WorldWideScience

Sample records for underwater acoustic models

  1. Underwater Acoustic Communication Quality Evaluation Model Based on USV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhichao Lv

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The unmanned surface vehicle (USV integrated with acoustic modems has some advantages such as easy integration, rapid placement, and low cost, which becomes a kind of selective novel node in the underwater acoustic (UWA communication network and a kind of underwater or overwater communication relay as well. However, it is difficult to ensure the communication quality among the nodes on the network due to the random underwater acoustic channel, the severe marine environment, and the complex mobile node system. Aiming to model the communication characteristics of the USV, the multipath effect and Doppler effect are main concerns for the UWA communication in this paper, so that the ray beam method is utilized, the channel transmission function and the channel gain are obtained, and the mobile communication quality evaluation model is built. The simulation and lake experiments verify that the built mobile UWA communication quality evaluation model on USV can provide preference and technique support for USV applications.

  2. Model-based processing for underwater acoustic arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, Edmund J

    2015-01-01

    This monograph presents a unified approach to model-based processing for underwater acoustic arrays. The use of physical models in passive array processing is not a new idea, but it has been used on a case-by-case basis, and as such, lacks any unifying structure. This work views all such processing methods as estimation procedures, which then can be unified by treating them all as a form of joint estimation based on a Kalman-type recursive processor, which can be recursive either in space or time, depending on the application. This is done for three reasons. First, the Kalman filter provides a natural framework for the inclusion of physical models in a processing scheme. Second, it allows poorly known model parameters to be jointly estimated along with the quantities of interest. This is important, since in certain areas of array processing already in use, such as those based on matched-field processing, the so-called mismatch problem either degrades performance or, indeed, prevents any solution at all. Third...

  3. 4th Pacific Rim Underwater Acoustics Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Wen; Cheng, Qianliu; Zhao, Hangfang

    2016-01-01

    These proceedings are a collection of 16 selected scientific papers and reviews by distinguished international experts that were presented at the 4th Pacific Rim Underwater Acoustics Conference (PRUAC), held in Hangzhou, China in October 2013. The topics discussed at the conference include internal wave observation and prediction; environmental uncertainty and coupling to sound propagation; environmental noise and ocean dynamics; dynamic modeling in acoustic fields; acoustic tomography and ocean parameter estimation; time reversal and matched field processing; underwater acoustic localization and communication as well as measurement instrumentations and platforms. These proceedings provide insights into the latest developments in underwater acoustics, promoting the exchange of ideas for the benefit of future research.

  4. Carbon Nanotube Underwater Acoustic Thermophone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-23

    Attorney Docket No. 300009 1 of 8 A CARBON NANOTUBE UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC THERMOPHONE STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The...the Invention [0003] The present invention is an acoustically transparent carbon nanotube thermophone. (2) Description of the Prior Art [0004...amplitude of the resulting sound waves. [0006] Recently, there has been development of underwater acoustic carbon nanotube (CNT) yarn sheets capable

  5. Cooperative OFDM underwater acoustic communications

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Xilin; Cheng, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Following underwater acoustic channel modeling, this book investigates the relationship between coherence time and transmission distances. It considers the power allocation issues of two typical transmission scenarios, namely short-range transmission and medium-long range transmission. For the former scenario, an adaptive system is developed based on instantaneous channel state information. The primary focus is on cooperative dual-hop orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM). This book includes the decomposed fountain codes designed to enable reliable communications with higher energy efficiency. It covers the Doppler Effect, which improves packet transmission reliability for effective low-complexity mirror-mapping-based intercarrier interference cancellation schemes capable of suppressing the intercarrier interference power level. Designed for professionals and researchers in the field of underwater acoustic communications, this book is also suitable for advanced-level students in electrical enginee...

  6. OFDM for underwater acoustic communications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Shengli

    2014-01-01

    A blend of introductory material and advanced signal processing and communication techniques, of critical importance to underwater system and network development This book, which is the first to describe the processing techniques central to underwater OFDM, is arranged into four distinct sections: First, it describes the characteristics of underwater acoustic channels, and stresses the difference from wireless radio channels. Then it goes over the basics of OFDM and channel coding. The second part starts with an overview of the OFDM receiver, and develops various modules for the receiver des

  7. Estimation of underwater acoustic fields at high frequencies

    OpenAIRE

    Temsamani, A.B.; Vandenplas, S.; Van Biesen, L.

    2001-01-01

    In this work a parametric modeling of the underwater acoustic field is investigated in a laboratory scale at high frequencies (150-850 kHz). The aim is to develop experimentally verifiable theoretical models to investigate the acoustic field propagation in elastic and viscoelastic or porous media. To achieve this goal, the efforts have been directed to three integral parts pertaining to the development of the methods. The first part deals with the modeling of the underwater acoustic field fol...

  8. Statistical Modeling of Large-Scale Signal Path Loss in Underwater Acoustic Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Perez Malumbres

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In an underwater acoustic channel, the propagation conditions are known to vary in time, causing the deviation of the received signal strength from the nominal value predicted by a deterministic propagation model. To facilitate a large-scale system design in such conditions (e.g., power allocation, we have developed a statistical propagation model in which the transmission loss is treated as a random variable. By applying repetitive computation to the acoustic field, using ray tracing for a set of varying environmental conditions (surface height, wave activity, small node displacements around nominal locations, etc., an ensemble of transmission losses is compiled and later used to infer the statistical model parameters. A reasonable agreement is found with log-normal distribution, whose mean obeys a log-distance increases, and whose variance appears to be constant for a certain range of inter-node distances in a given deployment location. The statistical model is deemed useful for higher-level system planning, where simulation is needed to assess the performance of candidate network protocols under various resource allocation policies, i.e., to determine the transmit power and bandwidth allocation necessary to achieve a desired level of performance (connectivity, throughput, reliability, etc..

  9. Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks: how do acoustic propagation models impact the performance of higher-level protocols?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llor, Jesús; Malumbres, Manuel P

    2012-01-01

    Several Medium Access Control (MAC) and routing protocols have been developed in the last years for Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks (UWSNs). One of the main difficulties to compare and validate the performance of different proposals is the lack of a common standard to model the acoustic propagation in the underwater environment. In this paper we analyze the evolution of underwater acoustic prediction models from a simple approach to more detailed and accurate models. Then, different high layer network protocols are tested with different acoustic propagation models in order to determine the influence of environmental parameters on the obtained results. After several experiments, we can conclude that higher-level protocols are sensitive to both: (a) physical layer parameters related to the network scenario and (b) the acoustic propagation model. Conditions like ocean surface activity, scenario location, bathymetry or floor sediment composition, may change the signal propagation behavior. So, when designing network architectures for UWSNs, the role of the physical layer should be seriously taken into account in order to assert that the obtained simulation results will be close to the ones obtained in real network scenarios.

  10. Network Computing for Distributed Underwater Acoustic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-31

    Physical layer in UASNs Our main investigations are about underwater communications using acoustic waves. Elec- tromagnetic and optical waves do not...Shengli, Z., and Jun-Hong, C. (2008), Prospects and problems of wireless communication for underwater sensor networks, Wirel. Commun . Mob. Comput., 8(8... Wireless Communications , 9(9), 2934–2944. [21] Pompili, D. and Akyildiz, I. (2010), A multimedia cross-layer protocol for underwater acoustic sensor networks

  11. Underwater Acoustic Target Tracking: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Junhai; Han, Ying; Fan, Liying

    2018-01-02

    Advances in acoustic technology and instrumentation now make it possible to explore marine resources. As a significant component of ocean exploration, underwater acoustic target tracking has aroused wide attention both in military and civil fields. Due to the complexity of the marine environment, numerous techniques have been proposed to obtain better tracking performance. In this paper, we survey over 100 papers ranging from innovative papers to the state-of-the-art in this field to present underwater tracking technologies. Not only the related knowledge of acoustic tracking instrument and tracking progress is clarified in detail, but also a novel taxonomy method is proposed. In this paper, algorithms for underwater acoustic target tracking are classified based on the methods used as: (1) instrument-assisted methods; (2) mode-based methods; (3) tracking optimization methods. These algorithms are compared and analyzed in the aspect of dimensions, numbers, and maneuvering of the tracking target, which is different from other survey papers. Meanwhile, challenges, countermeasures, and lessons learned are illustrated in this paper.

  12. Passive Mode Carbon Nanotube Underwater Acoustic Transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-20

    irreversible Joule heat) by an electric light bulb . The reciprocal (or reverse) of this process by supplying heat and shining light to the same electric bulb ...limit the invention to the precise form disclosed; and obviously many modifications and variations are possible in light of the above teaching...300151 1 of 14 PASSIVE MODE CARBON NANOTUBE UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC TRANSDUCER STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described

  13. Optimal Node Placement in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Network

    KAUST Repository

    Felemban, Muhamad

    2011-10-01

    Almost 70% of planet Earth is covered by water. A large percentage of underwater environment is unexplored. In the past two decades, there has been an increase in the interest of exploring and monitoring underwater life among scientists and in industry. Underwater operations are extremely difficult due to the lack of cheap and efficient means. Recently, Wireless Sensor Networks have been introduced in underwater environment applications. However, underwater communication via acoustic waves is subject to several performance limitations, which makes the relevant research issues very different from those on land. In this thesis, we investigate node placement for building an initial Underwater Wireless Sensor Network infrastructure. Firstly, we formulated the problem into a nonlinear mathematic program with objectives of minimizing the total transmission loss under a given number of sensor nodes and targeted volume. We conducted experiments to verify the proposed formulation, which is solved using Matlab optimization tool. We represented each node with a truncated octahedron to fill out the 3D space. The truncated octahedrons are tiled in the 3D space with each node in the center where locations of the nodes are given using 3D coordinates. Results are supported using ns-3 simulator. Results from simulation are consistent with the obtained results from mathematical model with less than 10% error.

  14. Task Allocation and Path Planning for Collaborative Autonomous Underwater Vehicles Operating through an Underwater Acoustic Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueyue Deng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic and unstructured multiple cooperative autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV missions are highly complex operations, and task allocation and path planning are made significantly more challenging under realistic underwater acoustic communication constraints. This paper presents a solution for the task allocation and path planning for multiple AUVs under marginal acoustic communication conditions: a location-aided task allocation framework (LAAF algorithm for multitarget task assignment and the grid-based multiobjective optimal programming (GMOOP mathematical model for finding an optimal vehicle command decision given a set of objectives and constraints. Both the LAAF and GMOOP algorithms are well suited in poor acoustic network condition and dynamic environment. Our research is based on an existing mobile ad hoc network underwater acoustic simulator and blind flooding routing protocol. Simulation results demonstrate that the location-aided auction strategy performs significantly better than the well-accepted auction algorithm developed by Bertsekas in terms of task-allocation time and network bandwidth consumption. We also demonstrate that the GMOOP path-planning technique provides an efficient method for executing multiobjective tasks by cooperative agents with limited communication capabilities. This is in contrast to existing multiobjective action selection methods that are limited to networks where constant, reliable communication is assumed to be available.

  15. Acoustic and Vibration Control for an Underwater Structure under Mechanical Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Jian Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic and vibration control for an underwater structure under mechanical excitation has been investigated by using negative feedback control algorithm. The underwater structure is modeled with cylindrical shells, conical shells, and circular bulkheads, of which the motion equations are built with the variational approach, respectively. Acoustic property is analyzed by the Helmholtz integration formulation with boundary element method. Based on negative feedback control algorithm, a control loop with a coupling use of piezoelectric sensor and actuator is built, and accordingly some numerical examples are carried out on active control of structural vibration and acoustic response. Effects of geometrical and material parameters on acoustic and vibration properties are investigated and discussed.

  16. On the Performance of the Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    waves for Underwater Wireless Communication (UWC); radio waves, optical waves, and acoustic waves are few to name. Radio waves are good for extra low...2211 underwater communication , wireless sensors, mutual information REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10. SPONSOR...Cotae, “On the Performance of the Underwater Wireless Communication Sensor Networks: Work in Progress” ASEE Mid-Atlantic Fall 2014 Conference

  17. Underwater Noise Modelling of Wave Energy Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    Future large-scale implementation of wave energy converts (WECs) will introduce an anthropogenic activity in the ocean which may contribute to underwater noise. The Ocean houses several marine species with acoustic sensibility; consequently the potential impact of the underwater noise needs to be addressed. At present, there are no acoustic impact studies based on acquired data. The WEAM project (Wave Energy Acoustic Monitoring) aims at developing an underwater noise monitoring plan for WECs. The development of an acoustic monitoring plan must consider the sound propagation in the ocean, identify noise sources, understand the operational characteristics and select adequate instrumentation. Any monitoring strategy must involve in-situ measurements. However, the vast distances which sound travels within the ocean, can make in-situ measurements covering the entire area of interest, impracticable. This difficulty can be partially overcome through acoustic numerical modelling. This paper presents a synthetic study, on the application of acoustic forward modelling and the evaluation of the impact of noise produced by wave energy devices on marine mammals using criteria based on audiograms of dolphins, or other species. The idea is to illustrate the application of that methodology, and to show to what extent it allows for estimating distances of impacts due to acoustic noise.

  18. Digital sonar design in underwater acoustics principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Qihu

    2012-01-01

    "Digital Sonar Design in Underwater Acoustics Principles and Applications" provides comprehensive and up-to-date coverage of research on sonar design, including the basic theory and techniques of digital signal processing, basic concept of information theory, ocean acoustics, underwater acoustic signal propagation theory, and underwater signal processing theory. This book discusses the general design procedure and approaches to implementation, the design method, system simulation theory and techniques, sonar tests in the laboratory, lake and sea, and practical validation criteria and methods for digital sonar design. It is intended for researchers in the fields of underwater signal processing and sonar design, and also for navy officers and ocean explorers. Qihu Li is a professor at the Institute of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and an academician of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  19. Design and Analysis of Underwater Acoustic Networks with Reflected Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emokpae, Lloyd

    -of-sight (LOS) and NLOS links by utilizing directional antennas, which will boost the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at the receiver while promoting NLOS usage. In our model, we employ a directional underwater acoustic antenna composed of an array of hydrophones that can be summed up at various phases and amplitudes resulting in a beam-former. We have also adopted a practical multimodal directional transducer concept which generates both directional and omni-directional beam patterns by combining the fundamental vibration modes of a cylindrical acoustic radiator. This allows the transducer to be electrically controlled and steered by simply adjusting the electrical voltage weights. A prototype acoustic modem is then developed to utilize the multimodal directional transducer for both LOS and NLOS communication. The acoustic modem has also been used as a platform for empirically validating our SBR communication model in a tank and with empirical data. Networking protocols have been developed to exploit the SBR communication model. These protocols include node discovery and localization, directional medium access control (D-MAC) and geographical routing. In node discovery and localization, each node will utilize SBR-based range measurements to its neighbors to determine their relative position. The D-MAC protocol utilizes directional antennas to increase the network throughput due to the spatial efficiency of the antenna model. In the proposed reflection-enabled directional MAC protocol (RED-MAC), each source node will be able to determine if an obstacle is blocking the LOS link to the destination and switch to the best NLOS link by utilizing surface/bottom reflections. Finally, we have developed a geographical routing algorithm which aims to establish the best stable route from a source node to a destination node. The optimized route is selected to achieve maximum network throughput. Extensive analysis of the network throughput when utilizing directional antennas is also presented

  20. A Secure Communication Suite for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Lo Duca

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe a security suite for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks comprising both fixed and mobile nodes. The security suite is composed of a secure routing protocol and a set of cryptographic primitives aimed at protecting the confidentiality and the integrity of underwater communication while taking into account the unique characteristics and constraints of the acoustic channel. By means of experiments and simulations based on real data, we show that the suite is suitable for an underwater networking environment as it introduces limited, and sometimes negligible, communication and power consumption overhead.

  1. An Energy Harvesting Underwater Acoustic Transmitter for Aquatic Animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Huidong; Tian, Chuan; Lu, Jun; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Brown, Richard S.; Deng, Zhiqun

    2016-09-20

    This paper presents a self-powered underwater acoustic transmitter using a piezoelectric beam to harvest the mechanical energy from fish swimming. This transmitter does not require a battery and is demonstrated in live fish. It transmits an acoustic waveform as the implanted fish swims. It enables long-term monitoring of aquatic animals.

  2. Performance Evaluation of Hybrid Acoustic-Optical Underwater Swarm Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuela PERSIA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Underwater Swarm is a particular Underwater Network configuration characterized by nodes very close one to each other, with mobility capability. The structure of the network is that of a distributed network, in which the nodes, through the exchange of control information, will take decisions in collaborative manner. This type of network raises challenges for its effective design and development, for which the only use of acoustic communication as traditionally suggested in underwater communication could be not enough. A new emerging solution could be a hybrid solution that combines the use of acoustic and optical channel in order to overcome the acoustic channel limitations in underwater environment. In this work, we want to investigate how the acoustic and optical communications influence the Underwater Swarm performance by considering the Low Layers Protocols (Physical Layer, Data Link Layer and Network Layer effects over the two different propagation technologies. Performance simulations have been carried out to suggest how the new hybrid system could be designed. This study will permit to provide useful analysis for the real implementation of an Underwater Swarm based on hybrid communication technology.

  3. Trade-off Analysis of Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, G.; Das, R.

    2017-09-01

    In the last couple of decades, Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks (UASNs) were started to be used for various commercial and non-commercial purposes. However, in underwater environments, there are some specific inherent constraints, such as high bit error rate, variable and large propagation delay, limited bandwidth capacity, and short-range communications, which severely degrade the performance of UASNs and limit the lifetime of underwater sensor nodes as well. Therefore, proving reliability of UASN applications poses a challenge. In this study, we try to balance energy consumption of underwater acoustic sensor networks and minimize end-to-end delay using an efficient node placement strategy. Our simulation results reveal that if the number of hops is reduced, energy consumption can be reduced. However, this increases end-to-end delay. Hence, application-specific requirements must be taken into consideration when determining a strategy for node deployment.

  4. Underwater acoustic communications. From point-to-point to networks

    OpenAIRE

    Jesus, S. M.

    2013-01-01

    This is a review presentation that addresses recent developments in underwater acoustic telemetry as a tool for ocean observation, monitoring and protection. Distributed sensing is a paradigm with important reflections in oceanic technology where bottom installed structures can not always be connected to a central hub through cabled networks. Moreover, recent developments in ocean robotics lead to the off-the-shelf availability of autonomous underwater vehicles that rely on wireless communica...

  5. Classification of underwater targets from autonomous underwater vehicle sampled bistatic acoustic scattered fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischell, Erin M; Schmidt, Henrik

    2015-12-01

    One of the long term goals of autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) minehunting is to have multiple inexpensive AUVs in a harbor autonomously classify hazards. Existing acoustic methods for target classification using AUV-based sensing, such as sidescan and synthetic aperture sonar, require an expensive payload on each outfitted vehicle and post-processing and/or image interpretation. A vehicle payload and machine learning classification methodology using bistatic angle dependence of target scattering amplitudes between a fixed acoustic source and target has been developed for onboard, fully autonomous classification with lower cost-per-vehicle. To achieve the high-quality, densely sampled three-dimensional (3D) bistatic scattering data required by this research, vehicle sampling behaviors and an acoustic payload for precision timed data acquisition with a 16 element nose array were demonstrated. 3D bistatic scattered field data were collected by an AUV around spherical and cylindrical targets insonified by a 7-9 kHz fixed source. The collected data were compared to simulated scattering models. Classification and confidence estimation were shown for the sphere versus cylinder case on the resulting real and simulated bistatic amplitude data. The final models were used for classification of simulated targets in real time in the LAMSS MOOS-IvP simulation package [M. Benjamin, H. Schmidt, P. Newman, and J. Leonard, J. Field Rob. 27, 834-875 (2010)].

  6. Energy-Efficient Channel Coding Strategy for Underwater Acoustic Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grasielli Barreto

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Underwater acoustic networks (UAN allow for efficiently exploiting and monitoring the sub-aquatic environment. These networks are characterized by long propagation delays, error-prone channels and half-duplex communication. In this paper, we address the problem of energy-efficient communication through the use of optimized channel coding parameters. We consider a two-layer encoding scheme employing forward error correction (FEC codes and fountain codes (FC for UAN scenarios without feedback channels. We model and evaluate the energy consumption of different channel coding schemes for a K-distributed multipath channel. The parameters of the FEC encoding layer are optimized by selecting the optimal error correction capability and the code block size. The results show the best parameter choice as a function of the link distance and received signal-to-noise ratio.

  7. Interpreting underwater acoustic images of the upper ocean boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulloa, Marco J

    2007-01-01

    A challenging task in physical studies of the upper ocean using underwater sound is the interpretation of high-resolution acoustic images. This paper covers a number of basic concepts necessary for undergraduate and postgraduate students to identify the most distinctive features of the images, providing a link with the acoustic signatures of physical processes occurring simultaneously beneath the surface of the sea. Sonars are so sensitive that they detected a new acoustic signature at the breaking of surface gravity waves in deep water, which resembles oblique motion-like vortices

  8. Adaptive turbo equalization for underwater acoustic communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cannelli, L; Leus, G.; Dol, H.S.; Walree, P.A. van

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a multiband transceiver designed for underwater channels is presented. Multi-branch filtering at the receiver is used to leverage the diversity offered by a multi-scale multi-lag scenario. The multi-branch bank of filters is constructed by estimating scale and delay coefficients

  9. Laboratory investigation of a passive acoustic method for measurement of underwater gas seep ebullition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Chad A; Wilson, Preston S

    2012-01-01

    Passive acoustic techniques are of interest as a low-power means of quantifying underwater point-source gas ebullition. Toward the development of systems for logging natural seep activity, laboratory experiments were performed that exploited the bubble's Minnaert natural frequency for the measurement of gas flow from a model seep. Results show agreement among acoustic, optical, and gas trap ebullition measurements over the range of emission rates from 0 to 10 bubbles per second. A mathematical model is proposed to account for the real gas behavior of bubbles which cannot be approximated as ideal, such as methane at marine depths exceeding 30 m. © 2012 Acoustical Society of America.

  10. Multiuser chirp modulation for underwater acoustic channel based on VTRM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Yuan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an ascheme is proposed for multiuser underwater acoustic communication by using the multi-chirp rate signals. It differs from the well known TDMA (Time Division Multiple Access, FDMA (Frequency Division Multiple Access or CDMA (Code Division Multiple Access, by assigning each users with different chirp-rate carriers instead of the time, frequency or PN code. Multi-chirp rate signals can be separated from each other by FrFT (Fractional Fourier Transform, which can be regarded as the chirp-based decomposing, and superior to the match filter in the underwater acoustic channel. VTRM (Virtual Time Reverse Mirror is applied into the system to alleviate the ISI caused by the multipatch and make the equalization more simple. Results of computer simulations and pool experiments prove that the proposed multiuser underwater acoustic communication based on the multi-chirp rate exhibit well performance. Outfield experments carrie out in Xiamen Port show that using about 10 kHz bandwidth, four users could communicate at the same time with 425 bps with low BER and can match the UAC application.

  11. Signal Processing of Underwater Acoustic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-11-01

    goes through a surface dipole distribution.. Show that when the work is expressed as a Stieltjes integral, this difficulty is avoided. 4.6 A stochastic...and Sons, Inc., New York, 1953 Duflos, J.: Etude des Effects de 1’Echantillonnage en Detection des Signaux Foibles, l’Onde Electrique , Paris, No. 443...M., and R. J. Thompson-’ Directivity Study of the Noise Field in the Ocean, Employing a Correlative Dipole , J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 36, pp. 1788-1794

  12. Elliptical acoustic particle motion in underwater waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Osto, David R; Dahl, Peter H

    2013-07-01

    Elliptical particle motion, often encountered in acoustic fields containing interference between a source signal and its reflections, can be quantified by the degree of circularity, a vector quantity formulated from acoustic particle velocity, or vector intensity measurements. Acoustic analysis based on the degree of circularity is expected to find application in ocean waveguides as its spatial dependence relates to the acquisition geometry, water column sound speed, surface conditions, and bottom properties. Vector sensor measurements from a laboratory experiment are presented to demonstrate the depth dependence of both the degree of circularity and an approximate formulation based on vertical intensity measurements. The approximation is applied to vertical intensity field measurements made in a 2006 experiment off the New Jersey coast (in waters 80 m deep) to demonstrate the effect of sediment structure on the range dependence of the degree of circularity. The mathematical formulation presented here establishes the framework to readily compute the degree of circularity from experimental measurements; the experimental examples are provided as evidence of the spatial and frequency dependence of this fundamental vector property.

  13. A Survey on Underwater Acoustic Sensor Network Routing Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Underwater acoustic sensor networks (UASNs have become more and more important in ocean exploration applications, such as ocean monitoring, pollution detection, ocean resource management, underwater device maintenance, etc. In underwater acoustic sensor networks, since the routing protocol guarantees reliable and effective data transmission from the source node to the destination node, routing protocol design is an attractive topic for researchers. There are many routing algorithms have been proposed in recent years. To present the current state of development of UASN routing protocols, we review herein the UASN routing protocol designs reported in recent years. In this paper, all the routing protocols have been classified into different groups according to their characteristics and routing algorithms, such as the non-cross-layer design routing protocol, the traditional cross-layer design routing protocol, and the intelligent algorithm based routing protocol. This is also the first paper that introduces intelligent algorithm-based UASN routing protocols. In addition, in this paper, we investigate the development trends of UASN routing protocols, which can provide researchers with clear and direct insights for further research.

  14. A Survey on Underwater Acoustic Sensor Network Routing Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Martínez, José-Fernán; Meneses Chaus, Juan Manuel; Eckert, Martina

    2016-03-22

    Underwater acoustic sensor networks (UASNs) have become more and more important in ocean exploration applications, such as ocean monitoring, pollution detection, ocean resource management, underwater device maintenance, etc. In underwater acoustic sensor networks, since the routing protocol guarantees reliable and effective data transmission from the source node to the destination node, routing protocol design is an attractive topic for researchers. There are many routing algorithms have been proposed in recent years. To present the current state of development of UASN routing protocols, we review herein the UASN routing protocol designs reported in recent years. In this paper, all the routing protocols have been classified into different groups according to their characteristics and routing algorithms, such as the non-cross-layer design routing protocol, the traditional cross-layer design routing protocol, and the intelligent algorithm based routing protocol. This is also the first paper that introduces intelligent algorithm-based UASN routing protocols. In addition, in this paper, we investigate the development trends of UASN routing protocols, which can provide researchers with clear and direct insights for further research.

  15. Target Localization in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks Using RSS Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengming Chang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the target localization problems based on received signal strength (RSS measurements in underwater acoustic wireless sensor network (UWSN. Firstly, the problems based on the maximum likelihood (ML criterion for estimating target localization in cases of both known and unknown transmit power are respectively derived, and fast implementation algorithms are proposed by transforming the non-convex problems into a generalized trust region subproblem (GTRS frameworks. A three-step procedure is also provided to enhance the estimation accuracy in the unknown target transmit power case. Furthermore, the Cramer–Rao lower bounds (CRLBs in both cases are derived. Computer simulation results show the superior performance of the proposed methods in the underwater environment.

  16. Acoustically sticky topographic metasurfaces for underwater sound absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hunki; Jung, Myungki; Kim, Minsoo; Shin, Ryung; Kang, Shinill; Ohm, Won-Suk; Kim, Yong Tae

    2018-03-01

    A class of metasurfaces for underwater sound absorption, based on a design principle that maximizes thermoviscous loss, is presented. When a sound meets a solid surface, it leaves a footprint in the form of thermoviscous boundary layers in which energy loss takes place. Considered to be a nuisance, this acoustic to vorticity/entropy mode conversion and the subsequent loss are often ignored in the existing designs of acoustic metamaterials and metasurfaces. The metasurface created is made of a series of topographic meta-atoms, i.e., intaglios and reliefs engraved directly on the solid object to be concealed. The metasurface is acoustically sticky in that it rather facilitates the conversion of the incident sound to vorticity and entropy modes, hence the thermoviscous loss, leading to the desired anechoic property. A prototype metasurface machined on a brass object is tested for its anechoicity, and shows a multitude of absorption peaks as large as unity in the 2-5 MHz range. Computations also indicate that a topographic metasurface is robust to hydrostatic pressure variation, a quality much sought-after in underwater applications.

  17. A Dual Communication and Imaging Underwater Acoustic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tricia C.

    A dual communication and imaging underwater acoustic system is proposed and developed throughout this dissertation. Due to the wide variation in underwater channel characteristics, the research here focuses more on robustness to multipath in the shallow underwater acoustic environment, rather than high bit-rate applications and signaling schemes. Lower bit-rate (in the hundreds of bits per second (bps) to low kbps), applications such as the transfer of ecological telemetry data, e.g. conductivity or temperature data, are the primary focus of this dissertation. The parallels between direct sequence spread spectrum in digital communication and pulse-echo with pulse compression in imaging, and channel estimation in communication and range profile estimation in imaging are drawn, leading to a unified communications and imaging platform. A digital communication algorithm for channel order and channel coefficient estimation and symbol demodulation using Matching Pursuit (MP) with Generalized Multiple Hypothesis Testing (GMHT) is implemented in programmable DSP in real time with field experiment results in varying underwater environments for the single receiver (Rx), single transmitter (Tx) case. The custom and off-the-shelf hardware used in the single receiver, single transmitter set of experiments are detailed as well. This work is then extended to the single-input multiple-output (SIMO) case, and then to the full multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) case. The results of channel estimation are used for simple range profile imaging reconstructions. Successful simulated and experimental results for both transducer array configurations are presented and analyzed. Non-real-time symbol demodulation and channel estimation is performed using experimental data from a scaled testing environment. New hardware based on cost-effective fish-finder transducers for a 6 Rx--1 Tx and 6 Rx--4 Tx transducer array is detailed. Lastly, in an application that is neither communication nor

  18. Dolphin Sounds-Inspired Covert Underwater Acoustic Communication and Micro-Modem

    OpenAIRE

    Gang Qiao; Yunjiang Zhao; Songzuo Liu; Muhammad Bilal

    2017-01-01

    A novel portable underwater acoustic modem is proposed in this paper for covert communication between divers or underwater unmanned vehicles (UUVs) and divers at a short distance. For the first time, real dolphin calls are used in the modem to realize biologically inspired Covert Underwater Acoustic Communication (CUAC). A variety of dolphin whistles and clicks stored in an SD card inside the modem helps to realize different biomimetic CUAC algorithms based on the specified covert scenario. I...

  19. Model based image restoration for underwater images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Thomas; Frühberger, Peter; Werling, Stefan; Heizmann, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The inspection of offshore parks, dam walls and other infrastructure under water is expensive and time consuming, because such constructions must be inspected manually by divers. Underwater buildings have to be examined visually to find small cracks, spallings or other deficiencies. Automation of underwater inspection depends on established water-proved imaging systems. Most underwater imaging systems are based on acoustic sensors (sonar). The disadvantage of such an acoustic system is the loss of the complete visual impression. All information embedded in texture and surface reflectance gets lost. Therefore acoustic sensors are mostly insufficient for these kind of visual inspection tasks. Imaging systems based on optical sensors feature an enormous potential for underwater applications. The bandwidth from visual imaging systems reach from inspection of underwater buildings via marine biological applications through to exploration of the seafloor. The reason for the lack of established optical systems for underwater inspection tasks lies in technical difficulties of underwater image acquisition and processing. Lightening, highly degraded images make a computational postprocessing absolutely essential.

  20. An efficient method to measure reliability of underwater acoustic communication links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roee Diamant

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of evaluating the reliability of underwater acoustic communication (UWAC systems. Reliability is a requirement for any communication system and is often defined as the probability to achieve a target bit error rate. Evaluation of system reliability is often performed empirically by conducting a large number of measurements. However, for UWAC, where experiments are expensive and time-consuming, not much data is available to perform such a reliability check. Based on the assumption that the long delay spread is the dominant characteristic of the underwater acoustic channel and for a given channel model, we offer a relaxed practical approach to evaluate the reliability of an UWAC system. As a test case, we show reliability results for the multiple input multiple output (MIMO code division multiple access (CDMA communication system.

  1. High-rate wireless data communications: An underwater acoustic communications framework at the physical layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bessios Anthony G.

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A variety of signal processing functions are performed by Underwater Acoustic Systems. These include: 1 detection to determine presence or absence of information signals in the presence of noise, or an attempt to describe which of a predetermined finite set of possible messages { m i , i , ... , M } the signal represents; 2 estimation of some parameter θ ˆ associated with the received signal (i.e. range, depth, bearing angle, etc.; 3 classification and source identification; 4 dynamics tracking; 5 navigation (collision avoidance and terminal guidance; 6 countermeasures; and 7 communications. The focus of this paper is acoustic communications. There is a global current need to develop reliable wireless digital communications for the underwater environment, with sufficient performance and efficiency to substitute for costly wired systems. One possible goal is a wireless system implementation that insures underwater terminal mobility. There is also a vital need to improve the performance of the existing systems in terms of data-rate, noise immunity, operational range, and power consumption, since, in practice, portable high-speed, long range, compact, low-power systems are desired. We concede the difficulties associated with acoustic systems and concentrate on the development of robust data transmission methods anticipating the eventual need for real time or near real time video transmission. An overview of the various detection techniques and the general statistical digital communication problem is given based on a statistical decision theory framework. The theoretical formulation of the underwater acoustic data communications problem includes modeling of the stochastic channel to incorporate a variety of impairments and environmental uncertainties, and proposal of new compensation strategies for an efficient and robust receiver design.

  2. A Framework for Multiple Object Tracking in Underwater Acoustic MIMO Communication Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo Rodriguez

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a computational framework for the analysis and design of large-scale algorithms utilized in the estimation of acoustic, doubly-dispersive, randomly time-variant, underwater communication channels. Channel estimation results are used, in turn, in the proposed framework for the development of efficient high performance algorithms, based on fast Fourier transformations, for the search, detection, estimation and tracking (SDET of underwater moving objects through acoustic wavefront signal analysis techniques associated with real-time electronic surveillance and acoustic monitoring (eSAM operations. Particular importance is given in this work to the estimation of the range and speed of deep underwater moving objects modeled as point targets. The work demonstrates how to use Kronecker products signal algebra (KSA, a branch of finite-dimensional tensor signal algebra, as a mathematical language for the formulation of novel variants of parallel orthogonal matching pursuit (POMP algorithms, as well as a programming aid for mapping these algorithms to large-scale computational structures, using a modified Kuck’s paradigm for parallel computation.

  3. An Ultra-Lightweight Encryption Scheme in Underwater Acoustic Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyan Peng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We tackle a fundamental security problem in underwater acoustic networks (UANs. The S-box in the existing block encryption algorithm is more energy consuming and unsuitable for resources-constrained UANs. In this paper, instead of S-box, we present a lightweight, 8-round iteration block cipher algorithm for UANs communication based on chaotic theory and increase the key space by changing the number of iteration round. We further propose secure network architecture of UANs. By analysis, our algorithm can resist brute-force searches and adversarial attacks. Simulation results show that, compared with traditional AES-128 and PRESENT algorithms, our cryptographic algorithm can make a good trade-off between security and overhead, has better energy efficiency, and applies to UANs.

  4. Underwater Optical Wireless Channel Modeling Using Monte-Carlo Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, P. Sri; Prince, Shanthi

    2011-10-01

    At present, there is a lot of interest in the functioning of the marine environment. Unmanned or Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (UUVs or AUVs) are used in the exploration of the underwater resources, pollution monitoring, disaster prevention etc. Underwater, where radio waves do not propagate, acoustic communication is being used. But, underwater communication is moving towards Optical Communication which has higher bandwidth when compared to Acoustic Communication but has shorter range comparatively. Underwater Optical Wireless Communication (OWC) is mainly affected by the absorption and scattering of the optical signal. In coastal waters, both inherent and apparent optical properties (IOPs and AOPs) are influenced by a wide array of physical, biological and chemical processes leading to optical variability. The scattering effect has two effects: the attenuation of the signal and the Inter-Symbol Interference (ISI) of the signal. However, the Inter-Symbol Interference is ignored in the present paper. Therefore, in order to have an efficient underwater OWC link it is necessary to model the channel efficiently. In this paper, the underwater optical channel is modeled using Monte-Carlo method. The Monte Carlo approach provides the most general and most flexible technique for numerically solving the equations of Radiative transfer. The attenuation co-efficient of the light signal is studied as a function of the absorption (a) and scattering (b) coefficients. It has been observed that for pure sea water and for less chlorophyll conditions blue wavelength is less absorbed whereas for chlorophyll rich environment red wavelength signal is absorbed less comparative to blue and green wavelength.

  5. Improving Passive Time Reversal Underwater Acoustic Communications Using Subarray Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengbing He

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Multichannel receivers are usually employed in high-rate underwater acoustic communication to achieve spatial diversity. In the context of multichannel underwater acoustic communications, passive time reversal (TR combined with a single-channel adaptive decision feedback equalizer (TR-DFE is a low-complexity solution to achieve both spatial and temporal focusing. In this paper, we present a novel receiver structure to combine passive time reversal with a low-order multichannel adaptive decision feedback equalizer (TR-MC-DFE to improve the performance of the conventional TR-DFE. First, the proposed method divides the whole received array into several subarrays. Second, we conduct passive time reversal processing in each subarray. Third, the multiple subarray outputs are equalized with a low-order multichannel DFE. We also investigated different channel estimation methods, including least squares (LS, orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP, and improved proportionate normalized least mean squares (IPNLMS. The bit error rate (BER and output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR performances of the receiver algorithms are evaluated using simulation and real data collected in a lake experiment. The source-receiver range is 7.4 km, and the data rate with quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK signal is 8 kbits/s. The uncoded BER of the single input multiple output (SIMO systems varies between 1 × 10 − 1 and 2 × 10 − 2 for the conventional TR-DFE, and between 1 × 10 − 2 and 1 × 10 − 3 for the proposed TR-MC-DFE when eight hydrophones are utilized. Compared to conventional TR-DFE, the average output SNR of the experimental data is enhanced by 3 dB.

  6. AUV Positioning Method Based on Tightly Coupled SINS/LBL for Underwater Acoustic Multipath Propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper researches an AUV (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle positioning method based on SINS (Strapdown Inertial Navigation System/LBL (Long Base Line tightly coupled algorithm. This algorithm mainly includes SINS-assisted searching method of optimum slant-range of underwater acoustic propagation multipath, SINS/LBL tightly coupled model and multi-sensor information fusion algorithm. Fuzzy correlation peak problem of underwater LBL acoustic propagation multipath could be solved based on SINS positional information, thus improving LBL positional accuracy. Moreover, introduction of SINS-centered LBL locating information could compensate accumulative AUV position error effectively and regularly. Compared to loosely coupled algorithm, this tightly coupled algorithm can still provide accurate location information when there are fewer than four available hydrophones (or within the signal receiving range. Therefore, effective positional calibration area of tightly coupled system based on LBL array is wider and has higher reliability and fault tolerance than loosely coupled. It is more applicable to AUV positioning based on SINS/LBL.

  7. The Impact of Very High Frequency Surface Reverberation on Coherent Acoustic Propagation and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    on Coherent Acoustic Propagation and Modeling Grant B. Deane Marine Physical Laboratory , Scripps Institution of Oceanography UCSD La Jolla, CA...long-term science objective is to develop a physical model of high-frequency scattering of underwater acoustic signals from the sea surface under a... acoustic communications problem. The scattering of sound from the sea surface is important for the operation of underwater sonar and underwater

  8. Game Theory-Based Cooperation for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks: Taxonomy, Review, Research Challenges and Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalhatu Muhammed

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Exploring and monitoring the underwater world using underwater sensors is drawing a lot of attention these days. In this field cooperation between acoustic sensor nodes has been a critical problem due to the challenging features such as acoustic channel failure (sound signal, long propagation delay of acoustic signal, limited bandwidth and loss of connectivity. There are several proposed methods to improve cooperation between the nodes by incorporating information/game theory in the node’s cooperation. However, there is a need to classify the existing works and demonstrate their performance in addressing the cooperation issue. In this paper, we have conducted a review to investigate various factors affecting cooperation in underwater acoustic sensor networks. We study various cooperation techniques used for underwater acoustic sensor networks from different perspectives, with a concentration on communication reliability, energy consumption, and security and present a taxonomy for underwater cooperation. Moreover, we further review how the game theory can be applied to make the nodes cooperate with each other. We further analyze different cooperative game methods, where their performance on different metrics is compared. Finally, open issues and future research direction in underwater acoustic sensor networks are highlighted.

  9. Game Theory-Based Cooperation for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks: Taxonomy, Review, Research Challenges and Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammed, Dalhatu; Anisi, Mohammad Hossein; Zareei, Mahdi; Vargas-Rosales, Cesar; Khan, Anwar

    2018-02-01

    Exploring and monitoring the underwater world using underwater sensors is drawing a lot of attention these days. In this field cooperation between acoustic sensor nodes has been a critical problem due to the challenging features such as acoustic channel failure (sound signal), long propagation delay of acoustic signal, limited bandwidth and loss of connectivity. There are several proposed methods to improve cooperation between the nodes by incorporating information/game theory in the node's cooperation. However, there is a need to classify the existing works and demonstrate their performance in addressing the cooperation issue. In this paper, we have conducted a review to investigate various factors affecting cooperation in underwater acoustic sensor networks. We study various cooperation techniques used for underwater acoustic sensor networks from different perspectives, with a concentration on communication reliability, energy consumption, and security and present a taxonomy for underwater cooperation. Moreover, we further review how the game theory can be applied to make the nodes cooperate with each other. We further analyze different cooperative game methods, where their performance on different metrics is compared. Finally, open issues and future research direction in underwater acoustic sensor networks are highlighted.

  10. A numerical method for the calculation of dynamic response and acoustic radiation from an underwater structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Q.; Joseph, P. F.

    2005-05-01

    An approach combining finite element with boundary element methods is proposed to calculate the elastic vibration and acoustic field radiated from an underwater structure. The FEM software NASTRAN is employed for computation of the structural vibration. An uncoupled boundary element method, based on the potential decomposition technique, is described to determine the acoustic added mass and damping coefficients that result due to fluid loading effects. The acoustic matrices of added mass and damping coefficients are then added to the structural mass and damping matrices, respectively, by the DMAP modules of NASTRAN. Numerical results are shown to be in good agreement with experimental data. The complex eigenvalue analyses of underwater structure are obtained by NASTRAN solution sequence SOL107. Results obtained from this study suggest that the natural frequencies of underwater structures are only weakly dependent on the acoustic frequency if the acoustic wavelength is roughly twice as large as the maximum structural dimension.

  11. Novel underwater soundscape: acoustic repertoire of plainfin midshipman fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIver, Eileen L; Marchaterre, Margaret A; Rice, Aaron N; Bass, Andrew H

    2014-07-01

    Toadfishes are among the best-known groups of sound-producing (vocal) fishes and include species commonly known as toadfish and midshipman. Although midshipman have been the subject of extensive investigation of the neural mechanisms of vocalization, this is the first comprehensive, quantitative analysis of the spectro-temporal characters of their acoustic signals and one of the few for fishes in general. Field recordings of territorial, nest-guarding male midshipman during the breeding season identified a diverse vocal repertoire composed of three basic sound types that varied widely in duration, harmonic structure and degree of amplitude modulation (AM): 'hum', 'grunt' and 'growl'. Hum duration varied nearly 1000-fold, lasting for minutes at a time, with stable harmonic stacks and little envelope modulation throughout the sound. By contrast, grunts were brief, ~30-140 ms, broadband signals produced both in isolation and repetitively as a train of up to 200 at intervals of ~0.5-1.0 s. Growls were also produced alone or repetitively, but at variable intervals of the order of seconds with durations between those of grunts and hums, ranging 60-fold from ~200 ms to 12 s. Growls exhibited prominent harmonics with sudden shifts in pulse repetition rate and highly variable AM patterns, unlike the nearly constant AM of grunt trains and flat envelope of hums. Behavioral and neurophysiological studies support the hypothesis that each sound type's unique acoustic signature contributes to signal recognition mechanisms. Nocturnal production of these sounds against a background chorus dominated constantly for hours by a single sound type, the multi-harmonic hum, reveals a novel underwater soundscape for fish. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Low complexity adaptive equalizers for underwater acoustic communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soflaei, Masoumeh; Azmi, Paeiz

    2014-08-01

    Interference signals due to scattering from surface and reflecting from bottom is one of the most important problems of reliable communications in shallow water channels. To solve this problem, one of the best suggested ways is to use adaptive equalizers. Convergence rate and misadjustment error in adaptive algorithms play important roles in adaptive equalizer performance. In this paper, affine projection algorithm (APA), selective regressor APA(SR-APA), family of selective partial update (SPU) algorithms, family of set-membership (SM) algorithms and selective partial update selective regressor APA (SPU-SR-APA) are compared with conventional algorithms such as the least mean square (LMS) in underwater acoustic communications. We apply experimental data from the Strait of Hormuz for demonstrating the efficiency of the proposed methods over shallow water channel. We observe that the values of the steady-state mean square error (MSE) of SR-APA, SPU-APA, SPU-normalized least mean square (SPU-NLMS), SPU-SR-APA, SM-APA and SM-NLMS algorithms decrease in comparison with the LMS algorithm. Also these algorithms have better convergence rates than LMS type algorithm.

  13. Underwater acoustic sensor networks: Medium access control, routing and reliable transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Peng

    been rarely investigated simultaneously in the same network context. We design the first routing protocol, called Vector-Based Forwarding (VBF), for M-UWSNs. VBF is shown to be energy efficient, and at the same time can handle node mobility effectively. We improve the performance of VBF by proposing a hop-by-hop approach, called Hop-by-Hop Vector-Based Forwarding (HH-VBF). Our simulation results show that HH-VBF is more robust in sparse networks. Further, to solve the challenging routing void problem in M-UWSNs, we design a smart void avoidance algorithm, called Vector-Based Void Avoidance (VBVA). VBVA can effectively bypass different types of voids such as convex voids, concave voids and mobile voids. VBVA is the first algorithm to address 3-dimensional voids and mobile voids in mobile sensor networks. Our simulation results show that VBVA can achieve almost the same success delivery ratio as flooding, while it saves much more energy. (3) Reliable data transfer: In M-UWSNs, the long propagation delays, the low communication bandwidth and the high channel error rates all pose grand challenges to the reliable data transfer. We first tackle this problem by proposing a novel hop-by-hop erasure coding approach. Our results indicate its significant performance improvement upon the most advanced approaches explored in underwater acoustic networks. We also develop a mathematical model for the erasure coding scheme, providing useful guidelines to handle node mobility in the network. The second approach we explore is a network coding scheme, in which we carefully couple network coding with multi-path routing for efficient error recovery. We evaluate the performance of this scheme using simulations. And the results show that our network coding scheme is efficient; in both error recovery and energy consumption. In this dissertation, we present these three strands of research work for M-UWSNs in detail, and at the end we point out some potential directions worth future

  14. Feature Extraction of Underwater Target Signal Using Mel Frequency Cepstrum Coefficients Based on Acoustic Vector Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanyue Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Feature extraction method using Mel frequency cepstrum coefficients (MFCC based on acoustic vector sensor is researched in the paper. Signals of pressure are simulated as well as particle velocity of underwater target, and the features of underwater target using MFCC are extracted to verify the feasibility of the method. The experiment of feature extraction of two kinds of underwater targets is carried out, and these underwater targets are classified and recognized by Backpropagation (BP neural network using fusion of multi-information. Results of the research show that MFCC, first-order differential MFCC, and second-order differential MFCC features could be used as effective features to recognize those underwater targets and the recognition rate, which using the particle velocity signal is higher than that using the pressure signal, could be improved by using fusion features.

  15. Design and Experimental Validation of a USBL Underwater Acoustic Positioning System

    OpenAIRE

    Reis, Joel; Morgado, Marco; Batista, Pedro; Oliveira, Paulo; Silvestre, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the steps for developing a low-cost POrtableNavigation Tool for Underwater Scenarios (PONTUS) to be used as a localization device for subsea targets. PONTUS consists of an integrated ultra-short baseline acoustic positioning system aided by an inertial navigation system. Built on a practical design, it can be mounted on an underwater robotic vehicle or be operated by a scuba diver. It also features a graphical user interface that provides information on the tracking of the...

  16. Measurement and Modeling of Narrowband Channels for Ultrasonic Underwater Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañete, Francisco J.; López-Fernández, Jesús; García-Corrales, Celia; Sánchez, Antonio; Robles, Encarnación; Rodrigo, Francisco J.; Paris, José F.

    2016-01-01

    Underwater acoustic sensor networks are a promising technology that allow real-time data collection in seas and oceans for a wide variety of applications. Smaller size and weight sensors can be achieved with working frequencies shifted from audio to the ultrasonic band. At these frequencies, the fading phenomena has a significant presence in the channel behavior, and the design of a reliable communication link between the network sensors will require a precise characterization of it. Fading in underwater channels has been previously measured and modeled in the audio band. However, there have been few attempts to study it at ultrasonic frequencies. In this paper, a campaign of measurements of ultrasonic underwater acoustic channels in Mediterranean shallow waters conducted by the authors is presented. These measurements are used to determine the parameters of the so-called κ-μ shadowed distribution, a fading model with a direct connection to the underlying physical mechanisms. The model is then used to evaluate the capacity of the measured channels with a closed-form expression. PMID:26907281

  17. Measurement and Modeling of Narrowband Channels for Ultrasonic Underwater Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Cañete

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Underwater acoustic sensor networks are a promising technology that allow real-time data collection in seas and oceans for a wide variety of applications. Smaller size and weight sensors can be achieved with working frequencies shifted from audio to the ultrasonic band. At these frequencies, the fading phenomena has a significant presence in the channel behavior, and the design of a reliable communication link between the network sensors will require a precise characterization of it. Fading in underwater channels has been previously measured and modeled in the audio band. However, there have been few attempts to study it at ultrasonic frequencies. In this paper, a campaign of measurements of ultrasonic underwater acoustic channels in Mediterranean shallow waters conducted by the authors is presented. These measurements are used to determine the parameters of the so-called κ-μ shadowed distribution, a fading model with a direct connection to the underlying physical mechanisms. The model is then used to evaluate the capacity of the measured channels with a closed-form expression.

  18. Optimization of computation efficiency in underwater acoustic navigation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hua

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a technique for the estimation of the relative bearing angle between the unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) and the base station for the homing and docking operations. The key requirement of this project includes computation efficiency and estimation accuracy for direct implementation onto the UUV electronic hardware, subject to the extreme constraints of physical limitation of the hardware due to the size and dimension of the UUV housing, electric power consumption for the requirement of UUV survey duration and range coverage, and heat dissipation of the hardware. Subsequent to the design and development of the algorithm, two phases of experiments were conducted to illustrate the feasibility and capability of this technique. The presentation of this paper includes system modeling, mathematical analysis, and results from laboratory experiments and full-scale sea tests.

  19. Underwater Acoustic Matched Field Imaging Based on Compressed Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huichen Yan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Matched field processing (MFP is an effective method for underwater target imaging and localizing, but its performance is not guaranteed due to the nonuniqueness and instability problems caused by the underdetermined essence of MFP. By exploiting the sparsity of the targets in an imaging area, this paper proposes a compressive sensing MFP (CS-MFP model from wave propagation theory by using randomly deployed sensors. In addition, the model’s recovery performance is investigated by exploring the lower bounds of the coherence parameter of the CS dictionary. Furthermore, this paper analyzes the robustness of CS-MFP with respect to the displacement of the sensors. Subsequently, a coherence-excluding coherence optimized orthogonal matching pursuit (CCOOMP algorithm is proposed to overcome the high coherent dictionary problem in special cases. Finally, some numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed CS-MFP method.

  20. Wide-band underwater acoustic absorption based on locally resonant unit and interpenetrating network structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heng, Jiang; Mi-Lin, Zhang; Yu-Ren, Wang; Yan-Ping, Hu; Ding, Lan; Qun-Li, Wu; Huan-Tong, Lu

    2010-01-01

    The interpenetrating network structure provides an interesting avenue to novel materials. Locally resonant phononic crystal (LRPC) exhibits excellent sound attenuation performance based on the periodical arrangement of sound wave scatters. Combining the LRPC concept and interpenetrating network glassy structure, this paper has developed a new material which can achieve a wide band underwater strong acoustic absorption. Underwater absorption coefficients of different samples were measured by the pulse tube. Measurement results show that the new material possesses excellent underwater acoustic effects in a wide frequency range. Moreover, in order to investigate impacts of locally resonant units, some defects are introduced into the sample. The experimental result and the theoretical calculation both show that locally resonant units being connected to a network structure play an important role in achieving a wide band strong acoustic absorption. (condensed matter: structure, thermal and mechanical properties)

  1. Energy Harvesting Hybrid Acoustic-Optical Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks Localization

    KAUST Repository

    Saeed, Nasir

    2017-12-26

    Underwater wireless technologies demand to transmit at higher data rate for ocean exploration. Currently, large coverage is achieved by acoustic sensor networks with low data rate, high cost, high latency, high power consumption, and negative impact on marine mammals. Meanwhile, optical communication for underwater networks has the advantage of the higher data rate albeit for limited communication distances. Moreover, energy consumption is another major problem for underwater sensor networks, due to limited battery power and difficulty in replacing or recharging the battery of a sensor node. The ultimate solution to this problem is to add energy harvesting capability to the acoustic-optical sensor nodes. Localization of underwater sensor networks is of utmost importance because the data collected from underwater sensor nodes is useful only if the location of the nodes is known. Therefore, a novel localization technique for energy harvesting hybrid acoustic-optical underwater wireless sensor networks (AO-UWSNs) is proposed. AO-UWSN employs optical communication for higher data rate at a short transmission distance and employs acoustic communication for low data rate and long transmission distance. A hybrid received signal strength (RSS) based localization technique is proposed to localize the nodes in AO-UWSNs. The proposed technique combines the noisy RSS based measurements from acoustic communication and optical communication and estimates the final locations of acoustic-optical sensor nodes. A weighted multiple observations paradigm is proposed for hybrid estimated distances to suppress the noisy observations and give more importance to the accurate observations. Furthermore, the closed form solution for Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) is derived for localization accuracy of the proposed technique.

  2. Energy Harvesting Hybrid Acoustic-Optical Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir Saeed

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Underwater wireless technologies demand to transmit at higher data rate for ocean exploration. Currently, large coverage is achieved by acoustic sensor networks with low data rate, high cost, high latency, high power consumption, and negative impact on marine mammals. Meanwhile, optical communication for underwater networks has the advantage of the higher data rate albeit for limited communication distances. Moreover, energy consumption is another major problem for underwater sensor networks, due to limited battery power and difficulty in replacing or recharging the battery of a sensor node. The ultimate solution to this problem is to add energy harvesting capability to the acoustic-optical sensor nodes. Localization of underwater sensor networks is of utmost importance because the data collected from underwater sensor nodes is useful only if the location of the nodes is known. Therefore, a novel localization technique for energy harvesting hybrid acoustic-optical underwater wireless sensor networks (AO-UWSNs is proposed. AO-UWSN employs optical communication for higher data rate at a short transmission distance and employs acoustic communication for low data rate and long transmission distance. A hybrid received signal strength (RSS based localization technique is proposed to localize the nodes in AO-UWSNs. The proposed technique combines the noisy RSS based measurements from acoustic communication and optical communication and estimates the final locations of acoustic-optical sensor nodes. A weighted multiple observations paradigm is proposed for hybrid estimated distances to suppress the noisy observations and give more importance to the accurate observations. Furthermore, the closed form solution for Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB is derived for localization accuracy of the proposed technique.

  3. Energy Harvesting Hybrid Acoustic-Optical Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks Localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Nasir; Celik, Abdulkadir; Al-Naffouri, Tareq Y; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2017-12-26

    Underwater wireless technologies demand to transmit at higher data rate for ocean exploration. Currently, large coverage is achieved by acoustic sensor networks with low data rate, high cost, high latency, high power consumption, and negative impact on marine mammals. Meanwhile, optical communication for underwater networks has the advantage of the higher data rate albeit for limited communication distances. Moreover, energy consumption is another major problem for underwater sensor networks, due to limited battery power and difficulty in replacing or recharging the battery of a sensor node. The ultimate solution to this problem is to add energy harvesting capability to the acoustic-optical sensor nodes. Localization of underwater sensor networks is of utmost importance because the data collected from underwater sensor nodes is useful only if the location of the nodes is known. Therefore, a novel localization technique for energy harvesting hybrid acoustic-optical underwater wireless sensor networks (AO-UWSNs) is proposed. AO-UWSN employs optical communication for higher data rate at a short transmission distance and employs acoustic communication for low data rate and long transmission distance. A hybrid received signal strength (RSS) based localization technique is proposed to localize the nodes in AO-UWSNs. The proposed technique combines the noisy RSS based measurements from acoustic communication and optical communication and estimates the final locations of acoustic-optical sensor nodes. A weighted multiple observations paradigm is proposed for hybrid estimated distances to suppress the noisy observations and give more importance to the accurate observations. Furthermore, the closed form solution for Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) is derived for localization accuracy of the proposed technique.

  4. Adjoint modeling for acoustic inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hursky, Paul; Porter, Michael B.; Cornuelle, B. D.; Hodgkiss, W. S.; Kuperman, W. A.

    2004-02-01

    The use of adjoint modeling for acoustic inversion is investigated. An adjoint model is derived from a linearized forward propagation model to propagate data-model misfit at the observation points back through the medium to the medium perturbations not being accounted for in the model. This adjoint model can be used to aid in inverting for these unaccounted medium perturbations. Adjoint methods are being applied to a variety of inversion problems, but have not drawn much attention from the underwater acoustic community. This paper presents an application of adjoint methods to acoustic inversion. Inversions are demonstrated in simulation for both range-independent and range-dependent sound speed profiles using the adjoint of a parabolic equation model. Sensitivity and error analyses are discussed showing how the adjoint model enables calculations to be performed in the space of observations, rather than the often much larger space of model parameters. Using an adjoint model enables directions of steepest descent in the model parameters (what we invert for) to be calculated using far fewer modeling runs than if a forward model only were used.

  5. Optimal Sensor placement for acoustic range-based underwater robotic positioning

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Glotzbach, T.; Moreno-Salinas, D.; Aranda, J.; Pascoal, A.M.

    of transponders. In what follow, we give a very brief overview of range-based positioning systems. To estimate the position of an underwater agent by means of acoustic range measurements, one needs several objects (reference objects or ROs henceforward... between target position and optimal acoustic sensor positions. For real sea operations, where the accuracy of range measuring devices is plagued by intermittent failures, outliers, and multipath propagation effects, it is important to have...

  6. Efficient Modelling Methodology for Reconfigurable Underwater Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mikkel Cornelius; Blanke, Mogens; Schjølberg, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers the challenge of applying reconfigurable robots in an underwater environment. The main result presented is the development of a model for a system comprised of N, possibly heterogeneous, robots dynamically connected to each other and moving with 6 Degrees of Freedom (DOF......). This paper presents an application of the Udwadia-Kalaba Equation for modelling the Reconfigurable Underwater Robots. The constraints developed to enforce the rigid connection between robots in the system is derived through restrictions on relative distances and orientations. To avoid singularities...... in the orientation and, thereby, allow the robots to undertake any relative configuration the attitude is represented in Euler parameters....

  7. Underwater Acoustic Propagation in the Philippine Sea: Intensity Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Andrew W.

    In the spring of 2009, broadband transmissions from a ship-suspended source with a 284 Hz center frequency were received on a moored and navigated vertical array of hydrophones over a range of 107 km in the Philippine Sea. During a 60-hour period over 19 000 transmissions were carried out. The observed wavefront arrival structure reveals four distinct purely refracted acoustic paths: one with a single upper turning point near 80 m depth, two with a pair of upper turning points at a depth of roughly 300 m, and one with three upper turning points at 420 m. Individual path intensity, defined as the absolute square of the center frequency Fourier component for that arrival, was estimated over the 60-hour duration and used to compute scintillation index and log-intensity variance. Monte Carlo parabolic equation simulations using internal-wave induced sound speed perturbations obeying the Garrett-Munk internal-wave en- ergy spectrum were in agreement with measured data for the three deeper-turning paths but differed by as much as a factor of four for the near surface-interacting path. Estimates of the power spectral density and temporal autocorrelation function of intensity were attempted, but were complicated by gaps in the measured time-series. Deep fades in intensity were observed in the near surface-interacting path. Hypothesized causes for the deep fades were examined through further acoustic propagation modeling and analysis of various available oceanographic measurements.

  8. Passive aquatic listener (PAL): An adoptive underwater acoustic recording system for the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anagnostou, Marios N.; Nystuen, Jeffrey A.; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.; Papadopoulos, Anastasios; Lykousis, Vassilios

    2011-01-01

    The ambient sound field in the ocean is a combination of natural and manmade sounds. Consequently, the interpretation of the ambient sound field can be used to quantify these processes. In the frequency range from 1 to 50 kHz, the general character of ocean ambient sound is a slowly changing background that is closely associated with local wind speed, interspersed with shorter time scale events such as rain storms, ships and animal calls. At lower frequencies the underwater ambient sound budget includes geologically generated sound activities including underwater volcanic eruptions, seismic and seepage faults that generate bubbles, etc. that can also potentially be classified and quantified. Acoustic data are collected on hydrophones. Hydrophones are simple, robust sensors that can be deployed on most ocean instrumentation systems including surface or sub-surface moorings, bottom mounted systems, drifters, ARGO floats or autonomous underwater platforms. A dedicated oceanic underwater recorder called a passive acoustic listener (PAL) has been developed. A principal issue is to accurately distinguish different sound sources so that they can be quantified as part of a sound budget, and then quantified if appropriate. Based on ongoing data collected from the Poseidon II network the retrieval potential of multi-parameters from underwater sound, including meteorological (i.e., precipitation and winds) and in general geophysical, anthropogenetic (i.e., ships, submarines, etc.) and biological (whales, etc.) sources is presented.

  9. Underwater Noise Modeling in Lithuanian Area of the Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatas Bagočius

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Along with rising awareness of public and scientific societies about environmental and ecological impacts of underwater noise, the need for underwater noise modelling in the shallow Lithuanian area of Baltic Sea emerged. Marine Strategy Framework Directive issues regarding underwater noise indicators refers to possibility of evaluation of Good Environmental State using underwater noise measurements as well as possibility to model underwater noise. Main anthropogenic underwater noise contributor in the Seas is the shipping lanes as known due to date, with no exclusion of Lithuanian Baltic Sea area. In this manuscript, it is presented the methods of development of simplistic underwater ambient noise model purposed for computation of underwater soundscape in shallow area of the Lithuanian Baltic Sea.

  10. The influence of environmental parameters on the optimal frequency in a shallow underwater acoustic channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarnescu, George

    2015-02-01

    In a shallow underwater acoustic channel the delayed replicas of a transmitted signal are mainly due to the interactions with the sea surface and the bottom layer. If a specific underwater region on the globe is considered, for which the sedimentary layer structure is constant across the transmission distance, then the variability of the amplitude-delay profile is determined by daily and seasonal changes of the sound speed profile (SSP) and by weather changes, such as variations of the wind speed. Such a parameter will influence the attenuation at the surface, the noise level and the profile of the sea surface. The temporal variation of the impulse response in a shallow underwater acoustic channel determines the variability of the optimal transmission frequency. If the ways in which the optimal frequency changes can be predicted, then an adaptive analog transceiver can be easily designed for an underwater acoustic modem or it can be found when a communication link has high throughput. In this article it will be highlighted the way in which the amplitude-delay profile is affected by the sound speed profile, wind speed and channel depth and also will be emphasized the changes of the optimal transmission frequency in a configuration, where the transmitter and receiver are placed on the seafloor and the bathymetry profile will be considered flat, having a given composition.

  11. Award 1 Title: Acoustic Communications 2011 Experiment: Deployment Support and Post Experiment Data Handling and Analysis. Award 2 Title: Exploiting Structured Dependencies in the Design of Adaptive Algorithms for Underwater Communication Award. 3 Title: Coupled Research in Ocean Acoustics and Signal Processing for the Next Generation of Underwater Acoustic Communication Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Exploiting Structured Dependencies in the Design of Adaptive Algorithms for Underwater Communication Award #3 Title Coupled Research in Ocean Acoustics ...and Signal Processing for theNext Generation of Underwater Acoustic Communication Systems James Preisig Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution...Dept. of Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Ocean Acoustics and Signals Laboratory Woods Hole, MA 02540 AND JPAnalytics LLC 638 Brick Kiln

  12. A Glider-Assisted Link Disruption Restoration Mechanism in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhigang; Wang, Ning; Su, Yishan; Yang, Qiuling

    2018-02-07

    Underwater acoustic sensor networks (UASNs) have become a hot research topic. In UASNs, nodes can be affected by ocean currents and external forces, which could result in sudden link disruption. Therefore, designing a flexible and efficient link disruption restoration mechanism to ensure the network connectivity is a challenge. In the paper, we propose a glider-assisted restoration mechanism which includes link disruption recognition and related link restoring mechanism. In the link disruption recognition mechanism, the cluster heads collect the link disruption information and then schedule gliders acting as relay nodes to restore the disrupted link. Considering the glider's sawtooth motion, we design a relay location optimization algorithm with a consideration of both the glider's trajectory and acoustic channel attenuation model. The utility function is established by minimizing the channel attenuation and the optimal location of glider is solved by a multiplier method. The glider-assisted restoration mechanism can greatly improve the packet delivery rate and reduce the communication energy consumption and it is more general for the restoration of different link disruption scenarios. The simulation results show that glider-assisted restoration mechanism can improve the delivery rate of data packets by 15-33% compared with cooperative opportunistic routing (OVAR), the hop-by-hop vector-based forwarding (HH-VBF) and the vector based forward (VBF) methods, and reduce communication energy consumption by 20-58% for a typical network's setting.

  13. A Glider-Assisted Link Disruption Restoration Mechanism in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Jin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Underwater acoustic sensor networks (UASNs have become a hot research topic. In UASNs, nodes can be affected by ocean currents and external forces, which could result in sudden link disruption. Therefore, designing a flexible and efficient link disruption restoration mechanism to ensure the network connectivity is a challenge. In the paper, we propose a glider-assisted restoration mechanism which includes link disruption recognition and related link restoring mechanism. In the link disruption recognition mechanism, the cluster heads collect the link disruption information and then schedule gliders acting as relay nodes to restore the disrupted link. Considering the glider’s sawtooth motion, we design a relay location optimization algorithm with a consideration of both the glider’s trajectory and acoustic channel attenuation model. The utility function is established by minimizing the channel attenuation and the optimal location of glider is solved by a multiplier method. The glider-assisted restoration mechanism can greatly improve the packet delivery rate and reduce the communication energy consumption and it is more general for the restoration of different link disruption scenarios. The simulation results show that glider-assisted restoration mechanism can improve the delivery rate of data packets by 15–33% compared with cooperative opportunistic routing (OVAR, the hop-by-hop vector-based forwarding (HH-VBF and the vector based forward (VBF methods, and reduce communication energy consumption by 20–58% for a typical network’s setting.

  14. The influence of acoustic emissions for underwater data transmission on the behaviour of harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) in a floating pen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kastelein, R.A.; Verboom, W.C.; Muijsers, M.; Jennings, N.V.; Heul, S. van der

    2005-01-01

    To prevent grounding of ships and collisions between ships in shallow coastal waters, an underwater data collection and communication network is currently under development: Acoustic Communication network for Monitoring of underwater Environment in coastal areas (ACME). Marine mammals might be

  15. Multiuser sonar watermarking and detection in an underwater acoustic channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobasseri, Bijan G.; Lynch, Robert S.; Andiario, David

    2013-06-01

    Sonar watermarking is the practice of embedding low-power, secure digital signatures in the time frequency space of a waveform. The algorithm is designed for a single source/receiver configuration. However, in a multiuser environment, multiple sources broadcast sonar waveforms that overlap in both time and frequency. The receiver can be configured as a filter bank where each bank is dedicated to detecting a specific watermark. However, a filter bank is prone to mutual interference as multiple sonar waveforms are simultaneously present at the detector input. To mitigate mutual interference, a multiuser watermark detector is formulated as a decorrelating detector that decouples detection amongst the watermark signatures. The acoustic channel is simulated in software and modeled by an FIR filter. This model is used to compensate for the degradation of spreading sequences used for watermark embedding. The test statistic generated at the output of the decorrelating detector is used in a joint maximum likelihood ratio detector to establish the presence or absence of the watermark in each sonar waveform. ROC curves are produced for multiple sources positioned at varying ranges subject to ambient ocean noise controlled by varying sea states.

  16. Underwater noise modelling for environmental impact assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farcas, Adrian [Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas), Pakefield Road, Lowestoft, NR33 0HT (United Kingdom); Thompson, Paul M. [Lighthouse Field Station, Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Cromarty IV11 8YL (United Kingdom); Merchant, Nathan D., E-mail: nathan.merchant@cefas.co.uk [Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas), Pakefield Road, Lowestoft, NR33 0HT (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    Assessment of underwater noise is increasingly required by regulators of development projects in marine and freshwater habitats, and noise pollution can be a constraining factor in the consenting process. Noise levels arising from the proposed activity are modelled and the potential impact on species of interest within the affected area is then evaluated. Although there is considerable uncertainty in the relationship between noise levels and impacts on aquatic species, the science underlying noise modelling is well understood. Nevertheless, many environmental impact assessments (EIAs) do not reflect best practice, and stakeholders and decision makers in the EIA process are often unfamiliar with the concepts and terminology that are integral to interpreting noise exposure predictions. In this paper, we review the process of underwater noise modelling and explore the factors affecting predictions of noise exposure. Finally, we illustrate the consequences of errors and uncertainties in noise modelling, and discuss future research needs to reduce uncertainty in noise assessments.

  17. Underwater Inspection of Navigation Structures with an Acoustic Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    38  Figure 4-11. Masonry wall comparison of visible image and acoustical image, downtown landing, Mississippi River, Vicksburg...early automated mosaic software efforts. ERDC/ITL TR-13-3 39 Figure 4-11. Masonry wall comparison of visible image and acoustical image...areas not accessible by conventional side- scan or multi-beam deployments. Figure 4-19 shows a profile and surface view of various sheet pilings

  18. A Double Rate Localization Algorithm with One Anchor for Multi-Hop Underwater Acoustic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jingjie; Shen, Xiaohong; Zhao, Ruiqin; Mei, Haodi; Wang, Haiyan

    2017-01-01

    Localization is a basic issue for underwater acoustic networks (UANs). Currently, most localization algorithms only perform well in one-hop networks or need more anchors which are not suitable for the underwater environment. In this paper, we proposed a double rate localization algorithm with one anchor for multi-hop underwater acoustic networks (DRL). The algorithm firstly presents a double rate scheme which separates the localization procedure into two modes to increase the ranging accuracy in multi-hop UANs while maintaining the transmission rate. Then an optimal selection scheme of reference nodes was proposed to reduce the influence of references’ topology on localization performance. The proposed DRL algorithm can be used in the multi-hop UANs to increase the localization accuracy and reduce the usage of anchor nodes. The simulation and experimental results demonstrated that the proposed DRL algorithm has a better localization performance than the previous algorithms in many aspects such as accuracy and communication cost, and is more suitable to the underwater environment. PMID:28452942

  19. Dolphin Sounds-Inspired Covert Underwater Acoustic Communication and Micro-Modem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Gang; Liu, Songzuo; Bilal, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    A novel portable underwater acoustic modem is proposed in this paper for covert communication between divers or underwater unmanned vehicles (UUVs) and divers at a short distance. For the first time, real dolphin calls are used in the modem to realize biologically inspired Covert Underwater Acoustic Communication (CUAC). A variety of dolphin whistles and clicks stored in an SD card inside the modem helps to realize different biomimetic CUAC algorithms based on the specified covert scenario. In this paper, the information is conveyed during the time interval between dolphin clicks. TMS320C6748 and TLV320AIC3106 are the core processors used in our unique modem for fast digital processing and interconnection with other terminals or sensors. Simulation results show that the bit error rate (BER) of the CUAC algorithm is less than 10−5 when the signal to noise ratio is over ‒5 dB. The modem was tested in an underwater pool, and a data rate of 27.1 bits per second at a distance of 10 m was achieved. PMID:29068363

  20. Dolphin Sounds-Inspired Covert Underwater Acoustic Communication and Micro-Modem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Qiao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel portable underwater acoustic modem is proposed in this paper for covert communication between divers or underwater unmanned vehicles (UUVs and divers at a short distance. For the first time, real dolphin calls are used in the modem to realize biologically inspired Covert Underwater Acoustic Communication (CUAC. A variety of dolphin whistles and clicks stored in an SD card inside the modem helps to realize different biomimetic CUAC algorithms based on the specified covert scenario. In this paper, the information is conveyed during the time interval between dolphin clicks. TMS320C6748 and TLV320AIC3106 are the core processors used in our unique modem for fast digital processing and interconnection with other terminals or sensors. Simulation results show that the bit error rate (BER of the CUAC algorithm is less than 10 − 5 when the signal to noise ratio is over ‒5 dB. The modem was tested in an underwater pool, and a data rate of 27.1 bits per second at a distance of 10 m was achieved.

  1. Dolphin Sounds-Inspired Covert Underwater Acoustic Communication and Micro-Modem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Gang; Zhao, Yunjiang; Liu, Songzuo; Bilal, Muhammad

    2017-10-25

    A novel portable underwater acoustic modem is proposed in this paper for covert communication between divers or underwater unmanned vehicles (UUVs) and divers at a short distance. For the first time, real dolphin calls are used in the modem to realize biologically inspired Covert Underwater Acoustic Communication (CUAC). A variety of dolphin whistles and clicks stored in an SD card inside the modem helps to realize different biomimetic CUAC algorithms based on the specified covert scenario. In this paper, the information is conveyed during the time interval between dolphin clicks. TMS320C6748 and TLV320AIC3106 are the core processors used in our unique modem for fast digital processing and interconnection with other terminals or sensors. Simulation results show that the bit error rate (BER) of the CUAC algorithm is less than 10 - 5 when the signal to noise ratio is over ‒5 dB. The modem was tested in an underwater pool, and a data rate of 27.1 bits per second at a distance of 10 m was achieved.

  2. Cascading Multi-Hop Reservation and Transmission in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Won Lee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The long propagation delay in an underwater acoustic channel makes designing an underwater media access control (MAC protocol more challenging. In particular, handshaking-based MAC protocols widely used in terrestrial radio channels have been known to be inappropriate in underwater acoustic channels, because of the inordinately large latency involved in exchanging control packets. Furthermore, in the case of multi-hop relaying in a hop-by-hop handshaking manner, the end-to-end delay significantly increases. In this paper, we propose a new MAC protocol named cascading multi-hop reservation and transmission (CMRT. In CMRT, intermediate nodes between a source and a destination may start handshaking in advance for the next-hop relaying before handshaking for the previous node is completed. By this concurrent relaying, control packet exchange and data delivery cascade down to the destination. In addition, to improve channel utilization, CMRT adopts a packet-train method where multiple data packets are sent together by handshaking once. Thus, CMRT reduces the time taken for control packet exchange and accordingly increases the throughput. The performance of CMRT is evaluated and compared with that of two conventional MAC protocols (multiple-access collision avoidance for underwater (MACA-U and MACA-U with packet trains (MACA-UPT. The results show that CMRT outperforms other MAC protocols in terms of both throughput and end-to-end delay.

  3. Swarm Underwater Acoustic 3D Localization: Kalman vs Monte Carlo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Taraglio

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Two three-dimensional localization algorithms for a swarm of underwater vehicles are presented. The first is grounded on an extended Kalman filter (EKF scheme used to fuse some proprioceptive data such as the vessel's speed and some exteroceptive measurements such as the time of flight (TOF sonar distance of the companion vessels. The second is a Monte Carlo particle filter localization processing the same sensory data suite. The results of several simulations using the two approaches are presented, with comparison. The case of a supporting surface vessel is also considered. An analysis of the robustness of the two approaches against some system parameters is given.

  4. Underwater target positioning with a single acoustic sensor

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    David, M-S; Pascoal, A.M.; Joaquin, A.

    the efficacy of the algorithms with real vehicles at sea. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors thank the Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovacion for its support under project DPI2009-14552-C02-02. The work of the second author was partially supported by the EU FP7 Project...), 1461, 2010. D.B. Jourdan and N. Roy. Optimal Sensor Placement for Agent Localization. ACM Transactions on Sensor Networks (TOSN), Volume 4,Article No. 13, 2008. M.B. Larsen. Autonomous Navigation of Underwater Ve- hicles. PhD thesis, Department...

  5. Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface Utility for Underwater Sound Monitoring and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Huiying; Halvorsen, Michele B.; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Fishes and marine mammals may suffer a range of potential effects from exposure to intense underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities such as pile driving, shipping, sonars, and underwater blasting. Several underwater sound recording (USR) devices have been built to acquire samples of the underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities. Software becomes indispensable for processing and analyzing the audio files recorded by these USRs. In this paper, we provide a detailed description of a new software package, the Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface (AAMI), specifically designed for analysis of underwater sound recordings to provide data in metrics that facilitate evaluation of the potential impacts of the sound on aquatic animals. In addition to the basic functions, such as loading and editing audio files recorded by USRs and batch processing of sound files, the software utilizes recording system calibration data to compute important parameters in physical units. The software also facilitates comparison of the noise sound sample metrics with biological measures such as audiograms of the sensitivity of aquatic animals to the sound, integrating various components into a single analytical frame. The features of the AAMI software are discussed, and several case studies are presented to illustrate its functionality. PMID:22969353

  6. Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface Utility for Underwater Sound Monitoring and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. Carlson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Fishes and marine mammals may suffer a range of potential effects from exposure to intense underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities such as pile driving, shipping, sonars, and underwater blasting. Several underwater sound recording (USR devices have been built to acquire samples of the underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities. Software becomes indispensable for processing and analyzing the audio files recorded by these USRs. In this paper, we provide a detailed description of a new software package, the Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface (AAMI, specifically designed for analysis of underwater sound recordings to provide data in metrics that facilitate evaluation of the potential impacts of the sound on aquatic animals. In addition to the basic functions, such as loading and editing audio files recorded by USRs and batch processing of sound files, the software utilizes recording system calibration data to compute important parameters in physical units. The software also facilitates comparison of the noise sound sample metrics with biological measures such as audiograms of the sensitivity of aquatic animals to the sound, integrating various components into a single analytical frame. The features of the AAMI software are discussed, and several case studies are presented to illustrate its functionality.

  7. Improving the Navys Passive Underwater Acoustic Monitoring of Marine Mammal Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    degrees in marine biology and physics, with minors in math and ocean sciences. In addition, a senior undergraduate student from the UCSD department of...Group. These data have been combined with those from HARP sites in the Santa Barbara Channel and at Hoke Seamount (discussed in Helble et al., 2013a...DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Distribution approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Improving the Navy’s Passive Underwater Acoustic

  8. The Research on Improved Companding Transformation for Reducing PAPR in Underwater Acoustic OFDM Communication System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinqiu Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To solve the problem of the high peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR in Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM for the underwater acoustic communication system, the paper offers a method of reducing PAPR which combines the amplitude limiting and the improved nonlinear transformation. Traditional amplitude limiting technique can reduce PAPR in OFDM system effectively, at the cost of reducing the bit error rate (BER. However the companding transformation has far less computation complexity than SLM or PTS technologies and can improve the BER performance compared to the amplitude limiting technique simultaneously. The paper combines these two kinds of techniques, takes full use of advantages of the two method, and puts forward a low-complexity scheme choosing parameters that are more appropriate to the underwater acoustic field, with the result of improved BER performance even in lower SNR. Both simulation and experiment results show that the new method which combines clipping and companding transformation can effectively reduce the PAPR in the underwater acoustic OFDM communication system and improve the BER performance simultaneously.

  9. Combined Hybrid DFE and CCK Remodulator for Medium-Range Single-Carrier Underwater Acoustic Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xialin Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced modulation and channel equalization techniques are essential for improving the performance of medium-range single-carrier underwater acoustic communications. In this paper, an enhanced detection scheme, hybrid time-frequency domain decision feedback equalizer (DFE combined with complementary code keying (CCK remodulator, is presented. CCK modulation technique provides strong tolerance to intersymbol interference caused by multipath propagation in underwater acoustic channels. The conventional hybrid DFE, using a frequency domain feedforward filter and a time domain feedback filter, provides good performance along with low computational complexity. The error propagation in the feedback filter, caused by feedbacking wrong decisions prior to CCK demodulation, may lead to great performance degradation. In our proposed scheme, with the help of CCK coding gain, more accurate remodulated CCK chips can be used as feedback. The proposed detection scheme is tested by the practical ocean experiments. The experimental results show that the proposed detection scheme ensures robust communications over 10-kilometre underwater acoustic channels with the data rate at 5 Kbits/s in 3 kHz of channel bandwidth.

  10. Modeling and Control of Underwater Robotic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schjoelberg, I:

    1996-12-31

    This doctoral thesis describes modeling and control of underwater vehicle-manipulator systems. The thesis also presents a model and a control scheme for a system consisting of a surface vessel connected to an underwater robotic system by means of a slender marine structure. The equations of motion of the underwater vehicle and manipulator are described and the system kinematics and properties presented. Feedback linearization technique is applied to the system and evaluated through a simulation study. Passivity-based controllers for vehicle and manipulator control are presented. Stability of the closed loop system is proved and simulation results are given. The equation of motion for lateral motion of a cable/riser system connected to a surface vessel at the top end and to a thruster at the bottom end is described and stability analysis and simulations are presented. The equations of motion in 3 degrees of freedom of the cable/riser, surface vessel and robotic system are given. Stability analysis of the total system with PD-controllers is presented. 47 refs., 32 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. A Novel Fractional Fourier Transform-Based ASK-OFDM System for Underwater Acoustic Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami Ashri

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A key research area in wireless transmission is underwater communications. It has a vital role in applications such as underwater sensor networks (UWSNs and disaster detection. The underwater channel is very unique as compared to other alternatives of transmission channels. It is characterized by path loss, multipath fading, Doppler spread and ambient noise. Thus, the bit error rate (BER is increased to a large extent when compared to its counterpart of cellular communications. Acoustic signals are the current best solution for underwater communications. The use of electromagnetic or optical waves obviously entails a much higher data rate. However, they suffer from high attenuation, absorption or scattering. This paper proposes a novel fractional fast Fourier transform (FrFT—orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (FrFT-OFDM system for underwater acoustic (UWA communication—which employs the amplitude shift keying (ASK modulation technique (FrFT-ASK-OFDM. Specifically, ASK achieves a better bandwidth efficiency as compared to other commonly used modulation techniques, such as quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM and phase shift keying (PSK. In particular, the system proposed in this article can achieve a very promising BER performance, and can reach higher data rates when compared to other systems proposed in the literature. The BER performance of the proposed system is evaluated numerically, and is compared to the corresponding M-ary QAM system in the UWA channel for the same channel conditions. Moreover, the performance of the proposed system is compared to the conventional fast Fourier transform (FFT-OFDM (FFT-OFDM system in the absence and presence of the effect of carrier frequency offset (CFO. Numerical results show that the proposed system outperforms the conventional FFT-based systems for UWA channels, even in channels dominated by CFO. Moreover, the spectral efficiency and data rate of the proposed system are approximately double

  12. HULU SUNGAI PERAK BED SEDIMENT MAPPING USING UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC SONAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Arriafdi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Development in acoustic survey techniques in particular side scan sonar have revolutionized the way we are able to image, map and understand the riverbed environment. It is now cost effective to image large areas of the riverbed using these techniques and the backscatter image created from surveys provides base line data from which thematic maps of the riverbed environment including maps of morphological geology, can be derived when interpreted in conjunction with in situ sampling data. This article focuses on investigation characteristics of sediments and correlation of side scan backscatter image with signal strength. The interpretation of acoustic backscatter rely on experienced interpretation by eye of grey scale images produced from the data. A 990F Starfish Side Scan Sonar was used to collect and develop a series of sonar images along 6 km of Hulu Sungai Perak. Background sediments could be delineated accurately and the image textures could be linked to the actual river floor appearance through grab sampling. A major difference was found in the acoustic returns from the two research area studies: the upstream area shows much rougher textures. This is due to an actual differences in riverbed roughness, caused by a difference in bottom currents and sediment dynamics in the two areas. The highest backscatter correlates with coarsest and roughness sediment. Result suggest that image based backscatter classification shows considerable promise for interpretation of side scan sonar data for the production of geological maps.

  13. Directionality and maneuvering effects on a surface ship underwater acoustic signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevorrow, Mark V; Vasiliev, Boris; Vagle, Svein

    2008-08-01

    This work examines underwater source spectra of a small (560 tons, 40 m length), single-screw oceanographic vessel, focusing on directionality and effects of maneuvers. The measurements utilized a set of four, self-contained buoys with GPS positioning, each recording two calibrated hydrophones with effective acoustic bandwidth from 150 Hz to 5 kHz. In straight, constant-speed runs at speeds up to 6.2 m s(-1), the ship source spectra showed spectral levels in reasonable agreement with reference spectra. The broadband source level was observed to increase as approximately speed to the fourth power over the range of 2.6-6.1 m s(-1), partially biased at low speeds by nonpropulsion machinery signals. Source directionality patterns were extracted from variations in source spectra while the ship transited past the buoy field. The observed spectral source levels exhibited a broadside maximum, with bow and stern aspect reduced by approximately 12-9 dB, respectively, independent of frequency. An empirical model is proposed assuming that spectral source levels exhibit simultaneous variations in aspect angle, speed, and turn rate. After correction for source directionality and speed during turning maneuvers, an excess of up to 18 dB in one-third octave source levels was observed.

  14. Secure Cooperation of Autonomous Mobile Sensors Using an Underwater Acoustic Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Dini

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Methodologies and algorithms are presented for the secure cooperation of a team of autonomous mobile underwater sensors, connected through an acoustic communication network, within surveillance and patrolling applications. In particular, the work proposes a cooperative algorithm in which the mobile underwater sensors (installed on Autonomous Underwater Vehicles—AUVs respond to simple local rules based on the available information to perform the mission and maintain the communication link with the network (behavioral approach. The algorithm is intrinsically robust: with loss of communication among the vehicles the coverage performance (i.e., the mission goal is degraded but not lost. The ensuing form of graceful degradation provides also a reactive measure against Denial of Service. The cooperative algorithm relies on the fact that the available information from the other sensors, though not necessarily complete, is trustworthy. To ensure trustworthiness, a security suite has been designed, specifically oriented to the underwater scenario, and in particular with the goal of reducing the communication overhead introduced by security in terms of number and size of messages. The paper gives implementation details on the integration between the security suite and the cooperative algorithm and provides statistics on the performance of the system as collected during the UAN project sea trial held in Trondheim, Norway, in May 2011.

  15. A fast and accurate decoder for underwater acoustic telemetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingraham, J M; Deng, Z D; Li, X; Fu, T; McMichael, G A; Trumbo, B A

    2014-07-01

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System, developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, has been used to monitor the survival of juvenile salmonids passing through hydroelectric facilities in the Federal Columbia River Power System. Cabled hydrophone arrays deployed at dams receive coded transmissions sent from acoustic transmitters implanted in fish. The signals' time of arrival on different hydrophones is used to track fish in 3D. In this article, a new algorithm that decodes the received transmissions is described and the results are compared to results for the previous decoding algorithm. In a laboratory environment, the new decoder was able to decode signals with lower signal strength than the previous decoder, effectively increasing decoding efficiency and range. In field testing, the new algorithm decoded significantly more signals than the previous decoder and three-dimensional tracking experiments showed that the new decoder's time-of-arrival estimates were accurate. At multiple distances from hydrophones, the new algorithm tracked more points more accurately than the previous decoder. The new algorithm was also more than 10 times faster, which is critical for real-time applications on an embedded system.

  16. Design and Experimental Validation of a USBL Underwater Acoustic Positioning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Joel; Morgado, Marco; Batista, Pedro; Oliveira, Paulo; Silvestre, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the steps for developing a low-cost POrtableNavigation Tool for Underwater Scenarios (PONTUS) to be used as a localization device for subsea targets. PONTUS consists of an integrated ultra-short baseline acoustic positioning system aided by an inertial navigation system. Built on a practical design, it can be mounted on an underwater robotic vehicle or be operated by a scuba diver. It also features a graphical user interface that provides information on the tracking of the designated target, in addition to some details on the physical properties inside PONTUS. A full disclosure of the architecture of the tool is first presented, followed by thorough technical descriptions of the hardware components ensemble and the software development process. A series of experiments was carried out to validate the developed prototype, and the results are presented herein, which allow assessing its overall performance. PMID:27649181

  17. Design and Experimental Validation of a USBL Underwater Acoustic Positioning System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Reis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the steps for developing a low-cost POrtableNavigation Tool for Underwater Scenarios (PONTUS to be used as a localization device for subsea targets. PONTUS consists of an integrated ultra-short baseline acoustic positioning system aided by an inertial navigation system. Built on a practical design, it can be mounted on an underwater robotic vehicle or be operated by a scuba diver. It also features a graphical user interface that provides information on the tracking of the designated target, in addition to some details on the physical properties inside PONTUS. A full disclosure of the architecture of the tool is first presented, followed by thorough technical descriptions of the hardware components ensemble and the software development process. A series of experiments was carried out to validate the developed prototype, and the results are presented herein, which allow assessing its overall performance.

  18. Acoustic communication for Maya Autonomous Underwater Vehicle - performance evaluation of acoustic modem

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Afzulpurkar, S.; Maurya, P.; Navelkar, G.S.; Desa, E.S.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Dabholkar, N.A.; Madhan, R.; Prabhudesai, S.P.

    traffic. This necessitates monitoring the AUV status and data quality through an acoustic link which needs to perform reliably under such conditions, at long range. To address these situations partially, acoustic communication capability is planned...

  19. An explanatory model of underwater adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Colodro

    Full Text Available The underwater environment is an extreme environment that requires a process of human adaptation with specific psychophysiological demands to ensure survival and productive activity. From the standpoint of existing models of intelligence, personality and performance, in this explanatory study we have analyzed the contribution of individual differences in explaining the adaptation of military personnel in a stressful environment. Structural equation analysis was employed to verify a model representing the direct effects of psychological variables on individual adaptation to an adverse environment, and we have been able to confirm, during basic military diving courses, the structural relationships among these variables and their ability to predict a third of the variance of a criterion that has been studied very little to date. In this way, we have confirmed in a sample of professionals (N = 575 the direct relationship of emotional adjustment, conscientiousness and general mental ability with underwater adaptation, as well as the inverse relationship of emotional reactivity. These constructs are the psychological basis for working under water, contributing to an improved adaptation to this environment and promoting risk prevention and safety in diving activities.

  20. Modelling cavitating flow around underwater missiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Petitpas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The diffuse interface model of Saurel et al. (2008 is used for the computation of compressible cavitating flows around underwater missiles. Such systems use gas injection and natural cavitation to reduce drag effects. Consequently material interfaces appear separating liquid and gas. These interfaces may have a really complex dynamics such that only a few formulations are able to predict their evolution. Contrarily to front tracking or interface reconstruction method the interfaces are computed as diffused numerical zones, that are captured in a routinely manner, as is done usually with gas dynamics solvers for shocks and contact discontinuity. With the present approach, a single set of partial differential equations is solved everywhere, with a single numerical scheme. This leads to very efficient solvers. The algorithm derived in Saurel et al. (2009 is used to compute cavitation pockets around solid bodies. It is first validated against experiments done in cavitation tunnel at CNU. Then it is used to compute flows around high speed underwater systems (Shkval-like missile. Performance data are then computed showing method ability to predict forces acting on the system.

  1. Underwater Acoustic Transponders Tracking While Mapping With A Multibeam Echo-Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moustier, C. P.; Franzheim, A.; Testa, W.; Burns, J. M.; Foy, R.

    2010-12-01

    A 160 kHz multibeam echo-sounder was used to interrogate and receive the replies from custom-built miniature underwater acoustic transponders attached to the carapace of king crabs in Womens Bay, Alaska. This new application of multibeam echo-sounders combines acoustic tracking and mapping, thus providing environmental context to the tracking information. Each transponder replies with its own coded sequence that stands out from other echoes received by the sonar. Range and bearing of the replies from multiple transponders can be obtained in a single sonar ping. The king crab experiment was done in 25-35 m of water depth, and the system was successfully tested without animals at 190 m depth. Work supported by NOAA's Undersea Research Program Grant G4768, with field work support from NOAA-NMFS/AFSC/RACE and Electronic Navigation Ltd.

  2. A GPS-free passive acoustic localization scheme for underwater wireless sensor networks

    KAUST Repository

    Mirza, Mohammed

    2011-10-01

    Seaweb is an acoustic communication technology that enables communication between sensor nodes. Seaweb interconnects the underwater nodes through digital signal processing (DSP)-based modem by using acoustic links between the neighbouring sensors. In this paper, we design and investigate a global positioning system (GPS)-free passive localization protocol using seaweb technology. This protocol uses the range data and planar trigonometry to estimate the positions of the discovered nodes. We take into consideration the small displacement of sensor nodes due to watch circles and placement of sensor nodes on non-uniform underwater surface, for precise localization. Once the nodes are localized, we divide the whole network .eld into circular levels that minimizes the traf.c complexity and thereby increases the lifetime of the sensor network .eld. We then form the mesh network inside each of the circular levels that increases the reliability. The algorithm is designed in such a way that it overcomes the ambiguous nodes errata and re.ected paths and makes the algorithm more robust. The synthetic network geometries are so designed which can evaluate the algorithm in the presence of perfect or imperfect ranges or in case of incomplete data. A comparative study is made with the existing algorithms which proves our newly proposed algorithm to be more effective. © 2011 IEEE.

  3. An Alignment Method for the Integration of Underwater 3D Data Captured by a Stereovision System and an Acoustic Camera

    OpenAIRE

    Lagudi, Antonio; Bianco, Gianfranco; Muzzupappa, Maurizio; Bruno, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The integration of underwater 3D data captured by acoustic and optical systems is a promising technique in various applications such as mapping or vehicle navigation. It allows for compensating the drawbacks of the low resolution of acoustic sensors and the limitations of optical sensors in bad visibility conditions. Aligning these data is a challenging problem, as it is hard to make a point-to-point correspondence. This paper presents a multi-sensor registration for the automatic integration...

  4. Underwater striling engine design with modified one-dimensional model

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Daijin; Qin, Kan; Luo, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Stirling engines are regarded as an efficient and promising power system for underwater devices. Currently, many researches on one-dimensional model is used to evaluate thermodynamic performance of Stirling engine, but in which there are still some aspects which cannot be modeled with proper mathematical models such as mechanical loss or auxiliary power. In this paper, a four-cylinder double-acting Stirling engine for Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUVs) is discussed. And a one-dimensional mod...

  5. Acoustic emission source modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hora P.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the acoustic emission (AE source modeling by means of FEM system COMSOL Multiphysics. The following types of sources are used: the spatially concentrated force and the double forces (dipole. The pulse excitation is studied in both cases. As a material is used steel. The computed displacements are compared with the exact analytical solution of point sources under consideration.

  6. An acoustically controlled tetherless underwater vehicle for installation and maintenance of neutrino detectors in the deep ocean

    CERN Document Server

    Ballou, P J

    1997-01-01

    The task of installing and servicing high energy neutrino detectors in the deep ocean from a surface support vessel is problematic using conventional tethered systems. An array of multiple detector strings rising 500 m from the ocean floor, and forming a grid with 50 m spacing between the strings, presents a substantial entanglement hazard for equipment cables deployed from the surface. Such tasks may be accomplished with fewer risks using a tetherless underwater remotely operated vehicle that has a local acoustic telemetry link to send control commands and sensor data between the vehicle and a stationary hydrophone suspended above or just outside the perimeter of the work site. The Phase I effort involves the development of an underwater acoustic telemetry link for vehicle control and sensor feedback, the evaluation of video compression methods for real-time acoustic transmission of video through the water, and the defining of local control routines on board the vehicle to allow it to perform certain basic m...

  7. Simulation of an Underwater Acoustic Communication Channel Characterized by Wind-Generated Surface Waves and Bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dol, H.S.; Ainslie, M.A.; Colin, M.E.G.D.; Janmaat, J.

    2012-01-01

    Sea surface scattering by wind-generated waves and bubbles is regarded to be the main nonplatform-related cause of the time variability of shallow acoustic communication channels. Simulations for predicting the quality of acoustic communication links in such channels thus require adequate modelling

  8. Computer simulations enhance experimental demonstrations in the underwater acoustics and sonar course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Murray S.

    2002-11-01

    Underwater acoustics and sonar (SP411) is a 3 hour course that is offered to midshipmen in their senior year. Typically, general science and oceanography majors, totaling 110 students/yr, enroll. Since this course is offered without a lab, the ''in class'' experience has been enhanced with the development (over many years) of our demo carts and computer workstations which surround the classroom. In a studio classroom atmosphere, students perform a variety of experiments in small groups. How can scientific visualizations best develop learning of complex interactions? Two examples are presented. PC-IMAT (personal curriculum interactive multisensor analysis training) simulations of multielement array steering support the theory and enhance the experiments that are performed in class such as the two-element array. Mathematica simulations involving the programming and animation of a point source in a rigid-rigid infinite parallel wave guide are used to stress the method of images, superposition, group and phase velocity and far-field modal pattern that is observed as a function of depth and source frequency. Later, students have fun using a ripple tank with an eye dropper to generate a point source between two adjustable parallel boundaries, and their understanding of ''underwater sound'' is greatly enhanced.

  9. Energy balanced strategies for maximizing the lifetime of sparsely deployed underwater acoustic sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hanjiang; Guo, Zhongwen; Wu, Kaishun; Hong, Feng; Feng, Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Underwater acoustic sensor networks (UWA-SNs) are envisioned to perform monitoring tasks over the large portion of the world covered by oceans. Due to economics and the large area of the ocean, UWA-SNs are mainly sparsely deployed networks nowadays. The limited battery resources is a big challenge for the deployment of such long-term sensor networks. Unbalanced battery energy consumption will lead to early energy depletion of nodes, which partitions the whole networks and impairs the integrity of the monitoring datasets or even results in the collapse of the entire networks. On the contrary, balanced energy dissipation of nodes can prolong the lifetime of such networks. In this paper, we focus on the energy balance dissipation problem of two types of sparsely deployed UWA-SNs: underwater moored monitoring systems and sparsely deployed two-dimensional UWA-SNs. We first analyze the reasons of unbalanced energy consumption in such networks, then we propose two energy balanced strategies to maximize the lifetime of networks both in shallow and deep water. Finally, we evaluate our methods by simulations and the results show that the two strategies can achieve balanced energy consumption per node while at the same time prolong the networks lifetime.

  10. Adaptive Equalizer Based on Second-Order Cone Programming in Underwater Acoustic Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang CHEN

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An improved adaptive equalizer based on the principle of minimum mean square error (MMSE is proposed. This optimization problem which is shown to be convex, is transformed to second-order cone (SOC and solved using the interior point method instead of conventional iterative methods such as least mean squares (LMS or recursive least squares (RLS. To validate its performance a single-carrier system for underwater acoustic communication with digital phase-locked loop and the adaptive fractional spaced equalizers was designed and a lake trial was carried out. According to the results, comparing with traditional equalizers based on LMS and RLS algorithms, the equalizer proposed needs no iterative process and gets rid of the contradiction between convergent rate and precision. Therefore it overcomes the difficulty of parameters setting. Furthermore, the algorithm needs much less training codes to achieve the same equalization performance and improves the communication efficiency.

  11. An Acoustic OFDM System with Symbol-by-Symbol Doppler Compensation for Underwater Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    MinhHai, Tran; Rie, Saotome; Suzuki, Taisaku; Wada, Tomohisa

    2016-01-01

    We propose an acoustic OFDM system for underwater communication, specifically for vertical link communications such as between a robot in the sea bottom and a mother ship in the surface. The main contributions are (1) estimation of time varying Doppler shift using continual pilots in conjunction with monitoring the drift of Power Delay Profile and (2) symbol-by-symbol Doppler compensation in frequency domain by an ICI matrix representing nonuniform Doppler. In addition, we compare our proposal against a resampling method. Simulation and experimental results confirm that our system outperforms the resampling method when the velocity changes roughly over OFDM symbols. Overall, experimental results taken in Shizuoka, Japan, show our system using 16QAM, and 64QAM achieved a data throughput of 7.5 Kbit/sec with a transmitter moving at maximum 2 m/s, in a complicated trajectory, over 30 m vertically. PMID:27057558

  12. An Acoustic OFDM System with Symbol-by-Symbol Doppler Compensation for Underwater Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran MinhHai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an acoustic OFDM system for underwater communication, specifically for vertical link communications such as between a robot in the sea bottom and a mother ship in the surface. The main contributions are (1 estimation of time varying Doppler shift using continual pilots in conjunction with monitoring the drift of Power Delay Profile and (2 symbol-by-symbol Doppler compensation in frequency domain by an ICI matrix representing nonuniform Doppler. In addition, we compare our proposal against a resampling method. Simulation and experimental results confirm that our system outperforms the resampling method when the velocity changes roughly over OFDM symbols. Overall, experimental results taken in Shizuoka, Japan, show our system using 16QAM, and 64QAM achieved a data throughput of 7.5 Kbit/sec with a transmitter moving at maximum 2 m/s, in a complicated trajectory, over 30 m vertically.

  13. An Acoustic OFDM System with Symbol-by-Symbol Doppler Compensation for Underwater Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MinhHai, Tran; Rie, Saotome; Suzuki, Taisaku; Wada, Tomohisa

    2016-01-01

    We propose an acoustic OFDM system for underwater communication, specifically for vertical link communications such as between a robot in the sea bottom and a mother ship in the surface. The main contributions are (1) estimation of time varying Doppler shift using continual pilots in conjunction with monitoring the drift of Power Delay Profile and (2) symbol-by-symbol Doppler compensation in frequency domain by an ICI matrix representing nonuniform Doppler. In addition, we compare our proposal against a resampling method. Simulation and experimental results confirm that our system outperforms the resampling method when the velocity changes roughly over OFDM symbols. Overall, experimental results taken in Shizuoka, Japan, show our system using 16QAM, and 64QAM achieved a data throughput of 7.5 Kbit/sec with a transmitter moving at maximum 2 m/s, in a complicated trajectory, over 30 m vertically.

  14. Snapping shrimp noise mitigation based on statistical detection in underwater acoustic orthogonal frequency division multiplexing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeonsu; Seo, Jongpil; Ahn, Jongmin; Chung, Jaehak

    2017-07-01

    We propose a mitigation scheme for snapping shrimp noise when it corrupts an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal in underwater acoustic communication systems. The OFDM signal distorted by the snapping shrimp noise is filtered by a band-stop filter. The snapping shrimp noises in the filtered signal are detected by a detector with a constant false alarm rate whose threshold is derived theoretically from the statistics of the background noise. The detected signals are reconstructed by a simple reconstruction method. The proposed scheme has a higher detection capability and a lower mean square error of the channel estimation for simulated data and a lower bit error rate for practical ocean OFDM data collected in northern East China Sea than the conventional noise-mitigating methods.

  15. Diagonal rejection-based minimum variance distortionless response for fiber underwater acoustic array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Zou, Ling; Zhou, Bin

    2017-07-01

    The high mounting precision of the fiber underwater acoustic array leads to an array manifold without perturbation. Besides, the targets are either static or slowly moving in azimuth in underwater acoustic array signal processing. Therefore, the covariance matrix can be estimated accurately by prolonging the observation time. However, this processing is limited to poor bearing resolution due to small aperture, low SNR and strong interferences. In this paper, diagonal rejection (DR) technology for Minimum Variance Distortionless Response (MVDR) was developed to enhance the resolution performance. The core idea of DR is rejecting the main diagonal elements of the covariance matrix to improve the output signal to interference and noise ratio (SINR). The definition of SINR here implicitly assumes independence between the spatial filter and the received observations at which the SINR is measured. The power of noise converges on the diagonal line in the covariance matrix and then it is integrated into the output beams. With the diagonal noise rejected by a factor smaller than 1, the array weights of MVDR will concentrate on interference suppression, leading to a better resolution capability. The algorithm was theoretically proved with optimal rejecting coefficient derived under both infinite and finite snapshots scenarios. Numerical simulations were conducted with an example of a linear array with eight elements half-wavelength spaced. Both resolution and Direction-of-Arrival (DOA) performances of MVDR and DR-based MVDR (DR-MVDR) were compared under different SNR and snapshot numbers. A conclusion can be drawn that with the covariance matrix accurately estimated, DR-MVDR can provide a lower sidelobe output level and a better bearing resolution capacity than MVDR without harming the DOA performance.

  16. Underwater Signal Modeling for Subsurface Classification Using Computational Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setayeshi, Saeed

    In the thesis a method for underwater layered media (UWLM) modeling is proposed, and a simple nonlinear structure for implementation of this model based on the behaviour of its characteristics and the propagation of the acoustic signal in the media accounting for attenuation effects is designed. The model that responds to the acoustic input is employed to test the artificial intelligence classifiers ability. Neural network models, the basic principles of the back-propagation algorithm, and the Hopfield model of associative memories are reviewed, and they are employed to use min-max amplitude ranges of a reflected signal of UWLM based on attenuation effects, to define the classes of the synthetic data, detect its peak features and estimate parameters of the media. It has been found that there is a correlation between the number of layers in the media and the optimum number of nodes in the hidden layer of the neural networks. The integration of the result of the neural networks that classify and detect underwater layered media acoustic signals based on attenuation effects to prove the correspondence between the peak points and decay values has introduced a powerful tool for UWLM identification. The methods appear to have applications in replacing original system, for parameter estimation and output prediction in system identification by the proposed networks. The results of computerized simulation of the UWLM modeling in conjunction with the proposed neural networks training process are given. Fuzzy sets is an idea that allows representing and manipulating inexact concepts, fuzzy min-max pattern classification method, and the learning and recalling algorithms for fuzzy neural networks implementation is explained in this thesis. A fuzzy neural network that uses peak amplitude ranges to define classes is proposed and evaluated for UWLM pattern recognition. It is demonstrated to be able to classify the layered media data sets, and can distinguish between the peak points

  17. Investigation on the Effect of Underwater Acoustic Pressure on the Fundamental Mode of Hollow-Core Photonic Bandgap Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Abdallah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, microstructured optical fibers have become the subject of extensive research as they can be employed in many civilian and military applications. One of the recent areas of research is to enhance the normalized responsivity (NR to acoustic pressure of the optical fiber hydrophones by replacing the conventional single mode fibers (SMFs with hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers (HC-PBFs. However, this needs further investigation. In order to fully understand the feasibility of using HC-PBFs as acoustic pressure sensors and in underwater communication systems, it is important to study their modal properties in this environment. In this paper, the finite element solver (FES COMSOL Multiphysics is used to study the effect of underwater acoustic pressure on the effective refractive index neff of the fundamental mode and discuss its contribution to NR. Besides, we investigate, for the first time to our knowledge, the effect of underwater acoustic pressure on the effective area Aeff and the numerical aperture (NA of the HC-PBF.

  18. EDOVE: Energy and Depth Variance-Based Opportunistic Void Avoidance Scheme for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouk, Safdar Hussain; Ahmed, Syed Hassan; Park, Kyung-Joon; Eun, Yongsoon

    2017-09-26

    Underwater Acoustic Sensor Network (UASN) comes with intrinsic constraints because it is deployed in the aquatic environment and uses the acoustic signals to communicate. The examples of those constraints are long propagation delay, very limited bandwidth, high energy cost for transmission, very high signal attenuation, costly deployment and battery replacement, and so forth. Therefore, the routing schemes for UASN must take into account those characteristics to achieve energy fairness, avoid energy holes, and improve the network lifetime. The depth based forwarding schemes in literature use node's depth information to forward data towards the sink. They minimize the data packet duplication by employing the holding time strategy. However, to avoid void holes in the network, they use two hop node proximity information. In this paper, we propose the Energy and Depth variance-based Opportunistic Void avoidance (EDOVE) scheme to gain energy balancing and void avoidance in the network. EDOVE considers not only the depth parameter, but also the normalized residual energy of the one-hop nodes and the normalized depth variance of the second hop neighbors. Hence, it avoids the void regions as well as balances the network energy and increases the network lifetime. The simulation results show that the EDOVE gains more than 15 % packet delivery ratio, propagates 50 % less copies of data packet, consumes less energy, and has more lifetime than the state of the art forwarding schemes.

  19. Underwater Multi-Vehicle Trajectory Alignment and Mapping Using Acoustic and Optical Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Ricard; Gracias, Nuno; Ridao, Pere

    2016-03-17

    Multi-robot formations are an important advance in recent robotic developments, as they allow a group of robots to merge their capacities and perform surveys in a more convenient way. With the aim of keeping the costs and acoustic communications to a minimum, cooperative navigation of multiple underwater vehicles is usually performed at the control level. In order to maintain the desired formation, individual robots just react to simple control directives extracted from range measurements or ultra-short baseline (USBL) systems. Thus, the robots are unaware of their global positioning, which presents a problem for the further processing of the collected data. The aim of this paper is two-fold. First, we present a global alignment method to correct the dead reckoning trajectories of multiple vehicles to resemble the paths followed during the mission using the acoustic messages passed between vehicles. Second, we focus on the optical mapping application of these types of formations and extend the optimization framework to allow for multi-vehicle geo-referenced optical 3D mapping using monocular cameras. The inclusion of optical constraints is not performed using the common bundle adjustment techniques, but in a form improving the computational efficiency of the resulting optimization problem and presenting a generic process to fuse optical reconstructions with navigation data. We show the performance of the proposed method on real datasets collected within the Morph EU-FP7 project.

  20. Underwater Multi-Vehicle Trajectory Alignment and Mapping Using Acoustic and Optical Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricard Campos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Multi-robot formations are an important advance in recent robotic developments, as they allow a group of robots to merge their capacities and perform surveys in a more convenient way. With the aim of keeping the costs and acoustic communications to a minimum, cooperative navigation of multiple underwater vehicles is usually performed at the control level. In order to maintain the desired formation, individual robots just react to simple control directives extracted from range measurements or ultra-short baseline (USBL systems. Thus, the robots are unaware of their global positioning, which presents a problem for the further processing of the collected data. The aim of this paper is two-fold. First, we present a global alignment method to correct the dead reckoning trajectories of multiple vehicles to resemble the paths followed during the mission using the acoustic messages passed between vehicles. Second, we focus on the optical mapping application of these types of formations and extend the optimization framework to allow for multi-vehicle geo-referenced optical 3D mapping using monocular cameras. The inclusion of optical constraints is not performed using the common bundle adjustment techniques, but in a form improving the computational efficiency of the resulting optimization problem and presenting a generic process to fuse optical reconstructions with navigation data. We show the performance of the proposed method on real datasets collected within the Morph EU-FP7 project.

  1. PASSIVE ACOUSTIC MONITORING OF ODONTOCETES IN THE VICINITY OF PUULOA UNDERWATER DETONATION TRAINING RANGE, HAWAII RANGE COMPLEX, OAHU

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-25

    team University of Hawai’i at Manoa undergraduates was trained by graduate student researchers in MMRP experienced with acoustic data analysis. A... Behavioural effects of exposure to underwater explosions in humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae). Canadian Journal of Zoology, 74(9), 1661-1672...However, most of the samples recording the presence of more distant humpback whales are like this, the low frequencies travelling longer distances

  2. Adaptive Decentralized Control of Mobile Underwater Sensor Networks and Robots for Modeling Underwater Phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrick Detweiler

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the dynamics of bodies of water and their impact on the global environment requires sensing information over the full volume of water. In this article, we develop a gradient-based decentralized controller that dynamically adjusts the depth of a network of underwater sensors to optimize sensing for computing maximally detailed volumetric models. We prove that the controller converges to a local minimum and show how the controller can be extended to work with hybrid robot and sensor network systems. We implement the controller on an underwater sensor network with depth adjustment capabilities. Through simulations and in-situ experiments, we verify the functionality and performance of the system and algorithm.

  3. The Research of Optical Turbulence Model in Underwater Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liying Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to research the effect of turbulence on underwater imaging system and image restoration, the underwater turbulence model is simulated by computer fluid dynamics. This model is obtained in different underwater turbulence intensity, which contains the pressure data that influences refractive index distribution. When the pressure value is conversed to refractive index, the refractive index distribution can be received with the refraction formula. In the condition of same turbulent intensity, the distribution of refractive index presents gradient in the whole region, with disorder and mutations in the local region. With the turbulence intensity increase, the holistic variation of the refractive index in the image is larger, and the refractive index change more tempestuously in the local region. All the above are illustrated by the simulation results with he ray tracing method and turbulent refractive index model. According to different turbulence intensity analysis, it is proved that turbulence causes image distortion and increases noise.

  4. Acoustic emission source modeling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hora, Petr; Červená, Olga

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 1 (2010), s. 25-36 ISSN 1802-680X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1630 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : acoustic emission source * wave propagation * FEM Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  5. Underwater Sound Reference Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Underwater Sound Reference Division (USRD) serves as the U.S. standardizing activity in the area of underwater acoustic measurements, as the National Institute...

  6. Experimental Demonstration of Long-Range Underwater Acoustic Communication Using a Vertical Sensor Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Anbang; Zeng, Caigao; Hui, Juan; Ma, Lin; Bi, Xuejie

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a composite channel virtual time reversal mirror (CCVTRM) for vertical sensor array (VSA) processing and applies it to long-range underwater acoustic (UWA) communication in shallow water. Because of weak signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), it is unable to accurately estimate the channel impulse response of each sensor of the VSA, thus the traditional passive time reversal mirror (PTRM) cannot perform well in long-range UWA communication in shallow water. However, CCVTRM only needs to estimate the composite channel of the VSA to accomplish time reversal mirror (TRM), which can effectively mitigate the inter-symbol interference (ISI) and reduce the bit error rate (BER). In addition, the calculation of CCVTRM is simpler than traditional PTRM. An UWA communication experiment using a VSA of 12 sensors was conducted in the South China Sea. The experiment achieves a very low BER communication at communication rate of 66.7 bit/s over an 80 km range. The results of the sea trial demonstrate that CCVTRM is feasible and can be applied to long-range UWA communication in shallow water. PMID:28653976

  7. A Compressive Multi-Frequency Linear Sampling Method for Underwater Acoustic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqadah, Hatim F

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the use of a qualitative inverse scattering method known as the linear sampling method (LSM) for imaging underwater scenes using limited aperture receiver configurations. The LSM is based on solving a set of unstable integral equations known as the far-field equations and whose stability breaks down even further for under-sampled observation aperture data. Based on the results of a recent study concerning multi-frequency LSM imaging, we propose an iterative inversion method that is founded upon a compressive sensing framework. In particular, we leverage multi-frequency diversity in the data by imposing a partial frequency variation prior on the solution which we show is justified when the frequency bandwidth is sampled finely enough. We formulate an alternating direction method of multiplier approach to minimize the proposed cost function. Proof of concept is established through numerically generated data as well as experimental acoustic measurements taken in a shallow pool facility at the U.S Naval Research Laboratory.

  8. Compression of a Deep Competitive Network Based on Mutual Information for Underwater Acoustic Targets Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Shen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The accuracy of underwater acoustic targets recognition via limited ship radiated noise can be improved by a deep neural network trained with a large number of unlabeled samples. However, redundant features learned by deep neural network have negative effects on recognition accuracy and efficiency. A compressed deep competitive network is proposed to learn and extract features from ship radiated noise. The core idea of the algorithm includes: (1 Competitive learning: By integrating competitive learning into the restricted Boltzmann machine learning algorithm, the hidden units could share the weights in each predefined group; (2 Network pruning: The pruning based on mutual information is deployed to remove the redundant parameters and further compress the network. Experiments based on real ship radiated noise show that the network can increase recognition accuracy with fewer informative features. The compressed deep competitive network can achieve a classification accuracy of 89.1 % , which is 5.3 % higher than deep competitive network and 13.1 % higher than the state-of-the-art signal processing feature extraction methods.

  9. Modeling and Simulation of Underwater Flexible Manipulator as Raleigh Beam Using Bond Graph

    OpenAIRE

    Sumit Kumar; Sunil Kumar; Chandan Deep Singh

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents modeling and simulation of flexible robot in an underwater environment. The underwater environment completely contrasts with ground or space environment. The robot in an underwater situation is subjected to various dynamic forces like buoyancy forces, hydrostatic and hydrodynamic forces. The underwater robot is modeled as Rayleigh beam. The developed model further allows estimating the deflection of tip in two directions. The complete dynamics of the u...

  10. An acoustically controlled tetherless underwater vehicle for installation and maintenance of neutrino detectors in the deep ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballou, Philip J.

    1997-01-01

    The task of installing and servicing high energy neutrino detectors in the deep ocean from a surface support vessel is problematic using conventional tethered systems. An array of multiple detector strings rising 500 m from the ocean floor, and forming a grid with 50 m spacing between the strings, presents a substantial entanglement hazard for equipment cables deployed from the surface. Such tasks may be accomplished with fewer risks using a tetherless underwater remotely operated vehicle that has a local acoustic telemetry link to send control commands and sensor data between the vehicle and a stationary hydrophone suspended above or just outside the perimeter of the work site. The Phase I effort involves the development of an underwater acoustic telemetry link for vehicle control and sensor feedback, the evaluation of video compression methods for real-time acoustic transmission of video through the water, and the defining of local control routines on board the vehicle to allow it to perform certain basic maneuvering tasks autonomously, or to initiate a self-rescue if the acoustic control link should be lost. In Phase II, a prototype tetherless vehicle system will be designed and constructed to demonstrate the ability to install cable interconnections within a detector array at 4 km depth. The same control technology could be used with a larger more powerful vehicle to maneuver the detector strings into desired positions as they are being lowered to the ocean floor

  11. An acoustically controlled tetherless underwater vehicle for installation and maintenance of neutrino detectors in the deep ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballou, Philip J.

    1997-02-01

    The task of installing and servicing high energy neutrino detectors in the deep ocean from a surface support vessel is problematic using conventional tethered systems. An array of multiple detector strings rising 500 m from the ocean floor, and forming a grid with 50 m spacing between the strings, presents a substantial entanglement hazard for equipment cables deployed from the surface. Such tasks may be accomplished with fewer risks using a tetherless underwater remotely operated vehicle that has a local acoustic telemetry link to send control commands and sensor data between the vehicle and a stationary hydrophone suspended above or just outside the perimeter of the work site. The Phase I effort involves the development of an underwater acoustic telemetry link for vehicle control and sensor feedback, the evaluation of video compression methods for real-time acoustic transmission of video through the water, and the defining of local control routines on board the vehicle to allow it to perform certain basic maneuvering tasks autonomously, or to initiate a self-rescue if the acoustic control link should be lost. In Phase II, a prototype tetherless vehicle system will be designed and constructed to demonstrate the ability to install cable interconnections within a detector array at 4 km depth. The same control technology could be used with a larger more powerful vehicle to maneuver the detector strings into desired positions as they are being lowered to the ocean floor.

  12. A Support Vector Learning-Based Particle Filter Scheme for Target Localization in Communication-Constrained Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinbin; Zhang, Chenglin; Yan, Lei; Han, Song; Guan, Xinping

    2017-12-21

    Target localization, which aims to estimate the location of an unknown target, is one of the key issues in applications of underwater acoustic sensor networks (UASNs). However, the constrained property of an underwater environment, such as restricted communication capacity of sensor nodes and sensing noises, makes target localization a challenging problem. This paper relies on fractional sensor nodes to formulate a support vector learning-based particle filter algorithm for the localization problem in communication-constrained underwater acoustic sensor networks. A node-selection strategy is exploited to pick fractional sensor nodes with short-distance pattern to participate in the sensing process at each time frame. Subsequently, we propose a least-square support vector regression (LSSVR)-based observation function, through which an iterative regression strategy is used to deal with the distorted data caused by sensing noises, to improve the observation accuracy. At the same time, we integrate the observation to formulate the likelihood function, which effectively update the weights of particles. Thus, the particle effectiveness is enhanced to avoid "particle degeneracy" problem and improve localization accuracy. In order to validate the performance of the proposed localization algorithm, two different noise scenarios are investigated. The simulation results show that the proposed localization algorithm can efficiently improve the localization accuracy. In addition, the node-selection strategy can effectively select the subset of sensor nodes to improve the communication efficiency of the sensor network.

  13. Efficient Weibull channel model for salinity induced turbulent underwater wireless optical communications

    KAUST Repository

    Oubei, Hassan M.

    2017-12-13

    Recent advances in underwater wireless optical communications necessitate a better understanding of the underwater channel. We propose the Weibull model to characterize the fading of salinity induced turbulent underwater wireless optical channels. The model shows an excellent agreement with the measured data under all channel conditions.

  14. Improving the Navy’s Passive Underwater Acoustic Monitoring of Marine Mammal Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    modeling effort. The C version of the Range-dependent Acoustic Model (“ CRAM ”), a parabolic equation-based numerical model developed by Richard...of humpback whale vocalizations originating in the shallow water reef areas just west of Kauai, Hawaii to the Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF...are poorly sorted compared to the well sorted, fine- grained quartz sediments of terrigenous origin often found in other shallow water environments

  15. Warfare Ecology on an Underwater Demolition Range: Acoustic Observations of Marine Life and Shallow Water Detonations in Hawai`i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Lee H.

    Most studies investigating the effects of military-associated anthropogenic noise concentrate on deep sea or open ocean propagation of sonar and its effect on marine mammals. In littoral waters, U.S. military special operations units regularly conduct shallow water explosives training, yet relatively little attention has been given to the potential impact on nearshore marine ecosystems from these underwater detonations. This dissertation research focused on the Pu'uloa Underwater Detonation Range off the coast of O`ahu, and examined multiple aspects of the surrounding marine ecosystem and the effects of detonations using acoustic monitoring techniques. The soundscape of a nearshore reef ecosystem adjacent to the UNDET range was characterized through analysis of passive acoustic recordings collected over the span of 6 years. Snapping shrimp were the predominant source of noise, and a diel pattern was present, with increased sound energy during the night hours. Results revealed a difference of up to 7dB between two Ecological Acoustic Recorder locations 2.5km apart along the 60ft isobath. Passive acoustic recording files were searched visually and aurally for odontocete whistles. Whistles were detected in only 0.6% of files analyzed, indicating this area is not frequently transited by coastal odontocete emitting social sounds. The study also opportunistically captured a humpback whale singing during a detonation event, during which the animal showed no obvious alteration of its singing behavior. Four separate underwater detonation events were recorded using a surface deployed F-42C transducer, and the resulting analysis showed no measurable drop in the biologically produced acoustic energy in reaction to the explosive events. Coral reef fishes were recorded visually and acoustically during detonation events at a known distance and bearing from a known explosive sound source. Individual fish behavioral responses to the explosion varied, and a sharp uptick in fish

  16. Underwater wireless optical communications: From system-level demonstrations to channel modelling

    KAUST Repository

    Oubei, Hassan M.

    2018-01-09

    In this paper, we discuss about recent experimental advances in underwater wireless optical communications (UWOC) over various underwater channel water types using different modulation schemes as well as modelling and describing the statistical properties of turbulence-induced fading in underwater wireless optical channels using laser beam intensity fluctuations measurements.

  17. Analysis of underwater decoupling properties of a locally resonant acoustic metamaterial coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Ling-Zhi; Xiao Yong; Wen Ji-Hong; Yang Hai-Bin; Wen Xi-Sen

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a semi-analytical solution for the vibration and sound radiation of a semi-infinite plate covered by a decoupling layer consisting of locally resonant acoustic metamaterial. Formulations are derived based on a combination use of effective medium theory and the theory of elasticity for the decoupling material. Theoretical results show good agreements between the method developed in this paper and the conventional finite element method (FEM), but the method of this paper is more efficient than FEM. Numerical results also show that system with acoustic metamaterial decoupling layer exhibits significant noise reduction performance at the local resonance frequency of the acoustic metamaterial, and such performance can be ascribed to the vibration suppression of the base plate. It is demonstrated that the effective density of acoustic metamaterial decoupling layer has a great influence on the mechanical impedance of the system. Furthermore, the resonance frequency of locally resonant structure can be effectively predicted by a simple model, and it can be significantly affected by the material properties of the locally resonant structure. (paper)

  18. Research on the Combination of Underwater Acoustic Countermeasure Equipments Against Torpedo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Jie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Today the use of acoustic countermeasure equipment has become the main means in submarine defense torpedo operation. Combination of acoustic countermeasure equipments are used during the operation so that we can amplify the countermeasure effect. Based on the subject of the acoustic countermeasure equipments’ combined use, this paper analyses the interference between these soft kill countermeasure equipments including gas curtain, acoustic decoy and acoustic interferometer, summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of the different combined use of acoustic countermeasure equipments.

  19. Detection and localisation of very high energy particles in underwater acoustic; Detection et localisation de particules de tres hautes energies en acoustique sous-marine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juennard, N

    2007-12-15

    The theme of this thesis is included in the Antares international project whose object is to build a neutrino telescope located in a deep water environment in the Mediterranean sea. In deep water sea, a neutrino can interact with a water molecule. The collision generates a luminous flash and an acoustic wave. The goal of this work is to study this acoustic sound wave and develop a system able to detect the corresponding wave front and to estimate the initial direction of the particle. We first focus on the acoustic sound wave. Two different models are studied, and works made recently have led to a mathematical expression of both signal and wave front. Then, several detection methods are studied, from the most classical to the more recent ones. The experimental comparison in semi-real situation leads to the choice of a detection method: the Extended stochastic matched filter. Position and direction of the neutrino are now estimated with a Gauss-Newton inspired algorithm. This estimator is based on a wave front propagation model and on the time detection information given by the telescope hydro-phones. Performances of the system are then estimated. An antenna structure is then proposed and a global simulation finalizes this thesis. In this simulation, detection and estimation are based on the results found in the previous sections. Underwater sea noise is real and the results of the simulation valid our works. (author)

  20. AFSC/ABL: Autonomous underwater vehicle for tracking acoustically-tagged fish 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) are increasingly being used to collect physical, chemical, and biological information in the marine environment. Recent efforts...

  1. Acoustic target models and phenomenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiswander, Paul R.; Kaiser, Stephen G.

    2000-07-01

    Ground-based and airborne acoustic systems often target vehicles that are powered by reciprocating internal combustion engines. Typically the far-field acoustic spectra of these vehicles are dominated by a few narrow spectral lines that are harmonically related. The dominant harmonics change with engine speed and also with emission angle. This paper describes a simple model that recreates some of this variability. The model breaks the far-field signature into two components: the generation of a train of pressure pulses at each exhaust outlet, and the radiation of sound pressures from the outlet(s) to the far field. Predictions are compared with field test data for two ground vehicles.

  2. GSR-TDMA: A Geometric Spatial Reuse-Time Division Multiple Access MAC Protocol for Multihop Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changho Yun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonnegligible propagation delay of acoustic signals causes spatiotemporal uncertainty that occasionally enables simultaneous, collision-free packet transmission among underwater nodes (UNs. These transmissions can be handled by efficiently managing the channel access of the UNs in the data-link layer. To this end, Geometric Spatial Reuse-TDMA (GSR-TDMA, a new TDMA-based MAC protocol, is designed for use in centralized, multihop underwater acoustic sensor networks (UASNs, and in this case all UNs are periodically scheduled after determining a geometric map according to the information on their location. The scheduling strategy increases the number of UNs that send packets coincidentally via two subscheduling configurations (i.e., interhop and intrahop scheduling. Extensive simulations are used to investigate the reception success rate (RSR and the multihop delay (MHD of GSR-TDMA, and the results are compared to those of previous approaches, including C-MAC and HSR-TDMA. GSR-TDMA outperforms C-MAC; the RSR of GSR-TDMA is 15% higher than that of C-MAC, and the MHD of GSR-TDMA is 30% lower than that of C-MAC at the most. In addition, GSR-TDMA provides even better performance improvements over HSR-TDMA; the RSR of GSR-TDMA is 50% higher than that of HSR-TDMA, and the MHD of GSR-TDMA is an order of 102 lower than that of HSR-TDMA at the most.

  3. Underwater drag-reducing effect of superhydrophobic submarine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Songsong; Ouyang, Xiao; Li, Jie; Gao, Shan; Han, Shihui; Liu, Lianhe; Wei, Hao

    2015-01-01

    To address the debates on whether superhydrophobic coatings can reduce fluid drag for underwater motions, we have achieved an underwater drag-reducing effect of large superhydrophobic submarine models with a feature size of 3.5 cm × 3.7 cm × 33.0 cm through sailing experiments of submarine models, modified with and without superhydrophobic surface under similar power supply and experimental conditions. The drag reduction rate reached as high as 15%. The fabrication of superhydrophobic coatings on a large area of submarine model surfaces was realized by immobilizing hydrophobic copper particles onto a precross-linked polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface. The pre-cross-linking time was optimized at 20 min to obtain good superhydrophobicity for the underwater drag reduction effect by investigating the effect of pre-cross-linking on surface wettability and water adhesive property. We do believe that superhydrophobic coatings may provide a promising application in the field of drag-reducing of vehicle motions on or under the water surface.

  4. An Alignment Method for the Integration of Underwater 3D Data Captured by a Stereovision System and an Acoustic Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagudi, Antonio; Bianco, Gianfranco; Muzzupappa, Maurizio; Bruno, Fabio

    2016-04-14

    The integration of underwater 3D data captured by acoustic and optical systems is a promising technique in various applications such as mapping or vehicle navigation. It allows for compensating the drawbacks of the low resolution of acoustic sensors and the limitations of optical sensors in bad visibility conditions. Aligning these data is a challenging problem, as it is hard to make a point-to-point correspondence. This paper presents a multi-sensor registration for the automatic integration of 3D data acquired from a stereovision system and a 3D acoustic camera in close-range acquisition. An appropriate rig has been used in the laboratory tests to determine the relative position between the two sensor frames. The experimental results show that our alignment approach, based on the acquisition of a rig in several poses, can be adopted to estimate the rigid transformation between the two heterogeneous sensors. A first estimation of the unknown geometric transformation is obtained by a registration of the two 3D point clouds, but it ends up to be strongly affected by noise and data dispersion. A robust and optimal estimation is obtained by a statistical processing of the transformations computed for each pose. The effectiveness of the method has been demonstrated in this first experimentation of the proposed 3D opto-acoustic camera.

  5. An Alignment Method for the Integration of Underwater 3D Data Captured by a Stereovision System and an Acoustic Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Lagudi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The integration of underwater 3D data captured by acoustic and optical systems is a promising technique in various applications such as mapping or vehicle navigation. It allows for compensating the drawbacks of the low resolution of acoustic sensors and the limitations of optical sensors in bad visibility conditions. Aligning these data is a challenging problem, as it is hard to make a point-to-point correspondence. This paper presents a multi-sensor registration for the automatic integration of 3D data acquired from a stereovision system and a 3D acoustic camera in close-range acquisition. An appropriate rig has been used in the laboratory tests to determine the relative position between the two sensor frames. The experimental results show that our alignment approach, based on the acquisition of a rig in several poses, can be adopted to estimate the rigid transformation between the two heterogeneous sensors. A first estimation of the unknown geometric transformation is obtained by a registration of the two 3D point clouds, but it ends up to be strongly affected by noise and data dispersion. A robust and optimal estimation is obtained by a statistical processing of the transformations computed for each pose. The effectiveness of the method has been demonstrated in this first experimentation of the proposed 3D opto-acoustic camera.

  6. Modelling, Design and Robust Control of a Remotely Operated Underwater Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Govinda García-Valdovinos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Underwater remotely operated vehicles (ROVs play an important role in a number of shallow and deep-water missions for marine science, oil and gas extraction, exploration and salvage. In these applications, the motions of the ROV are guided either by a human pilot on a surface support vessel through an umbilical cord providing power and telemetry, or by an automatic pilot. In the case of automatic control, ROV state feedback is provided by acoustic and inertial sensors and this state information, along with a controller strategy, is used to perform several tasks such as station-keeping and auto-immersion/heading, among others. In this paper, the modelling, design and control of the Kaxan ROV is presented: i The complete six degrees of freedom, non linear hydrodynamic model with its parameters, ii the Kaxan hardware/software architecture, iii numerical simulations in Matlab/Simulink platform of a model-free second order sliding mode control along with ocean currents as disturbances and thruster dynamics, iv a virtual environment to visualize the motion of the Kaxan ROV and v experimental results of a one degree of freedom underwater system.

  7. Evaluation of an Efficient Approach for Target Tracking from Acoustic Imagery for the Perception System of an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián A. Villar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the core algorithms of the perception system to be included within an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV. This perception system is based on the acoustic data acquired from side scan sonar (SSS. These data should be processed in an efficient time, so that the perception system is able to detect and recognize a predefined target. This detection and recognition outcome is therefore an important piece of knowledge for the AUVs dynamic mission planner (DMP. Effectively, the DMP should propose different trajectories, navigation depths and other parameters that will change the robot's behaviour according to the perception system output. Hence, the time in which to make a decision is critical in order to assure safe robot operation and to acquire good quality data; consequently, the efficiency of the on-line image processing from acoustic data is a key issue. Current techniques for acoustic data processing are time and computationally intensive. Hence, it was decided to process data coming from a SSS using a technique that is used for radars, due to its efficiency and its amenability to on-line processing. The engineering problem to solve in this case was underwater pipeline tracking for routine inspections in the off-shore industry. Then, an automatic oil pipeline detection system was developed borrowing techniques from the processing of radar measurements. The radar technique is known as Cell Average – Constant False Alarm Rate (CA – CFAR. With a slight variation of the algorithms underlying this radar technique, which consisted of the previous accumulation of partial sums, a great improvement in computing time and effort was achieved. Finally, a comparison with previous approaches over images acquired with a SSS from a vessel in the Salvador de Bahia bay in Brazil showed the feasibility of using this on-board technique for AUV perception.

  8. Risk mapping for sensitive species to underwater anthropogenic sound emissions: model development and validation in two Mediterranean areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzellino, A; Lanfredi, C; D'Amico, A; Pavan, G; Podestà, M; Haun, J

    2011-01-01

    Recent observations of cetacean mass strandings, coincident with anthropogenic sounds emissions, have raised concerns on the potential environmental impact of underwater noise. Cuvier's beaked whale (Ziphius cavirostris) was reported in all the cited stranding events. Within the NATO Marine Mammal Risk Mitigation project (MMRM), multiple interdisciplinary sea trials have been conducted in the Mediterranean Sea with the objective of developing tools and procedures to mitigate the impact of underwater sound emissions. During these cruises, visual observations, passive acoustic detections and environmental data were collected. The aim of this study was to evaluate "a priori" predictions of Cuvier's beaked whale presence in the Alboran Sea, using models developed in the Ligurian Sea that employ bathymetric and chlorophyll features as predictors. The accuracy of these predictions was found adequate and elements are given to account for the uncertainties associated to the use of models developed in areas different from their calibration site. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Prevention of Pressure Oscillations in Modeling a Cavitating Acoustic Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Klenow

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cavitation effects play an important role in the UNDEX loading of a structure. For far-field UNDEX, the structural loading is affected by the formation of local and bulk cavitation regions, and the pressure pulses resulting from the closure of the cavitation regions. A common approach to numerically modeling cavitation in far-field underwater explosions is Cavitating Acoustic Finite Elements (CAFE and more recently Cavitating Acoustic Spectral Elements (CASE. Treatment of cavitation in this manner causes spurious pressure oscillations which must be treated by a numerical damping scheme. The focus of this paper is to investigate the severity of these oscillations on the structural response and a possible improvement to CAFE, based on the original Boris and Book Flux-Corrected Transport algorithm on structured meshes [6], to limit oscillations without the energy loss associated with the current damping schemes.

  10. Underwater striling engine design with modified one-dimensional model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Daijin; Qin, Kan; Luo, Kai

    2015-09-01

    Stirling engines are regarded as an efficient and promising power system for underwater devices. Currently, many researches on one-dimensional model is used to evaluate thermodynamic performance of Stirling engine, but in which there are still some aspects which cannot be modeled with proper mathematical models such as mechanical loss or auxiliary power. In this paper, a four-cylinder double-acting Stirling engine for Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUVs) is discussed. And a one-dimensional model incorporated with empirical equations of mechanical loss and auxiliary power obtained from experiments is derived while referring to the Stirling engine computer model of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The P-40 Stirling engine with sufficient testing results from NASA is utilized to validate the accuracy of this one-dimensional model. It shows that the maximum error of output power of theoretical analysis results is less than 18% over testing results, and the maximum error of input power is no more than 9%. Finally, a Stirling engine for UUVs is designed with Schmidt analysis method and the modified one-dimensional model, and the results indicate this designed engine is capable of showing desired output power.

  11. Underwater striling engine design with modified one-dimensional model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daijin Li

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Stirling engines are regarded as an efficient and promising power system for underwater devices. Currently, many researches on one-dimensional model is used to evaluate thermodynamic performance of Stirling engine, but in which there are still some aspects which cannot be modeled with proper mathematical models such as mechanical loss or auxiliary power. In this paper, a four-cylinder double-acting Stirling engine for Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUVs is discussed. And a one-dimensional model incorporated with empirical equations of mechanical loss and auxiliary power obtained from experiments is derived while referring to the Stirling engine computer model of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA. The P-40 Stirling engine with sufficient testing results from NASA is utilized to validate the accuracy of this one-dimensional model. It shows that the maximum error of output power of theoretical analysis results is less than 18% over testing results, and the maximum error of input power is no more than 9%. Finally, a Stirling engine for UUVs is designed with Schmidt analysis method and the modified one-dimensional model, and the results indicate this designed engine is capable of showing desired output power.

  12. Underwater Acoustic Wireless Sensor Networks: Advances and Future Trends in Physical, MAC and Routing Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Climent, S.; Sanchez, A.; Capella, J.V.; Meratnia, Nirvana; Serrano, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    This survey aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the current research on underwater wireless sensor networks, focusing on the lower layers of the communication stack, and envisions future trends and challenges. It analyzes the current state-of-the-art on the physical, medium access control

  13. Underwater robots

    CERN Document Server

    Antonelli, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    This book, now at the third edition, addresses the main control aspects in underwater manipulation tasks. The mathematical model with significant impact on the control strategy is discussed. The problem of controlling a 6-degrees-of-freedoms autonomous underwater vehicle is deeply investigated and a survey of fault detection/tolerant strategies for unmanned underwater vehicles is provided. Inverse kinematics, dynamic and interaction control for underwater vehicle-manipulator systems are then discussed. The code used to generate most of the numerical simulations is made available and briefly discussed.       

  14. Modeling and Simulation of Motion of an Underwater Robot Glider for Shallow-water Ocean Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Wang; Amir Anvar

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the modeling and simulation of an underwater robot glider used in the shallow-water environment. We followed the Equations of motion derived by [2] and simplified dynamic Equations of motion of an underwater glider according to our underwater glider. A simulation code is built and operated in the MATLAB Simulink environment so that we can make improvements to our testing glider design. It may be also used to validate a robot glider design.

  15. CFD and FEM Model of an Underwater Vehicle Propeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chruściel Tadeusz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of the project for design and optimization of the Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV, research on its propulsion has been carried out. Te entire project was supported by CFD and FEM calculations taking into account the characteristics of the underwater vehicle. One of the tasks was to optimize the semi-open duct for horizontal propellers, which provided propulsion and controllability in horizontal plane. In order to create a measurable model of this task it was necessary to analyze numerical methodology of propeller design, along with the structure of a propellers with nozzles and contra-rotating propellers. It was confronted with theoretical solutions which included running of the analyzed propeller near an underwater vehicle. Also preliminary qualitative analyses of a simplified system with contra-rotating propellers and a semi-open duct were carried out. Te obtained results enabled to make a decision about the ROVs duct form. Te rapid prototyping SLS (Selective Laser Sintering method was used to fabricate a physical model of the propeller. As a consequence of this, it was necessary to verify the FEM model of the propeller, which based on the load obtained from the CFD model. Te article contains characteristics of the examined ROV, a theoretical basis of propeller design for the analyzed cases, and the results of CFD and FEM simulations.

  16. Simulation of an Underwater Acoustic Communication Channel Characterized by Wind-Generated Surface Waves and Bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dol, H.S.; Colin, M.E.G.D.; Ainslie, M.A.; Walree, P.A. van; Janmaat, J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract—Sea-surface scattering by wind-generated waves and bubbles is regarded to be the main nonplatform related cause of the time variability of shallow acoustic communication channels. Simulations for predicting the quality of acoustic communication links in such channels thus require adequate

  17. A PROPOSAL FOR A SUSTAINABLE MODEL BASED UPON UNDERWATER TOURISM RESEARCH IN AYVALIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. GÖKDENİZ

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Underwater sports are the activities being done with the aims of witnessing the beauties, hunting, taking photos, the ecology and the archaeology of underwater analysing or finding out the human being’s boundaries by improving the physical and psychological skills of men. The initial aim of this project is to increase the underwater flora and the fauna heritage of Ayvalık and to bring them in tourism. Ayvalık is on the west coast of Turkey. It is getting more and more famous with its underwater richness. Also, to form a new underwater sports centre in order to contribute to the improvement of the region. By providing visual attractiveness, the tourists related to underwater sports will pay attention to Ayvalık and underwater tourism will contribute much to the economy of the region. The aim of this project is to improve the underwater sports which is now a hobby than a sport. In Ayvalık Underwater World study, we dealt with 247 divers and 4 underwater sports club. In this study, we analysed the expectation, satisfaction, demographic and economic level of 247 divers about the services in the region. Interview technique has been used in the study on the 4 underwater sports clubs which are hosting divers. As a conclusion, a report has been prepared in which detailed information and proposals are presented by developing a sustainable marketing model concerned with the underwater sports for those who want to possess information, shareholders of the sector and make analyse about tourism.

  18. Thruster Modelling for Underwater Vehicle Using System Identification Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Shahrieel Mohd Aras

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper describes a study of thruster modelling for a remotely operated underwater vehicle (ROV by system identification using Microbox 2000/2000C. Microbox 2000/2000C is an XPC target machine device to interface between an ROV thruster with the MATLAB 2009 software. In this project, a model of the thruster will be developed first so that the system identification toolbox in MATLAB can be used. This project also presents a comparison of mathematical and empirical modelling. The experiments were carried out by using a mini compressor as a dummy depth pressure applied to a pressure sensor. The thruster model will thrust and submerge until it reaches a set point and maintain the set point depth. The depth was based on pressure sensor measurement. A conventional proportional controller was used in this project and the results gathered justified its selection.

  19. Underwater optical wireless communication network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnon, Shlomi

    2010-01-01

    The growing need for underwater observation and subsea monitoring systems has stimulated considerable interest in advancing the enabling technologies of underwater wireless communication and underwater sensor networks. This communication technology is expected to play an important role in investigating climate change, in monitoring biological, biogeochemical, evolutionary, and ecological changes in the sea, ocean, and lake environments, and in helping to control and maintain oil production facilities and harbors using unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs), submarines, ships, buoys, and divers. However, the present technology of underwater acoustic communication cannot provide the high data rate required to investigate and monitor these environments and facilities. Optical wireless communication has been proposed as the best alternative to meet this challenge. Models are presented for three kinds of optical wireless communication links: (a) a line-of-sight link, (b) a modulating retroreflector link, and (c) a reflective link, all of which can provide the required data rate. We analyze the link performance based on these models. From the analysis, it is clear that as the water absorption increases, the communication performance decreases dramatically for the three link types. However, by using the scattered light it was possible to mitigate this decrease in some cases. It is concluded from the analysis that a high-data-rate underwater optical wireless network is a feasible solution for emerging applications such as UUV-to-UUV links and networks of sensors, and extended ranges in these applications could be achieved by applying a multi-hop concept.

  20. Towards a complete physically based forecast model for underwater noise related to impact pile driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Moritz B; Rolfes, Raimund

    2015-03-01

    An approach for the prediction of underwater noise caused by impact pile driving is described and validated based on in situ measurements. The model is divided into three sub-models. The first sub-model, based on the finite element method, is used to describe the vibration of the pile and the resulting acoustic radiation into the surrounding water and soil column. The mechanical excitation of the pile by the piling hammer is estimated by the second sub-model using an analytical approach which takes the large vertical dimension of the ram into account. The third sub-model is based on the split-step Padé solution of the parabolic equation and targets the long-range propagation up to 20 km. In order to presume realistic environmental properties for the validation, a geoacoustic model is derived from spatially averaged geological information about the investigation area. Although it can be concluded from the validation that the model and the underlying assumptions are appropriate, there are some deviations between modeled and measured results. Possible explanations for the observed errors are discussed.

  1. Validation of multi-body modelling methodology for reconfigurable underwater robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M.C.; Eidsvik, O. A.; Blanke, Mogens

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the problem of employing reconfigurable robots in an underwater setting. The main results presented is the experimental validation of a modelling methodology for a system consisting of N dynamically connected robots with heterogeneous dynamics. Two distinct types...... of experiments are performed, a series of hydrostatic free-decay tests and a series of open-loop trajectory tests. The results are compared to a simulation based on the modelling methodology. The modelling methodology shows promising results for usage with systems composed of reconfigurable underwater modules....... The purpose of the model is to enable design of control strategies for cooperative reconfigurable underwater systems....

  2. Parametric geometric model and shape optimization of an underwater glider with blended-wing-body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chunya; Song, Baowei; Wang, Peng

    2015-11-01

    Underwater glider, as a new kind of autonomous underwater vehicles, has many merits such as long-range, extended-duration and low costs. The shape of underwater glider is an important factor in determining the hydrodynamic efficiency. In this paper, a high lift to drag ratio configuration, the Blended-Wing-Body (BWB), is used to design a small civilian under water glider. In the parametric geometric model of the BWB underwater glider, the planform is defined with Bezier curve and linear line, and the section is defined with symmetrical airfoil NACA 0012. Computational investigations are carried out to study the hydrodynamic performance of the glider using the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code Fluent. The Kriging-based genetic algorithm, called Efficient Global Optimization (EGO), is applied to hydrodynamic design optimization. The result demonstrates that the BWB underwater glider has excellent hydrodynamic performance, and the lift to drag ratio of initial design is increased by 7% in the EGO process.

  3. Acoustic Observatory Provides Real-Time Underwater Sounds from the Antarctic Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Boebel, Olaf; Kindermann, Lars; Klinck, Holger; Bornemann, Horst; Plötz, Joachim; Steinhage, Daniel; Riedel, Sven; Burkhardt, Elke

    2006-01-01

    To obtain real-time, year-round acoustic data from the coastal Antarctic Ocean, an autonomous listening station, PALAOA (PerenniAL Acoustic Observatory in the Antarctic Ocean, or Hawaiian whale), was constructed in austral summer 2005/06, 15 km North of the German Neumayer Base. PALAOAs design was guided by demanding prerequisites: perennial, 365/24, autonomous operation, real-time data access, and full frequency and dynamic coverage. The station is located at 70°31S 8°13W, on the Ekström ice...

  4. High-rate wireless data communications: An underwater acoustic communications framework at the physical layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony G. Bessios

    1996-01-01

    the signal represents; 2 estimation of some parameter θˆ associated with the received signal (i.e. range, depth, bearing angle, etc.; 3 classification and source identification; 4 dynamics tracking; 5 navigation (collision avoidance and terminal guidance; 6 countermeasures; and 7 communications. The focus of this paper is acoustic communications.

  5. Underwater Acoustic Measurements to Estimate Wind and Rainfall in the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Pensieri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oceanic ambient noise measurements can be analyzed to obtain qualitative and quantitative information about wind and rainfall phenomena over the ocean filling the existing gap of reliable meteorological observations at sea. The Ligurian Sea Acoustic Experiment was designed to collect long-term synergistic observations from a passive acoustic recorder and surface sensors (i.e., buoy mounted rain gauge and anemometer and weather radar to support error analysis of rainfall rate and wind speed quantification techniques developed in past studies. The study period included combination of high and low wind and rainfall episodes and two storm events that caused two floods in the vicinity of La Spezia and in the city of Genoa in 2011. The availability of high resolution in situ meteorological data allows improving data processing technique to detect and especially to provide effective estimates of wind and rainfall at sea. Results show a very good correspondence between estimates provided by passive acoustic recorder algorithm and in situ observations for both rainfall and wind phenomena and demonstrate the potential of using measurements provided by passive acoustic instruments in open sea for early warning of approaching coastal storms, which for the Mediterranean coastal areas constitutes one of the main causes of recurrent floods.

  6. An acoustical model based monitoring network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, P.W.; Basten, T.G.H.; Eerden, F.J.M. van der

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the approach for an acoustical model based monitoring network is demonstrated. This network is capable of reconstructing a noise map, based on the combination of measured sound levels and an acoustic model of the area. By pre-calculating the sound attenuation within the network the

  7. An adaptive grid to improve the efficiency and accuracy of modelling underwater noise from shipping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigg, Leah; Chen, Feng; Shapiro, Georgy; Ingram, Simon; Embling, Clare

    2017-04-01

    Underwater noise from shipping is becoming a significant concern and has been listed as a pollutant under Descriptor 11 of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive. Underwater noise models are an essential tool to assess and predict noise levels for regulatory procedures such as environmental impact assessments and ship noise monitoring. There are generally two approaches to noise modelling. The first is based on simplified energy flux models, assuming either spherical or cylindrical propagation of sound energy. These models are very quick but they ignore important water column and seabed properties, and produce significant errors in the areas subject to temperature stratification (Shapiro et al., 2014). The second type of model (e.g. ray-tracing and parabolic equation) is based on an advanced physical representation of sound propagation. However, these acoustic propagation models are computationally expensive to execute. Shipping noise modelling requires spatial discretization in order to group noise sources together using a grid. A uniform grid size is often selected to achieve either the greatest efficiency (i.e. speed of computations) or the greatest accuracy. In contrast, this work aims to produce efficient and accurate noise level predictions by presenting an adaptive grid where cell size varies with distance from the receiver. The spatial range over which a certain cell size is suitable was determined by calculating the distance from the receiver at which propagation loss becomes uniform across a grid cell. The computational efficiency and accuracy of the resulting adaptive grid was tested by comparing it to uniform 1 km and 5 km grids. These represent an accurate and computationally efficient grid respectively. For a case study of the Celtic Sea, an application of the adaptive grid over an area of 160×160 km reduced the number of model executions required from 25600 for a 1 km grid to 5356 in December and to between 5056 and 13132 in August, which

  8. An Energy Scaled and Expanded Vector-Based Forwarding Scheme for Industrial Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks with Sink Mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadud, Zahid; Hussain, Sajjad; Javaid, Nadeem; Bouk, Safdar Hussain; Alrajeh, Nabil; Alabed, Mohamad Souheil; Guizani, Nadra

    2017-09-30

    Industrial Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks (IUASNs) come with intrinsic challenges like long propagation delay, small bandwidth, large energy consumption, three-dimensional deployment, and high deployment and battery replacement cost. Any routing strategy proposed for IUASN must take into account these constraints. The vector based forwarding schemes in literature forward data packets to sink using holding time and location information of the sender, forwarder, and sink nodes. Holding time suppresses data broadcasts; however, it fails to keep energy and delay fairness in the network. To achieve this, we propose an Energy Scaled and Expanded Vector-Based Forwarding (ESEVBF) scheme. ESEVBF uses the residual energy of the node to scale and vector pipeline distance ratio to expand the holding time. Resulting scaled and expanded holding time of all forwarding nodes has a significant difference to avoid multiple forwarding, which reduces energy consumption and energy balancing in the network. If a node has a minimum holding time among its neighbors, it shrinks the holding time and quickly forwards the data packets upstream. The performance of ESEVBF is analyzed through in network scenario with and without node mobility to ensure its effectiveness. Simulation results show that ESEVBF has low energy consumption, reduces forwarded data copies, and less end-to-end delay.

  9. Spacecraft Internal Acoustic Environment Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, SShao-sheng R.; Allen, Christopher S.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic modeling can be used to identify key noise sources, determine/analyze sub-allocated requirements, keep track of the accumulation of minor noise sources, and to predict vehicle noise levels at various stages in vehicle development, first with estimates of noise sources, later with experimental data. In FY09, the physical mockup developed in FY08, with interior geometric shape similar to Orion CM (Crew Module) IML (Interior Mode Line), was used to validate SEA (Statistical Energy Analysis) acoustic model development with realistic ventilation fan sources. The sound power levels of these sources were unknown a priori, as opposed to previous studies that RSS (Reference Sound Source) with known sound power level was used. The modeling results were evaluated based on comparisons to measurements of sound pressure levels over a wide frequency range, including the frequency range where SEA gives good results. Sound intensity measurement was performed over a rectangular-shaped grid system enclosing the ventilation fan source. Sound intensities were measured at the top, front, back, right, and left surfaces of the and system. Sound intensity at the bottom surface was not measured, but sound blocking material was placed tinder the bottom surface to reflect most of the incident sound energy back to the remaining measured surfaces. Integrating measured sound intensities over measured surfaces renders estimated sound power of the source. The reverberation time T6o of the mockup interior had been modified to match reverberation levels of ISS US Lab interior for speech frequency bands, i.e., 0.5k, 1k, 2k, 4 kHz, by attaching appropriately sized Thinsulate sound absorption material to the interior wall of the mockup. Sound absorption of Thinsulate was modeled in three methods: Sabine equation with measured mockup interior reverberation time T60, layup model based on past impedance tube testing, and layup model plus air absorption correction. The evaluation/validation was

  10. Apparatus for Changing the Attack Angle of a Cavitator on a Supercavatating Underwater Research Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nedderman, William H

    2005-01-01

    ... tilt the cavitator tilt plate to a desired angle. Power components are remotely located and accessible to an operator so as to enable an operator to vary the angle of the cavitator tilt plate while the supercavitating underwater research model...

  11. Portable Multi Hydrophone Array for Field and Laboratory Measurements of Odontocete Acoustic Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    sound recorded fits established models for underwater shockwave and acoustic propagation. RESULTS Animals are now fully trained for fixed...classification during passive acoustic monitoring. Additionally, this array can be used to measure anthropogenic sounds such as underwater ...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Portable Multi Hydrophone Array for Field and Laboratory

  12. Computational Modeling of Hydrodynamics and Scour around Underwater Munitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Xu, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Munitions deposited in water bodies are a big threat to human health, safety, and environment. It is thus imperative to predict the motion and the resting status of the underwater munitions. A multitude of physical processes are involved, which include turbulent flows, sediment transport, granular material mechanics, 6 degree-of-freedom motion of the munition, and potential liquefaction. A clear understanding of this unique physical setting is currently lacking. Consequently, it is extremely hard to make reliable predictions. In this work, we present the computational modeling of two importance processes, i.e., hydrodynamics and scour, around munition objects. Other physical processes are also considered in our comprehensive model. However, they are not shown in this talk. To properly model the dynamics of the deforming bed and the motion of the object, an immersed boundary method is implemented in the open source CFD package OpenFOAM. Fixed bed and scour cases are simulated and compared with laboratory experiments. The future work of this project will implement the coupling between all the physical processes.

  13. Mechanical model of the ultrafast underwater trap of Utricularia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyeux, Marc; Vincent, Olivier; Marmottant, Philippe

    2011-02-01

    The underwater traps of the carnivorous plants of the Utricularia species catch their prey through the repetition of an “active slow deflation followed by passive fast suction” sequence. In this paper, we propose a mechanical model that describes both phases and strongly supports the hypothesis that the trap door acts as a flexible valve that buckles under the combined effects of pressure forces and the mechanical stimulation of trigger hairs, and not as a panel articulated on hinges. This model combines two different approaches, namely (i) the description of thin membranes as triangle meshes with strain and curvature energy, and (ii) the molecular dynamics approach, which consists of computing the time evolution of the position of each vertex of the mesh according to Langevin equations. The only free parameter in the expression of the elastic energy is the Young's modulus E of the membranes. The values for this parameter are unequivocally obtained by requiring that the trap model fires, like real traps, when the pressure difference between the outside and the inside of the trap reaches about 15 kPa. Among other results, our simulations show that, for a pressure difference slightly larger than the critical one, the door buckles, slides on the threshold, and finally swings wide open, in excellent agreement with the sequence observed in high-speed videos.

  14. Underwater measurements and modeling of a sonic boom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desharnais, Francine; Chapman, David M F

    2002-01-01

    During a sea trial on the Scotian Shelf, acoustic signals from a sonic boom were recorded on 11 hydrophones of a vertical array. The array spanned the lower 50 m of the water column above a sand bank at 76 m water depth. The source of the sonic boom was deduced to be a Concorde supersonic airliner traveling at about Mach 2. The waterborne waveform was observed to decay as an evanescent wave below the sea surface, as expected. The calm weather (sea state 1) resulted in low ambient noise and low self-noise at the hydrophones, and good signal-to-noise ratio on the upper hydrophones; however, the decreased signal amplitude is more difficult to detect towards the lower part of the water column. The period of the observed waveform is of the order 0.23 s, corresponding to a peak frequency of about 3 Hz. The shape of the measured waveform differs noticeably from the theoretical N-shape waveform predicted with Sawyers' theory [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 44, 523-524 (1968)]. A simple shallow-ocean geoacoustic model suggests that this effect may be caused in part by seismo-acoustic interaction of the infrasonic waves with the elastic sediments that form the seabed.

  15. High-Frequency Seafloor Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Darrell R

    2007-01-01

    High-Frequency Seafloor Acoustics is the first book in a new series sponsored by the Office of Naval Research on the latest research in underwater acoustics. This exciting new title provides ready access to experimental data, theory, and models relevant to high-frequency seafloor acoustics and will be of interest to sonar engineers and researchers working in underwater acoustics. The physical characteristics of the seafloor affecting acoustic propagation and scattering are covered, including physical and geoacoustic properties and surface roughness. Current theories for acoustic propagation in sediments are presented along with corresponding models for reflection, scattering, and seafloor penetration. The main text is backed up by an extensive bibliography and technical appendices.

  16. Boussinesq modeling of surface waves due to underwater landslides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Dutykh

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Consideration is given to the influence of an underwater landslide on waves at the surface of a shallow body of fluid. The equations of motion that govern the evolution of the barycenter of the landslide mass include various dissipative effects due to bottom friction, internal energy dissipation, and viscous drag. The surface waves are studied in the Boussinesq scaling, with time-dependent bathymetry. A numerical model for the Boussinesq equations is introduced that is able to handle time-dependent bottom topography, and the equations of motion for the landslide and surface waves are solved simultaneously. The numerical solver for the Boussinesq equations can also be restricted to implement a shallow-water solver, and the shallow-water and Boussinesq configurations are compared. A particular bathymetry is chosen to illustrate the general method, and it is found that the Boussinesq system predicts larger wave run-up than the shallow-water theory in the example treated in this paper. It is also found that the finite fluid domain has a significant impact on the behavior of the wave run-up.

  17. Acoustic inversion with self noise of an autonomous underwater vehicle to measure sound speed in marine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leijen, A.V.; Rothkranz, L.J.M.; Groen, F.C.A.

    2009-01-01

    This work reports on an experiment from the Maritime Rapid Environmental Assessment sea trials in 2007, where autonomous underwater vehicles were deployed for environmental assessment. Even though these underwater vehicles are very quiet platforms, this work investigates the potential of vehicle

  18. A prediction model for two-dimensional pressure distribution from underwater shock wave focusing by an ellipsoidal reflector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Guo, Rui; Chen, Liang; Cao, Yu; Yang, Yongliang; Zhao, Bobo

    2016-12-01

    Underwater shock wave focusing by ellipsoidal reflector is an important method for medical treatment, detection, and acoustic warfare. However, its pressure field is difficult to predict due to complicated physics. In this study, the pressure by focusing is modeled based on theories of shock wave propagation, nonlinear reflection, and nonlinear focusing, and the calculation domain is determined by approximate equations of wave fronts and lines. The pressure field during the whole process is described by combining direct and focusing pressures in the time and space domains. On this basis, the focusing behavior is simulated, and obtained pressure profiles are compared with experimental results, and the influence of reflector length on focusing performance is also discussed. The results indicate that although there are some rough assumptions, this model can simulate the underwater focusing in some detail and does a good job of predicting the pressure distribution, especially for the positive peak pressure, with an error below 10%; as the reflector length increases, the dynamic focus tends to move linearly forward to the other geometric focus, and the pressure gain increases continuously but the growth rate decreases.

  19. ACOUSTIC EFFECTS ON BINARY AEROELASTICITY MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok Hwa Yu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Acoustics is the science concerned with the study of sound. The effects of sound on structures attract overwhelm interests and numerous studies were carried out in this particular area. Many of the preliminary investigations show that acoustic pressure produces significant influences on structures such as thin plate, membrane and also high-impedance medium like water (and other similar fluids. Thus, it is useful to investigate the structure response with the presence of acoustics on aircraft, especially on aircraft wings, tails and control surfaces which are vulnerable to flutter phenomena. The present paper describes the modeling of structural-acoustic interactions to simulate the external acoustic effect on binary flutter model. Here, the binary flutter model which illustrated as a rectangular wing is constructed using strip theory with simplified unsteady aerodynamics involving flap and pitch degree of freedom terms. The external acoustic excitation, on the other hand, is modeled using four-node quadrilateral isoparametric element via finite element approach. Both equations then carefully coupled and solved using eigenvalue solution. The mentioned approach is implemented in MATLAB and the outcome of the simulated result are later described, analyzed and illustrated in this paper.

  20. Analyzing the Performance of Multi-hop Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gibson, John H; Xie, Geoffrey G; Xiao, Yang; Chen, Hui

    2007-01-01

    .... In this paper, we identify the challenges of modeling contention-based medium access control protocols and present a model for analyzing Aloha variants for a simple string topology as a first step...

  1. Parametric geometric model and hydrodynamic shape optimization of a flying-wing structure underwater glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-yu; Yu, Jian-cheng; Zhang, Ai-qun; Wang, Ya-xing; Zhao, Wen-tao

    2017-12-01

    Combining high precision numerical analysis methods with optimization algorithms to make a systematic exploration of a design space has become an important topic in the modern design methods. During the design process of an underwater glider's flying-wing structure, a surrogate model is introduced to decrease the computation time for a high precision analysis. By these means, the contradiction between precision and efficiency is solved effectively. Based on the parametric geometry modeling, mesh generation and computational fluid dynamics analysis, a surrogate model is constructed by adopting the design of experiment (DOE) theory to solve the multi-objects design optimization problem of the underwater glider. The procedure of a surrogate model construction is presented, and the Gaussian kernel function is specifically discussed. The Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm is applied to hydrodynamic design optimization. The hydrodynamic performance of the optimized flying-wing structure underwater glider increases by 9.1%.

  2. Numerical modelling of underwater detonation of non-ideal condensed-phase explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch, Stefan; Nikiforakis, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    The interest in underwater detonation tests originated from the military, since the expansion and subsequent collapse of the explosive bubble can cause considerable damage to surrounding structures or vessels. In military applications, the explosive is typically represented as a pre-burned material under high pressure, a reasonable assumption due to the short reaction zone lengths, and complete detonation of the unreacted explosive. Hence, numerical simulations of underwater detonation tests have been primarily concerned with the prediction of target loading and the damage incurred rather than the accurate modelling of the underwater detonation process. The mining industry in contrast has adopted the underwater detonation test as a means to experimentally characterise the energy output of their highly non-ideal explosives depending on explosive type and charge configuration. This characterisation requires a good understanding of how the charge shape, pond topography, charge depth, and additional charge confinement affect the energy release, some of which can be successfully quantified with the support of accurate numerical simulations. In this work, we propose a numerical framework which is able to capture the non-ideal explosive behaviour and in addition is capable of capturing both length scales: the reaction zone and the pond domain. The length scale problem is overcome with adaptive mesh refinement, which, along with the explosive model, is validated against experimental data of various TNT underwater detonations. The variety of detonation and bubble behaviour observed in non-ideal detonations is demonstrated in a parameter study over the reactivity of TNT. A representative underwater mining test containing an ammonium-nitrate fuel-oil ratestick charge is carried out to demonstrate that the presented method can be readily applied alongside experimental underwater detonation tests.

  3. An underwater optical wireless communication network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnon, Shlomi

    2009-08-01

    The growing need for underwater observation and sub-sea monitoring systems has stimulated considerable interest in advancing the enabling technologies of underwater wireless communication and underwater sensor networks. This communication technology is expected to play an important role in investigating climate change, in monitoring biological, bio-geochemical, evolutionary and ecological changes in the sea, ocean and lake environments and in helping to control and maintain oil production facilities and harbors using unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs), submarines, ships, buoys, and divers. However, the present technology of underwater acoustic communication cannot provide the high data rate required to investigate and monitor these environments and facilities. Optical wireless communication has been proposed as the best alternative to meet this challenge. We present models of three kinds of optical wireless communication links a) a line-of-sight link, b) a modulating retro-reflector link and c) a reflective link, all of which can provide the required data rate. We analyze the link performance based on these models. From the analysis, it is clear that as the water absorption increases, the communication performance decreases dramatically for the three link types. However, by using the scattered lighted it was possible to mitigate this decrease in some cases. We conclude from the analysis that a high data rate underwater optical wireless network is a feasible solution for emerging applications such as UUV to UUV links and networks of sensors, and extended ranges in these applications could be achieved by applying a multi-hop concept.

  4. Bearing and Range Estimation Algorithm for Buried Object in Underwater Acoustics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Han

    2009-01-01

    (DOA of objects and objects-sensors distances, is used in MUSIC algorithm instead of classical model. The influence of the depth of buried objects is discussed. Finally, the numerical results are given in the case of buried cylindrical shells.

  5. Energy based prediction models for building acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunskog, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    In order to reach robust and simplified yet accurate prediction models, energy based principle are commonly used in many fields of acoustics, especially in building acoustics. This includes simple energy flow models, the framework of statistical energy analysis (SEA) as well as more elaborated...... principles as, e.g., wave intensity analysis (WIA). The European standards for building acoustic predictions, the EN 12354 series, are based on energy flow and SEA principles. In the present paper, different energy based prediction models are discussed and critically reviewed. Special attention is placed...... on underlying basic assumptions, such as diffuse fields, high modal overlap, resonant field being dominant, etc., and the consequences of these in terms of limitations in the theory and in the practical use of the models....

  6. Improved Performance of Global Optimisation Methods for Inversion Problems in Underwater Acoustics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moll, C.A.M. van; Simons, D.G.

    2004-01-01

    To invert for parameters of the seabed and the water column, global optimisation methods are used. These methods search for the best parameter combination, so as to make the difference between modelled and measured pressure fields as small as possible. Simulated annealing and genetic algorithms (GA)

  7. Modelling of the underwater disposal of uranium mine tailings in Elliot Lake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbert, B.E.; Scharer, J.M.; Chakravatti, J.L.; Barnes, E.

    1982-01-01

    Underwater disposal of uranium mine tailings from the Elliot Lake area operations offers potential advantages in controlling radon gas release, emission of airborne particulate matter, and acid production from pyrites in the tailings. In addition, the proximity of the three active properties, one owned by Denison Mines Limited and two by Rio Algom Limited, to a large deep lake has spurred interest in the concept. It has been estimated that the placement of approximately 150 million tonnes of tailings from future planned production would occupy less than 20% of the lake volume. To assess the applicability of the underwater tailings disposal concept, a multi-stage study was developed in conjunction with the regulatory agencies. The most important facet identified for investigation during the first-stage investigations was an assessment of the effects of underwater disposal on water quality in the Serpent River Basin watershed. To simulate the effects of underwater disposal, a computer simulation routine was developed and integrated with a water quality model previously developed for the Basin which predicts levels of total dissolved solids, ammonia, dissolved radium-226 and pH. The underwater disposal model component reflects the effects of direct input of tailings into the hypolimnion, the chemical/biological transformation of dissolved constituents in the water column, the reactions of pyritic tailings deposited on the bottom, and the flux of dissolved constituents from the tailings into the water column. To establish site-specific values for the underwater disposal model, field and laboratory experiments were utilized to evaluate rates of pyrite and ammonia oxidation, and pH-alkalinity relationships. The results of these studies and their use in the water quality model are discussed. In addition, the results of two model run simulations are presented. (author)

  8. Information-Theoretic Analysis of Underwater Acoustic OFDM Systems in Highly Dispersive Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois-Xavier Socheleau

    2012-01-01

    established by the ISI/ICI and are based on lower bounds on mutual information that assume independent and identically distributed input data symbols. In agreement with recent statistical analyses of experimental shallow-water data, the channel is modeled as a multivariate Rician fading process with a slowly time-varying mean and with potentially correlated scatterers, which is more general than the common wide-sense stationary uncorrelated scattering model. Numerical assessments on real UA channels with spread factors around 10−1 show that reliable OFDM transmissions at 2 to 4 bits/sec/Hz are achievable provided an average signal-to-noise ratio of 15 to 20 dB.

  9. A Spatial Reference Grid for Real-Time Autonomous Underwater Modeling using 3-D Sonar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auran, P.G.

    1996-12-31

    The offshore industry has recognized the need for intelligent underwater robotic vehicles. This doctoral thesis deals with autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) and concentrates on a data representation for real-time image formation and analysis. Its main objective is to develop a 3-D image representation suitable for autonomous perception objectives underwater, assuming active sonar as the main sensor for perception. The main contributions are: (1) A dynamical image representation for 3-D range data, (2) A basic electronic circuit and software system for 3-D sonar sampling and amplitude thresholding, (3) A model for target reliability, (4) An efficient connected components algorithm for 3-D segmentation, (5) A method for extracting general 3-D geometrical representations from segmented echo clusters, (6) Experimental results of planar and curved target modeling. 142 refs., 120 figs., 10 tabs.

  10. Principles of Sonar Performance Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ainslie, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Sonar performance modelling (SPM) is concerned with the prediction of quantitative measures of sonar performance, such as probability of detection. It is a multidisciplinary subject, requiring knowledge and expertise in the disparate fields of underwater acoustics, acoustical oceanography, sonar

  11. Underwater Cylindrical Object Detection Using the Spectral Features of Active Sonar Signals with Logistic Regression Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoojeong Seo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of detecting objects bottoming on the sea floor is significant in various fields including civilian and military areas. The objective of this study is to investigate the logistic regression model to discriminate the target from the clutter and to verify the possibility of applying the model trained by the simulated data generated by the mathematical model to the real experimental data because it is not easy to obtain sufficient data in the underwater field. In the first stage of this study, when the clutter signal energy is so strong that the detection of a target is difficult, the logistic regression model is employed to distinguish the strong clutter signal and the target signal. Previous studies have found that if the clutter energy is larger, false detection occurs even for the various existing detection schemes. For this reason, the discrete Fourier transform (DFT magnitude spectrum of acoustic signals received by active sonar is applied to train the model to distinguish whether the received signal contains a target signal or not. The goodness of fit of the model is verified in terms of receiver operation characteristic (ROC, area under ROC curve (AUC, and classification table. The detection performance of the proposed model is evaluated in terms of detection rate according to target to clutter ratio (TCR. Furthermore, the real experimental data are employed to test the proposed approach. When using the experimental data to test the model, the logistic regression model is trained by the simulated data that are generated based on the mathematical model for the backscattering of the cylindrical object. The mathematical model is developed according to the size of the cylinder used in the experiment. Since the information on the experimental environment including the sound speed, the sediment type and such is not available, once simulated data are generated under various conditions, valid simulated data are selected using 70% of the

  12. Parametric geometric model and shape optimization of an underwater glider with blended-wing-body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunya Sun

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Underwater glider, as a new kind of autonomous underwater vehicles, has many merits such as long-range, extended-duration and low costs. The shape of underwater glider is an important factor in determining the hydrodynamic efficiency. In this paper, a high lift to drag ratio configuration, the Blended-Wing-Body (BWB, is used to design a small civilian under water glider. In the parametric geometric model of the BWB underwater glider, the planform is defined with Bezier curve and linear line, and the section is defined with symmetrical airfoil NACA 0012. Computational investigations are carried out to study the hydrodynamic performance of the glider using the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD code Fluent. The Kriging-based genetic algorithm, called Efficient Global Optimization (EGO, is applied to hydrodynamic design optimization. The result demonstrates that the BWB underwater glider has excellent hydrodynamic performance, and the lift to drag ratio of initial design is increased by 7% in the EGO process.

  13. A Comprehensive Study on the Internet of Underwater Things: Applications, Challenges, and Channel Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chien-Chi; Lin, Yi-Shan; Wu, Geng-De; Huang, Chun-Ju

    2017-06-22

    The Internet of Underwater Things (IoUT) is a novel class of Internet of Things (IoT), and is defined as the network of smart interconnected underwater objects. IoUT is expected to enable various practical applications, such as environmental monitoring, underwater exploration, and disaster prevention. With these applications, IoUT is regarded as one of the potential technologies toward developing smart cities. To support the concept of IoUT, Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks (UWSNs) have emerged as a promising network system. UWSNs are different from the traditional Territorial Wireless Sensor Networks (TWSNs), and have several unique properties, such as long propagation delay, narrow bandwidth, and low reliability. These unique properties would be great challenges for IoUT. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive study of IoUT, and the main contributions of this paper are threefold: (1) we introduce and classify the practical underwater applications that can highlight the importance of IoUT; (2) we point out the differences between UWSNs and traditional TWSNs, and these differences are the main challenges for IoUT; and (3) we investigate and evaluate the channel models, which are the technical core for designing reliable communication protocols on IoUT.

  14. A Comprehensive Study on the Internet of Underwater Things: Applications, Challenges, and Channel Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chi Kao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Internet of Underwater Things (IoUT is a novel class of Internet of Things (IoT, and is defined as the network of smart interconnected underwater objects. IoUT is expected to enable various practical applications, such as environmental monitoring, underwater exploration, and disaster prevention. With these applications, IoUT is regarded as one of the potential technologies toward developing smart cities. To support the concept of IoUT, Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks (UWSNs have emerged as a promising network system. UWSNs are different from the traditional Territorial Wireless Sensor Networks (TWSNs, and have several unique properties, such as long propagation delay, narrow bandwidth, and low reliability. These unique properties would be great challenges for IoUT. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive study of IoUT, and the main contributions of this paper are threefold: (1 we introduce and classify the practical underwater applications that can highlight the importance of IoUT; (2 we point out the differences between UWSNs and traditional TWSNs, and these differences are the main challenges for IoUT; and (3 we investigate and evaluate the channel models, which are the technical core for designing reliable communication protocols on IoUT.

  15. Time-Dependent Modeling of Underwater Explosions by Convolving Similitude Source with Bandlimited Impulse from the CASS/GRAB Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-30

    pressure Green’s function) is determined from the CASS/GRAB model. The similitude source is based on the work of Hopkinson,9 Arons ,10 Cole,11 and...Swisdak.12 Arons , Cole, and Swisdak summarized most underwater explosive results after World War II. Most work on similitude is based on experimental...Academic Press, 2000. 10. A. B. Arons , “Underwater Explosions Shock Wave Parameters at Large Distances from the Charge,” The Journal of

  16. Assessing the Underwater Acoustics of the World's Largest Vibration Hammer (OCTA-KONG) and Its Potential Effects on the Indo-Pacific Humpbacked Dolphin (Sousa chinensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhitao; Wu, Yuping; Duan, Guoqin; Cao, Hanjiang; Liu, Jianchang; Wang, Kexiong; Wang, Ding

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise in aquatic environments is a worldwide concern due to its potential adverse effects on the environment and aquatic life. The Hongkong-Zhuhai-Macao Bridge is currently under construction in the Pearl River Estuary, a hot spot for the Indo-Pacific humpbacked dolphin (Sousa chinensis) in China. The OCTA-KONG, the world's largest vibration hammer, is being used during this construction project to drive or extract steel shell piles 22 m in diameter. This activity poses a substantial threat to marine mammals, and an environmental assessment is critically needed. The underwater acoustic properties of the OCTA-KONG were analyzed, and the potential impacts of the underwater acoustic energy on Sousa, including auditory masking and physiological impacts, were assessed. The fundamental frequency of the OCTA-KONG vibration ranged from 15 Hz to 16 Hz, and the noise increments were below 20 kHz, with a dominant frequency and energy below 10 kHz. The resulting sounds are most likely detectable by Sousa over distances of up to 3.5 km from the source. Although Sousa clicks do not appear to be adversely affected, Sousa whistles are susceptible to auditory masking, which may negatively impact this species' social life. Therefore, a safety zone with a radius of 500 m is proposed. Although the zero-to-peak source level (SL) of the OCTA-KONG was lower than the physiological damage level, the maximum root-mean-square SL exceeded the cetacean safety exposure level on several occasions. Moreover, the majority of the unweighted cumulative source sound exposure levels (SSELs) and the cetacean auditory weighted cumulative SSELs exceeded the acoustic threshold levels for the onset of temporary threshold shift, a type of potentially recoverable auditory damage resulting from prolonged sound exposure. These findings may aid in the identification and design of appropriate mitigation methods, such as the use of air bubble curtains, “soft start” and “power down

  17. Assessing the underwater acoustics of the world's largest vibration hammer (OCTA-KONG) and its potential effects on the Indo-Pacific humpbacked dolphin (Sousa chinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhitao; Wu, Yuping; Duan, Guoqin; Cao, Hanjiang; Liu, Jianchang; Wang, Kexiong; Wang, Ding

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise in aquatic environments is a worldwide concern due to its potential adverse effects on the environment and aquatic life. The Hongkong-Zhuhai-Macao Bridge is currently under construction in the Pearl River Estuary, a hot spot for the Indo-Pacific humpbacked dolphin (Sousa chinensis) in China. The OCTA-KONG, the world's largest vibration hammer, is being used during this construction project to drive or extract steel shell piles 22 m in diameter. This activity poses a substantial threat to marine mammals, and an environmental assessment is critically needed. The underwater acoustic properties of the OCTA-KONG were analyzed, and the potential impacts of the underwater acoustic energy on Sousa, including auditory masking and physiological impacts, were assessed. The fundamental frequency of the OCTA-KONG vibration ranged from 15 Hz to 16 Hz, and the noise increments were below 20 kHz, with a dominant frequency and energy below 10 kHz. The resulting sounds are most likely detectable by Sousa over distances of up to 3.5 km from the source. Although Sousa clicks do not appear to be adversely affected, Sousa whistles are susceptible to auditory masking, which may negatively impact this species' social life. Therefore, a safety zone with a radius of 500 m is proposed. Although the zero-to-peak source level (SL) of the OCTA-KONG was lower than the physiological damage level, the maximum root-mean-square SL exceeded the cetacean safety exposure level on several occasions. Moreover, the majority of the unweighted cumulative source sound exposure levels (SSELs) and the cetacean auditory weighted cumulative SSELs exceeded the acoustic threshold levels for the onset of temporary threshold shift, a type of potentially recoverable auditory damage resulting from prolonged sound exposure. These findings may aid in the identification and design of appropriate mitigation methods, such as the use of air bubble curtains, "soft start" and "power down" techniques.

  18. Assessing the underwater acoustics of the world's largest vibration hammer (OCTA-KONG and its potential effects on the Indo-Pacific humpbacked dolphin (Sousa chinensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhitao Wang

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic noise in aquatic environments is a worldwide concern due to its potential adverse effects on the environment and aquatic life. The Hongkong-Zhuhai-Macao Bridge is currently under construction in the Pearl River Estuary, a hot spot for the Indo-Pacific humpbacked dolphin (Sousa chinensis in China. The OCTA-KONG, the world's largest vibration hammer, is being used during this construction project to drive or extract steel shell piles 22 m in diameter. This activity poses a substantial threat to marine mammals, and an environmental assessment is critically needed. The underwater acoustic properties of the OCTA-KONG were analyzed, and the potential impacts of the underwater acoustic energy on Sousa, including auditory masking and physiological impacts, were assessed. The fundamental frequency of the OCTA-KONG vibration ranged from 15 Hz to 16 Hz, and the noise increments were below 20 kHz, with a dominant frequency and energy below 10 kHz. The resulting sounds are most likely detectable by Sousa over distances of up to 3.5 km from the source. Although Sousa clicks do not appear to be adversely affected, Sousa whistles are susceptible to auditory masking, which may negatively impact this species' social life. Therefore, a safety zone with a radius of 500 m is proposed. Although the zero-to-peak source level (SL of the OCTA-KONG was lower than the physiological damage level, the maximum root-mean-square SL exceeded the cetacean safety exposure level on several occasions. Moreover, the majority of the unweighted cumulative source sound exposure levels (SSELs and the cetacean auditory weighted cumulative SSELs exceeded the acoustic threshold levels for the onset of temporary threshold shift, a type of potentially recoverable auditory damage resulting from prolonged sound exposure. These findings may aid in the identification and design of appropriate mitigation methods, such as the use of air bubble curtains, "soft start" and "power down

  19. Hidrodinamički model podvodnog projektila / Hidrodinamical model of an underwater projectile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Radosavljević

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Radi dobijanja kvalitetnog matematičkog modela podvodnog projektila u radu su definisane ulazne i izlazne veličine, brzine i ubrzanje projektila. Uz zadate uslove mogućeg kretanja projektila definisan je model podvodnog projektila sa šest jednačina. / The paper analyzes an underwater projectile. The input and output values, the projectile speed and acceleration are defined for a quality definition of the projectile mathematical model. With the conditions of the projectile potential movement previously set out, the torpedo model is defined by six equations.

  20. Computational acoustic modeling of cetacean vocalizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, Michael Dixon

    A framework for computational acoustic modeling of hypothetical vocal production mechanisms in cetaceans is presented. As a specific example, a model of a proposed source in the larynx of odontocetes is developed. Whales and dolphins generate a broad range of vocal sounds, but the exact mechanisms they use are not conclusively understood. In the fifty years since it has become widely accepted that whales can and do make sound, how they do so has remained particularly confounding. Cetaceans' highly divergent respiratory anatomy, along with the difficulty of internal observation during vocalization have contributed to this uncertainty. A variety of acoustical, morphological, ethological and physiological evidence has led to conflicting and often disputed theories of the locations and mechanisms of cetaceans' sound sources. Computational acoustic modeling has been used to create real-time parametric models of musical instruments and the human voice. These techniques can be applied to cetacean vocalizations to help better understand the nature and function of these sounds. Extensive studies of odontocete laryngeal morphology have revealed vocal folds that are consistently similar to a known but poorly understood acoustic source, the ribbon reed. A parametric computational model of the ribbon reed is developed, based on simplified geometrical, mechanical and fluid models drawn from the human voice literature. The physical parameters of the ribbon reed model are then adapted to those of the odontocete larynx. With reasonable estimates of real physical parameters, both the ribbon reed and odontocete larynx models produce sounds that are perceptually similar to their real-world counterparts, and both respond realistically under varying control conditions. Comparisons of acoustic features of the real-world and synthetic systems show a number of consistencies. While this does not on its own prove that either model is conclusively an accurate description of the source, it

  1. Hydrodynamic modeling with grey-box method of a foil-like underwater vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin-yu; Li, Yi-ping; Wang, Ya-xing; Feng, Xi-sheng

    2017-12-01

    In this study, a dynamic modeling method for foil-like underwater vehicles is introduced and experimentally verified in different sea tests of the Hadal ARV. The dumping force of a foil-like underwater vehicle is sensitive to swing motion. Some foil-like underwater vehicles swing periodically when performing a free-fall dive task in experiments. Models using conventional modeling methods yield solutions with asymptotic stability, which cannot simulate the self-sustained swing motion. By improving the ridge regression optimization algorithm, a grey-box modeling method based on 378 viscous drag coefficients using the Taylor series expansion is proposed in this study. The method is optimized for over-fitting and convergence problems caused by large parameter matrices. Instead of the PMM test data, the unsteady computational fluid dynamics calculation results are used in modeling. The obtained model can better simulate the swing motion of the underwater vehicle. Simulation and experimental results show a good consistency in free-fall tests during sea trials, as well as a prediction of the dive speed in the swing state.

  2. Acoustical model of a Shoddy fibre absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, John Peter

    Shoddy fibres or "Shoddies" are a mixture of post-consumer and post-industrial fibres diverted from textile waste streams and recycled into their raw fibre form. They have found widespread use as a raw material for manufacturing sound absorbers that include, but are not limited to: automotive, architectural and home appliance applications. The purpose of this project is to develop a simple acoustic model to describe the acoustic behaviour of sound absorbers composed primarily of Shoddy fibres. The model requires knowledge of the material's bulk density only. To date, these materials have not been the focus of much published research and acoustical designers must rely on models that were developed for other materials or are overly complex. For modelling purposes, an equivalent fluid approach is chosen to balance complexity and accuracy. In deriving the proposed model, several popular equivalent fluid models are selected and the required input parameters for each model identified. The models are: the model of Delaney and Bazley, two models by Miki, the model of Johnson in conjunction with the model of Champoux and Allard and the model of Johnson in conjunction with the model of Lafarge. Characterization testing is carried out on sets of Shoddy absorbers produced using three different manufacturing methods. The measured properties are open porosity, tortuosity, airflow resistivity, the viscous and thermal characteristic lengths and the static thermal permeability. Empirical relationships between model parameters and bulk density are then derived and used to populate the selected models. This yields several 'simplified' models with bulk density as the only parameter. The most accurate model is then selected by comparing each model's prediction to the results of normal incidence sound absorption tests. The model of Johnson-Lafarge populated with the empirical relations is the most accurate model over the range of frequencies considered (approx. 300 Hz - 4000 Hz

  3. Modeling and Model Identification of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    shape of the Standard REMUS AUV. Figure 4. Standard Hydroid REMUS 100 The REMUS AUV uses a single DC brushless motor to power a 3 bladed...The standard model comes with six brushless DC thrusters, four of them placed to control planar motion and whose angles can be manually changed prior...Reduction Project (0704-0188) Washington DC 20503. 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE June 2015 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED

  4. Scale Model Thruster Acoustic Measurement Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Magda; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale representation of the SLS vehicle, mobile launcher, tower, and launch pad trench. The SLS launch propulsion system will be comprised of the Rocket Assisted Take-Off (RATO) motors representing the solid boosters and 4 Gas Hydrogen (GH2) thrusters representing the core engines. The GH2 thrusters were tested in a horizontal configuration in order to characterize their performance. In Phase 1, a single thruster was fired to determine the engine performance parameters necessary for scaling a single engine. A cluster configuration, consisting of the 4 thrusters, was tested in Phase 2 to integrate the system and determine their combined performance. Acoustic and overpressure data was collected during both test phases in order to characterize the system's acoustic performance. The results from the single thruster and 4- thuster system are discussed and compared.

  5. Modeling the kinematics of an autonomous underwater vehicle for range-bearing Simultaneous Localization and Mapping

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Matsebe, O

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available realizing more general SLAM solutions and notably in building and using perceptually rich maps as part of a SLAM algorithm. This paper describes the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) kinematic and sensor models, it overviews the basic theoretical solution...

  6. SERDP/Office of Naval Research Workshop on Acoustic Detection and Classification of UXO in the Underwater Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    attached to the item by divers. In other, more sensitive environments, intentional detonations would cause unacceptable harm to nearby flora and fauna and...Underwater Environment 32 Sept. 2013 generation of sidescan and multibeam sonars that operate at Mega -Hertz (MHz) frequencies to image small, proud UXO

  7. Modelling techniques for underwater noise generated by tidal turbines in shallow water

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd, Thomas P.; Turnock, Stephen R.; Humphrey, Victor F.

    2011-01-01

    The modelling of underwater noise sources and their potential impact on the marine environment is considered, focusing on tidal turbines in shallow water. The requirement for device noise prediction as part of environmental impact assessment is outlined and the limited amount of measurement data and modelling research identified. Following the identification of potential noise sources, the dominant flowgenerated sources are modelled using empirical techniques. The predicted sound pressure lev...

  8. Enabling Persistent Autonomy for Underwater Gliders with Ocean Model Predictions and Terrain Based Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eStuntz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Effective study of ocean processes requires sampling over the duration of long (weeks to months oscillation patterns. Such sampling requires persistent, autonomous underwater vehicles, that have a similarly long deployment duration. The spatiotemporal dynamics of the ocean environment, coupled with limited communication capabilities, make navigation and localization difficult, especially in coastal regions where the majority of interesting phenomena occur. In this paper, we consider the combination of two methods for reducing navigation and localization error; a predictive approach based on ocean model predictions and a prior information approach derived from terrain-based navigation. The motivation for this work is not only for real-time state estimation, but also for accurately reconstructing the actual path that the vehicle traversed to contextualize the gathered data, with respect to the science question at hand. We present an application for the practical use of priors and predictions for large-scale ocean sampling. This combined approach builds upon previous works by the authors, and accurately localizes the traversed path of an underwater glider over long-duration, ocean deployments. The proposed method takes advantage of the reliable, short-term predictions of an ocean model, and the utility of priors used in terrain-based navigation over areas of significant bathymetric relief to bound uncertainty error in dead-reckoning navigation. This method improves upon our previously published works by 1 demonstrating the utility of our terrain-based navigation method with multiple field trials, and 2 presenting a hybrid algorithm that combines both approaches to bound navigational error and uncertainty for long-term deployments of underwater vehicles. We demonstrate the approach by examining data from actual field trials with autonomous underwater gliders, and demonstrate an ability to estimate geographical location of an underwater glider to 2

  9. MEMS-based Optic Fiber Fabry-Perot Sensor for Underwater Acoustic Measurement with A Wavelength-switched System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J.; Y Wang, F.; Luo, H.; Hu, Y. M.; Xiong, S. D.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, a MEMS-based extrinsic Farby-Perot Interferometric (EFPI) acoustic pressure acoustic sensor is presented. The diaphragm structure is used as the second reflected surface, and the sensitive surface to acoustic pressure. A wavelength-switched phase demodulation system for EFPI sensors is used for acoustic signal recovery. The modified phase demodulation system has been demonstrated to recover the signal to a stable intensity fluctuation level of ±0.5 dB at the test frequency of 2000 Hz. In the test depth of 50cm, the sensor has a resonant frequency of 3.7 kHz, a flat frequency range of 10-800Hz, and a corresponding acoustic pressure sensitivity of -159 dB re. 1/μPa.

  10. Underwater Noise Modeling and Direction-Finding Based on Heteroscedastic Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamarei Mahmoud

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new method for practical non-Gaussian and nonstationary underwater noise modeling. This model is very useful for passive sonar in shallow waters. In this application, measurement of additive noise in natural environment and exhibits shows that noise can sometimes be significantly non-Gaussian and a time-varying feature especially in the variance. Therefore, signal processing algorithms such as direction-finding that is optimized for Gaussian noise may degrade significantly in this environment. Generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (GARCH models are suitable for heavy tailed PDFs and time-varying variances of stochastic process. We use a more realistic GARCH-based noise model in the maximum-likelihood approach for the estimation of direction-of-arrivals (DOAs of impinging sources onto a linear array, and demonstrate using measured noise that this approach is feasible for the additive noise and direction finding in an underwater environment.

  11. Acoustic Models of Optical Mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, V. V.; Varaksina, E. I.

    2014-01-01

    Students form a more exact idea of the action of optical mirrors if they can observe the wave field being formed during reflection. For this purpose it is possible to organize model experiments with flexural waves propagating in thin elastic plates. The direct and round edges of the plates are used as models of plane, convex and concave mirrors.…

  12. Spreadsheet decision support model for MK 16 underwater breathing apparatus repair parts inventory management

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Peter B.

    1994-01-01

    This thesis proposes a spreadsheet-based decision support model for determining the most effective repair parts inventory for the MK 16 Underwater Breathing Apparatus (MK 16). Incorporating U.S. Navy demand information, the model provides the inventory manager the ability to modify repair parts inventories as changes occur to the order and shipping times, tempo of operations, or the number of MK 16 assigned. The thesis explores the current methods of MK 16 repair parts inventory design and re...

  13. Acoustical modeling of swallowing mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Samaneh Sarraf; Moussavi, Zahra M K

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a mathematical modeling of the swallowing sound generation is presented. To evaluate the model, its application on swallowing disorder (dysphagia) diagnosis is discussed. As a starting point, a simple linear time invariant model is assumed to represent the pharyngeal wall and tissue excited by a train of impulses. The modeling is approached by two different assumptions. In one approach, it is assumed that the impulse train, representing the neural activities to trigger swallow, is the same for both groups of control and dysphagic, and it is the pharyngeal model that accounts for the difference between the two groups. On the other hand, in the second approach, it is assumed that the pharyngeal response is the same for both groups, but the neural activities to initiate the swallow are different between the two groups. The results show that the second approach complies better with the physiological characteristics of swallowing mechanism as it provides a much better discrimination between the swallowing sounds of control and dysphagic groups of this study. Though, it should be noted that our dysphagic group subjects were cerebral palsy and stroke patients. Hence, the model accounting for initiation of neural activities is reasonable to show better results.

  14. Fractional delay waveguide modeling of acoustic tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaelimaeki, V.

    The theme of this work is computational modeling of acoustic tubes. The models are intended to be used in a sound synthesizer based on physical modeling. Such a synthesizer could be used producing realistic sounds of, e.g., woodwind instruments or the human voice. This work deals with digital waveguide modeling of acoustic tubes, such as bores of musical woodwind instruments or the human vocal tract. The acoustic tube systems considered in this work are those consisting of a straight cylindrical or conical tube or of concatenated cylindrical or conical tube sections. Also, the joint of three tube sections is studied. Of special interest for our application is a junction where a side branch is connected to a cylindrical tube as it is needed in the simulation of finger holes of wood-wind instruments. All of the cylindrical tube models are described for both pressure and volume velocity. In the case of conical bores, only pressure waves are considered as models for volume velocity waves are more complicated. The basic waveguide models are extended by employing the concept of fractional delay, which means a delay smaller than a unit delay. The fractional delays are implemented using bandlimited interpolation. Applying fractional delay filtering techniques, a spatially discretized waveguide model is turned into a spatially continuous one. This implies that the length of the digital waveguide can be adjusted as accurately as required, and a change of the impedance of a waveguide may occur at any desired point between sampling points. The authors call this kind of system a fractional delay waveguide filter (FDWF). It is a discrete-time structure but a spatially continuous model of a physical system.

  15. Hybrid Speaker Recognition Using Universal Acoustic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Jun; Kuroda, Tadahiro

    We propose a novel speaker recognition approach using a speaker-independent universal acoustic model (UAM) for sensornet applications. In sensornet applications such as “Business Microscope”, interactions among knowledge workers in an organization can be visualized by sensing face-to-face communication using wearable sensor nodes. In conventional studies, speakers are detected by comparing energy of input speech signals among the nodes. However, there are often synchronization errors among the nodes which degrade the speaker recognition performance. By focusing on property of the speaker's acoustic channel, UAM can provide robustness against the synchronization error. The overall speaker recognition accuracy is improved by combining UAM with the energy-based approach. For 0.1s speech inputs and 4 subjects, speaker recognition accuracy of 94% is achieved at the synchronization error less than 100ms.

  16. Ocean Acoustic Propagation and Coherence Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Propagation variability is an inescapable complicating factor for both active and passive sonar systems, and for underwater acoustic communications...framework, to be exploited in the use of underwater sound in shallow water. Our knowledge of acoustic field patterns in shallow water, building block...Ocean Acoustics and Signals Laboratory . Five acoustic studies are planned: 1. Canyon and slope acoustics : Identify purely geometrically controlled

  17. Theoretical Model of Acoustic Wave Propagation in Shallow Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozaczka Eugeniusz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The work is devoted to the propagation of low frequency waves in a shallow sea. As a source of acoustic waves, underwater disturbances generated by ships were adopted. A specific feature of the propagation of acoustic waves in shallow water is the proximity of boundaries of the limiting media characterised by different impedance properties, which affects the acoustic field coming from a source situated in the water layer “deformed” by different phenomena. The acoustic field distribution in the real shallow sea is affected not only by multiple reflections, but also by stochastic changes in the free surface shape, and statistical changes in the seabed shape and impedance. The paper discusses fundamental problems of modal sound propagation in the water layer over different types of bottom sediments. The basic task in this case was to determine the acoustic pressure level as a function of distance and depth. The results of the conducted investigation can be useful in indirect determination of the type of bottom.

  18. Underwater Wireless Acousto-Optic Waveguide (UWAOW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Giovanni; Kent, Lionel W. J.; Laycock, Leslie C.

    2017-10-01

    The present study originated in the lack of research into achieving underwater total internal reflection (TIR) via the acousto-optic effect. The uniqueness of this technique exists in the fact that it is based on a high sound pressure level which induces a localised change in refractive index of seawater sufficient to achieve total internal reflection within the communication channel. Different transducer systems for generating the pressure wave have been investigated and take the form of a wave which may be either a standing wave, or a novel beamforming technique. The former is based on an array of transducers and with an acoustic mirror at the receiver in order to establish the standing wave. The alternative approach relies on the high intrinsic directionality of a novel beamformer where an annular transducer array is examined as an acoustic source. In this paper, the main characteristics of the acoustic optic waveguide will be presented. This will include both sound and light propagation in the ocean, TIR, novel beam propagation, the refractive index of water as a function of the externally applied acoustic pressure, and the acoustic technology. The modelled results, the limitations imposed by the challenging medium, and the system requirements required to obtain an Underwater Wireless Acousto-Optic Waveguide (UWAOW) will be also addressed.

  19. Cooperative Rendezvous and Docking for Underwater Robots Using Model Predictive Control and Dual Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mikkel Cornelius; Johansen, Tor Arne; Blanke, Mogens

    2018-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of rendezvous and docking with visual constraints in the context of underwater robots with camera-based navigation. The objective is the convergence of the vehicles to a common point while maintaining visual contact. The proposed solution includes the design of a ...... of a distributed model predictive controller based on dual decomposition, which allows for optimization in a decentralized fashion. The proposed distributed controller enables rendezvous and docking between vehicles while maintaining visual contact....

  20. Theory and modeling of cylindrical thermo-acoustic transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Lihong, E-mail: lhtong@ecjtu.edu.cn [School of Civil Engineering and Architecture, East China Jiaotong University, Nanchang, Jiangxi (China); Lim, C.W. [Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR (China); Zhao, Xiushao; Geng, Daxing [School of Civil Engineering and Architecture, East China Jiaotong University, Nanchang, Jiangxi (China)

    2016-06-03

    Models both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions are proposed and the corresponding acoustic pressure solutions are obtained. The acoustic pressure for an individual carbon nanotube (CNT) as a function of input power is investigated analytically and it is verified by comparing with the published experimental data. Further numerical analysis on the acoustic pressure response and characteristics for varying input frequency and distance are also examined both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions. Through detailed theoretical and numerical studies on the acoustic pressure solution for thinfilm-solid cylindrical transduction, it is concluded that a solid with smaller thermal conductivity favors to improve the acoustic performance. In general, the proposed models are applicable to a variety of cylindrical thermo-acoustic devices performing in different gaseous media. - Highlights: • Theory and modeling both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions are proposed. • The modeling is verified by comparing with the published experimental data. • Acoustic response characteristics of cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions are predicted by the proposed model.

  1. Atlantic Herring Acoustic Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC Advanced Sampling Technologies Research Group conducts annual fisheries acoustic surveys using state-of-the-art acoustic, midwater trawling, and underwater...

  2. Dynamic modeling and motion simulation for a winged hybrid-driven underwater glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-Xin; Sun, Xiu-Jun; Wang, Yan-Hui; Wu, Jian-Guo; Wang, Xiao-Ming

    2011-03-01

    PETREL, a winged hybrid-driven underwater glider is a novel and practical marine survey platform which combines the features of legacy underwater glider and conventional AUV (autonomous underwater vehicle). It can be treated as a multi-rigid-body system with a floating base and a particular hydrodynamic profile. In this paper, theorems on linear and angular momentum are used to establish the dynamic equations of motion of each rigid body and the effect of translational and rotational motion of internal masses on the attitude control are taken into consideration. In addition, due to the unique external shape with fixed wings and deflectable rudders and the dual-drive operation in thrust and glide modes, the approaches of building dynamic model of conventional AUV and hydrodynamic model of submarine are introduced, and the tailored dynamic equations of the hybrid glider are formulated. Moreover, the behaviors of motion in glide and thrust operation are analyzed based on the simulation and the feasibility of the dynamic model is validated by data from lake field trials.

  3. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Tests Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) was a development test performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) East Test Area (ETA) Test Stand 116. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model and tower mounted on the Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 200 instruments located throughout the test article. There were four primary ASMAT instrument suites: ignition overpressure (IOP), lift-off acoustics (LOA), ground acoustics (GA), and spatial correlation (SC). Each instrumentation suite incorporated different sensor models which were selected based upon measurement requirements. These requirements included the type of measurement, exposure to the environment, instrumentation check-outs and data acquisition. The sensors were attached to the test article using different mounts and brackets dependent upon the location of the sensor. This presentation addresses the observed effect of the sensors and mounts on the acoustic and pressure measurements.

  4. Compact Acoustic Models for Embedded Speech Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Lévy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Speech recognition applications are known to require a significant amount of resources. However, embedded speech recognition only authorizes few KB of memory, few MIPS, and small amount of training data. In order to fit the resource constraints of embedded applications, an approach based on a semicontinuous HMM system using state-independent acoustic modelling is proposed. A transformation is computed and applied to the global model in order to obtain each HMM state-dependent probability density functions, authorizing to store only the transformation parameters. This approach is evaluated on two tasks: digit and voice-command recognition. A fast adaptation technique of acoustic models is also proposed. In order to significantly reduce computational costs, the adaptation is performed only on the global model (using related speaker recognition adaptation techniques with no need for state-dependent data. The whole approach results in a relative gain of more than 20% compared to a basic HMM-based system fitting the constraints.

  5. Acoustic Modeling of Lightweight Structures: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shasha; Shen, Cheng

    2017-10-01

    This paper gives an overview of acoustic modeling for three kinds of typical lightweight structures including double-leaf plate system, stiffened single (or double) plate and porous material. Classical models are citied to provide frame work of theoretical modeling for acoustic property of lightweight structures; important research advances derived by our research group and other authors are introduced to describe the current state of art for acoustic research. Finally, remaining problems and future research directions are concluded and prospected briefly

  6. Simple statistical channel model for weak temperature-induced turbulence in underwater wireless optical communication systems

    KAUST Repository

    Oubei, Hassan M.

    2017-06-16

    In this Letter, we use laser beam intensity fluctuation measurements to model and describe the statistical properties of weak temperature-induced turbulence in underwater wireless optical communication (UWOC) channels. UWOC channels with temperature gradients are modeled by the generalized gamma distribution (GGD) with an excellent goodness of fit to the measured data under all channel conditions. Meanwhile, thermally uniform channels are perfectly described by the simple gamma distribution which is a special case of GGD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first model that comprehensively describes both thermally uniform and gradient-based UWOC channels.

  7. Transducers and arrays for underwater sound

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, John L

    2016-01-01

    This improved and updated second edition covers the theory, development, and design of electro-acoustic transducers for underwater applications. This highly regarded text discusses the basics of piezoelectric and magnetostrictive transducers that are currently being used as well as promising new designs. It presents the basic acoustics as well as the specific acoustics data needed in transducer design and evaluation. A broad range of designs of projectors and hydrophones are described in detail along with methods of modeling, evaluation, and measurement. Analysis of projector and hydrophone transducer arrays, including the effects of mutual radiation impedance and numerical models for elements and arrays, are also covered. The book includes new advances in transducer design and transducer materials and has been completely reorganized to be suitable for use as a textbook, as well as a reference or handbook. The new edition contains updates to the first edition, end-of-chapter exercises, and solutions to select...

  8. The underwater acoustic environment at SGaan Kinghlas-Bowie Seamount Marine Protected Area: Characterizing vessel traffic and associated noise using satellite AIS and acoustic datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Ainsley S; Yurk, Harald; Vagle, Svein; Pilkington, James; Canessa, Rosaline

    2018-03-01

    Vessel traffic is one of the most wide-spread anthropogenic contributors to ocean noise worldwide and has the potential to alter ecosystems upon which cetaceans and other acoustically sensitive marine organisms rely. Canada's SGaan Kinghlas-Bowie Seamount Marine Protected Area (SK-B MPA) is one such area whose productive ecosystem could benefit from greater monitoring of human induced threats in order to inform management. Despite earning official designation as a Marine Protected Area under the Oceans Act in 2008, little remains known about vessel traffic in the region and the associated potential impacts on vulnerable marine species. Therefore, to increase our understanding of vessel traffic and accompanying noise at SK-B MPA, satellite AIS and acoustic data were investigated. The results of this study suggest that variations in ambient sound levels in the region are driven by near and distant shipping events, thus having implications for future management of the MPA. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Modelling acoustic propagation beneath Antarctic sea ice using measured environmental parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Polly; Duncan, Alec; Bose, Neil; Williams, Guy

    2016-09-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles are improving and expanding in situ observations of sea ice for the validation of satellite remote sensing and climate models. Missions under sea ice, particularly over large distances (up to 100 km) away from the immediate vicinity of a ship or base, require accurate acoustic communication for monitoring, emergency response and some navigation systems. We investigate the propagation of acoustic signals in the Antarctic seasonal ice zone using the BELLHOP model, examining the influence of ocean and sea ice properties. We processed available observations from around Antarctica to generate input variables such as sound speed, surface reflection coefficient (R) and roughness parameters. The results show that changes in the sound speed profile make the most significant difference to the propagation of the direct path signal. The inclusion of the surface reflected signals from a flat ice surface was found to greatly decrease the transmission loss with range. When ice roughness was added, the transmission loss increased with roughness, in a manner similar to the direct path transmission loss results. The conclusions of this work are that: (1) the accuracy of acoustic modelling in this environment is greatly increased by using realistic sound speed data; (2) a risk averse ranging model would use only the direct path signal transmission; and (3) in a flat ice scenario, much greater ranges can be achieved if the surface reflected transmission paths are included. As autonomous missions under sea ice increase in scale and complexity, it will be increasingly important for operational procedures to include effective modelling of acoustic propagation with representative environmental data.

  10. Thermoviscous Model Equations in Nonlinear Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Anders Rønne

    Four nonlinear acoustical wave equations that apply to both perfect gasses and arbitrary fluids with a quadratic equation of state are studied. Shock and rarefaction wave solutions to the equations are studied. In order to assess the accuracy of the wave equations, their solutions are compared...... to solutions of the basic equations from which the wave equations are derived. A straightforward weakly nonlinear equation is the most accurate for shock modeling. A higher order wave equation is the most accurate for modeling of smooth disturbances. Investigations of the linear stability properties...... of solutions to the wave equations, reveal that the solutions may become unstable. Such instabilities are not found in the basic equations. Interacting shocks and standing shocks are investigated....

  11. Predictive Model for the Analysis of the Effects of Underwater Impulsive Sources on Marine Life

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lazauski, Colin J

    2007-01-01

    A method is provided to predict the biological consequences to marine animals from exposure to multiple underwater impulsive sources by simulating underwater explosions over a defined period of time...

  12. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) is a 5% scale model test of the Ares I vehicle, launch pad and support structures conducted at MSFC to verify acoustic and ignition environments and evaluate water suppression systems Test design considerations 5% measurements must be scaled to full scale requiring high frequency measurements Users had different frequencies of interest Acoustics: 200 - 2,000 Hz full scale equals 4,000 - 40,000 Hz model scale Ignition Transient: 0 - 100 Hz full scale equals 0 - 2,000 Hz model scale Environment exposure Weather exposure: heat, humidity, thunderstorms, rain, cold and snow Test environments: Plume impingement heat and pressure, and water deluge impingement Several types of sensors were used to measure the environments Different instrument mounts were used according to the location and exposure to the environment This presentation addresses the observed effects of the selected sensors and mount design on the acoustic and pressure measurements

  13. North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory: Analysis of Shadow Zone Arrivals and Acoustic Propagation in Numerical Ocean Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dushaw, Brian

    2009-01-01

    ... depth of the receiver lies well below the depths of the predicted cusps. Several models for the temperature and salinity in the North Pacific Ocean were obtained and processed to enable simulations of acoustic propagation for comparison to the observations...

  14. An Examination of Higher-Order Treatments of Boundary Conditions in Split-Step Fourier Parabolic Equation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    31  APPENDIX. MATLAB CODES FOR HYBRID METHOD ............................................33  LIST OF REFERENCES...plasma physics, seismic propagation and underwater acoustics [1]. Tappert was the first to introduce the PE method for underwater acoustic...MMPE model, a Matlab version of the SSF algorithm has been developed for this thesis based on the same operator approximations as the MMPE model. It

  15. Acoustically Induced Streaming Flows near a Model Cod Otolith and their Potential Implications for Fish Hearing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotas, Charlotte W [ORNL; Rogers, Peter [Georgia Institute of Technology; Yoda, Minami [Georgia Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    The ears of fishes are remarkable sensors for the small acoustic disturbances associated with underwater sound. For example, each ear of the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) has three dense bony bodies (otoliths) surrounded by fluid and tissue, and detects sounds at frequencies from 30 to 500 Hz. Atlantic cod have also been shown to localize sounds. However, how their ears perform these functions is not fully understood. Steady streaming, or time-independent, flows near a 350% scale model Atlantic cod otolith immersed in a viscous fluid were studied to determine if these fluid flows contain acoustically relevant information that could be detected by the ear s sensory hair cells. The otolith was oscillated sinusoidally at various orientations at frequencies of 8 24 Hz, corresponding to an actual frequency range of 280 830 Hz. Phaselocked particle pathline visualizations of the resulting flows give velocity, vorticity, and rate of strain fields over a single plane of this mainly two-dimensional flow. Although the streaming flows contain acoustically relevant information, the displacements due to these flows are likely too small to explain Atlantic cod hearing abilities near threshold. The results, however, may suggest a possible mechanism for detection of ultrasound in some fish species.

  16. Acoustic model optimisation for a call routing system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kleynhans, N

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents work aimed at optimising acoustic models for the AutoSecretary call routing system. To develop the optimised acoustic models: (1) an appropriate phone set was selected and used to create a pronunciation dictionary, (2) various...

  17. Hybrid CFD/CAA Modeling for Liftoff Acoustic Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strutzenberg, Louise L.; Liever, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents development efforts at the NASA Marshall Space flight Center to establish a hybrid Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Aero-Acoustics (CFD/CAA) simulation system for launch vehicle liftoff acoustics environment analysis. Acoustic prediction engineering tools based on empirical jet acoustic strength and directivity models or scaled historical measurements are of limited value in efforts to proactively design and optimize launch vehicles and launch facility configurations for liftoff acoustics. CFD based modeling approaches are now able to capture the important details of vehicle specific plume flow environment, identifY the noise generation sources, and allow assessment of the influence of launch pad geometric details and sound mitigation measures such as water injection. However, CFD methodologies are numerically too dissipative to accurately capture the propagation of the acoustic waves in the large CFD models. The hybrid CFD/CAA approach combines the high-fidelity CFD analysis capable of identifYing the acoustic sources with a fast and efficient Boundary Element Method (BEM) that accurately propagates the acoustic field from the source locations. The BEM approach was chosen for its ability to properly account for reflections and scattering of acoustic waves from launch pad structures. The paper will present an overview of the technology components of the CFD/CAA framework and discuss plans for demonstration and validation against test data.

  18. Fabrication and Characterization of High-Sensitivity Underwater Acoustic Multimedia Communication Devices with Thick Composite PZT Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Cheng Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a high-sensitivity hydrophone fabricated with a Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS process using epitaxial thin films grown on silicon wafers. The evaluated resonant frequency was calculated through finite-element analysis (FEA. The hydrophone was designed, fabricated, and characterized by different measurements performed in a water tank, by using a pulsed sound technique with a sensitivity of −190 dB ± 2 dB for frequencies in the range 50–500 Hz. These results indicate the high-performance miniaturized acoustic devices, which can impact a variety of technological applications.

  19. Acoustic Communications Measurement Systems (ACOMMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Design and develop adaptive signal processing techniques to improve underwater acoustic communications and networking. Phase coherent and incoherent signal...

  20. Using Underwater Explosion and Cylinder Expansion Tests to Calibrate Afterburn Models for Aluminized Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedberg, Rasmus

    2017-06-01

    The study explores the combined use of underwater performance tests and cylinder expansion tests in order to parameterize detonation models for aluminized explosives which exhibit afterburning. The approach is suggested to be used in conjunction with thermochemical computation. A formulation containing RDX and aluminum powder is considered and several charges with varying masses are submerged and detonated. Pressure gauges are employed at horizontal distances scaling with the charge diameter, and the specific shock wave energy is shown to increase with charge mass. This is attributed to the combustion of aluminum particles after the Chapman-Jouguet plane. Cylinder expansion tests are carried out using Photon Doppler Velocimetry to register the wall expansion velocity. The tests are modeled using a multi-material arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian approach with the Guirguis-Miller model describing detonation with afterburning. The equation of state and afterburn rate law parameters are adjusted such that the model reproduces the results from the cylinder expansion and underwater tests. The approach seems promising, and might be valuable for aluminized explosive formulations intended to be used in a variety of confinement conditions. Swedish Armed Forces.

  1. Identification of a putative man-made object from an underwater crash site using CAD model superimposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincelli, Jay; Calakli, Fatih; Stone, Michael; Forrester, Graham; Mellon, Timothy; Jarrell, John

    2018-04-01

    In order to identify an object in video, a comparison with an exemplar object is typically needed. In this paper, we discuss the methodology used to identify an object detected in underwater video that was recorded during an investigation into Amelia Earhart's purported crash site. A computer aided design (CAD) model of the suspected aircraft component was created based on measurements made from orthogonally rectified images of a reference aircraft, and validated against historical photographs of the subject aircraft prior to the crash. The CAD model was then superimposed on the underwater video, and specific features on the object were geometrically compared between the CAD model and the video. This geometrical comparison was used to assess the goodness of fit between the purported object and the object identified in the underwater video. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. 3D MODELS COMPARISON OF COMPLEX SHELL IN UNDERWATER AND DRY ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Troisi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In marine biology the shape, morphology, texture and dimensions of the shells and organisms like sponges and gorgonians are very important parameters. For example, a particular type of gorgonian grows every year only few millimeters; this estimation was conducted without any measurement instrument but it has been provided after successive observational studies, because this organism is very fragile: the contact could compromise its structure and outliving. Non-contact measurement system has to be used to preserve such organisms: the photogrammetry is a method capable to assure high accuracy without contact. Nevertheless, the achievement of a 3D photogrammetric model of complex object (as gorgonians or particular shells is a challenge in normal environments, either with metric camera or with consumer camera. Indeed, the successful of automatic target-less image orientation and the image matching algorithms is strictly correlated to the object texture properties and of camera calibration quality as well. In the underwater scenario, the environment conditions strongly influence the results quality; in particular, water’s turbidity, the presence of suspension, flare and other optical aberrations decrease the image quality reducing the accuracy and increasing the noise on the 3D model. Furthermore, seawater density variability influences its refraction index and consequently the interior orientation camera parameters. For this reason, the camera calibration has to be performed in the same survey conditions. In this paper, a comparison between the 3D models of a Charonia Tritonis shell are carried out through surveys conducted both in dry and underwater environments.

  3. Acoustic sorting models for improved log segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang; Steve Verrill; Eini Lowell; Robert J. Ross; Vicki L. Herian

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examined three individual log measures (acoustic velocity, log diameter, and log vertical position in a tree) for their ability to predict average modulus of elasticity (MOE) and grade yield of structural lumber obtained from Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb. Franco]) logs. We found that log acoustic velocity only had a...

  4. Auditory modelling for assessing room acoustics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dorp Schuitman, J.

    2011-01-01

    The acoustics of a concert hall, or any other room, are generally assessed by measuring room impulse responses for one or multiple source and receiver location(s). From these responses, objective parameters can be determined that should be related to various perceptual attributes of room acoustics.

  5. Cymbal and BB underwater transducers and arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newnham, R.E.; Zhang, J.; Alkoy, S.; Meyer, R.; Hughes, W.J.; Hladky-Hennion, A.C.; Cochran, J.; Markley, D. [Materials Research Laboratory, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2002-09-01

    The cymbal is a miniaturized class V flextensional transducer that was developed for use as a shallow water sound projector and receiver. Single elements are characterized by high Q, low efficiency, and medium power output capability. Its low cost and thin profile allow the transducer to be assembled into large flexible arrays. Efforts were made to model both single elements and arrays using the ATILA code and the integral equation formulation (EQI).Millimeter size microprobe hydrophones (BBs) have been designed and fabricated from miniature piezoelectric hollow ceramic spheres for underwater applications such as mapping acoustic fields of projectors, and flow noise sensors for complex underwater structures. Green spheres are prepared from soft lead zirconate titanate powders using a coaxial nozzle slurry process. A compact hydrophone with a radially-poled sphere is investigated using inside and outside electrodes. Characterization of these hydrophones is done through measurement of hydrostatic piezoelectric charge coefficients, free field voltage sensitivities and directivity beam patterns. (orig.)

  6. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-22

    analysis was conducted on the North Pacific Acoustics Laboratory Philippine Sea tests 2009 and 2010, both of which Dr. Heaney participated as a co-chief...obtained from the ambient noise field. In underwater acoustics , this travel time strongly depends on the depth and temperature and to a lesser extent...et al. 2012) and underwater volcanoes (Green at al. 2013). Guided wave propagation contributes to the limited acoustical attenuation by the SOFAR

  7. Optimal Node Placement in Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Felamban, M.

    2013-03-25

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) are expected to play a vital role in the exploration and monitoring of underwater areas which are not easily reachable by humans. However, underwater communication via acoustic waves is subject to several performance limitations that are very different from those used for terresstrial networks. In this paper, we investigate node placement for building an initial underwater WSN infrastructure. We formulate this problem as a nonlinear mathematical program with the objective of minimizing the total transmission loss under a given number of sensor nodes and targeted coverage volume. The obtained solution is the location of each node represented via a truncated octahedron to fill out the 3D space. Experiments are conducted to verify the proposed formulation, which is solved using Matlab optimization tool. Simulation is also conducted using an ns-3 simulator, and the simulation results are consistent with the obtained results from mathematical model with less than 10% error.

  8. Vision-Based Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Navigation in Poor Visibility Conditions Using a Model-Free Robust Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Pérez-Alcocer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a vision-based navigation system for an autonomous underwater vehicle in semistructured environments with poor visibility. In terrestrial and aerial applications, the use of visual systems mounted in robotic platforms as a control sensor feedback is commonplace. However, robotic vision-based tasks for underwater applications are still not widely considered as the images captured in this type of environments tend to be blurred and/or color depleted. To tackle this problem, we have adapted the lαβ color space to identify features of interest in underwater images even in extreme visibility conditions. To guarantee the stability of the vehicle at all times, a model-free robust control is used. We have validated the performance of our visual navigation system in real environments showing the feasibility of our approach.

  9. Quantifying Multiscale Habitat Structural Complexity: A Cost-Effective Framework for Underwater 3D Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Ferrari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Coral reef habitat structural complexity influences key ecological processes, ecosystem biodiversity, and resilience. Measuring structural complexity underwater is not trivial and researchers have been searching for accurate and cost-effective methods that can be applied across spatial extents for over 50 years. This study integrated a set of existing multi-view, image-processing algorithms, to accurately compute metrics of structural complexity (e.g., ratio of surface to planar area underwater solely from images. This framework resulted in accurate, high-speed 3D habitat reconstructions at scales ranging from small corals to reef-scapes (10s km2. Structural complexity was accurately quantified from both contemporary and historical image datasets across three spatial scales: (i branching coral colony (Acropora spp.; (ii reef area (400 m2; and (iii reef transect (2 km. At small scales, our method delivered models with <1 mm error over 90% of the surface area, while the accuracy at transect scale was 85.3% ± 6% (CI. Advantages are: no need for an a priori requirement for image size or resolution, no invasive techniques, cost-effectiveness, and utilization of existing imagery taken from off-the-shelf cameras (both monocular or stereo. This remote sensing method can be integrated to reef monitoring and improve our knowledge of key aspects of coral reef dynamics, from reef accretion to habitat provisioning and productivity, by measuring and up-scaling estimates of structural complexity.

  10. Advanced Active Acoustics Lab (AAAL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Active Acoustics Lab (AAAL) is a state-of-the-art Undersea Warfare (USW) acoustic data analysis facility capable of both active and passive underwater...

  11. Underwater Glider System Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkins, Scott A; Humphreys, Douglas E; Sherman, Jeff; Osse, Jim; Jones, Clayton; Leonard, Naomi; Graver, Joshua; Bachmayer, Ralf; Clem, Ted; Carroll, Paul; Davis, Philip; Berry, Jon; Worley, Paul; Wasyl, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    The goals of this study are to determine how to advance from present capabilities of underwater glider (and hybrid motorglider) technology to what could be possible within the next few years; and to identify critical research issues that must be resolved to make such advancements possible. These goals were pursued by merging archival flight data with numerical model results and system spreadsheet analysis to extrapolate from the present state-of-the–art in underwater (UW) gliders to potential...

  12. Real-Time Dynamic Model Learning and Adaptation for Underwater Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    propeller on the vLBV300 SV Starboard, vertical propeller on the vLBV300 THAUS Tethered Hovering-Class Autonomous Underwater System UUV Unmanned...inhabitance of man and machine—the aim is to fundamentally enable the transformative capability of robots as underwater co-workers. The RDAS finds...be commanded via a high- or low-level computer interface, resulting in a tethered , hovering-class autonomous underwater system (THAUS). As

  13. Design and implementation of an underwater sound recording device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Jayson J; Myers, Josh R; Carlson, Thomas J; Deng, Z Daniel; Rohrer, John S; Caviggia, Kurt A; Woodley, Christa M; Weiland, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    To monitor the underwater sound and pressure waves generated by anthropogenic activities such as underwater blasting and pile driving, an autonomous system was designed to record underwater acoustic signals. The underwater sound recording device (USR) allows for connections of two hydrophones or other dynamic pressure sensors, filters high frequency noise out of the collected signals, has a gain that can be independently set for each sensor, and allows for 2 h of data collection. Two versions of the USR were created: a submersible model deployable to a maximum depth of 300 m, and a watertight but not fully submersible model. Tests were performed on the USR in the laboratory using a data acquisition system to send single-frequency sinusoidal voltages directly to each component. These tests verified that the device operates as designed and performs as well as larger commercially available data acquisition systems, which are not suited for field use. On average, the designed gain values differed from the actual measured gain values by about 0.35 dB. A prototype of the device was used in a case study to measure blast pressures while investigating the effect of underwater rock blasting on juvenile Chinook salmon and rainbow trout. In the case study, maximum positive pressure from the blast was found to be significantly correlated with frequency of injury for individual fish. The case study also demonstrated that the device withstood operation in harsh environments, making it a valuable tool for collecting field measurements.

  14. Design and Implementation of an Underwater Sound Recording Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa M. Woodley

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available To monitor the underwater sound and pressure waves generated by anthropogenic activities such as underwater blasting and pile driving, an autonomous system was designed to record underwater acoustic signals. The underwater sound recording device (USR allows for connections of two hydrophones or other dynamic pressure sensors, filters high frequency noise out of the collected signals, has a gain that can be independently set for each sensor, and allows for 2 h of data collection. Two versions of the USR were created: a submersible model deployable to a maximum depth of 300 m, and a watertight but not fully submersible model. Tests were performed on the USR in the laboratory using a data acquisition system to send single-frequency sinusoidal voltages directly to each component. These tests verified that the device operates as designed and performs as well as larger commercially available data acquisition systems, which are not suited for field use. On average, the designed gain values differed from the actual measured gain values by about 0.35 dB. A prototype of the device was used in a case study to measure blast pressures while investigating the effect of underwater rock blasting on juvenile Chinook salmon and rainbow trout. In the case study, maximum positive pressure from the blast was found to be significantly correlated with frequency of injury for individual fish. The case study also demonstrated that the device withstood operation in harsh environments, making it a valuable tool for collecting field measurements.

  15. Google™ underwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-10-01

    The first underwater panoramic images were added to Google Maps™, the company announced on 25 September. This first “underwater Street View collection,” launched in partnership with the Caitlin Seaview Survey, provides people with the opportunity to “become the next virtual Jacques Cousteau.” For more information, see: maps.google.com/ocean.

  16. A model of ionic polymer–metal composite actuators in underwater operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunetto, Paola; Fortuna, Luigi; Graziani, Salvatore; Strazzeri, Salvatore

    2008-01-01

    Ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs) are active materials that exhibit a bi-directional electromechanical coupling: a voltage produces membrane bending, while by bending an IPMC membrane a voltage output is obtained. IPMCs are of increasing interest in a number of application fields. More specifically, IPMCs can work in wet environments, even in water, and this represents a valuable capability in a number of applications fields such as underwater robotics, surveillance, and biomedical applications. In this work a totally new model of an active IPMC beam, solicited by a voltage signal and immersed in water, is introduced. The model estimates the moment produced by the applied voltage. Therefore, the classical Euler–Bernoulli cantilever beam theory and the concept of hydrodynamic function are used to describe the interaction between the beam and the water. Knowledge of this interaction allows estimation of the IPMC active beam motion in water

  17. An integrated wave-effects model for an underwater explosion bubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geers, Thomas L; Hunter, Kendall S

    2002-04-01

    A model for a moderately deep underwater explosion bubble is developed that integrates the shock wave and oscillation phases of the motion. A hyperacoustic relationship is formulated that relates bubble volume acceleration to far-field pressure profile during the shock-wave phase, thereby providing initial conditions for the subsequent oscillation phase. For the latter, equations for bubble-surface response are derived that include wave effects in both the external liquid and the internal gas. The equations are then specialized to the case of a spherical bubble, and bubble-surface displacement histories are calculated for dilational and translational motion. Agreement between these histories and experimental data is found to be substantially better than that produced by previous models.

  18. ECS: Efficient Communication Scheduling for Underwater Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Hong

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available TDMA protocols have attracted a lot of attention for underwater acoustic sensor networks (UWSNs, because of the unique characteristics of acoustic signal propagation such as great energy consumption in transmission, long propagation delay and long communication range. Previous TDMA protocols all allocated transmission time to nodes based on discrete time slots. This paper proposes an efficient continuous time scheduling TDMA protocol (ECS for UWSNs, including the continuous time based and sender oriented conflict analysis model, the transmission moment allocation algorithm and the distributed topology maintenance algorithm. Simulation results confirm that ECS improves network throughput by 20% on average, compared to existing MAC protocols.

  19. Acoustic field distribution of sawtooth wave with nonlinear SBE model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaozhou, E-mail: xzliu@nju.edu.cn; Zhang, Lue; Wang, Xiangda; Gong, Xiufen [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Ministry of Education, Institute of Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-10-28

    For precise prediction of the acoustic field distribution of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy with an ellipsoid transducer, the nonlinear spheroidal beam equations (SBE) are employed to model acoustic wave propagation in medium. To solve the SBE model with frequency domain algorithm, boundary conditions are obtained for monochromatic and sawtooth waves based on the phase compensation. In numerical analysis, the influence of sinusoidal wave and sawtooth wave on axial pressure distributions are investigated.

  20. Model-based acoustic remote sensing of seafloor characteristics

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    De, Ch.; Chakraborty, B.

    =UTF-8 3868 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 49, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2011 Model-Based Acoustic Remote Sensing of Seafloor Characteristics Chanchal De and Bishwajit Chakraborty, Member, IEEE Abstract—The characterization... of the estimated values of seafloor roughness spectrum parameters with the values of sediment mean grain size are compared with published information available in the literature. Index Terms—Acoustic remote sensing, backscatter model, echo envelope, inversion, mean...

  1. Underwater Optical Wireless Communications, Networking, and Localization: A Survey

    KAUST Repository

    Saeed, Nasir

    2018-02-28

    Underwater wireless communications can be carried out through acoustic, radio frequency (RF), and optical waves. Compared to its bandwidth limited acoustic and RF counterparts, underwater optical wireless communications (UOWCs) can support higher data rates at low latency levels. However, severe aquatic channel conditions (e.g., absorption, scattering, turbulence, etc.) pose great challenges for UOWCs and significantly reduce the attainable communication ranges, which necessitates efficient networking and localization solutions. Therefore, we provide a comprehensive survey on the challenges, advances, and prospects of underwater optical wireless networks (UOWNs) from a layer by layer perspective which includes: 1) Potential network architectures; 2) Physical layer issues including propagation characteristics, channel modeling, and modulation techniques 3) Data link layer problems covering link configurations, link budgets, performance metrics, and multiple access schemes; 4) Network layer topics containing relaying techniques and potential routing algorithms; 5) Transport layer subjects such as connectivity, reliability, flow and congestion control; 6) Application layer goals and state-of-the-art UOWN applications, and 7) Localization and its impacts on UOWN layers. Finally, we outline the open research challenges and point out the future directions for underwater optical wireless communications, networking, and localization research.

  2. Calibration of Underwater Sound Transducers

    OpenAIRE

    H.R.S. Sastry

    1983-01-01

    The techniques of calibration of underwater sound transducers for farfield, near-field and closed environment conditions are reviewed in this paper .The design of acoustic calibration tank is mentioned. The facilities available at Naval Physical & Oceanographic Laboratory, Cochin for calibration of transducers are also listed.

  3. Underwater laser detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomaa, Walid; El-Sherif, Ashraf F.; El-Sharkawy, Yasser H.

    2015-02-01

    The conventional method used to detect an underwater target is by sending and receiving some form of acoustic energy. But the acoustic systems have limitations in the range resolution and accuracy; while, the potential benefits of a laserbased underwater target detection include high directionality, high response, and high range accuracy. Lasers operating in the blue-green region of the light spectrum(420 : 570nm)have a several applications in the area of detection and ranging of submersible targets due to minimum attenuation through water ( less than 0.1 m-1) and maximum laser reflection from estimated target (like mines or submarines) to provide a long range of detection. In this paper laser attenuation in water was measured experimentally by new simple method by using high resolution spectrometer. The laser echoes from different targets (metal, plastic, wood, and rubber) were detected using high resolution CCD camera; the position of detection camera was optimized to provide a high reflection laser from target and low backscattering noise from the water medium, digital image processing techniques were applied to detect and discriminate the echoes from the metal target and subtract the echoes from other objects. Extraction the image of target from the scattering noise is done by background subtraction and edge detection techniques. As a conclusion, we present a high response laser imaging system to detect and discriminate small size, like-mine underwater targets.

  4. Thin film bulk acoustic wave devices : performance optimization and modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Pensala, Tuomas

    2011-01-01

    Thin film bulk acoustic wave (BAW) resonators and filters operating in the GHz range are used in mobile phones for the most demanding filtering applications and complement the surface acoustic wave (SAW) based filters. Their main advantages are small size and high performance at frequencies above 2 GHz. This work concentrates on the characterization, performance optimization, and modeling techniques of thin film BAW devices. Laser interferometric vibration measurements together with plat...

  5. Development of hydroacoustical techniques for the monitoring and classification of benthic habitats in Puck Bay: Modeling of acoustic waves scattering by seagrass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raczkowska, A.; Gorska, N.

    2012-12-01

    Puck Bay is an area of high species biodiversity belonging to the Coastal Landscape Park of Baltic Sea Protected Areas (BSPA) and is also included in the list of the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and covered by the protection program "Natura 2000". The underwater meadows of the Puck Bay are important for Europe's natural habitats due to their role in enhancing the productivity of marine ecosystems and providing shelter and optimal feeding conditions for many marine organisms. One of the dominant species comprising the underwater meadows of the Southern Baltic Sea is the seagrass Zostera marina. The spatial extent of underwater seagrass meadows is altered by pollution and eutrophication; therefore, to properly manage the area one must monitor its ecological state. Remote acoustic methods are useful tools for the monitoring of benthic habitats in many marine areas because they are non-invasive and allow researchers to obtain data from a large area in a short period of time. Currently there is a need to apply these methods in the Baltic Sea. Here we present an analysis of the mechanism of scattering of acoustic waves on seagrass in the Southern Baltic Sea based on the numerical modeling of acoustic wave scattering by the biological tissues of plants. The study was conducted by adapting a model developed on the basis of DWBA (Distorted Wave Born Approximation) developed by Stanton and Chu (2005) for fluid-like objects, including the characteristics of the Southern Baltic seagrass. Input data for the model, including the morphometry of seagrass leaves, their angle of inclination and the density plant cover, was obtained through the analysis of biological materials collected in the Puck Bay in the framework of a research project financed by the Polish Government (Development of hydroacoustic methods for studies of underwater meadows of Puck Bay, 6P04E 051 20). On the basis of the developed model, we have analyzed the dependence of the target strength of a single

  6. Modeling ground vehicle acoustic signatures for analysis and synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haschke, G.; Stanfield, R.

    1995-01-01

    Security and weapon systems use acoustic sensor signals to classify and identify moving ground vehicles. Developing robust signal processing algorithms for this is expensive, particularly in presence of acoustic clutter or countermeasures. This paper proposes a parametric ground vehicle acoustic signature model to aid the system designer in understanding which signature features are important, developing corresponding feature extraction algorithms and generating low-cost, high-fidelity synthetic signatures for testing. The authors have proposed computer-generated acoustic signatures of armored, tracked ground vehicles to deceive acoustic-sensored smart munitions. They have developed quantitative measures of how accurately a synthetic acoustic signature matches those produced by actual vehicles. This paper describes parameters of the model used to generate these synthetic signatures and suggests methods for extracting these parameters from signatures of valid vehicle encounters. The model incorporates wide-bandwidth and narrow- bandwidth components that are modulated in a pseudo-random fashion to mimic the time dynamics of valid vehicle signatures. Narrow- bandwidth feature extraction techniques estimate frequency, amplitude and phase information contained in a single set of narrow frequency- band harmonics. Wide-bandwidth feature extraction techniques estimate parameters of a correlated-noise-floor model. Finally, the authors propose a method of modeling the time dynamics of the harmonic amplitudes as a means adding necessary time-varying features to the narrow-bandwidth signal components. The authors present results of applying this modeling technique to acoustic signatures recorded during encounters with one armored, tracked vehicle. Similar modeling techniques can be applied to security systems

  7. Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  8. Underwater Vehicle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dick, James L

    2007-01-01

    There is thus provided an underwater vehicle having facility for maneuvering alongside a retrieving vehicle, as by manipulation of bow and stern planes, for engaging a hull surface of the retrieving...

  9. Autonomous Acoustic Receiver System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Collects underwater acoustic data and oceanographic data. Data are recorded onboard an ocean buoy and can be telemetered to a remote ship or shore station...

  10. Dynamics of underwater legged locomotion: modeling and experiments on an octopus-inspired robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calisti, M; Corucci, F; Arienti, A; Laschi, C

    2015-07-30

    This paper studies underwater legged locomotion (ULL) by means of a robotic octopus-inspired prototype and its associated model. Two different types of propulsive actions are embedded into the robot model: reaction forces due to leg contact with the ground and hydrodynamic forces such as the drag arising from the sculling motion of the legs. Dynamic parameters of the model are estimated by means of evolutionary techniques and subsequently the model is exploited to highlight some distinctive features of ULL. Specifically, the separation between the center of buoyancy (CoB)/center of mass and density affect the stability and speed of the robot, whereas the sculling movements contribute to propelling the robot even when its legs are detached from the ground. The relevance of these effects is demonstrated through robotic experiments and model simulations; moreover, by slightly changing the position of the CoB in the presence of the same feed-forward activation, a number of different behaviors (i.e. forward and backward locomotion at different speeds) are achieved.

  11. Fractal Model for Acoustic Absorbing of Porous Fibrous Metal Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the changing rules between sound absorbing performance and geometrical parameters of porous fibrous metal materials (PFMMs, this paper presents a fractal acoustic model by incorporating the static flow resistivity based on Biot-Allard model. Static flow resistivity is essential for an accurate assessment of the acoustic performance of the PFMM. However, it is quite difficult to evaluate the static flow resistivity from the microstructure of the PFMM because of a large number of disordered pores. In order to overcome this difficulty, we firstly established a static flow resistivity formula for the PFMM based on fractal theory. Secondly, a fractal acoustic model was derived on the basis of the static flow resistivity formula. The sound absorption coefficients calculated by the presented acoustic model were validated by the values of Biot-Allard model and experimental data. Finally, the variation of the surface acoustic impedance, the complex wave number, and the sound absorption coefficient with the fractal dimensions were discussed. The research results can reveal the relationship between sound absorption and geometrical parameters and provide a basis for improving the sound absorption capability of the PFMMs.

  12. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Litniewski, Jerzy; Kujawska, Tamara; 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging

    2012-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place continuously since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2011 the 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Warsaw, Poland, April 10-13. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 31 in the Series contains an excellent collection of papers in six major categories: Biological and Medical Imaging Physics and Mathematics of Acoustical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Transducers and Arrays Nondestructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Underwater Imaging

  13. Model for Estimation of Thermal History Produced by a Single Pass Underwater Wet Weld

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dill, Jay

    1997-01-01

    Thermal history calculations for single pass underwater wet weldments were made by solving the appropriate beat transfer equations using the three-dimensional Crank-Nicholson finite difference method...

  14. Comment on paper entitled, "An inversion of Freedman's 'image pulse' model in air". Acoust. Soc. Am. 119(2), 965-975 (2006).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickling, Robert; Gaunaurd, Guillermo C

    2006-08-01

    Echolocation (i.e., perceiving objects using acoustic echoes) is well-known in underwater detection and to a lesser extent in robot guidance and machine perception. The paper by Tsakiris and McKerrow is concerned with machine perception in air using Freedman's asymptotic model, which was originally developed to predict the backscattering multiple-echo effect observed in sonar detection. This effect was subsequently shown to be due to the elastic response of underwater targets. Freedman's model can be used in air because the acoustic target is assumed to be rigid. Also, the model's prediction of multiple echoes can be used to obtain information about the shape of the target. This is the so-called inversion of the Freedman model by Tsakiris and McKerrow. In their paper, various simple bodies are tested in air using ultrasound and it is shown that the model provides relatively poor information about body shape. Several explanations are given. However, one explanation is not considered, namely that the model itself is not satisfactory. First, there is poor agreement with exact backscattering theory. Second, deriving information about target shape from the multiple echoes predicted by the model is a highly questionable procedure. Both these aspects are examined here.

  15. Underwater radiated noise from modern commercial ships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Megan F; Ross, Donald; Wiggins, Sean M; Hildebrand, John A

    2012-01-01

    Underwater radiated noise measurements for seven types of modern commercial ships during normal operating conditions are presented. Calibrated acoustic data (autonomous seafloor-mounted acoustic recorder were combined with ship passage information from the Automatic Identification System. This approach allowed for detailed measurements (i.e., source level, sound exposure level, and transmission range) on ships of opportunity. A key result was different acoustic levels and spectral shapes observed from different ship-types. A 54 kGT container ship had the highest broadband source level at 188 dB re 1 μPa@1m; a 26 kGT chemical tanker had the lowest at 177 dB re 1 μPa@1m. Bulk carriers had higher source levels near 100 Hz, while container ship and tanker noise was predominantly below 40 Hz. Simple models to predict source levels of modern merchant ships as a group from particular ship characteristics (e.g., length, gross tonnage, and speed) were not possible given individual ship-type differences. Furthermore, ship noise was observed to radiate asymmetrically. Stern aspect noise levels are 5 to 10 dB higher than bow aspect noise levels. Collectively, these results emphasize the importance of including modern ship-types in quantifying shipping noise for predictive models of global, regional, and local marine environments. © 2012 Acoustical Society of America.

  16. Underwater Acoustic Carbon Nanotube Thermophone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-23

    electrically connected to the transducer cable. A silicon sealant material is used to for attachment points on the thermophone. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF...300 degrees Celsius) rated silicon sealant material 62 is used to for attachment points on the thermophone 10. [0030] Advantages and features of...of a cable is soldered to the carbon nanotube material chip at electrodes of the material chip. A high temperature rated silicon sealant is used for attachment points on the thermophone.

  17. Underwater Acoustic Beacon Location System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-23

    distance is the predicted detection range R based on consideration of Equations (1) and (2) together with the parameters for SL, NL, DI, DT and alpha ...R nvnv nvnv ia               cossin0 sincos0 0012 (12) [0091] Finally, the positions on the seafloor 500 in the array...numerical values of the beam pattern projected onto the seafloor are divided by the sum of all of the (non- zero ) numerical values projected onto the

  18. Aero-acoustic noise of wind turbines. Noise prediction models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maribo Pedersen, B. [ed.

    1997-12-31

    Semi-empirical and CAA (Computational AeroAcoustics) noise prediction techniques are the subject of this expert meeting. The meeting presents and discusses models and methods. The meeting may provide answers to the following questions: What Noise sources are the most important? How are the sources best modeled? What needs to be done to do better predictions? Does it boil down to correct prediction of the unsteady aerodynamics around the rotor? Or is the difficult part to convert the aerodynamics into acoustics? (LN)

  19. Test of single degree of freedom acoustic treatment impedance models for multimodal acoustic propagation in duct with flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccouche, Ryan; Moreau, Soléne; Ben Tahar, Mabrouk

    2017-06-01

    Passive acoustic treatments, also called liners, are the main solution to noise problems. The Single Degree Of Freedom (SDOF) acoustic treatment, composed of a thin material (perforated plate) affixed to air cavities with a rigid bottom, constitutes a solution. Predicting sound level reduction by an SDOF treatment requires reliable acoustic impedance models. An experimental/numerical method has been developed for a duct with an acoustic treatment to test acoustic impedance models of SDOF treatment with a multimodal propagation in the presence of a mean flow. This method is based on the comparison of experimental results from an aeroacoustic bench composed of a circular duct with a treated area, and numerical results from an FEM-PML axisymmetric model based on Galbrun's equation. The numerical results are confronted with experimental results to test impedance models up to M 0 =±0.25.

  20. Numerical modelling of nonlinear full-wave acoustic propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasco-Segura, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.velasco@ccadet.unam.mx; Rendón, Pablo L., E-mail: pablo.rendon@ccadet.unam.mx [Grupo de Acústica y Vibraciones, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, Apartado Postal 70-186, C.P. 04510, México D.F., México (Mexico)

    2015-10-28

    The various model equations of nonlinear acoustics are arrived at by making assumptions which permit the observation of the interaction with propagation of either single or joint effects. We present here a form of the conservation equations of fluid dynamics which are deduced using slightly less restrictive hypothesis than those necessary to obtain the well known Westervelt equation. This formulation accounts for full wave diffraction, nonlinearity, and thermoviscous dissipative effects. A two-dimensional, finite-volume method using Roe’s linearisation has been implemented to obtain numerically the solution of the proposed equations. This code, which has been written for parallel execution on a GPU, can be used to describe moderate nonlinear phenomena, at low Mach numbers, in domains as large as 100 wave lengths. Applications range from models of diagnostic and therapeutic HIFU, to parametric acoustic arrays and nonlinear propagation in acoustic waveguides. Examples related to these applications are shown and discussed.

  1. Sensor network architectures for monitoring underwater pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Nader; Jawhar, Imad; Al-Jaroodi, Jameela; Zhang, Liren

    2011-01-01

    This paper develops and compares different sensor network architecture designs that can be used for monitoring underwater pipeline infrastructures. These architectures are underwater wired sensor networks, underwater acoustic wireless sensor networks, RF (radio frequency) wireless sensor networks, integrated wired/acoustic wireless sensor networks, and integrated wired/RF wireless sensor networks. The paper also discusses the reliability challenges and enhancement approaches for these network architectures. The reliability evaluation, characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages among these architectures are discussed and compared. Three reliability factors are used for the discussion and comparison: the network connectivity, the continuity of power supply for the network, and the physical network security. In addition, the paper also develops and evaluates a hierarchical sensor network framework for underwater pipeline monitoring.

  2. Frequency and Time Domain Modeling of Acoustic Liner Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Donald B.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a research program directed at the acoustics of advanced subsonic propulsion systems undertaken at NASA Langley, Duke University was funded to develop a boundary condition model for bulk-reacting nacelle liners. The overall objective of the Langley program was to understand and predict noise from advanced subsonic transport engines and to develop related noise control technology. The overall technical areas included: fan and propeller source noise, acoustics of ducts and duct liners, interior noise, subjective acoustics, and systems noise prediction. The Duke effort was directed toward duct liner acoustics for the development of analytical methods to characterize liner behavior in both frequency domain and time domain. A review of duct acoustics and liner technology can be found in Reference [1]. At that time, NASA Langley was investigating the propulsion concept of an advanced ducted fan, with a large diameter housed inside a relatively short duct. Fan diameters in excess of ten feet were proposed. The lengths of both the inlet and exhaust portions of the duct were to be short, probably less than half the fan diameter. The nacelle itself would be relatively thin-walled for reasons of aerodynamic efficiency. The blade-passage frequency was expected to be less than I kHz, and very likely in the 200 to 300 Hz range. Because of the design constraints of a short duct, a thin nacelle, and long acoustic wavelengths, the application of effective liner technology would be especially challenging. One of the needs of the NASA Langley program was the capability to accurately and efficiently predict the behavior of the acoustic liner. The traditional point impedance method was not an adequate model for proposed liner designs. The method was too restrictive to represent bulk reacting liners and to allow for the characterization of many possible innovative liner concepts. In the research effort at Duke, an alternative method, initially developed to handle bulk

  3. Underwater noise levels in UK waters

    OpenAIRE

    Merchant, Nathan D.; Brookes, Kate L.; Faulkner, Rebecca C.; Bicknell, Anthony W. J.; Godley, Brendan J.; Witt, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Underwater noise from human activities appears to be rising, with ramifications for acoustically sensitive marine organisms and the functioning of marine ecosystems. Policymakers are beginning to address the risk of ecological impact, but are constrained by a lack of data on current and historic noise levels. Here, we present the first nationally coordinated effort to quantify underwater noise levels, in support of UK policy objectives under the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). ...

  4. A linearized dispersion relation for orthorhombic pseudo-acoustic modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Xiaolei

    2012-11-04

    Wavefield extrapolation in acoustic orthorhombic anisotropic media suffers from wave-mode coupling and stability limitations in the parameter range. We introduce a linearized form of the dispersion relation for acoustic orthorhombic media to model acoustic wavefields. We apply the lowrank approximation approach to handle the corresponding space-wavenumber mixed-domain operator. Numerical experiments show that the proposed wavefield extrapolator is accurate and practically free of dispersions. Further, there is no coupling of qSv and qP waves, because we use the analytical dispersion relation. No constraints on Thomsen\\'s parameters are required for stability. The linearized expression may provide useful application for parameter estimation in orthorhombic media.

  5. Acoustic model optimisation for a call routing system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kleynhans, N

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available 2004, pp. 93?96. [12] H. Kamper, F. J. M. Mukanya, and T. R. Niesler, ?Multi-accent acoustic modelling of South African English,? Speech Communication, vol. 54, pp. 801?813, Feb. 2012. [13] S. Young, G. Evermann, M. Gales, T. Hain, D. Kershaw, X...

  6. Integrated Modeling and Analysis of Physical Oceanographic and Acoustic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    dynamics of the ocean, surface and internal waves, and seabed and acoustics processes with atmospheric forcing, all in a fully synoptic and evolving...rays with the eKdVf model and a sine-wave starter is shown (synthetic SAR pictures , surface convergences, are shown). Waves computed with advection

  7. Predicting room acoustical behavior with the ODEON computer model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naylor, Graham; Rindel, Jens Holger

    1992-01-01

    for discrepancies are discussed. These discrepancies indicate areas in which the computational model has to be improved, and highlight some shortcomings of current room acoustical survey methods. The effects of various calculation parameters (e.g., number of rays, early reflection order) are also briefly considered....

  8. Airport acoustics: Aircraft noise distribution and modelling of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Airport acoustics: Aircraft noise distribution and modelling of some aircraft parameters. MU Onuu, EO Obisung. Abstract. No Abstract. Nigerian Journal of Physics Vol. 17 (Supplement) 2005: pp. 177-186. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  9. A room acoustical computer model for industrial environments - the model and its verification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus Lynge; Foged, Hans Torben

    1998-01-01

    sources. Combining these three source types it is possible to model huge machinery in an easy and visually clear way. Traditionally room acoustic simulations have been aimed at auditorium acoustics. The aim of the simulations has been to model the room acoustic measuring setup consisting...... of an omnidirectional sound source and a microphone. This allows the comparison of simulated results with the ones measured in real rooms. However when simulating the acoustic environment in industrial rooms, the sound sources are often far from being point like, as they can be distributed over a large space...

  10. A Connection Model between the Positioning Mechanism and Ultrasonic Measurement System via a Web Browser to Assess Acoustic Target Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Ken; Imaizumi, Tomohito; Abe, Koki; Takao, Yoshimi; Tamura, Shuko

    This paper details a network-controlled measurement system for use in fisheries engineering. The target strength (TS) of fish is important in order to convert acoustic integration values obtained during acoustic surveys into estimates of fish abundance. The target strength pattern is measured with the combination of the rotation system for the aspect of the sample and the echo data acquisition system using the underwater supersonic wave. The user interface of the network architecture is designed for collaborative use with researchers in other organizations. The flexible network architecture is based on the web direct-access model for the rotation mechanism. The user interface is available for monitoring and controlling via a web browser that is installed in any terminal PC (personal computer). Previously the combination of two applications was performed not by a web browser but by the exclusive interface program. So a connection model is proposed between two applications by indirect communication via the DCOM (Distributed Component Object Model) server and added in the web direct-access model. A prompt report system in the TS measurement system and a positioning and measurement system using an electric flatcar via a web browser are developed. By a secure network architecture, DCOM communications via both Intranet and LAN are successfully certificated.

  11. A theoretical approach to room acoustic simulations based on a radiative transfer model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruiz-Navarro, Juan-Miguel; Jacobsen, Finn; Escolano, José

    2010-01-01

    A theoretical approach to room acoustic simulations based on a radiative transfer model is developed by adapting the classical radiative transfer theory from optics to acoustics. The proposed acoustic radiative transfer model expands classical geometrical room acoustic modeling algorithms...... by incorporating a propagation medium that absorbs and scatters radiation, handling both diffuse and non-diffuse reflections on boundaries and objects in the room. The main scope of this model is to provide a proper foundation for a wide number of room acoustic simulation models, in order to establish and unify...... their principles. It is shown that this room acoustic modeling technique establishes the basis of two recently proposed algorithms, the acoustic diffusion equation and the room acoustic rendering equation. Both methods are derived in detail using an analytical approximation and a simplified integral equation...

  12. Acoustic Propagation Modeling for Marine Hydro-Kinetic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. N.; Johnson, E.

    2014-12-01

    The combination of riverine, tidal, and wave energy have the potential to supply over one third of the United States' annual electricity demand. However, in order to deploy and test prototypes, and commercial installations, marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices must meet strict regulatory guidelines that determine the maximum amount of noise that can be generated and sets particular thresholds for determining disturbance and injury caused by noise. An accurate model for predicting the propagation of a MHK source in a real-life hydro-acoustic environment has been established. This model will help promote the growth and viability of marine, water, and hydrokinetic energy by confidently assuring federal regulations are meet and harmful impacts to marine fish and wildlife are minimal. Paracousti, a finite difference solution to the acoustic equations, was originally developed for sound propagation in atmospheric environments and has been successfully validated for a number of different geophysical activities. The three-dimensional numerical implementation is advantageous over other acoustic propagation techniques for a MHK application where the domains of interest have complex 3D interactions from the seabed, banks, and other shallow water effects. A number of different cases for hydro-acoustic environments have been validated by both analytical and numerical results from canonical and benchmark problems. This includes a variety of hydrodynamic and physical environments that may be present in a potential MHK application including shallow and deep water, sloping, and canyon type bottoms, with varying sound speed and density profiles. With the model successfully validated for hydro-acoustic environments more complex and realistic MHK sources from turbines and/or arrays can be modeled.

  13. Acoustic Response of Underwater Munitions near a Sediment Interface: Measurement Model Comparisons and Classification Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-23

    selected replica. The cause was not immediately apparent, but it was suggested that the issue was most prevalent at lower frequencies. Figure 7 displays...sin()+√2−2() (3) where  = 2 / 1, K = k2 / k1 = (1 + i )/, and  = c2/c1 is a real index of refraction . Here, c2, 2...contains experimental error due to the manipulation of the target by the divers to collect the nine data sets. That is, divers must lift the target off

  14. An acoustic glottal source for vocal tract physical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannukainen, Antti; Kuortti, Juha; Malinen, Jarmo; Ojalammi, Antti

    2017-11-01

    A sound source is proposed for the acoustic measurement of physical models of the human vocal tract. The physical models are produced by fast prototyping, based on magnetic resonance imaging during prolonged vowel production. The sound source, accompanied by custom signal processing algorithms, is used for two kinds of measurements from physical models of the vocal tract: (i) amplitude frequency response and resonant frequency measurements, and (ii) signal reconstructions at the source output according to a target pressure waveform with measurements at the mouth position. The proposed source and the software are validated by computational acoustics experiments and measurements on a physical model of the vocal tract corresponding to the vowels [] of a male speaker.

  15. Background Acoustic Noise Models for the IMS Hydroacoustic Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    BACKGROUND ACOUSTIC NOISE MODELS FOR THE IMS HYDROACOUSTIC STATIONS Philip E. Harben and Terri F. Hauk Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory ...levels in the ocean have been increasing for the past several decades (McDonald, 2006) yet many of our hydroacoustic detection assessment tools use...dB since the 1960’s. To address this issue and provide accurate noise models at each of the six International Monitoring System (IMS) hydroacoustic

  16. Auralization fundamentals of acoustics, modelling, simulation, algorithms and acoustic virtual reality

    CERN Document Server

    Vorlander, Michael

    2007-01-01

    "Auralization" is the technique of creation and reproduction of sound on the basis of computer data. With this tool is it possible to predict the character of sound signals which are generated at the source and modified by reinforcement, propagation and transmission in systems such as rooms, buildings, vehicles or other technical devices. This book is organized as a comprehensive collection of the basics of sound and vibration, acoustic modelling, simulation, signal processing and audio reproduction. Implementations of the auralization technique are described using examples drawn from various fields in acoustic’s research and engineering, architecture, sound design and virtual reality.

  17. Chromospheric extents predicted by time-dependent acoustic wave models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuntz, Manfred

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical models for chromospheric structures of late-type giant stars are computed, including the time-dependent propagation of acoustic waves. Models with short-period monochromatic shock waves as well as a spectrum of acoustic waves are discussed, and the method is applied to the stars Arcturus, Aldebaran, and Betelgeuse. Chromospheric extent, defined as the monotonic decrease with height of the time-averaged electron densities, are found to be 1.12, 1.13, and 1.22 stellar radii for the three stars, respectively; this corresponds to a time-averaged electron density of 10 to the 7th/cu cm. Predictions of the extended chromospheric obtained using a simple scaling law agree well with those obtained by the time-dependent wave models; thus, the chromospheres of all stars for which the scaling law is valid consist of the same number of pressure scale heights.

  18. Chromospheric extents predicted by time-dependent acoustic wave models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuntz, M. (Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics, Boulder, CO (USA) Heidelberg Universitaet (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical models for chromospheric structures of late-type giant stars are computed, including the time-dependent propagation of acoustic waves. Models with short-period monochromatic shock waves as well as a spectrum of acoustic waves are discussed, and the method is applied to the stars Arcturus, Aldebaran, and Betelgeuse. Chromospheric extent, defined as the monotonic decrease with height of the time-averaged electron densities, are found to be 1.12, 1.13, and 1.22 stellar radii for the three stars, respectively; this corresponds to a time-averaged electron density of 10 to the 7th/cu cm. Predictions of the extended chromospheric obtained using a simple scaling law agree well with those obtained by the time-dependent wave models; thus, the chromospheres of all stars for which the scaling law is valid consist of the same number of pressure scale heights. 74 refs.

  19. Acoustic Scattering by Axisymmetric Finite-Length Bodies with Application to Fish: Measurement and Modeling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reeder, D

    2002-01-01

    ... laboratory acoustic measurements. A general acoustic scattering model is developed that is accurate and numerically efficient for a wide range of frequencies, angles of orientation, irregular axisymmetric shapes and boundary...

  20. Acoustic Environment of Haro Strait: Preliminary Propagation Modeling and Data Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Christopher D; Wolfson, Michael A

    2006-01-01

    Field measurements and acoustic propagation modeling for the frequency range 1 10 kHz are combined to analyze the acoustic environment of Haro Strait of Puget Sound, home to the southern resident killer whales...

  1. Prediction of the Acoustic Field Associated with Instability Wave Source Model for a Compressible Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubev, Vladimir; Mankbadi, Reda R.; Dahl, Milo D.; Kiraly, L. James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides preliminary results of the study of the acoustic radiation from the source model representing spatially-growing instability waves in a round jet at high speeds. The source model is briefly discussed first followed by the analysis of the produced acoustic directivity pattern. Two integral surface techniques are discussed and compared for prediction of the jet acoustic radiation field.

  2. Modeling Nonlinear Acoustic Standing Waves in Resonators: Theory and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Ganesh; Li, Xiaofan; Finkbeiner, Joshua

    2004-01-01

    The overall goal of the cooperative research with NASA Glenn is to fundamentally understand, computationally model, and experimentally validate non-linear acoustic waves in enclosures with the ultimate goal of developing a non-contact acoustic seal. The longer term goal is to transition the Glenn acoustic seal innovation to a prototype sealing device. Lucas and coworkers are credited with pioneering work in Resonant Macrosonic Synthesis (RMS). Several Patents and publications have successfully illustrated the concept of Resonant Macrosonic Synthesis. To utilize this concept in practical application one needs to have an understanding of the details of the phenomenon and a predictive tool that can examine the waveforms produced within resonators of complex shapes. With appropriately shaped resonators one can produce un-shocked waveforms of high amplitude that would result in very high pressures in certain regions. Our goal is to control the waveforms and exploit the high pressures to produce an acoustic seal. Note that shock formation critically limits peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes and also causes excessive energy dissipation. Proper shaping of the resonator is thus critical to the use of this innovation.

  3. Underwater Photogrammetry and Object Modeling: A Case Study of Xlendi Wreck in Malta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drap, Pierre; Merad, Djamal; Hijazi, Bilal; Gaoua, Lamia; Nawaf, Mohamad Motasem; Saccone, Mauro; Chemisky, Bertrand; Seinturier, Julien; Sourisseau, Jean-Christophe; Gambin, Timmy; Castro, Filipe

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a photogrammetry-based approach for deep-sea underwater surveys conducted from a submarine and guided by knowledge-representation combined with a logical approach (ontology). Two major issues are discussed in this paper. The first concerns deep-sea surveys using photogrammetry from a submarine. Here the goal was to obtain a set of images that completely covered the selected site. Subsequently and based on these images, a low-resolution 3D model is obtained in real-time, followed by a very high-resolution model produced back in the laboratory. The second issue involves the extraction of known artefacts present on the site. This aspect of the research is based on an a priori representation of the knowledge involved using systematic reasoning. Two parallel processes were developed to represent the photogrammetric process used for surveying as well as for identifying archaeological artefacts visible on the sea floor. Mapping involved the use of the CIDOC-CRM system (International Committee for Documentation (CIDOC)—Conceptual Reference Model)—This is a system that has been previously utilised to in the heritage sector and is largely available to the established scientific community. The proposed theoretical representation is based on procedural attachment; moreover, a strong link is maintained between the ontological description of the modelled concepts and the Java programming language which permitted 3D structure estimation and modelling based on a set of oriented images. A very recently discovered shipwreck acted as a testing ground for this project; the Xelendi Phoenician shipwreck, found off the Maltese coast, is probably the oldest known shipwreck in the western Mediterranean. The approach presented in this paper was developed in the scope of the GROPLAN project (Généralisation du Relevé, avec Ontologies et Photogrammétrie, pour l'Archéologie Navale et Sous-marine). Financed by the French National Research Agency (ANR) for four

  4. Underwater Photogrammetry and Object Modeling: A Case Study of Xlendi Wreck in Malta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drap, Pierre; Merad, Djamal; Hijazi, Bilal; Gaoua, Lamia; Nawaf, Mohamad Motasem; Saccone, Mauro; Chemisky, Bertrand; Seinturier, Julien; Sourisseau, Jean-Christophe; Gambin, Timmy; Castro, Filipe

    2015-12-04

    In this paper we present a photogrammetry-based approach for deep-sea underwater surveys conducted from a submarine and guided by knowledge-representation combined with a logical approach (ontology). Two major issues are discussed in this paper. The first concerns deep-sea surveys using photogrammetry from a submarine. Here the goal was to obtain a set of images that completely covered the selected site. Subsequently and based on these images, a low-resolution 3D model is obtained in real-time, followed by a very high-resolution model produced back in the laboratory. The second issue involves the extraction of known artefacts present on the site. This aspect of the research is based on an a priori representation of the knowledge involved using systematic reasoning. Two parallel processes were developed to represent the photogrammetric process used for surveying as well as for identifying archaeological artefacts visible on the sea floor. Mapping involved the use of the CIDOC-CRM system (International Committee for Documentation (CIDOC)-Conceptual Reference Model)-This is a system that has been previously utilised to in the heritage sector and is largely available to the established scientific community. The proposed theoretical representation is based on procedural attachment; moreover, a strong link is maintained between the ontological description of the modelled concepts and the Java programming language which permitted 3D structure estimation and modelling based on a set of oriented images. A very recently discovered shipwreck acted as a testing ground for this project; the Xelendi Phoenician shipwreck, found off the Maltese coast, is probably the oldest known shipwreck in the western Mediterranean. The approach presented in this paper was developed in the scope of the GROPLAN project (Généralisation du Relevé, avec Ontologies et Photogrammétrie, pour l'Archéologie Navale et Sous-marine). Financed by the French National Research Agency (ANR) for four years

  5. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Above Deck Water Sound Suppression Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janice D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program test matrix was designed to determine the acoustic reduction for the Liftoff acoustics (LOA) environment with an above deck water sound suppression system. The scale model test can be used to quantify the effectiveness of the water suppression system as well as optimize the systems necessary for the LOA noise reduction. Several water flow rates were tested to determine which rate provides the greatest acoustic reductions. Preliminary results are presented.

  6. Underwater Photogrammetry and Object Modeling: A Case Study of Xlendi Wreck in Malta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Drap

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a photogrammetry-based approach for deep-sea underwater surveys conducted from a submarine and guided by knowledge-representation combined with a logical approach (ontology. Two major issues are discussed in this paper. The first concerns deep-sea surveys using photogrammetry from a submarine. Here the goal was to obtain a set of images that completely covered the selected site. Subsequently and based on these images, a low-resolution 3D model is obtained in real-time, followed by a very high-resolution model produced back in the laboratory. The second issue involves the extraction of known artefacts present on the site. This aspect of the research is based on an a priori representation of the knowledge involved using systematic reasoning. Two parallel processes were developed to represent the photogrammetric process used for surveying as well as for identifying archaeological artefacts visible on the sea floor. Mapping involved the use of the CIDOC-CRM system (International Committee for Documentation (CIDOC—Conceptual Reference Model—This is a system that has been previously utilised to in the heritage sector and is largely available to the established scientific community. The proposed theoretical representation is based on procedural attachment; moreover, a strong link is maintained between the ontological description of the modelled concepts and the Java programming language which permitted 3D structure estimation and modelling based on a set of oriented images. A very recently discovered shipwreck acted as a testing ground for this project; the Xelendi Phoenician shipwreck, found off the Maltese coast, is probably the oldest known shipwreck in the western Mediterranean. The approach presented in this paper was developed in the scope of the GROPLAN project (Généralisation du Relevé, avec Ontologies et Photogrammétrie, pour l'Archéologie Navale et Sous-marine. Financed by the French National Research Agency

  7. Evanescent Acoustic Wave Scattering by Targets and Diffraction by Ripples Graduate Traineeship Award in Ocean Acoustics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Osterhoudt, Curtis F; Marston, Philip L

    2007-01-01

    .... The purpose of his research was to improve the understanding of the way that acoustic evanescent waves interact with targets buried in sediments in situations encountered in underwater acoustics...

  8. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Akiyama, Iwaki

    2009-01-01

    The 29th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Shonan Village, Kanagawa, Japan, April 15-18, 2007. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968 and forms a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. In the course of the years the volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have developed and become well-known and appreciated reference works. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art in the field as well as an in-depth look at its leading edge research, this Volume 29 in the Series contains again an excellent collection of seventy papers presented in nine major categories: Strain Imaging Biological and Medical Applications Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Components and Systems Geophysics and Underwater Imaging Physics and Mathematics Medical Image Analysis FDTD method and Other Numerical Simulations Audience Researcher...

  9. Structural Acoustic Physics Based Modeling of Curved Composite Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-19

    various geometries and materials. This can help drive future research on composite material applications and enhance design methods for future Navy...both the plate and the water is 0.15 inch. The plate elements are eight-node, linear , brick stress/displacement continuum elements (C3D8R) while the...water elements are eight-node, linear , brick acoustic continuum elements (AC3D8). The analyses of the flat plate model were completed using Abaqus

  10. Validation of an Acoustic Impedance Prediction Model for Skewed Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howerton, Brian M.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2009-01-01

    An impedance prediction model was validated experimentally to determine the composite impedance of a series of high-aspect ratio slot resonators incorporating channel skew and sharp bends. Such structures are useful for packaging acoustic liners into constrained spaces for turbofan noise control applications. A formulation of the Zwikker-Kosten Transmission Line (ZKTL) model, incorporating the Richards correction for rectangular channels, is used to calculate the composite normalized impedance of a series of six multi-slot resonator arrays with constant channel length. Experimentally, acoustic data was acquired in the NASA Langley Normal Incidence Tube over the frequency range of 500 to 3500 Hz at 120 and 140 dB OASPL. Normalized impedance was reduced using the Two-Microphone Method for the various combinations of channel skew and sharp 90o and 180o bends. Results show that the presence of skew and/or sharp bends does not significantly alter the impedance of a slot resonator as compared to a straight resonator of the same total channel length. ZKTL predicts the impedance of such resonators very well over the frequency range of interest. The model can be used to design arrays of slot resonators that can be packaged into complex geometries heretofore unsuitable for effective acoustic treatment.

  11. Affordable underwater wireless optical communication using LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilipenko, Vladimir; Arnon, Shlomi

    2013-09-01

    In recent years the need for high data rate underwater wireless communication (WC) has increased. Nowadays, the conventional technology for underwater communication is acoustic. However, the maximum data rate that acoustic technology can provide is a few kilobits per second. On the other hand, emerging applications such as underwater imaging, networks of sensors and swarms of underwater vehicles require much faster data rates. As a result, underwater optical WC, which can provide much higher data rates, has been proposed as an alternative means of communication. In addition to high data rates, affordable communication systems become an important feature in the development requirements. The outcome of these requirements is a new system design based on off-the-shelf components such as blue and green light emitting diodes (LEDs). This is due to the fact that LEDs offer solutions characterized by low cost, high efficiency, reliability and compactness. However, there are some challenges to be met when incorporating LEDs as part of the optical transmitter, such as low modulation rates and non linearity. In this paper, we review the main challenges facing the incorporation of LEDs as an integral part of underwater WC systems and propose some techniques to mitigate the LED limitations in order to achieve high data rate communication

  12. Design, modeling and optimization of an underwater manipulator with four-bar mechanism and compliant linkage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Sang Ok; Kim, Ji Hoon; Bae, Jang Ho; Kim, Jong Won; Seo, Tae Won

    2016-01-01

    Underwater manipulators are very important for a robot to perform a specific operation in water. Conventional robot arm manipulators have been suggested for various operations but have not been suitable for repeated motion in gathering something. This paper presents a new underwater manipulator design for gathering things such as starfish on the sea floor. The manipulator is composed of a four-bar linkage to achieve repeated motion along a loop and compliant linkages to enhance the efficiency of the gathering work. Kinematic and quasi-static analyses were performed to calculate the loop path and the reaction force at the actuation point. Based on the analysis, optimal design was performed to maximize the working distance with the height difference and the reaction moments considered as constraints. A prototype was assembled to test the performance of the manipulator, and the empirical loop path was compared to simulation results

  13. Design, modeling and optimization of an underwater manipulator with four-bar mechanism and compliant linkage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Sang Ok; Kim, Ji Hoon; Bae, Jang Ho; Kim, Jong Won [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Tae Won [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Underwater manipulators are very important for a robot to perform a specific operation in water. Conventional robot arm manipulators have been suggested for various operations but have not been suitable for repeated motion in gathering something. This paper presents a new underwater manipulator design for gathering things such as starfish on the sea floor. The manipulator is composed of a four-bar linkage to achieve repeated motion along a loop and compliant linkages to enhance the efficiency of the gathering work. Kinematic and quasi-static analyses were performed to calculate the loop path and the reaction force at the actuation point. Based on the analysis, optimal design was performed to maximize the working distance with the height difference and the reaction moments considered as constraints. A prototype was assembled to test the performance of the manipulator, and the empirical loop path was compared to simulation results.

  14. Integrated Model for the Acoustics of Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    the solid material. This model has been associated with seismic wave propagation in essentially dry soil . A second loss mechanism in fluid-saturated...method ( FEM ) for four cases. [The left and right panels show results at a frequency of 100 and 3000 Hz, respectively. The kh values increase from

  15. NIPS Workshop: Advances in Acoustic Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Ling; Hansen, Lars Kai

    that essentially independent in a reasonable ensemble can be efficiently coded using a sparse independent component representation. This means that supervised and unsupervised learning should result in similar representations. We do indeed find that supervised and unsupervised learning of a model based...

  16. Efficient and stable model reduction scheme for the numerical simulation of broadband acoustic metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyun, Jaeyub; Kook, Junghwan; Wang, Semyung

    2015-01-01

    and basis vectors for use according to the target system. The proposed model reduction scheme is applied to the numerical simulation of the simple mass-damping-spring system and the acoustic metamaterial systems (i.e., acoustic lens and acoustic cloaking device) for the first time. Through these numerical...

  17. Vibro-acoustic model of an active aircraft cabin window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloufi, Badr; Behdinan, Kamran; Zu, Jean

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents modeling and design of an active structural acoustic control (ASAC) system for controlling the low frequency sound field transmitted through an aircraft cabin window. The system uses stacked piezoelectric elements arranged in a manner to generate out-of-plane actuation point forces acting on the window panel boundaries. A theoretical vibro-acoustic model for an active quadruple-panel system is developed to characterize the dynamic behavior of the system and achieve a good understanding of the active control performance and the physical phenomena of the sound transmission loss (STL) characteristics. The quadruple-panel system represents the passenger window design used in some classes of modern aircraft with an exterior double pane of Plexiglas, an interior dust cover pane and a glazed dimmable pane, all separated by thin air cavities. The STL characteristics of identical pane window configurations with different piezoelectric actuator sets are analyzed. A parametric study describes the influence of important active parameters, such as the input voltage, number and location of the actuator elements, on the STL is investigated. In addition, a mathematical model for obtaining the optimal input voltage is developed to improve the acoustic attenuation capability of the control system. In general, the achieved results indicate that the proposed ASAC design offers a considerable improvement in the passive sound loss performance of cabin window design without significant effects, such as weight increase, on the original design. Also, the results show that the acoustic control of the active model with piezoelectric actuators bonded to the dust cover pane generates high structural vibrations in the radiating panel (dust cover) and an increase in sound power radiation. High active acoustic attenuation can be achieved by designing the ASAC system to apply active control forces on the inner Plexiglas panel or dimmable panel by installing the actuators on the

  18. SIMULATION AND ANALYSIS OF GREEDY ROUTING PROTOCOL IN VIEW OF ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND NETWORK LIFETIME IN THREE DIMENSIONAL UNDERWATER WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHEENA KOHLI

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Underwater Wireless Sensor Network (UWSN comprises of a number of miniature sized sensing devices deployed in the sea or ocean, connected by dint of acoustic links to each other. The sensors trap the ambient conditions and transmit the data from one end to another. For transmission of data in any medium, routing protocols play a crucial role. Moreover, being battery limited, an unavoidable parameter to be considered in operation and analysis of protocols is the network energy and the network lifetime. The paper discusses the greedy routing protocol for underwater wireless sensor networks. The simulation of this routing protocol also takes into consideration the characteristics of acoustic communication like attenuation, transmission loss, signal to noise ratio, noise, propagation delay. The results from these observations may be used to construct an accurate underwater communication model.

  19. Underwater floating robot-fish: a comparative analysis of the results of mathematical modelling and full-scale tests of the prototype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatsun Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a comparative analysis of the results of computer mathematical modelling of the motion of the underwater robot-fish implemented by using the MATLAB / Simulink package and fullscale tests of an experimental model developed in the laboratory of mechatronics and robotics of the SouthWest State University.

  20. Detection of Underwater UXOs in Mud

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    2nd International Conference on Underwater Acoustic Measurements, Crete, Greece, 2007. 16 [10] P.T. Gough and D.W. Hawkins “Imaging algorithms...course. Runs 275 and 325 folla.v the same trad < and run 322 foUows a track on the opposite side of the swath. The LF SAS image of run 325 is shown

  1. Impacts of underwater noise on marine vertebrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liebschner, Alexander; Seibel, Henrike; Teilmann, Jonas; Wittekind, Dietrich; Parmentier, Eric; Dähne, Michael; Dietz, Rune; Driver, Jörg; Elk, van Cornelis; Everaarts, Eligius; Findeisen, Henning; Kristensen, Jacob; Lehnert, Kristina; Lucke, Klaus; Merck, Thomas; Müller, Sabine; Pawliczka, Iwona; Ronnenberg, Katrin; Rosenberger, Tanja; Ruser, Andreas; Tougaard, Jakob; Schuster, Max; Sundermeyer, Janne; Sveegaard, Signe; Siebert, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    The project conducts application-oriented research on impacts of underwater noise on marine vertebrates in the North and Baltic Seas. In distinct subprojects, the hearing sensitivity of harbor porpoises and gray seals as well as the acoustic tolerance limit of harbor porpoises to impulsive noise

  2. A model for acoustic absorbent materials derived from coconut fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramis, J.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, a methodology is proposed for obtaining empirical equations describing the sound absorption characteristics of an absorbing material obtained from natural fibers, specifically from coconut. The method, which was previously applied to other materials, requires performing measurements of air-flow resistivity and of acoustic impedance for samples of the material under study. The equations that govern the acoustic behavior of the material are then derived by means of a least-squares fit of the acoustic impedance and of the propagation constant. These results can be useful since they allow the empirically obtained analytical equations to be easily incorporated in prediction and simulation models of acoustic systems for noise control that incorporate the studied materials.En este trabajo se describe el proceso seguido para obtener ecuaciones empíricas del comportamiento acústico de un material absorbente obtenido a partir de fibras naturales, concretamente el coco. El procedimiento, que ha sido ensayado con éxito en otros materiales, implica la realización de medidas de impedancia y resistencia al flujo de muestras del material bajo estudio. Las ecuaciones que gobiernan el comportamiento desde el punto de vista acústico del material se obtienen a partir del ajuste de ecuaciones de comportamiento de la impedancia acústica y la constante de propagación del material. Los resultados son útiles ya que, al disponer de ecuaciones analíticas obtenidas empíricamente, facilitan la incorporación de estos materiales en predicciones mediante métodos numéricos del comportamiento cuando son instalados formando parte de dispositivos para el control del ruido.

  3. Delay Tolerance in Underwater Wireless Communications: A Routing Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safdar Hussain Bouk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Similar to terrestrial networks, underwater wireless networks (UWNs also aid several critical tasks including coastal surveillance, underwater pollution detection, and other maritime applications. Currently, once underwater sensor nodes are deployed at different levels of the sea, it is nearly impossible or very expensive to reconfigure the hardware, for example, battery. Taking this issue into account, considerable amount of research has been carried out to ensure minimum energy costs and reliable communication between underwater nodes and base stations. As a result, several different network protocols were proposed for UWN, including MAC, PHY, transport, and routing. Recently, a new paradigm was introduced claiming that the intermittent nature of acoustic channel and signal resulted in designing delay tolerant routing schemes for the UWN, known as an underwater delay tolerant network. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive survey of underwater routing protocols with emphasis on the limitations, challenges, and future open issues in the context of delay tolerant network routing.

  4. Hemispherical optical dome for underwater communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiri, Ron S.; Lunde, Emily L.; Coronado, Patrick L.; Quijada, Manuel A.

    2017-08-01

    For many years, acoustic systems have been used as the primary method for underwater communication; however, the data transfer rate of such systems is low because sound propagates slowly through water. A higher throughput can be achieved using visible light to transmit data underwater. The first issue with this approach is that there is generally a large loss of the light signal due to scattering and absorption in water, even though there is an optimal wavelength for transmission in the blue or green wavelengths of the visible spectrum. The second issue is that a simple communication system, consisting only of a highly directional source/transmitter and small optical detector/receiver, has a very narrow field of view. The goal of this project is to improve an optical, underwater communication system by increasing the effective field of view of the receiving optics. To this end, we make two changes to the simple system: (1) An optical dome was added near the receiver. An array of lenses is placed radially on the surface of the dome, reminiscent of the compound eye of an insect. The lenses make the source and detector planes conjugate, and each lens adds a new region of the source plane to the instrument's total field of view. (2) The receiver was expanded to include multiple photodiodes. With these two changes, the receiver has much more tolerance to misalignments (in position and angle) of the transmitter. Two versions of the optical dome (with 6" and 8" diameters) were designed using PTC's Creo CAD software and modeled using Synopsys' CODE V optical design software. A series of these transparent hemispherical domes, with both design diameters, were manufactured using a 5-axis mill. The prototype was then retrofitted with lenses and compared with the computer-generated model to demonstrate the effectiveness of this solution. This work shows that the dome design improves the optical field of view of the underwater communication system considerably. Furthermore, with

  5. LES and acoustic analysis of thermo-acoustic instabilities in a partially premixed model combustor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernandez, I.; Staffelbach, G.; Poinsot, T.; Roman Casado, J.C.; Kok, Jacobus B.W.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations were performed using Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and acoustic analysis tools to study thermo-acoustic instabilities in a methane/air academic burner installed at the University of Twente (The Netherlands). It operates under fuel-lean partially premixed conditions at atmospheric

  6. Underwater Electromagnetic Sensor Networks—Part I: Link Characterization †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana-Díaz, Gara; Mena-Rodríguez, Pablo; Pérez-Álvarez, Iván; Jiménez, Eugenio; Dorta-Naranjo, Blas-Pablo; Zazo, Santiago; Pérez, Marina; Quevedo, Eduardo; Cardona, Laura; Hernández, J. Joaquín

    2017-01-01

    Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks (UWSNs) using electromagnetic (EM) technology in marine shallow waters are examined, not just for environmental monitoring but for further interesting applications. Particularly, the use of EM waves is reconsidered in shallow waters due to the benefits offered in this context, where acoustic and optical technologies have serious disadvantages. Sea water scenario is a harsh environment for radiocommunications, and there is no standard model for the underwater EM channel. The high conductivity of sea water, the effect of seabed and the surface make the behaviour of the channel hard to predict. This justifies the need of link characterization as the first step to approach the development of EM underwater sensor networks. To obtain a reliable link model, measurements and simulations are required. The measuring setup for this purpose is explained and described, as well as the procedures used. Several antennas have been designed and tested in low frequency bands. Agreement between attenuation measurements and simulations at different distances was analysed and made possible the validation of simulation setups and the design of different communications layers of the system. This leads to the second step of this work, where data and routing protocols for the sensor network are examined. PMID:28106843

  7. Underwater Electromagnetic Sensor Networks—Part I: Link Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gara Quintana-Díaz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks (UWSNs using electromagnetic (EM technology in marine shallow waters are examined, not just for environmental monitoring but for further interesting applications. Particularly, the use of EM waves is reconsidered in shallow waters due to the benefits offered in this context, where acoustic and optical technologies have serious disadvantages. Sea water scenario is a harsh environment for radiocommunications, and there is no standard model for the underwater EM channel. The high conductivity of sea water, the effect of seabed and the surface make the behaviour of the channel hard to predict. This justifies the need of link characterization as the first step to approach the development of EM underwater sensor networks. To obtain a reliable link model, measurements and simulations are required. The measuring setup for this purpose is explained and described, as well as the procedures used. Several antennas have been designed and tested in low frequency bands. Agreement between attenuation measurements and simulations at different distances was analysed and made possible the validation of simulation setups and the design of different communications layers of the system. This leads to the second step of this work, where data and routing protocols for the sensor network are examined.

  8. Analysis of distributed optical fibre acoustic sensors through numerical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoudi, Ali; Newson, Trevor P

    2017-12-11

    A distributed optical fibre acoustic sensor is numerically modelled. To increase the flexibility of the model, the building blocks of the sensing system are modelled separately and later combined to form the numerical model. This approach is adopted to facilitate the evaluation of each of the individual building blocks and their effects on the output of the sensor. The numerical model is used to assess the effect of parameters such as the linewidth of the laser source, the width of the probe pulse, and the frequency and amplitude of perturbation on the response of the sensing system. It is shown that the precision and accuracy of the sensing system are affected by the frequency and amplitude of perturbation as well as the pulse width and linewidth of the probe pulse.

  9. Electrohydroelastic Euler-Bernoulli-Morison model for underwater resonant actuation of macro-fiber composite piezoelectric cantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahab, S.; Erturk, A.

    2016-10-01

    Bio-inspired hydrodynamic thrust generation using smart materials has received growing attention over the past few years to enable improved maneuverability and agility, small form factor, reduced power consumption, and ease of fabrication in next-generation aquatic swimmers. In order to develop a high-fidelity model to predict the electrohydroelastic dynamics of macro-fiber composite (MFC) piezoelectric structures, in this work, mixing rules-based (i.e. rule of mixtures) electroelastic mechanics formulation is coupled with the global electroelastic dynamics based on the Euler-Bernoulli kinematics and nonlinear fluid loading based on Morison’s semi-empirical model. The focus is placed on the dynamic actuation problem for the first two bending vibration modes under geometrically and materially linear, hydrodynamically nonlinear behavior. The electroelastic and dielectric properties of a representative volume element (piezoelectric fiber and epoxy matrix) between two subsequent interdigitated electrodes are correlated to homogenized parameters of MFC bimorphs and validated for a set of MFCs that have the same overhang length but different widths. Following this process of electroelastic model development and validation, underwater actuation experiments are conducted for different length-to-width aspect ratios (L/b) in quiescent water, and the empirical drag and inertia coefficients are extracted from Morison’s equation to establish the electrohydroelastic model. The repeatability of these empirical coefficients is demonstrated for experiments conducted using aluminum cantilevers of different aspect ratios with a focus on the first two bending modes. The convergence of the nonlinear electrohydroelastic Euler-Bernoulli-Morison model to its hydrodynamically linear counterpart for increased L/b values is also reported. The proposed model, its harmonic balance analysis, and experimental results can be used not only for underwater piezoelectric actuation, but also for

  10. International Conference on Underwater Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Jaulin, Luc; Creuze, Vincent; Debese, Nathalie; Quidu, Isabelle; Clement, Benoît; Billon-Coat, Annick

    2016-01-01

    This volume constitutes the results of the International Conference on Underwater Environment, MOQESM’14, held at “Le Quartz” Conference Center in Brest, France, on October 14-15, 2014, within the framework of the 9th Sea Tech Week, International Marine Science and Technology Event. The objective of MOQESM'14 was to bring together researchers from both academia and industry, interested in marine robotics and hydrography with application to the coastal environment mapping and underwater infrastructures surveys. The common thread of the conference is the combination of technical control, perception, and localization, typically used in robotics, with the methods of mapping and bathymetry. The papers presented in this book focus on two main topics. Firstly, coastal and infrastructure mapping is addressed, focusing not only on hydrographic systems, but also on positioning systems, bathymetry, and remote sensing. The proposed methods rely on acoustic sensors such as side scan sonars, multibeam echo sounders, ...

  11. Three-Dimensional Numerical Modeling of Acoustic Trapping in Glass Capillaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ley, Mikkel Wennemoes Hvitfeld; Bruus, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Acoustic traps are used to capture and handle suspended microparticles and cells in microfluidic applications. A particular simple and much-used acoustic trap consists of a commercially available, millimeter-sized, liquid-filled straight glass capillary actuated by a piezoelectric transducer. Here...... of localized acoustic resonance modes in such a straight acoustic waveguide without any geometrical cavities in the axial direction of the capillary. The model further predicts that some of these modes are well suited for acoustic trapping, and it provides estimates for their frequencies and quality factors...

  12. Polar Cooperative Navigation Algorithm for Multi-Unmanned Underwater Vehicles Considering Communication Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheping Yan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available To solve the navigation accuracy problems of multi-Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (multi-UUVs in the polar region, a polar cooperative navigation algorithm for multi-UUVs considering communication delays is proposed in this paper. UUVs are important pieces of equipment in ocean engineering for marine development. For UUVs to complete missions, precise navigation is necessary. It is difficult for UUVs to establish true headings because of the rapid convergence of Earth meridians and the severe polar environment. Based on the polar grid navigation algorithm, UUV navigation in the polar region can be accomplished with the Strapdown Inertial Navigation System (SINS in the grid frame. To save costs, a leader-follower type of system is introduced in this paper. The leader UUV helps the follower UUVs to achieve high navigation accuracy. Follower UUVs correct their own states based on the information sent by the leader UUV and the relative position measured by ultra-short baseline (USBL acoustic positioning. The underwater acoustic communication delay is quantized by the model. In this paper, considering underwater acoustic communication delay, the conventional adaptive Kalman filter (AKF is modified to adapt to polar cooperative navigation. The results demonstrate that the polar cooperative navigation algorithm for multi-UUVs that considers communication delays can effectively navigate the sailing of multi-UUVs in the polar region.

  13. Polar Cooperative Navigation Algorithm for Multi-Unmanned Underwater Vehicles Considering Communication Delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zheping; Wang, Lu; Wang, Tongda; Yang, Zewen; Chen, Tao; Xu, Jian

    2018-03-30

    To solve the navigation accuracy problems of multi-Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (multi-UUVs) in the polar region, a polar cooperative navigation algorithm for multi-UUVs considering communication delays is proposed in this paper. UUVs are important pieces of equipment in ocean engineering for marine development. For UUVs to complete missions, precise navigation is necessary. It is difficult for UUVs to establish true headings because of the rapid convergence of Earth meridians and the severe polar environment. Based on the polar grid navigation algorithm, UUV navigation in the polar region can be accomplished with the Strapdown Inertial Navigation System (SINS) in the grid frame. To save costs, a leader-follower type of system is introduced in this paper. The leader UUV helps the follower UUVs to achieve high navigation accuracy. Follower UUVs correct their own states based on the information sent by the leader UUV and the relative position measured by ultra-short baseline (USBL) acoustic positioning. The underwater acoustic communication delay is quantized by the model. In this paper, considering underwater acoustic communication delay, the conventional adaptive Kalman filter (AKF) is modified to adapt to polar cooperative navigation. The results demonstrate that the polar cooperative navigation algorithm for multi-UUVs that considers communication delays can effectively navigate the sailing of multi-UUVs in the polar region.

  14. Analytical modelling for predicting the sound field of planar acoustic metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Xin; Fang, Yi

    2018-01-01

    An analytical model is built to predict the acoustic fields of acoustic metasurfaces. The acoustic fields are investigated for a Gaussian sound beam incident on the acoustic metasurfaces. The Gaussian sound beam is decomposed into a set of discrete elementary plane waves. The diffraction caused by the acoustic metasurfaces can be obtained using this analytical model, which is validated with the numerical simulations for the different incident angles of the Gaussian sound beam. This model overcomes the limitation of the method based on the generalised Snell's law which can only predict the direction of a specific diffracted order. Actually, this analytical model can be also used to predict the sound fields of acoustic metasurfaces under any incident sound if its Fourier transforms exist. This conclusion is demonstrated by studying the sound field for a point sound source incident on the acoustic metasurface. The acoustic admittances of acoustic metasurfaces are required in the calculation of the analytical model. Therefore, a numerical method for obtaining the effective acoustic admittances is proposed for the structurally complex metasurfaces without the analytical expressions of material properties, such as equivalent density and sound speed.

  15. SWARMs Ontology: A Common Information Model for the Cooperation of Underwater Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Bilbao, Sonia; Martín-Wanton, Tamara; Bastos, Joaquim; Rodriguez, Jonathan

    2017-03-11

    In order to facilitate cooperation between underwater robots, it is a must for robots to exchange information with unambiguous meaning. However, heterogeneity, existing in information pertaining to different robots, is a major obstruction. Therefore, this paper presents a networked ontology, named the Smart and Networking Underwater Robots in Cooperation Meshes (SWARMs) ontology, to address information heterogeneity and enable robots to have the same understanding of exchanged information. The SWARMs ontology uses a core ontology to interrelate a set of domain-specific ontologies, including the mission and planning, the robotic vehicle, the communication and networking, and the environment recognition and sensing ontology. In addition, the SWARMs ontology utilizes ontology constructs defined in the PR-OWL ontology to annotate context uncertainty based on the Multi-Entity Bayesian Network (MEBN) theory. Thus, the SWARMs ontology can provide both a formal specification for information that is necessarily exchanged between robots and a command and control entity, and also support for uncertainty reasoning. A scenario on chemical pollution monitoring is described and used to showcase how the SWARMs ontology can be instantiated, be extended, represent context uncertainty, and support uncertainty reasoning.

  16. SWARMs Ontology: A Common Information Model for the Cooperation of Underwater Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Bilbao, Sonia; Martín-Wanton, Tamara; Bastos, Joaquim; Rodriguez, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    In order to facilitate cooperation between underwater robots, it is a must for robots to exchange information with unambiguous meaning. However, heterogeneity, existing in information pertaining to different robots, is a major obstruction. Therefore, this paper presents a networked ontology, named the Smart and Networking Underwater Robots in Cooperation Meshes (SWARMs) ontology, to address information heterogeneity and enable robots to have the same understanding of exchanged information. The SWARMs ontology uses a core ontology to interrelate a set of domain-specific ontologies, including the mission and planning, the robotic vehicle, the communication and networking, and the environment recognition and sensing ontology. In addition, the SWARMs ontology utilizes ontology constructs defined in the PR-OWL ontology to annotate context uncertainty based on the Multi-Entity Bayesian Network (MEBN) theory. Thus, the SWARMs ontology can provide both a formal specification for information that is necessarily exchanged between robots and a command and control entity, and also support for uncertainty reasoning. A scenario on chemical pollution monitoring is described and used to showcase how the SWARMs ontology can be instantiated, be extended, represent context uncertainty, and support uncertainty reasoning. PMID:28287468

  17. Underwater manipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrum, P.B.; Cohen, G.H.

    1993-04-20

    Self-contained, waterproof, water-submersible, remote-controlled apparatus is described for manipulating a device, such as an ultrasonic transducer for measuring crack propagation on an underwater specimen undergoing shock testing. The subject manipulator includes metal bellows for transmittal of angular motions without the use of rotating shaft seals or O-rings. Inside the manipulator, a first stepper motor controls angular movement. In the preferred embodiment, the bellows permit the first stepper motor to move an ultrasonic transducer [plus minus]45 degrees in a first plane and a second bellows permit a second stepper motor to move the transducer [plus minus]10 degrees in a second plane orthogonal to the first. In addition, an XY motor-driven table provides XY motion.

  18. Underwater manipulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrum, P.B.; Cohen, G.H.

    1993-01-01

    Self-contained, waterproof, water-submersible, remote-controlled apparatus is described for manipulating a device, such as an ultrasonic transducer for measuring crack propagation on an underwater specimen undergoing shock testing. The subject manipulator includes metal bellows for transmittal of angular motions without the use of rotating shaft seals or O-rings. Inside the manipulator, a first stepper motor controls angular movement. In the preferred embodiment, the bellows permit the first stepper motor to move an ultrasonic transducer ±45 degrees in a first plane and a second bellows permit a second stepper motor to move the transducer ±10 degrees in a second plane orthogonal to the first. In addition, an XY motor-driven table provides XY motion

  19. A Hybrid Acoustic and Pronunciation Model Adaptation Approach for Non-native Speech Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yoo Rhee; Kim, Hong Kook

    In this paper, we propose a hybrid model adaptation approach in which pronunciation and acoustic models are adapted by incorporating the pronunciation and acoustic variabilities of non-native speech in order to improve the performance of non-native automatic speech recognition (ASR). Specifically, the proposed hybrid model adaptation can be performed at either the state-tying or triphone-modeling level, depending at which acoustic model adaptation is performed. In both methods, we first analyze the pronunciation variant rules of non-native speakers and then classify each rule as either a pronunciation variant or an acoustic variant. The state-tying level hybrid method then adapts pronunciation models and acoustic models by accommodating the pronunciation variants in the pronunciation dictionary and by clustering the states of triphone acoustic models using the acoustic variants, respectively. On the other hand, the triphone-modeling level hybrid method initially adapts pronunciation models in the same way as in the state-tying level hybrid method; however, for the acoustic model adaptation, the triphone acoustic models are then re-estimated based on the adapted pronunciation models and the states of the re-estimated triphone acoustic models are clustered using the acoustic variants. From the Korean-spoken English speech recognition experiments, it is shown that ASR systems employing the state-tying and triphone-modeling level adaptation methods can relatively reduce the average word error rates (WERs) by 17.1% and 22.1% for non-native speech, respectively, when compared to a baseline ASR system.

  20. Staggered-grid finite-difference acoustic modeling with the Time-Domain Atmospheric Acoustic Propagation Suite (TDAAPS).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldridge, David Franklin; Collier, Sandra L. (U.S. Army Research Laboratory); Marlin, David H. (U.S. Army Research Laboratory); Ostashev, Vladimir E. (NOAA/Environmental Technology Laboratory); Symons, Neill Phillip; Wilson, D. Keith (U.S. Army Cold Regions Research Engineering Lab.)

    2005-05-01

    This document is intended to serve as a users guide for the time-domain atmospheric acoustic propagation suite (TDAAPS) program developed as part of the Department of Defense High-Performance Modernization Office (HPCMP) Common High-Performance Computing Scalable Software Initiative (CHSSI). TDAAPS performs staggered-grid finite-difference modeling of the acoustic velocity-pressure system with the incorporation of spatially inhomogeneous winds. Wherever practical the control structure of the codes are written in C++ using an object oriented design. Sections of code where a large number of calculations are required are written in C or F77 in order to enable better compiler optimization of these sections. The TDAAPS program conforms to a UNIX style calling interface. Most of the actions of the codes are controlled by adding flags to the invoking command line. This document presents a large number of examples and provides new users with the necessary background to perform acoustic modeling with TDAAPS.

  1. CFD approach to modelling, hydrodynamic analysis and motion characteristics of a laboratory underwater glider with experimental results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogang Singh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Underwater gliders are buoyancy propelled vehicle which make use of buoyancy for vertical movement and wings to propel the glider in forward direction. Autonomous underwater gliders are a patented technology and are manufactured and marketed by corporations. In this study, we validate the experimental lift and drag characteristics of a glider from the literature using Computational fluid dynamics (CFD approach. This approach is then used for the assessment of the steady state characteristics of a laboratory glider designed at Indian Institute of Technology (IIT Madras. Flow behaviour and lift and drag force distribution at different angles of attack are studied for Reynolds numbers varying from 105 to 106 for NACA0012 wing configurations. The state variables of the glider are the velocity, gliding angle and angle of attack which are simulated by making use of the hydrodynamic drag and lift coefficients obtained from CFD. The effect of the variable buoyancy is examined in terms of the gliding angle, velocity and angle of attack. Laboratory model of glider is developed from the final design asserted by CFD. This model is used for determination of static and dynamic properties of an underwater glider which were validated against an equivalent CAD model and simulation results obtained from equations of motion of glider in vertical plane respectively. In the literature, only empirical approach has been adopted to estimate the hydrodynamic coefficients of the AUG that are required for its trajectory simulation. In this work, a CFD approach has been proposed to estimate the hydrodynamic coefficients and validated with experimental data. A two-mass variable buoyancy engine has been designed and implemented. The equations of motion for this two-mass engine have been obtained by modifying the single mass version of the equations described in the literature. The objectives of the present study are to understand the glider dynamics adopting a CFD approach

  2. Array Receivers and Sound Sources for Three Dimensional Shallow Water Acoustic Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-06

    great success. Our acoustics research groups, the Ocean Acoustics and Signals Laboratory and the Acoustic Communications Group, in the Applied Ocean...field efforts in shallow-water acoustics and underwater acoustic communications. We have plans to upgrade our existing hydrophone arrays and sound...Hydrophone Receiver Unit) arrays. The immedate objective was to improve our fieldwork capibility and to enhance the quality of our underwater acoustic

  3. Acoustic Modeling for Aqua Ventus I off Monhegan Island, ME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiting, Jonathan M.; Hanna, Luke A.; DeChello, Nicole L.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2013-10-31

    The DeepCwind consortium, led by the University of Maine, was awarded funding under the US Department of Energy’s Offshore Wind Advanced Technology Demonstration Program to develop two floating offshore wind turbines in the Gulf of Maine equipped with Goldwind 6 MW direct drive turbines, as the Aqua Ventus I project. The Goldwind turbines have a hub height of 100 m. The turbines will be deployed in Maine State waters, approximately 2.9 miles off Monhegan Island; Monhegan Island is located roughly 10 miles off the coast of Maine. In order to site and permit the offshore turbines, the acoustic output must be evaluated to ensure that the sound will not disturb residents on Monhegan Island, nor input sufficient sound levels into the nearby ocean to disturb marine mammals. This initial assessment of the acoustic output focuses on the sound of the turbines in air by modeling the assumed sound source level, applying a sound propagation model, and taking into account the distance from shore.

  4. An Autonomous Underwater Recorder Based on a Single Board Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldas-Morgan, Manuel; Alvarez-Rosario, Alexander; Rodrigues Padovese, Linilson

    2015-01-01

    As industrial activities continue to grow on the Brazilian coast, underwater sound measurements are becoming of great scientific importance as they are essential to evaluate the impact of these activities on local ecosystems. In this context, the use of commercial underwater recorders is not always the most feasible alternative, due to their high cost and lack of flexibility. Design and construction of more affordable alternatives from scratch can become complex because it requires profound knowledge in areas such as electronics and low-level programming. With the aim of providing a solution; a well succeeded model of a highly flexible, low-cost alternative to commercial recorders was built based on a Raspberry Pi single board computer. A properly working prototype was assembled and it demonstrated adequate performance levels in all tested situations. The prototype was equipped with a power management module which was thoroughly evaluated. It is estimated that it will allow for great battery savings on long-term scheduled recordings. The underwater recording device was successfully deployed at selected locations along the Brazilian coast, where it adequately recorded animal and manmade acoustic events, among others. Although power consumption may not be as efficient as that of commercial and/or micro-processed solutions, the advantage offered by the proposed device is its high customizability, lower development time and inherently, its cost. PMID:26076479

  5. An Autonomous Underwater Recorder Based on a Single Board Computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldas-Morgan, Manuel; Alvarez-Rosario, Alexander; Rodrigues Padovese, Linilson

    2015-01-01

    As industrial activities continue to grow on the Brazilian coast, underwater sound measurements are becoming of great scientific importance as they are essential to evaluate the impact of these activities on local ecosystems. In this context, the use of commercial underwater recorders is not always the most feasible alternative, due to their high cost and lack of flexibility. Design and construction of more affordable alternatives from scratch can become complex because it requires profound knowledge in areas such as electronics and low-level programming. With the aim of providing a solution; a well succeeded model of a highly flexible, low-cost alternative to commercial recorders was built based on a Raspberry Pi single board computer. A properly working prototype was assembled and it demonstrated adequate performance levels in all tested situations. The prototype was equipped with a power management module which was thoroughly evaluated. It is estimated that it will allow for great battery savings on long-term scheduled recordings. The underwater recording device was successfully deployed at selected locations along the Brazilian coast, where it adequately recorded animal and manmade acoustic events, among others. Although power consumption may not be as efficient as that of commercial and/or micro-processed solutions, the advantage offered by the proposed device is its high customizability, lower development time and inherently, its cost.

  6. Event localization in underwater wireless sensor networks using Monitoring Courses

    KAUST Repository

    Debont, Matthew John Robert

    2012-08-01

    We propose m-courses (Monitoring Courses), a novel solution to localize events in an underwater wireless sensor network. These networks consists of surface gateways and relay nodes. GPS can localize the position of surface gateways which can then distribute their locations through the network using acoustic modems. Relay nodes are deployed to remain static, but these untethered nodes may drift due to water currents, resulting in disruption of communication links. We develop a novel underwater alarm system using a cyclic graph model. In the event of link failure, a series of alarm packets are broadcast in the network. These alarms are then captured by the underwater m-courses, which can also be used to assure network connectivity and identify node failures. M-courses also allow the network to localize events and identify network issues locally before forwarding results upwards to a Surface Gateway node. This reduces communication overhead and allows for efficient management of nodes in a mobile network. Our results show that m-course routing reduces the number of sends required to report an event to a Surface Gateway by up to 80% when compared to a naïve routing implementation.

  7. Simulation and Characteristics Analysis on Vibration and Sound Radiation Response for a Small Underwater Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An underwater robot is one of the important ocean equipment, and especially its stealth performance has influenced on the vitality in naval warfare. Structure radiation noise as the main source of underwater robot noise, so analysis on vibration and noise radiation is a topic of great concern. The way is used widely that based on fluid-solid coupling modal analysis combined with simulation on vibration and noise-radiation response in order to evaluate stealth performance of underwater structure. In the paper, firstly via finite element method and boundary element method, the modal frequencies and vibration modes of small underwater robot are calculated. Then the surface vibration displacements of underwater robot and the sound pressures of acoustic field under different frequency horizontal exciting force are obtained and analyzed. Lastly, through the analysis of the structural vibration and acoustic performance, the control strategies for structure bending vibration, acoustic radiation and structural acoustic design are proposed.

  8. Fish and chips: implementation of a neural network model into computer chips to maximize swimming efficiency in autonomous underwater vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, R W; Ng, H; Chan, K H S; Li, J

    2008-09-01

    Recent developments in the design and propulsion of biomimetic autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) have focused on boxfish as models (e.g. Deng and Avadhanula 2005 Biomimetic micro underwater vehicle with oscillating fin propulsion: system design and force measurement Proc. 2005 IEEE Int. Conf. Robot. Auto. (Barcelona, Spain) pp 3312-7). Whilst such vehicles have many potential advantages in operating in complex environments (e.g. high manoeuvrability and stability), limited battery life and payload capacity are likely functional disadvantages. Boxfish employ undulatory median and paired fins during routine swimming which are characterized by high hydromechanical Froude efficiencies (approximately 0.9) at low forward speeds. Current boxfish-inspired vehicles are propelled by a low aspect ratio, 'plate-like' caudal fin (ostraciiform tail) which can be shown to operate at a relatively low maximum Froude efficiency (approximately 0.5) and is mainly employed as a rudder for steering and in rapid swimming bouts (e.g. escape responses). Given this and the fact that bioinspired engineering designs are not obligated to wholly duplicate a biological model, computer chips were developed using a multilayer perception neural network model of undulatory fin propulsion in the knifefish Xenomystus nigri that would potentially allow an AUV to achieve high optimum values of propulsive efficiency at any given forward velocity, giving a minimum energy drain on the battery. We envisage that externally monitored information on flow velocity (sensory system) would be conveyed to the chips residing in the vehicle's control unit, which in turn would signal the locomotor unit to adopt kinematics (e.g. fin frequency, amplitude) associated with optimal propulsion efficiency. Power savings could protract vehicle operational life and/or provide more power to other functions (e.g. communications).

  9. Deep Learning Methods for Underwater Target Feature Extraction and Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Hu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The classification and recognition technology of underwater acoustic signal were always an important research content in the field of underwater acoustic signal processing. Currently, wavelet transform, Hilbert-Huang transform, and Mel frequency cepstral coefficients are used as a method of underwater acoustic signal feature extraction. In this paper, a method for feature extraction and identification of underwater noise data based on CNN and ELM is proposed. An automatic feature extraction method of underwater acoustic signals is proposed using depth convolution network. An underwater target recognition classifier is based on extreme learning machine. Although convolution neural networks can execute both feature extraction and classification, their function mainly relies on a full connection layer, which is trained by gradient descent-based; the generalization ability is limited and suboptimal, so an extreme learning machine (ELM was used in classification stage. Firstly, CNN learns deep and robust features, followed by the removing of the fully connected layers. Then ELM fed with the CNN features is used as the classifier to conduct an excellent classification. Experiments on the actual data set of civil ships obtained 93.04% recognition rate; compared to the traditional Mel frequency cepstral coefficients and Hilbert-Huang feature, recognition rate greatly improved.

  10. Research on the acoustic scattering function and coherence properties from rough seafloor based on finite element model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Bo; Yang, Yi-Xin; Ma, Yuan-Liang; Chen, Dong-Xu

    2016-12-01

    Acoustic scattering from a rough sea bottom is recognized as a main source of reverberation. In this study, scattering properties from a layered bottom were exploited based on the finite element model. The scattering strength and loss from the layered rough seabed were investigated by ensembling the realizations of rough interface. They were found to be dependent on the thickness of sediment, and interference was significant in the case of thin sediment. Through verification of the finite element model, the scattering loss could be evaluated using the Eckart model with a proper sound speed in the thick sediment. The multiple scattering effect on the sound field was also exploited. It revealed that the effect depended strongly on the bottom type. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61571366), the Natural Science Basic Research in Shaanxi Province of China (Grant No. 2015JQ5199), and the Fund of Science and Technology from the Underwater Test and Control Laboratory (Grant No. 9140c260201130c26096).

  11. Underwater noise from offshore oil production vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbe, Christine; McCauley, Robert; McPherson, Craig; Gavrilov, Alexander

    2013-06-01

    Underwater acoustic recordings of six Floating Production Storage and Offloading (FPSO) vessels moored off Western Australia are presented. Monopole source spectra were computed for use in environmental impact assessments of underwater noise. Given that operations on the FPSOs varied over the period of recording, and were sometimes unknown, the authors present a statistical approach to noise level estimation. No significant or consistent aspect dependence was found for the six FPSOs. Noise levels did not scale with FPSO size or power. The 5th, 50th (median), and 95th percentile source levels (broadband, 20 to 2500 Hz) were 188, 181, and 173 dB re 1 μPa @ 1 m, respectively.

  12. Synthetic modelling of acoustical propagation applied to seismic oceanography experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormann, Jean; Cobo, Pedro; Biescas, Berta; Sallarés, Valentí; Papenberg, Cord; Recuero, Manuel; Carbonell, Ramón

    2010-03-01

    Recent work shows that multichannel seismic (MCS) systems provide detailed information on the oceans' finestructure. The aim of this paper is to analyze if high order numerical algorithms are suitable to accurately model the extremely weak wavefield scattered by the oceans' finestructures. For this purpose, we generate synthetic shot records along a coincident seismic and oceanographic profile acquired across a Mediterranean salt lens in the Gulf of Cadiz. We apply a 2D finite-difference time-domain propagation model, together with second-order Complex Frequency Shifted Perfectly Matched Layers at the numerical boundaries, using as reference a realistic sound speed map with the lateral resolution of the seismic data. We show that our numerical propagator creates an acoustical image of the ocean finestructures including the salt lens that reproduces with outstanding detail the real acquired one.

  13. Simulated performance of an acoustic modem using phase-modulated signals in a time-varying, shallow-water environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum-Niese, Christian; Jensen, Leif Bjørnø

    1996-01-01

    Underwater acoustic modems using coherent modulation, such as phase-shift keying, have proven to efficiently exploit the bandlimited underwater acoustical communication channel. However, the performance of an acoustic modem, given as maximum range and data and error rate, is limited in the complex...... of the shallow-water environment, the performance of the acoustic modem may be estimated. Simulations indicate that optimum performance is not necessarily found at receiver depths yielding the maximum total signal level, since the SMR may correspondingly be low due to strong intersymbol interference. [Work...... relative to the first arrival, while longer delays give rise to intersymbol interference. Following this, the signal-to-multipath ratio (SMR) is introduced. It is claimed that the SMR determines the performance rather than the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Using a ray model including temporal variations...

  14. Low Frequency Acoustic Intensity Propagation Modeling in Shallow Water Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    the formulation of Clay and Medwin [20] was coded into Matlab [21]. This formulation allows for the interaction of the water column with a second...Figure 7. Comparison of COMSOL and Normal Modes: Acoustic Magnitude Code predicted magnitude of acoustic pressure over the 0–600 m range from source ... source location. Figure 8. Comparison of COMSOL and Normal Modes: Imaginary Component Code predicted imaginary component of the total acoustic

  15. Wireless Underwater Monitoring Systems Based on Energy Harvestings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sea-Hee HWANGBO

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the important research fields for aquatic exploitation and conservation is underwater wireless sensor network. Since limited energy source for underwater nodes and devices is a main open problem, in this paper, we propose wireless underwater monitoring systems powered by energy harvester which resolves the energy constraint. The target system generates renewable energy from energy harvester and shares the energy with underwater sensor nodes. For the realization of the system, key components to be investigated are discriminated as follows: acoustic modem, actuator, smart battery charge controller, energy harvester and wireless power transfer module. By developing acoustic modem, actuator and smart battery charge controller and utilizing off-the-shelf energy harvester and wireless power transfer module, we design and implement a prototype of the system. Also, we verify the feasibility of concept of target system by conducting indoor and outdoor experiments.

  16. Innovative High Temperature Acoustic Liner Development and Modeling, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The massive acoustic loads produced by launch vehicles can detrimentally affect the proper functioning of vehicle components, payloads, and launch support...

  17. Attenuation of low-frequency underwater sound using an array of air-filled balloons and comparison to effective medium theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kevin M; Wilson, Preston S; Wochner, Mark S

    2017-12-01

    The ultimate goal of this work is to accurately predict the attenuation through a collection of large (on the order of 10-cm-radius) tethered encapsulated bubbles used in underwater noise abatement systems. Measurements of underwater sound attenuation were performed during a set of lake experiments, where a low-frequency compact electromechanical sound source was surrounded by different arrays of encapsulated bubbles with various individual bubbles sizes and void fractions. The measurements were compared with an existing predictive model [Church, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 97, 1510-1521 (1995)] of the dispersion relation for linear propagation in liquid containing encapsulated bubbles. Although the model was originally intended to describe ultrasound contrast agents, it is evaluated here for large bubbles, and hence low frequencies, as a design tool for future underwater noise abatement systems, and there is good quantitative agreement between the observations and the model.

  18. Vibro-acoustic modeling and analysis of a coupled acoustic system comprising a partially opened cavity coupled with a flexible plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shuangxia; Su, Zhu; Jin, Guoyong; Liu, Zhigang

    2018-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the modeling and solution method of a three-dimensional (3D) coupled acoustic system comprising a partially opened cavity coupled with a flexible plate and an exterior field of semi-infinite size, which is ubiquitously encountered in architectural acoustics and is a reasonable representation of many engineering occasions. A general solution method is presented to predict the dynamic behaviors of the three-dimensional (3D) acoustic coupled system, in which the displacement of the plate and the sound pressure in the cavity are respectively constructed in the form of the two-dimensional and three-dimensional modified Fourier series with several auxiliary functions introduced to ensure the uniform convergence of the solution over the entire solution domain. The effect of the opening is taken into account via the work done by the sound pressure acting at the coupling aperture that is contributed from the vibration of particles on the acoustic coupling interface and on the structural-acoustic coupling interface. Both the acoustic coupling between finite cavity and exterior field and the structural-acoustic coupling between flexible plate and interior acoustic field are considered in the vibro-acoustic modeling of the three-dimensional acoustic coupled acoustic system. The dynamic responses of the coupled structural-acoustic system are obtained using the Rayleigh-Ritz procedure based on the energy expressions for the coupled system. The accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed method are validated through numerical examples and comparison with results obtained by the boundary element analysis. Furthermore, the influence of the opening and the cavity volume on the acoustic behaviors of opened cavity system is studied.

  19. Linear time domain model of the acoustic potential field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesniewski, Peter J

    2002-08-01

    A new time domain formulation of the acoustic wave is developed to avoid approximating assumptions of the linearized scalar wave equation that limit its validity to low Mach particle velocity modeling or to a smooth potential field in a stationary medium. The proposed model offers precision of the moving frame while retaining the form of the widely used linearized scalar wave equation although with respect to modified coordinates. It is applicable to field calculations involving transient waves with unlimited particle velocity, propagating in inhomogenous fluids or in those with time varying density. The model is based on the exact flux continuity equation and the equation of motion, both using the moving reference frame. The resulting closed-form free space scalar wave equation employing total derivatives is converted back to the partial differential form by using modified independent variables. The modified variables are related to the common coordinates of space and time following integral expressions involving transient particle velocity representing wave radiated by each point of a stationary source. Consequently, transient field produced by complex surface velocity sources can be calculated following existing surface integrals of the radiation theory although using modified coordinates. The use of the proposed model is presented in a numerical simulation of a transient velocity source vibrating at selected magnitudes, leading to the determination of the propagating pressure and velocity wave at any point.

  20. Reduced-Order Models for Acoustic Response Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    written in ASCII format as a "punch" file. Implementation with Abaqus required a series of Python [35] programs to translate the data from the binary...66. Abaqus acoustic pressure results of the clamped, baffled plate .......................................106 67. Real part of complex first mode of...107 68. Baffled plate center displacement response to initial pressure in Abaqus .......................108 69. Abaqus acoustic pressure of

  1. Dislocation unpinning model of acoustic emission from alkali halide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    theoretical and experimental results related to the AE from alkali halide crystals. Keywords. Acoustic emission; dislocation; alkali halide crystals; plastic deformation. PACS Nos 43.40.Le; 62.20.Fe; 61.72.Hh. 1. Introduction. Discrete acoustic wave packets are generated in solids during their mechanical de- formation.

  2. Time-Evolving Acoustic Propagation Modeling in a Complex Ocean Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colin, M.E.G.G.; Duda, T.F.; Raa, L.A. te; Zon, T. van; Haley Jr., P.J.; Lermusiaux, P.F.J.; Leslie, W.G.; Mirabito, C.; Lam, F.P.A.; Newhall, A.E.; Lin, Y.T.; Lynch, J.F.

    2013-01-01

    During naval operations, sonar performance estimates often need to be computed in-situ with limited environmental information. This calls for the use of fast acoustic propagation models. Many naval operations are carried out in challenging and dynamic environments. This makes acoustic propagation

  3. Chaos-Based Underwater Communication With Arbitrary Transducers and Bandwidth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Bai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, an enhanced differential chaos shift keying (DCSK, based on a first order hybrid chaotic system, is being proposed for a high reliability underwater acoustic communication system. It can be integrated into systems that use standard existing transducers. We show that a coherent operation between the received signal and the time reversal of the basis function in a first order hybrid chaotic system maximizes the signal to noise ratio at the receiver. Concurrently, DCSK configuration is used to resist the distortion caused by the complex underwater acoustic channel. Our simulation results show that the proposed method has lower bit error rate (BER. In addition, it shows higher communication reliability over underwater acoustic channel as compared to the conventional DCSK using logistic map and its variant forms such as Correlation Delay Shift Keying (CDSK, Phase-Separate DCSK (PS-DCSK, High Efficiency DCSK (HE-DCSK, and Reference Modulated DCSK (RM-DCSK.

  4. Acoustic 3D modeling by the method of integral equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malovichko, M.; Khokhlov, N.; Yavich, N.; Zhdanov, M.

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents a parallel algorithm for frequency-domain acoustic modeling by the method of integral equations (IE). The algorithm is applied to seismic simulation. The IE method reduces the size of the problem but leads to a dense system matrix. A tolerable memory consumption and numerical complexity were achieved by applying an iterative solver, accompanied by an effective matrix-vector multiplication operation, based on the fast Fourier transform (FFT). We demonstrate that, the IE system matrix is better conditioned than that of the finite-difference (FD) method, and discuss its relation to a specially preconditioned FD matrix. We considered several methods of matrix-vector multiplication for the free-space and layered host models. The developed algorithm and computer code were benchmarked against the FD time-domain solution. It was demonstrated that, the method could accurately calculate the seismic field for the models with sharp material boundaries and a point source and receiver located close to the free surface. We used OpenMP to speed up the matrix-vector multiplication, while MPI was used to speed up the solution of the system equations, and also for parallelizing across multiple sources. The practical examples and efficiency tests are presented as well.

  5. Space Launch System Scale Model Acoustic Test Ignition Overpressure Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nance, Donald; Liever, Peter; Nielsen, Tanner

    2015-01-01

    The overpressure phenomenon is a transient fluid dynamic event occurring during rocket propulsion system ignition. This phenomenon results from fluid compression of the accelerating plume gas, subsequent rarefaction, and subsequent propagation from the exhaust trench and duct holes. The high-amplitude unsteady fluid-dynamic perturbations can adversely affect the vehicle and surrounding structure. Commonly known as ignition overpressure (IOP), this is an important design-to environment for the Space Launch System (SLS) that NASA is currently developing. Subscale testing is useful in validating and verifying the IOP environment. This was one of the objectives of the Scale Model Acoustic Test, conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center. The test data quantifies the effectiveness of the SLS IOP suppression system and improves the analytical models used to predict the SLS IOP environments. The reduction and analysis of the data gathered during the SMAT IOP test series requires identification and characterization of multiple dynamic events and scaling of the event waveforms to provide the most accurate comparisons to determine the effectiveness of the IOP suppression systems. The identification and characterization of the overpressure events, the waveform scaling, the computation of the IOP suppression system knockdown factors, and preliminary comparisons to the analytical models are discussed.

  6. Effects of locally resonant modes on underwater sound absorption in viscoelastic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jihong; Zhao, Honggang; Lv, Linmei; Yuan, Bo; Wang, Gang; Wen, Xisen

    2011-09-01

    Recently, by introducing locally resonant scatterers with spherical shape proposed in phononic crystals into design of underwater sound absorption materials, the low-frequency underwater sound absorption phenomenon induced by the localized resonances is observed. To reveal this absorption mechanism, the effect of the locally resonant mode on underwater sound absorption should be studied. In this paper, the finite element method, which is testified efficiently by comparing the calculation results with those of the layer multiple scattering method, is introduced to investigate the dynamic modes and the corresponding sound absorption of localized resonance. The relationship between the resonance modes described with the displacement contours of one unit cell and the corresponding absorption spectra is discussed in detail, which shows that the localized resonance leads to the absorption peak, and the mode conversion from longitudinal to transverse waves at the second absorption peak is more efficient than that at the first one. Finally, to show the modeling capability of FEM and investigate shape effects of locally resonant scatterers on underwater sound absorption, the absorption properties of viscoelastic materials containing locally resonant scatterers with ellipsoidal shape are discussed. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  7. A Speed Control Method for Underwater Vehicle under Hydraulic Flexible Traction

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yin; Xia, Ying-kai; Chen, Ying; Xu, Guo-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Underwater vehicle speed control methodology method is the focus of research in this study. Driven by a hydraulic flexible traction system, the underwater vehicle advances steadily on underwater guide rails, simulating an underwater environment for the carried device. Considering the influence of steel rope viscoelasticity and the control system traction structure feature, a mathematical model of the underwater vehicle driven by hydraulic flexible traction system is established. A speed contr...

  8. Electrical circuit modeling and analysis of microwave acoustic interaction with biological tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Zheng, Qian; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2014-05-01

    Numerical study of microwave imaging and microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging utilizes finite difference time domain (FDTD) analysis for simulation of microwave and acoustic interaction with biological tissues, which is time consuming due to complex grid-segmentation and numerous calculations, not straightforward due to no analytical solution and physical explanation, and incompatible with hardware development requiring circuit simulator such as SPICE. In this paper, instead of conventional FDTD numerical simulation, an equivalent electrical circuit model is proposed to model the microwave acoustic interaction with biological tissues for fast simulation and quantitative analysis in both one and two dimensions (2D). The equivalent circuit of ideal point-like tissue for microwave-acoustic interaction is proposed including transmission line, voltage-controlled current source, envelop detector, and resistor-inductor-capacitor (RLC) network, to model the microwave scattering, thermal expansion, and acoustic generation. Based on which, two-port network of the point-like tissue is built and characterized using pseudo S-parameters and transducer gain. Two dimensional circuit network including acoustic scatterer and acoustic channel is also constructed to model the 2D spatial information and acoustic scattering effect in heterogeneous medium. Both FDTD simulation, circuit simulation, and experimental measurement are performed to compare the results in terms of time domain, frequency domain, and pseudo S-parameters characterization. 2D circuit network simulation is also performed under different scenarios including different sizes of tumors and the effect of acoustic scatterer. The proposed circuit model of microwave acoustic interaction with biological tissue could give good agreement with FDTD simulated and experimental measured results. The pseudo S-parameters and characteristic gain could globally evaluate the performance of tumor detection. The 2D circuit network

  9. High accuracy navigation information estimation for inertial system using the multi-model EKF fusing adams explicit formula applied to underwater gliders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haoqian; Chen, Xiyuan; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    The underwater navigation system, mainly consisting of MEMS inertial sensors, is a key technology for the wide application of underwater gliders and plays an important role in achieving high accuracy navigation and positioning for a long time of period. However, the navigation errors will accumulate over time because of the inherent errors of inertial sensors, especially for MEMS grade IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit) generally used in gliders. The dead reckoning module is added to compensate the errors. In the complicated underwater environment, the performance of MEMS sensors is degraded sharply and the errors will become much larger. It is difficult to establish the accurate and fixed error model for the inertial sensor. Therefore, it is very hard to improve the accuracy of navigation information calculated by sensors. In order to solve the problem mentioned, the more suitable filter which integrates the multi-model method with an EKF approach can be designed according to different error models to give the optimal estimation for the state. The key parameters of error models can be used to determine the corresponding filter. The Adams explicit formula which has an advantage of high precision prediction is simultaneously fused into the above filter to achieve the much more improvement in attitudes estimation accuracy. The proposed algorithm has been proved through theory analyses and has been tested by both vehicle experiments and lake trials. Results show that the proposed method has better accuracy and effectiveness in terms of attitudes estimation compared with other methods mentioned in the paper for inertial navigation applied to underwater gliders. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Select Internet Resources on Acoustics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela R. Davis

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Merriam-Webster (2016 defines acoustics as, “a science that deals with the production, control, transmission, reception, and effects of sounds.” According to Rossing (2014, the study of acoustics began in ancient Greece with Pythagoras’ study of vibrating strings on musical instruments. Since those early beginnings, famous scientists including Rayleigh, Alexander Graham Bell, and Thomas Edison, have helped expand the field of acoustics to include architectural, physical, engineering, structural, underwater, physiological and psychological, musical acoustics, and speech. Acoustics is a highly interdisciplinary field and researchers may need resources from physics, medicine, and engineering to understand all aspects of their research.

  11. Design and Performance Evaluation of Underwater Data Dissemination Strategies using Interference Avoidance and Network Coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palacios, Raul; Heide, Janus; Fitzek, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The long propagation delays of the underwater acoustic channel make traditional Medium Access schemes impractical and inefficient under water. This paper introduces and studies Interference Avoidance and Network Coding for Medium Access protocol design aiming to cope with the underwater channel c...

  12. A Data Link Layer in Support of Swarming of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabba Molinares, Daladier

    2009-01-01

    Communication underwater is challenging because of the inherent characteristics of the media. First, common radio frequency (RF) signals utilized in wireless communications cannot be used under water. RF signals are attenuated in such as way that RF communication underwater is restricted to very few meters. As a result, acoustic-based…

  13. Studies on acoustic modelling techniques for CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatoorgoon, V.; Zhou, R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews the current technology being used to predict acoustic resonance in fluid-filled piping systems. The paper also reports on the analysis of a simple benchmark experiment that yielded some valuable insights and understanding into acoustic damping. A volumetric drag formula for the ABAQUS code is presented. Its application in experiments has yielded better results than previously obtained using a constant volumetric drag. (author). 24 refs., 1 tab., 12 figs

  14. A Shock-Refracted Acoustic Wave Model for the Prediction of Screech Amplitude in Supersonic Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2007-01-01

    A physical model is proposed for the estimation of the screech amplitude in underexpanded supersonic jets. The model is based on the hypothesis that the interaction of a plane acoustic wave with stationary shock waves provides amplification of the transmitted acoustic wave upon traversing the shock. Powell's discrete source model for screech incorporating a stationary array of acoustic monopoles is extended to accommodate variable source strength. The proposed model reveals that the acoustic sources are of increasing strength with downstream distance. It is shown that the screech amplitude increases with the fuiiy expanded jet Mach number. Comparisons of predicted screech amplitude with available test data show satisfactory agreement. The effect of variable source strength on directivity of the fundamental (first harmonic, lowest frequency mode) and the second harmonic (overtone) is found to be unimportant with regard to the principal lobe (main or major lobe) of considerable relative strength, and is appreciable only in the secondary or minor lobes (of relatively weaker strength

  15. Event Localization in Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks using Monitoring Courses

    KAUST Repository

    Debont, Matthew

    2011-11-01

    In this thesis we consider different methods to localize events in a multi-hop wireless sensor network operating underwater using acoustic modems. The network consists of surface gateway nodes and relay nodes. Localization of surface gateways can be achieved through GPS, but we cannot rely on this technology for localizing underwater nodes. Surface Gateway nodes can distribute their locations through the network using the incoming signals by the acoustic modems from the relay nodes. Relay nodes are deployed to remain static but due to water currents, floating, and the untethered nature of the nodes, they often suffer from frequent drifting which can result in a deployed network suffering link failures. In this work, we developed a novel concept of an underwater alarming system, which adapts a cyclic graph model. In the event of link failure, a series of alarm packets are broadcasted in the network. These alarms are then captured through a novel concept of underwater Monitoring Courses (M-Courses), which can also be used to assure network connectivity and identify node faults. M-Courses also allow the network to localize events and identify network issues at a local level before forwarding any results upwards to a Surface Gateway nodes. This reduces the amount of communication overhead needed and allowing for distributed management of nodes in a network which may be constantly moving. We show that the proposed algorithms can reduce the number of send operations needed for an event to be localized in a network. We have found that M-Course routing reduces the number of sends required to report an event to a Surface Gateway by up to 80% in some cases when compared to a naive routing implementation. But this is achieved by increasing the time for an event to reach a Surface Gateway. These effects are both due to the buffering effect of M-Course routing, which allows us to efficiently deal with multiple events in an local area and we find that the performance of M

  16. Structural Acoustic UXO Detection and Identification in Marine Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    high performance structural acoustic (SA) feature-based underwater sonar technology that can detect and localize buried (and proud) targets and...MR2103), we demonstrated the structural acoustic technology with an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) - based SA sonar successfully detecting UXO...We examined the acoustic color maps visually for the presence of a frequency/x position (aspect angle) feature that we had seen earlier in laboratory

  17. Underwater Geotechnical Foundations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Landris

    2001-01-01

    This report provides an overview and description of the design and construction of underwater geotechnical foundations and offers preliminary guidance based on past and current technology applications...

  18. Structural acoustics model of the violin radiativity profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissinger, George

    2008-12-01

    Violin radiativity profiles are dominated by the Helmholtz-like A0 cavity mode ( approximately 280 Hz), first corpus bending modes B1(-) and B1(+) ( approximately 500 Hz), and BH and bridge-filter peaks ( approximately 2.4 kHz and approximately 3.5 kHz, respectively), with falloff above approximately 4 kHz. The B1 modes-dependent on two low-lying free-plate modes--are proposed to excite A0 via coupling to B1-driven in-phase f-hole volume flows. VIOCADEAS data show that A0 radiativity increases primarily as A0-B1(-) frequency difference decreases, consistent with Meinel's 1937 experiment for too-thick/too-thin plate thicknesses, plus sound post removal and violin octet baritone results. The vibration-->acoustic energy filter, F(RAD), computed from shape-material-independent radiation and total damping, peaks at the critical frequency f(crit), estimated from a free-plate mode by analogy to flat-plate bending. Experimentally, f(crit) decreased as this plate mode (and B1(+)) frequency increased. Simulations show that increasing plate thicknesses lowers f(crit), reduces F(RAD), and moves the spectral balance toward lower frequencies. Incorporating string-->corpus filters (including bridge versus bridge-island impedances) provides a model for overall violin radiativity. This model-with B1 and A0-B1 couplings, and f(crit) (computed from a free-plate mode important to B1) strongly affecting the lowest and highest parts of the radiativity profile-substantiates prior empirical B1--sound quality linkages.

  19. Modelling and Order of Acoustic Transfer Functions Due to Reflections from Augmented Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diemer de Vries

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available It is commonly accepted that the sound reflections from real physical objects are much more complicated than what usually is and can be modelled by room acoustics modelling software. The main reason for this limitation is the level of detail inherent in the physical object in terms of its geometrical and acoustic properties. In the present paper, the complexity of the sound reflections from a corridor wall is investigated by modelling the corresponding acoustic transfer functions at several receiver positions in front of the wall. The complexity for different wall configurations has been examined and the changes have been achieved by altering its acoustic image. The results show that for a homogenous flat wall, the complexity is significant and for a wall including various smaller objects, the complexity is highly dependent on the position of the receiver with respect to the objects.

  20. Comparison of acoustical and optical zooplankton measurements using an acoustic scattering model: A case study from the Arctic frontal zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szczucka Joanna

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available High-frequency acoustic measurements supplemented by a modern optical method, Laser Optical Plankton Counter (LOPC, allowed us to perform a comparative analysis through the application of a mathematical model. We have studied the correspondence between measured and modelled echoes from zooplankton aggregations consisted mainly of two Calanus species. Data were collected from the upper 50 m water layer within the hydrographical frontal zone on the West Spitsbergen Shelf. The application of a “high-pass” model of sound scattering by fluid-like particles to the distribution of zooplankton sizes measured by LOPC resulted mostly in very good agreement between the measured (420 kHz BioSonics and modelled values, except for cases with very low zooplankton abundance or with occurrence of stronger scatterers (e.g. macrozooplankton, fish. An acoustic model validated for the elastic parameters of zooplankton confirmed that particles smaller than 1mmin diameter, although highly abundant, did not contribute significantly to the sound scattering process at a frequency of 420 kHz. The implementation of diverse complementary methods has great potential to obtain high spatial and temporal resolution in zooplankton distribution studies; however, their compatibility has to be tested first.

  1. Hydroelastic behaviour of a structure exposed to an underwater explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colicchio, G.; Greco, M.; Brocchini, M.; Faltinsen, O. M.

    2015-01-01

    The hydroelastic interaction between an underwater explosion and an elastic plate is investigated num- erically through a domain-decomposition strategy. The three-dimensional features of the problem require a large computational effort, which is reduced through a weak coupling between a one-dimensional radial blast solver, which resolves the blast evolution far from the boundaries, and a three-dimensional compressible flow solver used where the interactions between the compression wave and the boundaries take place and the flow becomes three-dimensional. The three-dimensional flow solver at the boundaries is directly coupled with a modal structural solver that models the response of the solid boundaries like elastic plates. This enables one to simulate the fluid–structure interaction as a strong coupling, in order to capture hydroelastic effects. The method has been applied to the experimental case of Hung et al. (2005 Int. J. Impact Eng. 31, 151–168 (doi:10.1016/j.ijimpeng.2003.10.039)) with explosion and structure sufficiently far from other boundaries and successfully validated in terms of the evolution of the acceleration induced on the plate. It was also used to investigate the interaction of an underwater explosion with the bottom of a close-by ship modelled as an orthotropic plate. In the application, the acoustic phase of the fluid–structure interaction is examined, highlighting the need of the fluid–structure coupling to capture correctly the possible inception of cavitation. PMID:25512585

  2. Hydrodynamic Coefficients Identification and Experimental Investigation for an Underwater Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaorong XIE

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodynamic coefficients are the foundation of unmanned underwater vehicles modeling and controller design. In order to reduce identification complexity and acquire necessary hydrodynamic coefficients for controllers design, the motion of the unmanned underwater vehicle was separated into vertical motion and horizontal motion models. Hydrodynamic coefficients were regarded as mapping parameters from input forces and moments to output velocities and acceleration of the unmanned underwater vehicle. The motion models of the unmanned underwater vehicle were nonlinear and Genetic Algorithm was adopted to identify those hydrodynamic coefficients. To verify the identification quality, velocities and acceleration of the unmanned underwater vehicle was measured using inertial sensor under the same conditions as Genetic Algorithm identification. Curves similarity between measured velocities and acceleration and those identified by Genetic Algorithm were used as optimizing standard. It is found that the curves similarity were high and identified hydrodynamic coefficients of the unmanned underwater vehicle satisfied the measured motion states well.

  3. Numerical Acoustic Models Including Viscous and Thermal losses: Review of Existing and New Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Risby; Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Aage, Niels

    2017-01-01

    This work presents an updated overview of numerical methods including acoustic viscous and thermal losses. Numerical modelling of viscothermal losses has gradually become more important due to the general trend of making acoustic devices smaller. Not including viscothermal acoustic losses...... in such numerical computations will therefore lead to inaccurate or even wrong results. Both, Finite Element Method (FEM) and Boundary Element Method (BEM), formulations are available that incorporate these loss mechanisms. Including viscothermal losses in FEM computations can be computationally very demanding, due...... and BEM method including viscothermal dissipation are compared and investigated....

  4. Modelling of Particles Aglomeration in the Acoustic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Grinbergienė

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article includes particles agglomeration principles analysis. Forces describes with the equations operating particle of its moving in the vibes. It presents equations of particle movement speed and trajectory estimation. It have performed agglomerations simulation of two identical (5 m and 5 m and different (5 m and 10 m diameters particles in the acoustic field using the discrete element method (DEM. The results showed that the two equal diameter particle agglomeration gravity affects at 8 kHz acoustic signal frequency.

  5. A modeling investigation of vowel-to-vowel movement planning in acoustic and muscle spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandipour, Majid

    The primary objective of this research was to explore the coordinate space in which speech movements are planned. A two dimensional biomechanical model of the vocal tract (tongue, lips, jaw, and pharynx) was constructed based on anatomical and physiological data from a subject. The model transforms neural command signals into the actions of muscles. The tongue was modeled by a 221-node finite element mesh. Each of the eight tongue muscles defined within the mesh was controlled by a virtual muscle model. The other vocal-tract components were modeled as simple 2nd-order systems. The model's geometry was adapted to a speaker, using MRI scans of the speaker's vocal tract. The vocal tract model, combined with an adaptive controller that consisted of a forward model (mapping 12-dimensional motor commands to a 64-dimensional acoustic spectrum) and an inverse model (mapping acoustic trajectories to motor command trajectories), was used to simulate and explore the implications of two planning hypotheses: planning in motor space vs. acoustic space. The acoustic, kinematic, and muscle activation (EMG) patterns of vowel-to-vowel sequences generated by the model were compared to data from the speaker whose acoustic, kinematic and EMG were also recorded. The simulation results showed that: (a) modulations of the motor commands effectively accounted for the effects of speaking rate on EMG, kinematic, and acoustic outputs; (b) the movement and acoustic trajectories were influenced by vocal tract biomechanics; and (c) both planning schemes produced similar articulatory movement, EMG, muscle length, force, and acoustic trajectories, which were also comparable to the subject's data under normal speaking conditions. In addition, the effects of a bite-block on measured EMG, kinematics and formants were simulated by the model. Acoustic planning produced successful simulations but motor planning did not. The simulation results suggest that with somatosensory feedback but no auditory

  6. Acoustic model order reduction for the lowest condition number in inverse method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madoliat, Reza; Nouri, Nowrouz Mohammad; Rahrovi, Ali

    2017-06-01

    Acoustic sources with wide surfaces can be broken down in a fluid environment into smaller acoustic sources. In this study, a general model is presented, indicating the type, number, direction, position and strength of these sources in such a way that the main sound and the sound of the equivalent sources match each other acceptably. When the position and direction of the source is determined, the strength of the source can be found using the inverse method. However, since the solution is not unique in the inverse method, a different acoustic strength is obtained for the sources if different positions are selected. By selecting an arrangement of general sources and using an optimization algorithm, the least possible mismatch between the main sound and the sound of equivalent sources can be achieved. In the inverse method, it is important to reduce the effects of measurement errors. The sensor placement and acoustic model order reduction (AMOR) are studied for reducing these effects.

  7. Underwater Scene Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nanyoung

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an underwater scene composition for elementary-education majors. This project deals with watercolor with crayon or oil-pastel resist (medium); the beauty of nature represented by fish in the underwater scene (theme); texture and pattern (design elements); drawing simple forms (drawing skill); and composition…

  8. Underwater walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, Joseph

    2004-07-01

    Lobsters are generalist decapods that evolved in a broad variety of niches in the Northwestern Atlantic. Due to their inherent buoyancy they have acquired adaptations to reduced traction and surge. We have developed a biomimetic robot based on the lobster that features artificial muscle actuators and sensors employing labeled-line codes. The central controller for this robot is based on the command neuron, coordinating neuron central pattern generator model. A library of commands is released by sensor feedback to mediate adaptive sequences and goal achieving behavior. Rheotaxic behaviors can mediate adaptations to achieve some of the advantages of the biological models.

  9. Integrated Modeling and Analysis of Physical Oceanographic and Acoustic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    acoustics, in Oceans ’12 (Hampton Roads ) Conference Proceedings, MTS/IEEE, 2012. [published, not refereed] Duda, T., Y.-T. Lin and B. D. Cornuelle...Award: 24 July 2013, Seoul, Korea Award Citation: Harry L. Swinney – “for his ingenious and challenging experiments which have had a large impact

  10. One-dimensional acoustic modeling of thermoacoustic instabilities (on cd)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kampen, J.F.; Huls, R.A.; Kok, Jacobus B.W.; van der Meer, Theodorus H.; Nilsson, A.; Boden, H.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the acoustic stability of a premixed turbulent natural gas flame confined in a combustor is investigated. Specifically when the flame is operated in a lean premixed mode, the thermoacoustic system is known to exhibit instabilities. These arise from a feedback mechanism between the

  11. FE Modeling of Human Vocal Tract Acoustics. Part I: Production of Czech Vowels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vampola, T.; Horáček, Jaromír; Švec, J. G.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 3 (2008), s. 433-447 ISSN 1610-1928 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/04/1025 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514; CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : biomechanics of voice * FE models of human vocaltract * acoustic modal analysis Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 0.538, year: 2008

  12. Broadband focusing of underwater sound using a transparent pentamode lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaoshi; Norris, Andrew N; Cushing, Colby W; Haberman, Michael R; Wilson, Preston S

    2017-06-01

    An inhomogeneous acoustic metamaterial lens based on spatial variation of refractive index for broadband focusing of underwater sound is reported. The index gradient follows a modified hyperbolic secant profile designed to reduce aberration and suppress side lobes. The gradient index (GRIN) lens is comprised of transversely isotropic hexagonal microstructures with tunable quasi-static bulk modulus and mass density. In addition, the unit cells are impedance-matched to water and have in-plane shear modulus negligible compared to the effective bulk modulus. The flat GRIN lens is fabricated by cutting hexagonal centimeter scale hollow microstructures in aluminum plates, which are then stacked and sealed from the exterior water. Broadband focusing effects are observed within the homogenization regime of the lattice in both finite element simulations and underwater measurements (20-40 kHz). This design approach has potential applications in medical ultrasound imaging and underwater acoustic communications.

  13. A model for an acoustically driven microbubble inside a rigid tube

    KAUST Repository

    Qamar, Adnan

    2014-09-10

    A theoretical framework to model the dynamics of acoustically driven microbubble inside a rigid tube is presented. The proposed model is not a variant of the conventional Rayleigh-Plesset category of models. It is derived from the reduced Navier-Stokes equation and is coupled with the evolving flow field solution inside the tube by a similarity transformation approach. The results are computed, and compared with experiments available in literature, for the initial bubble radius of Ro=1.5μm and 2μm for the tube diameter of D=12μm and 200μm with the acoustic parameters as utilized in the experiments. Results compare quite well with the existing experimental data. When compared to our earlier basic model, better agreement on a larger tube diameter is obtained with the proposed coupled model. The model also predicts, accurately, bubble fragmentation in terms of acoustic and geometric parameters.

  14. Modeling the complexity of acoustic emission during intermittent plastic deformation: Power laws and multifractal spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Jagadish; Ananthakrishna, G

    2018-01-01

    Scale-invariant power-law distributions for acoustic emission signals are ubiquitous in several plastically deforming materials. However, power-law distributions for acoustic emission energies are reported in distinctly different plastically deforming situations such as hcp and fcc single and polycrystalline samples exhibiting smooth stress-strain curves and in dilute metallic alloys exhibiting discontinuous flow. This is surprising since the underlying dislocation mechanisms in these two types of deformations are very different. So far, there have been no models that predict the power-law statistics for discontinuous flow. Furthermore, the statistics of the acoustic emission signals in jerky flow is even more complex, requiring multifractal measures for a proper characterization. There has been no model that explains the complex statistics either. Here we address the problem of statistical characterization of the acoustic emission signals associated with the three types of the Portevin-Le Chatelier bands. Following our recently proposed general framework for calculating acoustic emission, we set up a wave equation for the elastic degrees of freedom with a plastic strain rate as a source term. The energy dissipated during acoustic emission is represented by the Rayleigh-dissipation function. Using the plastic strain rate obtained from the Ananthakrishna model for the Portevin-Le Chatelier effect, we compute the acoustic emission signals associated with the three Portevin-Le Chatelier bands and the Lüders-like band. The so-calculated acoustic emission signals are used for further statistical characterization. Our results show that the model predicts power-law statistics for all the acoustic emission signals associated with the three types of Portevin-Le Chatelier bands with the exponent values increasing with increasing strain rate. The calculated multifractal spectra corresponding to the acoustic emission signals associated with the three band types have a maximum

  15. Numerical modeling of electrical-mechanical-acoustical behavior of a lumped acoustic source driven by a piezoelectric stack actuator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tajdari, F.; Berkhoff, A.P.; Boer, A. de

    2016-01-01

    The present work describes the electrical, mechanical and acoustical behavior of a thin honey-comb structure as an acoustic source. The acoustic source has to operate in the low frequency, quasi-static regime and is driven by a piezoelectric stack actuator. In addition, a two-way energy flow between

  16. Modeling of natural acoustic frequencies of a gas-turbine plant combustion chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrilin, I. A.; Gurakov, N. I.; Zubrilin, R. A.; Matveev, S. G.

    2017-05-01

    The paper presents results of determination of natural acoustic frequencies of a gas-turbine plant annular combustion chamber model using 3D-simulation. At the beginning, a calculation procedure for determining natural acoustic frequencies of the gas-turbine plant combustion chamber was worked out. The effect of spatial inhomogeneity of the flow parameters (fluid composition, pressure, temperature) arising in combustion and some geometrical parameters (cooling holes of the flame tube walls) on the calculation results is studied. It is found that the change of the fluid composition in combustion affects the acoustic velocity not more than 5%; therefore, the air with a volume variable temperature can be taken as a working fluid in the calculation of natural acoustic frequencies. It is also shown that the cooling holes of the flame tube walls with diameter less than 2 mm can be neglected in the determination of the acoustic modes in the frequency range of up to 1000 Hz. This reduces the number of the grid-model elements by a factor of six in comparison with a model that considers all of the holes. Furthermore, a method of export of spatial inhomogeneity of the flow parameters from a CFD solver sector model to the annular combustion chamber model in a modal solver is presented. As a result of the obtained model calculation, acoustic modes of the combustion chamber in the frequency range of up to 1000 Hz are determined. For a standard engine condition, a potentially dangerous acoustic mode with a frequency close to the ripple frequency of the precessing vortex core, which is formed behind the burner device of this combustion chamber, is detected.

  17. Modelling the light absorption coefficients of oceanic waters: Implications for underwater optical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, Sai Shri; Sahu, Sanjay Kumar; Dev, Pravin Jeba; Shanmugam, Palanisamy

    2018-05-01

    Spectral absorption coefficients of particulate (algal and non-algal components) and dissolved substances are modelled and combined with the pure seawater component to determine the total light absorption coefficients of seawater in the Bay of Bengal. Two parameters namely chlorophyll-a (Chl) concentration and turbidity were measured using commercially available instruments with high sampling rates. For modelling the light absorption coefficients of oceanic waters, the measured data are classified into two broad groups - algal dominant and non-algal particle (NAP) dominant. With these criteria the individual absorption coefficients of phytoplankton and NAP were established based on their concentrations using an iterative method. To account for the spectral dependence of absorption by phytoplankton, the wavelength-dependent coefficients were introduced into the model. The CDOM absorption was determined by subtracting the individual absorption coefficients of phytoplankton and NAP from the measured total absorption data and then related to the Chl concentration. Validity of the model is assessed based on independent in-situ data from certain discrete locations in the Bay of Bengal. The total absorption coefficients estimated using the new model by considering the contributions of algal, non-algal and CDOM have good agreement with the measured total absorption data with the error range of 6.9 to 28.3%. Results obtained by the present model are important for predicting the propagation of the radiant energy within the ocean and interpreting remote sensing observation data.

  18. Integrating acoustic analysis in the architectural design process using parametric modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Brady

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses how parametric modeling techniques can be used to provide architectural designers with a better understanding of the acoustic performance of their designs and provide acoustic engineers with models that can be analyzed using computational acoustic analysis software. Architects...... provide a method by which architects and engineers can work together more efficiently and communicate better. This research is illustrated through the design of an architectural project, a new school in Copenhagen, Denmark by JJW Architects, where parametric modeling techniques have been used in different...... are increasingly using parametric modeling techniques in their design processes to allow the exploration of large numbers of design options using multiple criteria. Parametric modeling software can be performance-driven and sound has the potential to become one of these performance-driven dimensions. This can...

  19. Three-dimensional point-cloud room model in room acoustics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovic, Milos; Olesen, Søren Krarup; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2013-01-01

    acquisition and its representation with a 3D point-cloud model, as well as utilization of such a model for the room acoustics simulations. A room is scanned with a commercially available input device (Kinect for Xbox360) in two different ways; the first one involves the device placed in the middle of the room...... to build a 3D point-cloud model of the room. Several models are created to meet requirements of different room acoustics simulation algorithms: plane fitting and uniform voxel grid for geometric methods and triangulation mesh for the numerical methods. Advantages of the proposed method over the traditional...

  20. Three-dimensional point-cloud room model for room acoustics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovic, Milos; Olesen, Søren Krarup; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2013-01-01

    acquisition and its representation with a 3D point-cloud model, as well as utilization of such a model for the room acoustics simulations. A room is scanned with a commercially available input device (Kinect for Xbox360) in two different ways; the first one involves the device placed in the middle of the room...... to build a 3D point-cloud model of the room. Several models are created to meet requirements of different room acoustics simulation algorithms: plane fitting and uniform voxel grid for geometric methods and triangulation mesh for the numerical methods. Advantages of the proposed method over the traditional...

  1. Use of acoustic systems for underwater archaeology

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vora, K.H.

    stream_size 2 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name J_Mar_Archaeol_2_71.pdf.txt stream_source_info J_Mar_Archaeol_2_71.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  2. Passive Localization of Underwater Acoustic Beacons

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    maxtime) TickCounto; aborto ; FSRead(gASerRefln,&numCharln,&addressBuf); TalkSail(’O); iistart the PTR’s data collecticn DrawString(w\\p: H) I display a...34); aborto ; EventLoopO; II main execution loop RAMSDClose(sPortA); HI must close the RAM Drivers before shutdown 193 free(gw); //must release the...kNumExp+l),sizeof(double)); if(wtrue ==NULL) DrawString("\\pCan’t allocate memory for data collection!!! ); aborto ; Nvmeas = calloc(3L*(kStep~kNumExp+l

  3. Acoustic Measurements of a Large Civil Transport Main Landing Gear Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravetta, Patricio A.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Wisda, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Microphone phased array acoustic measurements of a 26 percent-scale, Boeing 777-200 main landing gear model with and without noise reduction fairings installed were obtained in the anechoic configuration of the Virginia Tech Stability Tunnel. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0.12, 0.15, and 0.17 with the latter speed used as the nominal test condition. The fully and partially dressed gear with the truck angle set at 13 degrees toe-up landing configuration were the two most extensively tested configurations, serving as the baselines for comparison purposes. Acoustic measurements were also acquired for the same two baseline configurations with the truck angle set at 0 degrees. In addition, a previously tested noise reducing, toboggan-shaped fairing was re-evaluated extensively to address some of the lingering questions regarding the extent of acoustic benefit achievable with this device. The integrated spectra generated from the acoustic source maps reconfirm, in general terms, the previously reported noise reduction performance of the toboggan fairing as installed on an isolated gear. With the recent improvements to the Virginia Tech tunnel acoustic quality and microphone array capabilities, the present measurements provide an additional, higher quality database to the acoustic information available for this gear model.

  4. Integrated Modeling and Analysis of Physical Oceanographic and Acoustic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    email: swinney@chaos.utexas.edu John Wilkin Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Rutgers University New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8521 phone...side of the seamount were supplemented with a sponge to avoid spurious wave reflections. Stochastic Dynamically Orthogonal (DO) field equations, which...Lynch, J. F., Y.-T. Lin, T. F. Duda and A. E. Newhall , Characteristics of acoustic propagation and scattering in marine canyons, in Proceedings of

  5. Fluid-Interaction and Cavitation Effects on a Surface Ship Model Due to an Underwater Explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-09-01

    itself is conducting the solution process which would normally be a SOL 109 transient analysis process in MSC/ NASTRAN . Appendix B provides the DMAP ... NASTRAN [Ref. 6], the engineer has a greater ability to improve ship modeling and predict the vibrational response of ship hulls and internal equipment...specifically associated by the MAT field in the NASTRAN ASCII input file. Because of the numerical processing in the USA code, node numbering needs to be

  6. Finite Element Modeling of Scattering from Underwater Proud and Buried Military Munitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-28

    collected data and particularly identify features that can be used in classification . 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...7 2 The scattering amplitude as a function of frequency for a 0.5 m solid steel sphere. The solid line represents the partial wave...can be used in classification . Background Modeling the response of UXOs to a sonar signal in an ocean environment belongs to a large class of

  7. Calibration Techniques for Accurate Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortis, Mark

    2015-12-07

    Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in accurate estimates of locations and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems.

  8. Calibration Techniques for Accurate Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Shortis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in accurate estimates of locations and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems.

  9. Underwater glider observations and modeling of an abrupt mixing event in the upper ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, S.; Renault, L.; Garau, B.; Tintoré, J.

    2012-04-01

    An abrupt mixing event in the upper ocean is investigated in the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea using gliders, a new ocean monitoring technology, combined with regional atmospheric model outputs and mooring data. Intense winds (up to 20 m s-1) and buoyancy forcing during December 2009 induced strong vertical mixing of the upper ocean layer in the Balearic Sea. High-resolution data from a coastal glider reveal a surface cooling of near 2 ° C and the deepening of the Mixed Layer Depth (MLD) by more than 40 meters in the center of the basin. Comparisons between glider and ship-emulated sections of hydrographic profiles show that the glider data make visible the small-scale spatial variability of the MLD. The heat content released to the atmosphere by the upper ocean during this mixing event exceeds 1000 W m-2. A simulation from the Weather Research and Forecasting model reports values consistent with these observations. Additionally the atmospheric numerical simulation shows the development and evolution of a cyclone located south of the Balearic Islands. This cyclone is likely to be responsible for the wind intensification and the consequent air-sea energy exchanges that occurred in the study area during this period.

  10. A Multi-Model Reduction Technique for Optimization of Coupled Structural-Acoustic Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Creixell Mediante, Ester; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Brunskog, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Finite Element models of structural-acoustic coupled systems can become very large for complex structures with multiple connected parts. Optimization of the performance of the structure based on harmonic analysis of the system requires solving the coupled problem iteratively and for several...... frequencies, which can become highly time consuming. Several modal-based model reduction techniques for structure-acoustic interaction problems have been developed in the literature. The unsymmetric nature of the pressure-displacement formulation of the problem poses the question of how the reduction modal...... base should be formed, given that the modal vectors are not orthogonal due to the asymmetry of the system matrices. In this paper, a multi-model reduction (MMR) technique for structure-acoustic interaction problems is developed. In MMR, the reduction base is formed with the modal vectors of a family...

  11. Underwater 3D filming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Rinaldi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available After an experimental phase of many years, 3D filming is now effective and successful. Improvements are still possible, but the film industry achieved memorable success on 3D movie’s box offices due to the overall quality of its products. Special environments such as space (“Gravity” and the underwater realm look perfect to be reproduced in 3D. “Filming in space” was possible in “Gravity” using special effects and computer graphic. The underwater realm is still difficult to be handled. Underwater filming in 3D was not that easy and effective as filming in 2D, since not long ago. After almost 3 years of research, a French, Austrian and Italian team realized a perfect tool to film underwater, in 3D, without any constrains. This allows filmmakers to bring the audience deep inside an environment where they most probably will never have the chance to be.

  12. Using side-scan sonar to characterize and map physical habitat and anthropogenic underwater features in the St. Louis River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Characterizing underwater habitat and other features is difficult and costly, especially in the large St. Louis River Estuary. We are using side-scan sonar (SSS), first developed in the 1960s to remotely sense underwater habitat features from reflected acoustic signals (backscatt...

  13. Shallow-Water Mud Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Ballard, Tom Muir , David Knobles, Kevin Lee, and Preston Wilson), and Naval Underwater Warfare Center-PC & NP (Kerry Commander, Danny Lim, David Burnett...K. M. Lee, and T. G. Muir , “Laboratory P- and S-wave measurements of a reconstituted muddy sediment with comparison to card-house theory,” J. Acoust

  14. Design and implementation of a shielded underwater vector sensor for laboratory environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Andrew R; Hambric, Stephen A

    2011-12-01

    Underwater acoustic vector sensors, for measuring acoustic intensity, are typically used in open water where electromagnetic interference (EMI) is generally not a contributor to overall background noise. However, vector sensors are also useful in a laboratory setting where EMI can be a limiting factor at low frequencies. An underwater vector sensor is designed and built with specific care for EMI immunity. The sensor, and associated signal processing, is shown to reduce background noise at EMI frequencies by 10-50 dB and 10-20 dB across the entire frequency bandwidth, as compared to an identical unshielded vector sensor. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  15. An Adaptive Neural Mechanism with a Lizard Ear Model for Binaural Acoustic Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaikh, Danish; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2016-01-01

    expensive algorithms. We present a novel bioinspired solution to acoustic tracking that uses only two microphones. The system is based on a neural mechanism coupled with a model of the peripheral auditory system of lizards. The peripheral auditory model provides sound direction information which the neural...... mechanism uses to learn the target’s velocity via fast correlation-based unsupervised learning. Simulation results for tracking a pure tone acoustic target moving along a semi-circular trajectory validate our approach. Three different angular velocities in three separate trials were employed...

  16. Long-range Acoustic Interactions in Insect Swarms - An Adaptive Gravity Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbonos, Dan; Ianconescu, Reuven; Puckett, James G.; Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T.; Gov, Nir S.

    The collective motion of groups of animals emerges from the net effect of the interactions between individual members of the group. In many cases, such as birds, fish, or ungulates, these interactions are mediated by sensory stimuli that predominantly arise from nearby neighbors. But not all stimuli in animal groups are short range. We consider mating swarms of midges, which are thought to interact primarily via long-range acoustic stimuli. We exploit the similarity in form between the decay of acoustic and gravitational sources to build a model for swarm behavior. By accounting for the adaptive nature of the midges' acoustic sensing, we show that our ``adaptive gravity'' model makes mean-field predictions that agree well with experimental observations of laboratory swarms. Our results highlight the role of sensory mechanisms and interaction range in collective animal behavior. Additionally, the adaptive interactions open a new class of equations of motion, which may appear in other biological contexts.

  17. An acoustic-convective splitting-based approach for the Kapila two-phase flow model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eikelder, M.F.P. ten, E-mail: m.f.p.teneikelder@tudelft.nl [EDF R& D, AMA, 7 boulevard Gaspard Monge, 91120 Palaiseau (France); Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Daude, F. [EDF R& D, AMA, 7 boulevard Gaspard Monge, 91120 Palaiseau (France); IMSIA, UMR EDF-CNRS-CEA-ENSTA 9219, Université Paris Saclay, 828 Boulevard des Maréchaux, 91762 Palaiseau (France); Koren, B.; Tijsseling, A.S. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2017-02-15

    In this paper we propose a new acoustic-convective splitting-based numerical scheme for the Kapila five-equation two-phase flow model. The splitting operator decouples the acoustic waves and convective waves. The resulting two submodels are alternately numerically solved to approximate the solution of the entire model. The Lagrangian form of the acoustic submodel is numerically solved using an HLLC-type Riemann solver whereas the convective part is approximated with an upwind scheme. The result is a simple method which allows for a general equation of state. Numerical computations are performed for standard two-phase shock tube problems. A comparison is made with a non-splitting approach. The results are in good agreement with reference results and exact solutions.

  18. Characterization of a multi-element clinical HIFU system using acoustic holography and nonlinear modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreider, Wayne; Yuldashev, Petr V; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Farr, Navid; Partanen, Ari; Bailey, Michael R; Khokhlova, Vera A

    2013-08-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a treatment modality that relies on the delivery of acoustic energy to remote tissue sites to induce thermal and/or mechanical tissue ablation. To ensure the safety and efficacy of this medical technology, standard approaches are needed for accurately characterizing the acoustic pressures generated by clinical ultrasound sources under operating conditions. Characterization of HIFU fields is complicated by nonlinear wave propagation and the complexity of phased-array transducers. Previous work has described aspects of an approach that combines measurements and modeling, and here we demonstrate this approach for a clinical phased-array transducer. First, low amplitude hydrophone measurements were performed in water over a scan plane between the array and the focus. Second, these measurements were used to holographically reconstruct the surface vibrations of the transducer and to set a boundary condition for a 3-D acoustic propagation model. Finally, nonlinear simulations of the acoustic field were carried out over a range of source power levels. Simulation results were compared with pressure waveforms measured directly by hydrophone at both low and high power levels, demonstrating that details of the acoustic field, including shock formation, are quantitatively predicted.

  19. Specific acoustic models for spontaneous and dictated style in indonesian speech recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vista, C. B.; Satriawan, C. H.; Lestari, D. P.; Widyantoro, D. H.

    2018-03-01

    The performance of an automatic speech recognition system is affected by differences in speech style between the data the model is originally trained upon and incoming speech to be recognized. In this paper, the usage of GMM-HMM acoustic models for specific speech styles is investigated. We develop two systems for the experiments; the first employs a speech style classifier to predict the speech style of incoming speech, either spontaneous or dictated, then decodes this speech using an acoustic model specifically trained for that speech style. The second system uses both acoustic models to recognise incoming speech and decides upon a final result by calculating a confidence score of decoding. Results show that training specific acoustic models for spontaneous and dictated speech styles confers a slight recognition advantage as compared to a baseline model trained on a mixture of spontaneous and dictated training data. In addition, the speech style classifier approach of the first system produced slightly more accurate results than the confidence scoring employed in the second system.

  20. A three-dimensional model for T-shaped acoustic resonators with sound absorption materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ganghua; Cheng, Li; Li, Deyu

    2011-05-01

    Recent development in noise control using T-shaped acoustic resonators calls for the development of more reliable and accurate models to predict their acoustic characteristics, which is unfortunately lacking in the literature. This paper attempts to establish such a model based on three-dimensional theory for T-shaped acoustic resonators containing sound absorption materials. The model is validated by experiments using various configurations. Predictions on fundamental and high-order resonance frequencies are compared with those obtained from the one-dimensional model and finite element analyses, and the effects of the physical and geometric parameters of the absorption materials on the resonance frequencies and Q-factor are also investigated numerically and experimentally. Limitations and applicability of existing one-dimensional models are assessed. The proposed general three-dimensional model proved to be able to provide an accurate and reliable prediction on the resonance frequencies for T-shaped acoustic resonators with or without absorption materials. This can eventually meet the requirement for resonator array design in terms of accuracy.

  1. Underwater Sound Propagation from Marine Pile Driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyff, James A

    2016-01-01

    Pile driving occurs in a variety of nearshore environments that typically have very shallow-water depths. The propagation of pile-driving sound in water is complex, where sound is directly radiated from the pile as well as through the ground substrate. Piles driven in the ground near water bodies can produce considerable underwater sound energy. This paper presents examples of sound propagation through shallow-water environments. Some of these examples illustrate the substantial variation in sound amplitude over time that can be critical to understand when computing an acoustic-based safety zone for aquatic species.

  2. Theoretical and Numerical Modeling of Acoustic Metamaterials for Aeroacoustic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Iemma

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The advent, during the first decade of the 21st century, of the concept of acoustic metamaterial has disclosed an incredible potential of development for breakthrough technologies. Unfortunately, the extension of the same concepts to aeroacoustics has turned out to be not a trivial task, because of the different structure of the governing equations, characterized by the presence of the background aerodynamic convection. Some of the approaches recently introduced to circumvent the problem are biased by a fundamental assumption that makes the actual realization of devices extremely unlikely: the metamaterial should guarantee an adapted background aerodynamic convection in order to modify suitably the acoustic field and obtain the desired effect, thus implying the porosity of the cloaking device. In the present paper, we propose an interpretation of the metamaterial design that removes this unlikely assumption, focusing on the identification of an aerodynamically-impermeable metamaterial capable of reproducing the surface impedance profile required to achieve the desired scattering abatement. The attention is focused on a moving obstacle impinged by an acoustic perturbation induced by a co-moving source. The problem is written in a frame of reference rigidly connected to the moving object to couple the convective wave equation in the hosting medium with the inertially-anisotropic wave operator within the cloak. The problem is recast in an integral form and numerically solved through a boundary-field element method. The matching of the local wave vector is used to derive a convective design of the metamaterial applicable to the specific problem analyzed. Preliminary numerical results obtained under the simplifying assumption of a uniform aerodynamic flow reveal a considerable enhancement of the masking capability of the convected design. The numerical method developed shows a remarkable computational efficiency, completing a simulation of the entire

  3. Parvulescu Revisited: Small Tank Acoustics for Bioacousticians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Peter H; Hawkins, Anthony D; Popper, Arthur N; Fay, Richard R; Gray, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Researchers often perform hearing studies on fish in small tanks. The acoustic field in such a tank is considerably different from the acoustic field that occurs in the animal's natural environment. The significance of these differences is magnified by the nature of the fish's auditory system where either acoustic pressure (a scalar), acoustic particle velocity (a vector), or both may serve as the stimulus. It is essential for the underwater acoustician to understand the acoustics of small tanks to be able to carry out valid auditory research in the laboratory and to properly compare and interpret the results of others.

  4. A State-Space Modeling Approach for Active Structural Acoustic Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leopoldo P.R. de Oliveira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The demands for improvement in sound quality and reduction of noise generated by vehicles are constantly increasing, as well as the penalties for space and weight of the control solutions. A promising approach to cope with this challenge is the use of active structural-acoustic control. Usually, the low frequency noise is transmitted into the vehicle's cabin through structural paths, which raises the necessity of dealing with vibro-acoustic models. This kind of models should allow the inclusion of sensors and actuators models, if accurate performance indexes are to be accessed. The challenge thus resides in deriving reasonable sized models that integrate structural, acoustic, electrical components and the controller algorithm. The advantages of adequate active control simulation strategies relies on the cost and time reduction in the development phase. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to present a methodology for simulating vibro-acoustic systems including this coupled model in a closed loop control simulation framework that also takes into account the interaction between the system and the control sensors/actuators. It is shown that neglecting the sensor/actuator dynamics can lead to inaccurate performance predictions.

  5. Acoustic Velocity and Attenuation in Magnetorhelogical fluids based on an effective density fluid model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Min

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetrohelogical fluids (MRFs represent a class of smart materials whose rheological properties change in response to the magnetic field, which resulting in the drastic change of the acoustic impedance. This paper presents an acoustic propagation model that approximates a fluid-saturated porous medium as a fluid with a bulk modulus and effective density (EDFM to study the acoustic propagation in the MRF materials under magnetic field. The effective density fluid model derived from the Biot’s theory. Some minor changes to the theory had to be applied, modeling both fluid-like and solid-like state of the MRF material. The attenuation and velocity variation of the MRF are numerical calculated. The calculated results show that for the MRF material the attenuation and velocity predicted with this effective density fluid model are close agreement with the previous predictions by Biot’s theory. We demonstrate that for the MRF material acoustic prediction the effective density fluid model is an accurate alternative to full Biot’s theory and is much simpler to implement.

  6. GAUSSIAN MIXTURE MODELS FOR ADAPTATION OF DEEP NEURAL NETWORK ACOUSTIC MODELS IN AUTOMATIC SPEECH RECOGNITION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia A. Tomashenko

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. We study speaker adaptation of deep neural network (DNN acoustic models in automatic speech recognition systems. The aim of speaker adaptation techniques is to improve the accuracy of the speech recognition system for a particular speaker. Method. A novel method for training and adaptation of deep neural network acoustic models has been developed. It is based on using an auxiliary GMM (Gaussian Mixture Models model and GMMD (GMM-derived features. The principle advantage of the proposed GMMD features is the possibility of performing the adaptation of a DNN through the adaptation of the auxiliary GMM. In the proposed approach any methods for the adaptation of the auxiliary GMM can be used, hence, it provides a universal method for transferring adaptation algorithms developed for GMMs to DNN adaptation.Main Results. The effectiveness of the proposed approach was shown by means of one of the most common adaptation algorithms for GMM models – MAP (Maximum A Posteriori adaptation. Different ways of integration of the proposed approach into state-of-the-art DNN architecture have been proposed and explored. Analysis of choosing the type of the auxiliary GMM model is given. Experimental results on the TED-LIUM corpus demonstrate that, in an unsupervised adaptation mode, the proposed adaptation technique can provide, approximately, a 11–18% relative word error reduction (WER on different adaptation sets, compared to the speaker-independent DNN system built on conventional features, and a 3–6% relative WER reduction compared to the SAT-DNN trained on fMLLR adapted features.

  7. Minimal model for acoustic forces on Brownian particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboa Usabiaga, F.; Delgado-Buscalioni, R.

    2013-12-01

    We present a generalization of inertial coupling (IC) [Balboa Usabiaga , J. Comput. Phys.JCTPAH0021-999110.1016/j.jcp.2012.10.045 235, 701 (2013)], which permits the resolution of radiation forces on small particles with arbitrary acoustic contrast factor. The IC method is based on a Eulerian-Lagrangian approach: particles move in continuum space while the fluid equations are solved in a regular mesh (here we use the finite volume method). Thermal fluctuations in the fluid stress, important below the micron scale, are also taken into account following the Landau-Lifshitz fluid description. Each particle is described by a minimal cost resolution which consists of a single small kernel (bell-shaped function) concomitant to the particle. The main role of the particle kernel is to interpolate fluid properties and spread particle forces. Here, we extend the kernel functionality to allow for an arbitrary particle compressibility. The particle-fluid force is obtained from an imposed “no-slip” constraint which enforces similar particle and kernel fluid velocities. This coupling is instantaneous and permits the capture of the fast, nonlinear effects underlying the radiation forces on particles. Acoustic forces arise because of an excess either in particle compressibility (monopolar term) or in mass (dipolar contribution) over the fluid values. Comparison with theoretical expressions shows that the present generalization of the IC method correctly reproduces both contributions. Due to its low computational cost, the present method allows for simulations with many [O(104)] particles using a standard graphical processor unit.

  8. Physical modeling and characterization of thermo-acoustic loudspeakers made of silver nano-wire films

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Torraca, P.; Larcher, L.; Bobinger, M.; Pavan, P.; Seeber, B.; Lugli, P.

    2017-06-01

    Recent developments of ultra-low heat capacity nanostructured materials revived the interest in the thermo-acoustic (TA) loudspeaker technology, which shows important advantages compared to the classical dynamic loudspeakers as they feature a lower cost and weight, flexibility, conformability to the surface of various shapes, and transparency. The development of the TA loudspeaker technology requires accurate physical models connecting the material properties to the thermal and acoustic speaker's performance. We present here a combined theoretical and experimental analysis of TA loudspeakers, where the electro-thermal and the thermo-acoustic transductions are handled separately, thus allowing an in-depth description of both the pressure and temperature dynamics. The electro-thermal transduction is analyzed by accounting for all the heat flow processes taking place between the TA loudspeaker and the surrounding environment, with focus on their frequency dependence. The thermo-acoustic conversion is studied by solving the coupled thermo-acoustic equations, derived from the Navier-Stokes equations, and by exploiting the Huygens-Fresnel principle to decompose the TA loudspeaker surface into a dense set of TA point sources. A general formulation of the 3D pressure field is derived summing up the TA point source contributions via a Rayleigh integral. The model is validated against temperature and sound pressure level measured on the TA loudspeaker sample made of a Silver Nanowire random network deposited on a polyimide substrate. A good agreement is found between measurements and simulations, demonstrating that the model is capable of connecting material properties to the thermo-acoustic performance of the device, thus providing a valuable tool for the design and optimization of TA loudspeakers.

  9. The Control Packet Collision Avoidance Algorithm for the Underwater Multichannel MAC Protocols via Time-Frequency Masking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Establishing high-speed and reliable underwater acoustic networks among multiunmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs is basic to realize cooperative and intelligent control among different UUVs. Nevertheless, different from terrestrial network, the propagation speed of the underwater acoustic network is 1500 m/s, which makes the design of the underwater acoustic network MAC protocols a big challenge. In accordance with multichannel MAC protocols, data packets and control packets are transferred through different channels, which lowers the adverse effect of acoustic network and gradually becomes the popular issues of underwater acoustic networks MAC protocol research. In this paper, we proposed a control packet collision avoidance algorithm utilizing time-frequency masking to deal with the control packets collision in the control channel. This algorithm is based on the scarcity of the noncoherent underwater acoustic communication signals, which regards collision avoiding as separation of the mixtures of communication signals from different nodes. We first measure the W-Disjoint Orthogonality of the MFSK signals and the simulation result demonstrates that there exists time-frequency mask which can separate the source signals from the mixture of the communication signals. Then we present a pairwise hydrophones separation system based on deep networks and the location information of the nodes. Consequently, the time-frequency mask can be estimated.

  10. An Underwater Image Enhancement Algorithm for Environment Recognition and Robot Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Xie

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available There are many tasks that require clear and easily recognizable images in the field of underwater robotics and marine science, such as underwater target detection and identification of robot navigation and obstacle avoidance. However, water turbidity makes the underwater image quality too low to recognize. This paper proposes the use of the dark channel prior model for underwater environment recognition, in which underwater reflection models are used to obtain enhanced images. The proposed approach achieves very good performance and multi-scene robustness by combining the dark channel prior model with the underwater diffuse model. The experimental results are given to show the effectiveness of the dark channel prior model in underwater scenarios.

  11. Validation of High-Fidelity CFD/CAA Framework for Launch Vehicle Acoustic Environment Simulation against Scale Model Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liever, Peter A.; West, Jeffrey S.; Harris, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Aero-Acoustics (CFD/CAA) modeling framework has been developed for launch vehicle liftoff acoustic environment predictions. The framework couples the existing highly-scalable NASA production CFD code, Loci/CHEM, with a high-order accurate Discontinuous Galerkin solver developed in the same production framework, Loci/THRUST, to accurately resolve and propagate acoustic physics across the entire launch environment. Time-accurate, Hybrid RANS/LES CFD modeling is applied for predicting the acoustic generation physics at the plume source, and a high-order accurate unstructured mesh Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method is employed to propagate acoustic waves away from the source across large distances using high-order accurate schemes. The DG solver is capable of solving 2nd, 3rd, and 4th order Euler solutions for non-linear, conservative acoustic field propagation. Initial application testing and validation has been carried out against high resolution acoustic data from the Ares Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) series to evaluate the capabilities and production readiness of the CFD/CAA system to resolve the observed spectrum of acoustic frequency content. This paper presents results from this validation and outlines efforts to mature and improve the computational simulation framework.

  12. Numerical modelling of the structure of electromagnetic disturbances generated by acoustic-gravity waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogorel'tsev, A.I.; Bidlingmajer, E.R.

    1992-01-01

    A numeric model of electromagnetic field disturbances generated under the interaction of acoustic-gravitational waves with ionospheric plasma is elaborated and vertical structure of the above disturbances is calculated. The estimates shown that electromagnetic disturbances can penetrate into neutral atmosphere and can be recorded through measurements of the variation of magnetic field and electron field vertical component near the earth is surface. A conclusion is made on a feasibility of monitoring of acoustic-gravitational wave activity in the lower thermosphere through land measurements of magnetic and electric field variations

  13. Adaptation of acoustic model experiments of STM via smartphones and tablets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thees, Michael; Hochberg, Katrin; Kuhn, Jochen; Aeschlimann, Martin

    2017-10-01

    The importance of Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) in today's research and industry leads to the question of how to include such a key technology in physics education. Manfred Euler has developed an acoustic model experiment to illustrate the fundamental measuring principles based on an analogy between quantum mechanics and acoustics. Based on earlier work we applied mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets instead of using a computer to record and display the experimental data and thus converted Euler's experimental setup into a low-cost experiment that is easy to build and handle by students themselves.

  14. Thin Fresnel zone plate lenses for focusing underwater sound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, David C., E-mail: david.calvo@nrl.navy.mil; Thangawng, Abel L.; Nicholas, Michael; Layman, Christopher N. [Acoustics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2015-07-06

    A Fresnel zone plate (FZP) lens of the Soret type creates a focus by constructive interference of waves diffracted through open annular zones in an opaque screen. For underwater sound below MHz frequencies, a large FZP that blocks sound using high-impedance, dense materials would have practical disadvantages. We experimentally and numerically investigate an alternative approach of creating a FZP with thin (0.4λ) acoustically opaque zones made of soft silicone rubber foam attached to a thin (0.1λ) transparent rubber substrate. An ultra-thin (0.0068λ) FZP that achieves higher gain is also proposed and simulated which uses low-volume fraction, bubble-like resonant air ring cavities to construct opaque zones. Laboratory measurements at 200 kHz indicate that the rubber foam can be accurately modeled as a lossy fluid with an acoustic impedance approximately 1/10 that of water. Measured focal gains up to 20 dB agree with theoretical predictions for normal and oblique incidence. The measured focal radius of 0.68λ (peak-to-null) agrees with the Rayleigh diffraction limit prediction of 0.61 λ/NA (NA = 0.88) for a low-aberration lens.

  15. Thin Fresnel zone plate lenses for focusing underwater sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, David C.; Thangawng, Abel L.; Nicholas, Michael; Layman, Christopher N.

    2015-07-01

    A Fresnel zone plate (FZP) lens of the Soret type creates a focus by constructive interference of waves diffracted through open annular zones in an opaque screen. For underwater sound below MHz frequencies, a large FZP that blocks sound using high-impedance, dense materials would have practical disadvantages. We experimentally and numerically investigate an alternative approach of creating a FZP with thin (0.4λ) acoustically opaque zones made of soft silicone rubber foam attached to a thin (0.1λ) transparent rubber substrate. An ultra-thin (0.0068λ) FZP that achieves higher gain is also proposed and simulated which uses low-volume fraction, bubble-like resonant air ring cavities to construct opaque zones. Laboratory measurements at 200 kHz indicate that the rubber foam can be accurately modeled as a lossy fluid with an acoustic impedance approximately 1/10 that of water. Measured focal gains up to 20 dB agree with theoretical predictions for normal and oblique incidence. The measured focal radius of 0.68λ (peak-to-null) agrees with the Rayleigh diffraction limit prediction of 0.61 λ/NA (NA = 0.88) for a low-aberration lens.

  16. Thin Fresnel zone plate lenses for focusing underwater sound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo, David C.; Thangawng, Abel L.; Nicholas, Michael; Layman, Christopher N.

    2015-01-01

    A Fresnel zone plate (FZP) lens of the Soret type creates a focus by constructive interference of waves diffracted through open annular zones in an opaque screen. For underwater sound below MHz frequencies, a large FZP that blocks sound using high-impedance, dense materials would have practical disadvantages. We experimentally and numerically investigate an alternative approach of creating a FZP with thin (0.4λ) acoustically opaque zones made of soft silicone rubber foam attached to a thin (0.1λ) transparent rubber substrate. An ultra-thin (0.0068λ) FZP that achieves higher gain is also proposed and simulated which uses low-volume fraction, bubble-like resonant air ring cavities to construct opaque zones. Laboratory measurements at 200 kHz indicate that the rubber foam can be accurately modeled as a lossy fluid with an acoustic impedance approximately 1/10 that of water. Measured focal gains up to 20 dB agree with theoretical predictions for normal and oblique incidence. The measured focal radius of 0.68λ (peak-to-null) agrees with the Rayleigh diffraction limit prediction of 0.61 λ/NA (NA = 0.88) for a low-aberration lens

  17. Acoustical Measurement and Biot Model for Coral Reef Detection and Quantification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry M. Manik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coral reefs are coastal resources and very useful for marine ecosystems. Nowadays, the existence of coral reefs is seriously threatened due to the activities of blast fishing, coral mining, marine sedimentation, pollution, and global climate change. To determine the existence of coral reefs, it is necessary to study them comprehensively. One method to study a coral reef by using a propagation of sound waves is proposed. In this research, the measurement of reflection coefficient, transmission coefficient, acoustic backscattering, hardness, and roughness of coral reefs has been conducted using acoustic instruments and numerical modeling using Biot theory. The results showed that the quantification of the acoustic backscatter can classify the type of coral reef.

  18. Accounting for false-positive acoustic detections of bats using occupancy models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Matthew J.; Rodhouse, Thomas J.; Ormsbee, Patricia C.; Szewczak, Joseph M.; Nichols, James D.

    2014-01-01

    1. Acoustic surveys have become a common survey method for bats and other vocal taxa. Previous work shows that bat echolocation may be misidentified, but common analytic methods, such as occupancy models, assume that misidentifications do not occur. Unless rare, such misidentifications could lead to incorrect inferences with significant management implications.

  19. Improving Robustness of Deep Neural Network Acoustic Models via Speech Separation and Joint Adaptive Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Arun; Wang, DeLiang

    2015-01-01

    Although deep neural network (DNN) acoustic models are known to be inherently noise robust, especially with matched training and testing data, the use of speech separation as a frontend and for deriving alternative feature representations has been shown to improve performance in challenging environments. We first present a supervised speech separation system that significantly improves automatic speech recognition (ASR) performance in realistic noise conditions. The system performs separation via ratio time-frequency masking; the ideal ratio mask (IRM) is estimated using DNNs. We then propose a framework that unifies separation and acoustic modeling via joint adaptive training. Since the modules for acoustic modeling and speech separation are implemented using DNNs, unification is done by introducing additional hidden layers with fixed weights and appropriate network architecture. On the CHiME-2 medium-large vocabulary ASR task, and with log mel spectral features as input to the acoustic model, an independently trained ratio masking frontend improves word error rates by 10.9% (relative) compared to the noisy baseline. In comparison, the jointly trained system improves performance by 14.4%. We also experiment with alternative feature representations to augment the standard log mel features, like the noise and speech estimates obtained from the separation module, and the standard feature set used for IRM estimation. Our best system obtains a word error rate of 15.4% (absolute), an improvement of 4.6 percentage points over the next best result on this corpus.

  20. A Multi-Model Reduction Technique for Optimization of Coupled Structural-Acoustic Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Creixell Mediante, Ester; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Brunskog, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Finite Element models of structural-acoustic coupled systems can become very large for complex structures with multiple connected parts. Optimization of the performance of the structure based on harmonic analysis of the system requires solving the coupled problem iteratively and for several...

  1. Modeling nonlinear acoustic waves in media with inhomogeneities in the coefficient of nonlinearity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demi, L.; Verweij, M.D.; Van Dongen, K.W.A.

    2010-01-01

    The refraction and scattering of nonlinear acoustic waves play an important role in the realistic application of medical ultrasound. One cause of these effects is the tissue dependence of the nonlinear medium behavior. A method that is able to model those effects is essential for the design of

  2. An efficient numerical target strength prediction model: Validation against analysis solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fillinger, L.; Nijhof, M.J.J.; Jong, C.A.F. de

    2014-01-01

    A decade ago, TNO developed RASP (Rapid Acoustic Signature Prediction), a numerical model for the prediction of the target strength of immersed underwater objects. The model is based on Kirchhoff diffraction theory. It is currently being improved to model refraction, angle dependent reflection and

  3. A speech processing study using an acoustic model of a multiple-channel cochlear implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying

    1998-10-01

    A cochlear implant is an electronic device designed to provide sound information for adults and children who have bilateral profound hearing loss. The task of representing speech signals as electrical stimuli is central to the design and performance of cochlear implants. Studies have shown that the current speech- processing strategies provide significant benefits to cochlear implant users. However, the evaluation and development of speech-processing strategies have been complicated by hardware limitations and large variability in user performance. To alleviate these problems, an acoustic model of a cochlear implant with the SPEAK strategy is implemented in this study, in which a set of acoustic stimuli whose psychophysical characteristics are as close as possible to those produced by a cochlear implant are presented on normal-hearing subjects. To test the effectiveness and feasibility of this acoustic model, a psychophysical experiment was conducted to match the performance of a normal-hearing listener using model- processed signals to that of a cochlear implant user. Good agreement was found between an implanted patient and an age-matched normal-hearing subject in a dynamic signal discrimination experiment, indicating that this acoustic model is a reasonably good approximation of a cochlear implant with the SPEAK strategy. The acoustic model was then used to examine the potential of the SPEAK strategy in terms of its temporal and frequency encoding of speech. It was hypothesized that better temporal and frequency encoding of speech can be accomplished by higher stimulation rates and a larger number of activated channels. Vowel and consonant recognition tests were conducted on normal-hearing subjects using speech tokens processed by the acoustic model, with different combinations of stimulation rate and number of activated channels. The results showed that vowel recognition was best at 600 pps and 8 activated channels, but further increases in stimulation rate and

  4. Visual-adaptation-mechanism based underwater object extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Wang, Huibin; Xu, Lizhong; Shen, Jie

    2014-03-01

    Due to the major obstacles originating from the strong light absorption and scattering in a dynamic underwater environment, underwater optical information acquisition and processing suffer from effects such as limited range, non-uniform lighting, low contrast, and diminished colors, causing it to become the bottleneck for marine scientific research and projects. After studying and generalizing the underwater biological visual mechanism, we explore its advantages in light adaption which helps animals to precisely sense the underwater scene and recognize their prey or enemies. Then, aiming to transform the significant advantage of the visual adaptation mechanism into underwater computer vision tasks, a novel knowledge-based information weighting fusion model is established for underwater object extraction. With this bionic model, the dynamical adaptability is given to the underwater object extraction task, making them more robust to the variability of the optical properties in different environments. The capability of the proposed method to adapt to the underwater optical environments is shown, and its outperformance for the object extraction is demonstrated by comparison experiments.

  5. Design of acoustic trim based on geometric modeling and flow simulation for non-woven

    OpenAIRE

    Schladitz, K.; Peters, S.; Reinel-Bitzer, D.; Wiegmann, A.; Ohser, J.

    2005-01-01

    In order to optimize the acoustic properties of a stacked fiber non-woven, the microstructure of the non-woven is modeled by a macroscopically homogeneous random system of straight cylinders (tubes). That is, the fibers are modeled by a spatially stationary random system of lines (Poisson line process), dilated by a sphere. Pressing the non-woven causes anisotropy. In our model, this anisotropy is described by a one parametric distribution of the direction of the fibers. In the present applic...

  6. "Boxnep" advanced modular underwater robot

    OpenAIRE

    Buluev, Ilia

    2016-01-01

    The article discusses the relevance of the underwater vehicles' ability to solve a wide range of problems. The idea put in the basis of this research is designing a modular underwater robot. It allows to mount various equipment and test it in underwater environment. The paper deals with the concept of the robot and its characteristics.

  7. Resources for Underwater Robotics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Michael L.; Freitas, William M.

    2016-01-01

    4-H clubs can build and program underwater robots from raw materials. An annotated resource list for engaging youth in building underwater remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) is provided. This article is a companion piece to the Research in Brief article "Building Teen Futures with Underwater Robotics" in this issue of the "Journal of…

  8. A Numerical Model of an Acoustic Metamaterial Using the Boundary Element Method Including Viscous and Thermal Losses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Andersen, Peter Risby; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, boundary element method (BEM) and finite element method (FEM) implementations of acoustics in fluids with viscous and thermal losses have been developed. They are based on the linearized Navier–Stokes equations with no flow. In this paper, such models with acoustic losses are app...

  9. A partial hearing animal model for chronic electro-acoustic stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, S.; Wise, A. K.; Millard, R. E.; Shepherd, R. K.; Fallon, J. B.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Cochlear implants (CIs) have provided some auditory function to hundreds of thousands of people around the world. Although traditionally carried out only in profoundly deaf patients, the eligibility criteria for implantation have recently been relaxed to include many partially-deaf patients with useful levels of hearing. These patients receive both electrical stimulation from their implant and acoustic stimulation via their residual hearing (electro-acoustic stimulation; EAS) and perform very well. It is unclear how EAS improves speech perception over electrical stimulation alone, and little evidence exists about the nature of the interactions between electric and acoustic stimuli. Furthermore, clinical results suggest that some patients that undergo cochlear implantation lose some, if not all, of their residual hearing, reducing the advantages of EAS over electrical stimulation alone. A reliable animal model with clinically-relevant partial deafness combined with clinical CIs is important to enable these issues to be studied. This paper outlines such a model that has been successfully used in our laboratory. Approach. This paper outlines a battery of techniques used in our laboratory to generate, validate and examine an animal model of partial deafness and chronic CI use. Main results. Ototoxic deafening produced bilaterally symmetrical hearing thresholds in neonatal and adult animals. Electrical activation of the auditory system was confirmed, and all animals were chronically stimulated via adapted clinical CIs. Acoustic compound action potentials (CAPs) were obtained from partially-hearing cochleae, using the CI amplifier. Immunohistochemical analysis allows the effects of deafness and electrical stimulation on cell survival to be studied. Significance. This animal model has applications in EAS research, including investigating the functional interactions between electric and acoustic stimulation, and the development of techniques to maintain residual

  10. Underwater Broadband Source Localization Based on Modal Filtering and Features Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Fattaccioli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Passive source localization is a crucial issue in underwater acoustics. In this paper, we focus on shallow water environment (0 to 400 m and broadband Ultra-Low Frequency acoustic sources (1 to 100 Hz. In this configuration and at a long range, the acoustic propagation can be described by normal mode theory. The propagating signal breaks up into a series of depth-dependent modes. These modes carry information about the source position. Mode excitation factors and mode phases analysis allow, respectively, localization in depth and distance. We propose two different approaches to achieve the localization: multidimensional approach (using a horizontal array of hydrophones based on frequency-wavenumber transform (F-K method and monodimensional approach (using a single hydrophone based on adapted spectral representation (FTa method. For both approaches, we propose first complete tools for modal filtering, and then depth and distance estimators. We show that adding mode sign and source spectrum informations improves considerably the localization performance in depth. The reference acoustic field needed for depth localization is simulated with the new realistic propagation modelMoctesuma. The feasibility of both approaches, F-K and FTa, are validated on data simulated in shallow water for different configurations. The performance of localization, in depth and distance, is very satisfactory.

  11. Underwater Broadband Source Localization Based on Modal Filtering and Features Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristol Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Passive source localization is a crucial issue in underwater acoustics. In this paper, we focus on shallow water environment (0 to 400 m and broadband Ultra-Low Frequency acoustic sources (1 to 100 Hz. In this configuration and at a long range, the acoustic propagation can be described by normal mode theory. The propagating signal breaks up into a series of depth-dependent modes. These modes carry information about the source position. Mode excitation factors and mode phases analysis allow, respectively, localization in depth and distance. We propose two different approaches to achieve the localization: multidimensional approach (using a horizontal array of hydrophones based on frequency-wavenumber transform ( method and monodimensional approach (using a single hydrophone based on adapted spectral representation ( method. For both approaches, we propose first complete tools for modal filtering, and then depth and distance estimators. We show that adding mode sign and source spectrum informations improves considerably the localization performance in depth. The reference acoustic field needed for depth localization is simulated with the new realistic propagation modelMoctesuma. The feasibility of both approaches, and , are validated on data simulated in shallow water for different configurations. The performance of localization, in depth and distance, is very satisfactory.

  12. Passive Acoustic Leak Detection for Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors Using Hidden Markov Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marklund, A. Riber; Kishore, S.; Prakash, V.; Rajan, K. K.; Michel, F.

    2016-06-01

    Acoustic leak detection for steam generators of sodium fast reactors have been an active research topic since the early 1970s and several methods have been tested over the years. Inspired by its success in the field of automatic speech recognition, we here apply hidden Markov models (HMM) in combination with Gaussian mixture models (GMM) to the problem. To achieve this, we propose a new feature calculation scheme, based on the temporal evolution of the power spectral density (PSD) of the signal. Using acoustic signals recorded during steam/water injection experiments done at the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), the proposed method is tested. We perform parametric studies on the HMM+GMM model size and demonstrate that the proposed method a) performs well without a priori knowledge of injection noise, b) can incorporate several noise models and c) has an output distribution that simplifies false alarm rate control.

  13. Passive acoustic leak detection for sodium cooled fast reactors using hidden Markov models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riber Marklund, A. [CEA, Cadarache, DEN/DTN/STCP/LIET, Batiment 202, 13108 St Paul-lez-Durance, (France); Kishore, S. [Fast Reactor Technology Group of IGCAR, (India); Prakash, V. [Vibrations Diagnostics Division, Fast Reactor Technology Group of IGCAR, (India); Rajan, K.K. [Fast Reactor Technology Group and Engineering Services Group of IGCAR, (India)

    2015-07-01

    Acoustic leak detection for steam generators of sodium fast reactors have been an active research topic since the early 1970's and several methods have been tested over the years. Inspired by its success in the field of automatic speech recognition, we here apply hidden Markov models (HMM) in combination with Gaussian mixture models (GMM) to the problem. To achieve this, we propose a new feature calculation scheme, based on the temporal evolution of the power spectral density (PSD) of the signal. Using acoustic signals recorded during steam/water injection experiments done at the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), the proposed method is tested. We perform parametric studies on the HMM+GMM model size and demonstrate that the proposed method a) performs well without a priori knowledge of injection noise, b) can incorporate several noise models and c) has an output distribution that simplifies false alarm rate control. (authors)

  14. Hydrogel microphones for stealthy underwater listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Song, Jingfeng; Li, Shumin; Elowsky, Christian; Zhou, You; Ducharme, Stephen; Chen, Yong Mei; Zhou, Qin; Tan, Li

    2016-08-01

    Exploring the abundant resources in the ocean requires underwater acoustic detectors with a high-sensitivity reception of low-frequency sound from greater distances and zero reflections. Here we address both challenges by integrating an easily deformable network of metal nanoparticles in a hydrogel matrix for use as a cavity-free microphone. Since metal nanoparticles can be densely implanted as inclusions, and can even be arranged in coherent arrays, this microphone can detect static loads and air breezes from different angles, as well as underwater acoustic signals from 20 Hz to 3 kHz at amplitudes as low as 4 Pa. Unlike dielectric capacitors or cavity-based microphones that respond to stimuli by deforming the device in thickness directions, this hydrogel device responds with a transient modulation of electric double layers, resulting in an extraordinary sensitivity (217 nF kPa-1 or 24 μC N-1 at a bias of 1.0 V) without using any signal amplification tools.

  15. Underwater noise levels in UK waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Nathan D; Brookes, Kate L; Faulkner, Rebecca C; Bicknell, Anthony W J; Godley, Brendan J; Witt, Matthew J

    2016-11-10

    Underwater noise from human activities appears to be rising, with ramifications for acoustically sensitive marine organisms and the functioning of marine ecosystems. Policymakers are beginning to address the risk of ecological impact, but are constrained by a lack of data on current and historic noise levels. Here, we present the first nationally coordinated effort to quantify underwater noise levels, in support of UK policy objectives under the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). Field measurements were made during 2013-2014 at twelve sites around the UK. Median noise levels ranged from 81.5-95.5 dB re 1 μPa for one-third octave bands from 63-500 Hz. Noise exposure varied considerably, with little anthropogenic influence at the Celtic Sea site, to several North Sea sites with persistent vessel noise. Comparison of acoustic metrics found that the RMS level (conventionally used to represent the mean) was highly skewed by outliers, exceeding the 97 th percentile at some frequencies. We conclude that environmental indicators of anthropogenic noise should instead use percentiles, to ensure statistical robustness. Power analysis indicated that at least three decades of continuous monitoring would be required to detect trends of similar magnitude to historic rises in noise levels observed in the Northeast Pacific.

  16. Acoustic wave simulation using an overset grid for the global monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushida, N.; Le Bras, R.

    2017-12-01

    The International Monitoring System of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) has been monitoring hydro-acoustic and infrasound waves over the globe. Because of the complex natures of the oceans and the atmosphere, computer simulation can play an important role in understanding the observed signals. In this regard, methods which depend on partial differential equations and require minimum modelling, are preferable. So far, to our best knowledge, acoustic wave propagation simulations based on partial differential equations on such a large scale have not been performed (pp 147 - 161 of ref [1], [2]). The main difficulties in building such simulation codes are: (1) considering the inhomogeneity of medium including background flows, (2) high aspect ratio of computational domain, (3) stability during long time integration. To overcome these difficulties, we employ a two-dimensional finite different (FDM) scheme on spherical coordinates with the Yin-Yang overset grid[3] solving the governing equation of acoustic waves introduces by Ostashev et. al.[4]. The comparison with real recording examples in hydro-acoustic will be presented at the conference. [1] Paul C. Etter: Underwater Acoustic Modeling and Simulation, Fourth Edition, CRC Press, 2013. [2] LIAN WANG et. al.: REVIEW OF UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC PROPAGATION MODELS, NPL Report AC 12, 2014. [3] A. Kageyama and T. Sato: "Yin-Yang grid": An overset grid in spherical geometry, Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 5, Q09005, 2004. [4] Vladimir E. Ostashev et. al: Equations for finite-difference, time-domain simulation of sound propagation in moving inhomogeneous media and numerical implementation, Acoustical Society of America. DOI: 10.1121/1.1841531, 2005.

  17. A Survey of Routing Issues and Associated Protocols in Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Khalid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Underwater wireless sensor networks are a newly emerging wireless technology in which small size sensors with limited energy and limited memory and bandwidth are deployed in deep sea water and various monitoring operations like tactical surveillance, environmental monitoring, and data collection are performed through these tiny sensors. Underwater wireless sensor networks are used for the exploration of underwater resources, oceanographic data collection, flood or disaster prevention, tactical surveillance systems, and unmanned underwater vehicles. Sensor nodes consist of a small memory, a central processing unit, and an antenna. Underwater networks are much different from terrestrial sensor networks as radio waves cannot be used in underwater wireless sensor networks. Acoustic channels are used for communication in deep sea water. Acoustic signals have many limitations, such as limited bandwidth, higher end-to-end delay, network path loss, higher propagation delay, and dynamic topology. Usually, these limitations result in higher energy consumption with a smaller number of packets delivered. The main aim nowadays is to operate sensor nodes having a smaller battery for a longer time in the network. This survey has discussed the state-of-the-art localization based and localization-free routing protocols. Routing associated issues in the area of underwater wireless sensor networks have also been discussed.

  18. Modeling the thermo-acoustic effects of thermal-dependent speed of sound and acoustic absorption of biological tissues during focused ultrasound hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Haro, S A; Gutiérrez, M I; Vera, A; Leija, L

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the effects of thermal dependence of speed of sound (SOS) and acoustic absorption of biological tissues during noninvasive focused ultrasound (US) hyperthermia therapy. A finite element (FE) model was used to simulate hyperthermia therapy in the liver by noninvasive focused US. The model consisted of an ultrasonic focused transducer radiating a four-layer biological medium composed of skin, fat, muscle, and liver. The acoustic field and temperature distribution along the layers were obtained after 15 s of hyperthermia therapy using the bio-heat equation. The model solution was found with and without the thermal dependence of SOS and acoustic absorption of biological tissues. The inclusion of the thermal dependence of the SOS generated an increment of 0.4 mm in the longitudinal focus axis of the acoustic field. Moreover, results indicate an increment of the hyperthermia area (zone with temperature above 43 °C), and a maximum temperature difference of almost 3.5 °C when the thermal dependence of absorption was taken into account. The increment of the achieved temperatures at the treatment zone indicated that the effects produced by the thermal dependence of SOS and absorption must be accounted for when planning hyperthermia treatment in order to avoid overheating undesired regions.

  19. Development of a pressure based room acoustic model using impedance descriptions of surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marbjerg, Gerd Høy; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2013-01-01

    and acoustic radiosity will account for the diffuse reflections. This paper presents the motivation for the new model in the form of results in literature, which show the importance of retaining the angle dependence and phase information in reflections along with simple examples of angle dependent reflection......If a simulation tool is to be used for the optimization of absorbent ceilings, it is important that the simulation tool includes a good description of the surface. This study therefore aims at developing a model which can describe surfaces by their impedance values and not just by their statistical...... absorption coefficient, thus retaining the phase and the angle dependence. The approach of the proposed model will be to calculate the pressure impulse response using a combination of the image source method and acoustic radiosity. The image source method will account for the specular reflections...

  20. Effects of anticancer drugs on glia-glioma brain tumor model characterized by acoustic impedance microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soon, Thomas Tiong Kwong; Chean, Tan Wei; Yamada, Hikari; Takahashi, Kenta; Hozumi, Naohiro; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yoshida, Sachiko

    2017-07-01

    An ultrasonic microscope is a useful tool for observing living tissue without chemical fixation or histochemical processing. Two-dimensional (2D) acoustic impedance microscopy developed in our previous study for living cell observation was employed to visualize intracellular changes. We proposed a brain tumor model by cocultivating rat glial cells and C6 gliomas to quantitatively analyze the effects of two types of anticancer drugs, cytochalasin B (CyB) and temozolomide (TMZ), when they were applied. We reported that CyB treatment (25 µg/ml, T = 90 min) significantly reduced the acoustic impedance of gliomas and has little effect on glial cells. Meanwhile, TMZ treatment (2 mg/ml, T = 90 min) impacted both cells equally, in which both cells’ acoustic impedances were decreased. As CyB targets the actin filament polymerization of the cells, we have concluded that the decrease in acoustic impedance was in fact due to actin filament depolymerization and the data can be quantitatively assessed for future studies in novel drug development.

  1. Investigation of turbocharger compressor surge inception by means of an acoustic two-port model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabral, R.; Åbom, M.

    2018-01-01

    The use of centrifugal compressors have increased tremendously in the last decade being implemented in the modern IC engine design as a key component. However, an efficient implementation is restricted by the compression system surge phenomenon. The focus in the investigation of surge inception have mainly been on the aerodynamic field while neglecting the acoustic field. In the present work a new method based on the full acoustic 2-port model is proposed for investigation of centrifugal compressor stall and surge inception. Essentially, the compressor is acoustically decoupled from the compression system, hence enabling the determination of sound generation and the quantification of internal aero-acoustic coupling effects, both independently of the connected pipe system. These frequency dependent quantities are indicating if the compressor is prone to self-sustained oscillations in case of positive feedback when installed in a system. The method is demonstrated on experimentally determined 2-port data of an automotive turbocharger centrifugal compressor under a variety of realistic operating conditions.

  2. Acoustic modelling and simulation of next generation torpedoes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schippers, P.; Benders, F.P.A.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1987 sonar performance modelling is developed at TNO Physics and Electronics Laboratory. This is based on propagation modelling in a given environment together with modelling of the sonar based on its specific parameters. Beam forming, pulse type and signal processing are taken into account.

  3. The Box Model and the Acoustic Sounder, a Case Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Otto; Lundtang Petersen, Erik

    1979-01-01

    Concentrations of SO2 in a large city during a subsidence situation are predicted as a function of time by means of a simple box model and the predictions are compared to actual SO2 concentration measurements. The agreement between model results and measurements is found to be excellent. The model...

  4. Empirical angle-dependent Biot and MBA models for acoustic anisotropy in cancellous bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kang ll; Hughes, E R; Humphrey, V F; Leighton, T G; Choi, Min Joo

    2007-01-01

    The Biot and the modified Biot-Attenborough (MBA) models have been found useful to understand ultrasonic wave propagation in cancellous bone. However, neither of the models, as previously applied to cancellous bone, allows for the angular dependence of acoustic properties with direction. The present study aims to account for the acoustic anisotropy in cancellous bone, by introducing empirical angle-dependent input parameters, as defined for a highly oriented structure, into the Biot and the MBA models. The anisotropy of the angle-dependent Biot model is attributed to the variation in the elastic moduli of the skeletal frame with respect to the trabecular alignment. The angle-dependent MBA model employs a simple empirical way of using the parametric fit for the fast and the slow wave speeds. The angle-dependent models were used to predict both the fast and slow wave velocities as a function of propagation angle with respect to the trabecular alignment of cancellous bone. The predictions were compared with those of the Schoenberg model for anisotropy in cancellous bone and in vitro experimental measurements from the literature. The angle-dependent models successfully predicted the angular dependence of phase velocity of the fast wave with direction. The root-mean-square errors of the measured versus predicted fast wave velocities were 79.2 m s -1 (angle-dependent Biot model) and 36.1 m s -1 (angle-dependent MBA model). They also predicted the fact that the slow wave is nearly independent of propagation angle for angles about 50 0 , but consistently underestimated the slow wave velocity with the root-mean-square errors of 187.2 m s -1 (angle-dependent Biot model) and 240.8 m s -1 (angle-dependent MBA model). The study indicates that the angle-dependent models reasonably replicate the acoustic anisotropy in cancellous bone

  5. Modelling Acoustic Wave Propagation in Axisymmetric Varying-Radius Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David; Willatzen, Morten

    2008-01-01

    A computationally fast and accurate model (a set of coupled ordinary differential equations) for fluid sound-wave propagation in infinite axisymmetric waveguides of varying radius is proposed. The model accounts for fluid heat conduction and fluid irrotational viscosity. The model problem is solved...... by expanding solutions in terms of cross-sectional eigenfunctions following Stevenson’s method. A transfer matrix can be easily constructed from simple model responses of a given waveguide and later used in computing the response to any complex wave input. Energy losses due to heat conduction and viscous...

  6. The PAC-MAN model: Benchmark case for linear acoustics in computational physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegelwanger, Harald; Reiter, Paul

    2017-10-01

    Benchmark cases in the field of computational physics, on the one hand, have to contain a certain complexity to test numerical edge cases and, on the other hand, require the existence of an analytical solution, because an analytical solution allows the exact quantification of the accuracy of a numerical simulation method. This dilemma causes a need for analytical sound field formulations of complex acoustic problems. A well known example for such a benchmark case for harmonic linear acoustics is the ;Cat's Eye model;, which describes the three-dimensional sound field radiated from a sphere with a missing octant analytically. In this paper, a benchmark case for two-dimensional (2D) harmonic linear acoustic problems, viz., the ;PAC-MAN model;, is proposed. The PAC-MAN model describes the radiated and scattered sound field around an infinitely long cylinder with a cut out sector of variable angular width. While the analytical calculation of the 2D sound field allows different angular cut-out widths and arbitrarily positioned line sources, the computational cost associated with the solution of this problem is similar to a 1D problem because of a modal formulation of the sound field in the PAC-MAN model.

  7. Acoustical transmission-line model of the middle-ear cavities and mastoid air cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Douglas H

    2015-04-01

    An acoustical transmission line model of the middle-ear cavities and mastoid air cell system (MACS) was constructed for the adult human middle ear with normal function. The air-filled cavities comprised the tympanic cavity, aditus, antrum, and MACS. A binary symmetrical airway branching model of the MACS was constructed using an optimization procedure to match the average total volume and surface area of human temporal bones. The acoustical input impedance of the MACS was calculated using a recursive procedure, and used to predict the input impedance of the middle-ear cavities at the location of the tympanic membrane. The model also calculated the ratio of the acoustical pressure in the antrum to the pressure in the middle-ear cavities at the location of the tympanic membrane. The predicted responses were sensitive to the magnitude of the viscothermal losses within the MACS. These predicted input impedance and pressure ratio functions explained the presence of multiple resonances reported in published data, which were not explained by existing MACS models.

  8. Review and analysis of the DNW/Model 360 rotor acoustic data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinner, R. A.; Boxwell, D. A.; Spencer, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    A comprehensive model rotor aeroacoustic data base was collected in a large anechoic wind tunnel in 1986. Twenty-six microphones were positioned around the azimuth to collect acoustic data for approximately 150 different test conditions. A dynamically scaled, blade-pressure-instrumented model of the forward rotor of the BH360 helicopter simultaneously provided blade pressures for correlation with the acoustic data. High-speed impulsive noise, blade-vortex interaction noise, low-frequency noise, and broadband noise were all captured in this extensive data base. Trends are presentes for each noise source, with important parametric variations. The purpose of this paper is to introduce this data base and illustrate its potential for predictive code validation.

  9. TWO-STEP ALGORITHM OF TRAINING INITIALIZATION FOR ACOUSTIC MODELS BASED ON DEEP NEURAL NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Medennikov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a two-step initialization algorithm for training of acoustic models based on deep neural networks. The algorithm is focused on reducing the impact of the non-speech segments on the acoustic model training. The idea of the proposed algorithm is to reduce the percentage of non-speech examples in the training set. Effectiveness evaluation of the algorithm has been carried out on the example of English spontaneous telephone speech recognition (Switchboard. The application of the proposed algorithm has led to 3% relative word error rate reduction, compared with the training initialization by restricted Boltzmann machines. The results presented in the paper can be applied in the development of automatic speech recognition systems.

  10. Computational spectrotemporal auditory model with applications to acoustical information processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Tai-Shih

    A computational spectrotemporal auditory model based on neurophysiological findings in early auditory and cortical stages is described. The model provides a unified multiresolution representation of the spectral and temporal features of sound likely critical in the perception of timbre. Several types of complex stimuli are used to demonstrate the spectrotemporal information preserved by the model. Shown by these examples, this two stage model reflects the apparent progressive loss of temporal dynamics along the auditory pathway from the rapid phase-locking (several kHz in auditory nerve), to moderate rates of synchrony (several hundred Hz in midbrain), to much lower rates of modulations in the cortex (around 30 Hz). To complete this model, several projection-based reconstruction algorithms are implemented to resynthesize the sound from the representations with reduced dynamics. One particular application of this model is to assess speech intelligibility. The spectro-temporal Modulation Transfer Functions (MTF) of this model is investigated and shown to be consistent with the salient trends in the human MTFs (derived from human detection thresholds) which exhibit a lowpass function with respect to both spectral and temporal dimensions, with 50% bandwidths of about 16 Hz and 2 cycles/octave. Therefore, the model is used to demonstrate the potential relevance of these MTFs to the assessment of speech intelligibility in noise and reverberant conditions. Another useful feature is the phase singularity emerged in the scale space generated by this multiscale auditory model. The singularity is shown to have certain robust properties and carry the crucial information about the spectral profile. Such claim is justified by perceptually tolerable resynthesized sounds from the nonconvex singularity set. In addition, the singularity set is demonstrated to encode the pitch and formants at different scales. These properties make the singularity set very suitable for traditional

  11. Simulation of wave propagation inside a human eye: acoustic eye model (AEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Požar, T.; Halilovič, M.; Horvat, D.; Petkovšek, R.

    2018-02-01

    The design and development of the acoustic eye model (AEM) is reported. The model consists of a computer-based simulation that describes the propagation of mechanical disturbance inside a simplified model of a human eye. The capabilities of the model are illustrated with examples, using different laser-induced initial loading conditions in different geometrical configurations typically occurring in ophthalmic medical procedures. The potential of the AEM is to predict the mechanical response of the treated eye tissue in advance, thus complementing other preliminary procedures preceding medical treatments.

  12. A 3-D elasticity theory based model for acoustic radiation from multilayered anisotropic plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, C; Xin, F X; Lu, T J

    2014-05-01

    A theoretical model built upon three-dimensional elasticity theory is developed to investigate the acoustic radiation from multilayered anisotropic plates subjected to a harmonic point force excitation. Fourier transform technique and stationary phase method are combined to predict the far-field radiated sound pressure of one-side water immersed plate. Compared to equivalent single-layer plate models, the present model based on elasticity theory can differentiate radiated sound pressure between dry-side and wet-side excited cases, as well as discrepancies induced by different layer sequences for multilayered anisotropic plates. These results highlight the superiority of the present theoretical model especially for handling multilayered anisotropic structures.

  13. Underwater iceberg geometry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buckley, T. J

    1985-01-01

    ... basis for estimation iceberg draft. Factors affecting performance of an acoustic iceberg mapping system including frequency versus range and resolution, angle of incidence and beam bendering are investigated...

  14. The Improved Kriging Interpolation Algorithm for Local Underwater Terrain Based on Fractal Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengyun Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The interpolation-reconstruction of local underwater terrain using the underwater digital terrain map (UDTM is an important step for building an underwater terrain matching unit and directly affects the accuracy of underwater terrain matching navigation. The Kriging method is often used in terrain interpolation, but, with this method, the local terrain features are often lost. Therefore, the accuracy cannot meet the requirements of practical application. Analysis of the geographical features is performed on the basis of the randomness and self-similarity of underwater terrain. We extract the fractal features of local underwater terrain with the fractal Brownian motion model, compensating for the possible errors of the Kriging method with fractal theory. We then put forward an improved Kriging interpolation method based on this fractal compensation. Interpolation-reconstruction tests show that the method can simulate the real underwater terrain features well and that it has good usability.

  15. Modeling of acoustic wave propagation and scattering for telemetry of complex structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LU, B.

    2011-01-01

    This study takes place in the framework of tools development for the telemetry simulation. Telemetry is a possible technology applied to monitoring the sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR) and consists in positioning in the reactor core a transducer to generate an ultrasonic beam. This beam propagates through an inhomogeneous random medium since temperature fluctuations occur in the liquid sodium and consequently the sound velocity fluctuates as well, which modifies the bream propagation. Then the beam interacts with a reactor structure immersed in sodium. By measuring the time of flight of the backscattered echo received by the same transducer, one can determine the precise location of the structure. The telemetry simulation therefore requires modeling of both the acoustic wave propagation in an inhomogeneous random medium and the interaction of this wave with structures of various shapes; this is the objective of this work. A stochastic model based on a Monte Carlo algorithm is developed in order to take into account the random fluctuations of the acoustic field. The acoustic field through an inhomogeneous random medium is finally modeled from the field calculated in a mean homogeneous medium by modifying the travel times of rays in the homogeneous medium, using a correction provided by the stochastic model. This stochastic propagation model has been validated by comparison with a deterministic model and is much simpler to integrate in the CIVA software platform for non destructive evaluation simulation and less time consuming than the deterministic model. In order to model the interaction between the acoustic wave and the immersed structures, classical diffraction models have been evaluated for rigid structures, including the geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD) and the Kirchhoff approximation (KA). These two approaches appear to be complementary. Combining them so as to retain only their advantages, we have developed a hybrid model (the so-called refined KA

  16. Acoustic Mine Detection Using the Navy's CASS/GRAB Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chu, Peter C; Cintron, Carlos; Haeger, Steven D; Keenan, Ruth E

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to determine the necessity of a near real time ocean modeling capability such as the Naval Oceanographic Office's "NAVOCEANO" Modular Ocean Data Assimilation System "MODAS...

  17. On the Effects of Frequency Scaling Over Capacity Scaling in Underwater Networks—Part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, Won-Yong; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani; Médard, Muriel

    2013-01-01

    In this two-part paper, information-theoretic capacity scaling laws are analyzed in an underwater acoustic network with n regularly located nodes on a square, in which both bandwidth and received signal power can be limited significantly. Parts I and II deal with an extended network of unit node...... propagation speed of acoustic channel, and show that it is order-optimal for all operating regimes of extended networks. Finally, these scaling results are extended to the case of random node deployments providing fundamental limits to more complex scenarios of extended underwater networks....

  18. Didactic speech synthesizer – acoustic module, formants model

    OpenAIRE

    Teixeira, João Paulo; Fernandes, Anildo

    2013-01-01

    Text-to-speech synthesis is the main subject treated in this work. It will be presented the constitution of a generic text-to-speech system conversion, explained the functions of the various modules and described the development techniques using the formants model. The development of a didactic formant synthesiser under Matlab environment will also be described. This didactic synthesiser is intended for a didactic understanding of the formant model of speech production.

  19. RF Path and Absorption Loss Estimation for Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks in Different Water Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umair Mujtaba Qureshi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Underwater Wireless Sensor Network (UWSN communication at high frequencies is extremely challenging. The intricacies presented by the underwater environment are far more compared to the terrestrial environment. The prime reason for such intricacies are the physical characteristics of the underwater environment that have a big impact on electromagnetic (EM signals. Acoustics signals are by far the most preferred choice for underwater wireless communication. Because high frequency signals have the luxury of large bandwidth (BW at shorter distances, high frequency EM signals cannot penetrate and propagate deep in underwater environments. The EM properties of water tend to resist their propagation and cause severe attenuation. Accordingly, there are two questions that need to be addressed for underwater environment, first what happens when high frequency EM signals operating at 2.4 GHz are used for communication, and second which factors affect the most to high frequency EM signals. To answer these questions, we present real-time experiments conducted at 2.4 GHz in terrestrial and underwater (fresh water environments. The obtained results helped in studying the physical characteristics (i.e., EM properties, propagation and absorption loss of underwater environments. It is observed that high frequency EM signals can propagate in fresh water at a shallow depth only and can be considered for a specific class of applications such as water sports. Furthermore, path loss, velocity of propagation, absorption loss and the rate of signal loss in different underwater environments are also calculated and presented in order to understand why EM signals cannot propagate in sea water and oceanic water environments. An optimal solk6ution for underwater communication in terms of coverage distance, bandwidth and nature of communication is presented, along with possible underwater applications of UWSNs at 2.4 GHz.

  20. High Performance Computing Assets for Ocean Acoustics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-18

    can be tested against theory, practicality of computational methods can be determined, and studies of underwater acoustics phenomena can be...Administrative Grants Officer Vbefense Techllical Information Office Naval Research Laboratory Grant and Contract Services (WHOI) AOPE Department Office...distribution is unlimited. ONR DURIP Grant Final Report High Performance Computing Assets for Ocean Acoustics Research Timothy F. Dud a Applied Ocean

  1. Segment-Based Acoustic Models for Continuous Speech Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-05

    particular realization of the general model expressed in Equation (2). Such a mixture can 7. Kubala , F., Austin, S., Barry, C., Makhoul, J. Place- combine...Through Reevaluation of N-Best Sentence Hypotheses," Proc. DARPA Speech and Natural Language Workshop, pp. 83-87, February 1991. [14] F. Kubala , S. Austin

  2. Acoustic modeling of shell-encapsulated gas bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J.A. Frinking (Peter); N. de Jong (Nico)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractExisting theoretical models do not adequately describe the scatter and attenuation properties of the ultrasound contrast agents Quantison(TM) and Myomap(TM). An adapted version of the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, in which the shell is described by a viscoelastic solid, is proposed and

  3. Imaging acoustic vibrations in an ear model using spectrally encoded interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grechin, Sveta; Yelin, Dvir

    2018-01-01

    Imaging vibrational patterns of the tympanic membrane would allow an accurate measurement of its mechanical properties and provide early diagnosis of various hearing disorders. Various optical technologies have been suggested to address this challenge and demonstrated in vitro using point scanning and full-field interferometry. Spectrally encoded imaging has been previously demonstrated capable of imaging tissue acoustic vibrations with high spatial resolution, including two-dimensional phase and amplitude mapping. In this work, we demonstrate a compact optical apparatus for imaging acoustic vibrations that could be incorporated into a commercially available digital otoscope. By transmitting harmonic sound waves through the otoscope insufflation port and analyzing the spectral interferograms using custom-built software, we demonstrate high-resolution vibration imaging of a circular rubber membrane within an ear model.

  4. 3D modeling of carbonates petro-acoustic heterogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baden, Dawin; Guglielmi, Yves; Saracco, Ginette; Marié, Lionel; Viseur, Sophie

    2015-04-01

    Characterizing carbonate reservoirs heterogeneity is a challenging issue for Oil & Gas Industry, CO2 sequestration and all kinds of fluid manipulations in natural reservoirs, due to the significant impact of heterogeneities on fluid flow and storage within the reservoir. Although large scale (> meter) heterogeneities such as layers petrophysical contrasts are well addressed by computing facies-based models, low scale (geo-modeler. This method successfully allowed detecting and imaging in three dimensions differential diagenesis effects characterized by the occurrence of decimeter-scale diagenetic horizons in samples assumed to be homogeneous and/or different diagenetic sequences between shells filling and the packing matrix. We then discuss how small interfaces such as cracks, stylolithes and laminations which are also imaged may have guided these differential effects, considering that understanding the processes may be taken as an analogue to actual fluid drainage complexity in deep carbonate reservoir.

  5. Acoustic signal characterization of a ball milling machine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade-Romero, J Alexis; Romero, Jesus F A; Amestegui, Mauricio

    2011-01-01

    Los Angeles machine is used both for mining process and for standard testing covering strength of materials. As the present work is focused on the latter application, an improvement in the estimation procedure for the resistance percentage of small-size coarse aggregate is presented. More precisely, is proposed a pattern identification strategy of the vibratory signal for estimating the resistance percentage using a simplified chaotic model and the continuous wavelet transform.

  6. Towards a Hybrid Approach to Context Reasoning for Underwater Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ontologies have been widely used to facilitate semantic interoperability and serve as a common information model in many applications or domains. The Smart and Networking Underwater Robots in Cooperation Meshes (SWARMs project, aiming to facilitate coordination and cooperation between heterogeneous underwater vehicles, also adopts ontologies to formalize information that is necessarily exchanged between vehicles. However, how to derive more useful contexts based on ontologies still remains a challenge. In particular, the extreme nature of the underwater environment introduces uncertainties in context data, thus imposing more difficulties in context reasoning. None of the existing context reasoning methods could individually deal with all intricacies in the underwater robot field. To this end, this paper presents the first proposal applying a hybrid context reasoning mechanism that includes ontological, rule-based, and Multi-Entity Bayesian Network (MEBN reasoning methods to reason about contexts and their uncertainties in the underwater robot field. The theoretical foundation of applying this reasoning mechanism in underwater robots is given by a case study on the oil spill monitoring. The simulated reasoning results are useful for further decision-making by operators or robots and they show that the consolidation of different reasoning methods is a promising approach for context reasoning in underwater robots.

  7. Numerical computation of underwater explosions due to fuel-coolant interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.S.; Frost, D.L.; Knystautas, R.; Teodorczyk, A.; Ciccarelli, G.; Thibault, P.; Penrose, J.

    1989-03-01

    If coarse molten material is released into a coolant the possibility exists for a violent steam explosion. A detailed quantitative description of the processes involved in steam explosions is currently beyond the capabilities of the scientific community. However, a conservative estimate of the pressure transients resulting from a steam explosion can be obtained by studying the dynamics of the shock associated with the expansion of a high-pressure vapour bubble. In this study, the hydrodynamic equations governing the shock propagation of an expanding bubble were integrated numerically using the Flux Corrected Transport code. Simpler acoustic models based on experience with underwater explosions were also developed and used to estimate pressure transients and to calculate the peak pressures for benchmark cases. The results were found to be an order of magnitude higher than the corresponding pressures obtained using a complex model developed by Henry. A simplified version of the Henry model was developed by neglecting the complex description of the two-phase flow inside the ruptured tube and the arbitrarily assumed heat transfer and condensation rates. Results from the simplified model were found to be generally similar to, but had higher peak pressures than those obtained using the Henry model. It is concluded that the results produced by simple acoustic models, or by a simplified Henry model, are more conservative than the corresponding results obtained with the original Henry model

  8. Acoustic Wave Propagation in Snow Based on a Biot-Type Porous Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidler, R.

    2014-12-01

    Despite the fact that acoustic methods are inexpensive, robust and simple, the application of seismic waves to snow has been sparse. This might be due to the strong attenuation inherent to snow that prevents large scale seismic applications or due to the somewhat counterintuitive acoustic behavior of snow as a porous material. Such materials support a second kind of compressional wave that can be measured in fresh snow and which has a decreasing wave velocity with increasing density of snow. To investigate wave propagation in snow we construct a Biot-type porous model of snow as a function of porosity based on the assumptions that the solid frame is build of ice, the pore space is filled with a mix of air, or air and water, and empirical relationships for the tortuosity, the permeability, the bulk, and the shear modulus.We use this reduced model to investigate compressional and shear wave velocities of snow as a function of porosity and to asses the consequences of liquid water in the snowpack on acoustic wave propagation by solving Biot's differential equations with plain wave solutions. We find that the fast compressional wave velocity increases significantly with increasing density, but also that the fast compressional wave velocity might be even lower than the slow compressional wave velocity for very light snow. By using compressional and shear strength criteria and solving Biot's differential equations with a pseudo-spectral approach we evaluate snow failure due to acoustic waves in a heterogeneous snowpack, which we think is an important mechanism in triggering avalanches by explosives as well as by skiers. Finally, we developed a low cost seismic acquisition device to assess the theoretically obtained wave velocities in the field and to explore the possibility of an inexpensive tool to remotely gather snow water equivalent.

  9. Extending acoustic data measured with small-scale supersonic model jets to practical aircraft exhaust jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ching-Wen

    2010-06-01

    Modern military aircraft jet engines are designed with variable geometry nozzles to provide optimum thrust in different operating conditions within the flight envelope. However, the acoustic measurements for such nozzles are scarce, due to the cost involved in making full-scale measurements and the lack of details about the exact geometry of these nozzles. Thus the present effort at The Pennsylvania State University and the NASA Glenn Research Center, in partnership with GE Aviation, is aiming to study and characterize the acoustic field produced by supersonic jets issuing from converging-diverging military style nozzles. An equally important objective is to develop a scaling methodology for using data obtained from small- and moderate-scale experiments which exhibits the independence of the jet sizes to the measured noise levels. The experimental results presented in this thesis have shown reasonable agreement between small-scale and moderate-scale jet acoustic data, as well as between heated jets and heat-simulated ones. As the scaling methodology is validated, it will be extended to using acoustic data measured with small-scale supersonic model jets to the prediction of the most important components of full-scale engine noise. When comparing the measured acoustic spectra with a microphone array set at different radial locations, the characteristics of the jet noise source distribution may induce subtle inaccuracies, depending on the conditions of jet operation. A close look is taken at the details of the noise generation region in order to better understand the mismatch between spectra measured at various acoustic field radial locations. A processing methodology was developed to correct the effect of the noise source distribution and efficiently compare near-field and far-field spectra with unprecedented accuracy. This technique then demonstrates that the measured noise levels in the physically restricted space of an anechoic chamber can be appropriately

  10. Transcranial Assessment and Visualization of Acoustic Cavitation: Modeling and Experimental Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Gregory T.; McDannold, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of ultrasonically-controlled microbubble oscillations (acoustic cavitation) with tissues and biological media has been shown to induce a wide range of bioeffects that may have significant impact to therapy and diagnosis of central nervous system diseases and disorders. However, the inherently non-linear microbubble oscillations combined with the micrometer and microsecond scales involved in these interactions and the limited methods to assess and visualize them transcranially hinder both their optimal use and translation to the clinics. To overcome these challenges, we present a noninvasive and clinically relevant framework that combines numerical simulations with multimodality imaging to assess and visualize the microbubble oscillations transcranially. In the present work, acoustic cavitation was studied with an integrated US and MR imaging guided clinical FUS system in non-human primates. This multimodality imaging system allowed us to concurrently induce and visualize acoustic cavitation transcranially. A high-resolution brain CT-scan that allowed us to determine the head acoustic properties (density, speed of sound, and absorption) was also co-registered to the US and MR images. The derived acoustic properties and the location of the targets that were determined by the 3D-CT scans and the post sonication MRI respectively were then used as inputs to two-and three-dimensional Finite Difference Time Domain (2D, 3D-FDTD) simulations that matched the experimental conditions and geometry. At the experimentally-determined target locations, synthetic point sources with pressure amplitude traces derived by either a Gaussian function or the output of a microbubble dynamics model were numerically excited and propagated through the skull towards a virtual US imaging array. Then, using passive acoustic mapping that was refined to incorporate variable speed of sound, we assessed the losses and aberrations induced by the skull as a function of the acoustic

  11. Underwater Gliders: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javaid Muhammad Yasar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Underwater gliders are a type of underwater vehicle that transverse the oceans by shifting its buoyancy, during which its wings develop a component of the downward motion in the horizontal plane, thus producing a forward force. They are primarily used in oceanography sensing and data collection and play an important role in ocean research and development. Although there have been considerable developments in these gliders since the development of the first glider concept in 1989, to date, no review of these gliders have been done. This paper reviews existing underwater gliders, with emphasis on their respective working principles, range and payload capacity. All information on gliders available in the public domain or published in literature from the year 2000-2013 was reviewed. The majority of these gliders have an operational depth of 1000 m and a payload of less than 25 kg. The exception is a blend-body shape glider, which has a payload of approximately 800 kg and an operational depth around about 300 m. However, the commercialization of these gliders has been limited with only three know examples that have been successfully commercialized.

  12. An efficient analytical model for baffled, multi-celled membrane-type acoustic metamaterial panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langfeldt, F.; Gleine, W.; von Estorff, O.

    2018-03-01

    A new analytical model for the oblique incidence sound transmission loss prediction of baffled panels with multiple subwavelength sized membrane-type acoustic metamaterial (MAM) unit cells is proposed. The model employs a novel approach via the concept of the effective surface mass density and approximates the unit cell vibrations in the form of piston-like displacements. This yields a coupled system of linear equations that can be solved efficiently using well-known solution procedures. A comparison with results from finite element model simulations for both normal and diffuse field incidence shows that the analytical model delivers accurate results as long as the edge length of the MAM unit cells is smaller than half the acoustic wavelength. The computation times for the analytical calculations are 100 times smaller than for the numerical simulations. In addition to that, the effect of flexible MAM unit cell edges compared to the fixed edges assumed in the analytical model is studied numerically. It is shown that the compliance of the edges has only a small impact on the transmission loss of the panel, except at very low frequencies in the stiffness-controlled regime. The proposed analytical model is applied to investigate the effect of variations of the membrane prestress, added mass, and mass eccentricity on the diffuse transmission loss of a MAM panel with 120 unit cells. Unlike most previous investigations of MAMs, these results provide a better understanding of the acoustic performance of MAMs under more realistic conditions. For example, it is shown that by varying these parameters deliberately in a checkerboard pattern, a new anti-resonance with large transmission loss values can be introduced. A random variation of these parameters, on the other hand, is shown to have only little influence on the diffuse transmission loss, as long as the standard deviation is not too large. For very large random variations, it is shown that the peak transmission loss

  13. Integrating acoustic telemetry into mark-recapture models to improve the precision of apparent survival and abundance estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudgeon, Christine L; Pollock, Kenneth H; Braccini, J Matias; Semmens, Jayson M; Barnett, Adam

    2015-07-01

    Capture-mark-recapture models are useful tools for estimating demographic parameters but often result in low precision when recapture rates are low. Low recapture rates are typical in many study systems including fishing-based studies. Incorporating auxiliary data into the models can improve precision and in some cases enable parameter estimation. Here, we present a novel application of acoustic telemetry for the estimation of apparent survival and abundance within capture-mark-recapture analysis using open population models. Our case study is based on simultaneously collecting longline fishing and acoustic telemetry data for a large mobile apex predator, the broadnose sevengill shark (Notorhynchus cepedianus), at a coastal site in Tasmania, Australia. Cormack-Jolly-Seber models showed that longline data alone had very low recapture rates while acoustic telemetry data for the same time period resulted in at least tenfold higher recapture rates. The apparent survival estimates were similar for the two datasets but the acoustic telemetry data showed much greater precision and enabled apparent survival parameter estimation for one dataset, which was inestimable using fishing data alone. Combined acoustic telemetry and longline data were incorporated into Jolly-Seber models using a Monte Carlo simulation approach. Abundance estimates were comparable to those with longline data only; however, the inclusion of acoustic telemetry data increased precision in the estimates. We conclude that acoustic telemetry is a useful tool for incorporating in capture-mark-recapture studies in the marine environment. Future studies should consider the application of acoustic telemetry within this framework when setting up the study design and sampling program.

  14. Impact of Vessel Noise on Oyster Toadfish (Opsanus tau) Behavior and Implications for Underwater Noise Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahforst, Cecilia S.

    Underwater noise and its impacts on marine life are growing management concerns. This dissertation considers both the ecological and social concerns of underwater noise, using the oyster toadfish (Opsanus tau) as a model species. Oyster toadfish call for mates using a boatwhistle sound, but increased ambient noise levels from vessels or other anthropogenic activities are likely to influence the ability of males to find mates. If increased ambient noise levels reduce fish fitness then underwater noise can impact socially valued ecosystem services (e.g. fisheries). The following ecological objectives of the impacts of underwater noise on oyster toadfish were investigated: (1) to determine how noise influences male calling behavior; (2) to assess how areas of high vessel activity ("noisy") and low vessel activity ("quiet") influence habitat utilization (fish standard length and occupancy rate); and (3) to discover if fitness (number of clutches and number of embryos per clutch) is lower in "noisy" compared with "quiet" sites. Field experiments were executed in "noisy" and "quiet" areas. Recorded calls by males in response to playback sounds (vessel, predator, and snapping shrimp sounds) and egg deposition by females ("noisy" vs. "quiet" sites) demonstrated that oyster toadfish are impacted by underwater noise. First, males decreased their call rates and called louder in response to increased ambient noise levels. Second, oyster toadfish selected nesting sites in areas with little or no inboard motorboat activity. Third, male oyster toadfish at "noisy" sites either had no egg clutches on their shelters or the number of embryos per clutch was significantly lower than in the "quiet" areas. Underwater noise and disturbance from vessels are influencing the fitness of the oyster toadfish. The social significance of the growing concerns regarding underwater noise was investigated by identifying dominant themes found within two types of texts: four recent underwater noise

  15. Gassmann Modeling of Acoustic Properties of Sand-clay Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, B.; Carcione, J. M.

    The feasibility of modeling elastic properties of a fluid-saturated sand-clay mixture rock is analyzed by assuming that the rock is composed of macroscopic regions of sand and clay. The elastic properties of such a composite rock are computed using two alternative schemes.The first scheme, which we call the composite Gassmann (CG) scheme, uses Gassmann equations to compute elastic moduli of the saturated sand and clay from their respective dry moduli. The effective elastic moduli of the fluid-saturated composite rock are then computed by applying one of the mixing laws commonly used to estimate elastic properties of composite materials.In the second scheme which we call the Berryman-Milton scheme, the elastic moduli of the dry composite rock matrix are computed from the moduli of dry sand and clay matrices using the same composite mixing law used in the first scheme. Next, the saturated composite rock moduli are computed using the equations of Brown and Korringa, which, together with the expressions for the coefficients derived by Berryman and Milton, provide an extension of Gassmann equations to rocks with a heterogeneous solid matrix.For both schemes, the moduli of the dry homogeneous sand and clay matrices are assumed to obey the Krief's velocity-porosity relationship. As a mixing law we use the self-consistent coherent potential approximation proposed by Berryman.The calculated dependence of compressional and shear velocities on porosity and clay content for a given set of parameters using the two schemes depends on the distribution of total porosity between the sand and clay regions. If the distribution of total porosity between sand and clay is relatively uniform, the predictions of the two schemes in the porosity range up to 0.3 are very similar to each other. For higher porosities and medium-to-large clay content the elastic moduli predicted by CG scheme are significantly higher than those predicted by the BM scheme.This difference is explained by the fact

  16. Euclidean reconstruction of natural underwater scenes using optic imagery sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Han

    The development of maritime applications require monitoring, studying and preserving of detailed and close observation on the underwater seafloor and objects. Stereo vision offers advanced technologies to build 3D models from 2D still overlapping optic images in a relatively inexpensive way. However, while image stereo matching is a necessary step in 3D reconstruction procedure, even the most robust dense matching techniques are not guaranteed to work for underwater images due to the challenging aquatic environment. In this thesis, in addition to a detailed introduction and research on the key components of building 3D models from optic images, a robust modified quasi-dense matching algorithm based on correspondence propagation and adaptive least square matching for underwater images is proposed and applied to some typical underwater image datasets. The experiments demonstrate the robustness and good performance of the proposed matching approach.

  17. Acoustic Performance of an Advanced Model Turbofan in Three Aeroacoustic Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Hughes, Christopher E.

    2012-01-01

    A model advanced turbofan was acoustically tested in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Foot-Low-Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT), and in two other aeroacoustic facilities. The Universal Propulsion Simulator (UPS) fan was designed and manufactured by the General Electric Aircraft Engines (GEAE) Company, and featured active core, as well as bypass, flow paths. The reference test configurations were with the metal, M4, rotor with hardwall and treated bypass flow ducts. The UPS fan was tested within an airflow at a Mach number of 0.20 (limited flow data were also acquired at a Mach number of 0.25) which is representative of aircraft takeoff and approach conditions. Comparisons were made between data acquired within the airflow (9x15 LSWT and German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW)) and outside of a free jet (Boeing Low Speed Aero acoustic Facility (LSAF) and DNW). Sideline data were acquired on an 89-in. (nominal 4 fan diameters) sideline using the same microphone assembly and holder in the 9x15 LSWT and DNW facilities. These data showed good agreement for similar UPS operating conditions and configurations. Distortion of fan spectra tonal content through a free jet shear layer was documented, suggesting that in-flow acoustic measurements are required for comprehensive fan noise diagnostics. However, there was good agreement for overall sound power level (PWL) fan noise measurements made both within and outside of the test facility airflow.

  18. A hardware model of the auditory periphery to transduce acoustic signals into neural activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi eTateno

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available To improve the performance of cochlear implants, we have integrated a microdevice into a model of the auditory periphery with the goal of creating a microprocessor. We constructed an artificial peripheral auditory system using a hybrid model in which polyvinylidene difluoride was used as a piezoelectric sensor to convert mechanical stimuli into electric signals. To produce frequency selectivity, the slit on a stainless steel base plate was designed such that the local resonance frequency of the membrane over the slit reflected the transfer function. In the acoustic sensor, electric signals were generated based on the piezoelectric effect from local stress in the membrane. The electrodes on the resonating plate produced relatively large electric output signals. The signals were fed into a computer model that mimicked some functions of inner hair cells, inner hair cell–auditory nerve synapses, and auditory nerve fibers. In general, the responses of the model to pure-tone burst and complex stimuli accurately represented the discharge rates of high-spontaneous-rate auditory nerve fibers across a range of frequencies greater than 1 kHz and middle to high sound pressure levels. Thus, the model provides a tool to understand information processing in the peripheral auditory system and a basic design for connecting artificial acoustic sensors to the peripheral auditory nervous system. Finally, we discuss the need for stimulus control with an appropriate model of the auditory periphery based on auditory brainstem responses that were electrically evoked by different temporal pulse patterns with the same pulse number.

  19. Topological phononic states of underwater sound based on coupled ring resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Cheng; Li, Zheng; Ni, Xu; Sun, Xiao-Chen; Yu, Si-Yuan [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Lu, Ming-Hui, E-mail: luminghui@nju.edu.cn; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Yan-Feng [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2016-01-18

    We report a design of topological phononic states for underwater sound using arrays of acoustic coupled ring resonators. In each individual ring resonator, two degenerate acoustic modes, corresponding to clockwise and counter-clockwise propagation, are treated as opposite pseudospins. The gapless edge states arise in the bandgap resulting in protected pseudospin-dependent sound transportation, which is a phononic analogue of the quantum spin Hall effect. We also investigate the robustness of the topological sound state, suggesting that the observed pseudospin-dependent sound transportation remains unless the introduced defects facilitate coupling between the clockwise and counter-clockwise modes (in other words, the original mode degeneracy is broken). The topological engineering of sound transportation will certainly promise unique design for next generation of acoustic devices in sound guiding and switching, especially for underwater acoustic devices.

  20. Ultrasonic characterization of three animal mammary tumors from three-dimensional acoustic tissue models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamou, Jonathan M.

    This dissertation investigated how three-dimensional (3D) tissue models can be used to improve ultrasonic tissue characterization (UTC) techniques. Anatomic sites in tissue responsible for ultrasonic scattering are unknown, which limits the potential applications of ultrasound for tumor diagnosis. Accurate 3D models of tumor tissues may help identify the scattering sites. Three mammary tumors were investigated: a rat fibroadenoma, a mouse carcinoma, and a mouse sarcoma. A 3D acoustic tissue model, termed 3D impedance map (3DZM), was carefully constructed from consecutive histologic sections for each tumor. Spectral estimates (scatterer size and acoustic concentration) were obtained from the 3DZMs and compared to the same estimates obtained with ultrasound. Scatterer size estimates for three tumors were found to be similar (within 10%). The 3DZMs were also used to extract tissue-specific scattering models. The scattering models were found to allow clear distinction between the three tumors. This distinction demonstrated that UTC techniques may be helpful for noninvasive clinical tumor diagnosis.