WorldWideScience

Sample records for underwater plasma technology

  1. Underwater plasma arc cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leautier, R.; Pilot, G.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the work done to develop underwater plasma arc cutting techniques, to characterise aerosols from cutting operations on radioactive and non-radioactive work-pieces, and to develop suitable ventilation and filtration techniques. The work has been carried out in the framework of a contract between CEA-CEN Cadarache and the Commission of European Communities. Furthermore, this work has been carried out in close cooperation with CEA-CEN Saclay mainly for secondary emissions and radioactive analysis. The contract started in May 1986 and was completed in December 1988 by a supplementary agreement. This report has been compiled from several progress reports submitted during the work period, contains the main findings of the work and encloses the results of comparative tests on plasma arc cutting

  2. Plasma technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drouet, M.G.

    1984-03-01

    IREQ was contracted by the Canadian Electrical Association to review plasma technology and assess the potential for application of this technology in Canada. A team of experts in the various aspects of this technology was assembled and each team member was asked to contribute to this report on the applications of plasma pertinent to his or her particular field of expertise. The following areas were examined in detail: iron, steel and strategic-metals production; surface treatment by spraying; welding and cutting; chemical processing; drying; and low-temperature treatment. A large market for the penetration of electricity has been identified. To build up confidence in the technology, support should be provided for selected R and D projects, plasma torch demonstrations at full power, and large-scale plasma process testing

  3. Status on underwater plasma arc cutting in KHI, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Tadashi; Aota, Toshiichi; Nishizaki, Tadashi; Nakayama, Shigeru; Yamashita, Seiji

    1983-01-01

    In Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., the development of a remote dismantling system by underwater plasma arc cutting process has been advanced, expecting its application to the dismantling and removal of nuclear reactor facilities. In the previous two reports, the fundamental experimental results such as the comparison of the cutting capability in air and in water were shown, but this time, the remote automatic cutting of wedge-shaped specimens was carried out, using a newly installed manipulator for underwater works, therefore its outline is reported. Also the cutting experiment by overhead position and vertical position was performed by using the same equipment, and comparison was made with the cutting capability by downhand and horizontal positions. It is important to grasp the cutting characteristics in the case of upward advancing and downward advancing cuttings by overhead and vertical positions when the cutting of pressure vessels and horizontal pipes into rings is supposed. The experimental apparatus, the cutting conditions, the testing method and the test results of the cutting capability test, the test of changing direction during cutting, and the remote cutting of pipes into rings are described. The underwater plasma arc cutting can cut all metals, the cutting speed is relatively high, and the apparatus is simple and compact. (Kako, I.)

  4. Remote Underwater Characterization System - Innovative Technology Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, Walter David

    1999-01-01

    Characterization and inspection of water-cooled and moderated nuclear reactors and fuel storage pools requires equipment capable of operating underwater. Similarly, the deactivation and decommissioning of older nuclear facilities often requires the facility owner to accurately characterize underwater structures and equipment which may have been sitting idle for years. The underwater characterization equipment is often required to operate at depths exceeding 20 ft (6.1 m) and in relatively confined or congested spaces. The typical baseline approach has been the use of radiation detectors and underwater cameras mounted on long poles, or stationary cameras with pan and tilt features mounted on the sides of the underwater facility. There is a perceived need for an inexpensive, more mobile method of performing close-up inspection and radiation measurements in confined spaces underwater. The Remote Underwater Characterization System (RUCS) is a small, remotely operated submersible vehicle intended to serve multiple purposes in underwater nuclear operations. It is based on the commercially-available ''Scallop'' vehicle, but has been modified by Department of Energy's Robotics Technology Development Program to add auto-depth control, and vehicle orientation and depth monitoring at the operator control panel. The RUCS is designed to provide visual and gamma radiation characterization, even in confined or limited access areas. It was demonstrated in August 1998 at Idaho National Engineering and environmental Laboratory (INEEL) as part of the INEEL Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project. During the demonstration it was compared in a ''head-to-head'' fashion with the baseline characterization technology. This paper summarizes the results of the demonstration and lessons learned; comparing and contrasting both technologies in the areas of cost, visual characterization, radiological characterization, and overall operations

  5. High-frequency underwater plasma discharge application in antibacterial activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, M. W.; Choi, S.; Lyakhov, K.; Shaislamov, U. [Jeju National University, Department of Nuclear and Energy Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Mongre, R. K.; Jeong, D. K. [Jeju National University, Faculty of Biotechnology (Korea, Republic of); Suresh, R.; Lee, H. J., E-mail: hjlee@jejunu.ac.kr [Jeju National University, Department of Nuclear and Energy Engineering (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Plasma discharge is a novel disinfection and effectual inactivation approach to treat microorganisms in aqueous systems. Inactivation of Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) by generating high-frequency, high-voltage, oxygen (O{sub 2}) injected and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) added discharge in water was achieved. The effect of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} dose and oxygen injection rate on electrical characteristics of discharge and E. coli disinfection has been reported. Microbial log reduction dependent on H{sub 2}O{sub 2} addition with O{sub 2} injection was observed. The time variation of the inactivation efficiency quantified by the log reduction of the initial E. coli population on the basis of optical density measurement was reported. The analysis of emission spectrum recorded after discharge occurrence illustrated the formation of oxidant species (OH{sup •}, H, and O). Interestingly, the results demonstrated that O{sub 2} injected and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} added, underwater plasma discharge had fabulous impact on the E. coli sterilization. The oxygen injection notably reduced the voltage needed for generating breakdown in flowing water and escalated the power of discharge pulses. No impact of hydrogen peroxide addition on breakdown voltage was observed. A significant role of oxidant species in bacterial inactivation also has been identified. Furthermore the E. coli survivability in plasma treated water with oxygen injection and hydrogen peroxide addition drastically reduced to zero. The time course study also showed that the retardant effect on E. coli colony multiplication in plasma treated water was favorable, observed after long time. High-frequency underwater plasma discharge based biological applications is technically relevant and would act as baseline data for the development of novel antibacterial processing strategies.

  6. High-frequency underwater plasma discharge application in antibacterial activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M. W.; Choi, S.; Lyakhov, K.; Shaislamov, U.; Mongre, R. K.; Jeong, D. K.; Suresh, R.; Lee, H. J.

    2017-01-01

    Plasma discharge is a novel disinfection and effectual inactivation approach to treat microorganisms in aqueous systems. Inactivation of Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) by generating high-frequency, high-voltage, oxygen (O 2 ) injected and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) added discharge in water was achieved. The effect of H 2 O 2 dose and oxygen injection rate on electrical characteristics of discharge and E. coli disinfection has been reported. Microbial log reduction dependent on H 2 O 2 addition with O 2 injection was observed. The time variation of the inactivation efficiency quantified by the log reduction of the initial E. coli population on the basis of optical density measurement was reported. The analysis of emission spectrum recorded after discharge occurrence illustrated the formation of oxidant species (OH • , H, and O). Interestingly, the results demonstrated that O 2 injected and H 2 O 2 added, underwater plasma discharge had fabulous impact on the E. coli sterilization. The oxygen injection notably reduced the voltage needed for generating breakdown in flowing water and escalated the power of discharge pulses. No impact of hydrogen peroxide addition on breakdown voltage was observed. A significant role of oxidant species in bacterial inactivation also has been identified. Furthermore the E. coli survivability in plasma treated water with oxygen injection and hydrogen peroxide addition drastically reduced to zero. The time course study also showed that the retardant effect on E. coli colony multiplication in plasma treated water was favorable, observed after long time. High-frequency underwater plasma discharge based biological applications is technically relevant and would act as baseline data for the development of novel antibacterial processing strategies.

  7. Underwater welding using remote controlled robots. Development of remote underwater welding technology with a high power YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miwa, Yasuhiro; Sato, Syuuichi; Kojima, Toshio; Owaki, Katsura; Hirose, Naoya

    2002-01-01

    As components in nuclear power plant have been periodically carried out their inspection and repair to keep their integrity, on radioactive liquid wastes storage facility, because of difficulty on their inspection by human beings, some are remained without inspection, and even when capable of inspection, conversion from human works to remote operations is desired from a viewpoint of their operation efficiency upgrading. For response to these needs, some developments on a technology capable of carrying out inspection of their inside at underwater environment and repairing welding with YAG laser by means of remote operation, have been performed. Remote underwater inspection and repair technology is a combination technology of already applied underwater mobile technique (underwater inspection robot) with underwater YAG laser welding technique which is recently at actual using level. Therefore, this technology is composed of an inspection robot and a repair welding robot. And, testing results using the underwater inspection robot and welding test results using the underwater repair welding robot, were enough preferable to obtain forecasting applicable to actual apparatuses. This technology is especially effective for inspection and repair of inside of nuclear fuel cycle apparatuses and relatively high dose apparatuses, and can be thought to be applicable also to large capacity tanks, tanks dealing with harmful matters, underwater structures, and so on, in general industries. (G.K.)

  8. Remote Underwater Characterization System - Innovative Technology Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, W.D.

    1999-01-01

    Characterization and inspection of water-cooled and moderated nuclear reactors and fuel storage pools requires equipment capable of operating underwater. Similarly, the deactivation and decommissioning of older nuclear facilities often requires the facility owner to accurately characterize underwater structures and equipment which may have been sitting idle for years. The Remote Underwater Characterization System (RUCS) is a small, remotely operated submersible vehicle intended to serve multiple purposes in underwater nuclear operations. It is based on the commercially-available Scallop vehicle 1 , but has been modified by the Department of Energys Robotics Technology Development Program to add auto-depth control, and vehicle orientation and depth monitoring at the operator control panel. The RUCS is designed to provide visual and gamma radiation characterization, even in confined or limited access areas. It was demonstrated in August 1998 at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) as part of the INEEL Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project. During the demonstration it was compared in a ''head-to-head fashion with the baseline characterization technology. This paper summarizes the results of the demonstration and lessons learned; comparing and contrasting both technologies in the areas of cost, visual characterization, radiological characterization, and overall operations

  9. Technology Selection for Offshore Underwater Small Modular Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Shirvan, Koroush; Ballinger, Ronald; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Forsberg, Charles; Kazimi, Mujid; Todreas, Neil

    2016-01-01

    This work examines the most viable nuclear technology options for future underwater designs that would meet high safety standards as well as good economic potential, for construction in the 2030–2040 timeframe. The top five concepts selected from a survey of 13 nuclear technologies were compared to a small modular pressurized water reactor (PWR) designed with a conventional layout. In order of smallest to largest primary system size where the reactor and all safety systems are contained, the ...

  10. Plasma technology directory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, P.P.; Dybwad, G.L.

    1995-01-01

    The Plasma Technology Directory has two main goals: (1) promote, coordinate, and share plasma technology experience and equipment within the Department of Energy; and (2) facilitate technology transfer to the commercial sector where appropriate. Personnel are averaged first by Laboratory and next by technology area. The technology areas are accelerators, cleaning and etching deposition, diagnostics, and modeling

  11. Dismantling of JPDR reactor internals by underwater plasma arc cutting technique using robotic manipulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, M.

    1988-01-01

    The actual dismantling of JPDR started on December 4, 1986. As of now, equipment that surrounds the reactor has mostly been removed to provide working space in reactor containment prior to the dismantling of reactor internals. Some reactor internals have been successfully dismantled using the underwater arc cutting system with a robotic manipulator during the period of January to March 1988. The cutting system is composed of an underwater plasma arc cutting device and a robotic manipulator. The cut off reactor internals were core spray block, feedwater sparger and stabilizers for fuel upper grid tube. The plasma arc cutting device was developed to dismantle the reactor internals underwater. It mainly consists of a plasma torch, power and gas supply systems for the torch, and by-product treatment systems. It has the cutting ability of 130 mm thickness stainless steel underwater. The robotic manipulator has seven degrees of freedom of movement, enabling it to move in almost the same way as the arm of a human being. The arm of the robot is mounted on a supporting device which is suspended by three chains from the support structure set on a service floor. A plasma torch is griped by the robotic hand; its position to the structure to be cut is controlled from a remote control room, about 100 meters outside the reactor containment

  12. Technology selection for offshore underwater small modular reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shivan, Koroush; Ballinger, Ronald; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Forsberg, Charles; Kazimi, Mujid; Todreas, Neil

    2016-01-01

    This work examines the most viable nuclear technology options for future underwater designs that would meet high safety standards as well as good economic potential, for construction in the 2030-2040 time frame. The top five concepts selected from a survey of 13 nuclear technologies were compared to a small modular pressurized water reactor (PWR) designed with a conventional layout. In order of smallest to largest primary system size where the reactor and all safety systems are contained, the top five designs were: (1) a lead-bismuth fast reactor based on the Russian SVBR-100; (2) a novel organic cooled reactor; (3) an innovative superheated water reactor; (4) a boiling water reactor based on Toshiba's LSBWR; and (5) an integral PWR featuring compact steam generators. A similar study on potential attractive power cycles was also performed. A condensing and recompression supercritical CO 2 cycle and a compact steam Rankine cycle were designed. It was found that the hull size required by the reactor, safety systems and power cycle can be significantly reduced (50-80%) with the top five designs compared to the conventional PWR. Based on the qualitative economic consideration, the organic cooled reactor and boiling water reactor designs are expected to be the most cost effective options

  13. Technology selection for offshore underwater small modular reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shivan, Koroush; Ballinger, Ronald; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Forsberg, Charles; Kazimi, Mujid; Todreas, Neil [Dept. of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

    2016-12-15

    This work examines the most viable nuclear technology options for future underwater designs that would meet high safety standards as well as good economic potential, for construction in the 2030-2040 time frame. The top five concepts selected from a survey of 13 nuclear technologies were compared to a small modular pressurized water reactor (PWR) designed with a conventional layout. In order of smallest to largest primary system size where the reactor and all safety systems are contained, the top five designs were: (1) a lead-bismuth fast reactor based on the Russian SVBR-100; (2) a novel organic cooled reactor; (3) an innovative superheated water reactor; (4) a boiling water reactor based on Toshiba's LSBWR; and (5) an integral PWR featuring compact steam generators. A similar study on potential attractive power cycles was also performed. A condensing and recompression supercritical CO{sub 2} cycle and a compact steam Rankine cycle were designed. It was found that the hull size required by the reactor, safety systems and power cycle can be significantly reduced (50-80%) with the top five designs compared to the conventional PWR. Based on the qualitative economic consideration, the organic cooled reactor and boiling water reactor designs are expected to be the most cost effective options.

  14. Technology Selection for Offshore Underwater Small Modular Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koroush Shirvan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This work examines the most viable nuclear technology options for future underwater designs that would meet high safety standards as well as good economic potential, for construction in the 2030–2040 timeframe. The top five concepts selected from a survey of 13 nuclear technologies were compared to a small modular pressurized water reactor (PWR designed with a conventional layout. In order of smallest to largest primary system size where the reactor and all safety systems are contained, the top five designs were: (1 a lead–bismuth fast reactor based on the Russian SVBR-100; (2 a novel organic cooled reactor; (3 an innovative superheated water reactor; (4 a boiling water reactor based on Toshiba's LSBWR; and (5 an integral PWR featuring compact steam generators. A similar study on potential attractive power cycles was also performed. A condensing and recompression supercritical CO2 cycle and a compact steam Rankine cycle were designed. It was found that the hull size required by the reactor, safety systems and power cycle can be significantly reduced (50–80% with the top five designs compared to the conventional PWR. Based on the qualitative economic consideration, the organic cooled reactor and boiling water reactor designs are expected to be the most cost effective options.

  15. Technology Advances Enabling a New Class of Hybrid Underwater Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, A.

    2016-02-01

    Both tethered (ROV) and untethered (AUV) systems have proven to be highly valuable tools for a range of application undersea. Certain enabling technologies coupled with recent advances in robotic systems make it possible to consider supplementing many of the functions performed by these platforms with appropriately designed semi-autonomous vehicles that may be less expensive operate than traditional deep-water ROVs. Such vehicles can be deployed from smaller ships and may lead to sea-floor resident systems able to perform a range of interventions under direct human control when required. These systems are effectively a hybrid cross between ROV and AUV vehicles and poised to enable an important new class of undersea vehicle. It is now possible to radically redefine the meaning of the words "tethered vehicle" to include virtual tethering via acoustic and optical means or through the use of small diameter re-useable tethers, providing not power but only high bandwidth communications. The recent developments at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), paves the way for a derivative vehicle type able to perform a range of interventions in deep water. Such battery-powered, hybrid-tethered vehicles will be able to perform tasks that might otherwise require a conventional ROV. These functions will be possible from less complex ships because of a greatly reduced dependence on large, heavy tethers and associated vehicle handling equipment. In certain applications, such vehicles can be resident within subsea facilities, able to provide operators with near instant access when required. Several key emerging technologies and capabilities make such a vehicle possible. Advances in both acoustic and optical "wireless" underwater communications and mico-tethers as pioneered by the HROV Nereus offer the potential to transform ROV type operations and thus offer planners and designers an important new dimension to subsea robotic intervention

  16. HullBUG Technology Development for Underwater Hull Cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-14

    period an effort was also made to estimate the cost of a reasonably simple test device that consists of a motor, bearing support and underwater...planned for use at that facility. FIT Test Vehicle Successful operation of the HullBUG system on the sailing vessel Adele was performed in

  17. Research on key technology of prognostic and health management for autonomous underwater vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi

    2017-12-01

    Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) are non-cable and autonomous motional underwater robotics. With a wide range of activities, it can reach thousands of kilometers. Because it has the advantages of wide range, good maneuverability, safety and intellectualization, it becomes an important tool for various underwater tasks. How to improve diagnosis accuracy of the AUVs electrical system faults, and how to repair AUVs by the information are the focus of navy in the world. In turn, ensuring safe and reliable operation of the system has very important significance to improve AUVs sailing performance. To solve these problems, in the paper the prognostic and health management(PHM) technology is researched and used to AUV, and the overall framework and key technology are proposed, such as data acquisition, feature extraction, fault diagnosis, failure prediction and so on.

  18. Three modes of a direct-current plasma jet operated underwater to degrade methylene blue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuechen, LI; Biao, WANG; Pengying, JIA; Linwei, YANG; Yaru, LI; Jingdi, CHU

    2017-11-01

    A direct-current air plasma jet operated underwater presents three stable modes including an intermittently-pulsed discharge, a periodically-pulsed discharge and a continuous discharge with increasing the power voltage. The three discharge modes have different appearances for the plasma plumes. Moreover, gap voltage-current characteristics indicate that the continuous discharge is in a normal glow regime. Spectral lines from reactive species (OH, N2, N2 +, H α , and O) have been revealed in the emission spectrum of the plasma jet operated underwater. Spectral intensities emitted from OH radical and oxygen atom increase with increasing the power voltage or the gas flow rate, indicating that reactive species are abundant. These reactive species cause the degradation of the methylene blue dye in solution. Effects of the experimental parameters such as the power voltage, the gas flow rate and the treatment time are investigated on the degradation efficiency. Results indicate that the degradation efficiency increases with increasing the power voltage, the gas flow rate or the treatment time. Compared with degradation in the intermittently-pulsed mode or the periodically-pulsed one, it is more efficient in the continuous mode, reaching 98% after 21 min treatment.

  19. Typical Underwater Tunnels in the Mainland of China and Related Tunneling Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kairong Hong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the past decades, many underwater tunnels have been constructed in the mainland of China, and great progress has been made in related tunneling technologies. This paper presents the history and state of the art of underwater tunnels in the mainland of China in terms of shield-bored tunnels, drill-and-blast tunnels, and immersed tunnels. Typical underwater tunnels of these types in the mainland of China are described, along with innovative technologies regarding comprehensive geological prediction, grouting-based consolidation, the design and construction of large cross-sectional tunnels with shallow cover in weak strata, cutting tool replacement under limited drainage and reduced pressure conditions, the detection and treatment of boulders, the construction of underwater tunnels in areas with high seismic intensity, and the treatment of serious sedimentation in a foundation channel of immersed tunnels. Some suggestions are made regarding the three potential great strait-crossing tunnels—the Qiongzhou Strait-Crossing Tunnel, Bohai Strait-Crossing Tunnel, and Taiwan Strait-Crossing Tunnel—and issues related to these great strait-crossing tunnels that need further study are proposed. Keywords: Underwater tunnel, Strait-crossing tunnel, Shield-bored tunnel, Immersed tunnel, Drill and blast

  20. Underwater plasma arc cutting in Three Mile Island's reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGough, M.S.; Knetl, G.J.; Austin, W.E.

    1989-01-01

    On March 28, 1979, the Pennsylvania Three Mile Island nuclear power plant Unit 2 (TMI-2) suffered a partial fuel-melt accident. During this accident, over 20,000 lb of molten fuel flowed through holes melted through the baffle plates and through the lower-core support assembly (LCSA). The molten fuel subsequently resolidified in the bottom of the reactor vessel. The lower-core support assembly of the TMI-2 reactor was not structurally damaged during the accident. In order to permit defueling of that region of the core, the LCSA was cut to permit access. A five-axis teleoperator was developed to deliver plasma arc cutting, rotary grinding and abrasive waterjet cutting of end effectors to the LCSA. Complex geometry sectioning was completed in a mock-up facility at chemistry and pressure conditions simulating those of the vessel, prior to actual in-vessel operations. In-vessel activities began in early May 1988 and were completed on April 11, 1989. This paper presents the details of the in-vessel cutting efforts

  1. Innovative Technology of Mechanized Wet Underwater Welding of High-Alloy Corrosion Resistant Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakhovskyi, M.Yu.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The results of the practice of welding-repair technology using self-shielded flux-cored wire for wet underwater welding of high-alloy stainless steels type 18-10 are presented. The application of the technology allows reducing human participation in welding process under the extreme conditions. The practical value of the technology consists in the possibility of welding-repair works directly under water without any additional assembly works.

  2. Plasma technology in metallurgical processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haile, O.

    1995-12-31

    This literature work is mainly focusing on the mechanisms of plasma technology and telling about metallurgical processing, particularly iron and steelmaking as well as the advantage of the unique properties of plasma. The main advantages of plasma technology in metallurgical operations is to direct utilization of naturally available raw materials and fuels without costly upgrading andlor beneficiation, improved environmental impact, improve process control, significant amplification of reactor and process equipment utilization and increased efficiency of raw materials, energy and man power. This literature survey is based on the publication `plasma technology in metallurgical processing` presents a comprehensive account of the physical, electrical, and mechanical aspects of plasma production and practical processing. The applications of plasma technology in metallurgical processing are covered in depth with special emphasis on developments in promising early stages. Plasma technology of today is mature in the metallurgical process applications. A few dramatic improvements are expected in the near future this giving an impetus to the technologists for the long range planning. (18 refs.) (author)

  3. Underwater maintenance and inspection technology for reactor internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, M.; Sano, Y.; Sudou, A.; Konagai, C.; Okano, H.; Shima, S.

    1996-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly important to develop preventive maintenance technologies in addition to inspection, repair and maintenance technologies already developed. Those preventive maintenance technologies include fundamental technologies concerning residual stress improvement, surface metallurgical improvement, water chemistry improvement, welding and machining, and technology for execution concerning remote handling/automated machines. Toshiba is engaged in the development of fundamental and application technologies. This paper describes a shot peening and a laser peening as the residual stress improvement technology and a multipurpose maintenance robot and a visual inspection submersible as remote handling equipment for maintenance and inspection. (author)

  4. Dross and ultrafine particulate formation in underwater plasma-arc cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldie, B.; Harris, W.K.; Edimburg

    1991-01-01

    Production rates and detailed chemical and physical characteristics of solid emissions from underwater plasma-arc cutting of non-active 304 grade stainless steel have been studied. Steel thicknesses to 40 mm have been cut in water depths of up to 10 metres. An hyperbaric vessel and a deep water test column and associated experimental equipment and techniques were developed for these studies. Concentrations and compositions of effluent by-product gases were also investigated. Part of the work done has been jointly with CEA Saclay and other institutions. Quantitative data, and possible mechanisms involved in the following aspects of the project were achieved: distribution, particle size and composition of solid emissions; composition and flowrates of effluent gases; effect of depth and other cutting conditions on solid and gaseous emissions; filtration resistance characteristics of water suspended particles; repeatability of cut quality and yields of emissions under standard cutting conditions

  5. Survey and Recording Technologies in Italian Underwater Cultural Heritage: Research and Public Access Within the Framework of the 2001 UNESCO Convention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secci, Massimiliano

    2017-08-01

    The 2001 UNESCO Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage is slowly but peremptorily becoming a standard reference tool for underwater archaeology and underwater cultural heritage management. The many provisions included within the Convention touch on many aspects that are key to an effective protection and promotion of the underwater cultural heritage. Within the web of these provisions many aspects are gaining consideration and driving research in underwater archaeology worldwide. These provisions, when seen within a wider frame of social, economical and technological dynamics, pinpoint many aspects requiring further scrutiny from the disciplinary circle. In the framework of the 2001 UNESCO Convention, this article will analyze the path traveled in technological acquisition in the practice of Italian underwater archaeology and how this has affected the approach to underwater cultural heritage management, particularly highlighting how this process has been further influenced by the adoption in 2001 of the Convention and Italy's ratification of it in 2010.

  6. Low temperature plasma technology methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Paul K

    2013-01-01

    Written by a team of pioneering scientists from around the world, Low Temperature Plasma Technology: Methods and Applications brings together recent technological advances and research in the rapidly growing field of low temperature plasmas. The book provides a comprehensive overview of related phenomena such as plasma bullets, plasma penetration into biofilms, discharge-mode transition of atmospheric pressure plasmas, and self-organization of microdischarges. It describes relevant technology and diagnostics, including nanosecond pulsed discharge, cavity ringdown spectroscopy, and laser-induce

  7. ECOLOGICAL CONTROL EQUIPMENT AND TECHNOLOGY OF UNDERWATER VEGETATION DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. TITINSCHNEIDER

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The excess of aquatic submerse vegetation development carries to the reduction of the real rearing area for the piscicultural material from the production farms and allow nestling of the ichthyophages bird species that decrease the fish production. Aquatic submerse vegetation stumble the utilization of aquatic zones for recreation and also wright function of basins utilized for the electric energy production, of micro electricity works through obstruction of the dams grid. The control of the aquatic submerse vegetation development, for Myriophyllum verticillatum, Ceratophyllum submersum, Urticularia vulgaris, Potamogeton natans, Nimphoides peltata species it is accomplish through the removing of some parts of these, preferably with all the stump system. Usually, these its accomplish with the floating equipments fit up with the thermic engines and the propulsion and governating elements who have harm over the fish and some others aquatic organisms through the noise, the displacing a large quality of water caused of propulsion systems and through the noxes elimination (flue, carburant trails, etc.. These technologies reside from the evacuation of the aquatic submerse vegetation and the stump systems of these with the help of an adjustable rake, hang up from the coast by a rope, wrapped to a drummer, who is trained by a motto-propeller group with a small installed power.

  8. Current State of Technology of Fuel Cell Power Systems for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Mendez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs are vehicles that are primarily used to accomplish oceanographic research data collection and auxiliary offshore tasks. At the present time, they are usually powered by lithium-ion secondary batteries, which have insufficient specific energies. In order for this technology to achieve a mature state, increased endurance is required. Fuel cell power systems have been identified as an effective means to achieve this endurance but no implementation in a commercial device has yet been realized. This paper summarizes the current state of development of the technology in this field of research. First, the most adequate type of fuel cell for this application is discussed. The prototypes and design concepts of AUVs powered by fuel cells which have been developed in the last few years are described. Possible commercial and experimental fuel cell stack options are analyzed, examining solutions adopted in the analogous aerial vehicle applications, as well as the underwater ones, to see if integration in an AUV is feasible. Current solutions in oxygen and hydrogen storage systems are overviewed and energy density is objectively compared between battery power systems and fuel cell power systems for AUVs. A couple of system configuration solutions are described including the necessary lithium-ion battery hybrid system. Finally, some closing remarks on the future of this technology are given.

  9. Underwater Geotechnical Foundations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Landris

    2001-01-01

    This report provides an overview and description of the design and construction of underwater geotechnical foundations and offers preliminary guidance based on past and current technology applications...

  10. Gas-discharge plasma sources for nonlocal plasma technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demidov, V. I.; DeJoseph, C. A. Jr.; Simonov, V. Ya.

    2007-01-01

    Nonlocal plasma technology is based on the effect of self-trapping of fast electrons in the plasma volume [V. I. Demidov, C. A. DeJoseph, Jr., and A. A. Kudryavtsev, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 215002 (2006)]. This effect can be achieved by changing the ratio of fast electron flux to ion flux incident on the plasma boundaries. This in turn leads to a significant change in plasma properties and therefore can be useful for technological applications. A gas-discharge device which demonstrates control of the plasma properties by this method is described

  11. Application of nonlocal plasma technology for controlling plasma conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chengxun; Demidov, V. I.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.; Kurlyandskaya, I. P.; Rudakova, T. V.; Zhou, Z. X.

    2017-10-01

    A promising approach for better control of the plasma parameters involves the exploitation of peculiarities of plasmas with a nonlocal electron energy distribution. Nonlocal plasma technology (NLP-technology) is based on the effect of energetic electrons in the plasma volume. In this work, an experimental study of influence of the chemo-ionization processes on non-stationary plasma conductivity has been conducted. Due to energetic, supra-thermal electrons, which appear in the chemo-ionization reactions, the highly non-equilibrium and time dependent nonlocal electron energy distribution function is formed. In such a plasma thermal electrons always have positive conductivity (mobility), while supra-thermal, energetic electrons may have negative conductivity in heavy (argon, krypton and xenon) noble gases dependently on conditions. Experiments demonstrate that this effect may lead to the non-monotonic temporal behavior of plasma conductivity and may potentially create the negative electron mobility.

  12. Information and consulting center in plasma technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizireanu, S.; Aldea, E.; Mitu, B.; Dinescu, G.

    2001-01-01

    Plasma technologies are clean, non-expensive, and easy to adapt to small-scale production. They are largely used in various modern sectors of research, industry, medicine, biology and environmental protection. At the present time a pressure to transfer the knowledge from education and research sectors toward the industrial ones was established by the financing policies at national and European levels. Nevertheless, mainly in the last decade, an informational gap sets up in Romania between the suppliers of know-how in the plasma technologies and their beneficiaries. The newly appearing companies have little knowledge about the possibilities of our research and education. In turn, the research and education sectors do not know what companies are using nowadays plasma technologies, what kinds of technologies are needed and what aspects should be stressed in educational activity. The Information and Consulting Center in Plasma Technologies is an infrastructure project aiming at gathering information and expertise in plasma technologies with emphasizing on the Romanian capabilities. The information is accessible via Internet at the address http://www.alpha2.infim.ro. By accessing the center web page one enters into the main menu or it is possible to navigate by choosing key words, as for instance: objectives, plasma diagnostics, plasma technologies, which are listed in a dedicated search box. The information is organized in databases. In the database frame there are three main categories, which lead to detailed information about: - Users of plasma technologies, the technology type, the address; - Suppliers of plasma technologies, including the main research institutes with links to the relating Internet sites; - Education and training centers including the universities and their departments dedicated to plasma physics. The expertise is organized in three categories. They are instrumentation and equipment, plasma diagnostics and plasma technologies. In the

  13. Plasma Wave Electronic Terahertz Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shur, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Plasma waves are oscillations of electron density in time and space. In deep submicron field effect transistors plasma wave frequencies lie in the terahertz range and can be tuned by applied gate bias...

  14. Investigation of flux-powder wire’s components-stabilizers on welding and technological properties in underwater welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М. Ю. Каховський

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on long-term experience of welding by mechanized flux-cored wires, the E.O. Paton Electric Welding Institute investigated a self-protecting flux-cored wire for wet underwater welding of stainless steels type 18-10. It allows to perform welding of butt, fillet and overlapped joints in flat and vertical positions of high-alloy corrosion-resistant steels type of 18-10 (AISI 304L, 308L, 347 and 321. The article presents results of development of welding-repair technology using self-shielded flux-cored wire for wet underwater welding of high-alloy stainless steels type 18-10. Also, the article describes a method of increasing the process stability of the arc in wet underwater welding high corrosion resistant steels type 18-10 by self-shielded flux cored wire. Studied welding characteristics of the weld metal with the introduction of the charge wire components stabilizers. The application of this technology allows partially or completely reducing the human participation in welding process under the extreme conditions: at large depth, in radioactive environments (in case of NPS and also gaining a significant economic effect due to greater efficiency (productivity of welding-repair works. The practical value of this technology consists in possibility of welding-repair works directly under water without any additional assembly works. As to its properties the developed self-shielding wire for underwater welding of high-alloy corrosion resistant steel meets completely the requirements of class (B of the International standard ANSI/AWS D3.6 on underwater welding

  15. Atmospheric-pressure plasma technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogelschatz, U.

    2004-12-01

    Major industrial plasma processes operating close to atmospheric pressure are discussed. Applications of thermal plasmas include electric arc furnaces and plasma torches for generation of powders, for spraying refractory materials, for cutting and welding and for destruction of hazardous waste. Other applications include miniature circuit breakers and electrical discharge machining. Non-equilibrium cold plasmas at atmospheric pressure are obtained in corona discharges used in electrostatic precipitators and in dielectric-barrier discharges used for generation of ozone, for pollution control and for surface treatment. More recent applications include UV excimer lamps, mercury-free fluorescent lamps and flat plasma displays.

  16. [Low temperature plasma technology for biomass refinery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaoguo; Chen, Hongzhang

    2014-05-01

    Biorefinery that utilizes renewable biomass for production of fuels, chemicals and bio-materials has become more and more important in chemical industry. Recently, steam explosion technology, acid and alkali treatment are the main biorefinery treatment technologies. Meanwhile, low temperature plasma technology has attracted extensive attention in biomass refining process due to its unique chemical activity and high energy. We systemically summarize the research progress of low temperature plasma technology for pretreatment, sugar platflow, selective modification, liquefaction and gasification in biomass refinery. Moreover, the mechanism of low temperature plasma in biorefinery and its further development were also discussed.

  17. The industrial research project: “Blu-Archeosys – Innovative Technologies and Advanced Systems as Support in Underwater Archaeology”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Lorusso

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available The reasons of the research about new technologies as support in naval and underwater archaeology or, more generally, in waters archaeology are various and described in this work, where the characteristics of the research project “BLU-ARCHEOSYS – Innovative Technologies and Advanced SYStems as Support in Underwater ARCHaeology” are illustrated. This industrial research project faces problems regarding innovative technologies and instruments in waters archaeology and it comprehends synergic steps and joined works among skilled professionals that have the competences to interpret qualitative and/or quantitative data within an artistic – historical and technical – historical study, also with the involvement of various public and private institutions. The BLUARCHEOSYS project has, in fact, the objective to create technologies that have a reply in underwater archaeology and contemporaneously in other sectors. In particular, starting from the methodological way that spans from the discovery in underwater or subaerial environment to the collocation of the objects in museums, the intent is to support the different methodological stages with specific tools and innovative technologies. The education project, presented to the Ministry with the research one, is articulated in the different branches of artistic-historical character, of the management, normative and operative character, and of the technical-diagnostic-material-preservative character. The professionals will have not only theoretical knowledge about standard and consolidated technologies, but they will be also experts about methodologies, in particular the diagnostic ones, that put in field the innovative tools evaluated in the project, with consequent competitive advantage in the working field, more and more demanding specific sector competences.

  18. Application of fusion plasma technology. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabri, Z.A.

    1976-06-01

    This report presents principal findings of studies conducted at Iowa State on Applications of Fusion Plasma Technology. Two tasks were considered. The first was to identify and investigate plasma processes for near term industrial applications of already developed plasma technology. The second was to explore the potential of reprocessing the fuel for fusion test facilities in a closed-cycle system. For the first task, two applications were considered. One was alumina reduction in magnetically confined plasmas, and the other was uranium enrichment using plasma centrifuges. For the second task, in-core and ex-core plasma purification were considered. Separation techniques that are compatible with the plasma state were identified and preliminary analysis of their effectiveness were carried out. The effects of differential ionization of impurities on the separation effectiveness are considered. Possible technical difficulties in both tasks are identified and recommendations for future work are given

  19. The 2017 Plasma Roadmap: Low temperature plasma science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovich, I.; Baalrud, S. D.; Bogaerts, A.; Bruggeman, P. J.; Cappelli, M.; Colombo, V.; Czarnetzki, U.; Ebert, U.; Eden, J. G.; Favia, P.; Graves, D. B.; Hamaguchi, S.; Hieftje, G.; Hori, M.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Kortshagen, U.; Kushner, M. J.; Mason, N. J.; Mazouffre, S.; Mededovic Thagard, S.; Metelmann, H.-R.; Mizuno, A.; Moreau, E.; Murphy, A. B.; Niemira, B. A.; Oehrlein, G. S.; Petrovic, Z. Lj; Pitchford, L. C.; Pu, Y.-K.; Rauf, S.; Sakai, O.; Samukawa, S.; Starikovskaia, S.; Tennyson, J.; Terashima, K.; Turner, M. M.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.; Vardelle, A.

    2017-08-01

    Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics published the first Plasma Roadmap in 2012 consisting of the individual perspectives of 16 leading experts in the various sub-fields of low temperature plasma science and technology. The 2017 Plasma Roadmap is the first update of a planned series of periodic updates of the Plasma Roadmap. The continuously growing interdisciplinary nature of the low temperature plasma field and its equally broad range of applications are making it increasingly difficult to identify major challenges that encompass all of the many sub-fields and applications. This intellectual diversity is ultimately a strength of the field. The current state of the art for the 19 sub-fields addressed in this roadmap demonstrates the enviable track record of the low temperature plasma field in the development of plasmas as an enabling technology for a vast range of technologies that underpin our modern society. At the same time, the many important scientific and technological challenges shared in this roadmap show that the path forward is not only scientifically rich but has the potential to make wide and far reaching contributions to many societal challenges.

  20. Complex plasmas scientific challenges and technological opportunities

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez, Jose; Becker, Kurt; Thomsen, Hauke

    2014-01-01

    This book provides the reader with an introduction to the physics of complex plasmas, a discussion of the specific scientific and technical challenges they present, and an overview of their potential technological applications. Complex plasmas differ from conventional high-temperature plasmas in several ways: they may contain additional species, including nanometer- to micrometer-sized particles, negative ions, molecules and radicals, and they may exhibit strong correlations or quantum effects. This book introduces the classical and quantum mechanical approaches used to describe and simulate complex plasmas. It also covers some key experimental techniques used in the analysis of these plasmas, including calorimetric probe methods, IR absorption techniques and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The final part of the book reviews the emerging applications of microcavity and microchannel plasmas, the synthesis and assembly of nanomaterials through plasma electrochemistry, the large-scale generation of ozone using mi...

  1. Bringing Real World Underwater Science, Engineering and Technology in Tomorrow's Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, C.

    2012-04-01

    What do Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs), Ocean Science, Engineering and Technology have in common with science education in today's classroom? They all meet the growing demand for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) professionals in tomorrow's U.S. workforce. Engaging students in real world science experiences will help them develop skills such as critical thinking, problem solving, collaboration, communication, innovation, and creativity. These skills are crucial to building a strong, competitive workforce in an integrated global economy. Fifth grade students from St. Andrew's School of Math and Science in Charleston, SC, USA science classes were introduced to engineering and robotics by using a combination of two underwater ROVs programs from the Office of Naval Research (SeaPerch) and Marine Advanced Technology Education (MATE). Students were grouped in teams as "real scientists" to design and construct a ROV. Students selected their role from a list of engineering positions, and researched how to construct the best ROV. Students created blueprints and models of their ROV design. Scientists/engineers from various local agencies were scheduled to come and share their expertise with the students. On World Ocean Day, a presentation was planned for fifth grade students to work closely with kindergarten through fourth grade students. The purpose of the day was two-fold; it provided students the opportunity to peer teach and the opportunity to present their experiences to a wide audience. All students presented their designs and demonstrated their ROV's movement capabilities in child size pools. They also modeled how submersible pilots communicate with scientists and other researchers while operating their newly designed ROV. As a culminating event, students visited a local marine science high school class with similar ROVs and evaluated their engineering designs in a fresh water pond.

  2. Development and demonstration of the safe dismantling of metal components from the decommissioning of nuclear facilities by means of underwater plasma arc cutting. Development of a measurement and control system for a underwater plasma arc cutting device for the safe dismantling of metallic components from the decommissioning of nuclear facility. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haferkamp, H.; Bach, F.W.; Steiner, H.; Kah, S.

    1992-01-01

    For the decommissioning of nuclear installations, methods and tools for the dismantling of complicated metallic components with great material thickness are needed. The method of underwater plasma arc cutting offers the possibility for the dismantling of highly activated components because of the shielding effect of water. Up to now the tools for the underwater method are only available for simple contours. Target of the project was the development of a plasma arc cutting technique for the dismantling of complicated components and of a control and measurement system. (orig./DG) [de

  3. Influence of CO2 pressure on the emission spectra and plasma parameters in underwater laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goueguel, Christian L; McIntyre, Dustin L; Jain, Jinesh C

    2016-12-01

    Optical emission spectroscopic studies have been carried out to investigate the pressure effect of CO2 on laser-produced underwater plasma. The plasma was generated by focusing 1064 nm, 6 ns pulses from a Nd:YAG laser in a CO2-bearing solution. The temporal evolution of the continuum emission, Sr and Ba lines, and plasma electron density and temperature was characterized under CO2 pressure ranging from 10 to 300 bars. The electron density measurements were made using the Stark broadening of the 455.40 nm Ba II line, while the temperature measurements have been performed by the Saha-Boltzmann method using the Sr I-II lines at 460.73 and 407.77 nm, respectively. It was found that CO2 pressure has little effect on the emission line intensity and signal-to-background ratio. The electron density and the temperature are found to be independent of the CO2 pressure at early times. When time becomes longer, the electron density exhibits an appreciable rise as the CO2 pressure increases, while the temperature is found to be unchanged.

  4. Department of Plasma Physics and Technology - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadowski, M.

    1997-01-01

    In 1996 the main activities of Department P-5 (until December 1996 known as the Department of Thermonuclear Research) were concentrated on 5 topics: 1. Selected problems of plasma theory, 2. Studies of phenomena within high-current plasma concentrators, 3. Development of plasma diagnostic methods, 4. Studies in the field of fusion technology, 5. Research on new plasma-ion technologies. Theoretical studies mainly concerned elementary processes occurring within a plasma, and particularly those within near-electrode regions of microwave discharges as well as those within near-wall layers (SOL) of tokamaks. We also developed computational packages for parameter identification and modelling of physical phenomena in pulse plasma coaxial accelerators. Experimental studies were concentrated on the generation of a dense magnetized plasma in different high-current PF (Plasma Focus) facilities and small Z-Pinch devices. We carried out investigations of X-rays, relativistic electron beams (REBs), accelerated primary ions, and fast products of fusion reactions for deuterium discharges. Research on plasma diagnostics comprised the development of methods and equipment for studies of X-ray emission, pulsed electron beams, and fast ions, using special Cherenkov-type detectors of electrons and solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) of ions. New diagnostic techniques were developed. Studies in the field of fusion technology concerned the design, construction, and testing of different high-voltage pulse generators. We also developed special opto-electronic systems for control and data transmission. Research on plasma-ion technology concentrated on the generation of pulsed high-power plasma-ion streams and their applications for the surface modification of semiconductors, pure metals and alloys. The material engineering studies were carried out in close collaboration with our P-9 Department and other domestic and foreign research centers

  5. Microwave plasma emerging technologies for chemical processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de la Fuente, Javier F.; Kiss, Anton A.; Radoiu, Marilena T.; Stefanidis, Georgios D.

    2017-01-01

    Microwave plasma (MWP) technology is currently being used in application fields such as semiconductor and material processing, diamond film deposition and waste remediation. Specific advantages of the technology include the enablement of a high energy density source and a highly reactive medium,

  6. Department of Plasma Physics and Technology - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinski, M.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The activities of the Department in 2007 continued previous studies in the following fields of plasma physics, controlled nuclear fusion and plasma technology of surface engineering: · Studies of physical phenomena in pulsed discharges in the Plasma-Focus (PF) and RPI-IBIS facilities; · Development of selected methods for high-temperature plasma diagnostics; · Research on plasma technologies; · Selected problems of plasma theory and computational modelling. As for the experimental studies particular attention was paid to the analysis of the correlation of X-ray pulses with pulsed electron beams and other corpuscular emissions from different Plasma-Focus (PF) facilities. A collisional-radiative model, taking into account the Stark effect and strong electric fields in the so called '' hot- spot '' regions of a pinch, was applied in those analyses. The main aim of these studies was to identify the physical phenomena responsible for the emission during the PF-type discharges. The emitted protons were also measured with nuclear track detectors. The measurements made it possible to obtain images of the regions, where the D-D fusion reactions occurred, as well as to determine the angular distribution of the emitted protons. Pulsed plasma streams were also investigated by means of time-resolved optical spectroscopy and corpuscular diagnostics. In a frame of the EURATOM program, efforts were devoted to the development of diagnostic methods for tokamak-type facilities. Such studies include the design and construction of the 4-channel Cherenkov-type detection system for the TORE-SUPRA tokamak at CEA-Cadarache. In the meantime in order to collect some experience a new measuring head was especially prepared for experiments within small facilities. Other fusion- oriented efforts are connected with the application of the solid-state nuclear track detectors for investigation of protons from tokamak plasma and high-energy beams emitted from laser produced plasmas

  7. Technology of a small plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews plasma focus technology, including the underlying dynamic and energy balance theory, scaling of the neutron yield, cost effectiveness of the design, as well as the main subsystems, e.g., capacitor bank, spark-gap switch and triggering electronics, the plasma focus tube, some simple diagnostics, and a high-voltage charger. It discusses the range of densities and temperatures available with a small plasma focus, and the type of experiments and applications that can be carried out with it. 61 refs, 21 figs

  8. Synergetic effects of double laser pulses for the formation of mild plasma in water: Toward non-gated underwater laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakka, Tetsuo [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Institute of Sustainability Science, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Tamura, Ayaka; Nakajima, Takashi; Fukami, Kazuhiro; Ogata, Yukio H. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2012-05-07

    We experimentally study the dynamics of the plasma induced by the double-laser-pulse irradiation of solid target in water, and find that an appropriate choice of the pulse energies and pulse interval results in the production of an unprecedentedly mild (low-density) plasma, the emission spectra of which are very narrow even without the time-gated detection. The optimum pulse interval and pulse energies are 15-30 {mu}s and about {approx}1 mJ, respectively, where the latter values are much smaller than those typically employed for this kind of study. In order to clarify the mechanism for the formation of mild plasma we examine the role of the first and second laser pulses, and find that the first pulse produces the cavitation bubble without emission (and hence plasma), and the second pulse induces the mild plasma in the cavitation bubble. These findings may present a new phase of underwater laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  9. Underwater Glider System Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkins, Scott A; Humphreys, Douglas E; Sherman, Jeff; Osse, Jim; Jones, Clayton; Leonard, Naomi; Graver, Joshua; Bachmayer, Ralf; Clem, Ted; Carroll, Paul; Davis, Philip; Berry, Jon; Worley, Paul; Wasyl, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    The goals of this study are to determine how to advance from present capabilities of underwater glider (and hybrid motorglider) technology to what could be possible within the next few years; and to identify critical research issues that must be resolved to make such advancements possible. These goals were pursued by merging archival flight data with numerical model results and system spreadsheet analysis to extrapolate from the present state-of-the–art in underwater (UW) gliders to potential...

  10. Study of carboxylic functionalization of polypropylene surface using the underwater plasma technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, R. S.; Friedrich, J. F.; Wagner, M. H.

    2009-08-01

    Non-equilibrium solution plasma treatment of polymer surfaces in water offers the possibility of more dense and selective polymer surface functionalization in comparison to the well-known and frequently used low-pressure oxygen plasma. Functional groups are introduced when the polymer surface contacts the plasma moderated solution especially water solutions. The emission of ions, electrons, energy-rich neutrals and complexes, produced by the ion avalanche are limited by quenching, with the aid of the ambient water phase. The UV-radiation produced in plasma formation also helps to moderate the reaction solution further by producing additional excited, ionized/dissociated molecules. Thus, monotype functional groups equipped polymer surfaces, preferably OH groups, originating from the dissociated water molecules, could be produced more selectively. An interesting feature of the technique is its flexibility to use a wide variety of additives in the water phase. Another way to modify polymer surfaces is the deposition of plasma polymers carrying functional groups as carboxylic groups used in this work. Acetic acid, acrylic acid, maleic and itaconic acid were used as additive monomers. Acetic acid is not a chemically polymerizing monomer but it could polymerize by monomer/molecular fragmentation and recombination to a cross linked layer. The other monomers form preferably water-soluble polymers on a chemical way. Only the fragmented fraction of these monomers could form an insoluble coating by cross linking to substrate. The XPS analysis was used to track the alterations in -O-CO- bond percentage on the PP surface. To identify the -COOH groups on substrate surface unambiguously, which have survived the plasma polymerization process, the derivatization with trifluoroethanol was performed.

  11. Application and research of special waste plasma disposal technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan Wei

    2007-12-01

    The basic concept of plasma and the principle of waste hot plasma disposal technology are simply introduced. Several sides of application and research of solid waste plasma disposal technology are sumed up. Compared to the common technology, the advantages of waste hot plasma disposal technology manifest further. It becomes one of the most prospective and the most attended high tech disposal technology in particular kind of waste disposal field. The article also simply introduces some experiment results in Southwest Institute of Physics and some work on the side of importation, absorption, digestion, development of foreign plasma torch technology and researching new power sources for plasma torch. (authors)

  12. Rf probe technology for the next generation of technological plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, V.J.; Kenyon, A.J.; Thornhill, N.F.; Seeds, A.J.; Batty, I.

    2001-01-01

    We describe radio frequency (rf) analysis of technological plasmas at the 13.56 MHz fundamental drive frequency and integer narrow-band harmonics up to n = 9. In particular, we demonstrate the use of harmonic amplitude information as a process end-point diagnostic. Using very high frequency (vhf) techniques, we construct non-invasive ex situ remote-coupled probes: a diplexer, an equal-ratio-arm bridge, and a dual directional coupler used as a single directional device. These probes bolt into the plasma-tool 50 Ω transmission-line between the rf generator and matching network, and hence do not require modification of the plasma tool. The 50 Ω probe environment produces repeatable measurements of the chamber capacitance and narrow-band harmonic amplitude with an end-point detection sensitivity corresponding to a 2 dB change in the harmonic amplitude with the removal of 1 cm 2 of photoresist. The methodology and design of an instrument for the measurement of the plasma-tool frequency response, and the plasma harmonic amplitude and phase response are examined. The instrument allows the monitoring of the plasma phase delay, plasma-tool short- and long-term ageing, and process end-point prediction. (author)

  13. Plasma spray technology process parameters and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreekumar, K.P.; Karthikeyan, J.; Ananthapadmanabhan, P.V.; Venkatramani, N.; Chatterjee, U.K.

    1991-01-01

    The current trend in the structural design philosophy is based on the use of substrate with the necessary mechanical properties and a thin coating to exhibit surface properties. Plasma spray process is a versatile surface coating technique which finds extensive application in meeting advance technologies. This report describes the plasma spray technique and its use in developing coatings for various applications. The spray system is desribed in detail including the different variables such as power input to the torch, gas flow rate, powder properties, powder injection, etc. and their interrelation in deciding the quality of the coating. A brief write-up on the various plasma spray coatings developed for different applications is also included. (author). 15 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Underwater robots

    CERN Document Server

    Antonelli, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    This book, now at the third edition, addresses the main control aspects in underwater manipulation tasks. The mathematical model with significant impact on the control strategy is discussed. The problem of controlling a 6-degrees-of-freedoms autonomous underwater vehicle is deeply investigated and a survey of fault detection/tolerant strategies for unmanned underwater vehicles is provided. Inverse kinematics, dynamic and interaction control for underwater vehicle-manipulator systems are then discussed. The code used to generate most of the numerical simulations is made available and briefly discussed.       

  15. Department of Plasma Physics and Technology: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadowski, M.

    1998-01-01

    (full text) In 1997, theoretical studies mainly concerned the verification of physical models on the basis of experimental data, an analysis of plasma behaviour within regions close to electrode surfaces during quasi-continuous discharges induced by microwaves , as well as modelling of a discharge development within coaxial plasma injectors. Another direction of theoretical studies concerned elementary processes of importance for plasma research, and in particular those taking into consideration the role of spin within a classical model of proton - hydrogen atom collisions. Experimental studies comprised measurements of pulsed electron beams and effects of the polarization of X-rays emitted from Plasma Focus (PF) facilities, research on emission characteristics of different PF devices, as well as measurements of pulsed electron and ion-beams emitted from various devices of the PF and Z-Pinch type. An important direction of experimental studies concerned X-ray and ion measurements at a large PF-1000 facility. In the field of plasma diagnostics, efforts were devoted to an analysis of the results obtained from time-resolved measurements of nitrogen ions and deuterons within PF-type devices. Within a frame of diagnostics, a substantial achievement was also the design and construction of a new measuring equipment for studies of plasma dynamics and X-ray emissions. Particular attention was also paid to studies connected with the calibration of various solid-state nuclear track detectors (NTDs), particularly modern plastic detectors of the CR-39, PM-355 and PM-500 type. Studies in the field of fusion technology concerned the design and construction of a special pulse generator for the simulation of electromagnetic interference, as well as other efforts connected with research on electromagnetic compatibility of electronic and electrotechnical devices. Research on new types of HV pulse generators were carried out partially under contracts with industrial laboratories. In

  16. The plasma focus - numerical experiments leading technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saw, S.H.; Lee, S.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical experiments on the plasma focus are now used routinely to assist design and provide reference points for diagnostics. More importantly guidance has been given regarding the implementation of technology for new generations of plasma focus devices. For example intensive series of experiments have shown that it is of no use to reduce static bank inductance L0 below certain values because of the consistent loading effects of the plasma focus dynamics on the capacitor bank. Thus whilst it was thought that the PF1000 could receive major benefits by reducing its bank inductance L 0 , numerical experiments have shown to the contrary that its present L 0 of 30 nH is already optimum and that reducing L 0 would be a very expensive fruitless exercise. This knowledge gained from numerical experiments now acts as a general valuable guideline to all high performance (ie low inductance) plasma focus devices not to unnecessarily attempt to further lower the static inductance L 0 . The numerical experiments also show that the deterioration of the yield scaling law (e.g. the fusion neutron yield scaling with storage energy) is inevitable again due to the consistent loading effect of the plasma focus, which becomes more and more dominant as capacitor bank impedance reduces with increasing capacitance C 0 as storage energy is increased. This line of thinking has led to the suggestion of using higher voltages (as an alternative to increasing C 0 ) and to seeding of Deuterium with noble gases in order to enhance compression through thermodynamic mechanisms and through radiation cooling effects of strong line radiation. Circuit manipulation e.g. to enhance focus pinch compression by current-stepping is also being numerically experimented upon. Ultimately however systems have to be built, guided by numerical experiments, so that the predicted technology may be proven and realized. (author)

  17. Department of Plasma Physics and Technology: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadowski, M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: In 2000 the research activity in the Dept. P-V was concentrated upon studies in the field of high-temperature plasma physics, nuclear fusion, and plasma technology. The main topics were as follows: l. Analysis of selected problems of plasma theory, 2. Investigation of phenomena in high-current pulse discharges of the Plasma-Focus (PF) and Z-Pinch type, 3. Development of the selected methods and equipment for plasma diagnostics, 4. Research on technology of experimental facilities for basic studies and applications, 5. Studies of the modification of material surfaces by means of pulse plasma-ion streams. In a frame of theoretical studies the numerical modeling was continued for discharges in coaxial plasma accelerators. The second theoretical aim was the description of some elementary atomic processes in the quasi- classical approach. A paper on the electron scattering on the atoms and molecules was published. In the quasi- classical model, the electron spin was taken into account and trajectories of 2 electrons in the helium atom were analyzed. In the frame of experimental studies, various phenomena were investigated in PF and Z-Pinch systems. The emission of pulse electron beams and ions as well as polarized X-rays were investigated in the MAFA-PF facility. New data about polarization of selected X-ray lines were obtained (2 papers at conferences and 2 publications). Ion emission measurements performed in small-scale PF-devices at INFIP and IFAS (Argentina), and in the Micro-Capillary device at Ecole Politechnique (France), were elaborated (5 papers at conferences and 2 publications). New measurements were also performed in the Capillary Z-Pinch device at IPP in Prague. With partial support of a US research contract, studies of the optimization of a neutron yield were performed in the PF-360 facility with special cryogenic targets (made of h eavy ice'' layers) or deuterium-gas targets (10 presentations at conferences, 2 reports for EOARD, and 7 papers

  18. Google™ underwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-10-01

    The first underwater panoramic images were added to Google Maps™, the company announced on 25 September. This first “underwater Street View collection,” launched in partnership with the Caitlin Seaview Survey, provides people with the opportunity to “become the next virtual Jacques Cousteau.” For more information, see: maps.google.com/ocean.

  19. MATURING ECRF TECHNOLOGY FOR PLASMA CONTROL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CALLIS, R.W.; CARY, W.P.; CHU, S.; LOANE, J.L.; ELLIS, R.A.; FELCH, K.; GORELOV, Y.A.; GRUNLOH, H.J.; HOSEA, J.; KAJIWARA, K.; LOHR, J.; LUCE, T.C.; PEAVY, J.J.; PINSKER, R.I.; PONCE, D.; PRATER, R.; SHAPIRO, M.; TEMKIN, R.J.; TOOKER, J.F.

    2002-01-01

    OAK A271 MUTURING ECRF TECHNOLOGY FOR PLASMA CONTROL. Understanding of the physics of internal transport barriers (ITBs) is being furthered by analysis and comparisons of experimental data from many different tokamaks worldwide. An international database consisting of scalar and 2-D profile data for ITB plasmas is being developed to determine the requirements for the formation and sustainment of ITBs and to perform tests of theory-based transport models in an effort to improve the predictive capability of the models. Analysis using the database indicates that: (a) the power required to form ITBs decreases with increased negative magnetic shear of the target plasma, and: (b) the E x B flow shear rate is close to the linear growth rate of the ITG modes at the time of barrier formation when compared for several fusion devices. Tests of several transport models (JETTO, Weiland model) using the 2-D profile data indicate that there is only limited agreement between the model predictions and the experimental results for the range of plasma conditions examined for the different devices (DIII-D, JET, JT-60U). Gyrokinetic stability analysis (using the GKS code) of the ITB discharges from these devices indicates that the ITG/TEM growth rates decrease with increased negative magnetic shear and that the E x B shear rate is comparable to the linear growth rates at the location of the ITB

  20. Autonomous Underwater Vehicle(AUV) and Towed Vehicle Technologies for Under-Ice Hydrothermal Vent Studies at the Gakkel Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, H.; Akin, D.; Reves-Sohn, R.; Humphris, S.; Shank, T.; Edmonds, H.

    2006-12-01

    The extreme polar environment presents a unique challenge to the use of the otherwise mature oceanographic technologies associated with Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs), Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) and towed vehicles. For deep water mapping and sampling applications, ice cover in the arctic is a formidable obstacle. In pursuing our goals to locate, map and sample hydrothermal vents on the Gakkel Ridge, we have built and plan to deploy two AUVs named JAGUAR and PUMA and a towed sampling sled with hydraulically actuated sampling chambers. Our methodologies for working with AUVs in the Arctic differ significantly from standard blue-water operations. Specifically, we have focused on, deploying and calibrating acoustic transponders with the limited mobility imposed by multi-year ice; a far more robust system architecture for dealing with component failures underwater; an autonomous manipulation system on the AUV for capturing sessile biological organisms and geological samples; and a low bandwidth acoustic tether for vehicle status, navigation and mission redirection. Our sampling sled was designed with the premise that the limited mobility associated with working in ice will at best provide us with a few, short opportunities to image and sample on a hydrothermal vent site. To this end our sled is equipped with a suite of imaging and chemical sensors as well as devices for quickly obtaining multiple samples of both sessile and motile biological organisms. We plan to deploy these new technologies during the International Polar Year in 2007 as part of a collaborative international effort to characterize the biological and geological characteristics of hydrothermal venting on the ultra-slow spreading Gakkel Ridge in the eastern Arctic basin.

  1. Study the content relationship between science and technology documents: A compression of papers and patent in Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Dominos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraia Zolfaghari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The current research aims at studying the conceptual relationship between the science and technology documents through the comparison of vocabularies that are used within the patents and the papers in the field of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV.  The research method is descriptive. To perform the research, the patents were retrieved from Google Patents and Lens websites, and the papers from IEEE Explore database. A hybrid keyword-class method was used to conduct the search. It means that the search query was consisted of "Autonomous Underwater Vehicle" keyword and “H” class. The titles and the abstracts of the patents and the papers were automatically indexed through a semi-automatic method. This resulted in 195 keywords for patents and 114 ones for papers. Co-occurrence matrices of these two sets of keywords were created through RavarMatrix software. The hierarchical maps of keywords were drawn by SPSS. Findings show that 65 percent of papers’ keywords are those that occurred within the patents but 23 percent of patents’ keywords are similar to the papers’.  The structural comparison of patents and papers clustering’s also revealed that the structural proximity between patents and papers vocabularies is equal to zero. The other finding showed that the similarity between the members of ego networks of prominent keywords is for two cases zero and for others fewer than 15 percent except for the keyword “data”. It may be concluded that the science is affected by technology in the field of AUV.

  2. An overview of plasma-in-liquid experimental studies at the University of Michigan's Plasma Science and Technology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, John; Howard, Cameron; Sommers, Bradley

    2010-11-01

    Plasma production or plasma injection in liquid water affords one the opportunity to nonthermally inject advanced oxidation processes into water for the purpose of sterilization or chemical processing. Limitations of current injection approaches include limited throughput capacity, electrode erosion, and reduced process volume. Currently we are investigating two potential approaches to circumventing these issues. These include direct plasma injection using an underwater DBD plasma jet and the direct excitation of underwater isolated bubbles via a pulsed electric field. Presented here are results from these ongoing tests, which include a comparative study of the effectiveness of microdischarge, and plasma jet direct injection approaches on the decomposition of Methylene Blue dye. Additionally, an approach to excitation of isolated bubbles using pulsed electric fields is also discussed. Streamer propagation dynamics such as surface propagation and the observed excitation of surface waves on electrode-attached and free bubbles are also discussed.

  3. Underwater Depth and Temperature Sensing Based on Fiber Optic Technology for Marine and Fresh Water Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duraibabu, Dinesh Babu; Leen, Gabriel; Toal, Daniel; Newe, Thomas; Lewis, Elfed; Dooly, Gerard

    2017-05-27

    Oceanic conditions play an important role in determining the effects of climate change and these effects can be monitored through the changes in the physical properties of sea water. In fact, Oceanographers use various probes for measuring the properties within the water column. CTDs (Conductivity, Temperature and Depth) provide profiles of physical and chemical parameters of the water column. A CTD device consists of Conductivity (C), Temperature (T) and Depth (D) probes to monitor the water column changes with respect to relative depth. An optical fibre-based point sensor used as a combined pressure (depth) and temperature sensor and the sensor system are described. Measurements accruing from underwater trials of a miniature sensor for pressure (depth) and temperature in the ocean and in fresh water are reported. The sensor exhibits excellent stability and its performance is shown to be comparable with the Sea-Bird Scientific commercial sensor: SBE9Plus.

  4. Underwater Depth and Temperature Sensing Based on Fiber Optic Technology for Marine and Fresh Water Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Babu Duraibabu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Oceanic conditions play an important role in determining the effects of climate change and these effects can be monitored through the changes in the physical properties of sea water. In fact, Oceanographers use various probes for measuring the properties within the water column. CTDs (Conductivity, Temperature and Depth provide profiles of physical and chemical parameters of the water column. A CTD device consists of Conductivity (C, Temperature (T and Depth (D probes to monitor the water column changes with respect to relative depth. An optical fibre-based point sensor used as a combined pressure (depth and temperature sensor and the sensor system are described. Measurements accruing from underwater trials of a miniature sensor for pressure (depth and temperature in the ocean and in fresh water are reported. The sensor exhibits excellent stability and its performance is shown to be comparable with the Sea-Bird Scientific commercial sensor: SBE9Plus.

  5. The Plasma Hearth Process Technology Development Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geimer, R.; Batdorf, J.; Wolfe, P.

    1993-01-01

    The US DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) is currently evaluating the Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) for potential treatment of several DOE waste types. The PHP is a high-temperature vitrification process that has potential application for a wide range of mixed waste types in both the low-level and transuranic mixed waste categories. The PHP is being tested under both the OTD Mixed Waste Integrated Program and the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration. Initial testing has been completed on several different surrogate waste forms that are representative of some of the DOE mixed waste streams. Destruction of organic material exceeds that of conventional incineration technologies. The vitrified residual has leaching characteristics comparable to glass formulations produced in the high-level waste program. The first phase of the PHP demonstration project has been successfully completed, and the project is currently beginning a comprehensive second phase of development and testing

  6. Underwater Vehicle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dick, James L

    2007-01-01

    There is thus provided an underwater vehicle having facility for maneuvering alongside a retrieving vehicle, as by manipulation of bow and stern planes, for engaging a hull surface of the retrieving...

  7. CO2 conversion by plasma technology: insights from modeling the plasma chemistry and plasma reactor design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaerts, A.; Berthelot, A.; Heijkers, S.; Kolev, St.; Snoeckx, R.; Sun, S.; Trenchev, G.; Van Laer, K.; Wang, W.

    2017-06-01

    In recent years there has been growing interest in the use of plasma technology for CO2 conversion. To improve this application, a good insight into the underlying mechanisms is of great importance. This can be obtained from modeling the detailed plasma chemistry in order to understand the chemical reaction pathways leading to CO2 conversion (either in pure form or mixed with another gas). Moreover, in practice, several plasma reactor types are being investigated for CO2 conversion, so in addition it is essential to be able to model these reactor geometries so that their design can be improved, and the most energy efficient CO2 conversion can be achieved. Modeling the detailed plasma chemistry of CO2 conversion in complex reactors is, however, very time-consuming. This problem can be overcome by using a combination of two different types of model: 0D chemical reaction kinetics models are very suitable for describing the detailed plasma chemistry, while the characteristic features of different reactor geometries can be studied by 2D or 3D fluid models. In the first instance the latter can be developed in argon or helium with a simple chemistry to limit the calculation time; however, the ultimate aim is to implement the more complex CO2 chemistry in these models. In the present paper, examples will be given of both the 0D plasma chemistry models and the 2D and 3D fluid models for the most common plasma reactors used for CO2 conversion in order to emphasize the complementarity of both approaches. Furthermore, based on the modeling insights, the paper discusses the possibilities and limitations of plasma-based CO2 conversion in different types of plasma reactors, as well as what is needed to make further progress in this field.

  8. Plasma science and technology for emerging economies an AAAPT experience

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book highlights plasma science and technology-related research and development work at institutes and universities networked through Asian African Association for Plasma Training (AAAPT) which was established in 1988. The AAAPT, with 52 member institutes in 24 countries, promotes the initiation and intensification of plasma research and development through cooperation and technology sharing.   With 13 chapters on fusion-relevant, laboratory and industrial plasmas for wide range of applications and basic research and a chapter on AAAPT network, it demonstrates how, with collaborations, high-quality, industrially relevant academic and scientific research on fusion, industrial and laboratory plasmas and plasma diagnostics can be successfully pursued in small research labs.   These plasma sciences and technologies include pioneering breakthroughs and applications in (i) fusion relevant research in the quest for long-term, clean energy source development using high-temperature, high- density plasmas and (ii...

  9. 20. AINSE plasma science and technology conference. Conference handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The 20th AINSE plasma science and technology conference was held at Flinders University of South Australia on 13-14 February 1995. Topics under discussion included plasma physics studies, current status of rotamak devices, plasma processing and material studies. The handbook contains the conference program, 54 abstracts and a list of participants.

  10. 20. AINSE plasma science and technology conference. Conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The 20th AINSE plasma science and technology conference was held at Flinders University of South Australia on 13-14 February 1995. Topics under discussion included plasma physics studies, current status of rotamak devices, plasma processing and material studies. The handbook contains the conference program, 54 abstracts and a list of participants

  11. Introduction to Plasma Technology Science, Engineering and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Harry, John Ernest

    2011-01-01

    Written by a university lecturer with more than forty years experience in plasma technology, this book adopts a didactic approach in its coverage of the theory, engineering and applications of technological plasmas. The theory is developed in a unified way to enable brevity and clarity, providing readers with the necessary background to assess the factors that affect the behavior of plasmas under different operating conditions. The major part of the book is devoted to the applications of plasma technology and their accompanying engineering aspects, classified by the various pressure and densit

  12. Underwater optical wireless communication network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnon, Shlomi

    2010-01-01

    The growing need for underwater observation and subsea monitoring systems has stimulated considerable interest in advancing the enabling technologies of underwater wireless communication and underwater sensor networks. This communication technology is expected to play an important role in investigating climate change, in monitoring biological, biogeochemical, evolutionary, and ecological changes in the sea, ocean, and lake environments, and in helping to control and maintain oil production facilities and harbors using unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs), submarines, ships, buoys, and divers. However, the present technology of underwater acoustic communication cannot provide the high data rate required to investigate and monitor these environments and facilities. Optical wireless communication has been proposed as the best alternative to meet this challenge. Models are presented for three kinds of optical wireless communication links: (a) a line-of-sight link, (b) a modulating retroreflector link, and (c) a reflective link, all of which can provide the required data rate. We analyze the link performance based on these models. From the analysis, it is clear that as the water absorption increases, the communication performance decreases dramatically for the three link types. However, by using the scattered light it was possible to mitigate this decrease in some cases. It is concluded from the analysis that a high-data-rate underwater optical wireless network is a feasible solution for emerging applications such as UUV-to-UUV links and networks of sensors, and extended ranges in these applications could be achieved by applying a multi-hop concept.

  13. Application of plasma technology to nuclear engineering fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masaaki; Akatsuka, Hiroshi

    1996-01-01

    In order to discuss about the application of the plasma technology to nuclear engineering fields, we mention two subjects, the oxygenation of metal chloride waste by oxygen plasma and the characterization of fine particles generated in the plasma process. Through the experimental results of two subjects, both of the advantage and the disadvantage of the plasma technology and their characteristics are shown and discussed. The following conclusions are obtained. The reactive plasma is effective to oxygenate the chloride wastes. The particle generation which is one of the disadvantages must not be specialized and its characteristics can be estimated. Consequently, the plasma technology should be applicable to nuclear engineering fields adopting its advantage and overcoming its disadvantage. (author)

  14. Drydock Extension - A 1980 Underwater Technology Survey for Extension of Time between Drydocking

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    stations in Las Palmas and Aruba routinely clean tankers and cargo ships in a twenty-four hour period. C. Research Underway for Advancing Technology: The...to 100 in order to expose the hull down to the turn of the bilge has been a routine practice since 1975 in Las Palmas , Canary Islands (BID 59, 134...San Diego, CA 92112 Continental Diving Service, Inc. International Paint Co. P. 0. Box 2484 3105 Lorena AvenueMorgan City, LA 70381 Baltimore

  15. ECONOMIC AND ENERGETICAL ANALYSIS OF IMPROVED WASTE UTILIZATION PLASMA TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serghei VAMBOL

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Energy and economic evaluation of the improved plasma waste utilization technological process, as well as an expediency substantiation of the use of improved plasma technology by comparing its energy consumption with other thermal methods of utilization. Methodology. Analysis of existing modern and advanced methods of waste management and its impact on environmental safety. Considering of energy and monetary costs to implement two different waste management technologies. Results. Studies have shown regular gasification ensure greater heating value due to differences, a significant amount of nitrogen than for plasma gasification. From the point of view of minimizing energy and monetary costs and environmental safety more promising is to offer advanced technology for plasma waste. To carry out the energy assessment of the appropriateness of the considered technologies-comparative calculation was carried out at the standard conditions. This is because in the processing of waste produced useful products, such as liquefied methane, synthetic gas (94% methane and a fuel gas for heating, suitable for sale that provides cost-effectiveness of this technology. Originality. Shown and evaluated ecological and economic efficiency of proposed improved plasma waste utilization technology compared with other thermal techniques. Practical value. Considered and grounded of energy and monetary costs to implement two different waste management technologies, namely ordinary gasification and using plasma generators. Proposed plasma waste utilization technology allows to obtain useful products, such as liquefied methane, synthetic gas and a fuel gas for heating, which are suitable for sale. Plant for improved plasma waste utilization technological process allows to compensate the daily and seasonal electricity and heat consumption fluctuations by allowing the storage of obtained fuel products.

  16. Plasma enhanced C1 chemistry for green technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro

    2013-09-01

    Plasma catalysis is one of the innovative next generation green technologies that meet the needs for energy and materials conservation as well as environmental protection. Non-thermal plasma uniquely generates reactive species independently of reaction temperature, and these species are used to initiate chemical reactions at unexpectedly lower temperatures than normal thermochemical reactions. Non-thermal plasma thus broadens the operation window of existing chemical conversion processes, and ultimately allows modification of the process parameters to minimize energy and material consumption. We have been specifically focusing on dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) as one of the viable non-thermal plasma sources for practical fuel reforming. In the presentation, room temperature one-step conversion of methane to methanol and hydrogen using a miniaturized DBD reactor (microplasma reactor) is highlighted. The practical impact of plasma technology on existing C1-chemistry is introduced, and then unique characteristics of plasma fuel reforming such as non-equilibrium product distribution is discussed.

  17. New developments of plasma science with pulsed power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Keiichi; Ozaki, Tetsuo

    2010-03-01

    In this proceedings, the papers presented at the symposium on “New developments of Plasma Science with Pulsed Power Technology” held at National Institute for Fusion Science on March 5-6, 2009 are collected. The papers reflect the present status and recent progress in the experimental and theoretical works on plasma science using pulsed power technology. (author)

  18. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, Ronald C.

    1980-08-01

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described. (MOW)

  19. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-08-01

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described

  20. Physics and application of plasmas based on pulsed power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotta, Eiki; Ozaki, Tetsuo

    2012-04-01

    The papers presented at the symposium on 'Physics and Application of Plasmas Based on Pulsed Power Technology' held on December 21-22, 2010 at National Institute of Fusion Science are collected. The papers in this proceeding reflect the current status and progress in the experimental and theoretical researches on high power particle beams and high energy density plasmas produced by pulsed power technology. (author)

  1. Technology and plasma-materials interaction processes of tokamak disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrath, R.T.; Kellman, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    A workshop on the technology and plasma-materials interaction processes of tokamak disruptions was held April 3, 1992 in Monterey, California, as a satellite meeting of the 10th International Conference on Plasma-Surface Interactions. The objective was to bring together researchers working on disruption measurements in operating tokamaks, those performing disruption simulation experiments using pulsed plasma gun, electron beam and laser systems, and computational physicists attempting to model the evolution and plasma-materials interaction processes of tokamak disruptions. This is a brief report on the workshop. 4 refs

  2. Degradation of sulfur dioxide using plasma technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrada M, N.; Garcia E, R.; Pacheco P, M.; Valdivia B, R.; Pacheco S, J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the electro-chemical study performed for sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) treatment using non thermal plasma coupled to a nano structured fluid bed enhancing the toxic gas removal and the adsorption of acids formed during plasma treatment, more of 80% of removal was obtained. Non thermal plasma was ignited by dielectric barrier discharge (Dbd). The research was developed through an analysis of the chemical kinetics of the process and experimental study of degradation; in each experiment the electrical parameters and the influence of carbon nano structures were monitored to establish the optimal conditions of degradation. We compared the theoretical and experimental results to conclude whether the proposed model is correct for degradation. (Author)

  3. Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Annual Reports 1996 and 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatramani, N.

    1999-04-01

    This report describes the activity of the Laser and Plasma Technology Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre during the two year period 1996- 1997. This division is engaged in the research and development of high power beams mainly laser, plasma and electron beams. Laser and Plasma Technology Division has strived to establish indigenous capability to cater to the requirements of Department of Atomic Energy. This involves development and technology readiness study of laser, plasma and electron beam devices. In addition, studies are also carried out on related physical phenomenon with a view to gain better understanding of the devices. This report has been compiled from individual reports of various groups/sections working in the division. A list of publications by the several members of the division is also included. (author)

  4. Application-driven development of plasma source technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, J.; Mantei, T. D.

    2003-09-01

    This article reviews major developments in etch- and deposition-driven plasma source technology over the past decades. We first review the radio-frequency parallel plate diode, summarizing its great impact but also its inherent problems. Ensuing sections then treat microwave plasma generation, electron cyclotron resonance power transfer enhancement, inductively coupled plasma sources, and (very briefly) the radio-frequency helicon source. We then introduce the important and relatively new issues of control of the ion energy distribution function and the tailoring of plasma chemistry, including the decoupling of chemistry from pressure and power. The emerging areas of ambient pressure plasma sources and miniature ``plasmas on a chip'' are summarized, and we conclude with a brief view to the future.

  5. PREFACE: 23rd National Symposium on Plasma Science & Technology (PLASMA-2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mago, V. K.; Ananthapadmanabhan, P. V.; Patil, D. S.; Das, A. K.

    2010-01-01

    It is our pleasure to present the proceedings of the 23rd National Symposium on Plasma Science and Technology (PLASMA-2008) held at Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai, 10- December 2008 in association with the Plasma Science Society of India. The Plasma Science Society of India has been holding regular symposia on general topics related to Plasma. The symposium was designed to provide a forum for young researchers in Plasma Science and Technology to interact with eminent plasma scientists from India and abroad and to present their work. The scope of the symposium included frontline research in Basic Plasma Physics as well as significant advances in Plasma Technology. In view of the ever-growing importance of Plasma Science and Technology to India's Nuclear Energy program, the focal theme of the symposium was chosen as 'Plasmas in Nuclear Fuel Cycle'. The scientific program of this four day symposium consisted of review talks, invited topical lectures, contributed oral and poster presentations in the following areas of Plasma Science & Technology. Basic Plasma Physics, simulations and modeling (BP) Nuclear fusion and Technology (NF) Space & Astrophysical Plasma(SA) Exotic Plasmas, Non-linear Dynamics(EP) Laser Plasma Interaction and Beam Physics (LP) Industrial applications of plasmas (IP) Plasma Diagnostics(PD) Plasmas and clean environment(PC) There was also a Special Session devoted to the focal theme Plasmas in Nuclear Fuel Cycle (PANFC) Applications in Nuclear Fusion Technology (ANFT) Physics and technology of Processing Plasmas in Nuclear Fuel Cycle (PPNFC). Plasma Technology finds wide applications not only in nuclear, space and defense-related industries but also in medical, nano-technology and semiconductor industries. Plasma technologies have distinguished themselves in terms of compactness, process efficiency, techno economics and innovative possibilities. As we advance into the new technology era, there is a need for evolving strategies to apply the

  6. Plasma technology of the surface polymer activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutra, Jorge C.N.; Mello, Sandra C.; Massi, Marcos; Otani, Choyu; Maciel, Homero S.; Bittencourt, Edison

    2005-01-01

    A number of polymers, especially rubbers, require surface treatment to achieve a satisfactory level of adhesion. The surface of EPDM rubber vulcanized is high hydrophobicity and is not suited for a number of potential applications, in particular, for adhering to the polyurethane liner of solid rocket propellants. In this case, plasma treatment can be a very attractive process because it can efficiently increase the surface energy attributed to surface oxidation with the introduction of polar groups 1, 2. In order to investigate the influence of the parameters on the modifications of the treated surface samples of EPDM rubber by plasma generated by gas oxygen and argon, the water and methylene iodide contact angles were measured at room temperature with an image analyzing using the sessile drop technique 3 - 6 . (author)

  7. The nonthermal plasma technologies for strategy of climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urashima, K.

    2009-01-01

    Japan was mandated to achieve under the Kyoto Protocol is a 6% reduction compared with 1990 in the period from 2008 to 2012. All countries, even developing countries, should be included and discussed in any plan. It must be flexible and there must be diversity. A high value is placed on making the best use of technology for conservation of energy etc., and to unite environmental preservation and economic development. Plasma processes are carried out in either the high-temperature environment of transferred and non-transferred plasmas or at pressures low enough to give large active volumes with higher electron and lower gas temperature glow discharge plasmas. Several eligible non-thermal plasma technologies are already finished for small scale pilot test, and are already in the stage of commercialization. (author)

  8. Treatment of organic waste using thermal plasma pyrolysis technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.; Tang, L.

    2007-01-01

    This paper outlines the principles of thermal plasma pyrolysis processes and discusses recent research activities about organic waste treatment using thermal plasma pyrolysis technology. Different kinds of organic wastes, varying from plastic and used tires to agricultural residue and medical waste, have been subjected to thermal plasma pyrolysis tests in laboratory and pilot scale projects. Plasma pyrolysis of organic waste usually gives two product streams: a combustible gas having a calorific value in the range of 4-9 MJ/Nm 3 and a carbonaceous residue. Pyrolysis conditions as well as some technical measures such as the quenching process and steam reforming have significant influences on the properties of these pyrolysis products. Research results indicated that thermal plasma pyrolysis may be a useful way of waste management for energy and material recovery

  9. Laser and Plasma Technology Division annual report 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatramani, N.; Verma, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    A brief account of the research and development (R and D) activities carried out by Laser and Plasma Technology Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay during the period 1994 is presented. The activities are reported under the headings: 1) laser activities, 2) thermal plasma activities, 3) electron beam activity. At the end of each section, a list of publications by the staff members in the field indicated by the title of the section is given. (author). refs., tabs., figs

  10. ITER symposium on burning plasma science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    An international symposium entitled 'Burning plasma science and technology on ITER' was held in Tokyo on 24 January 2002, the day after after the second Negotiation Meeting (N2). About 200 people took part in the symposium. Presentations were made by scientists of the four parties that participated in the N2 Meeting and by the director of the Princeton plasma physics laboratory, Prof. R. Goldston. The abstracts of these presentations are included in this issue

  11. Laser and Plasma Technology Division : annual report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    A brief account of the research and development (R and D) activities carried out by Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay during 1991 is presented. The R and D activities are reported under the headings (1) Laser Activities, (2) Thermal Plasma Activities, (3) Electron Beam Activities and (4) Divisional Workshop Activities. List of publications is given at the end of each activity heading

  12. Plasma technology: a technical economical and political challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, V.A. de; Vicente, L.C.; Bender, O.W.; Sanches Junior, O.

    1987-01-01

    To survey the State of the Art and Technic in Material, Process and Products by Plasma, it was needed to assemble economic, political and managerial variables that will affect the absortion and implantation of this technology in Brazil. Through a survey in industries, universities, research centers, energy agencies and financial and forster institutions it was possible to build a frame that gave us conditions to forecasting and suggest some mesures to Plasma sector. (author) [pt

  13. Laser and Plasma Technology Division : annual report (1990-91)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    A brief account of the research and development (R and D) activities carried out by Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay during the period 1990-91 is presented. The R and D activities are reported under the headings: 1) Laser Activities, 2) Thermal Plasma Activities, and 3) Electron Beam Activities. List of publications including journal articles, papers published in symposia, conferences etc. is given at the end. (original). figs

  14. Laser and Plasma Technology Division annual report 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatramani, N.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the activity of the Laser and Plasma Technology Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai during the period 1995. This division is engaged in the research and development of high power beams namely lasers, plasma and electron beams which are characterized by high power density. This division has strived to establish indigenous capability to cater to the requirements of the Department of Atomic Energy. The broad program objectives of the division are (1) development and technology readiness studies of laser, plasma and electron beam devices; (2) studies on related physical phenomena with a view to gain better understanding of the devices and (3) improvements in technology and exploration of new areas. This report has been compiled from individual reports of various groups/sections with marginal editing. At the end of each section; a list of publications by the staff members in the field indicated by the title of the section is given. refs., figs., tabs

  15. Underwater manipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrum, P.B.; Cohen, G.H.

    1993-04-20

    Self-contained, waterproof, water-submersible, remote-controlled apparatus is described for manipulating a device, such as an ultrasonic transducer for measuring crack propagation on an underwater specimen undergoing shock testing. The subject manipulator includes metal bellows for transmittal of angular motions without the use of rotating shaft seals or O-rings. Inside the manipulator, a first stepper motor controls angular movement. In the preferred embodiment, the bellows permit the first stepper motor to move an ultrasonic transducer [plus minus]45 degrees in a first plane and a second bellows permit a second stepper motor to move the transducer [plus minus]10 degrees in a second plane orthogonal to the first. In addition, an XY motor-driven table provides XY motion.

  16. Underwater manipulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrum, P.B.; Cohen, G.H.

    1993-01-01

    Self-contained, waterproof, water-submersible, remote-controlled apparatus is described for manipulating a device, such as an ultrasonic transducer for measuring crack propagation on an underwater specimen undergoing shock testing. The subject manipulator includes metal bellows for transmittal of angular motions without the use of rotating shaft seals or O-rings. Inside the manipulator, a first stepper motor controls angular movement. In the preferred embodiment, the bellows permit the first stepper motor to move an ultrasonic transducer ±45 degrees in a first plane and a second bellows permit a second stepper motor to move the transducer ±10 degrees in a second plane orthogonal to the first. In addition, an XY motor-driven table provides XY motion

  17. The 22nd AINSE plasma science and technology conference. Conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    These proceedings contain the extended abstracts of the papers and posters presented at the 22nd AINSE plasma science and technology conference hosted by the Australian National University in Canberra. Topics under discussion included: fusion devices and experiments; plasma production; plasma confinement; plasma heating and current drive; plasma waves; plasma diagnostics; basic collisionless plasma physics; laser produced plasmas and inertial confinement; low-temperature plasmas and interferometry. The individual papers were indexed separately

  18. Plasma Science Committee (PLSC) and study on new opportunities in plasma science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Plasma Science Committee (PLSC) of the National Research Council (NRC) is charged with monitoring the health of the field of plasma science in the United States. Accordingly, the Committee identifies and examines both broad and specific issues affecting the field. Regular meetings, teleconferences, briefings from agencies and the scientific community, the formation of study panels to prepare reports, and special symposia are among the mechanisms used by the PLSC to meet its charge. This progress report presents a review of PLSC activities from July 15, 1991 to May 31, 1992. The details of prior activities are discussed in earlier reports. This report also includes the status of activities associated with the PLSC study on opportunities in plasma science and technology. During the above period, the PLSC has continued to track and participate in, when requested, discussions on the health of the field. Much of the perspective of the PLSC has been presented in the recently-published report Research Briefing on Contemporary Problems in Plasma Science. That report has served as the basis for briefings to representatives of the federal government as well as the community-at-large. In keeping with its charge to identify and highlight specific areas for scientific and technological opportunities, the PLSC completed publication of the report Plasma Processing of Materials: Scientific and Technological Opportunities and launched a study on new opportunities in plasma science and technology

  19. Physics and applications of plasmas produced by pulsed power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Tetsuo; Katsuki, Sunao

    2013-10-01

    The papers presented at the symposium on 'Physics and Applications of Plasmas Produced by Pulsed Power Technology' held on March 27-28, 2012 at the National Institute for Fusion Science are collected in these proceedings. The papers in these proceedings reflect the current status and progress in the experimental and theoretical research on high power particle beams and high energy density plasmas produced by pulsed power technology. This issue is the collection of 22 papers presented at the entitled meeting. Ten of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  20. Underwater Robots Surface in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Randy C.; Hacking, Kip S.; Damarjian, Jennifer L.; Wright, Geoffrey A.; Truscott, Tadd

    2015-01-01

    Underwater robots (or ROVs: Remotely Operated Vehicles as they are typically called in industry) have recently become a very popular instructional STEM activity. Nationally, ROVs have been used in science and technology classrooms for several years in cities such as Seattle, San Diego, Virginia Beach, and other coastal areas. In the past two…

  1. III International Conference on Laser and Plasma Researches and Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    A.P. Kuznetsov and S.V. Genisaretskaya III Conference on Plasma and Laser Research and Technologies took place on January 24th until January 27th, 2017 at the National Research Nuclear University "MEPhI" (NRNU MEPhI). The Conference was organized by the Institute for Laser and Plasma Technologies and was supported by the Competitiveness Program of NRNU MEPhI. The conference program consisted of nine sections: • Laser physics and its application • Plasma physics and its application • Laser, plasma and radiation technologies in industry • Physics of extreme light fields • Controlled thermonuclear fusion • Modern problems of theoretical physics • Challenges in physics of solid state, functional materials and nanosystems • Particle accelerators and radiation technologies • Modern trends of quantum metrology. The conference is based on scientific fields as follows: • Laser, plasma and radiation technologies in industry, energetic, medicine; • Photonics, quantum metrology, optical information processing; • New functional materials, metamaterials, “smart” alloys and quantum systems; • Ultrahigh optical fields, high-power lasers, Mega Science facilities; • High-temperature plasma physics, environmentally-friendly energetic based on controlled thermonuclear fusion; • Spectroscopic synchrotron, neutron, laser research methods, quantum mechanical calculation and computer modelling of condensed media and nanostructures. More than 250 specialists took part in the Conference. They represented leading Russian scientific research centers and universities (National Research Centre "Kurchatov Institute", A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow Institute of Physics and Tecnology and others) and leading scientific centers and universities from Germany, France, USA, Canada, Japan. We would like to thank heartily all of

  2. Recent development of plasma pollution control technology: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Shih Chang

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Gaseous pollution control, solid and liquid waste treatments have been commercialized based on incineration, catalysis, adsorption, disposal with landfill, etc. More recently technology based on plasmas has become significant due to the advantages such as lower costs, higher treatment and energy efficiencies, smaller space volume, etc. In order to commercialize this new technology, the treatment rate, energy efficiency of treatment, pressure drop of reactor, reusable by-products production rate, must be improved, based on the identifications of major fundamental mechanism of processes, optimizations of reactor, and power supply for an integrated system. In this work, recent development of plasma pollution control technology was critically reviewed and the principle of processes and reactor technologies were outlined. Special attention will be focused on material processing generated pollutants.

  3. New Plasma Technology for a Cleaner Environmant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Daniel R.

    2000-04-01

    Onboard hydrogen production using compact plasmatron fuel converters has the potential to significantly improve the environmental quality of automobiles, trucks and buses. Plasmatron electric discharge technology has been employed to develop compact, rapid response and efficient devices which convert of a wide range of fuels into hydrogen-rich gas. Hydrogen rich gas has beneficial effects on engine operation and may also be useful in exhaust aftertreatment. Use of compact plasmatron fuel converters with present spark ignition engine technology could facilitate a 70-90% reduction in nitrogen oxide emissions from automobiles. Nitrogen oxides are a major ingredient in the production of smog. Hydrocarbon emissions could also be significantly reduced. Hydrogen-rich gas could also be employed to reduce pollution from Diesel engine vehicles. There could also be applications to hybrid and fuel cell powered vehicles. In addition, hydrogen generation using compact plasmatron fuel converters might be employed to facilitate the use of biomass derived fuels including oils by onboard conversion into hydrogen-rich gas. Use of biomass derived fuels on board could lead to a net reduction in CO2 production. Compact plasmatron fuel converters facilitate hydrogen production from partial oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels by providing increased reactive species, mixing and increased temperatures. Experimental studies of hydrogen production from compact plasmatron fuel converters and effects on laboratory engine operation will be discussed.

  4. Development of Plasma Technologies at IPP NSC KIPT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tereshin, V.I.; Chebotarev, V.V.; Garkusha, I.E.; Lapshin, V.I.; Shvets, O.M.; Taran, V.S.

    2001-01-01

    Plasma Technologies in Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT are recently developed in the following directions. Material surfaces modification under their irradiation with pulsed plasma streams of different working gases. Besides traditional analysis of improvements of tribological characteristics and structural-phase changes of the modified layers recently we started investigations of material corrosions characteristic improvement under influence of pulsed plasma on the material surfaces. As to the surface coatings in arc discharges of Bulat type devices, new trends are related with multi-layers coatings, using Ti-AI-N coatings in cutting tools, using high frequency discharges or combined HF- and arc discharges for increasing the nomenclature of goods to be coated. Development of ozonators is respectively new area for IPP NSC KIPT. On the base of barrier high-frequency discharge there were developed a number of high efficiency ozonators with ozone production up to 100 G/hour. (author)

  5. Laser and Plasma Technology Division annual report 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatramani, N.; Verma, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the activities of the Laser and Plasma Technology Division during the year 1993. This Division is engaged in the research and development of high power beams namely laser, plasma and electron beams, which are characterized by high power density, normally in excess of 1 kW/mm 2 . Laser and Plasma Technology Division has strived to establish indigenous capability to cater to the requirements of the Department of Atomic Energy. The broad programme objectives of the Division are : (1) Development and technology readiness studies of laser, plasma and electron beam devices, (2) Studies on related physical phenomena with a view to gain better understanding of the devices, and (3) Improvements in technology and exploration of new areas. This report covers the activities of the Division during 1993 and describes how successfully the objectives have been met. The activities described in the report are diverse in nature. The report has been compiled from individual reports of various groups/sections with marginal editing. (author). refs., tabs., figs

  6. Recycling of the Electronic Waste Applying the Plasma Reactor Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázár, Marián; Jasminská, Natália; Čarnogurská, Mária; Dobáková, Romana

    2016-12-01

    The following paper discusses a high-temperature gasification process and melting of electronic components and computer equipment using plasma reactor technology. It analyses the marginal conditions of batch processing, as well as the formation of solid products which result from the procedure of waste processing. Attention is also paid to the impact of the emerging products on the environment.

  7. Recycling of the Electronic Waste Applying the Plasma Reactor Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lázár Marián

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The following paper discusses a high-temperature gasification process and melting of electronic components and computer equipment using plasma reactor technology. It analyses the marginal conditions of batch processing, as well as the formation of solid products which result from the procedure of waste processing. Attention is also paid to the impact of the emerging products on the environment.

  8. Underwater Sound Reference Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Underwater Sound Reference Division (USRD) serves as the U.S. standardizing activity in the area of underwater acoustic measurements, as the National Institute...

  9. Plasma Modeling Enabled Technology Development Empowered by Fundamental Scattering Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-05-01

    Technology development increasingly relies on modeling to speed the innovation cycle. This is particularly true for systems using low temperature plasmas (LTPs) and their role in enabling energy efficient processes with minimal environmental impact. In the innovation cycle, LTP modeling supports investigation of fundamental processes that seed the cycle, optimization of newly developed technologies, and prediction of performance of unbuilt systems for new applications. Although proof-of-principle modeling may be performed for idealized systems in simple gases, technology development must address physically complex systems that use complex gas mixtures that now may be multi-phase (e.g., in contact with liquids). The variety of fundamental electron and ion scattering, and radiation transport data (FSRD) required for this modeling increases as the innovation cycle progresses, while the accuracy required of that data depends on the intended outcome. In all cases, the fidelity, depth and impact of the modeling depends on the availability of FSRD. Modeling and technology development are, in fact, empowered by the availability and robustness of FSRD. In this talk, examples of the impact of and requirements for FSRD in the innovation cycle enabled by plasma modeling will be discussed using results from multidimensional and global models. Examples of fundamental studies and technology optimization will focus on microelectronics fabrication and on optically pumped lasers. Modeling of systems as yet unbuilt will address the interaction of atmospheric pressure plasmas with liquids. Work supported by DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science and the National Science Foundation.

  10. FOREWORD: 23rd National Symposium on Plasma Science & Technology (PLASMA-2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, A. K.

    2010-01-01

    The Twentieth Century has been a defining period for Plasma Science and Technology. The state of ionized matter, so named by Irving Langmuir in the early part of twentieth century, has now evolved in to a multidisciplinary area with scientists and engineers from various specializations working together to exploit the unique properties of the plasma medium. There have been great improvements in the basic understanding of plasmas as a many body system bound by complex collective Coulomb interactions of charges, atoms, molecules, free radicals and photons. Simultaneously, many advanced plasma based technologies are increasingly being implemented for industrial and societal use. The emergence of the multination collaborative project International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project has provided the much needed boost to the researchers working on thermonuclear fusion plasmas. In addition, the other plasma applications like MHD converters, hydrogen generation, advanced materials (synthesis, processing and surface modification), environment (waste beneficiation, air and water pollution management), nanotechnology (synthesis, deposition and etching), light production, heating etc are actively being pursued in governmental and industrial sectors. For India, plasma science and technology has traditionally remained an important area of research. It was nearly a century earlier that the Saha ionization relation pioneered the way to interpret experimental data from a vast range of near equilibrium plasmas. Today, Indian research contributions and technology demonstration capabilities encompass thermonuclear fusion devices, nonlinear plasma phenomena, plasma accelerators, beam plasma interactions, dusty and nonneutral plasmas, industrial plasmas and plasma processing of materials, nano synthesis and structuring, astrophysical and space plasmas etc. India's participation in the ITER programme is now reflected in increased interest in the research and development

  11. II International Conference on Plasma and Laser Research and Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurnaev, V A; Dodulad, E I

    2016-01-01

    II Conference on Plasma and Laser Research and Technologies took place on January 25 th until January 27 th , 2016 at National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI” (NRNU MEPhI). It was organized by the Institute of Laser and Plasma Technologies and was supported by the Competitiveness Program of NRNU MEPhI. The Conference consisted of four sections: Plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion, Laser physics, Modern aspects of solid state matter physics and Charged particle accelerators. The Conference provided participants an opportunity to present their research results for the consideration of a wide audience from the sidelines of science. The main topics of the Conference were: • Controlled nuclear fusion with magnetic and inertial confinement; • Low-temperature plasma and its application in modern technology; • Laser physics and technologies for industry, environmental control and precise measurements; • Optical information control, holography, spintronics and photonics; • Modern aspects of solid state matter physics and nanophysics; • Charged particle accelerators. More than 200 specialists on plasma, laser and solid state physics took part in the II Conference. They represented leading Russian scientific research centres and universities (such as Troitsk Institute of Innovative and Thermonuclear Research, Institute of Crystallography, National Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry and others) and universities from Belarus, Ukraine, Germany, USA, Canada, Belgium, and Sweden. All report presentations were broadcasted online on the NRNU MEPhI official site. The translation was watched by viewers from Moscow, Prague, St. Petersburgh and other cities, who could not attend the Conference. We would like to thank heartily all of the speakers, participants and organizing committee members for their contribution to the conference. (paper)

  12. Plasma Science Committee (PLSC) and the Panel on Opportunities in Plasma Science and Technology (OPST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Plasma Science Committee (PLSC) of the National Research Council (NRC) is charged with monitoring the health of the field of plasma science in the United States and identifies and examines both broad and specific issues affecting the field. Regular meetings, teleconferences, briefings from agencies and the scientific community, the formation of study panels to prepare reports, and special symposia are among the mechanisms used by the PLSC to meet its charge. During July 1992, the PLSC sponsored a workshop on nonneutral plasmas in traps. Although no written report on the workshop results, was prepared for public distribution, a summary of highlights was provided to the OPST Subpanel on Nonneutral Plasmas. The PLSC also continued its follow-up briefings and discussions on the results of the results of the report Plasma Processing of materials. Scientific and Technological Opportunities. As a result of these activities, the Committee is now working with the NRC Committee on Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences (CAMOS) to organize a symposium on database needs in plasma processing of materials

  13. A Framework for Evaluating Advanced Search Concepts for Multiple Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) Mine Countermeasures (MCM)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gooding, Trent

    2001-01-01

    .... In recent years, autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV) have emerged as a viable technology for conducting underwater search, survey, and clearance operations in support of the mine countermeasures (MCM) mission...

  14. Laser and Plasma Technology Division annual report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatramani, N.; Verma, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    The report describes the research and development (R and D) activities of Laser and Plasma technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay during 1992. The broad programme objectives of the Division are: (1) development and technology readiness studies of laser, plasma and electron beam devices, (2) studies on related physical phenomena with a view to gain better understanding of the devices, and (3) improvements in technology and exploration of new areas. The R and D activities are reported under the sections entitled: (1) Laser Activities, (2) Thermal Plasma Activities, and (3) Electron Beam Activities. At the end of each section, a list of publications by the staff members in the field indicated by the title of the section is given. Some of the highlights of R and D work during 1992 are:(1) fabrication of an electron beam sustained CO 2 laser, (2) commissioning of a 6.5 m high LMMHD (Liquid Metal Magneto-hydrodynamic) generator loaded with 1.5 tons of mercury, (3) fabrication of electron beam processing equipment, and (4) study of the magnetic properties of vanadium nitride films produced by reactive sputtering in an indigenously developed DC magnetron sputtering equipment. (author). 56 figs., 6 tabs

  15. An underwater optical wireless communication network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnon, Shlomi

    2009-08-01

    The growing need for underwater observation and sub-sea monitoring systems has stimulated considerable interest in advancing the enabling technologies of underwater wireless communication and underwater sensor networks. This communication technology is expected to play an important role in investigating climate change, in monitoring biological, bio-geochemical, evolutionary and ecological changes in the sea, ocean and lake environments and in helping to control and maintain oil production facilities and harbors using unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs), submarines, ships, buoys, and divers. However, the present technology of underwater acoustic communication cannot provide the high data rate required to investigate and monitor these environments and facilities. Optical wireless communication has been proposed as the best alternative to meet this challenge. We present models of three kinds of optical wireless communication links a) a line-of-sight link, b) a modulating retro-reflector link and c) a reflective link, all of which can provide the required data rate. We analyze the link performance based on these models. From the analysis, it is clear that as the water absorption increases, the communication performance decreases dramatically for the three link types. However, by using the scattered lighted it was possible to mitigate this decrease in some cases. We conclude from the analysis that a high data rate underwater optical wireless network is a feasible solution for emerging applications such as UUV to UUV links and networks of sensors, and extended ranges in these applications could be achieved by applying a multi-hop concept.

  16. Underwater cutting techniques developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bach, F.-W.

    1990-01-01

    The primary circuit structures of different nuclear powerplants are constructed out of stainless steels, ferritic steels, plated ferritic steels and alloys of aluminium. According to the level of the specific radiation of these structures, it is necessary for dismantling to work with remote controlled cutting techniques. The most successful way to protect the working crew against exposure of radiation is to operate underwater in different depths. The following thermal cutting processes are more or less developed to work under water: For ferritic steels only - flame cutting; For ferritic steels, stainless steels, cladded steels and aluminium alloys - oxy-arc-cutting, arc-waterjet-cutting with a consumable electrode, arc-saw-cutting, plasma-arc-cutting and plasma-arc-saw. The flame cutting is a burning process, all the other processes are melt-cutting processes. This paper explains the different techniques, giving a short introduction of the theory, a discussion of the possibilities with the advantages and disadvantages of these processes giving a view into the further research work in this interesting field. (author)

  17. Affordable underwater wireless optical communication using LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilipenko, Vladimir; Arnon, Shlomi

    2013-09-01

    In recent years the need for high data rate underwater wireless communication (WC) has increased. Nowadays, the conventional technology for underwater communication is acoustic. However, the maximum data rate that acoustic technology can provide is a few kilobits per second. On the other hand, emerging applications such as underwater imaging, networks of sensors and swarms of underwater vehicles require much faster data rates. As a result, underwater optical WC, which can provide much higher data rates, has been proposed as an alternative means of communication. In addition to high data rates, affordable communication systems become an important feature in the development requirements. The outcome of these requirements is a new system design based on off-the-shelf components such as blue and green light emitting diodes (LEDs). This is due to the fact that LEDs offer solutions characterized by low cost, high efficiency, reliability and compactness. However, there are some challenges to be met when incorporating LEDs as part of the optical transmitter, such as low modulation rates and non linearity. In this paper, we review the main challenges facing the incorporation of LEDs as an integral part of underwater WC systems and propose some techniques to mitigate the LED limitations in order to achieve high data rate communication

  18. Wireless sensor technology for in-situ plasma process monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahan, David

    2015-09-01

    There is an increasing demand for plasma measurement and control solutions to cope with the growing complexity of integrated circuit manufacture in the semiconductor industry. Standard plasma diagnostic instruments used in research, such as the Langmuir probe, are not suitable for use in the production environment for myriad reasons - contamination of the process being one of the main concerns. Silicon wafer based wireless sensors, which measure temperature during the process, have gained the most traction with tool manufacturers and chip makers - albeit during process development or the PM cycle rather than live production. In this presentation we will discuss two novel wireless technologies that have the potential for use in process tools. The first is an ion detector embedded in a silicon wafer. The sensor measures the average ion flux and the maximum ion energy during the process. This information is stored and is downloaded later for analysis. The second technology consists of a wireless sensor that sits inside the process and communicates data in real time to a detector installed on the rf power line. This platform is similar to RFID technology and can be combined with various sensor types to transmit data to the user during the process.

  19. International Conference on Underwater Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Jaulin, Luc; Creuze, Vincent; Debese, Nathalie; Quidu, Isabelle; Clement, Benoît; Billon-Coat, Annick

    2016-01-01

    This volume constitutes the results of the International Conference on Underwater Environment, MOQESM’14, held at “Le Quartz” Conference Center in Brest, France, on October 14-15, 2014, within the framework of the 9th Sea Tech Week, International Marine Science and Technology Event. The objective of MOQESM'14 was to bring together researchers from both academia and industry, interested in marine robotics and hydrography with application to the coastal environment mapping and underwater infrastructures surveys. The common thread of the conference is the combination of technical control, perception, and localization, typically used in robotics, with the methods of mapping and bathymetry. The papers presented in this book focus on two main topics. Firstly, coastal and infrastructure mapping is addressed, focusing not only on hydrographic systems, but also on positioning systems, bathymetry, and remote sensing. The proposed methods rely on acoustic sensors such as side scan sonars, multibeam echo sounders, ...

  20. Underwater Scene Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nanyoung

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an underwater scene composition for elementary-education majors. This project deals with watercolor with crayon or oil-pastel resist (medium); the beauty of nature represented by fish in the underwater scene (theme); texture and pattern (design elements); drawing simple forms (drawing skill); and composition…

  1. Studies on the Application of Plasma Arc Technology to Destruction of Shipboard Waste

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sartwell, Bruce

    1999-01-01

    ..., and how plasma arc technology is applied to waste treatment. It provides a description of the development of the plasma arc research facility at NRL and the experimental and theoretical modeling that was conducted at NRL from 1995 to 1998...

  2. Technological challenges at ITER plasma facing components production in Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazul, I.V., E-mail: mazuliv@niiefa.spb.su [Efremov Institute, 196641 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Belyakov, V.A.; Gervash, A.A.; Giniyatulin, R.N.; Guryeva, T.M.; Kuznetsov, V.E.; Makhankov, A.N.; Okunev, A.A. [Efremov Institute, 196641 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Sevryukov, O.N. [MEPhI, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Technological aspects of ITER PFC manufacturing in Russia are presented. • Range of technologies to be used during manufacturing of ITER PFC at Efremov Institute has been, in general, defined and their complexity, originality and difficulty are described. • Some features and challenges of welding, brazing and various tests are discussed. - Abstract: Major part of ITER plasma facing components will be manufactured in the Russian Federation (RF). Operational conditions and other requirements to these components, as well as the scale of production, are quite unique. These unique features and related technological solutions found in the frame of the project are discussed. Procedure breakdown and results of qualification for the proposed technologies and potential producers are presented, based on mockups production and testing. Design of qualification mockups and prototypes, testing programs and results are described. Basic quantitative and qualitative parameters of manufactured components and methods of quality control are presented. Critical manufacturing issues and prospects for unique production for future fusion needs are discussed.

  3. Science and technology of plasma activated direct wafer bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberds, Brian Edward

    This dissertation studied the kinetics of silicon direct wafer bonding with emphasis on low temperature bonding mechanisms. The project goals were to understand the topological requirements for initial bonding, develop a tensile test to measure the bond strength as a function of time and temperature and, using the kinetic information obtained, develop lower temperature methods of bonding. A reproducible surface metrology metric for bonding was best described by power spectral density derived from atomic force microscopy measurements. From the tensile strength kinetics study it was found that low annealing temperatures could be used to obtain strong bonds, but at the expense of longer annealing times. Three models were developed to describe the kinetics. A diffusion controlled model and a reaction rate controlled model were developed for the higher temperature regimes (T > 600sp°C), and an electric field assisted oxidation model was proposed for the low temperature range. An in situ oxygen plasma treatment was used to further enhance the field-controlled mechanism which resulted in dramatic increases in the low temperature bonding kinetics. Multiple internal transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (MIT-FTIR) was used to monitor species evolution at the bonded interface and a capacitance-voltage (CV) study was undertaken to investigate charge distribution and surface states resulting from plasma activation. A short, less than a minute, plasma exposure prior to contacting the wafers was found to obtain very strong bonds for hydrophobic silicon wafers at very low temperatures (100sp°C). This novel bonding method may enable new technologies involving heterogeneous material systems or bonding partially fabricated devices to become realities.

  4. Proceedings of the 21st symposium on plasma physics and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulhanek, P.; Rezac, K.; Smetana, M.

    2004-01-01

    The supplement contains 159 papers out of the 229 papers presented at the conference; these papers were selected through the review process of the Czechoslovak Journal of Physics. The papers are divided into 5 categories corresponding to the main topics of the symposium, which covered all kinds of plasma research and associated applications: tokamaks and other magnetic confinement devices; short lived plasmas (plasma focus, z-pinch, X-ray sources); laser plasma; low temperature plasma; and plasma technology. All 22 papers dealing with tokamaks and other magnetic confinement devices were submitted to INIS as well as all 31 papers discussing short lived plasmas. (A.K.)

  5. Underwater 3D filming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Rinaldi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available After an experimental phase of many years, 3D filming is now effective and successful. Improvements are still possible, but the film industry achieved memorable success on 3D movie’s box offices due to the overall quality of its products. Special environments such as space (“Gravity” and the underwater realm look perfect to be reproduced in 3D. “Filming in space” was possible in “Gravity” using special effects and computer graphic. The underwater realm is still difficult to be handled. Underwater filming in 3D was not that easy and effective as filming in 2D, since not long ago. After almost 3 years of research, a French, Austrian and Italian team realized a perfect tool to film underwater, in 3D, without any constrains. This allows filmmakers to bring the audience deep inside an environment where they most probably will never have the chance to be.

  6. Underwater Adhesives Retrofit Pipelines with Advanced Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Houston-based Astro Technology Inc. used a partnership with Johnson Space Center to pioneer an advanced fiber-optic monitoring system for offshore oil pipelines. The company's underwater adhesives allow it to retrofit older deepwater systems in order to measure pressure, temperature, strain, and flow properties, giving energy companies crucial data in real time and significantly decreasing the risk of a catastrophe.

  7. Underwater Coatings for Contamination Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann-Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

    2004-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is deactivating several fuel storage basins. Airborne contamination is a concern when the sides of the basins are exposed and allowed to dry during water removal. One way of controlling this airborne contamination is to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls are still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market that are used in marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives are easily applied and adhere well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INEEL fuel pools. The four pools considered included (1) Test Area North (TAN-607) with epoxy painted concrete walls; (2) Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) (CPP-603) with bare concrete walls; (3) Materials Test Reactor (MTR) Canal with stainless steel lined concrete walls; and (4) Power Burst Facility (PBF-620) with stainless steel lined concrete walls on the bottom and epoxy painted carbon steel lined walls on the upper portions. Therefore, the four materials chosen for testing included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The typical water temperature of the pools varies from 55 F to 80 F dependent on the pool and the season. These tests were done at room temperature. The following criteria were used during this evaluation. The underwater coating must: (1) Be easy to apply; (2) Adhere well to the four surfaces of interest; (3) Not change or have a negative impact on water chemistry or clarity; (4) Not be hazardous in final applied form; and (5) Be proven in other underwater applications. In addition, it is desirable for the coating to have a high pigment or high cross-link density to prevent radiation from penetrating. This paper will detail the testing completed and the test results. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates

  8. Recent developments in underwater repair welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offer, H.P.; Chapman, T.L.; Willis, E.R.; Maslakowski, J.; Van Diemen, P.; Smith, B.W.

    2001-01-01

    As nuclear plants age and reactor internal components begin to show increased evidence of age-related phenomena such as corrosion and fatigue, interest in the development of cost-effective mitigation and repair remedies grows. One technology currently receiving greater development and application program focus is underwater welding. Underwater welding, as used herein, is the application of weld metal to a substrate surface that is wet, but locally dry in the immediate area surrounding the welding torch. The locally dry environment is achieved by the use of a mechanical device that is specifically designed for water exclusion from the welding torch, surface to be welded, and the welding groove. This paper will explore recent developments in the use of underwater welding as a mitigation and repair technique. (author)

  9. A man-made object detection for underwater TV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Binbin; Wang, Wenwu; Chen, Yao

    2018-03-01

    It is a great challenging task to complete an automatic search of objects underwater. Usually the forward looking sonar is used to find the target, and then the initial identification of the target is completed by the side-scan sonar, and finally the confirmation of the target is accomplished by underwater TV. This paper presents an efficient method for automatic extraction of man-made sensitive targets in underwater TV. Firstly, the image of underwater TV is simplified with taking full advantage of the prior knowledge of the target and the background; then template matching technology is used for target detection; finally the target is confirmed by extracting parallel lines on the target contour. The algorithm is formulated for real-time execution on limited-memory commercial-of-the-shelf platforms and is capable of detection objects in underwater TV.

  10. Proceedings of the thirty second national symposium on plasma science and technology: plasma for societal benefits: book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dave, Sandhya; Shravan Kumar, S.; Vijayakumaran; Singh, Raj; Awasthi, L.M.

    2017-01-01

    This symposium covers topics on: basic plasma, computer modelling for plasma, exotic plasma, industrial plasma, laser plasma theory, nuclear fusion, plasma diagnostics, laser plasma, plasma processing, pulsed power, space and astrophysical plasma. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  11. Instrument technology for magnetosphere plasma imaging from high Earth orbit. Design of a radio plasma sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, D. Mark; Reinisch, Bodo W.

    1995-01-01

    The use of radio sounding techniques for the study of the ionospheric plasma dates back to G. Briet and M. A. Tuve in 1926. Ground based swept frequency sounders can monitor the electron number density (N(sub e)) as a function of height (the N(sub e) profile). These early instruments evolved into a global network that produced high-resolution displays of echo time delay vs frequency on 35-mm film. These instruments provided the foundation for the success of the International Geophysical Year (1958). The Alouette and International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) programs pioneered the used of spaceborne, swept frequency sounders to obtain N(sub e) profiles of the topside of the ionosphere, from a position above the electron density maximum. Repeated measurements during the orbit produced an orbital plane contour which routinely provided density measurements to within 10%. The Alouette/ISIS experience also showed that even with a high powered transmitter (compared to the low power sounder possible today) a radio sounder can be compatible with other imaging instruments on the same satellite. Digital technology was used on later spacecraft developed by the Japanese (the EXOS C and D) and the Soviets (Intercosmos 19 and Cosmos 1809). However, a full coherent pulse compression and spectral integrating capability, such as exist today for ground-based sounders (Reinisch et al., 1992), has never been put into space. NASA's 1990 Space Physics Strategy Implementation Study "The NASA Space Physics Program from 1995 to 2010" suggested using radio sounders to study the plasmasphere and the magnetopause and its boundary layers (Green and Fung, 1993). Both the magnetopause and plasmasphere, as well as the cusp and boundary layers, can be observed by a radio sounder in a high-inclination polar orbit with an apogee greater than 6 R(sub e) (Reiff et al., 1994; Calvert et al., 1995). Magnetospheric radio sounding from space will provide remote density measurements of

  12. Environmental application research and future plans in plasma arc technology at the georgia institute of technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemeth, J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper summarizes the facilities and past, current, and future research efforts at the georgia institute of technology plasma Arc research facility established in 1992. This research facility was established specifically to develop and test applications related to waste management and various remediation concepts. The results of research programs in the vitrification of asbestos materials, municipal incinerator ash, and in situ testing programs, including soil remediation, waste to energy research, landfill remediation and capacity management. The presentation will also include conference and symposium announcements and invitations. 9 tabs

  13. Proceedings of the 16th symposium on plasma physics and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Among 53 papers collected in the proceedings, 28 papers deal with the theory and modelling (8 papers), experimental research (11 papers) and diagnostics of high-temperature plasmas. These include lower hybrid current drive in tokamaks, plasma heating by electron beams, laser plasma interaction and z-pinch experiments. In the diagnostic papers, attention is mostly paid to X-ray and optical plasma spectroscopy and to advanced Langmuir probe diagnostics. The remaining papers discuss low-temperature plasmas and their applications. In this group, 8 papers deal with low-pressure electric discharges, 5 papers with high-pressure arcs, glidarcs and plasma torches, and 12 papers with various plasma technology topics, such as thin film deposition, plasma spraying and plasma chemistry. (J.U.)

  14. Texturation and superhydrophobicity of polyethylene terephthalate thanks to plasma technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarrade, Jeanne; Darmanin, Thierry; Taffin de Givenchy, Elisabeth; Guittard, Frédéric; Debarnot, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Anti-bioadhesive surfaces were designed from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) by three steps plasma-treatment. First, the nano-pattern is created by oxygen plasma-treatment with controlled dimensions. Then, the plasma-treated polymeric surface was hydrophobized with a tetrafluorocarbon plasma, allowing to obtain a water contact angle of 145 ± 4°. However, the SEM pictures give evidence to show the degradation of the structuration caused by the CF 4 -plasma and consequently, the superhydrophobicity was not reached. Thus, a plasma-polypyrrole layer was deposited before the plasma-fluorination, which has a protective role against the degradation generated by fluorinated species, preserving the structuration and improving the fluorination rate. Therefore, the obtained surfaces are superhydrophobic with water contact angle of 157 ± 2° and a hysteresis of 65 ± 3°. The ability of these surfaces to reduce bioadhesion will be performed in further work.

  15. Study of Multi-Function Micro-Plasma Spraying Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Liuying; Wang Hangong; Hua Shaochun; Cao Xiaoping

    2007-01-01

    A multi-functional micro-arc plasma spraying system was developed according to aerodynamics and plasma spray theory. The soft switch IGBT (Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor) invert technique, micro-computer control technique, convergent-divergent nozzle structure and axial powder feeding techniques have been adopted in the design of the micro-arc plasma spraying system. It is not only characterized by a small volume, a light weight, highly accurate control, high deposition efficiency and high reliability, but also has multi-functions in plasma spraying, welding and quenching. The experimental results showed that the system can produce a supersonic flame at a low power, spray Al 2 O 3 particles at an average speed up to 430 m/s, and make nanostructured AT13 coatings with an average bonding strength of 42.7 MPa. Compared to conventional 9M plasma spraying with a higher power, the coatings with almost the same properties as those by conventional plasma spray can be deposited by multi-functional micro-arc plasma spraying with a lower power plasma arc due to an improved power supply design, spray gun structure and powder feeding method. Moreover, this system is suitable for working with thin parts and undertaking on site repairs, and as a result, the application of plasma spraying will be greatly extended

  16. "Boxnep" advanced modular underwater robot

    OpenAIRE

    Buluev, Ilia

    2016-01-01

    The article discusses the relevance of the underwater vehicles' ability to solve a wide range of problems. The idea put in the basis of this research is designing a modular underwater robot. It allows to mount various equipment and test it in underwater environment. The paper deals with the concept of the robot and its characteristics.

  17. Resources for Underwater Robotics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Michael L.; Freitas, William M.

    2016-01-01

    4-H clubs can build and program underwater robots from raw materials. An annotated resource list for engaging youth in building underwater remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) is provided. This article is a companion piece to the Research in Brief article "Building Teen Futures with Underwater Robotics" in this issue of the "Journal of…

  18. Application of YAG laser processing in underwater welding and cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohwaki, Katsura; Morita, Ichiro; Kojima, Toshio; Sato, Shuichi

    2002-01-01

    The high-power YAG laser is a new fabrication tool. The laser torch is easy to combine with complex with complex mechanics because of beam delivery through optical fiber. A direct underwater laser welding technology has been developed and applied to the preservation, maintenance and removal of nuclear power plants. For subdividing or removing operations for retirement of plants, the laser cutting properties were confirmed to allow a maximum cutting thickness of 80 mm. For repairing inner surface of stainless steel tanks, an underwater laser welding system using a remote-controlled robot was developed and the high quality of underwater laser welding was confirmed. (author)

  19. Comparative study of the expansion dynamics of laser-driven plasma and shock wave in in-air and underwater ablation regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thao T. P.; Tanabe, Rie; Ito, Yoshiro

    2018-03-01

    We compared the expansion characteristics of the plasma plumes and shock waves generated in laser-induced shock process between the two ablation regimes: in air and under water. The observation was made from the initial moment when the laser pulse hit the target until 1.5 μs. The shock processes were driven by focusing a single laser pulse (1064 nm, FWHM = 13 ns) onto the surface of epoxy-resin blocks using a 40-mm focal length lens. The estimated laser intensity at the target plane is approximate to 9 ×109Wcm-2 . We used the fast-imaging technique to observe the expansion of the plasma plume and a custom-designed time-resolved photoelasticity imaging technique to observe the propagation of shock waves with the time resolution of nanoseconds. We found that at the same intensity of the laser beam, the plasma expansion during the laser pulse follows different mechanisms: the plasma plume that grows in air follows a radiation-wave model while a detonation-wave model can explain the expansion of the plasma plume induced in water. The ideal blast wave theory can be used to predict the decay of the shock wave in air but is not appropriate to describe the decay of the shock wave induced under water.

  20. Health Technology Assessment of pathogen reduction technologies applied to plasma for clinical use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchetti, Americo; Berrino, Alexandra; Casini, Marina; Codella, Paola; Facco, Giuseppina; Fiore, Alessandra; Marano, Giuseppe; Marchetti, Marco; Midolo, Emanuela; Minacori, Roberta; Refolo, Pietro; Romano, Federica; Ruggeri, Matteo; Sacchini, Dario; Spagnolo, Antonio G.; Urbina, Irene; Vaglio, Stefania; Grazzini, Giuliano; Liumbruno, Giancarlo M.

    2016-01-01

    Although existing clinical evidence shows that the transfusion of blood components is becoming increasingly safe, the risk of transmission of known and unknown pathogens, new pathogens or re-emerging pathogens still persists. Pathogen reduction technologies may offer a new approach to increase blood safety. The study is the output of collaboration between the Italian National Blood Centre and the Post-Graduate School of Health Economics and Management, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. A large, multidisciplinary team was created and divided into six groups, each of which addressed one or more HTA domains. Plasma treated with amotosalen + UV light, riboflavin + UV light, methylene blue or a solvent/detergent process was compared to fresh-frozen plasma with regards to current use, technical features, effectiveness, safety, economic and organisational impact, and ethical, social and legal implications. The available evidence is not sufficient to state which of the techniques compared is superior in terms of efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness. Evidence on efficacy is only available for the solvent/detergent method, which proved to be non-inferior to untreated fresh-frozen plasma in the treatment of a wide range of congenital and acquired bleeding disorders. With regards to safety, the solvent/detergent technique apparently has the most favourable risk-benefit profile. Further research is needed to provide a comprehensive overview of the cost-effectiveness profile of the different pathogen-reduction techniques. The wide heterogeneity of results and the lack of comparative evidence are reasons why more comparative studies need to be performed. PMID:27403740

  1. Innovative ion sources for accelerators: the benefits of the plasma technology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Celona, L.; Torrisi, L.; Ando, L.; Presti, M.; Láska, Leoš; Krása, Josef; Wolowski, J.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 54, Suppl. C (2004), s. C883-C888 ISSN 0011-4626. [Symposium on Plasma Physics and Technology /21./. Praha, 14.06.2004-17.06.2004] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010405 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010921 Keywords : plasma sources * ion sources * proton sources * ECR Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.292, year: 2004

  2. Equipment and technologies of air-plasma spraying of functional coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzmin Viktor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a short description of the DC plasma torch "PNK-50" structural features (ITAM SB RAS, Novosibirsk used for spraying of functional coatings with powder materials as well as gives the results of thermophysical and technological studies of spraying regimes. We present preliminary results of the plasma torch supersonic modification development and the results of industrial approbation of the plasma torch and of multi-purposes functional coatings deposition processes.

  3. Underwater acoustic communications. From point-to-point to networks

    OpenAIRE

    Jesus, S. M.

    2013-01-01

    This is a review presentation that addresses recent developments in underwater acoustic telemetry as a tool for ocean observation, monitoring and protection. Distributed sensing is a paradigm with important reflections in oceanic technology where bottom installed structures can not always be connected to a central hub through cabled networks. Moreover, recent developments in ocean robotics lead to the off-the-shelf availability of autonomous underwater vehicles that rely on wireless communica...

  4. Terminal homing position estimation forAutonomous underwater vehicle docking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    79  ix LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1.  NPS REMUS 100 with WHOI Docking Station. Source: [1...underwater missions were short and quick . Now, with advanced technology, underwater missions can be as long as the user desires. The new AUVs have...the full information problem. In order to use the MHE approach for real-time applications, the optimization process should be quick and accurate

  5. Proceedings of the international symposium on environmental technologies: Plasma systems and applications. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayne, P.W.; Mulholland, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    Plasma technology is an extremely versatile and powerful means of obtaining very high temperatures that can be used in a variety of environmental situations. Since most types of waste products and contaminants can be treated effectively and efficiently, plasma systems have been developed to address the disposal and annihilation domestic of medical, hazardous, radioactive, military, and miscellaneous wastes. Plasma technologies can also be implemented to recycle and recover usable materials from metallic wastes. The International Symposium on Environmental Technologies: Plasma Systems and Applications was held at the Omni Hotel in Atlanta, Georgia on October 8--12, 1995 to bring together a large group of technical experts working on the use of plasma for solving environmental problems. The Symposium is a sequel to the 1994 Metatechnies Conference on Stabilization and Volarization of Ultimate Waste by Plasma Processes that was held in September of 1994 at Bordeaux Lac, France. The proceedings to this second international conference contain the written contributions from eleven sessions and are published in two volumes. A total of 65 papers address the use of plasma systems for environmental applications and include topics concerning the development and use of innovative technologies for waste treatment, environmental remediation, recycling, characterization of the plasma and solid residue, off-gas analyses, as well as case studies and regulatory policies

  6. Proceedings of the 20th symposium on plasma physics and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The supplement contains 133 papers from those presented at the conference; these papers were selected through the review process of the Czechoslovak Journal of Physics. The papers are divided into 5 categories corresponding to the main topics of the symposium, which covered all kinds of plasma research and associated applications: tokamaks and other magnetic confinement devices; short lived plasmas (plasma focus, z-pinch, particle beamplasma interaction, Xray sources); laser plasma and research at the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS); low temperature plasma; and plasma technology. All 10 papers dealing with tokamaks and other magnetic confinement devices were submitted to INIS, as were 17 papers out of the 28 papers discussing short lived plasmas. (A.K.)

  7. Underwater fiber-wireless communication with a passive front end

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Sun, Bin; Lyu, Weichao; Kong, Meiwei; Sarwar, Rohail; Han, Jun; Zhang, Wei; Deng, Ning

    2017-11-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel concept on underwater fiber-wireless (Fi-Wi) communication system with a fully passive wireless front end. A low-cost step-index (SI) plastic optical fiber (POF) together with a passive collimating lens at the front end composes the underwater Fi-Wi architecture. We have achieved a 1.71-Gb/s transmission at a mean BER of 4.97 × 10-3 (1.30 × 10-3 when using power loading) over a 50-m SI-POF and 2-m underwater wireless channel using orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM). Although the wireless part is very short, it actually plays a crucial role in practical underwater implementation, especially in deep sea. Compared with the wired solution (e.g. using a 52-m POF cable without the UWOC part), the proposed underwater Fi-Wi scheme can save optical wet-mate connectors that are sophisticated, very expensive and difficult to install in deep ocean. By combining high-capacity robust POF with the mobility and ubiquity of underwater wireless optical communication (UWOC), the proposed underwater Fi-Wi technology will find wide application in ocean exploration.

  8. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Fusion Center, 1988--1989 report to the President

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    This report discusses the following topics on fusion energy: cold fusion; alcator confinement experiments; applied plasma physics research; fusion systems; coherent electromagnetic wave generation; and fusion technology and engineering

  9. Facilities for technology testing of ITER divertor concepts, models, and prototypes in a plasma environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.A.

    1991-12-01

    The exhaust of power and fusion-reaction products from ITER plasma are critical physics and technology issues from performance, safety, and reliability perspectives. Because of inadequate pulse length, fluence, flux, scrape-off layer plasma temperature and density, and other parameters, the present generation of tokamaks, linear plasma devices, or energetic beam facilities are unable to perform adequate technology testing of divertor components, though they are essential contributors to many physics issues such as edge-plasma transport and disruption effects and control. This Technical Requirements Documents presents a description of the capabilities and parameters divertor test facilities should have to perform accelerated life testing on predominantly technological divertor issues such as basic divertor concepts, heat load limits, thermal fatigue, tritium inventory and erosion/redeposition. The cost effectiveness of such divertor technology testing is also discussed

  10. What is the Plasma Focus Thermonuclear Pulsors Technology?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, R.; Gonzalez, J.; Moreno, C.; Clausse, A.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we describe a type of neutron generators, called Plasma Focus, which is suitable to several applications, where traditional generators are non-applicable.The main characteristics are its transportability and to be non-contaminating, which would allow in-situ tests.The Plasma Focus, produces neutron pulses by thermonuclear fusion reactions, satisfy these requirements and it is comparatively non expensive.This last feature would assure competitivity in the neutron sources market

  11. Plasma ion sources and ion beam technology inmicrofabrications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Lili [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    For over decades, focused ion beam (FIB) has been playing a very important role in microscale technology and research, among which, semiconductor microfabrication is one of its biggest application area. As the dimensions of IC devices are scaled down, it has shown the need for new ion beam tools and new approaches to the fabrication of small-scale devices. In the meanwhile, nanotechnology has also deeply involved in material science research and bioresearch in recent years. The conventional FIB systems which utilize liquid gallium ion sources to achieve nanometer scale resolution can no longer meet the various requirements raised from such a wide application area such as low contamination, high throughput and so on. The drive towards controlling materials properties at nanometer length scales relies on the availability of efficient tools. In this thesis, three novel ion beam tools have been developed and investigated as the alternatives for the conventional FIB systems in some particular applications. An integrated focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) system has been developed for direct doping or surface modification. This new instrument employs a mini-RF driven plasma source to generate focused ion beam with various ion species, a FEI two-lens electron (2LE) column for SEM imaging, and a five-axis manipulator system for sample positioning. An all-electrostatic two-lens column has been designed to focus the ion beam extracted from the source. Based on the Munro ion optics simulation, beam spot sizes as small as 100 nm can be achieved at beam energies between 5 to 35 keV if a 5 μm-diameter extraction aperture is used. Smaller beam spot sizes can be obtained with smaller apertures at sacrifice of some beam current. The FEI 2LE column, which utilizes Schottky emission, electrostatic focusing optics, and stacked-disk column construction, can provide high-resolution (as small as 20 nm) imaging capability, with fairly long working distance (25

  12. Plasma ion sources and ion beam technology in microfabrications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Lili

    2007-01-01

    For over decades, focused ion beam (FIB) has been playing a very important role in microscale technology and research, among which, semiconductor microfabrication is one of its biggest application area. As the dimensions of IC devices are scaled down, it has shown the need for new ion beam tools and new approaches to the fabrication of small-scale devices. In the meanwhile, nanotechnology has also deeply involved in material science research and bioresearch in recent years. The conventional FIB systems which utilize liquid gallium ion sources to achieve nanometer scale resolution can no longer meet the various requirements raised from such a wide application area such as low contamination, high throughput and so on. The drive towards controlling materials properties at nanometer length scales relies on the availability of efficient tools. In this thesis, three novel ion beam tools have been developed and investigated as the alternatives for the conventional FIB systems in some particular applications. An integrated focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) system has been developed for direct doping or surface modification. This new instrument employs a mini-RF driven plasma source to generate focused ion beam with various ion species, a FEI two-lens electron (2LE) column for SEM imaging, and a five-axis manipulator system for sample positioning. An all-electrostatic two-lens column has been designed to focus the ion beam extracted from the source. Based on the Munro ion optics simulation, beam spot sizes as small as 100 nm can be achieved at beam energies between 5 to 35 keV if a 5 (micro)m-diameter extraction aperture is used. Smaller beam spot sizes can be obtained with smaller apertures at sacrifice of some beam current. The FEI 2LE column, which utilizes Schottky emission, electrostatic focusing optics, and stacked-disk column construction, can provide high-resolution (as small as 20 nm) imaging capability, with fairly long working distance

  13. Application of Nonlocal Electron Kinetics to Plasma Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.

    2011-10-01

    Partially ionized plasmas are typically in a highly non-equilibrium thermodynamic state: the electrons are not in equilibrium with the neutral particle species or the ions, and the electrons are also not in equilibrium within their own ensemble, which results in a significant departure of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) from a Maxwellian. These non-equilibrium conditions provide considerable freedom to choose optimal plasma parameters for applications, which make gas-discharge plasmas remarkable tools for a variety of plasma applications, including plasma processing, discharge lighting, plasma propulsion, particle beam sources, and nanotechnology. Significant progress in understanding the formation of non-Maxwellian EVDF in the self-consistent electric fields has been one of the major achievements in the low-temperature plasmas during the last decade. This progress was made possible by a synergy between full-scale particle-in-cell simulations, analytical models, and experiments. Specific examples include rf discharges, dc discharges with auxiliary electrodes, Hall thruster discharges. In each example, nonlocal kinetic effects are identified as the main mechanisms responsible for the surprising degree of discharge self-organization. These phenomena include: explosive generation of cold electrons with rf power increase in low-pressure rf discharges; abrupt changes in discharge structure with increased bias voltage on a third electrode in a dc discharge with hot cathode; absence of a steady-state regime in Hall thruster discharges with intense secondary electron emission due to coupling of the sheath properties and the EVDF. In collaboration with Y. Raitses, A.V. Khrabrov, M. Campanell, V. I. Demidov, D. Sydorenko, I. Schweigert, and A. S. Mustafaev. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  14. Application of low pressure plasma technology in the field of environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yabing

    2000-01-01

    The characteristics of low pressure plasma produced by a gas discharges lie in that the energy of the electrons are much higher than that of the heavy particles in the system. The low-pressure plasma treatment technology for the environmental contaminants was synthetically studied, and the reaction processing and mechanism between the low-pressure plasma and the environmental contaminants were theoretically analyzed. At last, the prospects and existing problems on the application of low-pressure plasma in the field of environmental protection were discussed

  15. Suspensions Plasma Spraying of Ceramics with Hybrid Water-Stabilized Plasma Technology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mušálek, Radek; Medřický, Jan; Tesař, T.; Kotlan, Jiří; Pala, Zdeněk; Lukáč, František; Chráska, Tomáš; Curry, N.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 26, 1-2 (2017), s. 37-46 ISSN 1059-9630. [ISTC 2016: International Thermal Spray Conference. Shanghai, 10.05.2016-12.05.2016] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-12145S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : alumina * ceramics * dense * hybrid plasma torch * suspension plasma spraying * water-stabilized plasma * yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials OBOR OECD: Coating and films Impact factor: 1.488, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11666-016-0493-6

  16. A New Technology for Treating Pulp Waste with Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaozhen; Tian, Zhongyu

    2009-10-01

    New methods for both the treatment of pulp waste liquor called black liquor (BL) and the recovery of chemicals by using plasma, and the concentration of BL with the freezing technique were developed. The new methods aiming at the pilot plant scale are described and the experiments in a small-scale research facility for demonstration and test are presented. The energy consumption for treating waste liquid is 1 kg/kWh. Plasma processing can reduce the costs for treatment and eliminate pollution.

  17. FIRE, A Test Bed for ARIES-RS/AT Advanced Physics and Plasma Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meade, Dale M.

    2004-01-01

    The overall vision for FIRE [Fusion Ignition Research Experiment] is to develop and test the fusion plasma physics and plasma technologies needed to realize capabilities of the ARIES-RS/AT power plant designs. The mission of FIRE is to attain, explore, understand and optimize a fusion dominated plasma which would be satisfied by producing D-T [deuterium-tritium] fusion plasmas with nominal fusion gains ∼10, self-driven currents of ∼80%, fusion power ∼150-300 MW, and pulse lengths up to 40 s. Achieving these goals will require the deployment of several key fusion technologies under conditions approaching those of ARIES-RS/AT. The FIRE plasma configuration with strong plasma shaping, a double null pumped divertor and all metal plasma-facing components is a 40% scale model of the ARIES-RS/AT plasma configuration. ''Steady-state'' advanced tokamak modes in FIRE with high beta, high bootstrap fraction, and 100% noninductive current drive are suitable for testing the physics of the ARIES-RS/A T operating modes. The development of techniques to handle power plant relevant exhaust power while maintaining low tritium inventory is a major objective for a burning plasma experiment. The FIRE high-confinement modes and AT-modes result in fusion power densities from 3-10 MWm -3 and neutron wall loading from 2-4 MWm -2 which are at the levels expected from the ARIES-RS/AT design studies

  18. Tethered Antennas for Unmanned Underwater Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-27

    Concepts The first design (Figure 1) was based on the concept of an airfoil kite. The shape of the tow body was built around a NACA5515 hydrofoil to...Underwater Vehicles Brooke Ocean Technology (USA) Inc. 6 Figure 1: Hydrofoil Design The second design was based on that of a boat hull...communications. A sharp bow was utilized to cut through the water to reduce drag when on the surface. Like the hydrofoil design the top profile was

  19. Euclidean reconstruction of natural underwater scenes using optic imagery sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Han

    The development of maritime applications require monitoring, studying and preserving of detailed and close observation on the underwater seafloor and objects. Stereo vision offers advanced technologies to build 3D models from 2D still overlapping optic images in a relatively inexpensive way. However, while image stereo matching is a necessary step in 3D reconstruction procedure, even the most robust dense matching techniques are not guaranteed to work for underwater images due to the challenging aquatic environment. In this thesis, in addition to a detailed introduction and research on the key components of building 3D models from optic images, a robust modified quasi-dense matching algorithm based on correspondence propagation and adaptive least square matching for underwater images is proposed and applied to some typical underwater image datasets. The experiments demonstrate the robustness and good performance of the proposed matching approach.

  20. Performance Evaluation of Hybrid Acoustic-Optical Underwater Swarm Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuela PERSIA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Underwater Swarm is a particular Underwater Network configuration characterized by nodes very close one to each other, with mobility capability. The structure of the network is that of a distributed network, in which the nodes, through the exchange of control information, will take decisions in collaborative manner. This type of network raises challenges for its effective design and development, for which the only use of acoustic communication as traditionally suggested in underwater communication could be not enough. A new emerging solution could be a hybrid solution that combines the use of acoustic and optical channel in order to overcome the acoustic channel limitations in underwater environment. In this work, we want to investigate how the acoustic and optical communications influence the Underwater Swarm performance by considering the Low Layers Protocols (Physical Layer, Data Link Layer and Network Layer effects over the two different propagation technologies. Performance simulations have been carried out to suggest how the new hybrid system could be designed. This study will permit to provide useful analysis for the real implementation of an Underwater Swarm based on hybrid communication technology.

  1. Scientific and Technological Challenges of Diagnosing Burning Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, R. L.

    2009-05-01

    Research in magnetically confined fusion is now approaching a major milestone which is in evaluating and controlling burning plasma conditions. This milestone will be first met in the ITER experiment, presently being built in Cadarache, France through an international partnership, which includes China, the European Union, India, Japan, South Korea, Russia and the United States. In order to achieve its mission of achieving burning plasma conditions, and possibly ignition, a comprehensive set of scientific instruments (diagnostics) is being planned. That set represents the culmination of more than 50 years of development and research. More than 40 plasma parameters will be measured, including many which will be directly controlled. Some of these measurements will be done for the first time, such as probing the production, distribution and behavior of fusion produced, i.e. alpha particles, a key element in sustaining the fusion reaction process. These measurements will need to be done in a hostile environment, where a large nuclear radiation field, substantial direct particle flux, long pulse length and lack of direct access will bring severe constraints. Furthermore, the needs of the experiment will demand high reliability, low maintenance and the ability to retain a good calibration over a long period of time. We will review the challenges of the task and the opportunities for scientific breakthroughs from these state-of-the-art diagnostics instruments, as they pertain to the specific context of burning plasma conditions, together with examples of where these measurements will directly impact our scientific understanding and ability to control these conditions.

  2. Plasma-chemical technology of treatment of halogen-containing waste including polychlorinated biphenyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusarov, E. E.; Malkov, Yu. P.; Stepanov, S. G.; Troshchinenko, G. A.; Zasypkin, I. M.

    2010-12-01

    We consider the developed plasma-chemical technology of halogen-containing substances treatment. The paper contains the experimental plant schematic and the positive results obtained after the treatment of tetrafluoromethane, ozone-damaging freon 12, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), the waste containing fluoride and chloride organics. The technology is proposed for industrial application.

  3. Enrichment of colloidal solutions by nanoparticles in underwater spark discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopat'ko, K.; Aftandiliants, Y.; Veklich, A.; Boretskij, V.; Taran, N.; Batsmanova, L.; Trach, V.; Tugai, T.

    2015-01-01

    The underwater spark discharge between manganese granules was studied. Optical emission spectroscopy methods were used for diagnostics of such discharge plasma. The colloidal solution with manganese nanoparticles was produced by this discharge. The biological applications of this colloid were analyzed. The mechanism of metallic nanoparticle action and their transformation at interacting with biological objects were studied in Alternaria alternata culture

  4. Pulsed Corona Plasma Technology for Treating VOC Emissions from Pulp Mills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fridman, Alexander A.; Gutsol, Alexander; Kennedy, Lawrence A.; Saveliev, Alexei V.; Korobtsev, Sergey V.; Shiryaevsky, Valery L.; Medvedev, Dmitry

    2004-01-01

    Under the DOE Office of Industrial Technologies Forest Products program various plasma technologies were evaluated under project FWP 49885 ''Experimental Assessment of Low-Temperature Plasma Technologies for Treating Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Pulp Mills and Wood Products Plants''. The heterogeneous pulsed corona discharge was chosen as the best non-equilibrium plasma technology for control of the vent emissions from HVLC Brownstock Washers. The technology for removal of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from gas emissions with conditions typical of the exhausts of the paper industry by means of pulsed corona plasma techniques presented in this work. For the compounds of interest in this study (methanol, acetone, dimethyl sulfide and ? -pinene), high removal efficiencies were obtained with power levels competitive with the present technologies for the VOCs removal. Laboratory experiments were made using installation with the average power up to 20 W. Pilot plant prepared for on-site test has average plasma power up to 6.4 kW. The model of the Pilot Plant operation is presented

  5. Pulsed Corona Plasma Technology for Treating VOC Emissions from Pulp Mills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fridman, Alexander A.; Gutsol, Alexander; Kennedy, Lawrence A.; Saveliev, Alexei V.; Korobtsev, Sergey V.; Shiryaevsky, Valery L.; Medvedev, Dmitry

    2004-07-28

    Under the DOE Office of Industrial Technologies Forest Products program various plasma technologies were evaluated under project FWP 49885 ''Experimental Assessment of Low-Temperature Plasma Technologies for Treating Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Pulp Mills and Wood Products Plants''. The heterogeneous pulsed corona discharge was chosen as the best non-equilibrium plasma technology for control of the vent emissions from HVLC Brownstock Washers. The technology for removal of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from gas emissions with conditions typical of the exhausts of the paper industry by means of pulsed corona plasma techniques presented in this work. For the compounds of interest in this study (methanol, acetone, dimethyl sulfide and ? -pinene), high removal efficiencies were obtained with power levels competitive with the present technologies for the VOCs removal. Laboratory experiments were made using installation with the average power up to 20 W. Pilot plant prepared for on-site test has average plasma power up to 6.4 kW. The model of the Pilot Plant operation is presented.

  6. Underwater laser detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomaa, Walid; El-Sherif, Ashraf F.; El-Sharkawy, Yasser H.

    2015-02-01

    The conventional method used to detect an underwater target is by sending and receiving some form of acoustic energy. But the acoustic systems have limitations in the range resolution and accuracy; while, the potential benefits of a laserbased underwater target detection include high directionality, high response, and high range accuracy. Lasers operating in the blue-green region of the light spectrum(420 : 570nm)have a several applications in the area of detection and ranging of submersible targets due to minimum attenuation through water ( less than 0.1 m-1) and maximum laser reflection from estimated target (like mines or submarines) to provide a long range of detection. In this paper laser attenuation in water was measured experimentally by new simple method by using high resolution spectrometer. The laser echoes from different targets (metal, plastic, wood, and rubber) were detected using high resolution CCD camera; the position of detection camera was optimized to provide a high reflection laser from target and low backscattering noise from the water medium, digital image processing techniques were applied to detect and discriminate the echoes from the metal target and subtract the echoes from other objects. Extraction the image of target from the scattering noise is done by background subtraction and edge detection techniques. As a conclusion, we present a high response laser imaging system to detect and discriminate small size, like-mine underwater targets.

  7. Underwater Gliders: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javaid Muhammad Yasar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Underwater gliders are a type of underwater vehicle that transverse the oceans by shifting its buoyancy, during which its wings develop a component of the downward motion in the horizontal plane, thus producing a forward force. They are primarily used in oceanography sensing and data collection and play an important role in ocean research and development. Although there have been considerable developments in these gliders since the development of the first glider concept in 1989, to date, no review of these gliders have been done. This paper reviews existing underwater gliders, with emphasis on their respective working principles, range and payload capacity. All information on gliders available in the public domain or published in literature from the year 2000-2013 was reviewed. The majority of these gliders have an operational depth of 1000 m and a payload of less than 25 kg. The exception is a blend-body shape glider, which has a payload of approximately 800 kg and an operational depth around about 300 m. However, the commercialization of these gliders has been limited with only three know examples that have been successfully commercialized.

  8. Advanced Channeling Technologies in Plasma and Laser Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabagov, Sultan B.

    2018-01-01

    Channeling is the phenomenon well known in the world mostly related to the motion of the beams of charged particles in aligned crystals. However, recent studies have shown the feasibility of channeling phenomenology application for description of other various mechanisms of interaction of charged as well as neutral particle beams in solids, plasmas and electromagnetic fields covering the research fields from crystal based undulators, collimators and accelerators to capillary based X-ray and neutron optical elements. This brief review is devoted to the status of channeling-based researches at different centers within international and national collaborations. Present and future possible developments in channeling tools applied to electron interactions in strong plasma and laser fields will be analyzed.

  9. Solution processed organic light-emitting diodes using the plasma cross-linking technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Kongduo [Department of Light Sources and Illuminating Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Liu, Yang [Department of Light Sources and Illuminating Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Engineering Research Center of Advanced Lighting Technology, Ministry of Education, Shanghai 200433 (China); Gong, Junyi; Zeng, Pan; Kong, Xun; Yang, Xilu; Yang, Cheng; Yu, Yan [Department of Light Sources and Illuminating Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Liang, Rongqing [Department of Light Sources and Illuminating Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Engineering Research Center of Advanced Lighting Technology, Ministry of Education, Shanghai 200433 (China); Ou, Qiongrong, E-mail: qrou@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Light Sources and Illuminating Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Engineering Research Center of Advanced Lighting Technology, Ministry of Education, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2016-09-30

    Highlights: • Mixed acetylene and Ar plasma treatment makes the organic film surface cross-linked. • The plasma treatment for 30 s does not affect the performance of OLEDs. • Cross-linking surface can resist rinsing and corrosion of organic solvent. • The surface morphology is nearly unchanged after plasma treatment. • The plasma cross-linking method can realize solution processed multilayer OLEDs. - Abstract: Solution processed multilayer organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) present challenges, especially regarding dissolution of the first layer during deposition of a second layer. In this work, we first demonstrated a plasma cross-linking technology to produce a solution processed OLED. The surfaces of organic films can be cross-linked after mixed acetylene and Ar plasma treatment for several tens of seconds and resist corrosion of organic solvent. The film thickness and surface morphology of emissive layers (EMLs) with plasma treatment and subsequently spin-rinsed with chlorobenzene are nearly unchanged. The solution processed triple-layer OLED is successfully fabricated and the current efficiency increases 50% than that of the double-layer OLED. Fluorescent characteristics of EMLs are also observed to investigate factors influencing the efficiency of the triple-layer OLED. Plasma cross-linking technology may open up a new pathway towards fabrication of all-solution processed multilayer OLEDs and other soft electronic devices.

  10. Solution processed organic light-emitting diodes using the plasma cross-linking technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Kongduo; Liu, Yang; Gong, Junyi; Zeng, Pan; Kong, Xun; Yang, Xilu; Yang, Cheng; Yu, Yan; Liang, Rongqing; Ou, Qiongrong

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Mixed acetylene and Ar plasma treatment makes the organic film surface cross-linked. • The plasma treatment for 30 s does not affect the performance of OLEDs. • Cross-linking surface can resist rinsing and corrosion of organic solvent. • The surface morphology is nearly unchanged after plasma treatment. • The plasma cross-linking method can realize solution processed multilayer OLEDs. - Abstract: Solution processed multilayer organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) present challenges, especially regarding dissolution of the first layer during deposition of a second layer. In this work, we first demonstrated a plasma cross-linking technology to produce a solution processed OLED. The surfaces of organic films can be cross-linked after mixed acetylene and Ar plasma treatment for several tens of seconds and resist corrosion of organic solvent. The film thickness and surface morphology of emissive layers (EMLs) with plasma treatment and subsequently spin-rinsed with chlorobenzene are nearly unchanged. The solution processed triple-layer OLED is successfully fabricated and the current efficiency increases 50% than that of the double-layer OLED. Fluorescent characteristics of EMLs are also observed to investigate factors influencing the efficiency of the triple-layer OLED. Plasma cross-linking technology may open up a new pathway towards fabrication of all-solution processed multilayer OLEDs and other soft electronic devices.

  11. Degradation of sulfur dioxide using plasma technology; Degradacion de dioxido de azufre empleando tecnologia de plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada M, N.; Garcia E, R. [Instituto Tecnologico de Toluca, Av. Tecnologico s/n, Ex-Rancho La Virgen, 52140 Metepec, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Pacheco P, M.; Valdivia B, R.; Pacheco S, J., E-mail: nadiaemz@yahoo.com.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents the electro-chemical study performed for sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) treatment using non thermal plasma coupled to a nano structured fluid bed enhancing the toxic gas removal and the adsorption of acids formed during plasma treatment, more of 80% of removal was obtained. Non thermal plasma was ignited by dielectric barrier discharge (Dbd). The research was developed through an analysis of the chemical kinetics of the process and experimental study of degradation; in each experiment the electrical parameters and the influence of carbon nano structures were monitored to establish the optimal conditions of degradation. We compared the theoretical and experimental results to conclude whether the proposed model is correct for degradation. (Author)

  12. Application of plasma technology for the modification of polymer and textile materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radetić Maja M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma treatment is based on the physico-chemical changes of the material surface and as an ecologically and economically acceptable process it can be an attractive alternative to conventional modifications. The possibilities of plasma technology application to the modification of polymer and textile materials are discussed. Different specific properties of the material can be achieved by plasma cleaning, etching, functionalization or polymerization. The final effects are strongly influenced by the treatment parameters (treatment time, pressure, power, gas flow, the applied gas and nature of the material. The plasma treatment of polymers is predominantly focused on cleaning and activation of the surfaces to increase adhesion, binding, wettability, dye ability and printability. Current studies deal more with plasma polymerization where an ultra thin film of plasma polymer is deposited on the material surface and, depending on the applied monomer, different specific properties can be obtained (i.e. chemical and thermal resistance, abrasion resistance, antireflexion, water repellence, etc.. Plasma application to textiles is mostly oriented toward wool and synthetic fibres, though some studies also consider cotton, hemp, flax and silk. The main goal of plasma treatment is to impart a more hydrophilic fibre surface and accordingly increase wettability, dye ability, printability and particularly, shrink resistance in the case of wool. Recent studies have favored technical textiles, where plasma polymerization can offer a wide range of opportunities.

  13. Underwater Acoustic Target Tracking: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Junhai; Han, Ying; Fan, Liying

    2018-01-02

    Advances in acoustic technology and instrumentation now make it possible to explore marine resources. As a significant component of ocean exploration, underwater acoustic target tracking has aroused wide attention both in military and civil fields. Due to the complexity of the marine environment, numerous techniques have been proposed to obtain better tracking performance. In this paper, we survey over 100 papers ranging from innovative papers to the state-of-the-art in this field to present underwater tracking technologies. Not only the related knowledge of acoustic tracking instrument and tracking progress is clarified in detail, but also a novel taxonomy method is proposed. In this paper, algorithms for underwater acoustic target tracking are classified based on the methods used as: (1) instrument-assisted methods; (2) mode-based methods; (3) tracking optimization methods. These algorithms are compared and analyzed in the aspect of dimensions, numbers, and maneuvering of the tracking target, which is different from other survey papers. Meanwhile, challenges, countermeasures, and lessons learned are illustrated in this paper.

  14. The development of beryllium plasma spray technology for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.G.; Elliott, K.E.; Hollis, K.J.; Watson, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    Over the past five years, four international parties, which include the European Communities, Japan, the Russian Federation and the United States, have been collaborating on the design and development of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), the next generation magnetic fusion energy device. During the ITER Engineering Design Activity (EDA), beryllium plasma spray technology was investigated by Los Alamos National Laboratory as a method for fabricating and repairing and the beryllium first wall surface of the ITER tokamak. Significant progress has been made in developing beryllium plasma spraying technology for this application. Information will be presented on the research performed to improve the thermal properties of plasma sprayed beryllium coatings and a method that was developed for cleaning and preparing the surface of beryllium prior to depositing plasma sprayed beryllium coatings. Results of high heat flux testing of the beryllium coatings using electron beam simulated ITER conditions will also be presented

  15. Refuse-derived Fuel Energy Recovery by Plasma Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marián LÁZÁR

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports the results of experiments focused upon high temperature gasification of waste with a significant proportion of combustibles. This is refuse-derived fuel (RDF obtained by sorting the combustible components of communal waste. During the gasification of this waste in a plasma reactor (with a waste humidity of circa 24.9 %, when calculated per 1 kg of waste, syngas was obtained in an amount of 1.35 to 1.84 m3∙kg-1. Apart from gas, the gasification process also creates slag of a glassy structure suitable for further use.

  16. Deep Learning Methods for Underwater Target Feature Extraction and Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Hu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The classification and recognition technology of underwater acoustic signal were always an important research content in the field of underwater acoustic signal processing. Currently, wavelet transform, Hilbert-Huang transform, and Mel frequency cepstral coefficients are used as a method of underwater acoustic signal feature extraction. In this paper, a method for feature extraction and identification of underwater noise data based on CNN and ELM is proposed. An automatic feature extraction method of underwater acoustic signals is proposed using depth convolution network. An underwater target recognition classifier is based on extreme learning machine. Although convolution neural networks can execute both feature extraction and classification, their function mainly relies on a full connection layer, which is trained by gradient descent-based; the generalization ability is limited and suboptimal, so an extreme learning machine (ELM was used in classification stage. Firstly, CNN learns deep and robust features, followed by the removing of the fully connected layers. Then ELM fed with the CNN features is used as the classifier to conduct an excellent classification. Experiments on the actual data set of civil ships obtained 93.04% recognition rate; compared to the traditional Mel frequency cepstral coefficients and Hilbert-Huang feature, recognition rate greatly improved.

  17. Frontiers of particle beam and high energy density plasma science using pulse power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masugata, Katsumi

    2011-04-01

    The papers presented at the symposium on “Frontiers of Particle Beam and High Energy Density Plasma Science using Pulse Power Technology” held in November 20-21, 2009 at National Institute for Fusion Science are collected. The papers reflect the present status and resent progress in the experiment and theoretical works on high power particle beams and high energy density plasmas produced by pulsed power technology. (author)

  18. Coblation technology: plasma-mediated ablation for otolaryngology applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woloszko, Jean; Gilbride, Charles

    2000-05-01

    Coblation is a unique method of delivering radio frequency energy to soft tissue for applications in Otolaryngology (ENT). Using radio frequency in a bipolar mode with a conductive solution, such as saline, Coblation energizes the ions in the saline to form a small plasma field. The plasma has enough energy to break the tissue's molecular bonds, creating an ablative path. The thermal effect of this process is approximately 45 - 85 degrees Celsius, significantly lower than traditional radio-frequency techniques. Coblation has been used for Otolaryngological applications such as Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP), tonsillectomy, turbinate reduction, palate reduction, base of tongue reduction and various Head and Neck cancer procedures. The decreased thermal effect of Coblation anecdotally has led to less pain and faster recovery for cases where tissue is excised. In cases where Coblation is applied submucosally to reduce tissue volume (inferior turbinate, soft palate), the immediate volume reduction may lead to immediate clinical benefits for the patient. Coblation is currently being tested in various clinical studies to document the benefits for otolaryngological applications.

  19. Porous materials produced from incineration ash using thermal plasma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sheng-Fu; Chiu, Wen-Tung; Wang, To-Mai; Chen, Ching-Ting; Tzeng, Chin-Ching

    2014-06-01

    This study presents a novel thermal plasma melting technique for neutralizing and recycling municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) ash residues. MSWI ash residues were converted into water-quenched vitrified slag using plasma vitrification, which is environmentally benign. Slag is adopted as a raw material in producing porous materials for architectural and decorative applications, eliminating the problem of its disposal. Porous materials are produced using water-quenched vitrified slag with Portland cement and foaming agent. The true density, bulk density, porosity and water absorption ratio of the foamed specimens are studied here by varying the size of the slag particles, the water-to-solid ratio, and the ratio of the weights of the core materials, including the water-quenched vitrified slag and cement. The thermal conductivity and flexural strength of porous panels are also determined. The experimental results show the bulk density and the porosity of the porous materials are 0.9-1.2 g cm(-3) and 50-60%, respectively, and the pore structure has a closed form. The thermal conductivity of the porous material is 0.1946 W m(-1) K(-1). Therefore, the slag composite materials are lightweight and thermal insulators having considerable potential for building applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Technical feasibility study on volumetric reduction of radioactive wastes using plasma technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prado, E.S.P.; Dellamano, J.C.; Carneiro, A.L.G.; Santos, R.C.; Potiens Junior, A.J. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Petraconi, G., E-mail: edu.petraconi@usp.br [Instituto Tecnológico da Aeronáutica (ITA), São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The radioactive waste arising from nuclear reactors, hospitals, industry and research institutes are generated daily with a considerable amount. To final dispose of these radioactive waste safely and cost effectively, they must be transformed into physical and chemical compounds suitable for radionuclides immobilization with maximum volume and exhaust gaseous reduction. In this scope, among the promising technologies for the radioactive waste treatment, plasma technology allows reducing substantially the waste volume after exposing them to temperatures above 2,500 deg C. In the planning and management of radioactive waste, the challenges related to plasma technology are presented as a motivation factor for the possible implantation of plasma reactors in nuclear plants and research centers aiming at improving the process of radioactive waste management. (author)

  1. Carbon Nanotube Underwater Acoustic Thermophone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-23

    Attorney Docket No. 300009 1 of 8 A CARBON NANOTUBE UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC THERMOPHONE STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The...the Invention [0003] The present invention is an acoustically transparent carbon nanotube thermophone. (2) Description of the Prior Art [0004...amplitude of the resulting sound waves. [0006] Recently, there has been development of underwater acoustic carbon nanotube (CNT) yarn sheets capable

  2. Proceedings of the thirtieth national symposium on plasma science and technology: book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The topics covered in this symposium are: basic plasma, nuclear fusion, industrial plasma/plasma processing, space plasma and astrophysical plasma, laser plasma, exotic plasma, plasma diagnostics, computer modeling and other areas. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  3. Underwater topography acquired by remote sensing based on SOFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianhu; Zhou, Fengnian; Zhang, Hongmei; Li, Juanjuan

    2008-12-01

    In large-scope marine investigation, the traditional bathymetric measurement can not meet the requirement of rapid data acquisition with lower cost of financial and material resources, while remote sensing (RS) technology provides a perfect way in the work. RS can not only provide quickly and efficiently the information of underwater topography with respect to the traditional method, but also present corresponding underwater topography with different-period RS images. In this paper, we depict in detail the procedures and some key techniques in acquiring underwater topography by remote sensing inversion technology based on self-organization feature mapping (SOFM). Firstly, we introduce some basic theories about the acquisition of underwater topography by the RS inversion technology. Besides, we discuss the data acquisition and preparation in the work. Moreover, we implement correlation analysis and find out the sensitive bands used for building RS inversion model. In virtue of SOFM, we construct the mapping relation between water depth and the reflectivity of sensitive band in the studied area, and test the it in two experimental water areas. The model achieves satisfying accuracy and can meet the requirement of given bathymetric scale. Finally the mapping relation is used for the water depth inversion in the studied water area. We also use the water depth from the model to draw the underwater topographic map in the water area.

  4. Underwater gas tornado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byalko, Alexey V.

    2013-07-01

    We present the first experimental observation of a new hydrodynamic phenomenon, the underwater tornado. Simple measurements show that the tornado forms a vortex of the Rankine type, i.e. the rising gas rotates as a solid body and the liquid rotates with a velocity decreasing hyperbolically with the radius. We obtain the dependence of the tornado radius a on the gas stream value j theoretically: a ∼ j2/5. Processing of a set of experiments yielded the value 0.36 for the exponent in this expression. We also report the initial stages of the theoretical study of this phenomenon.

  5. Safety of Blood and Plasma Derivatives: Pathogen Reducing Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Pourfathollah

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Human blood and blood products is the source of a wide range of medicinal products used for the treatment and prevention of a variety of injuries and disease. Despite stringent routine measures and filters employed, residual pathogen infectivity remains an important challenge in the field of blood transfusion. In this article various measures and technologies that can be applied in order to reduce the residual risk are reviewed.

  6. End of the chain? Rugosity and fine-scale bathymetry from existing underwater digital imagery using structure-from-motion (SfM) technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storlazzi, Curt; Dartnell, Peter; Hatcher, Gerry; Gibbs, Ann E.

    2016-01-01

    The rugosity or complexity of the seafloor has been shown to be an important ecological parameter for fish, algae, and corals. Historically, rugosity has been measured either using simple and subjective manual methods such as ‘chain-and-tape’ or complicated and expensive geophysical methods. Here, we demonstrate the application of structure-from-motion (SfM) photogrammetry to generate high-resolution, three-dimensional bathymetric models of a fringing reef from existing underwater video collected to characterize the seafloor. SfM techniques are capable of achieving spatial resolution that can be orders of magnitude greater than large-scale lidar and sonar mapping of coral reef ecosystems. The resulting data provide finer-scale measurements of bathymetry and rugosity that are more applicable to ecological studies of coral reefs than provided by the more expensive and time-consuming geophysical methods. Utilizing SfM techniques for characterizing the benthic habitat proved to be more effective and quantitatively powerful than conventional methods and thus might portend the end of the ‘chain-and-tape’ method for measuring benthic complexity.

  7. The role of Tetronics plasma vitrification technology in the management and conditioning of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deegan, David; Scales, Charlie

    2007-01-01

    Plasma Arc Technology is finding wider application in the treatment of hazardous waste materials an area which has a lot of synergy with radioactive waste management. It is being stimulated by the increasing demands of regulatory and economic drivers; currently, within the Integrated Waste Management (IWM) sector, there is a climate of rising costs, limited numbers of technological solutions, restricted access to traditional disposal based solutions and a significant levels of market consolidation. Traditionally, the IWM sector has operated with basic mixing technology solutions: e.g. physiochemical consolidation, physiochemical separation, neutralisation and basic material bulking, with ultimate reliance on landfill, cement based encapsulation and high temperature incineration (HTI). The impact of national statutes, the value of national liabilities and infra-structural deficiencies is demanding constant technological advancement for continued regulatory compliance. This paper presents information on Tetronics' plasma based solution, for the treatment of Asbestos Containing Materials (ACM) and Plutonium Containing Material (PCM). (authors)

  8. Technologies for ITER divertor vertical target plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlosser, J.; Escourbiac, F.; Merola, M.; Fouquet, S.; Bayetti, P.; Cordier, J.J.; Grosman, A.; Missirlian, M.; Tivey, R.; Roedig, M.

    2005-01-01

    The ITER divertor vertical target has to sustain heat fluxes up to 20 MW m -2 . The concept developed for this plasma facing component working at steady state is based on carbon fibre composite armour for the lower straight part and tungsten for the curved upper part. The main challenges involved in the use of such components include the removal of the high heat fluxes deposited and mechanically and thermally joining the armour to the metallic heat sink, despite the mismatch in the thermal expansions. Two solutions based on the use of a CuCrZr hardened copper alloy and an active metal casting (AMC (registered) ) process were investigated during the ITER EDA phase: the first one called 'flat tile geometry' was mainly developed for the Tore Supra pumped limiter, the second one called 'monoblock geometry' was developed by the EU Participating Team for the ITER project. This paper presents a review of these two solutions and analyses their assets and drawbacks: pressure drop, critical heat flux, surface temperature and expected behaviour during operation, risks during the manufacture, control of the armour defects during the manufacture and at the reception, and the possibility of repairing defective tiles

  9. Underwater Hearing in Turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Katie L

    2016-01-01

    The hearing of turtles is poorly understood compared with the other reptiles. Although the mechanism of transduction of sound into a neural signal via hair cells has been described in detail, the rest of the auditory system is largely a black box. What is known is that turtles have higher hearing thresholds than other reptiles, with best frequencies around 500 Hz. They also have lower underwater hearing thresholds than those in air, owing to resonance of the middle ear cavity. Further studies demonstrated that all families of turtles and tortoises share a common middle ear cavity morphology, with scaling best suited to underwater hearing. This supports an aquatic origin of the group. Because turtles hear best under water, it is important to examine their vulnerability to anthropogenic noise. However, the lack of basic data makes such experiments difficult because only a few species of turtles have published audiograms. There are also almost no behavioral data available (understandable due to training difficulties). Finally, few studies show what kinds of sounds are behaviorally relevant. One notable paper revealed that the Australian snake-necked turtle (Chelodina oblonga) has a vocal repertoire in air, at the interface, and under water. Findings like these suggest that there is more to the turtle aquatic auditory scene than previously thought.

  10. Plasma science and technology: 50 years of progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecchi, J.L.; Cecchi, L.M.

    2003-01-01

    During the first 50 years of the American Vacuum Society (1953-2003), technology has advanced greatly. But the most impressive and conspicuous advance has been in computational power, due to the exponential increase in computing power at an exponentially decreasing cost per function. Many of our readers will remember the 'Macro-Mechanical System' called a slide rule that was symbolic of engineers and scientists in the 1950s and 1960s. From the slide rule of the past to today's desktop and notebook computers, possessing speed, storage, and power capability that dwarf the mainframes of the recent past, what a transformation!

  11. Decontamination of fresh and fresh-cut fruits and vegetables with cold plasma technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contamination of fresh and fresh-cut fruits and vegetables by foodborne pathogens has prompted research into novel interventions. Cold plasma is a nonthermal food processing technology which uses energetic, reactive gases to inactivate contaminating microbes. This flexible sanitizing method uses ele...

  12. Hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces fabricated using atmospheric pressure cold plasma technology: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrakellis, Panagiotis; Gogolides, Evangelos

    2018-03-29

    Hydrophobic surfaces are often used to reduce wetting of surfaces by water. In particular, superhydrophobic surfaces are highly desired for several applications due to their exceptional properties such as self-cleaning, anti-icing, anti-friction and others. Such surfaces can be prepared via numerous methods including plasma technology, a dry technique with low environmental impact. Atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) has recently attracted significant attention as lower-cost alternative to low-pressure plasmas, and as a candidate for continuous rather than batch processing. Although there are many reviews on water-repellent surfaces, and a few reviews on APP technology, there are hardly any review works on APP processing for hydrophobic and superhydrohobic surface fabrication, a topic of high importance in nanotechnology and interface science. Herein, we critically review the advances on hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surface fabrication using APP technology, trying also to give some perspectives in the field. After a short introduction to superhydrophobicity of nanostructured surfaces and to APPs we focus this review on three different aspects: (1) The atmospheric plasma reactor technology used for fabrication of (super)hydrophobic surfaces. (2) The APP process for hydrophobic surface preparation. The hydrophobic surface preparation processes are categorized methodologically as: a) activation, b) grafting, c) polymerization, d) roughening and hydrophobization. Each category includes subcategories related to different precursors used. (3) One of the most important sections of this review concerns superhydrophobic surfaces fabricated using APP. These are methodologically characterized as follows: a) single step processes where micro-nano textured topography and low surface energy coating are created at the same time, or b) multiple step processes, where these steps occur sequentially in or out of the plasma. We end the review with some perspectives in the field. We

  13. OFDM for underwater acoustic communications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Shengli

    2014-01-01

    A blend of introductory material and advanced signal processing and communication techniques, of critical importance to underwater system and network development This book, which is the first to describe the processing techniques central to underwater OFDM, is arranged into four distinct sections: First, it describes the characteristics of underwater acoustic channels, and stresses the difference from wireless radio channels. Then it goes over the basics of OFDM and channel coding. The second part starts with an overview of the OFDM receiver, and develops various modules for the receiver des

  14. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Fusion Center 1987--1988 report to the President

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    During the past year, technical progress has been made in all Plasma Fusion Center (PFC) research programs. The Plasma Fusion Center is recognized as one of the leading university research laboratories in the physics and engineering aspects of magnetic confinement fusion. Its research programs have produced significant results on several fronts: the basic physics of high-temperature plasmas (plasmas theory, RF heating, free electron lasers, development of advanced diagnostics, and intermediate-scale experiments on the Versator tokamak and Constance mirror devices), major confinement results on the Alcator C tokamak, including pioneering investigations of the stability, heating, and confinement properties of plasmas at high densities, temperatures and magnetic fields, experiments on the medium-scale TARA tandem mirror, including the development of novel MHD stabilization techniques in axisymmetric geometry, and a broad program of fusion technology and engineering development that addresses problems in several critical subsystem areas (e.g., magnet systems, superconducting materials development, environmental and safety studies, advanced millimeter-wave source development, and system studies of fusion reactor design, operation, and technology requirements

  15. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, 1984-1985. Report to the President

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    During the past year, technical progress has been made in all Plasma Fusion Center (PFC) research programs. The Plasma Fusion Center is recognized as one of the leading university research laboratories in the physics and engineering aspects of magnetic confinement fusion. Its research programs have produced significant results on four fronts: (1) the basic physics of high-temperature plasmas (plasma theory, rf heating, free electron lasers, development of advanced diagnostics and small-scale experiments on the Versator tokamak and Constance mirror devices); (2) major confinement results on the Alcator C tokamak, including pioneering investigations of the stability, heating, and confinement properties of plasmas at high densities, temperatures and magnetic fields; (3) development of an innovative design for axisymmetric tandem mirrors with inboard thermal barriers, with initial operation of the TARA tandem mirror experiment beginning in 1984; and (4) a broad program of fusion technology and engineering development that addresses problems in several critical subsystem areas (e.g., magnet systems, superconducting materials development, environmental and safety studies, advanced millimeter wave source development, and system studies of fusion reactor design, operation, and technology requirements). A review of these programs is given

  16. Safety aspects for underwater vehicles

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhan, R.; Navelkar, G.S.; Desa, E.S.; Afzulpurkar, S.; Prabhudesai, S.P.; Dabholkar, N.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Maurya, P.

    . This stresses for implementation of multiple safety measures of a high degree so that the platform operates continuously in a fail-safe mode. This paper discusses issues on safety measures implemented on the autonomous underwater platforms namely MAYA AUV...

  17. The Science and Technology Challenges of the Plasma-Material Interface for Magnetic Fusion Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Dennis

    2013-09-01

    The boundary plasma and plasma-material interactions of magnetic fusion devices are reviewed. The boundary of magnetic confinement devices, from the high-temperature, collisionless pedestal through to the surrounding surfaces and the nearby cold high-density collisional plasmas, encompasses an enormous range of plasma and material physics, and their integrated coupling. Due to fundamental limits of material response the boundary will largely define the viability of future large MFE experiments (ITER) and reactors (e.g. ARIES designs). The fusion community faces an enormous knowledge deficit in stepping from present devices, and even ITER, towards fusion devices typical of that required for efficient energy production. This deficit will be bridged by improving our fundamental science understanding of this complex interface region. The research activities and gaps are reviewed and organized to three major axes of challenges: power density, plasma duration, and material temperature. The boundary can also be considered a multi-scale system of coupled plasma and material science regulated through the non-linear interface of the sheath. Measurement, theory and modeling across these scales are reviewed, with a particular emphasis on establishing the use dimensionless parameters to understand this complex system. Proposed technology and science innovations towards solving the PMI/boundary challenges will be examined. Supported by US DOE award DE-SC00-02060 and cooperative agreement DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  18. Atomic and molecular physics of plasma-based environmental technologies for abatement of volatile organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penetrante, B. M.; Hsiao, M. C.; Bardsley, J. N.; Merritt, B. T.; Vogtin, G. E.; Kuthi, A.; Burkhart, C. P.; Bayless, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma techniques represent a new generation of air emission control technology that potentially could treat large-volume emissions containing dilute concentrations of volatile organic compounds. In order to apply non-thermal plasmas in an industrial scale, it is important to establish the electrical power requirements and byproducts of the process.There is a need for reliable data concerning the primary decomposition mechanisms and subsequent chemical kinetics associated with non- thermal plasma processing of volatile organic compounds. There are many basic atomic and molecular physics issues that are essential in evaluating the economic performance of non-thermal plasma reactors. These studies are important in understanding how the input electrical power is dissipated in the plasma and how efficiently it is converted to the production of the plasma species (radicals, ions or electrons) responsible for the decomposition of the volatile organic compounds. This paper will present results from basic experimental and theoretical studies aimed at identifying the reaction mechanisms responsible for the primary decomposition of various types of volatile organic compounds. (authors)

  19. Network lifetime-aware data collection in Underwater Sensor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Development of energy-efficient data collection and routing schemes for Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks (UWSNs) is a challenging issue due to the peculiarities of the underlying physical layer technology. Since the recharging or replacement of sensor nodes is almost impossible after deployment, the critical issue of ...

  20. Progress of research on plasma facing materials in University of Science and Technology Beijing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge, Chang-Chun; Zhou, Zhang-Jian; Song, Shu-Xiang; Du, Juan; Zhong, Zhi-Hong

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we report some new progress on plasma facing materials in University of Science and Technology Beijing (USTB), China. They include fabrication of tungsten coating with ultra-fine grain size by atmosphere plasma spraying; fabrication of tungsten with ultra-fine grain size by a newly developed method named as resistance sintering under ultra-high pressure; using the concept of functionally graded materials to join tungsten to copper based heat sink; joining silicon doped carbon to copper by brazing using a Ti based amorphous filler and direct casting

  1. The technology and science of steady-state operation in magnetically confined plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becoulet, A; Hoang, G T

    2008-01-01

    The steady-state operation of magnetically confined fusion plasmas is considered as one of the 'grand challenges' of future decades, if not the ultimate goal of the research and development activities towards a new source of energy. Reaching such a goal requires the high-level integration of both science and technology aspects of magnetic fusion into self-consistent plasma regimes in fusion-grade devices. On the physics side, the first constraint addresses the magnetic confinement itself which must be made persistent. This means to either rely on intrinsically steady-state configurations, like the stellarator one, or turn the inductively driven tokamak configuration into a fully non-inductive one, through a mix of additional current sources. The low efficiency of the external current drive methods and the necessity to minimize the re-circulating power claim for a current mix strongly weighted by the internal 'pressure driven' bootstrap current, itself strongly sensitive to the heat and particle transport properties of the plasma. A virtuous circle may form as the heat and particle transport properties are themselves sensitive to the current profile conditions. Note that several other factors, e.g. plasma rotation profile, magneto-hydro-dynamics activity, also influence the equilibrium state. In the present tokamak devices, several examples of such 'advanced tokamak' physics research demonstrate the feasibility of steady-state regimes, though with a number of open questions still under investigation. The modelling activity also progresses quite fast in this domain and supports understanding and extrapolation. This high level of physics sophistication of the plasma scenario however needs to be combined with steady-state technological constraints. The technology constraints for steady-state operation are basically twofold: the specific technologies required to reach the steady-state plasma conditions and the generic technologies linked to the long pulse operation of a

  2. Underwater Visual Computing: The Grand Challenge Just around the Corner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Lukas, Uwe Freiherr

    2016-01-01

    Visual computing technologies have traditionally been developed for conventional setups where air is the surrounding medium for the user, the display, and/or the camera. However, given mankind's increasingly need to rely on the oceans to solve the problems of future generations (such as offshore oil and gas, renewable energies, and marine mineral resources), there is a growing need for mixed-reality applications for use in water. This article highlights the various research challenges when changing the medium from air to water, introduces the concept of underwater mixed environments, and presents recent developments in underwater visual computing applications.

  3. A Review of the Emerging Field of Underwater Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Chua

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometers are versatile sensor systems, owing to their high sensitivity and ability to simultaneously measure multiple chemical species. Over the last two decades, traditional laboratory-based membrane inlet mass spectrometers have been adapted for underwater use. Underwater mass spectrometry has drastically improved our capability to monitor a broad suite of gaseous compounds (e.g., dissolved atmospheric gases, light hydrocarbons, and volatile organic compounds in the aquatic environment. Here we provide an overview of the progress made in the field of underwater mass spectrometry since its inception in the 1990s to the present. In particular, we discuss the approaches undertaken by various research groups in developing in situ mass spectrometers. We also provide examples to illustrate how underwater mass spectrometers have been used in the field. Finally, we present future trends in the field of in situ mass spectrometry. Most of these efforts are aimed at improving the quality and spatial and temporal scales of chemical measurements in the ocean. By providing up-to-date information on underwater mass spectrometry, this review offers guidance for researchers interested in adapting this technology as well as goals for future progress in the field.

  4. Silent Discharge Plasma Technology for the Treatment of Air Toxics and Other Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosocha, Louis A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chase, Peter J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gross, Michael P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1998-09-21

    Under this CRADA, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and High Mesa Technologies, Inc. (HMT) carried out a joint project on the development of the silent discharge plasma (SDP) technology for the treatment of hazardous air pollutants and other hazardous or toxic chemicals. The project had two major components: a technology-demonstration part and a scale-up and commercialization part. In the first part, a small-scale, mobile SDP plasma processor, which was being developed under a CRADA with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) was the mobile equipment was modified for higher capacity service and employed for an innovative remediation technologies demonstration on soil-vapor extraction off-gases at the McClellan Air Force Base near Sacramento, CA. The performance of the SDP system for the variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) encountered at the McClellan site was sufficiently promising to the project HMT and LANL worked together to formulate a scale-up strategy and commercialization/manufacturing plan, and to design a prototype scaled-up SDP unit. HMT and LANL are now in the final stages of completing a licensing agreement for the technology and HMT is in the process of raising funds to engineer and manufacture commercial prototype SDP equipment focused on stack-gas emissions control and environmental remediation. HMT, in collaboration with another Northern New Mexico business, Coyote Aerospace, has also been successful in receiving a Phase I Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) award from the Army Research Office to develop, design, and construct a small non-thermal plasma reactor for laboratory studies ("Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor for Control of Fugitive Emissions of Toxic Gases")

  5. Production of pig iron from red mud waste fines using thermal plasma technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasankar, K.; Ray, P. K.; Chaubey, A. K.; Padhi, A.; Satapathy, B. K.; Mukherjee, P. S.

    2012-08-01

    Red mud, an insoluble residue produced during alkali leaching of bauxite, is considered as a low-grade iron ore containing 30% to 50% iron. The present paper deals with the use of thermal plasma technology for producing pig iron from red mud waste fines. The smelting reduction of red mud was carried out in a 35 kW DC extended arc thermal plasma reactor. Red mud was properly mixed with fluxes and graphite (fixed carbon, 99%) as a reductant as per stoichiometric requirement. The effect of various process parameters like a reductant, fluxes and smelting time on iron recovery was studied and optimized. An optimum condition for the maximum recovery of iron was obtained. A new thermal plasma process applicable to direct iron making from red mud waste fines that would achieve significant utilization of red mud was proposed.

  6. Plasma technology: An optimal solution for the minimization of radioactive waste; Tecnologia de Plasma: Una solucion optima para la minimizacion de residuos radiactivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas, E.; Aresti, L.; Gutierrez, S.

    2012-07-01

    The application of technologies for reducing volume to treat radioactive waste is of particular importance in nuclear power plants in new construction and dismantlement because of the volume of waste generated. Plasma technology arises as alternative to other technical treatment offering major factors of reduced volume and the possibility of treating both organic waste such as inorganic.

  7. Challenges in the Plasma Etch Process Development in the sub-20nm Technology Nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kaushik

    2013-09-01

    For multiple generations of semiconductor technologies, RF plasmas have provided a reliable platform for critical and non-critical patterning applications. The electron temperature of processes in a RF plasma is typically several electron volts. A substantial portion of the electron population is within the energy range accessible for different types of electron collision processes, such as electron collision dissociation and dissociative electron attachment. When these electron processes occur within a small distance above the wafer, the neutral species, radicals and excited molecules, generated from these processes take part in etching reactions impacting selectivity, ARDE and micro-loading. The introduction of finFET devices at 22 nm technology node at Intel marks the transition of planar devices to 3-dimensional devices, which add to the challenges to etch process in fabricating such devices. In the sub-32 nm technology node, Back-end-of-the-line made a change with the implementation of Trench First Metal Hard Mask (TFMHM) integration scheme, which has hence gained traction and become the preferred integration of low-k materials for BEOL. This integration scheme also enables Self-Aligned Via (SAV) patterning which prevents via CD growth and confines via by line trenches to better control via to line spacing. In addition to this, lack of scaling of 193 nm Lithography and non-availability of EUV based lithography beyond concept, has placed focus on novel multiple patterning schemes. This added complexity has resulted in multiple etch schemes to enable technology scaling below 80 nm Pitches, as shown by the memory manufacturers. Double-Patterning and Quad-Patterning have become increasingly used techniques to achieve 64 nm, 56 nm and 45 nm Pitch technologies in Back-end-of-the-line. Challenges associated in the plasma etching of these multiple integration schemes will be discussed in the presentation. In collaboration with A. Ranjan, TEL Technology Center, America

  8. Atomic and molecular physics of plasma-based environmental technologies for abatement of volatile organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsiao, M.C.; Bardsley, J.N.; Merrit, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.; Kuthi, A.; Burkhart, C.P.; Bayless, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma techniques represent a new generation of air emission control technology that potentially could treat large-volume emissions containing dilute concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In order to apply non-thermal in an industrial scale, it is important to establish the electrical power requirements and byproducts of the process. There is a need for reliable data concerning the primary decomposition mechanisms and subsequent chemical kinetics associated with non-thermal plasma processing of VOCs. There are many basic atomic and molecular physics issues that are essential in evaluating the economic performance of non-thermal plasma reactor. These studies are important in understanding how the input electrical power is dissipated in the plasma and how efficiency it is converted to the production of the plasma species (radicals, ions or electrons) responsible for the decomposition of the VOCs. This paper presents results from basic experimental and theoretical studied aimed at identifying the reaction mechanisms responsible for the primary decomposition of various types of VOCs. (Authors)

  9. [Use of fractional plasma separation and adsorption (Prometheus technology) in the treatment of acute liver failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisova, E N; Sharipova, V R; Purlo, N V; Sukhanova, G A; Biriukova, L S

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of treating 8 patients with acute liver failure, by using the separation and adsorption of fractional plasma (Prometheus technology). Twenty-five procedures lasting 5-6 hours were performed. Anticoagulation with heparin was made under guidance of coagulogram parameters. The results of testing blood parameters before and after a procedure and hemodynamic parameters are given. The investigations have demonstrated the effectiveness and safety of the procedure.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF PROGRAM MODULE FOR CALCULATING SPEED OF TITANIC PLASMA SEDIMENTATION IN ENVIRONMENT OF TECHNOLOGICAL GAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Ivaschenko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The program module has been developed on the basis of package of applied MATLAB programs which allows to calculate speed of coating sedimentation over the section of plasma stream taking into account magnetic field influence of a stabilizing coil, and also to correct the obtained value of sedimentation speed depending on the value of negative accelerating potential, arch current, technological gas pressure. The program resolves visualization of calculation results.

  11. Beryllium processing technology review for applications in plasma-facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, R.G.; Jacobson, L.A.; Stanek, P.W.

    1993-07-01

    Materials research and development activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), i.e., the next generation fusion reactor, are investigating beryllium as the first-wall containment material for the reactor. Important in the selection of beryllium is the ability to process, fabricate and repair beryllium first-wall components using existing technologies. Two issues that will need to be addressed during the engineering design activity will be the bonding of beryllium tiles in high-heat-flux areas of the reactor, and the in situ repair of damaged beryllium tiles. The following review summarizes the current technology associated with welding and joining of beryllium to itself and other materials, and the state-of-the-art in plasma-spray technology as an in situ repair technique for damaged beryllium tiles. In addition, a review of the current status of beryllium technology in the former Soviet Union is also included.

  12. Beryllium processing technology review for applications in plasma-facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.G.; Jacobson, L.A.; Stanek, P.W.

    1993-07-01

    Materials research and development activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), i.e., the next generation fusion reactor, are investigating beryllium as the first-wall containment material for the reactor. Important in the selection of beryllium is the ability to process, fabricate and repair beryllium first-wall components using existing technologies. Two issues that will need to be addressed during the engineering design activity will be the bonding of beryllium tiles in high-heat-flux areas of the reactor, and the in situ repair of damaged beryllium tiles. The following review summarizes the current technology associated with welding and joining of beryllium to itself and other materials, and the state-of-the-art in plasma-spray technology as an in situ repair technique for damaged beryllium tiles. In addition, a review of the current status of beryllium technology in the former Soviet Union is also included

  13. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Fusion Center 1992--1993 report to the President

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at MIT's plasma fusion center. Some of the areas covered are: plasma diagnostics; rf plasma heating; gyrotron research; treatment of solid waste by arc plasma; divertor experiments; tokamak studies; and plasma and fusion theory

  14. Energy recovery of the H2S and CO2 elimination with technology by hybrid plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar T, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    This document is a research focused on energy recovery from acid gas removal contained in natural gas as hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), by obtaining highly energetic gas such as syngas (mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide, in particular) using plasma technology in its hybrid form, namely, gliding arc plasma, that has the property to behave like a thermal plasma and cold plasma, besides possessing among other virtues the ability to treat large flows continuously at atmospheric pressure without the need of using noble gases, with a power consumption of no more than 1000 W. Furthermore, this type of plasma has demonstrated to be a clean and efficient not only by high conversion rates of H 2 S (86%) and CO 2 (56%) and high percentages of selectivity in the production of hydrogen (H 2 ) and carbon monoxide carbon (CO) obtained in this work, but because it can even be seriously considered to replace other technologies currently used in the process of sweetening natural gas as adsorption, absorption and sequestering membranes. The results shown are based on a series of analysis, simulations, experiments and calculations, from the design of the plasma generating source based on an impulse-phase circuit, to the electrical characterization results and simulation by acquiring electrical signals, without forgetting the characterization of the resulting chemical components using various analytical techniques such as mass spectrometry, gas chromatography (GC), optical emission spectroscopy (OES), optical spectroscopy Fourier inverse transformed (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (Sem), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and multi-gas detectors (iBrid MX6). Additionally, performed chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism of the compounds involved in the degradation of H 2 S and CO 2 similar to those experienced as well as the study of energy efficiency (Ece), specific energy (Se), all this to meet a projects needs 127499, entitled -Development of alternative

  15. Plasma-based ion implantation and deposition: A review of physics,technology, and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelletier, Jacques; Anders, Andre

    2005-05-16

    After pioneering work in the 1980s, plasma-based ion implantation (PBII) and plasma-based ion implantation and deposition (PBIID) can now be considered mature technologies for surface modification and thin film deposition. This review starts by looking at the historical development and recalling the basic ideas of PBII. Advantages and disadvantages are compared to conventional ion beam implantation and physical vapor deposition for PBII and PBIID, respectively, followed by a summary of the physics of sheath dynamics, plasma and pulse specifications, plasma diagnostics, and process modeling. The review moves on to technology considerations for plasma sources and process reactors. PBII surface modification and PBIID coatings are applied in a wide range of situations. They include the by-now traditional tribological applications of reducing wear and corrosion through the formation of hard, tough, smooth, low-friction and chemically inert phases and coatings, e.g. for engine components. PBII has become viable for the formation of shallow junctions and other applications in microelectronics. More recently, the rapidly growing field of biomaterial synthesis makes used of PBII&D to produce surgical implants, bio- and blood-compatible surfaces and coatings, etc. With limitations, also non-conducting materials such as plastic sheets can be treated. The major interest in PBII processing originates from its flexibility in ion energy (from a few eV up to about 100 keV), and the capability to efficiently treat, or deposit on, large areas, and (within limits) to process non-flat, three-dimensional workpieces, including forming and modifying metastable phases and nanostructures. We use the acronym PBII&D when referring to both implantation and deposition, while PBIID implies that deposition is part of the process.

  16. Plasma etch technologies for the development of ultra-small feature size transistor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borah, D; Shaw, M T; Rasappa, S; Farrell, R A; O'Mahony, C; Faulkner, C M; Bosea, M; Gleeson, P; Holmes, J D; Morris, M A

    2011-01-01

    The advances in information and communication technologies have been largely predicated around the increases in computer processor power derived from the constant miniaturization (and consequent higher density) of individual transistors. Transistor design has been largely unchanged for many years and progress has been around scaling of the basic CMOS device. Scaling has been enabled by photolithography improvements (i.e. patterning) and secondary processing such as deposition, implantation, planarization, etc. Perhaps the most important of the secondary processes is the plasma etch methodology whereby the pattern created by lithography is 'transferred' to the surface via a selective etch to remove exposed material. However, plasma etch technologies face challenges as scaling continues. Maintaining absolute fidelity in pattern transfer at sub-16 nm dimensions will require advances in plasma technology (plasma sources, chamber design, etc) and chemistry (etch gases, flows, interactions with substrates, etc). In this paper, we illustrate some of these challenges by discussing the formation of ultra-small device structures from the directed self-assembly of block copolymers (BCPs) where nanopatterns are formed from the micro-phase separation of the system. The polymer pattern is transferred by a double etch procedure where one block is selectively removed and the remaining block acts as a resist pattern for silicon pattern transfer. Data are presented which shows that highly regular nanowire patterns of feature size below 20 nm can be created using etch optimization techniques and in this paper we demonstrate generation of crystalline silicon nanowire arrays with feature sizes below 8 nm. BCP techniques are demonstrated to be applicable from these ultra-small feature sizes to 40 nm dimensions. Etch profiles show rounding effects because etch selectivity in these nanoscale resist patterns is limited and the resist thickness rather low. The nanoscale nature of the

  17. Design of Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadahiro Hyakudome

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available There are concerns about the impact that global warming will have on our environment, and which will inevitably result in expanding deserts and rising water levels. While a lot of underwater vehicles are utilized, AUVs (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle were considered and chosen, as the most suitable tool for conduction survey concerning these global environmental problems. AUVs can comprehensive survey because the vehicle does not have to be connected to the support vessel by tether cable. When such underwater vehicles are made, it is necessary to consider about the following things. 1 Seawater and Water Pressure Environment, 2 Sink, 3 There are no Gas or Battery Charge Stations, 4 Global Positioning System cannot use, 5 Radio waves cannot use. In the paper, outline of above and how deal about it are explained.

  18. Optimum LED wavelength for underwater optical wireless communication at turbid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Etai; Arnon, Shlomi

    2014-10-01

    Underwater optical wireless communication is an emerging technology, which can provide high data rate. High data rate communication is required for applications such as underwater imaging, networks of sensors and swarms of underwater vehicles. These applications pursue an affordable light source, which can be obtained by light emitting diodes (LED). LEDs offer solutions characterized by low cost, high efficiency, reliability and compactness based on off-the-shelf components such as blue and green light emitting diodes. In this paper we present our recent theoretical and experimental results in this field.

  19. The mathematical modelling of plasmas at the service of space technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besse, Christophe; Degond, Pierre; Vignal, Marie-Helene

    2001-01-01

    The objective is here to provide a background for some aspects of the mathematical modelling in physics (i.e. a physical problem, its description by an appropriate set of equations, a reduction of this set, implementation on a computer, selection of test cases, validation, result interpretation, visualisation, exploitation of the code for prediction or production purposes), in the case of aspects related to plasmas in space environment. These plasmas can be those of the environment (ionosphere), those created by abnormal operating conditions of the satellite (induced discharges), or those used for technological purposes (plasma propulsion). After a presentation of some basic notions regarding space environment (scales, sun and solar wind, definition of a plasma, magnetosphere, ionosphere), the authors propose a modelling of ionospheric irregularities (model of Euler-Maxwell, model without dimension, three-dimensional dynamo model, quasi-two-dimensional dynamo model, striation model, turbulence modelling). They address the problem of discharges occurring on satellites: problem description, scenario description, Vlasov equation, limits and numerical results

  20. Recovery of Drug Delivery Nanoparticles from Human Plasma Using an Electrokinetic Platform Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibsen, Stuart; Sonnenberg, Avery; Schutt, Carolyn; Mukthavaram, Rajesh; Yeh, Yasan; Ortac, Inanc; Manouchehri, Sareh; Kesari, Santosh; Esener, Sadik; Heller, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    The effect of complex biological fluids on the surface and structure of nanoparticles is a rapidly expanding field of study. One of the challenges holding back this research is the difficulty of recovering therapeutic nanoparticles from biological samples due to their small size, low density, and stealth surface coatings. Here, the first demonstration of the recovery and analysis of drug delivery nanoparticles from undiluted human plasma samples through the use of a new electrokinetic platform technology is presented. The particles are recovered from plasma through a dielectrophoresis separation force that is created by innate differences in the dielectric properties between the unaltered nanoparticles and the surrounding plasma. It is shown that this can be applied to a wide range of drug delivery nanoparticles of different morphologies and materials, including low-density nanoliposomes. These recovered particles can then be analyzed using different methods including scanning electron microscopy to monitor surface and structural changes that result from plasma exposure. This new recovery technique can be broadly applied to the recovery of nanoparticles from high conductance fluids in a wide range of applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Power supply and impedance matching to drive technological radio-frequency plasmas with customized voltage waveforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franek, James; Brandt, Steven; Berger, Birk; Liese, Martin; Barthel, Matthias; Schüngel, Edmund; Schulze, Julian

    2015-05-01

    We present a novel radio-frequency (RF) power supply and impedance matching to drive technological plasmas with customized voltage waveforms. It is based on a system of phase-locked RF generators that output single frequency voltage waveforms corresponding to multiple consecutive harmonics of a fundamental frequency. These signals are matched individually and combined to drive a RF plasma. Electrical filters are used to prevent parasitic interactions between the matching branches. By adjusting the harmonics' phases and voltage amplitudes individually, any voltage waveform can be approximated as a customized finite Fourier series. This RF supply system is easily adaptable to any technological plasma for industrial applications and allows the commercial utilization of process optimization based on voltage waveform tailoring for the first time. Here, this system is tested on a capacitive discharge based on three consecutive harmonics of 13.56 MHz. According to the Electrical Asymmetry Effect, tuning the phases between the applied harmonics results in an electrical control of the DC self-bias and the mean ion energy at almost constant ion flux. A comparison with the reference case of an electrically asymmetric dual-frequency discharge reveals that the control range of the mean ion energy can be significantly enlarged by using more than two consecutive harmonics.

  2. Underwater laser imaging system (UWLIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLong, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Practical limitations with underwater imaging systems area reached when the noise in the back scattered radiation generated in the water between the imaging system and the target obscures the spatial contrast and resolution necessary for target discovery and identification. The advent of high power lasers operating in the blue-green portion of the visible spectrum (oceanic transmission window) has led to improved experimental illumination systems for underwater imaging. Range-gated and synchronously scanned devices take advantage of the unique temporal and spatial coherence properties of laser radiation, respectively, to overcome the deleterious effects of common volume back scatter.

  3. Underwater measurements of muon intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, V. M.; Pustovetov, V. P.; Trubkin, Y. A.; Kirilenkov, A. V.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental measurements of cosmic ray muon intensity deep underwater aimed at determining a muon absorption curve are of considerable interest, as they allow to reproduce independently the muon energy spectrum at sea level. The comparison of the muon absorption curve in sea water with that in rock makes it possible to determine muon energy losses caused by nuclear interactions. The data available on muon absorption in water and that in rock are not equivalent. Underground measurements are numerous and have been carried out down to the depth of approx. 15km w.e., whereas underwater muon intensity have been measured twice and only down to approx. 3km deep.

  4. Underwater Wireless Acousto-Optic Waveguide (UWAOW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Giovanni; Kent, Lionel W. J.; Laycock, Leslie C.

    2017-10-01

    The present study originated in the lack of research into achieving underwater total internal reflection (TIR) via the acousto-optic effect. The uniqueness of this technique exists in the fact that it is based on a high sound pressure level which induces a localised change in refractive index of seawater sufficient to achieve total internal reflection within the communication channel. Different transducer systems for generating the pressure wave have been investigated and take the form of a wave which may be either a standing wave, or a novel beamforming technique. The former is based on an array of transducers and with an acoustic mirror at the receiver in order to establish the standing wave. The alternative approach relies on the high intrinsic directionality of a novel beamformer where an annular transducer array is examined as an acoustic source. In this paper, the main characteristics of the acoustic optic waveguide will be presented. This will include both sound and light propagation in the ocean, TIR, novel beam propagation, the refractive index of water as a function of the externally applied acoustic pressure, and the acoustic technology. The modelled results, the limitations imposed by the challenging medium, and the system requirements required to obtain an Underwater Wireless Acousto-Optic Waveguide (UWAOW) will be also addressed.

  5. An Underwater Color Image Quality Evaluation Metric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Miao; Sowmya, Arcot

    2015-12-01

    Quality evaluation of underwater images is a key goal of underwater video image retrieval and intelligent processing. To date, no metric has been proposed for underwater color image quality evaluation (UCIQE). The special absorption and scattering characteristics of the water medium do not allow direct application of natural color image quality metrics especially to different underwater environments. In this paper, subjective testing for underwater image quality has been organized. The statistical distribution of the underwater image pixels in the CIELab color space related to subjective evaluation indicates the sharpness and colorful factors correlate well with subjective image quality perception. Based on these, a new UCIQE metric, which is a linear combination of chroma, saturation, and contrast, is proposed to quantify the non-uniform color cast, blurring, and low-contrast that characterize underwater engineering and monitoring images. Experiments are conducted to illustrate the performance of the proposed UCIQE metric and its capability to measure the underwater image enhancement results. They show that the proposed metric has comparable performance to the leading natural color image quality metrics and the underwater grayscale image quality metrics available in the literature, and can predict with higher accuracy the relative amount of degradation with similar image content in underwater environments. Importantly, UCIQE is a simple and fast solution for real-time underwater video processing. The effectiveness of the presented measure is also demonstrated by subjective evaluation. The results show better correlation between the UCIQE and the subjective mean opinion score.

  6. Effect of well-established plasma treatment technology on some physiological characteristics in maize leaves during seedling stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hongxiang; Fang Xiangqian; Bian Shaofeng; Zhang Lihua; Tan Guobo; Meng Xiangmeng; Yan Weiping; Liu Yaliang; Sun Ning

    2010-01-01

    In order to provide theoretical references and technical support for application of plasma treatment technology in agriculture, the seeds of maize were treated by well-established plasma treatment technology, then the changes of physiological characteristics of maize leaves during seedling stage were studied. The results indicated that the stress resistance of maize was improved by plasma treatment. The SOD, POD and CAT activities, soluble protein content and soluble sugar content of leaves at two-leave stage, four-leave stage, six-leave stage and eight-leave stage treated by plasma were higher than that of CK, but the MDA content was lower than CK. Although NR activity in leaves at twoleave stage and four-leave stage was slightly lower than CK, but higher than CK at six-leave stage (26.81%) and eightleaves stage (26.75%). Plasma treatment enhanced the nitrogen metabolism capacity, and this tendency was increased remarkable with the growth stages processes. (authors)

  7. Calibration of Underwater Sound Transducers

    OpenAIRE

    H.R.S. Sastry

    1983-01-01

    The techniques of calibration of underwater sound transducers for farfield, near-field and closed environment conditions are reviewed in this paper .The design of acoustic calibration tank is mentioned. The facilities available at Naval Physical & Oceanographic Laboratory, Cochin for calibration of transducers are also listed.

  8. Underwater nuclear power plant structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severs, S.; Toll, H.V.

    1982-01-01

    A structure for an underwater nuclear power generating plant comprising a triangular platform formed of tubular leg and truss members upon which are attached one or more large spherical pressure vessels and one or more small cylindrical auxiliary pressure vessels. (author)

  9. Effects of improving current characteristics of spark discharge on underwater shock waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O Higa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We have been developing a food-processing device that uses underwater shock waves generated by spark discharges at an underwater spark gap. Underwater shock waves can be used in food processing for softening, fracturing and sterilization. These technologies are attracting attention because the food is not heated during processing, so it does not change flavour. In this study, we develop a rice-powder manufacturing system using the fracturing effect provided by underwater shock waves. Because rice grains are very hard, the process must be applied repeatedly using a momentary high pressure to fracture the grains. The fast repeated generation of shock waves should provide high pressures from low energies. Therefore, we aim to achieve higher pressures from low energies expended by the underwater gap discharge. We increase the pulse compression rate by decreasing the circuit impedance of the device and increasing the charging voltage. Using optical observations and a pressure sensor, we measure the high pressure developed by the underwater shock wave and the rise time of the discharge current. We find that we can decrease the rise time of the discharge current by 17% while maintaining the peak current, and simultaneously increase the high pressure of the underwater shock wave by 135%.

  10. A Survey of Routing Issues and Associated Protocols in Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Khalid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Underwater wireless sensor networks are a newly emerging wireless technology in which small size sensors with limited energy and limited memory and bandwidth are deployed in deep sea water and various monitoring operations like tactical surveillance, environmental monitoring, and data collection are performed through these tiny sensors. Underwater wireless sensor networks are used for the exploration of underwater resources, oceanographic data collection, flood or disaster prevention, tactical surveillance systems, and unmanned underwater vehicles. Sensor nodes consist of a small memory, a central processing unit, and an antenna. Underwater networks are much different from terrestrial sensor networks as radio waves cannot be used in underwater wireless sensor networks. Acoustic channels are used for communication in deep sea water. Acoustic signals have many limitations, such as limited bandwidth, higher end-to-end delay, network path loss, higher propagation delay, and dynamic topology. Usually, these limitations result in higher energy consumption with a smaller number of packets delivered. The main aim nowadays is to operate sensor nodes having a smaller battery for a longer time in the network. This survey has discussed the state-of-the-art localization based and localization-free routing protocols. Routing associated issues in the area of underwater wireless sensor networks have also been discussed.

  11. A review of the US joining technologies for plasma facing components in the ITER fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odegard, B.C. Jr.; Cadden, C.H. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Watson, R.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Slattery, K.T. [Boeing Co., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1998-02-01

    This paper is a review of the current joining technologies for plasma facing components in the US for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project. Many facilities are involved in this project. Many unique and innovative joining techniques are being considered in the quest to join two candidate armor plate materials (beryllium and tungsten) to a copper base alloy heat sink (CuNiBe, OD copper, CuCrZr). These techniques include brazing and diffusion bonding, compliant layers at the bond interface, and the use of diffusion barrier coatings and diffusion enhancing coatings at the bond interfaces. The development and status of these joining techniques will be detailed in this report.

  12. A review of the US joining technologies for plasma facing components in the ITER fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odegard, B.C. Jr.; Cadden, C.H.; Watson, R.D.; Slattery, K.T.

    1998-02-01

    This paper is a review of the current joining technologies for plasma facing components in the US for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project. Many facilities are involved in this project. Many unique and innovative joining techniques are being considered in the quest to join two candidate armor plate materials (beryllium and tungsten) to a copper base alloy heat sink (CuNiBe, OD copper, CuCrZr). These techniques include brazing and diffusion bonding, compliant layers at the bond interface, and the use of diffusion barrier coatings and diffusion enhancing coatings at the bond interfaces. The development and status of these joining techniques will be detailed in this report

  13. PREFACE: 2nd International Meeting for Researchers in Materials and Plasma Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niño, Ely Dannier V.

    2013-11-01

    These proceedings present the written contributions of the participants of the 2nd International Meeting for Researchers in Materials and Plasma Technology, 2nd IMRMPT, which was held from February 27 to March 2, 2013 at the Pontificia Bolivariana Bucaramanga-UPB and Santander and Industrial - UIS Universities, Bucaramanga, Colombia, organized by research groups from GINTEP-UPB, FITEK-UIS. The IMRMPT, was the second version of biennial meetings that began in 2011. The three-day scientific program of the 2nd IMRMPT consisted in 14 Magisterial Conferences, 42 Oral Presentations and 48 Poster Presentations, with the participation of undergraduate and graduate students, professors, researchers and entrepreneurs from Colombia, Russia, France, Venezuela, Brazil, Uruguay, Argentina, Peru, Mexico, United States, among others. Moreover, the objective of IMRMPT was to bring together national and international researchers in order to establish scientific cooperation in the field of materials science and plasma technology; introduce new techniques of surface treatment of materials to improve properties of metals in terms of the deterioration due to corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement, abrasion, hardness, among others; and establish cooperation agreements between universities and industry. The topics covered in the 2nd IMRMPT include New Materials, Surface Physics, Laser and Hybrid Processes, Characterization of Materials, Thin Films and Nanomaterials, Surface Hardening Processes, Wear and Corrosion / Oxidation, Modeling, Simulation and Diagnostics, Plasma Applications and Technologies, Biomedical Coatings and Surface Treatments, Non Destructive Evaluation and Online Process Control, Surface Modification (Ion Implantation, Ion Nitriding, PVD, CVD). The editors hope that those interested in the are of materials science and plasma technology, enjoy the reading that reflect a wide range of topics. It is a pleasure to thank the sponsors and all the participants and contributors for

  14. Non-line-of-sight underwater optical wireless communication network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnon, Shlomi; Kedar, Debbie

    2009-03-01

    The growing need for ocean observation systems has stimulated considerable interest within the research community in advancing the enabling technologies of underwater wireless communication and underwater sensor networks. Sensors and ad hoc sensor networks are the emerging tools for performing extensive data-gathering operations on land, and solutions in the subsea setting are being sought. Efficient communication from the sensors and within the network is critical, but the underwater environment is extremely challenging. Addressing the special features of underwater wireless communication in sensor networks, we propose a novel non-line-of-sight network concept in which the link is implemented by means of back-reflection of the propagating optic signal at the ocean-air interface and derive a mathematical model of the channel. Point-to-multipoint links can be achieved in an energy efficient manner and broadcast broadband communications, such as video transmissions, can be executed. We show achievable bit error rates as a function of sensor node separation and demonstrate the feasibility of this concept using state-of-the-art silicon photomultiplier detectors.

  15. Underwater Remote Handling Equipment for Reactor Internals Maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motohiko Kimura; Mitsuaki Shimamura; Tomoyuki Itoh; Nobuhiko Tanaka; Yasuhiro Yuguchi; Katsuhiko Naruse

    2002-01-01

    More than fifty nuclear reactors generate about thirty-five percent of electricity in Japan. The need to operate these reactors safely and in a stable manner constitutes a very important issue. On the other hand, aged reactors are increasing and they are not necessarily designed and constructed using the latest technology. Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) on reactor internal components has become a major concern regarding aged reactors in recent years. Usually maintenance work such as inspection, repair, and preventive maintenance for core components is done by using underwater remote handling and robotic technology. It becomes very important to develop not only new efficient technology for inspection, repair, and preventive maintenance for all suspect components and but also the associated application technology for execution in a reactor. We have been developing several kind of remote handling equipment for underwater maintenance work. This paper describes some results obtained in the area of underwater remote handling that can contribute to the progress of plant reliability. (authors)

  16. Development of underwater YAG laser repair welding robots for tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miwa, Yasuhiro; Satoh, Syuichi; Ito, Kosuke; Kochi, Tsutomu; Kojima, Toshio; Ohwaki, Katsura; Morita, Ichiro

    1999-01-01

    A remote-controlled repair welding robot which uses YAG laser welding technology in underwater environment was developed. This is an underwater robot technology combined with a laser welding technology. This report will describe the structure and performance of this robot, and the welding test results. The repair welding robot consists of two parts. The one is driving equipment, and the other is welding unit. It can swim in the tank, move around the tank wall, and stay on the welding area. After that it starts YAG laser repair welding. The target of this technology is inner surface repair of some tanks made of austenitic stainless steel, for example RW (Radioactive Waste) tanks. A degradation by General Corrosion and so on might be occurred at inner surface of these tanks in BWR type nuclear power plants. If the damaged area is wide, repair welding works are done. Some workers go into the tank and set up scaffolding after full drainage. In many cases it spends too much time for draining water and repair welding preparation. If the repair welding works can be done in underwater environment, the outage period will be reduced. This is a great advantage. (author)

  17. Plasma biomarker discovery in preeclampsia using a novel differential isolation technology for circulating extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kok Hian; Tan, Soon Sim; Sze, Siu Kwan; Lee, Wai Kheong Ryan; Ng, Mor Jack; Lim, Sai Kiang

    2014-10-01

    To circumvent the complex protein milieu of plasma and discover robust predictive biomarkers for preeclampsia (PE), we investigate if phospholipid-binding ligands can reduce the milieu complexity by extracting plasma extracellular vesicles for biomarker discovery. Cholera toxin B chain (CTB) and annexin V (AV) which respectively binds GM1 ganglioside and phosphatidylserine were used to isolate extracellular vesicles from plasma of PE patients and healthy pregnant women. The proteins in the vesicles were identified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, antibody array, and mass spectrometry. CTB and AV were found to bind 2 distinct groups of extracellular vesicles. Antibody array and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that PE patients had elevated levels of CD105, interleukin-6, placental growth factor, tissue inhibitor of metallopeptidase 1, and atrial natriuretic peptide in cholera toxin B- but not AV-vesicles, and elevated levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, pro-calcitonin, S100b, tumor growth factor β, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1, brain natriuretic peptide, and placental growth factor in both cholera toxin B- and AV-vesicles. CD9 level was elevated in cholera toxin B-vesicles but reduced in AV vesicles of PE patients. Proteome analysis revealed that in cholera toxin B-vesicles, 87 and 222 proteins were present only in PE patients and healthy pregnant women respectively while in AV-vesicles, 104 and 157 proteins were present only in PE and healthy pregnant women, respectively. This study demonstrated for the first time that CTB and AV bind unique extracellular vesicles, and their protein cargo reflects the disease state of the patient. The successful use of these 2 ligands to isolate circulating plasma extracellular vesicles for biomarker discovery in PE represents a novel technology for biomarker discovery that can be applied to other specialties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Future explosive pulse-power technology for high-energy plasma physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinovsky, R.E.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Marsh, S.P.

    1991-01-01

    A variety of high-performance pulse-power systems in the 10 to 20-MJ class have been built in the last ten years or are planned in the next 3--5 years. Such systems, using capacitive energy storage, are employed in particle beam fusion, x-ray effects, x-ray physics, and plasma physics experiments. Advances in the technology of high-energy- density capacitors over the same time period has substantially decreased the cost per joule of the basic capacitor and kept the total parts count in large systems within reason. Overall, the savings in capacitor costs has about balanced the generally increasing system costs keeping the total cost of large, high-performance systems at $1--2 per joule over the period. The next step, to 100-MJ class systems, will profit from the improvements of the last decade, but there seems little reason to project a lowering of the cost per joule. In contrast, there is every reason to expect the continuously growing system costs to outstrip any savings to be realized from improvements in capacitor technology. Over the same period, explosive pulse power systems in the 10 to 20-MJ class have been employed, routinely, in plasma physics experiments. These one- shot systems currently cost about $100 K for the generator and switching and deliver energy to a plasma physics experiment in a few microseconds. Comparing only hardware costs, such systems are competitive with capacitor systems for developmental activities involving 100--200 shots -- but not for repetitive applications involving 1000's of shots. At this rate, explosive systems are competitive systems for applications involving up to 200--500 shots. In this paper, we discuss general concepts for generators and power-conditioning systems appropriate for high-energy applications. We scope two such applications and show how explosive pulse power can address those applications. And we describe one example of an explosively powered generator suitable for 100-MJ operation

  19. Optical Backscattering Measured by Airborne Lidar and Underwater Glider

    OpenAIRE

    James H. Churnside; Richard D. Marchbanks; Chad Lembke; Jordon Beckler

    2017-01-01

    The optical backscattering from particles in the ocean is an important quantity that has been measured by remote sensing techniques and in situ instruments. In this paper, we compare estimates of this quantity from airborne lidar with those from an in situ instrument on an underwater glider. Both of these technologies allow much denser sampling of backscatter profiles than traditional ship surveys. We found a moderate correlation (R = 0.28, p < 10−5), with differences that are partially ex...

  20. Localization Algorithms of Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks: A Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Guangjie; Jiang, Jinfang; Shu, Lei; Xu, Yongjun; Wang, Feng

    2012-01-01

    In Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks (UWSNs), localization is one of most important technologies since it plays a critical role in many applications. Motivated by widespread adoption of localization, in this paper, we present a comprehensive survey of localization algorithms. First, we classify localization algorithms into three categories based on sensor nodes’ mobility: stationary localization algorithms, mobile localization algorithms and hybrid localization algorithms. Moreover, we compare the localization algorithms in detail and analyze future research directions of localization algorithms in UWSNs. PMID:22438752

  1. PREFACE: 11th Asia-Pacific Conference on Plasma Science and Technology (APCPST-11) and 25th Symposium on Plasma Science for Materials (SPSM-25)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takayuki; Kaneko, Toshio; Sekine, Makoto; Tanaka, Yasunori

    2013-06-01

    The 11th Asia-Pacific Conference on Plasma Science and Technology (APCPST-11) was held in Kyoto, Japan on 2-5 October 2012 with the 25th Symposium on Plasma Science for Materials (SPSM-25). SPSM has been held annually since 1988 under the sponsorship of The 153rd Committee on Plasma Materials Science, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS). This symposium is one of the major activities of the Committee, which is organized by researchers in academia and industry for the purpose of advancing intersectional scientific information exchange and discussion of science and technology of plasma materials processing. APCPST and SPSM are jointly held biennially to survey the current status of low temperature and thermal plasma physics and chemistry for industrial applications. The whole area of plasma processing was covered from fundamentals to applications. Previous meetings were held in China, Japan, Korea, and Australia, attended by scientists from the Asia-Pacific and other countries. The joint conference was organized in plenary lectures, invited, contributed oral presentations and poster sessions. At this meeting, we had 386 participants from 10 countries and 398 presentations, including 26 invited presentations. This year, we arranged special topical sessions that covered green innovation, life innovation, and technical reports from industry. This conference seeks to bring the plasma community together and to create a forum for discussing the latest developments and issues, the challenges ahead in the field of plasma research and applications among engineers and scientists in Asia, the Pacific Rim, as well as Europe. This volume presents 44 papers that were selected via a strict peer-review process from full papers submitted for the proceedings of the conference. The topics range from the basic physics and chemistry of plasma processing to a broad variety of materials processing and environmental applications. This volume offers an overview of recent

  2. Will an underwater robot ever replace the diver? A rather poor progress or a great success?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olejnik Adam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the subject matter related to the development of underwater works technologies. Nearly 15 years ago one of the authors of this study published a material in the monthly magazine of “Podwodny Świat” (The Underwater World entitled “The Future of Underwater Technologies – the diver or the robot?” where he noted that the time of great changes in technologies aimed at researching the depths and conducting works under water has arrived. This new era mainly consists in the fact that on an increasing number of occasions the diver is replaced by an underwater robot. The presented material constitutes an attempt to provide an answer to the question whether the then posed thesis is still valid. In the article the authors discuss issues concerned with the development of techniques and technologies applied in the conquest of depths that leads them to the conclusion that the previously observed tendency of a double-tracked development of underwater technologies is gaining in strength, which causes that the works and exploration of bodies of water at great depths will be possible only with the use of unmanned techniques.

  3. Development of Plasma Vitrification Technology for Contaminated Soil at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kielpinski, A.L.; Marra, J.C.; Rogers, V.; Schumacher, R.F.; Etheridge, J.; Kirkland, R.

    1995-01-01

    The Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) of the United States Department of Energy's Office of Technology Development is developing treatment technologies for a wide variety of materials containing mixed low-level waste, i.e., having low levels of radioactivity along with hazardous constituents. Vitrification is a promising treatment technology for many of these wastes, including contaminated soil such as that found at the Savannah River Site. Proof-of-principle tests were performed to demonstrate the feasibility of both ex-situ and in-situ vitrification of contaminated soil by means of a plasma torch. A mixture of 89 percent as-excavated Savannah River Site sandy clay loam with 11 percent lime addition was tested. Vitrification of a mixture of this feed, in a 10 in. diameter crucible with a non-transferred arc plasma torch at a nominal 160 kW, was successful. The process produced homogeneous glass (albeit with local compositional variations), surrounded by a skull of incompletely reacted feed. Characterization of the resultant product durability using the Product Consistency Test showed elemental leaching well below the Environmental Assessment glass (which is often used as a minimum standard of glass acceptability in high-level waste glass assessment) for both the glass and the skull regions. Future tests should include doping the soil with hazardous constituents to enable further verification of the wasteform integrity via the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure. In-situ operation was mimicked in the test crucible by segregating the lime additive from the soil within the crucible. Making full use of the available torch maneuvering capabilities (which would likely exceed those of a torch used in-situ) failed to produce a homogeneous melt. Therefore, intimate mechanical mixture of the additive with the soil appears crucial to the success of SRS soil vitrification, and must be included in design considerations for in-situ operation

  4. Network Computing for Distributed Underwater Acoustic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-31

    Physical layer in UASNs Our main investigations are about underwater communications using acoustic waves. Elec- tromagnetic and optical waves do not...Shengli, Z., and Jun-Hong, C. (2008), Prospects and problems of wireless communication for underwater sensor networks, Wirel. Commun . Mob. Comput., 8(8... Wireless Communications , 9(9), 2934–2944. [21] Pompili, D. and Akyildiz, I. (2010), A multimedia cross-layer protocol for underwater acoustic sensor networks

  5. Cooperative OFDM underwater acoustic communications

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Xilin; Cheng, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Following underwater acoustic channel modeling, this book investigates the relationship between coherence time and transmission distances. It considers the power allocation issues of two typical transmission scenarios, namely short-range transmission and medium-long range transmission. For the former scenario, an adaptive system is developed based on instantaneous channel state information. The primary focus is on cooperative dual-hop orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM). This book includes the decomposed fountain codes designed to enable reliable communications with higher energy efficiency. It covers the Doppler Effect, which improves packet transmission reliability for effective low-complexity mirror-mapping-based intercarrier interference cancellation schemes capable of suppressing the intercarrier interference power level. Designed for professionals and researchers in the field of underwater acoustic communications, this book is also suitable for advanced-level students in electrical enginee...

  6. Systematic review of the performance of HIV viral load technologies on plasma samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollis, Kimberly A; Smit, Pieter W; Fiscus, Susan; Ford, Nathan; Vitoria, Marco; Essajee, Shaffiq; Barnett, David; Cheng, Ben; Crowe, Suzanne M; Denny, Thomas; Landay, Alan; Stevens, Wendy; Habiyambere, Vincent; Perrins, Jos; Peeling, Rosanna W

    2014-01-01

    Viral load (VL) monitoring is the standard of care in developing country settings for detecting HIV treatment failure. Since 2010 the World Health Organization has recommended a phase-in approach to VL monitoring in resource-limited settings. We conducted a systematic review of the accuracy and precision of HIV VL technologies for treatment monitoring. A search of Medline and Embase was conducted for studies evaluating the accuracy or reproducibility of commercially available HIV VL assays. 37 studies were included for review including evaluations of the Amplicor Monitor HIV-1 v1.5 (n = 25), Cobas TaqMan v2.0 (n = 11), Abbott RealTime HIV-1 (n = 23), Versant HIV-1 RNA bDNA 3.0 (n = 15), Versant HIV-1 RNA kPCR 1.0 (n = 2), ExaVir Load v3 (n = 2), and NucliSens EasyQ v2.0 (n = 1). All currently available HIV VL assays are of sufficient sensitivity to detect plasma virus levels at a lower detection limit of 1,000 copies/mL. Bias data comparing the Abbott RealTime HIV-1, TaqMan v2.0 to the Amplicor Monitor v1.5 showed a tendency of the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 to under-estimate results while the TaqMan v2.0 overestimated VL counts. Compared to the Amplicor Monitor v1.5, 2-26% and 9-70% of results from the Versant bDNA 3.0 and Abbott RealTime HIV-1 differed by greater than 0.5log10. The average intra and inter-assay variation of the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 were 2.95% (range 2.0-5.1%) and 5.44% (range 1.17-30.00%) across the range of VL counts (2log10-7log10). This review found that all currently available HIV VL assays are of sufficient sensitivity to detect plasma VL of 1,000 copies/mL as a threshold to initiate investigations of treatment adherence or possible treatment failure. Sources of variability between VL assays include differences in technology platform, plasma input volume, and ability to detect HIV-1 subtypes. Monitoring of individual patients should be performed on the same technology platform to ensure appropriate interpretation of

  7. Anesthetic management of adenoidectomy and tonsillectomy assisted by low-temperature plasma technology in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-meng LI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the anesthetic management strategy in children undergoing adenoidectomy and tonsillectomy using low-temperature plasma technology. Methods Sixty ASA status I children scheduled for adenoidectomy and tonsillectomy with plasma technology in the First Affiliated Hospital of General Hospital of PLA from September to December of 2013 were enrolled in this study. After induction with propofol, sufentanil and cisatracurium, the children were randomly divided into combined inhalation and intravenous anesthesia group (CIIA group, n=30 and total intravenous anesthesia group (TIVA group, n=30. In CIIA group, anesthesia was maintained with continuous infusion of propofol and remifentanil combined with sevoflurane inhalation during the surgery. In TIVA group, anesthesia was maintained only with continuous infusion of propofol and remifentanil. The hemodynamic changes and time for extubation and leaving operating room were recorded, and the emergence agitation was assessed using Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium (PAED scale. Results There was no significant difference in hemodynamic changes between the two groups (P>0.05. The total dosages of propofol and remifentanil in TIVA group [10.5±3.4 mg/(kg.h and 16.1±5.3μg/(kg.h, respectively] were significantly higher than those of CIIA group [6.6±2.8 mg/(kg.h, 10.4±4.2 μg/(kg.h, P<0.05]. The times for extubation and leaving operating room were significantly shorter in TIVA group (8.8±3.7min, 6.2±2.9min than in CIIA group (19.8±4.3 min, 13.7±5.2 min, P<0.05, and the rate of emergence agitation during the recovery period in TIVA group (1/30 was significantly less than that in CIIA group (9/30, P<0.05. Conclusion  Total intravenous anesthesia with tracheal intubation could shorten the recovery time and lessen the emergence agitation during the recovery period, and it may be used as a safe, feasible and convenient anesthetic strategy for adenoidectomy and tonsillectomy with

  8. Technology roadmap for development of SiC sensors at plasma processes laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Amorim Fraga

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Recognizing the need to consolidate the research and development (R&D activities in microelectronics fields in a strategic manner, the Plasma Processes Laboratory of the Technological Institute of Aeronautics (LPP-ITA has established a technology roadmap to serve as a guide for activities related to development of sensors based on silicon carbide (SiC thin films. These sensors have also potential interest to the aerospace field due to their ability to operate in harsh environment such as high temperatures and intense radiation. In the present paper, this roadmap is described and presented in four main sections: i introduction, ii what we have already done in the past, iii what we are doing in this moment, and iv our targets up to 2015. The critical technological issues were evaluated for different categories: SiC deposition techniques, SiC processing techniques for sensors fabrication and sensors characterization. This roadmap also presents a shared vision of how R&D activities in microelectronics should develop over the next five years in our laboratory.

  9. Forecast of Remote Underwater Sensing Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    attractive for use in space probe vehicles where measurement of planetary magnetic fields is desired. In this mode a three-axis device is used so that both...Acoustic Television," Oceans 󈨓, IEEL, p. 602, (1979). 62. Grimble, M. J.; Patton , R. J.; and Wise, 0. A.; "The Design of Dynamic Ship Positioning...S Cadnn rl Sonart ad TranIsponder N V i 0 dt io n" G eolI So c. -’Vi. Bu 11 1 1, 1-D47- 15D54, IJ-u. Occh iella , L . ;1 Pi ikel 1RH. - "A DoPpl er

  10. Agricultural and Food Processing Applications of Pulsed Power and Plasma Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaki, Koichi

    Agricultural and food processing applications of pulsed power and plasma technologies are described in this paper. Repetitively operated compact pulsed power generators with a moderate peak power are developed for the agricultural and the food processing applications. These applications are mainly based on biological effects and can be categorized as germination control of plants such as Basidiomycota and arabidopsis inactivation of bacteria in soil and liquid medium of hydroponics; extraction of juice from fruits and vegetables; decontamination of air and liquid, etc. Types of pulsed power that have biological effects are caused with gas discharges, water discharges, and electromagnetic fields. The discharges yield free radicals, UV radiation, intense electric field, and shock waves. Biologically based applications of pulsed power and plasma are performed by selecting the type that gives the target objects the adequate result from among these agents or byproducts. For instance, intense electric fields form pores on the cell membrane, which is called electroporation, or influence the nuclei. This paper mainly describes the application of the pulsed power for the germination control of Basidiomycota i.e. mushroom, inactivation of fungi in the soil and the liquid medium in hydroponics, and extraction of polyphenol from skins of grape.

  11. Ion Beam and Plasma Technology Development for Surface Modification at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, H.A.; Munson, C.P.; Wood, B.P.; Bitteker, L.J.; Nastasi, M.A.; Rej, D.J.; Waganaar, W.J.; Walter, K.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Coates, D.M.; Schleinitz, H.M. [DuPont Central Research and Development, Wilmington, DE (United States)

    1997-12-31

    We are developing two high-throughput technologies for materials modification. The first is a repetitive intense ion beam source for materials modification through rapid surface melt and resolidification (up to 10{sup 10} deg/sec cooling rates) and for ablative deposition of coatings. The short range of the ions (typically 0.1 to 5 micrometers) allows vaporization or melting at moderate beam energy density (typically 1-50 J/cm{sup 2}). A new repetitive intense ion beam accelerator called CHAMP is under development at Los Alamos. The design beam parameters are: E=200 keV, I=15 kA, {tau}=1 {micro}s, and 1 Hz. This accelerator will enable applications such as film deposition, alloying and mixing, cleaning and polishing, corrosion and wear resistance, polymer surface treatments, and nanophase powder synthesis. The second technology is plasma source ion implantation (PSII) using plasmas generated from both gas phase (using radio frequency excitation) and solid phase (using a cathodic arc) sources. We have used PSII to directly implant ions for surface modification or as method for generating graded interfaces to enhance the adhesion of surface coatings. Surfaces with areas of up to 16 m{sup 2} and weighing more than a thousand kilograms have been treated in the Los Alamos PSII chamber. In addition, PSII in combination with cathodic source deposition has been used to form highly adherent, thick Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings on steel for reactive metal containment in casting. These coatings resist delamination under extreme mechanical and thermal stress.

  12. Underwater Electromagnetic Sensor Networks—Part I: Link Characterization †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana-Díaz, Gara; Mena-Rodríguez, Pablo; Pérez-Álvarez, Iván; Jiménez, Eugenio; Dorta-Naranjo, Blas-Pablo; Zazo, Santiago; Pérez, Marina; Quevedo, Eduardo; Cardona, Laura; Hernández, J. Joaquín

    2017-01-01

    Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks (UWSNs) using electromagnetic (EM) technology in marine shallow waters are examined, not just for environmental monitoring but for further interesting applications. Particularly, the use of EM waves is reconsidered in shallow waters due to the benefits offered in this context, where acoustic and optical technologies have serious disadvantages. Sea water scenario is a harsh environment for radiocommunications, and there is no standard model for the underwater EM channel. The high conductivity of sea water, the effect of seabed and the surface make the behaviour of the channel hard to predict. This justifies the need of link characterization as the first step to approach the development of EM underwater sensor networks. To obtain a reliable link model, measurements and simulations are required. The measuring setup for this purpose is explained and described, as well as the procedures used. Several antennas have been designed and tested in low frequency bands. Agreement between attenuation measurements and simulations at different distances was analysed and made possible the validation of simulation setups and the design of different communications layers of the system. This leads to the second step of this work, where data and routing protocols for the sensor network are examined. PMID:28106843

  13. Distributed Underwater Sensing: A Paradigm Change for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T. C.

    Distributed netted underwater sensors (DNUS) present a paradigm change that has generated high interest all over the world. It utilizes many small spatially distributed, inexpensive sensors, and a certain number of mobile nodes, such as autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), forming a wireless acoustic network to relate data and provide real time monitoring of the ocean. Distributed underwater sensors can be used for oceanographic data collection, pollution monitoring, offshore exploration, disaster prevention, assisted navigation and tactical surveillance applications over wide areas. These functions were traditionally accomplished by a cabled system, such as an array of sensors deployed from a platform, or a large number of sensors moored on the ocean bottom, connected by a cable. The cabled systems are not only expensive but often require heavy ocean engineering (e.g., equipment to deploy heavy armored cables). In the future, as fabrication technology advances making low cost sensors a reality, DNUS is expected to be affordable and will become the undersea "OceanNet" for the marine industry like the current "internet" on land. This paper gives a layman view of the system concept, the state of the art, and future challenges. One of challenges, of particular interest to this conference, is to develop technologies for miniature-size sensors that are energy efficient, allowing long time deployment in the ocean.

  14. Underwater Electromagnetic Sensor Networks—Part I: Link Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gara Quintana-Díaz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks (UWSNs using electromagnetic (EM technology in marine shallow waters are examined, not just for environmental monitoring but for further interesting applications. Particularly, the use of EM waves is reconsidered in shallow waters due to the benefits offered in this context, where acoustic and optical technologies have serious disadvantages. Sea water scenario is a harsh environment for radiocommunications, and there is no standard model for the underwater EM channel. The high conductivity of sea water, the effect of seabed and the surface make the behaviour of the channel hard to predict. This justifies the need of link characterization as the first step to approach the development of EM underwater sensor networks. To obtain a reliable link model, measurements and simulations are required. The measuring setup for this purpose is explained and described, as well as the procedures used. Several antennas have been designed and tested in low frequency bands. Agreement between attenuation measurements and simulations at different distances was analysed and made possible the validation of simulation setups and the design of different communications layers of the system. This leads to the second step of this work, where data and routing protocols for the sensor network are examined.

  15. Development of a tentacle propulsion technique for underwater application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamgir, T; Rashid, M M; Khan, M R

    2013-01-01

    As robotic technology matures and more platforms are fielded in unstructured real-world situations, the more new areas of applications are being thought for robotic deployment. After successes in industrial robots, researchers are now trying to explore new robots with biological features of different biological creatures like, snake, bird, and spider for their stunning advantages. Underwater exploration using robots is a new avenue. Research on the tentacle robot for underwater application is a new field of research besides the other research in this arena. There are few researches on this topic are explored and mostly are on biological robot. Besides those researches this paper aims to propose and demonstrate another technique to build a tentacle for propulsion purposes. Therefore, in this paper will discuss more on mathematical development for the propulsion technique and its software verification technique in considering the environmental constrains

  16. Development of a tentacle propulsion technique for underwater application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamgir, T.; Rashid, M. M.; Khan, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    As robotic technology matures and more platforms are fielded in unstructured real-world situations, the more new areas of applications are being thought for robotic deployment. After successes in industrial robots, researchers are now trying to explore new robots with biological features of different biological creatures like, snake, bird, and spider for their stunning advantages. Underwater exploration using robots is a new avenue. Research on the tentacle robot for underwater application is a new field of research besides the other research in this arena. There are few researches on this topic are explored and mostly are on biological robot. Besides those researches this paper aims to propose and demonstrate another technique to build a tentacle for propulsion purposes. Therefore, in this paper will discuss more on mathematical development for the propulsion technique and its software verification technique in considering the environmental constrains.

  17. Unified electrohydroelastic investigation of underwater energy harvesting and dynamic actuation by incorporating Morison's equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahab, S.; Erturk, A.

    2015-04-01

    In this work, Macro-Fiber Composite (MFC)-based piezoelectric structures are employed for underwater mechanical base excitation (vibration energy harvesting) and electrical biomimetic actuation in bending operation at low frequencies. The MFC technology (fiber-based piezoelectric composites with interdigitated electrodes) exploits the effective 33-mode of piezoelectricity and strikes a balance between structural deformation and force levels for actuation to use in underwater locomotion, in addition to offering high power density for energy harvesting to enable battery-less underwater sensors. Following in-air electroelastic composite model development, it is aimed to establish semianalytical models that can predict the underwater dynamics of thin MFC cantilevers for different length-to-width aspect ratios. In-air analytical electroelastic dynamics of MFCs is therefore coupled with added mass and nonlinear hydrodynamic damping effects of fluid to describe the underwater electrohydroelastic dynamics in harvesting and actuation. To this end, passive plates of different aspect ratios are tested to extract and explore the repeatability of the inertia and drag coefficients in Morison's equation. The focus is placed on the first two bending modes in this semianalytical approach. Additionally, nonlinear dependence of the output power density to aspect ratio is characterized theoretically and experimentally in the underwater base excitation problem.

  18. A thermal engine for underwater glider driven by ocean thermal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yanan; Wang, Yanhui; Ma, Zhesong; Wang, Shuxin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal engine with a double-tube structure is developed for underwater glider. • Isostatic pressing technology is effective to increase volumetric change rate. • Actual volumetric change rate reaches 89.2% of the theoretical value. • Long term sailing of 677 km and 27 days is achieved by thermal underwater glider. - Graphical Abstract: - Abstract: Underwater glider is one of the most popular platforms for long term ocean observation. Underwater glider driven by ocean thermal energy extends the duration and range of underwater glider powered by battery. Thermal engine is the core device of underwater glider to harvest ocean thermal energy. In this paper, (1) model of thermal engine was raised by thermodynamics method and the performance of thermal engine was investigated, (2) thermal engine with a double-tube structure was developed and isostatic pressing technology was applied to improve the performance for buoyancy driven, referencing powder pressing theory, (3) wall thickness of thermal engine was optimized to reduce the overall weight of thermal engine, (4) material selection and dimension determination were discussed for a faster heat transfer design, by thermal resistance analysis, (5) laboratory test and long term sea trail were carried out to test the performance of thermal engine. The study shows that volumetric change rate is the most important indicator to evaluating buoyancy-driven performance of a thermal engine, isostatic pressing technology is effective to improve volumetric change rate, actual volumetric change rate can reach 89.2% of the theoretical value and the average power is about 124 W in a typical diving profile. Thermal engine developed by Tianjin University is a superior thermal energy conversion device for underwater glider. Additionally, application of thermal engine provides a new solution for miniaturization of ocean thermal energy conversion.

  19. Towards Enhanced Underwater Lidar Detection via Source Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illig, David W.

    Interest in underwater optical sensors has grown as technologies enabling autonomous underwater vehicles have been developed. Propagation of light through water is complicated by the dual challenges of absorption and scattering. While absorption can be reduced by operating in the blue-green region of the visible spectrum, reducing scattering is a more significant challenge. Collection of scattered light negatively impacts underwater optical ranging, imaging, and communications applications. This thesis concentrates on the ranging application, where scattering reduces operating range as well as range accuracy. The focus of this thesis is on the problem of backscatter, which can create a "clutter" return that may obscure submerged target(s) of interest. The main contributions of this thesis are explorations of signal processing approaches to increase the separation between the target and backscatter returns. Increasing this separation allows detection of weak targets in the presence of strong scatter, increasing both operating range and range accuracy. Simulation and experimental results will be presented for a variety of approaches as functions of water clarity and target position. This work provides several novel contributions to the underwater lidar field: 1. Quantification of temporal separation approaches: While temporal separation has been studied extensively, this work provides a quantitative assessment of the extent to which both high frequency modulation and spatial filter approaches improve the separation between target and backscatter. 2. Development and assessment of frequency separation: This work includes the first frequency-based separation approach for underwater lidar, in which the channel frequency response is measured with a wideband waveform. Transforming to the time-domain gives a channel impulse response, in which target and backscatter returns may appear in unique range bins and thus be separated. 3. Development and assessment of statistical

  20. Development of plasma diagnostics technologies - Measurement of transport= parameters in tokamak edge plasma by using electric transport probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Kyu Sun; Chang, Do Hee; Sim, Yeon Gun; Kim, Jin Hee [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-08-01

    Electric transport probe system is developed for the measurement of electron temperature, floating potential, plasma density and flow velocity of= edge plasmas in the KT-2 medium size tokamak. Experiments have been performed in KT-1 small size tokamak. Electric transport probe is composed of a single probe(SP) and a Mach probe (MP). SP is used for the measurements of electron density, floating potential, and plasma density and measured values are {approx} 3*10{sup 11}/cm{sup -3}, -20 volts, 15 {approx} 25 eV. For the most discharges, respectively. MP is for the measurements of toroidal(M{sub T}) and poloidal(M{sub P}) flow velocities, and density, which are M{sub T} {approx_equal} .0.85, M{sub P} {approx_equal}. 0.17, n. {approx_equal} 2.1*10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}, respectively. A triple probe is also developed for the direct reading of T{sub e} and n{sub e}, and is used for DC, RF, and RF+DC plasma in APL of Hanyang university. 38 refs., 36 figs. (author)

  1. Studies on the Application of Plasma Arc Technology to Destruction of Shipboard Waste

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sartwell, Bruce

    1999-01-01

    .... These include modeling and experiments conducted on the voltage/current relationships for plasma torches, optical emission studies of both transferred arc and non-transferred arc torches, plasma...

  2. Measurement and Modeling of Narrowband Channels for Ultrasonic Underwater Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañete, Francisco J.; López-Fernández, Jesús; García-Corrales, Celia; Sánchez, Antonio; Robles, Encarnación; Rodrigo, Francisco J.; Paris, José F.

    2016-01-01

    Underwater acoustic sensor networks are a promising technology that allow real-time data collection in seas and oceans for a wide variety of applications. Smaller size and weight sensors can be achieved with working frequencies shifted from audio to the ultrasonic band. At these frequencies, the fading phenomena has a significant presence in the channel behavior, and the design of a reliable communication link between the network sensors will require a precise characterization of it. Fading in underwater channels has been previously measured and modeled in the audio band. However, there have been few attempts to study it at ultrasonic frequencies. In this paper, a campaign of measurements of ultrasonic underwater acoustic channels in Mediterranean shallow waters conducted by the authors is presented. These measurements are used to determine the parameters of the so-called κ-μ shadowed distribution, a fading model with a direct connection to the underlying physical mechanisms. The model is then used to evaluate the capacity of the measured channels with a closed-form expression. PMID:26907281

  3. Measurement and Modeling of Narrowband Channels for Ultrasonic Underwater Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Cañete

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Underwater acoustic sensor networks are a promising technology that allow real-time data collection in seas and oceans for a wide variety of applications. Smaller size and weight sensors can be achieved with working frequencies shifted from audio to the ultrasonic band. At these frequencies, the fading phenomena has a significant presence in the channel behavior, and the design of a reliable communication link between the network sensors will require a precise characterization of it. Fading in underwater channels has been previously measured and modeled in the audio band. However, there have been few attempts to study it at ultrasonic frequencies. In this paper, a campaign of measurements of ultrasonic underwater acoustic channels in Mediterranean shallow waters conducted by the authors is presented. These measurements are used to determine the parameters of the so-called κ-μ shadowed distribution, a fading model with a direct connection to the underlying physical mechanisms. The model is then used to evaluate the capacity of the measured channels with a closed-form expression.

  4. A study on practical use of underwater abrasive water jet cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hitoshi; Demura, Kenji

    1993-09-01

    The practicality of underwater abrasive water jet cutting technology was studied in experiments. A study of abrasives in slurried form showed that optimum polymer concentration can be selected to suit underwater conditions. For the long-distance transport of slurry from the ocean surface to the ocean floor, a direct supply system by hose proved to be practical. This system takes advantage of the insolubility of the slurry in water due to a difference in specific gravity. For cutting thick steel plate at great ocean depths, a simulation with a pressurized container revealed the requirements for actual cutting. Confirmation of remote cutting operations will become the most important technology in field applications. Underwater sound vibration characteristics were found to change significantly in direct response to modifications in cutting conditions. This will be important basic data to develop an effective sensoring method.

  5. Hydrogen production by thermal water splitting using a thermal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudesocque, N.; Lafon, C.; Girold, C.; Vandensteendam, C.; Baronnet, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    CEA has been working for more than 10 years in plasma technologies devoted to waste treatment: incineration, vitrification, gases and liquid treatment. Based on this experience, CEA experiments since several years an innovative route for hydrogen production by thermal water splitting, using a plasma as heat source. This new approach could be considered as an alternative to electrolysis for massive hydrogen production from water and electricity. This paper presents a brief state of the art of water thermal plasmas, showing the temperatures and quench velocity ranges technologically achievable today. Thermodynamic properties of a water plasma are presented and discussed. A kinetic computational model is presented, describing the behavior of splitted products during the quench in a plasma plume for various parameters, such as the quench rate. The model results are compared to gas analysis in the plasma plume obtained with in-situ sampling probe. The plasma composition measurements are issued from an Optical Emission Spectroscopic method (OES). The prediction of 30 % H 2 recovery with a 108 K.s -1 quench rate has been verified. A second experimentation has been performed: mass gas analysis, flowrate measurement and OES to study the 'behavior' and species in underwater electrical arc stricken between graphite electrodes. With this quench, a synthesis gas was produced with a content 55 % of hydrogen. (authors)

  6. Integrated Approach to Dense Magnetized Plasmas Applications in Nuclear Fusion Technology. Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2007-2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-04-01

    Through its coordinated research activities, the IAEA promotes the development and application of nuclear technologies in Member States. The scientific and technical knowledge required for the construction and operation of large nuclear fusion research facilities, including ITER and the Laser Megajoule in France, and the Z machine and the National Ignition Facility in the United States of America, necessitates several accompanying research and development programmes in physics and technology. This is particularly true in the areas of materials science and fusion technology. Hence, the long standing IAEA effort to conduct coordinated research projects (CRPs) in these areas is aimed at: (i) the development of appropriate technical tools to investigate the issue of materials damage and degradation in a fusion plasma environment; and (ii) the emergence of a knowledge based understanding of the various processes underlying materials damage and degradation, thereby leading to the identification of suitable candidate materials fulfilling the stringent requirements of a fusion environment in any next step facility. Dense magnetized plasma (DMP) devices serve as a first test bench for testing of fusion relevant plasma facing materials, diagnostic development and calibration, technologies and scaling to conceptual principles of larger devices while sophisticated testing facilities such as the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) are being designed. The CRP on Integrated Approach to Dense Magnetized Plasmas Applications in Nuclear Fusion Technology described herein was initiated in 2007 with the participation of 12 research institutions in 8 Member States and was concluded in 2011. It was designed with specific research objectives falling into two main categories: support to mainstream fusion research and development of DMP technology. This publication is a compilation of the individual reports submitted by the 12 CRP participants. These reports discuss

  7. Model based image restoration for underwater images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Thomas; Frühberger, Peter; Werling, Stefan; Heizmann, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The inspection of offshore parks, dam walls and other infrastructure under water is expensive and time consuming, because such constructions must be inspected manually by divers. Underwater buildings have to be examined visually to find small cracks, spallings or other deficiencies. Automation of underwater inspection depends on established water-proved imaging systems. Most underwater imaging systems are based on acoustic sensors (sonar). The disadvantage of such an acoustic system is the loss of the complete visual impression. All information embedded in texture and surface reflectance gets lost. Therefore acoustic sensors are mostly insufficient for these kind of visual inspection tasks. Imaging systems based on optical sensors feature an enormous potential for underwater applications. The bandwidth from visual imaging systems reach from inspection of underwater buildings via marine biological applications through to exploration of the seafloor. The reason for the lack of established optical systems for underwater inspection tasks lies in technical difficulties of underwater image acquisition and processing. Lightening, highly degraded images make a computational postprocessing absolutely essential.

  8. Manufacturing technology development of plasma/ion nitriding for improvement of hardness of machine components and tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suprapto; Tjipto Sujitno; Saminto

    2015-01-01

    The manufacturing technology development of plasma/ion nitriding to improve of hardness of machine components and tools has been done. The development of this technology aims to improve device performance plasma nitriding double chamber and conducted with the addition of thermal radiation shield. Testing was done by testing for preheating operation (start-up), test operation for conditions nitriding and test for nitriding process. The results show that: the plasma nitriding device can be operated for nitriding process at the temperature of about 500 °C for 6 hours, using the thermal radiation shield obtained outside wall temperature of about 65 °C and shorten start-up time to about 60 minutes. The use of thermal radiation shield can also improve the efficiency of the electric power supply and increase the operating temperature for nitriding process. Test for nitriding obtained increase of hardness 1.33 times for the original camshaft (genuine parts) and 1.8 times for the imitation camshaft (imitation parts), the results are compared with after the tempering process at a temperature of 600 °C. For sample SS 304 was 2.45 times compared with before nitrided These results indicate that the development of manufacturing technology of plasma/ion nitriding to increase hardness of machine components and tools have been successfully able to increase the hardness, although still need to be optimized. Besides that, these devices can be developed to use for the process of carburizing and carbonitriding. (author)

  9. Rhodopsin in plasma from patients with diabetic retinopathy - development and validation of digital ELISA by Single Molecule Array (Simoa) technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Eva Rabing Brix; Olsen, Dorte Aalund; Christensen, Henry

    2017-01-01

    was therefore to develop and validate a Rhodopsin assay by employing digital ELISA technology, and to investigate whether Rhodopsin concentrations in diabetes patients with DR are elevated compared with diabetes patients without DR. METHODS: A digital ELISA assay using a Simoa HD-1 Analyzer (Quanterix...... patients with or without DR, but significantly increased number of DR patients having concentrations above the LOD. CONCLUSION: We developed and validated a digital ELISA method for quantification of Rhodopsin in plasma but found no statistically significant difference in the plasma concentration...

  10. Biodiesel production using fatty acids from food industry waste using corona discharge plasma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubas, A L V; Machado, M M; Pinto, C R S C; Moecke, E H S; Dutra, A R A

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to describe an alternative and innovative methodology to transform waste, frying oil in a potential energy source, the biodiesel. The biodiesel was produced from fatty acids, using a waste product of the food industry as the raw material. The methodology to be described is the corona discharge plasma technology, which offers advantages such as acceleration of the esterification reaction, easy separation of the biodiesel and the elimination of waste generation. The best conditions were found to be an oil/methanol molar ratio of 6:1, ambient temperature (25 °C) and reaction time of 110 min and 30 mL of sample. The acid value indicates the content of free fatty acids in the biodiesel and the value obtained in this study was 0.43 mg KOH/g. Peaks corresponding to octadecadienoic acid methyl ester, octadecanoic acid methyl ester and octadecenoic acid methyl ester, from the biodiesel composition, were identified using GC-MS. A major advantage of this process is that the methyl ester can be obtained in the absence of chemical catalysts and without the formation of the co-product (glycerin). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of Pulse Detonation-Plasma Technology Treatment on T8 Steel Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiuming; Zhang, Linwei; Liu, Keming; Lu, Lei; Lu, Deping; Zhou, Haitao

    2017-12-01

    T8 steel surfaces were treated by pulse detonation-plasma technology (PDT) at capacitance values of 600, 800, and 1000 μF, and the effects of PDT were analyzed using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron back-scattered diffraction, and micro-hardness tester and friction wear tester. The surface of T8 steel is first smoothed out, and then, craters are formed due to the inhomogeneity of the PDT energy and targeting during PDT treatment. The initial martensite in the T8 steel surface layer changes to austenite, and Fe3N is formed due to nitriding. The thickness of the modified layer, which is composed of columnar and fine grain structures, increases with the increasing capacity. Preferential orientation occurred in the {110} 〈 001 〉 direction in the modified layer, and the number of low-angle grain boundaries increased significantly after PDT treatment. The micro-hardness and wear resistance of the T8 steel was improved by PDT treatment, even doubled after the treatment with the capacitance of 1000 μF.

  12. Millimeter-wave imaging of magnetic fusion plasmas: technology innovations advancing physics understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Tobias, B.; Chang, Y.-T.; Yu, J.-H.; Li, M.; Hu, F.; Chen, M.; Mamidanna, M.; Phan, T.; Pham, A.-V.; Gu, J.; Liu, X.; Zhu, Y.; Domier, C. W.; Shi, L.; Valeo, E.; Kramer, G. J.; Kuwahara, D.; Nagayama, Y.; Mase, A.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.

    2017-07-01

    Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) imaging is a passive radiometric technique that measures electron temperature fluctuations; and microwave imaging reflectometry (MIR) is an active radar imaging technique that measures electron density fluctuations. Microwave imaging diagnostic instruments employing these techniques have made important contributions to fusion science and have been adopted at major fusion facilities worldwide including DIII-D, EAST, ASDEX Upgrade, HL-2A, KSTAR, LHD, and J-TEXT. In this paper, we describe the development status of three major technological advancements: custom mm-wave integrated circuits (ICs), digital beamforming (DBF), and synthetic diagnostic modeling (SDM). These have the potential to greatly advance microwave fusion plasma imaging, enabling compact and low-noise transceiver systems with real-time, fast tracking ability to address critical fusion physics issues, including ELM suppression and disruptions in the ITER baseline scenario, naturally ELM-free states such as QH-mode, and energetic particle confinement (i.e. Alfvén eigenmode stability) in high-performance regimes that include steady-state and advanced tokamak scenarios. Furthermore, these systems are fully compatible with today’s most challenging non-inductive heating and current drive systems and capable of operating in harsh environments, making them the ideal approach for diagnosing long-pulse and steady-state tokamaks.

  13. 4th Pacific Rim Underwater Acoustics Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Wen; Cheng, Qianliu; Zhao, Hangfang

    2016-01-01

    These proceedings are a collection of 16 selected scientific papers and reviews by distinguished international experts that were presented at the 4th Pacific Rim Underwater Acoustics Conference (PRUAC), held in Hangzhou, China in October 2013. The topics discussed at the conference include internal wave observation and prediction; environmental uncertainty and coupling to sound propagation; environmental noise and ocean dynamics; dynamic modeling in acoustic fields; acoustic tomography and ocean parameter estimation; time reversal and matched field processing; underwater acoustic localization and communication as well as measurement instrumentations and platforms. These proceedings provide insights into the latest developments in underwater acoustics, promoting the exchange of ideas for the benefit of future research.

  14. A new technique for robot vision in autonomous underwater vehicles using the color shift in underwater imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    FOR ROBOT VISION IN AUTONOMOUS UNDERWATER VEHICLES USING THE COLOR SHIFT IN UNDERWATER IMAGING by Jake A. Jones June 2017 Thesis Advisor... VEHICLES USING THE COLOR SHIFT IN UNDERWATER IMAGING 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Jake A. Jones 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS...underwater vehicles (AUVs), robot vision, autonomy, visual odometry, underwater color shift, optical properties of water 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 75 16

  15. Filling the vacuum chamber of a technological system with homogeneous plasma using a stationary glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metel, A. S.; Grigoriev, S. N.; Melnik, Yu. A.; Panin, V. V.

    2009-01-01

    Experimental study of a glow discharge with electrostatic confinement of electrons is carried out in the vacuum chamber volume V ∼ 0.12 m 3 of a technological system 'Bulat-6' in argon pressure range 0.005-5 Pa. The chamber is used as a hollow cathode of the discharge with the inner surface area S ∼ 1.5 m 2 . It is equipped with two feedthroughs, which make it possible to immerse in the discharge plasma interchangeable anodes with surface area S a ranging from ∼0.001 to ∼0.1 m 2 , as well as floating electrodes isolated from both the chamber and the anode. Dependences of the cathode fall U c = 0.4-3 kV on the pressure p at a constant discharge current in the range I = 0.2-2 A proved that aperture of the electron escape out of the electrostatic trap is equal to the sum S o = S a + S f of the anode surface S a and the floating electrode surface S f . The sum S o defines the lower limit p o of the pressure range, in which U c is independent of p. At p o the cathode fall U c grows up dramatically, when the pressure decreases, and the pressure p tends to the limit p ex , which is in fact the discharge extinction pressure. At p ∼ p ex electrons emitted by the cathode and the first generation of fast electrons produced in the cathode sheath spend almost all their energy up to 3 keV on heating the anode and the floating electrode up to 600-800 o C and higher. In this case the gas in the chamber is being ionized by the next generations of electrons produced in the cathode sheath, their energy being one order of magnitude lower. When S a 1/2 S, where m is the electron mass and M is the ion mass, the anode may be additionally heated by plasma electrons accelerated by the anode fall of potential U a up to 0.5 kV.

  16. Continuous production of fullerenes and other carbon nanomaterials on a semi-industrial scale using plasma technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenberger, T.M.; Gonzalez-Aguilar, J.; Fulcheri, L.; Fabry, F.; Grivei, E.; Probst, N.; Flamant, G.; Charlier, J.-C.

    2002-01-01

    A new production method is presented allowing the production of bulk quantities of fullerenes and other carbon nanomaterials using a 3-phase thermal plasma (260 kW). The main characteristics of this method lie in the independent control of the carbon throughput by injection of a solid carbon feedstock, and the immediate extraction of the synthesised product from the reactor, allowing production on a continuous basis. The currently investigated plasma facility is of an intermediate scale between lab-size and an industrial pilot plant, ready for further up scaling to an industrial size. The influence of a large number of different carbon precursors, plasma gases and operating conditions on the fullerene yield has been studied. At this state, quantities of up to 1 kg of carbon can be processed per hour with further scope for increase, leading to production rates for this type of materials not achievable with any other technology at present

  17. Using the combination refraction-reflection solid to design omni-directional light source used in underwater wireless optical communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Jionghui; Yao, Wenming; Wen, Linqiang

    2015-10-01

    Underwater wireless optical communication is a communication technology which uses laser as an information carrier and transmits data through water. Underwater wireless optical communication has some good features such as broader bandwidth, high transmission rate, better security, anti—interference performance. Therefore, it is promising to be widely used in the civil and military communication domains. It is also suitable for high-speed, short-range communication between underwater mobile vehicles. This paper presents a design approach of omni-directional light source used in underwater wireless optical communication, using TRACEPRO simulation tool to help design a combination solid composed of the lens, conical reflector and parabolic reflector, and using the modulated DPSS green laser in the transmitter module to output the laser beam in small divergence angles, after expanded by the combination refraction-reflection solid, the angle turns into a space divergence angle of 2π, achieving the omni-directional light source of hemisphere space, and test in the air and underwater, the result shows that the effect is fine. This paper analyzes the experimental test in the air and water, in order to make further improvement of the uniformity of light distribution, we optimize the reflector surface parameters of combination refraction-reflection solid and test in the air and water. The result shows that omni-directional light source used in underwater wireless optical communication optimized could achieve the uniformity of light distribution of underwater space divergence angle of 2π. Omni-directional light source used in underwater wireless optical communication designed in this paper has the characteristics of small size and uniformity of light distribution, it is suitable for application between UUVs, AUVs, Swimmer Delivery Vehicles (SDVs) and other underwater vehicle fleet, it realizes point-to-multipoint communications.

  18. Jellyfish inspired underwater unmanned vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Alex; Bresser, Scott; Chung, Sanghun; Tadesse, Yonas; Priya, Shashank

    2009-03-01

    An unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) was designed inspired by the form and functionality of a Jellyfish. These natural organisms were chosen as bio-inspiration for a multitude of reasons including: efficiency of locomotion, lack of natural predators, proper form and shape to incorporate payload, and varying range of sizes. The structure consists of a hub body surrounded by bell segments and microcontroller based drive system. The locomotion of UUV was achieved by shape memory alloy "Biometal Fiber" actuation which possesses large strain and blocking force with adequate response time. The main criterion in design of UUV was the use of low-profile shape memory alloy actuators which act as artificial muscles. In this manuscript, we discuss the design of two Jellyfish prototypes and present experimental results illustrating the performance and power consumption.

  19. Technological plasma source equipped with combined system of vacuum-arc discharge initiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sysoev, Yu.O.

    2013-01-01

    The construction and the operation principle of erosion plasma source with a three-stage system of vacuum-arc discharge excitation is described. As first two step was used the modified contactless start system with plasma injector, which was widely used in standard plasma sources of the ''Bulat'' systems. The operation principle of the third stage was based on the transition of glow discharge to arc discharge. Coordinated operation of three stages during various stages of coating deposition provided significant increasing of service life and reliability of the system of vacuum-arc discharge initiation and extended the functionality of the plasma source

  20. Underwater sympathetic detonation of pellet explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Shiro; Saburi, Tei; Nagayama, Kunihito

    2017-06-01

    The underwater sympathetic detonation of pellet explosives was taken by high-speed photography. The diameter and the thickness of the pellet were 20 and 10 mm, respectively. The experimental system consists of the precise electric detonator, two grams of composition C4 booster and three pellets, and these were set in water tank. High-speed video camera, HPV-X made by Shimadzu was used with 10 Mfs. The underwater explosions of the precise electric detonator, the C4 booster and a pellet were also taken by high-speed photography to estimate the propagation processes of the underwater shock waves. Numerical simulation of the underwater sympathetic detonation of the pellet explosives was also carried out and compared with experiment.

  1. Underwater Grass Comeback Helps Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fortified Susquehanna Flats, the largest bed of underwater grasses in the Chesapeake Bay, seems able to withstand a major weather punch. Its resilience is contributing to an overall increase in the Bay’s submerged aquatic vegetation.

  2. Underwater Object Segmentation Based on Optical Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Underwater optical environments are seriously affected by various optical inputs, such as artificial light, sky light, and ambient scattered light. The latter two can block underwater object segmentation tasks, since they inhibit the emergence of objects of interest and distort image information, while artificial light can contribute to segmentation. Artificial light often focuses on the object of interest, and, therefore, we can initially identify the region of target objects if the collimation of artificial light is recognized. Based on this concept, we propose an optical feature extraction, calculation, and decision method to identify the collimated region of artificial light as a candidate object region. Then, the second phase employs a level set method to segment the objects of interest within the candidate region. This two-phase structure largely removes background noise and highlights the outline of underwater objects. We test the performance of the method with diverse underwater datasets, demonstrating that it outperforms previous methods.

  3. Sensor network architectures for monitoring underwater pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Nader; Jawhar, Imad; Al-Jaroodi, Jameela; Zhang, Liren

    2011-01-01

    This paper develops and compares different sensor network architecture designs that can be used for monitoring underwater pipeline infrastructures. These architectures are underwater wired sensor networks, underwater acoustic wireless sensor networks, RF (radio frequency) wireless sensor networks, integrated wired/acoustic wireless sensor networks, and integrated wired/RF wireless sensor networks. The paper also discusses the reliability challenges and enhancement approaches for these network architectures. The reliability evaluation, characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages among these architectures are discussed and compared. Three reliability factors are used for the discussion and comparison: the network connectivity, the continuity of power supply for the network, and the physical network security. In addition, the paper also develops and evaluates a hierarchical sensor network framework for underwater pipeline monitoring.

  4. Non-Thermal Plasma (NTP) session overview: Second International Symposium on Environmental Applications of Advanced Oxidation Technologies (AOTs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosocha, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    Advanced Oxidation Technologies (used in pollution control and treating hazardous wastes) has expanded from using hydroxyl radicals to treat organic compounds in water, to using reductive free radicals as well, and to application to pollutants in both gases and aqueous media. Non-Thermal Plasma (NTP) is created in a gas by an electrical discharge or energetic electron injection. Highly reactive species (O atoms, OH, N radicals, plasma electrons) react with entrained hazardous organic chemicals in the gas, converting them to CO2, H2O, etc. NTP can be used to simultaneously remove different kinds of pollutants (eg, VOCs, SOx, NOx in flue gases). This paper presents an overview of NTP technology for pollution control and hazardous waste treatment; it is intended as an introduction to the NTP session of the symposium

  5. Underwater photogrammetry successful in Spain and France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    Underwater photogrammetry has been used to measure distortions in fuel assembly alignment pins in the upper internals of the Almarez and Dampierre PWRs. Photogrammetry is a three-dimensional precision measurement method using photographic techniques for the on-site measurement phase. On the strength of the operations at the two PWRs, underwater photogrammetry is now considered as a practical and effective technique for dimensional inspection at nuclear plants. (U.K.)

  6. Underwater noise levels in UK waters

    OpenAIRE

    Merchant, Nathan D.; Brookes, Kate L.; Faulkner, Rebecca C.; Bicknell, Anthony W. J.; Godley, Brendan J.; Witt, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Underwater noise from human activities appears to be rising, with ramifications for acoustically sensitive marine organisms and the functioning of marine ecosystems. Policymakers are beginning to address the risk of ecological impact, but are constrained by a lack of data on current and historic noise levels. Here, we present the first nationally coordinated effort to quantify underwater noise levels, in support of UK policy objectives under the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). ...

  7. Underwater gait analysis in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Daniele; Pavan, Davide; Morris, Meg; Guiotto, Annamaria; Iansek, Robert; Fortuna, Sofia; Frazzitta, Giuseppe; Sawacha, Zimi

    2017-02-01

    Although hydrotherapy is one of the physical therapies adopted to optimize gait rehabilitation in people with Parkinson disease, the quantitative measurement of gait-related outcomes has not been provided yet. This work aims to document the gait improvements in a group of parkinsonians after a hydrotherapy program through 2D and 3D underwater and on land gait analysis. Thirty-four parkinsonians and twenty-two controls were enrolled, divided into two different cohorts. In the first one, 2 groups of patients underwent underwater or land based walking training; controls underwent underwater walking training. Hence pre-treatment 2D underwater and on land gait analysis were performed, together with post-treatment on land gait analysis. Considering that current literature documented a reduced movement amplitude in parkinsonians across all lower limb joints in all movement planes, 3D underwater and on land gait analysis were performed on a second cohort of subjects (10 parkinsonians and 10 controls) who underwent underwater gait training. Baseline land 2D and 3D gait analysis in parkinsonians showed shorter stride length and slower speed than controls, in agreement with previous findings. Comparison between underwater and on land gait analysis showed reduction in stride length, cadence and speed on both parkinsonians and controls. Although patients who underwent underwater treatment exhibited significant changes on spatiotemporal parameters and sagittal plane lower limb kinematics, 3D gait analysis documented a significant (p<0.05) improvement in all movement planes. These data deserve attention for research directions promoting the optimal recovery and maintenance of walking ability. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Underwater Robotics, Anyone?: A Competition for High School and College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettinni, Richard

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how his students competed in the Annual Remote-Operated Underwater Vehicle (ROV) Competition, sponsored by the Marine Advanced Technology Education Center of Monterey, California, in 2003. He describes how the Lyndhurst High School robotics team, which was composed of his students, learned a lot and had a…

  9. The effect of pathogen reduction technology (Mirasol) on platelet quality when treated in additive solution with low plasma carryover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L; Winter, K M; Reid, S; Hartkopf-Theis, T; Marschner, S; Goodrich, R P; Marks, D C

    2011-10-01

    Pathogen reduction technologies (PRT) for platelets are now compatible with both plasma and platelet additive solutions (PAS). The aim of this study was to examine the effect of PRT on the platelet storage lesion, in the presence of PAS with low plasma carryover. PRT-treated (Mirasol) and untreated buffy coat-derived platelet concentrates prepared in 28% plasma/PAS-IIIM were evaluated using in vitro cell quality parameters on days 1, 2, 5, and 7 post-collection. At day 5, there were no significant differences between control and PRT treated platelets for swirl, viability, pO(2) , pCO(2) , mean platelet volume and adenosine diphosphate-induced aggregation. PRT treatment did not affect the functional integrity of the mitochondria. However, PRT resulted in a decrease in pH and enhancement of platelet glycolysis and activation, evidenced by increased glucose consumption and lactate production rates, increased expression of CD62P, CD63, annexin V staining and increased secretion of cytokines (P < 0.05). Hypotonic shock response and aggregation in response to collagen were also significantly reduced in PRT treated platelets (P < 0.05). Despite the observed differences in platelet metabolism and activation observed following PRT treatment in PAS and low plasma carryover, the results suggest that treatment and storage of platelets in PAS is no more detrimental to platelets than treatment and storage in plasma. © 2011 The Author(s). Vox Sanguinis © 2011 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  10. Mechanically durable underwater superoleophobic surfaces based on hydrophilic bulk metals for oil/water separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huadong; Lian, Zhongxu; Xu, Jinkai; Wan, Yanling; Wang, Zuobin; Li, Yiquan; Yu, Zhanjiang; Weng, Zhankun

    2018-04-01

    Despite the success of previous methods for fabricating underwater superoleophobic surfaces, most of the surfaces based on soft materials are prone to collapse and deformation due to their mechanically fragile nature, and they fail to perform their designed functions after the surface materials are damaged in water. In this work, the nanosecond laser-induced oxide coatings on hydrophilic bulk metals are reported which overcomes the limitation and shows the robust underwater superoleophobicity to a mechanical challenge encountered by surfaces deployed in water environment. The results show that the surface materials have the advantage that the underwater superoleophobicity is still preserved after the surfaces are scratched by knife or sandpaper and even completely destroyed because of the hydrophilic property of damaged materials in water. It is important that the results provide a guide for the design of durable underwater superoleophobic surfaces, and the development of superoleophobic materials in many potential applications such as the oil-repellent and the oil/water separation. Additionally, the nanosecond laser technology is simple, cost-effective and suitable for the large-area and mass fabrication of mechanically durable underwater superoleophobic metal materials.

  11. A Comprehensive Study on the Internet of Underwater Things: Applications, Challenges, and Channel Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chien-Chi; Lin, Yi-Shan; Wu, Geng-De; Huang, Chun-Ju

    2017-06-22

    The Internet of Underwater Things (IoUT) is a novel class of Internet of Things (IoT), and is defined as the network of smart interconnected underwater objects. IoUT is expected to enable various practical applications, such as environmental monitoring, underwater exploration, and disaster prevention. With these applications, IoUT is regarded as one of the potential technologies toward developing smart cities. To support the concept of IoUT, Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks (UWSNs) have emerged as a promising network system. UWSNs are different from the traditional Territorial Wireless Sensor Networks (TWSNs), and have several unique properties, such as long propagation delay, narrow bandwidth, and low reliability. These unique properties would be great challenges for IoUT. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive study of IoUT, and the main contributions of this paper are threefold: (1) we introduce and classify the practical underwater applications that can highlight the importance of IoUT; (2) we point out the differences between UWSNs and traditional TWSNs, and these differences are the main challenges for IoUT; and (3) we investigate and evaluate the channel models, which are the technical core for designing reliable communication protocols on IoUT.

  12. A Survey on Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks: Progresses, Applications, and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premalatha J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The endangered underwater species always drew the attention of the scientific society since their disappearance would cause irreplaceable loss. Asia is home to some of the most diverse habitats in the earth, but it is estimated that more than one in four species are endangered. In Underwater, a lot of factors are putting marine life under immense pressure. Extreme population pressure is leading to pollution, over-fishing and the devastation of crucial habitats. Consequently, the numbers of almost all fish are declining and many are already endangered. To help these species to survive, their habitat should be strictly protected. This can be achieved by strictly monitoring them. During this course, several parameters, constraints about the species and its environments are focused. Now, advances in sensor technology facilitate the monitoring of species and their habitat with less expenditure. Indeed, the increasing sophistication of underwater wireless sensors offers chances that enable new challenges in a lot of areas, like surveillance one. This paper endorses the use of sensors for monitoring underwater species endangered in their habitat. This paper further examines the key approaches and challenges in the design and implementation of underwater wireless sensor networks. We summarize major applications and the main phenomena related to acoustic propagation, and discuss how they affect the design and operation of communication systems and networking protocols at various layers.

  13. A Comprehensive Study on the Internet of Underwater Things: Applications, Challenges, and Channel Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chi Kao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Internet of Underwater Things (IoUT is a novel class of Internet of Things (IoT, and is defined as the network of smart interconnected underwater objects. IoUT is expected to enable various practical applications, such as environmental monitoring, underwater exploration, and disaster prevention. With these applications, IoUT is regarded as one of the potential technologies toward developing smart cities. To support the concept of IoUT, Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks (UWSNs have emerged as a promising network system. UWSNs are different from the traditional Territorial Wireless Sensor Networks (TWSNs, and have several unique properties, such as long propagation delay, narrow bandwidth, and low reliability. These unique properties would be great challenges for IoUT. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive study of IoUT, and the main contributions of this paper are threefold: (1 we introduce and classify the practical underwater applications that can highlight the importance of IoUT; (2 we point out the differences between UWSNs and traditional TWSNs, and these differences are the main challenges for IoUT; and (3 we investigate and evaluate the channel models, which are the technical core for designing reliable communication protocols on IoUT.

  14. Future Low Temperature Plasma Science and Technology: Attacking Major Societal Problems by Building on a Tradition of Scientific Rigor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, David

    2014-10-01

    Low temperature plasma (LTP) science is unequivocally one of the most prolific areas for varied applications in modern technology. For example, plasma etching technology is essential for reliably and rapidly patterning nanometer scale features over areas approaching one square meter with relatively inexpensive equipment. This technology enabled the telecommunication and information processing revolution that has transformed human society. I explore two concepts in this talk. The first is that the firm scientific understanding of LTP is and has been the enabling feature of these established technological applications. And the second is that LTP technology is poised to contribute to several emerging societal challenges. Beyond the important, ongoing applications of LTP science to problems of materials processing related to energy generation (e.g. thin film solar cell manufacture), there are novel and less well known potential applications in food and agriculture, infection control and medicine. In some cases, the potentially low cost nature of the applications in so compelling that they can be thought of as examples of frugal innovation. Supported in part by NSF and DoE.

  15. Removing biofilms from microstructured titanium ex vivo: a novel approach using atmospheric plasma technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Rupf

    Full Text Available The removal of biofilms from microstructured titanium used for dental implants is a still unresolved challenge. This experimental study investigated disinfection and removal of in situ formed biofilms from microstructured titanium using cold atmospheric plasma in combination with air/water spray. Titanium discs (roughness (Ra: 1.96 µm were exposed to human oral cavities for 24 and 72 hours (n = 149 each to produce biofilms. Biofilm thickness was determined using confocal laser scanning microscopy (n = 5 each. Plasma treatment of biofilms was carried out ex vivo using a microwave-driven pulsed plasma source working at temperatures from 39 to 43°C. Following plasma treatment, one group was air/water spray treated before re-treatment by second plasma pulses. Vital microorganisms on the titanium surfaces were identified by contact culture (Rodac agar plates. Biofilm presence and bacterial viability were quantified by fluorescence microscopy. Morphology of titanium surfaces and attached biofilms was visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Total protein amounts of biofilms were colorimetrically quantified. Untreated and air/water treated biofilms served as controls. Cold plasma treatment of native biofilms with a mean thickness of 19 µm (24 h to 91 µm (72 h covering the microstructure of the titanium surface caused inactivation of biofilm bacteria and significant reduction of protein amounts. Total removal of biofilms, however, required additional application of air/water spray, and a second series of plasma treatment. Importantly, the microstructure of the titanium discs was not altered by plasma treatment. The combination of atmospheric plasma and non-abrasive air/water spray is applicable for complete elimination of oral biofilms from microstructured titanium used for dental implants and may enable new routes for the therapy of periimplant disease.

  16. Developing the science and technology for the Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, J.; Biewer, T. M.; Bigelow, T. S.; Caneses, J. F.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Diem, S. J.; Goulding, R. H.; Isler, R. C.; Lumsdaine, A.; Beers, C. J.; Bjorholm, T.; Bradley, C.; Canik, J. M.; Donovan, D.; Duckworth, R. C.; Ellis, R. J.; Graves, V.; Giuliano, D.; Green, D. L.; Hillis, D. L.; Howard, R. H.; Kafle, N.; Katoh, Y.; Lasa, A.; Lessard, T.; Martin, E. H.; Meitner, S. J.; Luo, G.-N.; McGinnis, W. D.; Owen, L. W.; Ray, H. B.; Shaw, G. C.; Showers, M.; Varma, V.; the MPEX Team

    2017-11-01

    Linear plasma generators are cost effective facilities to simulate divertor plasma conditions of present and future fusion reactors. They are used to address important R&D gaps in the science of plasma material interactions and towards viable plasma facing components for fusion reactors. Next generation plasma generators have to be able to access the plasma conditions expected on the divertor targets in ITER and future devices. The steady-state linear plasma device MPEX will address this regime with electron temperatures of 1-10 eV and electron densities of 1021{\\text{}}-1020 m-3 . The resulting heat fluxes are about 10 MW m-2 . MPEX is designed to deliver those plasma conditions with a novel Radio Frequency plasma source able to produce high density plasmas and heat electron and ions separately with electron Bernstein wave (EBW) heating and ion cyclotron resonance heating with a total installed power of 800 kW. The linear device Proto-MPEX, forerunner of MPEX consisting of 12 water-cooled copper coils, has been operational since May 2014. Its helicon antenna (100 kW, 13.56 MHz) and EC heating systems (200 kW, 28 GHz) have been commissioned and 14 MW m-2 was delivered on target. Furthermore, electron temperatures of about 20 eV have been achieved in combined helicon and ECH heating schemes at low electron densities. Overdense heating with EBW was achieved at low heating powers. The operational space of the density production by the helicon antenna was pushed up to 1.1 × 1020 m-3 at high magnetic fields of 1.0 T at the target. The experimental results from Proto-MPEX will be used for code validation to enable predictions of the source and heating performance for MPEX. MPEX, in its last phase, will be capable to expose neutron-irradiated samples. In this concept, targets will be irradiated in ORNL’s High Flux Isotope Reactor and then subsequently exposed to fusion reactor relevant plasmas in MPEX.

  17. Research in space science and technology. [including X-ray astronomy and interplanetary plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckley, L. E.

    1977-01-01

    Progress in various space flight research programs is reported. Emphasis is placed on X-ray astronomy and interplanetary plasma physics. Topics covered include: infrared astronomy, long base line interferometry, geological spectroscopy, space life science experiments, atmospheric physics, and space based materials and structures research. Analysis of galactic and extra-galactic X-ray data from the Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS-3) and HEAO-A and interplanetary plasma data for Mariner 10, Explorers 47 and 50, and Solrad is discussed.

  18. Improvement of Technological Properties of a Vegetal Tanning Agent in Gas Discharge Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairullin, A. K.; Voznesensky, E. F.; Rakhmatullina, G. R.; Sabirov, A. M.; Tikhonova, N. V.

    2017-11-01

    The article considers the possibility of modification of the vegetal tanning agent quebracho in the plasma of a radio-frequency induction discharge at low pressure. It is established that plasma treatment leads to a decrease in the size of colloid fractions and a decrease in the molecular weight, while the functionality of the vegetal tanning agent is preserved. Application of the obtained product in the process of leather retanning allows improving its physical, mechanical and consumer properties.

  19. Dismantling of JPDR internals using under water plasma arc cutting technique operated by robotic manipulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagihara, S.; Asida, S.; Usui, H.

    1989-01-01

    Technology of underwater plasma cutting and design of robotic manipulator, successfully used for the dismantling of Japanese power demonstration JPDR reactor internals are considered. Of all time consumption which was 882 man-days, the 124 man-days were spent for preparation, 220 - for equipment mounting, 368 - for dismantling, 89 - for equipment disassembling and 81 - for decontamination. Labour consumption for dismantling of 1 t of the structures constituted 2200 man-days. Total dose of personnel irradiation does not exceed 0.05 R (10 -4 Sv)

  20. Underwater Noise Modeling in Lithuanian Area of the Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatas Bagočius

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Along with rising awareness of public and scientific societies about environmental and ecological impacts of underwater noise, the need for underwater noise modelling in the shallow Lithuanian area of Baltic Sea emerged. Marine Strategy Framework Directive issues regarding underwater noise indicators refers to possibility of evaluation of Good Environmental State using underwater noise measurements as well as possibility to model underwater noise. Main anthropogenic underwater noise contributor in the Seas is the shipping lanes as known due to date, with no exclusion of Lithuanian Baltic Sea area. In this manuscript, it is presented the methods of development of simplistic underwater ambient noise model purposed for computation of underwater soundscape in shallow area of the Lithuanian Baltic Sea.

  1. Underwater Sensor Networks: A New Energy Efficient and Robust Architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Climent, Salvador; Capella, Juan Vincente; Meratnia, Nirvana; Serrano, Juan José

    2012-01-01

    The specific characteristics of underwater environments introduce new challenges for networking protocols. In this paper, a specialized architecture for underwater sensor networks (UWSNs) is proposed and evaluated. Experiments are conducted in order to analyze the suitability of this protocol for

  2. Numerical Simulation of Plasma-Dynamical Processes in the Technological Inductively Coupled RF Plasmatron with Gas Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. M. Grishin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrodeless inductively coupled RF plasmatron (ICP torches became widely used in various fields of engineering, science and technology. Presently, owing to development of new technologies to produce very pure substances, nanopowders, etc., there is a steadily increasing interest in the induction plasma. This generates a need for a broad range of theoretical and experimental studies to optimize the design and technological parameters of different ICP equipment.The paper presents a numerical model to calculate parameters of inductively coupled RF plasmatron with gas-cooling flow. A finite volume method is used for a numerical solution of a system of Maxwell's and heat transfer equations in the application package ANSYS CFX (14.5. The pseudo-steady approach to solving problems is used.A numerical simulation has been computed in the application package ANSYS CFX (14.5 for a specific design option of the technological ICP, which has a three-coils inductor and current amplitude in the range J к = 50-170 A (3 MHz. The pure argon flows in the ICP. The paper discusses how the value of discharge current impacts on the thermodynamic parameters (pressure, temperature and the power energy in discharge zone. It shows that the ICP can generate a plasma stream with a maximum temperature of about 10 kK and an output speed of 10-15 m/s. The work determines a length of the plasma stream with a weight average temperature of more than 4 kK. It has been found that in order to keep the quartz walls in normal thermal state, the discharge current amplitude should not exceed 150 A. The paper shows the features of the velocity field distribution in the channel of the plasma torch, namely, the formation of vortex in the position of the first coil. The results obtained are important for calculating the dynamics of heating and evaporation of quartz particles in the manufacturing processes for plasma processing of quartz concentrate into high-purity quartz and

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic underwater vehicular propulsion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swallom, D.W.; Sadovnik, I.; Gibbs, J.S.; Gurol, H.; Nguyen, L.

    1990-01-01

    The development of magnetohydrodynamic propulsion systems for underwater vehicles is discussed. According to the authors, it is a high risk endeavor that offers the possibility of a number of significant advantages over conventional propeller propulsion systems. These advantages may include the potential for greater stealth characteristics, increased maneuverability, enhanced survivability, elimination of cavitation limits, and addition of a significant emergency propulsion system. The possibility of increased stealth is by far the most important advantage. A conceptual design study has been completed with numerical results that shows that these advantages may be obtained with a magnetohydrodynamic propulsion system in an annular configuration externally surrounding a generic study submarine that is neutrally buoyant and can operate with the existing submarine propulsion system power plant. The classical submarine mission requirements make the use of these characteristics of the magnetohydrodynamic propulsion system particularly appropriate for submarine missions. The magnetohydrodynamic annular propulsion system for a generic attack class submarine has been designed to take advantage of the magnetohydrodynamic thruster characteristics

  4. Routing strategies for underwater gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Russ E.; Leonard, Naomi E.; Fratantoni, David M.

    2009-02-01

    Gliders are autonomous underwater vehicles that achieve long operating range by moving at speeds comparable to those of, or slower than, typical ocean currents. This paper addresses routing gliders to rapidly reach a specified waypoint or to maximize the ability to map a measured field, both in the presence of significant currents. For rapid transit in a frozen velocity field, direct minimization of travel time provides a trajectory "ray" equation. A simpler routing algorithm that requires less information is also discussed. Two approaches are developed to maximize the mapping ability, as measured by objective mapping error, of arrays of vehicles. In order to produce data sets that are readily interpretable, both approaches focus sampling near predetermined "ideal tracks" by measuring mapping skill only on those tracks, which are laid out with overall mapping skill in mind. One approach directly selects each vehicle's headings to maximize instantaneous mapping skill integrated over the entire array. Because mapping skill decreases when measurements are clustered, this method automatically coordinates glider arrays to maintain spacing. A simpler method that relies on manual control for array coordination employs a first-order control loop to balance staying close to the ideal track and maintaining vehicle speed to maximize mapping skill. While the various techniques discussed help in dealing with the slow speed of gliders, nothing can keep performance from being degraded when current speeds are comparable to vehicle speed. This suggests that glider utility could be greatly enhanced by the ability to operate high speeds for short periods when currents are strong.

  5. Energy Harvesting Hybrid Acoustic-Optical Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks Localization

    KAUST Repository

    Saeed, Nasir

    2017-12-26

    Underwater wireless technologies demand to transmit at higher data rate for ocean exploration. Currently, large coverage is achieved by acoustic sensor networks with low data rate, high cost, high latency, high power consumption, and negative impact on marine mammals. Meanwhile, optical communication for underwater networks has the advantage of the higher data rate albeit for limited communication distances. Moreover, energy consumption is another major problem for underwater sensor networks, due to limited battery power and difficulty in replacing or recharging the battery of a sensor node. The ultimate solution to this problem is to add energy harvesting capability to the acoustic-optical sensor nodes. Localization of underwater sensor networks is of utmost importance because the data collected from underwater sensor nodes is useful only if the location of the nodes is known. Therefore, a novel localization technique for energy harvesting hybrid acoustic-optical underwater wireless sensor networks (AO-UWSNs) is proposed. AO-UWSN employs optical communication for higher data rate at a short transmission distance and employs acoustic communication for low data rate and long transmission distance. A hybrid received signal strength (RSS) based localization technique is proposed to localize the nodes in AO-UWSNs. The proposed technique combines the noisy RSS based measurements from acoustic communication and optical communication and estimates the final locations of acoustic-optical sensor nodes. A weighted multiple observations paradigm is proposed for hybrid estimated distances to suppress the noisy observations and give more importance to the accurate observations. Furthermore, the closed form solution for Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) is derived for localization accuracy of the proposed technique.

  6. Energy Harvesting Hybrid Acoustic-Optical Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir Saeed

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Underwater wireless technologies demand to transmit at higher data rate for ocean exploration. Currently, large coverage is achieved by acoustic sensor networks with low data rate, high cost, high latency, high power consumption, and negative impact on marine mammals. Meanwhile, optical communication for underwater networks has the advantage of the higher data rate albeit for limited communication distances. Moreover, energy consumption is another major problem for underwater sensor networks, due to limited battery power and difficulty in replacing or recharging the battery of a sensor node. The ultimate solution to this problem is to add energy harvesting capability to the acoustic-optical sensor nodes. Localization of underwater sensor networks is of utmost importance because the data collected from underwater sensor nodes is useful only if the location of the nodes is known. Therefore, a novel localization technique for energy harvesting hybrid acoustic-optical underwater wireless sensor networks (AO-UWSNs is proposed. AO-UWSN employs optical communication for higher data rate at a short transmission distance and employs acoustic communication for low data rate and long transmission distance. A hybrid received signal strength (RSS based localization technique is proposed to localize the nodes in AO-UWSNs. The proposed technique combines the noisy RSS based measurements from acoustic communication and optical communication and estimates the final locations of acoustic-optical sensor nodes. A weighted multiple observations paradigm is proposed for hybrid estimated distances to suppress the noisy observations and give more importance to the accurate observations. Furthermore, the closed form solution for Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB is derived for localization accuracy of the proposed technique.

  7. Energy Harvesting Hybrid Acoustic-Optical Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks Localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Nasir; Celik, Abdulkadir; Al-Naffouri, Tareq Y; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2017-12-26

    Underwater wireless technologies demand to transmit at higher data rate for ocean exploration. Currently, large coverage is achieved by acoustic sensor networks with low data rate, high cost, high latency, high power consumption, and negative impact on marine mammals. Meanwhile, optical communication for underwater networks has the advantage of the higher data rate albeit for limited communication distances. Moreover, energy consumption is another major problem for underwater sensor networks, due to limited battery power and difficulty in replacing or recharging the battery of a sensor node. The ultimate solution to this problem is to add energy harvesting capability to the acoustic-optical sensor nodes. Localization of underwater sensor networks is of utmost importance because the data collected from underwater sensor nodes is useful only if the location of the nodes is known. Therefore, a novel localization technique for energy harvesting hybrid acoustic-optical underwater wireless sensor networks (AO-UWSNs) is proposed. AO-UWSN employs optical communication for higher data rate at a short transmission distance and employs acoustic communication for low data rate and long transmission distance. A hybrid received signal strength (RSS) based localization technique is proposed to localize the nodes in AO-UWSNs. The proposed technique combines the noisy RSS based measurements from acoustic communication and optical communication and estimates the final locations of acoustic-optical sensor nodes. A weighted multiple observations paradigm is proposed for hybrid estimated distances to suppress the noisy observations and give more importance to the accurate observations. Furthermore, the closed form solution for Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) is derived for localization accuracy of the proposed technique.

  8. A bioinspired elastin-based protein for a cytocompatible underwater adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, M Jane; Kilbride, Bridget F; Wilker, Jonathan J; Liu, Julie C

    2017-04-01

    The development of adhesives that can be applied and create strong bonds underwater is a significant challenge for materials engineering. When the adhesive is intended for biomedical applications, further criteria, such as biocompatibility, must be met. Current biomedical adhesive technologies do not meet these needs. In response, we designed a bioinspired protein system that shows promise to achieve biocompatible underwater adhesion coupled with environmentally responsive behavior that is "smart" - that is, it can be tuned to suit a specific application. The material, ELY 16 , is constructed from an elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) that can be produced in high yields from Escherichia coli and can coacervate in response to environmental factors such as temperature, pH, and salinity. To confer wet adhesion, we utilized design principles from marine organisms such as mussels and sandcastle worms. When expressed, ELY 16 is rich in tyrosine. Upon modification with the tyrosinase enzyme to form mELY 16 , the tyrosine residues are converted to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA). Both ELY 16 and mELY 16 exhibit cytocompatibility and significant dry adhesion strength (>2 MPa). Modification with DOPA increases protein adsorption to glass and provides moderate adhesion strength (∼240 kPa) in a highly humid environment. Furthermore, this ELP exhibits a tunable phase transition behavior that can be formulated to coacervate in physiological conditions and provides a convenient mechanism for application underwater. Finally, mELY 16 possesses significantly higher adhesion strength in dry, humid, and underwater environments compared with a commercially available fibrin sealant. To our knowledge, mELY 16 provides the strongest bonds of any rationally designed protein when used completely underwater, and its high yields make it more viable for commercial application compared to natural adhesive proteins. In conclusion, this ELP shows great potential to be a new "smart" underwater

  9. Report on the joint meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Wall Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, K.L.

    1985-10-01

    This report of the Joint Meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Wall Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups contains contributing papers in the following areas: Plasma/Materials Interaction Program and Technical Assessment, High Heat Flux Materials and Components Program and Technical Assessment, Pumped Limiters, Ignition Devices, Program Planning Activities, Compact High Power Density Reactor Requirements, Steady State Tokamaks, and Tritium Plasma Experiments. All these areas involve the consideration of High Heat Flux on Materials and the Interaction of the Plasma with the First Wall. Many of the Test Facilities are described as well

  10. Plasma physics and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Fridman, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Part I: Fundamentals of Plasma Physics and Plasma ChemistryPlasma in Nature, in the Laboratory, and in IndustryOccurrence of Plasma: Natural and Man MadeGas DischargesPlasma Applications, Plasmas in IndustryPlasma Applications for Environmental ControlPlasma Applications in Energy ConversionPlasma Application for Material ProcessingBreakthrough Plasma Applications in Modern TechnologyElementary Processes of Charged Species in PlasmaElementary Charged Particles in Plasma and Their Elastic and Inelastic CollisionsIonization ProcessesMechanisms of Electron Losses: The Electron-Ion RecombinationEl

  11. Very Low Pressure Plasma Spray—A Review of an Emerging Technology in the Thermal Spray Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark F. Smith

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A fundamentally new family of thermal spray processes has emerged. These new processes, collectively known as very low pressure plasma spray or VLPPS, differ from traditional thermal spray processes in that coatings are deposited at unusually low chamber pressures, typically less than ~800 Pa (6 Torr. Depending upon the specific process, deposition may be in the form of very fine molten droplets, vapor phase deposition, or a mixture of vapor and droplet deposition. Resulting coatings are similar in quality to coatings produced by alternative coating technologies, such as physical vapor deposition (PVD or chemical vapor deposition (CVD, but deposition rates can be roughly an order of magnitude higher with VLPPS. With these new process technologies modified low pressure plasma spray (LPPS systems can now be used to produce dense, high quality coatings in the 1 to 100 micron thickness range with lamellar or columnar microstructures. A history of pioneering work in VLPPS technology is presented, deposition mechanisms are discussed, potential new applications are reviewed, and challenges for the future are outlined.

  12. Technology of direct conversion for mirror reactor end-loss plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, W.L.; Moir, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    Design concepts are presented for plasma direct convertors (PDC) intended primarily for use on the end-loss plasma from tandem-mirror reactors. Recent experimental results confirm most of these design concepts. Both a one-stage and a two-stage PDC were tested in reactor-like conditions using a 100-kV, 6-kW ion beam. In a separate test on the end of the TMX machine, a single stage PDC recovered 79 W for a net efficiency of 50%. Tandem mirror devices are well suited to PDC. The high minimum energy of the end-loss ions, the magnetic expansion outside the mirrors, and the vacuum conditions in the end tanks required by the confined plasma, all preexist. The inclusion of a PDC is therefore a rather small addition. These facts and the scale parameters for a PDC are discussed

  13. Survivability design for a hybrid underwater vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Biao; Wu, Chao; Li, Xiang; Zhao, Qingkai; Ge, Tong [State Key Lab of Ocean Engineering, School of Naval Architecture, Ocean and Civil Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-03-10

    A novel hybrid underwater robotic vehicle (HROV) capable of working to the full ocean depth has been developed. The battery powered vehicle operates in two modes: operate as an untethered autonomous vehicle in autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) mode and operate under remote control connected to the surface vessel by a lightweight, fiber optic tether in remotely operated vehicle (ROV) mode. Considering the hazardous underwater environment at the limiting depth and the hybrid operating modes, survivability has been placed on an equal level with the other design attributes of the HROV since the beginning of the project. This paper reports the survivability design elements for the HROV including basic vehicle design of integrated navigation and integrated communication, emergency recovery strategy, distributed architecture, redundant bus, dual battery package, emergency jettison system and self-repairing control system.

  14. Survivability design for a hybrid underwater vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Biao; Wu, Chao; Li, Xiang; Zhao, Qingkai; Ge, Tong

    2015-01-01

    A novel hybrid underwater robotic vehicle (HROV) capable of working to the full ocean depth has been developed. The battery powered vehicle operates in two modes: operate as an untethered autonomous vehicle in autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) mode and operate under remote control connected to the surface vessel by a lightweight, fiber optic tether in remotely operated vehicle (ROV) mode. Considering the hazardous underwater environment at the limiting depth and the hybrid operating modes, survivability has been placed on an equal level with the other design attributes of the HROV since the beginning of the project. This paper reports the survivability design elements for the HROV including basic vehicle design of integrated navigation and integrated communication, emergency recovery strategy, distributed architecture, redundant bus, dual battery package, emergency jettison system and self-repairing control system

  15. Radioactive Waste Treatment and Conditioning Using Plasma Technology Pilot Plant: Testing and Commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafizi Salihuddin; Rohyiza Baan; Norasalwa Zakaria

    2016-01-01

    Plasma pilot plant was commissioned for research and development program on radioactive waste treatment. The plant is equipped with a 50 kW direct current of non-transferred arc plasma torch which mounted vertically on top of the combustion chamber. The plant also consists of a dual function chamber, a water cooling system, a compress air supply system and a control system. This paper devoted the outcome after testing and commissioning of the plant. The problems arise was discussed in order to find the possible suggestion to overcome the issues. (author)

  16. Efficient Modelling Methodology for Reconfigurable Underwater Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mikkel Cornelius; Blanke, Mogens; Schjølberg, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers the challenge of applying reconfigurable robots in an underwater environment. The main result presented is the development of a model for a system comprised of N, possibly heterogeneous, robots dynamically connected to each other and moving with 6 Degrees of Freedom (DOF......). This paper presents an application of the Udwadia-Kalaba Equation for modelling the Reconfigurable Underwater Robots. The constraints developed to enforce the rigid connection between robots in the system is derived through restrictions on relative distances and orientations. To avoid singularities...... in the orientation and, thereby, allow the robots to undertake any relative configuration the attitude is represented in Euler parameters....

  17. Underwater laser cutting of metallic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfille, J.P.; Schildknecht, J.; Ramaswami, V.S.

    1993-01-01

    In the frame of an european contract, the feasibility of the underwater cutting with a CO 2 laser power is studied. The aim of this work is the dismantling metallic structures of reactors pools. The paper analyzes the general concept of the experimental device, the underwater cutting head, the experimenting vessel, examples of cuttings in dismantling situation with a 500 W CO 2 laser, and examples of cuttings with a 5 kW CO 2 laser. (author). 2 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Underwater noise from offshore oil production vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbe, Christine; McCauley, Robert; McPherson, Craig; Gavrilov, Alexander

    2013-06-01

    Underwater acoustic recordings of six Floating Production Storage and Offloading (FPSO) vessels moored off Western Australia are presented. Monopole source spectra were computed for use in environmental impact assessments of underwater noise. Given that operations on the FPSOs varied over the period of recording, and were sometimes unknown, the authors present a statistical approach to noise level estimation. No significant or consistent aspect dependence was found for the six FPSOs. Noise levels did not scale with FPSO size or power. The 5th, 50th (median), and 95th percentile source levels (broadband, 20 to 2500 Hz) were 188, 181, and 173 dB re 1 μPa @ 1 m, respectively.

  19. The Development of Plasma Thrusters and Its Importance for Space Technology and Science Education at University of Brasilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Jose Leonardo; Calvoso, Lui; Gessini, Paolo; Ferreira, Ivan

    Since 2004 The Plasma Physics Laboratory of University of Brasilia (Brazil) is developing Hall Plasma Thurusters for Satellite station keeping and orbit control. The project is supported by CNPq, CAPES, FAP DF and from The Brazillian Space Agency-AEB. The project is part of The UNIESPAÇO Program for Space Activities Development in Brazillian Universities. In this work we are going to present the highlights of this project together with its vital contribution to include University of Brasilia in the Brazillian Space Program. Electric propulsion has already shown, over the years, its great advantages in being used as main and secondary thruster system of several space mission types. Between the many thruster concepts, one that has more tradition in flying real spacecraft is the Hall Effect Thruster (HET). These thrusters, first developed by the USSR in the 1960s, uses, in the traditional design, the radial magnetic field and axial electric field to trap electrons, ionize the gas and accelerate the plasma to therefore generate thrust. In contrast to the usual solution of using electromagnets to generate the magnetic field, the research group of the Plasma Physics Laboratory of University of Brasília has been working to develop new models of HETs that uses combined permanent magnets to generate the necessary magnetic field, with the main objective of saving electric power in the final system design. Since the beginning of this research line it was developed and implemented two prototypes of the Permanent Magnet Hall Thruster (PMHT). The first prototype, called P-HALL1, was successfully tested with the using of many diagnostics instruments, including, RF probe, Langmuir probe, Ion collector and Ion energy analyzer. The second prototype, P-HALL2, is currently under testing, and it’s planned the increasing of the plasma diagnostics and technology analysis, with the inclusion of a thrust balance, mass spectroscopy and Doppler broadening. We are also developing an

  20. Corrosion Resistant Cladding by YAG Laser Welding in Underwater Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutomi Kochi; Toshio Kojima; Suemi Hirata; Ichiro Morita; Katsura Ohwaki

    2002-01-01

    It is known that stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) will occur in nickel-base alloys used in Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) and Internals of nuclear power plants. A SCC sensitivity has been evaluated by IHI in each part of RPV and Internals. There are several water level instrumentation nozzles installed in domestic BWR RPV. In water level instrumentation nozzles, 182 type nickel-base alloys were used for the welding joint to RPV. It is estimated the SCC potential is high in this joint because of a higher residual stress than the yield strength (about 400 MPa). This report will describe a preventive maintenance method to these nozzles Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and welds by a corrosion resistant cladding (CRC) by YAG Laser in underwater environment (without draining a reactor water). There are many kinds of countermeasures for SCC, for example, Induction Heating Stress Improvement (IHSI), Mechanical Stress Improvement Process (MSIP) and so on. A YAG laser CRC is one of them. In this technology a laser beam is used for heat source and irradiated through an optical fiber to a base metal and SCC resistant material is used for welding wires. After cladding the HAZ and welds are coated by the corrosion resistant materials so their surfaces are improved. A CRC by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) in an air environment had been developed and already applied to a couple of operating plants (16 Nozzles). This method was of course good but it spent much time to perform because of an installation of some water-proof working boxes to make a TIG-weldability environment. CRC by YAG laser welding in underwater environment has superior features comparing to this conventional TIG method as follows. At the viewpoint of underwater environment, (1) an outage term reduction (no drainage water). (2) a radioactive exposure dose reduction for personnel. At that of YAG laser welding, (1) A narrower HAZ. (2) A smaller distortion. (3) A few cladding layers. A YAG laser CRC test in underwater

  1. Optical Communication System for an Underwater Wireless Sensor Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, C.; Khalighi, A.; Bourennane, S.; Léon, P.; Rigaud, V.

    2012-04-01

    Seventy percent of the Earth is covered with water. Yet, we know so little about what lies below the sea surface. One new emerging technology that can help in oceans exploration is underwater wireless sensor network (UWSN). In such a network, a number of sensors are connected to a set of nodes that collect the data from them. Then, each node communicate its retrieved data to the other parts of the network through wireless links. So, an important step in the implementation of an UWSN is the design of an adequate transmitter/receiver system that is reliable, easy to implement, energy efficient and adapted to the underwater environment. Thanks to its cost-effectiveness and low-energy consumption property, optical underwater communication turns to be the most adequate solution for medium range node connections in an UWSN. To evaluate the optical underwater channel, we have studied its impulse response using a Monte Carlo simulator that takes into consideration all the transmitter, receiver and medium characteristics. We have demonstrated through these simulations that the channel delay dispersion is negligible in most practical cases. Therefore, we do not need to perform computationally complex signal processing such as channel equalization at the receiver. After studying the channel characteristics, we have turned our attention onto the transmitter/receiver system design. For this, we have simulated a system composed by a high-power monochromatic 532 nm LED transmitter and a Silicon PIN photodiode receiver with a collimating lens for capturing the scattered light. After photo-detection, the photo-current is converted to a voltage and low-pass filtered to limit the thermal noise variance which is the dominant noise in the receiver. Note that, in our case, background noise can be neglected because we are working in deep waters were the sunlight cannot penetrate. Then, using on-off-keying (OOK) modulation, we have proceeded to signal detection based on optimum

  2. Event Localization in Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks using Monitoring Courses

    KAUST Repository

    Debont, Matthew

    2011-11-01

    In this thesis we consider different methods to localize events in a multi-hop wireless sensor network operating underwater using acoustic modems. The network consists of surface gateway nodes and relay nodes. Localization of surface gateways can be achieved through GPS, but we cannot rely on this technology for localizing underwater nodes. Surface Gateway nodes can distribute their locations through the network using the incoming signals by the acoustic modems from the relay nodes. Relay nodes are deployed to remain static but due to water currents, floating, and the untethered nature of the nodes, they often suffer from frequent drifting which can result in a deployed network suffering link failures. In this work, we developed a novel concept of an underwater alarming system, which adapts a cyclic graph model. In the event of link failure, a series of alarm packets are broadcasted in the network. These alarms are then captured through a novel concept of underwater Monitoring Courses (M-Courses), which can also be used to assure network connectivity and identify node faults. M-Courses also allow the network to localize events and identify network issues at a local level before forwarding any results upwards to a Surface Gateway nodes. This reduces the amount of communication overhead needed and allowing for distributed management of nodes in a network which may be constantly moving. We show that the proposed algorithms can reduce the number of send operations needed for an event to be localized in a network. We have found that M-Course routing reduces the number of sends required to report an event to a Surface Gateway by up to 80% in some cases when compared to a naive routing implementation. But this is achieved by increasing the time for an event to reach a Surface Gateway. These effects are both due to the buffering effect of M-Course routing, which allows us to efficiently deal with multiple events in an local area and we find that the performance of M

  3. Plasma metabolic profiling of dairy cows affected with clinical ketosis using LC/MS technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Xu, C; Xia, C; Zhang, Hy; Sun, Lw; Gao, Y

    2014-01-01

    Ketosis in dairy cattle is an important metabolic disorder. Currently, the plasma metabolic profile of ketosis as determined using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) has not been reported. To investigate plasma metabolic profiles from cows with clinical ketosis in comparison to control cows. Twenty Holstein dairy cows were divided into two groups based on clinical signs and plasma β-hydroxybutyric acid and glucose concentrations 7-21 days postpartum: clinical ketosis and control cows. Plasma metabolic profiles were analyzed using LC/MS. Data were processed using principal component analysis and orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis. Compared to control cows, the levels of valine, glycine, glycocholic, tetradecenoic acid, and palmitoleic acid increased significantly in clinical ketosis. On the other hand, the levels of arginine, aminobutyric acid, leucine/isoleucine, tryptophan, creatinine, lysine, norcotinine, and undecanoic acid decreased markedly. Our results showed that the metabolic changes in cows with clinical ketosis involve complex metabolic networks and signal transduction. These results are important for future studies elucidating the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and prevention of clinical ketosis in dairy cows.

  4. Computations of the Power to Sustain Plasma in Air with Relevance to Aerospace Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vidmar, Robert

    2004-01-01

    ... level to 300,000 ft. An air chemistry code was upgraded and optimized for air-plasma research with key reactions that are functions of the reduced electric field, E/N, with a maximum value of 2E-15 V-sq cm...

  5. Design of a Prototype of Water Purification by Plasma Technology as the Foundation for an Industrial Wastewater Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barillas, L

    2015-01-01

    In order to mitigate the contamination of water sources due to the spill of sewage without any kind of treatment, mainly generated by the industrial sector; a prototype of water purification by plasma technology has been designed. The prototype will transform liquid water into plasma to eliminate the pathogens from the water, due to their exposure to ultraviolet radiation, electric fields and shock waves, which aid in the destruction of pollutants. The sewage will be accelerated at high speed to convert it into a liquid-gas mixture in order to transform it into plasma, which is achieved when the electrical discharge (of the type dielectric barrier discharge or DBD) is applied to the water by means of high voltage electrodes, from a source of alternating current (AC). Subsequently, the mixture slows down to be return into liquid phase and obtain clean water, all of these without a significantly rise of temperature. The device also has an automatic power control system. Finally, a short feasibility study was conducted in order to use this type of water cleaner in the future as a basis for a treatment plant of industrial waste water, so it comes to replace the current secondary and tertiary treatments used among the industry. It is intended that this new system will be more efficient and cheaper than the current waste water treatments. (paper)

  6. Design of a Prototype of Water Purification by Plasma Technology as the Foundation for an Industrial Wastewater Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barillas, L.

    2015-03-01

    In order to mitigate the contamination of water sources due to the spill of sewage without any kind of treatment, mainly generated by the industrial sector; a prototype of water purification by plasma technology has been designed. The prototype will transform liquid water into plasma to eliminate the pathogens from the water, due to their exposure to ultraviolet radiation, electric fields and shock waves, which aid in the destruction of pollutants. The sewage will be accelerated at high speed to convert it into a liquid-gas mixture in order to transform it into plasma, which is achieved when the electrical discharge (of the type dielectric barrier discharge or DBD) is applied to the water by means of high voltage electrodes, from a source of alternating current (AC). Subsequently, the mixture slows down to be return into liquid phase and obtain clean water, all of these without a significantly rise of temperature. The device also has an automatic power control system. Finally, a short feasibility study was conducted in order to use this type of water cleaner in the future as a basis for a treatment plant of industrial waste water, so it comes to replace the current secondary and tertiary treatments used among the industry. It is intended that this new system will be more efficient and cheaper than the current waste water treatments.

  7. Underwater inspection by immersion phased array UT technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirasawa, Taiji

    2017-01-01

    In the inspection during the service period of a nuclear power plant, ultrasonic flaw detection test (UT) is performed as a volume test to confirm the soundness of the equipment and structure. Phased array UT technology has been applied as a technique to measure with high accuracy the crack depth generated in stainless steel or Ni based alloy welds. This paper picked up main scanning methods based on ultrasonic beam control in phased array UT, as well as items to consider when carrying out underwater UT inspection of reactor internal structure, and described the concept of selection method of flaw detection method. As the example of underwater UT inspection, this paper introduced application examples for actual equipment and test body, in the defect depth measurement of water immersion phased array UT, by choosing reactor internal structures etc. of a BWR plant. The core shroud, core spray piping, jet pump, CRD housing, and shroud support of BWR plant that are introduced here are subject to individual inspection under maintenance standards and are extremely important equipment. (A.O.)

  8. Underwater Coatings Testing for INEEL Fuel Basin Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julia L. Tripp

    2004-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is deactivating several fuel storage basins. Airborne contamination is a concern when the sides of the basins are exposed and allowed to dry during water removal. One way of controlling this airborne contamination is to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls are still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market that are used in marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives are easily applied and adhere well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INEEL fuel pools. The four pools considered included (1) Test Area North (TAN-607) with epoxy painted concrete walls; (2) Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) (CPP-603) with bare concrete walls; (3) Materials Test Reactor (MTR) Canal with stainless steel lined concrete walls; and (4) Power Burst Facility (PBF-620) with stainless steel lined concrete walls on the bottom and epoxy painted carbon steel lined walls on the upper portions. Therefore, the four materials chosen for testing included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The typical water temperature of the pools varies from 55 F to 80 F dependent on the pool and the season. These tests were done at room temperature.

  9. IVO develops a new repair technique for underwater sites. Viscous doughlike substance underwater cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klingstedt, G.; Leisio, C. [ed.

    1998-07-01

    A viscous sealant is revolutionizing repair of the stone and concrete masonry of underwater dams, bridges and canals. There is now no need for expensive and time-consuming cofferdams, since a diver can extrude quick-setting mortar into underwater structures needing repair. This technique has worked well in recent years in various parts of Finland even in strongly flowing water. IVO experts are now starting to look more beyond the borders of Finland

  10. Use of plasma arc technology for treatment of solid radioactive waste and review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostov, E.; Bataklieva, T.

    2011-01-01

    The thermal treatment of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes by arc technology is an advanced and promising process. Therefore, this technology is becoming an important part of the waste management systems of new and existing nuclear power plants. However, due to the small number of existing facilities worldwide, limited operating experience and the ongoing need for research and development activities in this area, the reliability of the technology and the economical benefits are not well understood. Therefore, the goal of this report is to provide a basic understanding of the arc discharge technology for low and intermediate level radioactive waste destruction and to review the end product characteristics and the advancements in their improvement. In addition the information in this paper can be used as base for developing of technical, operational and economical criteria for technology selection methodology. (authors)

  11. Technology of Glow Discharge Plasma to Improve Color Intensity on Polyester Fabric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaelani, Zubaidi A.

    2000-01-01

    The surface modification have been studied onto polyester fiber toimprove color intensity of the dyed fabrics. The modifications carried byetching using glow discharge plasma under condition of 0.04 Torr, using 10Watt at 13.56 MHz. Both surface of original and modified fibers were analyzedby means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), and then both of fibers weredyed with disperse dyes and measured using color measurement apparatus tocompare the color shading, color intensity, and the brightness of the fibers.The color shading of modified fibers have small difference of original fiber,and the color intensity of modified fibers have much higher than originalfibers, while the brightness of the modified fibers tend to decrease. By themeasurements, can be concluded that the surface modifications by glowdischarge plasma are able to improve color deepness of the fabrics, and haveanother advantageous to the character of fabrics. (author)

  12. Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition – Technological Design Of Functional Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Januś M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition (PA CVD method allows to deposit of homogeneous, well-adhesive coatings at lower temperature on different substrates. Plasmochemical treatment significantly impacts on physicochemical parameters of modified surfaces. In this study we present the overview of the possibilities of plasma processes for the deposition of diamond-like carbon coatings doped Si and/or N atoms on the Ti Grade2, aluminum-zinc alloy and polyetherketone substrate. Depending on the type of modified substrate had improved the corrosion properties including biocompatibility of titanium surface, increase of surface hardness with deposition of good adhesion and fine-grained coatings (in the case of Al-Zn alloy and improving of the wear resistance (in the case of PEEK substrate.

  13. Improved microwave shielding behavior of carbon nanotube-coated PET fabric using plasma technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haji, Aminoddin, E-mail: Ahaji@iaubir.ac.ir [Department of Textile Engineering, Birjand Branch, Islamic Azad University, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Semnani Rahbar, Ruhollah [Department of Textile and Leather, Faculty of Chemistry and Petrochemical Engineering, Standard Research Institute, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mousavi Shoushtari, Ahmad [Textile Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-08-30

    Four different procedures were conducted to load amine functionalized multiwall carbon nanotube (NH{sub 2}-MWCNT) onto poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fabric surface to obtain a microwave shielding sample. Plasma treated fabric which was subsequently coated with NH{sub 2}-MWCNT in the presence of acrylic acid was chosen as the best sample. Surface changes in the PET fabrics were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Wide-angle X-ray diffraction was used to study the crystalline structure of the PET fabric. The microwave shielding performance of the PET fabrics in term of reflection loss was determined using a network analyzer at X-band (8.2–12.4 GHz). The XPS results revealed that the carbon atomic percentage decreased while the oxygen atomic percentage increased when the fabric was plasma treated and coated with NH{sub 2}-MWCNT. The SEM images showed that the NH{sub 2}-MWCNTs were homogenously dispersed and individually separated in the surface of fabric. Moreover, the structural studies showed that the crystalline region of the fabrics was not affected by NH{sub 2}-MWCNT and plasma treatment. The best microwave absorbing properties were obtained from the plasma treated fabric which was then coated with 10% NH{sub 2}-MWCNT in the presence of acrylic acid. It showed a minimum reflection loss of ∼−18.2 dB about 11 GHz. Proper attachments of NH{sub 2}-MWCNT on the PET fabric surface was explained in the suggested mechanism in which hydrogen bonding and amide linkage are responsible for the achievement of microwave shielding properties with high durability.

  14. Pyrolysis of Polyolefins Using Rotating Arc Plasma Technology for Production of Acetylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Polyolefin, as one of the most widely used macromolecule materials, has been one of the most serious threats to the environment. Current treatment methods of waste polyolefin including landfill, incineration, and thermal degradation have suffered from severe problems such as secondary pollution and the generation of other toxic substances. In this article, we report for the first time a high-efficiency method to produce high-value C2H2 from polyolefins using a rotating direct current arc plasma reactor, using polyethylene and polypropylene as feedstocks. The essence of this method is that a reductive atmosphere of pyrolysis enables a thermodynamic preference to C2H2 over other carbon-containing gas and the rotating direct current arc plasma reactor allows for a uniform distribution of high temperature to ensure high conversion of polymers. Thermodynamic simulation of product composition was performed, and the effect of plasma input power, polyolefin feed rate, and working gas flow rate on the pyrolysis results was experimentally investigated. It was found that, with proper parameter control, approximately complete conversion of carbon in polyolefin could be obtained, with a C2H2 selectivity higher than 80% and a C2H2 yield higher than 70%. These results not only create new opportunities for the reuse of polymer waste, but are also instructive for the green production of C2H2.

  15. Underwater Advanced Time-Domain Electromagnetic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-03

    sufficiently waterproofed ...................................................................... 20 Objective: Calibration method can be used both topside... additional background variability is observed at early times, as illustrated in Figure 15. The layout of this figure is the same as Figure 14. Now the...are discussed in the following sections and summarized in Table 5. Objective: System is sufficiently waterproofed The array remained underwater up to

  16. Detection of Underwater UXOs in Mud

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    2nd International Conference on Underwater Acoustic Measurements, Crete, Greece, 2007. 16 [10] P.T. Gough and D.W. Hawkins “Imaging algorithms...course. Runs 275 and 325 folla.v the same trad < and run 322 foUows a track on the opposite side of the swath. The LF SAS image of run 325 is shown

  17. Adaptive turbo equalization for underwater acoustic communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cannelli, L; Leus, G.; Dol, H.S.; Walree, P.A. van

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a multiband transceiver designed for underwater channels is presented. Multi-branch filtering at the receiver is used to leverage the diversity offered by a multi-scale multi-lag scenario. The multi-branch bank of filters is constructed by estimating scale and delay coefficients

  18. Underwater noise generated by offshore pile driving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsouvalas, A.

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise emission in the marine environment has always been an environmental issue of serious concern. In particular, the noise generated during the installation of foundation piles is considered to be one of the most significant sources of underwater noise pollution. This is mainly

  19. Evolution: Fossil Ears and Underwater Sonar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Olivier

    2016-08-22

    A key innovation in the history of whales was the evolution of a sonar system together with high-frequency hearing. Fossils of an archaic toothed whale's inner ear bones provide clues for a stepwise emergence of underwater echolocation ability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Impacts of underwater noise on marine vertebrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liebschner, Alexander; Seibel, Henrike; Teilmann, Jonas; Wittekind, Dietrich; Parmentier, Eric; Dähne, Michael; Dietz, Rune; Driver, Jörg; Elk, van Cornelis; Everaarts, Eligius; Findeisen, Henning; Kristensen, Jacob; Lehnert, Kristina; Lucke, Klaus; Merck, Thomas; Müller, Sabine; Pawliczka, Iwona; Ronnenberg, Katrin; Rosenberger, Tanja; Ruser, Andreas; Tougaard, Jakob; Schuster, Max; Sundermeyer, Janne; Sveegaard, Signe; Siebert, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    The project conducts application-oriented research on impacts of underwater noise on marine vertebrates in the North and Baltic Seas. In distinct subprojects, the hearing sensitivity of harbor porpoises and gray seals as well as the acoustic tolerance limit of harbor porpoises to impulsive noise

  1. 3rd International Meeting for Researchers in Materials and Plasma Technology (IMRMPT) and 1st Symposium on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    These proceedings present the written contributions of the participants of the 3rd International Meeting for Researchers in Materials and Plasma Technology (3rd IMRMPT) and the 1st Symposium on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology which was held from 4 to May 9, 2015 at the Dann Carlton Hotel Bucaramanga, Colombia, organized by the faculty of science of the Universidad Industrial de Santander (UIS) and the basic science department of the Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana. This was the third version of biennial meetings that began in 2011. The five-day scientific program of the 3rd IMRMPT consisted of 24 Magisterial Conferences, 70 Oral Presentations, 185 Poster Presentations, 3 Courses and 1 Discussion Panel with the participation of undergraduate and graduate students, professors, researchers and entrepreneurs from Colombia, Russia, Germany, France, Spain, England, United States, Mexico, Argentina, Uruguay, Brazil, Venezuela, among others. Moreover, the objective of IMRMPT was to bring together national and international researchers in order to establish a network of scientific cooperation with a global impact in the area of the science and the technology of materials; to promote the exchange of creative ideas and the effective transfer of scientific knowledge, from fundamental research to innovation applied to industrial solutions and to advances in the development of new research allowing to increase the lifetime of the materials used in the industry by means of efficient transference of the knowledge between sectors academia and industry. The topics covered in the 3rd IMRMPT include New Materials, Surface Physics, Structural Integrity, Renewable Energy, Online Process Control, Non Destructive Evaluation, Characterization of Materials, Laser and Hybrid Processes, Thin Films and Nanomaterials, Surface Hardening Processes, Wear and Corrosion/Oxidation, Plasma Applications and Technologies, Modelling, Simulation and Diagnostics, Biomedical Coatings, Surface Treatments

  2. Numerical Simulation and Experiment for Underwater Shock Wave in Newly Designed Pressure Vessel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Shibuta

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern eating habits depend in large part on the development of food processing technology. Thermal treatments are often performed in the conventional food processing, but it can cause discoloration and loss of nutrients of the food by thermal processing or treatment. On the other hand, food processing using an underwater shock wave has little influence of heat and its processing time is very short, preventing the loss of nutrients. In this research optical observation experiment and the numerical simulation were performed, in order to understand and control the behavior of the underwater shock wave in the development of the processing container using an underwater shock wave for the factory and home. In this experiment a rectangular container was used to observe the behavior of the underwater shock wave. In the experiment, the shock wave was generated by using explosive on the shock wave generation side. The shock wave, which passed through the phosphor bronze and propagated from the aluminum sidewall, was observed on the processing container side. Numerical simulation of an analogous experimental model was investigated, where LS-DYNA software was used for the numerical simulation. The comparative study of the experiment and the numerical simulation was investigated. The behavior of a precursor shock wave from the device wall was able to be clarified. This result is used for development of the device in numerical simulation.

  3. DOA Estimation for Underwater Wideband Weak Targets Based on Coherent Signal Subspace and Compressed Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Direction of arrival (DOA estimation is the basis for underwater target localization and tracking using towed line array sonar devices. A method of DOA estimation for underwater wideband weak targets based on coherent signal subspace (CSS processing and compressed sensing (CS theory is proposed. Under the CSS processing framework, wideband frequency focusing is accompanied by a two-sided correlation transformation, allowing the DOA of underwater wideband targets to be estimated based on the spatial sparsity of the targets and the compressed sensing reconstruction algorithm. Through analysis and processing of simulation data and marine trial data, it is shown that this method can accomplish the DOA estimation of underwater wideband weak targets. Results also show that this method can considerably improve the spatial spectrum of weak target signals, enhancing the ability to detect them. It can solve the problems of low directional resolution and unreliable weak-target detection in traditional beamforming technology. Compared with the conventional minimum variance distortionless response beamformers (MVDR, this method has many advantages, such as higher directional resolution, wider detection range, fewer required snapshots and more accurate detection for weak targets.

  4. Remote-Controlled Inspection Robot for Nuclear Facilities in Underwater Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuhiro Miwa; Syuichi Satoh; Naoya Hirose

    2002-01-01

    A remote-controlled inspection robot for nuclear facilities was developed. This is a underwater robot technology combined with inspection and flaw removal technologies. This report will describe the structure and performance of this robot. The inspection robot consists of two parts. The one is driving equipment, and the other is inspection and grinding units. It can swim in the tank, move around the tank wall, and stay on the inspection area. After that it starts inspection and flaw removal with a special grinding wheel. This technology had been developed to inspect some Radioactive Waste (RW) tanks in operating nuclear power plants. There are many RW tanks in these plants, which human workers can be hard to access because of a high level dose. This technology is too useful for inspection works of human-inaccessible areas. And also, in conventional inspection process, some worker go into the tank and set up scaffolding after full drainage and decontamination. It spends too much time for these preparations. If tank inspection and flaw removal can be performed in underwater, the outage period will be reduced. Remote-controlled process can be performed in underwater. This is the great advantage for plant owners. Since 1999 we have been applying this inspection robot to operating nuclear 11 facilities in Japan. (authors)

  5. Experimental Measurements of Temporal Dispersion for Underwater Laser Communications and Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochenour, Brandon Michael

    The challenge in implementing optical sensors underwater lies in the high variability of the ocean environment where propagation of light in the ocean is complicated by absorption and scattering. Most underwater optical sensors operate in the blue/green portion of the electromagnetic spectrum where seawater exhibits an absorption minimum. Mitigating scattering however is a greater challenge. In particular, scattering causes both spatial distortion (beam spreading) and temporal dispersion (pulse spreading or distortion). Each of type of dispersion decreases sensor performance (operating range, image resolution, data bandwidth, etc.). While spatial dispersion has received a great deal of attention in previous decades, technological limitations of sensor hardware have made experimental measurements of temporal dispersion underwater difficult until now. The main contribution of this thesis are experimental measurements of temporal dispersion of optical beams in turbid water, made with a high sensitivity/high dynamic range experimental technique. Measurements are performed as a function of water clarity (0-20 attenuation lengths), transmitter/receiver alignment (0-30 degrees, half angle), receiver field of view (1-7 degrees, full angle), and transmitter beam divergence (collimated and diffuse). Special attention is paid to the interdependency between spatial and temporal dispersion. This work provides severable notable contributions: 1. While experimental characterization of spatial dispersion has received significant attention underwater, there has been a lack of measurements characterizing temporal dispersion underwater. This work provides the most comprehensive set of experimental measurements to date regarding the temporal dispersion of optical beams underwater. 2. An experimental analysis of the influence of scattering phase function on temporal dispersion. Coarse estimates of the scattering phase function are used to determine the ranges (or attenuation lengths

  6. Vacuum laser-produced plasma for analytical application in fusion technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almaviva, S; Caneve, L; Colao, F; Fantoni, R; Maddaluno, G

    2012-01-01

    LIBS is a well established tool for qualitative, semi-quantitative and quantitative analysis of surfaces, with micro-destructive characteristics and some capabilities for stratigraphy. In this work, the depth profiling capabilities of LIBS has been checked by determining the composition of multilayered samples simulating the plasma facing components fusion device covered with co-deposited impurity layers. A new experimental setup has been designed and realized in order to optimize the characteristics of a LIBS system working at low pressure and remotely.

  7. Plasma-sprayed zirconia gas path seal technology: A state-of-the-art review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    The benefits derived from application of ceramic materials to high pressure turbine gas path seal components are described and the developmental backgrounds of various approaches are reviewed. The most fully developed approaches are those employing plasma sprayed zirconium oxide as the ceramic material. Prevention of cracking and spalling of the zirconium oxide under cyclic thermal shock conditions imposed by the engine operating cycle is the most immediate problem to be solved before implementation is undertaken. Three promising approaches to improving cyclic thermal shock resistance are described and comparative rig performance of each are reviewed. Advanced concepts showing potential for performance improvements are described.

  8. Histamine quantification in human plasma using high resolution accurate mass LC-MS technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurichesse, Mathieu; Gicquel, Thomas; Moreau, Caroline; Tribut, Olivier; Tarte, Karin; Morel, Isabelle; Bendavid, Claude; Amé-Thomas, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Histamine (HA) is a small amine playing an important role in anaphylactic reactions. In order to identify and quantify HA in plasma matrix, different methods have been developed but present several disadvantages. Here, we developed an alternative method using liquid chromatography coupled with an ultra-high resolution and accurate mass instrument, Q Exactive™ (Thermo Fisher) (LCHRMS). The method includes a protein precipitation of plasma samples spiked with HA-d4 as internal standard (IS). LC separation was performed on a C18 Accucore column (100∗2.1mm, 2.6μm) using a mobile phase containing nonafluoropentanoic acid (3nM) and acetonitrile with 0.1% (v/v) formic acid on gradient mode. Separation of analytes was obtained within 10min. Analysis was performed from full scan mode and targeted MS2 mode using a 5ppm mass window. Ion transitions monitored for targeted MS2 mode were 112.0869>95.0607m/z for HA and 116.1120>99.0855m/z for HA-d4. Calibration curves were obtained by adding standard calibration dilution at 1 to 180nM in TrisBSA. Elution of HA and IS occurred at 4.1min. The method was validated over a range of concentrations from 1nM to 100nM. The intra- and inter-run precisions were <15% for quality controls. Human plasma samples from 30 patients were analyzed by LCHRMS, and the results were highly correlated with those obtained using the gold standard radioimmunoassay (RIA) method. Overall, we demonstrate here that LCHRMS is a sensitive method for histamine quantification in biological human plasmas, suitable for routine use in medical laboratories. In addition, LCHRMS is less time-consuming than RIA, avoids the use of radioactivity, and could then be considered as an alternative quantitative method. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Stability analysis of hybrid-driven underwater glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Wen-dong; Wang, Shu-xin; Wang, Yan-hui; Song, Yang; Zhu, Ya-qiang

    2017-10-01

    Hybrid-driven underwater glider is a new type of unmanned underwater vehicle, which combines the advantages of autonomous underwater vehicles and traditional underwater gliders. The autonomous underwater vehicles have good maneuverability and can travel with a high speed, while the traditional underwater gliders are highlighted by low power consumption, long voyage, long endurance and good stealth characteristics. The hybrid-driven underwater gliders can realize variable motion profiles by their own buoyancy-driven and propeller propulsion systems. Stability of the mechanical system determines the performance of the system. In this paper, the Petrel-II hybrid-driven underwater glider developed by Tianjin University is selected as the research object and the stability of hybrid-driven underwater glider unitedly controlled by buoyancy and propeller has been targeted and evidenced. The dimensionless equations of the hybrid-driven underwater glider are obtained when the propeller is working. Then, the steady speed and steady glide path angle under steady-state motion have also been achieved. The steady-state operating conditions can be calculated when the hybrid-driven underwater glider reaches the desired steady-state motion. And the steadystate operating conditions are relatively conservative at the lower bound of the velocity range compared with the range of the velocity derived from the method of the composite Lyapunov function. By calculating the hydrodynamic coefficients of the Petrel-II hybrid-driven underwater glider, the simulation analysis has been conducted. In addition, the results of the field trials conducted in the South China Sea and the Danjiangkou Reservoir of China have been presented to illustrate the validity of the analysis and simulation, and to show the feasibility of the method of the composite Lyapunov function which verifies the stability of the Petrel-II hybrid-driven underwater glider.

  10. Resolution enhancement in active underwater polarization imaging with modulation transfer function analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jiefei; Yang, Kecheng; Xia, Min; Sun, Liying; Cheng, Zao; Liu, Hao; Ye, Junwei

    2015-04-10

    Active polarization imaging technology is a convenient and promising method for imaging in a scattering medium such as fog and turbid water. However, few studies have investigated the influence of polarization on the resolution in underwater imaging. This paper reports on the effects of polarization detection on the resolution of underwater imaging by using active polarization imaging technology. An experimental system is designed to determine the influence under various polarization and water conditions. The modulation transfer function is introduced to estimate the resolution variations at different spatial frequencies. Results show that orthogonal detection supplies the best resolution compared with other polarization directions in the turbid water. The performance of the circular polarization method is better than the linear process. However, if the light propagates under low scattering conditions, such as imaging in clean water or at small optical thickness, the resolution enhancement is not sensitive to the polarization angles.

  11. Reactor Power for Large Displacement Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClure, Patrick Ray [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reid, Robert Stowers [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Poston, David Irvin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dasari, Venkateswara Rao [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-24

    This is a PentaChart on reactor power for large displacement autonomous underwater vehicles. Currently AUVs use batteries or combinations of batteries and fuel cells for power. Battery/fuel cell technology is limited by duration. Batteries and cell fuels are a good match for some missions, but other missions could benefit greatly by a longer duration. The goal is the following: to design nuclear systems to power an AUV and meet design constraints including non-proliferation issues, power level, size constraints, and power conversion limitations. The action plan is to continue development of a range of systems for terrestrial systems and focus on a system for Titan Moon as alternative to Pu-238 for NASA.

  12. High-performance thermal cutting techniques for underwater use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bach, F.W.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past few years, the Institute for Materials Research of the University of Hanover developed a new product family (Contact-Arc-Metal-X) of electrothermal techniques for underwater cutting of metal structures. This CAMX technology comprises contact arc metal cutting by means of a sword-shaped electrode, contact arc metal grinding with a rotating electrode, and contact arc metal drilling with an integrated interlocking mechanism. CAMC is characterized by its capability to cut components with complex structures. Undercuts and cavities constitute no obstacles in the process. CAMG is a technique for straight cutting characterized by its high cutting speeds. CAMD is able to produce countersunk boreholes and holes of any geometry. The integrated tensioning mechanism allows parts to be gripped and transported which could not be handled by conventional gripper systems. (orig.) [de

  13. Optical Backscattering Measured by Airborne Lidar and Underwater Glider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H. Churnside

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The optical backscattering from particles in the ocean is an important quantity that has been measured by remote sensing techniques and in situ instruments. In this paper, we compare estimates of this quantity from airborne lidar with those from an in situ instrument on an underwater glider. Both of these technologies allow much denser sampling of backscatter profiles than traditional ship surveys. We found a moderate correlation (R = 0.28, p < 10−5, with differences that are partially explained by spatial and temporal sampling mismatches, variability in particle composition, and lidar retrieval errors. The data suggest that there are two different regimes with different scattering properties. For backscattering coefficients below about 0.001 m−1, the lidar values were generally greater than the glider values. For larger values, the lidar was generally lower than the glider. Overall, the results are promising and suggest that airborne lidar and gliders provide comparable and complementary information on optical particulate backscattering.

  14. Report of the international symposium for ITER. 'Burning plasma science and technology on ITER'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-10-01

    This report contains the presentations on the International Symposium for ITER, held on Jan. 24, 2002 on the occasion of the ITER Governmental Negotiations in Tokyo. This symposium is organized by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute with the support of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). The meaningful results were obtained through this symposium especially on new frontiers of science and technology brought by ITER, accelerated road maps towards realizing fusion energy, and portfolio of other fusion configurations from ITER. The 5 of the presented papers are indexed individually (J.P.N.)

  15. Validation of Passive Sampling Devices for Monitoring of Munitions Constituents in Underwater Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-30

    Program (ESTCP), project #ER-201433. Leveraged funding was provided by the Navy’s Environmental Sustainability Development to Integration (NESDI...Monitoring of Munitions Constituents in Underwater Environments . Environmental Security Technology Demonstration Program Project #ER-201433. Final...reference compounds. Environ . Monit. Assess. 189:1-19. DOI 10.1007/s10661-016- 5706-4. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Jenkins TF, Bigl SR

  16. HYDROLASING OF CONTAMINATED UNDERWATER BASIN SURFACES AT THE HANFORD K AREA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CHRONISTER, G.B.

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses selecting and implementing hydrolasing technology to reduce radioactive contamination in preparing to dispose of the K Basins; two highly contaminated concrete basins at the Hanford Site. A large collection of spent nuclear fuel stored for many years underwater at the K Basins has been removed to stable, dry, safe storage. Remediation activities have begun for the remaining highly contaminated water. sludge, and concrete basin structures. Hydrolasing will be used to decontaminate and prepare the basin structures for disposal

  17. The Analysis of Drive Systems in Unmanned Underwater Vehicles Towards Identifying the Method of Drive Transmission – Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakus Bartłomiej

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This is the second part of material concerned with the analysis of drive systems in remotely controlled underwater vehicles. The first part involved the problem of classification of unmanned underwater vehicles, mainly remotely controlled, as well as the nomenclature used in relation to various components of the discussed drive systems and thrusters. The functionality of particular drive systems was discussed along with the advantages and disadvantages of the analysed design technologies. This material presents the method of conducting an analysis of drive systems, its methodology and results.

  18. Action Sport Cameras as an Instrument to Perform a 3D Underwater Motion Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardina, Gustavo R D; Cerveri, Pietro; Barros, Ricardo M L; Marins, João C B; Silvatti, Amanda P

    2016-01-01

    Action sport cameras (ASC) are currently adopted mainly for entertainment purposes but their uninterrupted technical improvements, in correspondence of cost decreases, are going to disclose them for three-dimensional (3D) motion analysis in sport gesture study and athletic performance evaluation quantitatively. Extending this technology to sport analysis however still requires a methodologic step-forward to making ASC a metric system, encompassing ad-hoc camera setup, image processing, feature tracking, calibration and 3D reconstruction. Despite traditional laboratory analysis, such requirements become an issue when coping with both indoor and outdoor motion acquisitions of athletes. In swimming analysis for example, the camera setup and the calibration protocol are particularly demanding since land and underwater cameras are mandatory. In particular, the underwater camera calibration can be an issue affecting the reconstruction accuracy. In this paper, the aim is to evaluate the feasibility of ASC for 3D underwater analysis by focusing on camera setup and data acquisition protocols. Two GoPro Hero3+ Black (frequency: 60Hz; image resolutions: 1280×720/1920×1080 pixels) were located underwater into a swimming pool, surveying a working volume of about 6m3. A two-step custom calibration procedure, consisting in the acquisition of one static triad and one moving wand, carrying nine and one spherical passive markers, respectively, was implemented. After assessing camera parameters, a rigid bar, carrying two markers at known distance, was acquired in several positions within the working volume. The average error upon the reconstructed inter-marker distances was less than 2.5mm (1280×720) and 1.5mm (1920×1080). The results of this study demonstrate that the calibration of underwater ASC is feasible enabling quantitative kinematic measurements with accuracy comparable to traditional motion capture systems.

  19. Action Sport Cameras as an Instrument to Perform a 3D Underwater Motion Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo R D Bernardina

    Full Text Available Action sport cameras (ASC are currently adopted mainly for entertainment purposes but their uninterrupted technical improvements, in correspondence of cost decreases, are going to disclose them for three-dimensional (3D motion analysis in sport gesture study and athletic performance evaluation quantitatively. Extending this technology to sport analysis however still requires a methodologic step-forward to making ASC a metric system, encompassing ad-hoc camera setup, image processing, feature tracking, calibration and 3D reconstruction. Despite traditional laboratory analysis, such requirements become an issue when coping with both indoor and outdoor motion acquisitions of athletes. In swimming analysis for example, the camera setup and the calibration protocol are particularly demanding since land and underwater cameras are mandatory. In particular, the underwater camera calibration can be an issue affecting the reconstruction accuracy. In this paper, the aim is to evaluate the feasibility of ASC for 3D underwater analysis by focusing on camera setup and data acquisition protocols. Two GoPro Hero3+ Black (frequency: 60Hz; image resolutions: 1280×720/1920×1080 pixels were located underwater into a swimming pool, surveying a working volume of about 6m3. A two-step custom calibration procedure, consisting in the acquisition of one static triad and one moving wand, carrying nine and one spherical passive markers, respectively, was implemented. After assessing camera parameters, a rigid bar, carrying two markers at known distance, was acquired in several positions within the working volume. The average error upon the reconstructed inter-marker distances was less than 2.5mm (1280×720 and 1.5mm (1920×1080. The results of this study demonstrate that the calibration of underwater ASC is feasible enabling quantitative kinematic measurements with accuracy comparable to traditional motion capture systems.

  20. Laser plasma sources of soft x-rays and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) for application in science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartnik, Andrzej; Wachulak, Przemysław; Jarocki, Roman; Kostecki, Jerzy; Szczurek, Mirosław; Adjei, Daniel; Ahad, Inam Ul; Ayele, Mesfin G.; Fok, Tomasz; Szczurek, Anna; Torrisi, Alfio; Wegrzyński, Łukasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk

    2015-05-01

    Laser plasma sources of soft x-rays and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) developed in our laboratory for application in various areas of technology and science are presented. The sources are based on a laser-irradiated gas puff target approach. The targets formed by pulsed injection of gas under high-pressure are irradiated with nanosecond laser pulses from Nd:YAG lasers. We use commercial lasers generating pulses with time duration from 1ns to 10ns and energies from 0.5J to 10J at 10Hz repetition rate. The gas puff targets are produced using a double valve system equipped with a special nozzle to form a double-stream gas puff target which secures high conversion efficiency without degradation of the nozzle. The use of a gas puff target instead of a solid target makes generation of laser plasmas emitting soft x-rays and EUV possible without target debris production. The sources are equipped with various optical systems, including grazing incidence axisymmetric ellipsoidal mirrors, a "lobster eye" type grazing incidence multi-foil mirror, and an ellipsoidal mirror with Mo/Si multilayer coating, to collect soft x-ray and EUV radiation and form the radiation beams. In this paper new applications of these sources in various fields, including soft x-ray and EUV imaging in nanoscale, EUV radiography and tomography, EUV materials processing and modification of polymer surfaces, EUV photoionization of gases, radiobiology and soft x-ray contact microscopy are reviewed.

  1. Nano-Disperse Borides and Carbides: Plasma Technology Production, Specific Properties, Economic Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galevskii, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Galevskii, S. G.; Tomas, K. I.; Zubkov, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    The experience of production and study on properties of nano-disperse chromium and titanium borides and carbides, and silicon carbide has been generalized. The structure and special service aspects of utilized plasma-metallurgical complex equipped with a three-jet direct-flow reactor with a capacity of 150 kW have been outlined. Processing, heat engineering and service life characteristics of the reactor are specified. The synthesis parameters of borides and carbides, as well as their basic characteristics in nano-disperse condition and their production flow diagram are outlined. Engineering and economic performance of synthesizing borides in laboratory and industrial conditions is assessed, and the respective segment of the international market as well. The work is performed at State Siberian Industrial University as a project part of the State Order of Ministry of Science and Education of the Russian Federation No. 11.1531/2014/K.

  2. Underwater videography and photography in Gulf of Kachchh. Sponsored by Gujarat Ecological Society, Vadodara, Gujarat

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Marine Archaeology Centre (MAC) has been carrying out underwater explorations and excavations of ancient ports and sunken shipwrecks to preserve underwater cultural heritage. MAC has the infrastructure facility to carry out underwater investigations...

  3. Hydrodynamic Coefficients Identification and Experimental Investigation for an Underwater Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaorong XIE

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodynamic coefficients are the foundation of unmanned underwater vehicles modeling and controller design. In order to reduce identification complexity and acquire necessary hydrodynamic coefficients for controllers design, the motion of the unmanned underwater vehicle was separated into vertical motion and horizontal motion models. Hydrodynamic coefficients were regarded as mapping parameters from input forces and moments to output velocities and acceleration of the unmanned underwater vehicle. The motion models of the unmanned underwater vehicle were nonlinear and Genetic Algorithm was adopted to identify those hydrodynamic coefficients. To verify the identification quality, velocities and acceleration of the unmanned underwater vehicle was measured using inertial sensor under the same conditions as Genetic Algorithm identification. Curves similarity between measured velocities and acceleration and those identified by Genetic Algorithm were used as optimizing standard. It is found that the curves similarity were high and identified hydrodynamic coefficients of the unmanned underwater vehicle satisfied the measured motion states well.

  4. Delay Tolerance in Underwater Wireless Communications: A Routing Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safdar Hussain Bouk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Similar to terrestrial networks, underwater wireless networks (UWNs also aid several critical tasks including coastal surveillance, underwater pollution detection, and other maritime applications. Currently, once underwater sensor nodes are deployed at different levels of the sea, it is nearly impossible or very expensive to reconfigure the hardware, for example, battery. Taking this issue into account, considerable amount of research has been carried out to ensure minimum energy costs and reliable communication between underwater nodes and base stations. As a result, several different network protocols were proposed for UWN, including MAC, PHY, transport, and routing. Recently, a new paradigm was introduced claiming that the intermittent nature of acoustic channel and signal resulted in designing delay tolerant routing schemes for the UWN, known as an underwater delay tolerant network. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive survey of underwater routing protocols with emphasis on the limitations, challenges, and future open issues in the context of delay tolerant network routing.

  5. Progress of ITER full tungsten divertor technology qualification in Japan: Manufacturing full-scale plasma-facing unit prototypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezato, Koichiro, E-mail: ezato.koichiro@jaea.go.jp [Department of ITER Project, Naka Fusion Institute, Sector of Fusion Research and Development, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Suzuki, Satoshi; Seki, Yohji; Yamada, Hirokazu; Hirayama, Tomoyuki; Yokoyama, Kenji [Department of ITER Project, Naka Fusion Institute, Sector of Fusion Research and Development, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Escourbiac, Frederic; Hirai, Takeshi [ITER Organization, route de vinon sur Verdon, 13067 St Paul lez Durance (France)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • JADA has demonstrated the feasibility of manufacturing the full-W plasma-facing units (W-PFU). • The surface profiles of the W monoblocks of the W-PFU prototypes on the test frame to mimic the support structure of the ITER OVT were examined by using an optical three-dimensional measurement system. The results show the most W monoblock surface in the target part locates within + 0.25 mm from the CAD data. • The strict profile control with the profile tolerance of ±0.3 mm is imposed on the OVT to prevent the leading edges of the W monoblocks from over-heating. • The present full-scale prototyping demonstrates to satisfy this requirement on the surface profile. • It can be concluded that the technical maturities of JADA and its suppliers are as high as to start series manufacturing the ITER divertor components. - Abstract: Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is in progress for technology demonstration toward Full-tungsten (W) ITER divertor outer vertical target (OVT), especially, W monoblock technology that needs to withstand the repetitive heat load as high as 20 MW/m{sup 2} for 10 s. Under the framework of the W divertor qualification program developed ITER organization, JAEA as Japanese Domestic Agency (JADA) manufactured seven full-scale plasma-facing unit (PFU) prototypes with the Japanese industries. Four prototypes that have 146 W monoblock joint with casted copper (Cu) interlayer passed successfully the ultrasonic testing. In the other three prototypes that have the different W/Cu interlayer joint, joint defects were found. The dimension measurements reveal the requirements of the gap between W monoblocks and the surface profile of PFU are feasible.

  6. Progress of ITER full tungsten divertor technology qualification in Japan: Manufacturing full-scale plasma-facing unit prototypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezato, Koichiro; Suzuki, Satoshi; Seki, Yohji; Yamada, Hirokazu; Hirayama, Tomoyuki; Yokoyama, Kenji; Escourbiac, Frederic; Hirai, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • JADA has demonstrated the feasibility of manufacturing the full-W plasma-facing units (W-PFU). • The surface profiles of the W monoblocks of the W-PFU prototypes on the test frame to mimic the support structure of the ITER OVT were examined by using an optical three-dimensional measurement system. The results show the most W monoblock surface in the target part locates within + 0.25 mm from the CAD data. • The strict profile control with the profile tolerance of ±0.3 mm is imposed on the OVT to prevent the leading edges of the W monoblocks from over-heating. • The present full-scale prototyping demonstrates to satisfy this requirement on the surface profile. • It can be concluded that the technical maturities of JADA and its suppliers are as high as to start series manufacturing the ITER divertor components. - Abstract: Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is in progress for technology demonstration toward Full-tungsten (W) ITER divertor outer vertical target (OVT), especially, W monoblock technology that needs to withstand the repetitive heat load as high as 20 MW/m 2 for 10 s. Under the framework of the W divertor qualification program developed ITER organization, JAEA as Japanese Domestic Agency (JADA) manufactured seven full-scale plasma-facing unit (PFU) prototypes with the Japanese industries. Four prototypes that have 146 W monoblock joint with casted copper (Cu) interlayer passed successfully the ultrasonic testing. In the other three prototypes that have the different W/Cu interlayer joint, joint defects were found. The dimension measurements reveal the requirements of the gap between W monoblocks and the surface profile of PFU are feasible.

  7. An Evaluation of Potential Operating Systems for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    remote control of such vehicles requires the use of a tether , limiting the vehicle’s range; however operating underwater vehicles autonomously requires...URBI Universal Robot Body Interface UUV Unmanned Underwater Vehicle UNCLASSIFIED xi DSTO–TN–1194 UNCLASSIFIED THIS PAGE IS INTENTIONALLY BLANK xii... underwater environment, where many platforms are still reliant upon an umbilical tether for power and high bandwidth communications. This tether

  8. On the Performance of the Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    waves for Underwater Wireless Communication (UWC); radio waves, optical waves, and acoustic waves are few to name. Radio waves are good for extra low...2211 underwater communication , wireless sensors, mutual information REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10. SPONSOR...Cotae, “On the Performance of the Underwater Wireless Communication Sensor Networks: Work in Progress” ASEE Mid-Atlantic Fall 2014 Conference

  9. Underwater laser beam welding of Alloy 690

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Takehisa; Tamura, Masataka; Kono, Wataru; Kawano, Shohei; Yoda, Masaki

    2009-01-01

    Stress Corrosion Clacking (SCC) has been reported at Alloy 600 welds between nozzles and safe-end in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) plant. Alloy 690, which has higher chromium content than Alloy 600, has been applied for cladding on Alloy 600 welds for repairing damaged SCC area. Toshiba has developed Underwater Laser Beam Welding technique. This method can be conducted without draining, so that the repairing period and the radiation exposure during the repair can be dramatically decreased. In some old PWRs, high-sulfur stainless steel is used as the materials for this section. It has a high susceptibility of weld cracks. Therefore, the optimum welding condition of Alloy 690 on the high-sulfur stainless steel was investigated with our Underwater Laser Beam Welding unit. Good cladding layer, without any crack, porosity or lack of fusion, could be obtained. (author)

  10. Cymbal and BB underwater transducers and arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newnham, R.E.; Zhang, J.; Alkoy, S.; Meyer, R.; Hughes, W.J.; Hladky-Hennion, A.C.; Cochran, J.; Markley, D. [Materials Research Laboratory, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2002-09-01

    The cymbal is a miniaturized class V flextensional transducer that was developed for use as a shallow water sound projector and receiver. Single elements are characterized by high Q, low efficiency, and medium power output capability. Its low cost and thin profile allow the transducer to be assembled into large flexible arrays. Efforts were made to model both single elements and arrays using the ATILA code and the integral equation formulation (EQI).Millimeter size microprobe hydrophones (BBs) have been designed and fabricated from miniature piezoelectric hollow ceramic spheres for underwater applications such as mapping acoustic fields of projectors, and flow noise sensors for complex underwater structures. Green spheres are prepared from soft lead zirconate titanate powders using a coaxial nozzle slurry process. A compact hydrophone with a radially-poled sphere is investigated using inside and outside electrodes. Characterization of these hydrophones is done through measurement of hydrostatic piezoelectric charge coefficients, free field voltage sensitivities and directivity beam patterns. (orig.)

  11. Underwater noise modelling for environmental impact assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farcas, Adrian [Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas), Pakefield Road, Lowestoft, NR33 0HT (United Kingdom); Thompson, Paul M. [Lighthouse Field Station, Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Cromarty IV11 8YL (United Kingdom); Merchant, Nathan D., E-mail: nathan.merchant@cefas.co.uk [Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas), Pakefield Road, Lowestoft, NR33 0HT (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    Assessment of underwater noise is increasingly required by regulators of development projects in marine and freshwater habitats, and noise pollution can be a constraining factor in the consenting process. Noise levels arising from the proposed activity are modelled and the potential impact on species of interest within the affected area is then evaluated. Although there is considerable uncertainty in the relationship between noise levels and impacts on aquatic species, the science underlying noise modelling is well understood. Nevertheless, many environmental impact assessments (EIAs) do not reflect best practice, and stakeholders and decision makers in the EIA process are often unfamiliar with the concepts and terminology that are integral to interpreting noise exposure predictions. In this paper, we review the process of underwater noise modelling and explore the factors affecting predictions of noise exposure. Finally, we illustrate the consequences of errors and uncertainties in noise modelling, and discuss future research needs to reduce uncertainty in noise assessments.

  12. Ocean Research Enabled by Underwater Gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    Underwater gliders are autonomous underwater vehicles that profile vertically by changing their buoyancy and use wings to move horizontally. Gliders are useful for sustained observation at relatively fine horizontal scales, especially to connect the coastal and open ocean. In this review, research topics are grouped by time and length scales. Large-scale topics addressed include the eastern and western boundary currents and the regional effects of climate variability. The accessibility of horizontal length scales of order 1 km allows investigation of mesoscale and submesoscale features such as fronts and eddies. Because the submesoscales dominate vertical fluxes in the ocean, gliders have found application in studies of biogeochemical processes. At the finest scales, gliders have been used to measure internal waves and turbulent dissipation. The review summarizes gliders' achievements to date and assesses their future in ocean observation.

  13. Study of the technology of the plasma nanostructuring of silicon to form highly efficient emission structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galperin, V. A.; Kitsyuk, E. P. [“Technological Center” Research-and-Production Company (Russian Federation); Pavlov, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Nanotechnologies in Microelectronics (Russian Federation); Shamanaev, A. A., E-mail: artemiy.shamanaev@tcen.ru [“Technological Center” Research-and-Production Company (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    New methods for silicon nanostructuring and the possibility of raising the aspect ratios of the structures being formed are considered. It is shown that the technology developed relates to self-formation methods and is an efficient tool for improving the quality of field-emission cathodes based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by increasing the Si–CNT contact area and raising the efficiency of the heat sink.

  14. A MAC protocol for underwater sensors networks

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Rodrigo; Orozco, Javier; Ochoa, Sergio; Meseguer Pallarès, Roc; Eggly, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    “The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-26401-1_37." Underwater sensor networks are becoming an important field of research, because of its everyday increasing application scope. Examples of their application areas are environmental and pollution monitoring (mainly oil spills), oceanographic data collection, support for submarine geo-localization, ocean sampling and early tsunamis alert. It is well-known the challenge that represents to perfo...

  15. Passive Mode Carbon Nanotube Underwater Acoustic Transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-20

    irreversible Joule heat) by an electric light bulb . The reciprocal (or reverse) of this process by supplying heat and shining light to the same electric bulb ...limit the invention to the precise form disclosed; and obviously many modifications and variations are possible in light of the above teaching...300151 1 of 14 PASSIVE MODE CARBON NANOTUBE UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC TRANSDUCER STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described

  16. Underwater suction device for irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qurnell, F.D.; Peloquin, A.V.

    1982-01-01

    An underwater suction device for collecting irradiated materials in a pool of water includes injection and suction tubes and a removable, disposable filter for capturing irradiated materials. Pressurized water is injected into the suction tube through a jet pump nozzle to establish a suction flow through the tube. The suction device is manoeuverable by a pole, which is pivotally connected to the suction device by a latching mechanism. (author)

  17. MEDITERRANEAN: Underwater neutrinos get off the ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Now funded is the initial stage of NESTOR, an imaginative new programme for a dedicated underwater neutrino astroparticle physics laboratory. Located in the international waters off the southernmost corner of continental Europe near the town of Pylos in S.W. Greece, NESTOR (NEutrinos from Supernovae and TeV sources Ocean Range) recalls the wise king of Pylos who counselled the Greeks during the Trojan war, an excellent tradition for new scientific goals of detecting neutrinos

  18. Role of Confined Water in Underwater Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhinojwala, Ali

    Surface bound water is a strong deterrent for forming strong bonds between two surfaces underwater and expelling that bound water is important for strong adhesion. I will discuss examples of different strategies used by geckos, spiders, and mussels to handle this last layer of bound water. Recent results using infrared-visible sum frequency generation spectroscopy to probe the structure of this bound water will be discussed. National Science Foundation.

  19. Obstacle avoidance in underwater glider path planning

    OpenAIRE

    Isern González, Josep; Hernández Sosa, Daniel; Fernández Perdomo, Enrique; Cabrera Gámez, Jorge; Domínguez Brito, Antonio Carlos; Prieto Marañón, Víctor

    2012-01-01

    Underwater gliders have revealed as a valuable scientific platform, with a growing number of successful environmental sampling applications. They are specially suited for long range missions due to their unmatched autonomy level, although their low surge speed make them strongly affected by ocean currents. Path planning constitute a real concern for this type of vehicle, as it may reduce the time taken to reach a given waypoint or save power. In such a dynamic environment it is not easy to fi...

  20. A Recovery System for Unmanned Underwater Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-28

    300170 1 of 10 A RECOVERY SYSTEM FOR UNMANNED UNDERWATER VEHICLES STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described herein may...6 of 10 forces cannot be easily predicted and can be strong enough to require a significantly larger handling system and significantly more...the sea state, the ship handling system , the capture mechanism and the design of the capture mechanism 400. [0024] The water jets 100 will increase

  1. AINSE plasma science and technology conference and Elizabeth and Frederick White workshop on fundamental problems in the physics of magnetically confined plasmas: conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The handbook contains abstracts of papers and posters presented at the conference. The main topics relate to plasma physics and fusion, plasma processing and uses as well as specific fusion devices and experiments. Eighty-four out of ninety-two presentations were considered to be in the INIS subject scope and have been separately indexed

  2. Evaluation of Underwater Adhesives and Friction Coatings for In Situ Attachment of Fiber Optic Sensor System for Subsea Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Henry H.; Le, Suy Q.; Orndoff, Evelyne S.; Smith, Frederick D.; Tapia, Alma S.; Brower, David V.

    2012-01-01

    Integrity and performance monitoring of subsea pipelines and structures provides critical information for managing offshore oil and gas production operation and preventing environmentally damaging and costly catastrophic failure. Currently pipeline monitoring devices require ground assembly and installation prior to the underwater deployment of the pipeline. A monitoring device that could be installed in situ on the operating underwater structures could enhance the productivity and improve the safety of current offshore operation. Through a Space Act Agreement (SAA) between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) and Astro Technology, Inc. (ATI), JSC provides technical expertise and testing facilities to support the development of fiber optic sensor technologies by ATI. This paper details the first collaboration effort between NASA JSC and ATI in evaluating underwater applicable adhesives and friction coatings for attaching fiber optic sensor system to subsea pipeline. A market survey was conducted to examine different commercial ]off ]the ]shelf (COTS) underwater adhesive systems and to select adhesive candidates for testing and evaluation. Four COTS epoxy based underwater adhesives were selected and evaluated. The adhesives were applied and cured in simulated seawater conditions and then evaluated for application characteristics and adhesive strength. The adhesive that demonstrated the best underwater application characteristics and highest adhesive strength were identified for further evaluation in developing an attachment system that could be deployed in the harsh subsea environment. Various friction coatings were also tested in this study to measure their shear strengths for a mechanical clamping design concept for attaching fiber optic sensor system. A COTS carbide alloy coating was found to increase the shear strength of metal to metal clamping interface by up to 46 percent. This study provides valuable data for

  3. Research on Operational Aspects of Large Autonomous Underwater Glider Fleets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fratantoni, David M

    2007-01-01

    This program supported research on the operational and management issues stemming from application of large fleets of autonomous underwater gliders to oceanographic research and rapid environmental...

  4. Underwater hearing in the great cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo sinensis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kirstin Anderson; Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Wahlberg, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    The underwater hearing threshold of a great cormorant (Phalacrocroax carbo sinensis) was measured at 2 kHz using psychophysical methods. Previous in-air and underwater testing suggests that cormorants have rather poor in-air hearing compared to other birds of similar size (Johansen, 2016). Prelim......The underwater hearing threshold of a great cormorant (Phalacrocroax carbo sinensis) was measured at 2 kHz using psychophysical methods. Previous in-air and underwater testing suggests that cormorants have rather poor in-air hearing compared to other birds of similar size (Johansen, 2016...

  5. Calibration Techniques for Accurate Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortis, Mark

    2015-12-07

    Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in accurate estimates of locations and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems.

  6. Calibration Techniques for Accurate Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Shortis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in accurate estimates of locations and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems.

  7. Automatic stabilization of underwater robots in the time manipulation operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filaretov, V.F.; Koval, E.V.

    1994-01-01

    When carrying out underwater technical works by means of an underwater vehicles having a manipulator it is desirable to perform manipulation operations in the regime of the underwater vehicle hovering above the object without durable and complicated operations up its rigid fixation. Underwater vehicle stabilization is achieved by compensation all the effects on the vehicle caused by the operating manipulator in water medium. This automatic stabilization is formed due to input of the required control signals into corresponding vehicle propellers proportional to calculated components of the generalized forces and moments. The propellers should form stops reacting against effects

  8. Contour Tracking Control for the REMUS Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Van Reet, Alan R

    2005-01-01

    In the interest of enhancing the capabilities of autonomous underwater vehicles used in US Naval Operations, controlling vehicle position to follow depth contours presents exciting potential for navigation...

  9. Autopilot Using Differential Thrust for ARIES Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarton, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    .... Unfortunately, communication antennas must point to specific satellites in this system and thus underwater vehicles must steer a specific course on the surface during the communication process...

  10. Underwater detection by using ultrasonic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakar, S. A. A.; Ong, N. R.; Aziz, M. H. A.; Alcain, J. B.; Haimi, W. M. W. N.; Sauli, Z.

    2017-09-01

    This paper described the low cost implementation of hardware and software in developing the system of ultrasonic which can visualize the feedback of sound in the form of measured distance through mobile phone and monitoring the frequency of detection by using real time graph of Java application. A single waterproof transducer of JSN-SR04T had been used to determine the distance of an object based on operation of the classic pulse echo detection method underwater. In this experiment, the system was tested by placing the housing which consisted of Arduino UNO, Bluetooth module of HC-06, ultrasonic sensor and LEDs at the top of the box and the transducer was immersed in the water. The system which had been tested for detection in vertical form was found to be capable of reporting through the use of colored LEDs as indicator to the relative proximity of object distance underwater form the sensor. As a conclusion, the system can detect the presence of an object underwater within the range of ultrasonic sensor and display the measured distance onto the mobile phone and the real time graph had been successfully generated.

  11. Modeling and Control of Underwater Robotic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schjoelberg, I:

    1996-12-31

    This doctoral thesis describes modeling and control of underwater vehicle-manipulator systems. The thesis also presents a model and a control scheme for a system consisting of a surface vessel connected to an underwater robotic system by means of a slender marine structure. The equations of motion of the underwater vehicle and manipulator are described and the system kinematics and properties presented. Feedback linearization technique is applied to the system and evaluated through a simulation study. Passivity-based controllers for vehicle and manipulator control are presented. Stability of the closed loop system is proved and simulation results are given. The equation of motion for lateral motion of a cable/riser system connected to a surface vessel at the top end and to a thruster at the bottom end is described and stability analysis and simulations are presented. The equations of motion in 3 degrees of freedom of the cable/riser, surface vessel and robotic system are given. Stability analysis of the total system with PD-controllers is presented. 47 refs., 32 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Underwater Noise Modelling of Wave Energy Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    Future large-scale implementation of wave energy converts (WECs) will introduce an anthropogenic activity in the ocean which may contribute to underwater noise. The Ocean houses several marine species with acoustic sensibility; consequently the potential impact of the underwater noise needs to be addressed. At present, there are no acoustic impact studies based on acquired data. The WEAM project (Wave Energy Acoustic Monitoring) aims at developing an underwater noise monitoring plan for WECs. The development of an acoustic monitoring plan must consider the sound propagation in the ocean, identify noise sources, understand the operational characteristics and select adequate instrumentation. Any monitoring strategy must involve in-situ measurements. However, the vast distances which sound travels within the ocean, can make in-situ measurements covering the entire area of interest, impracticable. This difficulty can be partially overcome through acoustic numerical modelling. This paper presents a synthetic study, on the application of acoustic forward modelling and the evaluation of the impact of noise produced by wave energy devices on marine mammals using criteria based on audiograms of dolphins, or other species. The idea is to illustrate the application of that methodology, and to show to what extent it allows for estimating distances of impacts due to acoustic noise.

  13. The alkaline aluminium/hydrogen peroxide power source in the Hugin II unmanned underwater vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasvold, Øistein; Johansen, Kjell Håvard; Mollestad, Ole; Forseth, Sissel; Størkersen, Nils

    In 1993, The Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI) demonstrated AUV-Demo, an unmanned (untethered) underwater vehicle (UUV), powered by a magnesium/dissolved oxygen seawater battery (SWB). This technology showed that an underwater range of at least 1000 nautical miles at a speed of 4 knots was possible, but also that the maximum hotel load this battery system could support was very limited. Most applications for UUV technology need more power over a shorter period of time. Seabed mapping using a multibeam echo sounder mounted on an UUV was identified as a viable application and the Hugin project was started in 1995 in cooperation with Norwegian industry. For this application, an endurance of 36 h at 4 knots was required. Development of the UUV hull and electronics system resulted in the UUV Hugin I. It carries a Ni/Cd battery of 3 kW h, allowing up to 6 h under-water endurance. In parallel, we developed a battery based on a combination of alkaline Al/air and SWB technology, using a circulating alkaline electrolyte, aluminium anodes and maintaining the oxidant concentration in the electrolyte by continuously adding hydrogen peroxide (HP) to the electrolyte. This concept resulted in a safe battery, working at ambient pressure (balanced) and with sufficient power and energy density to allow the UUV Hugin II to make a number of successive dives, each of up to 36 h duration and with only 1 h deck time between dives for HP refill and electrolyte exchange. After 100 h, an exchange of anodes takes place. The power source consists of a four-cell Al/HP battery, a DC/DC converter delivering 600 W at 30 V, circulation and dosing pumps and a battery control unit. Hugin II is now in routine use by the Norwegian Underwater Intervention AS (NUI) which operates the UUV for high-precision seabed mapping down to a water depth of 600 m.

  14. Teaching and research in fusion plasmas and technology at the University of Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.H.; Southworth, F.H.

    1975-01-01

    Teaching in fusion at the University of Illinois is an integrated part of the nuclear engineering curriculum. Through the use of two key courses, ''Introduction to Fusion'' and ''Fusion Systems,'' basic preparation for those wishing to specialize in fusion is provided. These courses are primarily directed to plasma aspects of fusion, but materials and other engineering aspects have been integrated into the curriculum through a broadened coverage in such existing courses as nuclear materials, shielding, and reactor physics. Research is primarily focused at the PhD level, although some MS studies are in progress. While current theses involve a wide variety of topics, one major area being pursued is the study of advanced fuel (non-deuterium-tritium) reactors based on two-component fusion and other concepts. This effort consists of a series of loosely knit subtasks related to such problems as cyclotron emission and direct energy conversion. Also, various research involving charge-exchange losses during neutral-beam injection, vacuum-wall sputtering, and related topics has developed as a direct outgrowth of the PROMETHEUS project, which involved the conceptual design of a power-consuming mirror-type reactor for materials and engineering tests

  15. Development of measuring and control systems for underwater cutting of radioactive components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drews, P.; Fuchs, K.

    1990-01-01

    Shutdown and dismantling of nuclear power plants requires special techniques to decommission the radioactive components involved. For reasons of safety, decommissioning of components under water can be advantageous because of the radioactive shielding effect of water. In this project, research activities and developmental works focused on the realization of different sensor systems and their adaptation to cutting tasks. A new image-processing system has been developed in addition to the use of a modified underwater TV camera for optical cutting process control (plasma and abrasive wheel cutting). For control of process parameters, different inductive, ultrasonic and optical sensors have been modified and tested. The investigations performed are aimed at assuring high-quality underwater cutting with the help of sensor systems specially adapted to cutting tasks, with special signal procession and evaluation through microcomputer control. It is important that special attention be paid to the reduction of interferences in image pick-up and procession. The measuring system has been designed and realized according to the consideration of the demands for underwater cutting processes. The reliability of the system was tested in conjunction with a four-axes handling system

  16. The Plasma Focus Technology Applied to the Detection of Hydrogenated Substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, R.; Moreno, C.; Gonzalez, J.; Clausse, A

    2003-01-01

    The feasibility study of an industrial application of thermonuclear pulsors is presented.An experiment was conducted to detect hydrogenated substances using PF technology.The detection system is composed by two neutron detectors operated simultaneously on every shot.The first detector is used to register the PF neutron yield in each shot; whereas the other one was designed to detect neutrons scattered by the blanket.We obtained the detector sensitivity charts as a function of the position in space and frontal area of the substance to be detected

  17. Cell Lysis and Detoxification of Cyanotoxins Using a Novel Combination of Microbubble Generation and Plasma Microreactor Technology for Ozonation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagroop Pandhal

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available There has been a steady rise in the incidences of algal blooms globally, and worryingly, there is increasing evidence that changes in the global climate are leading to a shift toward cyanobacterial blooms. Many cyanobacterial genera are harmful, producing several potent toxins, including microcystins, for which there are over 90 described analogues. There are a wide range of negative effects associated with these toxins including gastroenteritis, cytotoxicity, hepatotoxicity and neurotoxicity. Although a variety of oxidation based treatment methods have been described, ozonation and advanced oxidation are acknowledged as most effective as they readily oxidise microcystins to non-toxic degradation products. However, most ozonation technologies have challenges for scale up including high costs and sub-optimum efficiencies, hence, a low cost and scalable ozonation technology is needed. Here we designed a low temperature plasma dielectric barrier discharge (DBD reactor with an incorporated fluidic oscillator for microbubble delivery of ozone. Both technologies have the potential to drastically reduce the costs of ozonation at scale. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed very rapid (<2 min destruction of two pure microcystins (MC-LR and MC-RR, together with removal of by-products even at low flow rate 1 L min−1 where bubble size was 0.56–0.6 mm and the ozone concentration within the liquid was 20 ppm. Toxicity levels were calculated through protein phosphatase inhibition assays and indicated loss of toxicity as well as confirming the by-products were also non-toxic. Finally, treatment of whole Microcystis aeruginosa cells showed that even at these very low ozone levels, cells can be killed and toxins (MC-LR and Desmethyl MC-LR removed. Little change was observed in the first 20 min of treatment followed by rapid increase in extracellular toxins, indicating cell lysis, with most significant release at the higher 3 L min−1 flow rate compared to 1 L

  18. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center FY97--FY98 work proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    Alcator C-Mod is the high-field, high-density divertor tokamak in the world fusion program. It is one of five divertor experiments capable of plasma currents exceeding one megamp. Because of its compact dimensions, Alcator C-Mod investigates an essential area in parameter space, which complements the world's larger experiments, in establishing the tokamak physics database. Three key areas of investigation have been called out in which Alcator C-Mod has a vital role to play: (1) divertor research on C-Mod takes advantage of the advanced divertor shaping, the very high scrap-off-layer power density, unique abilities in impurity diagnosis, and the High-Z metal wall, to advance the physics understanding of this critical topic; (2) in transport studies, C-Mod is making critical tests of both empirical scalings and theoretically based interpretations of tokamak transport, at dimensional parameters that are unique but dimensionless parameters often comparable to those in much larger experiments; (3) in the area of Advanced Tokamak research, so important to concept optimization, the high-field design of the device also provides long pulse length, compared to resistive skin time, which provides an outstanding opportunity to investigate the extent to which enhanced confinement and stability can be sustained in steady-state, using active profile control. In addition to these main programmatic emphasis, important enabling research is being performed in MHD stability and control, which has great significance for the immediate design of ITER, and in the physics and engineering of ICRF, which is the main auxiliary heating method on C-Mod

  19. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center FY97--FY98 work proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Alcator C-Mod is the high-field, high-density divertor tokamak in the world fusion program. It is one of five divertor experiments capable of plasma currents exceeding one megamp. Because of its compact dimensions, Alcator C-Mod investigates an essential area in parameter space, which complements the world`s larger experiments, in establishing the tokamak physics database. Three key areas of investigation have been called out in which Alcator C-Mod has a vital role to play: (1) divertor research on C-Mod takes advantage of the advanced divertor shaping, the very high scrap-off-layer power density, unique abilities in impurity diagnosis, and the High-Z metal wall, to advance the physics understanding of this critical topic; (2) in transport studies, C-Mod is making critical tests of both empirical scalings and theoretically based interpretations of tokamak transport, at dimensional parameters that are unique but dimensionless parameters often comparable to those in much larger experiments; (3) in the area of Advanced Tokamak research, so important to concept optimization, the high-field design of the device also provides long pulse length, compared to resistive skin time, which provides an outstanding opportunity to investigate the extent to which enhanced confinement and stability can be sustained in steady-state, using active profile control. In addition to these main programmatic emphasis, important enabling research is being performed in MHD stability and control, which has great significance for the immediate design of ITER, and in the physics and engineering of ICRF, which is the main auxiliary heating method on C-Mod.

  20. The effect of sodium profiling and feedback technologies on plasma conductivity and ionic mass balance: a study in hypotension-prone dialysis patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moret, K.; Aalten, J.; Wall Bake, A.W. van den; Gerlag, P.G.G.; Beerenhout, C.; Sande, F. van der; Leunissen, K.; Kooman, J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sodium profiling improves haemodynamic tolerance in haemodialysis (HD) patients but may also influence sodium homeostasis. Changes in blood volume and plasma conductivity (PC) during HD can be modelled by feedback technology, but their effects on sodium homeostasis are not widely

  1. Autonomous underwater handling system for service, measurement and cutting tasks for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, M.; Haferkamp, H.; Bach, W.; Rose, N.

    1992-01-01

    For about 10 years the Institute for Material Science at the Hanover University has worked on projects of underwater cutting and welding. Increasing tasks to be done in nuclear facilities led to the development of special handling systems to support and handle the cutting tools. Also sensors and computers for extensive and complex tasks were integrated. A small sized freediving handling system, equipped with 2 video cameras, ultrasonic and radiation sensors and a plasma cutting torch for inspection and decommissioning tasks in nuclear facilities is described in this paper. (Author)

  2. Development of underwater inspection and YAG laser repair welding robots for equipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Shuichi; Kojima, Toshio; Ohwaki, Katsura; Hirose, Naoya

    2000-01-01

    As equipments for power generation such as tank on bath storing wasted water, used resin and others in mainly radioactive wastes processing equipments in nuclear power plant and so forth are carried out periodical inspections and repairs to keep their soundness from long years ago, its importance seems to be increasing more and more hereafter at background of a trend of longer life in their plant. In response to such importance, development of technologies capable of remote control on inspection of inside of the equipments at underwater atmosphere and on repair welding due to YAG laser have been carried out. Here were described on necessity in remote inspection and repair technique, outlines on remote underwater inspection and repair technique, results on welding test, items on compatibility test, and their concrete examples. (G.K.)

  3. State of the art report: Underwater examination techniques for spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Yong Bum

    1997-06-01

    In these days, much efforts are being put to increase the final discharge burnup of PWR fuels. Therefore, the necessity of the inspection of irradiated nuclear fuels assembly during the the refueling outage is greatly increased to evaluate the safe operation and soundness of fuel assemblies in their next cycles in core, and apply the results for safe operation and effective core management. The necessity to evaluate the irradiation performance of indigenous nuclear fuels pushes the relative researchers to the development of on-site fuel inspection techniques and devices which can perform the underwater inspection and measurement of irradiated nuclear fuels during refueling outage. To ensure the technologies, the status of in situ underwater fuel inspection techniques and equipment were investigated and reviewed. Those information provides the fuel inspection capability to evaluate and certificate the performance and integrity of nuclear fuels which leads to the safe operation of NPP. (author). 49 refs., 52 figs

  4. High voltage power supply systems for electron beam and plasma technologies. Its new element base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermengi, P.G.; Kureghan, A.S.; Pokrovsky, S.V.; Tchvanov, V.A.

    1994-01-01

    Transforming technique and high voltage technique supplementing each other more and more unite in indivisible constructions of modern apparatuses and systems and applicated in modern technologies providing its high efficiency. Specially worked out, ecologically clean, inertial, inflammable perfluororganic liquid is used in elements and electronic apparatuses simultaneously as insulating and cooling media. This liquid is highly fluid, fills tiny cavities in construction elements and in the places of high concentration of losses, where maximum local overheating of active parts or apparatus constructions takes place, it transforms to boiling state with highly intensive taking off of heat energy from cooled surface point. For instance, being cooled by mentioned perfluororganic liquid, copper wire can conduct current to 50 A/mm 2 density, but in ordinary conditions of transformers, reactors and busses, current density can reach only few Amperes. Possibility of considerable increasing of current density, that is reached by means of intensive cooling, provided by worked out liquid, and taking into account its incredibly high insulating features (liquid has electric strength to 50 KV/mm) allows to provide optimum heat regime of active parts of transformers. reactors, condenser, semiconductor devices, resistors, construction elements and electrotechnical apparatus in general. Particularly high effect of decreasing of weight and dimensions characteristics of elements and electrotechnical apparatus in general can be reached under working out of special constructions of each element and apparatus details, adapted to use of mentioned liquid as insulating and cooling media

  5. Development of underwater laser cutting technique for steel and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have developed underwater cutting technique for 4.2 mm thick zircaloy pressure tubes and up to 6 mm thick steel using fibre-coupled 250 W average power pulsed Nd:YAG laser. This underwater cutting technique will be highly useful in various nuclear applications as well as in dismantling/repair of ship and pipe lines ...

  6. Visual-adaptation-mechanism based underwater object extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Wang, Huibin; Xu, Lizhong; Shen, Jie

    2014-03-01

    Due to the major obstacles originating from the strong light absorption and scattering in a dynamic underwater environment, underwater optical information acquisition and processing suffer from effects such as limited range, non-uniform lighting, low contrast, and diminished colors, causing it to become the bottleneck for marine scientific research and projects. After studying and generalizing the underwater biological visual mechanism, we explore its advantages in light adaption which helps animals to precisely sense the underwater scene and recognize their prey or enemies. Then, aiming to transform the significant advantage of the visual adaptation mechanism into underwater computer vision tasks, a novel knowledge-based information weighting fusion model is established for underwater object extraction. With this bionic model, the dynamical adaptability is given to the underwater object extraction task, making them more robust to the variability of the optical properties in different environments. The capability of the proposed method to adapt to the underwater optical environments is shown, and its outperformance for the object extraction is demonstrated by comparison experiments.

  7. Self-localization for underwater inspection robot in reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Futoshi; Kojima, Fumio

    2007-01-01

    An underwater inspection robot has been needed for preventive maintenance in a nuclear power plant. This paper deals with a self-localization method for the underwater inspection robot. In this method, the position and the orientation of the robot are estimated by using the particle filter. For showing the effectiveness of the proposed method, an experiment with real robot is demonstrated. (author)

  8. WODA technical guidance on underwater sound from dredging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomsen, F.; Borsani, F.; Clarke, D.; Jong, C. de; Wit, P. de; Goethals, F.; Holtkamp, M.; Martin, E.S.; Spadaro, P.; Raalte, G. van; Victor, G.Y.V.; Jensen, A.

    2016-01-01

    The World Organization of Dredging Associations (WODA) has identified underwater sound as an environmental issue that needs further consideration. A WODA Expert Group on Underwater Sound (WEGUS) prepared a guidance paper in 2013 on dredging sound, including a summary of potential impacts on aquatic

  9. Characterization of ships as sources of underwater noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, C.A.F. de

    2009-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the possible impact of anthropogenic underwater noise on marine life [1]. One of the concerns is the increasing contribution of shipping noise, with the growing number and size of commercial ships. Traditionally, underwater radiated noise control was only of interest

  10. The WODA guidance paper on underwater sound from dredging (abstract)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomsen, F.; Borsani, F.; Clarke, D.; Jong, C.A.F. de; Witt, P. de; Holtkamp, M.; Goethals, F.; San Martin, E.; Spadaro, P.; Raalte, G. van; Jensen, A.

    2013-01-01

    The World Organisation of Dredging Associations (WODA) has identified underwater sound as an environmental issue that needs further consideration. A WODA Expert Group on Underwater Sound (WEGUS) was established to provide a guidance paper on dredging sound, impact on aquatic biota and advice on

  11. Development of underwater laser cutting technique for steel and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Laser cutting; underwater laser cutting; fibre optic beam delivery; Nd:YAG laser; material processing; heat affected zone; microstructure. PACS Nos 42.62.Cf; 42.62.-b; 42.55.Rz; 42.81.Ai; 42.81.-i. 1. Introduction. Underwater laser cutting and welding has many applications in nuclear facilities and shiping industry and is a ...

  12. Analysis of the oxido-redox status of plasma proteins. Technology advances for clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, Maurizio; Candiano, Giovanni; Della Ciana, Leopoldo; Petretto, Andrea; Santucci, Laura; Prunotto, Marco; Camilla, Roberta; Coppo, Rosanna; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2011-05-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are potentially implicated in renal pathology. Direct evidence is available for animal models of glomerulonephritis but the demonstration of ROS implication in human diseases is only circumstantial and requires further experimental support. One problem limiting any evolution is the brief life of ROS (in terms of milliseconds) that makes it difficult their direct detection 'in vivo'. An alternative is to look at the products of oxidation of proteins that remain in blood as a signature of ROS activity. Recent data have shown the presence of oxidation products of albumin (sulfonic (34)Cys albumin) in serum of patients with focal-glomerulosclerosis, that is a primary glomerular diseases causing nephrotic syndrome. Structural studies based on spectroscopy and calorimetry strengthened the relevance of oxidation of the unique free SH groups of (34)Cys for conformation of albumin, in analogy with what already reported for other proteins. In this review, we present new developments on technologies for the detection of the oxido-redox potential of proteins that are based on the concept that oxidation is inversely correlated with their free content of sulphydryl groups. We describe, in particular, two new iodoacetamide-substituted cyanines that have been developed for labelling sulphydryl groups and can be utilized as stable dyes prior mono- and bi-dimensional electrophoresis. Proteins with low binding with iodoacetamide-cyanines may be considered as surrogate biomarkers of ROS activity. Standardization of these techniques and their acquisition in more laboratories would enable clinicians to plan screening studies on ROS in human diseases. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers (CMUTs for Underwater Imaging Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinlong Song

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer structure for use in underwater imaging is designed, fabricated and tested in this paper. In this structure, a silicon dioxide insulation layer is inserted between the top electrodes and the vibration membrane to prevent ohmic contact. The capacitance-voltage (C-V characteristic curve shows that the transducer offers suitable levels of hysteresis and repeatability performance. The −6 dB center frequency is 540 kHz and the transducer has a bandwidth of 840 kHz for a relative bandwidth of 155%. Underwater pressure of 143.43 Pa is achieved 1 m away from the capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer under 20  excitation. Two-dimensional underwater ultrasonic imaging, which is able to prove that a rectangular object is present underwater, is achieved. The results presented here indicate that our work will be highly beneficial for the establishment of an underwater ultrasonic imaging system.

  14. Underwater Sensor Network Redeployment Algorithm Based on Wolf Search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Peng; Feng, Yang; Wu, Feng

    2016-10-21

    This study addresses the optimization of node redeployment coverage in underwater wireless sensor networks. Given that nodes could easily become invalid under a poor environment and the large scale of underwater wireless sensor networks, an underwater sensor network redeployment algorithm was developed based on wolf search. This study is to apply the wolf search algorithm combined with crowded degree control in the deployment of underwater wireless sensor networks. The proposed algorithm uses nodes to ensure coverage of the events, and it avoids the prematurity of the nodes. The algorithm has good coverage effects. In addition, considering that obstacles exist in the underwater environment, nodes are prevented from being invalid by imitating the mechanism of avoiding predators. Thus, the energy consumption of the network is reduced. Comparative analysis shows that the algorithm is simple and effective in wireless sensor network deployment. Compared with the optimized artificial fish swarm algorithm, the proposed algorithm exhibits advantages in network coverage, energy conservation, and obstacle avoidance.

  15. Design and implementation of an underwater sound recording device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Jayson J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Rohrer, John S.; Caviggia, Kurt A.

    2011-09-19

    The purpose of this study was to design and build two versions of an underwater sound recording device. The device designed is referred to as the Underwater Sound Recorder (USR), which can be connected to one or two hydrophones or other underwater sound sensors. The URS contains a 26 dB preamplifier and a user selectable gain that permits additional amplification of input to the system from 26 dB to 46 dB. Signals within the frequency range up to 15 kHz may be recorded using the USR. Examples of USR applications are monitoring underwater processes that have the potential to create large pressure waves that could potentially harm fish or other aquatic life, such as underwater explosions or pile driving. Additional applications are recording sound generated by vessels or the vocalizations of some marine mammals, such as the calls from many species of whales.

  16. Combining plasma gasification and solid oxide cell technologies in advanced power plants for waste to energy and electric energy storage applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perna, Alessandra; Minutillo, Mariagiovanna; Lubrano Lavadera, Antonio; Jannelli, Elio

    2018-03-01

    The waste to energy (WtE) facilities and the renewable energy storage systems have a strategic role in the promotion of the "eco-innovation", an emerging priority in the European Union. This paper aims to propose advanced plant configurations in which waste to energy plants and electric energy storage systems from intermittent renewable sources are combined for obtaining more efficient and clean energy solutions in accordance with the "eco-innovation" approach. The advanced plant configurations consist of an electric energy storage (EES) section based on a solid oxide electrolyzer (SOEC), a waste gasification section based on the plasma technology and a power generation section based on a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). The plant configurations differ for the utilization of electrolytic hydrogen and oxygen in the plasma gasification section and in the power generation section. In the first plant configuration IAPGFC (Integrated Air Plasma Gasification Fuel Cell), the renewable oxygen enriches the air stream, that is used as plasma gas in the gasification section, and the renewable hydrogen is used to enrich the anodic stream of the SOFC in the power generation section. In the second plant configuration IHPGFC (Integrated Hydrogen Plasma Gasification Fuel Cell) the renewable hydrogen is used as plasma gas in the plasma gasification section, and the renewable oxygen is used to enrich the cathodic stream of the SOFC in the power generation section. The analysis has been carried out by using numerical models for predicting and comparing the systems performances in terms of electric efficiency and capability in realizing the waste to energy and the electric energy storage of renewable sources. Results have highlighted that the electric efficiency is very high for all configurations (35-45%) and, thanks to the combination with the waste to energy technology, the storage efficiencies are very attractive (in the range 72-92%). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  17. Water waves generated by underwater explosion

    CERN Document Server

    Mehaute, Bernard Le

    1996-01-01

    This is the first book on explosion-generated water waves. It presents the theoretical foundations and experimental results of the generation and propagation of impulsively generated waves resulting from underwater explosions. Many of the theories and concepts presented herein are applicable to other types of water waves, in particular, tsunamis and waves generated by the fall of a meteorite. Linear and nonlinear theories, as well as experimental calibrations, are presented for cases of deep and shallow water explosions. Propagation of transient waves on dissipative, nonuniform bathymetries to

  18. Hemispherical optical dome for underwater communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiri, Ron S.; Lunde, Emily L.; Coronado, Patrick L.; Quijada, Manuel A.

    2017-08-01

    For many years, acoustic systems have been used as the primary method for underwater communication; however, the data transfer rate of such systems is low because sound propagates slowly through water. A higher throughput can be achieved using visible light to transmit data underwater. The first issue with this approach is that there is generally a large loss of the light signal due to scattering and absorption in water, even though there is an optimal wavelength for transmission in the blue or green wavelengths of the visible spectrum. The second issue is that a simple communication system, consisting only of a highly directional source/transmitter and small optical detector/receiver, has a very narrow field of view. The goal of this project is to improve an optical, underwater communication system by increasing the effective field of view of the receiving optics. To this end, we make two changes to the simple system: (1) An optical dome was added near the receiver. An array of lenses is placed radially on the surface of the dome, reminiscent of the compound eye of an insect. The lenses make the source and detector planes conjugate, and each lens adds a new region of the source plane to the instrument's total field of view. (2) The receiver was expanded to include multiple photodiodes. With these two changes, the receiver has much more tolerance to misalignments (in position and angle) of the transmitter. Two versions of the optical dome (with 6" and 8" diameters) were designed using PTC's Creo CAD software and modeled using Synopsys' CODE V optical design software. A series of these transparent hemispherical domes, with both design diameters, were manufactured using a 5-axis mill. The prototype was then retrofitted with lenses and compared with the computer-generated model to demonstrate the effectiveness of this solution. This work shows that the dome design improves the optical field of view of the underwater communication system considerably. Furthermore, with

  19. Underwater Sound Propagation from Marine Pile Driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyff, James A

    2016-01-01

    Pile driving occurs in a variety of nearshore environments that typically have very shallow-water depths. The propagation of pile-driving sound in water is complex, where sound is directly radiated from the pile as well as through the ground substrate. Piles driven in the ground near water bodies can produce considerable underwater sound energy. This paper presents examples of sound propagation through shallow-water environments. Some of these examples illustrate the substantial variation in sound amplitude over time that can be critical to understand when computing an acoustic-based safety zone for aquatic species.

  20. Radon dynamics in underwater thermal radon therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lettner, H.; Hofmann, W.; Winkler, R.; Rolle, R.; Foisner, W.

    1998-01-01

    At a facility for underwater thermal radon therapy in Bad Hofgastein, experiments were carried out with the aim of establishing radon in the air exhaled by the treated patients and of radon decay products on the skin of the patients. The time course of radon concentration in the exhaled air shows a maximum a few minutes after entering the bath, then the Rn concentration remains constant over the remaining time spent in the bath. Taking into account several simplifying assumptions, the average dose to the epidermis from radon daughters is about 50 μGy. (A.K.)

  1. Navigation System Fault Diagnosis for Underwater Vehicle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkenberg, Thomas; Gregersen, Rene Tavs; Blanke, Mogens

    2014-01-01

    This paper demonstrates fault diagnosis on unmanned underwater vehicles (UUV) based on analysis of structure of the nonlinear dynamics. Residuals are generated using dierent approaches in structural analysis followed by statistical change detection. Hypothesis testing thresholds are made signal...... based to cope with non-ideal properties seen in real data. Detection of both sensor and thruster failures are demonstrated. Isolation is performed using the residual signature of detected faults and the change detection algorithm is used to assess severity of faults by estimating their magnitude...

  2. Adaptive Target Tracking for Underwater Maneuvering Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    concenetrate on the bearings-only approach. In this method the Observer monitors his bearing to the Source, over a period of time. Usually the Observer must...developed in [ 5] was earlier applied with much success to tracking maneuvering air targets. This approach will now be applied in the underwater environment...April 1977. [11] A. H. Jazwinski, Stochastic Processes and Filtering Theory, Academic Press, New York, 1970. [12] D. H. Halliday, and R. Resnick, Physics, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 1966. hI

  3. Applying "Spark Plasma Sintering" Technology to Enhance the Resistance to Contact Fatigue of Sintered Steel Based on Astaloy CRL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodziňák, D.; Čerňan, J.; Puchý, V.

    2017-12-01

    The article deals with the effect of porosity on the contact fatigue of sintered material type Astaloy CrL with 0.3 and 0.4% C. Sets of samples were used with densities beginning from the value of 7000 kg.m-3 to the value of almost 7859 kg.m-3 which represents almost zero porosity (compact material). It has been found out that the increase of compacting pressure applied simultaneously with temperature results in the reduction of porosity from the value of 9.10% to 0.0005% and increase in hardness from 145 to 193 HV10, depending on the carbon content. Logically there is also an increase in the fatigue life by the contact fatigue tests for the value of 50×106 cycles from the value of 900 MPa to 1150 MPa for samples with 0.3% of C and from 900 MPa to 1300 MPa for samples with 0.4% C. These investigations were also carried out in the past, but to achieve the reduction of porosity, different technonologies were used at each level such as double pressing, hot pressing, saturation, hot forging, etc. In this case, the single technology of "spark plasma sintering" making use of compacting at high temperatures is capable to continuously reduce porosity to zero.

  4. 46 CFR 115.650 - Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program options: Divers or underwater ROV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...: Divers or underwater ROV. 115.650 Section 115.650 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program options: Divers or underwater ROV. To complete your underwater survey, you may use divers or an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV). (a) If you use divers to...

  5. The Research on Improved Companding Transformation for Reducing PAPR in Underwater Acoustic OFDM Communication System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinqiu Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To solve the problem of the high peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR in Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM for the underwater acoustic communication system, the paper offers a method of reducing PAPR which combines the amplitude limiting and the improved nonlinear transformation. Traditional amplitude limiting technique can reduce PAPR in OFDM system effectively, at the cost of reducing the bit error rate (BER. However the companding transformation has far less computation complexity than SLM or PTS technologies and can improve the BER performance compared to the amplitude limiting technique simultaneously. The paper combines these two kinds of techniques, takes full use of advantages of the two method, and puts forward a low-complexity scheme choosing parameters that are more appropriate to the underwater acoustic field, with the result of improved BER performance even in lower SNR. Both simulation and experiment results show that the new method which combines clipping and companding transformation can effectively reduce the PAPR in the underwater acoustic OFDM communication system and improve the BER performance simultaneously.

  6. Underwater Inherent Optical Properties Estimation Using a Depth Aided Deep Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibin Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Underwater inherent optical properties (IOPs are the fundamental clues to many research fields such as marine optics, marine biology, and underwater vision. Currently, beam transmissometers and optical sensors are considered as the ideal IOPs measuring methods. But these methods are inflexible and expensive to be deployed. To overcome this problem, we aim to develop a novel measuring method using only a single underwater image with the help of deep artificial neural network. The power of artificial neural network has been proved in image processing and computer vision fields with deep learning technology. However, image-based IOPs estimation is a quite different and challenging task. Unlike the traditional applications such as image classification or localization, IOP estimation looks at the transparency of the water between the camera and the target objects to estimate multiple optical properties simultaneously. In this paper, we propose a novel Depth Aided (DA deep neural network structure for IOPs estimation based on a single RGB image that is even noisy. The imaging depth information is considered as an aided input to help our model make better decision.

  7. HARDWARE REALIZATION OF CANNY EDGE DETECTION ALGORITHM FOR UNDERWATER IMAGE SEGMENTATION USING FIELD PROGRAMMABLE GATE ARRAYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEX RAJ S. M.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Underwater images raise new challenges in the field of digital image processing technology in recent years because of its widespread applications. There are many tangled matters to be considered in processing of images collected from water medium due to the adverse effects imposed by the environment itself. Image segmentation is preferred as basal stage of many digital image processing techniques which distinguish multiple segments in an image and reveal the hidden crucial information required for a peculiar application. There are so many general purpose algorithms and techniques that have been developed for image segmentation. Discontinuity based segmentation are most promising approach for image segmentation, in which Canny Edge detection based segmentation is more preferred for its high level of noise immunity and ability to tackle underwater environment. Since dealing with real time underwater image segmentation algorithm, which is computationally complex enough, an efficient hardware implementation is to be considered. The FPGA based realization of the referred segmentation algorithm is presented in this paper.

  8. Underwater Inherent Optical Properties Estimation Using a Depth Aided Deep Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhibin; Wang, Yubo; Zheng, Bing; Zheng, Haiyong; Wang, Nan; Gu, Zhaorui

    2017-01-01

    Underwater inherent optical properties (IOPs) are the fundamental clues to many research fields such as marine optics, marine biology, and underwater vision. Currently, beam transmissometers and optical sensors are considered as the ideal IOPs measuring methods. But these methods are inflexible and expensive to be deployed. To overcome this problem, we aim to develop a novel measuring method using only a single underwater image with the help of deep artificial neural network. The power of artificial neural network has been proved in image processing and computer vision fields with deep learning technology. However, image-based IOPs estimation is a quite different and challenging task. Unlike the traditional applications such as image classification or localization, IOP estimation looks at the transparency of the water between the camera and the target objects to estimate multiple optical properties simultaneously. In this paper, we propose a novel Depth Aided (DA) deep neural network structure for IOPs estimation based on a single RGB image that is even noisy. The imaging depth information is considered as an aided input to help our model make better decision.

  9. Underwater pipeline impact localization using piezoceramic transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junxiao; Ho, Siu Chun Michael; Patil, Devendra; Wang, Ning; Hirsch, Rachel; Song, Gangbing

    2017-10-01

    Reports indicated that impact events accounted for 47% of offshore pipeline failures, which calls for impact detection and localization for subsea pipelines. In this paper, an innovative method for rapid localization of impacts on underwater pipelines utilizing a novel determination technique for both arrival-time and group velocity (ATGV) of ultrasonic guided waves with lead zirconate titanate (PZT) transducers is described. PZT transducers mounted on the outer surface of a model pipeline were utilized to measure ultrasonic guided waves generated by impact events. Based on the signals from PZT sensors, the ATGV technique integrates wavelet decomposition, Hilbert transform and statistical analysis to pinpoint the arrival-time of the designated ultrasonic guided waves with a specific group velocity. Experimental results have verified the effectiveness and the localization accuracy for eight impact points along a model underwater pipeline. All estimations errors were small and were comparable with the wavelength of the designated ultrasonic guided waves. Furthermore, the method is robust against the low frequency structural vibration introduced by other external forces.

  10. GAS FLOW IN UNDERWATER BREATHING INSTALLATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca CONSTANTIN

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The open circuit underwater breathing apparatus can be a one or two-stage regulator used in scuba diving or a two-stage regulator used in surface supplied installations. These installations are proper in underwater sites at small depth. The pneumatic circuit of a two-stage regulator is composed mainly of a first stage regulator mounted on the air cylinders and a second stage carried by the diver in his mouth. The two regulators are linked together by a medium pressure hose. The circuit opens when the depression created by the diver’s inhalation, in the second stage body, reaches a certain value. The second stage opening causes a transient movement, namely an expansion wave that propagates through the medium pressure hose to the first stage regulator. The first stage regulator opens and the air in the cylinders is allowed to flow to the diver. The longer the hose, the greater the duration of the expansion wave propagation. Investigations on the wave propagation offer data on the inspiration unsteady motion duration which influences the respiratory effort of the diver.

  11. An explanatory model of underwater adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Colodro

    Full Text Available The underwater environment is an extreme environment that requires a process of human adaptation with specific psychophysiological demands to ensure survival and productive activity. From the standpoint of existing models of intelligence, personality and performance, in this explanatory study we have analyzed the contribution of individual differences in explaining the adaptation of military personnel in a stressful environment. Structural equation analysis was employed to verify a model representing the direct effects of psychological variables on individual adaptation to an adverse environment, and we have been able to confirm, during basic military diving courses, the structural relationships among these variables and their ability to predict a third of the variance of a criterion that has been studied very little to date. In this way, we have confirmed in a sample of professionals (N = 575 the direct relationship of emotional adjustment, conscientiousness and general mental ability with underwater adaptation, as well as the inverse relationship of emotional reactivity. These constructs are the psychological basis for working under water, contributing to an improved adaptation to this environment and promoting risk prevention and safety in diving activities.

  12. Modelling cavitating flow around underwater missiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Petitpas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The diffuse interface model of Saurel et al. (2008 is used for the computation of compressible cavitating flows around underwater missiles. Such systems use gas injection and natural cavitation to reduce drag effects. Consequently material interfaces appear separating liquid and gas. These interfaces may have a really complex dynamics such that only a few formulations are able to predict their evolution. Contrarily to front tracking or interface reconstruction method the interfaces are computed as diffused numerical zones, that are captured in a routinely manner, as is done usually with gas dynamics solvers for shocks and contact discontinuity. With the present approach, a single set of partial differential equations is solved everywhere, with a single numerical scheme. This leads to very efficient solvers. The algorithm derived in Saurel et al. (2009 is used to compute cavitation pockets around solid bodies. It is first validated against experiments done in cavitation tunnel at CNU. Then it is used to compute flows around high speed underwater systems (Shkval-like missile. Performance data are then computed showing method ability to predict forces acting on the system.

  13. Hydrogel microphones for stealthy underwater listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Song, Jingfeng; Li, Shumin; Elowsky, Christian; Zhou, You; Ducharme, Stephen; Chen, Yong Mei; Zhou, Qin; Tan, Li

    2016-08-01

    Exploring the abundant resources in the ocean requires underwater acoustic detectors with a high-sensitivity reception of low-frequency sound from greater distances and zero reflections. Here we address both challenges by integrating an easily deformable network of metal nanoparticles in a hydrogel matrix for use as a cavity-free microphone. Since metal nanoparticles can be densely implanted as inclusions, and can even be arranged in coherent arrays, this microphone can detect static loads and air breezes from different angles, as well as underwater acoustic signals from 20 Hz to 3 kHz at amplitudes as low as 4 Pa. Unlike dielectric capacitors or cavity-based microphones that respond to stimuli by deforming the device in thickness directions, this hydrogel device responds with a transient modulation of electric double layers, resulting in an extraordinary sensitivity (217 nF kPa-1 or 24 μC N-1 at a bias of 1.0 V) without using any signal amplification tools.

  14. Hybrid Underwater Vehicle: ARV Design and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang DENG

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The development of SMU-I, a new autonomous & remotely-operated vehicle (ARV is described. Since it has both the characteristics of autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV and remote operated underwater vehicle (ROV, it is able to achieve precision fix station operation and manual timely intervention. In the paper the initial design of basic components, such as vehicle, propulsion, batteries etc. and the control design of motion are introduced and analyzed. ROV’s conventional cable is replaced by a fiber optic cable, which makes it available for high-bandwidth real-time video, data telemetry and high-quality teleoperation. Furthermore, with the aid of the manual real-time remote operation and ranging sonar, it also resolves the AUV’s conflicting issue, which can absolutely adapt the actual complex sea environment and satisfy the unknown mission need. The whole battery system is designed as two-battery banks, whose voltages and temperatures are monitored through CAN (controller area network bus to avoid battery fire and explosion. A fuzzy-PID controller is designed for its motion control, including depth control and direction control. The controller synthesizes the advantage of fuzzy control and PID control, utilizes the fuzzy rules to on-line tune the parameters of PID controller, and achieves a better control effect. Experiment results demonstrate to show the effectiveness of the test-bed.

  15. Software architecture of biomimetic underwater vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praczyk, Tomasz; Szymak, Piotr

    2016-05-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles are vehicles that are entirely or partly independent of human decisions. In order to obtain operational independence, the vehicles have to be equipped with a specialized software. The main task of the software is to move the vehicle along a trajectory with collision avoidance. Moreover, the software has also to manage different devices installed on the vehicle board, e.g. to start and stop cameras, sonars etc. In addition to the software embedded on the vehicle board, the software responsible for managing the vehicle by the operator is also necessary. Its task is to define mission of the vehicle, to start, to stop the mission, to send emergency commands, to monitor vehicle parameters, and to control the vehicle in remotely operated mode. An important objective of the software is also to support development and tests of other software components. To this end, a simulation environment is necessary, i.e. simulation model of the vehicle and all its key devices, the model of the sea environment, and the software to visualize behavior of the vehicle. The paper presents architecture of the software designed for biomimetic autonomous underwater vehicle (BAUV) that is being constructed within the framework of the scientific project financed by Polish National Center of Research and Development.

  16. STABILITY OF UNDERWATER STRUCTURE UNDER WAVE ATTACK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Paotonan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Geotube is, among others, a type of coastal structure that is increasingly accepted for coastal protection especially underwater breakwater. Besides its relatively low cost, it has other advantages such as flexibility, ease of construction and the fact that it can be filled with local sand material. Similar to all other coastal structures, it should also be stable under wave attack. A simple theoretical approach based on linear wave was adopted to estimate the stability of such structure. The theoretical solution was then compared with an experimental study. The experimental study was conducted at the Hydraulics and Hydrology Laboratory of Universitas Gadjah Mada. However, instead of a real geotube, PVC pipe was used where the weight of the PVC was varied by adjusting the volume of sand in the pipe. The result indicated that the agreement between the theoretical solution and the experiment was encouraging. The analytical solution may be utilized to predict underwater pipe stability under wave attack with certain degree of accuracy.

  17. Underwater noise levels in UK waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Nathan D; Brookes, Kate L; Faulkner, Rebecca C; Bicknell, Anthony W J; Godley, Brendan J; Witt, Matthew J

    2016-11-10

    Underwater noise from human activities appears to be rising, with ramifications for acoustically sensitive marine organisms and the functioning of marine ecosystems. Policymakers are beginning to address the risk of ecological impact, but are constrained by a lack of data on current and historic noise levels. Here, we present the first nationally coordinated effort to quantify underwater noise levels, in support of UK policy objectives under the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). Field measurements were made during 2013-2014 at twelve sites around the UK. Median noise levels ranged from 81.5-95.5 dB re 1 μPa for one-third octave bands from 63-500 Hz. Noise exposure varied considerably, with little anthropogenic influence at the Celtic Sea site, to several North Sea sites with persistent vessel noise. Comparison of acoustic metrics found that the RMS level (conventionally used to represent the mean) was highly skewed by outliers, exceeding the 97 th percentile at some frequencies. We conclude that environmental indicators of anthropogenic noise should instead use percentiles, to ensure statistical robustness. Power analysis indicated that at least three decades of continuous monitoring would be required to detect trends of similar magnitude to historic rises in noise levels observed in the Northeast Pacific.

  18. Natural hydrocarbon seeps observation with underwater gliders and UV fluorescence sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochet, V.

    2016-02-01

    Hydrocarbons may leak to the near-surface from subsurface accumulations, from mature source rock, or by buoyancy along major cross-strata routes. The presence of migrating near-surface hydrocarbons can provide strong evidence for the presence of a working petroleum system, as well as valuable information on source, maturity, and migration pathways. Detection and characterization of hydrocarbons in the water column may then help to de-risk hydrocarbon plays at a very preliminary stage of an exploration program. In order to detect hydrocarbons in the water column, an underwater glider survey was conducted in an offshore frontier area. Driven by buoyancy variation, underwater gliders enable collecting data autonomously along the water column for weeks to months. Underwater gliders are regularly piloted from shore by satellite telemetry and do not require a surface supervising vessel resulting in substantial operational costs savings. The data compiled, over 700m depth of the water column, included temperature, salinity, pressure, dissolved oxygen and hydrocarbon components (phenanthrene and naphthalene) measured by "MINIFLUO" sensors to particularly target representative crude oil compounds Two gliders were deployed at sea, one from coast in shallow water and the other one offshore on the survey area. Both accurately squared the survey area following pre-defined lines and cross lines. Data files were transmitted by satellite telemetry in near real time during the performance of the mission for real time observations and appropriate re-positioning of the gliders. Using rechargeable underwater gliders increased reliability reducing the risk of leakage and associated logistics during operation at sea. Despite strong evidences of seabed seepages such as pockmarks, faults, etc, over the area of interest, no hydrocarbon indices were detected in the water column, which was confirmed later by seabed sample analysis. The use of glider platforms for hydrocarbon detection has

  19. Influence of range-gated intensifiers on underwater imaging system SNR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Hu, Ling; Zhi, Qiang; Chen, Zhen-yue; Jin, Wei-qi

    2013-08-01

    Range-gated technology has been a hot research field in recent years due to its high effective back scattering eliminating. As a result, it can enhance the contrast between a target and its background and extent the working distance of the imaging system. The underwater imaging system is required to have the ability to image in low light level conditions, as well as the ability to eliminate the back scattering effect, which means that the receiver has to be high-speed external trigger function, high resolution, high sensitivity, low noise, higher gain dynamic range. When it comes to an intensifier, the noise characteristics directly restrict the observation effect and range of the imaging system. The background noise may decrease the image contrast and sharpness, even covering the signal making it impossible to recognize the target. So it is quite important to investigate the noise characteristics of intensifiers. SNR is an important parameter reflecting the noise features of a system. Through the use of underwater laser range-gated imaging prediction model, and according to the linear SNR system theory, the gated imaging noise performance of the present market adopted super second generation and generation Ⅲ intensifiers were theoretically analyzed. Based on the active laser underwater range-gated imaging model, the effect to the system by gated intensifiers and the relationship between the system SNR and MTF were studied. Through theoretical and simulation analysis to the image intensifier background noise and SNR, the different influence on system SNR by super second generation and generation Ⅲ ICCD was obtained. Range-gated system SNR formula was put forward, and compared the different effect influence on the system by using two kind of ICCDs was compared. According to the matlab simulation, a detailed analysis was carried out theoretically. All the work in this paper lays a theoretical foundation to further eliminating back scattering effect, improving

  20. Surveying the Underwater Arcaheological Site of Cape Glaros at Pagasetikos Gulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamanti, E.; Spondylis, E.; Vlachaki, F.; Kolyva, E.

    2017-02-01

    The Hellenic Institute of Marine Archaeology (H.I.M.A.)1 has been conducting an underwater archaeological research in the west coast of southern Pagasetikos Gulf, since 2000. Every year the underwater research focuses on specific archaeological targets that have been recovered during previous field campaigns. The current publication elaborates on the comprehensive documentation of the underwater archaeological site at Cape Glaros, during the 2015 field season, under the direction of the archaeologist Elias Spondylis. The 2015 research campaign was conducted within the framework of the ITACA- Innovation Technologies and Applications for Coastal Archaeological sites European Project (FP7/2007-2013, GA No 606805), at two archaeological sites, namely the Cape Glaros and Metohi. It was among the most important challenges of the project to successfully produce the detailed and accurate 3D mapping of the Cape Glaros site that covers an extended area. Four large concentrations of pottery finds and numerous anchors of different typology have been recorded, that can be dated from the late Hellenistic to the Byzantine periods. This challenge was tackled through the simultaneous implementation of three recording methods; photogrammetry, geodesy and conventional architectural mapping. The workflow of the documentation process, including data acquisition, processing and graphic visualization, along with the derived results are presented below. 1The Hellenic Institute of Marine Archaeology (H.I.M.A.) is a private, non-profit organization, founded in 1973, which undertakes maritime archaeological research under the supervision or in collaboration with the Greek Ministry of Culture. It has over 100 members, with diverse academic credentials, all of whom work, mainly, on a voluntary basis. 3D recording of underwater archaeological sites has been applied to numerous projects that have been carried out by the multidisciplinary team of H.I.M.A. in locations of utmost archaeological

  1. A Speed Control Method for Underwater Vehicle under Hydraulic Flexible Traction

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yin; Xia, Ying-kai; Chen, Ying; Xu, Guo-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Underwater vehicle speed control methodology method is the focus of research in this study. Driven by a hydraulic flexible traction system, the underwater vehicle advances steadily on underwater guide rails, simulating an underwater environment for the carried device. Considering the influence of steel rope viscoelasticity and the control system traction structure feature, a mathematical model of the underwater vehicle driven by hydraulic flexible traction system is established. A speed contr...

  2. Underwater television camera for monitoring inner side of pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayama, Kazuhiko.

    1997-01-01

    An underwater television support device equipped with a rotatable and vertically movable underwater television camera and an underwater television camera controlling device for monitoring images of the inside of the reactor core photographed by the underwater television camera to control the position of the underwater television camera and the underwater light are disposed on an upper lattice plate of a reactor pressure vessel. Both of them are electrically connected with each other by way of a cable to rapidly observe the inside of the reactor core by the underwater television camera. The reproducibility is extremely satisfactory by efficiently concentrating the position of the camera and image information upon inspection and observation. As a result, the steps for periodical inspection can be reduced to shorten the days for the periodical inspection. Since there is no requirement to withdraw fuel assemblies over a wide reactor core region, and the device can be used with the fuel assemblies being left as they are in the reactor, it is suitable for inspection of detectors for nuclear instrumentation. (N.H.)

  3. Towards a Hybrid Approach to Context Reasoning for Underwater Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ontologies have been widely used to facilitate semantic interoperability and serve as a common information model in many applications or domains. The Smart and Networking Underwater Robots in Cooperation Meshes (SWARMs project, aiming to facilitate coordination and cooperation between heterogeneous underwater vehicles, also adopts ontologies to formalize information that is necessarily exchanged between vehicles. However, how to derive more useful contexts based on ontologies still remains a challenge. In particular, the extreme nature of the underwater environment introduces uncertainties in context data, thus imposing more difficulties in context reasoning. None of the existing context reasoning methods could individually deal with all intricacies in the underwater robot field. To this end, this paper presents the first proposal applying a hybrid context reasoning mechanism that includes ontological, rule-based, and Multi-Entity Bayesian Network (MEBN reasoning methods to reason about contexts and their uncertainties in the underwater robot field. The theoretical foundation of applying this reasoning mechanism in underwater robots is given by a case study on the oil spill monitoring. The simulated reasoning results are useful for further decision-making by operators or robots and they show that the consolidation of different reasoning methods is a promising approach for context reasoning in underwater robots.

  4. Feasibility of underwater welding of highly irradiated in-vessel components of boiling-water reactors: A literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, A.L.

    1997-11-01

    In February 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES), initiated a literature review to assess the state of underwater welding technology. In particular, the objective of this literature review was to evaluate the viability of underwater welding in-vessel components of boiling water reactor (BWR) in-vessel components, especially those components fabricated from stainless steels that are subjected to high neutron fluences. This assessment was requested because of the recent increased level of activity in the commercial nuclear industry to address generic issues concerning the reactor vessel and internals, especially those issues related to repair options. This literature review revealed a preponderance of general information about underwater welding technology, as a result of the active research in this field sponsored by the U.S. Navy and offshore oil and gas industry concerns. However, the literature search yielded only a limited amount of information about underwater welding of components in low-fluence areas of BWR in-vessel environments, and no information at all concerning underwater welding experiences in high-fluence environments. Research reported by the staff of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site and researchers from the DOE fusion reactor program proved more fruitful. This research documented relevant experience concerning welding of stainless steel materials in air environments exposed to high neutron fluences. It also addressed problems with welding highly irradiated materials, and primarily attributed those problems to helium-induced cracking in the material. (Helium is produced from the neutron irradiation of boron, an impurity, and nickel.) The researchers found that the amount of helium-induced cracking could be controlled, or even eliminated, by reducing the heat input into the weld and applying a compressive stress perpendicular to the weld path.

  5. Subsea technology 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    The conference focuses on Subsea problems and requirements and contains 18 presentation on the topics: Flow management, autonomous underwater vehicles, risers and other technologies, installation of offshore production and exploitation units, management and maintenance of Subsea installations, design, production and functionality aspects of the Subsea structures and equipment, simulation aspects and oil and gas exploitation and production. (tk)

  6. Subsea technology 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The conference focuses on Subsea problems and requirements and contains 18 presentation on the topics: Flow management, autonomous underwater vehicles, risers and other technologies, installation of offshore production and exploitation units, management and maintenance of Subsea installations, design, production and functionality aspects of the Subsea structures and equipment, simulation aspects and oil and gas exploitation and production. (tk)

  7. Waning immunity and booster responses in nursing and medical technology students who had received plasma-derived or recombinant hepatitis B vaccine during infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Chiang; Yang, Chun-Yuh; Shih, Ching-Tang; Chen, Bai-Hsiun; Huang, Yeou-Lih

    2011-06-01

    The national hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination program was launched in Taiwan in 1984. After November 1992, a recombinant HBV vaccine replaced the plasma-derived HBV vaccine. A total of 1,812 nursing and medical technology freshman students was tested to evaluate their waning immunity toward hepatitis B. In the 2007 (2008) academic year, 438 (382) students testing nonprotective antibodies received 3 (1) booster doses of HBV vaccine according to suggestions from Taiwan's Center for Disease Control (CDC). The seroprevalences of hepatitis B surface antigen (+) were 0.8% and 0.7% in the plasma-derived and recombinant group, respectively; for antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) (+), they were 43.2% and 33.3% (P students previously vaccinated with plasma-derived HBV vaccine exhibited anti-HBs seroconversion. In the 2008 freshman group, the booster dose induced anti-HBs seroconversions of 92.1% and 95.9% in the students who had received the plasma-derived and recombinant HBV vaccine, respectively (P = .370). Most students exhibited signs of immune memory after receiving the booster, regardless of having received plasma-derived or recombinant HBV. Only a small number of vaccinees lost their immune memory after 16 years, suggesting that some students might benefit from boosting before proceeding to clinical practice. Copyright © 2011 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Determination of Se at low concentration in coal by collision/reaction cell technology inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Alessandra S.; Rondan, Filipe S.; Mesko, Marcia F.; Mello, Paola A.; Perez, Magali; Armstrong, Joseph; Bullock, Liam A.; Parnell, John; Feldmann, Joerg; Flores, Erico M. M.

    2018-05-01

    A method is proposed for the determination of selenium at low concentration in coal by collision/reaction cell technology inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (CRC-ICP-MS). Samples were decomposed by high pressure microwave-assisted wet digestion (MAWD) using 250 mg of coal, a mixture of 5 mL of 14.4 mol L-1 HNO3 and 1 mL of 40% HF and 70 min of heating program (200 °C and 40 bar). Hydrogen gas used in the collision/reaction cell was investigated to minimize the argon-based interferences at m/z 77, 78 and 80. The rejection parameter (RPq) and the H2 gas flow rate were set to 0.45 and 4.8 mL min-1, respectively. The use of H2 in the cell resulted in other polyatomic interferences, such as 76Ge1H+, 79Br1H+ and 81Br1H+, which impaired Se determination using 77Se, 80Se and 82Se isotopes, thus Se determination was carried out by monitoring only 78Se isotope. Selenium was determined in certified reference materials of coal (NIST 1635 and SARM 20) and an agreement better than 95% was observed between the results obtained by CRC-ICP-MS and the certified values. Under optimized conditions, the instrumental limit of detection was 0.01 μg L-1 and the method limit of detection was 0.01 μg g-1, which was suitable for Se determination at very low concentration in coal.

  9. A Secure Communication Suite for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Lo Duca

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe a security suite for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks comprising both fixed and mobile nodes. The security suite is composed of a secure routing protocol and a set of cryptographic primitives aimed at protecting the confidentiality and the integrity of underwater communication while taking into account the unique characteristics and constraints of the acoustic channel. By means of experiments and simulations based on real data, we show that the suite is suitable for an underwater networking environment as it introduces limited, and sometimes negligible, communication and power consumption overhead.

  10. Centralised versus Decentralised Control Reconfiguration for Collaborating Underwater Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furno, Lidia; Nielsen, Mikkel Cornelius; Blanke, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    The present paper introduces an approach to fault-tolerant reconfiguration for collaborating underwater robots. Fault-tolerant reconfiguration is obtained using the virtual actuator approach, Steen (2005). The paper investigates properties of a centralised versus a decentralised implementation...... an underwater drill needs to be transported and positioned by three collaborating robots as part of an underwater autonomous operation....... and assesses the capabilities under communication constraints between the individual robots. In the centralised case, each robot sends information related to its own status to a unique virtual actuator that computes the necessary reconfiguration. In the decentralised case, each robot is equipped with its own...

  11. Adaptive Decentralized Control of Mobile Underwater Sensor Networks and Robots for Modeling Underwater Phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrick Detweiler

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the dynamics of bodies of water and their impact on the global environment requires sensing information over the full volume of water. In this article, we develop a gradient-based decentralized controller that dynamically adjusts the depth of a network of underwater sensors to optimize sensing for computing maximally detailed volumetric models. We prove that the controller converges to a local minimum and show how the controller can be extended to work with hybrid robot and sensor network systems. We implement the controller on an underwater sensor network with depth adjustment capabilities. Through simulations and in-situ experiments, we verify the functionality and performance of the system and algorithm.

  12. A review of the findings of the plasma diagnostic package and associated laboratory experiments: Implications of large body/plasma interactions for future space technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Gerald B.; Lonngren, Karl E.

    1986-01-01

    The discoveries and experiments of the Plasma Diagnostic Package (PDP) on the OSS 1 and Spacelab 2 missions are reviewed, these results are compared with those of other space and laboratory experiments, and the implications for the understanding of large body interactions in a low Earth orbit (LEO) plasma environment are discussed. First a brief review of the PDP investigation, its instrumentation and experiments is presented. Next a summary of PDP results along with a comparison of those results with similar space or laboratory experiments is given. Last of all the implications of these results in terms of understanding fundamental physical processes that take place with large bodies in LEO is discussed and experiments to deal with these vital questions are suggested.

  13. Task Allocation and Path Planning for Collaborative Autonomous Underwater Vehicles Operating through an Underwater Acoustic Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueyue Deng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic and unstructured multiple cooperative autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV missions are highly complex operations, and task allocation and path planning are made significantly more challenging under realistic underwater acoustic communication constraints. This paper presents a solution for the task allocation and path planning for multiple AUVs under marginal acoustic communication conditions: a location-aided task allocation framework (LAAF algorithm for multitarget task assignment and the grid-based multiobjective optimal programming (GMOOP mathematical model for finding an optimal vehicle command decision given a set of objectives and constraints. Both the LAAF and GMOOP algorithms are well suited in poor acoustic network condition and dynamic environment. Our research is based on an existing mobile ad hoc network underwater acoustic simulator and blind flooding routing protocol. Simulation results demonstrate that the location-aided auction strategy performs significantly better than the well-accepted auction algorithm developed by Bertsekas in terms of task-allocation time and network bandwidth consumption. We also demonstrate that the GMOOP path-planning technique provides an efficient method for executing multiobjective tasks by cooperative agents with limited communication capabilities. This is in contrast to existing multiobjective action selection methods that are limited to networks where constant, reliable communication is assumed to be available.

  14. Status of the ANTARES underwater neutrino telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Hallewell, G D

    2003-01-01

    The ANTARES Collaboration is constructing a deep underwater neutrino detector for operation at -2400 m off the French Mediterranean coast near Toulon. The detector, which will begin operation in 2004, will have an aperture of approx 0.1 km sup 2 , and will contain 900 photomultiplier tubes. The photomultiplier axes will be angled 45 deg. downward toward the seabed to observe the Cherenkov emissions of upward-going muons created by the interactions in or near the detector of high energy neutrinos traversing the Earth. These neutrinos arrive undeviated from a variety of galactic and extragalactic sources of astrophysical interest, and might be produced in the possible annihilation of dark matter neutralinos. The design and present status of the detector are summarized. Results from site evaluation and the development of supporting instrumentation are outlined.

  15. Transducers and arrays for underwater sound

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, John L

    2016-01-01

    This improved and updated second edition covers the theory, development, and design of electro-acoustic transducers for underwater applications. This highly regarded text discusses the basics of piezoelectric and magnetostrictive transducers that are currently being used as well as promising new designs. It presents the basic acoustics as well as the specific acoustics data needed in transducer design and evaluation. A broad range of designs of projectors and hydrophones are described in detail along with methods of modeling, evaluation, and measurement. Analysis of projector and hydrophone transducer arrays, including the effects of mutual radiation impedance and numerical models for elements and arrays, are also covered. The book includes new advances in transducer design and transducer materials and has been completely reorganized to be suitable for use as a textbook, as well as a reference or handbook. The new edition contains updates to the first edition, end-of-chapter exercises, and solutions to select...

  16. The NESTOR underwater neutrino telescope project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapidis, Petros A. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, National Center for Scientific Research ' Demokritos' , Athens 15310 (Greece)], E-mail: rapidis@inp.demokritos.gr

    2009-04-11

    The NESTOR collaboration is continuing its efforts towards deploying an underwater neutrino telescope. Further site studies (e.g. water light transmission measurements, sedimentation rates, etc.) are being carried out within the context of characterizing a site that may host the proposed KM3NeT infrastructure. In addition, following the successful deployment of a single floor of a NESTOR tower in 2003, five floors are now in the final stages of preparation. The use of these five floors in a form of a truncated tower together with four autonomous strings to be located some 300 m away from the tower is being contemplated. This arrangement, named NuBE (for Neutrino Burst Experiment), that may allow the detection neutrinos in coincidence with Gamma Ray Bursts, will be described.

  17. A Validation Process for Underwater Localization Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Hildebrandt

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the validation process of a localization algorithm for underwater vehicles. In order to develop new localization algorithms, it is essential to characterize them with regard to their accuracy, long-term stability and robustness to external sources of noise. This is only possible if a gold-standard reference localization (GSRL is available against which any new localization algorithm (NLA can be tested. This process requires a vehicle which carries all the required sensor and processing systems for both the GSRL and the NLA. This paper will show the necessity of such a validation process, briefly sketch the test vehicle and its capabilities, describe the challenges in computing the localizations of both the GSRL and the NLA simultaneously for comparison, and conclude with experimental data of real-world trials.

  18. Improved Underwater Excitation-Emission Matrix Fluorometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Casey; daCunha, John; Rhoades, Bruce; Twardowski, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A compact, high-resolution, two-dimensional excitation-emission matrix fluorometer (EEMF) has been designed and built specifically for use in identifying and measuring the concentrations of organic compounds, including polluting hydrocarbons, in natural underwater settings. Heretofore, most EEMFs have been designed and built for installation in laboratories, where they are used to analyze the contents of samples collected in the field and brought to the laboratories. Because the present EEMF can be operated in the field, it is better suited to measurement of spatially and temporally varying concentrations of substances of interest. In excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorometry, fluorescence is excited by irradiating a sample at one or more wavelengths, and the fluorescent emission from the sample is measured at multiple wavelengths. When excitation is provided at only one wavelength, the technique is termed one-dimensional (1D) EEM fluorometry because the resulting matrix of fluorescence emission data (the EEM) contains only one row or column. When excitation is provided at multiple wavelengths, the technique is termed two-dimensional (2D) EEM fluorometry because the resulting EEM contains multiple rows and columns. EEM fluorometry - especially the 2D variety - is well established as a means of simultaneously detecting numerous dissolved and particulate compounds in water. Each compound or pool of compounds has a unique spectral fluorescence signature, and each EEM is rich in information content, in that it can contain multiple fluorescence signatures. By use of deconvolution and/or other mixture-analyses techniques, it is often possible to isolate the spectral signature of compounds of interest, even when their fluorescence spectra overlap. What distinguishes the present 2D EEMF over prior laboratory-type 2D EEMFs are several improvements in packaging (including a sealed housing) and other aspects of design that render it suitable for use in natural underwater

  19. Adaptive control of nonlinear underwater robotic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thor I. Fossen

    1991-04-01

    Full Text Available The problem of controlling underwater mobile robots in 6 degrees of freedom (DOF is addressed. Uncertainties in the input matrix due to partly known nonlinear thruster characteristics are modeled as multiplicative input uncertainty. This paper proposes two methods to compensate for the model uncertainties: (1 an adaptive passivity-based control scheme and (2 deriving a hybrid (adaptive and sliding controller. The hybrid controller consists of a switching term which compensates for uncertainties in the input matrix and an on-line parameter estimation algorithm. Global stability is ensured by applying Barbalat's Lyapunovlike lemma. The hybrid controller is simulated for the horizontal motion of the Norwegian Experimental Remotely Operated Vehicle (NEROV.

  20. Collision Detection for Underwater ROV Manipulator Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivčev, Satja; Rossi, Matija; Coleman, Joseph; Omerdić, Edin; Dooly, Gerard; Toal, Daniel

    2018-04-06

    Work-class ROVs equipped with robotic manipulators are extensively used for subsea intervention operations. Manipulators are teleoperated by human pilots relying on visual feedback from the worksite. Operating in a remote environment, with limited pilot perception and poor visibility, manipulator collisions which may cause significant damage are likely to happen. This paper presents a real-time collision detection algorithm for marine robotic manipulation. The proposed collision detection mechanism is developed, integrated into a commercial ROV manipulator control system, and successfully evaluated in simulations and experimental setup using a real industry standard underwater manipulator. The presented collision sensing solution has a potential to be a useful pilot assisting tool that can reduce the task load, operational time, and costs of subsea inspection, repair, and maintenance operations.

  1. The NESTOR underwater neutrino telescope project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapidis, Petros A.

    2009-01-01

    The NESTOR collaboration is continuing its efforts towards deploying an underwater neutrino telescope. Further site studies (e.g. water light transmission measurements, sedimentation rates, etc.) are being carried out within the context of characterizing a site that may host the proposed KM3NeT infrastructure. In addition, following the successful deployment of a single floor of a NESTOR tower in 2003, five floors are now in the final stages of preparation. The use of these five floors in a form of a truncated tower together with four autonomous strings to be located some 300 m away from the tower is being contemplated. This arrangement, named NuBE (for Neutrino Burst Experiment), that may allow the detection neutrinos in coincidence with Gamma Ray Bursts, will be described.

  2. Morphing hull implementation for unmanned underwater vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Timothy F; Gandhi, Farhan; Rufino, Russell J

    2013-01-01

    There has been much interest and work in the area of morphing aircraft since the 1980s. Morphing could also potentially benefit unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs). The current paper envisions a UUV with an interior pressure hull and a variable diameter outer flexible hull with fuel stored in the annulus between, and presents a mechanism to realize diameter change of the outer hull. The outer hull diameter of UUVs designed for very long endurance/range could be progressively reduced as fuel was consumed, thereby reducing drag and further increasing endurance and range capability. Diameter morphing could also be advantageous for compact storage of UUVs. A prototype is fabricated to represent an axial section of such a morphing diameter UUV. Diameter change is achieved using eight morphing trusses arranged equidistant around the circumference of the representative interior rigid hull. Each morphing truss has a lower rail (attached to the rigid hull) and an upper rail with V-linkages between, at either ends of the rail. Horizontal motion of the feet of the V-linkages (sliding in the lower rail) results in vertical motion of the upper rail which in turn produces diameter change of the outer hull. For the prototype built and tested, a 63% increase in outer diameter from 12.75″ to 20.75″ was achieved. The introduction of a stretched latex representative flexible skin around the outer rails increased actuation force requirement and led to a propensity for the wheel-in-track sliders in the morphing truss to bind. It is anticipated that this could be overcome with higher precision manufacturing. In addition to symmetric actuation of the morphing trusses resulting in diameter change, the paper also shows that with asymmetric actuation the hull cross-section shape can be changed (for example, from a circular section for underwater operation to a V-section for surface operations). (paper)

  3. On sampling the ocean using underwater gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, Daniel L.; Cole, Sylvia T.

    2011-08-01

    The sampling characteristics of an underwater glider are addressed through comparison with contemporaneous measurements from a ship survey using a towed vehicle. The comparison uses the underwater glider Spray and the towed vehicle SeaSoar north of Hawaii along 158°W between 22.75°N and 34.5°N. A Spray dive from the surface to 1000 m and back took 5.6 h and covered 5.3 km, resulting in a horizontal speed of 0.26 m s-1. SeaSoar undulated between the surface and 400 m, completing a cycle in 11 min while covering 2.6 km, for a speed of 3.9 m s-1. Adjacent profiles of temperature and salinity are compared between the two platforms to prove that each is accurate. Spray and SeaSoar data are compared through sections, isopycnal spatial series, and wave number spectra. The relative slowness of the glider results in the projection of high-frequency oceanic variability, such as internal waves, onto spatial structure. The projection is caused by Doppler smearing because of finite speed and aliasing due to discrete sampling. The projected variability is apparent in properties measured on depth surfaces or in isopycnal depth. No projected variability is seen in observations of properties on constant density surfaces because internal waves are intrinsically filtered. Wave number spectra suggest that projected variability affects properties at constant depth at wavelengths shorter than 30 km. These results imply that isobaric quantities, like geostrophic shear, are valid at wavelengths longer than 30 km, while isopycnal quantities, like spice, may be analyzed for scales as small as a glider measures.

  4. Short Communication Evaluation of an underwater biopsy probe for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lethal methods may become an increasingly useful tool to investigate shark populations where researchers encounter logistical or conservation-related constraints. Keywords: biopsy probe, laser photogrammetry, non-lethal sampling, underwater ...

  5. Digital sonar design in underwater acoustics principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Qihu

    2012-01-01

    "Digital Sonar Design in Underwater Acoustics Principles and Applications" provides comprehensive and up-to-date coverage of research on sonar design, including the basic theory and techniques of digital signal processing, basic concept of information theory, ocean acoustics, underwater acoustic signal propagation theory, and underwater signal processing theory. This book discusses the general design procedure and approaches to implementation, the design method, system simulation theory and techniques, sonar tests in the laboratory, lake and sea, and practical validation criteria and methods for digital sonar design. It is intended for researchers in the fields of underwater signal processing and sonar design, and also for navy officers and ocean explorers. Qihu Li is a professor at the Institute of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and an academician of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  6. Automated Underwater Image Restoration and Retrieval of Related Optical Properties

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hou, Weilin; Gray, Deric J; Weidemann, Alan D; Fournier, Georges R; Forand, J. L

    2007-01-01

    ...) in the spatial domain and the modulation transfer function (MTF) in the frequency domain. Due to the intensity variations involved in underwater sensing, denoising is carefully carried out by wavelet decompositions...

  7. Wireless Underwater Monitoring Systems Based on Energy Harvestings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sea-Hee HWANGBO

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the important research fields for aquatic exploitation and conservation is underwater wireless sensor network. Since limited energy source for underwater nodes and devices is a main open problem, in this paper, we propose wireless underwater monitoring systems powered by energy harvester which resolves the energy constraint. The target system generates renewable energy from energy harvester and shares the energy with underwater sensor nodes. For the realization of the system, key components to be investigated are discriminated as follows: acoustic modem, actuator, smart battery charge controller, energy harvester and wireless power transfer module. By developing acoustic modem, actuator and smart battery charge controller and utilizing off-the-shelf energy harvester and wireless power transfer module, we design and implement a prototype of the system. Also, we verify the feasibility of concept of target system by conducting indoor and outdoor experiments.

  8. Trade-off Analysis of Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, G.; Das, R.

    2017-09-01

    In the last couple of decades, Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks (UASNs) were started to be used for various commercial and non-commercial purposes. However, in underwater environments, there are some specific inherent constraints, such as high bit error rate, variable and large propagation delay, limited bandwidth capacity, and short-range communications, which severely degrade the performance of UASNs and limit the lifetime of underwater sensor nodes as well. Therefore, proving reliability of UASN applications poses a challenge. In this study, we try to balance energy consumption of underwater acoustic sensor networks and minimize end-to-end delay using an efficient node placement strategy. Our simulation results reveal that if the number of hops is reduced, energy consumption can be reduced. However, this increases end-to-end delay. Hence, application-specific requirements must be taken into consideration when determining a strategy for node deployment.

  9. Object detection from images obtained through underwater turbulence medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furhad, Md. Hasan; Tahtali, Murat; Lambert, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Imaging through underwater experiences severe distortions due to random fluctuations of temperature and salinity in water, which produces underwater turbulence through diffraction limited blur. Lights reflecting from objects perturb and attenuate contrast, making the recognition of objects of interest difficult. Thus, the information available for detecting underwater objects of interest becomes a challenging task as they have inherent confusion among the background, foreground and other image properties. In this paper, a saliency-based approach is proposed to detect the objects acquired through an underwater turbulent medium. This approach has drawn attention among a wide range of computer vision applications, such as image retrieval, artificial intelligence, neuro-imaging and object detection. The image is first processed through a deblurring filter. Next, a saliency technique is used on the image for object detection. In this step, a saliency map that highlights the target regions is generated and then a graph-based model is proposed to extract these target regions for object detection.

  10. Filming Underwater in 3d Respecting Stereographic Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, R.; Hordosch, H.

    2015-04-01

    After an experimental phase of many years, 3D filming is now effective and successful. Improvements are still possible, but the film industry achieved memorable success on 3D movie's box offices due to the overall quality of its products. Special environments such as space ("Gravity") and the underwater realm look perfect to be reproduced in 3D. "Filming in space" was possible in "Gravity" using special effects and computer graphic. The underwater realm is still difficult to be handled. Underwater filming in 3D was not that easy and effective as filming in 2D, since not long ago. After almost 3 years of research, a French, Austrian and Italian team realized a perfect tool to film underwater, in 3D, without any constrains. This allows filmmakers to bring the audience deep inside an environment where they most probably will never have the chance to be.

  11. Collision Avoidance of Moving Obstacles for Underwater Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KWON KYOUNG YOUB

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available A fuzzy logic for autonomous navigation of underwater robot is proposed in this paper. The VFF(Virtual Force Field algorithm, which is widely used in the field of mobile robot, is modified for application to the autonomous navigation of underwater robot. This Modified Virtual Force Field(MVFF algorithm using the fuzzy logic can be used in either track keeping or obstacle avoidance. Fuzzy logics are devised to handle various situations which can be faced during autonomous navigation of underwater robot. A graphic simulator based on OpenGL for an autonomous navigation has been developed. The good performance of the proposed MVFF algorithm is verified through computer simulations on an underwater robot.

  12. Multi-layer protective armour for underwater shock wave mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Hawass

    2015-12-01

    The strain gauge data and displacement sensors results showed that the multi-layer plates have higher level of underwater shock wave mitigation than the triple aluminum plates with strain and deflection of nearly 50%.

  13. Underwater image enhancement through depth estimation based on random forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Shen-Chuan; Tsai, Ting-Chou; Huang, Jyun-Han

    2017-11-01

    Light absorption and scattering in underwater environments can result in low-contrast images with a distinct color cast. This paper proposes a systematic framework for the enhancement of underwater images. Light transmission is estimated using the random forest algorithm. RGB values, luminance, color difference, blurriness, and the dark channel are treated as features in training and estimation. Transmission is calculated using an ensemble machine learning algorithm to deal with a variety of conditions encountered in underwater environments. A color compensation and contrast enhancement algorithm based on depth information was also developed with the aim of improving the visual quality of underwater images. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed scheme outperforms existing methods with regard to subjective visual quality as well as objective measurements.

  14. Navigation of autonomous underwater vehicle using extended kalman filter

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ranjan, T.N.; Nherakkol, A.; Navelkar, G.S.

    To navigate the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) accurately is one of the most important aspects in its application. A truly autonomous vehicle must determine its position which requires the optimal integration of all available attitude...

  15. Laboratory Evaluation of Underwater Grouting of CPP-603 Basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, V.J.; Pao, J.H.; Demmer, R.L.; Tripp, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    A project is underway to deactivate a Fuel Storage Basin. The project specifies the requirements and identifies the tasks that will be performed for deactivation of the CPP- 603 building at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The Fuel Receiving and Storage Building (CPP- 603) was originally used to receive and store spent nuclear fuel from various facilities. The area to undergo deactivation includes the three spent nuclear fuel storage basins and a transfer canal (1.5 million gallons of water storage). Deactivation operations at the task site include management of the hot storage boxes and generic fuel objects, removal of the fuel storage racks, basin sludge, water evaporation and basin grouting, and interior equipment, tanks, and associated components. This includes a study to develop a grout formulation and placement process for this deactivation project. Water will be allowed to passively evaporate to r educe the spread of contamination from the walls of the basin. The basins will be filled with grout, underwater, as the water evaporates to maintain the basin water at a safe level. The objective of the deactivation project is to eliminate potential exposure to hazardous and radioactive materials and eliminate potential safety hazards associated with the CPP-603 building

  16. An underwater robot controls water tanks in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lardiere, C.

    2015-01-01

    The enterprises Newton Research Labs and IHI Southwest Technologies have developed a robot equipped with sensors to inspect the inside walls (partially) and bottom of water tanks without being obliged to empty them. The robot called 'Inspector' is made up of 4 main components: a chassis with 4 independent steering wheels, a camera video system able to provide a 360 degree view, various non-destructive testing devices such as underwater laser scanners, automated ultra-sound or Foucault current probes and an operation system for both driving the robot and controlling the testing. The Inspector robot has been used to inspect the inside bottom of an operating condensate tank at the Palo Verde nuclear station. The robot was able to check all the welds joining the bottom plates and the welds between the walls and the bottom. The robot is also able to come back to the exact place where a defect was detected during a previous inspection. (A.C.)

  17. Intelligent Autonomy for Unmanned Surface and Underwater Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntsberger, Terry; Woodward, Gail

    2011-01-01

    As the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) and Autonomous Surface Vehicle (ASV) platforms mature in endurance and reliability, a natural evolution will occur towards longer, more remote autonomous missions. This evolution will require the development of key capabilities that allow these robotic systems to perform a high level of on-board decisionmaking, which would otherwise be performed by humanoperators. With more decision making capabilities, less a priori knowledge of the area of operations would be required, as these systems would be able to sense and adapt to changing environmental conditions, such as unknown topography, currents, obstructions, bays, harbors, islands, and river channels. Existing vehicle sensors would be dual-use; that is they would be utilized for the primary mission, which may be mapping or hydrographic reconnaissance; as well as for autonomous hazard avoidance, route planning, and bathymetric-based navigation. This paper describes a tightly integrated instantiation of an autonomous agent called CARACaS (Control Architecture for Robotic Agent Command and Sensing) developed at JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) that was designed to address many of the issues for survivable ASV/AUV control and to provide adaptive mission capabilities. The results of some on-water tests with US Navy technology test platforms are also presented.

  18. Application of a modified industrial robot in underwater areas. Einsatz eines modifizierten Industrieroboters im Unterwasserbereich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustmann, M.; Aust, E.

    1993-01-01

    At present, there are two alternative technical concepts for work at considerable underwater depths: 1 bar systems which carry the human worker near to the working site, from the inside of which he can perform his work with the help of built-in manipulators; and more sophisticated handling systems, which perform their work automatically, e.g. controlled and monitored from a ship, and supported by sensor technology and offline programming. This second alternative is presently being studied within the framework of a co-operation between the GKSS and the Brazilian oil company, PETROBRAS. (orig.)

  19. Reliability considerations of electronics components for the deep underwater muon and neutrino detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskovar, B.

    1980-02-01

    The reliability of some electronics components for the Deep Underwater Muon and Neutrino Detection (DUMAND) System is discussed. An introductory overview of engineering concepts and technique for reliability assessment is given. Component reliability is discussed in the contest of major factors causing failures, particularly with respect to physical and chemical causes, process technology and testing, and screening procedures. Failure rates are presented for discrete devices and for integrated circuits as well as for basic electronics components. Furthermore, the military reliability specifications and standards for semiconductor devices are reviewed

  20. Effects of underwater turbulence on laser beam propagation and coupling into single-mode optical fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Frank; Lasher, Mark

    2010-06-01

    We characterize and compare the effects of turbulence on underwater laser propagation with theory. Measurements of the coupling efficiency of the focused beam into a single-mode fiber are reported. A simple tip-tilt control system, based on the position of the image centroid in the focal plane, was shown to maintain good coupling efficiency for a beam radius equal to the transverse coherence length, r(0). These results are relevant to high bandwidth communication technology that requires good spatial mode quality.

  1. Estimation of underwater acoustic fields at high frequencies

    OpenAIRE

    Temsamani, A.B.; Vandenplas, S.; Van Biesen, L.

    2001-01-01

    In this work a parametric modeling of the underwater acoustic field is investigated in a laboratory scale at high frequencies (150-850 kHz). The aim is to develop experimentally verifiable theoretical models to investigate the acoustic field propagation in elastic and viscoelastic or porous media. To achieve this goal, the efforts have been directed to three integral parts pertaining to the development of the methods. The first part deals with the modeling of the underwater acoustic field fol...

  2. Strong tracking adaptive Kalman filters for underwater vehicle dead reckoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Kun; Fang, Shao-Ji; Pang, Yong-Jie

    2007-06-01

    To impove underwater vehicle dead reckoning, a developed strong tracking adaptive kalman filter is proposed. The filter is improved with an additional adaptive factor and an estimator of measurement noise covariance. Since the magnitude of fading factor is changed adaptively, the tracking ability of the filter is still enhanced in low velocity condition of underwater vehicles. The results of simulation tests prove the presented filter effective.

  3. Underwater striling engine design with modified one-dimensional model

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Daijin; Qin, Kan; Luo, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Stirling engines are regarded as an efficient and promising power system for underwater devices. Currently, many researches on one-dimensional model is used to evaluate thermodynamic performance of Stirling engine, but in which there are still some aspects which cannot be modeled with proper mathematical models such as mechanical loss or auxiliary power. In this paper, a four-cylinder double-acting Stirling engine for Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUVs) is discussed. And a one-dimensional mod...

  4. Characterization of ships as sources of underwater noise

    OpenAIRE

    Jong, C.A.F. de

    2009-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the possible impact of anthropogenic underwater noise on marine life [1]. One of the concerns is the increasing contribution of shipping noise, with the growing number and size of commercial ships. Traditionally, underwater radiated noise control was only of interest for naval [2,3] and fishery research vessels [4]. Due to the potential environmental impact, it becomes also relevant for commercial shipping. The challenge is to bring the expertise from the naval ...

  5. A potential flow based flight simulator for an underwater glider

    OpenAIRE

    Phoemsapthawee, Surasak; Le Boulluec, Marc; Laurens, Jean-marc; Deniset, Francois

    2013-01-01

    Underwater gliders are recent innovative types of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) used in ocean exploration and observation. They adjust their buoyancy to dive and to return to the ocean surface. During the change of altitude, they use the hydrodynamic forces developed by their wings to move forward. Their flights are controlled by changing the position of their centers of gravity and their buoyancy to adjust their trim and heel angles. For better flight control, the understanding of th...

  6. Analytical and Numerical Optimal Motion Planning for an Underwater Glider

    OpenAIRE

    Kraus, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    The use of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) for oceanic observation and research is becoming more common. Underwater gliders are a specific class of AUV that do not use conventional propulsion. Instead they change their buoyancy and center of mass location to control attitude and trajectory. The vehicles spend most of their time in long, steady glides, so even minor improvements in glide range can be magnified over multiple dives. This dissertation presents a rigid-body dynamic system...

  7. Boundary curvature effects on gas bubble oscillations in underwater explosion

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Kazuhiro

    1996-01-01

    The oscillation of a gas bubble produced as a result of underwater explosion could cause the severe whipping damage on nearby marine vehicle. The effects of rigid boundary curvatures to explosive gas bubble oscillation behavior in underwater were investigated. The analyses were conducted using a multimaterial Lagrangian-Eulerian finite element code, MSC/DYTRAN. The incident shock wave pressure, bubble pulse pressure, gas bubble radius and period were calculated for the case of detonation of a...

  8. Demonstration of ROV-Based Underwater Electromagnetic Array Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    stand with fiberglass rails over which each target is pulled under the array. Figure 15. Data collection configuration for dynamic pass through...parameters shown. 2.2.5 Launch and Recovery Vessel: The R/V Dare The R/V Dare is a welded aluminum hull vessel that was originally specialized for fast

  9. HullBUG Technology Development for Underwater Hull Cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-15

    motor -flat brushless DC “outrunner” style motor coupled to 3 sets of gears, each providing a 1.75 to 1 gear reduction to the brush head. The motor has...better understand the packaging and mounting of the tool on the FIT vehicle. Motors and controllers would be sized for the expected loads and...frequency drive was chosen to control a 3 phase electric motor to provide variability between minimum and maximum speeds. The following speed limits

  10. Demonstration of ROV-based Underwater Electromagnetic Array Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    Interface, Global Positioning System, Inertial Measurement Unit, Inertial Navigation System, Instrument Verification Strip, Industry Standard Objects...9  4.1  SITE LOCATION AND HISTORY ...Marine National Sanctuary GUI Graphical User Interface GPS Global Positioning System HAUV Hybrid AUV I In-phase IMU Inertial Measurement

  11. Demonstration of ROV Based Underwater Electromagnetic Array Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    dive - thus reducing the estimated daily cost (assuming ~10 dives/day) from $25,000 to $7,000 (~70% reduction ). Page Intentionally...Positioning System SNR: Signal to Noise Ratio STMR: Single Transmit Multiple Receive SWAP: Size, Weight , and Power TACTS: Tactical Aircrew Combat...tether, and carrying a large payload were demonstrated. The EMI array is mounted directly to the non-metallic ROV structural frame chassis . It is

  12. A COMPARISON BETWEEN ACTIVE AND PASSIVE TECHNIQUES FOR UNDERWATER 3D APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bianco

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In the field of 3D scanning, there is an increasing need for more accurate technologies to acquire 3D models of close range objects. Underwater exploration, for example, is very hard to perform due to the hostile conditions and the bad visibility of the environment. Some application fields, like underwater archaeology, require to recover tridimensional data of objects that cannot be moved from their site or touched in order to avoid possible damages. Photogrammetry is widely used for underwater 3D acquisition, because it requires just one or two digital still or video cameras to acquire a sequence of images taken from different viewpoints. Stereo systems composed by a pair of cameras are often employed on underwater robots (i.e. ROVs, Remotely Operated Vehicles and used by scuba divers, in order to survey archaeological sites, reconstruct complex 3D structures in aquatic environment, estimate in situ the length of marine organisms, etc. The stereo 3D reconstruction is based on the triangulation of corresponding points on the two views. This requires to find in both images common points and to match them (correspondence problem, determining a plane that contains the 3D point on the object. Another 3D technique, frequently used in air acquisition, solves this point-matching problem by projecting structured lighting patterns to codify the acquired scene. The corresponding points are identified associating a binary code in both images. In this work we have tested and compared two whole-field 3D imaging techniques (active and passive based on stereo vision, in underwater environment. A 3D system has been designed, composed by a digital projector and two still cameras mounted in waterproof housing, so that it can perform the various acquisitions without changing the configuration of optical devices. The tests were conducted in a water tank in different turbidity conditions, on objects with different surface properties. In order to simulate a typical

  13. Development of plasma melting technology for treatment of low level radioactive waste. Pt. 9. Treatment method for combustible wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasui, Shinji; Adachi, Kazuo; Amakawa, Masashi

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the incineration method for the miscellaneous solid waste containing the low level radioactive combustibles (wood, PE, PVC) in a plasma furnace. The maximum weights of the respective combustibles to be fed into the plasma furnace and the incineration conditions for continuous feeding of the respective combustibles were examined experimentally. As a result, a experimental equation which expresses the maximum weights of the respective combustibles to be fed in reference to the residence time in the plasma furnace was obtained by using apparent reaction rate constants. Furthermore, a calculation method for the feeding intervals in reference to the weights of the combustibles fed each time was obtained for the continuous feeding in the plasma furnace, and the method was found to be consistent with experimental results. (author)

  14. Underwater and in-air sounds from a small hovercraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Susanna B.; Greene, Charles R.

    2005-12-01

    Underwater and in-air recordings were made from a boat anchored near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, while a Griffon 2000TD hovercraft drove by at or near full power on four passes. At the closest point of approach (CPA, 6.5 m), underwater broadband (10-10 000 Hz) levels reached 133 and 131 dB re: 1 μPa at depths of 1 and 7 m, respectively. In-air unweighted and A-weighted broadband (10-10 000 Hz) levels reached 104 and 97 dB re: 20 μPa, respectively. The hovercraft produced sound at a wide range of frequencies. Both underwater and in air, the largest spectral peak was near 87 Hz, which corresponded to the blade rate of the thrust propeller. In addition, the spectral composition included several harmonics of this frequency. The shaft or blade rate of the lift fan was barely detectable underwater despite its proximity to the water. The hovercraft was considerably quieter underwater than similar-sized conventional vessels and may be an attractive alternative when there is concern over underwater sounds.

  15. Optimal Node Placement in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Network

    KAUST Repository

    Felemban, Muhamad

    2011-10-01

    Almost 70% of planet Earth is covered by water. A large percentage of underwater environment is unexplored. In the past two decades, there has been an increase in the interest of exploring and monitoring underwater life among scientists and in industry. Underwater operations are extremely difficult due to the lack of cheap and efficient means. Recently, Wireless Sensor Networks have been introduced in underwater environment applications. However, underwater communication via acoustic waves is subject to several performance limitations, which makes the relevant research issues very different from those on land. In this thesis, we investigate node placement for building an initial Underwater Wireless Sensor Network infrastructure. Firstly, we formulated the problem into a nonlinear mathematic program with objectives of minimizing the total transmission loss under a given number of sensor nodes and targeted volume. We conducted experiments to verify the proposed formulation, which is solved using Matlab optimization tool. We represented each node with a truncated octahedron to fill out the 3D space. The truncated octahedrons are tiled in the 3D space with each node in the center where locations of the nodes are given using 3D coordinates. Results are supported using ns-3 simulator. Results from simulation are consistent with the obtained results from mathematical model with less than 10% error.

  16. Temperature dependence of W metallic coatings synthesized by double glow plasma surface alloying technology on CVD diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Jie; Hei, Hongjun; Shen, Yanyan; Liu, Xiaoping; Tang, Bin; He, Zhiyong, E-mail: hezhiyong@tyut.edu.cn; Yu, Shengwang, E-mail: yushengwang@tyut.edu.cn

    2015-11-30

    Highlights: • DGPSA was firstly adopted to deposit W coatings on free-standing diamond films. • Temperature dependence of W coatings on free-standing diamond films was discussed. • W{sub 2}C and WC were formed at W/diamond interface during the DGPSA treatment. • The coatings possess continuous and compact surface structure except that made at 900 °C. • The coating obtained at 800 °C has the best adhesion and the maximum shear strength. - Abstract: W metallic coatings were synthesized on free-standing chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond films using double glow plasma surface alloying (DGPSA) technology. The influence of varying metalizing temperatures on the microstructures, phase composition and adhesion of the W metallic coatings were investigated. Likewise, the effectiveness of the W metallic coatings was preliminary evaluated via examining the shear strength of the brazing joints between W-metalized diamond films and commercial cemented carbide (WC–Co) inserts. The results showed that continuous and compact W metallic coatings were formed on the diamond films in the temperature range of 750–800 °C, while cracks or cavities presented at the W/diamond interface at 700 °C, 850 °C and 900 °C. Inter-diffusion of W and C atoms preformed, and WC and W{sub 2}C were formed at the W/diamond interfaces at all temperatures except 700 °C, at which only W{sub 2}C was formed. Moreover, etched cavities appeared at the W/diamond interface when the temperature exceeded 850 °C. The critical loads for coating delamination, as measured with the scratch test, increased as the temperature rose from 700 °C to 800 °C, while decreased with further increasing temperature. The maximum load was obtained at 800 °C with a value of 17.1 N. Besides, the shear strength of the brazing joints depicted the similar trend with the critical load. The highest shear strength (249 MPa) was also obtained at 800 °C.

  17. A scalable global positioning system-free localization scheme for underwater wireless sensor networks

    KAUST Repository

    Mohammed, A.M.

    2013-05-07

    Seaweb is an acoustic communication technology that enables communication between sensor nodes. Seaweb technology utilizes the commercially available telesonar modems that has developed link and network layer firmware to provide a robust undersea communication capability. Seaweb interconnects the underwater nodes through digital signal processing-based modem by using acoustic links between the neighboring sensors. In this paper, we design and investigate a global positioning system-free passive localization protocol by integrating the innovations of levelling and localization with the Seaweb technology. This protocol uses the range data and planar trigonometry principles to estimate the positions of the underwater sensor nodes. Moreover, for precise localization, we consider more realistic conditions namely, (a) small displacement of sensor nodes due to watch circles and (b) deployment of sensor nodes over non-uniform water surface. Once the nodes are localized, we divide the whole network field into circular levels and sectors to minimize the traffic complexity and thereby increases the lifetime of the sensor nodes in the network field. We then form the mesh network inside each of the sectors that increases the reliability. The algorithm is designed in such a way that it overcomes the ambiguous nodes errata and reflected paths and therefore makes the algorithm more robust. The synthetic network geometries are so designed which can evaluate the algorithm in the presence of perfect or imperfect ranges or in case of incomplete data. A comparative study is made with the existing algorithms which proves the efficiency of our newly proposed algorithm. 2013 Mohammed et al.

  18. Towards Ideal NOx and CO2 Emission Control Technology for Bio-Oils Combustion Energy System Using a Plasma-Chemical Hybrid Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, M; Fujishima, H; Yamato, Y; Kuroki, T; Tanaka, A; Otsuka, K

    2013-01-01

    A pilot-scale low-emission boiler system consisting of a bio-fuel boiler and plasma-chemical hybrid NO x removal system is investigated. This system can achieve carbon neutrality because the bio-fuel boiler uses waste vegetable oil as one of the fuels. The plasma-chemical hybrid NO x removal system has two processes: NO oxidation by ozone produced from plasma ozonizers and NO 2 removal using a Na 2 SO 3 chemical scrubber. Test demonstrations of the system are carried out for mixed oils (mixture of A-heavy oil and waste vegetable oil). Stable combustion is achieved for the mixed oil (20 – 50% waste vegetable oil). Properties of flue gas—e.g., O 2 , CO 2 and NO x —when firing mixed oils are nearly the same as those when firing heavy oil for an average flue gas flow rate of 1000 Nm 3 /h. NO x concentrations at the boiler outlet are 90 – 95 ppm. Furthermore, during a 300-min continuous operation when firing 20% mixed oil, NO x removal efficiency of more than 90% (less than 10 ppm NO x emission) is confirmed. In addition, the CO 2 reduction when heavy oil is replaced with waste vegetable oil is estimated. The system comparison is described between the plasma-chemical hybrid NO x removal and the conventional technology.

  19. Precision Geo-Referenced Navigation for Deep-Diving Autonomous Underwater Gliders and Enabled Scientific Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsey, J. C.; Jakuba, M.; Partan, J. W.; Webster, S.

    2016-02-01

    Recent and underway development efforts promise to deliver long endurance and deep-diving autonomous underwater gliders with the potential to persistently observe the deep (6000 m) ocean interior and sea floor over time scales of months to years. Both deep- and shallow-diving gliders navigate primarily by dead-reckoning between surfacing for GPS fixes, a paradigm that precludes their use in missions where science objectives call for precise navigation deep in the water column or near the deep sea floor. Coupled with an autonomous surface vessel, one-way travel time inverted ultra-short baseline positioning (OWTT-iUSBL) offers a compelling alternative to infrastructure-intensive external acoustic aiding. Such systems could provide navigation aiding to multiple underwater vehicles while providing autonomy and endurance for the system as a whole comparable to that of a solitary vehicle. While the concept of OWTT-iUSBL is not new, we argue that the maturity of acoustic modem technology combined with the emergence of very low-power precision timing and attitude sensors will make it possible to deploy OWTT-iUSBL systems on low-power underwater vehicles in the near term. Here, two recent supporting analyses are reviewed: (1) the achievable accuracy of OWTT-iUSBL navigation including single-fix error budgets for specific system configurations using representative commercially available components; and (2) the impact of a specific low-power configuration on the endurance of a deep-profiling autonomous underwater glider. Our analyses suggest that a practically realizable OWTT-iUSBL system could provide navigational accuracy 1-2 orders of magnitude superior to that presently achievable using periodic ascents to acquire global positioning system (GPS), and, for sufficiently deep deployments, actually yield more near-bottom data despite reducing overall vehicle endurance. Furthermore, we present some potential scientific applications that might benefit from these technologies

  20. Test plan for evaluation of plasma melter technology for vitrification of high-sodium content low-level radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, D.F.; Lahoda, E.J.; Gass, W.R.; D'Amico, N.

    1994-01-01

    This document provides a test plan for the conduct of plasma arc vitrification testing by a vendor in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Low-Level Waste (LLW) Vitrification Program. The vendor providing this test plan and conducting the work detailed within it [one of seven selected for glass melter testing under Purchase Order MMI-SVV-384212] is the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center (WSTC) in Pittsburgh, PA. WSTC authors of the test plan are D. F. McLaughlin, E. J. Lahoda, W. R. Gass, and N. D'Amico. The WSTC Program Manager for this test is D. F. McLaughlin. This test plan is for Phase I activities described in the above Purchase Order. Test conduct includes melting of glass frit with Hanford LLW Double-Shell Slurry Feed waste simulant in a plasma arc fired furnace