WorldWideScience

Sample records for underwent aortic valve

  1. [Evaluation of the antithrombotic strategy in low thrombotic risk patients who underwent aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceves-Velázquez, Eduardo; Vieyra-Herrera, Gerardo; Rodríguez-Chávez, Laura; Herrera-Alarcón, Valentín

    2017-07-16

    According to current guidelines, in patients without additional risk factors who have undergone aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis, anticoagulation in the first 3 months after surgery is still a matter of debate. According to current evidence, aspirin in low doses is a reasonable alternative to vitamin K antagonists (VKA). A comparison is made between the incidence of thrombotic and haemorrhagic complications in patients with low thrombotic risk who underwent aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis in the National Institute of Cardiology of Ignacio Chávez of Mexico. The hypothesis: aspirin as monotherapy has a beneficial effect compared to VKA. The studied patients were the low thrombotic risk patients who underwent aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis in the National Institute of Cardiology of Ignacio Chávez of Mexico from 2011 to 2015. The groups studied were: aspirin only, VKA only, and the combination of VKA plus aspirin. The patients were retrospectively followed-up for 12 months, and the thrombotic and haemorrhagic complications were documented. Of the 231 patients included in the study, only one patient in the VKA only group presented with a haemorrhagic complication. No thrombotic complications were observed. In the present study no thrombotic complications were observed in patients who did not receive anticoagulation in the first 3 months after an aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis after a follow up period of 12 months. This suggests that the use of aspirin only is safe during this period. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  2. Aortic Valve Regurgitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correct direction. These valves include the mitral valve, tricuspid valve, pulmonary valve and aortic valve. Each valve has ... Causes of aortic valve regurgitation include: Congenital heart valve disease. You may have been born with an aortic ...

  3. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/007684.htm Transcatheter aortic valve replacement To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is surgery to replace the aortic valve. ...

  4. Aortic valve bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jens T; Jensen, Maiken Brit; Arendrup, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In aortic valve bypass (AVB) a valve-containing conduit is connecting the apex of the left ventricle to the descending aorta. Candidates are patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis rejected for conventional aortic valve replacement (AVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). ...

  5. Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    with tricuspid aortic valves matched for age, gender and grade of valvular disease . These studies suggest that the predisposition for aortic...enlargement in healthy patients with normally functioning BAV when compared to healthy subjects with normally functioning tricuspid aortic valves ...ascending aorta but also in the pulmonary arteries of patients with BAV, compared to that of patients with tricuspid aortic valves . These studies

  6. Aortic Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It is then replaced with an artificial valve (prosthesis). There are two valve options for aortic valve ... place, the catheter will be withdrawn from your body through the original access point. Because not all ...

  7. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foghsgaard, Signe; Schmidt, Thomas Andersen; Kjaergard, Henrik K

    2009-01-01

    In this descriptive prospective study, we evaluate the outcomes of surgery in 98 patients who were scheduled to undergo minimally invasive aortic valve replacement. These patients were compared with a group of 50 patients who underwent scheduled aortic valve replacement through a full sternotomy...... operations were completed as mini-sternotomies, 4 died later of noncardiac causes. The aortic cross-clamp and perfusion times were significantly different across all groups (P replacement...... is an excellent operation in selected patients, but its true advantages over conventional aortic valve replacement (other than a smaller scar) await evaluation by means of randomized clinical trial. The "extended mini-aortic valve replacement" operation, on the other hand, is a risky procedure that should...

  8. Aortic valve surgery - open

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... while you are connected to this machine. This machine does the work of your heart while your heart is stopped. If your aortic valve is too damaged, you will need a new valve. This is called replacement surgery. Your surgeon will remove your aortic valve ...

  9. Tissue engineered aortic valve

    OpenAIRE

    Dohmen, P M

    2012-01-01

    Several prostheses are available to replace degenerative diseased aortic valves with unique advantages and disadvantages. Bioprotheses show excellent hemodynamic behavior and low risk of thromboembolic complications, but are limited by tissue deterioration. Mechanical heart valves have extended durability, but permanent anticoagulation is mandatory. Tissue engineering created a new generation heart valve, which overcome limitations of biological and mechanical heart valves due to remodelling,...

  10. Aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Athanasiou, Thanos; Mestres, Carlos A

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS OF THE STUDY: Prompted by anecdotal evidence and observations by surgeons, an investigation was undertaken into the potential differences in implanted aortic valve prosthesis sizes, during aortic valve replacement (AVR) procedures, between northern and southern European...... assigned to the 'small' aortic size subset. Effective orifice area indices were calculated for all patients to assess the geographic distribution of patient-prosthesis mismatch. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses adjusting for possible confounding variables were performed. RESULTS...

  11. [Traumatic aortic valve insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, J; Lemos, C; Marques, A M; Antunes, M J; Gonsalves, A

    1996-02-01

    The traumatic aortic valvular insufficiency (TAVI), through less frequent after a non-penetrating thoracic traumatism, is a serious entity with a very reserved prognosis. So it must be suspected in every patients with signs or symptoms of de novo heart failure post-traumatism. The transthoracic echocardiography and eventually transesophageal echocardiography have a fundamental role in the confirmation of the diagnosis. The clinical picture of traumatic aortic regurgitation is quickly evolutionary and the non efficacy of medical therapy has placed the valvular substitution surgery as the best succeeded treatment. With the advent of the aortic valve repairing surgery some TAVI cases has been submitted to this procedure. Nevertheless, the development of residual aortic regurgitation in these situations, usually requiring later valvular replacement surgery, make the aortic valvuloplasty a controversial surgical technique. The AA describe a recent clinical case of aortic regurgitation after a non-penetrant thoracic traumatism, discussing the aspects connected with physiopathology, diagnosis and therapy. The singularity of this case was based on the fact that the initial clinical diagnosis had been prejudiced by the context of a polytraumatism and there had been a time free of symptoms between the traumatism and the beginning of the symptomatology of left ventricular failure. Even though the identification of the problem allowed an intensive treatment of this serious situation that ended with the replacement of the aortic valve by mechanical aortic prosthesis, with the patient's total recovery.

  12. Aortic or Mitral Valve Replacement With the Biocor and Biocor Supra

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-26

    Aortic Valve Insufficiency; Aortic Valve Regurgitation; Aortic Valve Stenosis; Aortic Valve Incompetence; Mitral Valve Insufficiency; Mitral Valve Regurgitation; Mitral Valve Stenosis; Mitral Valve Incompetence

  13. Bicuspid aortic valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... females. A BAV often exists in babies with coarctation of the aorta (narrowing of the aorta). BAV is also seen ... to view the blood vessels of the heart Treatment ... to the heart and into the narrow opening of the aortic valve. A balloon attached to the end of ...

  14. [Aortic valve-sparing root reconstruction in Marfan syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, H; Sasaki, H; Hanafusa, Y; Hirata, M; Numata, S; Ando, M; Yagihara, T; Kitamura, S

    2002-07-01

    The outcome of aortic valve-sparing root reconstruction in Marfan syndrome was reviewed. Thirteen patients with Marfan syndrome underwent aortic valve-sparing root reconstruction for annuloaortic ectasia or aortic root dissection between 1994 and 1999. The grade of preoperative aortic regurgitation was I in 4, II in 2, III in 5, IV in 2 patients. The procedures of aortic valve-sparing were reimplantation in 7 and remodeling in 5 patients. There was no hospital and late death. Recurrence of aortic regurgitation greater than moderate grade developed in 1 patient immediately after the surgery and in the other 4 patients in the late stage. One patient of them required aortic valve replacement for it. Aortic valve-sparing root reconstruction is applicable in Marfan patients, although the indication should be cautious. Close observation is needed for recurrence of aortic regurgitation.

  15. Quadricuspid Aortic Valve Combined with Moderate Ascending Aortic Dilatation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uspenskiy, Vladimir E.; Osadchii, Alexei M.; Gordeev, Mikhail L.

    2015-01-01

    The quadricuspid aortic valve is a very uncommon malformation associated with aortic insufficiency, aortic stenosis, endocarditis, and ascending aortic dilatation. We report four cases of this aortic valve malformation. One patient with severe aortic regurgitation and moderate aortic dilatation required aortic valve replacement. Three patients had mild or moderate aortic insufficiency combined with moderate ascending aortic dilatation. These patients were referred to follow-up. The presented cases demonstrate that this aortic valve malformation may not be as rare as it appears and that attention must be paid to any quadricuspid findings during computed tomographic angiography and echocardiography. PMID:27390747

  16. Analysis of aortic root surgery with composite mechanical aortic valve conduit and valve-sparing reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Ricardo Ribeiro; Mejia, Omar Asdrubal Vilca; Fiorelli, Alfredo Inácio; Pomerantzeff, Pablo Maria Alberto; Dias, Altamiro Ribeiro; Mady, Charles; Stolf, Noedir Antonio Groppo

    2010-01-01

    Comparative analysis of early and late results of aortic root reconstruction with aortic valve sparing operations and the composite mechanical valve conduit replacement. From November 2002 to September 2009, 164 consecutive patients with mean age 54 ± 15 years, 115 male, underwent the aortic root reconstruction (125 mechanical valve conduit replacements and 39 valve sparing operations). Sixteen percent of patients had Marfan syndrome and 4.3% had bicuspid aortic valve. One hundred and forty-four patients (88%) were followed for a mean period of 41.1 ± 20.8 months. The hospital mortality was 4.9%, 5.6% in operations with valved conduits and 2.6% in the valve sparing procedures (P valve sparing operations, respectively (95% CI = 70% - 95%, P = 0.001), (95% CI = 82% - 95% P = 0.03) and (95% CI = 81% - 95%, P = 0.03). Multivariate analysis showed that creatinine greater than 1.4 mg/dl, Cabrol operation and renal dialysis were predictors of mortality, respectively, with occurrence chance of 6 (95% CI = 1.8 - 19.5, P = 0.003), 12 (95% CI = 3 - 49.7, P = 0.0004) and 16 (95% CI = 3.6 - 71.3, P = 0.0002). The aortic root reconstruction has a low early and late mortality, high survival free of complications and low need for reoperation. During the late follow-up, valve sparing aortic root reconstructions presented fewer incidences of bleeding, thromboembolic events and endocarditis.

  17. Aortic Annular Enlargement during Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selman Dumani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the surgery of aortic valve replacement is always attempted, as much as possible, to implant the larger prosthesis with the mains goals to enhance the potential benefits, to minimise transvalvular gradient, decrease left ventricular size and avoid the phenomenon of patient-prosthesis mismatch. Implantation of an ideal prosthesis often it is not possible, due to a small aortic annulus. A variety of aortic annulus enlargement techniques is reported to avoid patient-prosthesis mismatch. We present the case that has submitted four three times open heart surgery. We used Manouguian technique to enlarge aortic anulus with excellent results during the fourth time of surgery.

  18. Bentall Procedure Using Cryopreserved Valved Aortic Homografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Jan T.; Sierra, Jorge; Trindade, Pedro T.; Didier, Dominique; Kalangos, Afksendiyos

    2004-01-01

    The Bentall procedure is the standard operation for patients who have lesions of the ascending aorta associated with aortic valve disease. In many cases, however, mechanical prosthetic conduits are not suitable. There are few reports in the English-language medical literature concerning the mid- to long-term outcome of Bentall operations with cryopreserved homografts. Therefore, we reviewed our experience with this procedure and valved homografts. From January 1997 through December 2002, 21 patients underwent a Bentall operation with cryopreserved homografts at our institution. There were 14 males and 7 females; the mean age was 36 ± 21 years (range, 15–74 years). Eleven patients had undergone previous aortic valve surgery. All patients had aortic dilatation or aneurysms involving the ascending aorta. Indications for surgery included aortic valve stenosis or insufficiency, and aortic valve endocarditis (native valve or prosthetic). One patient had Takayasu's arteritis and 3 had Marfan syndrome. There was 1 hospital death (due to sepsis), but no other major postoperative complications. The mean hospital stay was 14 ± 7 days. Follow-up echocardiographic and computed tomographic scans were performed yearly. The mean follow-up was 34 months (6–72 months). Follow-up imaging revealed no calcifications or degenerative processes related to the homograft. Four patients had minimal valve regurgitation. Two patients died during follow-up. The 3-year actuarial survival rate was 85.7%. Our data suggest that the Bentall procedure with a valved homograft conduit is a safe procedure with excellent mid- to long-term results, comparable to results reported with aortic valve replacement with a homograft. PMID:15745290

  19. Mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement in Octogenarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Tasoglu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study analyzes the long-term outcomes of mechanical aortic valve replacement in octogenarian patients. Material and Method: A retrospective review was performed on 23 octogenarian patients who underwent mechanical aortic valve replacement. Hospital mortality, postoperative intensive care unit stay, hospital stay and long-term results was examined. Estimates of the cumulative event mortality rate were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The mean age of all patients was 82.9±2.3 years and most were men (65.22%. The median ejection fraction was 45%. 73.91% of patients were in New York Heart Association class III-IV. Thirteen patients (56.52% in this study underwent combined procedure, the remaining 10 (43.48% patients underwent isolated aortic valve replacement. The most common valve size was 23 mm. The mean intensive care unit stay was 1.76±1.14 days. The mean hospital stay was 9.33±5.06 days. No complications were observed in 56.52% patients during their hospital stay. The overall hospital mortality was 8.7%. Follow-up was completed for all 23 patients. Median follow-up time was 33 months (1-108 months. Actuarial survival among discharged from hospital was 59% at 5 years. Discussion: Mechanical aortic valve replacement is a safe procedure in octogenarian patients and can be performed safely even in combined procedure.

  20. Impact of Aortic Insufficiency on Ascending Aortic Dilatation and Adverse Aortic Events After Isolated Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With a Bicuspid Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongshi; Wu, Boting; Li, Jun; Dong, Lili; Wang, Chunsheng; Shu, Xianhong

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant flow pattern and congenital fragility bestows bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) with a propensity toward ascending aorta dilatation, aneurysm, and dissection. Whether isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR) can prevent further dilatation in BAV ascending aorta and what indicates concurrent aortic intervention in the case of valve operation remain controversial. From June 2006 to January 2009, patients with a BAV who underwent isolated AVR were consecutively included and categorized into aortic insufficiency (BAV-AI, n = 84) and aortic stenosis (n = 112) groups, and another population of patients with a tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency (n = 149) was also recruited during the same period for comparison of annual aortic dilatation rate and adverse aortic events after isolated AVR. With a median follow-up period of 72 months (interquartile range, 66 to 78 months), ascending aorta dilatation rates were faster in the BAV-AI group than the BAV plus aortic stenosis and tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency groups (both p regression analysis identified aortic insufficiency (hazard ratio, 3.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.2 to 11.1; p = 0.019) as an independent risk factor for adverse aortic events among patients with BAV in general, whereas preoperative ascending aortic diameter larger than 45 mm (hazard ratio, 13.8; 95% confidence interval, 3.0 to 63.3; p = 0.001) served as a prognostic indicator in the BAV-AI group. An aggressive policy of preventive aortic interventions seemed appropriate in patients with BAV-AI during AVR, and BAV phenotype presenting as either insufficiency or stenosis should be taken into consideration when contemplating optimal surgical strategies for BAV aortopathy. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation for a failed bio-bentall in patients with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigel, Roy; Siegel, Robert J; Kahlon, Ravi S; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Cheng, Wen; Makkar, Raj R

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Marfan syndrome are at risk for ascending aortic dilation and dissection at the level of the aortic sinuses, making aortic root and valve replacement common. Patients undergoing an aortic root replacement with concomitant replacement of the aortic valve with a bioprosthesis (Bio-Bentall) are predisposed to bioprosthesis failure. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become an option for aortic valve replacement, avoiding cardiopulmonary bypass and/or median sternotomy. We present the first 2 reported patients with Marfan syndrome who underwent a valve-in-valve TAVI in the setting of a prior Bio-Bentall. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Fate of remnant sinuses of Valsalva in patients with bicuspid and trileaflet valves undergoing aortic valve, ascending aorta, and aortic arch replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, Rita Karianna; Habertheuer, Andreas; Bavaria, Joseph E; Siki, Mary; Szeto, Wilson Y; Krause, Eric; Korutla, Varun; Desai, Nimesh D; Vallabhajosyula, Prashanth

    2017-08-01

    In patients presenting with aortic valvulopathy with concomitant ascending aortic aneurysm, surgical management of the sinus of Valsalva segment remains undefined, especially for moderately dilated aortic roots. In patients with this pathology undergoing aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement, we assessed the fate of the remnant preserved sinus of Valsalva segment stratified by aortic valve morphology and pathology. From 2002 to 2015, 428 patients underwent elective aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement. Patients were stratified on the basis of valvular morphology (bicuspid aortic valve [n = 254] and tricuspid aortic valve [n = 174]), valvular pathology (bicuspid aortic valve with aortic stenosis [n = 178], bicuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency [n = 76], tricuspid aortic valve with aortic stenosis [n = 61], tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency [n = 113]), and preoperative sinus of Valsalva dimensions (45 mm). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed no significant difference in freedom from reoperation in tricuspid aortic valve versus bicuspid aortic valve (P = .576). Multivariable Cox regression model performed with sinus of Valsalva dimensions at baseline and follow-up as time-varying covariates did not adversely affect survival. A repeated-measure, mixed-effects model constructed to assess longitudinal sinus of Valsalva trends revealed that the retained sinus of Valsalva dimensions remain stable over long-term follow-up (discharge to ≥10 years), irrespective of valvular morphology/pathology (bicuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency, tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency, tricuspid aortic valve with aortic stenosis) and preoperative sinus of Valsalva groups (45 mm). In patients with nonaneurysmal sinuses of Valsalva undergoing aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement, the sinus segment can be preserved irrespective of

  3. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koolbergen, David R; Manshanden, Johan S J; Bouma, Berto J; Blom, Nico A; Mulder, Barbara J M; de Mol, Bas A J M; Hazekamp, Mark G

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate our results of valve-sparing aortic root replacement and associated (multiple) valve repair. From September 2003 to September 2013, 97 patients had valve-sparing aortic root replacement procedures. Patient records and preoperative, postoperative and recent echocardiograms were reviewed. Median age was 40.3 (range: 13.4-68.6) years and 67 (69.1%) were male. Seven (7.2%) patients were younger than 18 years, the youngest being 13.4 years. Fifty-four (55.7%) had Marfan syndrome, 2 (2.1%) other fibrous tissue diseases, 15 (15.5%) bicuspid aortic valve and 3 (3.1%) had earlier Fallot repair. The reimplantation technique was used in all, with a straight vascular prosthesis in 11 (26-34 mm) and the Valsalva prosthesis in 86 (26-32 mm). Concomitant aortic valve repair was performed in 43 (44.3%), mitral valve repair in 10 (10.3%), tricuspid valve repair in 5 (5.2%) and aortic arch replacement in 3 (3.1%). Mean follow-up was 4.2 ± 2.4 years. Follow-up was complete in all. One 14-year old patient died 1.3 years post-surgery presumably of ventricular arrhythmia. One patient underwent reoperation for aneurysm of the proximal right coronary artery after 4.9 years and 4 patients required aortic valve replacement, 3 of which because of endocarditis after 0.1, 0.8 and 1.3 years and 1 because of cusp prolapse after 3.8 years. No thrombo-embolic complications occurred. Mortality, root reoperation and aortic regurgitation were absent in 88.0 ± 0.5% at 5-year follow-up. Results of valve-sparing root replacement are good, even in association with a high incidence of concomitant valve repair. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement can be performed at a very young age as long as an adult size prosthesis can be implanted. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  4. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Perceval Sutureless Aortic Valve Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Ankur; Reyes, Manuel; Yang, Eric Y; Little, Stephen H; Nabi, Faisal; Barker, Colin M; Ramchandani, Mahesh; Reul, Ross M; Reardon, Michael J; Kleiman, Neal S

    2017-06-01

    As experience with Perceval aortic prosthesis and valve-in-valve TAVR grows, it will be crucial to meticulously document short- and long-term follow-up for establishment of real-world safety and durability of these new technologies.

  5. Paravalvar leak of aortic valve replacement and/or mitral valve replacement: diagnosis of electron beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhi Aihua; Dai Ruping; Jiang Shiliang; Cao Cheng; Qi Xiaoou; Bai Hua; Chen Yao; Duan Xiufang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the periprothetic leak in aortic valve replacement and/or mitral valve replacement on electron beam CT. Methods: A retrospective study was performed in 121 patients who underwent electron beam CT between 2002 and 2004. 102 patients underwent aortic valve replacement, 12 patients underwent mitral valve replacement, and 7 patients underwent double valve replacement. Paravalvar leak was estimated by electron beam CT. Results: In 121 patients after the aortic valve replacement and/or mitral valve replacement, 7 patients were diagnosed as trifle aortic paravalvar leak, 3 patients as moderate aortic paravalvar leak, and 4 patients as mass aortic paravalvar leak on electron beam CT. 1 patients were diagnosed as trifle mitral paravalvar leak on electron beam CT. Conclusion: Electron beam CT is a very useful method in detecting paravalvar leak after valve replacement and for follow-up. (authors)

  6. Trans-apical aortic valve implantation in a patient with stentless valve degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; MacCarthy, Philip; Monaghan, Mark; Wendler, Olaf

    2011-06-01

    Trans-apical valve-in-valve trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has successfully been performed in selected, high-risk patients, who suffered prosthetic degeneration after aortic valve replacement using stented xenografts. We report the case of a 79-year-old male patient who underwent one of the first successful TAVIs in a failing stentless bioprosthesis. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Aortic root surgery in Marfan syndrome: Comparison of aortic valve-sparing reimplantation versus composite grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karck, Matthias; Kallenbach, Klaus; Hagl, Christian; Rhein, Christine; Leyh, Rainer; Haverich, Axel

    2004-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the results of aortic valve-sparing reimplantation and aortic root replacement with mechanical valve conduits in patients with Marfan syndrome undergoing operation for aortic root aneurysms. Patients and methods Between March 1979 and April 2002, 119 patients with clinical evidence of Marfan syndrome underwent composite graft replacement with mechanical valve conduits (n = 74) or aortic valve-sparing reimplantation according to David (n = 45). The underlying causes were aortic dissection type A (43 patients) and aneurysms (76 patients). Patients undergoing aortic valve reimplantation were younger compared with patients undergoing composite grafting (28 vs 35 years, P =.002) and had longer intraoperative aortic crossclamp times (125 vs 78 minutes, P valve reimplantation (P =.15). Mean follow-up was 30 months for patients undergoing aortic valve reimplantation and 114 months for patients undergoing composite grafting. Freedom from reoperation and death after 5 years postoperatively was 92% and 89% in patients undergoing composite grafting and 84% and 96% in patients undergoing aortic valve reimplantation (P =.31; P =.54), respectively. Thromboembolic complications or late postoperative bleeding occurred in 17 patients undergoing composite grafting, and an early postoperative event occurred in 1 patient undergoing aortic valve reimplantation. The results of aortic valve reimplantation and composite grafting of the aortic valve and ascending aorta with mechanical valve conduits are similar with regard to early and mid-term postoperative mortality and to the incidence of late reoperations in patients with Marfan syndrome. The low risk of thromboembolic or bleeding complications favors aortic valve reimplantation in these patients.

  8. Spontaneous Thrombosis of a Bicuspid Aortic valve due to Primary Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Farrell

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 51-year-old man who was admitted as an emergency with spontaneous thrombosis of the aortic valve and ascending aorta. At operation he was found to have a congenitally bicuspid aortic valve and subsequent investigation revealed primary antiphospholipid syndrome. He underwent successful removal of the thrombus combined with mechanical replacement of the aortic valve.

  9. Mitral Valve Aneurysm: A Rare Complication of Aortic Valve Endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Moaref

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A 20-year-old intravenous drug abuser man, refered to our hospital with dyspnea and orthopnea. Tranesophagealechocardiography revealed severe aortic regurgitation, healed vegetation of aortic valve and an aneurysm of theanterior leaflet of the mitral valve. The patient was discharged after aortic valve replacement and mitral valverepair.

  10. Preoperative computer tomography evaluation in transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groudeva, V.; Stoynova, V.; Trendafilova, D.; Dzhorgova, Y.; Nachev, G.

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement is rapidly emerging technique alternative to surgery in high risk patients. Imaging and especially computer tomography is important in preoperative assessment of the aortic ring and the prosthetic valve choice. The aim of this study is to share authors initial experience in CT assessment of the aortic ring prior to Transcatheter aortic valve replacement. 49 patients (mean age 76,55) underwent 320 rows MDCT (Acquilon One) prior TAVI. Protocol involved scanning from thoracic inlet to common femoral arteries. Aortic root size, aortic diameter at the level of coronary sinuses and the sinotubular junction and distance to coronary ostia were evaluated on a Vitrea work station. MDCT established maximal aortic ring diameter from 18 to 31 mm mean 25,04 mm while the lesser rate was from 16 to 21 mm. Accordingly positioned prostheses were in 34,75% No. 23, in 49% - No. 26 and in16,3% - No. 29. MDCT is crucial in aortic valve assessment prior to TAVI in experienced hands and multidisciplinary team. (authors) Key words: TRANSCATHETER AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT (TAVI). MDCT AORTIC VALVE ASSESSMENT

  11. Long-Term Risk for Aortic Complications After Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With Bicuspid Aortic Valve Versus Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itagaki, Shinobu; Chikwe, Joanna P; Chiang, Yuting P; Egorova, Natalia N; Adams, David H

    2015-06-09

    Bicuspid aortic valves are associated with valve dysfunction, ascending aortic aneurysm and dissection. Management of the ascending aorta at the time of aortic valve replacement (AVR) in these patients is controversial and has been extrapolated from experience with Marfan syndrome, despite the absence of comparative long-term outcome data. This study sought to assess whether the natural history of thoracic aortopathy after AVR in patients with bicuspid aortic valve disease is substantially different from that seen in patients with Marfan syndrome. In this retrospective comparison, outcomes of 13,205 adults (2,079 with bicuspid aortic valves, 73 with Marfan syndrome, and 11,053 control patients with acquired aortic valve disease) who underwent primary AVR without replacement of the ascending aorta in New York State between 1995 and 2010 were compared. The median follow-up time was 6.6 years. The long-term incidence of thoracic aortic dissection was significantly higher in patients with Marfan syndrome (5.5 ± 2.7%) compared with those with bicuspid valves (0.55 ± 0.21%) and control group patients (0.41 ± 0.08%, p Marfan syndrome (10.8 ± 4.4%) compared with those with bicuspid valves (4.8 ± 0.8%) and control group patients (1.4 ± 0.2%) (p Marfan syndrome were significantly more likely to undergo thoracic aortic surgery in late follow-up (10.4 ± 4.3%) compared with those with bicuspid valves (2.5 ± 0.6%) and control group patients (0.50 ± 0.09%) (p Marfan syndrome compared with those with bicuspid aortic valves confirm that operative management of patients with bicuspid aortic valves should not be extrapolated from Marfan syndrome and support discrete treatment algorithms for these different clinical entities. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Statins for aortic valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiago, Luciana; Tsuji, Selma Rumiko; Nyong, Jonathan; Puga, Maria Eduarda Dos Santos; Góis, Aécio Flávio Teixeira de; Macedo, Cristiane Rufino; Valente, Orsine; Atallah, Álvaro Nagib

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is the most common type of valvular heart disease in the USA and Europe. Aortic valve stenosis is considered similar to atherosclerotic disease. Some studies have evaluated statins for aortic valve stenosis. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of statins in aortic valve stenosis. Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS - IBECS, Web of Science and CINAHL Plus. These databases were searched from their inception to 24 November 2015. We also searched trials in registers for ongoing trials. We used no language restrictions.Selection criteria: Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) comparing statins alone or in association with other systemic drugs to reduce cholesterol levels versus placebo or usual care. Data collection and analysis: Primary outcomes were severity of aortic valve stenosis (evaluated by echocardiographic criteria: mean pressure gradient, valve area and aortic jet velocity), freedom from valve replacement and death from cardiovascular cause. Secondary outcomes were hospitalization for any reason, overall mortality, adverse events and patient quality of life.Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. The GRADE methodology was employed to assess the quality of result findings and the GRADE profiler (GRADEPRO) was used to import data from Review Manager 5.3 to create a 'Summary of findings' table. We included four RCTs with 2360 participants comparing statins (1185 participants) with placebo (1175 participants). We found low-quality evidence for our primary outcome of severity of aortic valve stenosis, evaluated by mean pressure gradient (mean difference (MD) -0.54, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.88 to 0.80; participants = 1935; studies = 2), valve area (MD -0.07, 95% CI -0.28 to 0.14; participants = 127; studies = 2), and aortic jet velocity (MD -0.06, 95% CI -0.26 to 0

  13. Maximizing prosthetic valve size with the Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jan; Geha, Alexander S.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: The CarboMedics Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve allows a one-size (and often two-size) increase over the standard intra-annular valve. This advantage should minimize the risk of patient-prosthesis mismatch, where the effective prosthetic valve orifice area....... This study evaluates the authors' clinical experience with Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve size selection, and the technical aspects of implantation. METHODS: Between January 1999 and October 2005, a total of 251 consecutive patients underwent 252 aortic valve replacements with Top Hat supra...... required unplanned coronary bypass, and 30-day mortality was 2.0% (5/251), indicating a good safety profile for the valves implanted in this series. CONCLUSION: The general distribution of implant sizes in the US indicates that cardiac surgeons may be under-sizing the Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve...

  14. Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation due to severe aortic regurgitation in a degenerated aortic homograft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lene Kjaer; Engstrøm, Thomas; Søndergaard, Lars

    2009-01-01

    a successful valve-in-valve implantation of a CoreValve aortic valve prosthesis through the right subclavian artery in a case of severe aortic regurgitation within a degenerated aortic homograft. The case exemplifies the possibilities of expanding the indications for TAVI, as well as other vascular access...

  15. Aortic valve replacement in octogenarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dark John H

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Aims As our population ages and life expectancy increases the number of people aged over 80 and more referred for cardiac surgery is growing. This study sought to identify the outcome of aortic valve replacement (AVR in octogenarians. Methods 68 patients aged 80 years or more underwent AVR at the Freeman Hospital, between April 2001 and April 2004. A retrospective review of the notes and outcomes from the patients' GP and the NHS strategic tracking service was performed. 54% (37 underwent isolated AVR whilst 46% (31 underwent combined AVR and CABG. Results Follow up was 100% complete. The mean age was 83.1 ± s.d. 2.9 years, a mean gradient of 83 ± s.d. 31 mmHg and mean AVA of 0.56 cm2. The mean additive EuroSCORE was 8.6 ± s.d. 1.2, the logistic EuroSCORE mean 12.0 ± s.d. 5.9. In hospital 30 day mortality was 13 %. Survival was 80% at 1 year and 78% at 2 years. Median follow up was for 712 days. Stepwise logistic regression identified chronic obstructive airways disease as an independent predictor of mortality (p Conclusion Our study demonstrates that the operative mortality for AVR in the over eighties is good, whilst the mid to long term outcome is excellent There is a very low attrition rate with those undergoing the procedure living as long than their age matched population. This study confirms AVR is a safe, acceptable treatment for octogenarians with excellent mid term outcomes.

  16. Aortic valve-sparing surgery in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachum, Eyal; Shinfeld, Amichay; Kogan, Alexander; Preisman, Sergey; Levin, Shany; Raanani, Ehud

    2013-08-01

    Patients with Marfan syndrome are referred for cardiac surgery due to root aneurysm with or without aortic valve regurgitation. Because these patients are young and frequently present with normal-appearing aortic cusps, valve sparing is often recommended. However, due to the genetic nature of the disease, the durability of such surgery remains uncertain. Between February 2004 and June 2012, 100 patients in our department suffering from aortic aneurysm with aortic valve regurgitation underwent elective aortic valve-sparing surgery. Of them, 30 had Marfan syndrome, were significantly younger (30 +/- 13 vs. 53 +/- 16 years), and had a higher percentage of root aneurysm, compared with ascending aorta aneurysm in their non-Marfan counterparts. We evaluated the safety, durability, clinical and echocardiographic mid-term results of these patients. While no early deaths were reported in either group, there were a few major early complications in both groups. At follow-up (reaching 8 years with a mean of 34 +/- 26 months) there were no late deaths, and few major late complications in the Marfan group. Altogether, 96% and 78% of the patients were in New York Heart Association functional class I-II in the Marfan and non-Marfan groups respectively. None of the Marfan patients needed reoperation on the aortic valve. Freedom from recurrent aortic valve regurgitation > 3+ was 94% in the Marfan patients. Aortic valve-sparing surgery in Marfan symdrome patients is safe and yields good mid-term clinical outcomes.

  17. Cellular Mechanisms of Aortic Valve Calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiduleva, E V; Irtyuga, O B; Shishkova, A A; Ignat'eva, E V; Kostina, A S; Levchuk, K A; Golovkin, A S; Rylov, A Yu; Kostareva, A A; Moiseeva, O M; Malashicheva, A B; Gordeev, M L

    2018-01-01

    Comparative in vitro study examined the osteogenic potential of interstitial cells of aortic valve obtained from the patients with aortic stenosis and from control recipients of orthotopic heart transplantation with intact aortic valve. The osteogenic inductors augmented mineralization of aortic valve interstitial cells (AVIC) in patients with aortic stenosis in comparison with the control level. Native AVIC culture of aortic stenosis patients demonstrated overexpression of osteopontin gene (OPN) and underexpression of osteoprotegerin gene (OPG) in comparison with control levels. In both groups, AVIC differentiation was associated with overexpression of RUNX2 and SPRY1 genes. In AVIC of aortic stenosis patients, expression of BMP2 gene was significantly greater than the control level. The study revealed an enhanced sensitivity of AVIC to osteogenic inductors in aortic stenosis patients, which indicates probable implication of OPN, OPG, and BMP2 genes in pathogenesis of aortic valve calcification.

  18. Imaging techniques in transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quaife RA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Robert A Quaife, Jennifer Dorosz, John C Messenger, Ernesto E Salcedo Division of Cardiology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: Calcific aortic stenosis is now understood as a complex valvular degenerative process sharing many risk factors with atherosclerosis. Once patients develop symptomatic calcific aortic stenosis, the only effective treatment is aortic valve replacement. In the past decade, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR has been developed as an alternative to surgery to treat severe calcific aortic stenosis. Cardiac imaging plays a pivotal role in the contemporary management of patients with calcific aortic stenosis, and particularly in patients being considered for TAVR, who demand detailed imaging of the aortic valve apparatus. In this review, we highlight the role of cardiac imaging for patient selection, procedural guidance, and evaluation of results of TAVR. Keywords: aortic stenosis, cardiovascular imaging, transcutaneous aortic valve replacement

  19. Artificial aortic valves: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsi, Y S; Birchall, I E; Rosenfeldt, F L

    2004-06-01

    This review discusses strategies that may address some of the limitations associated with replacing diseased or dysfunctional aortic valves with mechanical or tissue valves. These limitations range from structural failure and thromboembolic complications associated with mechanical valves to a limited durability and calcification with tissue valves. In pediatric patients there is an issue with the inability of substitutes to grow with the recipient. The emerging science of tissue engineering potentially provides an attractive alternative by creating viable tissue structures based on a resorbable scaffold. Morphometrically precise, biodegradable polymer scaffolds may be fabricated from data obtained from scans of natural valves by rapid prototyping technologies such as fused deposition modelling. The scaffold provides a mechanical profile until seeded cells produce their own extra cellular matrix. The microstructure of the forming tissue may be aligned into predetermined spatial orientations via fluid transduction in a bioreactor. Although there are many technical obstacles that must be overcome before tissue engineered heart valves are introduced into routine surgical practice these valves have the potential to overcome many of the shortcomings of current heart valve substitutes.

  20. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement†

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolbergen, David R.; Manshanden, Johan S. J.; Bouma, Berto J.; Blom, Nico A.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.; Hazekamp, Mark G.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate our results of valve-sparing aortic root replacement and associated (multiple) valve repair. From September 2003 to September 2013, 97 patients had valve-sparing aortic root replacement procedures. Patient records and preoperative, postoperative and recent echocardiograms were reviewed.

  1. A comparison of minimally invasive and standard aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoliński, Jarosław; Plicner, Dariusz; Grudzień, Grzegorz; Wąsowicz, Marcin; Musiał, Robert; Andres, Janusz; Kapelak, Bogusław

    2016-10-01

    The study objective was to compare aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy with aortic valve replacement through a median sternotomy. With propensity score matching, we selected 211 patients after aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy and 211 patients after aortic valve replacement who underwent operation between January 2010 and December 2013. Perioperative outcomes were analyzed, and multivariable logistic regression analysis of risk factors of postoperative morbidity was performed. For propensity score-matched patients, hospital mortality was 1.0% in the aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy group and 1.4% in the aortic valve replacement group (P = 1.000). Stroke occurred in 0.5% versus 1.4% (P = .615), myocardial infarction occurred in 1.4% versus 1.9% (P = 1.000), and new onset of atrial fibrillation occurred in 12.8% versus 24.2% (P = .003) of patients in the aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy and aortic valve replacement groups, respectively. Postoperative drainage was 353.5 ± 248.6 mL versus 544.3 ± 324.5 mL (P replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy and aortic valve replacement groups, respectively. Mediastinitis occurred in 2.8% of patients after aortic valve replacement and in 0.0% of patients after aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy surgery (P = .040). Intensive care unit stay (1.3 ± 1.2 days vs 2.6 ± 2.6 days) and hospital stay (5.7 ± 1.6 days vs 8.7 ± 4.4 days) were statistically significantly shorter in the aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy group. Aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy surgery resulted in reduced postoperative morbidity (odds ratio, 0.4; P replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy surgery resulted in a reduced infection rate, diminished postoperative bleeding and blood

  2. Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation due to severe aortic regurgitation in a degenerated aortic homograft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lene Kjaer; Engstrøm, Thomas; Søndergaard, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in severe aortic stenosis has proven to be a feasible and effective treatment modality for inoperable patients. Until now, neither aortic regurgitation nor degenerated bioprostheses has been an indication for TAVI. However, this article reports...... a successful valve-in-valve implantation of a CoreValve aortic valve prosthesis through the right subclavian artery in a case of severe aortic regurgitation within a degenerated aortic homograft. The case exemplifies the possibilities of expanding the indications for TAVI, as well as other vascular access...

  3. Aortic Root Enlargement or Sutureless Valve Implantation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos G. Baikoussis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aortic valve replacement (AVR in patients with a small aortic annulus is a challenging issue. The importance of prosthesis–patient mismatch (PPM post aortic valve replacement (AVR is controversial but has to be avoided. Many studies support the fact that PPM has a negative impact on short and long term survival. In order to avoid PPM, aortic root enlargement may be performed. Alternatively and keeping in mind that often some comorbidities are present in old patients with small aortic root, the Perceval S suturelles valve implantation could be a perfect solution. The Perceval sutureless bioprosthesis provides reasonable hemodynamic performance avoiding the PPM and providing the maximum of aortic orifice area. We would like to see in the near future the role of the aortic root enlargement techniques in the era of surgical implantation of the sutureless valve (SAVR and the transcatheter valve implantation (TAVI.

  4. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Degenerative Bioprosthetic Surgical Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvir, Danny; Webb, John; Brecker, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation is an emerging therapeutic alternative for patients with a failed surgical bioprosthesis and may obviate the need for reoperation. We evaluated the clinical results of this technique using a large, worldwide registry....

  5. [Valve-sparing Replacement in Patients with Aortic Root Dilatation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Kazuhiro; Minatoya, Kenji; Ueda, Ryoma; Takehara, Masato; Sakamoto, Kazuhisa; Ide, Yujiro; Kanemitsu, Hideo; Ueyama, Koji; Ikeda, Tadashi

    2018-01-01

    Valve-sparing root replacement is increasingly used to overcome drawbacks associated with valvular prostheses. In our institution, 7 patients underwent valve-sparing root replacement from August 2016 to July 2017. The mean age was 45 years (range, 14~69 years). Three patients had Marfan syndrome and 1 had Loeys-Dietz syndrome with acute aortic dissection. All patients underwent surgery with reimplantation technique using a Valsalva graft. Two patients required repair of aortic valve leaflet prolapse. All patients had an excellent clinical course, with mild or no aortic regurgitation and a decrease in end-diastolic volume on echocardiography. These results support the continued use of valve-sparing root replacement in selected patients.

  6. Factors associated with the development of aortic valve regurgitation over time after two different techniques of valve-sparing aortic root surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, Thorsten; Charitos, Efstratios I; Stierle, Ulrich; Robinson, Derek; Gorski, Armin; Sievers, Hans-H; Misfeld, Martin

    2009-02-01

    Early results after aortic valve-sparing root reconstruction are excellent. Longer-term follow-up, especially with regard to aortic valve function, is required for further judgment of these techniques. Between July of 1993 and September of 2006, 108 consecutive patients (mean age 53.0 +/- 15.8 years) underwent the Yacoub operation (group Y) and 83 patients underwent the David operation (group D). Innovative multilevel hierarchic modeling methods were used to analyze aortic regurgitation over time. In general, aortic regurgitation increased with time in both groups. Factors associated with the development of a significant increase in aortic regurgitation were Marfan syndrome, concomitant cusp intervention, and preoperative aortic anulus dimension. In Marfan syndrome, the initial aortic regurgitation was higher in group Y versus group D (0.56 aortic regurgitation vs 0.29 aortic regurgitation, P = .049), whereas the mean annual progression rate of aortic regurgitation was marginally higher in group Y (0.132 aortic regurgitation vs 0.075 aortic regurgitation, P = .1). Concomitant cusp intervention was associated with a significant aortic regurgitation increase in both groups (P Marfan syndrome and a large preoperative aortic annulus diameter were better treated with the reimplantation technique, whereas those with a smaller diameter were better treated with the remodeling technique. Concomitant free-edge plication of prolapsing cusps was disadvantageous in both groups. Considering these factors may serve to improve the aortic valve longevity after valve-sparing aortic root surgery.

  7. Midterm outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Shahram; Dohmen, Guido; Götzenich, Andreas; Haushofer, Marcus; Spillner, Jan Wilhelm; Autschbach, Rüdiger; Hoffmann, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become a therapeutic option for high-risk or nonoperable patients with severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis. The best known and most frequently implanted prostheses are the CoreValve and SAPIEN prostheses. We report our experiences and analyze the results of our TAVI program. A total of 357 patients underwent transfemoral (TF) and transapical (TA) TAVI in our center between January 2008 and October 2012. The procedure was performed in 190 patients with CoreValve, in 155 patients with SAPIEN, and in 12 patients with ACURATE TA prostheses. Transfemoral access was used in 190 patients. In 167 patients, TA access was used. The mean age was 80.2 ± 6.4 years. All patients were nonoperable or had a high risk for a conventional aortic valve replacement. The mean logistic EuroSCORE I was 25.92 ± 14.51%. The TF/CoreValve (190 patients) and TA/SAPIEN (155 patients) groups showed significant difference in the patients' mean age (81.7 ± 6.3 years vs. 79.5 ± 6.6 years, P = 0.002) and in mean logistic EuroSCORE I (22.16 ± 13.05% vs. 31.04 ± 16.40, P < 0.001). The overall 30-day mortality (357 patients) was 9.80% (TF, 8.42%; TA, 11.37%); overall 1-year mortality (275 patients), 21.45% (TF, 23.74%; TA, 19.12%); overall 2-year mortality (199 patients), 29.15% (TF, 35.96%; TA, 23.64%); overall 3-year mortality (133 patients), 37.59% (TF, 43.86%; TA, 32.89%); and overall 4-year mortality (38 patients), 39.47% (TF, 45%; TA, 33.33%). The rate of pacemaker implantation after TAVI was significantly higher in the CoreValve group than in the SAPIEN group: 44.74% (85/190 patients) versus 6.45% (10/155 patients), P < 0.001. Stroke rate was higher in the TF-CoreValve group than in the TA-SAPIEN group: 4.21% versus 0.64%, P = 0.045. Outcomes after TAVI were, in our population of nonoperable and high-risk patients, encouraging. The differences in midterm outcomes between the TF-CoreValve TAVI and the TA-SAPIEN TAVI were not significant.

  8. Comparison of the size of artificial aortic valve with ring diameter by echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rangbarnegad II

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent socio-economic state it is not possible to have different sets of prosthetic cardiac valves available in the operating room before open-heart surgery for valvular replacement. In this study the diameter of the aortic valve ring measured in 2-D echocardiography was compared with the size of the aortic prosthetic valves implanted for the patients with aortic valvular disease. The purpose was to find a logical correlation to help the surgeons to order the correct size of aortic prosthetic valve in advance of surgery. 26 patients with aortic valve disease were studied from 1972 till 1974 who underwent aortic valve replacement surgery. Now, it is possible to predict the accurate size of aortic mechanical valve prosthesis before surgery

  9. Incidence and progression of mild aortic regurgitation after Tirone David reimplantation valve-sparing aortic root replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Elizabeth H; Liang, David H; Kvitting, John-Peder Escobar; Kari, Fabian A; Fischbein, Michael P; Mitchell, R Scott; Miller, D Craig

    2014-01-01

    The study objective was to determine whether recurrent or residual mild aortic regurgitation, which occurs after valve-sparing aortic root replacement, progresses over time. Between 2003 and 2008, 154 patients underwent Tirone David-V valve-sparing aortic root replacement; 96 patients (62%) had both 1-year (median, 12 ± 4 months) and mid-term (62 ± 22 months) transthoracic echocardiograms available for analysis. Age of patients averaged 38 ± 13 years, 71% were male, 31% had a bicuspid aortic valve, 41% had Marfan syndrome, and 51% underwent aortic valve repair, predominantly cusp free margin shortening. Forty-one patients (43%) had mild aortic regurgitation on 1-year echocardiogram. In 85% of patients (n = 35), mild aortic regurgitation remained stable on the most recent echocardiogram (median, 57 ± 20 months); progression to moderate aortic regurgitation occurred in 5 patients (12%) at a median of 28 ± 18 months and remained stable thereafter; severe aortic regurgitation developed in 1 patient, eventually requiring reoperation. Five patients (5%) had moderate aortic regurgitation at 1 year, which did not progress subsequently. Two patients (2%) had more than moderate aortic regurgitation at 1 year, and both ultimately required reoperation. Although mild aortic regurgitation occurs frequently after valve-sparing aortic root replacement, it is unlikely to progress over the next 5 years and should not be interpreted as failure of the valve-preservation concept. Further, we suggest that mild aortic regurgitation should not be considered nonstructural valve dysfunction, as the 2008 valve reporting guidelines would indicate. We need 10- to 15-year follow-up to learn the long-term clinical consequences of mild aortic regurgitation early after valve-sparing aortic root replacement. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Two-Year Outcomes in Patients With Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis Randomized to Transcatheter Versus Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lars; Steinbrüchel, Daniel Andreas; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Nordic Aortic Valve Intervention (NOTION) trial was the first to randomize all-comers with severe native aortic valve stenosis to either transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) with the CoreValve self-expanding bioprosthesis or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR...

  11. Pathogenetic Basis of Aortopathy and Aortic Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-19

    Aortopathies; Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm; Aortic Valve Disease; Thoracic Aortic Disease; Thoracic Aortic Dissection; Thoracic Aortic Rupture; Ascending Aortic Disease; Descending Aortic Disease; Ascending Aortic Aneurysm; Descending Aortic Aneurysm; Marfan Syndrome; Loeys-Dietz Syndrome; Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome; Shprintzen-Goldberg Syndrome; Turner Syndrome; PHACE Syndrome; Autosomal Recessive Cutis Laxa; Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly; Arterial Tortuosity Syndrome

  12. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mylotte, Darren; Osnabrugge, Ruben L J; Windecker, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The authors sought to examine the adoption of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in Western Europe and investigate factors that may influence the heterogeneous use of this therapy.......The authors sought to examine the adoption of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in Western Europe and investigate factors that may influence the heterogeneous use of this therapy....

  13. Characterization of Aortic Valve Closure Artifact During Outflow Tract Mapping: Correlation With Hemodynamics and Mechanical Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Jorge; Ajijola, Olujimi; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Tung, Roderick

    2017-06-01

    Premature ventricular contractions originating in the left ventricle outflow tract represent a significant subgroup of patients referred for catheter ablation. Mechanical artifacts from aortic valve leaflet motion may be observed during mapping, although the incidence and characteristics have not been reported. Twenty-eight consecutive patients with left ventricle outflow tract premature ventricular contraction were included. Electric signals recorded on the ablation catheter not coincident with atrial or ventricular depolarization were analyzed on the recording system. Correlation with invasive hemodynamic aortic pressure tracings was performed. Additionally, 4 patients with mechanical aortic valves, who underwent scar-related ventricular tachycardia ablation, were analyzed to correlate the timing of the observed artifacts with native aortic valves. Aortic valve artifact was observed while mapping within the coronary cusps in 11 patients (39%; 73% men; age, 41±25 years; left ventricular ejection fraction 49±16%) with high incidence from the left coronary cusp. This artifact was consistently observed with timing coincident with the terminal portion of the T wave. The average interval between the end of the T wave and the aortic valve artifact was 19±37 ms. The duration of the aortic valve artifact was 39±8 ms with amplitude of 0.12±0.07 mV (range, 0.06-0.36 mV). In patients referred for left ventricle outflow tract premature ventricular contraction ablation, an aortic valve closure artifact is observed in up to one third of cases during mapping within the aortic cusps. The timing of this artifact correlates with invasive hemodynamics and mechanical aortic valve artifacts. Recognition of this physiological phenomenon is useful when assigning near-field activation. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Aortic root reimplantation procedure: a new milestone in aortic valve-sparing operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Чернявский

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Emphasis in this study was placed on clinical and functional assessment of a modified "Florida Sleeve" procedure during surgical correction of ascending aorta aneurysms with concomitant aortic insufficiency.Methods: 32 patients with an aneurysm of the ascending aorta and aortic insufficiency underwent a modified "Florida Sleeve" procedure. The average follow-up was 17 (0-60 months. The average age of patients was 57±13 (23-73 years 56±13 years.Results: The expected 4-year cumulative survival rate was 84.3%. Overall freedom from aortic insufficiency in the late period was 88.9%. Median aortic regurgitation was 1+ (1; 2. Long-term follow-up revealed no valve-associated complications.Conclusion: The aortic root reimplantation procedure enables optimal correction of the existing lesions of the aortic root without performing aortic valve replacement and demonstrates stable clinical and functional outcomes in the long-term period.Key words: aortic aneurysm; aortic valve; valve-sparing operations.FundingThe study had no sponsorship.Conflict of interestThe authors declare no conflict of interest.

  15. A case of SAPIEN XT valve fallen into left ventricle during valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Shigeki; Ehara, Natsuhiko; Nishiya, Kenta; Koyama, Tadaaki

    2017-06-24

    Late transcatheter heart valve embolization is a rare but life-threatening complication of transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Surgical intervention is performed for most cases, but some cases were treated by valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve implantation. We describe a patient in whom a 29-mm Edwards SAPIEN XT valve migrated into the left ventricular outflow tract 41 days after the initial implantation. We tried to perform valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve implantation using a transfemoral approach. As soon as the second transcatheter heart valve touched the first implanted valve, it fell into the left ventricle. Immediate surgical intervention was required. The first valve was removed, and surgical aortic valve replacement was successfully performed. In conclusion, we should choose surgical aortic valve replacement for late transcatheter heart valve embolization. Even if we need to treat by catheter intervention, transapical approach may be better.

  16. Reoperative Aortic Root Replacement in Patients with Previous Aortic Root or Aortic Valve Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Kwon Chong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Generalization of standardized surgical techniques to treat aortic valve (AV and aortic root diseases has benefited large numbers of patients. As a consequence of the proliferation of patients receiving aortic root surgeries, surgeons are more frequently challenged by reoperative aortic root procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of redo-aortic root replacement (ARR. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 66 patients (36 male; mean age, 44.5±9.5 years who underwent redo-ARR following AV or aortic root procedures between April 1995 and June 2015. Results: Emergency surgeries comprised 43.9% (n=29. Indications for the redo-ARR were aneurysm (n=12, pseudoaneurysm (n=1, or dissection (n=6 of the residual native aortic sinus in 19 patients (28.8%, native AV dysfunction in 8 patients (12.1%, structural dysfunction of an implanted bioprosthetic AV in 19 patients (28.8%, and infection of previously replaced AV or proximal aortic grafts in 30 patients (45.5%. There were 3 early deaths (4.5%. During follow- up (median, 54.65 months; quartile 1–3, 17.93 to 95.71 months, there were 14 late deaths (21.2%, and 9 valve-related complications including reoperation of the aortic root in 1 patient, infective endocarditis in 3 patients, and hemorrhagic events in 5 patients. Overall survival and event-free survival rates at 5 years were 81.5%±5.1% and 76.4%±5.4%, respectively. Conclusion: Despite technical challenges and a high rate of emergency conditions in patients requiring redo-ARR, early and late outcomes were acceptable in these patients.

  17. Aortic valve regurgitation and the congenitally bicuspid aortic valve: a clinico-pathological correlation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadee, A. S.; Becker, A. E.; Verheul, H. A.; Bouma, B.; Hoedemaker, G.

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the morphology of congenitally bicuspid aortic valves causing pure valve regurgitation. A case series collected over five years. An academic hospital. One hundred and forty eight excised congenitally bicuspid aortic valves. The morphological findings were correlated with sex, age,

  18. Aortic annulus eccentricity before and after transcatheter aortic valve implantation: Comparison of balloon-expandable and self-expanding prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuhbaeck, Annika, E-mail: annika.schuhbaeck@uk-erlangen.de [Department of Cardiology, University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Weingartner, Christina [Department of Cardiology, University of Gießen, Giessen (Germany); Arnold, Martin; Schmid, Jasmin; Pflederer, Tobias; Marwan, Mohamed [Department of Cardiology, University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Rixe, Johannes; Nef, Holger [Department of Cardiology, University of Gießen, Giessen (Germany); Schneider, Christian [Department of Radiology, University of Gießen, Giessen (Germany); Lell, Michael; Uder, Michael [Department of Radiology, University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Ensminger, Stephan [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Heart and Diabetes Center NRW, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bad Oeynhausen (Germany); Feyrer, Richard; Weyand, Michael [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Achenbach, Stephan [Department of Cardiology, University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Post-implant geometry of catheter-based aortic valve prostheses is influenced by aortic valve calcification. • Balloon-expandable prostheses are more circular as compared to self-expanding prostheses. • The impact of post-implant geometry on valve function needs to be investigated. - Abstract: Introduction: The geometry of the aortic annulus and implanted transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis might influence valve function. We investigated the influence of valve type and aortic valve calcification on post-implant geometry of catheter-based aortic valve prostheses. Methods: Eighty consecutive patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (mean age 82 ± 6 years) underwent computed tomography before and after TAVI. Aortic annulus diameters were determined. Influence of prosthesis type and degree of aortic valve calcification on post-implant eccentricity were analysed. Results: Aortic annulus eccentricity was reduced in patients after TAVI (0.21 ± 0.06 vs. 0.08 ± 0.06, p < 0.0001). Post-TAVI eccentricity was significantly lower in 65 patients following implantation of a balloon-expandable prosthesis as compared to 15 patients who received a self-expanding prosthesis (0.06 ± 0.05 vs. 0.15 ± 0.07, p < 0.0001), even though the extent of aortic valve calcification was not different. After TAVI, patients with a higher calcium amount retained a significantly higher eccentricity compared to patients with lower amounts of calcium. Conclusions: Patients undergoing TAVI with a balloon-expandable prosthesis show a more circular shape of the implanted prosthesis as compared to patients with a self-expanding prosthesis. Eccentricity of the deployed prosthesis is affected by the extent of aortic valve calcification.

  19. Aortic annulus eccentricity before and after transcatheter aortic valve implantation: Comparison of balloon-expandable and self-expanding prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuhbaeck, Annika; Weingartner, Christina; Arnold, Martin; Schmid, Jasmin; Pflederer, Tobias; Marwan, Mohamed; Rixe, Johannes; Nef, Holger; Schneider, Christian; Lell, Michael; Uder, Michael; Ensminger, Stephan; Feyrer, Richard; Weyand, Michael; Achenbach, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Post-implant geometry of catheter-based aortic valve prostheses is influenced by aortic valve calcification. • Balloon-expandable prostheses are more circular as compared to self-expanding prostheses. • The impact of post-implant geometry on valve function needs to be investigated. - Abstract: Introduction: The geometry of the aortic annulus and implanted transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis might influence valve function. We investigated the influence of valve type and aortic valve calcification on post-implant geometry of catheter-based aortic valve prostheses. Methods: Eighty consecutive patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (mean age 82 ± 6 years) underwent computed tomography before and after TAVI. Aortic annulus diameters were determined. Influence of prosthesis type and degree of aortic valve calcification on post-implant eccentricity were analysed. Results: Aortic annulus eccentricity was reduced in patients after TAVI (0.21 ± 0.06 vs. 0.08 ± 0.06, p < 0.0001). Post-TAVI eccentricity was significantly lower in 65 patients following implantation of a balloon-expandable prosthesis as compared to 15 patients who received a self-expanding prosthesis (0.06 ± 0.05 vs. 0.15 ± 0.07, p < 0.0001), even though the extent of aortic valve calcification was not different. After TAVI, patients with a higher calcium amount retained a significantly higher eccentricity compared to patients with lower amounts of calcium. Conclusions: Patients undergoing TAVI with a balloon-expandable prosthesis show a more circular shape of the implanted prosthesis as compared to patients with a self-expanding prosthesis. Eccentricity of the deployed prosthesis is affected by the extent of aortic valve calcification

  20. Long-term Follow-up After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation for Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Pablo; Moreno, Raúl; Calvo, Luis; Sánchez-Recalde, Ángel; Jiménez-Valero, Santiago; Galeote, Guillermo; López-Fernández, Teresa; Ramírez, Ulises; Riera, Luis; Plaza, Ignacio; Moreno, Isidro; Mesa, José María; López-Sendón, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is used as an alternative to surgical valve replacement in patients with severe aortic stenosis who are considered high-surgical-risk or inoperable. Two of the main areas of uncertainty in this field are valve durability and long-term survival. This prospective single-center registry study from a tertiary hospital included all consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous aortic valve implantation between 2008 and 2012. Clinical follow-up lasted a minimum of 2.5 years and a maximum of 6.5 years. Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 definitions were used. Seventy-nine patients were included, with an immediate success rate of 94.9%. The median survival was 47.6 months (95% confidence intervals, 37.4-57.9 months), ie, 4 years. One quarter of deaths occurred in the first month, and most were of cardiovascular cause. After the first month, most deaths were due to noncardiovascular causes. The mean values of valve gradients did not increase during follow-up. The cumulative rate of prosthetic valve dysfunction was 15.3%, with no cases of repeat valve replacement. Half of the patients with aortic stenosis who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation were alive 4 years after the procedure. There was a 15.3% prosthetic valve dysfunction rate in cumulative follow-up, with no cases of repeat valve replacement. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Mechanical or Biologic Prostheses for Aortic-Valve and Mitral-Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstone, Andrew B; Chiu, Peter; Baiocchi, Michael; Lingala, Bharathi; Patrick, William L; Fischbein, Michael P; Woo, Y Joseph

    2017-11-09

    In patients undergoing aortic-valve or mitral-valve replacement, either a mechanical or biologic prosthesis is used. Biologic prostheses have been increasingly favored despite limited evidence supporting this practice. We compared long-term mortality and rates of reoperation, stroke, and bleeding between inverse-probability-weighted cohorts of patients who underwent primary aortic-valve replacement or mitral-valve replacement with a mechanical or biologic prosthesis in California in the period from 1996 through 2013. Patients were stratified into different age groups on the basis of valve position (aortic vs. mitral valve). From 1996 through 2013, the use of biologic prostheses increased substantially for aortic-valve and mitral-valve replacement, from 11.5% to 51.6% for aortic-valve replacement and from 16.8% to 53.7% for mitral-valve replacement. Among patients who underwent aortic-valve replacement, receipt of a biologic prosthesis was associated with significantly higher 15-year mortality than receipt of a mechanical prosthesis among patients 45 to 54 years of age (30.6% vs. 26.4% at 15 years; hazard ratio, 1.23; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02 to 1.48; P=0.03) but not among patients 55 to 64 years of age. Among patients who underwent mitral-valve replacement, receipt of a biologic prosthesis was associated with significantly higher mortality than receipt of a mechanical prosthesis among patients 40 to 49 years of age (44.1% vs. 27.1%; hazard ratio, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.35 to 2.63; Pbiologic prosthesis than among recipients of a mechanical prosthesis. Patients who received mechanical valves had a higher cumulative incidence of bleeding and, in some age groups, stroke than did recipients of a biologic prosthesis. The long-term mortality benefit that was associated with a mechanical prosthesis, as compared with a biologic prosthesis, persisted until 70 years of age among patients undergoing mitral-valve replacement and until 55 years of age among those undergoing

  2. Postoperative Reverse Remodeling and Symptomatic Improvement in Normal-Flow Low-Gradient Aortic Stenosis After Aortic Valve Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter-Storch, Rasmus; Møller, Jacob E; Christensen, Nicolaj L

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe aortic stenosis (AS) most often presents with reduced aortic valve area (benefit of aortic valve...... replacement (AVR) among NFLG patients is controversial. We compared the impact of NFLG condition on preoperative left ventricular (LV) remodeling and myocardial fibrosis and postoperative remodeling and symptomatic benefit. METHODS AND RESULTS: Eighty-seven consecutive patients with reduced aortic valve area...... and normal stroke volume index undergoing AVR underwent echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, a 6-minute walk test, and measurement of natriuretic peptides before and 1 year after AVR. Myocardial fibrosis was assessed from magnetic resonance imaging. Patients were stratified as NFLG or normal...

  3. Aortic Valve Leaflet Perforation after Mitral Valve Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Aboelnasr

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available  A 32-year-old patient with symptomatic severe aortic regurge, 6 weeks after mitral valve repair, was admitted for aortic valve surgery. No preoperative clinical data consistent with infective endocarditis could be detected. Preoperative transthoracic echocardiography showed aortic leaflet perforation affecting non coronary cusp. During operation, leaflet perforation was detected and closed completely with autologous pericardial patch. No vegetations or abscess could be seen during operation. Iatrogenic aetiology of leaflet perforation after mitral repair was suspected in  this case. Recognition of this complication will help in  avoiding it during mitral valve surgery and expecting it as a possible complication during intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography.

  4. Impact of bicuspid aortic valve on complications and death in infective endocarditis of native aortic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahveci, Gokhan; Bayrak, Fatih; Pala, Selcuk; Mutlu, Bulent

    2009-01-01

    We retrospectively investigated the impact of bicuspid aortic valve on the prognosis of patients who had definite infective endocarditis of the native aortic valve.Of 51 patients, a bicuspid aortic valve was present in 22 (43%); the other 29 had tricuspid aortic valves. On average, the patients who had bicuspid valves were younger than those who had tricuspid valves. Patients with a tricuspid valve had larger left atrial diameters and were more likely to have severe mitral regurgitation.Periannular complications, which we detected in 19 patients (37%), were much more common in the patients who had a bicuspid valve (64% vs 17%, P = 0.001). The presence of a bicuspid valve was the only significant independent predictor of periannular complications. The in-hospital mortality rate in the bicuspid group was lower than that in the tricuspid group; however, this figure did not reach statistical significance (9% vs 24%, P = 0.15). In multivariate analysis, left atrial diameter was the only independent predictor associated with an increased risk of death (hazard ratio, 2.19; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-4.5; P = 0.031).In our study, patients with infective endocarditis in a bicuspid aortic valve were younger and had a higher incidence of periannular complications. Although a worse prognosis has been reported previously, we found that infective endocarditis in a native bicuspid aortic valve is not likely to increase the risk of death in comparison with infective endocarditis in native tricuspid aortic valves.

  5. Quadricuspid Aortic Valve Combined with Moderate Ascending Aortic Dilatation: A Report of Four Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uspenskiy, Vladimir E; Osadchii, Alexei M; Gordeev, Mikhail L

    2015-12-01

    The quadricuspid aortic valve is a very uncommon malformation associated with aortic insufficiency, aortic stenosis, endocarditis, and ascending aortic dilatation. We report four cases of this aortic valve malformation. One patient with severe aortic regurgitation and moderate aortic dilatation required aortic valve replacement. Three patients had mild or moderate aortic insufficiency combined with moderate ascending aortic dilatation. These patients were referred to follow-up. The presented cases demonstrate that this aortic valve malformation may not be as rare as it appears and that attention must be paid to any quadricuspid findings during computed tomographic angiography and echocardiography.

  6. Pulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass and renal function in elderly patients undergoing aortic valve surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milano, Aldo Domenico; Dodonov, Mikhail; Van Oeveren, Willem; Onorati, Francesco; Gu, Y. John; Tessari, Maddalena; Menon, Tiziano; Gottin, Leonardo; Faggian, Giuseppe

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate if pulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) has any protective influence on renal function in elderly patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR). METHODS: Forty-six patients (>= 75 years old) with aortic valve stenosis underwent AVR with either pulsatile perfusion (PP)

  7. Fibrin glue on an aortic cusp detected by transesophageal echocardiography after valve-sparing aortic valve replacement: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahira, Junko; Ishii, Hisanari; Sawai, Toshiyuki; Minami, Toshiaki

    2015-03-07

    Fibrin glue is used commonly during cardiac surgery but can behave as an intracardiac abnormal foreign body following surgery. There have been few such cases reported, and they were typically noticed only because of the resulting catastrophic cardiac conditions, such as valvular malfunction. We report a case where, for the first time, transesophageal echocardiography was used to detected fibrin glue that was adherent to the ventricular side of a patient's aortic valve immediately after aortic declamping. A 45-year-old Japanese man with Marfan syndrome underwent an aortic valve-sparing operation to treat moderate aortic valve regurgitation resulting from enlargement of his right coronary cusp. Fibrin glue was lightly applied to the suture line between the previous and new grafts. Transesophageal echocardiography performed prior to weaning from the cardiopulmonary bypass revealed mild aortic valve regurgitation in addition to a mobile membranous structure attached to the ventricular side of his aortic valve. It was identified as fibrin glue. We resolved the regurgitation by removing the fibrin glue and repeating the aortic cusp plication. The patient had no complications during recovery. Fibrin glue can act as an intracardiac foreign body and lead to a potentially fatal embolism. We demonstrated the use of transesophageal echocardiography to detect a fibrin glue-derived intracardiac abnormal foreign body and to confirm its removal. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case where fibrin glue adherent to the aortic valve was detected by transesophageal echocardiography. These findings demonstrate the importance of using transesophageal echocardiography during cardiac surgery that involves using biological glues.

  8. Aortic regurgitation after valve-sparing aortic root replacement: modes of failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Takanori; Okita, Yutaka; Matsumori, Masamichi; Okada, Kenji; Minami, Hitoshi; Munakata, Hiroshi; Inoue, Takeshi; Tanaka, Akiko; Sakamoto, Toshihito; Omura, Atsushi; Nomura, Takuo

    2011-11-01

    Despite the positive clinical results of valve-sparing aortic root replacement, little is known about the causes of reoperations and the modes of failure. From October 1999 to June 2010, 101 patients underwent valve-sparing aortic root replacement using the David reimplantation technique. The definition of aortic root repair failure included the following: (1) intraoperative conversion to the Bentall procedure; (2) reoperation performed because of aortic regurgitation; and (3) aortic regurgitation equal to or greater than a moderate degree at the follow-up. Sixteen patients were considered to have repair failure. Three patients required intraoperative conversion to valve replacement, 3 required reoperation within 3 months, and another 8 required reoperation during postoperative follow-up. At initial surgery 5 patients had moderate to severe aortic regurgitation, 6 patients had acute aortic dissections, 3 had Marfan syndrome, 2 had status post Ross operations, 3 had bicuspid aortic valves, and 1 had aortitis. Five patients had undergone cusp repair, including Arantius plication in 3 and plication at the commissure in 2. The causes of early failure in 6 patients included cusp perforation (3), cusp prolapse (3), and severe hemolysis (1). The causes of late failure in 10 patients included cusp prolapse (4), commissure dehiscence (3), torn cusp (2), and cusp retraction (1). Patients had valve replacements at a mean of 23 ± 20.9 months after reimplantation and survived. Causes of early failure after valve-sparing root replacement included technical failure, cusp lesions, and steep learning curve. Late failure was caused by aortic root wall degeneration due to gelatin-resorcin-formalin glue, cusp degeneration, or progression of cusp prolapse. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Successful Thrombolysis of Aortic Prosthetic Valve Thrombosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arun Kumar Agnihotri

    threatening. Standard surgical treatment using cardiopulmonary bypass carries high maternal and fetal complications. Here we report a case of an antenatal female in first trimester with aortic prosthetic valve thrombosis (PVT), who was successfully ...

  10. Transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis surgically replaced 4 months after implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Lund, Jens Teglgaard; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a new and rapidly evolving treatment option for high-risk surgical patients with degenerative aortic valve stenosis. Long-term results with these new valve prostheses are lacking, and potential valve dysfunction and failure would require valve replacemen....... We report the first case of surgical valve replacement in a patient with a dysfunctional transcatheter-implanted aortic valve prosthesis 4 months after implantation....

  11. Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation of a CoreValve in a JenaValve prosthesis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Shahram; Becker, Michael; Moza, Ajay; Autschbach, Rüdiger; Marx, Nikolaus; Schröder, Jörg

    2017-09-10

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation has become an accepted treatment modality for inoperable or high-risk surgical patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis. We report the case of a 70-year-old white man who was treated for severe symptomatic aortic regurgitation using transcatheter aortic valve implantation from the apical approach. Because of recurrent cardiac decompensation 4 weeks after implantation he underwent the implantation of a left ventricular assist device system. A year later echocardiography showed a severe transvalvular central insufficiency. Our heart team decided to choose a valve-in-valve approach while reducing the flow rate of left ventricular assist device to minimum and pacing with a frequency of 140 beats/minute. There was an excellent result and our patient is doing well with no relevant insufficiency of the aortic valve at 12-month follow-up. This is the first report about a successful treatment of a stenotic JenaValve using a CoreValve Evolut R; the use of a CoreValve Evolut R prosthesis may be an optimal option for valve-in-valve procedures.

  12. Imaging techniques in aortic valve and root surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regeer, M.V.

    2017-01-01

    Aortic valve sparing surgery for aortic regurgitation and/or aortopathy serves as an alternative to aortic valve and root replacement. One of the advantages of aortic valve sparing surgery over conventional replacement is that there is no need for life-long anticoagulation, which is particularly

  13. The bicuspid aortic valve and related disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    Full Text Available Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV is the most common congenital cardiac malformation, affecting 1-2% of the population, with strong male predominance. Individuals may have a normally functioning BAV, and may be unaware of its presence and the potential risk of complications. However, they may easily develop aortic valve disorders: either stenotic or regurgitant, or both. Today, BAV is recognized as a syndrome incorporating aortic valve disorders and aortic wall abnormalities, including aortic dilation, dissection or rupture. Congenital or hereditary diseases such as ventricular septal defect, patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, Turner's syndrome, Marfan's syndrome etc., may frequently be associated with BAV. Infective endocarditis and occasionally thrombus formation may develop during the lives of BAV patients. Elevated cholesterol or C-reactive protein may be seen in laboratory findings of these patients. Beta-blockers and statins are the possibilities for medical treatment, and aortic valve repair/replacement and ascending aorta replacement are indicated for patients with a severely diseased aortic valve and aorta. Rigorous follow-up throughout life is mandatory after BAV has been diagnosed. The aim of the present article was to describe the implications of BAV and its associated disorders, and to discuss diagnostic and treatment strategies.

  14. Sequential transcatheter aortic valve implantation due to valve dislodgement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campante Teles, Rui; Costa, Cátia; Almeida, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become an important treatment in high surgical risk patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS), whose complications need to be managed promptly. The authors report the case of an 86-year-old woman presenting with severe symptomatic AS, rejected fo...

  15. [Comparison of aortic annular diameter defined by different measurement mordalities before transcatheter aortic valve implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, R X; You, X D; Pu, Z X; Yang, Q; Huang, Z X; Zhou, L M; Huang, P T

    2017-05-24

    Objective: To compare aortic annular diameter measured by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), and multislice computed tomography (MSCT) in patients with severe aortic stenosis, and to evaluate the impact on selection of prosthetic valve type in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Methods: Clinical data of 138 patients with severe aortic stenosis referred for TAVI between January 2014 and June 2016 in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed.The difference of aortic annular diameter measured by TTE, TEE, and MSCT were compared.TTE was performed after TAVI to evaluate the accuracy of measurement before TAVI. Results: (1) Aortic annular diameter was (23.37±2.22) mm by TTE and (23.52±1.70) mm by TEE ( P =0.12). Pearson correlation analysis showed that aortic annular diameter measured by TTE was correlated to that measured by TEE ( r =0.87, P TTE and TTE (all P TTE and TEE measurements are smaller than that from MSCT.In the absence of a gold standard, selection of prosthetic valve type in TAVI procedure should rely on comprehensive considerations, which is of importance to get good clinical results for severe aortic stenosis patients underwent TAVI.

  16. Perceval S aortic valve implantation in an achondroplastic Dwarf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos G Baikoussis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite cardiovascular disease in patients with dwarfism is not rare; there is a lack of reports referring to cardiac interventions in such patients. Dwarfism may be due to achondroplasia or hormonal growth disorders. We present a 58-year-old woman with episodes of dyspnea for several months. She underwent on transthoracic echocardiography, and she diagnosed with severe aortic valve stenosis. She referred to our department for surgical treatment of this finding. In accordance of her anthropometric characteristics and her very small aortic annulus, we had the dilemma of prosthesis selection. We decided to implant a stentless valve to optimize her effective orifice area. Our aim is to present the successful Perceval S valve implantation and the descriptions of the problems coming across in operating on these special patients. To our knowledge, this is the first case patient in which a Perceval S valve is implanted according to the international bibliography.

  17. Perceval S aortic valve implantation in an achondroplastic Dwarf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikoussis, Nikolaos G; Argiriou, Michalis; Argiriou, Orestis; Dedeilias, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Despite cardiovascular disease in patients with dwarfism is not rare; there is a lack of reports referring to cardiac interventions in such patients. Dwarfism may be due to achondroplasia or hormonal growth disorders. We present a 58-year-old woman with episodes of dyspnea for several months. She underwent on transthoracic echocardiography, and she diagnosed with severe aortic valve stenosis. She referred to our department for surgical treatment of this finding. In accordance of her anthropometric characteristics and her very small aortic annulus, we had the dilemma of prosthesis selection. We decided to implant a stentless valve to optimize her effective orifice area. Our aim is to present the successful Perceval S valve implantation and the descriptions of the problems coming across in operating on these special patients. To our knowledge, this is the first case patient in which a Perceval S valve is implanted according to the international bibliography.

  18. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With Early- and New-Generation Devices in Bicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoon, Sung Han; Lefèvre, Thierry; Ahn, Jung Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies have evaluated the clinical outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis (AS). Particularly, limited data exist comparing the results of TAVR with new-generation devices versus early-generation devices.  Objective...

  19. Outcomes in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Bicuspid Versus Tricuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoon, Sung-Han; Bleiziffer, Sabine; De Backer, Ole

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is being increasingly performed in patients with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis (AS). OBJECTIVES: This study sought to compare the procedural and clinical outcomes in patients with bicuspid versus tricuspid AS from the Bicuspid AS TAVR mul...

  20. Full-root aortic valve replacement with stentless xenograft achieves superior regression of left ventricular hypertrophy compared to pericardial stented aortic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Reza; Auf der Maur, Christoph; Mueller, Xavier; Schläpfer, Reinhard; Jamshidi, Peiman; Daubeuf, François; Frossard, Nelly

    2015-02-03

    Full-root aortic valve replacement with stentless xenografts has potentially superior hemodynamic performance compared to stented valves. However, a number of cardiac surgeons are reluctant to transform a classical stented aortic valve replacement into a technically more demanding full-root stentless aortic valve replacement. Here we describe our technique of full-root stentless aortic xenograft implantation and compare the early clinical and midterm hemodynamic outcomes to those after aortic valve replacement with stented valves. We retrospectively compared the pre-operative characteristics of 180 consecutive patients who underwent full-root replacement with stentless aortic xenografts with those of 80 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement with stented valves. In subgroups presenting with aortic stenosis, we further analyzed the intra-operative data, early postoperative outcomes and mid-term regression of left ventricular mass index. Patients in the stentless group were younger (62.6 ± 13 vs. 70.3 ± 11.8 years, p regression of the left ventricular mass index in the stentless (p replacement can be performed without adversely affecting the early morbidity or mortality in patients operated on for aortic valve stenosis provided that the coronary ostia are not heavily calcified. The additional time necessary for the full-root stentless compared to the classical stented aortic valve replacement is therefore not detrimental to the early clinical outcomes and is largely rewarded in patients with aortic stenosis by lower transvalvular gradients at mid-term and a better regression of their left ventricular mass index.

  1. Characteristics of aortic valve dysfunction and ascending aorta dimensions according to bicuspid aortic valve morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hong Ju [Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Je Kyoun; Chee, Hyun Kun; Kim, Jun Suk [Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Sung Min [Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    To characterize aortic valve dysfunction and ascending aorta dimensions according to bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) morphology using computed tomography (CT) and surgical findings. We retrospectively enrolled 209 patients with BAVs who underwent transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and CT. BAVs were classified as anterior-posterior (BAV-AP) or lateral (BAV-LA) orientation of the cusps and divided according to the presence (raphe+) or absence (raphe-) of a raphe. Ascending aortic dimensions were measured by CT at four levels. BAV-AP was present in 129 patients (61.7 %) and raphe+ in 120 (57.4 %). Sixty-nine patients (33.0 %) had aortic regurgitation (AR), 70 (33.5 %) had aortic stenosis (AS), and 58 (27.8 %) had combined AS and AR. AR was more common in patients with BAV-AP and raphe+; AS was more common with BAV-LA and raphe-.Annulus/body surface area and tubular portion/body surface area diameters in patients with BAV-AP (17.1 ± 2.3 mm/m{sup 2} and 24.2 ± 5.3 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively) and raphe+ (17.3 ± 2.2 mm/m{sup 2} and 24.2 ± 5.5 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively) were significantly different from those with BAV-LA (15.8 ± 1.9 mm/m{sup 2} and 26.4 ± 5.5 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively) and raphe- (15.7 ± 1.9 mm/m{sup 2} and 26.2 ± 5.4 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively). The morphological characteristics of BAV might be associated with the type of valvular dysfunction, and degree and location of an ascending aorta dilatation. (orig.)

  2. A prospective, randomised trial of transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation vs. surgical aortic valve replacement in operable elderly patients with aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Henrik Møller; Klaaborg, Kaj E; Nissen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    In a prospective randomised trial we aimed to compare transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation (a-TAVI) with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in operable elderly patients.......In a prospective randomised trial we aimed to compare transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation (a-TAVI) with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in operable elderly patients....

  3. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A Siordia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR is a novel therapeutic intervention for the replacement of severely stenotic aortic valves in high-risk patients for standard surgical procedures. Since the initial PARTNER trial results, use of TAVR has been on the rise each year. New delivery methods and different valves have been developed and modified in order to promote the minimally invasive procedure and reduce common complications, such as stroke. This review article focuses on the current data on the indications, risks, benefits, and future directions of TAVR. Recently, TAVR has been considered as a standard-of-care procedure. While this technique is used frequently in high-risk surgical candidates, studies have been focusing on the application of this method for younger patients with lower surgical risk. Moreover, several studies have proposed promising results regarding the use of valve-in-valve technique or the procedure in which the valve is placed within a previously implemented bioprosthetic valve. However, ischemic strokes and paravalvular leak remain a matter of debate in these surgeries. New methods and devices have been developed to reduce the incidence of post-procedural stroke. While the third generation of TAVR valves (i.e., Edwards Sapien 3 and Medtronic Evolut R addresses the issue of paravalvular leak structurally, results on their efficacy in reducing the risk of paravalvular leak are yet to be obtained. Furthermore, TAVR enters the field of hybrid methods in the treatment of cardiac issues via both surgical and catheter-based approaches. Finally, while TAVR is primarily performed on cases with aortic stenosis, new valves and methods have been proposed regarding the application of this technique in aortic regurgitation, as well as other aortic pathologies. TAVR is a suitable therapeutic approach for the treatment of aortic stenosis in high-risk patients. Considering the promising results in the current patient population

  4. Surgical anatomy of the aortic root: Implication for valve-sparing reimplantation and aortic valve annuloplasty

    OpenAIRE

    de Kerchove, Laurent; Jashari, Ramadan; Boodhwani, Munir; Duy, Khanh Tran; Lengelé, Benoit; Gianello, Pierre; Nezhad, Zahra Mozala; Astarci, Parla; Noirhomme, Philippe; El Khoury, Gebrine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To enhance the reproducibility of aortic valve-sparing reimplantation and annuloplasty, we analyzed the topographic relationship between the ventriculoaortic junction (VAJ), basal ring (BR), and sinotubular junction (STJ). The root base thickness is also quantified. METHOD: Fifty-eight fresh human aortic valves were analyzed. The root was dissected to the limit where the aortic wall terminates into the cardiac structures (VAJ). Root height was measured externally from the STJ t...

  5. Transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis surgically replaced 4 months after implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Lund, Jens Teglgaard; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a new and rapidly evolving treatment option for high-risk surgical patients with degenerative aortic valve stenosis. Long-term results with these new valve prostheses are lacking, and potential valve dysfunction and failure would require valve replacemen...

  6. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in bicuspid anatomy: procedural results with two different types of valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presbitero, Patrizia; Iannetta, Loredana; Pagnotta, Paolo; Reimers, Bernhard; Rossi, Marco L; Zavalloni Parenti, Dennis; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bedogni, Francesco

    2018-04-01

    It is well known that bicuspid valve stenosis can be treated with transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) even if specific issues can cause problems: dilatation of ascending aorta, possible aorthopathy, eccentricity of the valve and calcium distribution in leaflets and in commissures. We classified Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) in type 0 (2 cusps and no raphe), and type 1 (2 cusps and one or more raphes). The aim of the present study was to report the results of two types of valve (CoreValve from 2009 to 2016 and Lotus valve from 2014 to 2017) in a consecutive series of BAV patients treated in 2 Italian centers. A total of 30 patients with BAV underwent TAVI from September 2009 to March 2017. Mean age was 78±8 years, 54.5% were males and 7.4% had peripheral vasculopathy, 6.5% previous stroke or TIA, 15.6% previous PCI and 9.4% previous coronary artery bypass grafting. Ten patients (30.3%) had a type 1; mean aortic valvular gradient was 57.7±17.7 mmHg; aortic valvular area was 0.7±0.2 mm2, left ventricular ejection fraction was 51.4±10.0% and ascending aorta was 41.0±5.6 mm. Among these 30 patients, 16 of them (group 1) undergone CoreValve implantation and 14 (group 2) undergone Lotus valve implantation. Patients in the first group had a higher Logistic Euroscore (P<0.001) and higher AVA (P=0.026) and valve area CT (P=0.003). Device size in group1 was more often bigger than in group 2 (P<0.001) and postdilatation was never used in the last group. Group 1 had a significant more frequent aortic regurgitation ≥2 assessed with angiography (28.6% vs. 0%; P=0.05). A non-statistically significant higher rate of second valve implantation (6.2% vs. 0%; P=1.00) was also observed. New permanent pacemaker implantation (40.0% vs. 35.7%; P=0.812) was equal in both valves. Postprocedural aortic regurgitation is still an issue in BAV undergone TAVI when: 1) the annulus is big; 2) when we are using self-expandable valves; and 3) in type 0 valves. Lotus valve, with a

  7. 3D echocardiographic analysis of aortic annulus for transcatheter aortic valve replacement using novel aortic valve quantification software: Comparison with computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediratta, Anuj; Addetia, Karima; Medvedofsky, Diego; Schneider, Robert J; Kruse, Eric; Shah, Atman P; Nathan, Sandeep; Paul, Jonathan D; Blair, John E; Ota, Takeyoshi; Balkhy, Husam H; Patel, Amit R; Mor-Avi, Victor; Lang, Roberto M

    2017-05-01

    With the increasing use of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients with aortic stenosis (AS), computed tomography (CT) remains the standard for annulus sizing. However, 3D transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has been an alternative in patients with contraindications to CT. We sought to (1) test the feasibility, accuracy, and reproducibility of prototype 3DTEE analysis software (Philips) for aortic annular measurements and (2) compare the new approach to the existing echocardiographic techniques. We prospectively studied 52 patients who underwent gated contrast CT, procedural 3DTEE, and TAVR. 3DTEE images were analyzed using novel semi-automated software designed for 3D measurements of the aortic root, which uses multiplanar reconstruction, similar to CT analysis. Aortic annulus measurements included area, perimeter, and diameter calculations from these measurements. The results were compared to CT-derived values. Additionally, 3D echocardiographic measurements (3D planimetry and mitral valve analysis software adapted for the aortic valve) were also compared to the CT reference values. 3DTEE image quality was sufficient in 90% of patients for aortic annulus measurements using the new software, which were in good agreement with CT (r-values: .89-.91) and small (software can accurately measure aortic annulus in patients with severe AS undergoing TAVR, in better agreement with CT than the existing methodology. Accordingly, intra-procedural TEE could potentially replace CT in patients where CT carries significant risk. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement and aortic valve repair in a patient with acromegaly and aortic root dilatation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Van Praet

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aortic regurgitation and dilatation of the aortic root and ascending aorta are severe complications of acromegaly. The current trend for management of an aortic root aneurysm is valve-sparing root replacement as well as restoring the diameter of the aortic sinotubular junction (STJ and annulus. Our case report supports the recommendation that in patients with acromegaly, severe aortic root involvement may indicate the need for surgery.

  9. Early results of valve-sparing ascending aortic replacement in type A aortic dissection and aortic insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М. Л. Гордеев

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study was designed to investigate predictors of effective valve-sparing ascending aortic replacement in patients with Stanford type A aortic dissection combined with aortic insufficiency and to analyze efficacy and safety of this kind of surgery.Methods: From January 2010 to December 2015, 49 patients with Stanford type A aortic dissection combined with aortic insufficiency underwent ascending aortic replacement. All patients were divided into 3 groups: valve-sparing procedures (group 1, n = 11, combined aortic valve and supracoronary ascending aortic replacement (group 2, n = 12, and Bentall procedure (group 3, n = 26. We assessed the initial status of patients, incidence of complications and efficacy of valve-sparing ascending aortic replacement.Results: The hospital mortality rate was 8.2% (4/49 patients. The amount of surgical correction correlated with the initial diameter of the aorta at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva. During the hospital period, none of patients from group 1 developed aortic insufficiency exceeding Grade 2 and the vast majority of patients had trivial aortic regurgitation. The parameters of cardiopulmonary bypass, cross-clamp time and circulatory arrest time did not correlate with the initial size of the ascending aorta and aortic valve blood flow impairment, neither did they influence significantly the incidence and severity of neurological complications. The baseline size of the ascending aorta and degree of aortic regurgitation did not impact the course of the early hospital period.Conclusions: Supracoronary ascending aortic replacement combined with aortic valve repair in ascending aortic dissection and aortic regurgitation is effective and safe. The initial size of the ascending aorta and aortic arch do not influence immediate results. The diameter of the aorta at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva and the condition of aortic valve leaflets could be considered as the limiting factors. Further long

  10. Case Report: Prothesis-patient mismatch after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Ospina, Luis; Garcia-Morell, Juan; Rodriguez-Monserrate, Carla P; Valentin-Nieves, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Valve replacement is the standard surgical treatment of diseased valves that cannot be repaired. The main goal of replacement is to exchange the diseased valve with one that has the engineering and hemodynamics as close as possible to the disease free native valve. However due to mechanical and fluid dynamic constraints all prosthetic heart valves (PHVs) are smaller than normal and thus are inherently stenotic. This represents a challenge when it comes time to replace a valve. The correct valve with the correct and matching profile has to be selected before the procedure to avoid possible complications. It is well recognized that patients are also prone to patient-prosthesis mismatch at long term which could have consequences in the clinical outcomes (1). The evaluation of patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) has not been sufficiently emphasized in common practice. Failure to recognize this fact may lead to significant hemodynamic impairment and worsening of the clinical status over the time. Making efforts to identifying patients at risk may decrease the prevalence of PPM, the economic impact to our health system, the morbidity and mortality involved in these cases as well as creates efforts to standardized pre-operative protocols to minimized risk of PPM. We present a case of a 78 years old male patient who underwent aortic valve replacement due severe aortic stenosis, afterwards his clinical course got complicated with several admissions for shortness of breath and decompensated congestive heart failure (CHF).

  11. Optimal results of aortic valve replacement with small mechanical valves (< 19 mm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yasuyuki; Hattori, Koji; Motoki, Manabu; Takahashi, Yosuke; Kotani, Shinsuke; Nishimura, Shinsuke; Shibata, Toshihiko

    2013-07-01

    Controversy exists regarding the optimal operative method or type of prosthesis for patients with a small aortic root. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the early and mid-term outcomes of standard aortic valve replacement (AVR) using 16 mm or 18 mm ATS Advanced Performance (AP) or 17 mm St. Jude Medical (SJM) Regent valves for a small aortic root. Between April 2003 and August 2009, 78 patients (age range: 50-86 years; 86% aged > or = 65 years) underwent AVR with 16 mm or 18 mm ATS AP valves (16AP group: n = 21, 18AP group: n = 32), or a 17 mm SJM Regent valve (17Regent group: n = 25). Fifty-six patients (72%) had a body surface area (BSA) of regression was similar among the groups (-30%, -25% and -28% in the 16AP, 17Regent and 18AP groups, respectively; p = 0.844). The early and mid-term results of AVR with 16 mm or 18 mm ATS AP valves, or with a 17 mm SJM Regent valve, were satisfactory. Therefore, standard AVR using these small mechanical prostheses, which avoids the need to enlarge the annulus or to conduct stentless bioprosthesis implantation, might represent an acceptable method, especially in elderly patients with a small aortic root.

  12. Surgical or Transcatheter Aortic-Valve Replacement in Intermediate-Risk Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reardon, Michael J; Van Mieghem, Nicolas M; Popma, Jeffrey J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although transcatheter aortic-valve replacement (TAVR) is an accepted alternative to surgery in patients with severe aortic stenosis who are at high surgical risk, less is known about comparative outcomes among patients with aortic stenosis who are at intermediate surgical risk. METHODS......: We evaluated the clinical outcomes in intermediate-risk patients with severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis in a randomized trial comparing TAVR (performed with the use of a self-expanding prosthesis) with surgical aortic-valve replacement. The primary end point was a composite of death from any cause...... or disabling stroke at 24 months in patients undergoing attempted aortic-valve replacement. We used Bayesian analytical methods (with a margin of 0.07) to evaluate the noninferiority of TAVR as compared with surgical valve replacement. RESULTS: A total of 1746 patients underwent randomization at 87 centers...

  13. The nordic aortic valve intervention (NOTION) trial comparing transcatheter versus surgical valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Søndergaard, Lars; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2013-01-01

    Degenerative aortic valve (AV) stenosis is the most prevalent heart valve disease in the western world. Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) has until recently been the standard of treatment for patients with severe AV stenosis. Whether transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) can...

  14. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation vs. surgical aortic valve replacement for treatment of severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siontis, George C M; Praz, Fabien; Pilgrim, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: In view of the currently available evidence from randomized trials, we aimed to compare the collective safety and efficacy of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) vs. surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) across the spectrum of risk and in important subgroups. METHODS AND RESULTS......: Trials comparing TAVI vs. SAVR were identified through Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases. The primary outcome was death from any cause at 2 years. We performed random-effects meta-analyses to combine the available evidence and to evaluate the effect in different subgroups. This systematic review...... and meta-analysis is registered with PROSPERO (CRD42016037273). We identified four eligible trials including 3806 participants, who were randomly assigned to undergo TAVI (n = 1898) or SAVR (n = 1908). For the primary outcome of death from any cause, TAVI when compared with SAVR was associated...

  15. New-Onset Atrial Fibrillation After Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Troels Højsgaard; Thygesen, Julie Bjerre; Thyregod, Hans Gustav

    2015-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have been shown to be the only treatments that can improve the natural cause of severe aortic valve stenosis. However, after SAVR and TAVI, the incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation...... (NOAF) is 31%-64% and 4%-32%, respectively. NOAF is independently associated with adverse events such as stroke, death, and increased length of hospital stay. Increasing the knowledge of predisposing factors, optimal postprocedural monitoring, and prophylactic antiarrhythmic and antithrombotic therapy...

  16. New-onset atrial fibrillation after surgical aortic valve replacement and transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Troels Højsgaard; Thygesen, Julie Bjerre; Thyregod, Hans Gustav

    2015-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have been shown to be the only treatments that can improve the natural cause of severe aortic valve stenosis. However, after SAVR and TAVI, the incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation...... (NOAF) is 31%-64% and 4%-32%, respectively. NOAF is independently associated with adverse events such as stroke, death, and increased length of hospital stay. Increasing the knowledge of predisposing factors, optimal postprocedural monitoring, and prophylactic antiarrhythmic and antithrombotic therapy...

  17. Emergency Valve-in-Valve Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation for the Treatment of Acute Stentless Bioprosthetic Aortic Insufficiency and Cardiogenic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan D. Hanson

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioprosthetic aortic valve degeneration may present as acute, severe aortic regurgitation and cardiogenic shock. Such patients may be unsuitable for emergency valve replacement surgery due to excessive risk of operative mortality but could be treatable with transfemoral valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI. There is a paucity of data regarding the feasibility of valve-in-valve TAVI in patients presenting with cardiogenic shock due to acute aortic insufficiency from stentless bioprosthetic valve degeneration. We present one such case, highlighting the unique aspects of valve-in-valve TAVI for this challenging patient subset.

  18. The bicuspid aortic valve and its relation to aortic dilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A bicuspid aortic valve (BAV is a common congenital heart disease, which affects 1-2% of the population. However, the relationship between BAVs and aortic dilation has not been sufficiently elucidated. METHODS: A total of 241 BAV patients who were referred to this hospital for cardiac surgey over a 4.75-year period were included in this study. In addition to the clinical characteristics of the included patients, the morphological features of the aortic valve and aorta, the length of the left main coronary artery, and the laboratory findings (the coagulation and hematological parameters as well as the total cholesterol concentration were determined and compared with those of the tricuspid aortic valve (TAV patients. RESULTS: The BAV patients were younger than the TAV patients for a valve surgery in the last 3 months of the study period. The BAV patients were predominantly male. Most of the BAVs that were surgically treated were stenotic, regurgitant, or combined, and only 19 (7.88% were normally functioning valves. According to echocardiography or operative records, 148 (78.31% were type A, 31 (16.40% were type B, and 10 (5.29% were type C. The left main coronary artery was much shorter in the BAV patients than it was in the TAV patients. There was no significant difference between BAV and TAV patients in the total cholesterol concentrations; whereas differences were noted between patients receiving lipid-lowering therapy and those not receiving lipid-lowering therapy. The dimensions of the aortic root, sinotubular junction, and ascending aorta were beyond normal limits, while they were significantly smaller in the BAV patients than in the TAV patients. They were also much smaller in patients receiving statin therapy than those not receiving statin therapy in both groups. Moreover, the aortic dilation in the BAV group was found to be significantly associated with patient age. CONCLUSIONS: The BAV patients developed aortic wall and

  19. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in failed bioprosthetic surgical valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvir, Danny; Webb, John G; Bleiziffer, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Owing to a considerable shift toward bioprosthesis implantation rather than mechanical valves, it is expected that patients will increasingly present with degenerated bioprostheses in the next few years. Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation is a less invasive approach......, stroke, and New York Heart Association functional class. RESULTS: Modes of bioprosthesis failure were stenosis (n = 181 [39.4%]), regurgitation (n = 139 [30.3%]), and combined (n = 139 [30.3%]). The stenosis group had a higher percentage of small valves (37% vs 20.9% and 26.6% in the regurgitation...... and combined groups, respectively; P = .005). Within 1 month following valve-in-valve implantation, 35 (7.6%) patients died, 8 (1.7%) had major stroke, and 313 (92.6%) of surviving patients had good functional status (New York Heart Association class I/II). The overall 1-year Kaplan-Meier survival rate was 83...

  20. Mechanical versus bioprosthetic aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Stuart J; Çelik, Mevlüt; Kappetein, A Pieter

    2017-07-21

    Mechanical valves used for aortic valve replacement (AVR) continue to be associated with bleeding risks because of anticoagulation therapy, while bioprosthetic valves are at risk of structural valve deterioration requiring reoperation. This risk/benefit ratio of mechanical and bioprosthetic valves has led American and European guidelines on valvular heart disease to be consistent in recommending the use of mechanical prostheses in patients younger than 60 years of age. Despite these recommendations, the use of bioprosthetic valves has significantly increased over the last decades in all age groups. A systematic review of manuscripts applying propensity-matching or multivariable analysis to compare the usage of mechanical vs. bioprosthetic valves found either similar outcomes between the two types of valves or favourable outcomes with mechanical prostheses, particularly in younger patients. The risk/benefit ratio and choice of valves will be impacted by developments in valve designs, anticoagulation therapy, reducing the required international normalized ratio, and transcatheter and minimally invasive procedures. However, there is currently no evidence to support lowering the age threshold for implanting a bioprosthesis. Physicians in the Heart Team and patients should be cautious in pursuing more bioprosthetic valve use until its benefit is clearly proven in middle-aged patients. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Stent valve implantation in conventional redo aortic valve surgery to prevent patient-prosthesis mismatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Enrico; Franciosi, Giorgio; Clivio, Sara; Faletra, Francesco; Moccetti, Marco; Moccetti, Tiziano; Pedrazzini, Giovanni; Demertzis, Stefanos

    2017-03-01

    The goal was to show the technical details, feasibility and clinical results of balloon-expandable stent valve implantation in the aortic position during conventional redo open-heart surgery in selected obese patients with a small aortic prosthesis and severe patient-prosthesis mismatch. Two symptomatic overweight patients (body mass index of 31 and 38), each with a small aortic prosthesis (a 4-year-old, 21-mm Hancock II biological valve and a 29-year-old, 23-mm Duromedic mechanical valve), increased transvalvular gradients (59/31 and 74/44 mmHg) and a reduced indexed effective orifice area (0.50 and 0.43 cm 2 /m 2 ) underwent implantation of two 26-mm balloon-expandable Sapien 3 valves during standard on-pump redo valve surgery. Using full re-sternotomy, cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest, the two balloon-expandable stent valves were implanted under direct view using a standard aortotomy, after prosthesis removal and without annulus enlargement. Aortic cross-clamp times were 162 and 126 min; cardiopulmonary bypass times were 178 and 180 min; total surgical times were 360 and 318 min. At discharge, echocardiograms showed transvalvular peak and mean gradients of 13/9 and 23/13 mmHg and indexed effective orifice areas of 0.64 and 1.08 cm 2 /m 2 . The 3-month echocardiographic follow-up showed transvalvular peak and mean gradients of 18/9 and 19/11 mmHg and indexed effective orifice areas of 0.78 cm 2 /m 2 and 0.84 cm 2 /m 2 , with improved symptoms (New York Heart Association class 1). Implantation of a balloon-expandable stent valve during redo aortic valve surgery is feasible in selected cases and prevents patient-prosthesis mismatch in obese patients without need for aortic annulus enlargement. Moreover, in the case of stent valve degeneration, this approach permits additional valve-in-valve procedures with large stent valves and prevents re-redo surgery. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  2. The influence of Marfans and bicuspid valves on outcomes following aortic valve reimplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Carlos E; García Montero, Carlos; Serrano, Santiago-Fiz; González, Ana; Mingo, Susana; Moñivas, Vanessa; Centeno, Jorge; Forteza, Alberto

    2017-10-01

    We analyzed our early and midterm results with aortic valve reimplantation surgery to determine the influence of Marfan syndrome and bicuspid valves on outcomes with this technique. Between March 2004 and December 2015, 267 patients underwent aortic valve reimplantation operations. The mean diameter of the sinuses of Valsalva was 50 ± 3 mm and moderate/severe aortic regurgitation was present in 34.4% of these patients. A bicuspid aortic valve was present in 21% and 40% had Marfan syndrome. Overall 30-day mortality was 0.37% (1/267). Mean follow-up was 59.7 ± 38.7 months. Overall survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was 98 ± 8%, 98 ± 1%, and 94 ± 2%, respectively. Freedom from reoperation and aortic regurgitation >II was 99 ± 5%, 98 ± 8%, 96.7 ± 8%, and 99 ± 6%, 98 ± 1%, 98 ± 1%, respectively at 1, 3, and 5 years follow-up, with no differences between Marfan and bicuspid aortic valve groups. (p = 0.94 and p = 0.96, respectively). No endocarditis or thromboembolic complications were documented, and 93.6% of the patients did not receive any anticoagulation therapy. The reimplantation technique for aortic root aneurysms is associated with excellent clinical and functional outcomes at short and mid-term follow-up. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. [Long-term outcome of aortic valve sparing procedures in connective tissue disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Ogino, H; Matsuda, H; Minatoya, K; Sasaki, N

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the long-term outcome of aortic valve sparing procedures for patients having connective tissue disorder. Between 1993 and 2008, the aortic valve sparing surgery was performed in 94 patients having aortic root dilatation. Eighty patients of them (37.2 +/- 13.4 years, 50 male) had cystic medial necrosis in the aortic wall, which was confirmed the pathological examination. We reviewed these patients. Sixty percent (48/80) had Marfan syndrome, 5% (4/80) had Loeyz-Dietz syndrome, 2% (2/80) had bicuspid aortic valve, and 11% (9/80) had aortic dissection. Our reimplantation procedure has been refined as followed: with a tube graft in 41, a tube graft with creation of neo-sinuses in 11, and a Valsalva graft in 14. Fourteen patients underwent the remodeling procedure. The follow-up rate was 100% with the duration of 3.7+/- 3.4 years. There were no operative death but six late deaths. Seventeen (21.3%) patients required aortic valve replacement, for recurrent aortic insufficiency in 13 and infection in 4. Freedom from reoperation was 80%, 43%, and freedom from moderate or severe aortic insufficiency was 80%, 54%, at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Pathological findings of the aortic valve obtained in the reoperations showed elongation and prolapse of the aortic valve due to myxomatous degeneration and fibrous thickening caused by aortic insufficiency. Even in connective tissue disorders, aortic valve sparing operation is associated with acceptable long-term durability, although cusp degeneration resulting in recurrent aortic insufficiency might be progressive.

  4. Expanding indications for valve-sparing aortic root reconstruction: early and midterm results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valo, Johanna; Jokinen, Janne J; Kaarne, Markku; Ihlberg, Leo

    2013-02-01

    Valve-sparing aortic root reconstruction (VSRR) is an accepted method to treat patients with aortic root dilation. The role of the VSRR is less well defined for patients with bicuspid aortic valve, severe aortic valve insufficiency, congenital heart defects, and type A aortic dissection. We studied the clinical outcome of patients who underwent VSRR for expanded indications. Seventy-eight patients underwent VSRR between the 2005 and 2012. Seventy-two patients (92%) underwent reimplantation and 6 patients (8%) were operated on with the remodeling technique. The mean age was 51 ± 12 years (range 24 to 73). For 71 patients (91%), the operation was elective, and for 7 (9%; all with type A aortic dissection), on an emergency basis. Preoperatively, the degree of aortic insufficiency was graded as 2+ or greater for 27 patients (35%). Connective tissue disorder (Marfan or Loeys-Dietz), bicuspid aortic valve, or congenital heart disease was present in 15 (19%), 15 (19%), and 7 patients (9%), respectively. Concomitant aortic valve leaflet repair was performed for 39 patients (50%). The mean follow-up time was 2.4 ± 1.7 years (range, 0.1 to 7.0). Thirty-day mortality was zero. The rate of postoperative complications was low: stroke 3%, renal failure 3%, prosthesis infection 1%, and low cardiac output syndrome 1%. Survival was 100% at 1 year and 97% at 5 years. Freedom from recurrent aortic valve insufficiency (≥2+) during the follow-up was 94%. The midterm results of VSRR in terms of survival, freedom from recurrent aortic valve insufficiency, and the need for reoperation are excellent, even for high-risk patients. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Colombian experience with transcatheter aortic valve implantation of medtronic CoreValve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dager, Antonio E; Nuis, Rutger-Jan; Caicedo, Bernardo; Fonseca, Jaime A; Arana, Camilo; Cruz, Lidsa; Benitez, Luis M; Nader, Carlos A; Duenas, Eduardo; de Marchena, Eduardo J; O'Neill, William W; de Jaegere, Peter P

    2012-01-01

    At our institutions, increasing numbers of aortic stenosis patients were not candidates for surgical aortic valve replacement. Accordingly, we initiated the Cali Colombian Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) program. From March 2008 through January 2011, 53 consecutive patients (mean age, 79 ± 6 yr; men, 58%) underwent TAVI with the Medtronic CoreValve System, and data were prospectively collected. Our study's endpoints conformed with Valve Academic Research Consortium recommendations. We report our clinical results.Predicted mortality rates were 25% (interquartile range, 17%-34%) according to logistic EuroSCORE and 6% (interquartile range, 3%-8%) according to the Society of Thoracic Surgeons score. The 30-day mortality rate was 9% (3 intraprocedural deaths, 5 total). The combined 30-day safety endpoint was 30% (major vascular sequelae, 23%; life-threatening bleeding, 12%; myocardial infarction, 4%; major stroke, 4%; and acute kidney injury [stage 3], 2%). Eight patients (15%) required post-implantation balloon dilation and 2 (4%) required valve-in-valve implantation, for a technical device success rate of 77%. Mean peak transvalvular gradient decreased from 74 ± 29 to 17 ± 8 mmHg and mean transvalvular gradient from 40 ± 17 to 8 ± 4 mmHg (both P=0.001). Moderate or severe aortic regurgitation decreased from 32% to 18% (P=0.12) and mitral regurgitation from 32% to 13% (P=0.002). The 1-year survival rate was 81%.We found that TAVI with the CoreValve prosthesis was safe and feasible, with sustained long-term results, for treating aortic stenosis in patients at excessive surgical risk; nonetheless, serious adverse events occurred in 30% of the patients.

  6. Prosthetic valve endocarditis after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Thue; De Backer, Ole; Thyregod, Hans G H

    2015-01-01

    or worse postprocedural paravalvular regurgitation (hazard ratio, 4.0 [1.5-11]), implantation of >1 prosthesis (hazard ratio, 5.2 [1.5-18]), and any vascular complication (hazard ratio, 3.8 [1.5-9.8]). CONCLUSIONS: TAVI-PVE occurred at a slightly higher rate than reported for surgically implanted valves...... risk factors. METHODS AND RESULTS: Observational single-center study of 509 consecutive patients treated with a transcatheter implanted self-expandable aortic valve prosthesis (Medtronic CoreValve). We identified 18 patients diagnosed with TAVI-PVE during a median follow-up period of 1.4 years...

  7. Autopsy after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kesteren, F.; Wiegerinck, E. M. A.; Rizzo, S.; Baan, J.; Planken, R. N.; von der Thüsen, J. H.; Niessen, H. W. M.; van Oosterhout, M. F. M.; Pucci, A.; Thiene, G.; Basso, C.; Sheppard, M. N.; Wassilew, K.; van der Wal, A. C.

    2017-01-01

    Autopsy after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a new field of interest in cardiovascular pathology. To identify the cause of death, it is important to be familiar with specific findings related to the time interval between the procedure and death. We aimed to provide an overview of

  8. Severe aortic valve stenosis and nosebleed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoedel, Johannes; Obergfell, Achim; Maass, Alexander H.; Schodel, Johannes

    2007-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is known to be associated with loss of high molecular von Willebrand multimers. This can lead to gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with gastrointestinal angiodysplasia, the Heyde syndrome. Here we present a case of anaemia and severe epistaxis associated with acquired von

  9. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation for bicuspid aortic valve stenosis: Acute and intermediate-term outcomes in a high volume institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anže Djordjević

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: We report our experience with transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI in patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV stenosis.Methods: Perioperative and intermediate-term follow-up data were retrospectively analysed. All procedures were performed within the premises of an experienced high-volume TAVI centre.Results: Tirty-three consecutive BAV patients (age 55 to 87 years underwent TAVI. Mean logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE was 23,2 ± 19,3. Transapical Edwards Sapien® valve was implanted in the majority of patients (87.9 %. Nine patients (27.3 % required post-ballooning of the implanted valve for moderate to severe paravalvular leak, 3 patients (9 % required a second valve implantation for persistent severe paravalvular leak, and 2 (6 % required conversion to conventional surgery. Post-operative mild aortic regurgitation (AR was presented in 12 patients (36.4% and AR = 2 in 3 %. No AR > 2 was observed. Te device success rate according to the valve academic research consortium (VARC criteria was 82 %. Similar BAV anatomy, calcium distribution, type and size of implanted valve were noticed in patients with and without residual AR. Tere was no thirty-day mortality. Two-year estimated survival was 70 % (CI: 52.7–93.1 and was similar in patients with and without post-procedural residual paravalvular leak.Conclusions: TAVI in BAV stenosis is feasible but, even in experienced centres, is technically more challenging and is associated with a higher rate of post-dilatation, re-valving, and conversion to conventional surgery. Results should be re-tested in light of the recent introduction of second-generation TAVI prostheses.

  10. Concomitant mitral valve surgery with aortic valve replacement: a 21-year experience with a single mechanical prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidhu Pushpinder

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long-term survival for combined aortic and mitral valve replacement appears to be determined by the mitral valve prosthesis from our previous studies. This 21-year retrospective study assess long-term outcome and durability of aortic valve replacement (AVR with either concomitant mitral valve replacement (MVR or mitral valve repair (MVrep. We consider only a single mechanical prosthesis. Methods Three hundred and sixteen patients underwent double valve replacement (DVR (n = 273 or AVR+MVrep (n = 43, in the period 1977 to 1997. Follow up of 100% was achieved via telephone questionnaire and review of patients' medical records. Actuarial analysis of long-term survival was determined by Kaplan-Meier method. The Cox regression model was used to evaluate potential predictors of mortality. Results There were seventeen cases (5.4% of early mortality and ninety-six cases of late mortality. Fifteen-year survival was similar in both groups at 44% and 57% for DVR and AVR+MVrep respectively. There were no significant differences in valve related deaths, anticoagulation related complications, or prosthetic valve endocarditis between the groups. There were 6 cases of periprosthetic leak in the DVR group. Sex, pre-operative mitral and aortic valve pathology or previous cardiac surgery did not significantly affect outcome. Conclusion The mitral valve appears to be the determinant of survival following double valve surgery and survival is not significantly influenced by mitral valve repair.

  11. Acute type A aortic dissection: characteristics and outcomes comparing patients with bicuspid versus tricuspid aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etz, Christian D; von Aspern, Konstantin; Hoyer, Alexandro; Girrbach, Felix F; Leontyev, Sergey; Bakhtiary, Farhad; Misfeld, Martin; Mohr, Friedrich W

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the clinical characteristics and postoperative outcome of patients with a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) suffering acute dissection in comparison with their tricuspid peers. Between 1995 and 2011, 460 consecutive patients underwent emergency repair for acute type A aortic dissection. In 379 patients without connective tissue disease, the aortic valve morphology could clearly be specified (91.6% tricuspid and 8.4% bicuspid). At the time of dissection, patients with a bicuspid valve were younger (46.7 ± 13 vs 61.6 ± 12 years, P tricuspid valve (bicuspid: 31.3% vs tricuspid: 6.3%, P tricuspid valve patients (P tricuspid patients (P = 0.166). Hospital mortality was 20.3% and not significantly different between the two valve morphologies, even despite the younger age of bicuspid patients: 28.1% among bicuspids vs 19.6% among tricuspids (P = 0.255). Survival after discharge was 63.3% at 10 years for all patients. BAV patients had a significantly better survival with 100% at 10 years compared with 60.2% in tricuspid valve patients (P = 0.011). Mean follow-up among survivors was comparable for bicuspid and tricuspid patients (3.7 and 4.1 years, respectively). Patients with BAV have a distinctive dissection pattern with the entry tear frequently located in the aortic root and-despite their younger age-are subject to substantial hospital mortality. For bicuspid patients suffering from dissection, composite root replacement yields an excellent outcome equal to an age- and gender-matched normal population. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  12. Long-term results of aortic valve-sparing operations in patients with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Tirone E; Armstrong, Sue; Maganti, Manjula; Colman, Jack; Bradley, Timothy J

    2009-10-01

    The appropriateness of aortic valve-sparing operations in patients with Marfan syndrome has been questioned. This study examines the long-term results of these operations in patients with Marfan syndrome. From 1988 to 2006, 103 consecutive patients with Marfan syndrome (mean age, 37 +/- 12 years) and aortic root aneurysm had aortic valve-sparing operations. Emergency surgery was performed in 11 patients: 8 for acute type A aortic dissection and 3 for unexplained persistent chest pain. Fourteen patients also had mitral valve surgery. The technique of aortic valve reimplantation was used in 77 patients, and aortic root remodeling was used in 26 patients. Patients were followed prospectively and underwent annual echocardiographic studies. The mean follow-up was 7.3 +/- 4.2 years and 100% complete. There was 1 operative death and 5 late deaths. Four of the 6 deaths were due to complications of aortic dissections. The patients' survival at 15 years was 87.2% compared with 95.6% for the general population of Ontario matched for age and sex. Seven patients had important aortic insufficiency: 4 mild to moderate, 2 moderate, and 1 moderate to severe. Freedom from greater than mild aortic insufficiency at 15 years was 79.2%. Three patients, all after aortic root remodeling, had aortic valve replacement, 2 for aortic insufficiency and 1 for endocarditis. At the most recent follow-up, 97 patients were alive: 86 were in functional class I, and 11 were in functional class II. Aortic valve-sparing operations provided excellent clinical outcomes in this series of patients with Marfan syndrome. Postoperatively, complications of aortic dissections were the leading cause of death.

  13. Safety considerations during transapical aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drews, Thorsten; Pasic, Miralem; Juran, Ralf; Unbehaun, Axel; Dreysse, Stephan; Kukucka, Marian; Mladenow, Alexander; Hetzer, Roland; Buz, Semih

    2014-05-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a new method for the treatment of very high-risk patients with aortic valve stenosis. The radiation dose to which the patient and each member of the heart team are exposed during this new fluoroscopically guided intervention is unknown. Between April 2008 and August 2013, 1177 consecutive patients underwent transapical TAVI (TA-TAVI). In 22 consecutive patients undergoing TA-TAVI, the radiation doses to the cardiothoracic surgeon, cardiologist, anaesthesiologist (performing echocardiography examination), surgical assistant and nurse were measured. The radiation dose measurements were performed during TAVI using thermoluminescence and film dosimeters positioned on seven parts of the body: (i) chest above the lead apron, (ii) pelvic area below the apron, (iii) chest below the apron, (iv) thyroid gland above the apron, (v) near eyes, (vi) hands (using rings) and (vii) the feet. The results were compared with the values given in the international literature on recommended radiation dose limits for workers. The mean radiation time was 6.1 min and the mean dose-area product for the patients was 8.661 µGy · m(2). Analysis of the dosimeters and the calculation of the effective dose showed a per intervention dose of 0.03 mSv for the surgeon, 0.05 mSv for the assistant, 0.02 mSv for the cardiologist and the anaesthesiologist and 0.001 mSv for the nurse. The maximum ionizing radiation per intervention was 0.5 mSv at the right hand of the surgeon (holding the introducer sheet) and 0.7 mSv at the left hand of the surgical assistant. Additionally, the analysis of the body dose shows a maximum dose to the lower leg of the surgeon (0.3 mSv) and the genital area of the assistant (0.06 mSv). During a TA-TAVI procedure, the patients receive a higher X-ray dose than during coronary angiography with intervention. After 100 TAVI procedures, the members of the heart team sustain a comparable dose of ionizing radiation to the annual dose

  14. THE PROGNOSIS IN TRANSCATHETER AORTIC VALVE IMPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Imaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the effect of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI, performed by different types of prostheses and various surgical access, on the prognosis of patients with critical aortic stenosis and comorbidities.Material and methods. Patients (n=130 that had consistently performed 80 TAVI by Edwards valve transfemoral (n=50 and transapical (n=30 access, as well as 50 transcatheter aortic valve replacement by CoreValve system were included into the study. Complications including perioperative mortality, total 30-day mortality, as well as post-hospital mortality were registered during aortic valve replacement, immediately after surgery, before the expiry of 30 days. Mean follow-up was 2.2 years (range 0.2 to 5.2 years.Results. Hospital mortality was on average 6.9%. 121 patients had been discharged from the department after the surgery. The number of deaths in the post-hospital period was 14.8%. Valve type and the type of access had no effect on post-hospital mortality. Men died more than 2.5 times often than women, regardless of age. Atrioventricular block, pacemaker implantation, and history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were the most significant prognostic factors. An important role of minor stroke and renal failure should be noted. Mortality did not depend on the surgical access or valve type. All parameters characterizing the intervention were significantly associated with mortality, both during and after surgery. The proportion of survivors at the end of the first year of observation using Corvalve system was 86.9%, Edwards valve by transfemoral access - 88% and Edwards valve by transapical access – 85.4% (insignificant differences for all groups, p>0.05. Two-year survival was 77.5%, 82.5% and 82.7%, respectively (also insignificant differences for all groups, p>0.05.Conclusion. TAVI is the method of choice, reasonable alternative approach for surgical valve replacement in patients with high surgical risk, although

  15. Leaflet reconstructive techniques for aortic valve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzitelli, Domenico; Stamm, Christof; Rankin, J Scott; Pfeiffer, Steffen; Fischlein, Theodor; Pirk, Jan; Choi, Yeong-Hoon; Detter, Christian; Kroll, Johannes; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Shrestha, Malakh; Schreiber, Christian; Lange, Rüdiger

    2014-12-01

    Refining leaflet reconstruction has become a primary issue in aortic valve repair. This descriptive analysis reviews leaflet pathology, repair techniques, and early results in a prospective regulatory trial of aortic valve repair. Sixty-five patients underwent valve repair for predominant moderate to severe aortic insufficiency (AI). The mean age was 63 ± 13 years, and 69% of the patients were male. Ascending aortic/root replacement was required in 62%. As a first step, ring annuloplasty was performed, and then leaflet repair included leaflet plication for prolapse, nodular unfolding, double pericardial patching of commissural defects or holes, complete pericardial leaflet replacement, leaflet extension, and Gore-Tex reinforcement. Leaflet techniques and causes of adverse outcomes were evaluated. The follow-up time was 2-years maximal and 0.9 years mean, with a survival of 97%. Eighty percent of patients required repair of leaflet defects: leaflet prolapse (52/65-80%), ruptured commissures (6/65-9%), leaflet holes (4/65-6%), and nodular retraction (6/65-9%). The average preoperative AI grade of 2.9 ± 0.8 fell to 0.7 ± 0.7 (p Gore-Tex reinforcements in 2 patients. Two patients with single pericardial leaflet replacements and all those with double pericardial reconstructions did well. Leaflet defects are common in patients with moderate to severe AI. Leaflet plication, nodular unfolding, and double pericardial patching performed well. Gore-Tex and leaflet extension seemed less satisfactory. Standardization and experience with leaflet reconstruction will be important for optimizing the outcomes of aortic valve repair. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Aortic valve surgery - minimally invasive

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... valve surgery. Techniques include min-thoracotomy, min-sternotomy, robot-assisted surgery, and percutaneous surgery. To perform the ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  17. Aortic elasticity and size are associated with aortic regurgitation and left ventricular dysfunction in tetralogy of Fallot after pulmonary valve replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grotenhuis, H.B.; Ottenkamp, J.; de Bruijn, L.; Westenberg, J.J.M.; Vliegen, H.W.; Kroft, L.J.M.; de Roos, A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Aortic wall pathology and concomitant aortic dilatation have been described in tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) patients, which may negatively affect aortic valve and left ventricular systolic function. Objective: To assess aortic dimensions, aortic elasticity, aortic valve competence and

  18. Risk Factors for Late Aortic Valve Dysfunction After the David V Valve-Sparing Root Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esaki, Jiro; Leshnower, Bradley G; Binongo, Jose N; Lasanajak, Yi; McPherson, LaRonica; Guyton, Robert A; Chen, Edward P

    2017-11-01

    Valve-sparing root replacement (VSRR) is an established therapy for aortic root pathology. However, late aortic valve dysfunction requiring reoperation remains a primary concern of this procedure. This study examines risk factors for late aortic insufficiency (AI) and aortic stenosis (AS) after David V VSRR. A retrospective review from 2005 to 2015 at a US academic center identified 282 patients who underwent VSRR. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to identify risk factors for late AI and AS after VSRR. The mean age was 46.4 years. Sixty-four patients (22.7%) had bicuspid valves, and 41 patients (14.5%) had Marfan syndrome. The incidence of reoperations was 27 (9.6%), and 42 cases (14.9%) presented with acute type A dissection. Operative mortality was 8 (2.8%). Seven-year survival was 90.9%. Seven-year cumulative incidence of reoperation, greater than 2+ AI and greater than moderate AS were 3.1%, 2.2%, and 0.8%, respectively. Multivariable analysis showed aortic root size 55 mm or larger (hazard ratio 3.44, 95% confidence interval: 1.27 to 9.29, p = 0.01) to be a risk factor for late AI whereas bicuspid valve (hazard ratio 16.07, 95% confidence interval: 3.12 to 82.68, p = 0.001) and cusp repair were found to be risk factors (hazard ratio 5.91, 95% confidence interval: 1.17 to 29.86, p = 0.03) for late AS. Valve-sparing root replacement can be performed with low operative risk and good overall long-term survival even in complex clinical settings. Durable valve function can be expected; however, aortic root size 55 cm or more, bicuspid valve anatomy, and cusp repair represent independent risk factors for late aortic valve dysfunction after these procedures. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With Different Valve Types in Elliptic Aortic Annuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeno, Yoshio; Abramowitz, Yigal; Yoon, Sung-Han; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Raul, Sharma; Israr, Sharjeel; Miyasaka, Masaki; Kawamori, Hiroyuki; Kazuno, Yoshio; Rami, Tanya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Mangat, Geeteshwar; Kashif, Mohammad; Chakravarty, Tarun; Nakamura, Mamoo; Cheng, Wen; Makkar, Raj R

    2017-06-23

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of an elliptic annulus on acute device success rates following self-expanding (SE) transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) vs. balloon-expandable (BE) TAVR.Methods and Results:Outcomes were assessed using Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 definitions. Aortic annulus ratio (AAR) was measured as short axis diameter/long axis diameter. Mean AAR was 0.81±0.06. Patients were therefore divided into 2 groups: AAR elliptic annuli, SE-TAVR was an independent predictor of unsuccessful device implantation (OR, 6.34, Pelliptic annuli was associated with an exponential rise in device success (threshold ≥17.5%; area under the curve, 0.83) but not for BE-TAVR. Furthermore, optimally oversized SE valves and BE valves had a similarly high device success for elliptic annuli (SE valve, 96.2% vs. BE valve, 95.3%). For circular annuli, similarly high device success was achieved for the 2 valve types. Conversely, for elliptic annuli, SE valves had a lower device success than BE valves. Device success following optimal oversizing of SE valves, however, was similar to that for BE valves.

  20. Initial Surgical Experience with Aortic Valve Repair: Clinical and Echocardiographic Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Francisco Diniz Affonso; Colatusso, Daniele de Fátima Fornazari; da Costa, Ana Claudia Brenner Affonso; Balbi Filho, Eduardo Mendel; Cavicchioli, Vinicius Nesi; Lopes, Sergio Augusto Veiga; Ferreira, Andrea Dumsch de Aragon; Collatusso, Claudinei

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Due to late complications associated with the use of conventional prosthetic heart valves, several centers have advocated aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root replacement for patients with aortic valve insufficiency, in order to enhance late survival and minimize adverse postoperative events. Methods From March/2012 thru March 2015, 37 patients consecutively underwent conservative operations of the aortic valve and/or aortic root. Mean age was 48±16 years and 81% were males. The aortic valve was bicuspid in 54% and tricuspid in the remaining. All were operated with the aid of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography. Surgical techniques consisted of replacing the aortic root with a Dacron graft whenever it was dilated or aneurysmatic, using either the remodeling or the reimplantation technique, besides correcting leaflet prolapse when present. Patients were sequentially evaluated with clinical and echocardiographic studies and mean follow-up time was 16±5 months. Results Thirty-day mortality was 2.7%. In addition there were two late deaths, with late survival being 85% (CI 95% - 68%-95%) at two years. Two patients were reoperated due to primary structural valve failure. Freedom from reoperation or from primary structural valve failure was 90% (CI 95% - 66%-97%) and 91% (CI 95% - 69%-97%) at 2 years, respectively. During clinical follow-up up to 3 years, there were no cases of thromboembolism, hemorrhage or endocarditis. Conclusions Although this represents an initial series, these data demonstrates that aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root surgery can be performed with satisfactory immediate and short-term results. PMID:27556321

  1. Cardiac energetics analysis after aortic valve replacement with 16-mm ATS mechanical valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushijima, Tomoki; Tanoue, Yoshihisa; Uchida, Takayuki; Matsuyama, Sho; Matsumoto, Takashi; Tominaga, Ryuji

    2014-09-01

    The 16-mm ATS mechanical valve is one of the smallest prosthetic valves used for aortic valve replacement (AVR) in patients with a very small aortic annulus, and its clinical outcomes are reportedly satisfactory. Here, we analyzed the left ventricular (LV) performance after AVR with the 16-mm ATS mechanical valve, based on the concept of cardiac energetics analysis. Eleven patients who underwent AVR with the 16-mm ATS mechanical valve were enrolled in this study. All underwent echocardiographic examination at three time points: before AVR, approximately 1 month after AVR, and approximately 1 year after AVR. LV contractility (end-systolic elastance [Ees]), afterload (effective arterial elastance [Ea]), and efficiency (ventriculoarterial coupling [Ea/Ees] and the stroke work to pressure-volume area ratio [SW/PVA]) were noninvasively measured by echocardiographic data and blood pressure measurement. Ees transiently decreased after AVR and then recovered to the pre-AVR level at the one-year follow-up. Ea significantly decreased in a stepwise manner. Consequently, Ea/Ees and SW/PVA were also significantly improved at the one-year follow-up compared with those before AVR. The midterm LV performance after AVR with the 16-mm ATS mechanical valve was satisfactory. AVR with the 16-mm ATS mechanical valve is validated as an effective treatment for patients with a very small aortic annulus. The cardiac energetics variables, coupling with the conventional hemodynamic variables, can contribute to a better understanding of the patients' clinical conditions, and those may serve as promising indices of the cardiac function.

  2. Incidental necropsy finding of a quadricuspid aortic valve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijswijk, Jan Willem; Willemink, Martin; Kluin, Jolanda; Vink, Aryan

    2015-01-01

    Quadricuspid aortic valve is a rare congenital cardiac malformation often associated with abnormal valve function. In this article, we present a case of quadricuspid aortic valve only diagnosed at the time of post-mortem examination. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Infective Endocarditis of the Aortic Valve with Anterior Mitral Valve Leaflet Aneurysm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomsic, Anton; Li, Wilson W. L.; van Paridon, Marieke; Bindraban, Navin R.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Mitral valve leaflet aneurysm is a rare and potentially devastating complication of aortic valve endocarditis. We report the case of a 48-year-old man who had endocarditis of the native aortic valve and a concomitant aneurysm of the anterior mitral valve leaflet. Severe mitral regurgitation occurred

  4. [A clinical experience of continuous warm blood cardioplegia in two cases of repeat aortic valve surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, H; In-nami, R; Watanabe, M; Funakoshi, N; Hirooka, K; Fujiwara, A

    1992-11-01

    The continuous warm blood cardioplegia (CWBC) was used for myocardial protection during aortic cross clamping in two cases of repeat aortic valve operations with good results. Case 1: A 46-year-old man, who underwent an aortic valve replacement because of the rheumatic aortic regurgitation (AR) in 1978, have suffered from orthopnea due to para-prosthetic valvular regurgitation since 1983. He was revealed to have bi-ventricular hypertrophy with myocardial damage on ECG, EF 0.27 on UCG, PCWP 20 mmHg and severe AR on cardiac catheterization. Case 2: A 43-year-old man, who had an aortic valvuloplasty for the non-rheumatic incompetency in 1981, have had a recurrent regurgitation, resulting in left ventricular hypertrophy accompanied by chest pain. Both cases were reoperated upon, having aortic valve replacement with mechanical prosthetic valves through the re-median sternotomy, utilizing CWBC with good recovery. CWBC provides an ideal circumstances for myocardial oxygen utilization during aortic cross clamping and moreover a benefit that needs not the wide dissection of the heart in a redo case because it has no need of topical cooling and ventricular defibrillation following aortic declamping. In conclusion, CWBC is very useful in a repeat aortic valve surgery.

  5. Global Strain in Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbæk, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -Global longitudinal systolic strain (GLS) is often reduced in aortic stenosis despite normal ejection fraction. The importance of reduced preoperative GLS on long-term outcome after aortic valve replacement (AVR) is unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: -A total of 125 patients with severe...... quartile 49% (n=15), p=0.04. Patients with increased age, left ventricular hypertrophy and left atrial dilatation were at increased risk. In Cox regression analysis after correcting for standard risk factors and ejection fraction, GLS was found to be significantly associated with cardiac morbidity...

  6. Sutureless implantation of the perceval s aortic valve prosthesis through right anterior minithoracotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmanov, Daniyar; Miceli, Antonio; Bevilacqua, Stefano; Farneti, Pierandrea; Solinas, Marco; Ferrarini, Matteo; Glauber, Mattia

    2013-12-01

    Many new, less invasive strategies are proposed for aortic valve operation in elderly patients. Rapid deployment sutureless aortic valve prosthesis has been recently introduced. We analyzed our experience with a sutureless valve implanted through a minimally invasive approach. A retrospective observational study with prospectively registered data was conducted on 137 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy. Between April 2011 and January 2013, 137 consecutive patients underwent aortic valve replacement with a recently introduced, rapid deployment, sutureless pericardial valve in minithoracotomy access (47 men; mean age, 76.6 ± 7.1 years). There were 35 obese patients with a body mass index of more than 30 kg/m(2). Mean logistic EuroSCORE I was 10.0; 74 (54%) patients were in New York Heart Association functional class III and IV. In all, 19 (13.9%), 45 (32.8%), and 73 (53.3%) patients received 21-, 23-, and 25-mm valve prostheses, respectively. The mean aortic cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass times were 59.3 ± 19 min and 92.3 ± 27 min, respectively. No operative mortality occurred. Median stay in the intensive care unit was 1 day, with assisted ventilation necessary for a median of 6 hours. Three cases of postoperative ischemic stroke were observed (1 patient with a previous history of an ischemic cerebral event). Median hospital length of stay was 6 days. A sutureless valve for minimally invasive aortic valve replacement is a feasible, effective, and safe tool. Ultimately amplifying indications for less invasive aortic valve replacement in a high surgical risk subset of patients, it can become a valid alternative for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Human tissue valves in aortic position: determinants of reoperation and valve regurgitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.P. Willems (Tineke); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); V.E. Kleyburg-Linkers; E. Bos (Egbert); L.A. van Herwerden (Lex); J.R.T.C. Roelandt (Jos); J.J.M. Takkenberg (Hanneke)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Human tissue valves for aortic valve replacement have a limited durability that is influenced by interrelated determinants. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to analyze the relation between these determinants of durability and valve

  8. Risks and Challenges of Surgery for Aortic Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubitzsch, Herko; Tarar, Waharat; Claus, Benjamin; Gabbieri, Davide; Falk, Volkmar; Christ, Torsten

    2018-03-01

    Prosthetic valve endocarditis is the most severe form of infective endocarditis. This study assessed the risks and challenges of surgery for aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis. In total, 116 consecutive patients (98 males, age 65.2±12.7years), who underwent redo-surgery for active aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis between 2000 and 2014, were reviewed. Cox regression analysis was used to identify factors for aortic root destructions as well as for morbidity and mortality. Median follow-up was 3.8 years (0-13.9 years). Aortic root destructions (42 limited and 29 multiple lesions) were associated with early prosthetic valve endocarditis and delayed diagnosis (≥14 d), but not with mortality. There were 16 (13.8%) early (≤30 d) and 32 (27.6%) late (>30 days) deaths. Survival at 1, 5, and 10 years was 72±4.3%, 56±5.4%, and 46±6.4%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of death, reinfection, and reoperation was 19.0% at 30days and 36.2% at 1year. Delayed diagnosis, concomitant procedures, and EuroSCORE II >20% were predictors for early mortality and need for mechanical circulatory support, age >70years, and critical preoperative state were predictors for late mortality. In their absence, survival at 10 years was 70±8.4%. Reinfections and reoperations occurred more frequently if ≥1 risk factor for endocarditis and aortic root destructions were present. At 10 years, freedom from reinfection and reoperation was 89±4.2% and 91±4.0%. The risks of death, reinfection, and reoperation are significant within the first year after surgery for aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis. Early diagnosis and aortic root destructions are the most important challenges, but advanced age, critical preoperative state, and the need for mechanical circulatory support determine long-term survival. Copyright © 2017 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B

  9. Aortic valve ochronosis: a rare manifestation of alkaptonuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, Christina Maria

    2011-01-01

    Alkaptonuric ochronosis is a heritable disorder of tyrosine metabolism, with various systemic abnormalities related to pigment deposition and degeneration of collagen and other tissues, including the heart and aorta. A 65-year-old woman with alkaptonuric ochronosis and a history of four joint replacements required aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis. Operative findings included ochronosis of a partly calcified aortic valve and the aortic intima. The aortic valve was removed at surgery and histologically investigated. Light microscopic examination of the aortic valve revealed intracellular and extracellular deposits of ochronotic pigment and a chronic inflammatory infiltrate. Beside the case representation, the disease history, aetiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation and treatment of aortic valve ochronosis are reviewed. PMID:22689837

  10. Early Outcomes of Sutureless Aortic Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Onur Hanedan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In elderly high-risk surgical patients, sutureless aortic valve replacement (AVR should be an alternative to standard AVR. The potential advantages of sutureless aortic prostheses include reducing cross-clamping and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB time and facilitating minimally invasive surgery and complex cardiac interventions, while maintaining satisfactory hemodynamic outcomes and low rates of paravalvular leakage. The current study reports our single-center experience regarding the early outcomes of sutureless aortic valve implantation. Methods: Between October 2012 and June 2015, 65 patients scheduled for surgical valve replacement with symptomatic aortic valve disease and New York Heart Association function of class II or higher were included to this study. Perceval S (Sorin Biomedica Cardio Srl, Sallugia, Italy and Edwards Intuity (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA valves were used. Results: The mean age of the patients was 71.15±8.60 years. Forty-four patients (67.7% were female. The average preoperative left ventricular ejection fraction was 56.9±9.93. The CPB time was 96.51±41.27 minutes and the cross-clamping time was 60.85±27.08 minutes. The intubation time was 8.95±4.19 hours, and the intensive care unit and hospital stays were 2.89±1.42 days and 7.86±1.42 days, respectively. The mean quantity of drainage from chest tubes was 407.69±149.28 mL. The hospital mortality rate was 3.1%. A total of five patients (7.69% died during follow-up. The mean follow-up time was 687.24±24.76 days. The one-year survival rate was over 90%. Conclusion: In the last few years, several models of valvular sutureless bioprostheses have been developed. The present study evaluating the single-center early outcomes of sutureless aortic valve implantation presents the results of an innovative surgical technique, finding that it resulted in appropriate hemodynamic conditions with acceptable ischemic time.

  11. [Current results of the aortic valve changes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Soriano, F; Barnet, J C; Quijano Pitman, F

    1979-01-01

    The prosthetic substitution of the aortic valve has experienced a great advance over the last years in relation with the surgical and hospital mortality. In the personal experience of one of the authors (F. López Soriano), the mortality rate was 0% in 40 patients in which an aortic valve change was performed, isolated or associated to other pathology. Between 1973 and 1978, 167 patients were operated at the "Instituto Nacional de Cardiología", with an early mortality of 11.3%; these results were superior to those previously published. The percentage of myocardic infarction following surgery was similar in both groups 8% less, than the 15% reported in other statistics. 25 patients of the total group needed second surgery due to prosthetic malfunction. A Starr Edward Model 2320 had been implanted on most patients, known for the high percentage of malfunction which is being discarted at present. Thromboembolic phenomena occurred in 9 patients (5.3%) from which five were located in the brain, none of them being fatal. The present results justify early surgery in moderately sinthomatic aortic valve disease, when comparing these results with the natural history of the disease and the evolution of said patients operated in later stages.

  12. Mechanisms of recurrent aortic regurgitation after aortic valve repair: predictive value of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Polain de Waroux, Jean-Benoît; Pouleur, Anne-Catherine; Robert, Annie; Pasquet, Agnès; Gerber, Bernhard L; Noirhomme, Philippe; El Khoury, Gébrine; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis J

    2009-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the intraoperative echocardiographic features associated with recurrent severe aortic regurgitation (AR) after an aortic valve repair surgery. Surgical valve repair for AR has significant advantages over valve replacement, but little is known about the predictors and mechanisms of its failure. We blindly reviewed all clinical, pre-operative, intraoperative, and follow-up transesophageal echocardiographic data of 186 consecutive patients who underwent valve repair for AR during a 10-year period and in whom intraoperative and follow-up echo data were available. After a median follow-up duration of 18 months, 41 patients had recurrent 3+ AR, 23 patients presented with residual 1+ to 2+ AR, and 122 had no or trivial AR. In patients with recurrent 3+ AR, the cause of recurrent AR was the rupture of a pericardial patch in 3 patients, a residual cusp prolapse in 26 patients, a restrictive cusp motion in 9 patients, an aortic dissection in 2 patients, and an infective endocarditis in 1 patient. Pre-operatively, all 3 groups were similar for aortic root dimensions and prevalence of bicuspid valve (overall 37%). Patients with recurrent AR were more likely to display Marfan syndrome or type 3 dysfunction pre-operatively. At the opposite end, patients with continent AR repair at follow-up were more likely to have type 2 dysfunction pre-operatively. After cardiopulmonary bypass, a shorter coaptation length, the degree of cusp billowing, a lower level of coaptation (relative to the annulus), a larger diameter of the aortic annulus and the sino-tubular junction, the presence of a residual AR, and the width of its vena contracta were associated with the presence of AR at follow-up. Multivariate Cox analysis identified a shorter coaptation length (odds ratio [OR]: 0.8, p = 0.05), a coaptation occurring below the level of the aortic annulus (OR: 7.9, p < 0.01), a larger aortic annulus (OR: 1.2, p = 0.01), and residual aortic regurgitation

  13. Transcatheter Versus Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Steinbrüchel, Daniel Andreas; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2015-01-01

    clinical trial compared TAVR with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in an all-comers patient cohort. METHODS: Patients ≥ 70 years old with severe aortic valve stenosis and no significant coronary artery disease were randomized 1:1 to TAVR using a self-expanding bioprosthesis versus SAVR. The primary...... difference in the primary endpoint was found (13.1% vs. 16.3%; p = 0.43 for superiority). The result did not change in the as-treated population. No difference in the rate of cardiovascular death or prosthesis reintervention was found. Compared with SAVR-treated patients, TAVR-treated patients had more...... conduction abnormalities requiring pacemaker implantation, larger improvement in effective orifice area, more total aortic valve regurgitation, and higher New York Heart Association functional class at 1 year. SAVR-treated patients had more major or life-threatening bleeding, cardiogenic shock, acute kidney...

  14. A giant myxoma originating from the aortic valve causing severe left ventricular tract obstruction: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prifti, Edvin; Ademaj, Fadil; Kajo, Efrosina; Baboci, Arben

    2015-04-16

    The left ventricular localization of a myxoma is very rare, usually arising from the interventricular septum close to the left ventricular outflow tract, the mitral valve, the ventricular wall and extremely rarely the aortic valve. A 13-year-old male was admitted due to dyspnea and angina. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed left ventricular outflow tract obstruction with a mean gradient of 58 mmHg, and a mobile mass measuring 65×25 mm originating from the ventricular surface of the aortic valve was identified. The patient underwent urgent surgical excision and aortic valve replacement. Histopathological examination of the mass confirmed the diagnosis of a myxoma. In conclusion, a myxoma originating from the aortic valve remains a very rare localization. Total resection associated with aortic valve replacement seems to offer an excellent outcome.

  15. Vascular complications associated with transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardar, M Rizwan; Goldsweig, Andrew M; Abbott, J Dawn; Sharaf, Barry L; Gordon, Paul C; Ehsan, Afshin; Aronow, Herbert D

    2017-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is now an accepted pathway for aortic valve replacement for patients who are at prohibitive, severe and intermediate risk for traditional aortic valve surgery. However, with this rising uptrend and adaptation of this new technology, vascular complications and their management remain an Achilles heel for percutaneous aortic valve replacement. The vascular complications are an independent predictor of mortality for patients undergoing TAVR. Early recognition of these complications and appropriate management is paramount. In this article, we review the most commonly encountered vascular complications associated with currently approved TAVR devices and their optimal percutaneous management techniques.

  16. Autopsy after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kesteren, F; Wiegerinck, E M A; Rizzo, S; Baan, J; Planken, R N; von der Thüsen, J H; Niessen, H W M; van Oosterhout, M F M; Pucci, A; Thiene, G; Basso, C; Sheppard, M N; Wassilew, K; van der Wal, A C

    2017-03-01

    Autopsy after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a new field of interest in cardiovascular pathology. To identify the cause of death, it is important to be familiar with specific findings related to the time interval between the procedure and death. We aimed to provide an overview of the autopsy findings in patients with TAVI in their medical history divided by the timing of death with specific interest in the added value of autopsy over a solely clinically determined cause of death. In 8 European centres, 72 cases with autopsy reports were available. Autopsies were divided according to the time interval of death and reports were analysed. In 32 patients who died ≤72 h postprocedure, mortality resulted from cardiogenic or haemorrhagic shock in 62.5 and 34.4%, respectively. In 31 patients with mortality >72 h to ≤30 days, cardiogenic shock was the cause of death in 51.6% followed by sepsis (22.6%) and respiratory failure (9.7%). Of the nine patients with death >30 days, 88.9% died of sepsis, caused by infective endocarditis in half of them. At total of 12 patients revealed cerebrovascular complications. Autopsy revealed unexpected findings in 61.1% and resulted in a partly or completely different cause of death as was clinically determined. Autopsy on patients who underwent TAVI reveals specific patterns of cardiovascular pathology that clearly relate to the time interval between TAVI and death and significantly adds to the clinical diagnosis. Our data support the role of autopsy including investigation of the cerebrum in the quickly evolving era of cardiac device technology.

  17. Aortic valve insufficiency in the teenager and young adult: the role of prosthetic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Scott M

    2013-10-01

    The contents of this article were presented in the session "Aortic insufficiency in the teenager" at the congenital parallel symposium of the 2013 Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) annual meeting. The accompanying articles detail the approaches of aortic valve repair and the Ross procedure.(1,2) The current article focuses on prosthetic valve replacement. For many young patients requiring aortic valve surgery, either aortic valve repair or a Ross procedure provides a good option. The advantages include avoidance of anticoagulation and potential for growth. In other patients, a prosthetic valve is an appropriate alternative. This article discusses the current state of knowledge regarding mechanical and bioprosthetic valve prostheses and their specific advantages relative to valve repair or a Ross procedure. In current practice, young patients requiring aortic valve surgery frequently undergo valve replacement with a prosthetic valve. In STS adult cardiac database, among patients ≤30 years of age undergoing aortic valve surgery, 34% had placement of a mechanical valve, 51% had placement of a bioprosthetic valve, 9% had aortic valve repair, and 2% had a Ross procedure. In the STS congenital database, among patients 12 to 30 years of age undergoing aortic valve surgery, 21% had placement of a mechanical valve, 18% had placement of a bioprosthetic valve, 30% had aortic valve repair, and 24% had a Ross procedure. In the future, the balance among these options may be altered by design improvements in prosthetic valves, alternatives to warfarin, the development of new patch materials for valve repair, and techniques to avoid Ross autograft failure.

  18. Valve mediated hemodynamics and their association with distal ascending aortic diameter in bicuspid aortic valve subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghav, Vrishank; Barker, Alex J; Mangiameli, Daniel; Mirabella, Lucia; Markl, Michael; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2018-01-01

    Valve mediated hemodynamics have been postulated to contribute to pathology of the ascending aorta (AAo). The objective of this study is to assess the association of aortic valve morphology and hemodynamics with downstream AAo size in subjects with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) disease. Four-dimensional flow MRI at 1.5 or 3 Tesla was used to evaluate the hemodynamics in the proximal AAo of 52 subjects: size-matched controls with tricuspid aortic valves (n = 24, mid ascending aorta [MAA] diameter = 38.0 ± 4.9 mm) and BAV patients with aortic dilatation (n = 14 right and left coronary leaflet fusion [RL]-BAV, MAA diameter = 38.1 ± 5.3 mm; n = 14 right and noncoronary leaflet fusion [RN]-BAV, MAA diameter = 36.5 ± 6.6 mm). A validated semi-automated technique was used to evaluate hemodynamic metrics (flow angle, flow displacement, and jet quadrant) and valve morphology (orifice circularity) for all subjects. Regression analysis of these metrics to AAo diameter was performed. RN-BAV subjects displayed a stronger correlation between hemodynamic metrics in the proximal AAo with diameter in the distal AAo compared with size-matched tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) controls and RL-BAV subjects. The distal AAo diameter was found to be strongly correlated to the upstream flow displacement (R 2 adjusted = 0.75) and flow angle (R 2 adjusted = 0.66) measured at the sino-tubular junction (STJ). Orifice circularity was also strongly correlated (R 2 adjusted = 0.53) to the distal AAo diameter in RN-BAV subjects. For TAV controls and RL-BAV subjects, correlations were weaker (R 2 adjusted valve morphology metrics. 3 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:246-254. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  19. Midterm outcome of valve-sparing aortic root replacement in inherited connective tissue disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Ogino, Hitoshi; Matsuda, Hitoshi; Minatoya, Kenji; Sasaki, Hiroaki; Iba, Yutaka

    2011-11-01

    This study determined the midterm outcome of valve-sparing aortic root replacement for patients with inherited connective tissue disorders. From 1993 to 2008, 94 patients underwent valve-sparing aortic root replacement. Sixty patients (64%), average age 33 years (range, 15 to 61 years), had inherited connective tissue disorders: Marfan syndrome, 54 (92%); Loeys-Dietz syndrome, 5 (8%); and smooth muscle α-actin (ACTA2) mutation in 1. Median preoperative sinus diameter was 52 mm (range, 42 to 76 mm), and moderate/severe aortic regurgitation was present in 14 (23%). Seven (12%, 1993 to 1999) underwent remodeling procedures, and 53 had reimplantation procedures. Cusp repair was performed in 4. Median follow-up was 55 months (range, 1 to 149 months). There were 15 patients in the early term (1993 to 2000) and 45 in the late term (2001 to 2008). Four late deaths occurred (cardiac, 3; aortic, 1), with 10-year survival of 86%. Rates of freedom from aortic valve replacement at 5 and 10 years were 85% and 58% in remodeling and 96% and 58% in reimplantation. Risk factors for reoperations were postprocedure intraoperative aortic insufficiency greater than mild (p = 0.046), remodeling procedure (p = 0.016), and early term (p = 0.0002). One patient (2%) with none/trivial postprocedure aortic insufficiency required aortic valve replacement. Freedom from reoperation in patients with none/trivial postprocedure aortic insufficiency at 5 and 10 years was 100% and 67%. Meticulous control of aortic insufficiency during operation would bring favorable midterm durability in valve-sparing aortic root replacement using a reimplantation technique, even in patients with inherited connective tissue disorders. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Aortic root replacement after previous surgical intervention on the aortic valve, aortic root, or ascending aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, E W Matthias; Radu, N Costin; Mekontso-Dessap, Armand; Hillion, Marie-Line; Loisance, Daniel

    2006-03-01

    Aortic root replacement after a previous operation on the aortic valve, aortic root, or ascending aorta remains a major challenge. Records of 56 consecutive patients (44 men; mean age, 56.4 +/- 13.6 years) undergoing reoperative aortic root replacement between June 1994 and June 2005 were reviewed retrospectively. Reoperation was performed 9.4 +/- 6.7 years after the last cardiac operation. Indications for reoperation were true aneurysm (n = 14 [25%]), false aneurysm (n = 10 [18%]), dissection or redissection (n = 9 [16%]), structural or nonstructural valve dysfunction (n = 10 [18%]), prosthetic valve-graft infection (n = 12 [21%]), and miscellaneous (n = 1 [2%]). Procedures performed were aortic root replacement (n = 47 [84%]), aortic root replacement plus mitral valve procedure (n = 5 [9%]), and aortic root replacement plus arch replacement (n = 4 [7%]). In 14 (25%) patients coronary artery bypass grafting had to be performed unexpectedly during the same procedure or immediately after the procedure to re-establish coronary perfusion. Hospital mortality reached 17.9% (n = 10). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed the need for unplanned perioperative coronary artery bypass grafting as the sole independent risk factor for hospital death (P = .005). Actuarial survival was 83.8% +/- 4.9% at 1 month, 73.0% +/- 6.3% at 1 year, and 65.7% +/- 9.0% at 5 years after the operation. One patient had recurrence of endocarditis 6.7 months after the operation and required repeated homograft aortic root replacement. Reoperative aortic root replacement remains associated with a high postoperative mortality. The need to perform unplanned coronary artery bypass grafting during reoperative aortic root replacement is a major risk factor for hospital death. The optimal technique for coronary reconstruction in this setting remains to be debated.

  1. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation with Core Valve: First Indian experience of three high surgical risk patients with severe aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Seth

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of aortic stenosis is increasing with aging population. However with multiple co-morbidities and prior procedures in this aging population, more and more patients are being declared unfit for the ‘Gold Standard’ treatment i.e. surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR. Among the patients who are unfit or high risk for aortic valve replacement (AVR by open heart surgery, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI has been proven to be a valuable alternative improving survival and quality of life. We report first Indian experience of Core Valve (Medtronic Inc. implantation in three high surgical risk patients performed on 22nd and 23rd February 2012.

  2. When operable patients become inoperable: conversion of a surgical aortic valve replacement into transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lene Kjaer; Arendrup, Henrik; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a relatively new treatment option for inoperable patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). This case describes how a planned conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) on a 73-year-old woman was successfully converted to a TAVI procedure....... On extracorporal circulation it was reconized that the aortic annulus, the coronary ostiae and the proximal part of the ascending aorta were severely calcified making valve implantation impossible. Surgical closure without valve substitution was estimated to be associated with a high risk of mortality due...

  3. A retrospective analysis of mitral valve pathology in the setting of bicuspid aortic valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rensburg, Annari; Doubell, Anton

    2017-01-01

    The therapeutic implications of bicuspid aortic valve associations have come under scrutiny in the transcatheter aortic valve implantation era. We evaluate the spectrum of mitral valve disease in patients with bicuspid aortic valves to determine the need for closer echocardiographic scrutiny/follow-up of the mitral valve. A retrospective analysis of echocardiograms done at a referral hospital over five years was conducted in patients with bicuspid aortic valves with special attention to congenital abnormalities of the mitral valve. One hundred and forty patients with a bicuspid aortic valve were included. A congenital mitral valve abnormality was present in eight (5.7%, P = 0.01) with a parachute mitral valve in four (2.8%), an accessory mitral valve leaflet in one (0.7%), mitral valve prolapse in one, a cleft in one and the novel finding of a trileaflet mitral valve in one. Minor abnormalities included an elongated anterior mitral valve leaflet (P abnormal papillary muscles (P = 0.002) and an additional chord or tendon in the left ventricle cavity (P = 0.007). Mitral valve abnormalities occur more commonly in patients with bicuspid aortic valves than matched healthy individuals. The study confirms that abnormalities in these patients extend beyond the aorta. These abnormalities did not have a significant functional effect. PMID:28515127

  4. One stage surgical treatment of aortic valve disease and aortic coarctation with aortic bypass grafting through the diaphragm and aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zipu; Wu, Shengjun; Li, Chengchen; Zou, Yu; Ma, Liang

    2015-11-10

    To validate ascending aorta-lower abdominal aorta bypass grafting treatment for patients with descending aortic coarctation and an aortic valve disease. The three patients in whom a descending atypical aortic coarctation was associated with an aortic valve disease were treated with one stage surgical treatment with aortic bypass grafting through the diaphragm and aortic valve replacement in our heart center. Operative technique consisted of performing ascending aorta-lower abdominal aorta bypass grafting through diaphragm muscle and implementing aortic valve replacement. The mean time for extracorporeal circulation and occluding clamp of aorta was recorded. Blood pressure data for pre- and post-operation was measured in the limbs. Computer-enhanced transvenous angiograms of pre- and post-operation were applied for detection of aortic stenosis. The other adverse events were noticed in outpatient service during a follow-up period. The mean extracorporeal circulation time was 54 ± 11 min. The mean time for occluding clamp of aorta was 34 ± 6 min. An arterial pressure gradient was totally corrected after surgical treatment. Post-operation computer-enhanced transvenous angiograms showed the grafts to be open with a fluent flow. The patients had no gastrointestinal tract complications. No adverse event was noticed during a follow-up period in outpatient service. Treatment of ascending aorta-lower abdominal aorta bypass is advisable for patients with descending aortic coarctation and an aortic valve disease.

  5. A comparison of echocardiographic and electron beam computed tomographic assessment of aortic valve area in patients with valvular aortic stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piers, Lieuwe H.; Dikkers, Riksta; Tio, Rene A.; van den Berg, Maarten P.; Willems, Tineke P.; Zijlstra, Felix; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare electron beam computed tomography (EBT) with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) in determining aortic valve area (AVA). Thirty patients (9 females, 21 males) underwent a contrast-enhanced EBT scan (e-Speed, GE, San Francisco, CA, USA) and TTE within 17 +/-

  6. Aortic valve replacement in a patient with severe nickel allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusini, Mario; Barbato, Raffaele; Spadaccio, Cristiano; Chello, Massimo

    2011-11-01

    Nickel allergy can raise clinical problems in patients undergoing cardiac surgery who require sternal closure with stainless steel wire. We describe the case of a 51-year-old woman with severe nickel allergy who underwent aortic valve replacement with a nickel-free ON-X prosthesis and sternal closure by Fiberwire # 2 suture without complications. Considering its biocompatibility and its mechanical characteristics including optimal strength and knot resistance, this suture might be a viable alternative in patients in which the use of stainless steel wire is contraindicated. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Early and medium term results of the sleeve valve-sparing procedure for aortic root ectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamba, Amando; Tasca, Giordano; Giannico, Floriana; Lobiati, Elisabetta; Skouse, Douglas; Galanti, Andrea; Martino, Antonello Stefano; Triggiani, Michele

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate our experience of using a simplified aortic valve sleeve procedure to treat aortic root ectasia and aneurysms with or without aortic regurgitation. In experienced hands, 2 aortic valve-sparing procedures, ie, Yacoub and David, have yielded excellent long-term results in the treatment of aortic root aneurysms, with or without aortic regurgitation. However, these techniques are demanding and not widely used. Recently, a new and simplified valve-sparing technique, named "sleeve procedure," has been proposed, and has yielded encouraging early results. Ninety consecutive patients with aortic root aneurysms underwent sleeve procedures from October 2006 to October 2012. Follow-up data (clinical 100% complete and echocardiographic 93% complete) were acquired from our outpatient clinic or from the referring cardiologist. The mean age of the patients was 61.5 ± 12.5 years, 79% were male, 16 (18%) had a bicuspid valve, 3 had Marfan syndrome, and 2 had aortic dissection. Over a mean clinical follow-up of 34 ± 19 months, 2 patients died from noncardiac causes and 1 was reoperated on for the recurrence of aortic regurgitation. On follow-up echocardiography after a mean of 18 ± 9 months, aortic regurgitation was absent/negligible, mild or moderate in 62%, 37%, and 1% of patients, respectively, and the diameters of the annulus, Valsalva sinuses, and sinotubular junction were 27.3 + 2.2, 37.0 + 3.4, and 30.6 + 3.1 mm, respectively. Our encouraging early and medium term results suggest that the sleeve procedure is a safe and effective aortic valve-sparing technique for the treatment of aortic root ectasia and aneurysm. However, longer follow-up is needed in order to draw definitive conclusions. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Delirium After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuseffi, Jennifer L; Borges, Nyal E; Boehm, Leanne M; Wang, Li; McPherson, John A; Fredi, Joseph L; Ahmad, Rashid M; Ely, E Wesley; Pandharipande, Pratik P

    2017-07-01

    Postoperative delirium is associated with increased mortality. Patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement are at risk for delirium because of comorbid conditions. To compare the incidence, odds, and mortality implications of delirium between patients undergoing transcatheter replacement and patients undergoing surgical replacement. The Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale and the Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit were used to assess arousal level and delirium prospectively in all patients with severe aortic stenosis who had transcatheter or surgical aortic valve replacement at an academic medical center. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between procedure type and occurrence of delirium. Cox regression was used to assess the association between postoperative delirium and 6-month mortality. A total of 105 patients had transcatheter replacement and 121 had surgical replacement. Patients in the transcatheter group were older (median age, 81 vs 68 years; P replacement. Delirium is less likely to develop in the transcatheter group but is associated with higher mortality in both groups. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  9. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement in Loeys-Dietz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nishant D; Arnaoutakis, George J; George, Timothy J; Allen, Jeremiah G; Alejo, Diane E; Dietz, Harry C; Cameron, Duke E; Vricella, Luca A

    2011-08-01

    Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is a recently recognized aggressive aortic disorder characterized by root aneurysm, arterial tortuosity, hypertelorism, and bifid uvula or cleft palate. The results of prophylactic root replacement using valve-sparing procedures (valve-sparing root replacement [VSRR]) in patients with LDS is not known. We reviewed all patients with clinical and genetic (transforming growth factor-β receptor mutations) evidence of LDS who underwent VSRR at our institution. Echocardiographic and clinical data were obtained from hospital and follow-up clinic records. From 2002 to 2009, 31 patients with a firm diagnosis of LDS underwent VSRR for aortic root aneurysm. Mean age was 15 years, and 24 (77%) were children. One (3%) patient had a bicuspid aortic valve. Preoperative sinus diameter was 3.9±0.8 cm (z score 7.0±2.9) and 2 (6%) had greater than 2+ aortic insufficiency. Thirty patients (97%) underwent reimplantation procedures using a Valsalva graft. There were no operative deaths. Mean follow-up was 3.6 years (range, 0 to 7 years). One patient required late repair of a pseudoaneurysm at the distal aortic anastomosis, and 1 had a conversion to a David reimplantation procedure after a Florida sleeve operation. No patient suffered thromboembolism or endocarditis, and 1 (3%) patient experienced greater than 2+ late aortic insufficiency. No patient required late aortic valve repair or replacement. Loeys-Dietz syndrome is an aggressive aortic aneurysm syndrome that can be addressed by prophylactic aortic root replacement with low operative risk. Valve-sparing procedures have encouraging early and midterm results, similar to those in Marfan syndrome, and are an attractive option for young patients. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Immediate results of aortic valve reconstruction by using autologous pericardium (Ozaki procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е. В. Россейкин

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study was designed to compare the immediate echocardiographic characteristics of aortic valve reconstruction by using autologous pericardium and the method proposed in 2007 by Shigeyuki Ozaki, as well as aortic valve replacement by means of frame-mounted biological prostheses Medtronic HANCOCK®II T505 CINCH® II and the Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT.Methods: Over a period from January 2014 to February 2016, 76 patients underwent aortic valve replacement by means of frame-mounted biological prostheses Medtronic HANCOCK®II T505 CINCH® II (n=41 and Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT (n=35 at our hospital. 20 patients underwent the Ozaki procedure. These three groups of patients were assigned to the study. Demographic and preoperative indicators of patients from all three groups were homogeneous (р>0.05. The evaluation of the aortic valves replaced was carried out by echocardiography.Results: Echocardiography was performed before the procedure and in the early postoperative period. Statistical analysis using ANOVA showed significantly lower values of the aortic valve pressure gradient (p<0.001 and larger effective orifice area and indexed effective orifice area of the valve (p<0.001 in the group of the Ozaki procedure.Conclusion: According to echocardiography data, in the immediate postoperative period the Ozaki procedure is associated with lower mean and peak gradients of pressure on the aortic valve and larger effective orifice area and indexed effective orifice area of the valve, as compared with the frame-mounted biological aortic prostheses Medtronic HANCOCK®II T505 CINCH® II and the Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT.FundingThe study had no sponsorship.Conflict of interestThe authors declare no conflict of interest.

  11. Immediate results of aortic valve reconstruction by using autologous pericardium (Ozaki procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е. В. Россейкин

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The study was designed to compare the immediate echocardiographic characteristics of aortic valve reconstruction by using autologous pericardium and the method proposed in 2007 by Shigeyuki Ozaki, as well as aortic valve replacement by means of frame-mounted biological prostheses Medtronic HANCOCK®II T505 CINCH® II and the Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT.Methods. Over a period from January 2014 to February 2016, 76 patients underwent aortic valve replacement by means of frame-mounted biological prostheses Medtronic HANCOCK®II T505 CINCH® II (n=41 and Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT (n=35 at our hospital. 20 patients underwent the Ozaki procedure. These three groups of patients were assigned to the study. Demographic and preoperative indicators of patients from all three groups were homogeneous (р>0.05. The evaluation of the aortic valves replaced was carried out by echocardiography.Results. Echocardiography was performed before the procedure and in the early postoperative period. Statistical analysis using ANOVA showed significantly lower values of the aortic valve pressure gradient (p<0.001 and larger effective orifice area and indexed effective orifice area of the valve (p<0.001 in the group of the Ozaki procedure.Conclusion. According to echocardiography data, in the immediate postoperative period the Ozaki procedure is associated with lower mean and peak gradients of pressure on the aortic valve and larger effective orifice area and indexed effective orifice area of the valve, as compared with the frame-mounted biological aortic prostheses Medtronic HANCOCK®II T505 CINCH® II and the Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT.Received 27 May 2016. Accepted 24 June 2016.Funding: The study had no sponsorship. Conflict of interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

  12. Acute Aortic Arch Perforation During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Bicuspid Aortic Stenosis and a Gothic Aortic Arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan-Iturbe, Oscar; Sawaya, Fadi J; Bieliauskas, Gintautas; Chow, Danny H F; De Backer, Ole; Søndergaard, Lars

    2017-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has evolved from a novel technology to an established therapy for high/intermediate-risk patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS). Although TAVR is used to treat bicuspid severe AS, the large randomized trials typically excluded bicuspid AS because of its unique anatomic features. This case report describes an acute aortic perforation during delivery of a transcatheter heart valve to treat a severe bicuspid AS with a "gothic aortic arch"; more careful evaluation of the preprocedural multislice computed tomographic scan would have unveiled a sharply angulated aortic arch. This life-threatening complication was successfully treated by thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Prevalence and Prognostic Significance of Right Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction in Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Alistair C; Harron, Katie; Jabbour, Richard J; Kanyal, Ritesh; Snow, Thomas M; Sawhney, Paramvir; Alpendurada, Francisco; Roughton, Michael; Pennell, Dudley J; Duncan, Alison; Di Mario, Carlo; Davies, Simon W; Mohiaddin, Raad H; Moat, Neil E

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) can provide important structural information in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Although CMR is considered the standard of reference for measuring ventricular volumes and mass, the relationship between CMR findings of right ventricular (RV) function and outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation has not previously been reported. A total of 190 patients underwent 1.5 Tesla CMR before transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Steady-state free precession sequences were used for aortic valve planimetry and to assess ventricular volumes and mass. Semiautomated image analysis was performed by 2 specialist reviewers blinded to patient treatment. Patient follow-up was obtained from the Office of National Statistics mortality database. The median age was 81.0 (interquartile range, 74.9-85.5) years; 50.0% were women. Impaired RV function (RV ejection fraction ≤50%) was present in 45 (23.7%) patients. Patients with RV dysfunction had poorer left ventricular ejection fractions (42% versus 69%), higher indexed left ventricular end-systolic volumes (96 versus 40 mL), and greater indexed left ventricular mass (101 versus 85 g/m(2); Pvalve area (hazard ratio, 4.16; P=0.025) were independently associated with survival. RV function, measured on preprocedural CMR, is an independent predictor of mortality after transcatheter aortic valve implantation. CMR assessment of RV function may be important in the risk stratification of patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Indexing aortic valve area by body surface area increases the prevalence of severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jander, Nikolaus; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa; Bahlmann, Edda

    2014-01-01

    To account for differences in body size in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is divided by body surface area (BSA) to calculate indexed AVA (AVAindex). Cut-off values for severe stenosis are......To account for differences in body size in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is divided by body surface area (BSA) to calculate indexed AVA (AVAindex). Cut-off values for severe stenosis are...

  15. Possible Subclinical Leaflet Thrombosis in Bioprosthetic Aortic Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makkar, Raj R; Fontana, Gregory; Jilaihawi, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A finding of reduced aortic-valve leaflet motion was noted on computed tomography (CT) in a patient who had a stroke after transcatheter aortic-valve replacement (TAVR) during an ongoing clinical trial. This finding raised a concern about possible subclinical leaflet thrombosis and pr...

  16. Acute Aortic Arch Perforation During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Bicuspid Aortic Stenosis and a Gothic Aortic Arch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millan-Iturbe, Oscar; Sawaya, Fadi J.; Bieliauskas, Gintautas

    2017-01-01

    AS because of its unique anatomic features. This case report describes an acute aortic perforation during delivery of a transcatheter heart valve to treat a severe bicuspid AS with a “gothic aortic arch”; more careful evaluation of the preprocedural multislice computed tomographic scan would have unveiled...

  17. Transesophageal echocardiography for cardiac thromboembolic risk assessment in patients with severe, symptomatic aortic valve stenosis referred for potential transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenders, Guy D; Paelinck, Bernard P; Wouters, Kristien; Claeys, Marc J; Rodrigus, Inez E; Van Herck, Paul L; Vrints, Christiaan J; Bosmans, Johan M

    2013-05-15

    Stroke is a devastating complication after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and might partially be related to cardiac embolization. The aim of this single-center prospective study was to determine the incidence of intracardiac thrombi and left atrial spontaneous echo contrast (SEC), both known predictors of cardiac embolic stroke, in patients referred for potential TAVI. One hundred four consecutive patients with severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis and at high or very high risk for surgery were included and underwent transesophageal echocardiography. In 11 patients (10.6%), intracardiac thrombi were detected, and 25 patients (24%) showed dense grade 2 SEC. Atrial fibrillation (p risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis referred for potential TAVI is high and can accurately be detected using transesophageal echocardiography. Systematic thromboembolic evaluation using transesophageal echocardiography is thus recommended in patients referred for TAVI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. David valve-sparing aortic root replacement: equivalent mid-term outcome for different valve types with or without connective tissue disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvitting, John-Peder Escobar; Kari, Fabian A; Fischbein, Michael P; Liang, David H; Beraud, Anne-Sophie; Stephens, Elizabeth H; Mitchell, R Scott; Miller, D Craig

    2013-01-01

    Although implicitly accepted by many that the durability of valve-sparing aortic root replacement in patients with bicuspid aortic valve disease and connective tissue disorders will be inferior, this hypothesis has not been rigorously investigated. From 1993 to 2009, 233 patients (27% bicuspid aortic valve, 40% Marfan syndrome) underwent Tirone David valve-sparing aortic root replacement. Follow-up averaged 4.7 ± 3.3 years (1102 patient-years). Freedom from adverse outcomes was determined using log-rank calculations. Survival at 5 and 10 years was 98.7% ± 0.7% and 93.5% ± 5.1%, respectively. Freedom from reoperation (all causes) on the aortic root was 92.2% ± 3.6% at 10 years; 3 reoperations were aortic valve replacement owing to structural valve deterioration. Freedom from structural valve deterioration at 10 years was 96.1% ± 2.1%. No significant differences were found in survival (P = .805, P = .793, respectively), reoperation (P = .179, P = .973, respectively), structural valve deterioration (P = .639, P = .982, respectively), or any other functional or clinical endpoints when patients were stratified by valve type (tricuspid aortic valve vs bicuspid aortic valve) or associated connective tissue disorder. At the latest echocardiographic follow-up (95% complete), 202 patients (94.8%) had none or trace aortic regurgitation, 10 (4.7%) mild, 0 had moderate to severe, and 1 (0.5%) had severe aortic regurgitation. Freedom from greater than 2+ aortic regurgitation at 10 years was 95.3% ± 2.5%. Six patients sustained acute type B aortic dissection (freedom at 10 years, 90.4% ± 5.0%). Tirone David reimplantation valve-sparing aortic root replacement in carefully selected young patients was associated with excellent clinical and echocardiographic outcome in patients with either a tricuspid aortic valve or bicuspid aortic valve. No demonstrable adverse influence was found for Marfan syndrome or connective tissue disorder on durability, clinical outcome

  19. The future of surgical aortic valve replacement and the role of sutureless technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbir, Selim

    2018-04-01

    Aortic valve stenosis has become the most frequent type of valve disease in worldwide. Surgical aortic valve replacement is still the gold standard therapy. More recently transcatheter aortic valve implantation has been demonstrated to be not inferior in patients with high and intermediate risk patients. Sutureless aortic valves were designed to simplify the surgical aortic valve replacement. With the aid of this new technology, the invasiveness of surgery can be reduced with potential improvements in outcome.

  20. Hemolytic Anemia after Aortic Valve Replacement: a Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Khosravi, Donya

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic anemia is exceedingly rare and an underestimated complication after aortic valve replacement (AVR).The mechanism responsible for hemolysis most commonly involves a regurgitated flow or jet that related to paravalvar leak or turbulence of subvalvar stenosis. It appears to be independent of its severity as assessed by echocardiography. We present a case of a 24-year-old man with a history of AVR in 10 year ago that developed severe hemolytic anemia due to a mild subvalvar stenosis caused by pannus formation and mild hypertrophic septum. After exclusion of other causes of hemolytic anemia and the lack of clinical and laboratory improvement, the patient underwent redo valve surgery with pannus and subvalvar hypertrophic septum resection. Anemia and heart failure symptoms gradually resolved after surgery.

  1. Aortic coarctation associated with aortic valve stenosis and mitral regurgitation in an adult patient: a two-stage approach using a large-diameter stent graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novosel, Luka; Perkov, Dražen; Dobrota, Savko; Ćorić, Vedran; Štern Padovan, Ranka

    2014-02-01

    We report a case of a staged surgical and endovascular management in a 62-year-old woman with aortic coarctation associated with aortic valve stenosis and mitral regurgitation. The patient was admitted for severe aortic valve stenosis and mitral valve incompetence. During hospitalization and preoperative imaging, a previously undiagnosed aortic coarctation was discovered. The patient underwent a 2-stage approach that combined a Bentall procedure and mitral valve replacement in the first stage, followed by correction of the aortic coarctation by percutaneous placement of an Advanta V12 large-diameter stent graft (Atrium, Mijdrecht, The Netherlands) which to our knowledge has not been used in an adult patient with this combination of additional cardiac comorbidities. A staged approach combining surgical treatment first and endovascular placement of an Advanta V12 stent graft in the second stage can be effective and safe in adult patients with coarctation of the aorta and additional cardiac comorbidities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Simulation for transthoracic echocardiography of aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navin C Nanda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulation allows interactive transthoracic echocardiography (TTE learning using a virtual three-dimensional model of the heart and may aid in the acquisition of the cognitive and technical skills needed to perform TTE. The ability to link probe manipulation, cardiac anatomy, and echocardiographic images using a simulator has been shown to be an effective model for training anesthesiology residents in transesophageal echocardiography. A proposed alternative to real-time reality patient-based learning is simulation-based training that allows anesthesiologists to learn complex concepts and procedures, especially for specific structures such as aortic valve.

  3. Antithrombotic therapy after bioprosthetic aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafiq, Sulman; Steinbrüchel, Daniel Andreas; Lilleør, Nikolaj Bang

    2017-01-01

    Background The optimal medical strategy for prevention of thromboembolic events after surgical bioprosthetic aortic valve replacement (BAVR) is still debated. The objective of this study was to compare warfarin therapy (target INR of 2.0 to 3.0) with aspirin 150 mg daily as antithrombotic therapy...... for the first three months after BAVR with or without concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The aim was to evaluate thromboembolic complications, major bleeding complications and death. Materials and methods Prospective, single-centre, open-label, randomized controlled trial. 370 patients were...

  4. Simulation for transthoracic echocardiography of aortic valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Navin C.; Kapur, K. K.; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra

    2016-01-01

    Simulation allows interactive transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) learning using a virtual three-dimensional model of the heart and may aid in the acquisition of the cognitive and technical skills needed to perform TTE. The ability to link probe manipulation, cardiac anatomy, and echocardiographic images using a simulator has been shown to be an effective model for training anesthesiology residents in transesophageal echocardiography. A proposed alternative to real-time reality patient-based learning is simulation-based training that allows anesthesiologists to learn complex concepts and procedures, especially for specific structures such as aortic valve. PMID:27397455

  5. Transesophageal echocardiographic guidance of transcatheter closure of the aortic valve in a patient with left ventricular assist device-related severe aortic regurgitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetham R Muskala

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A 68-year-old man with a severe ischemic cardiomyopathy underwent left ventricular assist device (LVAD implantation (Heart Mate II device for destination therapy. He presented 49 months after LVAD implantation with worsening heart failure symptoms and new severe aortic regurgitation. Given high risk for both surgical and transcatheter aortic valve replacement, he was admitted for transcatheter closure of the aortic valve under transesophageal echocardiographic (TEE guidance. TEE imaging revealed severe aortic regurgitation (Fig. 1A and B and Videos 1 and 2. Under TEE and fluoroscopic guidance, a 25 mm Amplatzer cribriform atrial septal defect closure device was advanced across the aortic valve (Fig. 1C and D and Videos 3 and 4. Immediately after device deployment, TEE revealed a well-seated device with complete aortic valve closure and trivial aortic regurgitation (Fig. 2A, B, C and D and Videos 5, 6, 7 and 8. Subsequent transthoracic echocardiograms obtained from 74 to 172 days after the procedure revealed no residual aortic regurgitation. The patient awoke with diffuse urticaria 244 days after the procedure and died en route to the emergency department, presumably secondary to a systemic allergic reaction. De novo aortic regurgitation is increasingly recognized in patients with LVADs (1. TEE-guided transcatheter aortic valve closure is an option in these high-risk patients (2.

  6. Treatment of Symptomatic Severe Aortic Stenosis With a Novel Resheathable Supra-Annular Self-Expanding Transcatheter Aortic Valve System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, Ganesh; Walton, Antony S; Brecker, Stephen J; Pasupati, Sanjeevan; Blackman, Daniel J; Qiao, Hongyan; Meredith, Ian T

    2015-08-24

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the safety and clinical performance of the CoreValve Evolut R transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) system (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota) in a single-arm, multicenter pivotal study in high- or extreme-risk patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis. Although outcomes following TAVR are improving, challenges still exist. The repositionable 14-F equivalent CoreValve Evolut R TAVR system was developed to mitigate some of these challenges. Suitable patients (n = 60) underwent TAVR with a 26- or 29-mm Evolut R valve. Primary safety endpoints were mortality and stroke at 30 days. Primary clinical performance endpoints were device success per the VARC-2 (Valve Academic Research Consortium-2) and the percent of patients with mild or less aortic regurgitation 24 h to 7 days post-procedure. Patients (66.7% female; mean age 82.8 ± 6.1 years; Society of Thoracic Surgeons Score 7.0 ± 3.7%) underwent TAVR via the transfemoral route in 98.3%, using a 29-mm valve in 68.3% of patients. All attempts at repositioning were successful. No death or stroke was observed up to 30 days. The VARC-2 overall device success rate was 78.6%. Paravalvular regurgitation post TAVR was mild or less in 96.6%, moderate in 3.4%, and severe in 0% at 30 days. Major vascular complications occurred in 8.3%, and permanent pacemaker implantation was required in 11.7% of patients. The repositionable 14-F equivalent Evolut R TAVR system is safe and effective at treating high-risk symptomatic aortic stenosis patients. Repositioning was successful when required in all patients, with low rates of moderate or severe paravalvular aortic regurgitation and low permanent pacemaker implantation. (The Medtronic CoreValve™ Evolut R™ CE Mark Clinical Study; NCT01876420). Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Aortic valve calcification as a predictor of location and severity of paravalvular regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koh, Ezra Y.; Lam, Kayan Y.; Bindraban, Navin R.; Cocchieri, Riccardo; Planken, R. Nils; Koch, Karel T.; Baan, Jan; de Mol, Bas A.; Marquering, Henk A.

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether the location of aortic valve calcium (AVC) influences the location of paravalvular regurgitation (PR). PR is an adverse effect of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) with a negative effect on long-term patient survival. The relationship between AVC and the occurrence

  8. Aorta measurements are heritable and influenced by bicuspid aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa J Martin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Word Count 266, 1609 charactersObjectives: To determine whether the contributions of genetics and bicuspid aortic valve (BAV independently influence aortic (Ao dimensions.Background: Ao dilation is a risk factor for aneurysm, dissection, and sudden cardiac death. Frequent association of BAV with Ao dilation implicates a common underlying defect possibly due to genetic factors. Methods: Families enriched for BAV underwent standardized transthoracic echocardiography. In addition to BAV status, echocardiographic measures of Ao (annulus to descending Ao, pulmonary artery and mitral valve annulus diameters were obtained. Using variance components analysis, heritability was estimated with and without BAV status. Additionally, bivariate genetic analyses between Ao dimensions and BAV were performed.Results: Our cohort was obtained from 209 families enriched for BAV. After adjusting for age, body surface area and sex, individuals with BAV had a statistically significant increase in all echocardiographic measurements (p < 0.006 except descending Ao and mitral valve annulus. Individuals with BAV were at greater odds of having Ao dilation (OR = 4.44, 95% CI 2.93 – 6.72 than family members without BAV. All echocardiographic measurements exhibited moderate to strong heritability (0.25 to 0.53, and these estimates were not influenced by inclusion of BAV as a covariate. Bivariate genetic analyses supported that the genetic correlation between BAV and echo measures were not significantly different from zero.Conclusions: We show for the first time that echocardiographic measurements of Ao, pulmonary artery and mitral valve annulus diameters are quantitative traits that exhibit significant heritability. In addition, our results suggest the presence of BAV independently influences the proximal Ao and pulmonary artery measures but not those in the descending Ao or mitral valve annulus.

  9. Subacute Aortic Regurgitation as a Rare Presentation of Latrogenic Aortic Valve Leaflet Perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Teimouri

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a paucity of literature regarding iatrogenic aortic valve perforation after cardiac operation is performed in the vicinity of the aortic valve. This report describes the clinical, echocardiographic, and angiocardiographic recognition of iatrogenic aortic valve perforation in a patient who had previously under gone membranous ventricular septal defect and pulmonary stenosis. Five days after the operation, the patient showed subacute signs and symptoms of congestive heart failure in surgical ward. Echocardiographic examination revealed free aortic regurgitation. The patient was scheduled for operation, which was performed using cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest. During the operation, exploration of the aortic root revealed tearing non-coronary aortic cusp at the level of the aortic ring and slightly dilated the left sinus. Despite close examination, no suture could be identified. It was reasoned that the tension created by the dacron patch pulled on the adjacent tissue and caused the separation of the non-coronary cusp from its ring and the patient was treated by aortic valve replacement with prosthetic aortic valve. We did not have the facility to use transesophaseal echocardiography for the examination of aortic valve repair and the poor condition of the patient did not permit us to repair the valve. Precise preoperative diagnosis of this lesion allows optimal surgical planning and treatment.

  10. Clinical Bioprosthetic Heart Valve Thrombosis After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Incidence, Characteristics, and Treatment Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, John; Sulimov, Dmitriy S; El-Mawardy, Mohamed; Sato, Takao; Allali, Abdelhakim; Holy, Erik W; Becker, Björn; Landt, Martin; Kebernik, Julia; Schwarz, Bettina; Richardt, Gert; Abdel-Wahab, Mohamed

    2017-04-10

    The aim of this study was to determine the incidence, characteristics, and treatment outcomes of patients diagnosed with clinical transcatheter heart valve thrombosis. Limited data exists on clinical or manifest transcatheter heart valve thrombosis. Prior studies have focused on subclinical thrombosis. A retrospective analysis was conducted of prospectively collected data from a single-center registry that included 642 consecutive patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement between 2007 and 2015 (305 patients had self-expanding valves; balloon-expandable, n = 281; mechanically expanding, n = 56). Long-term oral anticoagulation (OAC) was indicated in 261 patients, while 377 patients received dual-antiplatelet therapy post-procedure. All patients underwent scheduled clinical and echocardiographic follow-up. The overall incidence of clinical valve thrombosis was 2.8% (n = 18). No patient on OAC developed thrombosis. Of the detected thrombosis cases, 13 patients had balloon-expandable, 3 had self-expanding, and 2 had mechanically expanding valves. Thrombosis occurred significantly more often with balloon-expandable valves (odds ratio: 3.45; 95% confidence interval: 1.22 to 9.81; p = 0.01) and following valve-in-valve procedures (odds ratio: 5.93; 95% confidence interval: 2.01 to 17.51; p = 0.005). Median time to diagnosis of valve thrombosis was 181 days. The median N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide level was 1,318 pg/ml (interquartile range: 606 to 1,676 pg/ml). The mean transvalvular gradient and valve area were 34 ± 14 mm Hg and 1.0 ± 0.46 cm 2 , respectively. Computed tomography showed hypoattenuating areas with reduced leaflet motion. Initiation of OAC resulted in significant reduction of transvalvular gradient and clinical improvement. No deaths were related to valve thrombosis. Clinical transcatheter heart valve thrombosis is more common than previously considered, characterized by imaging abnormalities and increased gradients

  11. Osteoprotegerin inhibits aortic valve calcification and preserves valve function in hypercholesterolemic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Weiss

    Full Text Available There are no rigorously confirmed effective medical therapies for calcific aortic stenosis. Hypercholesterolemic Ldlr (-/- Apob (100/100 mice develop calcific aortic stenosis and valvular cardiomyopathy in old age. Osteoprotegerin (OPG modulates calcification in bone and blood vessels, but its effect on valve calcification and valve function is not known.To determine the impact of pharmacologic treatment with OPG upon aortic valve calcification and valve function in aortic stenosis-prone hypercholesterolemic Ldlr (-/- Apob (100/100 mice.Young Ldlr (-/- Apob (100/100 mice (age 2 months were fed a Western diet and received exogenous OPG or vehicle (N = 12 each 3 times per week, until age 8 months. After echocardiographic evaluation of valve function, the aortic valve was evaluated histologically. Older Ldlr (-/- Apob (100/100 mice were fed a Western diet beginning at age 2 months. OPG or vehicle (N = 12 each was administered from 6 to 12 months of age, followed by echocardiographic evaluation of valve function, followed by histologic evaluation.In Young Ldlr (-/- Apob (100/100 mice, OPG significantly attenuated osteogenic transformation in the aortic valve, but did not affect lipid accumulation. In Older Ldlr (-/- Apob (100/100 mice, OPG attenuated accumulation of the osteoblast-specific matrix protein osteocalcin by ∼80%, and attenuated aortic valve calcification by ∼ 70%. OPG also attenuated impairment of aortic valve function.OPG attenuates pro-calcific processes in the aortic valve, and protects against impairment of aortic valve function in hypercholesterolemic aortic stenosis-prone Ldlr (-/- Apob (100/100 mice.

  12. Futility, benefit, and transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindman, Brian R; Alexander, Karen P; O'Gara, Patrick T; Afilalo, Jonathan

    2014-07-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a transformative innovation that provides treatment for high or prohibitive surgical risk patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis who either were previously not referred for or were denied operative intervention. Trials have demonstrated improvements in survival and symptoms after TAVR versus medical therapy; however, there remains a sizable group of patients who die or lack improvement in quality of life soon after TAVR. This raises important questions about the need to identify and acknowledge the possibility of futility in some patients considered for TAVR. In this very elderly population, a number of factors in addition to traditional risk stratification need to be considered including multimorbidity, disability, frailty, and cognition in order to assess the anticipated benefit of TAVR. Consideration by a multidisciplinary heart valve team with broad areas of expertise is critical for assessing likely benefit from TAVR. Moreover, these complicated decisions should take place with clear communication around desired health outcomes on behalf of the patient and provider. The decision that treatment with TAVR is futile should include alternative plans to optimize the patient's health state or, in some cases, discussions related to end-of-life care. We review issues to be considered when making and communicating these difficult decisions. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Aortic valve replacement with simultaneous chest wall reconstruction for radiation-induced sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachithanandan, Anand; Dandekar, Uday; Grimer, Robert; Peart, Francis; Rooney, Stephen J

    2008-01-01

    Sarcomas, a rare complication of radiotherapy for breast carcinoma, have a poor prognosis. We describe a lady with previous mantle radiotherapy exposure, who developed a radiation-induced chest wall sarcoma. She underwent simultaneous aortic valve replacement (AVR) for severe aortic stenosis and excision of the sarcoma. Chest wall reconstruction was achieved with a composite marlex cement plate and a pedicled latissimus dorsi muscle flap.

  14. Pregnancy Outcomes in Women With Aortic Valve Substitutes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvelman, Helena J.; Arabkhani, Bardia; Cornette, Jerome M. J.; Pieper, Petronella G.; Bogers, Ad J. J. C.; Takkenberg, Johanna J. M.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.

    2013-01-01

    Young women who require aortic valve replacement need information on the potential cardiac and obstetric complications of pregnancy for the different valve substitutes available. We, therefore, assessed the pregnancy outcomes in women who had received an autograft, homograft, or mechanical valve in

  15. Early clinical outcome of aortic transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ihlberg, Leo; Nissen, Henrik Hoffmann; Nielsen, Niels Erik

    2013-01-01

    Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation has emerged as an option, in addition to reoperative surgical aortic valve replacement, to treat failed biologic heart valve substitutes. However, the clinical experience with this approach is still limited. We report the comprehensive experience...

  16. Bentall procedure using cryopreserved valved aortic homografts: mid- to long-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Jan T; Sierra, Jorge; Trindade, Pedro T; Dominique, Didier; Kalangos, Afksendiyos

    2004-01-01

    The Bentall procedure is the standard operation for patients who have lesions of the ascending aorta associated with aortic valve disease. In many cases, however, mechanical prosthetic conduits are not suitable. There are few reports in the English-language medical literature concerning the mid- to long-term outcome of Bentall operations with cryopreserved homografts. Therefore, we reviewed our experience with this procedure and valved homografts. From January 1997 through December 2002, 21 patients underwent a Bentall operation with cryopreserved homografts at our institution. There were 14 males and 7 females; the mean age was 36 +/- 21 years (range, 15-74 years). Eleven patients had undergone previous aortic valve surgery. All patients had aortic dilatation or aneurysms involving the ascending aorta. Indications for surgery included aortic valve stenosis or insufficiency, and aortic valve endocarditis (native valve or prosthetic). One patient had Takayasu's arteritis and 3 had Marfan syndrome. There was 1 hospital death (due to sepsis), but no other major postoperative complications. The mean hospital stay was 14 +/- 7 days. Follow-up echocardiographic and computed tomographic scans were performed yearly. The mean follow-up was 34 months (6-72 months). Follow-up imaging revealed no calcifications or degenerative processes related to the homograft. Four patients had minimal valve regurgitation. Two patients died during follow-up. The 3-year actuarial survival rate was 85.7%. Our data suggest that the Bentall procedure with a valved homograft conduit is a safe procedure with excellent mid- to long-term results, comparable to results reported with aortic valve replacement with a homograft.

  17. Association of aortic valve calcification severity with the degree of aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koos, Ralf; Mahnken, Andreas Horst; Dohmen, Guido; Brehmer, Kathrin; Günther, Rolf W; Autschbach, Rüdiger; Marx, Nikolaus; Hoffmann, Rainer

    2011-07-15

    This study sought to examine a possible relationship between the severity of aortic valve calcification (AVC), the distribution of AVC and the degree of aortic valve regurgitation (AR) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) for severe aortic stenosis (AS). 57 patients (22 men, 81 ± 5 years) with symptomatic AS and with a logistic EuroSCORE of 24 ± 12 were included. 38 patients (67%) received a third (18F)-generation CoreValve® aortic valve prosthesis, in 19 patients (33%) an Edwards SAPIEN™ prosthesis was implanted. Prior to TAVI dual-source computed tomography for assessment of AVC was performed. To determine the distribution of AVC the percentage of the calcium load of the most severely calcified cusp was calculated. After TAVI the degree of AR was determined by angiography and echocardiography. The severity of AR after TAVI was related to the severity and distribution of AVC. There was no association between the distribution of AVC and the degree of paravalvular AR after TAVI as assessed by angiography (r = -0.02, p = 0.88). Agatston AVC scores were significantly higher in patients with AR grade ≥ 3 (5055 ± 1753, n = 3) than in patients with AR grade AVC scores > 3000 were associated with a relevant paravalvular AR and showed a trend for increased need for second manoeuvres. There was a significant correlation between the severity of AVC and the degree of AR after AVR (r = 0.50, p AVC have an increased risk for a relevant AR after TAVI as well as a trend for increased need for additional procedures. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: The Experience of One Brazilian Health Care Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Fabiula Schwartz; Correa, Marcelo Goulart; Paula, Débora Holanda Gonçalves; Felix, Alex dos Santos; Belém, Luciano Herman Juaçaba; Mendes, Ana Paula Chedid; Silva, Valeria Gonçalves; Marques, Bruno Miranda; Monteiro, Andrey José de Oliveira; Weksler, Clara; Colafranceschi, Alexandre Siciliano; Kasal, Daniel Arthur Barata

    2018-01-01

    Objective Transcatheter aortic valve replacement has been an alternative to invasive treatment for symptomatic severe aortic stenosis in high risk patients. The primary endpoint was 30-day and 1-year mortality from any cause. Secondary endpoints were to compare the clinical and echocardiographic variation pre-and post- transcatheter aortic valve replacement, and the occurrence of complications throughout a 4-year follow-up period. Methods This prospective cohort, nestled to a multicenter study (Registro Brasileiro de Implante de Bioprótese por Cateter), describes the experience of a public tertiary center in transcatheter aortic valve replacement. All patients who underwent this procedure between October 2011 and February 2016 were included. Results Fifty-eight patients underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement. The 30-day all-cause mortality was 5.2% (n=3) and after 1 year was 17.2% (n=10). A significant improvement in New York Heart Association functional classification was observed when comparing pre-and post- transcatheter aortic valve replacement (III or IV 84.4% versus 5.8%; P<0.001). A decline in peak was observed (P<0.001) and mean (P<0.001) systolic transaortic gradient. The results of peak and mean post-implant transaortic gradient were sustained after one year (P=0.29 and P=0.36, respectively). Left ventricular ejection fraction did not change significantly during follow-up (P=0.41). The most frequent complications were bleeding (28.9%), the need for permanent pacemaker (27.6%) and acute renal injury (20.6%). Conclusion Mortality and complications in this study were consistent with worldwide experience. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement had positive clinical and hemodynamic results, when comparing pre-and post-procedure, and the hemodynamic profile of the prosthesis was sustained throughout follow-up.

  19. Aortic root, not valve, calcification correlates with coronary artery calcification in patients with severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henein, Michael; Hällgren, Peter; Holmgren, Anders

    2015-01-01

    calcification (AVC), due to tissue similarity between the two types of vessel rather than with the valve leaflet tissue. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We studied 212 consecutive patients (age 72.5 ± 7.9 years, 91 females) with AS requiring aortic valve replacement (AVR) in two Heart Centers, who underwent multidetector......% of patients. CAC correlated with ARC (rho = 0.51, p patients had echocardiographic evidence of BAV and 123 TAV, who were older (p ... even after adjusting for age (p = 0.01). AVC score was associated with BAV after adjusting for age (p = 0.03) but ARC was not. Of the total cohort, 82 patients (39%) had significant coronary stenosis (>50%), but these were not different in the pattern of calcification from those without CAS. CAC...

  20. Clinical Implication of Aortic Wall Biopsy in Aortic Valve Disease with Bicuspid Valve Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Han Kim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although unique aortic pathology related to bicuspid aortic valve (BAV has been previously reported, clinical implications of BAV to aortopathy risk have yet to be investigated. We looked for potential differences in matrix protein expressions in the aortic wall in BAV patients. Methods: Aorta specimens were obtained from 31 patients: BAV group (n=27, tricuspid aortic valve (TAV group (n=4. The BAV group was categorized into three subgroups: left coronary sinus-right coronary sinus (R+L group; n=13, 42%, right coronary sinus-non-coronary sinus (R+N group; n=8, 26%, and anteroposterior (AP group; n=6, 19%. We analyzed the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9, and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP-2. Results: Based on the mean value of the control group, BAV group showed decreased expression of eNOS in 72.7% of patients, increased MMP-9 in 82.3%, and decreased TIMP in 79.2%. There was a higher tendency for aortopathy in the BAV group: eNOS (BAV:TAV= 53%±7%:57%±11%, MMP-9 (BAV:TAV=48%±10%:38%±1%. The AP group showed lower expression of eNOS than the fusion (R+L, R+N group did; 48%±5% vs. 55%±7% (p=0.081. Conclusion: Not all patients with BAV had expression of aortopathy; however, for patients who had a suspicious form of bicuspid valve, aortic wall biopsy could be valuable to signify the presence of aortopathy.

  1. [Unicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis Combined with Aortic Coarctation;Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Takehiro; Wakasa, Satoru; Shingu, Yasushige; Matsui, Yoshiro

    2016-06-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve in an adult is extremely rare. In addition, 90% of the patients with aortic coarctation are reported to die before the age 50. A 60-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for further examination of exertional dyspnea which had begun one year before. She had been under medical treatment for hypertension since early thirties, and had been also diagnosed with moderate aortic stenosis at 50 years of age. She was at 1st diagnosed with aortic coarctation combined with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis. The aortic valve was then found unicuspid and was replaced under cardiopulmonary bypass with perfusion to both the ascending aorta and the femoral artery. Repair of aortic coarctation was performed 3 months later through left thoracotomy without extracorporeal circulation due to the rich collateral circulation. She had no postoperative complications, and hypertension as well as ankle-brachial index improved to the normal levels.

  2. Differential flow improvements after valve replacements in bicuspid aortic valve disease: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissell, Malenka M; Loudon, Margaret; Hess, Aaron T; Stoll, Victoria; Orchard, Elizabeth; Neubauer, Stefan; Myerson, Saul G

    2018-02-08

    Abnormal aortic flow patterns in bicuspid aortic valve disease (BAV) may be partly responsible for the associated aortic dilation. Aortic valve replacement (AVR) may normalize flow patterns and potentially slow the concomitant aortic dilation. We therefore sought to examine differences in flow patterns post AVR. Ninety participants underwent 4D flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance: 30 BAV patients with prior AVR (11 mechanical, 10 bioprosthetic, 9 Ross procedure), 30 BAV patients with a native aortic valve and 30 healthy subjects. The majority of subjects with mechanical AVR or Ross showed normal flow pattern (73% and 67% respectively) with near normal rotational flow values (7.2 ± 3.9 and 10.6 ± 10.5 mm 2 /ms respectively vs 3.8 ± 3.1 mm 2 /s for healthy subjects; both p > 0.05); and reduced in-plane wall shear stress (0.19 ± 0.13 N/m 2 for mechanical AVR vs. 0.40 ± 0.28 N/m 2 for native BAV, p flow patterns (mainly marked right-handed helical flow), with comparable rotational flow values to native BAV (20.7 ± 8.8 mm 2 /ms and 26.6 ± 16.6 mm 2 /ms respectively, p > 0.05), and a similar pattern for wall shear stress. Data before and after AVR (n = 16) supported these findings: mechanical AVR showed a significant reduction in rotational flow (30.4 ± 16.3 → 7.3 ± 4.1 mm 2 /ms; p flow patterns in BAV disease tend to normalize after mechanical AVR or Ross procedure, in contrast to the remnant abnormal flow pattern after bioprosthetic AVR. This may in part explain different aortic growth rates post AVR in BAV observed in the literature, but requires confirmation in a prospective study.

  3. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in Lower-Risk Patients With Aortic Stenosis: Is It Justified to Be the Preferred Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelghani, Mohammad; Serruys, Patrick W

    2016-04-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation underwent progressive improvements until it became the default therapy for inoperable patients, and a recommended therapy in high-risk operable patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis. In the lower-risk patient strata, a currently costly therapy that still has important complications with questionable durability is competing with the established effective and still-improving surgical replacement. This report tries to weigh the clinical evidence, the recent technical improvements, the durability, and the cost-effectiveness claims supporting the adoption of transcatheter aortic valve implantation in intermediate-low risk patients. The importance of appropriate patients' risk stratification and a more comprehensive approach to estimate that risk are also emphasized in the present report. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Unicuspid aortic valve disease: a magnetic resonance imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debl, K.; Buchner, S.; Heinicke, N.; Riegger, G.; Luchner, A. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Innere Medizin II, Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg (Germany); Djavidani, B.; Poschenrieder, F.; Feuerbach, S. [Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg (Germany); Schmid, C.; Kobuch, R. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Herz-, Thorax- und herznahe Gefaesschirurgie, Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg (Germany)

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: congenitally malformed aortic valves are a common finding in adults with aortic valve disease. Most of these patients have bicuspid aortic valve disease. Unicuspid aortic valve disease (UAV) is rare. The aim of our study was to describe valve morphology and the dimensions of the proximal aorta in a cohort of 12 patients with UAV in comparison to tricuspid aortic valve disease (TAV) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods/results: MRI studies were performed on a 1.5 T scanner in a total of 288 consecutive patients with aortic valve disease. 12 aortic valves were retrospectively classified as UAV. Annulus areas and dimensions of the thoracic aorta were retrospectively compared to a cohort of 103 patients with TAV. In UAV, valve morphology was unicuspid unicommissural with a posterior commissure in all patients. Mean annulus areas and mean diameters of the ascending aorta were significantly greater in UAV compared to TAV (12.6 {+-} 4.7 cm{sup 2} vs. 8.7 {+-} 2.3 cm{sup 2}, p < 0.01 and 4.6 {+-} 0.7 cm vs. 3.6 {+-} 0.5 cm, p < 0.0001, respectively), while no differences were observed in the mean diameters of the aortic arch (2.3 {+-} 0.6 cm vs. 2.3 {+-} 0.4 cm, p = 0.69). The diameters of the descending aorta were slightly smaller in UAV compared to TAV (2.2 {+-} 0.5 cm vs. 2.6 {+-} 0.3 cm, p < 0.05). (orig.)

  5. Autopsy after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Kesteren, F; Wiegerinck, E M A; Rizzo, S

    2017-01-01

    Autopsy after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a new field of interest in cardiovascular pathology. To identify the cause of death, it is important to be familiar with specific findings related to the time interval between the procedure and death. We aimed to provide an overview...... of the autopsy findings in patients with TAVI in their medical history divided by the timing of death with specific interest in the added value of autopsy over a solely clinically determined cause of death. In 8 European centres, 72 cases with autopsy reports were available. Autopsies were divided according...... (22.6%) and respiratory failure (9.7%). Of the nine patients with death >30 days, 88.9% died of sepsis, caused by infective endocarditis in half of them. At total of 12 patients revealed cerebrovascular complications. Autopsy revealed unexpected findings in 61.1% and resulted in a partly or completely...

  6. Computed Tomography Aortic Valve Calcium Scoring in Patients With Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawade, Tania; Clavel, Marie-Annick; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Dreyfus, Julien; Mathieu, Tiffany; Tastet, Lionel; Renard, Cedric; Gun, Mesut; Jenkins, William Steven Arthur; Macron, Laurent; Sechrist, Jacob W; Lacomis, Joan M; Nguyen, Virginia; Galian Gay, Laura; Cuéllar Calabria, Hug; Ntalas, Ioannis; Cartlidge, Timothy Robert Graham; Prendergast, Bernard; Rajani, Ronak; Evangelista, Arturo; Cavalcante, João L; Newby, David E; Pibarot, Philippe; Messika Zeitoun, David; Dweck, Marc R

    2018-03-01

    Computed tomography aortic valve calcium scoring (CT-AVC) holds promise for the assessment of patients with aortic stenosis (AS). We sought to establish the clinical utility of CT-AVC in an international multicenter cohort of patients. Patients with AS who underwent ECG-gated CT-AVC within 3 months of echocardiography were entered into an international, multicenter, observational registry. Optimal CT-AVC thresholds for diagnosing severe AS were determined in patients with concordant echocardiographic assessments, before being used to arbitrate disease severity in those with discordant measurements. In patients with long-term follow-up, we assessed whether CT-AVC thresholds predicted aortic valve replacement and death. In 918 patients from 8 centers (age, 77±10 years; 60% men; peak velocity, 3.88±0.90 m/s), 708 (77%) patients had concordant echocardiographic assessments, in whom CT-AVC provided excellent discrimination for severe AS (C statistic: women 0.92, men 0.89). Our optimal sex-specific CT-AVC thresholds (women 1377 Agatston unit and men 2062 Agatston unit) were nearly identical to those previously reported (women 1274 Agatston unit and men 2065 Agatston unit). Clinical outcomes were available in 215 patients (follow-up 1029 [126-2251] days). Sex-specific CT-AVC thresholds independently predicted aortic valve replacement and death (hazard ratio, 3.90 [95% confidence interval, 2.19-6.78]; P <0.001) after adjustment for age, sex, peak velocity, and aortic valve area. Among 210 (23%) patients with discordant echocardiographic assessments, there was considerable heterogeneity in CT-AVC scores, which again were an independent predictor of clinical outcomes (hazard ratio, 3.67 [95% confidence interval, 1.39-9.73]; P =0.010). Sex-specific CT-AVC thresholds accurately identify severe AS and provide powerful prognostic information. These findings support their integration into routine clinical practice. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifiers: NCT

  7. Clinical and echocardiographic assessment of the Medtronic Advantage aortic valve prosthesis: the Scandinavian multicentre, prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaverstad, Rune; Vitale, Nicola; Karevold, Asbjørn

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this report is the prospective, multicentre evaluation of clinical results and haemodynamic performance of the Medtronic Advantage aortic valve prosthesis. METHODS: From April 2001 to June 2003, 166 patients (male:female 125:41; mean (SD) age 61.8 (11.8) years) received...... an aortic advantage valve prosthesis. Complete cumulative follow-up was 242.7 patient-years (maximum 3.2; mean 1.6 years). Postoperatively, patients underwent early (within 30 days) and 1 year transthoracic echocardiography. RESULTS: 30 day mortality was 2.4% (n = 4). Kaplan-Meier estimates of freedom from...... echocardiography. CONCLUSIONS: Haemodynamic performance and early clinical results of Medtronic advantage in the aortic position were satisfactory and comparable with those of other bileaflet valves in current clinical use....

  8. Correction of moderate secondary mitral regurgitation due to aortic valve disease: immediate results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. М. Назаров

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the impact of surgical strategy in concomitant mitral valve surgery or isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR in patients with moderate secondary mitral regurgitation (MR, 1 574 patients underwent AVR over a period from January 2003 to December 2011. 241 patients had secondary MR 2+ and constituted the study population. Patients were stratified into two groups, those without concomitant mitral valve surgery (Group A, n = 113 and with it (Group B, n = 128. It was found out that AVR plastic correction of MI reduces its recurrence during short-term follow-up but increases the intervention time leading to an insignificant rise in lethality. In patients with aortic stenosis the age exceeding 70 years and the presence of atrial fibrillation are found to be the most significant predictors of preservation of residual mitral regurgitation in the early postoperative period, while more indicative for patients with aortic insufficiency is the presence of tricuspid regurgitation grade 2 or higher.

  9. Midterm Results of Aortic Valve Replacement with Cryopreserved Homografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Özker

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the midterm clinical results of aortic valve replacement with cryopreserved homografts.Materials and Methods: Aortic valve replacement was performed in 40 patients with cryopreserved homograft. The indications were aortic valve endocarditis in 20 patients (50%, truncus arteriosus in 6 patients (15%, and re-stenosis or regurtitation after aortic valve reconstruction in 14 (35% patients. The valve sizes ranged from 10 to 27mm. A full root replacement technique was used for homograft replacement in all patients.Results: The 30-day postoperative mortality rate was 12.5% (5 patients. There were four late deaths. Only one of them was related to cardiac events. Overall mortality was 22.5%. Thirty-three patients were followed up for 67±26 months. Two patients needed reoperation due to aortic aneurysm caused by endocarditis. The mean transvalvular gradient significantly decreased after valve replacement (p<0.003. The last follow up showed that the 27 (82% patients had a normal left ventricular function.Conclusion: Cryopreserved homografts are safe alternatives to mechanical valves that can be used when there are proper indications. Although it has a high perioperative mortality rate, cryopreserved homograft implantation is an alternative for valve replacement, particularly in younger patients and for complex surgical problems such as endocarditis that must be minimalized.

  10. Choice of Treatment for Aortic Valve Stenosis in the Era of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Eastern Denmark (2005 to 2015)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Luk, Ngai H V; Olsen, Niels T

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the choice of treatment for severe aortic valve stenosis in the era of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in Eastern Denmark. BACKGROUND: Until the early 21st century, the only therapeutic option for aortic valve stenosis was surgical a...

  11. Large aortic root pseudoaneurysm occurring late after aortic root repair and valve replacement for endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Panduranga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 68-year-old male presented with Group B Streptococcus aortic valve (AV endocarditis with aortic root abscess and refractory sepsis. An emergency cardiac surgery was performed with root abscess drainage, excision and debridement of necrotic tissue, reconstruction of annulus, and AV replacement. Fifteen months later he presented with a huge aortic root pseudoaneurysm (PA. This case illustrates late occurrence of aortic root PA following AV surgery for endocarditis.

  12. Quantitative assessment of an aortic and pulmonary valve function according to valve fenestration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirkhani, S.H.; Golestani, M.G.; Hosini, M.; Kazemian, A.

    1999-01-01

    There are some reasons for malfunction of aortic and pulmonary valve like fibrosis, calcification, and atheroma. Although, in some papers fenestration were known as a pathologic sign, but it is not generally accepted, while this matter is important in choosing suitable Homograft Heart Valve. In this paper fenestrations and its size, numbers and situation effect was studied. We collected 98 hearts, the donors died because of accident, we excluded valves with atheroma, calcification, fibrosis and unequal cusps, 91 aortic and 93 pulmonary valves were given further consideration. We classified valves according to situation, number and size of fenestration. Each valve was tested with 104 cm of non-nal saline column pressure which is equal to 76 mm Hg. Valve efficacy was detected by fluid flow assay. With study of 184 valves, 95 had no fenestration, 64 had less than 2 fenestration and 25 had more than 2 fenestration. Valve efficacy in condition of less than 2 fenestration was more than others (p <0.01). Malfunction effects of fenestration increased in larger valve and it will be decreased if their situation would be marginal (free margin of cusp). In the comparison of aortic and pulmonary valve we saw that malfunction effect of fenestration in pulmonary valve was more than aortic valve. Our experience in Immam Khomeini Homograft Valve Bank has shown that a great deal of valves is fenestrated. It seems that fenestration must be considered as a quality criterion in homograft valve preparation, especially in pulmonary and large aortic valves; but complementary studies is necessary

  13. Outcomes of Aortic Valve-Sparing Operations in Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Tirone E; David, Carolyn M; Manlhiot, Cedric; Colman, Jack; Crean, Andrew M; Bradley, Timothy

    2015-09-29

    In many cardiac units, aortic valve-sparing operations have become the preferred surgical procedure to treat aortic root aneurysm in patients with Marfan syndrome, based on relatively short-term outcomes. This study examined the long-term outcomes of aortic valve-sparing operations in patients with Marfan syndrome. All patients with Marfan syndrome operated on for aortic root aneurysm from 1988 through 2012 were followed prospectively for a median of 10 years. Follow-up was 100% complete. Time-to-event analyses were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method with log-rank test for comparisons. A total of 146 patients with Marfan syndrome had aortic valve-sparing operations. Reimplantation of the aortic valve was performed in 121 and remodeling of the aortic root was performed in 25 patients. Mean age was 35.7 ± 11.4 years and two-thirds were men. Nine patients had acute, 2 had chronic type A, and 3 had chronic type B aortic dissections before surgery. There were 1 operative and 6 late deaths, 5 caused by complications of dissections. Mortality rate at 15 years was 6.8 ± 2.9%, higher than the general population matched for age and sex. Five patients required reoperation on the aortic valve: 2 for endocarditis and 3 for aortic insufficiency. Three patients developed severe, 4 moderate, and 3 mild-to-moderate aortic insufficiency. Rate of aortic insufficiency at 15 years was 7.9 ± 3.3%, lower after reimplantation than remodeling. Nine patients developed new distal aortic dissections during follow-up. Rate of dissection at 15 years was 16.5 ± 3.4%. Aortic valve-sparing operations in patients with Marfan syndrome were associated with low rates of valve-related complications in long-term follow-up. Residual and new aortic dissections were the leading cause of death. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Outcomes for Low-Risk Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement: A Benchmark for Aortic Valve Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Lily E; Downs, Emily A; Hawkins, Robert B; Quader, Mohammed A; Speir, Alan M; Rich, Jeffrey B; Ghanta, Ravi K; Yarboro, Leora T; Ailawadi, Gorav

    2017-10-01

    Two large, randomized trials are underway evaluating transcatheter aortic valve replacement (AVR) against conventional surgical AVR. We analyzed contemporary, real-world outcomes of surgical AVR in low-risk patients to provide a practical benchmark of outcomes and cost for evaluating current and future transapical AVR technology. From 2010 to 2015, 2,505 isolated AVR operations were performed for severe aortic stenosis at 18 statewide cardiac institutions. Of these, 2,138 patients had a Society of Thoracic Surgeons predicted risk of mortality of less than 4%, and 1,119 met other clinical and hemodynamic criteria as outlined in the PARTNER 3 (The Placement of Transcatheter Aortic Valves) protocol. Patients with endocarditis, end-stage renal disease, ejection fraction of less than 0.45, bicuspid valves, and previous valve replacements were excluded. Outcomes of interest included operative death and postoperative adverse events. The median Society of Thoracic Surgeons predicted risk of mortality for the study-eligible patients was 1.44%, with a median age of 72 years (interquartile range [IQR], 65 to 78 years). Operative mortality was 1.3%, permanent stroke was 1.3%, and pacemaker requirement was 4.2%. The most common adverse events were transfusion of 2 or more units of red blood cells (18%) and atrial fibrillation (28%). The median length of stay was 6 days (IQR, 5 to 8 days). Median total hospital cost was $37,999 (IQR, $30,671 to $46,138). Examination of complications by age younger than 65 vs 65 or older demonstrated a significantly lower need for transfusion (11.2%, p risk patients undergoing surgical AVR in the current era have excellent results. The most common complications were atrial fibrillation and bleeding. These real-world results should provide additional context for upcoming transcatheter clinical trial data. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The living aortic valve: From molecules to function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Adrian H.; El-Hamamsy, Ismail; Butcher, Jonathan T.; Latif, Najma; Bertazzo, Sergio; Yacoub, Magdi H.

    2014-01-01

    The aortic valve lies in a unique hemodynamic environment, one characterized by a range of stresses (shear stress, bending forces, loading forces and strain) that vary in intensity and direction throughout the cardiac cycle. Yet, despite its changing environment, the aortic valve opens and closes over 100,000 times a day and, in the majority of human beings, will function normally over a lifespan of 70–90 years. Until relatively recently heart valves were considered passive structures that play no active role in the functioning of a valve, or in the maintenance of its integrity and durability. However, through clinical experience and basic research the aortic valve can now be characterized as a living, dynamic organ with the capacity to adapt to its complex mechanical and biomechanical environment through active and passive communication between its constituent parts. The clinical relevance of a living valve substitute in patients requiring aortic valve replacement has been confirmed. This highlights the importance of using tissue engineering to develop heart valve substitutes containing living cells which have the ability to assume the complex functioning of the native valve. PMID:25054122

  16. Valve-sparing aortic root reconstruction in children, teenagers, and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweddell, James S; Earing, Michael G; Bartz, Peter J; Dunham-Ingles, Jennifer L; Woods, Ronald K; Mitchell, Michael E

    2012-08-01

    We reviewed our experience with valve-sparing aortic root reconstruction (VSARR) using the sinus of Valsalva graft in children, teenagers, and young adults with connective tissue disorders. Results of a single-center experience with VSARR in children, teenagers, and young adults were retrospectively analyzed. End points were death, freedom from reintervention, and freedom from valve dysfunction. Between 2003 and 2010, 16 patients (Marfan, 9; Loeys Dietz syndrome, 6; conotruncal, 1) underwent VSARR. The mean age was 20±7.4 (range, 9 to 36 years). Indications for VSAAR were aortic root enlargement in 14 (sinus of Valsalva Z-score, 6.2±2) and aortic dissection in 2. Additional procedures included replacement of the ascending aorta in 7, with additional replacement of the aortic arch in 2. No early or late deaths occurred. One patient required a pacemaker. One patient with Loeys-Dietz syndrome required reoperation for aneurysmal dilatation of the coronary buttons. Two patients underwent replacement of the thoracoabdominal aorta for chronic dissection. Follow-up by echocardiography or magnetic resonance imaging at a mean of 33±29 months showed more than mild aortic regurgitation in 2 patients. Both patients with moderate aortic insufficiency also had a bicuspid aortic valve. VSARR using the sinus of Valsalva graft is a reproducible technique that achieves acceptable early and intermediate results. It is suitable for children, teenagers, and young adults. Anticoagulation is avoided. The procedure is appropriate for emergency operations but should be used with caution in patients with a bicuspid aortic valve. Copyright © 2012 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Imaging of aortic valve dynamics in 4D OCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schnabel Christian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical components of the heart, especially the valves and leaflets, are enormous stressed during lifetime. Therefore, those structures undergo different pathophysiological tissue transformations which affect cardiac output and in consequence living comfort of affected patients. These changes may lead to calcific aortic valve stenosis (AVS, the major heart valve disease in humans. The knowledge about changes of the dynamic behaviour during the course of this disease and the possibility of early stage diagnosis is of particular interest and could lead to the development of new treatment strategies and drug based options of prevention or therapy. 4D optical coherence tomography (OCT in combination with high-speed video microscopy were applied to characterize dynamic behaviour of the murine aortic valve and to characterize dynamic properties during artificial stimulation. We present a promising tool to investigate the aortic valve dynamics in an ex vivo disease model with a high spatial and temporal resolution using a multimodal imaging setup.

  18. First transcatheter aortic valve implantation for severe pure aortic regurgitation in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiam, Paul Toon-Lim; Ewe, See Hooi; Chua, Yeow Leng; Lim, Yean Teng

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become the standard of care for inoperable patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS), and an alternative to open aortic valve replacement for patients at high surgical risk. TAVI has also been performed in several groups of patients with off-label indications such as severe bicuspid AS, and as a valve-in-valve therapy for a degenerated surgical bioprosthesis. Although TAVI with CoreValve® prosthesis is technically challenging, and global experience in the procedure is limited, the procedure could be a treatment option for well-selected patients with severe pure aortic regurgitation (AR). Herein, we report Asia's first case of TAVI for severe pure AR in a patient who was at extreme surgical risk, with good clinical outcome at six months. PMID:24570320

  19. [Anesthetic management and experience in the transcatheter implantation of the CoreValve(®) self-expanding aortic valve].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Suárez, F E; del Valle Fernández, R; González Alvarez, A; Sánchez Lasheras, J; Fernández Sánchez, L; Argüelles Tamargo, L

    2013-10-01

    To analyze the experience and anesthetic management in the transcatheter implantation of the CoreValve(®) self-expanding aortic valve, in a university tertiary hospital. Observational analytical review of data incorporated into a prospectively maintained database of 142 patients diagnosed with severe aortic stenosis who underwent implantation of a CoreValve(®) aortic self-expanding aortic valve between December 2007 and December 2012. The mean age of patients was 82.5±6.1 years and the logistic EuroSCORE was 14.9±11.2. General anesthesia was used in 107 patients (75.3%), with local anesthesia with sedation in 35 (24.6%). Local anesthesia and sedation was associated with a lower requirement of vasoactive drugs (P=.003) during implantation. No statistically significant differences were found between the 2 anesthetic techniques in the duration of the procedure, hospital stay, or morbimortality. The success rate was 97.1%. The most common complication was conduction disorders that required implantation of a permanent pacemaker in 46 patients (32.3%). There was no intraoperative mortality, and all-cause mortality at 30 days was 6.3%, with a one-year survival estimated by the Kaplan-Meier of 83.1%. This study confirms that in patients with severe aortic stenosis and high surgical risk, transcatheter implantation of aortic valve is a safe and effective alternative. Both, general anesthesia and local anesthesia with sedation are valid options, depending on the experience of the team. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. Knowledge of native valve anatomy is essential in follow-up of patients after aortic valve replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cozijnsen, Luc; van der Zaag-Loonen, Hester J.; Cozijnsen, Martinus A.; Braam, Richard L.; Heijmen, Robin H.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: After aortic valve replacement (AVR), bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) patients continue to be at risk of aortic complications. Therefore, knowledge of native valve anatomy is important for follow-up. We aimed to determine the extent of which the presence of BAV disease is known in a regional

  1. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Versus Aortic Valve Bypass: A Comparison of Outcomes and Economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, John W; Boyd, Jack H; Patel, Parth M; Baker, Mary L; Syed, Amjad; Ladowski, Joe; Corvera, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is currently offered to patients who are high-risk candidates for conventional surgical aortic valve replacement. For the past 37 years, off-pump aortic valve bypass (AVB) has been used in elderly patients at our center for this similarly high-risk group. Although TAVR and AVB were offered to similar patients at our center, comparisons of clinical outcomes and hospital economics for each strategy were not reported. We reviewed the clinical and financial records of 53 consecutive AVB procedures performed since 2008 with the records of 51 consecutive TAVR procedures performed since 2012. Data included demographics, hemodynamics, The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) risk score, extent of coronary disease, and ventricular function. Follow-up was 100% in both groups. Hospital financial information for both cohorts was obtained. Mean risk score for the TAVR group was 10.1% versus 17.6% for AVB group (p < 0.001). Kaplan-Meier hospital rates of 3- and 6-month survival and of 1-year survival were 88%, 86%, 81%, and 61% and 89%, 83%, 83%, and 70% for the TAVR and AVB groups, respectively (p = 0.781). Two patients who had undergone TAVR had a procedure-related stroke. The one stroke in an AVB recipient was late and not procedure related. At discharge, mild and moderate perivalvular and central aortic insufficiency were present in 31% and 16% of TAVR recipients, respectively; no AVB valve leaked. Transvalvular gradients were reduced to less than 10 mm Hg in both groups. The average hospital length of stay for the AVB-treated patients was 13 days, and it was 9 days for the TAVR-treated patients. Median hospital charges were $253,000 for TAVR and $158,000 for AVB. Mean payment to the hospital was $65,000 (TAVR) versus $64,000 (AVB), and the mean positive contribution margin (profit) to the hospital was $14,000 for TAVR versus $29,000 for AVB. TAVR and AVB relieve aortic stenosis and have similar and acceptable procedural mortality

  2. Maximizing prosthetic valve size with the Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jan; Geha, Alexander S.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: The CarboMedics Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve allows a one-size (and often two-size) increase over the standard intra-annular valve. This advantage should minimize the risk of patient-prosthesis mismatch, where the effective prosthetic valve orifice area...

  3. Aortic valve sparing root surgery for Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matalanis, George; Perera, Nisal K

    2017-11-01

    Aortic valve sparing root surgery (AVSRS) is a safe and durable alternative for patients with dilated roots or pure aortic regurgitation (AR), which avoids the risks of anticoagulation or valvular degeneration with prosthetic valves. Notwithstanding the theoretical challenges of greater tissue fragility in Marfan syndrome (MFS), AVSRS has been demonstrated to have equal outcomes in this condition as it does in those without MFS. The benefits of retaining the native aortic valve in this generally younger age group extend beyond those of avoiding the inconvenience and complications of prolonged exposure to anticoagulants and include ease of management for future aortic, cardiac and non-cardiac procedures which are the norm for these patients. The essential principles of AVSRS in MFS do not differ from those for the rest of the population. Successful repair and durable valve function depend on a sound understanding of the close interaction between the structure and function of this exquisitely designed piece of engineering. We are fortunate to have numerous tools in our surgical armamentarium to preserve these valves. It is the purpose of this paper to demystify the complex structure-function interactions of the aortic valve, thereby gaining an intuition for AVSRS. We will also elaborate on specific technical details of established techniques that we have found successful in preserving the normal function of these valves in the long term.

  4. Mitral valve disease in patients with Marfan syndrome undergoing aortic root replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkala, Meghana R; Schaff, Hartzell V; Li, Zhuo; Volguina, Irina; Dietz, Harry C; LeMaire, Scott A; Coselli, Joseph S; Connolly, Heidi

    2013-09-10

    Cardiac manifestations of Marfan syndrome include aortic root dilation and mitral valve prolapse (MVP). Only scant data exist describing MVP in patients with Marfan syndrome undergoing aortic root replacement. We retrospectively analyzed data from 166 MFS patients with MVP who were enrolled in a prospective multicenter registry of patients who underwent aortic root aneurysm repair. Of these 166 patients, 9% had mitral regurgitation (MR) grade >2, and 10% had MR grade 2. The severity of MVP and MR was evaluated by echocardiography preoperatively and ≤ 3 years postoperatively. Forty-one patients (25%) underwent composite graft aortic valve replacement, and 125 patients (75%) underwent aortic valve-sparing procedures; both groups had similar prevalences of MR grade >2 (P=0.7). Thirty-three patients (20%) underwent concomitant mitral valve (MV) intervention (repair, n=29; replacement, n=4), including all 15 patients with MR grade >2. Only 1 patient required MV reintervention during follow-up (mean clinical follow-up, 31 ± 10 months). Echocardiography performed 21 ± 13 months postoperatively revealed MR >2 in only 3 patients (2%). One early death and 2 late deaths occurred. Although the majority of patients with Marfan syndrome who undergo elective aortic root replacement have MVP, only 20% have concomitant MV procedures. These concomitant procedures do not seem to increase operative risk. In patients with MR grade ≤ 2 who do not undergo a concomitant MV procedure, the short-term incidence of progressive MR is low; however, more follow-up is needed to determine whether patients with MVP and MR grade ≤ 2 would benefit from prophylactic MV intervention.

  5. Vortex dynamics in Patient-Specific Stenotic Tricuspid and Bicuspid Aortic Valves pre- and post- Trans-catheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatoum, Hoda; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2017-11-01

    Understanding blood flow related adverse complications such as leaflet thrombosis post-transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) requires a deeper understanding of how patient-specific anatomic and hemodynamic factors, and relative valve positioning dictate sinus vortex flow and stasis regions. High resolution time-resolved particle image velocimetry measurements were conducted in compliant and transparent 3D printed patient-specific models of stenotic bicuspid and tricuspid aortic valve roots from patients who underwent TAVI. Using Lagrangian particle tracking analysis of sinus vortex flows and probability distributions of residence time and blood damage indices we show that (a) patient specific modeling provides a more realistic assessment of TAVI flows, (b) TAVI deployment alters sinus flow patterns by significantly decreasing sinus velocity and vorticity, and (c) relative valve positioning can control critical vortex structures that may explain preferential leaflet thrombosis corresponding to separated flow recirculation, secondary to valve jet vectoring relative to the aorta axis. This work provides new methods and understanding of the spatio-temporal aortic sinus vortex dynamics in post TAVI pathology. This study was supported by the Ohio State University DHLRI Trifit Challenge award.

  6. Neurotrophin 3 upregulates proliferation and collagen production in human aortic valve interstitial cells: a potential role in aortic valve sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qingzhou; Song, Rui; Ao, Lihua; Cleveland, Joseph C; Fullerton, David A; Meng, Xianzhong

    2017-06-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a leading cardiovascular disorder in the elderly. Diseased aortic valves are characterized by sclerosis (fibrosis) and nodular calcification. Sclerosis, an early pathological change, is caused by aortic valve interstitial cell (AVIC) proliferation and overproduction of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. However, the mechanism of aortic valve sclerosis remains unclear. Recently, we observed that diseased human aortic valves overexpress growth factor neurotrophin 3 (NT3). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that NT3 is a profibrogenic factor to human AVICs. AVICs isolated from normal human aortic valves were cultured in M199 growth medium and treated with recombinant human NT3 (0.10 µg/ml). An exposure to NT3 induced AVIC proliferation, upregulated the production of collagen and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), and augmented collagen deposition. These changes were abolished by inhibition of the Trk receptors. NT3 induced Akt phosphorylation and increased cyclin D1 protein levels in a Trk receptor-dependent fashion. Inhibition of Akt abrogated the effect of NT3 on cyclin D1 production. Furthermore, inhibition of either Akt or cyclin D1 suppressed NT3-induced cellular proliferation and MMP-9 and collagen production, as well as collagen deposition. Thus, NT3 upregulates cellular proliferation, ECM protein production, and collagen deposition in human AVICs. It exerts these effects through the Trk-Akt-cyclin D1 cascade. NT3 is a profibrogenic mediator in human aortic valve, and overproduction of NT3 by aortic valve tissue may contribute to the mechanism of valvular sclerosis. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Percutaneous implantation of the first repositionable aortic valve prosthesis in a patient with severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buellesfeld, Lutz; Gerckens, Ulrich; Grube, Eberhard

    2008-04-01

    Percutaneous aortic valve replacement is a new less-invasive alternative for high-risk surgical candidates with aortic stenosis. However, the clinical experience is still limited, and the currently available 'first-generation devices' revealed technical shortcomings, such as lack of repositionability and presence of paravalvular leakages. We report the first-in-man experience with the new self-expanding Lotus Valve prosthesis composed of a nitinol frame with implemented bovine pericardial leaflets which is designed to address these issues, being repositionable and covered by a flexible membrane to seal paravalvular gaps. We implanted this prosthesis in a 93-year old patient presenting with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (valve area: 0.6 cm(2)). Surgical valve replacement had been declined due to comorbidities. We used a retrograde approach for insertion of the 21-French Lotus catheter loaded with the valve prosthesis via surgical cut-down to the external iliac artery. Positioning of the valve was guided by transesophageal echo and supra-aortic angiograms. The prosthesis was successfully inserted and deployed within the calcified native valve. Echocardiography immediately after device deployment showed a significant reduction of the transaortic mean pressure gradient (32 to 9 mmHg; final valve area 1.7 cm(2)) without evidence of residual aortic regurgitation. The postprocedural clinical status improved from NYHA-IV to NYHA-II. These results remained unchanged up to the 3 month follow-up. Successful percutaneous aortic valve replacement can be performed using the new self-expanding and repositionable Lotus valve for treatment of high-risk patients with aortic valve stenosis. Further studies are mandatory to assess device safety and efficacy in larger patient populations. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Survival and freedom from aortic valve-related reoperation after valve-sparing aortic root replacement in 1015 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kari, Fabian A; Doll, Kai-Nicolas; Hemmer, Wolfgang; Liebrich, Markus; Sievers, Hans-Hinrich; Richardt, Doreen; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Detter, Christian; Siepe, Matthias; Czerny, Martin; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize mortality and aortic valve replacement after valve-sparing aortic root replacement (V-SARR) in a multicentre cohort. Between 1994 and 2014, 1015 patients had V-SARR with (n = 288, 28%) or without cusp/commissure repair (n = 727, 72%) at the centres of Lübeck (n = 343, 34%), Stuttgart (n = 346, 34%), Hamburg (n = 109, 11%) and Freiburg (n = 217, 21%), Germany. Comparative survival of an age- and gender-matched general population was calculated. Log-rank tests and multiple logistic regression were used to identify risk factors. The mean follow-up was 5.2 ± 3.9 years. Cumulative follow-up comprised 2933 patient-years. Early survival was 98%. NYHA status and aneurysm size were predictive of death during mid-term follow-up (P = 0.025). Freedom from aortic valve replacement was 90% at 8 years, with the type of V-SARR (root remodelling, David II) being a risk factor (P = 0.015). Bicuspid aortic valve (P = 0.26) and initial valve function (P = 0.4) did not impact reoperation. The need of additional valve repair (cusps/commissures) was not linked to reoperation: freedom from aortic valve replacement at 8 years was 84% if cusp repair was performed versus 90% if V-SARR alone was performed (P = 0.218). Marfan syndrome had no impact on survival or on aortic valve replacement. Mid-term survival of patients after V-SARR is comparable with that of a matched general population. The regurgitant bicuspid aortic valve is a favourable substrate for V-SARR. Prophylactic surgery should be performed before symptoms or large aneurysms are present to achieve optimal mid-term outcomes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  9. Bicuspid aortic valves: Diagnostic accuracy of standard axial 64-slice chest CT compared to aortic valve image plane ECG-gated cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, David J., E-mail: david.murphy@st-vincents.ie [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); McEvoy, Sinead H., E-mail: s.mcevoy@st-vincents.ie [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Iyengar, Sri, E-mail: sri.iyengar@nhs.net [Department of Radiology, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth Devon PL6 8DH (United Kingdom); Feuchtner, Gudrun, E-mail: Gudrun.Feuchtner@i-med.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Cury, Ricardo C., E-mail: r.cury@baptisthealth.net [Department of Radiology, Baptist Cardiac and Vascular Institute, 8900 North Kendall Drive, Miami, FL 33176 (United States); Roobottom, Carl, E-mail: carl.roobottom@nhs.net [Department of Radiology, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth Devon PL6 8DH (United Kingdom); Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry (United Kingdom); Baumueller, Stephan, E-mail: Hatem.Alkadhi@usz.ch [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Alkadhi, Hatem, E-mail: stephan.baumueller@usz.ch [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Dodd, Jonathan D., E-mail: jonniedodd@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of standard axial 64-slice chest CT compared to aortic valve image plane ECG-gated cardiac CT for bicuspid aortic valves. Materials and methods: The standard axial chest CT scans of 20 patients with known bicuspid aortic valves were blindly, randomly analyzed for (i) the appearance of the valve cusps, (ii) the largest aortic sinus area, (iii) the longest aortic cusp length, (iv) the thickest aortic valve cusp and (v) valve calcification. A second blinded reader independently analyzed the appearance of the valve cusps. Forty-two age- and sex-matched patients with known tricuspid aortic valves were used as controls. Retrospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT multiphase reconstructions of the aortic valve were used as the gold-standard. Results: Fourteen (21%) scans were scored as unevaluable (7 bicuspid, 7 tricuspid). Of the remainder, there were 13 evaluable bicuspid valves, ten of which showed an aortic valve line sign, while the remaining three showed a normal Mercedes-Benz appearance owing to fused valve cusps. The 35 evaluable tricuspid aortic valves all showed a normal Mercedes-Benz appearance (P = 0.001). Kappa analysis = 0.62 indicating good interobserver agreement for the aortic valve cusp appearance. Aortic sinus areas, aortic cusp lengths and aortic cusp thicknesses of ≥3.8 cm{sup 2}, 3.2 cm and 1.6 mm respectively on standard axial chest CT best distinguished bicuspid from tricuspid aortic valves (P < 0.0001 for all). Of evaluable scans, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of standard axial chest CT in diagnosing bicuspid aortic valves was 77% (CI 0.54–1.0), 100%, 100% and 70% respectively. Conclusion: The aortic valve is evaluable in approximately 80% of standard chest 64-slice CT scans. Bicuspid aortic valves may be diagnosed on evaluable scans with good diagnostic accuracy. An aortic valve line sign, enlarged aortic sinuses and elongated, thickened valve cusps are specific CT

  10. Aortic valve calcification as a predictor of location and severity of paravalvular regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Ezra Y; Lam, Kayan Y; Bindraban, Navin R; Cocchieri, Riccardo; Planken, R Nils; Koch, Karel T; Baan, Jan; de Mol, Bas A; Marquering, Henk A

    2015-03-01

    To determine whether the location of aortic valve calcium (AVC) influences the location of paravalvular regurgitation (PR). PR is an adverse effect of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) with a negative effect on long-term patient survival. The relationship between AVC and the occurrence of PR has been documented. However, the relationship between the distribution of AVC and the location of PR is still sparsely studied. The purpose of this study was to correlate severity and location of AVC with PR in patients treated with TAVI. Fifty-six consecutive patients who underwent transaortic or transapical TAVI and had preoperative computed tomography scans were included in this retrospective study. The volume, mass and location of AVC was determined and compared between patients with and without PR using a non-parametric t-test. Postoperative echocardiography was performed to determine the presence and location of PR, which was associated with the cusp with highest AVC using a χ(2) test. Valve deployment was successful in all 56 patients. PR was present in 38 patients (68%) after TAVI. There was a non-significantly higher volume of AVC in the PR group [214 (70-418) vs 371 (254-606) cm(3), P = 0.15]. AVC mass was significantly higher in patients with PR than in patients without PR [282 (188-421) vs 142 (48-259) mg, respectively, P = 0.043]. The location of PR was determined in 36 of these patients. Of these 36 patients, PR occurred at the cusp with the highest AVC in 20 patients (56%, χ(2) P = 0.030). In our population, PR was associated with greater AVC mass. Moreover, the location of PR was associated with the cusp with the highest amount of AVC. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  11. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in the elderly: who to refer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Matthew; Green, Philip

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, experience with transcatheter aortic valve implantation has led to improved outcomes in elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) who may not have previously been considered for intervention. These patients are often frail with significant comorbid conditions. As the prevalence of AS increases, there is a need for improved assessment parameters to determine the patients most likely to benefit from this novel procedure. This review discusses the diagnostic criteria for severe AS and the trials available to aid in the decision to refer for aortic valve procedures in the elderly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Aortic valve preservation in Marfan syndrome. Initial experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forteza, Alberto; Cortina, Jose M; Sánchez, Violeta; Centeno, Jorge; López, M Jesús; Pérez de la Sota, Enrique; Rufilanchas, Juan J

    2007-05-01

    Preservation of the aortic valve using the technique described by David has been shown to be as effective as the Bentall-De Bono procedure. It avoids both the need for long-term anticoagulation and the complications associated with mechanical prostheses. We report our initial experience using this technique in patients with Marfan syndrome. Between April 2004 and April 2006, we used the David reimplantation technique in 40 patients with an aortic root aneurysm. Eighteen patients had Marfan syndrome. Their median age was 29 years (13-55 years). Echocardiography showed that the median diameter of the aortic sinus was 53 mm (46-59 mm). In 17 patients, aortic valve preservation was possible. No patient died during hospitalization and there were no significant complications. On echocardiography at discharge, no patient had greater than grade-II aortic regurgitation. During a median follow-up period of 8 months (1-24 months), one patient died due to rupture of an abdominal aneurysm. The others are all in New York Heart Association class I. Preservation of the aortic valve by means of valve reimplantation produced excellent results. It avoided both the thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications associated with prostheses and the need for long-term anticoagulation. If reimplanted valves continue to function adequately over the long term, this technique should become the treatment of choice for aneurysms of the ascending aorta in patients with Marfan syndrome.

  13. Relation of aortic valve calcium to chronic kidney disease (from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerraty, Marie A; Chai, Boyang; Hsu, Jesse Y; Ojo, Akinlolu O; Gao, Yanlin; Yang, Wei; Keane, Martin G; Budoff, Matthew J; Mohler, Emile R

    2015-05-01

    Although subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at markedly increased risk for cardiovascular mortality, the relation between CKD and aortic valve calcification has not been fully elucidated. Also, few data are available on the relation of aortic valve calcification and earlier stages of CKD. We sought to assess the relation of aortic valve calcium (AVC) with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), traditional and novel cardiovascular risk factors, and markers of bone metabolism in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study. All patients who underwent aortic valve scanning in the CRIC study were included. The relation between AVC and eGFR, traditional and novel cardiovascular risk factors, and markers of calcium metabolism were analyzed using both unadjusted and adjusted regression models. A total of 1,964 CRIC participants underwent computed tomography for AVC quantification. Decreased renal function was independently associated with increased levels of AVC (eGFR 47.11, 44.17, and 39 ml/min/1.73 m2, respectively, pAVC risk factors. Adjusted regression models identified several traditional and novel risk factors for AVC in patients with CKD. There was a difference in AVC risk factors between black and nonblack patients. In conclusion, our study shows that eGFR is associated in a dose-dependent manner with AVC in patients with CKD, and this association is independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pros and cons of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terré, Juan A; George, Isaac; Smith, Craig R

    2017-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) or replacement (TAVR) was recently approved by the FDA for intermediate risk patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). This technique was already worldwide adopted for inoperable and high-risk patients. Improved device technology, imaging analysis and operator expertise has reduced the initial worrisome higher complications rate associated with TAVR, making it comparable to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). However, many answers need to be addressed before adoption in lower risk patients. This paper highlights the pros and cons of TAVI based mostly on randomized clinical trials involving the two device platforms approved in the United States. We focused our analysis on metrics that will play a key role in expanding TAVR indication in healthier individuals. We review the significance and gave a perspective on paravalvular leak (PVL), valve performance, valve durability, leaflet thrombosis, stroke and pacemaker requirement.

  15. Aortic false aneurysm after double valve replacement in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Walters, Henry L; Forbes, Thomas J; Aggarwal, Sanjeev

    2013-06-01

    Aortic false aneurysm (AFA) is a rare but life threatening complication after aortic surgery. We report a 13-year-old boy who developed AFA after double valve replacement consisting of the following: (1) Bentall procedure utilizing a 25-mm St. Jude aortic valved composite Hemashield Dacron graft (Meadox Medicals, Oakland, NJ); and (2) replacement of right ventricle to pulmonary artery conduit with a 25-mm porcine valved conduit. The exterior metal ring of the pulmonary prosthetic valve conduit caused an abrasion of the Hemashield graft, resulting in the AFA. In addition to simple suture repair, the pulmonary conduit was wrapped with a Gore-Tex patch (W.L. Gore Assoc, Flagstaff, AZ) to prevent recurrence. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Long-Term Mortality Effect of Early Pacemaker Implantation After Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greason, Kevin L; Lahr, Brian D; Stulak, John M; Cha, Yong-Mei; Rea, Robert F; Schaff, Hartzell V; Dearani, Joseph A

    2017-10-01

    The need for pacemaker implantation is a well-described complication of aortic valve replacement. Not so well described is the effect such an event has on long-term outcome. This study reviewed a 21-year experience at the Mayo Clinic (Rochester, Minnesota) with aortic valve replacement to understand the influence of early postoperative pacemaker implantation on long-term mortality rates more clearly. This study retrospectively reviewed the records of 5,842 patients without previous pacemaker implantation who underwent surgical aortic valve replacement from January 1993 through June 2014. The median age of these patients was 73 years (range, 65 to 79 years), the median ejection fraction was 62% (range, 53% to 68%), 3,853 patients were male (66%), and coronary artery bypass graft operation was performed in 2,553 (44%) of the patients studied. Early pacemaker implantation occurred in 146 patients (2.5%) within 30 days of surgical aortic valve replacement. The median follow-up of patients was 11.1 years (range, 5.8 to 16.5 years), and all-cause mortality rates were 2.4% at 30 days, 6.4% at 1 year, 23.1% at 5 years, 48.3% at 10 years, and 67.9% at 15 years postoperatively. Early pacemaker implantation was associated with an increased risk of death after multivariable adjustment for baseline patients' characteristics (hazard ratio, 1.49; 95% confidence interval, 1.20, 1.84; p pacemaker implantation as a complication of surgical aortic valve replacement is associated with an increased risk of long-term death. Valve replacement-related pacemaker implantation rates should be important considerations with respect to new valve replacement paradigms, especially in younger and lower-risk patients. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Systematic review of the outcome of aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharma, Umesh C.; Barenbrug, Paul; Pokharel, Saraswati; Dassen, Willem R. M.; Pinto, Yigal M.; Maessen, Jos G.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After the establishment of aortic valve replacement procedure for aortic stenosis, there are heterogeneous studies and varying reports on outcome. An analysis that compares individual studies to summarize the overall effect is still lacking. This study systematically analyzes the change

  18. Effect of candesartan treatment on left ventricular remodeling after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbaek, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K

    2010-01-01

    In hypertension, angiotensin receptor blockers can augment regression of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. It is not known whether this also is the case after aortic valve replacement (AVR) for severe aortic stenosis (AS). To test the hypothesis that treatment with candesartan in addition...

  19. Left main coronary artery obstruction by dislodged native-valve calculus after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmaz, Tahir; Ayhan, Huseyin; Keles, Telat; Aslan, Abdullah Nabi; Erdogan, Kemal Esref; Sari, Cenk; Bilen, Emine; Akcay, Murat; Bozkurt, Engin

    2014-08-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement can be an effective, reliable treatment for severe aortic stenosis in surgically high-risk or ineligible patients. However, various sequelae like coronary artery obstruction can occur, not only in the long term, but also immediately after the procedure. We present the case of a 78-year-old woman whose left main coronary artery became obstructed with calculus 2 hours after the transfemoral implantation of an Edwards Sapien XT aortic valve. Despite percutaneous coronary intervention in that artery, the patient died. This case reminds us that early recognition of acute coronary obstruction and prompt intervention are crucial in patients with aortic stenosis who have undergone transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

  20. Surgery of the aortic root: should we go for the valve-sparing root reconstruction or the composite graft-valve replacement is still the first choice of treatment for these patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamana, Fernando de Azevedo; Dias, Ricardo Ribeiro; Duncan, Jose Augusto; Faria, Leandro Batisti de; Malbouisson, Luiz Marcelo Sa; Borges, Luciano de Figueiredo; Mady, Charles; Jatene, Fábio Biscegli

    2015-01-01

    To compare the results of the root reconstruction with the aortic valve-sparing operation versus composite graft-valve replacement. From January 2002 to October 2013, 324 patients underwent aortic root reconstruction. They were 263 composite graft-valve replacement and 61 aortic valve-sparing operation (43 reimplantation and 18 remodeling). Twenty-six percent of the patients were NYHA functional class III and IV; 9.6% had Marfan syndrome, and 12% had bicuspid aortic valve. There was a predominance of aneurysms over dissections (81% vs. 19%), with 7% being acute dissections. The complete follow-up of 100% of the patients was performed with median follow-up time of 902 days for patients undergoing composite graft-valve replacement and 1492 for those undergoing aortic valve-sparing operation. In-hospital mortality was 6.7% and 4.9%, respectively for composite graft-valve replacement and aortic valve-sparing operation (ns). During the late follow-up period, there was 0% moderate and 15.4% severe aortic regurgitation, and NYHA functional class I and II were 89.4% and 94%, respectively for composite graft-valve replacement and aortic valve-sparing operation (ns). Root reconstruction with aortic valve-sparing operation showed lower late mortality (P=0.001) and lower bleeding complications (P=0.006). There was no difference for thromboembolism, endocarditis, and need of reoperation. The aortic root reconstruction with preservation of the valve should be the operation being performed for presenting lower late mortality and survival free of bleeding events.

  1. Altered aortic shape in bicuspid aortic valve relatives influences blood flow patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Susanne; Smith, Danielle A; Barker, Alex J; Entezari, Pegah; Honarmand, Amir R; Carr, Maria L; Malaisrie, S Chris; McCarthy, Patrick M; Collins, Jeremy; Carr, James C; Markl, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is known to exhibit familial inheritance and is associated with aortopathy and altered aortic haemodynamics. However, it remains unclear whether BAV-related aortopathy can be inherited independently of valve morphology. Four-dimensional flow magnetic resonance imaging for the in vivo assessment of thoracic aortic 3D blood flow was performed in 24 BAV relatives with trileaflet aortic valves (age = 40 ± 14 years) and 15 healthy controls (age = 37 ± 10 years). Data analysis included aortic dimensions, shape (round/gothic/cubic), and 3D blood flow characteristics (semi-quantitative vortex/helix grading and peak velocities). Cubic and gothic aortic shapes were markedly more prevalent in BAV relatives compared with controls (38 vs. 7%). Ascending aorta (AAo) vortex flow in BAV relatives was significantly increased compared with controls (grading = 1.5 ± 1.0 vs. 0.6 ± 0.9, P = 0.015). Aortic haemodynamics were influenced by aortic shape: peak velocities were reduced for gothic aortas vs. round aortas (P = 0.003); vortex flow was increased for cubic aortas in the AAo (P gothic aortas in the AAo and descending aorta (P = 0.003, P = 0.029). Logistic regression demonstrated significant associations of shape with severity of vortex flow in AAo (P < 0.001) and aortic arch (P = 0.016) in BAV relatives. BAV relatives expressed altered aortic shape and increased vortex flow despite the absence of valvular disease or aortic dilatation. These data suggest a heritable component of BAV-related aortopathy affecting aortic shape and aberrant blood flow, independent of valve morphology. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Basal longitudinal strain predicts future aortic valve replacement in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Helle Gervig; Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Hassager, Christian

    2016-01-01

    analysis and coronary angiography by MDCT. The combined endpoint was indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR) and sudden cardiac death. During a median follow-up of 2.3 years (interquartile range 1.7-3.6) 43 patients (41%) met the endpoint of indication for AVR. The basal (13.4 ± 3.1% vs. 15.7 ± 3.......1%) and mid-ventricular segments (14.9 ± 2.7% vs. 16.2 ± 2.9%) were significantly reduced, but with sparing of the apical segments, in patients who later underwent AVR. In various multivariable Cox regression models, including only BLS, but not GLS, remained an independent predictor of AVR. CONCLUSION...

  3. Radiotherapy-induced aortic valve disease associated with porcelain aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Fukui, Kozo; Ichinoseki, Ikkoh; Munakata, Mamoru; Takahashi, Shoichi; Fukuda Ikuo

    2004-01-01

    Mediastinal irradiation has been reported to induce cardiac disease such as pericarditis, valvular dysfunction, conduction abnormalities, accelerated arteriosclerosis of the coronary arteries, and also calcifications of the ascending aorta. We herein describe a case of radiotherapy-induced porcelain aorta and aortic valve disease and their surgical treatment. The patient was diagnosed with myasthenia gravis (MG) in 1965 (Osserman's type II), and mediastinal irradiation was performed in 1970 for treatment of thymic tumor associated with MG. Thirty years after radiation therapy, complete atrioventricular block and aortic valve disease with severe calcification of the ascending aorta and aortic arch (porcelain aorta) were detected on echo cardiogram and cardiac catheterization. A permanent pacemaker was implanted via the left subclavian vein and aortic valve replacement was performed under extracorporeal circulation established by selective cerebral perfusion and balloon occlusion instead of aortic cross-clamping. As no risk factors of arteriosclerosis such as hypercholesterolemia, hyperglycemia and hypertension were apparent, we concluded that the aortic valve disease and porcelain aorta were primarily induced by radiotherapy. (author)

  4. A planning system for transapical aortic valve implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessat, Michael; Merk, Denis R.; Falk, Volkmar; Walther, Thomas; Jacobs, Stefan; Nöttling, Alois; Burgert, Oliver

    2009-02-01

    Stenosis of the aortic valve is a common cardiac disease. It is usually corrected surgically by replacing the valve with a mechanical or biological prosthesis. Transapical aortic valve implantation is an experimental minimally invasive surgical technique that is applied to patients with high operative risk to avoid pulmonary arrest. A stented biological prosthesis is mounted on a catheter. Through small incisions in the fifth intercostal space and the apex of the heart, the catheter is positioned under flouroscopy in the aortic root. The stent is expanded and unfolds the valve which is thereby implanted into the aortic root. Exact targeting is crucial, since major complications can arise from a misplaced valve. Planning software for the perioperative use is presented that allows for selection of the best fitting implant and calculation of the safe target area for that implant. The software uses contrast enhanced perioperative DynaCT images acquired under rapid pacing. In a semiautomatic process, a surface segmentation of the aortic root is created. User selected anatomical landmarks are used to calculate the geometric constraints for the size and position of the implant. The software is integrated into a PACS network based on DICOM communication to query and receive the images and implants templates from a PACS server. The planning results can be exported to the same server and from there can be rertieved by an intraoperative catheter guidance device.

  5. Regression in left ventricular mass after aortic valve replacement for chronic aortic regurgitation is unrelated to prosthetic valve size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Morgan L; Schaff, Hartzell V; Suri, Rakesh M; Li, Zhuo; Sundt, Thoralf M; Dearani, Joseph A; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2011-08-01

    We examined the role of prosthesis-patient mismatch on left ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement for chronic aortic valve regurgitation. We selected patients who had complete preoperative and follow-up echocardiograms with measurement of left ventricular mass. Patients were excluded who had moderate or greater aortic valve stenosis, concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting, or mitral valve procedures. Patients' mean age was 55 ± 17 years; 21% were female. The mean preoperative indexed left ventricular mass was 150 ± 45 g/m(2). Patients with mildly (n = 44; mean indexed mass, 126 ± 15 g/m(2)), moderately (n = 31; mean indexed mass, 168 ± 11 g/m(2)), or severely (n = 15; mean indexed mass, 241 ± 34 g/m(2)) increased preoperative indexed left ventricular mass, were similar, except for lower ejection fractions, larger end-diastolic dimensions, and larger ventricular wall thicknesses in the severely enlarged group (P regression was unrelated to labeled valve size, prosthesis-patient mismatch, or measured indexed effective aortic valve area. A greater preoperative indexed left ventricular mass (P regression. Despite having greater left ventricular mass regression, patients with severe preoperative indexed left ventricular mass did not return to normal values (mean, 142 ± 25 g/m(2)). Left ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement for chronic aortic regurgitation is unrelated to indexed prosthetic valve area. Although incomplete, regression is greatest in patients with the largest preoperative indexed left ventricular mass. Copyright © 2011 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Adjusting parameters of aortic valve stenosis severity by body size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minners, Jan; Gohlke-Baerwolf, Christa; Kaufmann, Beat A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adjustment of cardiac dimensions by measures of body size appears intuitively convincing and in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is commonly adjusted by body surface area (BSA). However, there is little evidence to support such an approach. OBJECTIVE: To identify...... the adequate measure of body size for the adjustment of aortic stenosis severity. METHODS: Parameters of aortic stenosis severity (jet velocity, mean pressure gradient (MPG) and AVA) and measures of body size (height, weight, BSA and body mass index (BMI)) were analysed in 2843 consecutive patients with aortic...... stenosis (jet velocity ≥2.5 m/s) and related to outcomes in a second cohort of 1525 patients from the Simvastatin/Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study. RESULTS: Whereas jet velocity and MPG were independent of body size, AVA was significantly correlated with height, weight, BSA and BMI (Pearson...

  7. Evaluation of a porcine model of early aortic valve sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sider, Krista L; Zhu, Cuilan; Kwong, Andrea V; Mirzaei, Zahra; de Langé, Cornelius F M; Simmons, Craig A

    2014-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is associated with significant cardiovascular morbidity. While late-stage CAVD is well-described, early pathobiological processes are poorly understood due to the lack of animal models that faithfully replicate early human disease. Here we evaluated a hypercholesterolemic porcine model of early diet-induced aortic valve sclerosis. Yorkshire swine were fed either a standard or high-fat/high-cholesterol diet for 2 or 5 months. Right coronary aortic valve leaflets were excised and analyzed (immuno)histochemically. Early human-like proteoglycan-rich onlays formed between the endothelial layer and elastic lamina in the fibrosa layer of valve leaflets, with accelerated formation associated with hypercholesterolemia (Psclerosis in hypercholesterolemic swine is characterized by the formation of proteoglycan-rich onlays in the fibrosa, which can occur prior to significant lipid accumulation, inflammatory cell infiltration, or myofibroblast activation. These characteristics mimic those of early human aortic valve disease, and thus the porcine model has utility for the study of early valve sclerosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Sutureless aortic valve replacement using a novel autologous tissue heart valve with stent (stent biovalve): proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Satoru; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Nakayama, Yasuhide; Date, Kazuma; Sumikura, Hirohito; Moriwaki, Takeshi; Nishimura, Motonobu; Tatsumi, Eisuke

    2015-06-01

    We developed an autologous, trileaflet tissue valve ("biovalve") using in-body tissue architecture technology to overcome the disadvantages of current bioprosthetic valves. We designed a novel biovalve with a balloon-expandable stent: the stent biovalve (SBV). This study evaluated the technical feasibility of sutureless aortic valve replacement using the SBV in an orthotopic position, as well as the functionality of the SBV under systemic circulation, in an acute experimental goat model. Three adult goats (54.5-56.1 kg) underwent sutureless AVR under cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). The technical feasibility and functionality of the SBVs were assessed using angiography, pressure catheterization, and two-dimensional echocardiography. The sutureless AVR was successful in all goats, and all animals could be weaned off CPB. The mean aortic cross-clamp time was 45 min. Angiogram, after weaning the animals off CPB, showed less than mild paravalvular leakage and central leakage was not detected in any of the goats. The mean peak-to-peak pressure gradient was 6.3 ± 5.0 mmHg. Epicardial two-dimensional echocardiograms showed smooth leaflet movement, including adequate closed positions with good coaptation; the open position demonstrated a large orifice area (average aortic valve area 2.4 ± 0.1 cm2). Sutureless AVR, using SBVs, was feasible in a goat model. The early valvular functionalities of the SBV were sufficient; future long-term experiments are needed to evaluate its durability and histological regeneration potential.

  9. Aortic valve replacement with 17-mm St. Jude Medical prostheses for a small aortic root in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaseya, Tohru; Kawara, Takemi; Tokunaga, Shigehiko; Kohno, Michitaka; Oishi, Yasuhisa; Morita, Shigeki

    2007-06-01

    There are few reports about the optimal prosthesis for elderly patients who have small aortic roots with an aortic annular size of less than 19 mm. From October 2004 to October 2006, 11 women aged 70 years or older (mean age, 74.9 +/- 3.5 years) underwent aortic valve replacement with a 17-mm Regent prosthesis (St. Jude Medical, St. Paul, MN), with the size determined using the manufacturer's sizer. Clinical status and the results of preoperative and postoperative echocardiography were evaluated. The patients had a mean body surface area of 1.33 +/- 0.13 m2. Preoperative average New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class was 2.5 +/- 0.7. Preoperative echocardiography showed a mean indexed effective orifice area of 0.33 +/- 0.14 cm2/m2 and a left ventricular mass index of 175 +/- 63 g/m2. Seven patients underwent associated procedures. Postoperative ventilation time was 14 +/- 5.6 hours, and the intensive care unit stay was 1.0 +/- 0.4 days. No patients died perioperatively. The NYHA functional class improved to class I in 9 patients. No obstruction of valve opening was observed. A significant increase in the mean indexed effective orifice area (0.87 +/- 0.10 cm2/m2) and regression of left ventricular mass index were found (114 +/- 46 cm2/m2) on postoperative echocardiography. Aortic valve replacement in elderly patients with small aortic roots (less than 19 mm) using a 17-mm Regent prosthesis showed satisfactory clinical and hemodynamic results.

  10. Combined surgical and catheter-based treatment of extensive thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Lönn, Lars; Søndergaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    valve stenosis (AS) who are considered at high risk for surgical aortic valve replacement. In this report, we describe the combined surgical and catheter-based treatment of an extensive TAA and AS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of hybrid TAA repair combined with TAVR....

  11. A Double Whammy: Severe Aortic Stenosis and Cocaine Overwhelm the Mitral Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maini, Rohit; Lim, Jonathan; Liu, Jing; Birnbaum, Itamar; Mirza, Farooq; Lakkis, Nasser; Hamzeh, Ihab

    2018-01-01

    A 50-year-old man presented with acute onset dyspnea following cocaine use. He had severe aortic stenosis (AS), mild mitral regurgitation (MR) due to mitral valve prolapse, and no coronary artery disease on recent coronary angiography. He was in acute heart failure with signs of impending cardiogenic shock. Urgent bedside echocardiography revealed hyperdynamic left ventricular systolic function with acute severe MR from a ruptured chordae tendineae. The acute cocaine-induced spike of his already elevated left ventricular systolic pressure from severe AS likely precipitated chordal rupture of his vulnerable mitral valve. This patient underwent emergent mitral and aortic valve replacements. Although cocaine use has been associated with a myriad of cardiovascular complications, acute MR due to chordal rupture has not, to our knowledge, been previously reported in this setting. Prompt diagnosis with echocardiography and surgical intervention are of paramount importance in the management of acute MR.

  12. Aortic dilatation in patients with prosthetic aortic valve: comparison of MRI and echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian; Rudolph, André; Wassmuth, Ralf; Abdel-Aty, Hassan; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette

    2010-05-01

    Patients with prosthetic aortic valve have an increased risk for aortic dissection, which rises further with growing aortic diameters. Thus, accurate aortic monitoring is required. As transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), the current clinical standard, is frequently restricted to the proximal ascending aorta, the use of two-dimensional cardiovascular magnetic resonance (2D-CMR) in transverse orientation was investigated as a screening tool to assess ascending aortic dimensions. Fast, non-contrast-enhanced, non-breath-hold, steady-state free-precession (SSFP) sequences (1.5 Tesla, slice thickness 7 mm, gap 1.8 mm, scan time 10-15 s) were applied to image the thorax in transverse planes. To test the accuracy of aortic dimensions obtained in this way, comparison was made to contrast-enhanced three-dimensional MR angiography (3D-MRA) as the 'gold standard' in 30 patients with aortic or aortic valve disease. After validation, transverse 2D-CMR was used to assess ascending aortic dimensions in 65 patients with aortic bioprostheses, and the results were compared to those acquired with TTE. Data acquired with both 2D-CMR and 3D-MRA agreed well when assessing ascending aortic diameters (r = 0.99; p 2.1 cm/m2) was present in 38.5% of 2D-CMR cases and in 11.5% of TTE cases. The intra- and inter-observer variabilities to assess aortic dimensions by 2D-CMR were 2.1 +/- 1.9% and 4.3 +/- 3.7%, respectively. Imaging of the complete thorax in transverse orientation using fast, non-contrast-enhanced SSFP images provided an accurate and reliable approach to screen for aortic dilatation. In patients with aortic bioprostheses, 2D-CMR revealed a high prevalence of aortic dilatation, which was considerably underestimated by TTE.

  13. Preventative valve-sparing aortic root replacement and pregnancy outcome in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, Vesna; Zlopasa, Gordan; Herman, Mislav; Planinić, Pavao; Micevska, Ana

    2012-06-01

    In Marfan syndrome, with dilatation of the aortic root secondary to an underlying connective tissue defect, pregnancy can cause hemodynamic stress leading to the development of an aortic aneurysm and even a fatal aortic dissection. In the presence of existing aortic root enlargement and a family history of aortic dissection, preventative elective surgery is suggested. Aortic root replacement with or without a valve-sparing procedure is superior to total aortic root replacement with prosthetic valve/tube graft. It provides excellent survival with low rates of aortic - valve related complications.

  14. Transfemoral Aortic Valve Implantation with the New Edwards Sapien 3 Valve for Treatment of Severe Aortic Stenosis-Impact of Valve Size in a Single Center Experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Wöhrle

    Full Text Available The third generation Edwards Sapien 3 (Edwards Lifesciences Inc., Irvine, California system was optimized to reduce residual aortic regurgitation and vascular complications.235 patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis were prospectively enrolled. Transcatheter aortic valve implantations (TAVI were performed without general anesthesia by transfemoral approach. Patients were followed for 30 days. Patients received 23mm (N = 77, 26mm (N = 91 or 29mm (N = 67 valve based on pre-procedural 256 multislice computer tomography. Mean oversizing did not differ between the 3 valves. There was no residual moderate or severe aortic regurgitation. Rate of mild aortic regurgitation and regurgitation index did not differ between groups. There was no switch to general anesthesia or conversion to surgery. Rate of major vascular complication was 3.0% with no difference between valve and delivery sheath sizes. Within 30 days rates of all cause mortality (2.6% and stroke (2.1% were low.In patients with severe aortic stenosis transfemoral TAVI with the Edwards Sapien 3 valve without general anesthesia was associated with a high rate of device success, no moderate or severe residual aortic regurgitation, low rates of major vascular complication, mortality and stroke within 30 days with no difference between the 3 valve sizes.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02162069.

  15. Use of an Automated Suture Fastening Device in Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beute, Tyler J; Orem, Matthew D; Schiller, Timothy M; Goehler, Matthew; Parker, Jessica; Willekes, Charles L; Timek, Tomasz

    2018-03-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (mAVR) is gaining clinical acceptance, however, it is associated with increased operative times due to limited surgical field and access. The Cor-Knot is an automated fastening device designed to facilitate suture fastening, but clinical data in mAVR are lacking. From May 2014 to February 2017, 92 patients underwent mAVR at our center with 39 valves secured with manually-tied (MT) sutures and 53 valves entirely secured with the Cor-Knot (CK). Pre-operative characteristics and 30-day outcomes data were extracted from our local Society of Thoracic Surgeons database and the electronic medical record. Survival data were obtained from the Michigan State Social Security Death Index. No significant difference in pre-operative characteristics were noted between the two groups. Aortic cross-clamp time (72±12 min vs 82±15 min, p=0.001) was significantly shorter with CK. There was no difference in post-operative mortality (0% vs 0%), stroke (0% vs 1.9%), atrial fibrillation (28% vs 33%), renal failure (0% vs 3.8%), or pacemaker implantation (5.1% vs 5.7%) between MT and CK. Valve function on post-operative echocardiography and 1-year patient survival were similar. In minimally invasive aortic valve replacement, the Cor-Knot device was associated with reduced aortic cross-clamp time while providing equivalent clinical outcomes. Larger studies are needed to confirm efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of the Cor-Knot device in minimally invasive aortic valve surgery. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Lipoprotein(a Induces Human Aortic Valve Interstitial Cell Calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Yu, PhD

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Lipoprotein(a, or Lp(a, significantly increased alkaline phosphatase activity, release of phosphate, calcium deposition, hydroxyapatite, cell apoptosis, matrix vesicle formation, and phosphorylation of signal transduction proteins; increased expression of chondro-osteogenic mediators; and decreased SOX9 and matrix Gla protein (p < 0.001. Inhibition of MAPK38 and GSK3β significantly reduced Lp(a-induced calcification of human aortic valve interstitial cells (p < 0.001. There was abundant presence of Lp(a and E06 immunoreactivity in diseased human aortic valves. The present study demonstrates a causal effect for Lp(a in aortic valve calcification and suggests that interfering with the Lp(apathway could provide a novel therapeutic approach in the management of this debilitating disease.

  17. Surgery of the aortic root: should we go for the valve-sparing root reconstruction or the composite graft-valve replacement is still the first choice of treatment for these patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando de Azevedo Lamana

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective:To compare the results of the root reconstruction with the aortic valve-sparing operation versus composite graftvalve replacement.Methods:From January 2002 to October 2013, 324 patients underwent aortic root reconstruction. They were 263 composite graft-valve replacement and 61 aortic valve-sparing operation (43 reimplantation and 18 remodeling. Twenty-six percent of the patients were NYHA functional class III and IV; 9.6% had Marfan syndrome, and 12% had bicuspid aortic valve. There was a predominance of aneurysms over dissections (81% vs. 19%, with 7% being acute dissections. The complete follow-up of 100% of the patients was performed with median follow-up time of 902 days for patients undergoing composite graft-valve replacement and 1492 for those undergoing aortic valve-sparing operation.Results:In-hospital mortality was 6.7% and 4.9%, respectively for composite graft-valve replacement and aortic valve-sparing operation (ns. During the late follow-up period, there was 0% moderate and 15.4% severe aortic regurgitation, and NYHA functional class I and II were 89.4% and 94%, respectively for composite graft-valve replacement and aortic valve-sparing operation (ns. Root reconstruction with aortic valve-sparing operation showed lower late mortality (P=0.001 and lower bleeding complications (P=0.006. There was no difference for thromboembolism, endocarditis, and need of reoperation.Conclusion:The aortic root reconstruction with preservation of the valve should be the operation being performed for presenting lower late mortality and survival free of bleeding events.

  18. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Severe Aortic Regurgitation With Acute Refractory Cardiogenic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achkouty, Guy; Amabile, Nicolas; Zannis, Konstantinos; Veugeois, Aurélie; Caussin, Christophe

    2018-03-01

    From January 2013 to January 2017, 686 consecutive patients were referred to our centre for transcatheter aortic valve replacement, including 5 subjects with severe aortic regurgitation and acute refractory cardiogenic shock. These patients were contraindicated for surgical treatment by the heart team because of high surgical risk (median logistic EuroSCORE: 74.6/Society of Thoracic Surgeons score: 37.9). The success rate of valve implantation was 100% through transfemoral access with self-expandable devices. The observed 30-day mortality rate was 20%. Hence, the transcatheter aortic valve replacement procedure might represent a successful and life-saving intervention for treatment of patients with severe aortic regurgitation who present with acute refractory cardiogenic shock. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Aortic valve replacement and prosthesis-patient mismatch in the era of trans-catheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Shigeki

    2016-08-01

    The treatment strategy for aortic stenosis (AS) has been changing due to newly developed valvular prostheses and trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). To determine the role of new modalities for AS with a small aortic root, papers using the concept of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) were reviewed. First, to determine the cut-off value of the indexed effective orifice area (IEOA) for defining PPM, the studies of surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) with a follow-up longer than 5 years and a patient number larger than 500 were reviewed. Second, the papers comparing TAVI and SAVR were reviewed. Furthermore, the prevalence of PPM was reviewed, with the addition of papers on aortic root enlargement, sutureless AVR, and aortic valve reconstruction with autologous pericardium. The results of the long-term survival after aortic valve replacement (AVR) have indicated that an IEOA less than 0.65 cm(2)/m(2) should be avoided in all cases, whereas the indications for patients with an IEOA between 065 and 0.85 cm(2)/m(2) should be determined by considering multiple factors. A large body size and younger age have a significantly negative influence on the long-term survival. In Asian population, the prevalence of PPM was low, despite the fact that the size of the aortic annulus was small. The IEOA after TAVI was larger than after surgical AVR in population-matched studies. To evaluate the role of TAVI and other modalities for a small aortic root, studies with a longer follow-up and larger volume are thus warranted.

  20. Calcific Aortic Valve Disease Is Associated with Layer-Specific Alterations in Collagen Architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather N Hutson

    Full Text Available Disorganization of the valve extracellular matrix (ECM is a hallmark of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD. However, while microarchitectural features of the ECM can strongly influence the biological and mechanical behavior of tissues, little is known about the ECM microarchitecture in CAVD. In this work, we apply advanced imaging techniques to quantify spatially heterogeneous changes in collagen microarchitecture in CAVD. Human aortic valves were obtained from individuals between 50 and 75 years old with no evidence of valvular disease (healthy and individuals who underwent valve replacement surgery due to severe stenosis (diseased. Second Harmonic Generation microscopy and subsequent image quantification revealed layer-specific changes in fiber characteristics in healthy and diseased valves. Specifically, the majority of collagen fiber changes in CAVD were found to occur in the spongiosa, where collagen fiber number increased by over 2-fold, and fiber width and density also significantly increased. Relatively few fibrillar changes occurred in the fibrosa in CAVD, where fibers became significantly shorter, but did not otherwise change in terms of number, width, density, or alignment. Immunohistochemical staining for lysyl oxidase showed localized increased expression in the diseased fibrosa. These findings reveal a more complex picture of valvular collagen enrichment and arrangement in CAVD than has previously been described using traditional analysis methods. Changes in fiber architecture may play a role in regulating the pathobiological events and mechanical properties of valves during CAVD. Additionally, characterization of the ECM microarchitecture can inform the design of fibrous scaffolds for heart valve tissue engineering.

  1. Is the use of renin-angiotensin system inhibitors in patients with aortic valve stenosis safe and of prognostic benefit?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Charlotte; Abdulla, Jawdat

    2017-01-01

    risk [576/3389 patients receiving RASi vs. 1118/4384 controls died; relative risk 0.93 (95% confidence interval 0.78-1.11), P = 0.44]. Use of RASi was also observed to lower the risk of aortic valve replacement (AVR) surgery [67/2913 patients with RASi vs. 154/3666 controls underwent AVR; relative risk......Aortic valve stenosis (AVS) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, especially in the presence of symptoms and echocardiographic signs of left ventricular remodelling (i.e. increase in left ventricular mass, left ventricular dilation, and systolic dysfunction). Renin...... for inclusion (PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane library search criteria: aortic stenosis, aortic valve, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor in different combinations, published in English at any time up to 1 April 2016). Our analyses suggested that use of RASi was safe, with no observed increase in mortality...

  2. Valve-sparing root replacement in children with aortic root aneurysm: mid-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Rüdiger; Badiu, Catalin C; Vogt, Manfred; Voss, Bernhard; Hörer, Jürgen; Prodan, Zsolt; Schreiber, Christian; Mazzitelli, Domenico

    2013-05-01

    We aimed at evaluating the results of aortic valve-sparing root replacement (AVSRR) in children with aortic root aneurysm (ARA) due to genetic disorders in terms of mortality, reoperation and recurrent aortic valve regurgitation (AVR). Thirteen patients (mean age 9.7 ± 6.5 years, 10 months-18 years) underwent AVSRR for ARA between 2002 and 2011. Six of the 13 patients had Marfan syndrome, 3 Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS), 2 bicuspid aortic valve syndrome and 2 an unspecified connective tissue disorder. AVR was graded as none/trace, mild and severe in 5, 7 and 1 patient, respectively. The mean pre-operative root diameter was 45 ± 10 mm (mean Z-score 10.3 ± 2.0). Remodelling of the aortic root was performed in 4 patients, reimplantation of the aortic valve in 9 and a concomitant cusp repair in 4. The diameter of the prostheses used for root replacement varied from 22 to 30 mm (mean Z-score = 2.3 ± 3). The follow-up was 100% complete with a mean follow-up time of 3.7 years. There was no operative mortality. One patient with LDS died 2.5 years after the operation due to spontaneous rupture of the descending aorta. Root re-replacement with mechanical conduit was necessary in 1 patient for severe recurrent AVR 8 days after remodelling of the aortic root. At final follow-up, AVR was graded as none/trace and mild in all patients. Eleven patients presented in New York Heart Association functional Class I and 1 in Class II. In paediatric patients with ARA, valve-sparing root replacement can be performed with low operative risk and excellent mid-term valve durability. Hence, prosthetic valve-related morbidity may be avoided. Due to the large diameters of the aortic root and the ascending aorta, the size of the implanted root prostheses will not limit later growth of the native aorta.

  3. Patient-prosthesis mismatch has no influence on in-hospital mortality after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yottasurodom, Chaiwut; Namthaisong, Kriengkrai; Porapakkham, Pramote; Kasemsarn, Choosak; Chotivatanapong, Taweesak; Chaiseri, Pradistchai; Wongdit, Suwannee; Yasotarin, Suwanna

    2012-08-01

    To analyze the relationship between prosthetic aortic valve orifice and body surface area (Effective Orifice Area Index, EOAI) and in-hospital mortality after aortic valve replacement. A prospective study was conducted between October 2007 to September 2010, 536 patients underwent isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR) was recorded on preoperative, operative and postoperative data. Patient Prosthesis Mismatch (PPM) was classified by Effective Orifice Area Indexed (EOAI) by prosthetic valve area divided by body surface area as mild or no significance if the EOAI is greater than 0.85 cm2/m2, moderate if between 0.65 cm2/m2 and 0.85 cm2/m2, and severe if less than 0.65 cm2/m2. Statistical differences were analyzed by Chi-square and student t-test with p-value less than 0.05 considered significant. There were 304 men, mean age was 60.98 years, mean valve orifice area 1.69 cm2, body surface area 1.60 m2, cross clamp time 1.13 hrs., bypass time 1.67 hrs. Mechanical valves were used in 274 patients (51.2%) and Bioprosthesis were used in 181 patients (48.8%). PPM was found in 33.7%, 6.7% was severe PPM, 27% was moderate PPM and 66.3% has no significant PPM Over all in-hospital mortality was 1.5%. There was no significant difference in hospital mortality between no PPM group, moderate PPM and severe PPM group (1.4% vs. 1.4% vs. 5.4%, p-value = 0.86). In a large aortic valve surgery population, moderate and severe patient prosthesis mismatch occurred in 35.6% of patients but had no influence on in-hospital mortality.

  4. Percutaneous aortic valve implantation of the Medtronic CoreValve self-expanding valve prosthesis via left subclavian artery access: the first case report in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavolias, George K; Georgiadou, Panagiota; Houri, Mazen; Sbarouni, Eftihia; Thomopoulou, Sofia; Tsiapras, Dimitrios; Smirli, Anna; Balanika, Marina; Voudris, Vassilis

    2010-01-01

    This case report describes a percutaneous aortic valve implantation with the Medtronic CoreValve selfexpanding valve prosthesis in a patient with severe aortic stenosis. The approach was made via the left subclavian artery because of the lack of femoral vessel access. The patient was a 78-year-old female with breathlessness on minimal effort, a recent hospitalisation due to pulmonary oedema, and frequent episodes of pre-syncope; surgical valve replacement had been ruled out. The prosthetic valve was successfully implanted with mild paravalvular aortic regurgitation. At 30 days, the patient's clinical condition had significantly improved, with excellent functioning of the aortic valve prosthesis.

  5. Uncommon acquired Gerbode defect following extensive bicuspid aortic valve endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dores Hélder

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gerbode defect is a rare type of left ventricle to right atrium shunt. It is usually congenital in origin, but acquired cases are also described, mainly following infective endocarditis, valve replacement, trauma or acute myocardial infarction. We report a case of a 50-year-old man who suffered an extensive and complex infective endocarditis involving a bicuspid aortic valve, the mitral-aortic intervalvular fibrosa and the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve. After dual valve replacement and annular reconstruction, a shunt between the left ventricle and the right atrium - Gerbode defect, and a severe leak of the mitral prosthesis were detected. Reintervention was performed with successful shunt closure with an autologous pericardial patch and paravalvular leak correction. No major complications occurred denying the immediate post-surgery period and the follow-up at the first year was uneventful.

  6. A Quantitative Study of Simulated Bicuspid Aortic Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeto, Kai; Nguyen, Tran; Rodriguez, Javier; Pastuszko, Peter; Nigam, Vishal; Lasheras, Juan

    2010-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that congentially bicuspid aortic valves develop degenerative diseases earlier than the standard trileaflet, but the causes are not well understood. It has been hypothesized that the asymmetrical flow patterns and turbulence found in the bileaflet valves together with abnormally high levels of strain may result in an early thickening and eventually calcification and stenosis. Central to this hypothesis is the need for a precise quantification of the differences in the strain rate levels between bileaflets and trileaflet valves. We present here some in-vitro dynamic measurements of the spatial variation of the strain rate in pig aortic vales conducted in a left ventricular heart flow simulator device. We measure the strain rate of each leaflet during the whole cardiac cycle using phase-locked stereoscopic three-dimensional image surface reconstruction techniques. The bicuspid case is simulated by surgically stitching two of the leaflets in a normal valve.

  7. Ascending Aortic Wall Cohesion: Comparison of Bicuspid and Tricuspid Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Benedik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Bicuspid aortic valve (AV represents the most common form of congenital AV malformation, which is frequently associated with pathologies of the ascending aorta. We compared the mechanical properties of the aortic wall between patients with bicuspid and tricuspid AV using a new custom-made device mimicking transversal aortic wall shear stress. Methods. Between 03/2010 and 07/2011, 190 consecutive patients undergoing open aortic valve replacement at our institution were prospectively enrolled, presenting either with a bicuspid (group 1, n=44 or a tricuspid (group 2, n=146 AV. Aortic wall specimen were examined with the “dissectometer” resulting in nine specific aortic-wall parameters derived from tensile strength curves (TSC. Results. Patients with a bicuspid AV showed significantly more calcified valves (43.2% versus 15.8%, P<0.001, and a significantly thinner aortic wall (2.04±0.42 mm versus 2.24±0.41 mm, P=0.008. Transesophageal echocardiography diameters (annulus, aortic sinuses, and sinotubular junction were significantly larger in the bicuspid group (P=0.003, P=0.02, P=0.01. We found no difference in the aortic wall cohesion between both groups as revealed by shear stress testing (P=0.72, P=0.40, P=0.41. Conclusion. We observed no differences of TSC in patients presenting with tricuspid or bicuspid AVs. These results may allow us to assume that the morphology of the AV and the pathology of the ascending aorta are independent.

  8. Valve-sparing and valve-replacing techniques for aortic root replacement in patients with Marfan syndrome: Analysis of early outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volguina, Irina V; Miller, D Craig; LeMaire, Scott A; Palmero, Laura C; Wang, Xing Li; Connolly, Heidi M; Sundt, Thoralf M; Bavaria, Joseph E; Dietz, Harry C; Milewicz, Dianna M; Coselli, Joseph S

    2009-05-01

    A prospective, international registry study was initiated to provide contemporary comparative data on short-term clinical outcomes after aortic valve-sparing and aortic valve-replacing root operations in patients with Marfan syndrome. The purpose of this initial report is to describe the study design and to compare early outcomes in the first 151 enrolled patients. We assessed 30-day outcomes in 151 patients who met strict Ghent diagnostic criteria for Marfan syndrome and underwent aortic root replacement with either valve-replacing (n = 46) or valve-sparing techniques (n = 105) at one of 18 participating centers. In the valve replacement group, a mechanical composite valve graft was used in 39 (85%) patients and a bioprosthetic valve in 7 (15%). In the valve-sparing group, David V procedures were performed in 57 (54%) patients, David I in 38 (36%), David IV in 8 (8%), Florida sleeve in 1 (1%), and Yacoub remodeling in 1 (1%). No in-hospital or 30-day deaths occurred. Despite longer crossclamp and cardiopulmonary bypass times in the valve-sparing group, there were no significant between-group differences in postoperative complications. Thirty-day valve-related complications occurred in 2 (4%) patients undergoing valve replacement and in 3 (3%) undergoing valve-sparing procedures (P = .6). The analysis of early outcomes revealed that valve-sparing techniques were the most common approach to root replacement in patients with Marfan syndrome in these centers. The complexity of valve-sparing root replacement did not translate into any demonstrable adverse early outcomes. Subsequent analysis will compare the 3-year durability of these two surgical approaches.

  9. Aortic valve replacement with sutureless prosthesis: better than root enlargement to avoid patient-prosthesis mismatch?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Erik; Martens, Andreas; Alhadi, Firas; Hoeffler, Klaus; Umminger, Julia; Kaufeld, Tim; Sarikouch, Samir; Koigeldiev, Nurbol; Cebotari, Serghei; Schmitto, Jan Dieter; Haverich, Axel; Shrestha, Malakh

    2016-06-01

    Aortic valve replacement in patients with a small aortic annulus may result in patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM). Aortic root enlargement (ARE) can reduce PPM, but leads to extended cardiac ischaemia times. Sutureless valves have the potential to prevent PPM while reducing cardiac ischaemia times. Between January 2007 and December 2011, a total of 128 patients with a small aortic annulus underwent surgery for aortic valve stenosis at our centre. Thirty-six (17% male, n = 6) patients received conventional valve replacement with ARE and 92 (16% male, n = 18) subjects received sutureless valve implantation (Sorin Perceval). We conducted a comparative, retrospective study with follow-up. The sutureless group showed a significantly higher age (79 years) than the ARE patients (62 years, P body surface area was 0.91 ± 0.2 cm(2)/m(2) in ARE patients and 0.83 ± 0.14 cm(2)/m(2) in sutureless patients (P = 0.040). The rate of patients with severe PPM was 6% (n = 2) in ARE patients and 11% (n = 8%) in sutureless patients (not significant, n.s.). The 30-day mortality rates were 2% (n = 2) in sutureless patients and 6% (n = 2) in ARE patients (n.s.). The 1- and 5-year survival rates of the sutureless group were 92 and 54% years, respectively, whereas the 1- and 5-year survival rates of the ARE group were 76% (n.s.). Although the sutureless valve patients received significantly more concomitant procedures, all operation-associated times were significantly shorter. Despite sutureless valve patients being older, the 30-day mortality and survival rates were comparable in the two groups. Since the indexed EOA was only slightly lower and the incidence of severe PPM was not significantly higher in the sutureless valve patients, we conclude that sutureless valve implantation is an alternative to conventional ARE to treat a small aortic annulus and avoid PPM, especially in geriatric patients who benefit from the quick implantation process. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford

  10. Reimplantation valve-sparing aortic root replacement in Marfan syndrome using the Valsalva conduit: an intercontinental multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settepani, Fabrizio; Szeto, Wilson Y; Pacini, Davide; De Paulis, Ruggero; Chiariello, Luigi; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto; Gallotti, Roberto; Bavaria, Joseph E

    2007-02-01

    Introduced by DePaulis in 2000, the Gelweave Valsalva graft (Sulzer Vascutek, Refrewshire, Scotland) is a modified Dacron conduit (DuPont, Wilmington, DE), with prefashioned sinuses of Valsalva. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mid-term results of the reimplantation valve-sparing aortic root replacement using the Gelweave Valsalva prosthesis in Marfan syndrome patients. A retrospective review was performed of 35 patients with Marfan syndrome in four centers who underwent the reimplantation valve-sparing aortic root replacement using the Gelweave Valsalva prosthesis. The patients were predominantly men, with a mean age of 36.5 +/- 12.6 years (range, 14 to 62 years). Two patients presented with acute type A dissections and underwent emergent operations. Elective hemiarch reconstruction using hypothermic circulatory arrest was required in 11 patients. Aortic valve cusp repair was performed in 2 patients. There were no operative or hospital deaths, and no patients died during follow-up. The mean follow-up was 19 months (range, 1 to 60 months). Significant (>2+) aortic insufficiency (AI), requiring aortic valve replacement, developed in 3 patients during follow-up that requiring aortic valve replacement. The 5-year freedom from reoperation owing to structural valve deterioration was 88.9% +/- 8.1%. There were no episodes of clinically significant thromboembolism. Reimplantation valve-sparing aortic root replacement with the Gelweave Valsalva prosthesis in Marfan patients provides satisfactory mid-term results, thus encouraging further use of this type of repair. However, long-term results are needed in order to define the durability of this technique.

  11. Lactococcus garvieae Endocarditis on a Prosthetic Biological Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsur, A; Slutzki, T; Flusser, D

    2015-09-01

    Lactococcus garvieae (LG) endocarditis is a rare disease in humans. There are only about 16 reported cases in the world. We report a 76-year-old male patient with LG endocarditis. In depth interview with the patient revealed that 2 weeks prior to admission, he had eaten sushi containing raw fish. Unlike many of the other infections reported, which were on a native mitral valve, our patient's vegetation was on a prosthetic aortic valve. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Optimal timing of aortic valve replacement in elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marumoto, Akira; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Kishimoto, Yuichiro; Saiki, Munehiro; Nishimura, Motonobu

    2014-01-01

    The elderly population with severe aortic stenosis (AS) requiring aortic valve replacement (AVR) is increasing. The optimal timing of AVR in these patients has been under discussion. We retrospectively reviewed the data from severe AS patients (n = 84) who underwent AVR with/without concomitant procedures from 2005 to 2010. The symptom status, preoperative data, operative outcome, late survival and freedom from cardiac events were compared between elderly patients (age ≥80 years [n = 31]) and younger patients (age <80 years [n = 53]). The operative mortality in elderly patients (3.2 %) and younger patients (3.8 %) was comparable. The symptoms in elderly patients were more severe and hospitalized heart failure (HF) was more frequently noted as the primary symptom (p = 0.017). Patients with and without hospitalized HF differed significantly in late survival and freedom from cardiac events (p = 0.001), but advanced age had no significant effect. The results of a Cox proportional hazards analysis revealed that hospitalized HF was a significant predictor for cardiac events after AVR, irrespective of age (hazard ratio 6.93, 95 % confidence interval 1.83-26.26, p < 0.004). In elderly patients with severe AS, surgery should be recommended even in the presence of minimal symptoms and should be performed before the onset of life-threatening HF.

  13. Shape of the dilated aorta in children with bicuspid aortic valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mart, Christopher R; McNerny, Bryn E

    2013-01-01

    The dilated aorta in adults with bicuspid aortic valve has been shown to have different shapes, but it is not known if this occurs in children. This observational study was performed to determine if there are different shapes of the dilated aorta in children with bicuspid aortic valve and their association with age, gender, hemodynamic alterations, and degree of aortic enlargement. One hundred and eighty-seven echocardiograms done on pediatric patients (0 – 18 years) for bicuspid aortic valve, during 2008, were reviewed. Aortic valve morphology, shape/size of the aorta, and pertinent hemodynamic alterations were documented. Aortic dilation was felt to be present when at least one aortic segment had a z-score > 2.0; global aortic enlargement was determined by summing the aortic segment z-scores. The aortic shape was assessed by age, gender, valve morphology, and hemodynamic alterations. Aortic dilation was present in 104/187 patients. The aorta had six different shapes designated from S1 through S6. There was no association between the aortic shape and gender, aortic valve morphology, or hemodynamic abnormalities. S3 was the most common after the age of six years and was associated with the most significant degree of global aortic enlargement. The shape of the dilated aorta in children with bicuspid aortic valve does not occur in a uniform manner and multiple shapes are seen. S2 and S3 are most commonly seen. As aortic dilation becomes more significant, a single shape (S3) becomes the dominant pattern

  14. Impact of hypertension on left ventricular structure in patients with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis (a SEAS substudy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rieck, Ashild E; Cramariuc, Dana; Staal, Eva M

    2010-01-01

    Both hypertension and aortic valve stenosis induce left ventricular hypertrophy. However, less is known about the influence of concomitant hypertension on left ventricular structure in patients with aortic valve stenosis.......Both hypertension and aortic valve stenosis induce left ventricular hypertrophy. However, less is known about the influence of concomitant hypertension on left ventricular structure in patients with aortic valve stenosis....

  15. Impact of prosthesis-patient mismatch on the regression of secondary mitral regurgitation after isolated aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthetic valve in patients with severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeloni, Emiliano; Melina, Giovanni; Pibarot, Philippe; Benedetto, Umberto; Refice, Simone; Ciavarella, Giuseppino M; Roscitano, Antonino; Sinatra, Riccardo; Pepper, John R

    2012-01-01

    Secondary mitral regurgitation (SMR) is generally reduced after isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR), but there is important interindividual variability in the magnitude of this reduction. Prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) may hinder normalization of left ventricular geometry and pressure overload following AVR, therefore we aimed to investigate the relationship between PPM and regression of SMR following AVR for aortic valve stenosis. A total of 419 patients with AS who underwent isolated AVR at 2 institutions and presenting moderate SMR (mitral regurgitant volume 30 to 45 mL/beat) not considered for surgical correction were included in this study. Clinical and echocardiographic follow-up were completed at a median follow-up time of 37 months. PPM was defined as an indexed effective orifice area ≤0.85 cm(2)/m(2) and was found in 170/419 patients (40.6%). There were no significant differences in baseline and operative characteristics between patients with or without PPM. Patients with PPM had less regression of SMR following AVR compared with those with no PPM (change in mitral regurgitant volume: -11±4 versus -17±5 mL, respectively; Pregression model, which showed indexed effective orifice area (Pregression of SMR following AVR. This unfavorable effect was associated with worse functional capacity. These findings emphasize the importance of operative strategies aiming to prevent PPM in patients with aortic valve stenosis and concomitant SMR.

  16. Collagen analysis of the ascending aortic dilatation associated with bicuspid aortic valve disease compared with tricuspid aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete Santos, Alexander; Yan, Junfeng; Lochmann, Peter; Pfeil, Heike; Petersen, Michael; Simm, Andreas; Treede, Hendrik; Sievers, Hans H; Mohamed, Salah A

    2016-12-01

    Dilatation of the ascending aorta is a common occurrence in patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV). The aim of the current study was to characterize collagen content in advanced glycation end products (AGEs) of dilated aortic tissue from two distinct areas, concave and convex aortic sites in patients with BAV and TAV. Collagen contents extracted from 100 mg tissue was isolated by enzymatic digestion using pepsin and the nondigested material was further digested using cyanogen bromide, insoluble collagen fraction (ICF) was extracted by hydrochloric acid hydrolysis. BAV tissue showed diminished fluorescence of the pepsin extracted fraction (PEF) compared with TAV tissue (12.4 ± 1.0% vs 32.9 ± 7.6%, p = 0.05). Patients with BAV had PEF of collagens significantly diminished in the dilated ascending aorta, especially in its convex portion, in course of aging and increment of dilated diameters. It is suggestible that BAV patients present more highly AGE-modified collagens in their ascending aorta.

  17. Comparison of ascending aortic cohesion between patients with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis and regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedik, Jaroslav; Dohle, Daniel S; Wendt, Daniel; Pilarczyk, Kevin; Price, Vivien; Mourad, Fanar; Zykina, Elizaveta; Stebner, Ferdinand; Tsagakis, Konstantinos; Jakob, Heinz

    2014-12-01

    A bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is commonly associated with aortic wall abnormalities, including dilatation of the ascending aorta and increased potential for aortic dissection. We compared the mechanical properties of the aortic wall of BAV patients with aortic valve stenosis (AS) and regurgitation (AR) using a dissectometer, a device mimicking transverse aortic wall shear stress. Between March 2010 and February 2013, 85 consecutive patients with bicuspid aortic valve undergoing open aortic valve replacement at our institution were prospectively enrolled, presenting either with stenosis (Group 1, n = 58) or regurgitation (Group 2, n = 27). Aortic wall cohesion measured by the dissectometer (Parameters P7, P8 and P9), aortic diameters measured by transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE) and thickness of the wall were compared. One patient presenting with the Marfan syndrome was excluded from the study. Patients with aortic regurgitation were significantly younger (48.2 ± 15.8 vs 64.7 ± 10.7, P group (27.3 ± 3.6 vs 25.5 ± 2.4, P = 0.008; 41.1 ± 7.7 vs 36.7 ± 8.0, P = 0.011; 37.6 ± 9.7 vs 33.8 ± 9.1, P = 0.049). The ascending aortic diameter did not differ (43.2 ± 10.6 vs 40.3 ± 9.1, P = 0.292). Patients with AR had significantly worse aortic cohesion, as measured by shear stress testing (P7: 97.2 ± 45.0 vs 145.5 ± 84.9, P = 0.015; P8: 2.00 ± 0.65 vs 3.82 ± 1.56, P cohesion, a thicker aortic wall and a larger aortic root in patients presenting with bicuspid AR compared with patients with AS. These results suggest that bicuspid AR represents a different disease process with possible involvement of the ascending aorta, as demonstrated by dissectometer examination. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  18. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With Aortic Stenosis and Mitral Regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromatis, Kreton; Thourani, Vinod H; Stebbins, Amanda; Vemulapalli, Sreekanth; Devireddy, Chandan; Guyton, Robert A; Matsouaka, Roland; Ghasemzadeh, Nima; Block, Peter C; Leshnower, Bradley G; Stewart, James P; Rumsfeld, John S; Lerakis, Stamatios; Babaliaros, Vasilis

    2017-12-01

    Many patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) for aortic stenosis also have significant mitral regurgitation (MR). We sought to understand the association of concomitant MR with TAVR clinical outcomes, as well changes in MR after TAVR. Patients who underwent TAVR in the US Transcatheter Valve Therapy Registry from January 3, 2012, to December 31, 2013, were studied, with longer-term clinical outcomes from Center for Medicare Services data. Of 11,104 patients, 3,481 (31.3%) had moderate MR, and 605 (5.5%) had severe MR. At 1 year, mortality was 21.0%, 21.5%, 26.3%, and 28.0% (p < 0.0001) and heart failure (HF) rehospitalization was 13.9%, 15.8%, 20.3%, and 23.4% (p < 0.0001) in the no, mild, moderate, and severe MR patients, respectively. After adjustment for baseline differences, significant MR was associated with increased risk of 1-year mortality or HF rehospitalization, with a HR of 1.16 (95% CI, 0.99 to 1.35) for moderate MR and 1.21 (95% CI, 0.97 to 1.50) for severe MR, compared with no MR. MR improved early after TAVR grade ≥ 1 in 79% of the severe MR patients and 66% of the moderate MR patients. Patients whose baseline moderate or severe MR improved had lower mortality (p = 0.022) and HF rehospitalization (p < 0.001) compared with patients whose MR did not improve. Moderate or severe MR accompanying severe AS treated with TAVR is associated with increased mortality or HF rehospitalization. This increased risk may be attributable to the minority of patients whose MR does not improve, suggesting a potential role for surveillance and targeted intervention for those patients. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Aortic valve-sparing in 37 patients with Marfan syndrome: midterm results with David operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forteza, Alberto; De Diego, Javier; Centeno, Jorge; López, Maria Jesus; Pérez, Enrique; Martín, Carlos; Sánchez, Violeta; Rufilanchas, Juan J; Cortina, Jose

    2010-01-01

    We reviewed our experience with aortic valve-sparing operations in Marfan syndrome during last 5 years. Between March 2004 and June 2009, 94 patients with aortic root aneurysms underwent valve-sparing operations. Of these, 37 (68% male) were diagnosed with Marfan syndrome, according to the Ghent diagnostic criteria. Mean age was 30 +/- 10 years (range, 11 to 59 years). Moderate/severe aortic regurgitation was present in 13%, and the mean diameter of the Valsalva sinuses was 50 +/- 4 mm (range, 42 to 62 mm). The David V modification was performed in the last 28 patients. Additional procedures were mitral valve repair in 6, tricuspid valve repair in 3, closure of septal atrial defect in 2, and closure of a patent foramen ovale in 13. Mean follow-up was 27 +/- 16 months (range, 1 to 61 months). There were no in-hospital deaths and no major adverse outcomes. One patient required implantation of a mechanical prosthesis during the same procedure because of moderate aortic regurgitation. One late death occurred. No patients required reoperation. In the last follow-up, 23 patients did not have aortic regurgitation, 12 had grade I, and 1 had grade II. No thromboembolic complications have been documented, and 97% of the patients are free from anticoagulation. Short-term and midterm results with the reimplantation technique for aortic root aneurysms in Marfan patients are excellent. If long-term results are similar, this technique could be the treatment of choice for these patients. 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Aortic valve disease : novel imaging insights from diagnosis to therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ewe, See Hooi

    2016-01-01

    The general introduction of this thesis outlines the epidemiology and the impact of aortic valve disease in the western world. The thesis further discusses the current and future role of advanced cardiac imaging modalities, using 3D echocardiography and speckle tracking echocardiography strain

  1. Heart failure after aortic valve substitution due to severe hypothyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Kim; Sørensen, Stine Heidenheim; Andersen, Niels Holmark

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of a 70-year-old female with considerable co-morbidities (Type 2 diabetes, Leiden factor V mutation, mild to moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) and a recent biological aortic valve substitution, who was admitted due to circulatory collapse caused by severe heart...

  2. Bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics: a fluid-structure interaction study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Santanu; Seaman, Clara; Sucosky, Philippe

    2011-11-01

    The bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is a congenital defect in which the aortic valve forms with two leaflets instead of three. While calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) also develops in the normal tricuspid aortic valve (TAV), its progression in the BAV is more rapid. Although studies have suggested a mechano-potential root for the disease, the native BAV hemodynamics remains largely unknown. This study aimed at characterizing BAV hemodynamics and quantifying the degree of wall-shear stress (WSS) abnormality on BAV leaflets. Fluid-structure interaction models validated with particle-image velocimetry were designed to predict the flow and leaflet dynamics in idealized TAV and BAV anatomies. Valvular function was quantified in terms of the effective orifice area. The regional leaflet WSS was characterized in terms of oscillatory shear index, temporal shear magnitude and temporal shear gradient. The predictions indicate the intrinsic degree of stenosis of the BAV anatomy, reveal drastic differences in shear stress magnitude and pulsatility on BAV and TAV leaflets and confirm the side- and site-specificity of the leaflet WSS. Given the ability of abnormal fluid shear stress to trigger valvular inflammation, these results support the existence of a mechano-etiology of CAVD in the BAV.

  3. Preventative Valve-Sparing Aortic Root Replacement and Pregnancy Outcome in Marfan Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Sokol, Vesna; Zlopaša, Gordan; Herman, Mislav; Planinić, Pavao; Micevska, Ana

    2012-01-01

    In Marfan syndrome, with dilatation of the aortic root secondary to an underlying connective tissue defect, pregnancy can cause hemodynamic stress leading to the development of an aortic aneurysm and even a fatal aortic dissection. In the presence of existing aortic root enlargement and a family history of aortic dissection, preventative elective surgery is suggested. Aortic root replacement with or without a valve-sparing procedure is superior to total aortic root replacement with ...

  4. Calcific Aortic Valve Disease: a Developmental Biology Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Punashi; Lincoln, Joy

    2018-03-08

    This review aims to highlight the past and more current literature related to the multifaceted pathogenic programs that contribute to calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) with a focus on the contribution of developmental programs. Calcification of the aortic valve is an active process characterized by calcific nodule formation on the aortic surface leading to a less supple and more stiffened cusp, thereby limiting movement and causing clinical stenosis. The mechanisms underlying these pathogenic changes are largely unknown, but emerging studies have suggested that signaling pathways common to valvulogenesis and bone development play significant roles and include Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β), bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), Wnt, Notch, and Sox9. This comprehensive review of the literature highlights the complex nature of CAVD but concurrently identifies key regulators that can be targeted in the development of mechanistic-based therapies beyond surgical intervention to improve patient outcome.

  5. Acute Right Coronary Ostial Stenosis during Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarwar Umran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of acute right coronary artery stenosis developing in a patient undergoing aortic valve replacement. We present a case report with a brief overview of the literature relating to coronary artery occlusion associated with cardiac valve surgery - the theories and treatments are discussed. A 85 year-old female was admitted under the care of the cardiothoracic team with signs and symptoms of heart failure. Investigations, including cardiac echocardiography and coronary angiography, indicated a critical aortic valve stenosis. Intraoperative right ventricular failure ensued post aortic valve replacement. Subsequent investigations revealed an acute occlusion of the proximal right coronary artery with resultant absence of distal flow supplying the right ventricle. An immediate right coronary artery bypass procedure was performed with resolution of the right ventricular failure. Subsequent weaning off cardiopulmonary bypass was uneventful and the patient continued to make excellent recovery in the postoperative phase. To our knowledge this is one of the few documented cases of intraoperative acute coronary artery occlusion developing during valve surgery. However, surgeons should be aware of the potential for acute occlusion so that early recognition and rapid intervention can be instituted.

  6. Reimplantation valve-sparing aortic root replacement with the Valsalva graft: what have we learnt after 100 cases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settepani, Fabrizio; Bergonzini, Marcello; Barbone, Alessandro; Citterio, Enrico; Basciu, Alessio; Ornaghi, Diego; Gallotti, Roberto; Tarelli, Giuseppe

    2009-07-01

    Reimplantation valve-sparing aortic root replacement has been increasingly performed with improving perioperative and mid-term results. The success of this operation primarily depends on preserving the highly sophisticated dynamic function of the aortic valve by recreating an anatomical three-dimensional configuration similar to the normal aortic root, thus minimizing the mechanical stress and strain on the cusps. Over the years several techniques have been proposed to reproduce the sinuses of Valsalva. We reviewed our experience with aortic valve reimplantation by means of a modified Dacron graft that incorporates sinuses of Valsalva, in a series of 100 consecutive patients. During a 60-month period, 100 patients with aortic root aneurysm underwent aortic valve reimplantation using the Gelweave Valsalva prosthesis. There were 74 males and the mean age was 60+/-12 years (range 28-83 years). Five patients had the Marfan's syndrome, 15 had a bicuspid aortic valve. Cusp repair was performed in five patients. The mean follow-up time was 28.6 months (range 1-60). Transesophageal echocardiogram was performed at the end of each procedure to assess the aortic valve in terms of competence, dynamic motion and level of coaptation within the graft. There was one hospital death and two late deaths. Overall survival at 60 months was 91.7+/-5.1%. Five patients developed severe aortic incompetence (AI) during follow-up requiring aortic valve replacement (AVR). The 60 months freedom from re-operation due to AI was 90.9+/-4.4%. One patient had moderate AI at latest echocardiographic study. The 60 months freedom from AI>2+ was 91.6+/-7.9%. Cox regression identified cusp's repair as independent risk factor (P=0.001) for late reimplantation failure (AVR or AI>2+). There were no episodes of endocarditis and the majority of the patients (88%) were in New York Heart Association functional class I. The aortic valve reimplantation with the Gelweave Valsalva prosthesis provided satisfactory

  7. Prosthetic aortic valve selection: current patient experience, preferences and knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korteland, Nelleke M; Bras, Frans J; van Hout, Fabienne M A; Kluin, Jolanda; Klautz, Robert J M; Bogers, Ad J J C; Takkenberg, Johanna J M

    2015-01-01

    Objective Current clinical practice guidelines advocate shared decision-making (SDM) in prosthetic valve selection. This study assesses among adult patients accepted for aortic valve replacement (AVR): (1) experience with current clinical decision-making regarding prosthetic valve selection, (2) preferences for SDM and risk presentation and (3) prosthetic valve knowledge and numeracy. Methods In a prospective multicentre cohort study, AVR patients were surveyed preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively. Results 132 patients (89 males/43 females; mean age 67 years (range 23–86)) responded preoperatively. Decisional conflict was observed in 56% of patients, and in 25% to such an extent that it made them feel unsure about the decision. 68% wanted to be involved in decision-making, whereas 53% agreed that they actually were. 69% were able to answer three basic knowledge questions concerning prosthetic valves correctly. 56% were able to answer three basic numeracy questions correctly. Three months postsurgery, 90% (n=110) were satisfied with their aortic valve prosthesis, with no difference between mechanical and bioprosthetic valve recipients. Conclusions In current clinical practice, many AVR patients experience decisional conflict and suboptimal involvement in prosthetic valve selection, and exhibit impaired knowledge concerning prosthetic valves and numeracy. Given the broad support for SDM among AVR patients and the obvious need for understandable information, to-be-developed tools to support SDM in the setting of prosthetic valve selection will help to improve quality of decision-making, better inform and actively involve patients, and reduce decisional conflict. Trial registration number NTR3618. PMID:25893105

  8. Subclinical leaflet thrombosis in surgical and transcatheter bioprosthetic aortic valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakravarty, Tarun; Søndergaard, Lars; Friedman, John

    2017-01-01

    rates of transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs; 4·18 TIAs per 100 person-years vs 0·60 TIAs per 100 person-years; p=0·0005) and all strokes or TIAs (7·85 vs 2·36 per 100 person-years; p=0·001). INTERPRETATION: Subclinical leaflet thrombosis occurred frequently in bioprosthetic aortic valves, more commonly...... and transcatheter aortic valves and the effect of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) on the subclinical leaflet thrombosis and subsequent valve haemodynamics and clinical outcomes on the basis of two registries of patients who had CT imaging done after TAVR or SAVR. METHODS: Patients enrolled between Dec 22, 2014......, and Jan 18, 2017, in the RESOLVE registry, and between June 2, 2014, and Sept 28, 2016, in the SAVORY registry, had CT imaging done with a dedicated four-dimensional volume-rendered imaging protocol at varying intervals after TAVR and SAVR. We defined subclinical leaflet thrombosis as the presence...

  9. Evolving Concepts in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhoff, F.

    2015-01-01

    Part I of the present thesis is dedicated to implantation technique and the clinical performance of new valve prostheses. A satisfactory TAVI result not solely depends on patient characteristics, but also relies on proper valve positioning and final placement. Moreover, prosthetic design is

  10. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery. A safe and useful technique beyond the cosmetic benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Federico A; Cánovas, Sergio J; Gil, Oscar; García-Fuster, Rafael; Hornero, Fernando; Vázquez, Alejandro; Martín, Elio; Mena, Armando; Martínez-León, Juan

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the in-hospital clinical outcomes of minimally invasive, isolated aortic valve replacement vs median sternotomy. Between 2005 and 2012, 615 patients underwent aortic valve replacement at a single institution, 532 by a median sternotomy (E group) and 83 by a J-shaped ministernotomy (M group). No significant differences were found between the E and M groups in terms of age (69.27 [9.31] years vs 69.40 [10.24] years, respectively), logistic EuroSCORE (6.27 [2.91] vs 5.64 [2.17], respectively), size of implanted valve prosthesis (21.94 [2.04] mm vs 21.79 [2.01] mm, respectively), or the incidence of diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, high blood pressure, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Mean cardiopulmonary bypass time was 102.90 (41.68) min for the E group vs 81.37 (25.41) min for the M group (Psurgery for aortic valve replacement are at least comparable to those achieved with median sternotomy. The length of the hospital stay was reduced by minimally invasive surgery in our single-institution experience. The retrospective nature of this study warrants further randomized prospective trials to validate our results. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. The Ibero-American transcatheter aortic valve implantation registry with the CoreValve prosthesis. Early and long-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-García, Antonio J; del Valle, Raquel; Trillo-Nouche, Ramiro; Elízaga, Jaime; Gimeno, Federico; Hernández-Antolín, Rosana; Teles, Rui; de Gama Ribeiro, Vasco; Molina, Eduardo; Cequier, Angel; Urbano-Carrillo, Cristóbal; Cruz-González, Ignacio; Payaslian, Miguel; Patricio, Lino; Sztejfman, Matías; Iñiguez, Andrés; Rodríguez, Víctor; Scuteri, Antonio; Caorsi, Carlos; López-Otero, Diego; Avanzas, Pablo; Alonso-Briales, Juan H; Hernández-García, José M; Morís, César

    2013-11-20

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is the recommended therapy for patients with severe aortic stenosis who are not suitable candidates for surgery. The aim of this study was to describe early experience and long-term follow-up with the CoreValve self-expanding aortic prosthesis at 42 Ibero-American hospitals. Multiple centre observational study including 1220 consecutive patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis who are not suitable candidates for surgery and underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation with the self-expanding Medtronic CoreValve System between December 2007 and May 2012. The registry included 1220 consecutive patients with a mean age of 80.8 ± 6.3 years and a mean logistic euroSCORE of 17.8% ± 13%. The procedural success rate was 96.1%. Hospital mortality was 7.3% and combined end-point was 21.3%. Aortic regurgitation after TAVI was present in 24.5% (Sellers grade ≥ 2). The estimated 1-year and 2-year survival rates were 82.1% and 73.4% respectively. The following issues were significant independent risk factors for hospital mortality: acute kidney failure (odds ratio 3.55); stroke (odds ratio 5.72); major bleeding (odds ratio 2.64) and euroSCORE (odds ratio 1.02). Long-term predictors of mortality were diabetes mellitus (hazard ratio 1.59, 95% confidence interval 1.09-2.31), severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (hazard ratio 1.85, 95% confidence interval 1.85-2.88), and functional classes NYHA III-IV (hazard ratio 1.31, 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.70). Transcatheter aortic valve implantation constitutes a safe and viable therapeutic option for high operative risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Long-term prognosis is conditioned by associate comorbidities. © 2013.

  12. Bentall operation, total aortic replacement and mitral valve replacement for a young adult with Marfan syndrome: a case of three-staged operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, K; Shimazaki, Y; Watanabe, T; Kuraoka, S; Minowa, T; Miura, M; Oshikiri, S; Toyama, H

    1998-08-01

    In Marfan syndrome, the most common cardiovascular abnormalities are dilatation of the aorta and aortic valve regurgitation in adult patients. Mitral valve dysfunction is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in infants and children with Marfan syndrome, and is not frequently operated on in adult Marfan patients who undergo surgery for diseases of the aortic root and total aorta. This report describes a successfully three-staged operation for a 24 year-old man with Marfan syndrome who underwent an emergent Bentall operation and aortic arch replacement, total aortic replacement and mitral valve replacement over 2 years. Mitral valve regurgitation was mild but increased after the second operation. The graft was tightly adhesive and invasive to the sternum. Endoscopic view was helpful to avoid graft damage at resternotomy. The postoperative course was uneventful in each operation. Microscopic examination of the mitral valve leaflets showed abnormal increase of mucopolysaccharides, and disruption and fragmentation of elastic fibers.

  13. Surgical treatment of aortic valve endocarditis: a 26-year experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylan Adademir

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We have retrospectively analyzed the results of the operations made for aortic valve endocarditis in a single center in 26 years. Methods: From June 1985 to January 2011, 174 patients were operated for aortic valve endocarditis. One hundred and thirty-eight (79.3% patients were male and the mean age was 39.3±14.4 (9-77 years. Twenty-seven (15.5% patients had prosthetic valve endocarditis. The mean duration of follow-up was 7.3±4.2 years (0.1-18.2 adding up to a total of 1030.8 patient/years. Results: Two hundred and eighty-two procedures were performed. The most frequently performed procedure was aortic valve replacement with mechanical prosthesis (81.6%. In-hospital mortality occurred in 27 (15.5% cases. Postoperatively, 25 (14.4% patients had low cardiac output and 17 (9.8% heart block. The actuarial survival rates for 10 and 15 years were 74.6±3.7% and 61.1±10.3%, respectively. In-hospital mortality was found to be associated with female gender, emergency operation, postoperative renal failure and low cardiac output. The long term mortality was significantly associated with mitral valve involvement. Male gender was found to be a significant risk factor for recurrence in the follow-up. Conclusion: Surgery for aortic valve endocarditis has significant mortality. Emergency operation, female gender, postoperative renal failure and low cardiac output are significant risk factors. Risk for recurrence and need for reoperation is low.

  14. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement in children: intermediate-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nishant D; Arnaoutakis, George J; George, Timothy J; Allen, Jeremiah G; Alejo, Diane E; Dietz, Harry C; Cameron, Duke E; Vricella, Luca A

    2011-03-01

    Valve-sparing root replacement (VSRR) is an attractive option for aortic aneurysm in children with low-operative risk, but mid- and late-term results are not yet known. Between 1997 and 2009, 56 children (mean age 11.5 years) underwent VSRR at our institution. Twenty-six (46.4%) had Marfan syndrome and 24 (42.8%) had Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Mean preoperative max sinus diameter was 4.2±0.8 cm (Z-score 7.7±2.9). Five (8.9%) had >2+ aortic insufficiency (AI). Two (3.6%) underwent David I reimplantation with a straight-tube, 12 (21.4%) had a Yacoub remodeling procedure, and 42 (75.0%) had reimplantation using a Valsalva-graft. There were one (1.8%) operative and three (5.4%) late deaths. One patient required reoperation for bleeding and one required late repair of a distal pseudoaneurysm. Mean follow-up was 5.2 years (range 0-12 years). No patients suffered thromboembolic events or had endocarditis. Of the 12 remodeling patients, four (33.3%) developed >2+ AI and required aortic valve repair or replacement. No patient developed >2+ AI after reimplantation. VSRR in children is a safe alternative to aortic root replacement with mechanical or biological prostheses. In this particular group of patients with connective tissue disorders and proclivity toward annular dilation and late AI, reimplantation is superior to remodeling.

  15. Morphological and Functional Evaluation of Quadricuspid Aortic Valves Using Cardiac Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Inyoung; Park, Jung Ah; Choi, Bo Hwa; Ko, Sung Min [Department of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul 05030 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Je Kyoun; Chee, Hyun Keun; Kim, Jun Seok [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul 05030 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the morphological and functional characteristics of quadricuspid aortic valves (QAV) on cardiac computed tomography (CCT). We retrospectively enrolled 11 patients with QAV. All patients underwent CCT and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), and 7 patients underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). The presence and classification of QAV assessed by CCT was compared with that of TTE and intraoperative findings. The regurgitant orifice area (ROA) measured by CCT was compared with severity of aortic regurgitation (AR) by TTE and the regurgitant fraction (RF) by CMR. All of the patients had AR; 9 had pure AR, 1 had combined aortic stenosis and regurgitation, and 1 had combined subaortic stenosis and regurgitation. Two patients had a subaortic fibrotic membrane and 1 of them showed a subaortic stenosis. One QAV was misdiagnosed as tricuspid aortic valve on TTE. In accordance with the Hurwitz and Robert's classification, consensus was reached on the QAV classification between the CCT and TTE findings in 7 of 10 patients. The patients were classified as type A (n = 1), type B (n = 3), type C (n = 1), type D (n = 4), and type F (n = 2) on CCT. A very high correlation existed between ROA by CCT and RF by CMR (r = 0.99) but a good correlation existed between ROA by CCT and regurgitant severity by TTE (r = 0.62). Cardiac computed tomography provides comprehensive anatomical and functional information about the QAV.

  16. Morphological and functional evaluation of quadricuspid aortic valves using cardiac computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, In Young; Park, Jung Ah; Choi, Bo Hwa; Ko, Sung Min; Shin, Je Kyoun; Chee, Hyun Keun; KIm, Jun Seok [Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    The aim of this study was to identify the morphological and functional characteristics of quadricuspid aortic valves (QAV) on cardiac computed tomography (CCT). We retrospectively enrolled 11 patients with QAV. All patients underwent CCT and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), and 7 patients underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). The presence and classification of QAV assessed by CCT was compared with that of TTE and intraoperative findings. The regurgitant orifice area (ROA) measured by CCT was compared with severity of aortic regurgitation (AR) by TTE and the regurgitant fraction (RF) by CMR. All of the patients had AR; 9 had pure AR, 1 had combined aortic stenosis and regurgitation, and 1 had combined subaortic stenosis and regurgitation. Two patients had a subaortic fibrotic membrane and 1 of them showed a subaortic stenosis. One QAV was misdiagnosed as tricuspid aortic valve on TTE. In accordance with the Hurwitz and Robert's classification, consensus was reached on the QAV classification between the CCT and TTE findings in 7 of 10 patients. The patients were classified as type A (n = 1), type B (n = 3), type C (n = 1), type D (n = 4), and type F (n = 2) on CCT. A very high correlation existed between ROA by CCT and RF by CMR (r = 0.99) but a good correlation existed between ROA by CCT and regurgitant severity by TTE (r = 0.62). Cardiac computed tomography provides comprehensive anatomical and functional information about the QAV.

  17. Mid-term results of different aortic valve-sparing procedures in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtke, Claudia; Karluss, Antje; Sier, Holger; Hüppe, Michael; Brauer, Kirk; Sievers, Hans-H

    2012-03-01

    Marfan patients with aortic root aneurysm are typically treated with the Bentall procedure, though aortic valve-sparing procedures (AVSPs) are also possible. The study aim was to compare the authors' experience with two such techniques performed at their institution, namely a reimplantation according to David (David I) and remodeling according to Yacoub. Between 1996 and 2009, a total of 37 Marfan patients underwent an AVSP at the authors' institution. Of these patients, 25 (mean age 32 +/- 14.9 years) underwent surgery according to David (group D), and 12 (mean age 35 +/- 10.9 years) according to Yacoub (group Y). The patients underwent both clinical and echocardiographic follow up examinations at a mean of 42.0 +/- 36.4 months after surgery. One patient from each group had moved abroad and was lost to follow up. The remaining 35 patients were alive at follow up, and none presented with any major neurological or bleeding complications. In addition, no significant differences were noted between the groups in terms of NYHA classification, left ventricular function, or left ventricular diameter. At follow up, aortic valve function was also comparable between groups, with a peak/mean gradient of 9.4 +/- 6.4/5.3 +/- 3.5 mmHg and 5.1 +/- 3.3/2.8 +/- 1.5 mmHg for groups D and Y, respectively (p = 0.081/0.058). The measured mean grades of aortic valve regurgitation were comparable in groups D and Y (0.6 +/- 0.7 and 1.1 +/- 0.6, respectively; p = 0.055). However, aortic root dimensions obtained via M-mode were smaller in group D patients (29.6 +/- 2.3 mm) than in group Y patients (36.1 +/- 6.6 mm) (p = 0.027). Only three patients from group Y required reoperation on the aortic valve due to valvular regurgitation (p = 0.028); two of these had presented with aortic dissection at the first operation. Both types of AVSP can be performed with comparably good interim clinical results, and also low mortality and morbidity, in patients with Marfan syndrome.

  18. Aortic valve myxoma at the extreme age: a review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Arshad; Zalawadiya, Sandip; Kovach, Julie; Afonso, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Primary cardiac tumours are a rare finding, with cardiac myxoma and fibroelastoma representing the majority of these tumours. Cardiac myxomas are most commonly found in the left atrium but are rarely found with attachment to the cardiac valves. The authors describe a case of aortic myxoma found in an 81-year-old man presented with peripheral arterial disease. CT angiogram of the thorax was performed to find the source of emboli and it showed a mass attached to the aortic valve and protruding into the aorta. Details of the location and texture were studied on transoesophageal echocardiography. Preoperative coronary angiography showed coronary artery disease and the patient underwent successful coronary artery bypass grafting and simultaneous resection of the mass. Histopathology revealed the mass as a myxoma. PMID:24642215

  19. Aortic valve replacement: is there an implant size variation across Europe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Athanasiou, Thanos; Mestres, Carlos A; Nashef, Samer A M; Aagaard, Jan; Moritz, Anton; Van Ingen, Gerrit; Chronidou, Fany; Palatianos, George; Alivizatos, Peter A; Stavridis, George T

    2008-03-01

    Prompted by anecdotal evidence and observations by surgeons, an investigation was undertaken into the potential differences in implanted aortic valve prosthesis sizes, during aortic valve replacement (AVR) procedures, between northern and southern European countries. A multi-institutional, non-randomized, retrospective analysis was conducted among 2,932 patients who underwent AVR surgery at seven tertiary cardiac surgery centers throughout Europe. Demographic and perioperative variables including valve size and type, body surface area (BSA) and early mortality were collected. Group analysis by patient geographic distribution and by annular diameter of the prosthesis utilized was conducted. Patients with a manufacturer's labeled prosthesis size > or = 21 mm were assigned to the 'large' aortic size subset, while those with a prosthesis size < 21 mm were assigned to the 'small' aortic size subset. Effective orifice area indices were calculated for all patients to assess the geographic distribution of patient-prosthesis mismatch. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses adjusting for possible confounding variables were performed. Prostheses with diameter < 21 mm were implanted at almost twice the rate in southern Europe compared to the north (56.4% versus 26.7%, p < 0.01). The mean valve size was also smaller in southern compared to northern European patients (21.6 +/- 2.1 mm versus 23.4 +/- 2.2 mm, p < 0.01). There were no regional differences in the distribution of either gender or BSA. In the multivariable model, south European patients were seven times more likely to receive a smaller-sized aortic valve (OR = 6.5, 95% CI = 4.82-8.83, p < 0.01), and thus the odds of developing patient-prosthesis mismatch were increased two-fold in southern European patients (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.25-2.80, p = 0.02). However, neither geographic distribution nor valve size were significantly associated with operative mortality. The study results demonstrated

  20. Video assisted right mini-thoracotomy for aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carl A; Melvin, Amber L; Lebow, Brandon F; Yap, Amanda; Knight, Peter A

    2018-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement through minimally invasive access is increasing. These procedures have several advantages over conventional sternotomy including decreased intensive care unit and hospital length of stay and decreased ventilation time. The right anterior mini-thoracotomy (RAM) approach is potentially attractive in that it completely spares the sternum leading to improved cosmesis, reduced blood loss, and improved patient satisfaction. However, this approach is underutilized due to anticipated technical challenges including difficulty with visualization and annular suture placement. We employ a camera and automated suturing technology for supra-annular valve implant. A RAM is performed via a 5 cm incision in the right second intercostal space with a camera port placed lateral to the incision. Peripheral venous cannulation is performed along with central arterial cannulation. Aortic cross clamp is placed through a 5 mm incision in the third interspace anterior to mid axillary line. Histidine tryptophan ketoglutarate (HTK) cardioplegia is administered. After aortic leaflet removal, annular and prosthetic sutures are placed with shafted instruments or with automated suturing technology. Aortic valve replacement can be performed safely through a RAM. The use of a camera and automated suturing technology facilitates this procedure, potentially enabling more surgeons to offer this less invasive approach to patients.

  1. The importance of echocardiography in transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilen, Emine; Sari, Cenk; Durmaz, Tahir; Keleş, Telat; Bayram, Nihal A; Akçay, Murat; Ayhan, Hüseyin M; Bozkurt, Engin

    2014-01-01

    Valvular heart diseases cause serious health problems in Turkey as well as in Western countries. According to a study conducted in Turkey, aortic stenosis (AS) is second after mitral valve disease among all valvular heart diseases. AS is frequently observed in elderly patients who have several cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities. In symptomatic severe AS, surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) is a definitive treatment. However, in elderly patients with left ventricular dysfunction and comorbidities, the risk of operative morbidity and mortality increases and outweighs the gain obtained from AVR surgery. As a result, almost one-third of the patients with serious AS are considered ineligible for surgery. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an effective treatment in patients with symptomatic severe AS who have high risk for conventional surgery. Since being performed for the first time in 2002, with a procedure success rate reported as 95% and a mortality rate of 5%, TAVI has become a promising method. Assessment of vascular anatomy, aortic annular diameter, and left ventricular function may be useful for the appropriate selection of patients and may reduce the risk of complications. Cardiac imaging methods including 2D and 3D echocardiography and multidetector computed tomography are critical during the evaluation of suitable patients for TAVI as well as during and after the procedure. In this review, we describe the role of echocardiography methods in clinical practice for TAVI procedure in its entirety, i.e. from patient selection to guidance during the procedure, and subsequent monitoring. © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Prosthesis-patient mismatch after transcatheter aortic valve implantation with the Medtronic-Corevalve bioprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jilaihawi, Hasan; Chin, Derek; Spyt, Tomasz; Jeilan, Mohamed; Vasa-Nicotera, Mariuca; Bence, Johan; Logtens, Elaine; Kovac, Jan

    2010-04-01

    Prosthesis-patient mismatch (P-PM) is an important determinant of morbidity and mortality following open aortic valve replacement. The aims of this study were to report its incidence and determinants following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) with the Corevalve bioprosthesis, which have-thus far-not been described. Patients with severe calcific aortic stenosis received TAVI with the Corevalve bioprosthesis via transfemoral route. Following TAVI, moderate P-PM was defined as indexed aortic valve effective orifice area (AVAi) Clinical, echocardiographic, and procedural factors relating to P-PM were studied. Optimal device position was defined on fluoroscopy as final position of the proximal aspect of the Corevalve stent frame 5-10 mm below the native aortic annulus. Between January 2007 and January 2009, 50 consecutive patients underwent TAVI in a single centre with the Corevalve bioprosthesis. Mean age was 82.8 years (SD 5.9; 70-93) and 48% were male. P-PM occurred in 16 of 50 cases (32%). Optimal position was achieved in 50% of cases. P-PM was unrelated to age, annulus size, LVOT size, Corevalve size, aortic angulation, ejection fraction, and sex. It was inversely correlated to optimal position (Spearman rho r = -0.34, P = 0.015). Those with optimal positioning had a 16% incidence of P-PM relative to 48% of those with suboptimal positioning (Pearson chi(2) P = 0.015). The incidence of P-PM following TAVI with the Corevalve bioprosthesis is compared favourably with that seen after AVR with conventional open stented bioprostheses and its occurrence is influenced by device positioning.

  3. Impact of obesity on long-term survival after aortic valve replacement with a small prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Biao; Yang, Hongyang; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Xiquan; Zhu, Wenjie; Cao, Guangqing; Wu, Shuming

    2013-07-01

    Although many studies have evaluated the impact of obesity on various medical treatments, it is not known whether obesity is related to late mortality with implantation of small aortic prostheses. This study evaluated the effect of obesity on the late survival of patients after aortic valve replacement (AVR) with implantation of a small aortic prosthesis (size ≤ 21 mm). From January 1998 to December 2008, 307 patients in our institution who underwent primary AVR with smaller prostheses survived 30 days after surgery. Patients were categorized as normal weight if body mass index (BMI) was prosthesis. Obesity or/and overweight may also affect the NYHA classification, even in the longer term. EOAI should be improved where possible, as it may reduce late mortality and improve quality of life in obese or overweight patients.

  4. Valve tissue characterization by magnetic resonance imaging in calcific aortic valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Ven, Florent; Tizón-Marcos, Helena; Fuchs, Christina; Mathieu, Patrick; Pibarot, Philippe; Larose, Eric

    2014-12-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease affects 10%-15% of the elderly population, causing considerable morbidity and mortality. There is no imaging technique that allows for the assessment of tissue composition of the valve in vivo. We thus investigated whether multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could characterize and quantify lipid, fibrous, and mineralized tissues within aortic valve (AV) cusps. AV leaflets were explanted from patients with severe aortic stenosis at the time of valve replacement surgery. Aortic cusps were imaged ex vivo using 1.5 T MRI using 3 gradient-echo sequences with T1, moderate T2, and proton density weightings (T1w, T2w, and PDw). Histopathologic analysis was performed on coregistered slices to identify and measure mineralized tissue, fibrous tissue, and lipid-rich tissue. Area and mean grey values were measured in all 3 weightings by standardized software. Four hundred ninety-two regions of interest from 30 AV leaflets were studied. Total leaflet surface and the areas of mineralized (P equation integrating the grey value data from all 3 weightings allowed multiparametric MRI to identify valve leaflet components with areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.92, 0.81, and 0.72, respectively. AV leaflet characteristics, including tissue composition, distribution, and area, may be successfully measured by multiparametric MRI with good to excellent accuracy. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Deformation Differences between Tricuspid and Bicuspid Aortic Valves in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeto, Kai; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Pastuszko, Peter; Nigam, Vishal; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2011-11-01

    It has been shown in clinical studies that patients with congenital bicuspid aortic valves (CBAVs) develop degenerative calcification of the leaflets at young ages compared to patients with the normal tricuspid aortic valves (TAVs). It has been hypothesized that the asymmetrical geometry of the leaflets in CBAVs, flow shear stresses (SS), disturbed flow, and excessive strain rate levels are possible causes for the early calcification and stenosis. Central to the validation of this hypothesis is the need to quantify the differences in strain rate levels between the BAVs and TAVs. We simulate the CBAVs by surgically stitching two of the leaflets of a porcine aortic valve together. To quantify strain differences, we performed in-vitro experiments in both trileaflet and bileaflet valves by tracking the motion of small ink dots marked on each leaflet surface. We then used phase-locked stereo photogrammetry to reconstruct at each instant of time the 3D surface of the leaflets and measure the strain rates in both radial and circumferential directions during the whole cardiac cycle. Our results indicate that the total strain rate of the simulated BAVs is about 15 to 20% higher than the normal leaflets of TAVs at systole. In the BAVs' case, the fused leaflet stretches radially up to 25% higher than the reference length. The excessive stretching in both directions in the fused leaflet results in large changes in the flow patterns and associated wall SS.

  6. Noninvasive assessment of filling pressure and left atrial pressure overload in severe aortic valve stenosis: relation to ventricular remodeling and clinical outcome after aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbæk, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K

    2011-01-01

    One of the hemodynamic consequences of aortic valve stenosis is pressure overload leading to left atrial dilatation. Left atrial size is a known risk factor providing prognostic information in several cardiac conditions. It is not known if this is also the case in patients with aortic valve...

  7. Diabetes Mellitus Impairs Left Ventricular Mass Regression after Surgical or Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Teruya; Toda, Koichi; Kuratani, Toru; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Yoshikawa, Yasushi; Fukushima, Satsuki; Saito, Shunsuke; Yoshioka, Daisuke; Kashiyama, Noriyuki; Daimon, Takashi; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    It is well-documented that persistent myocardial hypertrophy in patients with aortic stenosis is related to suboptimal postoperative outcomes after aortic valve replacement. Although diabetes is known to potentially exacerbate myocardial hypertrophy, it has yet to be examined if it affects postoperative left ventricular mass regression (LVMR). A single-centre, retrospective analysis was performed on 183 consecutive patients who underwent either surgical or transcatheter aortic valve replacement between 2010 and May 2013. Patient demographics, postoperative outcomes and echocardiographic data were obtained preoperatively and a year after surgery. There were 42 diabetic and 141 non-diabetic patients. Preoperative characteristics of diabetic patients were statistically similar to those of non-diabetic patients, except for higher prevalence of hyperlipidaemia (p regression analysis demonstrated that diabetes (standardised partial regression coefficient (SPRC)=-0.187, p=0.018), female gender (SPRC=0.245, p=0.026) and age (SPRC=0.203, p=0.018) were associated with poor postoperative LVMR. Patients with diabetes showed suboptimal postoperative LVMR, and the disease was a prognostic factor that was associated with poor LVMR. These findings suggest that diabetes may predispose the particular group of patients to worse postoperative outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Application of Regent mechanical valve in patients with small aortic annulus: 3-year follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Aortic valve replacement (AVR) with a small aortic annulus is always challenging for the cardiac surgeon. In this study, we sought to evaluate the midterm performance of implantation with a 17-mm or 19-mm St. Jude Medical Regent (SJM Regent) mechanical valve in retrospective consecutive cohort of patients with small aortic annulus (diameter ≤ 19 mm). Methods From January 2008 to April 2011, 40 patients (31 female, mean age = 47.2 ± 5.8 years) with small aortic annulus (≤19 mm in diameter) underwent aortic valve replacement with a 17-mm or 19-mm St. Jude Medical Regent (SJM Regent) mechanical valve. Preoperative mean body surface area, New York Heart Association class, and mean aortic annulus were 1.61 ± 0.26 m2, 3.2 ± 0.4, and 18 ± 1.4 mm respectively. Patients were divided into two groups, according to the implantation of 17 mm SJM Regent mechanical valve (group 1, n = 18) or 19 mm SJM Regent valve (group 2, n = 22). All patients underwent echocardiography examination preoperatively and at one year post-operation. Results There were no early deaths in either group. Follow-up time averaged 36 ± 17.6 months. The mean postoperative New York Heart Association class was 1.3 ± 0.6 (p < 0.001). By echocardiography, in group 1, the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), left ventricular fraction shortening (LVFS), and the indexed effective orifice area (EOAI) increased from 43.7% ± 11.6%, 27.3% ± 7.6%, and 0.70 ± 0.06 cm2/m2 to 69.8 ± 9.3%, 41.4 ± 8.3%, and 0.92 ± 0.10 cm2/m2 respectively (P < 0.05), while the left ventricular mass index (LVMI), and the aortic transvalvular pressure gradient decreased from 116.4 ± 25.4 g/m2, 46.1 ± 8.5 mmHg to 86.7 ± 18.2 g/m2 , 13.7 ± 5.2 mmHg respectively. In group 2, the LVEF, LVFS and EOAI increased from 45.9% ± 9.7%, 30.7% ± 8.0%, and 0.81 ± 0.09 cm2/m2 to 77.4%

  9. Florida Sleeve Procedure Is Durable and Improves Aortic Valve Function in Marfan Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalaei-Andabili, Seyed Hossein; Martin, Tomas; Hess, Philip; Klodell, Charles; Karimi, Ashkan; Arnaoutakis, George; Lee, Teng; Beaver, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    The Florida sleeve (FS) procedure was developed as a simplified approach for repair of functional type I aortic insufficiency secondary to aortic root aneurysm. We evaluated postoperative aortic valve function, long-term survival, and freedom from reoperation in Marfan syndrome patients who underwent the FS procedure at our center. All Marfan syndrome patients undergoing FS procedure from May 2002 to December 2014 were included. Echocardiography assessment included left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD), left ventricular end-systolic diameter (LVESD), ejection fraction, and degree of aortic insufficiency (none = 0, minimal = 1, mild = 2, moderate = 3, severe = 4). Social Security Death Index and primary care physicians' report were used for long-term follow-up. Thirty-seven Marfan syndrome patients, 21 (56.8%) men and 16 (43%) women with mean age of 35.08 ± 13.45 years underwent FL repair at our center. There was no in-hospital or 30-day death or stroke. Two patients required reoperation due to bleeding. Patients' survival rate was 94% at 1 to 8 years. Freedom from reoperation was 100% at 8 years. Twenty-five patients had postoperative follow-up echocardiography at 1 week. Aortic insufficiency grade significantly decreased after the procedure (preoperative mean ± SD: 1.76 ± 1.2 versus 1-week postoperative mean ± SD: 0.48 ± 0.71, p Marfan syndrome patients with immediate improvement in aortic valve function. Long-term survival and freedom from reoperation rates are encouraging. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. 2-year follow-up of patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation using a self-expanding valve prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buellesfeld, Lutz; Gerckens, Ulrich; Schuler, Gerhard; Bonan, Raoul; Kovac, Jan; Serruys, Patrick W; Labinaz, Marino; den Heijer, Peter; Mullen, Michael; Tymchak, Wayne; Windecker, Stephan; Mueller, Ralf; Grube, Eberhard

    2011-04-19

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety, device performance, and clinical outcome up to 2 years for patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The role of TAVI in the treatment of calcific aortic stenosis evolves rapidly, but mid- and long-term results are scarce. We conducted a prospective, multicenter, single-arm study with symptomatic patients undergoing TAVI for treatment of severe aortic valve stenosis using the 18-F Medtronic CoreValve (Medtronic, Minneapolis, Minnesota) prosthesis. In all, 126 patients (mean age 82 years, 42.9% male, mean logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation score 23.4%) with severe aortic valve stenosis (mean gradient 46.8 mm Hg) underwent the TAVI procedure. Access was transfemoral in all but 2 cases with subclavian access. Retrospective risk stratification classified 54 patients as moderate surgical risk, 51 patients as high-risk operable, and 21 patients as high-risk inoperable. The overall technical success rate was 83.1%. Thirty-day all-cause mortality was 15.2%, without significant differences in the subgroups. At 2 years, all-cause mortality was 38.1%, with a significant difference between the moderate-risk group and the combined high-risk groups (27.8% vs. 45.8%, p = 0.04). This difference was mainly attributable to an increased risk of noncardiac mortality among patients constituting the high-risk groups. Hemodynamic results remained unchanged during follow-up (mean gradient: 8.5 ± 2.5 mm Hg at 30 days and 9.0 ± 3.4 mm Hg at 2 years). Functional class improved in 80% of patients and remained stable over time. There was no incidence of structural valve deterioration. The TAVI procedure provides sustained clinical and hemodynamic benefits for as long as 2 years for patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis at increased risk for surgery. Copyright © 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Supra-annular structure assessment for self-expanding transcatheter heart valve size selection in patients with bicuspid aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianbao; He, Yuxin; Zhu, Qifeng; Gao, Feng; He, Wei; Yu, Lei; Zhou, Qijing; Kong, Minjian; Wang, Jian'an

    2018-04-01

    To explore assessment of supra-annular structure for self-expanding transcatheter heart valve (THV) size selection in patients with bicuspid aortic stenosis (AS). Annulus-based device selection from CT measurement is the standard sizing strategy for tricuspid aortic valve before transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Because of supra-annular deformity, device selection for bicuspid AS has not been systemically studied. Twelve patients with bicuspid AS who underwent TAVR with self-expanding THVs were included in this study. To assess supra-annular structure, sequential balloon aortic valvuloplasty was performed in every 2 mm increments until waist sign occurred with less than mild regurgitation. Procedural results and 30 day follow-up outcomes were analyzed. Seven patients (58.3%) with 18 mm; three patients (25%) with sequential 18 mm, 20 mm; and only two patients (16.7%) with sequential 18 mm, 20 mm, and 22 mm balloon sizing were performed, respectively. According to the results of supra-annular assessment, a smaller device size (91.7%) was selected in all but one patient compared with annulus based sizing strategy, and the outcomes were satisfactory with 100% procedural success. No mortality and 1 minor stroke were observed at 30 d follow-up. The percentage of NYHA III/IV decreased from 83.3% (9/12) to 16.7% (2/12). No new permanent pacemaker implantation and no moderate or severe paravalvular leakage were found. A supra-annular structure based sizing strategy is feasible for TAVR in patients with bicuspid AS. © 2018 The Authors Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The effect of postoperative medical treatment on left ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helder, Meghana R K; Ugur, Murat; Bavaria, Joseph E; Kshettry, Vibhu R; Groh, Mark A; Petracek, Michael R; Jones, Kent W; Suri, Rakesh M; Schaff, Hartzell V

    2015-03-01

    The study objective was to analyze factors associated with left ventricular mass regression in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement with a newer bioprosthesis, the Trifecta valve pericardial bioprosthesis (St Jude Medical Inc, St Paul, Minn). A total of 444 patients underwent aortic valve replacement with the Trifecta bioprosthesis from 2007 to 2009 at 6 US institutions. The clinical and echocardiographic data of 200 of these patients who had left ventricular hypertrophy and follow-up studies 1 year postoperatively were reviewed and compared to analyze factors affecting left ventricular mass regression. Mean (standard deviation) age of the 200 study patients was 73 (9) years, 66% were men, and 92% had pure or predominant aortic valve stenosis. Complete left ventricular mass regression was observed in 102 patients (51%) by 1 year postoperatively. In univariate analysis, male sex, implantation of larger valves, larger left ventricular end-diastolic volume, and beta-blocker or calcium-channel blocker treatment at dismissal were significantly associated with complete mass regression. In the multivariate model, odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) indicated that male sex (3.38 [1.39-8.26]) and beta-blocker or calcium-channel blocker treatment at dismissal (3.41 [1.40-8.34]) were associated with increased probability of complete left ventricular mass regression. Patients with higher preoperative systolic blood pressure were less likely to have complete left ventricular mass regression (0.98 [0.97-0.99]). Among patients with left ventricular hypertrophy, postoperative treatment with beta-blockers or calcium-channel blockers may enhance mass regression. This highlights the need for close medical follow-up after operation. Labeled valve size was not predictive of left ventricular mass regression. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Longitudinal strain predicts left ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis and preserved left ventricular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelsomino, Sandro; Lucà, Fabiana; Parise, Orlando; Lorusso, Roberto; Rao, Carmelo Massimiliano; Vizzardi, Enrico; Gensini, Gian Franco; Maessen, Jos G

    2013-11-01

    We explored the influence of global longitudinal strain (GLS) measured with two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography on left ventricular mass regression (LVMR) in patients with pure aortic stenosis (AS) and normal left ventricular function undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR). The study population included 83 patients with severe AS (aortic valve area regression (all P regression in patients with pure AS undergoing AVR. Our findings must be confirmed by further larger studies.

  14. Bioprosthetic Aortic Valve Endocarditis in Association with Enterococcus durans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallavollita, Luca; Di Gioacchino, Lorena; Balestrini, Fabrizio

    2016-04-01

    Enterococci are common organisms associated with endocarditis, but infection by Enterococcus durans is very rare. To our knowledge, only 3 cases have been reported in the medical literature, and all 3 have involved native valves. Here we publish the first reported case (to our knowledge) of E. durans endocarditis in association with a bioprosthetic aortic valve. After the organism and its antibiotic susceptibility were identified, the 74-year-old male patient was treated successfully with teicoplanin and gentamicin, over a course of 6 weeks.

  15. Will Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR be the Primary Therapy for Aortic Stenosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose F. Condado, MD, MS

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR is increasingly used for the treatment of high or very high surgical risk patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS or failing surgical bioprosthesis (valve-in-valve, VIV-TAVR. In TAVR, the collapsed transcatheter heart valve (THV is introduced using the delivery system inserted from the femoral artery (preferred or other alternative accesses (transapical, transaortic, transcarotid, subclavian/transinnominate or transcaval. The delivery system is then advanced until coaxially aligned with the aortic annulus, where the THV is deployed. This procedure can be associated with complications such as access site injury (vascular complication, paravalvar leak, cerebrovascular events and conduction disturbances. However, the rapid acceptance and successes observed with TAVR have been made possible through careful patient selection, preprocedural planning (i.e. MDCT annular sizing, THV technology (i.e. new generation valves, and procedural techniques (i.e. minimalist TF-TAVR and alternative percutaneous access options, as well as a decrease in complications as TAVR experience grows. Though the results or ongoing clinical trials evaluating TAVR in intermediate surgical risk patients are pending, it is likely that TAVR will soon be approved for lower risk patients as well.

  16. Aortic valve-sparing operations in aortic root aneurysms: remodeling or reimplantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnavardi, Mohammad; Yan, Tristan D; Bannon, Paul G; Wilson, Michael K

    2011-08-01

    A best evidence topic was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether the reimplantation (David) technique or the remodeling (Yacoub) technique provides the optimum event free survival in patients with an aortic root aneurysm suitable for an aortic valve-sparing operation. In total, 392 papers were found using the reported search criteria, of which 14 papers provided the best evidence to answer the clinical question. A total of 1338 patients (Yacoub technique in 606 and David technique in 732) from 13 centres were included. In most series, cardiopulmonary bypass time and aortic cross-clamp time were longer for the David technique compared to the Yacoub technique. Early mortality was comparable between the two techniques (0-6.9% for the Yacoub technique and 0-6% for the David technique). There is a tendency for a higher freedom from significant long-term aortic insufficiency in the David group than the Yacoub group, which does not necessarily result in a higher reoperation rate in the Yacoub group. In the largest series reported, freedom from a moderate-to-severe aortic insufficiency at 12 years was 82.6 ± 6.2% in the Yacoub and 91.0 ± 3.8% in the David group (P=0.035). Freedom from reoperation at the same time point was 90.4 ± 4.7% in the Yacoub group and 97.4 ± 2.2% in the David group (P=0.09). In another series, freedom from reoperation at a follow-up time of about four years was 89 ± 4% in the Yacoub group and 98 ± 2% in the David group. Although some authors merely preferred the Yacoub technique for a bicuspid aortic valve, the accumulated evidence in the current review indicates comparable results for both techniques in a bicuspid aortic valve. Current evidence is in favour of the David rather than the Yacoub technique in pathologies such as Marfan syndrome, acute type A aortic dissection, and excessive annular dilatation that may impair aortic root integrity. Careful selection of patients for each technique and

  17. Fluid Dynamics of Thrombosis in Transcatheter Aortic Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jung Hee; Zhu, Chi; Dou, Zhongwang; Resar, Jon; Mittal, Rajat

    2017-11-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) with bioprosthetic valves (BPV) has become highly prevalent in recent years. While one advantage of BPVs over mechanical ones is the lower incidence of valve thrombosis, recent clinical studies have suggested a higher than expected incidence of subclinical bioprosthetic valve thrombosis (BVT). Many factors that might affect the transvalvular hemodynamics including the valve position, orientation, stent, and interaction with the coronary flow, have been suggested, but the casual mechanisms of valve thrombosis are still unknown. In the present study, the hemodynamics associated with the formation of BVT is investigated using a novel, coupled flow-structure-biochemical computational modeling. A reduced degree of freedom, fluid-structure-interaction model is proposed for the efficient simulation of the hemodynamics and leaflet dynamics in the BPVs. Simple models to take into account the effects of the stent and coronary flows have also been developed. Simulations are performed for canonical models of BPVs in the aorta in various configurations and the results are examined to provide insights into the mechanisms for valve thrombosis. Supported by the NSF Grants IIS-1344772, CBET-1511200 and NSF XSEDE Grant TG-CTS100002.

  18. Coronary artery disease, revascularization, and clinical outcomes in transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millan-Iturbe, Oscar; Sawaya, Fadi J; Lønborg, Jacob

    2018-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has become an established therapeutic option for patients with symptomatic, severe aortic stenosis. The optimal treatment strategy for concomitant coronary artery disease (CAD) has not been tested prospectively in a randomized clinical trial. This study...

  19. Application of Regent mechanical valve in patients with small aortic annulus: 3-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Dong

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aortic valve replacement (AVR with a small aortic annulus is always challenging for the cardiac surgeon. In this study, we sought to evaluate the midterm performance of implantation with a 17-mm or 19-mm St. Jude Medical Regent (SJM Regent mechanical valve in retrospective consecutive cohort of patients with small aortic annulus (diameter ≤ 19 mm. Methods From January 2008 to April 2011, 40 patients (31 female, mean age = 47.2 ± 5.8 years with small aortic annulus (≤19 mm in diameter underwent aortic valve replacement with a 17-mm or 19-mm St. Jude Medical Regent (SJM Regent mechanical valve. Preoperative mean body surface area, New York Heart Association class, and mean aortic annulus were 1.61 ± 0.26 m2, 3.2 ± 0.4, and 18 ± 1.4 mm respectively. Patients were divided into two groups, according to the implantation of 17 mm SJM Regent mechanical valve (group 1, n = 18 or 19 mm SJM Regent valve (group 2, n = 22. All patients underwent echocardiography examination preoperatively and at one year post-operation. Results There were no early deaths in either group. Follow-up time averaged 36 ± 17.6 months. The mean postoperative New York Heart Association class was 1.3 ± 0.6 (p 2/m2 to 69.8 ± 9.3%, 41.4 ± 8.3%, and 0.92 ± 0.10 cm2/m2 respectively (P 2, 46.1 ± 8.5 mmHg to 86.7 ± 18.2 g/m2 , 13.7 ± 5.2 mmHg respectively. In group 2, the LVEF, LVFS and EOAI increased from 45.9% ± 9.7%, 30.7% ± 8.0%, and 0.81 ± 0.09 cm2/m2 to 77.4% ± 9.7%, 44.5% ± 9.6%, and 1.27 ± 0.11 cm2/m2 respectively, while the LVMI, and the aortic transvalvular pressure gradient decreased from 118.3 ± 27.6 g/m2, 44.0 ± 6.7 mmHg to 80.1 ± 19.7 g/m2, 10.8 ± 4.1 mmHg as well. The prevalence of PPM was documented in 2 patients in Group 1. Conclusions Patients with small aortic annulus and body surface

  20. Infective endocarditis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement-

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loh, Poay Huan; Bundgaard, Henning; S�ndergaard, Lars

    2013-01-01

    be atypical causing a delay in the diagnosis and treatment. The management is also complicated by their comorbidities, and surgical treatment may not be feasible leading to a significant morbidity and mortality. We describe a case of an 85-year-old man with TAVI prosthetic valve endocarditis successfully...

  1. An angry cat causing Pasteurella multocida endocarditis and aortic valve replacement-A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlsson, Anders; Friberg, Örjan; Källman, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Cat bite infections usually involve a mix of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria including species of Pasteurella, Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Bacteroides, and Fusobacterium. We report a case of Pasteurella multocida infection from cat bites leading to endocarditis and subsequent aortic valve replacement. A 70-year-old male was admitted because of fever, tachycardia, and malaise. He had a history of alcohol abuse and was living alone with a cat in a rural area. A sepsis of unknown origin was suspected, and intravenous treatment with gentamicin and cefotaxime was initiated. Blood cultures yielded Pasteurella multocida, and the patient history revealed repeated cat bites. After four days, the patient was discharged with oral penicillin V treatment. Two weeks later, the patient returned with fever and a new systolic murmur. An aortic valve endocarditis was diagnosed, and it became clear that the patient had not completed the prescribed penicillin V treatment. The patient underwent a biological aortic valve replacement with debridement of an annular abscess, and the postoperative course was uneventful. Endocarditis due to Pasteurella is extremely rare, and there are only a few reports in the literature. Predisposing factors in the present case were alcohol abuse and reduced compliance to treatment. Cat bites are often deep, and in rare circumstances can lead to life-threatening endocarditis. Proper surgical revision, antibiotic treatment, and patient compliance are necessary components in patient care to avoid this complication. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Baseline HV-interval predicts complete AV-block secondary to transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-In; Merx, Marc W; Meyer, Christian; Kirmanoglou, Kiriakos; Hellhammer, Katharina; Ohlig, Jan; Katsani, Dimitra; Zeus, Tobias; Westenfeld, Ralf; Eickholt, Christian; Linke, Axel; Kelm, Malte

    2015-10-01

    Development of AV-block is a frequent complication associated with transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). To date little is known about the predictive value of the HV-interval prior to TAVI with respect to the risk of AV-block development. HV-interval was determined in 25 consecutive elderly patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (AS) before and immediately after TAVI. All patients subsequently underwent TAVI and 8 of these 25 patients (32%) developed complete AV-block during the TAVI procedure requiring permanent pacemaker implantation. Six of these 8 patients (75%) had marked HV prolongation (>54 ms). Pre-procedural HV-interval was significantly prolonged in the subgroup developing complete AV-block (62.1 ms±13.0 vs 49.2 ms±12.9; P=0.029). Prolongation of the HV-interval above 54 ms was associated with a higher rate of complete AV-block (sensitivity 75.0%, specificity 77.8%, P=0.01). HV-interval was prolonged in approximately one third of our elderly patients with aortic valve stenosis and associated with a high rate of complete AV-block following TAVI. HV-interval is easily obtained during TAVI screening procedures, thus facilitating identification of patients at risk for complete AV-block due to TAVI and consequently enabling bespoke risk management.

  3. Increased risk of aortic valve stenosis in patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalid, Usman; Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease including atherosclerosis. The pathogenesis of aortic valve stenosis (AS) also includes an inflammatory component. We therefore investigated the risk of AS in patients with psoriasis compared...... with mild and severe disease, respectively. CONCLUSION: In a nationwide cohort, psoriasis was associated with a disease severity-dependent increased risk of AS. The mechanisms underlying this novel finding require further study....

  4. Intermittent acute aortic valve regurgitation: A case report of a prosthetic valve dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.E. Karagiannis (Stefanos); G. Karatasakis (George); K. Spargias (Konstantinos); L. Louka; D. Poldermans (Don); D.V. Cokkinos (Dennis)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractComplications of any mechanical prosthesis include thrombus or pannus formation. In our case report we demonstrate that prosthetic aortic valve regurgitation due to pannus formation may be intermittent and non-cyclic in pattern and therefore not obvious at the time of original clinical

  5. [Selection of patients for transcatheter aortic valve implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tron, Christophe; Godin, Matthieu; Litzler, Pierre-Yves; Bauer, Fabrice; Caudron, Jérome; Dacher, Jean-Nicolas; Borz, Bogdan; Canville, Alexandre; Kurtz, Baptiste; Bessou, Jean-Paul; Cribier, Alain; Eltchaninoff, Hélène

    2012-06-01

    A good selection of patients is a crucial step before transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in order to select the good indications and choose the access route. TAVI should be considered only in patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis and either contraindication or high surgical risk. Indication for TAVI should be discussed in a multidisciplinary team meeting. Echocardiography and/or CT scan are mandatory to evaluate the aortic annulus size and select the good prosthesis size. The possibility of transfemoral implantation is evaluated by angiography and CT scan, and based on the arterial diameters, but also on the presence of tortuosities and arterial calcifications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Aortic valve sclerosis is associated with lower serum adiponectin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çabuk, Gizem; Guray, Umit; Kafes, Habibe; Guray, Yesim; Cabuk, Ali Kemal; Bayir, Pinar T; Asarcikli, Lale D

    2015-06-01

    The sclerotic lesions of the aortic valve share common features with atherosclerosis. An anti-inflammatory protein, adiponectin, seems to have a protective effect on the cardiovascular system. The goal of our study is to determine adiponectin levels in patients with aortic sclerosis and to compare these values with the control group with similar age and cardiovascular risk profile. Sixty-eight patients with aortic sclerosis and 40 controls were included. Serum adiponectin levels were measured by solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. There were no significant differences regarding age, sex and other cardiovascular risk factors between groups. Also, mean body mass index values were similar. The rate of mitral annular calcification and left ventricular hypertrophy were significantly higher in patients with aortic sclerosis. Among laboratory variables, high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels were significantly higher in patients with aortic sclerosis than in those without (4.0 ± 2.9 vs. 2.9 ± 2.3 mg/dl, P = 0.04). Adiponectin levels were found to be significantly lower in aortic sclerosis group than in controls (9.7 ± 4.4 vs. 11.7 ± 4.9 μg/ml, P = 0.034). In the whole group, adiponectin levels were significantly correlated with BMI (r = -0.22, P = 0.02), white blood cell count (r = -0.2, P = 0.03), hsCRP (r = -0.25, P = 0.008), total cholesterol (r = -0.18, P = 0.05), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (r = 0.31, P = 0.001) and triglyceride (r = -0.36, P sclerosis, serum adiponectin levels were significantly lower compared with those with normal aortic valves. Our findings suggested that adiponectin might play a role in the progression of degenerative aortic valve disease.

  7. Valve Sparing Aortic Root Replacement in Children with Loeys-Dietz Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Tae Sim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder that is characterized by aggressive arterial and aortic disease, often involving the formation of aortic aneurysms. We describe the cases of two children with LDS who were diagnosed with aortic root aneurysms and successfully treated by valve-sparing aortic root replacement (VSRR with a Valsalva graft. VSRR is a safe and suitable operation for children that avoids prosthetic valve replacement.

  8. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Duke E; Vricella, Luca A

    2005-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is the most common inherited connective tissue disorder, affecting approximately 1 in 10,000 live births. The cardinal features of Marfan syndrome are the abnormalities of the skeleton (tall stature, arachnodactyly, and joint hyperelasticity), eye (lens subluxation), and aorta (root aneurysm with proclivity toward rupture and dissection). Aortic catastrophe accounts for most of the premature mortality among Marfan patients, a risk that climbs steeply during adolescence and results in death of half of Marfan patients by the age of 40 years. Most of the improvement in life expectancy that has been achieved in Marfan syndrome is attributable to early recognition of aortic root aneurysms and prophylactic replacement with composite grafts (mechanical valve prostheses within Dacron conduits) before rupture or dissection occurs. Despite the excellent early and late results with composite grafts, there has been growing interest in operative procedures that replace the sinuses but preserve the aortic valve leaflets, to avoid anticoagulation and minimize the risk of prosthesis-related endocarditis. These procedures are still in evolution and late results are not yet known, but as with mitral repair in the setting of myxomatous disease, valve-sparing procedures in Marfan syndrome have weathered a storm of initial criticism and skepticism and are steadily gaining acceptance.

  9. Aortic valve area assessed with 320-detector computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Kofoed, Klaus Fuglsang; Carstensen, Helle Gervig

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of aortic valve area (AVA) assessment with 320-detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) compared to transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) in a population with mild to severe aortic valve stenosis. AVA was estimated in 169 patients by planimetry on MDCT images (AVA......(MDCT)) and by the continuity equation with TTE (AVA(TTE)). To generate a reference AVA (AVA(REF)) we used the stroke volume from MDCT divided by the velocity time integral from CW Doppler by TTE (according to the continuity equation: stroke volume in LVOT = stroke volume passing the aortic valve). AVA(REF) was used...... as the reference to compare both measures against, since it bypasses the assumption of LVOT being circular in the continuity equation and the potential placement error of PW Doppler in the LVOT. The mean (±SD) age of the patients was 71 (±9) years, 113 (67%) were males. Mean AVA(TTE) was 0.93 (±0.33) cm(2), mean...

  10. Impact of energy loss index on left ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Terumasa; Okura, Hiroyuki; Kume, Teruyoshi; Fukuhara, Kenzo; Imai, Koichiro; Hayashida, Akihiro; Neishi, Yoji; Kawamoto, Takahiro; Tanemoto, Kazuo; Yoshida, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the energy loss index (ELI) has been proposed as a new functional index to assess the severity of aortic stenosis (AS). The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of the ELI on left ventricular mass (LVM) regression in patients after aortic valve replacement (AVR) with mechanical valves. A total of 30 patients with severe AS who underwent AVR with mechanical valves was studied. Echocardiography was performed to measure the LVM before AVR (pre-LVM) (n = 30) and repeated 12 months later (post-LVM) (n = 19). The ELI was calculated as [effective orifice area (EOA) × aortic cross sectional area]/(aortic cross sectional area - EOA) divided by the body surface area. The LVM regression rate (%) was calculated as 100 × (post-LVM - pre-LVM)/(pre-LVM). A cardiac event was defined as a composite of cardiac death and heart failure requiring hospitalization. LVM regressed significantly (245.1 ± 84.3 to 173.4 ± 62.6 g, P regression rate negatively correlated with the ELI (R = -0.67, P regression rates (area under the curve = 0.825; P = 0.030). Patients with ELI regression after AVR with mechanical valves. Whether the ELI is a stronger predictor of clinical events than EOAI is still unclear, and further large-scale study is necessary to elucidate the clinical impact of the ELI in patients with AVR.

  11. Predictive value of platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio in severe degenerative aortic valve stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efe Edem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aortic valve stenosis (AVS is the most common cause of left ventricular outflow obstruction, and its prevalence among elderly patients causes a major public health burden. Recently, platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR has been recognized as a novel prognostic biomarker that offers information about both aggregation and inflammation pathways. Since PLR indicates inflammation, we hypothesized that PLR may be associated with the severity of AVS due to chronic inflammation pathways that cause stiffness and calcification of the aortic valve. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively enrolled 117 patients with severe degenerative AVS, who underwent aortic valve replacement and 117 control patients in our clinic. PLR was defined as the absolute platelet count divided by the absolute lymphocyte count. Severe AVS was defined as calcification and sclerosis of the valve with a mean pressure gradient of >40 mmHg. Results: PLR was 197.03 ± 49.61 in the AVS group and 144.9 ± 40.35 in the control group, which indicated a statistically significant difference (P < 0.001. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis demonstrated that PLR values over 188 predicted the severity of aortic stenosis with a sensitivity of 87% and a specificity of 70% (95% confidence interval = 0.734–0.882; P < 0.001; area under ROC curve: 0.808. Conclusion: We suggest that the level of PLR elevation is related to the severity of degenerative AVS, and PLR should be used to monitor patients' inflammatory responses and the efficacy of treatment, which will lead us to more closely monitor this high-risk population to detect severe degenerative AVS at an early stage.

  12. A Typical Immune T/B Subset Profile Characterizes Bicuspid Aortic Valve: In an Old Status?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmela R. Balistreri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bicuspid valve disease is associated with the development of thoracic aortic aneurysm. The molecular mechanisms underlying this association still need to be clarified. Here, we evaluated the circulating levels of T and B lymphocyte subsets associated with the development of vascular diseases in patients with bicuspid aortic valve or tricuspid aortic valve with and without thoracic aortic aneurysm. We unveiled that the circulating levels of the MAIT, CD4+IL−17A+, and NKT T cell subsets were significantly reduced in bicuspid valve disease cases, when compared to tricuspid aortic valve cases in either the presence or the absence of thoracic aortic aneurysm. Among patients with tricuspid aortic valve, these cells were higher in those also affected by thoracic aortic aneurysm. Similar data were obtained by examining CD19+ B cells, naïve B cells (IgD+CD27−, memory unswitched B cells (IgD+CD27+, memory switched B cells (IgD−CD27+, and double-negative B cells (DN (IgD−CD27−. These cells resulted to be lower in subjects with bicuspid valve disease with respect to patients with tricuspid aortic valve. In whole, our data indicate that patients with bicuspid valve disease show a quantitative reduction of T and B lymphocyte cell subsets. Future studies are encouraged to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying this observation and its pathophysiological significance.

  13. Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part XXX: Transcatheter Aortic Valve Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A

    2017-12-01

    Initially, the transcatheter aortic valve replacement procedure was approved only for patients with aortic stenosis that was both severe and symptomatic who either also had too high a risk of aortic valve replacement surgery to have the surgery or who had a high risk for the surgery. Between the years 2012 and 2015, the death rate at 30 days declined from an initial rate of 7.5% to 4.6%. There has also been more use of the transfemoral approach over the years. In 2016, the transcatheter aortic valve replacement was approved for patients with aortic stenosis at intermediate risk of surgery.

  14. Quantified degree of eccentricity of aortic valve calcification predicts risk of paravalvular regurgitation and response to balloon post-dilation after self-expandable transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun-Bean; Hwang, In-Chang; Lee, Whal; Han, Jung-Kyu; Kim, Chi-Hoon; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Yang, Han-Mo; Park, Eun-Ah; Kim, Hyung-Kwan; Chiam, Paul T L; Kim, Yong-Jin; Koo, Bon-Kwon; Sohn, Dae-Won; Ahn, Hyuk; Kang, Joon-Won; Park, Seung-Jung; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2018-05-15

    Limited data exist regarding the impact of aortic valve calcification (AVC) eccentricity on the risk of paravalvular regurgitation (PVR) and response to balloon post-dilation (BPD) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). We investigated the prognostic value of AVC eccentricity in predicting the risk of PVR and response to BPD in patients undergoing TAVR. We analyzed 85 patients with severe aortic stenosis who underwent self-expandable TAVR (43 women; 77.2±7.1years). AVC was quantified as the total amount of calcification (total AVC load) and as the eccentricity of calcium (EoC) using calcium volume scoring with contrast computed tomography angiography (CTA). The EoC was defined as the maximum absolute difference in calcium volume scores between 2 adjacent sectors (bi-partition method) or between sectors based on leaflets (leaflet-based method). Total AVC load and bi-partition EoC, but not leaflet-based EoC, were significant predictors for the occurrence of ≥moderate PVR, and bi-partition EoC had a better predictive value than total AVC load (area under the curve [AUC]=0.863 versus 0.760, p for difference=0.006). In multivariate analysis, bi-partition EoC was an independent predictor for the risk of ≥moderate PVR regardless of perimeter oversizing index. The greater bi-partition EoC was the only significant parameter to predict poor response to BPD (AUC=0.775, p=0.004). Pre-procedural assessment of AVC eccentricity using CTA as "bi-partition EoC" provides useful predictive information on the risk of significant PVR and response to BPD in patients undergoing TAVR with self-expandable valves. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Increased hsCRP is associated with higher risk of aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blyme, Adam; Nielsen, Olav W.; Asferg, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate relations between inflammation and aortic valve stenosis (AS) by measuring high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, at baseline (hsCRP0) and after 1 year (hsCRP1) and exploring associations with aortic valve replacement (AVR). Design We examined 1423 patients from the Simvast......Objective To investigate relations between inflammation and aortic valve stenosis (AS) by measuring high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, at baseline (hsCRP0) and after 1 year (hsCRP1) and exploring associations with aortic valve replacement (AVR). Design We examined 1423 patients from...... the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study. Results During first year of treatment, hsCRP was reduced both in patients later receiving AVR (2.3 [0.9–4.9] to 1.8 [0.8–5.4] mg/l, p regression analyses, hsCRP1...

  16. Subclinical leaflet thrombosis after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Satoshi

    2017-12-01

    Although clinically significant valve thrombosis after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is rare, the incidence of subclinical leaflet thrombosis has been reported to be up to about 10%-15%. It is mostly found 1-3 months after procedure in any type of transcatheter heart valve. Leaflet thrombosis is detected by high-resolution CT in the form of limited valve opening/closure and hypoattenuated leaflet thickening. Transthoracic or transesophageal echocardiography is capable of detecting limitations of valve motion, leaflet thickening, increased flow velocity across the valve. However, CT seems to be more sensitive than echocardiography to detect leaflet thrombosis. It can occur under dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and a thienopyridine but rarely occurs with anticoagulation with a vitamin K antagonist. A vitamin K antagonist is also helpful to resolve leaflet thrombosis. Several studies are ongoing to determine the effect of new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in preventing major cardiovascular events. They will also provide useful information on whether NOACs prevent leaflet thrombosis. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation for degenerated surgical bioprostheses: the first case series in Asia with one-year follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiam, Paul Toon Lim; Ewe, See Hooi; Soon, Jia Lin; Ho, Kay Woon; Sin, Yong Koong; Tan, Swee Yaw; Lim, Soo Teik; Koh, Tian Hai; Chua, Yeow Leng

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become an established therapy for inoperable and high-surgical-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Although TAVI in patients with degenerated surgical aortic bioprostheses (i.e. valve-in-valve TAVI) is increasingly reported in Western studies, such data is lacking in Asian patients. We describe the initial experience of valve-in-valve TAVI in Asia. METHODS Eight patients who underwent valve-in-valve TAVI due to degenerated aortic bioprostheses were enrolled. The mechanism of bioprosthetic valve failure was stenotic, regurgitation or mixed. All procedures were performed via transfemoral arterial access, using the self-expanding CoreValve prosthesis or balloon-expandable SAPIEN XT prosthesis. RESULTS The mean age of the patients was 71.6 ± 13.2 years and five were male. Mean duration to surgical bioprosthesis degeneration was 10.2 ± 4.1 years. Valve-in-valve TAVI was successfully performed in all patients. CoreValve and SAPIEN XT prostheses were used in six and two patients, respectively. There were no deaths, strokes or permanent pacemaker requirement at 30 days, with one noncardiac mortality at one year. All patients experienced New York Heart Association functional class improvement. Post-procedure mean pressure gradients were 20 ± 11 mmHg and 22 ± 8 mmHg at 30 days and one year, respectively. Residual aortic regurgitation (AR) of more than mild severity occurred in one patient at 30 days. At one year, only one patient had mild residual AR. CONCLUSION In our experience of valve-in-valve TAVI, procedural success was achieved in all patients without adverse events at 30 days. Good clinical and haemodynamic outcomes were sustained at one year. PMID:27193081

  18. Percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation for degenerated surgical bioprostheses: the first case series in Asia with one-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiam, Paul Toon-Lim; Ewe, See-Hooi; Soon, Jia-Lin; Ho, Kay-Woon; Sin, Yong-Koong; Tan, Swee-Yaw; Lim, Soo-Teik; Koh, Tian-Hai; Chua, Yeow-Leng

    2016-07-01

    Percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become an established therapy for inoperable and high-surgical-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Although TAVI in patients with degenerated surgical aortic bioprostheses (i.e. valve-in-valve TAVI) is increasingly reported in Western studies, such data is lacking in Asian patients. We describe the initial experience of valve-in-valve TAVI in Asia. Eight patients who underwent valve-in-valve TAVI due to degenerated aortic bioprostheses were enrolled. The mechanism of bioprosthetic valve failure was stenotic, regurgitation or mixed. All procedures were performed via transfemoral arterial access, using the self-expanding CoreValve prosthesis or balloon-expandable SAPIEN XT prosthesis. The mean age of the patients was 71.6 ± 13.2 years and five were male. Mean duration to surgical bioprosthesis degeneration was 10.2 ± 4.1 years. Valve-in-valve TAVI was successfully performed in all patients. CoreValve and SAPIEN XT prostheses were used in six and two patients, respectively. There were no deaths, strokes or permanent pacemaker requirement at 30 days, with one noncardiac mortality at one year. All patients experienced New York Heart Association functional class improvement. Post-procedure mean pressure gradients were 20 ± 11 mmHg and 22 ± 8 mmHg at 30 days and one year, respectively. Residual aortic regurgitation (AR) of more than mild severity occurred in one patient at 30 days. At one year, only one patient had mild residual AR. In our experience of valve-in-valve TAVI, procedural success was achieved in all patients without adverse events at 30 days. Good clinical and haemodynamic outcomes were sustained at one year. Copyright © Singapore Medical Association.

  19. Coronary artery bypass grafting associated to aortic valve replacement in the elderly: survival and quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicchio Mariano

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Myocardial ischemia is often associated to aortic valve stenosis in the elderly. Aim of this study was to evaluate the impact on survival and quality of life of CABG associated to aortic valve replacement in the septuagenarians and octogenarians. Between January 1991 and January 2010, 520 patients ageing > 70 years underwent aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis in two Institutions. They were divided into 2 groups: Group A included 406 patients undergoing isolated aortic valve replacement; Group B 114 patients receiving aortic valve replacement and CABG. A comparative analysis of long-term survival and quality of life (SF-36 test was performed. Mean age was 74.2 ± 3.6 years (74.3 ± 3.6 in Group A, 74 ± 3.3 in Group B; p = 0.33. Hospital mortality was 9.5% (46 patients. Twenty-nine (7.8% in Group A and 17 in Group B (15.2%(p = 0.019. Actuarial survival was 88.5% ± 0.015 at 1 year, 81.9% ± 0.02 at 5 years, 76.6% ± 0.032 at 10 and 57.3 ± 0.1 at 15 years. Ten-year survival was 77% ± 0.034 in Group A and 77.8% ± 0.045 in Group B (p = 0.2. Multivariate analysis did not reveal associated CABG as a predictor of long term mortality. The scores obtained in the SF-36 test were similar in the two groups and significantly higher than those of the general population matched for country, age and sex (p Associated CABG determines a significant increase of hospital mortality in the elderly undergoing aortic valve replacement. Survivors did not show differences in long-term outcome and quality of life according to the presence of associated CABG.

  20. Circulating matrix metalloproteinase patterns in association with aortic dilatation in bicuspid aortic valve patients with isolated severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongshi; Wu, Boting; Dong, Lili; Wang, Chunsheng; Wang, Xiaolin; Shu, Xianhong

    2016-02-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) exhibits a clinical incline toward aortopathy, in which aberrant tensile and shear stress generated by BAV can induce differential expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their endogenous tissue inhibitors (TIMPs). Whether stenotic BAV, which exhibits additional eccentric high-velocity flow jet upon ascending aorta and further worsens circumferential systolic wall shear stress than BAV with echocardiographically normal aortic valve, can lead to unique plasma MMP/TIMP patterns is still unknown. According to their valvulopathy and aortic dilatation status, 93 BAV patients were included in the present study. Group A (n = 37) and B (n = 28) comprised severely stenotic patients with or without ascending aorta dilatation; Group C (n = 12) and D (n = 16) comprised echocardiographically normal BAV patients with or without ascending aorta dilatation. Plasma MMP/TIMP levels (MMP-1, -2, -3, -8, -9, -10, -13 and TIMP-1, -2, -4) were determined via a multiplex ELISA detection system in a single procedure. Among patients with isolated severe aortic stenosis, plasma levels of MMP-2 and -9 were significantly elevated when ascending aortic dilatation was present (p = 0.001 and p = 0.002, respectively). MMP-2, however, remained as the single elevated plasma component among echocardiographically normal BAV patients with dilated ascending aorta (p = 0.027). Multivariate analysis revealed that MMP-2 and MMP-9 could both serve as independent risk factor for aortic dilatation in the case of isolated severe stenosis (p = 0.003 and p = 0.001, respectively), and MMP-2 in echocardiographically normal patients (p = 0.002). In conclusion, BAV patients with isolated severe aortic stenosis demonstrated a distinct plasma MMP/TIMP pattern, which might be utilized as circulating biomarkers for early detection of aortic dilatation.

  1. Computed tomography characteristics of the aortic valve and the geometry of SAPIEN 3 transcatheter heart valve in patients with bicuspid aortic valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamori, Hiroyuki; Yoon, Sung-Han; Chakravarty, Tarun; Maeno, Yoshio; Kashif, Mohammad; Israr, Sharjeel; Abramowitz, Yigal; Mangat, Geeteshwar; Miyasaka, Masaki; Rami, Tanya; Kazuno, Yoshio; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Nakamura, Mamoo; Cheng, Wen; Friedman, John; Berman, Daniel; Sharma, Rahul; Makkar, Raj R

    2018-01-05

    We assessed the geometry of transcatheter heart valve (THV) and valve function associated with SAPIEN 3 implantation in patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) stenosis. We included 280 consecutive patients who had a contrast computed tomography (CT) before and after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in our institution. Each THV was assessed by CT at five cross-sectional levels: inflow, annulus, mid, sinus, and outflow. The geometry of THV was assessed for eccentricity (1 - minimum diameter/maximum diameter) and expansion (CT derived external valve area/nominal external valve area). CT measurements and transthoracic echocardiogram data were compared between BAV and tricuspid aortic valve (TAV). Among 280 patients, 41 patients were diagnosed as BAV. Compared to TAV, BAV was associated with lower expansion at mid-level, sinus-level, and outflow-level (mid 94.1 ± 6.8% vs. 98.1 ± 7.8%; P = 0.002, sinus 95.9 ± 7.2% vs. 101.6 ± 8.5%; P 4.0-11.4); P < 0.001, and outflow 2.5% (1.3-4.3) vs. 4.9% (2.2-7.5); P < 0.001]. There were no differences in frequency of paravalvular leak ≥ moderate and mean post-procedural gradient between BAV and TAV. BAV patients have greater THV eccentricity at all levels and lower THV expansion at mid, sinus, and outflow levels than the TAV patients. There were no differences in parameters of valve function between BAV and TAV patients. Despite the observed geometrical differences, TAVI with SAPIEN 3 in BAV patients allows for feasible valve function. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author(s) 2018. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Bicuspid Aortic Valve: Unresolved Issues and Role of Imaging Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most common congenital heart disease with marked heterogeneity in many aspects. Fusion patterns of the aortic cusp are quite variable with different type and severity of valvular dysfunction. Moreover, non-valvular cardiovascular abnormalities are associated with BAV. Among them, aortic aneurysm/dissection is the most serious clinical condition with variable patterns of segmental aortic dilatation. Potential association between BAV phenotype and valvulopathy or aortopathy has been suggested, but needs to be tested further. A lack of long-term outcome data at this moment is responsible for unresolved debate regarding appropriate management of patients with BAV, specifically to prevent development of aortic dissection. Long-term follow-up data of a well-characterized cohort or registry based on standardized classification of BAV phenotype and aortopathy are necessary for evidence-based medical practice. Advanced imaging techniques such as computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging offer better opportunities for accurate phenotype classification and imaging specialists should play a central role to establish a collaborative multicenter cohort or registry. PMID:25883749

  3. Anterior mitral valve aneurysm: a rare sequelae of aortic valve endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Janardhanan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In intravenous drug abusers, infective endocarditis usually involves right-sided valves, with Staphylococcus aureus being the most common etiologic agent. We present a patient who is an intravenous drug abuser with left-sided (aortic valve endocarditis caused by Enterococcus faecalis who subsequently developed an anterior mitral valve aneurysm, which is an exceedingly rare complication. A systematic literature search was conducted which identified only five reported cases in the literature of mitral valve aneurysmal rupture in the setting of E. faecalis endocarditis. Real-time 3D-transesophageal echocardiography was critical in making an accurate diagnosis leading to timely intervention. Learning objectives: • Early recognition of a mitral valve aneurysm (MVA is important because it may rupture and produce catastrophic mitral regurgitation (MR in an already seriously ill patient requiring emergency surgery, or it may be overlooked at the time of aortic valve replacement (AVR. • Real-time 3D-transesophageal echocardiography (RT-3DTEE is much more advanced and accurate than transthoracic echocardiography for the diagnosis and management of MVA.

  4. Anterior mitral valve aneurysm: a rare sequelae of aortic valve endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Muhammad Umar; Riaz, Irbaz Bin; Smith, M Cristy

    2016-01-01

    Summary In intravenous drug abusers, infective endocarditis usually involves right-sided valves, with Staphylococcus aureus being the most common etiologic agent. We present a patient who is an intravenous drug abuser with left-sided (aortic valve) endocarditis caused by Enterococcus faecalis who subsequently developed an anterior mitral valve aneurysm, which is an exceedingly rare complication. A systematic literature search was conducted which identified only five reported cases in the literature of mitral valve aneurysmal rupture in the setting of E. faecalis endocarditis. Real-time 3D-transesophageal echocardiography was critical in making an accurate diagnosis leading to timely intervention. Learning objectives Early recognition of a mitral valve aneurysm (MVA) is important because it may rupture and produce catastrophic mitral regurgitation (MR) in an already seriously ill patient requiring emergency surgery, or it may be overlooked at the time of aortic valve replacement (AVR). Real-time 3D-transesophageal echocardiography (RT-3DTEE) is much more advanced and accurate than transthoracic echocardiography for the diagnosis and management of MVA. PMID:27249815

  5. Three-year hemodynamic performance, left ventricular mass regression, and prosthetic-patient mismatch after rapid deployment aortic valve replacement in 287 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverich, Axel; Wahlers, Thorsten C; Borger, Michael A; Shrestha, Malakh; Kocher, Alfred A; Walther, Thomas; Roth, Matthias; Misfeld, Martin; Mohr, Friedrich W; Kempfert, Joerg; Dohmen, Pascal M; Schmitz, Christoph; Rahmanian, Parwis; Wiedemann, Dominik; Duhay, Francis G; Laufer, Günther

    2014-12-01

    Superior aortic valve hemodynamic performance can accelerate left ventricular mass regression and enhance survival and functional status after surgical aortic valve replacement. This can be achieved by rapid deployment aortic valve replacement using a subannular balloon-expandable stent frame, which functionally widens and reshapes the left ventricular outflow tract, to ensure a larger effective orifice area compared with conventional surgical valves. We report the intermediate-term follow-up data from a large series of patients enrolled in the Surgical Treatment of Aortic Stenosis With a Next Generation Surgical Aortic Valve (TRITON) trial. In a prospective, multicenter (6 European hospitals), single-arm study, 287 patients with aortic stenosis underwent rapid deployment aortic valve replacement using a stented trileaflet bovine pericardial bioprosthesis. Core laboratory echocardiography was performed at baseline, discharge, and 3 months, 1 year, and 3 years after rapid deployment aortic valve replacement. The mean patient age was 75.7 ± 6.7 years (range, 45-93; 49.1% women). The mean aortic valve gradient significantly decreased from discharge to 3 years of follow-up. The mean effective orifice area remained stable from discharge to 3 years. At 1 year, the left ventricular mass index had decreased by 14% (P replacement using a subannular balloon-expandable stent frame demonstrated excellent hemodynamic performance and significant left ventricular mass regression. With continued follow-up, future studies will establish whether these favorable structural changes correlate with improvement in long-term survival and functional status. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Percutaneous implantation of the CoreValve aortic valve prosthesis in patients at high risk or rejected for surgical valve replacement: Clinical evaluation and feasibility of the procedure in the first 30 patients in the AMC-UvA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baan, J.; Yong, Z. Y.; Koch, K. T.; Henriques, J. P. S.; Bouma, B. J.; de Hert, S. G.; van der Meulen, J.; Tijssen, J. G. P.; Piek, J. J.; de Mol, B. A. J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To report the feasibility, safety and efficacy of percutaneous aortic valve implantation (PAVI) with the CoreValve self-expanding aortic valve bioprosthesis in elderly patients with aortic valve stenosis who are rejected for surgery or have a high surgical risk.Methods. PAVI using the

  7. Limited versus full sternotomy for aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmani, Bilal H; Jones, Sion G; Malaisrie, S C; Chung, Darryl A; Williams, Richard Jnn

    2017-04-10

    Aortic valve disease is a common condition that is easily treatable with cardiac surgery. This is conventionally performed by opening the sternum longitudinally down the centre ("median sternotomy") and replacing the valve under cardiopulmonary bypass. Median sternotomy is generally well tolerated, but as less invasive options have become available, the efficacy of limited incisions has been called into question. In particular, the effects of reducing the visibility and surgical access has raised safety concerns with regards to the placement of cannulae, venting of the heart, epicardial wire placement, and de-airing of the heart at the end of the procedure. These difficulties may increase operating times, affecting outcome. The benefits of smaller incisions are thought to include decreased pain; improved respiratory mechanics; reductions in wound infections, bleeding, and need for transfusion; shorter intensive care stay; better cosmesis; and a quicker return to normal activity. To assess the effects of minimally invasive aortic valve replacement via a limited sternotomy versus conventional aortic valve replacement via median sternotomy in people with aortic valve disease requiring surgical replacement. We performed searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, clinical trials registries, and manufacturers' websites from inception to July 2016, with no language limitations. We reviewed references of identified papers to identify any further studies of relevance. Randomised controlled trials comparing aortic valve replacement via a median sternotomy versus aortic valve replacement via a limited sternotomy. We excluded trials that performed other minimally invasive incisions such as mini-thoracotomies, port access, trans-apical, trans-femoral or robotic procedures. Although some well-conducted prospective and retrospective case-control and cohort studies exist, these were not included in this review. Two review authors independently assessed trial papers to extract data

  8. Learning Alternative Access Approaches for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Implications for New Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Matthew C; Percival, Thomas; Zajarias, Alan; Melby, Spencer J; Lindman, Brian R; Quader, Nishath; Damiano, Ralph J; Moon, Marc R; Lasala, John M; Rao, Ravinder S; Bell, Jennifer; Damiano, Marci S; Maniar, Hersh S

    2017-05-01

    Smaller transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) delivery systems have increased the number of patients eligible for transfemoral procedures while decreasing the need for transaortic (TAo) or transapical (TA) access. As a result, newer TAVR centers are likely to have less exposure to these alternative access techniques, making it harder to achieve proficiency. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the learning curve for TAVR approaches and compare perioperative outcomes. From January 2008 to December 2014, 400 patients underwent TAVR (transfemoral, n = 179; TA, n = 120; and TAo, n = 101)). Learning curves were constructed using metrics of contrast utilization, procedural, and fluoroscopy times. Outcomes during the learning curve were compared with after proficiency was achieved. Depending on the metric, learning curves for all three routes differed slightly but all demonstrated proficiency by the 50th case. There were no significant differences in procedural times whereas improvements in contrast use were most notable for TA (69 ± 40 mL versus 50 ± 23 mL, p = 0.002). For both TA and TAo, fewer patients received transfusions once proficiency was reached (62% versus 34%, p = 0.003, and 42% versus 14%, p = 0.002, respectively). No differences in 30-day or 1-year mortality were seen before or after proficiency was reached for any approach. The learning curves for TA and TAo are distinct but technical proficiency begins to develop by 25 cases and becomes complete by 50 cases for both approaches. Given the relatively low volume of alternative access, achieving technical proficiency may take significant time. However, technical proficiency had no effect on 30-day or 1-year mortality for any access approach. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Aortic root reconstruction by aortic valve-sparing operation (David type I reimplantation) in Marfan syndrome accompanied by annuloaortic ectasia and acute type-A aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamura, Shunichi; Furuya, Hidekazu; Yagi, Kentarou; Ikeya, Eriko; Yamaguchi, Masaomi; Fujimura, Takabumi; Kanabuchi, Kazuo

    2006-09-20

    To reconstruct the aortic root for aneurysm of the ascending aorta accompanied by aortic regurgitation, annuloaortic ectasia (AAE) and acute type-A dissection with root destruction, the Bentall operation using a prosthetic valve still is the standard procedure today. Valve-sparing procedures have actively been used for aortic root lesions, and have also been attempted in aortic root reconstruction for Marfan syndrome which may have abnormalities in the valve leaflets. We conducted a valve-sparing procedure in a female patient with Marfan syndrome who had AAE accompanied by type-A acute aortic dissection. The patient was a 37-year-old woman complaining of severe pain from the chest to the back. The limbs were long, and funnel breast was observed. Diastolic murmurs were heard. On chest computed tomography, a dissection cavity was present from the ascending aorta to the left common iliac artery, and the root dilated to 55 mm. Grade II aortic regurgitation was observed on ultrasound cardiography. Regarding her family history, her father had died suddenly at 54 years of age. She was diagnosed with type-A acute dissection concurrent with Marfan syndrome and AAE. The structure of the aortic valve was normal, and root reconstruction by a valve-sparing operation and total replacement of the aortic arch was conducted. On postoperative ultrasound cardiography, the aortic regurgitation was within the allowable range, and the shortterm postoperative results were good.

  10. Association of warfarin therapy duration after bioprosthetic aortic valve replacement with risk of mortality, thromboembolic complications, and bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mérie, Charlotte; Køber, Lars; Skov Olsen, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The need for anticoagulation after surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) with biological prostheses is not well examined.......The need for anticoagulation after surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) with biological prostheses is not well examined....

  11. Impact of secondary hyperparathyroidism on ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis in hemodialysis-dependent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takami, Yoshiyuki; Tajima, Kazuyoshi

    2015-07-01

    In hemodialysis (HD)-dependent patients, secondary hyperparathyroidism induces cardiac hypertrophy. This study investigated whether parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels affect the degree of left ventricular (LV) mass regression in HD patients after aortic valve replacement (AVR) for aortic stenosis (AS). We retrospectively obtained preoperative and 2-year postoperative echocardiography and intact PTH measurements in 88 HD patients who underwent AVR, with bioprostheses (n = 35, 40%) and mechanical valves (n = 53, 60%) of effective orifice area >0.80 cm2/m2, between January 1997 and December 2010. The LV mass decreased significantly from 308 ± 88 to 217 ± 68 g at follow-up of 28 ± 4 months after AVR (p regression at follow-up was inversely related to preoperative PTH values (R = 0.44, p = 0.001). The LV mass regression at follow-up was significantly smaller in the patients (n = 47) with PTH ≥100 pg/mL than in those (n = 41) with PTH regression at 2-year follow-up (β = 0.23, r2 = 0.24, p = 0.02). In conclusion, the HD patients with high levels of PTH presented with less LV mass regression after AVR for AS without patient-prosthesis mismatch. Secondary hyperparathyroidism may impair regression of cardiac hypertrophy after AVR in HD patients with AS.

  12. Paravalvular Regurgitation after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Comparing Transthoracic versus Transesophageal Echocardiographic Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayek, Salim S; Corrigan, Frank E; Condado, Jose F; Lin, Shuang; Howell, Sharon; MacNamara, James P; Zheng, Shuai; Keegan, Patricia; Thourani, Vinod; Babaliaros, Vasilis C; Lerakis, Stamatios

    2017-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is increasingly being performed in cardiac catheterization laboratories using transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) to guide valve deployment. The risk of paravalvular regurgitation (PVR) remains a concern. We retrospectively reviewed 454 consecutive patients (mean age, 82 ± 8; 58% male) who underwent transfemoral TAVR at Emory Healthcare from 2007 to 2014. Two hundred thirty-four patients underwent TAVR in the cardiac catheterization laboratory with TTE guidance (TTE-TAVR; mean Society of Thoracic Surgeons score, 10%), while 220 patients underwent the procedure in the hybrid operating room with transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) guidance (TEE-TAVR; mean Society of Thoracic Surgeons score, 11%). All patients received an Edwards valve (SAPIEN 55%, SAPIEN-XT 45%). Clinical and procedural characteristics, echocardiographic parameters, and incidence of PVR were compared. The incidence of at least mild PVR at discharge was comparable between TTE-TAVR and TEE-TAVR (33% vs 38%, respectively; P = .326) and did not differ when stratified by valve type. However, in the TTE-TAVR group, there was a higher incidence of second valve implantation (7% vs 2%; P = .026) and postdilation (38% vs 17%; P TTE-TAVR was associated with PVR-related events: the combined outcome of mild PVR at discharge, intraprocedural postdilation, and second valve insertion (odds ratio = 1.58; 95% CI, 1.01-2.46). There were no significant differences in PVR at 30 days, 6 months, and 1 year between the two groups. TTE-TAVR in a high-risk group of patients was associated with increased incidence of intraprocedure PVR-related events, although it was not associated with higher rates of PVR at follow-up. Multicenter randomized trials are required to confirm the cost-effectiveness and safety of TTE-TAVR. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Fused aortic valve without an elliptical-shaped systolic orifice in patients with severe aortic stenosis: cardiac computed tomography is useful for differentiation between bicuspid aortic valve with raphe and tricuspid aortic valve with commissural fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bak, So Hyeon; Ko, Sung Min [Konkuk University School of Medicine, Departments of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Meong Gun; Shin, Je Kyoun; Chee, Hyun Kun; Kim, Jun Suk [Konkuk University School of Medicine, Departments of Thoracic Surgery, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-01

    The objective is to determine cardiac computed tomography (CCT) features capable of differentiating between bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) and tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) in severe aortic stenosis (AS) patients with fused cusp and without elliptical-shaped systolic orifices. We retrospectively enrolled 53 patients who had severe AS with fused cusps and without an elliptical-shaped systolic orifice on CCT and who had undergone surgery. CCT features were analyzed using: (1) aortic valve findings including cusp size, cusp area, opening shape, midline calcification, fusion length, calcium volume score, and calcium grade; (2) diameters of ascending and descending aorta, and main pulmonary artery; and (3) rheumatic mitral valve findings. The variables were evaluated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. At surgery, 19 patients had BAV and 34 had TAV. CCT features including uneven cusp size, uneven cusp area, round-shaped systolic orifice, longer cusp fusion, and dilatation of ascending aorta were significantly associated with BAV (P < 0.05). In particular, fusion length (OR, 1.76; P = 0.001), uneven cusp area (OR, 10.46; P = 0.012), and midline calcification (OR, 0.08; P = 0.013) were strongly associated with BAV. CCT provides diagnostic clues that helps differentiate between BAV with raphe and TAV with commissural fusion in patients with severe AS. (orig.)

  14. CT-angiography-based evaluation of the aortic annulus for prosthesis sizing in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI)-predictive value and optimal thresholds for major anatomic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Florian; Lange, Philipp; Zinsser, Dominik; Greif, Martin; Boekstegers, Peter; Schmitz, Christoph; Reiser, Maximilian F; Kupatt, Christian; Becker, Hans C

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the predictive value of CT-derived measurements of the aortic annulus for prosthesis sizing in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and to calculate optimal cutoff values for the selection of various prosthesis sizes. The local IRB waived approval for this single-center retrospective analysis. Of 441 consecutive TAVI-patients, 90 were excluded (death within 30 days: 13; more than mild aortic regurgitation: 10; other reasons: 67). In the remaining 351 patients, the CoreValve (Medtronic) and the Edwards Sapien XT valve (Edwards Lifesciences) were implanted in 235 and 116 patients. Optimal prosthesis size was determined during TAVI by inflation of a balloon catheter at the aortic annulus. All patients had undergone CT-angiography of the heart or body trunk prior to TAVI. Using these datasets, the diameter of the long and short axis as well as the circumference and the area of the aortic annulus were measured. Multi-Class Receiver-Operator-Curve analyses were used to determine the predictive value of all variables and to define optimal cutoff-values. Differences between patients who underwent implantation of the small, medium or large prosthesis were significant for all except the large vs. medium CoreValve (all p'sprosthesis size for both manufacturers (multi-class AUC's: 0.80, 0.88, 0.91, 0.88, 0.88, 0.89). Using the calculated optimal cutoff-values, prosthesis size is predicted correctly in 85% of cases. CT-based aortic root measurements permit excellent prediction of the prosthesis size considered optimal during TAVI.

  15. CT-angiography-based evaluation of the aortic annulus for prosthesis sizing in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI-predictive value and optimal thresholds for major anatomic parameters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Schwarz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the predictive value of CT-derived measurements of the aortic annulus for prosthesis sizing in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI and to calculate optimal cutoff values for the selection of various prosthesis sizes. METHODS: The local IRB waived approval for this single-center retrospective analysis. Of 441 consecutive TAVI-patients, 90 were excluded (death within 30 days: 13; more than mild aortic regurgitation: 10; other reasons: 67. In the remaining 351 patients, the CoreValve (Medtronic and the Edwards Sapien XT valve (Edwards Lifesciences were implanted in 235 and 116 patients. Optimal prosthesis size was determined during TAVI by inflation of a balloon catheter at the aortic annulus. All patients had undergone CT-angiography of the heart or body trunk prior to TAVI. Using these datasets, the diameter of the long and short axis as well as the circumference and the area of the aortic annulus were measured. Multi-Class Receiver-Operator-Curve analyses were used to determine the predictive value of all variables and to define optimal cutoff-values. RESULTS: Differences between patients who underwent implantation of the small, medium or large prosthesis were significant for all except the large vs. medium CoreValve (all p's<0.05. Furthermore, mean diameter, annulus area and circumference had equally high predictive value for prosthesis size for both manufacturers (multi-class AUC's: 0.80, 0.88, 0.91, 0.88, 0.88, 0.89. Using the calculated optimal cutoff-values, prosthesis size is predicted correctly in 85% of cases. CONCLUSION: CT-based aortic root measurements permit excellent prediction of the prosthesis size considered optimal during TAVI.

  16. Hemodynamic function of the standard St. Jude bileaflet disc valve has no clinical impact 10 years after aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Dorup, Inge; Emmertsen, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Size mismatch and impaired left ventricular function have been shown to determine the hemodynamic function of the standard St. Jude bileaflet disc valve early after aortic valve replacement (AVR). We aimed to analyse St. Jude valve hemodynamic function and its clinical impact in the s......OBJECTIVES: Size mismatch and impaired left ventricular function have been shown to determine the hemodynamic function of the standard St. Jude bileaflet disc valve early after aortic valve replacement (AVR). We aimed to analyse St. Jude valve hemodynamic function and its clinical impact......Hg. In a multilinear regression analysis GOA indexed for LVEDD, hypertension, and LVEF were independently related to peak gradient. CONCLUSION: High gradients of the standard St. Jude bileaflet disc valve 10 years after AVR was primarily related to systemic hypertension and mismatch between valve and left ventricular...

  17. Prediction of optimal deployment projection for transcatheter aortic valve replacement: angiographic 3-dimensional reconstruction of the aortic root versus multidetector computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Ronald K; Leipsic, Jonathon; Wood, David; Moore, Teri; Toggweiler, Stefan; Willson, Alex; Gurvitch, Ronen; Freeman, Melanie; Webb, John G

    2012-04-01

    Identifying the optimal fluoroscopic projection of the aortic valve is important for successful transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Various imaging modalities, including multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), have been proposed for prediction of the optimal deployment projection. We evaluated a method that provides 3-dimensional angiographic reconstructions (3DA) of the aortic root for prediction of the optimal deployment angle and compared it with MDCT. Forty patients undergoing transfemoral TAVR at St Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada, were evaluated. All underwent preimplant 3DA and 68% underwent preimplant MDCT. Three-dimensional angiographic reconstructions were generated from images of a C-arm rotational aortic root angiogram during breath-hold, rapid ventricular pacing, and injection of 32 mL contrast medium at 8 mL/s. Two independent operators prospectively predicted perpendicular valve projections. The implant angle was chosen at the discretion of the physician performing TAVR. The angles from 3DA, from MDCT, the implant angle, and the postdeployment perpendicular prosthesis view were compared. The shortest distance from the postdeployment perpendicular prosthesis projection to the regression line of predicted perpendicular projections was calculated. All but 1 patient had adequate image quality for reproducible angle predictions. There was a significant correlation between 3DA and MDCT for prediction of perpendicular valve projections (r=0.682, Pregression line of predicted angles to the postdeployment prosthesis view was 5.1±4.6° for 3DA and 7.9±4.9° for MDCT (P=0.01). Three-dimensional angiographic reconstructions and MDCT are safe, practical, and accurate imaging modalities for identifying the optimal perpendicular valve deployment projection during TAVR.

  18. Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew K. Roy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive dyspnea and hypoxaemia in the subacute phase after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI are uncommon and warrant immediate assessment of valve and prosthesis leaflet function to exclude thrombosis, as well as investigation for other causes related to the procedure, such as left ventricular dysfunction, pulmonary embolism, and respiratory sepsis. In this case, we report the observation of a patient presenting two weeks after TAVI with arterial hypoxaemia in an upright position, relieved by lying flat, and coupled with an intracardiac shunt detected on echocardiography in the absence of pulmonary hypertension, raising the suspicion of Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome (POS. Invasive intracardiac haemodynamic assessment showed a significant right-to-left shunt (Qp/Qs = 0.74, which confirmed the diagnosis, with subsequent closure of the intracardiac defect resulting in immediate relief of symptoms and hypoxaemia. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an interatrial defect and shunt causing Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome after transcatheter aortic valve implantation, resolved by percutaneous device closure.

  19. Temporal Trends in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in France: FRANCE 2 to FRANCE TAVI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auffret, Vincent; Lefevre, Thierry; Van Belle, Eric; Eltchaninoff, Hélène; Iung, Bernard; Koning, René; Motreff, Pascal; Leprince, Pascal; Verhoye, Jean Philippe; Manigold, Thibaut; Souteyrand, Geraud; Boulmier, Dominique; Joly, Patrick; Pinaud, Frédéric; Himbert, Dominique; Collet, Jean Philippe; Rioufol, Gilles; Ghostine, Said; Bar, Olivier; Dibie, Alain; Champagnac, Didier; Leroux, Lionel; Collet, Frédéric; Teiger, Emmanuel; Darremont, Olivier; Folliguet, Thierry; Leclercq, Florence; Lhermusier, Thibault; Olhmann, Patrick; Huret, Bruno; Lorgis, Luc; Drogoul, Laurent; Bertrand, Bernard; Spaulding, Christian; Quilliet, Laurent; Cuisset, Thomas; Delomez, Maxence; Beygui, Farzin; Claudel, Jean-Philippe; Hepp, Alain; Jegou, Arnaud; Gommeaux, Antoine; Mirode, Anfani; Christiaens, Luc; Christophe, Charles; Cassat, Claude; Metz, Damien; Mangin, Lionel; Isaaz, Karl; Jacquemin, Laurent; Guyon, Philippe; Pouillot, Christophe; Makowski, Serge; Bataille, Vincent; Rodés-Cabau, Josep; Gilard, Martine; Le Breton, Hervé

    2017-07-04

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is standard therapy for patients with severe aortic stenosis who are at high surgical risk. However, national data regarding procedural characteristics and clinical outcomes over time are limited. The aim of this study was to assess nationwide performance trends and clinical outcomes of TAVR during a 6-year period. TAVRs performed in 48 centers across France between January 2013 and December 2015 were prospectively included in the FRANCE TAVI (French Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation) registry. Findings were further compared with those reported from the FRANCE 2 (French Aortic National CoreValve and Edwards 2) registry, which captured all TAVRs performed from January 2010 to January 2012 across 34 centers. A total of 12,804 patients from FRANCE TAVI and 4,165 patients from FRANCE 2 were included in this analysis. The median age of patients was 84.6 years, and 49.7% were men. FRANCE TAVI participants were older but at lower surgical risk (median logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation [EuroSCORE]: 15.0% vs. 18.4%; p FRANCE TAVI underwent transfemoral TAVR. Transesophageal echocardiography guidance decreased from 60.7% to 32.3% of cases, whereas more recent procedures were increasingly performed in hybrid operating rooms (15.8% vs. 35.7%). Rates of Valve Academic Research Consortium-defined device success increased from 95.3% in FRANCE 2 to 96.8% in FRANCE TAVI (p FRANCE TAVI compared with 8.2% and 10.1%, respectively, in FRANCE 2 (p FRANCE TAVI registry provided reassuring data regarding trends in TAVR performance in an all-comers population on a national scale. Nonetheless, given that TAVR indications are likely to expand to patients at lower surgical risk, concerns remain regarding potentially life-threatening complications and pacemaker implantation. (Registry of Aortic Valve Bioprostheses Established by Catheter [FRANCE TAVI]; NCT01777828). Copyright © 2017 American College of

  20. Sex differences in aortic valve calcification measured by multidetector computed tomography in aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Shivani R; Clavel, Marie-Annick; Messika-Zeitoun, David; Cueff, Caroline; Malouf, Joseph; Araoz, Philip A; Mankad, Rekha; Michelena, Hector; Vahanian, Alec; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2013-01-01

    Aortic valve calcification (AVC) is the intrinsic mechanism of valvular obstruction leading to aortic stenosis (AS) and is measurable by multidetector computed tomography. The link between sex and AS is controversial and that with AVC is unknown. We prospectively performed multidetector computed tomography in 665 patients with AS (aortic valve area, 1.05±0.35 cm(2); mean gradient, 39±19 mm Hg) to measure AVC and to assess the impact of sex on the AVC-AS severity link in men and women. AS severity was comparable between women and men (peak aortic jet velocity: 4.05±0.99 versus 3.93±0.91 m/s, P=0.11; aortic valve area index: 0.55±0.20 versus 0.56±0.18 cm(2)/m(2); P=0.46). Conversely, AVC load was lower in women versus men (1703±1321 versus 2694±1628 arbitrary units; PAVC load were much greater in men than in women (odds ratio, 5.07; PAVC showed good associations with hemodynamic AS severity in men and women (all r>0.67; PAVC load, absolute or indexed, was higher in men versus women (all P≤0.01). In this large AS population, women incurred similar AS severity than men for lower AVC loads, even after indexing for their smaller body size. Hence, the relationship between valvular calcification process and AS severity differs in women and men, warranting further pathophysiological inquiry. For AS severity diagnostic purposes, interpretation of AVC load should be different in men and in women.

  1. Prosthetic Aortic Valve Fixation Study: 48 Replacement Valves Analyzed Using Digital Pressure Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Candice Y; Wong, Joshua K; Ross, Ronald E; Liu, David C; Khabbaz, Kamal R; Martellaro, Angelo J; Gorea, Heather R; Sauer, Jude S; Knight, Peter A

    Prostheses attachment is critical in aortic valve replacement surgery, yet reliable prosthetic security remains a challenge. Accurate techniques to analyze prosthetic fixation pressures may enable the use of fewer sutures while reducing the risk of paravalvular leaks (PVL). Customized digital thin film pressure transducers were sutured between aortic annulus models and 21-mm bioprosthetic valves with 15 × 4-mm, 12 × 4-mm, or 9 × 6-mm-wide pledgeted mattress sutures. Simulating open and minimally invasive access, 4 surgeons, blinded to data acquisition, each secured 12 valves using manual knot-tying (hand-tied [HT] or knot-pusher [KP]) or automated titanium fasteners (TFs). Real-time pressure measurements and times were recorded. Two-dimensional (2D) and 3D pressure maps were generated for all valves. Pressures less than 80 mm Hg were considered at risk for PVL. Pressures under each knot (intrasuture) fell less than 80 mm Hg for 12 of 144 manual knots (5/144 HT, 7/144 KP) versus 0 of 288 TF (P manual versus TF. Annular areas with pressures less than 80 mm Hg ranged from 0% of the sewing-ring area (all open TF) to 31% (12 × 4 mm, KP). The average time per manual knot, 46 seconds (HT, 31 seconds; KP, 61 seconds), was greater than TF, 14 seconds (P < 0.005). Reduced operative times and PVL risk would fortify the advantages of surgical aortic valve replacement. This research encourages continued exploration of technical factors in optimizing prosthetic valve security.

  2. Left ventricular mass regression after porcine versus bovine aortic valve replacement: a randomized comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Rakesh M; Zehr, Kenton J; Sundt, Thoralf M; Dearani, Joseph A; Daly, Richard C; Oh, Jae K; Schaff, Hartzell V

    2009-10-01

    It is unclear whether small differences in transprosthetic gradient between porcine and bovine biologic aortic valves translate into improved regression of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy after aortic valve replacement. We investigated transprosthetic gradient, aortic valve orifice area, and LV mass in patients randomized to aortic valve replacement with either the Medtronic Mosaic (MM) porcine or an Edwards Perimount (EP) bovine pericardial bioprosthesis. One hundred fifty-two patients with aortic valve disease were randomly assigned to receive either the MM (n = 76) or an EP prosthesis. There were 89 men (59%), and the mean age was 76 years. Echocardiograms from preoperative, postoperative, predismissal, and 1-year time points were analyzed. Baseline characteristics and preoperative echocardiograms were similar between the two groups. The median implant size was 23 mm for both. There were no early deaths, and 10 patients (7%) died after dismissal. One hundred seven of 137 patients (78%) had a 1-year echocardiogram, and none required aortic valve reoperation. The mean aortic valve gradient at dismissal was 19.4 mm Hg (MM) versus13.5 mm Hg (EP; p regression of LV mass index (MM, -32.4 g/m(2) versus EP, -27.0 g/m(2); p = 0.40). Greater preoperative LV mass index was the sole independent predictor of greater LV mass regression after surgery (p regression of LV mass during the first year after aortic valve replacement.

  3. Aortic valve prosthesis-patient mismatch and exercise capacity in adult patients with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Slooten, Ymkje J.; Melle, van Joost P.; Freling, Hendrik G.; Bouma, Berto J.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Jongbloed, Monique R. M.; Post, Martijn C.; Sieswerda, Gertjan T.; in 't Veld, Anna Huis; Ebels, Tjark; Voors, Adriaan A.; Pieper, Petronella G.

    Objectives To report the prevalence of aortic valve prosthesis patient mismatch (PPM) in an adult population with congenital heart disease (CHD) and its impact on exercise capacity. Adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) with a history of aortic valve replacement may outgrow their prosthesis

  4. Aortic valve prosthesis-patient mismatch and exercise capacity in adult patients with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Slooten, Ymkje J.; van Melle, Joost P.; Freling, Hendrik G.; Bouma, Berto J.; van Dijk, Arie Pj; Jongbloed, Monique Rm; Post, Martijn C.; Sieswerda, Gertjan T.; Huis In 't Veld, Anna; Ebels, Tjark; Voors, Adriaan A.; Pieper, Petronella G.

    2016-01-01

    To report the prevalence of aortic valve prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) in an adult population with congenital heart disease (CHD) and its impact on exercise capacity. Adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) with a history of aortic valve replacement may outgrow their prosthesis later in

  5. Deficient signaling via Alk2 (Acvr1 leads to bicuspid aortic valve development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penny S Thomas

    Full Text Available Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV is the most common congenital cardiac anomaly in humans. Despite recent advances, the molecular basis of BAV development is poorly understood. Previously it has been shown that mutations in the Notch1 gene lead to BAV and valve calcification both in human and mice, and mice deficient in Gata5 or its downstream target Nos3 have been shown to display BAVs. Here we show that tissue-specific deletion of the gene encoding Activin Receptor Type I (Alk2 or Acvr1 in the cushion mesenchyme results in formation of aortic valve defects including BAV. These defects are largely due to a failure of normal development of the embryonic aortic valve leaflet precursor cushions in the outflow tract resulting in either a fused right- and non-coronary leaflet, or the presence of only a very small, rudimentary non-coronary leaflet. The surviving adult mutant mice display aortic stenosis with high frequency and occasional aortic valve insufficiency. The thickened aortic valve leaflets in such animals do not show changes in Bmp signaling activity, while Map kinase pathways are activated. Although dysfunction correlated with some pro-osteogenic differences in gene expression, neither calcification nor inflammation were detected in aortic valves of Alk2 mutants with stenosis. We conclude that signaling via Alk2 is required for appropriate aortic valve development in utero, and that defects in this process lead to indirect secondary complications later in life.

  6. An up-to-date overview of the most recent transcatheter implantable aortic valve prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerinck, Esther M. A.; van Kesteren, Floortje; van Mourik, Martijn S.; Vis, Marije M.; Baan, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has evolved towards the routine therapy for high-risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. Technical refinements in TAVI are rapidly evolving with a simultaneous expansion of the number of available devices. This review will

  7. 6-month aortic valve implantation of an off-the-shelf tissue-engineered valve in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syedain, Zeeshan; Reimer, Jay; Schmidt, Jillian; Lahti, Matthew; Berry, James; Bianco, Richard; Tranquillo, Robert T

    2015-12-01

    Diseased aortic valves often require replacement, with over 30% of the current aortic valve surgeries performed in patients who will outlive a bioprosthetic valve. While many promising tissue-engineered valves have been created in the lab using the cell-seeded polymeric scaffold paradigm, none have been successfully tested long-term in the aortic position of a pre-clinical model. The high pressure gradients and dynamic flow across the aortic valve leaflets require engineering a tissue that has the strength and compliance to withstand high mechanical demand without compromising normal hemodynamics. A long-term preclinical evaluation of an off-the-shelf tissue-engineered aortic valve in the sheep model is presented here. The valves were made from a tube of decellularized cell-produced matrix mounted on a frame. The engineered matrix is primarily composed of collagen, with strength and organization comparable to native valve leaflets. In vitro testing showed excellent hemodynamic performance with low regurgitation, low systolic pressure gradient, and large orifice area. The implanted valves showed large-scale leaflet motion and maintained effective orifice area throughout the duration of the 6-month implant, with no calcification. After 24 weeks implantation (over 17 million cycles), the valves showed no change in tensile mechanical properties. In addition, histology and DNA quantitation showed repopulation of the engineered matrix with interstitial-like cells and endothelialization. New extracellular matrix deposition, including elastin, further demonstrates positive tissue remodeling in addition to recellularization and valve function. Long-term implantation in the sheep model resulted in functionality, matrix remodeling, and recellularization, unprecedented results for a tissue-engineered aortic valve. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Periostin Expression is Altered in Aortic Valves in Smad6 Mutant Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugi, Yukiko; Kern, Michael J; Markwald, Roger R; Burnside, Jessica L

    2013-01-01

    Smad6 is known to predominantly inhibit BMP signaling by negatively regulating the BMP signaling process. Therefore, Smad6 mutation potentially provides an important genetic model for investigating the role of BMP signaling in vivo. Periostin is a 90-kDA secreted extracellular matrix (ECM) protein and implicated in cardiac valve progenitor cell differentiation, maturation and adult aortic valve calcification in mice. We have previously reported periostin expression patterns during AV valve development in mice. Because periostin can play critical roles in aortic valve interstitial cell differentiation and can be correlated with adult valve disease pathogenesis, in the present study we specifically focused on periostin expression during outflow tract (OT) development and its expression within the adult mouse valves. We previously reported that periostin expression in valve progenitor cells was altered by exogenously adding BMP-2 in culture. In this study, we investigated whether expression of periostin and other valvulogenic ECM proteins was altered in Smad6-mutant newborn mice in vivo. Periostin protein was localized within OT during embryonic development in mice. At embryonic day (ED) 13.5, robust periostin expression was detected within the developing pulmonary trunk and developing pulmonary and aortic valves. Periostin expression remained intense in pulmonary and aortic valves up to the adult stage. Our immunohistochemical and immunointensity analyses revealed that periostin expression was significantly reduced in the aortic valves in Smad6−/− neonatal hearts. Versican expression was also significantly reduced in Smad6−/− aortic valves, whereas, hyaluronan deposition was not significantly altered in the Smad6−/− neonatal valves. Expression of periostin and versican was less prominently affected in AV valves compared to the aortic valves, suggesting that a cell lineage/origin-dependent response to regulatory molecules may play a critical role in valve

  9. Impact of Valvuloarterial Impedance on Concentric Remodeling in Aortic Stenosis and Its Regression after Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jeong Yoon; Seo, Jeong-Sook; Sun, Byung Joo; Kim, Dae-Hee; Song, Jong-Min; Kang, Duk-Hyun; Song, Jae-Kwan

    2016-09-01

    Left ventricle (LV) in patients with aortic stenosis (AS) faces a double hemodynamic load incorporating both valvular stenosis and reduced systemic arterial compliance (SAC). This study aimed to evaluate the impact of global LV afterload on LV hypertrophy (LVH) before and after aortic valve replacement (AVR). The study cohort included 453 patients (247 males; mean age, 64 ± 11 years) who underwent AVR. Pre- and post-AVR echocardiographic examinations were retrospectively analyzed including an index of valvuloarterial impedance (Z VA ) and LV mass index/LV end-diastolic volume index (LVMI/LVEDVI) as a parameter of LVH. Pre-AVR LVMI/LVEDVI was 2.7 ± 0.9 g/mL with an aortic valve area (AVA) of 0.6 ± 0.2 cm 2 . Z VA was 5.9 ± 1.9 mm Hg/mL/m 2 and showed a stronger correlation (β = 0.601, p regression in 322 patients with follow-up duration >1 year after AVR. Z VA is a major determinant of concentric remodeling in AS before AVR and LVH regression after AVR, which should be incorporated in routine evaluation of AS.

  10. Four-dimensional flow MRI of stented versus stentless aortic valve bioprostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesteren, Floortje van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wollersheim, Laurens W.; Kaya, Abdullah; Mol, Bas A. de [University of Amsterdam, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Baan, Jan; Boekholdt, S.M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nederveen, A.J.; Ooij, Pim van; Planken, R.N. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2018-01-15

    To evaluate aortic velocity, wall shear stress (WSS) and viscous energy loss (EL) of stented and stentless bioprostheses using 4D flow MRI 1 year after surgical aortic valve replacement. For this cross-sectional study 28 patients with stented (n = 14) or stentless (n = 14) bioprosthesis underwent non-contrast-enhanced 4D-flow MRI at 1.5 T. Analyses included a comparison of velocity, WSS and EL in the ascending aorta during peak systole for both spatially averaged values and a comparison of local differences using per-voxel analysis. No significant differences were found in peak and mean velocity (stented vs. stentless: 2.45 m/s vs. 2.11 m/s; p = 0.09 and 0.60 m/s vs. 0.62 m/s; p = 0.89), WSS (0.60 Pa vs. 0.59 Pa; p = 0.55) and EL (10.17 mW vs. 7.82 mW; p = 0.10). Per-voxel analysis revealed significantly higher central lumen velocity, and lower outer lumen velocity, WSS and EL for stentless versus stented prostheses. One year after aortic valve implantation with stented and stentless bioprostheses, velocity, WSS and EL were comparable when assessed for averaged values in the ascending aorta. However, the flow profile described with local analysis for stentless prosthesis is potentially favourable with a significantly higher central velocity profile and lower values for outer lumen velocity, WSS and EL. (orig.)

  11. Transcatheter implantation of a new prototype of self-expanding aortic valve prosthesis: first experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е. И. Кретов

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Calcific aortic stenosis is an aortic valve disease of atherosclerotic origin occurring in 2-4 % of persons older than 65 years, for whom open surgery is contraindicated. Models of self-expanding aortic valves available today have a number of significant drawbacks. The authors have developed a prototype of a new aortic valve and present its first successful implantation in the experiment.Received 17 October 2016. Accepted 22 November 2016.Funding: The study had no sponsorship.Conflict of interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

  12. Epicardial Adipose Tissue Thickness Independently Predicts Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabadi, Amir A; Kahlert, Heike A; Dykun, Iryna; Balcer, Bastian; Kahlert, Philipp; Rassaf, Tienush

    2017-05-01

    Epicardial fat tissue (EAT) is associated with coronary as well as aortic valve calcification. The study aim was to determine whether EAT thickness is different in patients with and without aortic valve stenosis (AVS). A cohort of 200 consecutive patients with severe AVS and 200 matched patients without AVS were included retrospectively in the study. EAT thickness was quantified, using transthoracic echocardiography, as the space between the epicardial wall of the myocardium and the visceral layer of the pericardium. Unadjusted and risk factor-adjusted logistic regression analysis was used to determine the association of EAT thickness with the presence of AVS. Overall, 400 patients (182 males, 218 females; mean age 79.6 ± 6.5 years) were included in the study. EAT thickness was significantly higher in patients with severe AVS (7.4 ± 0.3 mm versus 5.8 ± 0.2 mm; p EAT by one standard deviation was associated with a two-fold increased occurrence of AVS (OR [95%CI]: 2.10 [1.65-2.68]; p EAT and AVS was independent of BMI (1.78 [1.15-2.75], 2.62 [1.71- 4.02], and 2.22 [1.36- 3.62], for BMI 30kg/ m2, respectively). EAT, in addition to traditional cardiovascular risk factors, significantly improved the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (from 0.70 to 0.76; p = 0.003). EAT thickness is significantly associated with severe AVS, independent of traditional risk factors. While further studies are needed to confirm these results, the present findings support the hypothesis that EAT may influence sclerosis of the aortic valve.

  13. Reevaluation of the indications for permanent pacemaker implantation after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre Thygesen, Julie; Loh, Poay Huan; Cholteesupachai, Jiranut

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Conduction abnormalities (CA) requiring permanent pacemaker (PPM) are a well-known complication after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). This study aimed to determine the incidence of TAVI-related PPM and reevaluate the indications for PPM after the periprocedural period. METHODS...... AND RESULTS: A total of 258 consecutive patients underwent TAVI with the Medtronic CoreValve (MCV), whereas 24 patients were excluded from the study. TAVI-related PPM was defined as PPM implantation ≤30 days after the procedure and due to atrioventricular block (AVB). Third-degree AVB, second-degree type......-II, or advanced second-degree AVB were considered as absolute indications for PPM. The incidence of TAVI-related PPM implantation was 27.4%. Forty-six patients (19.7%) had an absolute indication for PPM, but CA had resolved in 50% beyond the periprocedural period. Electrocardiographic analysis of the patients who...

  14. The impact of age on the postoperative response of the diastolic function and left ventricular mass regression after surgical or transcatheter aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Teruya; Toda, Koichi; Kuratani, Toru; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Yoshikawa, Yasushi; Fukushima, Satsuki; Saito, Shunsuke; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2017-06-01

    We examined the impact of advanced age on left ventricular mass regression and the change in the diastolic function after aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis. The present study included 129 patients who underwent either surgical or transcatheter aortic valve replacement and 1-year postoperative echocardiography. The patient characteristics and echocardiographic findings were compared between patients who were regression was significantly greater (p = 0.02) and diastolic dysfunction was less prevalent in group Y (p = 0.02) in comparison to group O. The change in E/e' was significantly correlated with the left ventricular mass regression in group Y (p = 0.02), but not in Group O (p = 0.21). The patients in group O were less susceptible to improvements in myocardial remodeling and the diastolic function in comparison to those in group Y. The altered physiological response to aortic valve replacement might help to determine the appropriate timing of surgery in elderly patients.

  15. Double Valve Replacement (Mitral and Aortic for Rheumatic Heart Disease: A 20-year experience with 300 patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Mishra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rheumatic heart disease still remains one of the leading causes of congestive heart failure and death owing to valvular pathologies, in developing countries. Valve replacement still remains the treatment of choice in such patients.The aim of this study wasto analyze the postoperative outcome of  double valve replacement (Mitral and Aortic in patients of rheumatic heart disease. Materials and Methods: Between 1988 and 2008, 300 patients of rheumatic heart disease underwent double (Mitral and Aortic valve replacement with Starr Edwards valve or St Jude mechanical valve prosthesis were implanted. These patients were studied retrospectively for preoperative data and postoperative outcome including causes of early and late deaths and the data was analyzed statistically. Results: The 30-day hospital death rate was 11.3% andlate death occurred in 11.6%. Anticoagulant regimen was followed to maintain the target pro-thrombin time at 1.5 times the control value. The actuarial survival (exclusive of hospital mortality was 92.4%, 84.6%, and 84.4%, per year at 5, 10, and 20 years, respectively Conclusions: In view of the acknowledged advantageof superior durability, increased thromboresistance in our patient population, and its cost effectiveness the Starr-Edwards ball valve or St. Jude valve is the mechanical prosthesis of choice for advanced combined valvular disease. The low-intensity anticoagulant regimen has offered suffcient protection against thromboembolism as well as hemorrhage.

  16. Aortic valve endocarditis complicated by ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny, Benjamin E; Almanaseer, Yassar

    2014-12-01

    Infective endocarditis complicated by abscess formation and coronary artery compression is a rare clinical event with a high mortality rate, and diagnosis requires a heightened degree of suspicion. We present the clinical, angiographic, and echocardiographic features of a 73-year-old woman who presented with dyspnea and was found to have right coronary artery compression that was secondary to abscess formation resulting from diffuse infectious endocarditis. We discuss the patient's case and briefly review the relevant medical literature. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of abscess formation involving a native aortic valve and the right coronary artery.

  17. Calcific aortic valve damage as a risk factor for cardiovascular events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasilewski, Jarosław; Mirota, Kryspin; Wilczek, Krzysztof; Głowacki, Jan; Poloński, Lech

    2012-01-01

    Aortic valve calcification (AVC) is a common disease of the elderly. It is a progressive disease ranging from mild valve thickening to severe calcification with aortic valve stenosis. Risk factors for AVC are similar to those for atherosclerosis: age, gender, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, hypertension, smoking and renal failure. AVC shares many similarities to atherosclerosis, including inflammatory cells and calcium deposits, and correlates with coronary plaque burden. Presence of AVC is associated with increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events. The objective for this review is to discuss the clinical features, natural history and prognostic significance of aortic valve calcifications, including mechanical and hemodynamic factors of flow distribution

  18. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation and Morbidity and Mortality-Related Factors: a 5-Year Experience in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, André Luiz Silveira; Salgado, Constantino González; Mourilhe-Rocha, Ricardo; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Lima, Luciana Cristina Lima Correia; de Mattos, Nelson Durval Ferreira Gomes; Rabischoffsky, Arnaldo; Fagundes, Francisco Eduardo Sampaio; Colafranceschi, Alexandre Siciliano; Carvalho, Luiz Antonio Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation has become an option for high-surgical-risk patients with aortic valve disease. Objective To evaluate the in-hospital and one-year follow-up outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Methods Prospective cohort study of transcatheter aortic valve implantation cases from July 2009 to February 2015. Analysis of clinical and procedural variables, correlating them with in-hospital and one-year mortality. Results A total of 136 patients with a mean age of 83 years (80-87) underwent heart valve implantation; of these, 49% were women, 131 (96.3%) had aortic stenosis, one (0.7%) had aortic regurgitation and four (2.9%) had prosthetic valve dysfunction. NYHA functional class was III or IV in 129 cases (94.8%). The baseline orifice area was 0.67 ± 0.17 cm2 and the mean left ventricular-aortic pressure gradient was 47.3±18.2 mmHg, with an STS score of 9.3% (4.8%-22.3%). The prostheses implanted were self-expanding in 97% of cases. Perioperative mortality was 1.5%; 30-day mortality, 5.9%; in-hospital mortality, 8.1%; and one-year mortality, 15.5%. Blood transfusion (relative risk of 54; p = 0.0003) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (relative risk of 5.3; p = 0.036) were predictive of in-hospital mortality. Peak C-reactive protein (relative risk of 1.8; p = 0.013) and blood transfusion (relative risk of 8.3; p = 0.0009) were predictive of 1-year mortality. At 30 days, 97% of patients were in NYHA functional class I/II; at one year, this figure reached 96%. Conclusion Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was performed with a high success rate and low mortality. Blood transfusion was associated with higher in-hospital and one-year mortality. Peak C-reactive protein was associated with one-year mortality. PMID:27192383

  19. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation and Morbidity and Mortality-Related Factors: a 5-Year Experience in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Silveira Souza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation has become an option for high-surgical-risk patients with aortic valve disease. Objective: To evaluate the in-hospital and one-year follow-up outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Methods: Prospective cohort study of transcatheter aortic valve implantation cases from July 2009 to February 2015. Analysis of clinical and procedural variables, correlating them with in-hospital and one-year mortality. Results: A total of 136 patients with a mean age of 83 years (80-87 underwent heart valve implantation; of these, 49% were women, 131 (96.3% had aortic stenosis, one (0.7% had aortic regurgitation and four (2.9% had prosthetic valve dysfunction. NYHA functional class was III or IV in 129 cases (94.8%. The baseline orifice area was 0.67 ± 0.17 cm2 and the mean left ventricular-aortic pressure gradient was 47.3±18.2 mmHg, with an STS score of 9.3% (4.8%-22.3%. The prostheses implanted were self-expanding in 97% of cases. Perioperative mortality was 1.5%; 30-day mortality, 5.9%; in-hospital mortality, 8.1%; and one-year mortality, 15.5%. Blood transfusion (relative risk of 54; p = 0.0003 and pulmonary arterial hypertension (relative risk of 5.3; p = 0.036 were predictive of in-hospital mortality. Peak C-reactive protein (relative risk of 1.8; p = 0.013 and blood transfusion (relative risk of 8.3; p = 0.0009 were predictive of 1-year mortality. At 30 days, 97% of patients were in NYHA functional class I/II; at one year, this figure reached 96%. Conclusion: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was performed with a high success rate and low mortality. Blood transfusion was associated with higher in-hospital and one-year mortality. Peak C-reactive protein was associated with one-year mortality.

  20. St Jude Epic heart valve bioprostheses versus native human and porcine aortic valves - comparison of mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalejs, Martins; Stradins, Peteris; Lacis, Romans; Ozolanta, Iveta; Pavars, Janis; Kasyanov, Vladimir

    2009-05-01

    The major problem with heart valve bioprostheses made from chemically treated porcine aortic valves is their limited longevity caused by gradual deterioration, which has a causal link with valve tissue mechanical properties. To our best knowledge, there are no published studies on the mechanical properties of modern, commercially available bioprostheses comparing them to native human valves. The objective of this study is to determine the mechanical properties of St Jude Epic bioprostheses and to compare them with native human and porcine aortic valves. Leaflets from eight porcine aortic valves and six Epic bioprostheses were analyzed using uni-axial tensile tests in radial and circumferential directions. Mechanical properties of human valves have been previously published by our group. Results are represented as mean values+/-S.D. Circumferential direction. Modulus of elasticity of Epic bioprostheses in circumferential direction at the level of stress 1.0 MPa is 101.99+/-58.24 MPa, 42.3+/-4.96 MPa for native porcine and 15.34+/-3.84 MPa for human aortic valves. Ultimate stress is highest for Epic bioprostheses 5.77+/-1.94 MPa, human valves have ultimate stress of 1.74+/-0.29 MPa and porcine 1.58+/-0.26 MPa. Ultimate strain in circumferential direction is highest for human valves 18.35+/-7.61% followed by 7.26+/-0.69% for porcine valves and 5.95+/-1.54% for Epic bioprostheses. Radial direction. Modulus of elasticity in radial direction is 9.18+/-1.81 MPa for Epic bioprostheses, 5.33+/-0.61 MPa for native porcine, and 1.98+/-0.15 MPa for human aortic valve leaflets. In the radial direction ultimate stress is highest for Epic bioprostheses 0.7+/-0.21 MPa followed by native porcine valves 0.55+/-0.11 MPa and 0.32+/-0.04 MPa for human valves. For human valves ultimate strain is 23.92+/-4.87%, for native porcine valves 8.57+/-0.8% and 7.92+/-1.74% for Epic bioprostheses. Epic bioprostheses have non-linear stress-strain behavior similar to native valve tissue, but they

  1. Commercial versus PARTNER study experience with the transfemoral Edwards SAPIEN valve for inoperable patients with severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendyala, Lakshmana K; Minha, Sa'ar; Barbash, Israel M; Torguson, Rebecca; Magalhaes, Marco A; Okubagzi, Petros; Loh, Joshua P; Chen, Fang; Satler, Lowell F; Pichard, Augusto D; Waksman, Ron

    2014-01-15

    In patients with aortic stenosis who cannot have surgery, transcatheter aortic valve replacement using the Edwards SAPIEN valve has been shown to improve survival rate and is approved for commercial use in the United States. This study aims to assess the clinical profile, procedural characteristics, and in-hospital complications in patients treated with a commercial SAPIEN valve outside the clinical trial context. We retrospectively analyzed 69 consecutive patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement with a commercial SAPIEN valve compared with 55 Placement of AoRTic traNscathetER valves (PARTNER) trial patients from cohort B enrolled in the same institution by the same Heart Team. Compared with the commercial group, patients in the PARTNER cohort B had higher mean Society of Thoracic Surgeons score (10 ± 5 vs 9 ± 4, p = 0.04) and a lower rate of peripheral arterial disease (19% vs 44%, p = 0.004). Most patients in the commercial group had the procedure under conscious sedation (83% vs 66%, p = 0.03). Planned surgical cut down for vascular access was rare in the commercial group (1.4% vs 46%, p commercial group (7.2% vs 27%, p = 0.003; 2.9% vs 16%, p = 0.01; and 28% vs 60%, p commercial group. In conclusion, transfemoral commercial use of the Edwards SAPIEN valve for inoperable patients shows similar in-hospital mortality and stroke rates compared with PARTNER cohort B. The refinements in the procedure such as more conscious sedation, experience of the operators, and careful vascular planning in the commercial group led to lesser vascular and bleeding complications and shorter length of stay. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. New Fibrillin Gene Mutation - Possible Cause of Ascending Aortic Dilation in Patients with Aortic Valve Disease: Preliminary Results

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dudra, J.; Lindner, J.; Vaněk, I.; Šímová, Jana; Mazura, Ivan; Miler, I.; Čiháková, J.; Čapek, P.; Belák, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 2 (2009), s. 99-102 ISSN 1061-1711 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : aortic valve disease * ascending aortic dilatation * fibrilin gene mutation Subject RIV: EB - Gene tics ; Molecular Biology

  3. Outcomes in patients with contained ruptures of the aortic annulus after transcatheter aortic valve implantation with balloon-expandable devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breitbart, Philipp; Minners, Jan; Pache, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    ) at three centers in Germany and Denmark. CR were identified in 12 patients (1.2%, 80.7+5.0 years, STS-Score 4.1+1.4%). All 12 patients had received a balloon-expandable valve. In 3 patients periprocedural transesophageal echocardiography revealed findings suggestive of aortic dissection, an aortic...

  4. Readmission rates after transcatheter aortic valve replacement in high- and extreme-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcillo, Jessica; Condado, Jose F; Binongo, Jose N; Lasanajak, Yi; Caughron, Hope; Babaliaros, Vasilis; Devireddy, Chandan; Leshnower, Bradley; Guyton, Robert A; Block, Peter C; Simone, Amy; Keegan, Patricia; Khairy, Paul; Thourani, Vinod H

    2017-08-01

    In high- or extreme-risk patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement, readmissions have not been adequately studied and are the subject of increased scrutiny by healthcare systems. The objectives of this study were to determine the incidence of 30-day and 1-year cardiac and noncardiac readmissions, identify predictors of readmission, and assess the association between readmission and 1-year mortality. A retrospective review was performed on 714 patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement from September 2007 to January 2015 at Emory University. Patients' median age was 83 years, and 46.6% were female. Early all-cause readmission for the cohort was 10.5%, and late readmission was 18.8%. Anemia was related to both early all-cause (hazard ratio [HR], 0.74) and cardiovascular-related readmission (HR, 0.60). A 23-mm valve implanted was associated with early all-cause readmission (HR, 1.73). Length of hospital stay was related to late all-cause (HR, 1.14) and cardiovascular-related readmission (HR, 1.21). Postoperative permanent stroke had an impact on late cardiovascular-related readmission (HR, 3.60; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-11.49). Multivariable analysis identified anemia as being associated with 30-day all-cause readmission, and anemia and postoperative stroke were associated with 30-day cardiovascular-related readmission. Readmissions seemed to be related to 1-year mortality (HR, 2.04; 95% confidence interval, 1.33-3.12). We show some baseline comorbidities and procedural complications that are directly associated with early and late readmissions, and anemia and postoperative stroke were associated with an increase in mortality. Moreover, we found that readmission was associated with double the hazard of death within 1 year. Whether treatment of identified risk factors could decrease readmission rates and mortality warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by

  5. Cost-Effectiveness of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With a Self-Expanding Prosthesis Versus Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Matthew R.; Lei, Yang; Wang, Kaijun; Chinnakondepalli, Khaja; Vilain, Katherine A.; Magnuson, Elizabeth A.; Galper, Benjamin Z.; Meduri, Christopher U.; Arnold, Suzanne V.; Baron, Suzanne J.; Reardon, Michael J.; Adams, David H.; Popma, Jeffrey J.; Cohen, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Prior studies of the cost-effectiveness of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) have been based primarily on a single balloon-expandable system. Objectives The goal of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of TAVR with a self-expanding prosthesis compared with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) for patients with severe aortic stenosis and high surgical risk. Methods We performed a formal economic analysis on the basis of individual, patient-level data from the CoreValve U.S. High Risk pivotal trial. Empirical data regarding survival and quality of life (QOL) over 2 years, and medical resource use and hospital costs through 12 months were used to project life expectancy, quality-adjusted life expectancy, and lifetime medical costs in order to estimate the incremental cost-effectiveness of TAVR versus SAVR from a U.S. perspective. Results Relative to SAVR, TAVR reduced initial length of stay an average of 4.4 days, decreased the need for rehabilitation services at discharge, and resulted in superior 1-month QOL. Index admission and projected lifetime costs were higher with TAVR than with SAVR (differences $11,260 and $17,849 per patient, respectively), whereas TAVR was projected to provide a lifetime gain of 0.32 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs; 0.41 life-years [LYs]) with 3% discounting. Lifetime incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were $55,090 per QALY gained and $43,114 per LY gained. Sensitivity analyses indicated that a reduction in the initial cost of TAVR by ~$1,650 would lead to an ICER prosthesis provided meaningful clinical benefits compared with SAVR, with incremental costs considered acceptable by current U.S. standards. With expected modest reductions in the cost of index TAVR admissions, the value of TAVR compared with SAVR in this patient population would become high. PMID:26764063

  6. Aortic Regurgitation in Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With the Self-Expanding CoreValve Versus the Balloon-Expandable SAPIEN XT Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiramijyan, Sarkis; Magalhaes, Marco A; Koifman, Edward; Didier, Romain; Escarcega, Ricardo O; Baker, Nevin C; Negi, Smita I; Minha, Sa'ar; Torguson, Rebecca; Jiaxiang, Gai; Asch, Federico M; Wang, Zuyue; Okubagzi, Petros; Gaglia, Michael A; Ben-Dor, Itsik; Satler, Lowell F; Pichard, Augusto D; Waksman, Ron

    2016-05-01

    The incidence of aortic regurgitation (AR) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in a self-expanding and a balloon-expandable system is controversial. This study aimed to examine the incidence and severity of post-TAVR AR with the CoreValve (CV) versus the Edwards XT Valve (XT). Baseline, procedural, and postprocedural inhospital outcomes were compared. The primary end point was the incidence of post-TAVR AR of any severity, assessed with a transthoracic echocardiogram, in the CV versus XT groups. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was completed to evaluate for correlates of the primary end point. The secondary end points included the change in severity of AR at 30-day and 1-year follow-up. A total of 223 consecutive patients (53% men, mean age 82 years) who had transfemoral TAVR with either a CV (n = 119) or XT (n = 104) were evaluated. The rates of post-TAVR AR in the groups were similar, and there was no evidence of more-than-moderate AR in either group. There were significant differences in the rates of intraprocedural balloon postdilation with the CV (17.1%) versus XT valve (5.8%; p = 0.009) and in the rates of intraprocedural implantation of a second valve-in-valve prosthesis with the CV (9.9%) versus XT valve (2.2%; p = 0.036). There were no significant differences in inhospital safety outcomes between the 2 groups. In conclusion, the incidence of post-TAVR AR is similar between the CV and the XT valve when performed by experienced operators using optimal intraprocedural strategies, as deemed appropriate, to mitigate the severity of AR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cost-effectiveness of transcatheter aortic valve replacement compared with surgical aortic valve replacement in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis: results of the PARTNER (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves) trial (Cohort A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Matthew R; Magnuson, Elizabeth A; Lei, Yang; Wang, Kaijun; Vilain, Katherine; Li, Haiyan; Walczak, Joshua; Pinto, Duane S; Thourani, Vinod H; Svensson, Lars G; Mack, Michael J; Miller, D Craig; Satler, Lowell E; Bavaria, Joseph; Smith, Craig R; Leon, Martin B; Cohen, David J

    2012-12-25

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) compared with surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) for patients with severe aortic stenosis and high surgical risk. TAVR is an alternative to AVR for patients with severe aortic stenosis and high surgical risk. We performed a formal economic analysis based on cost, quality of life, and survival data collected in the PARTNER A (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves) trial in which patients with severe aortic stenosis and high surgical risk were randomized to TAVR or AVR. Cumulative 12-month costs (assessed from a U.S. societal perspective) and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were compared separately for the transfemoral (TF) and transapical (TA) cohorts. Although 12-month costs and QALYs were similar for TAVR and AVR in the overall population, there were important differences when results were stratified by access site. In the TF cohort, total 12-month costs were slightly lower with TAVR and QALYs were slightly higher such that TF-TAVR was economically dominant compared with AVR in the base case and economically attractive (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio economically dominated by AVR in the base case and economically attractive in only 7.1% of replicates. In the PARTNER trial, TAVR was an economically attractive strategy compared with AVR for patients suitable for TF access. Future studies are necessary to determine whether improved experience and outcomes with TA-TAVR can improve its cost-effectiveness relative to AVR. Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The power of disruptive technological innovation: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, David B; Davidson, Michael J; Schoen, Frederick J

    2015-11-01

    We sought to evaluate the principles of disruptive innovation, defined as technology innovation that fundamentally shifts performance and utility metrics, as applied to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). In particular, we considered implantation procedure, device design, cost, and patient population. Generally cheaper and lower performing, classical disruptive innovations are first commercialized in insignificant markets, promise lower margins, and often parasitize existing usage, representing unattractive investments for established market participants. However, despite presently high unit cost, TAVI is less invasive, treats a "new," generally high risk, patient population, and is generally done by a multidisciplinary integrated heart team. Moreover, at least in the short-term TAVI has not been lower-performing than open surgical aortic valve replacement in high-risk patients. We conclude that TAVI extends the paradigm of disruptive innovation and represents an attractive commercial opportunity space. Moreover, should the long-term performance and durability of TAVI approach that of conventional prostheses, TAVI will be an increasingly attractive commercial opportunity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Design of Bioprosthetic Aortic Valves using biaxial test data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabiri, Y; Paulson, K; Tyberg, J; Ronsky, J; Ali, I; Di Martino, E; Narine, K

    2015-01-01

    Bioprosthetic Aortic Valves (BAVs) do not have the serious limitations of mechanical aortic valves in terms of thrombosis. However, the lifetime of BAVs is too short, often requiring repeated surgeries. The lifetime of BAVs might be improved by using computer simulations of the structural behavior of the leaflets. The goal of this study was to develop a numerical model applicable to the optimization of durability of BAVs. The constitutive equations were derived using biaxial tensile tests. Using a Fung model, stress and strain data were computed from biaxial test data. SolidWorks was used to develop the geometry of the leaflets, and ABAQUS finite element software package was used for finite element calculations. Results showed the model is consistent with experimental observations. Reaction forces computed by the model corresponded with experimental measurements when the biaxial test was simulated. As well, the location of maximum stresses corresponded to the locations of frequent tearing of BAV leaflets. Results suggest that BAV design can be optimized with respect to durability.

  10. Patient-prosthesis mismatch and left ventricular remodelling after implantation of Shelhigh SuperStentless aortic valve prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germing, A; Lindstaedt, M; Holt, S; Reber, D; Mügge, A; Laczkovics, A; Fritz, M

    2008-08-01

    Aortic valve replacement is a standard procedure for the treatment of severe aortic valve stenosis. Due to lower flow velocities stentless valves are associated with a more effective regression of left ventricular hypertrophy in comparison to stented valves. However, mismatch between body surface area and valve size supports unfavourable hemodynamic results. The aim of the study was to analyze hemodynamic parameters by echocardiography after implantation of the Shelhigh SuperStentless bioprosthesis and to analyze the occurrence of patient-prosthesis mismatch and left ventricular remodelling in this specific valve type. A total of 20 patients with severe aortic stenosis underwent implantation of a Shelhigh Super Stentless prosthesis. Clinical and echocardiographic assessment was done prior to, immediate after and six months after surgery. All surgical procedures were successful, no surgery-related complication was documented perioperatively. One patient died after development of multiorgan failure. Echocardiography during the first eight days after surgery showed mean gradients of 16 mmHg, mean valve orifice areas of 1.8 cm(2) and indexed effective orifice areas at 0.95 cm(2)/m(2). Six-months follow-up data were obtained in 19/20 patients. There were no relevant changes in echocardiographic hemodynamic findings at the time of follow-up measurements. Significant regression of left ventricular hypertrophy was shown (P=0.0088). A patient-prosthesis mismatch occurred in one patient (0.54 cm(2)/m(2)). No recurrent symptoms were documented. Patient-prosthesis mismatch after implantation of SuperStentless Shelhigh prosthesis is rare. A significant regression of left ventricular hypertrophy could be shown after six months. Hemodynamic valve function assessed by echocardiography may be predicted early after surgery.

  11. Radial Force: An Underestimated Parameter in Oversizing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Prostheses: In Vitro Analysis with Five Commercialized Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egron, Sandrine; Fujita, Buntaro; Gullón, Lucía; Désirée, Pott; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Ensminger, Stephan; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2017-09-05

    The goal is to inform in depth on transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) prosthesis mechanical behavior, depending on frame type, design, and size, and how it crucially impacts the oversizing issue in clinical use, and ultimately the procedure outcome. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement is an established therapy for high-risk patients suffering from aortic stenosis, and the indication for TAVR is progressively expanding to intermediate-risk patients. Choosing the optimal oversizing degree is crucial to safely anchor the TAVR valve-which involves limiting the risks for embolism, aortic regurgitation, conductance disturbance, or annulus rupture-and to increase the valve prosthesis performance. The radial force (RF) profiles of five TAVR prostheses were measured in vitro: the CoreValve 23 and 26 (Medtronic, MN), the Acurate neo S (Symetis, Switzerland), and the SAPIEN XT 23 and 26 (Edwards Lifesciences, CA). Measurements were run with the RX Machine equipment (Machine Solutions Inc., AZ), which is used in ISO standard tests for intravascular stents. Test protocols were adapted for TAVR prostheses. With the prostheses RF profiles' results, mechanical behavior differences could be described and discussed in terms of oversizing strategy and clinical impact for all five valves. Besides, crossing the prostheses' RF profiles with their recommended size windows made the assessment of borderline size cases possible and helped analyze the risks when accurate measurement of patient aortic annulus proves difficult. The prostheses' RF profiles bring new support in clinical decision-making for valve type and size in patients.

  12. Emergency use of cardiopulmonary bypass in complicated transcatheter aortic valve replacement: importance of a heart team approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roselli, Eric E; Idrees, Jay; Mick, Stephanie; Kapadia, Samir; Tuzcu, Murat; Svensson, Lars G; Lytle, Bruce W

    2014-10-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) expands options for high-risk patients with aortic stenosis but is complex with life-threatening complications. We describe indications for use of salvage cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and assess outcomes. From 2006 to 2011, 303 patients underwent TAVR, and 12 (4%) required emergency CPB. Approach was transapical (9) and transfemoral (3). Mean age was 82±9 years, median Society of Thoracic Surgeons score was 11 and mean gradient was 46±9 mm Hg. Access for CPB was femoral under fluoroscopy. Principal indication for CPB was hemodynamic instability with or without ischemic changes. These resulted from aortic insufficiency (n=5), valve embolization (n=3), coronary malperfusion (n=2), bleeding requiring pericardiocentesis (n=1), and bleeding from ventricular apex (n=1). Additional procedures included valve-in-valve TAVR (n=5), surgical valve replacement (n=3), and coronary intervention (n=2). Additional circulatory support was used in 7 cases: intra-aortic balloon pump (5) and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (3). There were 2 hospital deaths. Mean postoperative gradient was 12±9 mm Hg, and median stay was 16 days. There were no myocardial infarctions or renal failure. One patient had stroke with arm weakness, 2 required tracheostomy, and 2 underwent reoperations for bleeding. Median follow-up was 19 months, and there were 5 late deaths. Complications during TAVR can be life threatening and may necessitate additional procedures. Expeditious use of CPB support provided by a multidisciplinary heart team optimizes rescue after myocardial collapse. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Early impact of aortic wrapping on patients undergoing aortic valve replacement with mild to moderate ascending aorta dilatation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sosnowski Andrzej

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The management of mild to moderate dilatation of the ascending aorta of less than 5 cm is controversial, particularly when concomitant surgical correction of aortic valve is required. We investigate the impact of a simple method of aorta reduction using Dacron graft wrapping during aortic valve replacement on the rest of the aorta. Methods We studied 14 patients who had ascending aorta dilatation of 4-5 cm before undergoing aortic wrapping during their aortic valve replacement and compared with their post-operative imaging within a month. Results The diameters of the ascending aorta wrapped with the Dacron graft were significantly reduced within 4 weeks after surgery from 44.7 ± 2.6 to 33.6 ± 3.9 mm (p Conclusions Reduction of ascending aortic dilatation by wrapping with a Dacron graft in this preliminary study is associated with favourable early reversed aortic remodelling. This supports the hypothesis that correction of mild-moderate dilatation of the ascending aorta with Dacron wrapping at the time of aortic valve surgery may prevent the progression of the dilatation, although the long-term study on a larger population is needed to confirm its benefits.

  14. [Valve-sparing aortic root replacement for young female patients with Marfan syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawata, Kan; Morota, T

    2009-10-01

    Annuloaortic ectasia is frequently related with Marfan syndrome, and Bentall procedure or aortic root replacement with valved conduit has been the conventional standard operation for this disease. Recently, some institutes have adopted valve-sparing aortic root replacement (VSARR) instead of Bentall procedure. Young female patients with Marfan syndrome who wishes for childbearing seem to be a group of good candidates of this type of operation, because it let them free from morbidities after artificial valve implantation. Valve-sparing operation should be taken into consideration when the size of Valsalva sinus reaches 45 mm for patients with Marfan syndrome and when it reaches 40 mm for patients with past histories or family histories of aortic dissection or aortic rupture. Since pregnancy is one of the most serious risk factors for aortic events, Valsalva sinus of 40 mm or larger could be the new standard for surgical indication if VSARR is applicable.

  15. Successful implantation of a second-generation aortic valve in severe aortic regurgitation secondary to a traumatic cusp lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangieri, Antonio [Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Institute, Milan (Italy); Latib, Azeem, E-mail: info@emocolumbus.it [Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Institute, Milan (Italy); EMO-GVM Centro Cuore Columbus, Milan (Italy); Aurelio, Andrea [Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Institute, Milan (Italy); Figini, Filippo [Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Institute, Milan (Italy); EMO-GVM Centro Cuore Columbus, Milan (Italy); Agricola, Eustachio; Rosa, Isabella; Stella, Stefano; Spagnolo, Pietro; Castiglioni, Alessandro [Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Institute, Milan (Italy); Colombo, Antonio [Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Institute, Milan (Italy); EMO-GVM Centro Cuore Columbus, Milan (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    A 67-year-old man with a dilated cardiomyopathy and severe aortic regurgitation (AR) secondary to a traumatic cusp lesion was referred to our institution because of progressive worsening of dyspnea. After formal discussion in the heart team, the patient was scheduled for TAVI (transcatheter aortic valve implantation). The pre procedural computed tomography scan revealed a minimum amount of calcium on the aortic valve and low position of coronary ostia. The TAVI procedure was performed with the implantation of a fully retrievable and repositionable aortic valve prosthesis (Direct Flow 29 mm, Direct Flow Medical, Santa Rosa, California) with an excellent result and no paravalvular leak. The TAVI devices designed for the treatment of calcific aortic stenosis have numerous limitations for the treatment of pure AR such as the risk of residual AR, the lack of repositionability and retrievability, and the need for valve- in-valve implantation. We believe that treatment of selected cases of pure AR with the Direct Flow valve is feasible and takes advantage of the retrievability of the prosthesis.

  16. A quarter of a century of experience with aortic valve-sparing operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Tirone E; Feindel, Christopher M; David, Carolyn M; Manlhiot, Cedric

    2014-09-01

    To examine the late outcomes of aortic valve-sparing operations to treat patients with aortic root aneurysm with and without aortic insufficiency (AI) in a cohort of patients followed up prospectively since 1988. A total of 371 consecutive patients had undergone aortic valve-sparing surgery (mean age, 47 ± 15 years; 78% men) from 1988 through 2010. In addition to the aortic root aneurysm, 47% had moderate or severe AI, 35.5% had Marfan syndrome, 12.1% had type A aortic dissection, 9.2% had bicuspid aortic valve, 8.4% had mitral insufficiency, 16.1% had aortic arch aneurysm, and 10.2% had coronary artery disease. Reimplantation of the aortic valve was used in 296 patients and remodeling of the aortic root in 75. Cusp repair by plication of the free margin along the nodule of Arantius was used in 36.6% of patients, and reinforcement of the free margin with a double layer of fine Gore-Tex suture in 24.2%. The patients were followed up prospectively with images of the aortic root for a median follow-up of 8.9 ± 5.2 years. A total of 4 operative and 39 late deaths occurred. Survival at 18 years was 76.8% ± 4.31%, lower than that for the general population matched for age and gender. Age, type A aortic dissection, impaired ventricular function, and preoperative AI were associated with increased mortality on multivariable analysis. Reoperations on the aortic valve were performed in 8 patients for recurrent AI and in 2 for infective endocarditis. Freedom from reoperation on the aortic valve at 18 years was 94.8% ± 2.0%. No predictors of the need for reoperation were found on multivariable analysis. Eighteen patients developed AI greater than mild. Freedom from AI greater than mild at 18 years was 78.0% ± 4.8%. No predictors of recurrent AI were identified on multivariable analysis. Aortic valve-sparing operations continue to provide excellent clinical outcomes, although a slow but progressive deterioration of aortic valve function seems to occur during the first 2

  17. High Risk Aortic Valve Replacement - The Challenges of Multiple Treatment Strategies with an Evolving Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, K; Beattie, R; McBride, M; Manoharan, G; Spence, M; Jones, J M

    2016-01-01

    Deciding on the optimal treatment strategy for high risk aortic valve replacement is challenging. Transcatheter Aortic Valve implantation (TAVI) has been available in our centre as an alternative treatment modality for patients since 2008. We present our early experience of TAVI and SAVR (surgical Aortic Valve Replacement) in high risk patients who required SAVR because TAVI could not be performed. The database for Surgical aortic valve and Transcatheter aortic valve replacement referrals was interrogated to identify relevant patients. Survival to hospital discharge was 95.5% in the forty five patients who had SAVR when TAVI was deemed technically unsuitable. One year survival was 86%. Defining who is appropriate for TAVI or high risk SAVR is challenging and multidisciplinary team discussion has never been more prudent in this field of evolving technology with ever decreasing risks of surgery. The introduction of TAVI at our institution has seen a rise in our surgical caseload by approximately by 25%. Overall, the option of aortic valve intervention is being offered to more patients in general which is a substantial benefit in the treatment of aortic valve disease.

  18. Primary Mitral Valve Regurgitation Outcome in Patients With Severe Aortic Stenosis 1 Year After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: Echocardiographic Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florentino, Thiago Marinho; Bihan, David Le; Abizaid, Alexandre Antonio Cunha; Cedro, Alexandre Vianna; Corrêa, Amably Pessoa; Santos, Alexandre Roginski Mendes Dos; Souza, Alexandre Costa; Bignoto, Tiago Costa; Sousa, José Eduardo Moraes Rego; Sousa, Amanda Guerra de Moraes Rego

    2017-07-10

    Mitral valve regurgitation (MR), present in up to 74% of the patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS), can be a negative prognostic factor when moderate or severe. The outcome of MR after percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and predictors associated with that outcome have not been well established in the literature. To assess the outcome of primary MR in patients submitted to TAVI and to identify associated factors. Observational study of patients with symptomatic severe AS submitted to TAVI from January 2009 to April 2015 at two specialized centers. Echocardiographic outcome was assessed with data collected before and 1 year after TAVI. Of the 91 patients with MR submitted to TAVI and followed up for at least 12 months, 67 (73.6%) had minimum/mild MR before the procedure and 24 (26.4%) had moderate/severe MR. Of those with minimum/mild MR, 62 (92.5%) had no change in the MR grade (p valores de EuroSCORE II (p = 0,023) e STS morbidade (p = 0,027), quando comparados aos que continuaram na mesma classe. Observou-se mudança significativa no grau de IM após realização de TAVI. Este estudo sugere uma tendência de melhora da IM moderada ou grave após TAVI, o que se associou a escores de risco pré-operatórios menos elevados.

  19. A Review of Evolutionary and Cyclical Changes in the Surgical Approach to Aortic Valve Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piciche, Marco; Dato, Guglielmo Actis; Lorusso, Roberto; Musumeci, Francesco

    2018-01-31

    Aortic valve surgery is no exception to the general rule that history is a cycle in many fields. This manuscript aims to assist readers in transitioning from past to present and on into the future within the field of aortic valve surgery. The existing literature has been examined, including old and modern articles published on pubmed, old articles non visible on pubmed, old and recent books on the history of medicine, looking for similarities and repetitions in techniques and surgical approaches to the aortic valve in the past and the current times. Steps of evolution included a blind approach, plasty procedures under direct visualization of the valve without the aid of cardiopulmonary bypass, prosthetic valve replacements via sternotomies with cardiopulmonary bypass, minimally-invasive access routes, trans-catheter aortic valve implants (TAVI), suture-less prostheses, mini-thoracotomies incorporating suture-less prostheses, and finally, totally-endoscopic aortic valve replacements. After the advent of CPB and several decades of open-heart surgery with full sternotomies, the minimally-invasive approach has re-emerged. Supported by a commitment to smaller incisions and shorter bypass times, the concept is now being aggressively developed. The cycling of science, including the field of aortic valve surgery, means that ingenious theories and concepts that have fallen by the wayside can be brought back and explored again with current tools and enhanced knowledge. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Wall Stress and Geometry of the Thoracic Aorta in Patients With Aortic Valve Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Barry J; Norman, Paul E; Hoskins, Peter R; Newby, David E; Dweck, Marc R

    2018-04-01

    Aortic valve disease increases velocity and changes the way blood enters the aorta. Over time, the biomechanical environment can cause aortic remodelling. We hypothesized that aortic geometry and wall stress would be different in patients with aortic valve disease compared with controls. We examined 40 patients with aortic sclerosis (n = 10) or mild (n = 10), moderate (n = 10), and severe (n = 10) aortic stenosis, and also 10 control individuals. The thoracic aorta of each individual was reconstructed into a three-dimensional model from computed tomography. We measured geometric variables and used finite element analysis to compute aortic wall stress. Statistical analyses were performed to test our hypothesis. Aortic wall stress was significantly associated with tortuosity of the descending aorta (r = 0.35, p = 0.01), arch radius (r = 0.49, p < 0.01), ascending aortic diameter (r = 0.59, p < 0.01), and aortic centerline length (r = 0.39, p < 0.01). Wall stress was highest in patients with severe stenosis (p = 0.02), although elevations in wall stress were also noted in those with mild stenosis (p = 0.02), and aortic sclerosis (p = 0.02) compared with controls. Similar trends were observed when we corrected for difference in blood pressure. Total centerline tortuosity was higher in patients with severe aortic stenosis than in controls (p = 0.04), as was descending aorta tortuosity (p = 0.04). Aortic geometry is associated with aortic wall stress. Patients with aortic valve disease have higher aortic wall stress than controls, and those with severe aortic stenosis have more tortuous aortas. However, increases in geometric measures and wall stress are not stepwise with increasing disease severity. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Asymptomatic Interrupted Aortic Arch, Severe Tricuspid Regurgitation, and Bicuspid Aortic Valve in a 76-Year-Old Woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajdini, Masih; Sardari, Akram; Forouzannia, Seyed Khalil; Baradaran, Abdolvahab; Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad Reza; Kassaian, Seyed Ebrahim

    2016-10-01

    Interrupted aortic arch is a rare congenital abnormality with a high infancy mortality rate. The principal finding is loss of luminal continuity between the ascending and descending portions of the aorta. Because of the high mortality rate in infancy, interrupted aortic arch is very rare among adults. In this report, we describe the case of a 76-year-old woman with asymptomatic interrupted aortic arch, severe tricuspid regurgitation, and bicuspid aortic valve. To our knowledge, she is the oldest patient ever reported with this possibly unique combination of pathologic conditions. In addition to reporting her case, we review the relevant medical literature.

  2. [The cost of innovation in treating aortic stenosis: transcatheter aortic valve implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, Simona; Saia, Francesco; Marrozzini, Cinzia; Berti, Elena; Guastaroba, Paolo; Fortuna, Daniela; Ciuca, Cristina; Moretti, Carolina; Marzocchi, Antonio; De Palma, Rossana

    2012-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) represents a promising therapeutic option for patients affected by severe aortic stenosis, but it is currently associated with high costs. Therefore, the assessment of its economic impact becomes urgent to support decision-makers' choices about its use, patient access to treatment and reimbursement mechanisms. A retrospective, observational, single-center (the teaching hospital located in Bologna, Italy) study was conducted. All patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis undergoing TAVI during the enrolment period (February 2008-August 2010) were included. The procedures were performed with both bioprostheses approved for clinical use and through different vascular access: CoreValve transfemoral (CV-TF), CoreValve transsubclavian (CV-TS), Edwards Sapien transapical (ES-TA), Edwards Sapien transfemoral (ES-TF). Costs of the whole index hospitalization have been calculated from the hospital perspective. Healthcare resource consumption was measured at patient level and assessed using unit costs (micro-costing approach). Overall, 87 consecutive patients (48 CV-TF, 12 CV-TS, 20 ES-TA, 7 ES-TF) were included in the study. They presented a high-risk profile (age 83.3 ± 5.4 years; logistic EuroSCORE 23.3 ± 12.3%) and important comorbidity. In-hospital mortality was 3.4%. Total cost of hospitalization was, on average, €35.841 (range €27.267-69.744) of which 68% was attributable to the procedure. A huge variation in costs was observed among different treatment groups. Patients treated with transfemoral implant (CV-TF: €33.977; ES-TF: €31.442) were on average less expensive than others (CV-TS: €37.035; ES-TA: €41.139). Our findings show that treating patients with TAVI places a heavy burden on hospital budget. Hence, due to the shortage of financial resources, affordability of TAVI requires further attention.

  3. Incidence, predictors and prognostic value of serious hemorrhagic complications following transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabile, Nicolas; Azmoun, Alexandre; Ghostine, Said; Ramadan, Ramzi; Haddouche, Yacine; Raoux, François; To, Ngoc-Tram; Troussier, Xavier; Nottin, Remi; Caussin, Christophe

    2013-09-20

    TAVI is an alternative solution for patients with aortic valve stenosis (AS) who are refused for conventional surgery. We sought to evaluate the incidence, characteristics, predictors and prognosis impact of serious hemorrhagic complications following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). One hundred and seventy one consecutive patients with symptomatic severe AS (83.5 ± 6.1 y; 53% women; mean EuroSCORE=22.1 ± 12.3) underwent transapical (TA) or transfemoral (TF) TAVI in our institution using Edwards SAPIEN© and Medtronic CoreValve© devices. The primary evaluated criterion was the incidence of any bleeding complication, according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium (VARC) criteria. VARC serious hemorrhagic complications occurred in 34.5% of patients (n=23 life-threatening/disabling (LT/D) and n=36 major bleedings). Most of these complications were related to access site complications (69%). Multivariable analysis revealed that TA access, low weight and underlying coronary artery diseases were independent predictors for development of serious bleeding. The mortality was significantly higher in patients with serious events compared to patients without bleeding (p=0.008, log-rank analysis). Although the survival didn't significantly differ in patients with major hemorrhagic events, subjects with LT/D bleeding events had a higher mortality than the subjects with no hemorrhagic complications (p<0.001, log-rank analysis). Occurrence of VARC LT/D event independently predicted all-cause mortality (HR=5.35 [2.51-11.43], p<0.001) during the first year following TAVI in multivariate Cox regression analysis. Severe bleeding is frequent following TAVI procedure and is mainly related to local hemorrhage. VARC LT/D events are associated with decreased survival after AS correction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Replica sizing strategy for aortic valve replacement improves haemodynamic outcome of the epic supra valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Lopez, David; Faerber, Gloria; Diab, Mahmoud; Amorim, Paulo; Zeynalov, Natig; Doenst, Torsten

    2017-10-01

    Current sizing strategies suggest valve selection based on annulus diameter despite supra-annular placement of biological prostheses potentially allowing placement of a larger size. We assessed the frequency of selecting a larger prosthesis if prosthesis size was selected using a replica (upsizing) and evaluated its impact on haemodynamics. We analysed all discharge echocardiograms between June 2012 and June 2014, where a replica sizer was used for isolated aortic valve replacement (Epic Supra: 266 patients, Trifecta: 49 patients). Upsizing was possible in 71% of the Epic Supra valves (by 1 size: 168, by 2 sizes: 20) and in 59% of the Trifectas (by 1 size: 26, by 2 sizes: 3). Patients for whom upsizing was possible had the lowest pressure gradients within their annulus size groups. The difference was significant in annulus diameters of 21-22 or 25-26 mm (Epic Supra) and 23-24 mm (Trifecta). Trifecta gradients were the lowest. However, the ability to upsize the Epic Supra by 2 sizes eliminated the differences between Epic Supra and Trifecta. Upsizing did not cause intraoperative complications. Using replica sizers for aortic prosthesis size selection allows the implantation of bigger prostheses than recommended in most cases and reduces postoperative gradients, specifically for Epic Supra. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  5. Complete Resolution of a Large Bicuspid Aortic Valve Thrombus with Anticoagulation in Primary Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayan Jo Rachwan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Native aortic valve thrombosis in primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APLS is a rare entity. We describe a 38-year-old man who presented with neurological symptoms and a cardiac murmur. Transthoracic echocardiography detected a large bicuspid aortic valve thrombus. Laboratory evaluation showed the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. Anticoagulation was started, and serial echocardiographic studies showed complete resolution of the aortic valve vegetation after 4 months. The patient improved clinically and had no residual symptoms. This report and review of the literature suggests that vegetations in APLS can be treated successfully with conservative treatment, regardless of their size.

  6. Rapidly Progrediating Aortic Valve Infective Endocarditis in an Intravenous Drug User Treated by Antibiotics and Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malkia S. Swedi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 22-year old male, a self-confessed recreational drug user who developed cardiogenic shock because of severe destruction of the aortic valve by rapidly progressive aortic valve endocarditis. The disease progression was acute; in a matter of days, the clinical manifestations were life-threatening necessitating urgent aortic valve replacement surgery. Cultivation revealed Streptococcus viridans as the microbial agent. Subsequent recovery with antibiotic treatment was without complication. This case report shows that immediately performed transoesophageal echocardiography and early consultation with a cardiac surgeon has fundamental importance in diagnosis and management of acute infective endocarditis in haemodynamically instable patients.

  7. Early identification of aortic valve sclerosis using iron oxide enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Amanda M; Rogers, Kem A; Belisle, Andre J L; Ronald, John A; Rutt, Brian K; Weissleder, Ralph; Boughner, Derek R

    2010-01-01

    To test the ability of MION-47 enhanced MRI to identify tissue macrophage infiltration in a rabbit model of aortic valve sclerosis (AVS). The aortic valves of control and cholesterol-fed New Zealand White rabbits were imaged in vivo pre- and 48 h post-intravenous administration of MION-47 using a 1.5 Tesla (T) MR clinical scanner and a CINE fSPGR sequence. MION-47 aortic valve cusps were imaged ex vivo on a 3.0T whole-body MR system with a custom gradient insert coil and a three-dimensional (3D) FIESTA sequence and compared with aortic valve cusps from control and cholesterol-fed contrast-free rabbits. Histopathological analysis was performed to determine the site of iron oxide uptake. MION-47 enhanced the visibility of both control and cholesterol-fed rabbit valves in in vivo images. Ex vivo image analysis confirmed the presence of significant signal voids in contrast-administered aortic valves. Signal voids were not observed in contrast-free valve cusps. In MION-47 administered rabbits, histopathological analysis revealed iron staining not only in fibrosal macrophages of cholesterol-fed valves but also in myofibroblasts from control and cholesterol-fed valves. Although iron oxide labeling of macrophage infiltration in AVS has the potential to detect the disease process early, a macrophage-specific iron compound rather than passive targeting may be required. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation using anatomically oriented, marrow stromal cell-based, stented, tissue-engineered heart valves: technical considerations and implications for translational cell-based heart valve concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmert, Maximilian Y; Weber, Benedikt; Behr, Luc; Sammut, Sebastien; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Wolint, Petra; Scherman, Jacques; Bettex, Dominique; Grünenfelder, Jürg; Falk, Volkmar; Hoerstrup, Simon P

    2014-01-01

    While transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has rapidly evolved for the treatment of aortic valve disease, the currently used bioprostheses are prone to continuous calcific degeneration. Thus, autologous, cell-based, living, tissue-engineered heart valves (TEHVs) with regeneration potential have been suggested to overcome these limitations. We investigate the technical feasibility of combining the concept of TEHV with transapical implantation technology using a state-of-the-art transcatheter delivery system facilitating the exact anatomical position in the systemic circulation. Trileaflet TEHVs fabricated from biodegradable synthetic scaffolds were sewn onto self-expanding Nitinol stents seeded with autologous marrow stromal cells, crimped and transapically delivered into the orthotopic aortic valve position of adult sheep (n = 4) using the JenaValve transapical TAVI System (JenaValve, Munich, Germany). Delivery, positioning and functionality were assessed by angiography and echocardiography before the TEHV underwent post-mortem gross examination. For three-dimensional reconstruction of the stent position of the anatomically oriented system, a computed tomography analysis was performed post-mortem. Anatomically oriented, transapical delivery of marrow stromal cell-based TEHV into the orthotopic aortic valve position was successful in all animals (n = 4), with a duration from cell harvest to TEHV implantation of 101 ± 6 min. Fluoroscopy and echocardiography displayed sufficient positioning, thereby entirely excluding the native leaflets. There were no signs of coronary obstruction. All TEHV tolerated the loading pressure of the systemic circulation and no acute ruptures occurred. Animals displayed intact and mobile leaflets with an adequate functionality. The mean transvalvular gradient was 7.8 ± 0.9 mmHg, and the mean effective orifice area was 1.73 ± 0.02 cm(2). Paravalvular leakage was present in two animals, and central aortic regurgitation due to a

  9. Asymptomatic papillary fibroelastoma of the Aortic valve in a young woman - a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitsis Antonis

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Echocardiography represents an invaluable diagnostic tool for the detection of intracardiac masses while simultaneously provides information about their size, location, mobility and attachment site as well as the presence and extent of any consequent hemodynamic derangement. A 29-year-old asymptomatic young woman with incidental transthoracic echocardiographic (TTE discovery of an aortic valve mass is presented. The 2-dimensional TTE showed a mobile, pedunculated mass, attached by a thin stalk to the aortic surface of the right coronary aortic cusp at the junction of its base with the anterior aortic wall. The importance of valve sparing tumour resection even in asymptomatic patients is emphasised.

  10. MDCT evaluation of aortic root and aortic valve prior to TAVI. What is the optimal imaging time point in the cardiac cycle?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurencak, T.; Turek, J.; Kietselaer, B.L.; Mihl, C.; Kok, M. de; Ommen, V.G. van; Garsse, L.A. van; Nijssen, E.C.; Wildberger, J.E.; Das, M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the optimal imaging time point for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) therapy planning by comprehensive evaluation of the aortic root. METHODS: Multidetector-row CT (MDCT) examination with retrospective ECG gating was retrospectively performed in 64 consecutive

  11. Bicuspid aortic valve demonstrated with multislice computed tomography - a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marzec, M.; Lasek, W.; Serafin, Z.; Laskowska, K.; Swiatkiewicz, I.; Kubica, J.

    2004-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is one of the most common congenital heart defects and often coexists with other congenital abnormalities of the heart and great vessels. A standard diagnostic technique for valve imaging is echocardiography. However, suboptimal images may cause a diagnostic problem, especially in obese patients, women and in case of significant valve calcifications. The paper reports a case of a 27-year-old male patient with recurrent chest pain, appearing regardless of exertion. Routine physical examination, laboratory tests and echocardiography were negative. Multislice computed tomography (MSCT) showed normal coronary arteries and bicuspid aortic valve. The diagnostics of bicuspid aortic valve and the diagnostic value of MSCT are discussed. MSCT seems to be an important point in cardiac diagnostic algorithms, being an alternative modality for MR in BAV imaging. The presented case emphasizes the potential of MSCT for the diagnostics of cardiac valve congenital diseases. (author)

  12. Quality of life after aortic valve replacement with biological prostheses in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Demidov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The paper aims to assess the quality of life of patients subjected to aortic valve replacement with a stented/stentless biological prosthesis. Methods. The research was done at the Acquired Heart Disease Department of Meshalkin National Medical Research Center. The inclusion criteria were patient age older than 65 years and severe stenosis of the aortic valve. 114 patients were randomized 1:1 in two groups: group I patients received stentless biological prostheses, while group II patients — stented xenopericardial ones. All patients underwent aortic valve replacement under normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass. Mean follow-up was 3.9 [2.77; 4.55] years, mean age 71.5±4 (65–84 years, mean left ventricle ejection fraction 65.5 (40–86 % and mean preoperative Log.Euroscore 5.4±1.3 (1.4–12.4. The quality of life was assessed by using a standard questionnaire SF-36.Results. Peak transprosthetic gradients at 1-year follow-up amounted to 16.22±4.34 and 24.66±4.74 mm Hg for group I and group II respectively. The 5-year survival rate was 90 [81; 99] % and 96 [90; 100] % for the two groups respectively and did not differ statistically (log rank test, p = 0.226. A statistically significant improvement of quality of life among patients in both groups was observed at 1-year follow-up, as compared to the preoperative values, however, marked intergroup differences in any of the parameters were not recorded.Conclusion. The quality of life after aortic valve replacement with stented and stentless biological prostheses in elderly patients confirms clinical and functional efficiency of both methods, does not show sound advantages of any of them and improves both the physical component of health and subjective emotional level.Received 25 July 2017. Revised 18 August 2017. Accepted 28 August 2017.Funding: The study was carried out with the support of a grant of the President of the Russian Federation (МД–6967.2016.7 created to provide government

  13. Aortic valve biomechanics during LVAD support: Implementation in a bioreactor design and preliminary testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Madiha

    Although Left Ventricle Assist Device (LVAD) support has enhanced the quality of life for many heart failure patients, its prolonged in-vivo implantation causes change in hemodynamics and biomechanics of the aortic heart valve eventually leading to development of aortic insufficiency (AI). The LVAD decreases pressure in the left ventricle, leading to high transvalvular pressure and reduced aortic valve opening. Our hypothesis is that the increased pressure leads to increased mechanical stretch in the aortic valve leaflets, inducing a cascade of responses that ultimately result in local tissue fibrosis and AI. The goal of this study is to investigate the mechanism behind this hypothesis using the methods of tissue engineering. A bioreactor has been built that imparts cyclic stretch and flow to small 3-D constructs of living cells cultured in a silicone membrane. The approach is to use this device for in vitro tissue culture of vascular interstitial cells (VICs) embedded in a collagen gel, which will be subjected to normal and altered stretch and shear representative of the in vivo valve biomechanics. The bioreactor was validated to measure the amount of stretch and shear it can impart to closely replicate in-vivo conditions using PIV technique and ImageJ software. Mean longitudinal strain of 0.037cm (SD= +/-0.013cm) was recorded with mean perpendicular strain being 0.0046cm (SD= +/-0.0169cm). Measured average shear stress imparted at 100ml/min was 2.735 dynes/cm2 (SD= +/-2.25 dynes/cm2) with 6.21 dynes/cm2 (SD= +/-3.35 dynes/cm2) at 200ml/min. The cells that underwent cycles of stretch and shear in the bioreactor were screened for formation of myofibroblast using techniques of immunohistochemistry. The marker used was ? smooth muscle actin (SMA) which identifies pathological differentiation of the CPCs to myofibroblast. Yhe expression of the myofibroblast phenotype is a feature of valvupathy. In case of Shear Vs Static control, the mean value for SMA expression for

  14. Stent and leaflet stresses in a 26-mm first-generation balloon-expandable transcatheter aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Yue; Krishnan, Kapil; Ye, Jian; Dvir, Danny; Guccione, Julius M; Ge, Liang; Tseng, Elaine E

    2017-05-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement is established therapy for high-risk and inoperable patients with severe aortic stenosis, but questions remain regarding long-term durability. Valve design influences durability. Increased leaflet stresses in surgical bioprostheses have been correlated with degeneration; however, transcatheter valve leaflet stresses are unknown. From 2007 to 2014, a majority of US patients received first-generation balloon-expandable transcatheter valves. Our goal was to determine stent and leaflet stresses in this valve design using finite element analyses. A 26-mm Sapien Transcatheter Heart Valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Inc, Irvine, Calif) underwent high-resolution microcomputed tomography scanning to develop precise 3-dimensional geometry of the leaflets, the stent, and the polyethylene terephthalate elements. The stent was modeled using 3-dimensional elements and the leaflets were modeled using shell elements. Stent material properties were based on stainless steel, whereas those for leaflets were obtained from surgical bioprostheses. Noncylindrical Sapien valve geometry was also simulated. Pressure loading to 80 mm Hg and 120 mm Hg was performed using ABAQUS finite element software (Dassault Systèmes, Waltham, Mass). At 80 mm Hg, maximum principal stresses on Sapien leaflets were 1.31 megaspascals (MPa). Peak leaflet stress was observed at commissural tips where leaflets connected to the stent. Maximum principal stresses for the stent were 188.91 MPa and located at stent tips where leaflet commissures were attached. Noncylindrical geometry increased peak principal leaflet stresses by 16%. Using exact geometry from high-resolution scans, the 26-mm Sapien Transcatheter Heart Valve showed that peak stresses for both stent and leaflets were present at commissural tips where leaflets were attached. These regions would be prone to leaflet degeneration. Understanding stresses in first-generation transcatheter valves allows comparison to

  15. Association of Aortic Valve Sclerosis with Previous Coronary Artery Disease and Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Carvalho Marmelo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aortic valve sclerosis (AVS is characterized by increased thickness, calcification and stiffness of the aortic leaflets without fusion of the commissures. Several studies show an association between AVS and presence of coronary artery disease. Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate the association between presence of AVS with occurrence of previous coronary artery disease and classical risk factors. Methods: The sample was composed of 2,493 individuals who underwent transthoracic echocardiography between August 2011 and December 2012. The mean age of the cohort was 67.5 ± 15.9 years, and 50.7% were female. Results: The most frequent clinical indication for Doppler echocardiography was the presence of stroke (28.8%, and the most common risk factor was hypertension (60.8%. The most prevalent pathological findings on Doppler echocardiography were mitral valve sclerosis (37.1% and AVS (36.7%. There was a statistically significant association between AVS with hypertension (p < 0.001, myocardial infarction (p = 0.007, diabetes (p = 0.006 and compromised left ventricular systolic function (p < 0.001. Conclusion: Patients with AVS have higher prevalences of hypertension, stroke, hypercholesterolemia, myocardial infarction, diabetes and compromised left ventricular systolic function when compared with patients without AVS. We conclude that there is an association between presence of AVS with previous coronary artery disease and classical risk factors.

  16. Del Nido cardioplegia in the setting of minimally invasive aortic valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vistarini, Nicola; Laliberté, Eric; Beauchamp, Philippe; Bouhout, Ismail; Lamarche, Yoan; Cartier, Raymond; Carrier, Michel; Perrault, Louis; Bouchard, Denis; El-Hamamsy, Ismaïl; Pellerin, Michel; Demers, Philippe

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to report our experience with del Nido cardioplegia (DNC) in the setting of minimally invasive aortic valve surgery. Forty-six consecutive patients underwent minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (AVR) through a "J" ministernotomy: twenty-five patients received the DNC (Group 1) and 21 patients received standard blood cardioplegia (SBC) (Group 2). The rate of ventricular fibrillation at unclamping was significantly lower in the DNC group (12% vs 52%, p=0.004), as well as postoperative creatinine kinase-MB (CK-MB) values (11.4±5.2 vs 17.7±6.9 µg/L, p=0.004). There were no deaths, myocardial infarctions or major complications in either group. Less postoperative use of intravenous insulin (28% vs 81%, pDNC group. In conclusion, the DNC is easy to use and safe during minimally invasive AVR, providing a myocardial protection at least equivalent to our SBC, improved surgical efficiency, minimal cost and less blood glucose perturbations.

  17. Predominance of Abdominal Visceral Adipose Tissue Reflects the Presence of Aortic Valve Calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, Masayoshi; Owada, Takashi; Yamauchi, Hiroyuki; Misaka, Tomofumi; Machii, Hirofumi; Yamaki, Takayoshi; Sugimoto, Koichi; Kunii, Hiroyuki; Nakazato, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Saitoh, Shu-Ichi; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2016-01-01

    Background. Aortic valve calcification (AVC) is a common feature of aging and is related to coronary artery disease. Although abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT) plays fundamental roles in coronary artery disease, the relationship between abdominal VAT and AVC is not fully understood. Methods. We investigated 259 patients who underwent cardiac and abdominal computed tomography (CT). AVC was defined as calcified lesion on the aortic valve by CT. %abdominal VAT was calculated as abdominal VAT area/total adipose tissue area. Results. AVC was detected in 75 patients, and these patients showed higher %abdominal VAT (44% versus 38%, p AVC. When the cutoff value of %abdominal VAT was set at 40.9%, the area under the curve to diagnose AVC was 0.626. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that age (OR 1.120, 95% CI 1.078-1.168, p AVC. The net reclassification improvement value for detecting AVC was increased when %abdominal VAT was added to the model: 0.5093 (95% CI 0.2489-0.7697, p AVC.

  18. Cardiac high-energy phosphate metabolism in patients with aortic valve disease assessed by 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, S; Horn, M; Pabst, T; Harre, K; Strömer, H; Bertsch, G; Sandstede, J; Ertl, G; Hahn, D; Kochsiek, K

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the clinical and hemodynamic correlates of alterations in cardiac high-energy phosphate metabolism in patients with aortic stenosis and with aortic incompetence. Fourteen volunteers, 13 patients with aortic stenosis, and 9 patients with aortic incompetence were included. Patients underwent echocardiography and left and right heart catheterization. 31P-MR spectra from the anterior myocardium were obtained with a 1.5 Tesla clinical MR system. Aortic stenosis and aortic incompetence patients had similar New York Heart Association (NYHA) classes (2.77 +/- 0.12 vs 2.44 +/- 0.18), ejection fractions (normal), left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic pressures, and LV wall thickness. In volunteers, phosphocreatine/adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratios were 2.02 +/- 0.11. For all patients, phosphocreatine/ATP was significantly reduced (1.64 +/- 0.09; *p = 0.011 vs volunteers). Phosphocreatine/ATP decreased to 1.55 +/- 0.12 (*p = 0.008) in aortic stenosis, while in aortic incompetence, phosphocreatine/ATP only showed a trend for a reduction (1.77 +/- 0.12; p = 0.148). For all patients, phosphocreatine/ATP decreased significantly only with NYHA class III (1.51 +/- 0.09; *p = 0.001), but not with NYHA classes I and II (phosphocreatine/ATP 1.86 +/- 0.18). In aortic stenosis, phosphocreatine/ATP ratios decreased (1.13 +/- 0.03; *p = 0.019) only when LV end-diastolic pressures were > 15 mm Hg or when LV diastolic wall stress was > 20 kdyne cm-2 (1.13 +/- 0.03; *p = 0.024). For a similar clinical degree of heart failure in human myocardium, volume overload hypertrophy does not, but pressure overload does, induce significant impairment of cardiac high-energy phosphate metabolism. In aortic valve disease, alterations of high-energy phosphate metabolism are related to the degree of heart failure.

  19. Calcium Scoring of Aortic Valve Calcification in Aortic Valve Stenosis with a Multislice Computed Tomography Scanner: Non-enhanced versus Contrast-enhanced Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehlenbruch, G.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Previous studies have shown a positive correlation between amount of aortic valve calcification (AVC) and degree of aortic valve stenosis (AVS). We have investigated whether calcium scoring of AVC from contrast-enhanced images is reliable. Material and Methods: Nineteen patients with suspected AVS underwent retrospectively ECG-gated multislice computed tomography (MSCT). Standardized scan protocols were applied prior to (120 KV, 133 mAseff) and after (120 KV, 500 mAseff) the administration of non-ionic contrast material. Image reconstruction was performed at 60% of the RR interval (slice thickness 3 mm, reconstruction increment 2 mm). AVC was quantified using Agatston score and calcium mass. The number of lesions was calculated. All non-enhanced images were scored using thresholds of 130 HU and 350 HU. Contrast-enhanced images were assessed with a threshold of 350 HU exclusively. Results: Fifteen patients with AVCs were included in the statistical analysis. The mean Agatston score (calcium mass) in non-enhanced images was 2888.4±2844.4 (694.2 mg±869.3 mg). Altering the threshold from 130 HU to 350 HU led to a 58.2% (30.5%) decrease in the AVC score ( P values <0.001). Contrast-enhanced images showed an increased Agatston score (calcium mass) of 56.2% (33.5%) compared to non-enhanced images ( P values <0.05) with the same threshold of 350 HU. Conclusion: Quantification of AVC from contrast-enhanced images is not reliable, as contrast material simulates calcification

  20. The JUPITER registry: 1-year results of transapical aortic valve implantation using a second-generation transcatheter heart valve in patients with aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silaschi, Miriam; Treede, Hendrik; Rastan, Ardawan J; Baumbach, Hardy; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Kappert, Utz; Eichinger, Walter; Rüter, Florian; de Kroon, Thomas L; Lange, Rüdiger; Ensminger, Stephan; Wendler, Olaf

    2016-11-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an established therapy for patients with aortic stenosis (AS) at high surgical risk. The JenaValve™ is a second-generation, self-expanding transcatheter heart valve (THV), implanted through transapical access (TA). During stent deployment, a specific 'clipping-mechanism' engages native aortic valve cusps for fixation. We present 1-year outcomes of the JUPITER registry, a post-market registry of the JenaValve for TA-TAVR. The JUPITER registry is a prospective, multicentre, uncontrolled and observational European study to evaluate the long-term safety and effectiveness of the Conformité Européenne-marked JenaValve THV. A total of 180 patients with AS were enrolled between 2012 and 2014. End-points were adjudicated in accordance with the valve academic research consortium document no. 1 definitions. The mean age was 80.4 ± 5.9 years and the mean logistic European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation I 21.2 ± 14.7%. The procedure was successful in 95.0% (171/180), implantation of a second THV (valve-in-valve) was performed in 2.2% (4/180) and conversion to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) was necessary in 2.8% (5/180). No annular rupture or coronary ostia obstruction occurred. Two patients required SAVR after the day of index procedure (1.1%). All-cause mortality at 30 days was 11.1% (20/180), being cardiovascular in 7.2% (13/180). A major stroke occurred in 1.1% (2/180) at 30 days, no additional major strokes were observed during 1 year. All-cause mortality after 30 days was 13.1% (21/160) and combined efficacy at 1 year was 80.8% (122/151). At 1-year follow-up, no patient presented with more than moderate paravalvular leakage, while 2 patients (3.2%) showed moderate, 12 (19.0%) mild and 49 (82.4%) trace/none paravalvular regurgitation. In a high-risk cohort of patients undergoing TA-TAVR for AS, the use of the JenaValve THV is safe and effective. In patients at higher risk for coronary ostia

  1. Aortic root surgery in Marfan syndrome: Bentall procedure with the composite mechanical valved conduit versus aortic valve reimplantation with Valsalva graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Paolo; Pellegrino, Antonio; Versaci, Francesco; Mantione, Ludmilla; Polisca, Patrizio; Iorio, Fiore S; Chiariello, Luigi

    2010-09-01

    The aim of the study is to compare mid-term results of Bentall aortic root replacement with composite mechanical valved conduit and aortic valve reimplantation procedure using the Valsalva graft for the treatment of aortic root aneurysm in patients with Marfan syndrome. We retrospectively compared data of 23 patients (mean age 38 + or - 14 years) who had undergone the Bentall procedure (group B) to those of 24 patients (mean age 36 + or - 12 years) who had undergone aortic valve reimplantation (group R) during a 14-year period. Follow-up (mean duration 65 + or - 44 months) was 100% complete. There were no operative deaths in either group. In group B, as compared with group R, preoperative aortic insufficiency (3.2 + or - 1.1/4 vs. 1.7 + or - 1.4/4, P Marfan patients, the Bentall procedure is associated with excellent mid-term outcome. The reimplantation technique, adopted for less dilated aortas, provides similarly satisfactory results. The Valsalva graft seems, with time, to allow a stable aortic valve function.

  2. Atrioventricular Conduction Changes After CoreValve Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Aguilera, José; Segura Saint-Gerons, José María; Mazuelos Bellido, Francisco; Suárez de Lezo, Javier; Ojeda Pineda, Soledad; Pan Álvarez-Ossorio, Manuel; Romero Moreno, Miguel Ángel; Pavlovic, Djordje; Espejo Pérez, Simona; Suárez de Lezo, José

    2016-01-01

    Conduction disturbances often occur after CoreValve transcatheter aortic valve implantation. The aim was to analyze which cardiac conduction changes occur in patients with aortic stenosis treated with this type of prosthesis. A total of 181 patients with severe aortic stenosis treated with this prosthesis and studied by electrocardiography between April 2008 and December 2013 were selected. A subgroup of 137 (75.7%) consecutive patients was studied by intracardiac electrocardiogram before and after prosthesis implantation. The primary endpoint of the study was the need for a permanent pacemaker within 72 hours after prosthesis implantation. Numerous variables to predict this possibility were analyzed. Following implantation, PR and QRS intervals were increased from 173±47 ms to 190±52ms (P < .01) and from 98±22ms to 129±24 ms (P < .01), whereas the A-H and H-V intervals were prolonged from 95±39ms to 108±41ms (P < .01) and from 54±10ms to 66±23ms (P < .01). A total of 89 (49%) patients had new-onset left bundle-branch block, and 33 (25%) required a pacemaker within the first 72hours. The independent predictors for a pacemaker were baseline right bundle-branch block and prosthetic depth. Intracardiac intervals had no predictive value. In addition, 13 patients required a pacemaker after 72 hours. CoreValve prosthesis implantation has a high incidence of conduction disturbance, with left bundle-branch block being the most common. A total of 25% of patients required a permanent pacemaker. The need for a pacemaker was related to baseline right bundle-branch block and prosthetic depth. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of the prosthesis-patient mismatch on long-term clinical outcomes after isolated aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Soonchang; Yi, Gijong; Youn, Young-Nam; Lee, Sak; Yoo, Kyung-Jong; Chang, Byung-Chul

    2013-11-01

    The effect of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) on clinical outcomes after aortic valve replacement remains controversial. We evaluated effect of PPM on long-term clinical outcomes after isolated aortic valve replacement in patients with predominant aortic stenosis. We analyzed data from patients with predominant aortic stenosis who underwent isolated aortic valve replacement between January 1995 and July 2010. The indexed effective orifice area, obtained by dividing the in vivo effective orifice area by the patient's body surface area, was used to define PPM as clinically nonsignificant (group I, 224 patients), mild (group II, 52 patients), moderate (group III, 39 patients), and severe (group IV, 36 patients). Early survival was not significantly different among the groups, but overall survival was decreased gradually in group IV. Overall survival at 12 years was lower in group IV than in group I (92.8% ± 2.7% vs 67.0 ± 10.1, respectively; P = .001). Cardiac-related-death-free survival at 12 years was lower in patients with severe PPM. Left ventricular mass index decreased during the follow-up period in all groups. But left ventricular mass index was less decreased in group IV compared with groups I, II, and III. Age, severe PPM, and ejection fraction <40%, and New York Heart Association Functional Class IV were independent risk factors of overall survival on multivariate analysis. Severe PPM was an independent risk factor for cardiac-related death. Severe PPM showed an adverse effect on long-term survival, and was an independent risk factor for cardiac-related death. In addition, patients with severe PPM showed less decreasing left ventricular mass index during follow-up. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Predictors of Paravalvular Regurgitation After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation for Aortic Stenosis Using New-Generation Balloon-Expandable SAPIEN 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Hidehiro; Hoelschermann, Frank; Tambor, Grit; Yoon, Sung-Han; Neuss, Michael; Butter, Christian

    2017-02-15

    Paravalvular regurgitation (PVR) is a common and serious complication after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). New-generation balloon-expandable SAPIEN 3 has an outer sealing skirt to minimize PVR. However, the predictors of PVR after SAPIEN 3 transcatheter heart valve (THV) implantation have not been well investigated. We sought to clarify the determinants of PVR after TAVI using SAPIEN 3 with quantitative multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) assessment. This study analyzed 281 patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who underwent TAVI using SAPIEN 3. Quantitative assessment of aortic root dimensions and calcium volume for leaflet, annulus, and left ventricular outflow tract were retrospectively performed with MDCT. MDCT nominal area oversizing was calculated using the following formula: % oversizing = (THV nominal area/MDCT derived annular area - 1) × 100. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the predictors of PVR greater than or equal to mild. PVR greater than or equal to mild was observed in 19% (53 of 281). Quantity and asymmetry of aortic valve calcium of annulus, left ventricular outflow tract, and leaflet were associated with higher incidence of PVR greater than or equal to mild, except leaflet asymmetry. Lower percentage of THV oversizing was also associated with PVR. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that larger calcification volume of annulus and lower percentage of THV oversizing were independent predictors of PVR greater than or equal to mild. These results suggest that prosthesis/annulus incongruence and aortic annulus calcification predicted PVR greater than or equal to mild after TAVI using SAPIEN 3. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Echocardiographic aortic valve calcification and outcomes in women and men with aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomassen, Henrik K; Cioffi, Giovanni; Gerdts, Eva; Einarsen, Eigir; Midtbø, Helga Bergljot; Mancusi, Costantino; Cramariuc, Dana

    2017-10-01

    Sex differences in risk factors of aortic valve calcification (AVC) by echocardiography have not been reported from a large prospective study in aortic stenosis (AS). AVC was assessed using a prognostically validated visual score and grouped into none/mild or moderate/severe AVC in 1725 men and women with asymptomatic AS in the Simvastatin Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study. The severity of AS was assessed by the energy loss index (ELI) taking pressure recovery in the aortic root into account. More men than women had moderate/severe AVC at baseline despite less severe AS by ELI (pAVC at baseline was independently associated with lower aortic compliance and more severe AS in both sexes, and with increased high-sensitive C reactive protein (hs-CRP) only in men (all pAVC at baseline was associated with a 2.5-fold (95% CI 1.64 to 3.80) higher hazard rate of major cardiovascular events in women, and a 2.2-fold higher hazard rate in men (95% CI 1.54 to 3.17) (both pAVC at baseline also predicted a 1.8-fold higher hazard rate of all-cause mortality in men (95% CI 1.04 to 3.06, pAVC scored by echocardiography has sex-specific characteristics in AS. Moderate/severe AVC is associated with higher cardiovascular morbidity in both sexes, and with higher all-cause mortality in men. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00092677. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Gallium-SPECT in the detection of prosthetic valve endocarditis and aortic ring abscess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, K.; Barnes, D.; Martin, R.H.; Rae, J.R. (Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Victoria General Hospital Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada))

    1991-09-01

    A 52-yr-old man who had a bioprosthetic aortic valve developed Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Despite antibiotic therapy he had persistent pyrexia and developed new conduction system disturbances. Echocardiography did not demonstrate vegetations on the valve or an abscess, but gallium scintigraphy using SPECT clearly identified a focus of intense activity in the region of the aortic valve. The presence of valvular vegetations and a septal abscess was confirmed at autopsy. Gallium scintigraphy, using SPECT, provided a useful noninvasive method for the demonstration of endocarditis and the associated valve ring abscess.

  7. Gallium-SPECT in the detection of prosthetic valve endocarditis and aortic ring abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, K.; Barnes, D.; Martin, R.H.; Rae, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    A 52-yr-old man who had a bioprosthetic aortic valve developed Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Despite antibiotic therapy he had persistent pyrexia and developed new conduction system disturbances. Echocardiography did not demonstrate vegetations on the valve or an abscess, but gallium scintigraphy using SPECT clearly identified a focus of intense activity in the region of the aortic valve. The presence of valvular vegetations and a septal abscess was confirmed at autopsy. Gallium scintigraphy, using SPECT, provided a useful noninvasive method for the demonstration of endocarditis and the associated valve ring abscess

  8. Supra-annular Valve-in-Valve implantation reduces blood stasis on the transcatheter aortic valve leaflets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Azadani, Ali N

    2017-06-14

    Leaflet thrombosis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) and Valve-in-Valve (ViV) procedures has been increasingly recognized. This study aimed to investigate the effect of positioning of the transcatheter aortic valve (TAV) in ViV setting on the flow dynamics aspect of post-ViV thrombosis by quantifying the blood stasis in the intra-annular and supra-annular settings. To that end, two idealized computational models, representing ViV intra-annular and supra-annular positioning of a TAV were developed in a patient-specific geometry. Three-dimensional flow fields were then obtained via fluid-solid interaction modeling to study the difference in blood residence time (BRT) on the TAV leaflets in the two settings. At the end of diastole, a strip of high BRT (⩾1.2s) region was observed on the TAV leaflets in the ViV intra-annular positioning at the fixed boundary where the leaflets are attached to the frame. Such a high BRT region was absent on the TAV leaflets in the supra-annular positioning. The maximum value of BRT on the surface of non-, right, and left coronary leaflets of the TAV in the supra-annular positioning were 53%, 11%, and 27% smaller compared to the intra-annular positioning, respectively. It was concluded that the geometric confinement of TAV by the leaflets of the failed bioprosthetic valve in ViV intra-annular positioning increases the BRT on the leaflets and may act as a permissive factor in valvular thrombosis. The absence of such a geometric confinement in the ViV supra-annular positioning leads to smaller BRT and subsequently less likelihood of leaflet thrombosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Quality of Life After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Prospective Data From GARY (German Aortic Valve Registry).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Rüdiger; Beckmann, Andreas; Neumann, Till; Krane, Markus; Deutsch, Marcus-André; Landwehr, Sandra; Kötting, Joachim; Welz, Armin; Zahn, Ralf; Cremer, Jochen; Figulla, Hans R; Schuler, Gerhard; Holzhey, David M; Funkat, Anne-Kathrin; Heusch, Gerd; Sack, Stefan; Pasic, Miralem; Meinertz, Thomas; Walther, Thomas; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Böhm, Michael; Möllmann, Helge; Hamm, Christian W; Mohr, Friedrich W

    2016-12-26

    This study sought to analyze health-related quality-of-life (HrQoL) outcomes of patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) based on data from GARY (German Aortic Valve Registry). Typically, patients currently referred for and treated by TAVR are elderly with a concomitant variable spectrum of multiple comorbidities, disabilities, and limited life expectancy. Beyond mortality and morbidity, the assessment of HrQoL is of paramount importance not only to guide patient-centered clinical decision-making but also to judge this new treatment modality in this high-risk patient population. In 2011, 3,875 patients undergoing TAVR were included in the GARY registry. HrQoL was prospectively measured using the EuroQol 5 dimensions questionnaire self-complete version on paper at baseline and 1 year. Complete follow-up EuroQol 5 dimensions questionnaire evaluation was available for 2,288 patients (transvascular transcatheter aortic valve replacement [TAVR-TV]: n = 1,626 and transapical TAVR [TAVR-TA]: n = 662). In-hospital mortality was 5.9% (n = 229) and the 1-year mortality was 23% (n = 893). The baseline visual analog scale score for general health status was 52.6% for TAVR-TV and 55.8% for TAVR-TA and, in parallel to an improvement in New York Heart Association functional class, improved to 59.6% and 58.5% at 1 year, respectively (p regression analysis several pre- and post-operative factors were predictive for less pronounced HrQoL benefits. TAVR treatment led to improvements in HrQoL, especially in terms of mobility and usual activities. The magnitude of improvements was higher in the TAVR-TV group as compared to the TAVR-TA group. However, there was a sizable group of patients who did not derive any HrQoL benefits. Several independent pre- and post-operative factors were identified being predictive for less pronounced HrQoL benefits. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Management of small aortic annulus in the era of sutureless valves: A comparative study among different biological options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoneim, Aly; Bouhout, Ismail; Demers, Philippe; Mazine, Amine; Francispillai, Mary; El-Hamamsy, Ismail; Carrier, Michel; Lamarche, Yoan; Bouchard, Denis

    2016-10-01

    Aortic valve replacement (AVR) in patients with a small aortic annulus is a challenging problem. The objective of this study was to compare 4 surgical approaches in terms of hemodynamics and perioperative outcomes. A retrospective single-center study included 351 consecutive patients with a small aortic annulus (≤21 mm) who underwent aortic valve surgery between January 2007 and December 2014. Surgical techniques included standard AVR in 259 (74%) patients, aortic root enlargement in 20 (6%), implantation of a stentless bioprosthesis in 23 (6%), and sutureless AVR in 49 (13%). Three hundred and eleven (89%) patients were female. The mean Logistic EuroSCORE II varied significantly among the groups and ranged from 6.5% ± 5.4% in the standard AVR group to 9.2% ± 4.7% in the stentless group. Early mortality occurred in 26 (7%) patients. Patients in the stentless group had the lowest aortic valve mean gradients on predischarge transthoracic echocardiography (10.9 ± 6.2 mm Hg; P < .001). In the stented group, the Trifecta prosthesis displayed the lowest postoperative mean transaortic gradient (10.3 ± 3.6; P < .001) with no severe prosthesis-patient mismatch. Postoperative gradients of the sutureless group were comparable with stented prostheses. In our study, stentless AVR and Trifecta bioprostheses had the best hemodynamic outcomes. The Perceval sutureless prosthesis provides reasonable hemodynamic performance and is a safe alternative. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 16-Detector row computed tomographic coronary angiography in patients undergoing evaluation for aortic valve replacement: comparison with catheter angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manghat, N.E.; Morgan-Hughes, G.J.; Broadley, A.J.; Undy, M.B.; Wright, D.; Marshall, A.J.; Roobottom, C.A.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of 16-detector row computed tomography (CT) in assessing haemodynamically significant coronary artery stenoses in patients under evaluation for aortic stenosis pre-aortic valve replacement. Subjects and methods: Forty consecutive patients under evaluation for severe aortic stenosis and listed for cardiac catheterization before potential aortic valve replacement underwent coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring and retrospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated multi-detector row computed tomographic coronary angiography (MDCTA) using a GE Lightspeed 16-detector row CT within 1 month of invasive coronary angiography (ICA) for comparative purposes. All 13 major coronary artery segments of the American Heart Association model were evaluated for the presence of ≥50% stenosis and compared to the reference standard. Data were analysed on a segment-by-segment basis and also in 'whole patient' terms. Results: A total of 412/450 segments from 35 patients were suitable for analysis. The overall accuracy of MDCTA for detection of segments with ≥50% stenosis was high, with a sensitivity of 81.3%, specificity 95.0%, positive predictive value (PPV) 57.8%, and negative predictive value (NPV) 98.4%. On a 'whole-patient' basis, 100% (19/19) of patients with significant coronary disease were correctly identified and there were no false-negatives. Excluding patients with CAC >1000 from the analysis improved the accuracy of MDCTA to: sensitivity 90%, specificity 98.1%, PPV 60%, NPV 99.7%. Conclusion: Non-invasive 16-detector row MDCTA accurately excludes significant coronary disease in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing evaluation before aortic valve replacement and in whom ICA can therefore be avoided. Its segment-by-segment accuracy is improved further if CAC > 1000 is used as a gatekeeper to MDCTA

  12. Technique and Patient Selection Criteria of Right Anterior Mini-Thoracotomy for Minimal Access Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Reza; Leprince, Pascal; Gassmann, Max; Jamshidi, Peiman; Yamani, Nassrin; Amour, Julien; Lebreton, Guillaume

    2018-03-26

    Aortic valve stenosis has become the most prevalent valvular heart disease in developed countries, and is due to the aging of these populations. The incidence of the pathology increases with growing age after 65 years. Conventional surgical aortic valve replacement through median sternotomy has been the gold standard of patient care for symptomatic aortic valve stenosis. However, as the risk profile of patients worsens, other therapeutic strategies have been introduced in an attempt to maintain the excellent results obtained by the established surgical treatment. One of these approaches is represented by transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Although the outcomes of high-risk patients undergoing treatment for symptomatic aortic valve stenosis have improved with transcatheter aortic valve replacement, many patients with this condition remain candidates for surgical aortic valve replacement. In order to reduce the surgical trauma in patients who are candidates for surgical aortic valve replacement, minimally invasive approaches have garnered interest during the past decade. Since the introduction of right anterior thoracotomy for aortic valve replacement in 1993, right anterior mini-thoracotomy and upper hemi-sternotomy have become the predominant incisional approaches among cardiac surgeons performing minimal access aortic valve replacement. Beside the location of the incision, the arterial cannulation site represents the second major landmark of minimal access techniques for aortic valve replacement. The two most frequently used arterial cannulation sites include central aortic and peripheral femoral approaches. With the purpose of reducing surgical trauma in these patients, we have opted for a right anterior mini-thoracotomy approach with a central aortic cannulation site. This protocol describes in detail a technique for minimally invasive aortic valve replacement and provides recommendations for patient selection criteria, including cardiac computer

  13. Differences in performance of five types of aortic valve prostheses: haemodynamic assessment by dobutamine stress echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Jeffrey P; Davies, Joan E; Ang, Keng Leong; Galiñanes, Manuel; Chin, Derek T

    2013-01-01

    In patients being considered for aortic valve replacement, there remains controversy over which design or tissue offers the best performance. We aimed to evaluate in a single study the haemodynamic performances of five different widely used aortic valve prostheses: stentless porcine xenograft (Elan), stentless bovine pericardium (Pericarbon Freedom), stented porcine xenograft (Aspire), stented bovine pericardium (More) and mechanical (Ultracor). We also compared them with normal aortic valves and stenosed valves of variable severity. Preoperative echocardiography and dobutamine stress echocardiography at 1 year postoperatively were undertaken in 106 patients (n=18-24 from each group). Stentless bioprostheses, whether porcine or bovine, displayed superior haemodynamics across nearly all echocardiographic parameters: lower gradients, larger effective orifice area, higher dimensionless severity index (DSI) and lower resistance, when compared with stented or mechanical prostheses. Comparing both stented designs, bovine tissue performed the worst at rest, but with stress, there was no difference. The stress performances of the stentless bioprostheses were similar to the mildly stenosed native aortic valve, whereas the performances of the stented and mechanical prostheses resembled that of native valves with mild-to-moderate stenoses. Haemodynamic differences, however, did not translate into differences in left ventricular mass reduction at 1 year. Stentless bioprostheses displayed haemodynamics superior to stented or mechanical prostheses and had the closest performance to a normal, native aortic valve. Stress DSI data, least reliant on variable annulus/valve sizes and flow rates, provided the best haemodynamic discrimination.

  14. A correlative study of aortic valve rotation angle and thoracic aortic sizes using ECG gated CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saremi, Farhood, E-mail: fsaremi@usc.edu; Cen, Steven; Tayari, Nazila; Alizadeh, Houman; Emami, Amir; Lin, Leah; Fleischman, Fernando

    2017-04-15

    Objective: Various degrees of aortic valve rotation may be seen in individuals with no history of congenital cardiovascular malformations, but its association with aortic sizes has not been studied. Methods: Gated computed tomographic (CT angiograms in 217 patients were studied (66.7 ± 15; 22–97 years old)). Aortic diameters were determined at 5 anatomic locations. The length of the aorta from sinus to left subclavian artery was measured. The angle of valve rotation was recorded by measuring the angle between a line connecting the midpoint of the non-coronary sinus to the anterior commissure and another line along the interatrial septum. Rotation angles were correlated with aortic measurements. Patients were separated into two groups based on aortic sizes and into three groups based on age. The threshold for aortic dilatation was set at maximum ascending aorta diameter ≥40 mm (≥21 mm body surface area [BSA] indexed). Results: No significant difference in rotation angles was seen between the three age groups or between genders. Rotation angles were significantly correlated with maximal, average, and BSA adjustment of the aortic root and ascending aortic measurements. The aortic root angles were significantly different between the dilated versus nondilated aortas. There was no significant association between the rotation angles and age, length of ascending aorta, or diameters of descending aorta. Multivariate adaptive regression splines showed 25° of aortic root rotation as the diagnostic cut off for ascending aorta dilation. Above the 25° rotation, every 10° of increasing rotation was associated with a 3.78 ± 0.87 mm increase in aortic diameter (p < 0.01) and a 1.73 ± 0.25 times increased risk for having a dilated aorta (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Rotation angles of the aortic valve may be an independent non-invasive imaging marker for dilatation of the ascending aorta. Patients with increased rotation angle of the aortic valve may have higher risk for

  15. Assessment of structural valve deterioration of transcatheter aortic bioprosthetic balloon-expandable valves using the new European consensus definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltchaninoff, Hélène; Durand, Eric; Avinée, Guillaume; Tron, Christophe; Litzler, Pierre-Yves; Bauer, Fabrice; Dacher, Jean-Nicolas; Werhlin, Camille; Bouhzam, Najime; Bettinger, Nicolas; Candolfi, Pascal; Cribier, Alain

    2018-03-30

    Durability of transcatheter aortic bioprosthetic valves remains a major issue. Standardised definitions of deterioration and failure of bioprosthetic valves have recently been proposed. The aim of this study was to assess structural transcatheter valve deterioration (SVD) and bioprosthetic valve failure (BVF) using these new definitions. All TAVI patients implanted up to September 2012 with a minimal theoretical five-year follow-up were included. Systematic clinical and echocardiographic follow-up was performed annually. New standardised definitions were used to assess durability of transcatheter aortic bioprosthetic valves. From 2002 to 2012, 378 patients were included. Mean age and logistic EuroSCORE were 83.3±6.8 years and 22.8±13.1%. Thirty-day mortality was 13.2%. Nine patients had SVD including two severe forms and two patients had definite late BVF. The incidence of SVD and BVF at eight years was 3.2% (95% CI: 1.45-6.11) and 0.58% (95% CI: 0.15-2.75), respectively. Even though limited by the poor survival of the very high-risk/compassionate early population, our data do not demonstrate any alarm concerning transcatheter aortic valve durability. Careful prospective assessment in younger and lower-risk patients and comparison with surgical bioprosthetic valves are required for further assessment of the long-term durability of transcatheter valves.

  16. Clinical Relevance of Baseline TCP in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannino, Anna; Stoler, Robert C; Hebeler, Robert F; Szerlip, Molly; Mack, Michael J; Grayburn, Paul A

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the influence of baseline thrombocytopenia (TCP) on short-term and long-term outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). A total of 732 consecutive patients with severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis undergoing TAVR from January 2012 to December 2015 were included. Primary outcomes of interest were the relationship of baseline TCP with 30-day and 1-year all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes of interest were procedural complications and in-hospital mortality in the same subgroups. The prevalence of TCP (defined as platelet count TCP (defined as platelet count TCP, moderate/severe TCP at baseline was associated with a significantly higher 30-day mortality (23.3% vs 2.3% and 3.1%, respectively; PTCP was an independent predictor of 30-day and 1-year mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 13.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.49-38.64; PTCP is a strong predictor of mortality in TAVR patients, possibly identifying a specific subgroup of frail patients; therefore, it should be taken into account when addressing TAVR risk.

  17. Prognostic implications of left ventricular asymmetry in patients with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigvardsen, Per Ejlstrup; Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Carstensen, Helle Gervig

    2018-01-01

    by multi-detector computed tomography according to previous definitions. Follow-up was conducted using electronic health records. Event-free survival was assessed using Cox proportional hazards models. Patients were followed for a median of 2.2 years (interquartile range 1.6-3.6). Indication for AVR......Aims: Left ventricular (LV) regional hypertrophy in the form of LV asymmetry is a common finding in patients with aortic valve stenosis. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that LV asymmetry predicts future symptomatic status and indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR......) in patients with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis. Methods and results: In total, 114 patients with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis (peak velocity > 2.5 m/s assessed by echocardiographic screening and LV ejection fraction > 50%) were enrolled in the study. LV asymmetry and LV geometry was assessed...

  18. Valve-Sparing Root Replacement Compared With Composite Valve Graft Procedures in Patients With Aortic Root Dilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounian, Maral; Rao, Vivek; Manlhiot, Cedric; Abraham, Nachum; David, Carolyn; Feindel, Christopher M; David, Tirone E

    2016-10-25

    Although aortic valve-sparing (AVS) operations are established alternatives to composite valve graft (CVG) procedures for patients with aortic root aneurysms, comparative long-term outcomes are lacking. This study sought to compare the results of patients undergoing AVS procedures with those undergoing CVG operations. From 1990 to 2010, a total of 616 patients age Marfan syndrome and lower rates of bicuspid aortic valve than those undergoing bio-CVG or m-CVG procedures. In-hospital mortality (0.3%) and stroke rate (1.3%) were similar among groups. After adjusting for clinical covariates, both bio-CVG and m-CVG procedures were associated with increased long-term major adverse valve-related events compared with patients undergoing AVS (hazard ratio [HR]: 3.4, p = 0.005; and HR: 5.2, p valve-related complications when compared with bio-CVG and m-CVG. AVS is the treatment of choice for young patients with aortic root aneurysm and normal or near-normal aortic cusps. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Biological aortic valve replacement: advantages and optimal indications of stentless compared to stented valve substitutes. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Reza; Danial, Pichoy; Oudjana, Ahmed Hamid; Jamshidi, Peiman; Gassmann, Max; Leprince, Pascal; Lebreton, Guillaume

    2018-05-01

    Controversy still surrounds the optimal biological valve substitute for aortic valve replacement. In light of the current literature, we review advantages and optimal indications of stentless compared to stented aortic bio-prostheses. Recent meta-analyses, prospective randomized controlled trials and retrospective studies comparing the most frequently used stentless and stented aortic bio-prostheses were analyzed. In the present review, the types and implantation techniques of the bio-prosthesis that are seldom taken into account by most studies and reviews were integrated in the interpretation of the relevant reports. For stentless aortic root bio-prostheses, full-root vs. sub-coronary implantation offered better early transvalvular gradients, effective orifice area and left ventricular mass regression as well as late freedom from structural valve deterioration in retrospective studies. Early mortality and morbidity did not differ between the stentless and stented aortic bio-prostheses. Early transvalvular gradients, effective orifice area and regression of left ventricular hypertrophy were significantly better for stentless, especially as full-root, compared to stented bio-prostheses. The long-term valve-related survival for stentless aortic root and Toronto SPV bio-prosthesis was as good as that for stented pericardial aortic bio-prostheses. For full-root configuration this survival advantage was statistically significant. There seems to be not one but different ideal biological valve substitutes for different subgroups of patients. In patients with small aortic root or exposed to prosthesis-patient mismatch full-root implantation of stentless bio-prostheses may better meet functional needs of individual patients. Longer follow-ups on newer generation of stented bio-prostheses are needed for comparison of their hemodynamic performance with stentless counterparts especially in full-root configuration.

  20. Is the femoral cannulation for minimally invasive aortic valve replacement necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, J; Rodriguez-Delgadillo, M A; Valle, J V; Campos, V; Herrera, J M; Rodriguez, F; Portela, F; Sorribas, F; Juffe, A

    1998-10-01

    Minimally invasive cardiac surgery through a small transverse sternotomy is a new promising technique that can be considered an alternative in most cases to aortic valve replacement thus reducing surgical trauma and subsequent time of hospitalization. The need to avoid the risks associated with femoro-femoral bypass has lead to the interest in aortic valve replacement (AVR) operations without femoral vessels cannulation. We want to emphasize a few important points of our technique, which differs somewhat from the one applied by Cosgrove and associates. This study details the approach to the minimally invasive AVR as first described by. Cosgrove et al. without standard femoral cannulation and points out our preliminary clinical experience. From October 1996 to May 1997 we have operated on 25 patients using minimally invasive AVR (MI-AVR) In 23 cases, access through transverse sternotomy as described by Cosgrove et al., was performed. In two additional cases the chest is opened via a mini-median sternotomy with an 'L'-shape extending from the sternal notch to the superior edge of the third interspace. Twenty-three patients underwent AVR through transverse sternotomy. The male/female ratio was 13:10. The mean age was 67 years (range 45-78 years). Seventy-four percent of the patients were over 65. Predominantly, in 43% of cases aortic valve stenosis and in 25% of cases aortic valve regurgitation isolated is presented. In 19 cases, a 10-cm transverse incision is performed over the second interspace. Likewise, in four cases over the third interspace according to the thorax morphology and length of the ascending aorta assessed by chest X-ray films. By convention, cannulation of the ascending aorta and right atrial appendage was performed as usual. In contrast, in one patient (5.5%), cannulation was placed in the superior vena cava and right common femoral vein into the inferior vena cava. In the present series, 15 mechanical prostheses and eight bioprostheses whose used

  1. Optimal timing of valve replacement in asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilen, Emine; Ipek, Gökürk; Ayhan, Huseyin; Nacar, Alper Bugra; Kasapkara, Haci Ahmet; Sani, Cenk; Basbug, Serdar; Kurt, Mustafa; Bozkurt, Engin

    2014-09-01

    Patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS) constitute a heterogeneous group which includes not only certain cases who are at high risk of sudden death and valve-related heart failure, but also those at low risk for these events. Degenerative AS, which includes a majority of patients with AS, is characterized by stricture of the valve, increased arterial stiffness, and diverse left ventricular response to the valvular plus arterial vascular load. In addition to using traditional primary parameters, the severity of AS and the total left ventricular load should be assessed using new measures such as energy loss index and valvulo-arterial impedance. Natriuretic peptide levels and global longitudinal strain imaging may also be used as secondary parameters to obtain information about left ventricular systolic function, although these parameters do not correlate with the severity of AS. Exercise stress testing and exercise echocardiography are also beneficial when assessing the patient if they are symptomatic, and for determining valvular and left ventricular contractile reserves. The aim of this review was to emphasize the importance of risk stratifications in asymptomatic severe AS cases, and to assess the severity of AS using not only conventional methods but also new methods on which much emphasis has been placed during recent years.

  2. Normal and stenotic human aortic valve opening: in vitro assessment of orifice area changes with flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montarello, J K; Perakis, A C; Rosenthal, E; Boyd, E G; Yates, A K; Deverall, P B; Sowton, E; Curry, P V

    1990-06-01

    The ability to measure aortic valve area clinically has emphasized the need to understand the changes in aortic valve orifice area during flow. To compare the performance of normal and stenotic human aortic valves we used a pulsatile flow model that simulated in vivo flow conditions. Five normal autopsy specimens and 15 stenotic valves removed at operation were mounted into the model. Valve function was assessed by analysis of video recordings of valve leaflet motion during flow. Over the flow rates tested normal valves demonstrated a linear increase in orifice area. There was no resistance to leaflet opening and valve closure was rapid. The majority of stenotic valves demonstrated an increase in orifice area at low flow rates. No valve showed any increase in maximal area beyond flow rates of 3 l min-1. Increased leaflet resistance of these abnormal valves resulted in notably slower opening and closing rates. In patients with a high cardiac output and severe stenosis, overestimation of the anatomic orifice area derived by the Gorlin equation can result. This is not related to variability in maximal orifice area.

  3. Form Follows Function: Advances in Trilayered Structure Replication for Aortic Heart Valve Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simionescu, Dan T.; Chen, Joseph; Jaeggli, Michael; Wang, Bo; Liao, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering the aortic heart valve is a challenging endeavor because of the particular hemodynamic and biologic conditions present in the native aortic heart valve. The backbone of an ideal valve substitute should be a scaffold that is strong enough to withstand billions of repetitive bending, flexing and stretching cycles, while also being slowly degradable to allow for remodeling. In this review we highlight three overlooked aspects that might influence the long term durability of tissue engineered valves: replication of the native valve trilayered histoarchitecture, duplication of the three-dimensional shape of the valve and cell integration efforts focused on getting the right number and type of cells to the right place within the valve structure and driving them towards homeostatic maintenance of the valve matrix. We propose that the trilayered structure in the native aortic valve that includes a middle spongiosa layer cushioning the motions of the two external fibrous layers should be our template for creation of novel scaffolds with improved mechanical durability. Furthermore, since cells adapt to micro-loads within the valve structure, we believe that interstitial cell remodeling of the valvular matrix will depend on the accurate replication of the structures and loads, resulting in successful regeneration of the valve tissue and extended durability. PMID:23355946

  4. Form Follows Function: Advances in Trilayered Structure Replication for Aortic Heart Valve Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan T. Simionescu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering the aortic heart valve is a challenging endeavor because of the particular hemodynamic and biologic conditions present in the native aortic heart valve. The backbone of an ideal valve substitute should be a scaffold that is strong enough to withstand billions of repetitive bending, flexing and stretching cycles, while also being slowly degradable to allow for remodeling. In this review, we highlight three overlooked aspects that might influence the long term durability of tissue engineered valves: (i replication of the native valve trilayered histoarchitecture, (ii duplication of the three-dimensional shape of the valve, (iii and cell integration efforts focused on getting the right number and type of cells to the right place within the valve structure and driving them towards homeostatic maintenance of the valve matrix. We propose that the trilayered structure in the native aortic valve that includes a middle spongiosa layer cushioning the motions of the two external fibrous layers should be our template for creation of novel scaffolds with improved mechanical durability. Furthermore, since cells adapt to micro-loads within the valve structure, we believe that interstitial cell remodeling of the valvular matrix will depend on the accurate replication of the structures and loads, resulting in successful regeneration of the valve tissue and extended durability.

  5. Patient-prosthesis mismatch and reduction in left ventricular mass after aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandler, Kristian; Møller, Christian H; Hassager, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The presence of patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) after aortic valve replacement may influence patient survival. We examined the relationship between PPM and changes in left ventricular mass index at 3 months follow-up and also overall survival.......The presence of patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) after aortic valve replacement may influence patient survival. We examined the relationship between PPM and changes in left ventricular mass index at 3 months follow-up and also overall survival....

  6. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation under conscious sedation – the first Indian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Maqbool

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI is maturing strongly as an alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR in patients who are inoperable/high risk for open heart surgery. General anesthesia (GA is the usual mode of anesthesia in these patients, but local anesthesia with conscious sedation (LACS has recently been described as a safe alternative with some added advantages. We report 2 cases who were unfit for GA and were done successfully under LACS.

  7. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation under conscious sedation – the first Indian experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Syed; Kumar, Vijay; Rastogi, Vishal; Seth, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is maturing strongly as an alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in patients who are inoperable/high risk for open heart surgery. General anesthesia (GA) is the usual mode of anesthesia in these patients, but local anesthesia with conscious sedation (LACS) has recently been described as a safe alternative with some added advantages. We report 2 cases who were unfit for GA and were done successfully under LACS. PMID:24814117

  8. Aorto-right ventricular fistula: a complication of aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najib, Mohammad Q; Ng, Daniel; Vinales, Karyne L; Chaliki, Hari P

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of aorto-right ventricular (aorto-RV) fistula after prosthetic aortic valve replacement is rare. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) with color-flow Doppler, transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), or both may be required for diagnosis. A 42-year-old woman sought care for palpitations and dyspnea due to atrial flutter 2 weeks after prosthetic aortic valve replacement and graft replacement of the ascending aorta. TTE and TEE revealed left-to-right shunt due to aorto-RV fistula.

  9. Bicuspid Aortic Valve and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm: Three Patient Populations, Two Disease Phenotypes, and One Shared Genotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert B. Hinton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV and thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA are two discrete cardiovascular phenotypes characterized by latent progressive disease states. There is a clear association between BAV and TAA; however the nature and extent of this relationship is unclear. There are both distinct and overlapping developmental pathways that have been established to contribute to the formation of the aortic valve and the aortic root, and the mature anatomy of these different tissue types is intimately intertwined. Likewise, human genetics studies have established apparently separate and common contributions to these clinical phenotypes, suggesting complex inheritance and a shared genetic basis and translating 3 patient populations, namely, BAV, TAA, or both, into a common but diverse etiology. A better understanding of the BAV-TAA association will provide an opportunity to leverage molecular information to modify clinical care through more sophisticated diagnostic testing, improved counseling, and ultimately new pharmacologic therapies.

  10. A computational model of aging and calcification in the aortic heart valve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli J Weinberg

    Full Text Available The aortic heart valve undergoes geometric and mechanical changes over time. The cusps of a normal, healthy valve thicken and become less extensible over time. In the disease calcific aortic stenosis (CAS, calcified nodules progressively stiffen the cusps. The local mechanical changes in the cusps, due to either normal aging or pathological processes, affect overall function of the valve. In this paper, we propose a computational model for the aging aortic valve that connects local changes to overall valve function. We extend a previous model for the healthy valve to describe aging. To model normal/uncomplicated aging, leaflet thickness and extensibility are varied versus age according to experimental data. To model calcification, initial sites are defined and a simple growth law is assumed. The nodules then grow over time, so that the area of calcification increases from one model to the next model representing greater age. Overall valve function is recorded for each individual model to yield a single simulation of valve function over time. This simulation is the first theoretical tool to describe the temporal behavior of aortic valve calcification. The ability to better understand and predict disease progression will aid in design and timing of patient treatments for CAS.

  11. No clinical effect of prosthesis-patient mismatch after transcatheter versus surgical aortic valve replacement in intermediate- and low-risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis at mid-term follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav Hørsted; Steinbrüchel, Daniel Andreas; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) after surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) for severe aortic valve stenosis (AVS) is common, but less common after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients considered at high risk for death after surgery. The objectives of this st......OBJECTIVES: Prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) after surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) for severe aortic valve stenosis (AVS) is common, but less common after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients considered at high risk for death after surgery. The objectives...... for TAVR, and younger age and higher body mass index for SAVR. At 2 years, there were numerical but no statistically significant differences between both TAVR and SAVR patients with severe and no severe PPM for MACCE (0.0 vs 12.8% for TAVR; P = 0.13, and 13.5 vs 7.0% for SAVR; P = 0.27), number of cardiac...

  12. Role of different vascular approaches on transcatheter aortic valve implantation outcome: a single-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, Marianna; Fiorina, Claudia; Curello, Salvatore; Maffeo, Diego; Chizzola, Giuliano; Di Matteo, Gerardo; Mastropierro, Rosa; Nardi, Matilde; Cervi, Edoardo; De Cicco, Giuseppe; Chiari, Ermanna; Curnis, Antonio; Bonardelli, Stefano; Coletti, Giuseppe; Manzato, Aldo; Metra, Marco; Ettori, Federica

    2015-04-01

    To compare different vascular approaches on clinical outcome of patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) with self-expandable bioprosthesis. We included all the patients undergoing CoreValve implantation at our institute between September 2007 and March 2014. They were divided into four groups based on the vascular approach: percutaneous transfemoral (pTF), cut-down transfemoral (cTF), transaxillary (TAx) and transaortic (TAo). Clinical outcomes were evaluated according to Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 recommendations. Out of 322 consecutive patients, 170 (53%) underwent pTF, 76 (23%) cTF, 32 (10%) TAx and 44 (14%) TAo approach. Although the TAx and TAo patients had a higher risk profile, they had a similar outcome compared with the pTF and cTF groups; in particular, there were no differences regarding cardiovascular and all-cause mortality at 30 days, 1 and 2 years, as well as stroke, myocardial infarction, bleeding, major vascular complications, permanent pacemaker implantation and acute kidney injury rates. The observed device success rate was higher in the TAo than in the other approaches (88.6 versus 65.9, 68.7 and 76.3% in the pTF, cTF and TAx groups, respectively; P = 0.019). No differences occurred regarding 30-day early safety and 1-year clinical efficacy across the four groups. Fluoroscopy time, amount of contrast medium used and minor vascular complications were significantly higher in pTF patients, as well as in-hospital stay in the TAo group. Atrial fibrillation and prosthetic valve regurgitation, but not the vascular approach, were independent predictors of all-cause mortality. A more invasive vascular approach, for CoreValve implantation, even in higher risk patients, does not affect early-term, mid-term and long-term outcomes.

  13. The Perceval Sutureless Aortic Valve: Review of Outcomes, Complications, and Future Direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Ramsey; Pelletier, Marc P; Chu, Michael W A; Bouchard, Denis; Melvin, Kevin N; Adams, Corey

    Surgical aortic valve replacement with a stented prosthesis has been the standard of care procedure for aortic stenosis. The Perceval (LivaNova, London, United Kingdom) is a sutureless aortic valve bioprosthesis currently implanted in more than 20,000 patients. The purpose of this article was to review the literature available after 9 years of clinical experience of the Perceval aortic valve. PubMED, Embase, and the Cochrane Library databases were searched. A meta-analysis of summary statistics from individual studies was conducted. A total of 333 studies were identified and 84 studies were included. Thirty-day mortality and 5-year survival ranged from 0% to 4.9% and 71.3% to 85.5%, respectively. Compared with stented prosthesis, pooled analysis demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in aortic cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass times (minutes) with Perceval (38.6 vs 63.3 and 61.4 vs 84.9, P < 0.00001, respectively). Compared with transcatheter aortic valve implantation, pooled analysis demonstrated a statistically significant reduction with Perceval in paravalvular leakage (1.26% vs 14.31%) and early mortality (2.3% vs 6.9%). Favorable hemodynamics, acceptable valve durability, and ease of implantation in minimally invasive cases were reported as benefits. A trend toward increased rates of permanent pacemaker implantation and low postoperative platelet count were identified. Special use and off-label procedures described included bicuspid aortic valves, valve-in-valve for homograft and stentless prosthesis failure, concomitant valvular procedures, porcelain aorta, and endocarditis. The Perceval valve has shown safe clinical and hemodynamic outcomes. Outcomes support its continued usage and potential expansion.

  14. [Transcatheter aortic valve implantation versus aortic valve replacement: cost analysis from the regional health service and hospital perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Elena; Fortuna, Daniela; Bartoli, Simona; Ciuca, Cristina; Orlando, Anna; Scondotto, Salvatore; Agabiti, Nera; Salizzoni, Stefano; Aranzulla, Tiziana Claudia; Gandolfo, Caterina; De Palma, Rossana; Saia, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the cost of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) procedures, together with the cost of the first-year hospitalizations following the index ones, in 4 Italian regions where diffusion level of TAVI and coverage decisions are different. The cost analysis was performed evaluating 372 patients enrolled consecutively from December 1, 2012 to September 30, 2015. The index hospitalization cost was calculated both from the hospital perspective through a full-costing approach and from the regional healthcare service perspective by applying the regional reimbursement tariffs. The follow-up costs were calculated for one year after the index hospitalization, from the regional healthcare sservice perspective, through the identification of hospital admissions for cardiovascular pathologies after the index hospitalization and computation of the relative regional tariffs. The mean hospitalization cost was € 32 120 for transfemoral TAVI (232 procedures), € 35 958 for transapical TAVI (31 procedures) and € 17 441 for AVR (109 procedures). From the regional healthcare service perspective, the mean transfemoral TAVI cost was € 29 989, with relevant regional variability (range from € 19 987 to € 36 979); the mean transapical TAVI cost was € 39 148; the mean AVR cost was € 32 020. The mean follow-up costs were € 2294 for transfemoral TAVI, € 2335 for transapical TAVI, and € 2601 for AVR. In our study, transapical TAVI resulted more expensive than transfemoral TAVI, while surgical AVR was cheaper than both (less than 40%). Costs of the transfemoral approach showed great variability between participating regions, probably due to different hospital costs, logistics, patients' selection and reimbursement policy. A central level of control would be appropriate to avoid unjustified differences in access to innovative procedures between different Italian regions.

  15. Quantification of aortic valve area and left ventricular muscle mass in healthy subjects and patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haimerl, J; Freitag-Krikovic, A; Rauch, A; Sauer, E

    2005-03-01

    MRI allows visualization and planimetry of the aortic valve orifice and accurate determination of left ventricular muscle mass, which are important parameters in aortic stenosis. In contrast to invasive methods, MRI planimetry of the aortic valve area (AVA) is flow independent. AVA is usually indexed to body surface area. Left ventricular muscle mass is dependent on weight and height in healthy individuals. We studied AVA, left ventricular muscle mass (LMM) and ejection fraction (EF) in 100 healthy individuals and in patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis (AS). All were examined by MRI (1.5 Tesla Siemens Sonate) and the AVA was visualized in segmented 2D flash sequences and planimetry of the performed AVA was manually. The aortic valve area in healthy individuals was 3.9+/-0.7 cm(2), and the LMM was 99+/-27 g. In a correlation analysis, the strongest correlation of AVA was to height (r=0.75, pvalve stenosis, AVA was 1.0+/-0.35 cm(2), in correlation to cath lab r=0.72, and LMM was 172+/-56 g. We compared the AS patients results with the data of the healthy subjects, where the reduction of the AVA was 28+/-10% of the expected normal value, while LMM was 42% higher in patients with AS. There was no correlation to height, weight or BSA in patients with AS. With cardiac MRI, planimetry of AVA for normal subjects and patients with AS offered a simple, fast and non-invasive method to quantify AVA. In addition LMM and EF could be determined. The strong correlation between height and AVA documented in normal subjects offered the opportunity to integrate this relation between expected valve area and definitive orifice in determining the disease of the aortic valve for the individual patient. With diagnostic MRI in patients with AS, invasive measurements of the systolic transvalvular gradient does not seem to be necessary.

  16. Aortic valve-sparing operation in Marfan syndrome: what do we know after a decade?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallenbach, Klaus; Baraki, Hassina; Khaladj, Nawid; Kamiya, Hiroyuki; Hagl, Christian; Haverich, Axel; Karck, Matthias

    2007-02-01

    We assessed the outcome in patients with Marfan syndrome operated on exclusively with the aortic valve-sparing reimplantation technique for aortic root aneurysms during more than a decade. Between July 1993 and April 2005, the aortic valve-sparing reimplantation technique (David I) was used in 325 patients. In 59 patients with clinical evidence of Marfan syndrome, procedures were done for aortic root aneurysm (n = 55) or aortic dissection type A (n = 4). Their mean age was 30 +/- 12 years (range, 9 to 62 years), and 37 (63%) were male. Additional procedures were arch replacement in 4 patients, coronary artery bypass grafting in 1, mitral valve surgery in 9, and closure of atrial septal defect in 3. Mean follow-up was 54 +/- 37 months (range, 0 to 139 months). No patient died during the first 30 days postoperatively. Mean bypass time was 163 +/- 34 minutes (range, 99 to 248 minutes), and mean aortic cross clamp time was 126 +/- 28 minutes (range, 78 to 202 minutes). Four patients (6.8%) required rethoracotomy for postoperative bleeding. Five late deaths (8.5%) occurred during follow-up. Reoperation of the reconstructed valve was required in 7 patients. Freedom from reoperation was 88% +/- 5% at 5 years and 80% +/- 9% at 10 years. Mean grade of aortic insufficiency was 1.81 preoperatively compared with 0.20 early postoperatively (p valve should encourage use of this technique in patients with Marfan syndrome.

  17. Valve-sparing operation for aortic root aneurysm in patients with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R; Ma, W G; Tian, L X; Sun, L Z; Chang, Q

    2010-03-01

    We report our experience with aortic valve-sparing procedures in patients with Marfan syndrome and aortic root aneurysm. Between August 2003 and July 2007, we performed aortic valve-sparing procedures in 20 patients with aortic root aneurysm resulting from Marfan syndrome. Mean age was 28 +/- 10 years (range, 10 to 57 years), and there were 9 females and 11 males. A reimplantation technique was used in 9 cases, a remodeling technique in 8 and a patch technique in 3 cases. Additional procedures included total aorta replacement in 1 patient, and aortic arch replacement plus stented elephant trunk in 2 patients. The mean follow-up time was 46 +/- 16 months (range, 17 to 64 months). No in-hospital or late death occurred. Reexploration for bleeding was required in one case on postoperative day 1. No valve-related complications occurred during the follow-up period. At the end of follow-up, trivial or no aortic regurgitation was demonstrated in 14 patients, mild in 4 patients, moderate in 1 and severe in 1. Two patients with moderate and severe aortic regurgitation required reoperation. The early and mid-term results of the valve-sparing operations were favorable, and the durability of the preserved valve should encourage use of this technique in patients with Marfan syndrome.

  18. Patient-specific simulation of guidewire deformation during transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vy, Phuoc; Auffret, Vincent; Castro, Miguel; Badel, Pierre; Rochette, Michel; Haigron, Pascal; Avril, Stéphane

    2018-02-27

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a recent mini-invasive procedure to implant an aortic valve prosthesis. Prosthesis positioning in transcatheter aortic valve implantation appears as an important aspect for the success of the intervention. Accordingly, we developed a patient-specific finite element framework to predict the insertion of the stiff guidewire, used to position the aortic valve. We simulated the guidewire insertion for 2 patients based on their pre-operative CT scans. The model was designed to primarily predict the position and the angle of the guidewires in the aortic valve, and the results were successfully compared with intraoperative images. The present paper describes extensively the numerical model, which was solved by using the ANSYS software with an implicit resolution scheme, as well as the stabilization techniques which were used to overcome numerical instabilities. We performed sensitivity analysis on the properties of the guidewire (curvature angle, curvature radius, and stiffness) and the conditions of insertion (insertion force and orientation). We also explored the influence of the model parameters. The accuracy of the model was quantitatively evaluated as the distance and the angle difference between the simulated guidewires and the intraoperative ones. A good agreement was obtained between the model predictions and intraoperative views available for 2 patient cases. In conclusion, we showed that the shape of the guidewire in the aortic valve was mainly determined by the geometry of the patient's aorta and by the conditions of insertion (insertion force and orientation). Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. ACE inhibition attenuates uremia-induced aortic valve thickening in a novel mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simolin, Mikko A; Pedersen, Tanja X; Bro, Susanne

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We examined whether impaired renal function causes thickening of the aortic valve leaflets in hyperlipidemic apoE-knockout (apoE-/-) mice, and whether the putative effect on the aortic valves could be prevented by inhibiting the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) with enalapril. METH...... for investigating the mechanisms of uremia-induced aortic valve disease, and also provides an opportunity to study its pharmacologic prevention.......BACKGROUND: We examined whether impaired renal function causes thickening of the aortic valve leaflets in hyperlipidemic apoE-knockout (apoE-/-) mice, and whether the putative effect on the aortic valves could be prevented by inhibiting the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) with enalapril....... METHODS: Thickening of the aortic valve leaflets in apoE-/- mice was induced by producing mild or moderate chronic renal failure resulting from unilateral nephrectomy (1/2 NX, n = 18) or subtotal nephrectomy (5/6 NX, n = 22), respectively. Additionally, the 5/6 NX mice were randomized to no treatment (n...

  20. Patient outcome after aortic valve replacement with a mechanical or biological prosthesis: weighing lifetime anticoagulant-related event risk against reoperation risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geldorp, Martijn W A; Eric Jamieson, W R; Kappetein, A Pieter; Ye, Jian; Fradet, Guy J; Eijkemans, Marinus J C; Grunkemeier, Gary L; Bogers, Ad J J C; Takkenberg, Johanna J M

    2009-04-01

    Although the results of aortic valve replacement with different valve prostheses are well documented in terms of survival, the risks of (valve-related) events are less well explored. We used a dataset of 3934 patients who underwent aortic valve replacement with either a bioprosthesis (73%) or a mechanical prosthesis (27%) between 1982 and 2003 to simulate the outcome of patients after aortic valve replacement with either valve type. With the use of microsimulation, we compared total age and gender-specific life expectancy, event-free life expectancy, reoperation-free life expectancy, lifetime risks of reoperation, and valve-related events for both valve types. The total follow-up was 26,467 patient-years. The mean follow-up was 6.1 years in the biological arm and 8.5 years in the mechanical arm. The mean age at implantation was 70 and 58 years for biological and mechanical prostheses, respectively, and the percentage of concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting was 47% and 28%, respectively. For a 60-year-old man, simulated life expectancy in years for biological versus mechanical prostheses was 11.9 versus 12.2, event-free life expectancy was 9.8 versus 9.3, and reoperation-free life expectancy was 10.5 versus 11.9. Lifetime risk of reoperation was 25% versus 3%. Lifetime risk of bleeding was 12% versus 41%. Even for patients aged 60 years, event-free life expectancy is better with a bioprosthesis. Although the chance of reoperation is higher, the lifetime risk of bleeding is lower compared with a mechanical prosthesis. Comparing lifetime event risks between different types of valve prostheses provides more insight into patient outcome after aortic valve replacement and aids patient selection and counseling.

  1. Timing of Onset and Outcome of New Conduction Abnormalities Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: Role of Balloon Aortic Valvuloplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campelo-Parada, Francisco; Nombela-Franco, Luis; Urena, Marina; Regueiro, Ander; Jiménez-Quevedo, Pilar; Del Trigo, María; Chamandi, Chekrallah; Rodríguez-Gabella, Tania; Auffret, Vincent; Abdul-Jawad Altisent, Omar; DeLarochellière, Robert; Paradis, Jean-Michel; Dumont, Eric; Philippon, François; Pérez-Castellano, Nicasio; Puri, Rishi; Macaya, Carlos; Rodés-Cabau, Josep

    2018-03-01

    Little is known about the timing of onset and outcome of conduction abnormalities (CA) following balloon-expandable transcatheter aortic valve implantation. The aim of this study was to examine the timing of CA and determine the impact of balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) on the persistence of these abnormalities. A total of 347 patients were included. Of these, 75 had a continuous electrocardiogram recording and a 6-lead electrocardiogram at each step of the procedure. In the transcatheter aortic valve implantation population undergoing continuous electrocardiogram monitoring, new-onset left bundle branch block (LBBB) or third-degree atrioventricular block occurred in 48 (64%) and 16 (21.3%) patients, with 51.5% of CA occurring before valve implantation. Left bundle branch block persisted more frequently at hospital discharge (53.8 vs 22.7%; P=.028) and at 1-month follow-up (38.5 vs 13.6%; P=.054) when occurring before valve implantation. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty prior to valve implantation was used in 264 (76.1%) patients, and 78 (22.5%) had persistent LBBB or complete atrioventricular block requiring pacemaker implantation. Persistent LBBB or unresolved atrioventricular block at 1 month occurred more frequently in the BAV group (76.1 vs 47.6%; P=.021), and the use of BAV was associated with a lack of CA resolution (OR, 3.5; 95%CI, 1.17-10.43; P=.021). In patients undergoing a balloon-expandable transcatheter aortic valve implantation, more than half of CA occurred before valve implantation. Early occurrence of CA was associated with a higher rate of persistence at 1-month follow-up. The use of BAV was associated with an increased risk of CA persistence. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Quantification of calcified particles in human valve tissue reveals asymmetry of calcific aortic valve disease development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsumi Yabusaki

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicated that small calcified particles observable by scanning electron microcopy (SEM may initiate calcification in cardiovascular tissues. We hypothesized that if the calcified particles precede gross calcification observed in calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD, they would exhibit a regional asymmetric distribution associated with CAVD development, which always initiates at the base of