoneum were significantly elevated when compared with before operation (P0.05. PetCO2 level 30 min after pneumoperitoneum in group B was significantly higher than that in group A (P0.05. Conclusions: Low pneumoperitoneum pressure has a small effect on the stress state in patients underwent gynecological laparoscopy, will not affect the surgical operation, and can obtain a preferable muscular relaxation and vision field; therefore, it can be selected in preference.

  16. Neurobiology of Insight Deficits in Schizophrenia: An fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shad, Mujeeb U.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.

    2015-01-01

    Prior research has shown insight deficits in schizophrenia to be associated with specific neuroimaging changes (primarily structural) especially in the prefrontal sub-regions. However, little is known about the functional correlates of impaired insight. Seventeen patients with schizophrenia (mean age 40.0±10.3; M/F= 14/3) underwent fMRI on a Philips 3.0 T Achieva system while performing on a self-awareness task containing self- vs. other-directed sentence stimuli. SPM5 was used to process the imaging data. Preprocessing consisted of realignment, coregistration, and normalization, and smoothing. A regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between brain activation in response to self-directed versus other-directed sentence stimuli and average scores on behavioral measures of awareness of symptoms and attribution of symptoms to the illness from Scale to Assess Unawareness of Mental Disorders. Family Wise Error correction was employed in the fMRI analysis. Average scores on awareness of symptoms (1 = aware; 5 = unaware) were associated with activation of multiple brain regions, including prefrontal, parietal and limbic areas as well as basal ganglia. However, average scores on correct attribution of symptoms (1 = attribute; 5 = misattribute) were associated with relatively more localized activation of prefrontal cortex and basal ganglia. These findings suggest that unawareness and misattribution of symptoms may have different neurobiological basis in schizophrenia. While symptom unawareness may be a function of a more complex brain network, symptom misattribution may be mediated by specific brain regions. PMID:25957484

  17. Altered default mode network activity in patient with anxiety disorders: An fMRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Xiaohu [Imaging Department of Tong Ji Hospital of Tong Ji University, Shanghai 200065 (China) and Bio-X lab, Department of Physics, Zhe Jiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)], E-mail: xhzhao999@263.net; Wang Peijun [Imaging Department of Tong Ji Hospital of Tong Ji University, Shanghai 200065 (China)], E-mail: tongjipjwang@vip.sina.com; Li Chunbo [Department of Psychiatry, Tong Ji Hospital of Tong Ji University, Shanghai 200065 (China)], E-mail: licb@mail.tongji.edu.cn; Hu Zhenghui [Department of Electrical and Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong (China)], E-mail: eezhhu@ust.hk; Xi Qian [Imaging Department of Tong Ji Hospital of Tong Ji University, Shanghai 200065 (China)], E-mail: 96125007@sina.com.cn; Wu Wenyuan [Department of Psychiatry, Tong Ji Hospital of Tong Ji University, Shanghai 200065 (China)], E-mail: wuwy@mail.tongji.edu.cn; Tang Xiaowei [Bio-X lab, Department of Physics, Zhe Jiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)], E-mail: tangxw@zju.edu.cn

    2007-09-15

    Anxiety disorder, a common mental disorder in our clinical practice, is characterized by unprovoked anxiety. Medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), which closely involved in emotional processing, are critical regions in the default mode network. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate whether default mode network activity is altered in patients with anxiety disorder. Ten anxiety patients and 10 healthy controls underwent fMRI while listening to emotionally neutral words alternating with rest (Experiment 1) and threat-related words alternating with emotionally neutral words (Experiment 2). In Experiment 1, regions of deactivation were observed in patients and controls. In Experiment 2, regions of deactivation were observed only in patients. The observed deactivation patterns in the two experiments, which included MPFC, PCC, and inferior parietal cortex, were similar and consistent with the default model network. Less deactivation in MPFC and greater deactivation in PCC were observed for patients group comparing to controls in Experiment 1. Our observations suggest that the default model network is altered in anxiety patients and dysfunction in MPFC and PCC may play an important role in anxiety psychopathology.

  18. Altered default mode network activity in patient with anxiety disorders: An fMRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xiaohu; Wang Peijun; Li Chunbo; Hu Zhenghui; Xi Qian; Wu Wenyuan; Tang Xiaowei

    2007-01-01

    Anxiety disorder, a common mental disorder in our clinical practice, is characterized by unprovoked anxiety. Medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), which closely involved in emotional processing, are critical regions in the default mode network. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate whether default mode network activity is altered in patients with anxiety disorder. Ten anxiety patients and 10 healthy controls underwent fMRI while listening to emotionally neutral words alternating with rest (Experiment 1) and threat-related words alternating with emotionally neutral words (Experiment 2). In Experiment 1, regions of deactivation were observed in patients and controls. In Experiment 2, regions of deactivation were observed only in patients. The observed deactivation patterns in the two experiments, which included MPFC, PCC, and inferior parietal cortex, were similar and consistent with the default model network. Less deactivation in MPFC and greater deactivation in PCC were observed for patients group comparing to controls in Experiment 1. Our observations suggest that the default model network is altered in anxiety patients and dysfunction in MPFC and PCC may play an important role in anxiety psychopathology

  19. FMRI of working memory in patients with mild cognitive impairment and probable Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yetkin, F. Zerrin; Rosenberg, Roger N.; Weiner, Myron F.; Purdy, Phillip D.; Cullum, C. Munro

    2006-01-01

    The goals of this study were to evaluate brain activation in patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and controls while performing a working memory (WM) task. Eleven AD patients, ten MCI subjects, and nine controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing a visual WM task. Statistical parametric maps of brain activation were obtained in each group, and group activation difference maps were generated. Ability to perform the task did not differ among the groups. Activation was observed in the parahippocampal region, superior-middle-inferior frontal gyri, parietal region, anterior-posterior cingulate, fusiform gyrus, and basal ganglia. MCI and AD groups showed more activation than the controls in the right superior frontal gyrus, bilateral middle temporal, middle frontal, anterior cingulate, and fusiform gyri. Activation in the right parahippocampal gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus, bilateral cingulate and lingual gyri, right lentiform nucleus, right fusiform gyrus, and left supramarginal gyrus in the AD group was less than in the MCI group. The WM task evoked activation in widely distributed regions, consistent with previous fMRI studies. AD and MCI patients showed an increased extent of activation and recruitment of additional areas. (orig.)

  20. Pre-surgical integration of FMRI and DTI of the sensorimotor system in transcortical resection of a high-grade insular astrocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea eEkstrand

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Herein we report on a patient with a WHO Grade III astrocytoma in the right insular region in close proximity to the internal capsule who underwent a right frontotemporal craniotomy. Total gross resection of insular gliomas remains surgically challenging based on the possibility of damage to the corticospinal tracts. However, maximizing the extent of resection has been shown to decrease future adverse outcomes. Thus, the goal of such surgeries should focus on maximizing extent of resection while minimizing possible adverse outcomes. In this case, pre-surgical planning included integration of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, to localize motor and sensory pathways. Novel fMRI tasks were individually developed for the patient to maximize both somatosensory and motor activation simultaneously in areas in close proximity to the tumor. Information obtained was used to optimize resection trajectory and extent, facilitating gross total resection of the astrocytoma. Across all three motor-sensory tasks administered, fMRI revealed an area of interest just superior and lateral to the astrocytoma. Further, DTI analyses showed displacement of the corona radiata around the superior dorsal surface of the astrocytoma, extending in the direction of the activation found using fMRI. Taking into account these results, a transcortical superior temporal gyrus surgical approach was chosen in order to avoid the area of interest identified by fMRI and DTI. Total gross resection was achieved and minor post-surgical motor and sensory deficits were temporary. This case highlights the utility of comprehensive pre-surgical planning, including fMRI and DTI, to maximize surgical outcomes on a case-by-case basis.

  1. A Pregnant Woman Who Underwent Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy due to Cushing’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halit Diri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cushing’s syndrome (CS may lead to severe maternal and fetal morbidities and even mortalities in pregnancy. However, pregnancy complicates the diagnosis and treatment of CS. This study describes a 26-year-old pregnant woman admitted with hypertension-induced headache. Hormonal analyses performed due to her cushingoid phenotype revealed a diagnosis of adrenocorticotropic hormone- (ACTH- independent CS. MRI showed a 3.5 cm adenoma in her right adrenal gland. After preoperative metyrapone therapy, she underwent a successful unilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy at 14-week gestation. Although she had a temporary postoperative adrenal insufficiency, hormonal analyses showed that she has been in remission since delivery. Findings in this patient, as well as those in previous patients, indicate that pregnancy is not an absolute contraindication for laparoscopic adrenalectomy. Rather, such surgery should be considered a safe and efficient treatment method for pregnant women with cortisol-secreting adrenal adenomas.

  2. Clinical outcomes for 14 consecutive patients with solid pseudopapillary neoplasms who underwent laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Matsushita, Akira; Katsuno, Akira; Yamahatsu, Kazuya; Sumiyoshi, Hiroki; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Uchida, Eiji

    2016-02-01

    The postoperative results of laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas (SPN), including the effects of spleen-preserving resection, are still to be elucidated. Of the 139 patients who underwent laparoscopic pancreatectomy for non-cancerous tumors, 14 consecutive patients (average age, 29.6 years; 1 man, 13 women) with solitary SPN who underwent laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy between March 2004 and June 2015 were enrolled. The tumors had a mean diameter of 4.8 cm. Laparoscopic spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy was performed in eight patients (spleen-preserving group), including two cases involving pancreatic tail preservation, and laparoscopic spleno-distal pancreatectomy was performed in six patients (standard resection group). The median operating time was 317 min, and the median blood loss was 50 mL. Postoperatively, grade B pancreatic fistulas appeared in two patients (14.3%) but resolved with conservative treatment. No patients had postoperative complications, other than pancreatic fistulas, or required reoperation. The median postoperative hospital stay was 11 days, and the postoperative mortality was zero.None of the patients had positive surgical margins or lymph nodes with metastasis. The median follow-up period did not significantly differ between the two groups (20 vs 39 months, P = 0.1368). All of the patients are alive and free from recurrent tumors without major late-phase complications. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy might be a suitable treatment for patients with SPN. A spleen-preserving operation is preferable for younger patients with SPN, and this study demonstrated the non-inferiority of the procedure compared to spleno-distal pancreatectomy. © 2015 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. [Patients with astigmatism who underwent cataract surgery by phacoemulsification: toric IOL x asferic IOL?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Netto, Emilio de Almeida; Gulin, Marina Carvalho; Zapparoli, Marcio; Moreira, Hamilton

    2013-01-01

    Compare the visual acuity of patients who underwent cataract surgery by phacoemulsification with IOL AcrySof(®) toric implantation versus AcrySof(®) IQ and evaluate the reduction of cylindrical diopters (CD) in the postoperative period. Analytical and retrospective study of 149 eyes with 1 or more diopters of regular symmetrical keratometric astigmatism, which underwent cataract surgery by phacoemulsification. The eyes were divided into two groups: the toric group with 85 eyes and the non-toric group with 64 eyes. In the pre-operative phase, topographic data and refraction of each eye to be operated were assessed. In the postoperative phase, refraction and visual acuity with and without correction were measured. The preoperative topographic astigmatism ranged from 1.00 to 5.6 DC in both groups. Average reduction of 1.37 CD (p<0.001) and 0.16 CD (p=0.057) was obtained for the toric and non-toric group when compared to the refractive astigmatism, respectively. Considering visual acuity without correction (NCVA), the toric group presented 44 eyes (51.7%) with NCVA of 0 logMAR (20/20) or 0.1 logMAR (20/25) and the toric group presented 7 eyes (10.93%) with these same NCVA values. The results show that patients with a significant keratometric astigmatism presented visual benefits with the toric IOL implantation. The reduction of the use of optical aids may be obtained provided aberrations of the human eye are corrected more accurately. Currently, phacoemulsification surgery has been used not only for functional improvement, but also as a refraction procedure.

  4. Enteral nutrition is superior to total parenteral nutrition for pancreatic cancer patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changli; Du, Zhi; Lou, Cheng; Wu, Chenxuan; Yuan, Qiang; Wang, Jun; Shu, Guiming; Wang, Yijun

    2011-01-01

    To determine the effects of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and enteral nutrition (EN) on biochemical and clinical outcomes in pancreatic cancer patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy. From the year 2006 to 2008, 60 patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy in Tianjin Third Central Hospital were enrolled in this study. They were randomly divided into the EN group and the TPN group. The biochemical and clinical parameters were recorded and analyzed between the two groups. There was no significant difference in the nutritional status, liver and kidney function, and blood glucose levels between the TPN and EN groups on the preoperative day, the 1st and 3 rd postoperative days. However, on the 7th postoperative day, there was significant difference between the two groups in 24 h urinary nitrogen, serum levels of, total protein (TP), transferrin (TF), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and γ-glutamyl transpeptadase (GGT), blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr). On the 14th postoperative day, there was a significant difference between the two groups in terms of urinary levels of 24 h nitrogen, TP, TF, retinol binding protein, ALT, AST, ALP, GGT, total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, BUN, Cr, and glucose. The incidence of delayed gastric emptying in the EN and TPN groups was 0% and 20%, respectively. Moreover, the incidence of pancreatic fistulas and hemorrhages in the EN group were 3.6% and 3.6%, versus 26.7% and 30% in the TPN group, respectively. EN is better than TPN for pancreatic cancer patients who received pancreaticoduodenectomy.

  5. The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) procedure as experienced by healthy participants and stroke patients – A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szameitat, André J; Shen, Shan; Sterr, Annette

    2009-01-01

    An important aspect in functional imaging research employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is how participants perceive the MRI scanning itself. For instance, the knowledge of how (un)comfortable MRI scanning is perceived may help institutional review boards (IRBs) or ethics committees to decide on the approval of a study, or researchers to design their experiments. We provide empirical data from our lab gained from 70 neurologically healthy mainly student subjects and from 22 mainly elderly patients suffering from motor deficits after brain damage. All participants took part in various basic research fMRI studies using a 3T MRI scanner. Directly after the scanning, all participants completed a questionnaire assessing their experience with the fMRI procedure. 87.2% of the healthy subjects and 77.3% of the patients rated the MRI procedure as acceptable to comfortable. In healthy subjects, males found the procedure more comfortable, while the opposite was true for patients. 12.1% of healthy subjects considered scanning durations between 30 and 60 min as too long, while no patient considered their 30 min scanning interval as too long. 93.4% of the healthy subjects would like to participate in an fMRI study again, with a significantly lower rate for the subjects who considered the scanning as too long. Further factors, such as inclusion of a diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) scan, age, and study duration had no effect on the questionnaire responses. Of the few negative comments, the main issues were noise, the restriction to keep still for the whole time, and occasional feelings of dizziness. MRI scanning in the basic research setting is an acceptable procedure for elderly and patient participants as well as young healthy subjects

  6. Functional inferences vary with the method of analysis in fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machulda, M M; Ward, H A; Cha, R; O'Brien, P; Jack, C R

    2001-11-01

    Neuroanatomic substrates of specific cognitive functions have been inferred from anatomic distributions of activated pixels during fMRI studies. With declarative memory tasks, interest has focused on the extent to which various medial temporal lobe anatomic structures are activated while subjects encode new information. The aim of this project was to examine how commonly used variations in fMRI data processing methods affect the distribution of activation in anatomically defined medial temporal lobe regions of interest (ROIs) during a complex scene-encoding task. ROIs were drawn on an MRI anatomic template formed from 3D SPGR scans of eight subjects combined in Talairach space. Separate ROIs were drawn for the posterior and anterior hippocampal formation, parahippocampal gyrus, and entorhinal cortex. Twelve different activation maps were created for each subject by using four correlation coefficients and three cluster volumes. Friedman's two-way ANOVA by ranks was used to test the hypothesis that the distribution of activated pixels among defined anatomic ROIs varied as a function of the data processing method. By simply varying the combination of correlation coefficient and cluster volume, significantly different distributions of activation within named medial temporal lobe structures were obtained from the same fMRI datasets (P < 0.015; P < 0.001). The number of subjects studied (n = 8) is in a range commonly found in the literature yet this clearly resulted in spurious associations between processing parameter variations and activation distribution. Using data processing methods that are independent of the arbitrary selection of cutoff values for thresholding activation maps may reduce the likelihood of obtaining spurious results. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  7. Investigating Inhibitory Control in Children with Epilepsy: An fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triplett, Regina L.; Velanova, Katerina; Luna, Beatriz; Padmanabhan, Aarthi; Gaillard, William D.; Asato, Miya R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective Deficits in executive function are increasingly noted in children with epilepsy and have been associated with poor academic and psychosocial outcomes. Impaired inhibitory control contributes to executive dysfunction in children with epilepsy; however, its neuroanatomic basis has not yet been investigated. We used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to probe the integrity of activation in brain regions underlying inhibitory control in children with epilepsy. Methods This cross-sectional study consisted of 34 children aged 8 to 17 years: 17 with well-controlled epilepsy and 17 age-and sex-matched controls. Participants performed the antisaccade (AS) task, representative of inhibitory control, during fMRI scanning. We compared AS performance during neutral and reward task conditions and evaluated task-related blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) activation. Results Children with epilepsy demonstrated impaired AS performance compared to controls during both neutral (non-reward) and reward trials, but exhibited significant task improvement during reward trials. Post-hoc analysis revealed that younger patients made more errors than older patients and all controls. fMRI results showed preserved activation in task-relevant regions in patients and controls, with the exception of increased activation in the left posterior cingulate gyrus in patients specifically with generalized epilepsy across neutral and reward trials. Significance Despite impaired inhibitory control, children with epilepsy accessed typical neural pathways as did their peers without epilepsy. Children with epilepsy showed improved behavioral performance in response to the reward condition, suggesting potential benefits of the use of incentives in cognitive remediation. PMID:25223606

  8. Comparing the neural correlates of affective and cognitive theory of mind using fMRI: Involvement of the basal ganglia in affective theory of mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodden, Maren E; Kübler, Dorothee; Knake, Susanne; Menzler, Katja; Heverhagen, Johannes T; Sommer, Jens; Kalbe, Elke; Krach, Sören; Dodel, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Theory of Mind (ToM) is the ability to infer other people's mental states like intentions or desires. ToM can be differentiated into affective (i.e., recognizing the feelings of another person) and cognitive (i.e., inferring the mental state of the counterpart) subcomponents. Recently, subcortical structures such as the basal ganglia (BG) have also been ascribed to the multifaceted concept ToM and most BG disorders have been reported to elicit ToM deficits. In order to assess both the correlates of affective and cognitive ToM as well as involvement of the basal ganglia, 30 healthy participants underwent event-related fMRI scanning, neuropsychological testing, and filled in questionnaires concerning different aspects of ToM and empathy. Directly contrasting affective (aff) as well as cognitive (cog) ToM to the control (phy) condition, activation was found in classical ToM regions, namely parts of the temporal lobe including the superior temporal sulcus, the supplementary motor area, and parietal structures in the right hemisphere. The contrast aff > phy yielded additional activation in the orbitofrontal cortex on the right and the cingulate cortex, the precentral and inferior frontal gyrus and the cerebellum on the left. The right BG were recruited in this contrast as well. The direct contrast aff > cog showed activation in the temporoparietal junction and the cingulate cortex on the right as well as in the left supplementary motor area. The reverse contrast cog > aff however did not yield any significant clusters. In summary, affective and cognitive ToM partly share neural correlates but can also be differentiated anatomically. Furthermore, the BG are involved in affective ToM and thus their contribution is discussed as possibly providing a motor component of simulation processes, particularly in affective ToM.

  9. Human amygdala activation by the sound produced during dental treatment: A fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Fang Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During dental treatments, patients may experience negative emotions associated with the procedure. This study was conducted with the aim of using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to visualize cerebral cortical stimulation among dental patients in response to auditory stimuli produced by ultrasonic scaling and power suction equipment. Subjects (n = 7 aged 23-35 years were recruited for this study. All were right-handed and underwent clinical pure-tone audiometry testing to reveal a normal hearing threshold below 20 dB hearing level (HL. As part of the study, subjects initially underwent a dental calculus removal treatment. During the treatment, subjects were exposed to ultrasonic auditory stimuli originating from the scaling handpiece and salivary suction instruments. After dental treatment, subjects were imaged with fMRI while being exposed to recordings of the noise from the same dental instrument so that cerebral cortical stimulation in response to aversive auditory stimulation could be observed. The independent sample confirmatory t-test was used. Subjects also showed stimulation in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex, indicating that the ultrasonic auditory stimuli elicited an unpleasant response in the subjects. Patients experienced unpleasant sensations caused by contact stimuli in the treatment procedure. In addition, this study has demonstrated that aversive auditory stimuli such as sounds from the ultrasonic scaling handpiece also cause aversive emotions. This study was indicated by observed stimulation of the auditory cortex as well as the amygdala, indicating that noise from the ultrasonic scaling handpiece was perceived as an aversive auditory stimulus by the subjects. Subjects can experience unpleasant sensations caused by the sounds from the ultrasonic scaling handpiece based on their auditory stimuli.

  10. Study of the seroma volume changes in the patients who underwent Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

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    Kim, Dae Ho; Son, Sang Jun; Mun, Jun Ki; Seo, Seok Jin; Lee, Je Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    By analyzing seroma volume changes in the patients who underwent Partial breast radiation therapy after breast conserving surgery, we try to contribute to the improvement of radiotherapy effect. Enrolled 20 patients who underwent partial breast radiation therapy by ViewRay MRIdian System were subject. After seeking for the size of the removed sample in the patients during surgery and obtained seroma volume changes on a weekly basis. On the Basis of acquired volume, it was compared with age, term from start of the first treatment after surgery, BMI (body mass index) and the extracted sample size during surgery. And using the ViewRay MRIdian RTP System, the figure was analyzed by PTV(=seroma volume + margin) to obtain a specific volume of the Partial breast radiation therapy. The changes of seroma volume from MR simulation to the first treatment (a week) is 0~5% in 8, 5~10% in 3, 10 to 15% in 2, and 20% or more in 5 people. Two patients(A, B patient) among subjects showed the biggest change. The A patient's 100% of the prescribed dose volume is 213.08 cc, PTV is 181.93 cc, seroma volume is 15.3 cc in initial plan. However, while seroma volume decreased 65.36% to 5.3 cc, 100% of the prescribed dose volume was reduced to 3.4% to 102.43 cc and PTV also did 43.6% to 102.54 cc. In the case of the B patient, seroma volume decreased 42.57% from 20.2 cc to 11.6 cc. Because of that, 100% of the prescribed dose volume decreased 8.1% and PTV also did to 40%. As the period between the first therapy and surgery is shorter, the patient is elder and the size of sample is smaller than 100 cc, the change grow bigger. It is desirable to establish an adaptive plan according to each patient's changes of seroma volume through continuous observation. Because partial breast patients is more sensitive than WBRT patients about dose conformity in accordance with the volume change.

  11. Comparative analysis of pain in patients who underwent total knee replacement regarding the tourniquet pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos George de Souza Leão

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVES: To evaluate through the visual analog scale (VAS the pain in patients undergoing total knee replacement (TKR with different pressures of the pneumatic tourniquet. METHODS: An observational, randomized, descriptive study on an analytical basis, with 60 patients who underwent TKR, divided into two groups, which were matched: a group where TKR was performed with tourniquet pressures of 350 mmHg (standard and the other with systolic blood pressure plus 100 mmHg (P + 100. These patients had their pain assessed by VAS at 48 h, and at the 5th and 15th days after procedure. Secondarily, the following were also measured: range of motion (ROM, complications, and blood drainage volume in each group; the data were subjected to statistical analysis. RESULTS: After data analysis, there was no statistical difference regarding the incidence of complications (p = 0.612, ROM (p = 0.202, bleeding after 24 and 48 h (p = 0.432 and p = 0.254 or in relation to VAS. No correlation was observed between time of ischemia compared to VAS and bleeding. CONCLUSIONS: The use of the pneumatic tourniquet pressure at 350 mmHg or systolic blood pressure plus 100 mmHg did not influence the pain, blood loss, ROM, and complications. Therefore the pressures at these levels are safe and do not change the surgery outcomes; the time of ischemia must be closely observed to avoid major complications.

  12. Assessment of quality of life in patients who underwent minimally invasive cosmetic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aquino, Marcello Simão; Haddad, Alessandra; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2013-06-01

    There are increasingly more patients seeking minimally invasive procedures, which have become more effective and safer in reducing the signs of facial aging. This study included 40 female adult patients who voluntarily underwent selected minimally invasive procedures (filling with hyaluronic acid and botulinum toxin injection) for facial rejuvenation. All patients were followed for a period of 6 months. They were evaluated with the use of questionnaires, a quality-of-life questionnaire (DLQI), the self-esteem scale of Rosenberg (EPM/Rosenberg), and a pain scale. The minimally invasive procedures resulted in improvement in quality of life and self-esteem, which were stronger the first 3 months after the procedures but remained at a higher level than that before treatment, even after 6 months. Hyaluronic acid with lidocaine in the formula is more comfortable for the patient as it makes the injection less painful. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  13. Assessment of Patients Who Underwent Nasal Reconstruction After Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer Excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, Hakan; Bitik, Ozan; Kamburoğlu, Haldun Onuralp; Dadaci, Mehmet; Çaliş, Mert; Öcal, Engin

    2015-06-01

    Basal and squamous cell carcinomas are the most common malignant cutaneous lesions affecting the nose. With the rising incidence of skin cancers, plastic surgeons increasingly face nasal reconstruction challenges. Although multiple options exist, optimal results are obtained when "like is used to repair like". We aimed to introduce a simple algorithm for the reconstruction of nasal defects with local flaps, realizing that there is always more than one option for reconstruction. We retrospectively reviewed 163 patients who underwent nasal reconstruction after excision of non-melanoma skin cancer between March 2011 and April 2014. We analyzed the location of the defects and correlated them with the techniques used to reconstruct them. There were 66 males and 97 females (age, 21-98 years). Basal cell carcinoma was diagnosed in 121 patients and squamous cell carcinoma in 42. After tumor excision, all the defects were immediately closed by either primary closure or local flap options such as Limberg, Miter, glabellar, bilobed, nasolabial, V-Y advancement, and forehead flaps. Obtaining tumor-free borders and a pleasing aesthetic result are major concerns in nasal reconstruction. Defect reconstruction and cosmesis are as important as rapid recovery and quick return to normal daily activities, and these should be considered before performing any procedure, particularly in elderly patients.

  14. [A survey of perioperative asthmatic attack among patients with bronchial asthma underwent general anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ie, Kenya; Yoshizawa, Atsuto; Hirano, Satoru; Izumi, Sinyuu; Hojo, Masaaki; Sugiyama, Haruhito; Kobayasi, Nobuyuki; Kudou, Kouichirou; Maehara, Yasuhiro; Kawachi, Masaharu; Miyakoshi, Kouichi

    2010-07-01

    We investigated the risk factor of perioperative asthmatic attack and effectiveness of preventing treatment for asthmatic attack before operation. We performed retrospective chart review of one hundred eleven patients with asthma underwent general anesthesia and surgical intervention from January 2006 to October 2007 in our hospital. The rate of perioperative asthmatic attack were as follows; 10.2% (5 in 49 cases) in no pretreatment group, 7.5% (3 in 40 cases) in any pretreatments except for systemic steroid, and 4.5% (1 in 22 cases) in systemic steroid pretreatment group. Neither preoperative asthma severity nor duration from the last attack had significant relevancy to perioperative attack rate. The otolaryngological surgery, especially those have nasal polyp and oral surgery had high perioperative asthma attack rate, although there was no significant difference. We recommend the systemic steroid pretreatment for asthmatic patients, especially when they have known risk factor such as administration of the systemic steroid within 6 months, or possibly new risk factor such as nasal polyp, otolaryngological and oral surgery.

  15. Influence of perioperative administration of amino acids on thermoregulation response in patients underwent colorectal surgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeba Snježana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hypothermia in the surgical patients can be the consequence of long duration of surgical intervention, general anesthesia and low temperature in operating room. Postoperative hypothermia contributes to a number of postoperative complications such as arrhythmia, myocardial ischemia, hypertension, bleeding, wound infection, coagulopathy, prolonged effect of muscle relaxants. External heating procedures are used to prevent this condition, but some investigations reported that infusion of aminoacids during surgery can induce thermogenesis and prevent postoperative hypothermia. Case report. We reported two males who underwent major colorectal surgery for rectal carcinoma. One patient received Aminosol 15% solution, 125 ml/h, while the other did not. The esophageal temperatures in both cases were measured every 30 minutes during the operation and 60 minutes after in Intensive Care Unit. We were monitoring blood pressure, heart rate, ECG, and shivering. Patient who received aminoacids showed ameliorated postoperative hypothermia without hypertension, arrhythmia, or shivering, while the other showed all symptoms mentioned above. Conclusion. According to literature data, as well as our findings, we can conclude that intraoperative intravenous treatment with amino acid solution ameliorates postoperative hypothermia along with its complications. .

  16. Congenital hydrocele: prevalence and outcome among male children who underwent neonatal circumcision in Benin City, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osifo, O D; Osaigbovo, E O

    2008-06-01

    To determine the prevalence and spontaneous resolution of congenital hydrocele diagnosed in male neonates who underwent circumcision at our centre. All male neonates presented for circumcision at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria between January 2002 and December 2006 were examined for the presence of hydrocele. Those diagnosed with this condition were recruited and followed up in a surgical outpatient clinic for 2 years. The number of cases of spontaneous resolution and age at which this occurred were documented on a structured pro forma. A total of 2715 neonates were circumcised and 128 (4.7%) were diagnosed with 163 cases of hydrocele, while 27 cases in 25 (0.9%) children failed to resolve at the age of 2 years. Neonatal hydrocele was bilateral in 112 (68.7%), and there were 20 (12.3%) right and 31 (19.0%) left. Among those with hydrocele, 28.1% were delivered preterm and resolution was spontaneous in many of them, with no observed significant statistical difference to those delivered full term (P=0.4740). Of the 163 hydrocele cases, 136 (83.4%) resolved spontaneously by age 18 months with peak resolution at 4-6 months. No spontaneous resolution occurred after 18 months and no hydrocele-related complication occurred during follow up. Neonates with congenital hydrocele should be observed for spontaneous resolution for at least 18 months before being subjected to surgery.

  17. Stress and Quality of Life for Taiwanese Women Who Underwent Infertility Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Yu; Stevenson, Eleanor Lowndes; Yang, Cheng-Ta; Liou, Shwu-Ru

    2018-04-28

    To describe the psychological stress and quality of life experienced by women who underwent fertility treatment in Taiwan. Cross-sectional, correlational study. Recruitment was conducted and questionnaires administered at a reproductive medicine center in Chiayi City, Taiwan. Informed consent to participate was obtained from 126 women who sought fertility treatment at the center. The Chinese Fertility Problem Inventory and Fertility Quality of Life scale were used to measure participants' levels of fertility-related stress and fertility-related quality of life. Descriptive statistics, correlation, and regression analysis were used. Overall, participants reported low levels of fertility-related stress and fertility-related quality of life; however, they had relatively high levels of stress related to need for parenthood. Women who were older, had greater body mass indexes, and consumed coffee regularly had lower fertility-related quality of life. Social and relationship concerns and stress related to need for parenthood were significant predictors of low fertility-related quality of life. In a culture in which childbearing is generally an expectation and an important part of family life, women who experience infertility are at risk to experience fertility-related stress. Social support and family consultation might be offered to improve women's fertility-related quality of life. Copyright © 2018 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Decreased thalamocortical functional connectivity after 36 hours of total sleep deprivation: evidence from resting state FMRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongcong Shao

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The thalamus and cerebral cortex are connected via topographically organized, reciprocal connections, which hold a key function in segregating internally and externally directed awareness information. Previous task-related studies have revealed altered activities of the thalamus after total sleep deprivation (TSD. However, it is still unclear how TSD impacts on the communication between the thalamus and cerebral cortex. In this study, we examined changes of thalamocortical functional connectivity after 36 hours of total sleep deprivation by using resting state function MRI (fMRI. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fourteen healthy volunteers were recruited and performed fMRI scans before and after 36 hours of TSD. Seed-based functional connectivity analysis was employed and differences of thalamocortical functional connectivity were tested between the rested wakefulness (RW and TSD conditions. RESULTS: We found that the right thalamus showed decreased functional connectivity with the right parahippocampal gyrus, right middle temporal gyrus and right superior frontal gyrus in the resting brain after TSD when compared with that after normal sleep. As to the left thalamus, decreased connectivity was found with the right medial frontal gyrus, bilateral middle temporal gyri and left superior frontal gyrus. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest disruptive changes of the thalamocortical functional connectivity after TSD, which may lead to the decline of the arousal level and information integration, and subsequently, influence the human cognitive functions.

  19. Differential Activation Patterns of fMRI in Sleep-Deprived Brain: Restoring Effects of Acupuncture

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    Lei Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies suggested a remediation role of acupuncture in insomnia, and acupuncture also has been used in insomnia empirically and clinically. In this study, we employed fMRI to test the role of acupuncture in sleep deprivation (SD. Sixteen healthy volunteers (8 males were recruited and scheduled for three fMRI scanning procedures, one following the individual’s normal sleep and received acupuncture SP6 (NOR group and the other two after 24 h of total SD with acupuncture on SP6 (SD group or sham (Sham group. The sessions were counterbalanced approximately two weeks apart. Acupuncture stimuli elicited significantly different activation patterns of three groups. In NOR group, the right superior temporal lobe, left inferior parietal lobule, and left postcentral gyrus were activated; in SD group, the anterior cingulate cortex, bilateral insula, left basal ganglia, and thalamus were significantly activated while, in Sham group, the bilateral thalamus and left cerebellum were activated. Different activation patterns suggest a unique role of acupuncture on SP6 in remediation of SD. SP6 elicits greater and anatomically different activations than those of sham stimuli; that is, the salience network, a unique interoceptive autonomic circuit, may indicate the mechanism underlying acupuncture in restoring sleep deprivation.

  20. An asymmetrical relationship between verbal and visual thinking: Converging evidence from behavior and fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amit, Elinor; Hoeflin, Caitlyn; Hamzah, Nada; Fedorenko, Evelina

    2017-05-15

    Humans rely on at least two modes of thought: verbal (inner speech) and visual (imagery). Are these modes independent, or does engaging in one entail engaging in the other? To address this question, we performed a behavioral and an fMRI study. In the behavioral experiment, participants received a prompt and were asked to either silently generate a sentence or create a visual image in their mind. They were then asked to judge the vividness of the resulting representation, and of the potentially accompanying representation in the other format. In the fMRI experiment, participants had to recall sentences or images (that they were familiarized with prior to the scanning session) given prompts, or read sentences and view images, in the control, perceptual, condition. An asymmetry was observed between inner speech and visual imagery. In particular, inner speech was engaged to a greater extent during verbal than visual thought, but visual imagery was engaged to a similar extent during both modes of thought. Thus, it appears that people generate more robust verbal representations during deliberate inner speech compared to when their intent is to visualize. However, they generate visual images regardless of whether their intent is to visualize or to think verbally. One possible interpretation of these results is that visual thinking is somehow primary, given the relatively late emergence of verbal abilities during human development and in the evolution of our species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Affective personality differences in neural processing efficiency confirmed using fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Jeremy R; Burgess, Gregory C; Schaefer, Alexandre; Yarkoni, Tal; Larsen, Randy J; Braver, Todd S

    2005-06-01

    To test for a relation between individual differences in personality and neural-processing efficiency, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess brain activity within regions associated with cognitive control during a demanding working memory task. Fifty-three participants completed both the self-report behavioral inhibition sensitivity (BIS) and behavioral approach sensitivity (BAS) personality scales and a standard measure of fluid intelligence (Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices). They were then scanned as they performed a three-back working memory task. A mixed blocked/ event-related fMRI design enabled us to identify both sustained and transient neural activity. Higher BAS was negatively related to event-related activity in the dorsal anterior cingulate, the lateral prefrontal cortex, and parietal areas in regions of interest identified in previous work. These relationships were not explained by differences in either behavioral performance or fluid intelligence, consistent with greater neural efficiency. The results reveal the high specificity of the relationships among personality, cognition, and brain activity. The data confirm that affective dimensions of personality are independent of intelligence, yet also suggest that they might be interrelated in subtle ways, because they modulate activity in overlapping brain regions that appear to be critical for task performance.

  2. Pomegranate Juice Augments Memory and fMRI Activity in Middle-Aged and Older Adults with Mild Memory Complaints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Y. Bookheimer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite increasing emphasis on the potential of dietary antioxidants in preventing memory loss and on diet as a precursor of neurological health, rigorous studies investigating the cognitive effects of foods and their components are rare. Recent animal studies have reported memory and other cognitive benefits of polyphenols, found abundantly in pomegranate juice. We performed a preliminary, placebo-controlled randomized trial of pomegranate juice in older subjects with age-associated memory complaints using memory testing and functional brain activation (fMRI as outcome measures. Thirty-two subjects (28 completers were randomly assigned to drink 8 ounces of either pomegranate juice or a flavor-matched placebo drink for 4 weeks. Subjects received memory testing, fMRI scans during cognitive tasks, and blood draws for peripheral biomarkers before and after the intervention. Investigators and subjects were all blind to group membership. After 4 weeks, only the pomegranate group showed a significant improvement in the Buschke selective reminding test of verbal memory and a significant increase in plasma trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC and urolithin A-glucuronide. Furthermore, compared to the placebo group, the pomegranate group had increased fMRI activity during verbal and visual memory tasks. While preliminary, these results suggest a role for pomegranate juice in augmenting memory function through task-related increases in functional brain activity.

  3. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

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    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Thyroid Scan and Uptake Thyroid scan ... for several hours before your exam because eating can affect the accuracy of the uptake measurement. Jewelry ...

  4. Radiopharmaceutical scanning agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This invention is directed to dispersions useful in preparing radiopharmaceutical scanning agents, to technetium labelled dispersions, to methods for preparing such dispersions and to their use as scanning agents

  5. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of the Thyroid Scan and Uptake? What is a Thyroid Scan and Uptake? A thyroid ... body converts food to energy. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? The ...

  6. Nuclear Scans - Multiple Languages

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    ... Expand Section Bone Scan - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations PET (Positron Emission Tomography) Scan - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified ( ...

  7. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Scan and Uptake Thyroid scan and uptake uses small amounts of radioactive materials called radiotracers, a special ... is a branch of medical imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive material to diagnose and determine ...

  8. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

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    Full Text Available ... of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Most thyroid scan and thyroid uptake ... you otherwise, you may resume your normal activities after your nuclear medicine scan. If any special instructions ...

  9. Long-term outcomes of four patients with tracheal agenesis who underwent airway and esophageal reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazuke, Yuko; Okuyama, Hiroomi; Uehara, Shuichiro; Ueno, Takehisa; Nara, Keigo; Yamanaka, Hiroaki; Kawahara, Hisayoshi; Kubota, Akio; Usui, Noriaki; Soh, Hideki; Nomura, Motonari; Oue, Takaharu; Sasaki, Takashi; Nose, Satoko; Saka, Ryuta

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term outcomes of four patients with tracheal agenesis who underwent airway and esophageal/alimentary reconstruction. We reviewed the medical records of four long-term survivors of tracheal agenesis and collected the following data: age, sex, type of tracheal agenesis, method of reconstruction, nutritional management, and physical and neurological development. The patients consisted of three boys and one girl, who ranged in age from 77 to 109months. The severity of their condition was classified as Floyd's type I (n=2), II (n=1), or III (n=1). Mechanical respiratory support was not necessary in any of the cases. Esophageal/alimentary reconstruction was performed using the small intestine (n=2), a gastric tube (n=1), and the esophagus (n=1). The age at esophageal reconstruction ranged from 41 to 55months. All of the cases required enteral nutrition via gastrostomy. Three of the patients were able to swallow a small amount of liquid and one was able to take pureed food orally. The physical development of the subjects was moderately delayed-borderline in childhood. Neurological development was normal in two cases and slightly delayed in two cases. None of the long-term survivors of tracheal agenesis required the use of an artificial respirator, and their development was close to normal. Future studies should aim to elucidate the optimal method for performing esophageal reconstruction to allow tracheal agenesis patients to achieve their full oral intake. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Predictors of weight regain in patients who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantavasinkul, Prapimporn Chattranukulchai; Omotosho, Philip; Corsino, Leonor; Portenier, Dana; Torquati, Alfonso

    2016-11-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is a highly effective treatment for obesity and results in long-term weight loss and resolution of co-morbidities. However, weight regain may occur as soon as 1-2 years after surgery. This retrospective study aimed to investigate the prevalence of weight regain and possible preoperative predictors of this phenomenon after RYGB. An academic medical center in the United States. A total of 1426 obese patients (15.8% male) who underwent RYGB during January 2000 to 2012 and had at least a 2-year follow-up were reviewed. We included only patients who were initially successful, having achieved at least 50% excess weight loss at 1 year postoperatively. Patients were then categorized into either the weight regain group (WR) or sustained weight loss (SWL) group based upon whether they gained≥15% of their 1-year postoperative weight. Weight regain was observed in 244 patients (17.1%). Preoperative body mass index was similar between groups. Body mass index was significantly higher and percent excess weight loss was significantly lower in the WR group (Pweight regain was 19.5±9.3 kg and-.8±8.5 in the WR and SWL groups, respectively (Pweight loss. Moreover, a longer duration after RYGB was associated with weight regain. Multivariate analysis revealed that younger age was a significant predictor of weight regain even after adjusting for time since RYGB. The present study confirmed that a longer interval after RYGB was associated with weight regain. Younger age was a significant predictor of weight regain even after adjusting for time since RYGB. The findings of this study underscore the complexity of the mechanisms underlying weight loss and regain after RYGB. Future prospective studies are needed to further explore the prevalence, predictors, and mechanisms of weight regain after RYGB. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of patients who underwent resympathectomy for treatment of primary hyperhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, José Ribas Milanez; Lembrança, Lucas; Fukuda, Juliana Maria; Kauffman, Paulo; Teivelis, Marcelo Passos; Puech-Leão, Pedro; Wolosker, Nelson

    2017-11-01

    Video thoracoscopic sympathectomy is the recommended surgical treatment for primary hyperhidrosis and has a high success rate. Despite this high success rate, some patients are unresponsive and eventually need a resympathectomy. Few studies have previously analysed exclusively the results of these resympathectomies in patients with primary hyperhidrosis. None of the studies have objectively evaluated the degree of response to surgery or the improvement in quality of life after resympathectomies. This is a retrospective study, evaluating 15 patients from an initial group of 2300 patients who underwent resympathectomy after failure of the primary surgical treatment. We evaluated sympathectomy levels of resection, technical difficulties, surgical complications preoperative quality of life, response to treatment and quality-of-life improvement 30 days after each surgery. Regarding gender, 11 (73.3%) patients were women. The average age was 23.2 with SD of 5.17 years, and the mean body mass index was 20.9 (SD 2.12). Ten patients had major complaints about their hands (66%) and 5 (33%) patients about their forearms. A high degree of response to sympathectomy occurred in 73% of patients. In 11 of these patients, the improvement in quality of life was considered high, 3 showed a mild improvement and 1 did not improve. No major complications occurred; the presence of adhesions was reported in 11 patients and pleural drainage was necessary in 4 patients. Resympathectomy is an effective procedure, and it improves the quality of life in patients with primary hyperhidrosis who failed after the first surgery. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  12. Surgical outcomes of 380 patients with double outlet right ventricle who underwent biventricular repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shoujun; Ma, Kai; Hu, Shengshou; Hua, Zhongdong; Yang, Keming; Yan, Jun; Chen, Qiuming

    2014-09-01

    The study objective was to report the outcomes of biventricular repair in patients with double outlet right ventricle. Patients with double outlet right ventricle who underwent biventricular repair at Fuwai Hospital from January 2005 to December 2012 were included. Patients were excluded if double outlet right ventricle was combined with atrioventricular septal defect, heterotaxy syndrome, atrioventricular discordance, or univentricular physiology. A total of 380 consecutive patients with a mean age of 1.9 ± 2.1 years (range, 1 month to 6 years) were included. Varied types of biventricular repair were customized individually. Follow-up was 90.4% complete, and the mean follow-up time was 3.4 ± 3.9 years. There were 17 (4.5%) early deaths and 7 (2.1%) late deaths. Preoperative pulmonary hypertension was the only risk factor for early mortality. Postoperative significant left ventricular outflow tract obstruction was present in 9 survivors. Patients with noncommitted ventricular septal defect had a longer crossclamp time, longer cardiopulmonary bypass time, and higher incidence of postdischarge left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. There were 4 reoperations, all of which were caused by subaortic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. All of the pressure gradients were decreased to less than 20 mm Hg after the modified Konno procedure with an uneventful postoperative course. Optimal results of varied types of biventricular repair for double outlet right ventricle have been acquired. Although noncommitted ventricular septal defect is technically difficult, the outcomes of patients are favorable. Late-onset left ventricular outflow tract obstruction is the main reason for reoperation but can be successfully relieved by the modified Konno procedure. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Newly Developed Sarcopenia as a Prognostic Factor for Survival in Patients who Underwent Liver Transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ja Young Jeon

    Full Text Available The relationship between a perioperative change in sarcopenic status and clinical outcome of liver transplantation (LT is unknown. We investigated whether post-LT sarcopenia and changes in sarcopenic status were associated with the survival of patients.This retrospective study was based on a cohort of 145 patients from a single transplant center who during a mean of 1 year after LT underwent computed tomography imaging evaluation. The cross-sectional area of the psoas muscle of LT patients was compared with that of age- and sex-matched healthy individuals. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to determine whether post-LT sarcopenia and changes in sarcopenic status affect post-LT survival.The mean age at LT of the 116 male and 29 female patients was 50.2 ± 7.9 years; the mean follow-up duration was 51.6 ± 32.9 months. All pre-LT patients with sarcopenia still had sarcopenia 1 year after LT; 14 (15% patients had newly developed sarcopenia. The mean survival duration was 91.8 ± 4.2 months for non-sarcopenic patients and 80.0 ± 5.2 months for sarcopenic patients (log-rank test, p = 0.069. In subgroup analysis, newly developed sarcopenia was an independent negative predictor for post-LT survival (hazard ratio: 10.53, 95% confidence interval: 1.37-80.93, p = 0.024.Sarcopenia in LT recipients did not improve in any of the previously sarcopenic patients and newly developed within 1 year in others. Newly developed sarcopenia was associated with increased mortality. Newly developed sarcopenia can be used to stratify patients with regard to the risk of post-LT mortality.

  14. Scanning gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engdahl, L.W.; Batter, J.F. Jr.; Stout, K.J.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning system for a gamma camera providing for the overlapping of adjacent scan paths is described. A collimator mask having tapered edges provides for a graduated reduction in intensity of radiation received by a detector thereof, the reduction in intensity being graduated in a direction normal to the scanning path to provide a blending of images of adjacent scan paths. 31 claims, 15 figures

  15. fMRI. Basics and clinical applications. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulmer, Stephan [Medizinisch Radiologisces Institut (MRI), Zuerich (Switzerland); Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie; Jansen, Olav (eds.) [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie

    2013-11-01

    State of the art overview of fMRI. Covers technical issues, methods of statistical analysis, and the full range of clinical applications. Revised and expanded edition including discussion of novel aspects of analysis and further important applications. Includes comparisons with other brain mapping techniques and discussion of potential combined uses. Since functional MRI (fMRI) and the basic method of BOLD imaging were introduced in 1993 by Seiji Ogawa, fMRI has evolved into an invaluable clinical tool for routine brain imaging, and there have been substantial improvements in both the imaging technique itself and the associated statistical analysis. This book provides a state of the art overview of fMRI and its use in clinical practice. Experts in the field share their knowledge and explain how to overcome diverse potential technical barriers and problems. Starting from the very basics on the origin of the BOLD signal, the book covers technical issues, anatomical landmarks, the full range of clinical applications, methods of statistical analysis, and special issues in various clinical fields. Comparisons are made with other brain mapping techniques, such as DTI, PET, TMS, EEG, and MEG, and their combined use with fMRI is also discussed. Since the first edition, original chapters have been updated and new chapters added, covering both novel aspects of analysis and further important clinical applications.

  16. Psychophysiological interaction between superior temporal gyrus (STG) and cerebellum: An fMRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, A. N.; Teng, X. L.; Ng, S. B.; Hamid, A. I. A.; Mukari, S. Z. M.

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to model the psychophysiological interaction (PPI) between the bilateral STG and cerebellum (lobule VI and lobule VII) during an arithmetic addition task. Eighteen young adults participated in this study. They were instructed to solve single-digit addition tasks in quiet and noisy backgrounds during an fMRI scan. Results showed that in both hemispheres, the response in the cerebellum was found to be linearly influenced by the activity in STG (vice-versa) for both in-quiet and in-noise conditions. However, the influence of the cerebellum on STG seemed to be modulated by noise. A two-way PPI model between STG and cerebellum is suggested. The connectivity between the two regions during a simple addition task in a noisy condition is modulated by the participants’ higher attention to perceive.

  17. Reproducible localization of interictal epileptiform discharges using EEG-triggered fMRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Symms, M.R.; Allen, P.J.; Fish, D.R.; Barker, G.J.

    1999-01-01

    We report preliminary experiences using fMRI triggered by EEG to localize the site of interictal epileptiform activity. EEG was recorded in the scanner and monitored on-line; the recording quality was good enough to allow the clear identification of spikes in the EEG. Snap-shot EPI was performed 2-4 s after an epileptiform discharge ('spike') or after at least 10 s of background activity ('rest') was observed. A pixel-by-pixel t-test was performed between the 'rest' and the 'spike' images to determine areas of significant activation. Significant activation was obtained in a patient with epilepsy. To assess the reliability and reproducibility of the technique, the patient was scanned on four separate occasions with similar areas being activated in all the studies, confirming the validity of the result. (author)

  18. Nouns, verbs, objects, actions, and abstractions: Local fMRI activity indexes semantics, not lexical categories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Rachel L.; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2014-01-01

    Noun/verb dissociations in the literature defy interpretation due to the confound between lexical category and semantic meaning; nouns and verbs typically describe concrete objects and actions. Abstract words, pertaining to neither, are a critical test case: dissociations along lexical-grammatical lines would support models purporting lexical category as the principle governing brain organisation, whilst semantic models predict dissociation between concrete words but not abstract items. During fMRI scanning, participants read orthogonalised word categories of nouns and verbs, with or without concrete, sensorimotor meaning. Analysis of inferior frontal/insula, precentral and central areas revealed an interaction between lexical class and semantic factors with clear category differences between concrete nouns and verbs but not abstract ones. Though the brain stores the combinatorial and lexical-grammatical properties of words, our data show that topographical differences in brain activation, especially in the motor system and inferior frontal cortex, are driven by semantics and not by lexical class. PMID:24727103

  19. Combining task-evoked and spontaneous activity to improve pre-operative brain mapping with fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Michael D; Qian, Tianyi; Madsen, Joseph R; Wang, Danhong; Li, Meiling; Ge, Manling; Zuo, Huan-Cong; Groppe, David M; Mehta, Ashesh D; Hong, Bo; Liu, Hesheng

    2016-01-01

    Noninvasive localization of brain function is used to understand and treat neurological disease, exemplified by pre-operative fMRI mapping prior to neurosurgical intervention. The principal approach for generating these maps relies on brain responses evoked by a task and, despite known limitations, has dominated clinical practice for over 20years. Recently, pre-operative fMRI mapping based on correlations in spontaneous brain activity has been demonstrated, however this approach has its own limitations and has not seen widespread clinical use. Here we show that spontaneous and task-based mapping can be performed together using the same pre-operative fMRI data, provide complimentary information relevant for functional localization, and can be combined to improve identification of eloquent motor cortex. Accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of our approach are quantified through comparison with electrical cortical stimulation mapping in eight patients with intractable epilepsy. Broad applicability and reproducibility of our approach are demonstrated through prospective replication in an independent dataset of six patients from a different center. In both cohorts and every individual patient, we see a significant improvement in signal to noise and mapping accuracy independent of threshold, quantified using receiver operating characteristic curves. Collectively, our results suggest that modifying the processing of fMRI data to incorporate both task-based and spontaneous activity significantly improves functional localization in pre-operative patients. Because this method requires no additional scan time or modification to conventional pre-operative data acquisition protocols it could have widespread utility. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Lateralization of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activation in the auditory pathway of patients with lateralized tinnitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smits, Marion [Erasmus MC - University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, Hs 224, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kovacs, Silvia; Peeters, Ronald R.; Hecke, Paul van; Sunaert, Stefan [University Hospitals of the Catholic University Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Ridder, Dirk de [University of Antwerp, Department of Neurosurgery, Edegem (Belgium)

    2007-08-15

    Tinnitus is hypothesized to be an auditory phantom phenomenon resulting from spontaneous neuronal activity somewhere along the auditory pathway. We performed fMRI of the entire auditory pathway, including the inferior colliculus (IC), the medial geniculate body (MGB) and the auditory cortex (AC), in 42 patients with tinnitus and 10 healthy volunteers to assess lateralization of fMRI activation. Subjects were scanned on a 3T MRI scanner. A T2*-weighted EPI silent gap sequence was used during the stimulation paradigm, which consisted of a blocked design of 12 epochs in which music presented binaurally through headphones, which was switched on and off for periods of 50 s. Using SPM2 software, single subject and group statistical parametric maps were calculated. Lateralization of activation was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively. Tinnitus was lateralized in 35 patients (83%, 13 right-sided and 22 left-sided). Significant signal change (P{sub corrected} < 0.05) was found bilaterally in the primary and secondary AC, the IC and the MGB. Signal change was symmetrical in patients with bilateral tinnitus. In patients with lateralized tinnitus, fMRI activation was lateralized towards the side of perceived tinnitus in the primary AC and IC in patients with right-sided tinnitus, and in the MGB in patients with left-sided tinnitus. In healthy volunteers, activation in the primary AC was left-lateralized. Our paradigm adequately visualized the auditory pathways in tinnitus patients. In lateralized tinnitus fMRI activation was also lateralized, supporting the hypothesis that tinnitus is an auditory phantom phenomenon. (orig.)

  1. Lateralization of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activation in the auditory pathway of patients with lateralized tinnitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smits, Marion; Kovacs, Silvia; Peeters, Ronald R.; Hecke, Paul van; Sunaert, Stefan; Ridder, Dirk de

    2007-01-01

    Tinnitus is hypothesized to be an auditory phantom phenomenon resulting from spontaneous neuronal activity somewhere along the auditory pathway. We performed fMRI of the entire auditory pathway, including the inferior colliculus (IC), the medial geniculate body (MGB) and the auditory cortex (AC), in 42 patients with tinnitus and 10 healthy volunteers to assess lateralization of fMRI activation. Subjects were scanned on a 3T MRI scanner. A T2*-weighted EPI silent gap sequence was used during the stimulation paradigm, which consisted of a blocked design of 12 epochs in which music presented binaurally through headphones, which was switched on and off for periods of 50 s. Using SPM2 software, single subject and group statistical parametric maps were calculated. Lateralization of activation was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively. Tinnitus was lateralized in 35 patients (83%, 13 right-sided and 22 left-sided). Significant signal change (P corrected < 0.05) was found bilaterally in the primary and secondary AC, the IC and the MGB. Signal change was symmetrical in patients with bilateral tinnitus. In patients with lateralized tinnitus, fMRI activation was lateralized towards the side of perceived tinnitus in the primary AC and IC in patients with right-sided tinnitus, and in the MGB in patients with left-sided tinnitus. In healthy volunteers, activation in the primary AC was left-lateralized. Our paradigm adequately visualized the auditory pathways in tinnitus patients. In lateralized tinnitus fMRI activation was also lateralized, supporting the hypothesis that tinnitus is an auditory phantom phenomenon. (orig.)

  2. The supraspinal neural correlate of bladder cold sensation--an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehnert, Ulrich; Michels, Lars; Zempleni, Monika-Zita; Schurch, Brigitte; Kollias, Spyros

    2011-06-01

    In recent years, functional imaging studies have revealed a supraspinal network, which is involved in perception and processing of bladder distention. Very little information exists on the cortical representation of C-fiber transmitted temperature sensation of the human bladder, although C-fibers seem to be involved in the pathomechanisms of bladder dysfunctions. Our aim was, therefore, to evaluate the outcome of bladder cold stimulation on supraspinal activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). A block design fMRI study was performed in 14 healthy females at the MR-center of the University of Zurich. After catheterization, all subjects were investigated in a 3.0-Tesla Scanner. The scanning consisted of 10 repetitive cycles. Each cycle consisted of five conditions: REST, INFUSION, SENSATION, DRAIN 1, and DRAIN 2. Cold saline was passively infused at 4-8°C during scanning. Not more than 100 ml were infused per cycle. Blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal analysis of the different conditions was compared to REST. All activations were evaluated on a random effects level at P = 0.001. Activation of brain regions for bladder cold stimulation (DRAIN 1 period) was found bilaterally in the inferior parietal lobe [Brodmann area (BA) 40], the right insula (BA 13), the right cerebellar posterior lobe, the right middle temporal gyrus (BA 20), and the right postcentral gyrus (BA 3). In conclusion, bladder cooling caused a different supraspinal activation pattern compared to what is known to occur during bladder distention. This supports our hypothesis that cold sensation is processed differently from bladder distension at the supraspinal level. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Statistical Analysis Methods for the fMRI Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Boyaci

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is a safe and non-invasive way to assess brain functions by using signal changes associated with brain activity. The technique has become a ubiquitous tool in basic, clinical and cognitive neuroscience. This method can measure little metabolism changes that occur in active part of the brain. We process the fMRI data to be able to find the parts of brain that are involve in a mechanism, or to determine the changes that occur in brain activities due to a brain lesion. In this study we will have an overview over the methods that are used for the analysis of fMRI data.

  4. Decoding subjective mental states from fMRI activity patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, Masako; Kamitani, Yukiyasu

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) decoding has emerged as a powerful tool to read out detailed stimulus features from multi-voxel brain activity patterns. Moreover, the method has been extended to perform a primitive form of 'mind-reading,' by applying a decoder 'objectively' trained using stimulus features to more 'subjective' conditions. In this paper, we first introduce basic procedures for fMRI decoding based on machine learning techniques. Second, we discuss the source of information used for decoding, in particular, the possibility of extracting information from subvoxel neural structures. We next introduce two experimental designs for decoding subjective mental states: the 'objective-to-subjective design' and the 'subjective-to-subjective design.' Then, we illustrate recent studies on the decoding of a variety of mental states, such as, attention, awareness, decision making, memory, and mental imagery. Finally, we discuss the challenges and new directions of fMRI decoding. (author)

  5. Advances in fMRI Real-Time Neurofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takeo; Sasaki, Yuka; Shibata, Kazuhisa; Kawato, Mitsuo

    2017-12-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) neurofeedback is a type of biofeedback in which real-time online fMRI signals are used to self-regulate brain function. Since its advent in 2003 significant progress has been made in fMRI neurofeedback techniques. Specifically, the use of implicit protocols, external rewards, multivariate analysis, and connectivity analysis has allowed neuroscientists to explore a possible causal involvement of modified brain activity in modified behavior. These techniques have also been integrated into groundbreaking new neurofeedback technologies, specifically decoded neurofeedback (DecNef) and functional connectivity-based neurofeedback (FCNef). By modulating neural activity and behavior, DecNef and FCNef have substantially advanced both basic and clinical research. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Activation Detection in fMRI Using Jeffrey Divergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghouane, Abd-Krim

    2009-12-01

    A statistical test for detecting activated pixels in functional MRI (fMRI) data is proposed. For the derivation of this test, the fMRI time series measured at each voxel is modeled as the sum of a response signal which arises due to the experimentally controlled activation-baseline pattern, a nuisance component representing effects of no interest, and Gaussian white noise. The test is based on comparing the dimension of the voxels fMRI time series fitted data models with and without controlled activation-baseline pattern. The Jeffrey divergence is used for this comparison. The test has the advantage of not requiring a level of significance or a threshold to be provided.

  7. Reading positional codes with fMRI: Problems and solutions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristjan Kalm

    Full Text Available Neural mechanisms which bind items into sequences have been investigated in a large body of research in animal neurophysiology and human neuroimaging. However, a major problem in interpreting this data arises from a fact that several unrelated processes, such as memory load, sensory adaptation, and reward expectation, also change in a consistent manner as the sequence unfolds. In this paper we use computational simulations and data from two fMRI experiments to show that a host of unrelated neural processes can masquerade as sequence representations. We show that dissociating such unrelated processes from a dedicated sequence representation is an especially difficult problem for fMRI data, which is almost exclusively the modality used in human experiments. We suggest that such fMRI results must be treated with caution and in many cases the assumed neural representation might actually reflect unrelated processes.

  8. Presurgical language fMRI: Mapping of six critical regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Christopher F; Walshaw, Patricia D; Hale, Kayleigh; Gaillard, William D; Baxter, Leslie C; Berl, Madison M; Polczynska, Monika; Noble, Stephanie; Alkawadri, Rafeed; Hirsch, Lawrence J; Constable, R Todd; Bookheimer, Susan Y

    2017-08-01

    Language mapping is a key goal in neurosurgical planning. fMRI mapping typically proceeds with a focus on Broca's and Wernicke's areas, although multiple other language-critical areas are now well-known. We evaluated whether clinicians could use a novel approach, including clinician-driven individualized thresholding, to reliably identify six language regions, including Broca's Area, Wernicke's Area (inferior, superior), Exner's Area, Supplementary Speech Area, Angular Gyrus, and Basal Temporal Language Area. We studied 22 epilepsy and tumor patients who received Wada and fMRI (age 36.4[12.5]; Wada language left/right/mixed in 18/3/1). fMRI tasks (two × three tasks) were analyzed by two clinical neuropsychologists who flexibly thresholded and combined these to identify the six regions. The resulting maps were compared to fixed threshold maps. Clinicians generated maps that overlapped significantly, and were highly consistent, when at least one task came from the same set. Cases diverged when clinicians prioritized different language regions or addressed noise differently. Language laterality closely mirrored Wada data (85% accuracy). Activation consistent with all six language regions was consistently identified. In blind review, three external, independent clinicians rated the individualized fMRI language maps as superior to fixed threshold maps; identified the majority of regions significantly more frequently; and judged language laterality to mirror Wada lateralization more often. These data provide initial validation of a novel, clinician-based approach to localizing language cortex. They also demonstrate clinical fMRI is superior when analyzed by an experienced clinician and that when fMRI data is of low quality judgments of laterality are unreliable and should be withheld. Hum Brain Mapp 38:4239-4255, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Adaptive Smoothing in fMRI Data Processing Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilamala, Albert; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2017-01-01

    Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) relies on multi-step data processing pipelines to accurately determine brain activity; among them, the crucial step of spatial smoothing. These pipelines are commonly suboptimal, given the local optimisation strategy they use, treating each step...... by defining a smoothing step as a layer in these networks able to adaptively modulate the degree of smoothing required by each brain volume to better accomplish a given data analysis task. The viability is evaluated on real fMRI data where subjects did alternate between left and right finger tapping tasks....

  10. The future of fMRI in cognitive neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poldrack, Russell A

    2012-08-15

    Over the last 20 years, fMRI has revolutionized cognitive neuroscience. Here I outline a vision for what the next 20 years of fMRI in cognitive neuroscience might look like. Some developments that I hope for include increased methodological rigor, an increasing focus on connectivity and pattern analysis as opposed to "blobology", a greater focus on selective inference powered by open databases, and increased use of ontologies and computational models to describe underlying processes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Corticostriatal and Dopaminergic Response to Beer Flavor with Both fMRI and [(11) C]raclopride Positron Emission Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlin, Brandon G; Dzemidzic, Mario; Harezlak, Jaroslaw; Kudela, Maria A; Tran, Stella M; Soeurt, Christina M; Yoder, Karmen K; Kareken, David A

    2016-09-01

    Cue-evoked drug-seeking behavior likely depends on interactions between frontal activity and ventral striatal (VST) dopamine (DA) transmission. Using [(11) C]raclopride (RAC) positron emission tomography (PET), we previously demonstrated that beer flavor (absent intoxication) elicited VST DA release in beer drinkers, inferred by RAC displacement. Here, a subset of subjects from this previous RAC-PET study underwent a similar paradigm during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to test how orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and VST blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) responses to beer flavor are related to VST DA release and motivation to drink. Male beer drinkers (n = 28, age = 24 ± 2, drinks/wk = 16 ± 10) from our previous PET study participated in a similar fMRI paradigm wherein subjects tasted their most frequently consumed brand of beer and Gatorade(®) (appetitive control). We tested for correlations between BOLD activation in fMRI and VST DA responses in PET, and drinking-related variables. Compared to Gatorade, beer flavor increased wanting and desire to drink, and induced BOLD responses in bilateral OFC and right VST. Wanting and desire to drink correlated with both right VST and medial OFC BOLD activation to beer flavor. Like the BOLD findings, beer flavor (relative to Gatorade) again induced right VST DA release in this fMRI subject subset, but there was no correlation between DA release and the magnitude of BOLD responses in frontal regions of interest. Both imaging modalities showed a right-lateralized VST response (BOLD and DA release) to a drug-paired conditioned stimulus, whereas fMRI BOLD responses in the VST and medial OFC also reflected wanting and desire to drink. The data suggest the possibility that responses to drug-paired cues may be rightward biased in the VST (at least in right-handed males) and that VST and OFC responses in this gustatory paradigm reflect stimulus wanting. Copyright © 2016 by the Research Society on

  12. 'Visual' cortical activation induced by acupuncture at vision-related acupoint: a fMRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, B.; Shan, B.C.; Zhi, L.H.; Li, K.; Lu, N.; Li, L.; Liu, H.

    2005-01-01

    It has attracted attention recently that acupuncture at vision-related acupoints, which are used to treat eye diseases according to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), could activate the visual cortex. Cho and colleagues have reported that acupuncture at vision-related acupoints in the foot, activate the visual cortex bilaterally. Similar results were reported by Siedentopf and coworkers using laser acupuncture. However, Gareus et al. did not get the result. In this study, manual acupuncture was used to examine the response of central nervous system (CNS) to acupuncture at Liv3, one of important acupoints used to treat eye-related disease in clinic. To avoid the non-specific factors such as pain and anxiety, a sham acupoint which is approximately 10 mm anterior to Liv3 and innervated by the same spinal segment was selected as control. The CNS response was obtained by subtracting fMRI brain images evoked by nearby 'sham' acupoint from that evoked by the 'real' acupoint. 17 healthy right handed volunteers were comprised in the study. The images were got on 1.5T MR with EPI sequence. After 62 baseline scans, a silver needle 0.30 mm in diameter and 25 mm long was inserted and twirled for 60 scans; then the needle was withdrawn while fMRI scanning continued, until a total of 402 scans were acquired. During acupuncture, the needle was twirled manually clockwise and anticlockwise at 1 Hz with 'even reinforcing and reducing' needle manipulation. The depth of needle insertion at the sham acupoint was approximately 15 mm, the same as at the real acupoint. All the points in this study were on the right foot. The data were analyzed with spm99 using random effects analysis, discrepancies in the activation areas between Liv3 and the sham acupoint were obtained at p<0.01. Acupuncture at Liv3 significantly activated Brodmann Area 19 (BA 19) bilaterally, middle temporal gyrus, cerebellum, ipsilateral posterior cingulate, parahippocampal gyrus, contralateral postcentral gyrus, and

  13. 'Visual' cortical activation induced by acupuncture at vision-related acupoint: A fMRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, B.; Shan, B.C.; Zhi, L.H.; Li, K.; Lu, N.; Li, L.; Liu, H.

    2005-01-01

    It has attracted attention recently that acupuncture at vision-related acupoints, which are used to treat eye diseases according to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), could activate the visual cortex. Cho and colleagues have reported that acupuncture at vision-related acupoints in the foot, activate the visual cortex bilaterally. Similar results were reported by Siedentopf and coworkers using laser acupuncture. However, Gareus et al. did not get the result, In this study, manual acupuncture was used to examine the response of central nervous system (CNS) to acupuncture at Liv3, one of important acupoints used to treat eye-related disease in clinic. To avoid the non-specific factors such as pain and anxiety, a sham acupoint which is approximately 10 mm anterior to Liv3 and innervated by the same spinal segment was selected as control. The CNS response was obtained by subtracting fMRI brain images evoked by nearby 'sham' acupoint from that evoked by the 'real' acupoint. 17 healthy right handed volunteers were comprised in the study. The images were got on 1.5T MR with EPI sequence. After 62 baseline scans, a silver needle 0.30 mm in diameter and 25 mm long was inserted and twirled for 60 scans; then the needle was withdrawn while fMRI scanning continued, until a total of 402 scans were acquired. During acupuncture, the needle was twirled manually clockwise and anticlockwise at 1 Hz with 'even reinforcing and reducing' needle manipulation. The depth of needle insertion at the sham acupoint was approximately 15 mm, the same as at the real acupoint. All the points in this study were on the right foot. The data were analyzed with spm99 using random effects analysis, discrepancies in the activation areas between Liv3 and the sham acupoint were obtained at p<0.01. Acupuncture at Liv3 significantly activated Brodmann Area 19 (BA 19) bilaterally, middle temporal gyrus, cerebellum, ipsilateral posterior cingulate, parahippocampal gyrus, contralateral postcentral gyrus, and

  14. CT scanning in meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wardle, Stephan; Carty, Helen (Royal Liverpool Children' s Hospital, Liverpool (United Kingdom). Department of Radiology)

    12 pediatric cases of acute meningitis were reviewed retrospectively. Findings on CT scan were compared with the clinical course and resulting neurological sequelae. Complications detected by CT scanning include subdural effusion, empyema, hydrocephalus, cerebral atrophy, oedema and infarction. The CT scan results adequately correlated with neurological signs in most cases. Infarction was a reliable indicator of neurological sequelae. Cerebral atrophy alone, however, did not correlate well with the clinical sequelae. (author). 19 refs.; 5 figs.; 6 tabs.

  15. Tinnitus- related distress: evidence from fMRI of an emotional stroop task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Golm

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic tinnitus affects 5 % of the population, 17 % suffer under the condition. This distress seems mainly to be dependent on negative cognitive-emotional evaluation of the tinnitus and selective attention to the tinnitus. A well-established paradigm to examine selective attention and emotional processing is the Emotional Stroop Task (EST. Recent models of tinnitus distress propose limbic, frontal and parietal regions to be more active in highly distressed tinnitus patients. Only a few studies have compared high and low distressed tinnitus patients. Thus, this study aimed to explore neural correlates of tinnitus-related distress. Methods Highly distressed tinnitus patients (HDT, n = 16, low distressed tinnitus patients (LDT, n = 16 and healthy controls (HC, n = 16 underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI during an EST, that used tinnitus-related words and neutral words as stimuli. A random effects analysis of the fMRI data was conducted on the basis of the general linear model. Furthermore correlational analyses between the blood oxygen level dependent response and tinnitus distress, loudness, depression, anxiety, vocabulary and hypersensitivity to sound were performed. Results Contradictory to the hypothesis, highly distressed patients showed no Stroop effect in their reaction times. As hypothesized HDT and LDT differed in the activation of the right insula and the orbitofrontal cortex. There were no hypothesized differences between HDT and HC. Activation of the orbitofrontal cortex and the right insula were found to correlate with tinnitus distress. Conclusions The results are partially supported by earlier resting-state studies and corroborate the role of the insula and the orbitofrontal cortex in tinnitus distress.

  16. Visual Learning Induces Changes in Resting-State fMRI Multivariate Pattern of Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidotti, Roberto; Del Gratta, Cosimo; Baldassarre, Antonello; Romani, Gian Luca; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2015-07-08

    When measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the resting state (R-fMRI), spontaneous activity is correlated between brain regions that are anatomically and functionally related. Learning and/or task performance can induce modulation of the resting synchronization between brain regions. Moreover, at the neuronal level spontaneous brain activity can replay patterns evoked by a previously presented stimulus. Here we test whether visual learning/task performance can induce a change in the patterns of coded information in R-fMRI signals consistent with a role of spontaneous activity in representing task-relevant information. Human subjects underwent R-fMRI before and after perceptual learning on a novel visual shape orientation discrimination task. Task-evoked fMRI patterns to trained versus novel stimuli were recorded after learning was completed, and before the second R-fMRI session. Using multivariate pattern analysis on task-evoked signals, we found patterns in several cortical regions, as follows: visual cortex, V3/V3A/V7; within the default mode network, precuneus, and inferior parietal lobule; and, within the dorsal attention network, intraparietal sulcus, which discriminated between trained and novel visual stimuli. The accuracy of classification was strongly correlated with behavioral performance. Next, we measured multivariate patterns in R-fMRI signals before and after learning. The frequency and similarity of resting states representing the task/visual stimuli states increased post-learning in the same cortical regions recruited by the task. These findings support a representational role of spontaneous brain activity. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/359786-13$15.00/0.

  17. Neural Correlates of Direct Access Trading in a Real Stock Market: An fMRI Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GianMario Raggetti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: While financial decision making has been barely explored, no study has previously investigated the neural correlates of individual decisions made by professional traders involved in real stock market negotiations, using their own financial resources.Aim: We sought to detect how different brain areas are modulated by factors like age, expertise, psychological profile (speculative risk seeking or aversion and, eventually, size and type (Buy/Sell of stock negotiations, made through Direct Access Trading (DAT platforms.Subjects and methods: Twenty male traders underwent fMRI while negotiating in the Italian stock market using their own preferred trading platform.Results: At least 20 decision events were collected during each fMRI session. Risk averse traders performed a lower number of financial transactions with respect to risk seekers, with a lower average economic value, but with a higher rate of filled proposals. Activations were observed in cortical and subcortical areas traditionally involved in decision processes, including the ventrolateral and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC, dlPFC, the posterior parietal cortex (PPC, the nucleus accumbens (NAcc, and dorsal striatum. Regression analysis indicated an important role of age in modulating activation of left NAcc, while traders' expertise was negatively related to activation of vlPFC. High value transactions were associated with a stronger activation of the right PPC when subjects' buy rather than sell. The success of the trading activity, based on a large number of filled transactions, was related with higher activation of vlPFC and dlPFC. Independent of chronological and professional age, traders differed in their attitude to DAT, with distinct brain activity profiles being detectable during fMRI sessions. Those subjects who described themselves as very self-confident, showed a lower or absent activation of both the caudate nucleus and the dlPFC, while more reflexive traders

  18. Neural Correlates of Direct Access Trading in a Real Stock Market: An fMRI Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raggetti, GianMario; Ceravolo, Maria G; Fattobene, Lucrezia; Di Dio, Cinzia

    2017-01-01

    Background: While financial decision making has been barely explored, no study has previously investigated the neural correlates of individual decisions made by professional traders involved in real stock market negotiations, using their own financial resources. Aim: We sought to detect how different brain areas are modulated by factors like age, expertise, psychological profile (speculative risk seeking or aversion) and, eventually, size and type (Buy/Sell) of stock negotiations, made through Direct Access Trading (DAT) platforms. Subjects and methods: Twenty male traders underwent fMRI while negotiating in the Italian stock market using their own preferred trading platform. Results: At least 20 decision events were collected during each fMRI session. Risk averse traders performed a lower number of financial transactions with respect to risk seekers, with a lower average economic value, but with a higher rate of filled proposals. Activations were observed in cortical and subcortical areas traditionally involved in decision processes, including the ventrolateral and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC, dlPFC), the posterior parietal cortex (PPC), the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), and dorsal striatum. Regression analysis indicated an important role of age in modulating activation of left NAcc, while traders' expertise was negatively related to activation of vlPFC. High value transactions were associated with a stronger activation of the right PPC when subjects' buy rather than sell. The success of the trading activity, based on a large number of filled transactions, was related with higher activation of vlPFC and dlPFC. Independent of chronological and professional age, traders differed in their attitude to DAT, with distinct brain activity profiles being detectable during fMRI sessions. Those subjects who described themselves as very self-confident, showed a lower or absent activation of both the caudate nucleus and the dlPFC, while more reflexive traders showed

  19. Exploring fMRI Data for Periodic Signal Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kai; Nielsen, Finn Årup; Larsen, Jan

    2002-01-01

    We use a Bayesian framework to detect periodic components in fMRI data. The resulting detector is sensitive to periodic components with a flexible number of harmonics and with arbitrary amplitude and phases of the harmonics. It is possible to detect the correct number of harmonics in periodic...

  20. Unsupervised segmentation of task activated regions in fmRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røge, Rasmus; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard

    2015-01-01

    of task activated functional units in multi-subject fMRI data that exploits that regions of task activation are consistent across subjects and can be more reliably inferred than regions that are not activated. We develop a non-parametric Gaussian mixture model that apriori assumes activations are smooth...

  1. The Effect of Strategy on Problem Solving: An FMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Sharlene D.; Pruce, Benjamin; Rusia, Akash; Burns, Thomas, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    fMRI was used to examine the differential effect of two problem-solving strategies. Participants were trained to use both a pictorial/spatial and a symbolic/algebraic strategy to solve word problems. While these two strategies activated similar cortical regions, a number of differences were noted in the level of activation. These differences…

  2. Neuroethics and fMRI: mapping a fledgling relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnett, Alex; Whiteley, Louise; Piwowar, Heather; Rasmussen, Edie; Illes, Judy

    2011-04-22

    Human functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) informs the understanding of the neural basis of mental function and is a key domain of ethical enquiry. It raises questions about the practice and implications of research, and reflexively informs ethics through the empirical investigation of moral judgments. It is at the centre of debate surrounding the importance of neuroscience findings for concepts such as personhood and free will, and the extent of their practical consequences. Here, we map the landscape of fMRI and neuroethics, using citation analysis to uncover salient topics. We find that this landscape is sparsely populated: despite previous calls for debate, there are few articles that discuss both fMRI and ethical, legal, or social implications (ELSI), and even fewer direct citations between the two literatures. Recognizing that practical barriers exist to integrating ELSI discussion into the research literature, we argue nonetheless that the ethical challenges of fMRI, and controversy over its conceptual and practical implications, make this essential.

  3. Neuroethics and fMRI: mapping a fledgling relationship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Garnett

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Human functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI informs the understanding of the neural basis of mental function and is a key domain of ethical enquiry. It raises questions about the practice and implications of research, and reflexively informs ethics through the empirical investigation of moral judgments. It is at the centre of debate surrounding the importance of neuroscience findings for concepts such as personhood and free will, and the extent of their practical consequences. Here, we map the landscape of fMRI and neuroethics, using citation analysis to uncover salient topics. We find that this landscape is sparsely populated: despite previous calls for debate, there are few articles that discuss both fMRI and ethical, legal, or social implications (ELSI, and even fewer direct citations between the two literatures. Recognizing that practical barriers exist to integrating ELSI discussion into the research literature, we argue nonetheless that the ethical challenges of fMRI, and controversy over its conceptual and practical implications, make this essential.

  4. Neuroethics and fMRI: Mapping a fledgling relationship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garnett, Alex; Whiteley, Louise Emma; Piwowar, Heather

    2011-01-01

    of moral judgments. It is at the centre of debate surrounding the importance of neuroscience findings for concepts such as personhood and free will, and the extent of their practical consequences. Here, we map the landscape of fMRI and neuroethics, using citation analysis to uncover salient topics. We find...

  5. Unified ICA-SPM analysis of fMRI experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Troels; Henriksen, Jonas; Nielsen, Carsten Haagen

    2009-01-01

    We present a toolbox for exploratory analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data using independent component analysis (ICA) within the widely used SPM analysis pipeline. The toolbox enables dimensional reduction using principal component analysis, ICA using several different ICA...

  6. Advances in High-Field BOLD fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Barth

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This review article examines the current state of BOLD fMRI at a high magnetic field strength of 7 Tesla. The following aspects are covered: a short description of the BOLD contrast, spatial and temporal resolution, BOLD sensitivity, localization and spatial specificity, technical challenges as well as an outlook on future developments are given. It is shown that the main technical challenges of performing BOLD fMRI at high magnetic field strengths—namely development of array coils, imaging sequences and parallel imaging reconstruction—have been solved successfully. The combination of these developments has lead to the availability of high-resolution BOLD fMRI protocols that are able to cover the whole brain with a repetition time (TR shorter than 3 s. The structural information available from these high-resolution fMRI images itself is already very detailed, which helps to co-localize structure and function. Potential future applications include whole-brain connectivity analysis on a laminar resolution and single subject examinations.

  7. Multivoxel Pattern Analysis for fMRI Data: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhak Mahmoudi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI exploits blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD contrasts to map neural activity associated with a variety of brain functions including sensory processing, motor control, and cognitive and emotional functions. The general linear model (GLM approach is used to reveal task-related brain areas by searching for linear correlations between the fMRI time course and a reference model. One of the limitations of the GLM approach is the assumption that the covariance across neighbouring voxels is not informative about the cognitive function under examination. Multivoxel pattern analysis (MVPA represents a promising technique that is currently exploited to investigate the information contained in distributed patterns of neural activity to infer the functional role of brain areas and networks. MVPA is considered as a supervised classification problem where a classifier attempts to capture the relationships between spatial pattern of fMRI activity and experimental conditions. In this paper , we review MVPA and describe the mathematical basis of the classification algorithms used for decoding fMRI signals, such as support vector machines (SVMs. In addition, we describe the workflow of processing steps required for MVPA such as feature selection, dimensionality reduction, cross-validation, and classifier performance estimation based on receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves.

  8. Multivoxel Pattern Analysis for fMRI Data: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takerkart, Sylvain; Regragui, Fakhita; Boussaoud, Driss; Brovelli, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) exploits blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) contrasts to map neural activity associated with a variety of brain functions including sensory processing, motor control, and cognitive and emotional functions. The general linear model (GLM) approach is used to reveal task-related brain areas by searching for linear correlations between the fMRI time course and a reference model. One of the limitations of the GLM approach is the assumption that the covariance across neighbouring voxels is not informative about the cognitive function under examination. Multivoxel pattern analysis (MVPA) represents a promising technique that is currently exploited to investigate the information contained in distributed patterns of neural activity to infer the functional role of brain areas and networks. MVPA is considered as a supervised classification problem where a classifier attempts to capture the relationships between spatial pattern of fMRI activity and experimental conditions. In this paper , we review MVPA and describe the mathematical basis of the classification algorithms used for decoding fMRI signals, such as support vector machines (SVMs). In addition, we describe the workflow of processing steps required for MVPA such as feature selection, dimensionality reduction, cross-validation, and classifier performance estimation based on receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. PMID:23401720

  9. Nonparametric modeling of dynamic functional connectivity in fmri data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Føns Vind; Madsen, Kristoffer H; Røge, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    dynamic changes. The existing approaches modeling dynamic connectivity have primarily been based on time-windowing the data and k-means clustering. We propose a nonparametric generative model for dynamic FC in fMRI that does not rely on specifying window lengths and number of dynamic states. Rooted...

  10. Impact of Global Normalization in fMRI Acupuncture Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinbo Sun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Global normalization is often used as a preprocessing step for dispelling the “nuisance effects.” However, it has been shown in cognitive and emotion tasks that this preprocessing step might greatly distort statistical results when the orthogonality assumption of global normalization is violated. The present study examines this issue in fMRI acupuncture studies. Thirty healthy subjects were recruited to evaluate the impacts of the global normalization on the BOLD responses evoked by acupuncture stimulation during De-qi sensation and tactile stimulation during nonpainful sensations. To this end, we compared results by conducting global normalization (PSGS and not conducting global normalization (NO PSGS based on a proportional scaling model. The orthogonality assumption of global normalization was violated, and significant changes between BOLD responses for NO PSGS and PSGS were shown in most subjects. Extensive deactivations of acupuncture in fMRI were the non-specifically pernicious consequences of global normalization. The central responses of acupuncture during De-qi are non-specifically activation-dominant at the somatosensory-related brain network, whose statistical power is specifically enhanced by PSGS. In conclusion, PSGS should be unjustified for acupuncture studies in fMRI. The differences including the global normalization or not may partly contribute to conflicting results and interpretations in previous fMRI acupuncture studies.

  11. Bayesian Modelling of fMRI Time Series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højen-Sørensen, Pedro; Hansen, Lars Kai; Rasmussen, Carl Edward

    2000-01-01

    We present a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) for inferring the hidden psychological state (or neural activity) during single trial fMRI activation experiments with blocked task paradigms. Inference is based on Bayesian methodology, using a combination of analytical and a variety of Markov Chain Monte...

  12. fMRI in Parkinson’s Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebner, Hartwig R.; Herz, Damian

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter we review recent advances in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Covariance patterns of regional resting-state activity in functional brain networks can be used to distinguish Parkinson patients from healthy controls and might play an important...

  13. Abnormal Baseline Brain Activity in Drug-Naïve Patients with Tourette Syndrome: A Resting-state fMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghua eCui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tourette Syndrome (TS is a childhood-onset chronic disorder characterized by the presence of multiple motor and vocal tics. This study investigated spontaneous low-frequency fluctuations in TS patients during resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI scans. We obtained resting-state fMRI scans from seventeen drug-naïve TS children and fifteen demographically matched healthy children. We computed the amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF and fractional ALFF (fALFF of resting-state fMRI data to measure spontaneous brain activity, and assessed the between-group differences in ALFF/fALFF and the relationship between ALFF/fALFF and tic severity scores. Our results showed that the children with TS exhibited significantly decreased ALFF in the posterior cingulate gyrus/precuneus and bilateral parietal gyrus. fALFF was decreased in TS children in the anterior cingulated cortex, bilateral middle and superior frontal cortices and superior parietal lobule, and increased in the left putamen and bilateral thalamus. Moreover, we found significantly positive correlations between fALFF and tic severity scores in the right thalamus. Our study provides empirical evidence for abnormal spontaneous neuronal activity in TS patients, which may implicate the underlying neurophysiological mechanism in TS and demonstrate the possibility of applying ALFF/fALFF for clinical TS studies.

  14. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Thyroid Scan and Uptake Thyroid scan and uptake uses ...

  15. Model PET Scan Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, Amber; Gazdovich, Jennifer; Redouté, Oriane; Reverte, Juan Manuel; Shelley, Samantha; Todorova, Vesela

    2018-05-01

    This paper provides a brief introduction to antimatter and how it, along with other modern physics topics, is utilized in positron emission tomography (PET) scans. It further describes a hands-on activity for students to help them gain an understanding of how PET scans assist in detecting cancer. Modern physics topics provide an exciting way to introduce students to current applications of physics.

  16. Scanning laser Doppler vibrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Marie; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    With a Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer (SLDV) a vibrating surface is automatically scanned over predefined grid points, and data processed for displaying vibration properties like mode shapes, natural frequencies, damping ratios, and operational deflection shapes. Our SLDV – a PSV-500H from...

  17. The nuisance of nuisance regression: spectral misspecification in a common approach to resting-state fMRI preprocessing reintroduces noise and obscures functional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallquist, Michael N; Hwang, Kai; Luna, Beatriz

    2013-11-15

    Recent resting-state functional connectivity fMRI (RS-fcMRI) research has demonstrated that head motion during fMRI acquisition systematically influences connectivity estimates despite bandpass filtering and nuisance regression, which are intended to reduce such nuisance variability. We provide evidence that the effects of head motion and other nuisance signals are poorly controlled when the fMRI time series are bandpass-filtered but the regressors are unfiltered, resulting in the inadvertent reintroduction of nuisance-related variation into frequencies previously suppressed by the bandpass filter, as well as suboptimal correction for noise signals in the frequencies of interest. This is important because many RS-fcMRI studies, including some focusing on motion-related artifacts, have applied this approach. In two cohorts of individuals (n=117 and 22) who completed resting-state fMRI scans, we found that the bandpass-regress approach consistently overestimated functional connectivity across the brain, typically on the order of r=.10-.35, relative to a simultaneous bandpass filtering and nuisance regression approach. Inflated correlations under the bandpass-regress approach were associated with head motion and cardiac artifacts. Furthermore, distance-related differences in the association of head motion and connectivity estimates were much weaker for the simultaneous filtering approach. We recommend that future RS-fcMRI studies ensure that the frequencies of nuisance regressors and fMRI data match prior to nuisance regression, and we advocate a simultaneous bandpass filtering and nuisance regression strategy that better controls nuisance-related variability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Transverse section scanning mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doherty, E.J.

    1978-01-01

    Apparatus is described for scanning a transverse, radionuclide scan-field using an array of focussed collimators. The collimators are movable tangentially on rails, driven by a single motor via a coupled screw. The collimators are also movable in a radial direction on rails driven by a step motor via coupled screws and bevel gears. Adjacent bevel gears rotate in opposite directions so adjacent collimators move in radially opposite directions. In use, the focal point of each collimator scans at least half of the scan-field, e.g. a human head located in the central aperture, and the electrical outputs of detectors associated with each collimator are used to determine the distribution of radioactive emission intensity at a number of points in the scan-field. (author)

  19. Beam scanning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enge, H.A.

    1977-01-01

    A system for deflecting a beam of particles having different momenta, preferably through a 90 0 angle, so as to cause the beam to impinge upon a moving target and to scan across the target is described. The system includes a means responsive to a beam from a suitable source for causing the beam to periodically scan in a scanning plane and further means for deflecting the periodically scanned beam through the desired angle in a deflection plane so that the deflected beam impinges on the target. Means are included in the system for reducing the momentum dispersion at the target in both the deflection and the scanning planes and for spatially focussing the beam so as to produce a desired beam diameter at the target

  20. LIDAR COMBINED SCANNING UNIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Elizarov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. The results of lidar combined scanning unit development for locating leaks of hydrocarbons are presented The unit enables to perform high-speed scanning of the investigated space in wide and narrow angle fields. Method. Scanning in a wide angular field is produced by one-line scanning path by means of the movable aluminum mirror with a frequency of 20Hz and amplitude of 20 degrees of swing. Narrowband scanning is performed along a spiral path by the deflector. The deflection of the beam is done by rotation of the optical wedges forming part of the deflector at an angle of ±50. The control function of the scanning node is performed by a specialized software product written in C# programming language. Main Results. This scanning unit allows scanning the investigated area at a distance of 50-100 m with spatial resolution at the level of 3 cm. The positioning accuracy of the laser beam in space is 15'. The developed scanning unit gives the possibility to browse the entire investigated area for the time not more than 1 ms at a rotation frequency of each wedge from 50 to 200 Hz. The problem of unambiguous definition of the beam geographical coordinates in space is solved at the software level according to the rotation angles of the mirrors and optical wedges. Lidar system coordinates are determined by means of GPS. Practical Relevance. Development results open the possibility for increasing the spatial resolution of scanning systems of a wide range of lidars and can provide high positioning accuracy of the laser beam in space.

  1. Re-examine tumor-induced alterations in hemodynamic responses of BOLD fMRI. Implications in presurgical brain mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Liya; Ali, Shazia; Fa, Tianning; Mao, Hui; Dandan, Chen; Olson, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Background: Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) fMRI is used for presurgical functional mapping of brain tumor patients. Abnormal tumor blood supply may affect hemodynamic responses and BOLD fMRI signals. Purpose: To perform a multivariate and quantitative investigation of the effect of brain tumors on the hemodynamic responses and its impact on BOLD MRI signal time course, data analysis in order to better understand tumor-induced alterations in hemodynamic responses, and accurately mapping cortical regions in brain tumor patients. Material and Methods: BOLD fMRI data from 42 glioma patients who underwent presurgical mapping of the primary motor cortex (PMC) with a block designed finger tapping paradigm were analyzed, retrospectively. Cases were divided into high grade (n = 24) and low grade (n = 18) groups based on pathology. The tumor volume and distance to the activated PMCs were measured. BOLD signal time courses from selected regions of interest (ROIs) in the PMCs of tumor affected and contralateral unaffected hemispheres were obtained from each patient. Tumor-induced changes of BOLD signal intensity and time to peak (TTP) of BOLD signal time courses were analyzed statistically. Results: The BOLD signal intensity and TTP in the tumor-affected PMCs are altered when compared to that of the unaffected hemisphere. The average BOLD signal level is statistically significant lower in the affected PMCs. The average TTP in the affected PMCs is shorter in the high grade group, but longer in the low grade tumor group compared to the contralateral unaffected hemisphere. Degrees of alterations in BOLD signal time courses are related to both the distance to activated foci and tumor volume with the stronger effect in tumor distance to activated PMC. Conclusion: Alterations in BOLD signal time courses are strongly related to the tumor grade, the tumor volume, and the distance to the activated foci. Such alterations may impair accurate mapping of tumor-affected functional

  2. Cortical Reorganization in Patients Recovered from Bell’s Palsy: An Orofacial and Finger Movements Task-State fMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeyoun Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To explore cortical reorganization of patients recovered from Bell’s palsy (BP by task-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI during finger and orofacial movements and provide more evidence for acupuncture clinical treatment of BP. Methods. We collected 17 BP patients with complete clinical recovery (BP group and 20 healthy volunteers (control group accepted the task-state fMRI scans with lip pursing movements and finger movements, respectively. Results. It was found that there were significant differences of brain functional status between the two groups. Conclusions. The results showed that there was cortical reorganization in the brain of patients recovered from BP after acupuncture treatment, which also suggested the relationship between the hand motor areas and facial motor areas of BP patients.

  3. Safety and EEG data quality of concurrent high-density EEG and high-speed fMRI at 3 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foged, Mette Thrane; Lindberg, Ulrich; Vakamudi, Kishore; Larsson, Henrik B. W.; Pinborg, Lars H.; Kjær, Troels W.; Fabricius, Martin; Svarer, Claus; Ozenne, Brice; Thomsen, Carsten; Beniczky, Sándor; Posse, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Concurrent EEG and fMRI is increasingly used to characterize the spatial-temporal dynamics of brain activity. However, most studies to date have been limited to conventional echo-planar imaging (EPI). There is considerable interest in integrating recently developed high-speed fMRI methods with high-density EEG to increase temporal resolution and sensitivity for task-based and resting state fMRI, and for detecting interictal spikes in epilepsy. In the present study using concurrent high-density EEG and recently developed high-speed fMRI methods, we investigate safety of radiofrequency (RF) related heating, the effect of EEG on cortical signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in fMRI, and assess EEG data quality. Materials and methods The study compared EPI, multi-echo EPI, multi-band EPI and multi-slab echo-volumar imaging pulse sequences, using clinical 3 Tesla MR scanners from two different vendors that were equipped with 64- and 256-channel MR-compatible EEG systems, respectively, and receive only array head coils. Data were collected in 11 healthy controls (3 males, age range 18–70 years) and 13 patients with epilepsy (8 males, age range 21–67 years). Three of the healthy controls were scanned with the 256-channel EEG system, the other subjects were scanned with the 64-channel EEG system. Scalp surface temperature, SNR in occipital cortex and head movement were measured with and without the EEG cap. The degree of artifacts and the ability to identify background activity was assessed by visual analysis by a trained expert in the 64 channel EEG data (7 healthy controls, 13 patients). Results RF induced heating at the surface of the EEG electrodes during a 30-minute scan period with stable temperature prior to scanning did not exceed 1.0° C with either EEG system and any of the pulse sequences used in this study. There was no significant decrease in cortical SNR due to the presence of the EEG cap (p > 0.05). No significant differences in the visually analyzed EEG

  4. Reliable quantification of BOLD fMRI cerebrovascular reactivity despite poor breath-hold performance☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Molly G.; Murphy, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) can be mapped using BOLD fMRI to provide a clinical insight into vascular health that can be used to diagnose cerebrovascular disease. Breath-holds are a readily accessible method for producing the required arterial CO2 increases but their implementation into clinical studies is limited by concerns that patients will demonstrate highly variable performance of breath-hold challenges. This study assesses the repeatability of CVR measurements despite poor task performance, to determine if and how robust results could be achieved with breath-holds in patients. Twelve healthy volunteers were scanned at 3T. Six functional scans were acquired, each consisting of 6 breath-hold challenges (10, 15, or 20 s duration) interleaved with periods of paced breathing. These scans simulated the varying breath-hold consistency and ability levels that may occur in patient data. Uniform ramps, time-scaled ramps, and end-tidal CO2 data were used as regressors in a general linear model in order to measure CVR at the grey matter, regional, and voxelwise level. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) quantified the repeatability of the CVR measurement for each breath-hold regressor type and scale of interest across the variable task performances. The ramp regressors did not fully account for variability in breath-hold performance and did not achieve acceptable repeatability (ICC  0.4). Further analysis of intra-subject CVR variability across the brain (ICCspatial and voxelwise correlation) supported the use of end-tidal CO2 data to extract robust whole-brain CVR maps, despite variability in breath-hold performance. We conclude that the incorporation of end-tidal CO2 monitoring into scanning enables robust, repeatable measurement of CVR that makes breath-hold challenges suitable for routine clinical practice. PMID:23845426

  5. Aging effects on the control of grip force magnitude: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Jeremy W; Eng, Janice J; Kokotilo, Kristen J; Boyd, Lara A

    2011-06-01

    Functional neuroimaging techniques have allowed for investigations into the mechanisms of age-related deterioration in motor control. This study used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to investigate age related differences in the control of grip force magnitude. Using an event-related design, fMRI scans were completed on 13 older adults, and 13 gender matched younger adults, while using their dominant hand to squeeze a rubber bulb for 4s at 10%, 40% or 70% of their maximum voluntary contraction. Both groups were able to match the relative force targets, however the older adults produced significantly lower levels of absolute force. fMRI analysis consisted of a 1) region of interest (ROI) approach to detect differences in selected motor areas within brain and 2) a voxel-wise whole brain comparison to find areas of differential activation that were not defined a priori between the older and younger group. The ROI analysis revealed that despite producing lower levels of absolute force, the older adults showed higher levels of activity predominantly in subcortical structures (putamen, thalamus and cerebellum) when compared to the younger group. The older adults also showed higher levels of activity in the ipsilateral ventral premotor cortex. A total of 19 of the 22 ROIs analyzed showed a significant main effect of the required force-level. In the majority of the ROIs that showed a significant force effect there were no significant differences in the magnitude of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal between the 10% and 40% conditions but a significantly higher BOLD signal in the 70% condition, suggesting that the modulation of brain activation with grip force may not be controlled in a linear fashion. It was also found that the older adult group demonstrate higher levels of activation in 7 areas during a force production task at higher force levels using a voxel-wise analysis. The 7 clusters that showed significant differences tended to be areas

  6. Temporal evaluation of computed tomographic scans at a Level 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-18

    Mar 18, 2016 ... hospitals and one (0.01%) patient signed a refusal-of-hospital- treatment (RHT). The overall mortality rate for patients who underwent a MDCT scan but died shortly thereafter in trauma was 3.9% (Table 2). Median time until start of the MDCT scan (TTS) was 69 minutes (IQR 39–126) with time-to-referral of ...

  7. Perceptual Characterization of the Macronutrient Picture System (MaPS for Food Image fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill L. King

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Food image fMRI paradigms are used widely for investigating the neural basis of ingestive behavior. However, these paradigms have not been validated in terms of ingestive behavior constructs, engagement of food-relevant neural systems, or test-retest reliability, making the generalizability of study findings unclear. Therefore, we validated the Macronutrient Picture System (MaPS (McClernon et al., 2013, which includes food images from the six categories represented in the Geiselman Food Preference Questionnaire (FPQ (Geiselman et al., 1998. Twenty-five healthy young adults (n = 21 female, mean age = 20.6 ± 1.1 years, mean BMI = 22.1 ± 1.9 kg/m2 rated the MaPS images in terms of visual interest, appetitive quality, nutrition, emotional valence, liking, and frequency of consumption, and completed the FPQ. In a second study, 12 individuals (n=8 female, mean age = 25.0 ± 6.5 years, mean BMI = 28.2 ± 8.7 kg/m2 viewed MaPS and control images (vegetables and non-food during two separate 3T BOLD fMRI scans after fasting overnight. Intuitively, high fat/high sugar (HF/HS and high fat/high complex carbohydrate (HF/HCCHO images achieved higher liking and appetitive ratings, and lower nutrition ratings, than low fat/low complex carbohydrate/high protein (LF/LCHO/HP images on average. Within each food category, FPQ scores correlated strongly with MaPS image liking ratings (p < 0.001. Brain activation differences between viewing images of HF/HS and vegetables, and between HF/HCCHO and vegetables, were seen in several reward-related brain regions (e.g., putamen, insula, and medial frontal gyrus. Intra-individual, inter-scan agreement in a summary measure of brain activation differences in seven reward network regions of interest was high (ICC = 0.61, and was even higher when two distinct sets of food images with matching visual ratings were shown in the two scans (ICC = 0.74. These results suggest that the MaPS provides valid representation of food

  8. Usefulness of Thallium Scan for Differential Diagnosis of Breast Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Sang Kyun; Yum, Ha Yong; Lee, Chung Han; Choi, Kyung Hyun

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate thallium scanning as a potential test in differentiating malignant from benign lesions of breast. Thirty-one female patients underwent thallium scan of the breast. After intravenous injection of 74-111 MBq(2-3 mCi)of thallium-201, anterior and lateral images were obtained. We compared thallium scans with pathological results. Of 11 patients with breast cancers, 10 cases (90.9%) were detected using thallium scan. Thallium scan obtained in one patient who had breast cancer but received several cycles of chemotherapy did not show thallium uptake. The smallest detectable cancer was 1.5 cm in diameter. In contrast, there is no thallium accumulation in breasts of 17 of 20 patients with benign disease (85%), Three cases of 13 fibrocystic disease show thallium uptake in their breast. In conclusion, thallium scan is an effective test in differentiating benign from malignant lesion.

  9. Neural correlates of the psychedelic state as determined by fMRI studies with psilocybin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carhart-Harris, Robin L.; Erritzoe, David; Williams, Tim; Stone, James M.; Reed, Laurence J.; Colasanti, Alessandro; Tyacke, Robin J.; Leech, Robert; Malizia, Andrea L.; Murphy, Kevin; Hobden, Peter; Evans, John; Feilding, Amanda; Wise, Richard G.; Nutt, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Psychedelic drugs have a long history of use in healing ceremonies, but despite renewed interest in their therapeutic potential, we continue to know very little about how they work in the brain. Here we used psilocybin, a classic psychedelic found in magic mushrooms, and a task-free functional MRI (fMRI) protocol designed to capture the transition from normal waking consciousness to the psychedelic state. Arterial spin labeling perfusion and blood-oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI were used to map cerebral blood flow and changes in venous oxygenation before and after intravenous infusions of placebo and psilocybin. Fifteen healthy volunteers were scanned with arterial spin labeling and a separate 15 with BOLD. As predicted, profound changes in consciousness were observed after psilocybin, but surprisingly, only decreases in cerebral blood flow and BOLD signal were seen, and these were maximal in hub regions, such as the thalamus and anterior and posterior cingulate cortex (ACC and PCC). Decreased activity in the ACC/medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) was a consistent finding and the magnitude of this decrease predicted the intensity of the subjective effects. Based on these results, a seed-based pharmaco-physiological interaction/functional connectivity analysis was performed using a medial prefrontal seed. Psilocybin caused a significant decrease in the positive coupling between the mPFC and PCC. These results strongly imply that the subjective effects of psychedelic drugs are caused by decreased activity and connectivity in the brain's key connector hubs, enabling a state of unconstrained cognition. PMID:22308440

  10. [Findings from Total Colonoscopy in Obstructive Colorectal Cancer Patients Who Underwent Stent Placement as a Bridge to Surgery(BTS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruo, Hirotoshi; Tsuyuki, Hajime; Kojima, Tadahiro; Koreyasu, Ryohei; Nakamura, Koichi; Higashi, Yukihiro; Shoji, Tsuyoshi; Yamazaki, Masanori; Nishiyama, Raisuke; Ito, Tatsuhiro; Koike, Kota; Ikeda, Takashi; Takayanagi, Yasuhiro; Kubota, Hiroyuki

    2017-11-01

    We clinically investigated 34 patients with obstructive colorectal cancer who underwent placement of a colonic stent as a bridge to surgery(BTS), focusing on endoscopic findings after stent placement.Twenty -nine patients(85.3%)underwent colonoscopy after stent placement, and the entire large intestine could be observed in 28(96.6%).Coexisting lesions were observed in 22(78.6%)of these 28 patients.The lesions comprised adenomatous polyps in 17 patients(60.7%), synchronous colon cancers in 5 patients(17.9%), and obstructive colitis in 3 patients(10.7%), with some overlapping cases.All patients with multiple cancers underwent one-stage surgery, and all lesions were excised at the same time.Colonoscopy after colonic stent placement is important for preoperative diagnosis of coexisting lesions and planning the extent of resection. These considerations support the utility of colonic stenting for BTS.

  11. Cortical inefficiency in patients with unipolar depression: an event-related FMRI study with the Stroop task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Gerd; Sinsel, Esther; Sobanski, Thomas; Köhler, Sabine; Marinou, Varvara; Mentzel, Hans-Joachim; Sauer, Heinrich; Schlösser, Ralf G M

    2006-05-15

    The present study is aimed to examine the neuronal correlates of Stroop interference in medication-free patients with major depressive disorder. Sixteen patients fulfilling Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) criteria for unipolar depression and 16 healthy control subjects matched for age, gender, and education were included. All subjects underwent an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) design with an adapted version of the Stroop task including congruent and incongruent task conditions. The fMRI experiment was conducted on a 1.5 T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner, and item responses were given manually by the subjects. With regard to behavioral performance, patients revealed no differences in both reaction time and accuracy relative to control subjects. With regard to brain activations, direct comparison of patients with control subjects in the interference condition revealed hyperactivity in rostral anterior cingulate gyrus (rACG) and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in depressive patients, which correlated strongly with the Stroop interference. The study provides new evidence for the functioning and dissociation of the anterior cingulate in depressed patients. The greater prefrontal activation may reflect a cortical inefficiency due to hyperactivity in rACG enhancing the cognitive interferences from the emotional state.

  12. Sensitivity and reliability of language laterality assessment with a free reversed association task - a fMRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fesl, Gunther; Brueckmann, Hartmut [University of Munich, Department of Neuroradiology, Campus Grosshadern, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377, Munich (Germany); Bruhns, Philipp [University of Munich, Department of Neuroradiology, Campus Grosshadern, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377, Munich (Germany); University of Munich, Department of Psycholinguistics, Munich (Germany); Rau, Sabine; Ilmberger, Josef [University of Munich, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Munich (Germany); Wiesmann, Martin [Helios Hospitals Schwerin, Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Schwerin (Germany); Kegel, Gerd [University of Munich, Department of Psycholinguistics, Munich (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the sensitivity and reliability of assessing hemispheric language dominance with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) using a 'free reversed association task.' Thirty-nine healthy subjects (13 dextrals, 13 sinistrals and 13 bimanuals) underwent two repeated fMRI sessions. In the active phases sets of words were presented via headphones, and an associated target item was named. During the baseline phases a standard answer was given after listening to unintelligible stimuli. Data were preprocessed with SPM, and then laterality indices (LI) and reliability coefficients (RC) were calculated. Extensive frontal, temporal and parietal activations were found. Seventy-eight percent of the subjects showed left-hemispheric dominance, 5% showed right-hemispheric dominance, and 17% had bilateral language representations. The incidence of right-hemispheric language dominance was 4.3 times higher in a left-hander with a handedness quotient (HQ) of -90 than in a right-hander with a HQ of +90. The RC was 0.61 for combined ROIs (global network). Strong correlations were found between the two session LIs (r = 0.95 for the global network). 'Free reversed association' is a sensitive and reliable task for the determination of individual language lateralization. This suggests that the task may be used in a clinical setting. (orig.)

  13. Tomographic scanning apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Details are presented of a tomographic scanning apparatus, its rotational assembly, and the control and circuit elements, with particular reference to the amplifier and multiplexing circuits enabling detector signal calibration. (U.K.)

  14. Tomographic Scanning Imaging Seeker

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hovland, Harald

    2005-01-01

    .... Simulation results are provided to show the reconstruction quality. The concept, using a single pixel and a simple rotating axis scan mechanism, allows for a simple, low-cost, software-driven imaging sensor...

  15. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... which are encased in metal and plastic and most often shaped like a box, attached to a ... will I experience during and after the procedure? Most thyroid scan and thyroid uptake procedures are painless. ...

  16. Tomographic scanning apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Details are given of a tomographic scanning apparatus, with particular reference to a multiplexer slip ring means for receiving output from the detectors and enabling interfeed to the image reconstruction station. (U.K.)

  17. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... often unattainable using other imaging procedures. For many diseases, nuclear medicine scans yield the most useful information needed to make a diagnosis or to determine appropriate treatment, if any. Nuclear ...

  18. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... energy. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? The thyroid scan is used ... the test. You should also drink plenty of water to help flush the radioactive material out of ...

  19. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

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    Full Text Available ... the body converts food to energy. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? The ... type of scan you are undergoing. top of page What does the equipment look like? The special camera ...

  20. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... nuclear medicine procedures are able to pinpoint molecular activity within the body, they offer the potential to ... tells you otherwise, you may resume your normal activities after your nuclear medicine scan. If any special ...

  1. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... gamma camera heads are oriented at a 90 degree angle and placed over the patient's body. SPECT ... are scheduled for an additional procedure that same day that requires an intravenous line. Actual scanning time ...

  2. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... energy. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? The thyroid scan is used ... computer aids in creating the images from the data obtained by the gamma camera. A probe is ...

  3. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... eat for several hours before your exam because eating can affect the accuracy of the uptake measurement. ... often unattainable using other imaging procedures. For many diseases, nuclear medicine scans yield the most useful information ...

  4. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... often unattainable using other imaging procedures. For many diseases, nuclear medicine scans yield the most useful information needed to make a diagnosis or to determine appropriate treatment, if any. Nuclear medicine is less expensive and ...

  5. Tomographic scanning apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This patent specification relates to a tomographic scanning apparatus using a fan beam and digital output signal, and particularly to the design of the gas-pressurized ionization detection system. (U.K.)

  6. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... abnormal was found, and should not be a cause of concern for you. If you had an intravenous ... abnormal was found, and should not be a cause of concern for you. Actual scanning time for each ...

  7. The Scanning Optical Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, C. J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the principle of the scanning optical microscope and explains its advantages over the conventional microscope in the improvement of resolution and contrast, as well as the possibility of producing a picture from optical harmonies generated within the specimen.

  8. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... evaluate changes in the gland following medication use, surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy top of page How should ... such as an x-ray or CT scan, surgeries or treatments using iodinated contrast material within the ...

  9. Scanning Auger Electron Microscope

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A JEOL model 7830F field emission source, scanning Auger microscope.Specifications / Capabilities:Ultra-high vacuum (UHV), electron gun range from 0.1 kV to 25 kV,...

  10. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... liquid or capsule form, it is typically swallowed up to 24 hours before the scan. The radiotracer given by intravenous injection is usually given up to 30 minutes prior to the test. When ...

  11. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exam of any medications you are taking, including vitamins and herbal supplements. You should also inform them ... of scan you are undergoing. top of page What does the equipment look like? The special camera ...

  12. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Because nuclear medicine procedures are able to pinpoint molecular activity within the body, they offer the potential ... or imaging device that produces pictures and provides molecular information. The thyroid scan and thyroid uptake provide ...

  13. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scan and thyroid uptake provide information about the structure and function of the thyroid. The thyroid is ... computer, create pictures offering details on both the structure and function of organs and tissues in your ...

  14. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... abnormal was found, and should not be a cause of concern for you. If you had an ... abnormal was found, and should not be a cause of concern for you. Actual scanning time for ...

  15. Pediatric CT Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Radiation Epidemiology Branch and collaborators have initiated a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the relationship between radiation exposure from CT scans conducted during childhood and adolescence and the subsequent development of cancer.

  16. Lung gallium scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... produced by the gallium. Images display on a computer screen. During the scan, it is important that ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  17. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? The thyroid scan is used to determine ... you are undergoing. top of page What does the equipment look like? The special camera and imaging ...

  18. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Uptake? A thyroid scan is a type of nuclear medicine imaging. The radioactive iodine uptake test (RAIU) ... of thyroid function, but does not involve imaging. Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that ...

  19. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scan and uptake uses small amounts of radioactive materials called radiotracers, a special camera and a computer ... last two months that used iodine-based contrast material. Your doctor will instruct you on how to ...

  20. RBC nuclear scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... scan uses small amounts of radioactive material to mark (tag) red blood cells (RBCs). Your body is ... Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 135. Tavakkoli A, Ashley SW. Acute ...

  1. Cervical spine CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your provider if you take the diabetes medicine metformin (Glucophage). You may need to take extra steps ... to contrast dye Birth defect if done during pregnancy CT scans expose you to more radiation than ...

  2. Leg CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your provider if you take the diabetes medicine metformin (Glucophage). You may need to take extra steps ... to contrast dye Birth defect if done during pregnancy CT scans expose you to more radiation than ...

  3. Shoulder CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your provider if you take the diabetes medicine metformin (Glucophage) because you may need to take extra ... to contrast dye Birth defect if done during pregnancy CT scans do expose you to more radiation ...

  4. Knee CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your provider if you take the diabetes medicine metformin (Glucophage). You may need to take extra steps ... to contrast dye Birth defect if done during pregnancy CT scans give off more radiation than regular ...

  5. Arm CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your provider if you take the diabetes drug metformin (Glucophage). You may need to take special steps ... to contrast dye Birth defect if done during pregnancy CT scans expose you to more radiation than ...

  6. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A thyroid scan is a type of nuclear medicine imaging. The radioactive iodine uptake test (RAIU) is ... thyroid function, but does not involve imaging. Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that uses ...

  7. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Uptake? A thyroid scan is a type of nuclear medicine imaging. The radioactive iodine uptake test (RAIU) is ... of thyroid function, but does not involve imaging. Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that uses ...

  8. Gender differences in brain regional homogeneity of healthy subjects after normal sleep and after sleep deprivation: a resting-state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xi-Jian; Gong, Hong-Han; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Zhou, Fu-Qing; Min, You-Jiang; Zhao, Feng; Wang, Si-Yong; Liu, Bi-Xia; Xiao, Xiang-Zuo

    2012-06-01

    To explore the gender differences of brain regional homogeneity (ReHo) in healthy subjects during the resting-state, after normal sleep, and after sleep deprivation (SD) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and the ReHo method. Sixteen healthy subjects (eight males and eight females) each underwent the resting-state fMRI exams twice, i.e., once after normal sleep and again after 24h's SD. According to the gender and sleep, 16 subjects were all measured twice and divided into four groups: the male control group (MC), female control group (FC), male SD group (MSD), and female SD group (FSD). The ReHo method was used to calculate and analyze the data, SPM5 software was used to perform a two-sample T-test and a two-pair T-test with a P value brain activity in the resting state can be widely found not only between the control and SD group in a same gender group, but also between the male group and female group. Thus, we should take the gender differences into consideration in future fMRI studies, especially the treatment of brain-related diseases (e.g., depression). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Nonparametric modeling of dynamic functional connectivity in fmri data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Føns Vind; Madsen, Kristoffer H.; Røge, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    dynamic changes. The existing approaches modeling dynamic connectivity have primarily been based on time-windowing the data and k-means clustering. We propose a nonparametric generative model for dynamic FC in fMRI that does not rely on specifying window lengths and number of dynamic states. Rooted......Dynamic functional connectivity (FC) has in recent years become a topic of interest in the neuroimaging community. Several models and methods exist for both functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalography (EEG), and the results point towards the conclusion that FC exhibits...... in Bayesian statistical modeling we use the predictive likelihood to investigate if the model can discriminate between a motor task and rest both within and across subjects. We further investigate what drives dynamic states using the model on the entire data collated across subjects and task/rest. We find...

  10. Probing the brain with molecular fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Souparno; Harvey, Peter; Simon, Jacob C; Jasanoff, Alan

    2018-04-09

    One of the greatest challenges of modern neuroscience is to incorporate our growing knowledge of molecular and cellular-scale physiology into integrated, organismic-scale models of brain function in behavior and cognition. Molecular-level functional magnetic resonance imaging (molecular fMRI) is a new technology that can help bridge these scales by mapping defined microscopic phenomena over large, optically inaccessible regions of the living brain. In this review, we explain how MRI-detectable imaging probes can be used to sensitize noninvasive imaging to mechanistically significant components of neural processing. We discuss how a combination of innovative probe design, advanced imaging methods, and strategies for brain delivery can make molecular fMRI an increasingly successful approach for spatiotemporally resolved studies of diverse neural phenomena, perhaps eventually in people. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. fMRI for mapping language networks in neurosurgical cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Santosh S

    2014-01-01

    Evaluating language has been a long-standing application in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, both in research and clinical circumstances, and still provides challenges. Localization of eloquent areas is important in neurosurgical cases, so that there is least possible damage to these areas during surgery, maintaining their function postoperatively, therefore providing good quality of life to the patient. Preoperative fMRI study is a non-invasive tool to localize the eloquent areas, including language, with other traditional methods generally used being invasive and at times perilous. In this article, we describe methods and various paradigms to study the language areas, in clinical neurosurgical cases, along with illustrations of cases from our institute

  12. Automatic physiological waveform processing for FMRI noise correction and analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Kelley

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Functional MRI resting state and connectivity studies of brain focus on neural fluctuations at low frequencies which share power with physiological fluctuations originating from lung and heart. Due to the lack of automated software to process physiological signals collected at high magnetic fields, a gap exists in the processing pathway between the acquisition of physiological data and its use in fMRI software for both physiological noise correction and functional analyses of brain activation and connectivity. To fill this gap, we developed an open source, physiological signal processing program, called PhysioNoise, in the python language. We tested its automated processing algorithms and dynamic signal visualization on resting monkey cardiac and respiratory waveforms. PhysioNoise consistently identifies physiological fluctuations for fMRI noise correction and also generates covariates for subsequent analyses of brain activation and connectivity.

  13. fMRI paradigm designing and post-processing tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, Jija S; Rajesh, PG; Chandran, Anuvitha VS; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we first review some aspects of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigm designing for major cognitive functions by using stimulus delivery systems like Cogent, E-Prime, Presentation, etc., along with their technical aspects. We also review the stimulus presentation possibilities (block, event-related) for visual or auditory paradigms and their advantage in both clinical and research setting. The second part mainly focus on various fMRI data post-processing tools such as Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) and Brain Voyager, and discuss the particulars of various preprocessing steps involved (realignment, co-registration, normalization, smoothing) in these software and also the statistical analysis principles of General Linear Modeling for final interpretation of a functional activation result

  14. Infant fMRI: A Model System for Cognitive Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Cameron T; Turk-Browne, Nicholas B

    2018-02-24

    Our understanding of the typical human brain has benefitted greatly from studying different kinds of brains and their associated behavioral repertoires, including animal models and neuropsychological patients. This same comparative perspective can be applied to early development - the environment, behavior, and brains of infants provide a model system for understanding how the mature brain works. This approach requires noninvasive methods for measuring brain function in awake, behaving infants. fMRI is becoming increasingly viable for this purpose, with the unique ability to precisely measure the entire brain, including both cortical and subcortical structures. Here we discuss potential lessons from infant fMRI for several domains of adult cognition and consider the challenges of conducting such research and how they might be mitigated. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Archetypal Analysis for Modeling Multisubject fMRI Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinrich, Jesper Løve; Bardenfleth, Sophia Elizabeth; Røge, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    are assumed to be generated by a set of 'prototype' time series. Archetypal analysis (AA) provides a promising alternative, combining the advantages of component-model flexibility with highly interpretable latent 'archetypes' (similar to cluster-model prototypes). To date, AA has not been applied to group......-level fMRI; a major limitation is that it does not generalize to multi-subject datasets, which may have significant variations in blood oxygenation-level-dependent signal and heteroscedastic noise. We develop multi-subject AA (MS-AA), which accounts for group-level data by assuming that archetypal...... performance when modelling archetypes for a motor task experiment. The procedure extracts a 'seed map' across subjects, used to provide brain parcellations with subject-specific temporal profiles. Our approach thus decomposes multisubject fMRI data into distinct interpretable component archetypes that may...

  16. Identifying fMRI Model Violations with Lagrange Multiplier Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Ben; Long, Christopher J; Rae, Caroline; Solo, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The standard modeling framework in Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is predicated on assumptions of linearity, time invariance and stationarity. These assumptions are rarely checked because doing so requires specialised software, although failure to do so can lead to bias and mistaken inference. Identifying model violations is an essential but largely neglected step in standard fMRI data analysis. Using Lagrange Multiplier testing methods we have developed simple and efficient procedures for detecting model violations such as non-linearity, non-stationarity and validity of the common Double Gamma specification for hemodynamic response. These procedures are computationally cheap and can easily be added to a conventional analysis. The test statistic is calculated at each voxel and displayed as a spatial anomaly map which shows regions where a model is violated. The methodology is illustrated with a large number of real data examples. PMID:22542665

  17. fMRI paradigm designing and post-processing tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jija S James

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we first review some aspects of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI paradigm designing for major cognitive functions by using stimulus delivery systems like Cogent, E-Prime, Presentation, etc., along with their technical aspects. We also review the stimulus presentation possibilities (block, event-related for visual or auditory paradigms and their advantage in both clinical and research setting. The second part mainly focus on various fMRI data post-processing tools such as Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM and Brain Voyager, and discuss the particulars of various preprocessing steps involved (realignment, co-registration, normalization, smoothing in these software and also the statistical analysis principles of General Linear Modeling for final interpretation of a functional activation result.

  18. Specific default mode subnetworks support mentalizing as revealed through opposing network recruitment by social and semantic FMRI tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Christopher J; Calhoun, Vince D; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Assaf, Michal

    2015-08-01

    The ability to attribute mental states to others, or "mentalizing," is posited to involve specific subnetworks within the overall default mode network (DMN), but this question needs clarification. To determine which default mode (DM) subnetworks are engaged by mentalizing processes, we assessed task-related recruitment of DM subnetworks. Spatial independent component analysis (sICA) applied to fMRI data using relatively high-order model (75 components). Healthy participants (n = 53, ages 17-60) performed two fMRI tasks: an interactive game involving mentalizing (Domino), a semantic memory task (SORT), and a resting state fMRI scan. sICA of the two tasks split the DMN into 10 subnetworks located in three core regions: medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC; five subnetworks), posterior cingulate/precuneus (PCC/PrC; three subnetworks), and bilateral temporoparietal junction (TPJ). Mentalizing events increased recruitment in five of 10 DM subnetworks, located in all three core DMN regions. In addition, three of these five DM subnetworks, one dmPFC subnetwork, one PCC/PrC subnetwork, and the right TPJ subnetwork, showed reduced recruitment by semantic memory task events. The opposing modulation by the two tasks suggests that these three DM subnetworks are specifically engaged in mentalizing. Our findings, therefore, suggest the unique involvement of mentalizing processes in only three of 10 DM subnetworks, and support the importance of the dmPFC, PCC/PrC, and right TPJ in mentalizing as described in prior studies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Topologic analysis and comparison of brain activation in children with epilepsy versus controls: an fMRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oweis, Khalid J.; Berl, Madison M.; Gaillard, William D.; Duke, Elizabeth S.; Blackstone, Kaitlin; Loew, Murray H.; Zara, Jason M.

    2010-03-01

    This paper describes the development of novel computer-aided analysis algorithms to identify the language activation patterns at a certain Region of Interest (ROI) in Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Previous analysis techniques have been used to compare typical and pathologic activation patterns in fMRI images resulting from identical tasks but none of them analyzed activation topographically in a quantitative manner. This paper presents new analysis techniques and algorithms capable of identifying a pattern of language activation associated with localization related epilepsy. fMRI images of 64 healthy individuals and 31 patients with localization related epilepsy have been studied and analyzed on an ROI basis. All subjects are right handed with normal MRI scans and have been classified into three age groups (4-6, 7-9, 10-12 years). Our initial efforts have focused on investigating activation in the Left Inferior Frontal Gyrus (LIFG). A number of volumetric features have been extracted from the data. The LIFG has been cut into slices and the activation has been investigated topographically on a slice by slice basis. Overall, a total of 809 features have been extracted, and correlation analysis was applied to eliminate highly correlated features. Principal Component analysis was then applied to account only for major components in the data and One-Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) has been applied to test for significantly different features between normal and patient groups. Twenty Nine features have were found to be significantly different (p<0.05) between patient and control groups

  20. Bayesian Modelling of fMRI Time Series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højen-Sørensen, Pedro; Hansen, Lars Kai; Rasmussen, Carl Edward

    2000-01-01

    We present a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) for inferring the hidden psychological state (or neural activity) during single trial fMRI activation experiments with blocked task paradigms. Inference is based on Bayesian methodology, using a combination of analytical and a variety of Markov Chain Monte...... Carlo (MCMC) sampling techniques. The advantage of this method is that detection of short time learning effects between repeated trials is possible since inference is based only on single trial experiments....

  1. Imaging gait analysis: An fMRI dual task study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürki, Céline N; Bridenbaugh, Stephanie A; Reinhardt, Julia; Stippich, Christoph; Kressig, Reto W; Blatow, Maria

    2017-08-01

    In geriatric clinical diagnostics, gait analysis with cognitive-motor dual tasking is used to predict fall risk and cognitive decline. To date, the neural correlates of cognitive-motor dual tasking processes are not fully understood. To investigate these underlying neural mechanisms, we designed an fMRI paradigm to reproduce the gait analysis. We tested the fMRI paradigm's feasibility in a substudy with fifteen young adults and assessed 31 healthy older adults in the main study. First, gait speed and variability were quantified using the GAITRite © electronic walkway. Then, participants lying in the MRI-scanner were stepping on pedals of an MRI-compatible stepping device used to imitate gait during functional imaging. In each session, participants performed cognitive and motor single tasks as well as cognitive-motor dual tasks. Behavioral results showed that the parameters of both gait analyses, GAITRite © and fMRI, were significantly positively correlated. FMRI results revealed significantly reduced brain activation during dual task compared to single task conditions. Functional ROI analysis showed that activation in the superior parietal lobe (SPL) decreased less from single to dual task condition than activation in primary motor cortex and in supplementary motor areas. Moreover, SPL activation was increased during dual tasks in subjects exhibiting lower stepping speed and lower executive control. We were able to simulate walking during functional imaging with valid results that reproduce those from the GAITRite © gait analysis. On the neural level, SPL seems to play a crucial role in cognitive-motor dual tasking and to be linked to divided attention processes, particularly when motor activity is involved.

  2. The effect of topiramate on cognitive fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Clarissa Lin; Centeno, Maria; Vollmar, Christian; Stretton, Jason; Symms, Mark; Cendes, Fernando; Mehta, Mitul A; Thompson, Pamela; Duncan, John S; Koepp, Matthias J

    2013-07-01

    Topiramate (TPM) is known to cause language impairment in healthy volunteers and patients with epilepsy. We assessed the effects of TPM on functional language networks in both patients with focal epilepsies and healthy controls using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We obtained fMRI data in 24 controls and 35 patients with frontal lobe epilepsy using a simple verbal fluency (VF) paradigm. Eight of the 35 patients were treated with TPM in polytherapy. We compared cognitive task related activations and de-activations in patients taking TPM with patients taking other AEDs and healthy controls. In a longitudinal pilot study with VF-fMRI paradigm, we studied two patients with focal epilepsies twice, prior to starting and on stable doses of TPM, two patients twice, before and after tapering TPM completely and two healthy controls twice, before and after single doses of 200mg TPM. Cross sectional analyses of VF-fMRI showed a reduction in the task-related deactivation of the default mode network (DMN) in patients taking TPM. The longitudinal study corroborated these findings as both chronic administration and a single dose of TPM were associated with impaired categorical verbal fluency and disruption of task-related deactivations. Similar neuropsychological and fMRI findings in patients and healthy controls indicate a specific effect of TPM in default mode network areas that may be essential components of the language network. Our preliminary data suggest a mechanism by which TPM impairs cognitive processing during language function and highlights the sensitivity of fMRI to detect the effects of AEDs on cognitive brain networks. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. fMRI of the motor speech center using EPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, In Kyu; Chang, Kee Hyun; Song, In Chan; Kim, Hong Dae; Seong, Su Ok; Jang, Hyun Jung; Han, Moon Hee; Lee, Sang Kun

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of functional MR imaging (fMRI) using the echo planar imaging (EPI) technique to map the motor speech center and to provide the basic data for motor speech fMRI during internal word generations. This study involved ten young, healthy, right-handed volunteers (M:F=8:2; age: 21-27); a 1.5T whole body scanner with multislice EPI was used. Brain activation was mapped using gradient echo single shot EPI (TR/TE of 3000/40, slice numbers 6, slice thicknesses mm, no interslice gap, matrix numbers 128 x 128, and FOV 30 x 30). The paradigm consisted of a series of alternating rest and activation tasks, repeated eight times. During the rest task, each of ten Korean nouns composed of two to four syllables was shown continuously every 3 seconds. The subjects were required to see the words but not to generate speech, whereas during the activation task, they were asked to internally generate as many words as possible from each of ten non-concrete one-syllabled Korean letters shown on the screen every 3 seconds. During an eight-minute period, a total of 960 axial images were acquired in each subject. Data were analyzed using the Z-score (p<0.05), and following color processing, the activated signals were overlapped on T1-weighted images. The location of the activated area, mean activated signal intensity were evaluated. The results of this study indicate that in most subjects, fMRI using EPI can effectively map the motor speech center. The data obtained may be useful for the clinical application of fMRI. (author). 34 refs., 3 tabs., 5 figs

  4. Radionuclide scan and other diagnostic studies in goitre patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aims of this study were to determine the pattern of radionuclide scan, its accuracy in diagnosing the nature of the lesion of a thyroid disease and comparing this with other available diagnostic techniques. Methods: This was a retrospective study that evaluated 124 patients with goiters who underwent clinical evaluation, ...

  5. The global signal in fMRI: Nuisance or Information?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Thomas T; Nalci, Alican; Falahpour, Maryam

    2017-04-15

    The global signal is widely used as a regressor or normalization factor for removing the effects of global variations in the analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. However, there is considerable controversy over its use because of the potential bias that can be introduced when it is applied to the analysis of both task-related and resting-state fMRI studies. In this paper we take a closer look at the global signal, examining in detail the various sources that can contribute to the signal. For the most part, the global signal has been treated as a nuisance term, but there is growing evidence that it may also contain valuable information. We also examine the various ways that the global signal has been used in the analysis of fMRI data, including global signal regression, global signal subtraction, and global signal normalization. Furthermore, we describe new ways for understanding the effects of global signal regression and its relation to the other approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Test-retest reliability of longitudinal task-based fMRI: Implications for developmental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herting, Megan M; Gautam, Prapti; Chen, Zhanghua; Mezher, Adam; Vetter, Nora C

    2017-07-13

    Great advances have been made in functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) studies, including the use of longitudinal design to more accurately identify changes in brain development across childhood and adolescence. While longitudinal fMRI studies are necessary for our understanding of typical and atypical patterns of brain development, the variability observed in fMRI blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal and its test-retest reliability in developing populations remain a concern. Here we review the current state of test-retest reliability for child and adolescent fMRI studies (ages 5-18 years) as indexed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). In addition to highlighting ways to improve fMRI test-retest reliability in developmental cognitive neuroscience research, we hope to open a platform for dialogue regarding longitudinal fMRI study designs, analyses, and reporting of results. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Radiation scanning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    In the radiation scanning system the radiation emitted from an image field is scanned by a field of radiosensitive detector elements, and the signals transmitted are used to control the video input of a scanning-pattern image display unit. By the variations of the transmitting properties of the detector elements and the electronic equipment spurious patterns are produced on the projected picture. In order to prevent this there is provided for a compensating circuit and a comparator by means of which the variations of the transmitting properties are compensated. It works synchronous by together with a multipler device and carries out a measurement of the statistic moment of the voltage of each channel. The compensating device may be designed as an open or closed control loop. (orig.) [de

  8. Frequency scanning microstrip antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Magnus; Jørgensen, Rolf

    1979-01-01

    The principles of using radiating microstrip resonators as elements in a frequency scanning antenna array are described. The resonators are cascade-coupled. This gives a scan of the main lobe due to the phase-shift in the resonator in addition to that created by the transmission line phase......-shift. Experimental results inX-band, in good agreement with the theory, show that it is possible to scan the main lobe an angle ofpm30degby a variation of the frequencypm300MHz, and where the 3 dB beamwidth is less than10deg. The directivity was 14.7 dB, while the gain was 8.1 dB. The efficiency might be improved...

  9. Comparison of laterality index of upper and lower limb movement using brain activated fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harirchian, Mohammad Hossein; Oghabian, Mohammad Ali; Rezvanizadeh, Alireza; Bolandzadeh, Niousha

    2008-03-01

    Asymmetry of bilateral cerebral function, i.e. laterality, is an important phenomenon in many brain actions such as motor functions. This asymmetry maybe altered in some clinical conditions such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS). The aim of this study was to delineate the laterality differences for upper and lower limbs in healthy subjects to compare this pattern with subjects suffering from MS in advance. Hence 9 Male healthy subjects underwent fMRI assessment, while they were asked to move their limbs in a predetermined pattern. The results showed that hands movement activates the brain with a significant lateralization in pre-motor cortex in comparison with lower limb. Also, dominant hands activate brain more lateralized than the non-dominant hand. In addition, Left basal ganglia were observed to be activated regardless of the hand used, While, These patterns of Brain activation was not detected in lower limbs. We hypothesize that this difference might be attributed to this point that hand is usually responsible for precise and fine voluntary movements, whereas lower limb joints are mainly responsible for locomotion, a function integrating voluntary and automatic bilateral movements.

  10. Prenatal marijuana exposure impacts executive functioning into young adulthood: An fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andra M; Mioduszewski, Ola; Hatchard, Taylor; Byron-Alhassan, Aziza; Fall, Carley; Fried, Peter A

    Understanding the potentially harmful long term consequences of prenatal marijuana exposure is important given the increase in number of pregnant women smoking marijuana to relieve morning sickness. Altered executive functioning is one area of research that has suggested negative consequences of prenatal marijuana exposure into adolescence. Investigating if these findings continue into young adulthood and exploring the neural basis of these effects was the purpose of this research. Thirty one young adults (ages 18-22years) from the longitudinal Ottawa Prenatal Prospective Study (OPPS) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during four tasks; 1) Visuospatial 2-Back, 2) Go/NoGo, 3) Letter 2-Back and 4) Counting Stroop task. Sixteen participants were prenatally exposed to marijuana while 15 had no prenatal marijuana exposure. Task performance was similar for both groups but blood flow was significantly different between the groups. This paper presents the results for all 4 tasks, highlighting the consistently increased left posterior brain activity in the prenatally exposed group compared with the control group. These alterations in neurophysiological functioning of young adults prenatally exposed to marijuana emphasizes the importance of education for women in child bearing years, as well as for policy makers and physicians interested in the welfare of both the pregnant women and their offspring's future success. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The impact of inspired oxygen levels on calibrated fMRI measurements of M, OEF and resting CMRO2 using combined hypercapnia and hyperoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Lajoie

    Full Text Available Recent calibrated fMRI techniques using combined hypercapnia and hyperoxia allow the mapping of resting cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2 in absolute units, oxygen extraction fraction (OEF and calibration parameter M (maximum BOLD. The adoption of such technique necessitates knowledge about the precision and accuracy of the model-derived parameters. One of the factors that may impact the precision and accuracy is the level of oxygen provided during periods of hyperoxia (HO. A high level of oxygen may bring the BOLD responses closer to the maximum M value, and hence reduce the error associated with the M interpolation. However, an increased concentration of paramagnetic oxygen in the inhaled air may result in a larger susceptibility area around the frontal sinuses and nasal cavity. Additionally, a higher O2 level may generate a larger arterial blood T1 shortening, which require a bigger cerebral blood flow (CBF T1 correction. To evaluate the impact of inspired oxygen levels on M, OEF and CMRO2 estimates, a cohort of six healthy adults underwent two different protocols: one where 60% of O2 was administered during HO (low HO or LHO and one where 100% O2 was administered (high HO or HHO. The QUantitative O2 (QUO2 MRI approach was employed, where CBF and R2* are simultaneously acquired during periods of hypercapnia (HC and hyperoxia, using a clinical 3 T scanner. Scan sessions were repeated to assess repeatability of results at the different O2 levels. Our T1 values during periods of hyperoxia were estimated based on an empirical ex-vivo relationship between T1 and the arterial partial pressure of O2. As expected, our T1 estimates revealed a larger T1 shortening in arterial blood when administering 100% O2 relative to 60% O2 (T1LHO = 1.56±0.01 sec vs. T1HHO = 1.47±0.01 sec, P < 4*10-13. In regard to the susceptibility artifacts, the patterns and number of affected voxels were comparable irrespective of the O2 concentration. Finally, the

  12. Optimal experimental designs for fMRI via circulant biased weighing designs

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Ching-Shui; Kao, Ming-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technology is popularly used in many fields for studying how the brain reacts to mental stimuli. The identification of optimal fMRI experimental designs is crucial for rendering precise statistical inference on brain functions, but research on this topic is very lacking. We develop a general theory to guide the selection of fMRI designs for estimating a hemodynamic response function (HRF) that models the effect over time of the mental stimulus, and...

  13. Tomographic scanning apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abele, M.

    1983-01-01

    A computerized tomographic scanning apparatus suitable for diagnosis and for improving target identification in stereotactic neurosurgery is described. It consists of a base, a source of penetrating energy, a detector which produces scanning signals and detector positioning means. A frame with top and bottom arms secures the detector and source to the top and bottom arms respectively. A drive mechanism rotates the frame about an axis along which the frame may also be moved. Finally, the detector may be moved relative to the bottom arm in a direction contrary to the rotation of the frame. (U.K.)

  14. Calibration of scanning Lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Courtney, Michael

    This report describes the tests carried out on a scanning lidar at the DTU Test Station for large wind turbines, Høvsøre. The tests were divided in two parts. In the first part, the purpose was to obtain wind speed calibrations at two heights against two cup anemometers mounted on a mast. Additio......This report describes the tests carried out on a scanning lidar at the DTU Test Station for large wind turbines, Høvsøre. The tests were divided in two parts. In the first part, the purpose was to obtain wind speed calibrations at two heights against two cup anemometers mounted on a mast...

  15. Scanning the phenomenological MSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Wuerzinger, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    A framework to perform scans in the 19-dimensional phenomenological MSSM is developed and used to re-evaluate the ATLAS experiments' sensitivity to R-parity-conserving supersymmetry with LHC Run 2 data ($\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV), using results from 14 separate ATLAS searches. We perform a $\\tilde{t}_1$ dedicated scan, only considering models with $m_{\\tilde{t}_1}<1$ TeV, while allowing both a neutralino ($\\tilde{\\chi}_1^0$) and a sneutrino ($\\tilde{\

  16. Adaptive Optical Scanning Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, P. W. M.; Poon, Ting-Chung; Liu, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Optical Scanning Holography (OSH) is a powerful technique that employs a single-pixel sensor and a row-by-row scanning mechanism to capture the hologram of a wide-view, three-dimensional object. However, the time required to acquire a hologram with OSH is rather lengthy. In this paper, we propose an enhanced framework, which is referred to as Adaptive OSH (AOSH), to shorten the holographic recording process. We have demonstrated that the AOSH method is capable of decreasing the acquisition time by up to an order of magnitude, while preserving the content of the hologram favorably. PMID:26916866

  17. Active pain coping is associated with the response in real-time fMRI neurofeedback during pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmert, Kirsten; Breimhorst, Markus; Bauermann, Thomas; Birklein, Frank; Rebhorn, Cora; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Haller, Sven

    2017-06-01

    Real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) neurofeedback is used as a tool to gain voluntary control of activity in various brain regions. Little emphasis has been put on the influence of cognitive and personality traits on neurofeedback efficacy and baseline activity. Here, we assessed the effect of individual pain coping on rt-fMRI neurofeedback during heat-induced pain. Twenty-eight healthy subjects completed the Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ) prior to scanning. The first part of the fMRI experiment identified target regions using painful heat stimulation. Then, subjects were asked to down-regulate the pain target brain region during four neurofeedback runs with painful heat stimulation. Functional MRI analysis included correlation analysis between fMRI activation and pain ratings as well as CSQ ratings. At the behavioral level, the active pain coping (first principal component of CSQ) was correlated with pain ratings during neurofeedback. Concerning neuroimaging, pain sensitive regions were negatively correlated with pain coping. During neurofeedback, the pain coping was positively correlated with activation in the anterior cingulate cortex, prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and visual cortex. Thermode temperature was negatively correlated with anterior insula and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activation. In conclusion, self-reported pain coping mechanisms and pain sensitivity are a source of variance during rt-fMRI neurofeedback possibly explaining variations in regulation success. In particular, active coping seems to be associated with successful pain regulation.

  18. Differential neural processing of social exclusion in adolescents with non-suicidal self-injury: An fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groschwitz, Rebecca C; Plener, Paul L; Groen, Georg; Bonenberger, Martina; Abler, Birgit

    2016-09-30

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is highly prevalent in adolescence and has been suggested as an autonomous diagnosis in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5). Social rejection is as potential risk-factor for NSSI and depression in adolescence. Objectives of this study were to identify differences in neural processing of social rejection in depressed adolescents with and without co-morbid NSSI and healthy controls. Participants were 28 depressed adolescents (14 with co-morbid NSSI, 79% females) and 15 healthy controls, with an average age of 15.2 years (SD=1.8). Social exclusion was implemented using the Cyberball paradigm 'Cyberball' during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). All participants reported feelings of social exclusion after fMRI scanning. Investigating the effects of NSSI, we found that depressed adolescents with NSSI showed relatively enhanced activation of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC) compared to depressed adolescents without NSSI and also compared to healthy controls. Results point towards divergent processing of social exclusion in depressed adolescents with NSSI as compared to adolescents with mere depression in brain regions previously related to the processing of social exclusion. This finding of distinct neurophysiological responses may stimulate further research on individual treatment approaches. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Brain activation in response to randomized visual stimulation as obtained from conjunction and differential analysis: an fMRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasaruddin, N. H.; Yusoff, A. N.; Kaur, S.

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this multiple-subjects functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was to identify the common brain areas that are activated when viewing black-and-white checkerboard pattern stimuli of various shapes, pattern and size and to investigate specific brain areas that are involved in processing static and moving visual stimuli. Sixteen participants viewed the moving (expanding ring, rotating wedge, flipping hour glass and bowtie and arc quadrant) and static (full checkerboard) stimuli during an fMRI scan. All stimuli have black-and-white checkerboard pattern. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM) was used in generating brain activation. Differential analyses were implemented to separately search for areas involved in processing static and moving stimuli. In general, the stimuli of various shapes, pattern and size activated multiple brain areas mostly in the left hemisphere. The activation in the right middle temporal gyrus (MTG) was found to be significantly higher in processing moving visual stimuli as compared to static stimulus. In contrast, the activation in the left calcarine sulcus and left lingual gyrus were significantly higher for static stimulus as compared to moving stimuli. Visual stimulation of various shapes, pattern and size used in this study indicated left lateralization of activation. The involvement of the right MTG in processing moving visual information was evident from differential analysis, while the left calcarine sulcus and left lingual gyrus are the areas that are involved in the processing of static visual stimulus.

  20. The Neural Correlates of Mental Rotation Abilities in Cannabis-Abusing Patients with Schizophrenia: An fMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Potvin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence suggests that cannabis abuse/dependence is paradoxically associated with better cognition in schizophrenia. Accordingly, we performed a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study of visuospatial abilities in 14 schizophrenia patients with cannabis abuse (DD, 14 nonabusing schizophrenia patients (SCZ, and 21 healthy controls (HCs. Participants performed a mental rotation task while being scanned. There were no significant differences in the number of mistakes between schizophrenia groups, and both made more mistakes on the mental rotation task than HC. Relative to HC, SCZ had increased activations in the left thalamus, while DD patients had increased activations in the right supramarginal gyrus. In both cases, hyper-activations are likely to reflect compensatory efforts. In addition, SCZ patients had decreased activations in the left superior parietal gyrus compared to both HC and DD patients. This latter result tentatively suggests that the neurophysiologic processes underlying visuospatial abilities are partially preserved in DD, relative to SCZ patients, consistently with the findings showing that cannabis abuse in schizophrenia is associated with better cognitive functioning. Further fMRI studies are required to examine the neural correlates of other cognitive dysfunctions in schizophrenia patients with and without comorbid cannabis use disorder.

  1. APACHE II SCORING SYSTEM AND ITS MODIFICATION FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF DISEASE SEVERITY IN CHILDREN WHO UNDERWENT POLYCHEMOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. V. Sotnikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Short-term disease prognosis should be considered for the appropriate treatment policy based on the assessment of disease severity in patients with acute disease. The adequate assessment of disease severity and prognosis allows the indications for transferring patients to the resuscitation and intensive care department to be defined more precisely. Disease severity of patients who underwent polychemotherapy was assessed using APACHE II scoring system.

  2. Atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) : A study of 219 patients who underwent surgery for AVSD at Rikshospitalet from 1979 to 1999

    OpenAIRE

    Skraastad, Ingrid Birthe Bendixen; Skraastad, Berit Kristine

    2010-01-01

    Background: The present study evaluates 219 consecutive patients that underwent surgical repair for AVSD in a long term follow-up. Methods: The patients had a surgical correction for AVSD at Rikshospitalet from January 1979 to December 1999. The follow-up was closed in January 2009. AVSD with additional defects and syndromes were included. Results: Forty-two patients died during the observational period. Early mortality was 12.8% and late mortality was 6.4%. Early mortality declined f...

  3. Comparison of libido, Female Sexual Function Index, and Arizona scores in women who underwent laparoscopic or conventional abdominal hysterectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayataş, Semra; Özkaya, Enis; Api, Murat; Çıkman, Seyhan; Gürbüz, Ayşen; Eser, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to compare female sexual function between women who underwent conventional abdominal or laparoscopic hysterectomy. Materials and Methods: Seventy-seven women who were scheduled to undergo hysterectomy without oophorectomy for benign gynecologic conditions were included in the study. The women were assigned to laparoscopic or open abdominal hysterectomy according to the surgeons preference. Women with endometriosis and symptomatic prolapsus were excluded. Female sexual function scores were obtained before and six months after the operation from each participant by using validated questionnaires. Results: Pre- and postoperative scores of three different quationnaires were found as comparable in the group that underwent laparoscopic hysterectomy (p>0.05). Scores were also found as comparable in the group that underwent laparotomic hysterectomy (p>0.05). Pre- and postoperative values were compared between the two groups and revealed similar results with regard to all three scores (p>0.05). Conclusion: Our data showed comparable pre- and the postoperative scores for the two different hysterectomy techniques. The two groups were also found to have similar pre- and postoperative score values. PMID:28913149

  4. Vaginal and pelvic recurrence rates based on vaginal cuff length in patients with cervical cancer who underwent radical hysterectomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K; Cho, S Y; Park, S I; Kim, B J; Kim, M H; Choi, S C; Ryu, S Y; Lee, E D

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the association of vaginal cuff length (VCL) with vaginal and pelvic recurrence rates in patients with cervical cancer who underwent radical hysterectomies. The clinicopathologic characteristics were collected from the medical records of 280 patients with cervical cancer who underwent radical hysterectomies. The association of VCL with 3-year vaginal and pelvic recurrence rates was determined using a Z-test. The association of VCL with other clinicopathologic characteristics was also determined. The VCL was not associated with 3-year vaginal and pelvic recurrence rates. The 3-year vaginal recurrence rate was 0%-2% and the 3-year pelvic recurrence rate was 7%-8%, independent of VCL. The VCL and the age of patients had an inverse relationship. However, the VCL was not associated with histologic type, FIGO stage, clinical tumor size, tumor size in the surgical specimen, depth of invasion, lymphovascular space invasion, parametrial involvement, lymph node involvement, and adjuvant therapy. One-hundred ninety of 280 patients (68%) underwent adjuvant therapies following radical hysterectomies. Although it is limited by the high rate of adjuvant therapy, the current study suggested that the VCL following radical hysterectomy in patients with cervical cancer was not associated with vaginal and pelvic recurrence rates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. What we can do and what we cannot do with fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logothetis, Nikos K

    2008-06-12

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is currently the mainstay of neuroimaging in cognitive neuroscience. Advances in scanner technology, image acquisition protocols, experimental design, and analysis methods promise to push forward fMRI from mere cartography to the true study of brain organization. However, fundamental questions concerning the interpretation of fMRI data abound, as the conclusions drawn often ignore the actual limitations of the methodology. Here I give an overview of the current state of fMRI, and draw on neuroimaging and physiological data to present the current understanding of the haemodynamic signals and the constraints they impose on neuroimaging data interpretation.

  6. Effects of citalopram and escitalopram on fMRI response to affective stimuli in healthy volunteers selected by serotonin transporter genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Michael E; Lauriat, Tara L; Lowen, Steven B; Churchill, Jeffrey H; Hodgkinson, Colin A; Goldman, David; Renshaw, Perry F

    2013-09-30

    This study was designed to assess whether functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) following antidepressant administration (pharmaco-fMRI) is sufficiently sensitive to detect differences in patterns of activation between enantiomers of the same compound. Healthy adult males (n=11) participated in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over trial with three medication periods during which they received citalopram (racemic mixture), escitalopram (S-citalopram alone), or placebo for 2 weeks. All participants had high expression serotonin transporter genotypes. An fMRI scan that included passive viewing of overt and covert affective faces and affective words was performed after each medication period. Activation in response to overt faces was greater following escitalopram than following citalopram in the right insula, thalamus, and putamen when the faces were compared with a fixation stimulus. For the rapid covert presentation, a greater response was observed in the left middle temporal gyrus in the happy versus fearful contrast following escitalopram than following citalopram. Thus, the combination of genomics and fMRI was successful in discriminating between two very similar drugs. However, the pattern of activation observed suggests that further studies are indicated to understand how to optimally combine the two techniques. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Functional Laterality of Task-Evoked Activation in Sensorimotor Cortex of Preterm Infants: An Optimized 3 T fMRI Study Employing a Customized Neonatal Head Coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheef, Lukas; Nordmeyer-Massner, Jurek A; Smith-Collins, Adam Pr; Müller, Nicole; Stegmann-Woessner, Gaby; Jankowski, Jacob; Gieseke, Jürgen; Born, Mark; Seitz, Hermann; Bartmann, Peter; Schild, Hans H; Pruessmann, Klaas P; Heep, Axel; Boecker, Henning

    2017-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in neonates has been introduced as a non-invasive method for studying sensorimotor processing in the developing brain. However, previous neonatal studies have delivered conflicting results regarding localization, lateralization, and directionality of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) responses in sensorimotor cortex (SMC). Amongst the confounding factors in interpreting neonatal fMRI studies include the use of standard adult MR-coils providing insufficient signal to noise, and liberal statistical thresholds, compromising clinical interpretation at the single subject level. Here, we employed a custom-designed neonatal MR-coil adapted and optimized to the head size of a newborn in order to improve robustness, reliability and validity of neonatal sensorimotor fMRI. Thirteen preterm infants with a median gestational age of 26 weeks were scanned at term-corrected age using a prototype 8-channel neonatal head coil at 3T (Achieva, Philips, Best, NL). Sensorimotor stimulation was elicited by passive extension/flexion of the elbow at 1 Hz in a block design. Analysis of temporal signal to noise ratio (tSNR) was performed on the whole brain and the SMC, and was compared to data acquired with an 'adult' 8 channel head coil published previously. Task-evoked activation was determined by single-subject SPM8 analyses, thresholded at p lateralization of SMC activation, as found in children and adults, is already present in the newborn period.

  8. Decoding the encoding of functional brain networks: An fMRI classification comparison of non-negative matrix factorization (NMF), independent component analysis (ICA), and sparse coding algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jianwen; Douglas, Pamela K; Wu, Ying Nian; Brody, Arthur L; Anderson, Ariana E

    2017-04-15

    Brain networks in fMRI are typically identified using spatial independent component analysis (ICA), yet other mathematical constraints provide alternate biologically-plausible frameworks for generating brain networks. Non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) would suppress negative BOLD signal by enforcing positivity. Spatial sparse coding algorithms (L1 Regularized Learning and K-SVD) would impose local specialization and a discouragement of multitasking, where the total observed activity in a single voxel originates from a restricted number of possible brain networks. The assumptions of independence, positivity, and sparsity to encode task-related brain networks are compared; the resulting brain networks within scan for different constraints are used as basis functions to encode observed functional activity. These encodings are then decoded using machine learning, by using the time series weights to predict within scan whether a subject is viewing a video, listening to an audio cue, or at rest, in 304 fMRI scans from 51 subjects. The sparse coding algorithm of L1 Regularized Learning outperformed 4 variations of ICA (pnegative BOLD signal, had the poorest accuracy compared to the ICA and sparse coding algorithms. Holding constant the effect of the extraction algorithm, encodings using sparser spatial networks (containing more zero-valued voxels) had higher classification accuracy (pNegative BOLD signal may capture task-related activations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of Integrated Cognitive Therapy on Hippocampal Functional Connectivity Patterns in Stroke Patients with Cognitive Dysfunction: A Resting-State fMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanli Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study aimed to identify abnormal hippocampal functional connectivity (FC following ischemic stroke using resting-state fMRI. We also explored whether abnormal hippocampal FC could be modulated by integrated cognitive therapy and tested whether these alterations were associated with cognitive performance. Methods. 18 right-handed cognitively impaired ischemic stroke patients and 18 healty control (HC subjects were included in this study. Stroke subjects were scanned at baseline and after integrated cognitive therapy, while HCs were only scanned at baseline, to identify regions that show significant correlations with the seed region. Behavioral and cognitive assessments were obtained before each scan. Results. During the resting state, we found abnormal hippocampal FC associated with temporal regions, insular cortex, cerebellum, and prefrontal cortex in stroke patients compared to HCs. After integrated cognitive therapy, however, the stroke group showed increased hippocampal FC mainly located in the prefrontal gyrus and the default mode network (DMN. Altered hippocampal FC was associated with cognitive improvement. Conclusion. Resting-state fMRI may provide novel insight into the study of functional networks in the brain after stroke. Furthermore, altered hippocampal FC may be a compensatory mechanism for cognitive recovery after ischemic stroke.

  10. Scanning transmission electron microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruit, P.

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a scanning transmission electron microscope comprising an electron source, an electron accelerator and deflection means for directing electrons emitted by the electron source at an object to be examined, and in addition a detector for detecting electrons coming from the

  11. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Thyroid Scan and Uptake ...

  12. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may be performed to measure the level of thyroid hormones in your blood. You may be told not to eat for several hours before your exam because eating can affect the ... as well. Thyroid Scan You will be positioned on an examination ...

  13. Dialogue scanning measuring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borodyuk, V.P.; Shkundenkov, V.N.

    1985-01-01

    The main developments of scanning measuring systems intended for mass precision processsing of films in nuclear physics problems and in related fields are reviewed. A special attention is paid to the problem of creation of dialogue systems which permit to simlify the development of control computer software

  14. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you: have had any tests, such as an x-ray or CT scan, surgeries or treatments using iodinated ... page How does the procedure work? With ordinary x-ray examinations, an image is made by passing x- ...

  15. SPM: Scanning positron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Dickmann

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Munich scanning positron microscope, operated by the Universität der Bundeswehr München and the Technische Universität München, located at NEPOMUC, permits positron lifetime measurements with a lateral resolution in the µm range and within an energy range of 1 – 20 keV.

  16. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... rate at which the body converts food to energy. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? The thyroid scan is used ... the patient's body. In contrast, nuclear medicine procedures use a ... off a small amount of energy in the form of gamma rays. Special cameras ...

  17. Scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binnig, G.; Rohrer, H.

    1983-01-01

    Based on vacuum tunneling, a novel type of microscope, the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was developed. It has an unprecedented resolution in real space on an atomic scale. The authors review the important technical features, illustrate the power of the STM for surface topographies and discuss its potential in other areas of science and technology. (Auth.)

  18. Terahertz scanning probe microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klapwijk, T.M.

    2014-01-01

    The invention provides aterahertz scanning probe microscope setup comprising (i) a terahertz radiation source configured to generate terahertz radiation; (ii) a terahertz lens configured to receive at least part of the terahertz radiation from the terahertz radiation source; (iii) a cantilever unit

  19. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will I experience during and after the procedure? Who interprets the results and how do I get them? What are the benefits vs. risks? What are the limitations of the Thyroid Scan ...

  20. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the structure and function of the thyroid. The thyroid is a gland in the neck that controls metabolism , a chemical process that regulates the rate at which the body converts food to energy. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? The thyroid scan is used to determine the size, shape ...

  1. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer top of page ... and Neck Cancer Treatment Radioactive Iodine (I-131) Therapy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear ... to Thyroid Scan and Uptake ...

  2. Scanning bubble chamber pictures

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    These were taken at the 2 m hydrogen bubble chamber. The photo shows an early Shiva system where the pre-measurements needed to qualify the event were done manually (cf photo 7408136X). The scanning tables were located in bld. 12. Gilberte Saulmier sits on foreground, Inge Arents at centre.

  3. Bone scan in rheumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales G, R.; Cano P, R.; Mendoza P, R.

    1993-01-01

    In this chapter a revision is made concerning different uses of bone scan in rheumatic diseases. These include reflex sympathetic dystrophy, osteomyelitis, spondyloarthropaties, metabolic bone diseases, avascular bone necrosis and bone injuries due to sports. There is as well some comments concerning pediatric pathology and orthopedics. (authors). 19 refs., 9 figs

  4. Scan This Book!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Andrew Richard

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author presents an interview with Brewster Kahle, leader of the Open Content Alliance (OCA). OCA book scan program is an alternative to Google's library project that aims to make books accessible online. In this interview, Kahle discusses his views on the challenges of getting books on the Web, on Google's library…

  5. Abscess scan - radioactive

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood cells are tagged with a radioactive substance ( radioisotope ) called indium. The cells are then injected back ... you have or had any of the following medical conditions, procedures, or treatments, as they can interfere with ... Often, other imaging tests such as an ultrasound or CT scan ...

  6. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or less. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Most thyroid scan ... areas. Outside links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo. ...

  7. Thoracic spine CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ma, MD, Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. CT Scans Read more Spinal Cord Injuries Read more Spine ...

  8. The chronnectome: time-varying connectivity networks as the next frontier in fMRI data discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Vince D; Miller, Robyn; Pearlson, Godfrey; Adalı, Tulay

    2014-10-22

    Recent years have witnessed a rapid growth of interest in moving functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) beyond simple scan-length averages and into approaches that capture time-varying properties of connectivity. In this Perspective we use the term "chronnectome" to describe metrics that allow a dynamic view of coupling. In the chronnectome, coupling refers to possibly time-varying levels of correlated or mutually informed activity between brain regions whose spatial properties may also be temporally evolving. We primarily focus on multivariate approaches developed in our group and review a number of approaches with an emphasis on matrix decompositions such as principle component analysis and independent component analysis. We also discuss the potential these approaches offer to improve characterization and understanding of brain function. There are a number of methodological directions that need to be developed further, but chronnectome approaches already show great promise for the study of both the healthy and the diseased brain.

  9. Effect of Task-Correlated Physiological Fluctuations and Motion in 2D and 3D Echo-Planar Imaging in a Higher Cognitive Level fMRI Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladstein, Jarle; Evensmoen, Hallvard R; Håberg, Asta K; Kristoffersen, Anders; Goa, Pål E

    2016-01-01

    To compare 2D and 3D echo-planar imaging (EPI) in a higher cognitive level fMRI paradigm. In particular, to study the link between the presence of task-correlated physiological fluctuations and motion and the fMRI contrast estimates from either 2D EPI or 3D EPI datasets, with and without adding nuisance regressors to the model. A signal model in the presence of partly task-correlated fluctuations is derived, and predictions for contrast estimates with and without nuisance regressors are made. Thirty-one healthy volunteers were scanned using 2D EPI and 3D EPI during a virtual environmental learning paradigm. In a subgroup of 7 subjects, heart rate and respiration were logged, and the correlation with the paradigm was evaluated. FMRI analysis was performed using models with and without nuisance regressors. Differences in the mean contrast estimates were investigated by analysis-of-variance using Subject, Sequence, Day, and Run as factors. The distributions of group level contrast estimates were compared. Partially task-correlated fluctuations in respiration, heart rate and motion were observed. Statistically significant differences were found in the mean contrast estimates between the 2D EPI and 3D EPI when using a model without nuisance regressors. The inclusion of nuisance regressors for cardiorespiratory effects and motion reduced the difference to a statistically non-significant level. Furthermore, the contrast estimate values shifted more when including nuisance regressors for 3D EPI compared to 2D EPI. The results are consistent with 3D EPI having a higher sensitivity to fluctuations compared to 2D EPI. In the presence partially task-correlated physiological fluctuations or motion, proper correction is necessary to get expectation correct contrast estimates when using 3D EPI. As such task-correlated physiological fluctuations or motion is difficult to avoid in paradigms exploring higher cognitive functions, 2D EPI seems to be the preferred choice for higher

  10. Motor Imagery as a Function of Disease Severity in Multiple Sclerosis: An fMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Tacchino

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor imagery (MI is defined as mental execution without any actual movement. While healthy adults usually show temporal equivalence, i.e., isochrony, between the mental simulation of an action and its actual performance, neurological disorders are associated with anisochrony. Unlike in patients with stroke and Parkinson disease, only a few studies have investigated differences of MI ability in multiple sclerosis (MS. However, the relationship among disease severity, anisochrony and brain activation patterns during MI has not been investigated yet. Here, we propose to investigate MI in MS patients using fMRI during a behavioral task executed with dominant/non-dominant hand and to evaluate whether anisochrony is associated with disease severity. Thirty-seven right-handed MS patients, 17 with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS suggestive of MS and 20 with relapsing-remitting MS (RR-MS and 20 right-handed healthy controls (HC underwent fMRI during a motor task consisting in the actual or imaged movement of squeezing a foam ball with the dominant and non-dominant hand. The same tasks were performed outside the MRI room to record the number of actual and imagined ball squeezes, and calculate an Index of performance (IP based on the ratio between actual and imagined movements. IP showed that a progressive loss of ability in simulating actions (i.e., anisochrony more pronounced for non-dominant hand, was found as function of the disease course. Moreover, anisochrony was associated with activation of occipito-parieto-frontal areas that were more extensive at the early stages of the disease, probably in order to counteract the changes due to MS. However, the neural engagement of compensatory brain areas becomes more difficult with more challenging tasks, i.e., dominant vs. non-dominant hand, with a consequent deficit in behavioral performance. These results show a strict association between MI performance and disease severity, suggesting that, at early

  11. The prognostic significance of preoperatively assessed AST/ALT (De Ritis) ratio on survival in patients underwent radical cystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgel, Sacit Nuri; Kose, Osman; Koc, Esra Meltem; Ates, Erhan; Akin, Yigit; Yilmaz, Yuksel

    2017-09-01

    We aimed to evaluate prognostic significance of preoperatively assessed aspartate aminotransaminase (AST)/alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (De Ritis) ratio on survival in bladder cancer (BC) patients underwent radical cystectomy (RC). We, respectively, analysed clinical and pathological data of 153 patients who underwent RC for BC between February 2006 and December 2016 at a tertiary level hospital. The potential prognostic value of De Ritis ratio was assessed by using ROC curve analysis. The effect of the De Ritis ratio was analysed by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression hazard models for patients' disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OAS). We had 149 BC patients, in total. Mean age was 61.65 ± 9.13 years. One hundred and thirty-nine (93.3%) of the patients were men. According to ROC analysis, optimal threshold of De Ritis ratio for DSS was 1.30. In Kaplan-Meier analyses, the high De Ritis ratio group showed worse progression in DSS and OAS (all parameters, p < 0.001). On Cox regression models of clinical and pathological parameters to predict DSS, De Ritis ratio (HR 5.79, 95% CI 2.25-15.13), pathological T stage (HR 15.89, 95% CI 3.92-64.33, in all p < 0.001); and to predict OAS, De Ritis ratio (HR 2.61, 95% CI 1.49-4.56; p < 0.001), pathological T stage (HR 5.42, 95% CI 2.63-11.64; p < 0.001) and age (HR 1.05, 95% CI 1.02-1.08; p = 0.001) were determined as independent prognostic factors. Preoperative elevated De Ritis ratio could be an independent prognostic factor in BC patients underwent RC. Our results should be confirmed by large and properly designed prospective, randomized trials.

  12. Systematic review with network meta-analysis: comparative efficacy of different enteral immunonutrition formulas in patients underwent gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guo-Min; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Bian, Wei; Wu, Jing; Deng, Yong-Hong; Zhang, Hui; Tian, Xu

    2017-04-04

    Optimal enteral immunonutrition (EIN) regime for gastric cancer (GC) patients underwent gastrectomy remains uncertainty. To assess comparative efficacy of different EIN formulas in GC patients underwent gastrectomy, we performed network meta-analysis. We included 11 RCTs enrolling 840 patients. Pairwise meta-analysis indicated that EIN (RR 0.56, 95% CI 0.36-0.86; MD -0.42, 95% CI -0.74-0.10), Arg+RNA+ω-3-FAs (RR 0.37, 95% CI 0.22-0.63; MD -0.42, 95% CI -0.75-0.07), Arg+Gln+ω-3-FAs (RR 0.22, 95% CI 0.05-0.94; MD -0.69, 95% CI -1.22-1.07) reduced ICs and LOS. Network meta-analysis confirmed the potential of Arg+RNA+ω-3-FAs for ICs (OR 0.27, 95% Crl 0.12-0.49) and Arg+Gln+ω-3-FAs for CIs (OR 0.22, 95% Crl 0.02-0.84) and LOS (SMD -0.63, 95% Crl -1.07-0.13), and indicated that Arg+RNA+ω-3-FAs was superior to Arg+RNA and Arg+Gln for ICs as well. We performed direct and network meta-analyses for randomized controlled trials comparing EIN formulas with each other or standard enteral nutrition (SEN) in reducing infectious complications (ICs), noninfectious complications (NICs) and length of hospital stay (LOS), through January 2016. The surface under the cumulative ranking curve (SCURA) and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) were used to rank regimes and rate qualities of evidences respectively. As for GC patients underwent gastrectomy, Arg+RNA+ω-3-FAs and Arg+Gln+ω-3-FAs are the optimal regimes of reducing ICs and LOS.

  13. [Four patients with hepatitis A presenting with fulminant hepatitis and acute renal failure and who underwent liver transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se Hoon; Lee, Joon Hyoek; Hwang, Ji Won; Kim, Hye Young; Lee, Chang Hoon; Gwak, Geum Youn; Choi, Moon Seok; Koh, Kwang Chul; Paik, Seung Woon; Yoo, Byung Chul

    2009-09-01

    Hepatitis A is generally known as a mild, self-limiting disease of the liver, but in rare instances it can progress to fulminant hepatitis, which may require liver transplantation for recovery. Such cases are known to be related to old age and underlying liver disease. We report four cases of hepatitis A in which patients presented with fulminant hepatitis and acute renal failure and underwent liver transplantation. The following common features were observed in our cases: (1) occurrence in relatively old age (>/=39 years old), (2) association with acute renal failure, (3) presence of hepatomegaly, and (4) microscopic features of submassive hepatic necrosis.

  14. Clinical Outcomes of patients with coronary artery disease who underwent FFR evaluation of intermediate coronary lesionS– COFFRS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa Prasad

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: In our experience, MACE events were not higher in patients with FFR > 0.8 and kept under medical therapy and were similarly lower in patients with FFR ≤0.8 and underwent revascularisation (p = 0.73. Also MACE events were higher in patients with FFR ≤ 0.8 and did not undergo revascularisation compared to other two appropriately treated groups (p = 0.03. FFR based revascularization decision appears to be a safe strategy in Indian patients.

  15. Mammographic scanning equalization radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabol, J.M.; Soutar, I.C.; Plewe, D.B.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on conventional x-ray mammography that suffers from poor visualization of low-contrast lesions and microcalcifications in regions where variations in breast thickness and parenchymal pattern result in suboptimal film exposure and contrast. MSER overcomes this limitation by equalizing the film exposure into the range of maximum film contrast, independent of variations in breast architecture. A prototype MSER system has been developed for imaging breast phantoms in which a Min-R cassette is exposed by scanning a small (4-cm 2 ) beam of pulsed (40-Hz) x-rays (30 KVp) over the breast phantom in a raster fashion while measuring the transmission with a scanning detector. Feedback of the transmission information modulates the width of each x-ray pulse to equalize the film exposure over the entire image

  16. The laser scanning camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagger, M.

    The prototype development of a novel lenseless camera is reported which utilises a laser beam scanned in a raster by means of orthogonal vibrating mirrors to illuminate the field of view. Laser light reflected from the scene is picked up by a conveniently sited photosensitive device and used to modulate the brightness of a T.V. display scanned in synchronism with the moving laser beam, hence producing a T.V. image of the scene. The camera which needs no external lighting system can act in either a wide angle mode or by varying the size and position of the raster can be made to zoom in to view in detail any object within a 40 0 overall viewing angle. The resolution and performance of the camera are described and a comparison of these aspects is made with conventional T.V. cameras. (author)

  17. Scanning probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mainsbridge, B.

    1994-01-01

    In late 1959, Richard Feynman observed that manoeuvring atoms was something that could be done in principle but has not been done, 'because we are too big'. In 1982, the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) was invented and is now a central tool for the construction of nanoscale devices in what was known as molecular engineering, and now, nanotechnology. The principles of the microscope are outlined and references are made to other scanning devices which have evolved from the original invention. The method of employment of the STM as a machine tool is described and references are made to current speculations on applications of the instrument in nanotechnology. A short bibliography on this topic is included. 27 refs., 7 figs

  18. Spatially adaptive mixture modeling for analysis of FMRI time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Thomas; Risser, Laurent; Ciuciu, Philippe

    2010-04-01

    Within-subject analysis in fMRI essentially addresses two problems, the detection of brain regions eliciting evoked activity and the estimation of the underlying dynamics. In Makni et aL, 2005 and Makni et aL, 2008, a detection-estimation framework has been proposed to tackle these problems jointly, since they are connected to one another. In the Bayesian formalism, detection is achieved by modeling activating and nonactivating voxels through independent mixture models (IMM) within each region while hemodynamic response estimation is performed at a regional scale in a nonparametric way. Instead of IMMs, in this paper we take advantage of spatial mixture models (SMM) for their nonlinear spatial regularizing properties. The proposed method is unsupervised and spatially adaptive in the sense that the amount of spatial correlation is automatically tuned from the data and this setting automatically varies across brain regions. In addition, the level of regularization is specific to each experimental condition since both the signal-to-noise ratio and the activation pattern may vary across stimulus types in a given brain region. These aspects require the precise estimation of multiple partition functions of underlying Ising fields. This is addressed efficiently using first path sampling for a small subset of fields and then using a recently developed fast extrapolation technique for the large remaining set. Simulation results emphasize that detection relying on supervised SMM outperforms its IMM counterpart and that unsupervised spatial mixture models achieve similar results without any hand-tuning of the correlation parameter. On real datasets, the gain is illustrated in a localizer fMRI experiment: brain activations appear more spatially resolved using SMM in comparison with classical general linear model (GLM)-based approaches, while estimating a specific parcel-based HRF shape. Our approach therefore validates the treatment of unsmoothed fMRI data without fixed GLM

  19. Dynamic effective connectivity in resting state fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae-Jeong; Friston, Karl J; Pae, Chongwon; Park, Bumhee; Razi, Adeel

    2017-11-20

    Context-sensitive and activity-dependent fluctuations in connectivity underlie functional integration in the brain and have been studied widely in terms of synaptic plasticity, learning and condition-specific (e.g., attentional) modulations of synaptic efficacy. This dynamic aspect of brain connectivity has recently attracted a lot of attention in the resting state fMRI community. To explain dynamic functional connectivity in terms of directed effective connectivity among brain regions, we introduce a novel method to identify dynamic effective connectivity using spectral dynamic causal modelling (spDCM). We used parametric empirical Bayes (PEB) to model fluctuations in directed coupling over consecutive windows of resting state fMRI time series. Hierarchical PEB can model random effects on connectivity parameters at the second (between-window) level given connectivity estimates from the first (within-window) level. In this work, we used a discrete cosine transform basis set or eigenvariates (i.e., expression of principal components) to model fluctuations in effective connectivity over windows. We evaluated the ensuing dynamic effective connectivity in terms of the consistency of baseline connectivity within default mode network (DMN), using the resting state fMRI from Human Connectome Project (HCP). To model group-level baseline and dynamic effective connectivity for DMN, we extended the PEB approach by conducting a multilevel PEB analysis of between-session and between-subject group effects. Model comparison clearly spoke to dynamic fluctuations in effective connectivity - and the dynamic functional connectivity these changes explain. Furthermore, baseline effective connectivity was consistent across independent sessions - and notably more consistent than estimates based upon conventional models. This work illustrates the advantage of hierarchical modelling with spDCM, in characterizing the dynamics of effective connectivity. Copyright © 2017 The Authors

  20. Hand grips strength effect on motor function in human brain using fMRI: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, S S; Mohamad, M; Syazarina, S O; Nafisah, W Y

    2014-01-01

    Several methods of motor tasks for fMRI scanning have been evolving from simple to more complex tasks. Motor tasks on upper extremity were applied in order to excite the increscent of motor activation on contralesional and ipsilateral hemispheres in brain. The main objective of this study is to study the different conditions for motor tasks on upper extremity that affected the brain activation. Ten healthy right handed with normal vision (3 male and 7 female, age range=20-30 years, mean=24.6 years, SD=2.21) participated in this study. Prior to the scanning, participants were trained on hand grip tasks using rubber ball and pressure gauge tool outside the scanner. During fMRI session, a block design with 30-s task blocks and alternating 30-s rest periods was employed while participants viewed a computer screen via a back projection-mirror system and instructed to follow the instruction by gripping their hand with normal and strong grips using a rubber ball. Statistical Parametric mapping (SPM8) software was used to determine the brain activation. Both tasks activated the primary motor (M1), supplementary motor area (SMA), dorsal and ventral of premotor cortex area (PMA) in left hemisphere while in right hemisphere the area of primary motor (M1) somatosensory was activated. However, the comparison between both tasks revealed that the strong hand grip showed the higher activation at M1, PMA and SMA on left hemisphere and also the area of SMA on right hemisphere. Both conditions of motor tasks could provide insights the functional organization on human brain

  1. Hand grips strength effect on motor function in human brain using fMRI: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, S. S.; Mohamad, M.; Syazarina, S. O.; Nafisah, W. Y.

    2014-11-01

    Several methods of motor tasks for fMRI scanning have been evolving from simple to more complex tasks. Motor tasks on upper extremity were applied in order to excite the increscent of motor activation on contralesional and ipsilateral hemispheres in brain. The main objective of this study is to study the different conditions for motor tasks on upper extremity that affected the brain activation. Ten healthy right handed with normal vision (3 male and 7 female, age range=20-30 years, mean=24.6 years, SD=2.21) participated in this study. Prior to the scanning, participants were trained on hand grip tasks using rubber ball and pressure gauge tool outside the scanner. During fMRI session, a block design with 30-s task blocks and alternating 30-s rest periods was employed while participants viewed a computer screen via a back projection-mirror system and instructed to follow the instruction by gripping their hand with normal and strong grips using a rubber ball. Statistical Parametric mapping (SPM8) software was used to determine the brain activation. Both tasks activated the primary motor (M1), supplementary motor area (SMA), dorsal and ventral of premotor cortex area (PMA) in left hemisphere while in right hemisphere the area of primary motor (M1) somatosensory was activated. However, the comparison between both tasks revealed that the strong hand grip showed the higher activation at M1, PMA and SMA on left hemisphere and also the area of SMA on right hemisphere. Both conditions of motor tasks could provide insights the functional organization on human brain.

  2. The role of the left inferior parietal lobule in second language learning: An intensive language training fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbeau, Elise B; Chai, Xiaoqian J; Chen, Jen-Kai; Soles, Jennika; Berken, Jonathan; Baum, Shari; Watkins, Kate E; Klein, Denise

    2017-04-01

    Research to date suggests that second language acquisition results in functional and structural changes in the bilingual brain, however, in what way and how quickly these changes occur remains unclear. To address these questions, we studied fourteen English-speaking monolingual adults enrolled in a 12-week intensive French language-training program in Montreal. Using functional MRI, we investigated the neural changes associated with new language acquisition. The participants were scanned before the start of the immersion program and at the end of the 12 weeks. The fMRI scan aimed to investigate the brain regions recruited in a sentence reading task both in English, their first language (L1), and in French, their second language (L2). For the L1, fMRI patterns did not change from Time 1 to Time 2, while for the L2, the brain response changed between Time 1 and Time 2 in language-related areas. Of note, for the L2, there was higher activation at Time 2 compared to Time 1 in the left inferior parietal lobule (IPL) including the supramarginal gyrus. At Time 2 this higher activation in the IPL correlated with faster L2 reading speed. Moreover, higher activation in the left IPL at Time 1 predicted improvement in L2 reading speed from Time 1 to Time 2. Our results suggest that learning-induced plasticity occurred as early as 12 weeks into immersive second-language training, and that the IPL appears to play a special role in language learning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. On neural correlates of individual differences in novel grammar learning: An fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepinska, Olga; de Rover, Mischa; Caspers, Johanneke; Schiller, Niels O

    2017-04-01

    We examine the role of language analytical ability, one of the components of language aptitude - a specific ability for learning languages - during acquisition of a novel grammar. We investigated whether the neural basis of Artificial Grammar Learning (AGL) differs between populations of highly and moderately skilled learners. Participants performed an AGL task during an fMRI scan and data from task's test phases were analysed. Highly skilled learners performed better than moderately skilled ones and engaged during the task more neural resources in the right hemisphere, i.e. in the right angular/supramarginal gyrus and superior frontal and middle frontal gyrus and in the posterior cingulate gyrus. Additional analyses investigating the temporal dynamics of brain activity during learning revealed lateralisation differences in the modulation of activity in the parietal and temporal cortex. In particular, the left angular gyrus BOLD activity was coupled with high performance on the AGL task and with a steep learning curve. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Left lateralization in autobiographical memory: an fMRI study using the expert archival paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campitelli, Guillermo; Parker, Amanda; Head, Kay; Gobet, Fernand

    2008-02-01

    In brain-imaging and behavioral research, studies of autobiographical memory have higher ecological validity than controlled laboratory memory studies. However, they also have less controllability over the variables investigated. This article presents a novel technique - the expert archival paradigm - that increases controllability while maintaining ecological validity. Stimuli were created from games played by two international-level chess masters. The two players were asked to perform a memory task with stimuli generated from their own games and stimuli generated from other players' games while they were scanned using fMRI. The study found a left lateralized pattern of brain activity that was very similar in both masters. The brain areas activated were the left temporo-parietal junction and left frontal areas. The expert archival paradigm has the advantage of not requiring an interview to assess the participants' autobiographical memories, and affords the possibility of measuring their accuracy of remembering as well as their brain activity related to remote and recent memories. It can also be used in any field of expertise, including arts, sciences, and sports, in which archival data are available.

  5. fMRI Evidence of Acupoints Specificity in Two Adjacent Acupoints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Acupoint specificity is the foundation of acupuncture treatment. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the acupoint specificity exists in two adjacent acupoints. Design and Setting. Two adjacent real acupoints, LR3 (Taichong and ST44 (Neiting, and a nearby nonacupoint were selected. Thirty-three health volunteers were divided into three groups in random order, and each group only received acupuncture at one of the three points. While they received acupuncture, fMRI scan was performed. Results. The common cerebral activated areas responding to LR3 and ST44 included the contralateral primary somatosensory area (SI and ipsilateral cerebellum. Acupuncture at LR3 specifically activated contralateral middle occipital gyrus, ipsilateral medial frontal gyrus, superior parietal lobe, middle temporal gyrus, rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC, lentiform nucleus, insula, and contralateral thalamus. Stimulation at ST44 selectively activated ipsilateral secondary somatosensory area (SII, contralateral middle frontal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, lingual gyrus, lentiform nucleus, and bilateral posterior cingulate cortex (PCC. Conclusions. Acupuncture at adjacent acupoints elicits distinct cerebral activation patterns, and those specific patterns might be involved in the mechanism of the specific therapeutic effects of different acupoints.

  6. An fMRI investigation of the cultural specificity of music memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Steven J.; Stambaugh, Laura A.; Beken, Münir; Richards, Todd L.; Johnson, Clark

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the role of culture in shaping music perception and memory. We tested the hypothesis that listeners demonstrate different patterns of activation associated with music processing—particularly right frontal cortex—when encoding and retrieving culturally familiar and unfamiliar stimuli, with the latter evoking broader activation consistent with more complex memory tasks. Subjects (n = 16) were right-handed adults born and raised in the USA (n = 8) or Turkey (n = 8) with minimal music training. Using fMRI procedures, we scanned subjects during two tasks: (i) listening to novel musical examples from their own culture and an unfamiliar culture and (ii) identifying which among a series of brief excerpts were taken from the longer examples. Both groups were more successful remembering music of their home culture. We found greater activation for culturally unfamiliar music listening in the left cerebellar region, right angular gyrus, posterior precuneus and right middle frontal area extending into the inferior frontal cortex. Subjects demonstrated greater activation in the cingulate gyrus and right lingual gyrus when engaged in recall of culturally unfamiliar music. This study provides evidence for the influence of culture on music perception and memory performance at both a behavioral and neurological level. PMID:20035018

  7. Incremental Activation Detection for Real-Time fMRI Series Using Robust Kalman Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI is a technique that enables us to observe human brain activations in real time. However, some unexpected noises that emerged in fMRI data collecting, such as acute swallowing, head moving and human manipulations, will cause much confusion and unrobustness for the activation analysis. In this paper, a new activation detection method for rt-fMRI data is proposed based on robust Kalman filter. The idea is to add a variation to the extended kalman filter to handle the additional sparse measurement noise and a sparse noise term to the measurement update step. Hence, the robust Kalman filter is designed to improve the robustness for the outliers and can be computed separately for each voxel. The algorithm can compute activation maps on each scan within a repetition time, which meets the requirement for real-time analysis. Experimental results show that this new algorithm can bring out high performance in robustness and in real-time activation detection.

  8. FMRI Study of Neural Responses to Implicit Infant Emotion in Anorexia Nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenni Leppanen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Difficulties in social–emotional processing have been proposed to play an important role in the development and maintenance of anorexia nervosa (AN. Few studies, thus far, have investigated neural processes that underlie these difficulties, including processing emotional facial expressions. However, the majority of these studies have investigated neural responses to adult emotional display, which may be confounded by elevated sensitivity to social rank and threat in AN. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the neural processes underlying implicit processing of positively and negatively valenced infant emotional display in AN. Twenty-one adult women with AN and twenty-six healthy comparison (HC women were presented with images of positively valenced, negatively valenced, and neutral infant faces during a fMRI scan. Significant differences between the groups in positive > neutral and negative > neutral contrasts were investigated in a priori regions of interest, including the bilateral amygdala, insula, and lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC. The findings revealed that the AN participants showed relatively increased recruitment while the HC participants showed relatively reduced recruitment of the bilateral amygdala and the right dorsolateral PFC in the positive > neutral contrast. In the negative > neutral contrast, the AN group showed relatively increased recruitment of the left posterior insula while the HC groups showed relatively reduced recruitment of this region. These findings suggest that people with AN may engage in implicit prefrontal down-regulation of elevated limbic reactivity to positively social–emotional stimuli.

  9. Prefrontal activity and diagnostic monitoring of memory retrieval: FMRI of the criterial recollection task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, David A; Kensinger, Elizabeth A; Schacter, Daniel L

    2006-01-01

    According to the distinctiveness heuristic, subjects rely more on detailed recollections (and less on familiarity) when memory is tested for pictures relative to words, leading to reduced false recognition. If so, then neural regions that have been implicated in effortful postretrieval monitoring (e.g., dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) might be recruited less heavily when trying to remember pictures. We tested this prediction with the criterial recollection task. Subjects studied black words, paired with either the same word in red font or a corresponding colored picture. Red words were repeated at study to equate recognition hits for red words and pictures. During fMRI scanning, alternating red word memory tests and picture memory tests were given, using only white words as test stimuli (say "yes" only if you recollect a corresponding red word or picture, respectively). These tests were designed so that subjects had to rely on memory for the criterial information. Replicating prior behavioral work, we found enhanced rejection of lures on the picture test compared to the red word test, indicating that subjects had used a distinctiveness heuristic. Critically, dorsolateral prefrontal activity was reduced when rejecting familiar lures on the picture test, relative to the red word test. These findings indicate that reducing false recognition via the distinctiveness heuristic is not heavily dependent on frontally mediated postretrieval monitoring processes.

  10. Nouns, verbs, objects, actions, and abstractions: local fMRI activity indexes semantics, not lexical categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Rachel L; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2014-05-01

    Noun/verb dissociations in the literature defy interpretation due to the confound between lexical category and semantic meaning; nouns and verbs typically describe concrete objects and actions. Abstract words, pertaining to neither, are a critical test case: dissociations along lexical-grammatical lines would support models purporting lexical category as the principle governing brain organisation, whilst semantic models predict dissociation between concrete words but not abstract items. During fMRI scanning, participants read orthogonalised word categories of nouns and verbs, with or without concrete, sensorimotor meaning. Analysis of inferior frontal/insula, precentral and central areas revealed an interaction between lexical class and semantic factors with clear category differences between concrete nouns and verbs but not abstract ones. Though the brain stores the combinatorial and lexical-grammatical properties of words, our data show that topographical differences in brain activation, especially in the motor system and inferior frontal cortex, are driven by semantics and not by lexical class. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. An fMRI investigation of the cultural specificity of music memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demorest, Steven M; Morrison, Steven J; Stambaugh, Laura A; Beken, Münir; Richards, Todd L; Johnson, Clark

    2010-06-01

    This study explored the role of culture in shaping music perception and memory. We tested the hypothesis that listeners demonstrate different patterns of activation associated with music processing-particularly right frontal cortex-when encoding and retrieving culturally familiar and unfamiliar stimuli, with the latter evoking broader activation consistent with more complex memory tasks. Subjects (n = 16) were right-handed adults born and raised in the USA (n = 8) or Turkey (n = 8) with minimal music training. Using fMRI procedures, we scanned subjects during two tasks: (i) listening to novel musical examples from their own culture and an unfamiliar culture and (ii) identifying which among a series of brief excerpts were taken from the longer examples. Both groups were more successful remembering music of their home culture. We found greater activation for culturally unfamiliar music listening in the left cerebellar region, right angular gyrus, posterior precuneus and right middle frontal area extending into the inferior frontal cortex. Subjects demonstrated greater activation in the cingulate gyrus and right lingual gyrus when engaged in recall of culturally unfamiliar music. This study provides evidence for the influence of culture on music perception and memory performance at both a behavioral and neurological level.

  12. Mechanism of case processing in the brain: an fMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Yokoyama

    Full Text Available In sentence comprehension research, the case system, which is one of the subsystems of the language processing system, has been assumed to play a crucial role in signifying relationships in sentences between noun phrases (NPs and other elements, such as verbs, prepositions, nouns, and tense. However, so far, less attention has been paid to the question of how cases are processed in our brain. To this end, the current study used fMRI and scanned the brain activity of 15 native English speakers during an English-case processing task. The results showed that, while the processing of all cases activates the left inferior frontal gyrus and posterior part of the middle temporal gyrus, genitive case processing activates these two regions more than nominative and accusative case processing. Since the effect of the difference in behavioral performance among these three cases is excluded from brain activation data, the observed different brain activations would be due to the different processing patterns among the cases, indicating that cases are processed differently in our brains. The different brain activations between genitive case processing and nominative/accusative case processing may be due to the difference in structural complexity between them.

  13. Awake fMRI reveals a specialized region in dog temporal cortex for face processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel D. Dilks

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent behavioral evidence suggests that dogs, like humans and monkeys, are capable of visual face recognition. But do dogs also exhibit specialized cortical face regions similar to humans and monkeys? Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in six dogs trained to remain motionless during scanning without restraint or sedation, we found a region in the canine temporal lobe that responded significantly more to movies of human faces than to movies of everyday objects. Next, using a new stimulus set to investigate face selectivity in this predefined candidate dog face area, we found that this region responded similarly to images of human faces and dog faces, yet significantly more to both human and dog faces than to images of objects. Such face selectivity was not found in dog primary visual cortex. Taken together, these findings: (1 provide the first evidence for a face-selective region in the temporal cortex of dogs, which cannot be explained by simple low-level visual feature extraction; (2 reveal that neural machinery dedicated to face processing is not unique to primates; and (3 may help explain dogs’ exquisite sensitivity to human social cues.

  14. Training in the adolescent brain: An fMRI training study on divergent thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleibeuker, Sietske W; Stevenson, Claire E; van der Aar, Laura; Overgaauw, Sandy; van Duijvenvoorde, Anna C; Crone, Eveline A

    2017-02-01

    Prior research suggests that adolescence is a time of enhanced sensitivity for practice and learning. In this study we tested the neural correlates of divergent thinking training in 15- to 16-year-old adolescents relative to an age-matched active control group. All participants performed an alternative uses task, a valid measure to test divergent thinking, while functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) images were acquired before and after a training program. In between the 2 scanning sessions the experimental group completed 2 weeks of divergent thinking training (8 sessions) and the control group completed 2 weeks of rule switching training (8 session). A Group × Time interaction demonstrated stable divergent thinking performance for the experimental group, whereas in the control group performance declined. Generating alternative uses (experimental task condition) relative to generating ordinary characteristics of objects (control task condition) was associated with increased activation in the supramarginal gyrus (SMG), angular gyrus (AG), and middle temporal gyrus (MTG). Test-retest analyses showed that within-individuals-activation in these regions was stable over time in both groups. Changes in alternative uses fluency over time, however, were positively associated with changes in superior lateral PFC activation over time. Together, the results indicate that core brain regions for creativity (SMG, AG, and MTG) are consistently recruited in adolescence, and that changes in performance are associated with changes in activation in lateral PFC. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. How native-like can you possibly get: fMRI evidence for processing accent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazi-Saidi, Ladan; Dash, Tanya; Ansaldo, Ana I

    2015-01-01

    If ever attained, adopting native-like accent is achieved late in the learning process. Resemblance between L2 and mother tongue can facilitate L2 learning. In particular, cognates (phonologically and semantically similar words across languages), offer the opportunity to examine the issue of foreign accent in quite a unique manner. Twelve Spanish speaking (L1) adults learnt French (L2) cognates and practiced their native-like pronunciation by means of a computerized method. After consolidation, they were tested on L1 and L2 oral picture- naming during fMRI scanning. The results of the present study show that there is a specific impact of accent on brain activation, even if L2 words are cognates, and belong to a pair of closely related languages. Results point that the insula is a key component of accent processing, which is in line with reports from patients with foreign accent syndrome following damage to the insula (e.g., Katz et al., 2012; Moreno-Torres et al., 2013; Tomasino et al., 2013), and healthy L2 learners (Chee et al., 2004). Thus, the left insula has been consistently related to the integration of attentional and working memory abilities, together with fine-tuning of motor programming to achieve optimal articulation.

  16. Neuroanatomical distribution of five semantic components of verbs: evidence from fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmerer, David; Castillo, Javier Gonzalez; Talavage, Thomas; Patterson, Stephanie; Wiley, Cynthia

    2008-10-01

    The Simulation Framework, also known as the Embodied Cognition Framework, maintains that conceptual knowledge is grounded in sensorimotor systems. To test several predictions that this theory makes about the neural substrates of verb meanings, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to scan subjects' brains while they made semantic judgments involving five classes of verbs-specifically, Running verbs (e.g., run, jog, walk), Speaking verbs (e.g., shout, mumble, whisper), Hitting verbs (e.g., hit, poke, jab), Cutting verbs (e.g., cut, slice, hack), and Change of State verbs (e.g., shatter, smash, crack). These classes were selected because they vary with respect to the presence or absence of five distinct semantic components-specifically, ACTION, MOTION, CONTACT, CHANGE OF STATE, and TOOL USE. Based on the Simulation Framework, we hypothesized that the ACTION component depends on the primary motor and premotor cortices, that the MOTION component depends on the posterolateral temporal cortex, that the CONTACT component depends on the intraparietal sulcus and inferior parietal lobule, that the CHANGE OF STATE component depends on the ventral temporal cortex, and that the TOOL USE component depends on a distributed network of temporal, parietal, and frontal regions. Virtually all of the predictions were confirmed. Taken together, these findings support the Simulation Framework and extend our understanding of the neuroanatomical distribution of different aspects of verb meaning.

  17. IMEF gamma scanning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Sang Yeol; Park, Dae Kyu; Ahn, Sang Bok; Ju, Yong Sun; Jeon, Yong Bum

    1997-06-01

    The gamma scanning system which is installed in IMEF is the equipment obtaining the gamma ray spectrum from irradiated fuels. This equipment could afford the useful data relating spent fuels like as burn-up measurements. We describe the specifications of the equipment and its accessories, and also described its operation procedure so that an operator can use this report as the operation procedure. (author). 1 tab., 11 figs., 11 refs.

  18. Multichannel scanning spectrophotometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagutin, A.F.

    1979-01-01

    A spectrophotometer designed in the Crimea astrophysical observatory is described. The spectrophotometer is intended for the installation at the telescope to measure energy distribution in the star spectra in the 3100-8550 A range. The device is made according to the scheme with a fixed diffraction lattice. The choice of the optical kinematic scheme is explained. The main design elements are shown. Some singularities of the scanning drive kinematics are considered. The device performance is given

  19. Scanning drop sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Shinde, Aniketa A.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Jones, Ryan J.; Marcin, Martin R.; Mitrovic, Slobodan

    2017-05-09

    Electrochemical or electrochemical and photochemical experiments are performed on a collection of samples by suspending a drop of electrolyte solution between an electrochemical experiment probe and one of the samples that serves as a test sample. During the electrochemical experiment, the electrolyte solution is added to the drop and an output solution is removed from the drop. The probe and collection of samples can be moved relative to one another so the probe can be scanned across the samples.

  20. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2010-08-24

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for which the pulse contains at most one or a few electrons, thus achieving imaging without the space-charge effect between electrons, and still in ten(s) of seconds. For imaging, the secondary electrons from surface structures are detected, as demonstrated here for material surfaces and biological specimens. By recording backscattered electrons, diffraction patterns from single crystals were also obtained. Scanning pulsed-electron microscopy with the acquired spatiotemporal resolutions, and its efficient heat-dissipation feature, is now poised to provide in situ 4D imaging and with environmental capability.

  1. Scanning unit for collectrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plaige, Yves.

    1976-01-01

    This invention concerns a measurement scanning assembly for collectron type detectors. It is used in measuring the neutron flux in nuclear reactors. As the number of these detectors in a reactor can be very great, they are not usually all connected permanently to the measuring facility but rather in turn by means of a scanning device which carries out, as it were, multiplexing between all the collectrons and the input of a single measuring system. The object of the invention is a scanning assembly which is of relative simplicity through an original organisation. Specifically, according to this organisation, the collectrons outputs are grouped together in bunches, each of these bunches being processed by a multiplexing sub-assembly belonging to a first stage, the different outputs of these multiplexing subassemblies of this first stage being grouped together yet again in bunches processed by multiplexors forming a new stage and so forth. Further, this structure is specially adapted for use with collectrons by utilising a current amplifier at each multiplexing level so that from one end to the other of the multiplexing system, the commutations are carried out on currents and not on voltages [fr

  2. Forensic Scanning Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, R. H.

    1983-03-01

    The scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray spectrometer is a versatile instrument which has many uses in the investigation of crime and preparation of scientific evidence for the courts. Major applications include microscopy and analysis of very small fragments of paint, glass and other materials which may link an individual with a scene of crime, identification of firearms residues and examination of questioned documents. Although simultaneous observation and chemical analysis of the sample is the most important feature of the instrument, other modes of operation such as cathodoluminescence spectrometry, backscattered electron imaging and direct x-ray excitation are also exploited. Marks on two bullets or cartridge cases can be compared directly by sequential scanning with a single beam or electronic linkage of two instruments. Particles of primer residue deposited on the skin and clothing when a gun is fired can be collected on adhesive tape and identified by their morphology and elemental composition. It is also possible to differentiate between the primer residues of different types of ammunition. Bullets may be identified from the small fragments left behind as they pass through the body tissues. In the examination of questioned documents the scanning electron microscope is used to establish the order in which two intersecting ink lines were written and to detect traces of chemical markers added to the security inks on official documents.

  3. Comparison of thallium-201 scan and Tc-99m sestamibi scan in the differential diagnosis of breast mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Ihn Ho; Won, Kyu Jang; Lee, Hyung Woo; Lee, Soon Jung [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-02-01

    We performed this study to compare Tl-201 and Tc-99m MIBI scans for the differentiation of malignant from benign breast mass. Thirty-eight female patients underwent Tl-201 breast scan and thirty-two of them also underwent Tc-99m MIBI scan of the breast. After intravenous injection of 74-111 MBq of Tl-201, early (10 minutes) and delayed (3 hours) images were obtained. Then, 555-740 MBq of Tc-99m MIBI was injected and images after 30 minutes were obtained. We compared Tl-201 and Tc-99m MIBI scans with pathologic results. Twenty-three patients were confirmed to have infiltrating duct carcinoma and fifteen patients to have benign breast mass by excisonal biopsy. The sensitivity of early and delayed Tl-201 scan and Tc-99m MIBI scan in the detection of malignant breast lesion were 100% (23/23), 82% (18/22), and 90% (18/20), respectively. The sensitivity of early Tl-201 scan was significantly higher than that of delayed Tl-201 scan, (p<0.05). The specificity of early and delayed Tl-201 scan and Tc-99m MIBI scan were 73% (11/15), 73% (11/15) and 83% (10/12), respectively (p: not significant). Three patients out of nine with fibroadenoma and one patient with atypical duct hyperplasia were false positive in both early and delayed Tl-201 scans. The size of fibroadenoma with false positive in early and delayed Tl-201 scan (4 cases) was larger than that of 11 fibroadenoma with true negative scan (p<0.01). Metastatic axillary lymph node involvement was present in fifteen patients. The sensitivity to detect metastatic nodes was 38% (5/13) for early Tl-201 images, 15% (2/13) for delayed Tl-201 images, 58% (7/12) for Tc-99m MIBI planar images and 67% (4/6) for Tc-99m MIBI SPECT. The sensitivity of Tc-99m MIBI planar or SPECT was significantly higher than that of delayed Tl-201 images (p<0.05). Early Tl-201 and Tc-99m MIBI scan are useful noninvasive methods to differentiate malignant from benign mass of breast. Tc-99m MIBI scan was sensitive in detecting axillary lymph node

  4. Comparison of thallium-201 scan and Tc-99m sestamibi scan in the differential diagnosis of breast mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Ihn Ho; Won, Kyu Jang; Lee, Hyung Woo; Lee, Soon Jung

    1999-01-01

    We performed this study to compare Tl-201 and Tc-99m MIBI scans for the differentiation of malignant from benign breast mass. Thirty-eight female patients underwent Tl-201 breast scan and thirty-two of them also underwent Tc-99m MIBI scan of the breast. After intravenous injection of 74-111 MBq of Tl-201, early (10 minutes) and delayed (3 hours) images were obtained. Then, 555-740 MBq of Tc-99m MIBI was injected and images after 30 minutes were obtained. We compared Tl-201 and Tc-99m MIBI scans with pathologic results. Twenty-three patients were confirmed to have infiltrating duct carcinoma and fifteen patients to have benign breast mass by excisonal biopsy. The sensitivity of early and delayed Tl-201 scan and Tc-99m MIBI scan in the detection of malignant breast lesion were 100% (23/23), 82% (18/22), and 90% (18/20), respectively. The sensitivity of early Tl-201 scan was significantly higher than that of delayed Tl-201 scan, (p<0.05). The specificity of early and delayed Tl-201 scan and Tc-99m MIBI scan were 73% (11/15), 73% (11/15) and 83% (10/12), respectively (p: not significant). Three patients out of nine with fibroadenoma and one patient with atypical duct hyperplasia were false positive in both early and delayed Tl-201 scans. The size of fibroadenoma with false positive in early and delayed Tl-201 scan (4 cases) was larger than that of 11 fibroadenoma with true negative scan (p<0.01). Metastatic axillary lymph node involvement was present in fifteen patients. The sensitivity to detect metastatic nodes was 38% (5/13) for early Tl-201 images, 15% (2/13) for delayed Tl-201 images, 58% (7/12) for Tc-99m MIBI planar images and 67% (4/6) for Tc-99m MIBI SPECT. The sensitivity of Tc-99m MIBI planar or SPECT was significantly higher than that of delayed Tl-201 images (p<0.05). Early Tl-201 and Tc-99m MIBI scan are useful noninvasive methods to differentiate malignant from benign mass of breast. Tc-99m MIBI scan was sensitive in detecting axillary lymph node

  5. Citrus aurantium Naringenin Prevents Osteosarcoma Progression and Recurrence in the Patients Who Underwent Osteosarcoma Surgery by Improving Antioxidant Capability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lirong Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrus aurantium is rich in flavonoids, which may prevent osteosarcoma progression, but its related molecular mechanism remains unclear. Flavonoids were extracted from C. aurantium and purified by reparative HPLC. Each fraction was identified by using electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS. Three main components (naringin, naringenin, and hesperetin were isolated from C. aurantium. Naringenin inhibited the growth of MG-63 cells, whereas naringin and hesperetin had no inhibitory function on cell growth. ROS production was increased in naringin- and hesperetin-treated groups after one day of culture while the level was always lowest in the naringenin-treated group after three days of culture. 95 osteosarcoma patients who underwent surgery were assigned into two groups: naringenin group (NG, received 20 mg naringenin daily, n=47 and control group (CG, received 20 mg placebo daily, n=48. After an average of two-year follow-up, osteosarcoma volumes were smaller in the NG group than in the CG group (P>0.01. The rate of osteosarcoma recurrence was also lower in the NG group than in CG group. ROS levels were lower in the NG group than in the CG group. Thus, naringenin from Citrus aurantium inhibits osteosarcoma progression and local recurrence in the patients who underwent osteosarcoma surgery by improving antioxidant capability.

  6. Prognostic Impact of the Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index on Long-Term Outcomes in Patients Who Underwent Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Hideki; Dohi, Tomotaka; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Doi, Shinichiro; Naito, Ryo; Konishi, Hirokazu; Tsuboi, Shuta; Ogita, Manabu; Kasai, Takatoshi; Hassan, Ahmed; Okazaki, Shinya; Isoda, Kikuo; Suwa, Satoru; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2017-06-01

    Malnutrition has been identified as an important predictor of poor clinical outcomes in patients with heart failure. The aim of this study is to examine the prognostic impact of nutritional status in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The impact of nutrition, assessed using the geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI) calculated by serum albumin and body mass index, was evaluated in 2,853 patients with CAD who underwent their first PCI between 2000 and 2011. Patients were assigned to tertiles based on their GNRI levels. The incidences of all-cause death and cardiac death were assessed. The median GNRI values were 101 (interquartile range 95 to 106). Lower GNRI levels were associated with older age and higher prevalence of acute coronary syndrome and chronic kidney disease. During the median follow-up period of 7.4 years, Kaplan-Meier curves showed ongoing divergence in rates of mortality among tertiles (GNRI nutritional status was associated with long-term clinical outcomes in CAD patients after PCI. Evaluation of GNRI carries important prognostic information and may guide the therapeutic approach to such patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Mid-Term Results of Patients who Underwent Radiofrequency Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Together with Mitral Valve Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurrahim Çolak

    Full Text Available Abstract Objetive: Saline-irrigated radiofrequency ablation, which has been widely used for surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation in recent years, is 80-90% successful in achieving sinus rhythm. In our study, our surgical experience and mid-term results in patients who underwent mitral valve surgery and left atrial radiofrequency ablation were analyzed. Methods: Forty patients (15 males, 25 females; mean age 52.05±9.9 years; range 32-74 underwent surgery for atrial fibrillation associated with mitral valvular disease. All patients manifested atrial fibrillation, which started at least six months before the surgical intervention. The majority of patients (36 patients, 90% were in NYHA class III; 34 (85% patients had rheumatic heart disease. In addition to mitral valve surgery and radiofrequency ablation, coronary artery bypass, DeVega tricuspid annuloplasty, left ventricular aneurysm repair, and left atrial thrombus excision were performed. Following discharge from the hospital, patients' follow-up was performed as outpatient clinic examinations and the average follow-up period of patients was 18±3 months. Results: While the incidence of sinus rhythm was 85.3% on the first postoperative day, it was 80% during discharge and 71% in the 1st year follow-up examination. Conclusion: Radiofrequency ablation is an effective method when it is performed by appropriate surgical technique. Its rate for returning to sinus rhythm is as high as the rate of conventional surgical procedure.

  8. Presurgical language fMRI in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy: effects of task performance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, B.; Wellmer, J.; Schur, S.; Dinkelacker, V.; Ruhlmann, J.; Mormann, F.; Axmacher, N.; Elger, C.E.; Fernandez, G.S.E.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine whether language functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) before epilepsy surgery can be similarly interpreted in patients with greatly different performance levels. METHODS: An fMRI paradigm using a semantic decision task with performance control and a perceptual control

  9. Auditory processing in the brainstem and audiovisual integration in humans studied with fMRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slabu, Lavinia Mihaela

    2008-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a powerful technique because of the high spatial resolution and the noninvasiveness. The applications of the fMRI to the auditory pathway remain a challenge due to the intense acoustic scanner noise of approximately 110 dB SPL. The auditory system

  10. Reproducibility of fMRI in the clinical setting: implications for trial designs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosnell, R.; Wegner, C.; Kincses, Z.T.; Korteweg, T.; Agosta, F.; Ciccarelli, O.; De Stefano, N.; Gass, A.; Hirsch, J.; Johansen-Berg, H.; Kappos, L.; Barkhof, F.; Mancini, L.; Manfredonia, F.; Marino, S.; Miller, D. H.; Montalban, X.; Palace, J.; Rocca, M.; Enzinger, C.; Ropele, S.; Rovira, A.; Smith, S.; Thompson, A.; Thornton, J.; Yousry, T.; Whitcher, B.; Filippi, M.; Matthews, P.M.

    2008-01-01

    With expanding potential clinical applications of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) it is important to test how reliable different measures of fMRI activation are between subjects and sessions and between centres. This study compared variability across 17 patients with multiple sclerosis

  11. Alcohol sensitizes cerebral responses to the odors of alcoholic drinks: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragulat, Veronique; Dzemidzic, Mario; Talavage, Thomas; Davidson, Dena; O'Connor, Sean J; Kareken, David A

    2008-07-01

    Small, priming doses of alcohol enhance desire to drink, and thus play a role in the loss of control of alcohol consumption. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we previously showed that alcoholic drink odors (AO; subjects' drinks of choice) induce greater nucleus accumbens (NAc) activity than non-appetitive odors (NApO; grass, leather) in subjects at risk for alcoholism. Here we hypothesized that priming exposure to alcohol would enhance responses to AO in the NAc and orbitofrontal cortex in comparison to NApO (grass, leather) and to the appetitive control odors (ApCO) of chocolate and grape. Ten hazardous drinkers (mean age = 22.7; SD = 2.9, average drinks per drinking day = 5.9, SD = 2.3; drinking days/90 days = 50.4, SD = 13.7) were scanned on a 1.5 T GE Signa MR scanner during intravenous infusion of lactated Ringer's or 6% ethanol in lactated Ringer's that was pharmacokinetically modeled to achieve a constant breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) of 50 mg% throughout imaging. During scanning, subjects sniffed AO, NApO, and ApCO. Alcohol infusion enhanced the contrast between AO and NApO in the NAc, and in orbitofrontal, medial frontal, and precuneus/posterior cingulate regions. The contrast between AO and appetitive control odors (ApCO; chocolate and grape) was similarly larger in the orbital, medial frontal, precuneus, and posterior cingulate/retrosplenial areas, with the most robust finding being a potentiated response in the posterior cingulate/retrosplenial area. The orbital region is similar to an area previously shown to manifest satiety-related decreases in activity induced by food cues. The results suggest that priming exposure to alcohol renders a limbic network more responsive to alcohol cues, potentially enhancing desire to drink.

  12. Ecological nuances in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI): psychological stressors, posture, and hydrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Amir; Lieber, Baruch; Soliman, Fatima; Buhle, Jason; Posner, Jonathan; Peterson, Bradley S; Posner, Michael I

    2005-03-01

    Brain imaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have forged an impressive link between psychology and neuroscience. Whereas most experiments in cognitive psychology require participants to perform while sitting upright in front of display devices, fMRI obliges participants to perform cognitive tasks while lying supine and motionless inside a narrow bore. In addition to introducing psychological and physical stressors, such as loud thumps and head restraints, fMRI procedures also alter brain hydrostatics. The ecological factors associated with current fMRI technology, such as supine posture, may skew cognitive processing and influence hemodynamic and electrophysiological measurements, especially in extreme age groups and pathological populations. Recognizing the central role of fMRI in unraveling the neural mechanisms of cognition, we outline ways to address these limitations.

  13. Significance of pulmonary nodules in multi-detector computed tomography scan of noncancerous patients

    OpenAIRE

    Toghiani, Ali; Adibi, Atoosa; Taghavi, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Background: Computed tomography (CT) scan is one the most useful devices in chest imaging. CT scan can be used in mediastinal abnormality, lungs, and pleural evaluations. According to the high prevalence and different causes of pulmonary nodules, we designed this study to evaluate the prevalence and the types of pulmonary nodules in noncancerous patients who underwent chest multi-detector CT (MDCT) scan. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study which was in our hospital to eval...

  14. Compressed Sensing for fMRI: Feasibility Study on the Acceleration of Non-EPI fMRI at 9.4T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Kyu Han

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI technique known as gradient-recalled echo (GRE echo-planar imaging (EPI is sensitive to image distortion and degradation caused by local magnetic field inhomogeneity at high magnetic fields. Non-EPI sequences such as spoiled gradient echo and balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP have been proposed as an alternative high-resolution fMRI technique; however, the temporal resolution of these sequences is lower than the typically used GRE-EPI fMRI. One potential approach to improve the temporal resolution is to use compressed sensing (CS. In this study, we tested the feasibility of k-t FOCUSS—one of the high performance CS algorithms for dynamic MRI—for non-EPI fMRI at 9.4T using the model of rat somatosensory stimulation. To optimize the performance of CS reconstruction, different sampling patterns and k-t FOCUSS variations were investigated. Experimental results show that an optimized k-t FOCUSS algorithm with acceleration by a factor of 4 works well for non-EPI fMRI at high field under various statistical criteria, which confirms that a combination of CS and a non-EPI sequence may be a good solution for high-resolution fMRI at high fields.

  15. Nucleus accumbens deep brain stimulation results in insula and prefrontal activation: a large animal FMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily J Knight

    Full Text Available Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS of the nucleus accumbens (NAc has previously been investigated clinically for the treatment of several psychiatric conditions, including obsessive-compulsive disorder and treatment resistant depression. However, the mechanism underlying the therapeutic benefit of DBS, including the brain areas that are activated, remains largely unknown. Here, we utilized 3.0 T functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI changes in Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent (BOLD signal to test the hypothesis that NAc/internal capsule DBS results in global neural network activation in a large animal (porcine modelAnimals (n = 10 were implanted in the NAc/internal capsule with DBS electrodes and received stimulation (1, 3, and 5 V, 130 Hz, and pulse widths of 100 and 500 µsec. BOLD signal changes were evaluated using a gradient echo-echo planar imaging (GRE-EPI sequence in 3.0 T MRI. We used a normalized functional activation map for group analysis and applied general linear modeling across subjects (FDR<0.001. The anatomical location of the implanted DBS lead was confirmed with a CT scanWe observed stimulation-evoked activation in the ipsilateral prefrontal cortex, insula, cingulate and bilateral parahippocampal region along with decrease in BOLD signal in the ipsilateral dorsal region of the thalamus. Furthermore, as the stimulation voltage increased from 3 V to 5 V, the region of BOLD signal modulation increased in insula, thalamus, and parahippocampal cortex and decreased in the cingulate and prefrontal cortex. We also demonstrated that right and left NAc/internal capsule stimulation modulates identical areas ipsilateral to the side of the stimulationOur results suggest that NAc/internal capsule DBS results in modulation of psychiatrically important brain areas notably the prefrontal cortex, cingulate, and insular cortex, which may underlie the therapeutic effect of NAc DBS in psychiatric disorders. Finally, our fMRI setup in the large

  16. Development of visual cortical function in infant macaques: A BOLD fMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom J Van Grootel

    Full Text Available Functional brain development is not well understood. In the visual system, neurophysiological studies in nonhuman primates show quite mature neuronal properties near birth although visual function is itself quite immature and continues to develop over many months or years after birth. Our goal was to assess the relative development of two main visual processing streams, dorsal and ventral, using BOLD fMRI in an attempt to understand the global mechanisms that support the maturation of visual behavior. Seven infant macaque monkeys (Macaca mulatta were repeatedly scanned, while anesthetized, over an age range of 102 to 1431 days. Large rotating checkerboard stimuli induced BOLD activation in visual cortices at early ages. Additionally we used static and dynamic Glass pattern stimuli to probe BOLD responses in primary visual cortex and two extrastriate areas: V4 and MT-V5. The resulting activations were analyzed with standard GLM and multivoxel pattern analysis (MVPA approaches. We analyzed three contrasts: Glass pattern present/absent, static/dynamic Glass pattern presentation, and structured/random Glass pattern form. For both GLM and MVPA approaches, robust coherent BOLD activation appeared relatively late in comparison to the maturation of known neuronal properties and the development of behavioral sensitivity to Glass patterns. Robust differential activity to Glass pattern present/absent and dynamic/static stimulus presentation appeared first in V1, followed by V4 and MT-V5 at older ages; there was no reliable distinction between the two extrastriate areas. A similar pattern of results was obtained with the two analysis methods, although MVPA analysis showed reliable differential responses emerging at later ages than GLM. Although BOLD responses to large visual stimuli are detectable, our results with more refined stimuli indicate that global BOLD activity changes as behavioral performance matures. This reflects an hierarchical development of

  17. Brain Activity Associated with Emoticons: An fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, Masahide; Saito, Keiichi; Mukawa, Naoki

    In this paper, we describe that brain activities associated with emoticons by using fMRI. In communication over a computer network, we use abstract faces such as computer graphics (CG) avatars and emoticons. These faces convey users' emotions and enrich their communications. However, the manner in which these faces influence the mental process is as yet unknown. The human brain may perceive the abstract face in an entirely different manner, depending on its level of reality. We conducted an experiment using fMRI in order to investigate the effects of emoticons. The results show that right inferior frontal gyrus, which associated with nonverbal communication, is activated by emoticons. Since the emoticons were created to reflect the real human facial expressions as accurately as possible, we believed that they would activate the right fusiform gyrus. However, this region was not found to be activated during the experiment. This finding is useful in understanding how abstract faces affect our behaviors and decision-making in communication over a computer network.

  18. Pycortex: an interactive surface visualizer for fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Shuang Gao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface visualizations of fMRI provide a comprehensive view of cortical activity. However, surface visualizations are difficult to generate and most common visualization techniques rely on unnecessary interpolation which limits the fidelity of the resulting maps. Furthermore, it is difficult to understand the relationship between flattened cortical surfaces and the underlying 3D anatomy using tools available currently. To address these problems we have developed pycortex, a Python toolbox for interactive surface mapping and visualization. Pycortex exploits the power of modern graphics cards to sample volumetric data on a per-pixel basis, allowing dense and accurate mapping of the voxel grid across the surface. Anatomical, functional and fiduciary information can be projected onto the cortical surface. The surface can be inflated and flattened interactively, aiding interpretation of the correspondence between the anatomical surface and the flattened cortical sheet. The output of pycortex can be viewed using WebGL, a technology compatible with modern web browsers. This allows complex fMRI surface maps to be distributed broadly online without requiring installation of complex software.

  19. Localization of Broca's area using verb generation tasks in the MEG: validation against fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Elizabeth W; Wang, Frank; Malone, Marion; Kadis, Darren S; Donner, Elizabeth J

    2011-03-03

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is routinely used to non-invasively localize language areas. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is being explored as an alternative technique. MEG tasks to localize receptive language are well established although there are no standardized tasks to localize expressive language areas. We developed two expressive language tasks for MEG and validated their localizations against fMRI data. Ten right-handed adolescents (μ=17.5 years) were tested with fMRI and MEG on two tasks: verb generation to pictures and verb generation to words. MEG and fMRI data were normalized and overlaid. The number of overlapping voxels activated in fMRI and MEG were counted for each subject, for each task, at different thresholding levels. For picture verb generation, there was 100% concordance between MEG and fMRI lateralization, and for word verb generation, there was 75% concordance. A count showed 79.6% overlap of voxels activated by both MEG and fMRI for picture verb generation and 50.2% overlap for word verb generation. The percentage overlap decreased with increasingly stringent activation thresholds. Our novel MEG expressive language tasks successfully identified neural regions involved in language production and showed high concordance with fMRI laterality. Percentage overlap of activated voxels was also high when validated against fMRI, but showed task-specific and threshold-related effects. The high concordance and high percentage overlap between fMRI and MEG activations confirm the validity of our new MEG task. Furthermore, the higher concordance from the picture verb generation task suggests that this is a promising task for use in the young clinical population. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Scanning radiographic apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, R.D.

    1980-04-01

    Visual display of dental, medical or other radiographic images is realized with an x-ray tube in which an electron beam is scanned through an x-y raster pattern on a broad anode plate, the scanning being synchronized with the x-y sweep signals of a cathode ray tube display and the intensity signal for the display being derived from a small x-ray detector which receives x-rays that have passed through the subject to be imaged. Positioning and support of the detector are provided for by disposing the detector in a probe which may be attached to the x-ray tube at any of a plurality of different locations and by providing a plurality of such probes of different configuration in order to change focal length, to accommodate to different detector placements relative to the subject, to enhance patient comfort and to enable production of both periapical images and wider angle pantomographic images. High image definition with reduced radiation dosage is provided for by a lead glass collimator situated between the x-ray tube and subject and having a large number of spaced-apart minute radiation transmissive passages convergent on the position of the detector. Releasable mounting means enable changes of collimator in conjunction with changes of the probe to change focal length. A control circuit modifies the x-y sweep signals applied to the x-ray tube and modulates electron beam energy and current in order to correct for image distortions and other undesirable effects which can otherwise be present in a scanning x-ray system.

  1. Surface micromachined scanning mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Kent Erik

    1992-01-01

    Both aluminum cantilever and torsional scanning mirrors have been fabricated and their static and dynamic properties are studied experimentally and theoretically. The experiments showed resonance frequencies in the range of 163 k-Hz - 632 kHz for cantilever beams with Q values between 5 and 11....... Torsional mirrors showed resonance frequencies in the range of 410 kHz - 667 kHz with Q values of 10 - 17. All measurements performed at atmospheric pressure. Both types of mechanical structures were deflected electrostatically at large angles (± 5°) more than 1011 times without breaking and without any...

  2. Scanning Color Laser Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awamura, D.; Ode, T.; Yonezawa, M.

    1988-01-01

    A confocal color laser microscope which utilizes a three color laser light source (Red: He-Ne, Green: Ar, Blue: Ar) has been developed and is finding useful applications in the semiconductor field. The color laser microscope, when compared to a conventional microscope, offers superior color separation, higher resolution, and sharper contrast. Recently some new functions including a Focus Scan Memory, a Surface Profile Measurement System, a Critical Dimension Measurement system (CD) and an Optical Beam Induced Current Function (OBIC) have been developed for the color laser microscope. This paper will discuss these new features.

  3. Radiographic scanning agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevan, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    This invention relates to radiodiagnostic agents and more particularly to a composition and method for preparing a highly effective technetium-99m-based bone scanning agent. One deficiency of x-ray examination is the inability of that technique to detect skeletal metastases in their incipient stages. It has been discovered that the methanehydroxydiphosphonate bone mineral-seeking agent is unique in that it provides the dual benefits of sharp radiographic imaging and excellent lesion detection when used with technetium-99m. This agent can also be used with technetium-99m for detecting soft tissue calcification in the manner of the inorganic phosphate radiodiagnostic agents

  4. Automatic Ultrasound Scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moshavegh, Ramin

    on the scanners, and to improve the computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) in ultrasound by introducing new quantitative measures. Thus, four major issues concerning automation of the medical ultrasound are addressed in this PhD project. They touch upon gain adjustments in ultrasound, automatic synthetic aperture image...... on the user adjustments on the scanner interface to optimize the scan settings. This explains the huge interest in the subject of this PhD project entitled “AUTOMATIC ULTRASOUND SCANNING”. The key goals of the project have been to develop automated techniques to minimize the unnecessary settings...

  5. A Case of Type 2 Amiodarone-Induced Thyrotoxicosis That Underwent Total Thyroidectomy under High-Dose Steroid Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshi Hashimoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amiodarone is used commonly and effectively in the treatment of arrhythmia; however, it may cause thyrotoxicosis categorized into two types: iodine-induced hyperthyroidism (type 1 amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT and destructive thyroiditis (type 2 AIT. We experienced a case of type 2 AIT, in which high-dose steroid was administered intravenously, and we finally decided to perform total thyroidectomy, resulting in a complete cure of the AIT. Even though steroid had been administered to the patient (maximum 80 mg of prednisolone, the operation was performed safely and no acute adrenal crisis as steroid withdrawal syndrome was found after the operation. Few cases of type 2 AIT that underwent total thyroidectomy with high-dose steroid administration have been reported. The current case suggests that total thyroidectomy should be taken into consideration for patients with AIT who cannot be controlled by medical treatment and even in those under high-dose steroid administration.

  6. Infants with Atypical Presentations of Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia with Misalignment of the Pulmonary Veins Who Underwent Bilateral Lung Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towe, Christopher T; White, Frances V; Grady, R Mark; Sweet, Stuart C; Eghtesady, Pirooz; Wegner, Daniel J; Sen, Partha; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Hamvas, Aaron; Cole, F Sessions; Wambach, Jennifer A

    2018-03-01

    To describe disease course, histopathology, and outcomes for infants with atypical presentations of alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of the pulmonary veins (ACDMPV) who underwent bilateral lung transplantation. We reviewed clinical history, diagnostic studies, explant histology, genetic sequence results, and post-transplant course for 6 infants with atypical ACDMPV who underwent bilateral lung transplantation at St. Louis Children's Hospital. We compared their histology with infants with classic ACDMPV and compared their outcomes with infants transplanted for other indications. In contrast with neonates with classic ACDPMV who present with severe hypoxemia and refractory pulmonary hypertension within hours of birth, none of the infants with atypical ACDMPV presented with progressive neonatal respiratory failure. Three infants had mild neonatal respiratory distress and received nasal cannula oxygen. Three other infants had no respiratory symptoms at birth and presented with hypoxemia and pulmonary hypertension at 2-3 months of age. Bilateral lung transplantation was performed at 4-20 months of age. Unlike in classic ACDMPV, histopathologic findings were not distributed uniformly and were not diffuse. Three subjects had apparent nonmosaic genetic defects involving FOXF1. Two infants had extrapulmonary anomalies (posterior urethral valves, inguinal hernia). Three transplanted children are alive at 5-16 years of age, similar to outcomes for infants transplanted for other indications. Lung explants from infants with atypical ACDMPV demonstrated diagnostic but nonuniform histopathologic findings. The 1- and 5-year survival rates for infants with atypical ACDMPV are similar to infants transplanted for other indications. Given the clinical and histopathologic spectra, ACDMPV should be considered in infants with hypoxemia and pulmonary hypertension, even beyond the newborn period. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The association between orthostatic hypotension and cognitive state among adults 65 years and older who underwent a comprehensive geriatric assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punchick, Boris; Freud, Tamar; Press, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The prevalence of cognitive impairment and orthostatic hypotension (OH) increases with age, but the results of studies that assessed possible associations between them are inconsistent. The aim of this study is to assess possible associations between cognitive impairment and OH in patients ≥65 years of age who underwent a comprehensive geriatric assessment. A retrospective analysis was conducted of the computerized medical records of the study population from 2005 to 2013. Data collected included blood pressure measurements that enabled the calculation of OH, results of the mini-mental state examination (MMSE), results of the Montreal cognitive assessment (MoCA) test, and cognitive diagnoses that were determined over the course of the assessment. The rate of OH in the study population of 571 adults was 32.1%. The mean MMSE score was 22.5 ± 5.2 among participants with OH and 21.6 ± 5.8 among those without OH (P = 0.09). The absence of a significant association between OH and MMSE remained after adjusting the MMSE score for age and education level. The mean MoCA score was 16.4 ± 5.0 among participants with OH and 16.4 ± 4.8 among those without (P = 0.33). The prevalence of OH was 39% among participants without cognitive impairment, 28.9% among those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 30.6% among those with dementia (P = 0.13). There was no association between OH and cognitive impairment in adults who underwent a comprehensive geriatric assessment. PMID:27442658

  8. Long-term prognosis and clinical characteristics of young adults (≤40 years old) who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Hirokazu; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Kasai, Takatoshi; Tsuboi, Shuta; Ogita, Manabu; Naito, Ryo; Katoh, Yoshiteru; Okai, Iwao; Tamura, Hiroshi; Okazaki, Shinya; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    Limited data exist regarding the long-term prognosis of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in young adults. The aim of this study was to retrospectively assess the long-term clinical outcomes in young patients who underwent PCI. Between 1985 and 2011, 7649 consecutive patients underwent PCI, and data from 69 young adults (age ≤40 years) and 4255 old adults (age ≧65 years) were analyzed. A Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to determine the independent predictors of a composite endpoint that included all-cause death and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) during the follow-up period. The mean age of the 69 young patients was 36.1±4.9 years, and 96% of them were men. Approximately 30% were current smokers, and their body mass index (BMI) was 26.7±5.0kg/m(2). The prevalence of diabetes and hypertension was 33% and 48%, respectively. All patients had ≥1 conventional cardiovascular risk factor. At a median follow-up of 9.8 years, the overall death rate was 5.8%, and new-onset ACS occurred in 8.7%. Current smoking was an independent predictor of the composite endpoint (hazard ratio 4.46, confidence interval 1.08-19.1, p=0.04) for young adults. Current smoking and obesity (high BMI) are the important clinical characteristics in young Japanese coronary heart disease patients who undergo PCI. The long-term prognosis in young patients is acceptable, but current smoking is a significant independent predictor of death and the recurrence of ACS in young Japanese coronary heart disease patients who are obese. Copyright © 2014 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Analysis of Ulcer Recurrences After Metatarsal Head Resection in Patients Who Underwent Surgery to Treat Diabetic Foot Osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Corbalán, Irene; Lázaro-Martínez, José Luis; Aragón-Sánchez, Javier; García-Morales, Esther; Molines-Barroso, Raúl; Alvaro-Afonso, Francisco Javier

    2015-06-01

    Metatarsal head resection is a common and standardized treatment used as part of the surgical routine for metatarsal head osteomyelitis. The aim of this study was to define the influence of the amount of the metatarsal resection on the development of reulceration or ulcer recurrence in patients who suffered from plantar foot ulcer and underwent metatarsal surgery. We conducted a prospective study in 35 patients who underwent metatarsal head resection surgery to treat diabetic foot osteomyelitis with no prior history of foot surgeries, and these patients were included in a prospective follow-up over the course of at least 6 months in order to record reulceration or ulcer recurrences. Anteroposterior plain X-rays were taken before and after surgery. We also measured the portion of the metatarsal head that was removed and classified the patients according the resection rate of metatarsal (RRM) in first and second quartiles. We found statistical differences between the median RRM in patients who had an ulcer recurrence and patients without recurrences (21.48 ± 3.10% vs 28.12 ± 10.8%; P = .016). Seventeen (56.7%) patients were classified in the first quartile of RRM, which had an association with ulcer recurrence (P = .032; odds ratio = 1.41; 95% confidence interval = 1.04-1.92). RRM of less than 25% is associated with the development of a recurrence after surgery in the midterm follow-up, and therefore, planning before surgery is undertaken should be considered to avoid postsurgical complications. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. [Evaluation of the antithrombotic strategy in low thrombotic risk patients who underwent aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceves-Velázquez, Eduardo; Vieyra-Herrera, Gerardo; Rodríguez-Chávez, Laura; Herrera-Alarcón, Valentín

    2017-07-16

    According to current guidelines, in patients without additional risk factors who have undergone aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis, anticoagulation in the first 3 months after surgery is still a matter of debate. According to current evidence, aspirin in low doses is a reasonable alternative to vitamin K antagonists (VKA). A comparison is made between the incidence of thrombotic and haemorrhagic complications in patients with low thrombotic risk who underwent aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis in the National Institute of Cardiology of Ignacio Chávez of Mexico. The hypothesis: aspirin as monotherapy has a beneficial effect compared to VKA. The studied patients were the low thrombotic risk patients who underwent aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis in the National Institute of Cardiology of Ignacio Chávez of Mexico from 2011 to 2015. The groups studied were: aspirin only, VKA only, and the combination of VKA plus aspirin. The patients were retrospectively followed-up for 12 months, and the thrombotic and haemorrhagic complications were documented. Of the 231 patients included in the study, only one patient in the VKA only group presented with a haemorrhagic complication. No thrombotic complications were observed. In the present study no thrombotic complications were observed in patients who did not receive anticoagulation in the first 3 months after an aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis after a follow up period of 12 months. This suggests that the use of aspirin only is safe during this period. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of advanced blood pressure control with nifedipine delayedrelease tablets on the blood pressure in patients underwent nasal endoscope surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Hua Xia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effect of advanced blood pressure control with nifedipine delayedrelease tablets on the blood pressure in patients underwent nasal endoscope surgery and its feasibility. Methods: A total of 80 patients who were admitted in ENT department from June, 2012 to June, 2015 for nasal endoscope surgery were included in the study and randomized into the observation group and the control group with 40 cases in each group. The patients in the observation group were given nifedipine delayed-release tablets for advanced blood pressure control before operation, and were given routine blood pressure control during operation; while the patients in the control group were only given blood pressure control during operation. The changes of blood pressure, mean central arterial pressure, and heart rate before anesthesia (T0, after intubation (T1, during operation (T2, extubation when waking (T3, 30 min after extubation (T4, and 3 h after back to wards (T5 in the two groups were compared. The intraoperative situation and the surgical field quality in the two groups were compared. Results: SBP, DBP, and MAP levels at T1-5 in the two groups were significantly lower than those at T0. SBP, DBP, and MAP levels at T2 were significantly lower than those at other timing points, and were gradually recovered after operation, but were significantly lower than those at T0. The effect taking time of blood pressure reducing, intraoperative nitroglycerin dosage, and postoperative wound surface exudation amount in the observation group were significantly less than those in the control group. The surgical field quality scores in the observation group were significantly superior to those in the control group. Conclusions: Advanced blood pressure control with nifedipine delayed-release tablets can stabilize the blood pressure during the perioperative period in patients underwent nasal endoscope surgery, and enhance the surgical field qualities.

  12. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botkin, D.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  13. Concordance of Epileptic Networks Associated with Epileptic Spikes Measured by High-Density EEG and Fast fMRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Jäger

    Full Text Available The present study aims to investigate whether a newly developed fast fMRI called MREG (magnetic resonance encephalography measures metabolic changes related to interictal epileptic discharges (IED. For this purpose BOLD changes are correlated with the IED distribution and variability.Patients with focal epilepsy underwent EEG-MREG using a 64 channel cap. IED voltage maps were generated using 32 and 64 channels and compared regarding their correspondence to the BOLD response. The extents of IEDs (defined as number of channels with >50% of maximum IED negativity were correlated with the extents of positive and negative BOLD responses. Differences in inter-spike variability were investigated between interictal epileptic discharges (IED sets with and without concordant positive or negative BOLD responses.17 patients showed 32 separate IED types. In 50% of IED types the BOLD changes could be confirmed by another independent imaging method. The IED extent significantly correlated with the positive BOLD extent (p = 0.04. In 6 patients the 64-channel EEG voltage maps better reflected the positive or negative BOLD response than the 32-channel EEG; in all others no difference was seen. Inter-spike variability was significantly lower in IED sets with than without concordant positive or negative BOLD responses (with p = 0.04.Higher density EEG and fast fMRI seem to improve the value of EEG-fMRI in epilepsy. The correlation of positive BOLD and IED extent could suggest that widespread BOLD responses reflect the IED network. Inter-spike variability influences the likelihood to find IED concordant positive or negative BOLD responses, which is why single IED analysis may be promising.

  14. Functional cortical and subcortical abnormalities in pedophilia: a combined study using a choice reaction time task and fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeppl, Timm B; Nitschke, Joachim; Dombert, Beate; Santtila, Pekka; Greenlee, Mark W; Osterheider, Michael; Mokros, Andreas

    2011-06-01

    Pedophiles show sexual interest in prepubescent children but not in adults. Research into the neurofunctional mechanisms of paraphilias has gathered momentum over the last years. To elucidate the underlying neural processing of sexual interest among pedophiles and to highlight the differences in comparison with nonparaphilic sexual interest in adults. Nine pedophilic patients and 11 nonpedophilic control subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while viewing pictures of nude (prepubescents, pubescents, and adults) and neutral content, as well as performing a concomitant choice reaction time task (CRTT). Brain blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals and response latencies in the CRTT during exposure to each picture category. Analysis of behavioral data showed group differences in reaction times regarding prepubescent and adult but not pubescent stimuli. During stimulation with pictures displaying nude prepubescents, pedophiles showed increased BOLD response in brain areas known to be involved in processing of visual sexual stimuli. Comparison of pedophilic patients with the control group discovered differences in BOLD responses with respect to prepubescent and adult but not to pubescent stimuli. Differential effects in particular occurred in the cingulate gyrus and insular region. The brain response of pedophiles to visual sexual stimulation by images of nude prepubescents is comparable with previously described neural patterns of sexual processing in nonpedophilic human males evoked by visual stimuli depicting nude adults. Nevertheless, group differences found in the cingulate gyrus and the insular region suggest an important role of these brain areas in pedophilic sexual interest. Furthermore, combining attention-based methods like CRTT with fMRI may be a viable option for future diagnostic procedures regarding pedophilia. © 2011 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  15. Superficial amygdala and hippocampal activity during affective music listening observed at 3 T but not 1.5 T fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skouras, Stavros; Gray, Marcus; Critchley, Hugo; Koelsch, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare 3 T and 1.5 T fMRI results during emotional music listening. Stimuli comprised of psychoacoustically balanced instrumental musical pieces, with three different affective expressions (fear, neutral, joy). Participants (N=32) were split into two groups, one subjected to fMRI scanning using 3 T and another group scanned using 1.5 T. Whole brain t-tests (corrected for multiple comparisons) compared joy and fear in each of the two groups. The 3 T group showed significant activity differences between joy and fear localized in bilateral superficial amygdala, bilateral hippocampus and bilateral auditory cortex. The 1.5 T group showed significant activity differences between joy and fear localized in bilateral auditory cortex and cuneus. This is the first study to compare results obtained under different field strengths with regard to affective processes elicited by means of auditory/musical stimulation. The findings raise concern over false negatives in the superficial amygdala and hippocampus in affective studies conducted under 1.5 T and caution that imaging improvements due to increasing magnetic field strength can be influenced by region-specific characteristics. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Long-lasting changes in brain activation induced by a single REAC technology pulse in Wi-Fi bands. Randomized double-blind fMRI qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Salvatore; Mura, Marco; Castagna, Alessandro; Fontani, Vania

    2014-07-11

    The aim of this randomized double-blind study was to evaluate in healthy adult subjects, with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), long lasting changes in brain activation patterns following administration of a single, 250 milliseconds pulse emitted with radio-electric asymmetric conveyer (REAC) technology in the Wi-Fi bands. The REAC impulse was not administered during the scan, but after this, according to a protocol that has previously been demonstrated to be effective in improving motor control and postural balance, in healthy subjects and patients. The study was conducted on 33 healthy volunteers, performed with a 1.5 T unit while operating a motor block task involving cyclical and alternating flexion and extension of one leg. Subsequently subjects were randomly divided into a treatment and a sham treatment control group. Repeated fMRI examinations were performed following the administration of the REAC pulse or sham treatment. The Treated group showed cerebellar and ponto-mesencephalic activation components that disappeared in the second scan, while these activation components persisted in the Sham group. This study shows that a very weak signal, such as 250 milliseconds Wi-Fi pulse, administered with REAC technology, could lead to lasting effects on brain activity modification.

  17. Comparison of Healthcare Costs Among Commercially Insured Women in the United States Who Underwent Hysteroscopic Sterilization Versus Laparoscopic Bilateral Tubal Ligation Sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Patricia I; Yao, Jianying; Lin, Jay; Law, Amy

    2017-05-01

    This study evaluated healthcare costs of index procedures and during a 6-month follow-up of women who had hysteroscopic sterilization (HS) versus laparoscopic bilateral tubal ligation (LBTL). Women (18-49 years) with claims for HS and LBTL procedures were identified from the MarketScan commercial claims database (January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2012) and placed into separate cohorts. Demographics, characteristics, index procedure costs, and 6-month total healthcare costs and sterilization procedure-related costs were compared. Multivariable regression analyses were used to examine the impact of HS versus LBTL on costs. Among the study population, 12,031 had HS (mean age: 37.0 years) and 7286 had LBTL (mean age: 35.8 years). The majority (80.9%) who had HS underwent the procedure in a physician's office setting. Fewer women who had HS versus LBTL received the procedure in an inpatient setting (0.5% vs. 2.1%), an ambulatory surgical center setting (5.0% vs. 23.8%), or a hospital outpatient setting (13.4% vs. 71.9%). Mean total cost for the index sterilization procedure was lower for HS than for LBTL ($3964 vs. $5163, p women who had HS versus LBTL. Multivariable regression results confirmed that costs were lower for women who had HS versus LBTL. Among commercially insured women in the United States, HS versus LBTL is associated with lower average costs for the index procedure and lower total healthcare and procedure-related costs during 6 months after the sterilization procedure.

  18. Scanning device for a spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignat'ev, V.M.

    1982-01-01

    The invention belongs to scanning devices and is intended for spectrum scanning in spectral devices. The purpose of the invention is broadening of spectral scanning range. The device construction ensures the spectrum scanning range determined from revolution fractions to several revolutions of the monochromator drum head, any number of the drum head revolutions determined by integral number with addition of the drum revolution fractions with high degree of accuracy being possible

  19. Factors influencing bone scan quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, F.G.; Shirley, A.W.

    1983-01-01

    A reliable subjective method of assessing bone scan quality is described. A large number of variables which theoretically could influence scan quality were submitted to regression and factor analysis. Obesity, age, sex and abnormality of scan were found to be significant but weak variables. (orig.)

  20. Decoded fMRI neurofeedback can induce bidirectional confidence changes within single participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Aurelio; Amano, Kaoru; Koizumi, Ai; Lau, Hakwan; Kawato, Mitsuo

    2017-04-01

    Neurofeedback studies using real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) have recently incorporated the multi-voxel pattern decoding approach, allowing for fMRI to serve as a tool to manipulate fine-grained neural activity embedded in voxel patterns. Because of its tremendous potential for clinical applications, certain questions regarding decoded neurofeedback (DecNef) must be addressed. Specifically, can the same participants learn to induce neural patterns in opposite directions in different sessions? If so, how does previous learning affect subsequent induction effectiveness? These questions are critical because neurofeedback effects can last for months, but the short- to mid-term dynamics of such effects are unknown. Here we employed a within-subjects design, where participants underwent two DecNef training sessions to induce behavioural changes of opposing directionality (up or down regulation of perceptual confidence in a visual discrimination task), with the order of training counterbalanced across participants. Behavioral results indicated that the manipulation was strongly influenced by the order and the directionality of neurofeedback training. We applied nonlinear mathematical modeling to parametrize four main consequences of DecNef: main effect of change in confidence, strength of down-regulation of confidence relative to up-regulation, maintenance of learning effects, and anterograde learning interference. Modeling results revealed that DecNef successfully induced bidirectional confidence changes in different sessions within single participants. Furthermore, the effect of up- compared to down-regulation was more prominent, and confidence changes (regardless of the direction) were largely preserved even after a week-long interval. Lastly, the effect of the second session was markedly diminished as compared to the effect of the first session, indicating strong anterograde learning interference. These results are interpreted in the framework

  1. Decoded fMRI neurofeedback can induce bidirectional confidence changes within single participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Aurelio; Amano, Kaoru; Koizumi, Ai; Lau, Hakwan; Kawato, Mitsuo

    2017-01-01

    Neurofeedback studies using real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) have recently incorporated the multi-voxel pattern decoding approach, allowing for fMRI to serve as a tool to manipulate fine-grained neural activity embedded in voxel patterns. Because of its tremendous potential for clinical applications, certain questions regarding decoded neurofeedback (DecNef) must be addressed. Specifically, can the same participants learn to induce neural patterns in opposite directions in different sessions? If so, how does previous learning affect subsequent induction effectiveness? These questions are critical because neurofeedback effects can last for months, but the short- to mid-term dynamics of such effects are unknown. Here we employed a within-subjects design, where participants underwent two DecNef training sessions to induce behavioural changes of opposing directionality (up or down regulation of perceptual confidence in a visual discrimination task), with the order of training counterbalanced across participants. Behavioral results indicated that the manipulation was strongly influenced by the order and the directionality of neurofeedback training. We applied nonlinear mathematical modeling to parametrize four main consequences of DecNef: main effect of change in confidence, strength of down-regulation of confidence relative to up-regulation, maintenance of learning effects, and anterograde learning interference. Modeling results revealed that DecNef successfully induced bidirectional confidence changes in different sessions within single participants. Furthermore, the effect of up- compared to down-regulation was more prominent, and confidence changes (regardless of the direction) were largely preserved even after a week-long interval. Lastly, the effect of the second session was markedly diminished as compared to the effect of the first session, indicating strong anterograde learning interference. These results are interpreted in the framework

  2. The role of emotional inhibitory control in specific internet addiction - an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieter, Julia; Hoffmann, Sabine; Mier, Daniela; Reinhard, Iris; Beutel, Martin; Vollstädt-Klein, Sabine; Kiefer, Falk; Mann, Karl; Leménager, Tagrid

    2017-05-01

    Addicts to specific internet applications involving communication features showed increased social anxiety, emotional competence deficits and impaired prefrontal-related inhibitory control. The dorsal Anterior Cingulate Cortex (dACC) likely plays an important role in cognitive control and negative affect (such as social exclusion, pain or anxiety). To assess (social) anxiety-related inhibitory control in specific internet addiction (addicted use of games and social networks) and its relation to altered dACC activation. N=44 controls and n=51 specific internet addicts completed an anxious words-based Affective Go/No-Go task (AGN). A subsample of n=23 healthy controls and n=25 specific internet addicts underwent functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) while completing an Emotional Stroop Task (EST) with socially anxious, positive, negative and neutral words. Subgroups of internet gaming and social network addicts were exploratively assessed. Psychometric measures of social anxiety, emotional competence and impulsivity were additionally explored. Specific internet addicts showed higher impulsivity, social anxiety and reduced emotional competence. Between-group differences in AGN and EST behavioral measures were not detected. No group differences were found in the dACC, but explorative analyses revealed decreased left middle and superior temporal gyrus activation during interference of socially anxious words in internet gaming and relative to social network addicts. Given the function of the left middle temporal gyrus in the retrieval of words or expressions during communication, our findings give a first hint that social words might be less retrievable in the semantic storage of internet gaming addicts, possibly indicating deficiencies in handling speech in social situations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. 65. Impact of focused echocardiography in clinical decision of patients presented with STMI, underwent primary percutenouse angioplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Qasem

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Echocardiography in coronary artery diseases is an essential, routine echocardiography prior to primary percutaneous angioplasty is not clear. In our clinical practice in primary angioplasty we faced lots of complications either before or during or after the procedure. Moreover, lots of incidental findings that discovered after the procedure which if known will affect the plan of management. One-hundred-nineteen consecutive underwent primary angioplasty. All patients underwent FE prior to the procedure in catheterization lab while the patient was preparing for the procedure. FE with 2DE of LV at base, mid and apex, and apical stander views. Diastology grading, E/E′ and color doppler of mitral and aortic valve were performed. (N = 119 case of STMI were enrolled, mean age 51 ± 12 year. Eleven cases (9.2% had normal coronary and normal LV function. Twenty cases (17% of MI complication detected before the procedures: RV infarction 8.4% (5.1% asymptomatic and 3.3% symptomatic, ischemic MR (8.4%, LV apical aneurysm (0.8%, significant pericardial effusion (0.80%. Acute pulmonary edema in 17 cases (14.3%: six cases (5.1% developed acute pulmonary edema on the cath lab with grade 3 diastolic dysfunction and E/E ′  >20, 9 cases (7.6% develop acute pulmonary edema in CCU with grade 2–3 diastolic dysfunction and E/E′ 15–20. 2 cases (2.7% develop acute pulmonary in CCU with grade 1–2 diastolic dysfunction and E/E′ 9–14. One case (0.8% presented cardiac tamponade 2 h post PCI. Incidental finding not related to STMI were as follow: 2 cases (1.7% with severe fibro degenerative MR, 2 cases (1.7% with mild to moderate AR and 2 cases (1.7% with mild to moderate AS. Isoled CABG 5/4.2% and CABG and MVR 2/1.7%. FE play an important role in guiding the management, early detection the incidental findings and complication post PCI.

  4. Scanning image correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digman, Michelle A; Gratton, Enrico

    2012-05-01

    Molecular interactions are at the origin of life. How molecules get at different locations in the cell and how they locate their partners is a major and partially unresolved question in biology that is paramount to signaling. Spatio-temporal correlations of fluctuating fluorescently tagged molecules reveal how they move, interact, and bind in the different cellular compartments. Methods based on fluctuations represent a remarkable technical advancement in biological imaging. Here we discuss image analysis methods based on spatial and temporal correlation of fluctuations, raster image correlation spectroscopy, number and brightness, and spatial cross-correlations that give us information about how individual molecules move in cells and interact with partners at the single molecule level. These methods can be implemented with a standard laser scanning microscope and produce a cellular level spatio-temporal map of molecular interactions. Copyright © 2012 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  5. CT scans in encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imanishi, Masami; Morimoto, Tetsuya; Iida, Noriyuki; Hisanaga, Manabu; Kinugawa, Kazuhiko

    1980-01-01

    Generally, CT scans reveal a decrease in the volume of the ventricular system, sylvian fissures and cortical sulci in the acute stage of encephalitis, and softening of the cerebral lobes with dilatation of the lateral ventricles and subarachnoidian dilated spaces in the chronic stage. We encountered three cases of encephalitis: mumps (case 1), herpes simplex (case 2), and syphilis (case 3). In case 1, brain edema was seen in the acute stage and brain atrophy in the chronic stage. In case 2, necrosis of the temporal pole, which is pathognomonic in herpes simplex encephalitis, was recognized. And in case 3, multiple lesions whose CT appearance was enhanced by contrast materials were found scattered over the whole brain. These lesions were diagnosed as inflammatory granuloma by histological examination. (author)

  6. Functional connectivity analysis of the brain network using resting-state fMRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Toshihiro

    2011-01-01

    Spatial patterns of spontaneous fluctuations in blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals reflect the underlying neural architecture. The study of the brain network based on these self-organized patterns is termed resting-state functional MRI (fMRI). This review article aims at briefly reviewing a basic concept of this technology and discussing its implications for neuropsychological studies. First, the technical aspects of resting-state fMRI, including signal sources, physiological artifacts, image acquisition, and analytical methods such as seed-based correlation analysis and independent component analysis, are explained, followed by a discussion on the major resting-state networks, including the default mode network. In addition, the structure-function correlation studied using diffuse tensor imaging and resting-state fMRI is briefly discussed. Second, I have discussed the reservations and potential pitfalls of 2 major imaging methods: voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping and task fMRI. Problems encountered with voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping can be overcome by using resting-state fMRI and evaluating undamaged brain networks in patients. Regarding task fMRI in patients, I have also emphasized the importance of evaluating the baseline brain activity because the amplitude of activation in BOLD fMRI is hard to interpret as the same baseline cannot be assumed for both patient and normal groups. (author)

  7. Scanning device for scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casale, R.

    1975-01-01

    A device is described for the scintigraphic scanning according to a horizontal plane, comprising: (a) A support provided with two guides horizontally and longitudinally located, one of which is located in the upper part of the support, while the second guide is located in the lower part of the support; (b) A carriage, movable with respect to the support along the two guides, provided in its upper part, projecting above the support, with rolling means suitable to support and to cause to slide along its axis a support rod for the first detector, horizontally and transversely located, said carriage being further provided in its lower part with a recess with possible rolling means suitable to support and to cause to slide along its axis a second support rod for the second detector, said second rod being located parallel to the first rod and below it; (c) One or two support rods for the detectors, the first of said rods being supported above the support in a sliding way along its axis, by the rolling means located in the upper part of the carriage, and the second rod if present is supported slidingly along its axis by the possible rolling means contained in the suitable recess which is provided in the lower part of the carriage, and (d) A vertical shaft supported by said carriage on which is mounted a toothed wheel for each rod, each toothed wheel engaging a positive drive belt or the like, which is connected to each said rod so that rotation of the shaft determines the simultaneous displacement of the two rods along their axes; and single motor means for driving said shaft during a scanning operation. (U.S.)

  8. Language mapping using high gamma electrocorticography, fMRI, and TMS versus electrocortical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babajani-Feremi, Abbas; Narayana, Shalini; Rezaie, Roozbeh; Choudhri, Asim F; Fulton, Stephen P; Boop, Frederick A; Wheless, James W; Papanicolaou, Andrew C

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare localization of the language cortex using cortical stimulation mapping (CSM), high gamma electrocorticography (hgECoG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Language mapping using CSM, hgECoG, fMRI, and TMS were compared in nine patients with epilepsy. Considering CSM as reference, we compared language mapping approaches based on hgECoG, fMRI, and TMS using their sensitivity, specificity, and the results of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses. Our results show that areas involved in language processing can be identified by hgECoG, fMRI, and TMS. The average sensitivity/specificity of hgECoG, fMRI, and TMS across all patients was 100%/85%, 50%/80%, and 67%/66%, respectively. The average area under the ROC curve of hgECoG, fMRI, and TMS across CSM-positive patients was 0.98, 0.76, and 0.68, respectively. There is considerable concordance between CSM, hgECoG, fMRI, and TMS language mapping. Our results reveal that hgECoG, fMRI, and TMS are valuable tools for presurgical language mapping. Language mapping on the basis of hgECoG, fMRI, and TMS can provide important additional information, therefore, these methods can be used in conjunction with CSM or as an alternative, when the latter is deemed impractical. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Brain functional BOLD perturbation modelling for forward fMRI and inverse mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jennifer; Calhoun, Vince

    2018-01-01

    Purpose To computationally separate dynamic brain functional BOLD responses from static background in a brain functional activity for forward fMRI signal analysis and inverse mapping. Methods A brain functional activity is represented in terms of magnetic source by a perturbation model: χ = χ0 +δχ, with δχ for BOLD magnetic perturbations and χ0 for background. A brain fMRI experiment produces a timeseries of complex-valued images (T2* images), whereby we extract the BOLD phase signals (denoted by δP) by a complex division. By solving an inverse problem, we reconstruct the BOLD δχ dataset from the δP dataset, and the brain χ distribution from a (unwrapped) T2* phase image. Given a 4D dataset of task BOLD fMRI, we implement brain functional mapping by temporal correlation analysis. Results Through a high-field (7T) and high-resolution (0.5mm in plane) task fMRI experiment, we demonstrated in detail the BOLD perturbation model for fMRI phase signal separation (P + δP) and reconstructing intrinsic brain magnetic source (χ and δχ). We also provided to a low-field (3T) and low-resolution (2mm) task fMRI experiment in support of single-subject fMRI study. Our experiments show that the δχ-depicted functional map reveals bidirectional BOLD χ perturbations during the task performance. Conclusions The BOLD perturbation model allows us to separate fMRI phase signal (by complex division) and to perform inverse mapping for pure BOLD δχ reconstruction for intrinsic functional χ mapping. The full brain χ reconstruction (from unwrapped fMRI phase) provides a new brain tissue image that allows to scrutinize the brain tissue idiosyncrasy for the pure BOLD δχ response through an automatic function/structure co-localization. PMID:29351339

  10. Brain functional BOLD perturbation modelling for forward fMRI and inverse mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zikuan; Robinson, Jennifer; Calhoun, Vince

    2018-01-01

    To computationally separate dynamic brain functional BOLD responses from static background in a brain functional activity for forward fMRI signal analysis and inverse mapping. A brain functional activity is represented in terms of magnetic source by a perturbation model: χ = χ0 +δχ, with δχ for BOLD magnetic perturbations and χ0 for background. A brain fMRI experiment produces a timeseries of complex-valued images (T2* images), whereby we extract the BOLD phase signals (denoted by δP) by a complex division. By solving an inverse problem, we reconstruct the BOLD δχ dataset from the δP dataset, and the brain χ distribution from a (unwrapped) T2* phase image. Given a 4D dataset of task BOLD fMRI, we implement brain functional mapping by temporal correlation analysis. Through a high-field (7T) and high-resolution (0.5mm in plane) task fMRI experiment, we demonstrated in detail the BOLD perturbation model for fMRI phase signal separation (P + δP) and reconstructing intrinsic brain magnetic source (χ and δχ). We also provided to a low-field (3T) and low-resolution (2mm) task fMRI experiment in support of single-subject fMRI study. Our experiments show that the δχ-depicted functional map reveals bidirectional BOLD χ perturbations during the task performance. The BOLD perturbation model allows us to separate fMRI phase signal (by complex division) and to perform inverse mapping for pure BOLD δχ reconstruction for intrinsic functional χ mapping. The full brain χ reconstruction (from unwrapped fMRI phase) provides a new brain tissue image that allows to scrutinize the brain tissue idiosyncrasy for the pure BOLD δχ response through an automatic function/structure co-localization.

  11. Assessment of quality of life of patients who underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and a rehabilitation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moises Cohen

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Quality of life can be defined as the expression of aconceptual model that tries to represent patient’s perspectivesand his/her level of satisfaction expressed by numbers. Theobjective of this study is to evaluate the parameters of quality oflife of 23 patients who underwent surgery for anterior cruciateligament reconstruction. Methods: We adopted SF-36, a generichealth-related evaluation questionnaire, to obtain informationregarding several aspects of patients’ health conditions, and theLysholm questionnaire, specific to evaluate the symptoms andfunction of the knee. The questionnaires were applied at two stagesof the treatment: pre- and postoperatively (after the rehabilitationprogram. Results: Before surgery, the Lysholm questionnairepresented the following results: excellent in 4% of the cases, goodin 22%, fair in 22%, and poor in 52%. After surgery (Lysholm e SF-36 the correlation level was approximately 44% (p = 0.041.Discussion: The correlation between the Lysholm and the SF-36questionnaires showed the following: the lower the level of pain,the higher the Lysholm score. The high scores presented by theLysholm questionnaire are directly proportional to physical andemotional aspects, and to functional capacity. Conclusion:Analysis of both questionnaires, as well as of their correlation,showed some improvement in patients´ quality of life. We werealso able to demonstrate the importance and usefulness of applyingthe two questionnaires at three different moments: before, duringand after physiotherapeutic intervention.

  12. The effect of anxiety and depression scores of couples who underwent assisted reproductive techniques on the pregnancy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzioglu, Fusun; Turk, Rukiye; Yucel, Cigdem; Dilbaz, Serdar; Cinar, Ozgur; Karahalil, Bensu

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of anxiety and depression scores of couples who underwent Assisted Reproductive Techniques (ART) on pregnancy outcomes. This study was conducted as a prospective and comparative study with 217 couples. The study data was collected by using a semi-structured questionnaire and the Turkish version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The questionnaire, STAI and BDI were applied to couples who initiated ART treatment. Couples' state anxiety scores were re-evaluated after embryo transfer (ET). A significant relationship was found between the depression score of women and pregnancy outcome (p 0.05) and lower depression scores (p positive pregnancy outcome. Study results indicated that the anxiety and depression scores of couples who had achieved a positive pregnancy result were lower than for couples with a negative result. The results of this study will contribute to the health professionals especially to the nurses who spend the most time with couples in providing consulting services and supporting psychological status of couples during ART process in Turkey.

  13. The Effects of Functional Knee Brace on Postural Control in Patients Who Underwent Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salehi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The current study aimed to evaluate the postural control in patients underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction pre and post wearing functional knee brace. Methods Eighteen athletes undergone unilateral anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction included in the study. They had unilateral anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction at least six months before session test. Postural control was assessed pre and post wearing custom-fit functional knee brace using a posturographic platform prokin 254. The balance tests included: 1 standing on prokin platform with eyes open/closed on anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction limb, 2 standing on prokin platform with eyes open/closed on both limbs. The standard deviation (SD of body sway along the anteroposterior (AP and mediolateral (ML axis, mean velocity of center of pressure (COP along AP/ ML axis and the area ellipse (measured in 2 mm were calculated. Results Results of the paired T-test revealed a significant effect on selected postural control variables for the brace conditions especially in low challengeable conditions (double leg, eyes open test situations (P < 0.05. But in high challengeable conditions this effect was not significant. Conclusions Functional knee brace improved postural control in the simple balancing task in the subjects with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. But this improvement in more difficult balancing task was limited.

  14. The Effect of Prazosin and Oxybutynin on the Symptoms Due to Using Double J Catheter in Patients Underwent TUL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tavakkoli Tabassi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Double J catheter has been used for years as an independent practice or a part of other urological practices. Although these catheters have solved many patients’ problems but those can cause symptoms and problems for patients. The aim of this study was the investigation the effect of prazosin and oxybutynin on the degree of symptoms due to using Double J catheter. Methods: In this interventional study, patients who underwent TUL from July 2008 to march 2008 in the lithotripsy ward of Imam Reza hospital were entered to the study and randomly divided in 3 groups randomly. In the first group, placebo, in the second group, oxybutynin, in the third group prazosin were prescribed. Three weeks later standard questionnaire Ureteric Stent Symptom Questionnaire (USSQ was completed. After collecting data, was analyzed using SPSS software. Results: A total of 113 patients (70 men 43 women were included to the study. The mean age was 39 years. There were no significance difference among urinary symptoms score pain of body and physical activity problems in three groups (P>0.05, but there was a significant difference in general health and work problems among them (P<0.05. Conclusion: Oxybutynin caused a low effect on improvement of general health and work problems in patients who were studied. It might Prazosin does not has a sufficient time to affect on urinary symptoms, because of shortness of usage.

  15. Factors associated with late specialized rehabilitation among veterans with lower extremity amputation who underwent immediate postoperative rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurichi, Jibby E; Xie, Dawei; Kwong, Pui L; Bates, Barbara E; Vogel, W Bruce; Stineman, Margaret G

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine what patient- and facility-level characteristics drive late specialized rehabilitation among veterans who already received immediate postoperative services. Data were obtained from eight administrative databases for 2,453 patients who underwent lower limb amputation in Veterans Affairs Medical Centers in 2002-2004. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine the hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals of the factors associated with days to readmission for late services after discharge from surgical hospitalization. There were 2304 patients who received only immediate postoperative services, whereas 152 also received late specialized rehabilitation. After adjustment, veterans who were less disabled physically, residing in the South Central compared with the Southeast region, and had their surgeries in facilities accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities were all more likely to receive late services. The hazard ratios for type of immediate postoperative rehabilitation were not constant over time. At hospital discharge, there was no difference in receipt; however, after 3 mos, those who received early specialized rehabilitation were significantly less likely to receive late services. The factors associated with late specialized rehabilitation were due mainly to facility-level characteristics and care process variables. Knowledge of these factors may help with decision-making policies regarding units accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities.

  16. Carotid intima-media thickness and ınsulin resistance changes in patients who underwent sleeve gastrectomy: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorulmaz, G; Cilekar, M; Bilge, U; Akcan, E; Akalin, A

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to examine changes in insulin resistance, Carotid Intima-Media Thickness (CIMT), in morbid obese patients without any known associated chronic diseases who underwent sleeve gastrectomy. The subjects of this study were patients with minimum BMI of 40, who did not have any known chronic diseases. Sleeve gastrectomy was performed and perioperative control endoscopy was performed. The following values were measured before the operation and after follow-up period after the operation: Fasting blood glucose and insulin, lipid profile, BMI, liver function tests, right and left CIMT. Furthermore, the patients' insulin resistance was calculated by HOMA method, and the values of 2.7. Six-teen patients (14 women and 2 men, average age: 39.12 ± 10.63 years), who did not have a known additional chronic disease, took part in the study. There was a significant difference between baseline and follow-up values of the patients, and the mean weight loss was 20.5%. Given the statistical evaluation of baseline and follow-up values, there was a significant difference in BMI, insulin resistance rates and right and left CIMT values. Bariatric surgery may provide some additional advantages for the management of cardiovascular risks in obese patients. However, it should be kept in mind that the most important components of fight against obesity are appropriate diet and exercise programs.

  17. Anatomical location of metastatic lymph nodes: an indispensable prognostic factor for gastric cancer patients who underwent curative resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bochao; Zhang, Jingting; Zhang, Jiale; Chen, Xiuxiu; Chen, Junqing; Wang, Zhenning; Xu, Huimian; Huang, Baojun

    2018-02-01

    Although the numeric-based lymph node (LN) staging was widely used in the worldwide, it did not represent the anatomical location of metastatic lymph nodes (MLNs) and not reflect extent of LN dissection. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated whether the anatomical location of MLNs was still necessary to evaluate the prognosis of node-positive gastric cancer (GC) patients. We reviewed 1451 GC patients who underwent radical gastrectomy in our institution between January 1986 and January 2008. All patients were reclassified into several groups according to the anatomical location of MLNs and the number of MLNs. The prognostic differences between different patient groups were compared and clinicopathologic features were analyzed. In the present study, both anatomical location of MLNs and the number of MLNs were identified as the independent prognostic factors (p location of MLNs was considered (p location of MLNs had no significant effect on the prognosis of these patients, the higher number of MLNs in the extraperigastric area was correlated with the unfavorable prognosis (p location of MLNs was an important factor influencing the prognostic outcome of GC patients. To provide more accurate prognostic information for GC patients, the anatomical location of MLNs should not be ignored.

  18. Simple Fully Automated Group Classification on Brain fMRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honorio, J.; Goldstein, R.; Honorio, J.; Samaras, D.; Tomasi, D.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2010-04-14

    We propose a simple, well grounded classification technique which is suited for group classification on brain fMRI data sets that have high dimensionality, small number of subjects, high noise level, high subject variability, imperfect registration and capture subtle cognitive effects. We propose threshold-split region as a new feature selection method and majority voteas the classification technique. Our method does not require a predefined set of regions of interest. We use average acros ssessions, only one feature perexperimental condition, feature independence assumption, and simple classifiers. The seeming counter-intuitive approach of using a simple design is supported by signal processing and statistical theory. Experimental results in two block design data sets that capture brain function under distinct monetary rewards for cocaine addicted and control subjects, show that our method exhibits increased generalization accuracy compared to commonly used feature selection and classification techniques.

  19. Machine learning classifiers and fMRI: a tutorial overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Francisco; Mitchell, Tom; Botvinick, Matthew

    2009-03-01

    Interpreting brain image experiments requires analysis of complex, multivariate data. In recent years, one analysis approach that has grown in popularity is the use of machine learning algorithms to train classifiers to decode stimuli, mental states, behaviours and other variables of interest from fMRI data and thereby show the data contain information about them. In this tutorial overview we review some of the key choices faced in using this approach as well as how to derive statistically significant results, illustrating each point from a case study. Furthermore, we show how, in addition to answering the question of 'is there information about a variable of interest' (pattern discrimination), classifiers can be used to tackle other classes of question, namely 'where is the information' (pattern localization) and 'how is that information encoded' (pattern characterization).

  20. Unsupervised learning of brain states from fMRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janoos, F; Machiraju, R; Sammet, S; Knopp, M V; Mórocz, I A

    2010-01-01

    The use of multivariate pattern recognition for the analysis of neural representations encoded in fMRI data has become a significant research topic, with wide applications in neuroscience and psychology. A popular approach is to learn a mapping from the data to the observed behavior. However, identifying the instantaneous cognitive state without reference to external conditions is a relatively unexplored problem and could provide important insights into mental processes. In this paper, we present preliminary but promising results from the application of an unsupervised learning technique to identify distinct brain states. The temporal ordering of the states were seen to be synchronized with the experimental conditions, while the spatial distribution of activity in a state conformed with the expected functional recruitment.

  1. Simple Fully Automated Group Classification on Brain fMRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honorio, J.; Goldstein, R.; Samaras, D.; Tomasi, D.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a simple, well grounded classification technique which is suited for group classification on brain fMRI data sets that have high dimensionality, small number of subjects, high noise level, high subject variability, imperfect registration and capture subtle cognitive effects. We propose threshold-split region as a new feature selection method and majority voteas the classification technique. Our method does not require a predefined set of regions of interest. We use average acros ssessions, only one feature perexperimental condition, feature independence assumption, and simple classifiers. The seeming counter-intuitive approach of using a simple design is supported by signal processing and statistical theory. Experimental results in two block design data sets that capture brain function under distinct monetary rewards for cocaine addicted and control subjects, show that our method exhibits increased generalization accuracy compared to commonly used feature selection and classification techniques.

  2. Using real-time fMRI brain-computer interfacing to treat eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokunbi, Moses O

    2018-05-15

    Real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging based brain-computer interfacing (fMRI neurofeedback) has shown encouraging outcomes in the treatment of psychiatric and behavioural disorders. However, its use in the treatment of eating disorders is very limited. Here, we give a brief overview of how to design and implement fMRI neurofeedback intervention for the treatment of eating disorders, considering the basic and essential components. We also attempt to develop potential adaptations of fMRI neurofeedback intervention for the treatment of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Variational group-PCA for intrinsic dimensionality determination in fMRI data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinrich, Jesper Løve; Nielsen, Søren Føns Vind; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard

    2016-01-01

    Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is widely used to gain a better understanding of the human brain's functional organization. As fMRI data are high dimensional it is challenging to analyse using conventional methods thus low-rank approximations such as principal component analysis (PCA...... implementation using a graphical processing unit (GPU). We test the model on fMRI data from 29 healthy subjects performing a block-design fingertapping experiment. The model identified 10 active components. Neither variational Bayesian PCA on temporally concatenated data nor Group-BPCA, where uncertainties...

  4. Adaptation of a haptic robot in a 3T fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Joseph; Plank, Markus; May, Larry; Liu, Thomas T; Poizner, Howard

    2011-10-04

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides excellent functional brain imaging via the BOLD signal with advantages including non-ionizing radiation, millimeter spatial accuracy of anatomical and functional data, and nearly real-time analyses. Haptic robots provide precise measurement and control of position and force of a cursor in a reasonably confined space. Here we combine these two technologies to allow precision experiments involving motor control with haptic/tactile environment interaction such as reaching or grasping. The basic idea is to attach an 8 foot end effecter supported in the center to the robot allowing the subject to use the robot, but shielding it and keeping it out of the most extreme part of the magnetic field from the fMRI machine (Figure 1). The Phantom Premium 3.0, 6DoF, high-force robot (SensAble Technologies, Inc.) is an excellent choice for providing force-feedback in virtual reality experiments, but it is inherently non-MR safe, introduces significant noise to the sensitive fMRI equipment, and its electric motors may be affected by the fMRI's strongly varying magnetic field. We have constructed a table and shielding system that allows the robot to be safely introduced into the fMRI environment and limits both the degradation of the fMRI signal by the electrically noisy motors and the degradation of the electric motor performance by the strongly varying magnetic field of the fMRI. With the shield, the signal to noise ratio (SNR: mean signal/noise standard deviation) of the fMRI goes from a baseline of ~380 to ~330, and ~250 without the shielding. The remaining noise appears to be uncorrelated and does not add artifacts to the fMRI of a test sphere (Figure 2). The long, stiff handle allows placement of the robot out of range of the most strongly varying parts of the magnetic field so there is no significant effect of the fMRI on the robot. The effect of the handle on the robot's kinematics is minimal since it is lightweight (~2

  5. Cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuit abnormalities in obsessive-compulsive disorder: A voxel-based morphometric and fMRI study of the whole brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wenxin; Zhu, Qifeng; Gong, Xiangyang; Zhu, Cheng; Wang, Yiquan; Chen, Shulin

    2016-10-15

    The primary aim of this study was to identify structural and functional abnormalities in the brains of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) patients. Another aim was to assess the effect of serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on brain structure of OCD patients. All subjects underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and resting functional MRI (fMRI). High-resolution three-dimensional images were processed using the voxel-based morphometry (VBM) method. The final analysis included 18 OCD patients and 16 healthy controls. In the OCD patients there was a decrease in gray matter volume in the bilateral cingulate cortex and bilateral striatum. In some cortical structures including the cerebellar anterior lobe, left orbital frontal gyrus, right middle frontal gyrus, left middle temporal gyrus, precentral gyrus, and postcentral gyrus, there was an increase in gray matter volume. On fMRI the OCD patients had overactivation of the right cerebellum and right parietal lobe and reduced activation of the left cingulate gyrus, putamen, and caudate nucleus. Eleven OCD patients who improved during 12 weeks of drug treatment with sertraline hydrochloride had a significant increase in gray matter volume in several brain structures but no significant differences were found on resting fMRI. The results indicated a consistent trend between structural and functional images. Higher cortical structures showed increased gray matter volume and increased activation as did the cerebellum whereas subcortical structures showed decreased gray matter volume and decreased activation. And brain structure improvement consisted with symptom improvement after SSRIs treatment in OCD patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical and echocardiographic findings of patients with suspected acute pulmonary thromboembolism who underwent computed tomography pulmonary angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adibi, Atoosa; Nouri, Shadi; Moradi, Maryam; Shahabi, Javad

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to determine the correlation between clinical and echocardiographic findings and risk factors of patients with suspected acute pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) who underwent computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA). Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 310 hospitalized patients aged >18 years with high clinical suspicion of PTE referred to imaging center of our hospital from different wards for CTPA were enrolled. The frequency of different clinical presentations, risk factors, items of Wells’ criteria, and echocardiographic findings was compared in patients with and without PTE, which have been diagnosed according to the CTPA results. Results: PTE was diagnosed in 53 (17.1%) of patients with suspected PTE. From clinical manifestations, tachypnea, pleuritic chest pain, and edema of lower extremities were significantly more frequent among patients with PTE (P < 0.05). Major surgery was the risk factor which was significantly more prevalent among patients with PTE (P < 0.05). Frequency of all criteria of Wells’ criteria, except hemoptysis, was significantly higher in patients with PTE (P < 0.05). The frequency of all studied echocardiographic variables was significantly higher in patients with PTE (P < 0.05). Conclusion: It is suggested that we could use the results of this study for utilizing the diagnostic process of PTE in patients with highly clinical suspicion of PTE and providing more validated decision. Using the results of this study, we could identify high-risk patients and made appropriate risk assessment for better management of patients with suspected PTE as well as reduce the rate of unnecessary CTPA and its related adverse consequences. PMID:28255326

  7. The effects of transfusion of irradiated blood upon cellular immune response in patients underwent open heart surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Togashi, Ken-ichi; Nakazawa, Satoshi; Moro, Hisanaga; Yazawa, Masatomo; Kanazawa, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Jun-ichi; Yamazaki, Yoshihiko; Eguchi, Shoji

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the effect of the transfusion of blood received 1500 rad exposure upon the immune response in 14 patients underwent various type of cardiac surgery. 13 patients received known amounts banked blood and irradiated fresh blood, while one patient received a lot of amounts of banked and irradiated and non-irradiated fresh blood. The authors studied the numbers of lymphocytes as well as lymphocyte subsets such as pan-T cells, B cells, helper/inducer T cells (T H/I ), cytotoxic/supressor T cells (T C/S ), active T cells, natural killer (NK) cells and NK cell activity during two weeks after surgeries. In all 14 patients, pan-T lymphocytes decreased markedly in a few days after surgeries, but increased to higher levels on the eight postoperative day than the levels preoperatively. T H/I and T C/S lymphocytes changed on the similar pattern as pan-T lymphocytes. Active T and B cells did not change significantly in two weeks. The number and activity of NK cells gave the lowest levels on the second postoperative day and did not recovery to the preoperative levels in two weeks. One patient received non-irradiated fresh blood showed the similar immune response as other 13 patients, while he gave the lower levels than others did. This patient died of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)-like syndrome on the 36th postoperative day. It may be thought that the transfusion of irradiated blood would prevent the host from GVHD and gave the better effects on the immune response than that of non-irradiated blood following open-heart surgeries. (author)

  8. Clinical and echocardiographic findings of patients with suspected acute pulmonary thromboembolism who underwent computed tomography pulmonary angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atoosa Adibi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the study was to determine the correlation between clinical and echocardiographic findings and risk factors of patients with suspected acute pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE who underwent computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 310 hospitalized patients aged >18 years with high clinical suspicion of PTE referred to imaging center of our hospital from different wards for CTPA were enrolled. The frequency of different clinical presentations, risk factors, items of Wells' criteria, and echocardiographic findings was compared in patients with and without PTE, which have been diagnosed according to the CTPA results. Results: PTE was diagnosed in 53 (17.1% of patients with suspected PTE. From clinical manifestations, tachypnea, pleuritic chest pain, and edema of lower extremities were significantly more frequent among patients with PTE (P < 0.05. Major surgery was the risk factor which was significantly more prevalent among patients with PTE (P < 0.05. Frequency of all criteria of Wells' criteria, except hemoptysis, was significantly higher in patients with PTE (P < 0.05. The frequency of all studied echocardiographic variables was significantly higher in patients with PTE (P < 0.05. Conclusion: It is suggested that we could use the results of this study for utilizing the diagnostic process of PTE in patients with highly clinical suspicion of PTE and providing more validated decision. Using the results of this study, we could identify high-risk patients and made appropriate risk assessment for better management of patients with suspected PTE as well as reduce the rate of unnecessary CTPA and its related adverse consequences.

  9. Early prediction of treatment response by serum CRP levels in patients with advanced esophageal cancer who underwent definitive chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneda, Masayuki; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Okamura, Shinichi

    2010-01-01

    Serum C reactive protein (CRP) has been shown to be associated with the progression of esophageal cancer. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between treatment response and serum CRP levels in time course during definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in terms of early prediction of CRT response by serum CRP. The subjects of this study were 36 patients with cT3/cT4 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma who underwent definitive CRT in our hospital. Serum CRP levels during definitive CRT (pretreatment, 1W, 2W and 3W after CRT initiation) were compared between CR and non-CR group. In addition, partition model was constructed to discriminate CR with non-CR and the prediction accuracy was evaluated. The patients were consisted of 28 males and 8 females. At pretreatment diagnosis, tumors were categorized as T3 (n=21) and T4 (n=15). Thirty four patients received FP-based chemotherapy and 2 patients received docetaxel-based chemotherapy. Treatment responses were categorized as CR (n=8), partial response (PR) (n=14), no change (NC) (n=2) and progressive disease (PD) (n=12). Serum CRP levels at the time of 2W after CRT initiation (CRT2W) in CR group were low compared to those in non-CR group (p=0.071). The partition model was constructed based on CRP levels at CRT2W. The prediction accuracies to discriminate CR from non-CR by CRP ≤0.1 were 50%, 82%, and 75% in sensitivity, specificity and accuracy, respectively. Serum CRP is a useful biomarker for an early prediction of CRT response. (author)

  10. Preoperative evaluation of myocardial viability by thallium-201 imaging in patients with old myocardial infarction who underwent coronary revascularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naruse, Hitoshi; Ohyanagi, Mitsumasa; Iwasaki, Tadaaki; Miyamoto, Takashi; Fukuchi, Minoru

    1992-01-01

    The myocardial uptake and redistribution in thallium scintigraphy and the regional wall motion by echocardiography were evaluated by a semi-quantitative method in 42 patients who previously had myocardial infarction (50 target vessels) and underwent coronary revascularization. The aim of this study was to elucidate the significance of the initial image, delayed image and redistribution on thallium-201 scintigraphy for clinical diagnosis of the myocardial viability. As a semi-quantitative analysis, we used a bull's-eye display for thallium image and centerline method for echocardiographic wall motion, and compared the results before and after revascularization. As a result, the thallium grade improved postoperatively in all 17 areas which preoperatively had showed redistribution, and also in 11 of the 32 areas without preoperative redistribution. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of preoperative thallium redistribution for predicting myocardial viability were 61%, 100% and 78%, respectively, when the postoperative improvement in the thallium grade was used as the standard. The postoperative probability of improvement in the thallium grade increased in proportion to the preoperative grade (delayed image)(p<0.01). There was no correlation between the preoperative thallium delayed image and postoperative improvement in wall motion. Postoperative improvement in thallium image and wall motion could not be predicted from the preoperative wall motion. Thus, postoperative improvement in thallium images can be anticipated if redistribution is present on the preoperative thallium image, and the preoperative thallium delayed image is useful for predicting myocardial viability. Improvement in wall motion could not be predicted preoperatively by these methods. (author)

  11. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Orientation to Pain, and Pain Perception in Ex-Prisoners of War Who Underwent Torture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsur, Noga; Defrin, Ruth; Ginzburg, Karni

    Studies suggest that torture survivors often experience long-term chronic pain and increased pain perception. However, it is unclear whether the actual experience of torture or rather the subsequent posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) explains these pain problems. Furthermore, although catastrophic and fearful orientations to pain have been suggested to play a significant role in the association between trauma and pain, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. This study examined whether chronic pain and pain perception among torture survivors are associated with torture experience or PTSD and whether catastrophic and fearful orientations mediate or moderate these associations. Fifty-nine ex-prisoners of war who underwent torture and 44 matched veterans participated in this study. Pain perception was evaluated by assessing pain threshold and reactivity to experimental suprathreshold noxious stimuli. Participants completed self-administered questionnaires assessing PTSD, chronic pain, pain catastrophizing, and fear of pain. Although chronic pain was associated with PTSD (0.44 < β < 0.49, p < .002), increased pain perception was correlated with torture (0.33 < β < 0.65, p < .05). Pain catastrophizing was found to mediate the association between PTSD and chronic pain (β = 0.18 and 0.19, respectively; p < .05). Fear of pain moderated the association between torture and pain perception (β = 0.41 and 0.42, respectively; p < .017). The findings suggest that chronic pain is contingent upon the psychological toll of torture, that is, PTSD. This study also indicates that PTSD exacerbates catastrophic orientation, which in turn may amplify chronic pain. Reactivity to experimental noxious stimuli was related to previous experiences of torture, which enhances perceived pain intensity when interacting with a fearful pain orientation. These findings highlight the significance of orientation to bodily experiences after trauma.

  12. CA-125–indicated asymptomatic relapse confers survival benefit to ovarian cancer patients who underwent secondary cytoreduction surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Fang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is no consensus regarding the management of ovarian cancer patients, who have shown complete clinical response (CCR to primary therapy and have rising cancer antigen CA-125 levels but have no symptoms of recurrent disease. The present study aims to determine whether follow-up CA-125 levels can be used to identify the need for imaging studies and secondary cytoreductive surgery (CRS. Methods We identified 410 ovarian cancer patients treated at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center between 1984 and 2011. These patients had shown CCR to primary therapy. Follow-up was conducted based on the surveillance protocol of the MD Anderson Cancer Center. We used the Cox proportional hazards model and log-rank test to assess the associations between the follow-up CA-125 levels and secondary CRS and survival duration. Results The CA-125 level of 1.68 × nadir was defined as the indicator of recurrent disease (p  1.68 × nadir at relapse (55.7 and 10.4 months; p = 0.04 and 0.01, respectively. The overall and progression free survival duration of patients with asymptomatic relapse and underwent a secondary CRS was longer than that of patients with symptomatic relapse (p = 0.02 and 0.04 respectively. Conclusions The increase of serum CA-125 levels is an early warning of clinical relapse in ovarian cancer. Using CA-125 levels in guiding the treatment of patients with asymptomatic recurrent ovarian cancer, who have shown CCR to primary therapy, can facilitate optimal secondary CRS and extend the survival duration of the patients.

  13. Periodical assessment of genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity in patients who underwent prostate low-dose-rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Nobumichi; Asakawa, Isao; Anai, Satoshi; Hirayama, Akihide; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Konishi, Noboru; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

    2013-01-01

    To compare the periodical incidence rates of genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in patients who underwent prostate low-dose-rate brachytherapy between the monotherapy group (seed implantation alone) and the boost group (in combination with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT)). A total of 218 patients with a median follow-up of 42.5 months were enrolled. The patients were divided into 2 groups by treatment modality, namely, the monotherapy group (155 patients) and the boost group (63 patients). The periodical incidence rates of GU and GI toxicity were separately evaluated and compared between the monotherapy group and the boost group using the National Cancer Institute - Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. To elucidate an independent factor among clinical and postdosimetric parameters to predict grade 2 or higher GU and GI toxicity in the acute and late phases, univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were carried out. Of all patients, 78.0% showed acute GU toxicity, and 7.8% showed acute GI toxicity, while 63.8% showed late GU toxicity, and 21.1% showed late GI toxicity. The incidence rates of late GU and GI toxicity were significantly higher in the boost group. Multivariate analysis showed that the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) before seed implantation was a significant parameter to predict acute GU toxicity, while there were no significant predictive parameters for acute GI toxicity. On the other hand, combination with EBRT was a significant predictive parameter for late GU toxicity, and rectal volume (mL) receiving 100% of the prescribed dose (R100) was a significant predictive parameter for late GI toxicity. The boost group showed higher incidence rates of both GU and GI toxicity. Higher IPSS before seed implantation, combination with EBRT and a higher R100 were significant predictors for acute GU, late GU and late GI toxicity

  14. Comparison of quality of life between men and women who underwent Transforaminal Percutaneous Endoscopic Discectomy for lumbar disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Gkasdaris, Grigorios; Thomaidis, Tryfon; Charitoudis, Georgios; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    Studies describing the efficacy of TPED on shortness of recovery and improvement of postoperative quality of life are limited, especially regarding gender something that has never been reported before in the literature. The purpose of this study is to evaluate possible differences of the health-related quality of life in patients who underwent TPED for LDH in accordance with sex. Seventy-six patients diagnosed and treated with TPED for LDH with 1 year follow-up were selected and divided into two groups of equal number depending on sex. Their quality of life was evaluated by using the SF-36 before the operation, six weeks, three, six and twelve months postoperatively. A statistical analysis was conducted, in order to compare the 8 scaled scores of the SF-36 combining each time two chronological phases in the total of patients, in each group and between groups. Fifty-two (68.4%) patients were ≤63 years old, while the rest 24 (31,4%) were >63 years old (mean ±SD = 56,5 ±12,1 years). Apart from the PF domain, the scores were higher in every visit for the two groups, but the change between groups was not significant. Women had a significantly higher increase of PF score in 3 months after TPED and in the interval 6 weeks-3 months comparing with men. However, in the intervals 3 months-6 months and 3 months-12 months men presented significantly higher increase compared to women. Statistically significant improvement of the quality of life for both men and women was observed. Generally, there was no significant difference between the two groups. As regards to the physical functioning, it appears to be a significant difference which is counterpoised over time. 2. TPED for LDH does not present major differences in the improvement of quality of life regarding gender.

  15. Multibeam bidirectional raster scanning in retinal scanning displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Karlton D.; Urey, Hakan; Bayer, Mircea M.

    2001-08-01

    A Retinal Scanning Display (RSD) utilizes scanning mirrors and optics to produce a flying spot that forms a raster image directly on the retina of the eye. A high-frequency resonant horizontal scanner and a linear ramp vertical scanner function together to produce video typically at a 60Hz frame rate. Although the raster can be formed by Unidirectional Writing (using only the forward half-period of the horizontal scan function) and one flying spot, it is desirable to achieve Bidirectional Writing (utilizing the full period of the Horizontal scan function) with multiple scanned spots for the purpose of increased efficiency of the display with a limited horizontal scanner frequency. This paper will look at the limitations and requirements for the scanning functions to make this possible.

  16. The Difference between Aesthetic Appreciation of Artistic and Popular Music: Evidence from an fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qiuling; Mo, Lei

    2016-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that pleasure from artistic music is intellectual while that from popular music is physiological, this study investigated the different functional mechanisms between aesthetic appreciation of artistic and popular music using fMRI. 18 male non-musicians were scanned while they performed an aesthetic rating task for excerpts of artistic music, popular music and musical notes playing and singing (control). The rating scores of artistic and popular music excerpts were both significantly higher than that of control materials while the scores of them were not different. The fMRI results showed both artistic and popular conditions activated the VS and vmPFC, compared with control condition. When contrasted popular and artistic condition directly, we found popular music activated right putamen, while artistic music activated right mPFC. By parametric analysis, we found the activation of right putamen tracked the aesthetic ratings of popular music, whereas the BOLD signal in right mPFC tracked the aesthetic ratings of artistic music. These results indicate the reward induced by popular music is closer to a primary reward while that induced by artistic music is closer to a secondary reward. We also found artistic music activated ToM areas, including PCC/PC, arMFC and TPJ, when compared with popular music. And these areas also tracked aesthetic ratings of artistic music but not those of popular music. These results imply that the pleasure from former comes from cognitive empathy. In conclusion, this study gives clear neuronal evidences supporting the view that artistic music is of intelligence and social cognition involved while the popular music is of physiology. PMID:27814379

  17. Functional changes in people with different hearing status and experiences of using Chinese sign language: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Xia, Shuang; Zhao, Fei; Qi, Ji

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess functional changes in the cerebral cortex in people with different sign language experience and hearing status whilst observing and imitating Chinese Sign Language (CSL) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). 50 participants took part in the study, and were divided into four groups according to their hearing status and experience of using sign language: prelingual deafness signer group (PDS), normal hearing non-signer group (HnS), native signer group with normal hearing (HNS), and acquired signer group with normal hearing (HLS). fMRI images were scanned from all subjects when they performed block-designed tasks that involved observing and imitating sign language stimuli. Nine activation areas were found in response to undertaking either observation or imitation CSL tasks and three activated areas were found only when undertaking the imitation task. Of those, the PDS group had significantly greater activation areas in terms of the cluster size of the activated voxels in the bilateral superior parietal lobule, cuneate lobe and lingual gyrus in response to undertaking either the observation or the imitation CSL task than the HnS, HNS and HLS groups. The PDS group also showed significantly greater activation in the bilateral inferior frontal gyrus which was also found in the HNS or the HLS groups but not in the HnS group. This indicates that deaf signers have better sign language proficiency, because they engage more actively with the phonetic and semantic elements. In addition, the activations of the bilateral superior temporal gyrus and inferior parietal lobule were only found in the PDS group and HNS group, and not in the other two groups, which indicates that the area for sign language processing appears to be sensitive to the age of language acquisition. After reading this article, readers will be able to: discuss the relationship between sign language and its neural mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc

  18. The Difference between Aesthetic Appreciation of Artistic and Popular Music: Evidence from an fMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ping; Huang, Hanhua; Luo, Qiuling; Mo, Lei

    2016-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that pleasure from artistic music is intellectual while that from popular music is physiological, this study investigated the different functional mechanisms between aesthetic appreciation of artistic and popular music using fMRI. 18 male non-musicians were scanned while they performed an aesthetic rating task for excerpts of artistic music, popular music and musical notes playing and singing (control). The rating scores of artistic and popular music excerpts were both significantly higher than that of control materials while the scores of them were not different. The fMRI results showed both artistic and popular conditions activated the VS and vmPFC, compared with control condition. When contrasted popular and artistic condition directly, we found popular music activated right putamen, while artistic music activated right mPFC. By parametric analysis, we found the activation of right putamen tracked the aesthetic ratings of popular music, whereas the BOLD signal in right mPFC tracked the aesthetic ratings of artistic music. These results indicate the reward induced by popular music is closer to a primary reward while that induced by artistic music is closer to a secondary reward. We also found artistic music activated ToM areas, including PCC/PC, arMFC and TPJ, when compared with popular music. And these areas also tracked aesthetic ratings of artistic music but not those of popular music. These results imply that the pleasure from former comes from cognitive empathy. In conclusion, this study gives clear neuronal evidences supporting the view that artistic music is of intelligence and social cognition involved while the popular music is of physiology.

  19. Use of Bone Scan During Initial Prostate Cancer Workup, Downstream Procedures, and Associated Medicare Costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falchook, Aaron D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Salloum, Ramzi G. [Department of Health Services Policy and Management, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina (United States); Hendrix, Laura H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Chen, Ronald C., E-mail: ronald_chen@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: For patients with a high likelihood of having metastatic disease (high-risk prostate cancer), bone scan is the standard, guideline-recommended test to look for bony metastasis. We quantified the use of bone scans and downstream procedures, along with associated costs, in patients with high-risk prostate cancer, and their use in low- and intermediate-risk patients for whom these tests are not recommended. Methods and Materials: Patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database diagnosed with prostate cancer from 2004 to 2007 were included. Prostate specific antigen (PSA), Gleason score, and clinical T stage were used to define D'Amico risk categories. We report use of bone scans from the date of diagnosis to the earlier of treatment or 6 months. In patients who underwent bone scans, we report use of bone-specific x-ray, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, and bone biopsy within 3 months after bone scan. Costs were estimated using 2012 Medicare reimbursement rates. Results: In all, 31% and 48% of patients with apparent low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer underwent a bone scan; of these patients, 21% underwent subsequent x-rays, 7% CT, and 3% MRI scans. Bone biopsies were uncommon. Overall, <1% of low- and intermediate-risk patients were found to have metastatic disease. The annual estimated Medicare cost for bone scans and downstream procedures was $11,300,000 for low- and intermediate-risk patients. For patients with apparent high-risk disease, only 62% received a bone scan, of whom 14% were found to have metastasis. Conclusions: There is overuse of bone scans in patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancers, which is unlikely to yield clinically actionable information and results in a potential Medicare waste. However, there is underuse of bone scans in high-risk patients for whom metastasis is likely.

  20. GPR scan assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas M. Abbas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mekaad Radwan monument is situated in the neighborhood of Bab Zuweila in the historical Cairo, Egypt. It was constructed at the middle XVII century (1635 AD. The building has a rectangle shape plan (13 × 6 m with the longitudinal sides approximately WNW-ESE. It comprises three storages namely; the ground floor; the opened floor (RADWAN Bench and the living floor with a total elevation of 15 m above the street level. The building suffers from severe deterioration phenomena with patterns of damage which have occurred over time. These deterioration and damages could be attributed to foundation problems, subsoil water and also to the earthquake that affected the entire Greater Cairo area in October 1992. Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR scan was accomplished against the walls of the opened floor (RADWAN Bench to evaluate the hazard impact on the walls textures and integrity. The results showed an anomalous feature through the southern wall of RADWAN Bench. A mathematical model has been simulated to confirm the obtained anomaly and the model response exhibited a good matching with the outlined anomaly.

  1. Gastrointestinal scanning agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, M.D.

    1980-01-01

    An easily prepared radiolabeled gastrointestinal scanning agent is described. Technetium-99m has ideal characteristics for imaging the upper and lower GI tract and determining stomach emptying and intestinal transit time when used with an insoluble particulate material. For example, crystalline and amorphous calcium phosphate particles can be effectively labeled in a one-step process using sup(99m)TcO 4 and SnCl 2 . These labeled particles have insignificant mass and when administered orally pass through the GI tract unchanged, without affecting the handling and density of the intestinal contents. Visualization of the esophageal entry into the stomach, the greater and lesser curvatures of the stomach, ejection into the duodenum, and rates of passage through the upper and lower GI tract are obtained. The slurry of sup(99m)TC particulate can be given rectally by enema. Good images of the cecum and the ascending, transverse, and descending colon are obtained. Mucosal folds and the splenic and hepatic flexures are visualized. The resilience of the large intestine is also readily visualized by pneumocolonographic techniques. (author)

  2. Radionuclide brain scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Dayem, H.

    1992-01-01

    At one stage of medical imaging development, radionuclide brain scanning was the only technique available for imaging of the brain. Advent of CT and MRI pushed it to the background. It regained some of the grounds lost to ''allied advances'' with the introduction of brain perfusion radiopharmaceuticals. Positron emission tomography is a promising functional imaging modality that at present will remain as a research tool in special centres in developed countries. However, clinically useful developments will gradually percolate from PET to SPECT. The non-nuclear imaging methods are totally instrument dependent; they are somewhat like escalators, which can go that far and no further. Nuclear imaging has an unlimited scope for advance because of the new developments in radiopharmaceuticals. As the introduction of a radiopharmaceutical is less costly than buying new instruments, the recent advances in nuclear imaging are gradually perfusing through the developing countries also. Therefore, it is essential to follow very closely PET developments because what is research today might become routine tomorrow

  3. LANL Robotic Vessel Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, Nels W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory in J-1 DARHT Operations Group uses 6ft spherical vessels to contain hazardous materials produced in a hydrodynamic experiment. These contaminated vessels must be analyzed by means of a worker entering the vessel to locate, measure, and document every penetration mark on the vessel. If the worker can be replaced by a highly automated robotic system with a high precision scanner, it will eliminate the risks to the worker and provide management with an accurate 3D model of the vessel presenting the existing damage with the flexibility to manipulate the model for better and more in-depth assessment.The project was successful in meeting the primary goal of installing an automated system which scanned a 6ft vessel with an elapsed time of 45 minutes. This robotic system reduces the total time for the original scope of work by 75 minutes and results in excellent data accumulation and transmission to the 3D model imaging program.

  4. Altered processing of rewarding and aversive basic taste stimuli in symptomatic women with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: An fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, Alessio Maria; Monteleone, Palmiero; Esposito, Fabrizio; Prinster, Anna; Volpe, Umberto; Cantone, Elena; Pellegrino, Francesca; Canna, Antonietta; Milano, Walter; Aiello, Marco; Di Salle, Francesco; Maj, Mario

    2017-07-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have displayed a dysregulation in the way in which the brain processes pleasant taste stimuli in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). However, exactly how the brain processes disgusting basic taste stimuli has never been investigated, even though disgust plays a role in food intake modulation and AN and BN patients exhibit high disgust sensitivity. Therefore, we investigated the activation of brain areas following the administration of pleasant and aversive basic taste stimuli in symptomatic AN and BN patients compared to healthy subjects. Twenty underweight AN women, 20 symptomatic BN women and 20 healthy women underwent fMRI while tasting 0.292 M sucrose solution (sweet taste), 0.5 mM quinine hydrochloride solution (bitter taste) and water as a reference taste. In symptomatic AN and BN patients the pleasant sweet stimulus induced a higher activation in several brain areas than that induced by the aversive bitter taste. The opposite occurred in healthy controls. Moreover, compared to healthy controls, AN patients showed a decreased response to the bitter stimulus in the right amygdala and left anterior cingulate cortex, while BN patients showed a decreased response to the bitter stimulus in the right amygdala and left insula. These results show an altered processing of rewarding and aversive taste stimuli in ED patients, which may be relevant for understanding the pathophysiology of AN and BN. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The effect of hippocampal function, volume and connectivity on posterior cingulate cortex functioning during episodic memory fMRI in mild cognitive impairment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papma, Janne M.; Koudstaal, Peter J.; Swieten, John C. van [Erasmus MC - University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Neurology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Smits, Marion; Lugt, Aad van der [Erasmus MC - University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Groot, Marius de; Vrooman, Henri A. [Erasmus MC - University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC - University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Medical Informatics, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Mattace Raso, Francesco U. [Erasmus MC - University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Geriatrics, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Niessen, Wiro J. [Erasmus MC - University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC - University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Medical Informatics, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft (Netherlands); Veen, Frederik M. van der [Erasmus University Rotterdam, Institute of Psychology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Prins, Niels D. [VU University Medical Center, Alzheimer Center, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-09-15

    Diminished function of the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) is a typical finding in early Alzheimer's disease (AD). It is hypothesized that in early stage AD, PCC functioning relates to or reflects hippocampal dysfunction or atrophy. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between hippocampus function, volume and structural connectivity, and PCC activation during an episodic memory task-related fMRI study in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). MCI patients (n = 27) underwent episodic memory task-related fMRI, 3D-T1w MRI, 2D T2-FLAIR MRI and diffusion tensor imaging. Stepwise linear regression analysis was performed to examine the relationship between PCC activation and hippocampal activation, hippocampal volume and diffusion measures within the cingulum along the hippocampus. We found a significant relationship between PCC and hippocampus activation during successful episodic memory encoding and correct recognition in MCI patients. We found no relationship between the PCC and structural hippocampal predictors. Our results indicate a relationship between PCC and hippocampus activation during episodic memory engagement in MCI. This may suggest that during episodic memory, functional network deterioration is the most important predictor of PCC functioning in MCI. (orig.)

  6. Menopause-related brain activation patterns during visual sexual arousal in menopausal women: An fMRI pilot study using time-course analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gwang-Won; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2017-02-20

    The aging process and menopausal transition are important factors in sexual dysfunction of menopausal women. No neuroimaging study has assessed the age- and menopause-related changes on brain activation areas associated with sexual arousal in menopausal women. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the time course of regional brain activity associated with sexual arousal evoked by visual stimulation in premenopausal and menopausal women, and further to assess the effect of menopause on the brain areas associated with sexual arousal in menopausal women using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Thirty volunteers consisting of 15 premenopausal and 15 menopausal women underwent the fMRI. For the activation condition, volunteers viewed sexually arousing visual stimulation. The brain areas with significantly higher activation in premenopausal women compared with menopausal women included the thalamus, amygdala, and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) using analysis of covariance adjusting for age (pchanges in the amygdala while viewing erotic video were positively correlated with estrogen levels in the two groups. Our findings suggest that reduced brain activity of the thalamus, amygdala, and ACC in menopausal women may be associated with menopause-related decrease in sexual arousal. These findings might help elucidate the neural mechanisms associated with sexual dysfunction in menopausal women. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of hippocampal function, volume and connectivity on posterior cingulate cortex functioning during episodic memory fMRI in mild cognitive impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papma, Janne M.; Koudstaal, Peter J.; Swieten, John C. van; Smits, Marion; Lugt, Aad van der; Groot, Marius de; Vrooman, Henri A.; Mattace Raso, Francesco U.; Niessen, Wiro J.; Veen, Frederik M. van der; Prins, Niels D.

    2017-01-01

    Diminished function of the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) is a typical finding in early Alzheimer's disease (AD). It is hypothesized that in early stage AD, PCC functioning relates to or reflects hippocampal dysfunction or atrophy. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between hippocampus function, volume and structural connectivity, and PCC activation during an episodic memory task-related fMRI study in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). MCI patients (n = 27) underwent episodic memory task-related fMRI, 3D-T1w MRI, 2D T2-FLAIR MRI and diffusion tensor imaging. Stepwise linear regression analysis was performed to examine the relationship between PCC activation and hippocampal activation, hippocampal volume and diffusion measures within the cingulum along the hippocampus. We found a significant relationship between PCC and hippocampus activation during successful episodic memory encoding and correct recognition in MCI patients. We found no relationship between the PCC and structural hippocampal predictors. Our results indicate a relationship between PCC and hippocampus activation during episodic memory engagement in MCI. This may suggest that during episodic memory, functional network deterioration is the most important predictor of PCC functioning in MCI. (orig.)

  8. The effect of hippocampal function, volume and connectivity on posterior cingulate cortex functioning during episodic memory fMRI in mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papma, Janne M; Smits, Marion; de Groot, Marius; Mattace Raso, Francesco U; van der Lugt, Aad; Vrooman, Henri A; Niessen, Wiro J; Koudstaal, Peter J; van Swieten, John C; van der Veen, Frederik M; Prins, Niels D

    2017-09-01

    Diminished function of the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) is a typical finding in early Alzheimer's disease (AD). It is hypothesized that in early stage AD, PCC functioning relates to or reflects hippocampal dysfunction or atrophy. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between hippocampus function, volume and structural connectivity, and PCC activation during an episodic memory task-related fMRI study in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). MCI patients (n = 27) underwent episodic memory task-related fMRI, 3D-T1w MRI, 2D T2-FLAIR MRI and diffusion tensor imaging. Stepwise linear regression analysis was performed to examine the relationship between PCC activation and hippocampal activation, hippocampal volume and diffusion measures within the cingulum along the hippocampus. We found a significant relationship between PCC and hippocampus activation during successful episodic memory encoding and correct recognition in MCI patients. We found no relationship between the PCC and structural hippocampal predictors. Our results indicate a relationship between PCC and hippocampus activation during episodic memory engagement in MCI. This may suggest that during episodic memory, functional network deterioration is the most important predictor of PCC functioning in MCI. • PCC functioning during episodic memory relates to hippocampal functioning in MCI. • PCC functioning during episodic memory does not relate to hippocampal structure in MCI. • Functional network changes are an important predictor of PCC functioning in MCI.

  9. Trial timing and pattern-information analyses of fMRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeithamova, Dagmar; de Araujo Sanchez, Maria-Alejandra; Adke, Anisha

    2017-06-01

    Pattern-information approaches to fMRI data analysis are becoming increasingly popular but few studies to date have investigated experimental design optimization for these analyses. Here, we tested several designs that varied in the number of trials and trial timing within fixed duration scans while participants encoded images of animals and tools. Trial timing conditions with fixed onset-to-onset timing ranged from slow 12-s trials with two repetitions of each item to quick 6-s trials with four repetitions per item. We also tested a jittered version of the quick design with 4-8s trials. We assessed the effect of trial timing on three dependent measures: category-level (animals vs. tools) decoding accuracy using a multivoxel pattern analysis, item-level (e.g., cat vs. dog vs. lion) information estimates using pattern similarity analysis, and memory effects comparing pattern similarity scores across repetitions of individual items subsequently remembered vs. forgotten. For single trial estimates, category decoding was equal across all trial timing conditions while item-level information and memory effects were better detected using slow trial timing. When modeling events on an item-by-item basis across all repetitions of a given item, a larger number of quick, regularly spaced trials provided an advantage over fewer slow trials for category decoding while item-level information was comparable across conditions. Jittered and non-jittered versions of the quick trial timing did not differ significantly in any analysis. These results will help inform experimental design choices in future studies planning to employ pattern-information analyses and demonstrate that design optimization guidelines developed for univariate analyses of a few conditions are not necessarily optimal for pattern-information analyses and condition-rich designs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Flexible transfer of knowledge in mental arithmetic--an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ischebeck, Anja; Zamarian, Laura; Schocke, Michael; Delazer, Margarete

    2009-02-01

    Recent imaging studies could show that fact acquisition in arithmetic is associated with decreasing activation in several frontal and parietal areas, and relatively increasing activation within the angular gyrus, indicating a switch from direct calculation to retrieval of a learned fact from memory. So far, however, little is known about the transfer of learned facts between arithmetic operations. The aim of the present fMRI study was to investigate whether and how newly acquired arithmetic knowledge might transfer from trained multiplication problems to related division problems. On the day before scanning, ten complex multiplication problems were trained. Within the scanner, trained multiplication problems were compared with untrained multiplication problems, and division problems related to multiplication (transfer condition) were compared with unrelated division problems (no-transfer condition). Replicating earlier results, untrained multiplication problems activated several frontal and parietal brain areas more strongly than trained multiplication problems, while trained multiplication problems showed relatively stronger activation in the left angular gyrus than untrained multiplication problems. Concerning division, an ROI analysis indicated that activation in the left angular gyrus was relatively stronger for the transfer condition than for the no-transfer condition. We also observed distinct inter-individual differences with regard to transfer that modulated activation within the left angular gyrus. Activation within the left angular gyrus was generally higher for participants who showed a transfer effect for division problems. In conclusion, the present study yielded some evidence that successful transfer of knowledge between arithmetic operations is accompanied by modifications of brain activation patterns. The left angular gyrus seems not only to be involved in the retrieval of stored arithmetic facts, but also in the transfer between arithmetic

  11. Age of second language acquisition affects nonverbal conflict processing in children: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohades, Seyede Ghazal; Struys, Esli; Van Schuerbeek, Peter; Baeken, Chris; Van De Craen, Piet; Luypaert, Robert

    2014-09-01

    In their daily communication, bilinguals switch between two languages, a process that involves the selection of a target language and minimization of interference from a nontarget language. Previous studies have uncovered the neural structure in bilinguals and the activation patterns associated with performing verbal conflict tasks. One question that remains, however is whether this extra verbal switching affects brain function during nonverbal conflict tasks. In this study, we have used fMRI to investigate the impact of bilingualism in children performing two nonverbal tasks involving stimulus-stimulus and stimulus-response conflicts. Three groups of 8-11-year-old children--bilinguals from birth (2L1), second language learners (L2L), and a control group of monolinguals (1L1)--were scanned while performing a color Simon and a numerical Stroop task. Reaction times and accuracy were logged. Compared to monolingual controls, bilingual children showed higher behavioral congruency effect of these tasks, which is matched by the recruitment of brain regions that are generally used in general cognitive control, language processing or to solve language conflict situations in bilinguals (caudate nucleus, posterior cingulate gyrus, STG, precuneus). Further, the activation of these areas was found to be higher in 2L1 compared to L2L. The coupling of longer reaction times to the recruitment of extra language-related brain areas supports the hypothesis that when dealing with language conflicts the specialization of bilinguals hampers the way they can process with nonverbal conflicts, at least at early stages in life.

  12. The impact of "physiological correction" on functional connectivity analysis of pharmacological resting state fMRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khalili-Mahani, N.; Chang, C.; Osch, M.J.; Veer, I.M.; van Buchem, M.A.; Dahan, A.; Beckmann, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Growing interest in pharmacological resting state fMRI (RSfMRI) necessitates developing standardized and robust analytical approaches that are insensitive to spurious correlated physiological signals. However, in pharmacological experiments physiological variations constitute an important aspect of

  13. Feature-space clustering for fMRI meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutte, C; Hansen, L.K.; G. Liptrot, Matthew

    2001-01-01

    of a clustering method applied to features extracted from the data. This approach is extremely versatile and encompasses previously published results [Goutte et al., 1999] as special cases. A typical application is in data reduction: as the increase in temporal resolution of fMRI experiments routinely yields f......MRI sequences containing several hundreds of images, it is sometimes necessary to invoke feature extraction to reduce the dimensionality of the data space. A second interesting application is in the meta-analysis of fMRI experiment, where features are obtained from a possibly large number of single......-voxel analyses. In particular this allows the checking of the differences and agreements between different methods of analysis. Both approaches are illustrated on a fMRI data set involving visual stimulation, and we show that the feature space clustering approach yields nontrivial results and, in particular...

  14. Tensor-based fusion of EEG and FMRI to understand neurological changes in Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evrim, Acar Ataman; Levin-Schwartz, Yuri; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging modalities such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalography (EEG) provide information about neurological functions in complementary spatiotemporal resolutions; therefore, fusion of these modalities is expected to provide better understanding of brain...

  15. Comparison of Standard Catheters Versus Radial Artery-Specific Catheter in Patients Who Underwent Coronary Angiography Through Transradial Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, On; Goel, Sunny; Acholonu, Michael; Kulbak, Guy; Verma, Shivani; Travlos, Efstratios; Casazza, Richard; Borgen, Elliot; Malik, Bilal; Friedman, Michael; Moskovits, Norbert; Frankel, Robert; Shani, Jacob; Ayzenberg, Sergey

    2016-08-01

    In this prospective, randomized controlled study, we aim to compare the performance outcomes of standard catheters with the radial artery-specific catheter. Over the past decade, transradial cardiac catheterization has gained widespread popularity because of its low complication rates compared with transfemoral access. Operators have the choice of using either standard catheters (used for both transfemoral and transradial approach, with need for separate catheter use for either right or left coronary artery engagement) or a dedicated radial artery catheter, which is specifically designed to engage both coronary arteries through radial artery access. A total of 110 consecutive patients who underwent coronary angiography at our institution from March 2015 to April 2015 were prospectively randomized to either radial artery-specific Tiger catheter (5Fr; Terumo Interventional Systems, Somerset, New Jersey) versus standard Judkins left and right catheters (5Fr R4, L4; Cordis Corporation, Miami, Florida). The end points of the study included fluoroscopy time, dose-area product, contrast volume used, and total procedure time for the coronary angiography. A total of 57 patients (52%) were randomized to radial artery-specific catheter and 53 (48%) to the standard catheter. Tiger catheter was associated with significantly lower fluoroscopy time (184 ± 91 vs 238 ± 131 seconds, p = 0.015), which was statistically significant. Other outcome measures such as dose-area product (2,882.4 ± 1,471.2 vs 3,524.6 ± 2,111.7 Gy·cm(2), p = 0.07), total contrast volume (48.1 ± 16.1 vs 53.4 ± 18.5 ml, p = 0.114), and total procedure time (337 ± 382 vs 434 ± 137 seconds, p = 0.085) were also lower in single-catheter group, but it did not reach statistical significance. A total of 8 patients (14%) were crossed over from radial-specific catheter arm to standard catheter arm because of substandard image quality and difficulty in coronary engagement. Six patients had to be

  16. CA-125–indicated asymptomatic relapse confers survival benefit to ovarian cancer patients who underwent secondary cytoreduction surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background There is no consensus regarding the management of ovarian cancer patients, who have shown complete clinical response (CCR) to primary therapy and have rising cancer antigen CA-125 levels but have no symptoms of recurrent disease. The present study aims to determine whether follow-up CA-125 levels can be used to identify the need for imaging studies and secondary cytoreductive surgery (CRS). Methods We identified 410 ovarian cancer patients treated at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center between 1984 and 2011. These patients had shown CCR to primary therapy. Follow-up was conducted based on the surveillance protocol of the MD Anderson Cancer Center. We used the Cox proportional hazards model and log-rank test to assess the associations between the follow-up CA-125 levels and secondary CRS and survival duration. Results The CA-125 level of 1.68 × nadir was defined as the indicator of recurrent disease (p CA-125 biochemical progression prior to clinically-defined relapse was 31 days (ranging from 1 to 391 days). The median number of the negative imaging studies for the clinical relapse findings in patients with a CA-125 level of CA-125 level at relapse was an independent predictor of overall and progression free survival in patients who had shown CCR to primary therapy (p = 0.04 and 0.02 respectively). The overall and progression free survival durations in patients with a CA-125 level ≤ 1.68 × nadir at relapse (69.4 and 13.8 months) were longer than those with a CA-125 level > 1.68 × nadir at relapse (55.7 and 10.4 months; p = 0.04 and 0.01, respectively). The overall and progression free survival duration of patients with asymptomatic relapse and underwent a secondary CRS was longer than that of patients with symptomatic relapse (p = 0.02 and 0.04 respectively). Conclusions The increase of serum CA-125 levels is an early warning of clinical relapse in ovarian cancer. Using CA-125 levels in

  17. Functional Topography of Human Corpus Callosum: An fMRI Mapping Study

    OpenAIRE

    Fabri, Mara; Polonara, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    The concept of a topographical map of the corpus callosum (CC) has emerged from human lesion studies and from electrophysiological and anatomical tracing investigations in other mammals. Over the last few years a rising number of researchers have been reporting functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activation in white matter, particularly the CC. In this study the scope for describing CC topography with fMRI was explored by evoking activation through simple sensory stimulation and moto...

  18. Collective Correlations of Brodmann Areas fMRI Study with RMT-Denoising

    OpenAIRE

    Burda, Zdzislaw; Kornelsen, Jennifer; Nowak, Maciej A.; Porebski, Bartosz; Sboto-Frankenstein, Uta; Tomanek, Boguslaw; Tyburczyk, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    We study collective behavior of Brodmann regions of human cerebral cortex using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and Random Matrix Theory (RMT). The raw fMRI data is mapped onto the cortex regions corresponding to the Brodmann areas with the aid of the Talairach coordinates. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the Pearson correlation matrix for 41 different Brodmann regions is carried out to determine their collective activity in the idle state and in the active state stimulated...

  19. Tactile and non-tactile sensory paradigms for fMRI and neurophysiologic studies in rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Bailey, Christopher J.; Herman, Peter; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2009-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become a popular functional imaging tool for human studies. Future diagnostic use of fMRI depends, however, on a suitable neurophysiologic interpretation of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal change. This particular goal is best achieved in animal models primarily due to the invasive nature of other methods used and/or pharmacological agents applied to probe different nuances of neuronal (and glial) activity coupled to the BOLD...

  20. Adaptive independent vector analysis for multi-subject complex-valued fMRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Li-Dan; Lin, Qiu-Hua; Gong, Xiao-Feng; Cong, Fengyu; Calhoun, Vince D

    2017-04-01

    Complex-valued fMRI data can provide additional insights beyond magnitude-only data. However, independent vector analysis (IVA), which has exhibited great potential for group analysis of magnitude-only fMRI data, has rarely been applied to complex-valued fMRI data. The main challenges in this application include the extremely noisy nature and large variability of the source component vector (SCV) distribution. To address these challenges, we propose an adaptive fixed-point IVA algorithm for analyzing multiple-subject complex-valued fMRI data. We exploited a multivariate generalized Gaussian distribution (MGGD)- based nonlinear function to match varying SCV distributions in which the MGGD shape parameter was estimated using maximum likelihood estimation. To achieve our de-noising goal, we updated the MGGD-based nonlinearity in the dominant SCV subspace, and employed a post-IVA de-noising strategy based on phase information in the IVA estimates. We also incorporated the pseudo-covariance matrix of fMRI data into the algorithm to emphasize the noncircularity of complex-valued fMRI sources. Results from simulated and experimental fMRI data demonstrated the efficacy of our method. Our approach exhibited significant improvements over typical complex-valued IVA algorithms, especially during higher noise levels and larger spatial and temporal changes. As expected, the proposed complex-valued IVA algorithm detected more contiguous and reasonable activations than the magnitude-only method for task-related (393%) and default mode (301%) spatial maps. The proposed approach is suitable for decomposing multi-subject complex-valued fMRI data, and has great potential for capturing additional subject variability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of memory fMRI response among Normal, MCI, and Alzheimer’s patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machulda, M.M.; Ward, H.A.; Borowski, B.; Gunter, J.L.; Cha, R.H.; O’Brien, P.C.; Petersen, R.C.; Boeve, B.F.; Knopman, D.; Tang-Wai, D.F.; Ivnik, R.J.; Smith, G.E.; Tangalos, E.G.; Jack, C.R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine whether an fMRI memory encoding task distinguishes among cognitively Normal elderly individuals, patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), and patients with early AD. Methods Twenty-nine subjects (11 Normal, 9 MCI, 9 AD) were studied with an fMRI memory encoding task. A passive sensory task was also performed to assess potential intergroup differences in fMRI responsiveness. We studied activation in the medial temporal lobe for the memory task and in the anatomic Rolandic area for the sensory task. Inter-group comparisons were performed using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analyses. The ROC method provides rigorous control of artifactual false positive “activation.” Subjects were tested for recall and recognition of the encoding task stimuli following the fMRI study. Results Medial temporal lobe activation was greater in Normals than MCIs and ADs (p = .03 and p = .04). There was no difference between ADs and MCIs in fMRI memory performance. There was an association between fMRI memory activation (area under the ROC curve) and post fMRI performance on recognition and free recall. There was no difference among the three groups on the sensory task. Conclusion MCI and AD subjects had less medial temporal lobe activation on the memory task than the Normals, but similar activation as Normals on the sensory task. These findings suggest decreased medial temporal activation may be a specific marker of limbic dysfunction due to the neurodegenerative changes of AD. In addition, fMRI is sufficiently sensitive to detect changes in the prodromal, MCI, phase of the disease. PMID:12939424

  2. Large Scale Scanning Probe Microscope "Making Shear Force Scanning visible."

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, E.; Offerhaus, Herman L.; van der Veen, Jan T.; van der Veen, J.T.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; Wessel, I.M.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a demonstration of a scanning probe microscope with shear-force tuning fork feedback. The tuning fork is several centimeters long, and the rigid fiber is replaced by a toothpick. By scaling this demonstration to visible dimensions the accessibility of shear-force scanning and tuning fork

  3. ScanImage: Flexible software for operating laser scanning microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pologruto, Thomas A; Sabatini, Bernardo L; Svoboda, Karel

    2003-01-01

    Background Laser scanning microscopy is a powerful tool for analyzing the structure and function of biological specimens. Although numerous commercial laser scanning microscopes exist, some of the more interesting and challenging applications demand custom design. A major impediment to custom design is the difficulty of building custom data acquisition hardware and writing the complex software required to run the laser scanning microscope. Results We describe a simple, software-based approach to operating a laser scanning microscope without the need for custom data acquisition hardware. Data acquisition and control of laser scanning are achieved through standard data acquisition boards. The entire burden of signal integration and image processing is placed on the CPU of the computer. We quantitate the effectiveness of our data acquisition and signal conditioning algorithm under a variety of conditions. We implement our approach in an open source software package (ScanImage) and describe its functionality. Conclusions We present ScanImage, software to run a flexible laser scanning microscope that allows easy custom design. PMID:12801419

  4. fMRI of the auditory system: understanding the neural basis of auditory gestalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Salle, Francesco; Esposito, Fabrizio; Scarabino, Tommaso; Formisano, Elia; Marciano, Elio; Saulino, Claudio; Cirillo, Sossio; Elefante, Raffaele; Scheffler, Klaus; Seifritz, Erich

    2003-12-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has rapidly become the most widely used imaging method for studying brain functions in humans. This is a result of its extreme flexibility of use and of the astonishingly detailed spatial and temporal information it provides. Nevertheless, until very recently, the study of the auditory system has progressed at a considerably slower pace compared to other functional systems. Several factors have limited fMRI research in the auditory field, including some intrinsic features of auditory functional anatomy and some peculiar interactions between fMRI technique and audition. A well known difficulty arises from the high intensity acoustic noise produced by gradient switching in echo-planar imaging (EPI), as well as in other fMRI sequences more similar to conventional MR sequences. The acoustic noise interacts in an unpredictable way with the experimental stimuli both from a perceptual point of view and in the evoked hemodynamics. To overcome this problem, different approaches have been proposed recently that generally require careful tailoring of the experimental design and the fMRI methodology to the specific requirements posed by the auditory research. The novel methodological approaches can make the fMRI exploration of auditory processing much easier and more reliable, and thus may permit filling the gap with other fields of neuroscience research. As a result, some fundamental neural underpinnings of audition are being clarified, and the way sound stimuli are integrated in the auditory gestalt are beginning to be understood.

  5. Effect of repetitive arm cycling following botulinum toxin injection for poststroke spasticity: evidence from FMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diserens, Karin; Ruegg, Dieter; Kleiser, Raimund; Hyde, Sandrine; Perret, Nicolas; Vuadens, Philippe; Fornari, Eleonora; Vingerhoets, Francois; Seitz, Rüdiger J

    2010-10-01

    Investigations were performed to establish if repetitive arm cycling training enhances the antispastic effect of intramuscular botulinum toxin (BTX) injections in postischemic spastic hemiparesis. Effects on cerebral activation were evaluated by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Eight chronic spastic hemisyndrome patients (49 ± 10 years) after middle cerebral artery infarction (5.5 ± 2.7 years) were investigated. BTX was injected into the affected arm twice, 6 months apart. Spasticity was assessed using the Ashworth Scale and range of motion before and 3 months after BTX injections. Images were analyzed using Brain Voyager QX 1.8, and fMRI signal changes were corrected for multiple comparisons. During passive movements of affected and nonaffected hands, fMRI activity was increased bilaterally in the sensorimotor cortex (MISI), secondary somatosensory areas (SII), and supplementary motor area predominantly in the contralesional hemisphere, compared with the rest. Following repetitive arm cycling, fMRI activity increased further in MISI of the lesioned hemisphere and SII of the contralesional hemisphere. For patients with residual motor activity, treatment-related fMRI activity increases were associated with reduced spasticity; in completely plegic patients, there was no fMRI activity change in SII but increased spasticity after training. Increased activity in SII of the contralesional hemisphere and in MISI of the lesioned hemisphere reflect a treatment-induced effect in the paretic arm. It is hypothesized that the increased BOLD activity results from increased afferent information related to the antispastic BTX effect reinforced by training.

  6. EEG and fMRI agree: Mental arithmetic is the easiest form of imagery to detect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Amabilis H; Noseworthy, Michael D; Reilly, James P; Guan, Weiguang; Connolly, John F

    2017-02-01

    fMRI and EEG during mental imagery provide alternative methods of detecting awareness in patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC) without reliance on behaviour. Because using fMRI in patients with DOC is difficult, studies increasingly employ EEG. However, there has been no verification that these modalities provide converging information at the individual subject level. The present study examined simultaneous EEG and fMRI in healthy volunteers during six mental imagery tasks to determine whether one mental imagery task generates more robust activation across subjects; whether activation can be predicted from familiarity with the imagined activity; and whether EEG and fMRI converge upon the same conclusions about individual imagery performance. Mental arithmetic generated the most robust activation in the majority of subjects for both EEG and fMRI, and level of activation could not be predicted from familiarity, with either modality. We conclude that overall, EEG and fMRI agree regarding individual mental imagery performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Scanning fast and slow: current limitations of 3 Tesla functional MRI and future potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland N Boubela

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Functional MRI at 3T has become a workhorse for the neurosciences, e.g., neurology, psychology, and psychiatry, enabling non-invasive investigation of brain function and connectivity. However, BOLD-based fMRI is a rather indirect measure of brain function, confounded by fluctuation related signals, e.g. head or brain motion, brain pulsation, blood flow, intermixed with susceptibility differences close or distant to the region of neuronal activity. Even though a plethora of preprocessing strategies have been published to address these confounds, their efficiency is still under discussion. In particular, physiological signal fluctuations closely related to brain supply may mask BOLD signal changes related to true neuronal activation. Here we explore recent technical and methodological advancements aimed at disentangling the various components, employing fast multiband vs. standard EPI, in combination with fast temporal ICA.Our preliminary results indicate that fast (TR< 0.5s scanning may help to identify and eliminate physiologic components, increasing tSNR and functional contrast. In addition, biological variability can be studied and task performance better correlated to other measures. This should increase specificity and reliability in fMRI studies. Furthermore, physiological signal changes during scanning may then be recognized as a source of information rather than a nuisance. As we are currently still undersampling the complexity of the brain, even at a rather coarse macroscopic level, we should be very cautious in the interpretation of neuroscientific findings, in particular when comparing different groups (e.g., age, sex, medication, pathology, etc.. From a technical point of view our goal should be to sample brain activity at layer specific resolution with low TR, covering as much of the brain as possible without violating SAR limits. We hope to stimulate discussion towards a better understanding and a more quantitative use of fMRI.

  8. Scanning fast and slow: current limitations of 3 Tesla functional MRI and future potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubela, Roland N.; Kalcher, Klaudius; Nasel, Christian; Moser, Ewald

    2017-01-01

    Functional MRI at 3T has become a workhorse for the neurosciences, e.g., neurology, psychology, and psychiatry, enabling non-invasive investigation of brain function and connectivity. However, BOLD-based fMRI is a rather indirect measure of brain function, confounded by physiology related signals, e.g., head or brain motion, brain pulsation, blood flow, intermixed with susceptibility differences close or distant to the region of neuronal activity. Even though a plethora of preprocessing strategies have been published to address these confounds, their efficiency is still under discussion. In particular, physiological signal fluctuations closely related to brain supply may mask BOLD signal changes related to “true” neuronal activation. Here we explore recent technical and methodological advancements aimed at disentangling the various components, employing fast multiband vs. standard EPI, in combination with fast temporal ICA. Our preliminary results indicate that fast (TR <0.5 s) scanning may help to identify and eliminate physiologic components, increasing tSNR and functional contrast. In addition, biological variability can be studied and task performance better correlated to other measures. This should increase specificity and reliability in fMRI studies. Furthermore, physiological signal changes during scanning may then be recognized as a source of information rather than a nuisance. As we are currently still undersampling the complexity of the brain, even at a rather coarse macroscopic level, we should be very cautious in the interpretation of neuroscientific findings, in particular when comparing different groups (e.g., age, sex, medication, pathology, etc.). From a technical point of view our goal should be to sample brain activity at layer specific resolution with low TR, covering as much of the brain as possible without violating SAR limits. We hope to stimulate discussion toward a better understanding and a more quantitative use of fMRI. PMID:28164083

  9. Gallium-67 scanning and autologous transplantation for lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansberg, R.; Bautovich, G.J.; Forsyth, C.J.; Joshua, D.E.; Gibson, J. [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Department of Nuclear Medicine and Haematology

    1998-06-01

    Full text: Gallium-67 ({sup 67}Ga) scanning in the malignant Iymphomas has been performed for over 20 years. Its major contributions are in staging and in detecting relapse, residual or progressive disease. Autologous bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation is now an accepted therapy for refractory and relapsed Iymphoma. Between May 1991 and December 1995, 19 patients underwent autologous bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for Non-Hodgkin`s Iymphoma or Hodgkin`s disease. Five patients had high grade Non-Hodgkin`s Iymphoma with widespread disease and did not undergo {sup 67}Ga scanning. There was one transplant related death. Thirteen patients had {sup 67}Ga scanning pre- and post-transplantation. Six patients remained in clinical remission with no evidence of gallium avid active disease at a median of 11 months (range 3 to 19 months) post-transplant. Five of these patients had intermediate grade Non-Hodgkin`s Iymphoma and one had Hodgkin`s disease. The other seven patients all demonstrated evidence of active disease on {sup 67}Ga scanning and subsequent clinical relapse. In all patients shown to have {sup 67}Ga avid disease pre-transplant, {sup 67}Ga scanning post-transplant is useful in detecting relapse These results suggest that {sup 67}Ga avid disease pre-transplant, {sup 67}Ga scanning post-autologous transplantation as it is for conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy

  10. Gallium-67 scanning and autologous transplantation for lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansberg, R.; Bautovich, G.J.; Forsyth, C.J.; Joshua, D.E.; Gibson, J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Gallium-67 ( 67 Ga) scanning in the malignant Iymphomas has been performed for over 20 years. Its major contributions are in staging and in detecting relapse, residual or progressive disease. Autologous bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation is now an accepted therapy for refractory and relapsed Iymphoma. Between May 1991 and December 1995, 19 patients underwent autologous bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for Non-Hodgkin's Iymphoma or Hodgkin's disease. Five patients had high grade Non-Hodgkin's Iymphoma with widespread disease and did not undergo 67 Ga scanning. There was one transplant related death. Thirteen patients had 67 Ga scanning pre- and post-transplantation. Six patients remained in clinical remission with no evidence of gallium avid active disease at a median of 11 months (range 3 to 19 months) post-transplant. Five of these patients had intermediate grade Non-Hodgkin's Iymphoma and one had Hodgkin's disease. The other seven patients all demonstrated evidence of active disease on 67 Ga scanning and subsequent clinical relapse. In all patients shown to have 67 Ga avid disease pre-transplant, 67 Ga scanning post-transplant is useful in detecting relapse These results suggest that 67 Ga avid disease pre-transplant, 67 Ga scanning post-autologous transplantation as it is for conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy

  11. Scanning tunneling microscopy II further applications and related scanning techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    1995-01-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy II, like its predecessor, presents detailed and comprehensive accounts of the basic principles and broad range of applications of STM and related scanning probe techniques. The applications discussed in this volume come predominantly from the fields of electrochemistry and biology. In contrast to those described in STM I, these studies may be performed in air and in liquids. The extensions of the basic technique to map other interactions are described in chapters on scanning force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, and scanning near-field optical microscopy, together with a survey of other related techniques. Also described here is the use of a scanning proximal probe for surface modification. Together, the two volumes give a comprehensive account of experimental aspects of STM. They provide essential reading and reference material for all students and researchers involved in this field. In this second edition the text has been updated and new methods are discussed.

  12. Scanning tunneling microscopy II further applications and related scanning techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    1992-01-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy II, like its predecessor, presents detailed and comprehensive accounts of the basic principles and broad range of applications of STM and related scanning probe techniques. The applications discussed in this volume come predominantly from the fields of electrochemistry and biology. In contrast to those described in Vol. I, these sudies may be performed in air and in liquids. The extensions of the basic technique to map other interactions are described inchapters on scanning force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, scanning near-field optical microscopy, together with a survey of other related techniques. Also described here is the use of a scanning proximal probe for surface modification. Togehter, the two volumes give a comprehensive account of experimental aspcets of STM. They provide essentialreading and reference material for all students and researchers involvedin this field.

  13. Predicting subject-driven actions and sensory experience in a virtual world with relevance vector machine regression of fMRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Giancarlo; De Martino, Federico; Esposito, Fabrizio; Goebel, Rainer; Formisano, Elia

    2011-05-15

    In this work we illustrate the approach of the Maastricht Brain Imaging Center to the PBAIC 2007 competition, where participants had to predict, based on fMRI measurements of brain activity, subject driven actions and sensory experience in a virtual world. After standard pre-processing (slice scan time correction, motion correction), we generated rating predictions based on linear Relevance Vector Machine (RVM) learning from all brain voxels. Spatial and temporal filtering of the time series was optimized rating by rating. For some of the ratings (e.g. Instructions, Hits, Faces, Velocity), linear RVM regression was accurate and very consistent within and between subjects. For other ratings (e.g. Arousal, Valence) results were less satisfactory. Our approach ranked overall second. To investigate the role of different brain regions in ratings prediction we generated predictive maps, i.e. maps of the weighted contribution of each voxel to the predicted rating. These maps generally included (but were not limited to) "specialized" regions which are consistent with results from conventional neuroimaging studies and known functional neuroanatomy. In conclusion, Sparse Bayesian Learning models, such as RVM, appear to be a valuable approach to the multivariate regression of fMRI time series. The implementation of the Automatic Relevance Determination criterion is particularly suitable and provides a good generalization, despite the limited number of samples which is typically available in fMRI. Predictive maps allow disclosing multi-voxel patterns of brain activity that predict perceptual and behavioral subjective experience. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Retrospective analysis of 856 cases with stage 0 to III rectal cancer underwent curative surgery combined modality therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pengju; Yao, Yunfeng; Zhao, Jun; Li, Ming; Peng, Yifan; Zhan, Tiancheng; Du, Changzheng; Wang, Lin; Chen, Nan; Gu, Jin

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the survival and prognostic factors of stage 0 to III rectal cancer in 10 years. Clinical data and follow-up of 856 rectal cancer patients with stage 0-III underwent curative surgery from January 2000 to December 2010 were retrospective analyzed. There were 470 male and 386 female patients, with a mean age of (58 ± 12) years. Kaplan-Meier method was used to analyze the overall survival and disease free survival. Log-rank test was used to compare the survival between groups. Cox regression was used to analyze the independent prognostic factors of rectal cancer. The patients in each stage were stage 0 with 18 cases, stage I with 209 cases, stage II with 235 cases, and stage III with 394 cases. All patients received curative surgery. There were 296 patients evaluated as cT3, cT4 and any T with N+ received preoperative radiotherapy. 5.4% patients got pathological complete response (16/296), and the recurrence rate was 4.7% (14/296). After a median time of 41.7 months (range 4.1 to 144.0 months) follow-up, the 5-year overall survival rate in stage 0 to I of was 91.0%, stage II 86.2%, and stage III 60.0%, with a significant difference (P=0.000). The cumulative local recurrence rate was 4.8% (41/856), of which 70.7% (29/41) occurred within 3 years postoperatively, 97.6% (40/41) in 5 years. The cumulative distant metastasis rate was 16.4% (140/856), of which 82.9% (129/140) occurred within 3 years postoperatively, 96.4% (135/140) in 5 years. The incidence of abnormal imaging findings was significantly higher in pulmonary than liver and other sites metastases (75.0% vs. 21.7%, χ² =25.691, P=0.000). The incidence of CEA elevation was significantly higher in liver than lung and other sites metastases (56.8% vs. 37.8%, χ² =25.691, P=0.000). Multivariable analysis showed that age (P=0.015, HR=1.385, 95% CI: 1.066 to 1.801), surgical approach (P=0.029, HR=1.337, 95% CI: 1.030 to 1.733), differentiation (P=0.000, HR=1.535, 95% CI: 1.222 to 1.928), TNM stage (P

  15. Comparison of Brain Activation Images Associated with Sexual Arousal Induced by Visual Stimulation and SP6 Acupuncture: fMRI at 3 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Nam Gil; Han, Jae Bok; Jang, Seong Joo

    2009-01-01

    This study was performed not only to compare the brain activation regions associated with sexual arousal induced by visual stimulation and SP6 acupuncture, but also to evaluate its differential neuro-anatomical mechanism in healthy women using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at 3 Tesla (T). A total of 21 healthy right-handed female volunteers (mean age 22 years, range 19 to 32) underwent fMRI on a 3T MR scanner. The stimulation paradigm for sexual arousal consisted of two alternating periods of rest and activation. It began with a 1-minute rest period, 3 minutes of stimulation with either of an erotic video film or SP6 acupuncture, followed by 1-minute rest. In addition, a comparative study on the brain activation patterns between an acupoint and a shampoint nearby GB37 was performed. The fMRI data were obtained from 20 slices parallel to the AC-PC line on an axial plane, giving a total of 2,000 images. The mean activation maps were constructed and analyzed by using the statistical parametric mapping (SPM99) software. As comparison with the shampoint, the acupoint showed 5 times and 2 times higher activities in the neocortex and limbic system, respectively. Note that brain activation in response to stimulation with the shampoint was not observed in the regions including the HTHL in the diencephalon, GLO and AMYG in the basal ganglia, and SMG in the parietal lobe. In the comparative study of visual stimulation vs. SP6 acupuncture, the mean activation ratio of stimulus was not significantly different to each other in both the neocortex and the limbic system (p < 0.05). The mean activities induced by both stimuli were not significantly different in the neocortex, whereas the acupunctural stimulation showed higher activity in the limbic system (p < 0.05). This study compared the differential brain activation patterns and the neural mechanisms for sexual arousal, which were induced by visual stimulation and SP6 acupuncture by using 3T fMRI. These findings

  16. Comparison of Brain Activation Images Associated with Sexual Arousal Induced by Visual Stimulation and SP6 Acupuncture: fMRI at 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Nam Gil [Dept. of Radiology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jae Bok; Jang, Seong Joo [Dept. of Radiology, Dongshin University, Naju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    This study was performed not only to compare the brain activation regions associated with sexual arousal induced by visual stimulation and SP6 acupuncture, but also to evaluate its differential neuro-anatomical mechanism in healthy women using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at 3 Tesla (T). A total of 21 healthy right-handed female volunteers (mean age 22 years, range 19 to 32) underwent fMRI on a 3T MR scanner. The stimulation paradigm for sexual arousal consisted of two alternating periods of rest and activation. It began with a 1-minute rest period, 3 minutes of stimulation with either of an erotic video film or SP6 acupuncture, followed by 1-minute rest. In addition, a comparative study on the brain activation patterns between an acupoint and a shampoint nearby GB37 was performed. The fMRI data were obtained from 20 slices parallel to the AC-PC line on an axial plane, giving a total of 2,000 images. The mean activation maps were constructed and analyzed by using the statistical parametric mapping (SPM99) software. As comparison with the shampoint, the acupoint showed 5 times and 2 times higher activities in the neocortex and limbic system, respectively. Note that brain activation in response to stimulation with the shampoint was not observed in the regions including the HTHL in the diencephalon, GLO and AMYG in the basal ganglia, and SMG in the parietal lobe. In the comparative study of visual stimulation vs. SP6 acupuncture, the mean activation ratio of stimulus was not significantly different to each other in both the neocortex and the limbic system (p < 0.05). The mean activities induced by both stimuli were not significantly different in the neocortex, whereas the acupunctural stimulation showed higher activity in the limbic system (p < 0.05). This study compared the differential brain activation patterns and the neural mechanisms for sexual arousal, which were induced by visual stimulation and SP6 acupuncture by using 3T fMRI. These findings

  17. Long-term vascular access ports as a means of sedative administration in a rodent fMRI survival model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettinger, Patrick C.; Li, Rupeng; Yan, Ji-Geng; Matloub, Hani S.; Cho, Younghoon R.; Pawela, Christopher P.; Rowe, Daniel B.; Hyde, James S.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a rodent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) survival model with the use of heparin-coated vascular access devices. Such a model would ease the administration of sedative agents, reduce the number of animals required in a survival experiment, and eliminate animal-to-animal variability seen in previous designs. Seven male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent surgical placement of an MRI-compatible vascular access port, followed by implantable electrode placement on the right median nerve. Functional MRI during nerve stimulation and resting-state functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) were performed at times 0, 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks postoperatively using a 9.4 T scanner. Anesthesia was maintained using intravenous dexmedetomidine and reversed using atipamezole. There were no fatalities or infectious complications during this study. All vascular access ports remained patent. Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) activation by electrical stimulation of the median nerve using implanted electrodes was seen within the forelimb sensory region (S1FL) for all animals at all time points. The number of activated voxels decreased at time points 4 and 8 weeks, returning to a normal level at 12 weeks, which is attributed to scar tissue formation and resolution around the embedded electrode. The applications of this experiment extend far beyond the scope of peripheral nerve experimentation. These vascular access ports can be applied to any survival MRI study requiring repeated medication administration, intravenous contrast, or blood sampling. PMID:21726581

  18. Identifying the effects of visceral interoception on human brain connectome: A multivariate analysis of covariance of fMRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrahi, Behnaz; Mantini, Dante

    2016-08-01

    Sources of variations in the neural circuitry of the human brain and interrelationship between intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) are still a matter of debate and ongoing research. Here, we applied a multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) based on high-dimensional independent component analysis (ICA) to identify the effects of interoception and related variables on human brain connectome. Fifteen healthy right-handed subjects (all females, age range 21 - 48 years; mean age = 30.3, SD = 8.7 years) underwent a blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) that included continuous intravesical saline infusion and drainage. The design matrix included the intravesical fullness, subject fullness rating, normalized right and left insula thickness, age, and neuropsychological assessments (Mini-Mental State Exam; MMSE, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; HADS) as covariates of interest. Univariate tests were also performed with a reduced design matrix (p effects of interoception (intravesical fullness) on spatial map intensity of the salience network (anchored by insula and anterior cingulate cortex) and the frontoparietal central executive network, The left and right insula thickness influenced the spatial map intensity of the subcortical network, and the attention/cognitive and default-mode networks, respectively. The intravesical fullness also showed an effect on the spectral power of the subcortical network. Further investigations of the effect of internal (bodily) sensations on the ICN properties can provide an invaluable tool for understanding the role of interoception in health and illness.

  19. Abdominal computed tomographic scan for patients with gunshot wounds to the abdomen selected for nonoperative management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velmahos, George C; Constantinou, Constantinos; Tillou, Areti; Brown, Carlos V; Salim, Ali; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2005-11-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) scanning is increasingly used in patients with abdominal gunshot wounds (AGSWs) selected for nonoperative management (NOM). Triple-contrast CT scanning (i.e., intravenous, oral, and rectal) has produced encouraging initial results. The exact role and usefulness of CT scanning with intravenous contrast only is unknown. Hemodynamically stable AGSW patients without generalized abdominal tenderness were offered a trial of NOM, underwent single-contrast (intravenous) CT scanning, and were prospectively followed from July 1, 2002, to May 31, 2004. The sensitivity and specificity of CT scanning to detect organ injuries requiring repair were calculated against the clinical results of NOM. The effect of CT scanning in management was recorded. One hundred patients with nontangential AGSWs were included. Twenty-six required laparotomy, which was nontherapeutic in five (19%). These five patients underwent operation on the basis of misleading CT findings (n = 3) or development of clinical symptoms (n = 2). Two CT scans were false-negative, and these patients were operated on at 121 and 307 minutes after arrival for hollow visceral injuries and recovered without postoperative complications. Three CT scans were false-positive and resulted in nontherapeutic laparotomies without postoperative complications. The sensitivity and specificity of CT scanning was 90.5% and 96%, respectively. CT findings resulted in a change of management in 40 patients. In nine, the decision to operate was changed to a decision to manage nonoperatively; whereas in eight, the opposite occurred. In addition, in 17, the decision to observe was changed to a decision to discharge; whereas in 1, the opposite occurred. Finally, five patients had additional tests after the findings of CT scanning. Abdominal CT scanning is a safe and useful method of selecting AGSW patients for NOM. Further exploration is needed to define the precise benefits of routine CT scanning over clinical

  20. FMRI investigation of cross-cultural music comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Steven J; Demorest, Steven M; Aylward, Elizabeth H; Cramer, Steven C; Maravilla, Kenneth R

    2003-09-01

    The popular view of music as a "universal" language ignores the privileged position of the cultural insider in comprehending musical information unique to their own tradition. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that listeners would demonstrate different neural activity in response to culturally familiar and unfamiliar music and that those differences may be affected by the extent of subjects' formal musical training. Just as familiar languages have been shown to use distinct brain processes, we hypothesized that an analogous difference might be found in music and that it may depend in part on subjects' formal musical knowledge. Using fMRI we compared the activation patterns of professional musicians and untrained controls reared in the United States as they listened to music from their culture (Western) and from an unfamiliar culture (Chinese). No overall differences in activation were observed for either subject group in response to the two musical styles, although there were differences in recall performance based on style and there were activation differences based on training. Trained listeners demonstrated additional activation in the right STG for both musics and in the right and left midfrontal regions for Western music and Chinese music, respectively. Our findings indicate that listening to culturally different musics may activate similar neural resources but with dissimilar results in recall performance.

  1. Contour Integration over Time: Psychophysical and fMRI Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuai, Shu-Guang; Li, Wu; Yu, Cong; Kourtzi, Zoe

    2017-05-01

    The brain integrates discrete but collinear stimuli to perceive global contours. Previous contour integration (CI) studies mainly focus on integration over space, and CI is attributed to either V1 long-range connections or contour processing in high-visual areas that top-down modulate V1 responses. Here, we show that CI also occurs over time in a design that minimizes the roles of V1 long-range interactions. We use tilted contours embedded in random orientation noise and moving horizontally behind a fixed vertical slit. Individual contour elements traveling up/down within the slit would be encoded over time by parallel, rather than aligned, V1 neurons. However, we find robust contour detection even when the slit permits only one viewable contour element. Similar to CI over space, CI over time also obeys the rule of collinearity. fMRI evidence shows that while CI over space engages visual areas as early as V1, CI over time mainly engages higher dorsal and ventral visual areas involved in shape processing, as well as posterior parietal regions involved in visual memory that can represent the orientation of temporally integrated contours. These results suggest at least partially dissociable mechanisms for implementing the Gestalt rule of continuity in CI over space and time. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Numeric aspects in pitch identification: an fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwenzer Michael

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pitch identification had yielded unique response patterns compared to other auditory skills. Selecting one out of numerous pitches distinguished this task from detecting a pitch ascent. Encoding of numerous stimuli had activated the intraparietal sulcus in the visual domain. Therefore, we hypothesized that numerosity encoding during pitch identification activates the intraparietal sulcus as well. Methods To assess pitch identification, the participants had to recognize a single pitch from a set of four possible pitches in each trial. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI disentangled neural activation during this four-pitch-choice task from activation during pitch contour perception, tone localization, and pitch discrimination. Results Pitch identification induced bilateral activation in the intraparietal sulcus compared to pitch discrimination. Correct responses in pitch identification correlated with activation in the left intraparietal sulcus. Pitch contour perception activated the superior temporal gyrus conceivably due to the larger range of presented tones. The differentiation between pitch identification and tone localization failed. Activation in an ACC-hippocampus network distinguished pitch discrimination from pitch identification. Conclusion Pitch identification is distinguishable from pitch discrimination on the base of activation in the IPS. IPS activity during pitch identification may be the auditory counterpart of numerosity encoding in the visual domain.

  3. Three-dimensional brain mapping using fMRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukunaga, Masaki; Tanaka, Chuzo; Umeda, Masahiro; Ebisu, Toshihiko; Aoki, Ichio; Higuchi, Toshihiro; Naruse, Shoji.

    1997-01-01

    Functional mapping of the activated brain, the location and extent of the activated area were determined, during motor tasks and sensory stimulation using fMRI superimposed on 3D anatomical MRI. Twelve volunteers were studied. The fMR images were acquired using a 2D gradient echo echo planar imaging sequence. The 3D anatomical MR images of the whole brain were acquired using a conventional 3D gradient echo sequence. Motor tasks were sequential opposition of fingers, clenching a hand and elbow flexion. Somatosensory stimulation were administered by scrubbing the palm and sole with a washing sponge. Visual stimulation consisted of full visual field stimulation. Data were analyzed by the cross-correlation method. Transversal fMR images and anatomical images were reconstructed using both volume-, surface-rendering methods, and reconstructed for coronal and sagittal sections. Activated areas were expressed using the three primary colors. Motor tasks activated the contralateral primary motor area (M1), the primary somatosensory area (S1) and the supplementary motor area (SMA). Somatosensory tasks activated the contralateral S1, M1 and secondary sensory area (S2). Activated areas during full visual field stimulation was observed in the bilateral occipital lobe, including both the primary cortex. Three-dimensional brain mapping allowed visualization of the anatomical location and extent of the activated brain during both motor task and sensory stimulation. Using this method we could obtain a functional map similar to the Penfield's schema. (author)

  4. Three-dimensional brain mapping using fMRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukunaga, Masaki; Tanaka, Chuzo; Umeda, Masahiro; Ebisu, Toshihiko; Aoki, Ichio [Meiji Univ. of Oriental Medicine, Hiyoshi, Kyoto (Japan); Higuchi, Toshihiro; Naruse, Shoji

    1997-10-01

    Functional mapping of the activated brain, the location and extent of the activated area were determined, during motor tasks and sensory stimulation using fMRI superimposed on 3D anatomical MRI. Twelve volunteers were studied. The fMR images were acquired using a 2D gradient echo echo planar imaging sequence. The 3D anatomical MR images of the whole brain were acquired using a conventional 3D gradient echo sequence. Motor tasks were sequential opposition of fingers, clenching a hand and elbow flexion. Somatosensory stimulation were administered by scrubbing the palm and sole with a washing sponge. Visual stimulation consisted of full visual field stimulation. Data were analyzed by the cross-correlation method. Transversal fMR images and anatomical images were reconstructed using both volume-, surface-rendering methods, and reconstructed for coronal and sagittal sections. Activated areas were expressed using the three primary colors. Motor tasks activated the contralateral primary motor area (M1), the primary somatosensory area (S1) and the supplementary motor area (SMA). Somatosensory tasks activated the contralateral S1, M1 and secondary sensory area (S2). Activated areas during full visual field stimulation was observed in the bilateral occipital lobe, including both the primary cortex. Three-dimensional brain mapping allowed visualization of the anatomical location and extent of the activated brain during both motor task and sensory stimulation. Using this method we could obtain a functional map similar to the Penfield`s schema. (author)

  5. Emotion-motion interactions in conversion disorder: an FMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Aybek

    Full Text Available To evaluate the neural correlates of implicit processing of negative emotions in motor conversion disorder (CD patients.An event related fMRI task was completed by 12 motor CD patients and 14 matched healthy controls using standardised stimuli of faces with fearful and sad emotional expressions in comparison to faces with neutral expressions. Temporal changes in the sensitivity to stimuli were also modelled and tested in the two groups.We found increased amygdala activation to negative emotions in CD compared to healthy controls in region of interest analyses, which persisted over time consistent with previous findings using emotional paradigms. Furthermore during whole brain analyses we found significantly increased activation in CD patients in areas involved in the 'freeze response' to fear (periaqueductal grey matter, and areas involved in self-awareness and motor control (cingulate gyrus and supplementary motor area.In contrast to healthy controls, CD patients exhibited increased response amplitude to fearful stimuli over time, suggesting abnormal emotional regulation (failure of habituation / sensitization. Patients with CD also activated midbrain and frontal structures that could reflect an abnormal behavioral-motor response to negative including threatening stimuli. This suggests a mechanism linking emotions to motor dysfunction in CD.

  6. Emotion-motion interactions in conversion disorder: an FMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aybek, Selma; Nicholson, Timothy R; O'Daly, Owen; Zelaya, Fernando; Kanaan, Richard A; David, Anthony S

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the neural correlates of implicit processing of negative emotions in motor conversion disorder (CD) patients. An event related fMRI task was completed by 12 motor CD patients and 14 matched healthy controls using standardised stimuli of faces with fearful and sad emotional expressions in comparison to faces with neutral expressions. Temporal changes in the sensitivity to stimuli were also modelled and tested in the two groups. We found increased amygdala activation to negative emotions in CD compared to healthy controls in region of interest analyses, which persisted over time consistent with previous findings using emotional paradigms. Furthermore during whole brain analyses we found significantly increased activation in CD patients in areas involved in the 'freeze response' to fear (periaqueductal grey matter), and areas involved in self-awareness and motor control (cingulate gyrus and supplementary motor area). In contrast to healthy controls, CD patients exhibited increased response amplitude to fearful stimuli over time, suggesting abnormal emotional regulation (failure of habituation / sensitization). Patients with CD also activated midbrain and frontal structures that could reflect an abnormal behavioral-motor response to negative including threatening stimuli. This suggests a mechanism linking emotions to motor dysfunction in CD.

  7. Gender differences in justice evaluations: Evidence from fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulebohn, James H; Davison, Robert B; Lee, Seungcheol Austin; Conlon, Donald E; McNamara, Gerry; Sarinopoulos, Issidoros C

    2016-02-01

    Justice research examining gender differences has yielded contrasting findings. This study enlists advanced techniques in cognitive neuroscience (fMRI) to examine gender differences in brain activation patterns in response to procedural and distributive justice manipulations. We integrate social role, information processing, justice, and neuroscience literature to posit and test for gender differences in 2 neural subsystems known to be involved in the appraisal of self-relevant events. Results indicate that the relationship between justice information processing and neural activity in areas representing these subsystems is significantly influenced by gender, with greater activation for females than males during consideration of both procedural and distributive justice information. In addition, we find evidence that gender and distributive injustice interact to influence bargaining behavior, with females rejecting ultimatum game offers more frequently than males. Results also demonstrate activation in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and ventral striatum brain regions during procedural justice evaluation is associated with offer rejection in females, but not in males. Managerial implications based on the study's support for gender differences in justice perceptions are discussed. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Working memory of somatosensory stimuli: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savini, Nicoletta; Brunetti, Marcella; Babiloni, Claudio; Ferretti, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    In a previous study, we have shown that passive recognition of tactile geometrical shapes (i.e. no exploratory movement) engages prefrontal and premotor areas in addition to somatosensory regions (Savini et al., 2010). In the present study we tested the hypothesis that these regions are involved not only in the perception but also during working memory of such somatic information. We performed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during the execution of N-BACK tasks, with 2D geometrical shapes blindly pressed on the subjects' right hand palm. Three conditions with increasing memory load (0-BACK, 1-BACK, 2-BACK) were used. Results showed that primary somatosensory area (SI), secondary somatosensory area (SII) and bilateral Insula were active in all conditions, confirming their importance in coding somatosensory stimuli. Activation of fronto-parietal circuit in supplementary motor area (SMA), right superior parietal lobe (rSPL), bilateral middle frontal gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus, and right superior frontal sulcus was significantly larger during 1-BACK and 2-BACK than 0-BACK. Left superior parietal lobe and right frontal eye field showed a higher activation during the 2-BACK than 0-BACK. Finally, SMA and rSPL were characterized by a statistically significant higher activation during 2-BACK than 1-BACK, revealing their sensitivity to the memory load. These results suggest that working memory of tactile geometrical shapes (no exploratory movement) involves a complex circuit of modal and supramodal fronto-parietal areas. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. FMRI evidence of 'mirror' responses to geometric shapes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Press

    Full Text Available Mirror neurons may be a genetic adaptation for social interaction. Alternatively, the associative hypothesis proposes that the development of mirror neurons is driven by sensorimotor learning, and that, given suitable experience, mirror neurons will respond to any stimulus. This hypothesis was tested using fMRI adaptation to index populations of cells with mirror properties. After sensorimotor training, where geometric shapes were paired with hand actions, BOLD response was measured while human participants experienced runs of events in which shape observation alternated with action execution or observation. Adaptation from shapes to action execution, and critically, observation, occurred in ventral premotor cortex (PMv and inferior parietal lobule (IPL. Adaptation from shapes to execution indicates that neuronal populations responding to the shapes had motor properties, while adaptation to observation demonstrates that these populations had mirror properties. These results indicate that sensorimotor training induced populations of cells with mirror properties in PMv and IPL to respond to the observation of arbitrary shapes. They suggest that the mirror system has not been shaped by evolution to respond in a mirror fashion to biological actions; instead, its development is mediated by stimulus-general processes of learning within a system adapted for visuomotor control.

  10. Adults and children processing music: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsch, Stefan; Fritz, Thomas; Schulze, Katrin; Alsop, David; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2005-05-01

    The present study investigates the functional neuroanatomy of music perception with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Three different subject groups were investigated to examine developmental aspects and effects of musical training: 10-year-old children with varying degrees of musical training, adults without formal musical training (nonmusicians), and adult musicians. Subjects made judgements on sequences that ended on chords that were music-syntactically either regular or irregular. In adults, irregular chords activated the inferior frontal gyrus, orbital frontolateral cortex, the anterior insula, ventrolateral premotor cortex, anterior and posterior areas of the superior temporal gyrus, the superior temporal sulcus, and the supramarginal gyrus. These structures presumably form different networks mediating cognitive aspects of music processing (such as processing of musical syntax and musical meaning, as well as auditory working memory), and possibly emotional aspects of music processing. In the right hemisphere, the activation pattern of children was similar to that of adults. In the left hemisphere, adults showed larger activations than children in prefrontal areas, in the supramarginal gyrus, and in temporal areas. In both adults and children, musical training was correlated with stronger activations in the frontal operculum and the anterior portion of the superior temporal gyrus.

  11. Contradictory reasoning network: an EEG and FMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camillo Porcaro

    Full Text Available Contradiction is a cornerstone of human rationality, essential for everyday life and communication. We investigated electroencephalographic (EEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in separate recording sessions during contradictory judgments, using a logical structure based on categorical propositions of the Aristotelian Square of Opposition (ASoO. The use of ASoO propositions, while controlling for potential linguistic or semantic confounds, enabled us to observe the spatial temporal unfolding of this contradictory reasoning. The processing started with the inversion of the logical operators corresponding to right middle frontal gyrus (rMFG-BA11 activation, followed by identification of contradictory statement associated with in the right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG-BA47 activation. Right medial frontal gyrus (rMeFG, BA10 and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, BA32 contributed to the later stages of process. We observed a correlation between the delayed latency of rBA11 response and the reaction time delay during inductive vs. deductive reasoning. This supports the notion that rBA11 is crucial for manipulating the logical operators. Slower processing time and stronger brain responses for inductive logic suggested that examples are easier to process than general principles and are more likely to simplify communication.

  12. Contradictory reasoning network: an EEG and FMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcaro, Camillo; Medaglia, Maria Teresa; Thai, Ngoc Jade; Seri, Stefano; Rotshtein, Pia; Tecchio, Franca

    2014-01-01

    Contradiction is a cornerstone of human rationality, essential for everyday life and communication. We investigated electroencephalographic (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in separate recording sessions during contradictory judgments, using a logical structure based on categorical propositions of the Aristotelian Square of Opposition (ASoO). The use of ASoO propositions, while controlling for potential linguistic or semantic confounds, enabled us to observe the spatial temporal unfolding of this contradictory reasoning. The processing started with the inversion of the logical operators corresponding to right middle frontal gyrus (rMFG-BA11) activation, followed by identification of contradictory statement associated with in the right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG-BA47) activation. Right medial frontal gyrus (rMeFG, BA10) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, BA32) contributed to the later stages of process. We observed a correlation between the delayed latency of rBA11 response and the reaction time delay during inductive vs. deductive reasoning. This supports the notion that rBA11 is crucial for manipulating the logical operators. Slower processing time and stronger brain responses for inductive logic suggested that examples are easier to process than general principles and are more likely to simplify communication.

  13. A Sensitivity Analysis of fMRI Balloon Model

    KAUST Repository

    Zayane, Chadia

    2015-04-22

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allows the mapping of the brain activation through measurements of the Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) contrast. The characterization of the pathway from the input stimulus to the output BOLD signal requires the selection of an adequate hemodynamic model and the satisfaction of some specific conditions while conducting the experiment and calibrating the model. This paper, focuses on the identifiability of the Balloon hemodynamic model. By identifiability, we mean the ability to estimate accurately the model parameters given the input and the output measurement. Previous studies of the Balloon model have somehow added knowledge either by choosing prior distributions for the parameters, freezing some of them, or looking for the solution as a projection on a natural basis of some vector space. In these studies, the identification was generally assessed using event-related paradigms. This paper justifies the reasons behind the need of adding knowledge, choosing certain paradigms, and completing the few existing identifiability studies through a global sensitivity analysis of the Balloon model in the case of blocked design experiment.

  14. The cooperation of the functional activation areas in human brain: an application of event-related fMRI study of the voluntary motor function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Enzhong; Tian Jie; Dai Ruwei

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To detect the cooperation of the functional activation areas in human brain using event-related fMRI technique developed in recent years. Methods: Forty-four subjects were selected in this experiment and scanned by GE Signa Horizon 1.5 Tesla superconductive MR system. A CUE-GO paradigm was used in this experiment. The data were analyzed in SUN and SGI workstation. Results: The activation areas were found in contralateral primary motor area (Ml), bilateral supplementary motor areas (SMA), pre-motor areas (PMA), basal ganglia, and cerebellar cortices. The time-signal curve of Ml was a typical single-peak curve, but the curves in PMA, basal ganglia, and cerebellar cortices were double-peak curves. SMA had 2 parts, one was Pre-SMA, and another was SMA Proper. The curve was double-peak type in Pre-SMA and single-peak type in SMA Proper. There was difference between the time-signal intensity curves in above-mentioned areas. Conclusion: (1) Ml is mainly associated with motor execution, while others with both motor preparation and execution. There are differences in the function at the variant areas in the brain. (2) The fact that bilateral SMA, PMA, basal ganglia, and cerebellar cortices were activated, is different from what the classical theories told. (3) Event-related fMRI technique has higher temporary and spatial resolutions. (4) There is cooperation among different cortical areas, basal ganglia, and cerebellum

  15. History of Suicide Attempt Is Associated with Reduced Medial Prefrontal Cortex Activity during Emotional Decision-Making among Men with Schizophrenia: An Exploratory fMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Potvin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the high prevalence of suicidal ideas/attempts in schizophrenia, only a handful of neuroimaging studies have examined the neurobiological differences associated with suicide risk in this population. The main objective of the current exploratory study is to examine the neurofunctional correlates associated with a history of suicide attempt in schizophrenia, using a risky decision-making task, in order to show alterations in brain reward regions in this population. Thirty-two male outpatients with schizophrenia were recruited: 13 patients with (SCZ + S and 19 without a history of suicidal attempt (SCZ − S. Twenty-one healthy men with no history of mental disorders or suicidal attempt/idea were also recruited. Participants were scanned using fMRI while performing the Balloon Analogue Risk Task. A rapid event-related fMRI paradigm was used, separating decision and outcome events, and the explosion probabilities were included as parametric modulators. The most important finding of this study is that SCZ + S patients had reduced activations of the medial prefrontal cortex during the success outcome event (with parametric modulation, relative to both SCZ − S patients and controls, as illustrated by a spatial conjunction analysis. These exploratory results suggest that a history of suicidal attempt in schizophrenia is associated with blunted brain reward activity during emotional decision-making.

  16. Hormonal treatment increases the response of the reward system at the menopause transition: a counterbalanced randomized placebo-controlled fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Julie; Météreau, Elise; Déchaud, Henri; Pugeat, Michel; Dreher, Jean-Claude

    2014-12-01

    Preclinical research using rodent models demonstrated that estrogens play neuroprotective effects if they are administered during a critical period near the time of cessation of ovarian function. In women, a number of controversial epidemiological studies reported that a neuroprotective effect of estradiol may be obtained on cognition and mood-related disorders if hormone therapy (HT) begins early at the beginning of menopause. Yet, little is known about the modulatory effects of early HT administration on brain activation near menopause. Here, we investigated whether HT, initiated early during the menopause transition, increases the response of the reward system, a key brain circuit involved in motivation and hedonic behavior. We used fMRI and a counterbalanced, double-blind, randomized and crossover placebo-controlled design to investigate whether sequential 17β-estradiol plus oral progesterone modulate reward-related brain activity. Each woman was scanned twice while presented with images of slot machines, once after receiving HT and once under placebo. The fMRI results demonstrate that HT, relative to placebo, increased the response of the striatum and ventromedial prefrontal cortex, two areas that have been shown to be respectively involved during reward anticipation and at the time of reward delivery. Our neuroimaging results bridge the gap between animal studies and human epidemiological studies of HT on cognition. These findings establish a neurobiological foundation for understanding the neurofunctional impact of early HT initiation on reward processing at the menopause transition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Satiation attenuates BOLD activity in brain regions involved in reward and increases activity in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex: an fMRI study in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jason M; Higgs, Suzanne; Dourish, Colin T; Hansen, Peter C; Harmer, Catherine J; McCabe, Ciara

    2015-04-01

    Neural responses to rewarding food cues are significantly different in the fed vs. fasted (>8 h food-deprived) state. However, the effect of eating to satiety after a shorter (more natural) intermeal interval on neural responses to both rewarding and aversive cues has not been examined. With the use of a novel functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) task, we investigated the effect of satiation on neural responses to both rewarding and aversive food tastes and pictures. Sixteen healthy participants (8 men, 8 women) were scanned on 2 separate test days, before and after eating a meal to satiation or after not eating for 4 h (satiated vs. premeal). fMRI blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals to the sight and/or taste of the stimuli were recorded. A whole-brain cluster-corrected analysis (P analysis showed that the vmPFC was more highly connected to the dlPFC when individuals were exposed to food stimuli when satiated than when not satiated. These results suggest that natural satiation attenuates activity in reward-related brain regions and increases activity in the dlPFC, which may reflect a "top down" cognitive influence on satiation. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02298049. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  18. Time factors associated with CT scan usage in trauma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung Kon Jin, P.H.P.; Geene, A.R. van; Linnau, K.F.; Jurkovich, G.J.; Ponsen, K.J.; Goslings, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: While computed tomography (CT) scan usage in acute trauma patients is currently part of the standard complete diagnostic workup, little is known regarding the time factors involved when CT scanning is added to the standard workup. An analysis of the current time factors and intervals in a high-volume, streamlined level-1 trauma center can potentially expose points of improvement in the trauma resuscitation phase. Materials and methods: During a 5-week period, data on current time factors involved in CT scanned trauma patients were prospectively collected. All consecutive trauma patients seen in the Emergency Department following severe trauma, or inter-hospital transfer following initial stabilizing elsewhere, and that underwent CT scanning, were included. Patients younger than 16 years of age were excluded. For all eligible patients, a complete time registration was performed, including admission time, time until completion of trauma series, time until CT imaging, and completion of CT imaging. Subgroup analyses were performed to differentiate severity of injury, based on ISS, and on primary or transfer presentations, surgery, and ICU admittance. Results: Median time between the arrival of the patient and completion of the screening X-ray trauma series was 9 min. Median start time for the first CT scan was 82 min. The first CT session was completed in a median of 105 min after arrival. Complete radiological workup was finished in 114 min (median). In 62% of all patients requiring CT scanning, a full body CT scan was obtained. Patients with ISS >15 had a significant shorter time until CT imaging and time until completion of CT imaging. Conclusion: In a high-volume level-1 trauma center, the complete radiological workup of trauma patients stable enough to undergo CT scanning, is completed in a median of 114 min. Patients that are more severely injured based on ISS were transported faster to CT, resulting in faster diagnostic imaging.

  19. Uji Ketahanan Beberapa Varietas Dan Pengaruh Jarak Tanam Terhadap Penyakit Karat Daun (Puccinia Polysora Underw) Pada Tanaman Jagung (Zea Mays L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Aditya, Sukma

    2013-01-01

    Sukma Aditya, "Some Resistance Test Plant Varieties and Influence Distance Against Disease Leaf Rust (Puccinia polysora Underw) In the Corn Plantation (Zea mays l.) In the Lowlands". Supervised by Dr. Ir. Hasanuddin, MS, and Ir. Mukhtar Pinem Iskandar, M. Agr. This study aims to determine the resistance of some varieties of maize (Zea mays L.) and plant spacing influence on leaf rust disease (Puccinia polysora Underw.) In the lowlands. Research conducted in the village of Tanjung Selamat, Med...

  20. Modeling fMRI signals can provide insights into neural processing in the cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanni, Simo; Sharifian, Fariba; Heikkinen, Hanna; Vigário, Ricardo

    2015-08-01

    Every stimulus or task activates multiple areas in the mammalian cortex. These distributed activations can be measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which has the best spatial resolution among the noninvasive brain imaging methods. Unfortunately, the relationship between the fMRI activations and distributed cortical processing has remained unclear, both because the coupling between neural and fMRI activations has remained poorly understood and because fMRI voxels are too large to directly sense the local neural events. To get an idea of the local processing given the macroscopic data, we need models to simulate the neural activity and to provide output that can be compared with fMRI data. Such models can describe neural mechanisms as mathematical functions between input and output in a specific system, with little correspondence to physiological mechanisms. Alternatively, models can be biomimetic, including biological details with straightforward correspondence to experimental data. After careful balancing between complexity, computational efficiency, and realism, a biomimetic simulation should be able to provide insight into how biological structures or functions contribute to actual data processing as well as to promote theory-driven neuroscience experiments. This review analyzes the requirements for validating system-level computational models with fMRI. In particular, we study mesoscopic biomimetic models, which include a limited set of details from real-life networks and enable system-level simulations of neural mass action. In addition, we discuss how recent developments in neurophysiology and biophysics may significantly advance the modelling of fMRI signals. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Optimized design and analysis of sparse-sampling fMRI experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler K Perrachione

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Sparse-sampling is an important methodological advance in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, in which silent delays are introduced between MR volume acquisitions, allowing for the presentation of auditory stimuli without contamination by acoustic scanner noise and for overt vocal responses without motion-induced artifacts in the functional timeseries. As such, the sparse-sampling technique has become a mainstay of principled fMRI research into the cognitive and systems neuroscience of speech, language, hearing, and music. Despite being in use for over a decade, there has been little systematic investigation of the acquisition parameters, experimental design considerations, and statistical analysis approaches that bear on the results and interpretation of sparse-sampling fMRI experiments. In this report, we examined how design and analysis choices related to the duration of repetition time (TR delay (an acquisition parameter, stimulation rate (an experimental design parameter and model basis function (an analysis parameter act independently and interactively to affect the neural activation profiles observed in fMRI. First, we conducted a series of computational simulations to explore the parameter space of sparse design and analysis with respect to these variables; second, we validated the results of these simulations in a series of sparse-sampling fMRI experiments. Overall, these experiments suggest three methodological approaches that can, in many situations, substantially improve the detection of neurophysiological response in sparse fMRI: (1 Sparse analyses should utilize a physiologically-informed model that incorporates hemodynamic response convolution to reduce model error. (2 The design of sparse fMRI experiments should maintain a high rate of stimulus presentation to maximize effect size. (3 TR delays of short to intermediate length can be used between acquisitions of sparse-sampled functional image volumes to improve

  2. Whole-brain vascular reactivity measured by fMRI using hyperventilation and breath-holding tasks: efficacy of 3D prospective acquisition correction (3D-PACE) for head motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naganawa, Shinji; Koshikawa, Tokiko; Fukatsu, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takeo; Maruyama, Katsuya; Takizawa, Osamu

    2004-01-01

    Functional MR imaging (fMRI) study using hyperventilation and breath-holding task has been reported to be one of the non-invasive methods to examine whole-brain vascular reactivity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a method for 3D prospective detection and correction of head motion (3D-PACE) in a study of whole-brain vascular reactivity using hyperventilation and breath-holding tasks. Eight healthy volunteers were scanned using an fMRI protocol of hyperventilation and breath-holding task blocks at 3 T in separate runs with and without 3D-PACE. In two subjects, two more runs with and without 3D-PACE were repeated. The mean total number of activated voxels ± standard deviation was 26,405.3±1,822.2 in the run with 3D-PACE and 17,329.9±2,766.3 in the run without 3D-PACE (P<0.05), although there is some intersubject variation regarding the effect of 3D-PACE. In the two subjects whose performed two more runs, the number of activated voxels were smaller in the run without 3D-PACE than even in the run with 3D-PACE performed later. We conclude that 3D-PACE is beneficial for fMRI studies of whole-brain vascular reactivity induced by hyperventilation and breath-holding. (orig.)

  3. Functional Laterality of Task-Evoked Activation in Sensorimotor Cortex of Preterm Infants: An Optimized 3 T fMRI Study Employing a Customized Neonatal Head Coil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Scheef

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in neonates has been introduced as a non-invasive method for studying sensorimotor processing in the developing brain. However, previous neonatal studies have delivered conflicting results regarding localization, lateralization, and directionality of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD responses in sensorimotor cortex (SMC. Amongst the confounding factors in interpreting neonatal fMRI studies include the use of standard adult MR-coils providing insufficient signal to noise, and liberal statistical thresholds, compromising clinical interpretation at the single subject level.Here, we employed a custom-designed neonatal MR-coil adapted and optimized to the head size of a newborn in order to improve robustness, reliability and validity of neonatal sensorimotor fMRI. Thirteen preterm infants with a median gestational age of 26 weeks were scanned at term-corrected age using a prototype 8-channel neonatal head coil at 3T (Achieva, Philips, Best, NL. Sensorimotor stimulation was elicited by passive extension/flexion of the elbow at 1 Hz in a block design. Analysis of temporal signal to noise ratio (tSNR was performed on the whole brain and the SMC, and was compared to data acquired with an 'adult' 8 channel head coil published previously. Task-evoked activation was determined by single-subject SPM8 analyses, thresholded at p < 0.05, whole-brain FWE-corrected.Using a custom-designed neonatal MR-coil, we found significant positive BOLD responses in contralateral SMC after unilateral passive sensorimotor stimulation in all neonates (analyses restricted to artifact-free data sets = 8/13. Improved imaging characteristics of the neonatal MR-coil were evidenced by additional phantom and in vivo tSNR measurements: phantom studies revealed a 240% global increase in tSNR; in vivo studies revealed a 73% global and a 55% local (SMC increase in tSNR, as compared to the 'adult' MR-coil.Our findings strengthen the

  4. Tomography system having axial scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    An improved method and apparatus has been invented for the transaxial tomographic scanning of a patient to determine mass distribution internal to the patient. A scanning system is provided having a rotatably mounted X-ray radiation source/detector assembly which orbits and scans the patient in plane of orbit. The source provides a plurality of beams of radiation in the orbital plane. Beams pass through the patient to an array of detectors which are spaced in the plane of orbit and respectively aligned with one of the beams. Radiation intensity data is collected at predetermined orientations of each beam-detector pair as the assembly orbits about the patient

  5. Transverse section radionuclide scanning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhl, D.E.; Edwards, R.Q.

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides a transverse section radionuclide scanning system for high-sensitivity quantification of brain radioactivity in cross-section picture format in order to permit accurate assessment of regional brain function localized in three dimensions. High sensitivity crucially depends on overcoming the heretofore known raster type scanning, which requires back and forth detector movement involving dead-time or partial enclosure of the scan field. Accordingly, this invention provides a detector array having no back and forth movement by interlaced detectors that enclose the scan field and rotate as an integral unit around one axis of rotation in a slip ring that continuously transmits the detector data by means of laser emitting diodes, with the advantages that increased amounts of data can be continuously collected, processed and displayed with increased sensitivity according to a suitable computer program. 5 claims, 11 figures

  6. Security scanning at 35 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderton, Rupert N.; Appleby, Roger; Coward, Peter R.; Kent, P. J.; Price, Sean; Sinclair, Gordon N.; Wasley, Matthew R. M.

    2001-08-01

    It has been known for some time that millimeter waves can pas through clothing. In short range applications such as in the scanning of people for security purposes, operating at Ka band can be an advantage. The penetration through clothing is increased and the cost of the equipment when compared to operation at W band. In this paper a Ka band mechanically scanned imager designed for security scanning is discussed. This imager is based on the folded conical scan technology previously reported. It is constructed from low cost materials such as polystyrene and printed circuit board. The trade off between image spatial resolution and the number of receivers will be described and solutions, which minimize this number discussed.

  7. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy - image interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maca, F.

    1998-01-01

    The basic ideas of image interpretation in Scanning Tunneling Microscopy are presented using simple quantum-mechanical models and supplied with examples of successful application. The importance is stressed of a correct interpretation of this brilliant experimental surface technique

  8. Dynamic Flaps Electronic Scan Antenna

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gonzalez, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    A dynamic FLAPS(TM) electronic scan antenna was the focus of this research. The novelty S of this SBIR resides in the use of plasma as the main component of this dynamic X-Band phased S array antenna...

  9. An automated method for identifying artifact in ICA of resting-state fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik eBhaganagarapu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available An enduring issue with data-driven analysis and filtering methods is the interpretation of results. To assist, we present an automatic method for identifaction of artifact in independent components (ICs derived from functional MRI (fMRI. The method was designed with the following features: Does not require temporal information about an fMRI paradigm; Does not require the user to train the algorithm; Requires only the fMRI images (additional acquisition of anatomical imaging not required; Is able to identify a high proportion of artifact-related ICs without removing components that are likely to be of neuronal origin; Can be applied to resting-state fMRI; Is automated, requiring minimal or no human intervention.We applied the method to a MELODIC probabilistic ICA of resting-state functional connectivity data acquired in 50 healthy control subjects, and compared the results to a blinded expert manual classification. The method identified between 26% and 72% of the components as artifact (mean 55%. 0.3% of components identified as artifact were discordant with the manual classification; retrospective examination of these ICs suggested the automated method had correctly identified these as artifact.We have developed an effective automated method which removes a substantial number of unwanted noisy components in ICA analyses of resting-state fMRI data. Source code of our implementation of the method is available.

  10. Sparse dictionary learning for fMRI analysis using autocorrelation maximization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Muhammad Usman; Shah, Adnan; Seghouane, Abd-Krim

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the effect of temporal autocorrelations in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data on sparse dictionary learning (SDL) is addressed. For sparse general linear model (sGLM), the fMRI time-series is modeled as a linear mixture of several signals such as neural dynamics, structured noise, random noise and unexplained signal variations on the basis of spatial sparseness. These signals are considered as underlying sources and SDL is used to estimate them. However, the sparse GLM model does not take into account the autocorrelations in fMRI data. To address this shortcoming, a new model is proposed to incorporate the prior knowledge about lag-1 autocorrelation into dictionary update stage. This helps improve the sensitivity and specificity of the fMRI data during statistical analysis. Using a simulation study, the effect of the proposed dictionary update on sGLM is compared to conventional sGLM by utilizing various detrending techniques. Furthermore, the proposed update is validated in an sGLM framework for real fMRI datasets, which shows its better capability to estimate neural dynamics in presence of spatiotemporal dependencies.

  11. Computer-automated focus lateralization of temporal lobe epilepsy using fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Sharon; Levin, Harvey S; Haneef, Zulfi

    2015-06-01

    To compare the performance of computer-automated diagnosis using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) interictal graph theory (CADFIG) to that achieved in standard clinical practice with MRI, for lateralizing the affected hemisphere in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Interictal resting state fMRI and high-resolution MRI were performed on 14 left and 10 right TLE patients. Functional topology measures were calculated from fMRI using graph theory, and used to lateralize the epileptogenic hemisphere using quadratic discriminant analysis. Leave-one-out cross-validation prediction accuracy of CADFIG was compared to performance based on expert manual analysis (MA) of MRI, using video EEG as the "gold standard" for focus lateralization. CADFIG correctly lateralized 95.8% (23/24) of cases, compared to 66.7% (16/24) with expert MA of MRI. Combining MA with CADFIG allowed all cases (24/24) to be correctly lateralized. CADFIG correctly identified the affected hemisphere for all patients (8/8) where MRI failed to lateralize. CADFIG based on fMRI lateralized the affected hemisphere in TLE with superior performance compared to expert MA of MRI. These results demonstrate that functional patterns in fMRI can be used with automated machine learning for diagnostic lateralization in TLE. Addition of fMRI-based tests to existing protocols for identifying the affected hemisphere in presurgical assessment can improve diagnostic accuracy and surgical outcome in TLE. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Dimensionality estimation for group fMRI data reduction at multiple levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sharon; Ross, Thomas J.; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Stein, Elliot A.; Yang, Yihong; Zhan, Wang

    2007-03-01

    Current techniques substantially overestimate the dimensionality of group fMRI data, and this problem worsens when principle component analysis (PCA) based data reductions are applied at multiple levels. In this paper, the mechanism of the overestimation is investigated, and a new method is developed for more reliable dimensionality estimation for group fMRI data at multiple levels. Simulation suggests that small variation of the signal components within a group is a major cause of dimensionality overestimation. To obtain an improved estimation, appropriate colored noise is added into the group fMRI data in order to blur the signal component variations. The noise parameters are estimated from the original fMRI data, and the improved dimensionality is determined by applying a first-order autoregressive (AR(1)) noise fitting technique to the PCA spectrum. The proposed method was tested on group resting-state fMRI datasets acquired from 14 normal human subjects in 5 different sessions. The PCA-based data reductions were performed at 3 levels in either "individual-session-subject" or "individual-subject-session" order. Results indicate that the proposed method significantly reduces the dimensionality overestimation for multiple level data reductions. Consistency of the estimated dimensionalities is observed with different group orders of the data reduction.

  13. An optical 6-axis force sensor for brain function analysis using fMRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Norihisa; Tada, Mitsunori; Ueda, Jun; Matsumoto, Yoshio; Ogasawara, Tsukasa

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an 6-axis optical force sensor which can be used in functional MRI (fMRI). Recently, fMRI are widely used for studying human brain function. Simultaneous measurement of brain activity and peripheral information, such as grip force, enables more precise investigations in studies of motor function. However, conventional force sensors cannot be used in fMRI environment, since metal elements generate noise which severely contaminate the signals of fMRI. An optical 2-axis force sensor has been developed using photo sensors and optical fibers by Tada et al., that resolved these problems. The developed force sensor removed all magnetic components from the sensing part. It detected minute displacements by measure amount of light and light traveled through the optical fibers. However, there still remain several problems on this optical force sensor. Firstly, the accuracy is not high compared to the conventional force sensors. Secondly, the robustness is not enough against the contact force to the optical fibers. In this paper, the problems concerning to the acturacy and the sensor output stability has been improved by novel methods of fixing fibers and arithmetic circuit. An optical 6-axis force is developed based on these improvements, and usefulness of our sensor for brain function analysis is confirmed in fMRI experimentations. (author)

  14. Impact of abnormal cerebrovascular reactivity on BOLD fMRI: a preliminary investigation of moyamoya disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerolle, Erin L; Ma, Yuhan; Sinclair, David; Pike, G Bruce

    2018-01-01

    Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies of patients with cerebrovascular disease have largely ignored the confounds associated with abnormal cerebral blood flow, vascular reactivity and neurovascular coupling. We studied BOLD fMRI activation and cerebrovascular reactivity in moyamoya disease. To characterize the impact of remote vascular demands on BOLD fMRI measurements, we varied the vascular territories engaged by manipulating the experimental task performed by the participants. Vascular territories affected by disease were identified using BOLD cerebrovascular reactivity. Preliminary evidence from two patients pre- and postrevascularization surgery and four controls indicates that neurovascular coupling in affected brain regions can be modulated by the task-related vascular demands in unaffected regions. In one patient studied, we observed that brain regions with improved cerebrovascular reactivity after surgery demonstrated normalized neurovascular coupling, that is the degree to which neurovascular coupling was modulated by task-related vascular demands was decreased. We propose that variations in task-dependent neurovascular coupling in patients with moyamoya disease are likely related to vascular steal. While preliminary, our findings are a proof of concept of the limitations of BOLD fMRI in cerebrovascular disease and suggest a role for assessment of cerebrovascular reactivity to improve interpretation of task-related BOLD fMRI activation. © 2016 The Authors. Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine.

  15. Feature-space-based FMRI analysis using the optimal linear transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fengrong; Morris, Drew; Lee, Wayne; Taylor, Margot J; Mills, Travis; Babyn, Paul S

    2010-09-01

    The optimal linear transformation (OLT), an image analysis technique of feature space, was first presented in the field of MRI. This paper proposes a method of extending OLT from MRI to functional MRI (fMRI) to improve the activation-detection performance over conventional approaches of fMRI analysis. In this method, first, ideal hemodynamic response time series for different stimuli were generated by convolving the theoretical hemodynamic response model with the stimulus timing. Second, constructing hypothetical signature vectors for different activity patterns of interest by virtue of the ideal hemodynamic responses, OLT was used to extract features of fMRI data. The resultant feature space had particular geometric clustering properties. It was then classified into different groups, each pertaining to an activity pattern of interest; the applied signature vector for each group was obtained by averaging. Third, using the applied signature vectors, OLT was applied again to generate fMRI composite images with high SNRs for the desired activity patterns. Simulations and a blocked fMRI experiment were employed for the method to be verified and compared with the general linear model (GLM)-based analysis. The simulation studies and the experimental results indicated the superiority of the proposed method over the GLM-based analysis in detecting brain activities.

  16. Processes in arithmetic strategy selection: A fMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien eTaillan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This neuroimaging (fMRI study investigated neural correlates of strategy selection. Young adults performed an arithmetic task in two different conditions. In both conditions, participants had to provide estimates of two-digit multiplication problems like 54 x 78. In the choice condition, participants had to select the better of two available rounding strategies, rounding-up strategy (RU (i.e., doing 60x80 = 4,800 or rounding-down strategy (RD (i.e., doing 50x70=3,500 to estimate product of 54x78. In the no-choice condition, participants did not have to select strategy on each problem but were told which strategy to use; they executed RU and RD strategies each on a series of problems. Participants also had a control task (i.e., providing correct products of multiplication problems like 40x50. Brain activations and performance were analyzed as a function of these conditions. Participants were able to frequently choose the better strategy in the choice condition; they were also slower when they executed the difficult RU than the easier RD. Neuroimaging data showed greater brain activations in right anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC, and angular gyrus (ANG, when selecting (relative to executing the better strategy on each problem. Moreover, RU was associated with more parietal cortex activation than RD. These results suggest an important role of fronto-parietal network in strategy selection and have important implications for our further understanding and modelling cognitive processes underlying strategy selection.

  17. Neural mechanisms of anaphoric reference revealed by fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Hammer

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Pronouns are bound to their antecedents by matching syntactic and semantic information. The aim of this functional magnetic resonance (fMRI study was to localize syntactic and semantic information retrieval and integration during pronoun resolution. Especially we investigated their possible interaction with verbal working memory manipulated by distance between antecedent and pronoun. We disentangled biological and syntactic gender information using German sentences about persons (biological/syntactic gender or things (syntactic gender followed by congruent or incongruent pronouns. Increasing the distance between pronoun and antecedent resulted in a short and a long distance condition. Analysis revealed a language related network including inferior frontal regions bilaterally (integration, left anterior and posterior temporal regions (lexico-semantics and syntactic retrieval and the anterior cingulate gyrus (conflict resolution involved in pronoun resolution. Activities within the inferior frontal region were driven by Congruency (incongruent > congruent and Distance (long > short. Temporal regions were sensitive to Distance and Congruency (but solely within long distant conditions. Furthermore, anterior temporal regions were sensitive to the antecedent type with an increased activity for person-pronouns compared to thing-pronouns. We suggest that activity modulations within these areas reflect the integration process of an appropriate antecedent which depends on the type of information that has to be retrieved (lexico-syntactic posterior-temporal, lexico-semantics anterior-temporal. It also depends on the overall syntactic and semantic complexity of long distant sentences. The results are interpreted in the context of the Memory-Unification-Control model for sentence comprehension as proposed by Vosse and van Kempen (2000, Hagoort (2005, and Snijders et al. (2009.

  18. Indications for brain computed tomography scan after minor head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif-Alhoseini, Mahdi; Khodadadi, Hossein; Chardoli, Mojtaba; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2011-10-01

    Minor head injury (MHI) is a common injury seen in Emergency Departments (ED). Computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain is a good method of investigation to diagnose intracranial lesions, but there is a disagreement about indications in MHI patients. We surveyed the post-traumatic symptoms, signs or past historical matters that can be used for the indication of brain CT scan. All patients with MHI who were older than 2 years, had a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score ≥13 and were referred to the ED, underwent brain CT scan. Data on age, headache, vomiting, loss of consciousness (LOC) or amnesia, post-traumatic seizure, physical evidence of trauma above the clavicles, alcohol intoxication, and anticoagulant usage were collected. The main outcome measure was the presence of lesions related to the trauma in brain CT scan. For categorical variables, Chi-square test was used. Six hundred and forty-two patients were examined by brain CT scan after MHI, and 388 patients (60.4%) did not have any risk indicator. Twenty patients (3.1%) had abnormal brain CT scans. The logistic regression model showed that headache (P=0.006), LOC or amnesia (P=0.024) and alcohol (P=0.036) were associated with abnormal brain CT. WE SUGGESTED THAT ABNORMAL BRAIN CT SCAN RELATED TO THE TRAUMA AFTER MHI CAN BE PREDICTED BY THE PRESENCE OF ONE OR MORE OF THE FOLLOWING RISK INDICATORS: Headache, vomiting, LOC or amnesia, and alcohol intoxication. Thus, if any patient has these indicators following MHI, he must be considered as a high-risk MHI.

  19. Volumetric measurement of the maxillary sinus by coronal CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Atsuko

    1996-01-01

    The volume of the maxillary sinus was estimated by coronal CT scan. The purpose of this study was to compare the estimated volume of the normal maxillary sinus with that of the inflamed maxillary sinus. Patients were classified following evaluation by CT scan of the paranasal sinuses into 3 categories. Group A (n=12): Patients suffered from headache, facial pain and epistaxis, but CT scans of their nasal cavity and paranasal sinus were within normal limits without inflammatory change. Group B (n=69): Patients with bilateral chronic maxillary sinusitis, CT scans of whom showed inflammatory changes in both maxillary sinuses. All of the patients in this group underwent sinus surgery after coronal CT scans. Group C (n=14): Patients with unilateral chronic maxillary sinusitis, CT scans of whom showed inflammatory change in unilateral maxillary sinuses. CT scans of these patients were measured by Plannimeter to take the area of each image of the maxillary sinus. Consecutively imaged areas were summated by integral calculus to obtain an estimate of the sinus volume. The mean maxillary sinus volume in the affected sinuses was significantly smaller than those in the contralateral normal sinuses (p<0.05, Wilcoxon-test). The various volumes of the maxillary sinuses and the developmental cause were discussed. Comparison of groups A with B suggested three distinct patterns; the maxillary sinus volume has decreased due to inflammatory changes in the bone. The small sinuses have a tendency to develop chronic inflammatory change. The aeration in the maxillary sinus may be decreased when anatomic variations that may obstruct the ethmoid infundibulum exist. (K.H.)

  20. Volumetric measurement of the maxillary sinus by coronal CT scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Atsuko [Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-08-01

    The volume of the maxillary sinus was estimated by coronal CT scan. The purpose of this study was to compare the estimated volume of the normal maxillary sinus with that of the inflamed maxillary sinus. Patients were classified following evaluation by CT scan of the paranasal sinuses into 3 categories. Group A (n=12): Patients suffered from headache, facial pain and epistaxis, but CT scans of their nasal cavity and paranasal sinus were within normal limits without inflammatory change. Group B (n=69): Patients with bilateral chronic maxillary sinusitis, CT scans of whom showed inflammatory changes in both maxillary sinuses. All of the patients in this group underwent sinus surgery after coronal CT scans. Group C (n=14): Patients with unilateral chronic maxillary sinusitis, CT scans of whom showed inflammatory change in unilateral maxillary sinuses. CT scans of these patients were measured by Plannimeter to take the area of each image of the maxillary sinus. Consecutively imaged areas were summated by integral calculus to obtain an estimate of the sinus volume. The mean maxillary sinus volume in the affected sinuses was significantly smaller than those in the contralateral normal sinuses (p<0.05, Wilcoxon-test). The various volumes of the maxillary sinuses and the developmental cause were discussed. Comparison of groups A with B suggested three distinct patterns; the maxillary sinus volume has decreased due to inflammatory changes in the bone. The small sinuses have a tendency to develop chronic inflammatory change. The aeration in the maxillary sinus may be decreased when anatomic variations that may obstruct the ethmoid infundibulum exist. (K.H.)