WorldWideScience

Sample records for underwater time-lapse motion

  1. Time-lapse imaging of human heart motion with switched array UWB radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovoll, Sverre; Berger, Tor; Paichard, Yoann; Aardal, Øyvind; Lande, Tor Sverre; Hamran, Svein-Erik

    2014-10-01

    Radar systems for detection of human heartbeats have mostly been single-channel systems with limited spatial resolution. In this paper, a radar system for ultra-wideband (UWB) imaging of the human heart is presented. To make the radar waves penetrate the human tissue the antenna is placed very close to the body. The antenna is an array with eight elements, and an antenna switch system connects the radar to the individual elements in sequence to form an image. Successive images are used to build up time-lapse movies of the beating heart. Measurements on a human test subject are presented and the heart motion is estimated at different locations inside the body. The movies show rhythmic motion consistent with the beating heart, and the location and shape of the reflections correspond well with the expected response form the heart wall. The spatial dependent heart motion is compared to ECG recordings, and it is confirmed that heartbeat modulations are seen in the radar data. This work shows that radar imaging of the human heart may provide valuable information on the mechanical movement of the heart.

  2. Slow speed—fast motion: time-lapse recordings in physics education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Michael; Möllmann, Klaus-Peter

    2018-05-01

    Video analysis with a 30 Hz frame rate is the standard tool in physics education. The development of affordable high-speed-cameras has extended the capabilities of the tool for much smaller time scales to the 1 ms range, using frame rates of typically up to 1000 frames s-1, allowing us to study transient physics phenomena happening too fast for the naked eye. Here we want to extend the range of phenomena which may be studied by video analysis in the opposite direction by focusing on much longer time scales ranging from minutes, hours to many days or even months. We discuss this time-lapse method, needed equipment and give a few hints of how to produce respective recordings for two specific experiments.

  3. OPTICAL FLOW APPLIED TO TIME-LAPSE IMAGE SERIES TO ESTIMATE GLACIER MOTION IN THE SOUTHERN PATAGONIA ICE FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lannutti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we assessed the feasibility of using optical flow to obtain the motion estimation of a glacier. In general, former investigations used to detect glacier changes involve solutions that require repeated observations which are many times based on extensive field work. Taking into account glaciers are usually located in geographically complex and hard to access areas, deploying time-lapse imaging sensors, optical flow may provide an efficient solution at good spatial and temporal resolution to describe mass motion. Several studies in computer vision and image processing community have used this method to detect large displacements. Therefore, we carried out a test of the proposed Large Displacement Optical Flow method at the Viedma Glacier, located at South Patagonia Icefield, Argentina. We collected monoscopic terrestrial time-lapse imagery, acquired by a calibrated camera at every 24 hour from April 2014 until April 2015. A filter based on temporal correlation and RGB color discretization between the images was applied to minimize errors related to changes in lighting, shadows, clouds and snow. This selection allowed discarding images that do not follow a sequence of similarity. Our results show a flow field in the direction of the glacier movement with acceleration in the terminus. We analyzed the errors between image pairs, and the matching generally appears to be adequate, although some areas show random gross errors related to the presence of changes in lighting. The proposed technique allowed the determination of glacier motion during one year, providing accurate and reliable motion data for subsequent analysis.

  4. The determination of high-resolution spatio-temporal glacier motion fields from time-lapse sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalbe, Ellen; Maas, Hans-Gerd

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive method for the determination of glacier surface motion vector fields at high spatial and temporal resolution. These vector fields can be derived from monocular terrestrial camera image sequences and are a valuable data source for glaciological analysis of the motion behaviour of glaciers. The measurement concepts for the acquisition of image sequences are presented, and an automated monoscopic image sequence processing chain is developed. Motion vector fields can be derived with high precision by applying automatic subpixel-accuracy image matching techniques on grey value patterns in the image sequences. Well-established matching techniques have been adapted to the special characteristics of the glacier data in order to achieve high reliability in automatic image sequence processing, including the handling of moving shadows as well as motion effects induced by small instabilities in the camera set-up. Suitable geo-referencing techniques were developed to transform image measurements into a reference coordinate system.The result of monoscopic image sequence analysis is a dense raster of glacier surface point trajectories for each image sequence. Each translation vector component in these trajectories can be determined with an accuracy of a few centimetres for points at a distance of several kilometres from the camera. Extensive practical validation experiments have shown that motion vector and trajectory fields derived from monocular image sequences can be used for the determination of high-resolution velocity fields of glaciers, including the analysis of tidal effects on glacier movement, the investigation of a glacier's motion behaviour during calving events, the determination of the position and migration of the grounding line and the detection of subglacial channels during glacier lake outburst floods.

  5. A-3 Construction Time Lapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    A time lapse from start to finish of steel erection for the 235-foot tall A-3 Test Stand. Ground work for the stand was broken in August 2008 and the final structural steel beam was placed April 9, 2009.

  6. Time-lapse photogrammetry in geomorphic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltner, Anette; Kaiser, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Image based approaches to reconstruct the earth surface (Structure from Motion - SfM) are establishing as a standard technology for high resolution topographic data. This is amongst other advantages due to the comparatively ease of use and flexibility of data generation. Furthermore, the increased spatial resolution led to its implementation at a vast range of applications from sub-mm to tens-of-km scale. Almost fully automatic calculation of referenced digital elevation models allows for a significant increase of temporal resolution, as well, potentially up to sub-second scales. Thereby, the setup of a time-lapse multi-camera system is necessary and different aspects need to be considered: The camera array has to be temporary stable or potential movements need to be compensated by temporary stable reference targets/areas. The stability of the internal camera geometry has to be considered due to a usually significantly lower amount of images of the scene, and thus redundancy for parameter estimation, compared to more common SfM applications. Depending on the speed of surface change, synchronisation has to be very accurate. Due to the usual application in the field, changing environmental conditions important for lighting and visual range are also crucial factors to keep in mind. Besides these important considerations much potential is comprised by time-lapse photogrammetry. The integration of multi-sensor systems, e.g. using thermal cameras, enables the potential detection of other processes not visible with RGB-images solely. Furthermore, the implementation of low-cost sensors allows for a significant increase of areal coverage and their setup at locations, where a loss of the system cannot be ruled out. The usage of micro-computers offers smart camera triggering, e.g. acquiring images with increased frequency controlled by a rainfall-triggered sensor. In addition these micro-computers can enable on-site data processing, e.g. recognition of increased surface

  7. Time-lapse seismic within reservoir engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenziel, T.

    2003-01-01

    Time-lapse 3D seismic is a fairly new technology allowing dynamic reservoir characterisation in a true volumetric sense. By investigating the differences between multiple seismic surveys, valuable information about changes in the oil/gas reservoir state can be captured. Its interpretation involves

  8. Time-Lapse Measurement of Wellbore Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguid, A.

    2017-12-01

    Well integrity is becoming more important as wells are used longer or repurposed. For CO2, shale gas, and other projects it has become apparent that wells represent the most likely unintended migration pathway for fluids out of the reservoir. Comprehensive logging programs have been employed to determine the condition of legacy wells in North America. These studies provide examples of assessment technologies. Logging programs have included pulsed neutron logging, ultrasonic well mapping, and cement bond logging. While these studies provide examples of what can be measured, they have only conducted a single round of logging and cannot show if the well has changed over time. Recent experience with time-lapse logging of three monitoring wells at a US Department of Energy sponsored CO2 project has shown the full value of similar tools. Time-lapse logging has shown that well integrity changes over time can be identified. It has also shown that the inclusion of and location of monitoring technologies in the well and the choice of construction materials must be carefully considered. Two of the wells were approximately eight years old at the time of study; they were constructed with steel and fiberglass casing sections and had lines on the outside of the casing running to the surface. The third well was 68 years old when it was studied and was originally constructed as a production well. Repeat logs were collected six or eight years after initial logging. Time-lapse logging showed the evolution of the wells. The results identified locations where cement degraded over time and locations that showed little change. The ultrasonic well maps show clearly that the lines used to connect the monitoring technology to the surface are visible and have a local effect on cement isolation. Testing and sampling was conducted along with logging. It provided insight into changes identified in the time-lapse log results. Point permeability testing was used to provide an in-situ point

  9. H∞ control for path tracking of autonomous underwater vehicle motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-Lin Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to simplify the design of path tracking controller and solve the problem relating to nonlinear dynamic model of autonomous underwater vehicle motion planning, feedback linearization method is first adopted to transform the nonlinear dynamic model into an equivalent pseudo-linear dynamic model in horizontal coordinates. Then considering wave disturbance effect, mixed-sensitivity method of H∞ robust control is applied to design state-feedback controller for this equivalent dynamic model. Finally, control law of pseudo-linear dynamic model is transformed into state (surge velocity and yaw angular rate tracking control law of nonlinear dynamic model through inverse coordinate transformation. Simulation indicates that autonomous underwater vehicle path tracking is successfully implemented with this proposed method, and the influence of parameter variation in autonomous underwater vehicle dynamic model on its tracking performance is reduced by H∞ controller. All the results show that the method proposed in this article is effective and feasible.

  10. Elliptical acoustic particle motion in underwater waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Osto, David R; Dahl, Peter H

    2013-07-01

    Elliptical particle motion, often encountered in acoustic fields containing interference between a source signal and its reflections, can be quantified by the degree of circularity, a vector quantity formulated from acoustic particle velocity, or vector intensity measurements. Acoustic analysis based on the degree of circularity is expected to find application in ocean waveguides as its spatial dependence relates to the acquisition geometry, water column sound speed, surface conditions, and bottom properties. Vector sensor measurements from a laboratory experiment are presented to demonstrate the depth dependence of both the degree of circularity and an approximate formulation based on vertical intensity measurements. The approximation is applied to vertical intensity field measurements made in a 2006 experiment off the New Jersey coast (in waters 80 m deep) to demonstrate the effect of sediment structure on the range dependence of the degree of circularity. The mathematical formulation presented here establishes the framework to readily compute the degree of circularity from experimental measurements; the experimental examples are provided as evidence of the spatial and frequency dependence of this fundamental vector property.

  11. Modeling and Simulation of Motion of an Underwater Robot Glider for Shallow-water Ocean Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Wang; Amir Anvar

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the modeling and simulation of an underwater robot glider used in the shallow-water environment. We followed the Equations of motion derived by [2] and simplified dynamic Equations of motion of an underwater glider according to our underwater glider. A simulation code is built and operated in the MATLAB Simulink environment so that we can make improvements to our testing glider design. It may be also used to validate a robot glider design.

  12. Effectiveness of an Automatic Tracking Software in Underwater Motion Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício A. Magalhaes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Tracking of markers placed on anatomical landmarks is a common practice in sports science to perform the kinematic analysis that interests both athletes and coaches. Although different software programs have been developed to automatically track markers and/or features, none of them was specifically designed to analyze underwater motion. Hence, this study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a software developed for automatic tracking of underwater movements (DVP, based on the Kanade-Lucas-Tomasi feature tracker. Twenty-one video recordings of different aquatic exercises (n = 2940 markers’ positions were manually tracked to determine the markers’ center coordinates. Then, the videos were automatically tracked using DVP and a commercially available software (COM. Since tracking techniques may produce false targets, an operator was instructed to stop the automatic procedure and to correct the position of the cursor when the distance between the calculated marker’s coordinate and the reference one was higher than 4 pixels. The proportion of manual interventions required by the software was used as a measure of the degree of automation. Overall, manual interventions were 10.4% lower for DVP (7.4% than for COM (17.8%. Moreover, when examining the different exercise modes separately, the percentage of manual interventions was 5.6% to 29.3% lower for DVP than for COM. Similar results were observed when analyzing the type of marker rather than the type of exercise, with 9.9% less manual interventions for DVP than for COM. In conclusion, based on these results, the developed automatic tracking software presented can be used as a valid and useful tool for underwater motion analysis.

  13. Time-lapse videos for physics education: specific examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Michael; Möllmann, Klaus-Peter

    2018-05-01

    There are many physics experiments with long time scales such that they are usually neither shown in the physics class room nor in student labs. However, they can be easily recorded with time-lapse cameras and the respective time-lapse videos allow qualitative and/or quantitative analysis of the underlying physics. Here, we present some examples from thermal physics (melting, evaporation, cooling) as well as diffusion processes

  14. Calibrating vadose zone models with time-lapse gravity data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lars; Binning, Philip John; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2011-01-01

    The vadose zone plays an important role in the hydrologic cycle. Various geophysical methods can determine soil water content variations in time and space in volumes ranging from a few cubic centimeters to several cubic meters. In contrast to the established methods, time-lapse gravity measurements...... hydrologic information. In this study, changes in the soil water content gave rise to a measurable signal in a forced infiltration experiment on a 107-m2 grassland area. Time-lapse gravity data were able to constrain the van Genuchten soil hydraulic parameters in both a synthetic example and a field...

  15. Analytical and Numerical Optimal Motion Planning for an Underwater Glider

    OpenAIRE

    Kraus, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    The use of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) for oceanic observation and research is becoming more common. Underwater gliders are a specific class of AUV that do not use conventional propulsion. Instead they change their buoyancy and center of mass location to control attitude and trajectory. The vehicles spend most of their time in long, steady glides, so even minor improvements in glide range can be magnified over multiple dives. This dissertation presents a rigid-body dynamic system...

  16. Time-lapse controlled-source electromagnetics using interferometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunziker, J.W.; Slob, E.C.; Wapenaar, C.P.A.

    In time-lapse controlled-source electromagnetics, it is crucial that the source and the receivers are positioned at exactly the same location at all times of measurement. We use interferometry by multidimensional deconvolution (MDD) to overcome problems in repeatability of the source location.

  17. TimeLapseAnalyzer: Multi-target analysis for live-cell imaging and time-lapse microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huth, Johannes; Buchholz, Malte; Kraus, Johann M.

    2011-01-01

    The direct observation of cells over time using time-lapse microscopy can provide deep insights into many important biological processes. Reliable analyses of motility, proliferation, invasive potential or mortality of cells are essential to many studies involving live cell imaging and can aid...

  18. MATLAB-based simulation of buoyancy-driven underwater glider motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Lei; Zhang, Yuwen; Fan, Hui; Yang, Wugang; Chen, Zhikun

    2008-02-01

    The mass configuration of the buoyancy-driven underwater glider is decomposed and defined. The coupling between the glider body and its internal masses is addressed using the energy law. A glider motion model is established, and the corresponding simulation program is derived using MATLAB. The characteristics of the glider motion are explored using this program. The simulation results show that the basic characteristic of a buoyancy-driven underwater glider is the periodic alternation of downward and upward motions. The glider’s spiral motion can be applied to missions in restricted regions. The glider’s horizontal velocity, gliding depth and its motion radius in spiral motion can be changed to meet different application purposes by using different glider parameter designs. The simulation also shows that the model is appropriate and the program has strong simulation functions.

  19. Definition of "banner clouds" based on time lapse movies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Schween

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Banner clouds appear on the leeward side of a mountain and resemble a banner or a flag. This article provides a comprehensive definition of "banner clouds". It is based primarily on an extensive collection of time lapse movies, but previous attempts at an explanation of this phenomenon are also taken into account. The following ingredients are considered essential: the cloud must be attached to the mountain but not appear on the windward side; the cloud must originate from condensation of water vapour contained in the air (rather than consist of blowing snow; the cloud must be persistent; and the cloud must not be of convective nature. The definition is illustrated and discussed with the help of still images and time lapse movies taken at Mount Zugspitze in the Bavarian Alps.

  20. Seismic imaging of reservoir flow properties: Time-lapse pressurechanges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasco, Don W.

    2003-04-08

    Time-lapse fluid pressure and saturation estimates are sensitive to reservoir flow properties such as permeability. In fact, given time-lapse estimates of pressure and saturation changes, one may define a linear partial differential equation for permeability variations within the reservoir. The resulting linear inverse problem can be solved quite efficiently using sparse matrix techniques. An application to a set of crosswell saturation and pressure estimates from a CO{sub 2} flood at the Lost Hills field in California demonstrates the utility of this approach. From the crosswell estimates detailed estimates of reservoir permeability are produced. The resulting permeability estimates agree with a permeability log in an adjacent well and are in accordance with water and CO{sub 2} saturation changes in the interwell region.

  1. Definition of "banner clouds" based on time lapse movies

    OpenAIRE

    Schween , J. H.; Kuettner , J.; Reinert , D.; Reuder , J.; Wirth , V.

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Banner clouds appear on the leeward side of a mountain and resemble a banner or a flag. This article provides a comprehensive definition of "banner clouds". It is based primarily on an extensive collection of time lapse movies, but previous attempts at an explanation of this phenomenon are also taken into account. The following ingredients are considered essential: the cloud must be attached to the mountain but not appear on the windward side; the cloud must originate ...

  2. A trajectory observer for camera-based underwater motion measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tor; Jouffroy, Jerome; Johansen, Vegar

    This work deals with the issue of estimating the trajectory of a vehicle or object moving underwater based on camera measurements. The proposed approach consists of a diffusion-based trajectory observer (Jouffroy and Opderbecke, 2004) processing whole segments of a trajectory at a time. Additiona....... Additionally, the observer contains a Tikhonov regularizer for smoothing the estimates. Then, a method for including the camera measurements in an appropriate manner is proposed....

  3. Soundscape and Noise Exposure Monitoring in a Marine Protected Area Using Shipping Data and Time-Lapse Footage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Nathan D; Pirotta, Enrico; Barton, Tim R; Thompson, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    We review recent work that developed new techniques for underwater noise assessment that integrate acoustic monitoring with automatic identification system (AIS) shipping data and time-lapse video, meteorological, and tidal data. Two sites were studied within the Moray Firth Special Area of Conservation (SAC) for bottlenose dolphins, where increased shipping traffic is expected from construction of offshore wind farms outside the SAC. Noise exposure varied markedly between the sites, and natural and anthropogenic contributions were characterized using multiple data sources. At one site, AIS-operating vessels accounted for total cumulative sound exposure (0.1-10 kHz), suggesting that noise modeling using the AIS would be feasible.

  4. Mycoplasma infection followed by time-lapse microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talas, Laszlo; Banfalvi, Gaspar; Fidrus, Eszter; Szigeti, Zsuzsa M; Nagy, Gabor

    2017-10-01

    Early detection of mycoplasma infection is crucial for saving precious often irreplaceable data from the tissues of patients. Mycoplasma infections cause diseases in the upper and lower respiratory tracts, urethritis in men resulting in painful dysuria, urgency and urethral discharge. Cough, fever, headache, urethritis may persist for several weeks and convalescence is slow. The symptoms of these diseases are aggravated by the detection of mycoplasma infections, that takes either a long time, besides being expensive or is specific and restricted to only a limited number of contaminant strains. Mycoplasmas are hard to detect visually but could be seen and followed by time-lapse microscopy. Our hypothesis is that one can detect mycoplasma infection irrespective of its origin and type of mycoplasma. Main lines of supporting evidence are provided by the time-lapse microscopy showing dynamic morphological alterations caused by mycoplasmas before changes in human cell cultures become visible. Morphometric measurements of mycoplasma infections revealed four subphases: i) detachment of infected cells, ii) aggregation, iii) biofilm formation and iv) shrinkage of infected cells. The applicability of time-lapse microscopy for the detection of mycoplasma infection was validated by a mycoplasma test Kit. Most important implications related to morphometric parameters include the observation of mycoplasma infected cultures for an extended period of time instead of applying static snap-shot microscopy. A reliable method is offered to estimate the time of mycoplasma exposure that elapsed during the cell growth. This microphotometric approach served a more economical detection of mycoplasma contamination at its early stage of cell growth and spread, irrespective of the origin of contaminated serum, without defining the type of mycoplasma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Time-lapse microscopy of lung endothelial cells under hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrvar, Shima; Ghanian, Zahra; Kondouri, Ganesh; Camara, Amadou S.; Ranji, Mahsa

    2017-02-01

    Objective: This study utilizes fluorescence microscopy to assess the effect of the oxygen tension on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mitochondria of fetal pulmonary artery endothelial cells (FPAECs). Introduction: Hypoxia is a severe oxygen stress, which mostly causes irreversible injury in lung cells. However, in some studies, it is reported that hypoxia decreases the severity of injuries. In this study, ROS production level was examined in hypoxic FPAECs treated with pentachlorophenol (PCP, uncoupler). This work was accomplished by monitoring and quantifying the changes in the level of the produced ROS in hypoxic cells before and after PCP treatment. Materials and methods: The dynamic of the mitochondrial ROS production in two groups of FPAECs was measured over time using time-lapse microscopy. For the first group, cells were incubated in 3% hypoxic condition for 2 hours and then continuously were exposed to hypoxic condition for imaging as well. For the second group, cells were incubated in normal oxygen condition. Time lapse images of the cells loaded with Mito-SOX (ROS indicator) were acquired, and the red fluorescence intensity profile of the cells was calculated. Changes in the level of the fluorescence intensity profile while they are treated with PCP indicates the dynamics of the ROS level. Results: The intensity profiles of the PCP-treated cells in the first group showed 47% lower ROS production rate than the PCP-treated cells in the second group. Conclusion: Time lapse microscopy revealed that hypoxic cells have lower ROS generation while treated with PCP. Therefore, this result suggests that hypoxia decreased electron transport chain activity in uncoupled chain.

  6. Interferometric full-waveform inversion of time-lapse data

    KAUST Repository

    Sinha, Mrinal

    2017-08-17

    One of the key challenges associated with time-lapse surveys is ensuring the repeatability between the baseline and monitor surveys. Non-repeatability between the surveys is caused by varying environmental conditions over the course of different surveys. To overcome this challenge, we propose the use of interferometric full waveform inversion (IFWI) for inverting the velocity model from data recorded by baseline and monitor surveys. A known reflector is used as the reference reflector for IFWI, and the data are naturally redatumed to this reference reflector using natural reflections as the redatuming operator. This natural redatuming mitigates the artifacts introduced by the repeatability errors that originate above the reference reflector.

  7. Motion analysis and trials of the deep sea hybrid underwater glider Petrel-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Wang, Yan-hui; Wu, Zhi-liang; Wang, Shu-xin

    2017-03-01

    A hybrid underwater glider Petrel-II has been developed and field tested. It is equipped with an active buoyancy unit and a compact propeller unit. Its working modes have been expanded to buoyancy driven gliding and propeller driven level-flight, which can make the glider work in strong currents, as well as many other complicated ocean environments. Its maximal gliding speed reaches 1 knot and the propelling speed is up to 3 knots. In this paper, a 3D dynamic model of Petrel-II is derived using linear momentum and angular momentum equations. According to the dynamic model, the spiral motion in the underwater space is simulated for the gliding mode. Similarly the cycle motion on water surface and the depth-keeping motion underwater are simulated for the level-flight mode. These simulations are important to the performance analysis and parameter optimization for the Petrel-II underwater glider. The simulation results show a good agreement with field trials.

  8. How to connect time-lapse recorded trajectories of motile microorganisms with dynamical models in continuous time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; Li, Liang; Gradinaru, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    We provide a tool for data-driven modeling of motility, data being time-lapse recorded trajectories. Several mathematical properties of a model to be found can be gleaned from appropriate model-independent experimental statistics, if one understands how such statistics are distorted by the finite...... of these effects that are valid for any reasonable model for persistent random motion. Our findings are illustrated with experimental data and Monte Carlo simulations....

  9. Action Sport Cameras as an Instrument to Perform a 3D Underwater Motion Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardina, Gustavo R D; Cerveri, Pietro; Barros, Ricardo M L; Marins, João C B; Silvatti, Amanda P

    2016-01-01

    Action sport cameras (ASC) are currently adopted mainly for entertainment purposes but their uninterrupted technical improvements, in correspondence of cost decreases, are going to disclose them for three-dimensional (3D) motion analysis in sport gesture study and athletic performance evaluation quantitatively. Extending this technology to sport analysis however still requires a methodologic step-forward to making ASC a metric system, encompassing ad-hoc camera setup, image processing, feature tracking, calibration and 3D reconstruction. Despite traditional laboratory analysis, such requirements become an issue when coping with both indoor and outdoor motion acquisitions of athletes. In swimming analysis for example, the camera setup and the calibration protocol are particularly demanding since land and underwater cameras are mandatory. In particular, the underwater camera calibration can be an issue affecting the reconstruction accuracy. In this paper, the aim is to evaluate the feasibility of ASC for 3D underwater analysis by focusing on camera setup and data acquisition protocols. Two GoPro Hero3+ Black (frequency: 60Hz; image resolutions: 1280×720/1920×1080 pixels) were located underwater into a swimming pool, surveying a working volume of about 6m3. A two-step custom calibration procedure, consisting in the acquisition of one static triad and one moving wand, carrying nine and one spherical passive markers, respectively, was implemented. After assessing camera parameters, a rigid bar, carrying two markers at known distance, was acquired in several positions within the working volume. The average error upon the reconstructed inter-marker distances was less than 2.5mm (1280×720) and 1.5mm (1920×1080). The results of this study demonstrate that the calibration of underwater ASC is feasible enabling quantitative kinematic measurements with accuracy comparable to traditional motion capture systems.

  10. Action Sport Cameras as an Instrument to Perform a 3D Underwater Motion Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo R D Bernardina

    Full Text Available Action sport cameras (ASC are currently adopted mainly for entertainment purposes but their uninterrupted technical improvements, in correspondence of cost decreases, are going to disclose them for three-dimensional (3D motion analysis in sport gesture study and athletic performance evaluation quantitatively. Extending this technology to sport analysis however still requires a methodologic step-forward to making ASC a metric system, encompassing ad-hoc camera setup, image processing, feature tracking, calibration and 3D reconstruction. Despite traditional laboratory analysis, such requirements become an issue when coping with both indoor and outdoor motion acquisitions of athletes. In swimming analysis for example, the camera setup and the calibration protocol are particularly demanding since land and underwater cameras are mandatory. In particular, the underwater camera calibration can be an issue affecting the reconstruction accuracy. In this paper, the aim is to evaluate the feasibility of ASC for 3D underwater analysis by focusing on camera setup and data acquisition protocols. Two GoPro Hero3+ Black (frequency: 60Hz; image resolutions: 1280×720/1920×1080 pixels were located underwater into a swimming pool, surveying a working volume of about 6m3. A two-step custom calibration procedure, consisting in the acquisition of one static triad and one moving wand, carrying nine and one spherical passive markers, respectively, was implemented. After assessing camera parameters, a rigid bar, carrying two markers at known distance, was acquired in several positions within the working volume. The average error upon the reconstructed inter-marker distances was less than 2.5mm (1280×720 and 1.5mm (1920×1080. The results of this study demonstrate that the calibration of underwater ASC is feasible enabling quantitative kinematic measurements with accuracy comparable to traditional motion capture systems.

  11. Combined time-lapse cinematography and immuno-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour, B M; Goscicka, T; MacKenzie, J L; Gautam, A; Tate, M; Clark, J

    1990-04-01

    A method was developed to record interactions between mobile non-adherent immunocytes by time-lapse cinematography and then to study the same cells by immuno-electron microscopy, using monoclonal antibodies against surface components. For this purpose a modified stage was designed to fit an inverted microscope. The attachment included a device to cool the culture chamber with N2 gas, a micro-injector for monoclonal antibody and immuno-gold treatment, and two pairs of washing needles to change the medium without disturbance. The technique was first employed to study the formation of aggregates around the antigen-presenting cells in cultures containing cells from hyper-immunized animals. Recently peripheral blood cells from normal subjects and patients with immune deficiency syndromes were stimulated with pokeweed mitogen, cluster formation was recorded, and the cells were processed for immuno-electron microscopy.

  12. Super-resolution Time-Lapse Seismic Waveform Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovcharenko, O.; Kazei, V.; Peter, D. B.; Alkhalifah, T.

    2017-12-01

    Time-lapse seismic waveform inversion is a technique, which allows tracking changes in the reservoirs over time. Such monitoring is relatively computationally extensive and therefore it is barely feasible to perform it on-the-fly. Most of the expenses are related to numerous FWI iterations at high temporal frequencies, which is inevitable since the low-frequency components can not resolve fine scale features of a velocity model. Inverted velocity changes are also blurred when there is noise in the data, so the problem of low-resolution images is widely known. One of the problems intensively tackled by computer vision research community is the recovering of high-resolution images having their low-resolution versions. Usage of artificial neural networks to reach super-resolution from a single downsampled image is one of the leading solutions for this problem. Each pixel of the upscaled image is affected by all the pixels of its low-resolution version, which enables the workflow to recover features that are likely to occur in the corresponding environment. In the present work, we adopt machine learning image enhancement technique to improve the resolution of time-lapse full-waveform inversion. We first invert the baseline model with conventional FWI. Then we run a few iterations of FWI on a set of the monitoring data to find desired model changes. These changes are blurred and we enhance their resolution by using a deep neural network. The network is trained to map low-resolution model updates predicted by FWI into the real perturbations of the baseline model. For supervised training of the network we generate a set of random perturbations in the baseline model and perform FWI on the noisy data from the perturbed models. We test the approach on a realistic perturbation of Marmousi II model and demonstrate that it outperforms conventional convolution-based deblurring techniques.

  13. Dust Storm Time Lapse Shows Opportunity's Skies Darken

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Dust Storm Time Lapse Shows Opportunity's Skies Darken NASA's Opportunity rover is literally seeing some of its darkest days. Both Mars Exploration Rovers have been riding out a regional dust storm for several weeks. Conditions became particularly dreary in the Meridiani Planum region where Opportunity sits, perched on the edge of 'Victoria Crater.' This image is a time-lapse composite where each horizon-survey image has been compressed horizontally (but not vertically) to emphasize the sky. The relative brightness and darkness of the sky from sol to sol (over a 30-sol period beginning June 14, 2007) is depicted accurately in these images, which view roughly the same part of the plains southwest of the rover. The images are approximately true color composites, generated from calibrated radiance data files using the panoramic camera's 601-nanometer, 535-nanometer and 482-nanometer filters. The rovers' atmospheric science team is concerned that smaller, regional dust storms could expand into a larger, globe-encircling storm. That could extend the time the sun stays obscured, challenging the capability of Opportunity's solar panels to produce enough electricity for the rover to function. Fortunately, as of July 19, 2007, the Opportunity site is clearing slightly. When the storm ends, atmospheric scientists hope to review data from the rovers that will help them determine what sort of dust was being lifted and distributed. The numbers across the top of the image report a measurement of atmospheric opacity, called by the Greek letter tau. The lower the number, the clearer the sky. Both Opportunity and Spirit have been recording higher tau measurements in July 2007 than they had seen any time previously in their three and a half years on Mars. The five sol numbers across the bottom correspond (left to right) to June 14, June 30, July 5, July 13 and July 15, 2007.

  14. Dynamic modeling and motion simulation for a winged hybrid-driven underwater glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-Xin; Sun, Xiu-Jun; Wang, Yan-Hui; Wu, Jian-Guo; Wang, Xiao-Ming

    2011-03-01

    PETREL, a winged hybrid-driven underwater glider is a novel and practical marine survey platform which combines the features of legacy underwater glider and conventional AUV (autonomous underwater vehicle). It can be treated as a multi-rigid-body system with a floating base and a particular hydrodynamic profile. In this paper, theorems on linear and angular momentum are used to establish the dynamic equations of motion of each rigid body and the effect of translational and rotational motion of internal masses on the attitude control are taken into consideration. In addition, due to the unique external shape with fixed wings and deflectable rudders and the dual-drive operation in thrust and glide modes, the approaches of building dynamic model of conventional AUV and hydrodynamic model of submarine are introduced, and the tailored dynamic equations of the hybrid glider are formulated. Moreover, the behaviors of motion in glide and thrust operation are analyzed based on the simulation and the feasibility of the dynamic model is validated by data from lake field trials.

  15. Time lapse gravity monitoring at Coso geothermal field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Rachel Vest

    An extensive time lapse gravity data set was acquired over the Coso geothermal field near Ridgecrest, California starting in 1987, with the latest data set acquired in 2013. In this thesis I use these gravity data to obtain a better understanding of mass changes occurring within the geothermal field. Geothermal energy is produced by flashing naturally heated ground water into steam which is used to turn turbines. Brine and re-condensed steam are then re-injected into the reservoir. A percentage of the water removed from the system is lost to the process. The time lapse gravity method consists of gravity measurements taken at the same locations over time, capturing snap shots of the changing field. After careful processing, the final data are differenced to extract the change in gravity over time. This change in gravity can then be inverted to recover the change in density and therefore mass over time. The inversion process also produces information on the three dimensional locations of these mass changes. Thirty five gravity data sets were processed and a subsection were inverted with two different starting times, a sixteen point data set collected continuously between 1991 and 2005, and a thirty-eight point data set collected between 1996 and 2005. The maximum change in gravity in the 1991 data group was -350 microGal observed near station CSE2. For the 1996 data group the maximum gravity change observed over the nine year period was -248 microGal. The gravity data were then inverted using the surface inversion method. Three values of density contrast were used, -0.05 g/cm3, -0.10 g/cm3, and -0.20 g/cm3. The starting surface in 1991 was set to 2,500 ft above sea level. The changes in surfaces were then converted to mass changes. The largest total mass change recovered was -1.39x1011 kg. This mass value is of the same order of magnitude as published well production data for the field. Additionally, the gravity data produces a better understanding of the spatial

  16. Network Analysis of Time-Lapse Microscopy Recordings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik eSmedler

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Multicellular organisms rely on intercellular communication to regulate important cellular processes critical to life. To further our understanding of those processes there is a need to scrutinize dynamical signaling events and their functions in both cells and organisms. Here, we report a method and provide MATLAB code that analyzes time-lapse microscopy recordings to identify and characterize network structures within large cell populations, such as interconnected neurons. The approach is demonstrated using intracellular calcium (Ca2+ recordings in neural progenitors and cardiac myocytes, but could be applied to a wide variety of biosensors employed in diverse cell types and organisms. In this method, network structures are analyzed by applying cross-correlation signal processing and graph theory to single-cell recordings. The goal of the analysis is to determine if the single cell activity constitutes a network of interconnected cells and to decipher the properties of this network. The method can be applied in many fields of biology in which biosensors are used to monitor signaling events in living cells. Analyzing intercellular communication in cell ensembles can reveal essential network structures that provide important biological insights.

  17. Exploring Time-Lapse Photography as a Means for Qualitative Data Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persohn, Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    Collecting information via time-lapse photography is nothing new. Scientists and artists have been using this kind of data since the late 1800s. However, my research and experiments with time-lapse have shown that great potential may lie in its application to educational and social scientific research methods. This article is part history, part…

  18. Capturing change: the duality of time-lapse imagery to acquire data and depict ecological dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinley Buckley, Emma M.; Allen, Craig R.; Forsberg, Michael; Farrell, Michael; Caven, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the scientific and communicative value of time-lapse imagery by exploring applications for data collection and visualization. Time-lapse imagery has a myriad of possible applications to study and depict ecosystems and can operate at unique temporal and spatial scales to bridge the gap between large-scale satellite imagery projects and observational field research. Time-lapse data sequences, linking time-lapse imagery with data visualization, have the ability to make data come alive for a wider audience by connecting abstract numbers to images that root data in time and place. Utilizing imagery from the Platte Basin Timelapse Project, water inundation and vegetation phenology metrics are quantified via image analysis and then paired with passive monitoring data, including streamflow and water chemistry. Dynamic and interactive time-lapse data sequences elucidate the visible and invisible ecological dynamics of a significantly altered yet internationally important river system in central Nebraska.

  19. Seismic imaging of reservoir flow properties: Time-lapse amplitude changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasco, D.W.; Datta-Gupta, Akhil; Behrens, Ron; Condon, Pat; Rickett, Jame s

    2003-03-13

    Asymptotic methods provide an efficient means by which to infer reservoir flow properties, such as permeability, from time-lapse seismic data. A trajectory-based methodology, much like ray-based methods for medical and seismic imaging, is the basis for an iterative inversion of time-lapse amplitude changes. In this approach a single reservoir simulation is required for each iteration of the algorithm. A comparison between purely numerical and the trajectory-based sensitivities demonstrates their accuracy. An application to a set of synthetic amplitude changes indicates that they can recover large-scale reservoir permeability variations from time-lapse data. In an application of actual time-lapse amplitude changes from the Bay Marchand field in the Gulf of Mexico we are able to reduce the misfit by 81% in twelve iterations. The time-lapse observations indicate lower permeabilities are required in the central portion of the reservoir.

  20. Capturing change: the duality of time-lapse imagery to acquire data and depict ecological dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma M. Brinley Buckley

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the scientific and communicative value of time-lapse imagery by exploring applications for data collection and visualization. Time-lapse imagery has a myriad of possible applications to study and depict ecosystems and can operate at unique temporal and spatial scales to bridge the gap between large-scale satellite imagery projects and observational field research. Time-lapse data sequences, linking time-lapse imagery with data visualization, have the ability to make data come alive for a wider audience by connecting abstract numbers to images that root data in time and place. Utilizing imagery from the Platte Basin Timelapse Project, water inundation and vegetation phenology metrics are quantified via image analysis and then paired with passive monitoring data, including streamflow and water chemistry. Dynamic and interactive time-lapse data sequences elucidate the visible and invisible ecological dynamics of a significantly altered yet internationally important river system in central Nebraska.

  1. Experimental investigation of efficient locomotion of underwater snake robots for lateral undulation and eel-like motion patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelasidi, Eleni; Liljebäck, Pål; Pettersen, Kristin Y; Gravdahl, Jan T

    2015-01-01

    Underwater snake robots offer many interesting capabilities for underwater operations. The long and slender structure of such robots provide superior capabilities for access through narrow openings and within confined areas. This is interesting for inspection and monitoring operations, for instance within the subsea oil and gas industry and within marine archeology. In addition, underwater snake robots can provide both inspection and intervention capabilities and are thus interesting candidates for the next generation inspection and intervention AUVs. Furthermore, bioinspired locomotion through oscillatory gaits, like lateral undulation and eel-like motion, is interesting from an energy efficiency point of view. Increasing the motion efficiency in terms of the achieved forward speed by improving the method of propulsion is a key issue for underwater robots. Moreover, energy efficiency is one of the main challenges for long-term autonomy of these systems. In this study, we will consider both these two aspects of efficiency. This paper considers the energy efficiency of swimming snake robots by presenting and experimentally investigating fundamental properties of the velocity and the power consumption of an underwater snake robot for both lateral undulation and eel-like motion patterns. In particular, we investigate the relationship between the parameters of the gait patterns, the forward velocity and the energy consumption for different motion patterns. The simulation and experimental results are seen to support the theoretical findings.

  2. Liveness-Based RRT Algorithm for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles Motion Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Motion planning is a crucial, basic issue in robotics, which aims at driving vehicles or robots towards to a given destination with various constraints, such as obstacles and limited resource. This paper presents a new version of rapidly exploring random trees (RRT, that is, liveness-based RRT (Li-RRT, to address autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs motion problem. Different from typical RRT, we define an index of each node in the random searching tree, called “liveness” in this paper, to describe the potential effectiveness during the expanding process. We show that Li-RRT is provably probabilistic completeness as original RRT. In addition, the expected time of returning a valid path with Li-RRT is obviously reduced. To verify the efficiency of our algorithm, numerical experiments are carried out in this paper.

  3. Evaluation of the added mass for a spheroid-type unmanned underwater vehicle by vertical planar motion mechanism test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Keon Lee

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows added mass and inertia can be acquired from the pure heaving motion and pure pitching motion respectively. A Vertical Planar Motion Mechanism (VPMM test for the spheroid-type Unmanned Underwater Vehicle (UUV was compared with a theoretical calculation and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD analysis in this paper. The VPMM test has been carried out at a towing tank with specially manufactured equipment. The linear equations of motion on the vertical plane were considered for theoretical calculation, and CFD results were obtained by commercial CFD package. The VPMM test results show good agreement with theoretical calculations and the CFD results, so that the applicability of the VPMM equipment for an underwater vehicle can be verified with a sufficient accuracy.

  4. Discrimination between phase and amplitude attributes in time-lapse seismic streamer data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spetzler, J.; Kvam, O.

    2006-01-01

    Time-lapse seismic experiments aim to obtain information about production-related effects in hydrocarbon reservoirs to increase the recovery percentage. However, nonrepeatability problems such as acquisition differences, overburden effects, and noise are often significantly stronger than the imprint

  5. The state of the art in time-lapse seismic monitoring of heavy oil fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lines, Larry; Embleton, Joan [Chorus (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Reservoir characterization is an essential tool for the maximization of heavy oil production. Characterization allows the changes occurring in the reservoir during production to be monitored. The current study demonstrates that time-lapse 3D seismology may be used to monitor these changes over time. When a reservoir change influences seismic velocity, changes in the subsurface may be assessed by time-lapse 3D seismology. Multiple factors (such as seismic noise, near-surface seasonal variations, or consistent acquisition and processing) affect the data acquired when using time-lapse 3D seismology to monitor heavy oil fields. The study shows how to circumvent these factors to obtain consistent and usable data. Using information such as well logs, Vp/Vs ratios from core samples and seismic data, it was demonstrated that time-lapse 3D seismology is a suitable characterization method for reservoir changes in heavy oil production.

  6. A randomized clinical trial comparing embryo culture in a conventional incubator with a time-lapse incubator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Kirstine; Hindkjaer, Johnny Juhl; Grøndahl, Marie Louise

    2012-01-01

    Time-lapse monitoring allows for a flexible embryo evaluation and potentially provides new dynamic markers of embryo competence. Before introducing time-lapse monitoring in a clinical setting, the safety of the instrument must be properly documented. Accordingly, the aim of this study...... was to evaluate the safety of a commercially available time-lapse incubator....

  7. History matching of time-lapse crosswell data using ensemble kalman filtering

    KAUST Repository

    de Matos Ravanelli, Fabio Miguel

    2015-09-03

    Data from crosswell seismic surveys is processed to provide crosswell time-lapse data to map fluid changes in a reservoir where time-lapse or 4D seismic data is unavailable or unreliable, such as in onshore reservoirs. The resultant processing results provide quantitative information for history matching purposes using a probabilistic approach to take in account uncertainties in the geological model and reduce uncertainties in reservoir production forecasts.

  8. Time-lapse seismic attribute analysis for a water-flooded reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Long; Sen, M K; Stoffa, P L; Seif, R K

    2008-01-01

    One of the goals of time-lapse seismic monitoring is the direct detection of the fluid front and two-phase contact area. However, several factors affect the quality of time-lapse seismic difference data and decrease detectability. One of these factors is random noise. In this paper, we propose five different methods aimed at improving the quality and detectability of noisy time-lapse seismic difference data. Common to these methods is the transform of the differences to a domain where the time-lapse signal and random noise are well separated. Our proposed methods include direct Fourier transform based spectral decomposition, bispectra, wavelet transform, singular value decomposition and hybrid methods. We also propose a method that combines multiple time-lapse difference data and gives a final difference which enhances the common part and attenuates the differences of the multiple difference images resulting in a better detectability than the original images. A synthetic time-lapse model is used to demonstrate the feasibility of our proposed methods

  9. Time-lapse high-resolution seismic surveys in the Mississippi Delta mudflow area, offshore Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son-Hindmarsh, R.; Hughson, R.A.; Ploessel, M.R.

    1984-05-01

    Time-lapse high-resolution surveys are useful for studying rapidly changing geologic features such as the mudflows of the Mississippi Delta, and for assessing how these potentially hazardous features might affect offshore structures. For time-lapse surveys, an initial high-resolution seismic survey is repeated at specified time intervals, following the same grid of tracklines, using the same seismic systems and a precise navigation system. Time-lapse surveys have been used successfully to monitor the active mudflow about 6 miles upslope from Shell Offshore Inc.'s Cognac Platform. The surveys show that mudflow activity has had no effect on the Platform. Time-lapse surveys obtain the most accurate determination of seafloor changes available at the present time. If one compares two or more random surveys in an area, instead of carefully performed time-lapse surveys, the accuracy of the results may be less than the actural amount of change; so results may be meaningless or misleading. Time-lapse surveys can produce results with vertical accuracy of about + or 5 feet along survey tracklines.

  10. A High-Rate Virtual Instrument of Marine Vehicle Motions for Underwater Navigation and Ocean Remote Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Gelin, Chrystel

    2013-01-01

    Dead-Reckoning aided with Doppler velocity measurement has been the most common method for underwater navigation for small vehicles. Unfortunately DR requires frequent position recalibrations and underwater vehicle navigation systems are limited to periodic position update when they surface. Finally standard Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers are unable to provide the rate or precision required when used on a small vessel. To overcome this, a low cost high rate motion measurement system for an Unmanned Surface Vehicle (USV) with underwater and oceanographic purposes is proposed. The proposed onboard system for the USV consists of an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) with accelerometers and rate gyros, a GPS receiver, a flux-gate compass, a roll and tilt sensor and an ADCP. Interfacing all the sensors proved rather challenging because of their different characteristics. The proposed data fusion technique integrates the sensors and develops an embeddable software package, using real time data fusion method...

  11. Advances in interpretation of subsurface processes with time-lapse electrical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, Kaminit; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Johnson, Tim B.; Slater, Lee D.

    2015-01-01

    Electrical geophysical methods, including electrical resistivity, time-domain induced polarization, and complex resistivity, have become commonly used to image the near subsurface. Here, we outline their utility for time-lapse imaging of hydrological, geochemical, and biogeochemical processes, focusing on new instrumentation, processing, and analysis techniques specific to monitoring. We review data collection procedures, parameters measured, and petrophysical relationships and then outline the state of the science with respect to inversion methodologies, including coupled inversion. We conclude by highlighting recent research focused on innovative applications of time-lapse imaging in hydrology, biology, ecology, and geochemistry, among other areas of interest.

  12. Full waveform inversion of repeating seismic events to estimate time-lapse velocity changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, R.; Lumley, D.

    2017-05-01

    Seismic monitoring provides valuable information regarding the time-varying changes in subsurface physical properties caused by natural or man-made processes. However, the resulting changes in the earth's subsurface properties are often small both in terms of magnitude and spatial extent, leading to minimal time-lapse differences in seismic amplitude or traveltime. In order to better extract information from the time-lapse data, we show that exploiting the full seismic waveform information can be critical. In this study, we develop and test methods of full waveform inversion that estimate an optimal subsurface model of time-varying elastic properties in order to fit the observed time-lapse seismic data with predicted waveforms based on numerical solutions of the wave equation. Time-lapse full waveform inversion is nonlinear and non-unique, and depends on the knowledge of the baseline velocity model before a change, and (non-)repeatability of earthquake source and sensor parameters, and of ambient and cultural noise. We propose to use repeating earthquake data sets acquired with permanent arrays of seismic sensors to enhance the repeatability of source and sensor parameters. We further develop and test time-lapse parallel, double-difference and bootstrapping inversion strategies to mitigate the dependence on the baseline velocity model. The parallel approach uses a time-invariant full waveform inversion method to estimate velocity models independently of the different source event times. The double-difference approach directly estimates velocity changes from time-lapse waveform differences, requiring excellent repeatability. The bootstrapping approach inverts for velocity models sequentially in time, implicitly constraining the time-lapse inversions, while relaxing an explicit requirement for high data repeatability. We assume that prior to the time-lapse inversion, we can estimate the true source locations and the origin time of the events, and also we can also

  13. Exploiting the airwave for time-lapse reservoir monitoring with CSEM on land

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wirianto, M.; Mulder, W.A.; Slob, E.C.

    2011-01-01

    In the application of controlled source electromagnetics for reservoir monitoring on land, repeatability errors in the source will mask the time-lapse signal due to hydrocarbon production when recording surface data close to the source. We demonstrate that at larger distances, the airwave will still

  14. Calibrating vadose zone models with time-lapse gravity data: a forced infiltration experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lars; Hansen, Allan Bo; Zibar, Majken Caroline Looms

    A change in soil water content is a change in mass stored in the subsurface, and when large enough, can be measured with a gravity meter. Over the last few decades there has been increased use of ground-based time-lapse gravity measurements to infer hydrogeological parameters. These studies have...

  15. 2D Time-lapse Seismic Tomography Using An Active Time Constraint (ATC) Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    We propose a 2D seismic time-lapse inversion approach to image the evolution of seismic velocities over time and space. The forward modeling is based on solving the eikonal equation using a second-order fast marching method. The wave-paths are represented by Fresnel volumes rathe...

  16. Inter and intra-observer variability of time-lapse annotations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundvall Germeys, Linda Karin M; Ingerslev, Hans Jakob; Knudsen, Ulla Breth

    . This provides the basis for further investigation of embryo assessment and selection by time-lapse imaging in prospective trials. Study funding/competing interest(s): Research at the Fertility Clinic was funded by an unrestricted grant from Ferring and MSD. The authors have no competing interests to declare....

  17. Latest time-lapse seismic data from Sleipner yield new insights into CO2 plume development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chadwick, R.A.; Noy, D.; Arts, R.; Eiken, O.

    2009-01-01

    Since its inception in 1996, the CO2 injection operation at Sleipner has been monitored by 3D time-lapse seismic surveys. Striking images of the CO2 plume have been obtained, showing a multi-tier feature of high reflectivity, interpreted as arising from a number of thin layers of CO2 trapped beneath

  18. Reconstruction Accuracy Assessment of Surface and Underwater 3D Motion Analysis: A New Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly de Jesus

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed accuracy of surface and underwater 3D reconstruction of a calibration volume with and without homography. A calibration volume (6000 × 2000 × 2500 mm with 236 markers (64 above and 88 underwater control points—with 8 common points at water surface—and 92 validation points was positioned on a 25 m swimming pool and recorded with two surface and four underwater cameras. Planar homography estimation for each calibration plane was computed to perform image rectification. Direct linear transformation algorithm for 3D reconstruction was applied, using 1600000 different combinations of 32 and 44 points out of the 64 and 88 control points for surface and underwater markers (resp.. Root Mean Square (RMS error with homography of control and validations points was lower than without it for surface and underwater cameras (P≤0.03. With homography, RMS errors of control and validation points were similar between surface and underwater cameras (P≥0.47. Without homography, RMS error of control points was greater for underwater than surface cameras (P≤0.04 and the opposite was observed for validation points (P≤0.04. It is recommended that future studies using 3D reconstruction should include homography to improve swimming movement analysis accuracy.

  19. Coupled hydrogeophysical inversion using time-lapse magnetic resonance sounding and time-lapse gravity data for hydraulic aquifer testing: Will it work in practice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herckenrath, Daan; Auken, Esben; Christiansen, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Temporal changes in water content can be directly related to the time-lapse signals retrieved using magnetic resonance sounding (TL-MRS) and relative gravimetry (TL-RG). Previous studies suggest that TL-RG measurements can potentially provide accurate estimates of aquifer characteristics in an aq......Temporal changes in water content can be directly related to the time-lapse signals retrieved using magnetic resonance sounding (TL-MRS) and relative gravimetry (TL-RG). Previous studies suggest that TL-RG measurements can potentially provide accurate estimates of aquifer characteristics...... in an aquifer pumping test experiment when used in a coupled hydrogeophysical inversion approach. However, these studies considered highly idealized conditions. The aim of this paper is twofold: first, we investigate three major issues which likely limit the practical utility of TL-RG for pumping test...... monitoring: partially penetrating pumping wells in anisotropic aquifers, delayed drainage effects, and typical data errors for TL-RG. Second, we introduce TL-MRS in a similar coupled hydrogeophysical inversion framework and compare the performance of TL-MRS and TL-RG for pumping test monitoring...

  20. Application of a linear finite-frequency theory to time-lapse crosswell tomography in ultrasonic and numerical experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spetzler, J.; Sijacic, D.; Wolf, K.H.A.A.

    2007-01-01

    Time-lapse seismic monitoring is the geophysical discipline whereby multiple data sets recorded at the same location but at different times are used to locate and quantify temporal changes in the elastic parameters of the subsurface. We validate a time-lapse monitoring method by crosswell tomography

  1. A randomized clinical trial comparing embryo culture in a conventional incubator with a time-lapse incubator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Kirstine; Hindkjaer, Johnny Juhl; Grøndahl, Marie Louise

    2012-01-01

    Time-lapse monitoring allows for a flexible embryo evaluation and potentially provides new dynamic markers of embryo competence. Before introducing time-lapse monitoring in a clinical setting, the safety of the instrument must be properly documented. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to eval...

  2. Effect of oxygen concentration on human embryo development evaluated by time-lapse monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Hans Jakob; Hindkjær, Johnny Juhl; Kirkegaard, Kirstine

    2012-01-01

    -points for each cell division and blastocyst stages were registered until 120 hours after oocyte retrieval. Only 2PN embryos completing the first cleavage were evaluated. The groups were compared using one-way ANOVA or Kruskall-Wallis test. Estimates are reported as medians with 95% confidence intervals. Time......Introduction: Data from a number of studies indicate -but not unequivocally- that culture of embryos in 5% O2 compared to 20% O2 improves blastocyst formation in humans and various animal species and may yield better pregnancy rates in IVF. The detrimental effects of atmospheric oxygen were...... was to evaluate the influence of oxygen tension on human pre-implantation development using time-lapse monitoring. Materials and methods: Human embryos were cultured to the blastocyst stage in a time-lapse incubator (EmbryoScope™) in 20% O2 (group 1), 20% O2 for 24 hours followed by culture in 5% O2 (group 2...

  3. Freeze core sampling to validate time-lapse resistivity monitoring of the hyporheic zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toran, Laura; Hughes, Brian; Nyquist, Jonathan; Ryan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    A freeze core sampler was used to characterize hyporheic zone storage during a stream tracer test. The pore water from the frozen core showed tracer lingered in the hyporheic zone after the tracer had returned to background concentration in collocated well samples. These results confirmed evidence of lingering subsurface tracer seen in time-lapse electrical resistivity tomographs. The pore water exhibited brine exclusion (ion concentrations in ice lower than source water) in a sediment matrix, despite the fast freezing time. Although freeze core sampling provided qualitative evidence of lingering tracer, it proved difficult to quantify tracer concentration because the amount of brine exclusion during freezing could not be accurately determined. Nonetheless, the additional evidence for lingering tracer supports using time-lapse resistivity to detect regions of low fluid mobility within the hyporheic zone that can act as chemically reactive zones of importance in stream health. © 2012, The Author(s). GroundWater © 2012, National Ground Water Association.

  4. Time-Lapse Monitoring of Subsurface Fluid Flow using Parsimonious Seismic Interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif

    2017-04-21

    A typical small-scale seismic survey (such as 240 shot gathers) takes at least 16 working hours to be completed, which is a major obstacle in case of time-lapse monitoring experiments. This is especially true if the subject that needs to be monitored is rapidly changing. In this work, we will discuss how to decrease the recording time from 16 working hours to less than one hour of recording. Here, the virtual data has the same accuracy as the conventional data. We validate the efficacy of parsimonious seismic interferometry with the time-lapse mentoring idea with field examples, where we were able to record 30 different data sets within a 2-hour period. The recorded data are then processed to generate 30 snapshots that shows the spread of water from the ground surface down to a few meters.

  5. Capturing tissue repair in zebrafish larvae with time-lapse brightfield stereomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, Thomas S; Brochu, Elizabeth A; Rieger, Sandra

    2015-01-31

    The zebrafish larval tail fin is ideal for studying tissue regeneration due to the simple architecture of the larval fin-fold, which comprises of two layers of skin that enclose undifferentiated mesenchyme, and because the larval tail fin regenerates rapidly within 2-3 days. Using this system, we demonstrate a method for capturing the repair dynamics of the amputated tail fin with time-lapse video brightfield stereomicroscopy. We demonstrate that fin amputation triggers a contraction of the amputation wound and extrusion of cells around the wound margin, leading to their subsequent clearance. Fin regeneration proceeds from proximal to distal direction after a short delay. In addition, developmental growth of the larva can be observed during all stages. The presented method provides an opportunity for observing and analyzing whole tissue-scale behaviors such as fin development and growth in a simple microscope setting, which is easily adaptable to any stereomicroscope with time-lapse capabilities.

  6. Time-lapse electrical surveys to locate infiltration zones in weathered hard rock tropical areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wubda, M.; Descloitres, M.; Yalo, N.; Ribolzi, O.; Vouillamoz, J. M.; Boukari, M.; Hector, B.; Séguis, L.

    2017-07-01

    In West Africa, infiltration and groundwater recharge processes in hard rock areas are depending on climatic, surface and subsurface conditions, and are poorly documented. Part of the reason is that identification, location and monitoring of these processes is still a challenge. Here, we explore the potential for time-lapse electrical surveys to bring additional information on these processes for two different climate situations: a semi-arid Sahelian site (north of Burkina and a humid Sudanian site (north of Benin), respectively focusing on indirect (localized) and direct (diffuse) recharge processes. The methodology is based on surveys in dry season and rainy season on typical pond or gully using Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) and frequency electromagnetic (FEM) apparent conductivity mapping. The results show that in the Sahelian zone an indirect recharge occurs as expected, but infiltration doesn't takes place at the center of the pond to the aquifer, but occurs laterally in the banks. In Sudanian zone, the ERT survey shows a direct recharge process as expected, but also a complicated behavior of groundwater dilution, as well as the role of hardpans for fast infiltration. These processes are ascertained by groundwater monitoring in adjacent observing wells. At last, FEM time lapse mapping is found to be difficult to quantitatively interpreted due to the non-uniqueness of the model, clearly evidenced comparing FEM result to auger holes monitoring. Finally, we found that time-lapse ERT can be an efficient way to track infiltration processes across ponds and gullies in both climatic conditions, the Sahelian setting providing results easier to interpret, due to significant resistivity contrasts between dry and rain seasons. Both methods can be used for efficient implementation of punctual sensors for complementary studies. However, FEM time-lapse mapping remains difficult to practice without external information that renders this method less attractive for

  7. Calixarenes and cations: a time-lapse photography of the big-bang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casnati, Alessandro

    2013-08-07

    The outstanding cation complexation properties emerging from the pioneering studies on calixarene ligands during a five-year period in the early 1980s triggered a big-bang burst of publications on such macrocycles that is still lasting at a distance of more than 30 years. A time-lapse photography of this timeframe is proposed which allows the readers to pinpoint the contributions of the different research groups.

  8. 3D Time-lapse Imaging and Quantification of Mitochondrial Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Sison, Miguel; Chakrabortty, Sabyasachi; Extermann, J?r?me; Nahas, Amir; James Marchand, Paul; Lopez, Antonio; Weil, Tanja; Lasser, Theo

    2017-01-01

    We present a 3D time-lapse imaging method for monitoring mitochondrial dynamics in living HeLa cells based on photothermal optical coherence microscopy and using novel surface functionalization of gold nanoparticles. The biocompatible protein-based biopolymer coating contains multiple functional groups which impart better cellular uptake and mitochondria targeting efficiency. The high stability of the gold nanoparticles allows continuous imaging over an extended time up to 3000 seconds withou...

  9. Automated Tracking of Root for Confocal Time-lapse Imaging of Cellular Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Doumane, Mehdi; Lionnet, Claire; Bayle, Vincent; Jaillais, Yvon; Caillaud, Marie-C?cile

    2017-01-01

    Here we describe a protocol that enables to automatically perform time-lapse imaging of growing root tips for several hours. Plants roots expressing fluorescent proteins or stained with dyes are imaged while they grow using automatic movement of the microscope stage that compensates for root growth and allows to follow a given region of the root over time. The protocol makes possible the image acquisition of multiple growing root tips, therefore increasing the number of recorded mitotic event...

  10. Probabilistic 3-D time-lapse inversion of magnetotelluric data: Application to an enhanced geothermal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Carbajal, Marina; Linde, Nicolas; Peacock, Jared R.; Zyserman, F. I.; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Thiel, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Surface-based monitoring of mass transfer caused by injections and extractions in deep boreholes is crucial to maximize oil, gas and geothermal production. Inductive electromagnetic methods, such as magnetotellurics, are appealing for these applications due to their large penetration depths and sensitivity to changes in fluid conductivity and fracture connectivity. In this work, we propose a 3-D Markov chain Monte Carlo inversion of time-lapse magnetotelluric data to image mass transfer following a saline fluid injection. The inversion estimates the posterior probability density function of the resulting plume, and thereby quantifies model uncertainty. To decrease computation times, we base the parametrization on a reduced Legendre moment decomposition of the plume. A synthetic test shows that our methodology is effective when the electrical resistivity structure prior to the injection is well known. The centre of mass and spread of the plume are well retrieved.We then apply our inversion strategy to an injection experiment in an enhanced geothermal system at Paralana, South Australia, and compare it to a 3-D deterministic time-lapse inversion. The latter retrieves resistivity changes that are more shallow than the actual injection interval, whereas the probabilistic inversion retrieves plumes that are located at the correct depths and oriented in a preferential north-south direction. To explain the time-lapse data, the inversion requires unrealistically large resistivity changes with respect to the base model. We suggest that this is partly explained by unaccounted subsurface heterogeneities in the base model from which time-lapse changes are inferred.

  11. Time-lapse seismic - repeatability versus usefulness and 2D versus 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landro, M.

    2017-12-01

    Time-lapse seismic has developed rapidly over the past decades, especially for monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs and subsurface storage of CO2. I will review and discuss some of the critical enabling factors for the commercial success of this technology. It was early realized that how well we are able to repeat our seismic experiment is crucial. However, it is always a question of detectability versus repeatability. For marine seismic, there are several factors limiting the repeatability: Weather conditions, positioning of sources and receivers and so on. I will discuss recent improvements in both acquisition and processing methods over the last decade. It is well known that repeated 3D seismic data is the most accurate tool for reservoir monitoring purposes. However, several examples show that 2D seismic data may be used for monitoring purposes despite lower repeatability. I will use examples from an underground blow out in the North Sea, and repeated 2D seismic lines acquired before and after the Tohoku earthquake in 2011 to illustrate this. A major challenge when using repeated 2D seismic for subsurface monitoring purposes is the lack of 3D calibration points and significantly less amount of data. For marine seismic acquisition, feathering issues and crossline dip effects become more critical compared to 3D seismic acquisition. Furthermore, the uncertainties arising from a non-ideal 2D seismic acquisition are hard to assess, since the 3D subsurface geometry has not been mapped. One way to shed more light on this challenge is to use 3D time lapse seismic modeling testing various crossline dips or geometries. Other ways are to use alternative data sources, such as bathymetry, time lapse gravity or electromagnetic data. The end result for all time-lapse monitoring projects is an interpretation associated with uncertainties, and for the 2D case these uncertainties are often large. The purpose of this talk is to discuss how to reduces and control these

  12. Assessment of Time-Lapse in Visible and Thermal Face Recognition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Farokhi, Sajad; Shamsuddin, Siti Mariyam; Flusser, Jan; Sheikh, Usman Ullah

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2012), s. 181-186 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP103/11/1552 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : face recognition * moment invariants * Zernike moments Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2012/ZOI/flusser-assessment of time-lapse in visible and thermal face recognition -j.pdf

  13. Time-lapse joint AVO inversion using generalized linear method based on exact Zoeppritz equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Longxiao; Gu, Hanming

    2018-03-01

    The conventional method of time-lapse AVO (Amplitude Versus Offset) inversion is mainly based on the approximate expression of Zoeppritz equations. Though the approximate expression is concise and convenient to use, it has certain limitations. For example, its application condition is that the difference of elastic parameters between the upper medium and lower medium is little and the incident angle is small. In addition, the inversion of density is not stable. Therefore, we develop the method of time-lapse joint AVO inversion based on exact Zoeppritz equations. In this method, we apply exact Zoeppritz equations to calculate the reflection coefficient of PP wave. And in the construction of objective function for inversion, we use Taylor series expansion to linearize the inversion problem. Through the joint AVO inversion of seismic data in baseline survey and monitor survey, we can obtain the P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, density in baseline survey and their time-lapse changes simultaneously. We can also estimate the oil saturation change according to inversion results. Compared with the time-lapse difference inversion, the joint inversion doesn't need certain assumptions and can estimate more parameters simultaneously. It has a better applicability. Meanwhile, by using the generalized linear method, the inversion is easily implemented and its calculation cost is small. We use the theoretical model to generate synthetic seismic records to test and analyze the influence of random noise. The results can prove the availability and anti-noise-interference ability of our method. We also apply the inversion to actual field data and prove the feasibility of our method in actual situation.

  14. Seismic time-lapse imaging using Interferometric least-squares migration

    KAUST Repository

    Sinha, Mrinal

    2016-09-06

    One of the problems with 4D surveys is that the environmental conditions change over time so that the experiment is insufficiently repeatable. To mitigate this problem, we propose the use of interferometric least-squares migration (ILSM) to estimate the migration image for the baseline and monitor surveys. Here, a known reflector is used as the reference reflector for ILSM. Results with synthetic and field data show that ILSM can eliminate artifacts caused by non-repeatability in time-lapse surveys.

  15. Using time-lapse gravity for groundwater model calibration: An application to alluvial aquifer storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lars; Binning, Philip John; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2011-01-01

    The estimation of hydrological model parameters by calibration to field data is a critical step in the modeling process. However, calibration often fails because of parameter correlation. Here it is shown that time-lapse gravity data can be combined with hydraulic head data in a coupled hydrogeop......The estimation of hydrological model parameters by calibration to field data is a critical step in the modeling process. However, calibration often fails because of parameter correlation. Here it is shown that time-lapse gravity data can be combined with hydraulic head data in a coupled...... shows that time-lapse gravity data are especially useful to constrain specific yield. Furthermore, we demonstrate that evapotranspiration, and riverbed conductance are better constrained by coupled inversion to gravity and head data than to head data alone. When estimating the four parameters...... simultaneously, the six correlation coefficients were reduced from unity when only head data were employed to significantly lower values when gravity and head data were combined. Our analysis reveals that the estimated parameter values are not very sensitive to the choice of weighting between head and gravity...

  16. Efficiency of time-lapse intervals and simple baits for camera surveys of wild pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B.L.; Holtfreter, R.W.; Ditchkoff, S.S.; Grand, J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Growing concerns surrounding established and expanding populations of wild pigs (Sus scrofa) have created the need for rapid and accurate surveys of these populations. We conducted surveys of a portion of the wild pig population on Fort Benning, Georgia, to determine if a longer time-lapse interval than had been previously used in surveys of wild pigs would generate similar detection results. We concurrently examined whether use of soured corn at camera sites affected the time necessary for pigs to locate a new camera site or the time pigs remained at a site. Our results suggest that a 9-min time-lapse interval generated dependable detection results for pigs and that soured corn neither attracted pigs to a site any quicker than plain, dry, whole-kernel corn, nor held them at a site longer. Maximization of time-lapse interval should decrease data and processing loads, and use of a simple, available bait should decrease cost and effort associated with more complicated baits; combination of these concepts should increase efficiency of wild pig surveys. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  17. Inter-laboratory agreement on embryo classification and clinical decision: Conventional morphological assessment vs. time lapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Granados, Luis; Serrano, María; González-Utor, Antonio; Ortíz, Nereyda; Badajoz, Vicente; Olaya, Enrique; Prados, Nicolás; Boada, Montse; Castilla, Jose A

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine inter-laboratory variability on embryo assessment using time-lapse platform and conventional morphological assessment. This study compares the data obtained from a pilot study of external quality control (EQC) of time lapse, performed in 2014, with the classical EQC of the Spanish Society for the Study of Reproductive Biology (ASEBIR) performed in 2013 and 2014. In total, 24 laboratories (8 using EmbryoScope™, 15 using Primo Vision™ and one with both platforms) took part in the pilot study. The clinics that used EmbryoScope™ analysed 31 embryos and those using Primo Vision™ analysed 35. The classical EQC was implemented by 39 clinics, based on an analysis of 25 embryos per year. Both groups were required to evaluate various qualitative morphological variables (cell fragmentation, the presence of vacuoles, blastomere asymmetry and multinucleation), to classify the embryos in accordance with ASEBIR criteria and to stipulate the clinical decision taken. In the EQC time-lapse pilot study, the groups were asked to determine, as well as the above characteristics, the embryo development times, the number, opposition and size of pronuclei, the direct division of 1 into 3 cells and/or of 3 into 5 cells and false divisions. The degree of agreement was determined by calculating the intra-class correlation coefficients and the coefficient of variation for the quantitative variables and the Gwet index for the qualitative variables. For both EmbryoScope™ and Primo Vision™, two periods of greater inter-laboratory variability were observed in the times of embryo development events. One peak of variability was recorded among the laboratories addressing the first embryo events (extrusion of the second polar body and the appearance of pronuclei); the second peak took place between the times corresponding to the 8-cell and morula stages. In most of the qualitative variables analysed regarding embryo development, there was almost

  18. A state-space Bayesian framework for estimating biogeochemical transformations using time-lapse geophysical data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.; Hubbard, S.; Williams, K.; Pride, S.; Li, L.; Steefel, C.; Slater, L.

    2009-04-15

    We develop a state-space Bayesian framework to combine time-lapse geophysical data with other types of information for quantitative estimation of biogeochemical parameters during bioremediation. We consider characteristics of end-products of biogeochemical transformations as state vectors, which evolve under constraints of local environments through evolution equations, and consider time-lapse geophysical data as available observations, which could be linked to the state vectors through petrophysical models. We estimate the state vectors and their associated unknown parameters over time using Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling methods. To demonstrate the use of the state-space approach, we apply it to complex resistivity data collected during laboratory column biostimulation experiments that were poised to precipitate iron and zinc sulfides during sulfate reduction. We develop a petrophysical model based on sphere-shaped cells to link the sulfide precipitate properties to the time-lapse geophysical attributes and estimate volume fraction of the sulfide precipitates, fraction of the dispersed, sulfide-encrusted cells, mean radius of the aggregated clusters, and permeability over the course of the experiments. Results of the case study suggest that the developed state-space approach permits the use of geophysical datasets for providing quantitative estimates of end-product characteristics and hydrological feedbacks associated with biogeochemical transformations. Although tested here on laboratory column experiment datasets, the developed framework provides the foundation needed for quantitative field-scale estimation of biogeochemical parameters over space and time using direct, but often sparse wellbore data with indirect, but more spatially extensive geophysical datasets.

  19. Feeling the Heat: Supraglacial Lake Changes as Observed via Time-Lapse Photography, Ngozumpa Glacier, Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horodyskyj, U. N.; Breashears, D.; Bilham, R. G.

    2011-12-01

    Supraglacial lakes are suspected of playing a catalytic role in the current rapid melting rate of temperate glaciers. Our field work on the Ngozumpa glacier, in the Nepalese Himalaya, was targeted to quantify the physics of this process. A field season was conducted in June 2011 to investigate the formation and evolution of these lakes via time-lapse photography. One supraglacial lake in particular was chosen for more intensive study. A pressure transducer recorded lake level changes throughout the field season; probes measured surface water temperature, water temperature at depth, and air temperature; and solar irradiation (incoming and outgoing) was measured with a pair of silicon pyranometers. Depth surveys were conducted, water samples were collected, and melt rates on north and south facing ice walls also were measured with a laser rangefinder during hours of peak insolation. During the course of the field season, 28 cm of overall water rise was measured in the lake. Two major icefall events a week apart contributed to 8 and 6 cm, respectively, rise alone. Surface water and air temperatures increased during this time, along with the amount of solar irradiation reaching the surface of the lake. South-facing ice walls were found to melt faster, but no walls were found to be immune to melt and collapse. Hourly time-lapse photography captured a major icefall in this lake, while another camera captured a larger lake farther upglacier draining more than 3 meters overnight. A third camera, aimed near the terminus, captured a lake changing in color (from milky blue to brown) and doubling in size during the field season. These initial results show substantial change in a short amount of time. Continued time-lapse photography should provide us with an even better record of surface evolution on this climatically sensitive glacier in the Himalaya.

  20. Time-lapse electrical geophysical monitoring of amendment-based biostimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Major, William; Lane, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Biostimulation is increasingly used to accelerate microbial remediation of recalcitrant groundwater contaminants. Effective application of biostimulation requires successful emplacement of amendment in the contaminant target zone. Verification of remediation performance requires postemplacement assessment and contaminant monitoring. Sampling-based approaches are expensive and provide low-density spatial and temporal information. Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is an effective geophysical method for determining temporal changes in subsurface electrical conductivity. Because remedial amendments and biostimulation-related biogeochemical processes often change subsurface electrical conductivity, ERT can complement and enhance sampling-based approaches for assessing emplacement and monitoring biostimulation-based remediation.Field studies demonstrating the ability of time-lapse ERT to monitor amendment emplacement and behavior were performed during a biostimulation remediation effort conducted at the Department of Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO) Yard, in Brandywine, Maryland, United States. Geochemical fluid sampling was used to calibrate a petrophysical relation in order to predict groundwater indicators of amendment distribution. The petrophysical relations were field validated by comparing predictions to sequestered fluid sample results, thus demonstrating the potential of electrical geophysics for quantitative assessment of amendment-related geochemical properties. Crosshole radar zero-offset profile and borehole geophysical logging were also performed to augment the data set and validate interpretation.In addition to delineating amendment transport in the first 10 months after emplacement, the time-lapse ERT results show later changes in bulk electrical properties interpreted as mineral precipitation. Results support the use of more cost-effective surface-based ERT in conjunction with limited field sampling to improve spatial

  1. Time-Lapse Electrical Geophysical Monitoring of Amendment-Based Biostimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Versteeg, Roelof; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Major, William; Lane, John W.

    2015-12-02

    Biostimulation is increasingly used to accelerate microbial remediation of recalcitrant groundwater contaminants. Effective application of biostimulation requires successful emplacement of amendment in the contaminant target zone. Verification of remediation performance requires postemplacement assessment and contaminant monitoring. Sampling based approaches are expensive and provide low-density spatial and temporal information. Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is an effective geophysical method for determining temporal changes in subsurface electrical conductivity. Because remedial amendments and biostimulation-related biogeochemical processes often change subsurface electrical conductivity, ERT can complement and enhance sampling-based approaches for assessing emplacement and monitoring biostimulation-based remediation. Field studies demonstrating the ability of time-lapse ERT to monitor amendment emplacement and behavior were performed during a biostimulation remediation effort conducted at the Department of Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO) Yard, in Brandywine, Maryland, United States. Geochemical fluid sampling was used to calibrate a petrophysical relation in order to predict groundwater indicators of amendment distribution. The petrophysical relations were field validated by comparing predictions to sequestered fluid sample results, thus demonstrating the potential of electrical geophysics for quantitative assessment of amendment-related geochemical properties. Crosshole radar zero-offset profile and borehole geophysical logging were also performed to augment the data set and validate interpretation. In addition to delineating amendment transport in the first 10 months after emplacement, the time-lapse ERT results show later changes in bulk electrical properties interpreted as mineral precipitation. Results support the use of more cost-effective surfacebased ERT in conjunction with limited field sampling to improve spatial

  2. Time-lapse 3D imaging of calcite precipitation in a microporous column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho, Jose R. A.; Withers, Philip J.

    2018-02-01

    Time-lapse X-ray computed tomography is used to image the evolution of calcite precipitation during flow through microporous quartz over the course of 400 h. The growth rate decreases by more than seven times, which is linked to the clogging of flow paths that restricts flow to some regions of the column. Fewer precipitates are observed as a function of column depth, which is found to be related to a differential nucleation density along the sample. A higher nucleation density closer to the inlet implies more crystal volume increase per unit of time without affecting the rate if normalized to the surface area of crystals. Our overall growth rates measured in porous media are orders of magnitude slower than growth rates derived from traditional precipitation experiments on free surfaces. Based on our time-lapse results we hypothesize a scenario where the evolving distribution of precipitates within a pore structure during precipitation progressively modifies the local transport through the pores. Within less permeable regions the saturation index may be lower than along the main flow paths. Therefore, the reactive crystal surfaces within those regions grow at a slower rate than that expected from the bulk fluid composition. Since the amount of reactive surface area within these less permeable regions increases over time, the overall growth rate decreases without a necessary significant change of the bulk fluid composition along more permeable flow paths. In conclusion, the overall growth rates in an evolving porous media expected from bulk fluid compositions alone can be overestimated due to the development of stagnant sub-regions where the reactive surface area is bath by a solution with lower saturation index. In this context we highlight the value of time-lapse 3D studies for understanding the dynamics of mineral precipitation in porous media.

  3. A software solution for recording circadian oscillator features in time-lapse live cell microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salmon Patrick

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluorescent and bioluminescent time-lapse microscopy approaches have been successfully used to investigate molecular mechanisms underlying the mammalian circadian oscillator at the single cell level. However, most of the available software and common methods based on intensity-threshold segmentation and frame-to-frame tracking are not applicable in these experiments. This is due to cell movement and dramatic changes in the fluorescent/bioluminescent reporter protein during the circadian cycle, with the lowest expression level very close to the background intensity. At present, the standard approach to analyze data sets obtained from time lapse microscopy is either manual tracking or application of generic image-processing software/dedicated tracking software. To our knowledge, these existing software solutions for manual and automatic tracking have strong limitations in tracking individual cells if their plane shifts. Results In an attempt to improve existing methodology of time-lapse tracking of a large number of moving cells, we have developed a semi-automatic software package. It extracts the trajectory of the cells by tracking theirs displacements, makes the delineation of cell nucleus or whole cell, and finally yields measurements of various features, like reporter protein expression level or cell displacement. As an example, we present here single cell circadian pattern and motility analysis of NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts expressing a fluorescent circadian reporter protein. Using Circadian Gene Express plugin, we performed fast and nonbiased analysis of large fluorescent time lapse microscopy datasets. Conclusions Our software solution, Circadian Gene Express (CGE, is easy to use and allows precise and semi-automatic tracking of moving cells over longer period of time. In spite of significant circadian variations in protein expression with extremely low expression levels at the valley phase, CGE allows accurate and

  4. Segmentation Method of Time-Lapse Microscopy Images with the Focus on Biocompatibility Assessment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soukup, Jindřich; Císař, P.; Šroubek, Filip

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 3 (2016), s. 497-506 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-29225S Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LO1205; GA UK(CZ) 914813/2013; GA UK(CZ) SVV-2016-260332; CENAKVA(CZ) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/01.0024 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : phase contrast microscopy * segmentation * biocompatibility assessment * time-lapse * cytotoxicity testing Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics Impact factor: 1.891, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/ZOI/soukupj-0460642.pdf

  5. Self-Propelled Motion of Monodisperse Underwater Oil Droplets Formed by a Microfluidic Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Naoko; Banno, Taisuke; Asami, Arisa; Kazayama, Yuki; Morimoto, Yuya; Osaki, Toshihisa; Takeuchi, Shoji; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Toyota, Taro

    2017-06-06

    We evaluated the speed profile of self-propelled underwater oil droplets comprising a hydrophobic aldehyde derivative in terms of their diameter and the surrounding surfactant concentration using a microfluidic device. We found that the speed of the oil droplets is dependent on not only the surfactant concentration but also the droplet size in a certain range of the surfactant concentration. This tendency is interpreted in terms of combination of the oil and surfactant affording spontaneous emulsification in addition to the Marangoni effect.

  6. Marine time-Lapse (4D) Seismic Operations and Improved Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, N.

    2002-01-01

    Time-lapse (4D) seismic monitoring of producing reservoirs presents strong potential for improving reservoir management. Case studies show the capacity of 4D seismic to monitor injected fluid fronts, locate bypassed oil, map pressure compartmentalization, and delineate the sealing or leaking flow properties of faults. The advent of 4D seismic is expected to have as significant effect on increased recovery as the earlier introduction of 3D seismic in the late 80's 4D seismic has now become an established part of operators long-term plans for subsurface assets and in recent years much of the seismic activity in the North Sea has been the acquisition of 4D seismic surveys.The producing reservoir will usually feature a floating or fixed surface installation. As these installations obstruct towed streamer operations a second vessel is often required to undershoot the obstruction, Fugro-Geoteam's fleet of 2D and 3D seismic vessels is ideally suited to this type of operation and the company has gained valuable operational experience in the North Sea, Mediterranean and the Middle East.Errors in the positioning of in-sea equipment impact seismic imaging. These errors are compounded with each successive time-lapse survey. Fugro continually strives for ways to meet customers' expectations for improved performance. Therefore, in 2001 Fugro introduced a new high accuracy positioning service. This paper focuses on Fugro-Geoteam's 4D/undershoot operational experience and the new positioning 'High Performance' service

  7. Possible mechanism of polyspermy block in human oocytes observed by time-lapse cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mio, Yasuyuki; Iwata, Kyoko; Yumoto, Keitaro; Kai, Yoshiteru; Sargant, Haruka C; Mizoguchi, Chizuru; Ueda, Minako; Tsuchie, Yuka; Imajo, Akifumi; Iba, Yumiko; Nishikori, Kyoko

    2012-09-01

    To analyze the fertilization process related to polyspermy block in human oocytes using an in vitro culturing system for time-lapse cinematography. We had 122 oocytes donated for this study from couples that provided informed consent. We recorded human oocytes at 2,000 to 2,800 frames every 10 s during the fertilization process and thereafter every 2 min using a new in vitro culture system originally developed by the authors for time-lapse cinematography. We displayed 30 frames per second for analysis of the polyspermy block during fertilization. Three oocytes showed the leading and following sperm within the zona pellucida in the same microscopic field. The dynamic images obtained during the fertilization process using this new system revealed that once a leading sperm penetrated the zona pellucida and attached to the oocyte membrane, a following sperm was arrested from further penetration into the zona pellucida within 10 s. The present results strongly suggest the existence of a novel mechanism of polyspermy block that takes place at the zona pellucida immediately after fertilization. These findings are clearly different from previous mechanisms describing polyspermy block as the oocyte membrane block to sperm penetration and the zona reaction. The finding presented herein thus represents a novel discovery about the highly complicated polyspermy block mechanism occurring in human oocytes.

  8. Analysis of compaction initiation in human embryos by using time-lapse cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Kyoko; Yumoto, Keitaro; Sugishima, Minako; Mizoguchi, Chizuru; Kai, Yoshiteru; Iba, Yumiko; Mio, Yasuyuki

    2014-04-01

    To analyze the initiation of compaction in human embryos in vitro by using time-lapse cinematography (TLC), with the goal of determining the precise timing of compaction and clarifying the morphological changes underlying the compaction process. One hundred and fifteen embryos donated by couples with no further need for embryo-transfer were used in this study. Donated embryos were thawed and processed, and then their morphological behavior during the initiation of compaction was dynamically observed via time-lapse cinematography (TLC) for 5 days. Although the initiation of compaction occurred throughout the period from the 4-cell to 16-cell stage, 99 (86.1 %) embryos initiated compaction at the 8-cell stage or later, with initiation at the 8-cell stage being most frequent (22.6 %). Of these 99 embryos, 49.5 % developed into good-quality blastocysts. In contrast, of the 16 (13.9 %) embryos that initiated compaction prior to the 8-cell stage, only 18.8 % developed into good-quality blastocysts. Embryos that initiated compaction before the 8-cell stage showed significantly higher numbers of multinucleated blastomeres, due to asynchronism in nuclear division at the third mitotic division resulting from cytokinetic failure. The initiation of compaction primarily occurs at the third mitotic division or later in human embryos. Embryos that initiate compaction before the 8-cell stage are usually associated with aberrant embryonic development (i.e., cytokinetic failure accompanied by karyokinesis).

  9. The Extreme Ice Survey: Capturing and Conveying Glacial Processes Through Time-Lapse Imagery and Narration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balog, J. D.; Box, J. E.; Pfeffer, W. T.; Hood, E. W.; Fagre, D. B.; Anker, C.; O'Neel, S.

    2010-12-01

    The Extreme Ice Survey (EIS) uses time-lapse photography, conventional photography, and video to document rapid change in the Earth's glacial ice. The EIS team currently has 38 time-lapse cameras at sites in Greenland, Iceland, Alaska, the Rocky Mountains and Nepal. EIS supplements this ongoing record with annual repeat photography in British Columbia, Iceland, the Alps, and Bolivia. EIS imagery supplies basic knowledge in glacier dynamics to the science community, as well as compelling, engaging narratives to the general public about the immediacy of the Anthropocene and climate change. Visual materials from EIS have impacted more than 150 million people, ranging from White House staff, the U. S. Congress and government agency officials to globally influential corporate officers and all age strata of the general public. Media products include a National Geographic/NOVA special, two National Geographic magazine articles, a feature in Parade magazine (circulation 71 million), and numerous presentations on CNN, NBC, BBC and National Public Radio. Columbia Glacier, Alaska, June 2006, May 2007, June 2008 terminus indicated.

  10. Time-lapse crystallography snapshots of a double-strand break repair polymerase in action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamsen, Joonas A; Beard, William A; Pedersen, Lars C; Shock, David D; Moon, Andrea F; Krahn, Juno M; Bebenek, Katarzyna; Kunkel, Thomas A; Wilson, Samuel H

    2017-08-15

    DNA polymerase (pol) μ is a DNA-dependent polymerase that incorporates nucleotides during gap-filling synthesis in the non-homologous end-joining pathway of double-strand break repair. Here we report time-lapse X-ray crystallography snapshots of catalytic events during gap-filling DNA synthesis by pol μ. Unique catalytic intermediates and active site conformational changes that underlie catalysis are uncovered, and a transient third (product) metal ion is observed in the product state. The product manganese coordinates phosphate oxygens of the inserted nucleotide and PP i . The product metal is not observed during DNA synthesis in the presence of magnesium. Kinetic analyses indicate that manganese increases the rate constant for deoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphate insertion compared to magnesium. The likely product stabilization role of the manganese product metal in pol μ is discussed. These observations provide insight on structural attributes of this X-family double-strand break repair polymerase that impact its biological function in genome maintenance.DNA polymerase (pol) μ functions in DNA double-strand break repair. Here the authors use time-lapse X-ray crystallography to capture the states of pol µ during the conversion from pre-catalytic to product complex and observe a third transiently bound metal ion in the product state.

  11. Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Investigations for Imaging the Grouting Injection in Shallow Subsurface Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Farooq

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The highway of Yongweol-ri, Muan-gun, south-western part of the South Korean Peninsula, is underlain by the abandoned of subsurface cavities, which were discovered in 2005. These cavities lie at shallow depths with the range of 5∼15 meters below the ground surface. Numerous subsidence events have repeatedly occurred in the past few years, damaging infrastructure and highway. As a result of continuing subsidence issues, the Korean Institute of Geosciences and Mineral Resources (KIGAM was requested by local administration to resolve the issue. The KIGAM used geophysical methods to delineate subsurface cavities and improve more refined understanding of the cavities network in the study area. Cement based grouting has been widely employed in the construction industry to reinforce subsurface ground. In this research work, time-lapse electrical resistivity surveys were accomplished to monitor the grouting injection in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway, which have provided a quasi-real-time monitoring for modifying the subsurface cavities related to ground reinforcement, which would be difficult with direct methods. The results obtained from time-lapse electrical resistivity technique have satisfactory imaged the grouting injection experiment in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway. Furthermore, the borehole camera confirmed the presence of grouting material in the subsurface cavities, and hence this procedure increases the mechanical resistance of subsurface cavities below the highway.

  12. A study on quality-adjusted impact of time lapse on iris recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonova, Nadezhda; Hua, Fang; Liu, Xuan; Remus, Jeremiah; Ross, Arun; Hornak, Lawrence; Schuckers, Stephanie

    2012-06-01

    Although human iris pattern is widely accepted as a stable biometric feature, recent research has found some evidences on the aging effect of iris system. In order to investigate changes in iris recognition performance due to the elapsed time between probe and gallery iris images, we examine the effect of elapsed time on iris recognition utilizing 7,628 iris images from 46 subjects with an average of ten visits acquired over two years from a legacy database at Clarkson University. Taken into consideration the impact of quality factors such as local contrast, illumination, blur and noise on iris recognition performance, regression models are built with and without quality metrics to evaluate the degradation of iris recognition performance based on time lapse factors. Our experimental results demonstrate the decrease of iris recognition performance along with increased elapsed time based on two iris recognition system (the modified Masek algorithm and a commercial software VeriEye SDK). These results also reveal the significance of quality factors in iris recognition regression indicating the variability in match scores. According to the regression analysis, our study in this paper helps provide the quantified decrease on match scores with increased elapsed time, which indicates the possibility to implement the prediction scheme for iris recognition performance based on learning of impact on time lapse factors.

  13. Very-High-Resolution Time-Lapse Photography for Plant and Ecosystems Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary H. Nichols

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Traditional photography is a compromise between image detail and area covered. We report a new method for creating time-lapse sequences of very-high-resolution photographs to produce zoomable images that facilitate observation across a range of spatial and temporal scales. Methods and Results: A robotic camera mount and software were used to capture images of the growth and movement in Brassica rapa every 15 s in the laboratory. The resultant time-lapse sequence (http://timemachine.gigapan.org/wiki/Plant_Growth captures growth detail such as circumnutation. A modified, solar-powered system was deployed at a remote field site in southern Arizona. Images were collected every 2 h over a 3-mo period to capture the response of vegetation to monsoon season rainfall (http://timemachine.gigapan.org/wiki/Arizona_Grasslands. Conclusions: A technique for observing time sequences of both individual plant and ecosystem response at a range of spatial scales is available for use in the laboratory and in the field.

  14. Informing hydrological models with ground-based time-lapse relative gravimetry: potential and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Christiansen, Lars; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Coupled hydrogeophysical inversion emerges as an attractive option to improve the calibration and predictive capability of hydrological models. Recently, ground-based time-lapse relative gravity (TLRG) measurements have attracted increasing interest because there is a direct relationship between ...... in gravity due to unmonitored non-hydrological effects, and the requirement of a gravitationally stable reference station. Application of TLRG in hydrology should be combined with other geophysical and/or traditional monitoring methods.......Coupled hydrogeophysical inversion emerges as an attractive option to improve the calibration and predictive capability of hydrological models. Recently, ground-based time-lapse relative gravity (TLRG) measurements have attracted increasing interest because there is a direct relationship between...... the signal and the change in water mass stored in the subsurface. Thus, no petrophysical relationship is required for coupled hydrogeophysical inversion. Two hydrological events were monitored with TLRG. One was a natural flooding event in the periphery of the Okavango Delta, Botswana, and one was a forced...

  15. Time-lapse nanoscopy of friction in the non-Amontons and non-Coulomb regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Tadashi; Sato, Takaaki; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Oguma, Masatsugu; Itamura, Noriaki; Goda, Keisuke; Sasaki, Naruo; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-11

    Originally discovered by Leonard da Vinci in the 15th century, the force of friction is directly proportional to the applied load (known as Amontons' first law of friction). Furthermore, kinetic friction is independent of the sliding speed (known as Coulomb's law of friction). These empirical laws break down at high normal pressure (due to plastic deformation) and low sliding speed (in the transition regime between static friction and kinetic friction). An important example of this phenomenon is friction between the asperities of tectonic plates on the Earth. Despite its significance, little is known about the detailed mechanism of friction in this regime due to the lack of experimental methods. Here we demonstrate in situ time-lapse nanoscopy of friction between asperities sliding at ultralow speed (∼0.01 nm/s) under high normal pressure (∼GPa). This is made possible by compressing and rubbing a pair of nanometer-scale crystalline silicon anvils with electrostatic microactuators and monitoring its dynamical evolution with a transmission electron microscope. Our analysis of the time-lapse movie indicates that superplastic behavior is induced by decrystallization, plastic deformation, and atomic diffusion at the asperity-asperity interface. The results hold great promise for a better understanding of quasi-static friction under high pressure for geoscience, materials science, and nanotechnology.

  16. Time Lapse Electrical Resistivity to Connect Evapotranspiration and Groundwater Fluxes in the Critical Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, S. K.; Harmon, R. E.; Barnard, H. R.; Randall, J.; Singha, K.

    2017-12-01

    The critical zone (CZ)—an open system extending from canopy top to the base of groundwater—is a highly dynamic and heterogeneous environment. In forested terrain, trees make up a large component of the CZ. This work aims to quantify the connection between vegetation and subsurface water storage at a hillslope scale within a forested watershed in the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Oregon. To identify the mechanism(s) controlling the connection at the hillslope scale, we observe patterns in electrical conductivity using 2D-time lapse-DC resistivity. To compare inversions through time a representative error model was determined using L-curve criterion. Inverted data show high spatial variability in ground electrical conductivity and variation at both diel and seasonal timescales. These changes are most pronounced in areas corresponding to dense vegetation. The diel pattern in electrical conductivity is also observed in monitored sap flow sensors, water-level gauges, tensiometers, and sediment thermal probes. To quantify the temporal connection between these data over the course of the growing season a cross correlation analysis was conducted. Preliminary data show that over the course of the growing season transpiration becomes decoupled from both groundwater and soil moisture. Further decomposition of the inverted time lapse data will highlight spatial variability in electrical conductivity providing insight into the where, when, and how(s) of tree-modified subsurface storage.

  17. Using a time lapse microgravity model for mapping seawater intrusion around Semarang

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supriyadi,, E-mail: supriyadi@mail.unnes.ac.id; Khumaedi [Physics Department, Semarang State University (UNNES), D7 Building 2nd Floor FMIPA Sekaran Gunungpati (Indonesia); Yusuf, M. [Badan Meteologi Klimatologi Goefisika (BMKG), Jl.Angkasa I No.2 Kemayoran Jakarta Pusat (Indonesia); Agung, W. [Physics Department, Diponegoro University (UNDIP), Jl. Prof. Soedharto, Tembalang, Semarang (Indonesia)

    2016-03-11

    A modeling of time-lapse microgravity anomaly due to sea water intrusion has been conducted. It used field data of aquifer cross section, aquifer thickness and lithology of research area. Those data were then processed using Grav3D and Surfer. Modeling results indicated that the intrusion of sea water resulting in a time-lapse microgravity anomalies of 0.12 to 0.18 mGal, at soil layer density of 0.15 g/cm{sup 3} to 0.3 g/cm{sup 3} and at depth of 30 to 100 m. These imply that the areas experiencing seawater intrusion were Tanjung Mas, SPBE Bandarharjo, Brass, Old Market Boom and Johar as the microgravity measured there were in the range of 0.12 to 0.18 mGal and the density contrast were at 0.15 g/cm{sup 3} to 0.28 g/cm{sup 3}. Areas that experienced fluid reduction were Puri Anjasmoro, Kenconowungu and Puspowarno with microgravity changes from -0.06 mGal to -0.18 mGal.

  18. CFD approach to modelling, hydrodynamic analysis and motion characteristics of a laboratory underwater glider with experimental results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogang Singh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Underwater gliders are buoyancy propelled vehicle which make use of buoyancy for vertical movement and wings to propel the glider in forward direction. Autonomous underwater gliders are a patented technology and are manufactured and marketed by corporations. In this study, we validate the experimental lift and drag characteristics of a glider from the literature using Computational fluid dynamics (CFD approach. This approach is then used for the assessment of the steady state characteristics of a laboratory glider designed at Indian Institute of Technology (IIT Madras. Flow behaviour and lift and drag force distribution at different angles of attack are studied for Reynolds numbers varying from 105 to 106 for NACA0012 wing configurations. The state variables of the glider are the velocity, gliding angle and angle of attack which are simulated by making use of the hydrodynamic drag and lift coefficients obtained from CFD. The effect of the variable buoyancy is examined in terms of the gliding angle, velocity and angle of attack. Laboratory model of glider is developed from the final design asserted by CFD. This model is used for determination of static and dynamic properties of an underwater glider which were validated against an equivalent CAD model and simulation results obtained from equations of motion of glider in vertical plane respectively. In the literature, only empirical approach has been adopted to estimate the hydrodynamic coefficients of the AUG that are required for its trajectory simulation. In this work, a CFD approach has been proposed to estimate the hydrodynamic coefficients and validated with experimental data. A two-mass variable buoyancy engine has been designed and implemented. The equations of motion for this two-mass engine have been obtained by modifying the single mass version of the equations described in the literature. The objectives of the present study are to understand the glider dynamics adopting a CFD approach

  19. Active and passive electrical and seismic time-lapse monitoring of earthen embankments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittgers, Justin Bradley

    In this dissertation, I present research involving the application of active and passive geophysical data collection, data assimilation, and inverse modeling for the purpose of earthen embankment infrastructure assessment. Throughout the dissertation, I identify several data characteristics, and several challenges intrinsic to characterization and imaging of earthen embankments and anomalous seepage phenomena, from both a static and time-lapse geophysical monitoring perspective. I begin with the presentation of a field study conducted on a seeping earthen dam, involving static and independent inversions of active tomography data sets, and self-potential modeling of fluid flow within a confined aquifer. Additionally, I present results of active and passive time-lapse geophysical monitoring conducted during two meso-scale laboratory experiments involving the failure and self-healing of embankment filter materials via induced vertical cracking. Identified data signatures and trends, as well as 4D inversion results, are discussed as an underlying motivation for conducting subsequent research. Next, I present a new 4D acoustic emissions source localization algorithm that is applied to passive seismic monitoring data collected during a full-scale embankment failure test. Acoustic emissions localization results are then used to help spatially constrain 4D inversion of collocated self-potential monitoring data. I then turn to time-lapse joint inversion of active tomographic data sets applied to the characterization and monitoring of earthen embankments. Here, I develop a new technique for applying spatiotemporally varying structural joint inversion constraints. The new technique, referred to as Automatic Joint Constraints (AJC), is first demonstrated on a synthetic 2D joint model space, and is then applied to real geophysical monitoring data sets collected during a full-scale earthen embankment piping-failure test. Finally, I discuss some non-technical issues related to

  20. Time-lapse cinematography in living Drosophila tissues: preparation of material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ilan; Parton, Richard M

    2006-11-01

    The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has been an extraordinarily successful model organism for studying the genetic basis of development and evolution. It is arguably the best-understood complex multicellular model system, owing its success to many factors. Recent developments in imaging techniques, in particular sophisticated fluorescence microscopy methods and equipment, now allow cellular events to be studied at high resolution in living material. This ability has enabled the study of features that tend to be lost or damaged by fixation, such as transient or dynamic events. Although many of the techniques of live cell imaging in Drosophila are shared with the greater community of cell biologists working on other model systems, studying living fly tissues presents unique difficulties in keeping the cells alive, introducing fluorescent probes, and imaging through thick hazy cytoplasm. This protocol outlines the preparation of major tissue types amenable to study by time-lapse cinematography and different methods for keeping them alive.

  1. Time-lapse cinematography of dynamic changes occurring during in vitro development of human embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mio, Yasuyuki; Maeda, Kazuo

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify developmental changes of early human embryos by using time-lapse cinematography (TLC). For human ova, fertilization and cleavage, development of the blastocyst, and hatching, as well as consequent changes were repeatedly photographed at intervals of 5-6 days by using an inverse microscope under stabilized temperature and pH. Photographs were taken at 30 frames per second and the movies were studied. Cinematography has increased our understanding of the morphologic mechanisms of fertilization, development, and behavior of early human embryos, and has identified the increased risk of monozygotic twin pregnancy based on prolonged incubation in vitro to the blastocyst stage. Using TLC, we observed the fertilization of an ovum by a single spermatozoon, followed by early cleavages, formation of the morula, blastocyst hatching, changes in the embryonic plates, and the development of monozygotic twins from the incubated blastocysts.

  2. Time-lapse cinematography of the capillary tube cell migration inhibition test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, M A

    1980-01-01

    The kinetics of human and guinea pig cell migration inhibition have been studied using time-lapse cinematography of cells migrating from capillary tubes. Guinea pig and human cells exhibit markedly different kinetics in the absence of inhibitors. Specific antigen causes a dose-related inhibition of migration for up to 60 h using guinea pig cells and a peak of inhibition after 18 h using the human leucocyte system. The timing of measurement of maximum activity more critical for the latter test. The kinetics of lymphokine generation have been examined and the migration inhibitory activity of the plant mitogen (PHA), a Kurloff cell product and a continuous cell line supernatant have been compared with the inhibitory profiles of lymphokine preparations and specific antigen.

  3. Automated Tracking of Root for Confocal Time-lapse Imaging of Cellular Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumane, Mehdi; Lionnet, Claire; Bayle, Vincent; Jaillais, Yvon; Caillaud, Marie-Cécile

    2017-04-20

    Here we describe a protocol that enables to automatically perform time-lapse imaging of growing root tips for several hours. Plants roots expressing fluorescent proteins or stained with dyes are imaged while they grow using automatic movement of the microscope stage that compensates for root growth and allows to follow a given region of the root over time. The protocol makes possible the image acquisition of multiple growing root tips, therefore increasing the number of recorded mitotic events in a given experiment. The protocol also allows the visualization of more than one fluorescent protein or dye simultaneously, using multiple channel acquisition. We particularly focus on imaging of cytokinesis in Arabidopsis root tip meristem, but this protocol is also suitable to follow root hair growth, pollen tube growth, and other regions of root over time, in various plant species. It may as well be amendable to automatically track non-plant structures with an apical growth.

  4. 3-D time-lapse electrical resistivity monitoring of injected CO2 in a shallow aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, Joseph A. J.A.; Auken, Esben; Christiansen, Anders Vest C A.V.C.

    2013-01-01

    Contamination of potable groundwater by leaking CO2 is a potential risk of carbon sequestration. With the help of a field experiment, we investigate if surface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can detect dissolved CO2 in a shallow aquifer. For this purpose, we injected CO2 at a depth of 5...... inversion reveals the geology at the site consisting of aeolian sands near the surface and glacial sands below 5 m depth. Time-lapse inversions clearly image the dissolved CO2 plume with decreased electrical resistivity values. We can follow the CO2 plume as it spreads and moves with the groundwater...... and 10 m and monitored its migration using 320 surface electrodes on a 126 m × 20 m grid. A fully automated acquisition system continuously collected data and uploaded it into an online database. The large amount of data allows for time-series analysis for data quality and noise estimation. A baseline...

  5. How does blastomere removal affect embryonic development? : A time-lapse analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Kirstine; Hindkjær, Johnny Juhl; Ingerslev, Hans Jakob

    Introduction: Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is offered to couples whose potential offspring are at risk of an inherited single gene disease or structural chromosomal disorder. PGD requires embryonic DNA for establishing the diagnosis, which can be obtained by performing blastomere biopsy...... of the 6-10 cell embryo. It has been argued that blastomere removal does not affect embryonic development, but few studies have focussed on safety of the procedure. Recently, time-lapse studies on mice have suggested that blastomere removal affects embryonic development. The present study was conducted...... at the same time-point as the control group, but had a significantly smaller size (p=0,000) and a thicker zona pellucida (p=0,000) when hatching. In the control group expansion of the blastocyst caused continous thinning of zona pellucida until the blastocyst hatched. In the biopsed group no expansion or zona...

  6. Optimal Estimation of Diffusion Coefficients from Noisy Time-Lapse-Recorded Single-Particle Trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Christian Lyngby

    2012-01-01

    Optimal Estimation of Diusion Coecients from Noisy Time-Lapse- Measurements of Single-Particle Trajectories Single-particle tracking techniques allow quantitative measurements of diusion at the single-molecule level. Recorded time-series are mostly short and contain considerable measurement noise....... The standard method for estimating diusion coecients from single-particle trajectories is based on leastsquares tting to the experimentally measured mean square displacements. This method is highly inecient, since it ignores the high correlations inherent in these. We derive the exact maximum likelihood...... parameter values. We extend the methods to particles diusing on a uctuating substrate, e.g., exible or semi exible polymers such as DNA, and show that uctuations induce an important bias in the estimates of diusion coecients if they are not accounted for. We apply the methods to obtain precise estimates...

  7. Time-lapse reveals that osteoclasts can move across the bone surface while resorbing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søe, Kent; Delaissé, Jean-Marie

    2017-01-01

    resulting in the formation of clusters of round pits. However, very importantly, we also demonstrate that more than half of the osteoclasts moved laterally, displacing their extracellular bone-resorbing compartment over the bone surface without disassembling and reconstructing it, thereby generating long......Bone erosion both demands that the osteoclast resorbs bone matrix and moves over the bone surface. It is widely accepted that these two activities alternate, because they are considered mutually exclusive since resorption is believed to involve an immobilizing seal to the bone surface. However......, clear real-time observations are still lacking. Herein, we used specific markers and time-lapse to monitor live the spatiotemporal generation of resorption events by osteoclasts cultured on bone slices. In accordance with the current view, we found alternating episodes of resorption and migration...

  8. Time-lapse seismic analysis of the North Sea Fulmar Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, David H.; McKenny, Robert S.; Burkhart, Tucker D.

    1998-12-31

    Time-lapse seismic analysis has been applied to two 3-D seismic surveys acquired over the central North Sea Fulmar field in a pre-production survey shot in 1977, reprocessed in 1987, and a survey in 1992. The Upper Jurassic reservoirs in the field have been under production since 1982. Differences in averaged impedance between the 1977 and 1992 surveys clearly show the effects of water influx and pressure decline. The changes observed in the seismic data are overall consistent with predictions obtained from a full-field, history-matched simulation. Differences in details may suggest areas of bypassed oil. Dta quality is not sufficient to serve as the sole basis for drilling decisions. 1 ref., 6 figs.

  9. A poly(dimethylsiloxane)-based device enabling time-lapse imaging with high spatial resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Masahiko; Hoshida, Tetsushi; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a regulator-free device that enables long-term incubation of mammalian cells for epi-fluorescence imaging, based on a concept that the size of sample to be gassed and heated is reduced to observation scale. A poly(dimethylsiloxane) block stamped on a coverslip works as a long-lasting supplier of CO 2 -rich gas to adjust bicarbonate-containing medium in a tiny chamber at physiological pH, and an oil-immersion objective warms cells across the coverslip. A time-lapse imaging experiment using HeLa cells stably expressing fluorescent cell-cycle indicators showed that the cells in the chamber proliferated with normal cell-cycle period over 2 days.

  10. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing of clinical isolates by digital time-lapse microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredborg, M; Rosenvinge, F S; Spillum, E

    2015-01-01

    (168 antimicrobial agent-organism combinations) demonstrated 3.6 % minor, no major and 1.2 % very major errors of the oCelloScope system compared to conventional susceptibility testing, as well as a rapid and correct phenotypic detection of strains with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA......Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) is essential for early and appropriate therapy. Methods with short detection time enabling same-day treatment optimisation are highly favourable. In this study, we evaluated the potential of a digital time-lapse microscope system, the o......CelloScope system, to perform rapid AST. The oCelloScope system demonstrated a very high accuracy (96 % overall agreement) when determining the resistance profiles of four reference strains, nine clinical isolates, including multi-drug-resistant isolates, and three positive blood cultures. AST of clinical isolates...

  11. Network Flow Integer Programming to Track Elliptical Cells in Time-Lapse Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turetken, Engin; Wang, Xinchao; Becker, Carlos J; Haubold, Carsten; Fua, Pascal

    2017-04-01

    We propose a novel approach to automatically tracking elliptical cell populations in time-lapse image sequences. Given an initial segmentation, we account for partial occlusions and overlaps by generating an over-complete set of competing detection hypotheses. To this end, we fit ellipses to portions of the initial regions and build a hierarchy of ellipses, which are then treated as cell candidates. We then select temporally consistent ones by solving to optimality an integer program with only one type of flow variables. This eliminates the need for heuristics to handle missed detections due to partial occlusions and complex morphology. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach on a range of challenging sequences consisting of clumped cells and show that it outperforms state-of-the-art techniques.

  12. Time-lapse Ground-Penetrating Radar for Deriving Soil Hydraulic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenk, Patrick; Jaumann, Stefan; Roth, Kurt

    2014-05-01

    A profound understanding of subsurface hydrological processes demands a detailed description of hydraulic parameter distributions at the pertinent scale of interest. However, characterizing soil hydraulic properties remains a challenge, especially for field scale studies. Accurate high-resolution GPR measurements of soil water dynamics have shown promise to alleviate this challenge. In recent years, ASSESS-GPR, a field scale test site for advancing Ground-Penetrating Radar methods has been successfully established in Heidelberg (e.g., Buchner et al, 2012 or Klenk, 2012). Permanently installed TDR sensor profiles allow for an independent, corroborating dataset which can serve as basis for hydrologic modeling. In such a well-controlled experimental setup, we can achieve a very high relative precision for non-invasively monitoring soil water dynamics with GPR (Klenk, 2012). We can furthermore study the dynamics of the capillary fringe in different materials through time-lapse GPR measurements during pumping experiments. For example, as Dagenbach et al (2013) have shown, information can be gained about the appropriate form of a hydraulic parameterization. We here expand on these previous works by presenting a set of experiments, where the water table has been raised and subsequently lowered in a multi-step fashion over the course of several days. We discuss the non-invasive, high-resolution monitoring of the corresponding subsurface water dynamics by time-lapse GPR and thoroughly assess potentials for deriving hydraulic parameters for the different materials through electromagnetic modeling of the GPR response for said materials under the measured forcing.

  13. On the Resolvability of Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage Reservoirs Using Time-Lapse Gravity Gradiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, E. Judith; Braun, Alexander

    2017-11-01

    Unconventional heavy oil resource plays are important contributors to oil and gas production, as well as controversial for posing environmental hazards. Monitoring those reservoirs before, during, and after operations would assist both the optimization of economic benefits and the mitigation of potential environmental hazards. This study investigates how gravity gradiometry using superconducting gravimeters could resolve depletion areas in steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) reservoirs. This is achieved through modelling of a SAGD reservoir at 1.25 and 5 years of operation. Specifically, the density change structure identified from geological, petrological, and seismic observations is forward modelled for gravity and gradients. Three main parameters have an impact on the resolvability of bitumen depletion volumes and are varied through a suitable parameter space: well pair separation, depth to the well pairs, and survey grid sampling. The results include a resolvability matrix, which identifies reservoirs that could benefit from time-lapse gravity gradiometry monitoring. After 1.25 years of operation, during the rising phase, the resolvable maximum reservoir depth ranges between the surface and 230 m, considering a well pair separation between 80 and 200 m. After 5 years of production, during the spreading phase, the resolvability of depletion volumes around single well pairs is greatly compromised as the depletion volume is closer to the surface, which translates to a larger portion of the gravity signal. The modelled resolvability matrices were derived from visual inspection and spectral analysis of the gravity gradient signatures and can be used to assess the applicability of time-lapse gradiometry to monitor reservoir density changes.

  14. Low-cost motility tracking system (LOCOMOTIS) for time-lapse microscopy applications and cell visualisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Adam E; Triajianto, Junian; Routledge, Edwin

    2014-01-01

    Direct visualisation of cells for the purpose of studying their motility has typically required expensive microscopy equipment. However, recent advances in digital sensors mean that it is now possible to image cells for a fraction of the price of a standard microscope. Along with low-cost imaging there has also been a large increase in the availability of high quality, open-source analysis programs. In this study we describe the development and performance of an expandable cell motility system employing inexpensive, commercially available digital USB microscopes to image various cell types using time-lapse and perform tracking assays in proof-of-concept experiments. With this system we were able to measure and record three separate assays simultaneously on one personal computer using identical microscopes, and obtained tracking results comparable in quality to those from other studies that used standard, more expensive, equipment. The microscopes used in our system were capable of a maximum magnification of 413.6×. Although resolution was lower than that of a standard inverted microscope we found this difference to be indistinguishable at the magnification chosen for cell tracking experiments (206.8×). In preliminary cell culture experiments using our system, velocities (mean µm/min ± SE) of 0.81 ± 0.01 (Biomphalaria glabrata hemocytes on uncoated plates), 1.17 ± 0.004 (MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells), 1.24 ± 0.006 (SC5 mouse Sertoli cells) and 2.21 ± 0.01 (B. glabrata hemocytes on Poly-L-Lysine coated plates), were measured and are consistent with previous reports. We believe that this system, coupled with open-source analysis software, demonstrates that higher throughput time-lapse imaging of cells for the purpose of studying motility can be an affordable option for all researchers.

  15. Low-cost motility tracking system (LOCOMOTIS for time-lapse microscopy applications and cell visualisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam E Lynch

    Full Text Available Direct visualisation of cells for the purpose of studying their motility has typically required expensive microscopy equipment. However, recent advances in digital sensors mean that it is now possible to image cells for a fraction of the price of a standard microscope. Along with low-cost imaging there has also been a large increase in the availability of high quality, open-source analysis programs. In this study we describe the development and performance of an expandable cell motility system employing inexpensive, commercially available digital USB microscopes to image various cell types using time-lapse and perform tracking assays in proof-of-concept experiments. With this system we were able to measure and record three separate assays simultaneously on one personal computer using identical microscopes, and obtained tracking results comparable in quality to those from other studies that used standard, more expensive, equipment. The microscopes used in our system were capable of a maximum magnification of 413.6×. Although resolution was lower than that of a standard inverted microscope we found this difference to be indistinguishable at the magnification chosen for cell tracking experiments (206.8×. In preliminary cell culture experiments using our system, velocities (mean µm/min ± SE of 0.81 ± 0.01 (Biomphalaria glabrata hemocytes on uncoated plates, 1.17 ± 0.004 (MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, 1.24 ± 0.006 (SC5 mouse Sertoli cells and 2.21 ± 0.01 (B. glabrata hemocytes on Poly-L-Lysine coated plates, were measured and are consistent with previous reports. We believe that this system, coupled with open-source analysis software, demonstrates that higher throughput time-lapse imaging of cells for the purpose of studying motility can be an affordable option for all researchers.

  16. Relative Morphokinetics Assessed by Time-Lapse Imaging Are Altered in Embryos From Patients With Endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freis, Alexander; Dietrich, Jens Erik; Binder, Moritz; Holschbach, Verena; Strowitzki, Thomas; Germeyer, Ariane

    2017-01-01

    Time-lapse technology allows almost continuous noninvasive assessment of embryonic development. It was shown previously that relative kinetics defining cleavage synchronicity are better predictors of blastocyst quality than absolute time points. This study aims to compare relative kinetics in embryos from patients with and without endometriosis. Time-lapse data were collected retrospectively from 596 patients undergoing infertility treatment for in vitro fertilization from January 2011 to July 2016. Four hundred twenty-eight patients with confounding comorbidities (ie, polycystic ovary syndrome, pathological spermiogram in the included cycle, numerical/structural genetic abnormalities, preimplantation genetic screening performed) or incomplete data sets were excluded. Of the 168 included patients, 72 (42.9%) had endometriosis. Indications for in vitro fertilization of controls were tubal factor, unexplained infertility, or prolonged infertility. Relative kinetics were calculated as defined previously: cleavage synchronicity (CS)2-8=((t3-t2) + (t5-t4))/(t8-t2), CS4-8=(t8-t5)/(t8-t4), CS2-4=(t4-t3)/(t4-t2), DNA replication time ratio (DR)=(t3-t2)/(t5-t3). In women with more than one embryo, the median time was analyzed. Median age, body mass index, smoking status, and AMH levels were similar in both groups. Embryos from patients with endometriosis showed poorer relative kinetics. The relative time CS2-8 was decreased in embryos from patients with endometriosis (0.7 [0.0-0.93] vs 0.8 [0.0-0.94], P relative kinetic parameters (CS2-4 and DR) were not significantly different. Embryos from patients with endometriosis presented with altered relative kinetics suggesting poorer embryo quality. These findings support recently published data demonstrating reduced oocyte quality in patients with endometriosis which is one possible explanation for their poor response to fertility treatment.

  17. Gliding motility of Babesia bovis merozoites visualized by time-lapse video microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahito Asada

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Babesia bovis is an apicomplexan intraerythrocytic protozoan parasite that induces babesiosis in cattle after transmission by ticks. During specific stages of the apicomplexan parasite lifecycle, such as the sporozoites of Plasmodium falciparum and tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii, host cells are targeted for invasion using a unique, active process termed "gliding motility". However, it is not thoroughly understood how the merozoites of B. bovis target and invade host red blood cells (RBCs, and gliding motility has so far not been observed in the parasite. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Gliding motility of B. bovis merozoites was revealed by time-lapse video microscopy. The recorded images revealed that the process included egress of the merozoites from the infected RBC, gliding motility, and subsequent invasion into new RBCs. The gliding motility of B. bovis merozoites was similar to the helical gliding of Toxoplasma tachyzoites. The trails left by the merozoites were detected by indirect immunofluorescence assay using antiserum against B. bovis merozoite surface antigen 1. Inhibition of gliding motility by actin filament polymerization or depolymerization indicated that the gliding motility was driven by actomyosin dependent process. In addition, we revealed the timing of breakdown of the parasitophorous vacuole. Time-lapse image analysis of membrane-stained bovine RBCs showed formation and breakdown of the parasitophorous vacuole within ten minutes of invasion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of the gliding motility of B. bovis. Since merozoites of Plasmodium parasites do not glide on a substrate, the gliding motility of B. bovis merozoites is a notable finding.

  18. Quantifying Effusion Rates at Active Volcanoes through Integrated Time-Lapse Laser Scanning and Photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Slatcher

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available During volcanic eruptions, measurements of the rate at which magma is erupted underpin hazard assessments. For eruptions dominated by the effusion of lava, estimates are often made using satellite data; here, in a case study at Mount Etna (Sicily, we make the first measurements based on terrestrial laser scanning (TLS, and we also include explosive products. During the study period (17–21 July 2012, regular Strombolian explosions were occurring within the Bocca Nuova crater, producing a ~50 m-high scoria cone and a small lava flow field. TLS surveys over multi-day intervals determined a mean cone growth rate (effusive and explosive products of ~0.24 m3·s−1. Differences between 0.3-m resolution DEMs acquired at 10-minute intervals captured the evolution of a breakout lava flow lobe advancing at 0.01–0.03 m3·s−1. Partial occlusion within the crater prevented similar measurement of the main flow, but integrating TLS data with time-lapse imagery enabled lava viscosity (7.4 × 105 Pa·s to be derived from surface velocities and, hence, a flux of 0.11 m3·s−1 to be calculated. Total dense rock equivalent magma discharge estimates are ~0.1–0.2 m3·s−1 over the measurement period and suggest that simultaneous estimates from satellite data are somewhat overestimated. Our results support the use of integrated TLS and time-lapse photography for ground-truthing space-based measurements and highlight the value of interactive image analysis when automated approaches, such as particle image velocimetry (PIV, fail.

  19. Time-lapse seismic waveform modelling and attribute analysis using hydromechanical models for a deep reservoir undergoing depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Y.-X.; Angus, D. A.; Blanchard, T. D.; Wang, G.-L.; Yuan, S.-Y.; Garcia, A.

    2016-04-01

    Extraction of fluids from subsurface reservoirs induces changes in pore pressure, leading not only to geomechanical changes, but also perturbations in seismic velocities and hence observable seismic attributes. Time-lapse seismic analysis can be used to estimate changes in subsurface hydromechanical properties and thus act as a monitoring tool for geological reservoirs. The ability to observe and quantify changes in fluid, stress and strain using seismic techniques has important implications for monitoring risk not only for petroleum applications but also for geological storage of CO2 and nuclear waste scenarios. In this paper, we integrate hydromechanical simulation results with rock physics models and full-waveform seismic modelling to assess time-lapse seismic attribute resolution for dynamic reservoir characterization and hydromechanical model calibration. The time-lapse seismic simulations use a dynamic elastic reservoir model based on a North Sea deep reservoir undergoing large pressure changes. The time-lapse seismic traveltime shifts and time strains calculated from the modelled and processed synthetic data sets (i.e. pre-stack and post-stack data) are in a reasonable agreement with the true earth models, indicating the feasibility of using 1-D strain rock physics transform and time-lapse seismic processing methodology. Estimated vertical traveltime shifts for the overburden and the majority of the reservoir are within ±1 ms of the true earth model values, indicating that the time-lapse technique is sufficiently accurate for predicting overburden velocity changes and hence geomechanical effects. Characterization of deeper structure below the overburden becomes less accurate, where more advanced time-lapse seismic processing and migration is needed to handle the complex geometry and strong lateral induced velocity changes. Nevertheless, both migrated full-offset pre-stack and near-offset post-stack data image the general features of both the overburden and

  20. In-situ, time-lapse study of extracellular polymeric substance discharge in Streptococcus mutans biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bernard Haochih; Yu, Li-Chieh

    2017-02-01

    Streptococcus mutans is one of the main pathogens that cause tooth decay. By metabolizing carbohydrates, S. mutans emits extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) that adheres to the tooth surface and forms layers of biofilm. Periodontal disease occurs due to the low pH environment created by S. mutans biofilm, and such an acidic environment gradually erodes tooth enamel. Since the existence of EPS is essential in the formation of biofilm, the in-situ investigation of its generation and distribution in real time is the key to the control and suppression of S. mutans biofilm. Prior studies of the biofilm formation process by fluorescence microscope, scanning electron microscope, or spectroscope have roughly divided the mechanism into three stages: (1) initial attachment; (2) microcolonies; and (3) maturation. However, these analytical methods are incapable to observe real-time changes in different locations of the extracellular matrix, and to analyze mechanical properties for single bacteria in micro and nanoscale. Since atomic force microscopy (AFM) operates by precise control of tip-sample interaction forces in liquid and in air, living microorganisms can be analyzed under near-physiological conditions. Thus, analytical techniques based on AFM constitute powerful tools for the study of biological samples, both qualitatively and quantitatively. In this study, we used AFM to quantitatively track the changes of multiple nanomechanical properties of S. mutans, including dissipation energy, adhesion force, deformation, and elastic modulus at different metabolic stages. The data revealed that the bacterial extracellular matrix has a gradient distribution in stickiness, in which different stickiness indicates the variation of EPS compositions, freshness, and metabolic stages. In-situ, time-lapse AFM images showed the local generation and distribution of EPS at different times, in which the highest adhesion distributed along sides of the S. mutans cells. Through time-lapse

  1. Land time-lapse CSEM : Collecting, modeling and inversion of CSEM data for a steam-injected oil field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaller, A.M.

    2018-01-01

    Geophysical methods are widely used for hydrocarbon exploration and time-lapse measurements. One method that can be applied in place of or in addition to the routinely used seismic method, is the Controlled-Source ElectroMagnetic (CSEM) method. The work described in this thesis explores various

  2. Growth Rate and Morphology of a Single Calcium Carbonate Crystal on Polysulfone Film Measured with Time Lapse Raman Micro Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liszka, B.; Lenferink, Aufrid T.M.; Otto, Cornelis

    2016-01-01

    The growth of single, self- nucleated calcium carbonate crystals on a polysulfone (PSU) film was investigated with high resolution, time lapse Raman imaging. The Raman images were acquired on the interface of the polymer with the crystal. The growth of crystals could thus be followed in time. PSU is

  3. Mass conservative three-dimensional water tracer distribution from MCMC inversion of time-lapse GPR data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalov, E.; Linde, N.; Vrugt, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Time-lapse geophysical measurements are widely used to monitor the movement of water and solutes through the subsurface. Yet commonly used deterministic least squares inversions typically suffer from relatively poor mass recovery, spread overestimation, and limited ability to appropriately estimate

  4. Time-lapse micro-tomography analysis of the deformation response of a gellan-gum-based scaffold

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kytýř, Daniel; Fenclová, Nela; Zlámal, Petr; Kumpová, Ivana; Fíla, Tomáš; Koudelka_ml., Petr; Gantar, A.; Novak, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 3 (2017), s. 397-402 ISSN 1580-2949 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : bone scaffold * gellan gum * time-lapse micro CT * digital volume correlation Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials OBOR OECD: Materials engineering Impact factor: 0.436, year: 2016 http://mit.imt.si/Revija/izvodi/mit173/kytyr.pdf

  5. Could monopronucleated ICSI zygotes be considered for transfer? Analysis through time-lapse monitoring and PGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, S; Vidal, F; Parriego, M; Rodríguez, I; Montalvo, V; Veiga, A; Boada, M

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the chromosomal constitution and the developmental potential of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) deriving embryos displaying a single pronucleus at the zygote stage. Eighty-eight embryos from single pronucleus (1PN) two polar bodies (2PB) ICSI zygotes from 64 preimplantational genetic screening (PGS) cycles (October 2012-December 2014), were retrospectively analyzed. Zygotes were cultured in a time-lapse incubator. Embryo biopsy was performed on day 3 and genetic analysis approached by array comparative genomic hybridization. Chromosomal analysis revealed that 17% (15/88) of embryos derived from 1PN 2PB zygotes were diagnosed as euploid. After blastomere biopsy at day 3, the blastocyst rate at day 5 was 3.4% (3/88). Only 2.3% (2/88) euploid blastocysts were obtained. In two couples and after counseling and patient agreement, the transfer of a euploid blastocyst from a 1PN 2PB ICSI zygote was performed resulting in the birth of a healthy child. These results open the possibility to consider embryos coming from 1PN 2PB ICSI zygotes for transfer when no other embryos from 2PN 2PB ICSI zygotes are available and if a PGS diagnosis of euploidy is obtained. Confirmation of biparental inheritance is strongly recommended.

  6. Time-lapse imaging of neuroblastoma cells to determine cell fate upon gene knockdown.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa Batra

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma is the most common extra-cranial solid tumor of early childhood. Standard therapies are not effective in case of poor prognosis and chemotherapy resistance. To improve drug therapy, it is imperative to discover new targets that play a substantial role in tumorigenesis of neuroblastoma. The mitotic machinery is an attractive target for therapeutic interventions and inhibitors can be developed to target mitotic entry, spindle apparatus, spindle activation checkpoint, and mitotic exit. We present an elaborate analysis pipeline to determine cancer specific therapeutic targets by first performing a focused gene expression analysis to select genes followed by a gene knockdown screening assay of live cells. We interrogated gene expression studies of neuroblastoma tumors and selected 240 genes relevant for tumorigenesis and cell cycle. With these genes we performed time-lapse screening of gene knockdowns in neuroblastoma cells. We classified cellular phenotypes and used the temporal context of the perturbation effect to determine the sequence of events, particularly the mitotic entry preceding cell death. Based upon this phenotype kinetics from the gene knockdown screening, we inferred dynamic gene functions in mitosis and cell proliferation. We identified six genes (DLGAP5, DSCC1, SMO, SNRPD1, SSBP1, and UBE2C with a vital role in mitosis and these are promising therapeutic targets for neuroblastoma. Images and movies of every time point of all screened genes are available at https://ichip.bioquant.uni-heidelberg.de.

  7. Monitoring of In-Situ Remediation By Time Lapse 3D Geo-Electric Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanli, A. I.; Tildy, P.; Neducza, B.; Nagy, P.; Hegymegi, C.

    2017-12-01

    Injection of chemical oxidant solution to degrade the subsurface contaminants can be used for hydrocarbon contamination remediation. In this study, we developed a non-destructive measurement strategy to monitor oxidative in-situ remediation processes. The difficulties of the presented study originate from the small volume of conductive solution that can be used due to environmental considerations. Due to the effect of conductive groundwater and the high clay content of the targeted layer and the small volume of conductive solution that can be used due to environmental considerations, a site specific synthetic modelling is necessary for measurement design involving the results of preliminary 2D ERT measurements, electrical conductivity measurements of different active agents and expected resistivity changes calculated by soil resistivity modelling. Because of chemical biodegradation, the results of soil resistivity modelling have suggested that the reagent have complex effects on contaminated soils. As a result the plume of resistivity changes caused by the injected agent was determined showing strong fracturing effect because of the high pressure of injection. 3D time-lapse geo-electric measurements were proven to provide a usable monitoring tool for in-situ remediation as a result of our sophisticated tests and synthetic modelling.

  8. Estimation of soil hydraulic properties based on time-lapse Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaumann, Stefan; Klenk, Patrick; Roth, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    Recent developments brought surface-based GPR measurements to a precision that make them useful for estimating soil hydraulic properties. For this study, we estimate Mualem-Brooks-Corey parameters for a layered subsurface material distribution employing the Levenberg-Marquardt inversion algorithm. The required measurement data were recorded at our artificial test site ASSESS, where we forced the hydraulic system with a fluctuating water table and observed the dynamic deformation of the capillary fringe with time-lapse GPR. Subsequently, these measurements were simulated based on a model comprising (i) the Richards equation describing the temporal evolution of the soil hydraulic system which was solved with MUPHI, (ii) the Complex Refractive Index Model (CRIM) serving as petrophysical relationship which links the soil hydraulic model to (iii) the electrodynamic model consisting of Maxwell's equations which are solved with MEEP. For the objective function of the optimization algorithm, both measured and simulated GPR data were evaluated with a semi-automated wavelet feature detection algorithm allowing to directly compare the travel time and amplitude of the GPR signal. In this presentation, we discuss the results of the inversion based on the inversion of GPR data and we also discuss how including Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) measurement data influences the estimated parameters.

  9. Direct prediction of spatially and temporally varying physical properties from time-lapse electrical resistance data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Thomas; Oware, Erasmus; Caers, Jef

    2016-09-01

    Time-lapse applications of electrical methods have grown significantly over the last decade. However, the quantitative interpretation of tomograms in terms of physical properties, such as salinity, temperature or saturation, remains difficult. In many applications, geophysical models are transformed into hydrological models, but this transformation suffers from spatially and temporally varying resolution resulting from the regularization used by the deterministic inversion. In this study, we investigate a prediction-focused approach (PFA) to directly estimate subsurface physical properties with electrical resistance data, circumventing the need for classic tomographic inversions. First, we generate a prior set of resistance data and physical property forecast through hydrogeological and geophysical simulations mimicking the field experiment. We reduce the dimension of both the data and the forecast through principal component analysis in order to keep the most informative part of both sets in a reduced dimension space. Then, we apply canonical correlation analysis to explore the relationship between the data and the forecast in their reduced dimension space. If a linear relationship can be established, the posterior distribution of the forecast can be directly sampled using a Gaussian process regression where the field data scores are the conditioning data. In this paper, we demonstrate PFA for various physical property distributions. We also develop a framework to propagate the estimated noise level in the reduced dimension space. We validate the results by a Monte Carlo study on the posterior distribution and demonstrate that PFA yields accurate uncertainty for the cases studied.

  10. Observation of human embryonic behavior in vitro by high-resolution time-lapse cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Kyoko; Mio, Yasuyuki

    2016-07-01

    Assisted reproductive technology (ART) has yielded vast amounts of information and knowledge on human embryonic development in vitro; however, still images provide limited data on dynamic changes in the developing embryos. Using our high-resolution time-lapse cinematography (hR-TLC) system, we were able to describe normal human embryonic development continuously from the fertilization process to the hatched blastocyst stage in detail. Our hR-TLC observation also showed the embryonic abnormality of a third polar body (PB)-like substance likely containing a small pronucleus being extruded and resulting in single-pronucleus (1PN) formation, while our molecular biological investigations suggested the possibility that some 1PN embryos could be diploid, carrying both maternal and paternal genomes. Furthermore, in some embryos the extruded third PB-like substance was eventually re-absorbed into the ooplasm resulting in the formation of an uneven-sized, two-PN zygote. In addition, other hR-TLC observations showed that cytokinetic failure was correlated with equal-sized, multi-nucleated blastomeres that were also observed in the embryo showing early initiation of compaction. Assessment combining our hR-TLC with molecular biological techniques enables a better understanding of embryonic development and potential improvements in ART outcomes.

  11. Aberrant behavior of mouse embryo development after blastomere biopsy as observed through time-lapse cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugajin, Tomohisa; Terada, Yukihiro; Hasegawa, Hisataka; Velayo, Clarissa L; Nabeshima, Hiroshi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2010-05-15

    To analyze whether blastomere biopsy affects early embryonal growth as observed through time-lapse cinematography. Comparative prospective study between embryos in which a blastomere was removed and embryos in which a blastomere was not removed. An experimental laboratory of the university. We calculated the time between blastocele formation and the end of hatching, the time between the start and end of hatching, the number of contractions and expansions between blastocyst formation and the end of hatching, and the maximum diameter of the expanded blastocyst. In blastomere removal embryos, compaction began at the six-cell stage instead of at the eight-cell stage. We also found that hatching was delayed in these embryos as compared with matched controls. Moreover, the frequency of contraction and expansion movements after blastocyst formation was significantly higher in the blastomere removal group as compared with the control group. Finally, the maximum diameter of the expanded blastocyst just before hatching was not significantly different between both groups. These findings suggested that blastomere removal has an adverse effect on embryonic development around the time of hatching. Thus, future developments in preimplantation genetic diagnosis and screening should involve further consideration and caution in light of the influence of blastomere biopsy on embryonal growth. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mathematical analysis of endothelial sibling pair cell-cell interactions using time-lapse cinematography data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L M; Ryan, U S; Absher, M; Olazabal, B M

    1982-01-01

    The sibling pairs from two different endothelial cell cultures were analysed by time-lapse cinematography. It was shown that wounded and regular (low density seeded) cultures differed in the behaviour patterns of their siblings. The cultures differed most significantly in the minimum interdivision time (IDT) which was 27% lower for the wounded culture. In the wounded culture there was a greater correlation of IDT values between sibling pairs. IDT values recorded both for paired and for unpaired cells were shorter for the wounded than for the regular culture. The mean IDT for unpaired cells was longer than the mean IDT for paired cells in the regular culture. Thus paired cells in the regular culture, had shorter IDTs, but not as short as in the wounded culture. It was significant that in the wounded culture the first generation of siblings were very close (less than 150 microns apart) at division. Overall the behaviour differences between the two cultures resulted in a higher rate of increase in cell numbers, and thus faster repair, of the wounded monolayer.

  13. Time-lapse analysis of potential cellular responsiveness to Johrei, a Japanese healing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taft, Ryan; Moore, Dan; Yount, Garret

    2005-01-24

    Johrei is an alternative healing practice which involves the channeling of a purported universal healing energy to influence the health of another person. Despite little evidence to support the efficacy of such practices the use of such treatments is on the rise. We assessed cultured human cancer cells for potential responsiveness to Johrei treatment from a short distance. Johrei treatment was delivered by practitioners who participated in teams of two, alternating every half hour for a total of four hours of treatment. The practitioners followed a defined set of mental procedures to minimize variability in mental states between experiments. An environmental chamber maintained optimal growth conditions for cells throughout the experiments. Computerized time-lapse microscopy allowed documentation of cancer cell proliferation and cell death before, during and after Johrei treatments. Comparing eight control experiments with eight Johrei intervention experiments, we found no evidence of a reproducible cellular response to Johrei treatment. Cell death and proliferation rates of cultured human cancer cells do not appear responsive to Johrei treatment from a short distance.

  14. Segmentation Method of Time-Lapse Microscopy Images with the Focus on Biocompatibility Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, Jindřich; Císař, Petr; Šroubek, Filip

    2016-06-01

    Biocompatibility testing of new materials is often performed in vitro by measuring the growth rate of mammalian cancer cells in time-lapse images acquired by phase contrast microscopes. The growth rate is measured by tracking cell coverage, which requires an accurate automatic segmentation method. However, cancer cells have irregular shapes that change over time, the mottled background pattern is partially visible through the cells and the images contain artifacts such as halos. We developed a novel algorithm for cell segmentation that copes with the mentioned challenges. It is based on temporal differences of consecutive images and a combination of thresholding, blurring, and morphological operations. We tested the algorithm on images of four cell types acquired by two different microscopes, evaluated the precision of segmentation against manual segmentation performed by a human operator, and finally provided comparison with other freely available methods. We propose a new, fully automated method for measuring the cell growth rate based on fitting a coverage curve with the Verhulst population model. The algorithm is fast and shows accuracy comparable with manual segmentation. Most notably it can correctly separate live from dead cells.

  15. Environmental Monitoring Of Leaks Using Time Lapsed Long Electrode Electrical Resistivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucker, D.F.; Fink, J.B.; Loke, M.H.; Myers, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    Highly industrialized areas pose significant challenges for surface based electrical resistivity characterization and monitoring due to the high degree of metallic infrastructure. The infrastructure is typically several orders of magnitude more conductive than the desired targets, preventing the geophysicist from obtaining a clear picture of the subsurface. These challenges may be minimized if steel-cased wells are used as long electrodes. We demonstrate a method of using long electrodes in a complex nuclear waste facility to monitor a simulated leak from an underground storage tank. The leak was simulated by injecting high conductivity fluid in a perforated well and the resistivity measurements were made before and after the leak test. The data were processed in four dimensions, where a regularization procedure was applied in both the time and space domains. The results showed a lowered resistivity feature develop south of the injection site. The time lapsed regularization parameter had a strong influence on the differences in inverted resistivity between the pre and post datasets, potentially making calibration of the results to specific hydrogeologic parameters difficult.

  16. Time-lapse analysis of potential cellular responsiveness to Johrei, a Japanese healing technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore Dan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Johrei is an alternative healing practice which involves the channeling of a purported universal healing energy to influence the health of another person. Despite little evidence to support the efficacy of such practices the use of such treatments is on the rise. Methods We assessed cultured human cancer cells for potential responsiveness to Johrei treatment from a short distance. Johrei treatment was delivered by practitioners who participated in teams of two, alternating every half hour for a total of four hours of treatment. The practitioners followed a defined set of mental procedures to minimize variability in mental states between experiments. An environmental chamber maintained optimal growth conditions for cells throughout the experiments. Computerized time-lapse microscopy allowed documentation of cancer cell proliferation and cell death before, during and after Johrei treatments. Results Comparing eight control experiments with eight Johrei intervention experiments, we found no evidence of a reproducible cellular response to Johrei treatment. Conclusion Cell death and proliferation rates of cultured human cancer cells do not appear responsive to Johrei treatment from a short distance.

  17. Monitoring water flows with time-lapse Electrical Resistivity Tomography on the Super-Sauze landslide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gance, J.; Sailhac, P.; Malet, J.-P.; Grandjean, G.; Supper, R.; Jochum, B.; Ottowitz, D.

    2012-04-01

    This work presents results of a permanent hydro-geophysical monitoring of an active landslide developed in clay-shales. Hydrology has been proved to be a major factor controlling the Super-Sauze earthflow behavior, but it knowledge still limited mainly because of the importance of spatial heterogeneities. The geometry of the bedrock creates internal crests and gullies that can guide waterflows or create a lock and engender an excess of pore water pressure; the soil surface characteristics plays also a large role in the surface hydraulic conductivity, and therefore, on the infiltration pattern. To understand in detail these processes, it is therefore important to monitor spatially at large scale (with high resolution) those phenomena and to overcome the monitoring difficulties inherent to a fast-moving clayey earthflow. The objectives of the survey are to identify and characterize spatially and temporarily the water flow circulation within the landslide body over a period of one year. The studied profile measures 114 m long and is surveyed with 93 electrodes spaced from 0.5, 1 or 2 meter according the soil surface cracking. Four resistivity datasets of 4300 measurements are acquired each day using a gradient array since May 2011. The monitoring is performed with the GEOMON4D system, developed by the Geological Survey of Austria. To facilitate the interpretation, humidity, conductivity, temperature, and piezometer sensors are placed along the profile. Two dGPS antenna placed upstream and downstream the profile allow to correlate the results with soil displacement. Lefranc tests and granulometry results realized on several samples have shown the important heterogeneities of the near surface. The objective of this work is to present the data processing strategy for the analysis of long periods time-lapse ERT survey of natural rain events taking into account changes through time of the position of the electrodes, changes in the soil surface state and important changes

  18. Time-Lapse Dynamics of the Mouse Oocyte Chromatin Organisation during Meiotic Resumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Belli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the mammalian oocyte, distinct patterns of centromeres and pericentromeric heterochromatin localisation correlate with the gamete’s developmental competence. Mouse antral oocytes display two main types of chromatin organisation: SN oocytes, with a ring of Hoechst-positive chromatin surrounding the nucleolus, and NSN oocytes lacking this ring. When matured to MII and fertilised, only SN oocytes develop beyond the 2-cell, and reach full term. To give detailed information on the dynamics of the SN or NSN chromatin during meiosis resumption, we performed a 9 hr time-lapse observation. The main significant differences recorded are: (1 reduction of the nuclear area only in SN oocytes; (2 ~17 min delay of GVBD in NSN oocytes; (3 chromatin condensation, after GVBD, in SN oocytes; (4 formation of 4-5 CHCs in SN oocytes; (5 increase of the perivitelline space, ~57 min later in NSN oocytes; (6 formation of a rosette-like disposition of CHCs, ~84 min later in SN oocytes; (7 appearance of the MI plate ~40 min later in NSN oocytes. Overall, we described a pathway of transition from the GV to the MII stage that is punctuated of discrete recordable events showing their specificity and occurring with different time kinetics in the two types of oocytes.

  19. Untangling cell tracks: Quantifying cell migration by time lapse image data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Carl-Magnus; Medyukhina, Anna; Belyaev, Ivan; Al-Zaben, Naim; Figge, Marc Thilo

    2018-03-01

    Automated microscopy has given researchers access to great amounts of live cell imaging data from in vitro and in vivo experiments. Much focus has been put on extracting cell tracks from such data using a plethora of segmentation and tracking algorithms, but further analysis is normally required to draw biologically relevant conclusions. Such relevant conclusions may be whether the migration is directed or not, whether the population has homogeneous or heterogeneous migration patterns. This review focuses on the analysis of cell migration data that are extracted from time lapse images. We discuss a range of measures and models used to analyze cell tracks independent of the biological system or the way the tracks were obtained. For single-cell migration, we focus on measures and models giving examples of biological systems where they have been applied, for example, migration of bacteria, fibroblasts, and immune cells. For collective migration, we describe the model systems wound healing, neural crest migration, and Drosophila gastrulation and discuss methods for cell migration within these systems. We also discuss the role of the extracellular matrix and subsequent differences between track analysis in vitro and in vivo. Besides methods and measures, we are putting special focus on the need for openly available data and code, as well as a lack of common vocabulary in cell track analysis. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  20. Time-Lapse Video Microscopy for Assessment of EYFP-Parkin Aggregation as a Marker for Cellular Mitophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sante, Gabriele; Casimiro, Mathew C; Pestell, Timothy G; Pestell, Richard G

    2016-05-04

    Time-lapse video microscopy can be defined as the real time imaging of living cells. This technique relies on the collection of images at different time points. Time intervals can be set through a computer interface that controls the microscope-integrated camera. This kind of microscopy requires both the ability to acquire very rapid events and the signal generated by the observed cellular structure during these events. After the images have been collected, a movie of the entire experiment is assembled to show the dynamic of the molecular events of interest. Time-lapse video microscopy has a broad range of applications in the biomedical research field and is a powerful and unique tool for following the dynamics of the cellular events in real time. Through this technique, we can assess cellular events such as migration, division, signal transduction, growth, and death. Moreover, using fluorescent molecular probes we are able to mark specific molecules, such as DNA, RNA or proteins and follow them through their molecular pathways and functions. Time-lapse video microscopy has multiple advantages, the major one being the ability to collect data at the single-cell level, that make it a unique technology for investigation in the field of cell biology. However, time-lapse video microscopy has limitations that can interfere with the acquisition of high quality images. Images can be compromised by both external factors; temperature fluctuations, vibrations, humidity and internal factors; pH, cell motility. Herein, we describe a protocol for the dynamic acquisition of a specific protein, Parkin, fused with the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) in order to track the selective removal of damaged mitochondria, using a time-lapse video microscopy approach.

  1. BactImAS: a platform for processing and analysis of bacterial time-lapse microscopy movies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekterović, Igor; Mekterović, Darko; Maglica, Zeljka

    2014-07-25

    The software available to date for analyzing image sequences from time-lapse microscopy works only for certain bacteria and under limited conditions. These programs, mostly MATLAB-based, fail for microbes with irregular shape, indistinct cell division sites, or that grow in closely packed microcolonies. Unfortunately, many organisms of interest have these characteristics, and analyzing their image sequences has been limited to time consuming manual processing. Here we describe BactImAS - a modular, multi-platform, open-source, Java-based software delivered both as a standalone program and as a plugin for Icy. The software is designed for extracting and visualizing quantitative data from bacterial time-lapse movies. BactImAS uses a semi-automated approach where the user defines initial cells, identifies cell division events, and, if necessary, manually corrects cell segmentation with the help of user-friendly GUI and incorporated ImageJ application. The program segments and tracks cells using a newly-developed algorithm designed for movies with difficult-to-segment cells that exhibit small frame-to-frame differences. Measurements are extracted from images in a configurable, automated fashion and an SQLite database is used to store, retrieve, and exchange all acquired data. Finally, the BactImAS can generate configurable lineage tree visualizations and export data as CSV files. We tested BactImAS on time-lapse movies of Mycobacterium smegmatis and achieved at least 10-fold reduction of processing time compared to manual analysis. We illustrate the power of the visualization tool by showing heterogeneity of both icl expression and cell growth atop of a lineage tree. The presented software simplifies quantitative analysis of time-lapse movies overall and is currently the only available software for the analysis of mycobacteria-like cells. It will be of interest to the community of both end-users and developers of time-lapse microscopy software.

  2. Oil Sands Characteristics and Time-Lapse and P-SV Seismic Steam Monitoring, Athabasca, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, A.; Nakayama, T.; Kashihara, K.; Skinner, L.; Kato, A.

    2008-12-01

    -injection. The differences of the seismic responses between the time-lapse seismic volumes can be quantitatively explained by P-wave velocity decrease of the oil sands layers due to steam-injection. In addition, the data suggests that a larger area would be influenced by pressure than temperature. We calculate several seismic attributes such as RMS values of amplitude difference, maximum cross correlations, and interval velocity differences. These attributes are integrated by using self-organization maps (SOM) and K-means methods. By this analysis, we are able to distinguish areas of steam chamber growth from transitional and non-affected areas. In addition, 3D P-SV converted-wave processing and analysis are applied on the second 3D data set (recorded with three-component digital sensor). Low Vp/Vs values in the P-SV volume show areas of steam chamber development, and high Vp/Vs values indicate transitional zones. Our analysis of both time-lapse 3D seismic and 3D P-SV data along with the rock physics model can be used to monitor qualitatively and quantitatively the rock property changes of the inter-well reservoir sands in the field.

  3. A method for quantifying cloud immersion in a tropical mountain forest using time-lapse photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassiouni, Maoya; Scholl, Martha A.; Torres-Sanchez, Angel J.; Murphy, Sheila F.

    2017-01-01

    Quantifying the frequency, duration, and elevation range of fog or cloud immersion is essential to estimate cloud water deposition in water budgets and to understand the ecohydrology of cloud forests. The goal of this study was to develop a low-cost and high spatial-coverage method to detect occurrence of cloud immersion within a mountain cloud forest by using time-lapse photography. Trail cameras and temperature/relative humidity sensors were deployed at five sites covering the elevation range from the assumed lifting condensation level to the mountain peaks in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico. Cloud-sensitive image characteristics (contrast, the coefficient of variation and the entropy of pixel luminance, and image colorfulness) were used with a k-means clustering approach to accurately detect cloud-immersed conditions in a time series of images from March 2014 to May 2016. Images provided hydrologically meaningful cloud-immersion information while temperature-relative humidity data were used to refine the image analysis using dew point information and provided temperature gradients along the elevation transect. Validation of the image processing method with human-judgment based classification generally indicated greater than 90% accuracy. Cloud-immersion frequency averaged 80% at sites above 900 m during nighttime hours and 49% during daytime hours, and was consistent with diurnal patterns of cloud immersion measured in a previous study. Results for the 617 m site demonstrated that cloud immersion in the Luquillo Mountains rarely occurs at the previously-reported cloud base elevation of about 600 m (11% during nighttime hours and 5% during daytime hours). The framework presented in this paper will be used to monitor at a low cost and high spatial resolution the long-term variability of cloud-immersion patterns in the Luquillo Mountains, and can be applied to ecohydrology research at other cloud-forest sites or in coastal ecosystems with advective sea

  4. Using electromagnetic conductivity imaging to generate time-lapse soil moisture estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jingyi; Scuderio, Elia; Corwin, Dennis; Triantafilis, John

    2015-04-01

    Irrigated agriculture is crucial to the agricultural productivity of the Moreno valley. To maintain profitability, more will need to be done by irrigators with less water, owing to competing demands from rapidly expanding urbanisation in southern California. In this regard, irrigators need to understand the spatial and temporal variation of soil moisture to discern inefficiencies. However, soil moisture is difficult to measure and monitor, unless a large bank of soil sensors are installed and at various depths in the profile. In order to value add to the limited amount of information, geophysical techniques, such as direct current resisivity (DCR) arrays are used to develop electrical resistivity images (ERI). Whilst successful the approach is time consuming and labour intensive. In this research we describe how equivalent data can be collected using a proximal sensing electromagnetic (EM) induction instrument (i.e. DUALEM-421) and inversion software (EM4Soil) to generate EM conductivity images (EMCI). Figure 1 shows the EMCI generated from DUALEM-421 data acquired at various days of a time-lapse experiment and including; day a) 0, b) 1, c) 2, d) 3, e) 5, f) 7 and g) 11. We calibrate the estimates of true electrical conductivity (sigma - mS/m) with volumetric moisture content and show with good accuracy the spatial and temporal variation of soil moisture status and over 12 day period. The results show clearly that the pivot sprinkler irrigation system is effective at providing sufficient amounts of water to the top 0.5 m of a Lucerne crop (i.e. red shaded areas of high sigma). However, in some places faulty sprinklers are evident owing to the lack of wetting (i.e. blue shaded areas of low sigma). In addition, and over time, our approach shows clearly the effect the Lucerne crop has in drying the soil profile and using the soil moisture.

  5. Tracking snowmelt in the subsurface: time-lapse electrical resistivity imaging on an alpine hill slope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, D.; Parsekian, A.; Hyde, K.; Beverly, D.; Speckman, H. N.; Ewers, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    In the mountain West region the winter snowpack provides more than 70% of our annual water supply. Modeling and predicting the timing and magnitude of snowmelt-driven water yield is difficult due to the complexities of hydrologic systems that move meltwater from snow to rivers. Particular challenges are understanding the temporal and spatial domain of subsurface hydraulic processes at relevant scales, which range from points to catchments. Subsurface characterization often requires borehole instrumentation, which is expensive and extremely difficult to install in remote, rugged terrain. Advancements in non-invasive geophysical methods allow us to monitor changes in geophysical parameters over time and infer changes in hydraulic processes. In the No-Name experimental catchment in the Medicine Bow National Forest in Wyoming, we are conducting a multi-season, time-lapse electrical resistivity imaging survey on a sub-alpine hill slope. This south-facing, partially forested slope ranges from 5 degrees to 35 degrees in steepness and consists of a soil mantle covering buried glacial talus deposits of unknown depth. A permanent grid of down-slope and cross-slope electrode arrays is monitored up to four times a day. The arrays span the entire vertical distance of the slope, from an exposed bedrock ridge to a seasonal drainage below, and cover treed and non-treed areas. Geophysical measurements are augmented by temperature and moisture time-series instrumented below the surface in a contiguous 3 meter borehole. A time-series of multiple resistivity models each day from May to July shows the changing distribution of subsurface moisture during a seasonal drying sequence punctuated by isolated rain events. Spatial patterns of changing moisture indicate that soil and gravel in the top two meters drain into a saturated layer parallel to the slope which overlies less saturated material. These results suggest that water from snowmelt and rain events tends to move down-slope beneath

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING OF LEAKS USING TIME LAPSED LONG ELECTRODE ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.A.; Rucker, D.F.; Fink, J.B.; Loke, M.H.

    2009-01-01

    Highly industrialized areas pose challenges for surface electrical resistivity characterization due to metallic infrastructure. The infrastructure is typically more conductive than the desired targets and will mask the deeper subsurface information. These challenges may be minimized if steel-cased wells are used as long electrodes in the area near the target. We demonstrate a method of using long electrodes to electrically monitor a simulated leak from an underground storage tank with both synthetic examples and a field demonstration. The synthetic examples place a simple target of varying electrical properties beneath a very low resistivity layer. The layer is meant to replicate the effects of infrastructure. Both surface and long electrodes are tested on the synthetic domain. The leak demonstration for the field experiment is simulated by injecting a high conductivity fluid in a perforated well within the S tank farm at Hanford, and the resistivity measurements are made before and after the leak test. All data are processed in four dimensions, where a regularization procedure is applied in both the time and space domains. The synthetic test case shows that the long electrode ERM could detect relative changes in resistivity that are commensurate with the differing target properties. The surface electrodes, on the other hand, had a more difficult time matching the original target's footprint. The field results shows a lowered resistivity feature develop south of the injection site after cessation of the injections. The time lapsed regularization parameter has a strong influence on the differences in inverted resistivity between the pre and post injection datasets, but the interpretation of the target is consistent across all values of the parameter. The long electrode ERM method may provide a tool for near real-time monitoring of leaking underground storage tanks.

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING OF LEAKS USING TIME LAPSED LONG ELECTRODE ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MYERS DA; RUCKER DF; FINK JB; LOKE MH

    2009-12-16

    Highly industrialized areas pose challenges for surface electrical resistivity characterization due to metallic infrastructure. The infrastructure is typically more conductive than the desired targets and will mask the deeper subsurface information. These challenges may be minimized if steel-cased wells are used as long electrodes in the area near the target. We demonstrate a method of using long electrodes to electrically monitor a simulated leak from an underground storage tank with both synthetic examples and a field demonstration. The synthetic examples place a simple target of varying electrical properties beneath a very low resistivity layer. The layer is meant to replicate the effects of infrastructure. Both surface and long electrodes are tested on the synthetic domain. The leak demonstration for the field experiment is simulated by injecting a high conductivity fluid in a perforated well within the S tank farm at Hanford, and the resistivity measurements are made before and after the leak test. All data are processed in four dimensions, where a regularization procedure is applied in both the time and space domains. The synthetic test case shows that the long electrode ERM could detect relative changes in resistivity that are commensurate with the differing target properties. The surface electrodes, on the other hand, had a more difficult time matching the original target's footprint. The field results shows a lowered resistivity feature develop south of the injection site after cessation of the injections. The time lapsed regularization parameter has a strong influence on the differences in inverted resistivity between the pre and post injection datasets, but the interpretation of the target is consistent across all values of the parameter. The long electrode ERM method may provide a tool for near real-time monitoring of leaking underground storage tanks.

  8. On the possibility of time-lapse ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography for bladder cancer grading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhijia; Chen, Bai; Ren, Hugang; Pan, Yingtian

    2009-09-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that the cellular details of bladder epithelium embedded in speckle noise can be uncovered with time-lapse ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography (TL-uOCT) by proper time-lapse frame averaging that takes advantage of cellular micromotion in fresh biological tissue ex vivo. Here, spectral-domain 3-D TL-uOCT is reported to further improve the image fidelity, and new experimental evidence is presented to differentiate normal and cancerous nuclei of rodent bladder epithelia. Results of animal cancer study reveal that despite a slight overestimation (e.g., cancerous (e.g., high-grade DN''~13 μm) urothelia, which may potentially be very useful for enhancing the diagnosis of nonpapillary bladder cancer. More animal study is being conducted to examine the utility to differentiate hyperplasia, dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ.

  9. Time-lapse three-dimensional inversion of complex conductivity data using an active time constrained (ATC) approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaoulis, M.; Revil, A.; Werkema, D.D.; Minsley, B.J.; Woodruff, W.F.; Kemna, A.

    2011-01-01

    Induced polarization (more precisely the magnitude and phase of impedance of the subsurface) is measured using a network of electrodes located at the ground surface or in boreholes. This method yields important information related to the distribution of permeability and contaminants in the shallow subsurface. We propose a new time-lapse 3-D modelling and inversion algorithm to image the evolution of complex conductivity over time. We discretize the subsurface using hexahedron cells. Each cell is assigned a complex resistivity or conductivity value. Using the finite-element approach, we model the in-phase and out-of-phase (quadrature) electrical potentials on the 3-D grid, which are then transformed into apparent complex resistivity. Inhomogeneous Dirichlet boundary conditions are used at the boundary of the domain. The calculation of the Jacobian matrix is based on the principles of reciprocity. The goal of time-lapse inversion is to determine the change in the complex resistivity of each cell of the spatial grid as a function of time. Each model along the time axis is called a 'reference space model'. This approach can be simplified into an inverse problem looking for the optimum of several reference space models using the approximation that the material properties vary linearly in time between two subsequent reference models. Regularizations in both space domain and time domain reduce inversion artefacts and improve the stability of the inversion problem. In addition, the use of the time-lapse equations allows the simultaneous inversion of data obtained at different times in just one inversion step (4-D inversion). The advantages of this new inversion algorithm are demonstrated on synthetic time-lapse data resulting from the simulation of a salt tracer test in a heterogeneous random material described by an anisotropic semi-variogram. ?? 2011 The Authors Geophysical Journal International ?? 2011 RAS.

  10. Combined time-lapse magnetic resonance imaging and modeling to investigate colloid deposition and transport in porous media

    OpenAIRE

    LEHOUX, Alizée; FAURE, Paméla; LAFOLIE, Francois; RODTS, Stéphane; COURTIER-MURIAS, Denis; COUSSOT, Philippe; MICHEL, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Colloidal particles can act as vectors of adsorbed pollutants in the subsurface, or be themselves pollutants. They can reach the aquifer and impair groundwater quality. The mechanisms of colloid transport and deposition are often studied in columns filled with saturated porous media. Time-lapse profiles of colloid concentration inside the columns have occasionally been derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data recorded in transport experiments. These profiles are valuable, in additio...

  11. Time-lapse Imaging of Primary Preneoplastic Mammary Epithelial Cells Derived from Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nakles, Rebecca E.; Millman, Sarah L.; Cabrera, M. Carla; Johnson, Peter; Mueller, Susette; Hoppe, Philipp S.; Schroeder, Timm; Furth, Priscilla A.

    2013-01-01

    Time-lapse imaging can be used to compare behavior of cultured primary preneoplastic mammary epithelial cells derived from different genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer. For example, time between cell divisions (cell lifetimes), apoptotic cell numbers, evolution of morphological changes, and mechanism of colony formation can be quantified and compared in cells carrying specific genetic lesions. Primary mammary epithelial cell cultures are generated from mammary glands without...

  12. Prediction of in-vitro developmental competence of early cleavage-stage mouse embryos with compact time-lapse equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribenszky, Csaba; Losonczi, Eszter; Molnár, Miklós; Lang, Zsolt; Mátyás, Szabolcs; Rajczy, Klára; Molnár, Katalin; Kovács, Péter; Nagy, Péter; Conceicao, Jason; Vajta, Gábor

    2010-03-01

    Single blastocyst transfer is regarded as an efficient way to achieve high pregnancy rates and to avoid multiple pregnancies. Risk of cancellation of transfer due to a lack of available embryos may be reduced by early prediction of blastocyst development. Time-lapse investigation of mouse embryos shows that the time of the first and second cleavage (to the 2- and 3-cell stages, respectively) has a strong predictive value for further development in vitro, while cleavage from the 3-cell to the 4-cell stage has no predictive value. In humans, embryo fragmentation during preimplantation development has been associated with lower pregnancy rates and a higher incidence of developmental abnormalities. Analysis of time-lapse records shows that most fragmentation is reversible in the mouse and is resorbed in an average of 9 h. Daily or bi-daily microscopic checks of embryo development, applied routinely in human IVF laboratories, would fail to detect 36 or 72% of these fragmentations, respectively. Fragmentation occurring in a defined time frame has a strong predictive value for in-vitro embryo development. The practical compact system used in the present trial, based on the 'one camera per patient' principle, has eliminated the usual disadvantages of time-lapse investigations and is applicable for the routine follow-up of in-vitro embryo development. Copyright 2009 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Time-lapse camera trapping as an alternative to pitfall trapping for estimating activity of leaf litter arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Rachael A; Fisher, Diana O

    2017-09-01

    Pitfall trapping is the standard technique to estimate activity and relative abundance of leaf litter arthropods. Pitfall trapping is not ideal for long-term sampling because it is lethal, labor-intensive, and may have taxonomic sampling biases. We test an alternative sampling method that can be left in place for several months at a time: verticallyplaced time-lapse camera traps that have a short focal distance, enabling identification of small arthropods. We tested the effectiveness of these time-lapse cameras, and quantified escape and avoidance behavior of arthropod orders encountering pitfall traps by placing cameras programed with a range of sampling intervals above pitfalls, to assess numerical, taxonomic, and body size differences in samples collected by the two methods. Cameras programed with 1- or 15-min intervals recorded around twice as many arthropod taxa per day and a third more individuals per day than pitfall traps. Hymenoptera (ants), Embioptera (webspinners), and Blattodea (cockroaches) frequently escaped from pitfalls so were particularly under-sampled by them. The time-lapse camera method effectively samples litter arthropods to collect long-term data. It is standardized, non-lethal, and does not alter the substrate or require frequent visits.

  14. Time-lapse electromagnetic induction surveys under olive tree canopies reveal soil moisture dynamics and controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Gonzalo; Giraldez Cervera, Juan Vicente; Vanderlinden, Karl

    2015-04-01

    Soil moisture (θ) is a critical variable that exerts an important control on plant status and development. Soil sampling, neutron attenuation and electromagnetic methods such as TDR or FDR have been used widely to measure θ and provide point data at a possible range of temporal resolutions. However, these methods require either destructive sampling or permanently installed devices with often limiting measurement depths, or are extremely time-consuming. Moreover, the small support of such measurements compromises its value in heterogeneous soils. To overcome such limitations electromagnetic induction (EMI) can be tested to monitor θ at different spatial and temporal scales. This work investigates the potential of EMI to characterize the spatio-temporal variability of soil moisture from apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) under the canopy of individual olive trees. During one year we measured θ with a frequency of 5 min and ECa on an approximately weekly basis along transects from the tree trunk towards the inter-row area. CS-616 soil moisture sensors where horizontally installed in the walls of a trench at depths of 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 m at five locations along the transect, with a separation of 0.8 m. The Dualem-21S sensor was used to measure weekly the ECa at 0.2 m increments, from the tree trunk to a distance of 4.4 m. The results showed similar drying and wetting patterns for θ and ECa. Both variables showed a decreasing pattern from the tree trunk towards the drip line, followed by a sharp increment and constant values towards the center of the inter-row space. This pattern reflects clearly the influence of root-zone water uptake under the tree canopy and higher θ values in the inter-row area where root-water uptake is smaller. Time-lapse ECa data responded to evaporation and infiltration fluxes with the highest sensitivity for the 1 and 1.5 m ECa signals, as compared to the 0.5 and 3.0 m signals. Overall these preliminary results revealed the

  15. Penicillin induced persistence in Chlamydia trachomatis: high quality time lapse video analysis of the developmental cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel J Skilton

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis is a major human pathogen with a unique obligate intracellular developmental cycle that takes place inside a modified cytoplasmic structure known as an inclusion. Following entry into a cell, the infectious elementary body (EB differentiates into a non-infectious replicative form known as a reticulate body (RB. RBs divide by binary fission and at the end of the cycle they redifferentiate into EBs. Treatment of C.trachomatis with penicillin prevents maturation of RBs which survive and enlarge to become aberrant RBs within the inclusion in a non-infective persistent state. Persistently infected individuals may be a reservoir for chlamydial infection. The C.trachomatis genome encodes the enzymes for peptidoglycan (PG biosynthesis but a PG sacculus has never been detected. This coupled to the action of penicillin is known as the chlamydial anomaly. We have applied video microscopy and quantitative DNA assays to the chlamydial developmental cycle to assess the effects of penicillin treatment and establish a framework for investigating penicillin induced chlamydial persistence.Addition of penicillin at the time of cell infection does not prevent uptake and the establishment of an inclusion. EB to RB transition occurs but bacterial cytokinesis is arrested by the second binary fission. RBs continue to enlarge but not divide in the presence of penicillin. The normal developmental cycle can be recovered by the removal of penicillin although the large, aberrant RBs do not revert to the normal smaller size but remain present to the completion of the developmental cycle. Chromosomal and plasmid DNA replication is unaffected by the addition of penicillin but the arrest of bacterial cytokinesis under these conditions results in RBs accumulating multiple copies of the genome.We have applied video time lapse microscopy to the study of the chlamydial developmental cycle. Linked with accurate measures of genome replication this provides a

  16. A Novel Methodology for Characterizing Cell Subpopulations in Automated Time-lapse Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Hattab

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Time-lapse imaging of cell colonies in microfluidic chambers provides time series of bioimages, i.e., biomovies. They show the behavior of cells over time under controlled conditions. One of the main remaining bottlenecks in this area of research is the analysis of experimental data and the extraction of cell growth characteristics, such as lineage information. The extraction of the cell line by human observers is time-consuming and error-prone. Previously proposed methods often fail because of their reliance on the accurate detection of a single cell, which is not possible for high density, high diversity of cell shapes and numbers, and high-resolution images with high noise. Our task is to characterize subpopulations in biomovies. In order to shift the analysis of the data from individual cell level to cellular groups with similar fluorescence or even subpopulations, we propose to represent the cells by two new abstractions: the particle and the patch. We use a three-step framework: preprocessing, particle tracking, and construction of the patch lineage. First, preprocessing improves the signal-to-noise ratio and spatially aligns the biomovie frames. Second, cell sampling is performed by assuming particles, which represent a part of a cell, cell or group of contiguous cells in space. Particle analysis includes the following: particle tracking, trajectory linking, filtering, and color information, respectively. Particle tracking consists of following the spatiotemporal position of a particle and gives rise to coherent particle trajectories over time. Typical tracking problems may occur (e.g., appearance or disappearance of cells, spurious artifacts. They are effectively processed using trajectory linking and filtering. Third, the construction of the patch lineage consists in joining particle trajectories that share common attributes (i.e., proximity and fluorescence intensity and feature common ancestry. This step is based on patch finding

  17. Underwater manipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrum, P.B.; Cohen, G.H.

    1993-04-20

    Self-contained, waterproof, water-submersible, remote-controlled apparatus is described for manipulating a device, such as an ultrasonic transducer for measuring crack propagation on an underwater specimen undergoing shock testing. The subject manipulator includes metal bellows for transmittal of angular motions without the use of rotating shaft seals or O-rings. Inside the manipulator, a first stepper motor controls angular movement. In the preferred embodiment, the bellows permit the first stepper motor to move an ultrasonic transducer [plus minus]45 degrees in a first plane and a second bellows permit a second stepper motor to move the transducer [plus minus]10 degrees in a second plane orthogonal to the first. In addition, an XY motor-driven table provides XY motion.

  18. Underwater manipulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrum, P.B.; Cohen, G.H.

    1993-01-01

    Self-contained, waterproof, water-submersible, remote-controlled apparatus is described for manipulating a device, such as an ultrasonic transducer for measuring crack propagation on an underwater specimen undergoing shock testing. The subject manipulator includes metal bellows for transmittal of angular motions without the use of rotating shaft seals or O-rings. Inside the manipulator, a first stepper motor controls angular movement. In the preferred embodiment, the bellows permit the first stepper motor to move an ultrasonic transducer ±45 degrees in a first plane and a second bellows permit a second stepper motor to move the transducer ±10 degrees in a second plane orthogonal to the first. In addition, an XY motor-driven table provides XY motion

  19. STUDY OF TIME LAPSE IN FOREIGN BODY ASPIRATION IN RELATION TO CHEST X - RAY AND TYPE OF FOREIGN BODY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTI ON: Foreign body aspiration in pediatrics is a potentially fatal accident which will continue until children explore their surroundings with their hand and mouth. Pediatric aspirations will persist until mankind exists. Not all foreign body aspirations are witnessed hence chances of delay in diagnosing an aspiration are high. Delay in diagnosis depends on site and character of foreign body aspirated. The chest x - ray findings and type of foreign body extracted vary depending on the duration the foreign body remains in airway . OBJECTIVE: To study the X - ray finding in pediatric airway aspiration and its relation to time lapse, the type and site of lodgment of foreign body extracted via bronchoscopy. The type of foreign body in relation to time lapse in aspiration. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This was a prospective study done in Bapuji child health institute and research center, JJM Medical College, Davangere . History and pre bronchoscopy x - Ray finding were noted for 65 children who were posted for suspicious bronchoscopy from August 2011 to September 2013. 11 children were excluded from study as they showed no foreign body on bronchoscopy. Time lapse in aspir ation and seeking medical care was noted. The bronchoscopic findings regarding site of foreign body lodgment and type of foreign body were recorded. The type of foreign body and variation of x - ray picture in relation to time lapse in aspiration were noted. Data collected was analyzed using descriptive statistics. RESULT: It was observed that mean age was 28 months. About 80% of the cases were between 1 to 3 years age. 82% (n=53/54 were radio lucent foreign body, only 1.5% (n=1/54 were radio o paque. Site of lodgment of foreign body was right main bronchus in 48% (n=26/54, left main bronchus 46% (n=25/54 , tracheal 1.85% (n=1/54, subglottic 1.85% (n=1/54, carinal 1.85% (n=1/54, multiple site i.e. left bronchus +right bronchus+ carinal 1.85% (n=1/54. Groundnut was most common

  20. Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Site Characterization and Time-lapse Monitoring Using Reflection Seismic Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshuhail, Abdullah A.

    2011-12-01

    Of the various disciplines involved in carbon capture and storage, seismic methods are critically important. In this dissertation, two case studies in west-central Alberta were investigated by employing reflection seismic methods, rock physics and numerical modelling. In the first case study, regional and local seismic site characterization was undertaken as part of the Wabamun Area CO2 Sequestration Project. The results show that P-wave reflection seismology can be an effective tool in regional and local mapping of the continuity of the carbonate Nisku aquifer as well as in delineating geologic discontinuities, such as karsting, that may compromise storage integrity. Furthermore, the information provided by the seismic data was valuable when integrated with petrophysical data in order to reduce the ambiguity in identifying CO 2 injection "sweet spots". Results from the fluid substitution and numerical forward seismic modelling suggest that CO2 anomalies in stiff carbonate aquifers like the Nisku Formation are small and so is the change in seismic response. For instance, the maximum change in reflection time and NRMS amplitude in time-lapse P-wave reflection surface seismic data was found to be ˜ 1.5 ms and ˜ 24%, respectively. Detection of these small changes depends on a number of factors, including data repeatability, frequency bandwidth and CO2 saturation scheme. The change in the S-wave properties is much smaller than in the acoustic properties suggesting that it is unlikely that PS-wave would be successful in identifying CO 2 anomaly. The second case study pertains to 4-D seismic monitoring at the Pembina-Cardium CO2 Pilot Project site where multi-component surface seismic and walk-away vertical seismic profile methods were implemented as part of the monitoring program. The quality of these data, in particular, was compromised by interference caused by infrastructure development which resulted in the loss of ˜ 20% of the seismic shot locations. The 4-D

  1. Understanding infiltration and groundwater flow at an artificial recharge facility using time-lapse gravity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Jeffrey

    Groundwater provides a fundamental resource for modern life. Throughout the world, groundwater is managed by storing (recharging) it underground in natural aquifers for future withdrawal and consumptive use. In Arizona, over 4 million people benefit from managed aquifer storage, but little effort is made to track the movement of recharged water through the subsurface. Motivated by current limitations in our ability to monitor percolation and groundwater movement at the scale of a recharge facility, an effort to collect time-lapse gravity data was carried out at the Southern Avra Valley Storage and Recovery Project (SAVSARP) operated by the City of Tucson, Arizona. In addition to collecting water-level data 12 wells, there were three primary gravity experiments: (1) five continuously-recording gravity meters (2 iGrav superconducting gravity meters and 3 gPhone gravity meters) were installed semi-permanently in control buildings adjacent to the recharge basins, (2) absolute gravity measurements were made at nine locations over a 17 month period, and (3) three relative-gravity campaigns were carried out on a network of 70 stations. This large-scale controlled experiment, with known infiltration and pumping rates, resulted in one of the most comprehensive datasets of its kind. Gravity data led to several hydrologic insights, both through direct measurement and modeling. First, the infiltration rate could be estimated accurately based on the initial rate of gravity change during infiltration, regardless of the specific yield. Using two gravity meters, the depth, and therefore speed, of the wetting front beneath a recharge basin was observed, including the time at which the water table was reached. Spatial maps of gravity change from relative gravity surveys show areas where infiltration efficiency is highest, and where groundwater accumulates; storage accumulated preferentially to the west of the recharge basins, away from pumping wells. Such information would be

  2. Spatiotemporal monitoring of soil water content profiles in an irrigated field using probabilistic inversion of time-lapse EMI data

    KAUST Repository

    Moghadas, Davood

    2017-10-17

    Monitoring spatiotemporal variations of soil water content (θ) is important across a range of research fields, including agricultural engineering, hydrology, meteorology and climatology. Low frequency electromagnetic induction (EMI) systems have proven to be useful tools in mapping soil apparent electrical conductivity (σa) and soil moisture. However, obtaining depth profile water content is an area that has not been fully explored using EMI. To examine this, we performed time-lapse EMI measurements using a CMD mini-Explorer sensor along a 10 m transect of a maize field over a 6 day period. Reference data were measured at the end of the profile via an excavated pit using 5TE capacitance sensors. In order to derive a time-lapse, depth-specific subsurface image of electrical conductivity (σ), we applied a probabilistic sampling approach, DREAM(ZS), on the measured EMI data. The inversely estimated σ values were subsequently converted to θ using the Rhoades et al. (1976) petrophysical relationship. The uncertainties in measured σa, as well as inaccuracies in the inverted data, introduced some discrepancies between estimated σ and reference values in time and space. Moreover, the disparity between the measurement footprints of the 5TE and CMD Mini-Explorer sensors also led to differences. The obtained θ permitted an accurate monitoring of the spatiotemporal distribution and variation of soil water content due to root water uptake and evaporation. The proposed EMI measurement and modeling technique also allowed for detecting temporal root zone soil moisture variations. The time-lapse θ monitoring approach developed using DREAM(ZS) thus appears to be a useful technique to understand spatiotemporal patterns of soil water content and provide insights into linked soil moisture vegetation processes and the dynamics of soil moisture/infiltration processes.

  3. Effect of time lapse on the diagnostic accuracy of cone beam computed tomography for detection of vertical root fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskandarloo, Amir; Shokri, Abbas, E-mail: Dr.a.shokri@gmail.com [Dental Research Center, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Asl, Amin Mahdavi [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Golestan University of Medical Sciences, Gorgan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jalalzadeh, Mohsen [Department of Endodontics, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tayari, Maryam [Department of Pedodontics, Golestan University of Medical Sciences, Gorgan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseinipanah, Mohammad [Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fardmal, Javad [Research Center for Health Sciences and Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    Accurate and early diagnosis of vertical root fractures (VRFs) is imperative to prevent extensive bone loss and unnecessary endodontic and prosthodontic treatments. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of time lapse on the diagnostic accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for VRFs in endodontically treated dog’s teeth. Forty eight incisors and premolars of three adult male dogs underwent root canal therapy. The teeth were assigned to two groups: VRFs were artificially induced in the first group (n=24) while the teeth in the second group remained intact (n=24). The CBCT scans were obtained by NewTom 3G unit immediately after inducing VRFs and after one, two, three, four, eight, 12 and 16 weeks. Three oral and maxillofacial radiologists blinded to the date of radiographs assessed the presence/absence of VRFs on CBCT scans. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy values were calculated and data were analyzed using SPSS v.16 software and ANOVA. The total accuracy of detection of VRFs immediately after surgery, one, two, three, four, eight, 12 and 16 weeks was 67.3%, 68.7%, 66.6%, 64.6%, 64.5%, 69.4%, 68.7%, 68% respectively. The effect of time lapse on detection of VRFs was not significant (p>0.05). Overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of CBCT for detection of VRFs were 74.3%, 62.2%, 67.2% respectively. Cone beam computed tomography is a valuable tool for detection of VRFs. Time lapse (four months) had no effect on detection of VRFs on CBCT scans. (author)

  4. Analysis of Zebrafish Kidney Development with Time-lapse Imaging Using a Dissecting Microscope Equipped for Optical Sectioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perner, Birgit; Schnerwitzki, Danny; Graf, Michael; Englert, Christoph

    2016-04-07

    In order to understand organogenesis, the spatial and temporal alterations that occur during development of tissues need to be recorded. The method described here allows time-lapse analysis of normal and impaired kidney development in zebrafish embryos by using a fluorescence dissecting microscope equipped for structured illumination and z-stack acquisition. To visualize nephrogenesis, transgenic zebrafish (Tg(wt1b:GFP)) with fluorescently labeled kidney structures were used. Renal defects were triggered by injection of an antisense morpholino oligonucleotide against the Wilms tumor gene wt1a, a factor known to be crucial for kidney development. The advantage of the experimental setup is the combination of a zoom microscope with simple strategies for re-adjusting movements in x, y or z direction without additional equipment. To circumvent focal drift that is induced by temperature variations and mechanical vibrations, an autofocus strategy was applied instead of utilizing a usually required environmental chamber. In order to re-adjust the positional changes due to a xy-drift, imaging chambers with imprinted relocation grids were employed. In comparison to more complex setups for time-lapse recording with optical sectioning such as confocal laser scanning or light sheet microscopes, a zoom microscope is easy to handle. Besides, it offers dissecting microscope-specific benefits such as high depth of field and an extended working distance. The method to study organogenesis presented here can also be used with fluorescence stereo microscopes not capable of optical sectioning. Although limited for high-throughput, this technique offers an alternative to more complex equipment that is normally used for time-lapse recording of developing tissues and organ dynamics.

  5. Spatiotemporal monitoring of soil water content profiles in an irrigated field using probabilistic inversion of time-lapse EMI data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadas, Davood; Jadoon, Khan Zaib; McCabe, Matthew F.

    2017-12-01

    Monitoring spatiotemporal variations of soil water content (θ) is important across a range of research fields, including agricultural engineering, hydrology, meteorology and climatology. Low frequency electromagnetic induction (EMI) systems have proven to be useful tools in mapping soil apparent electrical conductivity (σa) and soil moisture. However, obtaining depth profile water content is an area that has not been fully explored using EMI. To examine this, we performed time-lapse EMI measurements using a CMD mini-Explorer sensor along a 10 m transect of a maize field over a 6 day period. Reference data were measured at the end of the profile via an excavated pit using 5TE capacitance sensors. In order to derive a time-lapse, depth-specific subsurface image of electrical conductivity (σ), we applied a probabilistic sampling approach, DREAM(ZS) , on the measured EMI data. The inversely estimated σ values were subsequently converted to θ using the Rhoades et al. (1976) petrophysical relationship. The uncertainties in measured σa, as well as inaccuracies in the inverted data, introduced some discrepancies between estimated σ and reference values in time and space. Moreover, the disparity between the measurement footprints of the 5TE and CMD Mini-Explorer sensors also led to differences. The obtained θ permitted an accurate monitoring of the spatiotemporal distribution and variation of soil water content due to root water uptake and evaporation. The proposed EMI measurement and modeling technique also allowed for detecting temporal root zone soil moisture variations. The time-lapse θ monitoring approach developed using DREAM(ZS) thus appears to be a useful technique to understand spatiotemporal patterns of soil water content and provide insights into linked soil moisture vegetation processes and the dynamics of soil moisture/infiltration processes.

  6. A multimethod Global Sensitivity Analysis to aid the calibration of geomechanical models via time-lapse seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, D. C.; Angus, D. A.; Garcia, A.; Fisher, Q. J.; Parsons, S.; Kato, J.

    2018-03-01

    Time-lapse seismic attributes are used extensively in the history matching of production simulator models. However, although proven to contain information regarding production induced stress change, it is typically only loosely (i.e. qualitatively) used to calibrate geomechanical models. In this study we conduct a multimethod Global Sensitivity Analysis (GSA) to assess the feasibility and aid the quantitative calibration of geomechanical models via near-offset time-lapse seismic data. Specifically, the calibration of mechanical properties of the overburden. Via the GSA, we analyse the near-offset overburden seismic traveltimes from over 4000 perturbations of a Finite Element (FE) geomechanical model of a typical High Pressure High Temperature (HPHT) reservoir in the North Sea. We find that, out of an initially large set of material properties, the near-offset overburden traveltimes are primarily affected by Young's modulus and the effective stress (i.e. Biot) coefficient. The unexpected significance of the Biot coefficient highlights the importance of modelling fluid flow and pore pressure outside of the reservoir. The FE model is complex and highly nonlinear. Multiple combinations of model parameters can yield equally possible model realizations. Consequently, numerical calibration via a large number of random model perturbations is unfeasible. However, the significant differences in traveltime results suggest that more sophisticated calibration methods could potentially be feasible for finding numerous suitable solutions. The results of the time-varying GSA demonstrate how acquiring multiple vintages of time-lapse seismic data can be advantageous. However, they also suggest that significant overburden near-offset seismic time-shifts, useful for model calibration, may take up to 3 yrs after the start of production to manifest. Due to the nonlinearity of the model behaviour, similar uncertainty in the reservoir mechanical properties appears to influence overburden

  7. Obstetric and perinatal outcomes of pregnancies conceived with embryos cultured in a time-lapse monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insua, Maria Fernanda; Cobo, Ana Cristina; Larreategui, Zaloa; Ferrando, Marcos; Serra, Vicente; Meseguer, Marcos

    2017-09-01

    To compare obstetric and perinatal outcomes of singleton pregnancies resulting from embryos incubated in a time-lapse system (TLS) with those of embryos grown in standard IVF incubators (SI). Retrospective description of a cohort of patients who conceived during a randomized, controlled trial. Private university-affiliated IVF center. Of 856 randomized patients, 378 gave birth to a live-born infant: 216 of the deliveries originated from embryos incubated in TLS, and 162 deliveries were from embryos cultured in SI. Embryo incubation and selection in TLS. Delivery and neonatal outcomes. No significant differences were observed in the baseline characteristics of the study population. The delivery rate was 49.3% (TLS) vs. 40.0% (SI), and multiple deliveries were higher in the TLS group: 31.0% (67 of 216) vs. 24.7% (40 of 162) in the SI group. When singleton pregnancies were analyzed no differences were found between the two groups in the rate of obstetric problems with respect to weeks at delivery: 38.8 (95% confidence interval [CI] 38.4-39.1) (TLS) vs. 39.5 (95% CI 38.0-39.9) (SI); preterm births (outcomes such as birth weight: 3,163 g (95% CI 3,035-3,292 g) (TLS) vs. 3,074 (95% CI 2,913-3,236) (SI); low birth weight (obstetric and perinatal outcomes when a time-lapse incubator was used rather than a more widely used conventional incubator. As far as we know this is the first report from a randomized study of the neonatal outcomes of time-lapse monitoring. Our results suggest that this technology is an effective and safe alternative for embryo incubation, though trials of larger numbers of patients are required to further confirm our conclusions. NCT01549262. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Near real-time imaging of molasses injections using time-lapse electrical geophysics at the Brandywine DRMO, Brandywine, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versteeg, R. J.; Johnson, T.; Major, B.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Lane, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    Enhanced bioremediation, which involves introduction of amendments to promote biodegradation, increasingly is used to accelerate cleanup of recalcitrant compounds and has been identified as the preferred remedial treatment at many contaminated sites. Although blind introduction of amendments can lead to sub-optimal or ineffective remediation, the distribution of amendment throughout the treatment zone is difficult to measure using conventional sampling. Because amendments and their degradation products commonly have electrical properties that differ from those of ambient soil, time-lapse electrical geophysical monitoring has the potential to verify amendment emplacement and distribution. In order for geophysical monitoring to be useful, however, results of the injection ideally should be accessible in near real time. In August 2010, we demonstrated the feasibility of near real-time, autonomous electrical geophysical monitoring of amendment injections at the former Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO) in Brandywine, Maryland. Two injections of about 1000 gallons each of molasses, a widely used amendment for enhanced bioremediation, were monitored using measurements taken with borehole and surface electrodes. During the injections, multi-channel resistance data were recorded; data were transmitted to a server and processed using a parallel resistivity inversion code; and results in the form of time-lapse imagery subsequently were posted to a website. This process occurred automatically without human intervention. The resulting time-lapse imagery clearly showed the evolution of the molasses plume. The delay between measurements and online delivery of images was between 45 and 60 minutes, thus providing actionable information that could support decisions about field procedures and a check on whether amendment reached target zones. This experiment demonstrates the feasibility of using electrical imaging as a monitoring tool both during amendment emplacement

  9. A Dynamic Programming Model for Optimizing Frequency of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring in Geological CO2 Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjya, D.; Mukerji, T.; Mascarenhas, O.; Weyant, J.

    2005-12-01

    Designing a cost-effective and reliable monitoring program is crucial to the success of any geological CO2 storage project. Effective design entails determining both, the optimal measurement modality, as well as the frequency of monitoring the site. Time-lapse seismic provides the best spatial coverage and resolution for reservoir monitoring. Initial results from Sleipner (Norway) have demonstrated effective monitoring of CO2 plume movement. However, time-lapse seismic is an expensive monitoring technique especially over the long term life of a storage project and should be used judiciously. We present a mathematical model based on dynamic programming that can be used to estimate site-specific optimal frequency of time-lapse surveys. The dynamics of the CO2 sequestration process are simplified and modeled as a four state Markov process with transition probabilities. The states are M: injected CO2 safely migrating within the target zone; L: leakage from the target zone to the adjacent geosphere; R: safe migration after recovery from leakage state; and S: seepage from geosphere to the biosphere. The states are observed only when a monitoring survey is performed. We assume that the system may go to state S only from state L. We also assume that once observed to be in state L, remedial measures are always taken to bring it back to state R. Remediation benefits are captured by calculating the expected penalty if CO2 seeped into the biosphere. There is a trade-off between the conflicting objectives of minimum discounted costs of performing the next time-lapse survey and minimum risk of seepage and its associated costly consequences. A survey performed earlier would spot the leakage earlier. Remediation methods would have been utilized earlier, resulting in savings in costs attributed to excessive seepage. On the other hand, there are also costs for the survey and remedial measures. The problem is solved numerically using Bellman's optimality principal of dynamic

  10. Estimation of soil hydraulic parameters by integrated hydrogeophysical inversion of time-lapse GPR data measured at Selhausen, Germany

    KAUST Repository

    Jadoon, Khan

    2012-06-01

    We present an integrated hydrogeophysical inversion approach that uses time-lapse off-ground ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data to estimate soil hydraulic parameters, and apply it to a dataset collected in the field. Off-ground GPR data are mainly sensitive to the near-surface water content profile and dynamics, and are thus related to soil hydraulic parameters, such as the parameters of the hydraulic conductivity and water retention functions. The hydrological simulator HYDRUS 1-D was used with a two-layer single- and dual-porosity model. To monitor the soil water content dynamics, time-lapse GPR and time domain reflectometry (TDR) measurements were performed, whereby only GPR data was used in the inversion. The dual porosity model provided better results compared to the single porosity model for describing the soil water dynamics, which is supported by field observations of macropores. Furthermore, the GPR-derived water content profiles reconstructed from the integrated hydrogeophysical inversion were in good agreement with TDR observations. These results suggest that the proposed method is promising for non-invasive characterization of the shallow subsurface hydraulic properties and monitoring water dynamics at the field scale.

  11. Time-Lapse Monitoring with 4D Seismic Coda Waves in Active, Passive and Ambient Noise Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumley, D. E.; Kamei, R.; Saygin, E.; Shragge, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    The Earth's subsurface is continuously changing, due to temporal variations in fluid flow, stress, temperature, geomechanics and geochemistry, for example. These physical changes occur at broad tectonic and earthquake scales, and also at very detailed near-surface and reservoir scales. Changes in the physical states of the earth cause time-varying changes in the physical properties of rocks and fluids, which can be monitored with natural or manmade seismic waves. Time-lapse (4D) seismic monitoring is important for applications related to natural and induced seismicity, hydrocarbon and groundwater reservoir depletion, CO2 sequestration etc. An exciting new research area involves moving beyond traditional methods in order to use the full complex time-lapse scattered wavefield (4D coda waves) for both manmade active-source 3D/4D seismic data, and also to use continuous recordings of natural-source passive seismic data, especially (micro) earthquakes and ocean ambient noise. This research involves full wave-equation approaches including waveform inversion (FWI), interferometry, Large N sensor arrays, "big data" information theory, and high performance supercomputing (HPC). I will present high-level concepts and recent data results that are quite spectacular and highly encouraging.

  12. Time-lapse imaging of primary preneoplastic mammary epithelial cells derived from genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakles, Rebecca E; Millman, Sarah L; Cabrera, M Carla; Johnson, Peter; Mueller, Susette; Hoppe, Philipp S; Schroeder, Timm; Furth, Priscilla A

    2013-02-08

    Time-lapse imaging can be used to compare behavior of cultured primary preneoplastic mammary epithelial cells derived from different genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer. For example, time between cell divisions (cell lifetimes), apoptotic cell numbers, evolution of morphological changes, and mechanism of colony formation can be quantified and compared in cells carrying specific genetic lesions. Primary mammary epithelial cell cultures are generated from mammary glands without palpable tumor. Glands are carefully resected with clear separation from adjacent muscle, lymph nodes are removed, and single-cell suspensions of enriched mammary epithelial cells are generated by mincing mammary tissue followed by enzymatic dissociation and filtration. Single-cell suspensions are plated and placed directly under a microscope within an incubator chamber for live-cell imaging. Sixteen 650 μm x 700 μm fields in a 4x4 configuration from each well of a 6-well plate are imaged every 15 min for 5 days. Time-lapse images are examined directly to measure cellular behaviors that can include mechanism and frequency of cell colony formation within the first 24 hr of plating the cells (aggregation versus cell proliferation), incidence of apoptosis, and phasing of morphological changes. Single-cell tracking is used to generate cell fate maps for measurement of individual cell lifetimes and investigation of cell division patterns. Quantitative data are statistically analyzed to assess for significant differences in behavior correlated with specific genetic lesions.

  13. The turbulent life of juvenile icebergs: Observations from an array of high-rate time-lapse cameras in LeConte Bay, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienholz, C.; Amundson, J. M.; Jackson, R. H.; Motyka, R. J.; Nash, J. D.; Sutherland, D.

    2017-12-01

    Tidewater glacier behavior is driven by poorly understood processes occurring at the ice-ocean interface, including sedimentation and erosion, iceberg calving, and submarine melting. These processes are inherently difficult to observe, calling for innovative field techniques and numerical models. As part of a multi-year field effort to constrain ocean-glacier heat and mass exchange, we deployed an array of high-rate time-lapse cameras (sampling intervals between 15 seconds and 2 minutes) to monitor the terminus of LeConte Glacier and its proglacial fjord. The camera array has operated continuously for more than a year. Our high sampling rates enable tracking of iceberg motion with optical flow algorithms, which have been used widely in computer vision but less so in glaciology and oceanography. Such algorithms track individual features (e.g., corners of icebergs), which is ideal for iceberg-rich fjords, where motion can vary substantially over short temporal and spatial scales (e.g., due to complex surface currents or different iceberg sizes). We process our data to quantify subdaily to seasonal patterns in surface currents and relate them to forcing from tides, wind, and glacier runoff. Flow is most variable close to the glacier terminus due to frequent calving events and turbulent plume dynamics. Farther down fjord, more consistent patterns emerge, driven by tides, wind, and runoff and altered by fjord geometry. Our tracking results compare favorably to and complement our Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler measurements from boats and moorings. Given their high spatial and temporal resolution, our observations will place important surface constraints on forthcoming hydrodynamic modeling efforts. The deployment of the cameras in a harsh environment and the corresponding image processing provided an opportunity to test hardware and software thoroughly, which will prove useful for similar systems at other glaciers.

  14. Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data for Monitoring Dielectric Permittivity and Soil Moisture Variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Z; Terry, N; Hubbard, S S; Csatho, B

    2013-02-12

    In this study, we evaluate the possibility of monitoring soil moisture variation using tomographic ground penetrating radar travel time data through Bayesian inversion, which is integrated with entropy memory function and pilot point concepts, as well as efficient sampling approaches. It is critical to accurately estimate soil moisture content and variations in vadose zone studies. Many studies have illustrated the promise and value of GPR tomographic data for estimating soil moisture and associated changes, however, challenges still exist in the inversion of GPR tomographic data in a manner that quantifies input and predictive uncertainty, incorporates multiple data types, handles non-uniqueness and nonlinearity, and honors time-lapse tomograms collected in a series. To address these challenges, we develop a minimum relative entropy (MRE)-Bayesian based inverse modeling framework that non-subjectively defines prior probabilities, incorporates information from multiple sources, and quantifies uncertainty. The framework enables us to estimate dielectric permittivity at pilot point locations distributed within the tomogram, as well as the spatial correlation range. In the inversion framework, MRE is first used to derive prior probability distribution functions (pdfs) of dielectric permittivity based on prior information obtained from a straight-ray GPR inversion. The probability distributions are then sampled using a Quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC) approach, and the sample sets provide inputs to a sequential Gaussian simulation (SGSim) algorithm that constructs a highly resolved permittivity/velocity field for evaluation with a curved-ray GPR forward model. The likelihood functions are computed as a function of misfits, and posterior pdfs are constructed using a Gaussian kernel. Inversion of subsequent time-lapse datasets combines the Bayesian estimates from the previous inversion (as a memory function) with new data. The memory function and pilot point design takes

  15. Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data for Monitoring Dielectric Permittivity and Soil Moisture Variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Zhangshuan; Terry, Neil C.; Hubbard, Susan S.

    2013-02-22

    In this study, we evaluate the possibility of monitoring soil moisture variation using tomographic ground penetrating radar travel time data through Bayesian inversion, which is integrated with entropy memory function and pilot point concepts, as well as efficient sampling approaches. It is critical to accurately estimate soil moisture content and variations in vadose zone studies. Many studies have illustrated the promise and value of GPR tomographic data for estimating soil moisture and associated changes, however, challenges still exist in the inversion of GPR tomographic data in a manner that quantifies input and predictive uncertainty, incorporates multiple data types, handles non-uniqueness and nonlinearity, and honors time-lapse tomograms collected in a series. To address these challenges, we develop a minimum relative entropy (MRE)-Bayesian based inverse modeling framework that non-subjectively defines prior probabilities, incorporates information from multiple sources, and quantifies uncertainty. The framework enables us to estimate dielectric permittivity at pilot point locations distributed within the tomogram, as well as the spatial correlation range. In the inversion framework, MRE is first used to derive prior probability density functions (pdfs) of dielectric permittivity based on prior information obtained from a straight-ray GPR inversion. The probability distributions are then sampled using a Quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC) approach, and the sample sets provide inputs to a sequential Gaussian simulation (SGSIM) algorithm that constructs a highly resolved permittivity/velocity field for evaluation with a curved-ray GPR forward model. The likelihood functions are computed as a function of misfits, and posterior pdfs are constructed using a Gaussian kernel. Inversion of subsequent time-lapse datasets combines the Bayesian estimates from the previous inversion (as a memory function) with new data. The memory function and pilot point design takes advantage of

  16. Subsurface Hydrologic Processes Revealed by Time-lapse GPR in Two Contrasting Soils in the Shale Hills CZO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, L.; Lin, H.; Nyquist, J.; Toran, L.; Mount, G.

    2017-12-01

    Linking subsurface structures to their functions in determining hydrologic processes, such as soil moisture dynamics, subsurface flow patterns, and discharge behaviours, is a key to understanding and modelling hydrological systems. Geophysical techniques provide a non-invasive approach to investigate this form-function dualism of subsurface hydrology at the field scale, because they are effective in visualizing subsurface structure and monitoring the distribution of water. In this study, we used time-lapse ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to compare the hydrologic responses of two contrasting soils in the Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory. By integrating time-lapse GPR with artificial water injection, we observed distinct flow patterns in the two soils: 1) in the deep Rushtown soil (over 1.5 m depth to bedrock) located in a concave hillslope, a lateral preferential flow network extending as far as 2 m downslope was identified above a less permeable layer and via a series of connected macropores; whereas 2) in the shallow Weikert soil ( 0.3 m depth to saprock) located in a planar hillslope, vertical infiltration into the permeable fractured shale dominated the flow field, while the development of lateral preferential flow along the hillslope was restrained. At the Weikert soil site, the addition of brilliant blue dye to the water injection followed by in situ excavation supported GPR interpretation that only limited lateral preferential flow formed along the soil-saprock interface. Moreover, seasonally repeated GPR surveys indicated different patterns of profile moisture distribution in the two soils that in comparison with the dry season, a dense layer within the BC horizon in the deep Rushtown soil prevented vertical infiltration in the wet season, leading to the accumulation of soil moisture above this layer; whereas, in the shallow Weikert soil, water infiltrated into saprock in wet seasons, building up water storage within the fractured bedrock (i.e., the

  17. A Modular and Affordable Time-Lapse Imaging and Incubation System Based on 3D-Printed Parts, a Smartphone, and Off-The-Shelf Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Vera, Rodrigo; Schwan, Emil; Fatsis-Kavalopoulos, Nikos; Kreuger, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Time-lapse imaging is a powerful tool for studying cellular dynamics and cell behavior over long periods of time to acquire detailed functional information. However, commercially available time-lapse imaging systems are expensive and this has limited a broader implementation of this technique in low-resource environments. Further, the availability of time-lapse imaging systems often present workflow bottlenecks in well-funded institutions. To address these limitations we have designed a modular and affordable time-lapse imaging and incubation system (ATLIS). The ATLIS enables the transformation of simple inverted microscopes into live cell imaging systems using custom-designed 3D-printed parts, a smartphone, and off-the-shelf electronic components. We demonstrate that the ATLIS provides stable environmental conditions to support normal cell behavior during live imaging experiments in both traditional and evaporation-sensitive microfluidic cell culture systems. Thus, the system presented here has the potential to increase the accessibility of time-lapse microscopy of living cells for the wider research community.

  18. Imaging subsurface migration of dissolved CO2 in a shallow aquifer using 3-D time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auken, Esben; Doetsch, Joseph; Fiandaca, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of groundwater by leaking CO2 is a potential risk of carbon sequestration. With the help of a field experiment in western Denmark, we investigate to what extent surface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can detect and image dissolved CO2 in a shallow aquifer. For this purpose...... of aeolian and glacial sands near the surface and marine sands below 10m depth. 3-D time-lapse ERT inversions clearly image the dissolved CO2 plume with decreased electrical resistivity values. We can image the geochemical changes induced by the dissolved CO2 until the end of the acquisition, 120days after......-intrusive surface electrical resistivity tomography. © 2013 Elsevier B.V....

  19. A time-lapse gravity survey of the Coso geothermal field, China Lake Naval Air Weapons Station, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Geoffrey; Cronkite-Ratcliff, Collin; Blake, Kelly

    2018-04-19

    We have conducted a gravity survey of the Coso geothermal field to continue the time-lapse gravity study of the area initiated in 1991. In this report, we outline a method of processing the gravity data that minimizes the random errors and instrument bias introduced into the data by the Scintrex CG-5 relative gravimeters that were used. After processing, the standard deviation of the data was estimated to be ±13 microGals. These data reveal that the negative gravity anomaly over the Coso geothermal field, centered on gravity station CER1, is continuing to increase in magnitude over time. Preliminary modeling indicates that water-table drawdown at the location of CER1 is between 65 and 326 meters over the last two decades. We note, however, that several assumptions on which the model results depend, such as constant elevation and free-water level over the study period, still require verification.

  20. Acquiring fluorescence time-lapse movies of budding yeast and analyzing single-cell dynamics using GRAFTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zopf, Christopher J; Maheshri, Narendra

    2013-07-18

    Fluorescence time-lapse microscopy has become a powerful tool in the study of many biological processes at the single-cell level. In particular, movies depicting the temporal dependence of gene expression provide insight into the dynamics of its regulation; however, there are many technical challenges to obtaining and analyzing fluorescence movies of single cells. We describe here a simple protocol using a commercially available microfluidic culture device to generate such data, and a MATLAB-based, graphical user interface (GUI) -based software package to quantify the fluorescence images. The software segments and tracks cells, enables the user to visually curate errors in the data, and automatically assigns lineage and division times. The GUI further analyzes the time series to produce whole cell traces as well as their first and second time derivatives. While the software was designed for S. cerevisiae, its modularity and versatility should allow it to serve as a platform for studying other cell types with few modifications.

  1. Technical Note: Semi-automated effective width extraction from time-lapse RGB imagery of a remote, braided Greenlandic river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, C. J.; Smith, L. C.; Finnegan, D. C.; LeWinter, A. L.; Pitcher, L. H.; Chu, V. W.

    2015-06-01

    River systems in remote environments are often challenging to monitor and understand where traditional gauging apparatus are difficult to install or where safety concerns prohibit field measurements. In such cases, remote sensing, especially terrestrial time-lapse imaging platforms, offer a means to better understand these fluvial systems. One such environment is found at the proglacial Isortoq River in southwestern Greenland, a river with a constantly shifting floodplain and remote Arctic location that make gauging and in situ measurements all but impossible. In order to derive relevant hydraulic parameters for this river, two true color (RGB) cameras were installed in July 2011, and these cameras collected over 10 000 half hourly time-lapse images of the river by September of 2012. Existing approaches for extracting hydraulic parameters from RGB imagery require manual or supervised classification of images into water and non-water areas, a task that was impractical for the volume of data in this study. As such, automated image filters were developed that removed images with environmental obstacles (e.g., shadows, sun glint, snow) from the processing stream. Further image filtering was accomplished via a novel automated histogram similarity filtering process. This similarity filtering allowed successful (mean accuracy 79.6 %) supervised classification of filtered images from training data collected from just 10 % of those images. Effective width, a hydraulic parameter highly correlated with discharge in braided rivers, was extracted from these classified images, producing a hydrograph proxy for the Isortoq River between 2011 and 2012. This hydrograph proxy shows agreement with historic flooding observed in other parts of Greenland in July 2012 and offers promise that the imaging platform and processing methodology presented here will be useful for future monitoring studies of remote rivers.

  2. Technical Note: Semi-automated classification of time-lapse RGB imagery for a remote Greenlandic river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, C. J.; Smith, L. C.; Finnegan, D. C.; LeWinter, A. L.; Pitcher, L. H.; Chu, V. W.

    2015-01-01

    River systems in remote environments are often challenging to monitor and understand where traditional gauging apparatus are difficult to install or where safety concerns prohibit field measurements. In such cases, remote sensing, especially terrestrial time lapse imaging platforms, offer a means to better understand these fluvial systems. One such environment is found at the proglacial Isortoq River in southwest Greenland, a river with a constantly shifting floodplain and remote Arctic location that make gauging and in situ measurements all but impossible. In order to derive relevant hydraulic parameters for this river, two RGB cameras were installed in July of 2011, and these cameras collected over 10 000 half hourly time-lapse images of the river by September of 2012. Existing approaches for extracting hydraulic parameters from RGB imagery require manual or supervised classification of images into water and non-water areas, a task that was impractical for the volume of data in this study. As such, automated image filters were developed that removed images with environmental obstacles (e.g. shadows, sun glint, snow) from the processing stream. Further image filtering was accomplished via a novel automated histogram similarity filtering process. This similarity filtering allowed successful (mean accuracy 79.6%) supervised classification of filtered images from training data collected from just 10% of those images. Effective width, a hydraulic parameter highly correlated with discharge in braided rivers, was extracted from these classified images, producing a hydrograph proxy for the Isortoq River between 2011 and 2012. This hydrograph proxy shows agreement with historic flooding observed in other parts of Greenland in July 2012 and offers promise that the imaging platform and processing methodology presented here will be useful for future monitoring studies of remote rivers.

  3. Preliminary observations on polar body extrusion and pronuclear formation in human oocytes using time-lapse video cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, D; Flaherty, S P; Barry, M F; Matthews, C D

    1997-03-01

    In this study, we have used time-lapse video cinematography to study fertilization in 50 human oocytes that had undergone intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Time-lapse recording commenced shortly after ICSI and proceeded for 17-20 h. Oocytes were cultured in an environmental chamber which was maintained under standard culture conditions. Overall, 38 oocytes (76%) were fertilized normally, and the fertilization rate and embryo quality were not significantly different from 487 sibling oocytes cultured in a conventional incubator. Normal fertilization followed a defined course of events, although the timing of these events varied markedly between oocytes. In 35 of the 38 fertilized oocytes (92%), there were circular waves of granulation within the ooplasm which had a periodicity of 20-53 min. The sperm head decondensed during this granulation phase. The second polar body was then extruded, and this was followed by the central formation of the male pronucleus. The female pronucleus formed in the cytoplasm adjacent to the second polar body at the same time as, or slightly after, the male pronucleus, and was subsequently drawn towards the male pronucleus until the two abutted. Both pronuclei then increased in size, the nucleoli moved around within the pronuclei and some nucleoli coalesced. During pronuclear growth, the organelles contracted from the cortex towards the centre of the oocyte, leaving a clear cortical zone. The oocyte decreased in diameter from 112 to 106 microm (P cinematography is an excellent tool for studying fertilization and early embryo development, and have demonstrated that human fertilization comprises numerous complex dynamic events.

  4. In vivo time-lapse imaging of cell proliferation and differentiation in the optic tectum of Xenopus laevis tadpoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestman, Jennifer E.; Lee-Osbourne, Jane; Cline, Hollis T.

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the function of neural progenitors in the developing CNS of Xenopus laevis tadpoles using in vivo time-lapse confocal microscopy to collect images through the tectum at intervals of 2 to 24 hours over 3 days. Neural progenitor cells were labeled with fluorescent protein reporters based on expression of endogenous Sox2 transcription factor. With this construct, we identified Sox2-expressing cells as radial glia and as a component of the progenitor pool of cells in the developing tectum that gives rise to neurons and other radial glia. Lineage analysis of individual radial glia and their progeny demonstrated that less than 10% of radial glia undergo symmetric divisions resulting in two radial glia, while the majority of radial glia divide asymmetrically to generate neurons and radial glia. Time-lapse imaging revealed the direct differentiation of radial glia into neurons. Although radial glia may guide axons as they navigate to superficial tectum, we find no evidence that radial glia function as a scaffold for neuronal migration at early stages of tectal development. Over three days, the number of labeled cells increased 20%, as the fraction of radial glia dropped and the proportion of neuronal progeny increased to approximately 60% of the labeled cells. Tadpoles provided with short-term visual enhancement generated significantly more neurons, with a corresponding decrease in cell proliferation. Together these results demonstrate that radial glial cells are neural progenitors in the developing optic tectum and reveal that visual experience increases the proportion of neurons generated in an intact animal. PMID:22113462

  5. Time-lapse ERT and DTS for seasonal and short-term monitoring of an alpine river hyporheic zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaga, Jacopo; Laura, Busato; Mariateresa, Perri; Giorgio, Cassiani

    2016-04-01

    The hyporheic zone (HZ) is the area located beneath and adjacent to rivers and streams, where the interactions between surface water and groundwater take place. This complex physical domain allows the transport of several substances from a stream to the unconfined aquifer below, and vice versa, thus playing a fundamental role in the river ecosystem. The importance of the hyporheic zone makes its characterization a goal shared by several disciplines, which range from applied geophysics to biogeochemistry, from hydraulics to ecology. The frontier field of HZ characterization stays in applied non-invasive methodologies as Electrical Resistivity Tomography - ERT - and Distributed Temperature Sensing - DTS. ERT is commonly applied in cross-well configuration or with a superficial electrodes deployment while DTS is used in hydro-geophysics in the last decade, revealing a wide applicability to the typical issues of this field of study. DTS for hydro-geophysics studies is based on Raman scattering and employs heat as tracer and uses a fiber-optic cable to acquire temperature values. We applied both techniques for an alpine river case studies located in Val di Sole, TN, Italy. The collected measurements allow high-resolution characterization of the hyporheic zone, overcoming the critical problem of invasive measurements under riverbeds. In this work, we present the preliminary results regarding the characterization of the hyporheic zone of the alpine river obtained combining ERT and DTS time-lapse measurements. The data collection benefits from an innovative instrumentation deployment, which consists of both an ERT multicore cable and a DTS fiber-optic located in two separated boreholes drilled 5m under the watercourse and perpendicular to it. In particular we present the first year monitoring results and a short time-lapse monitoring experiment conducted during summer 2015. The site and the results here described are part of the EU FP7 CLIMB (Climate Induced Changes on the

  6. Tracking multiple particles in fluorescence time-lapse microscopy images via probabilistic data association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinez, William J; Rohr, Karl

    2015-02-01

    Tracking subcellular structures as well as viral structures displayed as 'particles' in fluorescence microscopy images yields quantitative information on the underlying dynamical processes. We have developed an approach for tracking multiple fluorescent particles based on probabilistic data association. The approach combines a localization scheme that uses a bottom-up strategy based on the spot-enhancing filter as well as a top-down strategy based on an ellipsoidal sampling scheme that uses the Gaussian probability distributions computed by a Kalman filter. The localization scheme yields multiple measurements that are incorporated into the Kalman filter via a combined innovation, where the association probabilities are interpreted as weights calculated using an image likelihood. To track objects in close proximity, we compute the support of each image position relative to the neighboring objects of a tracked object and use this support to recalculate the weights. To cope with multiple motion models, we integrated the interacting multiple model algorithm. The approach has been successfully applied to synthetic 2-D and 3-D images as well as to real 2-D and 3-D microscopy images, and the performance has been quantified. In addition, the approach was successfully applied to the 2-D and 3-D image data of the recent Particle Tracking Challenge at the IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) 2012.

  7. Underwater robots

    CERN Document Server

    Antonelli, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    This book, now at the third edition, addresses the main control aspects in underwater manipulation tasks. The mathematical model with significant impact on the control strategy is discussed. The problem of controlling a 6-degrees-of-freedoms autonomous underwater vehicle is deeply investigated and a survey of fault detection/tolerant strategies for unmanned underwater vehicles is provided. Inverse kinematics, dynamic and interaction control for underwater vehicle-manipulator systems are then discussed. The code used to generate most of the numerical simulations is made available and briefly discussed.       

  8. Time-lapse gravity and levelling in the sinkhole-endangered urban area of Bad Frankenhausen, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobe, Martin; Gabriel, Gerald; Weise, Adelheid; Krawczyk, Charlotte; Vogel, Detlef

    2017-04-01

    Sinkholes, resulting from subrosion in the subsurface, can reach diameters of several hundred meters and thus pose a severe hazard for infrastructure and inhabitants in urban areas. Subrosion is the leaching of readily-soluble rocks, such as rock salt, gypsum, anhydrite and limestone by ground or meteoric water and leads to mass transport and relocation. Two scenarios of sinkhole evolution are conceivable: First, the surface subsides continuously in order to compensate for the mass loss. Second, the mass relocation leads to development of subsurface cavities. If they reach a critical size and the cover layers are not supported anymore, the surface collapses abruptly. To improve the understanding of subrosion processes and the related surface deformation a case study is conducted in Bad Frankenhausen, Germany, where subrosion leaches the Zechstein evaporates of the Permian. One part of the study is to analyse the spatiotemporal development of sinkholes by applying time-lapse observations. Therefore, we established a monitoring network consisting of 15 gravity and additional levelling points covering the main sinkhole areas in the city centre. In March 2014, the baseline survey was carried out. Since then, quarterly measurement campaigns are performed. In each campaign four different gravity meters are used to collect a statistical significant amount of data and to control the plausibility of our data. The gravity measurements are complemented by levelling surveys. The rectification of the time-lapse gravity data comprises the correction for jumps and systematic errors, as well as for well calculable influences, such as earth tides and air pressure changes. Furthermore, special interest was applied to seasonal changes of hydrological parameters such as soil moisture or groundwater level. We found the hydrological influence to be in the single digit up to the lower two-digit µGal range, depending on the season and the station. The standard deviations of the adjusted

  9. An effective assay for high cellular resolution time-lapse imaging of sensory placode formation and morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Raman M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vertebrate peripheral nervous system contains sensory neurons that arise from ectodermal placodes. Placodal cells ingress to move inside the head to form sensory neurons of the cranial ganglia. To date, however, the process of placodal cell ingression and underlying cellular behavior are poorly understood as studies have relied upon static analyses on fixed tissues. Visualizing placodal cell behavior requires an ability to distinguish the surface ectoderm from the underlying mesenchyme. This necessitates high resolution imaging along the z-plane which is difficult to accomplish in whole embryos. To address this issue, we have developed an imaging system using cranial slices that allows direct visualization of placode formation. Results We demonstrate an effective imaging assay for capturing placode development at single cell resolution using chick embryonic tissue ex vivo. This provides the first time-lapse imaging of mitoses in the trigeminal placodal ectoderm, ingression, and intercellular contacts of placodal cells. Cell divisions with varied orientations were found in the placodal ectoderm all along the apical-basal axis. Placodal cells initially have short cytoplasmic processes during ingression as young neurons and mature over time to elaborate long axonal processes in the mesenchyme. Interestingly, the time-lapse imaging data reveal that these delaminating placodal neurons begin ingression early on from within the ectoderm, where they start to move and continue on to exit as individual or strings of neurons through common openings on the basal side of the epithelium. Furthermore, dynamic intercellular contacts are abundant among the delaminating placodal neurons, between these and the already delaminated cells, as well as among cells in the forming ganglion. Conclusions This new imaging assay provides a powerful method to analyze directly development of placode-derived sensory neurons and subsequent ganglia

  10. Field measurement of erosion rates: time-lapse monitoring of rapid stone flaking at Howden Minster, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doehne, E.; Pinchin, S.

    2012-04-01

    The use of a solar-powered, field time-lapse camera and environmental monitoring system enabled measurements of the pattern and rate of loss of stone from the surface of Howden Minster, an abandoned monastery in Yorkshire dating to 1380 AD. Acquiring a photograph every 1-3 hours allowed the stone damage to be correlated with local environmental conditions. Image comparison techniques borrowed from observational astronomy, such as blink comparison, were used to determine what elements had changed from image to image. Results indicate that loss is episodic rather than continuous and in several cases is related to specific environmental conditions, such as condensation/dew formation or high winds. Damage was found also to be synchronous, with surface change (flaking, granular disintegration, and loss of flakes) occurring at the same time on different stone blocks. Crystallization pressure from magnesium sulfate phase transitions appear to be the main cause of the loss of stone surfaces. Significant variation in surface loss rates was observed and appears to be related to variations in salt concentration. An examination of stone texture by ESEM/EDS revealed signification variations and suggests that salt concentrations are controlled in part by stone micromorphology. Quantitative data on rates of surface loss are not available from most monuments. Time-lapse methods permit the relatively inexpensive acquisition of this type of data, which is needed to aid conservation decision-making and the evaluation of interventions. Such tools should also prove useful to geomorphologists studying honeycomb weathering, the moving rocks on Death Valley's Racetrack Playa, and other phenomena that are otherwise difficult to study. Context: The rapid deterioration of magnesian limestone structures in the north of England has been a serious problem for more than one hundred years. While air quality in England has improved during this period, the rate of stone loss in these carved stone

  11. Remote estimation of the hydraulic properties of a sand using full-waveform integrated hydrogeophysical inversion of time-lapse, off-ground GPR data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambot, S.; Slob, E.; Rhebergen, J.B.; Lopera, O.; Jadoon, K.Z.; Vereecken, H.

    2009-01-01

    We used integrated hydrogeophysical inversion of time-lapse, proximal ground penetrating radar (GPR) data to remotely infer the unsaturated soil hydraulic properties of a laboratory sand during an infiltration event. The inversion procedure involved full-waveform modeling of the radar signal and

  12. Monitoring channel head erosion processes in response to an artificially induced abrupt base level change using time-lapse photography 2301

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headcut and channel extension in response to an abrupt base level change in 2004 of approximately 1m was studied in a 1.29 ha semiarid headwater drainage on the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) in southeastern Arizona, USA. Field observations and time-lapse photography were coupled with hy...

  13. Diferentes modelos de video Time-Lapse y su aplicación en las clínicas de reproducción asistida

    OpenAIRE

    Fanjul González, Paula

    2013-01-01

    TFM del Máster de Biología y Tecnología de la Reproducción sobre los distintos modelos de video Time-Lapse que se pueden utilizar para la valoración embrionaria en una clínica de reproducción asistida

  14. Time-lapse analysis of methane quantity in Mary Lee group of coal seams using filter-based multiple-point geostatistical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karacan, C. Özgen; Olea, Ricardo A.

    2013-01-01

    Coal seam degasification and its success are important for controlling methane, and thus for the health and safety of coal miners. During the course of degasification, properties of coal seams change. Thus, the changes in coal reservoir conditions and in-place gas content as well as methane emission potential into mines should be evaluated by examining time-dependent changes and the presence of major heterogeneities and geological discontinuities in the field. In this work, time-lapsed reservoir and fluid storage properties of the New Castle coal seam, Mary Lee/Blue Creek seam, and Jagger seam of Black Warrior Basin, Alabama, were determined from gas and water production history matching and production forecasting of vertical degasification wellbores. These properties were combined with isotherm and other important data to compute gas-in-place (GIP) and its change with time at borehole locations. Time-lapsed training images (TIs) of GIP and GIP difference corresponding to each coal and date were generated by using these point-wise data and Voronoi decomposition on the TI grid, which included faults as discontinuities for expansion of Voronoi regions. Filter-based multiple-point geostatistical simulations, which were preferred in this study due to anisotropies and discontinuities in the area, were used to predict time-lapsed GIP distributions within the study area. Performed simulations were used for mapping spatial time-lapsed methane quantities as well as their uncertainties within the study area.

  15. Assessing Uncertainty and Repeatability in Time-Lapse VSP Monitoring of CO2 Injection in a Brine Aquifer, Frio Formation, Texas (A Case Study)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazari, Siamak [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Daley, Thomas M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Division

    2013-02-07

    This study was done to assess the repeatability and uncertainty of time-lapse VSP response to CO2 injection in the Frio formation near Houston Texas. A work flow was built to assess the effect of time-lapse injected CO2 into two Frio brine reservoir intervals, the ‘C’ sand (Frio1) and the ‘Blue sand’ (Frio2). The time-lapse seismic amplitude variations with sensor depth for both reservoirs Frio1 and Frio2 were computed by subtracting the seismic response of the base survey from each of the two monitor seismic surveys. Source site 1 has been considered as one of the best sites for evaluating the time-lapse response after injection. For site 1, the computed timelapse NRMS levels after processing had been compared to the estimated time-lapse NRMS level before processing for different control reflectors, and for brine aquifers Frio1, and Frio2 to quantify detectability of amplitude difference. As the main interest is to analyze the time-lapse amplitude variations, different scenarios have been considered. Three different survey scenarios were considered: the base survey which was performed before injection, monitor1 performed after the first injection operation, and monitor2 which was after the second injection. The first scenario was base-monitor1, the second was basemonitor2, and the third was monitor1-monitor2. We considered three ‘control’ reflections above the Frio to assist removal of overburden changes, and concluded that third control reflector (CR3) is the most favorable for the first scenario in terms of NRMS response, and first control reflector (CR1) is the most favorable for the second and third scenarios in terms of NRMS response. The NRMS parameter is shown to be a useful measure to assess the effect of processing on time-lapse data. The overall NRMS for the Frio VSP data set was found to be in the range of 30% to 80% following basic processing. This could be considered as an estimated baseline in assessing the utility

  16. The Relationship between Cell Number, Division Behavior and Developmental Potential of Cleavage Stage Human Embryos: A Time-Lapse Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyi Kong

    Full Text Available Day 3 cleavage embryo transfer is routine in many assisted reproductive technology centers today. Embryos are usually selected according to cell number, cell symmetry and fragmentation for transfer. Many studies have showed the relationship between cell number and embryo developmental potential. However, there is limited understanding of embryo division behavior and their association with embryo cell number and developmental potential. A retrospective and observational study was conducted to investigate how different division behaviors affect cell number and developmental potential of day 3 embryos by time-lapse imaging. Based on cell number at day 3, the embryos (from 104 IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI treatment cycles, n = 799 were classified as follows: less than 5 cells (10C; n = 42. Division behavior, morphokinetic parameters and blastocyst formation rate were analyzed in 5 groups of day 3 embryos with different cell numbers. In 10C embryos increased compared to 7-8C embryos (45.8%, 33.3% vs. 11.1%, respectively. In ≥5C embryos, FR and DC significantly reduced developmental potential, whereas 10C. In NB embryos, the cell cycle elongation or shortening was the main cause for abnormally low or high cell number, respectively. After excluding embryos with abnormal division behaviors, the developmental potential, implantation rate and live birth rate of day 3 embryos increased with cell number.

  17. The sexual phase of the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata: cytological and time-lapse cinematography characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalco, Eleonora; Amato, Alberto; Ferrante, Maria Immacolata; Montresor, Marina

    2016-11-01

    Pseudo-nitzschia is a thoroughly studied pennate diatom genus for ecological and biological reasons. Many species in this genus, including Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata, can produce domoic acid, a toxin responsible for amnesic shellfish poisoning. Physiological, phylogenetic and biological features of P. multistriata were studied extensively in the past. Life cycle stages, including the sexual phase, fundamental in diatoms to restore the maximum cell size and avoid miniaturization to death, have been well described for this species. P. multistriata is heterothallic; sexual reproduction is induced when strains of opposite mating type are mixed, and proceeds with cells producing two functionally anisogamous gametes each; however, detailed cytological information for this process is missing. By means of confocal laser scanning microscopy and nuclear staining, we followed the nuclear fate during meiosis, and using time-lapse cinematography, we timed every step of the sexual reproduction process from mate pairing to initial cell hatching. The present paper depicts cytological aspects during gametogenesis in P. multistriata, shedding light on the chloroplast behaviour during sexual reproduction, finely describing the timing of the sexual phases and providing reference data for further studies on the molecular control of this fundamental process.

  18. Comparative effects of ionizing radiation on cycle time and mitotic duration. A time-lapse cinematography study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Hooghe, M.C.; Hemon, D.; Valleron, A.J.; Malaise, E.P.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of 60 Co γ rays on the length of the intermitotic period, the duration of mitosis, and the division probability of EMT6 cells have been studied in vitro using time-lapse cinematography. Irradiation increases the duration of the mitosis and of the cycle in comparable proportions: both parameters are practically doubled by a dose of 10 Gy. When daughters of irradiated cells die, the mitotic delay and lengthening of mitosis of their mother cells are longer than average. Mitotic delay and lengthening of mitosis depend on the age of cells at the moment of irradiation. The mitotic delay increases progressively when cells are irradiated during the first 8 h of their cycle (i.e., before the transition point), whereas mitosis is slightly prolonged. On the other hand, when the cells are irradiated after this transition point the mitotic delay decreases markedly, whereas the lengthening of mitosis increases sharply. These results tend to indicate that two different mechanisms are responsible for mitotic delay and prolongation of mitosis observed after irradiation

  19. Random walk behavior of migrating cortical interneurons in the marginal zone: time-lapse analysis in flat-mount cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Daisuke H; Yanagida, Mitsutoshi; Zhu, Yan; Mikami, Sakae; Nagasawa, Takashi; Miyazaki, Jun-ichi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Obata, Kunihiko; Murakami, Fujio

    2009-02-04

    Migrating neurons are thought to travel from their origin near the ventricle to distant territories along stereotypical pathways by detecting environmental cues in the extracellular milieu. Here, we report a novel mode of neuronal migration that challenges this view. We performed long-term, time-lapse imaging of medial ganglionic eminence (MGE)-derived cortical interneurons tangentially migrating in the marginal zone (MZ) in flat-mount cortices. We find that they exhibit a diverse range of behaviors in terms of the rate and direction of migration. Curiously, a predominant population of these neurons repeatedly changes its direction of migration in an unpredictable manner. Trajectories of migration vary from one neuron to another. The migration of individual cells lasts for long periods, sometimes up to 2 d. Theoretical analyses reveal that these behaviors can be modeled by a random walk. Furthermore, MZ cells migrate from the cortical subventricular zone to the cortical plate, transiently accumulating in the MZ. These results suggest that MGE-derived cortical interneurons, once arriving at the MZ, are released from regulation by guidance cues and initiate random walk movement, which potentially contributes to their dispersion throughout the cortex.

  20. Fusion of Time-Lapse Gravity Survey and Hydraulic Tomography for Estimating Spatially Varying Hydraulic Conductivity and Specific Yield Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jui-Pin; Yeh, Tian-Chyi Jim; Cheng, Ching-Chung; Zha, Yuanyuan; Chang, Liang-Cheng; Hwang, Cheinway; Wang, Yu-Li; Hao, Yonghong

    2017-10-01

    Hydraulic conductivity >(K>) and specific yield (Sy) are important aquifer parameters, pertinent to groundwater resources management and protection. These parameters are commonly estimated through a traditional cross-well pumping test. Employing the traditional approach to obtain detailed spatial distributions of the parameters over a large area is generally formidable. For this reason, this study proposes a stochastic method that integrates hydraulic head and time-lapse gravity based on hydraulic tomography (HT) to efficiently derive the spatial distribution of K and Sy over a large area. This method is demonstrated using several synthetic experiments. Results of these experiments show that the K and Sy fields estimated by joint inversion of the gravity and head data set from sequential injection tests in unconfined aquifers are superior to those from the HT based on head data alone. We attribute this advantage to the mass constraint imposed on HT by gravity measurements. Besides, we find that gravity measurement can detect the change of aquifer's groundwater storage at kilometer scale, as such they can extend HT's effectiveness over greater volumes of the aquifer. Furthermore, we find that the accuracy of the estimated fields is improved as the number of the gravity stations is increased. The gravity station's location, however, has minor effects on the estimates if its effective gravity integration radius covers the well field.

  1. Cinemechanometry (CMM): A method to determine the forces that drive morphogenetic movements from time-lapse images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranston, P Graham; Veldhuis, Jim H; Narasimhan, Sriram; Brodland, G Wayne

    2010-09-01

    Although cell-level mechanical forces are crucial to tissue self-organization in contexts ranging from embryo development to cancer metastases to regenerative engineering, the absence of methods to map them over time has been a major obstacle to new understanding. Here, we present a technique for constructing detailed, dynamic maps of the forces driving morphogenetic events from time-lapse images. Forces in the cell are considered to be separable into unknown active driving forces and known passive forces, where actomyosin systems and microtubules contribute primarily to the first group and intermediate filaments and cytoplasm to the latter. A finite-element procedure is used to estimate the field of forces that must be applied to the passive components to produce their observed incremental deformations. This field is assumed to be generated by active forces resolved along user-defined line segments whose location, often along cell edges, is informed by the underlying biology. The magnitudes and signs of these forces are determined by a mathematical inverse method. The efficacy of the approach is demonstrated using noisy synthetic data from a cross section of a generic invagination and from a planar aggregate that involves two cell types, edge forces that vary with time and a neighbor change.

  2. Formation and spreading of TDP-43 aggregates in cultured neuronal and glial cells demonstrated by time-lapse imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Ishii

    Full Text Available TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43 is a main constituent of cytoplasmic aggregates in neuronal and glial cells in cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. We have previously demonstrated that adenovirus-transduced artificial TDP-43 cytoplasmic aggregates formation is enhanced by proteasome inhibition in vitro and in vivo. However, the relationship between cytoplasmic aggregate formation and cell death remains unclear. In the present study, rat neural stem cell lines stably transfected with EGFP- or Sirius-expression vectors under the control of tubulin beta III, glial fibrillary acidic protein, or 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase promoter were differentiated into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, respectively, in the presence of retinoic acid. The differentiated cells were then transduced with adenoviruses expressing DsRed-tagged human wild type and C-terminal fragment TDP-43 under the condition of proteasome inhibition. Time-lapse imaging analyses revealed growing cytoplasmic aggregates in the transduced neuronal and glial cells, followed by collapse of the cell. The aggregates remained insoluble in culture media, consisted of sarkosyl-insoluble granular materials, and contained phosphorylated TDP-43. Moreover, the released aggregates were incorporated into neighboring neuronal cells, suggesting cell-to-cell spreading. The present study provides a novel tool for analyzing the detailed molecular mechanisms of TDP-43 proteinopathy in vitro.

  3. Formation and spreading of TDP-43 aggregates in cultured neuronal and glial cells demonstrated by time-lapse imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Tomohiro; Kawakami, Emiko; Endo, Kentaro; Misawa, Hidemi; Watabe, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is a main constituent of cytoplasmic aggregates in neuronal and glial cells in cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. We have previously demonstrated that adenovirus-transduced artificial TDP-43 cytoplasmic aggregates formation is enhanced by proteasome inhibition in vitro and in vivo. However, the relationship between cytoplasmic aggregate formation and cell death remains unclear. In the present study, rat neural stem cell lines stably transfected with EGFP- or Sirius-expression vectors under the control of tubulin beta III, glial fibrillary acidic protein, or 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase promoter were differentiated into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, respectively, in the presence of retinoic acid. The differentiated cells were then transduced with adenoviruses expressing DsRed-tagged human wild type and C-terminal fragment TDP-43 under the condition of proteasome inhibition. Time-lapse imaging analyses revealed growing cytoplasmic aggregates in the transduced neuronal and glial cells, followed by collapse of the cell. The aggregates remained insoluble in culture media, consisted of sarkosyl-insoluble granular materials, and contained phosphorylated TDP-43. Moreover, the released aggregates were incorporated into neighboring neuronal cells, suggesting cell-to-cell spreading. The present study provides a novel tool for analyzing the detailed molecular mechanisms of TDP-43 proteinopathy in vitro.

  4. Through the Looking Glass: Time-lapse Microscopy and Longitudinal Tracking of Single Cells to Study Anti-cancer Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Russell T; Orth, James D

    2016-05-14

    The response of single cells to anti-cancer drugs contributes significantly in determining the population response, and therefore is a major contributing factor in the overall outcome. Immunoblotting, flow cytometry and fixed cell experiments are often used to study how cells respond to anti-cancer drugs. These methods are important, but they have several shortcomings. Variability in drug responses between cancer and normal cells, and between cells of different cancer origin, and transient and rare responses are difficult to understand using population averaging assays and without being able to directly track and analyze them longitudinally. The microscope is particularly well suited to image live cells. Advancements in technology enable us to routinely image cells at a resolution that enables not only cell tracking, but also the observation of a variety of cellular responses. We describe an approach in detail that allows for the continuous time-lapse imaging of cells during the drug response for essentially as long as desired, typically up to 96 hr. Using variations of the approach, cells can be monitored for weeks. With the employment of genetically encoded fluorescent biosensors numerous processes, pathways and responses can be followed. We show examples that include tracking and quantification of cell growth and cell cycle progression, chromosome dynamics, DNA damage, and cell death. We also discuss variations of the technique and its flexibility, and highlight some common pitfalls.

  5. A Sparse Bayesian Imaging Technique for Efficient Recovery of Reservoir Channels With Time-Lapse Seismic Measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Sana, Furrukh

    2016-06-01

    Subsurface reservoir flow channels are characterized by high-permeability values and serve as preferred pathways for fluid propagation. Accurate estimation of their geophysical structures is thus of great importance for the oil industry. The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is a widely used statistical technique for estimating subsurface reservoir model parameters. However, accurate reconstruction of the subsurface geological features with the EnKF is challenging because of the limited measurements available from the wells and the smoothing effects imposed by the \\\\ell _{2} -norm nature of its update step. A new EnKF scheme based on sparse domain representation was introduced by Sana et al. (2015) to incorporate useful prior structural information in the estimation process for efficient recovery of subsurface channels. In this paper, we extend this work in two ways: 1) investigate the effects of incorporating time-lapse seismic data on the channel reconstruction; and 2) explore a Bayesian sparse reconstruction algorithm with the potential ability to reduce the computational requirements. Numerical results suggest that the performance of the new sparse Bayesian based EnKF scheme is enhanced with the availability of seismic measurements, leading to further improvement in the recovery of flow channels structures. The sparse Bayesian approach further provides a computationally efficient framework for enforcing a sparse solution, especially with the possibility of using high sparsity rates through the inclusion of seismic data.

  6. Technical note: Stage and water width measurement of a mountain stream using a simple time-lapse camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Leduc

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing applied to river monitoring adds complementary information useful for understanding the system behaviour. In this paper, we present a method for visual stage gauging and water surface width measurement using a ground-based time-lapse camera and a fully automatic image analysis algorithm for flow monitoring at a river cross section of a steep, bouldery channel. The remote stage measurement was coupled with a water level logger (pressure transducer on site and shows that the image-based method gives a reliable estimate of the water height variation and daily flow record when validated against the pressure transducer (R = 0.91. From the remotely sensed pictures, we also extracted the water width and show that it is possible to correlate water surface width and stage. The images also provide valuable ancillary information for interpreting and understanding flow hydraulics and site weather conditions. This image-based gauging method is a reliable, informative and inexpensive alternative or adjunct to conventional stage measurement especially for remote sites.

  7. Technical note: Stage and water width measurement of a mountain stream using a simple time-lapse camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, Pauline; Ashmore, Peter; Sjogren, Darren

    2018-01-01

    Remote sensing applied to river monitoring adds complementary information useful for understanding the system behaviour. In this paper, we present a method for visual stage gauging and water surface width measurement using a ground-based time-lapse camera and a fully automatic image analysis algorithm for flow monitoring at a river cross section of a steep, bouldery channel. The remote stage measurement was coupled with a water level logger (pressure transducer) on site and shows that the image-based method gives a reliable estimate of the water height variation and daily flow record when validated against the pressure transducer (R = 0.91). From the remotely sensed pictures, we also extracted the water width and show that it is possible to correlate water surface width and stage. The images also provide valuable ancillary information for interpreting and understanding flow hydraulics and site weather conditions. This image-based gauging method is a reliable, informative and inexpensive alternative or adjunct to conventional stage measurement especially for remote sites.

  8. Google™ underwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-10-01

    The first underwater panoramic images were added to Google Maps™, the company announced on 25 September. This first “underwater Street View collection,” launched in partnership with the Caitlin Seaview Survey, provides people with the opportunity to “become the next virtual Jacques Cousteau.” For more information, see: maps.google.com/ocean.

  9. End of the chain? Rugosity and fine-scale bathymetry from existing underwater digital imagery using structure-from-motion (SfM) technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storlazzi, Curt; Dartnell, Peter; Hatcher, Gerry; Gibbs, Ann E.

    2016-01-01

    The rugosity or complexity of the seafloor has been shown to be an important ecological parameter for fish, algae, and corals. Historically, rugosity has been measured either using simple and subjective manual methods such as ‘chain-and-tape’ or complicated and expensive geophysical methods. Here, we demonstrate the application of structure-from-motion (SfM) photogrammetry to generate high-resolution, three-dimensional bathymetric models of a fringing reef from existing underwater video collected to characterize the seafloor. SfM techniques are capable of achieving spatial resolution that can be orders of magnitude greater than large-scale lidar and sonar mapping of coral reef ecosystems. The resulting data provide finer-scale measurements of bathymetry and rugosity that are more applicable to ecological studies of coral reefs than provided by the more expensive and time-consuming geophysical methods. Utilizing SfM techniques for characterizing the benthic habitat proved to be more effective and quantitatively powerful than conventional methods and thus might portend the end of the ‘chain-and-tape’ method for measuring benthic complexity.

  10. Large-Scale Laboratory Experiments of Incipient Motion, Transport, and Fate of Underwater Munitions Under Waves, Currents, and Combined Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    different roughness (smooth PVC versus pitted steel) in unidirectional flow. In addition , based on flows resulting in initiation of motion, particle image...roughly 0.047 mm. The flume was temporarily narrowed to 0.55 m wide with cinder blocks and a plastic waterproof covering for these experiments (see...determining and recording even a small amount of movement by hand can become prohibitively time-consuming. In addition , while the movement of the cartridge

  11. Monitoring infiltration with time-lapse relative gravity: An option for non-invasive determination of soil hydraulic parameters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer-Gottwein, P.

    2012-04-01

    Various hydrogeophysical methods have been proposed to monitor infiltration and determine soil hydraulic parameters using coupled hydrogeophysical inversion. Methods include electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), ground penetrating radar (GPR, both surface and cross-hole) as well as passive microwave radiometry. Depending on the measurement set-up, both ERT and GPR can provide high-resolution images of soil water content. However, soil water content monitoring with both ERT and GPR depends on the validity and accuracy of empirical relationships linking soil water content to electrical resistivity (ERT) and dielectric permittivity (GPR). This has emerged as one of the main limitations for the performance of soil water monitoring with both GPR and ERT. As an alternative, ground-based time-lapse relative gravity (TLRG) is proposed for infiltration monitoring. The method is based on the fact that water content changes in the subsurface constitute changes in subsurface density and can be monitored as changes in the gravitational field. The advantage of TLRG over GPR and ERT is that TLRG directly senses mass changes. Thus, no empirical relationship is required to link water content changes to changes in a geophysical property. This study evaluates the performance of TLRG for infiltration monitoring and hydrogeophysical inversion of soil hydraulic parameters. Results include both synthetic infiltration experiments and a real-world infiltration experiment monitored with TLRG. In the synthetic experiments, soil water content profiles are generated using analytical infiltration solutions. Soil water content profiles are translated into gravity signals and are corrupted with random noise to produce synthetic data. The synthetic data is subsequently used in a hydrogeophysical inversion of soil hydraulic parameters. Fitted parameter confidence intervals and covariances are evaluated. The same inversion procedure is used on the real-world data. The results show that TLRG data

  12. Segmentation of Environmental Time Lapse Image Sequences for the Determination of Shore Lines Captured by Hand-Held Smartphone Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröhnert, M.; Meichsner, R.

    2017-09-01

    The relevance of globally environmental issues gains importance since the last years with still rising trends. Especially disastrous floods may cause in serious damage within very short times. Although conventional gauging stations provide reliable information about prevailing water levels, they are highly cost-intensive and thus just sparsely installed. Smartphones with inbuilt cameras, powerful processing units and low-cost positioning systems seem to be very suitable wide-spread measurement devices that could be used for geo-crowdsourcing purposes. Thus, we aim for the development of a versatile mobile water level measurement system to establish a densified hydrological network of water levels with high spatial and temporal resolution. This paper addresses a key issue of the entire system: the detection of running water shore lines in smartphone images. Flowing water never appears equally in close-range images even if the extrinsics remain unchanged. Its non-rigid behavior impedes the use of good practices for image segmentation as a prerequisite for water line detection. Consequently, we use a hand-held time lapse image sequence instead of a single image that provides the time component to determine a spatio-temporal texture image. Using a region growing concept, the texture is analyzed for immutable shore and dynamic water areas. Finally, the prevalent shore line is examined by the resultant shapes. For method validation, various study areas are observed from several distances covering urban and rural flowing waters with different characteristics. Future work provides a transformation of the water line into object space by image-to-geometry intersection.

  13. Proliferation of pulmonary endothelial cells: time-lapse cinematography of growth to confluence and restitution of monolayer after wounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, U S; Absher, M; Olazabal, B M; Brown, L M; Ryan, J W

    1982-01-01

    A fundamental characteristic of vascular endothelium is that it exists as a monolayer, a condition that must be met in both vascular growth and repair. Maintenance of the monolayer is important both for the exchange of nutrients and for interactions between blood solutes and endothelial enzymes and transport systems. We have used time-lapse cinematography to compare proliferative behavior of bovine pulmonary endothelial cells in (1) establishment of a monolayer from a low-density seed (7.5 X 10(4) cells in a 60 mm dish) and (2) restitution of a confluent monolayer (approx. 2.9 x 10(6) cells in a 60 mm dish) following a mechanical wound (removal of cells from an area 5 x 15 mm by scraping). Culture 2 was not refed after wounding. In culture 2, approx. 30% of the cells accounted for repopulation (confluence in 40 hr). In culture 1, all cells entered into division. Participating cells of culture 2 began division immediately (69 divisions/filmed area in 10 hr, vs. four divisions in culture 1). Interdivision times (IDT) were longer and relatively constant in culture 1 until near confluence; none were less than 10 h, whereas in 2, 24% of the IDT's were less than or equal to 10 hr. Remarkably, IDTs of culture 2 decreased steadily until confluence was re-established. Cell migration in culture 1 was multidirectional while direction of migration in culture 2 was always into the wound area. Mean migration rate (MIG) in culture 2 was related to the site of origin of the cells, those dividing farthest from the unwounded area had fastest MIGs. Neither culture formed more than a single layer of cells. Although the cell kinetics of cultures 1 and 2 differed, the same goal, confluence, was achieved in either case.

  14. Documentation of normal and leukemic myelopoietic progenitor cells with high-resolution phase-contrast time-lapse cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boll, I T

    2001-08-01

    The high-resolution phase-contrast, time-lapse cinematography using oil immersion lenses and 16-mm film demonstrates the kinetic cell events as maturation, locomotion, mitosis, and apoptosis of cells cultivated at 37 degrees C for up to 10 days. 0.5 v/v frozen-thawed sera with presumably high cytokine concentrations were added to the plasma or agar clot. Vital progenitor cells from human bone marrow and blood have a large, bright, unstructured nucleus with a large nucleolus and a narrow rim of cytoplasm (nuclear/cytoplasmic volume ratio = 0.7). Their nuclei are 6-14 micrometer in diameter and double their volume within 8 h. Many (70%) move at a mean speed of 2 micrometer/min, and many (30%) multiply with alpha-2alpha mitoses, generating progenitor cell families. Various disturbances during the course of mitosis lead to the formation of polyploid cells, thereby yielding the megakaryocytic cell line. Some of the progenitor cells undergo asymmetric alpha-alphan mitoses: One of the two initially identical daughter cells remains a progenitor cell in the morphological sense, whereas the other daughter cell - depending on the size of its mother cell - matures in the same culture medium to form a granulocytopoietic, monocytopoietic or erythrocytopoietic cell line. - In acute myeloid leukemias (AML), the blasts and their nuclei are slightly larger than the corresponding progenitor cells and move faster (5 micrometer/min). Symmetric alpha-2alpha mitoses permit unlimited multiplication of the leukemic blasts if contact with cytotoxic lymphocytes does not render them apoptotic. This results in more stromal cells than normal. Granulocytopenia, monocytopenia, and anemia occur due to the genetic impairment of signaling control for asymmetric alpha-alphan mitoses, and thrombocytopenia occurs due to the reduction in polyploidization. Copyright 2001 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg

  15. 2D Time-lapse Resistivity Monitoring of an Organic Produced Gas Plume in a Landfill using ERT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, N. D.; Mendonça, C. A.; Doherty, R.

    2014-12-01

    This project has the objective to study a landfill located on the margins of Tietê River, in São Paulo, Brazil, using the electroresistivity tomography method (ERT). Due to huge organic matter concentrations in the São Paulo Basin quaternary sediments, there is subsurface depth related biogas accumulation (CH4 and CO2), induced by anaerobic degradation of the organic matter. 2D resistivity sections were obtained from a test area since March 2012, a total of 7 databases, being the last one dated from October 2013. The studied line has the length of 56m, the electrode interval is of 2m. In addition, there are two boreholes along the line (one with 3 electrodes and the other one with 2) in order to improve data quality and precision. The boreholes also have a multi-level sampling system that indicates the fluid (gas or water) presence in relation to depth. With our results it was possible to map the gas plume position and its area of extension in the sections as it is a positive resistivity anomaly, with the gas level having approximately 5m depth. With the time-lapse analysis (Matlab script) between the obtained 2D resistivity sections from the site, it was possible to map how the biogas volume and position change in the landfill in relation to time. Our preliminary results show a preferential gas pathway through the subsurface studied area. A consistent relation between the gas depth and obtained microbiological data from archea and bacteria population was also observed.

  16. 3D full-waveform inversion of time-lapse horizontal borehole GPR data to map soil water content variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotzsche, A.; Van Der Kruk, J.; Oberroehrmann, M.; Vanderborght, J.; Vereecken, H.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture is a key state variable that controls water and mass fluxes in soil-plant systems and is variable in space and time. Over the last year's, hydrogeophysical methods such as ground penetrating radar (GPR) have been used to determine electromagnetic properties as proxies for soil water content (SWC). Here, we combined zero-offset-profiles (ZOP) GPR measurements within multiple horizontal minirhizotubes at different depths to determine the spatial and temporal variability of SWC under a winter wheat stand at the Selhausen test site (Germany). We studied spatio-temporal variations of SWC under three different treatments: rainfed, irrigated and sheltered. We acquired 15 time-lapse ZOP GPR dataset during the growing season of the wheat in the rhizotron facility using horizontal boreholes with a separation of 0.75m and a length of 6m at six depths between 0.1-1.2m. The obtained radar velocities were converted to SWC using the 4-phase volumetric complex refractive index model. SWC values obtained using standard ray-based processing methods were not reliable close to the surface (0.1-0.2m depth) because of the inference of the critically refracted air wave and the direct wave through the subsurface. Therefore, we implemented a full-waveform inversion that uses accurate 3D forward modeling of GPRMax that incorporates the air and soil interactions. The shuffled complex evolution (SCE) method allowed us to retrieve quantitative medium properties that explained the measured data with a R² of at least 0.95, and improved SWC estimates at all depths. The final SWC distributions for wet and dry conditions showed that the vertical variability is significantly larger than the lateral variability caused by strong influence of precipitation and irrigation events.

  17. Gas piston activity of the Nyiragongo lava lake: First insights from a Stereographic Time-Lapse Camera system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smets, Benoît; d'Oreye, Nicolas; Kervyn, Matthieu; Kervyn, François

    2017-10-01

    Nyiragongo volcano (D.R. Congo), in the western branch of the East African Rift System, is one of the most active volcanoes on Earth. Its eruptive activity is mainly characterized by the presence of a persistent lava lake in its main crater. As observed at other persistent lava lakes, the Nyiragongo lava lake level exhibits metric vertical variations in the form of minutes-to hour-long cycles, which we infer to be gas piston activity. To study this activity, we developed and tested a Stereographic Time-Lapse Camera (STLC) system, which takes stereo-pairs of photographs of the Nyiragongo crater at regular intervals. Each pair of gas- and steam-free images during daytime allows the production of a 3D point cloud. The comparison of the point clouds provides a measurement of topographic changes related to variations in lava lake level. The processing of a first dataset acquired between 18 and 20 September 2011, at an acquisition rate of 1 pair of images every 2 min, revealed cycles of vertical lava lake level variations reaching up to 3.8 m. Lava lake level variations >0.5 m are detected significantly. They are interpreted to result from gas accumulation and release in the lava lake itself. The limitations of the STLC approach are related to the number of cameras used and the atmospheric masking by steam and volcanic gas in the Nyiragongo crater. The proposed photogrammetric approach could be applied elsewhere or in other disciplines, where frequent topographic changes occur.

  18. Time-lapse downhole electrical resistivity monitoring of subsurface CO2 storage at the Maguelone shallow experimental site (Languedoc, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denchik, Nataliya; Pezard, Philippe; Lofi, Johanna; Perroud, Hervé; Neyens, Denis; Luquot, Linda

    2015-04-01

    A shallow field experimental site for CO2 injection was established at Maguelone (Languedoc,France), in order to test in an integrated manner a suite of surface and downhole hydrogeophysical monitoring methods. The objective is to improve our understanding of gas transport in the shallow subsurface and to determine the sensitivity of CO2 monitoring systems for leakage detection. The site offers a natural laboratory to study the processes associated with CO2 injection in a clastic and clay-rich context saturated with saline fluids. Prior to CO2injection, three nitrogen (N2) injections were undertaken in 2012 to measure the site response to neutral gas injection. In 2013, a volume of 111 m3 of CO2 was injected during 3.5 hours at 15 meter depth. During each experiment, the gas plumes were successfully detected from pressure monitoring, time-lapse induction logging and downhole resistivity monitoring with downhole dipole-dipole arrays. Increases in resistivity are attributed to free gas propagation (either N2 or CO2) whereas decreases in resistivity correlate with CO2 dissolution in the pore fluid. Chemical analyses confirm this hypothesis with a decrease in pH and an increase in the concentration of dissolved species in the later case. The next stage of the project will be performing the CO2 injection experiments with improved monitoring schema using results of the present study. In perspective, besides of improving our understanding of gas transport in the shallow subsurface, the additional issues could not just show a capability of used geophysical and geochemical techniques to monitor the CO2 plume and to detect near-surface CO2 migration pathways, but to help quantifying potential CO2 migration.

  19. AnimalFinder: A semi-automated system for animal detection in time-lapse camera trap images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price Tack, Jennifer L.; West, Brian S.; McGowan, Conor P.; Ditchkoff, Stephen S.; Reeves, Stanley J.; Keever, Allison; Grand, James B.

    2017-01-01

    Although the use of camera traps in wildlife management is well established, technologies to automate image processing have been much slower in development, despite their potential to drastically reduce personnel time and cost required to review photos. We developed AnimalFinder in MATLAB® to identify animal presence in time-lapse camera trap images by comparing individual photos to all images contained within the subset of images (i.e. photos from the same survey and site), with some manual processing required to remove false positives and collect other relevant data (species, sex, etc.). We tested AnimalFinder on a set of camera trap images and compared the presence/absence results with manual-only review with white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), wild pigs (Sus scrofa), and raccoons (Procyon lotor). We compared abundance estimates, model rankings, and coefficient estimates of detection and abundance for white-tailed deer using N-mixture models. AnimalFinder performance varied depending on a threshold value that affects program sensitivity to frequently occurring pixels in a series of images. Higher threshold values led to fewer false negatives (missed deer images) but increased manual processing time, but even at the highest threshold value, the program reduced the images requiring manual review by ~40% and correctly identified >90% of deer, raccoon, and wild pig images. Estimates of white-tailed deer were similar between AnimalFinder and the manual-only method (~1–2 deer difference, depending on the model), as were model rankings and coefficient estimates. Our results show that the program significantly reduced data processing time and may increase efficiency of camera trapping surveys.

  20. PFLOTRAN-E4D: A parallel open source PFLOTRAN module for simulating time-lapse electrical resistivity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Chen, Xingyuan

    2017-02-01

    Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is finding increased application for remotely monitoring processes occurring in the near subsurface in three-dimensions (i.e. 4D monitoring). However, there are few codes capable of simulating the evolution of subsurface resistivity and corresponding tomographic measurements arising from a particular process, particularly in parallel and with an open source license. Herein we describe and demonstrate an electrical resistivity tomography module for the PFLOTRAN subsurface flow and reactive transport simulation code, named PFLOTRAN-E4D. The PFLOTRAN-E4D module operates in parallel using a dedicated set of compute cores in a master-slave configuration. At each time step, the master processes receives subsurface states from PFLOTRAN, converts those states to bulk electrical conductivity, and instructs the slave processes to simulate a tomographic data set. The resulting multi-physics simulation capability enables accurate feasibility studies for ERT imaging, the identification of the ERT signatures that are unique to a given process, and facilitates the joint inversion of ERT data with hydrogeological data for subsurface characterization. PFLOTRAN-E4D is demonstrated herein using a field study of stage-driven groundwater/river water interaction ERT monitoring along the Columbia River, Washington, USA. Results demonstrate the complex nature of subsurface electrical conductivity changes, in both the saturated and unsaturated zones, arising from river stage fluctuations and associated river water intrusion into the aquifer. The results also demonstrate the sensitivity of surface based ERT measurements to those changes over time. PFLOTRAN-E4D is available with the PFLOTRAN development version with an open-source license at https://bitbucket.org/pflotran/pflotran-dev.

  1. PFLOTRAN-E4D: A parallel open source PFLOTRAN module for simulating time-lapse electrical resistivity data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Chen, Xingyuan

    2017-02-01

    Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is finding increased application for remotely monitoring processes occurring in the near subsurface in three-dimensions (i.e. 4D monitoring). However, there are few codes capable of simulating the evolution of subsurface resistivity and corresponding tomographic measurements arising from a particular process, particularly in parallel and with an open source license. Herein we describe and demonstrate an electrical resistivity tomography module for the PFLOTRAN subsurface simulation code, named PFLOTRAN-E4D. The PFLOTRAN-E4D module operates in parallel using a dedicated set of compute cores in a master-slave configuration. At each time step, the master processes receives subsurface states from PFLOTRAN, converts those states to bulk electrical conductivity, and instructs the slave processes to simulate a tomographic data set. The resulting multi-physics simulation capability enables accurate feasibility studies for ERT imaging, the identification of the ERT signatures that are unique to a given process, and facilitates the joint inversion of ERT data with hydrogeological data for subsurface characterization. PFLOTRAN-E4D is demonstrated herein using a field study of stage-driven groundwater/river water interaction ERT monitoring along the Columbia River, Washington, USA. Results demonstrate the complex nature of changes subsurface electrical conductivity, in both the saturated and unsaturated zones, arising from water table changes and from river water intrusion into the aquifer. The results also demonstrate the sensitivity of surface based ERT measurements to those changes over time. PFLOTRAN-E4D is available with the PFLOTRAN development version with an open-source license at https://bitbucket.org/pflotran/pflotran-dev .

  2. Combined time-lapse magnetic resonance imaging and modeling to investigate colloid deposition and transport in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehoux, Alizée P; Faure, Pamela; Lafolie, François; Rodts, Stéphane; Courtier-Murias, Denis; Coussot, Philippe; Michel, Eric

    2017-10-15

    Colloidal particles can act as vectors of adsorbed pollutants in the subsurface, or be themselves pollutants. They can reach the aquifer and impair groundwater quality. The mechanisms of colloid transport and deposition are often studied in columns filled with saturated porous media. Time-lapse profiles of colloid concentration inside the columns have occasionally been derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data recorded in transport experiments. These profiles are valuable, in addition to particle breakthrough curves (BTCs), for testing and improving colloid transport models. We show that concentrations could not be simply computed from MRI data when both deposited and suspended colloids contributed to the signal. We propose a generic method whereby these data can still be used to quantitatively appraise colloid transport models. It uses the modeled suspended and deposited particle concentrations to compute modeled MRI data that are compared to the experimental data. We tested this method by performing transport experiments with sorbing colloids in sand, and assessed for the first time the capacity of the model calibrated from BTCs to reproduce the MRI data. Interestingly, the dispersion coefficient and deposition rate calibrated from the BTC were respectively overestimated and underestimated compared with those calibrated from the MRI data, suggesting that these quantities, when determined from BTCs, need to be interpreted with care. In a broader perspective, we consider that combining MRI and modeling offers great potential for the quantitative analysis of complex MRI data recorded during transport experiments in complex environmentally relevant porous media, and can help improve our understanding of the fate of colloids and solutes, first in these media, and later in soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. In vivo time-lapse imaging of skin burn wound healing using second-harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Takeshi; Tanaka, Ryosuke; Hase, Eiji; Fukushima, Shu-ichiro; Araki, Tsutomu

    2014-02-01

    Wound healing is a process to repair the damaged tissue caused by thermal burn, incised wound, or stab wound. Although the wound healing has many aspects, it is common for dynamics of collagen fiber, such as decomposition, production, or growth, to be closely related with wound healing. If such the healing process can be visualized as a timelapse image of the collagen fiber in the same subject, one may obtain new findings regarding biological repairing mechanisms in the healing process. In this article, to investigate the temporal modoification of dermal collagen fiber in the burn wound healing, we used second-harmonic-generation (SHG) microscopy, showing high selectivity and good image contrast to collagen molecules as well as high spatial resolution, optical three-dimensional sectioning, minimal invasiveness, deep penetration, the absence of interference from background light, and in vivo measurement without additional staining. Since SHG light arises from a non-centrosymmetric triple helix of three polypeptide chains in the collagen molecule, SHG intensity sensitively reflects the structure maturity of collagen molecule and its aggregates. A series of time-lapse SHG images during the wound healing process of 2 weeks clearly indicated that condensation and melting of dermal collagen fibers by the deep dermal burn, decomposition of the damaged collagen fibers in the inflammation phase, production of new collagen fibers in the proliferation phase, and the growth of the new collagen fibers in the remodeling phase. These results show a high potential of SHG microscopy for optical assessment of the wound healing process in vivo.

  4. SEGMENTATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL TIME LAPSE IMAGE SEQUENCES FOR THE DETERMINATION OF SHORE LINES CAPTURED BY HAND-HELD SMARTPHONE CAMERAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kröhnert

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of globally environmental issues gains importance since the last years with still rising trends. Especially disastrous floods may cause in serious damage within very short times. Although conventional gauging stations provide reliable information about prevailing water levels, they are highly cost-intensive and thus just sparsely installed. Smartphones with inbuilt cameras, powerful processing units and low-cost positioning systems seem to be very suitable wide-spread measurement devices that could be used for geo-crowdsourcing purposes. Thus, we aim for the development of a versatile mobile water level measurement system to establish a densified hydrological network of water levels with high spatial and temporal resolution. This paper addresses a key issue of the entire system: the detection of running water shore lines in smartphone images. Flowing water never appears equally in close-range images even if the extrinsics remain unchanged. Its non-rigid behavior impedes the use of good practices for image segmentation as a prerequisite for water line detection. Consequently, we use a hand-held time lapse image sequence instead of a single image that provides the time component to determine a spatio-temporal texture image. Using a region growing concept, the texture is analyzed for immutable shore and dynamic water areas. Finally, the prevalent shore line is examined by the resultant shapes. For method validation, various study areas are observed from several distances covering urban and rural flowing waters with different characteristics. Future work provides a transformation of the water line into object space by image-to-geometry intersection.

  5. Time-lapse video microscopy and image analysis of adherence and growth patterns of Candida albicans strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Gabor; Hennig, Grant W; Petrenyi, Katalin; Kovacs, Laszlo; Pocsi, Istvan; Dombradi, Viktor; Banfalvi, Gaspar

    2014-06-01

    Digital image analysis of high time resolution video microscopy was used to investigate hyphal growth dynamics in different Candida albicans strains. The effects of the quorum sensing molecules tyrosol and farnesol, the deletion of the fungus specific protein phosphatase Z1 CaPPZ1), and the hypha-specific cyclin (HGC1) genes were analyzed by this method. Our system monitored cell growth in a CO2 incubator under near-physiological conditions and measured three major parameters under the following stringent conditions: (a) the time of yeast cell adherence, (b) the time of hyphal outgrowth, and (c) the rate of hyphal growth. This method showed that hyphal extension of wild-type SC5314 cells was accelerated by tyrosol and inhibited by farnesol. Hyphal growth rate was moderately lower in cappz1 and strongly reduced in hgc1 mutants. In addition, tyrosol treatment caused a firm adherence, while farnesol treatment and hgc1 mutation prevented the adherence of yeast cells to the surface of the culture flask. Transition from yeast-to-hyphal state was faster after tyrosol treatment, while it was reduced in farnesol-treated cells as well as in the cappz1 and hgc1 mutants. Our data confirm the notion that the attachment of yeast cells, the yeast-to-hyphal transition, and hyphal growth rate are closely related processes. Time-lapse video microscopy combined with image analysis offers a convenient and reliable method of testing chemicals, including potential drug candidates, and genetic manipulations on the dynamic morphological changes in C. albicans strains.

  6. Single-cell time-lapse analysis of depletion of the universally conserved essential protein YgjD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ackermann Martin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The essential Escherichia coli gene ygjD belongs to a universally conserved group of genes whose function has been the focus of a number of recent studies. Here, we put ygjD under control of an inducible promoter, and used time-lapse microscopy and single cell analysis to investigate the phenotypic consequences of the depletion of YgjD protein from growing cells. Results We show that loss of YgjD leads to a marked decrease in cell size and termination of cell division. The transition towards smaller size occurs in a controlled manner: cell elongation and cell division remain coupled, but cell size at division decreases. We also find evidence that depletion of YgjD leads to the synthesis of the intracellular signaling molecule (pppGpp, inducing a cellular reaction resembling the stringent response. Concomitant deletion of the relA and spoT genes - leading to a strain that is uncapable of synthesizing (pppGpp - abrogates the decrease in cell size, but does not prevent termination of cell division upon YgjD depletion. Conclusions Depletion of YgjD protein from growing cells leads to a decrease in cell size that is contingent on (pppGpp, and to a termination of cell division. The combination of single-cell timelapse microscopy and statistical analysis can give detailed insights into the phenotypic consequences of the loss of essential genes, and can thus serve as a new tool to study the function of essential genes.

  7. Application of time-lapse ERT to Characterize Soil-Water-Disease Interactions of Citrus Orchard - Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddinti, S. R.; Kbvn, D. P.; Ranjan, S.; Suradhaniwar, S.; J, P. A.; R M, G.

    2015-12-01

    Vidarbha region in Maharashtra, India (home for mandarin Orange) experience severe climatic uncertainties resulting in crop failure. Phytopthora are the soil-borne fungal species that accumulate in the presence of moisture, and attack the root / trunk system of Orange trees at any stage. A scientific understanding of soil-moisture-disease relations within the active root zone under different climatic, irrigation, and crop cycle conditions can help in practicing management activities for improved crop yield. In this study, we developed a protocol for performing 3-D time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) at micro scale resolution to monitor the changes in resistivity distribution within the root zone of Orange trees. A total of 40 electrodes, forming a grid of 3.5 m x 2 m around each Orange tree were used in ERT survey with gradient and Wenner configurations. A laboratory test on un-disturbed soil samples of the region was performed to plot the variation of electrical conductivity with saturation. Curve fitting techniques were applied to get the modified Archie's model parameters. The calibrated model was further applied to generate the 3-D soil moisture profiles of the study area. The point estimates of soil moisture were validated using TDR probe measurements at 3 different depths (10, 20, and 40 cm) near to the root zone. In order to understand the effect of soil-water relations on plant-disease relations, we performed ERT analysis at two locations, one at healthy and other at Phytopthora affected Orange tree during the crop cycle, under dry and irrigated conditions. The degree to which an Orange tree is affected by Phytopthora under each condition is evaluated using 'grading scale' approach following visual inspection of the canopy features. Spatial-temporal distribution of moisture profiles is co-related with grading scales to comment on the effect of climatic and irrigation scenarios on the degree and intensity of crop disease caused by Phytopthora.

  8. Underwater Vehicle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dick, James L

    2007-01-01

    There is thus provided an underwater vehicle having facility for maneuvering alongside a retrieving vehicle, as by manipulation of bow and stern planes, for engaging a hull surface of the retrieving...

  9. Hydrodynamic Coefficients Identification and Experimental Investigation for an Underwater Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaorong XIE

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodynamic coefficients are the foundation of unmanned underwater vehicles modeling and controller design. In order to reduce identification complexity and acquire necessary hydrodynamic coefficients for controllers design, the motion of the unmanned underwater vehicle was separated into vertical motion and horizontal motion models. Hydrodynamic coefficients were regarded as mapping parameters from input forces and moments to output velocities and acceleration of the unmanned underwater vehicle. The motion models of the unmanned underwater vehicle were nonlinear and Genetic Algorithm was adopted to identify those hydrodynamic coefficients. To verify the identification quality, velocities and acceleration of the unmanned underwater vehicle was measured using inertial sensor under the same conditions as Genetic Algorithm identification. Curves similarity between measured velocities and acceleration and those identified by Genetic Algorithm were used as optimizing standard. It is found that the curves similarity were high and identified hydrodynamic coefficients of the unmanned underwater vehicle satisfied the measured motion states well.

  10. Quantitative high-resolution observations of soil water dynamics in a complicated architecture with time-lapse Ground-Penetrating Radar

    OpenAIRE

    P. Klenk; S. Jaumann; K. Roth

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution time-lapse Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) observations of advancing and retreating water tables can yield a wealth of information about near-surface water content dynamics. In this study, we present and analyze a series of imbibition, drainage and infiltration experiments which have been carried out at our artificial ASSESS test site and observed with surface based GPR. The test site features a complicated but known subsurface architecture co...

  11. In situ monitoring of corrosion mechanisms and phosphate inhibitor surface deposition during corrosion of zinc-magnesium-aluminium (ZMA) alloys using novel time-lapse microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, James; Cooze, Nathan; Gallagher, Callum; Lewis, Tom; Prosek, Tomas; Thierry, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    In situ time-lapse optical microscopy was used to examine the microstructural corrosion mechanisms in three zinc-magnesium-aluminium (ZMA) alloy coated steels immersed in 1% NaCl pH 7. Preferential corrosion of MgZn(2) lamellae within the eutectic phases was observed in all the ZMA alloys followed by subsequent dissolution of Zn rich phases. The total extent and rate of corrosion, measured using time-lapse image analysis and scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET) estimated mass loss, decreased as Mg and Al alloying additions were increased up to a level of 3 wt% Mg and 3.7 wt% Al. This was probably due to the increased presence of MgO and Al(2)O(3) at the alloy surface retarding the kinetics of cathodic oxygen reduction. The addition of 1 × 10(-2) mol dm(-3) Na(3)PO(4) to 1% NaCl pH 7 had a dramatic influence on the corrosion mechanism for a ZMA with passivation of anodic sites through phosphate precipitation observed using time-lapse image analysis. Intriguing rapid precipitation of filamentous phosphate was also observed and it is postulated that these filaments nucleate and grow due to super saturation effects. Polarisation experiments showed that the addition of 1 × 10(-2) mol dm(-3) Na(3)PO(4) to the 1% NaCl electrolyte promoted an anodic shift of 50 mV in open circuit potential for the ZMA alloy with a reduction in anodic current of 2.5 orders of magnitude suggesting that it was acting primarily as an anodic inhibitor supporting the inferences from the time-lapse investigations. These phosphate additions resulted in a 98% reduction in estimated mass loss as measured by SVET demonstrating the effectiveness of phosphate inhibitors for this alloy system.

  12. Time-Lapse Monitoring of an Engineering Scaled Excavation at Federal District, Brazil by Passive Ambient NoiseInterferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Soto, M., Sr.; Hussain, Y.; Martinez-Carvajal, H., Sr.; Martino, S., Sr.; Rocha, M., Sr.

    2016-12-01

    gave Rayleigh wave velocity changes (dv/v=-dt/t). These changes correlated well with initiation and propagation of fracture at the face of this normal slope. It is concluded that cost effective technique, PANI has a good potential for the monitoring of time lapse changes of evolving fractures.

  13. Application of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring for the Control and Optimization of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian Toelle

    2008-11-30

    This project, 'Application of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring for the Control and Optimization of CO{sub 2} Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations', investigated the potential for monitoring CO{sub 2} floods in carbonate reservoirs through the use of standard p-wave seismic data. This primarily involved the use of 4D seismic (time lapse seismic) in an attempt to observe and map the movement of the injected CO{sub 2} through a carbonate reservoir. The differences between certain seismic attributes, such as amplitude, were used for this purpose. This technique has recently been shown to be effective in CO{sub 2} monitoring in Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) projects, such as Weyborne. This study was conducted in the Charlton 30/31 field in the northern Michigan Basin, which is a Silurian pinnacle reef that completed its primary production in 1997 and was scheduled for enhanced oil recovery using injected CO{sub 2}. Prior to injection an initial 'Base' 3D survey was obtained over the field and was then processed and interpreted. CO{sub 2} injection within the main portion of the reef was conducted intermittently during 13 months starting in August 2005. During this time, 29,000 tons of CO{sub 2} was injected into the Guelph formation, historically known as the Niagaran Brown formation. By September 2006, the reservoir pressure within the reef had risen to approximately 2000 lbs and oil and water production from the one producing well within the field had increased significantly. The determination of the reservoir's porosity distribution, a critical aspect of reservoir characterization and simulation, proved to be a significant portion of this project. In order to relate the differences observed between the seismic attributes seen on the multiple 3D seismic surveys and the actual location of the CO{sub 2}, a predictive reservoir simulation model was developed based on seismic attributes obtained from the base 3D seismic survey and available well data. This

  14. Estimation of soil hydraulic parameters in the field by integrated hydrogeophysical inversion of time-lapse ground-penetrating radar data

    KAUST Repository

    Jadoon, Khan

    2012-01-01

    An integrated hydrogeophysical inversion approach was used to remotely infer the unsaturated soil hydraulic parameters from time-lapse ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data collected at a fixed location over a bare agricultural field. The GPR model combines a full-waveform solution of Maxwell\\'s equations for three-dimensional wave propaga- tion in planar layered media together with global reflection and transmission functions to account for the antenna and its interactions with the medium. The hydrological simu- lator HYDRUS-1D was used with a two layer single- and dual-porosity model. The radar model was coupled to the hydrodynamic model, such that the soil electrical properties (permitivity and conductivity) that serve as input to the GPR model become a function of the hydrodynamic model output (water content), thereby permiting estimation of the soil hydraulic parameters from the GPR data in an inversion loop. To monitor the soil water con- tent dynamics, time-lapse GPR and time domain reflectometry (TDR) measurements were performed, whereby only GPR data was used in the inversion. Significant effects of water dynamics were observed in the time-lapse GPR data and in particular precipitation and evaporation events were clearly visible. The dual porosity model provided betier results compared to the single porosity model for describing the soil water dynamics, which is sup- ported by field observations of macropores. Furthermore, the GPR-derived water content profiles reconstructed from the integrated hydrogeophysical inversion were in good agree- ment with TDR observations. These results suggest that the proposed method is promising for non-invasive characterization of the shallow subsurface hydraulic properties and moni- toring water dynamics at the field scale. © Soil Science Society of America.

  15. Visualizing and quantifying movement from pre-recorded videos: The spectral time-lapse (STL algorithm [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2qo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R Madan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available When studying animal behaviour within an open environment, movement-related data are often important for behavioural analyses. Therefore, simple and efficient techniques are needed to present and analyze the data of such movements. However, it is challenging to present both spatial and temporal information of movements within a two-dimensional image representation. To address this challenge, we developed the spectral time-lapse (STL algorithm that re-codes an animal’s position at every time point with a time-specific color, and overlays it with a reference frame of the video, to produce a summary image. We additionally incorporated automated motion tracking, such that the animal’s position can be extracted and summary statistics such as path length and duration can be calculated, as well as instantaneous velocity and acceleration. Here we describe the STL algorithm and offer a freely available MATLAB toolbox that implements the algorithm and allows for a large degree of end-user control and flexibility.

  16. Underwater Gliders: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javaid Muhammad Yasar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Underwater gliders are a type of underwater vehicle that transverse the oceans by shifting its buoyancy, during which its wings develop a component of the downward motion in the horizontal plane, thus producing a forward force. They are primarily used in oceanography sensing and data collection and play an important role in ocean research and development. Although there have been considerable developments in these gliders since the development of the first glider concept in 1989, to date, no review of these gliders have been done. This paper reviews existing underwater gliders, with emphasis on their respective working principles, range and payload capacity. All information on gliders available in the public domain or published in literature from the year 2000-2013 was reviewed. The majority of these gliders have an operational depth of 1000 m and a payload of less than 25 kg. The exception is a blend-body shape glider, which has a payload of approximately 800 kg and an operational depth around about 300 m. However, the commercialization of these gliders has been limited with only three know examples that have been successfully commercialized.

  17. Nonlinear internal waves and plumes generated in response to sea-loch outflow, AUV, and time-lapse photography observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toberman, Matthew; Inall, Mark; Boyd, Tim; Dumount, Estelle; Griffiths, Colin

    2017-07-01

    The tidally modulated outflow of brackish water from a sea loch forms a thin surface layer that propagates into the coastal ocean as a buoyant gravity current, transporting nutrients and sediments, as well as fresh water, heat and momentum. The fresh intrusion both propagates into and generates a strongly stratified environment which supports trains of nonlinear internal waves (NLIWs). NLIWs are shown to propagate ahead of this buoyancy input in response to propagation of the outflow water into the stratified environment generated by the previous release as well as in the opposing direction after the reflection from steep bathymetry. Oblique aerial photographs were taken and photogrammetric rectification led to the identification of the buoyant intrusion and the subsequent generation of NLIWs. An autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) was deployed on repeated reciprocal transects in order to make simultaneous CTD, ADCP, and microstructure shear measurements of the evolution of these phenomena in conjunction with conventional mooring measurements. AUV-based temperature and salinity signals of NLIWs of depression were observed together with increased turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rates of over 2 orders of magnitude within and in the wake of the NLIWs. Repeated measurements allow a unique opportunity to investigate the horizontal structure of these phenomena. Simple metric scaling demonstrates that these processes are likely to be feature of many fjordic systems located on the west coast of Scotland but may also play a key role in the assimilation of the outflow from many tidally dominated fjordic systems throughout the world.

  18. Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Take the mystery out of motion. Our resource gives you everything you need to teach young scientists about motion. Students will learn about linear, accelerating, rotating and oscillating motion, and how these relate to everyday life - and even the solar system. Measuring and graphing motion is easy, and the concepts of speed, velocity and acceleration are clearly explained. Reading passages, comprehension questions, color mini posters and lots of hands-on activities all help teach and reinforce key concepts. Vocabulary and language are simplified in our resource to make them accessible to str

  19. Combination of metabolism measurement and a time-lapse system provides an embryo selection method based on oxygen uptake and chronology of cytokinesis timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejera, Alberto; Castelló, Damia; de Los Santos, Jose Maria; Pellicer, Antonio; Remohí, Jose; Meseguer, Marcos

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate correlations between oxygen consumption (OC) measurements before and after embryo cytokinesis, observing OC during embryo cleavages and combining that information with morphokinetics to relate to implantation potential. Prospective cohort study. University-affiliated private IVF unit. A total of 1,150 injected oocytes in 86 first oocyte donation cycles with embryo transfer on day 3. None. We analyzed the embryo OC and combined this data with the cytokinesis event, exact timing (in hours) of blastomeric cleavages, with the use of an incubator equipped with time-lapse videography, gathering a total of 7,630 measurements during the cytokinesis (active phase) and consecutive measurements after this division (passive phase), correlating this data with embryo outcome. OC was found to increase during embryo cleavage, showing high levels during first division with a strong correlation with implantation success. Moreover, those embryos with slow or fast development gave rise to lower OC levels, whereas higher levels were associated with optimal embryo division ranges linked to higher implantation potential. A detailed analysis of OC by time-lapse observations enhances the value that these measurements represented as markers of embryo quality, especially during the cytokinesis events produced during preimplantation development. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Simultaneous Gram and viability staining on activated sludge exposed to erythromycin: 3D CLSM time-lapse imaging of bacterial disintegration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louvet, Jean-Noël; Attik, Ghania; Dumas, Dominique; Potier, Olivier; Pons, Marie-Noëlle

    2011-11-01

    The effect of erythromycin on activated sludge bacteria according to their Gram type was investigated with 3-dimensional Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) time-lapse imaging. The fluorescent stains SYTOX Green and Texas Red-X conjugate of wheat germ agglutinin stained dying bacteria and Gram(+) bacteria respectively. Time-lapse imaging allowed an understanding of the staining mechanism and the measurement of the death rate. In presence of erythromycin (10mg/L), Gram(+) bacteria had a higher mortality rate than the Gram(-) bacteria. This result suggests that antibiotic in wastewater could change the activated sludge bacteria composition, according to their Gram type by selecting the bacteria which are the least sensitive to the antibiotics. However bacterial death was followed by bacterial disintegration leading to a decrease in the fluorescence. Results suggested that the viability indicators based on membrane integrity should be used with a correct sampling method, which can give the initial quantity of living bacteria. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessment of human embryo development using morphological criteria in an era of time-lapse, algorithms and 'OMICS': is looking good still important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, David K; Balaban, Basak

    2016-10-01

    With the worldwide move towards single embryo transfer there has been a renewed focus on the requirement for reliable means of assessing embryo viability. In an era of 'OMICS' technologies, and algorithms created through the use of time-lapse microscopy, the actual appearance of the human embryo as it progresses through each successive developmental stage to the blastocyst appears to have been somewhat neglected in recent years. Here we review the key features of the human preimplantation embryo and consider the relationship between morphological characteristics and developmental potential. Further, the impact of the culture environment on morphological traits, how key morphological qualities reflect aspects of embryo physiology, and how computer-assisted analysis of embryo morphology may facilitate a more quantitative approach to selection are discussed. The clinical introduction of time-lapse systems has reopened our eyes and given us a new vantage point from which to view the beauty of the initial stages of human life. Rather than a future in which the morphology of the embryo is deemed irrelevant, we propose that key features, such as multinucleation, cell size and blastocyst differentiation should be included in future iterations of selection/deselection algorithms. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved.For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Time-lapse deselection model for human day 3 in vitro fertilization embryos: the combination of qualitative and quantitative measures of embryo growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanhe; Chapple, Vincent; Feenan, Katie; Roberts, Peter; Matson, Phillip

    2016-03-01

    To present a time-lapse deselection model involving both qualitative and quantitative parameters for assessing embryos on day 3. Retrospective cohort study and prospective validation. Private IVF center. A total of 270 embryos with known implantation data (KID) after day 3 transfer from 212 IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles were retrospectively analyzed for building the proposed deselection model, followed by prospective validation using an additional 66 KID embryos. None. Morphological score on day 3, embryo morphokinetic parameters, abnormal cleavage patterns, and known implantation results. All included embryos were categorized either retrospectively or prospectively into 7 grades (A+, A, B, C, D, E, F). Qualitative deselection parameters included poor conventional day 3 morphology, abnormal cleavage patterns identified via time-lapse monitoring, and deselection effectively predicts day 3 embryo implantation potential and is applicable to all IVF embryos regardless of insemination method by using PNF as the reference starting time point. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Time-Lapse Analysis of Methane Quantity in the Mary Lee Group of Coal Seams Using Filter-Based Multiple-Point Geostatistical Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karacan, C Özgen; Olea, Ricardo A

    2013-08-01

    Coal seam degasification and its success are important for controlling methane, and thus for the health and safety of coal miners. During the course of degasification, properties of coal seams change. Thus, the changes in coal reservoir conditions and in-place gas content as well as methane emission potential into mines should be evaluated by examining time-dependent changes and the presence of major heterogeneities and geological discontinuities in the field. In this work, time-lapsed reservoir and fluid storage properties of the New Castle coal seam, Mary Lee/Blue Creek seam, and Jagger seam of Black Warrior Basin, Alabama, were determined from gas and water production history matching and production forecasting of vertical degasification wellbores. These properties were combined with isotherm and other important data to compute gas-in-place (GIP) and its change with time at borehole locations. Time-lapsed training images (TIs) of GIP and GIP difference corresponding to each coal and date were generated by using these point-wise data and Voronoi decomposition on the TI grid, which included faults as discontinuities for expansion of Voronoi regions. Filter-based multiple-point geostatistical simulations, which were preferred in this study due to anisotropies and discontinuities in the area, were used to predict time-lapsed GIP distributions within the study area. Performed simulations were used for mapping spatial time-lapsed methane quantities as well as their uncertainties within the study area. The systematic approach presented in this paper is the first time in literature that history matching, TIs of GIPs and filter simulations are used for degasification performance evaluation and for assessing GIP for mining safety. Results from this study showed that using production history matching of coalbed methane wells to determine time-lapsed reservoir data could be used to compute spatial GIP and representative GIP TIs generated through Voronoi decomposition

  4. Student-Built Underwater Video and Data Capturing Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitt, F.

    2016-12-01

    Students from Stockbridge High School Robotics Team invention is a low cost underwater video and data capturing device. This system is capable of shooting time-lapse photography and/or video for up to 3 days of video at a time. It can be used in remote locations without having to change batteries or adding additional external hard drives for data storage. The video capturing device has a unique base and mounting system which houses a pi drive and a programmable raspberry pi with a camera module. This system is powered by two 12 volt batteries, which makes it easier for users to recharge after use. Our data capturing device has the same unique base and mounting system as the underwater camera. The data capturing device consists of an Arduino and SD card shield that is capable of collecting continuous temperature and pH readings underwater. This data will then be logged onto the SD card for easy access and recording. The low cost underwater video and data capturing device can reach depths up to 100 meters while recording 36 hours of video on 1 terabyte of storage. It also features night vision infrared light capabilities. The cost to build our invention is $500. The goal of this was to provide a device that can easily be accessed by marine biologists, teachers, researchers and citizen scientists to capture photographic and water quality data in marine environments over extended periods of time.

  5. Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Rivera, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Motion is all around us. Learn how it is used in art, technology, and engineering. Five easy-to-read chapters explain the science behind motion, as well as its real-world applications. Vibrant, full-color photos, bolded glossary words, and a key stats section let readers zoom in even deeper. Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Abdo Zoom is a division of ABDO.

  6. Design and flight performance of hybrid underwater glider with controllable wings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhui Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid underwater glider combines motion modes of traditional autonomous underwater glider and those of autonomous underwater vehicles. Different motion modes need different flight performance, including flight efficiency, static stability, and maneuverability. Conventional hybrid underwater glider with fixed wings can’t achieve optimal flight performance in one flight mission demanding various motion modes. In this article, controllable wings for hybrid underwater glider Petrel II are designed. Angle of attack, sweep angle, and aspect ratio of controllable wings can be changed to adapt to different motion modes. Kinematics and dynamics models of Petrel II are established based on multibody theory. Motion simulations of Petrel II with different wing configurations are conducted in three motion modes, including glide motion, spiral motion, and horizontal turning motion. The simulation results show the impact of wing parameters on flight performance. Field trials demonstrate that the controllable wings can improve the flight performance.

  7. Time-lapse cinematography study of the germinal vesicle behaviour in mouse primary oocytes treated with activators of protein kinases A and C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, H; Mulnard, J

    1988-12-01

    A passive erratic movement of the germinal vesicle (GV), already visible in small incompetent oocytes, is followed by an active scalloping of the nuclear membrane soon before GV breakdown (GVBD) in cultured competent oocytes. Maturation can be inhibited by activators of protein kinase A (PK-A) and protein kinase C (PK-C). Our time-lapse cinematography analysis allowed us to describe an unexpected behaviour of the GV when PK-C, but not PK-A, is activated: GV undergoes a displacement toward the cortex according to the same biological clock which triggers the programmed translocation of the spindle in control oocytes. It is concluded that, when oocytes become committed to undergo maturation, the cytoplasm acquires a PK-A-controlled "centrifugal displacement property" which is not restricted to the spindle.

  8. Time lapse imaging analysis of the effect of ER stress modulators on apoptotic cell assessed by caspase3/7 activation in NG108-15 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayako Saito

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the data from the long term time lapse imaging of neuronal cell line NG108-15 that were treated with apoptosis inducer or various ER stress inducers. Use of the fluorescent reporter for activated caspase3/7 in combination with the conventional light microscope allowed us to investigate the time course of apoptosis induction at the single cell level. Quantitative as well as qualitative data are presented here to show the effect of two different ER stress modulating chemical compounds on caspase3/7-dependent apoptosis in neuronal cell line NG108-15 cells. Additional results and interpretation of our data concerning ER stress and apoptosis in NG108-15 cells can be found in Suga et al. (2015 [1] and in Suga et al. (2015 [2].

  9. The type of GnRH analogue used during controlled ovarian stimulation influences early embryo developmental kinetics: a time-lapse study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Manuel; Cruz, María; Humaidan, Peter; Garrido, Nicolás; Pérez-Cano, Inmaculada; Meseguer, Marcos

    2013-06-01

    To explore if the GnRH analogue used for controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) and the ovulation triggering factor (GnRH agonist + hCG triggering versus GnRH antagonist + GnRH agonist triggering) affect embryo development and kinetics. In a retrospective cohort study in the Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad (IVI) Alicante and the Instituto Universitario-IVI Valencia, Spain, 2817 embryos deriving from 400 couples undergoing oocyte donation were analysed. After controlled ovarian stimulation and IVF/intracytoplamic sperm injection, the timing of embryonic cleavages was assessed by a video time-lapse system. The results were analysed using Student's t test for comparison of timings (hours) and Chi-squared test for comparison of proportions. A p-value we can suggest that the type of protocol used for controlled ovarian stimulation influences embryo kinetics of development but these variations are not reflected in embryo quality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bayesian Markov-Chain-Monte-Carlo inversion of time-lapse crosshole GPR data to characterize the vadose zone at the Arrenaes Site, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholer, Marie; Irving, James; Zibar, Majken Caroline Looms

    2012-01-01

    We examined to what extent time-lapse crosshole ground-penetrating radar traveltimes, measured during a forced infiltration experiment at the Arreneas field site in Denmark, could help to quantify vadose zone hydraulic properties and their corresponding uncertainties using a Bayesian Markov......-chain-Monte-Carlo inversion approach with different priors. The ground-penetrating radar (GPR) geophysical method has the potential to provide valuable information on the hydraulic properties of the vadose zone because of its strong sensitivity to soil water content. In particular, recent evidence has suggested...... in Denmark, could help to quantify VGM parameters and their uncertainties in a layered medium, as well as the corresponding soil hydraulic properties. We used a Bayesian Markov-chain-Monte-Carlo inversion approach. We first explored the advantages and limitations of this approach with regard to a realistic...

  11. Stability analysis of hybrid-driven underwater glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Wen-dong; Wang, Shu-xin; Wang, Yan-hui; Song, Yang; Zhu, Ya-qiang

    2017-10-01

    Hybrid-driven underwater glider is a new type of unmanned underwater vehicle, which combines the advantages of autonomous underwater vehicles and traditional underwater gliders. The autonomous underwater vehicles have good maneuverability and can travel with a high speed, while the traditional underwater gliders are highlighted by low power consumption, long voyage, long endurance and good stealth characteristics. The hybrid-driven underwater gliders can realize variable motion profiles by their own buoyancy-driven and propeller propulsion systems. Stability of the mechanical system determines the performance of the system. In this paper, the Petrel-II hybrid-driven underwater glider developed by Tianjin University is selected as the research object and the stability of hybrid-driven underwater glider unitedly controlled by buoyancy and propeller has been targeted and evidenced. The dimensionless equations of the hybrid-driven underwater glider are obtained when the propeller is working. Then, the steady speed and steady glide path angle under steady-state motion have also been achieved. The steady-state operating conditions can be calculated when the hybrid-driven underwater glider reaches the desired steady-state motion. And the steadystate operating conditions are relatively conservative at the lower bound of the velocity range compared with the range of the velocity derived from the method of the composite Lyapunov function. By calculating the hydrodynamic coefficients of the Petrel-II hybrid-driven underwater glider, the simulation analysis has been conducted. In addition, the results of the field trials conducted in the South China Sea and the Danjiangkou Reservoir of China have been presented to illustrate the validity of the analysis and simulation, and to show the feasibility of the method of the composite Lyapunov function which verifies the stability of the Petrel-II hybrid-driven underwater glider.

  12. Noninferiority, randomized, controlled trial comparing embryo development using media developed for sequential or undisturbed culture in a time-lapse setup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardarson, Thorir; Bungum, Mona; Conaghan, Joe; Meintjes, Marius; Chantilis, Samuel J; Molnar, Laszlo; Gunnarsson, Kristina; Wikland, Matts

    2015-12-01

    To study whether a culture medium that allows undisturbed culture supports human embryo development to the blastocyst stage equivalently to a well-established sequential media. Randomized, double-blinded sibling trial. Independent in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinics. One hundred twenty-eight patients, with 1,356 zygotes randomized into two study arms. Embryos randomly allocated into two study arms to compare embryo development on a time-lapse system using a single-step medium or sequential media. Percentage of good-quality blastocysts on day 5. Percentage of day 5 good-quality blastocysts was 21.1% (standard deviation [SD] ± 21.6%) and 22.2% (SD ± 22.1%) in the single-step time-lapse medium (G-TL) and the sequential media (G-1/G-2) groups, respectively. The mean difference (-1.2; 95% CI, -6.0; 3.6) between the two media systems for the primary end point was less than the noninferiority margin of -8%. There was a statistically significantly lower number of good-quality embryos on day 3 in the G-TL group [50.7% (SD ± 30.6%) vs. 60.8% (SD ± 30.7%)]. Four out of the 11 measured morphokinetic parameters were statistically significantly different for the two media used. The mean levels of ammonium concentration in the media at the end of the culture period was statistically significantly lower in the G-TL group as compared with the G-2 group. We have shown that a single-step culture medium supports blastocyst development equivalently to established sequential media. The ammonium concentrations were lower in the single-step media, and the measured morphokinetic parameters were modified somewhat. NCT01939626. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Modeling of time-lapse multi-scale seismic monitoring of CO2 injected into a fault zone to enhance the characterization of permeability in enhanced geothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, R.; Borgia, A.; Daley, T. M.; Oldenburg, C. M.; Jung, Y.; Lee, K. J.; Doughty, C.; Altundas, B.; Chugunov, N.; Ramakrishnan, T. S.

    2017-12-01

    Subsurface permeable faults and fracture networks play a critical role for enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) by providing conduits for fluid flow. Characterization of the permeable flow paths before and after stimulation is necessary to evaluate and optimize energy extraction. To provide insight into the feasibility of using CO2 as a contrast agent to enhance fault characterization by seismic methods, we model seismic monitoring of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) injected into a fault. During the CO2 injection, the original brine is replaced by scCO2, which leads to variations in geophysical properties of the formation. To explore the technical feasibility of the approach, we present modeling results for different time-lapse seismic methods including surface seismic, vertical seismic profiling (VSP), and a cross-well survey. We simulate the injection and production of CO2 into a normal fault in a system based on the Brady's geothermal field and model pressure and saturation variations in the fault zone using TOUGH2-ECO2N. The simulation results provide changing fluid properties during the injection, such as saturation and salinity changes, which allow us to estimate corresponding changes in seismic properties of the fault and the formation. We model the response of the system to active seismic monitoring in time-lapse mode using an anisotropic finite difference method with modifications for fracture compliance. Results to date show that even narrow fault and fracture zones filled with CO2 can be better detected using the VSP and cross-well survey geometry, while it would be difficult to image the CO2 plume by using surface seismic methods.

  14. Interpretaion of synthetic seismic time-lapse monitoring data for Korea CCS project based on the acoustic-elastic coupled inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, J.; Min, D.; Kim, W.; Huh, C.; Kang, S.

    2012-12-01

    Recently, the CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage) is one of the promising methods to reduce the CO2 emission. To evaluate the success of the CCS project, various geophysical monitoring techniques have been applied. Among them, the time-lapse seismic monitoring is one of the effective methods to investigate the migration of CO2 plume. To monitor the injected CO2 plume accurately, it is needed to interpret seismic monitoring data using not only the imaging technique but also the full waveform inversion, because subsurface material properties can be estimated through the inversion. However, previous works for interpreting seismic monitoring data are mainly based on the imaging technique. In this study, we perform the frequency-domain full waveform inversion for synthetic data obtained by the acoustic-elastic coupled modeling for the geological model made after Ulleung Basin, which is one of the CO2 storage prospects in Korea. We suppose the injection layer is located in fault-related anticlines in the Dolgorae Deformed Belt and, for more realistic situation, we contaminate the synthetic monitoring data with random noise and outliers. We perform the time-lapse full waveform inversion in two scenarios. One scenario is that the injected CO2 plume migrates within the injection layer and is stably captured. The other scenario is that the injected CO2 plume leaks through the weak part of the cap rock. Using the inverted P- and S-wave velocities and Poisson's ratio, we were able to detect the migration of the injected CO2 plume. Acknowledgment This work was financially supported by the Brain Korea 21 project of Energy Systems Engineering, the "Development of Technology for CO2 Marine Geological Storage" program funded by the Ministry of Land, Transport and Maritime Affairs (MLTM) of Korea and the Korea CCS R&D Center (KCRC) grant funded by the Korea government (Ministry of Education, Science and Technology) (No. 2012-0008926).

  15. Morphological changes at Colima volcano caused the 2015 Hurricane Patricia investigated by repeated drone surveys and time lapse cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Thomas R.; Navarro, Carlos; Arambula, Raul; Salzer, Jackie; Reyes, Gabriel

    2016-04-01

    Colima is one of the most active volcanoes in Latin America, with frequent dome building eruptions and pyroclastic flow hazards. In July 2015 Colima had a new climax of eruptive activity, profoundly changing the summit morphology and redistributing volcanic ashes to the lower volcano apron. These unconsolidated ashes are prone to be mobilized by rainfall events, and therefore required close monitoring. A major hurricane then had landfall in western Mexico in October 2015, accumulating c. 450 mm of rainfall at a meteorological station at Nevado de Colima (3461 m) and immense lahar and ash deposit mobilization from Colima Volcano. Hurricane Patricia was the largest ever recorded category 5 storm, directly crossing the state of Colima. Due to the successful scientific advice and civil protection no human losses were directly associated to this lahar hazards. We have conducted drone overflight in profound valleys that directed the pyroclastic flows and lahars two days before and three days after the hurricane. Over 8,000 close range aerial photographs could be recorded, along with GPS locations of ground stations. Images were processed using the structure from motion methodology, and digital elevation models compared. Erosion locally exceeded 10 m vertically and caused significant landscape change. Mass mobilization unloaded the young pyroclastic deposits and led to significant underground heat loss and water boiling in the affected areas. We also firstly report the use of camera array set-ups along the same valley to monitor lahar deposition and erosion from different perspectives. Combining these photos using photogrammetric techniques allow time series of digital elevation change studies at the deepening erosional ravines, with large potential for future geomorphic monitoring. This study shows that photo monitoring is very useful for studying the link of volcano landscape evolution and hydrometerological extremes and for rapid assessment of indirect volcanic hazards.

  16. Combining time-lapse electrical resistivity, suction cup and tensiometer measurements to monitor snowmelt and solute transport at Oslo airport, Gardermoen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloem, Esther; French, Helen K.

    2013-04-01

    Geophysical methods provide indirect measurements of subsurface properties over larger volumes than traditional techniques, and are potentially cost-efficient. However, the usefulness of any individual set of geophysical measurements (akin to a snapshot at one point in time) is severely limited by the problem of non-uniqueness or ambiguity when used to study contaminated sites, where the attendant processes vary in space and time. To make progress on soil contamination assessment and site characterization there is a strong need to integrate quasi field-scale, extensively instrumented tools, with non-invasive (geophysical) methods. The impact of annual infiltration of large quantities of de-icing chemicals at Oslo airport, Gardermoen, represents common challenge for all airports with winter frost. It is also similar to the challenge posed by de-icing salt application along roads. To improve risk assessment, monitoring, and treatment strategies for natural attenuation, we require a better understanding on the resistivity effects from infiltrating snowmelt and contaminant movement to the methods suitable for monitoring resistivity changes over time at contaminated sites. Electrical and electromagnetic methods are widely applied for soil mapping and detecting of contaminated plumes. Time-lapse measurements have become a common method to characterize changes in water saturation and solute transport in the unsaturated zone (French and Binley, 2004; French et al. 2002). The non-uniqueness of the interpretation techniques can be reduced by constraining the inversion through the addition of independent measurements along the same profile. Such measurements include soil physical properties, soil suction, contaminant concentration and temperatures. At the research field station at Gardermoen, a degradable de-icing chemical and an inactive tracer were added to the snow cover prior to snowmelt. In order to link geophysical measurements to solute transport processes in the

  17. Underwater Sound Reference Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Underwater Sound Reference Division (USRD) serves as the U.S. standardizing activity in the area of underwater acoustic measurements, as the National Institute...

  18. Application of RVA and Time-Lapse Photography to Explore Effects of Extent of Chlorination, Milling Extraction Rate, and Particle-Size Reduction of Flour on Cake-Baking Functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three factors (extent of chlorination, milling extraction rate and particle-size reduction) in the cake-bakeing functionality of Croplan 594W flour were explored by Rapid Visco-Analyzer (RVA) and time-lapse photography. The extent of chlorination and milling extraction rate showed dramatic effects,...

  19. Quantitative high-resolution observations of soil water dynamics in a complicated architecture using time-lapse ground-penetrating radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenk, P.; Jaumann, S.; Roth, K.

    2015-03-01

    High-resolution time-lapse ground-penetrating radar (GPR) observations of advancing and retreating water tables can yield a wealth of information about near-surface water content dynamics. In this study, we present and analyze a series of imbibition, drainage and infiltration experiments that have been carried out at our artificial ASSESS test site and observed with surface-based GPR. The test site features a complicated but known subsurface architecture constructed with three different kinds of sand. It allows the study of soil water dynamics with GPR under a wide range of different conditions. Here, we assess in particular (i) the feasibility of monitoring the dynamic shape of the capillary fringe reflection and (ii) the relative precision of monitoring soil water dynamics averaged over the whole vertical extent by evaluating the bottom reflection. The phenomenology of the GPR response of a dynamically changing capillary fringe is developed from a soil physical point of view. We then explain experimentally observed phenomena based on numerical simulations of both the water content dynamics and the expected GPR response.

  20. Quantitative high-resolution observations of soil water dynamics in a complicated architecture with time-lapse Ground-Penetrating Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenk, P.; Jaumann, S.; Roth, K.

    2014-11-01

    High-resolution time-lapse Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) observations of advancing and retreating water tables can yield a wealth of information about near-surface water content dynamics. In this study, we present and analyze a series of imbibition, drainage and infiltration experiments which have been carried out at our artificial ASSESS test site and observed with surface based GPR. The test site features a complicated but known subsurface architecture constructed with three different kinds of sand. It allows studying soil water dynamics with GPR under a wide range of different conditions. Here, we assess in particular (i) the accurate determination of soil water dynamics averaged over the whole vertical extent by evaluating the bottom reflection and (ii) the feasibility of monitoring the dynamic shape of the capillary fringe reflection. The phenomenology of the GPR response of a dynamically changing capillary fringe is developed from a soil physical point of view. We then explain experimentally observed phenomena based on numerical simulations of both the water content dynamics and the expected GPR response.

  1. New algorithm to determine true colocalization in combination with image restoration and time-lapse confocal microscopy to MAP kinases in mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Ignacio Villalta

    Full Text Available The subcellular localization and physiological functions of biomolecules are closely related and thus it is crucial to precisely determine the distribution of different molecules inside the intracellular structures. This is frequently accomplished by fluorescence microscopy with well-characterized markers and posterior evaluation of the signal colocalization. Rigorous study of colocalization requires statistical analysis of the data, albeit yet no single technique has been established as a standard method. Indeed, the few methods currently available are only accurate in images with particular characteristics. Here, we introduce a new algorithm to automatically obtain the true colocalization between images that is suitable for a wide variety of biological situations. To proceed, the algorithm contemplates the individual contribution of each pixel's fluorescence intensity in a pair of images to the overall Pearsońs correlation and Manders' overlap coefficients. The accuracy and reliability of the algorithm was validated on both simulated and real images that reflected the characteristics of a range of biological samples. We used this algorithm in combination with image restoration by deconvolution and time-lapse confocal microscopy to address the localization of MEK1 in the mitochondria of different cell lines. Appraising the previously described behavior of Akt1 corroborated the reliability of the combined use of these techniques. Together, the present work provides a novel statistical approach to accurately and reliably determine the colocalization in a variety of biological images.

  2. Proliferation kinetics of cultured cells after irradiation with X-rays and 14 MeV neutrons studied by time-lapse cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, M W; Stap, J; Barendsen, G W

    1984-06-01

    Exponentially growing cells of an established line derived from a mouse osteosarcoma (MOS) have been studied by time-lapse cinematography after irradiation with 3 Gy of 200 kV X-rays or 1.5 Gy of 14 MeV neutrons. Cell cycle times (Tc) of individual cells and their progeny in three subsequent generations as well as the occurrence of aberrant mitosis have been determined to evaluate the variation in expression of damage in relation to the stage in the intermitotic cycle and the radiation quality. The results show that the radiation doses applied cause an equal elongation of the mean Tc, which is largest in the irradiated cells but persists in the three subsequent generations. After 3 Gy of X-rays, mitotic delay is largest in cells irradiated in later stages of the cycle, but this difference is not observed after 1.5 Gy of 14 MeV neutrons. In subsequent generations the Tc values show larger variations among descendents of cells treated in the same stage of the cycle as compared to controls but this variation is equal for the doses of X-rays and neutrons applied. Division probability was significantly reduced in irradiated cells as well as in subsequent generations, whereby with neutrons as compared to X-rays the damage is expressed in earlier generations, with less variation as a function of the cell cycle.

  3. Visualization of living terminal hypertrophic chondrocytes of growth plate cartilage in situ by differential interference contrast microscopy and time-lapse cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnum, C E; Turgai, J; Wilsman, N J

    1990-09-01

    The functional unit within the growth plate consists of a column of chondrocytes that passes through a sequence of phases including proliferation, hypertrophy, and death. It is important to our understanding of the biology of the growth plate to determine if distal hypertrophic cells are viable, highly differentiated cells with the potential of actively controlling terminal events of endochondral ossification prior to their death at the chondro-osseous junction. This study for the first time reports on the visualization of living hypertrophic chondrocytes in situ, including the terminal hypertrophic chondrocyte. Chondrocytes in growth plate explants are visualized using rectified differential interference contrast microscopy. We record and measure, using time-lapse cinematography, the rate of movement of subcellular organelles at the limit of resolution of this light microscopy system. Control experiments to assess viability of hypertrophic chondrocytes include coincubating organ cultures with the intravital dye fluorescein diacetate to assess the integrity of the plasma membrane and cytoplasmic esterases. In this system, all hypertrophic chondrocytes, including the very terminal chondrocyte, exist as rounded, fully hydrated cells. By the criteria of intravital dye staining and organelle movement, distal hypertrophic chondrocytes are identical to chondrocytes in the proliferative and early hypertrophic cell zones.

  4. Proliferation kinetics of cultured cells after irradiation with X-rays and 14 MeV neutrons studied by time-lapse cinematography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kooi, M.W.; Stap, J.; Barendsen, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    Exponentially growing cells of an established line derived from a mouse osteosarcoma (MOS) have been studied by time-lapse cinematography after irradiation with 3 Gy of 200 kV X- rays or 1.5 Gy of 14 MeV neutrons. The results show that the radiation doses applied cause an equal elongation of the mean cell cycle time Tsub(c), which is largest in the irradiated cells but persists in the three subsequent generations. After 3 Gy of X-rays, mitotic delay is largest in cells irradiated in later stages of the cycle, but this difference is not observed after 1.5 Gy of 14 MeV neutrons. In subsequent generations the Tsub(c) values show larger variations among descendents of cells treated in the same stage of the cycle as compared to controls but this variation is equal for the doses of X-rays and neutrons applied. Division probability was significantly reduced in irradiated cells as well as in subsequent generations, whereas with neutrons as compared to X-rays the damage is expressed in earlier generations, with less variation as a function of the cell cycle. (author)

  5. CellDyM: A room temperature operating cryogenic cell for the dynamic monitoring of snow metamorphism by time-lapse X-ray microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calonne, N.; Flin, F.; Lesaffre, B.; Dufour, A.; Roulle, J.; Puglièse, P.; Philip, A.; Lahoucine, F.; Geindreau, C.; Panel, J.-M.; Roscoat, S. Rolland; Charrier, P.

    2015-05-01

    Monitoring the time evolution of snow microstructure in 3-D is crucial for a better understanding of snow metamorphism. We, therefore, designed a cryogenic cell that precisely controls the experimental conditions of a sample while it is scanned by X-ray tomography. Based on a thermoelectrical regulation and a vacuum insulation, the cell operates at room temperature. It is, thus, adaptable to diverse scanners, offering advantages in terms of imaging techniques, resolution, and speed. Three-dimensional time-lapse series were obtained under equitemperature and temperature gradient conditions at a 7.8 μm precision. The typical features of each metamorphism and the anisotropic faceting behavior between the basal and prismatic planes, known to occur close to -2°C, were observed in less than 30 h. These results are consistent with the temperature fields expected from heat conduction simulations through the cell. They confirm the cell's accuracy and the interest of relatively short periods to study snow metamorphism.

  6. Significantly improved precision of cell migration analysis in time-lapse video microscopy through use of a fully automated tracking system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seufferlein Thomas

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell motility is a critical parameter in many physiological as well as pathophysiological processes. In time-lapse video microscopy, manual cell tracking remains the most common method of analyzing migratory behavior of cell populations. In addition to being labor-intensive, this method is susceptible to user-dependent errors regarding the selection of "representative" subsets of cells and manual determination of precise cell positions. Results We have quantitatively analyzed these error sources, demonstrating that manual cell tracking of pancreatic cancer cells lead to mis-calculation of migration rates of up to 410%. In order to provide for objective measurements of cell migration rates, we have employed multi-target tracking technologies commonly used in radar applications to develop fully automated cell identification and tracking system suitable for high throughput screening of video sequences of unstained living cells. Conclusion We demonstrate that our automatic multi target tracking system identifies cell objects, follows individual cells and computes migration rates with high precision, clearly outperforming manual procedures.

  7. Revelation of Different Nanoparticle-Uptake Behavior in Two Standard Cell Lines NIH/3T3 and A549 by Flow Cytometry and Time-Lapse Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Jochums

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The uptake of nanomaterials into different cell types is a central pharmacological issue for the determination of nanotoxicity as well as for the development of drug delivery strategies. Most responses of the cells depend on their intracellular interactions with nanoparticles (NPs. Uptake behavior can be precisely investigated in vitro, with sensitive high throughput methods such as flow cytometry. In this study, we investigated two different standard cell lines, human lung carcinoma (A549 and mouse fibroblast (NIH/3T3 cells, regarding their uptake behavior of titanium dioxide NPs. Cells were incubated with different concentrations of TiO2 NPs and samples were taken at certain time points to compare the uptake kinetics of both cell lines. Samples were analyzed with the help of flow cytometry by studying changes in the side and forward scattering signal. To additionally enable a detection via fluorescence, NPs were labeled with the fluorescent dye fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC and propidium iodide (PI. We found that NIH/3T3 cells take up the studied NPs more efficiently than A549 cells. These findings were supported by time-lapse microscopic imaging of the cells incubated with TiO2 NPs. Our results confirm that the uptake behavior of individual cell types has to be considered before interpreting any results of nanomaterial studies.

  8. Mobility Effect on Poroelastic Seismic Signatures in Partially Saturated Rocks With Applications in Time-Lapse Monitoring of a Heavy Oil Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Luanxiao; Yuan, Hemin; Yang, Jingkang; Han, De-hua; Geng, Jianhua; Zhou, Rui; Li, Hui; Yao, Qiuliang

    2017-11-01

    Conventional seismic analysis in partially saturated rocks normally lays emphasis on estimating pore fluid content and saturation, typically ignoring the effect of mobility, which decides the ability of fluids moving in the porous rocks. Deformation resulting from a seismic wave in heterogeneous partially saturated media can cause pore fluid pressure relaxation at mesoscopic scale, thereby making the fluid mobility inherently associated with poroelastic reflectivity. For two typical gas-brine reservoir models, with the given rock and fluid properties, the numerical analysis suggests that variations of patchy fluid saturation, fluid compressibility contrast, and acoustic stiffness of rock frame collectively affect the seismic reflection dependence on mobility. In particular, the realistic compressibility contrast of fluid patches in shallow and deep reservoir environments plays an important role in determining the reflection sensitivity to mobility. We also use a time-lapse seismic data set from a Steam-Assisted Gravity Drainage producing heavy oil reservoir to demonstrate that mobility change coupled with patchy saturation possibly leads to seismic spectral energy shifting from the baseline to monitor line. Our workflow starts from performing seismic spectral analysis on the targeted reflectivity interface. Then, on the basis of mesoscopic fluid pressure diffusion between patches of steam and heavy oil, poroelastic reflectivity modeling is conducted to understand the shift of the central frequency toward low frequencies after the steam injection. The presented results open the possibility of monitoring mobility change of a partially saturated geological formation from dissipation-related seismic attributes.

  9. The use of computerized video time lapse to study cell death in rat embryo cells transfected with c-ha-ras or c-myc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrester, H.B.; Vidair, C.A.; Dewey, W.C.; Ling, C.C.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Individual rat embryo fibroblasts that had been transfected with the c-myc (REC:myc) or c-Ha ras (REC:ras) oncogene were followed after irradiation using a computer video time lapse (CVTL) system in order to quantify the lethal events that resulted in loss of clonogenic survival after irradiation. By followed the cells for 2 to 3 generations before irradiation we were able to determine where they were in the cell cycle at the time of irradiation for cell cycle analysis. After irradiation, the individual cells and their progeny were followed in multiple fields for 5-6 days Then, pedigrees for individual irradiated cells were determined by noting the times of divisions fusions, and cell death. After X-irradiation, the clonogenic survival values for these two cell lines are similar. However, by using computerized video time lapse (CVTL) to follow individual cells we found that the loss of clonogenic survival was due to two different processes, cell death and a senescent-like process. The loss of clonogenic survival of x-irradiated (9.5 and 4 Gy) REC:myc cells was attributed almost entirely to the cells dying by apoptosis (∼99 and 90%). In contrast, approximately 60% of the x-irradiated (9.5 Gy) non-clonogenic REC:ras cells died by apoptosis (with a very small amount of necrosis), and the other 40% underwent a senescent-type process in which some of the cells and their progeny stopped dividing but remained as viable cells throughout 140 hours of observation. Both processes usually occurred after the cells had divided and continued to occur in the cells' progeny for up to five divisions after irradiation. The mode of cell death in the progeny of a non-clonogenic cell can be determined only by using CVTL and can not be determined by conventional clonogenic survival experiments. Also, only by following the individual cells and their progeny can the true amount of apoptosis be determined. The cumulative percentage of apoptosis scored in whole populations

  10. Understanding leachate flow in municipal solid waste landfills by combining time-lapse ERT and subsurface flow modelling - Part II: Constraint methodology of hydrodynamic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebert, M; Oxarango, L; Duquennoi, C; Touze-Foltz, N; Forquet, N; Clément, R

    2016-09-01

    Leachate recirculation is a key process in the operation of municipal solid waste landfills as bioreactors. To ensure optimal water content distribution, bioreactor operators need tools to design leachate injection systems. Prediction of leachate flow by subsurface flow modelling could provide useful information for the design of such systems. However, hydrodynamic models require additional data to constrain them and to assess hydrodynamic parameters. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a suitable method to study leachate infiltration at the landfill scale. It can provide spatially distributed information which is useful for constraining hydrodynamic models. However, this geophysical method does not allow ERT users to directly measure water content in waste. The MICS (multiple inversions and clustering strategy) methodology was proposed to delineate the infiltration area precisely during time-lapse ERT survey in order to avoid the use of empirical petrophysical relationships, which are not adapted to a heterogeneous medium such as waste. The infiltration shapes and hydrodynamic information extracted with MICS were used to constrain hydrodynamic models in assessing parameters. The constraint methodology developed in this paper was tested on two hydrodynamic models: an equilibrium model where, flow within the waste medium is estimated using a single continuum approach and a non-equilibrium model where flow is estimated using a dual continuum approach. The latter represents leachate flows into fractures. Finally, this methodology provides insight to identify the advantages and limitations of hydrodynamic models. Furthermore, we suggest an explanation for the large volume detected by MICS when a small volume of leachate is injected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Monitoring the evolution and migration of a methane gas plume in an unconfined sandy aquifer using time-lapse GPR and ERT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steelman, Colby M.; Klazinga, Dylan R.; Cahill, Aaron G.; Endres, Anthony L.; Parker, Beth L.

    2017-10-01

    Fugitive methane (CH4) leakage associated with conventional and unconventional petroleum development (e.g., shale gas) may pose significant risks to shallow groundwater. While the potential threat of stray (CH4) gas in aquifers has been acknowledged, few studies have examined the nature of its migration and fate in a shallow groundwater flow system. This study examines the geophysical responses observed from surface during a 72 day field-scale simulated CH4 leak in an unconfined sandy aquifer at Canadian Forces Base Borden, Canada, to better understand the transient behaviour of fugitive CH4 gas in the subsurface. Time-lapse ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) were used to monitor the distribution and migration of the gas-phase and assess any impacts to groundwater hydrochemistry. Geophysical measurements captured the transient formation of a CH4 gas plume emanating from the injector, which was accompanied by an increase in total dissolved gas pressure (PTDG). Subsequent reductions in PTDG were accompanied by reduced bulk resistivity around the injector along with an increase in the GPR reflectivity along horizontal bedding reflectors farther downgradient. Repeat temporal GPR reflection profiling identified three events with major peaks in reflectivity, interpreted to represent episodic lateral CH4 gas release events into the aquifer. Here, a gradual increase in PTDG near the injector caused a sudden lateral breakthrough of gas in the direction of groundwater flow, causing free-phase CH4 to migrate much farther than anticipated based on groundwater advection. CH4 accumulated along subtle permeability boundaries demarcated by grain-scale bedding within the aquifer characteristic of numerous Borden-aquifer multi-phase flow experiments. Diminishing reflectivity over a period of days to weeks suggests buoyancy-driven migration to the vadose zone and/or CH4 dissolution into groundwater. Lateral and vertical CH4 migration was

  12. Time-lapse cinematography-compatible polystyrene-based microwell culture system: a novel tool for tracking the development of individual bovine embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura, Satoshi; Akai, Tomonori; Somfai, Tamás; Hirayama, Muneyuki; Aikawa, Yoshio; Ohtake, Masaki; Hattori, Hideshi; Kobayashi, Shuji; Hashiyada, Yutaka; Konishi, Kazuyuki; Imai, Kei

    2010-12-01

    We have developed a polystyrene-based well-of-the-well (WOW) system using injection molding to track individual embryos throughout culture using time-lapse cinematography (TLC). WOW culture of bovine embryos following in vitro fertilization was compared with conventional droplet culture (control). No differences between control- and WOW-cultured embryos were observed during development to the blastocyst stage. Morphological quality and inner cell mass (ICM) and trophectoderm (TE) cell numbers were not different between control- and WOW-derived blastocysts; however, apoptosis in both the ICM and TE cells was reduced in WOW culture (P < 0.01). Oxygen consumption in WOW-derived blastocysts was closer to physiological level than that of control-derived blastocysts. Moreover, WOW culture improved embryo viability, as indicated by increased pregnancy rates at Days 30 and 60 after embryo transfer (P < 0.05). TLC monitoring was performed to evaluate the cleavage pattern and the duration of the first cell cycle of embryos from oocytes collected by ovum pickup; correlations with success of pregnancy were determined. Logistic regression analysis indicated that the cleavage pattern correlated with success of pregnancy (P < 0.05), but cell cycle length did not. Higher pregnancy rates (66.7%) were observed for animals in which transferred blastocysts had undergone normal cleavage, identified by the presence of two blastomeres of the same size without fragmentation, than among those with abnormal cleavage (33.3%). These results suggest that our microwell culture system is a powerful tool for producing and selecting healthy embryos and for identifying viability biomarkers.

  13. Remotely Measuring Trash Fluxes in the Flood Canals of Megacities with Time Lapse Cameras and Computer Vision Algorithms - a Case Study from Jakarta, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlar, F.; Turpin, E.; Kerkez, B.

    2014-12-01

    As megacities around the world continue to develop at breakneck speeds, future development, investment, and social wellbeing are threatened by a number of environmental and social factors. Chief among these is frequent, persistent, and unpredictable urban flooding. Jakarta, Indonesia with a population of 28 million, is a prime example of a city plagued by such flooding. Yet although Jakarta has ample hydraulic infrastructure already in place with more being constructed, the increasingly severity of the flooding it experiences is not from a lack of hydraulic infrastructure but rather a failure of existing infrastructure. As was demonstrated during the most recent floods in Jakarta, the infrastructure failure is often the result of excessive amounts of trash in the flood canals. This trash clogs pumps and reduces the overall system capacity. Despite this critical weakness of flood control in Jakarta, no data exists on the overall amount of trash in the flood canals, much less on how it varies temporally and spatially. The recent availability of low cost photography provides a means to obtain such data. Time lapse photography postprocessed with computer vision algorithms yields a low cost, remote, and automatic solution to measuring the trash fluxes. When combined with the measurement of key hydrological parameters, a thorough understanding of the relationship between trash fluxes and the hydrology of massive urban areas becomes possible. This work examines algorithm development, quantifying trash parameters, and hydrological measurements followed by data assimilation into existing hydraulic and hydrological models of Jakarta. The insights afforded from such an approach allows for more efficient operating of hydraulic infrastructure, knowledge of when and where critical levels of trash originate from, and the opportunity for community outreach - which is ultimately needed to reduce the trash in the flood canals of Jakarta and megacities around the world.

  14. Ionomycin-induced calcium influx induces neurite degeneration in mouse neuroblastoma cells: analysis of a time-lapse live cell imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Saki; Nakanishi, Ayumi; Takazawa, Minami; Okihiro, Shunsuke; Urano, Shiro; Fukui, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species induce neuronal cell death. However, the detailed mechanisms of cell death have not yet been elucidated. Previously, we reported neurite degeneration before the induction of cell death. Here, we attempted to elucidate the mechanisms of neurite degeneration before the induction of cell death using the neuroblastoma N1E-115 cell line and a time-lapse live cell imaging system. Treatment with the calcium ionophore ionomycin induced cell death and neurite degeneration in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Treatment with a low concentration of ionomycin immediately produced a significant calcium influx into the intracellular region in N1E-115 cells. After 1-h incubation with ionomycin, the fluorescence emission of MitoSOX TM increased significantly compared to the control. Finally, analysis using a new mitochondrial specific fluorescence dye, MitoPeDPP, indicated that treatment with ionomycin significantly increased the mitochondrial lipid hydroperoxide production in N1E-115 cells. The fluorescence emissions of Fluo-4 AM and MitoPeDPP were detected in the cell soma and neurite regions in ionomycin-treated N1E-115 cells. However, the emissions of neurites were much lower than those of the cell soma. TBARS values of ionomycin-treated cells significantly increased compared to the control. These results indicate that ionomycin induces calcium influx into the intracellular region and reactive oxygen species production in N1E-115 cells. Lipid hydroperoxide production was induced in ionomycin-treated N1E-115 cells. Calcium influx into the intracellular region is a possible activator of neurite degeneration.

  15. Fighting for territories: time-lapse analysis of dental pulp and dental follicle stem cells in co-culture reveals specific migratory capabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Schiraldi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell migration is a critical step during the repair of damaged tissues. In order to achieve appropriate cell-based therapies for tooth and periodontal ligament repair it is necessary first to understand the dynamics of tissue-specific stem cell populations such as dental pulp stem cells (DPSC and dental follicle stem cells (DFSC. Using time-lapse imaging, we analysed migratory and proliferative capabilities of these two human stem cell lines in vitro. When cultured alone, both DPSC and DFSC exhibited low and irregular migration profiles. In co-cultures, DFSC, but not DPSC, spectacularly increased their migration activity and velocity. DFSC rapidly surrounded the DPSC, thus resembling the in vivo developmental process, where follicle cells encircle both dental epithelium and pulp. Cell morphology was dependent on the culture conditions (mono-culture or co-culture and changed over time. Regulatory genes involved in dental cell migration and differentiation such as TWIST1, MSX1, RUNX2, SFRP1 and ADAM28, were also evaluated in co-cultures. MSX1 up-regulation indicates that DPSC and DFSC retain their odontogenic potential. However, DPSC lose their capacity to differentiate into odontoblasts in the presence of DFSC, as suggested by RUNX2 up-regulation and TWIST1 down-regulation. In contrast, the unchanged levels of SFRP1 expression suggest that DFSC retain their potential to form periodontal tissues even in the presence of DPSC. These findings demonstrate that stem cells behave differently according to their environment, retain their genetic memory, and compete with each other to acquire the appropriate territory. Understanding the mechanisms involved in stem cell migration may lead to new therapeutic approaches for tooth repair.

  16. Vapor flux and recrystallization during dry snow metamorphism under a steady temperature gradient as observed by time-lapse micro-tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. R. Pinzer

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dry snow metamorphism under an external temperature gradient is the most common type of recrystallization of snow on the ground. The changes in snow microstructure modify the physical properties of snow, and therefore an understanding of this process is essential for many disciplines, from modeling the effects of snow on climate to assessing avalanche risk. We directly imaged the microstructural changes in snow during temperature gradient metamorphism (TGM under a constant gradient of 50 K m−1, using in situ time-lapse X-ray micro-tomography. This novel and non-destructive technique directly reveals the amount of ice that sublimates and is deposited during metamorphism, in addition to the exact locations of these phase changes. We calculated the average time that an ice volume stayed in place before it sublimated and found a characteristic residence time of 2–3 days. This means that most of the ice changes its phase from solid to vapor and back many times in a seasonal snowpack where similar temperature conditions can be found. Consistent with such a short timescale, we observed a mass turnover of up to 60% of the total ice mass per day. The concept of hand-to-hand transport for the water vapor flux describes the observed changes very well. However, we did not find evidence for a macroscopic vapor diffusion enhancement. The picture of {temperature gradient metamorphism} produced by directly observing the changing microstructure sheds light on the micro-physical processes and could help to improve models that predict the physical properties of snow.

  17. Underwater Geotechnical Foundations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Landris

    2001-01-01

    This report provides an overview and description of the design and construction of underwater geotechnical foundations and offers preliminary guidance based on past and current technology applications...

  18. Live-cell time-lapse imaging and single-cell tracking of in vitro cultured neural stem cells - Tools for analyzing dynamics of cell cycle, migration, and lineage selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piltti, Katja M; Cummings, Brian J; Carta, Krystal; Manughian-Peter, Ayla; Worne, Colleen L; Singh, Kulbir; Ong, Danier; Maksymyuk, Yuriy; Khine, Michelle; Anderson, Aileen J

    2018-01-15

    Neural stem cell (NSC) cultures have been considered technically challenging for time-lapse analysis due to high motility, photosensitivity, and growth at confluent densities. We have tested feasibility of long-term live-cell time-lapse analysis for NSC migration and differentiation studies. Here, we describe a method to study the dynamics of cell cycle, migration, and lineage selection in cultured multipotent mouse or human NSCs using single-cell tracking during a long-term, 7-14 day live-cell time-lapse analysis. We used in-house made PDMS inserts with five microwells on a glass coverslip petri-dish to constrain NSC into the area of acquisition during long-term live-cell imaging. In parallel, we have defined image acquisition settings for single-cell tracking of cell cycle dynamics using Fucci-reporter mouse NSC for 7 days as well as lineage selection and migration using human NSC for 14 days. Overall, we show that adjustments of live-cell analysis settings can extend the time period of single-cell tracking in mouse or human NSC from 24-72 h up to 7-14 days and potentially longer. However, we emphasize that experimental use of repeated fluorescence imaging will require careful consideration of controls during acquisition and analysis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Time-lapse electric resistivity in a stressed mangrove forest to image the role of the root zone in porewater salt distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, C. M.; Krauss, K.; Kruse, S.

    2017-12-01

    The movement and storage of porewater salts is poorly understood in mangrove forests with limited surface water exchange between the forest and neighboring lagoon. These mangroves are often the most stressed, and have the most unfavorable salinity balance that often transition to mortality during extreme drought. A time-lapse resistivity survey was conducted in a stressed mangrove forest over a diel period. Resistivity is sensitive to the entire soil volume, including fine roots. The objective was to image changes in porewater salinity structures around both mangrove trees, where roots can be a prolific contributor to soil volume, and a salt pan with little or no vegetation. Throughout the diel period, salt pan conductivities remained relatively constant. The most significant temporal changes occur in the root zone around mangrove trees. Particularly interesting is a drop in resistivity (increased conductivity) at sunset when transpiration from individual trees decreases (or even ceases), potentially identifying a cumulative concentration of salts around the mangrove root zone after a full day of transpiration. The resistivity gradient decreases immediately after its peak at sunset, potentially identifying the consequences of hydraulic redistribution in diluting soils surrounding trees immediately after transpiration ceases. This is quicker than expected, and may imply a very strong and rapid eco-hydrological connection in the tree-facilitated salinity balance essential to their survival under the most salinity-stressed environments. At sunrise, resistivity increases, further suggesting dilution of salts via hydraulic redistribution of fresh water from the tree into the upper soil layers, or suggests an accumulation of salts within roots when presumably less water is moving through the trees. Repeated electric resistivity arrays provide spatial and temporal information about these salts and contribute to an overall understanding of how stressed mangrove forests

  20. Time-lapse resistivity measurements combined with soil water sampling to characterize solute movement in the unsaturated zone at Oslo airport, Gardermoen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloem, E.; French, H. K.; Binley, A.; Schotanus, D.; Eggen, G.

    2010-12-01

    Pollution of soils is a widespread problem and is an important part of the still to be implemented Soil Directive (EU). To improve risk assessment, monitoring, and treatment strategies for natural attenuation, we require a better understanding of the effect of soil heterogeneity on contaminant movement and methods for monitoring the effects of this heterogeneity at contaminated sites. Geophysical methods provide indirect measurements of subsurface properties over larger volumes than tradition techniques, and are potentially cost-efficient. However, the usefulness of any individual set of geophysical measurements (akin to a snapshot at one point in time) is severely limited by the problem of non-uniqueness or ambiguity when used to study contaminated sites, where the attendant processes vary in space and time. To make progress on soil contamination assessment and site characterization there is a strong need to integrate quasi field-scale, extensively instrumented tools, such as the multi-compartment sampler, with non-invasive (geophysical) and invasive (soil sampling, soil water sampling) methods. We illustrate this approach in an application to solute transport at Oslo airport, Norway. The impact of annual infiltration of large quantities of de-icing chemicals at Oslo airport, Gardermoen, represents common challenge for all airports with winter frost. It is also similar to the challenge posed by de-icing salt application along roads. At the research field station at Gardermoen, a degradable de-icing chemical and an inactive tracer were added to the snow cover prior to snowmelt and to the surface during an irrigation experiment performed after the snowmelt. In order to link geophysical measurements to solute transport processes in the unsaturated zone, time-lapse cross borehole resistivity as well as surface resistivity measurements were conducted at the same time as soil water samples were extracted. Measurements of soil temperature, and tension were also carried

  1. Monitoring the evolution and migration of a methane gas plume in an unconfined sandy aquifer using time-lapse GPR and ERT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steelman, Colby M; Klazinga, Dylan R; Cahill, Aaron G; Endres, Anthony L; Parker, Beth L

    2017-10-01

    Fugitive methane (CH 4 ) leakage associated with conventional and unconventional petroleum development (e.g., shale gas) may pose significant risks to shallow groundwater. While the potential threat of stray (CH 4 ) gas in aquifers has been acknowledged, few studies have examined the nature of its migration and fate in a shallow groundwater flow system. This study examines the geophysical responses observed from surface during a 72day field-scale simulated CH 4 leak in an unconfined sandy aquifer at Canadian Forces Base Borden, Canada, to better understand the transient behaviour of fugitive CH 4 gas in the subsurface. Time-lapse ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) were used to monitor the distribution and migration of the gas-phase and assess any impacts to groundwater hydrochemistry. Geophysical measurements captured the transient formation of a CH 4 gas plume emanating from the injector, which was accompanied by an increase in total dissolved gas pressure (P TDG ). Subsequent reductions in P TDG were accompanied by reduced bulk resistivity around the injector along with an increase in the GPR reflectivity along horizontal bedding reflectors farther downgradient. Repeat temporal GPR reflection profiling identified three events with major peaks in reflectivity, interpreted to represent episodic lateral CH 4 gas release events into the aquifer. Here, a gradual increase in P TDG near the injector caused a sudden lateral breakthrough of gas in the direction of groundwater flow, causing free-phase CH 4 to migrate much farther than anticipated based on groundwater advection. CH 4 accumulated along subtle permeability boundaries demarcated by grain-scale bedding within the aquifer characteristic of numerous Borden-aquifer multi-phase flow experiments. Diminishing reflectivity over a period of days to weeks suggests buoyancy-driven migration to the vadose zone and/or CH 4 dissolution into groundwater. Lateral and vertical CH 4

  2. Underwater Scene Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nanyoung

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an underwater scene composition for elementary-education majors. This project deals with watercolor with crayon or oil-pastel resist (medium); the beauty of nature represented by fish in the underwater scene (theme); texture and pattern (design elements); drawing simple forms (drawing skill); and composition…

  3. Modeling and Control of Underwater Robotic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schjoelberg, I:

    1996-12-31

    This doctoral thesis describes modeling and control of underwater vehicle-manipulator systems. The thesis also presents a model and a control scheme for a system consisting of a surface vessel connected to an underwater robotic system by means of a slender marine structure. The equations of motion of the underwater vehicle and manipulator are described and the system kinematics and properties presented. Feedback linearization technique is applied to the system and evaluated through a simulation study. Passivity-based controllers for vehicle and manipulator control are presented. Stability of the closed loop system is proved and simulation results are given. The equation of motion for lateral motion of a cable/riser system connected to a surface vessel at the top end and to a thruster at the bottom end is described and stability analysis and simulations are presented. The equations of motion in 3 degrees of freedom of the cable/riser, surface vessel and robotic system are given. Stability analysis of the total system with PD-controllers is presented. 47 refs., 32 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. The Improved Kriging Interpolation Algorithm for Local Underwater Terrain Based on Fractal Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengyun Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The interpolation-reconstruction of local underwater terrain using the underwater digital terrain map (UDTM is an important step for building an underwater terrain matching unit and directly affects the accuracy of underwater terrain matching navigation. The Kriging method is often used in terrain interpolation, but, with this method, the local terrain features are often lost. Therefore, the accuracy cannot meet the requirements of practical application. Analysis of the geographical features is performed on the basis of the randomness and self-similarity of underwater terrain. We extract the fractal features of local underwater terrain with the fractal Brownian motion model, compensating for the possible errors of the Kriging method with fractal theory. We then put forward an improved Kriging interpolation method based on this fractal compensation. Interpolation-reconstruction tests show that the method can simulate the real underwater terrain features well and that it has good usability.

  5. Quantitative monitoring of CO2 injection at Sleipner using seismic full waveform inversion in the time lapse mode and rock physics modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queisser, M.P.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon capture and sequestration is a technology to achieve a considerable deceleration of CO 2 emission promptly. Since 1996 one of the largest CO 2 storage projects is taking place at Sleipner in the Norwegian North Sea. In order to monitor injected CO 2 , time lapse seismic monitoring surveys have been carried out. Estimating subsurface parameters from the Sleipner seismic data is a challenging problem due to the specific geology of the storage reservoir, which is further complicated by injected CO 2 . Most seismic imaging methods enable only qualitative insights into the subsurface. Motivated by the need for a quantitative seismic monitoring of the injected CO 2 , I have applied 2D seismic full waveform inversion to seismic data sets from Sleipner from 1994 (baseline), 1999 and 2006 along three seismic lines to infer subsurface parameters and parameter changes in the storage reservoir. The P-wave velocity is the major parameter, as it is the most sensitive to CO 2 injection. An energy preconditioning of the gradient has been implemented. The usual source wavelet calibration did not prove to be reliable. An alternative source calibration has been successfully applied. By comparing seismic images with inversion results, I found that using seismic images to locate CO 2 accumulations in the subsurface may be misleading. The quantitative imaging approach using full waveform inversion resulted in a consistent evolution of the model parameter with time. Major reductions in P-wave velocity and hence the CO 2 accumulations could be quantitatively imaged down to a resolution of 10 m. Observed travel time shifts due to CO 2 injection are comparable to those derived from the inversion result. In order to estimate CO 2 saturations, rock physical concepts have been combined and extended to arrive at a rock physical formulation of the subsurface at Sleipner. I used pseudo Monte Carlo rock physics modeling to assess the influence of lithologic heterogeneity on the CO 2

  6. Underwater 3D filming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Rinaldi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available After an experimental phase of many years, 3D filming is now effective and successful. Improvements are still possible, but the film industry achieved memorable success on 3D movie’s box offices due to the overall quality of its products. Special environments such as space (“Gravity” and the underwater realm look perfect to be reproduced in 3D. “Filming in space” was possible in “Gravity” using special effects and computer graphic. The underwater realm is still difficult to be handled. Underwater filming in 3D was not that easy and effective as filming in 2D, since not long ago. After almost 3 years of research, a French, Austrian and Italian team realized a perfect tool to film underwater, in 3D, without any constrains. This allows filmmakers to bring the audience deep inside an environment where they most probably will never have the chance to be.

  7. Underwater Glider System Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkins, Scott A; Humphreys, Douglas E; Sherman, Jeff; Osse, Jim; Jones, Clayton; Leonard, Naomi; Graver, Joshua; Bachmayer, Ralf; Clem, Ted; Carroll, Paul; Davis, Philip; Berry, Jon; Worley, Paul; Wasyl, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    The goals of this study are to determine how to advance from present capabilities of underwater glider (and hybrid motorglider) technology to what could be possible within the next few years; and to identify critical research issues that must be resolved to make such advancements possible. These goals were pursued by merging archival flight data with numerical model results and system spreadsheet analysis to extrapolate from the present state-of-the–art in underwater (UW) gliders to potential...

  8. Frame by frame stop motion non-traditional approaches to stop motion animation

    CERN Document Server

    Gasek, Tom

    2011-01-01

    In a world that is dominated by computer images, alternative stop motion techniques like pixilation, time-lapse photography and down-shooting techniques combined with new technologies offer a new, tangible and exciting approach to animation. With over 25 years professional experience, industry veteran, Tom Gasek presents a comprehensive guide to stop motion animation without the focus on puppetry or model animation. With tips, tricks and hands-on exercises, Frame by Frame will help both experienced and novice filmmakers get the most effective results from this underutilized branch of animation

  9. Different effectiveness of closed embryo culture system with time-lapse imaging (EmbryoScope(TM)) in comparison to standard manual embryology in good and poor prognosis patients: a prospectively randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan-Guang; Lazzaroni-Tealdi, Emanuela; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Lin; Barad, David H; Kushnir, Vitaly A; Darmon, Sarah K; Albertini, David F; Gleicher, Norbert

    2016-08-24

    Previously manual human embryology in many in vitro fertilization (IVF) centers is rapidly being replaced by closed embryo incubation systems with time-lapse imaging. Whether such systems perform comparably to manual embryology in different IVF patient populations has, however, never before been investigated. We, therefore, prospectively compared embryo quality following closed system culture with time-lapse photography (EmbryoScope™) and standard embryology. We performed a two-part prospectively randomized study in IVF (clinical trial # NCT92256309). Part A involved 31 infertile poor prognosis patients prospectively randomized to EmbryoScope™ and standard embryology. Part B involved embryos from 17 egg donor-recipient cycles resulting in large egg/embryo numbers, thus permitting prospectively alternative embryo assignments to EmbryoScope™ and standard embryology. We then compared pregnancy rates and embryo quality on day-3 after fertilization and embryologist time utilized per processed embryo. Part A revealed in poor prognosis patients no differences in day-3 embryo scores, implantation and clinical pregnancy rates between EmbryoScope™ and standard embryology. The EmbryoScope™, however, more than doubled embryology staff time (P embryology. Appropriately designed and powered prospectively randomized studies appear urgently needed in well-defined patient populations before the uncontrolled utilization of these instruments further expands. NCT02246309 Registered September 18, 2014.

  10. "Boxnep" advanced modular underwater robot

    OpenAIRE

    Buluev, Ilia

    2016-01-01

    The article discusses the relevance of the underwater vehicles' ability to solve a wide range of problems. The idea put in the basis of this research is designing a modular underwater robot. It allows to mount various equipment and test it in underwater environment. The paper deals with the concept of the robot and its characteristics.

  11. Resources for Underwater Robotics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Michael L.; Freitas, William M.

    2016-01-01

    4-H clubs can build and program underwater robots from raw materials. An annotated resource list for engaging youth in building underwater remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) is provided. This article is a companion piece to the Research in Brief article "Building Teen Futures with Underwater Robotics" in this issue of the "Journal of…

  12. Development and experiments of the Sea-Wing underwater glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jian-Cheng; Zhang, Ai-Qun; Jin, Wen-Ming; Chen, Qi; Tian, Yu; Liu, Chong-Jie

    2011-12-01

    Underwater gliders, which glide through water columns by use of a pair of wings, are efficient long-distance, long-duration marine environment observatory platforms. The Sea-Wing underwater glider, developed by the Shenyang Institute of Automation, CAS, is designed for the application of deep-sea environment variables observation. The system components, the mechanical design, and the control system design of the Sea-Wing underwater glider are described in this paper. The pitch and roll adjusting models are derived based on the mechanical design, and the adjusting capabilities for the pitch and roll are analyzed according to the models. Field experiments have been carried out for validating the gliding motion and the ability of measuring ocean environment variables. Experimental results of the motion performances of the glider are presented.

  13. The aquatic tympanic ear: convergent adaptations for underwater hearing in three tetrapods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Wahlberg, Magnus; Larsen, Ole Næsbye

    pressure, low particle motion medium, and the consequence is that an efficient underwater ear is sensitive to sound pressure. It is often stated that underwater hearing can work efficiently without a middle ear apparatus by bone conduction, since sound is transmitted from water to inner ear tissue...... with little loss. However, the sensitivity of such an ear is limited by the very low particle motion in water. We report on underwater hearing in tetrapods ranging from totally aquatic (the clawed frog Xenopus laevis) and mostly aquatic (the red-eared slider Trachemys scripta) to mostly terrestrial (the...... is modified (cartilaginous or partly cartilaginous). In all three species, the lowest threshold to underwater sound is at this peak frequency and is around 80 dB re 1 µPa. The sensitivity to sound pressure is slightly lower in water than in air, making underwater hearing much more efficient in terms of sound...

  14. A highly versatile autonomous underwater vehicle with biomechanical propulsion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, D.G.; Bergers, M.M.C.; Henrion, S.; Hulzenga, J.I.J.; Jutte, R.W.; Pas, W.M.G.; Van Schravendijk, M.; Vercruyssen, T.G.A.; Wilken, A.P.

    2009-01-01

    An autonomous underwater vehicle with a biomechanical propulsion system is a possible answer to the demand for small, silent sensor platforms in many fields. The design of Galatea, a bio-mimetic AUV, involves four aspects: hydrodynamic shape, the propulsion, the motion control systems and payload.

  15. Characterizing the DNA Damage Response by Cell Tracking Algorithms and Cell Features Classification Using High-Content Time-Lapse Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Georgescu

    Full Text Available Traditionally, the kinetics of DNA repair have been estimated using immunocytochemistry by labeling proteins involved in the DNA damage response (DDR with fluorescent markers in a fixed cell assay. However, detailed knowledge of DDR dynamics across multiple cell generations cannot be obtained using a limited number of fixed cell time-points. Here we report on the dynamics of 53BP1 radiation induced foci (RIF across multiple cell generations using live cell imaging of non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A expressing histone H2B-GFP and the DNA repair protein 53BP1-mCherry. Using automatic extraction of RIF imaging features and linear programming techniques, we were able to characterize detailed RIF kinetics for 24 hours before and 24 hours after exposure to low and high doses of ionizing radiation. High-content-analysis at the single cell level over hundreds of cells allows us to quantify precisely the dose dependence of 53BP1 protein production, RIF nuclear localization and RIF movement after exposure to X-ray. Using elastic registration techniques based on the nuclear pattern of individual cells, we could describe the motion of individual RIF precisely within the nucleus. We show that DNA repair occurs in a limited number of large domains, within which multiple small RIFs form, merge and/or resolve with random motion following normal diffusion law. Large foci formation is shown to be mainly happening through the merging of smaller RIF rather than through growth of an individual focus. We estimate repair domain sizes of 7.5 to 11 µm2 with a maximum number of ~15 domains per MCF10A cell. This work also highlights DDR which are specific to doses larger than 1 Gy such as rapid 53BP1 protein increase in the nucleus and foci diffusion rates that are significantly faster than for spontaneous foci movement. We hypothesize that RIF merging reflects a "stressed" DNA repair process that has been taken outside physiological conditions when

  16. Underwater laser detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomaa, Walid; El-Sherif, Ashraf F.; El-Sharkawy, Yasser H.

    2015-02-01

    The conventional method used to detect an underwater target is by sending and receiving some form of acoustic energy. But the acoustic systems have limitations in the range resolution and accuracy; while, the potential benefits of a laserbased underwater target detection include high directionality, high response, and high range accuracy. Lasers operating in the blue-green region of the light spectrum(420 : 570nm)have a several applications in the area of detection and ranging of submersible targets due to minimum attenuation through water ( less than 0.1 m-1) and maximum laser reflection from estimated target (like mines or submarines) to provide a long range of detection. In this paper laser attenuation in water was measured experimentally by new simple method by using high resolution spectrometer. The laser echoes from different targets (metal, plastic, wood, and rubber) were detected using high resolution CCD camera; the position of detection camera was optimized to provide a high reflection laser from target and low backscattering noise from the water medium, digital image processing techniques were applied to detect and discriminate the echoes from the metal target and subtract the echoes from other objects. Extraction the image of target from the scattering noise is done by background subtraction and edge detection techniques. As a conclusion, we present a high response laser imaging system to detect and discriminate small size, like-mine underwater targets.

  17. A potential flow based flight simulator for an underwater glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoemsapthawee, Surasak; Le Boulluec, Marc; Laurens, Jean-Marc; Deniset, François

    2013-03-01

    Underwater gliders are recent innovative types of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) used in ocean exploration and observation. They adjust their buoyancy to dive and to return to the ocean surface. During the change of altitude, they use the hydrodynamic forces developed by their wings to move forward. Their flights are controlled by changing the position of their centers of gravity and their buoyancy to adjust their trim and heel angles. For better flight control, the understanding of the hydrodynamic behavior and the flight mechanics of the underwater glider is necessary. A 6-DOF motion simulator is coupled with an unsteady potential flow model for this purpose. In some specific cases, the numerical study demonstrates that an inappropriate stabilizer dimension can cause counter-steering behavior. The simulator can be used to improve the automatic flight control. It can also be used for the hydrodynamic design optimization of the devices.

  18. Hybrid Underwater Vehicle: ARV Design and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang DENG

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The development of SMU-I, a new autonomous & remotely-operated vehicle (ARV is described. Since it has both the characteristics of autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV and remote operated underwater vehicle (ROV, it is able to achieve precision fix station operation and manual timely intervention. In the paper the initial design of basic components, such as vehicle, propulsion, batteries etc. and the control design of motion are introduced and analyzed. ROV’s conventional cable is replaced by a fiber optic cable, which makes it available for high-bandwidth real-time video, data telemetry and high-quality teleoperation. Furthermore, with the aid of the manual real-time remote operation and ranging sonar, it also resolves the AUV’s conflicting issue, which can absolutely adapt the actual complex sea environment and satisfy the unknown mission need. The whole battery system is designed as two-battery banks, whose voltages and temperatures are monitored through CAN (controller area network bus to avoid battery fire and explosion. A fuzzy-PID controller is designed for its motion control, including depth control and direction control. The controller synthesizes the advantage of fuzzy control and PID control, utilizes the fuzzy rules to on-line tune the parameters of PID controller, and achieves a better control effect. Experiment results demonstrate to show the effectiveness of the test-bed.

  19. A bio-inspired electrocommunication system for small underwater robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Jindong; Xie, Guangming; Wen, Li; Zhang, Jianwei

    2017-03-29

    Weakly electric fishes (Gymnotid and Mormyrid) use an electric field to communicate efficiently (termed electrocommunication) in the turbid waters of confined spaces where other communication modalities fail. Inspired by this biological phenomenon, we design an artificial electrocommunication system for small underwater robots and explore the capabilities of such an underwater robotic communication system. An analytical model for electrocommunication is derived to predict the effect of the key parameters such as electrode distance and emitter current of the system on the communication performance. According to this model, a low-dissipation, and small-sized electrocommunication system is proposed and integrated into a small robotic fish. We characterize the communication performance of the robot in still water, flowing water, water with obstacles and natural water conditions. The results show that underwater robots are able to communicate electrically at a speed of around 1 k baud within about 3 m with a low power consumption (less than 1 W). In addition, we demonstrate that two leader-follower robots successfully achieve motion synchronization through electrocommunication in the three-dimensional underwater space, indicating that this bio-inspired electrocommunication system is a promising setup for the interaction of small underwater robots.

  20. Carbon Nanotube Underwater Acoustic Thermophone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-23

    Attorney Docket No. 300009 1 of 8 A CARBON NANOTUBE UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC THERMOPHONE STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The...the Invention [0003] The present invention is an acoustically transparent carbon nanotube thermophone. (2) Description of the Prior Art [0004...amplitude of the resulting sound waves. [0006] Recently, there has been development of underwater acoustic carbon nanotube (CNT) yarn sheets capable

  1. Understanding leachate flow in municipal solid waste landfills by combining time-lapse ERT and subsurface flow modelling - Part I: Analysis of infiltration shape on two different waste deposit cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebert, M; Clément, R; Moreau, S; Duquennoi, C; Loisel, S; Touze-Foltz, N

    2016-09-01

    Landfill bioreactors are based on an acceleration of in-situ waste biodegradation by performing leachate recirculation. To quantify the water content and to evaluate the leachate injection system, in-situ methods are required to obtain spatially distributed information, usually electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). In a previous study, the MICS (multiple inversions and clustering strategy) methodology was proposed to improve the hydrodynamic interpretation of ERT results by a precise delimitation of the infiltration area. In this study, MICS was applied on two ERT time-lapse data sets recorded on different waste deposit cells in order to compare the hydrodynamic behaviour of leachate flow between the two cells. This comparison is based on an analysis of: (i) the volume of wetted waste assessed by MICS and the wetting rate, (ii) the infiltration shapes and (iii) the pore volume used by the leachate flow. This paper shows that leachate hydrodynamic behaviour is comparable from one waste deposit cell to another with: (i) a high leachate infiltration speed at the beginning of the infiltration, which decreases with time, (ii) a horizontal anisotropy of the leachate infiltration shape and (iii) a very small fraction of the pore volume used by the leachate flow. This hydrodynamic information derived from MICS results can be useful for subsurface flow modelling used to predict leachate flow at the landfill scale. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparative effects of 60Co γ-rays and neon and helium ions on cycle duration and division probability of EMT 6 cells. A time-lapse cinematography study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collyn-d'Hooghe, M.; Hemon, D.; Gilet, R.

    1981-01-01

    Exponentially growing cultures of EMT 6 cells were irradiated in vitro with neon ions, helium ions or 60 Co γ-rays. Time-lapse cinematography allowed the determination, for individual cells, of cycle duration, success of the mitotic division and the age of the cell at the moment of irradiation. Irradiation induced a significant mitotic delay increasing proportionally with the delivered dose. Using mitotic delay as an endpoint, the r.b.e. for neon ions with respect to 60 Co γ-rays was 3.3 +- 0.2 while for helium ions it was 1.2 +- 0.1. Mitotic delay was greatest in those cells that had progressed furthest in their cycle at the time of irradiation. No significant mitotic delay was observed in the post-irradiation generation. Division probability was significantly reduced by irradiation both in the irradiated and in the post-irradiated generation. The reduction in division probability obtained with 3 Gy of neon ions was similar to that obtained after irradiation with 6 Gy of helium ions or 60 Co γ-rays. (author)

  3. Comparative effects of 60Co gamma-rays and neon and helium ions on cycle duration and division probability of EMT 6 cells. A time-lapse cinematography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collyn-d'Hooghe, M; Hemon, D; Gilet, R; Curtis, S B; Valleron, A J; Malaise, E P

    1981-03-01

    Exponentially growing cultures of EMT 6 cells were irradiated in vitro with neon ions, helium ions or 60Co gamma-rays. Time-lapse cinematography allowed the determination, for individual cells, of cycle duration, success of the mitotic division and the age of the cell at the moment of irradiation. Irradiation induced a significant mitotic delay increasing proportionally with the delivered dose. Using mitotic delay as an endpoint, the r.b.e. for neon ions with respect to 60Co gamma-rays was 3.3 +/- 0.2 while for helium ions it was 1.2 +/- 0.1. Mitotic delay was greatest in those cells that had progressed furthest in their cycle at the time of irradiation. No significant mitotic delay was observed in the post-irradiation generation. Division probability was significantly reduced by irradiation both in the irradiated and in the post-irradiated generation. The reduction in division probability obtained with 3 Gy of neon ions was similar to that obtained after irradiation with 6 Gy of helium ions or 60Co gamma-rays.

  4. Underwater gas tornado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byalko, Alexey V.

    2013-07-01

    We present the first experimental observation of a new hydrodynamic phenomenon, the underwater tornado. Simple measurements show that the tornado forms a vortex of the Rankine type, i.e. the rising gas rotates as a solid body and the liquid rotates with a velocity decreasing hyperbolically with the radius. We obtain the dependence of the tornado radius a on the gas stream value j theoretically: a ∼ j2/5. Processing of a set of experiments yielded the value 0.36 for the exponent in this expression. We also report the initial stages of the theoretical study of this phenomenon.

  5. Underwater Hearing in Turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Katie L

    2016-01-01

    The hearing of turtles is poorly understood compared with the other reptiles. Although the mechanism of transduction of sound into a neural signal via hair cells has been described in detail, the rest of the auditory system is largely a black box. What is known is that turtles have higher hearing thresholds than other reptiles, with best frequencies around 500 Hz. They also have lower underwater hearing thresholds than those in air, owing to resonance of the middle ear cavity. Further studies demonstrated that all families of turtles and tortoises share a common middle ear cavity morphology, with scaling best suited to underwater hearing. This supports an aquatic origin of the group. Because turtles hear best under water, it is important to examine their vulnerability to anthropogenic noise. However, the lack of basic data makes such experiments difficult because only a few species of turtles have published audiograms. There are also almost no behavioral data available (understandable due to training difficulties). Finally, few studies show what kinds of sounds are behaviorally relevant. One notable paper revealed that the Australian snake-necked turtle (Chelodina oblonga) has a vocal repertoire in air, at the interface, and under water. Findings like these suggest that there is more to the turtle aquatic auditory scene than previously thought.

  6. Identification of emergent motion compartments in the amniote embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, Rajprasad; Little, Charles D; Joshi, Pranav; Filla, Michael B; Cheuvront, Tracey J; Lansford, Rusty; Rongish, Brenda J

    2014-01-01

    The tissue scale deformations (≥ 1 mm) required to form an amniote embryo are poorly understood. Here, we studied ∼400 μm-sized explant units from gastrulating quail embryos. The explants deformed in a reproducible manner when grown using a novel vitelline membrane-based culture method. Time-lapse recordings of latent embryonic motion patterns were analyzed after disk-shaped tissue explants were excised from three specific regions near the primitive streak: 1) anterolateral epiblast, 2) posterolateral epiblast, and 3) the avian organizer (Hensen's node). The explants were cultured for 8 hours-an interval equivalent to gastrulation. Both the anterolateral and the posterolateral epiblastic explants engaged in concentric radial/centrifugal tissue expansion. In sharp contrast, Hensen's node explants displayed Cartesian-like, elongated, bipolar deformations-a pattern reminiscent of axis elongation. Time-lapse analysis of explant tissue motion patterns indicated that both cellular motility and extracellular matrix fiber (tissue) remodeling take place during the observed morphogenetic deformations. As expected, treatment of tissue explants with a selective Rho-Kinase (p160ROCK) signaling inhibitor, Y27632, completely arrested all morphogenetic movements. Microsurgical experiments revealed that lateral epiblastic tissue was dispensable for the generation of an elongated midline axis- provided that an intact organizer (node) is present. Our computational analyses suggest the possibility of delineating tissue-scale morphogenetic movements at anatomically discrete locations in the embryo. Further, tissue deformation patterns, as well as the mechanical state of the tissue, require normal actomyosin function. We conclude that amniote embryos contain tissue-scale, regionalized morphogenetic motion generators, which can be assessed using our novel computational time-lapse imaging approach. These data and future studies-using explants excised from overlapping anatomical

  7. OFDM for underwater acoustic communications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Shengli

    2014-01-01

    A blend of introductory material and advanced signal processing and communication techniques, of critical importance to underwater system and network development This book, which is the first to describe the processing techniques central to underwater OFDM, is arranged into four distinct sections: First, it describes the characteristics of underwater acoustic channels, and stresses the difference from wireless radio channels. Then it goes over the basics of OFDM and channel coding. The second part starts with an overview of the OFDM receiver, and develops various modules for the receiver des

  8. Estimating the hydrogeological parameters of an unconfined aquifer with the time-lapse resistivity-imaging method during pumping tests: Case studies at the Pengtsuo and Dajou sites, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ping-Yu; Chang, Lian-Cheng; Hsu, Shao-Yiu; Tsai, Jui-Pin; Chen, Wen-Fu

    2017-09-01

    We conducted time-lapse resistivity imaging during pumping tests at the Pengtsuo and Dajou test sites in Taiwan in order to examine the feasibility of estimating hydrogeological parameters with resistivity variations. Core logs reveal that the subsurface consists mainly of at least 100-m-thick gravel and sand at the two test sites. The resistivity differences between the pumping stages and pre-pumping background are well correlated to water level changes that are due to the dewatering of pumping activity. Therefore, it is possible to use the geometry of resistivity anomalies to estimate the hydraulic conductivity of the unconfined aquifer using the distance-drawdown equation for pumping tests in unsaturated aquifers. For each site, we used the contours of resistivity variations and recorded water levels in the pumping well to depict the bottom of the drawdown cone. The estimated hydraulic conductivity and specific yield, respectively, are 1.33 × 10- 4 m/s and 0.12 at the Pengtsuo site, and are 2.50 × 10- 4 m/s and 0.22 at the Dajou site. These values are consistent with the parameters that engineers from Taiwan Sugar Company calculated previously regarding groundwater-level variations in multiple wells (9.65 × 10- 5 m/s and 0.13 at Pengtsuo, and 1.00 × 10- 3 m/s and 0.19 at Dajou). This consistency suggests that resistivity imaging can perhaps serve as an alternative way to yield information about hydrogeological parameters.

  9. Underwater plasma arc cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leautier, R.; Pilot, G.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the work done to develop underwater plasma arc cutting techniques, to characterise aerosols from cutting operations on radioactive and non-radioactive work-pieces, and to develop suitable ventilation and filtration techniques. The work has been carried out in the framework of a contract between CEA-CEN Cadarache and the Commission of European Communities. Furthermore, this work has been carried out in close cooperation with CEA-CEN Saclay mainly for secondary emissions and radioactive analysis. The contract started in May 1986 and was completed in December 1988 by a supplementary agreement. This report has been compiled from several progress reports submitted during the work period, contains the main findings of the work and encloses the results of comparative tests on plasma arc cutting

  10. Safety aspects for underwater vehicles

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhan, R.; Navelkar, G.S.; Desa, E.S.; Afzulpurkar, S.; Prabhudesai, S.P.; Dabholkar, N.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Maurya, P.

    . This stresses for implementation of multiple safety measures of a high degree so that the platform operates continuously in a fail-safe mode. This paper discusses issues on safety measures implemented on the autonomous underwater platforms namely MAYA AUV...

  11. GAS FLOW IN UNDERWATER BREATHING INSTALLATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca CONSTANTIN

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The open circuit underwater breathing apparatus can be a one or two-stage regulator used in scuba diving or a two-stage regulator used in surface supplied installations. These installations are proper in underwater sites at small depth. The pneumatic circuit of a two-stage regulator is composed mainly of a first stage regulator mounted on the air cylinders and a second stage carried by the diver in his mouth. The two regulators are linked together by a medium pressure hose. The circuit opens when the depression created by the diver’s inhalation, in the second stage body, reaches a certain value. The second stage opening causes a transient movement, namely an expansion wave that propagates through the medium pressure hose to the first stage regulator. The first stage regulator opens and the air in the cylinders is allowed to flow to the diver. The longer the hose, the greater the duration of the expansion wave propagation. Investigations on the wave propagation offer data on the inspiration unsteady motion duration which influences the respiratory effort of the diver.

  12. Underwater optical wireless communication network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnon, Shlomi

    2010-01-01

    The growing need for underwater observation and subsea monitoring systems has stimulated considerable interest in advancing the enabling technologies of underwater wireless communication and underwater sensor networks. This communication technology is expected to play an important role in investigating climate change, in monitoring biological, biogeochemical, evolutionary, and ecological changes in the sea, ocean, and lake environments, and in helping to control and maintain oil production facilities and harbors using unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs), submarines, ships, buoys, and divers. However, the present technology of underwater acoustic communication cannot provide the high data rate required to investigate and monitor these environments and facilities. Optical wireless communication has been proposed as the best alternative to meet this challenge. Models are presented for three kinds of optical wireless communication links: (a) a line-of-sight link, (b) a modulating retroreflector link, and (c) a reflective link, all of which can provide the required data rate. We analyze the link performance based on these models. From the analysis, it is clear that as the water absorption increases, the communication performance decreases dramatically for the three link types. However, by using the scattered light it was possible to mitigate this decrease in some cases. It is concluded from the analysis that a high-data-rate underwater optical wireless network is a feasible solution for emerging applications such as UUV-to-UUV links and networks of sensors, and extended ranges in these applications could be achieved by applying a multi-hop concept.

  13. ULTRA: Underwater Localization for Transit and Reconnaissance Autonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntsberger, Terrance L.

    2013-01-01

    This software addresses the issue of underwater localization of unmanned vehicles and the inherent drift in their onboard sensors. The software gives a 2 to 3 factor of improvement over the state-of-the-art underwater localization algorithms. The software determines the localization (position, heading) of an AUV (autonomous underwater vehicle) in environments where there is no GPS signal. It accomplishes this using only the commanded position, onboard gyros/accelerometers, and the bathymetry of the bottom provided by an onboard sonar system. The software does not rely on an onboard bathymetry dataset, but instead incrementally determines the position of the AUV while mapping the bottom. In order to enable long-distance underwater navigation by AUVs, a localization method called ULTRA uses registration of the bathymetry data products produced by the onboard forward-looking sonar system for hazard avoidance during a transit to derive the motion and pose of the AUV in order to correct the DR (dead reckoning) estimates. The registration algorithm uses iterative point matching (IPM) combined with surface interpolation of the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. This method was used previously at JPL for onboard unmanned ground vehicle localization, and has been optimized for efficient computational and memory use.

  14. Adaptive control of nonlinear underwater robotic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thor I. Fossen

    1991-04-01

    Full Text Available The problem of controlling underwater mobile robots in 6 degrees of freedom (DOF is addressed. Uncertainties in the input matrix due to partly known nonlinear thruster characteristics are modeled as multiplicative input uncertainty. This paper proposes two methods to compensate for the model uncertainties: (1 an adaptive passivity-based control scheme and (2 deriving a hybrid (adaptive and sliding controller. The hybrid controller consists of a switching term which compensates for uncertainties in the input matrix and an on-line parameter estimation algorithm. Global stability is ensured by applying Barbalat's Lyapunovlike lemma. The hybrid controller is simulated for the horizontal motion of the Norwegian Experimental Remotely Operated Vehicle (NEROV.

  15. Morphing hull implementation for unmanned underwater vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Timothy F; Gandhi, Farhan; Rufino, Russell J

    2013-01-01

    There has been much interest and work in the area of morphing aircraft since the 1980s. Morphing could also potentially benefit unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs). The current paper envisions a UUV with an interior pressure hull and a variable diameter outer flexible hull with fuel stored in the annulus between, and presents a mechanism to realize diameter change of the outer hull. The outer hull diameter of UUVs designed for very long endurance/range could be progressively reduced as fuel was consumed, thereby reducing drag and further increasing endurance and range capability. Diameter morphing could also be advantageous for compact storage of UUVs. A prototype is fabricated to represent an axial section of such a morphing diameter UUV. Diameter change is achieved using eight morphing trusses arranged equidistant around the circumference of the representative interior rigid hull. Each morphing truss has a lower rail (attached to the rigid hull) and an upper rail with V-linkages between, at either ends of the rail. Horizontal motion of the feet of the V-linkages (sliding in the lower rail) results in vertical motion of the upper rail which in turn produces diameter change of the outer hull. For the prototype built and tested, a 63% increase in outer diameter from 12.75″ to 20.75″ was achieved. The introduction of a stretched latex representative flexible skin around the outer rails increased actuation force requirement and led to a propensity for the wheel-in-track sliders in the morphing truss to bind. It is anticipated that this could be overcome with higher precision manufacturing. In addition to symmetric actuation of the morphing trusses resulting in diameter change, the paper also shows that with asymmetric actuation the hull cross-section shape can be changed (for example, from a circular section for underwater operation to a V-section for surface operations). (paper)

  16. Underwater cutting techniques developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bach, F.-W.

    1990-01-01

    The primary circuit structures of different nuclear powerplants are constructed out of stainless steels, ferritic steels, plated ferritic steels and alloys of aluminium. According to the level of the specific radiation of these structures, it is necessary for dismantling to work with remote controlled cutting techniques. The most successful way to protect the working crew against exposure of radiation is to operate underwater in different depths. The following thermal cutting processes are more or less developed to work under water: For ferritic steels only - flame cutting; For ferritic steels, stainless steels, cladded steels and aluminium alloys - oxy-arc-cutting, arc-waterjet-cutting with a consumable electrode, arc-saw-cutting, plasma-arc-cutting and plasma-arc-saw. The flame cutting is a burning process, all the other processes are melt-cutting processes. This paper explains the different techniques, giving a short introduction of the theory, a discussion of the possibilities with the advantages and disadvantages of these processes giving a view into the further research work in this interesting field. (author)

  17. Underwater drag-reducing effect of superhydrophobic submarine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Songsong; Ouyang, Xiao; Li, Jie; Gao, Shan; Han, Shihui; Liu, Lianhe; Wei, Hao

    2015-01-01

    To address the debates on whether superhydrophobic coatings can reduce fluid drag for underwater motions, we have achieved an underwater drag-reducing effect of large superhydrophobic submarine models with a feature size of 3.5 cm × 3.7 cm × 33.0 cm through sailing experiments of submarine models, modified with and without superhydrophobic surface under similar power supply and experimental conditions. The drag reduction rate reached as high as 15%. The fabrication of superhydrophobic coatings on a large area of submarine model surfaces was realized by immobilizing hydrophobic copper particles onto a precross-linked polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface. The pre-cross-linking time was optimized at 20 min to obtain good superhydrophobicity for the underwater drag reduction effect by investigating the effect of pre-cross-linking on surface wettability and water adhesive property. We do believe that superhydrophobic coatings may provide a promising application in the field of drag-reducing of vehicle motions on or under the water surface.

  18. Design of Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadahiro Hyakudome

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available There are concerns about the impact that global warming will have on our environment, and which will inevitably result in expanding deserts and rising water levels. While a lot of underwater vehicles are utilized, AUVs (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle were considered and chosen, as the most suitable tool for conduction survey concerning these global environmental problems. AUVs can comprehensive survey because the vehicle does not have to be connected to the support vessel by tether cable. When such underwater vehicles are made, it is necessary to consider about the following things. 1 Seawater and Water Pressure Environment, 2 Sink, 3 There are no Gas or Battery Charge Stations, 4 Global Positioning System cannot use, 5 Radio waves cannot use. In the paper, outline of above and how deal about it are explained.

  19. The Development of a Hybrid Underwater Micro Biped Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Guo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been a great demand, in the medical field and in industrial applications, for a novel micro biped robot with multiple degrees of freedom that can swim smoothly in water or in aqueous medium. The fish-like micro-robot studied is a type of miniature device that is installed with sensing and actuating elements. This article describes the new structure and motion mechanism of a hybrid type of underwater micro-robot using an ion-conducting polymer film (ICPF actuator, and discusses the swimming and floating characteristics of the micro-robot in water, measured by changing the voltage frequency and the amplitude of the input voltage. Results indicate that the swimming speed of the proposed underwater micro-robot can be controlled by changing the frequency of the input voltage, and the direction (upward or downward can be manipulated by changing the frequency of the electric current applied and the amplitude of the voltage.

  20. Circular random motion in diatom gliding under isotropic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutiérrez-Medina, Braulio; Maldonado, Ana Iris Peña; Guerra, Andrés Jiménez; Rubio, Yadiralia Covarrubias; Meza, Jessica Viridiana García

    2014-01-01

    How cells migrate has been investigated primarily for the case of trajectories composed by joined straight segments. In contrast, little is known when cellular motion follows intrinsically curved paths. Here, we use time-lapse optical microscopy and automated trajectory tracking to investigate how individual cells of the diatom Nitzschia communis glide across surfaces under isotropic environmental conditions. We find a distinct kind of random motion, where trajectories are formed by circular arcs traveled at constant speed, alternated with random stoppages, direction reversals and changes in the orientation of the arcs. Analysis of experimental and computer-simulated trajectories show that the circular random motion of diatom gliding is not optimized for long-distance travel but rather for recurrent coverage of limited surface area. These results suggest that one main biological role for this type of diatom motility is to efficiently build the foundation of algal biofilms. (paper)

  1. Underwater laser imaging system (UWLIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLong, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Practical limitations with underwater imaging systems area reached when the noise in the back scattered radiation generated in the water between the imaging system and the target obscures the spatial contrast and resolution necessary for target discovery and identification. The advent of high power lasers operating in the blue-green portion of the visible spectrum (oceanic transmission window) has led to improved experimental illumination systems for underwater imaging. Range-gated and synchronously scanned devices take advantage of the unique temporal and spatial coherence properties of laser radiation, respectively, to overcome the deleterious effects of common volume back scatter.

  2. Underwater measurements of muon intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, V. M.; Pustovetov, V. P.; Trubkin, Y. A.; Kirilenkov, A. V.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental measurements of cosmic ray muon intensity deep underwater aimed at determining a muon absorption curve are of considerable interest, as they allow to reproduce independently the muon energy spectrum at sea level. The comparison of the muon absorption curve in sea water with that in rock makes it possible to determine muon energy losses caused by nuclear interactions. The data available on muon absorption in water and that in rock are not equivalent. Underground measurements are numerous and have been carried out down to the depth of approx. 15km w.e., whereas underwater muon intensity have been measured twice and only down to approx. 3km deep.

  3. An Underwater Color Image Quality Evaluation Metric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Miao; Sowmya, Arcot

    2015-12-01

    Quality evaluation of underwater images is a key goal of underwater video image retrieval and intelligent processing. To date, no metric has been proposed for underwater color image quality evaluation (UCIQE). The special absorption and scattering characteristics of the water medium do not allow direct application of natural color image quality metrics especially to different underwater environments. In this paper, subjective testing for underwater image quality has been organized. The statistical distribution of the underwater image pixels in the CIELab color space related to subjective evaluation indicates the sharpness and colorful factors correlate well with subjective image quality perception. Based on these, a new UCIQE metric, which is a linear combination of chroma, saturation, and contrast, is proposed to quantify the non-uniform color cast, blurring, and low-contrast that characterize underwater engineering and monitoring images. Experiments are conducted to illustrate the performance of the proposed UCIQE metric and its capability to measure the underwater image enhancement results. They show that the proposed metric has comparable performance to the leading natural color image quality metrics and the underwater grayscale image quality metrics available in the literature, and can predict with higher accuracy the relative amount of degradation with similar image content in underwater environments. Importantly, UCIQE is a simple and fast solution for real-time underwater video processing. The effectiveness of the presented measure is also demonstrated by subjective evaluation. The results show better correlation between the UCIQE and the subjective mean opinion score.

  4. Development of a highly maneuverable unmanned underwater vehicle on the basis of quad-copter dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Osman Md; Karim, Md. Arshadul; Saad, Abdullah His

    2017-12-01

    At present, research on unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) has become a significant & familiar topic for researchers from various engineering fields. UUV is of mainly two types - AUV (Autonomous Underwater vehicle) & ROV (Remotely Operated Vehicle). There exist a significant number of published research papers on UUV, where very few researchers emphasize on the ease of maneuvering and control of UUV. Maneuvering is important for underwater vehicle in avoiding obstacles, installing underwater piping system, searching undersea resources, underwater mine disposal operations, oceanographic surveys etc. A team from Dept. of Naval Architecture & Marine Engineering of MIST has taken a project to design a highly maneuverable unmanned underwater vehicle on the basis of quad-copter dynamics. The main objective of the research is to develop a control system for UUV which would be able to maneuver the vehicle in six DOF (Degrees of Freedom) with great ease. For this purpose we are not only focusing on controllability but also designing an efficient hull with minimal drag force & optimized propeller using CFD technique. Motors were selected on the basis of the simulated thrust generated by propellers in ANSYS Fluent software module. Settings for control parameters to carry out different types of maneuvering such as hovering, spiral, one point rotation about its centroid, gliding, rolling, drifting and zigzag motions were explained in short at the end.

  5. Calibration of Underwater Sound Transducers

    OpenAIRE

    H.R.S. Sastry

    1983-01-01

    The techniques of calibration of underwater sound transducers for farfield, near-field and closed environment conditions are reviewed in this paper .The design of acoustic calibration tank is mentioned. The facilities available at Naval Physical & Oceanographic Laboratory, Cochin for calibration of transducers are also listed.

  6. Underwater nuclear power plant structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severs, S.; Toll, H.V.

    1982-01-01

    A structure for an underwater nuclear power generating plant comprising a triangular platform formed of tubular leg and truss members upon which are attached one or more large spherical pressure vessels and one or more small cylindrical auxiliary pressure vessels. (author)

  7. Underwater Robots Surface in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Randy C.; Hacking, Kip S.; Damarjian, Jennifer L.; Wright, Geoffrey A.; Truscott, Tadd

    2015-01-01

    Underwater robots (or ROVs: Remotely Operated Vehicles as they are typically called in industry) have recently become a very popular instructional STEM activity. Nationally, ROVs have been used in science and technology classrooms for several years in cities such as Seattle, San Diego, Virginia Beach, and other coastal areas. In the past two…

  8. Computer Simulations Imply Forelimb-Dominated Underwater Flight in Plesiosaurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiqiu Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Plesiosaurians are an extinct group of highly derived Mesozoic marine reptiles with a global distribution that spans 135 million years from the Early Jurassic to the Late Cretaceous. During their long evolutionary history they maintained a unique body plan with two pairs of large wing-like flippers, but their locomotion has been a topic of debate for almost 200 years. Key areas of controversy have concerned the most efficient biologically possible limb stroke, e.g. whether it consisted of rowing, underwater flight, or modified underwater flight, and how the four limbs moved in relation to each other: did they move in or out of phase? Previous studies have investigated plesiosaur swimming using a variety of methods, including skeletal analysis, human swimmers, and robotics. We adopt a novel approach using a digital, three-dimensional, articulated, free-swimming plesiosaur in a simulated fluid. We generated a large number of simulations under various joint degrees of freedom to investigate how the locomotory repertoire changes under different parameters. Within the biologically possible range of limb motion, the simulated plesiosaur swims primarily with its forelimbs using an unmodified underwater flight stroke, essentially the same as turtles and penguins. In contrast, the hindlimbs provide relatively weak thrust in all simulations. We conclude that plesiosaurs were forelimb-dominated swimmers that used their hind limbs mainly for maneuverability and stability.

  9. Control of Open Contour Formations of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Zimmer

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a distributed elastic behaviour for a deformable chain-like formation of small autonomous underwater vehicles with the task of forming special shapes which have been explicitly defined or are defined by some iso-contour of an environmental concentration field. In the latter case, the formation has to move in such a way as to meet certain formation parameters as well as adapt to the iso-line. We base our controller on our previous models (for manually controlled end points using general curve evolution theory but will also propose appropriate motions for the end robots of an open chain.

  10. Interpreting underwater acoustic images of the upper ocean boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulloa, Marco J

    2007-01-01

    A challenging task in physical studies of the upper ocean using underwater sound is the interpretation of high-resolution acoustic images. This paper covers a number of basic concepts necessary for undergraduate and postgraduate students to identify the most distinctive features of the images, providing a link with the acoustic signatures of physical processes occurring simultaneously beneath the surface of the sea. Sonars are so sensitive that they detected a new acoustic signature at the breaking of surface gravity waves in deep water, which resembles oblique motion-like vortices

  11. Underwater gliders as virtual moorings; lessons from the RAPID program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeed, David; McCarthy, Gerard; White, David

    2013-04-01

    The RAPID program measures the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation in the sub tropical Atlantic using an array of moored instruments. We have made trials using autonomous underwater gliders as a replacement for one of the RAPID moorings. The mooring is located on the continental slope at a water depth of 1000m. Six glider deployments have been made concurrent with mooring deployments. In this presentation data from the moorings and from the gliders are compared; different glider sampling strategies are considered; and the advantages and disadvantages of gliders are described. The capability of gliders to resolve tidal motion and to quantify geostrophic currents is examined.

  12. Acoustic and Vibration Control for an Underwater Structure under Mechanical Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Jian Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic and vibration control for an underwater structure under mechanical excitation has been investigated by using negative feedback control algorithm. The underwater structure is modeled with cylindrical shells, conical shells, and circular bulkheads, of which the motion equations are built with the variational approach, respectively. Acoustic property is analyzed by the Helmholtz integration formulation with boundary element method. Based on negative feedback control algorithm, a control loop with a coupling use of piezoelectric sensor and actuator is built, and accordingly some numerical examples are carried out on active control of structural vibration and acoustic response. Effects of geometrical and material parameters on acoustic and vibration properties are investigated and discussed.

  13. Hydrodynamic modeling with grey-box method of a foil-like underwater vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin-yu; Li, Yi-ping; Wang, Ya-xing; Feng, Xi-sheng

    2017-12-01

    In this study, a dynamic modeling method for foil-like underwater vehicles is introduced and experimentally verified in different sea tests of the Hadal ARV. The dumping force of a foil-like underwater vehicle is sensitive to swing motion. Some foil-like underwater vehicles swing periodically when performing a free-fall dive task in experiments. Models using conventional modeling methods yield solutions with asymptotic stability, which cannot simulate the self-sustained swing motion. By improving the ridge regression optimization algorithm, a grey-box modeling method based on 378 viscous drag coefficients using the Taylor series expansion is proposed in this study. The method is optimized for over-fitting and convergence problems caused by large parameter matrices. Instead of the PMM test data, the unsteady computational fluid dynamics calculation results are used in modeling. The obtained model can better simulate the swing motion of the underwater vehicle. Simulation and experimental results show a good consistency in free-fall tests during sea trials, as well as a prediction of the dive speed in the swing state.

  14. Network Computing for Distributed Underwater Acoustic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-31

    Physical layer in UASNs Our main investigations are about underwater communications using acoustic waves. Elec- tromagnetic and optical waves do not...Shengli, Z., and Jun-Hong, C. (2008), Prospects and problems of wireless communication for underwater sensor networks, Wirel. Commun . Mob. Comput., 8(8... Wireless Communications , 9(9), 2934–2944. [21] Pompili, D. and Akyildiz, I. (2010), A multimedia cross-layer protocol for underwater acoustic sensor networks

  15. Cooperative OFDM underwater acoustic communications

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Xilin; Cheng, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Following underwater acoustic channel modeling, this book investigates the relationship between coherence time and transmission distances. It considers the power allocation issues of two typical transmission scenarios, namely short-range transmission and medium-long range transmission. For the former scenario, an adaptive system is developed based on instantaneous channel state information. The primary focus is on cooperative dual-hop orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM). This book includes the decomposed fountain codes designed to enable reliable communications with higher energy efficiency. It covers the Doppler Effect, which improves packet transmission reliability for effective low-complexity mirror-mapping-based intercarrier interference cancellation schemes capable of suppressing the intercarrier interference power level. Designed for professionals and researchers in the field of underwater acoustic communications, this book is also suitable for advanced-level students in electrical enginee...

  16. International Conference on Underwater Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Jaulin, Luc; Creuze, Vincent; Debese, Nathalie; Quidu, Isabelle; Clement, Benoît; Billon-Coat, Annick

    2016-01-01

    This volume constitutes the results of the International Conference on Underwater Environment, MOQESM’14, held at “Le Quartz” Conference Center in Brest, France, on October 14-15, 2014, within the framework of the 9th Sea Tech Week, International Marine Science and Technology Event. The objective of MOQESM'14 was to bring together researchers from both academia and industry, interested in marine robotics and hydrography with application to the coastal environment mapping and underwater infrastructures surveys. The common thread of the conference is the combination of technical control, perception, and localization, typically used in robotics, with the methods of mapping and bathymetry. The papers presented in this book focus on two main topics. Firstly, coastal and infrastructure mapping is addressed, focusing not only on hydrographic systems, but also on positioning systems, bathymetry, and remote sensing. The proposed methods rely on acoustic sensors such as side scan sonars, multibeam echo sounders, ...

  17. Research on key technology of prognostic and health management for autonomous underwater vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi

    2017-12-01

    Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) are non-cable and autonomous motional underwater robotics. With a wide range of activities, it can reach thousands of kilometers. Because it has the advantages of wide range, good maneuverability, safety and intellectualization, it becomes an important tool for various underwater tasks. How to improve diagnosis accuracy of the AUVs electrical system faults, and how to repair AUVs by the information are the focus of navy in the world. In turn, ensuring safe and reliable operation of the system has very important significance to improve AUVs sailing performance. To solve these problems, in the paper the prognostic and health management(PHM) technology is researched and used to AUV, and the overall framework and key technology are proposed, such as data acquisition, feature extraction, fault diagnosis, failure prediction and so on.

  18. Underwater Coatings for Contamination Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann-Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

    2004-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is deactivating several fuel storage basins. Airborne contamination is a concern when the sides of the basins are exposed and allowed to dry during water removal. One way of controlling this airborne contamination is to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls are still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market that are used in marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives are easily applied and adhere well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INEEL fuel pools. The four pools considered included (1) Test Area North (TAN-607) with epoxy painted concrete walls; (2) Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) (CPP-603) with bare concrete walls; (3) Materials Test Reactor (MTR) Canal with stainless steel lined concrete walls; and (4) Power Burst Facility (PBF-620) with stainless steel lined concrete walls on the bottom and epoxy painted carbon steel lined walls on the upper portions. Therefore, the four materials chosen for testing included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The typical water temperature of the pools varies from 55 F to 80 F dependent on the pool and the season. These tests were done at room temperature. The following criteria were used during this evaluation. The underwater coating must: (1) Be easy to apply; (2) Adhere well to the four surfaces of interest; (3) Not change or have a negative impact on water chemistry or clarity; (4) Not be hazardous in final applied form; and (5) Be proven in other underwater applications. In addition, it is desirable for the coating to have a high pigment or high cross-link density to prevent radiation from penetrating. This paper will detail the testing completed and the test results. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates

  19. A novel soft biomimetic microrobot with two motion attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Liwei; Guo, Shuxiang; Li, Maoxun; Mao, Shilian; Xiao, Nan; Gao, Baofeng; Song, Zhibin; Asaka, Kinji

    2012-12-06

     A variety of microrobots have commonly been used in the fields of biomedical engineering and underwater operations during the last few years. Thanks to their compact structure, low driving power, and simple control systems, microrobots can complete a variety of underwater tasks, even in limited spaces. To accomplish our objectives, we previously designed several bio-inspired underwater microrobots with compact structure, flexibility, and multi-functionality, using ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) actuators. To implement high-position precision for IPMC legs, in the present research, we proposed an electromechanical model of an IPMC actuator and analysed the deformation and actuating force of an equivalent IPMC cantilever beam, which could be used to design biomimetic legs, fingers, or fins for an underwater microrobot. We then evaluated the tip displacement of an IPMC actuator experimentally. The experimental deflections fit the theoretical values very well when the driving frequency was larger than 1 Hz. To realise the necessary multi-functionality for adapting to complex underwater environments, we introduced a walking biomimetic microrobot with two kinds of motion attitudes: a lying state and a standing state. The microrobot uses eleven IPMC actuators to move and two shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators to change its motion attitude. In the lying state, the microrobot implements stick-insect-inspired walking/rotating motion, fish-like swimming motion, horizontal grasping motion, and floating motion. In the standing state, it implements inchworm-inspired crawling motion in two horizontal directions and grasping motion in the vertical direction. We constructed a prototype of this biomimetic microrobot and evaluated its walking, rotating, and floating speeds experimentally. The experimental results indicated that the robot could attain a maximum walking speed of 3.6 mm/s, a maximum rotational speed of 9°/s, and a maximum floating speed of 7.14 mm/s. Obstacle

  20. A Novel Soft Biomimetic Microrobot with Two Motion Attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwei Shi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available  A variety of microrobots have commonly been used in the fields of biomedical engineering and underwater operations during the last few years. Thanks to their compact structure, low driving power, and simple control systems, microrobots can complete a variety of underwater tasks, even in limited spaces. To accomplish our objectives, we previously designed several bio-inspired underwater microrobots with compact structure, flexibility, and multi-functionality, using ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC actuators. To implement high-position precision for IPMC legs, in the present research, we proposed an electromechanical model of an IPMC actuator and analysed the deformation and actuating force of an equivalent IPMC cantilever beam, which could be used to design biomimetic legs, fingers, or fins for an underwater microrobot. We then evaluated the tip displacement of an IPMC actuator experimentally. The experimental deflections fit the theoretical values very well when the driving frequency was larger than 1 Hz. To realise the necessary multi-functionality for adapting to complex underwater environments, we introduced a walking biomimetic microrobot with two kinds of motion attitudes: a lying state and a standing state. The microrobot uses eleven IPMC actuators to move and two shape memory alloy (SMA actuators to change its motion attitude. In the lying state, the microrobot implements stick-insect-inspired walking/rotating motion, fish-like swimming motion, horizontal grasping motion, and floating motion. In the standing state, it implements inchworm-inspired crawling motion in two horizontal directions and grasping motion in the vertical direction. We constructed a prototype of this biomimetic microrobot and evaluated its walking, rotating, and floating speeds experimentally. The experimental results indicated that the robot could attain a maximum walking speed of 3.6 mm/s, a maximum rotational speed of 9°/s, and a maximum floating speed of 7

  1. Model based image restoration for underwater images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Thomas; Frühberger, Peter; Werling, Stefan; Heizmann, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The inspection of offshore parks, dam walls and other infrastructure under water is expensive and time consuming, because such constructions must be inspected manually by divers. Underwater buildings have to be examined visually to find small cracks, spallings or other deficiencies. Automation of underwater inspection depends on established water-proved imaging systems. Most underwater imaging systems are based on acoustic sensors (sonar). The disadvantage of such an acoustic system is the loss of the complete visual impression. All information embedded in texture and surface reflectance gets lost. Therefore acoustic sensors are mostly insufficient for these kind of visual inspection tasks. Imaging systems based on optical sensors feature an enormous potential for underwater applications. The bandwidth from visual imaging systems reach from inspection of underwater buildings via marine biological applications through to exploration of the seafloor. The reason for the lack of established optical systems for underwater inspection tasks lies in technical difficulties of underwater image acquisition and processing. Lightening, highly degraded images make a computational postprocessing absolutely essential.

  2. Design, modeling and optimization of an underwater manipulator with four-bar mechanism and compliant linkage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Sang Ok; Kim, Ji Hoon; Bae, Jang Ho; Kim, Jong Won; Seo, Tae Won

    2016-01-01

    Underwater manipulators are very important for a robot to perform a specific operation in water. Conventional robot arm manipulators have been suggested for various operations but have not been suitable for repeated motion in gathering something. This paper presents a new underwater manipulator design for gathering things such as starfish on the sea floor. The manipulator is composed of a four-bar linkage to achieve repeated motion along a loop and compliant linkages to enhance the efficiency of the gathering work. Kinematic and quasi-static analyses were performed to calculate the loop path and the reaction force at the actuation point. Based on the analysis, optimal design was performed to maximize the working distance with the height difference and the reaction moments considered as constraints. A prototype was assembled to test the performance of the manipulator, and the empirical loop path was compared to simulation results

  3. Thruster fault diagnosis method based on Gaussian particle filter for autonomous underwater vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-shan Sun

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs generally work in complex marine environments. Any fault in AUVs may cause significant losses. Thus, system reliability and automatic fault diagnosis are important. To address the actuator failure of AUVs, a fault diagnosis method based on the Gaussian particle filter is proposed in this study. Six free-space motion equation mathematical models are established in accordance with the actuator configuration of AUVs. The value of the control (moment loss parameter is adopted on the basis of these models to represent underwater vehicle malfunction, and an actuator failure model is established. An improved Gaussian particle filtering algorithm is proposed and is used to estimate the AUV failure model and motion state. Bayes algorithm is employed to perform robot fault detection. The sliding window method is adopted for fault magnitude estimation. The feasibility and validity of the proposed method are verified through simulation experiments and experimental data.

  4. Design, modeling and optimization of an underwater manipulator with four-bar mechanism and compliant linkage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Sang Ok; Kim, Ji Hoon; Bae, Jang Ho; Kim, Jong Won [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Tae Won [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Underwater manipulators are very important for a robot to perform a specific operation in water. Conventional robot arm manipulators have been suggested for various operations but have not been suitable for repeated motion in gathering something. This paper presents a new underwater manipulator design for gathering things such as starfish on the sea floor. The manipulator is composed of a four-bar linkage to achieve repeated motion along a loop and compliant linkages to enhance the efficiency of the gathering work. Kinematic and quasi-static analyses were performed to calculate the loop path and the reaction force at the actuation point. Based on the analysis, optimal design was performed to maximize the working distance with the height difference and the reaction moments considered as constraints. A prototype was assembled to test the performance of the manipulator, and the empirical loop path was compared to simulation results.

  5. 4th Pacific Rim Underwater Acoustics Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Wen; Cheng, Qianliu; Zhao, Hangfang

    2016-01-01

    These proceedings are a collection of 16 selected scientific papers and reviews by distinguished international experts that were presented at the 4th Pacific Rim Underwater Acoustics Conference (PRUAC), held in Hangzhou, China in October 2013. The topics discussed at the conference include internal wave observation and prediction; environmental uncertainty and coupling to sound propagation; environmental noise and ocean dynamics; dynamic modeling in acoustic fields; acoustic tomography and ocean parameter estimation; time reversal and matched field processing; underwater acoustic localization and communication as well as measurement instrumentations and platforms. These proceedings provide insights into the latest developments in underwater acoustics, promoting the exchange of ideas for the benefit of future research.

  6. A new technique for robot vision in autonomous underwater vehicles using the color shift in underwater imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    FOR ROBOT VISION IN AUTONOMOUS UNDERWATER VEHICLES USING THE COLOR SHIFT IN UNDERWATER IMAGING by Jake A. Jones June 2017 Thesis Advisor... VEHICLES USING THE COLOR SHIFT IN UNDERWATER IMAGING 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Jake A. Jones 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS...underwater vehicles (AUVs), robot vision, autonomy, visual odometry, underwater color shift, optical properties of water 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 75 16

  7. Jellyfish inspired underwater unmanned vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Alex; Bresser, Scott; Chung, Sanghun; Tadesse, Yonas; Priya, Shashank

    2009-03-01

    An unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) was designed inspired by the form and functionality of a Jellyfish. These natural organisms were chosen as bio-inspiration for a multitude of reasons including: efficiency of locomotion, lack of natural predators, proper form and shape to incorporate payload, and varying range of sizes. The structure consists of a hub body surrounded by bell segments and microcontroller based drive system. The locomotion of UUV was achieved by shape memory alloy "Biometal Fiber" actuation which possesses large strain and blocking force with adequate response time. The main criterion in design of UUV was the use of low-profile shape memory alloy actuators which act as artificial muscles. In this manuscript, we discuss the design of two Jellyfish prototypes and present experimental results illustrating the performance and power consumption.

  8. Underwater sympathetic detonation of pellet explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Shiro; Saburi, Tei; Nagayama, Kunihito

    2017-06-01

    The underwater sympathetic detonation of pellet explosives was taken by high-speed photography. The diameter and the thickness of the pellet were 20 and 10 mm, respectively. The experimental system consists of the precise electric detonator, two grams of composition C4 booster and three pellets, and these were set in water tank. High-speed video camera, HPV-X made by Shimadzu was used with 10 Mfs. The underwater explosions of the precise electric detonator, the C4 booster and a pellet were also taken by high-speed photography to estimate the propagation processes of the underwater shock waves. Numerical simulation of the underwater sympathetic detonation of the pellet explosives was also carried out and compared with experiment.

  9. Underwater Grass Comeback Helps Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fortified Susquehanna Flats, the largest bed of underwater grasses in the Chesapeake Bay, seems able to withstand a major weather punch. Its resilience is contributing to an overall increase in the Bay’s submerged aquatic vegetation.

  10. Underwater Object Segmentation Based on Optical Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Underwater optical environments are seriously affected by various optical inputs, such as artificial light, sky light, and ambient scattered light. The latter two can block underwater object segmentation tasks, since they inhibit the emergence of objects of interest and distort image information, while artificial light can contribute to segmentation. Artificial light often focuses on the object of interest, and, therefore, we can initially identify the region of target objects if the collimation of artificial light is recognized. Based on this concept, we propose an optical feature extraction, calculation, and decision method to identify the collimated region of artificial light as a candidate object region. Then, the second phase employs a level set method to segment the objects of interest within the candidate region. This two-phase structure largely removes background noise and highlights the outline of underwater objects. We test the performance of the method with diverse underwater datasets, demonstrating that it outperforms previous methods.

  11. Sensor network architectures for monitoring underwater pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Nader; Jawhar, Imad; Al-Jaroodi, Jameela; Zhang, Liren

    2011-01-01

    This paper develops and compares different sensor network architecture designs that can be used for monitoring underwater pipeline infrastructures. These architectures are underwater wired sensor networks, underwater acoustic wireless sensor networks, RF (radio frequency) wireless sensor networks, integrated wired/acoustic wireless sensor networks, and integrated wired/RF wireless sensor networks. The paper also discusses the reliability challenges and enhancement approaches for these network architectures. The reliability evaluation, characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages among these architectures are discussed and compared. Three reliability factors are used for the discussion and comparison: the network connectivity, the continuity of power supply for the network, and the physical network security. In addition, the paper also develops and evaluates a hierarchical sensor network framework for underwater pipeline monitoring.

  12. A trajectory tracking controller for an underwater hexapod vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plamondon, N; Nahon, M

    2009-09-01

    This paper describes work done in the modeling and control of a low speed underwater vehicle that uses paddles instead of thrusters to move in the water. A review of previously modeled vehicles and of controller designs for underwater applications is presented. Then, a method to accurately predict the thrust produced by an oscillating flexible paddle is developed and validated. This is followed by the development of a method to determine the ideal paddle motion to produce a desired thrust. Several controllers are then developed and tested using a numerical simulation of the vehicle. We found that some model-based controllers could improve the performance of the system while others showed no benefit. Finally, we report results from experimental trials performed in an open water environment comparing the performance of the controllers. The experimental results showed that all the model-based controllers outperform the simple proportional-derivative controller. The controller giving the best performance was the model-based nonlinear controller. We also found that the vehicle was able to follow a change of a roll angle of 90 degrees in 0.7 s and to precisely follow a sinusoidal trajectory with a period of 6.28 s and an amplitude of 5 degrees.

  13. A trajectory tracking controller for an underwater hexapod vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plamondon, N; Nahon, M

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes work done in the modeling and control of a low speed underwater vehicle that uses paddles instead of thrusters to move in the water. A review of previously modeled vehicles and of controller designs for underwater applications is presented. Then, a method to accurately predict the thrust produced by an oscillating flexible paddle is developed and validated. This is followed by the development of a method to determine the ideal paddle motion to produce a desired thrust. Several controllers are then developed and tested using a numerical simulation of the vehicle. We found that some model-based controllers could improve the performance of the system while others showed no benefit. Finally, we report results from experimental trials performed in an open water environment comparing the performance of the controllers. The experimental results showed that all the model-based controllers outperform the simple proportional-derivative controller. The controller giving the best performance was the model-based nonlinear controller. We also found that the vehicle was able to follow a change of a roll angle of 90 deg. in 0.7 s and to precisely follow a sinusoidal trajectory with a period of 6.28 s and an amplitude of 5 deg.

  14. Trajectory-Based Visual Localization in Underwater Surveying Missions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Burguera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new vision-based localization system applied to an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV with limited sensing and computation capabilities. The traditional EKF-SLAM approaches are usually expensive in terms of execution time; the approach presented in this paper strengthens this method by adopting a trajectory-based schema that reduces the computational requirements. The pose of the vehicle is estimated using an extended Kalman filter (EKF, which predicts the vehicle motion by means of a visual odometer and corrects these predictions using the data associations (loop closures between the current frame and the previous ones. One of the most important steps in this procedure is the image registration method, as it reinforces the data association and, thus, makes it possible to close loops reliably. Since the use of standard EKFs entail linearization errors that can distort the vehicle pose estimations, the approach has also been tested using an iterated Kalman filter (IEKF. Experiments have been conducted using a real underwater vehicle in controlled scenarios and in shallow sea waters, showing an excellent performance with very small errors, both in the vehicle pose and in the overall trajectory estimates.

  15. Underwater photogrammetry successful in Spain and France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    Underwater photogrammetry has been used to measure distortions in fuel assembly alignment pins in the upper internals of the Almarez and Dampierre PWRs. Photogrammetry is a three-dimensional precision measurement method using photographic techniques for the on-site measurement phase. On the strength of the operations at the two PWRs, underwater photogrammetry is now considered as a practical and effective technique for dimensional inspection at nuclear plants. (U.K.)

  16. Underwater noise levels in UK waters

    OpenAIRE

    Merchant, Nathan D.; Brookes, Kate L.; Faulkner, Rebecca C.; Bicknell, Anthony W. J.; Godley, Brendan J.; Witt, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Underwater noise from human activities appears to be rising, with ramifications for acoustically sensitive marine organisms and the functioning of marine ecosystems. Policymakers are beginning to address the risk of ecological impact, but are constrained by a lack of data on current and historic noise levels. Here, we present the first nationally coordinated effort to quantify underwater noise levels, in support of UK policy objectives under the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). ...

  17. Underwater gait analysis in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Daniele; Pavan, Davide; Morris, Meg; Guiotto, Annamaria; Iansek, Robert; Fortuna, Sofia; Frazzitta, Giuseppe; Sawacha, Zimi

    2017-02-01

    Although hydrotherapy is one of the physical therapies adopted to optimize gait rehabilitation in people with Parkinson disease, the quantitative measurement of gait-related outcomes has not been provided yet. This work aims to document the gait improvements in a group of parkinsonians after a hydrotherapy program through 2D and 3D underwater and on land gait analysis. Thirty-four parkinsonians and twenty-two controls were enrolled, divided into two different cohorts. In the first one, 2 groups of patients underwent underwater or land based walking training; controls underwent underwater walking training. Hence pre-treatment 2D underwater and on land gait analysis were performed, together with post-treatment on land gait analysis. Considering that current literature documented a reduced movement amplitude in parkinsonians across all lower limb joints in all movement planes, 3D underwater and on land gait analysis were performed on a second cohort of subjects (10 parkinsonians and 10 controls) who underwent underwater gait training. Baseline land 2D and 3D gait analysis in parkinsonians showed shorter stride length and slower speed than controls, in agreement with previous findings. Comparison between underwater and on land gait analysis showed reduction in stride length, cadence and speed on both parkinsonians and controls. Although patients who underwent underwater treatment exhibited significant changes on spatiotemporal parameters and sagittal plane lower limb kinematics, 3D gait analysis documented a significant (p<0.05) improvement in all movement planes. These data deserve attention for research directions promoting the optimal recovery and maintenance of walking ability. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Affordable underwater wireless optical communication using LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilipenko, Vladimir; Arnon, Shlomi

    2013-09-01

    In recent years the need for high data rate underwater wireless communication (WC) has increased. Nowadays, the conventional technology for underwater communication is acoustic. However, the maximum data rate that acoustic technology can provide is a few kilobits per second. On the other hand, emerging applications such as underwater imaging, networks of sensors and swarms of underwater vehicles require much faster data rates. As a result, underwater optical WC, which can provide much higher data rates, has been proposed as an alternative means of communication. In addition to high data rates, affordable communication systems become an important feature in the development requirements. The outcome of these requirements is a new system design based on off-the-shelf components such as blue and green light emitting diodes (LEDs). This is due to the fact that LEDs offer solutions characterized by low cost, high efficiency, reliability and compactness. However, there are some challenges to be met when incorporating LEDs as part of the optical transmitter, such as low modulation rates and non linearity. In this paper, we review the main challenges facing the incorporation of LEDs as an integral part of underwater WC systems and propose some techniques to mitigate the LED limitations in order to achieve high data rate communication

  19. An underwater optical wireless communication network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnon, Shlomi

    2009-08-01

    The growing need for underwater observation and sub-sea monitoring systems has stimulated considerable interest in advancing the enabling technologies of underwater wireless communication and underwater sensor networks. This communication technology is expected to play an important role in investigating climate change, in monitoring biological, bio-geochemical, evolutionary and ecological changes in the sea, ocean and lake environments and in helping to control and maintain oil production facilities and harbors using unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs), submarines, ships, buoys, and divers. However, the present technology of underwater acoustic communication cannot provide the high data rate required to investigate and monitor these environments and facilities. Optical wireless communication has been proposed as the best alternative to meet this challenge. We present models of three kinds of optical wireless communication links a) a line-of-sight link, b) a modulating retro-reflector link and c) a reflective link, all of which can provide the required data rate. We analyze the link performance based on these models. From the analysis, it is clear that as the water absorption increases, the communication performance decreases dramatically for the three link types. However, by using the scattered lighted it was possible to mitigate this decrease in some cases. We conclude from the analysis that a high data rate underwater optical wireless network is a feasible solution for emerging applications such as UUV to UUV links and networks of sensors, and extended ranges in these applications could be achieved by applying a multi-hop concept.

  20. Underwater 3D Reconstruction Based on Geometric Transformation of Sonar and Depth Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Mingjie; Chou, Wusheng; Yao, Guodong

    2017-10-01

    3D reconstruction is of vital importance to detect and monitor the underwater environment. A method based on geometric transformation of mechanical scanning sonar and depth information is proposed, in which the point cloud data from sonar and depth gauge are acquired to reconstruct the underwater 3D environment. However, noise and interference can affect the measurement of sonar, and movement of sonar during measurement can lead to distortion of the received data. Meanwhile, translation and rotation movement of sonar head may happen when ROV dives which can lead to different body reference coordinates of different scanning. To solve this, pre-processing and motion compensation are implemented at first, and underwater matching correction algorithm is used to calculate the translation and rotation of the sonar head. Then the inverse operation is implemented to convert the scan data of every depth into the same coordinate reference system. Finally, surface reconstruction of point clouds from sonar the depth information are used to reconstruct underwater environment based on MLS (Moving Least Square Method) using PCL (Point Cloud Library). Water tank experiments verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  1. Switching PD-based sliding mode control for hovering of a tilting-thruster underwater robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sangrok; Bak, Jeongae; Kim, Jongwon; Seo, TaeWon; Kim, Hwa Soo

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a switching PD-based sliding mode control (PD-SMC) method for the 6-degree-of-freedom (DOF) hovering motion of the underwater robot with tilting thrusters. Four thrusters of robot can be tilted simultaneously in the horizontal and vertical directions, and the 6-DOF motion is achieved by switching between two thruster configurations. Therefore, the tilting speed of thruster becomes the most essential parameter to determine the stability of hovering motion. Even though the previous PD control ensures stable hovering motion within a certain ranges of tilting speed, a PD-SMC is suggested in this paper by combining PD control with sliding mode control in order to achieve acceptable hovering performance even at the much lower tilting speeds. Also, the sign function in the sliding mode control is replaced by a sigmoid function to reduce undesired chattering. Simulations show that while PD control is effective only for tilting duration of 600 ms, the PD-based sliding mode control can guarantee the stable hovering motion of underwater robot even for the tilting duration of up to 1500 ms. Extensive experimental results confirm the hovering performance of the proposed PD-SMC method is much superior to that of PD method for much larger tilting durations.

  2. Computational Modeling of Hydrodynamics and Scour around Underwater Munitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Xu, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Munitions deposited in water bodies are a big threat to human health, safety, and environment. It is thus imperative to predict the motion and the resting status of the underwater munitions. A multitude of physical processes are involved, which include turbulent flows, sediment transport, granular material mechanics, 6 degree-of-freedom motion of the munition, and potential liquefaction. A clear understanding of this unique physical setting is currently lacking. Consequently, it is extremely hard to make reliable predictions. In this work, we present the computational modeling of two importance processes, i.e., hydrodynamics and scour, around munition objects. Other physical processes are also considered in our comprehensive model. However, they are not shown in this talk. To properly model the dynamics of the deforming bed and the motion of the object, an immersed boundary method is implemented in the open source CFD package OpenFOAM. Fixed bed and scour cases are simulated and compared with laboratory experiments. The future work of this project will implement the coupling between all the physical processes.

  3. Underwater Noise Modeling in Lithuanian Area of the Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatas Bagočius

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Along with rising awareness of public and scientific societies about environmental and ecological impacts of underwater noise, the need for underwater noise modelling in the shallow Lithuanian area of Baltic Sea emerged. Marine Strategy Framework Directive issues regarding underwater noise indicators refers to possibility of evaluation of Good Environmental State using underwater noise measurements as well as possibility to model underwater noise. Main anthropogenic underwater noise contributor in the Seas is the shipping lanes as known due to date, with no exclusion of Lithuanian Baltic Sea area. In this manuscript, it is presented the methods of development of simplistic underwater ambient noise model purposed for computation of underwater soundscape in shallow area of the Lithuanian Baltic Sea.

  4. Underwater Sensor Networks: A New Energy Efficient and Robust Architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Climent, Salvador; Capella, Juan Vincente; Meratnia, Nirvana; Serrano, Juan José

    2012-01-01

    The specific characteristics of underwater environments introduce new challenges for networking protocols. In this paper, a specialized architecture for underwater sensor networks (UWSNs) is proposed and evaluated. Experiments are conducted in order to analyze the suitability of this protocol for

  5. Magnetohydrodynamic underwater vehicular propulsion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swallom, D.W.; Sadovnik, I.; Gibbs, J.S.; Gurol, H.; Nguyen, L.

    1990-01-01

    The development of magnetohydrodynamic propulsion systems for underwater vehicles is discussed. According to the authors, it is a high risk endeavor that offers the possibility of a number of significant advantages over conventional propeller propulsion systems. These advantages may include the potential for greater stealth characteristics, increased maneuverability, enhanced survivability, elimination of cavitation limits, and addition of a significant emergency propulsion system. The possibility of increased stealth is by far the most important advantage. A conceptual design study has been completed with numerical results that shows that these advantages may be obtained with a magnetohydrodynamic propulsion system in an annular configuration externally surrounding a generic study submarine that is neutrally buoyant and can operate with the existing submarine propulsion system power plant. The classical submarine mission requirements make the use of these characteristics of the magnetohydrodynamic propulsion system particularly appropriate for submarine missions. The magnetohydrodynamic annular propulsion system for a generic attack class submarine has been designed to take advantage of the magnetohydrodynamic thruster characteristics

  6. Routing strategies for underwater gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Russ E.; Leonard, Naomi E.; Fratantoni, David M.

    2009-02-01

    Gliders are autonomous underwater vehicles that achieve long operating range by moving at speeds comparable to those of, or slower than, typical ocean currents. This paper addresses routing gliders to rapidly reach a specified waypoint or to maximize the ability to map a measured field, both in the presence of significant currents. For rapid transit in a frozen velocity field, direct minimization of travel time provides a trajectory "ray" equation. A simpler routing algorithm that requires less information is also discussed. Two approaches are developed to maximize the mapping ability, as measured by objective mapping error, of arrays of vehicles. In order to produce data sets that are readily interpretable, both approaches focus sampling near predetermined "ideal tracks" by measuring mapping skill only on those tracks, which are laid out with overall mapping skill in mind. One approach directly selects each vehicle's headings to maximize instantaneous mapping skill integrated over the entire array. Because mapping skill decreases when measurements are clustered, this method automatically coordinates glider arrays to maintain spacing. A simpler method that relies on manual control for array coordination employs a first-order control loop to balance staying close to the ideal track and maintaining vehicle speed to maximize mapping skill. While the various techniques discussed help in dealing with the slow speed of gliders, nothing can keep performance from being degraded when current speeds are comparable to vehicle speed. This suggests that glider utility could be greatly enhanced by the ability to operate high speeds for short periods when currents are strong.

  7. Survivability design for a hybrid underwater vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Biao; Wu, Chao; Li, Xiang; Zhao, Qingkai; Ge, Tong [State Key Lab of Ocean Engineering, School of Naval Architecture, Ocean and Civil Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-03-10

    A novel hybrid underwater robotic vehicle (HROV) capable of working to the full ocean depth has been developed. The battery powered vehicle operates in two modes: operate as an untethered autonomous vehicle in autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) mode and operate under remote control connected to the surface vessel by a lightweight, fiber optic tether in remotely operated vehicle (ROV) mode. Considering the hazardous underwater environment at the limiting depth and the hybrid operating modes, survivability has been placed on an equal level with the other design attributes of the HROV since the beginning of the project. This paper reports the survivability design elements for the HROV including basic vehicle design of integrated navigation and integrated communication, emergency recovery strategy, distributed architecture, redundant bus, dual battery package, emergency jettison system and self-repairing control system.

  8. Survivability design for a hybrid underwater vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Biao; Wu, Chao; Li, Xiang; Zhao, Qingkai; Ge, Tong

    2015-01-01

    A novel hybrid underwater robotic vehicle (HROV) capable of working to the full ocean depth has been developed. The battery powered vehicle operates in two modes: operate as an untethered autonomous vehicle in autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) mode and operate under remote control connected to the surface vessel by a lightweight, fiber optic tether in remotely operated vehicle (ROV) mode. Considering the hazardous underwater environment at the limiting depth and the hybrid operating modes, survivability has been placed on an equal level with the other design attributes of the HROV since the beginning of the project. This paper reports the survivability design elements for the HROV including basic vehicle design of integrated navigation and integrated communication, emergency recovery strategy, distributed architecture, redundant bus, dual battery package, emergency jettison system and self-repairing control system

  9. Recent developments in underwater repair welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offer, H.P.; Chapman, T.L.; Willis, E.R.; Maslakowski, J.; Van Diemen, P.; Smith, B.W.

    2001-01-01

    As nuclear plants age and reactor internal components begin to show increased evidence of age-related phenomena such as corrosion and fatigue, interest in the development of cost-effective mitigation and repair remedies grows. One technology currently receiving greater development and application program focus is underwater welding. Underwater welding, as used herein, is the application of weld metal to a substrate surface that is wet, but locally dry in the immediate area surrounding the welding torch. The locally dry environment is achieved by the use of a mechanical device that is specifically designed for water exclusion from the welding torch, surface to be welded, and the welding groove. This paper will explore recent developments in the use of underwater welding as a mitigation and repair technique. (author)

  10. A swarm of autonomous miniature underwater robot drifters for exploring submesoscale ocean dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Jules S.; Franks, Peter J. S.; Roberts, Paul L. D.; Mirza, Diba; Schurgers, Curt; Kastner, Ryan; Boch, Adrien

    2017-01-01

    Measuring the ever-changing 3-dimensional (3D) motions of the ocean requires simultaneous sampling at multiple locations. In particular, sampling the complex, nonlinear dynamics associated with submesoscales (swarm of 16 independent vehicles whose 3D trajectories are measured near-continuously, underwater. As the vehicles drift with the ambient flow or execute preprogrammed vertical behaviours, the simultaneous measurements at multiple, known locations resolve the details of the flow within the swarm. We describe the design, construction, control and underwater navigation of the M-AUE. A field programme in the coastal ocean using a swarm of these robots programmed with a depth-holding behaviour provides a unique test of a physical-biological interaction leading to plankton patch formation in internal waves. The performance of the M-AUE vehicles illustrates their novel capability for measuring submesoscale dynamics.

  11. Control of Oscillating Foil for Propulsion of Biorobotic Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Singh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper treats the question of control of a laterally and rotationally oscillating hydrofoil for the propulsion of biologically inspired robotic (biorobotic autonomous underwater vehicles (BAUVs. Sinusoidal oscillations of foils produce maneuvering and propulsive forces. The design is based on the internal model principle. Two springs are used to transmit forces from the actuators to the foil. Oscillating fins produce periodic forces, which can be used for fish-like propulsion and control of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs. The equations of motion of the foil include hydrodynamic lift and moment based on linear, unsteady, aerodynamic theory. A control law is derived for the lateral and rotational sinusoidal oscillation of the foil. In the closed-loop system, the lateral displacement and the rotational angle of the foil asymptotically follow sinusoidal trajectories of distinct frequencies and amplitudes independently. Simulation results are presented to show the trajectory tracking performance of the foil for different freestream velocities and sinusoidal command trajectories.

  12. Accuracy of Positioning Autonomous Biomimetic Underwater Vehicle Using Additional Measurement of Distances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naus Krzysztof

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes a study of problem of estimating the position coordinates of Autonomous Biomimetic Underwater Vehicle (ABUV using two methods: dead reckoning (DR and extended Kalman filter (EKF. In the first part of the paper, navigation system of ABUV is described and scientific problem with underwater positioning is formulated. The main part describes a way of estimating the position coordinates using DR and EKF and a numerical experiment involving motion of ABUV along the predetermined test distance. The final part of the paper contains a comparative statistical analysis of the results, carried out for assessing the accuracy of estimation of the position coordinates using DR and EKF methods. It presents the generalized conclusions from the research and the problems relating to the proper placement of the components of the system measuring distances.

  13. A swarm of autonomous miniature underwater robot drifters for exploring submesoscale ocean dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Jules S; Franks, Peter J S; Roberts, Paul L D; Mirza, Diba; Schurgers, Curt; Kastner, Ryan; Boch, Adrien

    2017-01-24

    Measuring the ever-changing 3-dimensional (3D) motions of the ocean requires simultaneous sampling at multiple locations. In particular, sampling the complex, nonlinear dynamics associated with submesoscales (swarm of 16 independent vehicles whose 3D trajectories are measured near-continuously, underwater. As the vehicles drift with the ambient flow or execute preprogrammed vertical behaviours, the simultaneous measurements at multiple, known locations resolve the details of the flow within the swarm. We describe the design, construction, control and underwater navigation of the M-AUE. A field programme in the coastal ocean using a swarm of these robots programmed with a depth-holding behaviour provides a unique test of a physical-biological interaction leading to plankton patch formation in internal waves. The performance of the M-AUE vehicles illustrates their novel capability for measuring submesoscale dynamics.

  14. Nonlinear multiple-input-multiple-output adaptive backstepping control of underwater glider systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjun Cao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, an adaptive backstepping control is proposed for multi-input and multi-output nonlinear underwater glider systems. The developed method is established on the basis of the state-space equations, which are simplified from the full glider dynamics through reasonable assumptions. The roll angle, pitch angle, and velocity of the vehicle are considered as control objects, a Lyapunov function consisting of the tracking error of the state vectors is established. According to Lyapunov stability theory, the adaptive control laws are derived to ensure the tracking errors asymptotically converge to zero. The proposed nonlinear MIMO adaptive backstepping control (ABC scheme is tested to control an underwater glider in saw-tooth motion, spiral motion, and multimode motion. The linear quadratic regular (LQR control scheme is described and evaluated with the ABC for the motion control problems. The results demonstrate that both control strategies provide similar levels of robustness while using the proposed ABC scheme leads to the more smooth control efforts with less oscillatory behavior.

  15. Motion sickness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bles, Willem; Bos, Jelte E.; Kruit, Hans

    2000-01-01

    The number of recently published papers on motion sickness may convey the impression that motion sickness is far from being understood. The current review focusses on a concept which tends to unify the different manifestations and theories of motion sickness. The paper highlights the relations

  16. Efficient Modelling Methodology for Reconfigurable Underwater Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mikkel Cornelius; Blanke, Mogens; Schjølberg, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers the challenge of applying reconfigurable robots in an underwater environment. The main result presented is the development of a model for a system comprised of N, possibly heterogeneous, robots dynamically connected to each other and moving with 6 Degrees of Freedom (DOF......). This paper presents an application of the Udwadia-Kalaba Equation for modelling the Reconfigurable Underwater Robots. The constraints developed to enforce the rigid connection between robots in the system is derived through restrictions on relative distances and orientations. To avoid singularities...... in the orientation and, thereby, allow the robots to undertake any relative configuration the attitude is represented in Euler parameters....

  17. Underwater laser cutting of metallic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfille, J.P.; Schildknecht, J.; Ramaswami, V.S.

    1993-01-01

    In the frame of an european contract, the feasibility of the underwater cutting with a CO 2 laser power is studied. The aim of this work is the dismantling metallic structures of reactors pools. The paper analyzes the general concept of the experimental device, the underwater cutting head, the experimenting vessel, examples of cuttings in dismantling situation with a 500 W CO 2 laser, and examples of cuttings with a 5 kW CO 2 laser. (author). 2 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Underwater noise from offshore oil production vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbe, Christine; McCauley, Robert; McPherson, Craig; Gavrilov, Alexander

    2013-06-01

    Underwater acoustic recordings of six Floating Production Storage and Offloading (FPSO) vessels moored off Western Australia are presented. Monopole source spectra were computed for use in environmental impact assessments of underwater noise. Given that operations on the FPSOs varied over the period of recording, and were sometimes unknown, the authors present a statistical approach to noise level estimation. No significant or consistent aspect dependence was found for the six FPSOs. Noise levels did not scale with FPSO size or power. The 5th, 50th (median), and 95th percentile source levels (broadband, 20 to 2500 Hz) were 188, 181, and 173 dB re 1 μPa @ 1 m, respectively.

  19. An Observability Metric for Underwater Vehicle Localization Using Range Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Arrichiello

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses observability issues related to the general problem of single and multiple Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV localization using only range measurements. While an AUV is submerged, localization devices, such as Global Navigation Satellite Systems, are ineffective, due to the attenuation of electromagnetic waves. AUV localization based on dead reckoning techniques and the use of affordable motion sensor units is also not practical, due to divergence caused by sensor bias and drift. For these reasons, localization systems often build on trilateration algorithms that rely on the measurements of the ranges between an AUV and a set of fixed transponders using acoustic devices. Still, such solutions are often expensive, require cumbersome calibration procedures and only allow for AUV localization in an area that is defined by the geometrical arrangement of the transponders. A viable alternative for AUV localization that has recently come to the fore exploits the use of complementary information on the distance from the AUV to a single transponder, together with information provided by on-board resident motion sensors, such as, for example, depth, velocity and acceleration measurements. This concept can be extended to address the problem of relative localization between two AUVs equipped with acoustic sensors for inter-vehicle range measurements. Motivated by these developments, in this paper, we show that both the problems of absolute localization of a single vehicle and the relative localization of multiple vehicles can be treated using the same mathematical framework, and tailoring concepts of observability derived for nonlinear systems, we analyze how the performance in localization depends on the types of motion imparted to the AUVs. For this effect, we propose a well-defined observability metric and validate its usefulness, both in simulation and by carrying out experimental tests with a real marine vehicle during which the

  20. Underwater floating robot-fish: a comparative analysis of the results of mathematical modelling and full-scale tests of the prototype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatsun Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a comparative analysis of the results of computer mathematical modelling of the motion of the underwater robot-fish implemented by using the MATLAB / Simulink package and fullscale tests of an experimental model developed in the laboratory of mechatronics and robotics of the SouthWest State University.

  1. Ice Shelf Rift Time-Lapse Photography, Antarctica, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — From November 2004 to March 2005, on the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica, an automated "web cam" was operated on the southward facing lip of a large ice-shelf rift to...

  2. Time-lapse seismic imaging of the Reykjanes geothermal reservoir

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weemstra, C.; Obermann, Anne; Blanck, Hanna; Verdel, Arie; Paap, B; Guðnason, Egill Árni; Hersir, Gylfi Páll; Jousset, Philippe; Sigurðsson, Ömar

    2016-01-01

    We report on the results obtained from a dense seismic deployment over a geothermal reservoir. The reservoir has been producing continuously for almost a decade and is located on the tip of the Reykjanes peninsula, SW Iceland. The seismic stations on top of the reservoir have continuously recorded

  3. Time-lapse resistivity surveys over simulated clandestine graves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jervis, John R; Pringle, Jamie K; Tuckwell, George W

    2009-11-20

    The aim of this study was to develop a better understanding of how electrical resistivity surveys can be used to locate clandestine graves. Resistivity surveys were conducted regularly over three simulated clandestine graves containing a pig cadaver, no cadaver and a pig cadaver wrapped in tarpaulin, respectively. Additionally, soil and groundwater samples were collected from two more simulated graves outside the survey area. The grave containing a pig cadaver was detectable from a low resistivity anomaly in the survey data. Groundwater data suggest that the resistivity anomaly associated with the surveyed pig grave was caused by a localised increase in groundwater conductivity. Wrapping a cadaver was found to initially change the resistivity response of a grave to a high resistivity anomaly. Resistivity surveys did not detect the disturbed soil in the grave that did not contain a cadaver. Although soil samples showed grave soil to be more porous than undisturbed soil, the lack of response from the grave that did not contain a cadaver suggests that disturbed soil was not responsible for the resistivity anomalies observed in this study. Resistivity surveys successfully detected all graves containing cadavers throughout the study, whilst also showing the potential to eliminate the need for mass excavation in a genuine search.

  4. Assessing ground compaction via time lapse surface wave analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dal Moro, Giancarlo; Al-Arifi, N.; Moustafa, S.S.R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2016), s. 249-256 ISSN 1214-9705 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : Full velocity spectrum (FVS) analysis * ground compaction * ground compaction * phase velocities * Rayleigh waves * seismic data inversion * surface wave dispersion * surface waves Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 0.699, year: 2016

  5. Maxillofacial injury: A retrospective analysis of time lapse between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-11-04

    1,2 BDS, MB BCh, PhD, DSc, FCD. 1 Division of .... where a large force to the body is required (i.e. a serious ... SAJS 141. Table 3. Frequency distribution for the five time groups (days) by study year and for all years combined.

  6. Hydrodynamic Analysis of the Spherical Underwater Robot SUR-II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunfeng Yue

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper describes the development of the second-generation Spherical Underwater Robot (SUR-II. The new SUR-II has an improved propulsion system structure, resulting in better performance compared with the original design. This paper focuses on the characteristics of the water-jet thruster and the spherical hull of the SUR-II. To analyse its hydrodynamic characteristics, the main hydrodynamic parameters of the SUR-II were estimated based on two reasonable assumptions and a reasonable dynamic equation was proposed to describe the relationship between force and velocity. Drag coefficients were calculated separately for vertical and horizontal motions due to the fin on the robot's equator and the holes in the robot's hull. The holes had a particularly adverse effect on the horizontal drag coefficient. A hydrodynamic analysis using computational fluid dynamics was then carried out to verify the estimated parameters. The velocity vectors, pressure contours and drag coefficient for each state of motion were obtained. Finally, the propulsive force was determined experimentally to verify the theoretical calculations and simulation results.

  7. Thrust producing mechanisms in ray-inspired underwater vehicle propulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geng Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a computational study of the hydrodynamics of a ray-inspired underwater vehicle conducted concurrently with experimental measurements. High-resolution stereo-videos of the vehicle’s fin motions during steady swimming are obtained and used as a foundation for developing a high fidelity geometrical model of the oscillatory fin. A Cartesian grid based immersed boundary solver is used to examine the flow fields produced due to these complex artificial pectoral fin kinematics. Simulations are carried out at a smaller Reynolds number in order to examine the hydrodynamic performance and understand the resultant wake topology. Results show that the vehicle’s fins experience large spanwise inflexion of the distal part as well as moderate chordwise pitching during the oscillatory motion. Most thrust force is generated by the distal part of the fin, and it is highly correlated with the spanwise inflexion. Two sets of inter-connected vortex rings are observed in the wake right behind each fin. Those vortex rings induce strong backward flow jets which are mainly responsible for the fin thrust generation.

  8. Boussinesq modeling of surface waves due to underwater landslides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Dutykh

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Consideration is given to the influence of an underwater landslide on waves at the surface of a shallow body of fluid. The equations of motion that govern the evolution of the barycenter of the landslide mass include various dissipative effects due to bottom friction, internal energy dissipation, and viscous drag. The surface waves are studied in the Boussinesq scaling, with time-dependent bathymetry. A numerical model for the Boussinesq equations is introduced that is able to handle time-dependent bottom topography, and the equations of motion for the landslide and surface waves are solved simultaneously. The numerical solver for the Boussinesq equations can also be restricted to implement a shallow-water solver, and the shallow-water and Boussinesq configurations are compared. A particular bathymetry is chosen to illustrate the general method, and it is found that the Boussinesq system predicts larger wave run-up than the shallow-water theory in the example treated in this paper. It is also found that the finite fluid domain has a significant impact on the behavior of the wave run-up.

  9. IVO develops a new repair technique for underwater sites. Viscous doughlike substance underwater cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klingstedt, G.; Leisio, C. [ed.

    1998-07-01

    A viscous sealant is revolutionizing repair of the stone and concrete masonry of underwater dams, bridges and canals. There is now no need for expensive and time-consuming cofferdams, since a diver can extrude quick-setting mortar into underwater structures needing repair. This technique has worked well in recent years in various parts of Finland even in strongly flowing water. IVO experts are now starting to look more beyond the borders of Finland

  10. Underwater Advanced Time-Domain Electromagnetic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-03

    sufficiently waterproofed ...................................................................... 20 Objective: Calibration method can be used both topside... additional background variability is observed at early times, as illustrated in Figure 15. The layout of this figure is the same as Figure 14. Now the...are discussed in the following sections and summarized in Table 5. Objective: System is sufficiently waterproofed The array remained underwater up to

  11. Underwater Adhesives Retrofit Pipelines with Advanced Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Houston-based Astro Technology Inc. used a partnership with Johnson Space Center to pioneer an advanced fiber-optic monitoring system for offshore oil pipelines. The company's underwater adhesives allow it to retrofit older deepwater systems in order to measure pressure, temperature, strain, and flow properties, giving energy companies crucial data in real time and significantly decreasing the risk of a catastrophe.

  12. Detection of Underwater UXOs in Mud

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    2nd International Conference on Underwater Acoustic Measurements, Crete, Greece, 2007. 16 [10] P.T. Gough and D.W. Hawkins “Imaging algorithms...course. Runs 275 and 325 folla.v the same trad < and run 322 foUows a track on the opposite side of the swath. The LF SAS image of run 325 is shown

  13. Adaptive turbo equalization for underwater acoustic communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cannelli, L; Leus, G.; Dol, H.S.; Walree, P.A. van

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a multiband transceiver designed for underwater channels is presented. Multi-branch filtering at the receiver is used to leverage the diversity offered by a multi-scale multi-lag scenario. The multi-branch bank of filters is constructed by estimating scale and delay coefficients

  14. Underwater noise generated by offshore pile driving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsouvalas, A.

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise emission in the marine environment has always been an environmental issue of serious concern. In particular, the noise generated during the installation of foundation piles is considered to be one of the most significant sources of underwater noise pollution. This is mainly

  15. Evolution: Fossil Ears and Underwater Sonar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Olivier

    2016-08-22

    A key innovation in the history of whales was the evolution of a sonar system together with high-frequency hearing. Fossils of an archaic toothed whale's inner ear bones provide clues for a stepwise emergence of underwater echolocation ability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Impacts of underwater noise on marine vertebrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liebschner, Alexander; Seibel, Henrike; Teilmann, Jonas; Wittekind, Dietrich; Parmentier, Eric; Dähne, Michael; Dietz, Rune; Driver, Jörg; Elk, van Cornelis; Everaarts, Eligius; Findeisen, Henning; Kristensen, Jacob; Lehnert, Kristina; Lucke, Klaus; Merck, Thomas; Müller, Sabine; Pawliczka, Iwona; Ronnenberg, Katrin; Rosenberger, Tanja; Ruser, Andreas; Tougaard, Jakob; Schuster, Max; Sundermeyer, Janne; Sveegaard, Signe; Siebert, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    The project conducts application-oriented research on impacts of underwater noise on marine vertebrates in the North and Baltic Seas. In distinct subprojects, the hearing sensitivity of harbor porpoises and gray seals as well as the acoustic tolerance limit of harbor porpoises to impulsive noise

  17. Shape optimization of blended-wing-body underwater glider by using gliding range as the optimization target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunya Sun

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Blended-Wing-Body Underwater Glider (BWBUG, which has excellent hydrodynamic performance, is a new kind of underwater glider in recent years. In the shape optimization of BWBUG, the lift to drag ratio is often used as the optimization target. However this results in lose of internal space. In this paper, the energy reserve is defined as the direct proportional function of the internal space of BWBUG. A motion model, which relates gliding range to steady gliding motion parameters as well as energy consumption, is established by analyzing the steady-state gliding motion. The maximum gliding range is used as the optimization target instead of the lift to drag ratio to optimizing the shape of BWBUG. The result of optimization shows that the maximum gliding range of initial design is increased by 32.1% though an Efficient Global Optimization (EGO process. Keywords: Blended-wing-body underwater glider, Shape optimization, Gliding range, Energy consumption model, Lift to drag ratio

  18. Design considerations for an underwater soft-robot inspired from marine invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, Michael; Sledge, Isaac; Mohseni, Kamran

    2015-10-29

    This article serves as an overview of the unique challenges and opportunities made possible by a soft, jellyfish inspired, underwater robot. We include a description of internal pressure modeling as it relates to propulsive performance, leading to a desired energy-minimizing volume flux program. Strategies for determining optimal actuator placement derived from biological body motions are presented. In addition a feedback mechanism inspired by the epidermal line sensory system of cephalopods is presented, whereby internal pressure distribution can be used to determine pertinent deformation parameters.

  19. Underwater videography and photography in Gulf of Kachchh. Sponsored by Gujarat Ecological Society, Vadodara, Gujarat

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Marine Archaeology Centre (MAC) has been carrying out underwater explorations and excavations of ancient ports and sunken shipwrecks to preserve underwater cultural heritage. MAC has the infrastructure facility to carry out underwater investigations...

  20. Delay Tolerance in Underwater Wireless Communications: A Routing Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safdar Hussain Bouk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Similar to terrestrial networks, underwater wireless networks (UWNs also aid several critical tasks including coastal surveillance, underwater pollution detection, and other maritime applications. Currently, once underwater sensor nodes are deployed at different levels of the sea, it is nearly impossible or very expensive to reconfigure the hardware, for example, battery. Taking this issue into account, considerable amount of research has been carried out to ensure minimum energy costs and reliable communication between underwater nodes and base stations. As a result, several different network protocols were proposed for UWN, including MAC, PHY, transport, and routing. Recently, a new paradigm was introduced claiming that the intermittent nature of acoustic channel and signal resulted in designing delay tolerant routing schemes for the UWN, known as an underwater delay tolerant network. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive survey of underwater routing protocols with emphasis on the limitations, challenges, and future open issues in the context of delay tolerant network routing.

  1. An Evaluation of Potential Operating Systems for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    remote control of such vehicles requires the use of a tether , limiting the vehicle’s range; however operating underwater vehicles autonomously requires...URBI Universal Robot Body Interface UUV Unmanned Underwater Vehicle UNCLASSIFIED xi DSTO–TN–1194 UNCLASSIFIED THIS PAGE IS INTENTIONALLY BLANK xii... underwater environment, where many platforms are still reliant upon an umbilical tether for power and high bandwidth communications. This tether

  2. On the Performance of the Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    waves for Underwater Wireless Communication (UWC); radio waves, optical waves, and acoustic waves are few to name. Radio waves are good for extra low...2211 underwater communication , wireless sensors, mutual information REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10. SPONSOR...Cotae, “On the Performance of the Underwater Wireless Communication Sensor Networks: Work in Progress” ASEE Mid-Atlantic Fall 2014 Conference

  3. Underwater laser beam welding of Alloy 690

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Takehisa; Tamura, Masataka; Kono, Wataru; Kawano, Shohei; Yoda, Masaki

    2009-01-01

    Stress Corrosion Clacking (SCC) has been reported at Alloy 600 welds between nozzles and safe-end in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) plant. Alloy 690, which has higher chromium content than Alloy 600, has been applied for cladding on Alloy 600 welds for repairing damaged SCC area. Toshiba has developed Underwater Laser Beam Welding technique. This method can be conducted without draining, so that the repairing period and the radiation exposure during the repair can be dramatically decreased. In some old PWRs, high-sulfur stainless steel is used as the materials for this section. It has a high susceptibility of weld cracks. Therefore, the optimum welding condition of Alloy 690 on the high-sulfur stainless steel was investigated with our Underwater Laser Beam Welding unit. Good cladding layer, without any crack, porosity or lack of fusion, could be obtained. (author)

  4. Cymbal and BB underwater transducers and arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newnham, R.E.; Zhang, J.; Alkoy, S.; Meyer, R.; Hughes, W.J.; Hladky-Hennion, A.C.; Cochran, J.; Markley, D. [Materials Research Laboratory, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2002-09-01

    The cymbal is a miniaturized class V flextensional transducer that was developed for use as a shallow water sound projector and receiver. Single elements are characterized by high Q, low efficiency, and medium power output capability. Its low cost and thin profile allow the transducer to be assembled into large flexible arrays. Efforts were made to model both single elements and arrays using the ATILA code and the integral equation formulation (EQI).Millimeter size microprobe hydrophones (BBs) have been designed and fabricated from miniature piezoelectric hollow ceramic spheres for underwater applications such as mapping acoustic fields of projectors, and flow noise sensors for complex underwater structures. Green spheres are prepared from soft lead zirconate titanate powders using a coaxial nozzle slurry process. A compact hydrophone with a radially-poled sphere is investigated using inside and outside electrodes. Characterization of these hydrophones is done through measurement of hydrostatic piezoelectric charge coefficients, free field voltage sensitivities and directivity beam patterns. (orig.)

  5. Underwater noise modelling for environmental impact assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farcas, Adrian [Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas), Pakefield Road, Lowestoft, NR33 0HT (United Kingdom); Thompson, Paul M. [Lighthouse Field Station, Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Cromarty IV11 8YL (United Kingdom); Merchant, Nathan D., E-mail: nathan.merchant@cefas.co.uk [Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas), Pakefield Road, Lowestoft, NR33 0HT (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    Assessment of underwater noise is increasingly required by regulators of development projects in marine and freshwater habitats, and noise pollution can be a constraining factor in the consenting process. Noise levels arising from the proposed activity are modelled and the potential impact on species of interest within the affected area is then evaluated. Although there is considerable uncertainty in the relationship between noise levels and impacts on aquatic species, the science underlying noise modelling is well understood. Nevertheless, many environmental impact assessments (EIAs) do not reflect best practice, and stakeholders and decision makers in the EIA process are often unfamiliar with the concepts and terminology that are integral to interpreting noise exposure predictions. In this paper, we review the process of underwater noise modelling and explore the factors affecting predictions of noise exposure. Finally, we illustrate the consequences of errors and uncertainties in noise modelling, and discuss future research needs to reduce uncertainty in noise assessments.

  6. Ocean Research Enabled by Underwater Gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    Underwater gliders are autonomous underwater vehicles that profile vertically by changing their buoyancy and use wings to move horizontally. Gliders are useful for sustained observation at relatively fine horizontal scales, especially to connect the coastal and open ocean. In this review, research topics are grouped by time and length scales. Large-scale topics addressed include the eastern and western boundary currents and the regional effects of climate variability. The accessibility of horizontal length scales of order 1 km allows investigation of mesoscale and submesoscale features such as fronts and eddies. Because the submesoscales dominate vertical fluxes in the ocean, gliders have found application in studies of biogeochemical processes. At the finest scales, gliders have been used to measure internal waves and turbulent dissipation. The review summarizes gliders' achievements to date and assesses their future in ocean observation.

  7. Performance Evaluation of a Novel Propulsion System for the Spherical Underwater Robot (SURIII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuoxin Gu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers a novel propulsion system for the third-generation Spherical Underwater Robot (SURIII, the improved propulsion system is designed and analyzed to verify its increased stability compared to the second-generation Spherical Underwater Robot (SURII. With the new propulsion system, the robot is not only symmetric on the X axis but also on the Y axis, which increases the flexibility of its movement. The new arrangement also reduces the space constraints of servomotors and vectored water-jet thrusters. This paper also aims to the hydrodynamic characteristic of the whole robot. According to the different situations of the surge and heave motion, two kinds of methods are used to calculate the drag coefficient for the SURIII. For surge motion, the drag coefficient can be determined by the Reynolds number. For heave motion, considering about the influences of edges and gaps of the SURIII, the drag coefficient needs to be calculated by the dynamic equation. In addition, the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD simulation is carried out to estimate some parameters which cannot be measured. The pressure contours, velocity vectors and velocity streamlines for different motions are extracted from the post-processor in the CFD simulation. The drag coefficients of surge and heave motion are both calculated by the simulation results and compared with the chosen one by Reynolds number. Finally, an experiment is also conducted for measure the propulsive force of the multi-vectored water-jet thrusters by using a 6-DoF load cell. The experimental results demonstrate the propulsive force is better than a previous version. Thus, the propulsive performance is better than before.

  8. A MAC protocol for underwater sensors networks

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Rodrigo; Orozco, Javier; Ochoa, Sergio; Meseguer Pallarès, Roc; Eggly, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    “The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-26401-1_37." Underwater sensor networks are becoming an important field of research, because of its everyday increasing application scope. Examples of their application areas are environmental and pollution monitoring (mainly oil spills), oceanographic data collection, support for submarine geo-localization, ocean sampling and early tsunamis alert. It is well-known the challenge that represents to perfo...

  9. Passive Mode Carbon Nanotube Underwater Acoustic Transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-20

    irreversible Joule heat) by an electric light bulb . The reciprocal (or reverse) of this process by supplying heat and shining light to the same electric bulb ...limit the invention to the precise form disclosed; and obviously many modifications and variations are possible in light of the above teaching...300151 1 of 14 PASSIVE MODE CARBON NANOTUBE UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC TRANSDUCER STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described

  10. Underwater suction device for irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qurnell, F.D.; Peloquin, A.V.

    1982-01-01

    An underwater suction device for collecting irradiated materials in a pool of water includes injection and suction tubes and a removable, disposable filter for capturing irradiated materials. Pressurized water is injected into the suction tube through a jet pump nozzle to establish a suction flow through the tube. The suction device is manoeuverable by a pole, which is pivotally connected to the suction device by a latching mechanism. (author)

  11. Tethered Antennas for Unmanned Underwater Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-27

    Concepts The first design (Figure 1) was based on the concept of an airfoil kite. The shape of the tow body was built around a NACA5515 hydrofoil to...Underwater Vehicles Brooke Ocean Technology (USA) Inc. 6 Figure 1: Hydrofoil Design The second design was based on that of a boat hull...communications. A sharp bow was utilized to cut through the water to reduce drag when on the surface. Like the hydrofoil design the top profile was

  12. MEDITERRANEAN: Underwater neutrinos get off the ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Now funded is the initial stage of NESTOR, an imaginative new programme for a dedicated underwater neutrino astroparticle physics laboratory. Located in the international waters off the southernmost corner of continental Europe near the town of Pylos in S.W. Greece, NESTOR (NEutrinos from Supernovae and TeV sources Ocean Range) recalls the wise king of Pylos who counselled the Greeks during the Trojan war, an excellent tradition for new scientific goals of detecting neutrinos

  13. Role of Confined Water in Underwater Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhinojwala, Ali

    Surface bound water is a strong deterrent for forming strong bonds between two surfaces underwater and expelling that bound water is important for strong adhesion. I will discuss examples of different strategies used by geckos, spiders, and mussels to handle this last layer of bound water. Recent results using infrared-visible sum frequency generation spectroscopy to probe the structure of this bound water will be discussed. National Science Foundation.

  14. Obstacle avoidance in underwater glider path planning

    OpenAIRE

    Isern González, Josep; Hernández Sosa, Daniel; Fernández Perdomo, Enrique; Cabrera Gámez, Jorge; Domínguez Brito, Antonio Carlos; Prieto Marañón, Víctor

    2012-01-01

    Underwater gliders have revealed as a valuable scientific platform, with a growing number of successful environmental sampling applications. They are specially suited for long range missions due to their unmatched autonomy level, although their low surge speed make them strongly affected by ocean currents. Path planning constitute a real concern for this type of vehicle, as it may reduce the time taken to reach a given waypoint or save power. In such a dynamic environment it is not easy to fi...

  15. A Recovery System for Unmanned Underwater Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-28

    300170 1 of 10 A RECOVERY SYSTEM FOR UNMANNED UNDERWATER VEHICLES STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described herein may...6 of 10 forces cannot be easily predicted and can be strong enough to require a significantly larger handling system and significantly more...the sea state, the ship handling system , the capture mechanism and the design of the capture mechanism 400. [0024] The water jets 100 will increase

  16. Research on Operational Aspects of Large Autonomous Underwater Glider Fleets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fratantoni, David M

    2007-01-01

    This program supported research on the operational and management issues stemming from application of large fleets of autonomous underwater gliders to oceanographic research and rapid environmental...

  17. Underwater hearing in the great cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo sinensis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kirstin Anderson; Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Wahlberg, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    The underwater hearing threshold of a great cormorant (Phalacrocroax carbo sinensis) was measured at 2 kHz using psychophysical methods. Previous in-air and underwater testing suggests that cormorants have rather poor in-air hearing compared to other birds of similar size (Johansen, 2016). Prelim......The underwater hearing threshold of a great cormorant (Phalacrocroax carbo sinensis) was measured at 2 kHz using psychophysical methods. Previous in-air and underwater testing suggests that cormorants have rather poor in-air hearing compared to other birds of similar size (Johansen, 2016...

  18. Calibration Techniques for Accurate Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortis, Mark

    2015-12-07

    Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in accurate estimates of locations and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems.

  19. Calibration Techniques for Accurate Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Shortis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in accurate estimates of locations and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems.

  20. Automatic stabilization of underwater robots in the time manipulation operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filaretov, V.F.; Koval, E.V.

    1994-01-01

    When carrying out underwater technical works by means of an underwater vehicles having a manipulator it is desirable to perform manipulation operations in the regime of the underwater vehicle hovering above the object without durable and complicated operations up its rigid fixation. Underwater vehicle stabilization is achieved by compensation all the effects on the vehicle caused by the operating manipulator in water medium. This automatic stabilization is formed due to input of the required control signals into corresponding vehicle propellers proportional to calculated components of the generalized forces and moments. The propellers should form stops reacting against effects

  1. Contour Tracking Control for the REMUS Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Van Reet, Alan R

    2005-01-01

    In the interest of enhancing the capabilities of autonomous underwater vehicles used in US Naval Operations, controlling vehicle position to follow depth contours presents exciting potential for navigation...

  2. Autopilot Using Differential Thrust for ARIES Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarton, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    .... Unfortunately, communication antennas must point to specific satellites in this system and thus underwater vehicles must steer a specific course on the surface during the communication process...

  3. Underwater Acoustic Target Tracking: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Junhai; Han, Ying; Fan, Liying

    2018-01-02

    Advances in acoustic technology and instrumentation now make it possible to explore marine resources. As a significant component of ocean exploration, underwater acoustic target tracking has aroused wide attention both in military and civil fields. Due to the complexity of the marine environment, numerous techniques have been proposed to obtain better tracking performance. In this paper, we survey over 100 papers ranging from innovative papers to the state-of-the-art in this field to present underwater tracking technologies. Not only the related knowledge of acoustic tracking instrument and tracking progress is clarified in detail, but also a novel taxonomy method is proposed. In this paper, algorithms for underwater acoustic target tracking are classified based on the methods used as: (1) instrument-assisted methods; (2) mode-based methods; (3) tracking optimization methods. These algorithms are compared and analyzed in the aspect of dimensions, numbers, and maneuvering of the tracking target, which is different from other survey papers. Meanwhile, challenges, countermeasures, and lessons learned are illustrated in this paper.

  4. Underwater detection by using ultrasonic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakar, S. A. A.; Ong, N. R.; Aziz, M. H. A.; Alcain, J. B.; Haimi, W. M. W. N.; Sauli, Z.

    2017-09-01

    This paper described the low cost implementation of hardware and software in developing the system of ultrasonic which can visualize the feedback of sound in the form of measured distance through mobile phone and monitoring the frequency of detection by using real time graph of Java application. A single waterproof transducer of JSN-SR04T had been used to determine the distance of an object based on operation of the classic pulse echo detection method underwater. In this experiment, the system was tested by placing the housing which consisted of Arduino UNO, Bluetooth module of HC-06, ultrasonic sensor and LEDs at the top of the box and the transducer was immersed in the water. The system which had been tested for detection in vertical form was found to be capable of reporting through the use of colored LEDs as indicator to the relative proximity of object distance underwater form the sensor. As a conclusion, the system can detect the presence of an object underwater within the range of ultrasonic sensor and display the measured distance onto the mobile phone and the real time graph had been successfully generated.

  5. Underwater Noise Modelling of Wave Energy Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    Future large-scale implementation of wave energy converts (WECs) will introduce an anthropogenic activity in the ocean which may contribute to underwater noise. The Ocean houses several marine species with acoustic sensibility; consequently the potential impact of the underwater noise needs to be addressed. At present, there are no acoustic impact studies based on acquired data. The WEAM project (Wave Energy Acoustic Monitoring) aims at developing an underwater noise monitoring plan for WECs. The development of an acoustic monitoring plan must consider the sound propagation in the ocean, identify noise sources, understand the operational characteristics and select adequate instrumentation. Any monitoring strategy must involve in-situ measurements. However, the vast distances which sound travels within the ocean, can make in-situ measurements covering the entire area of interest, impracticable. This difficulty can be partially overcome through acoustic numerical modelling. This paper presents a synthetic study, on the application of acoustic forward modelling and the evaluation of the impact of noise produced by wave energy devices on marine mammals using criteria based on audiograms of dolphins, or other species. The idea is to illustrate the application of that methodology, and to show to what extent it allows for estimating distances of impacts due to acoustic noise.

  6. Filtering Method for Location Estimation of an Underwater Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nak Yong Ko

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an application of extended Kalman filter(EKF for localization of an underwater robot. For the application, linearized model of robot motion and sensor measurement are derived. Like usual EKF, the method is recursion of two main steps: the time update(or prediction and measurement update. The measurement update uses exteroceptive sensors such as four acoustic beacons and a pressure sensor. The four beacons provide four range data from these beacons to the robot and pressure sensor does the depth data of the robot. One of the major contributions of the paper is suggestion of two measurement update approaches. The first approach corrects the predicted states using the measurement data individually. The second one corrects the predicted state using the measurement data collectively. The simulation analysis shows that EKF outperforms least squares or odometry based dead-reckoning in the precision and robustness of the estimation. Also, EKF with collective measurement update brings out better accuracy than the EKF with individual measurement update.

  7. Uniformity of cylindrical imploding underwater shockwaves at very small radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanuka, D.; Rososhek, A.; Bland, S. N.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2017-11-01

    We compare the convergent shockwaves generated from underwater, cylindrical arrays of copper wire exploded by multiple kilo-ampere current pulses on nanosecond and microsecond scales. In both cases, the pulsed power devices used for the experiments had the same stored energy (˜500 J) and the wire mass was adjusted to optimize energy transfer to the shockwave. Laser backlit framing images of the shock front were achieved down to the radius of 30 μm. It was found that even in the case of initial azimuthal non-symmetry, the shock wave self-repairs in the final stages of its motion, leading to a highly uniform implosion. In both these and previous experiments, interference fringes have been observed in streak and framing images as the shockwave approached the axis. We have been able to accurately model the origin of the fringes, which is due to the propagation of the laser beam diffracting off the uniform converging shock front. The dynamics of the shockwave and its uniformity at small radii indicate that even with only 500 J stored energies, this technique should produce pressures above 1010 Pa on the axis, with temperatures and densities ideal for warm dense matter research.

  8. Upper limb joint forces and moments during underwater cyclical movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Jessy; Rouard, Annie Hélène; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo

    2016-10-03

    Sound inverse dynamics modeling is lacking in aquatic locomotion research because of the difficulty in measuring hydrodynamic forces in dynamic conditions. Here we report the successful implementation and validation of an innovative methodology crossing new computational fluid dynamics and inverse dynamics techniques to quantify upper limb joint forces and moments while moving in water. Upper limb kinematics of seven male swimmers sculling while ballasted with 4kg was recorded through underwater motion capture. Together with body scans, segment inertial properties, and hydrodynamic resistances computed from a unique dynamic mesh algorithm capable to handle large body deformations, these data were fed into an inverse dynamics model to solve for joint kinetics. Simulation validity was assessed by comparing the impulse produced by the arms, calculated by integrating vertical forces over a stroke period, to the net theoretical impulse of buoyancy and ballast forces. A resulting gap of 1.2±3.5% provided confidence in the results. Upper limb joint load was within 5% of swimmer׳s body weight, which tends to supports the use of low-load aquatic exercises to reduce joint stress. We expect this significant methodological improvement to pave the way towards deeper insights into the mechanics of aquatic movement and the establishment of practice guidelines in rehabilitation, fitness or swimming performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of a submersible gravimeter on underwater vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, T.; Kanazawa, T.; Fujimoto, H.; Shinohara, M.; Ishihara, T.; Araya, A.; Iizasa, K.; Tsukioka, S.

    2012-12-01

    Gravity is one of the powerful indices to profile underground structures. Surface ship gravimeters are popular tool for the purpose of collecting gravity values in marine region. They enable you to obtain gravity values from large area easily, while the resolutions are relatively low because of the distance between the sea surface and bottom. Otherwise, ocean bottom gravimeters are able to be observed gravity with high resolution, but they have still covered few limited sites so that they are designed to do observation in quiet only. In some cases, such as hydrothermal deposit survey, the medium performance both in resolution and size of survey area are required. This paper describes a gravimeter we have been developing for satisfying the requirements. Our target is to detect gravity anomalies less than 1 mgal by using an underwater vehicle. This setting is roughly equivalent to find a typical hydrothermal deposit with a dimension of 0.5 km x 0.5 km x 10 m and a density contrast of 1 g/cm3 when we set the sensor at 50 m high from the seafloor. There are some issues such as noise reduction, robustness and downsizing to clear the target. A gravity sensor (Micro-g LaCoste S-174) is mounted on a gimbal control unit with an inertial navigation sensor for the problems. These are stored in a sphere vessel made of titanium alloy (125 kgf in air, 32 kgf in water) and it is available in 3500 m below sea surface. Furthermore, in order to reduce high frequency noise due to mainly the vehicle motion through a low-pass filter, data are able to be stored at sampling rates of approximately 100 Hz. The logging system and control unit for communication to/from ship is stored another canister (22 kgf in air, 10 kgf in water). We made gravity measurement experiments to examine the effectiveness of the gimbal system and filtering application. The gravimeter was set on a machine simulating pitch and roll motions with a period of 16 s and an amplitude of 7.5 degrees, which is greater

  10. Modelling, Design and Robust Control of a Remotely Operated Underwater Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Govinda García-Valdovinos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Underwater remotely operated vehicles (ROVs play an important role in a number of shallow and deep-water missions for marine science, oil and gas extraction, exploration and salvage. In these applications, the motions of the ROV are guided either by a human pilot on a surface support vessel through an umbilical cord providing power and telemetry, or by an automatic pilot. In the case of automatic control, ROV state feedback is provided by acoustic and inertial sensors and this state information, along with a controller strategy, is used to perform several tasks such as station-keeping and auto-immersion/heading, among others. In this paper, the modelling, design and control of the Kaxan ROV is presented: i The complete six degrees of freedom, non linear hydrodynamic model with its parameters, ii the Kaxan hardware/software architecture, iii numerical simulations in Matlab/Simulink platform of a model-free second order sliding mode control along with ocean currents as disturbances and thruster dynamics, iv a virtual environment to visualize the motion of the Kaxan ROV and v experimental results of a one degree of freedom underwater system.

  11. An integrated wave-effects model for an underwater explosion bubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geers, Thomas L; Hunter, Kendall S

    2002-04-01

    A model for a moderately deep underwater explosion bubble is developed that integrates the shock wave and oscillation phases of the motion. A hyperacoustic relationship is formulated that relates bubble volume acceleration to far-field pressure profile during the shock-wave phase, thereby providing initial conditions for the subsequent oscillation phase. For the latter, equations for bubble-surface response are derived that include wave effects in both the external liquid and the internal gas. The equations are then specialized to the case of a spherical bubble, and bubble-surface displacement histories are calculated for dilational and translational motion. Agreement between these histories and experimental data is found to be substantially better than that produced by previous models.

  12. Development of underwater laser cutting technique for steel and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have developed underwater cutting technique for 4.2 mm thick zircaloy pressure tubes and up to 6 mm thick steel using fibre-coupled 250 W average power pulsed Nd:YAG laser. This underwater cutting technique will be highly useful in various nuclear applications as well as in dismantling/repair of ship and pipe lines ...

  13. Visual-adaptation-mechanism based underwater object extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Wang, Huibin; Xu, Lizhong; Shen, Jie

    2014-03-01

    Due to the major obstacles originating from the strong light absorption and scattering in a dynamic underwater environment, underwater optical information acquisition and processing suffer from effects such as limited range, non-uniform lighting, low contrast, and diminished colors, causing it to become the bottleneck for marine scientific research and projects. After studying and generalizing the underwater biological visual mechanism, we explore its advantages in light adaption which helps animals to precisely sense the underwater scene and recognize their prey or enemies. Then, aiming to transform the significant advantage of the visual adaptation mechanism into underwater computer vision tasks, a novel knowledge-based information weighting fusion model is established for underwater object extraction. With this bionic model, the dynamical adaptability is given to the underwater object extraction task, making them more robust to the variability of the optical properties in different environments. The capability of the proposed method to adapt to the underwater optical environments is shown, and its outperformance for the object extraction is demonstrated by comparison experiments.

  14. Self-localization for underwater inspection robot in reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Futoshi; Kojima, Fumio

    2007-01-01

    An underwater inspection robot has been needed for preventive maintenance in a nuclear power plant. This paper deals with a self-localization method for the underwater inspection robot. In this method, the position and the orientation of the robot are estimated by using the particle filter. For showing the effectiveness of the proposed method, an experiment with real robot is demonstrated. (author)

  15. WODA technical guidance on underwater sound from dredging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomsen, F.; Borsani, F.; Clarke, D.; Jong, C. de; Wit, P. de; Goethals, F.; Holtkamp, M.; Martin, E.S.; Spadaro, P.; Raalte, G. van; Victor, G.Y.V.; Jensen, A.

    2016-01-01

    The World Organization of Dredging Associations (WODA) has identified underwater sound as an environmental issue that needs further consideration. A WODA Expert Group on Underwater Sound (WEGUS) prepared a guidance paper in 2013 on dredging sound, including a summary of potential impacts on aquatic

  16. Characterization of ships as sources of underwater noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, C.A.F. de

    2009-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the possible impact of anthropogenic underwater noise on marine life [1]. One of the concerns is the increasing contribution of shipping noise, with the growing number and size of commercial ships. Traditionally, underwater radiated noise control was only of interest

  17. The WODA guidance paper on underwater sound from dredging (abstract)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomsen, F.; Borsani, F.; Clarke, D.; Jong, C.A.F. de; Witt, P. de; Holtkamp, M.; Goethals, F.; San Martin, E.; Spadaro, P.; Raalte, G. van; Jensen, A.

    2013-01-01

    The World Organisation of Dredging Associations (WODA) has identified underwater sound as an environmental issue that needs further consideration. A WODA Expert Group on Underwater Sound (WEGUS) was established to provide a guidance paper on dredging sound, impact on aquatic biota and advice on

  18. Development of underwater laser cutting technique for steel and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Laser cutting; underwater laser cutting; fibre optic beam delivery; Nd:YAG laser; material processing; heat affected zone; microstructure. PACS Nos 42.62.Cf; 42.62.-b; 42.55.Rz; 42.81.Ai; 42.81.-i. 1. Introduction. Underwater laser cutting and welding has many applications in nuclear facilities and shiping industry and is a ...

  19. Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers (CMUTs for Underwater Imaging Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinlong Song

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer structure for use in underwater imaging is designed, fabricated and tested in this paper. In this structure, a silicon dioxide insulation layer is inserted between the top electrodes and the vibration membrane to prevent ohmic contact. The capacitance-voltage (C-V characteristic curve shows that the transducer offers suitable levels of hysteresis and repeatability performance. The −6 dB center frequency is 540 kHz and the transducer has a bandwidth of 840 kHz for a relative bandwidth of 155%. Underwater pressure of 143.43 Pa is achieved 1 m away from the capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer under 20  excitation. Two-dimensional underwater ultrasonic imaging, which is able to prove that a rectangular object is present underwater, is achieved. The results presented here indicate that our work will be highly beneficial for the establishment of an underwater ultrasonic imaging system.

  20. Underwater Sensor Network Redeployment Algorithm Based on Wolf Search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Peng; Feng, Yang; Wu, Feng

    2016-10-21

    This study addresses the optimization of node redeployment coverage in underwater wireless sensor networks. Given that nodes could easily become invalid under a poor environment and the large scale of underwater wireless sensor networks, an underwater sensor network redeployment algorithm was developed based on wolf search. This study is to apply the wolf search algorithm combined with crowded degree control in the deployment of underwater wireless sensor networks. The proposed algorithm uses nodes to ensure coverage of the events, and it avoids the prematurity of the nodes. The algorithm has good coverage effects. In addition, considering that obstacles exist in the underwater environment, nodes are prevented from being invalid by imitating the mechanism of avoiding predators. Thus, the energy consumption of the network is reduced. Comparative analysis shows that the algorithm is simple and effective in wireless sensor network deployment. Compared with the optimized artificial fish swarm algorithm, the proposed algorithm exhibits advantages in network coverage, energy conservation, and obstacle avoidance.

  1. Design and implementation of an underwater sound recording device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Jayson J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Rohrer, John S.; Caviggia, Kurt A.

    2011-09-19

    The purpose of this study was to design and build two versions of an underwater sound recording device. The device designed is referred to as the Underwater Sound Recorder (USR), which can be connected to one or two hydrophones or other underwater sound sensors. The URS contains a 26 dB preamplifier and a user selectable gain that permits additional amplification of input to the system from 26 dB to 46 dB. Signals within the frequency range up to 15 kHz may be recorded using the USR. Examples of USR applications are monitoring underwater processes that have the potential to create large pressure waves that could potentially harm fish or other aquatic life, such as underwater explosions or pile driving. Additional applications are recording sound generated by vessels or the vocalizations of some marine mammals, such as the calls from many species of whales.

  2. A man-made object detection for underwater TV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Binbin; Wang, Wenwu; Chen, Yao

    2018-03-01

    It is a great challenging task to complete an automatic search of objects underwater. Usually the forward looking sonar is used to find the target, and then the initial identification of the target is completed by the side-scan sonar, and finally the confirmation of the target is accomplished by underwater TV. This paper presents an efficient method for automatic extraction of man-made sensitive targets in underwater TV. Firstly, the image of underwater TV is simplified with taking full advantage of the prior knowledge of the target and the background; then template matching technology is used for target detection; finally the target is confirmed by extracting parallel lines on the target contour. The algorithm is formulated for real-time execution on limited-memory commercial-of-the-shelf platforms and is capable of detection objects in underwater TV.

  3. Verification of CFD analysis methods for predicting the drag force and thrust power of an underwater disk robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joung Tae-Hwan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the suitability of using the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD tools, ANSYSCFX, as an initial analysis tool for predicting the drag and propulsion performance (thrust and torque of a concept underwater vehicle design. In order to select an appropriate thruster that will achieve the required speed of the Underwater Disk Robot (UDR, the ANSYS-CFX tools were used to predict the drag force of the UDR. Vertical Planar Motion Mechanism (VPMM test simulations (i.e. pure heaving and pure pitching motion by CFD motion analysis were carried out with the CFD software. The CFD results reveal the distribution of hydrodynamic values (velocity, pressure, etc. of the UDR for these motion studies. Finally, CFD bollard pull test simulations were performed and compared with the experimental bollard pull test results conducted in a model basin. The experimental results confirm the suitability of using the ANSYS-CFX tools for predicting the behavior of concept vehicles early on in their design process.

  4. Verification of CFD analysis methods for predicting the drag force and thrust power of an underwater disk robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Hwan Joung

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the suitability of using the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD tools, ANSYS-CFX, as an initial analysis tool for predicting the drag and propulsion performance (thrust and torque of a concept underwater vehicle design. In order to select an appropriate thruster that will achieve the required speed of the Underwater Disk Robot (UDR, the ANSYS-CFX tools were used to predict the drag force of the UDR. Vertical Planar Motion Mechanism (VPMM test simulations (i.e. pure heaving and pure pitching motion by CFD motion analysis were carried out with the CFD software. The CFD results reveal the distribution of hydrodynamic values (velocity, pressure, etc. of the UDR for these motion studies. Finally, CFD bollard pull test simulations were performed and compared with the experimental bollard pull test results conducted in a model basin. The experimental results confirm the suitability of using the ANSYS-CFX tools for predicting the behavior of concept vehicles early on in their design process.

  5. Underwater welding using remote controlled robots. Development of remote underwater welding technology with a high power YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miwa, Yasuhiro; Sato, Syuuichi; Kojima, Toshio; Owaki, Katsura; Hirose, Naoya

    2002-01-01

    As components in nuclear power plant have been periodically carried out their inspection and repair to keep their integrity, on radioactive liquid wastes storage facility, because of difficulty on their inspection by human beings, some are remained without inspection, and even when capable of inspection, conversion from human works to remote operations is desired from a viewpoint of their operation efficiency upgrading. For response to these needs, some developments on a technology capable of carrying out inspection of their inside at underwater environment and repairing welding with YAG laser by means of remote operation, have been performed. Remote underwater inspection and repair technology is a combination technology of already applied underwater mobile technique (underwater inspection robot) with underwater YAG laser welding technique which is recently at actual using level. Therefore, this technology is composed of an inspection robot and a repair welding robot. And, testing results using the underwater inspection robot and welding test results using the underwater repair welding robot, were enough preferable to obtain forecasting applicable to actual apparatuses. This technology is especially effective for inspection and repair of inside of nuclear fuel cycle apparatuses and relatively high dose apparatuses, and can be thought to be applicable also to large capacity tanks, tanks dealing with harmful matters, underwater structures, and so on, in general industries. (G.K.)

  6. Water waves generated by underwater explosion

    CERN Document Server

    Mehaute, Bernard Le

    1996-01-01

    This is the first book on explosion-generated water waves. It presents the theoretical foundations and experimental results of the generation and propagation of impulsively generated waves resulting from underwater explosions. Many of the theories and concepts presented herein are applicable to other types of water waves, in particular, tsunamis and waves generated by the fall of a meteorite. Linear and nonlinear theories, as well as experimental calibrations, are presented for cases of deep and shallow water explosions. Propagation of transient waves on dissipative, nonuniform bathymetries to

  7. Hemispherical optical dome for underwater communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiri, Ron S.; Lunde, Emily L.; Coronado, Patrick L.; Quijada, Manuel A.

    2017-08-01

    For many years, acoustic systems have been used as the primary method for underwater communication; however, the data transfer rate of such systems is low because sound propagates slowly through water. A higher throughput can be achieved using visible light to transmit data underwater. The first issue with this approach is that there is generally a large loss of the light signal due to scattering and absorption in water, even though there is an optimal wavelength for transmission in the blue or green wavelengths of the visible spectrum. The second issue is that a simple communication system, consisting only of a highly directional source/transmitter and small optical detector/receiver, has a very narrow field of view. The goal of this project is to improve an optical, underwater communication system by increasing the effective field of view of the receiving optics. To this end, we make two changes to the simple system: (1) An optical dome was added near the receiver. An array of lenses is placed radially on the surface of the dome, reminiscent of the compound eye of an insect. The lenses make the source and detector planes conjugate, and each lens adds a new region of the source plane to the instrument's total field of view. (2) The receiver was expanded to include multiple photodiodes. With these two changes, the receiver has much more tolerance to misalignments (in position and angle) of the transmitter. Two versions of the optical dome (with 6" and 8" diameters) were designed using PTC's Creo CAD software and modeled using Synopsys' CODE V optical design software. A series of these transparent hemispherical domes, with both design diameters, were manufactured using a 5-axis mill. The prototype was then retrofitted with lenses and compared with the computer-generated model to demonstrate the effectiveness of this solution. This work shows that the dome design improves the optical field of view of the underwater communication system considerably. Furthermore, with

  8. Underwater Sound Propagation from Marine Pile Driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyff, James A

    2016-01-01

    Pile driving occurs in a variety of nearshore environments that typically have very shallow-water depths. The propagation of pile-driving sound in water is complex, where sound is directly radiated from the pile as well as through the ground substrate. Piles driven in the ground near water bodies can produce considerable underwater sound energy. This paper presents examples of sound propagation through shallow-water environments. Some of these examples illustrate the substantial variation in sound amplitude over time that can be critical to understand when computing an acoustic-based safety zone for aquatic species.

  9. Radon dynamics in underwater thermal radon therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lettner, H.; Hofmann, W.; Winkler, R.; Rolle, R.; Foisner, W.

    1998-01-01

    At a facility for underwater thermal radon therapy in Bad Hofgastein, experiments were carried out with the aim of establishing radon in the air exhaled by the treated patients and of radon decay products on the skin of the patients. The time course of radon concentration in the exhaled air shows a maximum a few minutes after entering the bath, then the Rn concentration remains constant over the remaining time spent in the bath. Taking into account several simplifying assumptions, the average dose to the epidermis from radon daughters is about 50 μGy. (A.K.)

  10. Navigation System Fault Diagnosis for Underwater Vehicle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkenberg, Thomas; Gregersen, Rene Tavs; Blanke, Mogens

    2014-01-01

    This paper demonstrates fault diagnosis on unmanned underwater vehicles (UUV) based on analysis of structure of the nonlinear dynamics. Residuals are generated using dierent approaches in structural analysis followed by statistical change detection. Hypothesis testing thresholds are made signal...... based to cope with non-ideal properties seen in real data. Detection of both sensor and thruster failures are demonstrated. Isolation is performed using the residual signature of detected faults and the change detection algorithm is used to assess severity of faults by estimating their magnitude...

  11. Adaptive Target Tracking for Underwater Maneuvering Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    concenetrate on the bearings-only approach. In this method the Observer monitors his bearing to the Source, over a period of time. Usually the Observer must...developed in [ 5] was earlier applied with much success to tracking maneuvering air targets. This approach will now be applied in the underwater environment...April 1977. [11] A. H. Jazwinski, Stochastic Processes and Filtering Theory, Academic Press, New York, 1970. [12] D. H. Halliday, and R. Resnick, Physics, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 1966. hI

  12. 46 CFR 115.650 - Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program options: Divers or underwater ROV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...: Divers or underwater ROV. 115.650 Section 115.650 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program options: Divers or underwater ROV. To complete your underwater survey, you may use divers or an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV). (a) If you use divers to...

  13. Breast Support Garments are Ineffective at Reducing Breast Motion During an Aqua Aerobics Jumping Exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Mills, Chris; Ayres, Bessie; Scurr, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    The buoyant forces of water during aquatic exercise may provide a form of ‘natural’ breast support and help to minimise breast motion and alleviate exercise induced breast pain. Six larger-breasted females performed standing vertical land and water-based jumps, whilst wearing three breast support conditions. Underwater video cameras recorded the motion of the trunk and right breast. Trunk and relative breast kinematics were calculated as well as exercised induced breast pain scores. Key resul...

  14. Underwater pipeline impact localization using piezoceramic transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junxiao; Ho, Siu Chun Michael; Patil, Devendra; Wang, Ning; Hirsch, Rachel; Song, Gangbing

    2017-10-01

    Reports indicated that impact events accounted for 47% of offshore pipeline failures, which calls for impact detection and localization for subsea pipelines. In this paper, an innovative method for rapid localization of impacts on underwater pipelines utilizing a novel determination technique for both arrival-time and group velocity (ATGV) of ultrasonic guided waves with lead zirconate titanate (PZT) transducers is described. PZT transducers mounted on the outer surface of a model pipeline were utilized to measure ultrasonic guided waves generated by impact events. Based on the signals from PZT sensors, the ATGV technique integrates wavelet decomposition, Hilbert transform and statistical analysis to pinpoint the arrival-time of the designated ultrasonic guided waves with a specific group velocity. Experimental results have verified the effectiveness and the localization accuracy for eight impact points along a model underwater pipeline. All estimations errors were small and were comparable with the wavelength of the designated ultrasonic guided waves. Furthermore, the method is robust against the low frequency structural vibration introduced by other external forces.

  15. An explanatory model of underwater adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Colodro

    Full Text Available The underwater environment is an extreme environment that requires a process of human adaptation with specific psychophysiological demands to ensure survival and productive activity. From the standpoint of existing models of intelligence, personality and performance, in this explanatory study we have analyzed the contribution of individual differences in explaining the adaptation of military personnel in a stressful environment. Structural equation analysis was employed to verify a model representing the direct effects of psychological variables on individual adaptation to an adverse environment, and we have been able to confirm, during basic military diving courses, the structural relationships among these variables and their ability to predict a third of the variance of a criterion that has been studied very little to date. In this way, we have confirmed in a sample of professionals (N = 575 the direct relationship of emotional adjustment, conscientiousness and general mental ability with underwater adaptation, as well as the inverse relationship of emotional reactivity. These constructs are the psychological basis for working under water, contributing to an improved adaptation to this environment and promoting risk prevention and safety in diving activities.

  16. Modelling cavitating flow around underwater missiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Petitpas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The diffuse interface model of Saurel et al. (2008 is used for the computation of compressible cavitating flows around underwater missiles. Such systems use gas injection and natural cavitation to reduce drag effects. Consequently material interfaces appear separating liquid and gas. These interfaces may have a really complex dynamics such that only a few formulations are able to predict their evolution. Contrarily to front tracking or interface reconstruction method the interfaces are computed as diffused numerical zones, that are captured in a routinely manner, as is done usually with gas dynamics solvers for shocks and contact discontinuity. With the present approach, a single set of partial differential equations is solved everywhere, with a single numerical scheme. This leads to very efficient solvers. The algorithm derived in Saurel et al. (2009 is used to compute cavitation pockets around solid bodies. It is first validated against experiments done in cavitation tunnel at CNU. Then it is used to compute flows around high speed underwater systems (Shkval-like missile. Performance data are then computed showing method ability to predict forces acting on the system.

  17. Hydrogel microphones for stealthy underwater listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Song, Jingfeng; Li, Shumin; Elowsky, Christian; Zhou, You; Ducharme, Stephen; Chen, Yong Mei; Zhou, Qin; Tan, Li

    2016-08-01

    Exploring the abundant resources in the ocean requires underwater acoustic detectors with a high-sensitivity reception of low-frequency sound from greater distances and zero reflections. Here we address both challenges by integrating an easily deformable network of metal nanoparticles in a hydrogel matrix for use as a cavity-free microphone. Since metal nanoparticles can be densely implanted as inclusions, and can even be arranged in coherent arrays, this microphone can detect static loads and air breezes from different angles, as well as underwater acoustic signals from 20 Hz to 3 kHz at amplitudes as low as 4 Pa. Unlike dielectric capacitors or cavity-based microphones that respond to stimuli by deforming the device in thickness directions, this hydrogel device responds with a transient modulation of electric double layers, resulting in an extraordinary sensitivity (217 nF kPa-1 or 24 μC N-1 at a bias of 1.0 V) without using any signal amplification tools.

  18. Software architecture of biomimetic underwater vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praczyk, Tomasz; Szymak, Piotr

    2016-05-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles are vehicles that are entirely or partly independent of human decisions. In order to obtain operational independence, the vehicles have to be equipped with a specialized software. The main task of the software is to move the vehicle along a trajectory with collision avoidance. Moreover, the software has also to manage different devices installed on the vehicle board, e.g. to start and stop cameras, sonars etc. In addition to the software embedded on the vehicle board, the software responsible for managing the vehicle by the operator is also necessary. Its task is to define mission of the vehicle, to start, to stop the mission, to send emergency commands, to monitor vehicle parameters, and to control the vehicle in remotely operated mode. An important objective of the software is also to support development and tests of other software components. To this end, a simulation environment is necessary, i.e. simulation model of the vehicle and all its key devices, the model of the sea environment, and the software to visualize behavior of the vehicle. The paper presents architecture of the software designed for biomimetic autonomous underwater vehicle (BAUV) that is being constructed within the framework of the scientific project financed by Polish National Center of Research and Development.

  19. STABILITY OF UNDERWATER STRUCTURE UNDER WAVE ATTACK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Paotonan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Geotube is, among others, a type of coastal structure that is increasingly accepted for coastal protection especially underwater breakwater. Besides its relatively low cost, it has other advantages such as flexibility, ease of construction and the fact that it can be filled with local sand material. Similar to all other coastal structures, it should also be stable under wave attack. A simple theoretical approach based on linear wave was adopted to estimate the stability of such structure. The theoretical solution was then compared with an experimental study. The experimental study was conducted at the Hydraulics and Hydrology Laboratory of Universitas Gadjah Mada. However, instead of a real geotube, PVC pipe was used where the weight of the PVC was varied by adjusting the volume of sand in the pipe. The result indicated that the agreement between the theoretical solution and the experiment was encouraging. The analytical solution may be utilized to predict underwater pipe stability under wave attack with certain degree of accuracy.

  20. Underwater noise levels in UK waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Nathan D; Brookes, Kate L; Faulkner, Rebecca C; Bicknell, Anthony W J; Godley, Brendan J; Witt, Matthew J

    2016-11-10

    Underwater noise from human activities appears to be rising, with ramifications for acoustically sensitive marine organisms and the functioning of marine ecosystems. Policymakers are beginning to address the risk of ecological impact, but are constrained by a lack of data on current and historic noise levels. Here, we present the first nationally coordinated effort to quantify underwater noise levels, in support of UK policy objectives under the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). Field measurements were made during 2013-2014 at twelve sites around the UK. Median noise levels ranged from 81.5-95.5 dB re 1 μPa for one-third octave bands from 63-500 Hz. Noise exposure varied considerably, with little anthropogenic influence at the Celtic Sea site, to several North Sea sites with persistent vessel noise. Comparison of acoustic metrics found that the RMS level (conventionally used to represent the mean) was highly skewed by outliers, exceeding the 97 th percentile at some frequencies. We conclude that environmental indicators of anthropogenic noise should instead use percentiles, to ensure statistical robustness. Power analysis indicated that at least three decades of continuous monitoring would be required to detect trends of similar magnitude to historic rises in noise levels observed in the Northeast Pacific.

  1. Underwater Wireless Acousto-Optic Waveguide (UWAOW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Giovanni; Kent, Lionel W. J.; Laycock, Leslie C.

    2017-10-01

    The present study originated in the lack of research into achieving underwater total internal reflection (TIR) via the acousto-optic effect. The uniqueness of this technique exists in the fact that it is based on a high sound pressure level which induces a localised change in refractive index of seawater sufficient to achieve total internal reflection within the communication channel. Different transducer systems for generating the pressure wave have been investigated and take the form of a wave which may be either a standing wave, or a novel beamforming technique. The former is based on an array of transducers and with an acoustic mirror at the receiver in order to establish the standing wave. The alternative approach relies on the high intrinsic directionality of a novel beamformer where an annular transducer array is examined as an acoustic source. In this paper, the main characteristics of the acoustic optic waveguide will be presented. This will include both sound and light propagation in the ocean, TIR, novel beam propagation, the refractive index of water as a function of the externally applied acoustic pressure, and the acoustic technology. The modelled results, the limitations imposed by the challenging medium, and the system requirements required to obtain an Underwater Wireless Acousto-Optic Waveguide (UWAOW) will be also addressed.

  2. A Speed Control Method for Underwater Vehicle under Hydraulic Flexible Traction

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yin; Xia, Ying-kai; Chen, Ying; Xu, Guo-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Underwater vehicle speed control methodology method is the focus of research in this study. Driven by a hydraulic flexible traction system, the underwater vehicle advances steadily on underwater guide rails, simulating an underwater environment for the carried device. Considering the influence of steel rope viscoelasticity and the control system traction structure feature, a mathematical model of the underwater vehicle driven by hydraulic flexible traction system is established. A speed contr...

  3. Underwater television camera for monitoring inner side of pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayama, Kazuhiko.

    1997-01-01

    An underwater television support device equipped with a rotatable and vertically movable underwater television camera and an underwater television camera controlling device for monitoring images of the inside of the reactor core photographed by the underwater television camera to control the position of the underwater television camera and the underwater light are disposed on an upper lattice plate of a reactor pressure vessel. Both of them are electrically connected with each other by way of a cable to rapidly observe the inside of the reactor core by the underwater television camera. The reproducibility is extremely satisfactory by efficiently concentrating the position of the camera and image information upon inspection and observation. As a result, the steps for periodical inspection can be reduced to shorten the days for the periodical inspection. Since there is no requirement to withdraw fuel assemblies over a wide reactor core region, and the device can be used with the fuel assemblies being left as they are in the reactor, it is suitable for inspection of detectors for nuclear instrumentation. (N.H.)

  4. Underwater fiber-wireless communication with a passive front end

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Sun, Bin; Lyu, Weichao; Kong, Meiwei; Sarwar, Rohail; Han, Jun; Zhang, Wei; Deng, Ning

    2017-11-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel concept on underwater fiber-wireless (Fi-Wi) communication system with a fully passive wireless front end. A low-cost step-index (SI) plastic optical fiber (POF) together with a passive collimating lens at the front end composes the underwater Fi-Wi architecture. We have achieved a 1.71-Gb/s transmission at a mean BER of 4.97 × 10-3 (1.30 × 10-3 when using power loading) over a 50-m SI-POF and 2-m underwater wireless channel using orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM). Although the wireless part is very short, it actually plays a crucial role in practical underwater implementation, especially in deep sea. Compared with the wired solution (e.g. using a 52-m POF cable without the UWOC part), the proposed underwater Fi-Wi scheme can save optical wet-mate connectors that are sophisticated, very expensive and difficult to install in deep ocean. By combining high-capacity robust POF with the mobility and ubiquity of underwater wireless optical communication (UWOC), the proposed underwater Fi-Wi technology will find wide application in ocean exploration.

  5. Towards a Hybrid Approach to Context Reasoning for Underwater Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ontologies have been widely used to facilitate semantic interoperability and serve as a common information model in many applications or domains. The Smart and Networking Underwater Robots in Cooperation Meshes (SWARMs project, aiming to facilitate coordination and cooperation between heterogeneous underwater vehicles, also adopts ontologies to formalize information that is necessarily exchanged between vehicles. However, how to derive more useful contexts based on ontologies still remains a challenge. In particular, the extreme nature of the underwater environment introduces uncertainties in context data, thus imposing more difficulties in context reasoning. None of the existing context reasoning methods could individually deal with all intricacies in the underwater robot field. To this end, this paper presents the first proposal applying a hybrid context reasoning mechanism that includes ontological, rule-based, and Multi-Entity Bayesian Network (MEBN reasoning methods to reason about contexts and their uncertainties in the underwater robot field. The theoretical foundation of applying this reasoning mechanism in underwater robots is given by a case study on the oil spill monitoring. The simulated reasoning results are useful for further decision-making by operators or robots and they show that the consolidation of different reasoning methods is a promising approach for context reasoning in underwater robots.

  6. A Secure Communication Suite for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Lo Duca

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe a security suite for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks comprising both fixed and mobile nodes. The security suite is composed of a secure routing protocol and a set of cryptographic primitives aimed at protecting the confidentiality and the integrity of underwater communication while taking into account the unique characteristics and constraints of the acoustic channel. By means of experiments and simulations based on real data, we show that the suite is suitable for an underwater networking environment as it introduces limited, and sometimes negligible, communication and power consumption overhead.

  7. Application of YAG laser processing in underwater welding and cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohwaki, Katsura; Morita, Ichiro; Kojima, Toshio; Sato, Shuichi

    2002-01-01

    The high-power YAG laser is a new fabrication tool. The laser torch is easy to combine with complex with complex mechanics because of beam delivery through optical fiber. A direct underwater laser welding technology has been developed and applied to the preservation, maintenance and removal of nuclear power plants. For subdividing or removing operations for retirement of plants, the laser cutting properties were confirmed to allow a maximum cutting thickness of 80 mm. For repairing inner surface of stainless steel tanks, an underwater laser welding system using a remote-controlled robot was developed and the high quality of underwater laser welding was confirmed. (author)

  8. Centralised versus Decentralised Control Reconfiguration for Collaborating Underwater Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furno, Lidia; Nielsen, Mikkel Cornelius; Blanke, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    The present paper introduces an approach to fault-tolerant reconfiguration for collaborating underwater robots. Fault-tolerant reconfiguration is obtained using the virtual actuator approach, Steen (2005). The paper investigates properties of a centralised versus a decentralised implementation...... an underwater drill needs to be transported and positioned by three collaborating robots as part of an underwater autonomous operation....... and assesses the capabilities under communication constraints between the individual robots. In the centralised case, each robot sends information related to its own status to a unique virtual actuator that computes the necessary reconfiguration. In the decentralised case, each robot is equipped with its own...

  9. Adaptive Decentralized Control of Mobile Underwater Sensor Networks and Robots for Modeling Underwater Phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrick Detweiler

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the dynamics of bodies of water and their impact on the global environment requires sensing information over the full volume of water. In this article, we develop a gradient-based decentralized controller that dynamically adjusts the depth of a network of underwater sensors to optimize sensing for computing maximally detailed volumetric models. We prove that the controller converges to a local minimum and show how the controller can be extended to work with hybrid robot and sensor network systems. We implement the controller on an underwater sensor network with depth adjustment capabilities. Through simulations and in-situ experiments, we verify the functionality and performance of the system and algorithm.

  10. UNDERWATER STROKE KINEMATICS DURING BREATHING AND BREATH-HOLDING FRONT CRAWL SWIMMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickos Vezos

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of breathing on the three - dimensional underwater stroke kinematics of front crawl swimming. Ten female competitive freestyle swimmers participated in the study. Each subject swam a number of front crawl trials of 25 m at a constant speed under breathing and breath-holding conditions. The underwater motion of each subject's right arm was filmed using two S-VHS cameras, operating at 60 Hz, which were positioned behind two underwater viewing windows. The spatial coordinates of selected points were calculated using the DLT procedure with 30 control points and after the digital filtering of the raw data with a cut-off frequency of 6 Hz, the hand's linear displacements and velocities were calculated. The results revealed that breathing caused significantly increases in the stroke duration (t9 = 2.764; p < 0.05, the backward hand displacement relative to the water (t9 = 2.471; p<0.05 and the lateral displacement of the hand in the X - axis during the downsweep (t9 = 2.638; p < 0.05. On the contrary, the peak backward hand velocity during the insweep (t9 = 2.368; p < 0.05 and the displacement of the hand during the push phase (t9 = -2.297; p < 0.05 were greatly reduced when breathing was involved. From the above, it was concluded that breathing action in front crawl swimming caused significant modifications in both the basic stroke parameters and the overall motor pattern were, possibly due to body roll during breathing

  11. Task Allocation and Path Planning for Collaborative Autonomous Underwater Vehicles Operating through an Underwater Acoustic Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueyue Deng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic and unstructured multiple cooperative autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV missions are highly complex operations, and task allocation and path planning are made significantly more challenging under realistic underwater acoustic communication constraints. This paper presents a solution for the task allocation and path planning for multiple AUVs under marginal acoustic communication conditions: a location-aided task allocation framework (LAAF algorithm for multitarget task assignment and the grid-based multiobjective optimal programming (GMOOP mathematical model for finding an optimal vehicle command decision given a set of objectives and constraints. Both the LAAF and GMOOP algorithms are well suited in poor acoustic network condition and dynamic environment. Our research is based on an existing mobile ad hoc network underwater acoustic simulator and blind flooding routing protocol. Simulation results demonstrate that the location-aided auction strategy performs significantly better than the well-accepted auction algorithm developed by Bertsekas in terms of task-allocation time and network bandwidth consumption. We also demonstrate that the GMOOP path-planning technique provides an efficient method for executing multiobjective tasks by cooperative agents with limited communication capabilities. This is in contrast to existing multiobjective action selection methods that are limited to networks where constant, reliable communication is assumed to be available.

  12. Impact of sea waves on underwater fish-breeding cages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilyaev Sergey Ivanovich

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cultivation of sea objects is of great importance while solving the problems of providing the constantly growing requirements of the national economy with sea products. Cultivation of sea objects uses special hydrobiotechnical constructions. As the practice showed, cultivation of seafood is commercially impossible without solving the questions of calculating and designing such constructions. In special literature these questions are poorly covered or not considered at all. In the article the results of theoretical and pilot studies of waves influence on hydrobiotechnical constructions is provided, in particular on underwater fish-breeding cages.This article offers the theoretical solution to the problem of determining the efforts of the ropes holding the fish tank under wave influences. In order to solve this problem, the equations of hard drives movements were set up and the differential equations of free oscillations of buzz were obtained.When determining the horizontal movements, the four different configurations of connections and the system motion directions in general are possible in case of waveoscillations. Next step is the solution of the differential equations and determination of natural oscillation frequency in the direction of the vertical axis. Defining efforts in the ropes from their own weight (static calculation is self-explanatory, it should be noted that accounting for the weighing influence of water on such structures does not have significant influence.Further the authors defined loading and efforts from the regular waves’ impacts.Modeling of the waves influence on submersible fish tank was carried by Fraud method. The studies were conducted with two models with large and small mesh. The signals of strain gauge sensors were registered by electronic measuring equipment.When comparing the theoretical and experimental data, satisfactory results have been obtained. It was determined that in order to improve the calculation

  13. Study of the algorithm of backtracking decoupling and adaptive extended Kalman filter based on the quaternion expanded to the state variable for underwater glider navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haoqian; Chen, Xiyuan; Zhou, Zhikai; Xu, Yuan; Lv, Caiping

    2014-12-03

    High accuracy attitude and position determination is very important for underwater gliders. The cross-coupling among three attitude angles (heading angle, pitch angle and roll angle) becomes more serious when pitch or roll motion occurs. This cross-coupling makes attitude angles inaccurate or even erroneous. Therefore, the high accuracy attitude and position determination becomes a difficult problem for a practical underwater glider. To solve this problem, this paper proposes backing decoupling and adaptive extended Kalman filter (EKF) based on the quaternion expanded to the state variable (BD-AEKF). The backtracking decoupling can eliminate effectively the cross-coupling among the three attitudes when pitch or roll motion occurs. After decoupling, the adaptive extended Kalman filter (AEKF) based on quaternion expanded to the state variable further smoothes the filtering output to improve the accuracy and stability of attitude and position determination. In order to evaluate the performance of the proposed BD-AEKF method, the pitch and roll motion are simulated and the proposed method performance is analyzed and compared with the traditional method. Simulation results demonstrate the proposed BD-AEKF performs better. Furthermore, for further verification, a new underwater navigation system is designed, and the three-axis non-magnetic turn table experiments and the vehicle experiments are done. The results show that the proposed BD-AEKF is effective in eliminating cross-coupling and reducing the errors compared with the conventional method.

  14. Study of the Algorithm of Backtracking Decoupling and Adaptive Extended Kalman Filter Based on the Quaternion Expanded to the State Variable for Underwater Glider Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoqian Huang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available High accuracy attitude and position determination is very important for underwater gliders. The cross-coupling among three attitude angles (heading angle, pitch angle and roll angle becomes more serious when pitch or roll motion occurs. This cross-coupling makes attitude angles inaccurate or even erroneous. Therefore, the high accuracy attitude and position determination becomes a difficult problem for a practical underwater glider. To solve this problem, this paper proposes backing decoupling and adaptive extended Kalman filter (EKF based on the quaternion expanded to the state variable (BD-AEKF. The backtracking decoupling can eliminate effectively the cross-coupling among the three attitudes when pitch or roll motion occurs. After decoupling, the adaptive extended Kalman filter (AEKF based on quaternion expanded to the state variable further smoothes the filtering output to improve the accuracy and stability of attitude and position determination. In order to evaluate the performance of the proposed BD-AEKF method, the pitch and roll motion are simulated and the proposed method performance is analyzed and compared with the traditional method. Simulation results demonstrate the proposed BD-AEKF performs better. Furthermore, for further verification, a new underwater navigation system is designed, and the three-axis non-magnetic turn table experiments and the vehicle experiments are done. The results show that the proposed BD-AEKF is effective in eliminating cross-coupling and reducing the errors compared with the conventional method.

  15. Status of the ANTARES underwater neutrino telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Hallewell, G D

    2003-01-01

    The ANTARES Collaboration is constructing a deep underwater neutrino detector for operation at -2400 m off the French Mediterranean coast near Toulon. The detector, which will begin operation in 2004, will have an aperture of approx 0.1 km sup 2 , and will contain 900 photomultiplier tubes. The photomultiplier axes will be angled 45 deg. downward toward the seabed to observe the Cherenkov emissions of upward-going muons created by the interactions in or near the detector of high energy neutrinos traversing the Earth. These neutrinos arrive undeviated from a variety of galactic and extragalactic sources of astrophysical interest, and might be produced in the possible annihilation of dark matter neutralinos. The design and present status of the detector are summarized. Results from site evaluation and the development of supporting instrumentation are outlined.

  16. Transducers and arrays for underwater sound

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, John L

    2016-01-01

    This improved and updated second edition covers the theory, development, and design of electro-acoustic transducers for underwater applications. This highly regarded text discusses the basics of piezoelectric and magnetostrictive transducers that are currently being used as well as promising new designs. It presents the basic acoustics as well as the specific acoustics data needed in transducer design and evaluation. A broad range of designs of projectors and hydrophones are described in detail along with methods of modeling, evaluation, and measurement. Analysis of projector and hydrophone transducer arrays, including the effects of mutual radiation impedance and numerical models for elements and arrays, are also covered. The book includes new advances in transducer design and transducer materials and has been completely reorganized to be suitable for use as a textbook, as well as a reference or handbook. The new edition contains updates to the first edition, end-of-chapter exercises, and solutions to select...

  17. The NESTOR underwater neutrino telescope project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapidis, Petros A. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, National Center for Scientific Research ' Demokritos' , Athens 15310 (Greece)], E-mail: rapidis@inp.demokritos.gr

    2009-04-11

    The NESTOR collaboration is continuing its efforts towards deploying an underwater neutrino telescope. Further site studies (e.g. water light transmission measurements, sedimentation rates, etc.) are being carried out within the context of characterizing a site that may host the proposed KM3NeT infrastructure. In addition, following the successful deployment of a single floor of a NESTOR tower in 2003, five floors are now in the final stages of preparation. The use of these five floors in a form of a truncated tower together with four autonomous strings to be located some 300 m away from the tower is being contemplated. This arrangement, named NuBE (for Neutrino Burst Experiment), that may allow the detection neutrinos in coincidence with Gamma Ray Bursts, will be described.

  18. A Validation Process for Underwater Localization Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Hildebrandt

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the validation process of a localization algorithm for underwater vehicles. In order to develop new localization algorithms, it is essential to characterize them with regard to their accuracy, long-term stability and robustness to external sources of noise. This is only possible if a gold-standard reference localization (GSRL is available against which any new localization algorithm (NLA can be tested. This process requires a vehicle which carries all the required sensor and processing systems for both the GSRL and the NLA. This paper will show the necessity of such a validation process, briefly sketch the test vehicle and its capabilities, describe the challenges in computing the localizations of both the GSRL and the NLA simultaneously for comparison, and conclude with experimental data of real-world trials.

  19. Improved Underwater Excitation-Emission Matrix Fluorometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Casey; daCunha, John; Rhoades, Bruce; Twardowski, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A compact, high-resolution, two-dimensional excitation-emission matrix fluorometer (EEMF) has been designed and built specifically for use in identifying and measuring the concentrations of organic compounds, including polluting hydrocarbons, in natural underwater settings. Heretofore, most EEMFs have been designed and built for installation in laboratories, where they are used to analyze the contents of samples collected in the field and brought to the laboratories. Because the present EEMF can be operated in the field, it is better suited to measurement of spatially and temporally varying concentrations of substances of interest. In excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorometry, fluorescence is excited by irradiating a sample at one or more wavelengths, and the fluorescent emission from the sample is measured at multiple wavelengths. When excitation is provided at only one wavelength, the technique is termed one-dimensional (1D) EEM fluorometry because the resulting matrix of fluorescence emission data (the EEM) contains only one row or column. When excitation is provided at multiple wavelengths, the technique is termed two-dimensional (2D) EEM fluorometry because the resulting EEM contains multiple rows and columns. EEM fluorometry - especially the 2D variety - is well established as a means of simultaneously detecting numerous dissolved and particulate compounds in water. Each compound or pool of compounds has a unique spectral fluorescence signature, and each EEM is rich in information content, in that it can contain multiple fluorescence signatures. By use of deconvolution and/or other mixture-analyses techniques, it is often possible to isolate the spectral signature of compounds of interest, even when their fluorescence spectra overlap. What distinguishes the present 2D EEMF over prior laboratory-type 2D EEMFs are several improvements in packaging (including a sealed housing) and other aspects of design that render it suitable for use in natural underwater

  20. Collision Detection for Underwater ROV Manipulator Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivčev, Satja; Rossi, Matija; Coleman, Joseph; Omerdić, Edin; Dooly, Gerard; Toal, Daniel

    2018-04-06

    Work-class ROVs equipped with robotic manipulators are extensively used for subsea intervention operations. Manipulators are teleoperated by human pilots relying on visual feedback from the worksite. Operating in a remote environment, with limited pilot perception and poor visibility, manipulator collisions which may cause significant damage are likely to happen. This paper presents a real-time collision detection algorithm for marine robotic manipulation. The proposed collision detection mechanism is developed, integrated into a commercial ROV manipulator control system, and successfully evaluated in simulations and experimental setup using a real industry standard underwater manipulator. The presented collision sensing solution has a potential to be a useful pilot assisting tool that can reduce the task load, operational time, and costs of subsea inspection, repair, and maintenance operations.

  1. The NESTOR underwater neutrino telescope project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapidis, Petros A.

    2009-01-01

    The NESTOR collaboration is continuing its efforts towards deploying an underwater neutrino telescope. Further site studies (e.g. water light transmission measurements, sedimentation rates, etc.) are being carried out within the context of characterizing a site that may host the proposed KM3NeT infrastructure. In addition, following the successful deployment of a single floor of a NESTOR tower in 2003, five floors are now in the final stages of preparation. The use of these five floors in a form of a truncated tower together with four autonomous strings to be located some 300 m away from the tower is being contemplated. This arrangement, named NuBE (for Neutrino Burst Experiment), that may allow the detection neutrinos in coincidence with Gamma Ray Bursts, will be described.

  2. On sampling the ocean using underwater gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, Daniel L.; Cole, Sylvia T.

    2011-08-01

    The sampling characteristics of an underwater glider are addressed through comparison with contemporaneous measurements from a ship survey using a towed vehicle. The comparison uses the underwater glider Spray and the towed vehicle SeaSoar north of Hawaii along 158°W between 22.75°N and 34.5°N. A Spray dive from the surface to 1000 m and back took 5.6 h and covered 5.3 km, resulting in a horizontal speed of 0.26 m s-1. SeaSoar undulated between the surface and 400 m, completing a cycle in 11 min while covering 2.6 km, for a speed of 3.9 m s-1. Adjacent profiles of temperature and salinity are compared between the two platforms to prove that each is accurate. Spray and SeaSoar data are compared through sections, isopycnal spatial series, and wave number spectra. The relative slowness of the glider results in the projection of high-frequency oceanic variability, such as internal waves, onto spatial structure. The projection is caused by Doppler smearing because of finite speed and aliasing due to discrete sampling. The projected variability is apparent in properties measured on depth surfaces or in isopycnal depth. No projected variability is seen in observations of properties on constant density surfaces because internal waves are intrinsically filtered. Wave number spectra suggest that projected variability affects properties at constant depth at wavelengths shorter than 30 km. These results imply that isobaric quantities, like geostrophic shear, are valid at wavelengths longer than 30 km, while isopycnal quantities, like spice, may be analyzed for scales as small as a glider measures.

  3. Short Communication Evaluation of an underwater biopsy probe for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lethal methods may become an increasingly useful tool to investigate shark populations where researchers encounter logistical or conservation-related constraints. Keywords: biopsy probe, laser photogrammetry, non-lethal sampling, underwater ...

  4. Digital sonar design in underwater acoustics principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Qihu

    2012-01-01

    "Digital Sonar Design in Underwater Acoustics Principles and Applications" provides comprehensive and up-to-date coverage of research on sonar design, including the basic theory and techniques of digital signal processing, basic concept of information theory, ocean acoustics, underwater acoustic signal propagation theory, and underwater signal processing theory. This book discusses the general design procedure and approaches to implementation, the design method, system simulation theory and techniques, sonar tests in the laboratory, lake and sea, and practical validation criteria and methods for digital sonar design. It is intended for researchers in the fields of underwater signal processing and sonar design, and also for navy officers and ocean explorers. Qihu Li is a professor at the Institute of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and an academician of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  5. Automated Underwater Image Restoration and Retrieval of Related Optical Properties

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hou, Weilin; Gray, Deric J; Weidemann, Alan D; Fournier, Georges R; Forand, J. L

    2007-01-01

    ...) in the spatial domain and the modulation transfer function (MTF) in the frequency domain. Due to the intensity variations involved in underwater sensing, denoising is carefully carried out by wavelet decompositions...

  6. Wireless Underwater Monitoring Systems Based on Energy Harvestings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sea-Hee HWANGBO

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the important research fields for aquatic exploitation and conservation is underwater wireless sensor network. Since limited energy source for underwater nodes and devices is a main open problem, in this paper, we propose wireless underwater monitoring systems powered by energy harvester which resolves the energy constraint. The target system generates renewable energy from energy harvester and shares the energy with underwater sensor nodes. For the realization of the system, key components to be investigated are discriminated as follows: acoustic modem, actuator, smart battery charge controller, energy harvester and wireless power transfer module. By developing acoustic modem, actuator and smart battery charge controller and utilizing off-the-shelf energy harvester and wireless power transfer module, we design and implement a prototype of the system. Also, we verify the feasibility of concept of target system by conducting indoor and outdoor experiments.

  7. Trade-off Analysis of Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, G.; Das, R.

    2017-09-01

    In the last couple of decades, Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks (UASNs) were started to be used for various commercial and non-commercial purposes. However, in underwater environments, there are some specific inherent constraints, such as high bit error rate, variable and large propagation delay, limited bandwidth capacity, and short-range communications, which severely degrade the performance of UASNs and limit the lifetime of underwater sensor nodes as well. Therefore, proving reliability of UASN applications poses a challenge. In this study, we try to balance energy consumption of underwater acoustic sensor networks and minimize end-to-end delay using an efficient node placement strategy. Our simulation results reveal that if the number of hops is reduced, energy consumption can be reduced. However, this increases end-to-end delay. Hence, application-specific requirements must be taken into consideration when determining a strategy for node deployment.

  8. Object detection from images obtained through underwater turbulence medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furhad, Md. Hasan; Tahtali, Murat; Lambert, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Imaging through underwater experiences severe distortions due to random fluctuations of temperature and salinity in water, which produces underwater turbulence through diffraction limited blur. Lights reflecting from objects perturb and attenuate contrast, making the recognition of objects of interest difficult. Thus, the information available for detecting underwater objects of interest becomes a challenging task as they have inherent confusion among the background, foreground and other image properties. In this paper, a saliency-based approach is proposed to detect the objects acquired through an underwater turbulent medium. This approach has drawn attention among a wide range of computer vision applications, such as image retrieval, artificial intelligence, neuro-imaging and object detection. The image is first processed through a deblurring filter. Next, a saliency technique is used on the image for object detection. In this step, a saliency map that highlights the target regions is generated and then a graph-based model is proposed to extract these target regions for object detection.

  9. Filming Underwater in 3d Respecting Stereographic Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, R.; Hordosch, H.

    2015-04-01

    After an experimental phase of many years, 3D filming is now effective and successful. Improvements are still possible, but the film industry achieved memorable success on 3D movie's box offices due to the overall quality of its products. Special environments such as space ("Gravity") and the underwater realm look perfect to be reproduced in 3D. "Filming in space" was possible in "Gravity" using special effects and computer graphic. The underwater realm is still difficult to be handled. Underwater filming in 3D was not that easy and effective as filming in 2D, since not long ago. After almost 3 years of research, a French, Austrian and Italian team realized a perfect tool to film underwater, in 3D, without any constrains. This allows filmmakers to bring the audience deep inside an environment where they most probably will never have the chance to be.

  10. Collision Avoidance of Moving Obstacles for Underwater Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KWON KYOUNG YOUB

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available A fuzzy logic for autonomous navigation of underwater robot is proposed in this paper. The VFF(Virtual Force Field algorithm, which is widely used in the field of mobile robot, is modified for application to the autonomous navigation of underwater robot. This Modified Virtual Force Field(MVFF algorithm using the fuzzy logic can be used in either track keeping or obstacle avoidance. Fuzzy logics are devised to handle various situations which can be faced during autonomous navigation of underwater robot. A graphic simulator based on OpenGL for an autonomous navigation has been developed. The good performance of the proposed MVFF algorithm is verified through computer simulations on an underwater robot.

  11. Multi-layer protective armour for underwater shock wave mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Hawass

    2015-12-01

    The strain gauge data and displacement sensors results showed that the multi-layer plates have higher level of underwater shock wave mitigation than the triple aluminum plates with strain and deflection of nearly 50%.

  12. Underwater image enhancement through depth estimation based on random forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Shen-Chuan; Tsai, Ting-Chou; Huang, Jyun-Han

    2017-11-01

    Light absorption and scattering in underwater environments can result in low-contrast images with a distinct color cast. This paper proposes a systematic framework for the enhancement of underwater images. Light transmission is estimated using the random forest algorithm. RGB values, luminance, color difference, blurriness, and the dark channel are treated as features in training and estimation. Transmission is calculated using an ensemble machine learning algorithm to deal with a variety of conditions encountered in underwater environments. A color compensation and contrast enhancement algorithm based on depth information was also developed with the aim of improving the visual quality of underwater images. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed scheme outperforms existing methods with regard to subjective visual quality as well as objective measurements.

  13. Navigation of autonomous underwater vehicle using extended kalman filter

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ranjan, T.N.; Nherakkol, A.; Navelkar, G.S.

    To navigate the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) accurately is one of the most important aspects in its application. A truly autonomous vehicle must determine its position which requires the optimal integration of all available attitude...

  14. Euclidean reconstruction of natural underwater scenes using optic imagery sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Han

    The development of maritime applications require monitoring, studying and preserving of detailed and close observation on the underwater seafloor and objects. Stereo vision offers advanced technologies to build 3D models from 2D still overlapping optic images in a relatively inexpensive way. However, while image stereo matching is a necessary step in 3D reconstruction procedure, even the most robust dense matching techniques are not guaranteed to work for underwater images due to the challenging aquatic environment. In this thesis, in addition to a detailed introduction and research on the key components of building 3D models from optic images, a robust modified quasi-dense matching algorithm based on correspondence propagation and adaptive least square matching for underwater images is proposed and applied to some typical underwater image datasets. The experiments demonstrate the robustness and good performance of the proposed matching approach.

  15. Determination of Spatial Configuration of an Underwater Swarm with Minimum Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramiro dell'Erba

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the extension of work presented at the IARP Conference “Bio inspired robotics” held in Frascati (Italy, 14 May 2014. The subject is the localization problem of an underwater swarm of autonomous underwater robots (AUV, in the frame of the HARNESS project; by localization, we mean the relative swarm configuration, i.e., the geometrical shape of the group. The result is achieved by using the signals that the robots exchange. The swarm is organized by rules and conceived to perform tasks, ranging from environmental monitoring to terrorism-attack surveillance. Two methods of determining the shape of the swarm, both based on trilateration calculation, are proposed. The first method focuses on the robot's speed. In this case, we use our knowledge of the speeds and distances between the machines, while the second method considers only distances and the orientation angles of the robots. Unlike a trilateration problem, we do not know the position of the beacons and this renders the problem a difficult one. Moreover, we have very few data. More than one step of motion is needed to resolve the multiple solutions found, owing to the symmetries of the system and optimization process of one or more objective functions leading to the final configuration. We subsequently checked our algorithm using a simulator taking into account random errors affecting the measurements.

  16. Task Assignment and Path Planning for Multiple Autonomous Underwater Vehicles Using 3D Dubins Curves †

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyu Cai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the task assignment and path planning problem for multiple AUVs in three dimensional (3D underwater wireless sensor networks where nonholonomic motion constraints of underwater AUVs in 3D space are considered. The multi-target task assignment and path planning problem is modeled by the Multiple Traveling Sales Person (MTSP problem and the Genetic Algorithm (GA is used to solve the MTSP problem with Euclidean distance as the cost function and the Tour Hop Balance (THB or Tour Length Balance (TLB constraints as the stop criterion. The resulting tour sequences are mapped to 2D Dubins curves in the X − Y plane, and then interpolated linearly to obtain the Z coordinates. We demonstrate that the linear interpolation fails to achieve G 1 continuity in the 3D Dubins path for multiple targets. Therefore, the interpolated 3D Dubins curves are checked against the AUV dynamics constraint and the ones satisfying the constraint are accepted to finalize the 3D Dubins curve selection. Simulation results demonstrate that the integration of the 3D Dubins curve with the MTSP model is successful and effective for solving the 3D target assignment and path planning problem.

  17. Autonomous navigation for autonomous underwater vehicles based on information filters and active sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bo; Zhang, Hongjin; Li, Chao; Zhang, Shujing; Liang, Yan; Yan, Tianhong

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses an autonomous navigation method for the autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) C-Ranger applying information-filter-based simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM), and its sea trial experiments in Tuandao Bay (Shangdong Province, P.R. China). Weak links in the information matrix in an extended information filter (EIF) can be pruned to achieve an efficient approach-sparse EIF algorithm (SEIF-SLAM). All the basic update formulae can be implemented in constant time irrespective of the size of the map; hence the computational complexity is significantly reduced. The mechanical scanning imaging sonar is chosen as the active sensing device for the underwater vehicle, and a compensation method based on feedback of the AUV pose is presented to overcome distortion of the acoustic images due to the vehicle motion. In order to verify the feasibility of the navigation methods proposed for the C-Ranger, a sea trial was conducted in Tuandao Bay. Experimental results and analysis show that the proposed navigation approach based on SEIF-SLAM improves the accuracy of the navigation compared with conventional method; moreover the algorithm has a low computational cost when compared with EKF-SLAM.

  18. KeproVt : underwater robotic system for visual inspection of nuclear reactor internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Byung-Hak; Byun, Seung-Hyun; Shin, Chang-Hoon; Yang, Jang-Bum; Song, Sung-Il; Oh, Jung-Mook

    2004-01-01

    An underwater robotic system for visual inspection of reactor vessel internals has been developed. The Korea Electric Power Robot for Visual Test (KeproVt) consists of an underwater robot, a vision processor based measuring unit, a master control station and a servo control station. The vision processor based measuring unit employs a first-of-a-kind engineering technology in nuclear robotics. The vision processor makes use of a camera located at the top of the water level referenced to the reactor center line to get an image of the robot, and computes the location and orientation of the robot. The robot guided by the control station with the measuring unit can be controlled to have any motion at any position in the reactor vessel with ±1 cm positioning and ±2 deg. heading accuracies with enough precision to inspect reactor internals. A simple and fast installation process is emphasized in the developed system. The installation process consists of hooking a vision camera on the guide rail of the refueling machine and putting a small robot (14.5 kg in weight) in the reactor cavity pool. The easy installation and automatic operation meet the demand of shortening the reactor outage and reducing the number of inspection personnel. The developed robotic system was successfully deployed at the Yonggwang Nuclear Unit 1 for the visual inspection of reactor internals

  19. Autonomous Navigation for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles Based on Information Filters and Active Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhong Yan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses an autonomous navigation method for the autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV C-Ranger applying information-filter-based simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM, and its sea trial experiments in Tuandao Bay (Shangdong Province, P.R. China. Weak links in the information matrix in an extended information filter (EIF can be pruned to achieve an efficient approach-sparse EIF algorithm (SEIF-SLAM. All the basic update formulae can be implemented in constant time irrespective of the size of the map; hence the computational complexity is significantly reduced. The mechanical scanning imaging sonar is chosen as the active sensing device for the underwater vehicle, and a compensation method based on feedback of the AUV pose is presented to overcome distortion of the acoustic images due to the vehicle motion. In order to verify the feasibility of the navigation methods proposed for the C-Ranger, a sea trial was conducted in Tuandao Bay. Experimental results and analysis show that the proposed navigation approach based on SEIF-SLAM improves the accuracy of the navigation compared with conventional method; moreover the algorithm has a low computational cost when compared with EKF-SLAM.

  20. Collective motion of cells mediates segregation and pattern formation in co-cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elod Méhes

    Full Text Available Pattern formation by segregation of cell types is an important process during embryonic development. We show that an experimentally yet unexplored mechanism based on collective motility of segregating cells enhances the effects of known pattern formation mechanisms such as differential adhesion, mechanochemical interactions or cell migration directed by morphogens. To study in vitro cell segregation we use time-lapse videomicroscopy and quantitative analysis of the main features of the motion of individual cells or groups. Our observations have been extensive, typically involving the investigation of the development of patterns containing up to 200,000 cells. By either comparing keratocyte types with different collective motility characteristics or increasing cells' directional persistence by the inhibition of Rac1 GTP-ase we demonstrate that enhanced collective cell motility results in faster cell segregation leading to the formation of more extensive patterns. The growth of the characteristic scale of patterns generally follows an algebraic scaling law with exponent values up to 0.74 in the presence of collective motion, compared to significantly smaller exponents in case of diffusive motion.