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Sample records for underwater sound projector

  1. Underwater Sound Reference Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Underwater Sound Reference Division (USRD) serves as the U.S. standardizing activity in the area of underwater acoustic measurements, as the National Institute...

  2. Increasing the efficiency of thermoacoustic carbon nanotube sound projectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliev, Ali E; Gartstein, Yuri N; Baughman, Ray H

    2013-06-14

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can generate smooth-spectra sound emission over a wide frequency range (1-10(5) Hz) by means of thermoacoustics (TA). However, in the low frequencies f, where the need for large area sound projectors is high, the sound generation efficiency η of open CNT sheets is low, since η [proportionality] f(2). Together with this problem, the nanoscale thickness of CNT sheets, their high sensitivity to the environment and the high surface temperatures useful for TA sound generation are other drawbacks, which we address here by protective encapsulation of free-standing CNT sheets in inert gases. We provide an extensive experimental study of such closed systems for different thermodynamic regimes and rationalize our observations within a basic theoretical framework. The observed sound pressure levels for encapsulated argon filled TA transducers (130 dB in air and 200 dB underwater in the near field at 5 cm distance, and 100 and 170 dB in the far field at 1 m distance) are Q times higher than those for open systems, where Q is the resonant quality factor of the thin enclosure plates. Moreover, the sound generation efficiency of the encapsulated system increases toward low frequencies (η [proportionality] 1/f(2)). Another method to increase η in the low frequency region is by modulation of the applied high frequency carrier current with a low frequency resonant envelope. This approach enables sound generation at the frequency of the applied current without the need for additional energy-consuming biasing. The acoustical and geometrical parameters providing further increases in efficiency and transduction performance for resonant systems are discussed.

  3. Calibration of Underwater Sound Transducers

    OpenAIRE

    H.R.S. Sastry

    1983-01-01

    The techniques of calibration of underwater sound transducers for farfield, near-field and closed environment conditions are reviewed in this paper .The design of acoustic calibration tank is mentioned. The facilities available at Naval Physical & Oceanographic Laboratory, Cochin for calibration of transducers are also listed.

  4. Thermal management of thermoacoustic sound projectors using a free-standing carbon nanotube aerogel sheet as a heat source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliev, Ali E; Mayo, Nathanael K; Baughman, Ray H; Avirovik, Dragan; Priya, Shashank; Zarnetske, Michael R; Blottman, John B

    2014-10-10

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) aerogel sheets produce smooth-spectra sound over a wide frequency range (1-10(5) Hz) by means of thermoacoustic (TA) sound generation. Protective encapsulation of CNT sheets in inert gases between rigid vibrating plates provides resonant features for the TA sound projector and attractive performance at needed low frequencies. Energy conversion efficiencies in air of 2% and 10% underwater, which can be enhanced by further increasing the modulation temperature. Using a developed method for accurate temperature measurements for the thin aerogel CNT sheets, heat dissipation processes, failure mechanisms, and associated power densities are investigated for encapsulated multilayered CNT TA heaters and related to the thermal diffusivity distance when sheet layers are separated. Resulting thermal management methods for high applied power are discussed and deployed to construct efficient and tunable underwater sound projector for operation at relatively low frequencies, 10 Hz-10 kHz. The optimal design of these TA projectors for high-power SONAR arrays is discussed.

  5. Transducers and arrays for underwater sound

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, John L

    2016-01-01

    This improved and updated second edition covers the theory, development, and design of electro-acoustic transducers for underwater applications. This highly regarded text discusses the basics of piezoelectric and magnetostrictive transducers that are currently being used as well as promising new designs. It presents the basic acoustics as well as the specific acoustics data needed in transducer design and evaluation. A broad range of designs of projectors and hydrophones are described in detail along with methods of modeling, evaluation, and measurement. Analysis of projector and hydrophone transducer arrays, including the effects of mutual radiation impedance and numerical models for elements and arrays, are also covered. The book includes new advances in transducer design and transducer materials and has been completely reorganized to be suitable for use as a textbook, as well as a reference or handbook. The new edition contains updates to the first edition, end-of-chapter exercises, and solutions to select...

  6. Underwater Sound Propagation from Marine Pile Driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyff, James A

    2016-01-01

    Pile driving occurs in a variety of nearshore environments that typically have very shallow-water depths. The propagation of pile-driving sound in water is complex, where sound is directly radiated from the pile as well as through the ground substrate. Piles driven in the ground near water bodies can produce considerable underwater sound energy. This paper presents examples of sound propagation through shallow-water environments. Some of these examples illustrate the substantial variation in sound amplitude over time that can be critical to understand when computing an acoustic-based safety zone for aquatic species.

  7. WODA technical guidance on underwater sound from dredging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomsen, F.; Borsani, F.; Clarke, D.; Jong, C. de; Wit, P. de; Goethals, F.; Holtkamp, M.; Martin, E.S.; Spadaro, P.; Raalte, G. van; Victor, G.Y.V.; Jensen, A.

    2016-01-01

    The World Organization of Dredging Associations (WODA) has identified underwater sound as an environmental issue that needs further consideration. A WODA Expert Group on Underwater Sound (WEGUS) prepared a guidance paper in 2013 on dredging sound, including a summary of potential impacts on aquatic

  8. The WODA guidance paper on underwater sound from dredging (abstract)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomsen, F.; Borsani, F.; Clarke, D.; Jong, C.A.F. de; Witt, P. de; Holtkamp, M.; Goethals, F.; San Martin, E.; Spadaro, P.; Raalte, G. van; Jensen, A.

    2013-01-01

    The World Organisation of Dredging Associations (WODA) has identified underwater sound as an environmental issue that needs further consideration. A WODA Expert Group on Underwater Sound (WEGUS) was established to provide a guidance paper on dredging sound, impact on aquatic biota and advice on

  9. Design and implementation of an underwater sound recording device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Jayson J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Rohrer, John S.; Caviggia, Kurt A.

    2011-09-19

    The purpose of this study was to design and build two versions of an underwater sound recording device. The device designed is referred to as the Underwater Sound Recorder (USR), which can be connected to one or two hydrophones or other underwater sound sensors. The URS contains a 26 dB preamplifier and a user selectable gain that permits additional amplification of input to the system from 26 dB to 46 dB. Signals within the frequency range up to 15 kHz may be recorded using the USR. Examples of USR applications are monitoring underwater processes that have the potential to create large pressure waves that could potentially harm fish or other aquatic life, such as underwater explosions or pile driving. Additional applications are recording sound generated by vessels or the vocalizations of some marine mammals, such as the calls from many species of whales.

  10. Underwater and in-air sounds from a small hovercraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Susanna B.; Greene, Charles R.

    2005-12-01

    Underwater and in-air recordings were made from a boat anchored near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, while a Griffon 2000TD hovercraft drove by at or near full power on four passes. At the closest point of approach (CPA, 6.5 m), underwater broadband (10-10 000 Hz) levels reached 133 and 131 dB re: 1 μPa at depths of 1 and 7 m, respectively. In-air unweighted and A-weighted broadband (10-10 000 Hz) levels reached 104 and 97 dB re: 20 μPa, respectively. The hovercraft produced sound at a wide range of frequencies. Both underwater and in air, the largest spectral peak was near 87 Hz, which corresponded to the blade rate of the thrust propeller. In addition, the spectral composition included several harmonics of this frequency. The shaft or blade rate of the lift fan was barely detectable underwater despite its proximity to the water. The hovercraft was considerably quieter underwater than similar-sized conventional vessels and may be an attractive alternative when there is concern over underwater sounds.

  11. Underwater sound produced by individual drop impacts and rainfall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pumphrey, Hugh C.; Crum, L. A.; Jensen, Leif Bjørnø

    1989-01-01

    ; the second occurs for some impacts but not others. A range of conditions is described in which a bubble is produced for every drop impact, and it is shown that these conditions are likely to be met by a significant fraction of the raindrops in a typical shower. Underwater sound produced by artificial as well...

  12. Sources of underwater sound and their characterisation (abstract)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ainslie, M.A.; Jong, C.A.F. de

    2013-01-01

    After centuries of speculation, punctuated by occasional theoretical or experimental advances, the first intensive research into underwater sound took place 100 years ago, applied initially to provide advance warning of icebergs after the loss of RMS Titanic in 1912, and later to counter the U-boat

  13. Design and implementation of an underwater sound recording device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Jayson J; Myers, Josh R; Carlson, Thomas J; Deng, Z Daniel; Rohrer, John S; Caviggia, Kurt A; Woodley, Christa M; Weiland, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    To monitor the underwater sound and pressure waves generated by anthropogenic activities such as underwater blasting and pile driving, an autonomous system was designed to record underwater acoustic signals. The underwater sound recording device (USR) allows for connections of two hydrophones or other dynamic pressure sensors, filters high frequency noise out of the collected signals, has a gain that can be independently set for each sensor, and allows for 2 h of data collection. Two versions of the USR were created: a submersible model deployable to a maximum depth of 300 m, and a watertight but not fully submersible model. Tests were performed on the USR in the laboratory using a data acquisition system to send single-frequency sinusoidal voltages directly to each component. These tests verified that the device operates as designed and performs as well as larger commercially available data acquisition systems, which are not suited for field use. On average, the designed gain values differed from the actual measured gain values by about 0.35 dB. A prototype of the device was used in a case study to measure blast pressures while investigating the effect of underwater rock blasting on juvenile Chinook salmon and rainbow trout. In the case study, maximum positive pressure from the blast was found to be significantly correlated with frequency of injury for individual fish. The case study also demonstrated that the device withstood operation in harsh environments, making it a valuable tool for collecting field measurements.

  14. Design and Implementation of an Underwater Sound Recording Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa M. Woodley

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available To monitor the underwater sound and pressure waves generated by anthropogenic activities such as underwater blasting and pile driving, an autonomous system was designed to record underwater acoustic signals. The underwater sound recording device (USR allows for connections of two hydrophones or other dynamic pressure sensors, filters high frequency noise out of the collected signals, has a gain that can be independently set for each sensor, and allows for 2 h of data collection. Two versions of the USR were created: a submersible model deployable to a maximum depth of 300 m, and a watertight but not fully submersible model. Tests were performed on the USR in the laboratory using a data acquisition system to send single-frequency sinusoidal voltages directly to each component. These tests verified that the device operates as designed and performs as well as larger commercially available data acquisition systems, which are not suited for field use. On average, the designed gain values differed from the actual measured gain values by about 0.35 dB. A prototype of the device was used in a case study to measure blast pressures while investigating the effect of underwater rock blasting on juvenile Chinook salmon and rainbow trout. In the case study, maximum positive pressure from the blast was found to be significantly correlated with frequency of injury for individual fish. The case study also demonstrated that the device withstood operation in harsh environments, making it a valuable tool for collecting field measurements.

  15. Broadband focusing of underwater sound using a transparent pentamode lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaoshi; Norris, Andrew N; Cushing, Colby W; Haberman, Michael R; Wilson, Preston S

    2017-06-01

    An inhomogeneous acoustic metamaterial lens based on spatial variation of refractive index for broadband focusing of underwater sound is reported. The index gradient follows a modified hyperbolic secant profile designed to reduce aberration and suppress side lobes. The gradient index (GRIN) lens is comprised of transversely isotropic hexagonal microstructures with tunable quasi-static bulk modulus and mass density. In addition, the unit cells are impedance-matched to water and have in-plane shear modulus negligible compared to the effective bulk modulus. The flat GRIN lens is fabricated by cutting hexagonal centimeter scale hollow microstructures in aluminum plates, which are then stacked and sealed from the exterior water. Broadband focusing effects are observed within the homogenization regime of the lattice in both finite element simulations and underwater measurements (20-40 kHz). This design approach has potential applications in medical ultrasound imaging and underwater acoustic communications.

  16. Sources of underwater sound and their characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ainslie, M.A.; Jong, C.A.F. de

    2016-01-01

    Because of the history of sonar and sonar engineering, the concept of “source level” is widely used to characterize anthropogenic sound sources, but is it useful for sources other than sonar transmitters? The concept and applicability of source level are reviewed for sonar, air guns, explosions,

  17. Mapping Underwater Sound in the Dutch Part of the North Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sertlek, H Özkan; Aarts, Geert; Brasseur, Sophie; Slabbekoorn, Hans; ten Cate, Carel; von Benda-Beckmann, Alexander M; Ainslie, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    The European Union requires member states to achieve or maintain good environmental status for their marine territorial waters and explicitly mentions potentially adverse effects of underwater sound. In this study, we focused on producing maps of underwater sound from various natural and anthropogenic origins in the Dutch North Sea. The source properties and sound propagation are simulated by mathematical methods. These maps could be used to assess and predict large-scale effects on behavior and distribution of underwater marine life and therefore become a valuable tool in assessing and managing the impact of underwater sound on marine life.

  18. Acoustically sticky topographic metasurfaces for underwater sound absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hunki; Jung, Myungki; Kim, Minsoo; Shin, Ryung; Kang, Shinill; Ohm, Won-Suk; Kim, Yong Tae

    2018-03-01

    A class of metasurfaces for underwater sound absorption, based on a design principle that maximizes thermoviscous loss, is presented. When a sound meets a solid surface, it leaves a footprint in the form of thermoviscous boundary layers in which energy loss takes place. Considered to be a nuisance, this acoustic to vorticity/entropy mode conversion and the subsequent loss are often ignored in the existing designs of acoustic metamaterials and metasurfaces. The metasurface created is made of a series of topographic meta-atoms, i.e., intaglios and reliefs engraved directly on the solid object to be concealed. The metasurface is acoustically sticky in that it rather facilitates the conversion of the incident sound to vorticity and entropy modes, hence the thermoviscous loss, leading to the desired anechoic property. A prototype metasurface machined on a brass object is tested for its anechoicity, and shows a multitude of absorption peaks as large as unity in the 2-5 MHz range. Computations also indicate that a topographic metasurface is robust to hydrostatic pressure variation, a quality much sought-after in underwater applications.

  19. Mapping underwater sound in the dutch part of the North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özkan Sertlek, H.; Aarts, Geert; Brasseur, Sophie; Slabbekoorn, Hans; Cate, ten Carel; Benda-Beckmann, von Alexander M.; Ainslie, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    The European Union requires member states to achieve or maintain good environmental status for their marine territorial waters and explicitly mentions potentially adverse effects of underwater sound. In this study, we focused on producing maps of underwater sound from various natural and

  20. Mapping underwater sound in the Dutch part of the North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sertlek, H.O.; Aarts, G.; Brasseur, S.; Slabbekoorn, H.; Cate, C. ten; Benda-Beckmann, A.M. von; Ainslie, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    The European Union requires member states to achieve or maintain good environmental status for their marine territorial waters and explicitly mentions potentially adverse effects of underwater sound. In this study, we focused on producing maps of underwater sound from various natural and

  1. Thin Fresnel zone plate lenses for focusing underwater sound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, David C., E-mail: david.calvo@nrl.navy.mil; Thangawng, Abel L.; Nicholas, Michael; Layman, Christopher N. [Acoustics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2015-07-06

    A Fresnel zone plate (FZP) lens of the Soret type creates a focus by constructive interference of waves diffracted through open annular zones in an opaque screen. For underwater sound below MHz frequencies, a large FZP that blocks sound using high-impedance, dense materials would have practical disadvantages. We experimentally and numerically investigate an alternative approach of creating a FZP with thin (0.4λ) acoustically opaque zones made of soft silicone rubber foam attached to a thin (0.1λ) transparent rubber substrate. An ultra-thin (0.0068λ) FZP that achieves higher gain is also proposed and simulated which uses low-volume fraction, bubble-like resonant air ring cavities to construct opaque zones. Laboratory measurements at 200 kHz indicate that the rubber foam can be accurately modeled as a lossy fluid with an acoustic impedance approximately 1/10 that of water. Measured focal gains up to 20 dB agree with theoretical predictions for normal and oblique incidence. The measured focal radius of 0.68λ (peak-to-null) agrees with the Rayleigh diffraction limit prediction of 0.61 λ/NA (NA = 0.88) for a low-aberration lens.

  2. Thin Fresnel zone plate lenses for focusing underwater sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, David C.; Thangawng, Abel L.; Nicholas, Michael; Layman, Christopher N.

    2015-07-01

    A Fresnel zone plate (FZP) lens of the Soret type creates a focus by constructive interference of waves diffracted through open annular zones in an opaque screen. For underwater sound below MHz frequencies, a large FZP that blocks sound using high-impedance, dense materials would have practical disadvantages. We experimentally and numerically investigate an alternative approach of creating a FZP with thin (0.4λ) acoustically opaque zones made of soft silicone rubber foam attached to a thin (0.1λ) transparent rubber substrate. An ultra-thin (0.0068λ) FZP that achieves higher gain is also proposed and simulated which uses low-volume fraction, bubble-like resonant air ring cavities to construct opaque zones. Laboratory measurements at 200 kHz indicate that the rubber foam can be accurately modeled as a lossy fluid with an acoustic impedance approximately 1/10 that of water. Measured focal gains up to 20 dB agree with theoretical predictions for normal and oblique incidence. The measured focal radius of 0.68λ (peak-to-null) agrees with the Rayleigh diffraction limit prediction of 0.61 λ/NA (NA = 0.88) for a low-aberration lens.

  3. Thin Fresnel zone plate lenses for focusing underwater sound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo, David C.; Thangawng, Abel L.; Nicholas, Michael; Layman, Christopher N.

    2015-01-01

    A Fresnel zone plate (FZP) lens of the Soret type creates a focus by constructive interference of waves diffracted through open annular zones in an opaque screen. For underwater sound below MHz frequencies, a large FZP that blocks sound using high-impedance, dense materials would have practical disadvantages. We experimentally and numerically investigate an alternative approach of creating a FZP with thin (0.4λ) acoustically opaque zones made of soft silicone rubber foam attached to a thin (0.1λ) transparent rubber substrate. An ultra-thin (0.0068λ) FZP that achieves higher gain is also proposed and simulated which uses low-volume fraction, bubble-like resonant air ring cavities to construct opaque zones. Laboratory measurements at 200 kHz indicate that the rubber foam can be accurately modeled as a lossy fluid with an acoustic impedance approximately 1/10 that of water. Measured focal gains up to 20 dB agree with theoretical predictions for normal and oblique incidence. The measured focal radius of 0.68λ (peak-to-null) agrees with the Rayleigh diffraction limit prediction of 0.61 λ/NA (NA = 0.88) for a low-aberration lens

  4. Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface Utility for Underwater Sound Monitoring and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Huiying; Halvorsen, Michele B.; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Fishes and marine mammals may suffer a range of potential effects from exposure to intense underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities such as pile driving, shipping, sonars, and underwater blasting. Several underwater sound recording (USR) devices have been built to acquire samples of the underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities. Software becomes indispensable for processing and analyzing the audio files recorded by these USRs. In this paper, we provide a detailed description of a new software package, the Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface (AAMI), specifically designed for analysis of underwater sound recordings to provide data in metrics that facilitate evaluation of the potential impacts of the sound on aquatic animals. In addition to the basic functions, such as loading and editing audio files recorded by USRs and batch processing of sound files, the software utilizes recording system calibration data to compute important parameters in physical units. The software also facilitates comparison of the noise sound sample metrics with biological measures such as audiograms of the sensitivity of aquatic animals to the sound, integrating various components into a single analytical frame. The features of the AAMI software are discussed, and several case studies are presented to illustrate its functionality. PMID:22969353

  5. Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface Utility for Underwater Sound Monitoring and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. Carlson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Fishes and marine mammals may suffer a range of potential effects from exposure to intense underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities such as pile driving, shipping, sonars, and underwater blasting. Several underwater sound recording (USR devices have been built to acquire samples of the underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities. Software becomes indispensable for processing and analyzing the audio files recorded by these USRs. In this paper, we provide a detailed description of a new software package, the Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface (AAMI, specifically designed for analysis of underwater sound recordings to provide data in metrics that facilitate evaluation of the potential impacts of the sound on aquatic animals. In addition to the basic functions, such as loading and editing audio files recorded by USRs and batch processing of sound files, the software utilizes recording system calibration data to compute important parameters in physical units. The software also facilitates comparison of the noise sound sample metrics with biological measures such as audiograms of the sensitivity of aquatic animals to the sound, integrating various components into a single analytical frame. The features of the AAMI software are discussed, and several case studies are presented to illustrate its functionality.

  6. Properties of sound attenuation around a two-dimensional underwater vehicle with a large cavitation number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Peng-Cheng; Pan Guang

    2015-01-01

    Due to the high speed of underwater vehicles, cavitation is generated inevitably along with the sound attenuation when the sound signal traverses through the cavity region around the underwater vehicle. The linear wave propagation is studied to obtain the influence of bubbly liquid on the acoustic wave propagation in the cavity region. The sound attenuation coefficient and the sound speed formula of the bubbly liquid are presented. Based on the sound attenuation coefficients with various vapor volume fractions, the attenuation of sound intensity is calculated under large cavitation number conditions. The result shows that the sound intensity attenuation is fairly small in a certain condition. Consequently, the intensity attenuation can be neglected in engineering. (paper)

  7. Captive Bottlenose Dolphins Do Discriminate Human-Made Sounds Both Underwater and in the Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Alice; Sébilleau, Mélissa; Boye, Martin; Durand, Candice; Hausberger, Martine; Lemasson, Alban

    2018-01-01

    Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) spontaneously emit individual acoustic signals that identify them to group members. We tested whether these cetaceans could learn artificial individual sound cues played underwater and whether they would generalize this learning to airborne sounds. Dolphins are thought to perceive only underwater sounds and their training depends largely on visual signals. We investigated the behavioral responses of seven dolphins in a group to learned human-made individual sound cues, played underwater and in the air. Dolphins recognized their own sound cue after hearing it underwater as they immediately moved toward the source, whereas when it was airborne they gazed more at the source of their own sound cue but did not approach it. We hypothesize that they perhaps detected modifications of the sound induced by air or were confused by the novelty of the situation, but nevertheless recognized they were being “targeted.” They did not respond when hearing another group member’s cue in either situation. This study provides further evidence that dolphins respond to individual-specific sounds and that these marine mammals possess some capacity for processing airborne acoustic signals. PMID:29445350

  8. Simulation and Characteristics Analysis on Vibration and Sound Radiation Response for a Small Underwater Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An underwater robot is one of the important ocean equipment, and especially its stealth performance has influenced on the vitality in naval warfare. Structure radiation noise as the main source of underwater robot noise, so analysis on vibration and noise radiation is a topic of great concern. The way is used widely that based on fluid-solid coupling modal analysis combined with simulation on vibration and noise-radiation response in order to evaluate stealth performance of underwater structure. In the paper, firstly via finite element method and boundary element method, the modal frequencies and vibration modes of small underwater robot are calculated. Then the surface vibration displacements of underwater robot and the sound pressures of acoustic field under different frequency horizontal exciting force are obtained and analyzed. Lastly, through the analysis of the structural vibration and acoustic performance, the control strategies for structure bending vibration, acoustic radiation and structural acoustic design are proposed.

  9. Topological phononic states of underwater sound based on coupled ring resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Cheng; Li, Zheng; Ni, Xu; Sun, Xiao-Chen; Yu, Si-Yuan [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Lu, Ming-Hui, E-mail: luminghui@nju.edu.cn; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Yan-Feng [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2016-01-18

    We report a design of topological phononic states for underwater sound using arrays of acoustic coupled ring resonators. In each individual ring resonator, two degenerate acoustic modes, corresponding to clockwise and counter-clockwise propagation, are treated as opposite pseudospins. The gapless edge states arise in the bandgap resulting in protected pseudospin-dependent sound transportation, which is a phononic analogue of the quantum spin Hall effect. We also investigate the robustness of the topological sound state, suggesting that the observed pseudospin-dependent sound transportation remains unless the introduced defects facilitate coupling between the clockwise and counter-clockwise modes (in other words, the original mode degeneracy is broken). The topological engineering of sound transportation will certainly promise unique design for next generation of acoustic devices in sound guiding and switching, especially for underwater acoustic devices.

  10. Behavioural Response Thresholds in New Zealand Crab Megalopae to Ambient Underwater Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Jenni A.; Radford, Craig A.; Jeffs, Andrew G.

    2011-01-01

    A small number of studies have demonstrated that settlement stage decapod crustaceans are able to detect and exhibit swimming, settlement and metamorphosis responses to ambient underwater sound emanating from coastal reefs. However, the intensity of the acoustic cue required to initiate the settlement and metamorphosis response, and therefore the potential range over which this acoustic cue may operate, is not known. The current study determined the behavioural response thresholds of four species of New Zealand brachyuran crab megalopae by exposing them to different intensity levels of broadcast reef sound recorded from their preferred settlement habitat and from an unfavourable settlement habitat. Megalopae of the rocky-reef crab, Leptograpsus variegatus, exhibited the lowest behavioural response threshold (highest sensitivity), with a significant reduction in time to metamorphosis (TTM) when exposed to underwater reef sound with an intensity of 90 dB re 1 µPa and greater (100, 126 and 135 dB re 1 µPa). Megalopae of the mud crab, Austrohelice crassa, which settle in soft sediment habitats, exhibited no response to any of the underwater reef sound levels. All reef associated species exposed to sound levels from an unfavourable settlement habitat showed no significant change in TTM, even at intensities that were similar to their preferred reef sound for which reductions in TTM were observed. These results indicated that megalopae were able to discern and respond selectively to habitat-specific acoustic cues. The settlement and metamorphosis behavioural response thresholds to levels of underwater reef sound determined in the current study of four species of crabs, enables preliminary estimation of the spatial range at which an acoustic settlement cue may be operating, from 5 m to 40 km depending on the species. Overall, these results indicate that underwater sound is likely to play a major role in influencing the spatial patterns of settlement of coastal crab

  11. The influence of underwater data transmission sounds on the displacement behaviour of captive harbour seals (Phoca vitulina)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kastelein, R.A.; Heul, S. van der; Verboom, W.C.; Triesscheijn, R.J.V.; Jennings, N.V.

    2006-01-01

    To prevent grounding of ships and collisions between ships in shallow coastal waters, an underwater data collection and communication network (ACME) using underwater sounds to encode and transmit data is currently under development. Marine mammals might be affected by ACME sounds since they may use

  12. Effects of locally resonant modes on underwater sound absorption in viscoelastic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jihong; Zhao, Honggang; Lv, Linmei; Yuan, Bo; Wang, Gang; Wen, Xisen

    2011-09-01

    Recently, by introducing locally resonant scatterers with spherical shape proposed in phononic crystals into design of underwater sound absorption materials, the low-frequency underwater sound absorption phenomenon induced by the localized resonances is observed. To reveal this absorption mechanism, the effect of the locally resonant mode on underwater sound absorption should be studied. In this paper, the finite element method, which is testified efficiently by comparing the calculation results with those of the layer multiple scattering method, is introduced to investigate the dynamic modes and the corresponding sound absorption of localized resonance. The relationship between the resonance modes described with the displacement contours of one unit cell and the corresponding absorption spectra is discussed in detail, which shows that the localized resonance leads to the absorption peak, and the mode conversion from longitudinal to transverse waves at the second absorption peak is more efficient than that at the first one. Finally, to show the modeling capability of FEM and investigate shape effects of locally resonant scatterers on underwater sound absorption, the absorption properties of viscoelastic materials containing locally resonant scatterers with ellipsoidal shape are discussed. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  13. Experimental Assessment of Underwater Radiated Sound of Different Ship Types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, H.W.; Jong, C.A.F. de

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the SONIC project is to develop tools to investigate and mitigate the effects of underwater noise generated by shipping. One way to study the contribution of shipping noise to the background noise in the seas is to produce shipping noise maps. The SONIC project delivers the required

  14. Underwater sound due to a subsea high speed turbo compressor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binnerts, B.; Benda-Beckmann, A.M. von; Beek, P.J.G. van

    2014-01-01

    In the oil & gas industry there is a trend towards more subsea activities. To improve gas recovery from existing and new fields at greater depths, the produced gas will be compressed, processed and transported via subsea templates and underwater networks (pipelines, flexible risers, etc.). Besides

  15. Underwater sound scattering and absorption by a coated infinite plate with a distributed inhomogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanni; Pan, Jie

    2013-04-01

    This paper concerns itself with the scattering and absorption of underwater incident sound by a coated infinite plate with an attached distributed inhomogeneity. Its objective is to determine if the distributed inhomogeneity can provide additional local reflection, such that it only increases the signal-to-noise ratio for a hydrophone detector placed on the inhomogeneity without significantly decreasing the overall sound absorption of the coated plate.

  16. Monitoring programme for the Maasvlakte 2. Part III : The effects of underwater sound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinis, F.; De Jong, C.; Ainslie, M.; Borst, W.; Vellinga, T.

    2013-01-01

    The Port of Rotterdam is expanding to meet the growing demand to accommodate large cargo vessels. The construction of Maasvlakte 2 (MV2) started in September 2008. One of the licensing conditions is the monitoring of the underwater sound produced during its construction, with an emphasis on the

  17. Monitoring Programme for the Maasvlakte 2, Part III - The Effects of Underwater Sound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinis, F.; Jong, C.A.F. de; Ainslie, M.A.; Borst, W.; Vellinga, T.

    2013-01-01

    The Port of Rotterdam is expanding to meet the growing demand to accommodate large cargo vessels. The construction of Maasvlakte 2 (MV2) started in September 2008. One of the licensing conditions is the monitoring of the underwater sound produced during its construction, with an emphasis on the

  18. Thermoacoustic excitation of sonar projector plates by free-standing carbon nanotube sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, Ali E; Mayo, Nathanael K; Baughman, Ray H; Avirovik, Dragan; Priya, Shashank; Zarnetske, Michael R; Blottman, John B

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) generate smooth-spectra sound over a wide frequency range (1–10 5  Hz) by means of thermoacoustics (TA). The protective encapsulation of CNT sheets in inert gases between rigid vibrating plates provides resonant features in the TA sound projector. The vibrational modes of plates and the compliance of the soft sealing spacers between those plates are studied with the aim of creating efficient, tunable underwater sound generation at relatively low frequencies, 10 Hz–10 kHz. (paper)

  19. Underwater sound from vessel traffic reduces the effective communication range in Atlantic cod and haddock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Jenni A; Van Parijs, Sofie M; Hatch, Leila T

    2017-11-07

    Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary is located in Massachusetts Bay off the densely populated northeast coast of the United States; subsequently, the marine inhabitants of the area are exposed to elevated levels of anthropogenic underwater sound, particularly due to commercial shipping. The current study investigated the alteration of estimated effective communication spaces at three spawning locations for populations of the commercially and ecologically important fishes, Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus). Both the ambient sound pressure levels and the estimated effective vocalization radii, estimated through spherical spreading models, fluctuated dramatically during the three-month recording periods. Increases in sound pressure level appeared to be largely driven by large vessel activity, and accordingly exhibited a significant positive correlation with the number of Automatic Identification System tracked vessels at the two of the three sites. The near constant high levels of low frequency sound and consequential reduction in the communication space observed at these recording sites during times of high vocalization activity raises significant concerns that communication between conspecifics may be compromised during critical biological periods. This study takes the first steps in evaluating these animals' communication spaces and alteration of these spaces due to anthropogenic underwater sound.

  20. Cymbal and BB underwater transducers and arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newnham, R.E.; Zhang, J.; Alkoy, S.; Meyer, R.; Hughes, W.J.; Hladky-Hennion, A.C.; Cochran, J.; Markley, D. [Materials Research Laboratory, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2002-09-01

    The cymbal is a miniaturized class V flextensional transducer that was developed for use as a shallow water sound projector and receiver. Single elements are characterized by high Q, low efficiency, and medium power output capability. Its low cost and thin profile allow the transducer to be assembled into large flexible arrays. Efforts were made to model both single elements and arrays using the ATILA code and the integral equation formulation (EQI).Millimeter size microprobe hydrophones (BBs) have been designed and fabricated from miniature piezoelectric hollow ceramic spheres for underwater applications such as mapping acoustic fields of projectors, and flow noise sensors for complex underwater structures. Green spheres are prepared from soft lead zirconate titanate powders using a coaxial nozzle slurry process. A compact hydrophone with a radially-poled sphere is investigated using inside and outside electrodes. Characterization of these hydrophones is done through measurement of hydrostatic piezoelectric charge coefficients, free field voltage sensitivities and directivity beam patterns. (orig.)

  1. Experimental findings on the underwater measurements uncertainty of speed of sound and the alignment system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, T. Q.; Alvarenga, A. V.; Oliveira, D. P.; Mayworm, R. C.; Souza, R. M.; Costa-Félix, R. P. B.

    2016-07-01

    Speed of sound is an important quantity to characterize reference materials for ultrasonic applications, for instance. The alignment between the transducer and the test body is an key activity in order to perform reliable and consistent measurement. The aim of this work is to evaluate the influence of the alignment system to the expanded uncertainty of such measurement. A stainless steel cylinder was previously calibrated on an out of water system typically used for calibration of non-destructive blocks. Afterwards, the cylinder was calibrated underwater with two distinct alignment system: fixed and mobile. The values were statistically compared to the out-of-water measurement, considered the golden standard for such application. For both alignment systems, the normalized error was less than 0.8, leading to conclude that the both measurement system (under and out-of-water) do not diverge significantly. The gold standard uncertainty was 2.7 m-s-1, whilst the fixed underwater system resulted in 13 m-s-1, and the mobile alignment system achieved 6.6 m-s-1. After the validation of the underwater system for speed of sound measurement, it will be applied to certify Encapsulated Tissue Mimicking Material as a reference material for biotechnology application.

  2. Oyster larvae settle in response to habitat-associated underwater sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, Ashlee; Eggleston, David B; Bohnenstiehl, DelWayne R

    2013-01-01

    Following a planktonic dispersal period of days to months, the larvae of benthic marine organisms must locate suitable seafloor habitat in which to settle and metamorphose. For animals that are sessile or sedentary as adults, settlement onto substrates that are adequate for survival and reproduction is particularly critical, yet represents a challenge since patchily distributed settlement sites may be difficult to find along a coast or within an estuary. Recent studies have demonstrated that the underwater soundscape, the distinct sounds that emanate from habitats and contain information about their biological and physical characteristics, may serve as broad-scale environmental cue for marine larvae to find satisfactory settlement sites. Here, we contrast the acoustic characteristics of oyster reef and off-reef soft bottoms, and investigate the effect of habitat-associated estuarine sound on the settlement patterns of an economically and ecologically important reef-building bivalve, the Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica). Subtidal oyster reefs in coastal North Carolina, USA show distinct acoustic signatures compared to adjacent off-reef soft bottom habitats, characterized by consistently higher levels of sound in the 1.5-20 kHz range. Manipulative laboratory playback experiments found increased settlement in larval oyster cultures exposed to oyster reef sound compared to unstructured soft bottom sound or no sound treatments. In field experiments, ambient reef sound produced higher levels of oyster settlement in larval cultures than did off-reef sound treatments. The results suggest that oyster larvae have the ability to respond to sounds indicative of optimal settlement sites, and this is the first evidence that habitat-related differences in estuarine sounds influence the settlement of a mollusk. Habitat-specific sound characteristics may represent an important settlement and habitat selection cue for estuarine invertebrates and could play a role in driving

  3. Oyster larvae settle in response to habitat-associated underwater sounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashlee Lillis

    Full Text Available Following a planktonic dispersal period of days to months, the larvae of benthic marine organisms must locate suitable seafloor habitat in which to settle and metamorphose. For animals that are sessile or sedentary as adults, settlement onto substrates that are adequate for survival and reproduction is particularly critical, yet represents a challenge since patchily distributed settlement sites may be difficult to find along a coast or within an estuary. Recent studies have demonstrated that the underwater soundscape, the distinct sounds that emanate from habitats and contain information about their biological and physical characteristics, may serve as broad-scale environmental cue for marine larvae to find satisfactory settlement sites. Here, we contrast the acoustic characteristics of oyster reef and off-reef soft bottoms, and investigate the effect of habitat-associated estuarine sound on the settlement patterns of an economically and ecologically important reef-building bivalve, the Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica. Subtidal oyster reefs in coastal North Carolina, USA show distinct acoustic signatures compared to adjacent off-reef soft bottom habitats, characterized by consistently higher levels of sound in the 1.5-20 kHz range. Manipulative laboratory playback experiments found increased settlement in larval oyster cultures exposed to oyster reef sound compared to unstructured soft bottom sound or no sound treatments. In field experiments, ambient reef sound produced higher levels of oyster settlement in larval cultures than did off-reef sound treatments. The results suggest that oyster larvae have the ability to respond to sounds indicative of optimal settlement sites, and this is the first evidence that habitat-related differences in estuarine sounds influence the settlement of a mollusk. Habitat-specific sound characteristics may represent an important settlement and habitat selection cue for estuarine invertebrates and could play a

  4. Repellence Effect of the New Sound for Underwater Speaker of Hydrofoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsunori Nakashima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to prevent hydrofoil colliding with cetaceans, the underwater speaker (UWS has been installed to repel cetaceans. Yamada et al. (2012 analyzed and devised the UWS sound as it fits the cetaceans' acoustic properties to prevent the collision furthermore. The new UWS sound was devised and synthesized by Yamada et al. (2015 with expectation of avoiding collision with large cetaceans (Patent applied for, JP2014-171411. In this research project, the new UWS sound was investigated by the playback experiment on humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae and by sighting survey in the actual hydrofoil shipping service route. As a result, a physiological and behavioral change of the humpback whale was observed in the playback experiment of the new UWS sound, and the chance of hydrofoil encountering cetaceans of the new UWS sound was smaller than that of the previous UWS sound. Therefore, the improvement of the new UWS sound was confirmed. Lastly, we wish this research project would contribute toward the safer cruise of hydrofoil in the future.

  5. Underwater sound scattering and absorption by a coated infinite plate with attached periodically located inhomogeneities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanni; Huang, Hai; Zheng, Jing; Pan, Jie

    2015-11-01

    This paper extends previous work of Zhang and Pan [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133(4), 2082-2096 (2013)] on sound scattering and absorption by an underwater coated plate with a single attached distributed-inhomogeneity to that with periodically located distributed-inhomogeneities. A comparison is made among cases of a plate without inhomogeneities, a plate with inhomogeneities, and one with inhomogeneities ignoring the mutual coupling. Results show that coupling of the structural waves scattered by the inhomogeneities plays an important role in modifying the sound absorption and scattering of surface sound pressure, especially at low frequencies and/or the resonance frequencies of the trapped modes of the plate. The sound absorption of the plate is dependent on the distance between the adjacent inhomogeneities, the length of the inhomogeneity, and the angle of the incident sound. On the surface of the inhomogeneities, the scattered/total sound pressure is generally enhanced. On the surface in between the inhomogeneities, the pressure is also enhanced at low frequencies but is nearly unchanged at higher frequencies. Results also show that the coupling-induced variation of scattered/total pressure is significant only at the resonance frequencies of the global modes and trapped modes. The surface normal velocity is presented to explain the coupling-induced variations in the vibration and pressure fields.

  6. Underwater sound radiation from an elastically coated plate with an embedded and distributed inhomogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanni; Pan, Jie

    2015-05-01

    This paper studies the effects of an embedded and distributed inhomogeneity on the underwater sound radiation from an elastically coated plate. Embedding a signal conditioning plate (SCP) in the coating material provides an extra parameter for controlling the sound radiation of the plate, as compared with the previous design with an SCP on the coating surface [Y. Zhang and J. Pan, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133(1), 173-185 (2013)]. For such a configuration, the vibration and sound responses of the coated plate to a point force excitation are described by three coupled Fredholm integral equations of the second kind. Its acoustical properties are examined by comparing the radiation powers from plates without an SCP, with a surface SCP, and with an embedded SCP. The differences in the sound powers are explained through resonance and scattering caused by the interaction of the embedded SCP with structural waves. The effects of the depth of the embedded SCP in the coating material on the sound radiation properties of the plate are discussed in detail.

  7. ProjectorKit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weigel, Martin; Boring, Sebastian; Steimle, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have developed interaction concepts based on mobile projectors. Yet pursuing work in this area - particularly in building projector-based interactions techniques within an application - is cumbersome and time-consuming. To mitigate this problem, we contribute ProjectorKit, a flexible ...... open-source toolkit that eases rapid prototyping mobile projector interaction techniques....

  8. Underwater sound emissions and effects of the pile driving of the OWEZ windfarm facility near Egmond aan Zee (Tconstruct)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, de D.; Burggraaf, D.; Ybema, M.S.; Hille Ris Lambers, R.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this part of the Monitoring and Evaluation Program NSW (MEP-NSW), i.e. “acoustic measurements”, is to measure and analyze underwater sound emissions from the construction of the OWEZ wind farm and to investigate the effects to marine animals (in particular fish, harbour porpoises and

  9. Semi-active control of piezoelectric coating's underwater sound absorption by combining design of the shunt impedances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yang; Li, Zhaohui; Huang, Aigen; Li, Qihu

    2015-10-01

    Piezoelectric shunt damping technology has been applied in the field of underwater sound absorption in recent years. In order to achieve broadband echo reduction, semi-active control of sound absorption of multi-layered piezoelectric coating by shunt damping is significant. In this paper, a practical method is proposed to control the underwater sound absorption coefficients of piezoelectric coating layers by combining design of the shunt impedance that allows certain sound absorption coefficients at setting frequencies. A one-dimensional electro-acoustic model of the piezoelectric coating and the backing is established based on the Mason equivalent circuit theory. First, the shunt impedance of the coating is derived under the constraint of sound absorption coefficient at one frequency. Then, taking the 1-3 piezoelectric composite coating as an example, the sound absorption properties of the coating shunted to the designed shunt impedance are investigated. Next, on the basis of that, an iterative method for two constrained frequencies and an optimizing algorithm for multiple constrained frequencies are provided for combining design of the shunt impedances. At last, an experimental sample with four piezoelectric material layers is manufactured, of which the sound absorption coefficients are measured in an impedance tube. The experimental results show good agreement with the finite element simulation results. It is proved that a serial R-L circuit can control the peak frequency, maximum and bandwidth of the sound absorption coefficient and the combining R-L circuits shunted to multiple layers can control the sound absorption coefficients at multiple frequencies.

  10. The low-frequency sound power measuring technique for an underwater source in a non-anechoic tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Ming; Tang, Rui; Li, Qi; Shang, Da-Jing

    2018-03-01

    In order to determine the radiated sound power of an underwater source below the Schroeder cut-off frequency in a non-anechoic tank, a low-frequency extension measuring technique is proposed. This technique is based on a unique relationship between the transmission characteristics of the enclosed field and those of the free field, which can be obtained as a correction term based on previous measurements of a known simple source. The radiated sound power of an unknown underwater source in the free field can thereby be obtained accurately from measurements in a non-anechoic tank. To verify the validity of the proposed technique, a mathematical model of the enclosed field is established using normal-mode theory, and the relationship between the transmission characteristics of the enclosed and free fields is obtained. The radiated sound power of an underwater transducer source is tested in a glass tank using the proposed low-frequency extension measuring technique. Compared with the free field, the radiated sound power level of the narrowband spectrum deviation is found to be less than 3 dB, and the 1/3 octave spectrum deviation is found to be less than 1 dB. The proposed testing technique can be used not only to extend the low-frequency applications of non-anechoic tanks, but also for measurement of radiated sound power from complicated sources in non-anechoic tanks.

  11. Underwater sounds near a fuel receiving facility in western Hong Kong: relevance to dolphins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würsig, B; Greene, C R

    2002-08-01

    Western Hong Kong is home to two species of marine mammals: Indo-Pacific humpbacked dolphins (Sousa chinensis) and finless porpoises (Neophocaena phocaenoides). Both are threatened in many parts of their range in southeast Asia [for example, International Biological Research Institute Reports 9 (1997), 41; Asian Marine Biology 14 (1997) 111]. In 1998, when the new Hong Kong International Airport opened in western Hong Kong, small tankers (about 100 m long, cargo capacity about 6300 metric tons) began delivering fuel to the Aviation Fuel Receiving Facility (AFRF) just off Sha Chau Island, north of the airport. Calibrated sound recordings were taken over a 4-day period from a quiet, anchored boat at distances 80-2000 m from aviation fuel delivery activities at the AFRF. From the recordings, 143 sections were selected for analysis. Narrowband spectral densities on the sound pressures were computed, and one-third octave band levels were derived for center frequencies from 10 to 16,000 Hz. Broadband levels, viz. 10-20,000 Hz. were also computed. The results showed that the Sha Chau area is normally noisy underwater, with the lowest broadband levels measured corresponding to those expected during a storm at sea (sea state 6). This background noise is believed to come largely from heavy vessel traffic in the Urmston Road to the north and east of Sha Chau and from vessels in the Pearl River Estuary to the West. The sound levels from the AFRF tankers are comparable to the levels measured from similar- and smaller-sized supply vessels supporting offshore oil exploration. The strongest sounds recorded were from a tanker leaving the AFRF at distance 100 m from the hydrophone, for which the one-third octave band level at 100 Hz was 141 dB re 1 microPa (spectrum level 127 dB re 1 microPa2/Hz) and the 10-20,000 Hz broadband level was 146 dB. At distances of 100 m or more and frequencies above 300 Hz, the one-third octave band levels were less than 130 dB (spectrum level 111 dB re

  12. Underwater sound radiation from an elastically coated plate with a discontinuity introduced by a signal conditioning plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanni; Pan, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Underwater structural sound radiation and reflection can be reduced by adding an elastic coating to a structure. To increase the signal-to-noise ratio of a detecting hydrophone placed in front of the coating, a signal conditioning plate (SCP) of finite size placed between the coating and the hydrophone is proposed to increase the local reflection of incoming sound. This paper studies the effects of a SCP as a distributed discontinuity on the general properties of the sound radiation of a coated plate. The discontinuity introduced by the SCP changes the vibration and radiated sound power of the coated plate by scattering and reflecting structural waves in the coating. The trapped modal response of the structural waves is also observed and found to be responsible for the increase of sound and vibration of the plate at the corresponding resonance frequencies.

  13. Risk mapping for sensitive species to underwater anthropogenic sound emissions: model development and validation in two Mediterranean areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzellino, A; Lanfredi, C; D'Amico, A; Pavan, G; Podestà, M; Haun, J

    2011-01-01

    Recent observations of cetacean mass strandings, coincident with anthropogenic sounds emissions, have raised concerns on the potential environmental impact of underwater noise. Cuvier's beaked whale (Ziphius cavirostris) was reported in all the cited stranding events. Within the NATO Marine Mammal Risk Mitigation project (MMRM), multiple interdisciplinary sea trials have been conducted in the Mediterranean Sea with the objective of developing tools and procedures to mitigate the impact of underwater sound emissions. During these cruises, visual observations, passive acoustic detections and environmental data were collected. The aim of this study was to evaluate "a priori" predictions of Cuvier's beaked whale presence in the Alboran Sea, using models developed in the Ligurian Sea that employ bathymetric and chlorophyll features as predictors. The accuracy of these predictions was found adequate and elements are given to account for the uncertainties associated to the use of models developed in areas different from their calibration site. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dolphin Sounds-Inspired Covert Underwater Acoustic Communication and Micro-Modem

    OpenAIRE

    Gang Qiao; Yunjiang Zhao; Songzuo Liu; Muhammad Bilal

    2017-01-01

    A novel portable underwater acoustic modem is proposed in this paper for covert communication between divers or underwater unmanned vehicles (UUVs) and divers at a short distance. For the first time, real dolphin calls are used in the modem to realize biologically inspired Covert Underwater Acoustic Communication (CUAC). A variety of dolphin whistles and clicks stored in an SD card inside the modem helps to realize different biomimetic CUAC algorithms based on the specified covert scenario. I...

  15. Dolphin Sounds-Inspired Covert Underwater Acoustic Communication and Micro-Modem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Gang; Liu, Songzuo; Bilal, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    A novel portable underwater acoustic modem is proposed in this paper for covert communication between divers or underwater unmanned vehicles (UUVs) and divers at a short distance. For the first time, real dolphin calls are used in the modem to realize biologically inspired Covert Underwater Acoustic Communication (CUAC). A variety of dolphin whistles and clicks stored in an SD card inside the modem helps to realize different biomimetic CUAC algorithms based on the specified covert scenario. In this paper, the information is conveyed during the time interval between dolphin clicks. TMS320C6748 and TLV320AIC3106 are the core processors used in our unique modem for fast digital processing and interconnection with other terminals or sensors. Simulation results show that the bit error rate (BER) of the CUAC algorithm is less than 10−5 when the signal to noise ratio is over ‒5 dB. The modem was tested in an underwater pool, and a data rate of 27.1 bits per second at a distance of 10 m was achieved. PMID:29068363

  16. Dolphin Sounds-Inspired Covert Underwater Acoustic Communication and Micro-Modem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Qiao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel portable underwater acoustic modem is proposed in this paper for covert communication between divers or underwater unmanned vehicles (UUVs and divers at a short distance. For the first time, real dolphin calls are used in the modem to realize biologically inspired Covert Underwater Acoustic Communication (CUAC. A variety of dolphin whistles and clicks stored in an SD card inside the modem helps to realize different biomimetic CUAC algorithms based on the specified covert scenario. In this paper, the information is conveyed during the time interval between dolphin clicks. TMS320C6748 and TLV320AIC3106 are the core processors used in our unique modem for fast digital processing and interconnection with other terminals or sensors. Simulation results show that the bit error rate (BER of the CUAC algorithm is less than 10 − 5 when the signal to noise ratio is over ‒5 dB. The modem was tested in an underwater pool, and a data rate of 27.1 bits per second at a distance of 10 m was achieved.

  17. Dolphin Sounds-Inspired Covert Underwater Acoustic Communication and Micro-Modem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Gang; Zhao, Yunjiang; Liu, Songzuo; Bilal, Muhammad

    2017-10-25

    A novel portable underwater acoustic modem is proposed in this paper for covert communication between divers or underwater unmanned vehicles (UUVs) and divers at a short distance. For the first time, real dolphin calls are used in the modem to realize biologically inspired Covert Underwater Acoustic Communication (CUAC). A variety of dolphin whistles and clicks stored in an SD card inside the modem helps to realize different biomimetic CUAC algorithms based on the specified covert scenario. In this paper, the information is conveyed during the time interval between dolphin clicks. TMS320C6748 and TLV320AIC3106 are the core processors used in our unique modem for fast digital processing and interconnection with other terminals or sensors. Simulation results show that the bit error rate (BER) of the CUAC algorithm is less than 10 - 5 when the signal to noise ratio is over ‒5 dB. The modem was tested in an underwater pool, and a data rate of 27.1 bits per second at a distance of 10 m was achieved.

  18. Characterization of Underwater Sounds Produced by a Backhoe Dredge Excavating Rock and Gravel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    source levels of the 2,700-m3 hopper dredge The City of Westminster operating on the Hastings Shingle and calculated the broadband source level to 186...Assessment of underwater noise from dredging operations on the Hasting Shingle Bank. Report No. Subacoustech 758R0137. Popper, A. N. 2003. Effects of

  19. Acoustic effects of oil-production activities on bowhead and white whales visible during spring migration near Pt. Barrow, Alaska-1990 phase: sound propagation and whale responses to playbacks of continuous drilling noise from an ice platform, as studied in pack ice conditions. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, W.J.; Greene, C.R.; Koski, W.R.; Smultea, M.A.; Cameron, G.

    1991-10-01

    The report concerns the effects of underwater noise from simulated oil production operations on the movements and behavior of bowhead and white whales migrating around northern Alaska in spring. An underwater sound projector suspended from pack ice was used to introduce recorded drilling noise and other test sounds into leads through the pack ice. These sounds were received and measured at various distances to determine the rate of sound attenuation with distance and frequency. The movements and behavior of bowhead and white whales approaching the operating projector were studied by aircraft- and ice-based observers. Some individuals of both species were observed to approach well within the ensonified area. However, behavioral changes and avoidance reactions were evident when the received sound level became sufficiently high. Reactions to aircraft are also discussed

  20. Attenuation of low-frequency underwater sound using an array of air-filled balloons and comparison to effective medium theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kevin M; Wilson, Preston S; Wochner, Mark S

    2017-12-01

    The ultimate goal of this work is to accurately predict the attenuation through a collection of large (on the order of 10-cm-radius) tethered encapsulated bubbles used in underwater noise abatement systems. Measurements of underwater sound attenuation were performed during a set of lake experiments, where a low-frequency compact electromechanical sound source was surrounded by different arrays of encapsulated bubbles with various individual bubbles sizes and void fractions. The measurements were compared with an existing predictive model [Church, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 97, 1510-1521 (1995)] of the dispersion relation for linear propagation in liquid containing encapsulated bubbles. Although the model was originally intended to describe ultrasound contrast agents, it is evaluated here for large bubbles, and hence low frequencies, as a design tool for future underwater noise abatement systems, and there is good quantitative agreement between the observations and the model.

  1. Projector Method: theory and examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    The Projector Method technique for numerically analyzing lattice gauge theories was developed to take advantage of certain simplifying features of gauge theory models. Starting from a very general notion of what the Projector Method is, the techniques are applied to several model problems. After these examples have traced the development of the actual algorithm from the general principles of the Projector Method, a direct comparison between the Projector and the Euclidean Monte Carlo is made, followed by a discussion of the application to Periodic Quantum Electrodynamics in two and three spatial dimensions. Some methods for improving the efficiency of the Projector in various circumstances are outlined. 10 refs., 7 figs

  2. The noisy underwater world : the effect of sound on behaviour of captive zebrafish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shafiei Sabet, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, public attention, activities in the field of conservation and animal welfare by nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and scientific exploration are raising awareness on the potential effects of sounds on marine mammals and fish species. The aim of this thesis was to

  3. Acoustic inversion with self noise of an autonomous underwater vehicle to measure sound speed in marine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leijen, A.V.; Rothkranz, L.J.M.; Groen, F.C.A.

    2009-01-01

    This work reports on an experiment from the Maritime Rapid Environmental Assessment sea trials in 2007, where autonomous underwater vehicles were deployed for environmental assessment. Even though these underwater vehicles are very quiet platforms, this work investigates the potential of vehicle

  4. Acoustic beam control in biomimetic projector via velocity gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Xiaowei; Dong, Erqian; Song, Zhongchang [Key Laboratory of Underwater Acoustic Communication and Marine Information Technology of the Ministry of Education, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Zhang, Yu, E-mail: yuzhang@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: dzk@psu.edu; Tang, Liguo [Key Laboratory of Underwater Acoustic Communication and Marine Information Technology of the Ministry of Education, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Cao, Wenwu, E-mail: yuzhang@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: dzk@psu.edu [Department of Mathematics and Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Li, Songhai [Sanya Key Laboratory of Marin Mammal and Marine Bioacoustics, Sanya Institute of Deep-Sea Science and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Science, Sanya 57200 (China); Zhang, Sai [Faculty of Science, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2016-07-04

    A biomimetic projector (BioP) based on computerized tomography of pygmy sperm whale's biosonar system has been designed using gradient-index (GRIN) material. The directivity of this BioP device was investigated as function of frequency and the velocity gradient of the GRIN material. A strong beam control over a broad bandwidth at the subwavelength scale has been achieved. Compared with a bare subwavelength source, the main lobe pressure of the BioP is about five times as high and the angular resolution is one order of magnitude better. Our results indicate that this BioP has excellent application potential in miniaturized underwater sonars.

  5. Diel and seasonal patterns of underwater sounds by Weddell seals, leopard seals, and killer whales in the Antarctic: When it's adaptive to be quiet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindach, Debrah; Thomas, Jeanette

    2005-09-01

    Automated underwater recordings taken during the austral breeding season of the Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) in Antarctica also provided data on the vocalizations of predators in the area; leopard seals (Hydrurga leptonyx) and killer whales (Orcinus orca). Weddell seals inhabit fast ice areas to give birth, mate, and molt. Near the end of the breeding season in December the fast ice often breaks out and the two pack ice predators are able to move near the Weddell seal colonies and prey on them, especially pups. Recordings were taken continuously for a 2.5-min period each hour from mid-October 1977 and late-January 1978 at Hutton Cliffs and South Turtle Rock Crack, in McMurdo Sound. The leopard seals increased their trill calls when killer whales came into the area as evidenced by an increase in their frequency-modulated squeak calls. Weddell seals decreased their vocalization rate dramatically (~10 sounds/min) compared to during the peak of the breeding season (~75 sounds/min). Perhaps by being quiet, Weddell seals do not attract predators to their area.

  6. Carbon Nanotube Underwater Acoustic Thermophone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-23

    Attorney Docket No. 300009 1 of 8 A CARBON NANOTUBE UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC THERMOPHONE STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The...the Invention [0003] The present invention is an acoustically transparent carbon nanotube thermophone. (2) Description of the Prior Art [0004...amplitude of the resulting sound waves. [0006] Recently, there has been development of underwater acoustic carbon nanotube (CNT) yarn sheets capable

  7. Optical safety of comparative theater projectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, David H; Stack, Casey; Schnuelle, David; Parkinson, Jay

    2014-03-01

    Traditional movie projectors employing carbon arcs were introduced to movie theaters more than a century ago, and they were replaced during the 1950s by xenon-arc projectors. Today, these arc-lamp film projectors are expected to be replaced by digital laser projectors. Questions have arisen with regard to safety of the new laser-based projectors and about the comparable safety to the xenon-arc projectors that they replace. Smaller projectors employing tungsten-halogen lamps have been used for decades in home and office environments, and small arc-discharge lamps more recently have enjoyed widespread use in digital projectors. The trend in digital projectors has led to increased luminance projection products. Results of a comparative evaluation of ocular hazards from various projection systems, with an emphasis on professional laser illuminated projection systems, are presented. Irradiance and source size measurements were made to determine the radiance of each of the projection systems for both thermal and blue light hazards to the retina. Ultraviolet and infrared measurements were also made for completeness of the hazard evaluation. Projectors are classified by risk groups according to national and international standards, and recommendations for projector safety are provided. It is shown that laser illuminated projectors have hazard distances comparable to traditional 35 mm movie-theater projectors of the order of 1 m. Since there is no resemblance to the optical hazards of distant, collimated laser beams in light shows and only minimal hazards are posed by theater projectors to the audience, the standards and regulations applicable to "laser light shows" should not be applicable for these types of products.

  8. Whose Line Sound is it Anyway? Identifying the Vocalizer on Underwater Video by Localizing with a Hydrophone Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Hoffmann-Kuhnt

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A new device that combined high-resolution (1080p wide-angle video and three channels of high-frequency acoustic recordings (at 500 kHz per channel in a portable underwater housing was designed and tested with wild bottlenose and spotted dolphins in the Bahamas. It consisted of three hydrophones, a GoPro camera, a small Fit PC, a set of custom preamplifiers and a high-frequency data acquisition board. Recordings were obtained to identify individual vocalizing animals through time-delay-of-arrival localizing in post-processing. The calculated source positions were then overlaid onto the video – providing the ability to identify the vocalizing animal on the recorded video. The new tool allowed for much clearer analysis of the acoustic behavior of cetaceans than was possible before.

  9. Innovations in IR projector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Barry E.; Higashi, B.; Ridley, Jeff A.; Holmen, J.; Newstrom, K.; Zins, C.; Nguyen, K.; Weeres, Steven R.; Johnson, Burgess R.; Stockbridge, Robert G.; Murrer, Robert Lee; Olson, Eric M.; Bergin, Thomas P.; Kircher, James R.; Flynn, David S.

    2000-07-01

    In the past year, Honeywell has developed a 512 X 512 snapshot scene projector containing pixels with very high radiance efficiency. The array can operate in both snapshot and raster mode. The array pixels have near black body characteristics, high radiance outputs, broad band performance, and high speed. IR measurements and performance of these pixels will be described. In addition, a vacuum probe station that makes it possible to select the best die for packaging and delivery based on wafer level radiance screening, has been developed and is in operation. This system, as well as other improvements, will be described. Finally, a review of the status of the present projectors and plans for future arrays is included.

  10. Seabed sediment classification for monitoring underwater nourishments using time series of multi-beam echo-soundings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaida, T. C.; Snellen, M.; van Dijk, T. A. G. P.; Simons, D. G.

    2017-12-01

    Coastal erosion induced by natural processes, such as wind, waves, tidal currents, or human interferences endangers human beings, infrastructure, fauna and flora at the oceans and rivers all over the world. In The Netherlands, in particular the North Sea islands are strongly affected by sediment erosion. To protect and stabilize the coastline, beach and shoreface nourishments are frequently performed. Thereby, sediment reservoirs are created that replace the eroded sediments. Increasing the long-term efficiency of coastal protection requires monitoring of the temporal and spatial development of the coastal nourishments. Multi-beam echo-sounders (MBES) allow for detailed and comprehensive investigations of the seabed composition and structure. To investigate the potential of using MBES for monitoring nourishments in a tidal inlet, four MBES surveys per year are carried out at the Dutch Wadden island Ameland. A pre-nourishment MBES survey was performed in April 2017 and the subsequent post-nourishment survey will take place in September 2017. Both surveys are equipped with a Kongsberg EM 2040C dual-head MBES and are supported with extensive grab sampling. In this study the use of MBES backscatter and bathymetry data are considered as an approach for monitoring coastal nourishments. The aim is to develop a monitoring procedure that allows for comparing MBES data taken during different surveys, i.e., with variations in environmental conditions, MBES characteristics and acquisition procedures. Different unsupervised and supervised acoustic seafloor classification techniques are applied to the processed MBES data to classify the seabed sediments. The analysis of the pre-nourishment MBES data indicates that the backscatter and consequently the classification are highly driven by the abundancy of shell fragments. These results will be used as a baseline to investigate the accumulation of the underwater nourishments. Independent grab samples will be used to select the

  11. Observations of shallow water marine ambient sound: the low frequency underwater soundscape of the central Oregon coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haxel, Joseph H; Dziak, Robert P; Matsumoto, Haru

    2013-05-01

    A year-long experiment (March 2010 to April 2011) measuring ambient sound at a shallow water site (50 m) on the central OR coast near the Port of Newport provides important baseline information for comparisons with future measurements associated with resource development along the inner continental shelf of the Pacific Northwest. Ambient levels in frequencies affected by surf-generated noise (f whale vocalizations. Additionally, an increase in spectral levels for frequencies ranging from 35 to 100 Hz is attributed to noise radiated from distant commercial ship commerce. One-second root mean square (rms) sound pressure level (SPLrms) estimates calculated across the 10-840 Hz frequency band for the entire year long deployment show minimum, mean, and maximum values of 84 dB, 101 dB, and 152 dB re 1 μPa.

  12. Sound

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2003-01-01

    Muddled about what makes music? Stuck on the study of harmonics? Dumbfounded by how sound gets around? Now you no longer have to struggle to teach concepts you really don t grasp yourself. Sound takes an intentionally light touch to help out all those adults science teachers, parents wanting to help with homework, home-schoolers seeking necessary scientific background to teach middle school physics with confidence. The book introduces sound waves and uses that model to explain sound-related occurrences. Starting with the basics of what causes sound and how it travels, you'll learn how musical instruments work, how sound waves add and subtract, how the human ear works, and even why you can sound like a Munchkin when you inhale helium. Sound is the fourth book in the award-winning Stop Faking It! Series, published by NSTA Press. Like the other popular volumes, it is written by irreverent educator Bill Robertson, who offers this Sound recommendation: One of the coolest activities is whacking a spinning metal rod...

  13. Sound

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Sound has the power to soothe, excite, warn, protect, and inform. Indeed, the transmission and reception of audio signals pervade our daily lives. Readers will examine the mechanics and properties of sound and provides an overview of the "interdisciplinary science called acoustics." Also covered are functions and diseases of the human ear.

  14. Sound

    CERN Document Server

    Rivera, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Sound is all around us. Learn how it is used in art, technology, and engineering. Five easy-to-read chapters explain the science behind sound, as well as its real-world applications. Vibrant, full-color photos, bolded glossary words, and a key stats section let readers zoom in even deeper. Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Abdo Zoom is a division of ABDO.

  15. Underwater robots

    CERN Document Server

    Antonelli, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    This book, now at the third edition, addresses the main control aspects in underwater manipulation tasks. The mathematical model with significant impact on the control strategy is discussed. The problem of controlling a 6-degrees-of-freedoms autonomous underwater vehicle is deeply investigated and a survey of fault detection/tolerant strategies for unmanned underwater vehicles is provided. Inverse kinematics, dynamic and interaction control for underwater vehicle-manipulator systems are then discussed. The code used to generate most of the numerical simulations is made available and briefly discussed.       

  16. Google™ underwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-10-01

    The first underwater panoramic images were added to Google Maps™, the company announced on 25 September. This first “underwater Street View collection,” launched in partnership with the Caitlin Seaview Survey, provides people with the opportunity to “become the next virtual Jacques Cousteau.” For more information, see: maps.google.com/ocean.

  17. Projector-Camera Systems for Immersive Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Treskunov, Anton; Pair, Jarrell

    2006-01-01

    .... These projector-camera systems effectively paint the real world with digital light. Any surface can become an interactive projection screen allowing unprepared spaces to be transformed into an immersive environment...

  18. The principle of the Fermionic projector

    CERN Document Server

    Finster, Felix

    2006-01-01

    The "principle of the fermionic projector" provides a new mathematical framework for the formulation of physical theories and is a promising approach for physics beyond the standard model. This book begins with a brief review of relativity, relativistic quantum mechanics, and classical gauge theories, emphasizing the basic physical concepts and mathematical foundations. The external field problem and Klein's paradox are discussed and then resolved by introducing the fermionic projector, a global object in space-time that generalizes the notion of the Dirac sea. At the mathematical core of the book is a precise definition of the fermionic projector and the use of methods of hyperbolic differential equations for detailed analysis. The fermionic projector makes it possible to formulate a new type of variational principle in space-time. The mathematical tools are developed for the analysis of the corresponding Euler-Lagrange equations. A particular variational principle is proposed that gives rise to an effective...

  19. Underwater Vehicle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dick, James L

    2007-01-01

    There is thus provided an underwater vehicle having facility for maneuvering alongside a retrieving vehicle, as by manipulation of bow and stern planes, for engaging a hull surface of the retrieving...

  20. Thermal resolution specification in infrared scene projectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaVeigne, Joe; Franks, Greg; Danielson, Tom

    2015-05-01

    Infrared scene projectors (IRSPs) are a key part of performing dynamic testing of infrared (IR) imaging systems. Two important properties of an IRSP system are apparent temperature and thermal resolution. Infrared scene projector technology continues to progress, with several systems capable of producing high apparent temperatures currently available or under development. These systems use different emitter pixel technologies, including resistive arrays, digital micro-mirror devices (DMDs), liquid crystals and LEDs to produce dynamic infrared scenes. A common theme amongst these systems is the specification of the bit depth of the read-in integrated circuit (RIIC) or projector engine , as opposed to specifying the desired thermal resolution as a function of radiance (or apparent temperature). For IRSPs, producing an accurate simulation of a realistic scene or scenario may require simulating radiance values that range over multiple orders of magnitude. Under these conditions, the necessary resolution or "step size" at low temperature values may be much smaller than what is acceptable at very high temperature values. A single bit depth value specified at the RIIC, especially when combined with variable transfer functions between commanded input and radiance output, may not offer the best representation of a customer's desired radiance resolution. In this paper, we discuss some of the various factors that affect thermal resolution of a scene projector system, and propose some specification guidelines regarding thermal resolution to help better define the real needs of an IR scene projector system.

  1. Selecting an LCD Projector for Your School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Media & Methods, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Presents criteria for schools selecting LCD (liquid crystal display) projectors based on expert opinions from the International Communications Industries Association, Inc. (ICIA). Highlights include intended use of the equipment; light output; portability; formats; video outputs; price; resolution; DLP technology; and a list of LCD projector…

  2. Faults on gamma projector Model 660 series for industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhri Ahmad; Arshad Yassin; Saidi Rajab; Shaharudin Sayuti; Abd Nassir Ibrahim; Abd Razak Hamzah

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to present MINTs experience pertaining to gamma projector maintenance activity. In Malaysia there are more than 100 gamma projectors that need to be maintained annually. Most of these projectors are of Tech-Ops Model 660 series portable gamma radiography systems, primarily for industrial radiography. The portability feature of the system provides both a safe means of transporting the radioactive source and operating flexibility, particularly useful in areas where access is limited. In Malaysia, Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT) has been approved as the National Gamma Projector Maintenance Centre by the Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB). This approval entitles MINT to undertake projector maintenance activity for all projectors throughout the country. Within 10 years of operation, MINT has dealt with thousands of projectors. (Author)

  3. Propagation of sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlberg, Magnus; Larsen, Ole Næsbye

    2017-01-01

    properties can be modified by sound absorption, refraction, and interference from multi paths caused by reflections.The path from the source to the receiver may be bent due to refraction. Besides geometrical attenuation, the ground effect and turbulence are the most important mechanisms to influence...... communication sounds for airborne acoustics and bottom and surface effects for underwater sounds. Refraction becomes very important close to shadow zones. For echolocation signals, geometric attenuation and sound absorption have the largest effects on the signals....

  4. Sound a very short introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Goldsmith, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Sound is integral to how we experience the world, in the form of noise as well as music. But what is sound? What is the physical basis of pitch and harmony? And how are sound waves exploited in musical instruments? Sound: A Very Short Introduction looks at the science of sound and the behaviour of sound waves with their different frequencies. It also explores sound in different contexts, covering the audible and inaudible, sound underground and underwater, acoustic and electronic sound, and hearing in humans and animals. It concludes with the problem of sound out of place—noise and its reduction.

  5. Underwater Hearing in Turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Katie L

    2016-01-01

    The hearing of turtles is poorly understood compared with the other reptiles. Although the mechanism of transduction of sound into a neural signal via hair cells has been described in detail, the rest of the auditory system is largely a black box. What is known is that turtles have higher hearing thresholds than other reptiles, with best frequencies around 500 Hz. They also have lower underwater hearing thresholds than those in air, owing to resonance of the middle ear cavity. Further studies demonstrated that all families of turtles and tortoises share a common middle ear cavity morphology, with scaling best suited to underwater hearing. This supports an aquatic origin of the group. Because turtles hear best under water, it is important to examine their vulnerability to anthropogenic noise. However, the lack of basic data makes such experiments difficult because only a few species of turtles have published audiograms. There are also almost no behavioral data available (understandable due to training difficulties). Finally, few studies show what kinds of sounds are behaviorally relevant. One notable paper revealed that the Australian snake-necked turtle (Chelodina oblonga) has a vocal repertoire in air, at the interface, and under water. Findings like these suggest that there is more to the turtle aquatic auditory scene than previously thought.

  6. 4th Pacific Rim Underwater Acoustics Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Wen; Cheng, Qianliu; Zhao, Hangfang

    2016-01-01

    These proceedings are a collection of 16 selected scientific papers and reviews by distinguished international experts that were presented at the 4th Pacific Rim Underwater Acoustics Conference (PRUAC), held in Hangzhou, China in October 2013. The topics discussed at the conference include internal wave observation and prediction; environmental uncertainty and coupling to sound propagation; environmental noise and ocean dynamics; dynamic modeling in acoustic fields; acoustic tomography and ocean parameter estimation; time reversal and matched field processing; underwater acoustic localization and communication as well as measurement instrumentations and platforms. These proceedings provide insights into the latest developments in underwater acoustics, promoting the exchange of ideas for the benefit of future research.

  7. Hybrid infrared scene projector (HIRSP): a high dynamic range infrared scene projector, part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantey, Thomas M.; Bowden, Mark; Cosby, David; Ballard, Gary

    2008-04-01

    This paper is a continuation of the merging of two dynamic infrared scene projector technologies to provide a unique and innovative solution for the simulation of high dynamic temperature ranges for testing infrared imaging sensors. This paper will present some of the challenges and performance issues encountered in implementing this unique projector system into a Hardware-in-the-Loop (HWIL) simulation facility. The projection system combines the technologies of a Honeywell BRITE II extended voltage range emissive resistor array device and an optically scanned laser diode array projector (LDAP). The high apparent temperature simulations are produced from the luminescent infrared radiation emitted by the high power laser diodes. The hybrid infrared projector system is being integrated into an existing HWIL simulation facility and is used to provide real-world high radiance imagery to an imaging infrared unit under test. The performance and operation of the projector is presented demonstrating the merit and success of the hybrid approach. The high dynamic range capability simulates a 250 Kelvin apparent background temperature to 850 Kelvin maximum apparent temperature signatures. This is a large increase in radiance projection over current infrared scene projection capabilities.

  8. ZoOHPraxiscope, Re-Inventing the Zoopraxiscope with an Overhead Projector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Faubel

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The ZoOHPraxiscope is a modified overhead projector that can be used to show cinematographic animations. It allows blending and mixing of animated shadow play with cinematographic animation. Similar to the Zoopraxiscope that was developed by the photographer Eadweard Muybridge in the 19th century, the ZoOHPraxiscope combines a rotating picture disc with a Laterna Magica and shutter mechanism. The mechanical shutter of the original device is replaced by a high-power LED that can be turned on and off at the fraction of a second. The overhead projector acts as Laterna Magica. This new device is used as a performance instrument to combine sound, vision, shadow play and animation.

  9. Hyperspectral Image Projector with Polarization Capability, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal outlines the development of a novel instrument for calibrating satellite based imaging sensors -- the Polarization Hyperspectral Image Projector...

  10. Dynamic IR scene projector based upon the digital micromirror device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, D. Brett; Bender, Matt W.; Crosby, Jay; Messer, Tim; Saylor, Daniel A.

    2001-08-01

    Optical Sciences Corp. has developed a new dynamic infrared scene projector technology called the Micromirror Array Projector System (MAPS). The MAPS is based upon the Texas Instruments Digital Micromirror DeviceTM which has been modified to project images that are suitable for testing sensors and seekers operating in the UV, visible, and IR wavebands. The projector may be used in several configurations which are optimized for specific applications. This paper provides an overview of the design and performance of the MAPS projection system, as well as example imagery from prototype projector systems.

  11. LCD Projectors: An Evaluation of Features and Utilization for Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawson, Curtis E.

    1990-01-01

    Describes liquid crystal display (LCD) projectors and discusses their use in educational settings. Highlights include rear screen projection; LCD projectors currently available and the number of pixel elements in each; and examples of instructional applications, including portable setups, and use with videocassette recorders (VCRs), computers, and…

  12. Advancements in the micromirror array projector technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, David B.; Bender, Matt W.; Crosby, Jay; Messer, Tim; Saylor, Daniel A.

    2003-09-01

    The Micromirror Array Projector System (MAPS) is a state-of-the-art dynamic scene projector developed by Optical Sciences Corporation (OSC) for Hardware-In-the-Loop (HWIL) simulation and sensor test applications. Since the introduction of the first MAPS in 2001, OSC has continued to improve the technology and develop systems for new projection and test applications. The MAPS is based upon the Texas Instruments Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) which has been modified to project high resolution, realistic imagery suitable for testing sensors and seekers operating in the UV, visible, NIR, and IR wavebands. This paper reviews the basic design and describes recent developments and new applications of the MAPS technology. Recent developments for the MAPS include increasing the format of the micromirror array to 1024x768 and increasing the binary frame rate to 10KHz. The MAPS technology has also been applied to the design of a Mobile Extended Spectrum Electro-Optical Test Set (MESEOTS). This test set is designed for testing UV, visible, NIR and IR sensors as well as laser rangefinders, laser trackers, and laser designators. The design and performance of the improved MAPS and the MESEOTS are discussed in paper.

  13. Routine check and annual maintenance for industrial radiography gamma projector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaharudin Sayuti; Abdul Nassir Ibrahim; Sukhri Ahmad; Arshad Yassin; Mohd Junaidi Jaapar; Khairul Anuar Mohd Salleh; Abdul Razak Hamzah

    2009-04-01

    The main objective of this paper is to share some experience pertaining to gamma projector maintenance programme. In Malaysia there are more than 100 gamma projectors, which need to be maintenance annually. Most of these projectors are Tech-Ops 660 series portable gamma radiography systems, which are used primarily for industrial radiography. The portability feature of the system provides both a safe means of transporting the radioactive source and operating flexibility, particularly useful in areas where access is limited. Generally, the national authorised service centre carries out the annual inspection of this system. In Malaysia, Malaysian Nuclear Agency has been recognised as the National Gamma Projector Maintenance Centre by the Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB). In this paper, a brief review of the design and operation is included in the discussion of the maintenance procedure, limitations and improvements of the gamma projector maintenance programme. (author)

  14. High-speed 3D surface measurement with mechanical projector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Jae-Sang; Zhang, Song

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a method to overcome the light spectral range limitation of using digital-light-processing (DLP) projector for 3D shape measurement by developing a mechanical projector. The mechanical projector enables much broader spectral range of light than that the DLP projector allows. The rapidly spinning disk with binary structures can generate desired sinusoidal patterns at a frequency of 10 kHz or higher with a single DC motor. By precisely synchronizing the camera with the projector, phase-shifted fringe patterns can be accurately captured for high-accuracy 3D shape measurement. We further employed a computational framework that could enable absolute phase and thus absolute 3D shape measurement. We developed such prototype system that experimentally demonstrated the success of the proposed method.

  15. Underwater manipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrum, P.B.; Cohen, G.H.

    1993-04-20

    Self-contained, waterproof, water-submersible, remote-controlled apparatus is described for manipulating a device, such as an ultrasonic transducer for measuring crack propagation on an underwater specimen undergoing shock testing. The subject manipulator includes metal bellows for transmittal of angular motions without the use of rotating shaft seals or O-rings. Inside the manipulator, a first stepper motor controls angular movement. In the preferred embodiment, the bellows permit the first stepper motor to move an ultrasonic transducer [plus minus]45 degrees in a first plane and a second bellows permit a second stepper motor to move the transducer [plus minus]10 degrees in a second plane orthogonal to the first. In addition, an XY motor-driven table provides XY motion.

  16. Underwater manipulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrum, P.B.; Cohen, G.H.

    1993-01-01

    Self-contained, waterproof, water-submersible, remote-controlled apparatus is described for manipulating a device, such as an ultrasonic transducer for measuring crack propagation on an underwater specimen undergoing shock testing. The subject manipulator includes metal bellows for transmittal of angular motions without the use of rotating shaft seals or O-rings. Inside the manipulator, a first stepper motor controls angular movement. In the preferred embodiment, the bellows permit the first stepper motor to move an ultrasonic transducer ±45 degrees in a first plane and a second bellows permit a second stepper motor to move the transducer ±10 degrees in a second plane orthogonal to the first. In addition, an XY motor-driven table provides XY motion

  17. Specialization for underwater hearing by the tympanic middle ear of the turtle, Trachemys scripta elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Brandt, Christian; Willis, K. L.

    2012-01-01

    Turtles, like other amphibious animals, face a trade-off between terrestrial and aquatic hearing. We used laser vibrometry and auditory brainstem responses to measure their sensitivity to vibration stimuli and to airborne versus underwater sound. Turtles are most sensitive to sound underwater...

  18. The aquatic tympanic ear: convergent adaptations for underwater hearing in three tetrapods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Wahlberg, Magnus; Larsen, Ole Næsbye

    pressure, low particle motion medium, and the consequence is that an efficient underwater ear is sensitive to sound pressure. It is often stated that underwater hearing can work efficiently without a middle ear apparatus by bone conduction, since sound is transmitted from water to inner ear tissue...... with little loss. However, the sensitivity of such an ear is limited by the very low particle motion in water. We report on underwater hearing in tetrapods ranging from totally aquatic (the clawed frog Xenopus laevis) and mostly aquatic (the red-eared slider Trachemys scripta) to mostly terrestrial (the...... is modified (cartilaginous or partly cartilaginous). In all three species, the lowest threshold to underwater sound is at this peak frequency and is around 80 dB re 1 µPa. The sensitivity to sound pressure is slightly lower in water than in air, making underwater hearing much more efficient in terms of sound...

  19. Discovery of Sound in the Sea: Resources for Educators, Students, the Public, and Policymakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigness-Raposa, Kathleen J; Scowcroft, Gail; Miller, James H; Ketten, Darlene R; Popper, Arthur N

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing concern about the effects of underwater sound on marine life. However, the science of sound is challenging. The Discovery of Sound in the Sea (DOSITS) Web site ( http://www.dosits.org ) was designed to provide comprehensive scientific information on underwater sound for the public and educational and media professionals. It covers the physical science of underwater sound and its use by people and marine animals for a range of tasks. Celebrating 10 years of online resources, DOSITS continues to develop new material and improvements, providing the best resource for the most up-to-date information on underwater sound and its potential effects.

  20. Effect of UV Radiation by Projectors on 3D Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovalenko Iaroslav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymers that solidify under light radiation are commonly used in digital light processing (DLP 3D printing. A wide range of photopolymers use photoinitiators that react to radiation in range of ultraviolet (UV wavelength. In the present study we provided measurement of radiant fluence in the UV wavelength range from 280 nm to 400 nm for two data projectors and compared effect of radiation on quality of 3D printing. One projector is commonly used DLP projector with high energy lamp. Second one is an industrial projector, in which RGB light emitting diodes (LEDs are replaced by UV LEDs with wattage at the level of 3.6 % of the first one. Achieved data confirmed uneven distribution of radiant energy on illuminated area. These results validate, that undesired heating light causes internal stress inside built models that causes defects in final products.

  1. Next Generation LWIR Spectrum Projector (CB-2) Design Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomas, M

    2004-01-01

    ...) and the two best ways to meet those requirements. Based upon the success of the CB-1 Spectrum Projector built and tested by MRC, Dugway Proving Ground, Block Engineering and Edgewood Research Development and Engineering Center (now U.S...

  2. Biophysics of underwater hearing in the clawed frog, Xenopus laevis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Elepfandt, A

    1995-01-01

    Anesthetized clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) were stimulated with underwater sound and the tympanic disk vibrations were studied using laser vibrometry. The tympanic disk velocities ranged from 0.01 to 0.5 mm/s (at a sound pressure of 2 Pa) in the frequency range of 0.4-4 kHz and were 20-40 dB higher...

  3. Low cost automatic cable winder for industrial radiography projector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nor Arymaswati Abdullah; Abdul Nassir Ibrahim; Shaharudin Sayuti; Glam Hadzir Patai Mohamad; Masrol Nizam Salleh; Arshad Yasin; Nur Aira Abdul Rahman

    2009-04-01

    Radiography is a well-established technique that is widely used to detect internal flaws in welds, castings and to check for misconstruction in assemblies. In general it is to verify weld quality in engineering structures such as the fabrication of pressure vessels, pipelines and storage tanks. It can be used on all metals, from light metals such as aluminium to dense metals such as lead. One of the techniques is industrial radiography projector. Industrial radiography projector is used to store radioactive materials when it is not required to expose the material under test. The projector will come together with a guide tube and control unit (cable winder and drive cable). When the source is to be used to radiograph an item, the cable winder will wind-out the source from projector to the desired location through a guide tube. Upon completion of the work the source will be retracted back into its safe shielded position in this projector. In common procedure, the operator has to be close to the exposures projector while wind-out or wind-in the source from and into the projector. This made the radiography operator receive the highest exposure among the radiation operator and this agreed by IAEA. This paper describes a winder cable that can be used to guide the movement of radiography source out of and into the projector that can be controlled by a remote control system. The system comprises of a gear, reversible motor and low frequency automatic controller. This system is powered by DC chargeable battery. (author)

  4. Dynamic IR scene projector using the digital micromirror device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, JiaoBo; Wang, Jun; Yang, Bin; Wang, JiLong; Wang, WeiNa; Xie, JunHu; Hu, Yu

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a new dynamic infrared scene projector using the Texas Instruments Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) which has been modified to project images which are suitable for testing sensor and seekers operating in the UV, visible, and IR wavebands. This paper provides an overview of the design and performance of the projection system, as well as example imagery from prototype projector systems. The dynamic IR scene contains 1024×768 pixels and can be updated at a rate of approximately 85 Hz.

  5. The Impact of Offshore Wind Turbines on Underwater Ambient Noise Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Glegg, Stewart

    2015-01-01

    The underwater sound levels generated by offshore wind turbine farms is a concern because of the possible environmental impact on marine mammals. This paper will consider how sound generated by a wind turbine is transmitted into a shallow water channel. It is shown that the underwater sound levels can be calculated for a typical offshore wind turbine by using the theory of Chapman and Ward (1990) combined with aeroacoustic models of trailing edge noise on the wind turbine blades. A procedure ...

  6. Visible-Infrared Hyperspectral Image Projector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolcar, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    The VisIR HIP generates spatially-spectrally complex scenes. The generated scenes simulate real-world targets viewed by various remote sensing instruments. The VisIR HIP consists of two subsystems: a spectral engine and a spatial engine. The spectral engine generates spectrally complex uniform illumination that spans the wavelength range between 380 nm and 1,600 nm. The spatial engine generates two-dimensional gray-scale scenes. When combined, the two engines are capable of producing two-dimensional scenes with a unique spectrum at each pixel. The VisIR HIP can be used to calibrate any spectrally sensitive remote-sensing instrument. Tests were conducted on the Wide-field Imaging Interferometer Testbed at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center. The device is a variation of the calibrated hyperspectral image projector developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, MD. It uses Gooch & Housego Visible and Infrared OL490 Agile Light Sources to generate arbitrary spectra. The two light sources are coupled to a digital light processing (DLP(TradeMark)) digital mirror device (DMD) that serves as the spatial engine. Scenes are displayed on the DMD synchronously with desired spectrum. Scene/spectrum combinations are displayed in rapid succession, over time intervals that are short compared to the integration time of the system under test.

  7. Thermal management of pico projector using a piezoelectric fan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyu, Jin-Cherng; Tsai, Ho-Min

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A fin-equipped pico projector cooled by a vibrating piezoelectric fan was studied. • The piezoelectric fan was actuated with four different frequencies at 90 V rms . • Both the heater power and the fan vibrating frequency affected the fan amplitude. • Forced and natural convection might be equally significant at a high heater power. • Fan amplitude strongly affected the thermal resistance of pico projector. - Abstract: A fin-array-equipped test pico projector with horizontal or vertical orientation was cooled by a vibrating piezoelectric fan in this study. The 47 mm × 10 mm piezoelectric fan was operated at 90 V rms at a frequency ranging from 135.5 Hz to 129.5 Hz. It was found that the fan vibrating amplitude was affected by both the input power of the heater and the fan operating frequency. The thermal resistance of the fan-cooled test pico projector not always reduced as the heater power increased, and would be equally affected by both forced convection and natural convection depending on Gr and Re numbers. Such phenomenon that might arise from the temperature effect on the fan blade material and the fluidic damping was especially marked when the plate-fin-array-equipped test pico projector was horizontally tested. The results also showed that the pin-fin array was more favorable than plate-fin array for the cooling of test pico projector as a piezoelectric fan vibrated at a specific frequency, regardless of the orientation. When the pin-fin array was cooled by a vibrating piezoelectric fan at 133.5 Hz at 7 W in a horizontally and vertically oriented projector, the maximum thermal resistance reduction was about 3.4 °C/W and 3.8 °C/W, respectively

  8. Underwater Geotechnical Foundations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Landris

    2001-01-01

    This report provides an overview and description of the design and construction of underwater geotechnical foundations and offers preliminary guidance based on past and current technology applications...

  9. Evaluating underwater noise regulations for piling noise in Belgium and The Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Rumes, B.; Erkman, A.; Haelters, J.

    2016-01-01

    There is concern about possible effects on the marine ecosystem of high levels of underwater noise generated during pile driving for the construction of offshore wind farms. As a result, various national governments in Europe have identified limits of underwater sound levels, as such imposing in many cases the use of noise mitigation measures. In this paper we compare the regulations with regard to impulsive underwater noise in the Belgian wind farm zone with those in the Dutch wind energy zo...

  10. Marine Animal Sound Database. Twelve Years of Tracking 52-Hz Whale Calls from a Unique Source in the North Pacific

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Watkins, William

    2004-01-01

    Long-term monitoring of underwater sounds using U.S. Navy SOSUS and other hydrophone arrays allowed us to follow the seasonal distribution of underwater calls produced by blue, fin and humpback whales across the North Pacific...

  11. Dynamic infrared scene projectors based upon the DMD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, D. Brett; Bender, Matt; Crosby, Jay; Messer, Tim

    2009-02-01

    The Micromirror Array Projector System (MAPS) is an advanced dynamic scene projector system developed by Optical Sciences Corporation (OSC) for Hardware-In-the-Loop (HWIL) simulation and sensor test applications. The MAPS is based upon the Texas Instruments Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) which has been modified to project high resolution, realistic imagery suitable for testing sensors and seekers operating in the UV, visible, NIR, and IR wavebands. Since the introduction of the first MAPS in 2001, OSC has continued to improve the technology and develop systems for new projection and Electro-Optical (E-O) test applications. This paper reviews the basic MAPS design and performance capabilities. We also present example projectors and E-O test sets designed and fabricated by OSC in the last 7 years. Finally, current research efforts and new applications of the MAPS technology are discussed.

  12. Logical reformulation of quantum mechanics. IV. Projectors in semiclassical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omnes, R.

    1989-01-01

    This is a technical paper providing the proofs of three useful theorems playing a central role in two kinds of physical applications: an explicit logical and mathematical formulation of the interpretation of quantum mechanics and the corresponding description of irreversibility. The Appendix contains a brief mathematical introduction to microlocal analysis. Three theorems are derived in the text: (A) Associating a projector in Hilbert space with a macroscopic regular cell in classical phase space. (B) Specifying the algebra of the projectors associated with different cells. (C) Showing the connection between the classical motion of cells and the Schroedinger evolution of projectors for a class of regular Hamiltonians corresponding approximately to deterministic systems as described within the framework of quantum mechanics. Applications to the interpretation of quantum mechanics are given and the consequences for irreversibility will be given later

  13. Arctic Climate Observations Using Underwater Sound (ACOUS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-30

    of the ice cover in the Arctic Ocean. ACOUS will provide data on the large thermohaline change now occurring in the Arctic Ocean, and advance the...at UAF for a simulation period of 47 years. Two general regimes of circulation with a 15-year period were discovered . Anti-cyclonic circulation

  14. Current status of the laser diode array projector technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, D. Brett; Saylor, Daniel A.

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes recent developments and the current status of the Laser Diode Array Projector (LDAP) Technology. The LDAP is a state-of-the-art dynamic infrared scene projector system capable of generating high resolution in-band infrared imagery at high frame rates. Three LDAPs are now operational at the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command's (AMCOM) Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (MRDEC). These projectors have been used to support multiple Hardware-in-the-Loop test entries of various seeker configurations. Seeker configurations tested include an InSb 256 X $256 focal-plane array (FPA), an InSb 512 X 512 FPA, a PtSi 640 X 480 FPA, a PtSi 256 X 256 FPA, an uncooled 320 X 240 microbolometer FPA, and two dual field- of-view (FOV) seekers. Several improvements in the projector technology have been made since we last reported in 1997. The format size has been increased to 544 X 544, and 672 X 512, and it has been proven that the LDAP can be synchronized without a signal from the unit-under test (UUT). The control software has been enhanced to provide 'point and click' control for setup, calibration, image display, image capture, and data analysis. In addition, the first long-wave infrared (LWIR) LDAP is now operational, as well as a dual field of view LDAP which can change its FOV within 0.25 seconds. The projector is interfaced to a Silicon Graphics scene generation computer which is capable of real-time 3-D scene generation. Sample images generated with the projector and captured by an InSb FPA sensor are included in the text.

  15. Underwater Scene Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nanyoung

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an underwater scene composition for elementary-education majors. This project deals with watercolor with crayon or oil-pastel resist (medium); the beauty of nature represented by fish in the underwater scene (theme); texture and pattern (design elements); drawing simple forms (drawing skill); and composition…

  16. Canonical surfaces associated with projectors in Grassmannian sigma models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussin, V.; Yurdusen, I.; Zakrzewski, W. J.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the construction of higher-dimensional surfaces based on the harmonic maps of S 2 into CP N-1 and other Grassmannians. We show that there are two ways of implementing this procedure - both based on the use of the relevant projectors. We study various properties of such projectors and show that the Gaussian curvature of these surfaces, in general, is not constant. We look in detail at the surfaces corresponding to the Veronese sequence of such maps and show that for all of them this curvature is constant but its value depends on which mapping is used in the construction of the surface.

  17. Accurate and Simple Calibration of DLP Projector Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilm, Jakob; Olesen, Oline Vinter; Larsen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    Much work has been devoted to the calibration of optical cameras, and accurate and simple methods are now available which require only a small number of calibration targets. The problem of obtaining these parameters for light projectors has not been studied as extensively and most current methods...... require a camera and involve feature extraction from a known projected pattern. In this work we present a novel calibration technique for DLP Projector systems based on phase shifting profilometry projection onto a printed calibration target. In contrast to most current methods, the one presented here...

  18. 77 FR 34967 - Notice of Issuance of Final Determination Concerning Digital Projectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... Digital Projectors, Substantial Transformation Dear Mr. Hall and Mr. Sjoberg: This is in response to your... Determination Concerning Digital Projectors AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland... certain digital projectors. Based upon the facts presented, CBP has concluded in the final determination...

  19. 76 FR 49782 - Notice of Issuance of Final Determination Concerning Certain Digital Projectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ...: Final Determination; Substantial Transformation; Country of Origin of Certain Digital Projectors Dear Mr... Determination Concerning Certain Digital Projectors AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of... of certain digital projectors. Based upon the facts presented, CBP has concluded that the assembly...

  20. Passive aquatic listener (PAL): An adoptive underwater acoustic recording system for the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anagnostou, Marios N.; Nystuen, Jeffrey A.; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.; Papadopoulos, Anastasios; Lykousis, Vassilios

    2011-01-01

    The ambient sound field in the ocean is a combination of natural and manmade sounds. Consequently, the interpretation of the ambient sound field can be used to quantify these processes. In the frequency range from 1 to 50 kHz, the general character of ocean ambient sound is a slowly changing background that is closely associated with local wind speed, interspersed with shorter time scale events such as rain storms, ships and animal calls. At lower frequencies the underwater ambient sound budget includes geologically generated sound activities including underwater volcanic eruptions, seismic and seepage faults that generate bubbles, etc. that can also potentially be classified and quantified. Acoustic data are collected on hydrophones. Hydrophones are simple, robust sensors that can be deployed on most ocean instrumentation systems including surface or sub-surface moorings, bottom mounted systems, drifters, ARGO floats or autonomous underwater platforms. A dedicated oceanic underwater recorder called a passive acoustic listener (PAL) has been developed. A principal issue is to accurately distinguish different sound sources so that they can be quantified as part of a sound budget, and then quantified if appropriate. Based on ongoing data collected from the Poseidon II network the retrieval potential of multi-parameters from underwater sound, including meteorological (i.e., precipitation and winds) and in general geophysical, anthropogenetic (i.e., ships, submarines, etc.) and biological (whales, etc.) sources is presented.

  1. A Brief Review of Anthropogenic Sound in the Oceans

    OpenAIRE

    Studds, Gerry E; Wright, Andrew J

    2007-01-01

    Sound in the oceans is generated by a variety of natural sources, such as breaking waves, rain, and marine animals, as well as a variety of human-produced sources, such as ships, sonars and seismic signals. This overview will begin with a quick review of some basic properties of sound waves with particular reference to differences between the behaviours of these waves underwater versus in air. A basic understanding of the physics of underwater sound is critical to understanding how marine ani...

  2. On proximity detection systems for pico-projectors

    OpenAIRE

    Buckley, Edward

    2012-01-01

    It has been suggested that proximity detection systems could potentially be beneficial in increasing the eye-safe luminous flux of laser-based picoprojectors. In this letter it is shown that, whilst the benefit for LCOS-based systems could be significant, the impact upon scanned-beam projectors is far smaller.

  3. Projector Quantum Monte Carlo without minus-sign problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frick, M.; Raedt, H. De

    Quantum Monte Carlo techniques often suffer from the so-called minus-sign problem. This paper explores a possibility to circumvent this fundamental problem by combining the Projector Quantum Monte Carlo method with the variational principle. Results are presented for the two-dimensional Hubbard

  4. Projector augmented wave method: ab initio molecular dynamics ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The projector augmented wave method is an all-electron method for efficient ab initio molecular dynamics simulations with full wave functions. .... In that case the muffin–tin approximation is used solely to define the basis set. ..... functions probe the local character of the auxiliary wave function in the atomic region. Examples ...

  5. Conversion of Bench Demonstration Using the Overhead Projector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, A. H.; Al-Shuaili, Ali

    2001-01-01

    Presents a new technique for projecting science demonstrations, enabling a larger number of students to see the demonstration without scaling up the experiment. Describes innovative attachments that magnify projector images using mirrors, solutions to the problem of convergent test tubes, development of overhead projection experiments, necessary…

  6. Speckle reduction methods in laser-based picture projectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, M. Nadeem; Chen, Xuyuan

    2016-02-01

    Laser sources have been promised for many years to be better light sources as compared to traditional lamps or light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for projectors, which enable projectors having wide colour gamut for vivid image, super brightness and high contrast for the best picture quality, long lifetime for maintain free operation, mercury free, and low power consumption for green environment. A major technology obstacle in using lasers for projection has been the speckle noise caused by to the coherent nature of the lasers. For speckle reduction, current state of the art solutions apply moving parts with large physical space demand. Solutions beyond the state of the art need to be developed such as integrated optical components, hybrid MOEMS devices, and active phase modulators for compact speckle reduction. In this article, major methods reported in the literature for the speckle reduction in laser projectors are presented and explained. With the advancement in semiconductor lasers with largely reduced cost for the red, green and the blue primary colours, and the developed methods for their speckle reduction, it is hoped that the lasers will be widely utilized in different projector applications in the near future.

  7. Autocalibrating Tiled Projectors on Piecewise Smooth Vertically Extruded Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, Behzad; Majumder, Aditi

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we present a novel technique to calibrate multiple casually aligned projectors on fiducial-free piecewise smooth vertically extruded surfaces using a single camera. Such surfaces include cylindrical displays and CAVEs, common in immersive virtual reality systems. We impose two priors to the display surface. We assume the surface is a piecewise smooth vertically extruded surface for which the aspect ratio of the rectangle formed by the four corners of the surface is known and the boundary is visible and segmentable. Using these priors, we can estimate the display's 3D geometry and camera extrinsic parameters using a nonlinear optimization technique from a single image without any explicit display to camera correspondences. Using the estimated camera and display properties, the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of each projector are recovered using a single projected pattern seen by the camera. This in turn is used to register the images on the display from any arbitrary viewpoint making it appropriate for virtual reality systems. The fast convergence and robustness of this method is achieved via a novel dimension reduction technique for camera parameter estimation and a novel deterministic technique for projector property estimation. This simplicity, efficiency, and robustness of our method enable several coveted features for nonplanar projection-based displays. First, it allows fast recalibration in the face of projector, display or camera movements and even change in display shape. Second, this opens up, for the first time, the possibility of allowing multiple projectors to overlap on the corners of the CAVE-a popular immersive VR display system. Finally, this opens up the possibility of easily deploying multiprojector displays on aesthetic novel shapes for edutainment and digital signage applications.

  8. Underwater Noise Modelling of Wave Energy Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    Future large-scale implementation of wave energy converts (WECs) will introduce an anthropogenic activity in the ocean which may contribute to underwater noise. The Ocean houses several marine species with acoustic sensibility; consequently the potential impact of the underwater noise needs to be addressed. At present, there are no acoustic impact studies based on acquired data. The WEAM project (Wave Energy Acoustic Monitoring) aims at developing an underwater noise monitoring plan for WECs. The development of an acoustic monitoring plan must consider the sound propagation in the ocean, identify noise sources, understand the operational characteristics and select adequate instrumentation. Any monitoring strategy must involve in-situ measurements. However, the vast distances which sound travels within the ocean, can make in-situ measurements covering the entire area of interest, impracticable. This difficulty can be partially overcome through acoustic numerical modelling. This paper presents a synthetic study, on the application of acoustic forward modelling and the evaluation of the impact of noise produced by wave energy devices on marine mammals using criteria based on audiograms of dolphins, or other species. The idea is to illustrate the application of that methodology, and to show to what extent it allows for estimating distances of impacts due to acoustic noise.

  9. Underwater 3D filming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Rinaldi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available After an experimental phase of many years, 3D filming is now effective and successful. Improvements are still possible, but the film industry achieved memorable success on 3D movie’s box offices due to the overall quality of its products. Special environments such as space (“Gravity” and the underwater realm look perfect to be reproduced in 3D. “Filming in space” was possible in “Gravity” using special effects and computer graphic. The underwater realm is still difficult to be handled. Underwater filming in 3D was not that easy and effective as filming in 2D, since not long ago. After almost 3 years of research, a French, Austrian and Italian team realized a perfect tool to film underwater, in 3D, without any constrains. This allows filmmakers to bring the audience deep inside an environment where they most probably will never have the chance to be.

  10. Underwater Glider System Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkins, Scott A; Humphreys, Douglas E; Sherman, Jeff; Osse, Jim; Jones, Clayton; Leonard, Naomi; Graver, Joshua; Bachmayer, Ralf; Clem, Ted; Carroll, Paul; Davis, Philip; Berry, Jon; Worley, Paul; Wasyl, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    The goals of this study are to determine how to advance from present capabilities of underwater glider (and hybrid motorglider) technology to what could be possible within the next few years; and to identify critical research issues that must be resolved to make such advancements possible. These goals were pursued by merging archival flight data with numerical model results and system spreadsheet analysis to extrapolate from the present state-of-the–art in underwater (UW) gliders to potential...

  11. Offshore dredger sounds: Source levels, sound maps, and risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, C.A.F. de; Ainslie, M.A.; Heinis, F.; Janmaat, J.

    2016-01-01

    The underwater sound produced during construction of the Port of Rotterdam harbor extension (Maasvlakte 2) was measured, with emphasis on the contribution of the trailing suction hopper dredgers during their various activities: dredging, transport, and discharge of sediment. Measured source levels

  12. Advancements in the micromirror array projector technology II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, D. B.; Bender, Matt; Crosby, Jay; McCall, Sean; Messer, Tim; Saylor, Daniel A.

    2005-05-01

    The Micromirror Array Projector System (MAPS) is a state-of-the-art dynamic scene projector developed by Optical Sciences Corporation (OSC) for Hardware-In-the-Loop (HWIL) simulation and sensor test applications. Since the introduction of the first MAPS in 2001, OSC has continued to improve the technology and develop systems for new projection and test applications. The MAPS is based upon the Texas Instruments Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) which has been modified to project high resolution, realistic imagery suitable for testing sensors and seekers operating in the UV, visible, NIR, and IR wavebands. This paper reviews the basic design and describes recent developments and new applications of the MAPS technology. Recent developments for the MAPS include increasing the format of the micromirror array to 1280x1024, increasing the video frame rate to >230 Hz, development of a DMD active cooling system, and development of a high-temperature illumination blackbody.

  13. An attenuated projector-backprojector for iterative SPECT reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gullberg, G.T.; Pelc, N.J.; Huesman, R.H.; Budinger, T.F.; Malko, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    A new ray-driven projector-backprojector which can easily be adapted for hardware implementation is described and simulated in software. The projector-backprojector discretely models the attenuated Radon transform of a source distributed within an attenuating medium as line integrals of discrete pixels, obtained using the standard sampling technique of averaging the emission source or attenuation distribution over small square regions. Attenuation factors are calculated for each pixel during the projection and backprojection operations instead of using precalculated values. The calculation of the factors requires a specification of the attenuation distribution, estimated either from an assumed constant distribution and an approximate body outline or from transmission measurements. The distribution of attenuation coefficients is stored in memory for efficient access during the projection and backprojection operations. The reconstruction of the source distribution is obtained by using a conjugate gradient or SIRT type iterative algorithm which requires one projection and one backprojection operation for each iteration. (author)

  14. Design of LED projector based on gradient-index lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Liyong; Zhu, Xiangbing; Cui, Haitian; Wang, Yuanhang

    2018-01-01

    In this study, a new type of projector light path is designed to eliminate the deficits of existing projection systems, such as complex structure and low collection efficiency. Using a three-color LED array as the lighting source, by means of the special optical properties of a gradient-index lens, the complex structure of the traditional projector is simplified. Traditional components, such as the color wheel, relay lens, and mirror, become unnecessary. In this way, traditional problems, such as low utilization of light energy and loss of light energy, are solved. With the help of Zemax software, the projection lens is optimized. The optimized projection lens, LED, gradient-index lens, and digital micromirror device are imported into Tracepro. The ray tracing results show that both the utilization of light energy and the uniformity are improved significantly.

  15. Study of a 252Cf source projector for plesiocurietherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanche, J.; Brault, G.; Barthelemy, P.; Boucher, R.; Berger, R.; Chemtob, M.; Parmentier, N.

    1975-01-01

    The source projector described is roughly a sphere 1.10m in diameter with an octogonal steel body and weighs about a metric ton. This device is designed for the purposes: to provide a biological shielding for the storage of 16 source-holders containing a total amount of 25μg of californium-252 and to insure the simultaneous ejection of up to 6 source-holders through the applicators. The availability of the californium-252 source-projector by the end of this year will provide major assistance in the clinical evaluation program of neutron plesiocurietherapy by facilitating the implantation of source-assemblies and reducing the radiation dose to hospital staff [fr

  16. Definition and results of test cases for shipping sound maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colin,M.E.G.D.; Ainslie, M.A.; Binnerts, B.; Jong, C.A.F. de; Karasalo, I.; Östberg, M.; Sertlek, H.O.; Folegot, T.; Clorennec, D.

    2015-01-01

    The SONIC (Suppression Of underwater Noise Induced by Cavitation) and AQUO (Achieve QUieter Oceans by shipping noise footprint reduction) projects were awarded within the European Seventh Framework Program to develop tools to investigate and mitigate the effects of underwater sound generated by

  17. Sound and sound sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Wahlberg, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    There is no difference in principle between the infrasonic and ultrasonic sounds, which are inaudible to humans (or other animals) and the sounds that we can hear. In all cases, sound is a wave of pressure and particle oscillations propagating through an elastic medium, such as air. This chapter...... is about the physical laws that govern how animals produce sound signals and how physical principles determine the signals’ frequency content and sound level, the nature of the sound field (sound pressure versus particle vibrations) as well as directional properties of the emitted signal. Many...... of these properties are dictated by simple physical relationships between the size of the sound emitter and the wavelength of emitted sound. The wavelengths of the signals need to be sufficiently short in relation to the size of the emitter to allow for the efficient production of propagating sound pressure waves...

  18. "Boxnep" advanced modular underwater robot

    OpenAIRE

    Buluev, Ilia

    2016-01-01

    The article discusses the relevance of the underwater vehicles' ability to solve a wide range of problems. The idea put in the basis of this research is designing a modular underwater robot. It allows to mount various equipment and test it in underwater environment. The paper deals with the concept of the robot and its characteristics.

  19. Resources for Underwater Robotics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Michael L.; Freitas, William M.

    2016-01-01

    4-H clubs can build and program underwater robots from raw materials. An annotated resource list for engaging youth in building underwater remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) is provided. This article is a companion piece to the Research in Brief article "Building Teen Futures with Underwater Robotics" in this issue of the "Journal of…

  20. Calibration of Underwater Acoustic Transducers at NRL/USRD

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    MacLean2 in 1940 and Cook3 in 1941. Standard hydrophones were developed by BTL using piezoelectric crystals of Rochelle salt and ammonium dihydrogen...phosphate. BTL developed modified moving-coil sound projectors for the audio-frequency range and piezoelectric crystal sources for the ultrasonic range...2: epT= MPpT = (TipSpdo/d2 )exp[jk(do-d 2)1] (3) where MT is the receving voltage sensitivity of T. Comb.ning Eqs. (2) and (3) yields epH/epT=(Mtd2/Mldl

  1. A Multi-Projector Calibration Method for Virtual Reality Simulators with Analytically Defined Screens

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina Portalés; Sergio Casas; Inmaculada Coma; Marcos Fernández

    2017-01-01

    The geometric calibration of projectors is a demanding task, particularly for the industry of virtual reality simulators. Different methods have been developed during the last decades to retrieve the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of projectors, most of them being based on planar homographies and some requiring an extended calibration process. The aim of our research work is to design a fast and user-friendly method to provide multi-projector calibration on analytically defined screens, w...

  2. A Multi-Projector Calibration Method for Virtual Reality Simulators with Analytically Defined Screens

    OpenAIRE

    Portalés Ricart, Cristina; Casas Yrurzum, Sergio; Coma Tatay, Inmaculada; Fernández Marín, Marcos

    2017-01-01

    The geometric calibration of projectors is a demanding task, particularly for the industry of virtual reality simulators. Different methods have been developed during the last decades to retrieve the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of projectors, most of them being based on planar homographies and some requiring an extended calibration process. The aim of our research work is to design a fast and user-friendly method to provide multi-projector calibration on analytically defined screens, w...

  3. Segmented separable footprint projector for digital breast tomosynthesis and its application for subpixel reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiabei; Fessler, Jeffrey A; Chan, Heang-Ping

    2017-03-01

    Digital forward and back projectors play a significant role in iterative image reconstruction. The accuracy of the projector affects the quality of the reconstructed images. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) often uses the ray-tracing (RT) projector that ignores finite detector element size. This paper proposes a modified version of the separable footprint (SF) projector, called the segmented separable footprint (SG) projector, that calculates efficiently the Radon transform mean value over each detector element. The SG projector is specifically designed for DBT reconstruction because of the large height-to-width ratio of the voxels generally used in DBT. This study evaluates the effectiveness of the SG projector in reducing projection error and improving DBT reconstruction quality. We quantitatively compared the projection error of the RT and the SG projector at different locations and their performance in regular and subpixel DBT reconstruction. Subpixel reconstructions used finer voxels in the imaged volume than the detector pixel size. Subpixel reconstruction with RT projector uses interpolated projection views as input to provide adequate coverage of the finer voxel grid with the traced rays. Subpixel reconstruction with the SG projector, however, uses the measured projection views without interpolation. We simulated DBT projections of a test phantom using CatSim (GE Global Research, Niskayuna, NY) under idealized imaging conditions without noise and blur, to analyze the effects of the projectors and subpixel reconstruction without other image degrading factors. The phantom contained an array of horizontal and vertical line pair patterns (1 to 9.5 line pairs/mm) and pairs of closely spaced spheres (diameters 0.053 to 0.5 mm) embedded at the mid-plane of a 5-cm-thick breast tissue-equivalent uniform volume. The images were reconstructed with regular simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) and subpixel SART using different projectors. The

  4. Underwater detection by using ultrasonic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakar, S. A. A.; Ong, N. R.; Aziz, M. H. A.; Alcain, J. B.; Haimi, W. M. W. N.; Sauli, Z.

    2017-09-01

    This paper described the low cost implementation of hardware and software in developing the system of ultrasonic which can visualize the feedback of sound in the form of measured distance through mobile phone and monitoring the frequency of detection by using real time graph of Java application. A single waterproof transducer of JSN-SR04T had been used to determine the distance of an object based on operation of the classic pulse echo detection method underwater. In this experiment, the system was tested by placing the housing which consisted of Arduino UNO, Bluetooth module of HC-06, ultrasonic sensor and LEDs at the top of the box and the transducer was immersed in the water. The system which had been tested for detection in vertical form was found to be capable of reporting through the use of colored LEDs as indicator to the relative proximity of object distance underwater form the sensor. As a conclusion, the system can detect the presence of an object underwater within the range of ultrasonic sensor and display the measured distance onto the mobile phone and the real time graph had been successfully generated.

  5. Sound Hole Sound

    OpenAIRE

    Politzer, David

    2015-01-01

    The volume of air that goes in and out of a musical instrument's sound hole is related to the sound hole's contribution to the volume of the sound. Helmholtz's result for the simplest case of steady flow through an elliptical hole is reviewed. Measurements on multiple holes in sound box geometries and scales relevant to real musical instruments demonstrate the importance of a variety of effects. Electric capacitance of single flat plates is a mathematically identical problem, offering an alte...

  6. Speckle perception and disturbance limit in laser based projectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschaffelt, Guy; Roelandt, Stijn; Meuret, Youri; Van den Broeck, Wendy; Kilpi, Katriina; Lievens, Bram; Jacobs, An; Janssens, Peter; Thienpont, Hugo

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the level of speckle that can be tolerated in a laser cinema projector. For this purpose, we equipped a movie theatre room with a prototype laser projector. A group of 186 participants was gathered to evaluate the speckle perception of several, short movie trailers in a subjective `Quality of Experience' experiment. This study is important as the introduction of lasers in projection systems has been hampered by the presence of speckle in projected images. We identify a speckle disturbance threshold by statistically analyzing the observers' responses for different values of the amount of speckle, which was monitored using a well-defined speckle measurement method. The analysis shows that the speckle perception of a human observer is not only dependent on the objectively measured amount of speckle, but it is also strongly influenced by the image content. As is also discussed in [Verschaffelt et al., Scientific Reports 5, art. nr. 14105, 2015] we find that, for moving images, the speckle becomes disturbing if the speckle contrast becomes larger than 6.9% for the red, 6.0% for the green, and 4.8% for the blue primary colors of the projector, whereas for still images the speckle detection threshold is about 3%. As we could not independently tune the speckle contrast of each of the primary colors, this speckle disturbance limit seems to be determined by the 6.9% speckle contrast of the red color as this primary color contains the largest amount of speckle. The speckle disturbance limit for movies thus turns out to be substantially larger than that for still images, and hence is easier to attain.

  7. Underwater Wireless Acousto-Optic Waveguide (UWAOW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Giovanni; Kent, Lionel W. J.; Laycock, Leslie C.

    2017-10-01

    The present study originated in the lack of research into achieving underwater total internal reflection (TIR) via the acousto-optic effect. The uniqueness of this technique exists in the fact that it is based on a high sound pressure level which induces a localised change in refractive index of seawater sufficient to achieve total internal reflection within the communication channel. Different transducer systems for generating the pressure wave have been investigated and take the form of a wave which may be either a standing wave, or a novel beamforming technique. The former is based on an array of transducers and with an acoustic mirror at the receiver in order to establish the standing wave. The alternative approach relies on the high intrinsic directionality of a novel beamformer where an annular transducer array is examined as an acoustic source. In this paper, the main characteristics of the acoustic optic waveguide will be presented. This will include both sound and light propagation in the ocean, TIR, novel beam propagation, the refractive index of water as a function of the externally applied acoustic pressure, and the acoustic technology. The modelled results, the limitations imposed by the challenging medium, and the system requirements required to obtain an Underwater Wireless Acousto-Optic Waveguide (UWAOW) will be also addressed.

  8. Color seamlessness in multi-projector displays using constrained gamut morphing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, Behzad; Lazarov, Maxim; Majumder, Aditi; Gopi, M

    2009-01-01

    Multi-projector displays show significant spatial variation in 3D color gamut due to variation in the chromaticity gamuts across the projectors, vignetting effect of each projector and also overlap across adjacent projectors. In this paper we present a new constrained gamut morphing algorithm that removes all these variations and results in true color seamlessness across tiled multiprojector displays. Our color morphing algorithm adjusts the intensities of light from each pixel of each projector precisely to achieve a smooth morphing from one projector's gamut to the other's through the overlap region. This morphing is achieved by imposing precise constraints on the perceptual difference between the gamuts of two adjacent pixels. In addition, our gamut morphing assures a C1 continuity yielding visually pleasing appearance across the entire display.We demonstrate our method successfully on a planar and a curved display using both low and high-end projectors. Our approach is completely scalable, efficient and automatic. We also demonstrate the real-time performance of our image correction algorithm on GPUs for interactive applications. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that presents a scalable method with a strong foundation in perception and realizes, for the first time, a truly seamless display where the number of projectors cannot be deciphered.

  9. 76 FR 30180 - Notice of Issuance of Final Determination Concerning Pocket Projectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-24

    ... their production where the last substantial transformation occurs. Therefore, when the light engine... transformation occurs. Therefore, when the light engine module and PCBA main board module are assembled and... pocket projector is a 1.97'' x 0.59'' x 4.06'', four ounce, digital light processing (DLP) projector that...

  10. State stability analysis for the fermionic projector in the continuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoch, Stefan Ludwig

    2008-07-01

    The principle of the fermionic projector in the continuum gives an indication that there might be a deeper reason why elementary particles only appear with a few definite masses. In this thesis the existence of approximately state-stable configurations is shown. In order to achieve that, we make use of a variational principle for the fermionic projector in the continuum which contains certain contributions supported on the light cone. In a certain sense, these extra terms contain the structure of the underlying discrete spacetime. Lorentz invariant distributions and their convolutions are studied. Some of these are well-defined because the convolution integrals have compactly supported integrands. Other convolutions can be regularized such that the property of being ill-defined only plays a role on the light cone. These results are used to analyze the variational principle and to give criteria for state stability, which can be numerically analyzed. Some plots are presented to allow a decision about state stability and to show how possible configurations could look like. (orig.)

  11. Micropatterning with a liquid crystal display (LCD) projector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoga, Kazuyoshi; Kobayashi, Jun; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2014-01-01

    Photolithography has been applied to biological applications such as cell and protein micropatterning and the fabrication of microfluidic channels. However, the preparation of photomasks for projecting micropattern lighting images is often time consuming and costly. Therefore, we have developed maskless photolithography devices by modifying the optics of commercially available liquid crystal display (LCD) projectors from extended to reduced projection. The developed second and third devices produce practically a centimeter-scale micropattern by dividing an original large mask pattern into several patterns, which are individually and synchronously exposed to substrates with a motorized XY-stage, applying them to cell micropatterning and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic device production. The first part of this chapter describes the developments of the maskless photolithography devices. The second part describes the exposure control system with a motorized XY-stage. The third part describes the applications of devices to cell micropatterning. The last part describes the application of the devices to the fabrication of the PDMS microfluidic channel. Maskless photolithography with an LCD projector has a large advantage with no requirement for a photomask. In particular, the maskless photolithography devices show a greater power by optimizing the conditions of pattern size and shape. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. State stability analysis for the fermionic projector in the continuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoch, Stefan Ludwig

    2008-01-01

    The principle of the fermionic projector in the continuum gives an indication that there might be a deeper reason why elementary particles only appear with a few definite masses. In this thesis the existence of approximately state-stable configurations is shown. In order to achieve that, we make use of a variational principle for the fermionic projector in the continuum which contains certain contributions supported on the light cone. In a certain sense, these extra terms contain the structure of the underlying discrete spacetime. Lorentz invariant distributions and their convolutions are studied. Some of these are well-defined because the convolution integrals have compactly supported integrands. Other convolutions can be regularized such that the property of being ill-defined only plays a role on the light cone. These results are used to analyze the variational principle and to give criteria for state stability, which can be numerically analyzed. Some plots are presented to allow a decision about state stability and to show how possible configurations could look like. (orig.)

  13. Analysis of Various Computer System Monitoring and LCD Projector through the Network TCP/IP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santoso Budijono

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Many electronic devices have a network connection facility. Projectors today have network facilities to bolster its customer satisfaction in everyday use. By using a device that can be controlled, the expected availability and reliability of the presentation system (computer and projector can be maintained to keep itscondition ready to use for presentation. Nevertheless, there is still a projector device that has no network facilities so that the necessary additional equipment with expensive price. Besides, control equipment in large quantities has problems in timing and the number of technicians in performing controls. This study began with study of literature, from searching for the projectors that has LAN and software to control and finding a number of computer control softwares where the focus is easy to use and affordable. Result of this research is creating asystem which contains suggestions of procurement of computer hardware, hardware and software projectors each of which can be controlled centrally from a distance.

  14. Feasibility study of utilizing ultraportable projectors for endoscopic video display (with videos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shou-Jiang; Fehring, Amanda; Mclemore, Mac; Griswold, Michael; Wang, Wanmei; Paine, Elizabeth R; Wu, Ruonan; To, Filip

    2014-10-01

    Modern endoscopy requires video display. Recent miniaturized, ultraportable projectors are affordable, durable, and offer quality image display. Explore feasibility of using ultraportable projectors in endoscopy. Prospective bench-top comparison; clinical feasibility study. Masked comparison study of images displayed via 2 Samsung ultraportable light-emitting diode projectors (pocket-sized SP-HO3; pico projector SP-P410M) and 1 Microvision Showwx-II Laser pico projector. BENCH-TOP FEASIBILITY STUDY: Prerecorded endoscopic video was streamed via computer. CLINICAL COMPARISON STUDY: Live high-definition endoscopy video was simultaneously displayed through each processor onto a standard liquid crystal display monitor and projected onto a portable, pull-down projection screen. Endoscopists, endoscopy nurses, and technicians rated video images; ratings were analyzed by linear mixed-effects regression models with random intercepts. All projectors were easy to set up, adjust, focus, and operate, with no real-time lapse for any. Bench-top study outcomes: Samsung pico preferred to Laser pico, overall rating 1.5 units higher (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.7-2.4), P < .001; Samsung pocket preferred to Laser pico, 3.3 units higher (95% CI = 2.4-4.1), P < .001; Samsung pocket preferred to Samsung pico, 1.7 units higher (95% CI = 0.9-2.5), P < .001. The clinical comparison study confirmed the Samsung pocket projector as best, with a higher overall rating of 2.3 units (95% CI = 1.6-3.0), P < .001, than Samsung pico. Low brightness currently limits pico projector use in clinical endoscopy. The pocket projector, with higher brightness levels (170 lumens), is clinically useful. Continued improvements to ultraportable projectors will supply a needed niche in endoscopy through portability, reduced cost, and equal or better image quality. © The Author(s) 2013.

  15. Underwater laser detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomaa, Walid; El-Sherif, Ashraf F.; El-Sharkawy, Yasser H.

    2015-02-01

    The conventional method used to detect an underwater target is by sending and receiving some form of acoustic energy. But the acoustic systems have limitations in the range resolution and accuracy; while, the potential benefits of a laserbased underwater target detection include high directionality, high response, and high range accuracy. Lasers operating in the blue-green region of the light spectrum(420 : 570nm)have a several applications in the area of detection and ranging of submersible targets due to minimum attenuation through water ( less than 0.1 m-1) and maximum laser reflection from estimated target (like mines or submarines) to provide a long range of detection. In this paper laser attenuation in water was measured experimentally by new simple method by using high resolution spectrometer. The laser echoes from different targets (metal, plastic, wood, and rubber) were detected using high resolution CCD camera; the position of detection camera was optimized to provide a high reflection laser from target and low backscattering noise from the water medium, digital image processing techniques were applied to detect and discriminate the echoes from the metal target and subtract the echoes from other objects. Extraction the image of target from the scattering noise is done by background subtraction and edge detection techniques. As a conclusion, we present a high response laser imaging system to detect and discriminate small size, like-mine underwater targets.

  16. Underwater Gliders: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javaid Muhammad Yasar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Underwater gliders are a type of underwater vehicle that transverse the oceans by shifting its buoyancy, during which its wings develop a component of the downward motion in the horizontal plane, thus producing a forward force. They are primarily used in oceanography sensing and data collection and play an important role in ocean research and development. Although there have been considerable developments in these gliders since the development of the first glider concept in 1989, to date, no review of these gliders have been done. This paper reviews existing underwater gliders, with emphasis on their respective working principles, range and payload capacity. All information on gliders available in the public domain or published in literature from the year 2000-2013 was reviewed. The majority of these gliders have an operational depth of 1000 m and a payload of less than 25 kg. The exception is a blend-body shape glider, which has a payload of approximately 800 kg and an operational depth around about 300 m. However, the commercialization of these gliders has been limited with only three know examples that have been successfully commercialized.

  17. In-air and underwater hearing of the cormorant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Wahlberg, Magnus; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    Numerous studies have mapped the hearing abilities of birds in air but currently there is little or no data on how diving birds hear or react to sound under water. Therefore, it is unknown whether the ears and auditory system of diving birds are adapted to underwater hearing. In the present study...... 10 cm under water in a large water filled-tank while being artificially ventilated. ABR-responses to calibrated tone bursts produced by a woofer and an underwater speaker, respectively, were measured at different intensities and frequencies to obtain hearing threshold values in air and under water......Hz) under water. Generally, the cormorant ear was not very sensitive to sound, neither in air nor under water. The hearing abilities in water, however, were better than what would have been expected for a purely in-air adapted ear. (Supported by the Carlsberg Foundation 2009_01_0292 and the Danish Council...

  18. A projector of iridium 192 wires: motivations and preliminary studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosset, J.M.; Gerbaulet, A.; Chassagne, D.

    1979-01-01

    Though the majority of procedures involved in curietherapy with Iridium 192 wires cause very few problems concerning radiation protection, this is not true in all cases: in elderly of debilitated patients, young children, or when using special techniques (curietherapy for prostate of bladder cancers for example). In these cases, the need for frequent treatment exposes the therapists to increased doses. The projector of Iridium 192 wires was conceived in order to reduce this irradiated hazard. A simple manipulation places the radioactive wires in a lead container during treatment, and then replaces them in the right position after therapy. This apparatus appears to offer the possibility of: an almost total protection of the therapists, and thus an opportunity for enlarging the indications for curietherapy; an improved quality of treatment to the patient during the application [fr

  19. Linear density response function in the projector augmented wave method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Jun; Mortensen, Jens Jørgen; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2011-01-01

    We present an implementation of the linear density response function within the projector-augmented wave method with applications to the linear optical and dielectric properties of both solids, surfaces, and interfaces. The response function is represented in plane waves while the single...... functions of Si, C, SiC, AlP, and GaAs compare well with previous calculations. While optical properties of semiconductors, in particular excitonic effects, are generally not well described by ALDA, we obtain excellent agreement with experiments for the surface loss function of graphene and the Mg(0001......) surface with plasmon energies deviating by less than 0.2 eV. Finally, the method is applied to study the influence of substrates on the plasmon excitations in graphene....

  20. Localized atomic basis set in the projector augmented wave method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ask Hjorth; Vanin, Marco; Mortensen, Jens Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    We present an implementation of localized atomic-orbital basis sets in the projector augmented wave (PAW) formalism within the density-functional theory. The implementation in the real-space GPAW code provides a complementary basis set to the accurate but computationally more demanding grid...... representation. The possibility to switch seamlessly between the two representations implies that simulations employing the local basis can be fine tuned at the end of the calculation by switching to the grid, thereby combining the strength of the two representations for optimal performance. The implementation...... is tested by calculating atomization energies and equilibrium bulk properties of a variety of molecules and solids, comparing to the grid results. Finally, it is demonstrated how a grid-quality structure optimization can be performed with significantly reduced computational effort by switching between...

  1. Projectors and seed conformal blocks for traceless mixed-symmetry tensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Miguel S. [Centro de Física do Porto, Departamento de Física e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Theory Division, Department of Physics, CERN, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Hansen, Tobias [Centro de Física do Porto, Departamento de Física e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); II. Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany); Penedones, João [Centro de Física do Porto, Departamento de Física e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Theory Division, Department of Physics, CERN, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Fields and Strings Laboratory, Institute of Physics, EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Trevisani, Emilio [Centro de Física do Porto, Departamento de Física e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2016-07-05

    In this paper we derive the projectors to all irreducible SO(d) representations (traceless mixed-symmetry tensors) that appear in the partial wave decomposition of a conformal correlator of four stress-tensors in d dimensions. These projectors are given in a closed form for arbitrary length l{sub 1} of the first row of the Young diagram. The appearance of Gegenbauer polynomials leads directly to recursion relations in l{sub 1} for seed conformal blocks. Further results include a differential operator that generates the projectors to traceless mixed-symmetry tensors and the general normalization constant of the shadow operator.

  2. Projectors and seed conformal blocks for traceless mixed-symmetry tensors

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Miguel S.; Penedones, João; Trevisani, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we derive the projectors to all irreducible SO(d) representations (traceless mixed-symmetry tensors) that appear in the partial wave decomposition of a conformal correlator of four stress-tensors in d dimensions. These projectors are given in a closed form for arbitrary length $l_1$ of the first row of the Young diagram. The appearance of Gegenbauer polynomials leads directly to recursion relations in $l_1$ for seed conformal blocks. Further results include a differential operator that generates the projectors to traceless mixed-symmetry tensors and the general normalization constant of the shadow operator.

  3. Underwater gas tornado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byalko, Alexey V.

    2013-07-01

    We present the first experimental observation of a new hydrodynamic phenomenon, the underwater tornado. Simple measurements show that the tornado forms a vortex of the Rankine type, i.e. the rising gas rotates as a solid body and the liquid rotates with a velocity decreasing hyperbolically with the radius. We obtain the dependence of the tornado radius a on the gas stream value j theoretically: a ∼ j2/5. Processing of a set of experiments yielded the value 0.36 for the exponent in this expression. We also report the initial stages of the theoretical study of this phenomenon.

  4. Effects of Sound on the Behavior of Wild, Unrestrained Fish Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Louise; Cheesman, Samuel; Hawkins, Anthony D

    2016-01-01

    To assess and manage the impact of man-made sounds on fish, we need information on how behavior is affected. Here, wild unrestrained pelagic fish schools were observed under quiet conditions using sonar. Fish were exposed to synthetic piling sounds at different levels using custom-built sound projectors, and behavioral changes were examined. In some cases, the depth of schools changed after noise playback; full dispersal of schools was also evident. The methods we developed for examining the behavior of unrestrained fish to sound exposure have proved successful and may allow further testing of the relationship between responsiveness and sound level.

  5. Hydrogel microphones for stealthy underwater listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Song, Jingfeng; Li, Shumin; Elowsky, Christian; Zhou, You; Ducharme, Stephen; Chen, Yong Mei; Zhou, Qin; Tan, Li

    2016-08-01

    Exploring the abundant resources in the ocean requires underwater acoustic detectors with a high-sensitivity reception of low-frequency sound from greater distances and zero reflections. Here we address both challenges by integrating an easily deformable network of metal nanoparticles in a hydrogel matrix for use as a cavity-free microphone. Since metal nanoparticles can be densely implanted as inclusions, and can even be arranged in coherent arrays, this microphone can detect static loads and air breezes from different angles, as well as underwater acoustic signals from 20 Hz to 3 kHz at amplitudes as low as 4 Pa. Unlike dielectric capacitors or cavity-based microphones that respond to stimuli by deforming the device in thickness directions, this hydrogel device responds with a transient modulation of electric double layers, resulting in an extraordinary sensitivity (217 nF kPa-1 or 24 μC N-1 at a bias of 1.0 V) without using any signal amplification tools.

  6. Diffraction analysis for DMD-based scene projectors in the long-wave infrared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qing; Zhang, Jianzhong; Wang, Jian; Sun, Qiang

    2016-10-01

    Diffraction effects play a significant role in the digital micromirror device (DMD)-based scene projectors in the long-wave infrared (IR) band (8-12 μm). The contrast provided by these projector systems can become noticeably worse because of the diffraction characteristics of the DMD. We apply a diffraction grating model of the DMD based on the scalar diffraction theory and the Fourier transform to address this issue. In addition, a simulation calculation is conducted with MATLAB. Finally, the simulation result is verified with an experiment. The simulation and experimental results indicate that, when the incident azimuth angle is 0° and the zenith angle is between 42°and 46°, the scene projectors will have a good imaging contrast in the long-wave IR. The diffraction grating model proposed in this study provides a method to improve the contrast of DMD-based scene projectors in the long-wave IR.

  7. Software of microcomputer ELEKTRONIKA-60 installed in the control system of the measuring projector PUOS-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dikij, V.M.; Nekipelova, G.D.; Shakhbazyan, V.V.; Yurpalov, V.D.

    1990-01-01

    The tasks, structure and aspects of realization of servodrivers of the PUOS-4 measuring projector (measuring carriage, tape transport) on the installed ELEKTRONIKA-60 microcomputer operating in the multi-machine system of film information preprocessing, are considered. Realizability of drivers is estimated under rigid operation conditions using the RTM60 real time monitor. The problem of the projector testing is also considered. 11 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  8. Generalized Phase Contrast with matched filtering using LCoS pico-projectors

    OpenAIRE

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    We report a beam shaping system for generating high intensity programmable opticalspots using mGPC: matched filtering combined with Generalized Phase Contrastapplying two consumer handheld pico-projectors. Such a system presents a low costalternative for optical trapping and manipulation, optical lattices and other beamshaping applications usually implemented with high-end spatial light modulators.Portable pico-projectors based on liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) devices were usedas binary ph...

  9. The s-Ordered Fock Space Projectors Gained by the General Ordering Theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shähandeh Farid; Bazrafkan Mohammad Reza; Ashrafi Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    Employing the general ordering theorem (GOT), operational methods and incomplete 2-D Hermite polynomials, we derive the t-ordered expansion of Fock space projectors. Using the result, the general ordered form of the coherent state projectors is obtained. This indeed gives a new integration formula regarding incomplete 2-D Hermite polynomials. In addition, the orthogonality relation of the incomplete 2-D Hermite polynomials is derived to resolve Dattoli's failure

  10. OFDM for underwater acoustic communications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Shengli

    2014-01-01

    A blend of introductory material and advanced signal processing and communication techniques, of critical importance to underwater system and network development This book, which is the first to describe the processing techniques central to underwater OFDM, is arranged into four distinct sections: First, it describes the characteristics of underwater acoustic channels, and stresses the difference from wireless radio channels. Then it goes over the basics of OFDM and channel coding. The second part starts with an overview of the OFDM receiver, and develops various modules for the receiver des

  11. Utgrunden off-shore wind farm - Measurements of underwater noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, Hans

    2003-07-01

    Airicole, GE Wind Energy and SEAS/Energi E2 have initiated this project in order to achieve a better understanding on how offshore based wind farms effect the underwater noise. The main reason is to gain knowledge on how marine wildlife could be effected by this kind of installation. The measurements were performed at Utgrunden wind farm that is situated at the reef Utgrunden on the Swedish southeast coast. The farm consists of seven 1,5 MW turbines. Three hydrophones registered the underwater sound and four accelerometers the tower vibrations. The measurement campaign was conducted during a period from November 2002 to February 2003. The objectives with this project is to answer the following issues and its results are: 1. What is the character of sound from a single power station? - The turbines radiate sound mainly at a few dominating frequencies from 30 Hz up to 800 Hz. At frequencies below 3 Hz no contribution from the turbines can be detected due to the high background level from the waves and the low tower vibration level. 2. What are the sound generating mechanisms in the turbine? - Gearbox mesh frequency vibrations that are transmitted via the tower structure and radiated out to the water mainly generate the sound. Airborne blade sound is effectively dampened in the transition from air to water. 3. How does the sound attenuate with increasing distance at different frequencies? - The average attenuation per doubled distance for frequencies between 31 Hz and 722 Hz is approximately 4 dB in the measured positions. No clear frequency dependence could be found. 4. How does the sound pressure level vary with increasing wind speed? - With increasing wind speed, the sound pressure level increases and the dominating frequencies move upward due to increasing turbine rotational speed. 5. How does sound from different power stations interfere with each other and influence the over all sound image? - No clear tendencies of interference could be observed in this study

  12. 3D-image theater system using TLP770J LCD data projector; Ekisho data projector wo mochiita rittai eizo theater system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawasato, H. [Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-02-01

    In today's multimedia era, visual systems are widely used not only for two-dimensional images but also for the depiction of virtual reality and for simulated three-dimensional images. At the same time, the projection technology used in large-screen projectors is shifting from the cathode ray tube (CRT) to the liquid crystal display (LCD). Toshiba has developed a simplified 3D-image theater system using the TLP770J LCD data projector, which offers easy maintenance and lower costs. (author)

  13. A Target Projector for Videogrammetry Under Vacuum Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roose, Stephane; Mazzoli, Alexandra; Barzin, Pascal; Jamotton, Pierre; Sablerolle, Steven; Tavares, Andre; Doyle, Dominic

    2012-07-01

    Videogrammetry is a 3-dimensional co-ordinate measuring technique that (now) uses digital image capture as the recording method. Images are taken from at least two different locations and the light-rays from the camera to the measurement object are intersected by triangulation into 3D point coordinates. With a large number of images, the camera orientation and 3D point locations are accurately determined with the use of a full mathematical model (bundle adjustment). Adhesive targets are commonly used for point materialization. Those targets consist of a retro-reflective material, with an adhesive backing for sticking to the structure under investigation. A drawback of these types of targets is that they can lose their adhesion and shape during thermal vacuum cycling, especially when cryogenic temperatures are involved. In addition the operation of placing and removing targets is a critical procedure that can lead to undesirable contamination and damage to the test item. Because they require to be physically attached to the surface to be measured, this can also compromise the quality assurance of the test object. Such problems were encountered during cryogenic thermal vacuum qualification testing of the ESA Planck Surveyor mission telescope reflectors. In the development described here the aim was to replace the use of adhesive targets by projected dots. The idea is not fundamentally new. Indeed a US company, Geodetic Systems Inc. (GSI) [1] proposes already a commercial target projector for videogrammetry which uses a flashlamp and is adequate for workshop and laboratory applications. Dot projection videogrammetry is also suggested as a shape measurement method of Gossamer structures, membrane reflectors, etc... [2][3]. Note that there are fundamental differences in use and applications of retro-reflective targets and dot projection: • Retro-reflective targets are materialized on the test article. They appear as fiducials attached to the test article. Any relative

  14. Hemispherical optical dome for underwater communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiri, Ron S.; Lunde, Emily L.; Coronado, Patrick L.; Quijada, Manuel A.

    2017-08-01

    For many years, acoustic systems have been used as the primary method for underwater communication; however, the data transfer rate of such systems is low because sound propagates slowly through water. A higher throughput can be achieved using visible light to transmit data underwater. The first issue with this approach is that there is generally a large loss of the light signal due to scattering and absorption in water, even though there is an optimal wavelength for transmission in the blue or green wavelengths of the visible spectrum. The second issue is that a simple communication system, consisting only of a highly directional source/transmitter and small optical detector/receiver, has a very narrow field of view. The goal of this project is to improve an optical, underwater communication system by increasing the effective field of view of the receiving optics. To this end, we make two changes to the simple system: (1) An optical dome was added near the receiver. An array of lenses is placed radially on the surface of the dome, reminiscent of the compound eye of an insect. The lenses make the source and detector planes conjugate, and each lens adds a new region of the source plane to the instrument's total field of view. (2) The receiver was expanded to include multiple photodiodes. With these two changes, the receiver has much more tolerance to misalignments (in position and angle) of the transmitter. Two versions of the optical dome (with 6" and 8" diameters) were designed using PTC's Creo CAD software and modeled using Synopsys' CODE V optical design software. A series of these transparent hemispherical domes, with both design diameters, were manufactured using a 5-axis mill. The prototype was then retrofitted with lenses and compared with the computer-generated model to demonstrate the effectiveness of this solution. This work shows that the dome design improves the optical field of view of the underwater communication system considerably. Furthermore, with

  15. Foley Sounds vs Real Sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trento, Stefano; Götzen, Amalia De

    2011-01-01

    This paper is an initial attempt to study the world of sound effects for motion pictures, also known as Foley sounds. Throughout several audio and audio-video tests we have compared both Foley and real sounds originated by an identical action. The main purpose was to evaluate if sound effects are...... applications of sound design such as advertisement or soundtracks for movies....

  16. Underwater soundscape of marine protected areas in the south Brazilian coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Gendriz, I; Padovese, L R

    2016-04-15

    The Laje de Santos Marine State Park (LSMSP) and Xixová-Japuí State Park (XJSP) are two protected areas (PA), close to the Santos Bay in the south Brazilian coast. The region encompasses both important biodiversity and anthropogenic activities. This study aims to serve as a first reference survey of the underwater soundscape of these PAs. Additionally it evaluates the presence of the anthropogenic and biological sound in these areas. One month of continuous recorded underwater sound, at selected locations in XJSP and LSMSP, is used in this study. The data were characterized by its spectral content and by the temporal evolution of Sound Pressure Levels (SPL). Both locations showed sound events with daily periodicities, mainly related with boats and fish chorus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Discovery of Sound in the Sea 2014 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    a false killer whale was able to reduce its hearing sensitivity when a warning sound preceded a loud sound. The DOSITS team will continue to scan...will investigate noise exposure and marine animals, highlighting hearing sensititivies across taxa, potential behavioral effects of underwater sound...bottlenose whales , and dugongs are in development for the DOSITS Audio Gallery. In addition, longer audio files continue to be added when possible. B

  18. Underwater plasma arc cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leautier, R.; Pilot, G.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the work done to develop underwater plasma arc cutting techniques, to characterise aerosols from cutting operations on radioactive and non-radioactive work-pieces, and to develop suitable ventilation and filtration techniques. The work has been carried out in the framework of a contract between CEA-CEN Cadarache and the Commission of European Communities. Furthermore, this work has been carried out in close cooperation with CEA-CEN Saclay mainly for secondary emissions and radioactive analysis. The contract started in May 1986 and was completed in December 1988 by a supplementary agreement. This report has been compiled from several progress reports submitted during the work period, contains the main findings of the work and encloses the results of comparative tests on plasma arc cutting

  19. Safety aspects for underwater vehicles

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhan, R.; Navelkar, G.S.; Desa, E.S.; Afzulpurkar, S.; Prabhudesai, S.P.; Dabholkar, N.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Maurya, P.

    . This stresses for implementation of multiple safety measures of a high degree so that the platform operates continuously in a fail-safe mode. This paper discusses issues on safety measures implemented on the autonomous underwater platforms namely MAYA AUV...

  20. Wide-band underwater acoustic absorption based on locally resonant unit and interpenetrating network structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heng, Jiang; Mi-Lin, Zhang; Yu-Ren, Wang; Yan-Ping, Hu; Ding, Lan; Qun-Li, Wu; Huan-Tong, Lu

    2010-01-01

    The interpenetrating network structure provides an interesting avenue to novel materials. Locally resonant phononic crystal (LRPC) exhibits excellent sound attenuation performance based on the periodical arrangement of sound wave scatters. Combining the LRPC concept and interpenetrating network glassy structure, this paper has developed a new material which can achieve a wide band underwater strong acoustic absorption. Underwater absorption coefficients of different samples were measured by the pulse tube. Measurement results show that the new material possesses excellent underwater acoustic effects in a wide frequency range. Moreover, in order to investigate impacts of locally resonant units, some defects are introduced into the sample. The experimental result and the theoretical calculation both show that locally resonant units being connected to a network structure play an important role in achieving a wide band strong acoustic absorption. (condensed matter: structure, thermal and mechanical properties)

  1. Assessing the standard Molybdenum projector augmented wave VASP potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattsson, Ann E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Multi-Scale Science

    2014-07-01

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) based Equation of State (EOS) construction is a prominent part of Sandia’s capabilities to support engineering sciences. This capability is based on augmenting experimental data with information gained from computational investigations, especially in those parts of the phase space where experimental data is hard, dangerous, or expensive to obtain. A key part of the success of the Sandia approach is the fundamental science work supporting the computational capability. Not only does this work enhance the capability to perform highly accurate calculations but it also provides crucial insight into the limitations of the computational tools, providing high confidence in the results even where results cannot be, or have not yet been, validated by experimental data. This report concerns the key ingredient of projector augmented-wave (PAW) potentials for use in pseudo-potential computational codes. Using the tools discussed in SAND2012-7389 we assess the standard Vienna Ab-initio Simulation Package (VASP) PAWs for Molybdenum.

  2. Underwater optical wireless communication network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnon, Shlomi

    2010-01-01

    The growing need for underwater observation and subsea monitoring systems has stimulated considerable interest in advancing the enabling technologies of underwater wireless communication and underwater sensor networks. This communication technology is expected to play an important role in investigating climate change, in monitoring biological, biogeochemical, evolutionary, and ecological changes in the sea, ocean, and lake environments, and in helping to control and maintain oil production facilities and harbors using unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs), submarines, ships, buoys, and divers. However, the present technology of underwater acoustic communication cannot provide the high data rate required to investigate and monitor these environments and facilities. Optical wireless communication has been proposed as the best alternative to meet this challenge. Models are presented for three kinds of optical wireless communication links: (a) a line-of-sight link, (b) a modulating retroreflector link, and (c) a reflective link, all of which can provide the required data rate. We analyze the link performance based on these models. From the analysis, it is clear that as the water absorption increases, the communication performance decreases dramatically for the three link types. However, by using the scattered light it was possible to mitigate this decrease in some cases. It is concluded from the analysis that a high-data-rate underwater optical wireless network is a feasible solution for emerging applications such as UUV-to-UUV links and networks of sensors, and extended ranges in these applications could be achieved by applying a multi-hop concept.

  3. Self-correction of projector nonlinearity in phase-shifting fringe projection profilometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Fuxing; Xing, Shuo; Guo, Hongwei

    2017-09-01

    In phase-shifting fringe projection profilometry, the luminance nonlinearity of the used projector has been recognized as one of the most crucial factors decreasing the measurement accuracy. To solve this problem, this paper presents a self-correcting technique that allows us to suppress the effect of the projector nonlinearity in the absence of any calibration data regarding the projector intensities or regarding the phase errors. In its first step, the standard phase-shifting algorithm is used to recover the phases, as well as the background intensities and the modulations. Using these results enables normalizing the fringe patterns, for ridding them of the effects of the background and modulations. Second, we smooth the calculated phase map by use of a low-pass filter in order to remove the ripple-like phase errors induced by the projector nonlinearity. Third, we determine a polynomial representing the projector nonlinearity by fitting the curve of the normalized fringe intensities against the cosine values of the smoothed phases. Finally, we correct the phase errors using the curve just obtained. Doing these steps in an iterative way eventually results in a phase map and, further, a 3D shape with their artifacts induced by the projector nonlinearity suppressed significantly. Experimental results demonstrate that this technique offers some advantages over others. It does not require a prior calibration of the projector, thus being suitable for dealing with a time-variant nonlinearity; its pointwise operation protects the edges and details of the measurement results from being blurred; and it works well with very few fringe patterns and is efficient in image capturing.

  4. Augmented reality 3D display using head-mounted projectors and transparent retro-reflective screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soomro, Shoaib R.; Urey, Hakan

    2017-02-01

    A 3D augmented reality display is proposed that can provide glass-free stereo parallax using a highly transparent projection screen. The proposed display is based on a transparent retro-reflective screen and a pair of laser pico projectors placed close to the viewer's head. The retro-reflective screen directs incident light towards its source with little scattering so that each of the viewer's eyes only perceives the content projected by the associated projector. Each projector displays one of the two components (left or right channel) of stereo content. The retro-reflective nature of screen provides high brightness compared to the regular diffused screens. The partially patterned retro-reflective material on clear substrate introduces optical transparency and facilitates the viewer to see the real-world scene on the other side of screen. The working principle and design of the proposed see-through 3D display are presented. A tabletop prototype consisting of an in-house fabricated 60×40cm2 see-through retro-reflective screen and a pair of 30 lumen pico-projectors with custom 3D printed housings is demonstrated. Geometric calibration between projectors and optimal viewing conditions (eye box size, eye-to-projector distance) are discussed. The display performance is evaluated by measuring the brightness and crosstalk for each eye. The screen provides high brightness (up to 300 cd/m2 per eye) using 30 lumens mobile projectors while maintaining the 75% screen transparency. The crosstalk between left and right views is measured as <10% at the optimum distance of 125-175 cm, which is within acceptable range.

  5. Dynamic contrast enhancement in widefield microscopy using projector-generated illumination patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samson, Edward Carlo; Blanca, Carlo Mar

    2007-01-01

    We present a simple and cost-effective optical protocol to realize contrast-enhancement imaging (such as dark-field, optical-staining and oblique illumination microscopy) of transparent samples on a conventional widefield microscope using commercial multimedia projectors. The projector functions as both light source and mask generator implemented by creating slideshows of the filters projected along the illumination planes of the microscope. The projected optical masks spatially modulate the distribution of the incident light to selectively enhance structures within the sample according to spatial frequency thereby increasing the image contrast of translucent biological specimens. Any amplitude filter can be customized and dynamically controlled so that switching from one imaging modality to another involves a simple slide transition and can be executed at a keystroke with no physical filters and no moving optical parts. The method yields an image contrast of 89-96% comparable with standard enhancement techniques. The polarization properties of the projector are then utilized to discriminate birefringent and non-birefringent sites on the sample using single-shot, simultaneous polarization and optical-staining microscopy. In addition to dynamic pattern generation and polarization, the projector also provides high illumination power and spectral excitation selectivity through its red-green-blue (RGB) channels. We exploit this last property to explore the feasibility of using video projectors to selectively excite stained samples and perform fluorescence imaging in tandem with reflectance and polarization reflectance microscopy

  6. Underwater cutting techniques developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bach, F.-W.

    1990-01-01

    The primary circuit structures of different nuclear powerplants are constructed out of stainless steels, ferritic steels, plated ferritic steels and alloys of aluminium. According to the level of the specific radiation of these structures, it is necessary for dismantling to work with remote controlled cutting techniques. The most successful way to protect the working crew against exposure of radiation is to operate underwater in different depths. The following thermal cutting processes are more or less developed to work under water: For ferritic steels only - flame cutting; For ferritic steels, stainless steels, cladded steels and aluminium alloys - oxy-arc-cutting, arc-waterjet-cutting with a consumable electrode, arc-saw-cutting, plasma-arc-cutting and plasma-arc-saw. The flame cutting is a burning process, all the other processes are melt-cutting processes. This paper explains the different techniques, giving a short introduction of the theory, a discussion of the possibilities with the advantages and disadvantages of these processes giving a view into the further research work in this interesting field. (author)

  7. Game Theory-Based Cooperation for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks: Taxonomy, Review, Research Challenges and Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalhatu Muhammed

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Exploring and monitoring the underwater world using underwater sensors is drawing a lot of attention these days. In this field cooperation between acoustic sensor nodes has been a critical problem due to the challenging features such as acoustic channel failure (sound signal, long propagation delay of acoustic signal, limited bandwidth and loss of connectivity. There are several proposed methods to improve cooperation between the nodes by incorporating information/game theory in the node’s cooperation. However, there is a need to classify the existing works and demonstrate their performance in addressing the cooperation issue. In this paper, we have conducted a review to investigate various factors affecting cooperation in underwater acoustic sensor networks. We study various cooperation techniques used for underwater acoustic sensor networks from different perspectives, with a concentration on communication reliability, energy consumption, and security and present a taxonomy for underwater cooperation. Moreover, we further review how the game theory can be applied to make the nodes cooperate with each other. We further analyze different cooperative game methods, where their performance on different metrics is compared. Finally, open issues and future research direction in underwater acoustic sensor networks are highlighted.

  8. Game Theory-Based Cooperation for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks: Taxonomy, Review, Research Challenges and Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammed, Dalhatu; Anisi, Mohammad Hossein; Zareei, Mahdi; Vargas-Rosales, Cesar; Khan, Anwar

    2018-02-01

    Exploring and monitoring the underwater world using underwater sensors is drawing a lot of attention these days. In this field cooperation between acoustic sensor nodes has been a critical problem due to the challenging features such as acoustic channel failure (sound signal), long propagation delay of acoustic signal, limited bandwidth and loss of connectivity. There are several proposed methods to improve cooperation between the nodes by incorporating information/game theory in the node's cooperation. However, there is a need to classify the existing works and demonstrate their performance in addressing the cooperation issue. In this paper, we have conducted a review to investigate various factors affecting cooperation in underwater acoustic sensor networks. We study various cooperation techniques used for underwater acoustic sensor networks from different perspectives, with a concentration on communication reliability, energy consumption, and security and present a taxonomy for underwater cooperation. Moreover, we further review how the game theory can be applied to make the nodes cooperate with each other. We further analyze different cooperative game methods, where their performance on different metrics is compared. Finally, open issues and future research direction in underwater acoustic sensor networks are highlighted.

  9. Design of Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadahiro Hyakudome

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available There are concerns about the impact that global warming will have on our environment, and which will inevitably result in expanding deserts and rising water levels. While a lot of underwater vehicles are utilized, AUVs (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle were considered and chosen, as the most suitable tool for conduction survey concerning these global environmental problems. AUVs can comprehensive survey because the vehicle does not have to be connected to the support vessel by tether cable. When such underwater vehicles are made, it is necessary to consider about the following things. 1 Seawater and Water Pressure Environment, 2 Sink, 3 There are no Gas or Battery Charge Stations, 4 Global Positioning System cannot use, 5 Radio waves cannot use. In the paper, outline of above and how deal about it are explained.

  10. A Multi-Projector Calibration Method for Virtual Reality Simulators with Analytically Defined Screens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Portalés

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The geometric calibration of projectors is a demanding task, particularly for the industry of virtual reality simulators. Different methods have been developed during the last decades to retrieve the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of projectors, most of them being based on planar homographies and some requiring an extended calibration process. The aim of our research work is to design a fast and user-friendly method to provide multi-projector calibration on analytically defined screens, where a sample is shown for a virtual reality Formula 1 simulator that has a cylindrical screen. The proposed method results from the combination of surveying, photogrammetry and image processing approaches, and has been designed by considering the spatial restrictions of virtual reality simulators. The method has been validated from a mathematical point of view, and the complete system—which is currently installed in a shopping mall in Spain—has been tested by different users.

  11. U.S. Army Missile Command hardware-in-the-loop infrared projector development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buford, James A., Jr.; Mobley, Scott B.

    1994-06-01

    This paper provides an overview of the HWIL simulations of IR systems, addresses the critical projector requirements/specifications for HWIL simulations, and reviews the most prominent technologies associated with IR scene projection. This review consists of a brief discussion of each technology in terms of physical operation with advantages and disadvantages being highlighted. Following this introduction, the IR target-slide zoom-optics projector (IRTZP) and IR laser diode array projector (LDAP) systems which are currently developed by MICOM are thoroughly discussed. This includes a discussion of the operational performance characteristics of both systems. The basis for this paper is work performed at the MICOM Advanced Simulation Center (ASC). The ASC is managed and operated by the Systems Simulation and Development Directorate of the MICOM Research, Development, and Engineering Center, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama.

  12. Bioacoustic Spectral Whistle Sound And Behaviour Of Male Dolphin Bottle Nose ( Tursiops aduncus) At Safari Park Indonesia, Cisarua Bogor

    OpenAIRE

    Muhamad Zainuddin Lubis; Sri Pujiyati; Totok Hestirianoto

    2016-01-01

    Whistle sound is generally used for echolocation purposes, while the sound of the blast-beat and whistles play a major role in internal and inter-group communication.The purpose of this research is to know the power spectral patterns and fluctuations in sound based on frequency and Power Spectral Density (PSD) of the sounds produced by dolphins and observing the position of dolphins , Noisy Time Domain (NTD) and behavior using underwater camera, and also comparing between time and sound spect...

  13. Interpreting underwater acoustic images of the upper ocean boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulloa, Marco J

    2007-01-01

    A challenging task in physical studies of the upper ocean using underwater sound is the interpretation of high-resolution acoustic images. This paper covers a number of basic concepts necessary for undergraduate and postgraduate students to identify the most distinctive features of the images, providing a link with the acoustic signatures of physical processes occurring simultaneously beneath the surface of the sea. Sonars are so sensitive that they detected a new acoustic signature at the breaking of surface gravity waves in deep water, which resembles oblique motion-like vortices

  14. Averaging underwater noise levels for environmental assessment of shipping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Nathan D; Blondel, Philippe; Dakin, D Tom; Dorocicz, John

    2012-10-01

    Rising underwater noise levels from shipping have raised concerns regarding chronic impacts to marine fauna. However, there is a lack of consensus over how to average local shipping noise levels for environmental impact assessment. This paper addresses this issue using 110 days of continuous data recorded in the Strait of Georgia, Canada. Probability densities of ~10(7) 1-s samples in selected 1/3 octave bands were approximately stationary across one-month subsamples. Median and mode levels varied with averaging time. Mean sound pressure levels averaged in linear space, though susceptible to strong bias from outliers, are most relevant to cumulative impact assessment metrics.

  15. Underwater laser imaging system (UWLIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLong, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Practical limitations with underwater imaging systems area reached when the noise in the back scattered radiation generated in the water between the imaging system and the target obscures the spatial contrast and resolution necessary for target discovery and identification. The advent of high power lasers operating in the blue-green portion of the visible spectrum (oceanic transmission window) has led to improved experimental illumination systems for underwater imaging. Range-gated and synchronously scanned devices take advantage of the unique temporal and spatial coherence properties of laser radiation, respectively, to overcome the deleterious effects of common volume back scatter.

  16. Underwater measurements of muon intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, V. M.; Pustovetov, V. P.; Trubkin, Y. A.; Kirilenkov, A. V.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental measurements of cosmic ray muon intensity deep underwater aimed at determining a muon absorption curve are of considerable interest, as they allow to reproduce independently the muon energy spectrum at sea level. The comparison of the muon absorption curve in sea water with that in rock makes it possible to determine muon energy losses caused by nuclear interactions. The data available on muon absorption in water and that in rock are not equivalent. Underground measurements are numerous and have been carried out down to the depth of approx. 15km w.e., whereas underwater muon intensity have been measured twice and only down to approx. 3km deep.

  17. Breath sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... described as moist, dry, fine, and coarse. Rhonchi. Sounds that resemble snoring. They occur when air is blocked or air flow becomes rough through the large airways. Stridor. Wheeze-like sound heard when a person breathes. Usually it is ...

  18. Computational imaging with a single-pixel detector and a consumer video projector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sych, D.; Aksenov, M.

    2018-02-01

    Single-pixel imaging is a novel rapidly developing imaging technique that employs spatially structured illumination and a single-pixel detector. In this work, we experimentally demonstrate a fully operating modular single-pixel imaging system. Light patterns in our setup are created with help of a computer-controlled digital micromirror device from a consumer video projector. We investigate how different working modes and settings of the projector affect the quality of reconstructed images. We develop several image reconstruction algorithms and compare their performance for real imaging. Also, we discuss the potential use of the single-pixel imaging system for quantum applications.

  19. Imagining Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimshaw, Mark; Garner, Tom Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We make the case in this essay that sound that is imagined is both a perception and as much a sound as that perceived through external stimulation. To argue this, we look at the evidence from auditory science, neuroscience, and philosophy, briefly present some new conceptual thinking on sound...... that accounts for this view, and then use this to look at what the future might hold in the context of imagining sound and developing technology....

  20. Changes in 63Hz third-octave band sound levels over 42 months recorded at four deep-ocean observatories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaar, M. van der; Ainslie, M.A.; Robinson, S.P.; Prior, M.K.; André, M.

    2014-01-01

    The growing scientific and societal concerns about the effects of underwater sound on marine ecosystems have been recently recognised through the introduction of several international initiatives, like the International Quiet Ocean Experiment, aimed at measuring the environmental impact of ocean

  1. An Underwater Color Image Quality Evaluation Metric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Miao; Sowmya, Arcot

    2015-12-01

    Quality evaluation of underwater images is a key goal of underwater video image retrieval and intelligent processing. To date, no metric has been proposed for underwater color image quality evaluation (UCIQE). The special absorption and scattering characteristics of the water medium do not allow direct application of natural color image quality metrics especially to different underwater environments. In this paper, subjective testing for underwater image quality has been organized. The statistical distribution of the underwater image pixels in the CIELab color space related to subjective evaluation indicates the sharpness and colorful factors correlate well with subjective image quality perception. Based on these, a new UCIQE metric, which is a linear combination of chroma, saturation, and contrast, is proposed to quantify the non-uniform color cast, blurring, and low-contrast that characterize underwater engineering and monitoring images. Experiments are conducted to illustrate the performance of the proposed UCIQE metric and its capability to measure the underwater image enhancement results. They show that the proposed metric has comparable performance to the leading natural color image quality metrics and the underwater grayscale image quality metrics available in the literature, and can predict with higher accuracy the relative amount of degradation with similar image content in underwater environments. Importantly, UCIQE is a simple and fast solution for real-time underwater video processing. The effectiveness of the presented measure is also demonstrated by subjective evaluation. The results show better correlation between the UCIQE and the subjective mean opinion score.

  2. An Autonomous Underwater Recorder Based on a Single Board Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldas-Morgan, Manuel; Alvarez-Rosario, Alexander; Rodrigues Padovese, Linilson

    2015-01-01

    As industrial activities continue to grow on the Brazilian coast, underwater sound measurements are becoming of great scientific importance as they are essential to evaluate the impact of these activities on local ecosystems. In this context, the use of commercial underwater recorders is not always the most feasible alternative, due to their high cost and lack of flexibility. Design and construction of more affordable alternatives from scratch can become complex because it requires profound knowledge in areas such as electronics and low-level programming. With the aim of providing a solution; a well succeeded model of a highly flexible, low-cost alternative to commercial recorders was built based on a Raspberry Pi single board computer. A properly working prototype was assembled and it demonstrated adequate performance levels in all tested situations. The prototype was equipped with a power management module which was thoroughly evaluated. It is estimated that it will allow for great battery savings on long-term scheduled recordings. The underwater recording device was successfully deployed at selected locations along the Brazilian coast, where it adequately recorded animal and manmade acoustic events, among others. Although power consumption may not be as efficient as that of commercial and/or micro-processed solutions, the advantage offered by the proposed device is its high customizability, lower development time and inherently, its cost. PMID:26076479

  3. An Autonomous Underwater Recorder Based on a Single Board Computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldas-Morgan, Manuel; Alvarez-Rosario, Alexander; Rodrigues Padovese, Linilson

    2015-01-01

    As industrial activities continue to grow on the Brazilian coast, underwater sound measurements are becoming of great scientific importance as they are essential to evaluate the impact of these activities on local ecosystems. In this context, the use of commercial underwater recorders is not always the most feasible alternative, due to their high cost and lack of flexibility. Design and construction of more affordable alternatives from scratch can become complex because it requires profound knowledge in areas such as electronics and low-level programming. With the aim of providing a solution; a well succeeded model of a highly flexible, low-cost alternative to commercial recorders was built based on a Raspberry Pi single board computer. A properly working prototype was assembled and it demonstrated adequate performance levels in all tested situations. The prototype was equipped with a power management module which was thoroughly evaluated. It is estimated that it will allow for great battery savings on long-term scheduled recordings. The underwater recording device was successfully deployed at selected locations along the Brazilian coast, where it adequately recorded animal and manmade acoustic events, among others. Although power consumption may not be as efficient as that of commercial and/or micro-processed solutions, the advantage offered by the proposed device is its high customizability, lower development time and inherently, its cost.

  4. Fluid Sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and in architectural design. Aesthetics, psychoacoustics, perception, and cognition are all present in this expanding field embracing such categories as soundscape composition, sound art, sonic art, sound design, sound studies and auditory culture. Of greatest significance to the overall field is the investigation...... of sound, site and the social, and how the spatial, the visual, and the bodily interact in sonic environments, how they are constructed and how they are entangled in other practices. With the Seismograf special issue Fluid Sounds, we bring this knowledge into the dissemination of audio research itself...

  5. Underwater nuclear power plant structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severs, S.; Toll, H.V.

    1982-01-01

    A structure for an underwater nuclear power generating plant comprising a triangular platform formed of tubular leg and truss members upon which are attached one or more large spherical pressure vessels and one or more small cylindrical auxiliary pressure vessels. (author)

  6. Underwater Robots Surface in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Randy C.; Hacking, Kip S.; Damarjian, Jennifer L.; Wright, Geoffrey A.; Truscott, Tadd

    2015-01-01

    Underwater robots (or ROVs: Remotely Operated Vehicles as they are typically called in industry) have recently become a very popular instructional STEM activity. Nationally, ROVs have been used in science and technology classrooms for several years in cities such as Seattle, San Diego, Virginia Beach, and other coastal areas. In the past two…

  7. Using the Overhead Projector as a Light Source for Physics Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Se-Yuen

    2006-01-01

    This article illustrates how the overhead projector can be used as a light source in some peculiar ways for physics demonstrations. Five examples are included: (1) Study of chromatic aberration; (2) Making giant Newton's rings; (3) Comparison of the rate of heat absorption by different surfaces; (4) Demonstration of greenhouse effect; and (5)…

  8. Robust and accurate visual echo cancellation in a full-duplex projector-camera system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Miao; Yang, Ruigang; Zhang, Zhengyou

    2008-10-01

    In this paper we study the problem of "visual echo" in a full-duplex projector-camera system for telecollaboration applications. Visual echo is defined as the appearance of projected contents observed by the camera. It can potentially saturate the projected contents, similar to audio echo in telephone conversation. Our approach to visual echo cancellation includes an offline calibration procedure that records the geometric and photometric transfer between the projector and the camera in a look-up table. During run-time, projected contents in the captured video are identified using the calibration information and suppressed, therefore achieving the goal of cancelling visual echo. Our approach can accurately handle full-color images under arbitrary reflectance of display surfaces and photometric response of the projector or camera. It is robust to geometric registration errors and quantization effects and is therefore particularly effective for high-frequency contents such as texts and hand drawings. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach with a variety of real images in a full-duplex projector-camera system.

  9. Calibration method for projector-camera-based telecentric fringe projection profilometry system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haibo; Lin, Huijing; Yao, Linshen

    2017-12-11

    By combining a fringe projection setup with a telecentric lens, a fringe pattern could be projected and imaged within a small area, making it possible to measure the three-dimensional (3D) surfaces of micro-components. This paper focuses on the flexible calibration of the fringe projection profilometry (FPP) system using a telecentric lens. An analytical telecentric projector-camera calibration model is introduced, in which the rig structure parameters remain invariant for all views, and the 3D calibration target can be located on the projector image plane with sub-pixel precision. Based on the presented calibration model, a two-step calibration procedure is proposed. First, the initial parameters, e.g., the projector-camera rig, projector intrinsic matrix, and coordinates of the control points of a 3D calibration target, are estimated using the affine camera factorization calibration method. Second, a bundle adjustment algorithm with various simultaneous views is applied to refine the calibrated parameters, especially the rig structure parameters and coordinates of the control points forth 3D target. Because the control points are determined during the calibration, there is no need for an accurate 3D reference target, whose is costly and extremely difficult to fabricate, particularly for tiny objects used to calibrate the telecentric FPP system. Real experiments were performed to validate the performance of the proposed calibration method. The test results showed that the proposed approach is very accurate and reliable.

  10. Generalized Phase Contrast with matched filtering using LCoS pico-projectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    We report a beam shaping system for generating high intensity programmable optical spots using mGPC: matched filtering combined with Generalized Phase Contrast applying two consumer handheld pico-projectors. Such a system presents a low cost alternative for optical trapping and manipulation, opti...... in these consumer pico-projector LCoS-devices, the mGPC approach tolerates phase aberrations that would have otherwise been contrasted by a standard phase imaging technique.......We report a beam shaping system for generating high intensity programmable optical spots using mGPC: matched filtering combined with Generalized Phase Contrast applying two consumer handheld pico-projectors. Such a system presents a low cost alternative for optical trapping and manipulation......, optical lattices and other beam shaping applications usually implemented with high-end spatial light modulators. Portable pico-projectors based on liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) devices were used as binary phase-only spatial light modulators by setting the appropriate polarization of the illumination...

  11. Thermal Performance Characterization of a 512x512 MWIR SLEDS Projector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-31

    Marks, J. Benedict , G. Ejzak, J. Dickason, N. Waite, M. Hernandez, H. Ahmed, F. Kiamilev, “512x512, 100Hz Mid-wave infrared LED scene projector...4. J. Benedict , R. McGee, J. Marks, K. Nabha, N. Waite, G. Ejzak, J. Dickason, H. Ahmed, M. Hernandez, P. Barakhshan, T. Browning, J. Volz, T

  12. A study on practical use of underwater abrasive water jet cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hitoshi; Demura, Kenji

    1993-09-01

    The practicality of underwater abrasive water jet cutting technology was studied in experiments. A study of abrasives in slurried form showed that optimum polymer concentration can be selected to suit underwater conditions. For the long-distance transport of slurry from the ocean surface to the ocean floor, a direct supply system by hose proved to be practical. This system takes advantage of the insolubility of the slurry in water due to a difference in specific gravity. For cutting thick steel plate at great ocean depths, a simulation with a pressurized container revealed the requirements for actual cutting. Confirmation of remote cutting operations will become the most important technology in field applications. Underwater sound vibration characteristics were found to change significantly in direct response to modifications in cutting conditions. This will be important basic data to develop an effective sensoring method.

  13. Analysis of humpback whale sounds in shallow waters of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Acoustic parameters; breeding habitat; humpback whale; phrases; sound units; thematic structure. Published online: 27 April 2015 ... ed against a standard sensor at the underwater Acoustic Test. Facility of NIOT, which is the only ..... Landing Marine Laboratories, California State University. Papastavrou V 1995 Soviets ...

  14. Underwater radiated noise from modern commercial ships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Megan F; Ross, Donald; Wiggins, Sean M; Hildebrand, John A

    2012-01-01

    Underwater radiated noise measurements for seven types of modern commercial ships during normal operating conditions are presented. Calibrated acoustic data (autonomous seafloor-mounted acoustic recorder were combined with ship passage information from the Automatic Identification System. This approach allowed for detailed measurements (i.e., source level, sound exposure level, and transmission range) on ships of opportunity. A key result was different acoustic levels and spectral shapes observed from different ship-types. A 54 kGT container ship had the highest broadband source level at 188 dB re 1 μPa@1m; a 26 kGT chemical tanker had the lowest at 177 dB re 1 μPa@1m. Bulk carriers had higher source levels near 100 Hz, while container ship and tanker noise was predominantly below 40 Hz. Simple models to predict source levels of modern merchant ships as a group from particular ship characteristics (e.g., length, gross tonnage, and speed) were not possible given individual ship-type differences. Furthermore, ship noise was observed to radiate asymmetrically. Stern aspect noise levels are 5 to 10 dB higher than bow aspect noise levels. Collectively, these results emphasize the importance of including modern ship-types in quantifying shipping noise for predictive models of global, regional, and local marine environments. © 2012 Acoustical Society of America.

  15. Sensitivity of a tucuxi (Sotalia fluviatilis guianensis) to airborne sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebschner, Alexander; Hanke, Wolf; Miersch, Lars; Dehnhardt, Guido; Sauerland, Matthias

    2005-01-01

    Auditory systems of cetaceans are considered highly specialized for underwater sound processing, whereas the extent of their hearing capacity in air is still a point of issue. In this study, the sensitivity to airborne sound in a male tucuxi (Sotalia fluviatilis guianensis) was tested by means of a go/no go response paradigm. Auditory thresholds were obtained from 2 to 31.5 kHz. Compared to the hearing thresholds of other dolphins as well as of amphibian mammals, the sensitivity to airborne sound of the test subject is low from 2 to 8 kHz, with the highest threshold at 4 kHz. Thresholds at 16 and 31.5 kHz reveal a sharp increase in hearing sensitivity. Thus, although not obtained in this study, the upper aerial hearing limit is in the ultrasonic range. A comparison of the present data with the underwater audiogram of the same test subject referred to sound intensity indicates that the sensitivity of Sotalia to underwater sound is generally better than to airborne sound. .

  16. Unsound Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knakkergaard, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the change in premise that digitally produced sound brings about and how digital technologies more generally have changed our relationship to the musical artifact, not simply in degree but in kind. It demonstrates how our acoustical conceptions are thoroughly challenged...... by the digital production of sound and, by questioning the ontological basis for digital sound, turns our understanding of the core term substance upside down....

  17. Sound Absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, H. V.; Möser, M.

    Sound absorption indicates the transformation of sound energy into heat. It is, for instance, employed to design the acoustics in rooms. The noise emitted by machinery and plants shall be reduced before arriving at a workplace; auditoria such as lecture rooms or concert halls require a certain reverberation time. Such design goals are realised by installing absorbing components at the walls with well-defined absorption characteristics, which are adjusted for corresponding demands. Sound absorbers also play an important role in acoustic capsules, ducts and screens to avoid sound immission from noise intensive environments into the neighbourhood.

  18. The influence of environmental parameters on the optimal frequency in a shallow underwater acoustic channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarnescu, George

    2015-02-01

    In a shallow underwater acoustic channel the delayed replicas of a transmitted signal are mainly due to the interactions with the sea surface and the bottom layer. If a specific underwater region on the globe is considered, for which the sedimentary layer structure is constant across the transmission distance, then the variability of the amplitude-delay profile is determined by daily and seasonal changes of the sound speed profile (SSP) and by weather changes, such as variations of the wind speed. Such a parameter will influence the attenuation at the surface, the noise level and the profile of the sea surface. The temporal variation of the impulse response in a shallow underwater acoustic channel determines the variability of the optimal transmission frequency. If the ways in which the optimal frequency changes can be predicted, then an adaptive analog transceiver can be easily designed for an underwater acoustic modem or it can be found when a communication link has high throughput. In this article it will be highlighted the way in which the amplitude-delay profile is affected by the sound speed profile, wind speed and channel depth and also will be emphasized the changes of the optimal transmission frequency in a configuration, where the transmitter and receiver are placed on the seafloor and the bathymetry profile will be considered flat, having a given composition.

  19. Network Computing for Distributed Underwater Acoustic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-31

    Physical layer in UASNs Our main investigations are about underwater communications using acoustic waves. Elec- tromagnetic and optical waves do not...Shengli, Z., and Jun-Hong, C. (2008), Prospects and problems of wireless communication for underwater sensor networks, Wirel. Commun . Mob. Comput., 8(8... Wireless Communications , 9(9), 2934–2944. [21] Pompili, D. and Akyildiz, I. (2010), A multimedia cross-layer protocol for underwater acoustic sensor networks

  20. Cooperative OFDM underwater acoustic communications

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Xilin; Cheng, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Following underwater acoustic channel modeling, this book investigates the relationship between coherence time and transmission distances. It considers the power allocation issues of two typical transmission scenarios, namely short-range transmission and medium-long range transmission. For the former scenario, an adaptive system is developed based on instantaneous channel state information. The primary focus is on cooperative dual-hop orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM). This book includes the decomposed fountain codes designed to enable reliable communications with higher energy efficiency. It covers the Doppler Effect, which improves packet transmission reliability for effective low-complexity mirror-mapping-based intercarrier interference cancellation schemes capable of suppressing the intercarrier interference power level. Designed for professionals and researchers in the field of underwater acoustic communications, this book is also suitable for advanced-level students in electrical enginee...

  1. International Conference on Underwater Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Jaulin, Luc; Creuze, Vincent; Debese, Nathalie; Quidu, Isabelle; Clement, Benoît; Billon-Coat, Annick

    2016-01-01

    This volume constitutes the results of the International Conference on Underwater Environment, MOQESM’14, held at “Le Quartz” Conference Center in Brest, France, on October 14-15, 2014, within the framework of the 9th Sea Tech Week, International Marine Science and Technology Event. The objective of MOQESM'14 was to bring together researchers from both academia and industry, interested in marine robotics and hydrography with application to the coastal environment mapping and underwater infrastructures surveys. The common thread of the conference is the combination of technical control, perception, and localization, typically used in robotics, with the methods of mapping and bathymetry. The papers presented in this book focus on two main topics. Firstly, coastal and infrastructure mapping is addressed, focusing not only on hydrographic systems, but also on positioning systems, bathymetry, and remote sensing. The proposed methods rely on acoustic sensors such as side scan sonars, multibeam echo sounders, ...

  2. Sound generator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2008-01-01

    A sound generator, particularly a loudspeaker, configured to emit sound, comprising a rigid element (2) enclosing a plurality of air compartments (3), wherein the rigid element (2) has a back side (B) comprising apertures (4), and a front side (F) that is closed, wherein the generator is provided

  3. Sound generator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2010-01-01

    A sound generator, particularly a loudspeaker, configured to emit sound, comprising a rigid element (2) enclosing a plurality of air compartments (3), wherein the rigid element (2) has a back side (B) comprising apertures (4), and a front side (F) that is closed, wherein the generator is provided

  4. Sound generator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2007-01-01

    A sound generator, particularly a loudspeaker, configured to emit sound, comprising a rigid element (2) enclosing a plurality of air compartments (3), wherein the rigid element (2) has a back side (B) comprising apertures (4), and a front side (F) that is closed, wherein the generator is provided

  5. Sound knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kauffmann, Lene Teglhus

    of the research is to investigate what is considered to ‘work as evidence’ in health promotion and how the ‘evidence discourse’ influences social practices in policymaking and in research. From investigating knowledge practices in the field of health promotion, I develop the concept of sound knowledge...... making, which I call ‘sound knowledge’. Sound knowledge is an approach to knowledge that takes the reflexive considerations of actors in policymaking processes as well as in research about what knowledge is into account. Seeing knowledge as sound makes connections between different ideas, concepts...... and ideologies explicit. Furthermore, in relation to an anthropology of knowledge, sound knowledge also offers a reconsideration of the way anthropologists study knowledge, as it specifies that studying knowledge for anthropologists means studying what people consider as knowledge, in what circumstances...

  6. A COMPARISON BETWEEN ACTIVE AND PASSIVE TECHNIQUES FOR UNDERWATER 3D APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bianco

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In the field of 3D scanning, there is an increasing need for more accurate technologies to acquire 3D models of close range objects. Underwater exploration, for example, is very hard to perform due to the hostile conditions and the bad visibility of the environment. Some application fields, like underwater archaeology, require to recover tridimensional data of objects that cannot be moved from their site or touched in order to avoid possible damages. Photogrammetry is widely used for underwater 3D acquisition, because it requires just one or two digital still or video cameras to acquire a sequence of images taken from different viewpoints. Stereo systems composed by a pair of cameras are often employed on underwater robots (i.e. ROVs, Remotely Operated Vehicles and used by scuba divers, in order to survey archaeological sites, reconstruct complex 3D structures in aquatic environment, estimate in situ the length of marine organisms, etc. The stereo 3D reconstruction is based on the triangulation of corresponding points on the two views. This requires to find in both images common points and to match them (correspondence problem, determining a plane that contains the 3D point on the object. Another 3D technique, frequently used in air acquisition, solves this point-matching problem by projecting structured lighting patterns to codify the acquired scene. The corresponding points are identified associating a binary code in both images. In this work we have tested and compared two whole-field 3D imaging techniques (active and passive based on stereo vision, in underwater environment. A 3D system has been designed, composed by a digital projector and two still cameras mounted in waterproof housing, so that it can perform the various acquisitions without changing the configuration of optical devices. The tests were conducted in a water tank in different turbidity conditions, on objects with different surface properties. In order to simulate a typical

  7. Underwater Coatings for Contamination Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann-Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

    2004-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is deactivating several fuel storage basins. Airborne contamination is a concern when the sides of the basins are exposed and allowed to dry during water removal. One way of controlling this airborne contamination is to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls are still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market that are used in marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives are easily applied and adhere well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INEEL fuel pools. The four pools considered included (1) Test Area North (TAN-607) with epoxy painted concrete walls; (2) Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) (CPP-603) with bare concrete walls; (3) Materials Test Reactor (MTR) Canal with stainless steel lined concrete walls; and (4) Power Burst Facility (PBF-620) with stainless steel lined concrete walls on the bottom and epoxy painted carbon steel lined walls on the upper portions. Therefore, the four materials chosen for testing included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The typical water temperature of the pools varies from 55 F to 80 F dependent on the pool and the season. These tests were done at room temperature. The following criteria were used during this evaluation. The underwater coating must: (1) Be easy to apply; (2) Adhere well to the four surfaces of interest; (3) Not change or have a negative impact on water chemistry or clarity; (4) Not be hazardous in final applied form; and (5) Be proven in other underwater applications. In addition, it is desirable for the coating to have a high pigment or high cross-link density to prevent radiation from penetrating. This paper will detail the testing completed and the test results. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates

  8. Modelling techniques for underwater noise generated by tidal turbines in shallow water

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd, Thomas P.; Turnock, Stephen R.; Humphrey, Victor F.

    2011-01-01

    The modelling of underwater noise sources and their potential impact on the marine environment is considered, focusing on tidal turbines in shallow water. The requirement for device noise prediction as part of environmental impact assessment is outlined and the limited amount of measurement data and modelling research identified. Following the identification of potential noise sources, the dominant flowgenerated sources are modelled using empirical techniques. The predicted sound pressure lev...

  9. Array Receivers and Sound Sources for Three Dimensional Shallow Water Acoustic Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-06

    great success. Our acoustics research groups, the Ocean Acoustics and Signals Laboratory and the Acoustic Communications Group, in the Applied Ocean...field efforts in shallow-water acoustics and underwater acoustic communications. We have plans to upgrade our existing hydrophone arrays and sound...Hydrophone Receiver Unit) arrays. The immedate objective was to improve our fieldwork capibility and to enhance the quality of our underwater acoustic

  10. Sound exposure changes European seabass behaviour in a large outdoor floating pen: Effects of temporal structure and a ramp-up procedure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neo, Y.Y.; Hubert, J.; Bolle, L.J.; Winter, Hendrik V.; Cate, ten C.; Slabbekoorn, H.

    2016-01-01

    Underwater sound from human activities may affect fish behaviour negatively and threaten the stability of fish stocks. However, some fundamental understanding is still lacking for adequate impact assessments and potential mitigation strategies. For example, little is known about the potential

  11. Novel underwater soundscape: acoustic repertoire of plainfin midshipman fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIver, Eileen L; Marchaterre, Margaret A; Rice, Aaron N; Bass, Andrew H

    2014-07-01

    Toadfishes are among the best-known groups of sound-producing (vocal) fishes and include species commonly known as toadfish and midshipman. Although midshipman have been the subject of extensive investigation of the neural mechanisms of vocalization, this is the first comprehensive, quantitative analysis of the spectro-temporal characters of their acoustic signals and one of the few for fishes in general. Field recordings of territorial, nest-guarding male midshipman during the breeding season identified a diverse vocal repertoire composed of three basic sound types that varied widely in duration, harmonic structure and degree of amplitude modulation (AM): 'hum', 'grunt' and 'growl'. Hum duration varied nearly 1000-fold, lasting for minutes at a time, with stable harmonic stacks and little envelope modulation throughout the sound. By contrast, grunts were brief, ~30-140 ms, broadband signals produced both in isolation and repetitively as a train of up to 200 at intervals of ~0.5-1.0 s. Growls were also produced alone or repetitively, but at variable intervals of the order of seconds with durations between those of grunts and hums, ranging 60-fold from ~200 ms to 12 s. Growls exhibited prominent harmonics with sudden shifts in pulse repetition rate and highly variable AM patterns, unlike the nearly constant AM of grunt trains and flat envelope of hums. Behavioral and neurophysiological studies support the hypothesis that each sound type's unique acoustic signature contributes to signal recognition mechanisms. Nocturnal production of these sounds against a background chorus dominated constantly for hours by a single sound type, the multi-harmonic hum, reveals a novel underwater soundscape for fish. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Design of illumination and projection optics for projectors with single digital micromirror devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C M; Shieh, H P

    2000-07-01

    We present a new optical system design for a projector with a single digital micromirror device (Texas Instruments Digital Micromirror Device) that improves on previous designs in terms of optical efficiency, uniformity, and contrast while yielding a low-profile and compact system. A rod integrator is incorporated with a compact relay system to maximize light efficiency and to increase illumination uniformity. The uniformity achieved by the optimized optical system was calculated to be 94%. In addition, this unique light-separator design has dual output channels to increase the image contrast by steering the off-state light away from the projection lens. This projector design provides very efficient light utilization, and we discuss how the geometrical optical efficiency of the system can be boosted to approach the theoretical maximum.

  13. Generic nonsinusoidal phase error correction for three-dimensional shape measurement using a digital video projector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2007-01-01

    A structured light system using a digital video projector is widely used for 3D shape measurement. However, the nonlinear gamma of the projector causes the projected fringe patterns to be nonsinusoidal, which results in phase error and therefore measurement error. It has been shown that, by using a small look-up table (LUT), this type of phase error can be reduced significantly for a three-step phase-shifting algorithm. We prove that this algorithm is generic for any phase-shifting algorithm. Moreover, we propose a new LUT generation method by analyzing the captured fringe image of a flat board directly. Experiments show that this error compensation algorithm can reduce the phase error to at least 13 times smaller.

  14. Sound Zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Bo; Olsen, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Sound zones, i.e. spatially confined regions of individual audio content, can be created by appropriate filtering of the desired audio signals reproduced by an array of loudspeakers. The challenge of designing filters for sound zones is twofold: First, the filtered responses should generate...... an acoustic separation between the control regions. Secondly, the pre- and post-ringing as well as spectral deterioration introduced by the filters should be minimized. The tradeoff between acoustic separation and filter ringing is the focus of this paper. A weighted L2-norm penalty is introduced in the sound...

  15. Metasurface for Water-to-Air Sound Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Eun; Park, Jong Jin; Choi, Haejin; Han, Chung Kyu; Wright, Oliver B.; Lee, Sam H.

    2018-01-01

    Effective transmission of sound from water to air is crucial for the enhancement of the detection sensitivity of underwater sound. However, only 0.1% of the acoustic energy is naturally transmitted at such a boundary. At audio frequencies, quarter-wave plates or multilayered antireflection coatings are too bulky for practical use for such enhancement. Here we present an acoustic metasurface of a thickness of only ˜λ /100 , where λ is the wavelength in air, consisting of an array of meta-atoms that each contain a set of membranes and an air-filled cavity. We experimentally demonstrate that such a meta-atom increases the transmission of sound at ˜700 Hz by 2 orders of magnitude, allowing about 30% of the incident acoustic power from water to be transmitted into air. Applications include underwater sonic sensing and communication.

  16. Pathway projector: web-based zoomable pathway browser using KEGG atlas and Google Maps API.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Nobuaki; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Ogawa, Ryu; Kido, Nobuhiro; Oshita, Kazuki; Ikegami, Keita; Tamaki, Satoshi; Tomita, Masaru

    2009-11-11

    Biochemical pathways provide an essential context for understanding comprehensive experimental data and the systematic workings of a cell. Therefore, the availability of online pathway browsers will facilitate post-genomic research, just as genome browsers have contributed to genomics. Many pathway maps have been provided online as part of public pathway databases. Most of these maps, however, function as the gateway interface to a specific database, and the comprehensiveness of their represented entities, data mapping capabilities, and user interfaces are not always sufficient for generic usage. We have identified five central requirements for a pathway browser: (1) availability of large integrated maps showing genes, enzymes, and metabolites; (2) comprehensive search features and data access; (3) data mapping for transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic experiments, as well as the ability to edit and annotate pathway maps; (4) easy exchange of pathway data; and (5) intuitive user experience without the requirement for installation and regular maintenance. According to these requirements, we have evaluated existing pathway databases and tools and implemented a web-based pathway browser named Pathway Projector as a solution. Pathway Projector provides integrated pathway maps that are based upon the KEGG Atlas, with the addition of nodes for genes and enzymes, and is implemented as a scalable, zoomable map utilizing the Google Maps API. Users can search pathway-related data using keywords, molecular weights, nucleotide sequences, and amino acid sequences, or as possible routes between compounds. In addition, experimental data from transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic analyses can be readily mapped. Pathway Projector is freely available for academic users at (http://www.g-language.org/PathwayProjector/).

  17. Micro Aerial Projector Stabilizing Projected Images Of An Airborne Robotics Projection Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-09

    Micro Aerial Projector - Stabilizing Projected Images Of An Airborne Robotics Projection Platform Werner Alexander Isop1, Jesus Pestana1, Gabriele...combining augmented reality and mobile robotics into a new form of human-machine interaction. Specifically, we introduce a small semi-autonomous micro aerial...it as a robotic companion, which follows the user and is able to project supportive information in the 3D environment. Fig. 1 shows an example where

  18. Recent advancements in system design for miniaturized MEMS-based laser projectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholles, M.; Frommhagen, K.; Gerwig, Ch.; Knobbe, J.; Lakner, H.; Schlebusch, D.; Schwarzenberg, M.; Vogel, U.

    2008-02-01

    Laser projection systems that use the flying spot principle and which are based on a single MEMS micro scanning mirrors are a very promising way to build ultra-compact projectors that may fit into mobile devices. First demonstrators that show the feasibility of this approach and the applicability of the micro scanning mirror developed by Fraunhofer IPMS for these systems have already been presented. However, a number of items still have to be resolved until miniaturized laser projectors are ready for the market. This contribution describes progress on several different items, each of them of major importance for laser projection systems. First of all, the overall performance of the system has been increased from VGA resolution to SVGA (800×600 pixels) with easy connection to a PC via DVI interface or by using the projector as embedded system with direct camera interface. Secondly, the degree of integration of the electronics has been enhanced by design of an application specific analog front end IC for the micro scanning mirror. It has been fabricated in a special high voltage technology and does not only allow to generate driving signals for the scanning mirror with amplitudes of up to 200V but also integrates position detection of the mirror by several methods. Thirdly, first results concerning Speckle reduction have been achieved, which is necessary for generation of images with high quality. Other aspects include laser modulation and solutions regarding projection on tilted screens which is possible because of the unlimited depth of focus.

  19. Projector methods applied to numerical integration of the SN transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hristea, V.; Covaci, St.

    2003-01-01

    We are developing two methods of integration for the S N transport equation in x - y geometry, methods based on projector technique. By cellularization of the phase space and by choosing a finite basis of orthogonal functions, which characterize the angular flux, the non-selfadjoint transport equation is reduced to a cellular automaton. This automaton is completely described by the transition Matrix T. Within this paper two distinct methods of projection are described. One of them uses the transversal integration technique. As an alternative to this we applied the method of the projectors for the integral S N transport equation. We show that the constant spatial approximation of the integral S N transport equation does not lead to negative fluxes. One of the problems with the projector method, namely the appearance of numerical instability for small intervals is solved by the Pade representation of the elements for Matrix T. Numerical tests here presented compare the numerical performances of the algorithms obtained by the two projection methods. The Pade representation was also taken into account for these two algorithm types. (authors)

  20. Projector-Based Augmented Reality for Quality Inspection of Scanned Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, J.; Weinmann, M.; Wursthorn, S.

    2017-09-01

    After scanning or reconstructing the geometry of objects, we need to inspect the result of our work. Are there any parts missing? Is every detail covered in the desired quality? We typically do this by looking at the resulting point clouds or meshes of our objects on-screen. What, if we could see the information directly visualized on the object itself? Augmented reality is the generic term for bringing virtual information into our real environment. In our paper, we show how we can project any 3D information like thematic visualizations or specific monitoring information with reference to our object onto the object's surface itself, thus augmenting it with additional information. For small objects that could for instance be scanned in a laboratory, we propose a low-cost method involving a projector-camera system to solve this task. The user only needs a calibration board with coded fiducial markers to calibrate the system and to estimate the projector's pose later on for projecting textures with information onto the object's surface. Changes within the projected 3D information or of the projector's pose will be applied in real-time. Our results clearly reveal that such a simple setup will deliver a good quality of the augmented information.

  1. Sound intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crocker, Malcolm J.; Jacobsen, Finn

    1998-01-01

    This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique.......This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique....

  2. Sound Intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crocker, M.J.; Jacobsen, Finn

    1997-01-01

    This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique.......This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique....

  3. Synchronous and Rhythmic Vocalizations and Correlated Underwater Behavior of Free-ranging Atlantic Spotted Dolphins (Stenella frontalis and Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus in the Bahamas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise L. Herzing

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Since 1985 a resident community of Atlantic spotted dolphins (Stenella frontalis, and bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus, have been studied underwater in the Bahamas. Over 200 individuals of both species have been identified and observed over the years. Basic correlations with sound patterns and behavior such as whistles during contact/reunions and squawks during aggression have been reported. This paper describes a small subset of their vocal repertoire that involves synchronous/rhythmic sound production. Dolphin behavior was recorded underwater using underwater video cameras with hydrophone input. Vocalizations were correlated with basic underwater behavioral activity and analyzed using Raven 1.3. Spotted dolphins were observed using two types of synchronized vocalizations including synchronized squawks (burst pulsed vocalizations and screams- (overlapping FM whistles during intraspecific and interspecific aggression. Bottlenose dolphins used three types of synchronized vocalizations; whistles/buzz bouts, bray/buzz bouts, and buzz bouts during intraspecific aggression. Body postures were synchronous with physical movements and often mirrored the rhythm of the vocalizations. The intervals between highly synchronized vocalizations had small variance and created a rhythmic quality and cadence to the acoustic sequences. Three types of vocalizations had similar ratios of sound duration to the spacing between sounds (Screams, whistle/buzz bouts, and bray/buzz bouts. Temporal aspects of sequences of sound and postures may be important aspects of individual and group coordination and behavior in delphinids.

  4. Underwater inspection by immersion phased array UT technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirasawa, Taiji

    2017-01-01

    In the inspection during the service period of a nuclear power plant, ultrasonic flaw detection test (UT) is performed as a volume test to confirm the soundness of the equipment and structure. Phased array UT technology has been applied as a technique to measure with high accuracy the crack depth generated in stainless steel or Ni based alloy welds. This paper picked up main scanning methods based on ultrasonic beam control in phased array UT, as well as items to consider when carrying out underwater UT inspection of reactor internal structure, and described the concept of selection method of flaw detection method. As the example of underwater UT inspection, this paper introduced application examples for actual equipment and test body, in the defect depth measurement of water immersion phased array UT, by choosing reactor internal structures etc. of a BWR plant. The core shroud, core spray piping, jet pump, CRD housing, and shroud support of BWR plant that are introduced here are subject to individual inspection under maintenance standards and are extremely important equipment. (A.O.)

  5. Underwater noise pollution in a coastal tropical environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, L; Carvalho, R R; Lailson-Brito, J; Azevedo, A F

    2014-06-15

    Underwater noise pollution has become a major concern in marine habitats. Guanabara Bay, southeastern Brazil, is an impacted area of economic importance with constant vessel traffic. One hundred acoustic recording sessions took place over ten locations. Sound sources operating within 1 km radius of each location were quantified during recordings. The highest mean sound pressure level near the surface was 111.56±9.0 dB re 1 μPa at the frequency band of 187 Hz. Above 15 kHz, the highest mean sound pressure level was 76.21±8.3 dB re 1 μPa at the frequency 15.89 kHz. Noise levels correlated with number of operating vessels and vessel traffic composition influenced noise profiles. Shipping locations had the highest noise levels, while small vessels locations had the lowest noise levels. Guanabara Bay showed noise pollution similar to that of other impacted coastal regions, which is related to shipping and vessel traffic. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Model based image restoration for underwater images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Thomas; Frühberger, Peter; Werling, Stefan; Heizmann, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The inspection of offshore parks, dam walls and other infrastructure under water is expensive and time consuming, because such constructions must be inspected manually by divers. Underwater buildings have to be examined visually to find small cracks, spallings or other deficiencies. Automation of underwater inspection depends on established water-proved imaging systems. Most underwater imaging systems are based on acoustic sensors (sonar). The disadvantage of such an acoustic system is the loss of the complete visual impression. All information embedded in texture and surface reflectance gets lost. Therefore acoustic sensors are mostly insufficient for these kind of visual inspection tasks. Imaging systems based on optical sensors feature an enormous potential for underwater applications. The bandwidth from visual imaging systems reach from inspection of underwater buildings via marine biological applications through to exploration of the seafloor. The reason for the lack of established optical systems for underwater inspection tasks lies in technical difficulties of underwater image acquisition and processing. Lightening, highly degraded images make a computational postprocessing absolutely essential.

  7. Sound settlements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duelund Mortensen, Peder

    2013-01-01

    Præsentation af projektresultater fra Interreg forskningen Sound Settlements om udvikling af bæredygtighed i det almene boligbyggerier i København, Malmø, Helsingborg og Lund samt europæiske eksempler på best practice......Præsentation af projektresultater fra Interreg forskningen Sound Settlements om udvikling af bæredygtighed i det almene boligbyggerier i København, Malmø, Helsingborg og Lund samt europæiske eksempler på best practice...

  8. Sound Settlements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peder Duelund; Hornyanszky, Elisabeth Dalholm; Larsen, Jacob Norvig

    2013-01-01

    Præsentation af projektresultater fra Interreg forskningen Sound Settlements om udvikling af bæredygtighed i det almene boligbyggerier i København, Malmø, Helsingborg og Lund samt europæiske eksempler på best practice......Præsentation af projektresultater fra Interreg forskningen Sound Settlements om udvikling af bæredygtighed i det almene boligbyggerier i København, Malmø, Helsingborg og Lund samt europæiske eksempler på best practice...

  9. A new technique for robot vision in autonomous underwater vehicles using the color shift in underwater imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    FOR ROBOT VISION IN AUTONOMOUS UNDERWATER VEHICLES USING THE COLOR SHIFT IN UNDERWATER IMAGING by Jake A. Jones June 2017 Thesis Advisor... VEHICLES USING THE COLOR SHIFT IN UNDERWATER IMAGING 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Jake A. Jones 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS...underwater vehicles (AUVs), robot vision, autonomy, visual odometry, underwater color shift, optical properties of water 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 75 16

  10. Microstructural characterizations and mechanical properties in underwater friction stir welding of aluminum and magnesium dissimilar alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yong; Lu, Zhengping; Yan, Keng; Huang, Linzhao

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Aluminum and magnesium alloys were joined by underwater friction stir welding. • Underwater FSW was conducted to improve properties of joint with lower heat input. • Microstructures and mechanical properties of dissimilar joint were investigated. • Intermetallic compounds developed in the fracture interface were analyzed. • Fracture features of the tensile samples were analyzed. - Abstract: Formation of intermetallic compounds in the stir zone of dissimilar welds affects the mechanical properties of the joints significantly. In order to reduce heat input and control the amount and morphological characteristics of brittle intermetallic compounds underwater friction stir welding of 6013 Al alloy and AZ31 Mg alloy was carried out. Microstructures, mechanical properties, elements distribution, and the fracture surface of the joints were analyzed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, etc. The result shows that sound dissimilar joint with good mechanical properties can be obtained by underwater friction stir welding. Al and Mg alloys were stirred together and undergone the process of recrystallization, forming complex intercalated flow patterns in the stir zone. Tensile strength of the dissimilar joint was up to 152.3 MPa. Maximum hardness (142HV) appeared in the middle of the centerline of the specimen. Intermetallic compounds layer consisting of Al 3 Mg 2 and Mg 17 Al 12 formed in the Al/Mg interface and resulted in the fracture of the joint

  11. Corrosion Resistant Cladding by YAG Laser Welding in Underwater Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutomi Kochi; Toshio Kojima; Suemi Hirata; Ichiro Morita; Katsura Ohwaki

    2002-01-01

    It is known that stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) will occur in nickel-base alloys used in Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) and Internals of nuclear power plants. A SCC sensitivity has been evaluated by IHI in each part of RPV and Internals. There are several water level instrumentation nozzles installed in domestic BWR RPV. In water level instrumentation nozzles, 182 type nickel-base alloys were used for the welding joint to RPV. It is estimated the SCC potential is high in this joint because of a higher residual stress than the yield strength (about 400 MPa). This report will describe a preventive maintenance method to these nozzles Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and welds by a corrosion resistant cladding (CRC) by YAG Laser in underwater environment (without draining a reactor water). There are many kinds of countermeasures for SCC, for example, Induction Heating Stress Improvement (IHSI), Mechanical Stress Improvement Process (MSIP) and so on. A YAG laser CRC is one of them. In this technology a laser beam is used for heat source and irradiated through an optical fiber to a base metal and SCC resistant material is used for welding wires. After cladding the HAZ and welds are coated by the corrosion resistant materials so their surfaces are improved. A CRC by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) in an air environment had been developed and already applied to a couple of operating plants (16 Nozzles). This method was of course good but it spent much time to perform because of an installation of some water-proof working boxes to make a TIG-weldability environment. CRC by YAG laser welding in underwater environment has superior features comparing to this conventional TIG method as follows. At the viewpoint of underwater environment, (1) an outage term reduction (no drainage water). (2) a radioactive exposure dose reduction for personnel. At that of YAG laser welding, (1) A narrower HAZ. (2) A smaller distortion. (3) A few cladding layers. A YAG laser CRC test in underwater

  12. A rotating and warping projector/backprojector for fan-beam and cone-beam iterative algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, G.L.; Hsieh, Y.L.; Gullberg, G.T.

    1994-01-01

    A rotating-and-warping projector/backprojector is proposed for iterative algorithms used to reconstruct fan-beam and cone-beam single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) data. The development of a new projector/backprojector for implementing attenuation, geometric point response, and scatter models is motivated by the need to reduce the computation time yet to preserve the fidelity of the corrected reconstruction. At each projection angle, the projector/backprojector first rotates the image volume so that the pixelized cube remains parallel to the detector, and then warps the image volume so that the fan-beam and cone-beam rays are converted into parallel rays. In the authors implementation, these two steps are combined so that the interpolation of voxel values are performed only once. The projection operation is achieved by a simple weighted summation, and the backprojection operation is achieved by copying weighted projection array values to the image volume. An advantage of this projector/backprojector is that the system point response function can be deconvolved via the Fast Fourier Transform using the shift-invariant property of the point response when the voxel-to-detector distance is constant. The fan-beam and cone-beam rotating-and-warping projector/backprojector is applied to SPECT data showing improved resolution

  13. An accurate projector gamma correction method for phase-measuring profilometry based on direct optical power detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Miao; Yin, Shibin; Yang, Shourui; Zhang, Zonghua

    2015-10-01

    Digital projector is frequently applied to generate fringe pattern in phase calculation-based three dimensional (3D) imaging systems. Digital projector often works with camera in this kind of systems so the intensity response of a projector should be linear in order to ensure the measurement precision especially in Phase-Measuring Profilometry (PMP). Some correction methods are often applied to cope with the non-linear intensity response of the digital projector. These methods usually rely on camera and gamma function is often applied to compensate the non-linear response so the correction performance is restricted by the dynamic range of camera. In addition, the gamma function is not suitable to compensate the nonmonotonicity intensity response. This paper propose a gamma correction method by the precisely detecting the optical energy instead of using a plate and camera. A photodiode with high dynamic range and linear response is used to directly capture the light optical from the digital projector. After obtaining the real gamma curve precisely by photodiode, a gray level look-up table (LUT) is generated to correct the image to be projected. Finally, this proposed method is verified experimentally.

  14. Second Sound

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 6. Second Sound - The Role of Elastic Waves. R Srinivasan. General Article Volume 4 Issue 6 June 1999 pp 15-19. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/004/06/0015-0019 ...

  15. Second Sound

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 3. Second Sound - Waves of Entropy and Temperature. R Srinivasan. General Article Volume 4 Issue 3 March 1999 pp 16-24. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/004/03/0016-0024 ...

  16. Second Sound

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    as a function of q is called adispersion curve. Landau postulated. R Srinivasan is a Visiting. Professor at the Raman. Research Institute after retiring as .... Second sound was seen in solid 4He crystals by Ackermann and others in 1966. 4He will not solidify even at absolute zero of temperature unless one applies a pressure ...

  17. Second Sound

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 6. Second Sound - The Role of Elastic Waves. R Srinivasan. General Article Volume 4 Issue 6 June 1999 pp 15-19. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/004/06/0015-0019 ...

  18. Sound engineer

    CERN Document Server

    Mara, Wil

    2015-01-01

    "Readers will learn what it takes to succeed as a sound engineer. The book also explains the necessary educational steps, useful character traits, potential hazards, and daily job tasks related to this career. Sidebars include thought-provoking trivia. Questions in the backmatter ask for text-dependent analysis. Photos, a glossary, and additional resources are included."-- Provided by publisher.

  19. Sound Settlements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peder Duelund; Hornyanszky, Elisabeth Dalholm; Larsen, Jacob Norvig

    2013-01-01

    Præsentation af projektresultater fra Interreg forskningen Sound Settlements om udvikling af bæredygtighed i det almene boligbyggerier i København, Malmø, Helsingborg og Lund samt europæiske eksempler på best practice...

  20. Jellyfish inspired underwater unmanned vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Alex; Bresser, Scott; Chung, Sanghun; Tadesse, Yonas; Priya, Shashank

    2009-03-01

    An unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) was designed inspired by the form and functionality of a Jellyfish. These natural organisms were chosen as bio-inspiration for a multitude of reasons including: efficiency of locomotion, lack of natural predators, proper form and shape to incorporate payload, and varying range of sizes. The structure consists of a hub body surrounded by bell segments and microcontroller based drive system. The locomotion of UUV was achieved by shape memory alloy "Biometal Fiber" actuation which possesses large strain and blocking force with adequate response time. The main criterion in design of UUV was the use of low-profile shape memory alloy actuators which act as artificial muscles. In this manuscript, we discuss the design of two Jellyfish prototypes and present experimental results illustrating the performance and power consumption.

  1. Design and Analysis of Underwater Acoustic Networks with Reflected Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emokpae, Lloyd

    Underwater acoustic networks (UWANs) have applications in environmental state monitoring, oceanic profile measurements, leak detection in oil fields, distributed surveillance, and navigation. For these applications, sets of nodes are employed to collaboratively monitor an area of interest and track certain events or phenomena. In addition, it is common to find autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) acting as mobile sensor nodes that perform search-and-rescue missions, reconnaissance in combat zones, and coastal patrol. These AUVs are to work cooperatively to achieve a desired goal and thus need to be able to, in an ad-hoc manner, establish and sustain communication links in order to ensure some desired level of quality of service. Therefore, each node is required to adapt to environmental changes and be able to overcome broken communication links caused by external noise affecting the communication channel due to node mobility. In addition, since radio waves are quickly absorbed in the water medium, it is common for most underwater applications to rely on acoustic (or sound) rather than radio channels for mid-to-long range communications. However, acoustic channels pose multiple challenging issues, most notably the high transmission delay due to slow signal propagation and the limited channel bandwidth due to high frequency attenuation. Moreover, the inhomogeneous property of the water medium affects the sound speed profile while the signal surface and bottom reflections leads to multipath effects. In this dissertation, we address these networking challenges by developing protocols that take into consideration the underwater physical layer dynamics. We begin by introducing a novel surface-based reflection scheme (SBR), which takes advantage of the multipath effects of the acoustic channel. SBR works by using reflections from the water surface, and bottom, to establish non-line-of-sight (NLOS) communication links. SBR makes it possible to incorporate both line

  2. Underwater sympathetic detonation of pellet explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Shiro; Saburi, Tei; Nagayama, Kunihito

    2017-06-01

    The underwater sympathetic detonation of pellet explosives was taken by high-speed photography. The diameter and the thickness of the pellet were 20 and 10 mm, respectively. The experimental system consists of the precise electric detonator, two grams of composition C4 booster and three pellets, and these were set in water tank. High-speed video camera, HPV-X made by Shimadzu was used with 10 Mfs. The underwater explosions of the precise electric detonator, the C4 booster and a pellet were also taken by high-speed photography to estimate the propagation processes of the underwater shock waves. Numerical simulation of the underwater sympathetic detonation of the pellet explosives was also carried out and compared with experiment.

  3. Underwater Grass Comeback Helps Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fortified Susquehanna Flats, the largest bed of underwater grasses in the Chesapeake Bay, seems able to withstand a major weather punch. Its resilience is contributing to an overall increase in the Bay’s submerged aquatic vegetation.

  4. Underwater Object Segmentation Based on Optical Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Underwater optical environments are seriously affected by various optical inputs, such as artificial light, sky light, and ambient scattered light. The latter two can block underwater object segmentation tasks, since they inhibit the emergence of objects of interest and distort image information, while artificial light can contribute to segmentation. Artificial light often focuses on the object of interest, and, therefore, we can initially identify the region of target objects if the collimation of artificial light is recognized. Based on this concept, we propose an optical feature extraction, calculation, and decision method to identify the collimated region of artificial light as a candidate object region. Then, the second phase employs a level set method to segment the objects of interest within the candidate region. This two-phase structure largely removes background noise and highlights the outline of underwater objects. We test the performance of the method with diverse underwater datasets, demonstrating that it outperforms previous methods.

  5. Sensor network architectures for monitoring underwater pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Nader; Jawhar, Imad; Al-Jaroodi, Jameela; Zhang, Liren

    2011-01-01

    This paper develops and compares different sensor network architecture designs that can be used for monitoring underwater pipeline infrastructures. These architectures are underwater wired sensor networks, underwater acoustic wireless sensor networks, RF (radio frequency) wireless sensor networks, integrated wired/acoustic wireless sensor networks, and integrated wired/RF wireless sensor networks. The paper also discusses the reliability challenges and enhancement approaches for these network architectures. The reliability evaluation, characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages among these architectures are discussed and compared. Three reliability factors are used for the discussion and comparison: the network connectivity, the continuity of power supply for the network, and the physical network security. In addition, the paper also develops and evaluates a hierarchical sensor network framework for underwater pipeline monitoring.

  6. Underwater photogrammetry successful in Spain and France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    Underwater photogrammetry has been used to measure distortions in fuel assembly alignment pins in the upper internals of the Almarez and Dampierre PWRs. Photogrammetry is a three-dimensional precision measurement method using photographic techniques for the on-site measurement phase. On the strength of the operations at the two PWRs, underwater photogrammetry is now considered as a practical and effective technique for dimensional inspection at nuclear plants. (U.K.)

  7. Underwater noise levels in UK waters

    OpenAIRE

    Merchant, Nathan D.; Brookes, Kate L.; Faulkner, Rebecca C.; Bicknell, Anthony W. J.; Godley, Brendan J.; Witt, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Underwater noise from human activities appears to be rising, with ramifications for acoustically sensitive marine organisms and the functioning of marine ecosystems. Policymakers are beginning to address the risk of ecological impact, but are constrained by a lack of data on current and historic noise levels. Here, we present the first nationally coordinated effort to quantify underwater noise levels, in support of UK policy objectives under the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). ...

  8. Underwater gait analysis in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Daniele; Pavan, Davide; Morris, Meg; Guiotto, Annamaria; Iansek, Robert; Fortuna, Sofia; Frazzitta, Giuseppe; Sawacha, Zimi

    2017-02-01

    Although hydrotherapy is one of the physical therapies adopted to optimize gait rehabilitation in people with Parkinson disease, the quantitative measurement of gait-related outcomes has not been provided yet. This work aims to document the gait improvements in a group of parkinsonians after a hydrotherapy program through 2D and 3D underwater and on land gait analysis. Thirty-four parkinsonians and twenty-two controls were enrolled, divided into two different cohorts. In the first one, 2 groups of patients underwent underwater or land based walking training; controls underwent underwater walking training. Hence pre-treatment 2D underwater and on land gait analysis were performed, together with post-treatment on land gait analysis. Considering that current literature documented a reduced movement amplitude in parkinsonians across all lower limb joints in all movement planes, 3D underwater and on land gait analysis were performed on a second cohort of subjects (10 parkinsonians and 10 controls) who underwent underwater gait training. Baseline land 2D and 3D gait analysis in parkinsonians showed shorter stride length and slower speed than controls, in agreement with previous findings. Comparison between underwater and on land gait analysis showed reduction in stride length, cadence and speed on both parkinsonians and controls. Although patients who underwent underwater treatment exhibited significant changes on spatiotemporal parameters and sagittal plane lower limb kinematics, 3D gait analysis documented a significant (p<0.05) improvement in all movement planes. These data deserve attention for research directions promoting the optimal recovery and maintenance of walking ability. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Affordable underwater wireless optical communication using LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilipenko, Vladimir; Arnon, Shlomi

    2013-09-01

    In recent years the need for high data rate underwater wireless communication (WC) has increased. Nowadays, the conventional technology for underwater communication is acoustic. However, the maximum data rate that acoustic technology can provide is a few kilobits per second. On the other hand, emerging applications such as underwater imaging, networks of sensors and swarms of underwater vehicles require much faster data rates. As a result, underwater optical WC, which can provide much higher data rates, has been proposed as an alternative means of communication. In addition to high data rates, affordable communication systems become an important feature in the development requirements. The outcome of these requirements is a new system design based on off-the-shelf components such as blue and green light emitting diodes (LEDs). This is due to the fact that LEDs offer solutions characterized by low cost, high efficiency, reliability and compactness. However, there are some challenges to be met when incorporating LEDs as part of the optical transmitter, such as low modulation rates and non linearity. In this paper, we review the main challenges facing the incorporation of LEDs as an integral part of underwater WC systems and propose some techniques to mitigate the LED limitations in order to achieve high data rate communication

  10. An underwater optical wireless communication network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnon, Shlomi

    2009-08-01

    The growing need for underwater observation and sub-sea monitoring systems has stimulated considerable interest in advancing the enabling technologies of underwater wireless communication and underwater sensor networks. This communication technology is expected to play an important role in investigating climate change, in monitoring biological, bio-geochemical, evolutionary and ecological changes in the sea, ocean and lake environments and in helping to control and maintain oil production facilities and harbors using unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs), submarines, ships, buoys, and divers. However, the present technology of underwater acoustic communication cannot provide the high data rate required to investigate and monitor these environments and facilities. Optical wireless communication has been proposed as the best alternative to meet this challenge. We present models of three kinds of optical wireless communication links a) a line-of-sight link, b) a modulating retro-reflector link and c) a reflective link, all of which can provide the required data rate. We analyze the link performance based on these models. From the analysis, it is clear that as the water absorption increases, the communication performance decreases dramatically for the three link types. However, by using the scattered lighted it was possible to mitigate this decrease in some cases. We conclude from the analysis that a high data rate underwater optical wireless network is a feasible solution for emerging applications such as UUV to UUV links and networks of sensors, and extended ranges in these applications could be achieved by applying a multi-hop concept.

  11. PREFACE: Aerodynamic sound Aerodynamic sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akishita, Sadao

    2010-02-01

    The modern theory of aerodynamic sound originates from Lighthill's two papers in 1952 and 1954, as is well known. I have heard that Lighthill was motivated in writing the papers by the jet-noise emitted by the newly commercialized jet-engined airplanes at that time. The technology of aerodynamic sound is destined for environmental problems. Therefore the theory should always be applied to newly emerged public nuisances. This issue of Fluid Dynamics Research (FDR) reflects problems of environmental sound in present Japanese technology. The Japanese community studying aerodynamic sound has held an annual symposium since 29 years ago when the late Professor S Kotake and Professor S Kaji of Teikyo University organized the symposium. Most of the Japanese authors in this issue are members of the annual symposium. I should note the contribution of the two professors cited above in establishing the Japanese community of aerodynamic sound research. It is my pleasure to present the publication in this issue of ten papers discussed at the annual symposium. I would like to express many thanks to the Editorial Board of FDR for giving us the chance to contribute these papers. We have a review paper by T Suzuki on the study of jet noise, which continues to be important nowadays, and is expected to reform the theoretical model of generating mechanisms. Professor M S Howe and R S McGowan contribute an analytical paper, a valuable study in today's fluid dynamics research. They apply hydrodynamics to solve the compressible flow generated in the vocal cords of the human body. Experimental study continues to be the main methodology in aerodynamic sound, and it is expected to explore new horizons. H Fujita's study on the Aeolian tone provides a new viewpoint on major, longstanding sound problems. The paper by M Nishimura and T Goto on textile fabrics describes new technology for the effective reduction of bluff-body noise. The paper by T Sueki et al also reports new technology for the

  12. Development of underwater inspection and YAG laser repair welding robots for equipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Shuichi; Kojima, Toshio; Ohwaki, Katsura; Hirose, Naoya

    2000-01-01

    As equipments for power generation such as tank on bath storing wasted water, used resin and others in mainly radioactive wastes processing equipments in nuclear power plant and so forth are carried out periodical inspections and repairs to keep their soundness from long years ago, its importance seems to be increasing more and more hereafter at background of a trend of longer life in their plant. In response to such importance, development of technologies capable of remote control on inspection of inside of the equipments at underwater atmosphere and on repair welding due to YAG laser have been carried out. Here were described on necessity in remote inspection and repair technique, outlines on remote underwater inspection and repair technique, results on welding test, items on compatibility test, and their concrete examples. (G.K.)

  13. State of the art report: Underwater examination techniques for spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Yong Bum

    1997-06-01

    In these days, much efforts are being put to increase the final discharge burnup of PWR fuels. Therefore, the necessity of the inspection of irradiated nuclear fuels assembly during the the refueling outage is greatly increased to evaluate the safe operation and soundness of fuel assemblies in their next cycles in core, and apply the results for safe operation and effective core management. The necessity to evaluate the irradiation performance of indigenous nuclear fuels pushes the relative researchers to the development of on-site fuel inspection techniques and devices which can perform the underwater inspection and measurement of irradiated nuclear fuels during refueling outage. To ensure the technologies, the status of in situ underwater fuel inspection techniques and equipment were investigated and reviewed. Those information provides the fuel inspection capability to evaluate and certificate the performance and integrity of nuclear fuels which leads to the safe operation of NPP. (author). 49 refs., 52 figs

  14. Matched-filtering generalized phase contrast using LCoS pico-projectors for beam-forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    We report on a new beam-forming system for generating high intensity programmable optical spikes using so-called matched-filtering Generalized Phase Contrast (mGPC) applying two consumer handheld pico-projectors. Such a system presents a low-cost alternative for optical trapping and manipulation......, optical lattices and other beam-shaping applications usually implemented with high-end spatial light modulators. Portable pico-projectors based on liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) devices are used as binary phase-only spatial light modulators by carefully setting the appropriate polarization of the laser...

  15. Matched-filtering generalized phase contrast using LCoS pico-projectors for beam-forming

    OpenAIRE

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    We report on a new beam-forming system for generating high intensity programmable optical spikes using so-called matched-filtering Generalized Phase Contrast (mGPC) applying two consumer handheld pico-projectors. Such a system presents a low-cost alternative for optical trapping and manipulation, optical lattices and other beam-shaping applications usually implemented with high-end spatial light modulators. Portable pico-projectors based on liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) devices are used as...

  16. History of resistor array infrared projectors: hindsight is always 100% operability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Owen M.; Goldsmith, George C., II; Stockbridge, Robert G.

    2005-05-01

    Numerous infrared scene projection technologies have been investigated since the 1970s. Notably, from the late 1980s the development of the first resistor array infrared projectors gained leverage from the strong concurrent developments within focal plane array imaging technology, linked by the common need for large integrated circuits comprising a 2-dimensional array of interconnected unit cells. In the resistor array case, it is the unit cell comprising the resistively heated emitter and its dedicated drive circuit that determines the projector response to its associated scene generator commands. In this paper we review the development of resistor array technology from a historical perspective, concentrating on the unit cell developments. We commence by describing the technological innovations that forged the way, sharing along the way stories of the successes and failures, all of which contributed to the steady if somewhat eventful growth of the critical knowledge base that underpins the strength of today's array technology. We conclude with comments on the characteristics and limitations of the technology and on the prospects for future array development.

  17. Programmable spectral engine design of hyperspectral image projectors based on digital micro-mirror device (DMD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xicheng; Gao, Jiaobo; Wu, Jianghui; Li, Jianjun; Cheng, Hongliang

    2017-02-01

    Recently, hyperspectral image projectors (HIP) have been developed in the field of remote sensing. For the advanced performance of system-level validation, target detection and hyperspectral image calibration, HIP has great possibility of development in military, medicine, commercial and so on. HIP is based on the digital micro-mirror device (DMD) and projection technology, which is capable to project arbitrary programmable spectra (controlled by PC) into the each pixel of the IUT1 (instrument under test), such that the projected image could simulate realistic scenes that hyperspectral image could be measured during its use and enable system-level performance testing and validation. In this paper, we built a visible hyperspectral image projector also called the visible target simulator with double DMDs, which the first DMD is used to product the selected monochromatic light from the wavelength of 410 to 720 um, and the light come to the other one. Then we use computer to load image of realistic scenes to the second DMD, so that the target condition and background could be project by the second DMD with the selected monochromatic light. The target condition can be simulated and the experiment could be controlled and repeated in the lab, making the detector instrument could be tested in the lab. For the moment, we make the focus on the spectral engine design include the optical system, research of DMD programmable spectrum and the spectral resolution of the selected spectrum. The detail is shown.

  18. Characterizing large river sounds: Providing context for understanding the environmental effects of noise produced by hydrokinetic turbines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevelhimer, Mark S; Deng, Z Daniel; Scherelis, Constantin

    2016-01-01

    Underwater noise associated with the installation and operation of hydrokinetic turbines in rivers and tidal zones presents a potential environmental concern for fish and marine mammals. Comparing the spectral quality of sounds emitted by hydrokinetic turbines to natural and other anthropogenic sound sources is an initial step at understanding potential environmental impacts. Underwater recordings were obtained from passing vessels and natural underwater sound sources in static and flowing waters. Static water measurements were taken in a lake with minimal background noise. Flowing water measurements were taken at a previously proposed deployment site for hydrokinetic turbines on the Mississippi River, where sounds created by flowing water are part of all measurements, both natural ambient and anthropogenic sources. Vessel sizes ranged from a small fishing boat with 60 hp outboard motor to an 18-unit barge train being pushed upstream by tugboat. As expected, large vessels with large engines created the highest sound levels, which were, on average, 40 dB greater than the sound created by an operating hydrokinetic turbine. A comparison of sound levels from the same sources at different distances using both spherical and cylindrical sound attenuation functions suggests that spherical model results more closely approximate observed sound attenuation.

  19. A new signal development process and sound system for diverting fish from water intakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinet, D.A.; Loeffelman, P.H.; van Hassel, J.H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that American Electric Power Service Corporation has explored the feasibility of using a patented signal development process and underwater sound system to divert fish away from water intake areas. The effect of water intakes on fish is being closely scrutinized as hydropower projects are re-licensed. The overall goal of this four-year research project was to develop an underwater guidance system which is biologically effective, reliable and cost-effective compared to other proposed methods of diversion, such as physical screens. Because different fish species have various listening ranges, it was essential to the success of this experiment that the sound system have a great amount of flexibility. Assuming a fish's sounds are heard by the same kind of fish, it was necessary to develop a procedure and acquire instrumentation to properly analyze the sounds that the target fish species create to communicate and any artificial signals being generated for diversion

  20. Underwater Noise Modeling in Lithuanian Area of the Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatas Bagočius

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Along with rising awareness of public and scientific societies about environmental and ecological impacts of underwater noise, the need for underwater noise modelling in the shallow Lithuanian area of Baltic Sea emerged. Marine Strategy Framework Directive issues regarding underwater noise indicators refers to possibility of evaluation of Good Environmental State using underwater noise measurements as well as possibility to model underwater noise. Main anthropogenic underwater noise contributor in the Seas is the shipping lanes as known due to date, with no exclusion of Lithuanian Baltic Sea area. In this manuscript, it is presented the methods of development of simplistic underwater ambient noise model purposed for computation of underwater soundscape in shallow area of the Lithuanian Baltic Sea.

  1. Underwater Sensor Networks: A New Energy Efficient and Robust Architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Climent, Salvador; Capella, Juan Vincente; Meratnia, Nirvana; Serrano, Juan José

    2012-01-01

    The specific characteristics of underwater environments introduce new challenges for networking protocols. In this paper, a specialized architecture for underwater sensor networks (UWSNs) is proposed and evaluated. Experiments are conducted in order to analyze the suitability of this protocol for

  2. Passive, broadband suppression of radiation of low-frequency sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Oleg A; Baynes, Alexander B

    2018-02-01

    Anthropogenic noise pollution of the ocean is an acute and growing problem. This letter explores one possible mechanism of noise abatement. The far-field acoustic pressure due to a compact underwater source can be suppressed by placing a small compliant body in the vicinity of the source. Here, the feasibility and efficiency of the suppression are evaluated by quantifying the reduction in radiated acoustic energy for several simple geometries, which include sound sources in an unbounded fluid, near a reflecting boundary, or in a shallow-water waveguide. The analysis is streamlined using analytic solutions for sound diffraction by simple shapes.

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic underwater vehicular propulsion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swallom, D.W.; Sadovnik, I.; Gibbs, J.S.; Gurol, H.; Nguyen, L.

    1990-01-01

    The development of magnetohydrodynamic propulsion systems for underwater vehicles is discussed. According to the authors, it is a high risk endeavor that offers the possibility of a number of significant advantages over conventional propeller propulsion systems. These advantages may include the potential for greater stealth characteristics, increased maneuverability, enhanced survivability, elimination of cavitation limits, and addition of a significant emergency propulsion system. The possibility of increased stealth is by far the most important advantage. A conceptual design study has been completed with numerical results that shows that these advantages may be obtained with a magnetohydrodynamic propulsion system in an annular configuration externally surrounding a generic study submarine that is neutrally buoyant and can operate with the existing submarine propulsion system power plant. The classical submarine mission requirements make the use of these characteristics of the magnetohydrodynamic propulsion system particularly appropriate for submarine missions. The magnetohydrodynamic annular propulsion system for a generic attack class submarine has been designed to take advantage of the magnetohydrodynamic thruster characteristics

  4. Routing strategies for underwater gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Russ E.; Leonard, Naomi E.; Fratantoni, David M.

    2009-02-01

    Gliders are autonomous underwater vehicles that achieve long operating range by moving at speeds comparable to those of, or slower than, typical ocean currents. This paper addresses routing gliders to rapidly reach a specified waypoint or to maximize the ability to map a measured field, both in the presence of significant currents. For rapid transit in a frozen velocity field, direct minimization of travel time provides a trajectory "ray" equation. A simpler routing algorithm that requires less information is also discussed. Two approaches are developed to maximize the mapping ability, as measured by objective mapping error, of arrays of vehicles. In order to produce data sets that are readily interpretable, both approaches focus sampling near predetermined "ideal tracks" by measuring mapping skill only on those tracks, which are laid out with overall mapping skill in mind. One approach directly selects each vehicle's headings to maximize instantaneous mapping skill integrated over the entire array. Because mapping skill decreases when measurements are clustered, this method automatically coordinates glider arrays to maintain spacing. A simpler method that relies on manual control for array coordination employs a first-order control loop to balance staying close to the ideal track and maintaining vehicle speed to maximize mapping skill. While the various techniques discussed help in dealing with the slow speed of gliders, nothing can keep performance from being degraded when current speeds are comparable to vehicle speed. This suggests that glider utility could be greatly enhanced by the ability to operate high speeds for short periods when currents are strong.

  5. Impact of internal waves on sound propagation off Bhimilipatnam, east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sridevi, B.; Murty, T.V.R.; Sadhuram, Y.; Rao, M.M.M.; Maneesha, K.; SujithKumar, S.; Prasanna, P.L.

    -259 Impact of internal waves on sound propagation off Bhimilipatnam, East coast of India B.Sridevi, T.V. Ramana Murty, Y. Sadhuram, M.M.M. Rao, K. Maneesha, S. Sujith Kumar and P.L. Prasanna National Institute of Oceanography, Regional center, 176... the variability of ocean environment rather than it’s mean. Oceanic changes relevant to underwater acoustics are classified into mean and fluctuating components (De Santo 1979) with the following general model of the sound velocity equation...

  6. Insights into Optimal Soft Start and Shutdown Procedures for Stationary or Moving Sound Sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ainslie, M.A.; Benda-Beckmann, A.M. von

    2012-01-01

    To reduce the risk of impact on marine life of underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities (such as offshore construction, seismic surveys and sonar searches), various mitigation measures are often put in place. Two commonly adopted mitigation measures are the soft start (or "ramp-up" –

  7. Impact of Vessel Noise on Oyster Toadfish (Opsanus tau) Behavior and Implications for Underwater Noise Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahforst, Cecilia S.

    Underwater noise and its impacts on marine life are growing management concerns. This dissertation considers both the ecological and social concerns of underwater noise, using the oyster toadfish (Opsanus tau) as a model species. Oyster toadfish call for mates using a boatwhistle sound, but increased ambient noise levels from vessels or other anthropogenic activities are likely to influence the ability of males to find mates. If increased ambient noise levels reduce fish fitness then underwater noise can impact socially valued ecosystem services (e.g. fisheries). The following ecological objectives of the impacts of underwater noise on oyster toadfish were investigated: (1) to determine how noise influences male calling behavior; (2) to assess how areas of high vessel activity ("noisy") and low vessel activity ("quiet") influence habitat utilization (fish standard length and occupancy rate); and (3) to discover if fitness (number of clutches and number of embryos per clutch) is lower in "noisy" compared with "quiet" sites. Field experiments were executed in "noisy" and "quiet" areas. Recorded calls by males in response to playback sounds (vessel, predator, and snapping shrimp sounds) and egg deposition by females ("noisy" vs. "quiet" sites) demonstrated that oyster toadfish are impacted by underwater noise. First, males decreased their call rates and called louder in response to increased ambient noise levels. Second, oyster toadfish selected nesting sites in areas with little or no inboard motorboat activity. Third, male oyster toadfish at "noisy" sites either had no egg clutches on their shelters or the number of embryos per clutch was significantly lower than in the "quiet" areas. Underwater noise and disturbance from vessels are influencing the fitness of the oyster toadfish. The social significance of the growing concerns regarding underwater noise was investigated by identifying dominant themes found within two types of texts: four recent underwater noise

  8. An implementation of core level spectroscopies in a real space Projector Augmented Wave density functional theory code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungberg, M.P.; Mortensen, Jens Jørgen; Pettersson, L.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the implementation of K-shell core level spectroscopies (X-ray absorption (XAS), X-ray emission (XES), and X-ray photoemission (XPS)) in the real-space-grid-based Projector Augmented Wave (PAW) GPAW code. The implementation for XAS is based on the Haydock recursion method avoiding...

  9. Survivability design for a hybrid underwater vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Biao; Wu, Chao; Li, Xiang; Zhao, Qingkai; Ge, Tong [State Key Lab of Ocean Engineering, School of Naval Architecture, Ocean and Civil Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-03-10

    A novel hybrid underwater robotic vehicle (HROV) capable of working to the full ocean depth has been developed. The battery powered vehicle operates in two modes: operate as an untethered autonomous vehicle in autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) mode and operate under remote control connected to the surface vessel by a lightweight, fiber optic tether in remotely operated vehicle (ROV) mode. Considering the hazardous underwater environment at the limiting depth and the hybrid operating modes, survivability has been placed on an equal level with the other design attributes of the HROV since the beginning of the project. This paper reports the survivability design elements for the HROV including basic vehicle design of integrated navigation and integrated communication, emergency recovery strategy, distributed architecture, redundant bus, dual battery package, emergency jettison system and self-repairing control system.

  10. Survivability design for a hybrid underwater vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Biao; Wu, Chao; Li, Xiang; Zhao, Qingkai; Ge, Tong

    2015-01-01

    A novel hybrid underwater robotic vehicle (HROV) capable of working to the full ocean depth has been developed. The battery powered vehicle operates in two modes: operate as an untethered autonomous vehicle in autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) mode and operate under remote control connected to the surface vessel by a lightweight, fiber optic tether in remotely operated vehicle (ROV) mode. Considering the hazardous underwater environment at the limiting depth and the hybrid operating modes, survivability has been placed on an equal level with the other design attributes of the HROV since the beginning of the project. This paper reports the survivability design elements for the HROV including basic vehicle design of integrated navigation and integrated communication, emergency recovery strategy, distributed architecture, redundant bus, dual battery package, emergency jettison system and self-repairing control system

  11. Recent developments in underwater repair welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offer, H.P.; Chapman, T.L.; Willis, E.R.; Maslakowski, J.; Van Diemen, P.; Smith, B.W.

    2001-01-01

    As nuclear plants age and reactor internal components begin to show increased evidence of age-related phenomena such as corrosion and fatigue, interest in the development of cost-effective mitigation and repair remedies grows. One technology currently receiving greater development and application program focus is underwater welding. Underwater welding, as used herein, is the application of weld metal to a substrate surface that is wet, but locally dry in the immediate area surrounding the welding torch. The locally dry environment is achieved by the use of a mechanical device that is specifically designed for water exclusion from the welding torch, surface to be welded, and the welding groove. This paper will explore recent developments in the use of underwater welding as a mitigation and repair technique. (author)

  12. Behavioural effects of exposure to underwater explosions in humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, S.; Lien, J.; Marques, F. [Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland, St. John`s, NF (Canada); Stevick, P. [College of the Atlantic, Bar Harbor, ME (United States); Ketten, D. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Medical School

    1996-09-01

    Findings of a study of high rate of entrapment in nets of humpback whales off the coast of northeastern Newfoundland in 1991-92 were reported. The entrapments took place in the southern portion of Trinity Bay, a site associated with construction operations, including explosions and drilling, that was assumed to have modified the underwater acoustic environment. Results indicated few behavioural reactions to detonations by the whales when measured in terms of decreased residency, overall movements, or general behaviour. However, there is tentative evidence that the increased entrapment rate may have been influenced by the long-term effects of exposure to abnormally high sound levels. 46 refs.

  13. Underwater Noise from a Wave Energy Converter Is Unlikely to Affect Marine Mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Tougaard, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Underwater noise was recorded from the Wavestar wave energy converter; a full-scale hydraulic point absorber, placed on a jack-up rig on the Danish North Sea coast. Noise was recorded 25 m from the converter with an autonomous recording unit (10 Hz to 20 kHz bandwidth). Median sound pressure levels (Leq) in third-octave bands during operation of the converter were 106-109 dB re. 1 μPa in the range 125-250 Hz, 1-2 dB above ambient noise levels (statistically significant). Outside the range 125...

  14. Data-based depth estimation of an incoming autonomous underwater vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T C; Xu, Wen

    2016-10-01

    The data-based method for estimating the depth of a moving source is demonstrated experimentally for an incoming autonomous underwater vehicle traveling toward a vertical line array (VLA) of receivers at constant speed/depth. The method assumes no information on the sound-speed and bottom profile. Performing a wavenumber analysis of a narrowband signal for each hydrophone, the energy of the (modal) spectral peaks as a function of the receiver depth is used to estimate the depth of the source, traveling within the depth span of the VLA. This paper reviews the theory, discusses practical implementation issues, and presents the data analysis results.

  15. How Might We Assess and Manage the Effects of Underwater Noise on Populations of Marine Animals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasker, Mark L

    2016-01-01

    The European Union Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) aims to achieve good environmental status (GES) in European seas by 2020. One of the features of GES is that underwater sound should not adversely affect the marine environment. Direct injury of marine life may occur, but a more pervasive effect is likely to be through the cumulative indirect effects on behavior. Assessing the significance of these effects on an ecosystem scale is difficult. If subsequent management of these effects is required, complex and challenging international decisions will be required.

  16. Organization of the two-level memory in the image processing system on scanning measuring projectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sychev, A.Yu.

    1977-01-01

    Discussed are the problems of improving the efficiency of the system for processing pictures taken in bubble chambers with the use of scanning measuring projectors. The system comprises 20 to 30 pro ectors linked with the ICL-1903A computer provided with a mainframe memory, 64 kilobytes in size. Because of the insufficient size of a mainframe memory, a part of the programs and data is located in a second-level memory, i.e. in an external memory. The analytical model described herein is used to analyze the effect of the memory organization on the characteristics of the system. It is shown that organization of pure procedures and introduction of the centralized control of the tWo-leVel memory result in substantial improvement of the efficiency of the picture processing system

  17. Time-dependent density-functional theory in the projector augmented-wave method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Michael; Häkkinen, Hannu; Lehtovaara, Lauri

    2008-01-01

    We present the implementation of the time-dependent density-functional theory both in linear-response and in time-propagation formalisms using the projector augmented-wave method in real-space grids. The two technically very different methods are compared in the linear-response regime where we fo...... surfaces for a set of atoms and molecules with the linear-response method and by calculating nonlinear emission spectra using the time-propagation method....... found perfect agreement in the calculated photoabsorption spectra. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the two methods as well as their convergence properties. We demonstrate different applications of the methods by calculating excitation energies and excited state Born–Oppenheimer potential...

  18. A projector formulation of the Galilean covariant Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, E S; Abreu, L M

    2008-01-01

    We construct in this paper a projector formulation of the Galilean covariant Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau field in five dimensions. Such an approach allows us to select the scalar and vector sectors of the theory through the use of the appropriate operators. As an application, we study a non-minimal coupling associated to the DKP harmonic oscillator, naturally in the non-relativistic regime and with the selection of the spin-0 sector in a general representation. We also discuss the local gauge invariance and the anomalous term which appear in the wave equations due to the minimal coupling. In both questions, our results were carried out as in the relativistic case, i.e. the consistent local gauge transformations can be obtained through the choice of the right form of the non-relativistic DKP field

  19. Non-mydriatic confocal retinal imaging using a digital light projector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Matthew S; Green, Jason J; Baskaran, Karthikeyan; Ingling, Allen W; Clendenon, Jeffrey L; Gast, Thomas J; Elsner, Ann E

    2015-02-07

    A digital light projector is implemented as an integrated illumination source and scanning element in a confocal non-mydriatic retinal camera, the Digital Light Ophthalmoscope (DLO). To simulate scanning, a series of illumination lines are rapidly projected on the retina. The backscattered light is imaged onto a 2-dimensional rolling shutter CMOS sensor. By temporally and spatially overlapping the illumination lines with the rolling shutter, confocal imaging is achieved. This approach enables a low cost, flexible, and robust design with a small footprint. The 3 rd generation DLO technical design is presented, using a DLP LightCrafter 4500 and USB3.0 CMOS sensor. Specific improvements over previous work include the use of yellow illumination, filtered from the broad green LED spectrum, to obtain strong blood absorption and high contrast images while reducing pupil constriction and patient discomfort.

  20. Efficient Modelling Methodology for Reconfigurable Underwater Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mikkel Cornelius; Blanke, Mogens; Schjølberg, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers the challenge of applying reconfigurable robots in an underwater environment. The main result presented is the development of a model for a system comprised of N, possibly heterogeneous, robots dynamically connected to each other and moving with 6 Degrees of Freedom (DOF......). This paper presents an application of the Udwadia-Kalaba Equation for modelling the Reconfigurable Underwater Robots. The constraints developed to enforce the rigid connection between robots in the system is derived through restrictions on relative distances and orientations. To avoid singularities...... in the orientation and, thereby, allow the robots to undertake any relative configuration the attitude is represented in Euler parameters....

  1. Underwater laser cutting of metallic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfille, J.P.; Schildknecht, J.; Ramaswami, V.S.

    1993-01-01

    In the frame of an european contract, the feasibility of the underwater cutting with a CO 2 laser power is studied. The aim of this work is the dismantling metallic structures of reactors pools. The paper analyzes the general concept of the experimental device, the underwater cutting head, the experimenting vessel, examples of cuttings in dismantling situation with a 500 W CO 2 laser, and examples of cuttings with a 5 kW CO 2 laser. (author). 2 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Underwater noise from offshore oil production vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbe, Christine; McCauley, Robert; McPherson, Craig; Gavrilov, Alexander

    2013-06-01

    Underwater acoustic recordings of six Floating Production Storage and Offloading (FPSO) vessels moored off Western Australia are presented. Monopole source spectra were computed for use in environmental impact assessments of underwater noise. Given that operations on the FPSOs varied over the period of recording, and were sometimes unknown, the authors present a statistical approach to noise level estimation. No significant or consistent aspect dependence was found for the six FPSOs. Noise levels did not scale with FPSO size or power. The 5th, 50th (median), and 95th percentile source levels (broadband, 20 to 2500 Hz) were 188, 181, and 173 dB re 1 μPa @ 1 m, respectively.

  3. Digitally synchronized LCD projector for multi-color fluorescence excitation in parallel capillary electrophoresis detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shi-Wei; Chang, Chih-Hang; Wu, Dai-Yang; Lin, Che-Hsin

    2010-10-15

    A simple method is proposed for modulating the excitation light used for multi-color fluorescence detection in a single capillary electrophoresis (CE) channel. In the proposed approach, a low-cost commercial liquid crystal device (LCD) projector with digitally-modulated LCD switches is used to provide the illumination light source and the fluorescence emitted from the CE chip is synchronously detected using an ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-vis-NIR) spectrometer. The modulated light source enables the detection of multiple fluorescence signals within a single CE channel without the need of mechanically switching optical components. In order to enhance the sensing performance of the proposed system, two short-pass filters and one band-pass filter are inserted into the LCD projector to modify the wavelength spectra for fluorescence excitation. With this simple approach, the signal-to-noise (SN) ratio of the fluorescence detection signals is greatly improved by a factor of approximately 22 when detecting Atto647N fluorescent dye. The feasibility of the proposed multi-color CE detection approach is demonstrated by detecting two different samples including a mixed sample comprising FITC, Rhodamine B and Atto647N fluorescent dyes and a bio-sample composed of two ssDNAs labeled with FITC and Cy3, respectively. Results confirm that the digitally-modulated excitation system proposed in this study has significant potential for the parallel analysis of fluorescently-labeled bio-samples using a multi-color detection scheme. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sound Search Engine Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    Sound search is provided by the major search engines, however, indexing is text based, not sound based. We will establish a dedicated sound search services with based on sound feature indexing. The current demo shows the concept of the sound search engine. The first engine will be realased June...

  5. IVO develops a new repair technique for underwater sites. Viscous doughlike substance underwater cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klingstedt, G.; Leisio, C. [ed.

    1998-07-01

    A viscous sealant is revolutionizing repair of the stone and concrete masonry of underwater dams, bridges and canals. There is now no need for expensive and time-consuming cofferdams, since a diver can extrude quick-setting mortar into underwater structures needing repair. This technique has worked well in recent years in various parts of Finland even in strongly flowing water. IVO experts are now starting to look more beyond the borders of Finland

  6. NASA Space Sounds API

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has released a series of space sounds via sound cloud. We have abstracted away some of the hassle in accessing these sounds, so that developers can play with...

  7. Underwater Advanced Time-Domain Electromagnetic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-03

    sufficiently waterproofed ...................................................................... 20 Objective: Calibration method can be used both topside... additional background variability is observed at early times, as illustrated in Figure 15. The layout of this figure is the same as Figure 14. Now the...are discussed in the following sections and summarized in Table 5. Objective: System is sufficiently waterproofed The array remained underwater up to

  8. Underwater Adhesives Retrofit Pipelines with Advanced Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Houston-based Astro Technology Inc. used a partnership with Johnson Space Center to pioneer an advanced fiber-optic monitoring system for offshore oil pipelines. The company's underwater adhesives allow it to retrofit older deepwater systems in order to measure pressure, temperature, strain, and flow properties, giving energy companies crucial data in real time and significantly decreasing the risk of a catastrophe.

  9. Detection of Underwater UXOs in Mud

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    2nd International Conference on Underwater Acoustic Measurements, Crete, Greece, 2007. 16 [10] P.T. Gough and D.W. Hawkins “Imaging algorithms...course. Runs 275 and 325 folla.v the same trad < and run 322 foUows a track on the opposite side of the swath. The LF SAS image of run 325 is shown

  10. Adaptive turbo equalization for underwater acoustic communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cannelli, L; Leus, G.; Dol, H.S.; Walree, P.A. van

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a multiband transceiver designed for underwater channels is presented. Multi-branch filtering at the receiver is used to leverage the diversity offered by a multi-scale multi-lag scenario. The multi-branch bank of filters is constructed by estimating scale and delay coefficients

  11. Underwater noise generated by offshore pile driving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsouvalas, A.

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise emission in the marine environment has always been an environmental issue of serious concern. In particular, the noise generated during the installation of foundation piles is considered to be one of the most significant sources of underwater noise pollution. This is mainly

  12. Evolution: Fossil Ears and Underwater Sonar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Olivier

    2016-08-22

    A key innovation in the history of whales was the evolution of a sonar system together with high-frequency hearing. Fossils of an archaic toothed whale's inner ear bones provide clues for a stepwise emergence of underwater echolocation ability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Impacts of underwater noise on marine vertebrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liebschner, Alexander; Seibel, Henrike; Teilmann, Jonas; Wittekind, Dietrich; Parmentier, Eric; Dähne, Michael; Dietz, Rune; Driver, Jörg; Elk, van Cornelis; Everaarts, Eligius; Findeisen, Henning; Kristensen, Jacob; Lehnert, Kristina; Lucke, Klaus; Merck, Thomas; Müller, Sabine; Pawliczka, Iwona; Ronnenberg, Katrin; Rosenberger, Tanja; Ruser, Andreas; Tougaard, Jakob; Schuster, Max; Sundermeyer, Janne; Sveegaard, Signe; Siebert, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    The project conducts application-oriented research on impacts of underwater noise on marine vertebrates in the North and Baltic Seas. In distinct subprojects, the hearing sensitivity of harbor porpoises and gray seals as well as the acoustic tolerance limit of harbor porpoises to impulsive noise

  14. Sound Ecologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Duffy

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Discussions about what constitutes ‘the rural’ invariably focus on notions of spatial location – of inhabiting spaces apart from that of the metropolitan. Deeply embedded in our images of what it means to be Australian, nonetheless our intellectual framing of ‘the rural’ as something outback and beyond has significant implications for our relations with these spaces. The relatively recent phenomenon of sea- and tree-changes has struck many unawares, and not simply because a good latté is so hard to find. Although a frivolous remark, such an apparent lack does shift our focus to a bodily scale of the rural; how is rural place re/made through our experiences of it? This article originates out of on-going research that explores the practice of listening and sound and the ways in which the body can draw attention to the intuitive, emotional, and psychoanalytical processes of subjectivity and place-making. Drawing on Nigel Thrift’s concept of an ecology of place, I suggest that contemporary heightened concerns with regards to loss and lack in rural Australia has led to a nascent emotional economy – one in which individual and intimate connections to the rural require a rethinking of how we live community and belonging. In such a terrain, what does it mean to be rural?

  15. Sound ecologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duffy, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Discussions about what constitutes ‘the rural’ invariably focus on notions of spatial location – of inhabiting spaces apart from that of the metropolitan. Deeply embedded in our images of what it means to be Australian, nonetheless our intellectual framing of ‘the rural’ as something outback and beyond has significant implications for our relations with these spaces. The relatively recent phenomenon of sea- and tree-changes has struck many unawares, and not simply because a good latté is so hard to find. Although a frivolous remark, such an apparent lack does shift our focus to a bodily scale of the rural; how is rural place re/made through our experiences of it? This article originates out of on-going research that explores the practice of listening and sound and the ways in which the body can draw attention to the intuitive, emotional, and psychoanalytical processes of subjectivity and place-making. Drawing on Nigel Thrift’s concept of an ecology of place, I suggest that contemporary heightened concerns with regards to loss and lack in rural Australia has led to a nascent emotional economy – one in which individual and intimate connections to the rural require a rethinking of how we live community and belonging. In such a terrain, what does it mean to be rural?

  16. Measurement of Underwater Operational Noise Emitted by Wave and Tidal Stream Energy Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepper, Paul A; Robinson, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    The increasing international growth in the development of marine and freshwater wave and tidal energy harvesting systems has been followed by a growing requirement to understand any associated underwater impact. Radiated noise generated during operation is dependent on the device's physical properties, the sound-propagation environment, and the device's operational state. Physical properties may include size, distribution in the water column, and mechanics/hydrodynamics. The sound-propagation environment may be influenced by water depth, bathymetry, sediment type, and water column acoustic properties, and operational state may be influenced by tidal cycle and wave height among others This paper discusses some of the challenges for measurement of noise characteristics from these devices as well as a case study of the measurement of radiated noise from a full-scale wave energy converter.

  17. Coupled Modeling of Hydrodynamics and Sound in Coastal Ocean for Renewable Ocean Energy Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Wen; Jung, Ki Won; Yang, Zhaoqing; Copping, Andrea; Deng, Z. Daniel

    2016-03-01

    An underwater sound model was developed to simulate sound propagation from marine and hydrokinetic energy (MHK) devices or offshore wind (OSW) energy platforms. Finite difference methods were developed to solve the 3D Helmholtz equation for sound propagation in the coastal environment. A 3D sparse matrix solver with complex coefficients was formed for solving the resulting acoustic pressure field. The Complex Shifted Laplacian Preconditioner (CSLP) method was applied to solve the matrix system iteratively with MPI parallelization using a high performance cluster. The sound model was then coupled with the Finite Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM) for simulating sound propagation generated by human activities, such as construction of OSW turbines or tidal stream turbine operations, in a range-dependent setting. As a proof of concept, initial validation of the solver is presented for two coastal wedge problems. This sound model can be useful for evaluating impacts on marine mammals due to deployment of MHK devices and OSW energy platforms.

  18. Stability analysis of hybrid-driven underwater glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Wen-dong; Wang, Shu-xin; Wang, Yan-hui; Song, Yang; Zhu, Ya-qiang

    2017-10-01

    Hybrid-driven underwater glider is a new type of unmanned underwater vehicle, which combines the advantages of autonomous underwater vehicles and traditional underwater gliders. The autonomous underwater vehicles have good maneuverability and can travel with a high speed, while the traditional underwater gliders are highlighted by low power consumption, long voyage, long endurance and good stealth characteristics. The hybrid-driven underwater gliders can realize variable motion profiles by their own buoyancy-driven and propeller propulsion systems. Stability of the mechanical system determines the performance of the system. In this paper, the Petrel-II hybrid-driven underwater glider developed by Tianjin University is selected as the research object and the stability of hybrid-driven underwater glider unitedly controlled by buoyancy and propeller has been targeted and evidenced. The dimensionless equations of the hybrid-driven underwater glider are obtained when the propeller is working. Then, the steady speed and steady glide path angle under steady-state motion have also been achieved. The steady-state operating conditions can be calculated when the hybrid-driven underwater glider reaches the desired steady-state motion. And the steadystate operating conditions are relatively conservative at the lower bound of the velocity range compared with the range of the velocity derived from the method of the composite Lyapunov function. By calculating the hydrodynamic coefficients of the Petrel-II hybrid-driven underwater glider, the simulation analysis has been conducted. In addition, the results of the field trials conducted in the South China Sea and the Danjiangkou Reservoir of China have been presented to illustrate the validity of the analysis and simulation, and to show the feasibility of the method of the composite Lyapunov function which verifies the stability of the Petrel-II hybrid-driven underwater glider.

  19. Iterative metal artifact reduction for x-ray computed tomography using unmatched projector/backprojector pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hanming; Wang, Linyuan; Li, Lei; Cai, Ailong; Hu, Guoen; Yan, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Metal artifact reduction (MAR) is a major problem and a challenging issue in x-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations. Iterative reconstruction from sinograms unaffected by metals shows promising potential in detail recovery. This reconstruction has been the subject of much research in recent years. However, conventional iterative reconstruction methods easily introduce new artifacts around metal implants because of incomplete data reconstruction and inconsistencies in practical data acquisition. Hence, this work aims at developing a method to suppress newly introduced artifacts and improve the image quality around metal implants for the iterative MAR scheme. Methods: The proposed method consists of two steps based on the general iterative MAR framework. An uncorrected image is initially reconstructed, and the corresponding metal trace is obtained. The iterative reconstruction method is then used to reconstruct images from the unaffected sinogram. In the reconstruction step of this work, an iterative strategy utilizing unmatched projector/backprojector pairs is used. A ramp filter is introduced into the back-projection procedure to restrain the inconsistency components in low frequencies and generate more reliable images of the regions around metals. Furthermore, a constrained total variation (TV) minimization model is also incorporated to enhance efficiency. The proposed strategy is implemented based on an iterative FBP and an alternating direction minimization (ADM) scheme, respectively. The developed algorithms are referred to as “iFBP-TV” and “TV-FADM,” respectively. Two projection-completion-based MAR methods and three iterative MAR methods are performed simultaneously for comparison. Results: The proposed method performs reasonably on both simulation and real CT-scanned datasets. This approach could reduce streak metal artifacts effectively and avoid the mentioned effects in the vicinity of the metals. The improvements are evaluated by

  20. GPU-accelerated iterative reconstruction from Compton scattered data using a matched pair of conic projector and backprojector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Van-Giang; Lee, Soo-Jin

    2016-07-01

    Iterative reconstruction from Compton scattered data is known to be computationally more challenging than that from conventional line-projection based emission data in that the gamma rays that undergo Compton scattering are modeled as conic projections rather than line projections. In conventional tomographic reconstruction, to parallelize the projection and backprojection operations using the graphics processing unit (GPU), approximated methods that use an unmatched pair of ray-tracing forward projector and voxel-driven backprojector have been widely used. In this work, we propose a new GPU-accelerated method for Compton camera reconstruction which is more accurate by using exactly matched pair of projector and backprojector. To calculate conic forward projection, we first sample the cone surface into conic rays and accumulate the intersecting chord lengths of the conic rays passing through voxels using a fast ray-tracing method (RTM). For conic backprojection, to obtain the true adjoint of the conic forward projection, while retaining the computational efficiency of the GPU, we use a voxel-driven RTM which is essentially the same as the standard RTM used for the conic forward projector. Our simulation results show that, while the new method is about 3 times slower than the approximated method, it is still about 16 times faster than the CPU-based method without any loss of accuracy. The net conclusion is that our proposed method is guaranteed to retain the reconstruction accuracy regardless of the number of iterations by providing a perfectly matched projector-backprojector pair, which makes iterative reconstruction methods for Compton imaging faster and more accurate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. An underwater robot controls water tanks in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lardiere, C.

    2015-01-01

    The enterprises Newton Research Labs and IHI Southwest Technologies have developed a robot equipped with sensors to inspect the inside walls (partially) and bottom of water tanks without being obliged to empty them. The robot called 'Inspector' is made up of 4 main components: a chassis with 4 independent steering wheels, a camera video system able to provide a 360 degree view, various non-destructive testing devices such as underwater laser scanners, automated ultra-sound or Foucault current probes and an operation system for both driving the robot and controlling the testing. The Inspector robot has been used to inspect the inside bottom of an operating condensate tank at the Palo Verde nuclear station. The robot was able to check all the welds joining the bottom plates and the welds between the walls and the bottom. The robot is also able to come back to the exact place where a defect was detected during a previous inspection. (A.C.)

  2. Upper limb joint forces and moments during underwater cyclical movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Jessy; Rouard, Annie Hélène; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo

    2016-10-03

    Sound inverse dynamics modeling is lacking in aquatic locomotion research because of the difficulty in measuring hydrodynamic forces in dynamic conditions. Here we report the successful implementation and validation of an innovative methodology crossing new computational fluid dynamics and inverse dynamics techniques to quantify upper limb joint forces and moments while moving in water. Upper limb kinematics of seven male swimmers sculling while ballasted with 4kg was recorded through underwater motion capture. Together with body scans, segment inertial properties, and hydrodynamic resistances computed from a unique dynamic mesh algorithm capable to handle large body deformations, these data were fed into an inverse dynamics model to solve for joint kinetics. Simulation validity was assessed by comparing the impulse produced by the arms, calculated by integrating vertical forces over a stroke period, to the net theoretical impulse of buoyancy and ballast forces. A resulting gap of 1.2±3.5% provided confidence in the results. Upper limb joint load was within 5% of swimmer׳s body weight, which tends to supports the use of low-load aquatic exercises to reduce joint stress. We expect this significant methodological improvement to pave the way towards deeper insights into the mechanics of aquatic movement and the establishment of practice guidelines in rehabilitation, fitness or swimming performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Urban Sound Ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh; Samson, Kristine

    2013-01-01

    Within recent years, there has been a renewed focus on sound in urban environments. From sound installations in public space to sound festivals in alternative settings, we find a common interest in sound art relating to the urban environment. Artworks or interventions presented in such contexts s...

  4. Sound reproduction system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, M.M.; De Vries, D.; Horbach, U.

    2002-01-01

    Arrangement of a sound reproduction system (1), including at least one input (2), a sound field generator (4), a loudspeaker panel (10); the at least one input (2) connected to the sound filed generator (4), and the sound filed (4) connected to the loudspeaker panel (10); the at least one input (2)

  5. The Sound of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merwade, Venkatesh; Eichinger, David; Harriger, Bradley; Doherty, Erin; Habben, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    While the science of sound can be taught by explaining the concept of sound waves and vibrations, the authors of this article focused their efforts on creating a more engaging way to teach the science of sound--through engineering design. In this article they share the experience of teaching sound to third graders through an engineering challenge…

  6. Ultrathin metasurface with high absorptance for waterborne sound

    KAUST Repository

    Mei, Jun

    2018-01-12

    We present a design for an acoustic metasurface which can efficiently absorb low-frequency sound energy in water. The metasurface has a simple structure and consists of only two common materials: i.e., water and silicone rubber. The optimized material and geometrical parameters of the designed metasurface are determined by an analytic formula in conjunction with an iterative process based on the retrieval method. Although the metasurface is as thin as 0.15 of the wavelength, it can absorb 99.7% of the normally incident sound wave energy. Furthermore, the metasurface maintains a substantially high absorptance over a relatively broad bandwidth, and also works well for oblique incidence with an incident angle of up to 50°. Potential applications in the field of underwater sound isolation are expected.

  7. Ultrathin metasurface with high absorptance for waterborne sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Jun; Zhang, Xiujuan; Wu, Ying

    2018-03-01

    We present a design for an acoustic metasurface which can efficiently absorb low-frequency sound energy in water. The metasurface has a simple structure and consists of only two common materials: i.e., water and silicone rubber. The optimized material and geometrical parameters of the designed metasurface are determined by an analytic formula in conjunction with an iterative process based on the retrieval method. Although the metasurface is as thin as 0.15 of the wavelength, it can absorb 99.7% of the normally incident sound wave energy. Furthermore, the metasurface maintains a substantially high absorptance over a relatively broad bandwidth, and also works well for oblique incidence with an incident angle of up to 50°. Potential applications in the field of underwater sound isolation are expected.

  8. Underwater videography and photography in Gulf of Kachchh. Sponsored by Gujarat Ecological Society, Vadodara, Gujarat

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Marine Archaeology Centre (MAC) has been carrying out underwater explorations and excavations of ancient ports and sunken shipwrecks to preserve underwater cultural heritage. MAC has the infrastructure facility to carry out underwater investigations...

  9. Hydrodynamic Coefficients Identification and Experimental Investigation for an Underwater Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaorong XIE

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodynamic coefficients are the foundation of unmanned underwater vehicles modeling and controller design. In order to reduce identification complexity and acquire necessary hydrodynamic coefficients for controllers design, the motion of the unmanned underwater vehicle was separated into vertical motion and horizontal motion models. Hydrodynamic coefficients were regarded as mapping parameters from input forces and moments to output velocities and acceleration of the unmanned underwater vehicle. The motion models of the unmanned underwater vehicle were nonlinear and Genetic Algorithm was adopted to identify those hydrodynamic coefficients. To verify the identification quality, velocities and acceleration of the unmanned underwater vehicle was measured using inertial sensor under the same conditions as Genetic Algorithm identification. Curves similarity between measured velocities and acceleration and those identified by Genetic Algorithm were used as optimizing standard. It is found that the curves similarity were high and identified hydrodynamic coefficients of the unmanned underwater vehicle satisfied the measured motion states well.

  10. Delay Tolerance in Underwater Wireless Communications: A Routing Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safdar Hussain Bouk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Similar to terrestrial networks, underwater wireless networks (UWNs also aid several critical tasks including coastal surveillance, underwater pollution detection, and other maritime applications. Currently, once underwater sensor nodes are deployed at different levels of the sea, it is nearly impossible or very expensive to reconfigure the hardware, for example, battery. Taking this issue into account, considerable amount of research has been carried out to ensure minimum energy costs and reliable communication between underwater nodes and base stations. As a result, several different network protocols were proposed for UWN, including MAC, PHY, transport, and routing. Recently, a new paradigm was introduced claiming that the intermittent nature of acoustic channel and signal resulted in designing delay tolerant routing schemes for the UWN, known as an underwater delay tolerant network. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive survey of underwater routing protocols with emphasis on the limitations, challenges, and future open issues in the context of delay tolerant network routing.

  11. Ultrasoft pseudopotentials and projector augmented-wave data sets: application to diatomic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adllan, Alwaleed Ahmed; Dal Corso, Andrea

    2011-10-01

    We test several ultrasoft pseudopotentials (US-PPs) and projector augmented-wave (PAW) data sets, calculating the bond lengths, the atomization energies and the frequencies of the vibrational stretch modes of various diatomic molecules. The US-PPs and the PAW data sets are constructed with the same recipe and using the local density approximation or the Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof generalized gradient approximation for the exchange and correlation energies. We study the dimers H2, N2, O2, F2, Al2, Si2, P2, S2 and Cl2 and several monohydrides, carbides, nitrides and oxides of boron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, fluorine, aluminum, silicon, phosphorus, sulfur, chlorine, iron and nickel. We find that US-PPs and PAW data sets constructed with the same parameters provide almost equivalent results for the bond lengths and the vibrational stretch frequencies while, for some molecules, the PAW method is superior to the US-PP method for the calculation of the atomization energies. Our geometries and vibrational frequencies are compared with the results present in the literature and obtained by localized basis sets. It is found that the agreement is very good, with discrepancies comparable to those due to the use of different localized basis sets.

  12. Speckle reduction using deformable mirrors with diffusers in a laser pico-projector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsuan-An; Pan, Jui-Wen; Yang, Zu-Po

    2017-07-24

    We propose a design for speckle reduction in a laser pico-projector adopting diffusers and deformable mirrors. This research focuses on speckle noise suppression by changing the angle of divergence of the diffuser. Moreover, the speckle contrast value can be further reduced by the addition of a deformable mirror. The speckle reduction ability obtained using diffusers with different divergence angles is compared. Three types of diffuser designs are compared in the experiments. For Type 1 which uses a circular symmetric diffuser the speckle contrast value can be decreased to 0.0264. For Type 2, the speckle contrast value can be reduced to 0.0267 because of the inclusion of an elliptical distribution diffuser. With Type 3 which includes a combination of the circular distribution diffuser and elliptical distribution diffuser, the speckle contrast value can be reduced to 0.0236. For all three types, the speckle contrast value is lower than 0.05. Under this speckle value, the speckle phenomenon is invisible to the human eye.

  13. Iterative CT reconstruction with small pixel size: distance-driven forward projector versus Joseph's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, K.; Rassner, U.; Davidson, H. C.; Schöndube, H.; Stierstorfer, K.; Hornegger, J.; Noo, F.

    2015-03-01

    Over the last few years, iterative reconstruction methods have become an important research topic in x-ray CT imaging. This effort is motivated by increasing evidence that such methods may enable significant savings in terms of dose imparted to the patient. Conceptually, iterative reconstruction methods involve two important ingredients: the statistical model, which includes the forward projector, and a priori information in the image domain, which is expressed using a regularizer. Most often, the image pixel size is chosen to be equal (or close) to the detector pixel size (at field-of-view center). However, there are applications for which a smaller pixel size is desired. In this investigation, we focus on reconstruction with a pixel size that is twice smaller than the detector pixel size. Using such a small pixel size implies a large increase in computational effort when using the distance-driven method for forward projection, which models the detector size. On the other hand, the more efficient method of Joseph will create imbalances in the reconstruction of each pixel, in the sense that there will be large differences in the way each projection contributes to the pixels. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the impact of these imbalances on image quality in comparison with utilization of the distance-driven method. The evaluation involves computational effort, bias and noise metrics, and LROC analysis using human observers. The results show that Joseph's method largely remains attractive.

  14. Using projector augmented-wave (PAW) formalism inside the density-functional perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audouze, Ch.

    2006-01-01

    In condensed matter physics, ab-initio simulation allows to get macroscopic quantities (for example equations of state) from microscopic ones, as phonon frequencies which characterize the vibration Eigenmodes of the system. Therefore, one can theoretically predict the behavior of the material at very high pressure conditions, which can be out of reach by experiences. Computations of phonon spectrum are obtained thanks to the linear response theory, where the equations of Density Functional Theory (as the Kohn-Sham model) are perturbed around their fundamental state. The linear response functionality is one of the options included in the ABINIT code, which is an open source package developed in particular by a team of the CEA-DAM (DPTA) and the Catholic University of Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium). Nevertheless, in spite of using pseudopotentials, computations of phonon spectrum are not tractable for heavy chemical elements, even on massively parallel computers. In order to overcome this difficulty, the linear response theory had to be extended to the PAW (Projector Augmented-Waves) formalism. In this CEA report, we first detail the PAW model, giving to it a more mathematical framework. Then we establish the linear response equations within the PAW formalism, up to the third order derivative of the total energy, for an isolated molecular system and for generic perturbations. Lastly, all these results are specified to the particular case of atom displacements and for perturbations associated to the change of an external potential in which the molecule is set. (author)

  15. Demonstration of the Wide-Field Imaging Interferometer Testbed Using a Calibrated Hyperspectral Image Projector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Leisawitz, David; Maher, Steve; Rinehart, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The Wide-field Imaging Interferometer testbed (WIIT) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center uses a dual-Michelson interferometric technique. The WIIT combines stellar interferometry with Fourier-transform interferometry to produce high-resolution spatial-spectral data over a large field-of-view. This combined technique could be employed on future NASA missions such as the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) and the Sub-millimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS). While both SPIRIT and SPECS would operate at far-infrared wavelengths, the WIIT demonstrates the dual-interferometry technique at visible wavelengths. The WIIT will produce hyperspectral image data, so a true hyperspectral object is necessary. A calibrated hyperspectral image projector (CHIP) has been constructed to provide such an object. The CHIP uses Digital Light Processing (DLP) technology to produce customized, spectrally-diverse scenes. CHIP scenes will have approximately 1.6-micron spatial resolution and the capability of . producing arbitrary spectra in the band between 380 nm and 1.6 microns, with approximately 5-nm spectral resolution. Each pixel in the scene can take on a unique spectrum. Spectral calibration is achieved with an onboard fiber-coupled spectrometer. In this paper we describe the operation of the CHIP. Results from the WIIT observations of CHIP scenes will also be presented.

  16. MIRAGE WF infrared scene projector system, with 1536 x 768 wide format resistive array, performance data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparkman, Kevin; Laveigne, Joe; Oleson, Jim; Franks, Greg; McHugh, Steve; Lannon, John; Woode, Brian; Greer, Derek; Bui, Nicole

    2009-05-01

    MIRAGE WF is the latest high definition version of the MIRAGE infrared scene projector product line from Santa Barbara Infrared Inc. (SBIR). MIRAGE WF is being developed under the Wide Format Resistive Array (WFRA) program. The WFRA development is one of several efforts within the Infrared Sensor Simulator - Preplanned Product Improvement (IRSS P3I) umbrella funded by the Central Test and Evaluation Investment Program (CTEIP) and led by the US Navy at Patuxent River, MD. Three MIRAGE WF infrared scene projection systems are being delivered as part of the WFRA program. The main differences between the MIRAGE XL (1024x1024) and MIRAGE WF are a 1536x768 emitter array and 100Hz true raster capability. The key emitter requirements that have been measured and will be discussed include: Operability, Maximum Apparent Temperature, Rise Time and Array Uniformity. Key System specifications are: 1536x768 pixels, maximum apparent temperature of 600K, maximum frame rate of 100Hz, raster and snap shot updating, radiance rise and fall time less than 5 ms and windowed mode (1024x768) operation at up to 200 Hz.

  17. PROJECTOR-BASED AUGMENTED REALITY FOR QUALITY INSPECTION OF SCANNED OBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kern

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available After scanning or reconstructing the geometry of objects, we need to inspect the result of our work. Are there any parts missing? Is every detail covered in the desired quality? We typically do this by looking at the resulting point clouds or meshes of our objects on-screen. What, if we could see the information directly visualized on the object itself? Augmented reality is the generic term for bringing virtual information into our real environment. In our paper, we show how we can project any 3D information like thematic visualizations or specific monitoring information with reference to our object onto the object’s surface itself, thus augmenting it with additional information. For small objects that could for instance be scanned in a laboratory, we propose a low-cost method involving a projector-camera system to solve this task. The user only needs a calibration board with coded fiducial markers to calibrate the system and to estimate the projector’s pose later on for projecting textures with information onto the object’s surface. Changes within the projected 3D information or of the projector’s pose will be applied in real-time. Our results clearly reveal that such a simple setup will deliver a good quality of the augmented information.

  18. Novel Carbazole Skeleton-Based Photoinitiators for LED Polymerization and LED Projector 3D Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assi Al Mousawi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Radical chemistry is a very convenient way to produce polymer materials. Here, an application of a particular photoinduced radical chemistry is illustrated. Seven new carbazole derivatives Cd1–Cd7 are incorporated and proposed as high performance near-UV photoinitiators for both the free radical polymerization (FRP of (methacrylates and the cationic polymerization (CP of epoxides utilizing Light Emitting Diodes LEDs @405 nm. Excellent polymerization-initiating abilities are found and high final reactive function conversions are obtained. Interestingly, these new derivatives display much better near-UV polymerization-initiating abilities compared to a reference UV absorbing carbazole (CARET 9H-carbazole-9-ethanol demonstrating that the new substituents have good ability to red shift the absorption of the proposed photoinitiators. All the more strikingly, in combination with iodonium salt, Cd1–Cd7 are likewise preferred as cationic photoinitiators over the notable photoinitiator bis(2,4,6-trimethylbenzoylphenylphosphine oxide (BAPO for mild irradiation conditions featuring their remarkable reactivity. In particular their utilization in the preparation of new cationic resins for LED projector 3D printing is envisioned. A full picture of the included photochemical mechanisms is given.

  19. An Evaluation of Potential Operating Systems for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    remote control of such vehicles requires the use of a tether , limiting the vehicle’s range; however operating underwater vehicles autonomously requires...URBI Universal Robot Body Interface UUV Unmanned Underwater Vehicle UNCLASSIFIED xi DSTO–TN–1194 UNCLASSIFIED THIS PAGE IS INTENTIONALLY BLANK xii... underwater environment, where many platforms are still reliant upon an umbilical tether for power and high bandwidth communications. This tether

  20. On the Performance of the Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    waves for Underwater Wireless Communication (UWC); radio waves, optical waves, and acoustic waves are few to name. Radio waves are good for extra low...2211 underwater communication , wireless sensors, mutual information REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10. SPONSOR...Cotae, “On the Performance of the Underwater Wireless Communication Sensor Networks: Work in Progress” ASEE Mid-Atlantic Fall 2014 Conference

  1. Underwater laser beam welding of Alloy 690

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Takehisa; Tamura, Masataka; Kono, Wataru; Kawano, Shohei; Yoda, Masaki

    2009-01-01

    Stress Corrosion Clacking (SCC) has been reported at Alloy 600 welds between nozzles and safe-end in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) plant. Alloy 690, which has higher chromium content than Alloy 600, has been applied for cladding on Alloy 600 welds for repairing damaged SCC area. Toshiba has developed Underwater Laser Beam Welding technique. This method can be conducted without draining, so that the repairing period and the radiation exposure during the repair can be dramatically decreased. In some old PWRs, high-sulfur stainless steel is used as the materials for this section. It has a high susceptibility of weld cracks. Therefore, the optimum welding condition of Alloy 690 on the high-sulfur stainless steel was investigated with our Underwater Laser Beam Welding unit. Good cladding layer, without any crack, porosity or lack of fusion, could be obtained. (author)

  2. Underwater noise modelling for environmental impact assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farcas, Adrian [Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas), Pakefield Road, Lowestoft, NR33 0HT (United Kingdom); Thompson, Paul M. [Lighthouse Field Station, Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Cromarty IV11 8YL (United Kingdom); Merchant, Nathan D., E-mail: nathan.merchant@cefas.co.uk [Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas), Pakefield Road, Lowestoft, NR33 0HT (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    Assessment of underwater noise is increasingly required by regulators of development projects in marine and freshwater habitats, and noise pollution can be a constraining factor in the consenting process. Noise levels arising from the proposed activity are modelled and the potential impact on species of interest within the affected area is then evaluated. Although there is considerable uncertainty in the relationship between noise levels and impacts on aquatic species, the science underlying noise modelling is well understood. Nevertheless, many environmental impact assessments (EIAs) do not reflect best practice, and stakeholders and decision makers in the EIA process are often unfamiliar with the concepts and terminology that are integral to interpreting noise exposure predictions. In this paper, we review the process of underwater noise modelling and explore the factors affecting predictions of noise exposure. Finally, we illustrate the consequences of errors and uncertainties in noise modelling, and discuss future research needs to reduce uncertainty in noise assessments.

  3. Ocean Research Enabled by Underwater Gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    Underwater gliders are autonomous underwater vehicles that profile vertically by changing their buoyancy and use wings to move horizontally. Gliders are useful for sustained observation at relatively fine horizontal scales, especially to connect the coastal and open ocean. In this review, research topics are grouped by time and length scales. Large-scale topics addressed include the eastern and western boundary currents and the regional effects of climate variability. The accessibility of horizontal length scales of order 1 km allows investigation of mesoscale and submesoscale features such as fronts and eddies. Because the submesoscales dominate vertical fluxes in the ocean, gliders have found application in studies of biogeochemical processes. At the finest scales, gliders have been used to measure internal waves and turbulent dissipation. The review summarizes gliders' achievements to date and assesses their future in ocean observation.

  4. Little Sounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baker M. Bani-Khair

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Spider and the Fly   You little spider, To death you aspire... Or seeking a web wider, To death all walking, No escape you all fighters… Weak and fragile in shape and might, Whatever you see in the horizon, That is destiny whatever sight. And tomorrow the spring comes, And the flowers bloom, And the grasshopper leaps high, And the frogs happily cry, And the flies smile nearby, To that end, The spider has a plot, To catch the flies by his net, A mosquito has fallen down in his net, Begging him to set her free, Out of that prison, To her freedom she aspires, Begging...Imploring...crying,  That is all what she requires, But the spider vows never let her free, His power he admires, Turning blind to light, And with his teeth he shall bite, Leaving her in desperate might, Unable to move from site to site, Tied up with strings in white, Wrapped up like a dead man, Waiting for his grave at night,   The mosquito says, Oh little spider, A stronger you are than me in power, But listen to my words before death hour, Today is mine and tomorrow is yours, No escape from death... Whatever the color of your flower…     Little sounds The Ant The ant is a little creature with a ferocious soul, Looking and looking for more and more, You can simply crush it like dead mold, Or you can simply leave it alone, I wonder how strong and strong they are! Working day and night in a small hole, Their motto is work or whatever you call… A big boon they have and joy in fall, Because they found what they store, A lesson to learn and memorize all in all, Work is something that you should not ignore!   The butterfly: I’m the butterfly Beautiful like a blue clear sky, Or sometimes look like snow, Different in colors, shapes and might, But something to know that we always die, So fragile, weak and thin, Lighter than a glimpse and delicate as light, Something to know for sure… Whatever you have in life and all these fields, You are not happier than a butterfly

  5. A MAC protocol for underwater sensors networks

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Rodrigo; Orozco, Javier; Ochoa, Sergio; Meseguer Pallarès, Roc; Eggly, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    “The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-26401-1_37." Underwater sensor networks are becoming an important field of research, because of its everyday increasing application scope. Examples of their application areas are environmental and pollution monitoring (mainly oil spills), oceanographic data collection, support for submarine geo-localization, ocean sampling and early tsunamis alert. It is well-known the challenge that represents to perfo...

  6. Passive Mode Carbon Nanotube Underwater Acoustic Transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-20

    irreversible Joule heat) by an electric light bulb . The reciprocal (or reverse) of this process by supplying heat and shining light to the same electric bulb ...limit the invention to the precise form disclosed; and obviously many modifications and variations are possible in light of the above teaching...300151 1 of 14 PASSIVE MODE CARBON NANOTUBE UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC TRANSDUCER STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described

  7. Underwater suction device for irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qurnell, F.D.; Peloquin, A.V.

    1982-01-01

    An underwater suction device for collecting irradiated materials in a pool of water includes injection and suction tubes and a removable, disposable filter for capturing irradiated materials. Pressurized water is injected into the suction tube through a jet pump nozzle to establish a suction flow through the tube. The suction device is manoeuverable by a pole, which is pivotally connected to the suction device by a latching mechanism. (author)

  8. Tethered Antennas for Unmanned Underwater Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-27

    Concepts The first design (Figure 1) was based on the concept of an airfoil kite. The shape of the tow body was built around a NACA5515 hydrofoil to...Underwater Vehicles Brooke Ocean Technology (USA) Inc. 6 Figure 1: Hydrofoil Design The second design was based on that of a boat hull...communications. A sharp bow was utilized to cut through the water to reduce drag when on the surface. Like the hydrofoil design the top profile was

  9. MEDITERRANEAN: Underwater neutrinos get off the ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Now funded is the initial stage of NESTOR, an imaginative new programme for a dedicated underwater neutrino astroparticle physics laboratory. Located in the international waters off the southernmost corner of continental Europe near the town of Pylos in S.W. Greece, NESTOR (NEutrinos from Supernovae and TeV sources Ocean Range) recalls the wise king of Pylos who counselled the Greeks during the Trojan war, an excellent tradition for new scientific goals of detecting neutrinos

  10. Role of Confined Water in Underwater Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhinojwala, Ali

    Surface bound water is a strong deterrent for forming strong bonds between two surfaces underwater and expelling that bound water is important for strong adhesion. I will discuss examples of different strategies used by geckos, spiders, and mussels to handle this last layer of bound water. Recent results using infrared-visible sum frequency generation spectroscopy to probe the structure of this bound water will be discussed. National Science Foundation.

  11. Obstacle avoidance in underwater glider path planning

    OpenAIRE

    Isern González, Josep; Hernández Sosa, Daniel; Fernández Perdomo, Enrique; Cabrera Gámez, Jorge; Domínguez Brito, Antonio Carlos; Prieto Marañón, Víctor

    2012-01-01

    Underwater gliders have revealed as a valuable scientific platform, with a growing number of successful environmental sampling applications. They are specially suited for long range missions due to their unmatched autonomy level, although their low surge speed make them strongly affected by ocean currents. Path planning constitute a real concern for this type of vehicle, as it may reduce the time taken to reach a given waypoint or save power. In such a dynamic environment it is not easy to fi...

  12. A Recovery System for Unmanned Underwater Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-28

    300170 1 of 10 A RECOVERY SYSTEM FOR UNMANNED UNDERWATER VEHICLES STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described herein may...6 of 10 forces cannot be easily predicted and can be strong enough to require a significantly larger handling system and significantly more...the sea state, the ship handling system , the capture mechanism and the design of the capture mechanism 400. [0024] The water jets 100 will increase

  13. Reef Sound as an Orientation Cue for Shoreward Migration by Pueruli of the Rock Lobster, Jasus edwardsii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, Ivan A; Green, Bridget S; Gardner, Caleb; Hesse, Jan; Stanley, Jenni A; Jeffs, Andrew G

    2016-01-01

    The post-larval or puerulus stage of spiny, or rock, lobsters (Palinuridae) swim many kilometres from open oceans into coastal waters where they subsequently settle. The orientation cues used by the puerulus for this migration are unclear, but are presumed to be critical to finding a place to settle. Understanding this process may help explain the biological processes of dispersal and settlement, and be useful for developing realistic dispersal models. In this study, we examined the use of reef sound as an orientation cue by the puerulus stage of the southern rock lobster, Jasus edwardsii. Experiments were conducted using in situ binary choice chambers together with replayed recording of underwater reef sound. The experiment was conducted in a sandy lagoon under varying wind conditions. A significant proportion of puerulus (69%) swam towards the reef sound in calm wind conditions. However, in windy conditions (>25 m s-1) the orientation behaviour appeared to be less consistent with the inclusion of these results, reducing the overall proportion of pueruli that swam towards the reef sound (59.3%). These results resolve previous speculation that underwater reef sound is used as an orientation cue in the shoreward migration of the puerulus of spiny lobsters, and suggest that sea surface winds may moderate the ability of migrating pueruli to use this cue to locate coastal reef habitat to settle. Underwater sound may increase the chance of successful settlement and survival of this valuable species.

  14. Research on Operational Aspects of Large Autonomous Underwater Glider Fleets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fratantoni, David M

    2007-01-01

    This program supported research on the operational and management issues stemming from application of large fleets of autonomous underwater gliders to oceanographic research and rapid environmental...

  15. Underwater hearing in the great cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo sinensis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kirstin Anderson; Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Wahlberg, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    The underwater hearing threshold of a great cormorant (Phalacrocroax carbo sinensis) was measured at 2 kHz using psychophysical methods. Previous in-air and underwater testing suggests that cormorants have rather poor in-air hearing compared to other birds of similar size (Johansen, 2016). Prelim......The underwater hearing threshold of a great cormorant (Phalacrocroax carbo sinensis) was measured at 2 kHz using psychophysical methods. Previous in-air and underwater testing suggests that cormorants have rather poor in-air hearing compared to other birds of similar size (Johansen, 2016...

  16. Calibration Techniques for Accurate Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortis, Mark

    2015-12-07

    Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in accurate estimates of locations and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems.

  17. Calibration Techniques for Accurate Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Shortis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in accurate estimates of locations and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems.

  18. Automatic stabilization of underwater robots in the time manipulation operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filaretov, V.F.; Koval, E.V.

    1994-01-01

    When carrying out underwater technical works by means of an underwater vehicles having a manipulator it is desirable to perform manipulation operations in the regime of the underwater vehicle hovering above the object without durable and complicated operations up its rigid fixation. Underwater vehicle stabilization is achieved by compensation all the effects on the vehicle caused by the operating manipulator in water medium. This automatic stabilization is formed due to input of the required control signals into corresponding vehicle propellers proportional to calculated components of the generalized forces and moments. The propellers should form stops reacting against effects

  19. Contour Tracking Control for the REMUS Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Van Reet, Alan R

    2005-01-01

    In the interest of enhancing the capabilities of autonomous underwater vehicles used in US Naval Operations, controlling vehicle position to follow depth contours presents exciting potential for navigation...

  20. Autopilot Using Differential Thrust for ARIES Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarton, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    .... Unfortunately, communication antennas must point to specific satellites in this system and thus underwater vehicles must steer a specific course on the surface during the communication process...

  1. Do top predators cue on sound production by mesopelagic prey?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann-Pickering, S.; Checkley, D. M., Jr.; Demer, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    Deep-scattering layer (DSL) organisms, comprising a variety of mesopelagic fishes, and squids, siphonophores, crustaceans, and other invertebrates, are preferred prey for numerous large marine predators, e.g. cetaceans, seabirds, and fishes. Some of the DSL species migrate from depth during daylight to feed near the surface at night, transitioning during dusk and dawn. We investigated if any DSL organisms create sound, particularly during the crepuscular periods. Over several nights in summer 2015, underwater sound was recorded in the San Diego Trough using a high-frequency acoustic recording package (HARP, 10 Hz to 100 kHz), suspended from a drifting surface float. Acoustic backscatter from the DSL was monitored nearby using a calibrated multiple-frequency (38, 70, 120, and 200 kHz) split-beam echosounder (Simrad EK60) on a small boat. DSL organisms produced sound, between 300 and 1000 Hz, and the received levels were highest when the animals migrated past the recorder during ascent and descent. The DSL are globally present, so the observed acoustic phenomenon, if also ubiquitous, has wide-reaching implications. Sound travels farther than light or chemicals and thus can be sensed at greater distances by predators, prey, and mates. If sound is a characteristic feature of pelagic ecosystems, it likely plays a role in predator-prey relationships and overall ecosystem dynamics. Our new finding inspires numerous questions such as: Which, how, and why have DSL organisms evolved to create sound, for what do they use it and under what circumstances? Is sound production by DSL organisms truly ubiquitous, or does it depend on the local environment and species composition? How may sound production and perception be adapted to a changing environment? Do predators react to changes in sound? Can sound be used to quantify the composition of mixed-species assemblages, component densities and abundances, and hence be used in stock assessment or predictive modeling?

  2. Underwater Acoustic Target Tracking: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Junhai; Han, Ying; Fan, Liying

    2018-01-02

    Advances in acoustic technology and instrumentation now make it possible to explore marine resources. As a significant component of ocean exploration, underwater acoustic target tracking has aroused wide attention both in military and civil fields. Due to the complexity of the marine environment, numerous techniques have been proposed to obtain better tracking performance. In this paper, we survey over 100 papers ranging from innovative papers to the state-of-the-art in this field to present underwater tracking technologies. Not only the related knowledge of acoustic tracking instrument and tracking progress is clarified in detail, but also a novel taxonomy method is proposed. In this paper, algorithms for underwater acoustic target tracking are classified based on the methods used as: (1) instrument-assisted methods; (2) mode-based methods; (3) tracking optimization methods. These algorithms are compared and analyzed in the aspect of dimensions, numbers, and maneuvering of the tracking target, which is different from other survey papers. Meanwhile, challenges, countermeasures, and lessons learned are illustrated in this paper.

  3. Modeling and Control of Underwater Robotic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schjoelberg, I:

    1996-12-31

    This doctoral thesis describes modeling and control of underwater vehicle-manipulator systems. The thesis also presents a model and a control scheme for a system consisting of a surface vessel connected to an underwater robotic system by means of a slender marine structure. The equations of motion of the underwater vehicle and manipulator are described and the system kinematics and properties presented. Feedback linearization technique is applied to the system and evaluated through a simulation study. Passivity-based controllers for vehicle and manipulator control are presented. Stability of the closed loop system is proved and simulation results are given. The equation of motion for lateral motion of a cable/riser system connected to a surface vessel at the top end and to a thruster at the bottom end is described and stability analysis and simulations are presented. The equations of motion in 3 degrees of freedom of the cable/riser, surface vessel and robotic system are given. Stability analysis of the total system with PD-controllers is presented. 47 refs., 32 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Synthesized size-sound sound symbolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lockwood, G.F.; Hagoort, P.; Dingemanse, M.; Papafragou, A.; Grodner, D.; Mirman, D.; Trueswell, J.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of sound symbolism have shown that people can associate sound and meaning in consistent ways when presented with maximally contrastive stimulus pairs of nonwords such as bouba/kiki (rounded/sharp) or mil/mal (small/big). Recent work has shown the effect extends to antonymic words from

  5. Near-field and high-resolution cylindrical noise source location method based on vector sound pressure array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZUO Xiang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The existing underwater noise source near-field location method usually assumes that the measurement plane is flat, which increases the difficulty of applying the underwater noise target test for cylindrical distribution. Simultaneously, the conventional near-field focused beam has a lower spatial resolution when used to locate an underwater noise source with cylindrical distribution. Moreover, the near-field underwater noise source location method based on the sound pressure array has a left and right side fuzzy problem. In order to solve these problems, by establishing the near-field measurement model of the noise source with cylindrical distribution as the measurement surface, and combining the unilateral directivity of the vector hydrophone and the high resolution characteristics of the MUSIC algorithm, a near-field and high resolution location method is proposed for cylindrical distribution based on vector sound pressure, and a computer simulation is carried out. The results show that the method can use a smaller array aperture to locate the underwater noise source, enabling it to be used to locate and recognize the noise sources of complex and large-scale cylindrical systems.

  6. Implementation of Constrained DFT for Computing Charge Transfer Rates within the Projector Augmented Wave Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melander, Marko; Jónsson, Elvar Ö; Mortensen, Jens J; Vegge, Tejs; García Lastra, Juan Maria

    2016-11-08

    Combining constrained density function theory (cDFT) with Marcus theory is an efficient and promising way to address charge transfer reactions. Here, we present a general and robust implementation of cDFT within the projector augmented wave (PAW) framework. PAW pseudopotentials offer a reliable frozen-core electron description across the whole periodic table, with good transferability, as well as facilitate the extraction of all-electron quantities. The present implementation is applicable to two different wave function representations, atomic-centered basis sets (LCAO) and the finite-difference (FD) approximation utilizing real-space grids. LCAO can be used for large systems, molecular dynamics, or quick initialization, while more accurate calculations are achieved with the FD basis. Furthermore, the calculations can be performed with flexible boundary conditions, ranging from isolated molecules to periodic systems in one-, two-, or three-dimensions. As such, this implementation is relevant for a wide variety of applications. We also present how to extract the electronic coupling element and reorganization energy from the resulting diabatic cDFT-PAW wave functions for the parametrization of Marcus theory. Here, the combined method is applied to important test cases where practical implementations of DFT fail due to the self-interaction error, such as the dissociation of the helium dimer cation, and it is compared to other established cDFT codes. Moreover, for charge localization in a diamine cation, where it was recently shown that the commonly used generalized gradient and hybrid functionals of DFT failed to produce the localized state, cDFT produces qualitatively and quantitatively accurate results when benchmarked against self-interaction corrected DFT and high-level CCSD(T) calculations at a fraction of the computational cost.

  7. Projector Augmented Wave Method Incorporated into Gauss-Type Atomic Orbital Based Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiao-Gen; Yanai, Takeshi

    2017-07-11

    The Projector Augmented Wave (PAW) method developed by Blöchl is well recognized as an efficient, accurate pseudopotential approach in solid-state density functional theory (DFT) calculations with the plane-wave basis. Here we present an approach to incorporate the PAW method into the Gauss-type function (GTF) based DFT implementation, which is widely used for molecular quantum chemistry calculations. The nodal and high-exponent GTF components of valence molecular orbitals (MOs) are removed or pseudized by the ultrasoft PAW treatment, while there is elaborate transparency to construct an accurate and well-controlled pseudopotential from all-electron atomic description and to reconstruct an all-electron form of valence MOs from the pseudo MOs. The smoothness of the pseudo MOs should benefit the efficiency of GTF-based DFT calculations in terms of elimination of high-exponent primitive GTFs and reduction of grid points in the numerical quadrature. The processes of the PAW method are divided into basis-independent and -dependent parts. The former is carried out using the previously developed PAW libraries libpaw and atompaw. The present scheme is implemented by incorporating libpaw into the conventional GTF-based DFT solver. The details of the formulations and implementations of GTF-related PAW procedures are presented. The test calculations are shown for illustrating the performance. With the near-complete GTF basis at the cc-pVQZ level, the total energies obtained using our PAW method with suited frozen core treatments converge to those with the conventional all-electron GTF-based method with a rather small absolute error.

  8. Making fictions sound real

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkjær, Birger

    2010-01-01

    of sounds. Apart from an account of the kinds of sounds that typically appear in a specific genre, a genre analysis of sound may also benefit from a functionalist approach that focuses on how sounds can make both realist and non-realist aspects of genres sound real to audiences.......This article examines the role that sound plays in making fictions perceptually real to film audiences, whether these fictions are realist or non-realist in content and narrative form. I will argue that some aspects of film sound practices and the kind of experiences they trigger are related...... to basic rules of human perception, whereas others are more properly explained in relation to how aesthetic devices, including sound, are used to characterise the fiction and thereby make it perceptually real to its audience. Finally, I will argue that not all genres can be defined by a simple taxonomy...

  9. Making fictions sound real

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkjær, Birger

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the role that sound plays in making fictions perceptually real to film audiences, whether these fictions are realist or non-realist in content and narrative form. I will argue that some aspects of film sound practices and the kind of experiences they trigger are related...... to basic rules of human perception, whereas others are more properly explained in relation to how aesthetic devices, including sound, are used to characterise the fiction and thereby make it perceptually real to its audience. Finally, I will argue that not all genres can be defined by a simple taxonomy...... of sounds. Apart from an account of the kinds of sounds that typically appear in a specific genre, a genre analysis of sound may also benefit from a functionalist approach that focuses on how sounds can make both realist and non-realist aspects of genres sound real to audiences....

  10. Sound wave transmission (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    When sounds waves reach the ear, they are translated into nerve impulses. These impulses then travel to the brain where they are interpreted by the brain as sound. The hearing mechanisms within the inner ear, can ...

  11. Development of underwater laser cutting technique for steel and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have developed underwater cutting technique for 4.2 mm thick zircaloy pressure tubes and up to 6 mm thick steel using fibre-coupled 250 W average power pulsed Nd:YAG laser. This underwater cutting technique will be highly useful in various nuclear applications as well as in dismantling/repair of ship and pipe lines ...

  12. Visual-adaptation-mechanism based underwater object extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Wang, Huibin; Xu, Lizhong; Shen, Jie

    2014-03-01

    Due to the major obstacles originating from the strong light absorption and scattering in a dynamic underwater environment, underwater optical information acquisition and processing suffer from effects such as limited range, non-uniform lighting, low contrast, and diminished colors, causing it to become the bottleneck for marine scientific research and projects. After studying and generalizing the underwater biological visual mechanism, we explore its advantages in light adaption which helps animals to precisely sense the underwater scene and recognize their prey or enemies. Then, aiming to transform the significant advantage of the visual adaptation mechanism into underwater computer vision tasks, a novel knowledge-based information weighting fusion model is established for underwater object extraction. With this bionic model, the dynamical adaptability is given to the underwater object extraction task, making them more robust to the variability of the optical properties in different environments. The capability of the proposed method to adapt to the underwater optical environments is shown, and its outperformance for the object extraction is demonstrated by comparison experiments.

  13. Self-localization for underwater inspection robot in reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Futoshi; Kojima, Fumio

    2007-01-01

    An underwater inspection robot has been needed for preventive maintenance in a nuclear power plant. This paper deals with a self-localization method for the underwater inspection robot. In this method, the position and the orientation of the robot are estimated by using the particle filter. For showing the effectiveness of the proposed method, an experiment with real robot is demonstrated. (author)

  14. Characterization of ships as sources of underwater noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, C.A.F. de

    2009-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the possible impact of anthropogenic underwater noise on marine life [1]. One of the concerns is the increasing contribution of shipping noise, with the growing number and size of commercial ships. Traditionally, underwater radiated noise control was only of interest

  15. Development of underwater laser cutting technique for steel and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Laser cutting; underwater laser cutting; fibre optic beam delivery; Nd:YAG laser; material processing; heat affected zone; microstructure. PACS Nos 42.62.Cf; 42.62.-b; 42.55.Rz; 42.81.Ai; 42.81.-i. 1. Introduction. Underwater laser cutting and welding has many applications in nuclear facilities and shiping industry and is a ...

  16. Fish protection at water intakes using a new signal development process and sound system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeffelman, P.H.; Klinect, D.A.; Van Hassel, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    American Electric Power Company, Inc., is exploring the feasibility of using a patented signal development process and sound system to guide aquatic animals with underwater sound. Sounds from animals such as chinook salmon, steelhead trout, striped bass, freshwater drum, largemouth bass, and gizzard shad can be used to synthesize a new signal to stimulate the animal in the most sensitive portion of its hearing range. AEP's field tests during its research demonstrate that adult chinook salmon, steelhead trout and warmwater fish, and steelhead trout and chinook salmon smolts can be repelled with a properly-tuned system. The signal development process and sound system is designed to be transportable and use animals at the site to incorporate site-specific factors known to affect underwater sound, e.g., bottom shape and type, water current, and temperature. This paper reports that, because the overall goal of this research was to determine the feasibility of using sound to divert fish, it was essential that the approach use a signal development process which could be customized to animals and site conditions at any hydropower plant site

  17. Broadcast sound technology

    CERN Document Server

    Talbot-Smith, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Broadcast Sound Technology provides an explanation of the underlying principles of modern audio technology. Organized into 21 chapters, the book first describes the basic sound; behavior of sound waves; aspects of hearing, harming, and charming the ear; room acoustics; reverberation; microphones; phantom power; loudspeakers; basic stereo; and monitoring of audio signal. Subsequent chapters explore the processing of audio signal, sockets, sound desks, and digital audio. Analogue and digital tape recording and reproduction, as well as noise reduction, are also explained.

  18. An Antropologist of Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh

    2015-01-01

    PROFESSOR PORTRAIT: Sanne Krogh Groth met Holger Schulze, newly appointed professor in Musicology at the Department for Arts and Cultural Studies, University of Copenhagen, to a talk about anthropology of sound, sound studies, musical canons and ideology.......PROFESSOR PORTRAIT: Sanne Krogh Groth met Holger Schulze, newly appointed professor in Musicology at the Department for Arts and Cultural Studies, University of Copenhagen, to a talk about anthropology of sound, sound studies, musical canons and ideology....

  19. Form Follows Sound

    OpenAIRE

    Caramiaux, Baptiste; Altavilla, Alessandro; Pobiner, Scott G.; Tanaka, Atau

    2015-01-01

    Sonic interaction is the continuous relationship between user actions and sound, mediated by some technology. Because interaction with sound may be task oriented or experience-based it is important to understand the nature of action-sound relationships in order to design rich sonic interactions. We propose a participatory approach to sonic interaction design that first considers the affordances of sounds in order to imagine embodied interaction, and based on this, generates interaction models...

  20. Modelling Hyperboloid Sound Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burry, Jane; Davis, Daniel; Peters, Brady

    2011-01-01

    The Responsive Acoustic Surfaces workshop project described here sought new understandings about the interaction between geometry and sound in the arena of sound scattering. This paper reports on the challenges associated with modelling, simulating, fabricating and measuring this phenomenon using...... both physical and digital models at three distinct scales. The results suggest hyperboloid geometry, while difficult to fabricate, facilitates sound scattering....

  1. Abnormal sound detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Izumi; Matsui, Yuji.

    1995-01-01

    Only components synchronized with rotation of pumps are sampled from detected acoustic sounds, to judge the presence or absence of abnormality based on the magnitude of the synchronized components. A synchronized component sampling means can remove resonance sounds and other acoustic sounds generated at a synchronously with the rotation based on the knowledge that generated acoustic components in a normal state are a sort of resonance sounds and are not precisely synchronized with the number of rotation. On the other hand, abnormal sounds of a rotating body are often caused by compulsory force accompanying the rotation as a generation source, and the abnormal sounds can be detected by extracting only the rotation-synchronized components. Since components of normal acoustic sounds generated at present are discriminated from the detected sounds, reduction of the abnormal sounds due to a signal processing can be avoided and, as a result, abnormal sound detection sensitivity can be improved. Further, since it is adapted to discriminate the occurrence of the abnormal sound from the actually detected sounds, the other frequency components which are forecast but not generated actually are not removed, so that it is further effective for the improvement of detection sensitivity. (N.H.)

  2. Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers (CMUTs for Underwater Imaging Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinlong Song

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer structure for use in underwater imaging is designed, fabricated and tested in this paper. In this structure, a silicon dioxide insulation layer is inserted between the top electrodes and the vibration membrane to prevent ohmic contact. The capacitance-voltage (C-V characteristic curve shows that the transducer offers suitable levels of hysteresis and repeatability performance. The −6 dB center frequency is 540 kHz and the transducer has a bandwidth of 840 kHz for a relative bandwidth of 155%. Underwater pressure of 143.43 Pa is achieved 1 m away from the capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer under 20  excitation. Two-dimensional underwater ultrasonic imaging, which is able to prove that a rectangular object is present underwater, is achieved. The results presented here indicate that our work will be highly beneficial for the establishment of an underwater ultrasonic imaging system.

  3. Underwater Sensor Network Redeployment Algorithm Based on Wolf Search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Peng; Feng, Yang; Wu, Feng

    2016-10-21

    This study addresses the optimization of node redeployment coverage in underwater wireless sensor networks. Given that nodes could easily become invalid under a poor environment and the large scale of underwater wireless sensor networks, an underwater sensor network redeployment algorithm was developed based on wolf search. This study is to apply the wolf search algorithm combined with crowded degree control in the deployment of underwater wireless sensor networks. The proposed algorithm uses nodes to ensure coverage of the events, and it avoids the prematurity of the nodes. The algorithm has good coverage effects. In addition, considering that obstacles exist in the underwater environment, nodes are prevented from being invalid by imitating the mechanism of avoiding predators. Thus, the energy consumption of the network is reduced. Comparative analysis shows that the algorithm is simple and effective in wireless sensor network deployment. Compared with the optimized artificial fish swarm algorithm, the proposed algorithm exhibits advantages in network coverage, energy conservation, and obstacle avoidance.

  4. A man-made object detection for underwater TV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Binbin; Wang, Wenwu; Chen, Yao

    2018-03-01

    It is a great challenging task to complete an automatic search of objects underwater. Usually the forward looking sonar is used to find the target, and then the initial identification of the target is completed by the side-scan sonar, and finally the confirmation of the target is accomplished by underwater TV. This paper presents an efficient method for automatic extraction of man-made sensitive targets in underwater TV. Firstly, the image of underwater TV is simplified with taking full advantage of the prior knowledge of the target and the background; then template matching technology is used for target detection; finally the target is confirmed by extracting parallel lines on the target contour. The algorithm is formulated for real-time execution on limited-memory commercial-of-the-shelf platforms and is capable of detection objects in underwater TV.

  5. Projector-Based Augmented Reality for Intuitive Intraoperative Guidance in Image-Guided 3D Interstitial Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krempien, Robert; Hoppe, Harald; Kahrs, Lueder; Daeuber, Sascha; Schorr, Oliver; Eggers, Georg; Bischof, Marc; Munter, Marc W.; Debus, Juergen; Harms, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to implement augmented reality in real-time image-guided interstitial brachytherapy to allow an intuitive real-time intraoperative orientation. Methods and Materials: The developed system consists of a common video projector, two high-resolution charge coupled device cameras, and an off-the-shelf notebook. The projector was used as a scanning device by projecting coded-light patterns to register the patient and superimpose the operating field with planning data and additional information in arbitrary colors. Subsequent movements of the nonfixed patient were detected by means of stereoscopically tracking passive markers attached to the patient. Results: In a first clinical study, we evaluated the whole process chain from image acquisition to data projection and determined overall accuracy with 10 patients undergoing implantation. The described method enabled the surgeon to visualize planning data on top of any preoperatively segmented and triangulated surface (skin) with direct line of sight during the operation. Furthermore, the tracking system allowed dynamic adjustment of the data to the patient's current position and therefore eliminated the need for rigid fixation. Because of soft-part displacement, we obtained an average deviation of 1.1 mm by moving the patient, whereas changing the projector's position resulted in an average deviation of 0.9 mm. Mean deviation of all needles of an implant was 1.4 mm (range, 0.3-2.7 mm). Conclusions: The developed low-cost augmented-reality system proved to be accurate and feasible in interstitial brachytherapy. The system meets clinical demands and enables intuitive real-time intraoperative orientation and monitoring of needle implantation

  6. Underwater welding using remote controlled robots. Development of remote underwater welding technology with a high power YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miwa, Yasuhiro; Sato, Syuuichi; Kojima, Toshio; Owaki, Katsura; Hirose, Naoya

    2002-01-01

    As components in nuclear power plant have been periodically carried out their inspection and repair to keep their integrity, on radioactive liquid wastes storage facility, because of difficulty on their inspection by human beings, some are remained without inspection, and even when capable of inspection, conversion from human works to remote operations is desired from a viewpoint of their operation efficiency upgrading. For response to these needs, some developments on a technology capable of carrying out inspection of their inside at underwater environment and repairing welding with YAG laser by means of remote operation, have been performed. Remote underwater inspection and repair technology is a combination technology of already applied underwater mobile technique (underwater inspection robot) with underwater YAG laser welding technique which is recently at actual using level. Therefore, this technology is composed of an inspection robot and a repair welding robot. And, testing results using the underwater inspection robot and welding test results using the underwater repair welding robot, were enough preferable to obtain forecasting applicable to actual apparatuses. This technology is especially effective for inspection and repair of inside of nuclear fuel cycle apparatuses and relatively high dose apparatuses, and can be thought to be applicable also to large capacity tanks, tanks dealing with harmful matters, underwater structures, and so on, in general industries. (G.K.)

  7. Water waves generated by underwater explosion

    CERN Document Server

    Mehaute, Bernard Le

    1996-01-01

    This is the first book on explosion-generated water waves. It presents the theoretical foundations and experimental results of the generation and propagation of impulsively generated waves resulting from underwater explosions. Many of the theories and concepts presented herein are applicable to other types of water waves, in particular, tsunamis and waves generated by the fall of a meteorite. Linear and nonlinear theories, as well as experimental calibrations, are presented for cases of deep and shallow water explosions. Propagation of transient waves on dissipative, nonuniform bathymetries to

  8. Radon dynamics in underwater thermal radon therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lettner, H.; Hofmann, W.; Winkler, R.; Rolle, R.; Foisner, W.

    1998-01-01

    At a facility for underwater thermal radon therapy in Bad Hofgastein, experiments were carried out with the aim of establishing radon in the air exhaled by the treated patients and of radon decay products on the skin of the patients. The time course of radon concentration in the exhaled air shows a maximum a few minutes after entering the bath, then the Rn concentration remains constant over the remaining time spent in the bath. Taking into account several simplifying assumptions, the average dose to the epidermis from radon daughters is about 50 μGy. (A.K.)

  9. Navigation System Fault Diagnosis for Underwater Vehicle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkenberg, Thomas; Gregersen, Rene Tavs; Blanke, Mogens

    2014-01-01

    This paper demonstrates fault diagnosis on unmanned underwater vehicles (UUV) based on analysis of structure of the nonlinear dynamics. Residuals are generated using dierent approaches in structural analysis followed by statistical change detection. Hypothesis testing thresholds are made signal...... based to cope with non-ideal properties seen in real data. Detection of both sensor and thruster failures are demonstrated. Isolation is performed using the residual signature of detected faults and the change detection algorithm is used to assess severity of faults by estimating their magnitude...

  10. Adaptive Target Tracking for Underwater Maneuvering Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    concenetrate on the bearings-only approach. In this method the Observer monitors his bearing to the Source, over a period of time. Usually the Observer must...developed in [ 5] was earlier applied with much success to tracking maneuvering air targets. This approach will now be applied in the underwater environment...April 1977. [11] A. H. Jazwinski, Stochastic Processes and Filtering Theory, Academic Press, New York, 1970. [12] D. H. Halliday, and R. Resnick, Physics, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 1966. hI

  11. Compact multiple laser beam scanning module for high-resolution pico-projector applications using a fiber bundle combiner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Masafumi; Fukaya, Shinpei; Yoda, Kaoru; Suzuki, Masaya

    2014-02-01

    We present a novel multiple laser beam scanning projection module using compact red-green-blue (RGB) fiber pigtailed laser modules for use in a high resolution pico-projector display system using a fiber bundle combiner in combination with a single MEMS mirror. This system can be used to create accurate multiple-projection images on a screen without overlaps or spaces among the projection images. The system uses very simple projection optics and has the potential to become a light engine unit for use in multiple projection systems, particularly those for light field displays. As such, light field display applications are also discussed.

  12. Acoustic grating fringe projector for high-speed and high-precision three-dimensional shape measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Xuebing; Zhao Huijie; Zeng Junyu; Qu Yufu

    2007-01-01

    A new acoustic grating fringe projector (AGFP) was developed for high-speed and high-precision 3D measurement. A new acoustic grating fringe projection theory is also proposed to describe the optical system. The AGFP instrument can adjust the spatial phase and period of fringes with unprecedented speed and accuracy. Using rf power proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control and CCD synchronous control, we obtain fringes with fine sinusoidal characteristics and realize high-speed acquisition of image data. Using the device, we obtained a precise phase map for a 3D profile. In addition, the AGFP can work in running fringe mode, which could be applied in other measurement fields

  13. Electronic structure calculations with GPAW: a real-space implementation of the projector augmented-wave method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enkovaara, J.; Rostgaard, Carsten; Mortensen, Jens Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    Electronic structure calculations have become an indispensable tool in many areas of materials science and quantum chemistry. Even though the Kohn-Sham formulation of the density-functional theory (DFT) simplifies the many-body problem significantly, one is still confronted with several numerical...... challenges. In this article we present the projector augmented-wave (PAW) method as implemented in the GPAW program package (https://wiki.fysik.dtu.dk/gpaw) using a uniform real-space grid representation of the electronic wavefunctions. Compared to more traditional plane wave or localized basis set...

  14. 46 CFR 115.650 - Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program options: Divers or underwater ROV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...: Divers or underwater ROV. 115.650 Section 115.650 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program options: Divers or underwater ROV. To complete your underwater survey, you may use divers or an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV). (a) If you use divers to...

  15. 78 FR 13869 - Puget Sound Energy, Inc.; Puget Sound Energy, Inc.; Puget Sound Energy, Inc.; Puget Sound Energy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    ...-123-LNG; 12-128-NG; 12-148-NG; 12- 158-NG] Puget Sound Energy, Inc.; Puget Sound Energy, Inc.; Puget Sound Energy, Inc.; Puget Sound Energy, Inc.; Puget Sound Energy, Inc.; CE FLNG, LLC; Consolidated...-NG Puget Sound Energy, Inc Order granting long- term authority to import/export natural gas from/to...

  16. Underwater pipeline impact localization using piezoceramic transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junxiao; Ho, Siu Chun Michael; Patil, Devendra; Wang, Ning; Hirsch, Rachel; Song, Gangbing

    2017-10-01

    Reports indicated that impact events accounted for 47% of offshore pipeline failures, which calls for impact detection and localization for subsea pipelines. In this paper, an innovative method for rapid localization of impacts on underwater pipelines utilizing a novel determination technique for both arrival-time and group velocity (ATGV) of ultrasonic guided waves with lead zirconate titanate (PZT) transducers is described. PZT transducers mounted on the outer surface of a model pipeline were utilized to measure ultrasonic guided waves generated by impact events. Based on the signals from PZT sensors, the ATGV technique integrates wavelet decomposition, Hilbert transform and statistical analysis to pinpoint the arrival-time of the designated ultrasonic guided waves with a specific group velocity. Experimental results have verified the effectiveness and the localization accuracy for eight impact points along a model underwater pipeline. All estimations errors were small and were comparable with the wavelength of the designated ultrasonic guided waves. Furthermore, the method is robust against the low frequency structural vibration introduced by other external forces.

  17. GAS FLOW IN UNDERWATER BREATHING INSTALLATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca CONSTANTIN

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The open circuit underwater breathing apparatus can be a one or two-stage regulator used in scuba diving or a two-stage regulator used in surface supplied installations. These installations are proper in underwater sites at small depth. The pneumatic circuit of a two-stage regulator is composed mainly of a first stage regulator mounted on the air cylinders and a second stage carried by the diver in his mouth. The two regulators are linked together by a medium pressure hose. The circuit opens when the depression created by the diver’s inhalation, in the second stage body, reaches a certain value. The second stage opening causes a transient movement, namely an expansion wave that propagates through the medium pressure hose to the first stage regulator. The first stage regulator opens and the air in the cylinders is allowed to flow to the diver. The longer the hose, the greater the duration of the expansion wave propagation. Investigations on the wave propagation offer data on the inspiration unsteady motion duration which influences the respiratory effort of the diver.

  18. An explanatory model of underwater adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Colodro

    Full Text Available The underwater environment is an extreme environment that requires a process of human adaptation with specific psychophysiological demands to ensure survival and productive activity. From the standpoint of existing models of intelligence, personality and performance, in this explanatory study we have analyzed the contribution of individual differences in explaining the adaptation of military personnel in a stressful environment. Structural equation analysis was employed to verify a model representing the direct effects of psychological variables on individual adaptation to an adverse environment, and we have been able to confirm, during basic military diving courses, the structural relationships among these variables and their ability to predict a third of the variance of a criterion that has been studied very little to date. In this way, we have confirmed in a sample of professionals (N = 575 the direct relationship of emotional adjustment, conscientiousness and general mental ability with underwater adaptation, as well as the inverse relationship of emotional reactivity. These constructs are the psychological basis for working under water, contributing to an improved adaptation to this environment and promoting risk prevention and safety in diving activities.

  19. Modelling cavitating flow around underwater missiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Petitpas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The diffuse interface model of Saurel et al. (2008 is used for the computation of compressible cavitating flows around underwater missiles. Such systems use gas injection and natural cavitation to reduce drag effects. Consequently material interfaces appear separating liquid and gas. These interfaces may have a really complex dynamics such that only a few formulations are able to predict their evolution. Contrarily to front tracking or interface reconstruction method the interfaces are computed as diffused numerical zones, that are captured in a routinely manner, as is done usually with gas dynamics solvers for shocks and contact discontinuity. With the present approach, a single set of partial differential equations is solved everywhere, with a single numerical scheme. This leads to very efficient solvers. The algorithm derived in Saurel et al. (2009 is used to compute cavitation pockets around solid bodies. It is first validated against experiments done in cavitation tunnel at CNU. Then it is used to compute flows around high speed underwater systems (Shkval-like missile. Performance data are then computed showing method ability to predict forces acting on the system.

  20. Hybrid Underwater Vehicle: ARV Design and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang DENG

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The development of SMU-I, a new autonomous & remotely-operated vehicle (ARV is described. Since it has both the characteristics of autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV and remote operated underwater vehicle (ROV, it is able to achieve precision fix station operation and manual timely intervention. In the paper the initial design of basic components, such as vehicle, propulsion, batteries etc. and the control design of motion are introduced and analyzed. ROV’s conventional cable is replaced by a fiber optic cable, which makes it available for high-bandwidth real-time video, data telemetry and high-quality teleoperation. Furthermore, with the aid of the manual real-time remote operation and ranging sonar, it also resolves the AUV’s conflicting issue, which can absolutely adapt the actual complex sea environment and satisfy the unknown mission need. The whole battery system is designed as two-battery banks, whose voltages and temperatures are monitored through CAN (controller area network bus to avoid battery fire and explosion. A fuzzy-PID controller is designed for its motion control, including depth control and direction control. The controller synthesizes the advantage of fuzzy control and PID control, utilizes the fuzzy rules to on-line tune the parameters of PID controller, and achieves a better control effect. Experiment results demonstrate to show the effectiveness of the test-bed.

  1. Software architecture of biomimetic underwater vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praczyk, Tomasz; Szymak, Piotr

    2016-05-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles are vehicles that are entirely or partly independent of human decisions. In order to obtain operational independence, the vehicles have to be equipped with a specialized software. The main task of the software is to move the vehicle along a trajectory with collision avoidance. Moreover, the software has also to manage different devices installed on the vehicle board, e.g. to start and stop cameras, sonars etc. In addition to the software embedded on the vehicle board, the software responsible for managing the vehicle by the operator is also necessary. Its task is to define mission of the vehicle, to start, to stop the mission, to send emergency commands, to monitor vehicle parameters, and to control the vehicle in remotely operated mode. An important objective of the software is also to support development and tests of other software components. To this end, a simulation environment is necessary, i.e. simulation model of the vehicle and all its key devices, the model of the sea environment, and the software to visualize behavior of the vehicle. The paper presents architecture of the software designed for biomimetic autonomous underwater vehicle (BAUV) that is being constructed within the framework of the scientific project financed by Polish National Center of Research and Development.

  2. STABILITY OF UNDERWATER STRUCTURE UNDER WAVE ATTACK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Paotonan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Geotube is, among others, a type of coastal structure that is increasingly accepted for coastal protection especially underwater breakwater. Besides its relatively low cost, it has other advantages such as flexibility, ease of construction and the fact that it can be filled with local sand material. Similar to all other coastal structures, it should also be stable under wave attack. A simple theoretical approach based on linear wave was adopted to estimate the stability of such structure. The theoretical solution was then compared with an experimental study. The experimental study was conducted at the Hydraulics and Hydrology Laboratory of Universitas Gadjah Mada. However, instead of a real geotube, PVC pipe was used where the weight of the PVC was varied by adjusting the volume of sand in the pipe. The result indicated that the agreement between the theoretical solution and the experiment was encouraging. The analytical solution may be utilized to predict underwater pipe stability under wave attack with certain degree of accuracy.

  3. Underwater noise levels in UK waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Nathan D; Brookes, Kate L; Faulkner, Rebecca C; Bicknell, Anthony W J; Godley, Brendan J; Witt, Matthew J

    2016-11-10

    Underwater noise from human activities appears to be rising, with ramifications for acoustically sensitive marine organisms and the functioning of marine ecosystems. Policymakers are beginning to address the risk of ecological impact, but are constrained by a lack of data on current and historic noise levels. Here, we present the first nationally coordinated effort to quantify underwater noise levels, in support of UK policy objectives under the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). Field measurements were made during 2013-2014 at twelve sites around the UK. Median noise levels ranged from 81.5-95.5 dB re 1 μPa for one-third octave bands from 63-500 Hz. Noise exposure varied considerably, with little anthropogenic influence at the Celtic Sea site, to several North Sea sites with persistent vessel noise. Comparison of acoustic metrics found that the RMS level (conventionally used to represent the mean) was highly skewed by outliers, exceeding the 97 th percentile at some frequencies. We conclude that environmental indicators of anthropogenic noise should instead use percentiles, to ensure statistical robustness. Power analysis indicated that at least three decades of continuous monitoring would be required to detect trends of similar magnitude to historic rises in noise levels observed in the Northeast Pacific.

  4. Computer simulations enhance experimental demonstrations in the underwater acoustics and sonar course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Murray S.

    2002-11-01

    Underwater acoustics and sonar (SP411) is a 3 hour course that is offered to midshipmen in their senior year. Typically, general science and oceanography majors, totaling 110 students/yr, enroll. Since this course is offered without a lab, the ''in class'' experience has been enhanced with the development (over many years) of our demo carts and computer workstations which surround the classroom. In a studio classroom atmosphere, students perform a variety of experiments in small groups. How can scientific visualizations best develop learning of complex interactions? Two examples are presented. PC-IMAT (personal curriculum interactive multisensor analysis training) simulations of multielement array steering support the theory and enhance the experiments that are performed in class such as the two-element array. Mathematica simulations involving the programming and animation of a point source in a rigid-rigid infinite parallel wave guide are used to stress the method of images, superposition, group and phase velocity and far-field modal pattern that is observed as a function of depth and source frequency. Later, students have fun using a ripple tank with an eye dropper to generate a point source between two adjustable parallel boundaries, and their understanding of ''underwater sound'' is greatly enhanced.

  5. A Speed Control Method for Underwater Vehicle under Hydraulic Flexible Traction

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yin; Xia, Ying-kai; Chen, Ying; Xu, Guo-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Underwater vehicle speed control methodology method is the focus of research in this study. Driven by a hydraulic flexible traction system, the underwater vehicle advances steadily on underwater guide rails, simulating an underwater environment for the carried device. Considering the influence of steel rope viscoelasticity and the control system traction structure feature, a mathematical model of the underwater vehicle driven by hydraulic flexible traction system is established. A speed contr...

  6. Coral larvae move toward reef sounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J A Vermeij

    Full Text Available Free-swimming larvae of tropical corals go through a critical life-phase when they return from the open ocean to select a suitable settlement substrate. During the planktonic phase of their life cycle, the behaviours of small coral larvae (<1 mm that influence settlement success are difficult to observe in situ and are therefore largely unknown. Here, we show that coral larvae respond to acoustic cues that may facilitate detection of habitat from large distances and from upcurrent of preferred settlement locations. Using in situ choice chambers, we found that settling coral larvae were attracted to reef sounds, produced mainly by fish and crustaceans, which we broadcast underwater using loudspeakers. Our discovery that coral larvae can detect and respond to sound is the first description of an auditory response in the invertebrate phylum Cnidaria, which includes jellyfish, anemones, and hydroids as well as corals. If, like settlement-stage reef fish and crustaceans, coral larvae use reef noise as a cue for orientation, the alleviation of noise pollution in the marine environment may gain further urgency.

  7. Underwater television camera for monitoring inner side of pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayama, Kazuhiko.

    1997-01-01

    An underwater television support device equipped with a rotatable and vertically movable underwater television camera and an underwater television camera controlling device for monitoring images of the inside of the reactor core photographed by the underwater television camera to control the position of the underwater television camera and the underwater light are disposed on an upper lattice plate of a reactor pressure vessel. Both of them are electrically connected with each other by way of a cable to rapidly observe the inside of the reactor core by the underwater television camera. The reproducibility is extremely satisfactory by efficiently concentrating the position of the camera and image information upon inspection and observation. As a result, the steps for periodical inspection can be reduced to shorten the days for the periodical inspection. Since there is no requirement to withdraw fuel assemblies over a wide reactor core region, and the device can be used with the fuel assemblies being left as they are in the reactor, it is suitable for inspection of detectors for nuclear instrumentation. (N.H.)

  8. Underwater fiber-wireless communication with a passive front end

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Sun, Bin; Lyu, Weichao; Kong, Meiwei; Sarwar, Rohail; Han, Jun; Zhang, Wei; Deng, Ning

    2017-11-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel concept on underwater fiber-wireless (Fi-Wi) communication system with a fully passive wireless front end. A low-cost step-index (SI) plastic optical fiber (POF) together with a passive collimating lens at the front end composes the underwater Fi-Wi architecture. We have achieved a 1.71-Gb/s transmission at a mean BER of 4.97 × 10-3 (1.30 × 10-3 when using power loading) over a 50-m SI-POF and 2-m underwater wireless channel using orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM). Although the wireless part is very short, it actually plays a crucial role in practical underwater implementation, especially in deep sea. Compared with the wired solution (e.g. using a 52-m POF cable without the UWOC part), the proposed underwater Fi-Wi scheme can save optical wet-mate connectors that are sophisticated, very expensive and difficult to install in deep ocean. By combining high-capacity robust POF with the mobility and ubiquity of underwater wireless optical communication (UWOC), the proposed underwater Fi-Wi technology will find wide application in ocean exploration.

  9. Towards a Hybrid Approach to Context Reasoning for Underwater Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ontologies have been widely used to facilitate semantic interoperability and serve as a common information model in many applications or domains. The Smart and Networking Underwater Robots in Cooperation Meshes (SWARMs project, aiming to facilitate coordination and cooperation between heterogeneous underwater vehicles, also adopts ontologies to formalize information that is necessarily exchanged between vehicles. However, how to derive more useful contexts based on ontologies still remains a challenge. In particular, the extreme nature of the underwater environment introduces uncertainties in context data, thus imposing more difficulties in context reasoning. None of the existing context reasoning methods could individually deal with all intricacies in the underwater robot field. To this end, this paper presents the first proposal applying a hybrid context reasoning mechanism that includes ontological, rule-based, and Multi-Entity Bayesian Network (MEBN reasoning methods to reason about contexts and their uncertainties in the underwater robot field. The theoretical foundation of applying this reasoning mechanism in underwater robots is given by a case study on the oil spill monitoring. The simulated reasoning results are useful for further decision-making by operators or robots and they show that the consolidation of different reasoning methods is a promising approach for context reasoning in underwater robots.

  10. Underwater photography - A visual survey method

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, R.

    . Calculation of the area photographed on the seafloor (X= altitude of the camera, L= length of the photograph, B= breadth of the photograph, LxB=Area of the photograph) Fig. 3. Calculation of scale factor data and sounding data, need...: Hersey, J.B. (Ed.) Deep sea photography. The Johns Hopkins Press: Baltimore, 43-45 Photo data Navigation data Sounding data Processing seafloor/ sub-bottom features Correction / projection Interpolation Of position Estimation of water depth...

  11. The Textile Form of Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Cecilie

    of sound. This issue is a part of a Ph.D. study at The Danish Design School in Copenhagen. Sound diffusion in architecture is a complex phenomenon. From the sound source the sound spreads in all directions as a sphere of wave fronts. When the sound is reflected from room boundaries or furniture, complex......Sound is a part of architecture, and sound is complex. Upon this, sound is invisible. How is it then possible to design visual objects that interact with the sound? This paper addresses the problem of how to get access to the complexity of sound and how to make textile material revealing the form...

  12. Behavioral responses of a harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) to playbacks of broadband pile driving sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastelein, Ronald A; van Heerden, Dorianne; Gransier, Robin; Hoek, Lean

    2013-12-01

    The high under-water sound pressure levels (SPLs) produced during pile driving to build offshore wind turbines may affect harbor porpoises. To estimate the discomfort threshold of pile driving sounds, a porpoise in a quiet pool was exposed to playbacks (46 strikes/min) at five SPLs (6 dB steps: 130-154 dB re 1 μPa). The spectrum of the impulsive sound resembled the spectrum of pile driving sound at tens of kilometers from the pile driving location in shallow water such as that found in the North Sea. The animal's behavior during test and baseline periods was compared. At and above a received broadband SPL of 136 dB re 1 μPa [zero-peak sound pressure level: 151 dB re 1 μPa; t90: 126 ms; sound exposure level of a single strike (SELss): 127 dB re 1 μPa(2) s] the porpoise's respiration rate increased in response to the pile driving sounds. At higher levels, he also jumped out of the water more often. Wild porpoises are expected to move tens of kilometers away from offshore pile driving locations; response distances will vary with context, the sounds' source level, parameters influencing sound propagation, and background noise levels. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A Secure Communication Suite for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Lo Duca

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe a security suite for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks comprising both fixed and mobile nodes. The security suite is composed of a secure routing protocol and a set of cryptographic primitives aimed at protecting the confidentiality and the integrity of underwater communication while taking into account the unique characteristics and constraints of the acoustic channel. By means of experiments and simulations based on real data, we show that the suite is suitable for an underwater networking environment as it introduces limited, and sometimes negligible, communication and power consumption overhead.

  14. Application of YAG laser processing in underwater welding and cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohwaki, Katsura; Morita, Ichiro; Kojima, Toshio; Sato, Shuichi

    2002-01-01

    The high-power YAG laser is a new fabrication tool. The laser torch is easy to combine with complex with complex mechanics because of beam delivery through optical fiber. A direct underwater laser welding technology has been developed and applied to the preservation, maintenance and removal of nuclear power plants. For subdividing or removing operations for retirement of plants, the laser cutting properties were confirmed to allow a maximum cutting thickness of 80 mm. For repairing inner surface of stainless steel tanks, an underwater laser welding system using a remote-controlled robot was developed and the high quality of underwater laser welding was confirmed. (author)

  15. Centralised versus Decentralised Control Reconfiguration for Collaborating Underwater Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furno, Lidia; Nielsen, Mikkel Cornelius; Blanke, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    The present paper introduces an approach to fault-tolerant reconfiguration for collaborating underwater robots. Fault-tolerant reconfiguration is obtained using the virtual actuator approach, Steen (2005). The paper investigates properties of a centralised versus a decentralised implementation...... an underwater drill needs to be transported and positioned by three collaborating robots as part of an underwater autonomous operation....... and assesses the capabilities under communication constraints between the individual robots. In the centralised case, each robot sends information related to its own status to a unique virtual actuator that computes the necessary reconfiguration. In the decentralised case, each robot is equipped with its own...

  16. Adaptive Decentralized Control of Mobile Underwater Sensor Networks and Robots for Modeling Underwater Phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrick Detweiler

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the dynamics of bodies of water and their impact on the global environment requires sensing information over the full volume of water. In this article, we develop a gradient-based decentralized controller that dynamically adjusts the depth of a network of underwater sensors to optimize sensing for computing maximally detailed volumetric models. We prove that the controller converges to a local minimum and show how the controller can be extended to work with hybrid robot and sensor network systems. We implement the controller on an underwater sensor network with depth adjustment capabilities. Through simulations and in-situ experiments, we verify the functionality and performance of the system and algorithm.

  17. Vocalisation Repertoire of Female Bluefin Gurnard (Chelidonichthys kumu in Captivity: Sound Structure, Context and Vocal Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig A Radford

    Full Text Available Fish vocalisation is often a major component of underwater soundscapes. Therefore, interpretation of these soundscapes requires an understanding of the vocalisation characteristics of common soniferous fish species. This study of captive female bluefin gurnard, Chelidonichthys kumu, aims to formally characterise their vocalisation sounds and daily pattern of sound production. Four types of sound were produced and characterised, twice as many as previously reported in this species. These sounds fit two aural categories; grunt and growl, the mean peak frequencies for which ranged between 129 to 215 Hz. This species vocalized throughout the 24 hour period at an average rate of (18.5 ± 2.0 sounds fish-1 h-1 with an increase in vocalization rate at dawn and dusk. Competitive feeding did not elevate vocalisation as has been found in other gurnard species. Bluefin gurnard are common in coastal waters of New Zealand, Australia and Japan and, given their vocalization rate, are likely to be significant contributors to ambient underwater soundscape in these areas.

  18. Sound Insulation between Dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory sound insulation requirements for dwellings exist in more than 30 countries in Europe. In some countries, requirements have existed since the 1950s. Findings from comparative studies show that sound insulation descriptors and requirements represent a high degree of diversity...... and initiate – where needed – improvement of sound insulation of new and existing dwellings in Europe to the benefit of the inhabitants and the society. A European COST Action TU0901 "Integrating and Harmonizing Sound Insulation Aspects in Sustainable Urban Housing Constructions", has been established and runs...... 2009-2013. The main objectives of TU0901 are to prepare proposals for harmonized sound insulation descriptors and for a European sound classification scheme with a number of quality classes for dwellings. Findings from the studies provide input for the discussions in COST TU0901. Data collected from 24...

  19. Task Allocation and Path Planning for Collaborative Autonomous Underwater Vehicles Operating through an Underwater Acoustic Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueyue Deng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic and unstructured multiple cooperative autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV missions are highly complex operations, and task allocation and path planning are made significantly more challenging under realistic underwater acoustic communication constraints. This paper presents a solution for the task allocation and path planning for multiple AUVs under marginal acoustic communication conditions: a location-aided task allocation framework (LAAF algorithm for multitarget task assignment and the grid-based multiobjective optimal programming (GMOOP mathematical model for finding an optimal vehicle command decision given a set of objectives and constraints. Both the LAAF and GMOOP algorithms are well suited in poor acoustic network condition and dynamic environment. Our research is based on an existing mobile ad hoc network underwater acoustic simulator and blind flooding routing protocol. Simulation results demonstrate that the location-aided auction strategy performs significantly better than the well-accepted auction algorithm developed by Bertsekas in terms of task-allocation time and network bandwidth consumption. We also demonstrate that the GMOOP path-planning technique provides an efficient method for executing multiobjective tasks by cooperative agents with limited communication capabilities. This is in contrast to existing multiobjective action selection methods that are limited to networks where constant, reliable communication is assumed to be available.

  20. Sound absorption of snow

    OpenAIRE

    Maysenhölder, W.; Schneebeli, M.; Zhou, X.; Zhang, T.; Heggli, M.

    2008-01-01

    Recently fallen snow possesses good sound-absorbing properties. This fact is well-known and confirmed by measurements. Is the filigree structure of snowflakes decisive? In principle we know that the sound-absorbing capacity of a porous material is dependent on its structure. But until now the question as to which structural characteristics are significant has been insufficiently answered. Detailed investigations of snow are to explain this fact by precise measurements of the sound absorption,...

  1. Status of the ANTARES underwater neutrino telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Hallewell, G D

    2003-01-01

    The ANTARES Collaboration is constructing a deep underwater neutrino detector for operation at -2400 m off the French Mediterranean coast near Toulon. The detector, which will begin operation in 2004, will have an aperture of approx 0.1 km sup 2 , and will contain 900 photomultiplier tubes. The photomultiplier axes will be angled 45 deg. downward toward the seabed to observe the Cherenkov emissions of upward-going muons created by the interactions in or near the detector of high energy neutrinos traversing the Earth. These neutrinos arrive undeviated from a variety of galactic and extragalactic sources of astrophysical interest, and might be produced in the possible annihilation of dark matter neutralinos. The design and present status of the detector are summarized. Results from site evaluation and the development of supporting instrumentation are outlined.

  2. The NESTOR underwater neutrino telescope project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapidis, Petros A. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, National Center for Scientific Research ' Demokritos' , Athens 15310 (Greece)], E-mail: rapidis@inp.demokritos.gr

    2009-04-11

    The NESTOR collaboration is continuing its efforts towards deploying an underwater neutrino telescope. Further site studies (e.g. water light transmission measurements, sedimentation rates, etc.) are being carried out within the context of characterizing a site that may host the proposed KM3NeT infrastructure. In addition, following the successful deployment of a single floor of a NESTOR tower in 2003, five floors are now in the final stages of preparation. The use of these five floors in a form of a truncated tower together with four autonomous strings to be located some 300 m away from the tower is being contemplated. This arrangement, named NuBE (for Neutrino Burst Experiment), that may allow the detection neutrinos in coincidence with Gamma Ray Bursts, will be described.

  3. A Validation Process for Underwater Localization Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Hildebrandt

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the validation process of a localization algorithm for underwater vehicles. In order to develop new localization algorithms, it is essential to characterize them with regard to their accuracy, long-term stability and robustness to external sources of noise. This is only possible if a gold-standard reference localization (GSRL is available against which any new localization algorithm (NLA can be tested. This process requires a vehicle which carries all the required sensor and processing systems for both the GSRL and the NLA. This paper will show the necessity of such a validation process, briefly sketch the test vehicle and its capabilities, describe the challenges in computing the localizations of both the GSRL and the NLA simultaneously for comparison, and conclude with experimental data of real-world trials.

  4. Improved Underwater Excitation-Emission Matrix Fluorometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Casey; daCunha, John; Rhoades, Bruce; Twardowski, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A compact, high-resolution, two-dimensional excitation-emission matrix fluorometer (EEMF) has been designed and built specifically for use in identifying and measuring the concentrations of organic compounds, including polluting hydrocarbons, in natural underwater settings. Heretofore, most EEMFs have been designed and built for installation in laboratories, where they are used to analyze the contents of samples collected in the field and brought to the laboratories. Because the present EEMF can be operated in the field, it is better suited to measurement of spatially and temporally varying concentrations of substances of interest. In excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorometry, fluorescence is excited by irradiating a sample at one or more wavelengths, and the fluorescent emission from the sample is measured at multiple wavelengths. When excitation is provided at only one wavelength, the technique is termed one-dimensional (1D) EEM fluorometry because the resulting matrix of fluorescence emission data (the EEM) contains only one row or column. When excitation is provided at multiple wavelengths, the technique is termed two-dimensional (2D) EEM fluorometry because the resulting EEM contains multiple rows and columns. EEM fluorometry - especially the 2D variety - is well established as a means of simultaneously detecting numerous dissolved and particulate compounds in water. Each compound or pool of compounds has a unique spectral fluorescence signature, and each EEM is rich in information content, in that it can contain multiple fluorescence signatures. By use of deconvolution and/or other mixture-analyses techniques, it is often possible to isolate the spectral signature of compounds of interest, even when their fluorescence spectra overlap. What distinguishes the present 2D EEMF over prior laboratory-type 2D EEMFs are several improvements in packaging (including a sealed housing) and other aspects of design that render it suitable for use in natural underwater

  5. Adaptive control of nonlinear underwater robotic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thor I. Fossen

    1991-04-01

    Full Text Available The problem of controlling underwater mobile robots in 6 degrees of freedom (DOF is addressed. Uncertainties in the input matrix due to partly known nonlinear thruster characteristics are modeled as multiplicative input uncertainty. This paper proposes two methods to compensate for the model uncertainties: (1 an adaptive passivity-based control scheme and (2 deriving a hybrid (adaptive and sliding controller. The hybrid controller consists of a switching term which compensates for uncertainties in the input matrix and an on-line parameter estimation algorithm. Global stability is ensured by applying Barbalat's Lyapunovlike lemma. The hybrid controller is simulated for the horizontal motion of the Norwegian Experimental Remotely Operated Vehicle (NEROV.

  6. Collision Detection for Underwater ROV Manipulator Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivčev, Satja; Rossi, Matija; Coleman, Joseph; Omerdić, Edin; Dooly, Gerard; Toal, Daniel

    2018-04-06

    Work-class ROVs equipped with robotic manipulators are extensively used for subsea intervention operations. Manipulators are teleoperated by human pilots relying on visual feedback from the worksite. Operating in a remote environment, with limited pilot perception and poor visibility, manipulator collisions which may cause significant damage are likely to happen. This paper presents a real-time collision detection algorithm for marine robotic manipulation. The proposed collision detection mechanism is developed, integrated into a commercial ROV manipulator control system, and successfully evaluated in simulations and experimental setup using a real industry standard underwater manipulator. The presented collision sensing solution has a potential to be a useful pilot assisting tool that can reduce the task load, operational time, and costs of subsea inspection, repair, and maintenance operations.

  7. The NESTOR underwater neutrino telescope project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapidis, Petros A.

    2009-01-01

    The NESTOR collaboration is continuing its efforts towards deploying an underwater neutrino telescope. Further site studies (e.g. water light transmission measurements, sedimentation rates, etc.) are being carried out within the context of characterizing a site that may host the proposed KM3NeT infrastructure. In addition, following the successful deployment of a single floor of a NESTOR tower in 2003, five floors are now in the final stages of preparation. The use of these five floors in a form of a truncated tower together with four autonomous strings to be located some 300 m away from the tower is being contemplated. This arrangement, named NuBE (for Neutrino Burst Experiment), that may allow the detection neutrinos in coincidence with Gamma Ray Bursts, will be described.

  8. Ontogenetic investigation of underwater hearing capabilities in loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) using a dual testing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, Ashley L; Bartol, Soraya M; Bartol, Ian K

    2014-07-15

    Sea turtles reside in different acoustic environments with each life history stage and may have different hearing capacity throughout ontogeny. For this study, two independent yet complementary techniques for hearing assessment, i.e. behavioral and electrophysiological audiometry, were employed to (1) measure hearing in post-hatchling and juvenile loggerhead sea turtles Caretta caretta (19-62 cm straight carapace length) to determine whether these migratory turtles exhibit an ontogenetic shift in underwater auditory detection and (2) evaluate whether hearing frequency range and threshold sensitivity are consistent in behavioral and electrophysiological tests. Behavioral trials first required training turtles to respond to known frequencies, a multi-stage, time-intensive process, and then recording their behavior when they were presented with sound stimuli from an underwater speaker using a two-response forced-choice paradigm. Electrophysiological experiments involved submerging restrained, fully conscious turtles just below the air-water interface and recording auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) when sound stimuli were presented using an underwater speaker. No significant differences in behavior-derived auditory thresholds or AEP-derived auditory thresholds were detected between post-hatchling and juvenile sea turtles. While hearing frequency range (50-1000/1100 Hz) and highest sensitivity (100-400 Hz) were consistent in audiograms pooled by size class for both behavior and AEP experiments, both post-hatchlings and juveniles had significantly higher AEP-derived than behavior-derived auditory thresholds, indicating that behavioral assessment is a more sensitive testing approach. The results from this study suggest that post-hatchling and juvenile loggerhead sea turtles are low-frequency specialists, exhibiting little differences in threshold sensitivity and frequency bandwidth despite residence in acoustically distinct environments throughout ontogeny. © 2014

  9. Morphing hull implementation for unmanned underwater vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Timothy F; Gandhi, Farhan; Rufino, Russell J

    2013-01-01

    There has been much interest and work in the area of morphing aircraft since the 1980s. Morphing could also potentially benefit unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs). The current paper envisions a UUV with an interior pressure hull and a variable diameter outer flexible hull with fuel stored in the annulus between, and presents a mechanism to realize diameter change of the outer hull. The outer hull diameter of UUVs designed for very long endurance/range could be progressively reduced as fuel was consumed, thereby reducing drag and further increasing endurance and range capability. Diameter morphing could also be advantageous for compact storage of UUVs. A prototype is fabricated to represent an axial section of such a morphing diameter UUV. Diameter change is achieved using eight morphing trusses arranged equidistant around the circumference of the representative interior rigid hull. Each morphing truss has a lower rail (attached to the rigid hull) and an upper rail with V-linkages between, at either ends of the rail. Horizontal motion of the feet of the V-linkages (sliding in the lower rail) results in vertical motion of the upper rail which in turn produces diameter change of the outer hull. For the prototype built and tested, a 63% increase in outer diameter from 12.75″ to 20.75″ was achieved. The introduction of a stretched latex representative flexible skin around the outer rails increased actuation force requirement and led to a propensity for the wheel-in-track sliders in the morphing truss to bind. It is anticipated that this could be overcome with higher precision manufacturing. In addition to symmetric actuation of the morphing trusses resulting in diameter change, the paper also shows that with asymmetric actuation the hull cross-section shape can be changed (for example, from a circular section for underwater operation to a V-section for surface operations). (paper)

  10. On sampling the ocean using underwater gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, Daniel L.; Cole, Sylvia T.

    2011-08-01

    The sampling characteristics of an underwater glider are addressed through comparison with contemporaneous measurements from a ship survey using a towed vehicle. The comparison uses the underwater glider Spray and the towed vehicle SeaSoar north of Hawaii along 158°W between 22.75°N and 34.5°N. A Spray dive from the surface to 1000 m and back took 5.6 h and covered 5.3 km, resulting in a horizontal speed of 0.26 m s-1. SeaSoar undulated between the surface and 400 m, completing a cycle in 11 min while covering 2.6 km, for a speed of 3.9 m s-1. Adjacent profiles of temperature and salinity are compared between the two platforms to prove that each is accurate. Spray and SeaSoar data are compared through sections, isopycnal spatial series, and wave number spectra. The relative slowness of the glider results in the projection of high-frequency oceanic variability, such as internal waves, onto spatial structure. The projection is caused by Doppler smearing because of finite speed and aliasing due to discrete sampling. The projected variability is apparent in properties measured on depth surfaces or in isopycnal depth. No projected variability is seen in observations of properties on constant density surfaces because internal waves are intrinsically filtered. Wave number spectra suggest that projected variability affects properties at constant depth at wavelengths shorter than 30 km. These results imply that isobaric quantities, like geostrophic shear, are valid at wavelengths longer than 30 km, while isopycnal quantities, like spice, may be analyzed for scales as small as a glider measures.

  11. Short Communication Evaluation of an underwater biopsy probe for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lethal methods may become an increasingly useful tool to investigate shark populations where researchers encounter logistical or conservation-related constraints. Keywords: biopsy probe, laser photogrammetry, non-lethal sampling, underwater ...

  12. Digital sonar design in underwater acoustics principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Qihu

    2012-01-01

    "Digital Sonar Design in Underwater Acoustics Principles and Applications" provides comprehensive and up-to-date coverage of research on sonar design, including the basic theory and techniques of digital signal processing, basic concept of information theory, ocean acoustics, underwater acoustic signal propagation theory, and underwater signal processing theory. This book discusses the general design procedure and approaches to implementation, the design method, system simulation theory and techniques, sonar tests in the laboratory, lake and sea, and practical validation criteria and methods for digital sonar design. It is intended for researchers in the fields of underwater signal processing and sonar design, and also for navy officers and ocean explorers. Qihu Li is a professor at the Institute of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and an academician of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  13. Automated Underwater Image Restoration and Retrieval of Related Optical Properties

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hou, Weilin; Gray, Deric J; Weidemann, Alan D; Fournier, Georges R; Forand, J. L

    2007-01-01

    ...) in the spatial domain and the modulation transfer function (MTF) in the frequency domain. Due to the intensity variations involved in underwater sensing, denoising is carefully carried out by wavelet decompositions...

  14. Wireless Underwater Monitoring Systems Based on Energy Harvestings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sea-Hee HWANGBO

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the important research fields for aquatic exploitation and conservation is underwater wireless sensor network. Since limited energy source for underwater nodes and devices is a main open problem, in this paper, we propose wireless underwater monitoring systems powered by energy harvester which resolves the energy constraint. The target system generates renewable energy from energy harvester and shares the energy with underwater sensor nodes. For the realization of the system, key components to be investigated are discriminated as follows: acoustic modem, actuator, smart battery charge controller, energy harvester and wireless power transfer module. By developing acoustic modem, actuator and smart battery charge controller and utilizing off-the-shelf energy harvester and wireless power transfer module, we design and implement a prototype of the system. Also, we verify the feasibility of concept of target system by conducting indoor and outdoor experiments.

  15. Trade-off Analysis of Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, G.; Das, R.

    2017-09-01

    In the last couple of decades, Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks (UASNs) were started to be used for various commercial and non-commercial purposes. However, in underwater environments, there are some specific inherent constraints, such as high bit error rate, variable and large propagation delay, limited bandwidth capacity, and short-range communications, which severely degrade the performance of UASNs and limit the lifetime of underwater sensor nodes as well. Therefore, proving reliability of UASN applications poses a challenge. In this study, we try to balance energy consumption of underwater acoustic sensor networks and minimize end-to-end delay using an efficient node placement strategy. Our simulation results reveal that if the number of hops is reduced, energy consumption can be reduced. However, this increases end-to-end delay. Hence, application-specific requirements must be taken into consideration when determining a strategy for node deployment.

  16. Object detection from images obtained through underwater turbulence medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furhad, Md. Hasan; Tahtali, Murat; Lambert, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Imaging through underwater experiences severe distortions due to random fluctuations of temperature and salinity in water, which produces underwater turbulence through diffraction limited blur. Lights reflecting from objects perturb and attenuate contrast, making the recognition of objects of interest difficult. Thus, the information available for detecting underwater objects of interest becomes a challenging task as they have inherent confusion among the background, foreground and other image properties. In this paper, a saliency-based approach is proposed to detect the objects acquired through an underwater turbulent medium. This approach has drawn attention among a wide range of computer vision applications, such as image retrieval, artificial intelligence, neuro-imaging and object detection. The image is first processed through a deblurring filter. Next, a saliency technique is used on the image for object detection. In this step, a saliency map that highlights the target regions is generated and then a graph-based model is proposed to extract these target regions for object detection.

  17. Filming Underwater in 3d Respecting Stereographic Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, R.; Hordosch, H.

    2015-04-01

    After an experimental phase of many years, 3D filming is now effective and successful. Improvements are still possible, but the film industry achieved memorable success on 3D movie's box offices due to the overall quality of its products. Special environments such as space ("Gravity") and the underwater realm look perfect to be reproduced in 3D. "Filming in space" was possible in "Gravity" using special effects and computer graphic. The underwater realm is still difficult to be handled. Underwater filming in 3D was not that easy and effective as filming in 2D, since not long ago. After almost 3 years of research, a French, Austrian and Italian team realized a perfect tool to film underwater, in 3D, without any constrains. This allows filmmakers to bring the audience deep inside an environment where they most probably will never have the chance to be.

  18. Collision Avoidance of Moving Obstacles for Underwater Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KWON KYOUNG YOUB

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available A fuzzy logic for autonomous navigation of underwater robot is proposed in this paper. The VFF(Virtual Force Field algorithm, which is widely used in the field of mobile robot, is modified for application to the autonomous navigation of underwater robot. This Modified Virtual Force Field(MVFF algorithm using the fuzzy logic can be used in either track keeping or obstacle avoidance. Fuzzy logics are devised to handle various situations which can be faced during autonomous navigation of underwater robot. A graphic simulator based on OpenGL for an autonomous navigation has been developed. The good performance of the proposed MVFF algorithm is verified through computer simulations on an underwater robot.

  19. Multi-layer protective armour for underwater shock wave mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Hawass

    2015-12-01

    The strain gauge data and displacement sensors results showed that the multi-layer plates have higher level of underwater shock wave mitigation than the triple aluminum plates with strain and deflection of nearly 50%.

  20. Underwater image enhancement through depth estimation based on random forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Shen-Chuan; Tsai, Ting-Chou; Huang, Jyun-Han

    2017-11-01

    Light absorption and scattering in underwater environments can result in low-contrast images with a distinct color cast. This paper proposes a systematic framework for the enhancement of underwater images. Light transmission is estimated using the random forest algorithm. RGB values, luminance, color difference, blurriness, and the dark channel are treated as features in training and estimation. Transmission is calculated using an ensemble machine learning algorithm to deal with a variety of conditions encountered in underwater environments. A color compensation and contrast enhancement algorithm based on depth information was also developed with the aim of improving the visual quality of underwater images. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed scheme outperforms existing methods with regard to subjective visual quality as well as objective measurements.

  1. Navigation of autonomous underwater vehicle using extended kalman filter

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ranjan, T.N.; Nherakkol, A.; Navelkar, G.S.

    To navigate the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) accurately is one of the most important aspects in its application. A truly autonomous vehicle must determine its position which requires the optimal integration of all available attitude...

  2. Euclidean reconstruction of natural underwater scenes using optic imagery sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Han

    The development of maritime applications require monitoring, studying and preserving of detailed and close observation on the underwater seafloor and objects. Stereo vision offers advanced technologies to build 3D models from 2D still overlapping optic images in a relatively inexpensive way. However, while image stereo matching is a necessary step in 3D reconstruction procedure, even the most robust dense matching techniques are not guaranteed to work for underwater images due to the challenging aquatic environment. In this thesis, in addition to a detailed introduction and research on the key components of building 3D models from optic images, a robust modified quasi-dense matching algorithm based on correspondence propagation and adaptive least square matching for underwater images is proposed and applied to some typical underwater image datasets. The experiments demonstrate the robustness and good performance of the proposed matching approach.

  3. The Textile Form of Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Cecilie

    three-dimensional geometries of interfering spheres are created. Textiles are generally a very good sound dampening material. To dampen the sound most effective it should be placed where the sound energy is highest. To find these invisible spots of energy and to reveal the geometry of them, two......Sound is a part of architecture, and sound is complex. Upon this, sound is invisible. How is it then possible to design visual objects that interact with the sound? This paper addresses the problem of how to get access to the complexity of sound and how to make textile material revealing the form...... of sound. This issue is a part of a Ph.D. study at The Danish Design School in Copenhagen. Sound diffusion in architecture is a complex phenomenon. From the sound source the sound spreads in all directions as a sphere of wave fronts. When the sound is reflected from room boundaries or furniture, complex...

  4. Underwater acoustic communications. From point-to-point to networks

    OpenAIRE

    Jesus, S. M.

    2013-01-01

    This is a review presentation that addresses recent developments in underwater acoustic telemetry as a tool for ocean observation, monitoring and protection. Distributed sensing is a paradigm with important reflections in oceanic technology where bottom installed structures can not always be connected to a central hub through cabled networks. Moreover, recent developments in ocean robotics lead to the off-the-shelf availability of autonomous underwater vehicles that rely on wireless communica...

  5. Estimation of underwater acoustic fields at high frequencies

    OpenAIRE

    Temsamani, A.B.; Vandenplas, S.; Van Biesen, L.

    2001-01-01

    In this work a parametric modeling of the underwater acoustic field is investigated in a laboratory scale at high frequencies (150-850 kHz). The aim is to develop experimentally verifiable theoretical models to investigate the acoustic field propagation in elastic and viscoelastic or porous media. To achieve this goal, the efforts have been directed to three integral parts pertaining to the development of the methods. The first part deals with the modeling of the underwater acoustic field fol...

  6. Strong tracking adaptive Kalman filters for underwater vehicle dead reckoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Kun; Fang, Shao-Ji; Pang, Yong-Jie

    2007-06-01

    To impove underwater vehicle dead reckoning, a developed strong tracking adaptive kalman filter is proposed. The filter is improved with an additional adaptive factor and an estimator of measurement noise covariance. Since the magnitude of fading factor is changed adaptively, the tracking ability of the filter is still enhanced in low velocity condition of underwater vehicles. The results of simulation tests prove the presented filter effective.

  7. Underwater striling engine design with modified one-dimensional model

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Daijin; Qin, Kan; Luo, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Stirling engines are regarded as an efficient and promising power system for underwater devices. Currently, many researches on one-dimensional model is used to evaluate thermodynamic performance of Stirling engine, but in which there are still some aspects which cannot be modeled with proper mathematical models such as mechanical loss or auxiliary power. In this paper, a four-cylinder double-acting Stirling engine for Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUVs) is discussed. And a one-dimensional mod...

  8. Characterization of ships as sources of underwater noise

    OpenAIRE

    Jong, C.A.F. de

    2009-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the possible impact of anthropogenic underwater noise on marine life [1]. One of the concerns is the increasing contribution of shipping noise, with the growing number and size of commercial ships. Traditionally, underwater radiated noise control was only of interest for naval [2,3] and fishery research vessels [4]. Due to the potential environmental impact, it becomes also relevant for commercial shipping. The challenge is to bring the expertise from the naval ...

  9. Remote Underwater Characterization System - Innovative Technology Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, Walter David

    1999-01-01

    Characterization and inspection of water-cooled and moderated nuclear reactors and fuel storage pools requires equipment capable of operating underwater. Similarly, the deactivation and decommissioning of older nuclear facilities often requires the facility owner to accurately characterize underwater structures and equipment which may have been sitting idle for years. The underwater characterization equipment is often required to operate at depths exceeding 20 ft (6.1 m) and in relatively confined or congested spaces. The typical baseline approach has been the use of radiation detectors and underwater cameras mounted on long poles, or stationary cameras with pan and tilt features mounted on the sides of the underwater facility. There is a perceived need for an inexpensive, more mobile method of performing close-up inspection and radiation measurements in confined spaces underwater. The Remote Underwater Characterization System (RUCS) is a small, remotely operated submersible vehicle intended to serve multiple purposes in underwater nuclear operations. It is based on the commercially-available ''Scallop'' vehicle, but has been modified by Department of Energy's Robotics Technology Development Program to add auto-depth control, and vehicle orientation and depth monitoring at the operator control panel. The RUCS is designed to provide visual and gamma radiation characterization, even in confined or limited access areas. It was demonstrated in August 1998 at Idaho National Engineering and environmental Laboratory (INEEL) as part of the INEEL Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project. During the demonstration it was compared in a ''head-to-head'' fashion with the baseline characterization technology. This paper summarizes the results of the demonstration and lessons learned; comparing and contrasting both technologies in the areas of cost, visual characterization, radiological characterization, and overall operations

  10. Terminal homing position estimation forAutonomous underwater vehicle docking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    79  ix LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1.  NPS REMUS 100 with WHOI Docking Station. Source: [1...underwater missions were short and quick . Now, with advanced technology, underwater missions can be as long as the user desires. The new AUVs have...the full information problem. In order to use the MHE approach for real-time applications, the optimization process should be quick and accurate

  11. A potential flow based flight simulator for an underwater glider

    OpenAIRE

    Phoemsapthawee, Surasak; Le Boulluec, Marc; Laurens, Jean-marc; Deniset, Francois

    2013-01-01

    Underwater gliders are recent innovative types of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) used in ocean exploration and observation. They adjust their buoyancy to dive and to return to the ocean surface. During the change of altitude, they use the hydrodynamic forces developed by their wings to move forward. Their flights are controlled by changing the position of their centers of gravity and their buoyancy to adjust their trim and heel angles. For better flight control, the understanding of th...

  12. Analytical and Numerical Optimal Motion Planning for an Underwater Glider

    OpenAIRE

    Kraus, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    The use of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) for oceanic observation and research is becoming more common. Underwater gliders are a specific class of AUV that do not use conventional propulsion. Instead they change their buoyancy and center of mass location to control attitude and trajectory. The vehicles spend most of their time in long, steady glides, so even minor improvements in glide range can be magnified over multiple dives. This dissertation presents a rigid-body dynamic system...

  13. Boundary curvature effects on gas bubble oscillations in underwater explosion

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Kazuhiro

    1996-01-01

    The oscillation of a gas bubble produced as a result of underwater explosion could cause the severe whipping damage on nearby marine vehicle. The effects of rigid boundary curvatures to explosive gas bubble oscillation behavior in underwater were investigated. The analyses were conducted using a multimaterial Lagrangian-Eulerian finite element code, MSC/DYTRAN. The incident shock wave pressure, bubble pulse pressure, gas bubble radius and period were calculated for the case of detonation of a...

  14. Deep Learning Methods for Underwater Target Feature Extraction and Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Hu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The classification and recognition technology of underwater acoustic signal were always an important research content in the field of underwater acoustic signal processing. Currently, wavelet transform, Hilbert-Huang transform, and Mel frequency cepstral coefficients are used as a method of underwater acoustic signal feature extraction. In this paper, a method for feature extraction and identification of underwater noise data based on CNN and ELM is proposed. An automatic feature extraction method of underwater acoustic signals is proposed using depth convolution network. An underwater target recognition classifier is based on extreme learning machine. Although convolution neural networks can execute both feature extraction and classification, their function mainly relies on a full connection layer, which is trained by gradient descent-based; the generalization ability is limited and suboptimal, so an extreme learning machine (ELM was used in classification stage. Firstly, CNN learns deep and robust features, followed by the removing of the fully connected layers. Then ELM fed with the CNN features is used as the classifier to conduct an excellent classification. Experiments on the actual data set of civil ships obtained 93.04% recognition rate; compared to the traditional Mel frequency cepstral coefficients and Hilbert-Huang feature, recognition rate greatly improved.

  15. Optimal Node Placement in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Network

    KAUST Repository

    Felemban, Muhamad

    2011-10-01

    Almost 70% of planet Earth is covered by water. A large percentage of underwater environment is unexplored. In the past two decades, there has been an increase in the interest of exploring and monitoring underwater life among scientists and in industry. Underwater operations are extremely difficult due to the lack of cheap and efficient means. Recently, Wireless Sensor Networks have been introduced in underwater environment applications. However, underwater communication via acoustic waves is subject to several performance limitations, which makes the relevant research issues very different from those on land. In this thesis, we investigate node placement for building an initial Underwater Wireless Sensor Network infrastructure. Firstly, we formulated the problem into a nonlinear mathematic program with objectives of minimizing the total transmission loss under a given number of sensor nodes and targeted volume. We conducted experiments to verify the proposed formulation, which is solved using Matlab optimization tool. We represented each node with a truncated octahedron to fill out the 3D space. The truncated octahedrons are tiled in the 3D space with each node in the center where locations of the nodes are given using 3D coordinates. Results are supported using ns-3 simulator. Results from simulation are consistent with the obtained results from mathematical model with less than 10% error.

  16. Performance Evaluation of Hybrid Acoustic-Optical Underwater Swarm Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuela PERSIA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Underwater Swarm is a particular Underwater Network configuration characterized by nodes very close one to each other, with mobility capability. The structure of the network is that of a distributed network, in which the nodes, through the exchange of control information, will take decisions in collaborative manner. This type of network raises challenges for its effective design and development, for which the only use of acoustic communication as traditionally suggested in underwater communication could be not enough. A new emerging solution could be a hybrid solution that combines the use of acoustic and optical channel in order to overcome the acoustic channel limitations in underwater environment. In this work, we want to investigate how the acoustic and optical communications influence the Underwater Swarm performance by considering the Low Layers Protocols (Physical Layer, Data Link Layer and Network Layer effects over the two different propagation technologies. Performance simulations have been carried out to suggest how the new hybrid system could be designed. This study will permit to provide useful analysis for the real implementation of an Underwater Swarm based on hybrid communication technology.

  17. The sounds of nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Norah; Deane, Cormac; Murphy, Padraig

    2017-07-01

    Public perceptions of nanotechnology are shaped by sound in surprising ways. Our analysis of the audiovisual techniques employed by nanotechnology stakeholders shows that well-chosen sounds can help to win public trust, create value and convey the weird reality of objects on the nanoscale.

  18. Poetry Pages. Sound Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fina, Allan de

    1992-01-01

    Explains how elementary teachers can help students understand onomatopoeia, suggesting that they define onomatopoeia, share examples of it, read poems and have students discuss onomatopoeic words, act out common household sounds, write about sound effects, and create choral readings of onomatopoeic poems. Two appropriate poems are included. (SM)

  19. Sound propagation in cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.; Polinder, H.; Lohman, W.; Zhou, H.; Borst, H.

    2009-01-01

    A new engineering model for sound propagation in cities is presented. The model is based on numerical and experimental studies of sound propagation between street canyons. Multiple reflections in the source canyon and the receiver canyon are taken into account in an efficient way, while weak

  20. OMNIDIRECTIONAL SOUND SOURCE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1996-01-01

    A sound source comprising a loudspeaker (6) and a hollow coupler (4) with an open inlet which communicates with and is closed by the loudspeaker (6) and an open outlet, said coupler (4) comprising rigid walls which cannot respond to the sound pressures produced by the loudspeaker (6). According...

  1. Breaking the Sound Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Tom; Boehringer, Kim

    2007-01-01

    Students in a fourth-grade class participated in a series of dynamic sound learning centers followed by a dramatic capstone event--an exploration of the amazing Trashcan Whoosh Waves. It's a notoriously difficult subject to teach, but this hands-on, exploratory approach ignited student interest in sound, promoted language acquisition, and built…

  2. Notes on Sound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie Jones

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Bonnie Jones creates improvised and composed text-sound performances that explore the fluidity and function of electronic noise (field recordings, circuit bending and text (poetry, found, spoken. She is interested in how people perceive, “read” and interact with these sounds and texts given our current technological moment.

  3. Seismic and Biological Sources of Ambient Ocean Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Simon Eric

    . This distribution of sources could reveal small-scale spatial ecological limitations, such as the availability of food and shelter. While array-based passive acoustic sensing is well established in seismoacoustics, the technique is little utilized in the study of ambient biological sound. With the continuance of Moore's law and advances in battery and memory technology, inferring biological processes from ambient sound may become a more accessible tool in underwater ecological evaluation and monitoring.

  4. Waveform analysis of sound

    CERN Document Server

    Tohyama, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    What is this sound? What does that sound indicate? These are two questions frequently heard in daily conversation. Sound results from the vibrations of elastic media and in daily life provides informative signals of events happening in the surrounding environment. In interpreting auditory sensations, the human ear seems particularly good at extracting the signal signatures from sound waves. Although exploring auditory processing schemes may be beyond our capabilities, source signature analysis is a very attractive area in which signal-processing schemes can be developed using mathematical expressions. This book is inspired by such processing schemes and is oriented to signature analysis of waveforms. Most of the examples in the book are taken from data of sound and vibrations; however, the methods and theories are mostly formulated using mathematical expressions rather than by acoustical interpretation. This book might therefore be attractive and informative for scientists, engineers, researchers, and graduat...

  5. InfoSound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Gopinath, B.; Haberman, Gary O.

    1990-01-01

    The authors explore ways to enhance users' comprehension of complex applications using music and sound effects to present application-program events that are difficult to detect visually. A prototype system, Infosound, allows developers to create and store musical sequences and sound effects...... with application events, and have real-time, continuous auditory control of sounds during application execution. InfoSound has been used to create auditory interfaces for two applications: a telephone network service simulation and a parallel computation simulation. The auditory interfaces in these applications...... helped users detect rapid, multiple-event sequences that were difficult to visually detect using text and graphical interfaces. The authors describe the architecture of InfoSound, the use of the system, and the lessons learned....

  6. Sound classification of dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    National schemes for sound classification of dwellings exist in more than ten countries in Europe, typically published as national standards. The schemes define quality classes reflecting different levels of acoustical comfort. Main criteria concern airborne and impact sound insulation between...... dwellings, facade sound insulation and installation noise. The schemes have been developed, implemented and revised gradually since the early 1990s. However, due to lack of coordination between countries, there are significant discrepancies, and new standards and revisions continue to increase the diversity...... is needed, and a European COST Action TU0901 "Integrating and Harmonizing Sound Insulation Aspects in Sustainable Urban Housing Constructions", has been established and runs 2009-2013, one of the main objectives being to prepare a proposal for a European sound classification scheme with a number of quality...

  7. The influence of sea ice, wind speed and marine mammals on Southern Ocean ambient sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menze, Sebastian; Zitterbart, Daniel P.; van Opzeeland, Ilse; Boebel, Olaf

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the natural variability of ambient sound in the Southern Ocean, an acoustically pristine marine mammal habitat. Over a 3-year period, two autonomous recorders were moored along the Greenwich meridian to collect underwater passive acoustic data. Ambient sound levels were strongly affected by the annual variation of the sea-ice cover, which decouples local wind speed and sound levels during austral winter. With increasing sea-ice concentration, area and thickness, sound levels decreased while the contribution of distant sources increased. Marine mammal sounds formed a substantial part of the overall acoustic environment, comprising calls produced by Antarctic blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus intermedia), fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus), Antarctic minke whales (Balaenoptera bonaerensis) and leopard seals (Hydrurga leptonyx). The combined sound energy of a group or population vocalizing during extended periods contributed species-specific peaks to the ambient sound spectra. The temporal and spatial variation in the contribution of marine mammals to ambient sound suggests annual patterns in migration and behaviour. The Antarctic blue and fin whale contributions were loudest in austral autumn, whereas the Antarctic minke whale contribution was loudest during austral winter and repeatedly showed a diel pattern that coincided with the diel vertical migration of zooplankton.

  8. Evaluation of a Single-Beam Sonar System to Map Seagrass at Two Sites in Northern Puget Sound, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Andrew W.; Lacy, Jessica R.; Finlayson, David P.; Gelfenbaum, Guy

    2008-01-01

    Seagrass at two sites in northern Puget Sound, Possession Point and nearby Browns Bay, was mapped using both a single-beam sonar and underwater video camera. The acoustic and underwater video data were compared to evaluate the accuracy of acoustic estimates of seagrass cover. The accuracy of the acoustic method was calculated for three classifications of seagrass observed in underwater video: bare (no seagrass), patchy seagrass, and continuous seagrass. Acoustic and underwater video methods agreed in 92 percent and 74 percent of observations made in bare and continuous areas, respectively. However, in patchy seagrass, the agreement between acoustic and underwater video was poor (43 percent). The poor agreement between the two methods in areas with patchy seagrass is likely because the two instruments were not precisely colocated. The distribution of seagrass at the two sites differed both in overall percent vegetated and in the distribution of percent cover versus depth. On the basis of acoustic data, seagrass inhabited 0.29 km2 (19 percent of total area) at Possession Point and 0.043 km2 (5 percent of total area) at the Browns Bay study site. The depth distribution at the two sites was markedly different. Whereas the majority of seagrass at Possession Point occurred between -0.5 and -1.5 m MLLW, most seagrass at Browns Bay occurred at a greater depth, between -2.25 and -3.5 m MLLW. Further investigation of the anthropogenic and natural factors causing these differences in distribution is needed.

  9. Extending The Calibration In The Underwater Sound Reference Division (USRD) Reciprocity Coupler To Incorporate Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    have a much higher impedance than the acoustic medium. 3. No air or any other low impedance material can be present in the coupler. The hydrophone...pressure ram controls the hydrostatic pressure in the coupler fluid, castor oil. Chamber temperature is controlled by heating or cooling distilled water...differential amplifier 4 USRD H48 Reciprocity Coupler 5 Ithaco 1201 6 NI BMC-2110 and NI-6259 7 Laptop Computer with Matlab 8 Pressure Ram 9 Neslab Endocal

  10. Acoustic Observatory Provides Real-Time Underwater Sounds from the Antarctic Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Boebel, Olaf; Kindermann, Lars; Klinck, Holger; Bornemann, Horst; Plötz, Joachim; Steinhage, Daniel; Riedel, Sven; Burkhardt, Elke

    2006-01-01

    To obtain real-time, year-round acoustic data from the coastal Antarctic Ocean, an autonomous listening station, PALAOA (PerenniAL Acoustic Observatory in the Antarctic Ocean, or Hawaiian whale), was constructed in austral summer 2005/06, 15 km North of the German Neumayer Base. PALAOAs design was guided by demanding prerequisites: perennial, 365/24, autonomous operation, real-time data access, and full frequency and dynamic coverage. The station is located at 70°31S 8°13W, on the Ekström ice...

  11. Effects of Environmental Variability on Long-Range Underwater Sound Propagation: Mode Processing of LOAPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    the ocean has been developed (together with T. Duda). Large changes in upper- ocean absorption coefficient predicted to follow carbon dioxide uptake...existing theory to the environments with strong range dependence. In addition, a study of oceanic acoustic response to acidification has been made...implementation. The second paper is a study of ambient noise level change in the ocean due to acidification . Also two papers devoted to the modal analysis

  12. Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Magnetic Mapping System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigerwalt, R.; Johnson, R. M.; Trembanis, A. C.; Schmidt, V. E.; Tait, G.

    2012-12-01

    An Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) Magnetic Mapping (MM) System has been developed and tested for military munitions detection as well as pipeline locating, wreck searches, and geologic surveys in underwater environments. The system is comprised of a high sensitivity Geometrics G-880AUV cesium vapor magnetometer integrated with a Teledyne-Gavia AUV and associated Doppler enabled inertial navigation further utilizing traditional acoustic bathymetric and side scan imaging. All onboard sensors and associated electronics are managed through customized crew members to autonomously operate through the vehicles primary control module. Total field magnetic measurements are recorded with asynchronous time-stamped data logs which include position, altitude, heading, pitch, roll, and electrical current usage. Pre-planned mission information can be uploaded to the system operators to define data collection metrics including speed, height above seafloor, and lane or transect spacing specifically designed to meet data quality objectives for the survey. As a result of the AUVs modular design, autonomous navigation and rapid deployment capabilities, the AUV MM System provides cost savings over current surface vessel surveys by reducing the mobilization/demobilization effort, thus requiring less manpower for operation and reducing or eliminating the need for a surface support vessel altogether. When the system completes its mission, data can be remotely downloaded via W-LAN and exported for use in advanced signal processing platforms. Magnetic compensation software has been concurrently developed to accept electrical current measurements directly from the AUV to address distortions from permanent and induced magnetization effects on the magnetometer. Maneuver and electrical current compensation terms can be extracted from the magnetic survey missions to perform automated post-process corrections. Considerable suppression of system noise has been observed over traditional

  13. Underwater Animal Monitoring Magnetic Sensor System

    KAUST Repository

    Kaidarova, Altynay

    2017-10-01

    Obtaining new insights into the behavior of free-living marine organisms is fundamental for conservation efforts and anticipating the impact of climate change on marine ecosystems. Despite the recent advances in biotelemetry, collecting physiological and behavioral parameters of underwater free-living animals remains technically challenging. In this thesis, we develop the first magnetic underwater animal monitoring system that utilizes Tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) sensors, the most sensitive solid-state sensors today, coupled with flexible magnetic composites. The TMR sensors are composed of CoFeB free layers and MgO tunnel barriers, patterned using standard optical lithography and ion milling procedures. The short and long-term stability of the TMR sensors has been studied using statistical and Allan deviation analysis. Instrumentation noise has been reduced using optimized electrical interconnection schemes. We also develop flexible NdFeB-PDMS composite magnets optimized for applications in corrosive marine environments, and which can be attached to marine animals. The magnetic and mechanical properties are studied for different NdFeB powder concentrations and the performance of the magnetic composites for different exposure times to sea water is systematically investigated. Without protective layer, the composite magnets loose more than 50% of their magnetization after 51 days in seawater. The durability of the composite magnets can be considerably improved by using polymer coatings which are protecting the composite magnet, whereby Parylene C is found to be the most effective solution, providing simultaneously corrosion resistance, flexibility, and enhanced biocompatibility. A Parylene C film of 2μm thickness provides the sufficient protection of the magnetic composite in corrosive aqueous environments for more than 70 days. For the high level performance of the system, the theoretically optimal position of the composite magnets with respect to the sensing

  14. Digitizing a sound archive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cone, Louise

    2017-01-01

    In 1990 an artist by the name of William Louis Sørensen was hired by the National Gallery of Denmark to collect important works of art – made from sound. His job was to acquire sound art, but also recordings that captured rare artistic occurrences, music, performances and happenings from both...... Danish and international artists. His methodology left us with a large collection of unique and inspirational time-based media sound artworks that have, until very recently, been inaccessible. Existing on an array of different media formats, such as open reel tapes, 8-track and 4 track cassettes, VHS...

  15. Underwater Optical Wireless Channel Modeling Using Monte-Carlo Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, P. Sri; Prince, Shanthi

    2011-10-01

    At present, there is a lot of interest in the functioning of the marine environment. Unmanned or Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (UUVs or AUVs) are used in the exploration of the underwater resources, pollution monitoring, disaster prevention etc. Underwater, where radio waves do not propagate, acoustic communication is being used. But, underwater communication is moving towards Optical Communication which has higher bandwidth when compared to Acoustic Communication but has shorter range comparatively. Underwater Optical Wireless Communication (OWC) is mainly affected by the absorption and scattering of the optical signal. In coastal waters, both inherent and apparent optical properties (IOPs and AOPs) are influenced by a wide array of physical, biological and chemical processes leading to optical variability. The scattering effect has two effects: the attenuation of the signal and the Inter-Symbol Interference (ISI) of the signal. However, the Inter-Symbol Interference is ignored in the present paper. Therefore, in order to have an efficient underwater OWC link it is necessary to model the channel efficiently. In this paper, the underwater optical channel is modeled using Monte-Carlo method. The Monte Carlo approach provides the most general and most flexible technique for numerically solving the equations of Radiative transfer. The attenuation co-efficient of the light signal is studied as a function of the absorption (a) and scattering (b) coefficients. It has been observed that for pure sea water and for less chlorophyll conditions blue wavelength is less absorbed whereas for chlorophyll rich environment red wavelength signal is absorbed less comparative to blue and green wavelength.

  16. Prediction of Tonal Underwater Noise Pattern from Cavitating Propellers with Special Attention to Ice Cover Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streckwall Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To predict underwater noise spectra associated to regular occurrence of propeller cavitation we have extended an existing method [1] (used for the prediction of fluctuating hull pressures to become applicable for effects that are linked to a finite speed of sound. In [2] an intermediate approach was realized where (besides the hull far field boundaries were introduced but the incompressible flow assumption was kept. However compressibility effects become noticeable in the far field, which may be judged to start at some 2-3 propeller-diameters distance from the centre of the cavitation events, if we confine to emissions at 1st-4th blade frequency. It was a logical continuation of our former efforts to realize a compressible flow model and integrate the propeller as a noise source. Having increased the functionality of our approach by referencing the speed of sound, the precision of the method was also somehow reduced. In our former approach, like in comparable approaches (see for instance [3] and [4], the singularity system generating the near field propeller induced pressures involved various sources and vortices distributed on the propeller blades. With our current compressible approach this complexity was dropped, as a single point source substitutes the cavitating propeller. Such a simplification correlates with the assumption, that the monopole character of a noise source is decisive for the far field noise levels. In this contribution we outline the steps characterizing the procedure for predicting tonal underwater noise from cavitating propellers. In the first step a Vortex Lattice Method (VLM is used to access the cavitation pattern on the propeller with special focus on the cavity volume attached to one blade. The second step accumulates the distributed cavities to establish a fluctuating point source of equivalent far field noise characteristic. As relevant limits the hull, the free surface, the sea bottom and an ice cover are

  17. Into the sounding environment A compositional approach

    OpenAIRE

    Tzedaki, Aikaterini

    2012-01-01

    The focus of the compositional approach presented in this folio is the sounding environment. The term sounding environment is used in this context to refer to the whole of our living experience in the world which we might register as relating to sound. It might include everything that is sounding, seemingly sounding, imagined sounding, remembered sounding, sensed as sounding, composed to sound. It includes thus the actual sound environment, all that is sensed or interpreted as sound and imagi...

  18. A Framework for Evaluating Advanced Search Concepts for Multiple Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) Mine Countermeasures (MCM)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gooding, Trent

    2001-01-01

    .... In recent years, autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV) have emerged as a viable technology for conducting underwater search, survey, and clearance operations in support of the mine countermeasures (MCM) mission...

  19. A comparative view of routing protocols for underwater wireless sensor networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bayrakdar, Y.; Meratnia, Nirvana; Kantarci, Aylin

    2011-01-01

    Design of efficient routing protocols for underwater sensor networks is challenging because of the distinctive characteristics of the water medium. Currently, many routing protocols are available for terrestrial wireless sensor networks. However, specific properties of underwater medium such as

  20. US-Japan Cooperative Research on Biology-Inspired Precision Maneuvering of Underwater Vehicles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kato, Naomi

    2004-01-01

    .... We constructed an underwater vehicle equipped with two pairs of mechanical pectoral fins and pectoral fin controllers to examine the swimming performance of the underwater vehicle in still water...

  1. Predictive Model for the Analysis of the Effects of Underwater Impulsive Sources on Marine Life

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lazauski, Colin J

    2007-01-01

    A method is provided to predict the biological consequences to marine animals from exposure to multiple underwater impulsive sources by simulating underwater explosions over a defined period of time...

  2. Urban Sound Ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh; Samson, Kristine

    2013-01-01

    . The article concludes that the ways in which recent sound installations work with urban ecologies vary. While two of the examples blend into the urban environment, the other transfers the concert format and its mode of listening to urban space. Last, and in accordance with recent soundscape research, we point...... share the characteristics of site specificity. However, this article will consider the artwork in a broader context by re-examining how sound installations relate to the urban environment. For that purpose, this article brings together ecology terms from acoustic ecology of the sound theories...... to how artists working with new information and media technologies create inventive ways of inserting sound and image into urban environments....

  3. The sound of activism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandstrom, B; Vetter, C

    2001-01-01

    ABSTRACT A longtime advocate for female empowerment and equality, Boden Sandstrom has worked for political change in many arenas. In the 1960s, she began a career as a librarian, but soon made activism her full-time job, working for feminist, leftist and socialist causes. In the 1970s, she found a way to turn her lifelong passion for music into a career as a sound engineer. Once established in that profession, she began donating her services to political events, marches, demonstrations, and rallies. After thirteen years of running her own company, called Woman Sound,Inc. (later City Sound Productions,Inc.), she turned to the study of ethnomusicology. She is now Program Manager and Lecturer for the Ethnomusicology Program at the University of Maryland, where she is also working on her doctorate in that subject. She continues to freelance as a sound engineer and serve as a technical producer for major events.

  4. Sound as Popular Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    , physical, perceptual, and sensory processes that integrate a multitude of cultural traditions and forms of knowledge. The chapters discuss conceptual issues as well as terminologies and research methods; analyze historical and contemporary case studies of listening in various sound cultures; and consider......The wide-ranging texts in this book take as their premise the idea that sound is a subject through which popular culture can be analyzed in an innovative way. From an infant’s gurgles over a baby monitor to the roar of the crowd in a stadium to the sub-bass frequencies produced by sound systems...... in the disco era, sound—not necessarily aestheticized as music—is inextricably part of the many domains of popular culture. Expanding the view taken by many scholars of cultural studies, the contributors consider cultural practices concerning sound not merely as semiotic or signifying processes but as material...

  5. Sound as Popular Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The wide-ranging texts in this book take as their premise the idea that sound is a subject through which popular culture can be analyzed in an innovative way. From an infant’s gurgles over a baby monitor to the roar of the crowd in a stadium to the sub-bass frequencies produced by sound systems...... in the disco era, sound—not necessarily aestheticized as music—is inextricably part of the many domains of popular culture. Expanding the view taken by many scholars of cultural studies, the contributors consider cultural practices concerning sound not merely as semiotic or signifying processes but as material......, physical, perceptual, and sensory processes that integrate a multitude of cultural traditions and forms of knowledge. The chapters discuss conceptual issues as well as terminologies and research methods; analyze historical and contemporary case studies of listening in various sound cultures; and consider...

  6. Sounds of Web Advertising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Iben Bredahl; Graakjær, Nicolai Jørgensgaard

    2010-01-01

    Sound seems to be a neglected issue in the study of web ads. Web advertising is predominantly regarded as visual phenomena–commercial messages, as for instance banner ads that we watch, read, and eventually click on–but only rarely as something that we listen to. The present chapter presents...... an overview of the auditory dimensions in web advertising: Which kinds of sounds do we hear in web ads? What are the conditions and functions of sound in web ads? Moreover, the chapter proposes a theoretical framework in order to analyse the communicative functions of sound in web advertising. The main...... argument is that an understanding of the auditory dimensions in web advertising must include a reflection on the hypertextual settings of the web ad as well as a perspective on how users engage with web content....

  7. It sounds good!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Both the atmosphere and we ourselves are hit by hundreds of particles every second and yet nobody has ever heard a sound coming from these processes. Like cosmic rays, particles interacting inside the detectors at the LHC do not make any noise…unless you've decided to use the ‘sonification’ technique, in which case you might even hear the Higgs boson sound like music. Screenshot of the first page of the "LHC sound" site. A group of particle physicists, composers, software developers and artists recently got involved in the ‘LHC sound’ project to make the particles at the LHC produce music. Yes…music! The ‘sonification’ technique converts data into sound. “In this way, if you implement the right software you can get really nice music out of the particle tracks”, says Lily Asquith, a member of the ATLAS collaboration and one of the initiators of the project. The ‘LHC...

  8. Sound Visualization and Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Winston E.

    1975-01-01

    Describes liquid surface holograms including their application to medicine. Discusses interference and diffraction phenomena using sound wave scanning techniques. Compares focussing by zone plate to holographic image development. (GH)

  9. Shape optimisation of an underwater Bernoulli gripper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Tim; Sellier, Mathieu

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we are interested in maximising the suction produced by an underwater Bernoulli gripper. Bernoulli grippers work by exploiting low pressure regions caused by the acceleration of a working fluid through a narrow channel, between the gripper and a surface, to provide a suction force. This mechanism allows for non-contact adhesion to various surfaces and may be used to hold a robot to the hull of a ship while it inspects welds for example. A Bernoulli type pressure analysis was used to model the system with a Darcy friction factor approximation to include the effects of frictional losses. The analysis involved a constrained optimisation in order to avoid cavitation within the mechanism which would result in decreased performance and damage to surfaces. A sensitivity based method and gradient descent approach was used to find the optimum shape of a discretised surface. The model's accuracy has been quantified against finite volume computational fluid dynamics simulation (ANSYS CFX) using the k- ω SST turbulence model. Preliminary results indicate significant improvement in suction force when compared to a simple geometry by retaining a pressure just above that at which cavitation would occur over as much surface area as possible. Doctoral candidate in the Mechanical Engineering Department of the University of Canterbury, New Zealand.

  10. The Modular Optical Underwater Survey System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhul Amin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center deploys the Modular Optical Underwater Survey System (MOUSS to estimate the species-specific, size-structured abundance of commercially-important fish species in Hawaii and the Pacific Islands. The MOUSS is an autonomous stereo-video camera system designed for the in situ visual sampling of fish assemblages. This system is rated to 500 m and its low-light, stereo-video cameras enable identification, counting, and sizing of individuals at a range of 0.5–10 m. The modular nature of MOUSS allows for the efficient and cost-effective use of various imaging sensors, power systems, and deployment platforms. The MOUSS is in use for surveys in Hawaii, the Gulf of Mexico, and Southern California. In Hawaiian waters, the system can effectively identify individuals to a depth of 250 m using only ambient light. In this paper, we describe the MOUSS’s application in fisheries research, including the design, calibration, analysis techniques, and deployment mechanism.

  11. Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Thermoelectric Power Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckle, J. R.; Knox, A.; Siviter, J.; Montecucco, A.

    2013-07-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) are a vital part of the oceanographer's toolbox, allowing long-term measurements across a range of ocean depths of a number of ocean properties such as salinity, fluorescence, and temperature profile. Buoyancy-based gliding, rather than direct propulsion, dramatically reduces AUV power consumption and allows long-duration missions on the order of months rather than hours or days, allowing large distances to be analyzed or many successive analyses of a certain area without the need for retrieval. Recent versions of these gliders have seen the buoyancy variation system change from electrically powered to thermally powered using phase-change materials, however a significant battery pack is still required to power communications and sensors, with power consumption in the region of 250 mW. The authors propose a novel application of a thermoelectric generation system, utilizing the depth-related variation in oceanic temperature. A thermal energy store provides a temperature differential across which a thermoelectric device can generate from repeated dives, with the primary purpose of extending mission range. The system is modeled in Simulink to analyze the effect of variation in design parameters. The system proves capable of generating all required power for a modern AUV.

  12. Data extraction system for underwater particle holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebrensky, J. J.; Craig, Gary; Hobson, Peter R.; Lampitt, R. S.; Nareid, Helge; Pescetto, A.; Trucco, Andrea; Watson, John

    2000-08-01

    Pulsed laser holography in an extremely powerful technique for the study of particle fields as it allows instantaneous, non-invasive high- resolution recording of substantial volumes. By relaying the real image one can obtain the size, shape, position and - if multiple exposures are made - velocity of every object in the recorded field. Manual analysis of large volumes containing thousands of particles is, however, an enormous and time-consuming task, with operator fatigue an unpredictable source of errors. Clearly the value of holographic measurements also depends crucially on the quality of the reconstructed image: not only will poor resolution degrade the size and shape measurements, but aberrations such as coma and astigmatism can change the perceived centroid of a particle, affecting position and velocity measurements. For large-scale applications of particle field holography, specifically the in situ recording of marine plankton with Holocam, we have developed an automated data extraction system that can be readily switched between the in-line and off-axis geometries and provides optimised reconstruction from holograms recorded underwater. As a videocamera is automatically stepped through the 200 by 200 by 1000mm sample volume, image processing and object tracking routines locate and extract particle images for further classification by a separate software module.

  13. Turbine sound may influence the metamorphosis behaviour of estuarine crab megalopae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew K Pine

    Full Text Available It is now widely accepted that a shift towards renewable energy production is needed in order to avoid further anthropogenically induced climate change. The ocean provides a largely untapped source of renewable energy. As a result, harvesting electrical power from the wind and tides has sparked immense government and commercial interest but with relatively little detailed understanding of the potential environmental impacts. This study investigated how the sound emitted from an underwater tidal turbine and an offshore wind turbine would influence the settlement and metamorphosis of the pelagic larvae of estuarine brachyuran crabs which are ubiquitous in most coastal habitats. In a laboratory experiment the median time to metamorphosis (TTM for the megalopae of the crabs Austrohelice crassa and Hemigrapsus crenulatus was significantly increased by at least 18 h when exposed to either tidal turbine or sea-based wind turbine sound, compared to silent control treatments. Contrastingly, when either species were subjected to natural habitat sound, observed median TTM decreased by approximately 21-31% compared to silent control treatments, 38-47% compared to tidal turbine sound treatments, and 46-60% compared to wind turbine sound treatments. A lack of difference in median TTM in A. crassa between two different source levels of tidal turbine sound suggests the frequency composition of turbine sound is more relevant in explaining such responses rather than sound intensity. These results show that estuarine mudflat sound mediates natural metamorphosis behaviour in two common species of estuarine crabs, and that exposure to continuous turbine sound interferes with this natural process. These results raise concerns about the potential ecological impacts of sound generated by renewable energy generation systems placed in the nearshore environment.

  14. Turbine Sound May Influence the Metamorphosis Behaviour of Estuarine Crab Megalopae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Matthew K.; Jeffs, Andrew G.; Radford, Craig A.

    2012-01-01

    It is now widely accepted that a shift towards renewable energy production is needed in order to avoid further anthropogenically induced climate change. The ocean provides a largely untapped source of renewable energy. As a result, harvesting electrical power from the wind and tides has sparked immense government and commercial interest but with relatively little detailed understanding of the potential environmental impacts. This study investigated how the sound emitted from an underwater tidal turbine and an offshore wind turbine would influence the settlement and metamorphosis of the pelagic larvae of estuarine brachyuran crabs which are ubiquitous in most coastal habitats. In a laboratory experiment the median time to metamorphosis (TTM) for the megalopae of the crabs Austrohelice crassa and Hemigrapsus crenulatus was significantly increased by at least 18 h when exposed to either tidal turbine or sea-based wind turbine sound, compared to silent control treatments. Contrastingly, when either species were subjected to natural habitat sound, observed median TTM decreased by approximately 21–31% compared to silent control treatments, 38–47% compared to tidal turbine sound treatments, and 46–60% compared to wind turbine sound treatments. A lack of difference in median TTM in A. crassa between two different source levels of tidal turbine sound suggests the frequency composition of turbine sound is more relevant in explaining such responses rather than sound intensity. These results show that estuarine mudflat sound mediates natural metamorphosis behaviour in two common species of estuarine crabs, and that exposure to continuous turbine sound interferes with this natural process. These results raise concerns about the potential ecological impacts of sound generated by renewable energy generation systems placed in the nearshore environment. PMID:23240063

  15. Research of Algorithms for Approaching and Docking Underwater Vehicle with Underwater Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pshikhopov Vyacheslav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Authors consider problem of maintenance and service of underwater vehicles. Usually, underwater station or accompanying ship is required for such operations. Docking is one of the most difficult tasks on the vehicle path from the outer space to the servicing bay. Algorithms allowing docking were presented in the earlier paper, and in this paper authors prove their stability. Movement control is based upon the path regulator. The stability of the closed-loop system according to Liapunov with the given control and limitations is proven. Equations, showing that vehicle will complete the positioning task with account to given limitations and staying stable are given. The criterion for switching movement and “positioning to point” algorithms is proposed. Achievement of the developed criterion was researched theoretically and in computer simulation. Experiments provide deviation of actual coordinates and velocity from the required ones and proved that achieving of criterion is enough to claim that system will be stable while performing algorithms with limitations for controls.

  16. Autonomous docking control of visual-servo type underwater vehicle system aiming at underwater automatic charging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanou, Akira; Ohnishi, Shota; Ishiyama, Shintaro; Minami, Mamoru

    2015-01-01

    A visual-servo type remotely operated vehicle (ROV) system with binocular wide-angle lens was developed to survey submarine resources, decontaminate radiation from mud in dam lake and so on. This paper explores the experiments on regulator performance and underwater docking of the robot system utilizing Genetic Algorithm (GA) for real-time recognition of the robot's relative position and posture through 3D marker. The visual servoing performances have been verified as follows; (1) The stability performances of the proposed regulator system have been evaluated by exerting abrupt distrubane force while the ROV is controlled by visual servoing. (2) The proposed system can track time-variant desired target position in x-axis (front-back direction of the robot). (3) The underwater docking can be completed by switching visual servoing and docking modes based on the error threshold, and by giving time-varying desired target position and orientation to the controller as a desired pose. (author)

  17. Modeling and Simulation of Underwater Flexible Manipulator as Raleigh Beam Using Bond Graph

    OpenAIRE

    Sumit Kumar; Sunil Kumar; Chandan Deep Singh

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents modeling and simulation of flexible robot in an underwater environment. The underwater environment completely contrasts with ground or space environment. The robot in an underwater situation is subjected to various dynamic forces like buoyancy forces, hydrostatic and hydrodynamic forces. The underwater robot is modeled as Rayleigh beam. The developed model further allows estimating the deflection of tip in two directions. The complete dynamics of the u...

  18. Underwater topography acquired by remote sensing based on SOFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianhu; Zhou, Fengnian; Zhang, Hongmei; Li, Juanjuan

    2008-12-01

    In large-scope marine investigation, the traditional bathymetric measurement can not meet the requirement of rapid data acquisition with lower cost of financial and material resources, while remote sensing (RS) technology provides a perfect way in the work. RS can not only provide quickly and efficiently the information of underwater topography with respect to the traditional method, but also present corresponding underwater topography with different-period RS images. In this paper, we depict in detail the procedures and some key techniques in acquiring underwater topography by remote sensing inversion technology based on self-organization feature mapping (SOFM). Firstly, we introduce some basic theories about the acquisition of underwater topography by the RS inversion technology. Besides, we discuss the data acquisition and preparation in the work. Moreover, we implement correlation analysis and find out the sensitive bands used for building RS inversion model. In virtue of SOFM, we construct the mapping relation between water depth and the reflectivity of sensitive band in the studied area, and test the it in two experimental water areas. The model achieves satisfying accuracy and can meet the requirement of given bathymetric scale. Finally the mapping relation is used for the water depth inversion in the studied water area. We also use the water depth from the model to draw the underwater topographic map in the water area.

  19. A bio-inspired electrocommunication system for small underwater robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Jindong; Xie, Guangming; Wen, Li; Zhang, Jianwei

    2017-03-29

    Weakly electric fishes (Gymnotid and Mormyrid) use an electric field to communicate efficiently (termed electrocommunication) in the turbid waters of confined spaces where other communication modalities fail. Inspired by this biological phenomenon, we design an artificial electrocommunication system for small underwater robots and explore the capabilities of such an underwater robotic communication system. An analytical model for electrocommunication is derived to predict the effect of the key parameters such as electrode distance and emitter current of the system on the communication performance. According to this model, a low-dissipation, and small-sized electrocommunication system is proposed and integrated into a small robotic fish. We characterize the communication performance of the robot in still water, flowing water, water with obstacles and natural water conditions. The results show that underwater robots are able to communicate electrically at a speed of around 1 k baud within about 3 m with a low power consumption (less than 1 W). In addition, we demonstrate that two leader-follower robots successfully achieve motion synchronization through electrocommunication in the three-dimensional underwater space, indicating that this bio-inspired electrocommunication system is a promising setup for the interaction of small underwater robots.

  20. Feasibility of in situ beta ray measurements in underwater environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye Min; Park, Ki Hyun; Kang, Sung Won; Joo, Koan Sik

    2017-09-01

    We describe an attempt at the development of an in situ detector for beta ray measurements in underwater environment. The prototype of the in situ detector is based on a CaF2: Eu scintillator using crystal light guide and Si photomultiplier. Tests were conducted using various reference sources for evaluating the linearity and stability of the detector in underwater environment. The system is simple and stable for long-term monitoring, and consumes low power. We show here an effective detection distance of 7 mm and a 2.273 MeV end-point energy spectrum of 90 Sr/ 90 Y when using the system underwater. The results demonstrate the feasibility of in situ beta ray measurements in underwater environment and can be applied for designing an in situ detector for radioactivity measurement in underwater environment. The in situ detector can also have other applications such as installation on the marine monitoring platform and quantitative analysis of radionuclides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.