WorldWideScience

Sample records for undertaking teaching roles

  1. Identifying potential academic leaders: Predictors of willingness to undertake leadership roles in an academic department of family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, David; Krueger, Paul; Meaney, Christopher; Antao, Viola; Kim, Florence; Kwong, Jeffrey C

    2016-02-01

    To identify variables associated with willingness to undertake leadership roles among academic family medicine faculty. Web-based survey. Bivariate and multivariable analyses (logistic regression) were used to identify variables associated with willingness to undertake leadership roles. Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto in Ontario. A total of 687 faculty members. Variables related to respondents' willingness to take on various academic leadership roles. Of all 1029 faculty members invited to participate in the survey, 687 (66.8%) members responded. Of the respondents, 596 (86.8%) indicated their level of willingness to take on various academic leadership roles. Multivariable analysis revealed that the predictors associated with willingness to take on leadership roles were as follows: pursuit of professional development opportunities (odds ratio [OR] 3.79, 95% CI 2.29 to 6.27); currently holding at least 1 leadership role (OR 5.37, 95% CI 3.38 to 8.53); a history of leadership training (OR 1.86, 95% CI 1.25 to 2.78); the perception that mentorship is important for one's current role (OR 2.25, 95% CI 1.40 to 3.60); and younger age (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.95 to 0.99). Willingness to undertake new or additional leadership roles was associated with 2 variables related to leadership experiences, 2 variables related to perceptions of mentorship and professional development, and 1 demographic variable (younger age). Interventions that support opportunities in these areas might expand the pool and strengthen the academic leadership potential of faculty members.

  2. Exploring the role of social interactions and supports in overcoming accessibility barriers while undertaking health tours in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Arnab; Harata, Noboru; Kiyoshi, Takami; Ohmori, Nobuaki

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the phenomenon of companionship as an adaptation strategy to counter the existing barriers to health care access in developing nations. Companionship is argued to be an outcome of "inter" and "intra" household collaboration to offer diverse supports in addition to altruism. The analysis of the household survey conducted in West Bengal, India, exhibited different patterns of health care tours and the associated dependencies. In addition to support in terms of mobility while traveling and companionship while waiting for the opportunity, support in terms of refuge is also found to be essential, especially for the poor while they undertake regional tours. Causal models focusing on aggregated general health tours and specific regional tours were estimated separately to comprehend the implicit social interactions and their effects on the patient as well as the companions. The research demonstrated that accessibility barriers affect not only the ill, but also those associated with them and at times adversely. Segregation of regional tours illustrated the gaps, which instigated such tours and also might aid in health infrastructure planning as a whole.

  3. JET Joint Undertaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keen, B.E.

    1987-03-01

    The paper presents the progress report of the Joint European Torus (JET) Joint Undertaking, 1986. The report contains a survey of the scientific and technical achievements on JET during 1986; the more important articles referred to in this survey are reproduced as appendices to this Report. The last section discusses developments which might improve the overall performance of the machine. (U.K.)

  4. Public Undertakings and Imputability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ølykke, Grith Skovgaard

    2013-01-01

    exercised by the State, imputability to the State, and the State’s fulfilment of the Market Economy Investor Principle. Furthermore, it is examined whether, in the absence of imputability, public undertakings’ market behaviour is subject to the Market Economy Investor Principle, and it is concluded...... that this is not the case. Lastly, it is discussed whether other legal instruments, namely competition law, public procurement law, or the Transparency Directive, regulate public undertakings’ market behaviour. It is found that those rules are not sufficient to mend the gap created by the imputability requirement. Legal......In this article, the issue of impuability to the State of public undertakings’ decision-making is analysed and discussed in the context of the DSBFirst case. DSBFirst is owned by the independent public undertaking DSB and the private undertaking FirstGroup plc and won the contracts in the 2008...

  5. Changing academic roles--new approaches to teaching and distance learning in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovenga, E J S; Bricknell, L

    2006-01-01

    A primary objective of this study was to identify a valid method for academic workload allocation. This required the identification of significant variables that may be used to indicate and measure academic workload. A supporting objective was to illustrate how the adoption of a flexible learning mode and supporting technologies across one university with multiple campuses and an international student cohort has impacted upon academic roles and teaching delivery methods. An extensive literature review focusing primarily on the teaching aspects of academic roles was undertaken. These roles were defined as teaching, including curriculum development, undertaking research, provide professional and community services and undertake some administrative work. This review was followed by the documentation of a case study. Significant changes to the roles and responsibilities of academics working in higher education are now discernable. The adoption of Web-based applications and other communication technologies have made it possible to not only extend traditional distance education offerings but also to teach large multicultural classes across multiple campuses simultaneously. This in turn necessitates a review of teaching strategies and of organization-wide student and staff support infrastructures to ensure that the teaching quality is maintained or improved whilst meeting individual student learning needs. Changes to academics' roles are occurring due to the globalisation of higher education as well as the adoption of new educational delivery methods and the use of new technologies. The resulting complexity of academic workload measurement and the need to equitably allocate this workload to individual academics has become more challenging than ever. More traditional universities can learn from such experiences to better prepare for these inevitable changes.

  6. ROLE OF DIVERSITY IN TEACHING MARKETING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAGDALENA PLATIS

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In a contemporary context, education is regarded as an innovative concept that has a powerful impact on educating the young generation. Selectively passing over knowledge in an adequate framework allows an optimum development of educational actions that have a specific goal. The role of education in the society’s development and in the development of each individual increases significantly as the impact of technological progress on the educational process requires an organization of the educative activity in accordance with these significant changes in society. From the past and up to now, the education system has undergone important stages in the transformation and improvement of the educational activity. The modernization of the education system aims to achieve an optimal balance between the contemporary society’s demands and the quality of the educational activity. The objectives of this study are the following: highlighting the context of higher education in Romania, presenting the importance of teaching marketing in an applied way, the analysis of the effectiveness of implementing modern teaching techniques, the analysis of the impact of diversity in teaching marketing discipline, highlighting the role of the teacher in teaching and learning activities. Teaching strategies and interactive teaching methods are direct ways of action that stimulate the activity of teaching-learning. By using modern strategies and means of education, the teacher makes task achievement more efficient, thus facilitating the transmission of knowledge taught.

  7. Cumulative cultural evolution: the role of teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Laureano; Toro, Miguel A

    2014-04-21

    In humans, cultural transmission occurs usually by cumulative inheritance, generating complex adaptive behavioral features. Cumulative culture requires key psychological processes (fundamentally imitation and teaching) that are absent or impoverished in non-human primates. In this paper we analyze the role that teaching has played in human cumulative cultural evolution. We assume that a system of cumulative culture generates increasingly adaptive behaviors, that are also more complex and difficult to imitate. Our thesis is that, as cultural traits become more complex, cumulative cultural transmission requires teaching to ensure accurate transmission from one generation to the next. In an increasingly complex cultural environment, we consider that individuals commit errors in imitation. We develop a model of cumulative cultural evolution in a changing environment and show that these errors hamper the process of cultural accumulation. We also show that a system of teaching between parents and offspring that increases the fidelity of imitation unblocks the accumulation and becomes adaptive whenever the gain in fitness compensates the cost of teaching. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Jet Joint Undertaking. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    The scientific, technical, experimental and theoretical investigations related to JET tokamak are presented. The JET Joint Undertaking, Volume 2, includes papers presented at: the 15th European Conference on controlled fusion and plasma heating, the 15th Symposium on fusion technology, the 12th IAEA Conference on plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion research, the 8th Topical Meeting on technology of fusion. Moreover, the following topics, concerning JET, are discussed: experience with wall materials, plasma performance, high power ion cyclotron resonance heating, plasma boundary, results and prospects for fusion, preparation for D-T operation, active gas handling system and remote handling equipment

  9. Psychiatrists' Role in Teaching Human Sexuality to Other Medical Specialties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Marian E.; Abulu, John

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This article addresses the potential role for psychiatrists in teaching sexuality to other medical disciplines. Methods: The authors searched PsycNet and PubMed/MEDLINE for pertinent articles and studies from the period between 1990 and 2009 using the terms human sexuality; teaching human sexuality; teaching methods; education and…

  10. TEACHING SPEAKING BY ROLE-PLAY ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadilah Fadilah

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The students often find some problems in practising English speaking. The problem frequently found is that their native language causes them difficult to use the foreign language. Other reason is because of motivation lack to practice the second language in daily conversation. They are also too shy and afraid to take part in the conversation. Many factors can cause the problem of the students’ speaking skills namely the students’ interest, the material, and the media among others including the technique in teaching English. There are many ways that can be done by the students to develop their ability in speaking English. The appropriate technique used by the English teacher also supports their interested in practising their speaking. One of the techniques that can be applied is role play.

  11. Gestures: Their Role in Teaching and Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2001-01-01

    Reviews existing literature on gestures and teaching in anthropology, linguistics, psychology, and education and, in the context of several concrete analyses of gesture use, articulates some focal questions relevant to educational research on knowing, learning, and teaching. (SLD)

  12. Perceived Role of the Journal Clubs in Teaching Critical Appraisal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is to determine the perceived role of journal clubs in teaching critical appraisal skills amongst the surgical ... the National Postgraduate College of Nigeria have mandated that all residency programs teach and assess the ..... having declared themselves to be self‑motivated learners by subscribing to a surgical residency, are ...

  13. Teaching planning theory as planner roles in urban planning education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Kristian

    2018-01-01

    suggests that teaching planning theory as a variety of planner roles offers a helpful pedagogical approach for helping students construct their identities as urban planners. The paper builds on the author’s own experiences of teaching planning theory in a master’s urban planning programme, and has been...

  14. The Gender-Related Role of Teaching Profession in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uygun, Selcuk

    2014-01-01

    Teaching is a professional job that requires expertise. The characteristics of the professionals can affect the quality of the profession. One of these characteristics is gender. In this study, the gender-related role of teaching profession in Turkey is examined. The analysis in a historical perspective of gender distributions of students who have…

  15. Accounting Systems for New Public Sector Undertakings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Accounting Systems for New Public Sector Undertakings Management: A Case Study. ... African Journal of Finance and Management ... It concludes that the current accounting systems such as financial accounting, cost accounting and reporting systems are not suitable for the effective and efficient management.

  16. The role of emotions in health professional ethics teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillam, Lynn; Delany, Clare; Guillemin, Marilys; Warmington, Sally

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we put forward the view that emotions have a legitimate and important role in health professional ethics education. This paper draws upon our experience of running a narrative ethics education programme for ethics educators from a range of healthcare disciplines. It describes the way in which emotions may be elicited in narrative ethics teaching and considers the appropriate role of emotions in ethics education for health professionals. We argue there is a need for a pedagogical framework to productively incorporate the role of emotions in health professional ethics teaching. We suggest a theoretical basis for an ethics pedagogy that integrates health professional emotions in both the experience and the analysis of ethical practice, and identify a range of strategies to support the educator to incorporate emotion within their ethics teaching.

  17. Role modelling in medical education: the importance of teaching skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Annette; Oates, Kim; Goulston, Kerry

    2016-04-01

    By observation of role models, and participation in activities, students develop their attitudes, values and professional competencies. Literature suggests that clinical skills and knowledge, personality, and teaching skills are three main areas that students consider central to the identification of positive role models. The aim of this study was to explore junior medical students' opinions of the ideal attributes of a good role model in clinical tutors. The study was conducted with one cohort (n = 301) of students who had completed year 1 of the medical programme in 2013. All students were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding the ideal attributes of a good role model in a clinical tutor. The questionnaire consisted of seven closed items and one open-ended question. The response rate to the questionnaire was 265/301 (88%). Although students found all three key areas important in a good role model, students emphasised the importance of excellence in teaching skills. Specifically, students see good role models as being able to provide a constructive learning environment, a good understanding of the curriculum and an ability to cater to the learning needs of all students. Students see good role models as being able to provide a constructive learning environment While acknowledging the importance of a patient-centred approach, as well as clinical knowledge and skills, our findings reinforce the importance of the actual teaching abilities of role models within medical education. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. THE ROLE AND SIGNIFICANCE OF HOMEWORK IN INITIAL MATHEMATICS TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sead Rešić

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This thesis elaborates on the role and importance of homework in the initial stages of teaching mathematics. The aim is to determine and analyze the degree of burden on students with homework. The following tasks were performed as a starting point for this research: determining the degree of correlation between the time that student spends on weekly homework and the student’s homework amount determinedby the pedagogical norm, determining the level of parents’ participation in helping students with homework, etermining the degree of correlation of differentiation of homework with the students' motivation for doing homework. Homework plays an important role in the initial stages of teaching mathematics, and takes up a significant place in the process of studying and teaching mathematics. The results, analysis, and conclusions are presented upon research.

  19. The Role of Research on Science Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Science Teachers Association (NJ1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Research on science teaching and learning plays an important role in improving science literacy, a goal called for in the National Science Education Standards (NRC 1996) and supported by the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA 2003). NSTA promotes a research agenda that is focused on the goal of enhancing student learning through effective…

  20. Effect of combined teaching method (role playing and storytelling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of combined teaching method (role playing and storytelling) on creative thinking of fourthgrade female students in the course of Heaven Gifts. Research Method: This quasi-experimental study was conducted with pretest-posttest design with control group on 60 fourth-grade female ...

  1. The role of active teaching programmes in academic skills ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The role of active teaching programmes in academic skills enhancement of Grade 12 Learners in the Stellenbosch Region. ... The premise of this study focused on the holistic approach to the human body, mainly the connection between the brain and the body. Learners attend school as holistic beings and both the body ...

  2. JET joint undertaking. Annual report 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    This document is intended for information only and should not be used as a technical reference. After an introductive part on the controlled nuclear fusion research and an historical survey of the JET project, are presented: the JET joint undertaking (members of council and committee...) with its administration (finance, personnel, external relations), and the scientific and technical department with its divisions for systems (experimental, magnet, plasma, assembly, power supplies, control and data acquisition, and site and building). In appendix is described the Euratom fusion research programme

  3. Internationalisation strategies and the development of competent teaching staff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Els van der Werf

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that the role of the lecturer in an internationalised higher education institution is not limited to teaching internationally or interculturally diverse groups of students. Teaching staff members will normally be required to undertake a variety of tasks, which require different

  4. Teaching medical anatomy: what is the role of imaging today?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grignon, Bruno; Oldrini, Guillaume; Walter, Frédéric

    2016-03-01

    Medical anatomy instruction has been an important issue of debate for many years and imaging anatomy has become an increasingly important component in the field, the role of which has not yet been clearly defined. The aim of the paper was to assess the current deployment of medical imaging in the teaching of anatomy by means of a review of the literature. A systematic search was performed using the electronic database PubMed, ScienceDirect and various publisher databases, with combinations of the relevant MeSH terms. A manual research was added. In most academic curricula, imaging anatomy has been integrated as a part of anatomical education, taught using a very wide variety of strategies. Considerable variation in the time allocation, content and delivery of medical imaging in teaching human anatomy was identified. Given this considerable variation, an objective assessment remains quite difficult. In most publications, students' perceptions regarding anatomical courses including imaging anatomy were investigated by means of questionnaires and, regardless of the method of teaching, it was globally concluded that imaging anatomy enhanced the quality and efficiency of instruction in human anatomy. More objective evaluation based on an increase in students' performance on course examinations or on specific tests performed before and after teaching sessions showed positive results in numerous cases, while mixed results were also indicated by other studies. A relative standardization could be useful in improving the teaching of imaging anatomy, to facilitate its assessment and reinforce its effectiveness.

  5. The role of mathematics for physics teaching and understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospiech, Gesche; Eylon, BatSheva; Bagno, Esther; Lehavi, Yaron; Geyer, Marie-Annette

    2016-05-01

    -1That mathematics is the "language of physics" implies that both areas are deeply interconnected, such that often no separation between "pure" mathematics and "pure" physics is possible. To clarify their interplay a technical and a structural role of mathematics can be distinguished. A thorough understanding of this twofold role in physics is also important for shaping physics education especially with respect to teaching the nature of physics. Herewith the teachers and their pedagogical content knowledge play an important role. Therefore we develop a model of PCK concerning the interplay of mathematics and physics in order to provide a theoretical framework for the views and teaching strategies of teachers. In an exploratory study four teachers from Germany and four teachers from Israel have been interviewed concerning their views and its transfer to teaching physics. Here we describe the results from Germany. Besides general views and knowledge held by all or nearly all teachers we also observe specific individual focus depending on the teachers' background and experiences. The results fit well into the derived model of PCK.

  6. The role of mathematics for physics teaching and understanding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pospiech, G; Geyer, M.A.; Eylon, B.; Bagno, E.; Lehavi, Y.

    2015-01-01

    That mathematics is the “language of physics” implies that both areas are deeply interconnected, such that often no separation between “pure” mathematics and “pure” physics is possible. To clarify their interplay a technical and a structural role of mathematics can be distinguished. A thorough understanding of this twofold role in physics is also important for shaping physics education especially with respect to teaching the nature of physics. Herewith the teachers and their pedagogical content knowledge play an important role. Therefore we develop a model of PCK concerning the interplay of mathematics and physics in order to provide a theoretical framework for the views and teaching strategies of teachers. In an exploratory study four teachers from Germany and four teachers from Israel have been interviewed concerning their views and its transfer to teaching physics. Here we describe the results from Germany. Besides general views and knowledge held by all or nearly all teachers we also observe specific individual focus depending on the teachers’ background and experiences. The results fit well into the derived model of PCK.

  7. Lessons from a pilot project in cognitive task analysis: the potential role of intermediates in preclinical teaching in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Judith; von Bergmann, HsingChi

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the use of cognitive task analysis to inform the teaching of psychomotor skills and cognitive strategies in clinical tasks in dental education. Methods used were observing and videotaping an expert at one dental school thinking aloud while performing a specific preclinical task (in a simulated environment), interviewing the expert to probe deeper into his thinking processes, and applying the same procedures to analyze the performance of three second-year dental students who had recently learned the analyzed task and who represented a spectrum of their cohort's ability to undertake the procedure. The investigators sought to understand how experts (clinical educators) and intermediates (trained students) overlapped and differed at points in the procedure that represented the highest cognitive load, known as "critical incidents." Findings from this study and previous research identified possible limitations of current clinical teaching as a result of expert blind spots. These findings coupled with the growing evidence of the effectiveness of peer teaching suggest the potential role of intermediates in helping novices learn preclinical dentistry tasks.

  8. Bridging the Gap from Teacher to Teacher Educator: The Role of a Teaching Portfolio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Miriam

    2018-01-01

    This article explores the role of a teaching portfolio in supporting the transition from teacher to teacher educator. It uses aspects of self-study to catalogue the challenges and successes during this transition. Despite well-documented acknowledgement of the differing demands of teaching when compared to teaching how to teach, little is written…

  9. Gender and Gender Role Differences in Student-Teachers' Commitment to Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Ikupa; Admiraal, Wilfried F.; Berry, Amanda K.

    2016-01-01

    Low commitment to teaching amongst teachers is a problem facing the teaching profession in many countries. Gender might be an important factor in explaining what kinds of prospective teachers are attracted to teaching. This empirical study examined the relationship between student-teachers' gender, gender roles and commitment to teaching within…

  10. How do science centers perceive their role in science teaching?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jan Alexis; Stougaard, Birgitte; Andersen, Beth Wehner

    This poster presents the data of a survey of 11 science centres in the Region of Southern Denmark. The survey is the initial step in a project which aims, on the one hand, to identify the factors which conditions successful learning outcomes of visits to science centres, and, on the other hand...... and teachers. In the present survey we have approached the topic from the perspective of science centres. Needless to say, the science centres’ own perception of their role in science teaching plays a vital role with respect to the successfulness of such visits. The data of our survey suggest that, also from......, to apply this identification so as to guide the interaction of science teachers and science centres. Recent literature on this topic (Rennie et. al. 2003; Falk & Dierking 2000) suggest that stable learning outcomes of such visits require that such visits are (1) prepared in the sense that the teacher has...

  11. Enfleshing Embodiment: "Falling into Trust" with the Body's Role in Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latta, Margaret Macintyre; Buck, Gayle

    2008-01-01

    Embodiment as a compelling way to rethink the nature of teaching and learning asks participants to see fundamentally what is at stake within teaching/learning situations, encountering ourselves and our relations to others/otherness. Drawing predominantly on the thinking of John Dewey and Maurice Merleau-Ponty the body's role within teaching and…

  12. Role of case presentation for teaching and learning activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Hirotaka

    2008-07-01

    In most clinical teaching settings, case presentation is the most frequently used teaching and learning activity. From an educational viewpoint, the two important roles of case presentations are the presenter's reflective opportunity and the clinician educator's clues to diagnose the presenter. When a presenter prepares for a case presentation, he/she has to organize all the information collected from a patient. The presenter sometimes does not recall what to ask or to examine with relation to pertinent differential diagnoses while seeing a patient, and afterward he/she might note that more information should have been collected. He/she is able to note the processes by reflection-on-action and improve the processes the next time. Such a reflective process is the most important role of case conference for a presenter. When a clinician has a consultation with a patient, early problem representation determines the quality of differential diagnoses. Clinicians make a "big picture" while listening to the patient (sometimes only a glance is enough to diagnose a patient) as problem representation to narrow down clinical areas to ask questions. If the early problem representation is far from the optimal direction, the possibility of misdiagnosis will be higher. To correct the cognitive processes that lead to misdiagnosis, disclosure of uncertainty will be the key. If the teaching environment among residents or young clinicians is too competitive, some might feel reluctant to disclose incorrect reasoning processes to their peers. Or, if a clinician educator is too authoritative, students may hide key information from the educator. The educator should construct the best environment for students to be able to disclose such uncertainty. The main role of clinician educators is to facilitate and evaluate case presentations and to suggest points for improvement. Neher et al's "five microskills" are a typical example of these processes, after a short presentation of an outpatient

  13. The Role of Case Presentation for Teaching and Learning Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Onishi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In most clinical teaching settings, case presentation is the most frequently used teaching and learning activity. From an educational viewpoint, the two important roles of case presentations are the presenter's reflective opportunity and the clinician educator's clues to diagnose the presenter. When a presenter prepares for a case presentation, he/she has to organize all the information collected from a patient. The presenter sometimes does not recall what to ask or to examine with relation to pertinent differential diagnoses while seeing a patient, and afterward he/she might note that more information should have been collected. He/she is able to note the processes by reflection-on-action and improve the processes the next time. Such a reflective process is the most important role of case conference for a presenter. When a clinician has a consultation with a patient, early problem representation determines the quality of differential diagnoses. Clinicians make a “big picture” while listening to the patient (sometimes only a glance is enough to diagnose a patient as problem representation to narrow down clinical areas to ask questions. If the early problem representation is far from the optimal direction, the possibility of misdiagnosis will be higher. To correct the cognitive processes that lead to misdiagnosis, disclosure of uncertainty will be the key. If the teaching environment among residents or young clinicians is too competitive, some might feel reluctant to disclose incorrect reasoning processes to their peers. Or, if a clinician educator is too authoritative, students may hide key information from the educator. The educator should construct the best environment for students to be able to disclose such uncertainty. The main role of clinician educators is to facilitate and evaluate case presentations and to suggest points for improvement. Neher et al's “five microskills” are a typical example of these processes, after a short

  14. The role of text in teaching foreign languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana A. Baranovskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The research is devoted to a multi-level study of the essence and role of text creation comprehension in teaching a foreign language. Capturing motivational and logical mental structures along with recognising communicative and cognitive aspects of a person's identity in a text are key linguopsychological elements of studying text activities. The scientific value of the research is in specifying the operational approach to describing a concrete level of a person's consciousness, on which cognitive structures acquire language realisation in the process on communication. Existence of a person's concsiousness is considered on three levels of abstracrion within the conscious: sensory field, associative field, motivational field. The contents of a person's language consciousness can be described through its thesaurus and presented as a filter that sifts through incoming meaningful information expressed in the sign form. The process of first language acquisition by a child is closely related to the apprearance of the correlation between dynamic and static systems of sound production (syllable production and articulation. Tranfer to foreign language acquisition will then be connected only with changing the characted of the correlation in each specific case. Foreign language teaching is connected with the learners' using the language skills they already possess. Peculiarity of language consciousness is revealed both when comparing lexical and grammatical categories in several languages, in which the forms of the same category have different meanings, and when comparing a limited set of such linguistic meanings with an unlimited number of linguistic features and relations between the objects.

  15. The Teaching Portfolio: The Department Chairperson's Role in Creating a Climate of Teaching Excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, John P.

    While the concept of the teaching portfolio is variously defined, portfolios generally provide the opportunity to display teaching abilities and accomplishments, as well as reflect on one's teaching. In using teaching portfolios, the departmental chairperson must create a climate in which faculty understand that putting together a portfolio will…

  16. Proletarianization of English Language Teaching: Iranian EFL Teachers and Their Alternative Role as Transformative Intellectuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Parvin

    2017-01-01

    In the field of English Language Teaching (ELT), attention has been shifted toward the alternative role of teachers as transformative intellectuals whereby transformation in teaching occurs from control and technical operations to criticism and intellectual reflection. This role enables teachers to focus on marginalized students' lived experiences…

  17. Effectiveness of Role Playing and Antiracist Teaching in Reducing Student Prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Josette

    1993-01-01

    Meta-analysis was used to integrate findings from studies that examined the effectiveness of role playing and antiracist teaching to reduce students' racial prejudice. Analysis of data from 26 studies indicated that role playing and antiracist teaching significantly reduced racial prejudice and were similarly effective. (SM)

  18. How physicians teach in the clinical setting: The embedded roles of teaching and clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinert, Yvonne; Basi, Mandeep; Nugus, Peter

    2017-12-01

    Clinical teaching lies at the heart of medical education. However, few studies have explored the embedded nature of teaching and clinical care. The goal of this study was to examine the process of clinical teaching as it naturally, and spontaneously, unfolds in a broad range of authentic contexts with medical students and residents. This focused ethnographic study consisted of 160 hours of participant observation and field interviews with three internal medicine teams. Thematic analysis guided data organization and interpretation. Three overlapping themes emerged: the interconnectedness between clinical work and pedagogy; a multiplicity of teachers; and the influence of space and artifacts on teaching and learning. Clinical teaching, which was deeply embedded in clinical care, was influenced by the acuity of patient problems, learner needs, and the context in which teaching unfolded; it also occurred on a spectrum that included planned, opportunistic, formal, and informal teaching (and learning). Study findings suggest that clinical teaching, which is marked by an intersection between service and teaching, can be viewed as an example of work-based teaching. They also yield suggestions for the enhancement of clinical teaching in inpatient settings, faculty development, and educational policies that recognize clinical teaching and learning.

  19. Educational research methods for researching innovations in teaching, learning and assessment: The nursing lecturer as researcher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks-Maran, Diane

    2015-11-01

    The author, who has had previous experience as a nurse researcher, has been engaged in helping nurse lecturers to undertake evaluation research studies into innovations in their teaching, learning and assessment methods. In order to undertake this work successfully, it was important to move from thinking like a nurse researcher to thinking like an educational researcher and developing the role of the nursing lecturer as researcher of their teaching. This article explores the difference between evaluation and evaluation research and argues for the need to use educational research methods when undertaking evaluation research into innovations in teaching, learning and assessment. A new model for educational evaluation research is presented together with two case examples of the model in use. The model has been tested on over 30 research studies into innovations in teaching, learning and assessment over the past 8 years. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Students Collaborating to Undertake Tracking Efforts for Sturgeon(SCUTES)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Students Collaborating to Undertake Tracking Efforts for Sturgeon (SCUTES) is a collaboration between NOAA Fisheries, sturgeon researchers, and teachers/educators in...

  1. Children's Teaching Skills: The Role of Theory of Mind and Executive Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis-Unger, Angela C.; Carlson, Stephanie M.

    2008-01-01

    Teaching others effectively may rely on knowledge about the mind as well as self-control processes. The goal of this investigation was to explore the role of theory of mind (ToM) and executive function (EF) in children's developing teaching skills. Children 3.5-5.5 years of age (N = 82) were asked to teach a confederate learner how to play a board…

  2. The Role of Discourse in Teaching Intercultural Professional Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartabayeva, Ayana A.; Zhaitapova, Altynai A.

    2016-01-01

    With Kazakhstan's accession to the Bologna Process, particular importance is attached to the professionally-oriented approach of teaching foreign languages to students, which facilitates formation of their foreign language communicative ability. The article deals with the problem of teaching English to students for the purpose of formation of…

  3. the role of teaching practice in teacher education programmes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal

    The teaching practice exercise is the culminating point where the relationship among the three major players: university supervisor, host teacher, and aspiring teacher interface to determine the quality of experience the aspiring teaching will take away. It becomes the bedrock on which the aspiring teacher once certified and ...

  4. Evaluating the Teaching Portfolio: A Role for Colleagues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centra, John A.

    2000-01-01

    The teaching portfolio has been promoted as a vehicle for collecting and documenting information about an individual's teaching performance. The problem of how best to assess the information has not yet been addressed adequately. This article describes how a teacher's colleagues can provide assessments of portfolios. (JM)

  5. The role of teaching practice in teacher education programmes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The teaching practice exercise is the culminating point where the relationship among the three major players: university supervisor, host teacher, and aspiring teacher interface to determine the quality of experience the aspiring teaching will take away. It becomes the bedrock on which the aspiring teacher once certified and ...

  6. The Role of Emotional Intelligence Skills in Teaching Excellence: The Validation of a Behavioral Skills Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harville, Pamela Cherie

    2012-01-01

    The role of emotional intelligence in effective teaching can be developed and enhanced through the use of an assessment instrument as a new evaluation and learning process for teachers. This involves a formative learning process for the qualities associated with excellent teaching characteristics and behaviors for use with teacher evaluation…

  7. The Role of Student Characteristics in Studying Micro Teaching-Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Tina

    2006-01-01

    This study explored the role of student characteristics in studying micro teaching-learning environments. The overarching hypothesis is that teachers teach differently to micro environments in their classrooms. This study is the first of a series exploring the following four questions: (1) What student profiles are identified at the beginning of a…

  8. On Semiotics and Jumping Frogs: The Role of Gesture in the Teaching of Subtraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Marie Therese

    2017-01-01

    In this article, I describe a research/teaching experience I undertook with a class of 5-year-old children in Malta. The topic was subtraction on the number line. I interpret the teaching/learning process through a semiotic perspective. In particular, I highlight the role played by the gesture of forming "frog jumps" on the number line.…

  9. Unveiling Pre-Service Teachers’ Attitudes Toward Teaching: The Role of Pedagogical Practicums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yimer Andrés Morales Cortés

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article reports a research developed at Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia with a group of pre-service teachers that was immersed in an English teaching practicum. The main purpose of this inquiry was to find out the role that practicum exerted on novice teachers’ attitudes towards teaching. Data were collected through interviews, questionnaires, verbal reports, and artifacts. The results evidenced the English practicum provided the teachers being trained opportunities to consider what teaching entails. Thus, the participants were able to reflect, develop awareness, positive attitudes, and satisfaction towards their teaching practice.

  10. Teaching in Two Tongues: Rethinking the Role of Language(s) in Teacher Education in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Shailaja; Viswanatha, Vanamala; Sahi, Jane

    2014-01-01

    This article is a sharing of emergent ideas about the potential role of languages in teacher education (TE) programmes in multilingual contexts in India. Languages play a critical role in TE programmes where they shape both the learning as well as the future teaching of prospective teachers. This role acquires particular significance in…

  11. Some personal notes on role plays as an excellent teaching tool : commentary on "using and developing role plays in teaching aimed at preparing for social responsibility".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunger, Iris

    2013-12-01

    Role plays are extremely valuable tools to address different aspects of teaching social responsibility, because they allow students to "live through" complex ethical decision making dilemmas. While role plays are getting high marks from students because their entertainment value is high, their educational value depends on their closeness to students' work experience and the skills of the teacher in helping students comprehend the lessons they are meant to convey.

  12. Anaesthetic specialist registrars in Ireland: current teaching practices and perceptions of their role as undergraduate teachers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, K

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Teaching is an important responsibility of non-consultant hospital doctors. In Ireland, specialist registrars (SpRs) in anaesthesia are contractually obliged to teach medical students, other doctors and nurses. Both medical students and fellow non-consultant hospital doctors attribute between 30 and 40% of their knowledge gain to non-consultant hospital doctors. METHODS: We carried out a confidential telephone survey of anaesthetic SpRs in Ireland regarding their current teaching practices and the perceptions of their role as undergraduate teachers. All the SpRs currently working in clinical practice in Ireland were eligible. RESULTS: Fifty-five of the 79 (70%) SpRs responded to the questionnaire. Only 7 (12.7%) of the respondents said they had been well trained as a teacher. The majority of the respondents stated that they would attend a learning-to-teach course\\/workshop if one was available, and felt that such a course would improve their ability as a teacher. Only 8 (14.5%) agreed that adequate emphasis is placed on commitment to teaching in the assessment of SpRs, both by individual departments and by the College of Anaesthetists. Anaesthetic SpRs in Ireland spend a considerable amount of time each day teaching undergraduate medical students, the majority (68.9%) stated that they had inadequate time to prepare for teaching. CONCLUSION: The majority of the respondents stated that they enjoy teaching, feel that they play an important role in undergraduate teaching but have inadequate time to prepare for teaching. An adequate emphasis is not placed on their commitment to teaching.

  13. Non-financial reporting, CSR frameworks and groups of undertakings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabó, Dániel Gergely; Sørensen, Karsten Engsig

    2017-01-01

    The recently adopted Directive on non-financial reporting (Directive 2014/95/EU) and several CSR frameworks are based on the assumption that groups of undertakings adopt, report and implement one group policy. This is a very important but also rather unique approach to groups. This article first...

  14. Using an undertaker's data to assess changing patterns of mortality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key informant interviews were done to support the undertaker's data and determine how families bear the burden of burying deceased relatives. Despite a disproportionate increase in deaths in certain age categories and evidence of worsening poverty, funerals remain large and elaborate affairs. Keywords: AIDS, burial ...

  15. Perceived Role of the Journal Clubs in Teaching Critical Appraisal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and Methods: The West African College of Surgeons and the National Postgraduate College of Nigeria have mandated that all residency programs teach and assess the ability to develop critical appraisal skills when reviewing the scientific literature. Residents at the revision course of the West African College of ...

  16. The Role of Values in Preservice Teachers' Decision to Teach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torsney, Benjamin M.; Ponnock, Annette R.; Lombardi, Doug

    2017-01-01

    The current study explored the values preservice teachers use as motivation for pursuing a teaching career. Preservice teachers (N = 97) from a large Northeastern urban university were chosen to complete a survey measuring personal utility value, social utility value, and epistemic value. Data analysis was conducted using exploratory factor…

  17. Axiological Role of English Adjectives in English Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerkina, Natalya N.; Kostina, Nataliia N.; Urazayeva, Nailya R.; Lomakina, Yekaterina A.; Emets, Tatiana V.; Gallyamova, Maria S.; Melnikova, Elena P.; Trutnev, Alexey Yu.; Lukina, Oksana A.

    2016-01-01

    The article focuses on peculiarities of English adjective teaching as one of main and important lexicological basis. As the English language nowadays is important and universal as a native language of worldwide society, exactly that's why process of learning must include wide range of techniques not only as a process of learning theories but also…

  18. Teaching the Prescriber's Role: The Psychology of Psychopharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, David L.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The author examines one aspect of the psychopharmacology curriculum: the psychology of psychopharmacology. Method: Drawing from his experience teaching this subject to trainees at many different levels and from an emerging evidence base suggesting that psychosocial factors in the doctor-patient relationship may be crucial for medication…

  19. Professional nurses' perception of their clinical teaching role at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Nursing education institutions in Lesotho face an increasing number of enrolments owing to a high demand for professional nurses to work in the community. Enrolments have doubled during the last 3 years, without an increase in teaching resources or staff. Professional nurses in the wards are expected to ...

  20. Factors influencing residents' evaluations of clinical faculty member teaching qualities and role model status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arah, Onyebuchi A; Heineman, Maas J; Lombarts, Kiki M J M H

    2012-04-01

      Evaluations of faculty members are widely used to identify excellent or substandard teaching performance. In order to enable such evaluations to be properly interpreted and used in faculty development, it is essential to understand the factors that influence resident doctors' (residents) evaluations of the teaching qualities of faculty members and their perceptions of faculty members as role-model specialists.   We carried out a cross-sectional survey within a longitudinal study of the System for Evaluation of Teaching Qualities (SETQ) of clinical teachers. The study sample included 889 residents and 1014 faculty members in 61 teaching programmes spanning 22 specialties in 20 hospitals in the Netherlands. Main outcome measures included residents' (i) global and (ii) specific ratings of faculty member teaching qualities, and (iii) global ratings of faculty members as role-model specialists. Statistical analysis was conducted using adjusted multivariable logistic generalised estimating equations.   In total, 690 residents (77.6%) completed 6485 evaluations of 962 faculty members, 848 (83.6%) of whom also self-evaluated. More recently certified faculty members, those who had attended a teacher training programme, and those who spent more time teaching than seeing patients or conducting research were more likely to score highly on most teaching qualities. However, faculty members who had undergone teacher training were less likely to be seen as role models (odds ratio [OR] 0.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.59-0.88). In addition, faculty members were evaluated slightly higher by male than female residents on core teaching domains and overall teaching quality, but were less likely to be seen as role models by male residents (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.67-0.97). Lastly, faculty members had higher odds of receiving top scores in specific teaching domains from residents in the first 4 years of residency and were less likely to be considered as role models by more

  1. The construction of teaching roles at Aalborg university centre, 1970–1980

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    F. C. Servant-Miklos, Virginie; Spliid, Claus Christian Monrad

    2017-01-01

    in Roskilde failed to make an impact in Aalborg, whereas teachers from AUC were more receptive to constructivist psychology as a theoretical framework for practice; third, through community-building and negotiation within the faculties, different interpretations of teaching roles emerged in the different......This paper proposes a historical analysis of the development of teaching roles at Aalborg University Centre in its first 10 years. The research highlights three processes through which the interpretation of the new ‘supervisor’ roles was constructed within the problem-oriented, project......-based educational model of AUC. First, the authors show that the institutional framework for teaching roles was deliberately left open to significant interpretation from the various faculties of the university; second, the critical theoretical model that had served as a guideline for the inception of project work...

  2. On-Line Role-Play as a Teaching Method in Engineering Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobo, Adolfo; Conde, Olga Ma.; Quintela, Ma. Ángeles; Mirapéix, Jesús Ma.; López-Higuera, José Miguel

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we propose adapting role-play teaching methodology to engineering studies. The role of a maintenance technician, a relevant job profile for engineering graduates is has chosen. The interaction is based on email exchange, with the instructor included in the simulation to help guide the activity and achieve learning objectives. In this…

  3. A Study to Understand the Role of Visual Arts in the Teaching and Learning of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanapal, Saroja; Kanapathy, Ravi; Mastan, Jamilah

    2014-01-01

    This research was carried out to understand the role of visual arts in the teaching and learning of science among Grade 3 teachers and students. A mixture of qualitative and quantitative research design was used to discover the different perceptions of both teachers and students on the role of visual arts in science. The data for the research was…

  4. Program directors in their role as leaders of teaching teams in residency training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slootweg, I.A.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Heineman, M.J.; Scherpbier, A.; Lombarts, K.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Program directors have a formal leading position within a teaching team. It is not clear how program directors fulfill their leadership role in practice. In this interview study we aim to explore the role of the program director as strategic leader, based on the research-question: What

  5. The Use of Video Role Play for Teaching Therapeutic Communication Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Elaine Ng; Anthony O’Brien; Sandra Mackey; Hong-Gu He; David G. Arthur

    2011-01-01

    Background: Effective Communication is a fundamental skill for practice across health care settings and is a component ofundergraduate nursing programs around the world. Resource materials appropriate for the teaching of communication in an Asiancontext are lacking.Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a self-developed video using role play in facilitating teaching andlearning associated with therapeutic communication.Methods: Videos were produced which demonstrated the...

  6. Researcher or nurse? Difficulties of undertaking semi-structured interviews on sensitive topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Susan

    2014-09-01

    To reflect on the author's personal and professional journey when undertaking semi-structured interviews on sensitive topics with potentially vulnerable people. When discussing care at the end of life, researchers must accept that some participants may become distressed or emotional, depending on their previous experiences. Interviews that involve sensitive topics require careful planning. The semi-structured interviews were conducted as part of the author's PhD study examining the experiences of advance care planning among family caregivers of people with advanced dementia. A reflection on my personal and professional journey when undertaking semi-structured interviews on sensitive topics with potentially vulnerable people. The frustration and tragedy of dementia, as experienced by the family caregivers, were powerful and required the author to exert self-control to avoid being overly sympathetic and offering words of reassurance, agreement and comfort. This blurring of roles between researcher and nurse has implications for all nurse researchers who undertake qualitative interviews, particularly when an intense emotional response is likely. Nurse researchers should plan and prepare for potential blurring of roles during emotional interviews and should never automatically assume that they are sufficiently prepared as a result of their previous experience and nurse training.

  7. Original article Personality determinants of motivation to undertake vocational training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Godlewska-Werner

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Recently, at a time of frequent changes in the economic and socio-economic circumstances, knowledge acquired in the course of formal education is insufficient. Especially, the education system is still criticized for a lack of flexibility and strong resistance to change. Therefore, regular participation in various forms of training is required. Employee education and training are becoming an optimal answer to complex business challenges. The aim of this study was to determine which personality traits are responsible for the strength of motivation to undertake vocational training and other educational forms. Participants and procedure The study included 104 staff members of Polish companies (60 women and 44 men. The study used Cattell’s 16 PF Questionnaire and the scales of readiness to undertake training and further education as a measure of the strength of motivation (Kawecka, Łaguna & Tabor, 2010. Results The study showed that openness to change and tension (primary traits had the greatest impact on the intention and planning to take vocational training. Additionally, the intention and planning to take vocational training were found to be associated with mindedness, independence, self-control, and anxiety (secondary traits. Such traits as rule-consciousness [G], social-boldness [H], abstractedness [M], and apprehension [O] (primary traits, were important in some aspects, which could constitute a background for further research and discussion of the results. Conclusions The obtained results lead to the conclusion that some of the individual differences in personality determine the motivation to undertake vocational training.

  8. Role of faculty development programs in improving teaching and learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf M. F. Kamel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Faculty development programs (FDPs have proven to be successful for improving teaching skills in higher education. This review article summarizes literature reviews and resource books on faculty development. It tackled why FDP is important, history of FDP in the past years, and questioned whether FDP produced any positive effect on students' academic achievement as well as the different methods to assess FDPs effectiveness. The review also discussed how to establish FDP, presented its ideal structure, features that make FDP effective, and outlined the barriers to its successful implementation as well as the future vision. This report also highlighted the situation of FDP in Saudi Arabia. Finally, the review concluded that professional FDPs produce promising outcomes in the learning and teaching practices and recommended that teachers in higher education should attend FDP training activities on regular basis and that the scope of planned FDPs should extend beyond the health professions discipline, to include social skills necessary for collaboration, professional growth as well as management, and leadership abilities.

  9. The role of simulation in teaching pediatric resuscitation: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Y

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Yiqun Lin,1 Adam Cheng2 1KidSIM-ASPIRE Simulation Research Program, Alberta Children's Hospital, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 2KidSIM-ASPIRE Research Program, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Emergency Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, AB, Canada Abstract: The use of simulation for teaching the knowledge, skills, and behaviors necessary for effective pediatric resuscitation has seen widespread growth and adoption across pediatric institutions. In this paper, we describe the application of simulation in pediatric resuscitation training and review the evidence for the use of simulation in neonatal resuscitation, pediatric advanced life support, procedural skills training, and crisis resource management training. We also highlight studies supporting several key instructional design elements that enhance learning, including the use of high-fidelity simulation, distributed practice, deliberate practice, feedback, and debriefing. Simulation-based training is an effective modality for teaching pediatric resuscitation concepts. Current literature has revealed some research gaps in simulation-based education, which could indicate the direction for the future of pediatric resuscitation research. Keywords: simulation, pediatric resuscitation, medical education, instructional design, crisis resource management, health care

  10. Preparing Biology Graduate Teaching Assistants for Their Roles as Instructors: An Assessment of Institutional Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schussler, Elisabeth E.; Read, Quentin; Marbach-Ad, Gili; Miller, Kristen; Ferzli, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    The inconsistency of professional development (PD) in teaching for graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) is a widespread problem in higher education. Although GTAs serve an important role in retention of undergraduate science majors and in promotion of scientific literacy in nonmajors, they often lack preparation and ongoing support for teaching. Given the recent national focus on instructional quality in introductory courses, our goal was to use an online survey to identify current practices of teaching PD for biology GTAs and compare these results with the last national survey on this topic. In responses from 71 participant institutions, 96% reported some mandatory teaching preparation for biology GTAs; however, 52% of these programs required 10 or fewer hours per year. Respondents wanted to change their programs to include more pedagogical information and teaching observations with feedback to their GTAs. Programmatic self-ratings of satisfaction with GTA PD were positively correlated with the number of topics discussed during PD. Although more schools are requiring GTA PD for teaching compared with the last national survey, the lack of program breadth at many schools warrants a national conversation with regard to recent calls for improving undergraduate instruction. PMID:26231562

  11. Teaching for Learner Autonomy: The Teacher's Role and Sociocultural Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feryok, Anne

    2013-01-01

    What is the role of the teacher in developing learner autonomy? The limited research in this area is seldom situated in theory and often based on self-reported data. This study is situated in sociocultural theory and draws on two constructs, the zone of proximal development and imitation, to explain the teacher's role in developing autonomy. The…

  12. ASPECTS REGARDING THE ROLE OF FACILITATORS IN CREATIVE LEARNING AND INNOVATIVE TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TODORUȚ AMALIA VENERA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I have analysed a series of facilitators that determine creativity and innovation in teaching learning processes, emphasising the role of assessment, organizational culture and information technologies as relevant and essential elements within this challenging approach to create the conditions for an intelligent development of the educational processes. Also I approached issues related to creative learning and innovative teaching in a society in which knowledge takes more and more intense forms and, they require changes and deep transformations in all educational environments. The fundamental objective was to underline the need to learn creatively and to teach innovatively, given the conditions of the development of information technologies and a deeper and deeper immersion in this information environment, with effects on involving more effectively the students in their own learning approach. Based on scientific researches, observation and comparative analyzes, I identified the facilitators which, along with the technologies, support the creative learning and innovative teaching.

  13. The roles of the instructors in an ESP-task based language teaching course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vargas Vásquez, José Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The graduate program in Teaching English at the University of Costa Rica offers yearly English courses to satisfy the language learning needs at different departments, research centers, or similar institutions. The objective of this article was to analyze the extent to which a group of student teachers fulfilled the roles of the instructors in the Task Based Language Teaching method used in the graduate program. The study used a mixed-methods approach and the subjects were three instructors during their teaching practicum. The roles of the instructors were assessed by the practicum supervisors, fellow students in the practicum, the students in the course, and the instructors themselves through rubrics, observation sheets, surveys, and teaching journals. The results from the different instruments using different scales pointed to the instructors fulfilling the roles of sequencing tasks and motivating the learners a majority of the times. The roles of preparing the learners for tasks and raising consciousness were fulfilled to a lesser extent, which indicated that the instructors needed to work further on these areas. The study concluded with recommendations for improving the roles that revealed weaknesses, notably aimed to provide a manageable numbers of vocabulary items and grammar structures in the pretask, as well as to provide prompt feedback, and to elicit students’ knowledge for the development of lessons.

  14. Rethinking Teaching in STEM Education in a Community College: Role of Instructional Consultation and Digital Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurland, Shelley Chih-Hsian

    Community college faculty members educate almost half of all U.S. undergraduates, who are often more diverse and more academically underprepared when compared to undergraduate students who attend four-year institutions. In addition, faculty members in community colleges are facing increased accountability for meeting student learning outcomes, expectations to adjust their teaching practices to include active learning practices, and expectations to incorporate more technologies into the classroom. Faculty developers are one of the support structures that faculty members can look to in order to meet those challenges. A survey of literature in faculty development suggests that instructional consultation can play an important role in shaping and transforming teaching practices. Hence, this action research study examined my work using instructional consulting with four full-time STEM faculty colleagues in order to examine and shape their teaching practices with and without the use of digital technologies. The two foci of the research, examining shifts in faculty participants' teaching practices, and my instructional consulting practices, were informed by Thomas and Brown's (2011) social view of learning and the concept of teaching and learning in a "co-learning" environment. Two dominant factors emerged regarding faculty participants' shift in teaching practices. These factors concerned: 1) the perception of control and 2) individual faculty participant's comfort level, expectations, and readiness. In addition to these two dominant factors, the instructional consultation process also supported a range of shifts in either mindset and/or teaching practices. My analysis showed that the use of digital technologies was not an essential factor in shifting faculty participant mindset and/or teaching practices, instead digital technologies were used to enhance the teaching process and students' learning experiences.

  15. Teachers’ Affective Well-being and Teaching Experience: The Protective Role of Perceived Emotional Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Fernández-Berrocal

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Teaching is a highly emotional and demanding profession. Developing emotional well-being among teachers will benefit not only the teachers themselves, but also their students. Previous studies have shown the protective role of emotional intelligence (EI as well as inconsistencies in the years of teaching experience variable on positive and negative work-specific variables. The aim of the present study was to analyze how EI and years of teaching experience are related to affective well-being in teachers. Further, we analyze the moderator role of perceived EI on the link between level of teaching experience and affective well-being. For these purpose, 524 teachers from different Spanish public schools took part in the study. They first completed the Trait Meta-Mood Scale-24 (TMMS-24 for measuring perceived EI, which evaluates three scales: Attention to one’s Feelings (Attention, Emotional Clarity (Clarity, and Mood Repair (Repair. Secondly, they completed the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS for affective well-being, which measures Positive Affect (PA and Negative Affect (NA. Finally, teachers indicated their years of teaching experience. The results revealed that teaching experience and attention variables are counterproductive in determining lower PA and higher NA, respectively. Clarity and Repair appeared to be a significant determinant of PA and NA, with higher Clarity and Repair determining higher PA and lower NA. Moderator analyses showed how teaching experience significantly decreased PA in teachers who had average or low levels of Repair, but not for those with higher levels of this variable, emphasizing the important role of Repair as a protector of affective well-being in teachers. Limitations and future areas for research are discussed.

  16. Improving English Language Learners’ Idiomatic Competence: Does Mode of Teaching Play a Role?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab Abolfazli Khonbi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Idioms feature prominently in daily communication. Accordingly, teaching and learning idioms should be a primary concern in language education, including English education. However, there is relatively little research on the role of formal instruction of idioms in developing idiomatic competence. This study investigated the instructional effects teaching idioms in four modes (short movie clip, sentence-use, definition, and role-play had on learners’ idiomatic competence. An idioms test was distributed among 47 English language learners at two language institutes to establish their idiomatic knowledge prior to the experiment. One hundred idioms were taught to all participants in the course of one month. The one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA of the posttest results revealed significant differences among the four idiom-teaching modes. Discussions and pedagogical implications are provided in the paper.

  17. The Use of Video Role Play for Teaching Therapeutic Communication Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Ng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Effective Communication is a fundamental skill for practice across health care settings and is a component ofundergraduate nursing programs around the world. Resource materials appropriate for the teaching of communication in an Asiancontext are lacking.Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a self-developed video using role play in facilitating teaching andlearning associated with therapeutic communication.Methods: Videos were produced which demonstrated the fundamental communication skills of listening, understanding,exploring and comforting/supporting, using role play. These were shown to Year 1 nursing students in tutorials over four weeks.Their usefulness was evaluated using a self-developed questionnaire. Among 74 questionnaires distributed at the end of thefourth tutorial, 72 were returned, with a 97% response rate.Results: Most students agreed that the video clips provided useful examples for role-playing the communication skills (89%,helped trigger them to perform role-playing (74%, were useful to improve understanding of different communication skills(93% and helped them learn from other students’ role-playing performance (87%. Overall impression of using the videos in thetutorial teaching was very useful (27% and useful (68%.Conclusions: Most students valued the videos developed purposely for teaching therapeutic communication and recommendedthat the videos be used in the future. Using video role plays facilitated the teaching and learning process and enhancedundergraduate nursing students’ understanding and application of communication skills. More video clips will be developed inthe future, with improved quality and with a broader range of health care communication scenarios demonstrated in order to beused more widely.

  18. Changes in the functions of undertakings in electricity supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberlack, H.W.

    1976-01-01

    For the electricity supply industry also it is necessary, by means of more intensive publicity work, to achieve the general realisation that neither new laws nor intervention of the state are required for dealing in the interests of the consumer with the problems arising, from great changes in all fields of business enterprise. It is more important for the electricity supply undertakings (EVU), by means of executive power and the administration of justice, to be put a position to carry out in the most efficient manner the functions entrusted to them by the Federal Government under the Power Supply Law and the energy programme. (orig.) [de

  19. Teaching medical ethics: what is the impact of role models? Some experiences from Swedish medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynoe, N; Löfmark, R; Thulesius, H O

    2008-04-01

    The goal of the present study was to elucidate what influences medical students' attitudes and interests in medical ethics. At the end of their first, fifth and last terms, 409 medical students from all six medical schools in Sweden participated in an attitude survey. The questions focused on the students' experience of good and poor role models, attitudes towards medical ethics in general and perceived effects of the teaching of medical ethics. Despite a low response rate at some schools, this study indicates that increased interest in medical ethics was related to encountering good physician role models, and decreased interest, to encountering poor role models. Physicians involved in the education of medical students seem to teach medical ethics as role models even when ethics is not on the schedule. The low response rate prevents us from drawing definite conclusions, but the results could be used as hypotheses to be further scrutinised.

  20. Computer-supported games and role plays in teaching water management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Arjen Ysbert

    2012-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for an interdisciplinary approach in teaching water management. Computer-supported games and role plays offer the potential of creating an environment in which different disciplines come together and in which students are challenged to develop integrated understanding.

  1. Navigating the Role of Graduate Student on the Teaching Team: Life in the Incubator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Laurel P.; Anderson, Mallory A.; Tucker, Teresa W.; Powell, Gwynn M.

    2013-01-01

    Pride, fear, and stress exist on the roller coaster that is the work-life of a graduate student functioning in the role of team member in a mixed-level, collaborative teaching team. These emotions are not uncommon to faculty/graduate student work relationships, but given the power differential, the interdependent team dynamic adds an incubator…

  2. Teachers' Trust in Role Partners, Intention to Continue in Teaching, and Schools Social Composition in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addi-Raccah, Audrey

    2012-01-01

    The study examines teachers' trust in their role partners and its relation to their intention to continue teaching at schools with high and low socioeconomic composition. Based on a questionnaire completed by 149 Israeli teachers in in-service training programs, and interviews with 10 teachers, it was found that teachers attribute different social…

  3. The Vital Role of Basic Mathematics in Teaching and Learning the Mole Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Alka; Koul, Anjni

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the importance of activity-based teaching in understanding the mole concept and the vital role of basic mathematical operations. It describes needs-based training for teachers in a professional development programme in India. Analysis of test results before and after the training indicates that teachers improved their…

  4. Teacher Perceptions of Professional Role and Innovative Teaching at Elementary Schools in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chih-Lun; Li, Feng-Chin

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to explore the association between primary school teachers' perceptions of professional role and their innovative teaching in Central Taiwan. Quantitative research methods were employed, and data were collected from 554 Central Taiwanese teachers. The results of the present study indicated that elementary school…

  5. Prospective Teachers' Future Time Perspective and Professional Plans about Teaching: The Mediating Role of Academic Optimism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Altay

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the mediating role of prospective teachers' academic optimism in the relationship between their future time perspective and professional plans about teaching. A total of 396 prospective teachers voluntarily participated in the study. Correlation, regression, and structural equation modeling analyses were conducted in…

  6. Teaching-Learning Conceptions and Academic Achievement: The Mediating Role of Test Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bas, Gökhan

    2016-01-01

    The current research aimed at examining the mediating role of test anxiety in the relationship between teaching-learning conceptions and academic achievement. The correlation investigation model was adopted in this research. The participants of the research were volunteering teachers (n = 108) and students (n = 526) from five different high…

  7. The Role and Place of Fear in What It Means to Teach and to Learn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latta, Margaret Macintyre

    2005-01-01

    A dominant theme arising out of a research project concerned with elucidating theory-practice relations in prospective and practicing teachers is the role and place of fear in what it means to teach and to learn. The text for this paper grew out of extended conversations the researcher had with 12 of these participants forming a self-study…

  8. The Role of Computer Technology in Teaching Reading and Writing: Preschool Teachers' Beliefs and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihmeideh, Fathi

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated preschool teachers' beliefs and practices regarding the use of computer technology in teaching reading and writing in Jordan. The researcher developed a questionnaire consisting of two scales--Teachers' Beliefs Scale (TB Scale) and Teachers' Practices Scale (TP Scale)--to examine the role of computer technology in teaching…

  9. The Role of an Academic Development Unit in Supporting Institutional VET Learning and Teaching Change Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotinatos, Nina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the role and impact of a central academic development unit (ADU) within an institutional strategic and operational change management project. The primary goal of this project was to improve vocational education and training (VET) learning and teaching practice in an Australian dual-sector regional university.…

  10. Playing with the Language: Investigating the Role of Communicative Games in an Arab Language Teaching System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bulushi, Ali H.; Al-Issa, Ali S.

    2017-01-01

    Language learning games combine a number of linguistic, psychological and social elements that have been found to have considerable advantages and powerfully impact language learning and teaching. They are incorporated into language curricula to promote interactive engaging learning. This study investigates the role of games in the Omani ELT…

  11. Improving English Language Learners' Idiomatic Competence: Does Mode of Teaching Play a Role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khonbi, Zainab Abolfazli; Sadeghi, Karim

    2017-01-01

    Idioms feature prominently in daily communication. Accordingly, teaching and learning idioms should be a primary concern in language education, including English education. However, there is relatively little research on the role of formal instruction of idioms in developing idiomatic competence. This study investigated the instructional effects…

  12. The Role of New Technologies in Competence Teaching in Higher Education: The Case of Accounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Mar Marin Sanchez, Ma; Ronco, Alicia Mateos

    2010-01-01

    The Spanish educational system will require certain changes in order to achieve the Bologna objectives for the European Higher Education Area, including a more professional profile, with new activities and roles for both students and teachers, who must assume new skills that will affect concepts and attitudes related to the teaching and learning…

  13. The teaching of African languages to European students: The role of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The teaching of African languages to European students: The role of linguistic pragmatics illustrated by Swahili. Reinhard Klein-Arendt. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE ...

  14. Personality and Attitude towards Teaching Profession: Mediating Role of Self Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üstüner, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to examine the correlation between the five factor personality traits of pre-service teachers and their attitudes towards the teaching profession and to test the mediating role of the pre-service teachers' self-efficacy beliefs. The study population included pre-service teachers that attended the…

  15. Teachers and Teaching for the New Millennium: The Role of HBCUs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Jacqueline Jordan; Fenwick, Leslie T.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a framework for a discussion of the role of historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) that focuses on teachers and teaching for the new millennium. HBCUs have the potential to make a significant difference in solving one of the most intractable problems in K-12 education: how to recruit, retain, and develop…

  16. The role of veterinary medical librarians in teaching information literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkelman, Andrea L; Viera, Ann R; Bickett-Weddle, Danelle A

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study seeks to determine the nature of the instruction librarians provide to veterinary medical students at all 28 United States veterinary colleges. A secondary goal of the study was to determine in what ways and to what extent librarians participated in other instructional activities at their colleges. Over half of the librarians formally taught in one or more courses, predominantly in the first two years of the veterinary curriculum. One presentation per course was most common. Over half of the librarians interviewed stated that evidence-based veterinary medicine was taught at their colleges, and about half of these librarians collaborated with veterinary faculty in this instruction. Many librarians participated in orientation for first-year veterinary students. The librarians also taught instructional sessions for residents, interns, faculty, graduate students, and practicing veterinarians. This study found that librarians teach information literacy skills both formally and informally, but, in general, instruction by librarians was not well integrated into the curriculum. This study advances several recommendations to help veterinary students develop information literacy skills. These include: encourage veterinary faculty and administrators to collaborate more closely with librarians, incorporate a broader array of information literacy skills into assignments, and add a literature evaluation course to the curriculum.

  17. On-line role-play as a teaching method in engineering studies

    OpenAIRE

    Cobo, Adolfo; Conde Campos, Olga; Quintela, Mª Ángeles; Mirapeix, Jesús Mª; López Higuera, José MIguel

    2011-01-01

    We propose to adapt the role-play teaching methodology to engineering studies, trying to overcome obstacles like its exclusive association with fantasy games or its demand of social skills. We have chosen the role of a maintenance technician, a relevant job profile for engineering graduates. The interaction is based on email exchange, and the instructor is included in the simulation to guide the activity development and the achievement of the learning objectives. In this paper, our experience...

  18. The Video Role Model as an Enterprise Teaching Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Martyn; Collins, Amanda

    2003-01-01

    This article examines the need to develop a more enterprising approach to learning by adopting an experiential approach. It specifically examines the use of video case studies of entrepreneurial role models within an enterprise module at Leeds Metropolitan University. The exercise enables students to act as a consultant or counsellor and apply…

  19. Using Online Role Play to Teach Internet Safety Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wishart, J. M.; Oades, C. E.; Morris, M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on an evaluation of Net-Detectives, a creative online role play activity aimed at 9-12 year olds. Net-Detectives forms part of Kidsmart, an Internet awareness programme aimed at school children. It was evaluated through a multiple method data collection using questionnaire surveys, follow up telephone interviews with teachers…

  20. Can Role-Play with Virtual Humans Teach Interpersonal Skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    2007, with concentrations in cinema -television and technology commercialization. He has led several mixed-reality- and game-based training efforts at...the role-play session are simply not detectable on an immediate posttest—a common pattern in the practice- effect literature (e.g., Roediger

  1. Role Socialization Theory: The Sociopolitical Realities of Teaching Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, K. Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Much has been learned about the socialization of physical education (PE) teachers using occupational socialization theory (OST). However, important to understanding any socialization process is explaining how the roles that individuals play are socially constructed and contextually bound. OST falls short of providing a comprehensive overview of…

  2. Exploring grade 3 teachers' resistance to `take up' progressive mathematics teaching roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westaway, Lise; Graven, Mellony

    2018-03-01

    This article addresses the question: Why teachers of mathematics have yet to `take up' progressive roles? Drawing on the philosophy of critical realism and its methodological equivalent, social realism, we analyse interview and observation data of four grade 3 teachers, with the view to identifying the mechanisms conditioning the expression of teachers' identities. In so doing, we show how post-apartheid changes in systemic roles of teachers create contradictory tensions for teachers as these bring their own mathematical learning and teaching experiences into contradiction with the new post-apartheid roles they are mandated to enact. We examine how this contradiction, together with beliefs about mathematics, pedagogy and learners, is expressed in the teaching of grade 3 mathematics. We maintain that the complementarity between teachers' beliefs and old systemic roles provides an explanation for why teachers of grade 3 mathematics have yet to `take-up' progressive roles. The implications point to the need for teacher development that creates enablers that lead to changes in classroom practices that align with policy-designated, progressive roles in teaching mathematics.

  3. The role of classical and modern teaching methods in business education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conțu Eleonora Gabriela

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the training-educational process is a dynamic and complex process which uses both classical and modern teaching methods in order to obtain performance in education. Even though traditional teaching methods have a formal character interaction between teacher and students, this is face-to-face and therefore students can give an immediate feedback. From this point of view classical teaching methods are important from time to time. In Romania, in the European context the role of effective learning strategies represents the key point for the education process. The role of teachers in developing creativity to those students who want to learn in an interactive way is very important because they should imply that students directly in the training -educational process. In this context the educational process must be student centered because only in this way their critical thinking and creativity is developed. We can say that when non-formal and informal learning is combined with formal learning the scope of pedagogy is accomplish. In contemporary context education is regarded as an innovative concept which is used to produce performance at the individual level and also, at institutional level, education provides support in order to build strategies according to the challenges from the labour market. The paper is based on a qualitative research, conducted on a sample of 100 people aged between 19 and 23 years old (students at a Business School. The key question raised at this point is: What is the role of classical and modern teaching methods in training-educational process? The objectives of this study are the following: 1. highlighting the context of higher education in Romania; 2. presenting the role of university strategy in contemporary context; 3. highlighting the importance of using classical/modern teaching methods in business education; 4. presenting the role of innovation and creativity in business education; 5. presenting the analysis

  4. Role modeling: a method for teaching caring in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelms, T P; Jones, J M; Gray, D P

    1993-01-01

    This study focused on the belief of some nurse educators that caring cannot be taught directly and is learned by students from faculty role-modelpan>ing and faculty student interactions in clinical, classroom, and other situations. The purpose was to further explore these beliefs to determine if nursing students perceived that they learn caring behaviors through observing role-modelpan>ing by faculty, as well as to explore students' perceptions of other means by which they learn about caring. Since opportunities for faculty to model nurse caring behaviors in the clinical setting are varied and serendipitous, a videotaped scenario simulating a patient care situation, using professional actors, was created and shown to nursing students. The videotape was seen by 137 BSN and ADN students who then recorded their perceptions on a two-page open-ended questionnaire developed by the researchers. Results from this study indicated that students do learn about caring from faculty role-modelpan>ing, as well as from health care staff they encounter, often in a very paradoxical way. Many interesting and unintended results also occurred through the use of this research approach.

  5. Teaching materials and the roles of EFL/ESL teachers practice and theory

    CERN Document Server

    McGrath, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Teaching Materials and the Roles of EFL/ESL Teachers is published amidst a decade long increase in academic publications and training courses concerned with the evaluation and design of English language teaching materials. It is timely to consider what effect the advice on offer has had on teachers' practice. Are teachers evaluating materials carefully, using textbooks in the ways expected by textbook writers, developing their own materials, and mediating between materials and learners in the ways advised in the professional literature? The book explores these issues from a variety of

  6. Playing with the Language: Investigating the Role of Communicative Games in an Arab Language Teaching System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Playing with the Language: Investigating the Role of Communicative Games in an Arab Language Teaching System

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Language learning games combine a number of linguistic, psychological and social elements that have been found to have considerable advantages and powerfully impact language learning and teaching. They are incorporated into language curricula to promote interactive engaging learning. This study investigates the role of games in the Omani ELT syllabus through conducting a thorough content analysis of Basic Education System English language textbooks across all grades as well as seeking the attitudes of teachers and students of three public schools representing the three teaching cycles in the educational system. A content analysis form and a questionnaire were used to collect data. Results showed that the Omani ELT syllabi endorsed a modest number of communicative games across grades, the majority of which focus on teaching vocabulary with a very timid focus on the language skills. Moreover, students hold highly positive attitudes about the role of games in improving their language whereas teachers have moderately positive attitudes about their role. Implications of these results on the language learning and teaching context are outlined.

  7. Research and implementation of role-playing teaching mode supported by gamification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xu; Zhang, Zhenglei; Sun, Lei

    2017-08-01

    The paper designs a Role-playing Teaching Mode Supported by Gamification to stimulate the interest of learners. In the process of creating the teaching mode, the factors of incentive factors, teaching mode and course selection are the most important factors gained by investigate and research. Then under the guidance of the three factors, a leaning framework of role-playing teaching mode which is called Gamification Learning Framework (GM1.0) is determined. In the design of GM1.0, First, collect problem cases which students interested in and select three courses which are Algorithm Design, Data Structure and Program Design. Then, extract the knowledge points of the three courses and merge into the problem cases to form game maps. Last, Learners gain a role-playing actor to join games with the support of game maps and finish selected tasks reaching a higher task level by upgrade checkpoints, experience promotions and award medals changing. After that, learners’ enthusiasm for learning can be stimulated and the innovation abilities can also be improved gradually.

  8. Teaching Reading Comprehension in English in a Distance Web-Based Course: New Roles for Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Hugo Muñoz Marín

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Distance web-based learning is a popular strategy in ELT teaching in Colombia. Despite of the growth of experiences, there are very few studies regarding teachers' participation in these courses. This paper reports preliminary findings of an on-going study aiming at exploring the roles that a teacher plays in an efl reading comprehension distance web-based course. Data analysis suggests that teachers play new roles solving technical problems, providing immediate feedback, interacting with students in a non traditional way, providing time management advice, and acting as a constant motivator. The authors conclude that EFL teachers require training for this new teaching roles and the analysis of web-based distance learning environments as an option under permanent construction that requires their active participation.

  9. Use of role play in undergraduate teaching of ethics - an experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noone, Padmini Hannah; Raj Sharma, Sudhamshu; Khan, Fairoz; Raviraj, K G; Shobhana, S S

    2013-04-01

    Lecture is the traditional way of teaching adopted in our routine. Learning about medical ethics used to be done by lecture. All of us felt that learning some aspects of ethics requires a deeper understanding of the topics especially those areas involving feelings and emotions. So the role play method was chosen. We taught the topics consent and euthanasia by both the didactic method and by role play to the students of second year MBBS during the period June-July 2012 and then we compared the results. We have tried to evaluate role play vis-a vis lecture by analyzing the feedback from the students. The affective component analysis requires a different method of teaching and assessment as shown by our experience. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  10. Example of Using Narratives in Teaching Programming: Roles of Variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timcenko, Olga

    2007-01-01

      Abstract. This paper describes a case study of using narratives to motivate non-technology inclined children, 11-15 years old, to learn programming, using LEGO Mindstorms robots and RoboLab graphical programming language. Case study was done during 2004/2005 and 2005/2006 school years, following...... two different school teams participating in FIRST LEGO League competitions. Using narrative concept and a concept of roles of variables, it was possible to explain several searching and sorting algorithms to children, including an algorithm of finding minimal/maximal value from the set of input values...

  11. An undertaking planning game for the electricity supply industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troescher, H.

    1977-01-01

    Planning games have been found satisfactory in many field in political and economic life. In particular the more convenient access to electronic calculators has made a contrinution to their wider use. It is therefore surprising that the first planning game which has become known for the electricity supply industry was first published in the year 1975. This is the planning game for the Bernischen Kraftwerke AG, which is based on a simplified model of a small electricity supply undertaking (EVU). This planning game was adapted in the RWE to the conditions in larger EVU and a few additional model components were added. Besides the general points of view on planning games for EVU the author deals with the extended planning game which is termed in the article PEW. (orig.) [de

  12. Preparing Biology Graduate Teaching Assistants for Their Roles as Instructors: An Assessment of Institutional Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schussler, Elisabeth E; Read, Quentin; Marbach-Ad, Gili; Miller, Kristen; Ferzli, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    The inconsistency of professional development (PD) in teaching for graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) is a widespread problem in higher education. Although GTAs serve an important role in retention of undergraduate science majors and in promotion of scientific literacy in nonmajors, they often lack preparation and ongoing support for teaching. Given the recent national focus on instructional quality in introductory courses, our goal was to use an online survey to identify current practices of teaching PD for biology GTAs and compare these results with the last national survey on this topic. In responses from 71 participant institutions, 96% reported some mandatory teaching preparation for biology GTAs; however, 52% of these programs required 10 or fewer hours per year. Respondents wanted to change their programs to include more pedagogical information and teaching observations with feedback to their GTAs. Programmatic self-ratings of satisfaction with GTA PD were positively correlated with the number of topics discussed during PD. Although more schools are requiring GTA PD for teaching compared with the last national survey, the lack of program breadth at many schools warrants a national conversation with regard to recent calls for improving undergraduate instruction. © 2015 E. E. Schussler et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2015 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  13. The role of radiology in anatomy teaching in UK medical schools: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, T J; Zhang, T; Taylor, H L; Brassett, C

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the current use of radiology in anatomy teaching across the UK, and to determine the level of interest expressed in expanding its role in medical education. A 22-question electronic survey was distributed to the organisers of anatomy teaching at 35 UK medical schools. The questionnaire explored the use of radiology in their anatomy course, the different kinds of available resources, and attitudes towards integrating radiology into anatomy teaching. Responses were received from 29/35 (83%) medical schools. Among the respondents, radiological anatomy featured in all but one of their curricula. Of those schools using radiology to aid anatomy teaching, 20/28 expressed a wish for more radiology in the curriculum. Timetabling constraints constituted one of the main difficulties in further implementation. In addition, 22/28 medical schools had already fostered collaborative links with local radiology departments, with 18 of these expressing a wish for further cooperation. Of the remaining six schools without current collaboration, four would like to establish connections. Compared with previous studies, this national survey shows a definite increase in radiological anatomy in medical school curricula with a stronger presence of radiologists in anatomy teaching. Despite this, most anatomy departments still express a desire to increase the radiological component in their courses. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Program directors in their role as leaders of teaching teams in residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slootweg, Irene A; van der Vleuten, Cees; Heineman, Maas Jan; Scherpbier, Albert; Lombarts, Kiki M J M H

    2014-12-01

    Program directors have a formal leading position within a teaching team. It is not clear how program directors fulfill their leadership role in practice. In this interview study we aim to explore the role of the program director as strategic leader, based on the research-question: What are the experiences of program directors with strategic leadership? We conducted an interview study using the principles of phenomenography to explore program directors' experiences. In the period June 2012-May 2013, 16 program directors from different hospital organisations were invited to participate in an interview study. Iterative data collection and analysis were based on strategic leadership: (1) developing collective mindset, (2) focusing on collaborative learning and (3) designing teaching organisation. Fourteen program directors participated in this study. We identified four leadership profiles: (1) captains, (2) carers, (3) professionals and (4) team-players. The 'team-players' come closest to integrally applying strategic leadership. For all four profiles there seems to be a preference for developing collectivity by means of providing information. Program directors have less experience with promoting collaborative learning and the designing of teaching organisation is task-oriented. Promoting collaborative learning is the most important challenge for developing leadership within the teaching team.

  15. The exclusion of 'public undertakings' from the re-use of public sector information regime

    OpenAIRE

    Ricolfi, M.; Drexl, J.; van Eechoud, M.; Salmeron, M.; Sappa, C.; Tziavos, P.; Valero, J.; Pavoni, F.; Patrito, P.

    2011-01-01

    Should public undertakings be covered by the PSI Directive? The definitions of public sector bodies and bodies governed by public law, to which the PSI Directive applies, are currently taken from the public procurement Directives and public undertakings are not covered by these definitions. Should public undertakings be considered as public sector bodies in the meaning of the Directive? Are there public undertakings holding "interesting" PSI? Are there different definitions of national legisl...

  16. Medical students' perspective about role-plays as a teaching strategy in community medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor, Iram; Mukhtar, Fatima; Hashmi, Noreen Rahat

    2012-04-01

    To assess the students' perspective about role-plays conducted as a teaching methodology in community medicine. A quasi-experimental study. Department of Community Medicine at Fatima Memorial College of Medicine and Dentistry from July to November 2010. A probability technique of simple random sampling was used to collect 63 students from the third and fourth year MBBS who were randomly distributed in five sub-groups. They were variously ascribed the roles of obsceners, participants and helpers. A questionnaire was distributed to collect student's responses. The data was analyzed on SPSS version 17 to compare the responses. Chi-square test was applied and p-value was fixed at students were selected as participants of this study in which 46 belonged to the fourth year MBBS class (73%) and 17 were third year MBBS students (27%). There were 13 male (20.6%) and 50 female (79.4%) students. Role-plays were identified as most effective method of teaching (n = 25, 37.9%) followed by lectures (n = 17, 25.8%, p = 0.054). Fifty-two students (78.5%) admitted that role-plays improved their knowledge of the subject, 55 (84.6%) said that it will help them in their clinical performance. Fifty-nine participants (89.4%) found role-plays interesting and 49 (74.2%) wanted to incorporate role-plays as a part of curriculum. Fifty-six of the participants (88.9%) agreed that role-plays improved their communication skills. Twenty-one participants (31.8%) believed that it helped them in making acquaintance with the local situation. Forty-six students (76.7%) identified role-plays as a feasible way of andragogy (p = 0.005) and 48 (76.2%) said that it provoked critical thinking about the subject (p = 0.038). Fifty-four students (85.7%) admitted that their attention span was better in role-plays as compared to lectures (p = 0.047). Role-plays were well accepted by the students as an effective teaching methodology and can be incorporated as a part of teaching strategies in Community Medicine.

  17. Building capacity to use and undertake research in health organisations: a survey of training needs and priorities among staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barratt, Helen; Fulop, Naomi J

    2016-12-07

    Efforts to improve healthcare and population health depend partly on the ability of health organisations to use research knowledge and participate in its production. We report the findings of a survey conducted to prioritise training needs among healthcare and public health staff, in relation to the production and implementation of research, across an applied health research collaboration. A questionnaire survey using a validated tool, the Hennessy-Hicks Training Needs Assessment Questionnaire. Participants rated 25 tasks on a five-point scale with regard to both their confidence in performing the task, and its importance to their role. A questionnaire weblink was distributed to a convenience sample of 35 healthcare and public health organisations in London and South East England, with a request that they cascade the information to relevant staff. 203 individuals responded, from 20 healthcare and public health organisations. None. Training needs were identified by comparing median importance and performance scores for each task. Individuals were also invited to describe up to three priority areas in which they require training. Across the study sample, evaluation; teaching; making do with limited resources; coping with change and managing competing demands were identified as key tasks. Assessing the relevance of research and learning about new developments were the most relevant research-related tasks. Participants' training priorities included evaluation; finding, appraising and applying research evidence; and data analysis. Key barriers to involvement included time and resources, as well as a lack of institutional support for undertaking research. We identify areas in which healthcare and public health professionals may benefit from support to facilitate their involvement in and use of applied health research. We also describe barriers to participation and differing perceptions of research between professional groups. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited

  18. 42 CFR 137.165 - Are Self-Governance Tribes required to undertake annual audits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Operational Provisions Audits and Cost Principles § 137.165 Are Self-Governance Tribes required to undertake...-Governance Tribes must undertake annual audits pursuant to the Single Audit Act, 31 U.S.C. 7501 et seq. ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Are Self-Governance Tribes required to undertake...

  19. The Role of Combatives Teaching in Physical Education, by Michal Vit and Zdenko Reguli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Cynarski

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Vit, M., & Reguli, Z. (2015. The Role of Combatives Teaching in Physical Education. Brno: Masaryk University. 128 pp. Retrieved from https://munispace.muni.cz/index.php/munispace/catalog/book/694 There is here a new book, dedicated to the application of martial arts elements in physical education. Sequentially are presented authors, the definition of 'combatives', discussed the contents of the book, pointing out its strengths and weaknesses. A short conclusion is finishing the review article.

  20. A study of nurse tutors' conceptualization of their ward teaching role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J A

    1985-07-01

    It is generally agreed by the nursing profession that the art and science of nursing can only be learnt in the direct delivery of patient care and that, in order to do this, students need to identify with a practitioner role-model in the clinical area. This research arose from the belief that nurse educationalists are failing to provide these learning opportunities for their students. The focus of the study was to identify factors in the nurse teacher's work role which mitigate against their teaching in the clinical area. The methodology was chosen in order to demonstrate the nurse teacher's conceptualization of her work role. In the first stage of the project this involved the repertory grid technique. From the results, a semantic differential questionnaire was built up and used for an attitude survey of a second sample of nurse teachers. The research samples consisted mainly of nurse tutors but a small group of both clinical teachers and senior tutors was included for comparison studies. Results showed that the main factors leading to a lack of clinical teaching by educational staff include lack of control and a sense of conflict, stress and anxiety in the ward-teaching situation, lack of peer support and an inability to plan ahead for such work. The most pervasive feature which emerged, however, was the felt lack of available time for clinical work vis-a-vis their other duties. This is discussed in terms of role strain. Differences in response between teacher grades were studied and showed that all the problems found appear to be greater among the nurse tutor group. This may be a consequence of a further finding that clinical teachers are more likely to make finer and more frequent distinctions between the aims and problems of ward- and school-based teaching.

  1. Playing with the Language: Investigating the Role of Communicative Games in an Arab Language Teaching System

    OpenAIRE

    Playing with the Language: Investigating the Role of Communicative Games in an Arab Language Teaching System; Ali S. Al-Issa

    2017-01-01

    Language learning games combine a number of linguistic, psychological and social elements that have been found to have considerable advantages and powerfully impact language learning and teaching. They are incorporated into language curricula to promote interactive engaging learning. This study investigates the role of games in the Omani ELT syllabus through conducting a thorough content analysis of Basic Education System English language textbooks across all grades as well ...

  2. Leadership in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Perspectives of Academics in Non-Formal Leadership Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeyer, Anne; Sheingold, Brenda Helen; Klopper, Hester C.; Warland, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Developing leaders and leadership are key factors to improve learning and teaching in higher education. Despite the abundance of literature concerning developing formal leadership, fewer studies have been conducted with academics in non-formal leadership roles that focus on how they develop their leadership in learning and teaching. Publication…

  3. 2014 Code of Practice: How Research Evidence on the Role and Impact of Teaching Assistants Can Inform Professional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Rob

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author reflects on findings from research on the role and impact of teaching assistants and experience of working as a special educational needs (SEN) officer. Research evidence suggests the reliance on teaching assistants to include pupils with Statements of SEN in mainstream settings masks a collective, though unintentional,…

  4. Comparing Video Modeling and Graduated Guidance Together and Video Modeling Alone for Teaching Role Playing Skills to Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akmanoglu, Nurgul; Yanardag, Mehmet; Batu, E. Sema

    2014-01-01

    Teaching play skills is important for children with autism. The purpose of the present study was to compare effectiveness and efficiency of providing video modeling and graduated guidance together and video modeling alone for teaching role playing skills to children with autism. The study was conducted with four students. The study was conducted…

  5. Teaching Clinical Ethics at the Bedside: William Osler and the Essential Role of the Hospitalist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William McCarthy, Matthew; Fins, Joseph J

    2017-06-01

    As the field of hospital medicine celebrates its twenty-first anniversary, we believe it is time to expand its mission to play an even greater role in medical education. Given hospitalists' proximity to students and clinical material, members of this growing cohort of physicians are uniquely positioned to teach normative reasoning, professionalism, communication, and medical ethics in real time to trainees on the wards. But, to do so, we must reimagine the role of the hospitalist in graduate and postgraduate medical education. © 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  6. On-line role-play as a teaching method in engineering studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Cobo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We propose to adapt the role-play teaching methodology to engineering studies, trying to overcome obstacles like its exclusive association with fantasy games or its demand of social skills. We have chosen the role of a maintenance technician, a relevant job profile for engineering graduates. The interaction is based on email exchange, and the instructor is included in the simulation to guide the activity development and the achievement of the learning objectives. In this paper, our experience with this methodology, its implementation, results and student feedback are presented.

  7. The role of information and communication technologies in improving teaching and learning processes in primary and secondary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Sangrà

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to analyse what is happening at schools regarding the integration and use of information and communication technologies (ICT and to examine teachers' perceptions about what teaching and learning processes can be improved through the use of ICT. A multiple-case-study research methodology was applied. From a previous exploratory research, four different types of schools were determined. Data show there is a widespread view that ICT in teaching favours several teaching and learning processes. In particular, it shows that the contribution of ICT to the improvement of teaching and learning processes is higher in the schools that have integrated ICT as an innovation factor. To attain this highest level implies that a school not only has to modernise the technological tools, but also has to change the teaching models: the teacher's role, issues regarding classroom organisational, the teaching and learning processes, and the interaction mechanisms.

  8. Schemata-Building Role of Teaching Word History in Developing Reading Comprehension Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam-reza Abbasian

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Methodologically, vocabulary instruction has faced significant ups and downs during the history of language education; sometimes integrated with the other elements of language network, other times tackled as a separate component. Among many variables supposedly affecting vocabulary achievement, the role of teaching word history, as a schemata-building strategy, in developing reading comprehension has received the least, if not any, attention. This study was an attempt, in fact, to explore the possibility of an integration of word history and reading comprehension ability of a group (No=100 of Iranian intermediate EFL learners. To conduct the study, 60/100 participants, identified as homogeneous members based on the Comprehensive English Language Test (CELT, were randomly divided them into two groups; an experimental and a control group. They were exposed to a teacher-made pretest and a post-test to check the participants' knowledge of word history and reading comprehension ability prior and posterior to the experiment. Pertinent statistical analyses proved that teaching word history plays both statistically and affectively, through enhancing motivation and attitude, meaningful schemata-building role in developing reading ability. Pedagogically, resort to word history may then be suggested as an effective and affective mechanism as far as teaching language skills, in particular reading, is concerned.

  9. The Price of Misassignment: The Role of Teaching Assignments in Teach for America Teachers' Exit from Low-Income Schools and the Teaching Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Morgaen L.; Johnson, Susan Moore

    2010-01-01

    Teach For America (TFA) recruits high-achieving college graduates to teach for 2 years in the nation's low-income schools. This study is the first to examine these teachers' retention nationwide, asking whether, when, and why they voluntarily transfer from their low-income placement schools or leave teaching altogether. Based on a survey of three…

  10. Use of Role-Playing Game (RPG as a didactic complement in the teaching of Immunology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus de Oliveira Lunardi Laureano

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available RPG is defined as a Role-Playing Game, in which participants can play against each other, or work together towards a objective. Thereby, an RPG game was developed to work on the content of Immunology with children and adolescents (5th to 8th grade where medieval battles, involving fantastic creatures, are associated with elements that make up the Immune System, such as a shaman representing an T lymphocyte. To teach Immunology through the RPG is primarily needed a master, will guide the participants to teach the content in a playful way, throughout a "war" within a person. The students who will control the characters responsible for attacking and defending the body (infectious agents and white blood cells, respectively having a dice for the scrolling of their actions in the game. As a result, it is expected with this work that Immunology content will be more easily fixed in a fun and enjoyable way.

  11. Promoting Preservice Teachers' Dual Self-Regulation Roles as Learners and as Teachers: Effects of Generic vs. Specific Prompts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramarski, Bracha; Kohen, Zehavit

    2017-01-01

    Researchers have recently suggested that teachers must undertake important dual self-regulation roles if they want to become effective at improving their students' self-regulation. First, teachers need to become proficient at self-regulated learning (SRL) themselves, and then teachers need to learn explicitly how to proactively teach SRL -- termed…

  12. Shifting Goal Posts: The Impact of Academic Workforce Reshaping and the Introduction of Teaching Academic Roles on the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavell, Helen; Roberts, Lynne; Fyfe, Georgina; Broughton, Michelle

    2018-01-01

    This qualitative study reports on findings from interviews with ten academics in an Australian university six to twelve months following academic workforce reshaping and the widespread introduction of teaching academic roles. The research aimed to determine how the workforce reshaping impacted on the capacity of academics with teaching…

  13. [The teaching profession].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Manuel

    2010-07-01

    This article focuses on understanding teaching activities, especially in the field of health science, as a set of tasks and actions that teachers undertake when transforming scientific knowledge into curriculum contents and actions. There are several ways to address this issue. Some authors identify specific roles and qualities of teachers structured as variables and dimensions. Others use the term competencies, applied as skills, aptitudes or abilities to do something very well or duly intervene in a certain matter. The term competence, although not yet clearly defined, is used in this work because it is widely used in Health Sciences education. Some definitions are reviewed. Teacher's competencies in the following areas recognized: those related to specific professional skills, in contents organization, in learning skills, in new information and communication technologies, in evaluation and in social and ethical areas of educational practices.

  14. Teaching communication skills using role-play: an experience-based guide for educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Vicki A; Back, Anthony L

    2011-06-01

    Teaching advanced communication skills requires educators who are not only excellent communicators themselves but have the ability to deconstruct the components of the interaction and develop a cognitive approach that can be used across a variety of learners, diverse content, and under different time constraints while helping the learner develop the skill of self-reflection in a 'safe' and effective learning environment. The use of role-play in small groups is an important method to help learners cultivate the skills required to engage in nuanced, often difficult conversations with seriously ill patients. To be effective, educators utilizing role-play must help learners set realistic goals and know when and how to provide feedback to the learners in a way that allows a deepening of skills and a promotion of self-awareness. The challenge is to do this in a manner that does not cause too much anxiety for the learner. In this article we outline an approach to teaching communication skills to advanced learners through the use of different types of role-play, feedback, and debriefing.

  15. Role and Structure of Morning Report in Children’s Teaching Hospitals in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliheh Kadivar

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Morning report is an integral component of medical training programs. It is conducted as "evidence based" or "problem based". It takes an efficient time of all members of the medical team in teaching hospitals, it seems necessary to evaluate its role in the education. Because of the importance of morning report in education, we evaluated the current and ideal conditions of morning report according to the opinions of medical teams in teaching children’s hospitals. Methods: A cross- sectional descriptive study conducted in three children’s teaching hospitals in Tehran in 2005. The opinion and perception of 358 participants, including faculties, residents, fellows, interns, and medical students, were collected by a questionnaire regarding the importance and structure of morning report. The data were presented as frequency and percentage. Results: 78% of respondents expected a high educational role for morning report. Although 317(88.54% had a regular attendance in morning report, only 34.1% were satisfied from current condition. The majority believed that faculty had better to lead the sessions, and voted for case presentation to be selected by senior resident on call, despite the prominent current leadership of the faculty. Most of the participants (88.6% preferred complicated and unusual cases for presentation. Current morning reports predominantly based on the presentation of the interesting or complicated cases were admitted on the previous day. A few number of cases were reintroduced after achieving the final diagnosis. In addition out-patients and those under observation in emergency room were usually ignored in the meetings. Conclusion: Regarding the educational role of morning report, there is a far distance between the present and ideal condition. Unattractiveness of presentations and poor participation in discussion might have negative impact on achieving the goals.

  16. Knowledge of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Attitudes toward Teaching Children with ADHD: The Role of Teaching Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Donnah L.; Watt, Susan E.; Noble, William; Shanley, Dianne C.

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and attitudes toward teaching children with ADHD are compared across stages of Australian teachers' careers. Relative to pre-service teachers with (n = 218) and without (n = 109) teaching experience, in-service teachers (n = 127) show more overall knowledge of ADHD, more knowledge of…

  17. THE ROLE OF THE GRAMMAR ON PORTUGUESE TEXTBOOKS: A LOOK ON TEACHING OF RELATIVE CLAUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliana Lopes CÂMARA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies how the textbooks of Portuguese Language of Secondary School, approved by the Programa Nacional do Livro Didático-2014, approach the teaching of grammar, in particular as regards the treatment of the relative subordinate clause. For this, first we start with the comparison between the proposals manuals for teaching grammar and what was accomplished in the student book. Furthermore, we propose here an interface between the results of the analysis of textbooks and functional description of the relative clause. In other words, we try to verify as some descriptive aspects can be used in the teaching of relative clause, with the aim of developing reading and writing skills. In order to do that, we take as theoretical framework the different conceptions of grammar proposed in Travaglia (2009, 2011 and Functional Discourse Grammar (HENGEVELD; MACKENZIE, 2008. This research points to the need to emphasize the cohesive role established by the relative pronoun that introduces the relative clause, to understand the non-restrictive relative clause from its argumentative function and to review the distinction between subtypes of adjective clause from the criteria of omission of the subordinate clause.

  18. THE ROLE OF CARTOGRAPHY IN THE TEACHING OF GEOGRAPHY: PERSPECTIVES FROM AN EXTENSION PROJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika do Carmo Cerqueira

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to discuss the role of cartography in the teaching of geography. In order to do so it brings theoretical and practical results of the research project and extension called “Popularization of cartography and its new technologies in public school,” held in the State School Dona Mora Guimarães (Cazajeiras X, Salvador- BA. It is considered that the teaching of cartography, despite the epistemological advances, has experienced several difficulties in its implementation. To analyze the barriers, potentialities, and examples of pedagogical practice, workshops were held focusing on the concepts of cartographic literacy - vision vertical/horizontal, laterality, decoding of symbols, proportionality, two-dimensional X three-dimensional representation and use of new technologies. It is advocated that cartographic literacy can be used as an innovative methodology for the teaching of geography in schools. In parallel, the difficulties found in a university and school context are discussed. Finally, successful experiences are shared with more than 400 students involved directly, who used technical and methodological resources, from where they live and constructivist approach, namely: mapping of the human body, of the classroom and building of models. It is concluded that the theme has many challenges, but lacks mainly the expansion of this debate to overcome the dissociative barriers, putting the cartography as means of communication of the geographical science.

  19. ROLE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES IN TEACHING LEARNING PROCESS: Perception of the Faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad HUSSAIN

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Information technologies have affected every aspect of human activity and have a potential role to play in the field of education and training, specially, in distance education to transform it into an innovative form of experience. The need of new technologies in teaching learning process grows stronger and faster. The information age becomes an era of knowledge providing sound and unmatched feasibility for discovery, exchange of information, communication and exploration to strengthen the teaching learning process.Information technologies help in promoting opportunities of knowledge sharing throughout the world. These can help the teachers and students having up-to-date information and knowledge. Accurate and right information is necessary for effective teaching and learning; and information technologies (Haag, 1998; p.10 are “set of tools that can help provide the right people with the right information at the right time.” Students are independent and they can make best decisions possible about their studies, learning time, place and resources.Students are able to work in collaborative and interactive learning environments effectively communicating, sharing information and exchanging ideas and learning experiences with all in the environment.

  20. Teaching Social Communication Skills Using a Cool versus Not Cool Procedure plus Role-Playing and a Social Skills Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf, Justin B.; Taubman, Mitchell; Milne, Christine; Dale, Stephanie; Leaf, Jeremy; Townley-Cochran, Donna; Tsuji, Kathleen; Kassardjian, Alyne; Alcalay, Aditt; Leaf, Ronald; McEachin, John

    2016-01-01

    We utilized a cool versus not cool procedure plus role-playing to teach social communication skills to three individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. The cool versus not cool procedure plus role-playing consisted of the researcher randomly demonstrating the behavior correctly (cool) two times and the behavior incorrectly (not cool) two…

  1. The Role of Electronic Reserves in Serving and Shaping New Teaching and Learning Environments in UK Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdale, Christine

    1999-01-01

    Describes the ResIDe Electronic Reserve at the University of the West of England (UWE), Bristol, an example of an electronic reserve that has been addressing many access problems and supporting different teaching/learning initiatives. Discusses new roles for the ResIDe electronic library, electronic information management, new librarian roles, and…

  2. Role of a computer-generated three-dimensional laryngeal model in anatomy teaching for advanced learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S; Hu, A; Wilson, T; Ladak, H; Haase, P; Fung, K

    2012-04-01

    (1) To investigate the efficacy of a computer-generated three-dimensional laryngeal model for laryngeal anatomy teaching; (2) to explore the relationship between students' spatial ability and acquisition of anatomical knowledge; and (3) to assess participants' opinion of the computerised model. Forty junior doctors were randomised to undertake laryngeal anatomy study supplemented by either a three-dimensional computer model or two-dimensional images. Outcome measurements comprised a laryngeal anatomy test, the modified Vandenberg and Kuse mental rotation test, and an opinion survey. Mean scores ± standard deviations for the anatomy test were 15.7 ± 2.0 for the 'three dimensions' group and 15.5 ± 2.3 for the 'standard' group (p = 0.7222). Pearson's correlation between the rotation test scores and the scores for the spatial ability questions in the anatomy test was 0.4791 (p = 0.086, n = 29). Opinion survey answers revealed significant differences in respondents' perceptions of the clarity and 'user friendliness' of, and their preferences for, the three-dimensional model as regards anatomical study. The three-dimensional computer model was equivalent to standard two-dimensional images, for the purpose of laryngeal anatomy teaching. There was no association between students' spatial ability and functional anatomy learning. However, students preferred to use the three-dimensional model.

  3. Role of Pre-Course Student Characteristics on Student Learning in Interactive Teaching Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kelly Anne

    The goal of this dissertation is to broaden our understanding of interactive teaching strategies, in the context of the introductory physics classroom at the undergraduate level. The dissertation is divided into four main projects, each of which investigates a specific aspect of teaching physics interactively. All four projects look towards improving the effectiveness of interactive teaching by understanding how pre-course student characteristics affect the way students learn interactively. We first discuss lecture demonstrations in the context of an interactive classroom using Peer Instruction. We study the role of predictions in conceptual learning. We examine how students' predictions affect what they report having seen during a demonstration. We also examine how student predictions affect what they recall as the outcome of the demonstration at the end of the semester. We then analyze student response patterns to conceptual questions posed during Peer Instruction. We look at the relationship between a student's tendency to switch their answer and pre-course student characteristics like science self-efficacy. Next we elucidate response timing to conceptual questions posed over the course of the semester, in two introductory physics classes taught using Peer Instruction. We look at the relationship between student response times and student characteristics like pre-course physics knowledge, science self-efficacy and gender. We study response times as a way of gaining insight into students thinking in Peer Instruction environments as well as to improve the implementation of Peer Instruction. Finally, we present work on the role of NB, an online collaborative textbook annotation tool, in a flipped, project based, physics class. We analyze the relationship between students' level of online engagement and traditional learning metrics to understand the effectiveness of NB in the context of flipped classrooms. We also report the results of experiments conducted to

  4. Implementation of Inquiry-Based Tutorials in AN Introductory Physics Course: the Role of the Graduate Teaching Assistant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoresen, Carol Wiggins

    1994-01-01

    This study determined if the training provided physics teaching assistants was sufficient to accomplish the objectives of inquiry-based tutorials for an introductory physics course. Qualitative research methods were used: (1) to determine if the Physics by Inquiry method was modeled; (2) to describe the process from the teaching assistant perspective; (3) to determine TA opinions on training methods; (4) to develop a frame of reference to better understand the role of TA's as instructional support staff. The study determined that the teaching assistants verbalized appropriate instructional actions, but were observed to use a predominantly didactic teaching style. TA's held a variety of perceptions and beliefs about inquiry -based learning and how science is learned. They felt comfortable in the role of tutorial instructor. They were satisfied with the training methods provided and had few suggestions to change or improve training for future tutorial instructors. A concurrent theme of teacher action dependent on teacher beliefs was sustained throughout the study. The TA's actions, as tutorial instructors, reflected their educational beliefs, student background and learning experiences. TA's performance as tutorial instructors depended on what they think and believe about learning science. Practical implications exist for training teaching assistants to be tutorial instructors. Some recommendations may be appropriate for TA's required to use instructional methods that they have not experienced as students. Interview prospective teaching assistants to determine educational experience and beliefs. Employ inexperienced teaching assistants whose perspectives match the proposed instructional role and who might be more receptive to modeling. Incorporate training into staff meetings. Provide time for TA's to experience the instructional model with simulation or role play as students and as instructors, accompanied by conference discussion. Use strategies known to enhance

  5. The role of teachers’ classroom discipline in their teaching effectiveness and students’ language learning motivation and achievement: A path method

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrak Rahimi; Fatemeh Hosseini Karkami

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the role of EFL teachers’ classroom discipline strategies in their teaching effectiveness and their students’ motivation and achievement in learning English as a foreign language. 1408 junior high-school students expressed their perceptions of the strategies their English teachers used (punishment, recognition/reward, discussion, involvement, and aggression) to discipline the classroom. The students evaluated their teachers’ teaching effectiveness by completing effecti...

  6. 12 CFR 980.2 - Limitation on Bank authority to undertake new business activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... business activities. 980.2 Section 980.2 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD NEW FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK ACTIVITIES NEW BUSINESS ACTIVITIES § 980.2 Limitation on Bank authority to undertake new business activities. No Bank shall undertake any new business activity except in accordance with the...

  7. The exclusion of 'public undertakings' from the re-use of public sector information regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricolfi, M.; Drexl, J.; van Eechoud, M.; Salmeron, M.; Sappa, C.; Tziavos, P.; Valero, J.; Pavoni, F.; Patrito, P.

    2011-01-01

    Should public undertakings be covered by the PSI Directive? The definitions of public sector bodies and bodies governed by public law, to which the PSI Directive applies, are currently taken from the public procurement Directives and public undertakings are not covered by these definitions. Should

  8. Integrating the teaching role into one's identity: a qualitative study of beginning undergraduate medical teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lankveld, T; Schoonenboom, J; Kusurkar, R A; Volman, M; Beishuizen, J; Croiset, G

    2017-08-01

    Beginning medical teachers often see themselves as doctors or researchers rather than as teachers. Using both figured worlds theory and dialogical self theory, this study explores how beginning teachers in the field of undergraduate medical education integrate the teacher role into their identity. A qualitative study was performed, involving 18 beginning medical teachers at a Dutch medical school. The teachers were interviewed twice and kept a logbook over a period of 7 months. The study shows that the integration of the teacher role into the teachers' identity was hampered by the idea that teaching is perceived by others as a low status occupation. Some teachers experienced significant tension because of this, while others showed resilience in resisting the negative associations that were thought to exist regarding teaching. The teachers used five different identity narratives in order to integrate the teacher role into their identity, in which the positions of teacher and doctor or researcher were found to be combined, adopted or rejected in diverse ways. The five identity narratives were: (1) coalition between the I-position of teacher and other I-positions; (2) no integration of the I-position of teacher: holding on to other I-positions; (3) construction of the I-position of teacher and other I-positions as opposites; (4) coalition between the I-position of teacher and a third position of coordinator; and (5) meta-position: trivialising the importance of status. These identity narratives offer starting points for supporting undergraduate teachers during their early professional years.

  9. Teaching materials: a critical position about the role they play in the language classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araya Araya, Karla

    2007-12-01

    conceptual study about theoretical assumptions related to the importance and the role teaching materials have in the language teaching-learning process has been carried out. Also, there is a general analysis regarding the relationship among teaching materials, motivation and ideology. Finally, it can be concluded that materials are reproductions and constructors of certain discursive and ideological realities that usually favor the interests of the dominant classes. That is why a critical position about the role teaching materials have is necessary to prevent the reproduction of prejudices and common sense assumptions about language and society.

  10. Understanding the Role of Teaching Materials in a Beginners’ Level English as a Foreign Language Course: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elio Jesús Cruz Rondón

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Learning a foreign language may be a challenge for most people due to differences in the form and structure between one’s mother tongue and a new one. However, there are some tools that facilitate the teaching and learning of a foreign language, for instance, new applications for digital devices, video blogs, educational platforms, and teaching materials. Therefore, this case study aims at understanding the role of teaching materials among beginners’ level students learning English as a foreign language. After conducting five non-participant classroom observations and nine semi-structured interviews, we found that the way the teacher implemented a pedagogical intervention by integrating the four language skills, promoting interactive learning through the use of online resources, and using the course book led to a global English teaching and learning process.

  11. Financial literacy among Turkish college students: the role of formal education, learning approaches, and parental teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akben-Selcuk, Elif; Altiok-Yilmaz, Ayse

    2014-10-01

    This study assessed financial literacy and its correlates among Turkish college students, with special emphasis on the role of formal education, learning approaches, and parental influences. Financial literacy was measured by the College Student Financial Literacy Survey, which assesses knowledge in four areas: general financial management, saving and borrowing, insurance, and investing. 853 Turkish university students were administered the survey (416 men, 437 women; M age = 20.3 yr., SD = 0.6). The mean percentage of correct responses was 45% (SD = 12.8%). Regression results showed that formal finance education in college, a deep approach to learning, and direct financial teaching by parents were significantly associated with higher financial literacy scores.

  12. The Role of Interactive Teaching Methods in Fostering Ethno-Pedagogical Competence in Future Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kymbat F. Aubakirova

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of research associated with the study of the role and place of interactive teaching methods in the process of forming ethnopedagogical competence of future teachers. The authors of the article special attention focuses on such methods as: discussion (the discussion on the clash of views, exchange of opinions; "brainstorming" (active search for answers with the help of guesses, ideas, hypotheses, associations; round table (discussing moral issues with representatives of different sectors of society; business game (simulation, emulation, image, reflection, managing different situations and their modeling; contests of practical work with their discussion; training (active correction method by communicating in groups, modeling interpersonal relationships; work in micro-groups; problem solving.

  13. The Role of Divine Revelation and Religious Teachings in Human Rights System: Security and Global Peace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Ghayyoum Zadeh

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Peace and security have always been considered as one of man’s concerns. The basis of peace and security should be sought in the theoretical foundations. However, the drafters of universal human rights have struggled to attain peace and security away from religious principles. The present article intends to introduce universal human rights in the light of religious teachings and elaborate on the related religious principles. It also deals with the distinctions between the principles governing the present world with regard to human rights and religious principles to show that if religious principles are seriously followed in the international relations, they will bring about perpetual peace and security for mankind. Therefore, Religion has a unique role in peace and security.

  14. The role of teaching and research hospitals in improving global health (in a globalized world).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggat, Sandra G; Tse, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    Globalization is impacting on Hong Kong and Australia in different ways, but the experience of the public healthcare systems in both jurisdictions suggests a need for teaching and research hospitals to refocus from the management of international patients to better meet the needs for global health. Traditional globalization suggests a stockpiling of capital--a focus on improving global health suggests dismantling the stockpiles and sharing access to the necessary data, information, knowledge and discoveries to further develop local health expertise. Consistent with its position as a leading healthcare provider, the University Health Network (UHN) has been reflecting on the impact of increasing globalization on hospitals. The goals of the UHN paper on globalization are threefold--to suggest how the external and internal environments of hospitals will change as a result of globalization; to suggest a role for hospitals in a globalized world; and to stimulate discussion and debate. Given our perspective, from the other side of the world, we are pleased to contribute to the discussion and debate but will limit our comments to the future role of teaching and research hospitals based on some of the experiences of Australia and Hong Kong. The citizens of Hong Kong have been acutely aware of the issue of globalization--the excellent deep-water harbour has ensured the position of Hong Kong as a major trading hub. Hong Kong has also had a continually evolving role as a financial centre and gateway to China, and with China's accession to the World Trade Organization the impact of globalization will be even greater. On the other hand, the citizens of Australia have lived with geographic isolation, relatively limited natural resources and a small population, all of which have limited their role in global trade and financial markets. However, both Hong Kong and Australia have seen recent benefits from the increasing speed of communication and information transfer and exchange

  15. The Child Neurology Trainee-as-Teacher: A Clinical Teaching Curriculum Tailored to Learners' Needs and Developmental Roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernson-Leung, Miya E; Urion, David K

    2018-01-01

    Clinical teaching skills programs for resident physicians are increasingly offered. Less attention has been devoted to the unique educational roles of specialty residents and subspecialty fellows, many of whom will become academic faculty physicians. These teaching roles, and therefore a trainee's learning needs and motivation, also change over the course of training. We designed and implemented a two-year longitudinal teaching curriculum for child neurology and neurodevelopmental disabilities residents using adult learning theory principles: experiential learning and immediate applicability to specific roles. Core modules included teaching in clinical settings, adult learning, and giving feedback. Training-year-specific modules for second-year residents (n = 11) and final-year residents (n = 10) included teaching through consultation and promoting clinical reasoning in supervisory roles. Learners completed an 11-item self-assessment before and after intervention. The overall program significantly increased residents' self-assessed knowledge of how to assess the level of a learner (P = 0.02, Cohen d = 0.84) and comfort and skill in giving feedback (P = 0.04, d = 0.64; P = 0.04, d = 0.71). The final-year-specific curriculum additionally increased self-assessed skill in teaching same-specialty residents (P = 0.05, d = 1.07) and in promoting clinical reasoning (P = 0.03, d = 1.14). The program was rated highly by trainees and faculty, and has been adopted as an ongoing part of our training program. Our experience offers a reproducible model and theoretical framework for child neurology, neurodevelopmental disabilities, and other specialty programs to develop customized trainee-as-teacher curricula with specialty- and training-year-specific content. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. An Effective Role of E-Learning Technology for English Language Teaching by Using Meta Communication Actors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istifci, Ilknur; Lomidazde, Tamar; Demiray, Ugur

    2011-01-01

    Meta communication plays a key role in foreign language learning and teaching. Broadly speaking, meta communication is communication about communication. Meta communication is something that goes beyond communication and all language learners and teachers should be familiar with its existence. It should be stressed that meta communication which…

  17. Role of Faculty Development Forums in Virtual Teaching Environment: A Case Study of Marketing Research & Case Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Rizwan Saleem; Hussain, Sajid

    2016-01-01

    The online learning has broadened the teaching spectrum from Face-to-Face to virtual environment, and this move has brought traditional teacher-centered instruction to learner-centered instruction. This paradigm shift appears to place demands on faculty to modify faculty's instruction roles that are different from those encountered in Face-to-Face…

  18. The Role of Different Types of Feedback in the Reciprocal Interaction of Teaching Performance and Self-Efficacy Belief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkuzu, Nalan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of feedback based on self-efficacy belief sources in the reciprocal interaction of teaching performance and self-efficacy beliefs. A single case study design was employed to address and began to bridge the gap in our understanding of the relationship between feedback, self-efficacy belief and…

  19. Elementary ESL and General Education Co-Teachers' Perceptions of Their Co-Teaching Roles: A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Jennifer Christenson

    2013-01-01

    This research investigates grades kindergarten - 5 English as a Second Language (ESL) and General Education (GE) co-teachers' perceptions of one another's roles, strengths, and areas for improvement in co-teaching academic language and content to English language learners (ELLs) in the GE classroom. Theories of social constructivism and…

  20. The Role of Teachers' Classroom Discipline in Their Teaching Effectiveness and Students' Language Learning Motivation and Achievement: A Path Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Mehrak; Karkami, Fatemeh Hosseini

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the role of EFL teachers' classroom discipline strategies in their teaching effectiveness and their students' motivation and achievement in learning English as a foreign language. 1408 junior high-school students expressed their perceptions of the strategies their English teachers used (punishment, recognition/reward,…

  1. Teaching Auditing Using Cases in an Online Learning Environment: The Role of ePortfolio Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihret, Dessalegn Getie; Abayadeera, Nadana; Watty, Kim; McKay, Jade

    2017-01-01

    While teaching auditing using cases is regarded as an effective approach, spatial separation of students and teachers in online contexts can restrict the application of case teaching. This study examines an undergraduate auditing course implemented to address this challenge by integrating case teaching with ePortfolio assessment. Students' written…

  2. Using GP trainees as role players as a teaching/training tool for established GP trainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Kim; Moore, Penny; Edwards, Jill

    2017-05-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of using GP trainees in place of professional actors, to role-play trainees with 'difficulties' or various challenging characteristics, as an educational tool for skills development of experienced GP trainers. The context was a residential experienced GP trainers' course and the role players were local ST3 GP trainees. Professional actors have been used for this purpose for many years in medical education at all levels, particularly in teaching communication and consultation skills in the Thames Valley area of the UK. We wanted to trial and evaluate whether using GP trainees themselves, with their own more authentic 'hinterland' of experience, (but no acting training) would be as, or more, effective than using actors. The exercise was successful and showed, through post-course feedback (immediate written feedback and later on-line questionnaire), that the use of trainees was considered by the delegates to be an effective, adaptable and realistic training tool, and more so than using professional actors. The trainees also reported educational benefit from the experience.

  3. The role of a small teaching reactor in education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobek, L.M.; Mayer, J.A. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    It cannot be simply concluded that because an undergraduate nuclear engineering program has access to a higher power research reactor that the number of BS graduates will be proportionately larger than a program whose reactor operates at a much lower power level. What can be concluded is that although smaller in size and capability, low-power research reactors and the nuclear engineering programs they serve provide an important role in producing much-needed nuclear engineers and scientists at the undergraduate level. Designed and built by General Electric primarily as a teaching tool for nuclear engineering education, the nuclear reactor at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) first began operation in 1959. The reactor power level was upgraded from 1 to 10 kW in 1969, and its 20-yr operating license was renewed in 1983. With the support of DOE funds, the reactor was converted to low-enriched fuel in 1988. Under partial funding from the DOE University Reactor Instrumentation Program, the reactor control console will soon be replaced. Since a small research reactor is an ideal tool for providing basic and intermediate nuclear training, the incorporation of nuclear subjects into traditional disciplines will consequently enhance reactor facility usage. With its continued modernization, the WPI nuclear reactor facility will play a key role in meeting nuclear manpower needs while providing excellent and rewarding career opportunities for students in all disciplines for many years to come

  4. Interactive Physics: the role of interactive learning objects in teaching Physics in Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, R. M.; Cámara, M. E.; Arranz, F. J.

    2009-04-01

    In this work we present the results of a Project in educational innovation entitled "Interactive Physics". We have developed resources for teaching Physics for students of Engineering, with an emphasis in conceptual reinforcement and addressing the shortcomings of students entering the University. The resources developed include hypertext, graphics, equations, quizzes and more elaborated problems that cover the customary syllabus in first-year Physics: kinematics and dynamics, Newton laws, electricity and magnetism, elementary circuits… The role of vector quantities is stressed and we also provide help for the most usual mathematical tools (calculus and trigonometric formulas). The structure and level of detail of the resources are fitted to the conceptual difficulties that most of the students find. Some of the most advanced resources we have developed are interactive simulations. These are real simulations of key physical situations, not only animations. They serve as learning objects, in the well known sense of small reusable digital objects that are self-contained and tagged with metadata. In this sense, we use them to link concepts and content through interaction with active engagement of the student. The development of an interactive simulation involves several steps. First, we identify common pitfalls in the conceptual framework of the students and the points in which they stumble frequently. Then we think of a way to make clear the physical concepts using a simulation. After that, we program the simulation (using Flash or Java) and finally the simulation is tested with the students, and we reelaborate some parts of it in terms of usability. In our communication, we discuss the usefulness of these interactive simulations in teaching Physics for engineers, and their integration in a more comprehensive b-learning system.

  5. To what extent has doctoral (PhD) education supported academic nurse educators in their teaching roles: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullin, Carol

    2018-01-01

    A doctoral degree, either a PhD or equivalent, is the academic credential required for an academic nurse educator position in a university setting; however, the lack of formal teaching courses in doctoral programs contradict the belief that these graduates are proficient in teaching. As a result, many PhD prepared individuals are not ready to meet the demands of teaching. An integrative literature review was undertaken. Four electronic databases were searched including the Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PubMed, Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) and ProQuest. Date range and type of peer-reviewed literature was not specified. Conditions and factors that influenced or impacted on academic nurse educators' roles and continue to perpetuate insufficient pedagogical preparation include the requirement of a research focused PhD, lack of mentorship in doctoral programs and the influence of epistemic cultures (including institutional emphasis and reward system). Other factors that have impacted the academic nurse educator's role are society's demand for highly educated nurses that have increased the required credential, the assumption that all nurses are considered natural teachers, and a lack of consensus on the practice of the scholarship of teaching. Despite recommendations from nursing licensing bodies and a major US national nursing education study, little has been done to address the issue of formal pedagogical preparation in doctoral (PhD) nursing programs. There is an expectation of academic nurse educators to deliver quality nursing education yet, have very little or no formal pedagogical preparation for this role. While PhD programs remain research-intensive, the PhD degree remains a requirement for a role in which teaching is the major responsibility.

  6. The role of teachers’ classroom discipline in their teaching effectiveness and students’ language learning motivation and achievement: A path method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrak Rahimi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the role of EFL teachers’ classroom discipline strategies in their teaching effectiveness and their students’ motivation and achievement in learning English as a foreign language. 1408 junior high-school students expressed their perceptions of the strategies their English teachers used (punishment, recognition/reward, discussion, involvement, and aggression to discipline the classroom. The students evaluated their teachers’ teaching effectiveness by completing effective Iranian EFL teacher questionnaire (Moafian, & Pishghadam, 2009. They also filled in Attitude/Motivation Test Battery (GhorbanDordinejad & ImamJomeh, 2011 that assessed their motivation towards learning English as a foreign language. Achievement in English was established based on formal grades students received at the end of the academic year. The results showed that EFL teachers reward and praise students for good behavior and they are not very authoritarian. Further, teaching effectiveness, motivation and achievement in learning English were all found to be related to discipline strategies. The results of path analysis showed that those teachers who used involvement and recognition strategies more frequently were perceived to be more effective teachers; however, students perceived teachers who used punitive strategies as being less effective in their teaching. It was also revealed that in classes where teachers managed disruptive behaviors by using punitive strategies, students had problems in learning as punitive strategies lowered students’ motivation. Teaching effectiveness was found to mediate the effect of punishment on motivation while motivation mediated the effect of punitive strategies on achievement. Motivation was found to have the strongest effect on achievement.

  7. Learning through role-playing games: an approach for active learning and teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Ferreira Randi

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the use of role-playing games (RPGs as a methodological approach for teaching cellular biology, assessing student satisfaction, learning outcomes, and retention of acquired knowledge. First-year undergraduate medical students at two Brazilian public universities attended either an RPG-based class (RPG group or a lecture (lecture-based group on topics related to cellular biology. Pre- and post-RPG-based class questionnaires were compared to scores in regular exams and in an unannounced test one year later to assess students' attitudes and learning. From the 230 students that attended the RPG classes, 78.4% responded that the RPG-based classes were an effective tool for learning; 55.4% thought that such classes were better than lectures but did not replace them; and 81% responded that they would use this method. The lecture-based group achieved a higher grade in 1 of 14 regular exam questions. In the medium-term evaluation (one year later, the RPG group scored higher in 2 of 12 questions. RPG classes are thus quantitatively as effective as formal lectures, are well accepted by students, and may serve as educational tools, giving students the chance to learn actively and potentially retain the acquired knowledge more efficiently.

  8. Scaffolding as a key role for teaching assistants: Perceptions of their pedagogical strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, David; Radford, Julie; Bakopoulou, Ioanna

    2017-11-19

    Inclusive education policies have led to a worldwide increase in the number of teaching assistants (TAs) working in mainstream schools. TAs have a large amount of responsibility for supporting children with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), a role which by default has become instructional in practice, and for which training and preparation are rarely adequate. While there is some research into the nature of TAs' interactions with pupils and the strategies they use which are helpful for children's learning, TAs' perspectives on their own classroom practice have yet to be explored. To explore TAs' perceptions about their use of inclusive pedagogical strategies. The study involved eleven TAs in two mainstream primary schools. The TAs were interviewed face to face to explore their views about inclusive pedagogical strategies. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. TAs were clear about the strategies they use to offer emotional and relational support to children. There were some gaps, however, in their knowledge about how children learn, specifically in terms of transferring responsibility for learning onto children. The study advances understanding of scaffolding from a TA perspective and highlights the importance of training TAs in scaffolding theory. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  9. Taking Teacher Education to Task: Exploring the Role of Faculty Education in Promoting Values and Moral Education of Task-Based Language Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Gabriel C. Delariarte

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available - This study aimed to determine the taking teacher education to task: exploring the role of teacher education in promoting values and moral education of task-based language teaching in the college of education of West Visayas State University Calinog-Campus for the school year 2012-2013. Descriptive research method was utilized in the study. The findings revealed that the respondents perceived highly observable Teachers’ role in promoting values and moral education of task-based language teaching; the entire group of respondents has perceived highly observable Teachers’ role in promoting values and moral education of task-based language teaching; both male and female respondent have perceived a highly observable Teachers’ role in promoting values and moral education of task-based language teaching; all age brackets have perceived a highly observable Teachers’ role in promoting values and moral education of task-based language teaching except 19 to 20 brackets that perceived very highly observable Teachers’ role in promoting values and moral education of taskbased language teaching. Finally, there is no significant difference in the perceived teacher’s role in promoting values and moral education of task-based language teaching when classified as to sex and age.

  10. Beliefs of Chilean University English Teachers: Uncovering Their Role in the Teaching and Learning Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Díaz Larenas Claudio

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Beliefs continue to be an important source to get to know teachers’ thinking processes and pedagogical decisions. Research in teachers’ beliefs has traditionally come from English-speaking contexts; however, a great deal of scientific work has been written lately in Brazil, Mexico, Colombia, and Argentina. This study elicits 30 Chilean university teachers’ beliefs about their own role in the teaching and learning of English in university environments. Through a qualitative research design, the data collected from interviews and journals were analyzed, triangulated, and categorized based on semantic content analysis. Results of the study indicate that university teachers reveal challenging and complex views about what it is like to teach English as a foreign language in a university context in Chile. The article concludes with a call to reflect on the importance of beliefs unravelling in teacher education programmes.Las creencias continúan siendo una fuente de importancia para conocer los procesos de pensamiento y los estilos pedagógicos de los docentes. Los estudios sobre las creencias docentes provienen en su mayoría de contextos angloparlantes; sin embargo, en los últimos años se ha escrito una gran cantidad de trabajos científicos en Brasil, México, Colombia y Argentina. Este estudio recoge las creencias de treinta docentes universitarios chilenos sobre su papel en la enseñanza y aprendizaje del inglés en ambientes universitarios. A partir de un diseño de investigación cualitativo, los datos recolectados por medio de entrevistas y diarios personales fueron analizados, triangulados y categorizados según el análisis de contenido semántico. Los resultados indicaron que los docentes de educación superior tienen visiones desafiantes y complejas sobre lo que significa enseñar inglés como lengua extranjera en un contexto universitario en Chile. El artículo concluye con una invitación a reflexionar sobre la importancia de

  11. The Perceived Role of the Teach for America Program on Teachers' Long-Term Career Aspirations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Michael A.; Straubhaar, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    In urban school systems, the percentage of teachers that leave the profession is disproportionally high. Part of the driving force for this high rate of teacher turnover are alternative certification programmes, like Teach For America (TFA) which recruits teachers only for a short-term teaching commitment. This study contributes a novel…

  12. the roles of games in teaching and learning of mathematics in junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    users

    on teaching and learning through games. (Mesch, 2006). Akpan. (1988) asserted that. Mathematics educators could improve the teaching and learning of the subject through games particularly at the early stage of education. He further stated that, ''children are natural lovers of games, hence it could be a good strategy to ...

  13. Teaching, Research, and Service: Are These Role Functions Satisfying to Venezuelan Faculty Women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Ana Gil

    This study examined the job satisfaction of female Venezuelan faculty members in their teaching, research and service functions. Using the Faculty Satisfaction Questionnaire, the study compared the responses of 107 full-time males and 100 full-time females at seven Venezuelan teacher colleges. Findings revealed: (1) that teaching as a role…

  14. The Application of Technology in Teaching Grammar to EFL Learners: The Role of Animated Sitcoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedi, Zari; Biri, Aso

    2016-01-01

    Building upon previous research into the effectiveness of using videos for language teaching purposes, this study utilized an English animated situation comedy (sitcom) as an authentic type of multimedia to teach a particular grammatical structure, namely conditional sentences. This study also aimed at investigating the learners' attitudes toward…

  15. Cultivating Virtue in Teaching: The Role of the Personal, the Professional, and the Situational

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Aaron S.

    2018-01-01

    tIt has been argued that virtuous teaching dispositions are essential to high-quality teaching. Discourse around dispositions, however, is still murky because there are contradictions in the field in regard to the issue of virtue. What is the source of teacher virtue, and how might it be cultivated? This essay explores evidence and implications…

  16. The Role of Basic Need Satisfaction for Junior Academics' Goal Conflicts and Teaching Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esdar, Wiebke; Gorges, Julia; Wild, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Junior academics at German universities work and qualify in a highly competitive environment. Most of them have to cope with too little time for too many demands in research and teaching. As previous studies have shown, these work conditions may impair well-being due to goal conflicts and may threaten their teaching motivation. How could this be…

  17. CONSIDERATIONS ON THE RULES ON COMPETITION GOVERNING UNDERTAKINGS IN THE EUROPEAN UNION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlad – Teodor Florea

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study concerns the general rules on competition between undertakings in the EU. The author paid attention primarly to matters on the prohibition of agreements that aim to distort or impair competition on the internal market. Moreover, he examined in detail the matter concerning the regulation and interdiction of the abuse of a dominant position. The work also reviews doctrinal opinions, as well as the jurisprudential solutions in the area. The author’s concern to summarize and develop the conditions for the implementation of each of the two legal mechanisms is worth noting: the prohibition of agreements between undertakings and the abuse of a dominant position. The essential considerations taken into account by the Court of Justice of the European Union in settling a case whose subject consisted of assessing the manner in which an undertaking reflected on competition on the internal market were selected at the end of the work.

  18. The role of librarians in teaching evidence-based medicine to pediatric residents: a survey of pediatric residency program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boykan, Rachel; Jacobson, Robert M

    2017-10-01

    The research sought to identify the general use of medical librarians in pediatric residency training, to define the role of medical librarians in teaching evidence-based medicine (EBM) to pediatric residents, and to describe strategies and curricula for teaching EBM used in pediatric residency training programs. We sent a 13-question web-based survey through the Association of Pediatric Program Directors to 200 pediatric residency program directors between August and December 2015. A total of 91 (46%) pediatric residency program directors responded. Most (76%) programs had formal EBM curricula, and more than 75% of curricula addressed question formation, searching, assessment of validity, generalizability, quantitative importance, statistical significance, and applicability. The venues for teaching EBM that program directors perceived to be most effective included journal clubs (84%), conferences (44%), and morning report (36%). While 80% of programs utilized medical librarians, most of these librarians assisted with scholarly or research projects (74%), addressed clinical questions (62%), and taught on any topic not necessarily EBM (58%). Only 17% of program directors stated that librarians were involved in teaching EBM on a regular basis. The use of a librarian was not associated with having an EBM curriculum but was significantly associated with the size of the program. Smaller programs were more likely to utilize librarians (100%) than were medium (71%) or large programs (75%). While most pediatric residency programs have an EBM curriculum and engage medical librarians in various ways, librarians' expertise in teaching EBM is underutilized. Programs should work to better integrate librarians' expertise, both in the didactic and clinical teaching of EBM.

  19. The Leadership Role in Transitioning an Urban Secondary School from a Traditional Service Delivery Model to a Co-Teaching Service Delivery Model for Students with Disabilities: A Phenomenological Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Ginni E.

    2013-01-01

    This research studies the leadership role in transitioning from a traditional service delivery model to a co-teaching service delivery model for students with disabilities. While there is an abundant amount of information on the service delivery model of co-teaching, sustaining co-teaching programs, and effective co-teaching programs for students…

  20. Perceptions of Unprofessional Attitudes and Behaviors: Implications for Faculty Role Modeling and Teaching Professionalism During Pathology Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissette, Mark D; Johnson, Kristen A; Raciti, Patricia M; McCloskey, Cindy B; Gratzinger, Dita A; Conran, Richard Michael; Domen, Ronald E; Hoffman, Robert D; Post, Miriam D; Roberts, Cory Anthony; Rojiani, Amyn M; Powell, Suzanne Zein-Eldin

    2017-10-01

    - Changes occurring in medicine have raised issues about medical professionalism. Professionalism is included in the Core Competencies and Milestones for all pathology residents. Previous studies have looked at resident professionalism attitudes and behaviors in primary care but none have looked specifically at pathology. - To examine behavior and attitudes toward professionalism within pathology and to determine how professionalism is taught in residency programs. - Surveys were sent to all College of American Pathologists junior members and all pathology residency program directors, and responses were compared. - Although no single behavior received the same professionalism rating among residents and program directors, both groups identified the same behaviors as being the most unprofessional: posting identifiable patient information or case images to social media, making a disparaging comment about a physician colleague or member of the support staff on social media or in a public hospital space, and missing work without reporting the time off. Faculty were observed displaying most of these behaviors as often or more often than residents by both groups. The most common means to teach professionalism in pathology residencies is providing feedback as situations arise and teaching by example. Age differences were found within each group and between groups for observed behaviors and attitudes. - As teaching by example was identified as a common educational method, faculty must be aware of the role their behavior and attitudes have in shaping resident behavior and attitudes. These results suggest a need for additional resources to teach professionalism during pathology residency.

  1. The role of mathematics in politics as an issue for mathematics teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sánchez, Mario; Blomhøj, Morten

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents analyses of some examples of mathematical models used in the Mexican society of today. We seek to justify why and illustrate how such examples can be included in mathematics teaching and in teacher education....

  2. Effectiveness of resident as teacher curriculum in preparing emergency medicine residents for their teaching role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosein Nejad, Hooman; Bagherabadi, Mehdi; Sistani, Alireza; Dargahi, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, recognizing the need and importance of training residents in teaching skills has resulted in several resident-as-teacher programs. The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of this teaching initiative and investigate the improvement in residents' teaching skills through evaluating their satisfaction and perceived effectiveness as well as assessing medical students' perception of the residents' teaching quality. This research is a quasi-experimental study with pre- and post-tests, continuing from Dec 2010 to May 2011 in Imam Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. In this survey, Emergency Medicine Residents (n=32) participated in an 8-hour workshop. The program evaluation was performed based on Kirkpatrick's model by evaluation of residents in two aspects: self-assessment and evaluation by interns who were trained by these residents. Content validity of the questionnaires was judged by experts and reliability was carried out by test re-test. The questionnaires were completed before and after the intervention. Paired sample t-test was applied to analyze the effect of RAT curriculum and workshop on the improvement of residents' teaching skills based on their self-evaluation and Mann-Whitney U test was used to identify significant differences between the two evaluator groups before and after the workshop. The results indicated that residents' attitude towards their teaching ability was improved significantly after participating in the workshop (pTeacher for emergency medicine residents resulted in favorable outcomes in the second evaluated level of Kirkpatrick's model, i.e. it showed measurable positive changes in the self-assessments of medical residents about different aspects of teaching ability and performance. However, implementing training sessions for resident physicians, although effective in improving their confidence and self-assessment of their teaching skills, seems to cause no positive change in the third

  3. Language Training for EFL Teaching at the University of Toronto : Approaches and Teacher Roles

    OpenAIRE

    Kojima, Hideo; Sasaki, Hitomi

    2008-01-01

    Today, Japanese teachers of English as a foreign language (EFL) are involved in a large scale ofeducational reform. They are expected to develop their professional competence and autonomy by theJapan Ministry of Education, Culture, Science, and Technology (MEXT), which encourages them toimplement Communicative Language Teaching (CLT) in their classes. This paper focuses on languagetraining for EFL teaching at the University Toronto, and aims to examine how an instructor of thecourse (Instruct...

  4. Who Assists the Faculty? The Need for Mentorship Programs for Faculty Undertaking Global Education Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Yasmin; London, Chad; Carston, Cathy; Salyers, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the expectations, motivations, and experiences of Canadian faculty members undertaking development and implementation of global education initiatives (GEI) for students in the form of exchange and study abroad programs, supervised practical coursework, and experiential learning in international settings. Findings revealed that…

  5. The Complexities of Supporting Asian International Pre-Service Teachers as They Undertake Practicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner-Lane, Rebecca; Tangen, Donna; Campbell, Marilyn

    2009-01-01

    Increasing numbers of Asian international students are choosing to undertake their tertiary studies in English-speaking countries. For universities, international students are an important source of revenue. However, Asian international students face multiple challenges in adapting to a foreign culture, understanding the expectations of their…

  6. 31 CFR 248.5 - Exception to requirement of undertaking of indemnity Form 2244.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exception to requirement of... POSSESSIONS Action to Be Taken by Claimants § 248.5 Exception to requirement of undertaking of indemnity Form... and agents, of and from any and all liability, loss, expense, claim, and demand whatsoever, arising in...

  7. Assisted reproductive technologies in Ghana : Transnational undertakings, local practices and ‘more affordable’ IVF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerrits, T.

    The article sketches the origins and development of IVF in Ghana as a highly transnational undertaking. Movements are from and to Africa, involving human beings (providers and users), and also refer to other entities such as technologies, skills and knowledge. None of these movements are paid for

  8. Best practice in undertaking and reporting health technology assessments : Working Group 4 report

    OpenAIRE

    Busse, R.; Orvain, J.; Velasco, M.; Perleth, M.; Drummond, M.; Gurtner, F.; Jorgensen, T.; Jovell, A.; Malone, J.; Ruther, A; Wild, C.

    2002-01-01

    [Executive Summary] The aim of Working Group 4 has been to develop and disseminate best practice in undertaking and reporting assessments, and to identify needs for methodologic development. Health technology assessment (HTA) is a multidisciplinary activity that systematically examines the technical performance, safety, clinical efficacy, and effectiveness, cost, costeffectiveness, organizational implications, social consequences, legal, and ethical considerations of the application of a heal...

  9. Role of Faculty Development Forums in Virtual Teaching Environment: A Case Study of Marketing Research & Case Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizwan Saleem Sandhu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The online learning has broadened the teaching spectrum from Face-to-Face to virtual environment, and this move has brought traditional teacher-centered instruction to learner-centered instruction. This paradigm shift appears to place demands on faculty to modify faculty’s instruction roles that are different from those encountered in Face-to-Face teaching. This study explores the role of faculty development forum in improving the virtual teaching skills of academic staff members in an online university. The study has used single holistic case study approach, and the data from nine respondents have been collected through an interview schedule divided into four sections of 1 Basic Information, 2 Presentation Skills, 3 Subject Knowledge and 4 Research Orientation as per the objectives of the study. It can be theorized from the findings of the study that in virtual environments where faculty members lack the learning opportunities and exposure available in the conventional environments such forums prove to be very effective in capacity building of the faculty.

  10. THE USE OF TEACHING MEDIA TO ENHANCE STUDENTS’ SKILL IN WRITING FUNCTIONAL TEXTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Hidayat

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Teaching writing functional texts usually tends to be conventionally applied. Most teachers tend to emphasize their teaching process traditionally without paying attention to the teaching media which can be used to help students’ success achieving the goal of learning. This paper is aimed at investigating the role of teaching media in enhancing students’ skill in writing functional texts. In this regard, classroom action research (CAR was employed as the method in this study. This study is intended to answer the following research questions: (1 Is teaching media effective for enhancing students’ skill in writing functional texts? (2 To what extent does teaching media enhance students’ skill in writing functional texts? Through the process of teaching and learning activities, in cycle 1, the writers taught writing functional texts through conventional teaching, they then gave a test on functional text to the students. Additionally, to confirm the writers’ belief to the students’ real writing proficiency, they then gave them TOEFL written test model. Next, in cycle 2, the writers taught the students by using teaching media. Finally, the writers gave them a test of writing functional text. After undertaking several tests in cycle 1, students got average score 56.60, and in cycle 2, they got 65.08. Thus, there was an improvement of the average score. In addition, the students’ enthusiasm also improved.

  11. Identification of Preferred Sources of Information for Undertaking Studies in the Faculty of Engineering Management at Poznan University of Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Wyrwicka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Since 2010 a survey has been conducted among first-year students about sources of information which influence the decision of undertaking field studies in Safety Engineering, Management Engineering and Logistics in the Faculty of Engineering Management at Poznan University of Technology. The goal of these analyses is both to assess the effectiveness of promotion and also show trends in the use of diverse channels of information transfer of studies. The results of the investigation show that internet promotion via university and faculty website plays the dominant role but also direct promotion, such as opinion of older friends, is crucial. Furthermore, from year to year the analyses indicate the significant increase of official media and reveal that the prospective students rely on a few sources of information simultaneously.

  12. Robert Frost: Democracy, Teaching, and Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Jeffery M.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this dissertation is to develop a connection between poetry and teacher education. I am motivated to undertake this project because poetry is an underappreciated resource, one that has a good deal to teach teachers. Specifically, I believe that poetry can teach teachers about how to creatively and democratically respond to problems of…

  13. Perceived role of the journal clubs in teaching critical appraisal skills: a survey of surgical trainees in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Abdulrasheed; Mshelbwala, Philip M; Mai, Ahmed; Asuku, Malachy E; Mbibu, Hyacinth N

    2014-07-01

    Critical appraisal skills allow surgeons to evaluate the literature in an objective and structured manner, with emphasis on the validity of the evidence. The development of skills in critical acquisition and appraisal of the literature is crucial to delivering quality surgical care. It is also widely accepted that journal clubs are a time-honored educational paradigm for teaching and development of critical appraisal skills. The aim of this study is to determine the perceived role of journal clubs in teaching critical appraisal skills amongst the surgical trainees in Nigeria. The West African College of Surgeons and the National Postgraduate College of Nigeria have mandated that all residency programs teach and assess the ability to develop critical appraisal skills when reviewing the scientific literature. Residents at the revision course of the West African College of Surgeons in September 2012 evaluated the role of journal clubs in teaching critical appraisal skills using a 17-item questionnaire. The questionnaire addressed four areas: Format, teaching and development of critical appraisal s kills, and evaluation. Most of the journal clubs meet weekly [39 (59%)] or monthly [25 (38%)]. Thirty-nine residents (59%) perceived the teaching model employed in the development of critical appraisal skills in their institutions was best characterized by "iscussion/summary by consultants" and "emphasis on formal suggestion for improvement in research." Rating the importance of development of critical appraisal skills to the objectives of the residency program and practice of evidence-based medicine, majority of the residents [65 (98%)] felt it was "very important." The commonest form of feedback was verbal from the consultants and residents [50 (76%)]. The perceived importance of journal clubs to the development of critical appraisal skills was rated as very important by the residents. However, residents indicated a need for a formal evaluation of the journal clubs. It is

  14. Perceived role of the journal clubs in teaching critical appraisal skills: A survey of surgical trainees in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrasheed Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Critical appraisal skills allow surgeons to evaluate the literature in an objective and structured manner, with emphasis on the validity of the evidence. The development of skills in critical acquisition and appraisal of the literature is crucial to delivering quality surgical care. It is also widely accepted that journal clubs are a time-honored educational paradigm for teaching and development of critical appraisal skills. The aim of this study is to determine the perceived role of journal clubs in teaching critical appraisal skills amongst the surgical trainees in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: The West African College of Surgeons and the National Postgraduate College of Nigeria have mandated that all residency programs teach and assess the ability to develop critical appraisal skills when reviewing the scientific literature. Residents at the revision course of the West African College of Surgeons in September 2012 evaluated the role of journal clubs in teaching critical appraisal skills using a 17-item questionnaire. The questionnaire addressed four areas: Format, teaching and development of critical appraisal s kills, and evaluation. Results: Most of the journal clubs meet weekly [39 (59%] or monthly [25 (38%]. Thirty-nine residents (59% perceived the teaching model employed in the development of critical appraisal skills in their institutions was best characterized by "discussion/summary by consultants" and "emphasis on formal suggestion for improvement in research." Rating the importance of development of critical appraisal skills to the objectives of the residency program and practice of evidence-based medicine, majority of the residents [65 (98%] felt it was "very important." The commonest form of feedback was verbal from the consultants and residents [50 (76%]. Conclusion: The perceived importance of journal clubs to the development of critical appraisal skills was rated as very important by the residents. However

  15. Place and role of multifield hospital in teaching program on surgery for students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Kapshytar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Present time is characterized by increase of dynamics of world and social development, introduction of ECTS (European Credit Transfer System [Andrushchenko V. P. at al. 2007; Pertseva T. O. at al. 2008]. Features of new information technologies and forms of educational process dictate need of active introduction of the principles of evidential medicine [Pidayev A. Century at al. 2004; Pishak at al. 2005; Bereznitsky Y. S. at al. 2006]. Thus the main postulate of the Bologna declaration is providing adequate material level of educational base where the training program is implemented in the hospital [Desyaterik V.I. 2008]. Research objective: to determine place and role of multifield clinical base in student’s teaching “General surgery”. Material and research methods. The chair of the general surgery with care of the patients, located in the Community organization “City clinical hospital urgent and an emergency medical service” based in 3 abdominal surgical departments. The hospital has totally 10 surgical departments of a various profile which are the specialized centers and bases of chairs of urology and medicine of accidents, military medicine, anesthesiology and resuscitation. Results of research. Students under the supervision of the teacher visit departments in the hospital and achieve practical skills according to subject goals, make the acquaintance of structure of surgical departments, desmurgy, an asepsis and antiseptics, anesthesia, participate in primary surgical processing of wounds, a bleeding stop, reposition of changes and dislocations, imposing of plaster bandages, imposing or removal of spoke and rod devices, performance of drainage. Big importance has studying of nosological forms is purulent - septic diseases of skin and hypoderma, chronic specific and nonspecific surgical infection, an necrosis, sepsis, tumors and anomalies of development, etc. Wreath of an educational program, the General surgery is writing of the

  16. Improving near-peer teaching quality in anatomy by educating teaching assistants: An example from Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Ellen; Holmin, Tobias E; Johansson, Bengt R; Braide, Magnus

    2018-02-14

    Peer-assisted learning has gained momentum in a variety of disciplines, including medical education. In Gothenburg, Sweden, medical students who have finished their compulsory anatomy courses have the option of working as teaching assistants (TAs). Teaching assistants provide small group teaching sessions as a complement to lectures given by faculty. Previously, TAs were left to handle the role as junior teachers by themselves, but since 2011, a continuation course in anatomy has been developed with the aim of providing the TAs better anatomy knowledge and guidance for teaching. The course was designed to comprise 7.5 ECTS credits (equivalent to 5 weeks of full-time studies), and today all TAs are required to take this course before undertaking their own teaching responsibilities. This study aims to compare course evaluations of TA teaching before and after the introduction of the anatomy continuation course, in order to understand how students perceived teaching performed by self-learned versus trained TAs. The results of this study demonstrate that there was a trend towards better teaching performed by trained TAs. The variability in rankings decreased significantly after the introduction of the continuation course. This was mainly due to an improvement among the TAs with the lowest levels of performance. In addition to comparing student rankings, TAs were interviewed regarding their experiences and perceptions within the continuation course. The course was generally positively regarded. The TAs described a sense of cohesion and appreciation since the institute invested in a course dedicated specifically for them. Anat Sci Educ. © 2018 American Association of Anatomists. © 2018 American Association of Anatomists.

  17. The role of gestures in achieving understanding in Early English teaching in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    aus der Wieschen, Maria Vanessa; Eskildsen, Søren Wind

    of several resources to make their talk more comprehensible, not only obvious ones such as translations to the L1 and providing pictures or realia, but also gestures. This paper investigates gestures employed by the teacher in the pursuit of intersubjectivity in early English teaching in a private primary...... brings this established agreement on the importance of gestures in classroom interaction to bear on early foreign language learning: Whereas prior work on gestures in L2 classrooms has predominantly dealt with adult L2 learners, this paper investigates the extent to which a teacher makes use of gestures...... in early child foreign language teaching. Using multimodal conversation analysis of three hours of classroom instruction in a Danish primary school, we uncover how a teacher uses gestures to enhance the comprehension of his L2 talk when teaching English in the 1st and 3rd grade, both of which are beginning...

  18. THE ROLE OF THE GRAMAMAR TEACHING: FROM COMMUNCATIVE APPROACHES TO THE COMMON EUROPEAN FRAMEWORK OF REFERENCE FOR LANGUAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Luque Agulló

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available

    In the history of language teaching, the role of grammar has been addressed by a number of linguistic theories, pedagogies and, currently, within the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEF. The way grammar is considered has a decisive influence on pedagogical practices, learning processes and many other areas involved in language teaching. This paper constitutes a revision of how grammar has evolved in the last fifty years paying special attention to its evolving role in both communicative (CLT and post-communicative approaches and in the CEF.From this revision, some controversial issues concerning the pedagogic value of teaching grammar will arise as well, such as whether grammar is worth teaching in the classroom or not and how it should be taught.Even though there exists a parallel linguistic framework between CLT and the CEF, some issues still need revision concerning the notion of grammatical competence and its role for language teaching.

    Históricamente, el papel de la gramática en la enseñanza de lenguas se ha justificado y cuestionado tanto por teorías lingüísticas como, actualmente, dentro del Marco Común Europeo de Referencia. La forma de contemplar la gramática influye de modo fundamental en la metodología docente, en la elaboración de manuales de texto y en los procesos de aprendizaje, entre otros. Este artículo revisa el papel de la gramática en los últimos cincuenta años prestando especial atención al método comunicativo, los post-comunicativos y dentro del Marco Com

  19. Nurses on the move: evaluation of a program to assist international students undertaking an accelerated Bachelor of Nursing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibold, Carmel; Rolls, Colleen; Campbell, Michelle

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on an evaluation of a Teaching and Learning Enhancement Scheme (TALES) program designed to meet the unique need of the 2005 cohort of international nursing students undertaking an accelerated Bachelor of Nursing (BN) program at the Victorian campus of Australian Catholic University (ACU) National. The program involved a team approach with three academic mentors and the international students working together to produce satisfactory learning outcomes through fortnightly meetings and provision of additional assistance including compiling a portfolio, reflective writing, English, including colloquial English and pronunciation, as well as familiarisation with handover and abbreviations common in the clinical field, general communication, assistance with preparing a resume and participation in simulated interviews. This relatively small group of international students (20) confirmed the findings of other studies from other countries of international nursing students' in terms of concerns in regard to studying in a foreign country, namely English proficiency, communication difficulties, cultural differences and unfamiliarity with the health care environment. The assistance provided by the program was identified by the completing students as invaluable in helping them settle into study and successfully complete the theoretical and clinical components of the course.

  20. Didactics of Teaching of Histology, Cytology and Embryology: the Role of Computer Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye.F. Barinov

    2013-10-01

    It must be emphasized that the ability to use computer technology in teaching can be considered to be formed, if they are based on the professional competence of the teacher, knowledge of the main provisions of the cognitive psychology on the cognitive process and the factors affecting its efficiency, and correct use of methods and means of information processing of teaching material. Only in this case we can hope that the use of computer technology in the educational process will be systemic and effective.

  1. Understanding Classroom Roles in Inquiry Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl L. Walker

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Inquiry-based teaching and learning are rooted in social constructivism and are central to curricular reform. Role theory and social constructivism provided insight into a commonly observed but insufficiently understood phenomenon in inquiry. Within inquiry, role shifts have been described as the switching of roles between students and teachers; however, the process may be better conceptualized as role diversification because students and teachers may undertake multiple roles simultaneously in inquiry. This article expands on existing research and proposes a framework potentially applicable to both learners and teachers, but here focused on learners. Beyond exploration, engagement, and stabilization of roles, diversification was added and described. This framework expanded on current education theory, adding new insight to a minimally explored topic, with implications for students, teachers, consultants, and researchers.

  2. How do Supervising Clinicians of a University Hospital and Associated Teaching Hospitals Rate the Relevance of the Key Competencies within the CanMEDS Roles Framework in Respect to Teaching in Clinical Clerkships?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jilg, Stefanie; Möltner, Andreas; Berberat, Pascal; Fischer, Martin R; Breckwoldt, Jan

    2015-01-01

    In German-speaking countries, the physicians' roles framework of the "Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists" (CanMEDS) is increasingly used to conceptualize postgraduate medical education. It is however unclear, whether it may also be applied to the final year of undergraduate education within clinical clerkships, called "Practical Year" (PY). Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore how clinically active physicians at a university hospital and at associated teaching hospitals judge the relevance of the seven CanMEDS roles (and their (role-defining) key competencies) in respect to their clinical work and as learning content for PY training. Furthermore, these physicians were asked whether the key competencies were actually taught during PY training. 124 physicians from internal medicine and surgery rated the relevance of the 28 key competencies of the CanMEDS framework using a questionnaire. For each competency, following three aspects were rated: "relevance for your personal daily work", "importance for teaching during PY", and "implementation into actual PY teaching". In respect to the main study objective, all questionnaires could be included into analysis. All seven CanMEDS roles were rated as relevant for personal daily work, and also as important for teaching during PY. Furthermore, all roles were stated to be taught during actual PY training. The roles "Communicator", "Medical Expert", and "Collaborator" were rated as significantly more important than the other roles, for all three sub-questions. No differences were found between the two disciplines internal medicine and surgery, nor between the university hospital and associated teaching hospitals. Participating physicians rated all key competencies of the CanMEDS model to be relevant for their personal daily work, and for teaching during PY. These findings support the suitability of the CanMEDS framework as a conceptual element of PY training.

  3. The Teacher, the Physician and the Person: Exploring Causal Connections between Teaching Performance and Role Model Types Using Directed Acyclic Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerebach, Benjamin C. M.; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.; Scherpbier, Albert J. J.; Arah, Onyebuchi A.

    2013-01-01

    Background In fledgling areas of research, evidence supporting causal assumptions is often scarce due to the small number of empirical studies conducted. In many studies it remains unclear what impact explicit and implicit causal assumptions have on the research findings; only the primary assumptions of the researchers are often presented. This is particularly true for research on the effect of faculty’s teaching performance on their role modeling. Therefore, there is a need for robust frameworks and methods for transparent formal presentation of the underlying causal assumptions used in assessing the causal effects of teaching performance on role modeling. This study explores the effects of different (plausible) causal assumptions on research outcomes. Methods This study revisits a previously published study about the influence of faculty’s teaching performance on their role modeling (as teacher-supervisor, physician and person). We drew eight directed acyclic graphs (DAGs) to visually represent different plausible causal relationships between the variables under study. These DAGs were subsequently translated into corresponding statistical models, and regression analyses were performed to estimate the associations between teaching performance and role modeling. Results The different causal models were compatible with major differences in the magnitude of the relationship between faculty’s teaching performance and their role modeling. Odds ratios for the associations between teaching performance and the three role model types ranged from 31.1 to 73.6 for the teacher-supervisor role, from 3.7 to 15.5 for the physician role, and from 2.8 to 13.8 for the person role. Conclusions Different sets of assumptions about causal relationships in role modeling research can be visually depicted using DAGs, which are then used to guide both statistical analysis and interpretation of results. Since study conclusions can be sensitive to different causal assumptions, results

  4. 'Teaching and Learning for Climate Change' – the Role of Teacher ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper provides a synoptic overview of three emerging South African cases of teacher education materials development, high school material design, and the design and implementation of a new tertiary-degree offering centred on teaching and learning for climate change. A mixed-methods approach was used in all ...

  5. An argument for peer teaching role play in home language reading ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Foundation Phase Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (2010) recommends Paired Reading for teaching reading literacy in both Home Language and Additional Language classrooms. This article describes research on the reading histories of teachers enrolled in an in-service Bachelor in Education (B.Ed.) ...

  6. The roles of games in teaching and learning of mathematics in junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the paper reveals that the use of games and activities can make the mathematics enjoyable. In the paper, practice, motivation, understanding and suppression of anxiety are some of the reasons behind the use of games in Mathematics teaching and learning. Since Mathematics is a dreaded subject, the paper concluded ...

  7. The Role of Films in the Teaching of Foreign Languages Ildiko ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of the country and the lifestyles, mannerisms, morals, religion, beliefs, values and dreams that pertain in these places. To know these is to know the people of Ghana and their socio-cultural and socio-economic environment. The same argument applies when we use foreign films in the teaching of a foreign language.

  8. Factors influencing residents' evaluations of clinical faculty member teaching qualities and role model status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Heineman, Maas J.; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Evaluations of faculty members are widely used to identify excellent or substandard teaching performance. In order to enable such evaluations to be properly interpreted and used in faculty development, it is essential to understand the factors that influence resident doctors' (residents)

  9. The Implications of a Connectivist Learning Blog Model and the Changing Role of Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Elaine; Elbeltagi, Ibrahim; Brown, Mel; Dungay, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    While the use of Web 2.0 tools and specifically blogs is becoming increasingly popular within higher education (HE) and has been shown to promote learning, relatively little is known about the manner in which such tools may affect how teaching and learning may change as a result of the use of such tools. It is within this context that a…

  10. The Role of Films in the Teaching of Foreign Languages | Csajbok ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Films are a very valuable medium in the teaching of a foreign language. Our research and experience indicate that in the foreign language classroom films offer an opportunity for students to learn not only the target language and its culture, but also new words, new terminologies and new phraseology, as well as their ...

  11. Professional Learning for Teaching Assistants and Its Effect on Classroom Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Chris; Sparrow, Len

    2012-01-01

    The Swan Valley Cluster of schools for the Make It Count project identified the professional learning of teachers and teaching assistants as a key factor in improving numeracy outcomes for urban Indigenous children. Initial training for assistants began in late 2010 and took the form of workshops based on a modified First Steps in Mathematics…

  12. The Role of Teaching Poetry in Developing Literacy in Greek Primary School: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravani, Evagelia

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this case study is to examine the ways in which the systematic teaching of poetry reading at Greek primary school enhances children's interest in reading and helps develop their oral skills by enriching their vocabulary and creative thinking. The present poetry project was implemented at a Greek public kindergarten in Rethymno,…

  13. Improving Teaching Capacity to Increase Student Achievement: The Key Role of Data Interpretation by School Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, David; Smith, Richard; Provost, Steven; Madden, Jake

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper argues that in a well-organised school with strong leadership and vision coupled with a concerted effort to improve the teaching performance of each teacher, student achievement can be enhanced. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that while macro-effect sizes such as "whole of school" metrics are useful for…

  14. Contradictions and shifts in teaching with a new curriculum: The role of mathematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stouraitis, Konstantinos; Potari, Despina; Skott, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    of enacting a new mathematics curriculum. We examine the connection between contradictions and shifts in teaching activity, with a special focus on the mathematical character of these contradictions. We claim that dialectical oppositions lying in the background of these contradictions promote teachers...

  15. Gender Differences in Reading Achievement and Enjoyment of Reading: The Role of Perceived Teaching Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochweber, Jan; Vieluf, Svenja

    2018-01-01

    The authors examined the extent to which classroom-specific relationships between students' gender and their reading achievement and enjoyment of reading are associated with student-perceived teaching quality. Based on a sample of 10,543 ninth-grade students from 427 classrooms, multilevel analyses revealed that effective classroom management,…

  16. Governance of Higher Education--The Role of Proximity in Teaching Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macheridis, Nikos; Paulsson, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The starting point of this article is the relation between teaching quality and expectations by different governance actors in higher education. Managing a department in a public university is, to a large extent, about the coordination of governance actors, involving government authorities as well as the university and the faculty. Internally, the…

  17. Active Teaching of Diffusion through History of Science, Computer Animation and Role Playing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajsek, Simona Strgulc; Vilhar, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    We developed and tested a lesson plan for active teaching of diffusion in secondary schools (grades 10-13), which stimulates understanding of the thermal (Brownian) motion of particles as the principle underlying diffusion. During the lesson, students actively explore the Brownian motion through microscope observations of irregularly moving small…

  18. Teaching and Learning for Wholeness: The Role of Archetypes in Educational Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Clifford

    2016-01-01

    In "Teaching for Wholeness," Clifford Mayes continues to expand the horizons of Jungian pedagogy, a movement that draws upon the thought of Carl Jung and Jungian scholars to address crucial educational issues and define new ones. Mayes leads readers through an analysis of Freudian and post- Freudian psychology in educational theory and…

  19. Time Travel: The Role of Temporality in Enabling Semantic Waves in Secondary School Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matruglio, Erika; Maton, Karl; Martin, J. R.

    2013-01-01

    Based on the theoretical understandings from Legitimation Code Theory (Maton, 2013) and Systemic Functional Linguistics (Martin, 2013) underpinning the research discussed in this special issue, this paper focuses on classroom pedagogy to illustrate an important strategy for making semantic waves in History teaching, namely "temporal shifting". We…

  20. The Predictive Role of Teaching Styles on Omani Students' Mathematics Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldhafri, Said; Alrajhi, Marwa

    2014-01-01

    The current study explored the effects of two teaching styles, authoritative and authoritarian, on students' mathematics motivation. The two motivational constructs examined were intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. Data were collected from 425 Omani 8th grade students (males = 202/females = 223, mean age = 13.44, SD = 0.79). Through two…

  1. The Roles of Life Satisfaction, Teaching Efficacy, and Self-Esteem in Predicting Teachers' Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çevik, Gülsen Büyüksahin

    2017-01-01

    The current research aims to find out the extent to which high school teachers' life satisfaction, teaching efficacy, and self-esteem predict their job satisfaction. Research participants included a total of 358 teachers (age = 38.82; Ss = 6.73; range, 22-58), 222 males (62%) and 136 females (38%), employed in 21 public high schools in the city…

  2. Interactive Education in Public Administration (1): The Role of Teaching "Objects"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, John; Brock, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Schools of public policy and administration are increasingly adopting interactive case teaching (long used in business schools) as one of their primary pedagogical methods -- not least because of its usefulness in both stimulating engagement by students and helping them turn that engagement into learning. This article and its companion piece…

  3. The Role of Irish Language Teaching: Cultural Identity Formation or Language Revitalization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slatinská, Anna; Pecníková, Jana

    2017-01-01

    The focal point of the article is Irish language teaching in the Republic of Ireland. Firstly, we deal with the most significant documents where the status of the Irish language is being defined. In this respect, for the purposes of analysis, we have chosen the document titled "20 Year Strategy for the Irish language" which plays a…

  4. Other Teachers' Teaching: Understanding the Roles of Peer Group Collaboration in Teacher Reflection and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielowich, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Although most innovative professional development encourages reflective dialogue among teachers, we still know very little about how such dialogue enables teacher learning. This study describes how teachers make sense of the conflicts among their intended goals and actual practices by responding to their peers' teaching. Four teachers in a large…

  5. The Role of Film in Teaching Political Science: 5 Fingers and Operation Cicero

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostock, William

    2011-01-01

    The idea that "film is an extraordinarily powerful teaching tool" (Champoux) is explored in relation to the film "5 Fingers" that presents an account of the true story of the reproduction and sale of top secret documents held by the British Ambassador in Ankara, Turkey to Nazi Germany by Elyesa Bazna, code named Cicero,…

  6. A variety of roles for a new type of teacher. Education technology and the teaching profession

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volman, M.L.L.

    2005-01-01

    This article focuses on the implications of the integration of computer technology into education for teachers, the teaching profession and the educational labor market. A Delphi study was done, consisting of interviews with experts in the field of educational technology and a round-table discussion

  7. Supporting 21st-Century Teaching and Learning: The Role of Google Apps for Education (GAFE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awuah, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    The future of higher education is likely to be driven by to the willingness to adapt and grow with the use of technologies in teaching, learning, and research. Google Apps for Education (GAFE) is a powerful cloud-computing solution that works for students regardless of their location, time, or the type of device being used. GAFE is used by…

  8. Understanding Teaching Assistant Self-Efficacy in Role and in Training: Its Susceptibility to Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Helen; Gulliford, Anthea

    2014-01-01

    There has been a noted growth in the number of teaching assistants (TAs) in mainstream schools. Research is inconclusive about their efficacy at changing outcomes for children and has proposed more training for TAs. Generic training models have suggested that enhancing self-efficacy in turn improves performance. This exploratory study investigated…

  9. FORM AND CONTENT OF TEACHING IN EARLY CHILHOOD EDUCATION: THE ROLE OF PLAY AND THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF CHILD LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Campregher Pasqualini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper approaches the relation between school education and psychic development in the light of cultural-historical theory and critical-historical pedagogy, discussing the triad form-content-receiver of teaching in the context of early childhood education. Considering the goal of developing the bases of theoretical thinking in children, the paper analyses role-play as leading activity in preschool and explores the contributions of child literature, highlighting the importance of providing access to artistic works which depict reality in an imaginative form as multisided and in permanent movement.

  10. Be my guest! Challenges and practical solutions of undertaking interviews with children in the home setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coad, Jane; Gibson, Faith; Horstman, Maire; Milnes, Linda; Randall, Duncan; Carter, Bernie

    2015-12-01

    This article aims to share critical debate on undertaking interviews with children in the home setting and draws on the authors' extensive research fieldwork. The article focuses on three key processes: planning entry to the child's home, conducting the interviews and exiting the field. In planning entry, we include children's engagement and issues of researcher gender. In conducting the interviews, we consider issues such as the balance of power, the importance of building a rapport, the voluntary nature of consent and the need for a flexible interview structure. Finally, we address exiting from the child's home with sensitivity at the end of the interview and/or research study. Undertaking research in the child's home provides a known and familiar territory for the child, but it means that the researcher faces a number of challenges that require solutions whilst they are a guest in a child's home. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Role Models and Teachers: medical students perception of teaching-learning methods in clinical settings, a qualitative study from Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasuriya-Illesinghe, Vathsala; Nazeer, Ishra; Athauda, Lathika; Perera, Jennifer

    2016-02-09

    Medical education research in general, and those focusing on clinical settings in particular, have been a low priority in South Asia. This explorative study from 3 medical schools in Sri Lanka, a South Asian country, describes undergraduate medical students' experiences during their final year clinical training with the aim of understanding the teaching-learning experiences. Using qualitative methods we conducted an exploratory study. Twenty eight graduates from 3 medical schools participated in individual interviews. Interview recordings were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative content analysis method. Emergent themes reveled 2 types of teaching-learning experiences, role modeling, and purposive teaching. In role modelling, students were expected to observe teachers while they conduct their clinical work, however, this method failed to create positive learning experiences. The clinical teachers who predominantly used this method appeared to be 'figurative' role models and were not perceived as modelling professional behaviors. In contrast, purposeful teaching allowed dedicated time for teacher-student interactions and teachers who created these learning experiences were more likely to be seen as 'true' role models. Students' responses and reciprocations to these interactions were influenced by their perception of teachers' behaviors, attitudes, and the type of teaching-learning situations created for them. Making a distinction between role modeling and purposeful teaching is important for students in clinical training settings. Clinical teachers' awareness of their own manifest professional characterizes, attitudes, and behaviors, could help create better teaching-learning experiences. Moreover, broader systemic reforms are needed to address the prevailing culture of teaching by humiliation and subordination.

  12. The Role Model Effect on Gender Equity: How are Female College Students Influenced by Female Teaching Assistants in Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Darilyn

    The gender gap of women in science is an important and unresolved issue in higher education and occupational opportunities. The present study was motivated by the fact that there are typically fewer females than males advancing in science, and therefore fewer female science instructor role models. This observation inspired the questions: Are female college students influenced in a positive way by female science teaching assistants (TAs), and if so how can their influence be measured? The study tested the hypothesis that female TAs act as role models for female students and thereby encourage interest and increase overall performance. To test this "role model" hypothesis, the reasoning ability and self-efficacy of a sample of 724 introductory college biology students were assessed at the beginning and end of the Spring 2010 semester. Achievement was measured by exams and course work. Performance of four randomly formed groups was compared: 1) female students with female TAs, 2) male students with female TAs, 3) female students with male TAs, and 4) male students with male TAs. Based on the role model hypothesis, female students with female TAs were predicted to perform better than female students with male TAs. However, group comparisons revealed similar performances across all four groups in achievement, reasoning ability and self-efficacy. The slight differences found between the four groups in student exam and coursework scores were not statistically significant. Therefore, the results did not support the role model hypothesis. Given that both lecture professors in the present study were males, and given that professors typically have more teaching experience, finer skills and knowledge of subject matter than do TAs, a future study that includes both female science professors and female TAs, may be more likely to find support for the hypothesis.

  13. [Environmental licensing of major undertakings: possible connection between health and environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Missifany; Araújo Neto, Mário Diniz de

    2014-09-01

    The prospect of multidisciplinary assessment that considers the environmental impacts on the health of the population during the implementation of potentially polluting projects is incipient in Brazil. Considering the scenario of major undertakings in the country, broadening the outlook on the health and environment relationship based on social and economic development processes striving for environmentally sustainable projects is a key strategy. This article examines the debate on the relationship between the current development model, the risks, the environment and health and discusses the importance of the participation of the health sector in the environmental licensing procedures, which is the instrument of the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA). Seeking to create more environmentally and socially sustainable territories, the health sector has been looking for opportunities to participate in the licensing processes of major undertakings from the EIA standpoint. Results of research conducted by the Ministry of Health have demonstrated the form of participation in these processes, highlighting the strengths and weaknesses that favor or hinder the increase of preventive actions in public health in the implementation of major undertakings in Brazil.

  14. COMMENTARY: I'M ONLY TRYING TO HELP: A ROLE FOR INTERVENTIONS IN TEACHING LISTENING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Rost

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available In my work as an author and teacher trainer, I have the opportunity to travel around the world and talk to teachers in a variety of settings. Though I meet teachers with a range of backgrounds and a wide disparity of resources, I find that a few common themes come up whenever I talk with teachers about language teaching and technology. One of the familiar refrains is that most of us claim to lack the technological resources we feel we need to teach effectively. There’s always something new on the horizon that we feel we just have to have. Another recurring theme is the lament that most of our students just don’t seem to take advantage of the extra learning opportunities we present them anyway! Teachers want to help, but often feel under appreciated for their efforts. Personally, I have relished the ongoing advances in technology over the course of my teaching career. I started out as a secondary school teacher in Togo, West Africa with chalk – sometimes yellow or pink! – and a blackboard as my only teaching technology. When teachers express a sense of being overwhelmed by new technology, I sometimes talk about my own beginnings and also remind them of a few of Donald Norman’s principles of human-centered design. According to Norman (2004, for any new technology to be effective, it must be intuitively helpful and elegantly efficient. In the case of language teaching, this means the technology must – immediately and transparently – help us teach better than we do already. If it doesn’t, we simply shouldn’t use it. In addition, Norman says, for any new technology to be widely adopted, it must appeal to the emotions as well as to reason. If people don’t enjoy using a particular technology, no matter how logically useful it may be, they will tend to shun it. Perhaps because as language teachers we tend to favor eclecticism, we will often throw any emerging technology into the mix as a "helpful resource." As Doughty and Long (2003

  15. Genital examination training: assessing the effectiveness of an integrated female and male teaching programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBain, Lynn; Pullon, Susan; Garrett, Sue; Hoare, Kath

    2016-11-22

    Learning to undertake intimate female and male examinations is an important part of medical student training but opportunities to participate in practical, supervised learning in a safe environment can be limited. A collaborative, integrated training programme to provide such learning was developed by two university teaching departments and a specialist sexual health service, utilising teaching associates trained for intimate examinations in a simulated clinical educational setting. The objective of this research was to determine changes in senior medical students' self- reported experience and confidence in performing male and female genital examinations, before and after participating in a new clinical teaching programme. A quasi-experimental mixed methods design, using pre and post programme questionnaires and focus groups, was used to assess the effectiveness of the programme. The students reported greatly improved skill, confidence and comfort levels for both male and female genital examination following the teaching programme. Skill, confidence and comfort regarding male examinations were rated particularly low on the pre-teaching programme self- assessment, but post-programme was rated at similar levels to the female examination. This integrated female-male teaching programme (utilising trained teaching associates as simulated patients in a supervised clinical teaching environment) was successful in increasing senior medical students' skills and levels of confidence in performing genital examinations. There were differences between female and male medical students in their learning. Suggestions for improvement included providing more detailed instruction to some clinical supervisors about their facilitation role in the session.

  16. Chinese Anti-Cancer Association as a non-governmental organization undertakes systematic cancer prevention work in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Cancer has become the first leading cause of death in the world, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Facing the increasing trend of cancer incidence and mortality, China issued and implemented “three-early (early prevention, early diagnosis and early treatment)” national cancer prevention plan. As the main body and dependence of social governance, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) take over the role of government in the field of cancer prevention and treatment. American Cancer Society (ACS) made a research on cancer NGOs and civil society in cancer control and found that cancer NGOs in developing countries mobilize civil society to work together and advocate governments in their countries to develop policies to address the growing cancer burden. Union for International Cancer Control (UICC), Cancer Council Australia (CCA), and Malaysian cancer NGOs are the representatives of cancer NGOs in promoting cancer control. Selecting Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (CACA) as an example in China, this article is to investigate how NGOs undertake systematic cancer prevention work in China. By conducting real case study, we found that, as a NGO, CACA plays a significant role in intensifying the leading role of government in cancer control, optimizing cancer outcomes, decreasing cancer incidence and mortality rates and improving public health. PMID:26361412

  17. Computer Class Role Playing Games, an innovative teaching methodology based on STEM and ICT: first experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraffi, S.

    2016-12-01

    Context/PurposeWe experienced a new teaching and learning technology: a Computer Class Role Playing Game (RPG) to perform educational activity in classrooms through an interactive game. This approach is new, there are some experiences on educational games, but mainly individual and not class-based. Gaming all together in a class, with a single scope for the whole class, it enhances peer collaboration, cooperative problem solving and friendship. MethodsTo perform the research we experimented the games in several classes of different degrees, acquiring specific questionnaire by teachers and pupils. Results Experimental results were outstanding: RPG, our interactive activity, exceed by 50% the overall satisfaction compared to traditional lessons or Power Point supported teaching. InterpretationThe appreciation of RPG was in agreement with the class level outcome identified by the teacher after the experimentation. Our work experience get excellent feedbacks by teachers, in terms of efficacy of this new teaching methodology and of achieved results. Using new methodology more close to the student point of view improves the innovation and creative capacities of learners, and it support the new role of teacher as learners' "coach". ConclusionThis paper presents the first experimental results on the application of this new technology based on a Computer game which project on a wall in the class an adventure lived by the students. The plots of the actual adventures are designed for deeper learning of Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics (STEM) and Social Sciences & Humanities (SSH). The participation of the pupils it's based on the interaction with the game by the use of their own tablets or smartphones. The game is based on a mixed reality learning environment, giving the students the feel "to be IN the adventure".

  18. The role of technology in fostering creativity in the teaching and learning of mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balarabe Yushau

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper looks at interrelationships between creativity and technology in the teaching and learning of mathematics. It suggests that a proper use of various technologies especially computers in the teaching and learning of mathematics has the potential of helping learners to develop their creativity. The technologies can provide an atmosphere under which mathematical skills can be extended beyond the ability to calculate or reproduce problems and enable learners to investigate, analyse and interpret problems at hand. Furthermore, with computers learners can use an experimental approach to deal with mathematical problems, which can lead to conjecture, pattern finding, examples and counter examples. In fact, if used effectively, computational aids can help in improving learners’ intellectual ability and hence mathematical achievement while fostering the requisite creativity not found in the traditional approach.

  19. The role of socioscientific issues in biology teaching – from the perspective of teachers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidemand, Sofie; Nielsen, Jan Alexis

    2017-01-01

    documented that a range of challenges hinders the uptake of socioscientific issues. In this study we investigated the interpretation and implementation of socioscientific issues among Danish biology teachers – who teach in a curriculum that, on paper, is permeated by socioscientific issues. We conducted five...... harbour a content-centred interpretation of socioscientific issues which manifests itself in at least three separate ways. First, the teachers generally use socioscientific issues as a means to an end of teaching factual biological content. Second, the teachers had a clear emphasis on mastery of factual...... content in their assessment practices. Third, the teachers tended to reduce socioscientific issues (e.g. should we allow GMOs) to specific biological contents (DNA) in a way that does not seem to allow students to engage with the real socioscientific issue. Our findings are particularly significant...

  20. The Role of Stylistic Approach in Teaching Contemporary Adabi TextsThe Case of Elaik ya Valadi of Saad-e-Sabbah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouroddin Parvin

    2014-01-01

    In this research, we will analyze the "eleik Ya Valadi" elegy of Saad e Sabbah, one of the pioneers of contemporary Arabic Rassa poetry at the morphological and syntactic levels with discretional-analytical methods and in stylistic context to analyze the role of stylistics in teaching Arabic texts. One of the most important results of this research is that it is one of the best methods in education of literacy, because of the fact that it considers the consistency and coordination between method of teaching and literacy, and also increases the students’ motivation for understanding and communication. Keywords: Contemporary literacy, teaching literacy, stylistics, Saad e sabbah

  1. The main social roles of English language in Russia in their connection with CLIL university teaching and classroom interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rubtcova Pavenkova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the main social roles of English language in Russia in their connection with CLIL university teaching and classroom interaction. Data comes from two stage expert research with CLIL and ESL university teachers (N=33. They were asked about the social roles of English language in the nowadays Russian universities and preferable conception for future development of CLIL university program. Four conceptions were chosen by experts: Global English, Russian English, multilingual conception and English as an investment. The features of each concept were identified and discussed in terms of their influence on the process of CLIL education. The «conceptions-leaders» were determined by ranking. They are Russian English and Multilingual conception.  Despite the fact that the concept of Russian English considered appropriate at the present time, future preferences are associated with the concept of multilingualism.

  2. Adventures in Learning: Creating Role Playing Video Games to Teach and Learn Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Catherine L. Lawson; Larry L. Lawson

    2010-01-01

    This article examines pedagogical lessons derived from the learning theory embodied in commercially successfully video games and their link to reported increases in 'fluid intelligence' of student populations. The scholarly literature in this area is reviewed in order to elicit practical principles by which to guide the development of instructional video game modules for the teaching of economics. The authors' experiences in developing and pilot testing such a module, and in subsequently guid...

  3. Role of Organizational Climate in Organizational Commitment: The Case of Teaching Hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Bahrami, Mohammad Amin; Barati, Omid; Ghoroghchian, Malake-sadat; Montazer-alfaraj, Razieh; Ranjbar Ezzatabadi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective The commitment of employees is affected by several factors, including factors related to the organizational climate. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between organizational commitment of nurses and the organizational climate in hospital settings. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 at two teaching hospitals in Yazd, Iran. A total of 90 nurses in these hospitals participated. We used stratified random sampling of the nursing population. The ...

  4. Research ın Hıgher Educatıon: the role of teachıng and student learnıng

    OpenAIRE

    Cabral, Ana Paula; Huet, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, national processes for research-quality assessment have been introduced or amended across Europe. Whatever the benefits of these systems might have brought to the organisation and quality of research most of them have contributed for a devaluing teaching and to a growing separation between the research worlds of the university and student learning. This study aims to contribute to a broader understanding of the role of research for the quality of teaching and student l...

  5. College students' role models, learning style preferences, and academic achievement in collaborative teaching: absolute versus relativistic thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Wen-Bin

    2008-01-01

    Based on the perspective of postformal operations, this study investigated whether college students' role models (technical teachers vs. lecturing teachers) and preferred learning styles (experience-driven mode vs. theory-driven mode) in collaborative teaching courses would be moderated by their cognitive development (absolute thinking vs. relativistic thinking) and examine whether academic achievement of students would be contingent upon their preferred learning styles. Two hundred forty-four college students who have taken the technical courses with collaborative teaching participated in this study. The results showed that those participants with absolute thinking perceived the modeling advantage of technical teachers was greater than that of lecturing teachers, preferred the experience-driven mode over the theory-driven mode, and displayed differential academic achievement between technical courses and general courses. On the other hand, the students with relativistic thinking revealed no difference in perceived modeling advantage of role models, learning styles preferences, and academic achievement between two categories of courses. In addition, this research indicates that college students' preferred learning styles would interact with course category (technical courses vs. general courses) to display differential academic achievement. Implications and future directions are discussed.

  6. Studying Gender Bias in Physics Grading: The role of teaching experience and country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Sarah I.

    2015-11-01

    The existence of gender-STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) stereotypes has been repeatedly documented. This article examines physics teachers' gender bias in grading and the influence of teaching experience in Switzerland, Austria, and Germany. In a 2 × 2 between-subjects design, with years of teaching experience included as moderating variable, physics teachers (N = 780) from Switzerland, Austria, and Germany graded a fictive student's answer to a physics test question. While the answer was exactly the same for each teacher, only the student's gender and specialization in languages vs. science were manipulated. Specialization was included to gauge the relative strength of potential gender bias effects. Multiple group regression analyses, with the grade that was awarded as the dependent variable, revealed only partial cross-border generalizability of the effect pattern. While the overall results in fact indicated the existence of a consistent and clear gender bias against girls in the first part of physics teachers' careers that disappeared with increasing teaching experience for Swiss teachers, Austrian teachers, and German female teachers, German male teachers showed no gender bias effects at all. The results are discussed regarding their relevance for educational practice and research.

  7. Role of Comparative Analysis in Cognitive Oriented Teaching Methods of Russian as Foreign Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana M. Mironova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses some basis for the comparative representation of the language material from the view point of cognitive approach in teaching Russian as a foreign language. There is an attempt to comprehend the conceptual significance of the native language consideration during the formation of metalinguistic knowledge of learners in the Russian language. On the example of interlingual lexical correspondences and prepositional-case constructions it is analysed mental structures and mechanisms that provide link between language and extralinguistic reality in the consciousness of the Spanish-speaking students.

  8. Who should be undertaking population-based surveys in humanitarian emergencies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spiegel Paul B

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Timely and accurate data are necessary to prioritise and effectively respond to humanitarian emergencies. 30-by-30 cluster surveys are commonly used in humanitarian emergencies because of their purported simplicity and reasonable validity and precision. Agencies have increasingly used 30-by-30 cluster surveys to undertake measurements beyond immunisation coverage and nutritional status. Methodological errors in cluster surveys have likely occurred for decades in humanitarian emergencies, often with unknown or unevaluated consequences. Discussion Most surveys in humanitarian emergencies are done by non-governmental organisations (NGOs. Some undertake good quality surveys while others have an already overburdened staff with limited epidemiological skills. Manuals explaining cluster survey methodology are available and in use. However, it is debatable as to whether using standardised, 'cookbook' survey methodologies are appropriate. Coordination of surveys is often lacking. If a coordinating body is established, as recommended, it is questionable whether it should have sole authority to release surveys due to insufficient independence. Donors should provide sufficient funding for personnel, training, and survey implementation, and not solely for direct programme implementation. Summary A dedicated corps of trained epidemiologists needs to be identified and made available to undertake surveys in humanitarian emergencies. NGOs in the field may need to form an alliance with certain specialised agencies or pool technically capable personnel. If NGOs continue to do surveys by themselves, a simple training manual with sample survey questionnaires, methodology, standardised files for data entry and analysis, and manual for interpretation should be developed and modified locally for each situation. At the beginning of an emergency, a central coordinating body should be established that has sufficient authority to set survey standards

  9. Comparison the Effect of Teaching of SBAR Technique with Role Play and Lecturing on Communication Skill of Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Toghian Chaharsoughi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ineffective communication is a main factor in engender of unwanted hospital errors and impede suitable patient care. SBAR technique (Situation-Background- Assessment- Recommendation is a standard tool for building communication among healthcare professionals. While educating the SBAR technique requires appropriate educational methods, but this issue has been less investigated. So, the aim of present study was to compare the effect of educating the SBAR technique with role play and lecturing on communication skills of nurses in transferring patients to next shift. Methods: This quasi-experimental study conducted by participating 78 nurses who assigned to role play and lecturing groups randomly. SBAR technique was educated to each group separately. At the end of the learning session in each group, the skills of the participants in performing SBAR technique were investigated by the standard SBAR scale. Data analysis was performed by using SPSS statistical software version 11.5. Results: Comparison the total score of performing SBAR technique using independent samples t-test showed statistical differences between mean score of role play and lecturing groups. Similarly, comparison the scores of skill in performing each four parts of SBAR technique showed statistical differences between two groups.Conclusion: Role play is an effective educational method in teaching SBAR technique for nurses and it can be used as a tool for build effective communication between healthcare professionals.

  10. Undertaking and writing research that is important, targeted, and the best you can do.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Sharynne

    2014-04-01

    Conducting and writing research is a privilege. It is a privilege because researchers can change lives through their findings and can influence public knowledge and debate. It is also a privilege because researchers are reliant on the time and goodwill of participants (and colleagues), and research is often underpinned by funding raised by the public, either through taxes or philanthropic donations. This privilege comes with responsibility. Researchers have a responsibility to undertake research that is important, targeted, and of high quality. This editorial aims to inspire, challenge, and bolster the research efforts of individuals and teams.

  11. Training staff to empower people with long-term conditions to undertake self care activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, Mandy

    Self care can help people with long-term conditions take control of their lives. However, their interest and ability to engage with it may fluctuate over the course of an illness and many need support to undertake self care activities. A team of community matrons in NHS South of Tyne and Wear helped to develop and pilot an e-learning tool for staff, to remind them of the importance of self care and give advice on ways to support patients. The tool has since been rolled out to all staff groups.

  12. The Role of ITs in Improving Teaching Quality in Schools: A Multicase Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Aróstegui Plaza

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we reflect, starting from empirical data, on the impact of Information Technology (IT in curriculum development and in shaping teachers’ professional identities. Based on two case studies carried out in two Secondary-Education classrooms located in southern Spain, we study the use that each of these teachers made ​​of IT and how their identities are reflected in the use of these tools and, at the same time, how to conform them. The first case is an ilustration of transition from a content-based curriculum appproach to another centered on students mainly by means of IT. As for the second, it shows how these resources allow this teacher to deepen the democratic principles of teaching he uses in class and on the Internet too, by and large through social networks. Based on our findings we conclude that, at least in the case of these two teachers, ITs represent a clear improvement in the quality of their teaching when they are focused on the educational application of the resource rather than on its technical side.

  13. Using Social Cognitive Theory to Explain the Intention of Final-year Pharmacy Students to Undertake a Higher Degree in Pharmacy Practice Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Stephen R; Moles, Rebekah J; Krass, Ines; Kritikos, Vicki S

    2016-08-25

    Objective. To develop and test a conceptual model that hypothesized student intention to undertake a higher degree in pharmacy practice research (PPR) would be increased by self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, and the social influence of faculty members. Methods. Cross-sectional surveys were completed by 387 final-year pharmacy undergraduates enrolled in 2012 and 2013. Structural equation modeling was used to explore relationships between variables and intention. Results. Fit indices were good. The model explained 55% of the variation in intention. As hypothesized, faculty social influence increased self-efficacy and indirectly increased outcome expectancy and intention. Conclusion. To increase pharmacy students' orientation towards a career in PPR, faculty members could use their social influence by highlighting PPR in their teaching.

  14. Teaching about Rosie the Riveter: The Role of Women during World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Karen

    1988-01-01

    Discusses a neglected area of U.S. history: the impact of World War II on the role and status of women. Shows how women's work in the home and in the community assisted the national defense effort, and examined the way that changes in employment opportunities affected traditional ideas about women's roles and fostered the modern women's movement.…

  15. Mars Colony: Using Role-Play as a Pedagogical Approach to Teaching Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenc, Nathan; Wood, Aja; Soldan, Katie; Tai, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss role-play as a pedagogical strategy to engage kindergarten and first-grade students in science and engineering. They present a five-part Mars colony lesson that they developed for a blended class, during which students role-play a space-exploration story that enables them to gain a firsthand perspective of what…

  16. The Role of Trustworthiness in Teaching: An Examination of "The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the role that trustworthiness plays in the ability of teachers to function as moral role models. Through exploration of Muriel Spark's novel, "The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie," I explain some of the central features of trustworthiness as a moral virtue and suggest how these features are critical…

  17. Use of role-play and community engagement to teach parasitic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Role-play can enhance students' learning, improve communication and serve as an effective tool for team building. When combined with community engagement projects (CEPs), it can enhance empathy in challenges relating to the community. The benefits of role-play in medical education have been reported ...

  18. Exploring Gender Roles' Effects of Turkish Women Teachers on Their Teaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Mediha

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how gender roles of women teachers affect their practices in the classrooms. Participants in the study were 75 female teachers working in elementary schools in Adana, Turkey. Findings indicated that gender roles of women teachers have important effects on their educational practices. Women teachers…

  19. The Evaluation of Role-Playing in the Context of Teaching Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belova, Nadja; Eilks, Ingo; Feierabend, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Role-plays are a common pedagogical tool in the Social Sciences. As an imitation of societal practices, role-plays are thought to support the development of argumentation and decision-making skills among learners. However, argumentation and decision making are also goals in science education in general and in socioscientific issues-oriented…

  20. Dutch voices: exploring the role of oral history in Dutch secondary history teaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijgen, Tim; Holthuis, Paul; Trškan, Danijela

    2016-01-01

    Oral history may enhance students’ historical content knowledge, historical reasoning competencies, and motivation to learn history. However, little is known regarding the role of oral history in Dutch history education. This study therefore explores the role of oral history in Dutch history

  1. ‘It’s a unique role!’ Perspectives on tutor attributes and expertise in distance language teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Shelley

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines the background to, and progress on, a project based on work carried out at the Open University UK (OUUK. The aim of the project is to articulate the attributes and expertise required by tutors of languages in distance education. A review of the literature on the roles and competencies required for tutors operating at a distance indicates that the specific context of language teaching has received relatively little attention from researchers in the field. There has, however, been considerable interest in the skills and attributes necessary for face-to-face language teaching in the classroom, which is outlined here. Issues of definition and research perspective are discussed, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various research approaches. The different stages and outcomes of the collaborative project are described in detail, demonstrating how the unfolding research design allowed opportunities for consultation, reflection, and responsive changes. The next stages of consultation are outlined, together with implications for the on-going professional development of tutors.

  2. A comparison of classroom and online asynchronous problem-based learning for students undertaking statistics training as part of a Public Health Masters degree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, N; Verstegen, D M L; Tan, F E S; O'Connor, S J

    2013-05-01

    This case-study compared traditional, face-to-face classroom-based teaching with asynchronous online learning and teaching methods in two sets of students undertaking a problem-based learning module in the multilevel and exploratory factor analysis of longitudinal data as part of a Masters degree in Public Health at Maastricht University. Students were allocated to one of the two study variants on the basis of their enrolment status as full-time or part-time students. Full-time students (n = 11) followed the classroom-based variant and part-time students (n = 12) followed the online asynchronous variant which included video recorded lectures and a series of asynchronous online group or individual SPSS activities with synchronous tutor feedback. A validated student motivation questionnaire was administered to both groups of students at the start of the study and a second questionnaire was administered at the end of the module. This elicited data about student satisfaction with the module content, teaching and learning methods, and tutor feedback. The module coordinator and problem-based learning tutor were also interviewed about their experience of delivering the experimental online variant and asked to evaluate its success in relation to student attainment of the module's learning outcomes. Student examination results were also compared between the two groups. Asynchronous online teaching and learning methods proved to be an acceptable alternative to classroom-based teaching for both students and staff. Educational outcomes were similar for both groups, but importantly, there was no evidence that the asynchronous online delivery of module content disadvantaged part-time students in comparison to their full-time counterparts.

  3. Benefits and barriers for registered nurses undertaking post-graduate diplomas in paediatric nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Anne; Copnell, Beverley

    2002-02-01

    This paper presents one aspect of a larger study identifying key influences on curriculum redesign and development of a post-graduate diploma in advanced clinical nursing. The focus is on paediatric intensive care and general paediatric streams. Data presented here relate to registered nurses' perceptions of benefits and barriers when undertaking this post-graduate diploma. As well as interviews and focus group discussions with a number of nurses, data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire, A total of 885 surveys were distributed to nurses working in paediatric areas in five hospitals in Victoria, Australia. Of these, 391 were completed (response rate 44%). One hundred and thirty (33%) had post-registration or post-graduate paediatric qualifications. Perceived benefits of undertaking the post-graduate diploma mainly related to an increase in knowledge and experience and improvement of employment opportunities. Perceived barriers mainly related to financial and professional issues such as cost of the course, loss of salary, the lack of direct remuneration on completion of the course and a lack of promotional opportunities. It was of concern that several nurses expressed a belief that paediatric qualifications were unnecessary and that many believed their employers did not value the qualification. Several recommendations are suggested to address the main barriers. These include more flexibility in the provision of such courses and opportunities for financial assistance. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The process of undertaking a quantitative dissertation for a taught M.Sc: Personal insights gained from supporting and examining students in the UK and Ireland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, Gill; Brennan, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This article discusses the roles of the student and the supervisor in the process of undertaking and writing a dissertation, a potentially daunting process. Results: The authors have supervised and examined students within 20 institutions and the personal insights gained result in the guidance provided within this article. Conclusion: The authors conclude that much can be done by students working with their supervisors, to improve progress in both performing and writing up the dissertation. Taking account of these factors will ease the dissertation process and move students progressively towards the production of a well-written dissertation

  5. Investigating the role of sliding friction in rolling motion: a teaching sequence based on experiments and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ambrosis, Anna; Malgieri, Massimiliano; Mascheretti, Paolo; Onorato, Pasquale

    2015-05-01

    We designed a teaching-learning sequence on rolling motion, rooted in previous research about student conceptions, and proposing an educational reconstruction strongly centred on the role of friction in different cases of rolling. A series of experiments based on video analysis is used to highlight selected key concepts and to motivate students in their exploration of the topic; and interactive simulations, which can be modified on the fly by students to model different physical situations, are used to stimulate autonomous investigation in enquiry activities. The activity sequence was designed for students on introductory physics courses and was tested with a group of student teachers. Comparisons between pre- and post-tests, and between our results and those reported in the literature, indicate that students’ understanding of rolling motion improved markedly and some typical difficulties were overcome.

  6. The role of teachers’ experiences in the construction of their knowledge and beliefs: A case study of English language teaching in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E. Lemus-Hidalgo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The present article drew on a larger interpretivist case study research of the role of teachers’ knowledge and beliefs in their teaching practices. It was constructed with the participation of four teachers that studied the same BA in ELT program and worked in the same state university in Mexico. The purpose of this article is to raise awareness of the role of learning and teaching experiences in the development of teachers’ knowledge and beliefs and of their implications for language teacher education. Observations, interviews, conversations, class video recordings and teachers’ journals were the methods used for the collection of the data. The case study not only shows that teachers’ knowledge, beliefs and teaching practices inform each other persistently in a dynamic process but also illustrates the significant role that learning and teaching experiences seem to have in the development of teachers’ knowledge and as sources of their beliefs. Teachers’ teaching practices appear to be mainly supported by their experiential knowledge and driven by their core beliefs; beliefs that are grounded in experience. Awareness of these aspects in the BA in ELT curriculum and in its delivery, would enhance the education of future teachers of English as a foreign language.

  7. Learning and teaching as communicative actions: Improving historical knowledge and cognition through Second Life avatar role play

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny S. Wakefield

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We examined a higher education history course where virtual role play was implemented as an assignment. The course was designed to help students gain an overall understanding of the causes, trajectory, and aftermath of the Cuban Revolution. Assignments included readings and discussions of historical essays and primary sources that were intended to prompt students to think critically about political, cultural, and scholarly debates surrounding the revolution but also inquiry and role play. In particular, students were encouraged to set aside pre-existing opinions in favor of or opposed to the revolutionary regime of Fidel Castro and U.S. Cold War diplomatic policy toward Cuba. The theoretical framework learning and teaching as communicative actions, in which communication and discourse, and the interplay among the four communicative actions proposed as the basis of human understanding, guided the course. Active learning through role-playing in a constructivism learning environment and classroom discourse helped students develop a higher level understanding of the complex events by perspective taking both for and against the Castro regime.

  8. An Effective Role of E-Learning Technology For English Language Teaching By Using Meta Communication Actors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilknur ISTIFCI

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Meta communication plays a key role in foreign language learning and teaching. Broadly speaking, meta communication is communication about communication. Meta communication is something that goes beyond communication and all language learners and teachers should be familiar with its existence. It should be stressed that meta communication which accompanies any message is very powerful. In face to face writing lessons, the student can make emphasis on any point by utilizing larger fonts, capital letters, or bold fonts in his essay. However, in virtual learning environments, students can make use of emoticons like :- “happy”, :-( “sad”, :-/ “perplexed”, O.o “confused” to communicate about communication. Further, they can deploy some acronyms like (BTW= By the way, ASAP= as soon as possible, TM= tomorrow to easily convey their messages. It should be emphasized that E-learning applications (virtual worlds, second life, ICTs are very beneficial in foreign language learning and teaching since they create a platform for students and teachers to interact in a context with no boundaries of time and distance. In Transformational Generative Grammar, foreign language teachers describe syntactic structures in English by using grammatical symbols with meta communicational elements. For instance, every English Foreign Language-EFL or English Language Teaching-ELT teachers or students is familiar with the symbols and related meanings like (S= sentence, subject, V= verb, O= object, N= noun, NP= noun phrase, VP= verb phrase, etc.. On the other side, when teaching English pronunciation to Turkish EFL learners, foreign language teachers utilize phonetic symbols like /è, æ, å, ğ, w, ŋ/ to write transcriptions of English words. These phonetic symbols have meta communicational elements in their composition because they communicate about communication. At this juncture, foreign language teachers should learn frequently used emoticons, keyboard

  9. The teacher's role in college level classes for non-science majors: A constructivist approach for teaching prospective science teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Abdullah Othman

    1997-12-01

    This interpretive research set out to investigate the characteristics of an exemplary college science instructor who endeavors to improve teaching and learning in a physical science course for prospective teachers. The course was innovative in the sense that it was designed to meet the specific needs of prospective elementary teachers who needed to have models of how to teach science in a way that employed materials and small group activities. The central purpose for this study is to understand the metaphors that Mark (a pseudonym), the chemistry instructor in the course, used as referents to conceptualize his roles and frame actions and interactions in the classroom. Within the theoretical frame of constructivism, human cognitive interests, and co-participation theories, an ethnographic research design, described by Erickson (1986), Guba and Lincoln (1989), and Gallagher (1991), was employed in the study. The main sources of data for this study were field notes, transcript analysis of interviews with the instructor and students, and analyses of videotaped excerpts. Additional data sources, such as student journals and the results of students' responses to the University/Community College Student Questionnaire which was developed by a group science education researchers at Florida State University, were employed to maximize that the assertions I constructed were consistent with the variety of data. Data analyses and interpretation in the study focused on identifying the aspects which the instructor and the researcher might find useful in reflecting to understand what was happening and why that was happening in the classroom. The analysis reveals how the instructor used constructivism as a referent for his teaching and the learning of his students. To be consistent with his beliefs and goals that prospective teachers should enjoy their journey of learning chemistry, Mark, the driver in the journey, used the roles of controller, facilitator, learner, and entertainer

  10. Teaching communication skills to hospice teams: comparing the effectiveness of a communication skills laboratory with in-person, second life, and phone role-playing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Gillian; Ortega, Rosio; Hochstetler, Vicki; Pierson, Kristen; Lin, Peiyi; Lowes, Susan

    2014-09-01

    Communication skills are critical in hospice care but challenging to teach. Therefore, a hospice agency developed a communication skills laboratory for nurses and social workers. Learners role-played 3 common hospice scenarios. The role-play modalities were in-person, Second Life, and telephone. Learners were scored on 4 communication aspects. Learners in all modalities rated the laboratory as very effective. However, learners in the Second Life and phone modality showed greater improvements from scene 1 to 3 than those in the in-person modality. There were no significant differences in improvement between the Second Life and phone modalities. Results support the effectiveness of this communication skills laboratory while using different teaching modalities and show phone and Second Life role-plays were more effective than an in-person role-play. © The Author(s) 2013.

  11. Teaching the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act to Legal and Ethical Environment of Business Undergraduate Students through a Role-Play Experiential Learning Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Konrad S.; Thue, Matthew I.

    2017-01-01

    This article begins with a description of a role-play exercise for teaching the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) to an introductory Legal and Ethical Environment of Business Law (Business Law) undergraduate class. It goes on to provide the context for consumer debt in the United States. Next, the problems of debt collection are…

  12. The Role of Teachers' Experiences in the Construction of Their Knowledge and Beliefs: A Case Study of English Language Teaching in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemus-Hidalgo, Maria E.

    2017-01-01

    The present article drew on a larger interpretivist case study research of the role of teachers' knowledge and beliefs in their teaching practices. It was constructed with the participation of four teachers that studied the same BA in ELT program and worked in the same state university in Mexico. The purpose of this article is to raise awareness…

  13. A Case Study of Using Online Communities and Virtual Environment in Massively Multiplayer Role Playing Games (MMORPGs) as a Learning and Teaching Tool for Second Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongmee, Isara; Strachan, Rebecca; Pickard, Alison; Montgomery, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Games (MMORPGs) create large virtual communities. Online gaming shows potential not just for entertaining, but also in education. This research investigates the use of commercial MMORPGs to support second language teaching. MMORPGs offer virtual safe spaces in which students can communicate by using their…

  14. The Role of Female Teachers in Activating Effective Teaching Skills and Methods among High School Students from the Teachers' Perspective--Najran, KSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahsheh, Rula; Alhawamdeh, Haifa

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to identify the role of female teachers in activating effective teaching skills and methods among high school students from the teachers' perspective--Najran, KSA. The researcher used the descriptive analytical approach. Instrument of the study is a questionnaire with (76) items distributing to (3) domains: the first domain is…

  15. Expanding the Role of Maryland Community Colleges in K-12 Teacher Preparation: Benefits and Costs of Implementing the Associate of Arts in Teaching (AAT) Degree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Jennifer Vest

    2012-01-01

    This study uses benefit-cost analysis to compare three alternative scenarios for implementing the Associate of Arts in Teaching (AAT) degree in Maryland community colleges. The first policy scenario is that community colleges retain their traditional role in K-12 teacher preparation by providing lower-division transfer courses and programs for…

  16. Education for Sustainable Agriculture: A Typology of the Role of Teaching Farms in Achieving Learning Goals and Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, Kelly; Swisher, Marilyn; Koenig, Rosalie L.; Rodriguez, Juan C.

    2017-01-01

    Teaching farms have recently gained popularity, but they are often expensive venues per student credit hour. It is therefore important they are used effectively. This research explored why faculty members use teaching farms, their goals and objectives with regard to the farm, and how they integrate teaching farms into curriculum. Twenty interviews…

  17. Jordanian Prospective and Experienced Chemistry Teachers' Beliefs about Teaching and Learning and Their Potential Role for Educational Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amoush, Siham A.; Markic, Silvija; Abu-Hola, Imfadi; Eilks, Ingo

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an exploratory study of Jordanian chemistry student teachers' and experienced teachers' beliefs about teaching and learning. Different instruments were used, focusing on different aspects of teaching and learning. The first instrument is based on teachers' and students' drawings of teaching situations. It includes open…

  18. From Cultural Knowledge to Intercultural Communicative Competence: Changing Perspectives on the Role of Culture in Foreign Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatkowska, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Approaches to the concept of culture and teaching cultural competence in a foreign language classroom have been changing over the last decades. The paper summarises, compares, contrasts and evaluates four major approaches to teaching cultural competence in foreign language teaching, that is, knowledge-based approach, contrastive approach,…

  19. Role of Organizational Climate in Organizational Commitment: The Case of Teaching Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Mohammad Amin; Barati, Omid; Ghoroghchian, Malake-Sadat; Montazer-Alfaraj, Razieh; Ranjbar Ezzatabadi, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    The commitment of employees is affected by several factors, including factors related to the organizational climate. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between organizational commitment of nurses and the organizational climate in hospital settings. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 at two teaching hospitals in Yazd, Iran. A total of 90 nurses in these hospitals participated. We used stratified random sampling of the nursing population. The required data were gathered using two valid questionnaires: Allen and Meyer's organizational commitment standard questionnaire and Halpin and Croft's Organizational Climate Description Questionnaire. Data analysis was done through SPSS 20 statistical software (IBM Corp., Armonk, NY, USA). We used descriptive statistics and Pearson's correlation coefficient for the data analysis. The findings indicated a positive and significant correlation between organizational commitment and organizational climate (r = 0.269, p = 0.01). There is also a significant positive relationship between avoidance of organizational climate and affective commitment (r = 0.208, p = 0.049) and between focus on production and normative and continuance commitment (r = 0.308, p = 0.003). Improving the organizational climate could be a valuable strategy for improving organizational commitment.

  20. The role of place on healthcare quality improvement: A qualitative case study of a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Sara

    2018-03-02

    This article examines how the built environment impacts, and is impacted by, healthcare staff day to day practice, care outcomes and the design of new quality and patient safety (Q&PS) projects. It also explores how perceptions of the built environment affect inter-professional dynamics. In doing so, it contributes to the overlooked interplay between the physical, social, and symbolic dimensions associated with a hospital's place. The study draws on 46 in-depth semi-structured interviews conducted at a large teaching hospital in Portugal formed by two buildings. Interview transcripts were analysed inductively using thematic analysis. The major contribution of this study is to advance the understanding of the interactions among the different dimensions of place on Q&PS improvement. For example, findings indicate that some of the characteristics of the physical infrastructure of the hospital have a negative impact on the quality of care provided and/or significantly limit the initiatives that can be implemented to improve it, including refurbishment works. However, decisions on refurbishment works were also influenced by the characteristics of the patient population, hospital budget, etc. Likewise, clinicians' emotional reactions to the limitations of the buildings depended on their expectations of the buildings and the symbolic projections they attributed to them. Nevertheless, differences between clinicians' expectations regarding the physical infrastructure and its actual features influenced clinicians' views on Q&PS initiatives designed by non-clinicians. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Comparison of Classic vs. Role plays Teaching Methods on the Menstrual Hygiene Behavior of Secondary School Girls in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Ostovar

    2013-09-01

    Background & aim: Awareness about the different aspects of health during puberty plays an important role in the health of girls and finally on their health future pregnancy. The aim of the present study was to to compare the effect of role playing and classical training methods in the the improvement of puberty health among secondary school girls in Yasouj City, Iran. Methods: In this study, the educational need during puberty school girls in the interview was determined. The two schools girls were randomly selected (students any school-60. Next, a knowledge and attitude questionnaire and a behavior checklist related to the main puberty health problems were completed. Then one of the schools randomly was selected as educational interventions schools and other were studied as controls. After grouping the students into four groups of 15, intervention were conducted in four sessions including: role-play, question and answer, and lecture. In the control group, all number of school students received training on puberty health through a classical education (lectures. The results were subsequently compared. Data were analyzed by Student t-test paired t-test, and analysis of variance. Results: The results of this study showed that the level of knowledge, attitude and behavior related to health matters during puberty showed significant improvement in the girls before and after implementation of educational intervention through role play (p<0.05.Thus, the mean score in group role play before intervention was 2.35±1.53 and after was 3.96±1.27 , The mean performance score before intervention 6.04±2.34 and after was, 8.61±1.55, respectively, while in classical group differences were not statistically significant (p<0.05 Conclusion: In comparison with the classical method of health education, teaching through role play significantly improved the level of knowledge, attitude and practice related to puberty health among adolescent girls. Key Words: Education, Adolescent Girls

  2. The Role of Theory Building in the Teaching of Secondary Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Michael; Herbst, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Although mathematical practice has traditionally valued two distinct kinds of mathematical work--referred to by Gowers (2000) as theory building and problem solving--activity in classrooms appears to be organized largely around the latter, rather than the former. This study takes up the question of whether there is a customary role for theory…

  3. Diversity Matters: Japan's Domestic Diversity and the Role of English Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Mieko

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates how Japanese university students perceive Japan's domestic diversity and understand the role of English within that context. Surveys and interviews with Japanese students reveal how they reflect on their own experiences with diversity in their past English as a Foreign Language (EFL) classes and also help to explore the…

  4. Teaching Conflict Resolution Skills to Middle and High School Students through Interactive Drama and Role Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Kelly N.; Frabutt, James M.; Vigliano, Debra

    2007-01-01

    In response to the rising levels of school conflict, the present study investigated a new approach to conflict resolution for middle and high school students using interactive drama and role play called the Win-Win Resolutions program. The standardized curriculum delivered within the school setting includes strategies for self-control and anger…

  5. Atheroprotector role of the spleen based on the teaching of Avicenna (Ibn Sina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emtiazy, Majid; Choopani, Rasool; Khodadoost, Mahmood; Tansaz, Mojgan; Nazem, Esmaiel

    2013-07-15

    Many studies have proven atherosclerosis is an inflammatory immune disease. The spleen plays an important immune role in the human body. Splenectomy is often used in several clinical disorders; but recent studies have shown that splenectomy may be effective in the development of atheroma lesions. Ibn Sina or Avicenna was known as one of the greatest philosopher and physician in Islam and in Medicine. He is remembered for his masterpiece, The "Al-Qanun fi al-Tibb" or "Qanun of medicine". According to the "Al-Qanun fi al-Tibb", spleen as storage organ plays an important role in absorption and secretion of the black bile in the human body. Therefore any disruption in the function of the spleen can lead to various diseases such as atherosclerosis. Based on his description, it is clear that Ibn Sina first described the role of spleen in prevention of atherosclerosis. In this review, we discuss the Avicenna (Ibn Sina) aspect of atheroprotector role of the spleen. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Is This the Past? The Place of Role-Play Exercises in Undergraduate History Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beidatsch, Cedric; Broomhall, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Increasingly, academic teachers are exploring the learning opportunities offered by student-centred participatory classroom and web-supported exercises. Role-play and gaming activities have been highlighted as fora which provide development of a range of personal and social skill sets in students, as well as understanding of subject content. This…

  7. The Role of Metaphor in Darwin and the Implications for Teaching Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramling, Niklas

    2009-01-01

    This article is about the role of metaphor in scientific knowledge formation and reasoning. These issues are studied by means of an example of the theory of evolution through natural selection. The premise is that the theory of evolution contains a set of problems regarding metaphor. A second premise is that these problems have to be handled in…

  8. "Try Walking in Our Shoes": Teaching Acculturation and Related Cultural Adjustment Processes through Role-Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboanga, Byron L.; Ham, Lindsay S.; Tomaso, Cara C.; Audley, Shannon; Pole, Nnamdi

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we describe several role-playing exercises on acculturation and relevant cultural adjustment processes that we incorporated into Tomcho and Foel's classroom activity on acculturation, and we report data that examine subsequent changes in students' responses on pretest and posttest measures shortly after the activity and present…

  9. Integrating the teaching role into one's identity : a qualitative study of beginning undergraduate medical teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van, Lankveld T.; Schoonenboom, J.; Kusurkar, R.A.; Volman, M.; Beishuizen, J.; Croiset, G.

    2017-01-01

    Beginning medical teachers often see themselves as doctors or researchers rather than as teachers. Using both figured worlds theory and dialogical self theory, this study explores how beginning teachers in the field of undergraduate medical education integrate the teacher role into their identity. A

  10. Tibet's Role in Inner Asia. Teaching Aids for the Study of Inner Asia, No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Turrell V.

    Second in a series of guides to help college and high school teachers incorporate information about Inner Asia into their courses, this pamphlet discusses the role of Tibet in Inner Asia. Aspects of Tibetan political and religious history are highlighted, and comments are made about the formative relationships Tibet had with her neighbors. Chapter…

  11. Learning to Read and Write Genre-Specific Text: Roles of Authentic Experience and Explicit Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell-Gates, Victoria; Duke, Nell K.; Martineau, Joseph A.

    2007-01-01

    This study explored, with both experimental and correlational designs, the roles of (a) authentic, communicatively functional reading and writing and (b) the explicit explanation of genre function and features on growth in genre-specific reading and writing abilities of children in grades two and three. The genres used for this exploration were…

  12. Undertaking cause-specific mortality measurement in an unregistered population: an example from Tigray Region, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godefay, Hagos; Abrha, Atakelti; Kinsman, John; Myléus, Anna; Byass, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The lack of adequate documentation of deaths, and particularly their cause, is often noted in African and Asian settings, but practical solutions for addressing the problem are not always clear. Verbal autopsy methods (interviewing witnesses after a death) have developed rapidly, but there remains a lack of clarity as to how these methods can be effectively applied to large unregistered populations. This paper sets out practical details for undertaking a representative survey of cause-specific mortality in a population of several million, taking Tigray Region in Ethiopia as a prototype. Sampling was designed around an expected level of maternal mortality ratio of 400 per 100,000 live births, which needed measuring within a 95% confidence interval of approximately ±100. Taking a stratified cluster sample within the region at the district level for logistic reasons, and allowing for a design effect of 2, this required a population of around 900,000 people, equating to six typical districts. Since the region is administered in six geographic zones, one district per zone was randomly selected. The survey was implemented as a two-stage process: first, to trace deaths that occurred in the sampled districts within the preceding year, and second to follow them up with verbal autopsy interviews. The field work for both stages was undertaken by health extension workers, working in their normally assigned areas. Most of the work was associated with tracing the deaths, rather than undertaking the verbal autopsy interviews. This approach to measuring cause-specific mortality in an unregistered Ethiopian population proved to be feasible and effective. Although it falls short of the ideal situation of continuous civil registration and vital statistics, a survey-based strategy of this kind may prove to be a useful intermediate step on the road towards full civil registration and vital statistics implementation.

  13. Undertaking cause-specific mortality measurement in an unregistered population: an example from Tigray Region, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagos Godefay

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The lack of adequate documentation of deaths, and particularly their cause, is often noted in African and Asian settings, but practical solutions for addressing the problem are not always clear. Verbal autopsy methods (interviewing witnesses after a death have developed rapidly, but there remains a lack of clarity as to how these methods can be effectively applied to large unregistered populations. This paper sets out practical details for undertaking a representative survey of cause-specific mortality in a population of several million, taking Tigray Region in Ethiopia as a prototype. Sampling: Sampling was designed around an expected level of maternal mortality ratio of 400 per 100,000 live births, which needed measuring within a 95% confidence interval of approximately ±100. Taking a stratified cluster sample within the region at the district level for logistic reasons, and allowing for a design effect of 2, this required a population of around 900,000 people, equating to six typical districts. Since the region is administered in six geographic zones, one district per zone was randomly selected. Implementation: The survey was implemented as a two-stage process: first, to trace deaths that occurred in the sampled districts within the preceding year, and second to follow them up with verbal autopsy interviews. The field work for both stages was undertaken by health extension workers, working in their normally assigned areas. Most of the work was associated with tracing the deaths, rather than undertaking the verbal autopsy interviews. Discussion: This approach to measuring cause-specific mortality in an unregistered Ethiopian population proved to be feasible and effective. Although it falls short of the ideal situation of continuous civil registration and vital statistics, a survey-based strategy of this kind may prove to be a useful intermediate step on the road towards full civil registration and vital statistics implementation.

  14. The Rise of the Unsaid: Spaces in Teaching Postcolonial Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Jabbar, Wisam Kh.

    2015-01-01

    Teaching postcolonial literature can be a daunting undertaking that teachers may try to avoid. This article explores three problems that teachers may confront in teaching postcolonial texts. The first problem deals with which literary text to choose and the criteria that may help teachers anchor their choices. Second, in response to the question…

  15. A Virtual Reality Simulation Model of Spinal Ultrasound: Role in Teaching Spinal Sonoanatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramlogan, Reva; Niazi, Ahtsham U; Jin, Rongyu; Johnson, James; Chan, Vincent W; Perlas, Anahi

    Ultrasound assessment of the lumbar spine improves the success of spinal and epidural anesthesia, especially for patients with underlying difficult anatomy. To assist with the teaching and learning of ultrasound-guided neuraxial anesthesia, we have created an online interactive educational model (http://www.usra.ca/vspine.php and http://pie.med.utoronto.ca/vspine). The aim of the current study was to determine whether the virtual spine model improved the knowledge of neuraxial anatomy and sonoanatomy. After obtaining ethics board approval and written participant consent, 14 anesthesia trainees with no prior experience with spine ultrasound imaging were included in this study. Construct validity was assessed using a pretest/posttest design to measure the knowledge acquired from self-study of the virtual spine simulation modules. Two tests (A and B) with 20 multiple-choice questions were used either for the pretest or posttest, at random in order to account for possible differences in difficulty between the 2 tests. These tests were administered immediately before and after a 1-hour training session using the spine ultrasound model. Fourteen anesthesia trainees completed the study. Seven used test A as the pretest (group A), and 7 used test B as the pretest (group B). Both groups showed a statistically significant improvement (P < 0.05) in test scores after a 1-hour session with the spine ultrasound model. The mean scores were 55% (SD, 11.2%) on the pretest and 77% (SD, 8.7%) on the posttest. The study demonstrated that after 1 hour of self-study by the trainees on the spine ultrasound model test scores improved by 40%.

  16. Role of transformational leadership on employee productivity of teaching hospitals: using structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatankhah, Soudabeh; Alirezaei, Samira; Khosravizadeh, Omid; Mirbahaeddin, Seyyed Elmira; Alikhani, Mahtab; Alipanah, Mobarakeh

    2017-08-01

    In today's transforming world, increased productivity and efficient use of existing facilities are practically beyond a choice and become a necessity. In this line, attention to change and transformation is one of the affecting factors on the growth of productivity in organizations, especially in hospitals. To examine the effect of transformational leadership on the productivity of employees in teaching hospitals affiliated to Iran University of Medical Sciences. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 254 participants from educational and medical centers affiliated to Iran University of Medical Sciences (Tehran, Iran) in 2016. The standard questionnaires of Bass & Avolio and of Hersi & Goldsmith were used to respectively assess transformational leadership and level of productivity. The research assumptions were tested in a significance level of 0.05 by applying descriptive statistics and structural equations modeling (SEM) using SPSS 19 and Amos 24. Results of the fitting indicators of the assessing model after amending includes Chi-square two to degrees of freedom of 2.756, CFI indicator 0.95, IFI indicator 0.92, Root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) indicator 0.10. These results indicate that the assessing model is well fitting after the amendment. Also, analysis of the model's assumptions and the final model of the research reveals the effect of transformational leadership on employees' productivity with a significance level of 0.83 (p=0.001). This research indicates that the more the leadership and decision-making style in hospitals lean towards transformational mode, the more positive outcomes it brings among employees and the organization due to increased productivity. Therefore, it is essential to pay focused attention to training/educational programs in organizations to create and encourage transformational leadership behaviors which hopefully lead to more productive employees.

  17. A mini-midwifery business institute in a midwifery professional roles course: an innovative teaching strategy for successful career planning and business management of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, D Elizabeth; Dewees, Connie; McDowell, William C

    2015-01-01

    It is essential to include teaching strategies in midwifery education that address career planning and the business aspects of practice. This article presents the Mini-Midwifery Business Institute (M-MBI), an innovative teaching strategy for midwives that can also be applied to other advanced practice professions. The M-MBI can be integrated into a professional roles course. Before and after graduation, midwifery students and other advanced practice professionals can use the information to gain confidence and skills for successful career planning and the business management of practice. © 2014 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  18. Role of SimMan in teaching clinical skills to preclinical medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swamy Meenakshi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Simulation training has potential in developing clinical skills in pre-clinical medical students, but there is little evidence on its effectiveness. Methods Twenty four first year graduate entry preclinical medical students participated in this crossover study. They were divided into two groups, one performed chest examination on each other and the other used SimMan. The groups then crossed over. A pretest, midtest and post-test was conducted in which the students answered the same questionnaire with ten questions on knowledge, and confidence levels rated using a 5 point Likert scale. They were assessed formatively using the OSCE marking scheme. At the end of the session, 23 students completed a feedback questionnaire. Data was analyzed using one-way ANOVA and independent t-test. Results When the two groups were compared, there was no significant difference in the pretest and the post-test scores on knowledge questions whereas the midtest scores increased significantly (P Mean confidence ratings increased from the pretest to midtest and then further in the post-test for both groups. Their confidence ratings increased significantly in differentiating between normal and abnormal signs [Group starting with SimMan, between pretest and midtest (P= 0.01 and group starting with peer examination, between midtest and post-test (P=0.02]. When the students’ ability to perform examination on each other for both groups was compared, there was a significant increase in the scores of the group starting with SimMan (P=0.007. Conclusions This pilot study demonstrated a significant improvement in the students’ knowledge and competence to perform chest examination after simulation with an increase in the student’s perceived levels of confidence. Feedback from the students was extremely positive. SimMan acts as a useful adjunct to teach clinical skills to preclinical medical students by providing a simulated safe environment and thus aids

  19. A systematic scoping review of the evidence for consumer involvement in organisations undertaking systematic reviews: focus on Cochrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Richard F; Norman, Gill; Golder, Su; Griffith, Polly

    2016-01-01

    Cochrane is the largest international producer of systematic reviews of clinical trial evidence. We looked for published evidence that reports where consumers (patients and the public) have been involved in Cochrane systematic reviews, and also in reviews published by other organisations.We found 36 studies that reported about consumer involvement either in individual systematic reviews, or in other organisations. The studies showed that consumers were involved in reviews in a range of different ways: coordinating and producing reviews, making reviews more accessible, and spreading the results of reviews ("knowledge transfer"). The most common role was commenting on reviews ("peer reviewing"). Consumers also had other general roles, for example in educating people about evidence or helping other consumers. There were some interesting examples of new ways of involving consumers. The studies showed that most consumers came from rich and English speaking countries. There was little evidence about how consumer involvement had changed the reviews ("impact"). The studies found that consumer involvement needed to be properly supported.In future we believe that more research should be done to understand what kind of consumer involvement has the best impact; that more review authors should report how consumers have been involved; and that consumers who help with reviews should come from more varied backgrounds. Background Cochrane is the largest international producer of systematic reviews, and is committed to consumer involvement in the production and dissemination of its reviews. The review aims to systematically scope the evidence base for consumer involvement in organisations which commission, undertake or support systematic reviews; with an emphasis on Cochrane. Methods In June 2015 we searched six databases and other sources for studies of consumer involvement in organisations which commission, undertake or support systematic reviews, or in individual systematic

  20. Co-teaching in information literacy during work placements: the librarian’s role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anett Kristin Kolstad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This article presents findings from a development project designed to improve Information Literacy (IL education by linking it to nursing students’ application of evidence-based practice during work placements. The Learning Centre at Oslo University College in Norway aimed to find out, what interactions and conditions influenced the librarian’s role in the context of interdisciplinary supervision of nursing students’ assignments and the development of a common supervision culture. Research Design: The librarian involved in the initiative had a dual role as both researcher and practitioner. Besides direct experiences from being a participant in the project, the empirical material consists of observation notes, meeting notes, presentations, guideline in IL, e-mails, an interview, 285 comments from students, nurse educators, nurse supervisors and librarians, through blog and the Wiki Learning Management System (LMS. The evidence on which this article is based involved analysis of both oral and written communication, framed in practice-oriented approaches. Findings: The conditions influencing the changing position of the librarian from an ‘outsider’ to becoming a member of the community of practice with common structures for the collaboration and supervision included meetings, a blog and a Wiki. Multidisciplinary, complementary skills in the supervision teams provided improved quality of supervision and led to a new joint supervision community. Conclusion: Together with the nurse educators and the nurse supervisors, the librarian was able to be a partner and a catalyst of IL workplace learning. The LMS was a decisive tool in the process. However, to be successful, this changed role for the librarian may require further pedagogical training and expertise in the development of interdisciplinary educational supervision.

  1. THE FREQUENT USE OF TEACHING STRATEGIES/METHODS AMONG TEACHERS ACCORDING TO THE TEACHER CANDIDATES OBSERVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukaddes SAKALLI

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to show the frequent use of teaching stratergies/methods amongteachers which has been observed by teacher candidates currently undergoing their own field/area teaching program.This study undertakes the general research model and the tools used to obtain the necessary data are personalinformation form and a questionaire. “Teachers frequent use of teaching methods/stratergies” to obtain necessarydata a 4 likert scale type of questionaire has been used. The scale developed on behalf of the researcher involves 35teaching methods/stratergies.The data obtained through 71 quetionaires where evaluated from 4 (always and 1(none as points and has been evaluated through the SPSS package program. In addition, the resultsof the data havebeen analysed through the following techniques: percentage (%, average (X and standard deviation (SS.According to the observations made by the teacher candidates the following teaching methods/stratergies wereundertaken by the teachers according to thier teaching field: lecturing, question-answer method were always used,homework, practice in the classroom, problem solving, showing and practicing methods were frequently used,project work, anaylsing example situations, debates, similarity, computer based education, observing privatetutorials, eduational games, cooperative learning, brainstroming, field trips and reflecting/miroring situations,group/team work, experiment, role play, micro-learning technique, statement, speech,meeting, display, drama,conference, formal debates, sempozium, seminar, panel, umbrella technique, forum and opposite panel

  2. Exploring the Teaching Motivations, Satisfaction, and Challenges of Veterinary Preceptors: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, Cary T; Myhre, Douglas L; Hecker, Kent G; Bailey, Jeremy V; Lockyer, Jocelyn M

    2016-01-01

    Optimization of clinical veterinary education requires an understanding of what compels veterinary preceptors in their role as clinical educators, what satisfaction they receive from the teaching experience, and what struggles they encounter while supervising students in private practice. We explored veterinary preceptors' teaching motivations, enjoyment, and challenges by undertaking a thematic content analysis of 97 questionnaires and 17 semi-structured telephone interviews. Preceptor motivations included intrinsic factors (obligation to the profession, maintenance of competence, satisfaction) and extrinsic factors (promotion of the veterinary field, recruitment). Veterinarians enjoyed observing the learner (motivation and enthusiasm, skill development) and engaging with the learner (sharing their passion for the profession, developing professional relationships). Challenges for veterinary preceptors included variability in learner interest and engagement, time management, and lack of guidance from the veterinary medicine program. We found dynamic interactions among the teaching motivations, enjoyment, and challenges for preceptors. Our findings suggest that in order to sustain the veterinary preceptor, there is a need to recognize the interplay between the incentives and disincentives for teaching, to foster the motivations and enjoyment for teaching, and to mitigate the challenges of teaching in community private practice.

  3. Utilising learning environment assessments to improve teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We examined the viability of using feedback from a learning environment instrument to guide improvements in the teaching practices of in-service teachers undertaking a distance-education programme. The 31 teachers involved administered a primary school version of the What Is Happening In this Class?

  4. On Teaching Energy: Preparing Students Better for their Role as Citizens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, J. D.; Lyford, M. E.; Buss, A.

    2009-12-01

    Supplying energy to an expanding population with a rising standard of living and maintaining human and natural systems is an increasingly difficult task. Thus, energy is often listed as one of the grand challenges facing humankind. Energy‘s grand challenges are many, complex, multifaceted and of variable scale. It is not surprising then that their solutions must be multi-dimensional as well. Historically, energy solutions have focused on energy science (a multidisciplinary topic spanning biology, chemistry, Earth science, physics, and math), technology or economics. In the real world, focusing solely on these aspects of energy has rarely produced energy projects that are just and fair. Sustainable, equitable and effective energy projects are only created when additional perspectives are considered, e.g. environment, culture, social institutions, politics, etc. The natures of these other perspectives are determined largely by the social context of any particular energy issue. For example, petroleum production has had vastly different impacts in Norway than it does in Nigeria. Thus, solutions to energy issues are, in fact, multidimensional functions. Given this complexity, preparing students to deal with the energy issues they will face in the future requires an instructional approach that integrates a multidisciplinary science approach with technology and social context. Yet this alone will not ensure that students leave the classroom with the skills necessary to equitably, effectively and logically deal with energy issues. Rather, teaching energy also requires sound pedagogy. Effective pedagogy ensures student success in the classroom and facilitates transfer of classroom knowledge to real world situations. It includes, but also goes beyond, employing classroom strategies that promote deep and lasting learning. In this arena, it fosters the development of a skill set that enables students to transfer classroom knowledge to real world issues. It prepares students

  5. Teachers' Perceptions of Their Mentoring Role in Three Different Clinical Settings: Student Teaching, Early Field Experiences, and Entry Year Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gut, Dianne M.; Beam, Pamela C.; Henning, John E.; Cochran, Deborah C.; Knight, Rhonda Talford

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the differences in mentoring across three different clinical settings: student teaching, early field experiences, and entry year teachers. Eighteen teachers with mentoring experience in all three clinical settings were selected and interviewed. The teachers' expectations for teacher development,…

  6. Does undertaking an intercalated BSc influence first clinical year exam results at a London medical school?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howman, Mary; Jones, Melvyn

    2011-02-03

    Intercalated BScs (iBScs) are an optional part of the medical school curriculum in many Universities. Does undertaking an iBSc influence subsequent student performance? Previous studies addressing this question have been flawed by iBSc students being highly selected. This study looks at data from medical students where there is a compulsory iBSc for non-graduates. Our aim was to see whether there was any difference in performance between students who took an iBSc before or after their third year (first clinical year) exams. A multivariable analysis was performed to compare the third year results of students at one London medical school who had or had not completed their iBSc by the start of this year (n = 276). A general linear model was applied to adjust for differences between the two groups in terms of potential confounders (age, sex, nationality and baseline performance). The results of third year summative exams for 276 students were analysed (184 students with an iBSc and 92 without). Unadjusted analysis showed students who took an iBSc before their third year achieved significantly higher end of year marks than those who did not with a mean score difference of 4.4 (0.9 to 7.9 95% CI, p = 0.01). (overall mean score 238.4 "completed iBSc" students versus 234.0 "not completed", range 145.2 - 272.3 out of 300). There was however a significant difference between the two groups in their prior second year exam marks with those choosing to intercalate before their third year having higher marks. Adjusting for this, the difference in overall exam scores was no longer significant with a mean score difference of 1.4 (-4.9 to +7.7 95% CI, p = 0.66). (overall mean score 238.0 " completed iBSc" students versus 236.5 "not completed"). Once possible confounders are controlled for (age, sex, previous academic performance) undertaking an iBSc does not influence third year exam results. One explanation for this confounding in unadjusted results is that students who do better

  7. Motivation for the teaching profession

    OpenAIRE

    Křížová, Kateřina

    2012-01-01

    Anotace: The thesis "The motivation for the teaching profession" dealt with fundamental problems of motivation to the teaching profession. In the theoretical part, we have focused on general characteristics of terms that pertain to the teaching profession, particularly the theory of the teaching profession, the choice of the teaching profession, the phase of the teaching profession, teacher typology, the role of teacher training and professionalization of teachers, but also washed into the te...

  8. Teaching Modern Southeast Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Williamson

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Teaching about Southeast Asia to undergraduates at an American liberal arts college presents several challenges. At my institution, it is the only course on the region in the curriculum; thus no preparation, and no follow-up. I have therefore struggled with the approach that I should take–pulled between a wish for students to gain an empirical understanding of Southeast Asian life, and a desire to have them learn the concepts and theories of critical inquiry. Obviously I am still learning how to successfully accomplish such an ambitious undertaking.

  9. An Evaluation of the Role of Simulation Training for Teaching Surgical Skills in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campain, Nicholas J; Kailavasan, Mithun; Chalwe, Mumba; Gobeze, Aberra A; Teferi, Getaneh; Lane, Robert; Biyani, Chandra Shekhar

    2018-04-01

    An estimated 5 billion people worldwide lack access to any surgical care, whilst surgical conditions account for 11-30% of the global burden of disease. Maximizing the effectiveness of surgical training is imperative to improve access to safe and essential surgical care on a global scale. Innovative methods of surgical training have been used in sub-Saharan Africa to attempt to improve the efficiency of training healthcare workers in surgery. Simulation training may have an important role in up-scaling and improving the efficiency of surgical training and has been widely used in SSA. Though not intended to be a systematic review, the role of simulation for teaching surgical skills in Sub-Saharan Africa was reviewed to assess the evidence for use and outcomes. A systematic search strategy was used to retrieve relevant studies from electronic databases PubMed, Ovid, Medline for pertinent articles published until August 2016. Studies that reported the use of simulation-based training for surgery in Africa were included. In all, 19 articles were included. A variety of innovative surgical training methods using simulation techniques were identified. Few studies reported any outcome data. Compared to the volume of surgical training initiatives that are known to take place in SSA, there is very limited good quality published evidence for the use of simulation training in this context. Simulation training presents an excellent modality to enhance and improve both volume and access to high quality surgical skills training, alongside other learning domains. There is a desperate need to meticulously evaluate the appropriateness and effectiveness of simulation training in SSA, where simulation training could have a large potential beneficial impact. Training programs should attempt to assess and report learner outcomes.

  10. Teaching Programming by Emphasizing Self-Direction: How Did Students React to the Active Role Required of Them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isomottonen, Ville; Tirronen, Ville

    2013-01-01

    Lecturing is known to be a controversial form of teaching. With massed classrooms, in particular, it tends to constrain the active participation of students. One of the remedies applied to programming education is to use technology that can vitalize interaction in the classroom, while another is to base teaching increasingly on programming…

  11. Multicultural Teaching in Flemish Secondary Schools: The Role of Ethnic School Composition, Track, and Teachers' Ethnic Prejudice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervaet, Roselien; Van Houtte, Mieke; Stevens, Peter A. J.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the association between a school's ethnic composition, the track in which teachers teach, and their level of involvement with multicultural teaching (MCT) in the Flemish context, taking into account the ethnic prejudice of teachers. Multilevel analyses of data from 590 Flemish teachers in 40 Belgian secondary schools…

  12. The Teacher, the Physician and the Person: Exploring Causal Connections between Teaching Performance and Role Model Types Using Directed Acyclic Graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Boerebach, Benjamin C. M.; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.; Scherpbier, Albert J. J.; Arah, Onyebuchi A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In fledgling areas of research, evidence supporting causal assumptions is often scarce due to the small number of empirical studies conducted. In many studies it remains unclear what impact explicit and implicit causal assumptions have on the research findings; only the primary assumptions of the researchers are often presented. This is particularly true for research on the effect of faculty's teaching performance on their role modeling. Therefore, there is a need for robust frame...

  13. A Case Study of Using Online Communities and Virtual Environment in Massively Multiplayer Role Playing Games (MMORPGs) as a Learning and Teaching Tool for Second Language Learners

    OpenAIRE

    Kongmee, Isara; Pickard, Alison; Strachan, Rebecca; Montgomery, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Games (MMORPGs) create large virtual communities. Online gaming shows potential not just for entertaining, but also in education. This research investigates the use of commercial MMORPGs to support second language teaching. MMORPGs offer virtual safe spaces in which students can communicate by using their target second language with global players. Using a mix of ethnography and action research, this study explores the students’ experiences of languag...

  14. The capabilities and scope-of-practice requirements of advanced life support practitioners undertaking critical care transfers: A Delphi study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Venter

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Critical care transfers (CCT refer to the high level of care given during transport (via ambulance, helicopter or fixed-wing aircraft of patients who are of high acuity. In South Africa (SA, advanced life support (ALS paramedics undertake CCTs. The scope of ALS in SA has no extended protocol regarding procedures or medications in terms of dealing with these CCTs. Aim. The aim of this study was to obtain the opinions of several experts in fields pertaining to critical care and transport and to gain consensus on the skills and scope-of-practice requirements of paramedics undertaking CCTs in the SA setting. Methods. A modified Delphi study consisting of three rounds was undertaken using an online survey platform. A heterogeneous sample (n=7, consisting of specialists in the fields of anaesthesiology, emergency medicine, internal medicine, critical care, critical care transport and paediatrics, was asked to indicate whether, in their opinion, selected procedures and medications were needed within the scope of practice of paramedics undertaking CCTs. Results. After three rounds, consensus was obtained in 70% (57/81 of procedures and medications. Many of these items are not currently within the scope of paramedics’ training. The panel felt that paramedics undertaking these transfers should have additional postgraduate training that is specific to critical care. Conclusion. Major discrepancies exist between the current scope of paramedic practice and the suggested required scope of practice for CCTs. An extended scope of practice and additional training should be considered for these practitioners.

  15. Technology transfer in the hydropower industry: An analysis of Chinese dam developers’ undertakings in Europe and Latin America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirchherr, Julian; Matthews, Nathanial

    2018-01-01

    Technology transfer is essential for transitioning to a low carbon economy which can include hydropower. Chinese dam developers allegedly dominate the global hydropower industry. Studies have been carried out on technology transfer in their undertakings in Africa and Asia. However, such work is

  16. Evaluation and feedback for effective clinical teaching in postgraduate medical education: validation of an assessment instrument incorporating the CanMEDS roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluit, Cornelia; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Grol, Richard; Ham, Marieke; Feskens, Remco; Laan, Roland; Wensing, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Providing clinical teachers in postgraduate medical education with feedback about their teaching skills is a powerful tool to improve clinical teaching. A systematic review showed that available instruments do not comprehensively cover all domains of clinical teaching. We developed and empirically test a comprehensive instrument for assessing clinical teachers in the setting of workplace learning and linked to the CanMEDS roles. In a Delphi study, the content validity of a preliminary instrument with 88 items was studied, leading to the construction of the EFFECT (evaluation and feedback for effective clinical teaching) instrument. The response process was explored in a pilot test and focus group research with 18 residents of 6 different disciplines. A confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) and reliability analyses were performed on 407 evaluations of 117 supervisors, collected in 3 medical disciplines (paediatrics, pulmonary diseases and surgery) of 6 departments in 4 different hospitals. CFA yielded an 11 factor model with a good to excellent fit and internal consistencies ranged from 0.740 to 0.940 per domain; 7 items could be deleted. The model of workplace learning showed to be a useful framework for developing EFFECT, which incorporates the CanMEDS competencies and proved to be valid and reliable.

  17. The value of near-peer teaching in the medical curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonagara VJ

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Vinay Jamnadas Sonagara, Swina Santhirakumaran, Harkaran Singh Kalkat Department of Undergraduate Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK According to the General Medical Council’s guide for “Good Medical Practice”, doctors are expected to partake in active mentoring roles and contribute to the education of other training doctors.1 This reflects the fact that medical education is an apprenticeship where the vertical transmission of knowledge from peers and colleagues contributes to a large proportion of the necessary clinical training. Therefore, peer teaching skills should be inculcated from an early stage. At Imperial College London, student-led societies encourage the cohort to take on mentoring and teaching roles to students in earlier years, in the form of near-peer teaching. However, this near-peer teaching largely remains a voluntary undertaking. Given the importance of these skills, there is an argument to be made that such tutoring schemes ought to form a more extensive and mandatory part of the medical syllabus.

  18. Non proliferation regimes undertakings: Benefits and limits of synergies in verification technologies and procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Thirty years ago the NPT was entering into force. Therewith, when a State became party to the NPT, it had, in accordance with article III.1 of the Treaty, an undertaking to conclude a Comprehensive Safeguards agreement with the IAEA and accept safeguards verification on source or special fissionable material in all peaceful nuclear activities within its territories in order to verify that such material is not diverted. This multilateral instrument was the foundation stone of the non-proliferation regime and marked the actual birth of internationally accepted measures to verily compliance with politically stringent agreements. Since that time several important multilateral or bilateral instruments on non-proliferation and disarmament have been negotiated and adopted to curb the development and the acquisition of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) most of them since the middle of the eighties and the collapse of the Soviet Union. Amongst the multilateral instruments are the Convention on the Prohibition of Bacteriological Weapon and Toxin Weapons (1972), the Convention on the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (1993), the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (1996), the Strengthening of the IAEA Safeguards and the Additional Protocol (1997), with some still in negotiation like the Protocol of the Convention on the Prohibition of Bacteriological and Toxin Weapons, and some on which negotiation is still a wish like the Fissile Material Cut-off Treaty. Bilateral disarmament agreements between the United States of America and the Russian Federation such as the INF Treaty, START I and II, the agreements on the elimination of excess defence nuclear material as well as the Trilateral Initiative with the IAEA pave the way to nuclear disarmament with the reduction of both the number of nuclear weapons arsenal and the fissile material inventories. The politically stringent undertakings of States that have become parties to those agreements would not be possible without the

  19. Role Playing Games no Ensino do Marketing: uma experiência com RPG Didático. Role Playing Games in the teaching of Marketing: an experience with teaching RPG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aragão, Rodrigo Moura Lima de

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Este relato apresenta e discute o uso dos Role Playing Games (RPGs no ensino do Marketing, especificamente, em disciplinas ministradas nos cursos de Administração e de Hotelaria da Escola Técnica Estadual Albert Einstein – Casa Verde, São Paulo (estado de São Paulo –, no segundo semestre de 2005. Primeiro, discorre sobre o RPG didático, alternativa constituída a partir dos RPGs tradicionais e dos livros-jogos, a qual, combinando características de ambos, mostrou-se adequada para a sala de aula. Em seguida, sua aplicação é exemplificada por meio de duas aventuras: Decisões de Produto no Planeta Mercadológico e Os Quatro Pergaminhos e o Segredo do Marketing Mix. A primeira, aplicada na turma de Administração, teve como objetivo simular práticas do Marketing; a segunda, percorrida pelos discentes de Hotelaria, buscou transmitir e fixar conceitos da disciplina. O RPG didático proporcionou a realização da simulação de tomadas de decisão referentes ao desenvolvimento de um novo produto e promoveu um contato no lúdico com os componentes do composto de Marketing. Além disso, o seu uso foi bem recebido pelos alunos, como apontaram os resultados de uma pesquisa feita no término do semestre: mais de 80% dos discentes de Administração e de Hotelaria considerou ótimo o emprego do RPG na sala de aula.This paper presents and discusses the use of Role Playing Games (RPG’s on Marketing teaching, particularly, on Marketing disciplines which were given in Management and Hospitality courses at Escola Técnica Estadual (ETE Albert Einstein – situated in Casa Verde, São Paulo city (São Paulo state –, during the second semester of 2005. First, it talks about the educational RPG, an alternative that derives from traditional RPG and from game-books, that has proved to be appropriate for class uses. After this, the paper exemplifies its application through two adventures: Decisões de Produto no Planeta Mercadológico and Os Quatro

  20. Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    "Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding" is a 19-minute award-winning short-film about teaching at university and higher-level educational institutions. It is based on the "Constructive Alignment" theory developed by Prof. John Biggs. The film delivers a foundation for understanding what...

  1. Verifying compliance with nuclear non-proliferation undertakings: IAEA safeguards agreements and additional protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-06-01

    This report provides background information on safeguards and explains procedures for States to conclude Additional Protocols to comprehensive Safeguards Agreements with the IAEA. Since the IAEA was founded in 1957, its safeguards system has been an indispensable component of the nuclear non-proliferation regime and has facilitated peaceful nuclear cooperation. In recognition of this, the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) makes it mandatory for all non-nuclear-weapon States (NNWS) party to the Treaty to conclude comprehensive safeguards agreements with the IAEA, and thus allow for the application of safeguards to all their nuclear material. Under Article III of the NPT, all NNWS undertake to accept safeguards, as set forth in agreements to be negotiated and concluded with the IAEA, for the exclusive purpose of verification of the fulfilment of the States' obligations under the NPT. In May 1997, the IAEA Board of Governors approved the Model Additional Protocol to Safeguards Agreements (reproduced in INFCIRC/540(Corr.)) which provided for an additional legal authority. In States that have both a comprehensive safeguards agreement and an additional protocol in force, the IAEA is able to optimize the implementation of all safeguards measures available. In order to simplify certain procedures under comprehensive safeguards agreements for States with little or no nuclear material and no nuclear material in a facility, the IAEA began making available, in 1971, a 'small quantities protocol' (SQP), which held in abeyance the implementation of most of the detailed provisions of comprehensive safeguards agreements for so long as the State concerned satisfied these criteria. The safeguards system aims at detecting and deterring the diversion of nuclear material. Such material includes enriched uranium, plutonium and uranium-233, which could be used directly in nuclear weapons. It also includes natural uranium and depleted uranium, the latter of which is

  2. Tapping into the teaching experiences of final year education students to increase support for students in their first year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretchen Geng

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the mentorship of pairing first year and final year teacher education students during their school placements or practicum. Participating students were studied using an Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA approach and undertaking Perceived Stress Scale (PSS to interpret their experience and their stress levels in the peer mentorship program. This peer mentoring program offered benefits for the first year education students by reducing their stress levels significantly and providing reassurance about their performance during school practicum. It also prepared the final year students for taking on teacher mentor roles. While the student mentorship program cannot replace the support provided by schools and universities, it does offer first year students reassurance as to their practical teaching abilities and performance. In addition, this study provides several perspectives on student mentorship during teaching practicum that are worthy of further research.

  3. Farmers Prone to Drought Risk: Why Some Farmers Undertake Farm-Level Risk-Reduction Measures While Others Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebrehiwot, Tagel; van der Veen, Anne

    2015-03-01

    This research investigates farmers' cognitive perceptions of risk and the behavioral intentions to undertake farm-level risk-reduction measures. It has been observed that people who are susceptible to natural hazards often fail to act, or do very little, to protect their assets or lives. To answer the question of why some people show adaptive behavior while others do not, a socio-psychological model of precautionary adaptation based on protection motivation theory and trans-theoretical stage model has been applied for the first time to areas of drought risk in the developing countries cultural context. The applicability of the integrated model is explored by means of a representative sample survey of smallholder farmers in northern Ethiopia. The result of the study showed that there is a statistically significant association between farmer's behavioral intention to undertake farm-level risk-reduction measures and the main important protection motivation model variables. High perceived vulnerability, severity of consequences, self-efficacy, and response efficacy lead to higher levels of behavioral intentions to undertake farm-level risk-reduction measures. For farmers in the action stage, self-efficacy and response efficacy were the main motivators of behavioral intention. For farmers in the contemplative stage, self-efficacy and cost appear to be the main motivators for them to act upon risk reduction, while perceived severity of consequences and cost of response actions were found to be important for farmers in the pre-contemplative stage.

  4. Prevention of School Bullying: The Important Role of Autonomy-Supportive Teaching and Internalization of Pro-Social Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Guy; Kanat-Maymon, Yaniv; Bibi, Uri

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study examined students' perceptions of autonomy-supportive teaching (AST) and its relations to internalization of pro-social values and bullying in class. Aims: We hypothesized that: (1) teachers' AST, which involves provision of rationale and taking the student's perspective, would relate positively to students' identified…

  5. The Role of Gender in Students' Ratings of Teaching Quality in Computer Science and Environmental Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Linda; Svensson, Ingrid; Borell, Jonas; Richardson, John T. E.

    2017-01-01

    Students' ratings of teaching quality on course units in a computer science program and an environmental engineering program at a large Swedish university were obtained using the Course Experience Questionnaire; 8888 sets of ratings were obtained from men and 4280 sets were obtained from women over ten academic years. These student ratings from…

  6. Understanding the Role of Teaching Materials in a Beginners' Level English as a Foreign Language Course: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Rondón, Elio Jesús; Velasco Vera, Leidy Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    Learning a foreign language may be a challenge for most people due to differences in the form and structure between one's mother tongue and a new one. However, there are some tools that facilitate the teaching and learning of a foreign language, for instance, new applications for digital devices, video blogs, educational platforms, and teaching…

  7. An Exploration of the Role Natural Language and Idiosyncratic Representations in Teaching How to Convert among Fractions, Decimals, and Percents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzheve, Michael T.; Capraro, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Using qualitative data collection and analyses techniques, we examined mathematical representations used by sixteen (N=16) teachers while teaching the concepts of converting among fractions, decimals, and percents. We also studied representational choices by their students (N=581). In addition to using geometric figures and manipulatives, teachers…

  8. Ways with Words: Teachers' Personal Epistemologies of the Role of Metalanguage in the Teaching of Poetry Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Anthony; Myhill, Debra Ann

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the personal epistemologies of teachers in relation to the place of linguistic and literary metalanguage in the teaching of poetry writing. The data draw on 93 interviews with 31 secondary English teachers in the UK, following lesson observations, and the data are a subset of a larger study investigating the impact of…

  9. Does Organizational Learning Affect the Performance of Higher Education Lecturers in Indonesia? The Mediating Role of Teaching Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartono, Edy; Wahyudi, Sugeng; Harahap, Pahlawansjah; Yuniawan, Ahyar

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to analyze the relationship between lecturers' performance and their teaching competence, measured by antecedent variables of organizational learning and need for achievement. It used the Structure Equation Model as data analysis technique, and the random sampling method to collect data from 207 lecturers of private universities in…

  10. Considering the Marketing of Higher Education: The Role of Student Learning Gain as a Potential Indicator of Teaching Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polkinghorne, Martyn; Roushan, Gelareh; Taylor, Julia

    2017-01-01

    The marketization of higher education has ensured that students have become consumers. As a result, students are demanding increased levels of information regarding potential university courses so that they can make informed decisions regarding how best to invest their money, time and opportunity. A comparison of the teaching quality delivered on…

  11. The Role of Peer Influence and Perceived Quality of Teaching in Faculty Acceptance of Web-Based Learning Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salajan, Florin D.; Welch, Anita G.; Ray, Chris M.; Peterson, Claudette

    2015-01-01

    This study's primary investigation is the impact of "peer influence" and "perceived quality of teaching" on faculty members' usage of web-based learning management systems within the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) framework. These factors are entered into an extended TAM as external variables impacting on the core constructs…

  12. Considering the Role of Self-Study of Teaching and Teacher Education Practices Research in Transforming Urban Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Mary Lynn; Pinnegar, Stefinee

    2015-01-01

    We explore the first four articles in this Special Issue of "Studying Teacher Education" to identify challenges to the self-study of teaching and teacher education practices (S-STEP) methodology, and how this methodology supports the work of teachers and teacher educators working in urban settings. We respond to these articles by…

  13. Teaching Reading Comprehension in English in a Distance Web-Based Course: New Roles for Teachers (La enseñanza de la comprensión de lectura en inglés en un curso a distancia en la red: nuevos roles para los docentes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Marín, Jorge Hugo; González Moncada, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    Distance web-based learning is a popular strategy in ELT teaching in Colombia. Despite of the growth of experiences, there are very few studies regarding teachers' participation in these courses. This paper reports preliminary findings of an on-going study aiming at exploring the roles that a teach er plays in an EFL reading comprehension distance…

  14. Barriers and Challenges Facing Pre-Service Teachers Use of Mobile Technologies for Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Kevin; Hopkins, Paul

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions, attitudes and beliefs of pre-service teachers using the iPad for their professional learning purposes and for teaching during their school placements. The sample consisted of 117 pre-service teachers undertaking a one-year postgraduate qualification in England to gain qualified teaching status (QTS). A mixed…

  15. Longitudinal changes in extended roles in radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.C.; Miller, L.R.; Mellor, F.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research was to identify the extent and scope of changes to radiography practice. Method: Questionnaires were sent to radiology managers at acute National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in 2000 as a follow-up to an initial survey conducted in 1998. Information was sought on region, teaching/non-teaching status, the nature of extended role tasks undertaken and the year in which these tasks were first undertaken. Results: Some 172 questionnaires were returned from a total of 253 dispatched (68%). In 161 hospitals radiographers administered intravenous injections and performed barium enemas in 119 hospitals, while a red-dot system was in operation in 141 hospitals. Reporting by radiographers had increased since 1998. Replies indicated that, at 124 hospitals, radiographers were reporting in ultrasound. Skeletal reporting was the second most-frequently-reported activity, with 63 hospitals indicating that radiographers reported in this modality, while barium enemas were reported by radiographers in 34 hospitals. Reporting was also undertaken by radiographers in mammography, nuclear medicine, paediatrics and chest radiography in a small minority of hospitals. There was no statistically significant difference between the adoption of tasks in non-teaching and teaching hospitals with the exception of radiographer-performed barium enemas (P=0.014) and red-dot systems (P=0.05). Radiographers were more likely to undertake both of these activities at non-teaching hospitals than in teaching hospitals. Regional differences were apparent in reporting, with a greater prevalence in the English regions than Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales. Conclusion: The study provided data that demonstrated the extent to which hospitals are utilizing the developing skills of radiographers. This has important implications for future education and training needs for radiographers and for delivery of imaging services

  16. The role as moderator and mediator in parent education groups--a leadership and teaching approach model from a parent perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forslund Frykedal, Karin; Rosander, Michael

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the didactic and social leadership in parent education groups based on a parent perspective, and to conceptualise parent experiences of the leader roles in these groups. Leadership in parent education groups has been associated with a lack of confidence in one's ability to function in that role. Research on how it can be delivered to produce a favourable outcome is scarce. It can be difficult to abandon the role of expert and let participants set their own learning agenda. To facilitate these processes requires leadership skills, knowledge of group dynamics as well as pedagogical skills. Qualitative interview study. Semi-structured interviews with parents (25 participants, 21 interviews). Transcripts were analysed using, first, thematic analysis, then comparative analysis. The study resulted in a four-field model, The Leadership - Teaching Approach model. It consists of the dimensions 'Teaching approaches' ('Knowledge is imparted' and 'Knowledge is jointly constructed'), and 'Leadership approaches' ('Instrumental approach' and 'Investigative approach'). Using an investigative approach is necessary to get a well-functioning group that can help the expectant and new parents in the transition to parenthood. Supervision can help develop an awareness of one's professional role as a nurse and leader of a parent education group. The actions and choices of nurses as leaders of parent groups have an impact on how the participants perceive and take in the content and purpose of the group, and whether they perceive it as meaningful. Getting support in reflecting about one's role as a leader in this context can help create a learning environment in which the participants can become engaged in the activities and be strengthened by the experience. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Classroom Practices in Early Foreign Language Teaching in Denmark: On the Role of Quantity and Quality of Exposure to English inside the Classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    aus der Wieschen, Maria Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    -term L2 proficiency (i.e., after 2 years of instruction) with respect to the following language dimensions: receptive vocabulary, receptive grammar, and receptive phonological discrimination? • What is the role of inside-school quantity and quality of exposure to and use of English in children’s rate......, the other half consists of the first generation of Danish Young Learners starting English lessons in the 1st grade. Data in the form of multiple-choice English tests and video-recordings of classroom interaction was collected during the Young Learners’ first two years of instructed English lessons. Against...... this background, my thesis investigates the role of classroom practices in early English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teaching by posing the following research questions: • Will there be differences between earlier (age 7) and later (age 9) starters of English language learning in their rate of learning and short...

  18. How do faculty conceptions on reading, writing and their role in the teaching of academic literacies influence their inclusive attitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Colombo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study explored faculty conceptions about reading and writing, the student body, reasons for student low-performance as well as their declared teaching practices aimed at helping students to better understand readings and write academic texts. The objective was to understand what type of professors´ conceptions contributed with a more inclusive attitude towards first-year students. Content analysis from data gathered from in-depth interviews indicates that professors who acknowledged the complexity of the reading and writing processes tend to be more inclusive and to use reading and writing to teach and not just to evaluate. Those who taught writing courses tended to consider writing as a general skill, transferable to other contexts and spheres of knowledge. Less-inclusive teachers, explaining why they did not offer guidance or proposed remedial solutions, claimed that students should already have mastered academic reading and writing when entering the university and that teaching these skills implied being overprotective and not allowing them to mature.

  19. How do faculty conceptions on reading, writing and their role in the teaching of academic literacies influence their inclusive attitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Colombo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8026.2016v69n3p115 This study explored faculty conceptions about reading and writing, the student body, reasons for student low-performance as well as their declared teaching practices aimed at helping students to better understand readings and write academic texts. The objective was to understand what type of professors´ conceptions contributed with a more inclusive attitude towards first-year students. Content analysis from data gathered from in-depth interviews indicates that professors who acknowledged the complexity of the reading and writing processes tend to be more inclusive and to use reading and writing to teach and not just to evaluate. Those who taught writing courses tended to consider writing as a general skill, transferable to other contexts and spheres of knowledge. Less-inclusive teachers, explaining why they did not offer guidance or proposed remedial solutions, claimed that students should already have mastered academic reading and writing when entering the university and that teaching these skills implied being overprotective and not allowing them to mature.

  20. Balancing the role of the dental school in teaching, research and patient care; including care for underserved areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, W P; Brodin, P; Balciuniene, I; Brukiene, V; Bucur, M V; Corbet, E; Dillenberg, J; Djukanovic, D; Ekanayake, K; Eriksen, H; Fisher, J; Goffin, G; Hull, P; Kumchai, T; Lumley, P; Lund, J; Mathur, V; Novaes, A; Puriene, A; Roger-Leroi, V; Saito, I; Turner, S; Mabelya, L

    2008-02-01

    Inequalities within dentistry are common and are reflected in wide differences in the levels of oral health and the standard of care available both within and between countries and communities. Furthermore there are patients, particularly those with special treatment needs, who do not have the same access to dental services as the general public. The dental school should aim to recruit students from varied backgrounds into all areas covered by the oral healthcare team and to train students to treat the full spectrum of patients including those with special needs. It is essential, however, that the dental student achieves a high standard of clinical competence and this cannot be gained by treating only those patients with low expectations for care. Balancing these aspects of clinical education is difficult. Research is an important stimulus to better teaching and better clinical care. It is recognized that dental school staff should be active in research, teaching, clinical work and frequently administration. Maintaining a balance between the commitments to clinical care, teaching and research while also taking account of underserved areas in each of these categories is a difficult challenge but one that has to be met to a high degree in a successful, modern dental school.

  1. Role-Modelpan>ing Cost-Conscious Care--A National Evaluation of Perceptions of Faculty at Teaching Hospitals in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mitesh S; Reed, Darcy A; Smith, Cynthia; Arora, Vineet M

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about how well faculty at teaching hospitals role-model behaviors consistent with cost-conscious care. We aimed to evaluate whether residents and program directors report that faculty at their program consistently role-model cost-conscious care, and whether the presence of a formal residency curriculum in cost-conscious care impacted responses. Cost-conscious care surveys were administered to internal medicine residents during the 2012 Internal Medicine In-Training Examination and to program directors during the 2012 Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine Annual Survey. Respondents stated whether or not they agreed that faculty in their program consistently role-model cost-conscious care. To evaluate a more comprehensive assessment of faculty behaviors, resident responses were matched with those of the director of their residency program. A multivariate logistic regression model was fit to the outcome variable, to identify predictors of responses that faculty do consistently role-model cost-conscious care from residency program, resident, and program director characteristics. Responses from 12,623 residents (58.4 % of total sample) and 253 program directors (68.4 %) from internal medicine residency programs in the United States were included. The primary outcome measure was responses to questionnaires on faculty role-modelpan>ing cost-conscious care. Among all responses in the final sample, 6,816 (54.0 %) residents and 121 (47.8 %) program directors reported that faculty in their program consistently role-model cost-conscious care. Among paired responses of residents and their program director, the proportion that both reported that faculty do consistently role-modeled cost-conscious care was 23.0 % for programs with a formal residency curriculum in cost-conscious care, 26.3 % for programs working on a curriculum, and 23.7 % for programs without a curriculum. In the adjusted model, the presence of a formal curriculum in cost

  2. Teaching conceptual design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, J.; Christiaans, H.H.C.M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the first observational study of an ongoing research project. The research focuses on ‘teaching conceptual design’ and on the investigation of new teaching methods and strategies. Presently, in the commonly established educational setting, students practice the role of designing

  3. Teaching and research in radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, L.I.

    1998-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals comprise a critical element of diagnostic and therapeutic clinical nuclear medicine. As well they contribute to more basic pre-clinical and clinical diagnostic studies such as the evaluation of new drugs and new drug formulations. Their development and utilization is based on the complex interaction of a number of disciplines including medicine, pharmacy, biochemistry, pharmacology, chemistry, physics and engineering. This technically-complex multidisciplinary base has impeded the development of a uniform curriculum of training for basic scientists and professionals who work with radiopharmaceuticals. the range of technical knowledge required is very broad; it ranges from chemical synthesis and radiolabelling, through a maze of biochemistry, pharmacology and now molecular biology, to GMP manufacture, dispensing and clinical consultation concerning use and interpretation of data. Clearly, no single discipline can (nor should) be expected to undertake in-depth training of radiopharmaceutical scientists, but equally clearly, there is need for the development of curricula that will develop specific components of the essential knowledge base. The 'radiopharmaceutical' or 'product' orientation of both teaching and research can be used to provide a focus for academic and professional organizations to develop 'radiopharmacy' curricula that effectively train radiopharmaceutical practitioners for specific roles within the clinical, academic, government and industrial interests of radiopharmaceutical scientists. Currently, there is a plethora of segmented training programs, many of which are inadequately positioned to be of great value to the field or its practitioners. Efforts to re-focus radiopharmacy programs and to build professional recognition for them are bringing about harmonization of performance objectives, and leading to didactic and experiential curricula. The impact and evolution of regulatory processes will demand new and better

  4. The Fifty Minute Ethnography: Teaching Theory through Fieldwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trnka, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    Ethnography is becoming an increasingly popular research methodology used across a number of disciplines. Typically, teaching students how to write an ethnography, much less how to undertake "fieldwork" (or the ethnographic research upon which ethnographies are based), is reserved for senior- or MA-level research methods courses. This…

  5. Decree No. 67/77 of 6 May establishing a National Uranium Undertaking as a public body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This Decree, promulgated on 29 March 1977, sets up a National Uranium Undertaking (ENU). The ENU Statute which is attached to the Decree lays down that its main purpose is to prospect for and inventory uranium deposits, to explore known deposits, to set up facilities for recovery and treatment of uranium ores, and finally, to market the products obtained. The ENU has taken over the work which, until now, had been carried out in that field by the Junta de Energia Nuclear and it is placed under the authority of the Minister of Industry and Technology. (NEA) [fr

  6. A participative model for undertaking and evaluating scientific communication in Earth Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Astorina, Alba; Tomasoni, Irene

    2015-04-01

    public administrations and citizens. This initiative aims at introducing students to the world of the research and scientific production and vice versa to connect scientists with the educational world, its language and its teaching models. The exchange Research-School is mutual and real. The goal is so twofold: introducing students to a critical/concrete vision of the scientific process and inviting scientists to reflect on PCST activities, participative models and their critical aspects Doing so, in fact, researchers have the chance to open a dialogue with the educational world - to better understand it, its lacks, needs, reasoning and, as a result, improve their own communication/involvement approaches. At the same time, schools, being co-players of a scientific research project and following side by side scientists in their procedures, can actively participate, give personal contributions and feedbacks. The initiative represents an attempt of 'participative research' in which researchers and students can freely express their expectations, acquire information, test new approaches and build together a piece of knowledge. The proposal makes use of participative methodologies and qualitative tools for evaluating the involvement of students, teachers and researchers and analyzing the communication model implied in the relation among them. In EGU presentation the first results of this evaluation process will be reported.

  7. Role-Play Preceded by Fieldwork in the Teaching of Pharmacology: from “Raw Sap” to “Elaborated Sap”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Riani Gotardelo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: The task of teaching abilities, attitudes and knowledge, which can sometimes be complex, related to the safe and efficient use of medications, stands as a great challenge faced by medical schools nowadays. The role of the prescriber, therefore, who promotes the rational use of medication at undergraduate level gains importance in professional training, with a direct impact on public healthcare. In this context, the implementation of teaching methods that allow an active, critical and reflexive medical training for students is desirable in order to enable them to develop the skills required to manage the main pharmacological classes used by the general practitioner. We intend to describe and analyze role-play preceded by fieldwork as an educational strategy. Methods: Following the fieldwork regarding the utilization of the main pharmacological classes used in primary healthcare, 5-6 groups of students prepared scripts and staged role-plays involving practical aspects of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, side effects, and potential drug interactions regarding the main drug types. The intervention was assessed using students’ responses to questionnaires coupled with Likert scales, the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREMM and semi-structured interviews. There was a correlation between participation in teaching practice and performance in multiple-choice questions in the final course evaluation. Results: All students felt involved and motivated in the activity. 78.5% strongly agreed and 19% partially agreed that the method allowed reflection on knowledge, abilities and attitude, all important to professional practice regarding rational therapeutic prescribing. The DREMM revealed a score of 129.23, consistent with a more positive learning environment in a reliable sample (Cronbach's alpha=0.86. Analysis of the open interviews allowed us to infer that the students considered the method efficient, dynamic, fun, and

  8. Teaching Cases in Management - O Chocolate Importado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Schreiber

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available International trade plays a special role in all countries due the influence exerted in the economic and social field. At the same time, subjects such as planning and implementing the operation of export and import becomes very important, with particular relevance among entrepreneurs and academics. When it comes to this issue, the aim of this teaching case is to provide discussions about the subjects of entrepreneurship, business planning and the learning of strategists. It describes the experience of company SK, started in July of 1997, which began its businesses through exporting and importing leather and its artifacts. Later, the enterprise redirected its focus and began importing chocolates for the Brazilian market. The entrepreneur found, during the process of the business construction, a series of challenges that obliged him to make decisions and make choices. Having an amount of capital and willingness to undertake, he had to decide which path to follow and how to decide. Were there right and wrong choices? How would he plan and operationalize a start-up business? How would he evaluate opportunities and estimate the risk of an enterprise? These are some of many questions that the reader will be challenged to answer after analyzing this case.

  9. The application of network teaching in applied optics teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huifu; Piao, Mingxu; Li, Lin; Liu, Dongmei

    2017-08-01

    Network technology has become a creative tool of changing human productivity, the rapid development of it has brought profound changes to our learning, working and life. Network technology has many advantages such as rich contents, various forms, convenient retrieval, timely communication and efficient combination of resources. Network information resources have become the new education resources, get more and more application in the education, has now become the teaching and learning tools. Network teaching enriches the teaching contents, changes teaching process from the traditional knowledge explanation into the new teaching process by establishing situation, independence and cooperation in the network technology platform. The teacher's role has shifted from teaching in classroom to how to guide students to learn better. Network environment only provides a good platform for the teaching, we can get a better teaching effect only by constantly improve the teaching content. Changchun university of science and technology introduced a BB teaching platform, on the platform, the whole optical classroom teaching and the classroom teaching can be improved. Teachers make assignments online, students learn independently offline or the group learned cooperatively, this expands the time and space of teaching. Teachers use hypertext form related knowledge of applied optics, rich cases and learning resources, set up the network interactive platform, homework submission system, message board, etc. The teaching platform simulated the learning interest of students and strengthens the interaction in the teaching.

  10. Architectural education and its role in teaching of art education in the second level of elementary schools

    OpenAIRE

    PRAŽANOVÁ, Markéta

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the work was effort to find reasons why to include the education in the field of architecture and environmental culture in teaching systems, mainly in the second level of elementary schools. I tried to apply these reasons into the topics of architecture training in the lessons of art education. The research among nearly 250 pupils of the 8.and 9.class of the elementary schools in big and small towns and last but not least also the discussion with the teachers of art education at e...

  11. Teaching Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in the Twenty-First Century: A Reflection on the Role of Technology in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, Shih Yee-Marie Tan; Kim, Jung Won; Shin, Ah Lahm; Kitts, Robert; Maneta, Eleni

    2017-01-01

    Technology has become an integral part of everyday life and is starting to shape the landscape of graduate medical education. This article reviews the use of technology in teaching child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) fellows, and 3 main aspects are considered. The first aspect is use of technology to enhance active learning. The second aspect covers technology and administrative tasks, and the third aspect is the development of a technology curriculum for CAP trainees. The article concludes with a brief review of some of the challenges and pitfalls that have to be considered and recommendations for future research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. How Do Faculty Conceptions on Reading, Writing and Their Role in the Teaching of Academic Literacies Influence Their Inclusive Attitude

    OpenAIRE

    Colombo, Laura; Prior, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8026.2016v69n3p115 This study explored faculty conceptions about reading and writing, the student body, reasons for student low-performance as well as their declared teaching practices aimed at helping students to better understand readings and write academic texts. The objective was to understand what type of professors´ conceptions contributed with a more inclusive attitude towards first-year students. Content analysis from data gathered from in-depth inte...

  13. Dodging the Literary Undertaker – Biographic Metafiction in Hanif Kureishi’s The Last Word

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalupský Petr

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Hanif Kureishi’s 2014 novel, The Last Word, involves most of the author’s idiosyncratic themes, such as ethnicity, racism, sexual identity, examination of interpersonal relationships and the crucial role of the creative imagination in human life. Its focal concern, however, is to explore the process of writing a literary biography of a living person and the character and dynamics of the relationship between the biographer and his subject - a writer. As such, the novel can be taken as being representative of biographic metafiction, a subcategory of historiographic metafiction, which, following the postmodernist questioning of our ability to know and textually represent historical truth, presents biographic writing critically or even mockingly, rendering its enthusiastic practitioners’ efforts with ironic scepticism. The aim of this article is to present The Last Word as a particular example of biographic metafiction that has all the crucial features of this genre, yet which differs from its predecessors through the complexity and thoroughness of its portrayal of the biographer-biographee relationship.

  14. Teaching tourism change agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blichfeldt, Bodil Stilling; Kvistgaard, Hans-Peter; Hird, John

    2017-01-01

    This article discuss es know ledge, competencies and skills Master’s students should obtain during their academic studies and particularly, the differences between teaching about a topic and teaching to do. This is ex emplified by experiential learning theory and the case of a change management...... course that is part of a Tourism Master’s program, where a major challenge is not only to teach students about change and change agents, but to teach them how change feels and ho w to become change agents. The c hange management course contains an experiment inspired by experiential teaching literature...... and methods. The experiment seeks to make students not only hear/learn about change agency and management, but to make them feel cha nge, hereby enabling them to develop the skills and competencies necessary for them to take on the role as change agent s and thus enable them to play key role s in implementing...

  15. 20 years of leptin: leptin and reproduction: past milestones, present undertakings, and future endeavors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chehab, Farid F

    2014-10-01

    The association between leptin and reproduction originated with the leptin-mediated correction of sterility in ob/ob mice and initiation of reproductive function in normal female mice. The uncovering of a central leptin pathway regulating food intake prompted the dissection of neuroendocrine mechanisms involving leptin in the metabolic control of reproduction. The absence of leptin receptors on GnRH neurons incited a search for intermediary neurons situated between leptin-responsive and GnRH neurons. This review addresses the most significant findings that have furthered our understanding of recent progress in this new field. The role of leptin in puberty was impacted by the discovery of neurons that co-express kisspeptin, neurokinin B, and dynorphin and these could act as leptin intermediates. Furthermore, the identification of first-order leptin-responsive neurons in the premammilary ventral nucleus and other brain regions opens new avenues to explore their relationship to GnRH neurons. Central to these advances is the unveiling that agouti-related protein/neuropeptide Y neurons project onto GnRH and kisspeptin neurons, allowing for a crosstalk between food intake and reproduction. Finally, while puberty is a state of leptin sensitivity, mid-gestation represents a state of leptin resistance aimed at building energy stores to sustain pregnancy and lactation. The mechanisms underlying leptin resistance in pregnancy have lagged; however, the establishment of this natural state is significant. Reproduction and energy balance are tightly controlled and backed up by redundant mechanisms that are critical for the survival of our species. It will be the goal of the following decade to shed new light on these complex and essential pathways. © 2014 Society for Endocrinology.

  16. EDUCATIVE NETWORK’S ROLE IN REINFORCING THE ACADEMIC DEVELOPMENT IN THE PALESTINIAN UNIVERSITIES (REFLECTIVE MODEL TOWARD AND INNOVATION IN TEACHING AND LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basha Sami

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for an educational proposal to emerge in the Palestinianeducational context is necessary and needed to face the various challenges that the higher education is dealing with in Palestine. The centers for teaching and learning (CTEs in the Palestinian universities should be seen as part of the effort to support the evolving process and the innovation needed to allow these higher education institutions be able to compete on local, regional and international level.Methods. It is an approach to a contextualized education, with a significant role played by all who connects and interacts with the community environment and society needs, in order to build an educative community projects. This needs a real educative action with engagement and commitment by all role actors and stakeholders.Results and scientific novelty. Based on personal experience I would like to transmit what I have learned and gained in my teaching and learning experiences and present an educative proposal that is based on the connection between the different educative higher institutions in Palestine. This proposal tackles social and educational challenges through a common process; it is about adapting a concrete model of Educative network in Palestine. The proposal is presenting itself as an alternative model to help the higher education to be more integrated to the society needs and to obtain the coordina tion role for innovative actions in a comprehensive way to fulfill the educational vision of being a leading body in the evolving society in conflict. Practical significance. The purpose of this article is to offer a very practical reflective model that becomes a guidance to sustain CTEs activities and engage more faculties to positively change the learning/teaching culture of their universities. It is about how networks can help to bring about change to education in the Palestinian Universities. I believe that university policymakers and CTEs all

  17. Chameleon or Chimera? The Role of the Higher Level Teaching Assistant (HLTA) in a Remodelled Workforce in English Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Susan

    2013-01-01

    This article draws on research conducted with HLTAs in the North-West of England over two years and is located in the context of workforce remodelling. The respondents have presented a picture of a role which is developing outside the hegemonic discourse of rationality, testing, accountability and performativity within which the teacher role is…

  18. Experience-based teaching of therapeutics and clinical pharmacology of antiepileptic drugs. Sudden unexplained death in epilepsy: do antiepileptic drugs have a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathers, C M; Schraeder, P L

    1995-06-01

    The contents of this paper have been written to be used in a teaching program specifically designed for medical postgraduate education of resident physicians and fellows in training interested in the clinical pharmacology of antiepileptic drugs and their role in the treatment of epilepsy and/or in the prevention of sudden unexpected death associated with this disease. With some modifications, such as a specific lecture to provide an overview of the numerous concepts presented in the text, the article could be used when teaching fourth-year medical students. The format of the paper is a combination of didactic review and eight case reports in a self-learning format. A quiz for self-assessment is included at the end of the article (see Appendix). This material was covered in part in the 1992 Board Review Course for Clinical Pharmacology sponsored by the American College of Clinical Pharmacology. The format or setting of instruction for this material could include small learning groups composed of 10 to 15 students. When used in combination with other topics prepared in similar formats, this could become a take home course for those preparing to take the Boards in Clinical Pharmacology. Each instructor could select specific publications from the reference list for assigned readings depending upon the material emphasized by the instructor. The questions included at the end of the text could be used as either a closed or an open book quiz to assess student learning.

  19. A pharmacy student's role as a teaching assistant in an undergraduate medicinal chemistry course - Implementation, evaluation, and unexpected opportunities for educational outreach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaVecchia, Matthew J; Claudio, Alyssa M; Fairclough, Jamie L

    2017-11-01

    To describe 1) a pharmacy student's teaching assistant (TA) role in an undergraduate medicinal chemistry course, 2) an active learning module co-developed by the TA and instructor, and 3) the unexpected opportunities for pharmacy educational outreach that resulted from this collaboration. Medicinal Chemistry (CHM3413) is an undergraduate course offered each fall at Palm Beach Atlantic University (PBA). As a TA for CHM3413, a pharmacy student from the Gregory School of Pharmacy (GSOP) at PBA co-developed and implemented an active learning module emphasizing foundational medicinal chemistry concepts as they pertain to performance enhancing drugs (PEDs). Surveys assessed undergraduate students' perceived knowledge of medicinal chemistry concepts, PEDs, and TA involvement. Students' (total n = 60, three fall semesters) perceived confidence in knowledge of medicinal chemistry concepts and PEDs increased significantly (p medicinal chemistry course. An advanced pharmacy practice experience elective in sports pharmacy (based on Ambrose's model) begins Fall 2017. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Classroom Practices in Early Foreign Language Teaching in Denmark: On the Role of Quantity and Quality of Exposure to English inside the Classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    aus der Wieschen, Maria Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    this background, my thesis investigates the role of classroom practices in early English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teaching by posing the following research questions: • Will there be differences between earlier (age 7) and later (age 9) starters of English language learning in their rate of learning and short...... the onset of English classes in Danish primary schools was lowered from 3rd to 1st grade. The participants in the studies conducted in this thesis are 264 Danish Young Learners. About half of these students have started learning English in the 3rd grade, as it was usual before the 2014 school reform......, the other half consists of the first generation of Danish Young Learners starting English lessons in the 1st grade. Data in the form of multiple-choice English tests and video-recordings of classroom interaction was collected during the Young Learners’ first two years of instructed English lessons. Against...

  1. Study on Case Teaching of Financial Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Zhenghong; Che, Zhengmei

    2011-01-01

    Case teaching is an efficient teaching method of management. It plays an important role to enhance the students' ability to practice the theory. However, case teaching of financial management has not achieved the expected results. The paper aims to study the importance, characteristics and corresponding methods of case teaching method of financial…

  2. The Role of Cultural Competence in the Teaching of Hungarian as a Foreign Language and in Cultural Diplomacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Sólyom

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, I aim to shed light on the importance of cultural competence from three perspectives. First, in my capacity as a sociolinguist, I will talk about how Hungarian culture is incorporated in the textbook "Colloquial Hungarian" (Rounds and Sólyom 2011, providing particular examples from various dialogues and cultural notes from the book. I believe that linguistic competence, communicative competence, and cultural competence are equally important parts of foreign language teaching and foreign language learning. Second, as a foreign language instructor at U.S. study abroad programs, I plan to discuss the importance of cultural norms of the speakers of the local language in the host country. Third, as a director of an American cultural and resource center in Budapest, I will talk about the importance of building bridges between two cultures, describing the goals and missions of the center as well as giving specific examples of the activities of the American Corner Budapest.

  3. What factors influence community-dwelling older people’s intent to undertake multifactorial fall prevention programs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill KD

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Keith D Hill,1,2 Lesley Day,3 Terry P Haines4,5 1School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia; 2National Ageing Research Institute, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, VIC, Australia; 3Falls Prevention Research Unit, Monash Injury Research Institute, Monash University, VIC, Australia; 4Allied Health Research Unit, Southern Health, Cheltenham, VIC, Australia; 5Physiotherapy Department, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing, and Health Sciences, Monash University, VIC, Australia Purpose: To investigate previous, current, or planned participation in, and perceptions toward, multifactorial fall prevention programs such as those delivered through a falls clinic in the community setting, and to identify factors influencing older people’s intent to undertake these interventions.Design and methods: Community-dwelling people aged >70 years completed a telephone survey. Participants were randomly selected from an electronic residential telephone listing, but purposeful sampling was used to include equal numbers with and without common chronic health conditions associated with fall-related hospitalization. The survey included scenarios for fall prevention interventions, including assessment/multifactorial interventions, such as those delivered through a falls clinic. Participants were asked about previous exposure to, or intent to participate in, the interventions. A path model analysis was used to identify factors associated with intent to participate in assessment/multifactorial interventions.Results: Thirty of 376 participants (8.0% reported exposure to a multifactorial falls clinic-type intervention in the past 5 years, and 16.0% expressed intention to undertake this intervention. Of the 132 participants who reported one or more falls in the past 12 months, over one-third were undecided or disagreed that a falls clinic type of intervention would be of benefit to them. Four elements

  4. The Continuing Search to Find a More Effective and Less Intimidating Way to Teach Research Methods in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Existing literature examining the teaching of research methods highlights difficulties students face when developing research competencies. Studies of student-centred teaching approaches have found increased student performance and improved confidence in undertaking research projects. To develop a student-centred approach, it could be beneficial…

  5. Towards a Typology of Improvisation as a Professional Teaching Skill: Implications for Pre-Service Teacher Education Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aadland, Helga; Espeland, Magne; Arnesen, Trond Egil

    2017-01-01

    In this article we discuss the concept of improvisation as a professional teaching skill. Our professional context is teacher education and our discussion is aimed at developing a categorized understanding, or rather a tentative typology, of what professional improvisation in teaching and teacher education might be. Undertaking such a bold…

  6. The experience of final year medical students undertaking a general practice run with a distance education component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, Steven; Gibbons, Veronique; Lawrenson, Ross

    2010-01-01

    In recognition of the difficulties posed for New Zealand medical students by travel during rural general practice attachments, a system of distance teaching was devised for final year medical students at the Waikato Clinical School. In place of weekly small group teaching using reflection on practice at the central campus led by a tutor, students participated in reflective learning via an electronic web based message board and once weekly brief individual discussion with a tutor. Moodle and Skype, both freeware applications, were used as the methods of facilitating asynchronous and synchronous learning environments. Students experienced significantly less travel time as a result of the innovation. They also reported enthusiasm for the modes of teaching and the technology. A small increase in tutor time commitment was necessary. Distance education initiatives can be undertaken with minimal expense in the general practice setting. The educational opportunities it offers can be similar to, but not identical to small group teaching.

  7. The role of Middle Managers in the enhancement of staff professionalism for the Further Education system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey, Jayne

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The Statutory Instrument of September 2007 approved as part of the regulatory powers of the Education Act (DfES, 2002 established regulations for a minimum undertaking of 30 hours’ Continuing Professional Development (CPD for all teaching staff on a year-on-year basis. Seen as part of the professionalisation agenda for the Further Education (FE sector, this regulation has placed additional responsibilities on the role of Middle Managers. Here we report on a small-scale research project based in one College of Further Education which set out to explore and better understand the role of Middle Managers in supporting the professionalisation agenda. The study determined to explore how Middle Managers, defined as those with operational rather than strategic roles, were supporting their colleagues whilst also trying to secure time for their own Continuing Professional Development (CPD. The impact of the IfL’s approach to dual professionalism is also explored.

  8. Teaching the Principles of Economics

    OpenAIRE

    N. Gregory Mankiw

    1998-01-01

    In this brief essay, I describe my approach to the principles course. I emphasize three themes. First, in teaching microeconomics, the tools of welfare economics should play a larger role than they have in the past. Second, in teaching macroeconomics, classical ideas should play a larger role than they have in the past. Third, in teaching all parts of the course, we instructors should be sure to stress the important principles and be careful not to overwhelm students with an excess of details.

  9. The role and importance of Tuvan literature and teaching it in schools in the preservation and development of Tuvan language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidiia Kh. Oorzhak

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors of the article start off by expressing their concern about the level of command of Tuvan by the younger generation, especially children. Preserving and developing Tuvan language is impossible without literature in Tuvan and teaching it in schools and other educational institutions. The article deals with the issues of teaching Tuvan literature in secondary comprehensive schools of the Republic of Tuva. The authors also provide an overview of textbooks of Tuvan literature compiled at the laboratory of Tuvan philology, Institute for the Development of National Schools of the Republic of Tuva, in compliance with the Federal educational standards of Russian Federation. The textbook provide the mandatory minimum of the standard-provided content of general education and guarantee the required quality of knowledge for school graduates. In 2013-2017, textbooks titled «Tөreen chogaal» (Literature in the Native Tongue were compiled and published for Grades 5-9, as well as two accompanying textbooks for Grades 5 and 6. The textbooks rely on the methodological principles of the study program «Tyva aas chogaaly bolgash literatura. Niiti өөredilge cherleriniң 5-11 klasstarynga chizhek programma» (Tuvan folklore and literature. Sample Study Program for Grade 5-11 of Comprehensive Schools. In comparison to the previous generation of textbooks, these have been largely updated both in their structure and scope of its content. The texts were grouped in the following categories: “Folklore, the nation’s boundless treasury”, “From folklore to literary genres”, “The world of childhood”, “The world of wonders”, “Holy places”, “The Stars of Victory” and “Animal world”. They prominently feature folklore texts, including shaman songs; tests and creative tasks have also been developed. In terms of their content and methodology, the textbooks intend to familiarize students with the spiritual, moral and aesthetic values of

  10. A qualitative interview study on the positive well-being of medical school faculty in their teaching role: job demands, job resources and role interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, J W; Verberg, C P M; Berkhout, J J; Lombarts, M J M H; Scherpbier, A J J A; Jaarsma, A D C

    2015-09-02

    Attention for the well-being of medical school faculty is not only important for the prevention of attrition and burnout, but may also boost performance in their tasks in medical education. Positive well-being can be conceptualized as work engagement and this is associated with increased performance. In this study we explore how demands and resources from different tasks affect work engagement specifically for education. Between June and September 2013, we conducted a multisite semi-structured interview study with a diverse group of medical school faculty and used an open-coding strategy within the Work Engagement Model on the transcribed interviews. We interviewed 16 faculty members whose teaching experience ranged from 7 to 38 years and whose professional tasks ranged from being solely an educator to being a physician, researcher, educator and administrator simultaneously. All participants were clear on the perceived demands and resources, although similar aspects of the work environment could be perceived oppositely between participants. Overarching themes were perceptions related to the organization or department, often described as a general and long-term effect and perceptions directly related to a task, often described as a direct and short-term effect on well-being. Furthermore, the demands and resources as resultant of fulfilling multiple tasks were described clearly by participants. The ambiguous nature of the work environment in terms of demands and resources requires an individualized approach to supporting work engagement. Furthermore, faculty members perceive many resources from fulfilling multiple tasks in relation to their tasks in education. Faculty developers and administrators alike could use these findings to apply the concept of work engagement to their daily support of faculty in medical education.

  11. Prevention of school bullying: the important role of autonomy-supportive teaching and internalization of pro-social values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Guy; Kanat-Maymon, Yaniv; Bibi, Uri

    2011-12-01

    This study examined students' perceptions of autonomy-supportive teaching (AST) and its relations to internalization of pro-social values and bullying in class. We hypothesized that: (1) teachers' AST, which involves provision of rationale and taking the student's perspective, would relate positively to students' identified internalization of considerateness towards classmates, and would relate negatively to external regulation (considerateness to obtain rewards or avoid punishments); (2) students' identified regulation would relate negatively to self-reported bullying in class, whereas external regulation would relate positively to bullying; and (3) the relation between teachers' AST and student bullying would be mediated by students' identification with the value of considerateness towards others. The sample consisted of 725 junior high school students (50% females) in Grades 7 and 8 from 27 classes in four schools serving students from lower-middle to middle-class socioeconomic backgrounds.   The participants completed questionnaires assessing the variables of interest. Correlational analysis supported the hypotheses. Moreover, mediational analyses using hierarchical linear modelling (HLM) demonstrated that identified regulation mediates the negative relation between AST and self-reported bullying in class. The mediational hypothesis was supported at the between-class level and at the within-class level.   The findings suggest that school policy aimed at bullying reduction should go beyond external control that involves external rewards and sanctions and should help teachers acquire autonomy-supportive practices focusing on students' meaningful internalization. ©2010 The British Psychological Society.

  12. JET Joint Undertaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keen, B.E.; Kupschus, P.

    1984-09-01

    The report is in sections, as follows. (1) Introduction and summary. (2) A brief description of the origins of the JET Project within the EURATOM fusion programme and the objectives and aims of the device. The basic JET design and the overall philosophy of operation are explained and the first six months of operation of the machine are summarised. The Project Team Structure adopted for the Operation Phase is set out. Finally, in order to set JET's progress in context, other large tokamaks throughout the world and their achievements are briefly described. (3) The activities and progress within the Operation and Development Department are set out; particularly relating to its responsibilities for the operation and maintenance of the tokamak and for developing the necessary engineering equipment to enhance the machine to full performance. (4) The activities and progress within the Scientific Department are described; particularly relating to the specification, procurement and operation of diagnostic equipment; definition and execution of the programme; and the interpretation of experimental results. (5) JET's programme plans for the immediate future and a broad outline of the JET Development Plan to 1990 are given. (author)

  13. JET Joint Undertaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keen, B.E.

    1988-03-01

    The paper is a JET progress report 1987, and covers the fourth full year of JET's operation. The report contains an overview summary of the scientific and technical advances during the year, and is supplemented by appendices of detailed contributions of the more important JET articles published during 1987. The document is aimed at specialists and experts engaged in nuclear fusion and plasma physics, as well as the general scientific community. (U.K.)

  14. JET Joint Undertaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keen, B.E.

    1986-03-01

    This is an overview summary of the scientific and technical advances at JET during the year 1985, supplemented by appendices of detailed contributions (in preprint form) of eight of the more important JET articles produced during that year. It is aimed not only at specialists and experts but also at a more general scientific community. Thus there is a brief summary of the background to the project, a description of the basic objectives of JET and the principle design features of the machine. The new structure of the Project Team is also explained. Developments and future plans are included. Improvements considered are those which are designed to overcome certain limitations encountered generally on Tokamaks, particularly those concerned with density limits, with plasma MHD behaviour, with impurities and with plasma transport. There is also a complete list of articles, reports and conference papers published in 1985 - there are 167 such items listed. (UK)

  15. JET joint undertaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-06-01

    JET began operations on 25 June 1983. This annual report contains administrative information and a general review of scientific and technical developments. Among them are vacuum systems, toroidal and poloidal field systems, power supplies, neutral beam heating, radiofrequency heating, remote handling, tritium handling, control and data acquisition systems and diagnostic systems

  16. Environmental Impact Assessment: Teaching the Principles and Practices by Means of a Role-Playing Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crittenden, Barry D.; England, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The principles and practices of environmental impact assessment are best taught to chemical engineering undergraduate students by means of a role­-playing case study. Many suitable examples are available from public sources. The planning appeal process has been selected so as to introduce an adversarial style involving cross-­examination on…

  17. The changing roles of natural resource professionals: providing tools to students to teach the public about fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pat Stephens Williams; Brian P. Oswald; Karen Stafford; Justice Jones; David. Kulhavy

    2011-01-01

    The Arthur Temple College of Forestry and Agriculture (ATCOFA) at Stephen F. Austin State University is taking a proactive stance toward preparing forestry students to work closely with the public on fire planning in wildland-urban interface areas. ATCOFA's incorporation of the "Changing Roles" curriculum provides lessons on how natural resource managers...

  18. The Role of WhatsApp in Teaching Vocabulary to Iranian EFL Learners at Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Sanaz; Chalak, Azizeh

    2016-01-01

    The availability and the use of mobile messaging applications are increasingly widespread among the new generation of students in Iran. The present study aimed to investigate the role of WhatsApp in the vocabulary learning improvement of Iranian junior high school EFL students. Using a mixed method design, a group of 60 students including 30 male…

  19. Art and Fairy Tales in an Interdisciplinary Interplay: Teaching Interventions towards Negotiation and Subversion of Gender Roles and Stereotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moula, Evangelia; Kabouropoulou, Mary

    2014-01-01

    The interdisciplinary project under discussion is suitable to be addressed to students of either primary or secondary education and it interweaves the art of painting with fairy tales. The aims of the project are: the deeper understanding of the complexity of human nature and the sensitization of students regarding gender roles and stereotypes. On…

  20. Conceptualising the Role of Information and Communication Technologies in the Design of Higher Education Teaching Models Used in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caird, Sally; Lane, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread availability of information and communication technologies (ICTs) and some research into specific pedagogical practices using them, there has been little research on the role of these technologies in shaping broader pedagogical approaches in higher education (HE). Increased experimentation in using ICTs raises questions…

  1. Teaching Tip: Using a Group Role-Play Exercise to Engage Students in Learning Business Processes and ERP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yide; Nicholson, Jennifer; Nicholson, Darren

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing process-centric focus and proliferation of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems in organizations, it is imperative for business graduates to understand cross-functional business processes and ERP system's role in supporting business processes. However, this topic can be rather abstract and dry to undergraduate students,…

  2. The Role of Distributed Leadership in Mainstreaming Environmental Sustainability into Campus Life in an Israeli Teaching College: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avissar, Ilana; Alkaher, Iris; Gan, Dafna

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Distributed leadership has been reported in the literature as an effective management approach for educational organizations such as institutions of higher education. This study aims to investigate the role of distributed leadership in the promotion of sustainability in an Israeli college of teacher education. Design/methodology/approach:…

  3. Gain in Student Understanding of the Role of Random Variation in Evolution Following Teaching Intervention Based on Luria-Delbruck Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel L. Robson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Undergraduate students in introductory biology classes are typically saddled with pre-existing popular beliefs that impede their ability to learn about biological evolution. One of the most common misconceptions about evolution is that the environment causes advantageous mutations, rather than the correct view that mutations occur randomly and the environment only selects for mutants with advantageous traits. In this study, a significant gain in student understanding of the role of randomness in evolution was observed after students participated in an inquiry-based pedagogical intervention based on the Luria-Delbruck experiment. Questionnaires with isomorphic questions regarding environmental selection among random mutants were administered to study participants (N = 82 in five separate sections of a sophomore-level microbiology class before and after the teaching intervention. Demographic data on each participant was also collected, in a way that preserved anonymity. Repeated measures analysis showed that post-test scores were significantly higher than pre-test scores with regard to the questions about evolution (F(1, 77 = 25.913, p < 0.001. Participants' pre-existing beliefs about evolution had no significant effect on gain in understanding of this concept. This study indicates that conducting and discussing an experiment about phage resistance in E. coli may improve student understanding of the role of stochastic events in evolution more broadly, as post-test answers showed that students were able to apply the lesson of the Luria-Delbruck experiment to other organisms subjected to other kinds of selection.

  4. Gain in student understanding of the role of random variation in evolution following teaching intervention based on luria-delbruck experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Rachel L; Burns, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Undergraduate students in introductory biology classes are typically saddled with pre-existing popular beliefs that impede their ability to learn about biological evolution. One of the most common misconceptions about evolution is that the environment causes advantageous mutations, rather than the correct view that mutations occur randomly and the environment only selects for mutants with advantageous traits. In this study, a significant gain in student understanding of the role of randomness in evolution was observed after students participated in an inquiry-based pedagogical intervention based on the Luria-Delbruck experiment. Questionnaires with isomorphic questions regarding environmental selection among random mutants were administered to study participants (N = 82) in five separate sections of a sophomore-level microbiology class before and after the teaching intervention. Demographic data on each participant was also collected, in a way that preserved anonymity. Repeated measures analysis showed that post-test scores were significantly higher than pre-test scores with regard to the questions about evolution (F(1, 77) = 25.913, p evolution had no significant effect on gain in understanding of this concept. This study indicates that conducting and discussing an experiment about phage resistance in E. coli may improve student understanding of the role of stochastic events in evolution more broadly, as post-test answers showed that students were able to apply the lesson of the Luria-Delbruck experiment to other organisms subjected to other kinds of selection.

  5. From Teaching to Facilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Graaff, Erik

    2013-01-01

    A shift from teaching to learning is characteristic of the introduction of Problem Based Learning (PBL) in an existing school. As a consequence the teaching staff has to be trained in skills like facilitating group work and writing cases. Most importantly a change in thinking about teaching...... and learning will have to be realized. In the implementation of PBL it makes a difference how the core features of the problem and the role of the facilitator have been defined. This paper will present components of a PBL faculty-development training programme and discuss the relevance with respect...

  6. Teaching materials physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quere, Y.

    1997-01-01

    The important role of materials and their behaviour under radiation exposure, for nuclear research and industry, is pointed out, and the development of nuclear applied metallurgy research at the Cea and in French Universities is reviewed. The teaching policy at the Cea in the field of materials science involved four action types: laboratory courses and theses, teaching outside and inside the Cea, summer schools, which allowed for a synergetic cooperation between the Cea, Universities and research centers, since the 50's

  7. Preparing Medical Students to Undertake a Cultural Immersion Experience: Introducing Frameworks for Preparatory and Post-Immersion Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Donna B.; Watson, Rashmi; Hadden, John

    2011-01-01

    Recruiting and retaining practitioners to rural and remote locations is a challenge for many industries including health and education. The medical, nursing and teaching professions have utilized immersion experiences for trainees and students to better prepare them and to address workforce shortages in crosscultural and underserved areas. This…

  8. Relational Analysis of Prospective Teachers' Emotions about Teaching, Emotional Styles, and Professional Plans about Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Altay

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the mediating roles of prospective teachers' emotional styles in the relationships between their emotions about teaching and professional plans about teaching. A total of 684 prospective teachers, majoring in computer education and instructional technology teaching, mathematics teaching, preschool teaching, special…

  9. The Level of Anxiety and Depression in Dialysis Patients Undertaking Regular Physical Exercise Training--a Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziubek, Wioletta; Kowalska, Joanna; Kusztal, Mariusz; Rogowski, Łukasz; Gołębiowski, Tomasz; Nikifur, Małgorzata; Szczepańska-Gieracha, Joanna; Zembroń-Łacny, Agnieszka; Klinger, Marian; Woźniewski, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a six-month physical training undertaken by haemodialysis (HD) patients, on the depression and anxiety. Patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) were recruited from the dialysis station at the Department of Nephrology and Transplantation Medicine in Wroclaw. Physical training took place at the beginning of the first 4-hours of dialysis, three times a week for six months. A personal questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) were used in the study. A total of 28 patients completed the study: 20 were randomised to endurance training and 8 were randomised to resistance training. Statistical analysis of depression and anxiety at the initial (t1) and final examination (t2) indicated a significant reduction in depression and anxiety, particularly anxiety as a trait (X2) in the whole study group. The change in anxiety as a state correlated with the disease duration, duration of dialysis and the initial level of anxiety as a state (t1X1). The change in anxiety as a trait significantly correlated with age and the initial level of anxiety (t1X2). Undertaking physical training during dialysis by patients with ESRD is beneficial in reducing their levels of anxiety and depression. Both resistance and endurance training improves mood, but only endurance training additionally results in anxiety reduction. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Effects of Periodic Task-Specific Test Feedback on Physical Performance in Older Adults Undertaking Band-Based Resistance Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuichi Hasegawa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of periodic task-specific test feedback on performance improvement in older adults undertaking community- and home-based resistance exercises (CHBRE. Fifty-two older adults (65–83 years were assigned to a muscular perfsormance feedback group (MPG, n=32 or a functional mobility feedback group (FMG, n=20. Both groups received exactly the same 9-week CHBRE program comprising one community-based and two home-based sessions per week. Muscle performance included arm curls and chair stands in 30 seconds, while functional mobility was determined by the timed up and go (TUG test. MPG received fortnightly test feedback only on muscle performance and FMG received feedback only on the TUG. Following training, there was a significant (P<0.05 interaction for all performance tests with MPG improving more for the arm curls (MPG 31.4%, FMG 15.9% and chair stands (MPG 33.7%, FMG 24.9% while FMG improved more for the TUG (MPG-3.5%, FMG-9.7%. Results from this nonrandomized study suggest that periodic test feedback during resistance training may enhance task-specific physical performance in older persons, thereby augmenting reserve capacity or potentially reducing the time required to recover functional abilities.

  11. Bio-based Industries Joint Undertaking: The catalyst for sustainable bio-based economic growth in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengal, Philippe; Wubbolts, Marcel; Zika, Eleni; Ruiz, Ana; Brigitta, Dieter; Pieniadz, Agata; Black, Sarah

    2018-01-25

    This article discusses the preparation, structure and objectives of the Bio-based Industries Joint Undertaking (BBI JU). BBI JU is a public-private partnership (PPP) between the European Commission (EC) and the Bio-based Industries Consortium (BIC), the industry-led private not-for-profit organisation representing the private sectors across the bio-based industries. The model of the public-private partnership has been successful as a new approach to supporting research and innovation and de-risking investment in Europe. The BBI JU became a reality in 2014 and represents the largest industrial and economic cooperation endeavour financially ever undertaken in Europe in the area of industrial biotechnologies. It is considered to be one of the most forward-looking initiatives under Horizon 2020 and demonstrates the circular economy in action. The BBI JU will be the catalyst for this strategy to mobilise actors across Europe including large industry, small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), all types of research organisations, networks and universities. It will support regions and in doing so, the European Union Member States and associated countries in the implementation of their bioeconomy strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. DETERMINATION OF THE URGENCY OF UNDERTAKING LAND CONSOLIDATION WORKS IN THE VILLAGES OF THE SŁAWNO MUNICIPALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław Leń

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The object of the paper is to analyze the spatial structure of land and identification of the needs of consolidation works and exchange of land in the villages of the Sławno municipality, lying in the district of Opoczno, in the Łódzkie Voivodship. The authors use the method of zero unitarisation for the purposes of determining the order of undertaking consolidation works and exchange of land in the area of research. The basis for calculation is the database of 19 factors (x1–x19 characteristic for the listed five groups of issues, describing each of the following villages. The obtained results, in a form of synthetic meter for each village, allowed creating the hierarchy of the urgency of carrying out consolidation works. The problem of excessive fragmentation of farms, constituting the collections of a certain number of parcels, in a broader sense, is one of the elements that prevent the acceleration of reforms by conversion of the Land and Buildings Register (EGiB in a full valuable real estate cadastre in Poland. The importance of the problem is highlighted by the fact that there are ecological grounds in the study area, significant from the point of view of environmental protection.

  13. What Is Required to Develop Career Pathways for Teaching Academics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Dawn; Roberts, Lynne; Ananthram, Subramaniam; Broughton, Michelle

    2018-01-01

    Despite the rise of teaching academic (teaching only) roles in Australia, the UK, the USA, and Canada, the experiences of teaching academics are not well documented in the literature. This article reports from a university-wide study that responded to the introduction of teaching academic roles during a major restructure of academic staff.…

  14. The role of radiation therapy in patients with cancer at one teaching hospital from 1978 through 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Hideo; Kuroda, Chikazumi; Nishiyama, Kinji; Tsukuma, Hideaki [Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan)

    2001-08-01

    To examine the role of radiation therapy in patients with cancer diagnosed at the Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases from 1978 through 1997, we analyzed 34, 128 data from our institution's hospital-based cancer registry. We examined trends over time in the proportion of patients who received radiation therapy, in relation to the specific cancer site and the clinical stage at diagnosis. Our results indicate that the use of radiation therapy to regress unresectable tumors (e.g., advanced lung cancer and esophageal cancer) has decreased and the use of radiation therapy to cure cancer (e.g., early laryngeal cancer and localized non-Hodgkin's lymphoma) and as a adjuvant treatment after definitive surgery (e.g., mastectomy) has increased in the last two decades. (author)

  15. Believe it or not: A case study of the role beliefs play in three middle school teachers' use of computers in teaching science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Carmia Suzannah

    In the past twenty years, teacher beliefs have been found to have a strong influence on the way teachers teach in many disciplines, but only recently is research being done in relation to teaching with computers. As computers become more ubiquitous in schools, it is more important than ever to determine how computers are being used in classrooms, how they could better support student learning, and the reasons why they may not be used in ways advocated by research. In this study, I used a conceptual model of the beliefs that have been shown to influence teaching behavior, an in-depth interview technique (Munby Repertory Grid Technique---RGT) to uncover beliefs, and an exemplary case study methodology to highlight the relationship between the beliefs and teaching with computer behaviors of three middle school teachers. The cases were exemplary in that many of the barriers research has shown to hinder teachers' ability to integrate computers in their teaching were minimized. The teachers all taught at the same technology magnet school and had strong administrative and technological support, professional development in the use of computers, and permanent access to student laptop computers equipped with wireless Internet. To get a complete picture of the teachers' belief systems, I used the Munby RGT with each teacher to explore their teaching with computer beliefs, their science teaching beliefs, and their general teaching beliefs. I then collected data on their teaching with computer behavior through classroom observations, lesson plan report forms, teaching behavior logs, and written reflections, among others. I found that the teachers' beliefs did influence their teaching with computer behavior. For example, although all teachers expressed beliefs that could support student-centered and inquiry-based teaching with computers, some of their beliefs, such as teacher-centered behavioral management beliefs, were more dominant and may have kept the teachers from reaching

  16. Trends in the Distribution of Teacher Effectiveness in the Intensive Partnerships for Effective Teaching: Progress Report. Working Paper WR-1036-BMGF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Jennifer L.; Baird, Matthew; Engberg, John; Hunter, Gerald Paul

    2014-01-01

    As part of its effective teaching initiative, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation partnered with three urban school districts across the U.S. and a group of four charter management organizations to undertake a strategic set of human capital reforms. A key objective of the "Intensive Partnerships for Effective Teaching" program was to…

  17. Clinical features and the role of atypical pathogens in nursing and healthcare-associated pneumonia (NHCAP): differences between a teaching university hospital and a community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Naoyuki; Kawai, Yasuhiro; Akaike, Hiroto; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Hayashi, Toshikiyo; Kurihara, Takeyuki; Okimoto, Niro

    2012-01-01

    The Japan Respiratory Society documented a new category of guidelines for nursing and healthcare-associated pneumonia (NHCAP), which is distinct from community acquired pneumonia (CAP). The objective of this study was to determine the epidemiological differences between NHCAP patients in a teaching university hospital and a community hospital. In addition, to clarify the strategy for treatment of NHCAP, we investigated the role of atypical pathogens. We analyzed 250 NHCAP and 421 CAP cases in a university hospital and 349 NHCAP and 374 CAP cases in a community hospital. Patient age and the incidences of poor general condition were significantly higher in the community hospital compared with those in the university hospital. The distribution and frequency of pathogens, especially multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens, were significantly different between the two hospitals. Central nervous system disorders, dementia and poor performance status, which was possibility related to aspiration pneumonia, were significantly more frequent in patients with NHCAP compared with those with CAP in both hospitals. Atypical pathogens were detected in a few cases in patients with NHCAP. There were many differences in the clinical characteristics between NHCAP patients in a university hospital and a community hospital even for hospitals located in the same area. Aspiration pneumonia was thought to be the main characteristic of NHCAP in both hospitals. Thus, all NHCAP patients did not need the same empiric therapy with a multidrug regimen directed against MDR pathogens. In addition, physicians rarely need to consider atypical pathogens in NHCAP treatment.

  18. Exploring elementary school teachers' perception of their role in teaching content literacy in the elementary science and social studies classrooms: A mixed methods study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Moore, Lisa Michelle

    2011-12-01

    This mixed-methods study explored third, fourth, and fifth grade teachers' perceptions of their role in teaching content literacy in the elementary science and social studies classroom. The rationale for this study was the growing number of studies questioning the reliance on the inoculation theory for content area literacy comprehension. The study was a mixed methods study so as to provide insight into the participants' thought processes in decision making and instructional planning. Data sources included timed instructional observations, tiered checklist to identify strategy instruction, and prompted critical reflections. The three-tiered observation instrument categorized strategies used by teachers in tiers according to the focus of the strategy. Tier I strategies were those identified as strategies good readers use, typically taught with narrative text. The inoculation theory posits these skills transfer to reading informational and expository text. Tier II strategies were those identified as strategies appropriate for informational or expository text. Use of these strategies acknowledged that narrative and informational/expository text require different strategies, but does not differentiate between expository text drawn from particular content area. Tier III strategies were those identified as strategies particularly suited to informational or expository text drawn from specific content areas. These strategies embody cognitive processes used to comprehend text drawn from specific content areas. The findings showed the participating teachers used a preferential Tier of strategy instruction. Some participants felt that reading comprehension was more important than content. They viewed reading as a subject instead of an integral part of science and social studies instruction.

  19. The Teaching of EFL Writing in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariyanti Ariyanti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Writing is one of the most important aspects in English language acquisition. Teaching writing has its own challenges since there are some steps and requirements that teachers should prepare to undertake in the classroom. This article is aimed to discuss teaching and learning writing in the classroom based on theoretical conceptualisation. In addition, curriculum of teaching writing will be another important factor to consider as well as research and practice in teaching writing. Based on comparison to many theoretical concepts from various researchers, it shows that most of Indonesian students still struggle to figure out their problems of grammatical area. The biggest challenge is derived from the difference in cultural backgrounds between the students’ mother tongue and English, so it is possible to know the production of their writing does not ‘sound’ well in appropriate culture of English. Several problems also occur when the teachers have big classes to teach and the result of teaching writing to the students may be defeated. In this case, time also being a big challenge for the teachers to have the students’ writing improve because to accomplish a good composition in English, it needs complex steps such as brainstorming, prewriting, drafting, and editing. However, new techniques in teaching writing are needed to develop the students’ writing outcomes.

  20. Student Teachers' Emotional Teaching Experiences in Relation to Different Teaching Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timoštšuk, I.; Kikas, E.; Normak, M.

    2016-01-01

    The role of emotional experiences in teacher training is acknowledged, but the role of emotions during first experiences of classroom teaching has not been examined in large samples. This study examines the teaching methods used by student teachers in early teaching practice and the relationship between these methods and emotions experienced. We…

  1. An investigation in to the impact of acquisition location on error type and rate when undertaking panoramic radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughlin, A; Drage, N; Greenall, C; Farnell, D J J

    2017-11-01

    Panoramic radiography is a common radiographic examination carried out in the UK. This study was carried out to determine if acquisition site has an impact on image quality. An image quality audit was carried out in South Wales across a number of dental and general radiology settings. The image quality was assessed retrospectively against national standards. A total of 174 radiographs were assessed from general radiology departments and 141 from dental radiology units. Chi-squared analysis was used to investigate whether there were differences in the grading between dental radiology units and general radiology departments. Differences between the two settings in terms of the number of errors in the radiographs was analysed using the Mann-Whitney test. Chi-squared analysis was used to see if there were differences between the types of errors in the two clinical settings. There was a significant association (p = 0.021) between the quality of the radiograph grading and type of radiology department. However when excellent and diagnostically acceptable radiographs were grouped together there was no significant difference between the two clinical settings. Although the vast majority of radiographs were diagnostic (89% for general radiology and 92% for dental radiology units), neither reached the required standards. The most common errors were patient positioning errors (54.6% radiographs affected) and preparation/instructional errors (47.9% radiographs affected). Errors in panoramic radiography are relatively high and further instruction to staff undertaking these procedures is required to ensure the targets are reached. Copyright © 2017 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Resumption of menstruation and pituitary response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone in functional hypothalamic amenorrhea subjects undertaking estrogen replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Z Q; Xu, J J; Lin, J F

    2013-11-01

    Functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA) refers to a functional menstrual disorder with various causes and presentations. Recovery of menstrual cyclicity is common in long-term follow-up but the affecting factors remain unknown. To explore factors affecting the menstrual resumption and to evaluate the pituitary response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in FHA. Thirty cases with FHA were recruited. All subjects were put on continuous 1 mg/day estradiol valerate orally and followed up monthly. Recovery was defined as the occurrence of at least three consecutive regular cycles. Responder referred to those who recovered within two years of therapy. Gonadotropin response to the 50 μg GnRH challenge was tested every three months. Nineteen (63.3%) subjects recovered with a mean time to recovery of 26.8 months. Time to recovery was negatively correlated with body mass index (BMI) before and by amenorrhea. Twentyone cases had undertaken therapy for more than two years and 10 of them recovered. BMI before and by amenorrhea were negatively correlated with the recovery. Significant increase of serum luteinizing hormone (LH) and LH response to GnRH were noted after recovery. Menstrual resumption was common in FHA undertaking estrogen replacement therapy (ERT). The likelihood of recovery was affected by their BMI before and by amenorrhea but not by the weight gain during therapy. Low serum LH and attenuated LH response to GnRH were the main features of pituitary deficiency in FHA. The menstrual resumption in FHA was accompanied by the recovery of serum LH and the LH response to GnRH.

  3. Distance Teaching on Bornholm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Finn J. S.; Clausen, Christian

    2001-01-01

    The case study represents an example of a top-down introduction of distance teaching as part of Danish trials with the introduction of multimedia in education. The study is concerned with the background, aim and context of the trial as well as the role and working of the technology and the organi......The case study represents an example of a top-down introduction of distance teaching as part of Danish trials with the introduction of multimedia in education. The study is concerned with the background, aim and context of the trial as well as the role and working of the technology...

  4. Teaching Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtchinova, Ekaterina

    2013-01-01

    Ekaterina Nemtchinova's book "Teaching Listening" explores different approaches to teaching listening in second language classrooms. Presenting up-to-date research and theoretical issues associated with second language listening, Nemtchinova explains how these new findings inform everyday teaching and offers practical suggestions…

  5. The Role of Faculty in Connecting Canadian Undergraduate Arts and Humanities Students to Scholarly Inquiries into Teaching: A Case for Purposeful Experiential Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratsoy, Ginny R.

    2016-01-01

    Increasingly, various sectors of Canadian universities are advocating an assortment of beyond-the-classroom learning models--from research assistantships through service learning and cooperative education placements. At the same time, faculty who engage in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) and related inquiries into teaching and…

  6. "Ensure that you are well aware of the risks you are taking…": actions and activities medical tourists' informal caregivers can undertake to protect their health and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, Valorie A; Whitmore, Rebecca; Snyder, Jeremy; Turner, Leigh

    2017-05-22

    When seeking care at international hospitals and clinics, medical tourists are often accompanied by family members, friends, or other caregivers. Such caregiver-companions assume a variety of roles and responsibilities and typically offer physical assistance, provide emotional support, and aid in decision-making and record keeping as medical tourists navigate unfamiliar environments. While traveling abroad, medical tourists' caregiver-companions can find themselves confronted with challenging communication barriers, financial pressures, emotional strain, and unsafe environments. To better understand what actions and activities medical tourists' informal caregivers can undertake to protect their health and safety, 20 interviews were conducted with Canadians who had experienced accompanying a medical tourist to an international health care facility for surgery. Interview transcripts were subsequently used to identify inductive and deductive themes central to the advice research participants offered to prospective caregiver-companions. Advice offered to future caregiver-companions spanned the following actions and activities to protect health and safety: become an informed health care consumer; assess and avoid exposure to identifiable risks; anticipate the care needs of medical tourists and thereby attempt to guard against caregiver burden; become familiar with important logistics related to travel and anticipated recovery timelines; and take practical measures to protect one's own health. Given that a key feature of public health is to use research findings to develop interventions and policies intended to promote health and reduce risks to individuals and populations, the paper draws upon major points of advice offered by study participants to take the first steps toward the development of an informational intervention designed specifically for the health and safety needs of medical tourists' caregiver companions. While additional research is required to finalize

  7. Ministerial Decree of 15 February 1974 establishing the inventory of qualified experts and physicians authorized to undertake the health physics and medical supervision of protection against ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    This Decree was made in implementation of DPR No. 185 of 13 February 1964 and provides for the legal and administrative acknowledgment of experts and physicians who are required to undertake supervision of protection against the hazards of ionizing radiations. (NEA) [fr

  8. The Role of Faculty in Connecting Canadian Undergraduate Arts and Humanities Students to Scholarly Inquiries into Teaching: A Case for Purposeful Experiential Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginny R. Ratsoy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly, various sectors of Canadian universities are advocating an assortment of beyond-the-classroom learning models – from research assistantships through service learning and cooperative education placements. At the same time, faculty who engage in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL and related inquiries into teaching and learning are striving to shift attention on their activities from the periphery to a more central position within campus culture – a particular challenge for Arts and Humanities professors, who may find themselves marginalized within SoTL. This article focuses attention on the intersections of experiential learning and SoTL and SoTL-related activity. Students have much to benefit from, and offer to, these activities – beyond their usual role as subjects of studies. I present a framework based on examples from research and my own experiences – with a focus on undergraduate Arts students, who, arguably, have the fewest opportunities for Experiential Learning in general – that illustrates varying degrees of involvement. As Arts faculty attempt to enhance and highlight inquiries into teaching and learning, they would be wise to conjoin them with experiential learning by including students in the process and product. Divers secteurs des universités canadiennes conseillent de plus en plus un assortiment de modèles d’apprentissage hors de la salle de classe – que ce soit par le biais de postes d’assistants à la recherche, de l’apprentissage par le service ou de stages dans le cadre de l’enseignement coopératif. En même temps, les professeurs qui sont actifs dans l’Avancement des connaissances en enseignement et en apprentissage (ACEA et dans des domaines connexes liés à l’enseignement et à l’apprentissage s’efforcent d’attirer l’attention sur leurs activités pour les faire passer de la périphérie à une position plus centrale sur les campus – ce qui s’avère être un

  9. (ELT ), Foreign Language Teaching (FLT )

    OpenAIRE

    Şenel, Müfit

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the relation of the Foreign Language Teaching with the Semiotic Approach that gains more importance recently and tries to explain how this concept has been used as Semiotic Approach in Foreign Language Teaching and Learning and teacher-learner roles, strong-weak sides, types of activities, etc. have been handled.

  10. Strategies for Successful Clinical Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koharchik, Linda; Redding, Sharon R

    2016-07-01

    This article is one in a series on the roles of adjunct clinical faculty and preceptors, who teach nursing students and new graduates to apply knowledge in clinical settings. This article describes teaching strategies as well as the importance of the learning environment.

  11. English Language Teaching Profile: Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    British Council, London (England). English-Teaching Information Centre.

    A profile of English language teaching in Poland is provided in outline form. The following topics are dealt with: the role of English in the country, teaching hours per week in English at each educational level, English language versus English literature, public examinations, syllabuses and textbooks, specialized English programs, adult English…

  12. Breaking the Solitude of Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchings, Pat

    1994-01-01

    Advocates development of a campus culture in which faculty can be colleagues to each other in teaching by sharing what they know, critiquing each other's work, assisting each other to improve, and creating conditions for recognition and reward of teaching. Covers the role of peer review and briefly describes some institutions' efforts. (JB)

  13. English Language Teaching Profile: Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    British Council, London (England). English-Teaching Information Centre.

    This profile in outline form of the English language teaching situation in Cyprus discusses the role of English within the Greek Cypriot community and within the educational system. Areas covered include English language requirements and English within the curriculum, teaching personnel and teacher training, instructional materials, English…

  14. Teaching to Teach in Toronto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Kien; Waddell, Andrea E.; Lofchy, Jodi

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The training objectives for postgraduate education in the United States and Canada both state that teaching skills should be formally developed during training. This article reviews the development of the Teaching-to-Teach program at the University of Toronto Department of Psychiatry, the current curriculum, evaluation, and future…

  15. The role of Personal Self-Regulation and Regulatory Teaching to predict motivational-affective variables, achievement and satisfaction: A structural model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus ede la Fuente

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation examines how personal self-regulation (presage variable and regulatory teaching (process variable of teaching relate to learning approaches, strategies for coping with stress, and self-regulated learning (process variables of learning and, finally, how they relate to performance and satisfaction with the learning process (product variables. The objective was to clarify the associative and predictive relations between these variables, as contextualized in two different models that use the presage-process-product paradigm (the Biggs and DEDEPRO models. A total of 1101 university students participated in the study. The design was cross-sectional and retrospective with attributional (or selection variables, using correlations and structural analysis. The results provide consistent and significant empirical evidence for the relationships hypothesized, incorporating variables that are part of and influence the teaching-learning process in Higher Education. Findings confirm the importance of interactive relationships within the teaching-learning process, where personal self-regulation is assumed to take place in connection with regulatory teaching. Variables that are involved in the relationships validated here reinforce the idea that both personal factors and teaching and learning factors should be taken into consideration when dealing with a formal teaching-learning context at university.

  16. Creative Approaches to Teaching Graduate Research Methods Workshops

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Reilly

    2017-01-01

    Engagement and deeper learning were enhanced by developing several innovative teaching strategies delivered in Research Methods workshops to Graduate Business Students.  Focusing primarily on students adopting a creative approach to formulating a valid research question for undertaking a dissertation successfully. These techniques are applicable to most subject domains to ensure student engagement.  Addressing the various multiple intelligences and learning styles existing within groups while...

  17. Teaching company law to business students::an effective framework

    OpenAIRE

    Madhloom, Omar; Butler, Nicolette

    2015-01-01

    Business students learning company law face a number of unique challenges. Therefore, instructors who teach company law to business students must carefully consider how their courses will meet these unique needs. This article will reflect on the challenges faced by business students studying company law before going on to consider how these challenges can be overcome. This work emphasises the importance of focusing on the learning outcomes of business students undertaking company law and the ...

  18. Co-Teaching with Strategy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conderman, Greg; Hedin, Laura R.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the popularity of co-teaching and widespread professional literature describing exemplary co-teaching practices, this instructional approach has yet to realize its potential. One way to increase the effectiveness of co-teaching is for special educators to contribute meaningfully by assuming the role of strategy leader in the co-taught…

  19. Teaching language teachers scaffolding professional learning

    CERN Document Server

    Maggioli, Gabriel Diaz

    2012-01-01

    Teaching Language Teachers: Scaffolding Professional Learning provides an updated view of as well as a reader-friendly introduction to the field of Teaching Teachers, with special reference to language teaching. By taking a decidedly Sociocultural perspective, the book addresses the main role of the Teacher of Teachers (ToT) as that of scaffolding the professional learning of aspiring teachers.

  20. English Language Teaching Profile: Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    British Council, London (England). English-Teaching Information Centre.

    This profile in outline form of the English language teaching situation in Hong Kong provides a brief background of the social, economic, and linguistic situation, and covers the following topics: the role of English, English within the educational system, the teaching cadre, teaching materials, English outside the educational system, and British…

  1. Is faculty practice valuable? The experience of Western Australian nursing and midwifery academics undertaking faculty clinical practice - A discussion paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Amanda C; Baker, Melanie; Geraghty, Sadie

    2017-09-01

    The faculty clinical practice model provides dedicated time for nursing lecturers and educators in a university school of nursing to work with supervision in the clinical environments for an agreed amount of time each year. Allowing academics to partake in faculty clinical practice this way has been shown to update skills and retain clinical competency. Some nursing and midwifery academics believe it is essential to remain clinically current and up-to-date with professional issues in the clinical environments, whereas other academics believe reading current research maintains clinical competency. This discussion paper will explore the authors' own experiences of faculty clinical practice as an opportunity to enhance their learning. Narrative accounts of time spent in the clinical areas being expressed as invaluable as it allowed the authors to become part of the health professional team, refine clinical skills, gain clinical confidence, and share knowledge. This, in turn, impacted upon the academic's teaching style as well as redefined it by introducing incidents and stories from their experience. It has been concluded by the authors that faculty clinical practice allows academics to increase confidence, encourage leadership skills, and improve their teaching abilities in their clinical area of expertise. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Nursing roles and functions addressing relatives during in-hospital rehabilitation following stroke. Care needs and involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aadal, Lena; Angel, Sanne; Langhorn, Leanne

    2017-01-01

    and the relatives and support the interaction between the patient and the relatives. Four themes occurred: the changed lives of relatives; shared life after stroke; noncooperating relatives; time for the relatives. CONCLUSION: Nurses experience their roles and functions addressing relatives after stroke as crucial...... to the patient. Caregivers require nurse assistance, support and to be seen as an essential partner in the care giving process. However, the nurses do not perceive that teaching of relatives is a task they should routinely undertake. This might indicate an ambiguity between the relatives' expectations...... and the actual contribution from nurses. AIM: This study describes nurses' experienced roles and functions addressing the relatives of patients with stroke during in-hospital rehabilitation. METHODOLOGICAL DESIGN: A phenomenological hermeneutic approach influenced by Paul Ricoeur. In a secondary analysis focus...

  3. Teaching Biochemistry at a Minority-Serving Institution: An Evaluation of the Role of Collaborative Learning as a Tool for Science Mastery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Angela W.

    2005-01-01

    A collaborative-learning approach to teaching biochemistry to a diverse group of students that was developed is proving successful. This instructional strategy has increased student academic performance and changed the way in which students master science.

  4. Teaching the French Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Thomas M.

    1989-01-01

    Reports on presentations made at a symposium sponsored by the Connecticut Humanities Council. Papers dealt with teaching the French Revolution by presenting European history in new relationships with the rest of the world and by examining the Declaration of the Rights of Man as it related to the role of women. (KO)

  5. Teaching Sexuality through Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cragin, Becca

    2015-01-01

    A central project of feminism has been raising awareness of the role cultural formations of sexuality play in women's inequality (Ritzenhoff and Hermes). Feminists who regularly include discussions of sexuality in their teaching are familiar with the pedagogical challenges of the subject as well as its importance. This article is intended for…

  6. Teaching Technicians about Teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magney, John; Troutt-Ervin, Eileen

    2000-01-01

    Two surveys of technical educators about the effectiveness of teaching technical students about teamwork found that most used group work but in limited ways and with little knowledge of cooperative and problem-based learning. Practical issues that should be addressed include team composition, roles, and leadership; communication; trust; decision…

  7. Analysis on Reform of the Relationship between Teaching and Learning of College English Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuexia Cui

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available There are substantial changes of the relationship between teaching and learning in college English teaching. On one hand, the dominant role of teachers has been changed. New teaching idea advocates the dominant role of students and also their active participation in teaching. On the other hand, the reform has combined teaching with learning which propels the interaction between them. Thus, based on the features of college English teaching, this paper, which aims to promote the quality of college English teaching and help cultivate professional and high-quality inter-disciplinary talents for our society, has analyzed the relationship between teaching and learning and came up with solutions to problems lurking in present college English teaching after specific reflection.

  8. Cancer patients undertaking bone scans in a department of Nuclear Medicine have significant stress related to the examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sioka, C.; Manetou, M.; Dimakopoulos, N.; Christidi, S.; Kouraklis, G.

    2005-01-01

    Bone scanning is a standard screening procedure for evaluation of metastases in cancer patient. In addition to the staging procedures, bone scan is a valuable test for deciding palliative therapeutic options in selected patients. The aim of this study was to investigate if patients with cancer who were undertaking routine bone scans had any stress related to the test. We asked 83 consecutive patients with various types of cancer if they had anxiety just prior to undergoing the test. Overall, we found that 53 (64%) patients had increased anxiety related to the examination and 30 (36%) patients did not. Among the 53 patients who were anxious about the bone scan, 32 were concerned about the results of the examination, 13 worried about the effects of the radiation, 4 were anxious for both results/radiation, and 4 patients had stress but could not specify the reason. Among the 32 patients who were concerned about the results of the examination, 15 were having their first bone scans, while 17 had already undergone the procedure before. Among the 13 patients who were mainly concerned about the risks of the radiation exposure during the test, 9 were having bone scans for the first time. Out of the 4 patients who feared both the results and radiation, 3 were having bone scans for the first time and 1 had it for several times. Finally, out of the 4 patients who had anxiety about the test but could not identify the reason, 3 were having bone scans for the first time and one had the test before but was claustrophobic. Our findings indicate that most patients (64%) with cancer who underwent a routine bone scan to check for metastatic disease had intense stress related either to the results or the side effects of the examination. However, there were more patients who were concerned about the results of the test rather than the effects of radiation. Among the patients who feared the effects of radioactivity most were having the test for the first time. A previous study in a

  9. Teaching Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niculescu Carmen-Mihaela

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The human being started as a self-educated person, this way managing to improve his living. For his descendants to avoid failures, he started to share his ancestors’ experience. When some people’s knowledge acquirement became big, they were called the sages, and among of them became eventually teachers, that took the role of transmitting the useful information related to life environmental conditions they lived. In time, their needs became more and more complex and their knowledge deeper. In the act of teaching itself, teachers create a shortcut between necessity and solving it, going beyond failures. Obviously, the present society is technologized, where the human being uses technology but he also searches for himself. This quest should be naturally performed with the help of the educator, of the experienced student, so that he could shape the young man and make him feel good with himself and find his place within society. The current education system describes to younger people nothing more than the evolution of science, technique and art, starting with the first trials till our days. What is really mandatory for us is to find a way where the educational system could become again a necessity for a person and not a way to keep very many people busy, while they can be intellectually and psycho-emotionally shaped.

  10. Ministerial Decree of 12 May 1980 authorising Agip Nucleare S.p.a. in Rome to undertake health physics and medical supervision of protection against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Section 83 of Decree No. 185 of 13 February 1964 on protection against ionizing radiation provides that institutions previously authorised by the Minister of Labour and Social Security may, on condition that they are adequately equipped for such services, be authorised to undertake health physics and medical supervision of personnel. This Decree accordingly authorises the Agip Nucleare Company to carry out this work. (NEA) [fr

  11. Implementation of the systemic approach in teaching and learning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The teachers who keep teaching by employing traditional methods find it difficult to promote the active role of the students in the classroom, see the relationship of their subject they are teaching with others, and perceive the prospective of their teaching. The philosophy of global teaching integrates exactly those elements ...

  12. Teaching methods in PE teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Šekeljić, Goran V.; Stamatović, Milovan V.

    2016-01-01

    The methods used in teaching physical education, as well as in every other very specific teaching area, have their own uniqueness and enormous importance in teaching. In the last fifty years literature showed many different methods systematized by several different criteria. Some were just taken from general didactics, some were tailored to the needs of physical education classes, and a few new ones were discovered. The special value of this work is that the existing methods are supplemented ...

  13. Teaching Vocabulary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard-Clouston, M.

    2013-01-01

    Vocabulary is central to English language teaching. Without sufficient vocabulary, students cannot understand others or express their own ideas. Teachers who find the task of teaching English vocabulary a little daunting are not alone! This book presents important issues from recent vocabulary research and theory so that teachers may approach…

  14. Teaching Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Grammar is a component in all language skills: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Teachers need to know rules of grammar (teacher knowledge) as well as techniques that help students use grammar effectively and effortlessly (teaching knowledge). Using reflective practice to help teachers become comfortable with teaching grammar, this…

  15. Teaching Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Richard R.

    2013-01-01

    "Teaching Reading" uncovers the interactive processes that happen when people learn to read and translates them into a comprehensive easy-to-follow guide on how to teach reading. Richard Day's revelations on the nature of reading, reading strategies, reading fluency, reading comprehension, and reading objectives make fascinating…

  16. Teaching Portfolio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Fischer

    The present teaching portfolio has been submitted for evaluation in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the teacher training programme for Assistant Professors at Department of Engineering, Aarhus University, Denmark.......The present teaching portfolio has been submitted for evaluation in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the teacher training programme for Assistant Professors at Department of Engineering, Aarhus University, Denmark....

  17. Teaching collocations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revier, Robert Lee; Henriksen, Birgit

    2006-01-01

    Very little pedadagoy has been made available to teachers interested in teaching collocations in foreign and/or second language classroom. This paper aims to contribute to and promote efforts in developing L2-based pedagogy for the teaching of phraseology. To this end, it presents pedagogical...

  18. Activating teaching methods in french language teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Kulhánková, Anna

    2009-01-01

    The subject of this diploma thesis is activating teaching methods in french language teaching. This thesis outlines the issues acitvating teaching methods in the concept of other teaching methods. There is a definition of teaching method, classification of teaching methods and characteristics of each activating method. In the practical part of this work are given concrete forms of activating teaching methods appropriate for teaching of french language.

  19. The Influence and Implications of Chinese Culture in the Decision to Undertake Cross-Border Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodycott, Peter; Lai, Ada

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about how a family in the Peoples Republic of China (PRC) makes decisions on cross-border study. International marketers and managers in higher education turn to research based on Chinese student preferences. However, such research ignores cultural traditions steeped in Confucian ideals of family and the subsequent roles and…

  20. Clinical embryology teaching: is it relevant anymore?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Karen M; Charles, Antony Robert; Holland, Andrew J A

    2013-10-01

    Embryology finds itself jostling for precious space in the crowded medical curriculum, yet remains important for helping students understand birth defects. It has been suggested that teaching embryology through clinical scenarios can increase its relevance and interest. The aim of this research was to determine the attitudes of final-year medical students to learning embryology and whether clinical scenarios aid understanding. Final-year medical students undertaking their paediatric rotation in 2009 and 2010 were invited to attend an optional lecture on clinical embryology and participate in the research. In the lecture, three clinical scenarios were presented, in which the lecturer traced the normal development of a foetus and the abnormal development that resulted in a birth defect. Outcomes were assessed quantitatively using a paper-based survey. The vast majority of students who valued embryology teaching in their medical programme thought it would assist them with clinical management, and believed learning through case scenarios helped their understanding. Students were divided in their beliefs about when embryology should be taught in the medical programme and whether it would increase their workload. Embryology teaching appears to be a valuable part of the medical curriculum. Embryology teaching was valued when taught in the clinical environment in later years of the medical programme. Students, clinicians and medical educators should be proactive in finding clinical learning opportunities for embryology teaching. © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  1. EDUCATION, TEACHING AND TEACHING PRACTICE: ANALYSES AND VIEWPOINTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stela Marques

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This text aims to analyze the teaching profession in its various educational perspectives. The motivation to write this article sprang from the need to understand how education, teaching and teaching practices can be critically involved in generating whole citizens, i.e., autonomous individuals that can think for themselves. The aim is to find an educational practice of possibility, which signals an education that enables a more righteous and equitable world, one that does not succumb to the constraints of massification. Nowadays we often notice the weakening of human bonds within the educational process, especially regarding the relationship between teaching practices and education. Thus, we intend to distinguish education from teaching, based on the pedagogical theory and history of education. We seek to reiterate the importance of teacher training and teachers’ role, in order to induce a critical, liberating and interchanging type of education.

  2. Design and Realization of Network Teaching System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Shan Shan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 21 century, with the wide spread in family and public, network has been applied in many new fields, and the application in classes is of no exception. In traditional education, teachers give lessons to students face to face. Hence, the teaching quality depends largely on the quality and initiative of the individual teacher. However, the serious disadvantages of this mode are that teachers completely dominate the classroom and may ignore the subjective cognition role of the students, which may be bad for the growth of creativity and the innovative thinking ability. Obviously, traditional education mode cannot meet the requirements of the this new era which leads to the booming developing tendency of the network. As a new teaching measure, scientifically combining modern information technology and teaching practice, network teaching not only changes the traditional education by the means and form, but even also gives new meanings to teaching concept, process, method as well as teacher-student role and other deep levels. With the help of network teaching system, on-line classroom learning, relevant information systematization, standardization and automation, this system provides students with an efficient online learning method with high quality. This also helps to solve the disadvantages of the traditional teaching mode and promote the teaching methods to a new stage. It improves the network teaching platform, enriches the network teaching resources, and establishes a network teaching system, so as to improve information quality of teachers and students and assist in improving teaching quality of schools.

  3. Students' Motivation toward Laboratory Work in Physiology Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohn, Niels Bonderup; Fago, Angela; Overgaard, Johannes; Madsen, Peter Teglberg; Malte, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory has been given a central role in physiology education, and teachers report that it is motivating for students to undertake experimental work on live animals or measuring physiological responses on the students themselves. Since motivation is a critical variable for academic learning and achievement, then we must concern ourselves…

  4. Undertaking high impact strategies: The role of national efficiency measures in long-term energy and emission reduction in steel making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Tengfang; Karali, Nihan; Sathaye, Jayant

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Evaluate long-term effects of national energy efficiency in steel making. • Use bottom-up optimization for projection in China, India and the U.S. • The effects include changes in steel production, energy use, emissions, and costs. • Three emission targets induce different structural changes and investments. • Projected energy and CO 2 intensity declines in each country from 2010 to 2050. - Abstract: In this paper, we applied bottom-up linear optimization modeling to analyze long-term national impacts of implementing energy efficiency measures on energy savings, CO 2 -emission reduction, production, and costs of steel making in China, India, and the U.S. We first established two base scenarios representing business-as-usual steel production for each country from 2010 to 2050; Base scenario (in which no efficiency measure is available) and Base-E scenario (in which efficiency measures are available), and model scenarios representing various emission-reduction targets that affects production, annual energy use and costs with the goal of cost minimization. A higher emission-reduction target generally induces larger structural changes and increased investments in nation-wide efficiency measures, in addition to autonomous improvement expected in the Base scenario. Given the same emission-reduction target compared to the base scenario, intensity of annual energy use and emissions exhibits declining trends in each country from year 2010 to 2050. While a higher emission-reduction target result in more energy reduction from the base scenario, such reduction can become more expensive to achieve. The results advance our understanding of long-term effects of national energy efficiency applications under different sets of emission-reduction targets for steel sectors in the three major economies, and provide useful implications for high impact strategies to manage production structures, production costs, energy use, and emission reduction in steel making

  5. My thoughts on teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bonnie J

    2009-01-01

    received at least 22 different awards and citations for teaching excellence, two of which came very early in her career while she was at North Carolina State University. Most notable among these many awards is the fact that she is now a three-time recipient of the Pfizer Teaching Award. Dr. Smith has also been nominated by Student AVMA for a Teaching Excellence Award in Basic Sciences and has received an Honorable Mention, Teacher of the Year Award from the AVMA. Additionally, she has received an Alumni Teaching Award and a University Award for Teaching Excellence, and she has been elected to the Virginia Tech Academy of Teaching Excellence. Each of these three awards recognizes the best educators on Virginia Tech's faculty. Students have been very articulate in their praise of Dr. Smith's teaching. The comments received include "She has developed a unique teaching style that infuses traditional lectures with her unrelenting energy while never sacrificing content or complexity" and "She approaches the material from many angles, with clear verbalization of concepts, creatively utilizing stories and metaphors for clarification." Finally, a very fitting comment that illustrates her impact on her students: "Outside the classroom, Dr. Smith also influences many of us by serving as a strong female role model. In the face of life's hardships, she perseveres with an unshakably positive spirit. She encourages us to excel in all we do within the walls of our school and in our own lives." Peers have likewise been most complimentary of Dr. Smith's abilities as an educator. Examples from her nomination packet include the following: "Dr. Smith is truly a Master Teacher of the college. She has consistently demonstrated exemplary qualities of teaching, dedication and work ethic. She has received every teaching award the College has to offer and is consistently recognized by students, peers and the University" and "She epitomizes the qualities we have come to associate with teaching

  6. Identifying Facilitating Factors and Barriers to Improving Student Retention Rates in Tertiary Teaching Courses: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Terence V.; Brindle, Kimberley A.

    2017-01-01

    Factors which impact student retention in tertiary level teaching courses are complex. This study examined facilitating factors and barriers to student retention for students studying education. Due to a limited number of studies, the search was extended to factors impacting students undertaking tertiary education. A systematic review was…

  7. Teaching English Through Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Hişmanoğlu

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at emphasizing the use of literature as a popular technique for teaching both basiclanguage skills (i.e. reading, writing, listening and speaking and language areas (i.e. vocabulary,grammar and pronunciation in our times. Reasons for using literary texts in foreign language classroomand main criteria for selecting suitable literary texts in foreign language classes are stressed so as tomake the reader familiar with the underlying reasons and criteria for language teachers’ using andselecting literary texts. Moreover, literature and the teaching of language skills, benefits of differentgenres of literature (i.e. poetry, short fiction, drama and novel to language teaching and some problemsencountered by language teachers within the area of teaching English through literature (i.e. lack ofpreparation in the area of literature teaching in TESL / TEFL programs, absence of clear-cut objectivesdefining the role of literature in ESL / EFL, language teachers’ not having the background and trainingin literature, lack of pedagogically-designed appropriate materials that can be used by language teachersin a classroom context are taken into account.

  8. The Role of Faculty Members' Cross-Cultural Competencies in Their Perceived Teaching Quality: Evidence from Culturally-Diverse Classes in Four European Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Beuckelaer, Alain; Lievens, Filip; Bucker, Joost

    2012-01-01

    In the field of higher education, it has often been claimed that in culturally-diverse classes high levels of cross-cultural competence will result in better teaching performance among faculty. Unfortunately, to date this relationship has not been tested empirically. In this study, we examine the nature of this relationship using course-related…

  9. Role of the Information Professional in the Development and Promotion of Digital Humanities Content for Research, Teaching, and Learning in the Modern Academic Library: An Irish Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Jane A.

    2016-01-01

    The Internet has been the catalyst for the convergence of many subject areas and online platforms. Information professionals such as Archivists, IT developers and especially Librarians have been impacted in the development and promotion of digital humanities content for research, teaching, and learning in the modern academic library. In this case…

  10. More than Just a Game: The Role of Simulation in The Teaching of Product Design and Entrepreneurship to Mechanical Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Gabriel J.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to contribute to the debate on the best pedagogical approach to developing undergraduate mechanical engineering skills to meet the requirements of contemporary complex working environments. The paper provides an example of using student-entrepreneur collaboration in the teaching of modules to Mechanical Engineering…

  11. The role of personal self-regulation and regulatory teaching to predict motivational-affective variables, achievement, and satisfaction: a structural model

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Fuente, Jesus; Zapata, Lucía; Martínez-Vicente, Jose M.; Sander, Paul; Cardelle-Elawar, María

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation examines how personal self-regulation (presage variable) and regulatory teaching (process variable of teaching) relate to learning approaches, strategies for coping with stress, and self-regulated learning (process variables of learning) and, finally, how they relate to performance and satisfaction with the learning process (product variables). The objective was to clarify the associative and predictive relations between these variables, as contextualized in two different models that use the presage-process-product paradigm (the Biggs and DEDEPRO models). A total of 1101 university students participated in the study. The design was cross-sectional and retrospective with attributional (or selection) variables, using correlations and structural analysis. The results provide consistent and significant empirical evidence for the relationships hypothesized, incorporating variables that are part of and influence the teaching–learning process in Higher Education. Findings confirm the importance of interactive relationships within the teaching–learning process, where personal self-regulation is assumed to take place in connection with regulatory teaching. Variables that are involved in the relationships validated here reinforce the idea that both personal factors and teaching and learning factors should be taken into consideration when dealing with a formal teaching–learning context at university. PMID:25964764

  12. Teachers' Beliefs about the Role of Interaction in Teaching Newtonian Mechanics and Its Influence on Students' Conceptual Understanding of Newton's Third Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhiainen, Johanna; Koponen, Ismo T.; Lavonen, Jari

    2006-01-01

    Students' conceptual understanding of Newton's third law has been the subject of numerous studies. These studies have often pointed out the importance of addressing the concept of interaction in teaching Newtonian mechanics. In this study, teachers were interviewed in order to examine how they understand interaction and use it in their…

  13. Improving teaching on the basis of student evaluation: integrative teaching consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibbecke, Gerald; Kahmann, Janine; Pignotti, Tanja; Altenberger, Leander; Kadmon, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Due to the development of medical education in the past decade the role of teachers has changed and requires higher didactic competence. Student evaluation of teaching alone does not lead to considerable improvement of teaching quality. We present the concept of "Integrative Teaching Consultation", which comprises both the teacher's reflection and own objectives to improve their teaching as well as data from students ratings. Teachers in collaboration with a teaching consultant reflect on their teaching ability and set themselves improvement goals. Then the consultant himself observes a teaching session and subsequently analyses the respective student evaluation in order to give meaningful feedback to the teacher. The combination of student feedback with professional consultation elements can initiate and maintain improvements in teaching. Teaching consultation complements existing faculty development programs and increases the benefit of student evaluations.

  14. Improving teaching on the basis of student evaluation: Integrative teaching consultation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wibbecke, Gerald

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Due to the development of medical education in the past decade the role of teachers has changed and requires higher didactic competence. Student evaluation of teaching alone does not lead to considerable improvement of teaching quality. We present the concept of "Integrative Teaching Consultation", which comprises both the teacher’s reflection and own objectives to improve their teaching as well as data from students ratings.Methods: Teachers in collaboration with a teaching consultant reflect on their teaching ability and set themselves improvement goals. Then the consultant himself observes a teaching session and subsequently analyses the respective student evaluation in order to give meaningful feedback to the teacher.Results: The combination of student feedback with professional consultation elements can initiate and maintain improvements in teaching. Conclusion: Teaching consultation complements existing faculty development programs and increases the benefit of student evaluations.

  15. Teaching Criminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Joseph W.

    1986-01-01

    This article surveys information resources, contemporary issues and trends, and selected instructional strategies useful in teaching undergraduate criminology. Instructional resources reviewed include textbooks, professional journals, and reference works. Twelve issues and trends are identified and three exemplary learning activities are…

  16. Main Principles of Teaching Foreign Languages and their Theoretical Interpretation

    OpenAIRE

    Jonas Mickonis

    2011-01-01

    Proper choice of the whole complex of principles of teaching a foreign language, being both pure didactic or those of methods of teaching foreign languages, enables the creation and improvement of efficient teaching strategies. Both principles play their own role in a teaching practice. In their turn, though significant, the didactic principles should not be regarded as being of optimal importance. The most important in this field are the principles of methods of teaching foreign languages wh...

  17. Teaching teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Jašinskaitė, Eglutė; Valaitytė, Vilija

    2005-01-01

    The article present the survey of scientific pedagogical and psychological literature analyzing the essence of teaching/learning of adults, ideas of humanistic psychology, constructivist conception of learning, and the viewpoint of various scientific theories towards adult teaching/learning. On the basis of the data of the questionnaire given, reasons for learning of schools teachers, their expectations about their future profession, some psychological moments of their relationship with the t...

  18. Effects of participation in a cross year peer tutoring programme in clinical examination skills on volunteer tutors' skills and attitudes towards teachers and teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamora Javier

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of students' teaching skills is increasingly recognised as an important component of UK undergraduate medical curricula and, in consequence, there is renewed interest in the potential benefits of cross-year peer tutoring. Whilst several studies have described the use of cross-year peer tutoring in undergraduate medical courses, its use in the clinical setting is less well reported, particularly the effects of peer tutoring on volunteer tutors' views of teachers and teaching. This study explored the effects of participation in a cross-year peer tutoring programme in clinical examination skills ('OSCE tutor' on volunteer tutors' own skills and on their attitudes towards teachers and teaching. Methods Volunteer tutors were final year MBChB students who took part in the programme as part of a Student Selected Component (SSC. Tutees were year 3 MBChB students preparing for their end of year 'OSCE' examination. Pre and post participation questionnaires, including both Likert-type and open response questions, were used. Paired data was compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. All tests were two-tailed with 5% significance level. Results Tutors reflected their cohort in terms of gender but were drawn from among the more academically successful final year students. Most had previous teaching experience. They were influenced to participate in 'OSCE tutor' by a desire to improve their own teaching and associated generic skills and by contextual factors relating to the organisation or previous experience of the OSCE tutor programme. Issues relating to longer term career aspirations were less important. After the event, tutors felt that participation had enhanced their skills in various areas, including practical teaching skills, confidence in speaking to groups and communication skills; and that as a result of taking part, they were now more likely to undertake further teacher training and to make teaching a major part

  19. Effects of participation in a cross year peer tutoring programme in clinical examination skills on volunteer tutors' skills and attitudes towards teachers and teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Sharon; Zamora, Javier

    2007-01-01

    Background Development of students' teaching skills is increasingly recognised as an important component of UK undergraduate medical curricula and, in consequence, there is renewed interest in the potential benefits of cross-year peer tutoring. Whilst several studies have described the use of cross-year peer tutoring in undergraduate medical courses, its use in the clinical setting is less well reported, particularly the effects of peer tutoring on volunteer tutors' views of teachers and teaching. This study explored the effects of participation in a cross-year peer tutoring programme in clinical examination skills ('OSCE tutor') on volunteer tutors' own skills and on their attitudes towards teachers and teaching. Methods Volunteer tutors were final year MBChB students who took part in the programme as part of a Student Selected Component (SSC). Tutees were year 3 MBChB students preparing for their end of year 'OSCE' examination. Pre and post participation questionnaires, including both Likert-type and open response questions, were used. Paired data was compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. All tests were two-tailed with 5% significance level. Results Tutors reflected their cohort in terms of gender but were drawn from among the more academically successful final year students. Most had previous teaching experience. They were influenced to participate in 'OSCE tutor' by a desire to improve their own teaching and associated generic skills and by contextual factors relating to the organisation or previous experience of the OSCE tutor programme. Issues relating to longer term career aspirations were less important. After the event, tutors felt that participation had enhanced their skills in various areas, including practical teaching skills, confidence in speaking to groups and communication skills; and that as a result of taking part, they were now more likely to undertake further teacher training and to make teaching a major part of their career. However

  20. Effects of participation in a cross year peer tutoring programme in clinical examination skills on volunteer tutors' skills and attitudes towards teachers and teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Sharon; Zamora, Javier

    2007-06-28

    Development of students' teaching skills is increasingly recognised as an important component of UK undergraduate medical curricula and, in consequence, there is renewed interest in the potential benefits of cross-year peer tutoring. Whilst several studies have described the use of cross-year peer tutoring in undergraduate medical courses, its use in the clinical setting is less well reported, particularly the effects of peer tutoring on volunteer tutors' views of teachers and teaching. This study explored the effects of participation in a cross-year peer tutoring programme in clinical examination skills ('OSCE tutor') on volunteer tutors' own skills and on their attitudes towards teachers and teaching. Volunteer tutors were final year MBChB students who took part in the programme as part of a Student Selected Component (SSC). Tutees were year 3 MBChB students preparing for their end of year 'OSCE' examination. Pre and post participation questionnaires, including both Likert-type and open response questions, were used. Paired data was compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. All tests were two-tailed with 5% significance level. Tutors reflected their cohort in terms of gender but were drawn from among the more academically successful final year students. Most had previous teaching experience. They were influenced to participate in 'OSCE tutor' by a desire to improve their own teaching and associated generic skills and by contextual factors relating to the organisation or previous experience of the OSCE tutor programme. Issues relating to longer term career aspirations were less important. After the event, tutors felt that participation had enhanced their skills in various areas, including practical teaching skills, confidence in speaking to groups and communication skills; and that as a result of taking part, they were now more likely to undertake further teacher training and to make teaching a major part of their career. However, whilst a number of students

  1. Unlearning How to Teach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliam, Erica

    2008-01-01

    The twenty-first century demands not only that we learn new forms of social engagement but also that we "unlearn" habits that have been useful in the past but may no longer be valuable to the future. Teachers have "un-learned" the role of "Sage-on-the-stage" as the dominent model of teaching, and the shift to "Guide-on-the-side" has served an…

  2. Teaching trainers to incorporate evidence-based medicine (EBM) teaching in clinical practice: the EU-EBM project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangaratinam, Shakila; Barnfield, Gemma; Weinbrenner, Susanne; Meyerrose, Berit; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Horvath, Andrea R; Zanrei, Gianni; Kunz, Regina; Suter, Katja; Walczak, Jacek; Kaleta, Anna; Oude Rengerink, Katrien; Gee, Harry; Mol, Ben W J; Khan, Khalid S

    2009-09-10

    Evidence based medicine (EBM) is considered an integral part of medical training, but integration of teaching various EBM steps in everyday clinical practice is uncommon. Currently EBM is predominantly taught through theoretical courses, workshops and e-learning. However, clinical teachers lack confidence in teaching EBM in workplace and are often unsure of the existing opportunities for teaching EBM in the clinical setting. There is a need for continuing professional development (CPD) courses that train clinical trainers to teach EBM through on-the-job training by demonstration of applied EBM real time in clinical practice. We developed such a course to encourage clinically relevant teaching of EBM in post-graduate education in various clinical environments. We devised an e-learning course targeting trainers with EBM knowledge to impart educational methods needed to teach application of EBM teaching in commonly used clinical settings. The curriculum development group comprised experienced EBM teachers, clinical epidemiologists, clinicians and educationalists from institutions in seven European countries. The e-learning sessions were designed to allow participants (teachers) to undertake the course in the workplace during short breaks within clinical activities. An independent European steering committee provided input into the process. The curriculum defined specific learning objectives for teaching EBM by exploiting educational opportunities in six different clinical settings. The e-modules incorporated video clips that demonstrate practical and effective methods of EBM teaching in everyday clinical practice. The course encouraged focussed teaching activities embedded within a trainer's personal learning plan and documentation in a CPD portfolio for reflection. This curriculum will help senior clinicians to identify and make the best use of available opportunities in everyday practice in clinical situations to teach various steps of EBM and demonstrate their

  3. Can virtual reality increase the realism of role plays used to teach college women sexual coercion and rape-resistance skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouriles, Ernest N; McDonald, Renee; Kullowatz, Antje; Rosenfield, David; Gomez, Gabriella S; Cuevas, Anthony

    2009-12-01

    The present study evaluated whether virtual reality (VR) can enhance the realism of role plays designed to help college women resist sexual attacks. Sixty-two female undergraduate students were randomly assigned to either the Role Play (RP) or Virtual Role Play (VRP) conditions, which were differentiated only by the use of VR technology in the VRP condition. A multimethod assessment strategy was used to evaluate the effects of VR on the experienced realism of sexually threatening role plays. Realism was assessed by participant self-reports of negative affect and perceptions of realism, direct observation of participants' verbal displays of negative affect during the role plays, and measurements of participant heart rate during the role plays. Results indicated that VR can indeed heighten the realism of sexually threatening role plays. Discussion focuses on issues regarding the use of VR-enhanced role plays for helping college women resist sexual attacks.

  4. CONHECIMENTO MATEMÁTICO PARA ENSINAR: PAPEL DA PLANIFICAÇÃO E DA REFLEXÃO NA FORMAÇÃO DE PROFESSORES. MATHEMATICAL KNOWLEDGE FOR TEACHING: THE ROLE OF PLANNING AND REFLECTION IN THE TRAINING OF TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serrazina, Maria de Lurdes Marquês

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Neste ensaio discuto o conhecimento matemático para ensinar, em particular no caso do professor que ensina matemática nos primeiros anos de escolaridade, nomeadamente, o papel que a sequência planificação – ação – reflexão pode ter no desenvolvimento e consolidação desse conhecimento. Começo por discutir o que se espera do professor como professor de Matemática, ilustrando com exemplos concretos, que pretendem mostrar que não basta ao professor saber a Matemática que ensina, mas tem também de saber como a ensinar e como avaliar as aprendizagens que daí resultam. Discuto depois o papel da planificação da atividade letiva e da reflexão sobre a prática para o desenvolvimento do conhecimento profissional do professor. Relativamente à planificação é discutido o constructo “trajetória de aprendizagem” e as suas componentes, em especial as sequências de ensino e o papel do professor no seu desenvolvimento. A reflexão sobre a prática, tendo como referência a planificação realizada previamente, é fundamental neste processo. O ensaio termina com a apresentação e discussão de um caso, o da professora Maria, uma professora com uma larga experiência, formanda do Programa de Formação Contínua em Matemática, analisando, a partir do seu portefólio escrito, a planificação e correspondente reflexão sobre duas aulas num 2.º ano de escolaridade.In this paper I discuss the mathematics knowledge for teaching, particularly the case of the teacher who teaches mathematics in the early years of schooling, specifically the role of the sequence planning – action – reflection may have in the development and consolidation of this knowledge. First I discuss what is expected of the teacher as a mathematics teacher, illustrated with concrete examples, which intend to show that for a teacher it is not enough to know the mathematics he/she has to teach, but also how to teach it and how to assess pupils’ learning. Then I

  5. Can Virtual Reality Increase the Realism of Role Plays Used to Teach College Women Sexual Coercion and Rape-Resistance Skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouriles, Ernest N.; McDonald, Renee; Kullowatz, Antje; Rosenfield, David; Gomez, Gabriella S.; Cuevas, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    The present study evaluated whether virtual reality (VR) can enhance the realism of role plays designed to help college women resist sexual attacks. Sixty-two female undergraduate students were randomly assigned to either the Role Play (RP) or Virtual Role Play (VRP) conditions, which were differentiated only by the use of VR technology in the VRP…

  6. Undertaking a Collaborative Rapid Realist Review to Investigate What Works in the Successful Implementation of a Frail Older Person's Pathway.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2018-01-25

    We addressed the research question "what factors enable the successful development and implementation of a frail older person\\'s pathway within the acute setting". A rapid realist review (RRR) was conducted by adopting the RAMESES standards. We began with a sample of 232 articles via database searches supplemented with 94 additional records including inputs from a twitter chat and a hospital site visit. Our final sample consisted of 18 documents. Following review and consensus by an expert panel we identified a conceptual model of context-mechanism-(resources)-outcomes. There was overall agreement frailty should be identified at the front door of the acute hospital. Significant challenges identified related to organisational boundaries both within the acute setting and externally, the need to shift outcomes to patient orientated ones, to support staff to sustain the pathway by providing ongoing education and by providing role clarity. RRRs can support research such as the systematic approach to improving care for frail older adults (SAFE) study by producing accounts of what works based on a wide range of sources and innovative engagement with stakeholders. It is evident from our provisional model that numerous factors need to combine and interact to enable and sustain a successful frail older person\\'s pathway.

  7. Teaching Science with Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gornostaeva, Svetlana

    2015-04-01

    This is a short introduction about me, description of different teaching methods, which is used in my teaching practice of Geography, biology and GIS systems education. The main part is tell about practical lesson with lab Vernier. My name is Svetlana Gornostaeva. I am a geography, biology and GIS systems teacher in Tallinn Mustjõe Gymnasium (www.mjg.ee) and private school Garant (http://www.erakoolgarant.ee/). In my teaching practice I do all to show that science courses are very important, interesting, and do not difficult. I use differentiated instruction methods also consider individual needs. At lessons is used different active teaching methods such as individual work of various levels of difficulty, team works, creative tasks, interactive exercises, excursions, role-playing games, meeting with experts. On my lessons I use visual aids (maps, a collection of rocks and minerals, herbarium, posters, Vernier data logger). My favorite teaching methods are excursions, meeting with experts and practical lesson with lab Vernier. A small part of my job demonstrate my poster. In the next abstract I want to bring a one practical work with Vernier which I do with my students, when we teach a theme "Atmosphere and climate". OUTDOOR LEARNING. SUBJECT "ATMOSPHERE AND CLIMATE". WEATHER OBSERVATIONS WITH VERNIER DATA LOGGER. The aim: students teach to use Vernier data logger and measure climatic parameters such as: temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, solar radiation, ultraviolet light radiation, wind speed. In working process pupils also teach work together, observe natural processes, analyze. Children are working by small groups, 4-5 in each group. Every one should personally measure all parameters and put numbers into the table. After it group observe cloudiness, analyze table and give conclusion "Is at this moment dominates cyclone or anticyclone ?". Children really like this kind of job. Vernier data logger it is really fantastic tool. It is mobile lab. This

  8. A communist teaching experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skak, Morten

    At the beginning of the course, students were told all the examination questions for the oral examination, and that they, in groups, should produce a report with a) A pedagogical presentation of (the selected part of) the theory/syllabus b) This theory put into perspective by self-produced empiri...... of teaching is an improvement? I can only show two (poor?) methods: a) asking the students and b) use their examination results.......-student teaching. A form of mutual teaching where (student)teachers have good knowledge of the students’ learning problems. The role of the (conventional) teacher: To initiate and supervise the process and act as “final” teacher when this is required. The experiment produced various problems and the students...... disliked the course design. The lack of students’ ability to get credit for own qualifications was seen as a major problem. My presentation will go through the experiment. The ultimate goal of teaching is to produce people who can raise welfare in our societies. How can we measure whether or not a new form...

  9. Neuroendocrine and Immune Responses Undertake Different Fates following Tryptophan or Methionine Dietary Treatment: Tales from a Teleost Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Azeredo

    2017-09-01

    with a high production of brain monoamine and cortisol levels, suggests that tryptophan might mediate regulatory mechanisms of neuroendocrine and immune systems cooperation. Overall, more studies are needed to ascertain the role of methionine and tryptophan in modulating (stimulate or regulate fish immune and neuroendocrine responses.

  10. Teaching of the subject "density difference caused by salinity", one of the reasons that plays role in the occurrence of currents in straits, seas and oceans by the use of a teaching material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumussoy, Verim

    2015-04-01

    different senses in geography lessons to promote effective and fun learning. Thus, geography lessons should be based on teaching principles such as 'from concrete to abstract' and 'from near-to-far' principles. Also, teaching methods such as visualization, simulation and experiment should be applied during the lessons. The use of this material will help students comprehend how subsurface currents in the straits, seas and oceans occur. By this simple experiment, students will be able to see what kind of a movement takes place under the Bosporus on which they travel by ferry and they will have the opportunity to carry it out themselves, making the lesson more fun.

  11. CREATIVE TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd. Ghofur

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this writing is asking English teachers to make a creative teaching, to endeavor increasing their quality in teaching learning process. In these cas the classroom teacher can choose the methods and materials according to the needs of the learners, the preferences teacher, and the constrainst of the school or educational setting and the methods is considered in terms of its links to more general linguistics, psychological, or educational traditions. Finally it will enable teachers to become better informed about the nature, strengths, and weaknesses of methods and approaches so they can better arrive at their own judgement and decisions.

  12. Teaching artfully

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemi, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution I address the challenges and rewards that are brought by teaching creatively in higher education. By looking auto-ethnographically at my own practice as educator at undergraduate and graduate programs in Denmark, I describe a number of creative educational tools: metaphor......-building by means of artefacts, integrated use of visuals in lectures, and dramaturgical structure in educational design. My objective in teaching creatively is to inspire my students, who are educators-to-be or facilitators of educational processes and are used to problem-based-learning approaches (PBL), to (more...

  13. COMMUNICATIVE LANGUAGE TEACHING AND ITS MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT THE PRACTICE IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING (ELT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Diana

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Communicative Language Teaching (CLT has been accepted as one of the teaching methods by numerous language teachers due to its major focus on developing learners’ communicative competence. This paper aims to describe communicative language teaching, misinterpretations about its practice and the factors leading to teachers’ misconceptions. It shows four misinterpreted beliefs of the implementation of communicative language teaching: communicative skills, teacher’s role in communicative activities, fluency and accuracy as the main goals and teaching techniques. It then presents three reasons that might lead to teachers’ misinterpretations concerning the practice of CLT. Teachers do not have enough training and  adequate resources.

  14. Obstacles to researching the researchers: a case study of the ethical challenges of undertaking methodological research investigating the reporting of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Joanne E; Herbison, G Peter; Roth, Paul; Paul, Charlotte

    2010-03-21

    Recent cohort studies of randomised controlled trials have provided evidence of within-study selective reporting bias; where statistically significant outcomes are more likely to be more completely reported compared to non-significant outcomes. Bias resulting from selective reporting can impact on meta-analyses, influencing the conclusions of systematic reviews, and in turn, evidence based clinical practice guidelines.In 2006 we received funding to investigate if there was evidence of within-study selective reporting in a cohort of RCTs submitted to New Zealand Regional Ethics Committees in 1998/99. This research involved accessing ethics applications, their amendments and annual reports, and comparing these with corresponding publications. We did not plan to obtain informed consent from trialists to view their ethics applications for practical and scientific reasons. In November 2006 we sought ethical approval to undertake the research from our institutional ethics committee. The Committee declined our application on the grounds that we were not obtaining informed consent from the trialists to view their ethics application. This initiated a seventeen month process to obtain ethical approval. This publication outlines what we planned to do, the issues we encountered, discusses the legal and ethical issues, and presents some potential solutions. Methodological research such as this has the potential for public benefit and there is little or no harm for the participants (trialists) in undertaking it. Further, in New Zealand, there is freedom of information legislation, which in this circumstance, unambiguously provided rights of access and use of the information in the ethics applications. The decision of our institutional ethics committee defeated this right and did not recognise the nature of this observational research. Methodological research, such as this, can be used to develop processes to improve quality in research reporting. Recognition of the potential

  15. Teaching Strings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    Intended primarily for use by instrumental music teachers who do not have a major concentration in strings, this guide provides pertinent basic resources, materials, teaching--learning expectation, and a general overall guide to achievement levels at various stages of development. Discussions are presented of Choosing the Proper Method Book,…

  16. Teaching Typography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Communication: Journalism Education Today, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Outlines nine objectives students should be able to accomplish after completing the activities in the unit on typography presented in the previous articles in this journal. Offers eight tips for teaching typography. Includes a short list of books about typography and a list of seven organizations. (SR)

  17. Teaching Pronunciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, John

    2013-01-01

    Murphy provides a comprehensive overview of teaching pronunciation with a focus on thought groups and prominence. Understanding thought groups, or how speakers use clusters of words to best fit the communicative situation, is essential for clearer understanding of most components of English pronunciation that are teachable in ESL/EFL classrooms.…

  18. Teaching "Tropismes."

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Kevin C.

    1988-01-01

    An approach to teaching Nathalie Sarrault's "Tropismes" in second-, third-, and fourth-year French class is outlined. The technique begins with analysis of elements of the tropism, establishing patterns, and requiring students to write a companion tropism to one of the author's. (MSE)

  19. Differentiated teaching and teacher development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard-Sørensen, Lotte

    . The first part (2014) was a sociological, critical practice research project on teachers’ practices (Bourdieu, 1977; Bourdieu & Wacquant, 1992) and the second part (2015) was a collaborative practice research project on the possibilities for developing teaching practices in diverse classrooms (Norwich...... understanding of their role as teachers.In the second part of the research process teachers have been presented for critical perspectives on their teaching practice. In research-labs between teachers and researchers new ways of collaborating with the students (in preparing for lessons, in lessons......Research questions, objectives and theoretical frameworkThis paper reports from a research project on differentiated teaching and the professional development of teaching in diverse Classrooms. The study was conducted from January 2014 until December 2015. The study consists of two different parts...

  20. The Methodology Factor in Teaching ESP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biria, Reza; Tahririan, M. Hassan

    1994-01-01

    The efficacy of different methods of teaching English for Special Purposes (ESP) was studied, with focus on whether the communicative method is compatible with the goals of ESP teaching. The role on ESP learning of general English taught at high school was also examined. (Contains 15 references.) (LB)

  1. Tasks for Integrating Language and Culture Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Peter; Rucynski, John, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the role of culture in language teaching and provides activities for introducing culture in the classroom, focusing on teaching context and methodology to integrate culture. The authors outline five activities that can be adapted to the language level and interests of students. Instructions for each activity include language…

  2. Mainstreaming academic literacy teaching: Implications for how ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article draws on research into the role of academic literacies within a range of disciplines and its implications for academic literacy teaching in Higher Education. The study explored ways of transforming current academic literacy teaching practices with a view to developing better synergy between the academic ...

  3. Assessing Graduate Teaching Assistants' Beliefs and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Jennifer; Powell, Darcey N.; Rouamba, Nathalie H.

    2016-01-01

    Graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) play a crucial role in North American colleges. At a mid-Atlantic, land grant institution, GTAs instruct 34,000 undergraduates per semester. Given this scope, GTAs exert a powerful influence on undergraduate learning, yet little is known about their teaching beliefs in relation to their classroom practices. This…

  4. Advertising and the Economy: A Teaching Package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor and Gamble Co., Cincinnati, OH.

    This teaching packet is designed to enrich lessons and motivate students, and is based on real-life marketing problems. The packet includes a booklet containing background for instructors on advertising's crucial economic role and its history in the United States, eight reproducible lessons, and teaching tips for each lesson. The packet also…

  5. Foreign Language Teaching and Cultural Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Raja T., Ed.; And Others

    A collection of works on the role of cultural identity in second language learning and teaching includes: "Linguas estrangeiras e ideologia" (Roberto Ballalai); "Cultural Identity and Bilinguality" (Josiane F. Hamers, Michel Blanc); "Foreign Language Teaching and Cultural Identity" (Lakshmie K. Cumaranatunge);…

  6. Teaching Health Care in Introductory Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Health care is one of the economy's biggest industries, so it is natural that the health care industry should play some role in the teaching of introductory economics. There are many ways that health care can appear in such a context: in the teaching of microeconomics, as a macroeconomic issue, to learn about social welfare, and even to learn how…

  7. Learning by Teaching: Developing Transferable Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stollhans, Sascha

    2016-01-01

    "Learning by teaching" (German: "Lernen durch Lehren," commonly abbreviated as "LdL") is a teaching and learning approach which was developed by the French language teacher Jean-Pol Martin in German schools in the 1980s (Martin, 1985). The method sees students in the role of the teacher, and enhances their learning…

  8. Learner Outcomes in Science in South Africa: Role of the Nature of Learner Difficulties with the Language for Learning and Teaching Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyoo, Samuel Ouma

    2017-08-01

    Paul Leslie Gardner pioneered the study of student difficulties with everyday words presented in the science context (Gardner 1971); several similarly designed studies (e.g. Cassels and Johnstone 1985; Tao in Research in Science Education, 24, 322-330, 1994; Farell and Ventura in Language and Education, 12(4), 243-254, 1998; Childs and O'Farell in Chemistry Education: Research and Practice, 4(3), 233-247, 2003) have since been reported in literature. This article draws from an exploratory study of the difficulties South African High School physical science learners encounter with everyday English words when presented in the science context. The participants (1107 learners and 35 respective physical science teachers) were drawn from 35 public secondary schools in Johannesburg area of South Africa. Data were obtained through a word test to participant learners followed by group interviews but face-to-face interviews with each physical science teacher. This study has revealed that in similar ways as have been reported in each of the studies so far, South African learners also face difficulties with meanings of everyday words presented in a science context. The main source of difficulties encountered was learner inability to distinguish between the meanings of familiar everyday words as used in everyday parlance from the `new' meanings of the same everyday words when used in the science context. Interpretations of learner interview responses revealed that fewer difficulties would have been experienced by learners if science teachers generally explained the context meanings of the words as used during science teaching. The findings suggest that focusing on contextual proficiency more than on general proficiency in the language of learning and teaching (LOLT) during teaching perhaps holds more promise for enhanced learning and achievement in science. Steps necessary to raise teacher awareness of the potential impact of context on meanings of everyday words of the LOLT

  9. TEACHING ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE TO FOREIGNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Claudia Horea

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Teaching English as a foreign language requires very different approaches if we consider the recipients of the didactic process. Concerning the practical aspects of the primary task of a language instructor, namely teaching, skills of all sorts are required in order to be able to use best methods and most appropriate resources and up to date materials and devices. Moreover, to teach students of your own mother tongue is one very distinct thing from teaching foreigners. These two categories, namely students of the same mother tongue as their teacher and foreigners, have two things in common, namely: first, they are the subjects on whom the activity of teaching English is to be applied and second, this language is not their native tongue. These facts can thus be reduced to one idea: addressing to recipients of EFL teaching. Still, there is a big difference between teaching the first category mentioned, those who have the same mother tongue as the teacher and teaching the second category, foreigners, to whom not even the vaguest hints can be provided in other language than English. There comes a new challenge, an extra endeavour for an even more special approach. This study undertakes to present some of the distinctions entailed at the level of teaching methods and to parallel the diverse methodological approaches for the two situations presented. Are the four skills that language acquisition assumes to be taught distinctly and shall the approaches in each particular situation differ from one case to the other or not too much? It takes some distinct features to be or, better saying, to become a teacher of languages; and to teach English as foreign language to foreigners is a new development within this typology, a diverse dimension. New levels of character traits are instinctively reached by instructors in order to better cope, unconsciously, psychologically and emotionally, with the upgraded’ challenges.

  10. Using non-scripted role-play to teach speaking skills: A study of English conversation of Thai college students at Yala Rajbhat University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuchanan Naksevee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the use of the non-scripted role-play activities to improve the oral performance of Thai college students with high and low English proficiency. It attempted to address the following questions: a Do high and low proficiency students perform differently in non-scripted role-play based on scores obtained from pre- and post-tests? If so, how? ; and b Can non-scripted role-play enhance the students’ speaking skills? Which group of students performs better in the non-scripted role-play? The data examined were obtained from tape recorded role-play of 16 non-English-major students (8 each proficiency level during their pre- and post-tests at Yala Rajabhat University in Southern Thailand. The role- play conversations were transcribed and analyzed following the Conversation Analysis (CA framework. The study found that the post test scores of both groups were significantly higher than their pre-test scores at the level of 0.00. The t-test result also revealed that the low proficiency students showed a significant degree of speaking improvement in terms of manner of expression and ability to interact at the level of 0.04 and 0.02 respectively. On the other hand, while improving on the same aspects, the high proficiency students also showed significant improvement in terms of fluency (sig = 0.02. The findings indicated that non- scripted role-play activities helped improve the students’ speaking skills and develop their ability to use the language naturally. Close single-case analyses additionally revealed that despite being traditionally taught conversation lessons with more focus on form and meaning, the participants trained with role-play noticeably improved on the language functions of genuine conversation. It was recommended that role-play activities be used in company with function-focused conversation lessons for the learners’ greater benefits.

  11. Teaching War Literature, Teaching Peace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Janet M.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores literature taught in three different courses and the peace education approaches used for each, including epics in literature courses, Vietnam War literature, and literature of anger and hope. The author recommends the teaching of war literature as an essential part of a peace education curriculum. Devastating events such as…

  12. El papel de la ética en la enseñanza de lenguas (The Role of Ethics in Language Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Guillermo Barrantes Montero

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Se propone el fundamento de la dimensión ética en la enseñanza de lenguas. Se señalan las divergencias en el ethos de las culturas moderna y post-moderna para contextualizar el tema. A partir de ello se resalta la condición de persona como valor máximo a cuya promoción integral han de orientarse las diversas acciones humanas. Dado que la enseñanza de lenguas implica una confrontación entre mismidad y la otredad, resulta imperioso recuperar su identidad como disciplina humanística –más allá del instrumentalismo positivista propio de la expansión del capitalismo económico financiero– con el fin de cimentar la valorabilidad ética de las acciones que se toman en ella. An attempt is made to provide a basis for the ethical dimension of language teaching. Discrepancies about ethos in modern and post-modern cultures are discussed to contextualize the topic. That will be the starting point to give the person as such the highest value, toward which all integral development of human actions must be oriented. Since language teaching implies a confrontation between sameness and otherness, it is crucial to recover its identity as a humanistic discipline–beyond the positivistic instrumentalism characteristic of current financial economic capitalism–with the aim of establishing the ethical value of any actions taken within its scope.

  13. Designing Of Lectures through Systemic Approach to Teaching and Learning, a Model for (SATL) MethodologyConcepts play a vital role in enabling chemist to deliver. The recently developing concept based teaching methods are likely to play a pivotal role towards the efforts for promoting understanding of chemical concepts and assimilation of vital theoretical foundations of chemistry. A. F. M. Fahmy and J. J. Lagowski are the leading figures in a worldwide derive towards concept building of young generation through this novel mode of teaching and learning. However, their efforts, till recently have been mostly organic chemistry specific. Nevertheless, SALTC teaching methods are equally applicable to various other disciplines in chemistry. SATLC methodology can also be thus used to overcome the problems faced by students in understanding the efficacy of any chemical entity for a specific and desired chemical action. This presentation outlines possible applications of SATLC technique to the concepts related to a number of aspects of Physical Chemistry that are to be put together in one unit for facilitating a chemical compound’s application in any chemical change desired by any researcher.

    OpenAIRE

    *M. Nazir; I. I. Naqvi

    2012-01-01

    Concepts play a vital role in enabling chemist to deliver. The recently developing concept based teaching methods are likely to play a pivotal role towards the efforts for promoting understanding of chemical concepts and assimilation of vital theoretical foundations of chemistry. A. F. M. Fahmy and J. J. Lagowski are the leading figures in a worldwide derive towards concept building of young generation through this novel mode of teaching and learning. However, their efforts, till recently hav...

  14. Investigation of Changes Implemented into Teaching Modern History in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak-Fabrykowski, Krystyna Teresa; Trzcinska, Eleonora

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze teaching of modern history in Poland and the teachers' role in the process of democratization. Forty-eight high school history teachers responded to a questionnaire investigating the curricula, textbooks, supplemental teaching materials and methods of teaching. The results demonstrate that since 1989 these…

  15. The Teaching Artist Field: A Multidimensional History in Outline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannenbaum, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Teaching artists work in a field with a long, rich history, and many roots and strands of development. One of TAJ's roles is to try to make this history more accessible and useful to working teaching artists. In this article, the author outlines the evolution of teaching artistry in the United States.

  16. Teaching Sound-Design @ENSCI les Ateliers

    OpenAIRE

    Cahen, Roland

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The purpose of this paper is to tell the story of teaching Sound-Design at ENSCI les Ateliers and to reflect upon the role Sound-Design practice and teaching has today and the original approach that we developed to teach designers how to work with sound. In order to put into perspective the actual teaching practice at ENSCI les ateliers, this paper presents the actual context of this new discipline of design, show how it has recently become more important and give a br...

  17. Relationships between teaching faculty and teaching librarians

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Linda S

    2014-01-01

    Every librarian who teaches in an academic library setting understands the complexities involved in partnering with teaching faculty. Relationships Between Teaching Faculty and Teaching Librarians recounts the efforts of librarians and faculty working together in disciplines across the board to create and sustain connections crucial to the success of library instruction. This unique collection of essays examines various types of partnerships between librarians and faculty (networking, coordination, and collaboration) and addresses the big issues involved, including teaching within an academic

  18. Conditions and Motivations to Undertake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flor Ángela Marulanda Valencia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at deepening in the analysis of motivations shown by a group of entrepreneurs in Medellin, Antioquia. It also describes the different perceptions about the enablers and obstacles for the development of entrepreneurship in appropriate environments to promote it. It was found that independence was the principal motivation for entrepreneurship and that the city offered the most favourable environment to foster it. Additionally, it was found that the most important obstacle to develop it was the difficulties to access a bank credit.

  19. Teaching Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay Young McChesney

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article is targeted to faculty teaching race and ethnicity, racism, diversity, and multicultural courses. Many students equate race with skin color. The premise of this article is that to teach students about the social construction of race, teachers must first know enough science to teach students that race is not biological. This article examines the biology of race by showing how advances in DNA sequencing led to genetics research that supports arguments that race is not biological. DNA comparisons show that all human populations living today are one species that came from Africa. The article explains the migration of humans out of Africa about 60,000 years ago and how they populated Australia, then Asia, Europe, and the Americas. The article shows how recent research maps the timing of the migration and admixture of specific population groups into Europe and India. The article shows how a mutation in one nucleotide can result in a trait like blue eyes, or Hemoglobin S (which confers resistance to malaria, which can be subject to evolution through natural selection. DNA comparisons show how natural selection shaped the genetics of human skin color to adapt to less UV light in the northern latitudes of Europe and Asia. The article shows that there is no relation between skin color or other “racial” characteristics and complex traits like intelligence. The science in this article will help teachers explain that as race is not biological, race is socially constructed and culturally enacted.

  20. Teaching of Geometry in Bulgaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankov, Kiril

    2013-01-01

    Geometry plays an important role in the school mathematics curriculum all around the world. Teaching of geometry varies a lot (Hoyls, Foxman, & Kuchemann, 2001). Many countries revise the objectives, the content, and the approaches to the geometry in school. Studies of the processes show that there are not common trends of these changes…