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  1. Arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dašić Žarko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Meniscal injuries are common in professional or recreational sports as well as in daily activities. If meniscal lesions lead to physical impairment they usually require surgical treatment. Arthroscopic treatment of meniscal injuries is one of the most often performed orthopedic operative procedures. Methods. The study analyzed the results of arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy in 213 patients in a 24-month period, from 2006, to 2008. Results. In our series of arthroscopically treated medial meniscus tears we noted 78 (36.62% vertical complete bucket handle lesions, 19 (8.92% vertical incomplete lesions, 18 (8.45% longitudinal tears, 35 (16.43% oblique tears, 18 (8.45% complex degenerative lesions, 17 (7.98% radial lesions and 28 (13.14% horisontal lesions. Mean preoperative International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC score was 49.81%, 1 month after the arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy the mean IKDC score was 84.08%, and 6 months after mean IKDC score was 90.36%. Six months after the procedure 197 (92.49% of patients had good or excellent subjective postoperative clinical outcomes, while 14 (6.57% patients subjectively did not notice a significant improvement after the intervention, and 2 (0.93% patients had no subjective improvement after the partial medial meniscectomy at all. Conclusion. Arthroscopic partial medial meniscetomy is minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedure and in well selected cases is a method of choice for treatment of medial meniscus injuries when repair techniques are not a viable option. It has small rate of complications, low morbidity and fast rehabilitation.

  2. Better outcome from arthroscopic partial meniscectomy than skin incisions only?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Ewa M; Hare, Kristoffer Borbjerg; Nielsen, Sabrina Mai

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Compare arthroscopic partial meniscectomy to a true sham intervention. METHODS: Sham-controlled superiority trial performed in three county hospitals in Denmark comparing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy to skin incisions only in patients aged 35-55 years with persistent knee pain and...

  3. Patient reported outcomes in patients undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for traumatic or degenerative meniscal tears

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    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Englund, Martin; Christensen, Robin

    2017-01-01

    -55, and undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for a traumatic or degenerative meniscal tear (defined by a combination of age and symptom onset). INTERVENTIONS: Both participant groups underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for a meniscal tear, with operating surgeons recording relevant information......, sport and recreational function, and quality of life (KOOS4). A 95% confidence interval excluding differences greater than 10 KOOS points between groups was interpreted as absence of a clinically meaningful difference. Analyses adjusted for age, sex, and body mass index. RESULTS: 397 eligible adults (42...

  4. Better outcome from arthroscopic partial meniscectomy than skin incisions only?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Ewa M; Hare, Kristoffer Borbjerg; Nielsen, Sabrina Mai

    2018-01-01

    . In total, nine participants experienced 11 adverse events; six in the surgery group and three in the skin-incisions-only group. CONCLUSION: We found greater improvement from arthroscopic partial meniscectomy compared with skin incisions only at 2 years, with the statistical uncertainty of the between......-group difference including what could be considered clinically relevant. Because of the study being underpowered, nearly half in the sham group being non-blinded and one-third crossing over to surgery, the results cannot be generalised to the greater patient population. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT01264991....

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Symptomatic Patients After Arthroscopic Partial Meniscectomy for Torn Discoid Lateral Meniscus.

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    Lee, Chang-Rack; Bin, Seong-Il; Kim, Jong-Min; Kim, Nam-Ki

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the change in the thickness and width of the residual meniscus using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients who underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for discoid lateral meniscus (DLM), to assess whether the degeneration of the articular cartilage in the lateral compartment of the knee progressed, and to evaluate clinical results. Among the patients who underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for DLM between January 1997 and December 2011, those who were aged 40 or below at surgery were followed up for at least 3 years, and received at least 2 follow-up MRIs that were retrospectively reviewed. MRIs were done in symptomatic knees. Using MRI, the relative thickness and width were measured in the anterior horn, midportion, and posterior horn. To determine whether the degeneration of the lateral compartment would progress, the articular cartilage was graded based on the Outerbridge classification in MRIs. The clinical results were evaluated using the Lysholm score. A total of 20 patients (21 knees) were included. The average follow-up period was 6.8 years. In residual meniscus, the relative thickness of the midportion decreased from 9.0% ± 2.4% to 7.3% ± 2.3% (P meniscus. A progression of degeneration in the lateral compartment was observed. However, the clinical results did not present significant changes. In symptomatic patients after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for DLM, the thickness and width of the residual meniscus decreases over time. The arthritic change of the lateral compartment of the knee progressed. However, the change in the size of the residual meniscus was of unknown clinical significance. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in middle-aged patients with mild or no knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hare, Kristoffer B; Lohmander, Stefan; Christensen, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy has been shown to be of no benefit to patients with concomitant knee osteoarthritis, but the optimal treatment of a degenerative meniscus tear in patients with mild or no knee osteoarthritis is unknown. This article describes the rationale and methodology...... of a randomized sham-controlled trial to assess the benefit of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy of a medial meniscus tear in patients with mild or no knee osteoarthritis. The objective of the study is to test whether the benefit from arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in patients with knee pain, medial meniscus...

  7. The relationship between patellofemoral and tibiofemoral morphology and gait biomechanics following arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy

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    Dempsey, Alasdair R.; Wang, Yuanyuan; Thorlund, Jonas Bloch

    2013-01-01

    osteoarthritis at arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy, underwent gait analysis and MRI on the operated knee once for each sub-cohort of 3 months, 2 years, or 4 years post-surgery. Cartilage volume, cartilage defects, and bone size were assessed from the MRI using validated methods. The 1st peak in the knee......Purpose To examine the relationship between tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joint articular cartilage and subchondral bone in the medial and gait biomechanics following partial medial meniscectomy. Methods For this cross-sectional study, 122 patients aged 30–55 years, without evidence of knee...... adduction moment, knee adduction moment impulse, 1st peak in the knee flexion moment, knee extension range of motion, and the heel strike transient from the vertical ground reaction force trace were identified from the gait data. Results Increased knee stance phase range of motion was associated...

  8. Patient reported outcomes in patients undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for traumatic or degenerative meniscal tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Englund, Martin; Christensen, Robin

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare patient reported outcomes from before surgery to 52 weeks after surgery between individuals undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for traumatic meniscal tears and those for degenerative meniscal tears. DESIGN: Comparative prospective cohort study. SETTING: Four publi...

  9. ULTRASOUND OF THE SHOULDER JOINT FOR IMPINGEMENT SYNDROME, CORRELATION WITH ARTHROSCOPIC SURGERY FOR OPERABILITY OF PARTIAL SUPRASPINATUS TENDON TEAR

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    Neeraj Gopal

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To show the accuracy of ultrasound studies in diagnosing impingement syndrome of the shoulder joint by correlating with arthroscopic surgery for operability of partial supraspinatus tendon tear. AIM : To correlate the sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound in the diagnosis for intrinsic causes of impingement syndrome of the shoulder joint , correlation with arthroscopic surgery and operability for supraspinatus tear. MATERIALS AND METHODS : This was a prospective study done on 40 patients clinically diagnosed with impingement syndrome who underwent ultrasound assessment. Arthroscopic correlation was done in 38 patients . OBSERVATIONS AND RESULTS : In our study of rotator cuff integrity assessment , ultras ound showed type - 1 in 3(7.5% , type - 2 in 10(25% , type - 3 in 21(52.5% , type - 4 in 3(7.5% and type - 5 in 3(7.5% When compared to the arthroscopic surgery findings , Sensitivity and specificity of PTT was 85.5% and 75% respectively. On dynamic evaluation of s houlder joint for impingement , our present study showed grade - 2 abnormality in 30 patients (75% and 8(20% patients had grade - 1 abnormality , this was found to be statistically significant. DISCUSSION : ultrasonography can detect impingement syndrome and pa rtial tear of the SST with high specificity and sensitivity , which makes it the most cost effective , noninvasive , rapidly performed , and widely available and most acceptable investigation to the patients

  10. Exercise therapy versus arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for degenerative meniscal tear in middle aged patients

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    Kise, Nina Jullum; Risberg, May Arna; Stensrud, Silje

    2016-01-01

    months, muscle strength had improved in the exercise group (P≤0.004). No serious adverse events occurred in either group during the two year follow-up. 19% of the participants allocated to exercise therapy crossed over to surgery during the two year follow-up, with no additional benefit. Conclusion......Objective To determine if exercise therapy is superior to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for knee function in middle aged patients with degenerative meniscal tears. Design Randomised controlled superiority trial. Setting Orthopaedic departments at two public hospitals and two physiotherapy...... clinics in Norway. Participants 140 adults, mean age 49.5 years (range 35.7-59.9), with degenerative medial meniscal tear verified by magnetic resonance imaging. 96% had no definitive radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis. Interventions 12 week supervised exercise therapy alone or arthroscopic partial...

  11. Exercise therapy versus arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for degenerative meniscal tear in middle aged patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kise, Nina Jullum; Risberg, May Arna; Stensrud, Silje

    2016-01-01

    months, muscle strength had improved in the exercise group (P≤0.004). No serious adverse events occurred in either group during the two year follow-up. 19% of the participants allocated to exercise therapy crossed over to surgery during the two year follow-up, with no additional benefit. CONCLUSION......OBJECTIVE: To determine if exercise therapy is superior to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for knee function in middle aged patients with degenerative meniscal tears. DESIGN: Randomised controlled superiority trial. SETTING: Orthopaedic departments at two public hospitals and two physiotherapy...... clinics in Norway. PARTICIPANTS: 140 adults, mean age 49.5 years (range 35.7-59.9), with degenerative medial meniscal tear verified by magnetic resonance imaging. 96% had no definitive radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis. INTERVENTIONS: 12 week supervised exercise therapy alone or arthroscopic partial...

  12. Long-term follow-up after arthroscopic tenotomy for partial rupture of the biceps brachii tendon.

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    Bergenhuyzen, A L R; Vermote, K A G; van Bree, H; Van Ryssen, B

    2010-01-01

    To report the long-term clinical outcomes and radiographic results in dogs diagnosed with partial bicipital rupture and treated by arthroscopic tenotomy. The medical records of dogs that had undergone arthroscopic tenotomy were retrospectively reviewed. Inclusion criteria for this study were: performance of an arthroscopic tenotomy between August 1999 and July 2007, availability of arthroscopic records data for review, and ability to obtain follow-up data for more than one year after arthroscopic tenotomy. In all cases, owners were interviewed during follow-up appointments or via telephone to determine perceived outcome after surgery. Forty-seven arthroscopic tenotomies were performed on 40 dogs without any major surgical complications. Long-term follow-up examinations, ranging from 12 months to 48 months (mean 26 months) after the tenotomy, were obtained for 24 dogs (25 shoulders). Clinical outcome was assessed as excellent in 22 shoulders, with each dog showing a full return of limb function. A total of 10 dogs (11 joints) were evaluated radiographically; six joints revealed no progression of pathology, and five joints showed a limited progression of pathology. Arthroscopic tenotomy in the treatment of bicipital partial rupture yields favourable long-term clinical results and a high degree of owner satisfaction. The feasibility of this technique and the long-term clinical and radiographic outcome from our study indicate that this technique can be considered a reliable and safe treatment for partial bicipital rupture.

  13. Arthroscopic Partial Capitate Resection for Type Ia Avascular Necrosis: A Short-Term Outcome Analysis.

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    Shimizu, Takamasa; Omokawa, Shohei; del Piñal, Francisco; Shigematsu, Koji; Moritomo, Hisao; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2015-12-01

    To examine short-term clinical results of arthroscopic partial resection for type Ia avascular necrosis of the capitate. Patients who underwent arthroscopic treatment for type 1a avascular necrosis of the capitate with at least 1-year follow-up were identified through a retrospective chart review. The necrotic capitate head was arthroscopically resected with removal of the lunate facet and preservation of the scaphoid and hamate facets. Wrist range of motion, grip strength, and radiographic parameters--carpal height ratio, radioscaphoid angle, and radiolunate angle-were determined before surgery and at the latest follow-up. Patients completed a visual analog scale for pain; Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand measure; and the Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation score before surgery and at the latest follow-up. Five patients (1 male, 4 females) with a mean age of 34 years (range, 16-49 years) and a mean follow-up duration of 20 months (range, 12-36 months) were identified during the chart review. All were type Ia (Milliez classification). Arthroscopy revealed fibrillation or softening with cartilage detachment at the lunate facet of the capitate head and an intact articular surface at the scaphoid and hamate facet. At the latest follow-up, the mean wrist flexion-extension was 123° (vs 81° before surgery) and grip strength was 74% (vs 37% before surgery). The visual analog scale score for pain; the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score; and the Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation score before surgery showed a significant improvement following treatment. Radiographic parameters did not significantly change at the final follow-up, although the proximal carpal row trended toward flexion. Arthroscopic partial resection of the capitate head was an acceptable treatment for type Ia avascular necrosis of the capitate. It provided adequate pain relief and improved the range of wrist motion and grip strength during short-term follow-up. Therapeutic IV. Copyright

  14. Knee Biomechanics During Jogging After Arthroscopic Partial Meniscectomy: A Longitudinal Study.

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    Hall, Michelle; Wrigley, Tim V; Metcalf, Ben R; Hinman, Rana S; Cicuttini, Flavia M; Dempsey, Alasdair R; Lloyd, David G; Bennell, Kim L

    2017-07-01

    Altered knee joint biomechanics is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of knee osteoarthritis and has been reported in patients after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) while performing various activities. Longitudinally, understanding knee joint biomechanics during jogging may assist future studies to assess the implications of jogging on knee joint health in this population. To investigate knee joint biomechanics during jogging in patients 3 months after APM and a healthy control group at baseline and 2 years later at follow-up. Controlled laboratory study. Seventy-eight patients who underwent medial APM and 38 healthy controls underwent a 3-dimensional motion analysis during barefoot overground jogging at baseline. Sixty-four patients who underwent APM and 23 controls returned at follow-up. External peak moments (flexion and adduction) and the peak knee flexion angle during stance were evaluated for the APM leg, non-APM leg (nonoperated leg), and control leg. At baseline, the peak knee flexion angle was 1.4° lower in the APM leg compared with the non-APM leg ( P = .03). No differences were found between the moments in the APM leg compared with the control leg (all P > .05). However, the normalized peak knee adduction moment was 35% higher in the non-APM leg compared with the control leg ( P = .008). In the non-APM leg, the normalized peak knee adduction and flexion moments were higher compared with the APM leg by 16% and 10%, respectively, at baseline ( P ≤ .004). Despite the increase in the peak knee flexion moment in the APM leg compared with the non-APM leg ( P .05). Comparing the APM leg and control leg, no differences in knee joint biomechanics during jogging for the variables assessed were observed. Higher knee moments in the non-APM leg may have clinical implications for the noninvolved leg. Kinematic differences were small (~1.4°) and therefore of questionable clinical relevance. These results may facilitate future clinical research

  15. Arthroscopic in Situ Repair of Partial Bursal Rotator Cuff Tears Without Acromioplasty.

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    Ranalletta, Maximiliano; Rossi, Luciano A; Atala, Nicolas A; Bertona, Agustin; Maignon, Gastón D; Bongiovanni, Santiago L

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate functional outcomes and complications in a consecutive group of patients with partial bursal rotator cuff tears (PBRCTs) treated with insitu repair without acromioplasty. Seventy-four patients who had undergone an arthroscopic single row in situ repair for bursal-sided rotator cuff tears were evaluated. Clinical assessment consisted of glenohumeral range of motion measurement, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, and the University of California at Los Angeles score. Pain was recorded using a visual analog scale. Postoperative complications were also assessed. Mean age was 55.2 years (±6.3) with a minimum of 2-year follow-up. After arthroscopic repair, all active range of motion parameters improved significantly (P In the midterm follow-up (42 months), arthroscopic in situ repair of PBRCTs without acromioplasty is a reliable procedure that produces significant functional improvements and pain relief. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Study of the seroma volume changes in the patients who underwent Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

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    Kim, Dae Ho; Son, Sang Jun; Mun, Jun Ki; Seo, Seok Jin; Lee, Je Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    By analyzing seroma volume changes in the patients who underwent Partial breast radiation therapy after breast conserving surgery, we try to contribute to the improvement of radiotherapy effect. Enrolled 20 patients who underwent partial breast radiation therapy by ViewRay MRIdian System were subject. After seeking for the size of the removed sample in the patients during surgery and obtained seroma volume changes on a weekly basis. On the Basis of acquired volume, it was compared with age, term from start of the first treatment after surgery, BMI (body mass index) and the extracted sample size during surgery. And using the ViewRay MRIdian RTP System, the figure was analyzed by PTV(=seroma volume + margin) to obtain a specific volume of the Partial breast radiation therapy. The changes of seroma volume from MR simulation to the first treatment (a week) is 0~5% in 8, 5~10% in 3, 10 to 15% in 2, and 20% or more in 5 people. Two patients(A, B patient) among subjects showed the biggest change. The A patient's 100% of the prescribed dose volume is 213.08 cc, PTV is 181.93 cc, seroma volume is 15.3 cc in initial plan. However, while seroma volume decreased 65.36% to 5.3 cc, 100% of the prescribed dose volume was reduced to 3.4% to 102.43 cc and PTV also did 43.6% to 102.54 cc. In the case of the B patient, seroma volume decreased 42.57% from 20.2 cc to 11.6 cc. Because of that, 100% of the prescribed dose volume decreased 8.1% and PTV also did to 40%. As the period between the first therapy and surgery is shorter, the patient is elder and the size of sample is smaller than 100 cc, the change grow bigger. It is desirable to establish an adaptive plan according to each patient's changes of seroma volume through continuous observation. Because partial breast patients is more sensitive than WBRT patients about dose conformity in accordance with the volume change.

  17. Changes in knee joint load indices from before to 12 months after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders; Creaby, M W

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) are at increased risk of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Meniscal damage and/or surgery may alter knee joint loading to increase OA risk. We investigated changes in knee joint loading following medial APM surgery, compared...... with the contra-lateral leg. METHODS: We estimated indices of knee joint loading (external peak knee adduction moment (KAM), KAM impulse and peak knee flexion moment (KFM)) normalized to body size (i.e., body mass (BM) and height (HT)) using 3D gait analysis in 23 patients (17 men, mean (SD) 46.2 (6.4) years, BMI...... 25.8 (3.4) kg/m(2)) without radiographic knee OA before and 12 months after medial APM. Static alignment was assessed by radiography and self-reported outcomes by Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). RESULTS: Peak KAM and KAM impulse increased in the APM leg compared to the contra...

  18. Comparisons of the Various Partial-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears on MR Arthrography and Arthroscopic Correlation

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    Chun, Kyung Ah; Kim, Min Sung; Kim, Young Joo [Catholic University of Korea Uijeongbu St.Mary' s Hospital, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    To assess the diagnostic performance of MR arthrography in the diagnosis of the various types of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears by comparing the MR imaging findings with the arthroscopic findings. The series of MR arthrography studies included 202 patients consisting of 100 patients with partial-thickness rotator cuff tears proved by arthroscopy and a control group of 102 patients with arthroscopically intact rotator cuffs, which were reviewed in random order. At arthroscopy, 54 articularsided, 26 bursal-sided, 20 both articular- and bursal-sided partial-thickness tears were diagnosed. The MR arthrographies were analyzed by two radiologists for articular-sided tears, bursal-sided tears, and both articular- and bursal-sided tears of the rotator cuff. The sensitivity and specificity of each type of partial-thickness tears were determined. Kappa statistics was calculated to determine the interand intra-observer agreement of the diagnosis of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. The sensitivity and specificity of the various types of rotator cuff tears were 85% and 90%, respectively for articular-sided tears, 62% and 95% for bursal- sided tears, as well as 45% and 99% for both articular- and bursal-sided tears. False-negative assessments were primarily observed in the diagnosis of bursal-sided tears. Conversely, both articular- and bursal-sided tears were overestimated as full-thickness tears. Inter-observer agreement was excellent for the diagnosis of articular-sided tears (k = 0.70), moderate (k = 0.59) for bursal-sided tears, and fair (k = 0.34) for both articular- and bursal-sided tears, respectively. Intra-observer agreement for the interpretation of articular- and bursal-sided tears was excellent and good, respectively, whereas intra-observer agreement for both articular- and bursal-sided tears was moderate. MR arthrography is a useful diagnostic tool for partial-thickness rotator cuff tears, but has limitations in that it has low sensitivity in bursal- and

  19. "Fatigue meniscal tears": a description of the lesion and the results of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy.

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    Demange, Marco Kawamura; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical outcomes of partial meniscectomy in patients with "fatigue meniscal tear", which presents as a non-traumatic tear with abrupt onset of symptoms of a radial tear in the transition between the middle and posterior thirds of the meniscus. We prospectively followed 71 patients with "fatigue meniscal tear" (41 women and 30 men, mean age of 63 years, SD 6.9 years) recruited among 497 patients with isolated medial meniscal lesions treated between January 2006 and June 2011. Inclusion criteria were spontaneous abrupt onset knee pain, minor or no trauma, no radiographic or MRI osteoarthritis, no bone oedema, pre-operative magnetic resonance image of medial meniscus tear, and arthroscopic evaluation demonstrating radial or vertical flap tear in the body to posterior horn junction of the medial meniscus. We followed all patients for a minimum of two years and reviewed their clinical symptoms, physical exam, functional outcome, and patient satisfaction at last follow-up. The average follow-up was 4.2 years, with a minimum follow-up of two years. Among the 71 patients, there were 59 (83.1 %) good or excellent results and 12 (16.9 %) poor results. These 12 patients demanded further treatment because of persistent pain, with three of the patients developing subchondral bone fracture. All patient complaints and poor outcomes could be identified in the initial six months after surgery. There was no gender difference in the subgroup analysis. Our findings indicate that patients with "fatigue meniscal tear" benefit from arthroscopic partial meniscectomy, with only 16.9 % reporting unfavourable results. IV, Cohort study or case series.

  20. High-grade bursal-side partial rotator cuff tears: comparison of mid- and long-term results following arthroscopic repair after conversion to a full-thickness tear.

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    Aydin, Nuri; Karaismailoglu, Bedri

    2017-07-21

    Partial-thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCTs) are one of the leading causes of shoulder dysfunction. Successful results have been reported with different treatment techniques, but the long-term consequences of these procedures are not yet clearly known. The purposes of this study were to evaluate and compare the mid- and long-term clinical outcomes of arthroscopically repaired bursal-side PTRCTs after conversion to full-thickness tears and identify the possible effects of age, gender, and hand dominance on clinical outcomes. Twenty-nine patients who had undergone arthroscopic repair of a significant bursal-side PTRCT were functionally evaluated. The repair was made after conversion to a full-thickness tear. The average patient age was 55.2 years (range 35-69 years, SD ±7.6 years). Clinical outcomes were evaluated at 2 and 5 years after surgery. Constant Shoulder Score (CSS) and Visual Analogue Scale for Pain (VAS pain) were used as outcome measures. The average CSS improved from 38.9 preoperatively to 89.2 and 87.8 at 2 and 5 years after surgery, respectively (p functional outcomes and VAS pain scores at 2 and 5 years after surgery compared with the preoperative period. The patients who underwent surgery from their non-dominant extremity showed a significantly higher CSS increase relative to those who underwent surgery on the dominant extremity (p = 0.022). Arthroscopic repair of high-grade bursal-side PTRCTs after conversion to full-thickness tears is a reliable surgical technique with good functional outcomes and pain relief both at mid- and long-term follow-ups. Surgery on the non-dominant side may be related to better functional outcomes.

  1. Clinical and radiographic results of arthroscopic partial lateral meniscectomies in stable knees with a minimum follow up of 20 years.

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    Hulet, Christophe; Menetrey, Jacques; Beaufils, Philippe; Chambat, Pierre; Djian, Patrick; Hardy, Philippe; Potel, Jean-François; Servien, Elvire; Seil, Romain

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective multicentric study was to evaluate the long-term effects of lateral meniscectomy and to identify those patients who are at the most risk of developing osteoarthritis (OA). Eighty-nine arthroscopic partial lateral meniscectomies in stable knees with a mean follow-up of 22 ± 3 years were included. The following influencing factors were analyzed: age, sex, body mass index (BMI), physical activity, alignment, the types of meniscal lesions, the extent of meniscal resections and the initially associated cartilage lesions. An independent examiner reviewed all patients, using subjective (KOOS and IKDC scores) and objective clinical and radiological evaluations (IKDC score). The contralateral knee was used as a reference to calculate the prevalence and the incidence of OA. The mean age at the time of surgery was 35 ± 13 years. The main location of the lesions was the mid-section of the lateral meniscus (79% of the cases). At the latest follow-up, 48% of the patients had an active lifestyle with as many as 48% of the patients enjoying moderate to intense physical activity 22 years after the procedure (vs. 71% before surgery). The KOOS score evolved from 82 to 69% during the same period. The prevalence of OA was 56% in the affected knee and the difference of prevalence between the operated and healthy knees was 44%. In those patients presenting with an OA of the operated knee and a normal contralateral knee, the incidence of OA was 53%. Predictors of OA were an age superior to 38 years at the time of surgery, obesity (BMI >30), and valgus malalignment as well as the presence of cartilage and degenerative meniscal lesions at the time of surgery. In the long term, arthroscopic partial lateral meniscectomy in stable knees without initial cartilage lesions might yield good to excellent results in young patients. Patients are at higher risk to develop symptomatic OA if they are over 40, having a high BMI, valgus malalignment and cartilage

  2. Predictors of the Clinical Outcome After Arthroscopic Partial Meniscectomy for Acute Trauma-Related Symptomatic Medial Meniscal Tear in Patients More Than 60 Years of Age.

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    Sofu, Hakan; Oner, Ali; Camurcu, Yalkin; Gursu, Sarper; Ucpunar, Hanifi; Sahin, Vedat

    2016-06-01

    To determine predictors of the clinical outcome after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy performed for acute trauma-related medial meniscal tear leading to mechanical symptoms in patients more than 60 years of age. In this retrospective study with 4.1 years' follow-up, the clinical data of 154 arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomies were evaluated. The body mass index (BMI), duration of symptoms, the hip-knee-ankle angle, type of the meniscal tear, presence of any chondral lesions, degenerative changes in the patellofemoral joint, the status of the cruciate ligaments and lateral meniscus, and the presence of any plica or synovitis were the independent variables. Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale were the instruments used as outcome measures. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine the major predictors. The mean VAS score for 154 knees evaluated in this study improved from 5.6 points preoperatively to 2.3 points at the latest follow-up. The mean Lysholm score improved from 43 points to 72.7 points. VAS and Lysholm scores at the latest follow-up were significantly worse in patients with a preoperative BMI ≥ 26 kg/m(2), hip-knee-ankle angle > 5°, grade III or IV chondral lesion of the medial compartment according to Outerbridge classification, degenerative changes in patellofemoral joint surfaces, and an anterior cruciate ligament that was either partially ruptured or degenerative with increased laxity. A preoperative BMI ≥ 26 kg/m(2), Outerbridge grade III or IV chondral lesion of the medial compartment of the operated knee joint diagnosed during arthroscopic intervention, degenerative changes in patellofemoral joint surfaces, and the presence of an anterior cruciate ligament either partially ruptured or degenerative with increased laxity should be considered as the major predictors of the clinical outcome after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy performed for acute trauma-related symptomatic medial meniscal tear in patients

  3. Large increase in arthroscopic meniscus surgery in the middle-aged and older population in Denmark from 2000 to 2011

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    Thorlund, Jonas B; Hare, Kristoffer B; Lohmander, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background - Arthroscopic meniscal surgery is the most common orthopedic procedure, and the incidence has increased in Denmark over the last 10 years. Concomitantly, several randomized controlled trials have shown no benefit of arthroscopic procedures including arthroscopic partial meniscectomy i...

  4. Arthroscopic Repair of Articular Surface Partial-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: Transtendon Technique versus Repair after Completion of the Tear—A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Ono

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Articular surface partial-thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCTs are commonly repaired using two different surgical techniques: transtendon repair or repair after completion of the tear. Although a number of studies have demonstrated excellent clinical outcomes, it is unclear which technique may provide superior clinical outcomes and tendon healing. The purpose was to evaluate and compare the clinical outcomes following arthroscopic repair of articular surface PTRCT using a transtendon technique or completion of the tear. A systematic review of the literature was performed following PRISMA guidelines and checklist. The objective outcome measures evaluated in this study were the Constant Score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, Visual Analogue Scale, physical examination, and complications. Three studies met our criteria. All were prospective randomized comparative studies with level II evidence and published from 2012 to 2013. A total of 182 shoulders (mean age 53.7 years; mean follow-up 40.5 months were analyzed as part of this study. Both procedures provided excellent clinical outcomes with no significant difference in Constant Score and other measures between the procedures. Both procedures demonstrated improved clinical outcomes. However, there were no significant differences between each technique. Further studies are required to determine the long-term outcome of each technique.

  5. Arthroscopic treatment of iliopsoas impingement (IPI) after total hip replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerosch, Jorg; Neuhäuser, Christian; Sokkar, Sherif M

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to present our arthroscopic surgical technique and the results in patient with an iliopsoas impingement (IPI) syndrome after a hip replacement. Between 1999 and 2011, 35 patients with the clinical picture of an IPI after total hip replacement were diagnosed and treated arthroscopically. The age was ranged from 58 to 82 years. All patients underwent conservative treatment for at least 6 months without success. The indication for the arthroscopic procedure was the failure of the conservative therapy as well as typical clinical signs as painful hip flexion, a positive local anesthesia test and radiological evidence of the presence of a prominent anterior acetabular component. The arthroscopic treatment was performed in all patients with anterior capsulotomy and partial capsulectomy of the hip joint. After identification of the pathology an arthroscopic release of the iliopsoas tendon in the region of the proved lesion was performed. The average follow-up period was 3.6 years (6 months to 12 years). In all patients osseous integrated acetabular components were found. In six cases there was a surface replacement, in three cases it was a cementless screw-in cup and in the other three cases it was a cementless modular press-fit cup. 8 out of 12 patients suffered from a hip dysplasia with a secondary osteoarthritis. After establishing an anterior capsular window arthroscopically, the iliopsoas tendon could be visualized in all cases. In addition to multiple local tendinitis all patients already showed mechanical limitation with partial rupture of variable extent in the iliopsoas tendon. During the arthroscopy the lesion was detected at the level of the anterior prominent acetabular component as well as distal to it. 10 out of 12 patients reported immediately after postoperative mobilization that the typical preoperative complaints have disappeared. Two patients still had residual pain. In one of those patients this was relieved by the time

  6. Arthroscopic psoas tenotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wettstein, Michael; Jung, Jochen; Dienst, Michael

    2006-08-01

    Tenotomy may be indicated for psoas tendinitis or painful snapping if conservative treatment remains unsuccessful. Because of significant complications with open techniques, endoscopic operations have been developed. We present a new arthroscopic technique to access and release the psoas tendon from the hip joint. This procedure can be performed in addition to other arthroscopic procedures of the hip joint or alone. To exclude additional hip disease, a diagnostic round of the joint should be completed. After hip arthroscopy of the central compartment has been performed, traction is released and the 30 degrees arthroscope is placed via the proximal anterolateral portal lying on the anterior femoral neck. The medial synovial fold can be identified. This fold lies slightly medially underneath the anteromedial capsule at the level of the psoas tendon. The arthroscope is turned toward the anterior capsule. Sometimes, the tendon shines through a thin articular capsule, or it may even be accessed directly via a hole connecting the hip joint and the iliopectineal bursa at the level of the anterior head-neck junction. If this cannot be done, an electrothermic probe is introduced via the anterior portal to make a 2-cm transverse capsular incision. The tendon is released with the back side of the electrothermic device turned to the iliacus muscle that lies anterior to the psoas tendon. A complete release is achieved when the tendon stumps can be seen gapping at a distance and the fibers of the iliacus muscle are visible. The first 9 patients who underwent surgery performed according to this technique developed no complications, and their hip flexion strength was restored to normal within 3 months.

  7. Arthroscopic treatment for snapping scapula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blønd, Lars; Rechter, Simone

    2014-01-01

    with painful snapping scapula underwent arthroscopic scapulothoracic bursectomi and resection of the hook formation at the medial superior margin of the scapular. Preoperatively, all patients reported temporary relief via a local anesthetic injection and had completed a 3-month rehabilitation program......-100) postoperatively. Out of 20 patients, 18 improved and 19 indicated that they would undergo the surgery again. CONCLUSION: In this study, it was found that, among patients troubled by painful snapping scapula and without relief by exercise-based rehabilitation, arthroscopic resection of the medial superior hook...

  8. The effects of neuromuscular exercise on medial knee joint load post-arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy: ‘SCOPEX’ a randomised control trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall Michelle

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meniscectomy is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, with increased medial joint loading a likely contributor to the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis in this group. Therefore, post-surgical rehabilitation or interventions that reduce medial knee joint loading have the potential to reduce the risk of developing or progressing osteoarthritis. The primary purpose of this randomised, assessor-blind controlled trial is to determine the effects of a home-based, physiotherapist-supervised neuromuscular exercise program on medial knee joint load during functional tasks in people who have recently undergone a partial medial meniscectomy. Methods/design 62 people aged 30–50 years who have undergone an arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy within the previous 3 to 12 months will be recruited and randomly assigned to a neuromuscular exercise or control group using concealed allocation. The neuromuscular exercise group will attend 8 supervised exercise sessions with a physiotherapist and will perform 6 exercises at home, at least 3 times per week for 12 weeks. The control group will not receive the neuromuscular training program. Blinded assessment will be performed at baseline and immediately following the 12-week intervention. The primary outcomes are change in the peak external knee adduction moment measured by 3-dimensional analysis during normal paced walking and one-leg rise. Secondary outcomes include the change in peak external knee adduction moment during fast pace walking and one-leg hop and change in the knee adduction moment impulse during walking, one-leg rise and one-leg hop, knee and hip muscle strength, electromyographic muscle activation patterns, objective measures of physical function, as well as self-reported measures of physical function and symptoms and additional biomechanical parameters. Discussion The findings from this trial will provide evidence regarding the effect of a home

  9. Alterations of the Deltoid Muscle After Open Versus Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Nam Su; Cha, Sang Won; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2015-12-01

    Open repair can be more useful than arthroscopic repair for immobile and severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears. However, it is not known whether the deltoid muscle is altered after open repair or to what extent the deltoid origin remains detached after surgery. To compare postoperative alterations of the deltoid muscle in open versus arthroscopic repair for severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Enrolled in this study were 135 patients who underwent surgical repair for severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears and who had routine follow-up MRIs at least 6 months after surgery. Open repairs were performed in 56 cases and arthroscopic repairs in 79 cases. The detachment and thickness of the deltoid muscle at its proximal origin were recorded in 5 zones on MRI. The alterations of the deltoid muscle and postoperative integrity of the repaired rotator cuff were evaluated. Partial detachment of the deltoid occurred in 1 patient (1.8%) in the open group and in 2 patients (2.5%) in the arthroscopic group (P = .80). All the partial detachments occurred in zones 2 and 3. Attenuation of the proximal origin of the deltoid was found in 3 patients (5.4%) in the open group and in 4 patients (5.1%) in the arthroscopic group (P = .87). Atrophy of the deltoid muscle was shown in 3 patients (5.4%) in the open group and 4 patients (5.1%) in the arthroscopic group (P = .61). The retear rate of the repaired cuff was 30.4% (17/56) in the open group and 38.0% (30/79) in the arthroscopic group (P = .74). Between open and arthroscopic repair for severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears, there was no significant difference in detachment of the deltoid origin and alterations of the deltoid muscle after repair. Postoperative alterations of the deltoid occurred in arthroscopic surgery as well as in open surgery. For immobile massive rotator cuff tear, open repair is an acceptable technique

  10. Arthroscopic surgery for degenerative knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Juhl, C B; Roos, E M

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine benefits and harms of arthroscopic knee surgery involving partial meniscectomy, debridement, or both for middle aged or older patients with knee pain and degenerative knee disease. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pain and physical function....... RESULTS: The search identified nine trials assessing the benefits of knee arthroscopic surgery in middle aged and older patients with knee pain and degenerative knee disease. The main analysis, combining the primary endpoints of the individual trials from three to 24 months postoperatively, showed a small...... included symptomatic deep venous thrombosis (4.13 (95% confidence interval 1.78 to 9.60) events per 1000 procedures), pulmonary embolism, infection, and death. CONCLUSIONS: The small inconsequential benefit seen from interventions that include arthroscopy for the degenerative knee is limited in time...

  11. Morphological classification of acromial spur: correlation between Rockwood tilt view and arthroscopic finding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kongmalai Pinkawas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose and hypothesis: Acromion spur is the extrinsic factor for impingement syndrome and rotator cuff tear. The Rockwood tilt view can be used to evaluate prominence of the anterior acromion, however no study has shown the correlation of findings between the Rockwood tilt view and the arthroscopic finding. Methods: We developed the arthroscopic classification of acromion spur as type 1 flat spur, type 2 bump spur, type 3 heel spur, type 4 keel spur, and type 5 irregular spur. Patients with rotator cuff syndrome who underwent arthroscopic surgery were recruited. Two observers were asked to classify the type of spur from arthroscopic findings and Rockwood tilt views separately in random pattern. The prevalence of supraspinatus tendon tear was also recorded as no tear, partial-thickness tear, and full-thickness tear. Results: The keel spur (33.9% was the most common finding followed by the heel spur (27.8%. The correlation was high especially for the heel, the keel, and the irregular spur (75.47%, 74.03%, and 72.73%, respectively. These three types of spurs have a high prevalence of full thickness of supraspinatus tendon tear. Conclusion: The Rockwood tilt view can be used to evaluate the morphology of an acromion spur, especially the at-risk spur that correlates highly with the full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear. The arthroscopic classification will also be a useful tool to improve communication between the surgeon and the guide for appropriate treatment in a rotator cuff tear patient when encountering the heel, keel, and irregular spur.

  12. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in elite rugby players

    OpenAIRE

    Tambe, Amol; Badge, Ravi; Funk, Lennard

    2009-01-01

    Background: Rugby is an increasingly popular collision sport. A wide spectrum of injuries can be sustained during training and match play. Rotator cuff injury is uncommon in contact sports and there is little published literature on the treatment of rotator cuff tears in rugby players. Aims: We therefore reviewed the results and functional outcomes of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in elite rugby players. Materials and Methods: Eleven professional rugby players underwent arthroscopic ...

  13. Arthroscopic treatment of refractory adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Marcos Rassi

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the results of arthroscopic treatment of refractory adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder associated as for improved range of motion after a minimum follow up of six years. METHODS: from August 2002 to December 2004, ten patients with adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder resistant to conservative treatment underwent arthroscopic surgery. One interscalene catheter was placed for postoperative analgesia before the procedure. All were in Phase II, with a minimum follow up o...

  14. ARTHROSCOPIC MENISCUS REPAIR WITH BIOABSORBABLE ARROWS IN LOCAL ANESTHESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Senekovič

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. The menisci have important function in the knee joint. Because of this it is universally accepted that we have to preserve them as much as possible. After open and partially arthroscopic suture techniques new methods of all-inside meniscus repair with bioabsorbable arrows have been developed in the last decade. The meniscus repair using these arrows represents an easy task for a skilled surgeon. In addition, it can be performed in local anesthesia. We have evaluated the results of the first group of patients who were treated by this method.Methods. From February 2001 to August 2002 15 patients with torn meniscuses have been treated at the Clinical Department for Traumatology, University Medical centre, Ljubljana. We repaired their torn menisci arthroscopically with bioabsorbable arrows in local anesthesia. We divided patients in three groups: a group with isolated meniscus injury, a group with meniscus injury and anterior cruciate ligament injury and a group with associated pathology. Four patients had incarcerated meniscuses. Preoperative Lysholm score in the first group was 38, in the second 42 and in the third group 48. We repaired 12 medial and 3 lateral meniscuses. On average we need 45 minutes for therapeutic arthroscopy. Torn meniscus was fixated with minimum of 1 and maximum of 5 bioabsorbable arrows. All patients except one had the affected knee immobilized with cylinder plaster for 15 days on average.Results. At least three months after the arthroscopic fixation of the torn meniscus in local anesthesia another clinical evaluation was made. In all groups significant improvement was observed regarding the range of motions and absence of pain. Postoperative Lysholm score in the first group was 89, in the second 75 and in the third 71. Average deficit of flexion was 3 degrees while extension was full. One patient complained about the same pain in the joint, he underwent another arthroscopy which showed that the meniscus was

  15. Arthroscopic Retrograde Drilling in Juvenile Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Talus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masquijo, Julio J; Ferreyra, Andres; Baroni, Eduardo

    2016-09-01

    Juvenile osteochondritis dissecans of the talus is rare, and the literature provides little data to guide treatment. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate our clinical and radiographic results with arthroscopic retrograde drilling in patients who were refractory to conservative care. We retrospectively evaluated all patients with juvenile osteochondritis dissecans of the talus who underwent surgery for the treatment of stable lesions that failed conservative treatment. Medical records were reviewed for symptoms and demographic information. Preoperative and latest postoperative radiographs were used to determine degree of healing. AOFAS Ankle/Hindfoot scale and visual analog scale for pain were used to evaluate clinical outcomes. We identified 6 patients (6 ankles). The mean age was 13 years, and the mean duration of follow-up was 37 months (range, 16 to 69 mo). All of them had progressed toward healing and were asymptomatic, but only 3 out of 6 had a complete radiographic healing at last follow-up. The average AOFAS Ankle/Hindfoot score improved from 69 points (55 to 75, IQR=10) preoperatively to 98 points (90 to 100, IQR=7) (P<0.0027). Visual analog scale improved from 6.2 (4 to 8, IQR=3) to 0.3 (0 to 2, IQR=1) (P<0.002). All patients expressed satisfaction with operative results. Arthroscopic retrograde drilling seems to be effective for symptoms relief, although 50% of the cases have had persistent lesions on radiographs. A longer follow-up is necessary to assess joint function in those cases with partial radiographic healing. Level IV-therapeutic.

  16. Open versus arthroscopic treatment of chronic rotator cuff impingement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schröder, J.; van Dijk, C. N.; Wielinga, A.; Kerkhoffs, G. M.; Marti, R. K.

    2001-01-01

    We report the results of 238 consecutive patients who underwent in total 261 acromioplasties because of chronic rotator cuff impingement. The procedure was performed either in conventional open technique (80) or arthroscopically (181). Two years (1-10) after the operation 68% of the patients treated

  17. Comparison between open and arthroscopic procedure for lateral clavicle resection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duindam, N.; Kuiper, J.W.P.; Hoozemans, M.J.M.; Burger, B.J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Arthroscopic lateral clavicle resection (LCR) is increasingly used, compared to an open approach, but literature does not clearly indicate which approach is preferable. The goal of this study was to compare function and pain between patients who underwent lateral clavicle resection using an

  18. Arthroscopic treatment of acromioclavicular dislocation

    OpenAIRE

    Mihai T. Gavrilă; Ștefan Cristea

    2017-01-01

    A thorough understanding of biomechanical function of both acromioclavicular (AC) and coracoclavicular (CC) ligaments, stimulated surgeons to repair high-grade AC dislocation using arthroscopic technique. This technique necessitates a clear understanding of shoulder anatomy, especially of the structures in proximity to the clavicle and coracoid process and experiences in arthroscopic surgery. The follow case describes an arthroscopic technique used to treat AC dislocation in young man 30 year...

  19. Arthroscopic capsular release for refractory shoulder stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Rassi Fernandes

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results of the arthroscopic treatment of refractory adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder with two to nine years of follow-up, comparing the pre-and postoperative range of motion. METHODS: This was an observational study (case series of 18 patients who underwent arthroscopic capsular release for refractory shoulder stiffness. The mean age was of 53.6 years (range: 39 to 68, with female predominance (77.77% and nine cases left shoulders. There were 6 primary (33.33% and 12 secondary cases (66.67%. Arthroscopic capsular release was performed in all patients after a mean of 9.33 months of physical therapy (range: 6 to 20 months with a minimum follow-up of two years (range: 26 to 110 months. RESULTS: The mean active and passive forward flexion, external rotation and internal rotation increased from 94.4º/103.3º, 11.9º/21.9º, and S1/L5 vertebral level, respectively, to 151.1º/153.8º, 57.2º/64.4º, and T12/T10 vertebral level, respectively. There was a significant difference between the pre-and postoperative range of motion (p < 0.001. according to the constant-murley functional score (rom, the value increased from 14 (preoperative mean to 30 points (postoperative mean. postoperatively, all patients showed diminished shoulder pain (none or mild/15 or 10 points in the constant-murley score. CONCLUSION: arthroscopic treatment is an effective treatment for refractory shoulder stiffness.

  20. Finnish Degenerative Meniscal Lesion Study (FIDELITY): a protocol for a randomised, placebo surgery controlled trial on the efficacy of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for patients with degenerative meniscus injury with a novel 'RCT within-a-cohort' study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihvonen, Raine; Paavola, Mika; Malmivaara, Antti; Järvinen, Teppo L N

    2013-03-09

    Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) to treat degenerative meniscus injury is the most common orthopaedic procedure. However, valid evidence of the efficacy of APM is lacking. Controlling for the placebo effect of any medical intervention is important, but seems particularly pertinent for the assessment of APM, as the symptoms commonly attributed to a degenerative meniscal injury (medial joint line symptoms and perceived disability) are subjective and display considerable fluctuation, and accordingly difficult to gauge objectively. A multicentre, parallel randomised, placebo surgery controlled trial is being carried out to assess the efficacy of APM for patients from 35 to 65 years of age with a degenerative meniscus injury. Patients with degenerative medial meniscus tear and medial joint line symptoms, without clinical or radiographic osteoarthritis of the index knee, were enrolled and then randomly assigned (1 : 1) to either APM or diagnostic arthroscopy (placebo surgery). Patients are followed up for 12 months. According to the prior power calculation, 140 patients were randomised. The two randomised patient groups will be compared at 12 months with intention-to-treat analysis. To safeguard against bias, patients, healthcare providers, data collectors, data analysts, outcome adjudicators and the researchers interpreting the findings will be blind to the patients' interventions (APM/placebo). Primary outcomes are Lysholm knee score (a generic knee instrument), knee pain (using a numerical rating scale), and WOMET score (a disease-specific, health-related quality of life index). The secondary outcome is 15D (a generic quality of life instrument). Further, in one of the five centres recruiting patients for the randomised controlled trial (RCT), all patients scheduled for knee arthroscopy due to a degenerative meniscus injury are prospectively followed up using the same protocol as in the RCT to provide an external validation cohort. In this article, we

  1. Arthroscopic Treatment of Discoid Lateral Meniscus Tears in Children With Achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanda, Alfred; Wallace, Maegen; Bober, Michael B; Mackenzie, William

    2016-01-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common form of skeletal dysplasia that presents to the pediatric orthopaedist. More than half of achondroplasia patients are affected with knee pain. It is thought that the majority of this pain may be due to spinal stenosis, hip pathology, or knee malalignment. Discoid menisci can be a source of lateral knee joint pain in skeletally immature patients in general. We present the first case series of patients with achondroplasia who had symptomatic discoid lateral menisci treated with arthroscopic knee surgery. The charts of 6 patients (8 knees) with achondroplasia who underwent arthroscopic knee surgery for symptomatic discoid lateral menisci were collected. History and physical examination data, magnetic resonance imaging findings, and operative reports were reviewed. Meniscal tear configuration and treatment type (meniscectomy vs. repair) were noted. Each patient was found to have a tear of the discoid meniscus. All menisci were treated with saucerization. In addition, meniscal repair was performed in 2 cases, partial meniscectomy in 3 cases, and subtotal meniscectomy in 3 cases. Two patients had bilateral discoid meniscal tears which were treated. Average follow-up was 2.4 years (range, 1 to 4.5 y) and the average pediatric International Knee Documentation Committee (pedi-IKDC) score was 85.3% (range, 75% to 95.4%). At final follow-up, all patients were pain free and able to return to full activities. Discoid meniscus tears may be a source of lateral joint line pain in patients with achondroplasia. These injuries can be successfully treated with arthroscopic surgery in this patient population. Future studies need to be done to determine the exact incidence of discoid menisci in achondroplasia patients and also to determine whether there is a genetic relationship between the 2 conditions. Level IV-case series.

  2. Arthroscopic removal of an osteoid osteoma of the talus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, R B; Jarolem, K L; Sheskier, S C; Desai, P; Cisa, J

    1995-04-01

    This article describes a patient with a 10-year history of persistent ankle pain. Differential diagnosis included osteoid osteoma and anterior ankle impingement. This patient subsequently underwent arthroscopic excision of a lesion on the talar neck following a complete radiographic work-up, which was nondiagnostic. The diagnosis of osteoid osteoma was finalized upon pathologic study of the arthroscopic shavings. The use of a motorized instrument for excision did not preclude pathologic evaluation of the specimen. Therefore, in an accessible location on the talar neck, arthroscopic excision of an osteoid osteoma can be performed.

  3. Assessment of the results from arthroscopic surgical treatment of adhesive capsulitis

    OpenAIRE

    Marcio Cohen; Marcus Vinicius Amaral; Bruno Lobo Brandão; Marcelo Reis Pereira; Martim Monteiro; Geraldo da Rocha Motta Filho

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Describe the outcomes of patients with adhesive capsulitis treated with arthroscopic surgical procedure. METHODS: Between January and September of 2009, 9 patients (10 cases) underwent arthroscopic surgical release. There were 4 male (one bilateral) and 5 female patients. Their mean age was 51 years (27-63). The time from onset of symptoms to the surgical procedure averaged 23.4 months (6-38). Preoperative assessment was based on the UCLA and Constant score. ROM was evaluated ...

  4. Arthroscopic treatment of acromioclavicular dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai T. Gavrilă

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A thorough understanding of biomechanical function of both acromioclavicular (AC and coracoclavicular (CC ligaments, stimulated surgeons to repair high-grade AC dislocation using arthroscopic technique. This technique necessitates a clear understanding of shoulder anatomy, especially of the structures in proximity to the clavicle and coracoid process and experiences in arthroscopic surgery. The follow case describes an arthroscopic technique used to treat AC dislocation in young man 30 years old, who suffered an injury at right shoulder. Results were similar to those obtained using open surgery and this encouraged us to continue utilization of this method. As a conclusion, arthroscopic treatment of AC separation is one of the best options as surgical treatment. Early results suggested that immediate anatomic reduction of an acute AC separation usually provides satisfactory clinical results at intermediate-term follow-up.

  5. Arthroscopic treatment for chronic lateral epicondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Barcellos Terra

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTOBJECTIVE: To report the clinical and functional results from arthroscopic release of the short radial extensor of the carpus (SREC in patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis that was refractory to conservative treatment. METHODS: Over the period from January 2012 to November 2013, 15 patients underwent arthroscopic treatment. The surgical technique used was the one described by Romeo and Cohen, based on anatomical studies on cadavers. The inclusion criteria were that the patients needed to present lateral epicondylitis and that conservative treatment (analgesics, anti-inflammatory agents, corticoid infiltration or physiotherapy had failed over a period of more than six months. The patients were evaluated based on the elbow functional score of the Mayo Clinic, Nirschl's staging system and a visual analog scale (VAS for pain. RESULTS: A total of 15 patients (9 men and 6 women were included. The mean Mayo elbow functional score after the operation was 95 (ranging from 90 to 100. The pain VAS improved from a mean of 9.2 before the operation to 0.64 after the operation. On Nirschl's scale, the patients presented an improvement from a mean of 6.5 before the operation to approximately one. There were significant differences from before to after the surgery for the three functional scores used ( p 0.05. CONCLUSION: Arthroscopic treatment for lateral epicondylitis was shown to be a safe and effective therapeutic option when appropriately indicated and performed, in refractory cases of chronic lateral epicondylitis. It also allowed excellent viewing of the joint space for diagnosing and treating associated pathological conditions, with a minimally invasive procedure.

  6. Arthroscopic meniscal allograft transplantation without bone plugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Seijas Vázquez, Roberto; García Balletbó, Montserrat; Álvarez Díaz, Pedro; Steinbacher, Gilbert; Cuscó Segarra, Xavier; Rius Vilarrubia, Marta; Cugat Bertomeu, Ramón

    2011-02-01

    Partial or total meniscectomy are common procedures performed at Orthopedic Surgery departments. Despite providing a great relief of pain, it has been related to early onset knee osteoarthritis. Meniscal allograft transplantation has been proposed as an alternative to meniscectomy. The purposes of this study were to describe an arthroscopic meniscal allograft transplantation without bone plugs technique and to report the preliminary results. All meniscal allograft transplantations performed between 2001 and 2006 were approached for eligibility, and a total of 35 patients (involving 37 menisci) were finally engaged in the study. Patients were excluded if they had ipsilateral knee ligament reconstruction or cartilage repair surgery before meniscal transplantation or other knee surgeries after the meniscal transplantation. Scores on Lysholm, Subjective IKDC Form, and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scale for pain were obtained at a mean follow-up of 38.6 months and compared to pre-operative data. Data on chondral lesions were obtained during the arthroscopic procedure and through imaging (radiographs and MRI) studies pre-operatively. Two graft failures out of 59 transplants (3.4%) were found. Daily life accidents were responsible for all graft failures. Significant improvements for Lysholm, Subjective IKDC Form, and VAS for pain scores following the meniscal allograft transplantation were found (P lesion, there was no significant interactions for Lysholm (n.s.), Subjective IKDC Form (n.s.), and VAS for pain scores (n.s.). This study demonstrated that an arthroscopic meniscal allograft transplantation without bone plugs improved knee function and symptoms after a total meniscectomy. Improvements were observed independently of the degree of chondral lesion.

  7. [Arthroscopic treatment for calcaneal spur syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stropek, S; Dvorák, M

    2008-10-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Arthroscopic treatment of calcaneal spur syndrome is a tissue-sparing and effective approach when conservative therapy has failed. This method, its results and our experience with the treatment of this syndrome are presented here. MATERIAL Between January 2003 and November 2007, 26 patients underwent an arthroscopic procedure for calcaneal spur syndrome; of these, 20 were women with an average age of 49 years, and six were men with an average age of 45 years. Four, three women and one man, were lost to follow-up, therefore 22 patients with 24 heels were eventually evaluated. All had conservative therapy for 3 to 6 monts. METHODS The arthroscopic method used was developed by the arthroscopic group of the Orthopaedic Service of Hospital Hermanos Ameijeiras in Havana, Cuba. The surgical technique insolves treatment of the spur and plantar fasciitis commonly found in calcaneal spur syndrome, but it also addresses adjacent calcaneal periostitis. RESULTS The results were evaluated on the scale that is part of the foot function index developed by Budiman-Mak for measuring rheumatoid arthritis pain. The patients were asked mine questions on pain intensity during various activities before and after surgery. Pain was evaluated on a scale with grades from 0 to 9. The average value was 5.9 before surgery and 1.4 after surgery. A 0-1 pain range was reported by 25 %, 1-2 by 26 % and 2-4 by 22 % of the patients. All patients reported improvement. DISCUSSION The orthopaedic group in Havana led by Carlos achieved 85 % excellent outcomes (pain range, 0-2) at one-year followup; this was 79 % in our study, in which no problems with foot arches or wound infection were recorded. CONCLUSIONS The heel spur syndrome is a result of an inflamed ligament (plantar fascia) due to repeated microtrauma. It is not a traction osteophyte,but a reaction of the tissue where it attaches to the calcaneus. Adjacent calcaneal periostitis is usually present as well. Therefore, this

  8. Arthroscopic surgery of the metatarsophalangeal first joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, C. N.; Veenstra, K. M.; Nuesch, B. C.

    1998-01-01

    Arthroscopic surgery of the metatarsophalangeal first joint was used to treat a dorsal impingement syndrome of the hallux by removing the dorsally located osteophytes. Also, osteochondritis dissecans, painful sesamoid bones resistant to conservative therapy, and hallux rigidus were arthroscopically

  9. Quantification of the Learning Curve for Arthroscopic Os Trigonum Excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakado, Kotaro

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to quantify the learning curve for arthroscopic os trigonum excision using the log-linear model. Twenty-three consecutive feet underwent arthroscopic os trigonum excision and release of the flexor hallucis longus. The required time from the beginning of shaving of the soft tissue until completion of os trigonum excision and release of the flexor hallucis longus (van Dijk time) was recorded. Regression analysis was applied to predict the required time on the basis of the cumulative case volume after logarithmic transformation of both statistics. The mean required time was 35.2 (range 9 to 90) minutes. After logarithmic transformation, a significant linear correlation was observed between the required time and the cumulative case volume (p = .0043). The best-fit linear equation was calculated as log (y, estimated required time)  = -0.41 log (x, case volume) + 1.86, resulting in an estimated learning rate of 75.3% (= 2 -0.41 ). The results showed an overall time reduction in arthroscopic os trigonum excision in support of a learning curve effect with an ~75% learning rate, indicating that the required time for arthroscopic os trigonum excision can decrease by ≤25% when the cumulative volume of cases has doubled. Copyright © 2017 The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Arthroscopic knee anatomy in young achondroplasia patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Pilar Duque Orozco, M.; Record, N. C.; Rogers, K. J; Bober, M. B.; Mackenzie, W. G.; Atanda, A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Purpose Achondroplasia is the most common form of skeletal dysplasia, affecting more than 250 000 individuals worldwide. In these patients, the developing knee undergoes multiple anatomical changes. The purpose of this study was to characterise the intra-articular knee anatomy in children with achondroplasia who underwent knee arthroscopy. Methods Records of achondroplasia patients who underwent knee arthroscopy between 2009 and 2014 were reviewed. Demographic data, operative reports, follow-up notes, MRI and arthroscopy images were reviewed. Bony, cartilaginous and ligamentous changes were noted. The trochlea sulcus angle was measured from intra-operative arthroscopic images. Results A total of 12 knee arthroscopies in nine patients were performed. The mean age at surgery was 16.9 years (12 to 22). In all patients, the indication for surgery was knee pain and/or mechanical symptoms that were refractory to non-operative treatment. Three anatomical variations involving the distal femur were found in all knees: a deep femoral trochlea; a high A-shaped intercondylar notch; and a vertically oriented anterior cruciate ligament. The average trochlea sulcus angle measured 123°. Pathology included: synovial plica (one knee); chondral lesions (three knees); discoid lateral meniscus (11 knees); and meniscal tears (six knees). All patients were pain-free and returned to normal activity at final follow-up. Conclusion Children with achondroplasia have characteristic distal femur anatomy noted during knee arthroscopy. These variations should be considered normal during knee arthroscopy in these patients. Arthroscopic findings confirmed previous MRI findings within this specific population with the addition of a deep trochlear groove which was not previously reported. PMID:28828058

  11. Arthroscopic knee anatomy in young achondroplasia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pilar Duque Orozco, M; Record, N C; Rogers, K J; Bober, M B; Mackenzie, W G; Atanda, A

    2017-06-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common form of skeletal dysplasia, affecting more than 250 000 individuals worldwide. In these patients, the developing knee undergoes multiple anatomical changes. The purpose of this study was to characterise the intra-articular knee anatomy in children with achondroplasia who underwent knee arthroscopy. Records of achondroplasia patients who underwent knee arthroscopy between 2009 and 2014 were reviewed. Demographic data, operative reports, follow-up notes, MRI and arthroscopy images were reviewed. Bony, cartilaginous and ligamentous changes were noted. The trochlea sulcus angle was measured from intra-operative arthroscopic images. A total of 12 knee arthroscopies in nine patients were performed. The mean age at surgery was 16.9 years (12 to 22). In all patients, the indication for surgery was knee pain and/or mechanical symptoms that were refractory to non-operative treatment. Three anatomical variations involving the distal femur were found in all knees: a deep femoral trochlea; a high A-shaped intercondylar notch; and a vertically oriented anterior cruciate ligament. The average trochlea sulcus angle measured 123°. Pathology included: synovial plica (one knee); chondral lesions (three knees); discoid lateral meniscus (11 knees); and meniscal tears (six knees). All patients were pain-free and returned to normal activity at final follow-up. Children with achondroplasia have characteristic distal femur anatomy noted during knee arthroscopy. These variations should be considered normal during knee arthroscopy in these patients. Arthroscopic findings confirmed previous MRI findings within this specific population with the addition of a deep trochlear groove which was not previously reported.

  12. [Arthroscopic treatment of psoas impingement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möckel, G; Miehlke, W

    2018-03-14

    Tenotomy of the psoas tendon in symptomatic internal coxa saltans or psoas impingement should relieve pain. Indicated in conservative treatment-resistant internal coxa saltans and in psoas impingement. Contraindications are symptomatic psoas pathologies in hip dysplasia patients. Three different procedures exist with the arthroscopic technique, in which the psoas tenotomy can be performed at one of three different levels. These are the arthroscopic transcapsular, the endoscopic extra-articular, and the arthroscopic central techniques. Forearm crutches are recommended for approximately 2-4 weeks as well as physiotherapy to strengthen the hip flexors. A literature-based comparison could reveal no difference between the extra-articular and transcapsular techniques. Particularly in the long term was no loss of strength evident. Various different authors describe the techniques as good, finding neither complications nor recurrence of internal snapping hip.

  13. Arthroscopic-assisted biceps tenodesis for ruptures of the long head of biceps brachii: The cobra procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, David P; Burkhart, Stephen S

    2004-07-01

    A number of open procedures have been presented in the literature that described the repair of the ruptured long head of biceps brachii (LHBB). Although arthroscopic biceps tenodesis techniques have been used to address partial tears or subluxation of the biceps, no arthroscopic technique to assist in the treatment of complete retracted ruptures of the LHBB has been described. This article describes an arthroscopic-assisted biceps tenodesis, using interference screw fixation, in the treatment of acute or chronic LHBB ruptures. An arthroscopic-assisted biceps tenodesis with interference screw fixation provides an alternative to open LHBB tenodesis. The ability to tenodese the retracted LHBB arthroscopically is a technologic advance that could reduce morbidity in comparison to open tenodesis, thus resulting in a better functional outcome.

  14. Lateral meniscus allograft transplantation: clinical and anatomic outcomes after arthroscopic implantation with tibial tunnels versus open implantation without tunnels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faivre, B; Boisrenoult, P; Lonjon, G; Pujol, N; Beaufils, P

    2014-05-01

    Meniscus allograft transplantation (MAT) is used to treat patients with knee pain after total or subtotal meniscectomy. The graft can be inserted during open or arthroscopic surgery. The objectives are anatomic horn positioning and strong fixation to the bone and capsule of an appropriately sized graft. Arthroscopic MAT with trans-tibial bone fixation ensures better mid-term functional outcomes and limits allograft extrusion. We conducted a retrospective single-centre study of 23 consecutive patients who underwent MAT between 2001 and 2010. Among them, 11 had open surgery and anchoring of the horns without tunnels and 12 had arthroscopically-assisted surgery with bony fixation of the horns through trans-tibial tunnels. The two groups were comparable at baseline. Mean follow-up was 66.1 months. Post-operative outcomes were assessed using the IKDC score and KOOS, standard radiographs of both knees, and either magnetic resonance imaging or computed arthrotomography. We measured joint space narrowing, meniscal extrusion in the sagittal and coronal planes; and the degree of cartilage coverage by the graft using an index developed for this study. The overall failure rate was 17.4% (4/23, two cases each of complete and partial graft removal). Joint space narrowing increased by 28% versus the pre-operative value (P=0.009). IKDC and KOOS values were not significantly different between the two groups. Absolute meniscus extrusion was greater in the arthroscopy group (4mm vs. 3mm, P=0.03). Osteoarthritis of the transplanted compartment is unavoidable. Open surgery is associated with less meniscal extrusion. The clinical outcomes are independent from the technique used. Other factors require investigation, including graft rehabilitation, quality peripheral suturing, and intermeniscal ligament reconstruction. IV, retrospective study. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  15. Behavior of arthroscopic irrigation systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuijthof, G. J. M.; Dusée, L.; Herder, J. L.; van Dijk, C. N.; Pistecky, P. V.

    2005-01-01

    In the literature, no consensus exists about optimal irrigation of joints during arthroscopic operations. The goal of this paper is to study the behavior of irrigation systems resulting in the proposal of guidelines for optimal irrigation. To this end, optimal irrigation is defined as the steady

  16. Efficacy of arthroscopic treatment for resolving infection in septic arthritis of native joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aïm, F; Delambre, J; Bauer, T; Hardy, P

    2015-02-01

    Septic arthritis is a diagnostic and therapeutic emergency that threatens both life and function. The primary objective of this study was to assess the efficacy on the infectious process of arthroscopic treatment in patients with septic arthritis of native joints. The secondary objective was to identify factors predicting failure to achieve infection resolution after arthroscopic treatment. We hypothesised that arthroscopy was the appropriate treatment strategy. Forty-six cases of septic arthritis in 46 patients with a mean age of 46 years (range, 18-72 years) were retrospectively reviewed. The cause of the septic arthritis was haematogenous dissemination in 39.1% of patients, surgery in 34.8%, a local injection in 19.6%, and trauma in 6.5%. The involved joint was the knee in 32 patients, the shoulder in 6, the hip in 3, the ankle in 3, and the elbow in 2. All patients underwent arthroscopic joint lavage, with or without synovectomy depending on the Gächter stage. Dual antibiotic therapy was given routinely after the procedure. For each patient, we assessed time to treatment, intraoperative findings according to the Gächter classification, cultures of drainage-fluids, and whether repeat arthroscopic lavage was required. Recovery of the infection was defined as absence of clinical or laboratory signs of infection at last follow-up. Mean follow-up was 42 months (range, 1-120). Mean time from symptom onset to arthroscopic treatment was 7.5 days. Full recovery of the infection was achieved in 93% of patients, although 25% required more than one arthroscopic lavage. Factors significantly associated with arthroscopic treatment failure were Gächter stage III or IV and positive drainage-fluid cultures after 24h. Arthroscopic treatment is indicated in all patients with septic arthritis on native joints. The procedure should be repeated if the initial course is unfavourable. IV. Retrospective study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Arthroscopic repair techniques for massive rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Jeffrey S; Song, Frederick S

    2012-01-01

    Patients with massive rotator cuff tears present with pain, weakness, and loss of function. Candidates for arthroscopic repair include symptomatic, young, active patients; those with an acute tear or tears with early changes of atrophy; and patients willing to comply with recovery and rehabilitation processes after surgery. As massive rotator cuff tears extend, the glenohumeral articulation is destabilized, allowing superior migration. Repair of the force couples and reinforcement of the anterosuperior rotator cuff cable can restore functional elevation via the deltoid. Muscle changes, including rotator cuff atrophy and fatty infiltration, will affect shoulder strength and function. As chronic changes become more extensive (such as the absence of the acromiohumeral interval and degenerative joint changes), other repair options may be more durable. Other arthroscopic options, including partial rotator cuff closure, graft to augment the repair, and use of the long head of the biceps tendon, have been helpful in pain relief and functional gains.

  18. The Functional and Structural Outcomes of Arthroscopic Iliopsoas Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, Jacob B; Kapron, Ashley L; Wylie, James D; Wilkinson, Brandon G; Maak, Travis G; Gonzalez, Cristian D; Aoki, Stephen K

    2016-05-01

    Arthroscopic release of the iliopsoas tendon may alleviate pain associated with internal snapping hip, but previous reports of physical function, hip strength, and muscle atrophy after surgery are mixed. The hips of patients who underwent arthroscopic iliopsoas release would demonstrate significantly reduced hip flexion strength and iliopsoas muscle volume when compared with their contralateral hips and the hips of patients who underwent hip arthroscopy without psoas release. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Eighteen patients who underwent hip arthroscopy with iliopsoas release for symptomatic internal snapping hip and concomitant femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and/or chondrolabral damage (release group) and 18 patients who underwent arthroscopy for FAI and/or chondrolabral damage without iliopsoas release (control group) were evaluated at a mean of 21 months (range, 16-30 months) postoperatively. Magnetic resonance images were performed and segmented to calculate iliopsoas volume. Isometric hip flexion strength was evaluated in the supine and seated positions with a custom testing apparatus. Differences between groups and differences between the operative and nonoperative limbs within groups were compared with unpaired and paired t tests, respectively. In the release group, the iliopsoas muscle of the surgical limb was significantly smaller (288 ± 98 vs 384 ± 113 cm(3), P strength (-19% ± 16% vs -3.9% ± 20%, P = .018) between the operative and contralateral limbs. There were no significant differences in supine strength between limbs or groups (all P > .168). Arthroscopic iliopsoas release results in iliopsoas atrophy with a 25% volume loss and a 19% reduction in seated hip flexion strength. © 2016 The Author(s).

  19. Results of arthroscopic meniscal repair

    OpenAIRE

    Orlowski, Mar?a Bel?n; Arroquy, Dami?n; Chahla, Jorge; Gui?az?, Jorge; Bisso, Mart?n Carboni; Vilaseca, Tom?s

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Currently the arthroscopic treatment of meniscal pathology has become one of the most common procedures in orthopedic practice and although in most cases meniscectomy is done, meniscal sutures are the treatment of choice when a reparable lesion is diagnosed, especially in young patients. It has been reported that the meniscal repair leads to a lower incidence of developing degenerative changes in the long-term when compared with meniscectomy and nonsurgical treatment of meniscal i...

  20. Arthroscopic autologous chondrocyte implantation in the ankle joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, Sandro; Buda, Roberto; Ruffilli, Alberto; Cavallo, Marco; Pagliazzi, Gherardo; Bulzamini, Maria Chiara; Desando, Giovanna; Luciani, Deianira; Vannini, Francesca

    2014-06-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is an established procedure in the ankle providing satisfactory results. The development of a completely arthroscopic ACI procedure in the ankle joint made the technique easier and reduced the morbidity. The purpose of this investigation was to report the clinical results of a series of patients who underwent arthroscopic ACI of the talus at a mean of 7 ± 1.2-year follow-up. Forty-six patients (mean age 31.4 ± 7.6) affected by osteochondral lesions of the talar dome (OLT) received arthroscopic ACI between 2001 and 2006. Patients were clinically evaluated using AOFAS score pre-operatively and at 12, 36 months and at final follow-up of 87.2 ± 14.5 months. The mean pre-operative AOFAS score was 57.2 ± 14.3. At the 12-month follow-up, the mean AOFAS score was 86.8 ± 13.4 (p = 0.0005); at 36 months after surgery, the mean score was 89.5 ± 13.4 (p = 0.0005); whereas at final follow-up of 87.2 ± 14.5 months it was 92.0 ± 11.2 (p = 0.0005). There were three failures. Histological and immunohistochemical evaluations of specimens harvested from failed implants generally showed several aspects of a fibro-cartilaginous tissue associated with some aspects of cartilage tissue remodelling as indicated by the presence of type II collagen expression. This study confirmed the ability of arthroscopic ACI to repair osteochondral lesions in the ankle joint with satisfactory clinical results after mid-term follow-up. IV, retrospective case series.

  1. Arthroscopic proximal versus open subpectoral biceps tenodesis with arthroscopic repair of small- or medium-sized rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Young; Lee, Jong-Myoung; Kwon, Seok Hyun; Kim, Jeong-Woo

    2016-12-01

    The study was aimed to compare arthroscopic proximal biceps tenodesis and open subpectoral biceps tenodesis in repair of small or medium rotator cuff tears. Eighty-five patients underwent biceps tenodesis with arthroscopic repair of a rotator cuff tear, and 66 patients were followed for median of 26.8 (18-42) months with ultrasonography were reviewed. The arthroscopic biceps tenodesis group included 34 cases, and the open subpectoral biceps group included 32 cases. Patients were evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS), American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), and constant scores. Rotator cuff repair and fixation of the biceps tendon were assessed by ultrasonography. Fixation failure and degree of deformity were evaluated by the pain in the bicipital groove and biceps apex distance (BAD). VAS score and tenderness at the bicipital groove decreased significantly in the open subpectoral group at 3 months postoperative. In both groups, the range of motion, ASES score, and constant score increased significantly (P tendinitis and using intra-bicipital groove tenodesis technique. III.

  2. Clinical evaluation of arthroscopic treatment of shoulder adhesive capsulitis

    OpenAIRE

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Santos, Pedro Doneux; Silva, Luciana Andrade; Sella, Guilherme do Val; Carrenho, Leonardo; Checchia, Sergio Luiz

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results of arthroscopic releases performed in patients with adhesive capsulitis refractory to conservative treatment. METHODS: This was a retrospective study, conducted between 1996 and 2012, which included 56 shoulders (52 patients) that underwent surgery; 38 were female, and 28 had the dominant side affected. The mean age was 51 (29-73) years. The mean follow-up was 65 (12-168) months and the mean preoperative time was 8.9 (2-24) months. According to ...

  3. Arthroscopic Revision Surgery for Failure of Open Latarjet Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuéllar, Adrián; Cuéllar, Ricardo; de Heredia, Pablo Beltrán

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy in treating pain, limited range of motion, and continued instability of the Latarjet open technique via the use of arthroscopy. A retrospective review of patients who underwent arthroscopic capsule plication after failure of an open Latarjet technique was performed. Revision surgery was indicated in cases of recurrent instability and associated pain. Only patients with a glenoid defect Latarjet with a glenoid bone defect Latarjet procedures. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. KNEE ARTHROSCOPIC VISIBILITY ALTERATIONS IN OBESE AND NON-OBESE PATIENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zini, Cássio; Stieven-Filho, Edmar; Tabushi, Fernando Issamu; Ribas, Carmen Australia Paredes Marcondes; Ribas, Fernanda Marcondes; Opolski, Ana Cristina; Erbano, Bruna Olandoski

    Obesity is a chronic disease and has become the most prevalent public health problem worldwide. The impact of obesity on knee is strong and the BMI is correlated with the different alterations. Compare surgical visualization of arthroscopic field in partial meniscectomy in obese and non-obese. Sixty patients were selected, 30 obese and 30 non-obese who underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. The arthroscopic surgical procedures were recorded and analyzed. For the analysis of visualization was used the Johnson's classification (2000). Were analyzed 48 men and 12 women, the average age was 42.9 years with BMI between 21.56 to 40.14 kg/m2. The distribution of visibility of the surgical field according to the classification was: grade 1 - 38/60 (63.3%); grade 2 - 13/60 (21.6%); grade 3 - 6/60 (10%); grade 4 - 3/60 (5%). Knee arthroscopy did not show a significant difference in the visibility of arthroscopic field in obese and non-obese patients. Thus, it should not be indicated as the preferred method of diagnostic evaluation of joint changes in these patients. A obesidade é doença crônica e tem se tornado o problema de saúde pública mais prevalente em todo mundo. O impacto dela no joelho é grande e o IMC está correlacionado com as diferentes alterações existentes. Comparar a visualização do campo videoartroscópico na meniscectomia parcial de joelho em pacientes obesos e não obesos. Foram selecionados 60 pacientes, sendo 30 obesos e 30 não obesos que realizaram meniscectomia parcial videoartroscópica. Os procedimentos videoartroscópicos foram gravados e posteriormente analisados. Foi utilizada na análise a classificação de visibilidade do campo videoartroscópico de Johnson (2000). Foram analisados 48 homens e 12 mulheres com idade média de 42,9 anos e IMC de 21,56 a 40,14 kg/m2. A distribuição da visibilidade do campo cirúrgico foi: grau 1 - 38/60 (63,3%); grau 2 - 13/60 (21,6%); grau 3 - 6/60 (10%); grau 4 - 3/60 (5%). A artroscopia de

  5. Isolated meniscal injuries in paediatric patients: outcomes after arthroscopic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, G; Accadbled, F; Violas, P; Sales de Gauzy, J; Knörr, J

    2015-04-01

    The management of isolated meniscal tears in paediatric patients is poorly standardised, and few published data are available. Nevertheless, there is widespread agreement that meniscectomy, even when partial, produces poor outcomes including the premature development of osteoarthritis. Arthroscopic repair of isolated meniscal tears in paediatric patients yields good outcomes and should be attempted routinely. We retrospectively assessed 19 arthroscopic repair procedures performed between 2006 and 2010 by a single surgeon in 17 patients with a mean age of 14 years. In every case, the knee was stable and the meniscus normal before the meniscal tear, which was the only injury. Mean follow-up was 22 months. In all 19 cases, the evaluation included a physical examination, pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and determination of the Tegner and Lysholm scores. Post-operative MRI was performed in 10 cases. The outcome was good in 12/17 (70%) patients with significant improvements in the mean Tegner score, from 3.9 to 7.1, and mean Lysholm score, from 55.9 to 85.4, between the pre-operative and post-operative assessments. The clinical outcomes were not significantly associated with time to arthroscopic repair, gender, lesion site, or lesion type. Neither was any correlation demonstrated between clinical outcomes and meniscal healing as assessed by MRI. The known poor outcomes after meniscectomy in paediatric patients, the results of our study, and previously published data support routine arthroscopic repair of isolated meniscal tears in this age group, regardless of the site and type of injury. In addition, in asymptomatic patients, clinical follow-up is sufficient and post-operative MRI unnecessary. Level IV. Retrospective study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. MR findings of chondromalacia Patella : correlation of the grade and associated lesions with arthroscopic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Yon Su; Kwon, Soon Tae; Lee, Hwan Do; Kang, Yong Soo; Byun, Ki Yong; Rhee, Kwang Jin [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1998-02-01

    To assess the MR findings of chondromalacia patella and correlate the grade and associated lesions with the arthroscopic findings. Twenty-five patients with pain in the anterior part of the knee underwent fat-suppressed axial and coronal T2-weighted and T2-weighted imaging, using a 10-cm field of view, and a 5-inch general purpose coil. We retrospectively assessed these findings, and the locations, grades and associated lesions, and correlated these with arthroscopic findings. We evaluated the exact location and grade of chondromalacia patella and associated lesions, as seen on MR images. These and the arthroscopic findings showed close correlation, and in cases involving this condition, MRI is thus a useful indicator of an appropriate surgical method and plan. (author). 18 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Outcomes are favorable after arthroscopic treatment of osteochondritis dissecans of the talus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Graham Seow Hng; Bin Abd Razak, Hamid Rahmatullah; Mitra, Amit Kanta

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopic treatment of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the talus has resulted in outcomes as good as, or better than, those after arthrotomy. We noted a lack of prospective studies investigating the outcomes of arthroscopic treatment. As such, we conducted a prospective study investigating the functional outcomes, pain scores, patient satisfaction, and expectation scores of patients undergoing arthroscopic treatment of OCD of the talus, hypothesizing that these patients would have good outcomes and satisfaction. A total of 61 patients underwent arthroscopic chondroplasty, removal of loose bodies, and microfracture for OCD of the talus and completed ≥1 year of follow-up. We evaluated patients pre- and postoperatively at 6 and 12 months using the Ankle-Hindfoot score, visual analog scale for pain, and Medical Outcomes Study short-form 36 questionnaires. We also evaluated the patients' expectations and satisfaction. The mean Ankle-Hindfoot score improved significantly from 53.0 ± 14.3 points preoperatively to 77.8 ± 19.1 at 6 months and 83.1 ± 18.3 at 12 months after arthroscopic treatment (p treatment of OCD of the talus continues to be a successful procedure to alleviate pain and loss of function. It is also associated with improvements to quality of life and good patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Systematic review: what surgical technique provides the best outcome for symptomatic partial articular-sided rotator cuff tears?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollier, Matthew; Shea, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    There is no consensus in the literature regarding the optimal surgical treatment of symptomatic partial rotator cuff tears. We attempted to determine the optimal surgical treatment for partial articular-sided rotator cuff tears through a systematic review of appropriate studies. Medline®, PubMed, Ovid, and the cochrane register of controlled trials were searched for all studies published between January 1991 to March 2010 that used the key words "shoulder", "partial rotator cuff tear", "PASTA", "articularsided rotator cuff tear", "incomplete rotator cuff tear", "arthroscopic" and "repair". Inclusion criteria were studies (Level I to IV) that reported clinical outcomes in patients who had arthroscopic evaluation and arthroscopic or mini-open treatment of a symptomatic partial articular-sided rotator cuff tear. One of three surgical treatments was used: debridement with or without acromioplasty; transtendon arthroscopic repair; or tear completion with repair. Exclusion criteria included studies with over 50% overhead throwers or athletes, studies that involved an open approach to the rotator cuff without arthroscopy, and data presented in technical notes or review papers. Data abstracted from the studies included patient demographics, tear characteristics, surgical procedure(s), and clinical outcomes. Of 588 studies involving partial rotator cuff tears, 14 studies were identified which met our inclusion and exclusion criteria. All studies were Level IV retrospective case-series studies. Seven studies reported outcomes after rotator cuff debridement. Tear completion and repair was performed in three studies. Transtendon repair of a partial articular-sided rotator cuff tear was performed in three studies. Although different outcome measures were used, each study reported subjective and objective improvement postoperatively. One study compared outcomes in patients who underwent arthroscopic debridement versus another group where patients had tear completion and mini

  9. Tears of the Supraspinatus Tendon: Assessment with Indirect Magnetic Resonance Arthrography in 67 Patients with Arthroscopic Correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyck, P. van; Gielen, J.L.; Parizel, P.M. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital Antwerp and Univ. of Antwerp, Antwerp (Belgium)) (and others)

    2009-11-15

    Background: Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is generally regarded as the gold standard for shoulder imaging. As an alternative to direct MR arthrography, the less invasive indirect MR arthrography technique was proposed, offering logistic advantages because fluoroscopic or ultrasonographic guidance for joint injection is not required. Purpose: To assess the diagnostic performance of indirect MR arthrography in the diagnosis of full- and partial-thickness supraspinatus tears in a symptomatic population. Material and Methods: Two radiologists with different levels of experience independently and retrospectively interpreted indirect MR (1.5T) arthrograms of the shoulder obtained in 67 symptomatic patients who underwent subsequent arthroscopy. On MR, the supraspinatus tendon was evaluated for full- or partial-thickness tear. With arthroscopy as the standard of reference, sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of indirect MR arthrography in the detection of full- and partial-thickness tears of the supraspinatus tendon was calculated. Kappa (kappa) statistics were used for the assessment of the agreement between arthroscopic and imaging findings and for the assessment of interobserver agreement. Results: For full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus tendon, sensitivities, specificities, and accuracies exceeded 90% for both observers, with excellent interobserver agreement (kappa = 0.910). For partial-thickness tears, sensitivities (38-50%) and accuracies (76-78%) were poor for both reviewers, and interobserver agreement was moderate (kappa = 0.491). Discrepancies between MR diagnosis and arthroscopy were predominantly observed with small partial-thickness tears. Conclusion: Indirect MR arthrography is highly accurate in the diagnosis of full-thickness rotator cuff tears. However, the diagnosis of partial-thickness tears with indirect MR arthrography remains faulty, because exact demarcation of degenerative change and partial rupture is difficult. On the

  10. Arthroscopic Management of Bennett Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Jason; Culp, Randall W

    2017-11-01

    Bennett fracture is the most common fracture of the thumb. Choosing the appropriate approach to fracture fixation requires a thorough knowledge of the anatomy surrounding the first carpometacarpal joint, which is necessary to prevent injury to local sensory nerves and tendons. Although no study has shown superior outcomes compared with open reduction internal fixation and fluoroscopically guided closed reduction and percutaneous pinning, arthroscopic-assisted fixation allows for debridement of the carpometacarpal joint, direct visualization of the articular surface during reduction, and has minimal morbidity and associated complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Bone fragment union and remodeling after arthroscopic bony bankart repair for traumatic anterior shoulder instability with a glenoid defect: influence on postoperative recurrence of instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Shigeto; Ozaki, Ritsuro; Take, Yasuhiro; Mae, Tatsuo; Hayashida, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    Although good clinical outcomes have been reported after arthroscopic bony Bankart repair, the extent of bone union is still unclear. To investigate bone union after arthroscopic bony Bankart repair and its influence on postoperative recurrence of instability. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Among 113 consecutive shoulders that underwent arthroscopic bony Bankart repair, postoperative evaluation of bone union by computed tomography (CT) was performed at various times in 81 shoulders. Bone union was investigated during 3 periods: 3 to 6 months postoperatively (first period), 7 to 12 months postoperatively (second period), and 13 months or more postoperatively (third period). The influence of the size of the preoperative glenoid defect and the size of the bone fragment on bone union was investigated, as well as the influence of bone union on postoperative recurrence of instability. In shoulders with bone union, bone fragment remodeling and changes in the glenoid defect size were also investigated. The bone union rate was 30.5% in the first period, 55.3% in the second period, and 84.6% in the third period. Among 53 shoulders with CT evaluation in the second period or later and follow-up for a minimum of 1 year, there was complete union in 33 shoulders (62.3%), partial union in 3 (5.7%), nonunion in 8 (15.1%), and no fragment on CT in 9 (17.0%). The complete union rate was 50% for 22 shoulders with small bone fragments (10%). The recurrence rate for postoperative instability was only 6.1% for shoulders with complete union, while it was 50% for shoulders with partial union, nonunion, no fragment, and no fragment on CT. The recurrence rate was significantly higher (36.4%) in shoulders with small fragments, but it was significantly lower in shoulders with bone union. In shoulders with bone union, the bone fragment frequently became larger over time, while the size of the glenoid defect decreased significantly from 18.6% preoperatively to 4.7% postoperatively. Bone

  12. [Arthroscopic Finding of Knee Joint in Relation to Age and Its Comparison with Pre-Operative Clinical Finding - a Retrospective Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Látal, P; Šimeček, K; Kloub, M

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY In the retrospective study of two South Bohemian centres we present the comparison of pre-operative anamnestic clinical signs in relation to the arthroscopic intraoperative finding. The obtained data is used also to evaluate the arthroscopic finding in relation to age and sex. MATERIAL AND METHODS The arthroscopic findings of patients who underwent surgery in 2013-2014 period (1.1.2013-31.12.2014) at the Department of Trauma Surgery of České Budějovice Hospital, a.s. and in 2014 (1.1.-31.12.2014) at the Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology of Písek Hospital, a.s. were evaluated. In total, 1 021 patients underwent surgery, with the mean age of 44 years. The patients were not selected. The group includes all the patients who underwent surgery, including those in whom repeat arthroscopy was performed, in the respective period of time, regardless of the mechanism of difficulties. A preoperative MRI scan was carried out in 470 patients. The referring physician was present during the examination. In all the patients undergoing surgery, the main clinical preoperative sign was examined based on the documentation, namely in the following order - hemarthros, locked knee, hydrops or merely a pain. In the arthroscopic finding, the medial meniscal lesion - anterior and posterior horn, and complete tear was assessed. The same was done for lateral meniscus. In anterior cruciate ligament - ACL - partial or complete tear was assessed. We identified the frequency of findings in relation to age and evaluated the correlations between the clinical signs and the arthroscopic finding. We calculated the sensitivity and specificity of hemarthros as a sign of ACL tear. The analysis was conducted based on the medical history in medical record documentation and the surgical protocol. The cartilage was not assessed. RESULTS Analysis of clinical and anamnestic signs in relation to arthroscopic findings 1. Negative arthroscopic findings (potential cartilage damage

  13. The arthroscopic latarjet procedure for anterior shoulder instability: 5-year minimum follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Guillaume D; Fogerty, Simon; Rosso, Claudio; Lafosse, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    The arthroscopic Latarjet procedure combines the benefits of arthroscopic surgery with the low rate of recurrent instability associated with the Latarjet procedure. Only short-term outcomes after arthroscopic Latarjet procedure have been reported. To evaluate the rate of recurrent instability and patient outcomes a minimum of 5 years after stabilization performed with the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Patients who underwent the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure before June 2008 completed a questionnaire to determine whether they had experienced a dislocation, subluxation, or further surgery. The patients also completed the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI). A total of 62 of 87 patients (64/89 shoulders) were contacted for follow-up. Mean follow-up time was 76.4 months (range, 61.2-100.7 months). No patients had reported a dislocation since their surgery. One patient reported having subluxations since the surgery. Thus, 1 patient (1.59%) had recurrent instability after the procedure. The mean ± standard deviation aggregate WOSI score was 90.6% ± 9.4%. Mean WOSI domain scores were as follows: Physical Symptoms, 90.1% ± 8.7%; Sports/Recreation/Work, 90.3% ± 12.9%; Lifestyle, 93.7% ± 9.8%; and Emotions, 88.7% ± 17.3%. The rate of recurrent instability after arthroscopic Latarjet procedure is low in this series of patients with a minimum 5-year follow-up. Patient outcomes as measured by the WOSI are good. © 2014 The Author(s).

  14. A STUDY OF ARTHROSCOPIC MANAGEMENT OF MENISCAL INJURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Meniscal injuries are common as a result of sports related injuries and motor vehicle accidents. Current arthroscopic partial menisectomy / repairs indicated for management of meniscal tears because of early rehabilitation and return to work and minimal complications . MATERIALS AND METHODS: Present study is a hospital based prospective study of 20 adult cases admitted for a period of 14 months, age group involved was between 10 - 40 years with 17 patients were male and 3 patients were female. RESULTS : Meniscal injuries on Right K nee were 11 cases and Left Knee were 9 cases. Type of meniscal tear were longitudinal 10 cases, oblique 5 cases, horizontal 3 cases, radial 1 case and complex (with discoid meniscus tear 1 case. Meniscal injuries associated with partial/complete ACL tear were 6 cases. There was one case of discoid meniscus. Surgery was performed at an average 1 month after Meniscal tear, duration of hospital stay was 3 . 6 days ranging from 3 - 6 days, mean time for earliest return to work was 14.35 days with range 10 - 16 days. Excellent to good results were seen in 95 %.of cases. CONCLUSION : Arthroscopic menisectomy is minimally invasive technique. Advantage of which includes early return to work, minimal complications, early post - operative rehabilitation, Short duration of hos pital stay.

  15. Arthroscopic Synovectomy of Wrist in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jae Woo; Park, Min Jong

    2017-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disorder affecting multiple joints. Wrist involvement is common. Patients with persistent symptoms despite medical management are candidates for surgery. Synovectomy can provide pain relief and functional improvement for rheumatoid wrist. Arthroscopic synovectomy is a safe and reliable method, with minimal postoperative morbidity. This article reviews the role, technique, and results of arthroscopic synovectomy in the rheumatoid wrist. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Arthroscopic treatment of refractory adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Rassi Fernandes

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the results of arthroscopic treatment of refractory adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder associated as for improved range of motion after a minimum follow up of six years. METHODS: from August 2002 to December 2004, ten patients with adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder resistant to conservative treatment underwent arthroscopic surgery. One interscalene catheter was placed for postoperative analgesia before the procedure. All were in Phase II, with a minimum follow up of two years. The mean age was 52.9 years (39-66, predominantly female (90%, six on the left shoulder. The time between onset of symptoms and surgical treatment ranged from six to 20 months. Four adhesive capsulitis were found to be primary (40% and six secondary (60%. RESULTS: the preoperative mean of active anterior elevation was 92°, of external rotation was 10.5° of the L5 level internal rotation; the postoperative ones were 149°, 40° and T12 level, respectively. Therefore, the average gain was 57° for the anterior elevation, 29.5° for external rotation in six spinous processes. There was a significant difference in movements' gains between the pre and post-operative periods (p<0.001. By the Constant Score (range of motion, there was an increase of 13.8 (average pre to 32 points (average post. CONCLUSION: the arthroscopic treatment proved effective in refractory adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder resistant to conservative treatment, improving the range of joint movements of patients evaluated after a minimum follow up of six years.

  17. Functional outcomes after arthroscopic treatment of lateral epicondylitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Takuro; Moriya, Tamami; Iba, Kosuke; Ozasa, Yasuhiro; Sonoda, Tomoko; Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate surgical outcomes of arthroscopic debridement for lateral epicondylitis using a validated, patient-assessed scoring system as well as conventional outcome measures. We also wanted to identify potential predictive factors that may be associated with the outcomes. A total of 20 elbows in 18 patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis who underwent arthroscopic surgery were included. There were nine men and nine women with a mean age of 54 years (range 42-71 years). Operative treatment consisted of debridement of the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) origin and resection of the radiocapitellar synovial plica interposed in the joint. Outcomes were assessed using a patient rating, visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score, the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) elbow score, and the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire. The average length of follow-up was 28 months (range 24-40 months). After surgery, according to the patients' reports, 14 of 20 elbows were much better, and 6 elbows were better. A mean preoperative VAS pain score at rest of 3.9 points improved to 0.3 points (P<0.0001), and that during activity improved from 7.8 points to 0.9 points (P<0.0001). The mean preoperative JOA elbow score of 29 points was improved to 90 points (P<0.0001). The mean postoperative DASH score was 10.6 (range 0-50). Absent of T2-weighted high signal focus of the ECRB origin on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (P=0.02) and receiving public assistance (P=0.01) were significantly associated with worse DASH scores. Arthroscopic release was a satisfactory procedure for chronic lateral epicondylitis. Preoperative MRI of the ECRB origin and socioeconomic factors were significantly associated with postoperative residual symptoms evaluated with the DASH score. (author)

  18. Arthroscopic treatment of refractory adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Marcos Rassi

    2014-01-01

    to evaluate the results of arthroscopic treatment of refractory adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder associated as for improved range of motion after a minimum follow up of six years. from August 2002 to December 2004, ten patients with adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder resistant to conservative treatment underwent arthroscopic surgery. One interscalene catheter was placed for postoperative analgesia before the procedure. All were in Phase II, with a minimum follow up of two years. The mean age was 52.9 years (39-66), predominantly female (90%), six on the left shoulder. The time between onset of symptoms and surgical treatment ranged from six to 20 months. Four adhesive capsulitis were found to be primary (40%) and six secondary (60%). the preoperative mean of active anterior elevation was 92°, of external rotation was 10.5° of the L5 level internal rotation; the postoperative ones were 149°, 40° and T12 level, respectively. Therefore, the average gain was 57° for the anterior elevation, 29.5° for external rotation in six spinous processes. There was a significant difference in movements' gains between the pre and post-operative periods (padhesive capsulitis of the shoulder resistant to conservative treatment, improving the range of joint movements of patients evaluated after a minimum follow up of six years.

  19. Short-term outcomes after arthroscopic capsular release for adhesive capsulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Callum P; Lam, Patrick H; Murrell, George A C

    2016-09-01

    Little is known about the short-term temporal outcomes of an arthroscopic capsular release for adhesive capsulitis (frozen shoulder). Specifically, it is not known how immediate the improvements are and how quickly patients return to normal function after an arthroscopic release. The study included 140 shoulders in 133 patients with idiopathic adhesive capsulitis who underwent a complete arthroscopic release of the shoulder capsule, performed by a single surgeon in a day surgery setting. Patient-reported pain and shoulder function were evaluated with the use of Likert scales, and an independent examiner assessed shoulder strength and range of motion preoperatively and at 1 week, 6 weeks, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks postoperatively. Arthroscopic capsular release resulted in immediate improvements in pain, functional outcomes, and range of motion (P adhesive capsulitis experienced significant reductions in pain, improvements in range of motion, and improvements in overall shoulder function in the first postoperative week. These immediate improvements in pain and function continue to improve at 6, 12, and 24 weeks postoperatively. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Neuromuscular Exercise Post Partial Medial Meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Michelle; Hinman, Rana S; Wrigley, Tim V

    2015-01-01

    : An assessor-blinded, randomised controlled trial including people aged 30-50 years with no to mild pain following medial arthroscopic partial meniscectomy was conducted. Participants were randomly allocated to either a 12-week neuromuscular exercise program that targeted neutral lower limb alignment......PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of a 12-week, home-based, physiotherapist-guided neuromuscular exercise program on the knee adduction moment (an indicator of mediolateral knee load distribution) in people with a medial arthroscopic partial meniscectomy within the past 3-12 months. METHODS...

  1. Arthroscopic quadriceps tendon repair: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Hidetomo; Shimada, Yoichi; Yamamura, Toshiaki; Yamada, Shin; Sato, Takahiro; Nozaka, Koji; Kijima, Hiroaki; Saito, Kimio

    2015-01-01

    Recently, although some studies of open repair of the tendon of the quadriceps femoris have been published, there have been no reports in the literature on primary arthroscopic repair. In our present study, we present two cases of quadriceps tendon injury arthroscopically repaired with excellent results. Case 1 involved a 68-year-old man who was injured while shifting his weight to prevent a fall. MRI showed complete rupture at the insertion of the patella of the quadriceps tendon. The rupture was arthroscopically repaired using both suture anchor and pull-out suture fixation methods via bone tunnels (hereafter, pull-out fixation). Two years after surgery, retearing was not observed on MRI and both Japan Orthopedic Association (JOA) Knee and Lysholm scores had recovered to 100. Case 2 involved a 50-year-old man who was also injured when shifting his weight to prevent a fall. MRI showed incomplete superficial rupture at the insertion of the patella of the quadriceps tendon. The rupture was arthroscopically repaired using pull-out fixation of six strand sutures. One year after surgery, MRI revealed a healed tendon and his JOA and Lysholm scores were 95 and 100, respectively. Thus, arthroscopic repair may be a useful surgical method for repairing quadriceps tendon injury.

  2. Arthroscopic Quadriceps Tendon Repair: Two Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetomo Saito

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, although some studies of open repair of the tendon of the quadriceps femoris have been published, there have been no reports in the literature on primary arthroscopic repair. In our present study, we present two cases of quadriceps tendon injury arthroscopically repaired with excellent results. Case 1 involved a 68-year-old man who was injured while shifting his weight to prevent a fall. MRI showed complete rupture at the insertion of the patella of the quadriceps tendon. The rupture was arthroscopically repaired using both suture anchor and pull-out suture fixation methods via bone tunnels (hereafter, pull-out fixation. Two years after surgery, retearing was not observed on MRI and both Japan Orthopedic Association (JOA Knee and Lysholm scores had recovered to 100. Case 2 involved a 50-year-old man who was also injured when shifting his weight to prevent a fall. MRI showed incomplete superficial rupture at the insertion of the patella of the quadriceps tendon. The rupture was arthroscopically repaired using pull-out fixation of six strand sutures. One year after surgery, MRI revealed a healed tendon and his JOA and Lysholm scores were 95 and 100, respectively. Thus, arthroscopic repair may be a useful surgical method for repairing quadriceps tendon injury.

  3. One strategy for arthroscopic suture fixation of tibial intercondylar eminence fractures using the Meniscal Viper Repair System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ochiai Satoshi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Principles for the treatment of tibial intercondylar eminence fracture are early reduction and stable fixation. Numerous ways to treatment of this fracture have been invented. We designed a simple, low-invasive, and arthroscopic surgical strategy for tibial intercondylar eminence fracture utilizing the Meniscal Viper Repair System used for arthroscopic meniscal suture. Methods We studied 5 patients, who underwent arthroscopic suture fixation that we modified. The present technique utilized the Meniscal Viper Repair System for arthroscopic suture of the meniscus. With one handling, a high-strength ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene(UHMWPE suture can be passed through the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL and the loops for suture retrieval placed at both sides of ACL. Surgical results were evaluated by the presence or absence of bone union on plain radiographs, postoperative range of motion of the knee joint, the side-to-side differences measured by Telos SE, and Lysholm scores. Results The reduced position achieved after surgery was maintained and good function was obtained in all cases. The mean distance of tibia anterior displacement and assessment by Lysholm score showed good surgical results. Conclusion This method simplified the conventional arthroscopic suture fixation and increased its precision, and was applicable to Type II fractures that could be reduced, as well as surgically indicated Types III and IV. The present series suggested that our surgical approach was a useful surgical intervention for tibial intercondylar eminence fracture.

  4. Arthroscopically-assisted Latarjet: an easy and reproducible technique for improving the accuracy of graft and screw placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverna, Ettore; Guarrella, Vincenzo; Cartolari, Roberto; Ufenast, Henri; Broffoni, Laura; Barea, Christophe; Garavaglia, Guido

    2018-04-01

    The effectiveness of the Latarjet largely depends on accurate graft placement, as well as on proper position and direction of the screws. We present our technique for an arthroscopically-assisted Latarjet comparing radiological results with the open technique. We retrospectively reviewed the postoperative computed tomography scans of 38 patients who underwent a Latarjet procedure. For 16 patients, the procedure was performed with the open technique and, for 22 patients, it was performed using an arthroscopically-assisted technique. An independent radiologist evaluated graft and hardware position, as well as graft integration or resorption. Postoperative complications were also documented. The graft was correctly placed in only 18.8% of cases in the open group and 72.7% of cases in the arthroscopically-assisted group. There were no postoperative complications in the arthroscopically-assisted group, whereas one patient had a recurrence and two required hardware removal in the open group. The Latarjet procedure is a challenging procedure for which a key point is the correct placement of the coracoid graft onto the glenoid neck and correct position of the screws. The present study substantiates a clear benefit for the use of a guide with an arthroscopically-assisted technique in terms of graft and hardware placement. At short-term follow-up, there appears to be a benefit for graft integration and avoidance of resorption.

  5. The Effect of Subcritical Bone Loss and Exposure on Recurrent Instability After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair in Intercollegiate American Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickens, Jonathan F; Owens, Brett D; Cameron, Kenneth L; DeBerardino, Thomas M; Masini, Brendan D; Peck, Karen Y; Svoboda, Steven J

    2017-07-01

    There is no consensus on the optimal method of stabilization (arthroscopic or open) in collision athletes with anterior shoulder instability. To examine the effect of "subcritical" bone loss and football-specific exposure on the rate of recurrent shoulder instability after arthroscopic stabilization in an intercollegiate American football population. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Fifty intercollegiate football players underwent primary arthroscopic stabilization for anterior shoulder instability and returned to football for at least a single season. Preoperatively, 32 patients experienced recurrent subluxations, and 18 patients experienced a single or recurrent dislocation. Shoulders with glenoid bone loss >20%, an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion, an off-track lesion, and concomitant rotator cuff repair were excluded from the study. The primary outcome of interest was the ability to return to football without subsequent instability. Patients were followed for time to a subsequent instability event after return to play using days of exposure to football and total follow-up time after arthroscopic stabilization. Fifty consecutive patients returned to American football for a mean 1.5 seasons (range, 1-3) after arthroscopic stabilization. Three of 50 (6%; 95% CI, 1.3%-16.5%) patients experienced recurrent instability. There were no subsequent instability events after a mean 3.2 years of military service. All shoulders with glenoid bone loss >13.5% (n = 3) that underwent arthroscopic stabilization experienced recurrent instability upon returning to sport, while none of the shoulders with football ( X 2 = 15.80, P 13.5% glenoid bone loss had an incidence rate of 5.31 cases of recurrent instability per 1000 athlete-exposures of football. In 72,000 athlete-exposures to football with football players with <13.5% glenoid bone loss provides reliable outcomes and low recurrence rates.

  6. Arthroscopic study of cranial cruciate ligament and medial meniscal lesions in the dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemering, G.B.; Eilert, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty stifles (10 dogs) were studied for a period of 1 year after various lesions of the cranial cruciate ligament and medial meniscus were produced surgicaoy. Through serial arthroscopic evaluations, degenerative processes In stifles with a “torn” cranial cruciate ligament were documented. Intra-articular changes were minimal after partial meniscectomy and were severe after total meniscectomy. Multiple arthroscopies caused no demonstrable changes

  7. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in elite rugby players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambe, Amol; Badge, Ravi; Funk, Lennard

    2009-01-01

    Rugby is an increasingly popular collision sport. A wide spectrum of injuries can be sustained during training and match play. Rotator cuff injury is uncommon in contact sports and there is little published literature on the treatment of rotator cuff tears in rugby players. We therefore reviewed the results and functional outcomes of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in elite rugby players. Eleven professional rugby players underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair at our hospital over a 2-year period. We collected data on these patients from the operative records. The patients were recalled for outcome scoring and ultrasound scans. There were seven rugby league players and four rugby union players, including six internationals. Their mean age was 25.7 years. All had had a traumatic episode during match play and could not return to the game after the injury. The mean time to surgery was 5 weeks. The mean width of the cuff tear was 1.8 cm. All were full- thickness cuff tears. Associated injuries included two Bankart lesions, one bony Bankart lesion, one posterior labral tear, and two 360 degrees labral tears. The biceps was involved in three cases. Two were debrided and a tenodesis was performed in one. Repair was with suture anchors. Following surgery, all patients underwent a supervised accelerated rehabilitation programme. The final follow-up was at 18 months (range: 6-31 months) post surgery. The Constant scores improved from 44 preoperatively to 99 at the last follow-up. The mean score at 3 months was 95. The Oxford shoulder score improved from 34 to 12, with the mean third month score being 18. The mean time taken to return to full match play at the preinjury level was 4.8 months. There were no complications in any of the patients and postoperative scans in nine patients confirmed that the repairs had healed. We conclude that full-thickness rotator cuff tears in the contact athlete can be addressed successfully by arthroscopic repair, with a rapid return to

  8. Multimodal pain management after arthroscopic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Sten

    Multimodal Pain Management after Arthroscopic Surgery By Sten Rasmussen, M.D. The thesis is based on four randomized controlled trials. The main hypothesis was that multimodal pain treatment provides faster recovery after arthroscopic surgery. NSAID was tested against placebo after knee arthroscopy....... Intraarticular bupivacaine plus morphine plus steroid was tested against bupivacaine plus morphine and against saline in two trials after arthroscopic knee meniscectomy and diagnostic knee arthroscopy respectively. Intraarticular bupivacaine plus morphine plus steroid was tested against saline after operative...... with bupivacaine plus morphine and bupivacaine plus morphine plus steroid after diagnostic knee arthroscopy reduced time to work from 10 to 5 to 2 days. Additional analysis revealed that the surgical trauma and the use of tourniquet influenced recovery. The thesis proves a reduction in the time to return to work...

  9. Arthroscopic revision release of gluteal muscle contracture after failed primary open surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xintao; Jiang, Xiaocheng; He, Feilin; Liang, Zuru; You, Tian; Jin, Dadi; Zhang, Wentao

    2017-08-01

    The treatment of gluteal muscle contracture (GMC) after failed primary open release surgery has rarely been reported in the literature. GMC is a troublesome health problem in some developing countries, and it can result in the limitation of patients' hip function, leading to the development of inferiority complexes. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of arthroscopic revision surgery after failed primary open release on patients with GMC. A total of 278 hips of 140 patients who underwent arthroscopic revision procedures after failed primary open surgeries were gathered from the department files. All patients were treated using a "three-step" arthroscopic release procedure by the same surgeon group. The mean follow-up for the 136 patients was 38.9 months. There was significant difference (P revision and pre-operative results on the Harris scoring system. Unreleased contracture tissues that needed revision operations included the gluteus maximus, tensor fasciae latae muscle, and gluteus medius in all patients, and the gluteus minimus and hip capsule in 11.0% and 8.1% of patients, respectively. Short-term complications included subcutaneous bruising of the abdomen in 11 patients, extensive ecchymosis in the lateral thigh in 12 patients, and a transient reduction of muscle strength in all patients. No complications involving postoperative incision infection, nerve and blood vessel damage, or positive Trendelenburg sign occurred. Symptoms of hip snapping and limitation of range of motion (ROM), combined with a positive Trendelenburg sign in two patients after the primary open surgery, were all resolved except for the Trendelenburg sign through arthroscopic revision release. The overall satisfaction rate of the revision operations was 90.4%. The three-step arthroscopic release procedure is effective for failed primary open GMC surgeries as shown by improved post-operative function and patient satisfaction regardless of which primary procedure was performed.

  10. MID-LONG TERM RESULTS OF MANIPULATION AND ARTHROSCOPIC RELEASE IN FROZEN SHOULDER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Haluk; Seckin, Mustafa Faik; Akcal, Mehmet Akif; Kara, Adnan; Kilinc, Bekir Eray; Akman, Senol

    2017-01-01

    Surgical treatment options should be discussed in cases of frozen shoulder, which is usually treated in a conservative manner. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of manipulation and arthroscopic release in cases of frozen shoulder which resisted conservative treatment. A total of 32 patients who underwent manipulation and arthroscopic capsular release in 34 shoulders were included in the study. The average follow-up period was 49.5 months (range: 24-90 months). No reason for onset could be found in 8 (25%) patients, who were classified as primary frozen shoulder; twenty-four (75%) patients were classified as secondary frozen shoulder due to underlying pathologies. The average pre-operative complaint period was 11 months (range: 3-24 months). After arthroscopic examination, manipulation was performed first, followed by arthroscopic capsular release. The range of motion in both shoulders was compared before the procedure and in the last follow-up visit. Constant and Oxford classifications were used to assess functional results, and the results were assessed statistically. Patient values for passive elevation, abduction, adduction-external rotation, abduction-external rotation, and abduction-internal rotation increased in a statistically significant manner between the preoperative assessment and follow-up evaluation (p<0.01). The average change of 47.97±21.03 units observed in the patients' values obtained in the control measurements against the pre-op Constant scores was determined to be statistically significant (p<0.01). According to the Oxford classification, 29 shoulders were sufficient. Successful results can be obtained with arthroscopic release performed after manipulation in patients with frozen shoulder resistant to conservative treatment. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series.

  11. Substantial disability 3 months after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Ewa M.; Roos, H P; Ryd, L

    2000-01-01

    , and the Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale were available for 74 consecutive patients (50 males, 24 females; mean age, 45 years) with isolated meniscus tear (n = 47) or meniscus tear combined with cartilage damage (n = 27). At postoperative follow-up (mean, 14.4 weeks) significant improvement was seen, but despite only...

  12. Translational manipulation after failed arthroscopic capsular release for recalcitrant adhesive capsulitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubal, Paul J; Placzek, Jeffrey

    2008-10-01

    This article reports the use of translational manipulation after failed arthroscopic capsular release for adhesive capsulitis. The patient was a 40-year-old woman, insulin-dependent diabetic with the insidious onset of right shoulder adhesive capsulitis. The patient underwent physical therapy 3 times a week for 6 weeks with minimal changes in her range of motion or pain. After failing physical therapy, the patient had arthroscopic capsular release and long-lever arm rotational manipulation of the right shoulder. The patient participated in physical therapy again, failing to regain her range of motion. Subsequently, the patient underwent interscalene block and translational manipulation by the same therapist followed by physical therapy. The patient's range-of-motion measures, strength testing, pain scale measurements, and functional scoring were recorded throughout her rehabilitation. She returned 2 years postdischarge for the same tests and measurements. Adhesive capsulitis in association with diabetes mellitus poses a serious treatment dilemma. Arthroscopic release may have limited benefits secondary to limited release and/or postoperative pain limiting rehabilitation. Translational manipulation under interscalene block may be considered in this difficult treatment group.

  13. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for the elderly (over 75-years)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Rintaro; Furukawa, Keizo; Kajiyama, Shiro; Sakimura, Toshiyuki; Shindo, Hiroyuki; Eto, Masao

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the surgical results of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR) and investigate the interoperative complications for elderly people (over 75-years). We evaluated nine patients 75 and over who underwent rotator cuff repair, followed up for more than 12 months, and underwent MRI six months or more after the operation which was performed between December 2004 to July 2008. Their average age was 77.3 years. The control patients were 61 patients less than 75 who underwent ARCR during same term. Their average age was 59.9 years. Clinical outcome was evaluated based on interoperative complications, the Japanese Orthopaedic Association score (JOA score), and cuff integrity using MRI Sugaya's classification. In the over 75 patients, anchors came out from the tuberosity in three patients. Postoperative complications were not seen in both groups. No differences were observed in JOA score and cuff integrity using MRI Sugaya's classification compared with patients under 75. The surgical outcome of ARCR for elderly people (over 75-years) was satisfactory, and ARCR for elderly people (over 75-years) shoud be performed with caution because of the coming out of anchors. (author)

  14. Arthroscopic Stabilization of Posterior Shoulder Instability Is Successful in American Football Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arner, Justin W; McClincy, Michael P; Bradley, James P

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate subjective and objective clinical outcomes of arthroscopic posterior capsulolabral repair for the treatment of symptomatic unidirectional posterior shoulder instability in American football players. Fifty-six consecutive American football players with unidirectional posterior shoulder instability underwent an arthroscopic posterior capsulolabral repair with or without suture anchors. Patients were evaluated, with return to play as the primary outcome measure supplemented with the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scoring system. Stability, range of motion, strength, pain, and function were also assessed with subjective scales. At a mean follow-up of 44.7 months postoperatively, 93% returned to sport and 79% returned to sport at the same level. Significant improvements (P 60; stability American football players because it improves stability, pain, and joint function, which optimizes the likelihood of successful return to play. Case series; Level of evidence, IV. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The internal validity of arthroscopic simulators and their effectiveness in arthroscopic education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade Shantz, Jesse Alan; Leiter, Jeff R S; Gottschalk, Tania; MacDonald, Peter Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to identify standard procedures for the validation of arthroscopic simulators and determine whether simulators improve the surgical skills of users. Arthroscopic simulator validation studies and randomized trials assessing the effectiveness of arthroscopic simulators in education were identified from online databases, as well as, grey literature and reference lists. Only validation studies and randomized trials were included for review. Study heterogeneity was calculated and where appropriate, study results were combined employing a random effects model. Four hundred and thirteen studies were reviewed. Thirteen studies met the inclusion criteria assessing the construct validity of simulators. A pooled analysis of internal validation studies determined that simulators could discriminate between novice and experts, but not between novice and intermediate trainees on time of completion of a simulated task. Only one study assessed the utility of a knee simulator in training arthroscopic skills directly and demonstrated that the skill level of simulator-trained residents was greater than non-simulator-trained residents. Excessive heterogeneity exists in the literature to determine the internal and transfer validity of arthroscopic simulators currently available. Evidence suggests that simulators can discriminate between novice and expert users, but discrimination between novice and intermediate trainees in surgical education should be paramount. International standards for the assessment of arthroscopic simulator validity should be developed to increase the use and effectiveness of simulators in orthopedic surgery.

  16. Arthroscopic findings in osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, LC; Spijkervet, FKL; de Bont, LGM

    Purpose: This article reports on the results of a study of the arthroscopic findings in the joint surfaces of osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints (TMJs). Patients and Methods: Arthroscopy was performed in the upper joint compartment of 40 TMJs in 40 patients. Thirty-one TMJs that were diagnosed

  17. Short-term Complications of the Arthroscopic Latarjet Procedure: A North American Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athwal, George S; Meislin, Robert; Getz, Charles; Weinstein, David; Favorito, Paul

    2016-10-01

    To report on the intraoperative and early postoperative (Latarjet procedure in patients with complex anterior shoulder instability. Between 2010 and 2014, 83 patients underwent an arthroscopic Latarjet procedure for recurrent post-traumatic anterior instability. The group's mean age was 28 ± 10 years and consisted of 76 (92%) male patients. A "problem" was defined as an unanticipated perioperative event that was not likely to affect the patient's final outcome. A "complication" was defined as an event that was likely to negatively affect outcome. At a mean follow-up of 17 months (range, 3 to 43 months), 20 (24%) patients sustained either a problem and/or a complication. The problem rate was 18% and the complication rate was 10%. The most commonly encountered adverse event was intraoperative fracture of the coracoid graft, which occurred in 6 patients (7%). In addition, 1 arthroscopic case was intraoperatively converted to open and 1 patient sustained a transient axillary nerve injury. A total of 7 cases underwent secondary operative procedures. The rate of problems and/or complications in primary cases was not significantly different than revision cases (P = .335). The rate of adverse events reported in this arthroscopic series is not insignificant and is similar to that reported with the traditional open Latarjet. With appropriate training, the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure can be effective for the management of patients with complex shoulder instability. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of Exercise Therapy Compared with Arthroscopic Surgery on Knee Muscle Strength and Functional Performance in Middle-Aged Patients with Degenerative Meniscus Tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensrud, Silje; Risberg, May Arna; Roos, Ewa M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare the effect of a 12-wk exercise therapy program and arthroscopic partial meniscectomy on knee strength and functional performance in middle-aged patients with degenerative meniscus tears. DESIGN: A total of 82 patients (mean age, 49 yrs; 35% women......) with a symptomatic, unilateral, magnetic resonance imaging-verified degenerative meniscus tear and no or mild radiographic osteoarthritis were randomly assigned to a supervised neuromuscular and strength exercise program or arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. Outcomes assessed 3 mos after intervention initiation were...

  19. MR accuracy and arthroscopic incidence of meniscal radial tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magee, Thomas; Shapiro, Marc; Williams, David [Department of Radiology, Neuroimaging Institute, 27 East Hibiscus Blvd., Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

    2002-12-01

    A meniscal radial tear is a vertical tear that involves the inner meniscal margin. The tear is most frequent in the middle third of the lateral meniscus and may extend outward in any direction. We report (1) the arthroscopic incidence of radial tears, (2) MR signs that aid in the detection of radial tears and (3) our prospective accuracy in detection of radial tears. Design and patients. Three musculoskeletal radiologists prospectively read 200 consecutive MR examinations of the knee that went on to arthroscopy by one orthopedic surgeon. MR images were assessed for location and MR characteristics of radial tears. MR criteria used for diagnosis of a radial tear were those outlined by Tuckman et al.: truncation, abnormal morphology and/or lack of continuity or absence of the meniscus on one or more MR images. An additional criterion used was abnormal increased signal in that area on fat-saturated proton density or T2-weighted coronal and sagittal images. Prospective MR readings were correlated with the arthroscopic findings.Results. Of the 200 consecutive knee arthroscopies, 28 patients had radial tears reported arthroscopically (14% incidence). MR readings prospectively demonstrated 19 of the 28 radial tears (68% sensitivity) when the criteria for diagnosis of a radial tear were truncation or abnormal morphology of the meniscus. With the use of the additional criterion of increased signal in the area of abnormal morphology on fat-saturated T2-weighted or proton density weighted sequences, the prospective sensitivity was 25 of 28 radial tears (89% sensitivity). There were no radial tears described in MR reports that were not demonstrated on arthroscopy (i.e., there were no false positive MR readings of radial tears in these 200 patients). Radial tears are commonly seen at arthroscopy. There was a 14% incidence in this series of 200 patients who underwent arthroscopy. Prospective detection of radial tears was 68% as compared with arthroscopy when the criteria as

  20. Speed of recovery after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurowicki, Jennifer; Berglund, Derek D; Momoh, Enesi; Disla, Shanell; Horn, Brandon; Giveans, M Russell; Levy, Jonathan C

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to delineate the time taken to achieve maximum improvement (plateau of recovery) and the degree of recovery observed at various time points (speed of recovery) for pain and function after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. An institutional shoulder surgery registry query identified 627 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair between 2006 and 2015. Measured range of motion, patient satisfaction, and patient-reported outcome measures were analyzed for preoperative, 3-month, 6-month, 1-year, and 2-year intervals. Subgroup analysis was performed on the basis of tear size by retraction grade and number of anchors used. As an entire group, the plateau of maximum recovery for pain, function, and motion occurred at 1 year. Satisfaction with surgery was >96% at all time points. At 3 months, 74% of improvement in pain and 45% to 58% of functional improvement were realized. However, only 22% of elevation improvement was achieved (P < .001). At 6 months, 89% of improvement in pain, 81% to 88% of functional improvement, and 78% of elevation improvement were achieved (P < .001). Larger tears had a slower speed of recovery for Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation scores, forward elevation, and external rotation. Smaller tears had higher motion and functional scores across all time points. Tear size did not influence pain levels. The plateau of maximum recovery after rotator cuff repair occurred at 1 year with high satisfaction rates at all time points. At 3 months, approximately 75% of pain relief and 50% of functional recovery can be expected. Larger tears have a slower speed of recovery. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Arthroscopic Repair of Recurrent Posterior Shoulder Subluxation After Total Shoulder Arthroplasty: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieshaber-Bouyer, Ricardo; Gerber, Christian

    2017-01-01

    A 53-year-old man presented with osteoarthritis (Walch biconcave [B2] glenoid retroversion, 22°; glenohumeral subluxation index, 65%) and a partial rupture of the supraspinatus tendon in the left shoulder. Following anatomic total joint replacement, he developed disabling recurrent posterior subluxation despite a stable prosthesis and a correctly centered glenoid head, as observed with postoperative radiography and computed tomography. In order to avoid bone loss and the complications associated with revision arthroplasty, we performed arthroscopic reefing of the posterior capsule as an experimental minimally invasive treatment. The reduction in capsular volume successfully stabilized the shoulder for approximately 9 years; thereafter, the recurrence of instability ultimately required the conversion to a reverse prosthesis. Arthroscopic capsular reefing proved to be an effective treatment for posterior shoulder subluxations after total shoulder arthroplasty, and can be considered to avoid revision arthroplasty in young patients with a stable and correctly centered prosthesis.

  2. Arthroscopic treatment of a medial meniscal cyst using a posterior trans-septal approach: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohishi Tsuyoshi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Arthroscopic partial menisectomy followed by cyst decompression is currently recommended for treatment of a meniscal cyst. However, it is doubtful whether partial menisectomy should be performed on cysts communicating with the joint in cases without a meniscal tear on its surface since meniscal function will be sacrificed. In this report, a meniscal cyst arising from the posterior horn of the medial meniscus without meniscal tear on its surface was resected using an arthroscopic posterior trans-septal approach. A 59 year-old male presented to our hospital with popliteal pain when standing up after squatting down. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a multilobulated meniscal cyst arising from the posterior horn of the medial meniscus extending to the posterior septum with a grade 2 meniscal tear by Mink's classification. The medial meniscus was intact on the surface on arthroscopic examination. The meniscal cyst and posterior septum were successfully resected using a posterior trans-septal approach without harming the meniscus. This is the first report on a meniscal cyst being resected using an arthroscopic posterior trans-septal approach with a 9-month follow-up period.

  3. HIGH-RESOLUTION ULTRASONOGRAPHY OF SHOULDER FOR ROTATOR CUFF TEAR: CORRELATION WITH ARTHROSCOPIC FINDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnumurthy H. Y

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Rotator cuff disease is the most common cause of shoulder pain. Ultrasonography being non-invasive, widely available, more cost-effective method and is the first choice in imaging of rotator cuff tears. Arthroscopy of shoulder is considered as the gold standard for diagnosis of rotator cuff tears. Objective of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of high-resolution ultrasonography of shoulder for rotator cuff tears with arthroscopy of shoulder. METHODS Thirty patients clinically suspected to have rotator cuff tear who underwent ultrasonography and arthroscopy of shoulder were included in the study. Duration of study was for two years. All ultrasonography examinations were conducted in ultrasound machine using GE Voluson 730 PRO high frequency (10-12 MHz linear array transducer done by two experienced radiologists. Arthroscopies were done by two experienced shoulder arthroscopic surgeons. RESULTS Age of the patients with rotator cuff tears ranged from 40 to 80 years. 57% were females and 43% were males among the patients who had rotator cuff tears. 71.43% of the rotator cuff tears were found in the dominant arm. 64.28% of patients with rotator cuff tear had given history of fall or trauma to the corresponding shoulder within 6 months prior to presentation. 39.28% of patients who had rotator cuff tears were known diabetics. Supraspinatus tendon was the most commonly affected tendon, followed by infraspinatus and subscapularis tendons. For overall detection of rotator cuff tears, ultrasonography in comparison with the arthroscopy has sensitivity and specificity of 92.85% and 100%. For detection of full thickness rotator cuff tear, its sensitivity and specificity was 94.73% and 100% and for partial thickness rotator cuff tears 76.92% and 100%. Ultrasonography has 100% sensitivity and specificity for detection of supraspinatus full thickness tear. For supraspinatus partial thickness tear, sensitivity and specificity was 88

  4. Arthroscopic Excision of a Symptomatic Meso-acromiale

    OpenAIRE

    Stetson, William B.; McIntyre, J. Alex; Mazza, Genevieve R.

    2017-01-01

    The surgical technique for the management of a symptomatic os acromiale remains unclear. Several operative techniques have been described including open excision, open reduction?internal fixation (ORIF), arthroscopic acromioplasty or subacromial decompression, and arthroscopic excision. There are 4 types of os acromiale, with the meso-acromion being the most common and difficult to treat. The excision of a pre-acromion arthroscopically or in an open manner usually produces satisfactory result...

  5. Effects of ultrasound-guided stellate ganglion block on acute pain after arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun Mi; Kim, Eun Mi; Chung, Mi Hwa; Park, Jong Hee; Lee, Hyo Keun; Choi, Young Rong; Lee, Mihyeon

    2015-01-01

    Apart from a few case reports, the effectiveness of stellate ganglion block (SGB) as a monotherapy in acute nociceptive pain has not been determined. We aimed to assess the effects of SGB on postoperative pain after arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Randomized, blind, controlled, clinical trial University Hospital outpatient Forty-six patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery were assigned randomly to 2 groups: group S included patients who underwent SGB prior to surgery and group C did not. In group S, subfascial ultrasound-guided SGB was conducted with 4 mL of 0.375% levobupivacaine. For the first postoperative 48 hours, postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) and analgesic requirements were compared. The results of 40 patients were included in the study. There was no difference between groups with regards to analgesics requirement for the first postoperative 48 hours and no difference in VAS score (P > 0.05). Small number of patients in study. Preoperative ultrasound-guided SGB did not reduce postoperative acute pain in arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

  6. Long term results of arthroscopic bankart repair for traumatic anterior shoulder instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Andrew HC

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The arthroscopic method offers a less invasive technique of Bankart repair for traumatic anterior shoulder instability. We would like to report the 2 year clinical outcomes of bio-absorbable suture anchors used in traumatic anterior dislocations of the shoulder. Methods Data from 79 shoulders in 74 patients were collected over 4 years (2004 - 2008. Each patient was followed-up over a period of 2 years. The patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair using bio-absorbable suture anchors for their shoulder instability. These surgeries were performed at a single institution by a single surgeon over the time period. The patients were assessed with two different outcome measurement tools. The University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA shoulder rating scale and the Simple Shoulder Test (SST score. The scores were calculated before surgery and at the 2-year follow-up. The recurrence rates, range of motion as well post-operative function and return to sporting activities were evaluated. Results SST results from the 12 domains showed a significant improvement from a mean of 6.1 ± 3.1 to 11.1 ± 1.8 taken at the 2-year follow-up (p Conclusion Arthroscopic Bankart repair with the use of suture anchors is a reliable treatment method, with good clinical outcomes, excellent post-operative shoulder motion and low recurrence rates.

  7. Sex Differences in Self-Reported Hip Function Up to 2 Years After Arthroscopic Surgery for Femoroacetabular Impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Roody; Pan, Xueliang; Cenkus, Kathleen; Brown, Lindsey; Ellis, Thomas; Di Stasi, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a significant cause of disability in young adults. Hip arthroscopic surgery restores bony congruence and improves function in the majority of patients, but recent evidence indicates that women may experience worse pre- and postoperative function than men. The purpose of this study was to identify whether self-reported hip function differed between men and women with symptomatic FAI. The hypothesis was that mean self-reported hip function scores would improve after arthroscopic surgery but that women would report poorer function than men both before and up to 2 years after arthroscopic surgery. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. A total of 229 patients (68.4% women; mean [±SD] age, 31.6 ± 10.8 years; mean [±SD] body mass index, 26.8 ± 11.9 kg/m(2)) underwent hip arthroscopic surgery for unilateral symptomatic FAI. All eligible and consenting patients with radiologically and clinically confirmed FAI completed the International Hip Outcome Tool (iHOT-33) and the Hip Outcome Score activities of daily living subscale (HOS-ADL) before hip arthroscopic surgery and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after arthroscopic surgery. A linear mixed model for repeated measures was used to test for differences in self-reported hip function between men and women over the study period (P ≤ .05). There were no significant time × sex interactions for either the HOS-ADL (P = .12) or iHOT-33 (P = .64), but both measures showed significant improvements between the preoperative time point and each of the 4 follow-up points (P < .0001); however, self-reported hip function did not improve between 6 and 24 months after arthroscopic surgery (P ≥ .11). Post hoc independent t tests indicated that women reported poorer hip function than did men before surgery (P ≤ .003) both on the HOS-ADL (mean ± standard error of the mean [SEM], 67.4 ± 1.9 [men] vs 60.5 ± 1.3 [women]) and iHOT-33 (mean ± SEM, 38.0 ± 1.9 [men] vs 30.9 ± 1.3 [women]); scores were

  8. Arthroscopic anatomy of the subdeltoid space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Salata

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available From the first shoulder arthroscopy performed on a cadaver in 1931, shoulder arthroscopy has grown tremendously in its ability to diagnose and treat pathologic conditions about the shoulder. Despite improvements in arthroscopic techniques and instrumentation, it is only recently that arthroscopists have begun to explore precise anatomical structures within the subdeltoid space. By way of a thorough bursectomy of the subdeltoid region, meticulous hemostasis, and the reciprocal use of posterior and lateral viewing portals, one can identify a myriad of pertinent ligamentous, musculotendinous, osseous, and neurovascular structures. For the purposes of this review, the subdeltoid space has been compartmentalized into lateral, medial, anterior, and posterior regions. Being able to identify pertinent structures in the subdeltoid space will provide shoulder arthroscopists with the requisite foundation in core anatomy that will be required for challenging procedures such as arthroscopic subscapularis mobilization and repair, biceps tenodesis, subcoracoid decompression, suprascapular nerve decompression, quadrangular space decompression and repair of massive rotator cuff tears.

  9. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF ELBOW CONTRACTURE IN SPORTSMAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Kuznetsov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an example of treatment of a professional sportsman with osteochondritis dissecans and flexion-extension contracture of an elbow. As a result of treatment it was proven, that the arthroscopic method of treatment undoubtedly had an obvious positive effect compared to the traditional non-operative treatment. The course of treatment for such patients with similar pathologies should be an active one - the use of arthroscopy followed by a rehabilitation in order to achieve the best result possible.

  10. Arthroscopic Correlates of Subtle Syndesmotic Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, Gregory P; DeFontes, Kenneth; Barr, Cameron R; Parks, Brent G; Camire, Lyn M

    2017-05-01

    Arthroscopic criteria for identifying syndesmotic disruption have been variable and subjective. We aimed to quantify syndesmotic disruption arthroscopically using a standardized measurement device. Ten cadaveric lower extremity specimens were tested in intact state and after serial sectioning of the syndesmotic structures (anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament [AiTFL], interosseous ligament [IOL], posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament [PiTFL], deltoid). Diagnostic ankle arthroscopy was performed after each sectioning. Manual external rotational stress was applied across the tibiofibular joint. Custom-manufactured spherical balls of increasing diameter mounted on the end of an arthroscopic probe were inserted into the tibiofibular space to determine the degree of diastasis of the tibiofibular joint under each condition. A ball 3 mm in diameter reliably indicated a high likelihood of combined disruption of the AiTFL and IOL. Disruption of the AiTFL alone could not be reliably distinguished from the intact state. Use of a spherical probe placed into the tibiofibular space during manual external rotation of the ankle provided an objective measure of syndesmotic instability. Passage of a 2.5-mm probe indicated some disruption of the syndesmosis, but the test had poor negative predictive value. Passage of a 3.0-mm spherical probe indicated very high likelihood of disruption of both the AiTFL and the IOL. The findings challenge the previously used but unsupported standard of a 2-mm diastasis of the tibiofibular articulation for diagnosis of subtle syndesmotic instability.

  11. Three-dimensional volume measurement of coracoid graft osteolysis after arthroscopic Latarjet procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeni, David L; Opsomer, Gaëtan; Sood, Amit; Munji, Jeremy; Sanchez, Matthieu; Villain, Benoit; Walch, Gilles; Lafosse, Laurent

    2017-03-01

    The Latarjet procedure has been shown to be a reliable method to prevent recurrent anterior shoulder instability. Coracoid bone graft osteolysis is a potential catastrophic complication and can lead to recurrent instability. The purpose of our study is to present a novel quantitative method to measure the amount of coracoid bone osteolysis using 3-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) scan imaging. This is a prospective study with 15 patients (16 shoulders) who underwent an arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. Three-dimensional CT scans were obtained at 6 weeks and 6 months. Using volumetric analysis, we quantified the amount of bone loss using our described method. Interobserver reliability and intraobserver reliability were calculated. On the basis of our new volumetric analysis of the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure using 3D CT scans, we found that the superior half of the coracoid bone graft undergoes a significant amount of osteolysis at 6 months postoperatively. The interobserver reliability and intraobserver reliability were excellent. This study presents a reproducible method to quantify and compare coracoid bone graft osteolysis after an arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. We also developed a description system that may be used for comparison studies. To our knowledge, this is the first method that quantifies the amount of coracoid bone graft osteolysis using more accurate 3D CT scanning. The 3D analysis we propose is a valid method to measure the amount of coracoid bone graft osteolysis after an arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. Our description system may guide the surgeon regarding possible revision surgery when faced with significant osteolysis of the coracoid bone graft. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Patients With Impingement Syndrome With and Without Rotator Cuff Tears Do Well 20 Years After Arthroscopic Subacromial Decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Moritz; Berndt, Thomas; Rühmann, Oliver; Lerch, Solveig

    2016-03-01

    To present the long-term outcome of arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASD) for patients with impingement syndrome with or without rotator cuff tears as well as with or without calcific tendinitis in a follow-up of 20 years. We included 95 patients after a mean follow-up of 19.9 (19.5 to 20.5) years. All patients underwent ASD, including acromioplasty, resection of the coracoacromial ligament, and coplaning without cuff repair. The Constant score was used to assess the functioning of the shoulder. In addition, we defined a combined failure end point of a poor Constant score and revision surgery. Revision surgery was performed in14.7% of the patients. The combined end point showed successful results in 78.8% of all cases. All patients with isolated impingement syndrome achieved successful results. Those with partial-thickness tears had successful outcomes in 90.9% of all cases, and patients with full-thickness tears had successful outcomes in 70.6% of all cases. The tendinitis calcarea group showed the poorest results, with a 65.2% success rate. Our long-term results show that patients with impingement syndrome who received ASD, including acromioplasty, resection of the coracoacromial ligament, and coplaning do well 20 years after the index surgery. ASD without cuff repair even appears to be a safe, efficacious, and sustainable procedure for patients with partial rotator cuff tears. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Arthroscopic Treatment for Primary Septic Arthritis of the Hip in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Hartmut Schröder

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Primary septic arthritis is a rare differential diagnosis of acute hip pain in adults. Inspired by the success of all-arthroscopic treatment in pediatric patients, we developed a diagnostic and surgical pathway for our adult patients. Methods. Seven patients, average age 44±13.7 years with acute hip pain since 4.4±2.9 days in the average, were included. Septic arthritis was confirmed by joint aspiration and dissemination was excluded by MRI and standard radiographs. Surgical treatment consisted of immediate arthroscopic lavage using 4 portals for debridement, high-volume irrigation, partial synovectomy, and drainage. Results. Patients were treated in hospital for 12.4±3.1 days (range 7–16 days. WBC and CRP returned to physiological levels. During the mean follow-up of 26.4±19.4 months (range 13–66 months no patient showed recurrence of infection. The 5 patients with an unimpaired hip joint prior to the infection had a mean modified Harris Hip Score of 94±5.6 points (range 91–100 at final follow-up. Conclusions. Arthroscopic therapy using a minimally invasive approach with low perioperative morbidity for the treatment of primary septic arthritis of the adult hip is able to restore normal hip function in acute cases without dissemination of the infection. Level of Evidence. IV.

  14. Arthroscopic lavage and debridement for osteoarthritis of the knee: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    , the assessment of their effectiveness in this review. LAVAGE AND DEBRIDEMENT: Arthroscopic lavage involves the visually guided introduction of saline solution into the knee joint and removal of fluid, with the intent of extracting any excess fluids and loose bodies that may be in the knee joint. Debridement, in comparison, may include the introduction of saline into the joint, in addition to the smoothening of bone surface without any further intervention (less invasive forms of debridement), or the addition of more invasive procedures such as abrasion, partial or full meniscectomy, synovectomy, or osteotomy (referred to as debridement in combination with meniscectomy or other procedures). The focus of this health technology assessment is on the effectiveness of lavage, and debridement (with or without meniscal tear resection). THE MEDICAL ADVISORY SECRETARIAT FOLLOWED ITS STANDARD PROCEDURES AND SEARCHED THESE ELECTRONIC DATABASES: Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and The International Network of Agencies for Health Technology Assessment. THE KEYWORDS SEARCHED WERE: arthroscopy, debridement, lavage, wound irrigation, or curettage; arthritis, rheumatoid, osteoarthritis; osteoarthritis, knee; knee or knee joint. TIME FRAME: Only 2 previous health technology assessments were identified, one of which was an update of the other, and included 3 of 4 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) from the first report. Therefore, the search period for inclusion of studies in this assessment was January 1, 1995 to April 24, 2005. EXCLUDED WERE: case reports, comments, editorials, and letters. Identified were 335 references, including previously published health technology assessments, and 5 articles located through a manual search of references from published articles and health technology assessments. These were examined against the criteria, as

  15. Clinical evaluation of arthroscopic treatment of shoulder adhesive capsulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Naoki Miyazaki

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results of arthroscopic releases performed in patients with adhesive capsulitis refractory to conservative treatment. METHODS: This was a retrospective study, conducted between 1996 and 2012, which included 56 shoulders (52 patients that underwent surgery; 38 were female, and 28 had the dominant side affected. The mean age was 51 (29-73 years. The mean follow-up was 65 (12-168 months and the mean preoperative time was 8.9 (2-24 months. According to Zukermann's classification, 23 cases were considered primary and 33 secondary. With the patient in the lateral decubitus position, circumferential release of the joint capsule was performed: joint debridement; rotator interval opening; coracohumeral ligament release; anterior, posterior, inferior, and finally antero-inferior capsulotomy. A subscapularis tenotomy was performed when necessary. All patients underwent intense physical therapy in the immediate postoperative period. In 33 shoulders, an interscalene catheter was implanted for anesthetic infusion. Functional results were evaluated by the UCLA criteria. RESULTS: Improved range of motion was observed: mean increase of 45° of elevation, 41° of external rotation and eight vertebral levels of medial rotation. According to the UCLA score excellent results were obtained in 25 (45% patients; good, in 24 (45%; fair, in two (3%; and poor, in two (7%. Patients who had undergone inferior capsulotomy achieved better results. Only 8.8% of patients who used the anesthetic infusion catheter underwent postoperative manipulation. Seven patients had complications. CONCLUSION: There was improvement in pain and range of motion. Inferior capsulotomy leads to better results. The use of the interscalene infusion catheter reduces the number of re-approaches.

  16. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries and Outcome of Arthroscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To study the results of arterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repairs using arthroscopic assisted reconstructions using harmstrings. A follow-up rehabilitation programme of immediate mobilisation, weight bearing and extension. Subjects: Twenty arthroscopic reconstructions of the anterior cruciate ligament using the ...

  17. Safety and efficiency of posterior arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrickx, Roel P. M.; de Leeuw, Peter A. J.; Golano, Pau; van Dijk, C. Niek; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.

    2015-01-01

    To study the safety and efficiency of posterior arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis. Ten fresh-frozen human lower leg specimens without evidence of previous surgery to the foot and ankle were selected. Arthroscopic debridement of the tibiotalar joint was performed in all specimens using a standardized

  18. Arthroscopic Bioabsorbable Screw Fixation of Unstable Osteochondritis Dissecans in Adolescents: Clinical Results, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Second-Look Arthroscopic Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Keun Churl; Kim, Kwang Mee; Jeong, Ki Joon; Lee, Yong Chan; Kim, Jeong Woo; Chun, Churl Hong

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes of arthroscopic bioabsorbable screw fixation in osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) in adolescent patients with unstable lesions causing pain. The study included 11 patients (10 males and 1 female) with OCD who underwent arthroscopic bioabsorbable screw fixation between July 2007 and February 2014 and were available for follow-up for more than 12 months. The mean age at diagnosis was 16.3 years (range, 11 to 19 years), and the average follow-up period was 51 months (range, 12 to 91 months). Clinical results were evaluated using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Lysholm knee score, and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score measured before surgery and at follow-up. Functional evaluation was made using the Tegner activity scale. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and second-look arthroscopy were performed at the 12-month follow-up. Between the preoperative assessment and follow-up, improvements were seen in the KOOS (range, 44.9 to 88.1), Lysholm knee score (range, 32.6 to 82.8), and IKDC score (range, 40.8 to 85.6). The Tegner activity scale also improved from 2.8 to 6.1. Based on postoperative MRI, there were eight Dipaola grade I cases and three grade II cases. No complications due to fixation failure developed in any case. Second-look arthroscopy at 12 months postoperatively revealed that the lesion was covered with cartilage in all cases. For unstable OCD lesions causing pain in adolescents, arthroscopic bioabsorbable screw fixation provided favorable outcomes with reduced pain and restoration of movement. Therefore, it should be considered as an effective treatment for OCD.

  19. Chronic ankle instability: Arthroscopic anatomical repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Hernández, M; Mellado-Romero, M; Páramo-Díaz, P; García-Lamas, L; Vilà-Rico, J

    Ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries. Despite appropriate conservative treatment, approximately 20-40% of patients continue to have chronic ankle instability and pain. In 75-80% of cases there is an isolated rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament. A retrospective observational study was conducted on 21 patients surgically treated for chronic ankle instability by means of an arthroscopic anatomical repair, between May 2012 and January 2013. There were 15 men and 6 women, with a mean age of 30.43 years (range 18-48). The mean follow-up was 29 months (range 25-33). All patients were treated by arthroscopic anatomical repair of anterior talofibular ligament. Four (19%) patients were found to have varus hindfoot deformity. Associated injuries were present in 13 (62%) patients. There were 6 cases of osteochondral lesions, 3 cases of posterior ankle impingement syndrome, and 6 cases of peroneal pathology. All these injuries were surgically treated in the same surgical time. A clinical-functional study was performed using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score. The mean score before surgery was 66.12 (range 60-71), and after surgery it increased up to a mean of 96.95 (range 90-100). All patients were able to return to their previous sport activity within a mean of 21.5 weeks (range 17-28). Complications were found in 3 (14%) patients. Arthroscopic anatomical ligament repair technique has excellent clinical-functional results with a low percentage of complications, and enables patients to return to their previous sport activity within a short period of time. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Arthroscopic Trapeziectomy With Suture Button Suspensionplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landes, Genevieve; Gaspar, Michael P.; Goljan, Peter; Jacoby, Sidney M.; Bachoura, Abdo; Culp, Randall W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Arthroscopic trapeziectomy with suture button suspensionplasty (ATBS) is a relatively new surgical option for the treatment of thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) osteoarthritis. Although ATBS has many potential benefits over alternative surgical treatments for CMC arthritis, little data exist regarding its safety and complication rates. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that ATBS is associated with a low risk of complications within 1 year of surgery. Methods: A retrospective review of patients treated with ATBS by one senior hand surgeon over a span of 3 years was performed. Results: A total of 153 cases of ATBS were performed in 136 patients. Ninety-seven cases involved arthroscopic hemitrapeziectomies, and 56 involved arthroscopic complete trapeziectomies. There were 44 males and 92 females with a mean age of 62. Thirty-eight percent of the cases were graded as Eaton stage IV, 46% stage III, and 14% stage II CMC arthritis, while 3 cases (2%) were performed as revisions. Mean follow-up duration was 58 weeks. Mean preoperative key pinch strength of the affected versus the unaffected side was 92% compared with 95% postoperatively. Revision surgery was performed in 9 out of 153 cases (<6%). Of those 9 cases, 5 had additional minor bony debridement with subsequent improvement in pain, 3 had the implant repositioned due to button prominence, and 1 patient presented with osteomyelitis of the first and second metacarpals that was successfully treated with button removal and an antibiotic regimen. Conclusions: ATBS is a safe, minimally invasive procedure for treatment of symptomatic stages II through IV thumb CMC arthritis. PMID:27390569

  1. Arthroscopic-Assisted Open Reduction Internal Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Graham A; Doyle, Matthew D; Castellucci-Garza, Francesca M

    2018-04-01

    The indications for arthroscopy have expanded over the years. Arthroscopic-assisted open reduction internal fixation in the setting of acute trauma is gaining popularity with foot and ankle surgeons. It serves to facilitate direct visualization of fracture fragments and allows for precise articular reduction with minimal soft tissue insult. Current evidence reports a high incidence of chondral injury with ankle fractures. Arthroscopy performed at the time of open reduction internal fixation allows for joint inspection and potential treatment of these posttraumatic defects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Arthroscopic Hip Surgery in the Elite Athlete: Comparison of Female and Male Competitive Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Kotaro R; Matsuda, Shuichi; Safran, Marc R

    2017-07-01

    Few studies have published the results of hip arthroscopic surgery in elite athletes and none studying a significant number of elite female athletes. (1) To compare sex-based differences in the ability to return to prior competitive sports activity after arthroscopic hip surgery. (2) To compare sex-based differences in the type of sports activity, diagnosis, and treatment in athletes requiring hip arthroscopic surgery. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Data on all elite athletes who underwent primary hip arthroscopic surgery between 2007 and 2014 were included. Athletes with a Hip Sports Activity Scale (HSAS) score of over 6 were identified. The preoperative evaluation included a medical history, history of sports activity, and hip-specific outcome scores (Modified Harris Hip Score [MHHS] and International Hip Outcome Tool-33 [iHOT-33]). Surgical findings and time to return to competitive sports were documented. Of 547 hips in 484 consecutive patients, 98 elite athletes (49 female) with a mean follow-up of 18.9 ± 12.8 months were identified. Eighty patients desired to return to their original competitive activity: 38 were female (42 hips; mean age, 21.5 ± 3.9 years), and 42 were male (54 hips; mean age, 20.5 ± 1.9 years). Moreover, 84.2% of female athletes and 83.3% of male athletes were able to return to the same level of competition at a mean of 8.3 ± 3.0 and 8.8 ± 2.9 months, respectively. Significant improvements between preoperative and postoperative outcome scores were seen in both groups (all P athletes had more pincer femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) ( P = .0004) and instability ( P athletes were diagnosed more commonly with combined FAI ( P athletes competed more frequently in flexibility (4/38, 11%; P = .047) and endurance (9/38, 24%) sports, while male athletes participated in cutting (14/42, 33%), contact (6/42, 14%), and asymmetric (13/42, 31%) sports more often. Patients who returned to their baseline level of competition had a shorter

  3. Clinical and Radiological Results with Second-Look Arthroscopic Findings after Open Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy without Arthroscopic Procedures for Medial Meniscal Root Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Il; Park, Dongjun; Cho, Jinho

    2018-03-01

    To identify the structural integrity of the healing site after medial open wedge high tibial osteotomy (MOWHTO) in patients with a posterior root tear of the medial meniscus (PRTMM) and chondral lesion by second-look arthroscopy and to determine the clinical and radiological findings. From August 2010 to June 2016, 52 consecutive patients underwent MOWHTO and arthroscopic examination without a chondral resurfacing procedure and meniscal treatment for PRTMM. Twenty-four patients were available for second-look arthroscopic evaluation. The mean follow-up period was 19.5 months (range, 5 to 46 months). Clinical evaluation was based on the Lysholm knee scores and Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) scores. There were 5 lax healing, 6 scar tissue, 13 failed healing of PRTMM. Definite change of chondral lesion was not observed. The Kellgren-Lawrence grade did not improve according to the follow-up plain radiograph. The mean Lysholm score improved from 34.7 preoperatively to 77.1 at the last follow-up, and the mean HSS score significantly increased from 36.5 to 82.4. This study revealed a low rate of healing potency of PRTMM and chondral lesion after MOWHTO without any attempt for meniscal treatment or chondral resurfacing. The cartilage and healing status of PRTMM was not associated with improved clinical outcomes and radiological findings.

  4. A Prospective Comparative Study of Arthroscopic Versus Mini-Open Latarjet Procedure With a Minimum 2-Year Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Blandine; Klouche, Shahnaz; Deranlot, Julien; Bauer, Thomas; Nourissat, Geoffroy; Hardy, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    To compare postoperative pain during the first postoperative week and the position of the coracoid bone block at the anterior aspect of the glenoid after the arthroscopic and the mini-open Latarjet procedure. The secondary purpose was to assess functional results and recurrence after at least 2 years of follow-up. This comparative prospective study included patients who underwent a Latarjet-Bristow procedure for anterior shoulder instability in 2012. The Latarjet procedure was performed by a mini-open approach (G1) in one center and by an arthroscopic approach (G2) in the other. The main evaluation criterion was average shoulder pain during the first postoperative week assessed by the patient on a standard 10-cm visual analog scale (0-10). Secondary criteria were consumption of analgesics during the first week, the position of the coracoid bone block on radiograph and computed tomography scan at the 3-month follow-up and clinical outcomes (Western Ontario Score Index and new surgery) after at least 2 years of follow-up. Fifty-eight patients were included, 22 G1 and 36 G2, 13 women and 45 men, mean age 26.9 ± 7.7 years. The mean follow-up was 29.8 ± 4.4 months. There was significantly less pain in the arthroscopic Latarjet group than in the mini-open group during the first postoperative week (2.5 ± 1.4 vs 1.2 ± 1.2, P = .002) with comparable consumption of analgesics (P > .05). The arthroscopic Latarjet procedure resulted in a more lateral coracoid bone block (P = .04) and a better equatorial position than the mini-open technique (P = .02). Three patients underwent revision surgery (1 recurrence [2.8%], 1 block fracture, 1 screw ablation) in the arthroscopic group, none in the mini-open group (P = .54). At the final follow-up, the Western Ontario Score Index score was good in all patients (G1: 78.5 ± 7.5% vs G2: 82.3 ± 7%, P = .03). This prospective comparative study showed that the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure was significantly less painful than

  5. Rehabilitation after arthroscopic repair of intra-articular disorders of the hip in a professional football athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippon, Marc J; Christensen, Jesse C; Wahoff, Michael S

    2009-02-01

    To report the 4-phase rehabilitation progression of a professional athlete who underwent arthroscopic intra-articular repair of the hip after injury during the 2006-07 season. Case study; level of evidence, 4. Objective values were obtained by standard goniometric measurements, handheld dynamometer, dynamic sports testing, and clinical testing for intra-articular pathology. This case report illustrates improvements in hip mobility, muscle-force output, elimination of clinical signs of intra-articular involvement, and ability to perform high-level sport-specific training at 9 wk postsurgery. At 16 wk postsurgery, the patient was able to return to full preparation for sport for the following season. After the 4-phase rehabilitation program, the patient demonstrated improvement in all areas of high-level function after an arthroscopic intra-articular repair of the hip. The preoperative management to return to sport is outlined, with clinical outcomes and criteria for return to competition.

  6. Clinical results and second-look arthroscopic findings after treatment with adipose-derived stem cells for knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Yong-Gon; Choi, Yun-Jin; Kwon, Sae-Kwang; Kim, Yong-Sang; Yeo, Jee-Eun

    2015-05-01

    In the present study, the clinical outcomes and second-look arthroscopic findings of intra-articular injection of stem cells with arthroscopic lavage for treatment of elderly patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) were evaluated. Stem cell injections combined with arthroscopic lavage were administered to 30 elderly patients (≥65 years) with knee OA. Subcutaneous adipose tissue was harvested from both buttocks by liposuction. After stromal vascular fractions were isolated, a mean of 4.04 × 10(6) stem cells (9.7 % of 4.16 × 10(7) stromal vascular fraction cells) were prepared and injected in the selected knees of patients after arthroscopic lavage. Outcome measures included the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Scores, visual analog scale, and Lysholm score at preoperative and 3-, 12-, and 2-year follow-up visits. Sixteen patients underwent second-look arthroscopy. Almost all patients showed significant improvement in all clinical outcomes at the final follow-up examination. All clinical results significantly improved at 2-year follow-up compared to 12-month follow-up (P 65 years, only five patients demonstrated worsening of Kellgren-Lawrence grade. On second-look arthroscopy, 87.5 % of elderly patients (14/16) improved or maintained cartilage status at least 2 years postoperatively. Moreover, none of the patients underwent total knee arthroplasty during this 2-year period. Adipose-derived stem cell therapy for elderly patients with knee OA was effective in cartilage healing, reducing pain, and improving function. Therefore, adipose-derived stem cell treatment appears to be a good option for OA treatment in elderly patients. Therapeutic case series study, Level IV.

  7. FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME OF ACCELERATED REHABILITATION IN ARTHROSCOPIC ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION WITH BONE PATELLAR TENDON BONE GRAFT A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

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    Hiranyakumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION An ideal rehabilitation program post anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction enables an individual to return to pre injury levels at a faster rate with minimal to no risk of reinjury to the graft. Rehabilitation protocols have changed considerably over time in the past. It has become “aggressive”, meaning an intensive rehabilitation which includes greater variety of exercises and sports related training. AIM OF THE STUDY The aim of our study is to assess the outcome of accelerated rehabilitation post anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction. METHODOLOGY 106 patients were operated by a single surgeon underwent arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using bone patella tendon bone graft and partial meniscectomy for associated meniscal tear. Patients were put on an accelerated rehabilitation protocol designed in our institute on first post-operative day, under the guidance of a physical therapist in consultation with the operated surgeon. Patients were followed up at 3 weeks, 6 months and 9 months, post onset of rehabilitation, patients were assessed using KT1000 Arthrometer and Lysholm knee scoring system. RESULTS Out of 106 patients, who were selected, 96(91% were males and 10(9% were females. The mean pre-operative Lysholm score was 55.09. Post operatively, while on accelerated rehabilitation program the Lysholm scores were 69.73 at 3 weeks, 89.13 at 6 months and 89.19 at 9 months. In our pre-operative evaluation mean KT 1000 arthrometer score was 10.53 and post-operative at six months was 3.49. At nine months 105 patients had excellent results whereas 1 patient had good result. CONCLUSION Accelerated rehabilitation protocol enables the patient to functionally recover faster to pre injury levels. A rehabilitation protocol for 6 months is sufficient in enabling a patient to get back to pre-injury levels. Functional outcome is the same with or without associated meniscal injuries.

  8. Arthroscopic Finding of an Extra-Articular Loose Body in the Subacromial Space: Case Report Presentation and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartelius, Carl; Apostolopoulos, Alexandros P; Zaman, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Loose bodies are pieces of soft tissue that run free within a body cavity, typically in the synovium; loose bodies outside of synovial cavities are very rare. This case study demonstrates such an instance occurring in the subacromial space, which is especially unusual. We report on it coupled with an analysis of the literature of known cases that have occurred previously. A 55-year old right-hand-dominant female patient presented with left shoulder pain. She had injured her left shoulder 7 yr previously and had achieved adequate pain and symptomatic control with physiotherapy. A magnetic resonance imaging scan demonstrated subacromial subdeltoid bursitis with a large subacromial spur, a bulky acromioclavicular (AC) joint, and a partial tear of the supraspinatous tendon. The patient subsequently underwent shoulder arthroscopy for subacromial decompression and AC joint excision. Arthroscopy demonstrated a suspected impingement of the rotator cuff in the subacromial space, bursitis, and a prominent acromion that limited the subacromial space (bigliani, type III), but during the procedure a detached white mass was discovered in the subacromial bursa. After histological analysis, the mass showed osteocartilagenous tissue, consistent with a loose body. Following the procedure, there were no complications, and the patient's symptoms gradually resolved. Extraarticular loose bodies are extremely rare, especially in the subacromial bursa. Reported cases have all been associated with either traumatic or degenerative shoulder pathology, and the diagnosis was commonly established incidentally on arthroscopy. Cases were managed with removal during the same procedure. Arthroscopic removal of loose bodies and bursa debridement, good options for treatment of loose bodies in the subacromial space, can result in good function.

  9. Does the Age of a Patient Affect the Outcome of Temporomandibular Joint Arthroscopic Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jungsuk; Israel, Howard

    2017-06-01

    Although temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders encompass all age groups, it is generally considered to affect young to middle-age adults. The aim of this investigation was to study patients who met the criteria for TMJ arthroscopy and to determine whether there was a difference in outcomes between younger and older patients. This was a retrospective chart review of patients who underwent TMJ operative arthroscopy. The primary variable studied was patient age. Major outcome variables included changes in subjective pain measured by a visual analog scale (VAS) and changes in maximum interincisal opening (MIO) after arthroscopic surgery. Other variables of interest included the presence of systemic disease, synovitis, and osteoarthritis diagnosed arthroscopically. Data analysis included the Student t test, regression analysis (R Studio, Boston, MA), and χ 2 test with a P value less than .05 indicating statistical significance. The study population consisted of 103 patients diagnosed with internal derangement and severe inflammatory or degenerative TMJ disease (Wilkes stages II to V) who underwent operative arthroscopy. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on age (group Y, 40 yr old, n = 52, mean age, 56 yr). The presence of osteoarthritis diagnosed arthroscopically was significantly greater in group O than in group Y (P < .01). There was significant postoperative improvement in pain (VAS) and MIO in group Y (P < .01) and group O (P < .01). Although the 2 groups showed substantial improvement after arthroscopy, when comparing differences in outcomes between the groups, the absolute postoperative pain level for group O was significantly lower than for group Y (P < .05). Comparison of postoperative MIO did not show a significant difference between group Y and group O (P = .286). Groups Y and O showed substantial improvement in pain (VAS) and mandibular mobility (MIO) after surgical TMJ arthroscopy. Group O had a higher prevalence of arthroscopically diagnosed

  10. Arthroscopic management of calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder--do we need to remove all the deposit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzello, Giacomo; Franceschi, Francesco; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Ruzzini, Laura; Meloni, Maria Chiara; Spiezia, Filippo; Papalia, Rocco; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2009-01-01

    Results of arthroscopic management of chronic, recalcitrant calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder in 28 patients were evaluated. Twenty-six patients (average age, 44 years) were ultimately enrolled in the study. Postoperative radiographs were performed to determine the amount of calcium deposit removal. Radiographic examination 2 months after surgery was performed to evaluate further deposit changes. The Constant score showed a statistically significant improvement in all patients. Better results were obtained when complete removal of the calcifications was achieved. On radiographic examination, performed two months after surgery, no calcification deposit increased in size and no translucent deposit changed into a dense deposit. Most of the dense deposits, partially removed, changed into translucent deposits. In this series, we found arthroscopic management was effective in treating calcific tendinopathy.

  11. Injuries to the cranial cruciate ligament and associated structures: summary of clinical, radiographic, arthroscopic and pathological findings from 10 horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prades, M.; Grant, B.D.; Turner, T.A.; Nixon, A.J.; Brown, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    The clinical, radiographic, arthroscopic and pathological findings of 10 horses with injury to the cranial cruciate ligament are presented. The most consistent clinical signs included moderate to severe distension of the femoropatellar joint and a Grade III to a Grade V out of V lameness. Craniocaudal instability could be elicited in five horses under general anaesthesia and in one conscious horse. Radiographic evaluation of the stifles revealed that avulsion fracture of the medial intercondylar eminence was the most common finding in six out of 10 horses. Arthroscopic examination of the affected femorotibial joints were performed in five horses. This confirmed the presumptive diagnosis of cranial cruciate ligament injury or rupture. Post mortem examinations were performed on two horses which documented partial tears of the cranial cruciate ligament

  12. Evaluation of anterior stability of knee joint following arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with patellar ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fibiger, Wojciech; Kukiełka, Radosław T Kukiełka

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate and assess anterior stability of the knee joint before and during 12-month rehabilitation after arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament with the central third of the patellar ligament and stabilization with interference screws (Kenneth-Jones method) and to analyse the effectiveness of the surgery and rehabilitation by patient self-assessment of pain and crepitation in the patello-femoral joint. The study involved a group of 46 patients after arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with the patellar ligament performed in 2005 and 2006. All patients underwent examinations of anterior stability of the knee joint using a KT-1000/S arthrometer. Stability measurements were performed on both knees on the day before surgery, and at 3, 6 and 12 months after the operation. Additionally, the patients subjectively evaluated post-operative pain and crepitation in the patello-femoral joint at 3, 6 and 12 months. Knee stability after ACL reconstruction according to the Mazurkiewicz scale using a KT-1000 arthrometer was rated as good and excellent, while the patients subjectively assessed the treatment process in terms of pain and crepitation in the patello-femoral joint at 12 months after the operation as excellent (10.8%), good (74%), and satisfactory (15.2%). Arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with the central third of the patellar ligament and stabilization with interference screws fully restored the lost stability of the knee, but the possibility of pain and crepitations in the patello-femoral joint needs to be taken into account. In the course of rehabilitation, it is natural that an ACL graft may extend as a result of remodeling and the impact of rehabilitation being administered.

  13. Extracapsular approach for arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement: clinical and radiographic results and complications

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    Bruno Dutra Roos

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTOBJECTIVES: To evaluate the clinical and radiographic results and complications relating to patients undergoing arthroscopic treatment for femoroacetabular impingement by means of an extracapsular approach. METHODS: Between January 2011 and March 2012, 49 patients (50 hips underwent arthroscopic treatment for femoroacetabular impingement, performed by the hip surgery team of the Orthopedic Hospital of Passo Fundo, Rio Grande do Sul. Forty patients (41 hips fulfilled all the requirements for this study. The mean follow-up was 29.1 months. The patients were assessed clinically by means of the Harris Hip score, as modified by Byrd (MHHS, the Non-Arthritic Hip score (NAHS and the internal rotation of the hip. Their hips were also evaluated radiographically, with measurement of the CE angle, dimensions of the joint space, alpha angle, neck-head index, degree of arthrosis and presence of heterotopic ossification of the hip. RESULTS: Out of the 41 hips treated, 31 (75.6% presented good or excellent clinical results. There was a mean postoperative increase of 22.1 points for the MHHS, 21.5 for the NAHS and 16.4° for the internal rotation of the hip ( p< 0.001. Regarding the radiographic evaluation, correction to normal values was observed for the alpha angle and neck-head index, with a mean postoperative decrease of 32.9° and mean increase of 0.10, respectively ( p< 0.001. CONCLUSION: Arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement by means of an extracapsular approach presented satisfactory clinical and radiographic results over a mean follow-up of 29.1 months, with few complications.

  14. Assessment of the results from arthroscopic surgical treatment of adhesive capsulitis

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    Marcio Cohen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Describe the outcomes of patients with adhesive capsulitis treated with arthroscopic surgical procedure. METHODS: Between January and September of 2009, 9 patients (10 cases underwent arthroscopic surgical release. There were 4 male (one bilateral and 5 female patients. Their mean age was 51 years (27-63. The time from onset of symptoms to the surgical procedure averaged 23.4 months (6-38. Preoperative assessment was based on the UCLA and Constant score. ROM was evaluated with one week and six months of surgery. RESULTS: According to UCLA shoulder score (p < 0.01 it increased from 9.8 preoperatively (6-14 to 31.6 postoperatively (26-35 and the Constant (p < 0.01 from 20 (13-27 to 79.2 (66-91. ROM improved significantly, with mean passive elevation changing from 89° (80-100° preoperatively to 150° postoperatively with one week and 153° with six months, mean passive external rotation changing from 12.5° (0-30° preoperatively to 46° (one week and 56° (six months postoperatively, and passive internal rotation from L5 (T12-gluteus to T11 (one week and T9 (six months. There was not statistical significance of the duration of the disease and the postoperative result. CONCLUSION: This study shows that the surgical treatment of adhesive capsulitis with arthroscopic capsular release and manipulation appears to be a safe procedure that results in pain relief and functional gain.

  15. A comparison of magnetic resonance arthrography and arthroscopic findings in the assessment of anterior shoulder dislocations

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    Jordan, R.W.; Naeem, R.; Srinivas, K.; Shyamalan, G. [Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to establish the sensitivity and specificity of MRA in the investigation of patients with traumatic anterior shoulder dislocations. A retrospective analysis of consecutive patients undergoing both magnetic resonance arthrography and arthroscopic assessment after a traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation between January 2011 and 2014 was performed. Demographic data were collected from electronic records. Images were interpreted by 8 musculoskeletal radiologists and patients were treated by 8 consultant orthopaedic surgeons. Arthroscopic findings were obtained from surgical notes and these findings were used as a reference for MRA. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value were calculated for the different injuries. Sixty-nine patients underwent both an MRA and shoulder arthroscopy during the study period; however, clinical notes were unavailable in 9 patients. Fifty-three patients (88 %) were male, the mean age was 28 years (range 18 to 50) and 16 subjects (27 %) had suffered a primary dislocation. The overall sensitivity and specificity of MRA to all associated injuries was 0.9 (CI 0.83-0.95) and 0.94 (CI 0.9-0.96) retrospectively. The lowest sensitivity was seen in osseous Bankart 0.8 (CI 0.44-0.96) and superior labral tear (SLAP) lesions 0.5 (CI 0.14-0.86). The overall positive predictive value was 0.88 (CI 0.76-0.91) with the lowest values found in rotator cuff 0.4 (CI 0.07-0.83) and glenohumeral ligament (GHL) lesions 0.29 (CI 0.05-0.7). Magnetic resonance angiography has a high sensitivity when used to identify associated injuries in shoulder dislocation, although in 8 patients (13 %) arthroscopy identified an additional injury. The overall agreement between MRA and arthroscopic findings was good, but the identification of GHL and rotator cuff injuries was poor. (orig.)

  16. The use of arthroscopic thermal shrinkage to treat chronic lateral ankle instability in young athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiotti, Marco; Massoni, Carlo; Tarantino, Umberto

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the preliminary results of arthroscopic thermal capsular shrinkage performed for chronic lateral ankle instability in soccer players. Case series. We reviewed 22 male soccer players (average age, 18 years) with chronic lateral ankle instability who underwent arthroscopic thermal shrinkage between 1997 and 1998. The only exclusion criterion for this study was the failure of previous surgery. Before surgery, all patients had participated in a physical rehabilitation program consisting of peroneal strengthening exercises and proprioceptive training for several months, without any relief of their symptoms. All patients were characterized by repeated episodes of giving way, a positive anterior drawer sign, and positive stress radiographs. The stress radiographs consisted of a sagittal stress and talar tilt by the TELOS device (Fallston, MD). The Karlsson and Peterson ankle function scoring scale was used to assess these patients for their current activity level as well as activity before surgery. Patients were reviewed at a mean of 42 months (range, 32 to 56 months); 19 patients (86.3%) reported a good or excellent functional outcome as assessed by the Karlsson and Peterson ankle function scoring scale. Eighteen of the 22 patients presented no evidence of ankle instability on physical examination or on stress radiographs. Only 1 patient was not able to return to his previous level of sports activity and complained of ankle instability when walking on uneven ground. This study suggests that arthroscopic thermal capsular shrinkage is a valid and safe procedure for treatment of chronic lateral ankle instability. Longer follow-up is needed, however, to see how these results may change with time in high-demand athletes. Level IV.

  17. New arthroscopic assisted technique for ankle instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerstner Garces, Juan Ricardo

    2004-01-01

    An assisted arthroscopic technique for chronic ankle instability is presented by the author, together with his results for 27 patients treated between January 2000 and February 2004, with a minimum follow-up of six months. Indications for his technique, according to the rehabilitation protocol of the Medical Centre, included patients with chronic subjective and objective ankle instability, anteroposterior instability, associated anteromedical impingement syndromes, non competitive athletes, patients not displaying defects in the alignment of the axis of foot and ankle, or systemic disorders such as diabetes mellitus, collagenisis or hyperelasticity. Patients were evaluated according to the AOFAS scale for the outcome of ankle procedures, and followed up for a minimum period of six months. Positive results confirm an efficient and effective technique, simple and easy to reproduce, that does not hinder future open anatomical or non-anatomical reconstruction, and in which complications are minimal

  18. Arthroscopical treatment of elbow joint disease

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    C.M.F. Rezende

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Elbow arthroscopy was performed in 30 dogs of different breeds. The procedure was performed bilaterally in 20 of these dogs, yielding a total of 50 joints. Different lesions were found, varying from cartilage fissures (8 to fragmentation (42 of medial coronoid process (FCP of the ulna. Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD of the humerus medial condyle was associated in four of them. All of these cases displayed varying degrees of synovitis. Osteoarthrosis (OA in varying intensity was observed in 44 joints. The majority of cases were treated two to four months after the manifestation of clinical signs. Good clinical recovery occurred in dogs with minimal joint lesions, where these were diagnosed and treated within four weeks of the onset of clinical symptoms. Early diagnosis and arthroscopic treatment prevent osteoarthrosis and preserve locomotor function.

  19. Arthroscopic skills assessment and use of box model for training in arthroscopic surgery using Sawbones – “FAST” workstation

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    Goyal Saumitra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Arthroscopic skills training outside the operative room may decrease risks and errors by trainee surgeons. There is a need of simple objective method for evaluating proficiency and skill of arthroscopy trainees using simple bench model of arthroscopic simulator. The aim of this study is to correlate motor task performance to level of prior arthroscopic experience and establish benchmarks for training modules. Methods: Twenty orthopaedic surgeons performed a set of tasks to assess a arthroscopic triangulation, b navigation, c object handling and d meniscus trimming using SAWBONES “FAST” arthroscopy skills workstation. Time to completion and the errors were computed. The subjects were divided into four levels; “Novice”, “Beginner”, “Intermediate” and “Advanced” based on previous arthroscopy experience, for analyses of performance. Results: The task performance under transparent dome was not related to experience of the surgeon unlike opaque dome, highlighting the importance of hand-eye co-ordination required in arthroscopy. Median time to completion for each task improved as the level of experience increased and this was found to be statistically significant (p 85% of subjects across all the levels reported improvement in performance with sequential tasks. Conclusion: Use of the arthroscope requires visuo-spatial coordination which is a skill that develops with practice. This simple box model can reliably differentiate the arthroscopic skills based on experience and can be used to monitor progression of skills of trainees in institutions.

  20. Clinical and arthroscopic outcome of single bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: Comparison of remnant preservation versus conventional technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungwook; Kim, Myung-Ku; Kwon, Yong Suk; Kang, Hyunseong

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes and second-look arthroscopic findings of remnant preservation technique with those of conventional anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in single bundle ACL reconstructions. One hundred sixty two consecutive patients underwent ACL reconstruction by one surgeon, with 93 patients receiving remnant preservation technique (Group A) and 69 patients receiving conventional ACL reconstruction (Group B). The mean follow-up was 15months. Clinical outcomes were assessed using Lysholm scores and the International Knee Documentation Committee form (IKDC form) evaluation. Post-operative knee stability was evaluated through manual knee laxity evaluation, pivot-shift test, and a Telos device. Differences in post-operative stability (manual knee laxity, pivot shift test and Telos device) were not significant between the groups (p=0.681, p=0.610, p=0.696). And also no significant differences were noted with respect to the IKDC form and the latest Lysholm scores. But in the second-look arthroscopic findings, synovial coverage was confirmed to be excellent in 36% (22/61) of Group A patients and 23% (7/30) of Group B patients. ACL reconstruction with both techniques was found to result in acceptable stability, clinical outcomes and second-look arthroscopic findings. With regard to synovial coverage, the remnant reservation techniques were found to be superior to conventional ACL reconstruction. Level III, retrospective comparative study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparative analysis on arthroscopic sutures of large and extensive rotator cuff injuries in relation to the degree of osteopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Almeida

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the results from arthroscopic suturing of large and extensive rotator cuff injuries, according to the patient's degree of osteopenia.METHOD: 138 patients who underwent arthroscopic suturing of large and extensive rotator cuff injuries between 2003 and 2011 were analyzed. Those operated from October 2008 onwards formed a prospective cohort, while the remainder formed a retrospective cohort. Also from October 2008 onwards, bone densitometry evaluation was requested at the time of the surgical treatment. For the patients operated before this date, densitometry examinations performed up to two years before or after the surgical treatment were investigated. The patients were divided into three groups. Those with osteoporosis formed group 1 (n = 16; those with osteopenia, group 2 (n = 33; and normal individuals, group 3 (n = 55.RESULTS: In analyzing the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA scores of group 3 and comparing them with group 2, no statistically significant difference was seen (p = 0.070. Analysis on group 3 in comparison with group 1 showed a statistically significant difference (p = 0.027.CONCLUSION: The results from arthroscopic suturing of large and extensive rotator cuff injuries seem to be influenced by the patient's bone mineral density, as assessed using bone densitometry.

  2. The use of small (2.7 mm) screws for arthroscopically guided repair of carpal chip fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, I M; Smith, M R W

    2011-05-01

    Removal of large chip fractures of the carpal bones and the osteochondral deficits that result, have been associated with a worse prognosis than removal of small fragments in similar locations. Reducing the articular defects by repair of large osteochondral fragments may have advantages over removal. Horses with osteochondral chip fractures that were of sufficient size and infrastructure to be repaired with small (2.7 mm diameter) AO/ASIF cortex screws were identified and repair effected by arthroscopically guided internal fixation. Thirty-three horses underwent surgery to repair 35 fractures of the dorsodistal radial carpal bone (n = 25), the dorsal margin of the radial facet of the third carpal bone (n = 9) and the intermediate facet of the distal radius (n = 1). There were no surgical complications and fractures healed satisfactorily in 26 of 28 horses and 23 horses returned to racing performance. Arthroscopically guided repair of carpal chip fractures with small diameter cortex screws is technically feasible and experiences with 33 cases suggest that this may have advantages over fragment removal in managing such cases. Surgeons treating horses with large chip fractures of the carpal bones should consider arthroscopically guided internal fixation as an alternative to removal. © 2010 EVJ Ltd.

  3. Arthroscopic repair of acute traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation in young athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrain, M V; Botto, G J; Montenegro, H J; Mauas, D M

    2001-04-01

    To compare the results of arthroscopic repair in acute anterior shoulder traumatic dislocation with those of nonoperative treatment. A prospective nonrandomized study was performed. Between August 1989 and April 1997, 46 patients were seen after a first episode of traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation. The average age was 21 years (range, 17 to 27 years). Most dislocations were in rugby players (36 patients). There were 18 patients treated by nonoperative methods and 28 patients treated by acute arthroscopic repair; 22 patients using transglenoid suture and 6 patients with bone anchor suture fixation. Of the patients treated nonoperatively, 94.5% suffered a redislocation between 4 and 18 months (average, 6 months). In the operative group, 96% of the patients (27) obtained excellent results according to the Rowe scale. Only 1 patient suffered a redislocation 1 year after surgery. Three different types of lesions were found during surgery: group I, capsular tear with no labrum lesion (4%); group II, capsular tear with partial labrum detachment (32%); and group III, capsular tear and full anterior labrum detachment (64%). The average follow-up was 67.4 months (range, 28 to 120). There were no surgical complications. The operative group obtained 96% excellent results, but the nonoperative group only obtained 5.5% excellent results, according to the Rowe scale. The nonoperative group showed a high incidence of redislocation (94.5%) compared with the operative group (4%). Based on the findings of this study, we recommend using an arthroscopic evaluation and repair after an initial anterior traumatic shoulder dislocation in young athletes.

  4. Evaluation and comparison of clinical results of femoral fixation devices in arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Deniz; Ozcan, Mert

    2016-03-01

    Several femoral fixation devices are available for hamstring tendon autograft in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, but the best technique is debatable. We hypothesised that different suspensory femoral fixation techniques have no superiority over each other. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the clinical results of different suspensory femoral fixation devices in arthroscopic ACL reconstruction. This was a Level III, retrospective, comparative study. A total of 100 consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction in a single institution with a mean follow-up time of 40 months (12-67 months) were divided into three groups according to femoral fixation devices as 'Endobutton' (n=34), 'Transfix' (n=35) and 'Aperfix' (n=31). The length of painful period after surgery, time to return to work and sporting activities, final range of motion, anterior drawer and Lachman tests, knee instability symptoms, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective knee evaluation score, Short Form 36 (SF-36) score, Lysholm knee score and Tegner point of the patients were evaluated and compared between groups. There were no significant differences between the groups. All techniques led to significant recovery in knee instability tests and symptoms. In this study, the clinical results of different suspensory femoral fixation techniques were found to be similar. We believe that different femoral fixation techniques have no effect on clinical results provided that the technique is correctly applied. The surgeon must choose a technique appropriate to his or her experience. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A guided surgical approach and novel fixation method for arthroscopic Latarjet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boileau, Pascal; Gendre, Patrick; Baba, Mohammed; Thélu, Charles-Édouard; Baring, Toby; Gonzalez, Jean-François; Trojani, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Most of the complications of the Latarjet procedure are related to the bone block positioning and use of screws. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if an arthroscopic Latarjet guiding system improves accuracy of bone block positioning and if suture button fixation could be an alternative to screw fixation in allowing bone block healing and avoiding complications. Seventy-six patients (mean age, 27 years) underwent an arthroscopic Latarjet procedure with a guided surgical approach and suture button fixation. Bone graft union and positioning accuracy were assessed by postoperative computed tomography imaging. Clinical examinations were performed at each visit. At a mean of 14 months (range, 6-24 months) postoperatively, 75 of 76 patients had a stable shoulder. No neurologic complications were observed; no patients have required further surgery. The coracoid graft was positioned strictly tangential to the glenoid surface in 96% of the cases and below the equator in 93%. The coracoid graft healed in 69 patients (91%). A guided surgical approach optimizes graft positioning accuracy. Suture button fixation can be an alternative to screw fixation, obtaining an excellent rate of bone union. Neurologic and hardware complications, classically reported with screw fixation, have not been observed with this guided technique and novel fixation method. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Arthroscopic Surgical Technique for an Acute Talar Dome Osteochondral Lesion in a Professional Rugby League Player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Martin; Fraser, Ethan J; Linklater, James; Harris, Craig; Morgan, Kieran

    2017-06-01

    Talar osteochondral lesions represent challenging clinical entities, particularly in high-demand athletes. Surgical treatment of large lesions often requires a 2-step procedure, or the use of osteotomy in the case of autologous osteochondral transfer, which can delay return to sport. A professional rugby league player underwent surgery for a complex injury to the ankle. A talar osteochondral lesion with a maximal diameter of 15 mm was treated in an arthroscopic fashion using the cartilage taken from the completely displaced osteochondral fragment. Cartilage was cut into chips and combined with bone graft product containing platelet-derived growth factor and a porous collagen scaffold. Autologous cartilage was then reimplanted arthroscopically. The patient was allowed full ankle motion from 2 weeks postoperatively, and weightbearing was commenced at 6 weeks. Follow-up imaging and functional outcomes, including return to sport, were assessed at regular intervals. The patient was able to return to professional rugby league by 23 weeks postoperatively. Magnetic resonance imaging at 16 months postoperatively showed restoration of the subchondral plate and osseous infill. At final follow-up, the patient remained pain free and was playing at preinjury level. This report describes good outcomes using a novel, 1-step cartilage repair technique to treat a large talar osteochondral lesion in a professional athlete. Level V: Expert opinion.

  7. Two-Year Outcomes After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair in Recreational Athletes Older Than 70 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Sanjeev; Greenspoon, Joshua A; Horan, Marilee P; Warth, Ryan J; Millett, Peter J

    2015-07-01

    Outcomes after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in recreational athletes older than 70 years are not widely reported. To evaluate clinical outcomes after arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears in recreational athletes aged 70 years or older. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Institutional review board approval was obtained before initiation of this study. Data were collected prospectively and were retrospectively reviewed. From December 2005 to August 2012, patients who were at least 70 years of age, who described themselves as recreational athletes, and who underwent a primary or revision arthroscopic repair of full-thickness supraspinatus tears by a single surgeon were identified from a surgical registry. Demographic data, surgical data, and the following pre- and postoperative clinical outcomes scores were collected: American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (QuickDASH), Short Form-12 Physical Component Summary (SF-12 PCS), and Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE). Acromiohumeral distance and Goutallier classifications were recorded. Patient satisfaction (range, 1-10, 10 = best) and reasons for activity modification were collected at final follow-up. Forty-nine shoulders (44 patients) were included. The mean age was 73 years (range, 70-82 years). There were 33 men and 11 women (5 bilateral). The mean preoperative acromiohumeral distance was 9.2 mm (range, 3.0-15.9 mm). All patients had Goutallier classifications of 0, 1, or 2. Mean follow-up was 3.6 years (range, 2.0-6.9 years) in 43 of 49 (88%) shoulders. No rotator cuff repairs were revised, however, 1 patient had surgical treatment for stiffness. All postoperative outcomes measures demonstrated significant improvements when compared with their preoperative baselines. The mean ASES score was 90.3 (range, 60-100), the mean SANE score was 85.1 (range, 29-100), the mean QuickDASH score was 11.3 (0-50), and the mean SF-12 PCS score was

  8. Quantitative analysis of peak torque and power-velocity characteristics of shoulder rotator muscles after arthroscopic labral repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szuba, Łukasz; Markowska, Iga; Czamara, Andrzej; Noga, Henryk

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to use biomechanical testing to assess differences in the power and strength of patients who participated in a short-term, home-based rehabilitation program following arthroscopic labral repair compared with a healthy control group. The functional outcomes of patients who underwent arthroscopic labral repair followed by self-directed short-term rehabilitation at home were compared with age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched healthy controls. Group I included 20 male patients who had undergone arthroscopic labral repair after being diagnosed with recurrent anterior glenohumeral joint instability without bony lesions of the humeral head or glenoid. Postoperatively, they participated in physical therapy for 17±4 appointments, followed by self-guided home-based exercises. Group II included 25 males without injuries. The two groups were matched for age and BMI. The orthopaedic examination, functional tests, and biomechanical measurements were performed under isokinetic conditions at an average of 16±3 months postoperatively. Significant differences were observed in range of shoulder rotation on the operative shoulder compared with the unaffected side and in the dominant arms of the control group. The patients were also found to have significant deficits in biomechanical parameters such as power and peak torque angle. Significant deficits in peak torque, power, and peak torque angle during external and internal shoulder rotation remained up to 16 months after arthroscopic labral repair. Further research is needed to understand the changes in shoulder power assessment after labral repair. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Features of Designing the Criterion-Based Rehabilitation Program for Patients after Arthroscopic Reconstruction of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Roy

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an innovative criterion-based rehabilitation program for patients, who underwent arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. The features of the program are described, methodological foundations to perform permissible exercises are presented for each periods of the program, which correspond to a specific motor mode. The degree of preparedness of the patient is determined by the criterion of performance of the test exercises that will permit him to the loads of a new, higher level of trainings. The effectiveness of the developed program is confirmed clinically.

  10. Effect of centre-edge angle on clinical and quality of life outcomes after arthroscopic acetabular labral debridement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ziying; Chen, Shiyi; Li, Yunxia; Li, Hong; Chen, Jiwu

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare clinical and quality of life outcomes following arthroscopic acetabular labral debridement between patients with different centre-edge (CE) angle. A total of 79 patients who underwent hip labral debridement were enrolled in this study. Radiographic measurements of CE angle were collected, and patients were assigned into a normal group (25°  0.05). Additionally, there was a greater improvement in clinical scores post-operatively in the normal group compared with the dysplasia group (P 25° compared with patients with CE angle < 20°.

  11. Proprioception and functional deficits of partial meniscectomized knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malliou, P; Gioftsidou, A; Pafis, G; Rokka, S; Kofotolis, N; Mavromoustakos, S; Godolias, G

    2012-06-01

    The partial meniscectomy leads to proprioceptive knee deficits in a short period after the arthroscopic procedure; however, to our knowledge, a limited number of studies have investigated the long-term outcomes of partial meniscectomy on the knee joint proprioception. The aim of the present study was to assess the proprioception and muscle function of the partial meniscectomized knee through balance and functional tests 1-2 years posterior to arthroscopic surgery. This was an observational study. Partially meniscectomized persons after 1-2 years. Twenty-six male patients who had an arthroscopic partial meniscectomy at the age between 20-40. All patients performed balance (Biodex Stability System and balance boards) and functional (triple jump) tests. On the balance system the deviations from the horizontal plane were recorded, on the balance boards their performance was timed, and on the functional test triple jump their performance was recorded in meters. One-way Anova was used to determine significant differences between the healthy and injured limb. The level of statistical significance was set at pproprioception and knee muscular ability in the operated leg compared to the non-operated leg. Clinical rehabilitation impact. Proprioception and knee muscular ability deficits significantly affect objective knee function, indicating the importance not only of the restoring muscle function but also of the proprioception ability in partial meniscectomy patients.

  12. Prospective study of the " Inside-Out" arthroscopic ankle ligament technique: Preliminary result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nery, Caio; Fonseca, Lucas; Raduan, Fernando; Moreno, Marcus; Baumfeld, Daniel

    2017-03-22

    Lateral ankle ligament injury is among the most common orthopedic injuries. The objective of this study is to present the preliminary prospective results of treatment using the "Inside-Out" variant of the fully arthroscopic Broström-Gould technique. Twenty six patients were included: 20 male and 6 female, aged 19-60 years, mean 41 years. All patients had positive "anterior drawer" and "talar tilt" tests. When necessary, cartilage injuries were treated with microfracture and arthroscopic resection for anterior impingement; three patients had hindfoot varus, on whom Dwyer osteotomy was performed; one patient had peroneal tendinopathy and was treated with tendoscopic debridement and another one had partial injury of the deltoid ligament, which was treated by direct repair. Two arthroscopic surgery portals were used; the anteromedial and anterolateral. After careful inspection of the joint, the anterior surface of the fibula was cleaned to resect the remains of the anterior talo-fibular ligament. An anchor with two sutures was placed on the anterior aspect of the fibula, 1cm from the distal apex of the malleolus. The sutures were passed through the remnant of the anterior talo-fibular ligament as well as the extensor retinaculum using special curved needles. Duncan knots were used to tie the ligament and the inferior extensor retinaculum while the ankle was kept in a neutral position. Patients were kept immobilized non-weight bearing for 2 weeks and were then allowed to start weight bearing in a removable protective boot for 4 weeks. The patients were able to return to sporting activities 6 months after surgery. After a mean follow-up of 27 months (range 21-36 months), patients were functionally evaluated using the American Orthopedics Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle score. The mean preoperative value was 58 points, while the mean postoperative value increased to 90 points. One patient had paresthesia in the superficial fibular nerve area, which resolved

  13. Do Patients With Borderline Dysplasia Have Inferior Outcomes After Hip Arthroscopic Surgery for Femoroacetabular Impingement Compared With Patients With Normal Acetabular Coverage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Levy, David M; Weber, Alexander E; Kuhns, Benjamin D; Mather, Richard C; Salata, Michael J; Nho, Shane J

    2017-07-01

    The literature contains conflicting reports regarding whether outcomes of hip arthroscopic surgery for patients with borderline dysplasia are inferior to outcomes in patients with normal acetabular coverage. To assess differences in the outcomes of hip arthroscopic surgery for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in groups of patients with borderline dysplasia and normal coverage. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A registry of consecutive patients who had undergone primary hip arthroscopic surgery with capsular plication for FAI between January 2012 and January 2014 were divided based on the preoperative lateral center-edge angle (LCEA) into 2 distinct groups: (1) borderline dysplasia (LCEA 18°-25°) and (2) normal acetabular coverage (LCEA 25.1°-40°). There were 36 patients in the borderline dysplastic group and 312 patients in the normal coverage group. The primary outcome measure was the Hip Outcome Score-Activities of Daily Living (HOS-ADL) at a minimum of 2 years postoperatively. Secondary outcome measures included the HOS-Sports and modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS). The mean preoperative LCEA differed significantly between groups (23.4° ± 1.5° for borderline dysplastic, 32.5° ± 3.8° for normal coverage; P borderline dysplastic group had a higher percentage of female patients than the normal coverage group (27/36 [75%] vs 177/312 [57%], respectively; P = .048). There were no differences in other preoperative demographics and radiographic parameters. At a minimum 2 years after hip arthroscopic surgery (mean follow-up, 2.6 ± 0.6 years), both groups demonstrated significant improvements in all patient-reported outcome scores ( P borderline dysplastic and normal coverage groups in final outcome scores, score improvements, or percentage of patients experiencing clinically significant improvements. One patient in the borderline dysplastic group (3%) underwent revision hip arthroscopic surgery, and none underwent total hip arthroplasty during the follow

  14. A case that underwent bilateral video-assisted thoracoscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No Abstract Available A case that underwent bilateral video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical (VATS) biopsy combined with pneumonectomy is presented. The patient developed hypoxia during the contralateral VATS biopsy. His hypoxia was treated with positive expiratory pressure (PEEP) to the dependent lung and apneic ...

  15. Arthroscopic Anatomy of the Ankle Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Ronald G

    2016-10-01

    There are a number of variations in the intra-articular anatomy of the ankle which should not be considered pathological under all circumstances. The anteromedial corner of the tibial plafond (between the anterior edge of the tibial plafond and the medial malleolus) can have a notch, void of cartilage and bone. This area can appear degenerative arthroscopically; it is actually a normal variant of the articular surface. The anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITF) can possess a lower, accessory band which can impinge on the anterolateral edge of the talar dome. In some cases it can cause irritation along this area of the talus laterally. If it is creating local irritation it can be removed since it does not provide any additional stabilization to the syndesmosis. There is a beveled region at the anterior leading edge of the lateral and dorsal surfaces of the talus laterally. This triangular region is void of cartilage and subchondral bone. The lack of talar structure in this region allows the lower portion of the AITF ligament to move over the talus during end range dorsiflexion of the ankle, preventing impingement. The variation in talar anatomy for this area should not be considered pathological. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Do Ligamentum Teres Tears Portend Inferior Outcomes in Patients With Borderline Dysplasia Undergoing Hip Arthroscopic Surgery? A Match-Controlled Study With a Minimum 2-Year Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaharbakhshi, Edwin O; Perets, Itay; Ashberg, Lyall; Mu, Brian; Lenkeit, Christopher; Domb, Benjamin G

    2017-09-01

    Arthroscopic surgery in borderline dysplastic hips remains controversial, but the role of the ligamentum teres (LT) has not been studied in this setting. Borderline dysplastic patients with LT tears have worse short-term outcomes than those without LT tears. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Data were prospectively collected on patients who underwent arthroscopic surgery between February 2008 and April 2014. The inclusion criteria were borderline dysplasia (lateral center-edge angle [LCEA], 18°-25°) and labral tears; arthroscopic treatments including labral preservation and capsular plication; and preoperative patient-reported outcome scores including the modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), Non-Arthritic Hip Score (NAHS), Hip Outcome Score-Sport-Specific Subscale, and visual analog scale for pain. Patients were excluded for preoperative Tönnis osteoarthritis grade >0, workers' compensation claims, previous ipsilateral hip surgery and conditions, or frank dysplasia (LCEA borderline dysplastic patients undergoing hip arthroscopic surgery with labral treatment and capsular plication, LT tears may indicate advanced instability and portend slightly inferior outcomes when compared with a match-controlled group. Borderline dysplastic patients with LT tears may have increased propensities toward revision arthroscopic surgery and conversion to THA. LT tears in these patients may warrant consideration for additional procedures including periacetabular osteotomy and LT reconstruction.

  17. Evaluation of the functional results after rotator cuff arthroscopic repair with the suture bridge technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Naoki Miyazaki

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results of arthroscopic treatment of large and extensive rotator cuff injuries (RCI that involved the supra and infraspinatus muscles using the suture bridge (SB technique. METHODS: Between July 2010 and November 2014, 37 patients with RCI who were treated with SB technique were evaluated. The study included all patients with a minimum follow-up of 12 months who underwent primary surgery of the shoulder. Twenty-four patients were male and 13 were female. The mean age was 60 years (45-75. The dominant side was affected in 32 cases. The most common cause of injury was trauma (18 cases. The mean preoperative motion was 123°, 58°, T11. Through magnetic resonance imaging, 36 fatty degenerations were classified according to Goutallier. Patients underwent rotator cuff repair with SB technique, which consists of using a medial row anchor with two Corkscrew(r fibertape(r or fiberwire(r at the articular margin, associated with lateral fixation without stitch using PushLocks(r or SwiveLocks(r. RESULTS: The mean age was 60 years and mean fatty degeneration was 2.6. The mean range of motion (following the AAOS in the postoperative evaluation was 148° of forward elevation, 55° in lateral rotation and medial rotation in T9. Using the criteria of the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA, 35 (94% patients had excellent and good results; one (2.7%, fair; and one (2.7%, poor. CONCLUSION: Arthroscopic repair of a large and extensive RCI using SB technique had good and excellent results in 94% of the patients.

  18. Femoral Head Avascular Necrosis Is Not Caused by Arthroscopic Posterolateral Femoroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Robert E; Rupp, Sasha N

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to identify the risk of avascular necrosis of the femoral head after arthroscopic femoroplasty extending to the posterolateral femoral neck, the source of the primary blood supply to the femoral head. Cam lesions of femoroacetabular impingement are typically anterior along the junction of the femoral head and neck. However, anatomic variations can involve the posterolateral vascular region of the femoral head and neck. Femoroplasty involving this vascular region can lead to injury to the blood supply to the femoral head, with subsequent avascular necrosis. If the posterolateral portion of the cam lesion is preserved, persistent femoroacetabular impingement may occur. A retrospective review identified 112 patients who underwent arthroscopic femoroplasty for femoroacetabular impingement over a 2-year period. Of these patients, 14 had femoroplasty that extended to the posterolateral femoral head. Of this group, 5 had undergone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after femoroplasty and the other 9 were contacted to undergo MRI of the hip to evaluate for avascular necrosis. A radiologist and the senior author evaluated all MRI scans specifically for avascular necrosis of the femoral head. All procedures were performed by the senior author. Mean age of the 14 patients (8 women and 6 men) with femoroplasty that extended into the posterolateral vascular region of the femoral head was 44 years (range, 23-69 years). All 14 patients underwent MRI evaluation of the affected hip a mean of 25 months (range, 7-44 months) after femoroplasty. No MRI scans showed evidence of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. Femoroplasty of the posterolateral vascular region of the femoral head is not associated with avascular necrosis. Patients with femoroacetabular impingement and a cam lesion extending to the posterolateral femoral head can undergo femoroplasty of this region without the development of avascular necrosis. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):177-180.]. Copyright

  19. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF ANTERIOR IMPINGEMENT IN THE ANKLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Mikek

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Anterior soft tissue impingement is a common cause of chronic pain in the ankle. The preferred method of operative treatment is an arthroscopic excision of hypertrophic fibrous and synovial tissue in the anterior part of the ankle joint.Methods. We present the results of arthroscopic treatment of anterior ankle impingement in group of 14 patients.Results. Subjective improvement after the procedure was observed in all patients and 13 of them (93% were without any symptoms after the operation. One patient reported of intermittent pain, especially when walking on uneven grounds.Conclusions. We conclude that arthroscopic excision of hypertrophic synovial tissue in the anterior part of the ankle which causes the symptoms of impingement is a minimally invasive procedure that is both safe and reliable. When used for appropriate indications, an improvement can be expected in over 90% of patients.

  20. Arthroscopic bursectomy for recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hofwegen, Christopher; Baker, Champ L; Savory, Carlton G; Baker, Champ L

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the use of arthroscopic bursectomy for pain relief in patients with trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty. In this retrospective case series of 12 patients undergoing arthroscopic treatment of recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty, outcomes were assessed via phone interview with a numeric pain rating scale from 1 to 10 and were compared with preoperative pain ratings. Patients were asked the percentage of time they had painless hip function and whether they would have the surgery again. At an average 36-month follow-up (range, 4-85 months), the average numeric pain scale rating improved from 9.3 to 3.3. At an average of 62% of the time, patients had painless use of the hip. Ten of 12 patients in the study felt the pain relief gained was substantial enough to warrant having procedure again. In these patients, arthroscopic bursectomy was a viable option for patients with recalcitrant bursitis after hip arthroplasty.

  1. Arthroscopic treatment of septic arthritis of the knee in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agout, C; Lakhal, W; Fournier, J; de Bodman, C; Bonnard, C

    2015-12-01

    Childhood septic arthritis of the knee is a serious disease that can impair growth and cause serious functional sequelae. There are few data on arthroscopic treatment in children, and series were always less than 20 cases. The objective of this study was to assess clinical and radiographic results of arthroscopic drainage combined with antibiotic therapy for the treatment of childhood septic arthritis of the knee. The hypothesis was that arthroscopic treatment is also effective in children. A retrospective study, conducted between January 2003 and December 2012, included patients under 15 years of age with septic arthritis of the knee treated by arthroscopic drainage with a minimum of 2 years' follow-up. Fifty-six patients, with a mean age at surgery of 3.4 years (range, 3 months to 12 years), were included. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common causative organism. Two patients (3.6%) had recurrence, successfully treated by repeat arthroscopic drainage. Mean Lysholm score was 96.9 (range, 70-100) and mean KOOS-Child pain, symptoms, daily life, sports and quality of life scores were respectively 97 (81-100), 95 (75-100), 98 (89-100), 93 (71-100) and 95 (70-100) at a mean 65 months' follow-up. Ranges of motion were normal. Radiology found no joint damage. Arthroscopic drainage combined with antibiotic treatment is a simple and effective treatment for childhood septic arthritis of the knee and is for our reference attitude. It can also be indicated in case of recurrence. IV, retrospective study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Open Latarjet versus arthroscopic Latarjet: clinical results and cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randelli, P; Fossati, C; Stoppani, C; Evola, F R; De Girolamo, L

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical results between open and arthroscopic Latarjet and perform a cost analysis of the two techniques. A systematic review of articles present in PubMed and MEDLINE was performed in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. Studies concerning post-operative outcomes following Latarjet procedures for chronic anterior shoulder instability were selected for analysis. The clinical and radiographic results as well as the costs of the open and arthroscopic techniques were evaluated. Twenty-three articles, describing a total of 1317 shoulders, met the inclusion criteria: 17 studies were related to open Latarjet, and 6 to the arthroscopic technique. Despite the heterogeneity of the evaluation scales, the clinical results seemed very satisfactory for both techniques. We detected a statistically significant difference in the percentage of bone graft healing in favour of the open technique (88.6 vs 77.6 %). Recurrent dislocation was more frequent following open surgery (3.3 % after open surgery vs 0.3 % after arthroscopy), but this finding was biased by the large difference in follow-up duration between the two techniques. The direct costs of the arthroscopic procedure were double in comparison to open surgery (€2335 vs €1040). A lack of data prevented evaluation of indirect costs and, therefore, a cost-effectiveness analysis. The open and arthroscopic Latarjet techniques showed excellent and comparable clinical results. However, the much higher direct costs of the arthroscopic procedure do not seem, at present, to be justified by a benefit to the patient. III.

  3. Biomechanical comparison of open and arthroscopic Latarjet procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze-Borges, Johanna; Agneskirchner, Jens D; Bobrowitsch, Evgenij; Patzer, Thilo; Struck, Melena; Smith, Tomas; Wellmann, Mathias

    2013-04-01

    To biomechanically compare the effectiveness of the standard open and arthroscopic techniques of the Latarjet procedure to address a critical anterior glenoid defect in combination with a capsular insufficiency. Translation testing of 12 human cadaveric shoulder specimens was performed in a robot-assisted setup under 3 different conditions: (1) intact/vented shoulder joint, (2) combined anterior glenoid bone and capsular defect, and (3) open and arthroscopic Latarjet procedures. Testing was performed for each condition in 2 test positions: 60° of glenohumeral abduction with neutral rotation (ABD position) and 60° of abduction and external rotation (ABER position). Each position was tested with a passive humerus load of 30 N in the anterior, inferior, and anteroinferior directions. Translational movement of the humeral head was evaluated with and without the application of a 10-N load to the conjoint tendon (CJT). In the ABD position, translations after the open Latarjet procedure significantly differed from the arthroscopic technique in the anterior and anteroinferior directions when testing was performed with loading of the CJTs (CJT loading). Without CJT loading, the open Latarjet technique showed significantly lower translations in the anterior, inferior (P = .004), and anteroinferior (P = .001) testing directions in the ABD position. In the ABER position, the arthroscopic procedure showed no significant difference compared with the standard open procedure. We found a superior stabilization effect of the open Latarjet technique in the ABD position. The difference is ascribed to the anterior capsular repair, which was performed within the open technique and omitted during the arthroscopic procedure. The reduction of translation in a pure abduction position of the arm is more effectively performed with a conventional open Latarjet technique that includes a capsular repair. In combined ABER position, there was no difference found between the open and

  4. Evaluation of functional results from shoulders after arthroscopic repair of complete rotator cuff tears associated with traumatic anterior dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaydson Gomes Godinho

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical outcome of arthroscopic rotator cuff fixation and, when present, simultaneous repair of the Bankart lesion caused by traumatic dislocation; and to assess whether the size of the rotator cuff injury caused by traumatic dislocation has any influence on the postoperative clinical outcomes. METHODS: Thirty-three patients with traumatic shoulder dislocation and complete rotator cuff injury, with at least two years of follow up, were retrospectively evaluated. For analysis purposes, the patients were divided into groups: presence of fixed Bankart lesion or absence of this lesion, and rotator cuff lesions smaller than 3.0 cm (group A or greater than or equal to 3.0 cm (group B. All the patients underwent arthroscopic repair of the lesions and were evaluated postoperatively by means of the UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles score and strength measurements. RESULTS: The group with Bankart lesion repair had a postoperative UCLA score of 33.96, while the score of the group without Bankart lesion was 33.7, without statistical significance (p = 0.743. Group A had a postoperative UCLA score of 34.35 and group B, 33.15, without statistical significance (p = 0.416. CONCLUSION: The functional outcomes of the patients who only presented complete rotator cuff tearing after traumatic shoulder dislocation, which underwent arthroscopic repair, were similar to the outcomes of those who presented an associated with a Bankart lesion that was corrected simultaneously with the rotator cuff injury. The extent of the original rotator cuff injury did not alter the functional results in the postoperative evaluation.

  5. Arthroscopic Latarjet procedure: is optimal positioning of the bone block and screws possible? A prospective computed tomography scan analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kany, Jean; Flamand, Olivier; Grimberg, Jean; Guinand, Régis; Croutzet, Pierre; Amaravathi, Rajkumar; Sekaran, Padmanaban

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure could be performed with accurate bone block positioning and screw fixation with a similar rate of complications to the open Latarjet procedure. In this prospective study, 105 shoulders (104 patients) underwent the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure performed by the same senior surgeon. The day after surgery, an independent surgeon examiner performed a multiplanar bidimensional computed tomography scan analysis. We also evaluated our learning curve by comparing 2 chronologic periods (30 procedures performed in each period), separated by an interval during which 45 procedures were performed. Of the 105 shoulders included in the study, 95 (90.5%) (94 patients) were evaluated. The coracoid graft was accurately positioned relative to the equator of the glenoid surface in 87 of 95 shoulders (91.5%). Accurate bone-block positioning on the axial view with "circle" evaluation was obtained for 77 of 95 shoulders (81%). This procedure was performed in a lateralized position in 7 of 95 shoulders (7.3%) and in a medialized position in 11 shoulders (11.6%). The mean screw angulation with the glenoid surface was 21°. One patient had transient axillary nerve palsy. Of the initial 104 patients, 3 (2.8%) underwent revision. The analysis of our results indicated that the screw-glenoid surface angle significantly predicted the accuracy of the bone-block positioning (P = .001). Our learning curve estimates showed that, compared with our initial period, the average surgical time decreased, and the risk of lateralization showed a statistically significant decrease during the last period (P = .006). This study showed that accurate positioning of the bone block onto the anterior aspect of the glenoid is possible, safe, and reproducible with the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure without additional complications compared with open surgery. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc

  6. Avascular osteonecrosis of the femoral condyle after arthroscopic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Kaar, M.; Garcia, J.; Fritschy, D.; Bonvin, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    Avascular osteonecrosis of the femoral condyle after arthroscopic surgery. Retrospective review of 10 patients who presented with avascular necrosis of the ipsilateral femoral condyle following arthroscopic meniscectomy (9 medial, 1 lateral). The bone lesions were evaluated by radiography and MRI, which were repeated for few patients. MRI allows earlier diagnosis of avascular necrosis of the femoral condyle and offers an evaluation of extent of the lesions whose evolution is variable: 3 patients required a knee prosthesis, the other 7 patients were treated medically. (authors)

  7. Complications Associated With Arthroscopic Labral Repair Implants: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Jerrod J; Elliott, Michael P; Mair, Scott D

    2015-07-01

    Arthroscopic labral repair in the shoulder has become commonplace in recent years. A variety of implants have evolved in parallel with arthroscopic techniques. Any orthopedic implant that is placed in close proximity to the joint has the potential to cause subsequent damage to the articular surface if it is left prominent or dislodges secondary to improper surgical technique. This article focuses on a series of implant-related complications of labral surgery and their subsequent management. Additionally, correct patient selection and surgical technique are discussed. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. NUTRITION SUPPORT COMPLICATIONS IN PATIENT WHO UNDERWENT CARDIAC SURGERY

    OpenAIRE

    Krdžalić, Alisa; Kovčić, Jasmina; Krdžalić, Goran; Jahić, Elmir

    2016-01-01

    Background: The nutrition support complications after cardiac surgery should be detected and treated on time. Aim: To show the incidence and type of nutritional support complication in patients after cardiac surgery. Methods: The prospective study included 415 patients who underwent cardiac surgery between 2010 and 2013 in Clinic for Cardiovascular Disease of University Clinical Center Tuzla. Complications of the delivery system for nutrition support (NS) and nutrition itself were analy...

  9. Efficacy of arthroscopically placed pain catheter adjacent to the suprascapular nerve (continuous arthroscopically assisted suprascapular nerve block following arthroscopic rotator-cuff repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamakado K

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Kotaro YamakadoDepartment of Orthopaedics, Fukui General Hospital, Fukui, JapanBackground: Rotator-cuff surgery is well recognized to be a painful procedure.Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of an arthroscopically placed perineural catheter at the scapular notch to provide a continuous block of the suprascapular nerve (continuous arthroscopically assisted suprascapular nerve block [ca-SSNB] following arthroscopic rotator-cuff repair (ARCR.Materials and methods: This level II, prospective, randomized, controlled trial without postoperative blinding included 40 patients, who had a 48-hour pain pump, with 0.2% ropivacaine infusion and a continuous rate of 3 mL/hour, placed via an arthroscopically placed catheter following ARCR with arthroscopic release of the superior transverse ligament: 21 patients had a ca-SSNB, and 19 patients had a continuous subacromial bursal block (SAB. The visual analog scale (at 6 hours and on the first, second, and third postoperative days and the total number of additional pain-reduction attempts during the 3 postoperative days were calculated.Results: The respective visual analog scale scores (mm obtained from the ca-SSNB and SAB groups were 62.4 and 67.6 (P=0.73 before surgery, 9.1 and 19.4 (P=0.12 at 6 hours after surgery, 24.4 and 44.6 (P=0.019 on the first postoperative day, 19.4 and 40.4 (P=0.0060 on the second postoperative day, and 18.5 and 27.8 (P=0.21 on the third postoperative day. Total additional pain-reduction attempts recorded for the ca-SSNB and SAB groups during the 3 postoperative days were 0.3 times and 1.2 times (P=0.0020, respectively.Conclusion: ca-SSNB was highly effective in controlling postoperative pain after ARCR.Keywords: shoulder, rotator cuff tear, postoperative pain control, continuous suprascapular nerve block, arthroscopic rotator cuff repair

  10. [ARTHROSCOPIC STUDY OF REMNANT-PRESERVED RECONSTRUCTION OF ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Daifeng; Xiao, Mochao; Zhang, Yunpeng; Yan, Shi; Dong, Feng; Lian, Yongyun

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the value of ligament remnant preservation during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction by observing the integrity, the tension, the synovial membrane covering, and the color of the reconstructed ligament under arthroscopy. Between January 2011 and December 2013, 122 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction and arthroscopic internal fixation removal at 1 year after reconstruction were included in this study. Of these cases, 61 cases underwent ACL reconstruction using the remnant-preserved technique (preservation group); the other 61 cases underwent ACL reconstruction using non remnant-preserved technique (non preservation group). There was no significant difference in gender, age, injury side, body mass index, type of injury, the time from injury to reconstruction, and the result of KT-2000 examination between 2 groups (P > 0.05). The reconstructed ACL were observed under arthroscopy when internal fixation was removed, and the effectiveness was evaluated according to the criteria of AO Yingfang. In preservation group, the results were excellent in 34 cases, good in 22 cases, fair in 4 cases, and poor in 1 case; and in non preservation group, the results were excellent in 29 cases, good in 20 cases, fair in 10 cases, and poor in 2 cases; and there was no significant difference between 2 groups (Z= -1.320, P=0.187). In ACL reconstruction, the remnant-preserved technique is not obviously better than non remnant-preserved technique in the integrity, tension, membrane covering, and color.

  11. Arthroscopic Bankart Repair Versus Open Bristow-Latarjet for Shoulder Instability: A Matched-Pair Multicenter Study Focused on Return to Sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonna, Davide; Bellato, Enrico; Caranzano, Francesco; Assom, Marco; Rossi, Roberto; Castoldi, Filippo

    2016-12-01

    The arthroscopic Bankart repair and open Bristow-Latarjet procedure are the 2 most commonly used techniques to treat recurrent shoulder instability. To compare in a case control-matched manner the 2 techniques, with particular emphasis on return to sport after surgery. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A study was conducted in 2 hospitals matching 60 patients with posttraumatic recurrent anterior shoulder instability with a minimum follow-up of 2 years (30 patients treated with arthroscopic Bankart procedure and 30 treated with open Bristow-Latarjet procedure). Patients with severe glenoid bone loss and revision surgeries were excluded. In one hospital, patients were treated with arthroscopic Bankart repair using anchors; in the other, patients underwent the Bristow-Latarjet procedure. Patients were matched according to age at surgery, type and level of sport practiced before shoulder instability (Degree of Shoulder Involvement in Sports [DOSIS] scale), and number of dislocations. The primary outcomes were return to sport (Subjective Patient Outcome for Return to Sports [SPORTS] score), rate of recurrent instability, Oxford Shoulder Instability Score (OSIS), Subjective Shoulder Value (SSV), Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI), and range of motion (ROM). After a mean follow-up of 5.3 years (range, 2-9 years), patients who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair obtained better results in terms of return to sport (SPORTS score: 8 vs 6; P = .02) and ROM in the throwing position (86° vs 79°; P = .01), and they reported better subjective perception of the shoulder (SSV: 86% vs 75%; P = .02). No differences were detectable using the OSIS or WOSI. The rate of recurrent instability was not statistically different between the 2 groups (Bankart repair 10% vs Bristow-Latarjet 0%; P = .25), although the study may have been underpowered to detect a clinically important difference in this parameter. The multiple regression analysis showed that the independent

  12. Arthroscopic repair for subacromial incarceration of a torn rotator cuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Nakamizo

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: Arthroscopic reduction and repair are applicable for inverted flap tears of the rotator cuff. The findings of the present study indicated that patients with a heel-type acromion in the anteroposterior view of radiographs are at greater risk for inverted flap tears of the rotator cuff.

  13. Arthroscopic Accessibility of the Talus Quantified by Computed Tomography Simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bergen, Christiaan J. A.; Tuijthof, Gabriëlle J. M.; Maas, Mario; Sierevelt, Inger N.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2012-01-01

    Background: Anterior ankle arthroscopy is the preferred surgical approach for the treatment of osteochondral defects of the talus (OCDs). However, the ankle is a congruent joint with limited surgical access. Purpose: The dual purpose of this study was (1) to quantify the anterior arthroscopic reach

  14. Arthroscopic treatment of bony loose bodies in the subacromial space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The mechanism of formation of bony loose bodies is not clear, may be associated with synovial cartilage metaplasia. Arthroscopic removal of loose bodies and bursa debridement is a good option for treatment of the loose body in the subacromial space, which can receive good function.

  15. Arthroscopic management of mucoid degeneration of anterior cruciate ligament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirag H Chudasama

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Mucoid hypertrophy of the ACL should be suspected in elderly persons presenting pain on terminal extension or flexion without preceding trauma, especially when there is no associated meniscal lesion or ligamentous insufficiency. They respond well to a judicious arthroscopic release of the ACL with notchplasty.

  16. Possibilities for arthroscopic treatment of the ageing sternoclavicular joint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathcke, Martin; Tranum-Jensen, Jorgen; Krogsgaard, Michael Rindom

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate if there are typical degenerative changes in the ageing sternoclavicular joint (SCJ), potentially accessible for arthroscopic intervention. METHODS Both SCJs were obtained from 39 human cadavers (mean age: 79 years, range: 59-96, 13 F/26 M). Each frozen specimen was divided fro...

  17. Rotator cuff tears: assessment with MR arthrography in 275 patients with arthroscopic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldt, S.; Bruegel, M.; Mueller, D.; Holzapfel, K.; Rummeny, E.J.; Woertler, K. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Imhoff, A.B. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Sports Orthopedics, Munich (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    We assessed the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography in the diagnosis of articular-sided partial-thickness and full-thickness rotator cuff tears in a large symptomatic population. MR arthrograms obtained in 275 patients including a study group of 139 patients with rotator cuff tears proved by arthroscopy and a control group of 136 patients with arthroscopically intact rotator cuff tendons were reviewed in random order. MR imaging was performed on a 1.0 T system (Magnetom Expert, Siemens). MR arthrograms were analyzed by two radiologists in consensus for articular-sided partial-thickness and full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and subscapularis tendons. At arthroscopy, 197 rotator cuff tears were diagnosed, including 105 partial-thickness (93 supraspinatus, nine infraspinatus, three subscapularis) and 92 full-thickness (43 supraspinatus, 20 infraspinatus, 29 subscapularis) tendon tears. For full-thickness tears, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 96%, 99%, and 98%, respectively, and for partial tears 80%, 97%, and 95%, respectively. False negative and positive assessments in the diagnosis of articular-sided partial-thickness tears were predominantly [78% (35/45)] observed with small articular-sided (Ellman grade1) tendon tears. MR arthrography is highly accurate in the diagnosis of full-thickness rotator cuff tears and is accurate in the diagnosis of articular-sided partial-thickness tears. Limitations in the diagnosis of partial-thickness tears are mainly restricted to small articular-sided tears (Ellman grade 1) due to difficulties in differentiation between fiber tearing, tendinitis, synovitic changes, and superficial fraying at tendon margins. (orig.)

  18. Fundamental arthroscopic skill differentiation with virtual reality simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Kelsey; Pedowitz, Robert

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use and validity of virtual reality modules as part of the educational approach to mastering arthroscopy in a safe environment by assessing the ability to distinguish between experience levels. Additionally, the study aimed to evaluate whether experts have greater ambidexterity than do novices. Three virtual reality modules (Swemac/Augmented Reality Systems, Linkoping, Sweden) were created to test fundamental arthroscopic skills. Thirty participants-10 experts consisting of faculty, 10 intermediate participants consisting of orthopaedic residents, and 10 novices consisting of medical students-performed each exercise. Steady and Telescope was designed to train centering and image stability. Steady and Probe was designed to train basic triangulation. Track and Moving Target was designed to train coordinated motions of arthroscope and probe. Metrics reflecting speed, accuracy, and efficiency of motion were used to measure construct validity. Steady and Probe and Track a Moving Target both exhibited construct validity, with better performance by experts and intermediate participants than by novices (P reality modules developed through task deconstruction. Participants with the most arthroscopic experience performed better and were more consistent than novices on all 3 virtual reality modules. Greater arthroscopic experience correlates with more symmetry of ambidextrous performance. However, further adjustment of the modules may better simulate fundamental arthroscopic skills and discriminate between experience levels. Arthroscopy training is a critical element of orthopaedic surgery resident training. Developing techniques to safely and effectively train these skills is critical for patient safety and resident education. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Graft position and fusion rate following arthroscopic Latarjet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casabianca, Laurent; Gerometta, Antoine; Massein, Audrey; Khiami, Frederic; Rousseau, Romain; Hardy, Alexandre; Pascal-Moussellard, Hugues; Loriaut, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    The arthroscopic Latarjet procedure is recently becoming an increasingly popular technique. Nevertheless, position and fusion of the autograft had not been well studied yet. The purpose of this study was to assess the positioning of the coracoid graft and the fusion rate on CT scan in the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. The study design was a prospective series of 19 consecutive patients who received arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. Radiological assessment on CT scan performed 3 months post-operatively included an analysis of the fusion and the position of the coracoid bone graft using a validated method. 02:30-04:20 was considered an ideal positioning in the sagittal view. In the axial view, the positioning was considered as flush, congruent, medial, too medial, or lateral. The median age of patients was 27.6 (±6.9). Mean operative time was of 161 min ±34.8. The fusion rate was of 78 %. Coracoid grafts were positioned 01:52 h (56° ± 14°) to 4:04 h (122° ± 12.5°). In the axial view, 32 % of the grafts positioning were considered as flush, 38 % as congruent, 30 % as medial, and 6 % too medial. No lateral position was noted. Two complications occurred, one graft fracture during screwing requiring opening conversion and an early case of osteolysis in a medial-positioned graft. The arthroscopic Latarjet procedure is a technically challenging technique that provides satisfactory fusion rate and graft positioning with a low complication rate. The clinical importance of this study lies in the observation that it is the first study to evaluate the position of the coracoid bone graft in arthroscopic Latarjet according to a detailed and validated method. IV.

  20. Outcomes of arthroscopic lateral epicondylitis release: Should we treat earlier?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeur, L; Desmoineaux, P; Devillier, A; Pujol, N; Beaufils, P

    2016-10-01

    When managed conservatively, lateral epicondylitis often subsides only after considerable time, during which social and occupational activities are severely disrupted. If conservative management fails, a recently introduced option is arthroscopic release of the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB). The primary objective of this study was to compare clinical outcomes of this procedure according to preoperative symptom duration. Earlier arthroscopic release is associated with better functional outcomes. Consecutive patients with arthroscopically managed lateral epicondylitis were included in a retrospective study. Arthroscopy was performed only after at least 6 months of conservative treatment. The criteria to evaluate the clinical outcomes were the Nirschl and Quick-DASH scores, muscle strength, time to pain relief, and percentage of functional recovery. Thirty-five patients were evaluated at a median of 4 years (range: 1-12 years) after surgery. Mean preoperative symptom duration was 18 months (range: 6-106 months) with a mean sick leave duration of 2.3±4.9 months. Postoperatively, mean time to recovery was 37.5 days (range: 7 days to 5 years) and mean sick leave duration was 2.4±2.4 months. The mean Quick-DASH score was 15.9±19.1. The Nirschl score improved significantly, from 26.4±7.9 to 66.3±16.3. The initial muscle strength deficit was 10.1±33.2% and muscle strength at last follow-up was increased by 4.3±30.3%. Symptom duration showed no correlations with any of the clinical outcome measures. Outcomes after arthroscopic release were not associated with symptom duration in this study. Nevertheless, the good clinical outcomes support treatment with arthroscopic release after only 6 months of conservative management. IV, retrospective study. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  1. Outcomes of arthroscopic treatment of osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum and description of the technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Steven M; Walsh, Amanda; Lovy, Andrew J; Pruzansky, Jason S; Shukla, Dave R; Hausman, Michael R

    2015-10-01

    We hypothesize that a technique for all-arthroscopic fixation of capitellum osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) lesions using suture fixation and autogenous iliac crest bone grafting offers a successful alternative to open internal fixation techniques as shown by 2-year validated patient-reported outcomes. Our technique uses arthroscopic all-inside suture fixation with iliac crest autogenous bone grafting. The procedure was performed on 4 elite-level, adolescent athletes presenting with 5 unstable capitellum OCD lesions resulting in elbow pain, limited range of motion, and decreased ability to play. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an unstable OCD lesion, which was correlated with arthroscopy. Postoperatively, patients were evaluated by the short version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire; Oxford Elbow and Mayo Elbow scores; visual analog scale; postoperative range of motion; and return to play. Three female patients and one male patient aged 13 to 15 years underwent the procedure. The mean final follow-up period was 2.8 years. Union was achieved in all patients, as seen on magnetic resonance imaging at a mean of 3 months. At follow-up, the mean loss of extension was 2°. Mean flexion was 153°. There was no loss of supination or pronation. The mean score on the short version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire was 11. The mean Mayo Elbow score was 88. The mean Oxford Elbow score was 42. The mean visual analog scale score was 2. The mean time to return to play was 4 months. All patients continued to compete at an elite level. There were no infections or cases of fixation failure, and no patients required conversion to open surgery or needed revision surgery. Arthroscopic all-inside fixation of unstable OCD lesions is a successful technique, facilitating athletes to return to an elite level of play. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  2. Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis in a Patient who Underwent Hip Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevzat Dabak

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS is a rare, benign, but a locally aggressive tumor. It is characterized by the proliferation of synovial membrane, but it can also be seen in tendon sheaths and bursae. Clinical presentation of solitary lesions include compression and locking of the joint suggesting loose bodies in the joint and a subsequent findings of an effusion, whereas diffuse lesions manifest with pain and chronic swelling. In this article, we presented a curious case of PVNS in a female patient who have been followed up due to an acetabular cystic lesion. She underwent total hip arthroplasty for severe osteoarthritis of the hip joint and associated pain. The diagnosis of PVNS was established intraoperatively. (The Me­di­cal Bul­le­tin of Ha­se­ki 2014; 52: 235-7

  3. ALGORITHM FOR MANAGEMENT OF HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS UNDERWENT UROLOGY INTERVENTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Davydova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the efficacy of cardiovascular non-invasive complex assessment and pre-operative preparation in hypertensive patients needed in surgical treatment of urology dis- eases.Material and methods. Males (n=883, aged 40 to 80 years were included into the study. The main group consisted of patients that underwent laparotomic nephrectomy (LTN group; n=96 and patients who underwent laparoscopic nephrectomy (LSN group; n=53. Dynamics of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM data was analyzed in these groups in the immediate postoperative period. The efficacy of a package of non-invasive methods for cardiovascular system assessment was studied. ABPM was performed after nephrectomy (2-nd and 10-th days after surgery in patients with complaints of vertigo episodes or intense general weakness to correct treatment.Results. In LTN group hypotension episodes or blood pressure (BP elevations were observed in 20 (20.8% and 22 (22.9% patients, respectively, on the 2-nd day after the operation. These complications required antihypertensive treatment correction. Patients with hypotension episodes were significantly older than patients with BP elevation and had significantly lower levels of 24-hour systolic BP, night diastolic BP and minimal night systolic BP. Re-adjustment of antihypertensive treatment on the 10-th postoperative day was required to 2 (10% patients with hypotension episodes and to 1 (4.5% patient with BP elevation. Correction of antihypertensive therapy was required to all patients in LSN group on the day 2, and to 32 (60.4% patients on the 10-th day after the operation. Reduction in the incidence of complications (from 1.2% in 2009 to 0.3% in 2011, p<0.001 was observed during the application of cardiovascular non-invasive complex assessment and preoperative preparation in hypertensive patients.Conclusion. The elaborated management algorithm for patients with concomitant hypertension is recommended to reduce the cardiovascular

  4. ALGORITHM FOR MANAGEMENT OF HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS UNDERWENT UROLOGY INTERVENTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Davydova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the efficacy of cardiovascular non-invasive complex assessment and pre-operative preparation in hypertensive patients needed in surgical treatment of urology dis- eases.Material and methods. Males (n=883, aged 40 to 80 years were included into the study. The main group consisted of patients that underwent laparotomic nephrectomy (LTN group; n=96 and patients who underwent laparoscopic nephrectomy (LSN group; n=53. Dynamics of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM data was analyzed in these groups in the immediate postoperative period. The efficacy of a package of non-invasive methods for cardiovascular system assessment was studied. ABPM was performed after nephrectomy (2-nd and 10-th days after surgery in patients with complaints of vertigo episodes or intense general weakness to correct treatment.Results. In LTN group hypotension episodes or blood pressure (BP elevations were observed in 20 (20.8% and 22 (22.9% patients, respectively, on the 2-nd day after the operation. These complications required antihypertensive treatment correction. Patients with hypotension episodes were significantly older than patients with BP elevation and had significantly lower levels of 24-hour systolic BP, night diastolic BP and minimal night systolic BP. Re-adjustment of antihypertensive treatment on the 10-th postoperative day was required to 2 (10% patients with hypotension episodes and to 1 (4.5% patient with BP elevation. Correction of antihypertensive therapy was required to all patients in LSN group on the day 2, and to 32 (60.4% patients on the 10-th day after the operation. Reduction in the incidence of complications (from 1.2% in 2009 to 0.3% in 2011, p<0.001 was observed during the application of cardiovascular non-invasive complex assessment and preoperative preparation in hypertensive patients.Conclusion. The elaborated management algorithm for patients with concomitant hypertension is recommended to reduce the cardiovascular

  5. Feasibility of arthroscopic placement of autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis grafts in the cadaver hip joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fritz Thorey

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available An assortment of clinical trials have been done presenting the effectiveness of autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC for the regeneration of chondral leasions. The purpose of the study was to underline the accessability of the acetabulum and the femoral head through the known portals and prove i the feasibility of placing the AMIC in the different zones of the hip joint and ii check for dislocation after joint movement. Six human cadavers underwent hip arthroscopy on both hips. Two chondral lesions were set on each femoral head and two in the acetabulum to evaluate a total of 48 defects. After microfracturing an autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis graft was placed on these lesions arthroscopically. After repeated joint movement the dislocation of the graft was checked. It was possible to place the AMIC graft in all 48 chondral lesions. The time needed for placing the graft was 8±2.9 minutes. A trend of time reduction could be detected throughout this study as the surgeon gained more experience. For the femoral head, after twenty cycles of joint movement 18/24 spots showed no displacement, 4/24 showed minor displacement (<3 mm and 2/24 showed major displacement (>3 mm. None showed total displacement. For the acetabulum 22/24 spots showed no displacement and 2/24 showed minor displacement. A combined microfracturing and placing of an AMIC graft of focal chondral lesions of the hip joint can be done arthroscopically. Prospective randomized in vivo studies should compare the results of arthroscopilally placed AMIC grafts with microfracturing and microfracturing alone.

  6. Development of an Arthroscopic Joint Capsule Injury Model in the Canine Shoulder.

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    David Kovacevic

    Full Text Available The natural history of rotator cuff tears can be unfavorable as patients develop fatty infiltration and muscle atrophy that is often associated with a loss of muscle strength and shoulder function. To facilitate study of possible biologic mechanisms involved in early degenerative changes to rotator cuff muscle and tendon tissues, the objective of this study was to develop a joint capsule injury model in the canine shoulder using arthroscopy.Arthroscopic surgical methods for performing a posterior joint capsulectomy in the canine shoulder were first defined in cadavers. Subsequently, one canine subject underwent bilateral shoulder joint capsulectomy using arthroscopy, arthroscopic surveillance at 2, 4 and 8 weeks, and gross and histologic examination of the joint at 10 weeks.The canine subject was weight-bearing within eight hours after index and follow-up surgeries and had no significant soft tissue swelling of the shoulder girdle or gross lameness. Chronic synovitis and macroscopic and microscopic evidence of pathologic changes to the rotator cuff bony insertions, tendons, myotendinous junctions and muscles were observed.This study demonstrates feasibility and proof-of-concept for a joint capsule injury model in the canine shoulder. Future work is needed to define the observed pathologic changes and their role in the progression of rotator cuff disease. Ultimately, better understanding of the biologic mechanisms of early progression of rotator cuff disease may lead to clinical interventions to halt or slow this process and avoid the more advanced and often irreversible conditions of large tendon tears with muscle fatty atrophy.

  7. Percutaneous medial collateral ligament release in arthroscopic medial meniscectomy in tight knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakioglu, Onur; Ozsoy, Mehmet Hakan; Ozdemir, Haci Mustafa; Yigit, Hasan; Cavusoglu, Ali Turgay; Lobenhoffer, Philipp

    2013-07-01

    Visualization and surgery of tears in the posterior medial meniscus are difficult in tight knees. Iatrogenic chondral lesions might cause serious morbidity, and residual tears may result in inadequate symptom relief. We evaluated the clinical and radiological results of superficial medial collateral ligament (MCL) release during arthroscopic medial meniscectomy in tight knees. Eighteen patients [median age: 43 years (22-59); median follow-up: 8.3 months (6-12)] who underwent arthroscopic meniscectomy were included in the study. Patients with ligamentous injuries, severe chondral damage or meniscal repairs were excluded. Preoperatively, anteroposterior knee radiographs were obtained with 11-kg valgus stress using a specialized instrument. During the operation, if opening of the medial knee in 30° flexion under 11-kg valgus stress was inadequate, controlled release of the posterior portion of the MCL was performed using a 16-gauge needle. Intraoperative valgus stress was monitored using a specially designed lateral support with mounted load cell. MCL injury was evaluated both with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and valgus stress radiographs, which were obtained in the 1st week and 3rd and 6th months postoperatively to monitor healing of the elongated MCL. In all patients, meniscectomy could be performed with adequate visualization of the posterior medial meniscus and without iatrogenic chondral injury. The median medial joint space width on valgus stress radiographs was 7.1 mm preoperatively and 9.1, 8.0 and 7.2 mm in the 1st week, and 3rd and 6th months, respectively (p < 0.0001). On MRI, the injured structure was the posterior two-thirds of the MCL. Median Lysholm score, which was 42 points before the operation, had increased to 94 points at the final follow-up (p = 0.0002). Controlled release of the MCL in tight knees allowed easier handling in posterior medial meniscus tears and a better understanding of tear configurations, avoiding iatrogenic chondral

  8. The triangle between the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments: an arthroscopic anatomy study.

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    Kaya, Alper; Köken, Murat; Akan, Burak; Karagüven, Doğaç; Güçlü, Berk

    2015-01-01

    The goal of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is to place the graft in closest proximity to the native ACL anatomy. This study aims to examine the angular relation between intact anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (PCL) from an arthroscopic perspective. Forty patients (20 male, 20 female) with a mean age of 35.12 (range: 18-40) years that underwent knee arthroscopy for reasons other than ACL rupture were included in the study. Following diagnostic examination and repair of the primary pathology, the triangle between ACL and PCL was seen at different flexion degrees of the knee joint (120, 90, 60, and 30°) through standard anterolateral (AL) and anteromedial (AM) portals. The narrow top angle of the triangle between the long intersecting axes of ACL and PCL was measured using recorded images by 3 blind observers. The average ACL-PCL angle was 61°, (standard deviation±2°) at 90°of knee flexion. The angles were narrower when viewed through the AM portal. The degree of the angles was not affected by age, sex, body mass index (BMI), or the side (right or left) on which the procedure was performed. There was good-to-excellent intra- and interobserver reliability. The angular relation between intact ACL and PCL has the potential to provide a better view of the anatomy during arthroscopic ACL surgery. To perform better anatomic reconstructions, it is important to create a 60° angle between the ACL graft and PCL (as viewed through AL portal) at 90°of knee flexion.

  9. Arthroscopic management of traumatic anterior shoulder instability in collision athletes: analysis of 204 cases with a 4- to 9-year follow-up and results with the suture anchor technique.

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    Larrain, Mario Victor; Montenegro, Hugo Jorge; Mauas, David Marcelo; Collazo, Cristian Carlos; Pavón, Facundo

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of arthroscopy in the selection of surgical procedure and treatment of both acute and recurrent traumatic anterior shoulder instability in rugby players by use of pre-established selection criteria. We describe the injury mechanisms, analyze the pathologic lesions and treatment indications based on surgical findings, and assess the results in patients treated with the arthroscopic suture anchor technique. From November 1996 to November 2001, 204 rugby players with acute or recurrent traumatic anterior instability underwent an initial arthroscopic examination. Criteria such as type of Bankart lesion, tissue quality, and presence of bony defects were evaluated and used to determine the method of stabilization: arthroscopy or open stabilization. Open surgery was indicated in patients with bone humeral deficiencies greater than one fourth of the articular humeral head, bone glenoid deficiencies greater than 25% of the glenoid extension, capsular laxity with poor tissue quality, and humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament; all other patients underwent arthroscopic reconstruction via the bone suture anchor technique. The mean follow-up was 5.9 years (range, 3.9 to 8.9 years). We performed arthroscopic stabilization in 39 cases of acute instability; only 1 case (2.5%) required the mini-open technique for reinsertion of humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament. Of 158 cases of recurrent instability, 121 underwent arthroscopic stabilization, and 37 (23.4%) required reconstruction with open surgery. The main cause was bony deficiency (treated with the Latarjet procedure). The results of the arthroscopic reconstructions were evaluated by use of the Rowe scale and analyzed according to stability and range of motion. Good or excellent results were found in 94.9% of cases in the acute instability group and in 91.8% in the recurrent instability group, the poor results were due to instability recurrence. In

  10. Open versus arthroscopic approach in the treatment of femoroacetabular impingement: a case–control study with two-years follow up

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    Bruno Dutra Roos

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To compare clinical and imaging results and complications between patients treated for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI who underwent either anterior open surgery or an arthroscopic approach, with a minimum follow-up of two years. Methods This retrospective case–control study included patients submitted to FAI surgical treatment between November 2007 and March 2012. Patients treated with open surgery were compared with those treated with arthroscopy. Patients were clinically assessed by the modified Harris Hip Score, Non-Arthritic Hip Score, and internal hip rotation. Patients were radiographically assessed by the center-edge angle, joint space width, alpha angle, neck-head index, degree of arthrosis, and presence of heterotopic ossification of the hip. Results In the study period, 56 patients (58 hips with FAI were included; 16 underwent open surgery and 40 underwent arthroscopy. The 40 patients treated by the arthroscopic route had a mean follow-up of 29.1 months, and 75.6% presented good or excellent clinical results. The radiographic evaluation parameters progressed to normal levels. The 16 patients who underwent open surgery had a mean follow-up of 52 months, and 70.58% presented good or excellent clinical results. The radiographic evaluation parameters progressed to normal levels. Postoperative clinical and radiographic results were considered similar in both groups. Conclusions Arthroscopy and open surgery treatments for FAI provided comparable clinical and radiographic results. However, a higher rate of complications was observed in the open surgery group.

  11. Frequency of Helicobacter pylori in patients underwent endoscopy

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    Ahmet Tay

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate thefrequency of Helicobacter pylori in patients underwent endoscopyeastern Anatolia.Materials and methods: The patients whose endoscopicantral biopsies were taken for any reason in our endoscopyunit in February-June 2010 period were includedand retrospectively investigated. The frequency of Helicobacterpylori was determined as separating the patientsaccording to general, sex and the age groups. Antral biopsieswere stained with hematoxylin-eosin and modified giemsamethod and examined under light microscope andreported as (+ mild, (++ moderate, (+++ severe positiveaccording to their intensities.Results: Biopsy specimens of 1298 patients were includedinto the study. The mean age was 47.5 ± 17.5 years(range 14-88 and 607 of these patients (47% were male.Histopathological evaluation revealed that, 918 of the patientswere (71% positive and 379 (29% were negativefor Helicobacter pylori. Approximately 60% of our patientshad mild, 29% had moderate and 11% had severe positivityfor Helicobacter pylori. No significant difference wasfound in the frequency of Helicobacter pylori betweenwomen and men. The frequencies of Helicobacter pyloriwere 73.2%, 71.5%, 68.6% and 70.4%, respectively, inthe age groups of 14-30 years, 31-45 years, 46-60 yearsand 61-88 years.Conclusion: The frequency of Helicobacter pylori was71% in Eastern Anatolia Region. No statistically significantdifference was found between genders and agegroups in term of the frequency of Helicobacter pylori.

  12. The 25 most cited articles in arthroscopic orthopaedic surgery.

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    Cassar Gheiti, Adrian J; Downey, Richard E; Byrne, Damien P; Molony, Diarmuid C; Mulhall, Kevin J

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to use Web of Knowledge to determine which published arthroscopic surgery-related articles have been cited most frequently by other authors by ranking the 25 most cited articles. We furthermore wished to determine whether there is any difference between a categorical "journal-by-journal" analysis and an "all-database" analysis in arthroscopic surgery and whether such a search methodology would alter the results of previously published lists of "citation classics" in the field. We analyzed the characteristics of these articles to determine what qualities make an article important to this subspecialty of orthopaedic surgery. Web of Knowledge was searched on March 7, 2011, using the term "arthroscopy" for citations to articles related to arthroscopy in 61 orthopaedic journals and using the all-database function. Each of the 61 orthopaedic journals was searched separately for arthroscopy-related articles to determine the 25 most cited articles. An all-database search for arthroscopy-related articles was carried out and compared with a journal-by-journal search. Each article was reviewed for basic information including the type of article, authorship, institution, country, publishing journal, and year published. The number of citations ranged from 189 to 567 in a journal-by-journal search and from 214 to 1,869 in an all-database search. The 25 most cited articles on arthroscopic surgery were published in 11 journals: 8 orthopaedic journals and 3 journals from other specialties. The most cited article in arthroscopic orthopaedic surgery was published in The New England Journal of Medicine, which was not previously identified by a journal-by-journal search. An all-database search in Web of Knowledge gives a more in-depth methodology of determining the true citation ranking of articles. Among the top 25 most cited articles, autologous chondrocyte implantation/transplantation is currently the most cited and most popular topic in arthroscopic

  13. Can arthroscopic rotator cuff repair prevent proximal migration of the humeral head?

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    Pablo Sanz-Ruiz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Shoulder arthroscopy has become increasingly used in recent years, especially in rotator cuff repair. The purpose of this study was to determine whether arthroscopic rotator cuff repair could prevent proximal migration of the humeral head. Material and Methods: We performed a retrospective study of 56 patients suffering from shoulder pain. They were divided into two groups, one comprising patients with impingement syndrome who underwent acromioplasty only and another comprising patients with rotator cuff tear who underwent acromioplasty combined with rotator cuff repair. The pre-operative Hirooka angle and the results of the simple shoulder test (SST were compared after 1 year. Results: We found no differences between the groups for the Hirooka angle or SST results. We did find a significant difference (P<0.05 between pre-operative and post-operative SST results. Conclusions: Rotator cuff repair using arthroscopy is a minimally invasive procedure that improves function and prevents proximal migration of the humeral head after 1 year of follow-up. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(4.000: 190-195

  14. Results of infected total knee arthroplasty treated with arthroscopic debridement and continuous antibiotic irrigation system

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    Che-Wei Liu

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Arthroscopic debridement combined with continuous antibiotic irrigation and suction is an effective treatment for patients with acute presentation of late infected total knee arthroplasty.

  15. Comparison of Ankle Joint Visualization Between the 70° and 30° Arthroscopes: A Cadaveric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonogai, Ichiro; Hayashi, Fumio; Tsuruo, Yoshihiro; Sairyo, Koichi

    2018-02-01

    Ankle arthroscopy is an important diagnostic and therapeutic tool. Arthroscopic ankle surgery for anterior ankle impingement or osteochondral lesions (OCLs) is mostly performed with a 30° arthroscope; however, visualization of lesions is sometimes difficult. This study sought to compare ankle joint visualization between 70° and 30° arthroscopes and clarify the effectiveness of 70° arthroscopy. Standard anterolateral and anteromedial portals were placed with 4-mm 70° or 30° angled arthroscopes in a fresh 77-year-old male cadaveric ankle. The medial ligament and surrounding tissue were dissected via a medial malleolar skin incision. Kirschner wires were inserted into the distal tibia anterior edge; 5-mm diameter OCLs were created on the medial talar gutter anteriorly, midway, and posteriorly. The talar dome and distal tibia anterior edge were visualized using both arthroscopes. The 70° arthroscope displayed the anterior edge of the distal tibia immediately in front of the arthroscope, allowing full visualization of the posterior OCL of the medial talar gutter more clearly than the 30° arthroscope. This study revealed better ankle joint visualization with the 70° arthroscope, and may enable accurate, safe, and complete debridement, especially in treatment of medial talar gutter posterior OCLs and removal of anterior distal tibial edge bony impediments. Level IV, Anatomic study.

  16. Partial isolated rupture of the popliteus tendon in a professional soccer player: a case report

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    Mariani Pier

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The complete isolated rupture of the popliteus tendon has been described as a rare injury and this report describes the case of a 31-year-old soccer player who sustained a partial rupture of the popliteus tendon during a game. The injury was suspected clinically and at MRI but confirmed only by the arthroscopic examination. The treatment consisted in open debridment with no tendon repair or augmentation. Seven weeks post-operation the patient was symptom-free and returned to competitive professional soccer at the same preinjury level. The clinical and arthroscopic findings of the case reported suggest a possible overuse disease with degenerative expression.

  17. Partial isolated rupture of the popliteus tendon in a professional soccer player: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Pier Paolo; Margheritini, Fabrizio

    2009-07-31

    The complete isolated rupture of the popliteus tendon has been described as a rare injury and this report describes the case of a 31-year-old soccer player who sustained a partial rupture of the popliteus tendon during a game. The injury was suspected clinically and at MRI but confirmed only by the arthroscopic examination. The treatment consisted in open debridment with no tendon repair or augmentation. Seven weeks post-operation the patient was symptom-free and returned to competitive professional soccer at the same preinjury level. The clinical and arthroscopic findings of the case reported suggest a possible overuse disease with degenerative expression.

  18. Partial isolated rupture of the popliteus tendon in a professional soccer player: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The complete isolated rupture of the popliteus tendon has been described as a rare injury and this report describes the case of a 31-year-old soccer player who sustained a partial rupture of the popliteus tendon during a game. The injury was suspected clinically and at MRI but confirmed only by the arthroscopic examination. The treatment consisted in open debridment with no tendon repair or augmentation. Seven weeks post-operation the patient was symptom-free and returned to competitive professional soccer at the same preinjury level. The clinical and arthroscopic findings of the case reported suggest a possible overuse disease with degenerative expression. PMID:19646233

  19. Arthroscopic excision of bone fragments in a neglected fracture of the lateral process of the talus in a junior soccer player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funasaki, Hiroki; Kato, Soki; Hayashi, Hiroteru; Marumo, Keishi

    2014-06-01

    Fractures of the lateral process of the talus are uncommon and often overlooked. Typically, they are found in adult snowboarders. We report the case of an 11-year-old male soccer player who complained of lateral ankle pain after an inversion injury 6 months earlier. He did not respond to conservative treatment and thus underwent arthroscopic excision of fragments of the talar lateral process. The ankle was approached through standard medial and anterolateral portals. A 2.7-mm-diameter 30° arthroscope was used. Soft tissues around the talus were cleared with a motorized shaver, and the lateral aspect of the talar process was then visualized. The lateral process presented as an osseous overgrowth, and a loose body was impinged between the talus and the calcaneus. The osseous overgrowth was resected piece by piece with a punch, and the loose body was removed en block. The patient returned to soccer 5 weeks after the operation. This case exemplifies 2 important points: (1) This type of fracture can develop even in children and not only in snowboarders. (2) Arthroscopic excision of talar lateral process fragments can be accomplished easily, and return to sports can be achieved in a relatively short time.

  20. Outcome and Structural Integrity of Rotator Cuff after Arthroscopic Treatment of Large and Massive Tears with Double Row Technique: A 2-Year Followup

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    Ignacio Carbonel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional outcome and the tendon healing after arthroscopic double row rotator cuff repair of large and massive rotator cuff tears. Methods. 82 patients with a full-thickness large and massive rotator cuff tear underwent arthroscopic repair with double row technique. Results were evaluated by use of the UCLA, ASES, and Constant questionnaires, the Shoulder Strength Index (SSI, and range of motion. Follow-up time was 2 years. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI studies were performed on each shoulder preoperatively and 2 years after repair. Results. 100% of the patients were followed up. UCLA, ASES, and Constant questionnaires showed significant improvement compared with preoperatively (P<0.001. Range of motion and SSI in flexion, abduction, and internal and external rotation also showed significant improvement (P<0.001. MRI studies showed 24 cases of tear after repair (29%. Only 8 cases were a full-thickness tear. Conclusions. At two years of followup, in large and massive rotator cuff tears, an arthroscopic double row rotator cuff repair technique produces an excellent functional outcome and structural integrity.

  1. Effects of Remnant Tissue Preservation on Clinical and Arthroscopic Results After Anatomic Double-Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

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    Kondo, Eiji; Yasuda, Kazunori; Onodera, Jun; Kawaguchi, Yasuyuki; Kitamura, Nobuto

    2015-08-01

    Clinical utility of remnant tissue preservation after single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has not been established. In addition, no studies have evaluated the clinical utility of remnant preservation after anatomic double-bundle ACL reconstruction. The study hypotheses were as follows: (1) Subjective and functional clinical results may be comparable between anatomic double-bundle reconstructions that preserve the remnant tissue and those that resect the remnant tissue, (2) postoperative knee stability and the second-look arthroscopic evaluation may be significantly more favorable with the remnant-preserving reconstruction, and (3) the degree of the initial graft coverage may significantly affect postoperative knee stability. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. A total of 179 patients underwent anatomic double-bundle ACL reconstruction. Based on the Crain classification of ACL remnant tissue, 81 patients underwent the remnant-preserving procedure (group P) and the remaining 98 patients underwent the remnant-resecting procedure (group R). There were no differences between the 2 groups concerning all background factors, including preoperative knee instability and intraoperative tunnel positions. The patients were followed for 2 years or more. The subjective and functional clinical results were comparable between the 2 reconstruction procedures. Side-to-side anterior laxity was significantly less (P = .0277) in group P (0.9 mm) than in group R (1.5 mm). The pivot-shift test was negative in 89% of group P and 78% of group R patients; the result for group R was significantly lower (P = .0460). In the arthroscopic observations, results for group P were significantly better than for group R concerning postoperative laceration and fibrous tissue coverage of the grafts (P = .0479). Remnant preservation in anatomic double-bundle ACL reconstruction did not significantly improve subjective and functional results in the short-term evaluation, but it

  2. Arthroscopic treatment for calcific tendinitis; a case report

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    Mihai T. Gavrilă

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Calcific tendinitis is a common cause of shoulder pain, peaking in the fourth and fifth decades of life. The excruciate pain; especially during the night is the symptom who brings patient to the doctor. In many cases conservative treatment is the best choice. Sometimes it doesn’t work and is necessary operative treatment. It is presented a case of 60 years old women who had calcific tendinits for several years and accused pain few months with absence of improvement after conservative treatment. The patient was treated surgically with removal of calcium deposit arthroscopically. After surgery, pain relief was dramatic and movement increased rapidly. Results were very good with no complications. As a conclusion, arthroscopic evacuation of calcific deposit could be considered the best solution for patients whose symptomatology fail to improve after conservative treatment.

  3. Short-term results of arthroscopic treatment of osteochondritis dissecans in skeletally immature patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tis, John E; Edmonds, Eric W; Bastrom, Tracey; Chambers, Henry G

    2012-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the capitellum occurs in skeletally immature athletes, and most likely results from repetitive trauma during overhead activities. Treatment may consist of activity modifications, internal fixation, abrasion chondroplasty, microfracture, antegrade drilling, retrograde drilling, osteochondral autograft or allograft implantation, chondrocyte implantation, and rib autograft through arthroscopy or arthrotomy. One treatment modality has not been proven to be clearly more effective than the others. This study was undertaken to evaluate our treatment regimen that utilized arthroscopic-assisted treatments of capitellar OCD, including removal of loose bodies, antegrade or retrograde drilling, and chondroplasty in the pediatric population. All patients treated arthroscopically for a diagnosis of capitellar OCD over a 5-year period, were retrospectively reviewed. All were asked to return for follow-up questionnaire and radiographs. Exclusion criteria included those lost to follow-up. Demographics were recorded and range of motion was evaluated preoperatively and at most recent follow-up for flexion, extension, supination, and pronation. Preoperative and the most recent anterior/posterior and lateral radiographs of the elbow were reviewed. A 200-point elbow rating scale was used to assess patient outcomes. The arthroscopic appearance of the lesion was graded. Changes in preoperative to postoperative range of motion and size of lesion were compared using repeated measures analysis of variation. There were 13 elbows in 12 patients; only 3 of the injuries occurred acutely. Mean age at the time of surgery was 13.1±1.07 (range, 10.8 to 14.6 y). Mean follow-up was 23.4±16.7 months (range, 2 to 60 mo). There were 3 grade I lesions, 2 grade II lesions, 1 grade IV lesion, and 7 grade V lesions. Seven of the lesions underwent transhumeral drilling, 2 transarticular drilling, 3 loose body removals, and 2 had only debridement. There were no

  4. Three Tesla MRI for the diagnosis of meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament pathology: a comparison to arthroscopic findings

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    Sampson, M.J. [Department of Radiology Sports Surgery Clinic, Santry Demesne, Dublin (Ireland)], E-mail: allymattsampson@hotmail.com; Jackson, M.P.; Moran, C.J.; Moran, R. [Department of Orthopaedics, Sports Surgery Clinic, Santry Demesne, Dublin (Ireland); Eustace, S.J. [Department of Radiology Sports Surgery Clinic, Santry Demesne, Dublin (Ireland); Shine, S. [Department of Radiology, Cappagh Hospital, Finglas, Dublin (Ireland)

    2008-10-15

    Aim: To assess the accuracy of 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Materials and methods: Sixty-one consecutive patients were identified who were referred for evaluation of suspected intra-articular pathology with a 3 T MRI and who, subsequently, underwent an arthroscopic procedure of the knee were included for the study. Two musculoskeletal radiologists interpreted the images. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were then calculated for the MRI versus the arthroscopic findings as a reference standard. Results: The sensitivity and specificity for the overall detection of meniscal tears in this study was 84 and 93%, respectively. The results for the medial meniscus separately were 91 and 93% and for the lateral 77 and 93%. The evaluation of ACL integrity was 100% sensitive and specific. The meniscal tear type was correctly identified in 75% of cases and its location in 94%. Conclusion: This study demonstrates good results of 3 T MRI in the evaluation of the injured knee. Caution should still be given to the interpretation on MRI of a lateral meniscus tear, and it is suggested that the standard diagnostic criteria of high signal reaching the articular surface on two consecutive image sections be adhered to even at these higher field strengths.

  5. Management of temporary urinary retention after arthroscopic knee surgery in low-dose spinal anesthesia: development of a simple algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luger, Thomas J; Garoscio, Ivo; Rehder, Peter; Oberladstätter, Jürgen; Voelckel, Wolfgang

    2008-06-01

    In practice, trauma and orthopedic surgery during spinal anesthesia are often performed with routine urethral catheterization of the bladder to prevent an overdistention of the bladder. However, use of a catheter has inherent risks. Ultrasound examination of the bladder (Bladderscan) can precisely determine the bladder volume. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify parameters indicative of urinary retention after low-dose spinal anesthesia and to develop a simple algorithm for patient care. This prospective pilot study approved by the Ethics Committee enrolled 45 patients after obtaining their written informed consent. Patients who underwent arthroscopic knee surgery received low-dose spinal anesthesia with 1.4 ml 0.5% bupivacaine at level L3/L4. Bladder volume was measured by urinary bladder scanning at baseline, at the end of surgery and up to 4 h later. The incidence of spontaneous urination versus catheterization was assessed and the relative risk for catheterization was calculated. Mann-Whitney test, chi(2) test with Fischer Exact test and the relative odds ratio were performed as appropriate. *P 300 ml postoperatively had a 6.5-fold greater likelihood for urinary retention. In the management of patients with short-lasting spinal anesthesia for arthroscopic knee surgery we recommend monitoring bladder volume by Bladderscan instead of routine catheterization. Anesthesiologists or nurses under protocol should assess bladder volume preoperatively and at the end of surgery. If bladder volume is >300 ml, catheterization should be performed in the OR. Patients with a bladder volume of 500 ml.

  6. Mid-Long Term Results in the Arthroscopic Selective Capsular Release and Manipulation Treatment of Frozen Shoulder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Haluk; Seckin, Mustafa Faik; Kara, Adnan; Camur, Savas; Kilinc, Eray; Akman, Senol

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Our aim was to present mid-long term functional outcomes of patients who underwent arthroscopic selective capsular release and manipulation for frozen shoulder refractory to conservative treatment. Methods: Between 2006 and 2012, 32 patients presented to our clinic with the diagnosis of frozen shoulder. 24 shoulders of 22 patients treated with arthroscopic selective capsular release and manipulation were included in the study. Functional results were analyzed with Constant shoulder score. The mean follow-up was 4.3 years (range 1-7 years). Results: We detected an average increase in passive range of motion in flexion 72°, abduction 90°, abduction-internal rotation 33°, and abduction-external rotation 38°, adduction-external rotation at 37° compared to the preoperative status. Constant shoulder score increased by an average of 44 points after surgery. Eighteen (82%) patients were satisfied with the operation. Three of four patients whose symptoms persisted had resistant diabetes mellitus. Conclusion: Frozen shoulder is one of the most well-known causes of shoulder pain and disability. Although surgery has a good rate of success it does not help in all cases. Unsatisfactory results may be experienced in patients who have diabetes mellitus as a confounding factor.

  7. Three Tesla MRI for the diagnosis of meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament pathology: a comparison to arthroscopic findings

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    Sampson, M.J.; Jackson, M.P.; Moran, C.J.; Moran, R.; Eustace, S.J.; Shine, S.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To assess the accuracy of 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Materials and methods: Sixty-one consecutive patients were identified who were referred for evaluation of suspected intra-articular pathology with a 3 T MRI and who, subsequently, underwent an arthroscopic procedure of the knee were included for the study. Two musculoskeletal radiologists interpreted the images. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were then calculated for the MRI versus the arthroscopic findings as a reference standard. Results: The sensitivity and specificity for the overall detection of meniscal tears in this study was 84 and 93%, respectively. The results for the medial meniscus separately were 91 and 93% and for the lateral 77 and 93%. The evaluation of ACL integrity was 100% sensitive and specific. The meniscal tear type was correctly identified in 75% of cases and its location in 94%. Conclusion: This study demonstrates good results of 3 T MRI in the evaluation of the injured knee. Caution should still be given to the interpretation on MRI of a lateral meniscus tear, and it is suggested that the standard diagnostic criteria of high signal reaching the articular surface on two consecutive image sections be adhered to even at these higher field strengths

  8. Comparative study of open and arthroscopic coracoid transfer for shoulder anterior instability (Latarjet)-computed tomography evaluation at a short term follow-up. Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordasiewicz, Bartłomiej; Kicinski, Maciej; Małachowski, Konrad; Wieczorek, Janusz; Chaberek, Sławomir; Pomianowski, Stanisław

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and to compare the radiological parameters after arthroscopic and open Latarjet technique via evaluation of computed tomography (CT) scans. Our hypothesis was that the radiological results after arthroscopic stabilisation remained in the proximity of those results achieved after open stabilisation. CT scan evaluation results of patients after primary Latarjet procedure were analysed. Patients operated on between 2006 and 2011 using an open technique composed the OPEN group and patients operated on arthroscopically between 2011 and 2013 composed the ARTHRO group. Forty-three out of 55 shoulders (78.2%) in OPEN and 62 out of 64 shoulders (95.3%) in ARTHRO were available for CT scan evaluation. The average age at surgery was 28 years in OPEN and 26 years in ARTHRO. The mean follow-up was 54.2 months in OPEN and 23.4 months in ARTHRO. CT scan evaluation was used to assess graft fusion and osteolysis. Bone block position and screw orientation were assessed in the axial and the sagittal views. The subscapularis muscle fatty infiltration was evaluated according to Goutallier classification. The non-union rate was significantly higher in OPEN than in ARTHRO: 5 (11.9%) versus 1 (1.7%) (p  0.05). These results should be evaluated very carefully due to significant difference in the follow-up of both groups. A significantly higher rate of partial graft osteolysis at the level of the superior screw was reported in ARTHRO with 32 patients (53.3%) versus 10 (23.8%) in OPEN (p  0.05). However, in the position between 3 and 5 o'clock there were 56.7% of the grafts in ARTHRO versus 87.8% in OPEN (p Latarjet stabilisation showed satisfactory radiographic results, comparable to the open procedure, however the short-term follow-up can bias this evaluation. Graft healing rate was very high in the arthroscopic technique, but yet osteolysis of the superior part of the graft and more superior graft position in the sagittal view were

  9. Arthroscopic treatment of pigmented villonodular synovitis involving bilateral shoulders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Kyoung Hwan; Lim, Kyung Sub; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2010-06-09

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a lesion of benign proliferative synovium that invades joint, tendon sheath, and bursa. It mainly occurs in 1 joint, the knee joint or hand, and multi-joint invasion is reported to be atrophy of the deltoid and infraspinatus and a mass-like protrusion on the anterior portion of left shoulder. Active forward elevation was limited to 30 degrees on the right and 90 degrees on the left. Overall synovial hyperplasia and nodular mass was observed on magnetic resonance imaging. Massive rotator cuff tear and invasion of the lesion toward the subacromial space and deltoid muscle was noted as well. Arthroscopic examination revealed a typical finding of PVNS: yellowish brown pigmentation over the overall joint capsule and subacromial space. Arthroscopic total synovectomy without rotator cuff repair was performed for both shoulders. Clinical outcomes showed good pain relief and no recurrence of the disease, although range of motion and muscle strength was not significantly improved, possibly due to accompanied massive rotator cuff tear. Arthroscopic total synovectomy in the treatment of PVNS of the shoulder joint is a minimally invasive and effective method, which makes it possible to access the whole joint space and subacromial space. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Historical review of arthroscopic surgery of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrill, Abigail C L; Nakano, Naoki; Khanduja, Vikas

    2017-10-01

    Increasing our appreciation of the historical foundations of hip arthroscopy offers greater insight and understanding of the field's current and future applications. This article offers a broad history of the progress of hip arthroscopy. Hip arthroscopy's development from the early technologies of endoscopy to the present day is described through a review of the available literature. Endoscopic science begins with the Lichtleiter, developed by Phillip Bozzini (1779-1809) in 1806, but endoscopes were not applied to joints until 1912, as presented by Severin Nordentoft (1866-1922). The work of Kenji Takagi (1888-1963), especially, was instrumental in the arthroscope's development, allowing Michael Burman (1901-75) to perform the first recorded hip arthroscopy, detailed in a 1931 paper after extensive cadaveric research. Although World War II stalled further development, a renewed application of fibre optics following post-war innovations in glass manufacture heralded the modern arthroscope's invention. During the 1970s hip arthroscopy was first mobilized for diagnosis and exploration, leading to its later adoption for therapeutic surgical interventions. Modern hip arthroscopy has been facilitated by international research into optimum distraction, portals of entry, positioning of patients, and the technology of arthroscopic instruments. In 2008, the International Society for Hip Arthroscopy (ISHA) was founded to represent this international expert community. Technology, communication and evidence-based medicine have jointly facilitated the development of this young but promising corner of Orthopaedics.

  11. Arthroscopic internal fixation of osteochondritis dissecans of the femoral head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Dean K; Safran, Marc R

    2013-05-01

    Osteochondritis dessicans of the femoral head is an uncommon problem. Limited literature reports the incidence of osteochondritis dessicans and its treatment. The surgical technique used and outcomes for a 40-year-old man with symptomatic femoral head osteochonditis dissecans who was treated 11 years previously with retrograde drilling and hip arthroscopy are discussed.Despite temporary symptomatic improvement without subchondral collapse after his index procedure, increasing pain a decade later was thought to be caused by a large apical osteochondritic fragment and chondrolabral dysfunction from femoroacetabular impingement. Acetabuloplasty of acetabular overcoverage permitted arthroscopic internal fixation of the bone fragment by improving screw trajectory. Labral refixation and femoroplasty were subsequently performed. At 18-month follow-up, his nonarthritic hip score improved from 53 to 76 and his osteochondritic lesion had healed radiographically.Although clinical improvement with radiographic union has been reported following open screw fixation of femoral head osteochondritis dissecans, to the authors' knowledge this is the first published case with a similar outcome using arthroscopic techniques. Clinical improvement and union of even long-standing osteochondritis dissecans of the femoral head may occur with arthroscopic fragment fixation. Hip arthroscopy may play significant therapeutic and diagnostic roles in the treatment of this condition while offering a less invasive alternative to open osteosynthesis. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Preliminary Results of a Consecutive Series of Large & Massive Rotator Cuff Tears Treated with Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repairs Augmented with Extracellular Matrix

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    Paolo Consigliere

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recurrence rate of rotator cuff tears is still high despite the improvements of surgical techniques, materials used and a better knowledge of the healing process of the rotator cuff tendons. Large to massive rotator cuff tears are particularly associated with a high failure rate, especially in elderly. Augmentation of rotator cuff repairs with extracellular matrix or synthetic patches has gained popularity in recent years with the aim of reducing failure.The aim of this study was to investigate the outcome of rotator cuff repairs augmented with denatured extracellular matrix in a series of patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for large to massive tears.Methods: Ten consecutive patients, undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with extracellular matrix augment for large and massive tears, were prospectively enrolled into this single surgeon study. All repairs were performed arthroscopically with a double row technique augmented with extracellular matrix. Oxford Shoulder Score, Constant Score and pain visual analogue scale (VAS were used to monitor the shoulder function and outcome pre-operatively and at three, six and 12-month follow-up. Minimum follow up was tree months. Mean follow up was 7 months.Results: Mean Constant score improved from 53 (SD=4 pre-operatively to 75 (SD=11 at final follow up. Mean Oxford score also increased from 30 (SD=8 pre-operatively to 47 (SD=10 at the final follow up. The visual analogue scale (VAS improved from seven out of 10 (SD=2 preoperatively to 0.6 (SD=0.8 at final follow up. Additionally, there was significant improvement at three months mark in Constant score. Conclusion: Arthroscopic repair and augmentation of large and massive rotator cuff tears with extracellular matrix patch has good early outcome.

  13. Arthroscopic debridement of the osteoarthritic knee combined with hyaluronic acid (Orthovisc® treatment: A case series and review of the literature

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    Li Xinning

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective An evaluation of safety and efficacy of high molecular weight hyaluronan (HA delivered at the time of arthroscopic debridement of the osteoarthritic knee. Methods Thirty consecutive patients who met inclusion and exclusion criteria underwent arthroscopic debridement by a single surgeon and concomitant delivery of 6 ml/90 mg HA (Orthovisc®. These patients were evaluated preoperatively, at 6 weeks, 3 and 6 months post-operatively. Evaluations consisted of WOMAC pain score, SF-36 Physical Component Summary (PCS score and complications. Results No complications occurred during this study. Pre-op average WOMAC pain score was 6.8 +/- 3.5 (n = 30 with a reduction to 3.4 +/- 3.1 at 6 weeks (n = 27. Final average WOMAC pain score improved to 3.2 +/- 3.8 at six months (n = 23. No patients had deterioration of the WOMAC pain score. Mean pre-operative SF-36 PCS score was 39.0 +/- 10.4 with SF-36 PCS score of the bottom 25th percentile at 29.9 (n = 30. Post procedure and HA delivery, mean PCS score at 6 weeks improved to 43.7 +/- 8.0 with the bottom 25th percentile at 37.5 (n = 27. At 6 months, mean PCS score was 48.0 +/- 9.8 with the bottom 25th percentile improved to 45.8 (n = 23. Conclusion The results show that concomitant delivery of high molecular weight hyaluronan (Orthovisc® – 6 ml/90 mg is safe when given at the time of arthroscopic debridement of the osteoarthritic knee. By delivering HA (Orthovisc® at the time of the arthroscopic debridement, there may be a decreased risk of joint infection and/or injection site pain. Furthermore, the combination of both procedures show efficacy in reducing WOMAC pain scores and improving SF-36 PCS scores over a six month period.

  14. Racing performance after arthroscopic removal of apical sesamoid fracture fragments in Thoroughbred horses age > or = 2 years: 84 cases (1989-2002).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, L V; Bramlage, L R; Mohammed, H O; Embertson, R M; Ruggles, A J; Hopper, S A

    2006-09-01

    Studies have shown that surgical removal of apical fracture fragments in Standardbred racehorses carries the best prognosis for return to racing performance, but there are no reports involving mature Thoroughbred (TB) racehorses. To describe the incidence of apical proximal sesamoid fractures in TB racehorses and determine probability and quality of racing performance after arthroscopic removal of such fractures in TB racehorses age > or = 2 years. Medical records and pre- and post operative race records of TB racehorses age > or = 2 years that underwent arthroscopic surgery for removal of apical proximal sesamoid fracture fragments were reviewed. Sixty-four percent of fractures occurred in the hindlimbs and 36% in the forelimbs. Horses with forelimb fractures had a reduced probability of return to racing (67%) compared to those with hindlimb fractures (83%), but the majority (77%) of treated horses recovered to return to race post operatively. Horses with medial forelimb fractures raced at only a 47% rate; those with suspensory desmitis at 63%. Unlike Standardbreds, there was no difference in probability of racing post operatively between horses that had, and had not, raced preoperatively. Data show that arthroscopic removal of apical proximal sesamoid fracture fragments is successful at restoring ability to race in skeletally mature TB horses without evidence of severe suspensory ligament damage. Prognosis for return to racing is excellent (83%) in horses with hindlimb fractures and good (67%) in those with forelimb fractures. Medial fractures of the forelimb have the worst prognosis. The determination of prognosis for differing sites in TB racehorses should increase knowledge of apical proximal sesamoid bone fractures and improve communication from veterinarian to owner, and trainer, on the potential for arthroscopic restoration of the ability to race.

  15. Arthroscopic removal of fractures of the lateral malleolus of the tibia in the tarsocrural joint: a retrospective study of 13 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, H D; Bladon, B M

    2010-09-01

    There is limited information on the treatment of lateral malleolus (LM) fractures in the horse, with no previously published case series for the outcome following arthroscopic removal of such fractures. This report reviews and evaluates findings of a retrospective study of 13 horses admitted to a private equine referral hospital over a 10 year period (1999-2009) that underwent arthroscopic removal of fractures of the LM. Hospital records were reviewed and details including patient history, aetiology of the fracture and limb affected, results of all diagnostic tests and surgical reports were documented. Performance information concerning Thoroughbred horses that went onto race post operatively was collected using an online database. Owners and trainers were contacted regarding the return to performance for non-Thoroughbred cases or those that did not go onto race post operatively. Of the 13 horses presented, 12 were Thoroughbreds, 9 of which were National Hunt racehorses and 3 were Flat racehorses. The other horse in the study was used for general purpose riding. All cases presented with an acute unilateral fracture. Eleven of the 13 had >6 months post operative follow-up and all were nonlame. Of the 12 Thoroughbreds, 10 have raced again, a total of 104 times (median 5 times). The median time from surgery to return to racing was 241 days (180-366 days). It is concluded that horses with fractures of the LM have an excellent prognosis for return to full athletic performance following arthroscopic debridement; and that arthroscopic fragment removal is an appropriate treatment method for fractures of the LM.

  16. Open Compared with Arthroscopic Treatment of Acute Septic Arthritis of the Native Knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Brenton P; Loewenthal, Mark R; Dewar, David C

    2017-03-15

    Acute native knee septic arthritis is a joint-threatening emergency. Operative treatments by open or arthroscopic methods are available to surgeons. To our knowledge, the literature to date has primarily consisted of case series and no large study has yet compared these methods. The aim of this study was to compare open and arthroscopic treatment for acute native knee septic arthritis. All adult patients with acute native knee septic arthritis treated at our institution with either open or arthroscopic irrigation from 2000 to 2015 were retrospectively evaluated. The clinical findings, laboratory evidence, arthrocentesis and microbiology results, knee radiographs, and outcomes were compared. There were 161 patients (166 knees) with acute native knee septic arthritis treated between 2000 and 2015. Initially, 123 knees were treated by arthroscopic irrigation and 43 knees were treated by open irrigation; however, 71% in the open treatment group required repeat irrigation compared with 50% in the arthroscopic treatment group. The superiority of an arthroscopic procedure persisted after adjustment for potential confounders by multivariable analysis, with an odds ratio of 2.56 (95% confidence interval, 1.1 to 5.9; p = 0.027). After 3 irrigation procedures, the cumulative success rate was 97% in the arthroscopic treatment group and 83% in the open treatment group (p = 0.011). The total number of irrigation procedures required was fewer in the arthroscopic treatment group (p = 0.010). In the arthroscopic treatment group, the mean postoperative range of motion was greater (p = 0.016) and there was a trend toward a shorter median length of stay (p = 0.088). Arthroscopic treatment for acute native knee septic arthritis was a more successful index procedure and required fewer total irrigation procedures compared with open treatment. Long-term postoperative range of motion was significantly greater following arthroscopic treatment. Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for

  17. Arthroscopically assisted reconstruction of triangular fibrocartilage complex foveal avulsion in the ulnar variance-positive patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, ByungSung; Yoon, Hong-Kee; Nho, Jae-Hwi; Park, Kang Hee; Park, Sung-Yong; Yoon, Jun-Hee; Song, Hyun Seok

    2013-11-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the clinical results of patients treated by arthroscopically assisted reconstruction of foveal avulsion injury of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) using a suture anchor. We retrospectively reviewed the results of 15 patients (11 men and 4 women; mean age, 30.5 years) who underwent surgical procedures for the treatment of TFCC foveal avulsion at our hospital. The patients were followed up for a mean of 29 months. The patients had TFCC foveal avulsion caused by sprains (n = 8), falls (n = 4), playing baseball (n = 2), and a motor vehicle accident (n = 1). All the patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging. Radiographs obtained to assess ulnar variance (UV), ulnar-dorsal subluxation, and function of the wrist based on grip power; Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score; and Mayo wrist score were examined for all patients both preoperatively and postoperatively. On preoperative magnetic resonance imaging, TFCC foveal avulsion was observed in 13 of 15 cases. The mean UV value based on preoperative simple radiographic findings was 1.7 ± 1.0 mm, and dorsal subluxation at the distal ulna improved from 2.9 ± 3.0 mm to 0.2 ± 0.9 mm (P = .017). In all cases the distal radioulnar joint instability disappeared postoperatively. Grip power (compared with the uninvolved limb) was 79.3% preoperatively and 82.9% postoperatively (P = .086). The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand scores were 28.4 points preoperatively and 16.6 points postoperatively (P = .061). The Mayo wrist scores were excellent in 10 cases, good in 2, and fair in 3, and the mean score improved significantly from 64 points preoperatively to 84 points postoperatively (P = .007). Arthroscopic-assisted suture anchor reattachment of the TFCC in patients with traumatic TFCC foveal avulsion can prevent or reduce distal radioulnar joint instability and reduce pain even in chronic cases with positive UV. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2013

  18. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF THE LATERAL ELBOW PAIN –OUR EXPERIENCE

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    Oskar Zupanc

    2008-01-01

    Arthroscopic treatment of the lateral elbow pain has been proved to be very effectiveespecially in younger population and in patients with early elbow osteoarthritis. The lengthof hospital stay is reduced. However, the length of rehabilitation depends on the stage ofelbow osteoarthritis and extensiveness of the arthroscopic intervention

  19. Septic Arthritis After Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Evaluation of an Arthroscopic Graft-Retaining Treatment Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Philipp; Schulz, Martin; Immendoerfer, Micha; Mayer, Philipp; Schlumberger, Michael; Richter, Joerg

    2015-12-01

    Septic arthritis after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a rare but severe complication. Treatment regimens differ, and optimal management has not been established. To determine the incidence of postoperative infections after ACL reconstruction, to identify the microbiological spectrum, and to evaluate a standardized graft-retaining treatment protocol consisting of sequential arthroscopic irrigation and debridement (I&D) procedures and antibiotic therapy until C-reactive protein levels are within normal range. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. From January 2004 to June 2014, a total of 7096 consecutive arthroscopic ACL reconstructions were performed at a single institution (5907 primary and 1189 revision reconstructions). Thirty-six cases with postoperative septic arthritis were identified and retrospectively analyzed with regard to incidence, clinical presentation, time to and number of arthroscopic reoperations, and microbiological findings. The follow-up examination consisted of a clinical examination, instrumeted measurement of laxity (KT-1000 arthrometer), classification according to objective and subjective International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores, and radiological evaluation. The incidence of septic arthritis was 0.51% (n = 36), with 0.41% (n = 24) in primary and 1.01% (n = 12) in revision reconstructions (odds ratio, 2.5; P = .008). The first I&D was performed a mean (± SD) of 19.6 ± 10.6 days after the index procedure. Eradication was achieved in all patients after a mean of 2.25 ± 1.22 procedures, with graft retention in all but 1 patient (97.2%). The mean duration of antibiotic treatment was 5.4 ± 2.3 weeks (range, 2.1-12.9 weeks) and ≤ 4 weeks in 13 patients (36%). No recurrence of infections was seen. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (62.5%) and Staphylococcus aureus (21.9%) were the most frequent pathogens. Twenty-nine patients were available for follow-up (80.6%) after a mean 4.7 ± 3.2 years (range, 0

  20. Prevalence and Impact of Hip Arthroscopic Surgery on Future Participation in Elite American Football Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, Derrick M; Sheehan, Joe; Nho, Shane J; Voos, James E; Salata, Michael J

    2018-02-01

    Intra-articular injuries to the hip in elite athletes represent a source of significant pain and disability. Hip arthroscopic surgery has become the gold standard for the treatment of disorders involving the hip joint. To examine the incidence of and abnormalities treated with hip arthroscopic surgery as well as the impact on future participation in American football athletes invited to the National Football League (NFL) Scouting Combine with a history of hip arthroscopic surgery. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Athletes invited to the NFL Combine from 2012 to 2015 were evaluated for a history of hip arthroscopic surgery. Athlete demographics, imaging findings, and physical examination results were gathered using the NFL Combine database. Information on prospective participation in the NFL with regard to draft status, games played, games started, and current status was gathered using publicly available databases and compared against all other athletes participating in the combine. Fourteen athletes (15 hips) had a history of arthroscopic hip surgery. Acetabular labral tears were treated in 93% (14 hips), with femoroacetabular impingement decompression performed in 33% (5 hips). Compared with athletes who had no history of hip arthroscopic surgery, those undergoing arthroscopic surgery did not possess a lower likelihood of being drafted (66% vs 71%, respectively; P = .78) or of being on an active roster (52% vs 43%, respectively; P = .44) after their first season in the NFL. Moreover, there was no significant difference in the number of regular-season games played (10.9 ± 4.8 with arthroscopic surgery vs 11.0 ± 5.1 without; P = .96) or started (7.0 ± 3.6 with arthroscopic surgery vs 7.1 ± 5.3 without; P = .98). American football athletes invited to the NFL Combine with a history of hip arthroscopic surgery were not at risk for diminished participation when compared with all other athletes during their first season in the NFL.

  1. Editorial Commentary: The Wake of the Dragon: Will the Orthopaedic Community Adopt the Shoulder Arthroscopic Latarjet Procedure as We Adopted the Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boileau, Pascal; Saliken, David

    2017-12-01

    The Latarjet procedure is a complex and difficult operation when performed both with an open approach and arthroscopically. The difficulties come from the fact that it is a combined intra- and extra-articular procedure, and that working close to the brachial plexus may be frightening for surgeons. Because of the high complication and reoperation rates reported in the literature, this procedure is, at the moment, rejected by a large part of the orthopaedic community, specifically in North America. The Chinese experience shows, after the European one, that arthroscopic Latarjet is an efficient and irreplaceable option for the treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder instability in the context of capsular and/or glenoid deficiency. A recent study shows that the arthroscopic procedure provides accurate bone block positioning and high rates of healing, excellent clinical results (no recurrence of instability at 2-year follow-up), and low rates of complications (no neurovascular injury). Although the arthroscopic Latarjet should be approached with caution, the learning curve should not be thought of as prohibitive. To learn how to perform an arthroscopic Latarjet, surgeons should visit an experienced surgeon and take a course to practice on cadavers first. Although it will take time and effort to learn and perform this operation correctly, we should command our Chinese colleagues to encourage us to follow their path. There is no reason that in the near future the orthopaedic community does not adopt the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure, as we adopted the arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and other complex surgical procedures. Among the strongest reasons to perform the Latarjet procedure arthroscopically are the accuracy of graft placement, the safety for neurovascular structures provided by direct visualization and magnification, and the excellent clinical results allowing young people to go back to sport, including high-risk (contact, overhead) sports. Copyright © 2017

  2. Partial priapism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyerup, Peter; Dahl, Claus; Azawi, Nessn Htum

    2014-01-01

    Partial priapism, also called partial segmental thrombosis of the corpus cavernosum, is a rare urological condition. Factors such as bicycle riding, drug usage, penile trauma and haematological diseases have been associated with the condition. Medical treatment with low molecular weight heparin (...... (LMWH) or acetylsalicylic acid is first choice treatment, and surgery is preserved for patients unresponsive to analgesics. In this report we describe the case of a 70-year-old man with partial priapism after blood transfusions treated successfully with LMWH....

  3. Use of MR arthrography in detecting tears of the ligamentum teres with arthroscopic correlation

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    Chang, Connie Y.; Gill, Corey M.; Huang, Ambrose J.; Simeone, Frank J.; Torriani, Martin; Bredella, Miriam A. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); McCarthy, Joseph C. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-12-20

    To demonstrate the normal appearance of the ligamentum teres on MR arthrography (MRA) and evaluate the accuracy of MRA in detecting ligamentum teres tears with arthroscopic correlation. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained with a waiver for informed consent because of the retrospective study design. A total of 165 cases in 159 patients (111 females, 48 males; mean age 41 ± 12 years) who underwent both MRA and hip arthroscopy were evaluated for appearance of the ligamentum teres, including the size, number of bundles, and ligamentum teres tears. Marrow edema of the fovea capitis adjacent to the ligamentum teres insertion and the presence of hip plicae were also recorded. The mean thickness and length of the ligamentum teres were 3.5 ± 1.5 mm and 25.2 ± 3.8 mm, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value, and accuracy of MRA for the detection of ligamentum teres tears were 78, 97, 74, 97, and 95 %, respectively. MRA is an accurate method to evaluate the normal morphology and to detect tears of the ligamentum teres. (orig.)

  4. Arthroscopic laser in intra-articular knee cartilage disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosir, Hany R.; Siebert, Werner E.

    1996-12-01

    Different assemblies have endeavored to develop arthroscopic laser surgery. Various lasers have been tried in the treatment of orthopaedic problems, and the most useful has turned out to be the Hol-YAG laser 2.1 nm which is a near- contact laser. By using the laser as a powerful tool, and cutting back on the power level, one is able to better achieve the desired treatment effect. Clinical studies to evaluating the role of the laser in different arthroscopic knee procedures, comparing to conventional techniques, showed that the overall outcome attains a momentous confidence level which is shifted to the side of the laser versus the conventional for all maneuvers, barring meniscectomy where there is not perceiving disparity between laser versus the conventional. Meniscectomy continues to be one of the most commonly performed orthopaedic procedures. Laser provides a single tool which can ablate and debride meniscal rims with efficiency and safety. Chondroplasty can also be accomplished with ease using defocused laser energy. Both lateral release and soft tissue cermilization benefit from the cutting effect of laser along with its hemostatic effect. Synovial reduction with a defocused laser is also easily accomplished. By one gadget, one can cut, ablate, smooth, coagulate, congeal and with authentic tissue depth control The future of laser arthroscopic surgery lies in its ability to weld or repair tissues. Our research study has shown that laser activated photoactive dyes can produce a molecular bonding of collagen fibers, and therefore a repair 'weld' can be achieved with both meniscal tissues and with articular cartilage lesions.

  5. Telerehabilitation after arthroscopic subacromial decompression is effective and not inferior to standard practice: Preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastora-Bernal, Jose Manuel; Martín-Valero, Rocío; Barón-López, Francisco Javier; Guerrero Moyano, Noelia; Estebanez-Pérez, María-José

    2017-01-01

    Background Telerehabilitation promises to improve quality, increase patient access and reduce costs in health care. Physiotherapy with exercises is generally recommended to restore function after surgery in patients with chronic subacromial syndrome. Relatively few studies have investigated the feasibility of telerehabilitation interventions in musculoskeletal and orthopaedic disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a customizable telerehabilitation intervention and compare with traditional care. Methods This research includes 18 consecutive patients with subacromial impingement who underwent arthroscopic subacromial decompression in a controlled clinical prospective study. Patients were randomized to either a 12-week telerehabilitation programme or the usual face-to-face physical therapy for immediate postoperative rehabilitation. We have developed a telerehabilitation system to provide services to patients who have undergone shoulder arthroscopy. An independent blinded observer performed postoperative follow-up after 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Results The preliminary efficacy of this telerehabilitation programme in terms of both physical and functional objective outcome measures was assessed on eight patients. Using the Constant-Murley score to evaluate functional outcome, patients in the telerehabilitation group were shown to have improved from a mean 43.50 ± 3.21 points to a mean 68.50 ± 0.86 points after 12 weeks. The physical and functional improvements in the telerehabilitation group were similar to those in the control group ( p = 0.213). There was a non-significant trend for greater improvements in the telerehabilitation group for most outcome measurements. Conclusion The results of this study provide evidence for the efficacy of telerehabilitation after shoulder arthroscopy in shoulder impingement syndrome. A telerehabilitation programme with range of motion, strengthening of the rotator cuff and scapula

  6. Arthroscopic Stabilization After a First-Time Dislocation: Collision Versus Contact Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranalletta, Maximiliano; Rossi, Luciano A; Alonso Hidalgo, Ignacio; Sirio, Adrian; Puig Dubois, Julieta; Maignon, Gastón D; Bongiovanni, Santiago L

    2017-09-01

    There is no universally accepted definition of "contact" or "collision" sports in the literature. The few available studies evaluating contact and collision sports consider them to be synonymous. However, athletes in collision sports purposely hit or collide with each other or with inanimate objects with greater force and frequency than in contact sports, which could jeopardize functional outcomes. To compare the functional outcomes, return to sports, and recurrences in a series of contact and collision athletes with a first-time anterior shoulder dislocation treated using arthroscopic stabilization with suture anchors. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. A total of 56 athletes were enrolled in this study, including 22 contact athletes and 34 collision athletes. All athletes underwent arthroscopic shoulder stabilization using suture anchors. Range of motion, the Rowe score, a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, and the Athletic Shoulder Outcome Scoring System (ASOSS) were used to assess functional outcomes. Return to sports and recurrences were also evaluated. The mean age at the time of surgery was 22.2 years, and the mean follow-up was 62.4 months (range, 36-94 months). No significant difference in shoulder motion was found between preoperative and postoperative results or between the contact and collision groups. The Rowe, VAS, and ASOSS scores showed statistical improvement in both groups after surgery ( P = .001). Patients in the contact group returned to sports significantly faster than those in the collision group (5.2 vs 6.9 months, respectively; P = .01). In all, 43 athletes (76.8%) returned to near-preinjury sports activity levels (≥90% recovery) after surgery: 86.4% of patients in the contact group and 70.6% in the collision group ( P = .04). The total recurrence rate was 8.9%. There were 5 recurrences (14.7%) in the collision group and no recurrences in the contact group ( P motion, and postoperative return to sports in contact and collision athletes

  7. Partial priapism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoyerup, Peter; Azawi, Nessn Htum

    2013-01-01

    With only 34 prior cases in world literature, partial priapism (PP), also called partial segmental thrombosis of the corpus cavernosum, is a rare urological condition. The aetiology and treatment of PP is still unclear, but bicycle riding, trauma, drug usage, sexual intercourse, haematological...

  8. Arthroscopic assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Jeffrey P; Bleedorn, Jason A; Sutherland, Brian J; Sullivan, Ruth; Kalscheur, Vicki L; Ramaker, Megan A; Schaefer, Susan L; Hao, Zhengling; Muir, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CR) is a degenerative condition in dogs that typically has a non-contact mechanism. Subsequent contralateral rupture often develops in dogs with unilateral CR. Synovitis severity is an important factor that promotes ligament degradation. Consequently, we wished to evaluate the utility of arthroscopy for assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with CR. Herein, we report results of a prospective study of 27 dogs with unilateral CR and bilateral radiographic osteoarthritis. Arthroscopic images and synovial biopsies from the lateral and medial joint pouches were obtained bilaterally and graded for synovial hypertrophy, vascularity, and synovitis. Synovial tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive (TRAP+) macrophages, CD3(+) T lymphocytes, Factor VIII+ blood vessels, and synovial intima thickness were quantified histologically and related to arthroscopic observations. Risk of subsequent contralateral CR was examined using survival analysis. We found that arthroscopic scores were increased in the index stifle, compared with the contralateral stifle (ppairs. Arthroscopic grading of vascularity and synovitis was correlated with number density of Factor VIII+ vessels (SR>0.34, p0.31, p<0.05). Strong intra-observer and moderate inter-observer agreement for arthroscopic scoring was found. Dog age and arthroscopic vascularity significantly influenced risk of contralateral CR over time. We conclude that arthroscopic grading of synovitis is a precise tool that correlates with histologic synovitis. Arthroscopy is useful for assessment of stifle synovitis in client-owned dogs, and could be used in longitudinal clinical trials to monitor synovial responses to disease-modifying therapy.

  9. Knee extensor muscle strength in middle-aged and older individuals undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Michelle; Juhl, Carsten B; Lund, Hans

    2015-01-01

    a moderate reduction was again apparent at 4 years post-APM (SMD: -0.56, (-1.20-0.08) compared to controls. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that middle-aged and older individuals undergoing APM have reduced knee extensor muscle strength in the operated leg compared to control data. As meniscus pathology...

  10. Comparison of arthroscopic and open Latarjet with a learning curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, G; Benchouk, S; Kherad, O; Lädermann, A

    2016-02-01

    To compare arthroscopic and open Latarjet performed by a single shoulder surgeon with learning curve analysis A comparative and learning curve analysis was carried out on a prospectively gathered database of 2 consecutive series of patients treated with arthroscopic and open Latarjet procedures performed by a single shoulder surgeon between 2008 and 2014. The database included patient characteristics, ISIS scores, operative time, intra- and postoperative complications, graft and screws positioning, as well as pre- and postoperative Walch-Duplay scores. Sixty-four patients were included in the study, 28 in the arthroscopic group and 36 in the open group with similar age, sex ratio and preoperative ISIS score. Operative time was significantly higher in the arthroscopic group (146 versus 81 min, p = 0.001), and although no intra-operative complications were recorded in either group, there were significantly more postoperative complications in the arthroscopic group (29 vs. 11 %, p = 0.03). Screw placement was more accurate in the open group, and postoperative Walch-Duplay score did not show any significant difference between the groups (88 points in the arthroscopic group and 91 points in the open group). The arthroscopic Latarjet learning curve analysis showed that the need for conversion ceased after the first 10 patients and that surgical time came close to that of open procedure after 20 procedures. In this study, 10 arthroscopic Latarjet procedures were needed to overcome the need for conversion, and 20 procedures to achieve equal operating time to the open technique. Even though functional outcome and patient satisfaction were similar in both techniques, complications, screw placement inaccuracy, persistent apprehension and recurrences still remain higher with the arthroscopic technique. Retrospective comparative analysis, Level III.

  11. Arthroscopic treatment of unresolved Osgood-Schlatter lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBerardino, Thomas M; Branstetter, Joanna G; Owens, Brett D

    2007-10-01

    Osgood-Schlatter disease is a self-limiting condition in most cases. Those with unresolved pain after conservative treatment can obtain relief with surgical debridement of the mobile ossicles and tibial tuberosity. We present an arthroscopic technique for debridement. The location of the inferomedial and lateral parapatella tendon portals can be raised slightly to allow improved instrumentation and visualization in the anterior interval. An anterior interval release is performed with the mechanical shaver and radiofrequency ablation device. Care is taken to visualize the meniscal anterior horns and intermeniscal ligament. By staying anterior to these structures, debridement can be performed aggressively onto the anterior tibial slope. The bony lesions are shelled out from their soft-tissue attachments. Small and loose fragments are removed with a pituitary ronguer, whereas larger lesions are removed with an arthroscopic burr. Working deep along the anterior tibial slope is facilitated by extending the knee and taking tension off the patellar tendon. Postoperatively, patients are allowed full weight bearing and unrestricted range of motion. The advantages of this technique include the avoidance of the patellar tendon longitudinal split required for open procedures and the ability to address concomitant intra-articular pathology.

  12. Accelerated rehabilitation after arthroscopic Bankart repair in professional footballers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerss, Jim; Morgan, Chris; Brownson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Advances in arthroscopic surgery have resulted in biomechanically stronger repairs that might allow for accelerated rehabilitation protocols and hence faster return to play. Evidence for such regimes in the shoulder, particularly in elite athletes, is lacking. Methods This prospective single surgeon (PB) series included 34 professional footballers undergoing an accelerated rehabilitation programme following arthroscopic soft tissue stabilization subsequent to traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation. Data were collected on time to regain elevation range, external rotation range, return to play and rate of recurrence. Results Mean follow-up time was 4.8 years (range 2 years to 10 years). Full range of forward elevation was regained at a mean of 5 weeks (range 3 weeks to 7 weeks) and external rotation range (in neutral) at a mean of 6 weeks (range 4 weeks to 8 weeks). Mean return to play time was 11 weeks (range 9 weeks to 14 weeks). Three players (9%) reported a recurrent episode of dislocation at a mean of 19 months. Conclusions An accelerated rehabilitation programme resulted in a return to play time of 11 weeks compared to previously reported times of between 5 months and 9 months in the contact sports population. A recurrence rate of 9% compares favourably to other published studies following similar surgery (5.1% to 28.6%) but which employed more conservative postoperative rehabilitation regimes. PMID:27660661

  13. Accuracy of Coracoid Bone Graft Placement: Open versus Arthroscopic Latarjet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Adriano; Grasso, Andrea; Arrighi, Annalisa; Pistorio, Angela; Molfetta, Luigi

    2017-06-01

    Purpose  The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of the coracoid bone graft placement with the open Latarjet-Patte and arthroscopic Latarjet (arthro-Latarjet) procedures in the treatment of anterior instability of the shoulder. Methods  Forty-six patients affected by anterior shoulder instability were divided into two groups. In group A ( n  = 25), patients were operated by arthroscopic Latarjet (arthro-Latarjet) procedure and in group B ( n  = 21), patients were operated by open Latarjet-Patte procedure. Instrumental investigation was based on three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) at a minimum 1-year follow-up. Graft placement and integration, divergence and posterior protrusion of the screws, and glenohumeral osteoarthritis were considered as outcomes. Statistical analysis was performed with chi-square or Fisher's exact test. Significance was set at p  Latarjet-Patte procedure showed better results than those of the arthro-Latarjet group in reference to the positioning of the graft on the coronal plane ( p  = 0.025). No significant differences between the groups were observed for graft integration, divergence of the screws, posterior protrusion of the screws, and osteoarthritis. Level of Evidence  Level II, nonrandomized prospective comparative study.

  14. Ultrasound-guided arthroscopic management of hallux rigidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz M. Paczesny

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : The use of metatarso-phalangeal joint arthroscopy in the treatment of osteochondritis dissecans was first described in 1988. The technique produces good results. However, it can be difficult to enter a joint when it is deformed by degenerative disease. Sonography is a modern visualisation modality which can be used in orthopaedic surgery. Aim: To describe a method of intraoperative sonographic navigation during first metatarso-phalangeal joint arthroscopy. Material and methods: The modality was used in 3 patients. The joint was visualised in the ultrasound scanner. After confirming the intra-articular position of the guide needle, a medial portal was established. The procedure started with the removal and vaporisation of the hypertrophic synovium. Gradual resection of the osteophytes was then carried out. The procedure was terminated after the ultrasound image showed that a smooth upper surface of the metatarsal head had been achieved. Results : All 3 patients were satisfied with the procedure and function of the treated feet. Average surgery time was 81 min. No complications were found. Conclusions : Mini-invasive treatment of hallux rigidus with sonography-guided arthroscopic cheilectomy appears to be a reproducible procedure leading to good clinical results. We encourage surgeons familiar with ultrasound visualisation of the joints to use the technique described in this paper in the arthroscopic treatment of hallux rigidus.

  15. Short Term Results of Arthroscopic Repair of Subscapularis Tendon Tear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Zafarani

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background:Despite being the largest rotator cuff tendon of the shoulder,the function and clinical relevance of subscapularis pathology has been largely ignored in the literature.Although many studies have focused on subscapularis tears recently,majority of them reported techniques for open repair. The advent of arthroscopy and   arthroscopic repair techniques has opened new frontiers in the diagnosis and repair of torn rotator cuff tendons, including the subscapularis.In this article,we review shortterm results of arthroscopic subscapularis repair. Method: Ten patients with subscapularis tendon tear of the rotator cuff were studied   prospectively including 8 men and 2 women with an average age of 49.7±12.8 years and an average delay in treatment of 23.3 months. Clinical outcomes, including the UCLAscore were assessed in all patients after 3 months of the surgery. Results: 6 patients were followed regularly for more than 6 months,while other 4 patients had a follow-up period of more than a year. The pain score improved from 1.75 to 9 and the UCLA score from 8.8 to 30.6.Conclusions: rthroscopic repair of subscapularis tendon tear results in significant subjective and objective improvement and high levels of patient satisfaction.  

  16. Efficacy of Arthroscopic Teaching Methods: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Luke; Spanyer, Jonathon; Yenna, Zachary; Burchell, Patrick; Garber, Andrew; Riehl, John

    Arthroscopic education research recently has been focused on the use of skills labs to facilitate resident education and objective measure development to gauge technical skill. This study evaluates the effectiveness of three different teaching methods. Medical students were randomized into three groups. The first group received only classroom-based lecture. The second group received the same lecture and 28 minutes of lab-based hands-off arthroscopy instruction using a cadaver and arthroscopy setup. The final group received the same lecture and 7 minutes of hands-on arthroscopy instruction in the lab on a cadaver knee. The arthroscopic knee exam that followed simulated a diagnostic knee exam and subjects were measured on task completion and by the number of look downs. The number of look downs and the number of tasks completed did not achieve statistical significance between groups. Posttest survey results revealed that the hands-on group placed significantly more value on their educational experience as compared with the other two groups. (Journal of Surgical Orthopaedic Advances.

  17. Arthroscopic Resection of The Distal Clavicle With Concomitant Subacromial Decompression: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HZ Chan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder impingement syndrome and acromioclavicular joint osteoarthritis often occur simultaneously and easily missed. Kay et al. reported excellent results with combined arthroscopic subacromial decompression and resection of the distal end of the clavicle in patients with both disorders. Arthroscopic treatment of these disorders produces more favourable results than open procedures. We report two patients who were not responding to conservative management and were treated with direct arthroscopic distal clavicle excision and subacromial decompression in single setting. Both patients gained good postoperative outcome in terms of pain score, function and strength improvement assessed objectively with visual analogue score (VAS and University of California Los Angeles Score (UCLA.

  18. Evaluation of the results from arthroscopic surgical treatment of rotator cuff injuries in patients aged 65 years and over

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Naoki Miyazaki

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the results from arthroscopic surgical treatment of rotator cuff injuries in patients aged 65 years and over.METHODS: Between 1998 and 2009, 168 patients underwent operations. Five cases were excluded. The remaining 163 patients were stratified according to their age group: 65-69 years (49.1%, 70-74 (26.4% and 75 years and over (24.5%. Their mean age was 71 years (range: 65-83. There were 63 male patients (38.7%. The mean length of time with pain, from the onset of symptoms to the surgery, was 23 months (range: 2 days to 240 months. Sixty-two patients (38% reported histories of trauma and 26 (16% reported that their pain worsened through exertion.RESULTS: From the UCLA criteria, 80.4% of the results were excellent, 16% good, 1.8% fair and 1.8% poor. Complications occurred in 11%. The final clinical result did not show any correlation with age progression, injury size or tendons affected. However, there was a significant association (p < 0.001 between the presence of trauma and larger injuries. The length of time between the onset of symptoms and the surgical procedure had a significant relationship (p < 0.027 with the postoperative results: the longer this time was, the worse the results were.CONCLUSION: Arthroscopic treatment of rotator cuff injuries in patients aged 65 years and over presented excellent and good results in 96.4% of the cases, according to the UCLA assessment, with a low complication rate. Advanced age did not show any influence on the postoperative clinical evolution, but the earlier the surgical treatment was instituted, the better the results were.

  19. Osteoarthritis of the carpometacarpal articulation of the thumb; a classification original arthroscopic and treatment algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badia, Alejandro; Riano, Felix; Indriago, Igor; Orbay, Jorge; Gonzalez Hernandez, Eduardo; Khouri, Roger

    2005-01-01

    Osteoarthritis of the thumb basal joint is a very common and disabling condition that is most often seen in middle aged women with staging of the disease and treatment based upon clinical and radiographic findings. Arthroscopic assessment of the first carpometacarpal (CMC) joint combines easy identification and classification of joint pathology with minimal morbidity, this allows the condition to be managed either arthroscopically or converted to an open procedure as indicated. We obtained consistent arthroscopic findings, which did not necessarily correlate to the different radiographic stages. In arthroscopy stage I, diffuse synovitis and occasional capsular attenuation was found even in the absence of radiographic changes. Stage II was characterized by central wears on the articular cartilage of the trapezium and on the cubital side of the base of the first metacarpal. Finally in Stage III, extensive cartilage loss was a consistent finding. We therefore propose an arthroscopic classification and establish an algorithm for the treatment of basal joint osteoarthritis

  20. Clinical Outcome After Arthroscopic Debridement and Microfracture for Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Capitellum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bexkens, Rens; van den Ende, Kim I. M.; Ogink, Paul T.; van Bergen, Christiaan J. A.; van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Eygendaal, Denise

    2017-01-01

    Background: Various surgical treatment techniques have been developed to treat capitellar osteochondritis dissecans; however, the optimal technique remains the subject of ongoing debate. Purpose: To evaluate clinical outcomes after arthroscopic debridement and microfracture for advanced capitellar

  1. Injection of Mesenchymal Stem Cells as a Supplementary Strategy of Marrow Stimulation Improves Cartilage Regeneration After Lateral Sliding Calcaneal Osteotomy for Varus Ankle Osteoarthritis: Clinical and Second-Look Arthroscopic Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Sang; Koh, Yong Gon

    2016-05-01

    To compare the clinical and second-look arthroscopic outcomes in patients undergoing arthroscopic marrow stimulation combined with lateral sliding calcaneal osteotomy for varus ankle osteoarthritis, with or without adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) injection. In this retrospective comparative study, 49 patients with varus ankle osteoarthritis underwent second-look arthroscopy after arthroscopic marrow stimulation combined with lateral sliding calcaneal osteotomy between January 2010 and November 2012; 23 ankles underwent marrow stimulation alone (group 1), and 26 underwent marrow stimulation with MSC injection (group 2). The decision whether to receive the MSC injection, which was free of charge, was solely up to the patients. Second-look arthroscopies were performed at a mean of 12.5 months and 12.4 months postoperatively in group 1 and group 2, respectively. Clinical outcome measures included a visual analog scale (VAS) score for pain and the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) score. The radiologic outcome variable was the talar tilt angle. On second-look arthroscopy, cartilage regeneration was evaluated using the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) grade. The mean VAS score improved significantly from 7.3 ± 0.9 to 3.9 ± 1.2 in group 1 and from 7.4 ± 0.8 to 3.1 ± 1.5 in group 2 at final follow-up (P osteoarthritis who underwent lateral sliding calcaneal osteotomy, significant improvements in VAS and AOFAS scores, as well as better ICRS grades, were achieved at short-term follow-up after marrow stimulation with additional MSC injection compared with after marrow stimulation alone. Level III, retrospective comparative study. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Arthroscopic lysis and lavage in patients with temporomandibular anterior disc displacement without reduction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machoň, V.; Šedý, Jiří; Klíma, K.; Hirjak, D.; Foltán, R.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 1 (2012), s. 109-113 ISSN 0901-5027 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR GAP304/10/0320 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0538 Program:1M Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : temporomandibular joint * arthroscopic lysis * arthroscopic lavage Subject RIV: FJ - Surgery incl. Transplants Impact factor: 1.521, year: 2012

  3. Arthroscopic 360-Degree Capsular Release for Idiopathic Adhesive Capsulitis in the Lateral Decubitus Position

    OpenAIRE

    Romeo, Anthony A.; Cvetanovich, Gregory L.; Leroux, Timothy Sean; Bernardoni, Eamon; Saltzman, Bryan M.; Verma, Nikhil N.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Idiopathic glenohumeral adhesive capsulitis impairs patient motion and function. If conservative management fails, arthroscopic capsular release is classically performed in the beach-chair position with incapsule release and manipulation under anesthesia. We report outcomes following arthroscopic 360-degree capsular release in lateral decubitus position followed by limited manipulation to confirm restoration of range of motion. Methods: A retrospective case series of patients unde...

  4. Psychometric properties of patient-reported outcome measures for hip arthroscopic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, Joanne L; Collins, Natalie J; Roos, Ewa M.

    2013-01-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are considered the gold standard when evaluating outcomes in a surgical population. While the psychometric properties of some PROs have been tested, the properties of newer PROs in patients undergoing hip arthroscopic surgery remain somewhat unknown.......Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are considered the gold standard when evaluating outcomes in a surgical population. While the psychometric properties of some PROs have been tested, the properties of newer PROs in patients undergoing hip arthroscopic surgery remain somewhat unknown....

  5. Risk Factors for the Postoperative Recurrence of Instability After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair in Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Nakagawa, Shigeto; Mae, Tatsuo; Sato, Seira; Okimura, Shinichiro; Kuroda, Miki

    2017-01-01

    Background: Several risk factors for the postoperative recurrence of instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair have been reported, but there have been few detailed investigations of the specific risk factors in relation to the type of sport. Purpose: This study investigated the postoperative recurrence of instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair without additional reinforcement procedures in competitive athletes, including athletes with a large glenoid defect. The purpose of this stu...

  6. Isolated HAGL lesion after arthroscopic Bankart repair in a professional soccer player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Haluk; Seckin, Mustafa Faik; Kara, Adnan; Akman, Senol

    2017-05-01

    Post-traumatic anterior shoulder instability commonly occurs following an avulsion of capsulolabral complex from glenoid (Bankart lesion) or rarely after humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligaments (HAGL lesion). Arthroscopic Bankart repair offers high success rates of healing. However, trauma following the treatment may cause implant failure or re-avulsion of the treated tissue. We aim to present the diagnosis and treatment of an isolated HAGL lesion in a professional soccer player who had previously undergone arthroscopic Bankart repair.

  7. Arthroscopic Treatment of Septic Arthritis of the Elbow in a 4-Year-Old Girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Koide

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric septic arthritis is uncommon and has been traditionally treated by joint aspiration or open arthrotomy. There are some reports about arthroscopic surgery in pediatric septic arthritis of the knee, hip, and shoulder. However, there is no report for the case of elbow. We report a case of pediatric septic arthritis of elbow treated with arthroscopically with good clinical condition at 3-year follow-up. This paper is based on a report first published in Japanese (Tojo (2012.

  8. Arthroscopic Hemitrapeziectomy for First Carpometacarpal Arthritis: Results at 7-year Follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmeister, Eric P.; Leak, Robert S.; Culp, Randall W.; Osterman, A. Lee

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the outcome of arthroscopic hemitrapeziectomy combined with thermal capsular plication and temporary K-wire fixation in patients with painful thumb basal joint due to either osteoarthritis or posttraumatic arthritis. There were 18 thumbs that were evaluated in this retrospective study of arthroscopic hemitrapeziectomy of the distal trapezium in addition to a pancapsular thermal shrinkage at an average of 7.6-year follow-up. No patient has required fu...

  9. 2009 survey results: surgeon practice patterns regarding arthroscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfern, John; Burks, Robert

    2009-12-01

    A survey was conducted to collect information on the surgical management and practice preferences of the audience members at a recent continuing medical education conference. Participants were polled on a variety of surgical topics, and their responses were recorded using a wireless audience response system. The answers were tabulated and are presented in this report. The majority of respondents preferred an arthroscopic repair for rotator cuff tears (52%) and shoulder instability (71%). Most (50%) perform single-row repair; 33% perform double-row repair. For simple knee arthroscopy, most use preoperative antibiotics (85%), no tourniquet (53%), and no chemical anticoagulation or only compression boots (69%). For cruciate ligament reconstruction, the majority preferred only a preoperative antibiotic (67%), no chemical anticoagulation or only compression boots (56%), and single-bundle reconstruction (88%) using a transtibial femoral tunnel (78%). Most (47%) prefer an all inside suture-based meniscus repair device.

  10. Arthroscopic assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey P Little

    Full Text Available Cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CR is a degenerative condition in dogs that typically has a non-contact mechanism. Subsequent contralateral rupture often develops in dogs with unilateral CR. Synovitis severity is an important factor that promotes ligament degradation. Consequently, we wished to evaluate the utility of arthroscopy for assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with CR. Herein, we report results of a prospective study of 27 dogs with unilateral CR and bilateral radiographic osteoarthritis. Arthroscopic images and synovial biopsies from the lateral and medial joint pouches were obtained bilaterally and graded for synovial hypertrophy, vascularity, and synovitis. Synovial tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive (TRAP+ macrophages, CD3(+ T lymphocytes, Factor VIII+ blood vessels, and synovial intima thickness were quantified histologically and related to arthroscopic observations. Risk of subsequent contralateral CR was examined using survival analysis. We found that arthroscopic scores were increased in the index stifle, compared with the contralateral stifle (p0.34, p0.31, p<0.05. Strong intra-observer and moderate inter-observer agreement for arthroscopic scoring was found. Dog age and arthroscopic vascularity significantly influenced risk of contralateral CR over time. We conclude that arthroscopic grading of synovitis is a precise tool that correlates with histologic synovitis. Arthroscopy is useful for assessment of stifle synovitis in client-owned dogs, and could be used in longitudinal clinical trials to monitor synovial responses to disease-modifying therapy.

  11. Structural damage and chemical contaminants on reprocessed arthroscopic shaver blades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masahiko; Nakagawa, Yasuaki; Okamoto, Yukihiro; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nakamura, Takashi

    2009-02-01

    on the reprocessed arthroscopic shaver blades. Surgeons should keep in mind that mechanical damage and chemical contamination are found on reprocessed arthroscopic blades.

  12. Interactive stereotaxic teleassistance of remote experts during arthroscopic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Arne; Undt, Gerhard; Schicho, Kurt; Wanschitz, Felix; Watzinger, Franz; Murakami, Kenichiro; Czerny, Christian; Ewers, Rolf

    2002-01-01

    This article describes the technical setup for stereotaxic telesurgical assistance for arthroscopic procedures. It also outlines the current state, limitations, and feasibility of this technical development. Teleassistance or teleconsultation implemented in endoscopic or arthroscopic procedures have not yet been reported. In this study, 7 computer-assisted arthroscopies of the temporomandibular joint were supported by extramural experts via interactive stereotaxic teleconsultation from distant locations. The external experts were supplied with close to real-time video, audio, and stereotaxic navigation data directly from the operation site. This setup allows the surgeons and external experts to interactively determine portals, target structures, and instrument positions relative to the patient's anatomy and to discuss any step of the procedures. Optoelectronic tracking interfaced to computer- based navigation technology allowed precise positioning of instruments for single or multiple temporomandibular joint punctures. The average error of digitizing probe measurements was 1.3 mm (range, 0.0 to 2.5 mm) and the average standard deviation was 0.7 mm (range, 0.4 to 0.9 mm). Evaluation of the reliability and accuracy of this technique suggests that it is sufficient for controlled navigation, even inside the small temporomandibular joint, a fact that encourages further applications for arthroscopy in general. The minimum requirement for high-quality video transmission for teleassisted procedures are integrated services digital network (ISDN) connections. Conventional ISDN-based videoconferencing can be combined with computer-aided intraoperative navigation. Transmission control protocol/internet protocol (TCP/IP)-based stereotaxic teleassistance data transmission via ATM or satellite seem to be promising techniques to considerably improve the field of arthroscopy.

  13. Intraarticular glucocorticoid, morphine and bupivacaine reduces pain and convalescence after arthroscopic ankle surgery: a randomized study of 36 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, S; Kehlet, H

    2000-01-01

    , bupivacaine and morphine reduced pain, joint swelling, time of immobilization, duration of sick leave and return to sports after the arthroscopic procedure. In the treatment group, 1 patient had transitory purulent arthritis requiring antibiotics and arthroscopic synovectomy occurred.......In a double-blind randomized study, 36 patients undergoing arthroscopic removal of bony spurs and synovitis causing impingement of the ankle were allocated to intraarticular saline or bupivacaine 15 mg + morphine 5 mg + intraarticular methylprednisolone 40 mg. Combined methylprednisolone...

  14. Factors associated with the failure of arthroscopic surgery treatment in patients with femoroacetabular impingement: A cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, D; Gómez-Hoyos, J; Márquez, W; Gallo, J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of the anatomical and functional characteristics with therapeutic failure in patients with femoroacetabular impingement, who underwent hip arthroscopy. A cohort study was performed on 179 patients with femoroacetabular impingement who underwent hip arthroscopy between 2004 and 2012. The demographic, anatomical, functional, and clinical information were recorded. A logistic regression model and ANCOVA were used in order to compare the described characteristics with the treatment outcomes of the hip arthroscopy. The median time of follow-up for symptoms was 13 months (8-30), and the mean time of follow-up after surgery was 23.83 ± 9.8 months. At the end of the follow-up 3.91% of the patients were considered as a therapeutic failure. The WOMAC score in pain and functional branches, as well as the total WOMAC score, showed significant differences (P<.05). The mean WOMAC score was higher (0 to 100 with 0 being a perfect score) in the group of patients who failed after surgery as compared with the group who meet the requirements for a successful treatment, 65.9 vs 48.8, respectively (mean difference 17.0; 95% CI; 1.3-32.6; P=.033). The poor functional state prior to arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement, mainly due to preoperative pain, assessed using the WOMAC scale, is associated with a higher therapeutic failure rate. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Infrapatellar plica of the knee: Revisited with MR arthrographies undertaken in the knee flexion position mimicking operative arthroscopic posture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Han; Song, Ho-Taek; Kim, Sungjun [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung-Jae [Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Arthroscopic Surgery Unit, Yonsei University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Jin-Suck, E-mail: jss@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To describe the appearance of the infrapatellar plica (IPP) on magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) taken in 70° knee flexion, corresponding to the arthroscopic posture. Materials and methods: Twenty-two patients (23 knee joints) who underwent MRA with 70° knee flexion were enrolled. All patients underwent MRA with 70° knee flexion to simulate operative arthroscopy. The images included fat-suppressed T1-weighted spin echo axial, sagittal, and coronal images. The visualization and morphology of the IPP were retrospectively assessed by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Results: The IPP was demonstrated in 78.3% (n = 18/23) and was best visualized on the sagittal section through the intercondylar notch. The IPP manifested as a linear hypointense structure with variable thicknesses. The intercondylar component was delineated clearly, arising from the anterior intercondylar notch in parallel with the ACL and curving gently downward to attach to the infrapatellar fat pad. On the other hand, the Hoffa's fat pad component was not depicted clearly. The morphology of the IPP was either a separate type (60.9%) or a split type (17.4%). Conclusion: The IPPs can be visualized with a high rate of detection and various morphologic appearances must be appreciated under the review of a flexed knee MRA.

  16. Partial Cancellation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Partial Cancellation. Full Cancellation is desirable. But complexity requirements are enormous. 4000 tones, 100 Users billions of flops !!! Main Idea: Challenge: To determine which cross-talker to cancel on what “tone” for a given victim. Constraint: Total complexity is ...

  17. Impingement syndrome of the ankle following supination external rotation trauma: MR imaging findings with arthroscopic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaffler, Gottfried J. [Department of Radiology, University of California San Francisco, 350 Parnassus Avenue, Suite 150, San Francisco, CA 94117 (United States); Department of Radiology, University Hospital Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 9, 8036 Graz (Austria); Tirman, Phillip F.J.; Stoller, David W. [San Francisco Magnetic Resonance Center, 3333 California Street, Suite 105, San Francisco, CA 94118 (United States); Genant, Harry K. [Department of Radiology, University of California San Francisco, 350 Parnassus Avenue, Suite 150, San Francisco, CA 94117 (United States); Ceballos, Cecar; Dillingham, Michael F. [Sports Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, 2884 Sand Hill Rd., Suite 110, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2003-06-01

    Our objective was to identify MR imaging findings in patients with syndesmotic soft tissue impingement of the ankle and to investigate the reliability of these imaging characteristics to predict syndesmotic soft tissue impingement syndromes of the ankle. Twenty-one ankles with chronic pain ultimately proven to have anterior soft tissue impingement syndrome were examined by MR imaging during January 1996 to June 2001. The MR imaging protocol included sagittal and coronal short tau inversion recovery (STIR), sagittal T1-weighted spin echo, axial and coronal proton-density, and T2-weighted spin-echo sequences. Nineteen ankles that underwent MR imaging during the same period of time and that had arthroscopically proven diagnosis different than impingement syndrome served as a control group. Fibrovascular scar formations distinct from the syndesmotic ligaments possibly related to syndesmotic soft tissue impingement were recorded. Arthroscopy was performed subsequently in all patients and was considered the gold standard. The statistical analysis revealed an overall frequency of scarred syndesmotic ligaments of 70% in the group with ankle impingement. Fibrovascular scar formations distinct from the syndesmotic ligaments presented with low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and remained low to intermediate in signal intensity on T2-weighted MR imaging. Compared with arthroscopy, MR imaging revealed a sensitivity of 89%, a specificity of 100%, and a diagnostic accuracy of 93% for scarred syndesmotic ligaments. The frequency of scar formation distinct from the syndesmotic ligaments in patients with impingement syndrome of the ankle was not statistically significantly higher than in the control group. In contrast to that, anterior tibial osteophytes and talar osteophytes were statistically significantly higher in the group with anterior impingement than in the control group. Conventional MR imaging was found to be insensitive for the diagnosis of syndesmotic soft tissue

  18. Graft position in arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: anteromedial versus transtibial technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, Olcay; Mahırogulları, Mahir; Mutlu, Serhat; Cercı, Mehmet H; Seker, Ali; Cakmak, Selami

    2016-11-01

    When treating anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, the position of the ACL graft plays a key role in regaining postoperative knee function and physiologic kinematics. In this study, we aimed to compare graft angle, graft position in tibial tunnel, and tibial and femoral tunnel positions in patients operated with anteromedial (AM) and transtibial (TT) methods to those of contralateral healthy knees. Forty-eight patients who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with ipsilateral hamstring tendon autograft were included. Of these, 23 and 25 were treated by AM and TT techniques, respectively. MRI was performed at 18.4 and 19.7 months postoperatively in AM and TT groups. Graft angles, graft positions in the tibial tunnel and alignment of tibial and femoral tunnels were noted and compared in these two groups. The sagittal graft insertion tibia midpoint distance (SGON) has been used for evaluation of graft position in tunnel. Sagittal ACL graft angles in operated and healthy knees of AM patients were 57.78° and 46.80° (p anterior-posterior position of femoral tunnel was better in AM patients. Lysholm scores and range of motion of operated knees in the AM and TT groups showed no significant difference (p > 0.05). Precise reconstruction on sagittal plane cannot be obtained with either AM or TT technique. However, AM technique is superior to TT technique in terms of anatomical graft positioning. Posterior-placed grafts in tibial tunnel prevent ACL reconstruction, although tibial tunnel is drilled on sagittal plane.

  19. Use of a fluoroscopic overlay to assist arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, Gele; Araujo, Paulo; Rabuck, Stephen; Carey, Robert; Rincon, Gustavo; Zhang, Xudong; Harner, Christopher

    2013-08-01

    A growing body of evidence supports the importance of anatomic tunnel positioning in the success of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, which stimulates the need for technologies to aid surgeons in achieving accurate anatomic tunnel placement. Intraoperative fluoroscopy is potentially one such technology, while its efficacy and usability have yet to be established. To investigate the performance of an intraoperative fluoroscopic overlay in guiding tunnel placement during ACL reconstruction. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty cadaveric knees underwent computed tomography (CT) scans and arthroscopic digitization of ACL insertion sites. The outlines of the digitized insertion sites were mapped to the corresponding CT-acquired bone models through a co-registration procedure. Twenty orthopaedic surgeons performed simulated ACL reconstructions, each on a randomly assigned cadaveric knee, first without and then with the aid of a fluoroscopic overlay system. The overlay system displayed on a lateral fluoroscopic image targets points representing the locations of the ACL insertion sites estimated from the literature data. Surgeons were allowed to adjust their tunnel positions under the guidance of the fluoroscopic image. Their initial, intermediate, and final positions were documented and compared with the target points as well as the native insertion sites. Surgeons demonstrated significant (P < .01) improvements in femoral and tibial tunnel placements relative to the target points from an average distance of 3.9 mm to 1.6 mm on the femur and 2.1 mm to 0.9 mm on the tibia. The improvements toward the knee-specific actual insertion sites were significant on the tibial side but not on the femoral side. Surgeons can be successfully guided with fluoroscopy to create more consistent femoral and tibial tunnels during ACL reconstruction. More research is warranted to develop better population representations of the locations of natural insertion sites

  20. Arthroscopic deepening trochleoplasty for chronic anterior knee pain after previous failed conservative and arthroscopic treatment. Report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blønd, Lars

    2017-01-01

    A proportion of patients having years of chronic anterior knee pain(AKP) that have not responded to non-operative modalities. Trochlear dysplasia have been found to be a cause for AKP. By restoring the anatomy with a trochleoplasty procedure the patellofemoral joint is unloaded. This study is a prospective 2year follow-up study, based on two cases with chronic AKP for several years and having severe trochlear dysplasia and both were successfully treated by arthroscopic deepening trochleoplasty. Case one was a 46year old women with chronic anterior knee pain (AKP). Imaging showed lateral trochlear inclination angle of 2°, trochlear asymmetry 0.36, central height 81% and medial height 83%. Thepreoperative Kujala score was 70 and Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) subscale for pain was 67. Case two was a 26year old man troubled by AKP and knee knee joint effusion for >8years without any instability in the history. Imaging showed lateral trochlear inclination angle of 6°, trochlear asymmetry 0.25, central height 76% and medial height 78%. The preoperative Kujala score was 49 and KOOS subscale for pain was 72. The postoperative Kujala score was for case one 82 and for case two 81. The postoperative KOOS subscale for pain was for case one 89 and for case two 92. Improvement in the KOOS subscale for sport and recreational activities and quality of living were also found. This is the first case report to demonstrate that patient having had years of chronic AKP and trochlear dysplasia can be successfully treated by arthroscopic trochleoplasty. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical and Radiographic Predictors for Worsened Clinical Outcomes After Hip Arthroscopic Labral Preservation and Capsular Closure in Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Soshi; Utsunomiya, Hajime; Mori, Toshiharu; Taketa, Tomonori; Nishikino, Shoichi; Nakamura, Toshitaka; Sakai, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    Patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) have a greater risk of acetabular labral tearing and joint instability, which predispose them to developing osteoarthritis. The arthroscopic management of DDH, however, remains controversial. Specific clinical characteristics and radiographic parameters correlate with and predict a worsened clinical outcome after hip arthroscopic surgery for DDH. Case control study; Level of evidence, 3. Of patients with DDH who underwent an arthroscopic procedure between March 2009 and June 2011, there were 28 hips in 28 patients (6 male and 22 female) that met the inclusion criteria. The mean patient age was 28.4 years. Clinical and radiographic follow-up evaluations up to a minimum of 2 years after surgery were performed for all patients. Failure of the procedure was defined as conversion to subsequent surgery or having a Tönnis osteoarthritis grade of 2 and modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS) that remained 85. Univariate analysis and Cox hazard proportional analysis were performed on the 2 subpopulations. There were 9 patients in the failure group (including 3 hips with T nnis grade 2) and 19 patients in the success group. In 22 of 28 patients, the mean mHHS significantly improved from 61.6 ± 18.8 (range, 12.0-85.0) preoperatively to 94.3 ± 7.0 (range, 73.7-100.0) at final follow-up, and the mean Non-Arthritic Hip Score (NAHS) improved from 56.2 ± 13.9 (range, 35.0-81.3) preoperatively to 92.7 ± 9.5 (range, 65.0-100.0) at final follow-up (P Hip Outcomes Research Network [MAHORN] grades 3-5) was significantly higher in the failure group than in the success group (8/9 [89%] vs 3/19 [16%] patients, respectively; P 140°, center-edge (CE) angle 23 kg/m(2), acetabular cartilage damage (MAHORN grades 3-5), and cartilage damage of the femoral head (International Cartilage Repair Society grades 2-4). The most important predictors for a poor clinical outcome at the time of surgery were a broken Shenton line and an FNS angle >140

  2. Effects of arthroscopy-guided suprascapular nerve block combined with ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Jun; Hwang, Jung-Taek; Kim, Do-Young; Lee, Sang-Soo; Hwang, Sung Mi; Lee, Na Rea; Kwak, Byung-Chan

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the pain relieving effect of ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB) combined with arthroscopy-guided suprascapular nerve block (SSNB) with that of ultrasound-guided ISB alone within the first 48 h after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Forty-eight patients with rotator cuff tears who had undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were enrolled. The 24 patients in group 1 received ultrasound-guided ISB and arthroscopy-guided SSNB; the remaining 24 patients in group 2 underwent ultrasound-guided ISB alone. Visual analogue scale pain score and patient satisfaction score were checked at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 48 h post-operatively. Group 1 had a lower visual analogue scale pain score at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 48 h post-operatively (1.7  6.0, 6.2 > 4.3, 6.4 > 5.1, 6.9 > 5.9, 7.9 > 7.1). Six patients in group 1 developed rebound pain twice, and the others in group 1 developed it once. All of the patients in group 2 had one rebound phenomenon each (p = 0.010). The mean timing of rebound pain in group 1 was later than that in group 2 (15.5 > 9.3 h, p  4.0, p = 0.001). Arthroscopy-guided SSNB combined with ultrasound-guided ISB resulted in lower visual analogue scale pain scores at 3-24 and 48 h post-operatively, and higher patient satisfaction scores at 6-36 h post-operatively with the attenuated rebound pain compared to scores in patients who received ultrasound-guided ISB alone after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The combined blocks may relieve post-operative pain more effectively than the single block within 48 h after arthroscopic cuff repair. Randomized controlled trial, Level I. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02424630.

  3. Partial gigantism

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    М.М. Karimova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A girl with partial gigantism (the increased I and II fingers of the left foot is being examined. This condition is a rare and unresolved problem, as the definite reason of its development is not determined. Wait-and-see strategy is recommended, as well as correcting operations after closing of growth zones, and forming of data pool for generalization and development of schemes of drug and radial therapeutic methods.

  4. Does perception of usefulness of arthroscopic simulators differ with levels of experience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuijthof, Gabriëlle J M; Visser, P; Sierevelt, Inger N; Van Dijk, C Niek; Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J

    2011-06-01

    Some commercial simulators are available for training basic arthroscopic skills. However, it is unclear if these simulators allow training for their intended purposes and whether the perception of usefulness relates to level of experience. We addressed the following questions: (1) Do commercial simulators have construct (times to perform tasks) and face validity (realism), and (2) is the perception of usefulness (educational value and user-friendliness) related to level of experience? We evaluated two commercially available virtual reality simulators (Simulators A and B) and recruited 11 and nine novices (no arthroscopies), four and four intermediates (one to 59 arthroscopies), and seven and nine experts (> 60 arthroscopies) to test the devices. To assess construct validity, we recorded the median time per experience group for each of five repetitions of one identical navigation task. To assess face validity, we used a questionnaire to judge up to three simulator characteristic tasks; the questionnaire asked about the realism, perception of educational value, and perception of user-friendliness. We observed partial construct validity for Simulators A and B and considered face validity satisfactory for both simulators for simulating the outer appearance and human joint, but barely satisfactory for the instruments. Simulators A and B had equal educational value according to the participants. User-friendliness was judged better for Simulator B although both were graded satisfactory. The perception of usefulness did not differ with level of experience. Our observations suggest training on either simulator is reasonable preparation for real-life arthroscopy, although there is room for improvement for both simulators.

  5. Comparative study of open and arthroscopic coracoid transfer for shoulder anterior instability (Latarjet)-clinical results at short term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordasiewicz, Bartłomiej; Małachowski, Konrad; Kicinski, Maciej; Chaberek, Sławomir; Pomianowski, Stanisław

    2017-05-01

    contralateral shoulder: 7° versus 14° in ARTHRO. Recurrence was reported in three cases in each group: 6.2% in OPEN and 4.8% in ARTHRO. A revision surgery was performed in four patients (9.3%) in OPEN and six (9.7%) in ARTHRO. Radiographic evaluation showed a significantly lower rate (5%) of graft healing problems (fracture, non-union and osteolysis) after arthroscopic stabilisation, however a partial osteolysis of the proximal part of the bone block was significantly more frequent (53.5%). The arthroscopic Latarjet stabilisation showed satisfactory and comparable results to open procedure. We recommend further investigation and development of arthroscopic technique. III.

  6. Lateral Decubitus All-Arthroscopic Latarjet Procedure for Treatment of Shoulder Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewington, Matthew R.; Urquhart, Nathan; Wong, Ivan H.

    2015-01-01

    Shoulder instability can be a challenging condition to treat when it becomes refractory to soft-tissue procedures or when bone loss exceeds 25% to 27% of the glenoid. The Bristow-Latarjet procedure has been developed and popularized to deal with these concerns. Traditionally, the procedure has been performed as an open approach; however, this has been recently supplanted by novel arthroscopic techniques. We present a technique for the procedure performed with the patient in a semi-lateral decubitus position that assists with optimal graft placement on the native glenoid. We use the cannulated Bristow-Latarjet Instability Shoulder System (DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA). After a diagnostic arthroscopic evaluation, we use multiple arthroscopic anterior portals to debride the rim of the glenoid. The coracoid is prepared and taken down arthroscopically, and the cannulated guide is attached and advanced through an arthroscopically created subscapularis split. With the shoulder held in a reduced position, we are then able to drill and anchor the graft to the native glenoid. The patient is able to begin gentle range-of-motion exercises immediately postoperatively. PMID:26258032

  7. One-incision versus two-incision techniques for arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Fernando C; Moraes, Vinícius Y; Franciozi, Carlos Es; Debieux, Pedro; Luzo, Marcus V; Belloti, João Carlos

    2017-12-15

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are serious knee injuries that are frequently treated surgically in the form of arthroscopically assisted reconstruction with grafts from the patella or hamstrings tendons. We reviewed the evidence for the choice of arthroscopically assisted ACL reconstruction technique in terms of whether it should involve one incision (femoral tunnel drilled from inside the knee joint under arthroscopic visualisation) or two incisions (femoral tunnel drilled from outside to inside the knee joint). To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of one-incision versus two-incision techniques for arthroscopically assisted ACL reconstruction in adults. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences (LILACS), the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, ClinicalTrials.gov, reference lists, and conference abstracts. The date of the search was 16 August 2017. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled clinical trials evaluating one-incision versus two-incision techniques for arthroscopically assisted ACL reconstruction in adults. Two review authors independently searched and selected studies, and extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of the eligible studies. We undertook limited pooling of data using the fixed-effect model. We included five trials (four randomised and one quasi-randomised) evaluating a total of 320 participants who were mainly in their 20s. All participants underwent ACL reconstruction with patella tendon grafts. All five included trials were at a high risk of bias, particularly performance bias. Based on these limitations and the insufficiency of the available data resulting in imprecision of effect estimates, we judged the quality of the evidence as very low for all outcomes. This means that we are uncertain of the findings of the

  8. The Burden of Craft in Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Where Have We Been and Where We Are Going.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Stephen S

    2015-08-01

    The rather turbulent history of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair went through stages of innovation, conflict, disruption, assimilation, and transformation that might be anticipated when a new and advanced technology (arthroscopic cuff repair) displaces an entrenched but outdated discipline (open cuff repair). The transition from open to arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has been a major paradigm shift that has greatly benefited patients. However, this technical evolution/revolution has also imposed a higher "burden of craft" on the practitioners of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Technological advancements in surgery demand that surgeons accept this burden of craft and master the advanced technology for the benefit of their patients. This article outlines the author's involvement in the development of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, and it also explores the surgeon's obligation to accept the burden of craft that is imposed by this discipline.

  9. Arthroscopic Treatment of a Case with Concomitant Subacromial and Subdeltoid Synovial Chondromatosis and Labrum Tear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevres Hurriyet Aydogan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial chondromatosis is a disease that seldomly seen in shoulder joint and is related to benign synovial proliferation and synchronous chondral tissue formation within the joint cavity. Patients suffer from progressive restriction of range of motion and shoulder pain. Extra-articular involvement is an extremely rare condition. Degenerative osteoarthritis, joint subluxation, and bursitis are common complications in untreated patients. Open or arthroscopic surgery is suitable while there is no consensus related to superiority of different approaches. We presented an arthroscopic treatment of a male patient, 48 years old with labrum tear and synovial chondromatosis localized in subacromial and subdeltoid region. Advantages of arthroscopic surgery in the presence of intra- and extra-articular combined pathologies are also discussed.

  10. Comparison of Three Virtual Reality Arthroscopic Simulators as Part of an Orthopedic Residency Educational Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kevin D; Amendola, Annunziato; Phisitkul, Phinit

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose Orthopedic education continues to move towards evidence-based curriculum in order to comply with new residency accreditation mandates. There are currently three high fidelity arthroscopic virtual reality (VR) simulators available, each with multiple instructional modules and simulated arthroscopic procedures. The aim of the current study is to assess face validity, defined as the degree to which a procedure appears effective in terms of its stated aims, of three available VR simulators. Methods Thirty subjects were recruited from a single orthopedic residency training program. Each subject completed one training session on each of the three leading VR arthroscopic simulators (ARTHRO mentor-Symbionix, ArthroS-Virtamed, and ArthroSim-Toltech). Each arthroscopic session involved simulator-specific modules. After training sessions, subjects completed a previously validated simulator questionnaire for face validity. Results The median external appearances for the ARTHRO Mentor (9.3, range 6.7-10.0; p=0.0036) and ArthroS (9.3, range 7.3-10.0; p=0.0003) were statistically higher than for Arthro- Sim (6.7, range 3.3-9.7). There was no statistical difference in intraarticular appearance, instrument appearance, or user friendliness between the three groups. Most simulators reached an appropriate level of proportion of sufficient scores for each categor y (≥70%), except for ARTHRO Mentor (intraarticular appearance-50%; instrument appearance- 61.1%) and ArthroSim (external appearance- 50%; user friendliness-68.8%). Conclusion These results demonstrate that ArthroS has the highest overall face validity of the three current arthroscopic VR simulators. However, only external appearance for ArthroS reached statistical significance when compared to the other simulators. Additionally, each simulator had satisfactory intraarticular quality. This study helps further the understanding of VR simulation and necessary features for accurate arthroscopic representation

  11. Open Versus Arthroscopic Latarjet Procedure for Anterior Shoulder Instability: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Eoghan T; Lim Fat, Daren; Farrington, Shane K; Mullett, Hannan

    2018-03-01

    Anterior shoulder instability with significant glenoid bone loss is a challenging condition. The open Latarjet procedure is the established standard treatment method in this setting, but there is an increasing use of the arthroscopic technique. To systematically review the current evidence in the literature to ascertain if the open or arthroscopic Latarjet procedure resulted in improved patient outcomes. Systematic review and meta-analysis. A literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library was performed based on the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses) guidelines. Cohort studies comparing the open and arthroscopic Latarjet procedures for anterior shoulder instability were included. Clinical outcomes were compared, with all statistical analysis performed using Review Manager (version 5.3). A P value of Latarjet procedures resulted in a similar number of total recurrent instability (2.0% vs 2.4%; P = .75), revision procedures (2.4% vs 5.4%; P = .06), and total complications (13.8% vs 11.9%; P = .50), but the open procedure had a lower rate of persistent apprehension (10.2% vs 35.7%; P Latarjet procedures result in significant improvements in patient function and outcome scores, with low rates of recurrent instability and similar complication rates. While technically challenging, the arthroscopic procedure has been shown to be a safe and viable alternative. However, there is a significant learning curve associated with the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. The significant learning curve associated with this procedure suggests the arthroscopic procedure may be advisable to perform only in high-volume centers with experienced arthroscopists.

  12. The efficacy of post-operative devices following knee arthroscopic surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatewood, Corey T; Tran, Andrew A; Dragoo, Jason L

    2017-02-01

    There is a wide array of device modalities available for post-operative treatment following arthroscopic knee surgery; however, it remains unclear which types and duration of modality are the most effective. This systematic review aimed to investigate the efficacy of device modalities used following arthroscopic knee surgery. A systematic search of the literature was performed on: PubMed; Scopus; MEDLINE; EMBASE; PEDro; SportDiscus; and CINAHL databases (1995-2015) for clinical trials using device modalities following arthroscopic knee surgery: cryotherapy, continuous passive motion (CPM), neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), surface electromyographic (sEMG) biofeedback and shockwave therapy (ESWT). Only level 1 and 2 studies were included and the methodological quality of studies was evaluated using Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scores. Outcome measures included: muscle strength, range of motion, swelling, blood loss, pain relief, narcotic use, knee function evaluation and scores, patient satisfaction and length of hospital stay. Twenty-five studies were included in this systematic review, nineteen of which found a significant difference in outcomes. For alleviating pain and decreasing narcotic consumption following arthroscopic knee surgery, cryocompression devices are more effective than traditional icing alone, though not more than compression alone. CPM does not affect post-operative outcomes. sEMG biofeedback and NMES improve quadriceps strength and overall knee functional outcomes following knee surgery. There is limited evidence regarding the effects of ESWT. Cryotherapy, NMES and sEMG are recommended for inclusion into rehabilitation protocols following arthroscopic knee surgery to assist with pain relief, recovery of muscle strength and knee function, which are all essential to accelerate recovery. CPM is not warranted in post-operative protocols following arthroscopic knee surgery because of its limited effectiveness in returning knee

  13. Arthroscopic Anatomy of the Dislocated Hip in Infants and Obstacles Preventing Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Oliver; Wirth, Thomas; Fernandez, Francisco F

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the anatomy as seen arthroscopically, the role of the labrum and its relevance in luxation and reduction procedures, and secondary changes to the cartilaginous acetabular roof and to determine the main obstacles preventing reduction of dislocated hips in infants and young children. A specialized pediatric medial approach to hip arthroscopy was performed on 25 hip joints in 21 patients younger than 4 years of age. The arthroscopic procedure was conducted using a 2.7-mm cannulated instrument. A subadductor portal was used for the 70° arthroscope, and a high anterolateral portal served as a working portal. The anatomic findings of the individual hip joints were recorded. We examined the femoral head, the teres ligament, the transverse ligament, the acetabulum, and the acetabular labrum. The obstacles preventing reduction were successively resected. An arthroscopic investigation of all major structures and arthroscopic reduction was possible in 25 hip joints. A hypertrophic teres ligament was present in 23 of the 25 hips. Capsular constriction prevented reduction in 22 of the 25 hips. The acetabular labrum was not inverted in any of the examined hip joints and was also never an obstacle to reduction. Secondary changes to the cartilaginous preformed acetabular roof were present in 10 hips. We have shown that arthroscopy of a developmentally dislocated hip can be safely performed using the subadductor portal. Through this arthroscopic approach, we were able to identify the previously described pathologic structures-the limbus, neolimbus, pulvinar, hypertrophic teres ligament, and capsular constriction. The capsule was the most common block to reduction, followed by the teres ligament. Successful reduction can be achieved by removal of intra-articular tissues, the pulvinar, and the teres ligament, and nearly always a capsular release. The limbus and neolimbus were not factors in achieving reduction in our series. Level IV, case

  14. Diagnostic performance of direct traction MR arthrography of the hip: detection of chondral and labral lesions with arthroscopic comparison

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    Schmaranzer, Florian; Klauser, Andrea; Henninger, Benjamin [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Kogler, Michael; Schmaranzer, Ehrenfried [District Hospital St. Johann in Tyrol, Department of Radiology, St. Johann in Tyrol (Austria); Forstner, Thomas [Johannes Keppler University, Department for Applied Systems Research and Statistics, Linz (Austria); Reichkendler, Markus [District Hospital St. Johann in Tyrol, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, St. Johann in Tyrol (Austria)

    2015-06-01

    To assess diagnostic performance of traction MR arthrography of the hip in detection and grading of chondral and labral lesions with arthroscopic comparison. Seventy-five MR arthrograms obtained ± traction of 73 consecutive patients (mean age, 34.5 years; range, 14-54 years) who underwent arthroscopy were included. Traction technique included weight-adapted traction (15-23 kg), a supporting plate for the contralateral leg, and intra-articular injection of 18-27 ml (local anaesthetic and contrast agent). Patients reported on neuropraxia and on pain. Two blinded readers independently assessed femoroacetabular cartilage and labrum lesions which were correlated with arthroscopy. Interobserver agreement was calculated using κ values. Joint distraction ± traction was evaluated in consensus. No procedure had to be stopped. There were no cases of neuropraxia. Accuracy for detection of labral lesions was 92 %/93 %, 91 %/83 % for acetabular lesions, and 92 %/88 % for femoral cartilage lesions for reader 1/reader 2, respectively. Interobserver agreement was moderate (κ = 0.58) for grading of labrum lesions and substantial (κ = 0.7, κ = 0.68) for grading of acetabular and femoral cartilage lesions. Joint distraction was achieved in 72/75 and 14/75 hips with/without traction, respectively. Traction MR arthrography safely enabled accurate detection and grading of labral and chondral lesions. (orig.)

  15. Physical therapy intervention for a former power lifter after arthroscopic microfracture procedure for grade iv glenohumeral chondral defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Craig P; Sum, Jonathan

    2011-03-01

    Power lifting places the shoulder complex at risk for injury. Microfracture is a relatively new procedure for chondral defects of the glenohumeral joint and is not well described in the literature. The purpose of this case report is to describe the post-operative rehabilitation used with a power lifter who underwent a microfracture procedure to address glenoid and humeral chondral defects, debridement of type I superior labral anterior-posterior lesion, and a subacromial decompression. The patient was a 46 year-old male who was evaluated nine weeks status-post arthroscopic microfracture procedure for glenoid and humeral chondral defects, debridement of superior labral anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesion, and subacromial decompression. Rehabilitation consisted of postural education, manual therapy, rotator cuff and scapular strengthening, dynamic stabilization, weightbearing exercises, and weight training over nine weeks (24 sessions). Lifting modifications were addressed. Results of the QuickDASH indicate that activities of daily living (ADLs), work, and sports modules all improved significantly, and the patient was able to return to recreational power lifting with limited discomfort or restrictions. A structured post-operative physical therapy treatment program allowed this patient to return to recreational power lifting while restoring independent function for work-related activities and ADLs.

  16. Detour sign in the diagnosis of subluxation of the long head of the biceps tendon with arthroscopic correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khil, Eun K; Cha, Jang G; Yi, Ji S; Kim, Hyun-Joo; Min, Kyung D; Yoon, Young C; Jeon, Chan H

    2017-02-01

    To determine whether detection of the detour sign via MRI indicates subluxation of the long head of the biceps tendon (SLBT) in the shoulder joint and to investigate the association of SLBT with the degeneration of the long head of the biceps tendon (LBT) and rotator cuff tears. This retrospective study included 65 patients with shoulder pain who underwent shoulder MRI and arthroscopic surgery. When axial images revealed that the LBT was displaced over the inner rim of the bicipital groove with some remaining contact with the groove (Criterion 1), or demonstrated a "detour sign" of the biceps tendon (Criterion 2), the lesion was diagnosed as an SLBT. Shoulder arthroscopy was used as the reference standard. Arthroscopy identified SLBT in 18 patients. When the MRI diagnosis was based on Criterion 1 alone, SLBT was diagnosed with a sensitivity of 44.4-55.6% and 75.4-80% accuracy. However, when the MRI diagnosis was based on Criteria 1 plus 2, SLBT was diagnosed with a sensitivity of 83.3-94.4% and 78.5-81.5% accuracy. There was a significant difference (p < 0.05) in the diagnostic sensitivity of Criteria 1 and 2. The detour sign based on axial MRI may be regarded an additional useful anatomical feature that improves the diagnostic performance of MRI in the identification of SLBT lesions. Advances in knowledge: Recognition of the detour sign may enhance the diagnostic performance of the conventional MRI protocol over the MR arthrography protocol for SLBT.

  17. Correlation of clinical, MRI and arthroscopic findings in diagnosing meniscus and ligament injuries at knee joint: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamini Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to correlate clinical, MRI, and arthroscopic findings in diagnosing ligament and meniscus tears in knee joint injuries. Materials and Methods: Our study included 20 patients in the age range of 11-60 years who were referred to radiology department for MRI of knee joint following injury to the knee. Prior to MRI, a detailed history, clinical, and local examination was done in all the subjects. MRI was carried out on 1.5 Tesla MR Machine and the standard protocol consisted of fat-suppressed PD (TE 45, TR 2800 in axial, sagittal, and coronal planes, T2W (TE 80, TR 4000 in sagittal plane and T1W (TE 11, TR 495 in sagittal plane. All the patients underwent arthroscopy by an orthopedic surgeon. Results: MR had 100% sensitivity and NPV of diagnosing ACL tears in this study. Clinical examination had sensitivity of 88% and NPV 75% in diagnosing ACL injuries. There was high NPV of MR examination (96% in diagnosing meniscus tear while the PPV of MR examination was low (71%. These values were low in case of clinical examination. Conclusions: MRI is a useful non-invasive modality having high diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, and negative predictive value making it a very reliable screening test for diagnosing internal derangements.

  18. Arthroscopic versus posterior endoscopic excision of a symptomatic os trigonum: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jae Hoon; Kim, Yoon-Chung; Kim, Ha-Yong

    2013-05-01

    Both subtalar arthroscopic and posterior endoscopic techniques are used to treat posterior ankle impingement syndrome (PAIS). However, there have been no studies comparing the 2 procedures. Both arthroscopic and endoscopic excisions of the os trigonum are safe and effective in treating PAIS. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Twenty-eight patients were treated with excision of the os trigonum either by an arthroscopic (16 patients) or endoscopic (12 patients) technique. The mean patient age was 29.8 years (range, 17-55 years), and the mean follow-up period was 30 months (range, 18-58 months). Preoperative and postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) score for pain, American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score, and Maryland Foot Score (MFS) were used to analyze the functional results. Duration of surgery, time to return to sports (RTS), and patient satisfaction were evaluated as well. The size of the os trigonum was measured using T1-weighted sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The clinical and MRI results were compared between the 2 groups. The VAS score, AOFAS score, and MFS for both the arthroscopic group (preoperative: 6.3, 63.8, and 61.5, respectively; postoperative: 1.2, 89.9, and 89.6, respectively) and endoscopic group (preoperative: 6.7, 64.8, and 62.5, respectively; postoperative: 1.2, 89.9, and 88.4, respectively) improved significantly (P .05). All patients were satisfied with the results. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in the preoperative and postoperative VAS score, AOFAS score, or MFS (P > .05). The mean size of the os trigonum was 11.1 × 8.8 mm(2) in the arthroscopic group and 12.6 × 10.4 mm(2) in the endoscopic group, and the difference was significant (P os trigonum arthroscopically. Both arthroscopic and posterior endoscopic excisions of the os trigonum were safe and effective in treating PAIS. The arthroscopic procedure was more demanding, especially in cases of a large os trigonum. The posterior

  19. Outcomes after arthroscopic fixation of tibial eminence fractures with bioabsorbable nails in skeletally immature patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momaya, Amit M; Read, Connor; Steirer, Megan; Estes, Reed

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to report the outcomes and any complications with arthroscopic bioabsorbable nail fixation of tibial eminence fractures in skeletally immature patients. We retrospectively reviewed all surgically treated tibial eminence fractures treated by a single surgeon and seven patients were identified with a minimum 2-year follow-up. Mean deficits of flexion and extension were minimal. Satisfactory Tegner levels, Lysholm knee scores, and International Knee Documentation Committee subjective scores were reported. Arthroscopic fixation of tibial eminence fractures with bioabsorbable nails yields satisfactory outcomes for this uncommon injury and obviates the need for future hardware removal.

  20. Effects of conservative therapy applied before arthroscopic subacromial decompression on the clinical outcome in patients with stage 2 shoulder impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Ali; Yildiz, Vahit; Topal, Murat; Tuncer, Kutsi; Köse, Mehmet; Şenocak, Eyüp

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effects of conservative therapy applied before arthroscopic subacromial decompression on the clinical outcome in patients with stage 2 shoulder impingement syndrome. Sixty-eight patients having stage 2 shoulder impingement syndrome and treated with arthroscopic subacromial decompression were included in the study. We divided these patients into 2 groups, whereby 32 (47%) patients received conservative therapy before arthroscopic subacromial decompression and 36 (53%) patients did not receive conservative therapy. We compared both groups in terms of the the Constant, UCLA, and VAS scores for shoulder pain before and after arthroscopic subacromial decompression. Constant, UCLA, and VAS scores were statistically significantly improved in both groups after arthroscopic subacromial decompression (P 0.05). Conservative therapy applied in patients with stage 2 shoulder impingement syndrome before arthroscopic subacromial decompression does not have a positive contribution on the clinical outcome after arthroscopic subacromial decompression.

  1. Energy-Based Metrics for Arthroscopic Skills Assessment

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    Behnaz Poursartip

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive skills assessment methods are essential in developing efficient surgical simulators and implementing consistent skills evaluation. Although numerous methods have been investigated in the literature, there is still a need to further improve the accuracy of surgical skills assessment. Energy expenditure can be an indication of motor skills proficiency. The goals of this study are to develop objective metrics based on energy expenditure, normalize these metrics, and investigate classifying trainees using these metrics. To this end, different forms of energy consisting of mechanical energy and work were considered and their values were divided by the related value of an ideal performance to develop normalized metrics. These metrics were used as inputs for various machine learning algorithms including support vector machines (SVM and neural networks (NNs for classification. The accuracy of the combination of the normalized energy-based metrics with these classifiers was evaluated through a leave-one-subject-out cross-validation. The proposed method was validated using 26 subjects at two experience levels (novices and experts in three arthroscopic tasks. The results showed that there are statistically significant differences between novices and experts for almost all of the normalized energy-based metrics. The accuracy of classification using SVM and NN methods was between 70% and 95% for the various tasks. The results show that the normalized energy-based metrics and their combination with SVM and NN classifiers are capable of providing accurate classification of trainees. The assessment method proposed in this study can enhance surgical training by providing appropriate feedback to trainees about their level of expertise and can be used in the evaluation of proficiency.

  2. Hand lesion after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: Association with complex regional pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanesue, Ryo; Gotoh, Masafumi; Mitsui, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Hidehiro; Honda, Hirokazu; Ohzono, Hiroki; Shimokobe, Hisao; Tokunaga, Tsuyoshi; Imai, Takaki; Okawa, Takahiro; Shiba, Naoto

    2018-01-01

    It is known that complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) occurs after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR); however, few studies have investigated this complication. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to evaluate CRPS after ARCR. A total of 182 patients who underwent ARCR were enrolled in this study. The average age of patients was 62.8 ± 10.0 years, with an average follow-up period of 21.5 ± 38.1 months. CRPS criteria outlined by the Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare study team for CRPS in Japan (MHLWJ) and International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP 2005) were utilized for diagnosis. There are two rating systems for the "clinical purpose" and "research purpose" in both criteria, respectively. Clinical outcomes, including Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) and University of California, Los Angeles scores, were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analysis. CRPS exclusively occurred in the hand of the operated limb, developing within 3 months of surgery. Two or more of the following symptoms were noted in patients with the hand lesion associated with CRPS: edema (93.4%), restricted range of motion (83.4%), hyperalgesia (30.1%), paridrosis (20.4%), and atrophic change (12.2%). Under these conditions, the incidences of CRPS were 24.2% (44/182) when evaluated by the MHLWJ rating system for the "clinical purpose;" 11% (22/182) by the MHLWJ rating system for the "research purpose;" 6% (11/182) by the IASP 2005 for the "clinical purpose;" and 0.5% (1/182) by the IASP 2005 for the "research purpose." Results of multivariate analysis demonstrated that "Function" in the JOA score was a risk factor for the development of CRPS after ARCR, when evaluated by a system for the "clinical purpose" of the MHLWJ. Following ARCR, CRPS-induced hand lesions occur more frequently than is generally believed, thereby suggesting that its impact on surgical outcomes should be clarified in the future. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Orthopaedic

  3. Impact of extra-articular pathologies on groin pain: An arthroscopic evaluation.

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    Mitsunori Kaya

    Full Text Available For patients who have anterior hip pain evaluated by Patrick's test and tenderness at Scarpa's triangle, we perform periarticular debridement based on the hypothesis that extra-articular pathologies are responsible for the hip pain. The purpose of this study was to categorize the endoscopic extra-articular findings and to evaluate the clinical significance of periarticular pathologies in anterior hip pain.Arthroscopic findings of 77 patients who underwent periarthritic debridement were evaluated. As extra-articular pathologies, injuries of the direct head and reflective head of the rectus femoris muscle were evaluated. A thin layer of fat tissue normally exists on the anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS, the attachment site of the direct head of the rectus femoris muscle. The macroscopic appearance of the fat pad on the AIIS was categorized as normal, blood vessel-rich adipose tissue or adipose tissue with fibrosis or scar formation and histologically confirmed. Adhesion of gluteal muscles to the joint capsule was also evaluated.Of the 77 patients, 75 had rupture of the direct head of the rectus femoris. In contrast, rupture of the reflective head was extremely rare. Seven patients had a normal fat pad on the AIIS, 11 had blood vessel-rich adipose tissue and 55 had adipose tissue with fibrosis. Fat tissue was completely replaced by fibrous scar tissue in another 4 patients. In 64 patients, adhesion between the anterior joint capsule and gluteus muscles was marked. Groin pain disappeared soon after the operation even when labral tears were not repaired and all patients returned to daily life and sports activities within 2 weeks after operation.Rectus femoris tendinosis, fibrosis of the AIIS fat pad, and adhesion of gluteal and rectus femoris muscles are common extra-articular pathologies in patients with anterior hip pain. Management of only these lesions induces rapid relief of anterior hip pain even in the absence of labral tear repair. My

  4. Impact of extra-articular pathologies on groin pain: An arthroscopic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Mitsunori

    2018-01-01

    For patients who have anterior hip pain evaluated by Patrick's test and tenderness at Scarpa's triangle, we perform periarticular debridement based on the hypothesis that extra-articular pathologies are responsible for the hip pain. The purpose of this study was to categorize the endoscopic extra-articular findings and to evaluate the clinical significance of periarticular pathologies in anterior hip pain. Arthroscopic findings of 77 patients who underwent periarthritic debridement were evaluated. As extra-articular pathologies, injuries of the direct head and reflective head of the rectus femoris muscle were evaluated. A thin layer of fat tissue normally exists on the anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS), the attachment site of the direct head of the rectus femoris muscle. The macroscopic appearance of the fat pad on the AIIS was categorized as normal, blood vessel-rich adipose tissue or adipose tissue with fibrosis or scar formation and histologically confirmed. Adhesion of gluteal muscles to the joint capsule was also evaluated. Of the 77 patients, 75 had rupture of the direct head of the rectus femoris. In contrast, rupture of the reflective head was extremely rare. Seven patients had a normal fat pad on the AIIS, 11 had blood vessel-rich adipose tissue and 55 had adipose tissue with fibrosis. Fat tissue was completely replaced by fibrous scar tissue in another 4 patients. In 64 patients, adhesion between the anterior joint capsule and gluteus muscles was marked. Groin pain disappeared soon after the operation even when labral tears were not repaired and all patients returned to daily life and sports activities within 2 weeks after operation. Rectus femoris tendinosis, fibrosis of the AIIS fat pad, and adhesion of gluteal and rectus femoris muscles are common extra-articular pathologies in patients with anterior hip pain. Management of only these lesions induces rapid relief of anterior hip pain even in the absence of labral tear repair. My observations suggest

  5. Revision Arthroscopic Repair Versus Latarjet Procedure in Patients With Recurrent Instability After Initial Repair Attempt: A Cost-Effectiveness Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhni, Eric C; Lamba, Nayan; Swart, Eric; Steinhaus, Michael E; Ahmad, Christopher S; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2016-09-01

    To compare the cost-effectiveness of arthroscopic revision instability repair and Latarjet procedure in treating patients with recurrent instability after initial arthroscopic instability repair. An expected-value decision analysis of revision arthroscopic instability repair compared with Latarjet procedure for recurrent instability followed by failed repair attempt was modeled. Inputs regarding procedure cost, clinical outcomes, and health utilities were derived from the literature. Compared with revision arthroscopic repair, Latarjet was less expensive ($13,672 v $15,287) with improved clinical outcomes (43.78 v 36.76 quality-adjusted life-years). Both arthroscopic repair and Latarjet were cost-effective compared with nonoperative treatment (incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of 3,082 and 1,141, respectively). Results from sensitivity analyses indicate that under scenarios of high rates of stability postoperatively, along with improved clinical outcome scores, revision arthroscopic repair becomes increasingly cost-effective. Latarjet procedure for failed instability repair is a cost-effective treatment option, with lower costs and improved clinical outcomes compared with revision arthroscopic instability repair. However, surgeons must still incorporate clinical judgment into treatment algorithm formation. Level IV, expected value decision analysis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Septic arthritis after arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament and multi-ligament reconstructions is rare and can be successfully treated with arthroscopic irrigation and debridement: analysis of 866 reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Philipp; Geßlein, Markus; Mayer, Philipp; Schlumberger, Michael; Mayr, Raul; Richter, Jörg

    2018-03-20

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of septic arthritis following arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and multi-ligament reconstructions, and to evaluate a treatment regime with sequential arthroscopic irrigation and debridement procedures combined with antibiotic therapy that is focused on retention of the graft. Between 2004 and 2016 a total of 866 PCL reconstructions and multi-ligament reconstructions were performed at our institution (408 isolated PCL reconstructions, 458 combined reconstructions). Medical charts of all cases were retrospectively reviewed with regard to the occurrence of septic complications. These cases were analysed with special focus on clinical management, number of reoperations and if the grafts were retained. Further, microbiological findings, postoperative clinical course and available clinical outcome data were evaluated. Four cases of septic arthritis (0.5%) were identified (follow-up rate 96.5%): two following isolated PCL reconstruction (0.5%), and two following multi-ligament reconstruction (0.4%), respectively. Septic arthritis was successfully treated in all cases with a mean of 2.5 ± 2.4 irrigation and debridement procedures (1-6). In one case of isolated PCL reconstruction, the graft was resected within the fifth irrigation and debridement due to septic loosing of the femoral fixation. All other grafts were retained. With regard to the outcome, all patients were subjectively satisfied with good stability (stress radiographs) in cases of retained grafts. Postoperative septic arthritis after arthroscopic PCL and complex knee ligament reconstructions is a rare but serious complication. Arthroscopic graft-retaining treatment is recommended, as it is established in ACL surgery. Graft retention can be expected in the majority of the cases. Case series, Level 4.

  7. Does Perception of Usefulness of Arthroscopic Simulators Differ with Levels of Experience?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuijthof, Gabriëlle J. M.; Visser, P.; Sierevelt, Inger N.; van Dijk, C. Niek; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.

    2011-01-01

    Some commercial simulators are available for training basic arthroscopic skills. However, it is unclear if these simulators allow training for their intended purposes and whether the perception of usefulness relates to level of experience. We addressed the following questions: (1) Do commercial

  8. Long-term outcomes after arthroscopic capsular release for idiopathic adhesive capsulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Lievre, Hugh M J; Murrell, George A C

    2012-07-03

    One management strategy for the treatment of idiopathic adhesive capsulitis, or frozen shoulder, is arthroscopic capsular release. While there are long-term data regarding nonoperative treatment and good short-term outcomes following a release for idiopathic adhesive capsulitis, little is known about the outcomes five years or more after arthroscopic capsular release. Patients with idiopathic adhesive capsulitis treated with a circumferential arthroscopic capsular release of the glenohumeral joint by a single surgeon were assessed with use of patient-reported pain scores, shoulder functional scores with use of a Likert scale, and shoulder range of motion at the preoperative evaluation and at one, six, twelve, twenty-four, and fifty-two weeks and a mean of seven years after surgery. At a mean follow-up of seven years (range, five through thirteen years), forty-three patients (forty-nine shoulders) had significant improvement with regard to pain frequency and severity, patient-reported shoulder function, stiffness, and difficulty in completing activities compared with the findings at the initial presentation (p adhesive capsulitis treated with an arthroscopic capsular release had early significant improvements in shoulder range of motion, pain frequency and severity, and function. These improvements were maintained and/or enhanced at seven years. In contrast to results reported for nonoperative treatment, shoulder range of motion at seven years was equivalent to that in the contralateral shoulder.

  9. Effect of irrigation fluid temperature on core body temperature and inflammatory response during arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoyun; Ye, Luyou; Liu, Zhongtang; Wen, Hong; Hu, Yuezheng; Xu, Xinxian

    2015-08-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the influence of irrigation fluid on the patients' physiological response to arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Patients who were scheduled for arthroscopic shoulder surgery were prospectively included in this study. They were randomly assigned to receive warm arthroscopic irrigation fluid (Group W, n = 33) or room temperature irrigation fluid (Group RT, n = 33) intraoperatively. Core body temperature was measured at regular intervals. The proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, and IL-10 were measured in drainage fluid and serum. The changes of core body temperatures in Group RT were similar with those in Group W within 15 min after induction of anesthesia, but the decreases in Group RT were significantly greater after then. The lowest temperature was 35.1 ± 0.4 °C in Group RT and 35.9 ± 0.3 °C in Group W, the difference was statistically different (P irrigation fluid compared with warm irrigation fluid. And local inflammatory response is significantly reduced by using warm irrigation fluid. It seems that warm irrigation fluid is more recommendable for arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

  10. Arthroscopic repair of horizontal meniscal cleavage tears with marrow-stimulating technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Ji-Hyun; Kwon, Oh-Jin; Nam, Tae-Seok

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate patients after arthroscopic repair of meniscal horizontal tears with a marrow-stimulating technique through clinical signs and second-look arthroscopy. We retrospectively reviewed a consecutive series of 32 meniscal repairs with horizontal cleavage tears and evaluated them through clinical assessment and second-look arthroscopic examinations. Arthroscopic meniscal repair and a marrow-stimulating technique were performed. Functional outcomes were evaluated using the visual analog scale (VAS) pain score, Lysholm knee scoring scale, and Tegner activity scale. Assessment of meniscal healing was evaluated clinically by the presence of meniscal signs; second-look arthroscopy was performed in 11 patients. Correlation between chronicity of a meniscal lesion (time from initial symptom [TFIS]) and meniscal healing was evaluated. The mean follow-up period was 45.6 ± 13.9 months. Improvements in mean VAS scores from 6.7 to 1.9 (P meniscal healing was clinically significant (P = .001) but arthroscopically insignificant (P = .085) on second-look arthroscopy. The meniscal repair procedure for horizontal cleavage tears in the present study suggests an alternative treatment option to approach the treatment of meniscal tears extending into the avascular zone and degenerative tissue. The marrow-stimulating technique using a cannulated reamer can be considered as an alternative method for the augmentation of meniscal healing. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of a Remodeled Neo-tendon After Arthroscopic Latarjet Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolen, Daniel; Went, Philip; Tomala, Dirk; Sternberg, Christoph; Lafosse, Laurent; Leuzinger, Jan

    2017-03-01

    To macroscopically, histologically, and radiologically describe a time-dependent remodeling process of a neo-tendon or -ligament in the shoulder after the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. During follow-up surgery after the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure, 17 shoulders in 16 patients were evaluated for a remodeled tendon-like structure. The mean overall follow-up period was 27.4 months. The mean time between the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure and revision was 11.6 months. All shoulders were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging, and seven histologic specimens were obtained during revision surgery. A distinct, oriented strand of tissue was found in 16 of 17 shoulders on revision surgery. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging analyses showed a signal-free, longitudinal tendon-like structure originating at the tip of the acromion, traversing the space of the former subcoracoid bursa to attach in the course of the transposed conjoint tendon or the proximal short head of the biceps. Histologic analysis of seven specimens showed a characteristic timeline of remodeling. A tendon- or ligament-like structure is remodeled between the anterior bottom tip of the acromion and the transposed coracoid process in a time-dependent manner after the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Improvement in technique for arthroscopic ankle fusion: results in 15 patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kats, J.; Kampen, A. van; Waal Malefijt, M.C. de

    2003-01-01

    We retrospectively assessed time until consolidation, complications, and functional results according to Morgan from the clinical charts and radiographs of 15 arthroscopic ankle fusions. In 11 patients unilateral distraction and crossed screw placement over the fusion area through tibia and fibula

  13. Signs of knee osteoarthritis common in 620 patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for meniscal tear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Kenneth; Englund, Martin; Lohmander, L. Stefan

    2017-01-01

    and patients' characteristics in a cohort of patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for a meniscal tear. Patients and methods - 641 patients assigned for arthroscopy on suspicion of meniscus tear were consecutively recruited from February 2013 through January 2015. Of these, 620 patients (mean age 49 (18...

  14. Impingement syndrome of the shoulder following double row suture anchor technique for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a case report

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    Rambani Rohit

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff is a demanding surgery. Accurate placement of anchors is key to success. Case presentation A 38-year-old woman received arthroscopic repair of her rotator cuff using a double row suture anchor technique. Postoperatively, she developed impingement syndrome which resulted from vertical displacement of a suture anchor once the shoulder was mobilised. The anchor was removed eight weeks following initial surgery and the patient had an uneventful recovery. Conclusion Impingement syndrome following arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuffs using double row suture anchor has not been widely reported. This is the first such case where anchoring has resulted in impingement syndrome.

  15. Single-row vs. double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: clinical and 3 Tesla MR arthrography results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudisco, Cosimo; Bisicchia, Salvatore; Savarese, Eugenio; Fiori, Roberto; Bartolucci, Dario A; Masala, Salvatore; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2013-01-27

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has become popular in the last few years because it avoids large skin incisions and deltoid detachment and dysfunction. Earlier arthroscopic single-row (SR) repair methods achieved only partial restoration of the original footprint of the tendons of the rotator cuff, while double-row (DR) repair methods presented many biomechanical advantages and higher rates of tendon-to-bone healing. However, DR repair failed to demonstrate better clinical results than SR repair in clinical trials. MR imaging at 3 Tesla, especially with intra-articular contrast medium (MRA), showed a better diagnostic performance than 1.5 Tesla in the musculoskeletal setting. The objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical and 3 Tesla MRA results in two groups of patients operated on for a medium-sized full-thickness rotator cuff tear with two different techniques. The first group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the SR technique; the second group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the DR technique. All patients were evaluated at a minimum of 3 years after surgery. The primary end point was the re-tear rate at 3 Tesla MRA. The secondary end points were the Constant-Murley Scale (CMS), the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores, surgical time and implant expense. The mean follow-up was 40 months in the SR group and 38.9 months in the DR group. The mean postoperative CMS was 70 in the SR group and 68 in the DR group. The mean SST score was 9.4 in the SR group and 10.1 in the DR group. The re-tear rate was 60% in the SR group and 25% in the DR group. Leakage of the contrast medium was observed in all patients. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3 Tesla MRA in the evaluation of two different techniques of rotator cuff repair. DR repair resulted in a statistically significant lower re-tear rate, with longer surgical time and higher implant expense, despite no difference in clinical outcomes. We think that

  16. Single-row vs. double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: clinical and 3 Tesla MR arthrography results

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    Tudisco Cosimo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has become popular in the last few years because it avoids large skin incisions and deltoid detachment and dysfunction. Earlier arthroscopic single-row (SR repair methods achieved only partial restoration of the original footprint of the tendons of the rotator cuff, while double-row (DR repair methods presented many biomechanical advantages and higher rates of tendon-to-bone healing. However, DR repair failed to demonstrate better clinical results than SR repair in clinical trials. MR imaging at 3 Tesla, especially with intra-articular contrast medium (MRA, showed a better diagnostic performance than 1.5 Tesla in the musculoskeletal setting. The objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical and 3 Tesla MRA results in two groups of patients operated on for a medium-sized full-thickness rotator cuff tear with two different techniques. Methods The first group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the SR technique; the second group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the DR technique. All patients were evaluated at a minimum of 3 years after surgery. The primary end point was the re-tear rate at 3 Tesla MRA. The secondary end points were the Constant-Murley Scale (CMS, the Simple Shoulder Test (SST scores, surgical time and implant expense. Results The mean follow-up was 40 months in the SR group and 38.9 months in the DR group. The mean postoperative CMS was 70 in the SR group and 68 in the DR group. The mean SST score was 9.4 in the SR group and 10.1 in the DR group. The re-tear rate was 60% in the SR group and 25% in the DR group. Leakage of the contrast medium was observed in all patients. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3 Tesla MRA in the evaluation of two different techniques of rotator cuff repair. DR repair resulted in a statistically significant lower re-tear rate, with longer surgical time and higher implant

  17. A Checklist Intervention to Assess Resident Diagnostic Knee and Shoulder Arthroscopic Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwachukwu, Benedict; Gaudiani, Michael; Hammann-Scala, Jennifer; Ranawat, Anil

    The purpose of this investigation was to apply an arthroscopic shoulder and knee checklist in the evaluation of orthopedic resident arthroscopic skill efficiency and to demonstrate the use of a surgical checklist for assessing resident surgical efficiency over the course of a surgical rotation. Orthopedic surgery residents rotating on the sports medicine service at our institution between 2011 and 2015 were enrolled in this study. Residents were administered a shoulder and knee arthroscopy assessment tool at the beginning and end of their 6-week rotation. The assessment tools consisted of checklist items for knee and shoulder arthroscopy skills. Residents were timed while performing these checklist tasks. The primary outcome measure was resident improvement as a function of time to completion for the checklist items, and the intervention was participation in a 6-week resident rotation with weekly arthroscopy didactics, cadaver simulator work, and operating room experience. A paired t test was used to compare means. Mean time to checklist completion during week 1 among study participants for the knee checklist was 787.4 seconds for the knee checklist and 484.4 seconds at the end of the rotation. Mean time to checklist completion during week 1 among study participants for the shoulder checklist was 1655.3 seconds and 832.7 seconds for the shoulder checklist at the end of the rotation. Mean improvement in time to completion was 303 seconds (p = 0.0006, SD = 209s) and 822.6 seconds (p = 0.00008, SD = 525.2s) for the arthroscopic knee and shoulder assessments, respectively. An arthroscopic checklist is 1 method to evaluate and assess resident efficiency and improvement during surgical training. Among residents participating in this study, we found statistically significant improvements in time for arthroscopic task completion. II. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Optimal suture anchor direction in arthroscopic lateral ankle ligament repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Ichiro; Hagio, Tomonobu; Noda, Masahiro; Kanazawa, Kazuki; Minokawa, So; Yamamoto, Takuaki

    2017-05-26

    In this study, the distance between the insertion point of the suture anchors and posterior surface of the fibula during arthroscopic lateral ankle ligament repair was investigated on computed tomography (CT) images. The hypothesis of this study was that there is an optimal insertional direction of the suture anchor to avoid anchor-related complications. One hundred eleven ankles of 98 patients who had undergone three-dimensional CT scans for foot or ankle disorders without deformity of the fibula were assessed (59 males, 52 females; median age 25.5 years; age range 12-78 years). The shortest distance from the insertion point of the suture anchor to the deepest point of the fossa/top of the convex aspect of the fibula was measured on the axial plane, tilting from the longitudinal axis of the fibula at 90°, 75°, 60°, and 45°. The distance from the insertion point of the suture anchor to the posterior surface of the fibula was also measured in a direction parallel to the sagittal plane of the lateral surface of the talus on the axial plane, tilting from the longitudinal axis of the fibula at 90°, 75°, 60°, and 45°. The posterior fossa was observed in all cases on the 90° and 75° images. The distance from the insertion point to the posterior surface of the fibula in the parallel direction was 15.0 ± 3.4 mm at 90°, 17.5 ± 3.2 mm at 75°, 21.7 ± 3.3 mm at 60°, and 25.7 ± 3.6 mm at 45°. The posterior points in the parallel direction were located on the posterior fossa in 36.0% of cases at 90°, in 12.6% at 75°, and in 0.0% at 60° and 45°. The suture anchor should be directed from anterior to posterior at an angle of <45° to the longitudinal axis of the fibula, parallel to the lateral surface of the talus, to avoid passing through the fibula. Cohort study, Level III.

  19. Arthroscopic synovectomy in rheumatoid synovitis of knee joint

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    G M Kavalersky

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine indications to and efficacy of arthroscopic synovectomy (AS via anteriolateral portal in rheumatoid arthritis (RA with knee joint synovitis. Material and methods. 139 pts with RA and knee joint synovitis were included. Kneeswelling, pain, restriction of movement score (from 0 to 3 were assessed at baseline and at the end of the study. Coefficient of conservative treatment inefficacy (duration of treatmentwithout significant improvement was counted. Value of this coefficient multiplication by the sum of the above mentioned measures was used to determine indications to AS. AS was indicated in 111 cases (79,9%. It was performed in 72 pts (group 1. In 39 pts of group 2 this operation was not performed. 28 pts without indications to AS (group3 continued conservative treatment. Before the operation and after 6 months pts filled SF-36 questionnaire to assess quality of life. We used Russian version of SF-36 which was prepared to assess quality of life of Saint Petersburg adult inhabitants. This version possesses necessary psychometric features and is appropriate for conducting studies of quality of life and health status of Russian population. Results. AS provided significant improvement. All Clinical measures in group 1 showed similar mean improvement approximately by 1 (from 0,83 to 0,95, p<0,001. Integral measures (physical health and psychological health in group 1 pts were higher (by 3,4 and 3,8 respectively. In group 3 all clinical measures values decreased to 0-1 while 30,8-48,7% assessments in group 2 pts showed 2 and in 5,1% - 3 for restriction of movement. Conservative treatment in rheumatoid synovitis is not equally effective for all pts. It does not provide sufficient effect in presence of indications to synovectomy. On the other hand in pts with less severe form of the disease not having indications to synovectomy such therapy provides fast and significant clinical improvement during 6 months of follow up

  20. Arthroscopic Bankart repair associated with subscapularis augmentation (ASA) versus open Latarjet to treat recurrent anterior shoulder instability with moderate glenoid bone loss: clinical comparison of two series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, R; Della Rotonda, G; Cautiero, F; Ciccarelli, M; Maiotti, M; Massoni, C; Di Pietto, F; Zappia, M

    2017-04-01

    The treatment of chronic anterior shoulder instability with glenoid bone loss is still debated. The purpose of this study is to compare short-term results of two techniques treating chronic shoulder instability with moderate glenoid bone loss: bone block according to open Latarjet-Patte procedure and arthroscopic Bankart repair in association with subscapularis augmentation. Ninety-one patients with moderate anterior glenoid bone loss underwent from 2011 to 2015. From these patients, two groups of 20 individuals each have been selected. The groups were homogeneous in terms of age, gender, dominance and glenoid bone loss. In group A, an open Latarjet procedure has been performed, and in group B, an arthroscopic Bankart repair associated with subscapularis augmentation has been performed. The mean follow-up in group A was 21 months (20-39 months), while in group B was 20 months (15-36 months). QuickDash score, Constant and Rowe shoulder scores, were used for evaluations of results. The mean preoperative rate of QuickDash score was 3.6 for group A and 4.0 for group B; Rowe Score was 50.0 for group A and 50.0 for group B. Preoperative mean Constant score was 56.2 for Latarjet-Patte and 55.2 for Bankart plus ASA. Postoperative mean QuickDash score was in group A 1.8 and 1.7 in group B; Rowe Score was 89.8 and 91.6; Constant Score was 93.3 and 93.8. No complications related to surgery have been observed for both procedures. Not statistically significant difference was reported between the two groups (p > .05). Postoperatively, the mean deficit of external rotation in ER1 was -9° in group A and -8 in group B; In ER2, the mean deficit was -5° in both groups (p = .0942). Arthroscopic subscapularis augmentation of Bankart repair is an effective procedure for the treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder instability with glenoid bone loss without any significant difference in comparison with the well-known open Latarjet procedure.

  1. Comparing etoricoxib and celecoxib for preemptive analgesia for acute postoperative pain in patients undergoing arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a randomized controlled trial

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    Glabglay Prapakorn

    2010-10-01

    Etoricoxib is more effective than celecoxib and placebo for using as preemptive analgesia for acute postoperative pain control in patients underwent arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Trial registration number NCT01017380

  2. Intraarticular glucocorticoid, morphine and bupivacaine reduces pain and convalescence after arthroscopic ankle surgery: a randomized study of 36 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, S; Kehlet, H

    2000-01-01

    In a double-blind randomized study, 36 patients undergoing arthroscopic removal of bony spurs and synovitis causing impingement of the ankle were allocated to intraarticular saline or bupivacaine 15 mg + morphine 5 mg + intraarticular methylprednisolone 40 mg. Combined methylprednisolone, bupivac......In a double-blind randomized study, 36 patients undergoing arthroscopic removal of bony spurs and synovitis causing impingement of the ankle were allocated to intraarticular saline or bupivacaine 15 mg + morphine 5 mg + intraarticular methylprednisolone 40 mg. Combined methylprednisolone......, bupivacaine and morphine reduced pain, joint swelling, time of immobilization, duration of sick leave and return to sports after the arthroscopic procedure. In the treatment group, 1 patient had transitory purulent arthritis requiring antibiotics and arthroscopic synovectomy occurred....

  3. Osteochondral lesion of lateral tibial plateau with extrusion of lateral meniscus treated with retrograde osteochondral autograft transplantation and arthroscopic centralisation

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    Jae-Sung An

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: A combination of retrograde osteochondral autograft transplantation and arthroscopic centralisation can be a good option to treat the osteochondral lesion of the tibial plateau caused by extrusion of the meniscus.

  4. Pseudocyclops: two cases of ACL graft partial tears mimicking cyclops lesions on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpfendorfer, Claus; Subhas, Naveen; Winalski, Carl S.; Ilaslan, Hakan [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Miniaci, Anthony [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Orthopedics, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using autografts or allografts is a common surgical procedure, particularly in young athletes. Although the procedure has excellent success rates, complications such as mechanical impingement, graft rupture, and arthrofibrosis can occur, often necessitating additional surgery. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has become a valuable tool in evaluating complications after ACL reconstruction. We report two cases of ACL reconstruction complicated by arthroscopically proven partial graft tears. In both cases the torn anterior graft fibers were flipped into the intercondylar notch, mimicking anterior arthrofibrosis, i.e., a ''cyclops lesion,'' on MR imaging. Careful review of the direction of graft fibers on MR imaging in the ''pseudocyclops'' lesions can help differentiate these partial tears from the fibrosis of a true cyclops. The ''pseudocyclops'' lesion is a previously undescribed MR imaging sign of partial ACL graft tear. Larger studies are required to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the sign, as well as the clinical importance of these partial graft tears. (orig.)

  5. Comparison of the postoperative analgesic effects of naproxen sodium and naproxen sodium-codeine phosphate for arthroscopic meniscus surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Bali, Cagla; Ergenoglu, Pinar; Ozmete, Ozlem; Akin, Sule; Ozyilkan, Nesrin Bozdogan; Cok, Oya Yalcin; Aribogan, Anis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are frequently used to control arthroscopic pain. Addition of oral effective opioid "codeine" to NSAIDs may be more effective and decrease parenteral opioid consumption in the postoperative period. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and side effects of naproxen sodium and a new preparation naproxen sodium-codeine phosphate when administered preemptively for arthroscopic meniscectomy. METHODS: ...

  6. Comparison of the operation of arthroscopic tibial inlay and traditional tibial inlay for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Daifeng; Xiao, Mochao; Lian, Yongyun; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To perform dual-bundle reconstruction of posterior cruciate ligament using full arthroscopic tibial inlay technology with self-designed tibia tunnel drilling system and to compare the effect of arthroscopic tibial inlay versus traditional technique for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Material and methods: 32 patients were randomly divided into experiment group (improved tibial inlay, n = 17) and control group (traditional tibial inlay, n = 15). Self-designed tibia tunne...

  7. Arthroscopic pubic symphysis debridement and adductor enthesis repair in athletes with athletic pubalgia: technical note and video illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, Sascha; Tumin, Masjudin; Wilhelm, Peter; Pohlemann, Tim; Kelm, Jens

    2014-11-01

    We elaborately describe our novel arthroscopic technique of the symphysis pubis in athletes with osteitis pubis and concomitant adductor enthesopathy who fail to conservative treatment modalities. The symphysis pubis is debrided arthroscopically and the degenerated origin of adductor tendon (enthesis) is excised and reattached. With our surgical procedure the stability of the symphysis pubis is successfully preserved and the adductor longus enthesopathy simultaneously addressed in the same setting.

  8. Arthroscopic repair of traumatic isolated subscapularis tendon lesions (Lafosse Type III or IV): a prospective magnetic resonance imaging-controlled case series with 1 year of follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grueninger, Patrick; Nikolic, Nikola; Schneider, Joerg; Lattmann, Thomas; Platz, Andreas; Chmiel, Corinne; Meier, Christoph

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively assess the efficacy of arthroscopic repair of isolated high-grade subscapularis (SSC) tendon lesions by means of clinical follow-up combined with magnetic resonance imaging investigations. Between January 2008 and September 2010, 11 patients (9 men and 2 women; mean age, 45 ± 10 years) with Lafosse type III or IV traumatic isolated SSC tendon lesions underwent arthroscopic repair including tenodesis of the long head of the biceps tendon. All patients were preoperatively assessed by clinical examination (Constant-Murley score [CMS]) and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance arthrography. At 1 year of follow-up, specific clinical SSC tests, the CMS, and the loss of external rotation were evaluated. A native magnetic resonance investigation was performed to assess the structural integrity of the repair. The SSC muscle was compared with its preoperative condition regarding fatty infiltration and size (cross-sectional area). Patient satisfaction was graded from 1 (poor) to 4 (excellent). The mean time interval from trauma to surgery was 3.7 months. A concomitant lesion of the biceps tendon was observed in 10 patients (91%). The mean CMS improved from 44 to 89 points (P lift-off test, 4.8 v 2.9). The mean loss of external rotation at 0° of abduction was 10° compared with the contralateral side (P Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation showed complete structural integrity of the tendon repair in all studies. The SSC showed a significant decrease in fatty infiltration and increase in the cross-sectional area. Arthroscopic repair of higher-grade isolated SSC lesions provides reliable tendon healing accompanied by excellent functional results 1 year after surgery. Level IV, prospective therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Fisioterapia após substituição artroscópica do ligamento cruzado cranial em cães: II - avaliação artroscópica e anatomopatológica Physiotherapy after arthroscopic repair of the cranial cruciate ligament in dogs: II - Arthroscopic and anatomopathological evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A.L. Muzzi

    2009-08-01

    physiotherapy group and the other eight in a temporary immobilization group. Arthroscopic and histological examinations showed articular lesions consistent with degenerative joint disease at 60 days after surgery, which was more severe in dogs from the temporary immobilization group. From histological studies, the graft underwent a collagenic reorganization process that was more intense and earlier in dogs from the physiotherapy group. There was a progressive establishment of collagen fiber continuity in the graft-bone interface. It can be concluded that fascia lata graft can be used to replace the CCL by arthroscopic surgery, the graft undergo a ligamentization and osteointegration process, and the postoperative physiotherapy decrease the degenerative joint disease progression and stimulate the ligamentization of the graft.

  10. Preoperative CT planning of screw length in arthroscopic Latarjet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Alexandre; Gerometta, Antoine; Granger, Benjamin; Massein, Audrey; Casabianca, Laurent; Pascal-Moussellard, Hugues; Loriaut, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    The Latarjet procedure has shown its efficiency for the treatment of anterior shoulder dislocation. The success of this technique depends on the correct positioning and fusion of the bone block. The length of the screws that fix the bone block can be a problem. They can increase the risk of non-union if too short or be the cause of nerve lesion or soft tissue discomfort if too long. Suprascapular nerve injuries have been reported during shoulder stabilisation surgery up to 6 % of the case. Bone block non-union depending on the series is found around 20 % of the cases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of this CT preoperative planning to predict optimal screws length. The clinical importance of this study lies in the observation that it is the first study to evaluate the efficiency of CT planning to predict screw length. Inclusion criteria were patients with chronic anterior instability of the shoulder with an ISIS superior to 4. Exclusion criteria were patients with multidirectional instability or any previous surgery on this shoulder. Thirty patients were included prospectively, 11 of them went threw a CT planning, before their arthroscopic Latarjet. Optimal length of both screws was calculated, adding the size of the coracoid at 5 and 15 mm from the tip to the glenoid. Thirty-two-mm screws were used for patients without planning. On a post-operative CT scan with 3D reconstruction, the distance between the screw tip and the posterior cortex was measured. A one-sample Wilcoxon test was used to compare the distance from the tip of the screw to an acceptable positioning of ±2 mm from the posterior cortex. In the group without planning, screw 1 tended to differ from the acceptable positioning: mean 3.44 mm ± 3.13, med 2.9 mm, q1; q3 [0.6; 4.75] p = 0.1118, and screw 2 differed significantly from the acceptable position: mean 4.83 mm ± 4.11, med 3.7 mm, q1; q3 [1.7; 5.45] p = 0.0045. In the group with planning, position of

  11. Is arthroscopic assisted percutaneous screw fixation as good as open reduction and internal fixation for the treatment of displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeap, Ewe Juan; Rao, Jaynesthra; Pan, Chee Huan; Soelar, Shahrul Aiman; Younger, Alistair S E

    2016-09-01

    This study compares the outcomes of calcaneal fracture surgery after open reduction internal fixation and plating (ORIF) versus arthroscopic assisted percutaneous screw fixation (APSF). Group I (N=12) underwent ORIF. Group II (N=15) underwent APSF. Anthropometric data, pre and post-operative stay, complications and duration off work were recorded in this retrospective case cohort study. Radiographs were analyzed for Bohler's, Gissane's angle and Sanders' classification. AOFAS Hindfoot and SF 36 scores were collected at final follow-up. Anthropometric data, Bohler's and Gissane's angles, AOFAS and SF 36 scores were not significantly different. Pre-operative duration was 12.3 days in ORIF and 6.9 days in APSF. Post-operative duration was 7.3 days vs 3.8 days. Duration off work was 6.2 months vs 2.9 months. The APSF group was able to have surgery earlier, go home faster, and return to work earlier. This study was not powered to demonstrate a difference in wound complication rates. Copyright © 2015 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of using pump on postoperative pleural effusion in the patients that underwent CABG

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    Mehmet Özülkü

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The present study investigated effect of using pump on postoperative pleural effusion in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting. Methods: A total of 256 patients who underwent isolated coronary artery bypass grafting surgery in the Cardiovascular Surgery clinic were enrolled in the study. Jostra-Cobe (Model 043213 105, VLC 865, Sweden heart-lung machine was used in on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. Off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting was performed using Octopus and Starfish. Proximal anastomoses to the aorta in both on-pump and off-pump techniques were performed by side clamps. The patients were discharged from the hospital between postoperative day 6 and day 11. Results: The incidence of postoperative right pleural effusion and bilateral pleural effusion was found to be higher as a count in Group 1 (on-pump as compared to Group 2 (off-pump. But the difference was not statistically significant [P>0.05 for right pleural effusion (P=0.893, P>0.05 for bilateral pleural effusion (P=0.780]. Left pleural effusion was encountered to be lower in Group 2 (off-pump. The difference was found to be statistically significant (P<0.05, P=0.006. Conclusion: Under the light of these results, it can be said that left pleural effusion is less prevalent in the patients that underwent off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting when compared to the patients that underwent on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting.

  13. Dysphagia among Adult Patients who Underwent Surgery for Esophageal Atresia at Birth

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    Valérie Huynh-Trudeau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical experiences of adults who underwent surgery for esophageal atresia at birth is limited. There is some evidence that suggests considerable long-term morbidity, partly because of dysphagia, which has been reported in up to 85% of adult patients who undergo surgery for esophageal atresia. The authors hypothesized that dysphagia in this population is caused by dysmotility and/or anatomical anomalies.

  14. Evolution of elderly patients who underwent cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass

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    Alain Moré Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is a steady increase in the number of elderly patients with severe cardiovascular diseases who require a surgical procedure to recover some quality of life that allows them a socially meaningful existence, despite the risks.Objectives: To analyze the behavior of elderly patients who underwent cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass.Method: A descriptive, retrospective, cross-sectional study was conducted with patients over 65 years of age who underwent surgery at the Cardiocentro Ernesto Che Guevara, in Santa Clara, from January 2013 to March 2014.Results: In the study, 73.1% of patients were men; and there was a predominance of subjects between 65 and 70 years of age, accounting for 67.3%. Coronary artery bypass graft was the most prevalent type of surgery and had the longest cardiopulmonary bypass times. Hypertension was present in 98.1% of patients. The most frequent postoperative complications were renal dysfunction and severe low cardiac output, with 44.2% and 34.6% respectively.Conclusions: There was a predominance of men, the age group of 65 to 70 years, hypertension, and patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft with prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass. Renal dysfunction was the most frequent complication.

  15. Acute myocardial infarctation in patients with critical ischemia underwent lower limb revascularization

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    Esdras Marques Lins

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atherosclerosis is the main cause of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD of the lower limbs. Patients with PAOD often also have obstructive atherosclerosis in other arterial sites, mainly the coronary arteries. This means that patients who undergo infrainguinal bypass to treat critical ischemia have a higher risk of AMI. There are, however, few reports in the literature that have assessed this risk properly. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of acute myocardial infarction in patients who underwent infrainguinal bypass to treat critical ischemia of the lower limbs caused by PAOD. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 64 patients who underwent 82 infrainguinal bypass operations, from February 2011 to July 2012 were studied. All patients had electrocardiograms and troponin I blood assays during the postoperative period (within 72 hours. RESULTS: There were abnormal ECG findings and elevated blood troponin I levels suggestive of AMI in five (6% of the 82 operations performed. All five had conventional surgery. The incidence of AMI as a proportion of the 52 conventional surgery cases was 9.6%. Two patients died. CONCLUSION: There was a 6% AMI incidence among patients who underwent infrainguinal bypass due to PAOD. Considering only cases operated using conventional surgery, the incidence of AMI was 9.6%.

  16. Preoperative and postoperative serial assessments of postural balance and fall risk in patients with arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokalp, Oguzhan; Akkaya, Semih; Akkaya, Nuray; Buker, Nihal; Gungor, Harun R; Ok, Nusret; Yorukoglu, Cagdas

    2016-04-27

    Impaired postural balance due to somatosensory data loss with mechanical instability has been shown in patients with ACL deficiency. To assess postural balance in patients with ACL insufficiency prior to surgery and following reconstruction with serial evaluations. Thirty patients (mean age of 27.7 ± 6.7 years) who underwent arthroscopic reconstruction of ACL with bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft were examined for clinical and functional variables at preoperative day and postoperative 12th week. Posturographic analysis were performed by using Tetrax Interactive Balance System (Sunlight Medical Ltd, Israel) at preoperative day, at 4th, 8th, and 12th weeks following reconstruction. Data computed by posturographic software by the considerations of the oscillation velocities of body sways is fall risk as a numeric value (0-100, lower values indicate better condition). All of the patients (mean age of 27.7 ± 6.7 years) had significant improvements for clinical, functional evaluations and fall risk (pfall risk was within high-risk category (59.9 ± 22.8) preoperatively. The highest fall risk was detected at postoperative 4th week. Patients had high fall risk at 8th week similar to preoperative value. Mean fall risk decreased to low level risk at 12th week. Preoperative symptom duration had relationships with preoperative fall risk and postoperative improvement of fall risk (p= 0.001, r= -0.632, p= 0.001, r= -0.870, respectively). The improvement of fall risk was higher in patients with symptoms shorter than 6 months (p= 0.001). According to these results, mean fall risk of patients with ACL insufficiency was within high risk category preoperatively, and fall risk improves after surgical reconstruction, but as the duration of complaints lengthens especially longer than 6 months, the improvement of fall risk decreases following reconstruction.

  17. Is the arthroscopic suture bridge technique suitable for full-thickness rotator cuff tears of any size?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Hyun; Kim, Jeong Woo; Kim, Tae Kyun; Kweon, Seok Hyun; Kang, Hong Je; Kim, Se Jin; Park, Jin Sung

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare functional outcomes and tendon integrity between the suture bridge and modified tension band techniques for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. A consecutive series of 128 patients who underwent the modified tension band (MTB group; 69 patients) and suture bridge (SB group; 59 patients) techniques were enrolled. The pain visual analogue scale (VAS), Constant, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores were determined preoperatively and at the final follow-up. Rotator cuff hypotrophy was quantified by calculating the occupation ratio (OR). Rotator cuff integrity and the global fatty degeneration index were determined by using magnetic resonance imaging at 6 months postoperatively. The average VAS, Constant, and ASES scores improved significantly at the final follow-up in both groups (p bridge groups (7.0 vs. 6.8%, respectively; p = n.s.). The retear rate of large-to-massive tears was significantly lower in the suture bridge group than in the modified tension band group (33.3 vs. 70%; p = 0.035). Fatty infiltration (postoperative global fatty degeneration index, p = 0.022) and muscle hypotrophy (postoperative OR, p = 0.038) outcomes were significantly better with the suture bridge technique. The retear rate was lower with the suture bridge technique in the case of large-to-massive rotator cuff tears. Additionally, significant improvements in hypotrophy and fatty infiltration of the rotator cuff were obtained with the suture bridge technique, possibly resulting in better anatomical outcomes. The suture bridge technique was a more effective method for the repair of rotator cuff tears of all sizes as compared to the modified tension band technique. Retrospective Cohort Design, Treatment Study, level III.

  18. Interstitial Tear of the Subscapularis Tendon, Arthroscopic Findings and Technique of Repair

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    Hossein Saremi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tears of the subscapularis tendon have been significantly recognized as a source of shoulder pain and dysfunction in the past decade, thanks to arthroscopic evaluation of the shoulder and biomechanical and anatomical studies of the tendon. Current classification of subscapularis tendon tear is based on insertion site of the tendon. Recently, a classification for non-insertional types of subscapularis tendon tear has been published. Interstitial tear of subscapularis tendon has not been described in classifications available in the literature. This report describes significant interstitial tear of the subscapularis tendon. This tear looks normal in superior, bursal and articular sides. Then its specific arthroscopic findings as "Air bag sign" and repair technique of the pathology is explained .

  19. Rotator cuff tears in luxatio erecta: an arthroscopic perspective of two cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Vivek; Madi, Sandesh; Tapashetti, Sandeep; Acharya, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Luxatio erecta accounts for only 0.5% of all shoulder dislocations. More than 150 cases have been described in the literature, focusing mainly on the method of reduction and/or associated complications. Some of the well-described complications include injuries to the humeral head, glenoid, clavicle, rotator cuff, capsules and ligaments, brachial plexus and axillary artery/vein. Among these, rotator cuff injuries are reported to occur in about 80% of cases. However, in the majority of instances, cuff injuries have been managed conservatively and have been reported to apparently provide optimal functional outcomes. We report our experience with two cases of luxatio erecta associated with massive rotator cuff injuries, which were evaluated and further managed by arthroscopic repair. The emphasis in these cases is to define cuff injuries and proceed based on patients’ age, demands and characteristics of the cuff tears. Arthroscopic evaluation and cuff repairs should be contemplated in these patients, to improve shoulder functions. PMID:26561229

  20. Editorial Commentary: Arthroscopic Simulation Training Need Not Be Expensive to Be Effective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Aman

    2017-11-01

    In a randomized controlled trial of arthroscopic training tools, the low-cost/low-fidelity Cigar Box Arthroscopy Trainer demonstrated equivalent efficacy to the validated, and more expensive, Anatomic Knee Arthroscopy Trainer (AKAT) in the training of novice arthroscopists using a validated scoring system, the Basic Arthroscopic Knee Skill Scoring System. As simulation training and formal surgical skills training is now mandatory, residency and fellowship programs are required to incorporate training modules and equipment to maximize learning while minimizing potential for patient harm. Low-cost, low-fidelity simulation tools such as this may provide a solution to do so while minimizing costs and maximizing educational returns on investment. The value in simulation training will be in its synergistic ability to augment the traditional apprenticeship model of resident and fellow training. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Outcome in the arthroscopic treatment of synovial chondromatosis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Lucjan; Mazurkiewicz, Stanisław; Treder, Mariusz; Wiśniewski, Piotr

    2005-08-30

    Background. Synovial osteochondromatosis is a disease in which loose cartilaginous bodies develop around large joints, usually the knee. It is caused by synovial metaplasia of unknown etiology. Symptoms are due either to mechanical problems caused by the loose bodies or to the degenerative arthritis that follows after several years. Surgical or arthroscopic removal of the loose bodies appears to be the only effective treatment. This article reports treatment outcome in synovial chondromatosis of the knee. Material and methods. We treated 13 patients: 11 by arthroscopy and 2 by arthrotomy. The follow-up examination was performed at least two years after after surgery. Results. There were 6 good and very good outcomes, while 2 patients required arthroscopic re-operation. Conclusions. Arthroscopy seems to be the treatment of choice in synovial chondromatosis of the knee.

  2. Over-optimistic patient expectations of recovery and leisure activities after arthroscopic meniscus surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Kenneth; Roos, Ewa M; Nissen, Nis

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose - Patients' expectations of outcomes following arthroscopic meniscus surgery are largely unknown. We investigated patients' expectations concerning recovery and participation in leisure-time activities after arthroscopic meniscus surgery and the postoperative fulfillment...... of these. Patients and methods - The study sample consisted of 491 consecutively recruited patients (mean age 50 (SD 13) years, 55% men) who were assigned for arthroscopy on suspicion of meniscus injury and later verified by arthroscopy. Before surgery, patients completed questionnaires regarding...... meniscus surgery were too optimistic regarding their recovery time and postoperative participation in leisure activities. This highlights the need for shared decision making which should include giving the patient information on realistic expectations of recovery time and regarding participation in leisure...

  3. Partial isolated rupture of the popliteus tendon in a professional soccer player: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Mariani, Pier Paolo; Margheritini, Fabrizio

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The complete isolated rupture of the popliteus tendon has been described as a rare injury and this report describes the case of a 31-year-old soccer player who sustained a partial rupture of the popliteus tendon during a game. The injury was suspected clinically and at MRI but confirmed only by the arthroscopic examination. The treatment consisted in open debridment with no tendon repair or augmentation. Seven weeks post-operation the patient was symptom-free and returned to competit...

  4. Tratamento artroscópico da rigidez pós-traumática do cotovelo Arthroscopic treatment of post-traumatic elbow stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Carlos Garcia Júnior

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar pacientes submetidos à artroscopia para liberação do cotovelo rígido, discutindo a técnica, possíveis dificuldades e riscos. MÉTODOS: Foram realizadas 24 artroscopias de cotovelos. Todos os pacientes foram avaliados usando goniometria pré e seis meses pós-cirurgia e pontuados com o escore de cotovelo Mayo. RESULTADOS: Operados 15 homens e nove mulheres, 14 cotovelos direitos e 10 esquerdos, média de idade de 34,58 anos e de tempo de seguimento de 38,41 meses. A média do ganho do arco de movimento foi de 43,3º e MES de 85,4. CONCLUSÃO: A liberação artroscópica pode viabilizar melhor visualização e aumento das opções de mudança de estratégia durante a cirurgia, diminuição do trauma cirúrgico e possibilidade de reabilitação precoce, podendo atingir resultados similares ou melhores que os da cirurgia aberta. Contra a artroscopia há a grande curva de aprendizado e o maior custo do procedimento. Ambas as técnicas relatam complicações neurovasculares. Para evitar tais problemas, o protocolo para realização dos portais deve ser rigorosamente seguido. A liberação artroscópica mostrou ser opção segura e eficaz no ganho da ADM no cotovelo rígido pós-traumático.To evaluate patients undergoing arthroscopic release of a stiff elbow, with discussion of the technique, possible difficulties and risks. METHODS: Twenty-four elbow arthroscopy procedures were performed. All the patients were evaluated using goniometry before the operation and six months after wards and were rated using the Mayo elbow performance score (MEPS. RESULTS: Fifteen men and nine women underwent surgery (14 right elbows and ten left elbows. Their mean age was 34.58 years and length of follow-up, 38.41 months. Their mean gain of range of motion was 43.3º and of MEPS, 85.4. CONCLUSION: Arthroscopic liberation might enable better intrarticular visualization and enhance options to change strategy during surgery, reduction of surgical

  5. Difference between early versus delayed postoperative physical rehabilitation protocol following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar M Fawzy

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion Significant improvement in pain, ROM, and function after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was seen at 1 year postoperatively, regardless of early or delayed postoperative rehabilitation protocols. However, early motion increases pain scores and may increase the possibility of rotator cuff retear but with early regain of ROM. A delayed rehabilitation protocol with immobilization for 6 weeks would be better for tendon healing without risk for retear or joint stiffness and easily convalescence with less postoperative pain.

  6. A Qualitative Investigation of Return to Sport After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair: Beyond Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjong, Vehniah K; Devitt, Brian M; Murnaghan, M Lucas; Ogilvie-Harris, Darrell J; Theodoropoulos, John S

    2015-08-01

    Arthroscopic shoulder stabilization is known to have excellent functional results, but many patients do not return to their preinjury level of sport, with return to play rates reported between 48% and 100% despite good outcome scores. To understand specific subjective psychosocial factors influencing a patient's decision to return to sport after arthroscopic shoulder stabilization. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted with patients aged 18 to 40 years who had undergone primary arthroscopic shoulder stabilization and had a minimum 2-year follow-up. All patients participated in sport before surgery without any further revision operations or shoulder injuries. Qualitative data analysis was performed in accordance with the Strauss and Corbin theory to derive codes, categories, and themes. Preinjury and current sport participation was defined by type, level of competition, and the Brophy/Marx shoulder activity score. Patient-reported pain and shoulder function were also obtained. A total of 25 patients were interviewed, revealing that fear of reinjury, shifts in priority, mood, social support, and self-motivation were found to greatly influence the decision to return to sport both in patients who had and had not returned to their preinjury level of play. Patients also described fear of sporting incompetence, self-awareness issues, recommendations from physical therapists, and degree of confidence as less common considerations affecting their return to sport. In spite of excellent functional outcomes, extrinsic and intrinsic factors such as competing interests, kinesiophobia, age, and internal stressors and motivators can have a major effect on a patient's decision to return to sport after arthroscopic shoulder stabilization. The qualitative methods used in this study provide a unique patient-derived perspective into postoperative recovery and highlight the necessity to recognize and address subjective and psychosocial

  7. Results of arthroscopic treatment in unresolved Osgood-Schlatter disease in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circi, Esra; Beyzadeoglu, Tahsin

    2017-02-01

    In this study we aimed to determine outcomes following arthroscopic ossicle excision in athletes with unresolved Osgood-Schlatter disease (OSD). Arthroscopy was performed on 11 patients (11 knees) with OSD between September 2008 and November 2014. Surgical treatment inclusion criteria were determined as: failure of conservative treatment; isolated pain over the tibial tubercle and distal patellar tendon; pain limiting sporting performance at a competitive level. All patients had a documented history of OSD; the mean duration of persistent pain over the tibial tubercle was 15.5 months. The mean age was 23 years. The mean follow-up period was 66.1 months. The mean latency in returning to sports related training activities after the surgery was 6.7 weeks. The mean Kujala patello-femoral score improved from 82.9 points pre-operatively, to 98.5 points at the final follow-up (p < 0.01). The mean Lysholm knee scale score was 87.5 points in the pre-operative period, increasing to a score of 96.9 points at final follow-up (p < 0.01). The mean Tegner activity level score was 7.5 in the pre-operative period, increasing to 8.5 post-operatively (p < 0.01). We investigated the functional outcomes after arthroscopic treatment of unresolved OSD in athletes. All athletes with OSD showed satisfactory functional recovery following arthroscopic treatment. All patients were able to return to the same level of athletic activity. Arthroscopic surgery for unresolved OSD has the major advantage of faster recovery and avoiding damage to the patellar tendon.

  8. Arthroscopic resection of the distal clavicle in osteoarthritis of the acromioclavicular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Soo Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Symptomatic acromioclavicular joint (ACJ lesions are a common cause of shoulder complaints that can be treated successfully with both conservative and surgical methods. There are several operative techniques, including both open and arthroscopic surgery, for excising the distal end of the clavicle. Here, we present a new modified arthroscopic technique for painful osteoarthritis of the ACJ and evaluate its clinical outcomes. Our hypothesis was that 4- to 7-mm resection of the distal clavicle in an en bloc fashion would have several advantages, including no bony remnants, maintenance of stability of the ACJ, and reduced prevalence of heterotopic ossification, in addition to elimination of the pathologic portion of the distal clavicle. Materials and Methods: 20 shoulders of 20 consecutive patients with painful and isolated osteoarthritis of the ACJ who were treated by arthroscopic en bloc resection of the distal clavicle were included in the study. There were 10 males and 10 females with an average age of 56 years (range 42-70 years. The mean duration of followup was 6 years and 2 months (range 4-8 years 10 months. The results were evaluated using the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA shoulder rating score. Results: The overall UCLA score was 13.7 preoperatively, which improved to 33.4 postoperatively. All subscores were improved significantly ( P < 0.001. There were no specific complications at the latest followup. Conclusion: It is critical in this procedure to resect the distal clavicle evenly from superior to inferior in an en bloc fashion without any small bony remnants and to preserve the capsule and acromioclavicular ligament superoposteriorly. This arthroscopic procedure is a reliable and reproducible technique for painful osteoarthritis of the ACJ lesions in active patients engaged in overhead throwing sports and heavy labor.

  9. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING (MRI) SPECTRUM OF Rotator Cuff Tears, with Arthroscopic – MRI Contextualizations

    OpenAIRE

    Batista, Alexandre; Bagulho, Cecília

    2017-01-01

    Our understanding of rotator cuff (RC) pathogenesis and the optimal management of RC pathology is evolving and shoulder magnetic imaging (MRI) has a crucial role in this development, as it functionally depicts pathology in the painful shoulder patient, conveys optimal sensitivity and specificity rates in rotator cuff tear evaluation and characterization, and allows useful additional information in terms of patient management, namely regarding muscle atrophy, reducing unnecessary arthroscopic ...

  10. Arthroscopic Trapeziectomy With Suture Button Suspensionplasty: A Retrospective Review of 153 Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Landes, Genevieve; Gaspar, Michael P.; Goljan, Peter; Jacoby, Sidney M.; Bachoura, Abdo; Culp, Randall W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Arthroscopic trapeziectomy with suture button suspensionplasty (ATBS) is a relatively new surgical option for the treatment of thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) osteoarthritis. Although ATBS has many potential benefits over alternative surgical treatments for CMC arthritis, little data exist regarding its safety and complication rates. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that ATBS is associated with a low risk of complications within 1 year of surgery. Methods: A retrospective ...

  11. Recurrent Instability After Arthroscopic Bankart Reconstruction: A Systematic Review of Surgical Technical Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Landon; Rothermel, Shane; Joshi, Rajat; Dhawan, Aman

    2017-11-01

    Recurrent instability remains of concern after arthroscopic Bankart reconstruction. We evaluated various technical factors including anchor design, anchor material, number of anchors used, and interval closure on risk of recurrent instability after arthroscopic Bankart reconstruction. A systematic review of MEDLINE and Cochrane databases was conducted, following PRISMA guidelines. Extracted data were recorded on a standardized form. Methodological index for non-randomized studies (MINORS) and Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS) were used to assess study quality and risk bias. Because of study heterogeneity and low levels of evidence, meta-analysis was not possible. Pooled weighted means were calculated and individual study evaluation and comparisons (qualitative analysis) were performed for systematic review. Of 2097 studies identified, 26 met criteria for systematic review. Pooled weighted means revealed 11.4% versus 15% recurrent instability with 3 or more suture anchors versus fewer than 3 anchors, 10.1% versus 7.8% with absorbable versus nonabsorbable suture anchors, respectively, and 8.0% versus 9.4% with knotless versus standard anchors, respectively. Interval closure did not qualitatively decrease recurrent instability or decrease range of motion. Our systematic review reveals that despite individual study, and previous systematic reviews pointing to the contrary, the composite contemporary published literature would support no difference in the risk of recurrent instability after arthroscopic Bankart reconstruction with rotator interval closure, differing numbers of anchors used for the repair, use of knotless versus standard anchors, or use of bioabsorbable versus nonabsorbable anchors. We recommend surgeons focus on factors that have been shown to modify the risk factors after arthroscopic Bankart reconstruction, such as patient selection. Level IV, systematic review of Level III and IV studies. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America

  12. Functional outcomes after open versus arthroscopic Latarjet procedure: A prospective comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourissat, G; Neyton, L; Metais, P; Clavert, P; Villain, B; Haeni, D; Walch, G; Lafosse, L

    2016-12-01

    The Latarjet procedure provides effective stabilization of chronically unstable shoulders. Since this procedure is mainly performed in a young athletic population, the functional impact is significant. Published data does not shed light on the time needed to recover work-related or sports-related function. Performing this procedure arthroscopically may improve functional recovery. This led us to carry out a prospective, multicenter study to compare the functional recovery after arthroscopic versus open Latarjet procedure. Between June and November 2014, 184 patients were included in a prospective multicenter study: 85 in the open group and 99 in the arthroscopy group. The patients were evaluated preoperatively with the WOSI score. The early postoperative pain was evaluated on D3, D7 and D30. The WOSI score was determined postoperatively at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months of follow-up. The functional scores of the shoulder in both cohorts were identical overall preoperatively. In the immediate postoperative period, the arthroscopy group had statistically lower pain levels on D3 and D7. The postoperative WOSI was improved in both groups at 3 months, then continued to improve until it reached a plateau at 1 year. The WOSI score was better in the arthroscopy group at 3 months, but better in the open group at 6 months. This study found that a Latarjet procedure performed arthroscopically generates less immediately postoperative pain than when it is performed as an open procedure. The Latarjet procedure (whether open or arthroscopic) improves shoulder function, with normal function returning after 1 year. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Arthroscopic treatment of impingement of the ankle reduces pain and enhances function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, S; Hjorth Jensen, C

    2002-01-01

    A consecutive series of 105 patients with a median age of 35 (16-62) years who were operated on with arthroscopic resection for impingement of the ankle using standardized technique without distraction is presented. All patients complained of painful dorsiflexion and had failed to respond...... synovectomy and intravenous antibiotics. In one patient persistent symptoms were recorded. Ankle arthroscopy yielded good results in the treatment of anterior impingement of the ankle as it effectively reduced pain and enhanced function....

  14. "Wet diapers--dry patients": an effective dressing for patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapila, Atul; Bhargava, Amit; Funk, Len; Copeland, Stephen; Levy, Ofer

    2005-02-01

    Shoulder arthroscopy is very commonly associated with postoperative leakage of irrigation fluid. This causes apprehension to patients and their relatives and leads to frequent change of dressings. We describe a simple and effective diaper dressing for patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery. It is highly absorbent, cost-effective, and easy to apply. We have used this dressing successfully in more than 1,500 shoulder arthroscopies over the last 3 years with no adverse reaction.

  15. Arthroscopic osteochondral autologous transplantation for the treatment of osteochondritis dissecans of the femoral head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uchida Soshi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD of the femoral head is an unusual cause of hip pain. It can be associated with other intra-articular pathologies including: acetabular labral tears or bone deformities such as Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease (LCPD. In this article, we propose a modern surgical technique using an arthroscopic antegrade and retrograde osteochondral autologous transplantation (OAT procedure for assessing and treating OCD lesions of the femoral head.

  16. Intraligamentous ganglion cysts of the anterior cruciate Ligament: MR findings with clinical and arthroscopic correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do-Dai, D.D.; Youngberg, R.A.; Lanchbury, F.D.; Pitcher, J.D. Jr.; Garver, T.H. [Madigan Army Medical Center, Tacoma, WA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic resonance findings with clinical and arthroscopic correlation of intraligamentous cysts of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are presented. Three cases of intraligamentous cysts of the ACL were identified out of 681 knee MRI examinations over a 2-year period. Arthroscopy and postoperative MRI were performed in all three patients, each of whom experienced knee pain with extreme flexion and extension. In all three cases the intraligamentous cyst was homogeneously hypointense on T1-weighted imaging and hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging relative to the ACL. Two of the three ACL cysts required a 70{degrees} scope for adequate visualization and establishment of posteromedial and posterolateral portals for arthroscopic treatment. One cyst could not be visualized arthroscopically and probing of the ACL from the anterior portal resulted in drainage of the cyst. No patient had presence of ACL cyst on follow-up MRI or recurrence of symptoms at a mean of 24 months. Intraligamentous cyst of ACL is a rare cause of knee pain. It should be suspected in patients having chronic pain with extremes of motion. Magnetic resonance findings are diagnostic and help to guide arthroscopy. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Arthroscopic double-row suture anchor fixation of minimally displaced greater tuberosity fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jong-Hun; Kim, Weon-Yoo; Ra, Ki-Hang

    2007-10-01

    In cases of displaced greater tuberosity fractures, treatments by arthroscopic-assisted reduction and percutaneous screw fixation have been reported. However, in cases in which there is a comminuted fracture or a minimally displaced fracture combined with concomitant lesions such as rotator cuff tear or labral pathology, it is difficult to reduce the fracture and to treat other pathologies by use of a percutaneous screw. Recently, many surgeons have used the double-row repair method in rotator cuff repair, which provides a tendon-bone interface better suited for biologic healing and restoring normal anatomy. In accordance with this method, we used the arthroscopic technique of double-row suture anchor fixation for a minimally displaced greater tuberosity fracture without additional incision. Initially, debridement was performed on the fracture surface by use of a shaver, and the medial-row anchor was inserted through the anterior portal or the intact cuff. Two lateral-row anchors were inserted just anterior and posterior to the lower margin of the fractured fragment under C-arm guidance. The medial-row sutures and lateral-row sutures were then placed. Arthroscopic double-row suture anchor fixation of a displaced greater tuberosity fracture restores the original footprint of the rotator cuff and normal tendon-bone interface of the displaced greater tuberosity fracture.

  18. [Clinical-imaging-arthroscopic correlation in the diagnosis of meniscal lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, P D; Vaisman, B A; Calvo, R R; Mococain, M P; Delgado, B I

    2011-01-01

    To assess the relation between location and intensity of pain in the articular interline as reported by the patient and proven objectively with the physical exam, and the type and location of the meniscal lesion found in the knee imaging study and arthroscopy. Prospective, observational, longitudinal study including 34 consecutive patients with a clinical and arthroscopic diagnosis of symptomatic meniscal tears. Pain location was reported, an MRI was taken and finally all patients were assessed with knee arthroscopy. We found an excellent correlation between the clinical manifestation of pain and the arthroscopic findings (p meniscal pathology with the anatomical lesion could be useful at the time of deciding to perform surgery, as the clinical identification of certain types of meniscal tears could potentially determine what the best time to perform surgery is. Our study shows that there is no significant relation neither between the magnitude of pain and the laterality of the lesion, nor between the magnitude of pain and the type of lesion diagnosed arthroscopically. This shows that patients cannot be selected considering the anatomy of the lesion based only on the physical exam.

  19. Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Tear Transosseous Repair System: The Sharc-FT Using the Taylor Stitcher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Andrea; Lunini, Enricomaria; Rebuzzi, Manuela; Verdano, Michele; Baudi, Paolo; Ceccarelli, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Transosseous rotator cuff tear repair was first described in 1944. Over the years, it has represented the gold standard for such lesions. Through open and mini-open approaches, as well as the arthroscopic approach, the transosseous repair system represents one of the most reliable surgical techniques from a biological and mechanical perspective. Nevertheless, further improvements are required. This article describes an arthroscopic rotator cuff tear transosseous repair system, developed in collaboration with NCS Lab (Carpi, Italy): the Sharc-FT using the Taylor Stitcher. Our first experience in the clinical application of the arthroscopic technique using the transosseous suture system has shown encouraging clinical outcomes, confirming its efficacy. The patient satisfaction rate was high, and no patient expressed concern about the implant. The complication rate was very low. By improving the suture technique in the treatment of rotator cuff tears, a remarkable increase in the success rate in the treatment of this pathology could be reached; nevertheless, complications such as retears of the rotator cuff still occur.

  20. Arthroscopic Hemitrapeziectomy for First Carpometacarpal Arthritis: Results at 7-year Follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leak, Robert S.; Culp, Randall W.; Osterman, A. Lee

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the outcome of arthroscopic hemitrapeziectomy combined with thermal capsular plication and temporary K-wire fixation in patients with painful thumb basal joint due to either osteoarthritis or posttraumatic arthritis. There were 18 thumbs that were evaluated in this retrospective study of arthroscopic hemitrapeziectomy of the distal trapezium in addition to a pancapsular thermal shrinkage at an average of 7.6-year follow-up. No patient has required further surgery. A subjective improvement in pain, pinch activities, strength, and range of motion (ROM) was noted in all patients, and no patient had further surgery on their thumb. On exam, no patient had a first carpal–metacarpal grind or laxity. Total ROM of the thumb axis decreased by 20%, but all patients could oppose to the fifth finger. Grip strength remained unchanged, key pinch improved from 8 to 11 lbs, and tip pinch improved from 4 to 5 lbs. Radiographs showed a metacarpal subsidence of 1.8 mm (0–4 mm). Four complications were noted: two cases of dorsal radial nerve neuritis, one rupture of the flexor pollicis longus, and one prolonged hematoma. Results demonstrate that arthroscopic hemitrapeziectomy and capsular shrinkage for first carpometacarpal arthritis is an effective technique that provides high patient satisfaction, a functional pain-free thumb, and a reliable rate of return to activity. PMID:18820976

  1. Relationship of physical examination test of shoulder instability to arthroscopic findings in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devitt, Chad M; Neely, Marlon R; Vanvechten, Brian J

    2007-10-01

    To determine the diagnostic validity of commonly used physical examination maneuvers for shoulder instability. Retrospective study. Dogs (n=24) referred for shoulder arthroscopy. Results of physical maneuvers and arthroscopic findings were recorded and sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratios (LR+), and negative likelihood ratios (LR-) were calculated for each of 4 physical examination test findings for arthroscopic changes in the medial, lateral, cranial, or caudal compartments of the shoulder joint viewed in dorsal recumbency by lateral and craniomedial portals. Distribution of compartment changes was: medial (17 dogs), caudal (15), cranial (12), and lateral (5). The biceps test had a moderate effect (LR+=9) on post-test probability of cranial compartment changes and a small effect on post-test probability of lateral and caudal compartment changes (LR+=3 and 2.4, respectively). Hyperabduction had a minimal effect and mediolateral instability test had a small effect (LR+=1.64 and 2.68, respectively) on post-test probability of medial compartment changes. Craniocaudal instability test had little to no effect on post-test probability of changes in any compartment. Physical examination tests evaluated were limited in their ability to predict the type of arthroscopic pathology in this study population. Clinicians should understand that a diagnostic test performs inconsistently based on prevalence of a condition in a given patient population. The use of likelihood ratios can assist clinicians in determining the probability of intraarticular changes from a group with a differing prevalence than the patient population presented.

  2. Return to Sports and Recurrences After Arthroscopic Anterior Shoulder Stabilization in Martial Arts Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranalletta, Maximiliano; Rossi, Luciano A; Sirio, Adrian; Dilernia, Fernando Diaz; Bertona, Agustin; Maignon, Gastón D; Bongiovanni, Santiago L

    2017-09-01

    The high demands to the glenohumeral joint and the violent shoulder blows experienced during martial arts (MA) could compromise return to sports and increase the recurrence rate after arthroscopic stabilization for anterior shoulder instability in these athletes. To report the functional outcomes, return to sports, and recurrences in a series of MA athletes with anterior shoulder instability treated with arthroscopic stabilization with suture anchors. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A total of 20 consecutive MA athletes were treated for anterior shoulder instability at a single institution between January 2008 and December 2013. Range of motion (ROM), the Rowe score, a visual analog scale (VAS), and the Athletic Shoulder Outcome Scoring System (ASOSS) were used to assess functional outcomes. Return-to-sport and recurrence rates were also evaluated. The mean age at the time of surgery was 25.4 years (range, 18-35 years), and the mean follow-up was 71 months (range, 36-96 months). No significant difference in preoperative and postoperative shoulder ROM was found. The Rowe, VAS, and ASOSS scores showed statistical improvement after surgery ( P < .001). In all, 19 athletes (95%) returned to sports. However, only 60% achieved ≥90% recovery after surgery. The recurrence rate was 20%. In this retrospective study of a consecutive cohort of MA athletes, arthroscopic anterior shoulder stabilization significantly improved functional scores. However, only 60% of the athletes achieved the same level of competition, and there was a 20% recurrence rate.

  3. Massive cuff tears treated with arthroscopically assisted latissimus dorsi transfer. Surgical technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cupis, Vincenzo; De Cupis, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Summary Latissimus dorsi transfer is our preferred treatment for active disabled patients with a posterosuperior massive cuff tear. We present an arthroscopically assisted technique which avoids an incision through the deltoid obtaining a better and faster clinical outcome. The patient is placed in lateral decubitus. After the arthroscopic evaluation of the lesion through a posterior and a posterolateral portal, with the limb in traction we perform the preparation of the greater tuberosity of the humerus. We place the arm in abduction and internal rotation and we proceed to the harvest of the latissimus dorsi and the tendon preparation by stitching the two sides using very resistant sutures. After restoring limb traction, under arthroscopic visualization, we pass a curved grasper through the posterolateral portal by going to the armpit in the space between the teres minor and the posterior deltoid. Once the grasper has exited the access at the level of the axilla we fix two drainage transparent tubes, each with a wire inside, and, withdrawing it back, we shuttle the two tubes in the subacromial space. After tensioning the suture wires from the anterior portals these are assembled in a knotless anchor of 5.5 mm that we place in the prepared site on the greater tuberosity of the humerus. A shoulder brace at 15° of abduction and neutral rotation protect the patient for the first month post-surgery but physical therapy can immediately start. PMID:23738290

  4. Arthroscopic Treatment of Comminuted Distal Clavicle Fractures (Latarjet Fractures) Using 2 Double-Button Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, Nicolas; Desmoineaux, Pierre; Boisrenoult, Philippe; Beaufils, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Complex distal clavicle fractures associated with a rupture of the coracoclavicular ligaments (Latarjet fractures) can result in delayed union or nonunion. There is no standard treatment for a clavicle fracture. This report introduces an arthroscopic technique for treating distal clavicle fractures associated with ruptured coracoclavicular ligament using 2 double-button devices. By use of posterior and anterior standard arthroscopic portals, the base of the coracoid process is exposed through the rotator interval. A 4-mm hole is drilled through the clavicle and the coracoid process with a specific ancillary drill guide. The first button is pushed through both holes down the coracoid process. The device is tightened, and the second button is fixed on top of the clavicle, allowing reduction and fixation of the proximal part of the fracture. Then, the undersurface of the lateral clavicle is dissected through standard posterior and lateral subacromial approaches. The inferior clavicle fragment is reduced and fixed to the clavicle body by a double button fixed down and at the top of the clavicle. With this technique, the arthroscopic treatment of distal clavicle fracture has been extended to comminuted fractures. PMID:23767010

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging is not suitable for interpretation of meniscal status ten years after arthroscopic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, Nicolas; Tardy, Nicolas; Boisrenoult, Philippe; Beaufils, Philippe

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the MRI features of the all-inside repaired meniscus in the long-term. Among 27 consecutive all-inside arthroscopic meniscal repairs, 23 patients aged 25 ± 5 years at the time of surgery were reviewed at a median follow-up of 10 ± 1 years. Retrospective clinical examinations and imaging assessments using a 1.5-T MRI after all-inside arthroscopic meniscal repair were conducted. At follow-up, Lysholm and IKDC averaged 89 ± 11 and 95 ± 8, respectively. MRI examinations revealed no meniscal signal alteration in three patients (13%), a vertical signal located in the previously torn area in seven (30%), a horizontal grade 3 in nine (39%), and a complex tear (grade 4) in four (17.5%). There were no differences between medial and lateral menisci (p = 0.15), stable and stabilised knees (p = 0.56). Several abnormal vertical and/or horizontal hypersignals are still present on MRI examination ten years after arthroscopic all-inside meniscal repair. The appearance of early signs of osteoarthritis is rare, suggesting a chondroprotective effect of the repaired meniscus.

  6. Distraction arthroplasty with arthroscopic microfracture in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis of the ankle joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasa, Tomoyuki; Adachi, Nobuo; Kato, Tomohiro; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    We treated a 39-year-old female who had experienced destruction of her ankle joint owing to rheumatoid arthritis. This relatively young patient wished to avoid ankle fusion and joint replacement. Therefore, distraction arthroplasty with arthroscopic microfracture was performed to improve her symptoms and preserve motion. A microfracture procedure specifically for cartilage defects of the tibial plafond and talar dome was performed with the arthroscope, after which a hinged external fixator was applied to distract the ankle joint. The ankle joint space was enlarged by the external device and joint movement allowed. After 3 months, removal of the external device and repeat arthroscopy revealed newly formed fibrocartilage on the surfaces of both the tibia and the talus. At 2 years after the surgery, a radiograph showed that the joint space enlargement of the ankle had been maintained. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score improved from 37 points preoperatively to 82 points at 2 years postoperatively. Our findings suggest that good clinical results can be achieved with distraction arthroplasty and arthroscopic microfracture in a relatively young patient with rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Arthroscopic approach and intraarticular anatomy of the stifle in South American camelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentecost, Rebecca L; Niehaus, Andrew J; Santschi, Elizabeth

    2012-05-01

    To describe a cranial arthroscopic approach to the stifle of South American camelids and to report our clinical experience with camelid stifle arthroscopy. Experimental study and retrospective case series. (1) Cadaveric alpaca hindlimbs (n = 18; 9 alpacas); (2) 1 alpaca and 1 llama Polymethylmethacrylate joint casts (n = 2) were made to define stifle joint dimensions. Cadaveric stifle joints (n = 16) were evaluated arthroscopically to determine arthroscopic portal locations, describe the intraarticular anatomy, and report potential complications. An alpaca and a llama with stifle joint disease had diagnostic arthroscopy. Successful entry into the stifle joint was achieved in 16 cadaver limbs. Observed structures were: the suprapatellar pouch, articular surface of the patella, femoral trochlear ridges and groove, cranial aspect of the femoral condyles (n = 16); distal aspect of the cranial and proximal aspect of the caudal cruciate ligaments (14); and cranial aspects of the medial and lateral menisci (11), and cranial meniscotibial and intermeniscal ligaments (8). Stifle arthroscopy allowed for joint evaluation and removal of osteochondral fragments in 1 alpaca and 1 llama with naturally occurring stifle disease. Complications of cadaver or live procedures included minor cartilage scoring (3 stifles) and subcutaneous periarticular fluid accumulation (8 stifles). Arthroscopy provides a safe approach for diagnosis and treatment of stifle lesions in South American camelids. Copyright 2012 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  8. Virtual Reality Compared with Bench-Top Simulation in the Acquisition of Arthroscopic Skill: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaszek, Daniel; You, Daniel; Chang, Justues; Pickell, Michael; Hesse, Daniel; Hopman, Wilma M; Borschneck, Daniel; Bardana, Davide

    2017-04-05

    Work-hour restrictions as set forth by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and other governing bodies have forced training programs to seek out new learning tools to accelerate acquisition of both medical skills and knowledge. As a result, competency-based training has become an important part of residency training. The purpose of this study was to directly compare arthroscopic skill acquisition in both high-fidelity and low-fidelity simulator models and to assess skill transfer from either modality to a cadaveric specimen, simulating intraoperative conditions. Forty surgical novices (pre-clerkship-level medical students) voluntarily participated in this trial. Baseline demographic data, as well as data on arthroscopic knowledge and skill, were collected prior to training. Subjects were randomized to 5-week independent training sessions on a high-fidelity virtual reality arthroscopic simulator or on a bench-top arthroscopic setup, or to an untrained control group. Post-training, subjects were asked to perform a diagnostic arthroscopy on both simulators and in a simulated intraoperative environment on a cadaveric knee. A more difficult surprise task was also incorporated to evaluate skill transfer. Subjects were evaluated using the Global Rating Scale (GRS), the 14-point arthroscopic checklist, and a timer to determine procedural efficiency (time per task). Secondary outcomes focused on objective measures of virtual reality simulator motion analysis. Trainees on both simulators demonstrated a significant improvement (p virtual reality simulation group consistently outperformed the bench-top model group in the diagnostic arthroscopy crossover tests and in the simulated cadaveric setup. Furthermore, the virtual reality group demonstrated superior skill transfer in the surprise skill transfer task. Both high-fidelity and low-fidelity simulation trainings were effective in arthroscopic skill acquisition. High-fidelity virtual reality

  9. Knee function and knee muscle strength in middle-aged patients with degenerative meniscal tears eligible for arthroscopic partial meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensrud, Silje; Risberg, May Arna; Roos, Ewa M.

    2014-01-01

    -sectional study. METHODS: Eighty-two participants with MRI verified degenerative meniscal tear (35% women, mean age 49 years) answered the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and were tested for isokinetic knee muscle strength and lower extremity performance (one-leg hop for distance, 6 m timed...... hop and maximum number of knee-bends in 30 s). Limb Symmetry Index (LSI) was used to express side-to-side differences in per cent using the non-injured leg as the control. An LSI ≥90% was considered normal. RESULTS: Mean scores of the five subscales of the KOOS were from 13 to 36 points lower compared...... with a population-based reference group and similar to patients prior to anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Quadriceps strength and lower-extremity performance were impaired for the injured leg compared with the non-injured leg (p10% differences between the injured and the non-injured leg....

  10. Recovery of lower extremity muscle strength and functional performance in middle-aged patients undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganderup, Tina; Jensen, Carsten; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    -surgery, and that this deficiency would be normalized at 12 months following surgery. METHODS: Twenty-three patients (46 ± 6.5 years) meniscectomized in 2012 and 2013 were examined for knee extension, knee flexion, and hip abduction maximal isometric muscle strength (iMVC), rate of force development (RFD200), and knee function...... (single-leg hop for distance and single-leg knee bends in 30 s.) before surgery, 3 and 12 months after surgery. RESULTS: Functional performance, knee extension iMVC and RFD200 were impaired in the affected leg compared to the contralateral leg (p

  11. Voiding patterns of adult patients who underwent hypospadias repair in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, Jawdat; Kocherov, Stanislav; Chertin, Leonid; Farkas, Amicur; Chertin, Boris

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the voiding patterns of adult patients who underwent hypospadias repair in childhood. Following IRB approval 103 (22.7%) of 449 adult patients who underwent hypospadias repair between 1978 and 1993 responded to the following questionnaires: International Prostate Symptom Score (I-PSS) and Short Form 12 questionnaire (SF-12). Uroflowmetry (UF) was performed for all patients. The patients were divided into three groups according to the primary meatus localization. Group I had 63 patients (61.5%) treated for glanular hypospadias, group II had 19 patients (18.4%) treated for distal hypospadias, and group III comprised the remaining 21 patients (20.4%) treated for proximal hypospadias. The mean ± SD I-PSS score for all patients who responded to the questionnaire was 2.3 ± 2.4, and UF was 21.1 ± 4.3 mL/s. The patients from groups I and III had fewer urinary symptoms compared with those of the group II: 1.3 ± 1.5, 5.5 ± 2.4, and 1.6 ± 1.4, respectively (p hypospadias repair in childhood had normal or mild voiding disturbance, with no effects on their physical or mental status. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Prognostic Analysis of Breast Cancer Patients Who Underwent Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Using QOL-ACD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Yasuhiro; Kashiwagi, Shinichiro; Takada, Koji; Goto, Wataru; Asano, Yuka; Morisaki, Tamami; Noda, Satoru; Takashima, Tsutomu; Onoda, Naoyoshi; Hirakawa, Kosei; Ohira, Masaichi

    2017-11-01

    We investigated into association of quality of life(QOL)and prognosis of breast cancer patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy(NAC). We retrospectively studied 228 patients with breast cancer who were performed NAC during a period between 2007 and 2015. TheQ OL score was measured with"The QOL Questionnaire for Cancer Patients Treated with Anticancer Drugs(QOL-ACD)". We evaluate association between QOL score with antitumor effect and prognosis. Changes in the QOL score between before and after NAC were compared as well. We divided 2 groups by QOL-ACD scoreinto high and low groups. Therapeautic effect of NAC on 75 patients were pathological complete response(pCR). QOL-ACD score was not significantly associated with pCR rate in both high and low groups(p=0.199). High group was significantly associated with higher survival rate in both of disease free survival(p=0.009, logrank)and overall survival(p=0.040, logrank). QOLACD score decreased after NAC in both of pCR and non-pCR patients. In conclusion, QOL evaluation using QOL-ACD could be an indicator of breast cancer patients' prognosis who underwent NAC.

  13. HLA-G regulatory haplotypes and implantation outcome in couples who underwent assisted reproduction treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Cynthia Hernandes; Gelmini, Georgia Fernanda; Wowk, Pryscilla Fanini; Mattar, Sibelle Botogosque; Vargas, Rafael Gustavo; Roxo, Valéria Maria Munhoz Sperandio; Schuffner, Alessandro; Bicalho, Maria da Graça

    2012-09-01

    The role of HLA-G in several clinical conditions related to reproduction has been investigated. Important polymorphisms have been found within the 5'URR and 3'UTR regions of the HLA-G promoter. The aim of the present study was to investigate 16 SNPs in the 5'URR and 14-bp insertion/deletion (ins/del) polymorphism located in the 3'UTR region of the HLA-G gene and its possible association with the implantation outcome in couples who underwent assisted reproduction treatments (ART). The case group was composed of 25 ART couples. Ninety-four couples with two or more term pregnancies composed the control group. Polymorphism haplotype frequencies of the HLA-G were determined for both groups. The Haplotype 5, Haplotype 8 and Haplotype 11 were absolute absence in ART couples. The HLA-G*01:01:02a, HLA-G*01:01:02b alleles and the 14-bp ins polymorphism, Haplotype 2, showed an increased frequency in case women and similar distribution between case and control men. However, this susceptibility haplotype is significantly presented in case women and in couple with failure implantation after treatment, which led us to suggest a maternal effect, associated with this haplotype, once their presence in women is related to a higher number of couples who underwent ART. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Sarcopenia: a new predictor of postoperative complications for elderly gastric cancer patients who underwent radical gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chong-Jun; Zhang, Feng-Min; Zhang, Fei-Yu; Yu, Zhen; Chen, Xiao-Lei; Shen, Xian; Zhuang, Cheng-Le; Chen, Xiao-Xi

    2017-05-01

    A geriatric assessment is needed to identify high-risk elderly patients with gastric cancer. However, the current geriatric assessment has been considered to be either time-consuming or subjective. The present study aimed to investigate the predictive effect of sarcopenia on the postoperative complications for elderly patients who underwent radical gastrectomy. We conducted a prospective study of patients who underwent radical gastrectomy from August 2014 to December 2015. Computed tomography-assessed lumbar skeletal muscle, handgrip strength, and gait speed were measured to define sarcopenia. Sarcopenia was present in 69 of 240 patients (28.8%) and was associated with lower body mass index, lower serum albumin, lower hemoglobin, and higher nutritional risk screening 2002 scores. Postoperative complications significantly increased in the sarcopenic patients (49.3% versus 24.6%, P sarcopenia (odds ratio: 2.959, 95% CI: 1.629-5.373, P Sarcopenia, presented as a new geriatric assessment factor, was a strong and independent risk factor for postoperative complications of elderly patients with gastric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Circulating S100B and Adiponectin in Children Who Underwent Open Heart Surgery and Cardiopulmonary Bypass

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    Alessandro Varrica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. S100B protein, previously proposed as a consolidated marker of brain damage in congenital heart disease (CHD newborns who underwent cardiac surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB, has been progressively abandoned due to S100B CNS extra-source such as adipose tissue. The present study investigated CHD newborns, if adipose tissue contributes significantly to S100B serum levels. Methods. We conducted a prospective study in 26 CHD infants, without preexisting neurological disorders, who underwent cardiac surgery and CPB in whom blood samples for S100B and adiponectin (ADN measurement were drawn at five perioperative time-points. Results. S100B showed a significant increase from hospital admission up to 24 h after procedure reaching its maximum peak (P0.05 have been found all along perioperative monitoring. ADN/S100B ratio pattern was identical to S100B alone with the higher peak at the end of CPB and remained higher up to 24 h from surgery. Conclusions. The present study provides evidence that, in CHD infants, S100B protein is not affected by an extra-source adipose tissue release as suggested by no changes in circulating ADN concentrations.

  16. Effect of different pneumoperitoneum pressure on stress state in patients underwent gynecological laparoscopy

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    Ai-Yun Shen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the effect of different CO2 pneumoperitoneum pressure on the stress state in patients underwent gynecological laparoscopy. Methods: A total of 90 patients who were admitted in our hospital from February, 2015 to October, 2015 for gynecological laparoscopy were included in the study and divided into groups A, B, and C according to different CO2 pneumoperitoneum pressure. The changes of HR, BP, and PetCO2 during the operation process in the three groups were recorded. The changes of stress indicators before operation (T0, 30 min during operation (T1, and 12 h after operation (T2 were compared. Results: The difference of HR, BP, and PetCO2 levels before operation among the three groups was not statistically significant (P>0.05. HR, BP, and PetCO2 levels 30 min after pneumoperitoneum were significantly elevated when compared with before operation (P0.05. PetCO2 level 30 min after pneumoperitoneum in group B was significantly higher than that in group A (P0.05. Conclusions: Low pneumoperitoneum pressure has a small effect on the stress state in patients underwent gynecological laparoscopy, will not affect the surgical operation, and can obtain a preferable muscular relaxation and vision field; therefore, it can be selected in preference.

  17. Long-term functional results and isokinetic strength evaluation after arthroscopic tenotomy of the long head of biceps tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The, Bertram; Brutty, Mike; Wang, Allan; Campbell, Peter T; Halliday, Michael J C; Ackland, Timothy R

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the biomechanical function of the upper arm after arthroscopic long head of biceps (LHB) tenotomy at long-term follow-up. Twenty-five male subjects ranging from 30 to 63 years old were evaluated at a mean follow-up of 7.0 years after tenotomy. Bilateral isokinetic testing was performed to obtain peak torque values, as well as total work done throughout the full range of elbow flexion and supination. Magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed nine unrecognized LHB ruptures in the contralateral arm, leaving 16 subjects to complete the testing protocol. The mean quickDASH score was 8.1 (standard error [SE] 2.5). The mean oxford elbow score was 97.9 (SE 1.6). The tenotomy arm recorded a decrease in peak flexion torque of 7.0% (confidence interval [CI] 1.2-12.8), and a decrease in the peak supination torque of 9.1% (CI 1.8-16.4) relative to the contralateral arm. The total work carried out through the full range of joint motion was reduced in elbow flexion by 5.1% (CI -1.3-11.4) and in forearm supination by 5.7% (CI-2.4-13.9). Maximum strength in elbow flexion and forearm supination is significantly reduced compared with the contralateral arm. However, this impairment is partially compensated for by relatively greater strength sustained through the latter stages of joint motion. This results in comparable total work measurements between the tenotomised and contralateral side, potentially accounting for ongoing high levels of patient satisfaction and clinical function in the long term after LHB tenotomy. Case series without comparison group.

  18. A CLINICAL STUDY OF ARTHROSCOPIC MANAGEMENT OF ANTERIOR C RUCIATE LIGAMENT INJURIES OF KNEE JOINT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paragjyoti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Anterior C ruciate L igament (ACL tear is a common sports injury of the knee. There are a lot of controversies related to the management of this injury and more than 2000 papers have been published on the various aspects of the topic. Arthroscopic reconstruction of the ACL with autogenous graft material is widely used nowadays. The two most commonly used grafts are the central one - third of the patellar ligament (bone - tendon - bone, BTB and the hamstring tendon ( S emitendinosus - gracilis, STG construct but the former graft leads to increased donor site morbidity & hurdles in postoperative rehab & pain. The aim of the study is to study the Arthroscopic management of anterior cruciate ligament injury of knee joint using quadrupled hamstring graft. METHOD: The study was carried out on 30 cases of anterior cruciate ligament injury of knee joint attending the OPD and emergency of department of Orthopaedics, Silchar Medical College & Hospital who met the inclusion criteria. An informed consent was obtained from each patient prior to participation in the study. All the patients were examined in detail and worked up to obtain pre - anaesthetic clearance. X - rays and MRI were done routinely in all the cases. Clinical and radiological parameters were recorded. Arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with quadrupled hamstring graft was done in all the patients. Concomitant meniscal inju ries were treated according to the merit of the injury. Patients were followed up at regular intervals and outcome variables were assessed and recorded. RESULTS: Results of our study clearly showed that arthroscopic ACL reconstruction using quadrupled hamstring graft is a safe, effective and reproducible procedure in restoring knee function with minimal donor site morbidity. At follow up evaluation, all patients had good outcomes in terms of clinical stability, range of motion and general symptoms. CONCLUSION: From the results in this study

  19. INTRAARTICULAR INJECTION OF HYALURONIC ACID AFTER ARTHROSCOPIC LAVAGE OF THE KNEE: LONG-TERM RESULTS

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    Lidia Vladimirovna Luchikhina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficiency of arthroscopic lavage in combination with subsequent injection of hyaluronic acid into the joint cavity at shortand long-term follow-ups. Subjects and methods. Eighty-two patients with knee osteoarthrosis (OA were examined in accordance with the American College of Rheumatology criteria. Group 1 consisted of 40 patients only after arthroscopic lavage; Group 2 comprised 42 patients who were administered hyaluronic acid after arthroscopic lavage. Clinical evaluation encompassed pain while walking, resting, and moving (by a visual analogue scale, limited ability in covering 100 m (by a 5-point scale, general clinical evaluation (by a 5-point ordinal scale, the presence or absence of pain after 100-m walking, as well as resting pain (its presence or absence. Results. The treatment effect evaluated using different indicators was comparably positive in both groups within 3 months. Following 3 months of therapy, its effect remained stable and even better in Group 2. The latter showed a particularly noticeable superiority a year later. Thus, there were excellent and good results in 88 and 47.5% in Groups 2 and 1, respectively. The clinical symptoms of the disease were absent in 58% in Group 2 and in only 15% in Group 1. Moreover, Group 1 showed worsening and 20% of the patients had no effect. This trend was also seen while evaluating the therapeutic effectiveness in different periods. Thus, after therapy, no substantial difference was found in both groups, but 3 months later this difference was as many as 0.8 scores and a year later Group 2 had many points in its favor (1.2 scores. Conclusion. Arthroscopic lavage followed by the administration of hyaluronic acid makes it possible to prevent the negative effect of a washing liquid on the metabolism and structure of the articular cartilage and to achieve a long-term effect against the major clinical symptoms (joint pain and function affecting the quality of life. The

  20. Gluteus maximus contraction velocity assessed by tensiomyography improves following arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seijas, Roberto; Marín, Miguel; Rivera, Eila; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Barastegui, David; Álvarez-Díaz, Pedro; Cugat, Ramón

    2018-03-01

    Muscular impairment, particularly for the gluteus maximus (GM), has been observed in femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the tensiomyographic changes of the GM, rectus femoris (RF) and adductor longus (AL) before and after arthroscopic surgery for FAI. It was hypothesized that arthroscopic treatment of FAI would improve the preoperative muscular impairment. All patients undergoing arthroscopic treatment of FAI between January and July 2015 were approached for eligibility. Patients included had a tensiomyography (TMG) evaluation including maximal displacement (Dm) and contraction time (Tc) of these muscles in both lower extremities. TMG values between the injured and healthy sides were compared at the preoperative and post-operative (3, 6 and 12 months after surgery) periods. There were no significant differences for the RF and AL, and Dm of the GM for any of the comparisons (n.s.). However, GM Tc was significantly lower at 3 (p = 0.016), 6 (p = 0.008), and 12 (p = 0.049) months after surgery in the injured side compared to preoperatively. GM Tc of the healthy side was significantly lower than the injured side at the preoperative period (p = 0.004) and at 3 (p = 0.024) and 6 (p = 0.028) months after surgery, but these significant differences were no longer observed at 12 months after surgery (n.s.). There was a significant reduction of pain in the GM area at 1 year after surgery compared to preoperatively (p < 0.0001). Arthroscopic treatment of FAI and the subsequent rehabilitation improves contraction velocity of the GM of the injured side. Despite Tc is elevated in the GM of the injured compared to the healthy side preoperatively and at 3 and 6 months after surgery, differences in Tc between both sides are no longer significant at 12 months. Athletes with FAI participating in sports with great involvement of GM may benefit from arthroscopic treatment and its subsequent rehabilitation. TMG can be used as

  1. Pseudoaneurisma de artéria genicular após cirurgia artroscópica de joelho: Relato de dois casos Geniculate artery pseudoaneurysm after arthroscopic knee surgery: Two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgard dos Santos Pereira Junior

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A artroscopia do joelho é considerado um procedimento cirúrgico muito seguro, com um número relativamente pequeno de complicações. Relatamos o caso de dois pacientes do sexo masculino que foram submetidos à artroscopia de joelho (para meniscectomia parcial e reconstrução do ligamento cruzado anterior com parafuso transverso femoral e interferência tibial que desenvolveram um pseudoaneurisma de artéria genicular superior lateral após o procedimento. A ultrassonografia com Doppler realizou o diagnóstico e os pacientes foram tratados cirurgicamente com ligadura arterial. Um paciente apresentou extenso hematoma na coxa e foi necessária reposição volêmica. Estes casos exemplificam uma complicação vascular rara, nem sempre benigna, em uma cirurgia minimamente invasiva do joelho.Arthroscopy of the knee is a very safe surgical procedure, with relatively few complications. Here we present the cases of two patients submitted to arthroscopic surgery for partial meniscectomy and reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament with femoral transverse screw and tibial interference screw that developed a superior lateral genicular artery pseudoaneurysm. Doppler ultrasonography was performed for diagnostic purposes and the patients were treated by direct arterial suture. One patient developed a large haematoma requiring volemic replacement. These cases illustrate a rare, and not always benign vascular complication, in a minimally invasive arthroscopic surgery.

  2. A Pregnant Woman Who Underwent Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy due to Cushing’s Syndrome

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    Halit Diri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cushing’s syndrome (CS may lead to severe maternal and fetal morbidities and even mortalities in pregnancy. However, pregnancy complicates the diagnosis and treatment of CS. This study describes a 26-year-old pregnant woman admitted with hypertension-induced headache. Hormonal analyses performed due to her cushingoid phenotype revealed a diagnosis of adrenocorticotropic hormone- (ACTH- independent CS. MRI showed a 3.5 cm adenoma in her right adrenal gland. After preoperative metyrapone therapy, she underwent a successful unilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy at 14-week gestation. Although she had a temporary postoperative adrenal insufficiency, hormonal analyses showed that she has been in remission since delivery. Findings in this patient, as well as those in previous patients, indicate that pregnancy is not an absolute contraindication for laparoscopic adrenalectomy. Rather, such surgery should be considered a safe and efficient treatment method for pregnant women with cortisol-secreting adrenal adenomas.

  3. Clinical outcomes for 14 consecutive patients with solid pseudopapillary neoplasms who underwent laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Matsushita, Akira; Katsuno, Akira; Yamahatsu, Kazuya; Sumiyoshi, Hiroki; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Uchida, Eiji

    2016-02-01

    The postoperative results of laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas (SPN), including the effects of spleen-preserving resection, are still to be elucidated. Of the 139 patients who underwent laparoscopic pancreatectomy for non-cancerous tumors, 14 consecutive patients (average age, 29.6 years; 1 man, 13 women) with solitary SPN who underwent laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy between March 2004 and June 2015 were enrolled. The tumors had a mean diameter of 4.8 cm. Laparoscopic spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy was performed in eight patients (spleen-preserving group), including two cases involving pancreatic tail preservation, and laparoscopic spleno-distal pancreatectomy was performed in six patients (standard resection group). The median operating time was 317 min, and the median blood loss was 50 mL. Postoperatively, grade B pancreatic fistulas appeared in two patients (14.3%) but resolved with conservative treatment. No patients had postoperative complications, other than pancreatic fistulas, or required reoperation. The median postoperative hospital stay was 11 days, and the postoperative mortality was zero.None of the patients had positive surgical margins or lymph nodes with metastasis. The median follow-up period did not significantly differ between the two groups (20 vs 39 months, P = 0.1368). All of the patients are alive and free from recurrent tumors without major late-phase complications. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy might be a suitable treatment for patients with SPN. A spleen-preserving operation is preferable for younger patients with SPN, and this study demonstrated the non-inferiority of the procedure compared to spleno-distal pancreatectomy. © 2015 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. [Patients with astigmatism who underwent cataract surgery by phacoemulsification: toric IOL x asferic IOL?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Netto, Emilio de Almeida; Gulin, Marina Carvalho; Zapparoli, Marcio; Moreira, Hamilton

    2013-01-01

    Compare the visual acuity of patients who underwent cataract surgery by phacoemulsification with IOL AcrySof(®) toric implantation versus AcrySof(®) IQ and evaluate the reduction of cylindrical diopters (CD) in the postoperative period. Analytical and retrospective study of 149 eyes with 1 or more diopters of regular symmetrical keratometric astigmatism, which underwent cataract surgery by phacoemulsification. The eyes were divided into two groups: the toric group with 85 eyes and the non-toric group with 64 eyes. In the pre-operative phase, topographic data and refraction of each eye to be operated were assessed. In the postoperative phase, refraction and visual acuity with and without correction were measured. The preoperative topographic astigmatism ranged from 1.00 to 5.6 DC in both groups. Average reduction of 1.37 CD (p<0.001) and 0.16 CD (p=0.057) was obtained for the toric and non-toric group when compared to the refractive astigmatism, respectively. Considering visual acuity without correction (NCVA), the toric group presented 44 eyes (51.7%) with NCVA of 0 logMAR (20/20) or 0.1 logMAR (20/25) and the toric group presented 7 eyes (10.93%) with these same NCVA values. The results show that patients with a significant keratometric astigmatism presented visual benefits with the toric IOL implantation. The reduction of the use of optical aids may be obtained provided aberrations of the human eye are corrected more accurately. Currently, phacoemulsification surgery has been used not only for functional improvement, but also as a refraction procedure.

  5. Enteral nutrition is superior to total parenteral nutrition for pancreatic cancer patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changli; Du, Zhi; Lou, Cheng; Wu, Chenxuan; Yuan, Qiang; Wang, Jun; Shu, Guiming; Wang, Yijun

    2011-01-01

    To determine the effects of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and enteral nutrition (EN) on biochemical and clinical outcomes in pancreatic cancer patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy. From the year 2006 to 2008, 60 patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy in Tianjin Third Central Hospital were enrolled in this study. They were randomly divided into the EN group and the TPN group. The biochemical and clinical parameters were recorded and analyzed between the two groups. There was no significant difference in the nutritional status, liver and kidney function, and blood glucose levels between the TPN and EN groups on the preoperative day, the 1st and 3 rd postoperative days. However, on the 7th postoperative day, there was significant difference between the two groups in 24 h urinary nitrogen, serum levels of, total protein (TP), transferrin (TF), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and γ-glutamyl transpeptadase (GGT), blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr). On the 14th postoperative day, there was a significant difference between the two groups in terms of urinary levels of 24 h nitrogen, TP, TF, retinol binding protein, ALT, AST, ALP, GGT, total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, BUN, Cr, and glucose. The incidence of delayed gastric emptying in the EN and TPN groups was 0% and 20%, respectively. Moreover, the incidence of pancreatic fistulas and hemorrhages in the EN group were 3.6% and 3.6%, versus 26.7% and 30% in the TPN group, respectively. EN is better than TPN for pancreatic cancer patients who received pancreaticoduodenectomy.

  6. Which Global Rating Scale? A Comparison of the ASSET, BAKSSS, and IGARS for the Assessment of Simulated Arthroscopic Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Robert M; Baldwin, Mathew J; Akhtar, Kash; Alvand, Abtin; Rees, Jonathan L

    2016-01-06

    With the move to competency-based models of surgical training, a number of assessment methods have been developed. Of these, global rating scales have emerged as popular tools, and several are specific to the assessment of arthroscopic skills. Our aim was to determine which one of a group of commonly used global rating scales demonstrated superiority in the assessment of simulated arthroscopic skills. Sixty-three individuals of varying surgical experience performed a number of arthroscopic tasks on a virtual reality simulator (VirtaMed ArthroS). Performance was blindly assessed by two observers using three commonly used global rating scales used to assess simulated skills. Performance was also assessed by validated objective motion analysis. All of the global rating scales demonstrated construct validity, with significant differences between each skill level and each arthroscopic task (p rating scale. Correlations of global rating scale ratings with motion analysis were high and strong for each global rating scale when correlated with time taken (Spearman rho, -0.95 to -0.76; p rating scale demonstrated superiority as an assessment tool. For these commonly used arthroscopic global rating scales, none was particularly superior and any one score could therefore be used. Agreement on using a single score seems sensible, and it would seem unnecessary to develop further scales with the same domains for these purposes. Copyright © 2016 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  7. Early prediction of treatment response by serum CRP levels in patients with advanced esophageal cancer who underwent definitive chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneda, Masayuki; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Okamura, Shinichi

    2010-01-01

    Serum C reactive protein (CRP) has been shown to be associated with the progression of esophageal cancer. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between treatment response and serum CRP levels in time course during definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in terms of early prediction of CRT response by serum CRP. The subjects of this study were 36 patients with cT3/cT4 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma who underwent definitive CRT in our hospital. Serum CRP levels during definitive CRT (pretreatment, 1W, 2W and 3W after CRT initiation) were compared between CR and non-CR group. In addition, partition model was constructed to discriminate CR with non-CR and the prediction accuracy was evaluated. The patients were consisted of 28 males and 8 females. At pretreatment diagnosis, tumors were categorized as T3 (n=21) and T4 (n=15). Thirty four patients received FP-based chemotherapy and 2 patients received docetaxel-based chemotherapy. Treatment responses were categorized as CR (n=8), partial response (PR) (n=14), no change (NC) (n=2) and progressive disease (PD) (n=12). Serum CRP levels at the time of 2W after CRT initiation (CRT2W) in CR group were low compared to those in non-CR group (p=0.071). The partition model was constructed based on CRP levels at CRT2W. The prediction accuracies to discriminate CR from non-CR by CRP ≤0.1 were 50%, 82%, and 75% in sensitivity, specificity and accuracy, respectively. Serum CRP is a useful biomarker for an early prediction of CRT response. (author)

  8. Avaliação funcional do reparo artroscópico da instabilidade anterior recidivante do ombro Functional assessment of arthroscopic repair for recurrent anterior shoulder instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildeu Afonso de Almeida Filho

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar clínica e radiograficamente pacientes submetidos ao tratamento cirúrgico da instabilidade anterior do ombro pela técnica de Bankart via artroscópica através da reconstrução com âncoras metálicas. MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo de 49 pacientes submetidos ao reparo artroscópico da instabilidade anterior do ombro no período de 2002 a 2007. Os pacientes foram avaliados pelo escore de Carter-Rowe e pela classificação de Samilson e Prieto. A média de idade na cirurgia foi de 30 anos. O seguimento médio foi de 42,7 (variação de 18-74 meses. Oitenta e cinco porcento dos pacientes eram do sexo masculino. RESULTADOS: A média do escore de Carter-Rowe foi de 83 (variação de 30-100 pontos, sendo 31 resultados excelentes, sete bons, três regulares e oito ruins. Reluxação foi observada em 16% (oito pacientes, sendo 37,5% desses de origem traumática. Degeneração articular esteve presente em 32,5% dos casos, com cinco casos grau 1, seis casos grau 2 e dois casos grau 3. A perda média de rotação externa foi de 12º e de 8º na elevação anterior. Houve relação estatisticamente significante (p OBJECTIVE: To clinically and radiologically evaluate patients who underwent arthroscopic surgical treatment for anterior shoulder instability by means of the Bankart technique, using metal anchors. METHODS: This was a retrospective study on 49 patients who underwent arthroscopic repair of anterior shoulder instability between 2002 and 2007. The patients were evaluated using the Carter-Rowe score and the Samilson and Prieto classification. The mean age at the time of surgery was 30 years. The mean length of follow-up was 42.7 months (ranging from 18 to 74. 85% of the patients were male. RESULTS: The mean Carter-Rowe score was 83 points (ranging from 30 to 100 including 31 excellent results, 7 good, 3 fair and 8 poor. Recurrent dislocation was observed in 16% (8 patients, and 37.5% of them were of traumatic origin. Joint

  9. The Economic Impact of Acetabular Labral Tears: A Cost-effectiveness Analysis Comparing Hip Arthroscopic Surgery and Structured Rehabilitation Alone in Patients Without Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodhia, Parth; Gui, Chengcheng; Chandrasekaran, Sivashankar; Suarez-Ahedo, Carlos; Dirschl, Douglas R; Domb, Benjamin G

    2016-07-01

    Hip arthroscopic surgery has emerged as a successful procedure to manage acetabular labral tears and concurrent hip injuries, which if left untreated, may contribute to hip osteoarthritis (OA). Therefore, it is essential to analyze the economic impact of this treatment option. To investigate the cost-effectiveness of hip arthroscopic surgery versus structured rehabilitation alone for acetabular labral tears, to examine the effects of age on cost-effectiveness, and to estimate the rate of symptomatic OA and total hip arthroplasty (THA) in both treatment arms over a lifetime horizon. Economic and decision analysis; Level of evidence, 2. A cost-effectiveness analysis of hip arthroscopic surgery compared with structured rehabilitation for symptomatic labral tears was performed using a Markov decision model constructed over a lifetime horizon. It was assumed that patients did not have OA. Direct costs (in 2014 United States dollars), utilities of health states (in quality-adjusted life years [QALYs] gained), and probabilities of transitioning between health states were estimated from a comprehensive literature review. Costs were estimated using national averages of Medicare reimbursements, adjusted for all payers in the United States from a societal perspective. Utilities were estimated from the Harris Hip Score. Cost-effectiveness was assessed using the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to determine the effect of uncertainty on the model outcomes. For a cohort representative of patients undergoing hip arthroscopic surgery at our facility, arthroscopic surgery was more costly (additional $2653) but generated more utility (additional 3.94 QALYs) compared with rehabilitation over a lifetime. The mean ICER was $754/QALY, well below the conventional willingness to pay of $50,000/QALY. Arthroscopic surgery was cost-effective for 94.5% of patients. Although arthroscopic surgery decreased in cost

  10. Arthroscopic compared with open repairs for recurrent anterior shoulder instability. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenters, Tim R; Franta, Amy K; Wolf, Fredric M; Leopold, Seth S; Matsen, Frederick A

    2007-02-01

    Both arthroscopic and open surgical repairs are utilized for the management of anterior glenohumeral instability. To determine the evidence supporting the relative effectiveness of these two approaches, we conducted a rigorous and comprehensive analysis of all reports comparing arthroscopic and open repairs. A systematic analysis of eighteen published or presented studies was performed to determine if there were significant differences between the two approaches with regard to recurrence (recurrent dislocation, subluxation, and/or apprehension and/or a reoperation for instability), return to work and/or sports, and Rowe scores. We also performed subgroup analysis to determine if the quality of the study or the arthroscopic technique influenced the results. We identified four randomized controlled trials, ten controlled clinical trials, and four other comparative studies. Results were influenced both by the quality of the study and by the arthroscopic technique. Meta-analysis revealed that, compared with open methods, arthroscopic repairs were associated with significantly higher risks of recurrent instability (p < 0.00001, relative risk = 2.37, 95% confidence interval = 1.66 to 3.38), recurrent dislocation (p < 0.0001, relative risk = 2.74, 95% confidence interval = 1.75 to 4.28), and a reoperation (p = 0.002, relative risk = 2.32, 95% confidence interval = 1.35 to 3.99). When considered alone, arthroscopic suture anchor techniques were associated with significantly higher risks of recurrent instability (p = 0.01, relative risk = 2.25, 95% confidence interval = 1.21 to 4.17) and recurrent dislocation (p = 0.004, relative risk = 2.57, 95% confidence interval = 1.35 to 4.92) than were open methods. Arthroscopic approaches were also less effective than open methods with regard to enabling patients to return to work and/or sports (p = 0.03, relative risk = 0.87, 95% confidence interval = 0.77 to 0.99). On the other hand, analysis of the randomized clinical trials

  11. Comparative analysis of pain in patients who underwent total knee replacement regarding the tourniquet pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos George de Souza Leão

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVES: To evaluate through the visual analog scale (VAS the pain in patients undergoing total knee replacement (TKR with different pressures of the pneumatic tourniquet. METHODS: An observational, randomized, descriptive study on an analytical basis, with 60 patients who underwent TKR, divided into two groups, which were matched: a group where TKR was performed with tourniquet pressures of 350 mmHg (standard and the other with systolic blood pressure plus 100 mmHg (P + 100. These patients had their pain assessed by VAS at 48 h, and at the 5th and 15th days after procedure. Secondarily, the following were also measured: range of motion (ROM, complications, and blood drainage volume in each group; the data were subjected to statistical analysis. RESULTS: After data analysis, there was no statistical difference regarding the incidence of complications (p = 0.612, ROM (p = 0.202, bleeding after 24 and 48 h (p = 0.432 and p = 0.254 or in relation to VAS. No correlation was observed between time of ischemia compared to VAS and bleeding. CONCLUSIONS: The use of the pneumatic tourniquet pressure at 350 mmHg or systolic blood pressure plus 100 mmHg did not influence the pain, blood loss, ROM, and complications. Therefore the pressures at these levels are safe and do not change the surgery outcomes; the time of ischemia must be closely observed to avoid major complications.

  12. Assessment of quality of life in patients who underwent minimally invasive cosmetic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aquino, Marcello Simão; Haddad, Alessandra; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2013-06-01

    There are increasingly more patients seeking minimally invasive procedures, which have become more effective and safer in reducing the signs of facial aging. This study included 40 female adult patients who voluntarily underwent selected minimally invasive procedures (filling with hyaluronic acid and botulinum toxin injection) for facial rejuvenation. All patients were followed for a period of 6 months. They were evaluated with the use of questionnaires, a quality-of-life questionnaire (DLQI), the self-esteem scale of Rosenberg (EPM/Rosenberg), and a pain scale. The minimally invasive procedures resulted in improvement in quality of life and self-esteem, which were stronger the first 3 months after the procedures but remained at a higher level than that before treatment, even after 6 months. Hyaluronic acid with lidocaine in the formula is more comfortable for the patient as it makes the injection less painful. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  13. Assessment of Patients Who Underwent Nasal Reconstruction After Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer Excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, Hakan; Bitik, Ozan; Kamburoğlu, Haldun Onuralp; Dadaci, Mehmet; Çaliş, Mert; Öcal, Engin

    2015-06-01

    Basal and squamous cell carcinomas are the most common malignant cutaneous lesions affecting the nose. With the rising incidence of skin cancers, plastic surgeons increasingly face nasal reconstruction challenges. Although multiple options exist, optimal results are obtained when "like is used to repair like". We aimed to introduce a simple algorithm for the reconstruction of nasal defects with local flaps, realizing that there is always more than one option for reconstruction. We retrospectively reviewed 163 patients who underwent nasal reconstruction after excision of non-melanoma skin cancer between March 2011 and April 2014. We analyzed the location of the defects and correlated them with the techniques used to reconstruct them. There were 66 males and 97 females (age, 21-98 years). Basal cell carcinoma was diagnosed in 121 patients and squamous cell carcinoma in 42. After tumor excision, all the defects were immediately closed by either primary closure or local flap options such as Limberg, Miter, glabellar, bilobed, nasolabial, V-Y advancement, and forehead flaps. Obtaining tumor-free borders and a pleasing aesthetic result are major concerns in nasal reconstruction. Defect reconstruction and cosmesis are as important as rapid recovery and quick return to normal daily activities, and these should be considered before performing any procedure, particularly in elderly patients.

  14. [A survey of perioperative asthmatic attack among patients with bronchial asthma underwent general anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ie, Kenya; Yoshizawa, Atsuto; Hirano, Satoru; Izumi, Sinyuu; Hojo, Masaaki; Sugiyama, Haruhito; Kobayasi, Nobuyuki; Kudou, Kouichirou; Maehara, Yasuhiro; Kawachi, Masaharu; Miyakoshi, Kouichi

    2010-07-01

    We investigated the risk factor of perioperative asthmatic attack and effectiveness of preventing treatment for asthmatic attack before operation. We performed retrospective chart review of one hundred eleven patients with asthma underwent general anesthesia and surgical intervention from January 2006 to October 2007 in our hospital. The rate of perioperative asthmatic attack were as follows; 10.2% (5 in 49 cases) in no pretreatment group, 7.5% (3 in 40 cases) in any pretreatments except for systemic steroid, and 4.5% (1 in 22 cases) in systemic steroid pretreatment group. Neither preoperative asthma severity nor duration from the last attack had significant relevancy to perioperative attack rate. The otolaryngological surgery, especially those have nasal polyp and oral surgery had high perioperative asthma attack rate, although there was no significant difference. We recommend the systemic steroid pretreatment for asthmatic patients, especially when they have known risk factor such as administration of the systemic steroid within 6 months, or possibly new risk factor such as nasal polyp, otolaryngological and oral surgery.

  15. Influence of perioperative administration of amino acids on thermoregulation response in patients underwent colorectal surgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeba Snježana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hypothermia in the surgical patients can be the consequence of long duration of surgical intervention, general anesthesia and low temperature in operating room. Postoperative hypothermia contributes to a number of postoperative complications such as arrhythmia, myocardial ischemia, hypertension, bleeding, wound infection, coagulopathy, prolonged effect of muscle relaxants. External heating procedures are used to prevent this condition, but some investigations reported that infusion of aminoacids during surgery can induce thermogenesis and prevent postoperative hypothermia. Case report. We reported two males who underwent major colorectal surgery for rectal carcinoma. One patient received Aminosol 15% solution, 125 ml/h, while the other did not. The esophageal temperatures in both cases were measured every 30 minutes during the operation and 60 minutes after in Intensive Care Unit. We were monitoring blood pressure, heart rate, ECG, and shivering. Patient who received aminoacids showed ameliorated postoperative hypothermia without hypertension, arrhythmia, or shivering, while the other showed all symptoms mentioned above. Conclusion. According to literature data, as well as our findings, we can conclude that intraoperative intravenous treatment with amino acid solution ameliorates postoperative hypothermia along with its complications. .

  16. Congenital hydrocele: prevalence and outcome among male children who underwent neonatal circumcision in Benin City, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osifo, O D; Osaigbovo, E O

    2008-06-01

    To determine the prevalence and spontaneous resolution of congenital hydrocele diagnosed in male neonates who underwent circumcision at our centre. All male neonates presented for circumcision at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria between January 2002 and December 2006 were examined for the presence of hydrocele. Those diagnosed with this condition were recruited and followed up in a surgical outpatient clinic for 2 years. The number of cases of spontaneous resolution and age at which this occurred were documented on a structured pro forma. A total of 2715 neonates were circumcised and 128 (4.7%) were diagnosed with 163 cases of hydrocele, while 27 cases in 25 (0.9%) children failed to resolve at the age of 2 years. Neonatal hydrocele was bilateral in 112 (68.7%), and there were 20 (12.3%) right and 31 (19.0%) left. Among those with hydrocele, 28.1% were delivered preterm and resolution was spontaneous in many of them, with no observed significant statistical difference to those delivered full term (P=0.4740). Of the 163 hydrocele cases, 136 (83.4%) resolved spontaneously by age 18 months with peak resolution at 4-6 months. No spontaneous resolution occurred after 18 months and no hydrocele-related complication occurred during follow up. Neonates with congenital hydrocele should be observed for spontaneous resolution for at least 18 months before being subjected to surgery.

  17. Stress and Quality of Life for Taiwanese Women Who Underwent Infertility Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Yu; Stevenson, Eleanor Lowndes; Yang, Cheng-Ta; Liou, Shwu-Ru

    2018-04-28

    To describe the psychological stress and quality of life experienced by women who underwent fertility treatment in Taiwan. Cross-sectional, correlational study. Recruitment was conducted and questionnaires administered at a reproductive medicine center in Chiayi City, Taiwan. Informed consent to participate was obtained from 126 women who sought fertility treatment at the center. The Chinese Fertility Problem Inventory and Fertility Quality of Life scale were used to measure participants' levels of fertility-related stress and fertility-related quality of life. Descriptive statistics, correlation, and regression analysis were used. Overall, participants reported low levels of fertility-related stress and fertility-related quality of life; however, they had relatively high levels of stress related to need for parenthood. Women who were older, had greater body mass indexes, and consumed coffee regularly had lower fertility-related quality of life. Social and relationship concerns and stress related to need for parenthood were significant predictors of low fertility-related quality of life. In a culture in which childbearing is generally an expectation and an important part of family life, women who experience infertility are at risk to experience fertility-related stress. Social support and family consultation might be offered to improve women's fertility-related quality of life. Copyright © 2018 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Partial oxidation of 2-propanol on perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumathi, R.; Viswanathan, B.; Varadarajan, T.K. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Madras (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-12-31

    Partial oxidation of 2-propanol was carried out on AB{sub 1-x}B`{sub x}O{sub 3} (A=Ba, B=Pb, Ce, Ti; B`=Bi, Sb and Cu) type perovskite oxides. Acetone was the major product observed on all the catalysts. All the catalysts underwent partial reduction during the reaction depending on the composition of the reactant, nature of the B site cation and the extent of substitution at B site. The catalytic activity has been correlated with the reducibility of the perovskite oxides determined from Temperature Programmed Reduction (TPR) studies. (orig.)

  19. Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Enhanced by Platelet-Rich Plasma Maintain Adhesion to Scaffolds in Arthroscopic Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoberman, Alexander R; Cirino, Carl; McCarthy, Mary Beth; Cote, Mark P; Pauzenberger, Leo; Beitzel, Knut; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Dyrna, Felix

    2018-03-01

    To assess the response of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (bMSCs) enhanced by platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in the setting of a normal human tendon (NHT), a demineralized bone matrix (DBM), and a fibrin scaffold (FS) with simulated arthroscopic mechanical washout stress. Bone marrow was aspirated from the humeral head and concentrated. BMSCs were counted, plated, and grown to confluence. Cells were seeded onto 3 different scaffolds: (1) NHT, (2) DBM, and (3) FS. Each scaffold was treated with a combination of (+)/(-) PRP and (+)/(-) arthroscopic washout simulation. A period of 60 minutes was allotted before arthroscopic washout. Adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation assays were performed to assess cellular activity in each condition. Significant differences were seen in mesenchymal stromal cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation among the scaffolds. DBM and FS showed superior results to NHT for cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. PRP significantly enhanced cellular adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Arthroscopic simulation did not significantly decrease bMSC adhesion. We found that the type of scaffold impacts bMSCs' behavior. Both scaffolds (DBM and FS) were superior to NHT. The use of an arthroscopic simulator did not significantly decrease the adhesion of bMSCs to the scaffolds nor did it decrease their biologic differentiation potential. In addition, PRP enhanced cellular adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Improved healing after tendon repair can lead to better clinical outcomes. BMSCs are attractive for enhancing healing given their accessibility and regenerative potential. Application of bMSCs using scaffolds as cell carriers relies on arthroscopic feasibility. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Medium-term results following arthroscopic reduction in walking-age children with developmental hip dysplasia after failed closed reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liang; Yan, Hua; Yang, Changsheng; Cai, Daozhang; Wang, Yijun

    2017-09-21

    Arthroscopic reduction has become increasingly popular as an alternative to open reduction for the treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). However, patient outcomes beyond one and a half years after surgery remain unclear. The purpose of this study is to report the medium-term outcomes of walking-age patients who received arthroscopic reduction after an unsuccessful closed reduction. This research was conducted as part of a retrospectively registered study. We performed arthroscopic reduction in eight children with DDH after failed closed reduction between January 2010 and January 2012 and followed all cases for a minimum of 5 years. Arthroscopic reduction was performed using a two-portal approach without traction. Capsular release and resection of the transverse acetabular ligament were also performed if needed. Patient demographics, clinical variables, anatomical assessment measures, and post-operative complications were extracted from medical records. We treated five male and three female patients with an average age at operation of 15.6 months (range, 12 to 22 months). All obstacles to reduction were corrected arthroscopically. Concentric reduction of the hip joint was observed in post-operative X-rays in all cases. The average safe zone was increased from 17.5° (8° to 30°) to 42.1° (36° to 50°) after the operation. The average acetabular (AC) index was reduced from 40.3° (33° to 65°) to 21.9° (19° to 26°) at the end of follow-up. No complications occurred and no patients developed necrosis of the femoral head, recurrent dislocation, or residual hip dysplasia. Arthroscopic reduction is a suitable surgical procedure for the treatment of DDH among walking-age children with failed closed reduction and severe dislocation. This method is quick and safe, and it can be performed without post-operative complications over the medium term.

  1. Arthroscopic perspective of the axillary nerve in relation to the glenoid and arm position: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jae Chul; Kim, Jae Hoon; Ahn, Jin Hwan; Lee, Seok Hyun

    2007-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the morphologic features of the axillary nerve and its relation to the glenoid under an arthroscopic setup, and to determine the changes in nerve position according to different arm positions. Twenty-three fresh-frozen fore-quarter cadaveric shoulder specimens were used for evaluations in an arthroscopic setup with the lateral decubitus position. The main trunk of the axillary nerve with or without some of its branches was exposed after careful arthroscopic dissection. Morphologic features and the course of the axillary nerve from the anterior and posterior portals were documented. The closest distances from the glenoid rim were measured with a probe by use of a distance range system. The changes in nerve position were determined in 4 different arm positions. At the end of arthroscopic examination, the nerves were marked and verified by open dissections. The axillary nerve appeared in the joint near the inferior edge of the subscapularis muscle. With reference to the inferior glenoid rim horizontally, the nerve had a mean running angle of 23 degrees (range, 14 degrees to 41 degrees; SD, 8 degrees ). The closest points from the glenoid were between the 5:30- and 6:00-o'clock position (right) or 6:00- and 6:30-o'clock position (left). The closest distance range varied from 10 to 25 mm in the neutral arm position. The abduction-neutral position resulted in the greatest distance between the inferior glenoid and the nerve. The abduction-neutral rotation position was the optimal position for minimizing axillary nerve injuries, because it resulted in the greatest distance between the inferior glenoid and the nerve. Knowledge of the anatomy of the axillary nerve aids the shoulder surgeon in avoiding nerve injury during arthroscopic procedures. Abduction-neutral rotation may be more helpful for arthroscopic surgeons performing procedures in the anteroinferior glenoid with the nerve being farther away from the working field.

  2. Long-Term Restoration of Anterior Shoulder Stability: A Retrospective Analysis of Arthroscopic Bankart Repair Versus Open Latarjet Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Stefan M; Scheyerer, Max J; Farshad, Mazda; Catanzaro, Sabrina; Rahm, Stefan; Gerber, Christian

    2016-12-07

    Various operative techniques are used for treating recurrent anterior shoulder instability, and good mid-term results have been reported. The purpose of this study was to compare shoulder stability after treatment with the 2 commonly performed procedures, the arthroscopic Bankart soft-tissue repair and the open coracoid transfer according to Latarjet. A comparative, retrospective case-cohort analysis of 360 patients (364 shoulders) who had primary repair for recurrent anterior shoulder instability between 1998 and 2007 was performed. The minimum duration of follow-up was 6 years. Reoperations, overt recurrent instability (defined as recurrent dislocation or subluxation), apprehension, the subjective shoulder value (SSV), sports participation, and overall satisfaction were recorded. An open Latarjet procedure was performed in 93 shoulders, and an arthroscopic Bankart repair was done in 271 shoulders. Instability or apprehension persisted or recurred after 11% (10) of the 93 Latarjet procedures and after 41.7% (113) of the 271 arthroscopic Bankart procedures. Overt instability recurred after 3% of the Latarjet procedures and after 28.4% (77) of the Bankart procedures. In the Latarjet group, 3.2% of the patients were not satisfied with their result compared with 13.2% in the Bankart group (p = 0.007). Kaplan-Meier analysis of survivorship, with apprehension (p Latarjet procedure and the decreasing effectiveness of the arthroscopic Bankart repair over time. Twenty percent of the first recurrences after arthroscopic Bankart occurred no earlier than 91 months postoperatively, as opposed to the rare recurrences after osseous reconstruction, which occurred in the early postoperative period, with only rare late failures. In this retrospective cohort study, the arthroscopic Bankart procedure was inferior to the open Latarjet procedure for repair of recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation. The difference between the 2 procedures with respect to the quality of outcomes

  3. Validation of Different Combination of Three Reversing Half-Hitches Alternating Posts (RHAPs) Effects on Arthroscopic Knot Integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Alexander Cm; Prohaska, Daniel J; Bye, Brian P

    2017-05-01

    With arthroscopic techniques being used, the importance of knot tying has been examined. Previous literature has examined the use of reversing half-hitches on alternating posts (RHAPs) on knot security. Separately, there has been research regarding different suture materials commonly used in the operating room. The specific aim of this study was to validate the effect of different stacked half-hitch configuration and different braided suture materials on arthroscopic knot integrity. Three different suture materials tied with five different RHAPs in arthroscopic knots were compared. A single load-to-failure test was performed and the mean ultimate clinical failure load was obtained. Significant knot holding strength improvement was found when one half-hitch was reversed as compared to baseline knot. When two of the half-hitches were reversed, there was a greater improvement with all knots having a mean ultimate clinical failure load greater than 150 newtons (N). Comparison of the suture materials demonstrated a higher mean ultimate clinical failure load when Force Fiber ® was used and at least one half-hitch was reversed. Knots tied with either Force Fiber ® or Orthocord ® showed 0% chance of knot slippage while knots tied with FiberWire ® or braided fishing line had about 10 and 30% knot slippage chances, respectively. A significant effect was observed in regards to both stacked half-hitch configuration and suture materials used on knot loop and knot security. Caution should be used with tying three RHAPs in arthroscopic surgery, particularly with a standard knot pusher and arthroscopic cannulas. The findings of this study indicated the importance of three RHAPs in performing arthroscopic knot tying and provided evidence regarding discrepancies of maximum clinical failure loads observed between orthopaedic surgeons, thereby leading to better surgical outcomes in the future.

  4. Avascular osteonecrosis of the femoral condyle after arthroscopic surgery; Osteonecrose aseptique du condyle femoral apres meniscectomie par voie arthroscopique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Kaar, M.; Garcia, J. [Hopital Cantonal Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Fritschy, D.; Bonvin, J.C. [Policlinique de Chirurgie, Hopital Cantonal Universitaire, Geneve (Switzerland)

    1997-04-01

    Avascular osteonecrosis of the femoral condyle after arthroscopic surgery. Retrospective review of 10 patients who presented with avascular necrosis of the ipsilateral femoral condyle following arthroscopic meniscectomy (9 medial, 1 lateral). The bone lesions were evaluated by radiography and MRI, which were repeated for few patients. MRI allows earlier diagnosis of avascular necrosis of the femoral condyle and offers an evaluation of extent of the lesions whose evolution is variable: 3 patients required a knee prosthesis, the other 7 patients were treated medically. (authors). 21 refs.

  5. Arthroscopic Treatment of 2 Consecutive Cases of Dysplasia Epiphysealis Hemimelica of the Ankle: A 5-Year Follow-Up Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosma Calderaro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica (DEH is a rare disease of unknown etiology consisting in an abnormal osteocartilaginous growth at the epiphysis, usually hemimelic with histological findings similar to benign osteochondroma. In this case series, we described the results of the arthroscopic treatment of 2 consecutive cases of intra-articular ankle localization of DEH in 2 patients aged 9 and 10 years. The good result obtained, persistent at the 5-year follow-up, leads us to consider the arthroscopic approach as a reliable treatment in patient affected by intra-articular ankle DEH.

  6. T2 relaxometry of the infrapatellar fat pad after arthroscopic surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torriani, Martin; Bredella, Miriam A. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Taneja, Atul K. [Hospital do Coracao (HCor), Teleimagem, and Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Hosseini, Ali; Li, Guoan [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Bioengineering Laboratory, Department of Orthopedics, Boston, MA (United States); Gill, Thomas J. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Sports Medicine Center, Department of Orthopedics, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-03-15

    To investigate the T2 relaxation values of the infrapatellar fat pad (IFP) after arthroscopic surgery. This study was approved by the institutional review board; all individuals signed informed consent. We performed MRI in 16 knees from 8 subjects. Prior to imaging, each subject had unilateral arthroscopic knee surgery and an asymptomatic non-operated contralateral knee. We used a 10-echo multiple-TE fast-spin echo pulse sequence for creation of T2 relaxation time maps. Two musculoskeletal radiologists independently placed regions of interest in the IFP, suprapatellar subcutaneous and deep intermuscular adipose tissue. Qualitative assessments were performed to assess fibrotic changes affecting patellar retinaculum and IFP. Statistical analyses of T2 values determined differences between groups, correlation with time after surgery, and cut-off values to differentiate groups. The average time between arthroscopy and imaging was 3.5 ± 0.4 years. IFP of knees with prior surgery had significantly shorter mean T2 values (133 ± 14 ms) compared with control knees (147 ± 8 ms, P = 0.03). There was no significant difference between operated and control knees regarding T2 values of suprapatellar subcutaneous (P = 0.3) or deep intermuscular adipose tissue (P = 0.2). There was no correlation between IFP T2 values and time after surgery (P > 0.2). IFP T2 values ≤ 139 ms had 75 % sensitivity and 88 % specificity in identifying prior arthroscopy. Shortening of T2 relaxation values is present in IFP chronically after arthroscopic surgery and may be an indicator of adipose tissue fibrosis. (orig.)

  7. Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgical Simulation Training Curriculum: Transfer Reliability and Maintenance of Skill Over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, John C; Belmont, Philip J; Lanzi, Joseph; Martin, Kevin; Bader, Julia; Owens, Brett; Waterman, Brian R

    2015-01-01

    Surgical education is evolving as work hour constraints limit the exposure of residents to the operating room. Potential consequences may include erosion of resident education and decreased quality of patient care. Surgical simulation training has become a focus of study in an effort to counter these challenges. Previous studies have validated the use of arthroscopic surgical simulation programs both in vitro and in vivo. However, no study has examined if the gains made by residents after a simulation program are retained after a period away from training. In all, 17 orthopedic surgery residents were randomized into simulation or standard practice groups. All subjects were oriented to the arthroscopic simulator, a 14-point anatomic checklist, and Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool (ASSET). The experimental group received 1 hour of simulation training whereas the control group had no additional training. All subjects performed a recorded, diagnostic arthroscopy intraoperatively. These videos were scored by 2 blinded, fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons and outcome measures were compared within and between the groups. After 1 year in which neither group had exposure to surgical simulation training, all residents were retested intraoperatively and scored in the exact same fashion. Individual surgical case logs were reviewed and surgical case volume was documented. There was no difference between the 2 groups after initial simulation testing and there was no correlation between case volume and initial scores. After training, the simulation group improved as compared with baseline in mean ASSET (p = 0.023) and mean time to completion (p = 0.01). After 1 year, there was no difference between the groups in any outcome measurements. Although individual technical skills can be cultivated with surgical simulation training, these advancements can be lost without continued education. It is imperative that residency programs implement a simulation curriculum and

  8. Osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum: minimum 1-year follow-up after arthroscopic debridement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch, Bradley; Wolf, Brian R

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of our study is to show that arthroscopic debridement is an appropriate intervention for midterm to long-term subjective symptom relief of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the elbow. A retrospective case series of 13 patients undergoing arthroscopic treatment of OCD of the elbow over a 10-year period was studied. Patients were assessed with a mean follow-up of 3.6 years (range, 12 months to 8 years). The disability/symptom section of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) was used to measure patient-reported outcome. Additional questions were used to assess other injuries to the elbow and return to sports activities. Of 13 patients, 8 reported participating in repetitive valgus stress sports associated with overhead throwing. Two participated in gymnastics. Ten patients provided follow-up data greater than 1 year after surgical intervention. The mean follow-up DASH score for surgically treated patients was 8.6 (range, 0.0 to 22.41). Four patients reported a complete return to their sports activities, and six reported complete cessation of at least 1 sport. By use of intraoperative reports, the OCD lesions were graded according to the Classification System for OCD Lesions established by the American Sports Medicine Institute. No difference in mean DASH score between grades was found. In our small group of patients, arthroscopic debridement of OCD of the capitellum resulted in a functional elbow with subjective symptom relief for the majority of patients, as evidenced by DASH scores. However, despite a functional outcome, many patients reported ceasing at least some sporting activities because of their elbow. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Management of an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion: arthroscopic remplissage with Bankart repair versus Latarjet procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Nam Su; Yoo, Jae Hyun; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2016-12-01

    This study compared the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic remplissage with Bankart repair and Latarjet operation in patients with a large engaging Hill-Sachs lesion. Thirty-seven shoulders subjected to arthroscopic remplissage with a Bankart repair (group A) and 35 shoulders subjected to a Latarjet operation (group B), for a large engaging Hill-Sachs lesion without significant glenoid bone loss, were retrospectively evaluated. Each group was followed up for a mean more than 2-year period. At the last follow-up, postoperative pain, shoulder mobility, muscle strength, Rowe score, and UCLA score revealed no significant difference between the two groups. The postoperative mean deficit in external rotation at the side (ERs) was 8° ± 23° in group A (P = 0.044). In group B, the mean deficits in ERs, external rotation at 90° of abduction, and internal rotation to the posterior were 10° ± 20°, 7° ± 16°, and 1.9° ± 4°, respectively (P = 0.004, 0.022, and 0.009, respectively). The recurrence rate was 5.4 % (two shoulders) in group A and 5.7 % (two shoulders) in group B (n.s.). The overall complication rate was significantly higher in group B (14.3 %) than in group A (0 %) (P = 0.017). For recurrent anterior shoulder instability with a large engaging Hill-Sachs lesion, both arthroscopic remplissage with Bankart repair and the Latarjet procedure were safe and reliable techniques with a low recurrence rate. However, the Latarjet group had a significantly higher postoperative complication rate than the remplissage group. Case-control study, Level III.

  10. Clinical factors that affect perceived quality of life in arthroscopic reconstruction for acromioclavicular joint dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abat, F; Gich, I; Natera, L; Besalduch, M; Sarasquete, J

    To analyse the results of arthroscopic repair of acromioclavicular dislocation in terms of health-related quality of life. Prospective study of patients with acromioclavicular dislocation Rockwood grade iii-v, treated arthroscopically with a mean follow up of 25.4 months. The demographics of the series were recorded and evaluations were performed preoperatively, at 3 months and 2 years with validated questionnaires as Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36), visual analogue scale (VAS), The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH), Constant-Murley Shoulder Outcome Score (Constant) and Walch-Duplay Score (WD). Twenty patients, 17 men and 3 women with a mean age of 36.1 years, were analysed. According to the classification of Rockwood, 3 patients were grade iii, 3 grade iv and 14 grade v. Functional and clinical improvement was detected in all clinical tests (SF-36, VAS and DASH) at 3 months and 2 years follow up (P<.001). The final Constant score was 95.3±2.4 and the WD was 1.8±0.62. It was not found that the health-related quality of life was affected by any variable studied except the evolution of DASH. The health-related quality of life (assessed by SF-36) in patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of acromioclavicular joint dislocation grades iii-v was not influenced by gender, age, grade, displacement, handedness, evolution of the VAS, scoring of the Constant or by the WD. However, it is correlated with the evolution in the DASH score. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluating Simulation in Training for Arthroscopic Knee Surgery: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetaimish, Bandar; Elbadawi, Hussein; Ayeni, Olufemi R

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the reported outcomes for measuring the effectiveness of simulation during knee arthroscopy training and determine the consistency of reporting and validation of simulation used in knee arthroscopy training. Four databases (MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) were screened for studies involving knee arthroscopy simulation training. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to the searched studies, and a quality assessment was completed for included studies. The reviewers searched the references list in each of the eligible studies to identify other relevant studies that was not captured by our search strategy. We identified 13 eligible studies. The mean number of participants per study was 24 (range: 9 to 42 participants). The 3 most commonly reported surgical skills were the mean time to perform the task (100%), the visualization and probing tasks (77%), and the number of cartilage collisions with measurement of the surgical force (46%). The most commonly described measurement instruments included the Simulation Built-In Scoring System (54%), motion analysis system (23%), and Basic Arthroscopic Knee Skill Scoring System global rating scale (15%). The most frequently reported type of validity for the simulator was construct validity (54%) and concurrent validity (31%). Moreover, construct validity (69%) and concurrent validity (54%) were the most commonly reported type of validity for the measurement instrument. There is significant variation in reported learning outcomes and measurement instruments for evaluating the effectiveness of knee arthroscopic simulation-based education. Despite this, time to perform a task was the most commonly reported skill-evaluating outcome of simulation. The included studies in this review were of variable strength in terms of their evidence and methodologic quality. This study highlights the need for consistent outcome reporting after arthroscopic simulation training. Level IV

  12. Improved arthroscopic one-piece excision technique for the treatment of symptomatic discoid medial meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-De; Li, Tong; Gao, Shi-Jun

    2017-10-30

    Discoid medial meniscus is an extremely rare abnormality of the knee. During arthroscopic meniscectomy for symptomatic discoid medial meniscus, it is difficult to remove the posterior portion of the meniscus because of the confined working space within the compartment and the obstruction caused by the anterior cruciate ligament and the tibial intercondylar eminence. To overcome these problems, we describe an improved arthroscopic technique for one-piece excision of symptomatic discoid medial meniscus through three unique portals. Three improved portals were made in the injured knee: a standard anteromedial portal, a central transpatellar tendon portal, and a high anterolateral portal. The anterior side of the discoid medial meniscus was cut 7 mm from the periphery of the meniscus. Next, the anterior portion of the free discoid meniscus fragment was pulled in the anterolateral direction with tension. A curve-shaped cut was made along the longitudinal tear to the posterior horn using basket forceps through the standard anteromedial portal. Then, the anterior portion of the free discoid meniscus was pulled in the anteromedial direction. Pulling the fragment under tension made it easier to cut the posterior side of the discoid meniscus. The posterior side of the discoid meniscus was cut 7 mm from the periphery of the meniscus with straight scissors or basket forceps through the central transpatellar tendon portal. This technique resulted in satisfactory results. Excellent visualization of the posterior part of the discoid medial meniscus was gained during the procedure, and it was easy to cut the posterior part of the discoid medial meniscus. No recurrent symptoms were found. This improved arthroscopic one-piece excision technique for the treatment of symptomatic discoid medial meniscus enables the posterior part of the meniscus to be cut satisfactorily. Moreover, compared with previous techniques, this novel technique causes less formation of foreign bodies and less

  13. Is intra-articular magnesium effective for postoperative analgesia in arthroscopic shoulder surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saritas, Tuba Berra; Borazan, Hale; Okesli, Selmin; Yel, Mustafa; Otelcioglu, Şeref

    2015-01-01

    Various medications are used intra-articularly for postoperative pain reduction after arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Magnesium, a N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, may be effective for reduction of both postoperative pain scores and analgesic requirements. A total of 67 patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery were divided randomly into two groups to receive intra-articular injections of either 10 mL magnesium sulphate (100 mg⁄mL; group M, n=34) or 10 mL of normal saline (group C, n=33). The analgesic effect was estimated using a visual analogue scale 1 h, 2 h, 6 h, 8 h, 12 h, 18 h and 24 h after operation. Postoperative analgesia was maintained by intra-articular morphine (0.01%, 10 mg) + bupivacaine (0.5%, 100 mL) patient-controlled analgesia device as a 1 mL infusion with a 1 mL bolus dose and 15 min lock-out time; for visual analogue scale scores >5, intramuscular diclofenac sodium 75 mg was administered as needed during the study period (maximum two times). Intra-articular magnesium resulted in a significant reduction in pain scores in group M compared with group C 1 h, 2 h, 6 h, 8 h and 12 h after the end of surgery, respectively, at rest and with passive motion. Total diclofenac consumption and intra-articular morphine + bupivacaine consumption were significantly lower in group M. Postoperative serum magnesium levels were significantly higher in group M, but were within the normal range. Magnesium causes a reduction in postoperative pain in comparison to saline when administered intra-articularly after arthroscopic shoulder surgery, and has no serious side effects.

  14. Long-term outcomes of four patients with tracheal agenesis who underwent airway and esophageal reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazuke, Yuko; Okuyama, Hiroomi; Uehara, Shuichiro; Ueno, Takehisa; Nara, Keigo; Yamanaka, Hiroaki; Kawahara, Hisayoshi; Kubota, Akio; Usui, Noriaki; Soh, Hideki; Nomura, Motonari; Oue, Takaharu; Sasaki, Takashi; Nose, Satoko; Saka, Ryuta

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term outcomes of four patients with tracheal agenesis who underwent airway and esophageal/alimentary reconstruction. We reviewed the medical records of four long-term survivors of tracheal agenesis and collected the following data: age, sex, type of tracheal agenesis, method of reconstruction, nutritional management, and physical and neurological development. The patients consisted of three boys and one girl, who ranged in age from 77 to 109months. The severity of their condition was classified as Floyd's type I (n=2), II (n=1), or III (n=1). Mechanical respiratory support was not necessary in any of the cases. Esophageal/alimentary reconstruction was performed using the small intestine (n=2), a gastric tube (n=1), and the esophagus (n=1). The age at esophageal reconstruction ranged from 41 to 55months. All of the cases required enteral nutrition via gastrostomy. Three of the patients were able to swallow a small amount of liquid and one was able to take pureed food orally. The physical development of the subjects was moderately delayed-borderline in childhood. Neurological development was normal in two cases and slightly delayed in two cases. None of the long-term survivors of tracheal agenesis required the use of an artificial respirator, and their development was close to normal. Future studies should aim to elucidate the optimal method for performing esophageal reconstruction to allow tracheal agenesis patients to achieve their full oral intake. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Predictors of weight regain in patients who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantavasinkul, Prapimporn Chattranukulchai; Omotosho, Philip; Corsino, Leonor; Portenier, Dana; Torquati, Alfonso

    2016-11-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is a highly effective treatment for obesity and results in long-term weight loss and resolution of co-morbidities. However, weight regain may occur as soon as 1-2 years after surgery. This retrospective study aimed to investigate the prevalence of weight regain and possible preoperative predictors of this phenomenon after RYGB. An academic medical center in the United States. A total of 1426 obese patients (15.8% male) who underwent RYGB during January 2000 to 2012 and had at least a 2-year follow-up were reviewed. We included only patients who were initially successful, having achieved at least 50% excess weight loss at 1 year postoperatively. Patients were then categorized into either the weight regain group (WR) or sustained weight loss (SWL) group based upon whether they gained≥15% of their 1-year postoperative weight. Weight regain was observed in 244 patients (17.1%). Preoperative body mass index was similar between groups. Body mass index was significantly higher and percent excess weight loss was significantly lower in the WR group (Pweight regain was 19.5±9.3 kg and-.8±8.5 in the WR and SWL groups, respectively (Pweight loss. Moreover, a longer duration after RYGB was associated with weight regain. Multivariate analysis revealed that younger age was a significant predictor of weight regain even after adjusting for time since RYGB. The present study confirmed that a longer interval after RYGB was associated with weight regain. Younger age was a significant predictor of weight regain even after adjusting for time since RYGB. The findings of this study underscore the complexity of the mechanisms underlying weight loss and regain after RYGB. Future prospective studies are needed to further explore the prevalence, predictors, and mechanisms of weight regain after RYGB. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of patients who underwent resympathectomy for treatment of primary hyperhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, José Ribas Milanez; Lembrança, Lucas; Fukuda, Juliana Maria; Kauffman, Paulo; Teivelis, Marcelo Passos; Puech-Leão, Pedro; Wolosker, Nelson

    2017-11-01

    Video thoracoscopic sympathectomy is the recommended surgical treatment for primary hyperhidrosis and has a high success rate. Despite this high success rate, some patients are unresponsive and eventually need a resympathectomy. Few studies have previously analysed exclusively the results of these resympathectomies in patients with primary hyperhidrosis. None of the studies have objectively evaluated the degree of response to surgery or the improvement in quality of life after resympathectomies. This is a retrospective study, evaluating 15 patients from an initial group of 2300 patients who underwent resympathectomy after failure of the primary surgical treatment. We evaluated sympathectomy levels of resection, technical difficulties, surgical complications preoperative quality of life, response to treatment and quality-of-life improvement 30 days after each surgery. Regarding gender, 11 (73.3%) patients were women. The average age was 23.2 with SD of 5.17 years, and the mean body mass index was 20.9 (SD 2.12). Ten patients had major complaints about their hands (66%) and 5 (33%) patients about their forearms. A high degree of response to sympathectomy occurred in 73% of patients. In 11 of these patients, the improvement in quality of life was considered high, 3 showed a mild improvement and 1 did not improve. No major complications occurred; the presence of adhesions was reported in 11 patients and pleural drainage was necessary in 4 patients. Resympathectomy is an effective procedure, and it improves the quality of life in patients with primary hyperhidrosis who failed after the first surgery. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  17. Surgical outcomes of 380 patients with double outlet right ventricle who underwent biventricular repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shoujun; Ma, Kai; Hu, Shengshou; Hua, Zhongdong; Yang, Keming; Yan, Jun; Chen, Qiuming

    2014-09-01

    The study objective was to report the outcomes of biventricular repair in patients with double outlet right ventricle. Patients with double outlet right ventricle who underwent biventricular repair at Fuwai Hospital from January 2005 to December 2012 were included. Patients were excluded if double outlet right ventricle was combined with atrioventricular septal defect, heterotaxy syndrome, atrioventricular discordance, or univentricular physiology. A total of 380 consecutive patients with a mean age of 1.9 ± 2.1 years (range, 1 month to 6 years) were included. Varied types of biventricular repair were customized individually. Follow-up was 90.4% complete, and the mean follow-up time was 3.4 ± 3.9 years. There were 17 (4.5%) early deaths and 7 (2.1%) late deaths. Preoperative pulmonary hypertension was the only risk factor for early mortality. Postoperative significant left ventricular outflow tract obstruction was present in 9 survivors. Patients with noncommitted ventricular septal defect had a longer crossclamp time, longer cardiopulmonary bypass time, and higher incidence of postdischarge left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. There were 4 reoperations, all of which were caused by subaortic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. All of the pressure gradients were decreased to less than 20 mm Hg after the modified Konno procedure with an uneventful postoperative course. Optimal results of varied types of biventricular repair for double outlet right ventricle have been acquired. Although noncommitted ventricular septal defect is technically difficult, the outcomes of patients are favorable. Late-onset left ventricular outflow tract obstruction is the main reason for reoperation but can be successfully relieved by the modified Konno procedure. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Newly Developed Sarcopenia as a Prognostic Factor for Survival in Patients who Underwent Liver Transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ja Young Jeon

    Full Text Available The relationship between a perioperative change in sarcopenic status and clinical outcome of liver transplantation (LT is unknown. We investigated whether post-LT sarcopenia and changes in sarcopenic status were associated with the survival of patients.This retrospective study was based on a cohort of 145 patients from a single transplant center who during a mean of 1 year after LT underwent computed tomography imaging evaluation. The cross-sectional area of the psoas muscle of LT patients was compared with that of age- and sex-matched healthy individuals. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to determine whether post-LT sarcopenia and changes in sarcopenic status affect post-LT survival.The mean age at LT of the 116 male and 29 female patients was 50.2 ± 7.9 years; the mean follow-up duration was 51.6 ± 32.9 months. All pre-LT patients with sarcopenia still had sarcopenia 1 year after LT; 14 (15% patients had newly developed sarcopenia. The mean survival duration was 91.8 ± 4.2 months for non-sarcopenic patients and 80.0 ± 5.2 months for sarcopenic patients (log-rank test, p = 0.069. In subgroup analysis, newly developed sarcopenia was an independent negative predictor for post-LT survival (hazard ratio: 10.53, 95% confidence interval: 1.37-80.93, p = 0.024.Sarcopenia in LT recipients did not improve in any of the previously sarcopenic patients and newly developed within 1 year in others. Newly developed sarcopenia was associated with increased mortality. Newly developed sarcopenia can be used to stratify patients with regard to the risk of post-LT mortality.

  19. [Arthroscopic treatment of chondral lesions of the ankle joint. Evidence-based therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, M; Jordan, M; Hamborg-Petersen, E

    2016-02-01

    Ankle sprains are the most relevant injuries of the lower extremities and can lead to damage to ligaments and osteochondral lesions. Up to 50 % of patients with a sprained ankle later develop a lesion of the cartilage in the ankle joint or an osteochondral lesion of the talus. This can lead to osteoarthritis of the injured ankle joint. Spontaneous healing is possible in all age groups in cases of a bone bruise in the subchondral bone but in isolated chondral injuries is only useful in pediatric patients. In many cases chondral and osteochondral injuries lead to increasing demarcation of the affected area and can result in progressive degeneration of the joint if not recognized in time. There also exist a certain number of osteochondral changes of the articular surface of the talus without any history of relevant trauma, which are collectively grouped under the term osteochondrosis dissecans. Perfusion disorders are discussed as one of many possible causes of these alterations. Nowadays, chondral and osteochondral defects can be treated earlier due to detection using very sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) techniques. The use of conservative treatment only has a chance of healing in pediatric patients. Conservative measures for adults should only be considered as adjuvant treatment to surgery.Based on a comprehensive analysis of the current literature, this article gives an overview and critical analysis of the current concepts for treatment of chondral and osteochondral injuries and lesions of the talus. With arthroscopic therapy curettage and microfracture of talar lesions are the predominant approaches or retrograde drilling of the defect is another option when the chondral coating is retained. Implantation of autologous chondral cells or homologous juvenile cartilage tissue is also possible with arthroscopic techniques. Osteochondral fractures (flake fracture) are usually performed as a mini-open procedure supported by

  20. [Arthroscope monitored solution of adult intramuscular injection associated gluteal muscle contracture by radiofrequency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Jie; Xue, Jing; Zhou, Mi; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Li, Zhong-Li; Cai, Xu; Wei, Min; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Juan-Li

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the result of releasing adult intramuscular injection associated gluteal muscle contracture under the monitor of arthroscope by radiofrequency probe. From June 2001 to June 2005, 108 cases of bilateral gluteal muscle contracture were treated with radiofrequency colation under the arthroscope and solution with an average age of 24 years (from 18 to 40 years). There were 57 males and 51 females. Preoperatively, the course of the outline of the femur greater trochanter the sciatic nerve in buttocks and the area of gluteal muscle contracture were marked. With the patients firmly anchored in the straight lateral position, normal saline (which contains Adnephrin) was injected between the surface of contracted gluteus and subcutaneous fat to reduce bleeding in operation. The ports for the motorized shaver and radiofrequency probe were located at the edge of gluteal muscle contracture and were 5 mm superior to the greater trochanter. The 6 mm diameter port for the arthroscope was 3 cm inferior to the greater trochanter. Space was made between contracture bands and overlying subcutaneous tissue with a periosteal elevator by blunt dissection. After the anterior and posterior edge of the contracture bands were fully revealed, normal saline were filled in the space. With the monitor of arthroscope, the procedures were: removing fatty tissue from the surface of the contracture bands with motorized shaver, then cutting off the contracture bands curve and carefully probing and cutting off contracture bands which were mixed in gluteus maximus with radiofrequency probe, finally hemostasis by radiofrequency probe. In the operation flexion, adduction, internal rotation and straightening hip joint were repeated, until it got normal range of motion without snap and bleeding. Results One hundred and one patients were followed up with an average of 19 months. According to a comprehensive evaluating system, 91 cases were excellent, 7 were good, and 3 were fair. No infection

  1. Comminuted fracture of the accessory carpal bone removed via an arthroscopic-assisted arthrotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, Alvaro G; Santschi, Elizabeth M

    2015-02-01

    A 16-year-old American paint horse gelding was presented for evaluation of a left forelimb lameness grade III/V. Radiographs and computed tomography revealed a comminuted fracture of the accessory carpal bone involving the entire articulation with the distal radius and the proximal aspect of the articulation with the ulnar carpal bone. Multiple fragments were present in the palmar pouch of the antebrachiocarpal joint. An arthroscopic-assisted open approach was necessary to remove all fractured fragments. Subsequently the horse was re-admitted for lameness and was treated successfully with antibiotics and long-term supportive bandaging.

  2. A new technique for arthroscopic meniscus transplant using soft tissue fixation and anatomical meniscal root reinsertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yee Han Dave; Caborn, David N M

    2012-05-01

    Allograft meniscus transplant is considered as a treatment option for meniscus-deficient patients to provide pain relief and decrease contact stress. This procedure is now considered as safe and reliable for the treatment for knee pain after total menisectomy. This is a new technique that has been developed for arthroscopic meniscus transplant with no bone blocks. It anatomically recreates the meniscus-tibial insertions and provides aperture fixation of the meniscus horns. It is an alternative to the established bone block meniscus transplant technique and is less surgically invasive. V.

  3. Imaging evaluation of the hip after arthroscopic surgery for femoroacetabular impingement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crim, Julia [University of Missouri at Columbia, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2017-10-15

    Arthroscopic surgery for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is increasingly frequently performed. Initial reports were that complications were very low, but as experience has increased, a number of long-term complications, in addition to factors related to poor clinical outcomes, have been identified. This review describes the normal and abnormal postoperative imaging appearance of the hip after arthroscopy for FAI. Abnormalities discussed include incomplete resection or over-resection of the impingement lesion, heterotopic ossification, cartilage damage, chondrolysis, instability and dislocation, recurrent labral tear, adhesions, psoas atrophy, infection, and avascular necrosis. (orig.)

  4. The open latarjet procedure is more reliable in terms of shoulder stability than arthroscopic bankart repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessière, Charles; Trojani, Christophe; Carles, Michel; Mehta, Saurabh S; Boileau, Pascal

    2014-08-01

    Arthroscopic Bankart repair and open Latarjet bone block procedure are widely considered mainstays for surgical treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder instability. The choice between these procedures depends mainly on surgeon preference or training rather than published evidence. We compared patients with recurrent posttraumatic anterior shoulder instability treated with arthroscopic Bankart or open Latarjet procedure in terms of (1) frequency and timing of recurrent instability, (2) risk factors for recurrent instability, and (3) patient-reported outcomes. In this retrospective comparative study, we paired 93 patients undergoing open Latarjet procedures with 93 patients undergoing arthroscopic Bankart repairs over the same period for posttraumatic anterior shoulder instability by one of four surgeons at the same center. Both groups were comparable except that patients in the Latarjet group had more glenoid lesions and more instability episodes preoperatively. Minimum followup was 4 years (mean, 6 years; range, 4-10 years). Patients were assessed with a questionnaire, including stability, Rowe score, and return to sports. Recurrent instability was defined as at least one episode of recurrent dislocation or subluxation. Return to sports was evaluated using a 0% to 100% scale that patients completed after recovery from surgery. Various risk factors for recurrent instability were also analyzed. At latest followup, 10% (nine of 93) in the Latarjet group and 22% (20 of 93) in the Bankart group demonstrated recurrent instability (p = 0.026; odds ratio, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.17-0.91). Ten recurrences in the Bankart group (50%) occurred after 2 years, compared to only one (11%) in the Latarjet group. Reoperation rate was 6% and 7% in the Bankart and Latarjet groups, respectively. In both groups, patients younger than 20 years had higher recurrence risk (p = 0.019). In the Bankart group, independent factors predictive for recurrence were practice of competitive sports and

  5. Arthroscopic Subtalar Arthrodesis after a Calcaneus Fracture Covered with a Forearm Flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Michels

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical treatment of intraarticular calcaneal fractures is often associated with postoperative wound problems. Soft tissue necrosis, bone loss and uncontrollable infection are a challenge for the surgeon and amputation may in some cases be the ultimate solution. A free flap can be very helpful to cover a significant soft tissue defect and help in fighting the infection. However, the free flap complicates the surgical approach if subtalar arthrodesis and bone reconstruction are needed. This study demonstrates the value of an arthroscopic technique to resect the remaining articular cartilage in preparation for subtalar arthrodesis and bone grafting. This approach avoids compromising the soft tissues and minimizes damage to the free flap.

  6. Arthroscopic Meniscal Allograft Transplantation With Soft-Tissue Fixation Through Bone Tunnels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, Tim; Parkinson, Ben; Smith, Nick A; Verdonk, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Meniscal allograft transplantation improves clinical outcomes for patients with symptomatic meniscus-deficient knees. We describe an established arthroscopic technique for meniscal allograft transplantation without the need for bone fixation of the meniscal horns. After preparation of the meniscal bed, the meniscus is parachuted into the knee through a silicone cannula and the meniscal horns are fixed with sutures through bone tunnels. The body of the meniscus is then fixed with a combination of all-inside and inside-out sutures. This technique is reliable and reproducible and has clinical outcomes comparable with those of bone plug fixation techniques.

  7. Comminuted fracture of the accessory carpal bone removed via an arthroscopic-assisted arthrotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, Alvaro G.; Santschi, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    A 16-year-old American paint horse gelding was presented for evaluation of a left forelimb lameness grade III/V. Radiographs and computed tomography revealed a comminuted fracture of the accessory carpal bone involving the entire articulation with the distal radius and the proximal aspect of the articulation with the ulnar carpal bone. Multiple fragments were present in the palmar pouch of the antebrachiocarpal joint. An arthroscopic-assisted open approach was necessary to remove all fractured fragments. Subsequently the horse was re-admitted for lameness and was treated successfully with antibiotics and long-term supportive bandaging. PMID:25694665

  8. Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Capitellum: A Case Report of Successful Arthroscopic Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ribeiras Cabral

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD of the capitellum is a localized disorder of the subchondral bone, in a region with limited healing capacity. Although its aetiology is still unknown, it has been associated with repetitive microtrauma. The natural history of this disease involves the evolution for degenerative joint disease in approximately half of the patients, with early identification and treatment being critical to optimizing the outcome. Case Presentation. We present a rare case in our practice, illustrating a capitellar OCD in a fifteen-year-old White male without an identified cause of repetitive microtrauma. Conclusion. In this case prompt diagnosis and arthroscopic-assisted treatment led to a successful result.

  9. Complications following arthroscopic fixation of acromioclavicular separations: a systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woodmass JM

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Jarret M Woodmass,1 John G Esposito,1 Yohei Ono,1,2 Atiba A Nelson,1 Richard S Boorman,1 Gail M Thornton,1,3 Ian KY Lo1 1Department of Surgery, Section of Orthopaedic Surgery, McCaig Institute for Bone and Joint Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 2Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan; 3Department of Orthopaedics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada Purpose: Over the past decade, a number of arthroscopic or arthroscopically assisted reconstruction techniques have emerged for the management of acromioclavicular (AC separations. These techniques provide the advantage of superior visualization of the base of the coracoid, less soft tissue dissection, and smaller incisions. While these techniques have been reported to provide excellent functional results with minimal complications, discrepancies exist within the literature. This systematic review aims to assess the rate of complications following these procedures. Methods: Two independent reviewers completed a search of Medline, Embase, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library entries up to December 2013. The terms “Acromioclavicular Joint (MeSH” OR “acromioclavicular* (text” OR “coracoclavicular* (text” AND “Arthroscopy (MeSH” OR “Arthroscop* (text” were used. Pooled estimates and 95% confidence intervals were calculated assuming a random-effects model. Statistical heterogeneity was quantified using the I2 statistic. Level of evidence: IV Results: A total of 972 abstracts met the search criteria. After removal of duplicates and assessment of inclusion/exclusion criteria, 12 articles were selected for data extraction. The rate of superficial infection was 3.8% and residual shoulder/AC pain or hardware irritation occurred at a rate of 26.7%. The rate of coracoid/clavicle fracture was 5.3% and occurred most commonly with techniques utilizing bony tunnels. Loss of AC joint reduction occurred in 26

  10. A criterion based sling weaning progression (sweap) and outcomes following shoulder arthroscopic surgery in an active duty military population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hire, Justin M; Pniewski, Joshua E; Dickston, Michelle L; Jacobs, Jeremy M; Mueller, Terry L; Abell, Brian E; Bojescul, John A

    2014-04-01

    Little objective evidence is available to guide rehabilitation protocols in regard to the sling weaning process following arthroscopy surgery of the shoulder. The purpose of this study was to establish an objective, criterion based protocol for accelerated sling weaning following shoulder arthroscopy. 82 active duty service members (ADSM) underwent elective shoulder arthroscopic surgery by three orthopaedic staff surgeons. One physical therapist progressed patients through the criterion based sling weaning progression (SWEAP) protocol for each surgery and documented pain levels, sleep habits, and decrease in sling use. Preoperative and six month postoperative Quick Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (qDASH) and Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) scores were obtained. The ability to perform an Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) was recorded at six months postoperative. Patients completed sling weaning at an overall mean of 16.6 ± 5.0 days with continued use in unprotected military settings only beyond this timeframe. As patients steadily progressed out of the sling for 1 hour, 2-3 hours, and half-day periods, average pain scores decreased during these time periods at 5.0±1.2, 3.7±1.2, and 2.1±1.3 (0-10 pain scale), respectively. Patients obtained 6-7 hours of sleep or normal sleep habits at an average of 10.9±4.4 days postoperative. Overall, preoperative qDASH and SPADI scores improved from 39.8±13.0 to 2.4±2.0 and 46.4±16.1 to 3.3±3.2, respectively, at 6 months follow up. All 82 patients were able to return to deployable status. 30 (36.6%) patients required formal restrictions for the push-up portion of the APFT at six months postoperative. 7 of these 30 patients required running restrictions. Early improvement in quality of life indicators can be obtained in the initial postoperative period with a progressive, criterion based SWEAP protocol. Patients demonstrated favorable outcomes with return to occupational and physical fitness activities

  11. Endoscopic repair of partial-thickness undersurface tears of the gluteus medius tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaunat, M; Chatellard, R; Noël, E; Sonnery-Cottet, B; Nové-Josserand, L

    2013-11-01

    Partial-thickness tear of the gluteus medius and minimus muscles has recently been recognized as a cause of chronic trochanteric pain resistant to medical treatment. The present article reports an original endoscopic technique of identification and repair. It uses a standard arthroscope at 30°, with the patient in lateral decubitus, without fluoroscopy. In case of partial-thickness undersurface tear, careful hook palpation followed by bursa exploration enables the pathological tendon to be diagnosed. A trans-tendinous approach then allows debridement, with systematic resection of the bone structures implicated in the impingement, followed by side-to-side tendon suture. Level IV (case series). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. The efficacy of rofecoxib 50 mg and hydrocodone/acetaminophen 7.5/750 mg in patients with post-arthroscopic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelly, Jacques E; Nissen, Carl W; Rodgers, Anthony J; Smugar, Steven S; Tershakovec, Andrew M

    2007-01-01

    To compare the efficacy and tolerability of rofecoxib, hydrocodone/acetaminophen 7.5 mg/750 mg (H/A) and placebo in treating pain after arthroscopy of the knee. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single dose study enrolling patients experiencing moderate or severe pain after knee arthroscopy. Patients with moderate-to-severe postoperative pain received either rofecoxib 50 mg (n = 151), H/A (n = 145), or placebo (n = 147). Pain was measured over 24 h. The primary endpoint was total pain relief at 6 h for rofecoxib 50 mg compared with placebo. H/A (p = 0.003), but not rofecoxib (p = 0.256) was significantly more effective than placebo for total pain relief at 6 h (TOPAR6). Although analgesic onset and peak were significantly better for H/A than for both rofecoxib (p TOPAR was not attained, although it did show several efficacy benefits at 24 h, including a significant opioid-sparing effect. All treatments were well tolerated, with no significant differences observed. The limited efficacy of rofecoxib in this study contrasts to the results of previous surgical studies evaluating rofecoxib, and may be partially explained by the postoperative dosing in this arthroscopic surgical model.

  13. A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF ARTHROSCOPIC ACL RECONSTRUCTION WITH HAMSTRING TENDON GRAFT

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    Ashish R. Agarwal

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND ACL reconstruction is one of the commonest knee surgeries done. Young adults are the commonest patients; thus, this injury has a large impact on socioeconomic status of the family. The aim of the study is to study the outcome of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with hamstring tendon graft. MATERIALS AND METHODS 50 patients following up in the OPD who had undergone ACL reconstruction with hamstring tendon graft are evaluated. Patients who had other lesions, such meniscal injuries or collateral injuries were discarded. These patients were evaluated by using Tegner and Lysholm score of 6 months, 12 months and 24 months. Settings- It is a retrospective analysis of the data collected from the patients who were opiated at Nair Hospital. RESULTS 90% of patients in the study were males. Mean age of the study population is 30.7 years. All the patients in the study had instability as a symptom, while 80% of them also had pain. Six months after surgery, according to Tegner and Lysholm score, 52% patients had good outcome, while 48% had fair outcome. At 2 years, 98% of study population had excellent outcome. CONCLUSION Arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with hamstring graft is an effective way of treating ACL tear.

  14. Midterm Outcomes After Arthroscopic Anteroinferior Capsular Release for the Treatment of Idiophatic Adhesive Capsulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranalletta, Maximiliano; Rossi, Luciano Andrés; Zaidenberg, Ezequiel Ernesto; Campos, Carlos; Ignacio, Tanoira; Maignon, Gastón Daniel; Bongiovanni, Santiago Luis

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to report the early and midterm functional outcomes and complications of a consecutive series of patients with primary adhesive capsulitis who were treated with isolated anteroinferior arthroscopic capsular release after they did not respond to conservative treatment. Thirty-two consecutive patients with idiopathic adhesive capsulitis who did not respond to conservative physiotherapy were included in the study. Arthroscopic anteroinferior capsular release was performed in all cases. The primary outcome was improvement in range of motion in the short- and midterm follow-up. We also evaluated pain relief with the visual analog scale, functional outcomes with the Constant-Murley score, and we registered postoperative complications. The mean age was 49.6 years (range, 33-68 years) and the mean follow-up was 63 months (range, 18-84). Overall, there was significant improvement in the Constant-Murley score from 42.4 to 86 points (P adhesive capsulitis, isolated anteroinferior capsular release provides a reliable improvement in pain and range of motion that is maintained in the mid-term follow-up. Level IV, therapeutic, case series study. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF SHOULDER IMPINGEMENT SYNDROME IN ONE-DAY HOSPITAL

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    Martin Mikek

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Arthroscopic subacromial decompression is the method of choice in operative treatment of subacromial rotator cuff impingement. In General Hospital Novo mesto the procedure is performed on a basis of one-day surgery.Methods. We present a prospective analysis of results of operative treatment of shoulder impingement in 36 patients. In all patients functional shoulder scores according to Constant, SST and UCLA were recorded before the operative procedure and again at least three months after the index procedure.Results. According to acromial morphology in the observed group there were three patients with type I acromion (8%, 22 patients had type II acromion (61% and 11 had acromion type III (31%. The average Constant score improved from 21 (SD ± 15 before the operation to 78 (SD ± 12 after the operation and average SST score improved from 4,7 (SD ± 2 to 7,5 (SD ± 1.4 and average UCLA score from 11 (SD ± 3 to 26 (SD ± 3.Conclusions. We conclude that arthroscopic subacromial decompression in properly selected patients enables attainment of good or excellent results in over 90% of patients. Because of minimal invasivness the procedure can be safely performed as one-day surgery.

  16. Functional evaluation of arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries in patients with pseudoparalysis,

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    Alberto Naoki Miyazaki

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the functional result from arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries in patients with pseudoparalysis, defined as incapacity to actively raise the arm above 90◦ , while complete passive elevation was possible.METHODS: we reevaluated 38 patients with a mean follow-up of 51 months (minimum of 24. We analyzed the pseudoparalysis reversion rate and the functional result obtained.RESULTS: according to the assessment criteria of the University of California in Los Angeles (UCLA, 31 (82% patients had good and excellent results, two (5% had fair results and five (13% had poor results. The mean active elevation went from 39◦ before the operation to 139◦ after the operation (p < 0.05; the mean active lateral rotation went from 30◦ to 48◦ (p < 0.05 and the mean active medial rotation went from level L3 to T12 (p < 0.05.CONCLUSION: arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries produced good and excellent results in 82% of the cases and a statistically significant improvement of active range of motion, with reversion of the pseudoparalysis in 97.4% of the cases. It is therefore a good treatment option.

  17. Do Arthroscopic Fluid Pumps Display True Surgical Site Pressure During Hip Arthroscopy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jeremy A; Marland, Jennifer D; Payne, Brayden; Whiting, Daniel R; West, Hugh S

    2018-01-01

    To report on the accuracy of 5 commercially available arthroscopic fluid pumps to measure fluid pressure at the surgical site during hip arthroscopy. Patients undergoing hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement were block randomized to the use of 1 of 5 arthroscopic fluid pumps. A spinal needle inserted into the operative field was used to measure surgical site pressure. Displayed pump pressures and surgical site pressures were recorded at 30-second intervals for the duration of the case. Mean differences between displayed pump pressures and surgical site pressures were obtained for each pump group. Of the 5 pumps studied, 3 (Crossflow, 24K, and Continuous Wave III) reflected the operative field fluid pressure within 11 mm Hg of the pressure readout. In contrast, 2 of the 5 pumps (Double Pump RF and FMS/DUO+) showed a difference of greater than 59 mm Hg between the operative field fluid pressure and the pressure readout. Joint-calibrated pumps more closely reflect true surgical site pressure than gravity-equivalent pumps. With a basic understanding of pump design, either type of pump can be used safely and efficiently. The risk of unfamiliarity with these differences is, on one end, the possibility of pump underperformance and, on the other, potentially dangerously high operating pressures. Level II, prospective block-randomized study. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. The global percutaneous shuttling technique tip for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan G. Vopat

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Most arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs utilize suture passing devices placed through arthro- scopic cannulas. These devices are limited by the size of the passing device where the suture is passed through the tendon. An alternative technique has been used in the senior author’s practice for the past ten years, where sutures are placed through the rotator cuff tendon using percutaneous passing devices. This technique, dubbed the global percutaneous shuttling technique of rotator cuff repair, affords the placement of sutures from nearly any angle and location in the shoulder, and has the potential advantage of larger suture bites through the tendon edge. These advantages may increase the area of tendon available to compress to the rotator cuff footprint and improve tendon healing and outcomes. The aim of this study is to describe the global percutaneous shuttling (GPS technique and report our results using this method. The GPS technique can be used for any full thickness rotator cuff tear and is particularly useful for massive cuff tears with poor tissue quality. We recently followed up 22 patients with an average follow up of 32 months to validate its usefulness. American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores improved significantly from 37 preoperatively to 90 postoperatively (P<0.0001. This data supports the use of the GPS technique for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Further biomechanical studies are currently being performed to assess the improvements in tendon footprint area with this technique.

  19. Sports-specific differences in postsurgical infections after arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutsch, Werner; Zellner, Johannes; Zeman, Florian; Nerlich, Michael; Koch, Matthias; Pfeifer, Christian; Angele, Peter

    2017-12-01

    Post-operative infection after arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a rare but severe complication, particularly for young and active patients. It is unclear whether the prevalence of knee infection is correlated with the type of sports or the level of performance. From 2008 to 2012, the internal single-centre ACL registry of the FIFA Medical Centre of Excellence Regensburg was retrospectively screened for sex, age, time between isolated primary ACL rupture and surgery, surgical technique, rate of infection after ACL reconstruction and the type of sports practised. In total, 4801 ACL reconstructions had been conducted over 5 years, 4579 in amateur and 221 in professional athletes. After application of the exclusion criteria, 1809 athletes with ACL reconstruction were analysed regarding postsurgical infection and the type of sports practised. Professionals and amateurs did not significantly differ with regard to infection rates (n.s.) but in the timing of ACL repair (p sports (n.s.). Staphylococcus aureus and epidermidis were the predominant detected bacteria. All patients were hospitalised and successfully treated with arthroscopic lavage and antibiotic medication. ACL infections showed sports-related differences. Athletes practising summer outdoor sports such as football had a significantly higher risk of infection after ACL reconstruction than winter sports athletes. No difference was found between professional and amateur athletes. Relevant prevention strategies for postsurgical ACL infections should consider influencing patient factors such as the type of sports activity and attendant circumstances. III.

  20. Time Interval between Trauma and Arthroscopic Meniscal Repair Has No Influence on Clinical Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wal, Robert J P; Thomassen, Bregje J W; Swen, Jan-Willem A; van Arkel, Ewoud R A

    2016-07-01

    Arthroscopic meniscal repair is the gold standard for longitudinal peripheral meniscal tears. The time interval between trauma and meniscal repair remains controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate failure rates and clinical outcome of arthroscopic meniscal repair in relation to chronicity of injury. A total of 238 meniscal repairs were performed in 234 patients. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) was reconstructed in almost all ACL-deficient knees (130 out of 133). Time interval between injury and repair was divided into acute ( 2 to  12 weeks). Patients completed postal questionnaires to evaluate clinical outcome and failure rates. Study instruments included Lysholm, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), and Tegner scoring systems. At a median follow-up of 41 months (interquartile range [IQR], 34-53 months) 55 medial and 10 lateral meniscal repairs failed (overall failure rate, 27%). There was a significant higher failure rate for medial meniscal repair (p meniscal repair has no influence on the failure rate. Differences in survival rate of meniscal repair are more dependent on location of the lesion and ACL status, rather than chronicity of injury. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  1. Signs of knee osteoarthritis common in 620 patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for meniscal tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihl, Kenneth; Englund, Martin; Lohmander, L Stefan; Jørgensen, Uffe; Nissen, Nis; Schjerning, Jeppe; Thorlund, Jonas B

    2017-02-01

    Background and purpose - Recent evidence has questioned the effect of arthroscopic knee surgery for middle-aged and older patients with degenerative meniscal tears with or without concomitant radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated the prevalence of early or more established knee OA and patients' characteristics in a cohort of patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for a meniscal tear. Patients and methods - 641 patients assigned for arthroscopy on suspicion of meniscus tear were consecutively recruited from February 2013 through January 2015. Of these, 620 patients (mean age 49 (18-77) years, 57% men) with full datasets available were included in the present study. Prior to surgery, patients completed questionnaires regarding onset of symptoms, duration of symptoms, and mechanical symptoms along with the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS). At arthroscopy, the operating surgeon recorded information about meniscal pathology and cartilage damage. Early or more established knee OA was defined as the combination of self-reported frequent knee pain, cartilage damage, and the presence of degenerative meniscal tissue. Results - 43% of patients (269 of 620) had early or more established knee OA. Of these, a large proportion had severe cartilage lesions with almost half having a severe cartilage lesion in at least 1 knee compartment. Interpretation - Based on a definition including frequent knee pain, cartilage damage, and degenerative meniscal tissue, early or more established knee OA was present in 43% of patients undergoing knee arthroscopy for meniscal tear.

  2. Modified Arthroscopic Latarjet Procedure With Coracoid Exteriorization for Treatment of Anterior Glenohumeral Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranne, Juha O.; Kainonen, Terho U.; Lehtinen, Janne T.; Heinonen, Olli J.

    2013-01-01

    The Latarjet procedure for treating anterior glenohumeral instability includes transfer of the coracoid and biceps tendon to the anterior glenoid. A modified method for the arthroscopic procedure was developed to facilitate the procedure and minimize the risk of injury to the brachial plexus. The detached coracoid was exteriorized through the anteroinferior portal for drilling and shaping. A Coracoid Drill Guide (Arthrex, Naples, FL) was used to help cut the coracoid to the desired size and make 2 drill holes in the coracoid for fixation to the glenoid. The Coracoid Transfer Instrument (Acierart, Masku, Finland) was designed to facilitate coracoid transfer and serve as a pin guide for fixation. Ten patients with severe anterior glenohumeral instability were treated with this technique. They had only mild to moderate postoperative pain. There were no postoperative infections or recurrent dislocations. The safety of this operation was similar to that of other operations on the coracoid process in the proximity of the brachial plexus. The modified arthroscopic Latarjet procedure may be applied successfully to the treatment of anterior glenohumeral instability, with good patient satisfaction and functional outcome. PMID:24400183

  3. Arthroscopic Patelloplasty and Circumpatellar Denervation for the Treatment of Patellofemoral Osteoarthritis

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    Gang Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patellofemoral osteoarthritis commonly occurs in older people, often resulting in anterior knee pain and severely reduced quality of life. The aim was to examine the effectiveness of arthroscopic patelloplasty and circumpatellar denervation for the treatment of patellofemoral osteoarthritis (PFOA. Methods: A total of 156 PFOA patients (62 males, 94 females; ages 45-81 years, mean 66 years treated in our department between September 2012 and March 2013 were involved in this study. Clinical manifestations included recurrent swelling and pain in the knee joint and aggravated pain upon ascending/descending stairs, squatting down, or standing up. PFOA was treated with arthroscopic patelloplasty and circumpatellar denervation. The therapeutic effects before and after surgery were statistically evaluated using Lysholm and Kujala scores. The therapeutic effects were graded by classification of the degree of cartilage defect. Results: A total of 149 cases were successfully followed up for 14.8 months, on average. The incisions healed well, and no complications occurred. After surgery, the average Lysholm score improved from 73.29 to 80.93, and the average Kujala score improved from 68.34 to 76.48. This procedure was highly effective for patients with cartilage defects I-III but not for patients with cartilage defect IV. Conclusions: For PFOA patients, this procedure is effective for significantly relieving anterior knee pain, improving knee joint function and quality of life, and deferring arthritic progression.

  4. Adductor canal blockade for moderate to severe pain after arthroscopic knee surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espelund, M; Grevstad, U; Jaeger, P

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The analgesic effect of the adductor canal block (ACB) after knee surgery has been evaluated in a number of trials. We hypothesized that the ACB would provide substantial pain relief to patients responding with moderate to severe pain after arthroscopic knee surgery. METHODS: Fifty...... subjects with moderate to severe pain after arthroscopic knee surgery were enrolled in this placebo-controlled, blinded trial. All subjects received two ACBs; an initial ACB with either 30 ml ropivacaine 7.5 mg/ml (n = 25) (R group) or saline (n = 25) (C group) and after 45 min a second ACB...... with the opposite study medication, according to randomization. Primary outcome was pain during 45 degrees active flexion of the knee at 45 min after the first block, assessed on a 0-100 mm visual analogue scale. Secondary outcome measures were: pain at rest and during flexion of the knee, worst pain experienced...

  5. What Arthroscopic Skills Need to Be Trained Before Continuing Safe Training in the Operating Room?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuijthof, Gabrielle; Cabitza, Federico; Ragone, Vincenza; Compagnoni, Riccardo; Randelli, Pietro

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to generate consensus among experienced surgeons on "what skills a resident should possess before continuing safe training in the operating room (OR)." An online survey of 65 questions was developed and distributed to surgeons in the European community. A total of 216 responded. The survey included 15 questions regarding generic and specific skills; 16 on patient and tissue manipulation, 11 on knowledge of pathology and 6 on inspection of e-anatomical structures; 5 methods to prepare residents; and 12 on specific skills exercises. The importance of each question (arthroscopic skill) was evaluated ranging from 1 (not important at all) to 6 (very important). Chi-square test, respondent agreement, and a qualitative ranking method were determined to identify the top ranked skills ( p  skills considered important were "anatomical knowledge," "tissue manipulation," "spatial perception," and "triangulation" (all chi-square test > 134, p   0.85, and all "high priority" level). The top ranked 2 specific arthroscopic skills were "portal placement" and "triangulating the tip of the probe with a 30-degree scope" (chi-square test > 176, p  high priority). The online survey identified consensus on skills that are considered important for a trainee to possess before continuing training in the OR. Compared with the Canadian colleagues, the European arthroscopy community demonstrated similar ranking. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  6. Glenohumeral position during CT arthrography with arthroscopic correlation: optimization of diagnostic yield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeone, F.J.; Gill, Corey M.; Torriani, Martin; Bredella, Miriam A. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Boston, MA (United States); Taneja, Atul K. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Hospital do Coracao (HCor) and Teleimagem, Musculoskeletal Imaging, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic yield of two acquisitions of single-contrast CT arthrography (CTA) of the shoulder in internal, neutral, or external glenohumeral rotation with arthroscopic correlation. The CT study was obtained using two acquisitions (first the humerus positioned in maximum tolerated external rotation with the arm along the body and the second with the humerus in internal rotation with the palm placed flat on the table). Two independent readers blinded to the arthroscopic results evaluated the CTA images for labral tears, glenoid bone loss/fractures, and cartilage loss. For each CTA acquisition, sensitivity and specificity for detection of the aforementioned pathology were assessed. Inter-reader agreement was quantified by weighted k statistics. Sensitivity and specificity for detecting anteroinferior or posterior labral tears was highest with neutral rotation (sensitivity 91-100%, specificity 61-100%). For glenoid fracture, sensitivity (67%) was highest with external rotation and specificity (100%) was highest with internal rotation. For cartilage loss, sensitivity (64%) and specificity (89%) was highest with external rotation and neutral rotation, respectively. Neutral rotation showed high sensitivity and specificity for glenoid fractures and cartilage loss. Inter-reader agreement ranged from fair to very good. Neutral glenohumeral position in shoulder CT arthrography was adequately sensitive and specific for the detection of intra-articular pathology, avoiding the use of more than one acquisition. (orig.)

  7. Improvement in technique for arthroscopic ankle fusion: results in 15 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kats, J; van Kampen, A; de Waal-Malefijt, M C

    2003-01-01

    We retrospectively assessed time until consolidation, complications, and functional results according to Morgan from the clinical charts and radiographs of 15 arthroscopic ankle fusions. In 11 patients unilateral distraction and crossed screw placement over the fusion area through tibia and fibula were used (group A); in 4 patients a technique of bilateral distraction and parallel screw placement from the dorsal side of the tibia into the neck of the talus was used (group B). In group A there were two cases of insufficient compression at the arthrodesis site, three cases of suboptimal compression, and five cases of malposition of the screws. In all cases in group B good compression and fixation was achieved, and no case of malpositioning of screws occurred. There was nonunion in 3 of 11 patients in group A and in none of the four patients in group B. Time until fusion was 23.3 in group A and 12.5 weeks in group B. Functional results were better in group B. The initial experiences with our technique of bilateral distraction and parallel screw placement are therefore promising. Screw placement is easier and optimal compression and fixation are achieved. We feel that this technique should be considered when performing an arthroscopic ankle fusion.

  8. Clinical and Arthroscopic Findings of Acute Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears of the Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Shirakura

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical, arthrographic, and arthroscopic findings in 53 patients with acutely torn anterior cruciate ligaments (ACLs were documented. Arthroscopy and instability tests under anesthesia were performed on all patients within 2 weeks after the initial injury. Twenty-three patients complained of extension blocks, and localized tenderness on the medial side was revealed in 26 patients at the initial examination. Aspiration from joints exhibited hemarthrosis in 52 patients. Arthroscopy revealed ACL ruptures in all patients. Four Segond's fractures, 26 meniscus tears (8 medial and 18 lateral, 1 osteochondral fracture, and 19 medial collateral ligament ruptures were revealed. Arthroscopy detected only 1 of the 5 ruptures of the posteromedial corner of the medial meniscus, which were noted on arthrography. Three ACL stumps were protruding among the femorotibial joint, which seemed to be restricting full extension. Statistical analysis showed that tenderness on the medial side was not revealed more frequently in knees with medial collateral ligament injuries than in the others. The volume of aspirated fluids in knees with no leakage in arthrography significantly increased over those with leakages (p < 0.05. Diagnosis of ACL injuries should be completed by clinical, arthrographic, and arthroscopic examinations.

  9. Symptomatic discoid lateral meniscus: a clinical and arthroscopic study in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Zhang, Zhong; Li, Jian

    2016-08-05

    Discoid lateral meniscus (DLM) is relatively common in East Asia..Symptomatic discoid lateral meniscus (SDLM) is an important indication for knee arthroscopic surgery. However, studies investigating SDLM are rare. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics and intra-articular variants of SDLM in a Chinese population. We retrospectively reviewed all patients with SDLM from January 2005 to December 2014 in our hospital. Clinical variables included gender, age, duration, age of onset, affected side, symptoms and trauma history as well as arthroscopic findings: DLM types, tear patterns and concomitant medial meniscus tear, which were evaluated and compared statistically. Of the 496 consecutive participants with SDLM, females outnumbered males (69.6 % vs. 30.4 %). The age of onset ranged from 3 to 80 years (median, 31 years), and was significantly higher in females than in males (p meniscus tear (11, 2.2 %), at a significantly higher age compared with patients without tear (median, 57 years vs. 33 years, p meniscus.

  10. Heated wire humidification circuit attenuates the decrease of core temperature during general anesthesia in patients undergoing arthroscopic hip surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sooyong; Yoon, Seok-Hwa; Youn, Ann Misun; Song, Seung Hyun; Hwang, Ja Gyung

    2017-12-01

    Intraoperative hypothermia is common in patients undergoing general anesthesia during arthroscopic hip surgery. In the present study, we assessed the effect of heating and humidifying the airway with a heated wire humidification circuit (HHC) to attenuate the decrease of core temperature and prevent hypothermia in patients undergoing arthroscopic hip surgery under general anesthesia. Fifty-six patients scheduled for arthroscopic hip surgery were randomly assigned to either a control group using a breathing circuit connected with a heat and moisture exchanger (HME) (n = 28) or an HHC group using a heated wire humidification circuit (n = 28). The decrease in core temperature was measured from anesthetic induction and every 15 minutes thereafter using an esophageal stethoscope. Decrease in core temperature from anesthetic induction to 120 minutes after induction was lower in the HHC group (-0.60 ± 0.27℃) compared to the control group (-0.86 ± 0.29℃) (P = 0.001). However, there was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of intraoperative hypothermia or the incidence of shivering in the postanesthetic care unit. The use of HHC may be considered as a method to attenuate intraoperative decrease in core temperature during arthroscopic hip surgery performed under general anesthesia and exceeding 2 hours in duration.

  11. The arthroscopic treatment of displaced tibial spine fractures in children and adolescents using Meniscus Arrows(A (R))

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Diederick B.; de Graaf, Joost S.; Hemmer, Patrick H.; Burgerhof, Johannes G. M.; Kramer, William L. M.

    This article summarises the results of a newly developed technique that utilises Meniscus Arrows(A (R)) for the arthroscopic fixation of displaced tibial spine fractures in children and adolescents. Twelve tibial spine fractures in the knees of eleven children between 6 and 15 years old, with an

  12. Intra-articular versus intravenous magnesium-sulfate as adjuvant to femoral nerve block in arthroscopic knee sur

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    Mohamed Abdulatif

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: The combined use of femoral nerve block with IA or IV MgSO4 is associated with significant reduction of the intensity and duration of postoperative pain and postoperative analgesic requirements in patients undergoing arthroscopic knee surgery with the IA MgSO4 being superior to IV route of administration.

  13. Are the good functional results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff injuries maintained over the long term?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Naoki Miyazaki

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether the good and excellent functional results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears are maintained over the long term. METHODS: From the sample of the study conducted by our group in 2006, in which we evaluated the functional results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears, 35 patients were reassessed, 8 years after the first evaluation. The inclusion criteria were that these patients with massive rotator cuff tears operated by means of an arthroscopic technique, who participated in the previous study and achieved good or excellent outcomes according to the UCLA criteria. Patients whose results were not good or excellent in the first evaluation according to the UCLA criteria were excluded. RESULTS: Among the 35 patients reassessed, 91% of them continued to present good and excellent results (40% excellent and 51% good, while 3% presented fair results and 6% poor results. The time interval between the first and second evaluations was 8 years and the minimum length of follow-up since the immediate postoperative period was 9 years (range: 9-17 years, with an average of 11.4 years. CONCLUSION: The good and excellent results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears were mostly maintained (91%, with the same level of function and satisfaction, even though 8 years had passed since the first assessment, with a follow-up period averaging 11.4 years.

  14. Arthroscopic subacromial decompression results in normal shoulder function after two years in less than 50% of patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konradsen, Lars Aage Glud; Jensen, Claus Hjorth

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome two years after arthroscopic subacromial decompression using the Western Ontario Rotator-Cuff (WORC) index and a diagram-based questionnaire to self-assess active shoulder range of motion (ROM). METHODS: Outcomes in 80 patients...

  15. Arthroscopic Latarjet and Capsular Shift (ALCS) procedure: a new "freehand" technique for anterior shoulder instability associated with significant bone defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Deepak N

    2015-03-01

    Anterior shoulder instability associated with significant bone loss has been described as "bony-instability," and this condition is usually treated with an anterior glenoid bone grafting procedure (Latarjet procedure). The Latarjet procedure involves transfer of the horizontal limb of the coracoid process along with the conjoint tendon to the anterior glenoid rim, and is traditionally performed as an open surgical procedure. Recently, an arthroscopic technique for the Latarjet procedure has been described; the technique necessitates the use of specialized instrumentation and involves excision of the entire anterior capsule to facilitate coracoid fixation. We describe a new "freehand" arthroscopic technique for the Latarjet procedure, and, in addition, a simultaneous capsular shift to further optimize mid and end range stability. This technique eliminates the use of additional instrumentation and can be done using routine arthroscopic instruments. Preliminary experience with this technique suggests that the arthroscopic Latarjet and capsular shift is a technically demanding procedure. Glenohumeral capsule can be preserved, and this should be attempted wherever possible to optimize stability. Additional specialized instrumentation would probably reduce surgical time; however, the procedure can be performed with routine instruments.

  16. Pulsed electromagnetic fields after arthroscopic treatment for osteochondral defects of the talus: Double-blind randomized controlled multicenter trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J.A. van Bergen (Christiaan); L. Blankevoort (Leendert); R.J. de Haan (Rob); I.N. Sierevelt (Inger); D.E. Meuffels (Duncan); P.R.N. D'Hooghe (Pieter); R. Krips (Rover); G. van Damme (Geert); C.N. van Dijk (Niek)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Osteochondral talar defects usually affect athletic patients. The primary surgical treatment consists of arthroscopic debridement and microfracturing. Although this is mostly successful, early sport resumption is difficult to achieve, and it can take up to one year to obtain

  17. Pulsed electromagnetic fields after arthroscopic treatment for osteochondral defects of the talus: double-blind randomized controlled multicenter trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bergen, Christiaan J. A.; Blankevoort, Leendert; de Haan, Rob J.; Sierevelt, Inger N.; Meuffels, Duncan E.; d'Hooghe, Pieter R. N.; Krips, Rover; van Damme, Geert; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Osteochondral talar defects usually affect athletic patients. The primary surgical treatment consists of arthroscopic debridement and microfracturing. Although this is mostly successful, early sport resumption is difficult to achieve, and it can take up to one year to obtain

  18. Arthroscopic assisted reduction and internal fixation of lateral femoral epiphyseal injury in adolescent soccer player: a report of one case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Seuk; Jung, Young Bok; Ahn, Jin Hwan; Shim, Jong Seop; Nam, Dae Cheol

    2007-06-01

    Ligament injuries are more common than fractures in adolescents. We operated on an adolescent soccer player, who had a lateral femoral epiphyseal injury using arthroscopic-assisted reduction and percutaneous internal fixation. During second-look arthroscopy 2 years after the first operation, there was articular cartilage congruity, without any visible step-off. The axial alignment did not reveal any residual valgus deformity.

  19. An anterior ankle arthroscopic technique for retrograde osteochondral autograft transplantation of posteromedial and central talar dome cartilage defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajsfisz, Anthony; Makridis, Konstantinos G; Naji, Omar; Hirsh, Caroline; Boisrenoult, Philippe; Beaufils, Philippe

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to present an arthroscopic technique for the treatment for posteromedial and central cartilage defects of the talus using anterior arthroscopic portals and without performing a medial malleolar osteotomy. Nine fresh cadavers were dissected. Autografts were implanted under arthroscopy using a retrograde osteochondral transplantation system, and their position was estimated using specific angular calibrators and later confirmed by software analysis of two photographs of the disarticulated ankle joint. In eight cases, the congruence between the surrounding articular cartilage and the cartilage of the graft was high, with differences measuring <1 mm. There were no iatrogenic cartilage lesions of the tibial plafond and no fractures of the talus. All the autografts remained stable during full range of motion cycles of the ankle joint. One failure was reported. This cadaveric study showed that the retrograde osteochondral autograft transplantation technique in the talus is feasible. It can be used to restore the posteromedial and central talar articular surfaces using conventional ankle arthroscopic instrumentation and anterior arthroscopic portals without resorting to a medial malleolar osteotomy. Further clinical and biomechanical studies are required to prove the efficacy of this technique and its reproducibility in routine clinical practice.

  20. Arthroscopic Harvest of Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells From the Infrapatellar Fat Pad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoo, Jason L; Chang, Wenteh

    2017-11-01

    The successful isolation of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) from the arthroscopically harvested infrapatellar fat pad (IFP) would provide orthopaedic surgeons with an autologous solution for regenerative procedures. To demonstrate the quantity and viability of the mesenchymal stem cell population arthroscopically harvested from the IFP as well as the surrounding synovium. Descriptive laboratory study. The posterior border of the IFP, including the surrounding synovial tissue, was harvested arthroscopically from patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Tissue was then collected in an AquaVage adipose canister, followed by fat fractionization using syringe emulsification and concentration with an AdiPrep device. In the laboratory, the layers of tissue were separated and then digested with 0.3% type I collagenase. The pelleted stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells were then immediately analyzed for viability, mesenchymal cell surface markers by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and clonogenic capacity. After culture expansion, the metabolic activity of the ADSCs was assessed by an AlamarBlue assay, and the multilineage differentiation capability was tested. The transition of surface antigens from the SVF toward expanded ADSCs at passage 2 was further evaluated. SVF cells were successfully harvested with a mean yield of 4.86 ± 2.64 × 10 5 cells/g of tissue and a mean viability of 69.03% ± 10.75%, with ages ranging from 17 to 52 years (mean, 35.14 ± 13.70 years; n = 7). The cultured ADSCs composed a mean 5.85% ± 5.89% of SVF cells with a mean yield of 0.33 ± 0.42 × 10 5 cells/g of tissue. The nonhematopoietic cells (CD45 - ) displayed the following surface antigens as a percentage of the viable population: CD44 + (52.21% ± 4.50%), CD73 + CD90 + CD105 + (19.20% ± 17.04%), and CD44 + CD73 + CD90 + CD105 + (15.32% ± 15.23%). There was also a significant increase in the expression of ADSC markers CD73 (96.97% ± 1.72%; P

  1. Arthroscopic Evaluation of Subluxation of the Long Head of the Biceps Tendon and Its Relationship with Subscapularis Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Kyoung-Hwan; Kim, Su Cheol; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the angle between the long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) and the glenoid during arthroscopic surgery and its correlation with biceps subluxation on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Furthermore, we evaluated the relationship of this angle with subscapularis tears and biceps pathologies. MRI and arthroscopic images of 270 consecutive patients who had undergone arthroscopic surgery were retrospectively evaluated. On MRI, 60 shoulders with biceps subluxation and 210 shoulders without subluxation were identified. On the arthroscopic view from the posterior portal, the angle between the LHBT and the glenoid (biceps-glenoid angle) was measured. The biceps-glenoid angle, tears of the LHBT, degenerative superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions, and presence of a subscapularis tear were compared according to the presence of biceps subluxation on MRI. In the subluxation group, 51 (85%) had a subscapularis tendon tear and all shoulders showed biceps tendon pathologies. In the non-subluxation group, 116 (55.2%) had a subscapularis tendon tear, 125 (60%) had tears in the biceps tendon, and 191 (91%) had degenerative SLAP lesions. The incidences of subscapularis tears ( p < 0.001) and biceps pathologies ( p < 0.001) showed significant differences. The mean biceps-glenoid angle was 87.0° (standard deviation [SD], 11.4°) in the subluxation group and 90.0° (SD, 9.6°) in the non-subluxation group, showing a statistically significant difference ( p = 0.037). Shoulders with subluxation of the biceps tendon on the preoperative MRI revealed more pathologies in the subscapularis tendon and biceps tendon during arthroscopy. However, the arthroscopically measured biceps-glenoid angle did not have clinical relevance to the determination of subluxation of the LHBT from the bicipital groove.

  2. Partial differential equations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    been a regular stream of high quality work done in these areas. Talking of elliptic partial differen- tial equations, important contributions have been made in the ...... [6] Evans L C 1992 Periodic homogenisation of certain fully nonlinear partial differential equations; Proc. Roy. Soc. Edinburgh Sect. A 120 No. 3–4, 245–265.

  3. Additional mesenchymal stem cell injection improves the outcomes of marrow stimulation combined with supramalleolar osteotomy in varus ankle osteoarthritis: short-term clinical results with second-look arthroscopic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Sang; Lee, Moses; Koh, Yong Gon

    2016-12-01

    Supramalleolar osteotomy (SMO) is reported to be an effective treatment for varus ankle osteoarthritis by redistributing the load line within the ankle joint. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been proposed as a new treatment option for osteoarthritis on the basis of their cartilage regeneration ability. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical, radiological, and second-look arthroscopic outcomes between MSC injection with marrow stimulation and marrow stimulation alone in patients with varus ankle osteoarthritis who have undergone SMO. In this retrospective study, 62 patients (64 ankles) with varus ankle osteoarthritis underwent second-look arthroscopy at a mean of 12.8 months after arthroscopic marrow stimulation combined with SMO; 33 ankles were subjected to marrow stimulation alone (group I), and 31 were subjected to marrow stimulation with MSC injection (group II). Clinical outcome measures included a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score. Radiological outcome variables included the tibial-ankle surface (TAS), talar tilt (TT), and tibial-lateral surface (TLS) angles. In second-look arthroscopy, cartilage regeneration was evaluated using the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) grade. The mean VAS score improved significantly from 7.2 ± 1.0 to 4.7 ± 1.4 in group I and from 7.3 ± 0.8 to 3.7 ± 1.5 in group II at the final follow-up (P varus ankle osteoarthritis who have undergone SMO. Furthermore, the ICRS grade is significantly correlated with clinical outcome.

  4. An anatomic arthroscopic description of the hip capsular ligaments for the hip arthroscopist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telleria, Jessica J M; Lindsey, Derek P; Giori, Nicholas J; Safran, Marc R

    2011-05-01

    To examine and describe the normal anatomic intra-articular locations of the hip capsular ligaments in the central and peripheral compartments of the hip joint. Eight paired fresh-frozen human cadaveric hips (mean age, 73.3 years) were carefully dissected free of soft tissue to expose the hip capsule. Needles were placed through the capsule along the macroscopic borders of the hip capsular ligaments. Arthroscopy was performed on each hip, and the relations of the needles, and thus the ligaments, to the arthroscopic portals and other soft-tissue and osseous landmarks in the hip were recorded by use of a clock-face reference system. The iliofemoral ligament (ILFL) ran from 12:45 to 3 o'clock. The ILFL was pierced by the anterolateral and anterior portals just within its lateral and medial borders, respectively. The pubofemoral ligament was located from the 3:30 to the 5:30 clock position; the lateral border was at the psoas-U perimeter, and the medial border was at the junction of the anteroinferior acetabulum and the cotyloid fossa. The ischiofemoral ligament (ISFL) ran from the 7:45 to the 10:30 clock position. The posterolateral portal pierced the ISFL just inside its superior/lateral border, and the inferior/lateral border was located at the posteroinferior acetabulum. In the peripheral compartment the lateral ILFL and superior/lateral ISFL borders were in proximity to the lateral synovial fold. The medial ILFL and lateral pubofemoral ligament borders were closely approximated to the medial synovial fold. The hip capsular ligaments have distinct and consistent arthroscopic locations within the hip joint and are associated with clearly identifiable landmarks in the central and peripheral compartments. The standard hip arthroscopy portals are closely related to the borders of the hip capsular ligaments. These findings will help orthopaedic surgeons know which structures are being addressed during arthroscopic surgery and may help in the development of future hip

  5. Effects of Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields on Return to Sports After Arthroscopic Debridement and Microfracture of Osteochondral Talar Defects: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reilingh, Mikel L.; van Bergen, Christiaan J. A.; Gerards, Rogier M.; van Eekeren, Inge C.; de Haan, Rob J.; Sierevelt, Inger N.; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.; Krips, Rover; Meuffels, Duncan E.; van Dijk, C. N.; Blankevoort, Leendert

    2016-01-01

    Osteochondral defects (OCDs) of the talus usually affect athletic patients. The primary surgical treatment consists of arthroscopic debridement and microfracture. Various possibilities have been suggested to improve the recovery process after debridement and microfracture. A potential solution to

  6. The comparison effects of intra-articular injection of different opioids on postoperative pain relieve after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A randomized clinical trial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Arti

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: Administering 5 mg intra-articular morphine after arthroscopic ACL reconstruction is a valuable choice and is recommended to be added to other local anesthetics administrated drugs after this procedure.

  7. Successful removable partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Christopher D

    2012-03-01

    Removable partial dentures (RPDs) remain a mainstay of prosthodontic care for partially dentate patients. Appropriately designed, they can restore masticatory efficiency, improve aesthetics and speech, and help secure overall oral health. However, challenges remain in providing such treatments, including maintaining adequate plaque control, achieving adequate retention, and facilitating patient tolerance. The aim of this paper is to review the successful provision of RPDs. Removable partial dentures are a successful form of treatment for replacing missing teeth, and can be successfully provided with appropriate design and fabrication concepts in mind.

  8. Hyperbolic partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Witten, Matthew

    1986-01-01

    Hyperbolic Partial Differential Equations III is a refereed journal issue that explores the applications, theory, and/or applied methods related to hyperbolic partial differential equations, or problems arising out of hyperbolic partial differential equations, in any area of research. This journal issue is interested in all types of articles in terms of review, mini-monograph, standard study, or short communication. Some studies presented in this journal include discretization of ideal fluid dynamics in the Eulerian representation; a Riemann problem in gas dynamics with bifurcation; periodic M

  9. Beginning partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    O'Neil, Peter V

    2011-01-01

    A rigorous, yet accessible, introduction to partial differential equations-updated in a valuable new edition Beginning Partial Differential Equations, Second Edition provides a comprehensive introduction to partial differential equations (PDEs) with a special focus on the significance of characteristics, solutions by Fourier series, integrals and transforms, properties and physical interpretations of solutions, and a transition to the modern function space approach to PDEs. With its breadth of coverage, this new edition continues to present a broad introduction to the field, while also addres

  10. Arthroscopic Reduction and Fixation of Tibial Spine Avulsion Fractures by a Stainless Steel Wiring Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhamid, Mohamed M; Bayoumy, Maysara Abdelhalim; Elkady, Hesham A; Abdelkawi, Ayman Farouk

    2017-12-01

    Several techniques of arthroscopic treatment of tibial spine avulsion fractures have been described in the literature. These techniques include the use of various fixation devices such as screws, K-wires, wiring, sutures, and suture anchors. In this study, we evaluate a new wiring technique for the treatment of these injuries. This technique involves fixation by stainless steel tension wires passed over the fractured spine and tied over a bone bridge. The advantages of this technique are that it aids in reduction, allows for compression of the tibial spine fragment anatomically in its fracture bed, provides stable fixation in difficult comminuted fractures, and allows for early mobilization and weight bearing because of the solid fixation.

  11. Isolated subacromial bursal fluid on MRI of the shoulder in symptomatic patients: correlation with arthroscopic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monu, J.U.V. [Dept. of Radiology, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Pruett, S. [Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Vanarthos, W.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Pope, T.L. Jr. [Dept. of Radiology, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Fluid in the subacromial bursa (SAB) is a common finding on magnetic resonance (MR) images of the shoulder, and the implications of this finding have not been clarified. We retrospectively reviewed and correlated the MR features with arthroscopic findings in 21 symptomatic patients who had fluid in the SAB on MR imaging without demonstrable rotator cuff tear. Rotator cuff impingement was the most frequent surgical finding (42.9%). Other frequent surgical observations were glenbid labrum abnormality (28.6%), bursitis (19%), and supraspinatus tendinitis (14.3%). Distribution of acromial types was similar to that reported by Bigliani et al., and impingement was evenly distributed among acromial types in our study population. We conclude that in our patient population group the MR finding of isolated SAB fluid in symptomatic patients is highly likely to be associated with the finding of other abnormalities in the shoulder joint at surgery. (orig.)

  12. A novel flexible drill device enabling arthroscopic transosseous repair of Bankart lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Y-Y; Park, J S; Choi, S J; Hong, S I

    2017-06-01

    We have developed a flexible drill device that makes arthroscopic transosseous repair possible, and report preliminary results. Twelve patients with post-traumatic anterior inferior glenohumeral instability were selected. the flexible drill device is inserted into the shoulder joint through the posterior portal and the guide pipe unit is placed 5mm posterior to the margin of the anterior glenoid rim. The flexible drill is driven through the glenoid with the power drill, creating a hole in the glenoid. A non-absorbable suture is passed through the hole and a sliding knot tying is performed over the capsule and labrum after completing stitches with the suture hook loaded. The same procedures are repeated in the 2, 3 and 4 o'clock positions of the glenoid. There was no recurrence of dislocation at the mean follow-up period of 52.3 months. The mean Rowe score was 89.5. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Anaesthetic management of shoulder arthroscopic repair in Parkinson′s disease with deep brain stimulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranju Gandhi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the anaesthetic management of arthroscopic repair for complete rotator cuff tear of shoulder in a 59-year-old female with Parkinson′s disease (PD with deep brain stimulator (DBS using a combination of general anaesthesia with interscalene approach to brachial plexus block. The DBS consists of implanted electrodes in the brain connected to the implantable pulse generator (IPG normally placed in the anterior chest wall subcutaneously. It can be programmed externally from a hand-held device placed directly over the battery stimulator unit. In our patient, IPG with its leads was located in close vicinity of the operative site with potential for DBS malfunction. Implications of DBS in a patient with PD for shoulder arthroscopy for anaesthesiologist are discussed along with a brief review of DBS.

  14. [Arthroscopic stabilisation of acute acromioclavicular dislocation using the TighRope device].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajnar, L; Bartoš, R; Sedivý, P

    2013-01-01

    To present the TightRope (Arthrex, Naples, FL) technique and its results in the arthroscopic stabilisation of acute acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) dislocation carried out at our department. From July 2009 till December 2010, arthroscopic stabilisation of acute ACJ dislocation was performed in 22 patients. The group consisted of 18 men and four women with an average age of 37.4 years. The Rockwood type III to type V ACJ dislocations (III, 16; IV, 1; V, 5) were indicated for surgery. The average interval between injury and surgery was 5.4 days. In all cases, a second-generation TightRope implant was inserted by the EndoButton technique joining the distal end of the clavicle and the coracoid process. The results were evaluated using the UCLA Shoulder Scale at 6 months after surgery. All 22 patients returned to their pre-operative activities without any restriction of shoulder motion within 5 months of surgery. The average post-operative UCLA score was 31.2 points (range, 28 to 35). Radiographic evidence of the loss of full reduction, with no effect on the clinical outcome, was recorded in four patients (18%) during post-operative rehabilitation. Of these, one had Rockwood type III, two had type IV and one had type V dislocations. One patient suffered post-operative pull-out of the implant from the coracoid; three patients showed skin wound healing by second intention above the lateral clavicle, with one requiring surgical repair under local anaesthesia. There was no neurovascular complication, intra- or postoperative fracture of the coracoid process or lateral clavicle, or deep wound infection. Arthroscopic stabilisation of acute ACJ dislocation is a minimally invasive procedure providing the coracoclavicular ligament complex with dynamic stability. In comparison with open procedures, it is less painful post-operatively, allows the patients to return early to daily activities and has a better cosmetic effect. It eliminates the necessity of removing the osteosynthetic

  15. The Anatomic Basis for the Arthroscopic Latarjet Procedure: A Cadaveric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawi, Nael; Reinhold, Aja; Suero, Eduardo M; Liodakis, Emmanouil; Przyklenk, Sandra; Brandes, Julia; Schmiedl, Andreas; Krettek, Christian; Meller, Rupert

    2016-02-01

    The Latarjet technique is a reliable treatment option for recurrent anterior shoulder instability. However, the complication rate has been reported to be as high as 30%, with 1.6% of patients suffering a nerve injury. The all-arthroscopic Latarjet procedure has been gaining popularity, even as it has introduced its own challenges. Given that the surgeon is not able to palpate the nerves, their localization and protection can be difficult. Additionally, the use of different instruments can lead to distinct nerve injury mechanisms. To describe the anatomic trajectory of the musculocutaneous, axillary, and suprascapular nerves in relation to the arthroscopic Latarjet approach. Using this information, guidance is provided for reducing nerve injuries during instrumentation and screw insertion. Descriptive laboratory study. A total of 50 cadaveric shoulders from 25 whole-body specimens were examined. The specimens were placed in the beach-chair position, and the deltopectoral and dorsal approaches were used to expose the relevant structures. A subscapularis muscle split was performed between the inferior and middle thirds of the tendon. Digital caliper measurements were taken between various points of the trajectories of the nerves and surrounding anatomic landmarks. The location of the nerves relative to the split was recorded. The musculocutaneous nerve lay within the split in 66% of the shoulders (n = 33); it was medial to the split in 28% (n = 14); it was found lateral to split in 2% (n = 1); and it was not identified in 4% of shoulders (n = 2). The mean length of the axillary nerve was 4.0 cm (95% CI, 3.7-4.2) from the exit of the plexus to the quadrangular space. The axillary nerve was found to be within the split in 50% of the shoulders (n = 25) and medial to the split in the remaining 50% (n = 25). The suprascapular nerve at the level of the supraspinatous fossa passed 3.3 cm (95% CI, 3.1-3.5) medial to the superior rim of the posterior glenoid. The nerve curves

  16. Arthroscopic Ankle Arthrodesis for Treating Osteoarthritis in a Patient with Kashin-Beck Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenjiro Iwasa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Kashin-Beck disease (KBD is an endemic degenerative osteoarthritis. Death of cartilage and growth plate is the pathologic feature; therefore, KBD involves skeletal deformity and often results in osteoarthritis. Deficiency of selenium, high humic acid levels in water, and fungi on storage gains are considered the cause of KBD. The most frequently involved joints are ankles, knees, wrists, and elbows and symptoms are pain and limited motions of those joints. The main treatments for KBD are rehabilitation and osteotomy to correct the deformities because preventive treatment has not been established. In this report, we present a case of ankle osteoarthritis due to KBD and first describe arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis for treating osteoarthritis of KBD.

  17. Arthroscopic knee surgery does not modify hyperalgesic responses to heat injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads U; Duun, Preben; Kraemer, Otto

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Experimental studies suggest that surgical injury may up- or down-regulate nociceptive function. Therefore, the aim of this clinical study was to evaluate the effect of elective arthroscopically assisted knee surgery on nociceptive responses to a heat injury. METHODS: Seventeen patients...... contralateral to the surgical side. Ibuprofen and acetaminophen were given for 2 days before the first burn injury and again from the time of surgery. In the controls, the two burn injuries were separated by 7 days. Sensory variables included cumulated pain score during induction of the burn (visual analog...... scale), secondary hyperalgesia area, and mechanical and thermal pain perception and pain thresholds assessed before and 1 h after the burn injury. RESULTS: The heat injuries induced significant increases in pain perception (P heat pain...

  18. Anatomical reference point for harvesting a flexor graft during arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clécio de Lima Lopes

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the prevalence of a vascular network adjacent to the insertion of the pes anserinus, so that it could be used as an anatomical reference point to facilitate harvesting flexor grafts for arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL.METHODS: Thirty patients with ACL tears who were going to undergo ACL reconstruction using the tendons of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles as grafts were selected randomly. During the harvesting of these tendons, the presence or absence of this anatomical reference point was noted.RESULTS: All the patients presented a vascular network of greater or lesser diameter.CONCLUSION: The vascular network seems to be a good reference point during harvesting of the tendons of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles, for facilitating graft harvesting.

  19. Costs, quality of life and cost-effectiveness of arthroscopic and open repair for rotator cuff tears: an economic evaluation alongside the UKUFF trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, J; Gray, A; Cooper, C; Cooper, D; Ramsay, C; Carr, A

    2016-12-01

    A trial-based comparison of the use of resources, costs and quality of life outcomes of arthroscopic and open surgical management for rotator cuff tears in the United Kingdom NHS was performed using data from the United Kingdom Rotator Cuff Study (UKUFF) randomised controlled trial. Using data from 273 patients, healthcare-related use of resources, costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were estimated at 12 months and 24 months after surgery on an intention-to-treat basis with adjustment for covariates. Uncertainty about the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for arthroscopic versus open management at 24 months of follow-up was incorporated using bootstrapping. Multiple imputation methods were used to deal with missing data. There were no significant differences between the arthroscopic and open groups in terms of total mean use and cost of resources or QALYs at any time post-operatively. Open management dominated arthroscopic management in 59.8% of bootstrapped cost and effect differences. The probability that arthroscopic management was cost-effective compared with open management at a willingness-to-pay threshold of £20 000 per QALY gained was 20.9%. There was no significant overall difference in the use or cost of resources or quality of life between arthroscopic and open management in the trial. There was uncertainty about which strategy was most cost-effective. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:1648-55. ©2016 Gray et al.

  20. Arthroscopic Versus Open Latarjet in the Treatment of Recurrent Anterior Shoulder Dislocation With Marked Glenoid Bone Loss: A Prospective Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yiming; Jiang, Chunyan; Song, Guanyang

    2017-06-01

    Very few studies have compared open Latarjet versus arthroscopic Latarjet procedures. To compare the clinical and computed tomographic outcomes between open and arthroscopic Latarjet procedures. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A prospective, comparative study was performed. The open Latarjet group included 44 patients, and the arthroscopic Latarjet group included 46 patients. All patients had more than 2 years of clinical follow-up (range of motion, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons [ASES] score, Constant-Murley score, and Rowe score). The position of the transferred coracoid, the screw orientation, and graft resorption were evaluated on computed tomography (CT) scan. The surgery time for the open group was significantly shorter than that for the arthroscopic group ( P = .003). No recurrent dislocation occurred in either group. The apprehension test was negative in all patients in both groups. At the final follow-up, no significant difference was detected between the open group and the arthroscopic group regarding any of the clinical outcome measurements. The transferred coracoid graft was level with the glenoid in all patients in both groups. The open group had better position in the superior-inferior direction compared with the arthroscopic group ( P Latarjet group showed notably less graft resorption compared with patients in the open Latarjet group.

  1. Partial knee replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... candidate for partial knee replacement and what the success rate is for your condition. Alternative Names Unicompartmental ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  2. Partial knee replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100225.htm Partial knee replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  3. Comparison of manipulation and arthroscopic capsular release for adhesive capsulitis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, John A; Schroeder, Nicholas; Miller, Bruce S; Carpenter, James E

    2013-08-01

    It is currently unclear as to whether there is a difference in the clinical effectiveness of an arthroscopic capsular release compared to a manipulation under anaesthesia (MUA) in patients with recalcitrant idiopathic adhesive capsulitis. A systematic review was performed using computerized keyword searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Two reviewers independently performed searches and article reduction. Studies that reported outcomes data following either a manipulation under regional or general anaesthesia or an arthroscopic capsular release in patients with idiopathic adhesive capsulitis were included. Data on clinical measures of shoulder range of motion and subjective outcome measures were extracted and summarized. Twenty-two studies (21 studies provided level IV evidence) including 989 patients were included resulting in a comparison of 9 MUA and 17 capsular release groups. Patients were 60% female with a median age of 52 years old (range, 24-91 years). Median duration of symptoms and follow-up were 9 months (range, 3-50) and 35 months (range, 3-189), respectively. There were minimal differences in the median changes in abduction, flexion, and external rotation range of motion (ROM), and final Constant score between the MUA and capsular release groups. The quality of evidence available is low and the data available demonstrate little benefit for a capsular release instead of, or in addition to, an MUA. A high quality study is required to definitively evaluate the relative benefits of these procedures. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. When should the external approach be resorted to in the arthroscopic treatment of perimeniscal cyst?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bombaci Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Meniscal cysts very often cause meniscal tears and especially when it is peripheral, some of the healthy parts of meniscus might be needlessly sacrificed. In particular conditions, extraarticular approaches might save some menisci. In the present study, we evaluated the conditions which required using the extraarticular approach in addition to the arthroscopic procedure, to maximally preserve the meniscus. Methods: Eight patients with perimeniscal cysts were evaluated retrospectively. One cyst was localized within the medial meniscus and seven in the lateral meniscus. The mean age was 36.13 (range; 19–63 years, mean follow-up time, 27.3 (range; 12–47 months. Patients were evaluated by using a Visual Analogue Score (VAS to measure pain relief and “Lysholm score” to measure functional improvement. In all patients except one, in which the cystic cavity was connected with the joint at the periphery of the meniscus, the cyst was drained from the intraarticular opening. When the cyst was too large (three cases and in one case where a large amount of meniscus was preserved for reasons mentioned above, additional extraarticular drainage was carried out. Results: The mean preoperative and postoperative VAS were 6 (range; 2–8 and 1.55 (range; 0–3 (p = 0.00058 and Lysholm scores were 64.75 (range; 48–86 and 93.11 (range; 80–100 (p = 0.0014, respectively. Discussion: In cysts, which have very limited or no connection with the joint on the most peripheral region of the meniscus and/or are larger than the meniscus height, extraarticular drainage of the cyst might produce unnecessary meniscal loss and function. In the extraarticular drainage, scrapping the walls of the cyst, while inspecting with an arthroscope, reduces recurrence of the cyst.

  5. Arthroscopic removal of discrete palmar carpal osteochondral fragments in horses: 25 cases (1999-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Hayley M; Nixon, Alan J

    2015-05-01

    To characterize discrete palmar carpal osteochondral fragmentation in horses and to document the effect of osteoarthritis and surgical removal of these fragments on functional outcome. Retrospective case series. 25 horses. Medical records and radiographic views were reviewed to identify horses that had radiographic evidence of palmar carpal fragmentation, which was subsequently treated by arthroscopic removal. Information collected included cause of fracture, initial and long-term clinical and radiographic findings, and functional outcome. Palmar carpal fragmentation of 30 carpal bones was identified in 25 unilaterally affected horses. A known traumatic event was reported to cause the fragmentation in 17 of the 25 (68%) horses. Of the 25 horses, 17 (68%) had fragmentation involving the antebrachiocarpal joint, 7 (28%) had fragmentation involving the middle carpal joint, and 1 (4%) had fragmentation involving the carpometacarpal joint. The proximal aspect of the radial carpal bone was the most commonly affected site (12/30 fragments), followed by the accessory carpal bone (6/30). Of the 25 horses, 19 (76%) were not lame (sound) after surgery and returned to their intended use, 4 (16%) were considered pasture sound, and 2 were euthanized (because of severe postoperative osteoarthritis or long bone fracture during recovery from anesthesia). Eight of the 14 horses with preoperative evidence of osteoarthritis returned to function after surgery. Twelve of 17 horses with antebrachiocarpal joint fragments and 6 of 7 horses with middle carpal joint fragments returned to their previous use. Results indicated that the prognosis for horses after arthroscopic removal of palmar carpal osteochondral fragments is good. Early intervention, before the development of osteoarthritis, is recommended.

  6. Early postoperative fluoroquinolone use is associated with an increased revision rate after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancienne, Jourdan M; Brockmeier, Stephen F; Rodeo, Scott A; Young, Chris; Werner, Brian C

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the association of postoperative fluoroquinolone use following arthroscopic primary rotator cuff repair with failure requiring revision rotator cuff repair. An insurance database was queried for patients undergoing rotator cuff repair from 2007 to 2015. These patients were divided into three groups: (1) patients prescribed fluoroquinolones within 6 months postoperatively (divided into 0-2, 2-4, and 4-6 months), (2) a matched negative control cohort of patients not prescribed fluoroquinolones, and (3) a matched positive control cohort of patients prescribed fluoroquinolones between 6 and 18 months following rotator cuff repair. Rates of failure requiring revision rotator cuff repair were compared within 2 years. A total of 1292 patients were prescribed fluoroquinolones within 6 months after rotator cuff repair, including 442 within 2 months, 433 within 2 to 4 months, and 417 within 4 to 6 months, and were compared to 5225 matched negative controls and 1597 matched positive controls. The rate of revision rotator cuff repair was significantly higher in patients prescribed fluoroquinolones within 2 months (6.1 %) compared to matched negative (2.2 %, P = 0.0009) and positive controls (2.4 %, P = 0.0026). There were no significant differences in the rate of revision rotator cuff repair when fluoroquinolones were prescribed >2 months after rotator cuff repair. Early use of fluoroquinolones following rotator cuff repair was independently associated with significantly increased rates of failure requiring revision rotator cuff repair. This is the first clinical study examining the association of postoperative fluoroquinolone use with failure following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. III.

  7. Patient expectations before arthroscopic shoulder surgery: correlation with patients' reasons for seeking treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warth, Ryan J; Briggs, Karen K; Dornan, Grant J; Horan, Marilee P; Millett, Peter J

    2013-12-01

    Elevated expectations before orthopaedic procedures appear to correlate with inferior preoperative subjective measures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate preoperative patient expectations before arthroscopic shoulder surgery and to correlate them with preoperative subjective measures and patients' reasons for seeking treatment. We prospectively collected and retrospectively analyzed data from patients before elective arthroscopic shoulder surgery for a wide range of pathologic processes. Preoperative subjective data included QuickDASH scores, pain and functional components of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, and mental and physical components of the SF-12 score. Expectations data were collected and grouped on the basis of the reasons for seeking of medical treatment and ranked according to their relative importance. The study included 313 shoulders. There were 205 men and 108 women with a mean age at surgery of 48.7 years (range, 18-78 years). Overall, the most important expectations were for the "shoulder to be back to the way it was before the problem started" and to continue participation in sporting activities. Patients who presented with the "shoulder coming out" had fewer important expectations than did those who presented for other reasons. Those patients who indicated a desire to continue participation in sports had significantly less pain (improved ASES pain scores) compared with the rest of the population. Although return to sport was the most important expectation overall, the importance of other expectations varied by patients' reasons for seeking treatment. The current questionnaire may have limited use in patients with shoulder instability. Level III, cross-sectional design, epidemiology. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of Bristow procedure and Bankart arthroscopic method as the treatment of recurrent shoulder instability

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    Abolghasem Zarezade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anterior shoulder dislocation is the most common major joint dislocation. In patients with recurrent shoulder dislocation, surgical intervention is necessary. In this study, two methods of treatment, Bankart arthroscopic method and open Bristow procedure, were compared. Materials and Methods: This clinical trial survey had been done in the orthopedic department of Alzahra and Kashani hospitals of Isfahan during 2008-2011. Patients with recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation who were candidates for surgical treatment were randomly divided into two groups, one treated by Bankart arthroscopic technique and the other treated by Bristow method. All the patients were assessed after the surgery using the criteria of ROWE, CONSTANT, UCLA, and ASES. Data were analyzed by SPSS software. Results: Six patients (16.22% had inappropriate condition with ROWE score (score less than 75; of them, one had been treated with Bristow and five with Bankart (5.26 vs. 27.78. Nine patients (24.32% had appropriate condition, which included six from Bristow group and three treated by Bankart technique (31.58 vs. 16.67. Finally, 22 patients (59.46% showed great improvement with this score, which included 12 from Bristow and 10 from Bankart groups (63.16 vs. 55.56. According to Fisher′s exact test, there were no significant differences between the two groups (P = 0.15. Conclusion: The two mentioned techniques did not differ significantly, although some parameters such as level of performance, pain intensity, use of analgesics, and range of internal rotation showed more improvement in Bristow procedure. Therefore, if there is no contraindication for Bristow procedure, it is preferred to use this method.

  9. Beginning partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    O'Neil, Peter V

    2014-01-01

    A broad introduction to PDEs with an emphasis on specialized topics and applications occurring in a variety of fields Featuring a thoroughly revised presentation of topics, Beginning Partial Differential Equations, Third Edition provides a challenging, yet accessible,combination of techniques, applications, and introductory theory on the subjectof partial differential equations. The new edition offers nonstandard coverageon material including Burger's equation, the telegraph equation, damped wavemotion, and the use of characteristics to solve nonhomogeneous problems. The Third Edition is or

  10. Partial dynamical symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alhassid, Y.; Leviatan, A.

    1993-01-01

    A novel symmetry structure, partial dynamical symmetry is introduced. The Hamiltonian is not invariant under the transformations of a group G and irreps of G are mixed in its eigenstates. it possesses, however, a partial set of eigenstates which do have good symmetry and can be labeled by irreps of G. A general algorithm to construct such Hamiltonians for a semi-simple group G is presented. (Author) 6 refs

  11. [Findings from Total Colonoscopy in Obstructive Colorectal Cancer Patients Who Underwent Stent Placement as a Bridge to Surgery(BTS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruo, Hirotoshi; Tsuyuki, Hajime; Kojima, Tadahiro; Koreyasu, Ryohei; Nakamura, Koichi; Higashi, Yukihiro; Shoji, Tsuyoshi; Yamazaki, Masanori; Nishiyama, Raisuke; Ito, Tatsuhiro; Koike, Kota; Ikeda, Takashi; Takayanagi, Yasuhiro; Kubota, Hiroyuki

    2017-11-01

    We clinically investigated 34 patients with obstructive colorectal cancer who underwent placement of a colonic stent as a bridge to surgery(BTS), focusing on endoscopic findings after stent placement.Twenty -nine patients(85.3%)underwent colonoscopy after stent placement, and the entire large intestine could be observed in 28(96.6%).Coexisting lesions were observed in 22(78.6%)of these 28 patients.The lesions comprised adenomatous polyps in 17 patients(60.7%), synchronous colon cancers in 5 patients(17.9%), and obstructive colitis in 3 patients(10.7%), with some overlapping cases.All patients with multiple cancers underwent one-stage surgery, and all lesions were excised at the same time.Colonoscopy after colonic stent placement is important for preoperative diagnosis of coexisting lesions and planning the extent of resection. These considerations support the utility of colonic stenting for BTS.

  12. A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing the Efficacy of Fascia Iliaca Compartment Block Versus Local Anesthetic Infiltration After Hip Arthroscopic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Malgorzata; Alshameeri, Zeiad; Sardesai, Anand; Khanduja, Vikas

    2017-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of fascia iliaca compartment block (FICB) with local anesthetic infiltration (LAI) of the arthroscopy portals for pain control after hip arthroscopy. A prospective single-blinded randomized controlled trial that involved patients who underwent hip arthroscopy was performed. Participants were randomized to receiving either FICB or LAI of the portal tracts with local anesthetic. Supplemental analgesia was also used in both groups on an on-demand basis. The primary outcome measure was the postoperative level of pain as assessed by numeric pain score at 1, 3, 6, and 24 hours after the procedure in both groups. Secondary outcome measures were the frequency and the dose of morphine and other medications consumed at 1 and 24 hours after surgery as well as any other adverse events relating to pain or medications used for pain relief in both the groups. The study had to be terminated early because there was a significant statistical difference in the primary outcome measure after the recruitment of 46 patients: 20 in the LAI group and 26 in the FICB group. Severity of pain in the FICB group was higher especially during the first hour postoperatively (P = .02). This was associated with a higher consumption of opioids and other analgesics, which resulted in more side effects such as nausea and vomiting. LAI provided a better analgesia after arthroscopic surgery of the hip in comparison with FICB and was also associated with reduced consumption of opioids and a lower rate of side effects. Level I, single-blinded randomized controlled study. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. All rights reserved.

  13. Arthroscopic decompression not recommended in the treatment of rotator cuff tendinopathy: a final review of a randomised controlled trial at a minimum follow-up of ten years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketola, S; Lehtinen, J T; Arnala, I

    2017-06-01

    Rotator cuff tendinopathy has a multifactorial origin. Rejecting the mechanistic theory has also led to abandoning operative treatment at initial presentation in the first line. Physiotherapy exercise programmes are the accepted first line treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term additional benefits of subacromial decompression in the treatment of rotator cuff tendinopathy. This randomised controlled trial of 140 patients (52 men, 88 women, mean age 47.1 years; 18 to 60) with rotator cuff tendinopathy extended previous work up to a maximum of 13 years. The patients were randomised into two treatment groups: arthroscopic acromioplasty and a supervised exercise treatment and a similar supervised exercise treatment alone. Self-reported pain on a visual analogue scale (VAS) was the primary outcome measure. Secondary measures were disability, working ability, pain at night, Shoulder Disability Questionnaire score and the number of painful days during the three months preceding the final assessment. A total of 90 patients (64%) returned questionnaires at a mean 12 years after randomisation. On an intention-to-treat basis, both treatment groups reached statistically significant improvement compared with the initial VAS for pain, but there was no significant difference between groups. The same was true in the secondary outcome measures. Due to group changes, the results were also analysed per protocol: operated or not. No significant differences between the groups were found. The natural history of rotator cuff tendinopathy probably plays a significant role in the results in the long-term. Even though the patients who underwent operative treatment had a stronger belief in recovery, which is likely to be surgical and the effect of placebo, the exercise group obtained similar results. In the future, an optimum exercise regime should be searched for, as the most clinically and cost-effective conservative treatment for rotator cuff tendinopathy. Cite this

  14. Isometric exercises with elements postisometric relaxation to eliminate the knee joint contracture after arthroscopic plastics of anterior cruciate ligament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Pylypenko

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to determine the efficiency of isometric exercises and post isometric relaxation of character for removal and prevention of contractures and recovery of motor function after arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament in the late postoperative period. Material: The study involved 22 patients aged less than 40 years. Results: The results showed that the level of pain decreased equally in patients of main and control group from 3 to 0 points, the performance difference in the amplitude of the bending of the knee joint during the goniometry in the treatment group was 70 in the control group – 30 and the extension 10 – fixed, reaching 5 hyperextension and not changed in the control group. Conclusions: The use of isometric exercises and post isometric relaxation prevent postoperative contracture of the knee joint. Methods of their application are recommended for use in the comprehensive rehabilitation of patients after arthroscopic plastics anterior cruciate ligament.

  15. Ultrasound assisted arthroscopic approach for removal of basilar sesamoid fragments of the proximal sesamoid bones in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Elizabeth J; Rodgerson, Dwayne H

    2014-08-01

    To describe an ultrasound assisted arthroscopic approach for removal of non-articular basilar sesamoid fragments in Thoroughbred yearlings. Thoroughbred yearlings (n = 7). Basilar sesamoid fragments identified during pre-sale radiographic examination were removed using a palmar/plantar arthroscopic approach to the fetlock joint and ultrasonographic guidance. Complete fragment removal was confirmed by ultrasonography and radiography. Basilar sesamoid fracture fragments were localized and removed successfully using rongeurs and a radiofrequency probe for soft tissue dissection of the fragment. Complete fragment removal was confirmed by ultrasonography and radiography. No intra- or postoperative complications occurred. At 6-8 months follo