WorldWideScience

Sample records for understood evaluating observations

  1. How flares can be understood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severny, A.B.

    1977-01-01

    Specific features of the flare phenomenon which are important for understanding of flares are the following: (1) Fine structure of visible emission of flares, especially at the very beginning and in the pre-flare active region. This structure can be seen also in later stages of development as bright points, some of which exist from the flare beginning (Babin's observations at Crimea, 1972-1976). (2) Turbulent motion with velocities up to 250-300 km s -1 as can be estimated from broadening of emission lines. (3) Predominantly red asymmetry of emission lines in the explosive phase and during further development of flares. (4) 'Supersonic' velocities and supergravitational accelerations of separate moving masses of the flare plasma. (5) The appearance of flares in areas with high grad H, exceeding 0.1 G km -1 which is equivalent to regions of electric currents > approximately 10 11 A. (6) Strong variations of net magnetic flux through the active region, as it follows from Meudon, Crimean, and Sacramento Peak (Rust's) observations. (Auth.)

  2. Poorly Understood Aspects of Striated Muscle Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alf Månsson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle contraction results from cyclic interactions between the contractile proteins myosin and actin, driven by the turnover of adenosine triphosphate (ATP. Despite intense studies, several molecular events in the contraction process are poorly understood, including the relationship between force-generation and phosphate-release in the ATP-turnover. Different aspects of the force-generating transition are reflected in the changes in tension development by muscle cells, myofibrils and single molecules upon changes in temperature, altered phosphate concentration, or length perturbations. It has been notoriously difficult to explain all these events within a given theoretical framework and to unequivocally correlate observed events with the atomic structures of the myosin motor. Other incompletely understood issues include the role of the two heads of myosin II and structural changes in the actin filaments as well as the importance of the three-dimensional order. We here review these issues in relation to controversies regarding basic physiological properties of striated muscle. We also briefly consider actomyosin mutation effects in cardiac and skeletal muscle function and the possibility to treat these defects by drugs.

  3. Donors in Semiconductors - are they Understood in Electronic Era?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmochowski, Janusz E

    2007-01-01

    The physics of semiconductors and contemporary electronics cannot be understood without impurities. The hydrogen-like shallow donor (and acceptor) state of electron (hole) bound by Coulomb electrostatic force of excess charge of impurity is used to control conductivity of semiconductors and construct semiconductor diodes, transistors and numerous types of semiconductor electronic and optoelectronic devices, including lasers. Recently, surprisingly, the physics of impurity donors appeared to be much reacher. Experimental evidence has been provided for universal existence of other types of electronic states of the same donor impurity: i) mysterious, deep, DX-type state resulting in metastability - slow hysteresis phenomena - understood as two-electron, acceptor-like state of donor impurity, formed upon large lattice distortion or rearrangement around impurity and accompanying capture of second electron, resulting in negative electron correlation energy U; ii) deep, localized, fully symmetric, A1, one-electron donor state of substitutional impurity. The latter state can be formed from the 'ordinary' shallow hydrogen-like state in the process of strong localization of electron by short range, local potential of impurity core, preserving full (A 1 ) symmetry of the substitutional impurity in the host lattice. The 'anticrossing' of the two A 1 (shallow hydrogenic and deep localized) energy levels upon transformation is observed. All types of electronic states of impurity can be universally observed for the same donor impurity and mutual transformation between different states occur upon changing experimental conditions. The knowledge about existence and properties of these n ew , molecular type, donor states in semiconductors seems still await general recognition and positive application in contemporary material and device science and engineering

  4. Evaluating Teacher Preparation Using Graduates' Observational Ratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronfeldt, Matthew; Campbell, Shanyce L.

    2016-01-01

    Despite growing calls for more accountability of teacher education programs (TEPs), there is little consensus about how to evaluate them. This study investigates the potential for using observational ratings of program completers to evaluate TEPs. Drawing on statewide data on almost 9,500 program completers, representing 44 providers (183…

  5. How Self-Reliance Is Understood: Viewpoints from One Local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DrNneka

    Tanzania's 1967 policy of self-reliance (Hultin 1985, p.8). Before looking at the way self-reliance is understood in rural Malawi during a process of development, it may be beneficial to look at some of the tensions between micro and macro forms of development. Leading to Self-Reliance. Development Aid is a term that has ...

  6. How self-reliance is understood: viewpoints from one local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    How self-reliance is understood: viewpoints from one local community in Malawi. ... model that resists dependence on external aid, empowers community development, and provides opportunities to sustain development activity through local initiative, can be employed to increase social capital leading to sustainable growth.

  7. Urachal tumour: case report of a poorly understood carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallarino Luigi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urachal carcinoma is an uncommon neoplasm associated with poor prognosis. Case presentation A 45-year-old man was admitted with complaints of abdominal pain and pollakisuria. A soft mass was palpable under his navel. TC-scan revealed a 11 × 6 cm tumor, which was composed of a cystic lesion arising from the urachus and a solid mass component at the urinary bladder dome. The tumor was removed surgically. Histological examination detected poor-differentiated adenocarcinoma, which had invaded the urinary bladder. The patient has been followed up without recurrence for 6 months. Conclusion The urachus is the embryological remnant of urogenital sinus and allantois. Involution usually happens before birth and urachus is present as a median umbilical ligament. The pathogenesis of urachal tumours is not fully understood. Surgery is the treatment of choice and role of adjuvant treatment is not clearly understood.

  8. Teacher Observation: Evaluation Report and Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worth, Jack; Sizmur, Juliet; Walker, Matthew; Bradshaw, Sally; Styles, Ben

    2017-01-01

    The Teacher Observation intervention aimed to improve teacher effectiveness through structured peer observation. Teachers observe and are observed by their peers a number of times over the course of two years. It was delivered by the Centre for Market and Public Organisation (CMPO) at the University of Bristol. CMPO researchers trained lead…

  9. Evaluation of observables in statistical multifragmentation theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    The canonical formulation of equilibrium statistical multifragmentation is examined. It is shown that the explicit construction of observables (average values) by sampling the partition probabilities is unnecessary insofar as closed expressions in the form of recursion relations can be obtained quite easily. Such expressions may conversely be used to verify the sampling algorithms

  10. Default options in the ICU: widely used but insufficiently understood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Joanna; Halpern, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Default options dramatically influence the behavior of decision makers and may serve as effective decision support tools in the ICU. Their use in medicine has increased in an effort to improve efficiency, reduce errors, and harness the potential of healthcare technology. Recent findings Defaults often fall short of their predicted influence when employed in critical care settings as quality improvement interventions. Investigations reporting the use of defaults are often limited by variations in the relative effect across sites. Preimplementation experiments and long-term monitoring studies are lacking. Summary Defaults in the ICU may help or harm patients and clinical efficiency depending on their format and use. When constructing and encountering defaults, providers should be aware of their powerful and complex influences on decision making. Additional evaluations of the appropriate creation of healthcare defaults and their resulting intended and unintended consequences are needed. PMID:25203352

  11. Emotions are understood from biological motion across remote cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Carolyn; Walker, Trent T; Memmi, Sarah; Wheatley, Thalia

    2017-04-01

    Patterns of bodily movement can be used to signal a wide variety of information, including emotional states. Are these signals reliant on culturally learned cues or are they intelligible across individuals lacking exposure to a common culture? To find out, we traveled to a remote Kreung village in Ratanakiri, Cambodia. First, we recorded Kreung portrayals of 5 emotions through bodily movement. These videos were later shown to American participants, who matched the videos with appropriate emotional labels with above chance accuracy (Study 1). The Kreung also viewed Western point-light displays of emotions. After each display, they were asked to either freely describe what was being expressed (Study 2) or choose from 5 predetermined response options (Study 3). Across these studies, Kreung participants recognized Western point-light displays of anger, fear, happiness, sadness, and pride with above chance accuracy. Kreung raters were not above chance in deciphering an American point-light display depicting love, suggesting that recognizing love may rely, at least in part, on culturally specific cues or modalities other than bodily movement. In addition, multidimensional scaling of the patterns of nonverbal behavior associated with each emotion in each culture suggested that similar patterns of nonverbal behavior are used to convey the same emotions across cultures. The considerable cross-cultural intelligibility observed across these studies suggests that the communication of emotion through movement is largely shaped by aspects of physiology and the environment shared by all humans, irrespective of differences in cultural context. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Futures market observations help in property evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickles, E.

    1994-01-01

    A standard approach to the valuation of petroleum properties and to project economics requires the calculation of present value of future cash flows. The technique is well-known and widely used in property evaluations, which are crucial to the acquisition activity in which independent producers recently have been so heavily engaged. But shortcomings of the standard approach also are well-known. Two significant problems are the choice of discount rate and the need to forecast prices. The appropriate discount rate depends upon the risk involved, and the correct relationship between risk and expected return may be difficult to determine. Oil price forecasts, meanwhile, are notoriously unreliable. These problems have led to adaptation of the option-valuation technique now widely and successfully used in the financial markets to the problem of valuing real assets, such as an oil field. In this context an option is the right, but not the obligation, to buy or sell an asset at some future time for a price (the exercise price) determined at the time the option is acquired. The important parameters are equilibrium price, volatility, and convenience yield, each of which can be projected on the basis of market data close at hand. Then the values can be combined with the production profile of an oil field to mathematically estimate present value. The valuation method is described

  13. Tip of the Tongue States Increase under Evaluative Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Lori E.; Schmank, Christopher J.; Castro, Nichol; Buchanan, Tony W.

    2018-01-01

    We tested the frequent assumption that the difficulty of word retrieval increases when a speaker is being observed and evaluated. We modified the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) so that participants believed that its evaluative observation components continued throughout the duration of a subsequent word retrieval task, and measured participants'…

  14. Arizona Lesson Observation and Evaluation (ALOE): Design Test Edition, 1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargo, J. Steven; And Others

    The Arizona Lesson Observation and Evaluation (ALOE) system of evaluating teaching is presented. ALOE was developed from Arizona adaptations of the Georgia Teacher Performance Assessment Instruments and, with G. Taylor's "Functional Elements Analysis of Teaching Skills" (FEATS), forms an integrated observation package which allows…

  15. The Effect of Differentially Focused Observation on Evaluation of Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Robert A.; Prickett, Carol A.

    1987-01-01

    Reports on a research study which examined problems that occur when preservice teachers in music education observe and evaluate a classroom. Perceptions of observers assigned three different visual perspectives of a single music lesson were compared. Concludes that student observers should be given specific direction regarding interpreting…

  16. Guidelines for reporting evaluations based on observational methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portell, Mariona; Anguera, M Teresa; Chacón-Moscoso, Salvador; Sanduvete-Chaves, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Observational methodology is one of the most suitable research designs for evaluating fidelity of implementation, especially in complex interventions. However, the conduct and reporting of observational studies is hampered by the absence of specific guidelines, such as those that exist for other evaluation designs. This lack of specific guidance poses a threat to the quality and transparency of these studies and also constitutes a considerable publication hurdle. The aim of this study thus was to draw up a set of proposed guidelines for reporting evaluations based on observational methodology. The guidelines were developed by triangulating three sources of information: observational studies performed in different fields by experts in observational methodology, reporting guidelines for general studies and studies with similar designs to observational studies, and proposals from experts in observational methodology at scientific meetings. We produced a list of guidelines grouped into three domains: intervention and expected outcomes, methods, and results. The result is a useful, carefully crafted set of simple guidelines for conducting and reporting observational studies in the field of program evaluation.

  17. Evaluating Music Teachers: A Comparison of Evaluations by Observers with Varied Levels of Musical and Observational Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirokawa, Joy Ondra

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the differences in the evaluations of music teachers conducted by individuals with varying backgrounds in music and observation techniques. Part I compared evaluations completed by school administrators and music department leadership. Part II utilized the findings of Part I to create focused and…

  18. Sensitivity Analysis in Observational Research: Introducing the E-Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderWeele, Tyler J; Ding, Peng

    2017-08-15

    Sensitivity analysis is useful in assessing how robust an association is to potential unmeasured or uncontrolled confounding. This article introduces a new measure called the "E-value," which is related to the evidence for causality in observational studies that are potentially subject to confounding. The E-value is defined as the minimum strength of association, on the risk ratio scale, that an unmeasured confounder would need to have with both the treatment and the outcome to fully explain away a specific treatment-outcome association, conditional on the measured covariates. A large E-value implies that considerable unmeasured confounding would be needed to explain away an effect estimate. A small E-value implies little unmeasured confounding would be needed to explain away an effect estimate. The authors propose that in all observational studies intended to produce evidence for causality, the E-value be reported or some other sensitivity analysis be used. They suggest calculating the E-value for both the observed association estimate (after adjustments for measured confounders) and the limit of the confidence interval closest to the null. If this were to become standard practice, the ability of the scientific community to assess evidence from observational studies would improve considerably, and ultimately, science would be strengthened.

  19. Statistical evaluation of gamma-ray line observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, M. L.; Chupp, E. L.; Dunphy, P. P.; Forrest, D. J.; Ryan, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    The statistical reliability of reported positive observations of solar and cosmic gamma-ray lines has been evaluated. The relative probability that each measurement is due to a real source rather than to an accidental fluctuation in the background has been determined, and it is found that the results are statistically compelling in only a small fraction of the reported observations. At present, extreme caution must be exercised in drawing astrophysical conclusions from reports of the detection of cosmic gamma-ray lines.

  20. [Inferential evaluation of intimacy based on observation of interpersonal communication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Masanori

    2015-06-01

    How do people inferentially evaluate others' levels of intimacy with friends? We examined the inferential evaluation of intimacy based on the observation of interpersonal communication. In Experiment 1, participants (N = 41) responded to questions after observing conversations between friends. Results indicated that participants inferentially evaluated not only goodness of communication, but also intimacy between friends, using an expressivity heuristic approach. In Experiment 2, we investigated how inferential evaluation of intimacy was affected by prior information about relationships and by individual differences in face-to-face interactional ability. Participants (N = 64) were divided into prior- and no-prior-information groups and all performed the same task as in Experiment 1. Additionally, their interactional ability was assessed. In the prior-information group, individual differences had no effect on inferential evaluation of intimacy. On the other hand, in the no-prior-information group, face-to-face interactional ability partially influenced evaluations of intimacy. Finally, we discuss the fact that to understand one's social environment, it is important to observe others' interpersonal communications.

  1. WDAC Task Team on Observations for Model Evaluation: Facilitating the use of observations for CMIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waliser, D. E.; Gleckler, P. J.; Ferraro, R.; Eyring, V.; Bosilovich, M. G.; Schulz, J.; Thepaut, J. N.; Taylor, K. E.; Chepfer, H.; Bony, S.; Lee, T. J.; Joseph, R.; Mathieu, P. P.; Saunders, R.

    2015-12-01

    Observations are essential for the development and evaluation of climate models. Satellite and in-situ measurements as well as reanalysis products provide crucial resources for these purposes. Over the last two decades, the climate modeling community has become adept at developing model intercomparison projects (MIPs) that provide the basis for more systematic comparisons of climate models under common experimental conditions. A prominent example among these is the coupled MIP (CMIP). Due to its growing importance in providing input to the IPCC, the framework for CMIP, now planning CMIP6, has expanded to include a very comprehensive and precise set of experimental protocols, with an advanced data archive and dissemination system. While the number, types and sophistication of observations over the same time period have kept pace, their systematic application to the evaluation of climate models has yet to be fully exploited due to a lack of coordinated protocols for identifying, archiving, documenting and applying observational resources. This presentation will discuss activities and plans of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) Data Advisory Council's (WDAC) Task Team on Observations for Model Evaluation for facilitating the use of observations for model evaluation. The presentation will include an update on the status of the obs4MIPs and ana4MIPs projects, whose purpose is to provide a limited collection of well-established and documented observation and reanalysis datasets for comparison with Earth system models, targeting CMIP in particular. The presentation will also describe the role these activities and datasets play in the development of a set of community standard observation-based climate model performance metrics by the Working Group on Numerical Experimentation (WGNE)'s Performance Metrics Panel, as well as which CMIP6 experiments these activities are targeting, and where additional community input and contributions to these activities are needed.

  2. Congenital Vomer Agenesis: A Rare and Poorly Understood Condition Revealed by Cone Beam CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, David Jun; Lenoir, Vincent; Chatelain, Sibylle; Stefanelli, Salvatore; Becker, Minerva

    2018-02-10

    Isolated congenital vomer agenesis is a very rare and poorly understood condition. In the context of dental work-up by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), the explored volume of the facial bones occasionally reveals incidental abnormalities. We report the case of a 13-year old Caucasian female who underwent CBCT for the pre-treatment evaluation of primary failure of tooth eruption affecting the permanent right upper and inferior molars. CBCT depicted a large defect of the postero-inferior part of the nasal septum without associated soft tissue abnormality and without cranio-facial malformation or cleft palate. In the absence of a history of trauma, chronic inflammatory sinonasal disease, neoplasia and drug abuse, a posterior nasal septum defect warrants the diagnosis of vomer agenesis. A discussion of this condition and of salient CBCT features is provided.

  3. Systematic evaluation of observational methods assessing biomechanical exposures at work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takala, Esa-Pekka; Irmeli, Pehkonen; Forsman, Mikael

    2009-01-01

      Systematic evaluation of observational methods assessing biomechanical exposures at work   Esa-Pekka Takala 1, Irmeli Pehkonen 1, Mikael Forsman 2, Gert-Åke Hansson 3, Svend Erik Mathiassen 4, W. Patrick Neumann 5, Gisela Sjøgaard 6, Kaj Bo Veiersted 7, Rolf Westgaard 8, Jørgen Winkel 9   1...... University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, 9 University of Gothenburg and National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen   The aim of this project was to identify and systematically evaluate observational methods to assess workload on the musculoskeletal system. Searches...... by sorting the methods according to the several items evaluated.   Numerous methods have been developed to assess physical workload (biomechanical exposures) in order to identify hazards leading to musculoskeletal disorders, to monitor the effects of ergonomic changes, and for research. No indvidual method...

  4. Evaluation of internal noise methods for Hotelling observer models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yani; Pham, Binh T.; Eckstein, Miguel P.

    2007-01-01

    The inclusion of internal noise in model observers is a common method to allow for quantitative comparisons between human and model observer performance in visual detection tasks. In this article, we studied two different strategies for inserting internal noise into Hotelling model observers. In the first strategy, internal noise was added to the output of individual channels: (a) Independent nonuniform channel noise, (b) independent uniform channel noise. In the second strategy, internal noise was added to the decision variable arising from the combination of channel responses. The standard deviation of the zero mean internal noise was either constant or proportional to: (a) the decision variable's standard deviation due to the external noise, (b) the decision variable's variance caused by the external noise, (c) the decision variable magnitude on a trial to trial basis. We tested three model observers: square window Hotelling observer (HO), channelized Hotelling observer (CHO), and Laguerre-Gauss Hotelling observer (LGHO) using a four alternative forced choice (4AFC) signal known exactly but variable task with a simulated signal embedded in real x-ray coronary angiogram backgrounds. The results showed that the internal noise method that led to the best prediction of human performance differed across the studied model observers. The CHO model best predicted human observer performance with the channel internal noise. The HO and LGHO best predicted human observer performance with the decision variable internal noise. The present results might guide researchers with the choice of methods to include internal noise into Hotelling model observers when evaluating and optimizing medical image quality

  5. Obs4MIPS: Satellite Observations for Model Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, R.; Waliser, D. E.; Gleckler, P. J.

    2017-12-01

    This poster will review the current status of the obs4MIPs project, whose purpose is to provide a limited collection of well-established and documented datasets for comparison with Earth system models (https://www.earthsystemcog.org/projects/obs4mips/). These datasets have been reformatted to correspond with the CMIP5 model output requirements, and include technical documentation specifically targeted for their use in model output evaluation. The project holdings now exceed 120 datasets with observations that directly correspond to CMIP5 model output variables, with new additions in response to the CMIP6 experiments. With the growth in climate model output data volume, it is increasing more difficult to bring the model output and the observations together to do evaluations. The positioning of the obs4MIPs datasets within the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) allows for the use of currently available and planned online tools within the ESGF to perform analysis using model output and observational datasets without necessarily downloading everything to a local workstation. This past year, obs4MIPs has updated its submission guidelines to closely align with changes in the CMIP6 experiments, and is implementing additional indicators and ancillary data to allow users to more easily determine the efficacy of an obs4MIPs dataset for specific evaluation purposes. This poster will present the new guidelines and indicators, and update the list of current obs4MIPs holdings and their connection to the ESGF evaluation and analysis tools currently available, and being developed for the CMIP6 experiments.

  6. Evaluating Climate Models: Should We Use Weather or Climate Observations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oglesby, R. J.; Rowe, C. M.; Maasch, K. A.; Erickson, D. J.; Hays, C.

    2009-12-01

    Calling the numerical models that we use for simulations of climate change 'climate models' is a bit of a misnomer. These 'general circulation models' (GCMs, AKA global climate models) and their cousins the 'regional climate models' (RCMs) are actually physically-based weather simulators. That is, these models simulate, either globally or locally, daily weather patterns in response to some change in forcing or boundary condition. These simulated weather patterns are then aggregated into climate statistics, very much as we aggregate observations into 'real climate statistics'. Traditionally, the output of GCMs has been evaluated using climate statistics, as opposed to their ability to simulate realistic daily weather observations. At the coarse global scale this may be a reasonable approach, however, as RCM's downscale to increasingly higher resolutions, the conjunction between weather and climate becomes more problematic. We present results from a series of present-day climate simulations using the WRF ARW for domains that cover North America, much of Latin America, and South Asia. The basic domains are at a 12 km resolution, but several inner domains at 4 km have also been simulated. These include regions of complex topography in Mexico, Colombia, Peru, and Sri Lanka, as well as a region of low topography and fairly homogeneous land surface type (the U.S. Great Plains). Model evaluations are performed using standard climate analyses (e.g., reanalyses; NCDC data) but also using time series of daily station observations. Preliminary results suggest little difference in the assessment of long-term mean quantities, but the variability on seasonal and interannual timescales is better described. Furthermore, the value-added by using daily weather observations as an evaluation tool increases with the model resolution.

  7. Observational Pharmacoepidemiology in the Drug Safety and Effectiveness Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Cabrita

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Observational epidemiological studies have been used in the medicines context for more than 40 years, contributing to characterize drug use patterns and safety, efficacy and effectiveness profiles. Its use has been increased in recognition of the clinical trials limitations to assess the therapeutic and iatrogenic potential of the medicines after its commercialization. The evolution of the regulatory framework for pharmacovigilance, requiring post-marketing studies, post-authorization safety studies (PASS and the post-authorization efficacy studies (PAES to approve certain drugs, reinforced the importance of observational pharmacoepidemiology for the characterization of the medicines safety and effectiveness profiles. Pharmacoepidemiological research can be carried out from field studies designed to obtain the necessary information or in databases with health records of population samples that already contain the information. This 2nd option is more efficient and more and more frequent. Although, observational research from field studies continues to have its space, the increasing availability of databases allowed a new development to observational pharmacoepidemiology. Indeed, access to automated records databases with up-to-date information on medical prescriptions and global health care to representative population samples with long follow-up periods is a valuable tool for the study of drug use patterns and therapeutic and iatrogenic potential in routine clinical practice. In this context, observational pharmacoepidemiology reinforces its role as a scientific area particularly suitable for evaluating the safety and the effectiveness of the medicines in the “real world”, making a relevant contribution to overcome the gap in translating the evidence from the clinical trials for clinical practice.

  8. Multi-phenomenology Observation Network Evaluation Tool'' (MONET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltrogge, D.; North, P.; Vallado, D.

    2014-09-01

    Evaluating overall performance of an SSA "system-of-systems" observational network collecting against thousands of Resident Space Objects (RSO) is very difficult for typical tasking or scheduling-based analysis tools. This is further complicated by networks that have a wide variety of sensor types and phenomena, to include optical, radar and passive RF types, each having unique resource, ops tempo, competing customer and detectability constraints. We present details of the Multi-phenomenology Observation Network Evaluation Tool (MONET), which circumvents these difficulties by assessing the ideal performance of such a network via a digitized supply-vs-demand approach. Cells of each sensors supply time are distributed among RSO targets of interest to determine the average performance of the network against that set of RSO targets. Orbit Determination heuristics are invoked to represent observation quantity and geometry notionally required to obtain the desired orbit estimation quality. To feed this approach, we derive the detectability and collection rate performance of optical, radar and passive RF sensor physical and performance characteristics. We then prioritize the selected RSO targets according to object size, active/inactive status, orbit regime, and/or other considerations. Finally, the OD-derived tracking demands of each RSO of interest are levied against remaining sensor supply until either (a) all sensor time is exhausted; or (b) the list of RSO targets is exhausted. The outputs from MONET include overall network performance metrics delineated by sensor type, objects and orbits tracked, along with likely orbit accuracies which might result from the conglomerate network tracking.

  9. A conceptual framework for evaluating data suitability for observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Ning; Weng, Chunhua; Hripcsak, George

    2017-09-08

    To contribute a conceptual framework for evaluating data suitability to satisfy the research needs of observational studies. Suitability considerations were derived from a systematic literature review on researchers' common data needs in observational studies and a scoping review on frequent clinical database design considerations, and were harmonized to construct a suitability conceptual framework using a bottom-up approach. The relationships among the suitability categories are explored from the perspective of 4 facets of data: intrinsic, contextual, representational, and accessible. A web-based national survey of domain experts was conducted to validate the framework. Data suitability for observational studies hinges on the following key categories: Explicitness of Policy and Data Governance, Relevance, Availability of Descriptive Metadata and Provenance Documentation, Usability, and Quality. We describe 16 measures and 33 sub-measures. The survey uncovered the relevance of all categories, with a 5-point Likert importance score of 3.9 ± 1.0 for Explicitness of Policy and Data Governance, 4.1 ± 1.0 for Relevance, 3.9 ± 0.9 for Availability of Descriptive Metadata and Provenance Documentation, 4.2 ± 1.0 for Usability, and 4.0 ± 0.9 for Quality. The suitability framework evaluates a clinical data source's fitness for research use. Its construction reflects both researchers' points of view and data custodians' design features. The feedback from domain experts rated Usability, Relevance, and Quality categories as the most important considerations. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  10. Evaluating rainfall kinetic energy - intensity relationships with observed disdrometric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo-Martinez, Marta; Begueria, Santiago; Latorre, Borja

    2016-04-01

    Rainfall kinetic energy is required for determining erosivity, the ability of rainfall to detach soil particles and initiate erosion. Its determination relay on the use of disdrometers, i.e. devices capable of measuring the drop size distribution and velocity of falling raindrops. In the absence of such devices, rainfall kinetic energy is usually estimated with empirical expressions relating rainfall energy and intensity. We evaluated the performance of 14 rainfall energy equations in estimating one-minute rainfall energy and event total energy, in comparison with observed data from 821 rainfall episodes (more than 100 thousand one-minute observations) by means of an optical disdrometer. In addition, two sources of bias when using such relationships were evaluated: i) the influence of using theoretical terminal raindrop fall velocities instead of measured values; and ii) the influence of time aggregation (rainfall intensity data every 5-, 10-, 15-, 30-, and 60-minutes). Empirical relationships did a relatively good job when complete events were considered (R2 > 0.82), but offered poorer results for within-event (one-minute resolution) variation. Also, systematic biases where large for many equations. When raindrop size distribution was known, estimating the terminal fall velocities by empirical laws produced good results even at fine time resolution. The influence of time aggregation was very high in the estimated kinetic energy, although linear scaling may allow empirical correction. This results stress the importance of considering all these effects when rainfall energy needs to be estimated from more standard precipitation records. , and recommends the use of disdrometer data to locally determine rainfall kinetic energy.

  11. Photometric Redshifts with the LSST: Evaluating Survey Observing Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Melissa L.; Connolly, Andrew J.; Ivezić, Željko; Schmidt, Samuel J.; Jones, R. Lynne; Jurić, Mario; Daniel, Scott F.; Yoachim, Peter

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we present and characterize a nearest-neighbors color-matching photometric redshift estimator that features a direct relationship between the precision and accuracy of the input magnitudes and the output photometric redshifts. This aspect makes our estimator an ideal tool for evaluating the impact of changes to LSST survey parameters that affect the measurement errors of the photometry, which is the main motivation of our work (i.e., it is not intended to provide the “best” photometric redshifts for LSST data). We show how the photometric redshifts will improve with time over the 10 year LSST survey and confirm that the nominal distribution of visits per filter provides the most accurate photo-z results. The LSST survey strategy naturally produces observations over a range of airmass, which offers the opportunity of using an SED- and z-dependent atmospheric affect on the observed photometry as a color-independent redshift indicator. We show that measuring this airmass effect and including it as a prior has the potential to improve the photometric redshifts and can ameliorate extreme outliers, but that it will only be adequately measured for the brightest galaxies, which limits its overall impact on LSST photometric redshifts. We furthermore demonstrate how this airmass effect can induce a bias in the photo-z results, and caution against survey strategies that prioritize high-airmass observations for the purpose of improving this prior. Ultimately, we intend for this work to serve as a guide for the expectations and preparations of the LSST science community with regard to the minimum quality of photo-z as the survey progresses.

  12. Evaluation of Xerostomia in Different Psychological Disorders: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerabhadrappa, Suresh Kandagal; Chandrappa, Pramod Redder; Patil, Snehal; Roodmal, Seema Yadav; Kumarswamy, Akshay; Chappi, Mounesh Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Psychiatric diseases like anxiety, depression, schizophrenia and bipolar disorders are increasing at an alarming rate. These diseases can affect the quantity and quality of saliva leading to multiple oral diseases. Although many researchers have evaluated xerostomia in general population, its prevalence is not been assessed in patients suffering from different psychological disorders. To investigate the prevalence of xerostomia and to assess the correlation between xerostomia and dryness of lip and mucosa in different psychological disorders. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted over a period of six months in Department of Psychiatry and Department of Oral Medicine. Patients with anxiety, depression, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, as diagnosed by an experienced psychiatrist, were given a questionnaire to evaluate the xerostomia. Patients with symptoms of xerostomia were subjected to oral examination by a skilled oral diagnostician to check for dryness of lips and mucosa. One hundred patients from each group of psychiatric diseases were included in the study using a consecutive sampling technique. An equal number of healthy individuals reporting to oral medicine department for routine oral screening were included as control group after initial psychiatric evaluation. In this study statistically significant increase in the xerostomia in psychiatric patients was recorded when compared to the control group (pXerostomia was significantly higher in anxiety patients (51%) followed by depression (47%), bipolar disorder (41%), schizophrenia (39%) and control group (27%). The majority of the psychiatric patients had 'moderate' to 'severe' xerostomia whereas the control group had 'mild' xerostomia. Xerostomia was significantly higher in younger age group (18-49 years) than in older age group and females patients had higher xerostomia than male patients. Psychiatric patients had significantly more dryness of lip and mucosa than healthy controls. A moderate

  13. Large breast compressions: Observations and evaluation of simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, Christine; White, Mark; Guarino, Salvatore; Hall-Craggs, Margaret A.; Douek, Michael; Hawkes, David J. [Centre of Medical Image Computing, UCL, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom and Computer Vision Laboratory, ETH Zuerich, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Centre of Medical Image Computing, UCL, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Department of Surgery, UCL, London W1P 7LD (United Kingdom); Department of Imaging, UCL Hospital, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Department of Surgery, UCL, London W1P 7LD (United Kingdom); Centre of Medical Image Computing, UCL, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: Several methods have been proposed to simulate large breast compressions such as those occurring during x-ray mammography. However, the evaluation of these methods against real data is rare. The aim of this study is to learn more about the deformation behavior of breasts and to assess a simulation method. Methods: Magnetic resonance (MR) images of 11 breasts before and after applying a relatively large in vivo compression in the medial direction were acquired. Nonrigid registration was employed to study the deformation behavior. Optimal material properties for finite element modeling were determined and their prediction performance was assessed. The realism of simulated compressions was evaluated by comparing the breast shapes on simulated and real mammograms. Results: Following image registration, 19 breast compressions from 8 women were studied. An anisotropic deformation behavior, with a reduced elongation in the anterior-posterior direction and an increased stretch in the inferior-superior direction was observed. Using finite element simulations, the performance of isotropic and transverse isotropic material models to predict the displacement of internal landmarks was compared. Isotropic materials reduced the mean displacement error of the landmarks from 23.3 to 4.7 mm, on average, after optimizing material properties with respect to breast surface alignment and image similarity. Statistically significantly smaller errors were achieved with transverse isotropic materials (4.1 mm, P=0.0045). Homogeneous material models performed substantially worse (transverse isotropic: 5.5 mm; isotropic: 6.7 mm). Of the parameters varied, the amount of anisotropy had the greatest influence on the results. Optimal material properties varied less when grouped by patient rather than by compression magnitude (mean: 0.72 vs 1.44). Employing these optimal materials for simulating mammograms from ten MR breast images of a different cohort resulted in more realistic breast

  14. Large breast compressions: observations and evaluation of simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Christine; White, Mark; Guarino, Salvatore; Hall-Craggs, Margaret A; Douek, Michael; Hawkes, David J

    2011-02-01

    Several methods have been proposed to simulate large breast compressions such as those occurring during x-ray mammography. However, the evaluation of these methods against real data is rare. The aim of this study is to learn more about the deformation behavior of breasts and to assess a simulation method. Magnetic resonance (MR) images of 11 breasts before and after applying a relatively large in vivo compression in the medial direction were acquired. Nonrigid registration was employed to study the deformation behavior. Optimal material properties for finite element modeling were determined and their prediction performance was assessed. The realism of simulated compressions was evaluated by comparing the breast shapes on simulated and real mammograms. Following image registration, 19 breast compressions from 8 women were studied. An anisotropic deformation behavior, with a reduced elongation in the anterior-posterior direction and an increased stretch in the inferior-superior direction was observed. Using finite element simulations, the performance of isotropic and transverse isotropic material models to predict the displacement of internal landmarks was compared. Isotropic materials reduced the mean displacement error of the landmarks from 23.3 to 4.7 mm, on average, after optimizing material properties with respect to breast surface alignment and image similarity. Statistically significantly smaller errors were achieved with transverse isotropic materials (4.1 mm, P=0.0045). Homogeneous material models performed substantially worse (transverse isotropic: 5.5 mm; isotropic: 6.7 mm). Of the parameters varied, the amount of anisotropy had the greatest influence on the results. Optimal material properties varied less when grouped by patient rather than by compression magnitude (mean: 0.72 vs. 1.44). Employing these optimal materials for simulating mammograms from ten MR breast images of a different cohort resulted in more realistic breast shapes than when using

  15. Large breast compressions: Observations and evaluation of simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, Christine; White, Mark; Guarino, Salvatore; Hall-Craggs, Margaret A.; Douek, Michael; Hawkes, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Several methods have been proposed to simulate large breast compressions such as those occurring during x-ray mammography. However, the evaluation of these methods against real data is rare. The aim of this study is to learn more about the deformation behavior of breasts and to assess a simulation method. Methods: Magnetic resonance (MR) images of 11 breasts before and after applying a relatively large in vivo compression in the medial direction were acquired. Nonrigid registration was employed to study the deformation behavior. Optimal material properties for finite element modeling were determined and their prediction performance was assessed. The realism of simulated compressions was evaluated by comparing the breast shapes on simulated and real mammograms. Results: Following image registration, 19 breast compressions from 8 women were studied. An anisotropic deformation behavior, with a reduced elongation in the anterior-posterior direction and an increased stretch in the inferior-superior direction was observed. Using finite element simulations, the performance of isotropic and transverse isotropic material models to predict the displacement of internal landmarks was compared. Isotropic materials reduced the mean displacement error of the landmarks from 23.3 to 4.7 mm, on average, after optimizing material properties with respect to breast surface alignment and image similarity. Statistically significantly smaller errors were achieved with transverse isotropic materials (4.1 mm, P=0.0045). Homogeneous material models performed substantially worse (transverse isotropic: 5.5 mm; isotropic: 6.7 mm). Of the parameters varied, the amount of anisotropy had the greatest influence on the results. Optimal material properties varied less when grouped by patient rather than by compression magnitude (mean: 0.72 vs 1.44). Employing these optimal materials for simulating mammograms from ten MR breast images of a different cohort resulted in more realistic breast

  16. An Evaluation of Lightning Flash Rate Parameterizations Based on Observations of Colorado Storms during DC3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basarab, B.; Fuchs, B.; Rutledge, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    Predicting lightning activity in thunderstorms is important in order to accurately quantify the production of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) by lightning (LNOx). Lightning is an important global source of NOx, and since NOx is a chemical precursor to ozone, the climatological impacts of LNOx could be significant. Many cloud-resolving models rely on parameterizations to predict lightning and LNOx since the processes leading to charge separation and lightning discharge are not yet fully understood. This study evaluates predicted flash rates based on existing lightning parameterizations against flash rates observed for Colorado storms during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment (DC3). Evaluating lightning parameterizations against storm observations is a useful way to possibly improve the prediction of flash rates and LNOx in models. Additionally, since convective storms that form in the eastern plains of Colorado can be different thermodynamically and electrically from storms in other regions, it is useful to test existing parameterizations against observations from these storms. We present an analysis of the dynamics, microphysics, and lightning characteristics of two case studies, severe storms that developed on 6 and 7 June 2012. This analysis includes dual-Doppler derived horizontal and vertical velocities, a hydrometeor identification based on polarimetric radar variables using the CSU-CHILL radar, and insight into the charge structure using observations from the northern Colorado Lightning Mapping Array (LMA). Flash rates were inferred from the LMA data using a flash counting algorithm. We have calculated various microphysical and dynamical parameters for these storms that have been used in empirical flash rate parameterizations. In particular, maximum vertical velocity has been used to predict flash rates in some cloud-resolving chemistry simulations. We diagnose flash rates for the 6 and 7 June storms using this parameterization and compare

  17. Systematic evaluation of observational methods assessing biomechanical exposures at work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takala, Esa-Pekka; Pehkonen, Irmeli; Forsman, Mikael

    2010-01-01

    the use of technical instruments. Generally, the observations showed moderate to good agreement with the corresponding assessments made from video recordings; agreement was the best for large-scale body postures and work actions. Postures of wrist and hand as well as trunk rotation seemed to be more...... difficult to observe correctly. Intra- and inter-observer repeatability were reported for 7 and 17 methods, respectively, and were judged mostly to be good or moderate. CONCLUSIONS: With training, observers can reach consistent results on clearly visible body postures and work activities. Many observational...

  18. How operating room efficiency is understood in a surgical team: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakelian, Erebouni; Gunningberg, Lena; Larsson, Jan

    2011-02-01

    Building surgical teams is one attempt to ensure the health-care system becomes more efficient, but how is 'efficiency' understood or interpreted? The aim was to study how organized surgical team members and their leaders understood operating room efficiency. Qualitative study. A 1100-bed Swedish university hospital. Eleven participants, nine team members from the same team and their two leaders were interviewed. The analysis was performed according to phenomenography, a research approach that aims to discover variations in peoples' understanding of a phenomenon. Seven ways of understanding operating room efficiency were identified: doing one's best from one's prerequisites, enjoying work and adjusting it to the situation, interacting group performing parallel tasks, working with minimal resources to produce desired results, fast work with preserved quality, long-term effects for patient care and a relative concept. When talking about the quality and benefits of delivered care, most team members invoked the patient as the central focus. Despite seven ways of understanding efficiency between the team members, they described their team as efficient. The nurses and assistant nurses were involved in the production and discussed working in a timely manner more than the leaders. The seven ways of understanding operating room efficiency appear to represent both organization-oriented and individual-oriented understanding of that concept in surgical teams. The patient is in focus and efficiency is understood as maintaining quality of care and measuring benefits of care for the patients.

  19. Experimental evaluation of shark detection rates by aerial observers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D Robbins

    Full Text Available Aerial surveys are a recognised technique to identify the presence and abundance of marine animals. However, the capability of aerial observers to reliably sight coastal sharks has not been previously assessed, nor have differences in sighting rates between aircraft types been examined. In this study we investigated the ability of observers in fixed-wing and helicopter aircraft to sight 2.5 m artificial shark analogues placed at known depths and positions. Initial tests revealed that the shark analogues could only be detected at shallow depths, averaging only 2.5 m and 2.7 m below the water surface for observers in fixed-wing and helicopter aircraft, respectively. We then deployed analogues at shallower depths along a 5 km-long grid, and assessed their sightability to aircraft observers through a series of transects flown within 500 m. Analogues were seen infrequently from all distances, with overall sighting rates of only 12.5% and 17.1% for fixed-wing and helicopter observers, respectively. Although helicopter observers had consistently higher success rates of sighting analogues within 250 m of their flight path, neither aircraft observers sighted more than 9% of analogues deployed over 300 m from their flight paths. Modelling of sighting rates against environmental and experimental variables indicated that observations were affected by distance, aircraft type, sun glare and sea conditions, while the range of water turbidities observed had no effect. We conclude that aerial observers have limited ability to detect the presence of submerged animals such as sharks, particularly when the sharks are deeper than ∼ 2.6 m, or over 300 m distant from the aircraft's flight path, especially during sunny or windy days. The low rates of detections found in this study cast serious doubts on the use of aerial beach patrols as an effective early-warning system to prevent shark attacks.

  20. Experimental evaluation of shark detection rates by aerial observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, William D; Peddemors, Victor M; Kennelly, Steven J; Ives, Matthew C

    2014-01-01

    Aerial surveys are a recognised technique to identify the presence and abundance of marine animals. However, the capability of aerial observers to reliably sight coastal sharks has not been previously assessed, nor have differences in sighting rates between aircraft types been examined. In this study we investigated the ability of observers in fixed-wing and helicopter aircraft to sight 2.5 m artificial shark analogues placed at known depths and positions. Initial tests revealed that the shark analogues could only be detected at shallow depths, averaging only 2.5 m and 2.7 m below the water surface for observers in fixed-wing and helicopter aircraft, respectively. We then deployed analogues at shallower depths along a 5 km-long grid, and assessed their sightability to aircraft observers through a series of transects flown within 500 m. Analogues were seen infrequently from all distances, with overall sighting rates of only 12.5% and 17.1% for fixed-wing and helicopter observers, respectively. Although helicopter observers had consistently higher success rates of sighting analogues within 250 m of their flight path, neither aircraft observers sighted more than 9% of analogues deployed over 300 m from their flight paths. Modelling of sighting rates against environmental and experimental variables indicated that observations were affected by distance, aircraft type, sun glare and sea conditions, while the range of water turbidities observed had no effect. We conclude that aerial observers have limited ability to detect the presence of submerged animals such as sharks, particularly when the sharks are deeper than ∼ 2.6 m, or over 300 m distant from the aircraft's flight path, especially during sunny or windy days. The low rates of detections found in this study cast serious doubts on the use of aerial beach patrols as an effective early-warning system to prevent shark attacks.

  1. Concluding Thoughts: Observing, Promoting, Evaluating, and Reviewing Research Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.

    1986-01-01

    When institutional personnel assess faculty research performance, they should consider the extent to which the institution rewards research, ways to encourage faculty to be productive, criteria for evaluating research performance, and the specific steps useful in reviewing research performance within academic units. (Author/MSE)

  2. Evaluation of observational research reports published in Turkish nursing journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaçam, Z; Şen, E; Yildirim, B

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this literature-based descriptive study was to examine the reporting of the observational research studies published in peer-reviewed nursing journals in Turkey. Eleven peer-reviewed nursing journals printed on a regular basis in Turkey between 2007 and 2012 were selected. These journals were searched for observational research studies, and 502 studies were selected and examined by using the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology Statement. Of the 502 studies, 495 were cross-sectional, 3 were cohort, and 4 were case controlled. Summary and introduction and aim sections were sufficient in most of the studies. The methods sections of the reports were mostly not reported: 64.3% of the reports did not indicate eligibility/inclusion criteria; sampling method, 67.0%; possible sources of bias, 99.2%; ways to reach sample size, 92.6%. In the results section, the number of individuals participating in each stage of the studies (44.0%) and in other analyses made (39.2%) was not reported. In the discussion section, a main comment about research findings was partly made (97.4%), and limitations of the studies and possible sources of bias were not written in 99.0% of the studies. This study clearly revealed that the observational research studies published in nursing journals in Turkey did not fulfil the important criteria and needed to be improved. Information obtained from this study can contribute to improvement of the quality of reporting observational studies in nursing and thus using obtained findings in practice. © 2015 International Council of Nurses.

  3. Poorly understood and often miscategorized congenital umbilical cord hernia: an alternative repair method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İnce, E; Temiz, A; Ezer, S S; Gezer, H Ö; Hiçsönmez, A

    2017-06-01

    Umbilical cord hernia is poorly understood and often miscategorized as "omphalocele minor". Careless clamping of the cord leads to iatrogenic gut injury in the situation of umbilical cord hernia. This study aimed to determine the characteristics and outcomes of umbilical cord hernias. We also highlight an alternative repair method for umbilical cord hernias. We recorded 15 cases of umbilical cord hernias over 10 years. The patients' data were retrospectively reviewed, and preoperative preparation of the newborn, gestational age, birth weight, other associated malformations, surgical technique used, enteral nutrition, and length of hospitalization were recorded. This study included 15 neonates with umbilical cord hernias. The mean gestational age at the time of referral was 38.2 ± 2.1 umbilical cord hernia, the body folds develop normally and form the umbilical ring. The double purse-string technique is easy to apply and produces satisfactory cosmetic results in neonates with umbilical cord hernias.

  4. The BErkeley Atmospheric CO2 Observation Network: initial evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Shusterman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With the majority of the world population residing in urban areas, attempts to monitor and mitigate greenhouse gas emissions must necessarily center on cities. However, existing carbon dioxide observation networks are ill-equipped to resolve the specific intra-city emission phenomena targeted by regulation. Here we describe the design and implementation of the BErkeley Atmospheric CO2 Observation Network (BEACO2N, a distributed CO2 monitoring instrument that utilizes low-cost technology to achieve unprecedented spatial density throughout and around the city of Oakland, California. We characterize the network in terms of four performance parameters – cost, reliability, precision, and systematic uncertainty – and find the BEACO2N approach to be sufficiently cost-effective and reliable while nonetheless providing high-quality atmospheric observations. First results from the initial installation successfully capture hourly, daily, and seasonal CO2 signals relevant to urban environments on spatial scales that cannot be accurately represented by atmospheric transport models alone, demonstrating the utility of high-resolution surface networks in urban greenhouse gas monitoring efforts.

  5. The BErkeley Atmospheric CO2 Observation Network: initial evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shusterman, Alexis A.; Teige, Virginia E.; Turner, Alexander J.; Newman, Catherine; Kim, Jinsol; Cohen, Ronald C.

    2016-10-01

    With the majority of the world population residing in urban areas, attempts to monitor and mitigate greenhouse gas emissions must necessarily center on cities. However, existing carbon dioxide observation networks are ill-equipped to resolve the specific intra-city emission phenomena targeted by regulation. Here we describe the design and implementation of the BErkeley Atmospheric CO2 Observation Network (BEACO2N), a distributed CO2 monitoring instrument that utilizes low-cost technology to achieve unprecedented spatial density throughout and around the city of Oakland, California. We characterize the network in terms of four performance parameters - cost, reliability, precision, and systematic uncertainty - and find the BEACO2N approach to be sufficiently cost-effective and reliable while nonetheless providing high-quality atmospheric observations. First results from the initial installation successfully capture hourly, daily, and seasonal CO2 signals relevant to urban environments on spatial scales that cannot be accurately represented by atmospheric transport models alone, demonstrating the utility of high-resolution surface networks in urban greenhouse gas monitoring efforts.

  6. Evaluation of satellite-retrieved extreme precipitation using gauge observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhoff, M.; Zolina, O.; Simmer, C.; Schulz, J.

    2012-04-01

    Precipitation extremes have already been intensively studied employing rain gauge datasets. Their main advantage is that they represent a direct measurement with a relatively high temporal coverage. Their main limitation however is their poor spatial coverage and thus a low representativeness in many parts of the world. In contrast, satellites can provide global coverage and there are meanwhile data sets available that are on one hand long enough to be used for extreme value analysis and that have on the other hand the necessary spatial and temporal resolution to capture extremes. However, satellite observations provide only an indirect mean to determine precipitation and there are many potential observational and methodological weaknesses in particular over land surfaces that may constitute doubts concerning their usability for the analysis of precipitation extremes. By comparing basic climatological metrics of precipitation (totals, intensities, number of wet days) as well as respective characteristics of PDFs, absolute and relative extremes of satellite and observational data this paper aims at assessing to which extent satellite products are suitable for analysing extreme precipitation events. In a first step the assessment focuses on Europe taking into consideration various satellite products available, e.g. data sets provided by the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP). First results indicate that satellite-based estimates do not only represent the monthly averaged precipitation very similar to rain gauge estimates but they also capture the day-to-day occurrence fairly well. Larger differences can be found though when looking at the corresponding intensities.

  7. Using observations to evaluate biosphere-atmosphere interactions in models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Julia; Konings, Alexandra G.; Alemohammad, Seyed H.; Gentine, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Biosphere-atmosphere interactions influence the hydrologic cycle by altering climate and weather patterns (Charney, 1975; Koster et al., 2006; Seneviratne et al., 2006), contributing up to 30% of precipitation and radiation variability in certain regions (Green et al., 2017). They have been shown to contribute to the persistence of drought in Europe (Seneviratne et al., 2006), as well as to increase rainfall in the Amazon (Spracklen et al., 2012). Thus, a true representation of these feedbacks in Earth System Models (ESMs) is crucial for accurate forecasting and planning. However, it has been difficult to validate the performance of ESMs since often-times surface and atmospheric flux data are scarce and/or difficult to observe. In this study, we use the results of a new global observational study (using remotely sensed solar-induced fluorescence to represent the biosphere flux) (Green et al., 2017) to determine how well a suite of 13 ESMs capture biosphere-atmosphere feedbacks. We perform a Conditional Multivariate Granger Causality analysis in the frequency domain with radiation, precipitation and temperature as atmospheric inputs and GPP as the biospheric input. Performing the analysis in the frequency domain allows for separation of feedbacks at different time-scales (subseasonal, seasonal or interannual). Our findings can be used to determine whether there is agreement between models, as well as, to pinpoint regions or time-scales of model bias or inaccuracy, which will provide insight on potential improvement. We demonstrate that in addition to the well-known problem of convective parameterization over land in models, the main issue in representing feedbacks between the land and the atmosphere is due to the misrepresentation of water stress. These results provide a direct quantitative assessment of feedbacks in models and how to improve them. References: Charney, J.G. Dynamics of deserts and drought in the Sahel. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological

  8. Testing biochemistry revisited: how in vivo metabolism can be understood from in vitro enzyme kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen van Eunen

    Full Text Available A decade ago, a team of biochemists including two of us, modeled yeast glycolysis and showed that one of the most studied biochemical pathways could not be quite understood in terms of the kinetic properties of the constituent enzymes as measured in cell extract. Moreover, when the same model was later applied to different experimental steady-state conditions, it often exhibited unrestrained metabolite accumulation.Here we resolve this issue by showing that the results of such ab initio modeling are improved substantially by (i including appropriate allosteric regulation and (ii measuring the enzyme kinetic parameters under conditions that resemble the intracellular environment. The following modifications proved crucial: (i implementation of allosteric regulation of hexokinase and pyruvate kinase, (ii implementation of V(max values measured under conditions that resembled the yeast cytosol, and (iii redetermination of the kinetic parameters of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase under physiological conditions.Model predictions and experiments were compared under five different conditions of yeast growth and starvation. When either the original model was used (which lacked important allosteric regulation, or the enzyme parameters were measured under conditions that were, as usual, optimal for high enzyme activity, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate and some other glycolytic intermediates tended to accumulate to unrealistically high concentrations. Combining all adjustments yielded an accurate correspondence between model and experiments for all five steady-state and dynamic conditions. This enhances our understanding of in vivo metabolism in terms of in vitro biochemistry.

  9. The market of human organs: a window into a poorly understood global business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surman, O S; Saidi, R; Purtilo, R; Simmerling, M; Ko, D; Burke, T F

    2008-03-01

    The global demand for human organs has set the stage for an exploding and poorly understood global business in human organs. Whenever there is demand for a product, the opportunity for business arises. The form that a business takes is dependent on a complex network of inputs and outputs, each affecting the others. Historically, the details of any specific market are drastically underestimated. Nowhere is this truer than in the market of human organs. The drivers, which propel the "goods" of human organs, form a flourishing business. Critical analysis is essential to understanding of the supply and demand sides and to determine the role of government in regulating the industry. Governmental groups have dismissed formation of a regulated market for organ sales. The concept is nonetheless a topic of active discussion, motivated by the suffering of patients in need of organs and exploitation of the victims of human trafficking. Ethical principles have been invoked on each side of the ensuing debate. Theory in the absence of sufficient data is shaky ground for enactment of new policy. The Aristotelian concept of "practical wisdom" and the pragmatism of William James illuminate the importance of scientific investigation as guide to policy formation. How will stakeholders benefit or lose? What impact might be anticipated in regard to organized medicine's social contract? What can we learn about cross-cultural differences and their effect on the global landscape?

  10. How spirituality is understood and taught in New Zealand medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambie, D; Egan, R; Walker, S; MacLeod, R

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this research was to explore how spirituality is currently understood and taught in New Zealand Medical Schools. A mixed methods study was carried out involving interviews (n = 14) and a survey (n = 73). The first stage of the study involved recorded semi-structured interviews of people involved in curriculum development from the Dunedin School of Medicine (n = 14); which then informed a cross-sectional self-reported electronic survey (n = 73). The results indicate that spirituality is regarded by many involved in medical education in New Zealand as an important part of healthcare that may be taught in medical schools, but also that there is little consensus among this group as to what the topic is about. These findings provide a basis for further discussion about including spirituality in medical curricula, and in particular indicate a need to develop a shared understanding of what 'spirituality' means and how it can be taught appropriately. As a highly secular country, these New Zealand findings are significant for medical education in other secular Western countries. Addressing spirituality with patients has been shown to positively impact a range of health outcomes, but how spirituality is taught in medical schools is still developing across the globe.

  11. Practical performance evaluation of the Wave Glider in geophysical observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugioka, Hiroko; Hamano, Yozo

    2016-04-01

    The Wave Glider (WG), manufactured by Liquid Robotics Inc. of California, USA, is the first wave and solar powered autonomous sea surface vehicle. It has led the way to make ocean data collection and communications easier and safer, lower risk and cost, and real-time. By analyzing data from a long-term deployment of the WG in the sea to investigate the feasibility, an assessment of operating characteristics informs the potential utility of the WG to identify the parameters for a seafloor experiment designed the WG as a station-keeping gateway. We apply the WG in the following two observation systems that we have been developing. First, after the 2011 Tohoku earthquake tsunami, we have developed a real-time offshore tsunami monitoring system using a new type of seafloor tsunami sensor called Vector TsunaMeter (VTM) able to directly estimate the tsunami propagation vector based on the electromagnetic induction theory to provide early and reliable information at the coastal area. The WG equipped with both an acoustic modem and a satellite communication modem is used in the system as a relay platform for data transfer and communications between the sea bottom observatory and the land station. We had some experiments beginning with newly developing of the VTM in November 2012 to complete as a real-time monitoring system using the WG in March 2014. During the last experiment, we succeeded in detecting the micro-tsunami associated with the 2014 Iquique, Chile earthquake with Mw 8.2 on April 1 to confirm the practical utility of the WG. Second, since the Nishinoshima volcano of the Bonin Islands erupted in November 2013, we have been developing an isolated volcanic activity monitoring system using the unmanned WG vehicle. In this system the WG plays roles not only in a relay station with a satellite communication modem but also in a multi-purpose observatory platform with microphone for detecting acoustic waves in the air due to eruptions, with hydrophones for detecting

  12. The vulnerability of family caregivers in relation to vulnerability as understood by nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvimäki, Anneli; Stenbock-Hult, Bettina; Sundell, Eija; Oesch-Börman, Christine

    2017-03-01

    In Finland, the care of older persons is shifting from institutional care to family care. Research shows that family caregivers experience their situation much in the same way as professional nurses. The nurses' experiences have been studied in terms of vulnerability, and the same perspective could deepen our understanding of family caregivers' experiences. The aim of this study was to gain knowledge of the vulnerability of older caregivers taking care of an ageing family member. The research questions were as follows: How do family caregivers experience vulnerability? How do their experiences relate to vulnerability as understood by nurses? The study was done as a secondary analysis of focus group interviews on the experiences and daily life of older family caregivers. Four caregivers had taken part in monthly interviews during a period of 10 months. The interviews were analysed by deductive and inductive content analysis. The results showed that the caregivers saw caregiving as part of being human. They experienced a variety of feelings and moral agony and were harmed physically, mentally and socially. They showed courage, protected themselves and recognised that being a caregiver also was a source of maturing and developing. These results corresponded with the nurses' understanding of vulnerability. Shame, the experience of duty as a burden, worry and loneliness were themes that were found only among the family caregivers. The use of a matrix may have restricted the analysis, but using it in an unconstrained way allowed for new themes to be created. The results indicate a common humanness and vulnerability in professional and family caregiving. They also show that family caregivers need more support both from society and professionals. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  13. A-Train Based Observational Metrics for Model Evaluation in Extratropical Cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naud, Catherine M.; Booth, James F.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; van den Heever, Susan C.; Posselt, Derek J.

    2015-01-01

    Extratropical cyclones contribute most of the precipitation in the midlatitudes, i.e. up to 70 during winter in the northern hemisphere, and can generate flooding, extreme winds, blizzards and have large socio-economic impacts. As such, it is important that general circulation models (GCMs) accurately represent these systems so their evolution in a warming climate can be understood. However, there are still uncertainties on whether warming will increase their frequency of occurrence, their intensity and how much rain or snow they bring. Part of the issue is that models have trouble representing their strength, but models also have biases in the amount of clouds and precipitation they produce. This is caused by potential issues in various aspects of the models: convection, boundary layer, and cloud scheme to only mention a few. In order to pinpoint which aspects of the models need improvement for a better representation of extratropical cyclone precipitation and cloudiness, we will present A-train based observational metrics: cyclone-centered, warm and cold frontal composites of cloud amount and type, precipitation rate and frequency of occurrence. Using the same method to extract similar fields from the model, we will present an evaluation of the GISS-ModelE2 and the IPSL-LMDZ-5B models, based on their AR5 and more recent versions. The AR5 version of the GISS model underestimates cloud cover in extratropical cyclones while the IPSL AR5 version overestimates it. In addition, we will show how the observed CloudSat-CALIPSO cloud vertical distribution across cold fronts changes with moisture amount and cyclone strength, and test if the two models successfully represent these changes. We will also show how CloudSat-CALIPSO derived cloud type (i.e. convective vs. stratiform) evolves across warm fronts as cyclones age, and again how this is represented in the models. Our third process-based analysis concerns cumulus clouds in the post-cold frontal region and how their

  14. Evaluation of Music Instruction by Musicians and Nonmusicians Assigned Differential Observation Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prickett, Carol A.; Duke, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses a study in which music education majors and non-music-education majors observed a violin lesson. Reports that observers received varying instructions regarding how to observe the lesson. Reports that majors' evaluations were generally lower or equal to nonmusic majors' ratings. Concludes that the focus of the observation task and…

  15. How Global Education Is Understood and to What Extent It Is Implemented in One Educator Preparation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amewu-Sirleaf, Lydia Valentina

    2015-01-01

    This mixed method study investigated the overarching question "how global education is understood and implemented in an educator preparation program in a Colorado university". The sub-questions used to answer the research question are: (1) How is global education/perspective understood and implemented by the faculty; (2) How do students…

  16. The physics of magnetic resonance imaging: how well understood is it?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, S.E.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Part of my work involves tutoring trainee radiologists on the physics of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). I have observed that a full understanding of the physics involved with MRI, or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to be more specific, seems to be beyond the hopes of many people working in the field. All diagnostic radiology textbooks that I have read touch very superficially on the physics of NMR and sometimes the explanations and models used are quite inaccurate and misleading. After further investigation, I found some very good coverage on the subject in chemistry texts. The physics of NMR is based on some very difficult quantum mechanical concepts. What I have managed to understand has been tremendously satisfying and has shed light on several conceptual difficulties which I initially struggled with. The physics of MRI is based on the motion of the hydrogen proton when subjected to an external magnetic field. Protons, which are positively charged particles, have an intrinsic spin and as a result, a magnetic field. A proton, when placed in an external magnetic field, undergoes several changes in its motion. The laws of quantum mechanics govern these changes. Diagnostic radiology textbook models describing the motion of a proton tend to be poor and inaccurate leading to confusion. For example, subatomic particles are subject to laws of quantum mechanics and are forbidden to align exactly with an applied magnetic field thus creating precession. Some textbooks make no attempt to explain this phenomenon whereas others attempt a superficial but inadequate quantum mechanical explanation. I am interested to canvas opinions from others involved in MRI as to difficulties they have encountered with the understanding of the physics of MRI and how they have been overcome. Copyright (2000) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  17. Occupational therapy evaluation: use of self-report and/or observation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristina Tomra; Wæhrens, Eva Elisabet Ejlersen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Occupational Therapy Intervention Process Model (OTIPM) serves to guide occupational therapists in their professional reasoning. The OTIPM prescribes evaluation of task performance based on both self-report and observation. Although this approach seems ideal, many clinicians raise...

  18. Point of Maintenance Ruggedized Operational Device Evaluation and Observation Test Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gorman, Megan

    2002-01-01

    .... The Ruggedized Operational Device Evaluation and Observation (RODEO) test examined hardware packaging, software user interface, and environmental factors associated with the usability of potential Point of Maintenance (POMx) electronic tools...

  19. Evaluation of PM-3 Chemistry Data and Possible Interpretations of 3H Observations, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, Robert [Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Marutzky, Sam J. [Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2015-02-01

    This report summarizes the analyses of the groundwater results from sampling of PM-3-1 (deep) and PM-3-2 (shallow), with a particular focus of evaluating the groundwater geochemistry data in comparison to the geochemistry observed in other wells in the Thirsty Canyon area as well as to evaluate the potential source of 3H observed in these piezometers from previous sampling activities, which employed depth-discrete bailers or a Bennett submersible piston pump.

  20. Conflict Prevalence in Primary School and How It Is Understood to Affect Teaching and Learning in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Afia Amponsaa Opoku-Asare

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Verbal and non-verbal interactions that occur daily between teachers and headteachers, teachers and pupils, and among pupils can generate conflict that may adversely affect teaching, learning, and schooling effectiveness. Little attention is, however, paid to the quality of relationships that exists between teachers and pupils, among teachers, among pupils, between teachers and their school heads, and between schools and their local communities. This study sought to investigate conflict prevalence in Ghana’s primary schools, and how relationship conflict is understood to affect teaching and learning at the level of headteachers as administrators, teachers as classroom managers, and pupils as learners, and direct beneficiaries of primary education. Using data gathered via interview, questionnaire administration, and observation in 30 public primary schools in 10 circuits of one district of Ashanti Region, the findings revealed a high prevalence of fighting, heckling, bullying, and other forms of relationship conflict among pupils; strained teacher–pupil relations due to insolence, indiscipline, and use of offensive language; and teacher–parent arguments and quarrels due to harsh punishment and verbal assault of pupils. Teacher–pupil conflicts may extend to teachers excluding the affected pupils from teaching and learning activities, denying them the rights to ask and answer questions, and have their class exercises marked, leading to lowered pupil self-esteem, reduced concentration during lessons, and passive involvement in learning activities, which could result in truancy and school dropout. Strengthening guidance mechanisms and encouraging peer mediation could significantly curb conflict in school environments and thereby raise educational standards in the district.

  1. Evaluation of Two Methods for Modeling Measurement Errors When Testing Interaction Effects with Observed Composite Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yu-Yu; Kwok, Oi-Man; Lai, Mark H. C.

    2018-01-01

    Path models with observed composites based on multiple items (e.g., mean or sum score of the items) are commonly used to test interaction effects. Under this practice, researchers generally assume that the observed composites are measured without errors. In this study, we reviewed and evaluated two alternative methods within the structural…

  2. Leveraging Teacher Talent: Peer Observation in Educator Evaluation. Ask the Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Many teachers are already keen observers and skilled in supporting and collaborating with their colleagues. Leveraging this rich talent among staff can be an efficient way to address capacity challenges and enrich teachers' evaluations with more targeted feedback. Teachers, however, require training to become systematic, reliable observers who can…

  3. Observer variability when evaluating patient movement from electronic portal images of pelvic radiotherapy fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraint Lewis, D.; Ryan, Karen R.; Smith, Cyril W.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: A study has been performed to evaluate inter-observer variability when assessing pelvic patient movement using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Materials and methods: Four patient image sets were used with 3-6 portal images per set. The observer group consisted of nine radiographers with 3-18 months clinical EPID experience. The observers outlined bony landmarks on a digital simulator image and used matching software to evaluate field placement errors (FPEs) on each portal image relative to the reference simulator image. Data were evaluated statistically, using a two-component analysis of variance technique, to quantify both the inter-observer variability in evaluating FPEs and inter-fraction variability in patient position relative to the residuals of the analysis. Intra-observer variability was also estimated using four of the observers carrying out three sets of repeat readings. Results: Eight sets of variance data were analysed, based on FPEs in two orthogonal directions for each of the four patient image sets studied. Initial analysis showed that both inter-observer variation and inter-fraction-patient position variation were statistically significant (P<0.05) in seven of the eight cases evaluated. The averaged root-mean-square (RMS) deviation of the observers from the group mean was 1.1 mm, with a maximum deviation of 5.0 mm recorded for an individual observer. After additional training and re-testing of two of the observers who recorded the largest deviations from the group mean, a subsequent analysis showed the inter-observer variability for the group to be significant in only three of the eight cases, with averaged RMS deviation reduced to 0.5 mm, with a maximum deviation of 2.7 mm. The intra-observer variability was 0.5 mm, averaged over the four observers tested. Conclusions: We have developed a quantitative approach to evaluate inter-observer variability in terms of its statistical significance compared to inter

  4. Lessons from cross-fleet/cross-airline observations - Evaluating the impact of CRM/LOFT training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Roy E.

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of the crew resource management/line oriented flight training (CRM/LOFT) program to help determine the level of standardization across fleets and airlines in the critical area of evaluating crew behavior and performance. One of the goals of the project is to verify that check airmen and LOFT instructors within organizations are evaluating CRM issues consistently and that differences observed between fleets are not a function of idiosyncracies on the part of observers. Attention is given to the research tools for crew evaluation.

  5. Evaluation of camouflage pattern performance of textiles by human observers and CAMAELEON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Daniela H.; Selj, Gorm K.

    2017-10-01

    Military textiles with camouflage pattern are an important part of the protection measures for soldiers. Military operational environments differ a lot depending on climate and vegetation. This requires very different camouflage pattern to achieve good protection. To find the best performing pattern for given environments we have in earlier evaluations mainly applied observer trials as evaluation method. In these camouflage evaluation test human observers were asked to search for targets (in natural settings) presented on a high resolution PC screen, and the corresponding detection times were recorded. Another possibility is to base the evaluation on simulations. CAMAELEON is a licensed tool that ranks camouflaged targets by their similarity with local backgrounds. The similarity is estimated through the parameters local contrast, orientation of structures in the pattern and spatial frequency, by mimicking the response and signal processing in the visual cortex of the human eye. Simulations have a number of advantages over observer trials, for example, that they are more flexible, cheaper, and faster. Applying these two methods to the same images of camouflaged targets we found that CAMAELEON simulation results didn't match observer trial results for targets with disruptive patterns. This finding now calls for follow up studies in order to learn more about the advantages and pitfalls of CAMAELEON. During recent observer trials we studied new camouflage patterns and the effect of additional equipment, such as combat vests. In this paper we will present the results from a study comparing evaluation results of human based observer trials and CAMAELEON.

  6. Evaluation of team lifting on work demands, workload and workers' evaluation: an observational field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Steven; van der Molen, Henk F; Kuijer, P Paul F M; Hoozemans, Marco J M; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to assess differences in work demands, energetic workload and workers' discomfort and physical effort in two regularly observable workdays in ironwork; one where loads up to 50kg were handled with two persons manually (T50) and one where loads up to 100kg were handled manually with four persons (T100). Differences between these typical workdays were assessed with an observational within-subject field study of 10 ironworkers. No significant differences were found for work demands, energetic workload or discomfort between T50 and T100 workdays. During team lifts, load mass exceeded 25kg per person in 57% (T50 workday) and 68% (T100 workday) of the lifts. Seven ironworkers rated team lifting with two persons as less physically demanding compared with lifting with four persons. When loads heavier than 25kg are lifted manually with a team, regulations of the maximum mass weight are frequently violated. Loads heavier than 25kg are frequently lifted during concrete reinforcement work and should be lifted by a team of persons. However, the field study showed that loads above 25kg are most of the time not lifted with the appropriate number of workers. Therefore, loads heavier than 25kg should be lifted mechanically. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Large scale evaluation of soil moisture retrievals from passive microwave observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parinussa, R.; Holmes, T. R.; Crow, W. T.; De Jeu, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    For several years passive microwave observations have been used to retrieve surface soil moisture from the Earth's surface. Several satellite sensors such as the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E) and WindSat have been used for this purpose using multi-channel observations. Large scale validation of these retrievals is generally hampered by a lack of ground-based observation networks with sufficient spatial density to be accurately up-scaled to the resolution of satellite-based soil moisture retrievals. In response to this challenge, two new global evaluation techniques have been proposed which circumvent the need for extensive ground-based soil moisture observations. The first technique (Rvalue) is based on calculating the correlation coefficient between known rainfall errors and Kalman filter analysis increments realized during the assimilation of remotely sensed soil moisture into an antecedent precipitation index. The second technique is based on a so-called Triple Collocation (TC) analysis, which is a statistical tool for estimating the root mean square error (RMSE) of a set of three linearly related data sources with independent error structures. These two newly-developed, large-scale soil moisture evaluation techniques are applied for cross-verification on a global scale. Both techniques are also used to determine the sensitivity of soil moisture retrievals to land surface temperature estimates by artificially degrading the satellite signal used for the retrieval of this important parameter. Instead of coincident land surface temperature observations from the same satellite, external sources for land surface temperature are also evaluated using the same evaluation techniques. Finally, both day- and night-time observations are evaluated separately to determine the impact of the different physical conditions during day- and night-time. The evaluation results produced by the Rvalue and TC soil moisture verification approaches show a high mutual

  8. Study on team evaluation (5). On application of behavior observation-based teamwork evaluation sheet for power plant operator team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasou, Kunihide; Sugihara, Yoshikuni

    2009-01-01

    This report discusses the range of application of the behavior observation-based teamwork evaluation sheet. Under the concept of this method, teamwork evaluation sheet is developed, which assumes a certain single failure (failure of feed water transmitter). The evaluation sheets are applied to evaluate team work of 26 thermal power plant operator teams in combined under abnormal operating conditions of failure of feed water transmitter, feed draft fan or steam flow governor. As a result of ANOVA, it finds that there are no differences between 3 kinds of single failure. In addition, the similar analysis is executed to 3 kinds of multiple failures (steam generator tube rapture, loss of coolant accident and loss of secondary coolant accident) under which 7 PWR nuclear power plant operator teams are evaluated. As a result, ANOVA shows no differences between 3 kinds of multiple failures. These results indicate that a behavior observation-based team work evaluation sheet, which is designed for a certain abnormal condition, is applicable to the abnormal conditions that have the same development of abnormal conditions. (author)

  9. Inter-observer variation in masked and unmasked images for quality evaluation of clinical radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tingberg, A.; Eriksson, F.; Medin, J.; Besjakov, J.; Baarth, M.; Haakansson, M.; Sandborg, M.; Almen, A.; Lanhede, B.; Alm-Carlsson, G.; Mattsson, S.; Maansson, L. G.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the influence of masking on the inter-observer variation in image quality evaluation of clinical radiographs of chest and lumbar spine. Background: Inter-observer variation is a big problem in image quality evaluation since this variation is often much bigger than the variation in image quality between, for example, two radiographic systems. In this study, we have evaluated the effect of masking on the inter-observer variation. The idea of the masking was to force every observer to view exactly the same part of the image and to avoid the effect of the overall 'first impression' of the image. A discussion with a group of European expert radiologists before the study indicated that masking might be a good way to reduce the inter-observer variation. Methods: Five chest and five lumbar spine radiographs were collected together with detailed information regarding exposure conditions. The radiographs were digitised with a high-performance scanner and five different manipulations were performed, simulating five different exposure conditions. The contrast, noise and spatial resolution were manipulated by this method. The images were printed onto the film and the individual masks were produced for each film, showing only the parts of the images that were necessary for the image quality evaluation. The quality of the images was evaluated on ordinary viewing boxes by a large group of experienced radiologists. The images were examined with and without the masks with a set of image criteria (if fulfilled, 1 point; and not fulfilled, 0 point), and the mean score was calculated for each simulated exposure condition. Results: The results of this study indicate that - contrary to what was supposed - the inter-observer variation increased when the images were masked. In some cases, especially for chest, this increase was statistically significant. Conclusions: Based on the results of this study, image masking in studies of fulfilment of image criteria cannot

  10. Development and evaluation of an observational system for goalball match analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Pereira Morato

    Full Text Available Abstract Our purpose was to develop and evaluate an observational system for goalball match analysis. We used a non-participant systematic game observation method including eight elite games, video recorded, and randomly chosen. Observational categories and performance indicators were determined for each offensive (i.e., ball control, attack preparation, and throwing and defensive principles (i.e., defensive balance, throw reading, and blocking. The comprehensive method of development and the ideal reliability levels (kappa coefficient of 0.81–1.00 of this protocol ensure the generation of quantitative and qualitative information for players and coaches and the rigor required for scientific use.

  11. Is restlessness best understood as a process? Reflecting on four boys’ restlessness during music therapy in kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helle-Valle, Anna; Binder, Per-Einar; Anderssen, Norman; Stige, Brynjulf

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT ADHD can be considered an internationally recognized framework for understanding children’s restlessness. In this context, children’s restlessness is understood as a symptom of neurodevelopmental disorder. However, there are other possible understandings of children’s restlessness. In this article, we explore four boys’ collaborative and creative process as it is described and understood by three adults. The process is framed by a community music therapy project in a Norwegian kindergarten, and we describe four interrelated phases of this process: Exploring musical vitality and cooperation, Consolidating positions, Performing together, and Discovering ripple effects. We discuss these results in relation to seven qualities central to a community music therapy approach: participation, resource orientation, ecology, performance, activism, reflexivity and ethics. We argue that in contrast to a diagnostic approach that entails a focus on individual problems, a community music therapy approach can shed light on adult and systemic contributions to children’s restlessness. PMID:28532331

  12. An approach for the evaluation of observables in analytic versions of QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cvetic, Gorazd; Valenzuela, Cristian

    2006-01-01

    We present two variants of an approach for the evaluation of observables in analytic QCD models. The approach is motivated by the skeleton expansion in a certain class of schemes. We then evaluate the Adler function at low energies in one variant of this approach, in various analytic QCD models for the coupling parameter, and compare it with perturbative QCD predictions and the experimental results. We introduce two analytic QCD models for the coupling parameter which reproduce the measured value of the semihadronic τ decay ratio. Further, we evaluate the Bjorken polarized sum rule at low energies in both variants of the evaluation approach, using for the coupling parameter the analytic QCD model of Shirkov and Solovtsov, and compare with values obtained by the evaluation approach of Milton et al and Shirkov. (letter to the editor)

  13. Observing the Cultural Dialogue of English Learner Literacy: A Standpoint Perspective on an Educational Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna, Katherine Richardson

    2009-01-01

    This position paper observes the impact of "Proposition 227", California's "English for the Children" initiative, on the professional development of teachers of English Learners. It draws on information I obtained while working as an evaluator of the California Teacher Institutes (CTIs), a network of institutes aimed to enhance…

  14. Video-Based Self-Observation as a Component of Developmental Teacher Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Leonardo A.; Baecher, Laura

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the benefits to teacher evaluation when video-based self-observation is done by teachers as a vehicle for individual, reflective practice. We explore how it was applied systematically at the ICPNA bi-national center among hundreds of EFL teachers within two institution-wide initiatives that have relied on self-observation…

  15. A Behavioral Observation Index Designed to Evaluate Training of Correctional Officers in a Prison Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherspoon, Arnold Delano

    This study represents an effort to develop an observational instrument to assess a correctional officer's behavior, and to evaluate officer training programs. A list of 73 inmate behaviors to which the officer might respond was assembled. The most relevant, significant, and most often occurring inmate behaviors were selected. Six judges with…

  16. Validity and reliability of the Mastication Observation and Evaluation (MOE) instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remijn, L.; Speyer, R.; Groen, B.E.; Limbeek, J. van; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.

    2014-01-01

    The Mastication Observation and Evaluation (MOE) instrument was developed to allow objective assessment of a child's mastication process. It contains 14 items and was developed over three Delphi rounds. The present study concerns the further development of the MOE using the COSMIN (Consensus based

  17. Evaluation of the ESA CCI soil moisture product using ground-based observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorigo, W.A.; Gruber, A.; de Jeu, R.A.M.; Wagner, W.; Stacke, T.; Loew, A.; Albergel, C.; Brocca, L; Chung, D.; Parinussa, R.M.; Kidd, R.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we evaluate the skill of a new, merged soil moisture product (ECV_SM) that has been developed in the framework of the European Space Agency's Water Cycle Multi-mission Observation Strategy and Climate Change Initiative projects. The product combines in a synergistic way the soil

  18. An Evaluation of the Effectiveness of an Automated Observation and Feedback System on Safe Sitting Postures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Eunjeong; Moon, Kwangsu; Oah, Shezeen; Lee, Yohaeng

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of an automated observation and feedback system in improving safe sitting postures. Participants were four office workers. The dependent variables were the percentages of time participants spent in five safe body positions during experimental sessions. We used a multiple-baseline design counterbalanced across…

  19. Development and evaluation of the "BRISK Scale," a brief observational measure of risk communication competence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, P.K.; Joekes, K.; Mills, G.; Gutheil, C.; Smith, K.; Cochran, N.E.; Elwyn, G.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop and evaluate a brief observational measure of clinical risk communication competence. METHODS: A 4-item checklist-type measure, the BRISK (Brief Risk Information Skill) Scale, was developed by selecting and refining items from a more comprehensive measure of clinical risk

  20. Housing Services for Child Welfare-Involved Families: An Initial Evaluation Using Observational Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Patrick J.; Taylor, Jeremy J.; Rufa, Anne K.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact of housing services among child welfare-involved families using observational data. Propensity score matching with data from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being compared intact families (n = 183) who received housing services 12 months after initial investigation to nontreated families balanced on…

  1. [Evaluation of clinical competence in urology: innovative approach based on performance observation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibert, L; Grand'Maison, P; Charlin, B; Grise, P

    1997-09-01

    The authors present a pilot project for the evaluation of clinical skills in urology using a method of evaluation based on observation of real performance. An objective and structured clinical examination (OSCE) applied to urology was developed according to a precise predetermined design: 1) Identification of the objectives to be evaluated. 2) Choice of sampling of clinical situations representative of routine urological practice. 3) Construction, on the basis of these cases, of physician-patient interaction stations and question stations, with, for each case, weighting of objectives, construction of observation grids and writing of instructions for candidates, simulated patients and observers. An OSCE circuit of 10 clinical cases and 16 stations was constructed. The main poles of activity and urological settings were represented. Objective complementary investigations, diagnosis and treatment received the highest weightings. The reliability coefficient, the content validity and the construct validity will be verified on the basis of the overall score obtained by candidate. Establishment of the score and the expected results in terms of reliability, validity, and feasibility are discussed. The psychometric qualities of the OSCE have been demonstrated. Although a single instrument is not sufficient, it is currently the measuring tool which most closely approximates ideal evaluation of clinical skills. If the feasibility of this method is confirmed, this pilot project in urology could provide a new approach to evaluation strategies and could participate in the current reflection concerning urology training.

  2. Evaluation of Aerosol-cloud Interaction in the GISS Model E Using ARM Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBoer, G.; Bauer, S. E.; Toto, T.; Menon, Surabi; Vogelmann, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Observations from the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program are used to evaluate the ability of the NASA GISS ModelE global climate model in reproducing observed interactions between aerosols and clouds. Included in the evaluation are comparisons of basic meteorology and aerosol properties, droplet activation, effective radius parameterizations, and surface-based evaluations of aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI). Differences between the simulated and observed ACI are generally large, but these differences may result partially from vertical distribution of aerosol in the model, rather than the representation of physical processes governing the interactions between aerosols and clouds. Compared to the current observations, the ModelE often features elevated droplet concentrations for a given aerosol concentration, indicating that the activation parameterizations used may be too aggressive. Additionally, parameterizations for effective radius commonly used in models were tested using ARM observations, and there was no clear superior parameterization for the cases reviewed here. This lack of consensus is demonstrated to result in potentially large, statistically significant differences to surface radiative budgets, should one parameterization be chosen over another.

  3. Evaluation concepts to compare observed and simulated deposition areas of mass movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiser, Micha; Scheidl, Christian; Kaitna, Roland

    2017-04-01

    A delineation of potentially endangered areas by geophysical mass flows, like debris flows, rock and snow avalanches, is an important for regional and urban planning. For this numerical simulation programs have become an important tool in engineering hazard assessment. However, when being confronted with the evaluation of model performance and sensitivity there are no standard, objective approaches. In this contribution we present a new approach to quantitatively compare 2D simulations of observed and simulated deposition patterns - a concept derived from a literature review of 75 peer reviewed articles which inverse modelled real events of different types of mass flows. It seems that existing evaluation concepts with respect to the deposition distribution does only account for one or a combination of two possible evaluation errors based on overestimation, underestimation and/or overlap of the simulation outcome with the observed reference. The proposed evaluation concept integrates all three possible errors and yields a single metric between -1 (no fit) and 1 (perfect fit). Combined with a ternary plot we further show that the proposed evaluation concept might act as a simple decision support tool to i) identify weaknesses and strengths of the simulation model, ii) to find the best simulation setup and iii) to test whether higher complexity of simulation models are balanced by higher accuracies. This method shall help developers and end-users of simulation models to better understand model behavior and provide a possibility for comparison of model results, independent of simulation platform and type of mass flow.

  4. Evaluation of the Earth Systems Research Laboratory's global Observing System Simulation Experiment system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikki C. Privé

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available An Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE system has been implemented at the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration Earth Systems Research Laboratory in the US as part of an international Joint OSSE effort. The setup of the OSSE consists of a Nature Run from a 13-month free run of the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts operational model, synthetic observations developed at the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Global Modelling and Assimilation Office, and an operational version of the NCEP Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation data assimilation and Global Forecast System numerical weather prediction model. Synthetic observations included both conventional observations and the following radiance observations: AIRS, AMSU-A, AMSU-B, HIRS2, HIRS3, MSU, GOES radiance and OSBUV. Calibration was performed by modifying the error added to the conventional synthetic observations to achieve a match between data denial impacts on the analysis state in the OSSE system and in the real data system. Following calibration, the performance of the OSSE system was evaluated in terms of forecast skill scores and impact of observations on forecast fields.

  5. Video-Based Self-Observation as a Component of Developmental Teacher Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo A. Mercado

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we explore the benefits to teacher evaluation when video-based self-observation is done by teachers as a vehicle for individual, reflective practice. We explore how it was applied systematically at the Instituto Cultural Peruano Norteamericano (ICPNA bi-national center in Lima, Peru among hundreds of English as a foreign language (EFL teachers in two institution-wide initiatives that have relied on self-observation through video professional development. In these cases, we provide a descriptive framework for each initiative as well as information on what was ultimately achieved by teachers, supervisors and the institution as a whole. We conclude with recommendations for implementing video-based self-evaluation.

  6. Evaluation of cloud resolving model simulations of midlatitude cirrus with ARM and A-Train observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlbauer, A. D.; Ackerman, T. P.; Lawson, P.; Xie, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    This paper evaluates cloud resolving model (CRM) and cloud system-resolving model (CSRM) simulations of a midlatitude cirrus case with comprehensive observations collected under the auspices of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program and with spaceborne observations from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) A-train satellites. Vertical profiles of temperature, relative humidity and wind speeds are reasonably well simulated by the CSRM and CRM but there are remaining biases in the temperature, wind speeds and relative humidity, which can be mitigated through nudging the model simulations toward the observed radiosonde profiles. Simulated vertical velocities are underestimated in all simulations except in the CRM simulations with grid spacings of 500m or finer, which suggests that turbulent vertical air motions in cirrus clouds need to be parameterized in GCMs and in CSRM simulations with horizontal grid spacings on the order of 1km. The simulated ice water content and ice number concentrations agree with the observations in the CSRM but are underestimated in the CRM simulations. The underestimation of ice number concentrations is consistent with the overestimation of radar reflectivity in the CRM simulations and suggests that the model produces too many large ice particles especially toward cloud base. Simulated cloud profiles are rather insensitive to perturbations in the initial conditions or the dimensionality of the model domain but the treatment of the forcing data has a considerable effect on the outcome of the model simulations. Despite considerable progress in observations and microphysical parameterizations, simulating the microphysical, macrophysical and radiative properties of cirrus remains challenging. Comparing model simulations with observations from multiple instruments and observational platforms is important for revealing model deficiencies and for providing rigorous benchmarks. However, there still is considerable

  7. Evaluation of the Quality of Reporting of Observational Studies in Otorhinolaryngology - Based on the STROBE Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriksma, Martine; Joosten, Michiel H M A; Peters, Jeroen P M; Grolman, Wilko; Stegeman, Inge

    2017-01-01

    Observational studies are the most frequently published studies in literature. When randomized controlled trials cannot be conducted because of ethical or practical considerations, an observational study design is the first choice. The STROBE Statement (STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology) was developed to provide guidance on how to adequately report observational studies. The objectives were 1) to evaluate the quality of reporting of observational studies of otorhinolaryngologic literature using the STROBE Statement checklist, 2) to compare the quality of reporting of observational studies in the top 5 Ear, Nose, Throat (ENT) journals versus the top 5 general medical journals and 3) to formulate recommendations to improve adequate reporting of observational research in otorhinolaryngologic literature. The top 5 general medical journals and top 5 otorhinolaryngologic journals were selected based on their ISI Web of Knowledge impact factors. On August 3rd, 2015, we performed a PubMed search using different filters to retrieve observational articles from these journals. Studies were selected from 2010 to 2014 for the general medical journals and from 2015 for the ENT journals. We assessed all STROBE items to examine how many items were reported adequately for each journal type. The articles in the top 5 general medical journals (n = 11) reported a mean of 69.2% (95% confidence interval (CI): 65.8%-72.7%; median 70.6%), whereas the top 5 ENT journals (n = 29) reported a mean of 51.4% (95% CI: 47.7%-55.0%; median 50.0%). The two journal types reported STROBE items significantly different (p STROBE Statement.

  8. Clinical observed performance evaluation: a prospective study in final year students of surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Markey, G C

    2010-06-24

    We report a prospective study of clinical observed performance evaluation (COPE) for 197 medical students in the pre-qualification year of clinical education. Psychometric quality was the main endpoint. Students were assessed in groups of 5 in 40-min patient encounters, with each student the focus of evaluation for 8 min. Each student had a series of assessments in a 25-week teaching programme. Over time, several clinicians from a pool of 16 surgical consultants and registrars evaluated each student by direct observation. A structured rating form was used for assessment data. Variance component analysis (VCA), internal consistency and inter-rater agreement were used to estimate reliability. The predictive and convergent validity of COPE in relation to summative OSCE, long case, and overall final examination was estimated. Median number of COPE assessments per student was 7. Generalisability of a mean score over 7 COPE assessments was 0.66, equal to that of an 8 x 7.5 min station final OSCE. Internal consistency was 0.88-0.97 and inter-rater agreement 0.82. Significant correlations were observed with OSCE performance (R = 0.55 disattenuated) and long case (R = 0.47 disattenuated). Convergent validity was 0.81 by VCA. Overall final examination performance was linearly related to mean COPE score with standard error 3.7%. COPE permitted efficient serial assessment of a large cohort of final year students in a real world setting. Its psychometric quality compared well with conventional assessments and with other direct observation instruments as reported in the literature. Effect on learning, and translation to clinical care, are directions for future research.

  9. Various versions of analytic QCD and skeleton-motivated evaluation of observables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cvetic, Gorazd; Valenzuela, Cristian

    2006-01-01

    We present skeleton-motivated evaluation of QCD observables. The approach can be applied in analytic versions of QCD in certain classes of renormalization schemes. We present two versions of analytic QCD which can be regarded as low-energy modifications of the ''minimal'' analytic QCD and which reproduce the measured value of the semihadronic τ decay ratio r τ . Further, we describe an approach of calculating the higher-order analytic couplings A k (k=2,3,...) on the basis of logarithmic derivatives of the analytic coupling A 1 (Q 2 ). This approach can be applied in any version of analytic QCD. We adjust the free parameters of the aforementioned two analytic models in such a way that the skeleton-motivated evaluation reproduces the correct known values of r τ and of the Bjorken polarized sum rule (BjPSR) d b (Q 2 ) at a given point (e.g., at Q 2 =2 GeV 2 ). We then evaluate the low-energy behavior of the Adler function d v (Q 2 ) and the BjPSR d b (Q 2 ) in the aforementioned evaluation approach, in the three analytic versions of QCD. We compare with the results obtained in the minimal analytic QCD and with the evaluation approach of Milton et al. and Shirkov

  10. A four-alternative forced choice (4AFC) software for observer performance evaluation in radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guozhi; Cockmartin, Lesley; Bosmans, Hilde

    2016-03-01

    Four-alternative forced choice (4AFC) test is a psychophysical method that can be adopted for observer performance evaluation in radiological studies. While the concept of this method is well established, difficulties to handle large image data, perform unbiased sampling, and keep track of the choice made by the observer have restricted its application in practice. In this work, we propose an easy-to-use software that can help perform 4AFC tests with DICOM images. The software suits for any experimental design that follows the 4AFC approach. It has a powerful image viewing system that favorably simulates the clinical reading environment. The graphical interface allows the observer to adjust various viewing parameters and perform the selection with very simple operations. The sampling process involved in 4AFC as well as the speed and accuracy of the choice made by the observer is precisely monitored in the background and can be easily exported for test analysis. The software has also a defensive mechanism for data management and operation control that minimizes the possibility of mistakes from user during the test. This software can largely facilitate the use of 4AFC approach in radiological observer studies and is expected to have widespread applicability.

  11. Using observational methods to evaluate public open spaces and physical activity in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino A A, F; Reis, Rodrigo S; Ribeiro, Isabela C; Parra, Diana C; Brownson, Ross C; Fermino, Rogerio C

    2010-07-01

    Open public spaces have been identified as important facilities to promote physical activity (PA) at the community level. The main goals of this study are to describe open public spaces user's characteristics and to explore to what extent these characteristics are associated with PA behavior. A system of direct observation was used to evaluate the PA levels on parks and squares (smaller parks) and users's characteristics (gender and age). The 4 parks and 4 squares observed were selected from neighborhoods with different socioeconomic status and environmental characteristics. The settings were observed 3 times a day, 6 days per week, during 2 weeks. More men than women were observed in parks (63.1%) and squares (70.0%) as well as more adults and adolescents than older adults and children. Users were more physically active in parks (men = 34.1%, women = 36.1%) than in squares (men = 25.5%, women 22.8%). The characteristics of public open spaces may affect PA in the observed places. Initiatives to improve PA levels in community settings should consider users' characteristics and preferences to be more effective and reach a larger number of people.

  12. Public availability of results of observational studies evaluating an intervention registered at ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudart, Marie; Ravaud, Philippe; Baron, Gabriel; Dechartres, Agnes; Haneef, Romana; Boutron, Isabelle

    2016-01-28

    Observational studies are essential for assessing safety. The aims of this study were to evaluate whether results of observational studies evaluating an intervention with safety outcome(s) registered at ClinicalTrials.gov were published and, if not, whether they were available through posting on ClinicalTrials.gov or the sponsor website. We identified a cohort of observational studies with safety outcome(s) registered on ClinicalTrials.gov after October 1, 2007, and completed between October 1, 2007, and December 31, 2011. We systematically searched PubMed for a publication, as well as ClinicalTrials.gov and the sponsor website for results. The main outcomes were the time to the first publication in journals and to the first public availability of the study results (i.e. published or posted on ClinicalTrials.gov or the sponsor website). For all studies with results publicly available, we evaluated the completeness of reporting (i.e. reported with the number of events per arm) of safety outcomes. We identified 489 studies; 334 (68%) were partially or completely funded by industry. Results for only 189 (39%, i.e. 65% of the total target number of participants) were published at least 30 months after the study completion. When searching other data sources, we obtained the results for 53% (n = 158; i.e. 93% of the total target number of participants) of unpublished studies; 31% (n = 94) were posted on ClinicalTrials.gov and 21% (n = 64) on the sponsor website. As compared with non-industry-funded studies, industry-funded study results were less likely to be published but not less likely to be publicly available. Of the 242 studies with a primary outcome recorded as a safety issue, all these outcomes were adequately reported in 86% (114/133) when available in a publication, 91% (62/68) when available on ClinicalTrials.gov, and 80% (33/41) when available on the sponsor website. Only 39% of observational studies evaluating an intervention with safety outcome

  13. Development and evaluation of the "BRISK Scale," a brief observational measure of risk communication competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Paul K J; Joekes, Katherine; Mills, Greg; Gutheil, Caitlin; Smith, Kahsi; Cochran, Nancy E; Elwyn, Glyn

    2016-12-01

    To develop and evaluate a brief observational measure of clinical risk communication competence. A 4-item checklist-type measure, the BRISK (Brief Risk Information Skill) Scale, was developed by selecting and refining items from a more comprehensive measure of clinical risk communication competence. Six volunteer raters received brief training on the measure and then used the BRISK Scale to evaluate 52 video-recorded encounters between 2nd-year medical students and standardized patients conducted as part of an Observed Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) involving a risk communication task. Internal consistency reliability, inter-rater reliability, and criterion validity were assessed. Raters reported no difficulties using the BRISK Scale; scores across all raters and subjects ranged from 0 to 16 with a mean score of 6.49 (SD=3.17). The BRISK Scale showed good internal consistency reliability (α=0.64), and inter-rater reliability at the scale level (Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC)=0.79 for consistency, and 0.75 for absolute agreement) and individual-item level (ICC range: 0.62-.91). Novice raters' BRISK Scale scores were highly correlated (r=0.84, p<0.01) with expert raters' scores on the Risk Communication Content measure, a more comprehensive measure of risk communication competence. The BRISK Scale is a promising new brief observational measure of clinical risk communication competence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Observational studies often make clinical practice recommendations: an empirical evaluation of authors' attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Vinay; Jorgenson, Joel; Ioannidis, John P A; Cifu, Adam

    2013-04-01

    Although observational studies provide useful descriptive and correlative information, their role in the evaluation of medical interventions remains contentious. There has been no systematic evaluation of authors' attitudes toward their own nonrandomized studies and how often they recommend specific medical practices. We reviewed all original articles of nonrandomized studies published in 2010 in New England Journal of Medicine, Lancet, Journal of the American Medical Association, and Annals of Internal Medicine. We classified articles based on whether authors recommend a medical practice and whether they state that a randomized trial is needed to support their recommendation. We also examined the types of logical extrapolations used by authors who did advance recommendations. Of the 631 original articles published in 2010, 298 (47%) articles were eligible observational studies. In 167 (56%) of 298 studies, authors recommended a medical practice based on their results. Only 24 (14%) of 167 studies stated that a randomized controlled trial (RCT) should be done to validate the recommendation, whereas the other 143 articles made a total of 149 logical extrapolations to recommend specific medical practices. Recommendations without a call for a randomized trial were most common in studies of modifiable factors (59%), but they were also common in studies reporting incidence or prevalence (51%), studies examining novel tests (41%), and association studies of nonmodifiable factors (32%). The authors of observational studies often extrapolate their results to make recommendations concerning a medical practice, typically without first calling for a RCT. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Evaluating Water Budget Closure Across Spatial Scales: An Observational Approach through Texas Water Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, N.; Jaimes, A.; Vaughan, S.; Morgan, C.; Moore, G. W.; Miller, G. R.; Everett, M. E.; Lawing, M.; Mohanty, B.

    2017-12-01

    Applications varying from improving water conservation practices at the field scale to predicting global hydrology under a changing climate depend upon our ability to achieve water budget closure. 1) Prevalent heterogeneity in soils, geology and land-cover, 2) uncertainties in observations and 3) space-time scales of our control volume and available data are the main factors affecting the percentage of water budget closure that we can achieve. The Texas Water Observatory presents a unique opportunity to observe the major components of the water cycle (namely precipitation, evapotranspiration, root zone soil moisture, streamflow and groundwater) in varying eco-hydrological regions representative of the lower Brazos River basin at multiple scales. The soils in these regions comprise of heavy clays that swell and shrink to create complex preferential pathways in the sub-surface, thus, making the hydrology in this region difficult to quantify. This work evaluates the water budget of the region by varying the control volume in terms of 3 temporal (weekly, monthly and seasonal) and 3 different spatial scales. The spatial scales are 1) Point scale - that is typical for process understanding of water dynamics, 2) Eddy Covariance footprint scale - that is typical of most eco-hydrological applications at the field scale and, 3) Satellite footprint scale- that is typically used in regional and global hydrological analysis. We employed a simple water balance model to evaluate the water budget at all scales. The point scale water budget was assessed using direct observations from hydro-geo-thematically located observation locations within different eddy covariance footprints. At the eddy covariance footprint scale, the sub-surface of each eddy covariance footprint was intensively characterized using electromagnetic induction (EM 38) and the resultant data was used to calculate the inter-point variability to upscale the sub-surface storage while the satellite scale water budget

  16. Evaluation of sulfate aerosol optical depths over the North Atlantic and comparison with satellite observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkowitz, C.M.; Ghan, S.J.; Benkovitz, C.M.; Wagener, R.; Nemesure, S.; Schwartz, S.E.

    1993-11-01

    It has been postulated that scattering of sunlight by aerosols can significantly reduce the amount of solar energy absorbed by the climate system. Aerosol measurement programs alone cannot provide all the information needed to evaluate the radiative forcing due to anthropogenic aerosols. Thus, comprehensive global-scale aerosol models, properly validated against surface-based and satellite measurements, are a fundamental tool for evaluating the impacts of aerosols on the planetary radiation balance. Analyzed meteorological fields from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts are used to drive a modified version of the PNL Global Chemistry Model, applied to the atmospheric sulfur cycle. The resulting sulfate fields are used to calculate aerosol optical depths, which in turn are compared to estimates of aerosol optical depth based on satellite observations

  17. Computational and human observer image quality evaluation of low dose, knowledge-based CT iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eck, Brendan L.; Fahmi, Rachid; Miao, Jun [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Brown, Kevin M.; Zabic, Stanislav; Raihani, Nilgoun [Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, Ohio 44143 (United States); Wilson, David L., E-mail: dlw@case.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 and Department of Radiology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Aims in this study are to (1) develop a computational model observer which reliably tracks the detectability of human observers in low dose computed tomography (CT) images reconstructed with knowledge-based iterative reconstruction (IMR™, Philips Healthcare) and filtered back projection (FBP) across a range of independent variables, (2) use the model to evaluate detectability trends across reconstructions and make predictions of human observer detectability, and (3) perform human observer studies based on model predictions to demonstrate applications of the model in CT imaging. Methods: Detectability (d′) was evaluated in phantom studies across a range of conditions. Images were generated using a numerical CT simulator. Trained observers performed 4-alternative forced choice (4-AFC) experiments across dose (1.3, 2.7, 4.0 mGy), pin size (4, 6, 8 mm), contrast (0.3%, 0.5%, 1.0%), and reconstruction (FBP, IMR), at fixed display window. A five-channel Laguerre–Gauss channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) was developed with internal noise added to the decision variable and/or to channel outputs, creating six different internal noise models. Semianalytic internal noise computation was tested against Monte Carlo and used to accelerate internal noise parameter optimization. Model parameters were estimated from all experiments at once using maximum likelihood on the probability correct, P{sub C}. Akaike information criterion (AIC) was used to compare models of different orders. The best model was selected according to AIC and used to predict detectability in blended FBP-IMR images, analyze trends in IMR detectability improvements, and predict dose savings with IMR. Predicted dose savings were compared against 4-AFC study results using physical CT phantom images. Results: Detection in IMR was greater than FBP in all tested conditions. The CHO with internal noise proportional to channel output standard deviations, Model-k4, showed the best trade-off between fit

  18. Computational and human observer image quality evaluation of low dose, knowledge-based CT iterative reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eck, Brendan L.; Fahmi, Rachid; Miao, Jun; Brown, Kevin M.; Zabic, Stanislav; Raihani, Nilgoun; Wilson, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Aims in this study are to (1) develop a computational model observer which reliably tracks the detectability of human observers in low dose computed tomography (CT) images reconstructed with knowledge-based iterative reconstruction (IMR™, Philips Healthcare) and filtered back projection (FBP) across a range of independent variables, (2) use the model to evaluate detectability trends across reconstructions and make predictions of human observer detectability, and (3) perform human observer studies based on model predictions to demonstrate applications of the model in CT imaging. Methods: Detectability (d′) was evaluated in phantom studies across a range of conditions. Images were generated using a numerical CT simulator. Trained observers performed 4-alternative forced choice (4-AFC) experiments across dose (1.3, 2.7, 4.0 mGy), pin size (4, 6, 8 mm), contrast (0.3%, 0.5%, 1.0%), and reconstruction (FBP, IMR), at fixed display window. A five-channel Laguerre–Gauss channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) was developed with internal noise added to the decision variable and/or to channel outputs, creating six different internal noise models. Semianalytic internal noise computation was tested against Monte Carlo and used to accelerate internal noise parameter optimization. Model parameters were estimated from all experiments at once using maximum likelihood on the probability correct, P C . Akaike information criterion (AIC) was used to compare models of different orders. The best model was selected according to AIC and used to predict detectability in blended FBP-IMR images, analyze trends in IMR detectability improvements, and predict dose savings with IMR. Predicted dose savings were compared against 4-AFC study results using physical CT phantom images. Results: Detection in IMR was greater than FBP in all tested conditions. The CHO with internal noise proportional to channel output standard deviations, Model-k4, showed the best trade-off between fit and

  19. Surgeon-level reporting presented by funnel plot is understood by doctors but inaccurately interpreted by members of the public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Ashish; Mehrotra, Prerna; Amawi, Falah; Lund, Jonathan N

    2015-01-01

    Risk-adjusted outcome data for general surgeons practicing in the United Kingdom were published for the first time in 2013 with the aim of increasing transparency, improving standards, and providing the public with information to aid decision making. Most specialties used funnel plots to present their data. We assess the ability of members of the public (MoP), medical students, nonsurgical doctors (NSD), and surgeons to understand risk-adjusted surgical outcome data. A fictitious outcome dataset was created and presented in the form of a funnel plot to 10 participants from each of the aforementioned group. Standard explanatory text was provided. Each participant was given 5 minutes to review the funnel plot and complete a questionnaire. For each question, there was only 1 correct answer. Completion rate was 100% (n = 40). No difference existed between NSD and surgeons. A significant difference for identification of the "worst performing surgeon" was noted between surgeons and MoP (p funnel plot significantly "more difficult" to interpret than surgeons did (p < 0.01) and NSD (p < 0.01). MoP found these data significantly more "difficult to understand" and were less likely to both spot "outliers" and use this data to inform decisions than doctors. Surgeons should be aware that outcome data may require an alternative method of presentation to be understood by MoP. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluating Gridded Spring Indices Using the USA National Phenology Network's Observational Phenology Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crimmins, T. M.; Gerst, K.

    2017-12-01

    The USA National Phenology Network (USA-NPN; www.usanpn.org) produces and freely delivers daily and short-term forecast maps of spring onset dates at fine spatial scale for the conterminous United States and Alaska using the Spring Indices. These models, which represent the start of biological activity in the spring season, were developed using a long-term observational record of four species of lilacs and honeysuckles contributed by volunteer observers. Three of the four species continue to be tracked through the USA-NPN's phenology observation program, Nature's Notebook. The gridded Spring Index maps have utility for a wide range of natural resource planning and management applications, including scheduling invasive species and pest detection and control activities, anticipating allergy outbreaks and planning agricultural harvest dates. However, to date, there has not been a comprehensive assessment of how well the gridded Spring Index maps accurately reflect phenological activity in lilacs and honeysuckles or other species of plants. In this study, we used observational plant phenology data maintained by the USA-NPN to evaluate how well the gridded Spring Index maps match leaf and flowering onset dates in a) the lilac and honeysuckle species used to construct the models and b) in several species of deciduous trees. The Spring Index performed strongly at predicting the timing of leaf-out and flowering in lilacs and honeysuckles. The average error between predicted and observed date of onset ranged from 5.9 to 11.4 days. Flowering models performed slightly better than leaf-out models. The degree to which the Spring Indices predicted native deciduous tree leaf and flower phenology varied by year, species, and region. Generally, the models were better predictors of leaf and flowering onset dates in the Northeastern and Midwestern US. These results reveal when and where the Spring Indices are a meaningful proxy of phenological activity across the United States.

  1. Evaluation and Observation of Autogenous Healing Ability of Bond Cracks along Rebar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Choonghyun; Kunieda, Minoru

    2014-04-17

    Micro cracks occurring in concrete around tensile rebar is well known latent damage phenomenon. These micro cracks develop, and can be detected after reaching the surface of the concrete. Detection of these cracks before they are fully formed is preferable, but observing the whole crack structure is difficult. Another problem is repairing micro cracks under the concrete surface. The autogenous ability of bond cracks along rebar was evaluated using the air permeability test. Air permeability coefficients were measured before and after tensile loading, and experimental air permeability coefficients became larger near cracks along rebar as a result of tensile loading. Recuring for 28 days after tensile loading made the air permeability coefficients smaller, but this restriction only occurred during water recuring. Observation of crack patterns helped the understanding of change in the air permeability coefficients. Several small cracks along rebar were observed after tensile loading, and most cracks along rebar were not found after water recuring. On the other hand, the crack pattern did not change after air recuring. These results indicate that bond cracks along rebar can be closed by autogenous healing, and cause the air permeability coefficients.

  2. Evaluation and Observation of Autogenous Healing Ability of Bond Cracks along Rebar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choonghyun Kang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Micro cracks occurring in concrete around tensile rebar is well known latent damage phenomenon. These micro cracks develop, and can be detected after reaching the surface of the concrete. Detection of these cracks before they are fully formed is preferable, but observing the whole crack structure is difficult. Another problem is repairing micro cracks under the concrete surface. The autogenous ability of bond cracks along rebar was evaluated using the air permeability test. Air permeability coefficients were measured before and after tensile loading, and experimental air permeability coefficients became larger near cracks along rebar as a result of tensile loading. Recuring for 28 days after tensile loading made the air permeability coefficients smaller, but this restriction only occurred during water recuring. Observation of crack patterns helped the understanding of change in the air permeability coefficients. Several small cracks along rebar were observed after tensile loading, and most cracks along rebar were not found after water recuring. On the other hand, the crack pattern did not change after air recuring. These results indicate that bond cracks along rebar can be closed by autogenous healing, and cause the air permeability coefficients.

  3. Evaluating drizzle formation parametrization using ship-based observations in the Northeastern Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Jui-Yuan Christine; Fielding, Mark; Feingold, Graham; Van Leeuwen, Peter Jan; Hogan, Robin

    2017-04-01

    Drizzle, common in marine boundary-layer clouds, plays a crucial role in the microphysical, thermodynamic and dynamic processes that determine cloud structure and properties. Consequently, our ability to model drizzle has a significant impact on understanding and quantifying cloud feedbacks. However, many global models continue to produce drizzle too frequently by a factor of 1.5-2 at cloud base, and likely too heavily in the marine stratocumulus regime. This common model deficiency clearly calls for stronger observational constraints, but progress has been difficult due to a lack of appropriate coincident cloud/drizzle measurements. The entwined nature of clouds and precipitation also compounds the problem further. The recent Marine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) GPCI Investigation of Clouds (MAGIC) campaign, making routine ship-based measurements between Los Angeles and Hawaii in 2013, provides an excellent opportunity to evaluate drizzle formation parameterizations. We will show the observed characteristics of coincident clouds and in-cloud precipitation during the campaign, using a novel retrieval method and combined measurements from cloud radar, lidar and shortwave radiation. More importantly, we will present observational-constrained parametrizations suggested by this dataset, and discuss their differences from existing parametrizations that are based on large eddy simulations.

  4. Evaluating the Application of Multi-Satellite Observations in Hydrologic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolten, John

    2011-01-01

    When monitoring local or regional hydrosphere dynamics for applications such as agricultural productivity or drought and flooding events, it is necessary to have accurate, high-resolution estimates of terrestrial water and energy storages. Though in-situ observations provide reliable estimates of hydrologic states and fluxes, they are only capable of accurately capturing the dynamics at relatively discrete points in space and time, which makes them inadequate for characterizing the variability of the water budget across scales. In contrast, satellite-based remote sensing is ideal for providing observations of hydrological states and fluxes because it provides spatially-distributed observations at spatial and temporal scales required for regional land surface process modeling. Due to the continued progress in algorithm development and emerging satellite technology, we now have near-real time monitoring of several components of the water cycle including precipitation, soil moisture, lake and river height, terrestrial water storage, snow cover, and evapotranspiration. As these data become more readily available, their application to hydrologic modeling is becoming more common, however there remains little consensus on the most appropriate method for optimal integration and evaluation in regard to hydrological applications. Here we present two case studies operationally applying several remotely sensed products from AMSR-E, GRACE, and MODIS and discuss assimilation strategies, ease of integration and interpretation, and methods for quantifying the success of the application methodology.

  5. Potential and limitations of multidecadal satellite soil moisture observations for selected climate model evaluation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Loew

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture is an essential climate variable (ECV of major importance for land–atmosphere interactions and global hydrology. An appropriate representation of soil moisture dynamics in global climate models is therefore important. Recently, a first multidecadal, observation-based soil moisture dataset has become available that provides information on soil moisture dynamics from satellite observations (ECVSM, essential climate variable soil moisture. The present study investigates the potential and limitations of this new dataset for several applications in climate model evaluation. We compare soil moisture data from satellite observations, reanalysis and simulations from a state-of-the-art land surface model and analyze relationships between soil moisture and precipitation anomalies in the different dataset. Other potential applications like model parameter optimization or model initialization are not investigated in the present study. In a detailed regional study, we show that ECVSM is capable to capture well the interannual and intraannual soil moisture and precipitation dynamics in the Sahelian region. Current deficits of the new dataset are critically discussed and summarized at the end of the paper to provide guidance for an appropriate usage of the ECVSM dataset for climate studies.

  6. ORCHIDEE-CNP: Site-Scale Evaluation against Observations from a Soil Formation Chronosequence in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goll, D. S.; Vuichard, N.; Maignan, F.; Jornet-Puig, A.; Sardans, J.; Peng, S.; Sun, Y.; Kvakić, M.; Guimberteau, M.; Guenet, B.; Zaehle, S.; Penuelas, J.; Jannssens, I.; Ciais, P.

    2017-12-01

    Land surface models rarely incorporate the terrestrial phosphorus cycle and its interactions with the carbon cycle, despite the extensive scientific debate about the importance of nitrogen and phosphorus supply for future land carbon uptake. We describe a representation of the terrestrial phosphorus cycle for the land surface model ORCHIDEE, and evaluate it with data from nutrient manipulation experiments along a soil formation chronosequence in Hawaii. ORCHIDEE accounts for influence of nutritional state of vegetation on tissue nutrient concentrations, photosynthesis, plant growth, biomass allocation, biochemical (phosphatase-mediated) mineralization and biological nitrogen fixation. Changes in nutrient content (quality) of litter affect the carbon use efficiency of decomposition and in return the nutrient availability to vegetation. The model explicitly accounts for root zone depletion of phosphorus as a function of root phosphorus uptake and phosphorus transport from soil to the root surface. The model captures the observed differences in the foliage stoichiometry of vegetation between an early (300yr) and a late stage (4.1 Myr) of soil development. The contrasting sensitivities of net primary productivity to the addition of either nitrogen, phosphorus or both among sites are in general reproduced by the model. As observed, the model simulates a preferential stimulation of leaf level productivity when nitrogen stress is alleviated, while leaf level productivity and leaf area index are stimulated equally when phosphorus stress is alleviated. The nutrient use efficiencies in the model are lower as observed primarily due to biases in the nutrient content and turnover of woody biomass.

  7. A systematic review of observational studies evaluating costs of adverse drug reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batel Marques F

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Francisco Batel Marques,1,2 Ana Penedones,1,2 Diogo Mendes,1,2 Carlos Alves,1,2 1CHAD – Centre for Health Technology Assessment and Drug Research, AIBILI – Association for Innovation and Biomedical Research on Light and Image, 2School of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal Introduction: The growing evidence of the increased frequency and severity of adverse drug events (ADEs, besides the negative impact on patient’s health status, indicates that costs due to ADEs may be steadily rising. Observational studies are an important tool in pharmacovigilance. Despite these studies being more susceptible to bias than experimental designs, they are more competent in assessing ADEs and their associated costs.Objective: To identify and characterize the best available evidence on ADE-associated costs.Methods: MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Embase were searched from 1995 to 2015. Observational studies were included. The methodological quality of selected studies was assessed by Cochrane Collaboration tool for experimental and observational studies. Studies were classified according to the setting analyzed in “ambulatory”, “hospital”, or both. Costs were classified as “direct” and “indirect”. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The total incremental cost per patient with ADE was estimated.Results: Twenty-nine (94% longitudinal observational studies and two (7% cross-sectional studies were included. Twenty-three (74% studies were assessed with the highest methodological quality score. The studies were mainly conducted in the US (61%. Twenty (65% studies evaluated any therapeutic group. Twenty (65% studies estimated costs of ADEs leading to or prolonging hospitalization. The “direct costs” were evaluated in all studies, whereas only two (7% also estimated the “indirect costs”. The “direct costs” in ambulatory ranged from €702.21 to €40,273.08, and the in hospital from €943.40 to €7

  8. A Pilot Study to Evaluate California's Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Using Atmospheric Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graven, H. D.; Fischer, M. L.; Lueker, T.; Guilderson, T.; Brophy, K. J.; Keeling, R. F.; Arnold, T.; Bambha, R.; Callahan, W.; Campbell, J. E.; Cui, X.; Frankenberg, C.; Hsu, Y.; Iraci, L. T.; Jeong, S.; Kim, J.; LaFranchi, B. W.; Lehman, S.; Manning, A.; Michelsen, H. A.; Miller, J. B.; Newman, S.; Paplawsky, B.; Parazoo, N.; Sloop, C.; Walker, S.; Whelan, M.; Wunch, D.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric CO2 concentration is influenced by human activities and by natural exchanges. Studies of CO2 fluxes using atmospheric CO2 measurements typically focus on natural exchanges and assume that CO2 emissions by fossil fuel combustion and cement production are well-known from inventory estimates. However, atmospheric observation-based or "top-down" studies could potentially provide independent methods for evaluating fossil fuel CO2 emissions, in support of policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate climate change. Observation-based estimates of fossil fuel-derived CO2 may also improve estimates of biospheric CO2 exchange, which could help to characterize carbon storage and climate change mitigation by terrestrial ecosystems. We have been developing a top-down framework for estimating fossil fuel CO2 emissions in California that uses atmospheric observations and modeling. California is implementing the "Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006" to reduce total greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, and it has a diverse array of ecosystems that may serve as CO2 sources or sinks. We performed three month-long field campaigns in different seasons in 2014-15 to collect flask samples from a state-wide network of 10 towers. Using measurements of radiocarbon in CO2, we estimate the fossil fuel-derived CO2 present in the flask samples, relative to marine background air observed at coastal sites. Radiocarbon (14C) is not present in fossil fuel-derived CO2 because of radioactive decay over millions of years, so fossil fuel emissions cause a measurable decrease in the 14C/C ratio in atmospheric CO2. We compare the observations of fossil fuel-derived CO2 to simulations based on atmospheric modeling and published fossil fuel flux estimates, and adjust the fossil fuel flux estimates in a statistical inversion that takes account of several uncertainties. We will present the results of the top-down technique to estimate fossil fuel emissions for our field

  9. Comparison between EEG and observation of rabbit behaviour in evaluation of subarachnoid neurotoxicity of metrizamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maly, P.; Elmqvist, D.; Almen, T.; Golman, K.; Lund Univ. Hospital; Nyegaard and Co. A/S, Oslo

    1986-01-01

    The non-ionic contrast medium metrizamide (370 mg I/ml) was injected into the cisterna magna of rabbits at 2 dose levels (0.1 ml/kg and 0.5 ml/kg) to investigate whether visually evaluated EEG can detect neutrotoxicity at a lower dose level than a method based on observation and ranking of signs of excitation and depression in animal behaviour. Half of the metrizamide injections were made without anaesthesia, whereas the remaining injections were made during a short alphadolon/alphaxolon anaesthesia. EEG and animal behaviour were followed for 24 h after the injection of metrizamide. At the low 'clinical' dose, EEG could not detect statistically significant neurotoxicity, neither in anaesthetized nor in non-anaesthetized rabbits. Observation of animal behaviour, however, could detect statistically significant signs of depression in animals that had been anaesthetized. At the high dose level, both methods could detect significantly more serious symptoms of neurotoxicity than at the low dose level. (orig.)

  10. Stochastic Signal Processing for Sound Environment System with Decibel Evaluation and Energy Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Ikuta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In real sound environment system, a specific signal shows various types of probability distribution, and the observation data are usually contaminated by external noise (e.g., background noise of non-Gaussian distribution type. Furthermore, there potentially exist various nonlinear correlations in addition to the linear correlation between input and output time series. Consequently, often the system input and output relationship in the real phenomenon cannot be represented by a simple model using only the linear correlation and lower order statistics. In this study, complex sound environment systems difficult to analyze by using usual structural method are considered. By introducing an estimation method of the system parameters reflecting correlation information for conditional probability distribution under existence of the external noise, a prediction method of output response probability for sound environment systems is theoretically proposed in a suitable form for the additive property of energy variable and the evaluation in decibel scale. The effectiveness of the proposed stochastic signal processing method is experimentally confirmed by applying it to the observed data in sound environment systems.

  11. Albedo Observation by Hayabusa2 LIDAR: Instrument Performance and Error Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Ryuhei; Senshu, Hiroki; Namiki, Noriyuki; Mizuno, Takahide; Abe, Shinsuke; Yoshida, Fumi; Noda, Hirotomo; Hirata, Naru; Oshigami, Shoko; Araki, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Koji

    2017-07-01

    The Japanese asteroid explorer Hayabusa2 was launched at the end of 2014. Hayabusa2 is supposed to observe the near-Earth C-type asteroid 162173 Ryugu (1999 JU3) and bring surface material samples back to Earth in 2020. It is equipped with Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) instrument for laser ranging which can be used to measure the intensities of transmitted and received pulses. The intensity data can be used to estimate the normal albedo of Ryugu at a laser wavelength of 1.064 μm. To perform this estimation, we determined the transfer functions of the laser module and receiver to convert the intensity data into pulse energies, along with the utilization ratio of the returned pulse energy, through verification tests of the LIDAR flight model. Then, we evaluated the error of the normal albedo. This error is affected not only by the performance of the LIDAR but also by the slope and roughness of the asteroid's surface. In this paper, we focus on the error in the normal albedo due only to the instrument error, which will be 18.0 % in an observation at a nominal altitude of 20 km.

  12. Winter precipitation characteristics in western US related to atmospheric river landfalls: observations and model evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; Guan, B.; Waliser, D. E.; Ferraro, R. D.; Case, J. L.; Iguchi, T.; Kemp, E.; Putman, W.; Wang, W.; Wu, D.; Tian, B.

    2018-01-01

    Winter precipitation (PR) characteristics in western United States (WUS) related to atmospheric river (AR) landfalls are examined using the observation-based PRISM data. The observed AR-related precipitation characteristics are in turn used to evaluate model precipitation data from the NASA MERRA2 reanalysis and from seven dynamical downscaling simulations driven by the MERRA2. Multiple metrics including mean bias, Taylor diagram, and two skill scores are used to measure model performance for three climatological sub-regions in WUS, Pacific Northwest (PNW), Pacific Southwest (PSW) and Great Basin (GB). All model data well represent the winter-mean PR with spatial pattern correlations of 0.8 or higher with PRISM for the three sub-regions. Higher spatial resolutions and/or the use of spectral nudging generally yield higher skill scores in simulating the geographical distribution of PR for the entire winter. The PRISM data shows that the AR-related fraction of winter PR and associated daily PR PDFs in each region vary strongly for landfall locations; AR landfalls in the northern WUS coast (NC) affect mostly PNW while those in the southern WUS coast (SC) affect both PSW and GB. NC (SC) landfalls increase the frequency of heavy PR in PNW (PSW and GB) but reduce it in PSW (PNW). All model data reasonably represent these observed variations in the AR-related winter PR fractions and the daily PR PDFs according to AR landfall locations. However, unlike for the entire winter period, no systematic effects of resolution and/or spectral nudging are identified in these AR-related PR characteristics. Dynamical downscaling in this study generally yield positive added values to the MERRA2 PR in the AR-related PR fraction for most sub-regions and landfall locations, most noticeably for PSW by NU-WRF. The downscaling also generate positive added value in p95 for PNW, but negative values for PSW and GB due to overestimation of heavy precipitation events.

  13. Global-scale evaluation of 22 precipitation datasets using gauge observations and hydrological modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. E. Beck

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We undertook a comprehensive evaluation of 22 gridded (quasi-global (sub-daily precipitation (P datasets for the period 2000–2016. Thirteen non-gauge-corrected P datasets were evaluated using daily P gauge observations from 76 086 gauges worldwide. Another nine gauge-corrected datasets were evaluated using hydrological modeling, by calibrating the HBV conceptual model against streamflow records for each of 9053 small to medium-sized ( <  50 000 km2 catchments worldwide, and comparing the resulting performance. Marked differences in spatio-temporal patterns and accuracy were found among the datasets. Among the uncorrected P datasets, the satellite- and reanalysis-based MSWEP-ng V1.2 and V2.0 datasets generally showed the best temporal correlations with the gauge observations, followed by the reanalyses (ERA-Interim, JRA-55, and NCEP-CFSR and the satellite- and reanalysis-based CHIRP V2.0 dataset, the estimates based primarily on passive microwave remote sensing of rainfall (CMORPH V1.0, GSMaP V5/6, and TMPA 3B42RT V7 or near-surface soil moisture (SM2RAIN-ASCAT, and finally, estimates based primarily on thermal infrared imagery (GridSat V1.0, PERSIANN, and PERSIANN-CCS. Two of the three reanalyses (ERA-Interim and JRA-55 unexpectedly obtained lower trend errors than the satellite datasets. Among the corrected P datasets, the ones directly incorporating daily gauge data (CPC Unified, and MSWEP V1.2 and V2.0 generally provided the best calibration scores, although the good performance of the fully gauge-based CPC Unified is unlikely to translate to sparsely or ungauged regions. Next best results were obtained with P estimates directly incorporating temporally coarser gauge data (CHIRPS V2.0, GPCP-1DD V1.2, TMPA 3B42 V7, and WFDEI-CRU, which in turn outperformed the one indirectly incorporating gauge data through another multi-source dataset (PERSIANN-CDR V1R1. Our results highlight large differences in estimation accuracy

  14. An Evaluation of CMIP5 Precipitation Variability for China Relative to Observations and CMIP3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauenfeld, O. W.; Chen, L.

    2013-12-01

    Precipitation represents an important link between the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere and is thus a key component of the climate system. As indicated by the Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), global surface air temperatures increased by 0.74°C during the 20th century, with further warming of 0.2°C/decade projected by the 2030s. Projected changes in precipitation, however, are much more variable, and exhibit more complex temporal and spatial patterns. This presentation focuses on precipitation variability based on 20 general circulation models (GCMs) participating in the fifth coupled model intercomparison project (CMIP5). Specifically, we focus on China and provide a comprehensive evaluation of the CMIP5 models compared to historical 20th century precipitation variability from two observational precipitation products: the University of East Anglia's Climatic Research Unit (CRU) time series (TS) dataset version 3.10, and the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) version 6. We also reassess the performance of the third CMIP (CMIP3) to quantify potential improvements in CMIP5 over the previous generation of GCMs. Finally, we provide 21st century precipitation projections for China based on three representative concentration pathways (RCP): RCP 8.5, 4.5, and 2.6. These future precipitation projections are presented in light of the observed 20th century biases in the models. We find that CMIP5 models are able to better reproduce the general spatial pattern of observed 20th century precipitation than CMIP3. However, for China as a whole, the annual precipitation magnitude is overestimated in CMIP5, more so than in CMIP3. This smaller overestimation in CMIP3 was primarily driven by a large underestimation of summer precipitation. Spatially, overestimated precipitation magnitudes are evident for most regions of China, especially along the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau. Over southeastern China

  15. Observational evaluation of outcomes and resource utilization from hemostatic matrices in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J Scott; Tackett, Scott; Patel, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    Studies have indicated that outcomes may differ by choice of flowable hemostat, but there is limited evidence in spine surgery. The objective of this study was to conduct a comparison of outcomes following use of advanced flowable hemostatic matrices in a large spine surgery population. This is an observational retrospective cohort analysis using Premier's US Perspective Hospital Database. Two commonly-used hemostatic matrices (Floseal and Surgiflo kitted with thrombin) were compared in cases categorized as either major or severe spine surgery. Outcomes included complications, blood product administration, hospital length of stay (LOS), surgery time, and amount of matrix used in surgery. Major spine surgery patients treated with Surgiflo were associated with increased risk of blood product transfusion (OR = 2.56, 95% CI = 1.79-3.65, p group. Severe spine surgery patients treated with Surgiflo were associated with longer surgical time (+26.9 min, p transfusion and LOS did not differ by choice of matrix in this patient group. Inherent to limitations associated with database analysis, this study did not evaluate potential physician differences such as skill and experience, assess long-term outcomes, nor include cases with missing data. The results from this analysis indicated that surgery time, risk of blood transfusion, and amount of matrix used are greater with Surgiflo patients, compared to Floseal patients. Choice of matrix did not appear to impact hospital LOS or risk of surgical complications. Future research should evaluate the cost consequences of increased clinical and resource utilization by choice of hemostatic matrix in spine surgery.

  16. Evaluation of Protocol Biopsy Utility 12 Months after Renal Transplantation: A Multicenter Observational Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Moulin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical merit of surveillance kidney graft biopsies remains controversial. A retrospective, multicenter analysis evaluated 12-month surveillance biopsies (SB, 154 patients versus no SB (NSB, 138 patients (11 with diagnostic biopsy in patients >18 months posttransplant with estimated GFR (eGFR ≥30 mL/min. The primary objective was to describe renal function at 18 months post-transplant in patients with or without SB at month 12. Globally, most recipients in both cohorts were at low immunological risk (<10% of patients with PRA ≥30%. The immunosuppressive regimen remained unchanged following more than half of SB that exhibited chronic lesions (18/33, 54.5%. Mean (SD eGFR at month 18 (primary endpoint was 56 (19 mL/min/1.73 m² with SB and 54 (15 mL/min/1.73 m² with NSB (=0.48. In the SB group, slight nonspecific changes were observed in 51 cases, rejection (acute or chronic in 6 cases, CNI-related toxicity in 15 cases, recurrence of initial disease in two cases, and interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy (IF/TA in 83 cases (71.6%, of which 35 cases (30.2% were grade II/III lesions. eGFR <50 mL/min/1.73 m² at month 6 predicted IF/TA grade II or III (OR 3.85, 95% CI 1.64, 9.05, <0.002. SB at 12 months posttransplant did not prompt significant modification of immunosuppression, and no renal benefit was observed.

  17. Short-term evaluation of resin sealing and rebonding on amalgam microleakage: an SEM observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi, Horieh; Sadeghi, Samaneh

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two different sealing agents on the microleakage of Class V amalgam restorations with and without resin rebonding. Sixty extracted premolars were divided into six groups with ten teeth in each group. Class V cavity preparations were prepared on the facial surfaces of each tooth with the coronal margins placed in enamel and apical margins in cementum (dentin). The preparations in three groups were treated with Copalite, Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP), and no sealing agent, respectively. The other three groups received the same sealing agents in conjunction with a rebonding process. This arrangement of specimens provided for a comparison of the groups with and without a rebonding procedure. Amalgam was used as the restorative material. Specimens were thermocycled, stained, and sectioned. Microleakage was graded (0-3) using a stereomicroscope at 40x magnification. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used along with a high resolution elemental analysis. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Withney, and Wilcoxon pair wise statistical tests (alpha=.05). The bonded amalgam groups demonstrated significantly less microleakage, whereas the unsealed groups showed the highest microleakage (P=0.001). A significant difference between the mean rank of the microleakage of enamel and dentin margins was observed (P=0.037). Insignificant, lower microleakage was observed in groups receiving a rebonding procedure (P=0.085). Copalite and a multi-step adhesive system had a significant effect on microleakage of Class V amalgam restorations. The influence of the multi-step adhesive system was significantly greater than Copalite. The rebonding of the amalgam restorations did not have a significant effect on microleakage.

  18. Evaluation of reanalysis datasets against observational soil temperature data over China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Zhang, Jingyong

    2018-01-01

    Soil temperature is a key land surface variable, and is a potential predictor for seasonal climate anomalies and extremes. Using observational soil temperature data in China for 1981-2005, we evaluate four reanalysis datasets, the land surface reanalysis of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ERA-Interim/Land), the second modern-era retrospective analysis for research and applications (MERRA-2), the National Center for Environmental Prediction Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (NCEP-CFSR), and version 2 of the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS-2.0), with a focus on 40 cm soil layer. The results show that reanalysis data can mainly reproduce the spatial distributions of soil temperature in summer and winter, especially over the east of China, but generally underestimate their magnitudes. Owing to the influence of precipitation on soil temperature, the four datasets perform better in winter than in summer. The ERA-Interim/Land and GLDAS-2.0 produce spatial characteristics of the climatological mean that are similar to observations. The interannual variability of soil temperature is well reproduced by the ERA-Interim/Land dataset in summer and by the CFSR dataset in winter. The linear trend of soil temperature in summer is well rebuilt by reanalysis datasets. We demonstrate that soil heat fluxes in April-June and in winter are highly correlated with the soil temperature in summer and winter, respectively. Different estimations of surface energy balance components can contribute to different behaviors in reanalysis products in terms of estimating soil temperature. In addition, reanalysis datasets can mainly rebuild the northwest-southeast gradient of soil temperature memory over China.

  19. A framework to observe and evaluate the sustainability of human-natural systems in a complex dynamic context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satanarachchi, Niranji; Mino, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to explore the prominent implications of the process of observing complex dynamics linked to sustainability in human-natural systems and to propose a framework for sustainability evaluation by introducing the concept of sustainability boundaries. Arguing that both observing and evaluating sustainability should engage awareness of complex dynamics from the outset, we try to embody this idea in the framework by two complementary methods, namely, the layer view- and dimensional view-based methods, which support the understanding of a reflexive and iterative sustainability process. The framework enables the observation of complex dynamic sustainability contexts, which we call observation metastructures, and enable us to map the contexts to sustainability boundaries.

  20. Evaluating the effectiveness of Neuro web design model in business websites (observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boshra Sedghi Shamir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available By combining Neuromarketing، social psychology and e-commerce، a new area has been added to the world of consumer neuroscience named Nero web design. The practical Neuro business web design model consists of 67 applicable and implementable techniques in business websites and has been gathered in three sequential phases: attraction، message delivery، and reshaping with the aim of negotiating to the visitor’s brain to increase the conversion rate on a business website. Eight websites have been implemented to evaluate the effectiveness of this model: A simple website without using the model، a complete website (using all 67 techniques in the model، and six other websites that differentiate in reshaping groups. The unique and targeted visitors for each websites obtained through internet advertisements. They became 957 new visitors altogether. In the period of two months of observational studying، Website heat maps that track the mouse movements of visitors، showed that visitors attracted to all parts of the complete website homepage particularly order form module but not so for the simple website. This reflects the success of attraction phase of the model. The results showed that the conversion rate of each of the seven model websites as compared to simple website is greatly high and even more than the international average conversion rate.

  1. A breeding site model for regional, dynamical malaria simulations evaluated using in situ temporary ponds observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest O. Asare

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Daily observations of potential mosquito developmental habitats in a suburb of Kumasi in central Ghana reveal a strong variability in their water persistence times, which ranged between 11 and 81 days. The persistence of the ponds was strongly tied with rainfall, location and size of the puddles. A simple power-law relationship is found to fit the relationship between the average pond depth and area well. A prognostic water balance model is derived that describes the temporal evolution of the pond area and depth, incorporating the power-law geometrical relation. Pond area increases in response to rainfall, while evaporation and infiltration act as sink terms. Based on a range of evaluation metrics, the prognostic model is judged to provide a good representation of the pond coverage evolution at most sites. Finally, we demonstrate that the prognostic equation can be generalised and equally applied to a grid-cell to derive a fractional pond coverage, and thus can be implemented in spatially distributed models for relevant vector- borne diseases such as malaria.

  2. Evaluation of regional ionospheric grid model over China from dense GPS observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The current global or regional ionospheric models have been established for monitoring the ionospheric variations. However, the spatial and temporal resolutions are not enough to describe total electron content (TEC variations in small scales for China. In this paper, a regional ionospheric grid model (RIGM with high spatial-temporal resolution (0.5° × 0.5° and 10-min interval in China and surrounding areas is established based on spherical harmonics expansion from dense GPS measurements provided by Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONOC and the International GNSS Service (IGS. The correlation coefficient between the estimated TEC from GPS and the ionosonde measurements is 0.97, and the root mean square (RMS with respect to Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE Global Ionosphere Maps (GIMs is 4.87 TECU. In addition, the impact of different spherical harmonics orders and degrees on TEC estimations are evaluated and the degree/order 6 is better. Moreover, effective ionospheric shell heights from 300 km to 700 km are further assessed and the result indicates that 550 km is the most suitable for regional ionospheric modeling in China at solar maximum.

  3. An evaluation of ASCAT surface soil moisture products with in-situ observations in Southwestern France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Albergel

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A long term data acquisition effort of profile soil moisture is currently underway at 13 automatic weather stations located in Southwestern France. In this study, the soil moisture measured in-situ at 5 cm is used to evaluate the normalised surface soil moisture (SSM estimates derived from coarse-resolution (25 km active microwave data of the ASCAT scatterometer instrument (onboard METOP, issued by EUMETSAT for a period of 6 months (April–September in 2007. The seasonal trend is removed from the satellite and in-situ time series by considering scaled anomalies. One station (Mouthoumet of the ground network, located in a mountainous area, is removed from the analysis as very few ASCAT SSM estimates are available. No correlation is found for the station of Narbonne, which is close to the Mediterranean sea. On the other hand, nine stations present significant correlation levels. For two stations, a significant correlation is obtained when considering only part of the ASCAT data. The soil moisture measured in-situ at those stations, at 30 cm, is used to estimate the characteristic time length (T of an exponential filter applied to the ASCAT product. The best correlation between a soil water index derived from ASCAT and the in-situ soil moisture observations at 30 cm is obtained with a T-value of 14 days.

  4. An evaluation of ASCAT surface soil moisture products with in-situ observations in Southwestern France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albergel, C.; Rüdiger, C.; Carrer, D.; Calvet, J.-C.; Fritz, N.; Naeimi, V.; Bartalis, Z.; Hasenauer, S.

    2009-02-01

    A long term data acquisition effort of profile soil moisture is currently underway at 13 automatic weather stations located in Southwestern France. In this study, the soil moisture measured in-situ at 5 cm is used to evaluate the normalised surface soil moisture (SSM) estimates derived from coarse-resolution (25 km) active microwave data of the ASCAT scatterometer instrument (onboard METOP), issued by EUMETSAT for a period of 6 months (April-September) in 2007. The seasonal trend is removed from the satellite and in-situ time series by considering scaled anomalies. One station (Mouthoumet) of the ground network, located in a mountainous area, is removed from the analysis as very few ASCAT SSM estimates are available. No correlation is found for the station of Narbonne, which is close to the Mediterranean sea. On the other hand, nine stations present significant correlation levels. For two stations, a significant correlation is obtained when considering only part of the ASCAT data. The soil moisture measured in-situ at those stations, at 30 cm, is used to estimate the characteristic time length (T) of an exponential filter applied to the ASCAT product. The best correlation between a soil water index derived from ASCAT and the in-situ soil moisture observations at 30 cm is obtained with a T-value of 14 days.

  5. A breeding site model for regional, dynamical malaria simulations evaluated using in situ temporary ponds observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asare, Ernest O; Tompkins, Adrian M; Amekudzi, Leonard K; Ermert, Volker

    2016-03-31

    Daily observations of potential mosquito developmental habitats in a suburb of Kumasi in central Ghana reveal a strong variability in their water persistence times, which ranged between 11 and 81 days. The persistence of the ponds was strongly tied with rainfall, location and size of the puddles. A simple power-law relationship is found to fit the relationship between the average pond depth and area well. A prognostic water balance model is derived that describes the temporal evolution of the pond area and depth, incorporating the power-law geometrical relation. Pond area increases in response to rainfall, while evaporation and infiltration act as sink terms. Based on a range of evaluation metrics, the prognostic model is judged to provide a good representation of the pond coverage evolution at most sites. Finally, we demonstrate that the prognostic equation can be generalised and equally applied to a grid-cell to derive a fractional pond coverage, and thus can be implemented in spatially distributed models for relevant vector- borne diseases such as malaria.

  6. Observer variation in target volume delineation of lung cancer related to radiation oncologist-computer interaction: a 'Big Brother' evaluation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbakkers, R.J.; Duppen, J.C.; Fitton, I.; Deurloo, K.E.; Zijp, L.; Uitterhoeve, A.L.; Rodrigus, P.T.; Kramer, G.W.P.M.; Bussink, J.; Jaeger, K. de; Belderbos, J.S.; Hart, A.A.M.; Nowak, P.J.; Herk, M. van; Rasch, C.R.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To evaluate the process of target volume delineation in lung cancer for optimization of imaging, delineation protocol and delineation software. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eleven radiation oncologists (observers) from five different institutions delineated the Gross Tumor Volume

  7. A participative model for undertaking and evaluating scientific communication in Earth Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Astorina, Alba; Tomasoni, Irene

    2015-04-01

    Public communication of Science and Technology (PCST) is an integral part of the mission of the Italian National Research Council (CNR) and widely carried out among the scientific community. Recently it has also become a research field investigating practices, channels, tools and models of public engagement and their impact on the relation between Science and Society. Understanding such aspects is increasingly considered relevant for an effective and aware outreach. Within this context, CNR has adopted some innovative communication approaches addressed to different publics, such as stakeholders, users, media, young people and the general public, using participative methodologies. Besides being practices of communication promoting the scientific culture, such initiatives aim at understanding the models at the basis of the relationship between the scientific community and the public. To what extent do scientists put their communication and involvement strategies in discussion? Do they use to have a real exchange with their publics in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the participatory techniques they adopt in communicating and disseminating their activities? In this paper we present a case study of a communication and educational proposal recently developed by CNR in order to promote a mutual exchange between Education/School and Research, that are the most important actors in the production and the revision of the scientific knowledge. The proposal brings an ongoing CNR research project (its steps, subjects, tools, activities, costs etc) in classrooms, making use of interactive Earth Sciences workshops conducted directly by researchers. The ongoing CNR project shared with students studies Innovative Methodologies of Earth Observation supporting the Agricultural sector in Lombardy. It aims at exploiting the Aerospace Earth Observation (EO) tools to develop dedicated agricultural downstream services that will bring added economic value and benefits for Lombardy

  8. GLP-2: A POORLY UNDERSTOOD MEDIATOR ENROLLED IN VARIOUS BARIATRIC/METABOLIC SURGERY-RELATED PATHOPHYSIOLOGIC MECHANISMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAZZO, Everton; GESTIC, Martinho Antonio; UTRINI, Murillo Pimentel; CHAIM, Felipe David Mendonça; GELONEZE, Bruno; PAREJA, José Carlos; CHAIM, Elinton Adami; MAGRO, Daniéla Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a gastrointestinal hormone whose effects are predominantly trophic on the intestinal mucosa. Aim: Critically evaluate the current literature on the influence of bariatric/metabolic surgery on the levels of GLP-2 and its potential clinical implications. Method s: Narrative review through online research on the databases Medline and Lilacs. There were six prospective human studies, two cross-sectional human studies, and three experimental animal studies selected. Results: There is evidence demonstrating significant increase in the levels of GLP-2 following gastric bypass, Scopinaro operation, and sleeve gastrectomy. There are no differences between gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy in regards to the increase in the GLP-2 levels. There is no correlation between the postoperative levels of GLP-2 and the occurrence of adequate or insufficient postoperative weight loss. Conclusion: GLP-2 plays significant roles on the regulation of nutrient absorption, permeability of gut mucosa, control of bone resorption, and regulation of satiety. The overall impact of these effects potentially exerts a significant adaptive or compensatory effect within the context of varied bariatric surgical techniques. PMID:28076485

  9. First-Year Evaluation of Mexico's Tax on Nonessential Energy-Dense Foods: An Observational Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Batis

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to prevent continued increases in obesity and diabetes, in January 2014, the Mexican government implemented an 8% tax on nonessential foods with energy density ≥275 kcal/100 g and a peso-per-liter tax on sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs. Limited rigorous evaluations of food taxes exist worldwide. The objective of this study was to examine changes in volume of taxed and untaxed packaged food purchases in response to these taxes in the entire sample and stratified by socioeconomic status (SES.This study uses data on household packaged food purchases representative of the Mexican urban population from The Nielsen Company's Mexico Consumer Panel Services (CPS. We included 6,248 households that participated in the Nielsen CPS in at least 2 mo during 2012-2014; average household follow-up was 32.7 mo. We analyzed the volume of purchases of taxed and untaxed foods from January 2012 to December 2014, using a longitudinal, fixed-effects model that adjusted for preexisting trends to test whether the observed post-tax trend was significantly different from the one expected based on the pre-tax trend. We controlled for household characteristics and contextual factors like minimum salary and unemployment rate. The mean volume of purchases of taxed foods in 2014 changed by -25 g (95% confidence interval = -46, -11 per capita per month, or a 5.1% change beyond what would have been expected based on pre-tax (2012-2013 trends, with no corresponding change in purchases of untaxed foods. Low SES households purchased on average 10.2% less taxed foods than expected (-44 [-72, -16] g per capita per month; medium SES households purchased 5.8% less taxed foods than expected (-28 [-46, -11] g per capita per month, whereas high SES households' purchases did not change. The main limitations of our findings are the inability to infer causality because the taxes were implemented at the national level (lack of control group, our sample is only representative of

  10. First-Year Evaluation of Mexico's Tax on Nonessential Energy-Dense Foods: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batis, Carolina; Rivera, Juan A; Popkin, Barry M; Taillie, Lindsey Smith

    2016-07-01

    In an effort to prevent continued increases in obesity and diabetes, in January 2014, the Mexican government implemented an 8% tax on nonessential foods with energy density ≥275 kcal/100 g and a peso-per-liter tax on sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). Limited rigorous evaluations of food taxes exist worldwide. The objective of this study was to examine changes in volume of taxed and untaxed packaged food purchases in response to these taxes in the entire sample and stratified by socioeconomic status (SES). This study uses data on household packaged food purchases representative of the Mexican urban population from The Nielsen Company's Mexico Consumer Panel Services (CPS). We included 6,248 households that participated in the Nielsen CPS in at least 2 mo during 2012-2014; average household follow-up was 32.7 mo. We analyzed the volume of purchases of taxed and untaxed foods from January 2012 to December 2014, using a longitudinal, fixed-effects model that adjusted for preexisting trends to test whether the observed post-tax trend was significantly different from the one expected based on the pre-tax trend. We controlled for household characteristics and contextual factors like minimum salary and unemployment rate. The mean volume of purchases of taxed foods in 2014 changed by -25 g (95% confidence interval = -46, -11) per capita per month, or a 5.1% change beyond what would have been expected based on pre-tax (2012-2013) trends, with no corresponding change in purchases of untaxed foods. Low SES households purchased on average 10.2% less taxed foods than expected (-44 [-72, -16] g per capita per month); medium SES households purchased 5.8% less taxed foods than expected (-28 [-46, -11] g per capita per month), whereas high SES households' purchases did not change. The main limitations of our findings are the inability to infer causality because the taxes were implemented at the national level (lack of control group), our sample is only representative of urban

  11. Evaluation of Predicted and Observed Data on Biotransformation of Twenty-Nine Trace Organic Chemicals

    KAUST Repository

    Bertolini, Maria

    2011-07-01

    Trace organic chemicals present in household products, pesticides, pharmaceuticals and personal care products may have adverse ecotoxicological effects once they are released to the environment. These chemicals are usually transported with the sewage to wastewater treatment facilities, where they might be attenuated depending on the degree of treatment applied prior to discharge to receiving streams. This study evaluates the removal performance of 29 trace organic compounds during two different activated sludge treatment systems. Predominant attenuation processes such as biotransformation and sorption for the target compounds were identified. Biotransformation rate constants determined in this study were used to assess removal of compounds from other treatment plants with similar operational conditions, using data gathered from the literature. The commercial software Catalogic was applied to predict environmental fate of chemicals. The software program consisted of four models able to simulate molecular transformations and to generate degradation trees. In order to assess the accuracy of this program in predicting biotransformation, one biodegradation model is used to contrast predicted degradation pathway with metabolic pathways reported in the literature. The predicted outcome was correct for more than 40 percent of the 29 targeted substances, while 38 percent of the chemicals exhibited some degree of lower agreement between predicted and observed pathways. Percent removal data determined for the two treatment facilities was compared with transformation probability output from Catalogic. About 80 percent of the 29 compounds exhibited a good correlation between probability of transformation of the parent compound and percent removal data from the two treatment plants (R2 = 0.82 and 0.9). Based upon findings for 29 trace organic chemicals regarding removal during activated sludge treatment, attacked fragments present in their structures, predicted data from

  12. An ultrasound evaluation of laryngeal mask airway position in pediatric patients: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongmin; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Won Oak; Kil, Hae Keum

    2015-02-01

    In children, the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) is frequently displaced within the hypopharynx, resulting in repositioning of the device. When the tip of the LMA is placed in the esophageal inlet, the arytenoids are moved ventrally. When the LMA is rotated or deviated, the ventral movement of the arytenoids may result in asymmetric elevation of an arytenoid cartilage, which can be detected with ultrasound (US). In this study, we sought to estimate the incidence of LMA malposition detected with US in pediatric patients. The primary end point was to compare the incidence of LMA malposition between US and fiber optic bronchoscopy (FOB). The secondary end points were to find the interrelationship between US-detected and FOB-detected malposition of the LMA and to locate the diagnostic performance of US in detecting LMA malposition. In this observational study, 100 consecutive children were included. After anesthetic induction, US evaluation was performed before and after LMA insertion to obtain the glottic image on the anterior neck. FOB was performed to assess LMA position (FOB LMA grade and LMA rotation grade). With a post-LMA US image, the symmetry of the arytenoid cartilages was evaluated. Asymmetrical elevation of an arytenoid cartilage in reference to the glottic midline and the opposite arytenoid cartilage was graded as 0 to 3 (US arytenoid grade). The interrelationships between US arytenoid grade and FOB LMA grade or LMA rotation grade were assessed. The incidence of asymmetrical elevation of an arytenoid was 50% (95% confidence interval [CI], 40%-60%). On FOB, the incidence of LMA malposition was 78% (95% CI, 69%-86%), and that of LMA rotation was 43% (95% CI, 33%-53%). The incidence of LMA malposition was higher with FOB (P < 0.0001), but the incidence of rotation was similar (P = 0.395). US arytenoid grade did not correlate with FOB LMA grade (P = 0.611) but showed a significant correlation with LMA rotation grade (P < 0.0001; 95% CI, 60%-83%). To detect a

  13. Evaluation of the Quality of Reporting of Observational Studies in Otorhinolaryngology - Based on the STROBE Statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriksma, Martine; Joosten, Michiel H M A; Peters, Jeroen P M; Grolman, Wilko; Stegeman, Inge

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Observational studies are the most frequently published studies in literature. When randomized controlled trials cannot be conducted because of ethical or practical considerations, an observational study design is the first choice. The STROBE Statement (STrengthening the Reporting of

  14. Clinical evaluation of the use of a multifunctional remotely controlled insulin pump: multicenter observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boizel, Robert; Pinget, Michel; Lachgar, Karim; Parkin, Christopher G; Grulet, Hervé; Guillon-Metz, Françoise; Weissmann, Joerg

    2014-11-01

    Current insulin pumps now feature advanced functions for calculating insulin dosages, delivering insulin and analyzing data, however, the perceived usefulness of these functions in clinical settings has not been well studied. We assessed the use and patient perceptions of an insulin delivery system (Accu-Chek® Combo, Roche Diagnostics, Mannheim, Germany) that combines an insulin pump and a handheld multifunctional blood glucose meter with integrated remote control functions. This prospective, observational, multicenter study enrolled 74 type 1 diabetes patients within 13 weeks after starting use of the pump system. At 4 to 24 weeks, investigators collected usage data from the latest 14-day period. Seventy-two patients completed the evaluation, aged 39 ± 15 years, diabetes duration 16 ± 13 years, HbA1c 8.3 ± 1.6%. At follow-up, 62 (86.1%) patients used the remote control for ≥50% of all boluses, 20 (27.8%) used the bolus advisor for ≥50% of all boluses, and 42 (58.3%) viewed at least 1 of the e-logbook reports. More than 95% of users appraised the functions as easy-to-use and useful; median scores from VAS (0 = useless to 100 = indispensable) ranged from 72 to 85. A high percentage of study patients used the system's advanced features, especially the remote control feature for bolusing. Overall, patients assessed the functions as useful and easy to use. Results support the implementation of these smart capabilities in further insulin pump developments. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  15. Accurate CT-MR image registration for deep brain stimulation: a multi-observer evaluation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühaak, Jan; Derksen, Alexander; Heldmann, Stefan; Hallmann, Marc; Meine, Hans

    2015-03-01

    Since the first clinical interventions in the late 1980s, Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus has evolved into a very effective treatment option for patients with severe Parkinson's disease. DBS entails the implantation of an electrode that performs high frequency stimulations to a target area deep inside the brain. A very accurate placement of the electrode is a prerequisite for positive therapy outcome. The assessment of the intervention result is of central importance in DBS treatment and involves the registration of pre- and postinterventional scans. In this paper, we present an image processing pipeline for highly accurate registration of postoperative CT to preoperative MR. Our method consists of two steps: a fully automatic pre-alignment using a detection of the skull tip in the CT based on fuzzy connectedness, and an intensity-based rigid registration. The registration uses the Normalized Gradient Fields distance measure in a multilevel Gauss-Newton optimization framework and focuses on a region around the subthalamic nucleus in the MR. The accuracy of our method was extensively evaluated on 20 DBS datasets from clinical routine and compared with manual expert registrations. For each dataset, three independent registrations were available, thus allowing to relate algorithmic with expert performance. Our method achieved an average registration error of 0.95mm in the target region around the subthalamic nucleus as compared to an inter-observer variability of 1.12 mm. Together with the short registration time of about five seconds on average, our method forms a very attractive package that can be considered ready for clinical use.

  16. Evaluating Observational Learning in a Competitive Two-Sided Crowdsourcing Market: A Bayesian Inferential Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayaburi, Emmanuel Wusuhon Yanibo

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the effect of observational learning in crowdsourcing markets as a lens to identify appropriate mechanism(s) for sustaining this increasingly popular business model. Observational learning occurs when crowdsourcing participating agents obtain knowledge from signals they observe in the marketplace and incorporate such…

  17. GLP-2: A POORLY UNDERSTOOD MEDIATOR ENROLLED IN VARIOUS BARIATRIC/METABOLIC SURGERY-RELATED PATHOPHYSIOLOGIC MECHANISMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzo, Everton; Gestic, Martinho Antonio; Utrini, Murillo Pimentel; Chaim, Felipe David Mendonça; Geloneze, Bruno; Pareja, José Carlos; Chaim, Elinton Adami; Magro, Daniéla Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a gastrointestinal hormone whose effects are predominantly trophic on the intestinal mucosa. Critically evaluate the current literature on the influence of bariatric/metabolic surgery on the levels of GLP-2 and its potential clinical implications. s: Narrative review through online research on the databases Medline and Lilacs. There were six prospective human studies, two cross-sectional human studies, and three experimental animal studies selected. There is evidence demonstrating significant increase in the levels of GLP-2 following gastric bypass, Scopinaro operation, and sleeve gastrectomy. There are no differences between gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy in regards to the increase in the GLP-2 levels. There is no correlation between the postoperative levels of GLP-2 and the occurrence of adequate or insufficient postoperative weight loss. GLP-2 plays significant roles on the regulation of nutrient absorption, permeability of gut mucosa, control of bone resorption, and regulation of satiety. The overall impact of these effects potentially exerts a significant adaptive or compensatory effect within the context of varied bariatric surgical techniques. O peptídeo semelhante ao glucagon-2 (GLP-2) é hormônio gastrointestinal com efeitos predominantemente tróficos sobre a mucosa intestinal. Avaliar criticamente a literatura atual a respeito da cirurgia bariátrica/metabólica sobre os níveis de GLP-2 e suas potenciais implicações clínicas. Revisão narrativa realizada através de pesquisa on-line nas bases de dados Medline e LILACS. Foram selecionados seis estudos prospectivos em humanos, dois transversais em humanos e três experimentais em animais. Existem evidências demonstrando aumento significativo nos níveis de GLP-2 após o bypass gástrico, a operação de Scopinaro e a gastrectomia vertical. Não foram observadas diferenças entre o bypass gástrico e a gastrectomia vertical em relação ao aumento do GLP-2

  18. EVALUATION ON THE SEISMIC RESPONSE CHARACTERISTICS OF A ROAD EMBANKMENT BASED ON THE MODERATE EARTHQUAKE OBSERVATION AND THE MICROTREMOR MEASUREMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Yoshiya; Ichii, Koji; Yamada, Masayuki; Tokida, Ken-Ichi; Takezawa, Koichiro; Shibao, Susumu; Mitsushita, Junji; Murata, Akira; Furukawa, Aiko; Koizumi, Keigo

    Accurate evaluation on the seismic response characteristics of a road embankment is very important for the rational seismic assessment. However, in a lot of previous studies, the seismic response characteristics of an embankment were evaluated based on the results of shaking table test, centrifuge model test and dynamic FEM analysis. In this study, the transfer function and the shear wave velocity of a road embankment were evaluated based on the in-situ records of moderate earthquake observation and microtremor measurement. Test results show the possibility that the shear wave velocity of an embankment can be estimated by the earthquake observation or the microtremor measurement and the dynamic linear FEM analysis.

  19. THE IMPORTANCE OF OBSERVING THE DIFFERENCE IN WEBSITE EVALUATIONS OBTAINED FROM DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Rondović

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to show how website evaulations differ if performed by different evaluators despite the same methodological framework being used for the assessment. A quantitative analysis of websites was performed according to the modified evaluation framework based on the 2QCV3Q-model. The AHP method was used for the verification of the weight criteria, while a single-factor ANOVA was used to check the difference in the average scores of the evaluations performed by three groups of evaluators The results obtained by the single-factor ANOVA showed a statistically significant difference in the average scores of internal evaluation when compared to the evaluation done by clients and independent evaluators. The results obtained can be used in the banking industry as guidelines and recommendations for the future design or redesign of websites, as well as a literary base for comparative analyses of this kind in developing countries.

  20. Performance and Evaluation of the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office Observing System Simulation Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prive, Nikki; Errico, R. M.; Carvalho, D.

    2018-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (NASA/GMAO) has spent more than a decade developing and implementing a global Observing System Simulation Experiment framework for use in evaluting both new observation types as well as the behavior of data assimilation systems. The NASA/GMAO OSSE has constantly evolved to relect changes in the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation data assimiation system, the Global Earth Observing System model, version 5 (GEOS-5), and the real world observational network. Software and observational datasets for the GMAO OSSE are publicly available, along with a technical report. Substantial modifications have recently been made to the NASA/GMAO OSSE framework, including the character of synthetic observation errors, new instrument types, and more sophisticated atmospheric wind vectors. These improvements will be described, along with the overall performance of the current OSSE. Lessons learned from investigations into correlated errors and model error will be discussed.

  1. Blood wastage reduction: a 10-year observational evaluation in a large teaching institution in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoric, Lana; Daurat, Gerald; Demattei, Christophe; Macheboeuf, Martine; Boisson, Christophe; Bouix, Olivier; Gris, Jean C; Ripart, Jacques; Cuvillon, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    Blood transfusion has increased significantly during the last decade and blood wastage reduction is a medical and economic challenge in hospital practice and for institutional quality, particularly in the ICU and operating theatre. To evaluate the impact of multiple strategies in one hospital to reduce red blood cell wastage. Multicentre, prospective, comparative, observational study. Over 10 years, the study was conducted over two time periods. During the first period (2000 to 2003), information was given to medical professionals about blood wastage, and audits (reasons for wastage) were performed, in a large teaching institution (more than 4% wastage in 1999). The second period (2004 to 2010) was designed to analyse the impact of seven strategies intended to minimise blood wastage. Blood wastage reduction in the local centre was compared with regional (64 institutions) and national centres (1470 institutions). Reduction was compared using the Mann-Kendall non-parametric trend test. Local centre (22,572 transfused patients, Nîmes, France), regional centre (South France, 64 institutions, 208,525 transfused patients) and national centres (France, 1470 institutions). Medical and surgical procedures. The primary end-point was to describe the percentage of blood wastage for two periods in a local centre. The secondary objective was to compare the percentage of blood wastage in the local centre with wastage at regional and national centres. Over the 10 year study period the percentage of blood wastage in the local centre decreased, with a significant reduction in the second period, from more than 4% (1999) to less than 1% (2010; P < 0.05). Blood wastage at regional and national centres was never less than 1%. Inadequate containers for transport, absence of a temperature analyser in the ICU and inadequate intraoperative blood strategies (excessive orders of blood) were the main causes of wastage. Correction of these points affected the outcome favourably in the second

  2. Evaluating catchment-scale hydrological modeling by means of terrestrial gravity observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasan, S.; Troch, P.A.; Bogaart, P.W.; Kroner, C.

    2008-01-01

    In a previous study (Hasan et al., 2006) we applied time series analysis and distributed hydrological modeling techniques to investigate the effect of hydrological processes on observed terrestrial gravity residuals. In this study we apply terrestrial gravity observations (measured in one location)

  3. Evaluating the Validity of Classroom Observations in the Head Start Designation Renewal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashburn, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Classroom observations are increasingly common in education policies as a means to assess the quality of teachers and/or education programs for purposes of making high-stakes decisions. This article considers one policy, the Head Start Designation Renewal System (DRS), which involves classroom observations to assess the quality of Head Start…

  4. Home is to be understood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie; Werner Hansen, Siv

    2018-01-01

    situation in Denmark is, as in many other countries at the moment, complex. On the one hand laws and regulations are concurrently tightened concerning residency permits, boarder control, and possession of belongings. On the other hand a nationwide humanitarian (non-political) network of citizens who have...... engages with the current societal issue of migration by instigating a co-creation experiment, which aims to convert the museum’s vision (defined by values such as ‘community’, ‘participation’, ‘responsibility’ and ‘change’) into practice. In particular, we address how the museum creates a space...... and visual ethnography (Pink, 2013; Rose, 2012) from the process of initiating and planning of the project and including visual material from the launch of the exhibition. References: Bishop, C. (2006). The Social turn: Collaboration and Its Discontents, Artforum http...

  5. Can delusions be understood linguistically?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinzen, Wolfram; Rosselló, Joana; McKenna, Peter

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Delusions are widely believed to reflect disturbed cognitive function, but the nature of this remains elusive. The “un-Cartesian” cognitive-linguistic hypothesis maintains (a) that there is no thought separate from language, that is, there is no distinct mental space removed from language where “thinking” takes place; and (b) that a somewhat broadened concept of grammar is responsible for bestowing meaning on propositions, and this among other things gives them their quality of being true or false. It is argued that a loss of propositional meaning explains why delusions are false, impossible and sometimes fantastic. A closely related abnormality, failure of linguistic embedding, can additionally account for why delusions are held with fixed conviction and are not adequately justified by the patient. The un-Cartesian linguistic approach to delusions has points of contact with Frith’s theory that inability to form meta-representations underlies a range of schizophrenic symptoms. It may also be relevant to the nature of the “second factor” in monothematic delusions in neurological disease. Finally, it can inform the current debate about whether or not delusions really are beliefs. PMID:27322493

  6. We Have Not Understood Descartes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallias, Andras

    1996-01-01

    Describes a personal involvement with digital media and the origins of the conception of the "diagrammatic" poem. Reflects on what is considered to be a poem in tune with today's computerized society. (PA)

  7. Increasing community capacity for participatory evaluation of healthy eating and active living strategies through direct observations and environmental audits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemner, Allison L; Stachecki, Jessica R; Bildner, Michele E; Brennan, Laura K

    2015-01-01

    Local partnerships from the Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities initiative elected to participate in enhanced evaluation trainings to collect data through environmental audits and direct observations as well as to build their evaluation capacity. Environmental audit and direct observation tools and protocols were adapted for the relevant healthy eating and active living policy and environmental change approaches being conducted by the Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities partnerships. Customized trainings were conducted by the evaluation team to increase capacity and understanding for evaluation activities. A total of 87 trainings were conducted by the evaluation team in 31 Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities community partnerships. Data were collected for a total of 41 environmental audits and 17 direct observations. Community case examples illustrate how these trainings developed evaluation capacity. For instance, youth from one community presented environmental audit findings to local elected officials. The 31 partnerships participating in the community-based evaluation efforts resulted in 164 individuals trained in collecting context-specific data to assess the impact of healthy eating and active living policy and environmental strategies designed to create community change.

  8. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Wildlife Detection and Observation Technologies at a Solar Power Tower Facility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H Diehl

    Full Text Available Solar power towers produce electrical energy from sunlight at an industrial scale. Little is known about the effects of this technology on flying animals and few methods exist for automatically detecting or observing wildlife at solar towers and other tall anthropogenic structures. Smoking objects are sometimes observed co-occurring with reflected, concentrated light ("solar flux" in the airspace around solar towers, but the identity and origins of such objects can be difficult to determine. In this observational pilot study at the world's largest solar tower facility, we assessed the efficacy of using radar, surveillance video, and insect trapping to detect and observe animals flying near the towers. During site visits in May and September 2014, we monitored the airspace surrounding towers and observed insects, birds, and bats under a variety of environmental and operational conditions. We detected and broadly differentiated animals or objects moving through the airspace generally using radar and near solar towers using several video imaging methods. Video revealed what appeared to be mostly small insects burning in the solar flux. Also, we occasionally detected birds flying in the solar flux but could not accurately identify birds to species or the types of insects and small objects composing the vast majority of smoking targets. Insect trapping on the ground was somewhat effective at sampling smaller insects around the tower, and presence and abundance of insects in the traps generally trended with radar and video observations. Traps did not tend to sample the larger insects we sometimes observed flying in the solar flux or found dead on the ground beneath the towers. Some of the methods we tested (e.g., video surveillance could be further assessed and potentially used to automatically detect and observe flying animals in the vicinity of solar towers to advance understanding about their effects on wildlife.

  9. Evaluating the effectiveness of wildlife detection and observation technologies at a solar power tower facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Robert H.; Valdez, Ernest W.; Preston, Todd M.; Wellik, Mike J.; Cryan, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Solar power towers produce electrical energy from sunlight at an industrial scale. Little is known about the effects of this technology on flying animals and few methods exist for automatically detecting or observing wildlife at solar towers and other tall anthropogenic structures. Smoking objects are sometimes observed co-occurring with reflected, concentrated light (“solar flux”) in the airspace around solar towers, but the identity and origins of such objects can be difficult to determine. In this observational pilot study at the world’s largest solar tower facility, we assessed the efficacy of using radar, surveillance video, and insect trapping to detect and observe animals flying near the towers. During site visits in May and September 2014, we monitored the airspace surrounding towers and observed insects, birds, and bats under a variety of environmental and operational conditions. We detected and broadly differentiated animals or objects moving through the airspace generally using radar and near solar towers using several video imaging methods. Video revealed what appeared to be mostly small insects burning in the solar flux. Also, we occasionally detected birds flying in the solar flux but could not accurately identify birds to species or the types of insects and small objects composing the vast majority of smoking targets. Insect trapping on the ground was somewhat effective at sampling smaller insects around the tower, and presence and abundance of insects in the traps generally trended with radar and video observations. Traps did not tend to sample the larger insects we sometimes observed flying in the solar flux or found dead on the ground beneath the towers. Some of the methods we tested (e.g., video surveillance) could be further assessed and potentially used to automatically detect and observe flying animals in the vicinity of solar towers to advance understanding about their effects on wildlife.

  10. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Wildlife Detection and Observation Technologies at a Solar Power Tower Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Robert H; Valdez, Ernest W; Preston, Todd M; Wellik, Michael J; Cryan, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    Solar power towers produce electrical energy from sunlight at an industrial scale. Little is known about the effects of this technology on flying animals and few methods exist for automatically detecting or observing wildlife at solar towers and other tall anthropogenic structures. Smoking objects are sometimes observed co-occurring with reflected, concentrated light ("solar flux") in the airspace around solar towers, but the identity and origins of such objects can be difficult to determine. In this observational pilot study at the world's largest solar tower facility, we assessed the efficacy of using radar, surveillance video, and insect trapping to detect and observe animals flying near the towers. During site visits in May and September 2014, we monitored the airspace surrounding towers and observed insects, birds, and bats under a variety of environmental and operational conditions. We detected and broadly differentiated animals or objects moving through the airspace generally using radar and near solar towers using several video imaging methods. Video revealed what appeared to be mostly small insects burning in the solar flux. Also, we occasionally detected birds flying in the solar flux but could not accurately identify birds to species or the types of insects and small objects composing the vast majority of smoking targets. Insect trapping on the ground was somewhat effective at sampling smaller insects around the tower, and presence and abundance of insects in the traps generally trended with radar and video observations. Traps did not tend to sample the larger insects we sometimes observed flying in the solar flux or found dead on the ground beneath the towers. Some of the methods we tested (e.g., video surveillance) could be further assessed and potentially used to automatically detect and observe flying animals in the vicinity of solar towers to advance understanding about their effects on wildlife.

  11. Experimental evaluation of non-classical correlations between measurement outcomes and target observable in a quantum measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Iinuma, Masataka; Suzuki, Yutaro; Nii, Taiki; Kinoshita, Ryuji; Hofmann, Holger F.

    2015-01-01

    In general, it is difficult to evaluate measurement errors when the initial and final conditions of the measurement make it impossible to identify the correct value of the target observable. Ozawa proposed a solution based on the operator algebra of observables which has recently been used in experiments investigating the error-disturbance trade-off of quantum measurements. Importantly, this solution makes surprisingly detailed statements about the relations between measurement outcomes and t...

  12. Automated and observer based light field indicator edge evaluation in diagnostic X-ray equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottaro, Marcio; Nagy, Balazs Vince; Soares, Fernanda Cristina Salvador; Rosendo, Danilo Cabral, E-mail: marcio@iee.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil); Optics and Engineering Informatics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budapest (Hungary)

    2017-04-15

    Introduction: To analyze edge detection and optical contrast calculation of light field-indicators used in X-ray via automated- and observer-based methods, and comparison with current standard approaches, which do not give exact definition for light field edge determination. Methods: Automated light sensor array was used to measure the penumbra zone of the edge in the standard X-ray equipment, while trained and naive human observers were asked to mark the light field edge according to their own determination. Different interpretations of the contrast were then calculated and compared. Results: In contrast to automated measurements of edge definition and detection, measurements by human observers showed large inter-observer variation independent of their training with X-ray equipment. Different contrast calculations considering the different edge definitions gave very different contrast values. Conclusion: As the main conclusion, we propose a more exact edge definition of the X-ray light field, corresponding well to the average human observer's edge determination. The new edge definition method with automated systems would reduce human variability in edge determination. Such errors could potentially affect the approval of X-ray equipment, and also increase the radiation dose. The automated measurement based on human observers’ edge definition and the corresponding contrast calculation may lead to a more precise light field calibration, which enables reduced irradiation doses on radiology patients. (author)

  13. Automated and observer based light field indicator edge evaluation in diagnostic X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottaro, Marcio; Nagy, Balazs Vince; Soares, Fernanda Cristina Salvador; Rosendo, Danilo Cabral

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: To analyze edge detection and optical contrast calculation of light field-indicators used in X-ray via automated- and observer-based methods, and comparison with current standard approaches, which do not give exact definition for light field edge determination. Methods: Automated light sensor array was used to measure the penumbra zone of the edge in the standard X-ray equipment, while trained and naive human observers were asked to mark the light field edge according to their own determination. Different interpretations of the contrast were then calculated and compared. Results: In contrast to automated measurements of edge definition and detection, measurements by human observers showed large inter-observer variation independent of their training with X-ray equipment. Different contrast calculations considering the different edge definitions gave very different contrast values. Conclusion: As the main conclusion, we propose a more exact edge definition of the X-ray light field, corresponding well to the average human observer's edge determination. The new edge definition method with automated systems would reduce human variability in edge determination. Such errors could potentially affect the approval of X-ray equipment, and also increase the radiation dose. The automated measurement based on human observers’ edge definition and the corresponding contrast calculation may lead to a more precise light field calibration, which enables reduced irradiation doses on radiology patients. (author)

  14. Evaluation and Improvement of Cloud and Convective Parameterizations from Analyses of ARM Observations and Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Genio, Anthony D. [NASA Goddard Inst. for Space Studies (GISS), New York, NY (United States)

    2016-03-11

    Over this period the PI and his performed a broad range of data analysis, model evaluation, and model improvement studies using ARM data. These included cloud regimes in the TWP and their evolution over the MJO; M-PACE IOP SCM-CRM intercomparisons; simulations of convective updraft strength and depth during TWP-ICE; evaluation of convective entrainment parameterizations using TWP-ICE simulations; evaluation of GISS GCM cloud behavior vs. long-term SGP cloud statistics; classification of aerosol semi-direct effects on cloud cover; depolarization lidar constraints on cloud phase; preferred states of the winter Arctic atmosphere, surface, and sub-surface; sensitivity of convection to tropospheric humidity; constraints on the parameterization of mesoscale organization from TWP-ICE WRF simulations; updraft and downdraft properties in TWP-ICE simulated convection; insights from long-term ARM records at Manus and Nauru.

  15. Application of the upper lip catch test for airway evaluation in edentulous patients: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zahid Hussain; Arbabi, Shahriar; Yekaninejad, Mir Saeed; Khan, Ramooz Hussain

    2014-01-01

    Application of upper lip catch test (ULCT) for airway evaluation in edentulous patients. This research is an evaluation of a clinical diagnostic test in edentulous patients prior to operation. Five hundred eighty eight edentulous patients in a referral university hospital, between March 2008 and June 2011 scheduled for elective surgery under general anesthesia were enrolled. Those unable to open the mouth and those with pharyngo-laryngeal pathology were excluded. ULCT was assessed and compared with Cormack-Lehane grading as a gold standard for airway evaluation. A high negative predictive value of 99.4% was a notable finding for the ULCT. The results also showed a high specificity (89.4%), high sensitivity (75.0%) and a high accuracy (89.3%) in a comparatively higher range for the ULCT. The ULCT proved to be a useful predictor for airway assessment in edentulous patients in this setting. Further studies are needed to reconfirm its validity in other ethnic groups.

  16. Distributed Space Mission Design for Earth Observation Using Model-Based Performance Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Sreeja; LeMoigne-Stewart, Jacqueline; Cervantes, Ben; DeWeck, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Distributed Space Missions (DSMs) are gaining momentum in their application to earth observation missions owing to their unique ability to increase observation sampling in multiple dimensions. DSM design is a complex problem with many design variables, multiple objectives determining performance and cost and emergent, often unexpected, behaviors. There are very few open-access tools available to explore the tradespace of variables, minimize cost and maximize performance for pre-defined science goals, and therefore select the most optimal design. This paper presents a software tool that can multiple DSM architectures based on pre-defined design variable ranges and size those architectures in terms of predefined science and cost metrics. The tool will help a user select Pareto optimal DSM designs based on design of experiments techniques. The tool will be applied to some earth observation examples to demonstrate its applicability in making some key decisions between different performance metrics and cost metrics early in the design lifecycle.

  17. Automated and observer based light field indicator edge evaluation in diagnostic X-ray equipment

    OpenAIRE

    Bottaro, Márcio; Nagy, Balázs Vince; Soares, Fernanda Cristina Salvador; Rosendo, Danilo Cabral

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction To analyze edge detection and optical contrast calculation of light field-indicators used in X-ray via automated- and observer-based methods, and comparison with current standard approaches, which do not give exact definition for light field edge determination. Methods Automated light sensor array was used to measure the penumbra zone of the edge in the standard X-ray equipment, while trained and naïve human observers were asked to mark the light field edge according t...

  18. Evaluation of NLDAS-2 Multi-Model Simulated Soil Moisture Using the Observations from North American Soil Moisture Dataset (NASMD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Y.; Ek, M. B.; Wu, Y.; Ford, T.; Quiring, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    The North American Land Data Assimilation System phase 2 (NLDAS-2, http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/mmb/nldas/) has generated 35-years (1979-2013) of hydrometeorological products from four state-of-the-art land surface models (Noah, Mosaic, SAC, VIC). These products include energy fluxes, water fluxes, and state variables. Soil moisture is one of the most important state variables in NLDAS-2 as it plays a key role in land-atmosphere interaction, regional climate and ecological model simulation, water resource management, and other study areas. The soil moisture data from these models have been used for US operational drought monitoring activities, water resources management and planning, initialization of regional weather and climate models, and other meteorological and hydrological research purposes. However, these data have not yet been comprehensively evaluated due to the lack of extensive soil moisture observations. In this study, observations from over 1200 sites in the North America compiled from 27 observational networks in the North American Soil Moisture Database (NASMD, http://soilmoisture.tamu.edu/) were used to evaluate the model-simulated daily soil moisture for different vegetation cover varying from grassland to forest, and different soil texture varying from sand to clay. Seven states in the United States from NASMD were selected based on known measurement error estimates for the evaluation. Statistical metrics, such as anomaly correlation, root-mean-square errors (RMSE), and bias are computed to assess NLDAS-2 soil moisture products. Three sensitivity tests were performed using the Noah model to examine the effect of soil texture and vegetation type mismatch on NLDAS-2 soil moisture simulation. In the first test, site observed soil texture was used. In the second test, site observed vegetation type/land cover was used. In the third test, both site observed soil texture and vegetation type were used. The results from three sensitivity tests will be

  19. Some Observations on the Relationships Between Research Productivity and Student Evaluations of Courses and Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, William A.; Singhal, Sushila

    "Does the good researcher tend to be a good teacher, and vice versa?" University administrators contend that teaching and research are equally important, though students claim that researchers neglect teaching and professors claim that only their research efforts are rewarded. In this study, course and instructor evaluations were defined…

  20. DOD and VA. Preliminary Observations on Efforts to Improve Care Management and Disability Evaluations for Servicemembers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-27

    including hiring medical taff in a competitive market, replacing temporarily borrowed personnel with ermanent staff, and getting eligible...servicemembers into the units. To help ervicemembers navigate the disability evaluation process, the Army is ncreasing staff in several areas, but gaps and...remain, including hiring medical staff in a competitive market, replacing temporarily borrowed personnel with permanent staff, and getting eligible

  1. Teacher Evaluations: A Correlation of Observed Teaching Practice and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Pamela D.

    2017-01-01

    This quantitative study employed a correlational research design to examine the extent to which overall teacher evaluation scores and instructional practice domain scores relate to student achievement scores in mathematics and English language arts among 3rd grade students. This research tested the theory of instruction by Jerome Bruner as it…

  2. Contemplating the Presence of Third Party Observers and Facilitators in Psychological Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Randy K.; Krauss, Daniel A.

    2009-01-01

    Significant controversy surrounds how psychologists should balance competing interests when considering whether and under what conditions third parties should be permitted to be present during psychological evaluations. This is especially true in forensic contexts where much is often at stake for those being assessed. Unfortunately, existing…

  3. The Use of Observational Diaries in In-Training Evaluation: Student Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govaerts, Marjan J. B.; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.; Schuwirth, Lambert W. T.; Muijtjens, Arno M. M.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: In health science education clinical clerkships serve the twofold purpose of guiding student learning and assessment of performance. Evidently, both formative and summative assessment procedures are needed in clerkship assessment. In-training evaluation (ITE) has the potential to serve both assessment functions. Implementation of…

  4. Observational Studies on Evaluating the Safety and Adverse Effects of Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jin-Ling; Wang, Jung-Der

    2013-01-01

    Background. This study aims to share our experiences when carrying out observational studies of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Methods. We have proactively monitored the safety profiles of Duhuo Jisheng Tang (DJT), Suan Zao Ren Tang (SZRT), and TMN-1. A list of adverse events (AEs), complete blood counts, and liver and kidney function tests were obtained from the participants during their scheduled hospital visits. Retrospective observational studies were conducted based on the reimbursement database of the National Health Insurance system, Taiwan, to explore the relationship between the use of TCM that have been adulterated by aristolochic acid and the risk from both nephrotoxins and carcinogens. Results. A total of 221, 287, and 203 AEs were detected after SZRT, DJT, and TMN-1 had been taken, respectively. Dizziness, headache, stomach ache, and diarrhea were judged to be probably related to SZRT treatment. Retrospective observational studies found an association between the consumption of aristolochic acid-containing Chinese formulae such as Mu Tong and an increased risk of CKD, ESRD, and urinary tract cancer. Conclusion. Prospective and retrospective observational studies seem to have specific advantages when investigating the safety and adverse effects of TCM therapies, as well as possibly other alternative/complementary therapies. PMID:24159351

  5. Observational Studies on Evaluating the Safety and Adverse Effects of Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Nein Lai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study aims to share our experiences when carrying out observational studies of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM. Methods. We have proactively monitored the safety profiles of Duhuo Jisheng Tang (DJT, Suan Zao Ren Tang (SZRT, and TMN-1. A list of adverse events (AEs, complete blood counts, and liver and kidney function tests were obtained from the participants during their scheduled hospital visits. Retrospective observational studies were conducted based on the reimbursement database of the National Health Insurance system, Taiwan, to explore the relationship between the use of TCM that have been adulterated by aristolochic acid and the risk from both nephrotoxins and carcinogens. Results. A total of 221, 287, and 203 AEs were detected after SZRT, DJT, and TMN-1 had been taken, respectively. Dizziness, headache, stomach ache, and diarrhea were judged to be probably related to SZRT treatment. Retrospective observational studies found an association between the consumption of aristolochic acid-containing Chinese formulae such as Mu Tong and an increased risk of CKD, ESRD, and urinary tract cancer. Conclusion. Prospective and retrospective observational studies seem to have specific advantages when investigating the safety and adverse effects of TCM therapies, as well as possibly other alternative/complementary therapies.

  6. Automated and observer based light field indicator edge evaluation in diagnostic X-ray equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Bottaro

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction To analyze edge detection and optical contrast calculation of light field-indicators used in X-ray via automated- and observer-based methods, and comparison with current standard approaches, which do not give exact definition for light field edge determination. Methods Automated light sensor array was used to measure the penumbra zone of the edge in the standard X-ray equipment, while trained and naïve human observers were asked to mark the light field edge according to their own determination. Different interpretations of the contrast were then calculated and compared. Results In contrast to automated measurements of edge definition and detection, measurements by human observers showed large inter-observer variation independent of their training with X-ray equipment. Different contrast calculations considering the different edge definitions gave very different contrast values. Conclusion As the main conclusion, we propose a more exact edge definition of the X-ray light field, corresponding well to the average human observer’s edge determination. The new edge definition method with automated systems would reduce human variability in edge determination. Such errors could potentially affect the approval of X-ray equipment, and also increase the radiation dose. The automated measurement based on human observers’ edge definition and the corresponding contrast calculation may lead to a more precise light field calibration, which enables reduced irradiation doses on radiology patients.

  7. On Participant-Observation as a Component of Evaluation: Strategies, Constraints and Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Barbara

    1982-01-01

    Daily participant observations of social development over two years at Family House, a residential treatment program, were coded into a narrative and analyzed using a phenomenological perspective allowing "native categories" of significance to emerge and guide the analysis. The strengths and limitations of this novel research strategy…

  8. Development of the Teacher Feedback Observation Scheme: evaluating the quality of feedback in peer groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thurlings, Marieke; Vermeulen, Marjan; Kreijns, Karel; Bastiaens, Theo; Stijnen, Sjef

    2018-01-01

    Research suggests that feedback is an essential element in learning. This study focuses on feedback that teachers provide in reciprocal peer groups to improve their performance in the classroom. The Teacher Feedback Observation Scheme (TFOS) was developed to identify feedback patterns, which

  9. Evaluating effectiveness and safety toward electronic cigarette among Malaysian vapers: One-month observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizur Rahman

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: A month follow-up showed a good smoking cessation rate among Malaysian vapers mainly in single users, whereas less number of quitters but the high reduction in tobacco cigarette consumption observed in dual users without any harmful effects. Furthermore, extended period studies are warranted to confirm its long-term safety and effectiveness among different Malaysian population.

  10. Using video-based observation research methods in primary care health encounters to evaluate complex interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asan, Onur; Montague, Enid

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the use of video-based observation research methods in primary care environment and highlight important methodological considerations and provide practical guidance for primary care and human factors researchers conducting video studies to understand patient-clinician interaction in primary care settings. We reviewed studies in the literature which used video methods in health care research, and we also used our own experience based on the video studies we conducted in primary care settings. This paper highlighted the benefits of using video techniques, such as multi-channel recording and video coding, and compared "unmanned" video recording with the traditional observation method in primary care research. We proposed a list that can be followed step by step to conduct an effective video study in a primary care setting for a given problem. This paper also described obstacles, researchers should anticipate when using video recording methods in future studies. With the new technological improvements, video-based observation research is becoming a promising method in primary care and HFE research. Video recording has been under-utilised as a data collection tool because of confidentiality and privacy issues. However, it has many benefits as opposed to traditional observations, and recent studies using video recording methods have introduced new research areas and approaches.

  11. Does design matter? systematic evaluation of the impact of analytical choices on effect estimates in observational studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Madigan (David); P.B. Ryan (Patrick); M.J. Schuemie (Martijn)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Clinical studies that use observational databases, such as administrative claims and electronic health records, to evaluate the effects of medical products have become commonplace. These studies begin by selecting a particular study design, such as a case control, cohort, or

  12. Confronting the WRF and RAMS mesoscale models with innovative observations in the Netherlands: Evaluating the boundary layer heat budget

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G. J.; Tolk, L. F.; Moene, A. F.; Hartogensis, O. K.; Peters, W.; Holtslag, A. A. M.

    2011-01-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) and the Regional Atmospheric Mesoscale Model System (RAMS) are frequently used for (regional) weather, climate and air quality studies. This paper covers an evaluation of these models for a windy and calm episode against Cabauw tower observations

  13. Evaluation of methods to derive green-up dates based on daily NDVI satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doktor, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Bridging the gap between satellite derived green-up dates and in situ phenological observations has been the purpose of many studies over the last decades. Despite substantial advancements in satellite technology and data quality checks there is as yet no universally accepted method for extracting phenological metrics based on satellite derived vegetation indices. Dependent on the respective method derived green-up dates can vary up to serveral weeks using identical data sets. Consequently, it is difficult to compare various studies and to accurately determine an increased vegetation length due to changing temperature patterns as observed by ground phenological networks. Here, I compared how the characteristic NDVI increase over temperate deciduous forests in Germany in spring relates to respective budburst events observed on the ground. MODIS Terra daily surface reflectances with a 250 m resolution (2000-2008) were gathered to compute daily NDVI values. As ground truth, observations of the extensive phenological network of the German Weather Service were used. About 1500 observations per year and species (Beech, Oak and Birch) were available evenly distributed all over Germany. Two filtering methods were tested to reduce the noisy raw data. The first method only keeps NDVI values which are classified as ‚ideal global quality' and applies on those a temporal moving window where values are removed which differ more than 20% of the mean. The second method uses an adaptation of the BISE (Best Index Slope Extraction) algorithm. Subsequently, three functions were fitted to the selected observations: a simple linear interpolation, a sigmoidal function and a double logistic sigmoidal function allowing to approximate two temporally separated green-up signals. The green-up date was then determined at halfway between minimum and maximum (linear interpolation) or at the inflexion point of the sigmoidal curve. A number of global threshold values (NDVI 0.4,0.5,0.6) and

  14. Evaluation of a pilot peer observation of teaching scheme for chair-side tutors at Glasgow University Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, A M; Bissell, V; Bovill, C

    2013-06-01

    To introduce and examine a pilot peer observation of teaching (POT) scheme within the Department of Paediatric Dentistry at Glasgow Dental School and its associated outreach centres. All tutors teaching paediatric dentistry were invited to be involved in evaluation of the POT scheme. Participants were randomly paired with a peer, who then observed their teaching and provided constructive feedback. For those consenting to be involved in the evaluation of the scheme, semi-structured, one-to-one interviews were carried out by the principal investigator. POT was found by all participants to be a beneficial process, reassuring those of their teaching styles and giving them ideas to adapt their teaching. POT is an effective method for engaging chair-side tutors in the reflection and development of their teaching practice via observations and scholarly discussion.

  15. Optimization of energy window and evaluation of scatter compensation methods in myocardial perfusion SPECT using the ideal observer with and without model mismatch and an anthropomorphic model observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaly, Michael; Links, Jonathan M.; Frey, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. We used the ideal observer (IO) and IO with model mismatch (IO-MM) applied in the projection domain and an anthropomorphic channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) applied to reconstructed images to optimize the acquisition energy window width and to evaluate various scatter compensation methods in the context of a myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) defect detection task. The IO has perfect knowledge of the image formation process and thus reflects the performance with perfect compensation for image-degrading factors. Thus, using the IO to optimize imaging systems could lead to suboptimal parameters compared with those optimized for humans interpreting SPECT images reconstructed with imperfect or no compensation. The IO-MM allows incorporating imperfect system models into the IO optimization process. We found that with near-perfect scatter compensation, the optimal energy window for the IO and CHO was similar; in its absence, the IO-MM gave a better prediction of the optimal energy window for the CHO using different scatter compensation methods. These data suggest that the IO-MM may be useful for projection-domain optimization when MM is significant and that the IO is useful when followed by reconstruction with good models of the image formation process. PMID:26029730

  16. Evaluation of High-resolution Geomagnetic Field Observation System Using HTS-SQUID Magnetometer and its Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katori, Y.; Okubo, K.; Hato, T.; Tsukamoto, A.; Tanabe, K.; Onishi, N.; Furukawa; Isogami, S.; Takeuchi, N.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic field changes associated with earthquakes have been investigated previously (1964 Stacey, 1994 Johnston et al.). Our research group also reported successful observation of "co-faulting" Earth's magnetic field changes due to piezomagnetic effects caused by earthquake rupturing in 2008 Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake of M7.2 (2011 Okubo et al.) using optoelectronic observation system with flux-gate magnetometers. This is an important finding; the electromagnetic fields originating from such sources satisfy the Maxwell equations and hence they propagate from the sources to the observation site at a speed of light in the crustal materials. Further efforts could lead us to a new system for super-early warning of destructive earthquakes with the magnetic measurements. On the other hand, the observed result in 2008 Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake was suggested that the geomagnetic variation signal accompanying fault movement, whose sources are the piezomagnetic effects, is very small; therefore development of a high-sensitive magnetometer system is very important. To solve this problem, we introduce long-term precise geomagnetic observations using high-temperature-superconductor based superconducting-quantum-interference-device (HTS-SQUID) magnetometer system. That is, our research group developed the HTS-SQUID magnetometer system for high-resolution observation of Earth's magnetic field. Since March 2012, we have observed the geomagnetic field using a HTS-SQUID magnetometer at Iwaki observation site (IWK) in Fukushima, Japan. The sampling interval of the magnetometer is 0.04 sec. The observation clock has been synchronized by use of GPS signals. An accelerometer is also installed at observation point. Additionally, in the next stage, we develop the HTS- SQUID magnetometer system Unit No.2 (mark II). In the present study, we show the results observed by our HTS-SQUID magnetometer system and make an evaluation of our geomagnetic field observation system.

  17. A breeding site model for regional, dynamical malaria simulations evaluated using in situ temporary ponds observations

    OpenAIRE

    Ernest O. Asare; Adrian M. Tompkins; Leonard K. Amekudzi; Volker Ermert

    2016-01-01

    Daily observations of potential mosquito developmental habitats in a suburb of Kumasi in central Ghana reveal a strong variability in their water persistence times, which ranged between 11 and 81 days. The persistence of the ponds was strongly tied with rainfall, location and size of the puddles. A simple power-law relationship is found to fit the relationship between the average pond depth and area well. A prognostic water balance model is derived that describes the temporal evolution of the...

  18. Evaluating FIDO: Developing and pilot testing the Field Instantaneous Dog Observation tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy E. Bauer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Field assessments of the health and welfare of kenneled dogs (Canis lupus familiaris must be both accurate and rapid. In order to facilitate such evaluations, especially by individuals with limited training in canine behavior and welfare, a non-invasive tool was developed and pilot-tested utilizing dogs housed in commercial breeding facilities. Behavioral responses to approach were organized into three categories: red, indicating a fearful response to approach, green, indicating an affiliative or neutral response to approach, and yellow, indicating an ambivalent response to approach. The inter-rater reliability (IRR of the tool when used by both behavioral experts and novice raters was evaluated with and without the presence of the dog’s familiar caretaker. Utilizing Cohen’s kappa, the experts had almost perfect levels of agreement (kappa=0.87. The novice raters had substantial levels of agreement (kappa=0.74. Overall, the dogs assessed by the novice raters had high proportions of green responses to approach and there was no statistically significant effect of caretaker presence on the proportion of green responses to approach. The assessment tool evaluated herein appears to have a high degree of IRR whether used by experts in canine behavior or by novice raters and may be a useful screening tool to determine the need for more in-depth welfare assessments

  19. Application of the upper lip catch test for airway evaluation in edentulous patients: An observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahid Hussain Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Application of upper lip catch test (ULCT for airway evaluation in edentulous patients. Methods: This research is an evaluation of a clinical diagnostic test in edentulous patients prior to operation. Five hundred eighty eight edentulous patients in a referral university hospital, between March 2008 and June 2011 scheduled for elective surgery under general anesthesia were enrolled. Those unable to open the mouth and those with pharyngo-laryngeal pathology were excluded. ULCT was assessed and compared with Cormack-Lehane grading as a gold standard for airway evaluation. Results: A high negative predictive value of 99.4% was a notable finding for the ULCT. The results also showed a high specificity (89.4%, high sensitivity (75.0% and a high accuracy (89.3% in a comparatively higher range for the ULCT. Conclusion: The ULCT proved to be a useful predictor for airway assessment in edentulous patients in this setting. Further studies are needed to reconfirm its validity in other ethnic groups.

  20. Development, Production and Evaluation of Aerosol Climate Data Records from European Satellite Observations (Aerosol_cci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Popp

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Producing a global and comprehensive description of atmospheric aerosols requires integration of ground-based, airborne, satellite and model datasets. Due to its complexity, aerosol monitoring requires the use of several data records with complementary information content. This paper describes the lessons learned while developing and qualifying algorithms to generate aerosol Climate Data Records (CDR within the European Space Agency (ESA Aerosol_cci project. An iterative algorithm development and evaluation cycle involving core users is applied. It begins with the application-specific refinement of user requirements, leading to algorithm development, dataset processing and independent validation followed by user evaluation. This cycle is demonstrated for a CDR of total Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD from two subsequent dual-view radiometers. Specific aspects of its applicability to other aerosol algorithms are illustrated with four complementary aerosol datasets. An important element in the development of aerosol CDRs is the inclusion of several algorithms evaluating the same data to benefit from various solutions to the ill-determined retrieval problem. The iterative approach has produced a 17-year AOD CDR, a 10-year stratospheric extinction profile CDR and a 35-year Absorbing Aerosol Index record. Further evolution cycles have been initiated for complementary datasets to provide insight into aerosol properties (i.e., dust aerosol, aerosol absorption.

  1. Preliminary evaluation of an observational measure of group cohesion for group psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Matthew D; McLeod, Bryce D; Mikami, Amori Y

    2013-03-01

    Group psychotherapy research would benefit from an observational measure of group cohesion to complement existing self-report measures. This study introduces the Therapy Process Observational Coding System-Group Cohesion scale (TPOCS-GC), which observationally assesses cohesion between each member and the group. In total 27 parents participated in a group parent-training social competency intervention for children with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder. Independent coders double-coded group cohesion and the alliance in 144 client-sessions. Parents, teachers, and children completed cognitive, behavioral, and therapy participation measures. The TPOCS-GC demonstrated modest to strong item-level interrater reliability and acceptable internal consistency. Group cohesion evidenced moderate stability over the course of treatment. Relations between TPOCS-GC and theoretically linked and unrelated variables provided some evidence for construct and predictive validity. This preliminary study suggests that the TPOCS-GC is a reliable instrument that may help fill an instrumentation gap in the field. 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  2. Real space channelization for generic DBT system image quality evaluation with channelized Hotelling observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Dimitar; Cockmartin, Lesley; Marshall, Nicholas; Vancoillie, Liesbeth; Young, Kenneth; Bosmans, Hilde

    2017-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a relatively new 3D mammography technique that promises better detection of low contrast masses than conventional 2D mammography. The parameter space for DBT is large however and finding an optimal balance between dose and image quality remains challenging. Given the large number of conditions and images required in optimization studies, the use of human observers (HO) is time consuming and certainly not feasible for the tuning of all degrees of freedom. Our goal was to develop a model observer (MO) that could predict human detectability for clinically relevant details embedded within a newly developed structured phantom for DBT applications. DBT series were acquired on GE SenoClaire 3D, Giotto Class, Fujifilm AMULET Innovality and Philips MicroDose systems at different dose levels, Siemens Inspiration DBT acquisitions were reconstructed with different algorithms, while a larger set of DBT series was acquired on Hologic Dimensions system for first reproducibility testing. A channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) with Gabor channels was developed The parameters of the Gabor channels were tuned on all systems at standard scanning conditions and the candidate that produced the best fit for all systems was chosen. After tuning, the MO was applied to all systems and conditions. Linear regression lines between MO and HO scores were calculated, giving correlation coefficients between 0.87 and 0.99 for all tested conditions.

  3. Evaluation of Temperature and Humidity Profiles of Unified Model and ECMWF Analyses Using GRUAN Radiosonde Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Chan Noh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Temperature and water vapor profiles from the Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA and the United Kingdom Met Office (UKMO Unified Model (UM data assimilation systems and from reanalysis fields from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF were assessed using collocated radiosonde observations from the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS Reference Upper-Air Network (GRUAN for January–December 2012. The motivation was to examine the overall performance of data assimilation outputs. The difference statistics of the collocated model outputs versus the radiosonde observations indicated a good agreement for the temperature, amongst datasets, while less agreement was found for the relative humidity. A comparison of the UM outputs from the UKMO and KMA revealed that they are similar to each other. The introduction of the new version of UM into the KMA in May 2012 resulted in an improved analysis performance, particularly for the moisture field. On the other hand, ECMWF reanalysis data showed slightly reduced performance for relative humidity compared with the UM, with a significant humid bias in the upper troposphere. ECMWF reanalysis temperature fields showed nearly the same performance as the two UM analyses. The root mean square differences (RMSDs of the relative humidity for the three models were larger for more humid conditions, suggesting that humidity forecasts are less reliable under these conditions.

  4. Evaluation of water vapor distribution in general circulation models using satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soden, Brian J.; Bretherton, Francis P.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of the water vapor distribution obtained from two general circulation models, the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate Model (CCM), with satellite observations of total precipitable water (TPW) from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and upper tropospheric relative humidity (UTH) from GOES. Overall, both models are successful in capturing the primary features of the observed water vapor distribution and its seasonal variation. For the ECMWF model, however, a systematic moist bias in TPW is noted over well-known stratocumulus regions in the eastern subtropical oceans. Comparison with radiosonde profiles suggests that this problem is attributable to difficulties in modeling the shallowness of the boundary layer and large vertical water vapor gradients which characterize these regions. In comparison, the CCM is more successful in capturing the low values of TPW in the stratocumulus regions, although it tends to exhibit a dry bias over the eastern half of the subtropical oceans and a corresponding moist bias in the western half. The CCM also significantly overestimates the daily variability of the moisture fields in convective regions, suggesting a problem in simulating the temporal nature of moisture transport by deep convection. Comparison of the monthly mean UTH distribution indicates generally larger discrepancies than were noted for TPW owing to the greater influence of large-scale dynamical processes in determining the distribution of UTH. In particular, the ECMWF model exhibits a distinct dry bias along the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and a moist bias over the subtropical descending branches of the Hadley cell, suggesting an underprediction in the strength of the Hadley circulation. The CCM, on the other hand, demonstrates greater discrepancies in UTH than are observed for the ECMWF model, but none that are as

  5. National observational study to evaluate the "cleanyourhands" campaign (NOSEC): a questionnaire based study of national implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Christopher; Savage, Joanne; Cookson, Barry; Hayward, Andrew; Cooper, Ben; Duckworth, Georgia; Michie, Susan; Jeanes, Annette; Teare, Louise; Charlett, Andre; Stone, Sheldon Paul

    2015-01-01

    The number of national hand-hygiene campaigns has increased recently, following the World Health Organisation's (WHO) "Save Lives: clean your hands" initiative (2009), which offers hospitals a multi-component hand-hygiene intervention. The number of campaigns to be evaluated remains small. Most evaluations focus on consumption of alcohol hand rub (AHR). We are not aware of any evaluation reporting implementation of all campaign components. In a previously published report, we evaluated the effects of the English and Welsh cleanyourhands campaign (2004-8) on procurement of AHR and soap, and on selected healthcare associated infections. We now report on the implementation of each individual campaign component: provision of bedside AHR, ward posters, patient empowerment materials, audit and feedback, and guidance to secure institutional engagement. all 189 acute National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in England and Wales (December 2005-June 2008). Six postal questionnaires (five voluntary, one mandatory) were distributed to infection control teams six-monthly from 6 to 36 months post roll-out. Selection and attrition bias were measured. Response rates fell from 134 (71 %) at 6 months to 82 (44 %) at 30 months, rising to 167 (90 %) for the final mandatory one (36 months). There was no evidence of attrition or selection bias. Hospitals reported widespread early implementation of bedside AHR and posters and a gradual rise in audit. At 36 months, 90 % of respondents reported the campaign to be a top hospital priority, with implementation of AHR, posters and audit reported by 96 %, 97 % and 91 % respectively. Patient empowerment was less successful. The study suggests that all campaign components, apart from patient empowerment, were widely implemented and sustained. It supports previous work suggesting that adequate piloting, strong governmental support, refreshment of campaigns, and sufficient time to engage institutions help secure sustained implementation

  6. Combining soundscape analysis with in situ observations and oceanographic data for future ecosystem evaluation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, S. E.; Freeman, L. A.

    2016-02-01

    Coral reef ecosystems face many anthropogenic threats. There are urgent requirements for improved monitoring and management. Conventional assessment methods using SCUBA are costly and prone to bias and under-sampling. Here, three approaches to understanding coral reef ecology are combined to aid the goal of enhanced passive monitoring in the future: statistical analysis of oceanographic habitats, remote cameras for nocturnal surveys of benthic fauna, and soundscape analysis in the context of oceanographic setting and ecological metrics collected in-situ. Hawaiian reefs from Kure Atoll to the island of Hawaii, an area spanning two oceanographic habitats, are assessed. Multivariate analysis of acoustic, remote camera, and in-situ observational data showed significant differences in more than 20 percent of ecological and acoustic variables when grouped by oceanic regime, suggesting that large-scale oceanography substantially influences local ecological states and associated soundscapes. Acoustic variables further delineated sites by island, suggesting local conditions influence the soundscape to a greater degree. While the number of invertebrates (with an emphasis on crustaceans and echinoderms) imaged using remote cameras correlated with a number of acoustic metrics, an increasingly higher correlation between invertebrate density and spectral level was observed as acoustic bands increased in frequency from 2 to 20 kHz. In turn, correlation was also observed between the number of predatory fish and sound levels above 2 kHz, suggesting a connection between the number of invertebrates, sound levels at higher frequencies, and the presence of their predators. Comparisons between sound recordings and diversity indices calculated from observational and remote camera data indicate that greater diversity in fishes and benthic invertebrates is associated with a larger change in sound levels between day and night. Interdisciplinary analyses provide a novel view to underwater

  7. Evaluating effectiveness and safety toward electronic cigarette among Malaysian vapers: One-month observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Azizur Rahman; Mohamad Haniki Nik Mohamad; Shazia Jamshed

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Electronic cigarette (e-cig) is recently growing substitute for smoking. The attention and practice of e-cig among consumers is expanded globally, and Malaysia is not an exception to this, but the paucity of local data motivates us to do the current research. Methods: A total of 220 e-cig vapers recruited for the study and divided into two categories based on smoking status as a single user and dual user. Both users observed for 1 month period to assess smoking cessation rate, a...

  8. Intercomparison and evaluation of satellite peroxyacetyl nitrate observations in the upper troposphere–lower stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Pope

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN is an important chemical species in the troposphere as it aids the long-range transport of NOx and subsequent formation of O3 in relatively clean remote regions. Over the past few decades observations from aircraft campaigns and surface sites have been used to better understand the regional distribution of PAN. However, recent measurements made by satellites allow for a global assessment of PAN in the upper troposphere–lower stratosphere (UTLS. In this study, we investigate global PAN distributions from two independent retrieval methodologies, based on measurements from the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS instrument, on board Envisat from the Institute of Meteorology and Climate Research (IMK, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, and the Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester (UoL. Retrieving PAN from MIPAS is challenging due to the weak signal in the measurements and contamination from other species. Therefore, we compare the two MIPAS datasets with observations from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier transform spectrometer (ACE-FTS, in situ aircraft data and the 3-D chemical transport model TOMCAT. MIPAS shows peak UTLS PAN concentrations over the biomass burning regions (e.g. ranging from 150 to  >  200 pptv at 150 hPa and during the summertime Asian monsoon as enhanced convection aids the vertical transport of PAN from the lower atmosphere. At 150 hPa, we find significant differences between the two MIPAS datasets in the tropics, where IMK PAN concentrations are larger by 50–100 pptv. Comparisons between MIPAS and ACE-FTS show better agreement with the UoL MIPAS PAN concentrations at 200 hPa, but with mixed results above this altitude. TOMCAT generally captures the magnitude and structure of climatological aircraft PAN profiles within the observational variability allowing it to be used to investigate the MIPAS PAN differences

  9. Hypersexuality in Psychiatric Conditions Observer-Rated Scale (HIPCORS): Evaluation of Reliability and Validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, C K Dennisa; Cheung, Gary; Jansen, Karl

    2017-04-03

    Hypersexual behavior is not uncommon in psychiatric presentations. Most available scales that measure hypersexual behavior are self-rated, often containing sexually explicit questions, unsuitable for use in mentally unwell people. Lack of a clinically suitable instrument may have resulted in underdetection and under-researching of hypersexuality in people with mental disorders, with potential to cause significant consequences for themselves and those around them, including family members, coclients, and clinicians. To address this need, we developed the Hypersexuality in Psychiatric Conditions Observer-Rated Scale (HIPCORS), a rater-rated, nonintrusive tool, designed for use in mentally unwell people. It has been shown to be a reliable and valid instrument.

  10. Experimental and histopathological observation scoring methods for evaluation of wound healing properties ofJatyadi Ghrita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamadagni, Pallavi S; Jamadagni, Shrirang; Mukherjee, Koyel; Upadhyay, Sachchidanand; Gaidhani, Sudesh; Hazra, Jayram

    2016-01-01

    Jatyadi ghrita is a classical Ayurvedic formulation indicated in the treatment of various types of ulcers. The study was designed to explore the wound healing properties of Jatyadi Ghrita in diabetes - induced rats. In the present study, diabetes mellitus was induced to 6 to 8-week-old male Wistar rats by injecting streptozotocin cut 65 mg/kg body weight intravenously by 15 min prior to the administration of Nicotinamide at 230 mg/kg body weight intraperitoneally. Animals having diabetes were used for grouping namely, diabetic control (DC), Ghrita control (GC), positive control (PC), i.e., mupirocin HCl, Jatyadi Ghrita treatment and one group of non-DC. Full-thickness excision wound was created and diameter was recorded. Daily clinical observations were recorded. A wound scoring method was developed. Wound diameter and score were recorded on days 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 9, 12, 14 and 15. Photographs were taken at the same time interval points. Body weight and feed consumption were recorded weekly. Animals were sacrificed at regular intervals to collect the wound area tissue for histopathology analysis. Obtained data was analyzed statistically. It was observed that there was no significant difference in diameter and percent change in wound healing as compared to any control. However, clinical score and histopathological changes in Jatyadi Ghrita group were improved from the second day of the study as compared to control. This indicates that the drug has similar wound healing activity as compared to the modern drug mupirocin HCl.

  11. Evaluating greenhouse gas emissions inventories for agricultural burning using satellite observations of active fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiao-Wen; Jin, Yufang; Giglio, Louis; Foley, Jonathan A; Randerson, James T

    2012-06-01

    Fires in agricultural ecosystems emit greenhouse gases and aerosols that influence climate on multiple spatial and temporal scales. Annex 1 countries of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), many of which ratified the Kyoto Protocol, are required to report emissions of CH4 and N2O from these fires annually. In this study, we evaluated several aspects of this reporting system, including the optimality of the crops targeted by the UNFCCC globally and within Annex 1 countries, and the consistency of emissions inventories among different countries. We also evaluated the success of individual countries in capturing interannual variability and long-term trends in agricultural fire activity. In our approach, we combined global high-resolution maps of crop harvest area and production, derived from satellite maps and ground-based census data, with Terra and Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements of active fires. At a global scale, we found that adding ground nuts (e.g., peanuts), cocoa, cotton and oil palm, and removing potato, oats, rye, and pulse other from the list of 14 crops targeted by the UNFCCC increased the percentage of active fires covered by the reporting system by 9%. Optimization led to a different recommended list for Annex 1 countries, requiring the addition of sunflower, cotton, rapeseed, and alfalfa and the removal of beans, sugarcane, pulse others, and tuber-root others. Extending emissions reporting to all Annex 1 countries (from the current set of 19 countries) would increase the efficacy of the reporting system from 6% to 15%, and further including several non-Annex 1 countries (Argentina, Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Thailand, Kazakhstan, Mexico, and Nigeria) would capture over 55% of active fires in croplands worldwide. Analyses of interannual trends from the United States and Australia showed the importance of both intensity of fire use and crop production in controlling year

  12. Towards Improving Sea Ice Predictabiity: Evaluating Climate Models Against Satellite Sea Ice Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroeve, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    The last four decades have seen a remarkable decline in the spatial extent of the Arctic sea ice cover, presenting both challenges and opportunities to Arctic residents, government agencies and industry. After the record low extent in September 2007 effort has increased to improve seasonal, decadal-scale and longer-term predictions of the sea ice cover. Coupled global climate models (GCMs) consistently project that if greenhouse gas concentrations continue to rise, the eventual outcome will be a complete loss of the multiyear ice cover. However, confidence in these projections depends o HoHoweon the models ability to reproduce features of the present-day climate. Comparison between models participating in the World Climate Research Programme Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) and observations of sea ice extent and thickness show that (1) historical trends from 85% of the model ensemble members remain smaller than observed, and (2) spatial patterns of sea ice thickness are poorly represented in most models. Part of the explanation lies with a failure of models to represent details of the mean atmospheric circulation pattern that governs the transport and spatial distribution of sea ice. These results raise concerns regarding the ability of CMIP5 models to realistically represent the processes driving the decline of Arctic sea ice and to project the timing of when a seasonally ice-free Arctic may be realized. On shorter time-scales, seasonal sea ice prediction has been challenged to predict the sea ice extent from Arctic conditions a few months to a year in advance. Efforts such as the Sea Ice Outlook (SIO) project, originally organized through the Study of Environmental Change (SEARCH) and now managed by the Sea Ice Prediction Network project (SIPN) synthesize predictions of the September sea ice extent based on a variety of approaches, including heuristic, statistical and dynamical modeling. Analysis of SIO contributions reveals that when the

  13. The atmospheric composition geostationary satellite constellation for air quality and climate science: Evaluating performance with Observation System Simulation Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, D. P.; Barre, J.; Worden, H. M.; Arellano, A. F.; Gaubert, B.; Anderson, J. L.; Mizzi, A. P.; Lahoz, W. A.

    2014-12-01

    Current satellite observations of tropospheric composition made from low Earth orbit provide at best one or two measurements each day at any given location. Coverage is global but sparse, often with large uncertainties in individual measurements that limit examination of local and regional atmospheric composition over short time periods. This has hindered the operational uptake of these data for monitoring air quality and population exposure, and for initializing and evaluating chemical weather forecasts. By the end of the current decade there are planned geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) satellite missions for atmospheric composition over North America, East Asia and Europe with additional missions proposed. Together, these present the possibility of a constellation of GEO platforms to achieve continuous time-resolved high-density observations of continental domains for mapping pollutant sources and variability on diurnal and local scales. We describe Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) to evaluate the contributions of these GEO missions to improve knowledge of near-surface air pollution due to intercontinental long-range transport and quantify chemical precursor emissions. We discuss the requirements on measurement simulation, chemical transport modeling, and data assimilation for a successful OSSE infrastructure. Our approach uses an efficient computational method to sample a high-resolution global GEOS-5 chemistry Nature Run over each geographical region of the GEO constellation. The demonstration carbon monoxide (CO) observation simulator, which is being expanded to other chemical pollutants, currently produces multispectral retrievals and captures realistic scene-dependent variation in measurement vertical sensitivity and cloud cover. We use the DART Ensemble Adjustment Kalman Filter to assimilate the simulated observations in a CAM-Chem global chemistry-climate model Control Run. The impact of observing over each region is evaluated using data

  14. How do patients with a Turkish background evaluate their medical care in Germany? An observational study in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goetz K

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Katja Goetz,1 Jessica Bungartz,2 Joachim Szecsenyi,1 Jost Steinhaeuser3 1Department of General Practice and Health Services Research, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; 2Praxis Medizin im Zentrum, München, Germany; 3Institute of Family Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Lübeck, Germany Background: Patients’ evaluation of medical care is an essential dimension of quality of care and an important aspect of the feedback cycle for health care providers. The aim of this study was to document how patients with a Turkish background evaluate primary care in Germany and determine which aspects of care are associated with language abilities.Methods: The study was based on an observational design. Patients with a Turkish background from German primary care practices completed the EUROPEP (European Project on Patient Evaluation of General Practice Care questionnaire consisting of 23 items. Seventeen primary care practices were involved with either German (n=8 or Turkish (n=9 general practitioners (GPs.Results: A convenience sample of 472 patients with a Turkish background from 17 practices participated in the study (response rate 39.9%. Practices with a German GP had a lower response rate (19.6% than those with a Turkish GP (57.5%. Items evaluated the highest were “keeping data confidential” (73.4% and “quick services for urgent health problems” (69.9%. Subgroup analysis showed lower evaluation scores from patients with good or excellent German language abilities. Patients who consulted a Turkish GP had higher evaluation scores.Conclusion: The evaluation from patients with a Turkish background living in Germany with either Turkish or German GPs showed lower scores than patients in other studies in Europe using EUROPEP. However, our results had higher evaluation scores than those of Turkish patients evaluating GPs in Turkey. Therefore, different explanation models for these findings should be explored in future studies

  15. Task-based model/human observer evaluation of SPIHT wavelet compression with human visual system-based quantization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yani; Pham, Binh T; Eckstein, Miguel P

    2005-03-01

    The set partitioning in hierarchical trees (SPIHT) wavelet image compression algorithm with the human visual system (HVS) quantization matrix was investigated using x-ray coronary angiograms. We tested whether the HVS quantization matrix for the SPIHT wavelet compression improved computer model/human observer performance in a detection task with variable signals compared to performance with the default quantization matrix. We also tested the hypothesis of whether evaluating the rank order of the two quantization matrices (HVS versus default) based on performance of computer model observers in a signal known exactly but variable task (SKEV) generalized to model/human performance in the more clinically realistic signal known statistically task (SKS). Nine hundred test images were created using real x-ray coronary angiograms as backgrounds and simulated arteries with filling defects (signals). The task for the model and human observer was to detect which one of the four computer simulated arterial segments contained the signal, four alternative-forced-choice (4 AFC). We obtained performance for four model observers (nonprewhitening matched filter with an eye filter, Hotelling, Channelized Hotelling, and Laguerre Gauss Hotelling model observers) for both the SKEV and SKS tasks with images compressed with and without the HVS quantization matrix. A psychophysical study measured performance from three human observers for the same conditions and tasks as the model observers. Performance for all four model observers improved with the use of the HVS quantization scheme. Improvements ranged from 5% (at compression ratio 7:1) to 50% (at compression ratio 30:1) for both the SKEV and SKS tasks. Human observer performance improvement averaged across observers ranged from 6% (at compression ratio 7:1) to 35% (at compression ratio 30:1) for the SKEV task and from 2% (at compression ratio 7:1) to 38% (at compression ratio 30:1) for the SKS task. Addition of internal noise to the

  16. Climatic change in French Polynesia: detection of observed changes and projections evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopuare, Marania

    2014-01-01

    The effects of climate change on Pacific islands is a major concern for the local populations. The rainfall parameter, specifically, appears as one of the sensitive parameters, as it determines water resources. The goal of this thesis is to bring a first insight into the 21. century evolution of precipitation in Tahiti. The first step was to characterize rainfall in Tahiti using data records from the observation network of Meteo France. The 'rainfall season', lasting from November to April, is the season of interest, as rainfall amounts are the highest at this time of the year. Indeed, the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), host of deep convection, remains the principal source of rainfall in Tahiti in austral summer (December-January-February). On inter-annual and inter-decadal timescales, the El nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Inter-decadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) imply north/south and east/west migrations of the SPCZ, drawing it away, or closer to Tahiti. The positive phase of the IPO involves a north-eastward displacement of the SPCZ, which causes higher rainfall amounts in Tahiti. The SPCZ is displaced towards the southwest during negative IPO phase, leading to a decrease of rainfall in Tahiti. The study reveals that the IPO positive phase favor the occurrence of intense El nino events. In those cases, the SPCZ is critically displaced to the northeast and lies zonally just south of the equator. Accordingly, the SPCZ is drawn away from Tahiti and alters the southeast flow of trade winds. As a result, substantial orographic precipitation affect the southeast coasts of Tahiti. Following the assessment of observed precipitation for the period 1961-2011, an original method has been set up to obtain a model able to resolve the island and capture the orographic effects at best. Two successive down-scaling steps have been necessary to get the limited area model ALADINClimat over Tahiti (at the resolution of 12 km), starting from the global coupled model

  17. Evaluations of particulate mass loading from visibility observations and atmospheric turbidity measurements: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasi, C.; Vitale, V.

    1984-01-01

    Two extinction models for continental and rural particles were defined by using a very accurate computer programme based on Mie extinction theory for spherical particles. The first extinction model gives several sets of volume extinction coefficients at seven visible and near-infra-red wave-lengths, calculated for twenty-seven Junge-type size distribution curves (with Junge parameter ranging from 1.8 to 4.4) and for eight relative-humidity values of the air. This model also gives the corresponding values of Aangstroem's exponent α and mean particle mass. The second extinction model gives similar sets of data, calculated for two log-normal size distribution curves of tropospheric and large rural particles at five relative-humidity values of the air. These monomodal models can be used to determine bimodal extinction models consisting of variable number fractions of tropospherics and rural particles. Evaluations of the particulate mass loading can be obtained from measurements of visual range and atmospheric turbidity, choosing the most appropriate extinction model on the basis of the spectral features characterizing atmospheric attenuation. Measurements of visibility and atmospheric turbidity in two rural localities of the Po valley were examined by employing both the present extinction models and other extinction models commonly used. The comparison of the results shows that the Junge-type extinction model can be reliably used in cases in which the exponent Junge-type extinction model and bimodal model were found to give realistic evaluations of the lower and upper limits of particulate mass loading

  18. A Framework for Orbital Performance Evaluation in Distributed Space Missions for Earth Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Sreeja; LeMoigne-Stewart, Jacqueline; Miller, David W.; de Weck, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Distributed Space Missions (DSMs) are gaining momentum in their application to earth science missions owing to their unique ability to increase observation sampling in spatial, spectral and temporal dimensions simultaneously. DSM architectures have a large number of design variables and since they are expected to increase mission flexibility, scalability, evolvability and robustness, their design is a complex problem with many variables and objectives affecting performance. There are very few open-access tools available to explore the tradespace of variables which allow performance assessment and are easy to plug into science goals, and therefore select the most optimal design. This paper presents a software tool developed on the MATLAB engine interfacing with STK, for DSM orbit design and selection. It is capable of generating thousands of homogeneous constellation or formation flight architectures based on pre-defined design variable ranges and sizing those architectures in terms of predefined performance metrics. The metrics can be input into observing system simulation experiments, as available from the science teams, allowing dynamic coupling of science and engineering designs. Design variables include but are not restricted to constellation type, formation flight type, FOV of instrument, altitude and inclination of chief orbits, differential orbital elements, leader satellites, latitudes or regions of interest, planes and satellite numbers. Intermediate performance metrics include angular coverage, number of accesses, revisit coverage, access deterioration over time at every point of the Earth's grid. The orbit design process can be streamlined and variables more bounded along the way, owing to the availability of low fidelity and low complexity models such as corrected HCW equations up to high precision STK models with J2 and drag. The tool can thus help any scientist or program manager select pre-Phase A, Pareto optimal DSM designs for a variety of science

  19. Compressing pathology whole-slide images using a human and model observer evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Krupinski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We aim to determine to what degree whole-slide images (WSI can be compressed without impacting the ability of the pathologist to distinguish benign from malignant tissues. An underlying goal is to demonstrate the utility of a visual discrimination model (VDM for predicting observer performance. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 regions of interest (ROIs from a breast biopsy whole-slide images at five levels of JPEG 2000 compression (8:1, 16:1, 32:1, 64:1, and 128:1 plus the uncompressed version were shown to six pathologists to determine benign versus malignant status. Results: There was a significant decrease in performance as a function of compression ratio (F = 14.58, P < 0.0001. The visibility of compression artifacts in the test images was predicted using a VDM. Just-noticeable difference (JND metrics were computed for each image, including the mean, median, ≥90th percentiles, and maximum values. For comparison, PSNR (peak signal-to-noise ratio and Structural Similarity (SSIM were also computed. Image distortion metrics were computed as a function of compression ratio and averaged across test images. All of the JND metrics were found to be highly correlated and differed primarily in magnitude. Both PSNR and SSIM decreased with bit rate, correctly reflecting a loss of image fidelity with increasing compression. Observer performance as measured by the Receiver Operating Characteristic area under the curve (ROC Az was nearly constant up to a compression ratio of 32:1, then decreased significantly for 64:1 and 128:1 compression levels. The initial decline in Az occurred around a mean JND of 3, Minkowski JND of 4, and 99th percentile JND of 6.5. Conclusion: Whole-slide images may be compressible to relatively high levels before impacting WSI interpretation performance. The VDM metrics correlated well with artifact conspicuity and human performance.

  20. Compressing pathology whole-slide images using a human and model observer evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Johnson, Jeffrey P.; Jaw, Stacey; Graham, Anna R.; Weinstein, Ronald S.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: We aim to determine to what degree whole-slide images (WSI) can be compressed without impacting the ability of the pathologist to distinguish benign from malignant tissues. An underlying goal is to demonstrate the utility of a visual discrimination model (VDM) for predicting observer performance. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 regions of interest (ROIs) from a breast biopsy whole-slide images at five levels of JPEG 2000 compression (8:1, 16:1, 32:1, 64:1, and 128:1) plus the uncompressed version were shown to six pathologists to determine benign versus malignant status. Results: There was a significant decrease in performance as a function of compression ratio (F = 14.58, P < 0.0001). The visibility of compression artifacts in the test images was predicted using a VDM. Just-noticeable difference (JND) metrics were computed for each image, including the mean, median, ≥90th percentiles, and maximum values. For comparison, PSNR (peak signal-to-noise ratio) and Structural Similarity (SSIM) were also computed. Image distortion metrics were computed as a function of compression ratio and averaged across test images. All of the JND metrics were found to be highly correlated and differed primarily in magnitude. Both PSNR and SSIM decreased with bit rate, correctly reflecting a loss of image fidelity with increasing compression. Observer performance as measured by the Receiver Operating Characteristic area under the curve (ROC Az) was nearly constant up to a compression ratio of 32:1, then decreased significantly for 64:1 and 128:1 compression levels. The initial decline in Az occurred around a mean JND of 3, Minkowski JND of 4, and 99th percentile JND of 6.5. Conclusion: Whole-slide images may be compressible to relatively high levels before impacting WSI interpretation performance. The VDM metrics correlated well with artifact conspicuity and human performance. PMID:22616029

  1. Heat Storage in Urban Areas: Local-Scale Observations and Evaluation of a Simple Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmond, C. S. B.; Oke, T. R.

    1999-07-01

    The flux density of sensible heat to or from storage in the physical mass of the city is determined for seven cities (Chicago, Illinois; Los Angeles, California; Mexico City, Distrito Federal; Miami, Florida; Sacramento, California; Tucson, Arizona; and Vancouver, British Columbia) in North America across a 30° latitudinal range. These cities have a variety of synoptic-scale climates and surface cover and structural morphologies. In all cases the `measured' storage heat flux is determined as the energy balance residual from direct observations of net all-wave radiation, and sensible and latent heat fluxes conducted using the same radiometer and eddy correlation techniques. Databases describing the surface characteristics around each site are developed from analysis of aerial photography and field surveys. Results indicate that storage heat flux is a significant component of the surface energy balance at all sites and is greatest at downtown and light industrial sites. Hysteresis behavior, of varying degrees, is seen at all locations. A simple objective hysteresis model (OHM), which calculates storage heat flux as a function of net all-wave radiation and the surface properties of the site, is found to perform well in the mean for most cases, with the notable exception of Tucson; but considerable scatter is observed at some sites. Some of this is attributed to the moisture, wind, and synoptic controls at each of the sites, and to hour-to-hour variability in the convective fluxes that the OHM does not simulate. Averaging over 2 to 3 h may be a more appropriate way to use the model. Caution should be used when employing the OHM in windy environments.

  2. Evaluation of the implementation of the directly observed treatment strategy for tuberculosis in a large city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavôr, Débora Cristina Brasil da Silva; Pinheiro, Jair Dos Santos; Gonçalves, Maria Jacirema Ferreira

    2016-04-01

    To assess the degree of implementation of the Directly Observed Treatment, Short-course - DOTS for tuberculosis (TB) in a large city. Assessment of the implementation of the logic model, whose new cases of infectious pulmonary TB were recruited from specialized clinics and followed-up in basic health units. The judgment matrix covering the five components of the DOTS strategy were used. The result of the logic model indicates DOTS was partially implemented. In external, organizational and implementation contexts, the DOTS strategy was partially implemented; and, the effectiveness was not implemented. The partial implementation of the DOTS strategy in the city of Manaus did not reflect in TB control compliance, leading to low effectiveness of the program. Avaliar o grau de implantação da estratégia de tratamento diretamente observado (Directly Observed Treatment, Short-course - DOTS) para tuberculose (TB) em um município de grande porte. Avaliação de implantação por meio de modelo lógico, cujos casos novos de TB pulmonar bacilífera foram recrutados em ambulatórios especializados e acompanhados nas unidades básicas de saúde. Utilizou-se matriz de julgamento que abrange os cinco componentes da estratégia DOTS. O resultado do modelo lógico indica DOTS implantada parcialmente. Nos contextos externo, organizacional e de implantação, a estratégia DOTS está implantada parcialmente; e, na efetividade não está implantada. A implantação parcial da estratégia DOTS, na cidade de Manaus, reflete na não conformidade do controle da TB, levando à baixa efetividade do programa.

  3. NeXOS, developing and evaluating a new generation of insitu ocean observation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delory, Eric; del Rio, Joaquin; Golmen, Lars; Roar Hareide, Nils; Pearlman, Jay; Rolin, Jean-Francois; Waldmann, Christoph; Zielinski, Oliver

    2017-04-01

    Ocean biological, chemical or physical processes occur over widely varying scales in space and time: from micro- to kilometer scales, from less than seconds to centuries. While space systems supply important data and information, insitu data is necessary for comprehensive modeling and forecasting of ocean dynamics. Yet, collection of in-situ observation on these scales is inherently challenging and remains generally difficult and costly in time and resources. This paper address the innovations and significant developments for a new generation of insitu sensors in FP7 European Union project "Next generation, Cost- effective, Compact, Multifunctional Web Enabled Ocean Sensor Systems Empowering Marine, Maritime and Fisheries Management" or "NeXOS" for short. Optical and acoustics sensors are the focus of NeXOS but NeXOS moves beyond just sensors as systems that simultaneously address multiple objectives and applications are becoming increasingly important. Thus NeXOS takes a perspective of both sensors and sensor systems with significant advantages over existing observing capabilities via the implementation of innovations such as multiplatform integration, greater reliability through better antifouling management and greater sensor and data interoperability through use of OGC standards. This presentation will address the sensor system development and field-testing of the new NeXOS sensor systems. This is being done on multiple platforms including profiling floats, gliders, ships, buoys and subsea stations. The implementation of a data system based on SWE and PUCK furthers interoperability across measurements and platforms. This presentation will review the sensor system capabilities, the status of field tests and recommendations for long-term ocean monitoring.

  4. Evaluation of a terrestrial carbon cycle submodel in an earth system model using networks of eddy covariance observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichii, K.; Suzuki, T.

    2010-12-01

    Improvement of terrestrial submodels in earth system models (ESMs) is important to reduce uncertainties in future projections of global carbon cycle and climate. Since these submodels lack detailed validation, evaluation of terrestrial submodels using networks of field observations is necessary. The purpose of this study is to improve an ESM by refining a terrestrial submodel using eddy covariance observations. To evaluate and improve the terrestrial submodel included in the UVic-ESCM, we conducted two experiments: an off-line experiment and an ESM experiment. In the off-line experiment, we used the terrestrial submodel forced by observed climate inputs (off-line model run). We evaluated and refined the model at a point scale using eddy covariance observations. In this process, we first tested the default terrestrial submodel with eddy covariance observations. Next, we refined the terrestrial submodel using eddy covariance observations. Then, in the ESM experiment (carbon cycle-climate coupled model run), we used the default and refined terrestrial submodel as a terrestrial submodel in the ESM. We tested the effects of the terrestrial submodel improvements on the ESM simulations at both site and global scales. First, we evaluated the terrestrial submodel as an off-line mode (the terrestrial submodel was extracted from ESM) at point scales using 48 eddy covariance observation data, and improved it through fixing model parameters and structures. The modifications were conducted to reproduce the seasonal simulation of the terrestrial carbon cycle by removing several biases in the terrestrial submodel through fixing parameters and models related to such as snow melting process, rooting depth, and photosynthesis efficiency. The terrestrial submodel was improved with the reduction of the root mean square error and the closer simulation of the seasonal carbon fluxes. Second, using the UVic-ESCM with the improved terrestrial submodel, we confirmed model improvement at most

  5. Self-Observation and Peer Feedback as a Faculty Development Approach for Problem-Based Learning Tutors: A Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Irène; James, Richard W; Bischof, Paul; Baroffio, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Good teaching requires spontaneous, immediate, and appropriate action in response to various situations. It is even more crucial in problem-based learning (PBL) tutorials, as the tutors, while directing students toward the identification and attainment of learning objectives, must stimulate them to contribute to the process and provide them with constructive feedback. PBL tutors in medicine lack opportunities to receive feedback from their peers on their teaching strategies. Moreover, as tutorials provide little or no time to stop and think, more could be learned by reflecting on the experience than from the experience itself. We designed and evaluated a faculty development approach to developing PBL tutors that combined self-reflection and peer feedback processes, both powerful techniques for improving performance in education. We developed an observation instrument for PBL facilitation to be used both by tutors to self-observe and reflect on own teaching strategies and by peers to observe and provide feedback to tutors. Twenty PBL sessions were video-recorded. Tutors completed the instrument immediately after their PBL session and again while watching their video-recorded session (self-observation). A group of three observers completed the instrument while watching each recorded session and provided feedback to each tutor (peer observation and feedback). We investigated tutors' perceptions of the feasibility and acceptability of the approach and gathered data on its effectiveness in enhancing tutors' facilitation skills. The preclinical medical curriculum at the University of Geneva is essentially taught by PBL. A new program of faculty development based on self-observation and peer feedback was offered to voluntary tutors and evaluated. Our results suggest that self-observation and peer feedback, supported by an instrument, can be effective in enhancing tutors' facilitation skills. Reflection on self-observation raised teachers' awareness of the effectiveness of

  6. Global carbon-water cycles patterns inferred from FLUXNET observations - useful for model evaluation? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichstein, M.; Jung, M.; Beer, C.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Tomelleri, E.; Papale, D.; Fluxnet Lathuille Synthesis Team (Cf. Www. Fluxdata. Org)

    2010-12-01

    The current FLUXNET database (www.fluxdata.org) of CO2, water and energy exchange between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere contains almost 1000 site-years with data from more than 250 sites, encompassing all major biomes of the world and being processed in a standardized way (1-3). In this presentation we show that the information in the data is sufficient to derive generalized empirical relationships between vegetation/respective remote sensing information, climate and the biosphere-atmosphere exchanges across global biomes. These empirical patterns are used to generate global grids of the respective fluxes and derived properties (e.g. radiation and water-use efficiencies or climate sensitivities in general, bowen-ratio, AET/PET ratio). For example we re-estimate global “text-book” numbers such as global Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) as ca. 123PgC (4), or global evapotranspiration (ET) as ca. 65km3/yr (5) - for the first time with a more solid and direct empirical basis. Evaluation against independent data at regional to global scale (e.g. atmospheric carbon dioxide inversions, runoff data) lends support to the validity of our almost purely empirical up-scaling approaches. Moreover climate factors such as radiation, temperature and water balance are identified as driving factors for variations and trends of carbon and water fluxes, with distinctly different sensitivities between different regions. Hence, these global fields of biosphere-atmosphere exchange and the inferred relations between climate, vegetation type and fluxes should be used for evaluation or benchmarking of climate models or their land-surface components, while overcoming scale-issues with classical point-to-grid-cell comparisons. 1. M. Reichstein et al., Global Change Biology 11, 1424 (2005). 2. D. Baldocchi, Australian Journal of Botany 56,1 (2008). 3. D. Papale et al., Biogeosciences 3, 571 (2006). 4. Beer et al. Science 329 (2010). 5. Jung et al. Nature in press (doi:10

  7. Evaluating climate model performance with various parameter sets using observations over the recent past

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Loutre

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Many sources of uncertainty limit the accuracy of climate projections. Among them, we focus here on the parameter uncertainty, i.e. the imperfect knowledge of the values of many physical parameters in a climate model. Therefore, we use LOVECLIM, a global three-dimensional Earth system model of intermediate complexity and vary several parameters within a range based on the expert judgement of model developers. Nine climatic parameter sets and three carbon cycle parameter sets are selected because they yield present-day climate simulations coherent with observations and they cover a wide range of climate responses to doubled atmospheric CO2 concentration and freshwater flux perturbation in the North Atlantic. Moreover, they also lead to a large range of atmospheric CO2 concentrations in response to prescribed emissions. Consequently, we have at our disposal 27 alternative versions of LOVECLIM (each corresponding to one parameter set that provide very different responses to some climate forcings. The 27 model versions are then used to illustrate the range of responses provided over the recent past, to compare the time evolution of climate variables over the time interval for which they are available (the last few decades up to more than one century and to identify the outliers and the "best" versions over that particular time span. For example, between 1979 and 2005, the simulated global annual mean surface temperature increase ranges from 0.24 °C to 0.64 °C, while the simulated increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration varies between 40 and 50 ppmv. Measurements over the same period indicate an increase in global annual mean surface temperature of 0.45 °C (Brohan et al., 2006 and an increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration of 44 ppmv (Enting et al., 1994; GLOBALVIEW-CO2, 2006. Only a few parameter sets yield simulations that reproduce the observed key variables of the climate system over the last

  8. Description, evaluation and clinical decision making according to various fetal heart rate patterns. Inter-observer and regional variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, O; Bøttcher, L M; Weber, Tom

    1992-01-01

    At 10 Danish obstetrical departments, 116 residents (42 senior and 74 junior) participated in a study to assess inter-observer and regional variability in the description and evaluation of and clinical decision regarding 11 fetal heart rate patterns. The 11 traces included normal as well as patho......At 10 Danish obstetrical departments, 116 residents (42 senior and 74 junior) participated in a study to assess inter-observer and regional variability in the description and evaluation of and clinical decision regarding 11 fetal heart rate patterns. The 11 traces included normal as well...... and the presence of silent or sinusoidal pattern (87-94% on an arbitrary 0-100% scale), and low regarding the assessment of variability and type of deceleration (50-72%). The degree of agreement in interpreting heart rate patterns was 59% (on an arbitrary 0-100% scale). Senior residents generally interpreted...

  9. Evaluation of fatigue damage of pressure vessel materials by observation of microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kazuo

    1994-01-01

    As the important factor as the secular change mode of pressure vessel materials, there is fatigue damage. In USA, there is the move to use LWRs by extending their life, and it becomes necessary to show the soundness of the structures of machinery and equipment for long period. For exactly evaluating the soundness of the structures of machinery and equipment, it is important to clarify the degree of secular deterioration of the materials. In this report, by limiting to the fatigue damage of LWR pressure vessel steel, the method of grasping the change of microstructure and the method of estimating the degree of fatigue damage from the change of microstructure are shown. The change of microstructure arising in materials due to fatigue advances in the following steps, namely, the multiplication of dislocations, the tangling of dislocations, the formation of cell structure, the turning of cells, the formation of microcracks, the growth of cracks and fracture. In the case of pressure vessel steel, due to the quenching and tempering, the cell structure is formed from the beginning, and the advance of fatigue is recognized as the increase of the turning angle of cell structures. The detection of fatigue damage by microstructure is reported. (K.I.)

  10. On the calculation of the topographic wetness index: evaluation of different methods based on field observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sørensen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The topographic wetness index (TWI, ln(a/tanβ, which combines local upslope contributing area and slope, is commonly used to quantify topographic control on hydrological processes. Methods of computing this index differ primarily in the way the upslope contributing area is calculated. In this study we compared a number of calculation methods for TWI and evaluated them in terms of their correlation with the following measured variables: vascular plant species richness, soil pH, groundwater level, soil moisture, and a constructed wetness degree. The TWI was calculated by varying six parameters affecting the distribution of accumulated area among downslope cells and by varying the way the slope was calculated. All possible combinations of these parameters were calculated for two separate boreal forest sites in northern Sweden. We did not find a calculation method that performed best for all measured variables; rather the best methods seemed to be variable and site specific. However, we were able to identify some general characteristics of the best methods for different groups of measured variables. The results provide guiding principles for choosing the best method for estimating species richness, soil pH, groundwater level, and soil moisture by the TWI derived from digital elevation models.

  11. Using Historical Precipitation, Temperature, and Runoff Observations to Evaluate Evaporation Formulations in Land Surface Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Randal D.; Mahanama, P. P.

    2012-01-01

    Key to translating soil moisture memory into subseasonal precipitation and air temperature forecast skill is a realistic treatment of evaporation in the forecast system used - in particular, a realistic treatment of how evaporation responds to variations in soil moisture. The inherent soil moisture-evaporation relationships used in today's land surface models (LSMs), however, arguably reflect little more than guesswork given the lack of evaporation and soil moisture data at the spatial scales represented by regional and global models. Here we present a new approach for evaluating this critical aspect of LSMs. Seasonally averaged precipitation is used as a proxy for seasonally-averaged soil moisture, and seasonally-averaged air temperature is used as a proxy for seasonally-averaged evaporation (e.g., more evaporative cooling leads to cooler temperatures) the relationship between historical precipitation and temperature measurements accordingly mimics in certain important ways nature's relationship between soil moisture and evaporation. Additional information on the relationship is gleaned from joint analysis of precipitation and streamflow measurements. An experimental framework that utilizes these ideas to guide the development of an improved soil moisture-evaporation relationship is described and demonstrated.

  12. Evaluation of a plot-scale methane emission model using eddy covariance observations and footprint modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Budishchev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Most plot-scale methane emission models – of which many have been developed in the recent past – are validated using data collected with the closed-chamber technique. This method, however, suffers from a low spatial representativeness and a poor temporal resolution. Also, during a chamber-flux measurement the air within a chamber is separated from the ambient atmosphere, which negates the influence of wind on emissions. Additionally, some methane models are validated by upscaling fluxes based on the area-weighted averages of modelled fluxes, and by comparing those to the eddy covariance (EC flux. This technique is rather inaccurate, as the area of upscaling might be different from the EC tower footprint, therefore introducing significant mismatch. In this study, we present an approach to validate plot-scale methane models with EC observations using the footprint-weighted average method. Our results show that the fluxes obtained by the footprint-weighted average method are of the same magnitude as the EC flux. More importantly, the temporal dynamics of the EC flux on a daily timescale are also captured (r2 = 0.7. In contrast, using the area-weighted average method yielded a low (r2 = 0.14 correlation with the EC measurements. This shows that the footprint-weighted average method is preferable when validating methane emission models with EC fluxes for areas with a heterogeneous and irregular vegetation pattern.

  13. Evaluation and Optimization of China's Anthropogenic CO2 Emissions using Observations from Northern China (2005-2009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayalu, A.; Munger, J. W.; Wang, Y.; Wofsy, S.; Zhao, Y.; Nielsen, C. P.; Nehrkorn, T.; McElroy, M. B.; Chang, R.

    2017-12-01

    China has pledged to peak carbon emissions by 2030, but there continues to be significant uncertainty in estimates of its anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. In this study, we evaluate the performance of three anthropogenic CO2 inventories, two global and one regional, using five years of continuous hourly observations from a site in Northern China. We model five years of continuous hourly observations (2005 to 2009) using the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport Model (STILT) run in backward time mode driven by high resolution meteorology from the Weather Research and Forecasting Model version 3.6.1 (WRF) with vegetation fluxes prescribed by a simple biosphere model. We calculate regional enhancements to advected background CO2 derived from NOAA CarbonTracker on seasonal and annual bases and use observations to optimize emissions inventories within the site's influence region at these timescales. Finally, we use annual enhancements to examine carbon intensity of provinces in and adjacent to Northern China as CO2 per unit of the region's GDP to evaluate the effects of local and global economic events on CO2 emissions. With the exception of peak growing season where discrepancies are confounded by errors in the vegetation model, we find the regional inventory agrees significantly better with observations than the global inventories at all timescales. Here we use a single measurement site; significant improvements in inventory optimizations can be achieved with a network of measurements stations. This study highlights the importance of China-specific data over global averages in emissions evaluation and demonstrates the value of top-down studies in independently evaluating inventory performance. We demonstrate the framework's ability to resolve differences of at least 20% among inventories, establishing a benchmark for ongoing efforts to decrease uncertainty in China's reported CO2 emissions estimates.

  14. Evaluation of Regional Climatic Model Simulated Aerosol Optical Properties over South Africa Using Ground-Based and Satellite Observations

    OpenAIRE

    Tesfaye, M.; Botai, J.; Sivakumar, V.; Mengistu Tsidu, G.

    2013-01-01

    The present study evaluates the aerosol optical property computing performance of the Regional Climate Model (RegCM4) which is interactively coupled with anthropogenic-desert dust schemes, in South Africa. The validation was carried out by comparing RegCM4 estimated: aerosol extinction coefficient profile, Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), and Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) with AERONET, LIDAR, and MISR observations. The results showed that the magnitudes of simulated AOD at the Skukuza station (2...

  15. Evaluation of WRF PBL parameterization schemes against direct observations during a dry event over the Ganges valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyanadh, Anusha; Prabha, Thara V.; Balaji, B.; Resmi, E. A.; Karipot, Anandakumar

    2017-09-01

    Accurate representations of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) are important in all weather forecast systems, especially in simulations of turbulence, wind and air quality in the lower atmosphere. In the present study, detailed observations from the Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment - Integrated Ground based Observational Campaign (CAIPEEX-IGOC) 2014 comprising of the complete surface energy budget and detailed boundary layer observations are used to validate Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model simulations over a diverse terrain over the Ganges valley region, Uttar Pradesh, India. A drying event in June 2014 associated with a heat wave is selected for validation.Six local and nonlocal PBL schemes from WRF at 1 km resolution are compared with hourly observations during the diurnal cycle. Near-surface observations of weather parameters, radiation components and eddy covariance fluxes from micrometeorological tower, and profiles of variables from microwave radiometer, and radiosonde observations are used for model evaluations. Models produce a warmer, drier surface layer with higher wind speed, sensible heat flux and temperature than observations. Layered boundary layer dynamics, including the residual layer structure as illustrated in the observations over the Ganges valley are missed in the model, which lead to deeper mixed layers and excessive drying.Although it is difficult to identify any single scheme as the best, the qualitative and quantitative analyses for the entire study period and overall reproducibility of the observations indicate that the MYNN2 simulations describe lower errors and more realistic simulation of spatio-temporal variations in the boundary layer height.

  16. Hanford site water table changes 1950-1980: data observations and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, D.A.; Reisenauer, A.E.; Black, G.D.; Young, M.A.

    1986-04-01

    The basalt formations underlying the Hanford site are being considered for characterization and evaluation as a deep geologic repository for defense and commercial radioactive wastes. To understand the hydrology of the Hanford area, we need to know if the ground-water system is in steady state and what impact a change in surface stress from artificial recharge may have on the underlying basalt aquifers. Researchers at Pacific Northwest Laboratory are supporting efforts to understand these issues by illustrating how changes in wastewater disposal activities at the Hanford site have altered the configuration of the water table surface with time. The objective of this work was to determine the magnitude and direction of changes in the elevation of the water table across the Hanford site from 1950 to 1980. Plots of the magnitudes of water-level changes occurring over 5-year intervals from 1950 through 1980 are presented. The water-level changes that occurred during each 5-year interval are related to water discharges from nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities or other discharge sources. The plots of water-level changes show large water-level increases in the vicinity of the Separations Area (200 East and 200 West) from 1950 to 1960; the rate of increase of water-level changes grows more slowly from 1960 to 1970, while the areal extent of the mounding continues to expand. Only small changes occur from 1970 to 1980; during this time period, the unconfined system appears to be in approximate equilibrium with the sources. Based on previous experience, it is believed that an increase in ground-water mounding will begin to appear near the 200 East Area B Pond as a result of the increased discharges from the restart of PUREX in 1983

  17. Evaluation of Cryotechniques for Tem Observation of Sols - Application to Boehmite Sols Used in Catalysts Forming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauchadour D.

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of suspensions in the heterogeneous catalysis field being a big issue, it appears important to be able to control this step as much as possible. Size of the objects in the suspension, aggregation state, homogeneity or heterogeneity (all called texture or structure here are some important parameters which are sometimes difficult to evaluate with traditionalmethods such as X-ray scattering or rheology. The cryotechniques applied to transmission electron microscopy is then an interesting alternative. Three different methods of cryofixation have been tested on low solid content suspensions of boehmite commonly used during the dispersion step of alumina carrier forming. Two different cryoprotectants were tested as well. It is shown that liquid propane immersion cooling (PL and slam freezing (SF methods require the use of a cryoprotectant whereas high pressure technique (HP avoids ice crystal formation without any addition of cryoprotectant in the suspension. It is shown also that DMSO is efficient with PL and SF techniques only when added at a high concentration (50% to the suspension. Glycerol is preferred because water is vitrified since that 30% of glycerol is added. Comparisons of high pressure preparations with and without glycerol show very little differences of texture on the replica. Explanations of the origin of the small differences of density are tentatively given. More analyses are now under progress to clarify the role of glycerol. Cryomicroscopy is conclude to be a very good technique when the texture of a suspension must be studied for example in the elaboration or in the improvement of a peptisation or a colloid formation process.

  18. Evaluation of temperature–pulse centile charts in identifying serious bacterial illness: observational cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brent, Andrew J; Lakhanpaul, Monica; Ninis, Nelly; Levin, Michael; MacFaul, Roddy; Thompson, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Background Distinguishing serious bacterial infection (SBI) from milder/self-limiting infections is often difficult. Interpretation of vital signs is confounded by the effect of temperature on pulse and respiratory rate. Temperature–pulse centile charts have been proposed to improve the predictive value of pulse rate in the clinical assessment of children with suspected SBI. Objectives To assess the utility of proposed temperature–pulse centile charts in the clinical assessment of children with suspected SBI. Study design and participants The predictive value for SBI of temperature–pulse centile categories, pulse centile categories and Advanced Paediatric Life Support (APLS) defined tachycardia were compared among 1360 children aged 3 months to 10 years presenting with suspected infection to a hospital emergency department (ED) in England; and among 325 children who presented to hospitals in the UK with meningococcal disease. Main outcome measure SBI. Results Among children presenting to the ED, 55 (4.0%) had SBI. Pulse centile category, but not temperature–pulse centile category, was strongly associated with risk of SBI (p=0.0005 and 0.288, respectively). APLS defined tachycardia was also strongly associated with SBI (OR 2.90 (95% CI 1.60 to 5.26), p=0.0002). Among children with meningococcal disease, higher pulse and temperature–pulse centile categories were both associated with more severe disease (p=0.004 and 0.041, respectively). Conclusions Increased pulse rate is an important predictor of SBI, supporting National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence recommendations that pulse rate be routinely measured in the assessment of febrile children. Temperature–pulse centile charts performed more poorly than pulse alone in this study. Further studies are required to evaluate their utility in monitoring the clinical progress of sick children over time. PMID:21233079

  19. Evaluation of temperature-pulse centile charts in identifying serious bacterial illness: observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brent, Andrew J; Lakhanpaul, Monica; Ninis, Nelly; Levin, Michael; MacFaul, Roddy; Thompson, Matthew

    2011-04-01

    Distinguishing serious bacterial infection (SBI) from milder/self-limiting infections is often difficult. Interpretation of vital signs is confounded by the effect of temperature on pulse and respiratory rate. Temperature-pulse centile charts have been proposed to improve the predictive value of pulse rate in the clinical assessment of children with suspected SBI. To assess the utility of proposed temperature-pulse centile charts in the clinical assessment of children with suspected SBI. The predictive value for SBI of temperature-pulse centile categories, pulse centile categories and Advanced Paediatric Life Support (APLS) defined tachycardia were compared among 1360 children aged 3 months to 10 years presenting with suspected infection to a hospital emergency department (ED) in England; and among 325 children who presented to hospitals in the UK with meningococcal disease. SBI. Among children presenting to the ED, 55 (4.0%) had SBI. Pulse centile category, but not temperature-pulse centile category, was strongly associated with risk of SBI (p=0.0005 and 0.288, respectively). APLS defined tachycardia was also strongly associated with SBI (OR 2.90 (95% CI 1.60 to 5.26), p=0.0002). Among children with meningococcal disease, higher pulse and temperature-pulse centile categories were both associated with more severe disease (p=0.004 and 0.041, respectively). Increased pulse rate is an important predictor of SBI, supporting National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence recommendations that pulse rate be routinely measured in the assessment of febrile children. Temperature-pulse centile charts performed more poorly than pulse alone in this study. Further studies are required to evaluate their utility in monitoring the clinical progress of sick children over time.

  20. Evaluation of a conceptual rainfall forecasting model from observed and simulated rain events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Dolciné

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Very short-term rainfall forecasting models designed for runoff analysis of catchments, particularly those subject to flash-floods, typically include one or more variables deduced from weather radars. Useful variables for defining the state and evolution of a rain system include rainfall rate, vertically integrated rainwater content and advection velocity. The forecast model proposed in this work complements recent dynamical formulations by focusing on a formulation incorporating these variables using volumetric radar data to define the model state variables, determining the rainfall source term directly from multi-scan radar data, explicitly accounting for orographic enhancement, and explicitly incorporating the dynamical model components in an advection-diffusion scheme. An evaluation of this model is presented for four rain events collected in the South of France and in the North-East of Italy. Model forecasts are compared with two simple methods: persistence and extrapolation. An additional analysis is performed using an existing mono-dimensional microphysical meteorological model to produce simulated rain events and provide initialization data. Forecasted rainfall produced by the proposed model and the extrapolation method are compared to the simulated events. The results show that the forecast model performance is influenced by rainfall temporal variability and performance is better for less variable rain events. The comparison with the extrapolation method shows that the proposed model performs better than extrapolation in the initial period of the forecast lead-time. It is shown that the performance of the proposed model over the extrapolation method depends essentially on the additional vertical information available from voluminal radar.

  1. Evaluation of oestrus observation and conception rates in suckling beef cows using whole milk progesterone concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.C. Lourens

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available A 2-sample regime was used to measure whole milk progesterone concentration on the day of oestrus and insemination (Day 0 and 6 days later (Day 6 in a sample of 50 primiparous and 100 multiparous suckling beef cows. Exposure to teaser bulls and observation by cattlemen identified the occurrence of oestrus. Three sets of criteria used to define ovulatory oestrus were compared : a milk progesterone concentration less than 6 nmol / l on Day 0 ; b milk progesterone less than 6 nmol / l on Day 0 and rising to greater than 6 nmol / l on Day 6; c milk progesterone less than 6 nmol / l on Day 0 and rising to greater than 6 nmol / l on Day 6, or cow diagnosed pregnant to 1st insemination. Using only a single milk sample on Day 0 (criterion a would have resulted in the positive predictive value of heat detection being estimated at 98.7%. Using a paired measurement (criterion b resulted in a significantly lower estimate of 84.7%. The inclusion of cows that conceived despite not showing a marked rise in milk progesterone concentration (criterion c resulted in a more accurate estimate of 89.3%. Use of a 2-sample regime also allowed calculation of conception rates while eliminating the effect of heat detection errors. In the cows sampled, of those in ovulatory oestrus that were inseminated, 73.1% conceived to the 1st insemination. These results demonstrate that artificial insemination within a limited breeding season can be successful if nutrition is optimal and management is intensive. The use of a 2-sample milk progesterone test may be a valuable tool in investigating heat detection and conception problems in beef herds in which artificial insemination is used.

  2. Geochemical evaluation of observed changes in volcanic activity during the 2007 eruption at Stromboli (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, A.; Grassa, F.; Inguaggiato, S.; Liotta, M.; Longo, M.; Madonia, P.; Brusca, L.; Capasso, G.; Morici, S.; Rouwet, D.; Vita, F.

    2009-05-01

    On February 27, 2007 a new eruption started at Stromboli that lasted until April 2 and included a paroxysmal explosion on March 15. Geochemical monitoring carried out over several years revealed some appreciable variations that preceded both the eruption onset and the explosion. The carbon dioxide (CO 2) flux from the soil at Pizzo Sopra La Fossa markedly increased a few days before the eruption onset, and continued during lava effusion to reach its maximum value (at 90,000 g m - 2 d - 1 ) a few days before the paroxysm. Almost contemporarily, the δ13C CO 2 of the SC5 fumarole located in the summit area increased markedly, peaking just before the explosion ( δ13C CO 2 ~ - 1.8‰). Following the paroxysm, helium (He) isotopes measured in the gases dissolved in the basal thermal aquifer sharply increased. Almost contemporarily, the automatic station of CO 2 flux recorded an anomalous degassing rate. Also temperatures and the vertical thermal gradient, which had been measured since November 2006 in the soil at Pizzo Sopra La Fossa, showed appreciable variabilities that lasted until the end of the eruption. The geochemical variations indicated the degassing of a new batch of volatile-rich magma that preceded and probably fed the paroxysm. The anomalous 3He/ 4He ratio suggested that the ascent of a second batch of volatile-rich magma toward the surface was probably responsible of the resumption of the ordinary activity. A comparison with the geochemical variations observed during the 2002-2003 eruption indicated that the 2007 eruption was less energetic.

  3. An Evaluation of the Shortwave Direct Aerosol Radiative Forcing Using CALIOP and MODIS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, Eiji; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Winker, David

    2018-01-01

    In this study, all-sky ShortWave Direct Aerosol Radiative Forcing (SWDARF) at the top of atmosphere is estimated using the method of Oikawa et al. (2013) applied to two generations of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) Level 2 products, i.e., version 2 (V2) and version 3 (V3), and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud product. The estimated SWDARF in Oikawa et al. (2013) was based on CALIPSO V2 product, which contained significant errors in cloud clearing and low-altitude aerosols. This error was corrected in V3, resulting in greatly improved and significantly different aerosol and cloud distributions. In clear-sky conditions, the magnitude of aerosol optical thickness underestimation becomes smaller and SWDARF becomes more negative using the V3 product. In addition, above-cloud aerosols, which cause positive SWDARF, are less frequently detected and below-cloud aerosols are more frequently detected in the V3 product than in the V2 product, so that cloudy-sky SWDARF becomes more negative using the V3 product. From these results, clear-sky, cloudy-sky, and all-sky SWDARFs become more negative using the V3 product than the V2 product. The magnitude of negative SWDARF using the V3 product is more than twice as large as the V2 product under all-sky conditions due to V3 improvements in the lidar retrieval algorithms. Considering the uncertainties of aerosol and cloud measurements, annual zonal averages of clear-sky, cloudy-sky, and all-sky SWDARFs from 60°S to 60°N are estimated as -4.0 ± 0.2, -1.1 ± 0.3, and -2.1 ± 0.2 Wm-2 from the V3 product.

  4. Evaluating hot spot-ridge interaction in the Atlantic from regional-scale seismic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaherty, James B.; Dunn, Robert A.

    2007-05-01

    We probe variations in mantle temperature, composition, and fabric along hot spot-influenced sections of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), using surface waves from nearby ridge earthquakes recorded on broadband island-based seismic stations. We invert frequency-dependent phase delays from these events to estimate one-dimensional mean shear velocity and radial shear anisotropy profiles in the upper 200 km of the mantle within two seafloor age intervals: 5-10 Ma and 15-20 Ma. Mean shear velocity profiles correlate with apparent hot spot flux: lithosphere formed near the low-flux Ascension hot spot is characterized by high mantle velocities, while the MAR near the higher-flux Azores hot spot has lower velocities. The impact of the high-flux Iceland hot spot on mantle velocities along the nearby MAR is strongly asymmetric: the lithospheric velocities near the Kolbeinsey ridge are moderately slow, while velocities near the Reykjanes ridge estimated in previous studies are much slower. Within each region the increase in shear velocity with age is consistent with a half-space cooling model, and the velocity variations observed between Ascension, the Azores, and Kolbeinsey are consistent with approximately ±75° potential-temperature variation among these sites. In comparison, the Reykjanes lithosphere is too slow to result purely from half-space cooling of a high-temperature mantle source. We speculate that the anomalously low shear velocities within the lithosphere produced at the Reykjanes ridge result from high asthenospheric temperatures of +50-75 K combined with ˜12% (by volume) gabbro retained in the mantle due to the imbalance between high hot spot-influenced melt production and relatively inefficient melt extraction along the slow spreading Reykjanes. Radial shear anisotropy in the upper 150 km also indicates an apparent hot spot influence: mantle fabric near Ascension is quite weak, consistent with previous models of anisotropy produced by corner flow during slow

  5. Evaluation of novel computerized tomography scoring systems in human traumatic brain injury: An observational, multicenter study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Peter Thelin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality. Computerized tomography (CT scanning of the brain is essential for diagnostic screening of intracranial injuries in need of neurosurgical intervention, but may also provide information concerning patient prognosis and enable baseline risk stratification in clinical trials. Novel CT scoring systems have been developed to improve current prognostic models, including the Stockholm and Helsinki CT scores, but so far have not been extensively validated. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the Stockholm and Helsinki CT scores for predicting functional outcome, in comparison with the Rotterdam CT score and Marshall CT classification. The secondary aims were to assess which individual components of the CT scores best predict outcome and what additional prognostic value the CT scoring systems contribute to a clinical prognostic model.TBI patients requiring neuro-intensive care and not included in the initial creation of the Stockholm and Helsinki CT scoring systems were retrospectively included from prospectively collected data at the Karolinska University Hospital (n = 720 from 1 January 2005 to 31 December 2014 and Helsinki University Hospital (n = 395 from 1 January 2013 to 31 December 2014, totaling 1,115 patients. The Marshall CT classification and the Rotterdam, Stockholm, and Helsinki CT scores were assessed using the admission CT scans. Known outcome predictors at admission were acquired (age, pupil responsiveness, admission Glasgow Coma Scale, glucose level, and hemoglobin level and used in univariate, and multivariable, regression models to predict long-term functional outcome (dichotomizations of the Glasgow Outcome Scale [GOS]. In total, 478 patients (43% had an unfavorable outcome (GOS 1-3. In the combined cohort, overall prognostic performance was more accurate for the Stockholm CT score (Nagelkerke's pseudo-R2 range 0.24-0.28 and the Helsinki CT score

  6. Evaluating the coupled vegetation-fire model, LPJ-GUESS-SPITFIRE, against observed tropical forest biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spessa, Allan; Forrest, Matthew; Werner, Christian; Steinkamp, Joerg; Hickler, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Wildfire is a fundamental Earth System process. It is the most important disturbance worldwide in terms of area and variety of biomes affected; a major mechanism by which carbon is transferred from the land to the atmosphere (2-4 Pg per annum, equiv. 20-30% of global fossil fuel emissions over the last decade); and globally a significant source of particulate aerosols and trace greenhouse gases. Fire is also potentially important as a feedback in the climate system. If climate change favours more intense fire regimes, this would result in a net transfer of carbon from ecosystems to the atmosphere, as well as higher emissions, and under certain circumstances, increased troposphere ozone production- all contributing to positive climate-land surface feedbacks. Quantitative analysis of fire-vegetation-climate interactions has been held back until recently by a lack of consistent global data sets on fire, and by the underdeveloped state of dynamic vegetation-fire modelling. Dynamic vegetation-fire modelling is an essential part of our forecasting armory for examining the possible impacts of climate, fire regimes and land-use on ecosystems and emissions from biomass burning beyond the observation period, as part of future climate or paleo-climate studies. LPJ-GUESS is a process-based model of vegetation dynamics designed for regional to global applications. It combines features of the Lund-Potsdam-Jena Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (LPJ-DGVM) with those of the General Ecosystem Simulator (GUESS) in a single, flexible modelling framework. The models have identical representations of eco-physiological and biogeochemical processes, including the hydrological cycle. However, they differ in the detail with which vegetation dynamics and canopy structure are simulated. Simplified, computationally efficient representations are used in the LPJ-DGVM, while LPJ-GUESS employs a gap-model approach, which better captures ecological succession and hence ecosystem changes due to

  7. Outcome reporting across randomised trials and observational studies evaluating treatments for Twin-Twin Transfusion Syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Helen; Duffy, James M N; Umadia, Ogochukwu; Khalil, Asma

    2018-04-01

    Twin-Twin Transfusion syndrome is associated with significant mortality and morbidity. Potential treatments require robust evaluation. The aim of this study was to evaluate outcome reporting across observational studies and randomised controlled trials assessing treatments for twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS). Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE and Medline were searched from inception to August 2016. Observational studies and randomised controlled trials reporting outcomes following a treatment for TTTS in monochorionic-diamniotic twin pregnancies and monochorionic-triamniotic or dichorionic-triamniotic triplet pregnancies were included. We systematically extracted and categorised outcome reporting. Six randomised trials and 94 observational studies, reporting data from 20,071 maternal participants and 3,199 children, were included. Six different treatments were evaluated. Included studies reported sixty-two different outcomes, including 10 fetal, 28 neonatal, 6 early childhood and 18 maternal outcomes. The outcomes were inconsistently reported across trials. For example, when considering offspring mortality, 31 studies (31%) reported live birth, 31 studies (31%) reported intrauterine death, 49 studies (49%) reported neonatal mortality, and 17 studies (17%) reported perinatal mortality. Four studies (4%) reported respiratory distress syndrome. Only 19 (19%) of studies were designed for long-term follow-up and 11 of these studies (11%) reported cerebral palsy. Most studies evaluating treatments for TTTS, have often neglected to report clinically important outcomes, especially neonatal morbidity outcomes. Most studies are not designed for long-term follow-up. The development of a core outcome set could help standardised outcome collection and reporting in Twin-Twin Transfusion syndrome studies. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of JPEG 2000 encoder options: human and model observer detection of variable signals in X-ray coronary angiograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yani; Pham, Binh; Eckstein, Miguel P

    2004-05-01

    Previous studies have evaluated the effect of the new still image compression standard JPEG 2000 using nontask based image quality metrics, i.e., peak-signal-to-noise-ratio (PSNR) for nonmedical images. In this paper, the effect of JPEG 2000 encoder options was investigated using the performance of human and model observers (nonprewhitening matched filter with an eye filter, square-window Hotelling, Laguerre-Gauss Hotelling and channelized Hotelling model observer) for clinically relevant visual tasks. Two tasks were investigated: the signal known exactly but variable task (SKEV) and the signal known statistically task (SKS). Test images consisted of real X-ray coronary angiograms with simulated filling defects (signals) inserted in one of the four simulated arteries. The signals varied in size and shape. Experimental results indicated that the dependence of task performance on the JPEG 2000 encoder options was similar for all model and human observers. Model observer performance in the more tractable and computationally economic SKEV task can be used to reliably estimate performance in the complex but clinically more realistic SKS task. JPEG 2000 encoder settings different from the default ones resulted in greatly improved model and human observer performance in the studied clinically relevant visual tasks using real angiography backgrounds.

  9. A multicentre observational study to evaluate a new tool to assess emergency physicians' non-technical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowerdew, Lynsey; Gaunt, Arran; Spedding, Jessica; Bhargava, Ajay; Brown, Ruth; Vincent, Charles; Woloshynowych, Maria

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate a new tool to assess emergency physicians' non-technical skills. This was a multicentre observational study using data collected at four emergency departments in England. A proportion of observations used paired observers to obtain data for inter-rater reliability. Data were also collected for test-retest reliability, observability of skills, mean ratings and dispersion of ratings for each skill, as well as a comparison of skill level between hospitals. Qualitative data described the range of non-technical skills exhibited by trainees and identified sources of rater error. 96 assessments of 43 senior trainees were completed. At a scale level, intra-class coefficients were 0.575, 0.532 and 0.419 and using mean scores were 0.824, 0.702 and 0.519. Spearman's ρ for calculating test-retest reliability was 0.70 using mean scores. All skills were observed more than 60% of the time. The skill Maintenance of Standards received the lowest mean rating (4.8 on a nine-point scale) and the highest mean was calculated for Team Building (6.0). Two skills, Supervision & Feedback and Situational Awareness-Gathering Information, had significantly different distributions of ratings across the four hospitals (ptechnical skills, especially in relation to leadership. The framework of skills may be used to identify areas for development in individual trainees, as well as guide other patient safety interventions.

  10. Systematic research review of observational approaches used to evaluate mother-child mealtime interactions during preschool years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmeier, Heidi; Skouteris, Helen; Hetherington, Marion

    2015-01-01

    The family meal and social interactions during the meal are important events in a child's life. Specifically, mealtime interactions have been linked to child weight status, the development of children's eating patterns, and socialization. Mealtime interactions may be observed and evaluated to provide insights into this important event beyond self-reported measurements. We aimed to identify, review, and examine studies in which mother-child mealtime behaviors were measured through observation. MEDLINE Complete, PsycINFO, and PsycARTICLES were systematically searched by using sensitive search strategies. We included observational studies of mother-child eating and mealtimes and associations between mother-child interactions and preschool child eating or weight status published to March 2014. Thirteen articles were included in our review. All studies but one were cross-sectional, and none of the studies evaluated how mutual dimensions (e.g., parent responsiveness to the child and child responsiveness to the parent) of dyadic interactions between mothers and children influence maternal feeding practices, children's eating, and weight. The parenting style was associated with maternal feeding practices but not directly with children's eating. Parental discouragements to eat and negative statements about food were associated with higher child weight status. Parental encouragement to eat was associated with higher child weight status as well as maternal body mass index. No associations were shown between maternal reports of feeding practices and observed maternal feeding practices. Parents' overarching attitudes and approaches to parenting appear to be associated with their feeding practices or styles. Future studies should implement longitudinal observational methods with the capacity to measure levels of dimensions within bidirectional parent-child interactions and the extent to which these factors influence maternal practices, children's eating, and weight status.

  11. Evaluation of UTLS Carbon Monoxide Simulations in GMI and GEOS-Chem Chemical Transport Models using Aura MLS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Murray, Lee T.; Damon, Megan R.; Su, Hui; Livesey, Nathaniel J.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the distribution and variation of carbon monoxide (CO) in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) during 2004-2012 as simulated by two chemical transport models, using the latest version of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) observations. The simulated spatial distributions, temporal variations and vertical transport of CO in the UTLS region are compared with those observed by MLS. We also investigate the impact of surface emissions and deep convection on CO concentrations in the UTLS over different regions, using both model simulations and MLS observations. Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) and GEOS-Chem simulations of UTLS CO both show similar spatial distributions to observations. The global mean CO values simulated by both models agree with MLS observations at 215 and 147 hPa, but are significantly underestimated by more than 40% at 100 hPa. In addition, the models underestimate the peak CO values by up to 70% at 100 hPa, 60% at 147 hPa and 40% at 215 hPa, with GEOS-Chem generally simulating more CO at 100 hPa and less CO at 215 hPa than GMI. The seasonal distributions of CO simulated by both models are in better agreement with MLS in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) than in the Northern Hemisphere (NH), with disagreements between model and observations over enhanced CO regions such as southern Africa. The simulated vertical transport of CO shows better agreement with MLS in the tropics and the SH subtropics than the NH subtropics. We also examine regional variations in the relationships among surface CO emission, convection and UTLS CO concentrations. The two models exhibit emission-convection- CO relationships similar to those observed by MLS over the tropics and some regions with enhanced UTLS CO.

  12. Design of a model observer to evaluate calcification detectability in breast tomosynthesis and application to smoothing prior optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michielsen, Koen; Nuyts, Johan; Cockmartin, Lesley; Marshall, Nicholas; Bosmans, Hilde

    2016-12-01

    In this work, the authors design and validate a model observer that can detect groups of microcalcifications in a four-alternative forced choice experiment and use it to optimize a smoothing prior for detectability of microcalcifications. A channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) with eight Laguerre-Gauss channels was designed to detect groups of five microcalcifications in a background of acrylic spheres by adding the CHO log-likelihood ratios calculated at the expected locations of the five calcifications. This model observer is then applied to optimize the detectability of the microcalcifications as a function of the smoothing prior. The authors examine the quadratic and total variation (TV) priors, and a combination of both. A selection of these reconstructions was then evaluated by human observers to validate the correct working of the model observer. The authors found a clear maximum for the detectability of microcalcification when using the total variation prior with weight β TV = 35. Detectability only varied over a small range for the quadratic and combined quadratic-TV priors when weight β Q of the quadratic prior was changed by two orders of magnitude. Spearman correlation with human observers was good except for the highest value of β for the quadratic and TV priors. Excluding those, the authors found ρ = 0.93 when comparing detection fractions, and ρ = 0.86 for the fitted detection threshold diameter. The authors successfully designed a model observer that was able to predict human performance over a large range of settings of the smoothing prior, except for the highest values of β which were outside the useful range for good image quality. Since detectability only depends weakly on the strength of the combined prior, it is not possible to pick an optimal smoothness based only on this criterion. On the other hand, such choice can now be made based on other criteria without worrying about calcification detectability.

  13. Evaluation of biomass burning aerosols in the HadGEM3 climate model with observations from the SAMBBA field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. T. Johnson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We present observations of biomass burning aerosol from the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA and other measurement campaigns, and use these to evaluate the representation of biomass burning aerosol properties and processes in a state-of-the-art climate model. The evaluation includes detailed comparisons with aircraft and ground data, along with remote sensing observations from MODIS and AERONET. We demonstrate several improvements to aerosol properties following the implementation of the Global Model for Aerosol Processes (GLOMAP-mode modal aerosol scheme in the HadGEM3 climate model. This predicts the particle size distribution, composition, and optical properties, giving increased accuracy in the representation of aerosol properties and physical–chemical processes over the Coupled Large-scale Aerosol Scheme for Simulations in Climate Models (CLASSIC bulk aerosol scheme previously used in HadGEM2. Although both models give similar regional distributions of carbonaceous aerosol mass and aerosol optical depth (AOD, GLOMAP-mode is better able to capture the observed size distribution, single scattering albedo, and Ångström exponent across different tropical biomass burning source regions. Both aerosol schemes overestimate the uptake of water compared to recent observations, CLASSIC more so than GLOMAP-mode, leading to a likely overestimation of aerosol scattering, AOD, and single scattering albedo at high relative humidity. Observed aerosol vertical distributions were well captured when biomass burning aerosol emissions were injected uniformly from the surface to 3 km. Finally, good agreement between observed and modelled AOD was gained only after scaling up GFED3 emissions by a factor of 1.6 for CLASSIC and 2.0 for GLOMAP-mode. We attribute this difference in scaling factor mainly to different assumptions for the water uptake and growth of aerosol mass during ageing via oxidation and condensation of organics. We also note

  14. 'Beyond Milestones': a randomised controlled trial evaluating an innovative digital resource teaching quality observation of normal child development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Anne M; Cunningham, Clare; Sinclair, Adriane J; Rao, Arjun; Lonergan, Amy; Bye, Ann M E

    2014-05-01

    The study aimed to create and evaluate the educational effectiveness of a digital resource instructing paediatric trainees in a systematic approach to critical and quality observation of normal child development. A digital educational resource was developed utilising the skills of an expert developmental paediatrician who was videoed assessing normal early child development at a series of critical stages. Videos illustrated aspects of language, sophistication of play and socialisation, cognition, and motor progress. Expert commentary, teaching text and summaries were used. A randomised controlled trial evaluated the resource. Paediatric trainees were recruited from The Sydney Children's Hospitals Network. Outcome measures were repeated at three time points (pre-teaching, immediate-post and 1 month) and included self-rated attitudes, knowledge of markers of development and observational expertise. Qualitative data on teaching usefulness were obtained through open-ended questions. Fifty-six paediatric trainees (registrar 79%, women 82%; mean age 31 years) completed the pre-assessment, 46 the immediate-post and 45 the 1-month follow-up (20% attrition). Compared with the Control group, the Teaching group scored higher over time on markers of development (P = 0.006), observational expertise (P improves knowledge, increases confidence and is useful, providing a structured approach to developmental assessment. The techniques taught can be applied to every paediatric consultation. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  15. Evaluation of high-resolution satellite precipitation products with surface rain gauge observations from Laohahe Basin in northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-hu Jiang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Three high-resolution satellite precipitation products, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM standard precipitation products 3B42V6 and 3B42RT and the Climate Precipitation Center's (CPC morphing technique precipitation product (CMORPH, were evaluated against surface rain gauge observations from the Laohahe Basin in northern China. Widely used statistical validation indices and categorical statistics were adopted. The evaluations were performed at multiple time scales, ranging from daily to yearly, for the years from 2003 to 2008. The results show that all three satellite precipitation products perform very well in detecting the occurrence of precipitation events, but there are some different biases in the amount of precipitation. 3B42V6, which has a bias of 21%, fits best with the surface rain gauge observations at both daily and monthly scales, while the biases of 3B42RT and CMORPH, with values of 81% and 67%, respectively, are much higher than a normal receivable threshold. The quality of the satellite precipitation products also shows monthly and yearly variation: 3B42RT has a large positive bias in the cold season from September to April, while CMORPH has a large positive bias in the warm season from May to August, and they all attained their best values in 2006 (with 10%, 50%, and −5% biases for 3B42V6, 3B42RT, and CMORPH, respectively. Our evaluation shows that, for the Laohahe Basin, 3B42V6 has the best correspondence with the surface observations, and CMORPH performs much better than 3B42RT. The large errors of 3B42RT and CMORPH remind us of the need for new improvements to satellite precipitation retrieval algorithms or feasible bias adjusting methods.

  16. Description, evaluation and clinical decision making according to various fetal heart rate patterns. Inter-observer and regional variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, O; Bøttcher, L M; Weber, Tom

    1992-01-01

    departments, especially between departments far apart. It is concluded that we still need a scientific clarification of which specific heart rate changes are the best predictors of fetal stress. Artificial intelligence programs for interpreting fetal cardiotocograms and ECG signals constitute one promising......At 10 Danish obstetrical departments, 116 residents (42 senior and 74 junior) participated in a study to assess inter-observer and regional variability in the description and evaluation of and clinical decision regarding 11 fetal heart rate patterns. The 11 traces included normal as well...... as pathological patterns, and normal as well as clinically asphyxiated babies. Five antepartum and six intrapartum patterns were included. A total of 1,276 descriptions and evaluations were obtained. The degree of agreement in description of fetal heart rate changes was high regarding the baseline...

  17. An evaluation of the effectiveness of observation camera placement within the MeerKAT radio telescope project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heyns, Andries

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A recent development within the MeerKAT sub-project of the Square Kilometre Array radio telescope network was the placement of a network of three observation cameras in pursuit of two specific visibility objectives. In this paper, we evaluate the effectiveness of the locations of the MeerKAT observation camera network according to a novel multi-objective geographic information systems-based facility location framework. We find that the configuration chosen and implemented by the MeerKAT decision-makers is of very high quality, although we are able to uncover slightly superior alternative placement configurations. A significant amount of time and effort could, however, have been saved in the process of choosing the appropriate camera sites, had our solutions been available to the decision-makers.

  18. Evaluation of two decomposition schemes in Earth System Models against LIDET, C14 observations and global soil carbon maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciuto, D. M.; Yang, X.; Thornton, P. E.

    2015-12-01

    Soils contain the largest pool of carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. Soil carbon dynamics and associated nutrient dynamics play significant roles in regulating global carbon cycle and atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Our capability to predict future climate change depends to a large extent on a well-constrained representation of soil carbon dynamics in ESMs. Here we evaluate two decomposition schemes - converging trophic cascade (CTC) and Century - in CLM4.5/ACME V0 using data from the long-term intersite decomposition experiment team (LIDET), radiocarbon (14C) observations, and Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD). For the evaluation against LIDET, We exercise the full CLM4.5/ ACME V0 land model, including seasonal variability in nitrogen limitation and environmental scalars (temperature, moisture, O2), in order to represent LIDET experiment in a realistic way. We show that the proper design of model experiments is crucial to model evaluation using data from field experiments such as LIDET. We also use 14C profile data at 10 sites to evaluate the performance of CTC and CENTURY decomposition scheme. We find that the 14C profiles at these sites are most sensitive to the depth dependent decomposition parameters, consistent with previous studies.

  19. Online health information search and evaluation: observations and semi-structured interviews with college students and maternal health experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyojin; Park, Sun-Young; Bozeman, Ingrid

    2011-09-01

    While the Internet is a popular source of health information, health seekers' inadequate skills to locate and discern quality information pose a potential threat to their healthcare decision-making. We aimed to examine health information search and appraisal behaviours among young, heavy users of the Internet. In study 1, we observed and interviewed 11 college students about their search strategies and evaluation of websites. In study 2, three health experts evaluated two websites selected as the best information sources in study 1. Familiarity with health websites and confidence in search strategies were major factors affecting search and evaluation behaviours. Website quality was mostly judged by aesthetics and peripheral cues of source credibility and message credibility. In contrast to users' favourable website evaluation, the experts judged the websites to be inappropriate and untrustworthy. Our results highlight a critical need to provide young health seekers with resources and training that are specifically geared toward health information search and appraisal. The role of health seekers' knowledge and involvement with the health issue in search effort and success warrants future research. © 2011 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2011 Health Libraries Group.

  20. Evaluating water controls on vegetation growth in the semi-arid sahel using field and earth observation data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdi, Abdulhakim M.; Boke-Olen, Niklas; Tenenbaum, David E.

    2017-01-01

    identify the main biophysical limitations that induce canopy water stress in Sahelian vegetation and evaluate the relationships between field data and Earth observation-derived spectral products for up-scaling GPP. We find that plant-available water and vapor pressure deficit together control the GPP......Water loss is a crucial factor for vegetation in the semi-arid Sahel region of Africa. Global satellite-driven estimates of plant CO2 uptake (gross primary productivity, GPP) have been found to not accurately account for Sahelian conditions, particularly the impact of canopy water stress. Here, we...

  1. Satellite-Based Investigation and Evaluation of the Observational Environment of Meteorological Stations in Anhui Province, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Bin; Shi, Tao; Yang, Yuan-Jian; Wu, Bi-Wen; Wang, La-Bao; Shi, Chun-E.; Guo, Jian-Xia; Ji, Cheng-Li; Wen, Hua-Yang

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, by using multi-temporal and high resolution Landsat data and geographic information system techniques, the land use/land cover (LULC) in the 2-km buffer zone of 52 meteorological stations in the Anhui province of China is retrieved and categorized into three types: vegetation (including farmland, forest and grass land), water (including lakes, rivers and pools), and construction (including buildings and roads). Besides, the land surface temperature (LST) in the buffer zone of these stations is also obtained from thermal infrared data. The normalized LST index (NLI) and the heat effect contribution index (HECI) of different LULC types are calculated. Via case studies and statistical analysis, the LULC and thermal environment's temporal-spatial variance in the 2-km buffer zone of these stations are surveyed, and their impacts on the observational environment are investigated. The study shows that the observational environments of the meteorological stations in Anhui province have been greatly influenced by rapid urbanization. The study proposes two new methods to classify the stations' observational environment into three types (urban, sub-urban, and rural). One uses the NLI and the other uses the HECI. The NLI method needs only LST information. The HECI method combines both LULC and LST information and, hence, is considered more reliable. The evaluation methods and criteria can be used conveniently, effectively, and quantitatively, and are especially useful when analyzing observational data from meteorological stations in weather and climate research and when choosing a location for a new meteorological station.

  2. Evaluation of cloud-resolving model simulations of midlatitude cirrus with ARM and A-train observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhlbauer, A.; Ackerman, T. P.; Lawson, R. P.; Xie, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-07-01

    Cirrus clouds are ubiquitous in the upper troposphere and still constitute one of the largest uncertainties in climate predictions. This paper evaluates cloud-resolving model (CRM) and cloud system-resolving model (CSRM) simulations of a midlatitude cirrus case with comprehensive observations collected under the auspices of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program and with spaceborne observations from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration A-train satellites. The CRM simulations are driven with periodic boundary conditions and ARM forcing data, whereas the CSRM simulations are driven by the ERA-Interim product. Vertical profiles of temperature, relative humidity, and wind speeds are reasonably well simulated by the CSRM and CRM, but there are remaining biases in the temperature, wind speeds, and relative humidity, which can be mitigated through nudging the model simulations toward the observed radiosonde profiles. Simulated vertical velocities are underestimated in all simulations except in the CRM simulations with grid spacings of 500 m or finer, which suggests that turbulent vertical air motions in cirrus clouds need to be parameterized in general circulation models and in CSRM simulations with horizontal grid spacings on the order of 1 km. The simulated ice water content and ice number concentrations agree with the observations in the CSRM but are underestimated in the CRM simulations. The underestimation of ice number concentrations is consistent with the overestimation of radar reflectivity in the CRM simulations and suggests that the model produces too many large ice particles especially toward the cloud base. Simulated cloud profiles are rather insensitive to perturbations in the initial conditions or the dimensionality of the model domain, but the treatment of the forcing data has a considerable effect on the outcome of the model simulations. Despite considerable progress in observations and microphysical parameterizations, simulating

  3. Development of 4D mathematical observer models for the task-based evaluation of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Frey, Eric C.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2015-04-01

    performance of human observers in detecting regional motion defects in 4D gated MP SPECT images. The result supports the use of the observer model in the optimization and evaluation of 4D image reconstruction and compensation methods for improving the detection of motion abnormalities in 4D gated MP SPECT images.

  4. Development of 4D mathematical observer models for the task-based evaluation of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Frey, Eric C; Tsui, Benjamin M W

    2015-01-01

    performance of human observers in detecting regional motion defects in 4D gated MP SPECT images. The result supports the use of the observer model in the optimization and evaluation of 4D image reconstruction and compensation methods for improving the detection of motion abnormalities in 4D gated MP SPECT images. (paper)

  5. Evaluation of precipitation in observations, reanalysis and climate models over the Himalayas from an agricultural point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daloz, A. S.; Chakraborty, R.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Himalayas support the agricultural and water resource needs of over 2 billion people. According to some reports the impacts of climate change in the region may be catastrophic so, there is an urgent need for better understanding the impact of climate change on this region, especially on agricultural production, which is the primary livelihood of the population. However, the region is known for its unique landscape and complicated biophysical and socioeconomic systems. This complexity is a source of difficulty for obtaining both reliable observations and realistic predictions of future climate in the region. The ultimate aim of our inter-disciplinary research project is to couple disparate climate and agro-ecosystem models to understand how future changes in precipitation may impact agriculture in the Himalayas. The project is divided into two parts: Quantify the response of precipitation to climate change in state-of-the-art climate model simulations, Evaluate the impact of projected future changes in precipitation on agricultural production with an agro-ecosystem model. For the first part of the project we evaluated the ability of climate models to represent the present climate of this region. Climate model output was compared against precipitation observations from ground stations, satellites, and atmospheric reanalyses to document the biases of the models and evaluate objectively the future changes in precipitation. After evaluating the biases of our models, climate model predictions of precipitation changes over the Himalayas were quantified. The models clearly show a significant increase in precipitation over a large part of the region, especially during the monsoon season and the season preceding the monsoon. The second component of the study seeks to introduce these precipitation changes into an agro-ecosystem model. This model, that contains multiple dynamic variables with regulate-able stochasticity and will allow us to visualize probable impacts of

  6. Using observed postconstruction peak discharges to evaluate a hydrologic and hydraulic design model, Boneyard Creek, Champaign and Urbana, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over, Thomas M.; Soong, David T.; Holmes, Robert R.

    2011-01-01

    Boneyard Creek—which drains an urbanized watershed in the cities of Champaign and Urbana, Illinois, including part of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) campus—has historically been prone to flooding. Using the Stormwater Management Model (SWMM), a hydrologic and hydraulic model of Boneyard Creek was developed for the design of the projects making up the first phase of a long-term plan for flood control on Boneyard Creek, and the construction of the projects was completed in May 2003. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Cities of Champaign and Urbana and UIUC, installed and operated stream and rain gages in order to obtain data for evaluation of the design-model simulations. In this study, design-model simulations were evaluated by using observed postconstruction precipitation and peak-discharge data. Between May 2003 and September 2008, five high-flow events on Boneyard Creek satisfied the study criterion. The five events were simulated with the design model by using observed precipitation. The simulations were run with two different values of the parameter controlling the soil moisture at the beginning of the storms and two different ways of spatially distributing the precipitation, making a total of four simulation scenarios. The simulated and observed peak discharges and stages were compared at gaged locations along the Creek. The discharge at one of these locations was deemed to be critical for evaluating the design model. The uncertainty of the measured peak discharge was also estimated at the critical location with a method based on linear regression of the stage and discharge relation, an estimate of the uncertainty of the acoustic Doppler velocity meter measurements, and the uncertainty of the stage measurements. For four of the five events, the simulated peak discharges lie within the 95-percent confidence interval of the observed peak discharges at the critical location; the fifth was just outside the upper end of

  7. Evaluation of lesion detection capabilities of anatomically based MAP image reconstruction methods using the computer observer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Kudo, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the lesion detection capabilities of anatomically based maximum a posteriori (MAP) image reconstruction methods in emission computed tomography using the computer observer model. In lesion detection tasks, conventional anatomically based MAP reconstruction methods cannot preserve lesions not present in the anatomical image with high contrast and at the same time suppress noise in the background regions. We previously proposed a new anatomically based MAP reconstruction method called the SOS-MAP method, which is based on the spots-on-smooth image model in which the image is modeled by the sum of the smooth background image and the sparse spot image, and showed that the SOS-MAP method can overcome the above-mentioned drawback of conventional anatomically based MAP methods. However, the lesion detection capabilities of the SOS-MAP method remained to be clarified. In the present study, the computer observer model was used to evaluate the lesion detection capabilities of the SOS-MAP method, and it was found that the SOS-MAP method is superior to conventional anatomically based MAP methods for the detection of lesions. (author)

  8. Humpback whale Megaptera novaeangliae (Cetartiodactyla: Balaenopteridae group sizes in line transect ship surveys: An evaluation of observer errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme A. Bortolotto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Accurate estimates of group sizes through line transect sampling methods are important to correctly ascertain the abundance of animals that occur in groups. Since the average observed group size is a component of the distance sampling formula, bias in these data leads to biased abundance estimates. This study aimed to evaluate the potential errors in group size estimation during line transect ship surveys to estimate abundances of the humpback whale, Megaptera novaeangliae (Borowski 1781. In a research cruise along the Brazilian coast, an experiment to collect group size information was conducted from two different sighting platforms on the same vessel. Group sizes were recorded by primary observers at first sighting (PO1 and, in some cases, after some time (PO2. A tracker (T was located on a higher platform to estimate the sizes of groups detected by the primary observers, but tracked one group at a time until it passed abeam. Thus, the dedicated effort to obtain multiple group counts (i.e. higher platform, more time and no responsibility for detecting new groups was expected to provide more accurate numbers. PO2 estimates were compared with PO1 estimates, and T estimates were compared with both PO1 and PO2. Additionally, ratios between T and both PO2 (R1 and PO1 (R2, and between PO2 and PO1 (R3 were calculated. To investigate a possible improvement in abundance estimates, a correction factor (CF was computed from the ratio of T and PO2 means. Primary observer self-correction (= 1.60, CV% = 70.3 was statistically similar to the correction for the tracker (= 1.62, CV% = 84.1. CF resulted in 1 and would not improve abundance estimates. This study supports that observers conducting line transect surveys on large whales have the potential to provide group size information that is as adequate as the correction procedure adopted.

  9. Optimal kvp selection for dual-energy imaging of the chest: evaluation by task-specific observer preference tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D B; Siewerdsen, J H; Tward, D J; Paul, N S; Dhanantwari, A C; Shkumat, N A; Richard, S; Yorkston, J; Van Metter, R

    2007-10-01

    Human observer performance tests were conducted to identify optimal imaging techniques in dual-energy (DE) imaging of the chest with respect to a variety of visualization tasks for soft and bony tissue. Specifically, the effect of kVp selection in low- and high-energy projection pairs was investigated. DE images of an anthropomorphic chest phantom formed the basis for observer studies, decomposed from low-energy and high-energy projections in the range 60-90 kVp and 120-150 kVp, respectively, with total dose for the DE image equivalent to that of a single chest radiograph. Five expert radiologists participated in observer preference tests to evaluate differences in image quality among the DE images. For visualization of soft-tissue structures in the lung, the [60/130] kVp pair provided optimal image quality, whereas [60/140] kVp proved optimal for delineation of the descending aorta in the retrocardiac region. Such soft-tissue detectability tasks exhibited a strong dependence on the low-kVp selection (with 60 kVp providing maximum soft-tissue conspicuity) and a weaker dependence on the high-kVp selection (typically highest at 130-140 kVp). Qualitative examination of DE bone-only images suggests optimal bony visualization at a similar technique, viz., [60/140] kVp. Observer preference was largely consistent with quantitative analysis of contrast, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio, with subtle differences likely related to the imaging task and spatial-frequency characteristics of the noise. Observer preference tests offered practical, semiquantitative identification of optimal, task-specific imaging techniques and will provide useful guidance toward clinical implementation of high-performance DE imaging systems.

  10. Randomized controlled trials and real-world observational studies in evaluating cardiovascular safety of inhaled bronchodilator therapy in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kardos P

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Peter Kardos,1 Sally Worsley,2 Dave Singh,3 Miguel Román-Rodríguez,4 David E Newby,5 Hana Müllerová2 1Group Practice and Respiratory, Allergy and Sleep Unit, Red Cross Maingau Hospital, Frankfurt, Germany; 2GSK, Stockley Park, Middlesex, 3University of Manchester, Medicines Evaluation Unit, University Hospital of South Manchester NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK; 4Primary Care Respiratory Research Unit, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria de Palma IdisPa, Palma de Mallorca, Spain; 5BHF Centre for Cardiovascular Science, University of Edinburgh, The Queen’s Medical Research Institute, Edinburgh, UK Abstract: Long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA or long-acting β2-agonist (LABA bronchodilators and their combination are recommended for the maintenance treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Although the efficacy of LAMAs and LABAs has been well established through randomized controlled trials (RCTs, questions remain regarding their cardiovascular (CV safety. Furthermore, while the safety of LAMA and LABA monotherapy has been extensively studied, data are lacking for LAMA/LABA combination therapy, and the majority of the studies that have reported on the CV safety of LAMA/LABA combination therapy were not specifically designed to assess this. Evaluation of CV safety for COPD treatments is important because many patients with COPD have underlying CV comorbidities. However, severe CV and other comorbidities are often exclusion criteria for RCTs, contributing to a lack in external validity and generalizability. Real-world observational studies are another important tool to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of COPD therapies in a broader population of patients and can improve upon the external validity limitations of RCTs. We examine what is already known regarding the CV and cerebrovascular safety of LAMA/LABA combination therapy from RCTs and real-world observational studies, and explore the advantages and

  11. Predicting the Mineral Composition of Dust Aerosols. Part 2; Model Evaluation and Identification of Key Processes with Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlwitz, J. P.; Garcia-Pando, C. Perez; Miller, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    A global compilation of nearly sixty measurement studies is used to evaluate two methods of simulating the mineral composition of dust aerosols in an Earth system model. Both methods are based upon a Mean Mineralogical Table (MMT) that relates the soil mineral fractions to a global atlas of arid soil type. The Soil Mineral Fraction (SMF) method assumes that the aerosol mineral fractions match the fractions of the soil. The MMT is based upon soil measurements after wet sieving, a process that destroys aggregates of soil particles that would have been emitted from the original, undisturbed soil. The second method approximately reconstructs the emitted aggregates. This model is referred to as the Aerosol Mineral Fraction (AMF) method because the mineral fractions of the aerosols differ from those of the wet-sieved parent soil, partly due to reaggregation. The AMF method remedies some of the deficiencies of the SMF method in comparison to observations. Only the AMF method exhibits phyllosilicate mass at silt sizes, where they are abundant according to observations. In addition, the AMF quartz fraction of silt particles is in better agreement with measured values, in contrast to the overestimated SMF fraction. Measurements at distinct clay and silt particle sizes are shown to be more useful for evaluation of the models, in contrast to the sum over all particles sizes that is susceptible to compensating errors, as illustrated by the SMF experiment. Model errors suggest that allocation of the emitted silt fraction of each mineral into the corresponding transported size categories is an important remaining source of uncertainty. Evaluation of both models and the MMT is hindered by the limited number of size-resolved measurements of mineral content that sparsely sample aerosols from the major dust sources. The importance of climate processes dependent upon aerosol mineral composition shows the need for global and routine mineral measurements.

  12. Evaluation of Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM with All Weather Gauge Observations over CONUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S.; Qi, Y.; Hu, B.; Hu, J.; Hong, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is composed of an international network of satellites that provide the next-generation global observations of rain and snow. Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) is the state-of-art precipitation products with high spatio-temporal resolution of 0.1°/30min. IMERG unifies precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational satellites with the core sensors dual-frequency precipitation radar (DPR) and microwave imager (GMI) on board a "Core" satellite. Additionally, IMERG blends the advantages of currently most popular satellite-based quantitative precipitation estimates (QPE) algorithms, i.e. TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA), Climate Prediction Center morphing technique (CMORPH), Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks-Cloud Classification System (PERSIANN-CCS). The real-time and post real-time IMERG products are now available online at https://stormpps.gsfc.nasa.gov/storm. In this study, the final run post real-time IMERG is evaluated with all-weather manual gauge observations over CONUS from June 2014 through May 2015. Relative Bias (RB), Root-Mean-Squared Error (RMSE), Correlation Coefficient (CC), Probability Of Detection (POD), False Alarm Ratio (FAR), and Critical Success Index (CSI) are used to quantify the performance of IMERG. The performance of IMERG in estimating snowfall precipitation is highlighted in the study. This timely evaluation with all-weather gauge observations is expected to offer insights into performance of IMERG and thus provide useful feedback to the algorithm developers as well as the GPM data users.

  13. Potential use of river suspended-sediment observations to evaluate the effects of seismic shaking on sediment yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avşar, Ulaş

    2014-05-01

    It has been empirically proved that large earthquakes (M>6) trigger landslides and shattering of landscapes, which increase the sediment yield in drainage basins and hence sediment delivery to the rivers. Besides the historical records reporting eyewitness accounts of muddy rivers after earthquakes, this phenomenon was also supported by quantitative analyses on the suspended sediment load of rivers before and after the Chi-Chi Earthquake (Mw=7.6) in 1999 in Taiwan. Observations and understanding of this phenomenon is crucial to trace the sedimentological fingerprints of paleoearthquakes in marine and lacustrine sedimentary sequences. This study presents the evaluation of the publicly available river discharge and suspended-sediment concentration measurements to assess the possible effects of earthquakes on sediment yields in Turkey. For this purpose, measurements from 10 hydrometric stations are utilized, which are located near the epicentres of the 1998 Adana-Ceyhan Earthquake (Mw=6.2), the 1999 İzmit Earthquake (Mw=7.4) and the 1999 Düzce Earthquake (Mw=7.2). The dataset contains ca. 1600 measurements between 1991 and 2005. At only a few stations, anomalies in sediment concentration are observed immediately after the earthquakes. On the other hand, at most of the stations, the data through longer periods after the earthquakes (3-4 years) reveal slight increases in sediment concentration. The low temporal resolution of the measurements (every 20-30 days) limits the observation of possible sudden increase in sediment concentration immediately after the earthquakes. According to the preliminary results, sediment yield seems to be affected from seismic shaking. However, for more robust results, longer-term measurements with higher temporal resolution are required. The future study will focus on a quantitative evaluation and modelling on expected sediment yield after seismic shaking.

  14. Evaluating the Correctness of Airborne Laser Scanning Data Heights Using Vehicle-Based RTK and VRS GPS Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Vermeer

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we describe a system in which a GPS receiver mounted on the roof of a car is used to provide reference information to evaluate the elevation accuracy and georeferencing of airborne laser scanning (ALS point clouds. The concept was evaluated in the Klaukkala test area where a number of roads were traversed to collect real-time kinematic data. Two test cases were evaluated, including one case using the real-time kinematic (RTK method with a dedicated GPS base station at a known benchmark in the area and another case using the GNSSnet virtual reference station service (VRS. The utility of both GPS methods was confirmed. When all test data were included, the mean difference between ALS data and GPS-based observations was −2.4 cm for both RTK and VRS GPS cases. The corresponding dispersions were ±4.5 cm and ±5.9 cm, respectively. In addition, our examination did not reveal the presence of any significant rotation between ALS and GPS data.

  15. Evaluating the Capacity of Global CO2 Flux and Atmospheric Transport Models to Incorporate New Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, S. R.; Collatz, G. J.; Erickson, D. J.; Denning, A. S.; Wofsy, S. C.; Andrews, A. E.

    2007-01-01

    As we enter the new era of satellite remote sensing for CO2 and other carbon cyclerelated quantities, advanced modeling and analysis capabilities are required to fully capitalize on the new observations. Model estimates of CO2 surface flux and atmospheric transport are required for initial constraints on inverse analyses, to connect atmospheric observations to the location of surface sources and sinks, and ultimately for future projections of carbon-climate interactions. For application to current, planned, and future remotely sensed CO2 data, it is desirable that these models are accurate and unbiased at time scales from less than daily to multi-annual and at spatial scales from several kilometers or finer to global. Here we focus on simulated CO2 fluxes from terrestrial vegetation and atmospheric transport mutually constrained by analyzed meteorological fields from the Goddard Modeling and Assimilation Office for the period 1998 through 2006. Use of assimilated meteorological data enables direct model comparison to observations across a wide range of scales of variability. The biospheric fluxes are produced by the CASA model at lxi degrees on a monthly mean basis, modulated hourly with analyzed temperature and sunlight. Both physiological and biomass burning fluxes are derived using satellite observations of vegetation, burned area (as in GFED-2), and analyzed meteorology. For the purposes of comparison to CO2 data, fossil fuel and ocean fluxes are also included in the transport simulations. In this presentation we evaluate the model's ability to simulate CO2 flux and mixing ratio variability in comparison to in situ observations at sites in Northern mid latitudes and the continental tropics. The influence of key process representations is inferred. We find that the model can resolve much of the hourly to synoptic variability in the observations, although there are limits imposed by vertical resolution of boundary layer processes. The seasonal cycle and its

  16. Evaluating Biosphere Model Estimates of the Start of the Vegetation Active Season in Boreal Forests by Satellite Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Böttcher

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the performance of the simulated start of the photosynthetically active season by a large-scale biosphere model in boreal forests in Finland with remote sensing observations. The start of season for two forest types, evergreen needle- and deciduous broad-leaf, was obtained for the period 2003–2011 from regional JSBACH (Jena Scheme for Biosphere–Atmosphere Hamburg runs, driven with climate variables from a regional climate model. The satellite-derived start of season was determined from daily Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS time series of Fractional Snow Cover and the Normalized Difference Water Index by applying methods that were targeted to the two forest types. The accuracy of the satellite-derived start of season in deciduous forest was assessed with bud break observations of birch and a root mean square error of seven days was obtained. The evaluation of JSBACH modelled start of season dates with satellite observations revealed high spatial correspondence. The bias was less than five days for both forest types but showed regional differences that need further consideration. The agreement with satellite observations was slightly better for the evergreen than for the deciduous forest. Nonetheless, comparison with gross primary production (GPP determined from CO2 flux measurements at two eddy covariance sites in evergreen forest revealed that the JSBACH-simulated GPP was higher in early spring and led to too-early simulated start of season dates. Photosynthetic activity recovers differently in evergreen and deciduous forests. While for the deciduous forest calibration of phenology alone could improve the performance of JSBACH, for the evergreen forest, changes such as seasonality of temperature response, would need to be introduced to the photosynthetic capacity to improve the temporal development of gross primary production.

  17. Evaluation of the CMAQ and GMI Model-Simulated Shape Factors with DISCOVER-AQ Observations with Implications for Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, C. M.; Pickering, K. E.; Crawford, J. H.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Diskin, G. S.; Loughner, C.; Strode, S.

    2016-12-01

    The NASA Earth Venture-1 DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) project took place over four years and was comprised of four deployments: the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan region of Maryland during July 2011: the San Joaquin Valley of California during January-February 2013; the Houston, TX, metropolitan area during September 2013; and the last in the Front Range region of Colorado during July-August 2014. The P-3B aircraft provided in situ vertical profiles of meteorological quantities, trace gases, and aerosols over surface air quality monitoring sites during flight days for each deployment. A major goal of DISCOVER-AQ is to understand the processes linking column abundances to surface concentrations for O3 and NO2, which includes understanding the typical profile shapes and the atmospheric conditions influencing these profile shapes. Additionally, these data may be used to evaluate the ability of air quality models to replicate the observed profile shapes. This has implications for the global models currently used in remote sensing retrievals of vertical column abundance as well as for the use of regional air quality models within retrievals. The regional CMAQ and global GMI atmospheric chemistry and transport models are evaluated against the observed P-3B lower tropospheric shape factors (the fraction of the column within each vertical layer) for the clusters of typical profile shapes obtained through an agglomerative hierarchical clustering technique for O3 and NO2. The CMAQ model captured the shape factors for O3, and moderately well captured the NO2 shape factors, for the conditions associated with the Maryland campaign, suggesting that a regional air quality model may adequately specify a priori profile shapes for remote sensing retrievals for the conditions associated with this deployment. Coarser vertical resolution in the GMI model affected the ability of that

  18. Evaluation of Fourier and Response Spectra at Ichihasama and Koromogawa Seismic Intensity Observation Sites During the Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku Earthquake in 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Hayato; Miyajima, Masakatsu

    In this study, we evaluate an acceleration Fourier and response spectra at Ichihasama and Koromogawa seismic intensity observation sites which observed JMA seismic intensity of 6 upper but seismic waveform records don't exist during the Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake in 2008. Firstly, formula to evaluate acceleration Fourier and response spectra are developed using peak ground acceleration, JMA seismic intensity and predominant period of earthquake spectra based on records obtained from crustal earthquakes with Magnitude of 6 to 7. Acceleration Fourier and response spectra are evaluated for another local government site which are not chosen for development of the formula. The evaluated values mostly agree with the observed ones. Finally, acceleration Fourier and response spectra are evaluated for Ichihasama and Koromogawa observation sites. It is clarified that short period below 1 second was predominated in the evaluated spectra.

  19. Developing, Implementing, and Evaluating the Educational Module Students Active Learning via Internet Observations (SALIO) in Undergraduate Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin; Bjuhr, Marie; Mårtensson, Gunilla

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed not only to describe the development and implementation of the module but also to evaluate the nursing students' perceptions. A cross-sectional design including 101 students who were asked to participate and answer a survey. We describe the development of the pedagogic module Students Active Learning via Internet Observations based on situated learning. The findings show that learning about service users' own lived experiences via web-based platforms was instructive according to the students: 81% agreed to a high or very high degree. Another important finding was that 96% of students responded that the module had clinical relevance for nursing work. We argue that learning that engages students with data that are contextually and culturally situated is important for developing competence in caregiving. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Evaluation of cloud fraction and its radiative effect simulated by IPCC AR4 global models against ARM surface observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Qian

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Cloud Fraction (CF is the dominant modulator of radiative fluxes. In this study, we evaluate CF simulated in the IPCC AR4 GCMs against ARM long-term ground-based measurements, with a focus on the vertical structure, total amount of cloud and its effect on cloud shortwave transmissivity. Comparisons are performed for three climate regimes as represented by the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM sites: Southern Great Plains (SGP, Manus, Papua New Guinea and North Slope of Alaska (NSA. Our intercomparisons of three independent measurements of CF or sky-cover reveal that the relative differences are usually less than 10% (5% for multi-year monthly (annual mean values, while daily differences are quite significant. The total sky imager (TSI produces smaller total cloud fraction (TCF compared to a radar/lidar dataset for highly cloudy days (CF > 0.8, but produces a larger TCF value than the radar/lidar for less cloudy conditions (CF < 0.3. The compensating errors in lower and higher CF days result in small biases of TCF between the vertically pointing radar/lidar dataset and the hemispheric TSI measurements as multi-year data is averaged. The unique radar/lidar CF measurements enable us to evaluate seasonal variation of cloud vertical structures in the GCMs.

    Both inter-model deviation and model bias against observation are investigated in this study. Another unique aspect of this study is that we use simultaneous measurements of CF and surface radiative fluxes to diagnose potential discrepancies among the GCMs in representing other cloud optical properties than TCF. The results show that the model-observation and inter-model deviations have similar magnitudes for the TCF and the normalized cloud effect, and these deviations are larger than those in surface downward solar radiation and cloud transmissivity. This implies that other dimensions of cloud in addition to cloud amount, such as cloud optical thickness and

  1. Seasonal & Daily Amazon Column CO2 & CO Observations from Ground & Space Used to Evaluate Tropical Ecosystem Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, M. K.; Parker, H. A.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wunch, D.; Jacobson, A. R.; Kawa, S. R.; Keppel-Aleks, G.; Basu, S.; O'Dell, C.; Frankenberg, C.; Michalak, A. M.; Baker, D. F.; Christofferson, B.; Restrepo-Coupe, N.; Saleska, S. R.; De Araujo, A. C.; Miller, J. B.

    2016-12-01

    The Amazon basin stores 150-200 PgC, exchanges 18 PgC with the atmosphere every year and has taken up 0.42-0.65 PgC/y over the past two decades. Despite its global significance, the response of the tropical carbon cycle to climate variability and change is ill constrained as evidenced by the large negative and positive feedbacks in future climate simulations. The complex interplay of radiation, water and ecosystem phenology remains unresolved in current tropical ecosystem models. We use high frequency regional scale TCCON observations of column CO2, CO and CH4 near Manaus, Brazil that began in October 2014 to understand the aforementioned interplay of processes in regulating biosphere-atmosphere exchange. We observe a robust daily column CO2 uptake of about 2 ppm (4 ppm to 0.5 ppm) over 8 hours and evaluate how it changes as we transition to the dry season. Back-trajectory calculations show that the daily CO2 uptake footprint is terrestrial and influenced by the heterogeneity of the Amazon rain forests. The column CO falls from above 120 ppb to below 80 ppb as we transition from the biomass burning to wet seasons. The daily mean column CO2 rises by 3 ppm from October through June. Removal of biomass burning, secular CO2 increase and variations from transport (by Carbon tracker simulations) implies an increase of 2.3 ppm results from tropical biospheric processes (respiration and photosynthesis). This is consistent with ground-based remote sensing and eddy flux observations that indicate that leaf development and demography drives the tropical carbon cycle in regions that are not water limited and is not considered in current models. We compare our observations with output from 7 CO2 inversion transport models with assimilated meteorology and find that while 5 models reproduce the CO2 seasonal cycle all of them under predict the daily drawdown of CO2 by a factor of 3. This indicates that the CO2 flux partitioning between photosynthesis and respiration is incorrect

  2. Evaluation of the shortwave cloud radiative effect over the ocean by use of ship and satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hanschmann

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study the shortwave cloud radiative effect (SWCRE over ocean calculated by the ECHAM 5 climate model is evaluated for the cloud property input derived from ship based measurements and satellite based estimates and compared to ship based radiation measurements. The ship observations yield cloud fraction, liquid water path from a microwave radiometer, cloud bottom height as well as temperature and humidity profiles from radiosonde ascents. Level-2 products of the Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM~SAF from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI have been used to characterize clouds. Within a closure study six different experiments have been defined to find the optimal set of measurements to calculate downward shortwave radiation (DSR and the SWCRE from the model, and their results have been evaluated under seven different synoptic situations. Four of these experiments are defined to investigate the advantage of including the satellite-based cloud droplet effective radius as additional cloud property. The modeled SWCRE based on satellite retrieved cloud properties has a comparable accuracy to the modeled SWCRE based on ship data. For several cases, an improvement through introducing the satellite-based estimate of effective radius as additional information to the ship based data was found. Due to their different measuring characteristics, however, each dataset shows best results for different atmospheric conditions.

  3. Densitometric evaluation might prevent failure of knee artroplasty for aseptic loosening. An 8-year observational controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianantonio Saviola

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To study the correlation between quantitative ultrasound (QUS expressed as stiffness index (SI and the risk of aseptic loosening of knee arthroplasty. Methods: An observational retrospective controlled study was performed on 85 female patients (mean age: 73.3 years divided into 2 groups from January 2007 to March 2015 and carried out at the Orthopedic Rehabilitation Unit, Casa di Cura Eremo, Arco, Trento, Italy. Group A included 42 patients who had undergone a revision of knee prosthesis for aseptic-loosening, and group B included 43 age-matched patients who underwent primary replacement of the knee without following aseptic loosening. Patients in both groups were evaluated for SI with Achilles - QUS system at the same side of the surgery. Results: In group A, 20/42 patients (47.6% had an SI T-score below -2.5. In group B, 14/43 (32.5% patients had a SI T-score below -2.5. The difference between the 2 groups was statistically significant (p=0.015. Conclusion: Stiffness index appears to be an important predictor of aseptic loosening of the knee prosthesis. Therefore, densitometric evaluation, including SI, may be recommended before surgical knee replacement.

  4. Emotion dysregulation and dyadic conflict in depressed and typical adolescents: evaluating concordance across psychophysiological and observational measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Sheila E; Baucom, Brian R; Yaptangco, Mona; Bride, Daniel; Hsiao, Ray; McCauley, Elizabeth; Beauchaine, Theodore P

    2014-04-01

    Many depressed adolescents experience difficulty in regulating their emotions. These emotion regulation difficulties appear to emerge in part from socialization processes within families and then generalize to other contexts. However, emotion dysregulation is typically assessed within the individual, rather than in the social relationships that shape and maintain dysregulation. In this study, we evaluated concordance of physiological and observational measures of emotion dysregulation during interpersonal conflict, using a multilevel actor-partner interdependence model (APIM). Participants were 75 mother-daughter dyads, including 50 depressed adolescents with or without a history of self-injury, and 25 typically developing controls. Behavior dysregulation was operationalized as observed aversiveness during a conflict discussion, and physiological dysregulation was indexed by respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). Results revealed different patterns of concordance for control versus depressed participants. Controls evidenced a concordant partner (between-person) effect, and showed increased physiological regulation during minutes when their partner was more aversive. In contrast, clinical dyad members displayed a concordant actor (within-person) effect, becoming simultaneously physiologically and behaviorally dysregulated. Results inform current understanding of emotion dysregulation across multiple levels of analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Nurses' evaluations of the feasibility and the clinical utility of the Critical-Care Pain Observation Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gélinas, Céline

    2010-06-01

    Feasibility and clinical utility are essential characteristics to consider when it comes to developing or selecting a pain assessment tool to implement into practice. However, these characteristics have not been widely studied with available pain assessment tools in critically ill adults. The objective of this study was to describe nurses' evaluations of the feasibility and clinical utility of the Critical-Care Pain Observation Tool (CPOT) in assessing pain in critically ill ventilated adults. A descriptive design was used. Of the 51 nurses who used the CPOT with the enrolled patients (n = 55), 33 returned their completed evaluation form. Overall, the feasibility and clinical utility of the CPOT were positively evaluated by the nurse participants. More than 90% of them supported that the directives about the use of the CPOT were clear and that it was simple to understand and easy to complete. Regarding its clinical utility, a little more than 70% of the nurses mentioned that the CPOT was helpful for nursing practice and recommended its use routinely. They acknowledged that the CPOT provided them with a common language and a standardized way to assess patients' pain. Half of the nurse participants supported that the CPOT had influenced their practice. On the other hand, six nurses mentioned that they were already sensitive to nonverbal cues of pain before the introduction of the CPOT. In conclusion, the CPOT is a valid behavioral pain scale, which has been suggested by experts in recent critical reviews. So far, the CPOT is being used for research purposes and has been implemented into clinical practice of various health care centers of North America. (c) 2010 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of VIIRS, GOCI, and MODIS Collection 6 AOD Retrievals Against Ground Sunphotometer Observations Over East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Q.; Zhang, H.; Choi, M.; Li, S.; Kondragunta, S.; Kim, J.; Holben, B.; Levy, R. C.; Liu, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Persistent high aerosol loadings together with extremely high population densities have raised serious air quality and public health concerns in many urban centers in East Asia. However, ground-based air quality monitoring is relatively limited in this area. Recently, satellite-retrieved Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) at high resolution has become a powerful tool to characterize aerosol patterns in space and time. Using ground AOD observations from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON)-Asia Campaign, as well as from handheld sunphotometers, we evaluated emerging aerosol products from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP), the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) aboard the Communication, Ocean, and Meteorology Satellite (COMS), and Terra and Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) (Collection 6) in East Asia in 2012 and 2013. In the case study in Beijing, when compared with AOD observations from handheld sunphotometers, 51% of VIIRS Environmental Data Record (EDR) AOD, 37% of GOCI AOD, 33% of VIIRS Intermediate Product (IP) AOD, 26% of Terra MODIS C6 3km AOD, and 16% of Aqua MODIS C6 3km AOD fell within the reference expected error (EE) envelope (+/-0.05/+/- 0.15 AOD). Comparing against AERONET AOD over the JapanSouth Korea region, 64% of EDR, 37% of IP, 61% of GOCI, 39% of Terra MODIS, and 56% of Aqua MODIS C6 3km AOD fell within the EE. In general, satellite aerosol products performed better in tracking the day-to-day variability than tracking the spatial variability at high resolutions. The VIIRS EDR and GOCI products provided the most accurate AOD retrievals, while VIIRS IP and MODIS C6 3km products had positive biases.

  7. Evaluation of VIIRS, GOCI, and MODIS Collection 6 AOD retrievals against ground sunphotometer observations over East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Q.; Zhang, H.; Choi, M.; Li, S.; Kondragunta, S.; Kim, J.; Holben, B.; Levy, R. C.; Liu, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Persistent high aerosol loadings together with extremely high population densities have raised serious air quality and public health concerns in many urban centers in East Asia. However, ground-based air quality monitoring is relatively limited in this area. Recently, satellite-retrieved Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) at high resolution has become a powerful tool to characterize aerosol patterns in space and time. Using ground AOD observations from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON)-Asia Campaign, as well as from handheld sunphotometers, we evaluated emerging aerosol products from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP), the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) aboard the Communication, Ocean, and Meteorology Satellite (COMS), and Terra and Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) (Collection 6) in East Asia in 2012 and 2013. In the case study in Beijing, when compared with AOD observations from handheld sunphotometers, 51 % of VIIRS Environmental Data Record (EDR) AOD, 37 % of GOCI AOD, 33 % of VIIRS Intermediate Product (IP) AOD, 26 % of Terra MODIS C6 3 km AOD, and 16 % of Aqua MODIS C6 3 km AOD fell within the reference expected error (EE) envelope (±0.05 ± 0.15 AOD). Comparing against AERONET AOD over the Japan-South Korea region, 64 % of EDR, 37 % of IP, 61 % of GOCI, 39 % of Terra MODIS, and 56 % of Aqua MODIS C6 3 km AOD fell within the EE. In general, satellite aerosol products performed better in tracking the day-to-day variability than tracking the spatial variability at high resolutions. The VIIRS EDR and GOCI products provided the most accurate AOD retrievals, while VIIRS IP and MODIS C6 3 km products had positive biases.

  8. Observer Evaluation of a Metal Artifact Reduction Algorithm Applied to Head and Neck Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korpics, Mark; Surucu, Murat; Mescioglu, Ibrahim; Alite, Fiori; Block, Alec M.; Choi, Mehee; Emami, Bahman; Harkenrider, Matthew M.; Solanki, Abhishek A.; Roeske, John C., E-mail: jroeske@lumc.edu

    2016-11-15

    Purpose and Objectives: To quantify, through an observer study, the reduction in metal artifacts on cone beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images using a projection-interpolation algorithm, on images containing metal artifacts from dental fillings and implants in patients treated for head and neck (H&N) cancer. Methods and Materials: An interpolation-substitution algorithm was applied to H&N CBCT images containing metal artifacts from dental fillings and implants. Image quality with respect to metal artifacts was evaluated subjectively and objectively. First, 6 independent radiation oncologists were asked to rank randomly sorted blinded images (before and after metal artifact reduction) using a 5-point rating scale (1 = severe artifacts; 5 = no artifacts). Second, the standard deviation of different regions of interest (ROI) within each image was calculated and compared with the mean rating scores. Results: The interpolation-substitution technique successfully reduced metal artifacts in 70% of the cases. From a total of 60 images from 15 H&N cancer patients undergoing image guided radiation therapy, the mean rating score on the uncorrected images was 2.3 ± 1.1, versus 3.3 ± 1.0 for the corrected images. The mean difference in ranking score between uncorrected and corrected images was 1.0 (95% confidence interval: 0.9-1.2, P<.05). The standard deviation of each ROI significantly decreased after artifact reduction (P<.01). Moreover, a negative correlation between the mean rating score for each image and the standard deviation of the oral cavity and bilateral cheeks was observed. Conclusion: The interpolation-substitution algorithm is efficient and effective for reducing metal artifacts caused by dental fillings and implants on CBCT images, as demonstrated by the statistically significant increase in observer image quality ranking and by the decrease in ROI standard deviation between uncorrected and corrected images.

  9. A Novel Observation-Guided Approach for Evaluating Mesoscale Convective Systems Simulated by the DOE ACME Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Z.; Ma, P. L.; Hardin, J. C.; Houze, R.

    2017-12-01

    Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) are the largest type of convective storms that develop when convection aggregates and induces mesoscale circulation features. Over North America, MCSs contribute over 60% of the total warm-season precipitation and over half of the extreme daily precipitation in the central U.S. Our recent study (Feng et al. 2016) found that the observed increases in springtime total and extreme rainfall in this region are dominated by increased frequency and intensity of long-lived MCSs*. To date, global climate models typically do not run at a resolution high enough to explicitly simulate individual convective elements and may not have adequate process representations for MCSs, resulting in a large deficiency in projecting changes of the frequency of extreme precipitation events in future climate. In this study, we developed a novel observation-guided approach specifically designed to evaluate simulated MCSs in the Department of Energy's climate model, Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME). The ACME model has advanced treatments for convection and subgrid variability and for this study is run at 25 km and 100 km grid spacings. We constructed a robust MCS database consisting of over 500 MCSs from 3 warm-season observations by applying a feature-tracking algorithm to 4-km resolution merged geostationary satellite and 3-D NEXRAD radar network data over the Continental US. This high-resolution MCS database is then down-sampled to the 25 and 100 km ACME grids to re-characterize key MCS properties. The feature-tracking algorithm is adapted with the adjusted characteristics to identify MCSs from ACME model simulations. We demonstrate that this new analysis framework is useful for evaluating ACME's warm-season precipitation statistics associated with MCSs, and provides insights into the model process representations related to extreme precipitation events for future improvement. *Feng, Z., L. R. Leung, S. Hagos, R. A. Houze, C. D. Burleyson

  10. A diagnostic evaluation of modeled mercury wet depositions in Europe using atmospheric speciated high-resolution observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieser, J; De Simone, F; Gencarelli, C; Geyer, B; Hedgecock, I; Matthias, V; Travnikov, O; Weigelt, A

    2014-01-01

    This study is part of the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS), a European FP7 project dedicated to the improvement and validation of mercury models to assist in establishing a global monitoring network and to support political decisions. One key question about the global mercury cycle is the efficiency of its removal out of the atmosphere into other environmental compartments. So far, the evaluation of modeled wet deposition of mercury was difficult because of a lack of long-term measurements of oxidized and elemental mercury. The oxidized mercury species gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) and particle-bound mercury (PBM) which are found in the atmosphere in typical concentrations of a few to a few tens pg/m(3) are the relevant components for the wet deposition of mercury. In this study, the first European long-term dataset of speciated mercury taken at Waldhof/Germany was used to evaluate deposition fields modeled with the chemistry transport model (CTM) Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) and to analyze the influence of the governing parameters. The influence of the parameters precipitation and atmospheric concentration was evaluated using different input datasets for a variety of CMAQ simulations for the year 2009. It was found that on the basis of daily and weekly measurement data, the bias of modeled depositions could be explained by the bias of precipitation fields and atmospheric concentrations of GOM and PBM. A correction of the modeled wet deposition using observed daily precipitation increased the correlation, on average, from 0.17 to 0.78. An additional correction based on the daily average GOM and PBM concentration lead to a 50% decrease of the model error for all CMAQ scenarios. Monthly deposition measurements were found to have a too low temporal resolution to adequately analyze model deficiencies in wet deposition processes due to the nonlinear nature of the scavenging process. Moreover, the general overestimation of atmospheric GOM by the CTM

  11. Observer variation in target volume delineation of lung cancer related to radiation oncologist-computer interaction: A 'Big Brother' evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenbakkers, Roel J.H.M.; Duppen, Joop C.; Fitton, Isabelle; Deurloo, Kirsten E.I.; Zijp, Lambert; Uitterhoeve, Apollonia L.J.; Rodrigus, Patrick T.R.; Kramer, Gijsbert W.P.; Bussink, Johan; Jaeger, Katrien De; Belderbos, Jose S.A.; Hart, Augustinus A.M.; Nowak, Peter J.C.M.; Herk, Marcel van; Rasch, Coen R.N.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the process of target volume delineation in lung cancer for optimization of imaging, delineation protocol and delineation software. Patients and methods: Eleven radiation oncologists (observers) from five different institutions delineated the Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) including positive lymph nodes of 22 lung cancer patients (stages I-IIIB) on CT only. All radiation oncologist-computer interactions were recorded with a tool called 'Big Brother'. For each radiation oncologist and patient the following issues were analyzed: delineation time, number of delineated points and corrections, zoom levels, level and window (L/W) settings, CT slice changes, use of side windows (coronal and sagittal) and software button use. Results: The mean delineation time per GTV was 16 min (SD 10 min). The mean delineation time for lymph node positive patients was on average 3 min larger (P=0.02) than for lymph node negative patients. Many corrections (55%) were due to L/W change (e.g. delineating in mediastinum L/W and then correcting in lung L/W). For the lymph node region, a relatively large number of corrections was found (3.7 corr/cm 2 ), indicating that it was difficult to delineate lymph nodes. For the tumor-atelectasis region, a relative small number of corrections was found (1.0 corr/cm 2 ), indicating that including or excluding atelectasis into the GTV was a clinical decision. Inappropriate use of L/W settings was frequently found (e.g. 46% of all delineated points in the tumor-lung region were delineated in mediastinum L/W settings). Despite a large observer variation in cranial and caudal direction of 0.72 cm (1 SD), the coronal and sagittal side windows were not used in 45 and 60% of the cases, respectively. For the more difficult cases, observer variation was smaller when the coronal and sagittal side windows were used. Conclusions: With the 'Big Brother' tool a method was developed to trace the delineation process. The differences between

  12. Analysis of reporting quality for oral presentations of observational studies at 19thNational Surgical Congress: Proposal for a national evaluation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasbahçeci, Mustafa; Başak, Fatih; Acar, Aylin; Şişik, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    To compare the quality of oral presentations presented at the 19 th National Surgical Congress with a national evaluation system with respect to the applicability of systems, and consistency between systems and reviewers. Fifty randomly selected observational studies, which were blinded for author and institute information, were evaluated by using the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies (STROBE), Timmer Score, and National Evaluation System by two reviewers. Abstract scores, evaluation periods, and compatibility between reviewers were compared for each evaluation system. Abstract scores by three different evaluation systems were regarded as the main outcome. Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank and Friedman tests for comparison of scores and times, kappa analysis for compatibility between reviewers, and Spearman correlation for analysis of reviewers based on pairs of evaluation systems were used. There was no significant difference between abstract scores for each system (p>0.05). A significant difference for evaluation period of reviewers was detected for each system (pEvaluation System was regarded as acceptable (κ=0.394 and κ=0.354, respectively). Assessment of reviewers for pairs of evaluation systems revealed that scores increased in the same direction with each other significantly (pEvaluation System is an appropriate method for evaluation of conference abstracts due to the consistent results between the referees similarly with the current international evaluation systems and ease of applicability with regard to evaluation period.

  13. [Evaluation of immunosuppressive treatment on homocystein levels in patients after kidney transplantation during a 2 year observation period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksamit, Dariusz; Janda, Katarzyna; Kuźniewski, Marek; Krzanowski, Marcin; Ignacak, Ewa; Betkowska-Prokop, Alina; Chowaniec, Eve; Sułowicz, Wladysław

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of the type of prescribed immunosuppression: cyclosporine A (CsA) vs. tacrolimus (Tac) on remote homocystein levels in patients (pts) after kidney transplantation (Ktx). The study included 51 pts (17 F, 34 M) aged 15 to 62 years (mean 38.1) after cadaver Ktx. The mean observation period equaled 21.2 months (6 -24); while total observation period was 90 personlyears. Before Ktx, 46 pts were treated with maintenance hemodialysis (HD), while 5 by peritoneal dialysis (PD). After Ktx, patients had immunosuppression prescribed according to the following schemes: prednisone (P) + CsA + azathioprine (AZA) - 12 pts; P + CsA + mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) -26 pts; P + Tac + MMF - 11 pts; and P + Tac + AZA - 2 pts. Hcy level was measured using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Serum creatinine level was measured by standard method using the Hitachi 917 analyzer. Creatinine clearance was calculated based on the Cockcroft-Gault formula. Patient's blood was drawn before Ktx and 3, 6, 9, 12,15, 18, 21 and 24 months post procedure. Delayed graft function (DGF) after Ktx was diagnosed in 29 pts (56.9%) and this group required from 4 to 28 HD sessions (mean 14 sessions). Hcy level did not significantly differ between pts requiring (29 pts) and not requiring (22 pts) HD treatment after Ktx. It was also noted that the number of performed HD sessions did not significantly correlate with Hcy levels 24 months after Ktx (R =0.04, p=0.81). No relationship was found (non-parametric Spearman test) between the drop in Hcy level 3 months after Ktx as compare with value before Ktx and ischemia time (R=0.09, p=0.49), number of compatible HLA A and B (R=0.07, p=0.63), and DR antigens (R=0.09, p=0.51). Decrease in Hcy level (before Ktx and 24 months after Ktx) did not significantly correlate with the above parameters, respectively: R=-0.14, p=0.40; R=0.06, p=0.73; R=0.12, p=0.45; R=0.11, p=0.50. Decrease in Hcy level (before Ktx and 3

  14. Evaluation of Teaching Methods in Mass CPCR Training in Different Groups of the Society, an Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasani, Hamed; Bahrami, Mojtaba; Malekpour, Abdorrasoul; Dehghani, Mohammadreza; Allahyary, Elaheh; Amini, Mitra; Abdorahimi, Mehdi; khani, Sara; Kalantari Meibodi, Mohammad; Kojuri, Javad

    2015-05-01

    To determine the efficacy of different methods of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPCR) training in 3 different groups of the society. In a prospective and observational study of 2000 individuals in 3 different groups including G1, G2, and G3 4 different protocols of CPCR training were applied and their efficacy was compared between the groups. Also, 12 months after the study course, 460 participants from 3 groups were asked to take apart in a theoretical and practical examination to evaluate the long-term efficacy of the 4 protocols. Among 2000 individuals took a parted in the study, 950 (47.5%) were G1, 600 (30%) were G2, and 450 (22.5%) were G3. G1 in 4 groups were 2.37 and 2.65 times more successful in pretest theoretical and 2.61 and 18.20 times more successful in practical examinations compared with G2 and G3 and gained highest improvement in CPCR skills. Other groups also showed significantly improved CPCR skills. Comparison of different methods of CPCR learning showed that the workshop using interactive lecture as well as human model, educational film, and reference CPCR book has the highest efficacy in all groups. This protocol of CPCR training showed more efficacy in long-term postdelayed evaluation. On the contrary, medical students had better long-term outcomes from the course. Although G1 and G2 obtained better results in learning CPCR skills, in G3 also the theoretical and practical knowledge were improved significantly. This course increased confidence for doing CPCR in all groups of the study. Considering that the most of the bystanders at emergency states are general population, training this group of the society and increasing their confidence about performing CPCR can be so effective and lifesaving at emergency states. (Clinical trial. Gov registration: NCT02120573).

  15. Development of a multi-scale data assimilation system for model-observation integration and climate model evaluation (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z.; Liu, Y.; Lin, W.; Vogelmann, A. M.; Feng, S.; Fridlind, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    To improve our understanding and the representation of subgrid processes in climate models, an increasing number of ground-based long-term observing systems have been established. These systems focus on detailed measurements over a domain of a typical climate model grid size. An example is the US DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program, which has been collecting data related to radiation, clouds and precipitation at three primary sites, the Southern Great Plains (SGP) of the USA, the North Slope of Alaska, and the Tropical West Pacific, for approximately 20 years. A well-established approach to use ARM-like measurements in climate model evaluation is jointly using the Single Column Model (SCM), Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs), and/or large eddy simulations (LESs). To enhance the effectiveness of this approach, we have developed multi-scale data assimilation (MS-DA) system on top of the NCEP Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) System and implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model at the cloud resolving resolution (WRF-CRM) over the ARM Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. It is demonstrated that the MS-DA effectively assimilate the dense ARM in-situ observations and high-resolution satellite data, thus significantly reducing uncertainties in the WRF CRM simulation. We have used the WRF CRM simulation constrained by the MS-DA to derive multi-scale forcing that is used to drive SCMs, CRMs, and LESs, expand the large scale forcing parameters to hydrometeors that are not provided in the existing continuous forcing product, and characterize dependency of large-scale forcing on domain-size that represents SCM grid-sizes, sub-grid processes, and cloud-regimes.

  16. Collaborative Research: Using ARM Observations to Evaluate GCM Cloud Statistics for Development of Stochastic Cloud-Radiation Parameterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Samuel S. P. [San Diego State Univ., CA (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The long-range goal of several past and current projects in our DOE-supported research has been the development of new and improved parameterizations of cloud-radiation effects and related processes, using ARM data, and the implementation and testing of these parameterizations in global models. The main objective of the present project being reported on here has been to develop and apply advanced statistical techniques, including Bayesian posterior estimates, to diagnose and evaluate features of both observed and simulated clouds. The research carried out under this project has been novel in two important ways. The first is that it is a key step in the development of practical stochastic cloud-radiation parameterizations, a new category of parameterizations that offers great promise for overcoming many shortcomings of conventional schemes. The second is that this work has brought powerful new tools to bear on the problem, because it has been an interdisciplinary collaboration between a meteorologist with long experience in ARM research (Somerville) and a mathematician who is an expert on a class of advanced statistical techniques that are well-suited for diagnosing model cloud simulations using ARM observations (Shen). The motivation and long-term goal underlying this work is the utilization of stochastic radiative transfer theory (Lane-Veron and Somerville, 2004; Lane et al., 2002) to develop a new class of parametric representations of cloud-radiation interactions and closely related processes for atmospheric models. The theoretical advantage of the stochastic approach is that it can accurately calculate the radiative heating rates through a broken cloud layer without requiring an exact description of the cloud geometry.

  17. Evaluation of remotely sensed and modelled soil moisture products using global ground-based in situ observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albergel, C.; de Rosnay, P.; Gruhier, C.; Munoz-Sabater, J.; Hasenauer, S.; Isaksen, L.; Kerr, Y.; Wagner, W.

    2012-04-01

    In situ soil moisture data collected from more than 200 stations located in various biomes and climate (Africa, Australia, Europe and the United States) are used to determine the reliability of three soil moisture products, (i) one analysis from the ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) numerical weather prediction system (SM-DAS-2) and two remotely sensed soil moisture products, namely (ii) ASCAT (Advanced Scatterometer) and (iii) SMOS (Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity). SM-DAS-2 is produced offline at ECMWF and relies on an advanced surface data assimilation system Extended Kalman Filter) used to optimally combine conventional observations with satellite measurements. ASCAT remotely sensed surface soil moisture is provided in near real time by EUMETSAT. At ECMWF, ASCAT is used for soil moisture analyses in SM-DAS-2, also. Finally the SMOS remotely sensed soil moisture data level two product developed at CESBIO is used. Evaluation of the times series as well as of the anomaly values, shows good performances of the three products to capture surface soil moisture annual cycle as well as its short term variability. Correlation values with in situ data are very satisfactory over most of the investigated sites located in contrasted biomes and climate conditions with averaged values of 0.70 for SM-DAS-2, 0.53 for ASCAT and 0.54 for SMOS. Although radio frequency interference disturbs the natural microwave emission of the Earth observed by SMOS in several parts of the world, hence the soil moisture retrieval, performances of SMOS over Australia are very encouraging.

  18. Evaluating psychiatric case-control studies using the STROBE (STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational Studies in Epidemiology statement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Domingues Goi

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE:Case-control studies are important in developing clinical and public health knowledge. The STROBE statement (STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational Studies in Epidemiology was developed to establish a checklist of items that should be included in articles reporting observational studies. Our aim was to analyze whether the psychiatric case-control articles published in Brazilian journals with CAPES Qualis rating B1/B2 in 2009 conformed with the STROBE statement.DESIGN AND SETTING:Descriptive study on psychiatric papers published in Brazilian journals, within the Postgraduate Medical Program on Psychiatry, at Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul.METHODS:All psychiatric case-control studies from Brazilian Qualis B1/B2 journals of psychiatry, neurology and public health in 2009 were analyzed. The four most specific items of the STROBE statement were used to evaluate whether these studies fitted within the case-control parameters: 1 selection of cases and controls; 2 controlling for bias; 3 statistical analysis; and 4 presentation of results.RESULTS:Sixteen case-control studies were identified, of which eleven (68.75% were in psychiatry-focused journals. From analysis using the STROBE statement, all of the articles conformed with item 1; two (12.5% completely conformed with item 2; none completely conformed with item 3; and only three (18.8% conformed with item 4.CONCLUSION:The case-control studies analyzed here did not completely conform with the four STROBE statement items for case-control design. In view of the inadequate methodology of the published studies, these findings justify focusing on research and methodology and expanding the investigations on adherence of studies to their designs.

  19. Evaluating psychiatric case-control studies using the STROBE (STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational Studies in Epidemiology) statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goi, Pedro Domingues; Goi, Julia Domingues; Cordini, Kariny Larissa; Ceresér, Keila Mendes; Rocha, Neusa Sica da

    2014-01-01

    Case-control studies are important in developing clinical and public health knowledge. The STROBE statement (STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational Studies in Epidemiology) was developed to establish a checklist of items that should be included in articles reporting observational studies. Our aim was to analyze whether the psychiatric case-control articles published in Brazilian journals with CAPES Qualis rating B1/B2 in 2009 conformed with the STROBE statement. Descriptive study on psychiatric papers published in Brazilian journals, within the Postgraduate Medical Program on Psychiatry, at Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. All psychiatric case-control studies from Brazilian Qualis B1/B2 journals of psychiatry, neurology and public health in 2009 were analyzed. The four most specific items of the STROBE statement were used to evaluate whether these studies fitted within the case-control parameters: 1) selection of cases and controls; 2) controlling for bias; 3) statistical analysis; and 4) presentation of results. Sixteen case-control studies were identified, of which eleven (68.75%) were in psychiatry-focused journals. From analysis using the STROBE statement, all of the articles conformed with item 1; two (12.5%) completely conformed with item 2; none completely conformed with item 3; and only three (18.8%) conformed with item 4. The case-control studies analyzed here did not completely conform with the four STROBE statement items for case-control design. In view of the inadequate methodology of the published studies, these findings justify focusing on research and methodology and expanding the investigations on adherence of studies to their designs.

  20. Evaluation and Inter-Comparison of Satellite Soil Moisture Products Using In Situ Observations over Texas, U.S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram L. Ray

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this study was to evaluate four major remote sensing soil moisture (SM products over the state of Texas. These remote sensing products are: (i the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer—Earth Observing System (AMSR-E (2002–September 2011; (ii the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity system (SMOS, 2010–present; (iii AMSR2 (2012–present; and (iv the Soil Moisture Active Passive system (SMAP, 2015–present. The quality of the generated SM data is influenced by the accuracy and precision of the sensors and the retrieval algorithms used in processing raw data. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the quality of these satellite SM products using in situ measurements and/or by inter-comparing their data during overlapping periods. In this study, these two approaches were used where we compared each satellite SM product to in situ soil moisture measurements and we also conducted an inter-comparison of the four satellite SM products at 15 different locations in Texas over six major land cover types (cropland, shrub, grassland, forest, pasture and developed and eight climate zones along with in situ SM data from 15 Mesonet, USCRN and USDA-NRCS Scan stations. Results show that SM data from SMAP had the best correlation coefficients range from 0.37 to 0.92 with in situ measurements among the four tested satellite surface SM products. On the other hand, SM data from SMOS, AMSR2 and AMSR-E had moderate to low correlation coefficients ranges with in situ data, respectively, from 0.24–0.78, 0.07–0.62 and 0.05–0.52. During the overlapping periods, average root mean square errors (RMSEs of the correlations between in situ and each satellite data were 0.13 (AMSR-E and 0.13 (SMOS cm3/cm3 (2010–2011, 0.16 (AMSR2 and 0.14 (SMOS cm3/cm3 (2012–2016 and 0.13, 0.16, 0.14 (SMAP, AMSR2, SMOS cm3/cm3 (2015–2016, respectively. Despite the coarser spatial resolution of all four satellite products (25–36 km, their SM measurements are

  1. Evaluation of a regional real-time precise positioning system based on GPS/BeiDou observations in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wenwu; Tan, Bingfeng; Chen, Yongchang; Teferle, Felix Norman; Yuan, Yunbin

    2018-02-01

    The performance of real-time (RT) precise positioning can be improved by utilizing observations from multiple Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) instead of one particular system. Since the end of 2012, BeiDou, independently established by China, began to provide operational services for users in the Asia-Pacific regions. In this study, a regional RT precise positioning system is developed to evaluate the performance of GPS/BeiDou observations in Australia in providing high precision positioning services for users. Fixing three hourly updated satellite orbits, RT correction messages are generated and broadcasted by processing RT observation/navigation data streams from the national network of GNSS Continuously Operating Reference Stations in Australia (AUSCORS) at the server side. At the user side, RT PPP is realized by processing RT data streams and the RT correction messages received. RT clock offsets, for which the accuracy reached 0.07 and 0.28 ns for GPS and BeiDou, respectively, can be determined. Based on these corrections, an accuracy of 12.2, 30.0 and 45.6 cm in the North, East and Up directions was achieved for the BeiDou-only solution after 30 min while the GPS-only solution reached 5.1, 15.3 and 15.5 cm for the same components at the same time. A further improvement of 43.7, 36.9 and 45.0 percent in the three directions, respectively, was achieved for the combined GPS/BeiDou solution. After the initialization process, the North, East and Up positioning accuracies were 5.2, 8.1 and 17.8 cm, respectively, for the BeiDou-only solution, while 1.5, 3.0, and 4.7 cm for the GPS-only solution. However, we only noticed a 20.9% improvement in the East direction was obtained for the GPS/BeiDou solution, while no improvements in the other directions were detected. It is expected that such improvements may become bigger with the increasing accuracy of the BeiDou-only solution.

  2. Meeting Earth Observation Requirements for Global Agricultural Monitoring: An Evaluation of the Revisit Capabilities of Current and Planned Moderate Resolution Optical Earth Observing Missions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa K. Whitcraft

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Agriculture is a highly dynamic process in space and time, with many applications requiring data with both a relatively high temporal resolution (at least every 8 days and fine-to-moderate (FTM < 100 m spatial resolution. The relatively infrequent revisit of FTM optical satellite observatories coupled with the impacts of cloud occultation have translated into a barrier for the derivation of agricultural information at the regional-to-global scale. Drawing upon the Group on Earth Observations Global Agricultural Monitoring (GEOGLAM Initiative’s general satellite Earth observation (EO requirements for monitoring of major production areas, Whitcraft et al. (this issue have described where, when, and how frequently satellite data acquisitions are required throughout the agricultural growing season at 0.05°, globally. The majority of areas and times of year require multiple revisits to probabilistically yield a view at least 70%, 80%, 90%, or 95% clear within eight days, something that no present single FTM optical observatory is capable of delivering. As such, there is a great potential to meet these moderate spatial resolution optical data requirements through a multi-space agency/multi-mission constellation approach. This research models the combined revisit capabilities of seven hypothetical constellations made from five satellite sensors—Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper (Landsat 7 ETM+, Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager and Thermal Infrared Sensor (Landsat 8 OLI/TIRS, Resourcesat-2 Advanced Wide Field Sensor (Resourcesat-2 AWiFS, Sentinel-2A Multi-Spectral Instrument (MSI, and Sentinel-2B MSI—and compares these capabilities with the revisit frequency requirements for a reasonably cloud-free clear view within eight days throughout the agricultural growing season. Supplementing Landsat 7 and 8 with missions from different space agencies leads to an improved capacity to meet requirements, with Resourcesat-2 providing the largest

  3. First observation of $\\pi^{-}K^+$ and $\\pi^{+}K^-$ atoms, their lifetime measurement and $\\pi K$ scattering lengths evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasyev, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    The Low Energy QCD allows to calculate the ππ and π K scattering lengths with high precision. There are accurate relations between these scattering lengths and π + π − , π − K + , π + K − atoms lifetimes. The experiment on the first observation of π − K + and π + K − atoms is described. The atoms were generated in Nickel and Platinum targets hit by the PS CERN proton beam with momentum of 24 GeV/ c . Moving in the target, part of atoms break up producing characteristic π K pairs (atomic pairs) with small relative momentum Q in their c.m.s. In the experiment, we detected n A = 349 ± 62 (5.6 standard deviations) π − K + and π + K − atomic pairs. The main part of π K pairs are produced in free state. The majority of such particles are generated directly or from short-lived sources as ρ , ω and similar resonances. The electromagnetic interactions in the final state create Coulomb pairs with a known sharp dependence on Q . This effect allows to evaluate the number of these Coulomb pai...

  4. Evaluation of the Reanalysis Surface Incident Shortwave Radiation Products from NCEP, ECMWF, GSFC, and JMA Using Satellite and Surface Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotong Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Solar radiation incident at the Earth’s surface (Rs is an essential component of the total energy exchange between the atmosphere and the surface. Reanalysis data have been widely used, but a comprehensive validation using surface measurements is still highly needed. In this study, we evaluated the Rs estimates from six current representative global reanalyses (NCEP–NCAR, NCEP-DOE; CFSR; ERA-Interim; MERRA; and JRA-55 using surface measurements from different observation networks [GEBA; BSRN; GC-NET; Buoy; and CMA] (674 sites in total and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES EBAF product from 2001 to 2009. The global mean biases between the reanalysis Rs and surface measurements at all sites ranged from 11.25 W/m2 to 49.80 W/m2. Comparing with the CERES-EBAF Rs product, all the reanalyses overestimate Rs, except for ERA-Interim, with the biases ranging from −2.98 W/m2 to 21.97 W/m2 over the globe. It was also found that the biases of cloud fraction (CF in the reanalyses caused the overestimation of Rs. After removing the averaged bias of CERES-EBAF, weighted by the area of the latitudinal band, a global annual mean Rs values of 184.6 W/m2, 180.0 W/m2, and 182.9 W/m2 were obtained over land, ocean, and the globe, respectively.

  5. Evaluating Multi-Sensor Nighttime Earth Observation Data for Identification of Mixed vs. Residential Use in Urban Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Aubrecht

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a novel top-down approach to geospatially identify and distinguish areas of mixed use from predominantly residential areas within urban agglomerations. Under the framework of the World Bank’s Central American Country Disaster Risk Profiles (CDRP initiative, a disaggregated property stock exposure model has been developed as one of the key elements for disaster risk and loss estimation. Global spatial datasets are therefore used consistently to ensure wide-scale applicability and transferability. Residential and mixed use areas need to be identified in order to spatially link accordingly compiled property stock information. In the presented study, multi-sensor nighttime Earth Observation data and derivative products are evaluated as proxies to identify areas of peak human activity. Intense artificial night lighting in that context is associated with a high likelihood of commercial and/or industrial presence. Areas of low light intensity, in turn, can be considered more likely residential. Iterative intensity thresholding is tested for Cuenca City, Ecuador, in order to best match a given reference situation based on cadastral land use data. The results and findings are considered highly relevant for the CDRP initiative, but more generally underline the relevance of remote sensing data for top-down modeling approaches at a wide spatial scale.

  6. Evaluation of fixed dose combination of glimepiride and metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes. Results of Russian observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Vladislavovna Zaytseva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim.To investigate the efficacy and safety of combined glimepiride and metformin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM.Materials and methods.A multi-centre, open-label, prospective, observational study was conducted. A total of 1200 patients with T2DM inadequately controlled with metformin, glimepiride or combination of metformin + glimepiride were enrolled. Change in serum glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose (FPG, and postprandial blood glucose (PPG levels; weight; waist circumference and hypoglycemic episodes were evaluated.Results.Baseline HbA1c levels (8.24% ± 0.42% were significantly reduced after 12 weeks of treatment (7.48% ± 0.48% and at the end of the study(6.88% ± 0.56%. Target HbA1c levels (≤7% were achieved in 65.1% of patients at the final visit at 24 weeks. FPG and PPG levels decreased by 1.45 ± 1.14 mmol/l and 2.17 ± 1.27 mmol/l respectively (p < 0.001. No severe hypoglycemic events were reported. Body mass index reduced by 0.85 ± 1.28 kg/m2 (p < 0.001.Conclusion. Combined glimepiride and metformin therapy significantly improved long-term glycemic control in patients with T2DM during the period of 24 weeks without additional risk of hypoglycemic events or weight gain.

  7. The Circum-Chryse Region as a Possible Example of a Hydrologic Cycle on Mars: Geologic Observations and Theoretical Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Clow, Gary D.; Davis, Wanda L.; Gulick, Virginia C.; Janke, David R.; McKay, Christopher P.; Stoker, Carol R.; Zent, Aaron P.

    1995-01-01

    The transection and superposition relationships among channels, chaos, surface materials units, and other features in the circum-Chryse region of Mars were used to evaluate relative age relationships and evolution of flood events. Channels and chaos in contact (with one another) were treated as single discrete flood-carved systems. Some outflow channel systems form networks and are inferred to have been created by multiple flood events. Within some outflow channel networks, several separate individual channel systems can be traced to a specific chaos which acted as flood-source area to that specific flood channel. Individual flood-carved systems were related to widespread materials units or other surface features that served as stratigraphic horizons. Chryse outflow channels are inferred to have formed over most of the perceivable history of Mars. Outflow channels are inferred to become younger with increasing proximity to the Chryse basin. In addition, outflow channels closer to the basin show a greater diversity in age. The relationship of subsequent outflow channel sources to the sources of earlier floods is inferred to disfavor episodic flooding due to the progressive tapping of a juvenile near-surface water supply. Instead, we propose the circum-Chryse region as a candidate site of past hydrological recycling. The discharge rates necessary to carve the circum-Chryse outflow channels would have inevitably formed temporary standing bodies of H2O on the Martian surface where the flood-waters stagnated and pooled (the Chryse basin is topographically enclosed). These observations and inferences have led us to formulate and evaluate two hypotheses: (1) large amounts of the sublimated H2O off the Chryse basin flood lakes precipitated (snowed) onto the flood-source highlands and this H2O was incorporated into the near surface, recharging the H2O sources, making possible subsequent deluges; and (2) ponded flood-water in Chryse basin drained back down an anti basinward

  8. First-Year Evaluation of Mexico’s Tax on Nonessential Energy-Dense Foods: An Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Juan A.; Popkin, Barry M.; Taillie, Lindsey Smith

    2016-01-01

    Background In an effort to prevent continued increases in obesity and diabetes, in January 2014, the Mexican government implemented an 8% tax on nonessential foods with energy density ≥275 kcal/100 g and a peso-per-liter tax on sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). Limited rigorous evaluations of food taxes exist worldwide. The objective of this study was to examine changes in volume of taxed and untaxed packaged food purchases in response to these taxes in the entire sample and stratified by socioeconomic status (SES). Methods and Findings This study uses data on household packaged food purchases representative of the Mexican urban population from The Nielsen Company’s Mexico Consumer Panel Services (CPS). We included 6,248 households that participated in the Nielsen CPS in at least 2 mo during 2012–2014; average household follow-up was 32.7 mo. We analyzed the volume of purchases of taxed and untaxed foods from January 2012 to December 2014, using a longitudinal, fixed-effects model that adjusted for preexisting trends to test whether the observed post-tax trend was significantly different from the one expected based on the pre-tax trend. We controlled for household characteristics and contextual factors like minimum salary and unemployment rate. The mean volume of purchases of taxed foods in 2014 changed by -25 g (95% confidence interval = -46, -11) per capita per month, or a 5.1% change beyond what would have been expected based on pre-tax (2012–2013) trends, with no corresponding change in purchases of untaxed foods. Low SES households purchased on average 10.2% less taxed foods than expected (-44 [–72, –16] g per capita per month); medium SES households purchased 5.8% less taxed foods than expected (-28 [–46, –11] g per capita per month), whereas high SES households’ purchases did not change. The main limitations of our findings are the inability to infer causality because the taxes were implemented at the national level (lack of control group

  9. Inferring past land use-induced changes in surface albedo from satellite observations: a useful tool to evaluate model simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Boisier

    2013-03-01

    . Our methodology is a useful tool not only to infer observations-based historical changes in land surface variables impacted by LCC, but also to point out deficiencies of the models. We therefore suggest that it could be more widely developed and used in conjunction with other tools in order to evaluate LSMs.

  10. Evaluation of tropospheric and stratospheric ozone trends over Western Europe from ground-based FTIR network observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Vigouroux

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the European project UFTIR (Time series of Upper Free Troposphere observations from an European ground-based FTIR network, six ground-based stations in Western Europe, from 79° N to 28° N, all equipped with Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR instruments and part of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC, have joined their efforts to evaluate the trends of several direct and indirect greenhouse gases over the period 1995–2004. The retrievals of CO, CH4, C2H6, N2O, CHClF2, and O3 have been optimized. Using the optimal estimation method, some vertical information can be obtained in addition to total column amounts. A bootstrap resampling method has been implemented to determine annual partial and total column trends for the target gases. The present work focuses on the ozone results. The retrieved time series of partial and total ozone columns are validated with ground-based correlative data (Brewer, Dobson, UV-Vis, ozonesondes, and Lidar. The observed total column ozone trends are in agreement with previous studies: 1 no total column ozone trend is seen at the lowest latitude station Izaña (28° N; 2 slightly positive total column trends are seen at the two mid-latitude stations Zugspitze and Jungfraujoch (47° N, only one of them being significant; 3 the highest latitude stations Harestua (60° N, Kiruna (68° N and Ny-Ålesund (79° N show significant positive total column trends. Following the vertical information contained in the ozone FTIR retrievals, we provide partial columns trends for the layers: ground-10 km, 10–18 km, 18–27 km, and 27–42 km, which helps to distinguish the contributions from dynamical and chemical changes on the total column ozone trends. We obtain no statistically significant trends in the ground-10 km layer for five out of the six ground-based stations. We find significant positive trends for the lowermost

  11. Global budget of tropospheric ozone: Evaluating recent model advances with satellite (OMI), aircraft (IAGOS), and ozonesonde observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lu; Jacob, Daniel J.; Liu, Xiong; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Lin; Kim, Patrick S.; Sulprizio, Melissa P.; Yantosca, Robert M.

    2017-10-01

    The global budget of tropospheric ozone is governed by a complicated ensemble of coupled chemical and dynamical processes. Simulation of tropospheric ozone has been a major focus of the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model (CTM) over the past 20 years, and many developments over the years have affected the model representation of the ozone budget. Here we conduct a comprehensive evaluation of the standard version of GEOS-Chem (v10-01) with ozone observations from ozonesondes, the OMI satellite instrument, and MOZAIC-IAGOS commercial aircraft for 2012-2013. Global validation of the OMI 700-400 hPa data with ozonesondes shows that OMI maintained persistent high quality and no significant drift over the 2006-2013 period. GEOS-Chem shows no significant seasonal or latitudinal bias relative to OMI and strong correlations in all seasons on the 2° × 2.5° horizontal scale (r = 0.88-0.95), improving on previous model versions. The most pronounced model bias revealed by ozonesondes and MOZAIC-IAGOS is at high northern latitudes in winter-spring where the model is 10-20 ppbv too low. This appears to be due to insufficient stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE). Model updates to lightning NOx, Asian anthropogenic emissions, bromine chemistry, isoprene chemistry, and meteorological fields over the past decade have overall led to gradual increase in the simulated global tropospheric ozone burden and more active ozone production and loss. From simulations with different versions of GEOS meteorological fields we find that tropospheric ozone in GEOS-Chem v10-01 has a global production rate of 4960-5530 Tg a-1, lifetime of 20.9-24.2 days, burden of 345-357 Tg, and STE of 325-492 Tg a-1. Change in the intensity of tropical deep convection between these different meteorological fields is a major factor driving differences in the ozone budget.

  12. Evaluation of directly observed treatment for tuberculosis in the Bojanala health district, North West Province of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Tumbo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tuberculosis (TB remains one of the top public health problems in South Africa. Approximately 150 000 new cases and 10 000 TB-related deaths are reported in South Africa annually. In declaring TB a global emergency in 1993, the World Health Organization developed control strategies that include active case finding, laboratory support, directly observed treatment (DOT, contact tracing, and prevention of multidrug– and extreme drugresistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB and XDR-TB. High DOT rates reported in some countries have been discordant with ‘low cure’ and ‘high MDR’ rates.Objectives: The aim of the study was to evaluate the use of DOT for TB in the Bojanala health district, North West Province, South Africa, by estimating the proportion of DOT use (1 amongst all TB patients and (2 in the initial TB treatment regimen compared to retreatment regimens.Method: A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted in 2008. Data regarding implementation of DOT were collected from eight purposefully selected primary health care clinics and one prison clinic in the health district. Upon receiving their informed consent, a questionnaire was administered to patients receiving TB treatment at the selected facilities.Results: A total of 88 (of 90 selected patients participated in the study, of whom 50(56.8% were on DOT and had DOT supporters. However, 35 (40% had never heard of DOT. DOT was used mainly for patients on the retreatment regimen (87.5%, rather than for those on first-line treatment (48.6%.Conclusion: In this South African rural health district, the DOT utilisation rate for TB was 56.8%, mainly for patients on the TB retreatment regimen. Strict implementation of DOT in all patients undergoing TB treatment is a known strategy for improving TB cure rate and preventing recurrence and drug resistance.

  13. Aerosol Optical Depth over Europe: Evaluation of the CALIOPE air quality modelling system with direct-sun AERONET observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basart, Sara; Pay, María. Teresa; Pérez, Carlos; Cuevas, Emilio; Jorba, Oriol; Piot, Matthias; María Baldasano, Jose

    2010-05-01

    In the frame of the CALIOPE project (Baldasano et al., 2008), the Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC-CNS) currently operates a high-resolution air quality forecasting system based on daily photochemical forecasts in Europe (12km x 12km resolution) with the WRF-ARW/HERMES/CMAQ modelling system (http://www.bsc.es/caliope) and desert dust forecasts over Southern Europe with BSC-DREAM8b (Pérez et al., 2006; http://www.bsc.es/projects/earthscience/DREAM). High resolution simulations and forecasts are possible through their implementation on MareNostrum supercomputer at BSC-CNS. As shown in previous air quality studies (e.g. Rodríguez et al., 2001; Jiménez-Guerrero et al., 2008), the contribution of desert dust on particulate matter levels in Southern Europe is remarkable due to its proximity to African desert dust sources. When considering only anthropogenic emissions (Baldasano et al., 2008) and the current knowledge about aerosol physics and chemistry, chemistry-transport model simulations underestimate the PM10 concentrations by 30-50%. As a first approach, the natural dust contribution from BSC-DREAM8b is on-line added to the anthropogenic aerosol output of CMAQ. The aim of the present work is the quantitative evaluation of the WRF-ARW/HERMES/ CMAQ/BSC-DREAM8b forecast system to simulate the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) over Europe. The performance of the modelled AOD has been quantitatively evaluated with discrete and categorical (skill scores) statistics by a comparison to direct-sun AERONET observations for 2004. The contribution of different types of aerosols will be analyzed by means of the O'Neill fine mode AOD products (O'Neill et al., 2001). A previous aerosol characterization of AERONET data was performed (Basart et al., 2009) in order to discriminate the different aerosol source contributions within the study region. The results indicate a remarkable improvement in the discrete and skill-scores evaluation (accuracy, critical success index and

  14. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2010-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming a partici......Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  15. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2011-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming a partici......Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  16. It counts who counts: an experimental evaluation of the importance of observer effects on spotlight count estimates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunde, Peter; Jessen, Lonnie

    2013-01-01

    Spotlight surveys conducted by volunteers is a promising method to assess the abundance of nocturnally active mammals, but estimates are subject to bias if different observer groups differ in their ability to detect animals in the dark. We quantified the variation amongst volunteer spotlight...... observers with respect to their ability to detect and estimate distance to realistic animal silhouettes at different distances. Detection probabilities were higher for observers experienced in spotlighting mammals than for inexperienced observers, higher for observers with a hunting background compared...

  17. Evaluation of SMOS and ASCAT soil moisture products over Norway using ground-based in situ observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesfeller, Alexandra; Lahoz, William A.; Svendby, Tove M.; Haugen, Lars E.; Wagner, Wolfgang; Dorigo, Wouter; Kerr, Yann; de Jeu, Richard A. M.

    2013-04-01

    Norway is one the most difficult and challenging areas in the globe for measuring soil moisture remotely. Measurements are difficult or not possible owing to the presence of snow, ice, water bodies, orography, rocks, and a very high coastline-to-area ratio. By focusing on these challenging conditions in Norway, the work described in this study provides a stringent test of the capabilities of satellite sensors to measure soil moisture remotely. We focus on the evaluation of soil moisture products from the ASCAT (Advanced SCATterometer) and the SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) satellites. SMOS was launched by ESA on November 2nd, 2009; it records brightness temperatures in the L-Band at 1.4 GHz, which are converted into soil moisture through inverse modelling. ASCAT is a real-aperture radar that measures surface backscattering coefficients in the C-band at 5.255 GHz. This study compares SMOS and ASCAT Level 2 soil moisture data from 2010 until 2012 with in situ data over Norway at various sites spanning a wide range of surface conditions. We show that the satellite and in situ dataset agree well, with correlation values of 0.53 for SMOS/in situ data and 0.61 for ASCAT/in situ data averaged over all sites considered. These values are comparable with those from studies from other areas of the globe such as France, Australia and the USA. The bias between the satellite and in situ data is smaller than the standard deviation of the individual datasets, indicating that differences between the datasets are within the 1-sigma error bars. We conclude that the SMOS and ASCAT soil moisture products over Norway have high quality, and will be useful for various applications, including land surface monitoring, weather forecasting and hydrological modelling. Further studies quantifying the quality of soil moisture data over Norway will be discussed, including comparison with soil moisture data from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR

  18. Ozone deposition into a boreal forest over a decade of observations: evaluating deposition partitioning and driving variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ü. Rannik

    2012-12-01

    able to predict the observed average seasonal variation in total and non-stomatal deposition but failed to explain the inter-annual differences, suggesting that some still unknown mechanisms might be involved in determining the inter-annual variability. Model calculation was performed to evaluate the potential sink strength of the chemical reactions of ozone with sesquiterpenes in the canopy air space, which revealed that sesquiterpenes in typical amounts at the site were unlikely to cause significant ozone loss in canopy air space. The results clearly showed the importance of several non-stomatal removal mechanisms. Unknown chemical compounds or processes correlating with monoterpene concentrations, including potentially reactions at the surfaces, contribute to non-stomatal sink term.

  19. EVALUATION OF THE ADVERSE REACTIONS OF ANTIRETROVIRAL DRUG REGIMENS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN KOLKATA: A PROSPECTIVE OBSERVATIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avishek Banerjea

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The introduction of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART has led to a significant decrease in AIDS-related mortality and morbidity. However, adverse reactions to these drugs, being inevitable, have led to major obstacles in its success, especially in developing nations like India. Moreover, the latest changes made by W.H.O. in the treatment guidelines of ART naive patients would expectedly lead to changes in the Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR patterns as well. Hence, this study aimed at evaluating the ADRs of currently prescribed ART regimens in a tertiary care hospital in Kolkata (WB. METHODOLOGY 168 ART naive patients enrolled initially were studied prospectively over a period of 1 year; each patient being followed up individually for 6 months. All patients were asked to visit the ART centre once a month or whenever they developed any symptom. They were screened clinically and investigated suitably by the physician according to the latest NACO guidelines. RESULTS Majority were males (56% with an M:F ratio of 1:0.774; 93.3% patients belonging to the 15-49 yrs. age group. TDF+3TC+EFV (56% was the commonest 1st line regimen prescribed. 76.6% patients experienced ADRs. Total 184 ADRs were noted, of which, GIT contributed the most (27.17%. Majority (66.67% of neurological ADRs was contributed by neuropsychiatric manifestations. Rash (10.3% was the commonest cutaneous ADR. Anaemia (13.6% was the commonest haematological ADR with a statistically significant female preponderance. Most ADRs were grade 1 (63.04%. Majority ADRs were “possible” (65.76% while 34.24% were “probable” by Naranjo scale. Maximal ADRs (48.37% were noted from patients under AZT+3TC+NVP regime. IRIS was observed as a paradoxical reaction to ART in 10% cases. CONCLUSION It should not be forgotten that ADRs are the inevitable consequence of pharmacotherapy. Hence, proper implementation of current protocols designed for screening of patients especially during

  20. An Observational Study to Evaluate the Usability and Intent to Adopt an Artificial Intelligence–Powered Medication Reconciliation Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Michael Juntao; Poonawala, Robina

    2016-01-01

    Background Medication reconciliation (the process of creating an accurate list of all medications a patient is taking) is a widely practiced procedure to reduce medication errors. It is mandated by the Joint Commission and reimbursed by Medicare. Yet, in practice, medication reconciliation is often not effective owing to knowledge gaps in the team. A promising approach to improve medication reconciliation is to incorporate artificial intelligence (AI) decision support tools into the process to engage patients and bridge the knowledge gap. Objective The aim of this study was to improve the accuracy and efficiency of medication reconciliation by engaging the patient, the nurse, and the physician as a team via an iPad tool. With assistance from the AI agent, the patient will review his or her own medication list from the electronic medical record (EMR) and annotate changes, before reviewing together with the physician and making decisions on the shared iPad screen. Methods In this study, we developed iPad-based software tools, with AI decision support, to engage patients to “self-service” medication reconciliation and then share the annotated reconciled list with the physician. To evaluate the software tool’s user interface and workflow, a small number of patients (10) in a primary care clinic were recruited, and they were observed through the whole process during a pilot study. The patients are surveyed for the tool’s usability afterward. Results All patients were able to complete the medication reconciliation process correctly. Every patient found at least one error or other issues with their EMR medication lists. All of them reported that the tool was easy to use, and 8 of 10 patients reported that they will use the tool in the future. However, few patients interacted with the learning modules in the tool. The physician and nurses reported the tool to be easy-to-use, easy to integrate into existing workflow, and potentially time-saving. Conclusions We have

  1. Evaluation of a sublingual immunotherapy solution in olive-induced respiratory allergy in Jordan: a retrospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Asad K

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Khaled Al-Asad, Sayed Al-Nazer, Anan Al-Faqih, Mohammad Jamil Hashem Private practice, Amman, Jordan Background: Olive pollen is an important cause of respiratory allergy in the Middle East. In this study, the clinical characteristics of adults and children with confirmed allergic rhinitis (AR; with or without asthma in Jordan were described, and the use of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT in a real-life clinical setting was assessed.Methods: This retrospective observational study evaluated the clinical features of olive-induced allergy and the use of an SLIT solution of standardized extracts toward Ole e 1 given in a pre- and coseasonal scheme with a daily dose of 300 index of reactivity for two consecutive seasons. Inclusion criteria were as follows: ≥5 years of age, AR, proven olive sensitization, and at least 2 years follow-up after SLIT initiation. The following data were recorded at SLIT initiation: clinical characteristics, rhinitis and asthma symptom scores, and concomitant symptomatic medications. During follow-up and at the end of each season, the following data were recorded: symptom progression/scores, any changes to symptomatic medications, and treatment compliance. The secondary objective was to determine any effect on quality of life, use of concomitant AR medications, and treatment compliance. Results: Eighty-six patients with seasonal AR were included in this analysis (52.3% with coexisting asthma. Between the initiation of treatment and the end of second pollen season, symptoms of AR and asthma were decreased by 79.5% and 41.7%, respectively, with an improvement in quality of life score in 71.5% of the patients (P<0.0001 for all. Physicians reported that after 2 years of SLIT, there was an improvement in the symptoms of both AR (95.2% and asthma (93.3%, with 98.8% of the patients showing good treatment compliance. A reduction in symptomatic medications was also found. SLIT was well tolerated with no systemic reactions being

  2. Evaluation of inter-observer agreement when using a clinical respiratory scoring system in pre-weaned dairy calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczinski, S; Faure, C; Jolivet, S; Abdallah, A

    2016-07-01

    To determine inter-observer agreement for a clinical scoring system for the detection of bovine respiratory disease complex in calves, and the impact of classification of calves as sick or healthy based on different cut-off values. Two third-year veterinary students (Observer 1 and 2) and one post-graduate student (Observer 3) received 4 hours of training on scoring dairy calves for signs of respiratory disease, including rectal temperature, cough, eye and nasal discharge, and ear position. Observers 1 and 2 scored 40 pre-weaning dairy calves 24 hours apart (80 observations) over three visits to a calf-rearing facility, and Observers 1, 2 and 3 scored 20 calves on one visit. Inter-observer agreement was assessed using percentage of agreement (PA) and Kappa statistics for individual clinical signs, comparing Observers 1 and 2. Agreement between the three observers for total clinical score was assessed using cut-off values of ≥4, ≥5 and ≥6 to indicate unhealthy calves. Inter-observer PA for rectal temperature was 0.68, for cough 0.78, for nasal discharge 0.62, for eye discharge 0.63, and for ear position 0.85. Kappa values for all clinical signs indicated slight to fair agreement (respiratory disease, using relatively inexperienced observers. These disagreements may ultimately mean increased false negative or false positive diagnoses and incorrect treatment of cases. Visual assessment of clinical signs associated with bovine respiratory disease needs to be thoroughly validated when disease monitoring is based on the use of a clinical scoring system.

  3. Creating a Sustainable Online Instructor Observation System: A Case Study Highlighting Flaws when Blending Mentoring and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Marthann; Dennis, Kay; Eskey, Michael; Taylor, Cathy; Zeng, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Quality and accountability mandates require institutions to monitor online instruction in a uniform and complete manner. In many institutions, instructor training is sparse and faculty evaluation occurs only through end-of-course student evaluations that may or may not yield adequate information on how the instructor performs online. Consequently,…

  4. Expanding the social communication model of pain: are adult attachment characteristics associated with observers' pain-related evaluations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, S Jeffrey; McWilliams, Lachlan A; Dick, Bruce D

    2012-02-01

    Evaluations of another's pain can have important implications in medical, employment, and social settings. Influenced by the Social Communication Model of Pain, this vignette-based study investigated the potential influence of characteristics of the person being evaluated (viz., the coping strategy used by an individual with chronic pain depicted in a vignette) and characteristics of those making evaluations (viz., self-reported attachment anxiety and avoidance of the study participants). The main hypothesis was that participants higher in attachment avoidance would be more critical in their evaluations than those lower in attachment avoidance. Undergraduate students (N = 267) read 1 of 2 vignettes about an individual experiencing chronic pain, provided ratings of this individual, and completed a measure of adult attachment. The vignettes varied in terms of the pain-related coping strategy (catastrophizing vs. distraction) described. Similar to past research, the catastrophizing vignette received more negative ratings than the distraction vignette (e.g., greater disability level), and female participants provided more positive ratings than male participants (e.g., greater deservingness of support). While the attachment variables were unrelated to some dependent variables, consistent with the main hypothesis, attachment avoidance was associated with lower ratings of perceived deservingness of support and desirability as a friend. The current findings suggest that chronic pain patients' coping styles influence evaluations made about them, and that evaluators' gender and attachment characteristics also have important effects on such evaluations.

  5. Using ARM observations to evaluate cloud and convection parameterizations and cloud-convection-radiation interactions in the GFDL general circulation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donner, Leo J. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Washington, DC (United States); Lin, Yanluan [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Washington, DC (United States); Cooke, Will [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-01-11

    GFDL CM3 convective vertical velocities, parameterized because their scales are below those resolved in current climate models, have been compared with observations from DOE ARM. Single-column forcing has been used for this comparison for two time periods from TWP-ICE and three from MC3E. These are the first independent evaluations of the parameterized vertical velocities against observations. The results show that basic characteristics of the observations are captured by CM3 when forced with single-column observations and constrained to observed large-scale states. In many, but not all, cases, the parameterized vertical velocities exceed those observed, especially at higher levels in the clouds. Similar problems have been noted by others in cloud-resolving models. The results have important implications for cloud-aerosol interactions, which depend on vertical velocities, and likely pose constraints on entrainment by convection, which may be related to climate sensitivity.

  6. Evaluation of microscopic observation drug susceptibility assay for diagnosis of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Viet Nam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Thi Minh Ha; Nguyen, Thi Ngoc Lan; Wolbers, Marcel; Vo, Sy Kiet; Hoang, Thi Thanh Hang; Nguyen, Hong Duc; To, My Huong; Vuong, Minh Bach; Nguyen, Thi Phuong Thao; Tran, Van Quyet; Nguyen, Thi Bich Tuyen; Vo, Thi Ha; Nguyen, Thi Nho; Dai, Viet Hoa; Phan, Thi Hoang Anh; Nguyen, Huy Dung; Farrar, Jeremy; Caws, Maxine

    2012-03-01

    Early diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) and multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) is important for the elimination of TB. We evaluated the microscopic observation drug susceptibility (MODS) assay as a direct rapid drug susceptibility testing (DST) method for MDR-TB screening in sputum samples All adult TB suspects, who were newly presenting to Pham Ngoc Thach Hospital from August to November 2008 were enrolled into the study. Processed sputum samples were used for DST by MODS (DST-MODS) (Rifampicin (RIF) 1 μg/ml and Isoniazid (INH) 0.4 μg/ml), MGIT culture (Mycobacterial Growth Indicator Tube) and Lowenstein Jensen (LJ) culture. Cultures positive by either MGIT or LJ were used for proportional DST (DST-LJ) (RIF 40 μg/ml and INH 0.2 μg/ml). DST profiles on MODS and LJ were compared. Discrepant results were resolved by multiplex allele specific PCR (MAS-PCR). Seven hundred and nine TB suspects/samples were enrolled into the study, of which 300 samples with DST profiles available from both MODS and DST-LJ were analyzed. Cording in MODS was unable to correctly identify 3 Mycobacteria Other Than Tuberculosis (MOTT) isolates, resulting in 3 false positive TB diagnoses. None of these isolates were identified as MDR-TB by MODS. The sensitivity and specificity of MODS were 72.6% (95%CI: 59.8, 83.1) and 97.9% (95%CI: 95.2, 99.3), respectively for detection of INH resistant isolates, 72.7% (95%CI: 30.9, 93.7) and 99.7% (95%CI: 98.1, 99.9), respectively for detecting RIF resistant isolates and 77.8% (95%CI: 39.9, 97.1) and 99.7% (95%CI: 98.1, 99.9), respectively for detecting MDR isolates. The positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) of DST-MODS were 87.5% (95%CI: 47.3, 99.6) and 99.3% (95%CI: 97.5, 99.9) for detection of MDR isolates; and the agreement between MODS and DST-LJ was 99.0% (kappa: 0.8, P drug resistance detection was probably due to low bacterial load samples and the high INH concentration (0.4 μg/ml). The low PPV of DST-MODS may be due to the

  7. Evaluation of chikungunya virus infection in children from India during 2009-2010: A cross sectional observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavendhar, B Siva; Ray, Pratima; Ratagiri, Vinod H; Sharma, B S; Kabra, Sushil K; Lodha, Rakesh

    2016-06-01

    Chikungunya virus, a small (about 60-70 nm diameter), spherical, enveloped, positive, single stranded RNA virus is transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. After a short period of incubation (3-5 days) symptoms like fever with joint pains and others start appearing. After a gap of 20 years, this virus re-emerged during 2006-2008 in India causing a major outbreak of CHIKV in India. This study was conducted subsequent to the major outbreak in order to evaluate the proportion of chikungunya virus infection in children with suggestive symptoms at three geographical locations of India. Lineage of circulating strains and changes in the E1 structural polypeptide were also determined. Blood samples were collected (in Sodium citrate vacutainer tubes) during 1st June 2009 to 31st May 2010 from children (age 0 ≤ 18 years) suspected to have chikungunya infection, that is, those who presented with sudden onset of fever and/or joint pain, myalgia, and headache from three regions of India, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) in New Delhi, Karnataka Institute of Medical Sciences (KIMS) in Hubli and Sawai Mansingh Medical College (SMS) in Jaipur. Detection of CHIKV antibodies in all acute-phase patient plasma samples was done by IgM ELISA and for samples within ≤5 days of fever, a one-step RT-PCR was carried out on a block thermo-cycler targeting 294 bp region of E1 gene that codes for the viral envelope protein. Comparison of nucleotide and amino acid sequences from few positive samples of two regions was done with African S-27 reference strain using BioEdit. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using MEGA 6 by using the Maximum Likelihood method based on the Kimura 2-parameter model. Out of the 723 acute phase samples tested from three geographical locations of India, Chikungunya virus infection was detected in 249/723 (34.44%) subjects by either IgM Elisa (180/723) or RT-PCR (69/412). RT-PCR was employed in samples collected from children with ≤5 days of fever. Maximum

  8. Observations on the perspectives and limits of the evidence-based approach in the evaluation of gamification processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruni Filippo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As continually greater attention is given to the processes of gamification, the dimension pertaining to evaluation must also be focussed on the purpose of avoiding ineffective forms of banalisation. In reference to the evidence-based approach proposed by Mayer and in highlighting its possibilities and limits, an experiment is herein presented related to teacher training, in which we attempt to unite some traits of the processes of gamification to a first evaluation screen. The data obtained, if they seem on the one hand, indicate an overall positive perception on the part of the attendees, on the other though, they indicate forms of resistance and of saturation with respect to both the excessively competitive mechanisms and the peer evaluation procedures.

  9. Evaluation of Cloud-resolving and Limited Area Model Intercomparison Simulations using TWP-ICE Observations. Part 2: Rain Microphysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varble, Adam; Zipser, Edward J.; Fridlind, Ann; Zhu, Ping; Ackerman, Andrew; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Fan, Jiwen; Hill, Adrian; Shipway, Ben; Williams, Christopher R.

    2014-12-27

    Ten 3D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations and four 3D limited area model (LAM) simulations of an intense mesoscale convective system observed on January 23-24, 2006 during the Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) are compared with each other and with observations and retrievals from a scanning polarimetric radar, co-located UHF and VHF vertical profilers, and a Joss-Waldvogel disdrometer in an attempt to explain published results showing a low bias in simulated stratiform rainfall. Despite different forcing methodologies, similar precipitation microphysics errors appear in CRMs and LAMs with differences that depend on the details of the bulk microphysics scheme used. One-moment schemes produce too many small raindrops, which biases Doppler velocities low, but produces rain water contents (RWCs) that are similar to observed. Two-moment rain schemes with a gamma shape parameter (μ) of 0 produce excessive size sorting, which leads to larger Doppler velocities than those produced in one-moment schemes, but lower RWCs than observed. Two moment schemes also produce a convective median volume diameter distribution that is too broad relative to observations and thus, may have issues balancing raindrop formation, collision coalescence, and raindrop breakup. Assuming a μ of 2.5 rather than 0 for the raindrop size distribution improves one-moment scheme biases, and allowing μ to have values greater than 0 may improve two-moment schemes. Under-predicted stratiform rain rates are associated with under-predicted ice water contents at the melting level rather than excessive rain evaporation, in turn likely associated with convective detrainment that is too high in the troposphere and mesoscale circulations that are too weak. In addition to stronger convective updrafts than observed, limited domain size prevents a large, well-developed stratiform region from developing in CRMs, while a dry bias in ECMWF analyses does the same to the LAMs.

  10. The Modified-Classroom Observation Schedule to Measure Intentional Communication (M-COSMIC): Evaluation of Reliability and Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Sally; Hudry, Kristelle; Brown, Laura; Pasco, Greg; Charman, Tony

    2010-01-01

    The Modified-Classroom Observation Schedule to Measure Intentional Communication (M-COSMIC) was developed as an ecologically valid measure of social-communication behaviour, delineating forms, functions, and intended partners of children's spontaneous communication acts. Forty-one children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) aged 48-73 months were…

  11. Esthetic Evaluation of Anterior Single-Tooth Implants with Different Abutment Designs - Patients' Satisfaction Compared to Dentists' Observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patil, Ratnadeep; Gresnigt, Marco M M; Mahesh, Kavita; Dilbaghi, Anjali; Cune, Marco S

    Purpose: To correlate patients' satisfaction and dentists' observations regarding two abutment designs used for single crowns in the esthetic zone: a divergent one (control) and a curved one (experimental), with special emphasis on muco-gingival esthetics. Materials and Methods: Twenty-six patients

  12. On polarimetric radar signatures of deep convection for model evaluation: columns of specific differential phase observed during MC3E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Lier-Walqui, Marcus; Fridlind, Ann; Ackerman, Andrew S; Collis, Scott; Helmus, Jonathan; MacGorman, Donald R; North, Kirk; Kollias, Pavlos; Posselt, Derek J

    2016-02-01

    The representation of deep convection in general circulation models is in part informed by cloud-resolving models (CRMs) that function at higher spatial and temporal resolution; however, recent studies have shown that CRMs often fail at capturing the details of deep convection updrafts. With the goal of providing constraint on CRM simulation of deep convection updrafts, ground-based remote sensing observations are analyzed and statistically correlated for four deep convection events observed during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E). Since positive values of specific differential phase observed above the melting level are associated with deep convection updraft cells, so-called columns are analyzed using two scanning polarimetric radars in Oklahoma: the National Weather Service Vance WSR-88D (KVNX) and the Department of Energy C-band Scanning Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Precipitation Radar (C-SAPR). KVNX and C-SAPR volumes and columns are then statistically correlated with vertical winds retrieved via multi-Doppler wind analysis, lightning flash activity derived from the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array, and KVNX differential reflectivity . Results indicate strong correlations of volume above the melting level with updraft mass flux, lightning flash activity, and intense rainfall. Analysis of columns reveals signatures of changing updraft properties from one storm event to another as well as during event evolution. Comparison of to shows commonalities in information content of each, as well as potential problems with associated with observational artifacts.

  13. Evaluation of diet pattern and weight gain in postmenopausal women enrolled in the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is unclear which of four popular contemporary diet patterns is best for weight maintenance among postmenopausal women. Four dietary patterns were characterised among postmenopausal women aged 49-81 years (mean 63.6 (sd 7.4) years) from the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study: (1) a low-...

  14. Comparison of the medical students' perceived self-efficacy and the evaluation of the observers and patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammentorp, Jette; Thomsen, Janus Laust; Jarbøl, Dorte Ejg

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of self-assessment has been questioned in studies comparing physicians' self-assessments to observed assessments; however, none of these studies used self-efficacy as a method for self-assessment.The aim of the study was to investigate how medical students' perceived self-efficacy...

  15. OZONE PRODUCTION EFFICIENCY AND NOX DEPLETION IN AN URBAN PLUME: INTERPRETATION OF FIELD OBSERVATIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR EVALUATING O3-NOX-VOC SENSITIVITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozone production efficiency (OPE) can be defined as the number of ozone (O3) molecules photochemically produced by a molecule of NOx (NO + NO2) before it is lost from the NOx - O3 cycle. Here, we consider observational and modeling techniques to evaluate various operational defi...

  16. Evaluation of Cloud-Resolving and Limited Area Model Intercomparison Simulations Using TWP-ICE Observations. Part 2 ; Precipitation Microphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varble, Adam; Zipser, Edward J.; Fridland, Ann M.; Zhu, Ping; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Fan, Jiwen; Hill, Adrian; Shipway, Ben; Williams, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Ten 3-D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations and four 3-D limited area model (LAM) simulations of an intense mesoscale convective system observed on 23-24 January 2006 during the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) are compared with each other and with observations and retrievals from a scanning polarimetric radar, colocated UHF and VHF vertical profilers, and a Joss-Waldvogel disdrometer in an attempt to explain a low bias in simulated stratiform rainfall. Despite different forcing methodologies, similar precipitation microphysics errors appear in CRMs and LAMs with differences that depend on the details of the bulk microphysics scheme used. One-moment schemes produce too many small raindrops, which biases Doppler velocities low, but produces rainwater contents (RWCs) that are similar to observed. Two-moment rain schemes with a gamma shape parameter (mu) of 0 produce excessive size sorting, which leads to larger Doppler velocities than those produced in one-moment schemes but lower RWCs. Two-moment schemes also produce a convective median volume diameter distribution that is too broad relative to observations and, thus, may have issues balancing raindrop formation, collision-coalescence, and raindrop breakup. Assuming a mu of 2.5 rather than 0 for the raindrop size distribution improves one-moment scheme biases, and allowing mu to have values greater than 0 may improve excessive size sorting in two-moment schemes. Underpredicted stratiform rain rates are associated with underpredicted ice water contents at the melting level rather than excessive rain evaporation, in turn likely associated with convective detrainment that is too high in the troposphere and mesoscale circulations that are too weak. A limited domain size also prevents a large, well-developed stratiform region like the one observed from developing in CRMs, although LAMs also fail to produce such a region.

  17. Evaluation of Oceanic Surface Observation for Reproducing the Upper Ocean Structure in ECHAM5/MPI-OM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hao; Zheng, Fei; Zhu, Jiang

    2017-12-01

    Better constraints of initial conditions from data assimilation are necessary for climate simulations and predictions, and they are particularly important for the ocean due to its long climate memory; as such, ocean data assimilation (ODA) is regarded as an effective tool for seasonal to decadal predictions. In this work, an ODA system is established for a coupled climate model (ECHAM5/MPI-OM), which can assimilate all available oceanic observations using an ensemble optimal interpolation approach. To validate and isolate the performance of different surface observations in reproducing air-sea climate variations in the model, a set of observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) was performed over 150 model years. Generally, assimilating sea surface temperature, sea surface salinity, and sea surface height (SSH) can reasonably reproduce the climate variability and vertical structure of the upper ocean, and assimilating SSH achieves the best results compared to the true states. For the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), assimilating different surface observations captures true aspects of ENSO well, but assimilating SSH can further enhance the accuracy of ENSO-related feedback processes in the coupled model, leading to a more reasonable ENSO evolution and air-sea interaction over the tropical Pacific. For ocean heat content, there are still limitations in reproducing the long time-scale variability in the North Atlantic, even if SSH has been taken into consideration. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of assimilating surface observations in capturing the interannual signal and, to some extent, the decadal signal but still highlight the necessity of assimilating profile data to reproduce specific decadal variability.

  18. Multivendor Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Dataset, Observer Annotation Performance Evaluation, and Standardized Evaluation Framework for Intraretinal Cystoid Fluid Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of image analysis and machine learning methods for segmentation of clinically significant pathology in retinal spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT, used in disease detection and prediction, is limited due to the availability of expertly annotated reference data. Retinal segmentation methods use datasets that either are not publicly available, come from only one device, or use different evaluation methodologies making them difficult to compare. Thus we present and evaluate a multiple expert annotated reference dataset for the problem of intraretinal cystoid fluid (IRF segmentation, a key indicator in exudative macular disease. In addition, a standardized framework for segmentation accuracy evaluation, applicable to other pathological structures, is presented. Integral to this work is the dataset used which must be fit for purpose for IRF segmentation algorithm training and testing. We describe here a multivendor dataset comprised of 30 scans. Each OCT scan for system training has been annotated by multiple graders using a proprietary system. Evaluation of the intergrader annotations shows a good correlation, thus making the reproducibly annotated scans suitable for the training and validation of image processing and machine learning based segmentation methods. The dataset will be made publicly available in the form of a segmentation Grand Challenge.

  19. Evaluation of Detector-to-Detector and Mirror Side Differences for Terra MODIS Reflective Solar Bands Using Simultaneous MISR Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Aisheng; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Angal, A.; Barnes, W.

    2011-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is one of the five Earth-observing instruments on-board the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth-Observing System(EOS) Terra spacecraft, launched in December 1999. It has 36 spectral bands with wavelengths ranging from 0.41 to 14.4 mm and collects data at three nadir spatial resolutions: 0.25 km for 2 bands with 40 detectors each, 0.5 km for 5 bands with 20 detectors each and 1 km for the remaining 29 bands with 10 detectors each. MODIS bands are located on four separate focal plane assemblies (FPAs) according to their spectral wavelengths and aligned in the cross-track direction. Detectors of each spectral band are aligned in the along-track direction. MODIS makes observations using a two-sided paddle-wheel scan mirror. Its on-board calibrators (OBCs) for the reflective solar bands (RSBs) include a solar diffuser (SD), a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM) and a spectral-radiometric calibration assembly (SRCA). Calibration is performed for each band, detector, sub-sample (for sub-kilometer resolution bands) and mirror side. In this study, a ratio approach is applied to MODIS observed Earth scene reflectances to track the detector-to-detector and mirror side differences. Simultaneous observed reflectances from the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), also onboard the Terra spacecraft, are used with MODIS observed reflectances in this ratio approach for four closely matched spectral bands. Results show that the detector-to-detector difference between two adjacent detectors within each spectral band is typically less than 0.2% and, depending on the wavelengths, the maximum difference among all detectors varies from 0.5% to 0.8%. The mirror side differences are found to be very small for all bands except for band 3 at 0.44 mm. This is the band with the shortest wavelength among the selected matching bands, showing a time-dependent increase for the mirror side difference. This

  20. Inter-observer agreement according to three methods of evaluating mammographic density and parenchymal pattern in a case control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkel, Rikke Rass; von Euler-Chelpin, My Catarina; Nielsen, Mads

    2015-01-01

    , Tabár's PIV and PV and the upper two quartiles (within density range) of PMD. The relative risk of breast cancer was estimated using logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (ORs) adjusted for age, which were compared between the two readers. RESULTS: Substantial inter-observer agreement was seen......, respectively. Inter-reader variability showed different impact on the relative risk of breast cancer estimated by the two readers on a multiple-category scale, however, not on a high/low-risk scale. Tabár's pattern IV demonstrated the highest ORs of all density patterns investigated. CONCLUSIONS: Our study......BACKGROUND: Mammographic breast density and parenchymal patterns are well-established risk factors for breast cancer. We aimed to report inter-observer agreement on three different subjective ways of assessing mammographic density and parenchymal pattern, and secondarily to examine what potential...

  1. Evaluation of the sea ice proxy IP25 against observational and diatom proxy data in the SW Labrador Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weckstrom, Kaarina; Masse, Guillaume; Collins, Lewis G.

    2013-01-01

    The recent rapid decline in Arctic sea ice cover has increased the need to improve the accuracy of the sea ice component in climate models and to provide detailed long-term sea ice concentration records, which are only available via proxy data. Recently, the highly branched isoprenoid IP25......, identified in marine sediments underlying seasonal sea ice, has emerged as a potential sea ice specific proxy for past sea ice cover. We tested the reliability of this biomarker as a sea ice proxy against observational sea ice data (sea ice concentrations from the global HadISST1 database) and against a more....... When assessed against observational sea ice data, IP25 appears to be a more sensitive indicator of sea ice variability in this setting compared to sea ice diatoms and proved to be a robust and reliable proxy for reconstructing low-frequency variability in past sea ice concentrations. The PIP25 index...

  2. The Modified-Classroom Observation Schedule to Measure Intentional Communication (M-COSMIC): Evaluation of reliability and validity

    OpenAIRE

    Clifford, Sally; Hudry, Kristelle; Brown, Laura; Pasco, Greg; Charman, Tony; PACT Consortium, X.; PACT Consortium, PACT Consortium

    2010-01-01

    The Modified – Classroom Observation Schedule to Measure Intentional Communication (M-COSMIC) was developed as an ecologically valid measure of social-communication behaviour, delineating forms, functions, and intended partners of children’s spontaneous communication acts. Forty one children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) aged 48 to 73 months were filmed within small-group settings at school. Communication behaviours during a five-minute teacher-led activity and a 10-minute free play ses...

  3. Evaluation of directly observed treatment for tuberculosis in the Bojanala health district, North West Province of South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Tumbo, John M.; Ogunbanjo, Gboyega A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the top public health problems in South Africa. Approximately 150 000 new cases and 10 000 TB-related deaths are reported in South Africa annually. In declaring TB a global emergency in 1993, the World Health Organization developed control strategies that include active case finding, laboratory support, directly observed treatment (DOT), contact tracing, and prevention of multidrug– and extreme drugresistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB and XDR-TB). High D...

  4. Observational tool to evaluate technician-tactical behavior in volleyball athletes in the base sport areas of Pinar del Rio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Rosa García-Hernández

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The volleyball, collective sport characterized by the cooperation-opposition in the obtaining of an ideal competitive performance level, has proven in the last decades a continuous and quick development based on the rules´ transformation that govern them; promoting changes in the methods and procedures trainings conception with reach that it consider the methodological systems for the technical and preparation tactics. The following research intend to search an own relevancy in the context of the initial formation and of the technical and tactical improvement in the high-performance levels that, it has the purpose to offer the volleyball trainers an evaluation tool to check the technician-tactical level of 10 and 12 years children in the base sport areas. In the same way, it hopes to contribute to the achievement of a bigger effectiveness in the technical-tactics evaluation in the initiation volleyball and to improve the theoretical - methodological conception of this evaluation component in the sportsman's preparation, as well as to incorporate instruments that provide it.

  5. Evaluation of NASA GEOS-ADAS Modeled Diurnal Warming Through Comparisons to SEVIRI and AMSR2 SST Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentemann, C. L.; Akella, S.

    2018-02-01

    An analysis of the ocean skin Sea Surface Temperature (SST) has been included in the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) - Atmospheric Data Assimilation System (ADAS), Version 5 (GEOS-ADAS). This analysis is based on the GEOS atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) that simulates near-surface diurnal warming and cool skin effects. Analysis for the skin SST is performed along with the atmospheric state, including Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite radiance observations as part of the data assimilation system. One month (September, 2015) of GEOS-ADAS SSTs were compared to collocated satellite Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) SSTs to examine how the GEOS-ADAS diurnal warming compares to the satellite measured warming. The spatial distribution of warming compares well to the satellite observed distributions. Specific diurnal events are analyzed to examine variability within a single day. The dependence of diurnal warming on wind speed, time of day, and daily average insolation is also examined. Overall the magnitude of GEOS-ADAS warming is similar to the warming inferred from satellite retrievals, but several weaknesses in the GEOS-AGCM simulated diurnal warming are identified and directly related back to specific features in the formulation of the diurnal warming model.

  6. An Evaluation of Satellite Estimates of Solar Surface Irradiance Using Ground Observations in San Antonio, Texas, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Xia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Estimates of solar irradiance at the earth’s surface from satellite observations are useful for planning both the deployment of distributed photovoltaic systems and their integration into electricity grids. In order to use surface solar irradiance from satellites for these purposes, validation of its accuracy against ground observations is needed. In this study, satellite estimates of surface solar irradiance from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES are compared with ground observations at two sites, namely the main campus of the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA and the Alamo Solar Farm of San Antonio (ASF. The comparisons are done mostly on an hourly timescale, under different cloud conditions classified by cloud types and cloud layers, and at different solar zenith angle intervals. It is found that satellite estimates and ground observations of surface solar irradiance are significantly correlated (p < 0.05 under all sky conditions (r: 0.80 and 0.87 on an hourly timescale and 0.94 and 0.91 on a daily timescale, respectively for the UTSA and ASF sites; on the hourly timescale, the correlations are 0.77 and 0.86 under clear-sky conditions, and 0.74 and 0.84 under cloudy conditions, respectively for the UTSA and ASF sites, and mostly >0.60 under different cloud types and layers for both sites. The correlations under cloudy-sky conditions are mostly stronger than those under clear-sky conditions at different solar zenith angles. The correlation coefficients are mostly the smallest with solar zenith angle in the range of 75–90° under all sky, clear-sky and cloudy-sky conditions. At the ASF site, the overall bias of GOES surface solar irradiance is small (+1.77 Wm−2 under all sky while relatively larger under clear-sky (−22.29 Wm−2 and cloudy-sky (+40.31 Wm−2 conditions. The overall good agreement of the satellite estimates with the ground observations underscores the usefulness of the GOES surface solar

  7. Yes Virginia, quantum mechanics can be understood

    CERN Document Server

    Wallace, John P

    2017-01-01

    Virginia, B. W. Wooster, and Jeeves take up physics with the hope of understanding quantum mechanics. In the process they take a rather grand tour on an old sailing ship and aid a sow in distress. On their journey they discover that physics is not as difficult a subject as they imagined. When they dismantled physics and reassembled it in a form where gravity, strong, electromagnetic and the weak forces all stem from understanding the gaming strategy known as the fair-game. That great cultural divide first expounded by the novelist C.P.Snow was found to be a mere ditch that can be stepped over. The sins of the past were violations of energy conservation and strange notions about what mass actually represents. Now mass is defined without the assistance of the Standard Model. Things will not be the same. Singularities have been banished. The electron now has a scale and is no longer captive in a point. The gluon is no longer essential along with the single virtual photon.

  8. The Center of Gravity, Systemically Understood

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    Swain and Larry G. Heysteck (Riyadh, Saudi Arabia: CMH , Desert Storm Interviews, 1991), 33. 91Purvis, et al., 17. 40...Sullivan. "Interview: Centcom Planning Cell." In Unedited Transcript, edited by Richard Swain and Larry G. Heysteck. Riyadh, Saudi Arabia: CMH

  9. Evil Understood as the Absence of Freedom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabjerg, Bjørn

    2017-01-01

    Self-development is closely related to the idea of formation (or what is referred to as Bildung in German). But when speaking of formation, we have to address the question, ‘what are we formed by?’ Is the human being formed by him- or herself, or by resources originating from outside the self? Fr...

  10. Description, evaluation and clinical decision making according to various fetal heart rate patterns. Inter-observer and regional variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, O; Bøttcher, L M; Weber, Tom

    1992-01-01

    as pathological patterns, and normal as well as clinically asphyxiated babies. Five antepartum and six intrapartum patterns were included. A total of 1,276 descriptions and evaluations were obtained. The degree of agreement in description of fetal heart rate changes was high regarding the baseline...... departments, especially between departments far apart. It is concluded that we still need a scientific clarification of which specific heart rate changes are the best predictors of fetal stress. Artificial intelligence programs for interpreting fetal cardiotocograms and ECG signals constitute one promising...

  11. Inter-observer agreement for the evaluation of bone involvement on Whole Body Low Dose Computed Tomography (WBLDCT) in Multiple Myeloma (MM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacchino, M.; Minetti, V.; Dore, R.; Calliada, F. [University of Pavia, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Institute of Radiology, Pavia (Italy); Bonaffini, P.A.; Nasatti, A.; Sironi, S. [University of Milano Bicocca, San Gerardo Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Monza (Italy); Corso, A. [University of Pavia, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Division of Hematology, Pavia (Italy); Tinelli, C. [University of Pavia, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Service of Biometry and Statistics, Pavia (Italy)

    2015-11-15

    We aimed to assess inter-observer agreement in bone involvement evaluation and define accuracy and reproducibility of MDCT images analysis in Multiple Myeloma (MM), by comparing two acquisition protocols at two different institutions. A total of 100 MM patients underwent whole body low-dose computed tomography (WB-LDCT), with two protocols: Group I (50 patients), 80 kV and 200-230 mAs; Group II, 120 kV-40 mAs. Four readers (two experts) retrospectively reviewed 22 anatomical districts, reporting the following for each patient: 1) osteolytic lesions; 2) cortical bone integrity; 3) fractures; 4) risk of vertebral collapse; 5) hyperattenuating bone lesions; and 6) extraosseous extension. Inter-observer agreement (by all readers, expert and young observers and comparison of the two protocols) was then statistically analyzed. According to Cohen's criteria, inter-observer agreement among the four readers and between experts and residents was good for the detection of bone lesions and extra-medullary extension, and for the evaluation of risk of collapse and cortical integrity. There was good agreement when comparing the two protocols. A greater variability was found for the evaluation of hyperattenuating lesions and the presence of fractures. WB-LDCT represents a reproducible and reliable technique that is helpful for defining bone disease in MM patients, with partial influence of readers' experience. (orig.)

  12. [Evaluation of the concentration of cerebrospinal fluid ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) in patients with purulent, bacterial meningitis--own observations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepa, Lucjan

    2012-01-01

    THE AIM of the study was evaluation of usefulness of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) concentration assessment in adults with purulent, bacterial meningoencephalitis. The investigation was performed in 14 subjects hospitalized at the Department of Infectious Diseases of Medical University of Silesia in Bytom from 2007 - 2009 due to purulent, bacterial meningoencephalitis. All patients were divided into to groups according to the severity of their clinical condition: I group - very severe course of the disease, II group - moderate and mild course of the disease. In all individuals CSF CNTF concentration was evaluated during the first 24 hours of hospitalization. Mean CSF CNTF concentration in patients in very severe clinical condition (group I) was 14,73 pg/ mL compared to 6,79 pg/mL in subjects of group II with moderate and mild course of disease. The difference between CSF mean concentration of this cytokine was statistically significant (p CNTF concentrations and other CSF inflammatory parameters. Control assays performed in 4 patients from group I revealed evident decrease of CSF CNTF level in fatal course of the disease. In survivals with recovery CSF concentration of this cytokine was only slightly decreased compared to initial level. CONCLUSIONS. The obtained results indicate the usefulness of CSF CNTF concentration assessment in estimation of severity of the patient's clinical condition. The level of this cytokine concentration also seems to be helpful as prognostic marker in purulent, bacterial meningoencephalitis.

  13. Evaluation of aerosol distributions in the GISS-TOMAS global aerosol microphysics model with remote sensing observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. H. Lee

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD and Angstrom Coefficient (AC predictions in the GISS-TOMAS model of global aerosol microphysics are evaluated against remote sensing data from MODIS, MISR, and AERONET. The model AOD agrees well (within a factor of two over polluted continental (or high sulfate, dusty, and moderate sea-salt regions but less well over the equatorial, high sea-salt, and biomass burning regions. Underprediction of sea-salt in the equatorial region is likely due to GCM meteorology (low wind speeds and high precipitation. For the Southern Ocean, overprediction of AOD is very likely due to high sea-salt emissions and perhaps aerosol water uptake in the model. However, uncertainties in cloud screening at high latitudes make it difficult to evaluate the model AOD there with the satellite-based AOD. AOD in biomass burning regions is underpredicted, a tendency found in other global models but more severely here. Using measurements from the LBA-SMOCC 2002 campaign, the surface-level OC concentration in the model are found to be underpredicted severely during the dry season while much less severely for EC concentration, suggesting the low AOD in the model is due to underpredictions in OM mass. The potential for errors in emissions and wet deposition to contribute to this bias is discussed.

  14. Evaluation of the possibility of forecasting the displacements of the Solina Dam based on observation of the feeler gauges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bąk Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available These studies are the continuation of previously conducted researches based on displacements of the Solina Dam. To support the monitoring of the dam, the EDF model were used. This model determines the dependence between displacements observed on the elements of the dam and the level of the upper water, cyclicality of temperatures and the impact of time. The use of model, in both the imaging of displacements of the Solina Dam and forecasts made for the benchmarks located on the crest of the dam, gave satisfactory results, therefore further analysis were undertaken. Displacement forecasting was made based on data from feeler gauges located at the pillars, retaining walls and four galleries. Analysis based on 4 different forecasting periods enabled for the conclusion that to obtain reliable forecasts, measurement data based on 10 years of operation with frequency of 1 per month is required. The use of such a comprehensive database allowed for the achievement of full compliance between modelled values and observed displacements within the established confidence intervals.

  15. Metabolic evaluation and measurement of ovarian volume in polycystic ovary sydrome: a cross-sectional observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehtap Evran

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Polycystic ovary sydrome is a disease of women in reproductive period, with hirsutism or hyperandrogenic signs in laboratory evaluation, causing infertility due to dysmenorrhea and unovulation. Accompanying insulin resistance and adiposity may increase cardiometabolic risk. In our study, we planned to represent the physical examination and laboratory findings of the patients diagnosed as polycystic ovary sydrome, together with andominal ultrasonographic evaluation of the ovaries. Material-methods: Twenty-two patients who admitted the endocrinology department with the complaints of hirsutism and dysmenorrhea were included in the study. Purpose: Polycystic ovary sydrome is a disease of women in reproductive period, with hirsutism or hyperandrogenic signs in laboratory evaluation, causing infertility due to dysmenorrhea and unovulation. Accompanying insulin resistance and adiposity may increase cardiometabolic risk. In our study, we planned to represent the physical examination and laboratory findings of the patients diagnosed as polycystic ovary sydrome, together with andominal ultrasonographic evaluation of the ovaries. Material and Methods: Twenty-two patients who admitted the endocrinology department with the complaints of hirsutism and dysmenorrhea were included in the study. Their ages, family histories, polycystic ovary sydrome phenotypes, first menstrual age, length of cyclus and physical examination findings were recorded. Ferriman and Gallwey score was used for hirsutism. Insulin resistance was calculated via HOMA-IR method by making the biochemical and hormonal tests. Ovarian volumes were measured by abdominal ultrasonography. SPSS-16 was used for the statistical analysis of the findings. Results: Mean age was 21.41+/-0.88. Polycystic ovary sydrome phenotypes were B in 40.9%, C in 31.8% and A in 27.3%. Cyclus length was normal in 31.8% (27-34 days. Ferriman and Gallwey score was and #8805;7 in all of the patients. Although

  16. Evaluating the potential use of a high-resolution X-band polarimetric radar observations in Urban Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostou, Marios N.; Kalogiros, John; Marzano, Frank S.; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.; Baldini, Luca; Nikolopoulos, EfThymios; Montopoli, Mario; Picciotti, Errico

    2014-05-01

    The Mediterranean area concentrates the major natural risks related to the water cycle, including heavy precipitation and flash-flooding during the fall season. Every year in central and south Europe we witness several fatal and economical disasters from severe storm rainfall triggering Flash Floods, and its impacts are increasing worldwide, but remain very difficult to manage. The spatial scale of flash flood occurrence is such that its vulnerability is often focused on dispersed urbanization, transportation and tourism infrastructures (De Marchi and Scolobig 2012). Urbanized and industrialized areas shows peculiar hydrodynamic and meteo-oceanographic features and they concentrate the highest rates of flash floods and fatal disasters. The main causes of disturbance being littoral urban development and harbor activities, the building of littoral rail- and highways, and the presence of several polluted discharges. All the above mentioned characteristics limit our ability to issue timely flood warnings. Precipitation estimates based on raingauge networks are usually associated with low coverage density, particularly at high altitudes. On the other hand, operational weather radar networks may provide valuable information of precipitation at these regimes but reliability of their estimates is often limited due to retrieval (e.g. variability in the reflectivity-to-rainfall relationship) and spatial extent constrains (e.g. blockage issues, overshooting effects). As a result, we currently lack accurate precipitation estimates over urban complex terrain areas, which essentially means that we lack accurate knowledge of the triggering factor for a number of hazards like flash floods and debris flows/landslides occurring in those areas. A potential solution to overcome sampling as well as retrieval uncertainty limitations of current observational networks might be the use of network of low-power dual-polarization X-band radars as complement to raingauges and gap-filling to

  17. Evaluating commercial marine emissions and their role in air quality policy using observations and the CMAQ model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Allison M.; Canty, Timothy P.; Anderson, Daniel C.; Vinciguerra, Timothy P.; He, Hao; Goldberg, Daniel L.; Ehrman, Sheryl H.; Dickerson, Russell R.; Salawitch, Ross J.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the representation of emissions from the largest (Class 3) commercial marine vessels (c3 Marine) within the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. In present emissions inventories developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), c3 Marine emissions are divided into off-shore and near-shore files. Off-shore c3 Marine emissions are vertically distributed within the atmospheric column, reflecting stack-height and plume rise. Near-shore c3 Marine emissions, located close to the US shoreline, are erroneously assumed to occur only at the surface. We adjust the near-shore c3 Marine emissions inventory by vertically distributing these emissions to be consistent with the off-shore c3 Marine inventory. Additionally, we remove near-shore c3 Marine emissions that overlap with off-shore c3 Marine emissions within the EPA files. The CMAQ model generally overestimates surface ozone (O3) compared to Air Quality System (AQS) site observations, with the largest discrepancies occurring near coastal waterways. We compare modeled O3 from two CMAQ simulations for June, July, and August (JJA) 2011 to surface O3 observations from AQS sites to examine the efficacy of the c3 Marine emissions improvements. Model results at AQS sites show average maximum 8-hr surface O3 decreases up to ∼6.5 ppb along the Chesapeake Bay, and increases ∼3-4 ppb around Long Island Sound, when the adjusted c3 Marine emissions are used. Along with the c3 Marine emissions adjustments, we reduce on-road mobile NOX emissions by 50%, motivated by work from Anderson et al. 2014, and reduce the lifetime of the alkyl nitrate species group from ∼10 days to ∼1 day based on work by Canty et al. 2015, to develop the ;c3 Science; model scenario. Simulations with these adjustments further improve model representation of the atmosphere. We calculate the ratio of column formaldehyde (HCHO) and tropospheric column nitrogen dioxide (NO2) using observations from the Ozone

  18. Evaluation of model-simulated source contributions to tropospheric ozone with aircraft observations in the factor-projected space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Yoshida

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Trace gas measurements of TOPSE and TRACE-P experiments and corresponding global GEOS-Chem model simulations are analyzed with the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF method for model evaluation purposes. Specially, we evaluate the model simulated contributions to O3 variability from stratospheric transport, intercontinental transport, and production from urban/industry and biomass burning/biogenic sources. We select a suite of relatively long-lived tracers, including 7 chemicals (O3, NOy, PAN, CO, C3H8, CH3Cl, and 7Be and 1 dynamic tracer (potential temperature. The largest discrepancy is found in the stratospheric contribution to 7Be. The model underestimates this contribution by a factor of 2–3, corresponding well to a reduction of 7Be source by the same magnitude in the default setup of the standard GEOS-Chem model. In contrast, we find that the simulated O3 contributions from stratospheric transport are in reasonable agreement with those derived from the measurements. However, the springtime increasing trend over North America derived from the measurements are largely underestimated in the model, indicating that the magnitude of simulated stratospheric O3 source is reasonable but the temporal distribution needs improvement. The simulated O3 contributions from long-range transport and production from urban/industry and biomass burning/biogenic emissions are also in reasonable agreement with those derived from the measurements, although significant discrepancies are found for some regions.

  19. Evaluation of regional climate model simulations versus gridded observed and regional reanalysis products using a combined weighting scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eum, Hyung-Il; Laprise, Rene [University of Quebec at Montreal, ESCER (Etude et Simulation du Climat a l' Echelle Regionale), Montreal, QC (Canada); Gachon, Philippe [University of Quebec at Montreal, ESCER (Etude et Simulation du Climat a l' Echelle Regionale), Montreal, QC (Canada); Environment Canada, Adaptation and Impacts Research Section, Climate Research Division, Montreal, QC (Canada); Ouarda, Taha [University of Quebec, INRS-ETE (Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre Eau-Terre-Environnement), Quebec, QC (Canada)

    2012-04-15

    This study presents a combined weighting scheme which contains five attributes that reflect accuracy of climate data, i.e. short-term (daily), mid-term (annual), and long-term (decadal) timescales, as well as spatial pattern, and extreme values, as simulated from Regional Climate Models (RCMs) with respect to observed and regional reanalysis products. Southern areas of Quebec and Ontario provinces in Canada are used for the study area. Three series of simulation from two different versions of the Canadian RCM (CRCM4.1.1, and CRCM4.2.3) are employed over 23 years from 1979 to 2001, driven by both NCEP and ERA40 global reanalysis products. One series of regional reanalysis dataset (i.e. NARR) over North America is also used as reference for comparison and validation purpose, as well as gridded historical observed daily data of precipitation and temperatures, both series have been beforehand interpolated on the CRCM 45-km grid resolution. Monthly weighting factors are calculated and then combined into four seasons to reflect seasonal variability of climate data accuracy. In addition, this study generates weight averaged references (WARs) with different weighting factors and ensemble size as new reference climate data set. The simulation results indicate that the NARR is in general superior to the CRCM simulated precipitation values, but the CRCM4.1.1 provides the highest weighting factors during the winter season. For minimum and maximum temperature, both the CRCM4.1.1 and the NARR products provide the highest weighting factors, respectively. The NARR provides more accurate short- and mid-term climate data, but the two versions of the CRCM provide more precise long-term data, spatial pattern and extreme events. Or study confirms also that the global reanalysis data (i.e. NCEP vs. ERA40) used as boundary conditions in the CRCM runs has non-negligible effects on the accuracy of CRCM simulated precipitation and temperature values. In addition, this study demonstrates

  20. A global 2007-2015 spaceborne sun-induced vegetation fluorescence time series evaluated with Australian flux tower observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraeten, Willem W.; Sanders, Abram F. J.; Kooreman, Maurits L.; van Leth, Thomas C.; Beringer, Jason; Joiner, Joanna; Delcloo, Andy

    2017-04-01

    The Gross Primary Production (GPP) of the terrestrial biosphere is a key quantity in the understanding of the global carbon cycle. GPP is the amount of atmospheric carbon fixed through the process of plant photosynthesis and it represents the largest ecosystem gross flux of CO2 between the atmosphere and the Earth surface. To date, monitoring of GPP has not been possible at scales beyond that of a single agricultural field or natural ecosystem. At those scales, networks of eddy-covariance towers provide a platform to measure Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) of carbon at high temporal resolution, although with only sparse spatial coverage. Satellite observations can bridge that gap by providing the spatial distributions and changes over time of vegetation-related spectral indices. These "greenness indicators", however, tend to return the potential carbon uptake by plants rather than the actual uptake since short term environmental changes affecting plant productivity (e.g., water availability, temperature, nutrient deficiency, diseases) are not well captured. Sun-induced plant fluorescence (SiF), however, is tightly related to photosynthetic activity in the red and near-infrared wavelength range, and SiF can be retrieved from spaceborne measurements from sensors with good signal-to-noise ratios and fine spectral resolutions. We use optical data from the Global Ozone Monitoring Instrument 2 (GOME-2A) satellite sensor to infer terrestrial fluorescence from space. The spectral signatures of atmospheric absorption, surface reflectance, and fluorescence radiance are disentangled using reference hyperspectral data of non-fluorescence surfaces (desserts) to solve for the atmospheric absorption. An empirically based principal component analysis (PCA) approach was applied. Here we show a global 2007-2015 times series of sun-induced vegetation fluorescence derived from GOME-2A observations which we have compared with GPP data derived from twelve Net Ecosystem Exchange flux tower

  1. Effects of low oxygen dead space ventilation and breath-holding test in evaluating cerebrovascular reactivity: A comparative observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Ke-Ju; Zhong, Ling-Ling; Ni, Xiao-Yu; Xia, Lei; Xue, Liu-Jun; Cheng, Guan-Liang

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to explore the application prospect of low oxygen dead space ventilation (LODSV) in evaluating vasomotor reactivity (VMR) by comparison between LODSV and breath-holding test (BHT). Outpatient or inpatient patients who underwent transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) were enrolled into this study. These patients successively underwent BHT and LODSV. The cooperation degree, tolerance conditions and adverse reactions in patients were recorded, and VMR was calculated, compared and analyzed. Patients had poor cooperation during BHT. Except for compensatory tachypnea after BHT, patients basically had no adverse reaction. The main manifestations of patients undergoing LODSV were deepened breathing and accelerated frequency in the end of the ventilation, and increased heart rate and a slight decline in pulse oxygen that rapidly recovered after ventilation. The increase rate of blood flow velocity in patients undergoing LODSV was significantly higher than in BHT (P<0.001), and its calculated VMR value was approximately 15% higher than BHT (P<0.001). BHT revealed a monophasic curve that slightly descends and rapidly increases, and LODSV revealed a curve that descends for a short time and slowly increases with a platform. LODSV can effectively eliminate the affect of poor cooperation in patients, and avoid intolerance caused by hypoxia. Hence, VMR value is more accurate than that determined by BHT; and this can reflect the maximum reaction ability of the blood vessels. Therefore, this method has higher clinical application value.

  2. Evaluation of SMAP, SMOS, and AMSR2 soil moisture retrievals against observations from two networks on the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingying; Yang, Kun; Qin, Jun; Cui, Qian; Lu, Hui; La, Zhu; Han, Menglei; Tang, Wenjun

    2017-06-01

    Two soil moisture and temperature monitoring networks were established in the Tibetan Plateau (TP) during recent years. One is located in a semihumid area (Naqu) of central TP and consists of 56 soil moisture and temperature measurement (SMTM) stations, the other is located in a semiarid area (Pali) of southern TP and consists of 21 SMTM stations. In this study, the station data are used to evaluate soil moisture retrievals from three microwave satellites, i.e., the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) of NASA, the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) of European Space Agency, and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. It is found that the SMAP retrievals tend to underestimate soil moisture in the two TP networks, mainly due to the negative biases in the effective soil temperature that is derived from a climate model. However, the SMAP product well captures the amplitude and temporal variation of the soil moisture. The SMOS product performs well in Naqu network with acceptable error metrics but fails to capture the temporal variation of soil moisture in Pali network. The AMSR2 products evidently exaggerate the temporal variation of soil moisture in Naqu network but dampen it in Pali network, suggesting its retrieval algorithm needs further improvements for the TP.

  3. An Observational Study to Evaluate Associations Between Low-Level Gestational Exposure to Organophosphate Pesticides and Cognition During Early Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donauer, Stephanie; Altaye, Mekibib; Xu, Yingying; Sucharew, Heidi; Succop, Paul; Calafat, Antonia M; Khoury, Jane C; Lanphear, Bruce; Yolton, Kimberly

    2016-09-01

    Prenatal exposure to organophosphate pesticides, which is ubiquitous, may be detrimental to neurological development. We examined 327 mother/infant pairs in Cincinnati, Ohio, between 2003 and 2006 to determine associations between prenatal exposure to organophosphate pesticides and neurodevelopment. Twice during pregnancy urinary concentrations of 6 common dialkylphosphates, nonspecific metabolites of organophosphate pesticides, were measured. Aggregate concentrations of diethylphosphates, dimethylphosphates, and total dialkylphosphates were calculated. Bayley Scales of Infant Development, Second Edition-Mental and Psychomotor Developmental indices were administered at ages 1, 2, and 3 years, the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals-Preschool, Second Edition, at age 4, and the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence, Third Edition, at age 5. Mothers with higher urinary total dialkylphosphate concentrations reported higher levels of socioeconomic status and increased fresh fruit and vegetable intake. We found no associations between prenatal exposure to organophosphate pesticides and cognition at 1-5 years of age. In our cohort, exposure to organophosphate pesticides during pregnancy was not associated with cognition during early childhood. It is possible that a higher socioeconomic status and healthier diet may protect the fetus from potential adverse associations with gestational organophosphate pesticide exposure, or that dietary exposure to the metabolites is innocuous and not an ideal measure of exposure to the parent compound. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. The Medical Necessity for Medicinal Cannabis: Prospective, Observational Study Evaluating the Treatment in Cancer Patients on Supportive or Palliative Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Bar-Sela

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cancer patients using cannabis report better influence from the plant extract than from synthetic products. However, almost all the research conducted to date has been performed with synthetic products. We followed patients with a medicinal cannabis license to evaluate the advantages and side effects of using cannabis by cancer patients. Methods. The study included two interviews based on questionnaires regarding symptoms and side effects, the first held on the day the license was issued and the second 6–8 weeks later. Cancer symptoms and cannabis side effects were documented on scales from 0 to 4 following the CTCAE. The distress thermometer was used also. Results. Of the 211 patients who had a first interview, only 131 had the second interview, 25 of whom stopped treatment after less than a week. All cancer or anticancer treatment-related symptoms showed significant improvement (P<0.001. No significant side effects except for memory lessening in patients with prolonged cannabis use (P=0.002 were noted. Conclusion. The positive effects of cannabis on various cancer-related symptoms are tempered by reliance on self-reporting for many of the variables. Although studies with a control group are missing, the improvement in symptoms should push the use of cannabis in palliative treatment of oncology patients.

  5. Practical Management of HIV-Associated Anemia in Resource-Limited Settings: Prospective Observational Evaluation of a New Mozambican Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brentlinger, Paula E; Silva, Wilson P; Vermund, Sten H; Valverde, Emilio; Buene, Manuel; Moon, Troy D

    2016-01-01

    Mozambique's updated guideline for management of HIV-associated anemia prompts clinicians to consider opportunistic conditions, adverse drug reactions, and untreated immunosuppression in addition to iron deficiency, intestinal helminthes, and malaria. We prospectively evaluated this guideline in rural Zambézia Province. Likely cause(s) of anemia were determined through prespecified history, physical examination, and laboratory testing. Diagnoses were "etiologic" if laboratory confirmed (sputum microscopy, blood culture, Plasmodium falciparum malaria rapid test) or "syndromic" if not. To assess hemoglobin response, we used serial point-of-care measurements. We studied 324 ambulatory, anemic (hemoglobin management (iron supplementation, deworming, and/or antimalarials) alone. Thirty (9.3%) died and/or were hospitalized, and 125 (38.6%) were lost to follow-up. Multivariable linear and logistic regression models described better hemoglobin responses and/or outcomes in subjects with higher CD4(+) T-lymphocyte counts, pre-enrollment antiretroviral therapy and/or co-trimoxazole prophylaxis, discontinuation of zidovudine for suspected adverse reaction, and smear-positive tuberculosis. Adverse outcomes were associated with fever, low body mass index, bacteremia, esophageal candidiasis, and low or missing CD4(+) T cell counts. In this severely resource-limited setting, successful anemia management often required interventions other than conventional presumptive treatment, thus supporting Mozambique's guideline revision.

  6. Clinical observation and therapeutic evaluation of Rh-endostatin combined with DP regimen in treating patients with advanced esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wen-Ying; Song, Tao; Li, Ning; Luo, Su-Xia; Li, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    To observe the curative effects of rh-endostatin combined with DP regimen in treating patients with advanced esophageal cancer and analyze the correlation of CT perfusion (CTP) parameters and the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Twenty patients with esophageal cancer confirmed pathologically were randomly divided into combined treatment (rh-endostatin+DP regimen) group and single chemotherapy group, 10 patients in each group, respectively. All patients were given conventional CT examination and CTP imaging for primary tumor. The level of VEGF, the size of tumor and CTP parameters (BF, BV, PS and MTT) before treatment and after 2 cycles of treatment were determined for the comparison and the correlation between CTP parameters and VEGF expression was analyzed. the therapeutic effect of rh-endostatin+DP regimen group was superior to single chemotherapy group. VEGF level after treatment in rh- endostatin +DP regimen group was obviously lower than single chemotherapy group (Prh-endostatin +DP regimen group, BF, BV and PS decreased while MTT increased after treatment (P0.05). Rh-endostatin can down-regulate the expression of VEGF in esophageal cancer, change the state of hypertransfusion and high permeability of tumor vessels and had the better curative effect and slighter adverse reactions when combined with chemotherapy.

  7. Protocol for the evaluation and validation of Qi Blood Yin Yang deficiency pattern questionnaire: prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihye; Kim, Keun Ho

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to validate the pattern identification standard of qi, blood, yin, and yang deficiency patterns diagnosis. The current study will investigate the usefulness of the Qi Blood Yin Yang deficiency pattern questionnaire as a diagnostic tool for qi, blood, yin, and yang deficiencies by assessing the agreement between the scores and a gold standard established by assessors. This protocol is for a single center, prospective, observational study. A total of 248 eligible patients with unexplained chronic fatigue will be assigned to four groups in a 1:1:1:1 ratio as the qi deficiency group, blood deficiency group, yin deficiency group, and yang deficiency group. The primary outcome will be measured using the score of the Qi Blood Yin Yang deficiency pattern questionnaire and the secondary outcomes will be measured using the fatigue severity scale, Korean-translated chalder fatigue scale, computerized tongue image analysis system, and three types of pattern identification questionnaires (cold-heat, food accumulation, and seven emotions patterns). The safety of the clinical study will be assessed after measurements at every visit. All statistical analysis will be performed using the R Statistics program. Statistics experts will analyze the relationship between clinical data using the Pearson's Chi-squared test and independent t -test. This study will provide reference data and good evidence that are applicable to future studies. Furthermore, the results of the present study are useful to improve the care of patients with unexplained chronic fatigue and unexplained chronic fatigue-related disorders.

  8. Evaluation of postoperative discomfort following third molar surgery using submucosal dexamethasone - a randomized observer blind prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warraich, Riaz; Faisal, Muhammad; Rana, Madiha; Shaheen, Anjum; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Rana, Majeed

    2013-07-01

    Surgical removal of impacted lower third molar is still the most frequent procedure done by Oral and Maxillofacial surgeons and is often associated with pain, swelling and trismus. These postoperative sequelae can cause distress to the patient as a result of tissue trauma and affect the patient's quality of life after surgery. Use of antiseptic mouthwashes, drains, muscle relaxants, cryotherapy, antibiotics, corticosteroids and physiotherapy seems to decrease postoperative discomfort. Among them corticosteroids are well-known adjuncts to surgery for suppressing tissue mediators of inflammation, thereby reducing transudation of fluids and lessening edema. The rationale of this study is to determine the effectiveness of submucosal injection of dexamethasone in reducing postoperative discomfort after third molar surgery. 100 patients requiring surgical removal of third molar under local anesthesia were randomly divided into 2 groups, group I receiving 4 mg dexamethasone as submucosal injection and the control group II received no steroid administration. Facial swelling was quantified by anatomical facial landmarks. Furthermore, pain and patient satisfaction, as well as neurological score and the degree of mouth opening were observed from each patient. Patients receiving dexamethasone showed significant reduction in pain, swelling, trismus, a tendency to less neurological complaints and improved quality of life compared with the control group. Submucosal injection of dexamethasone is more efficient to manage postoperative discomfort after removal of third molars compared to no steroid administration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of a simple, point-scale hydrologic model in simulating soil moisture using the Delaware environmental observing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legates, David R.; Junghenn, Katherine T.

    2018-04-01

    Many local weather station networks that measure a number of meteorological variables (i.e. , mesonetworks) have recently been established, with soil moisture occasionally being part of the suite of measured variables. These mesonetworks provide data from which detailed estimates of various hydrological parameters, such as precipitation and reference evapotranspiration, can be made which, when coupled with simple surface characteristics available from soil surveys, can be used to obtain estimates of soil moisture. The question is Can meteorological data be used with a simple hydrologic model to estimate accurately daily soil moisture at a mesonetwork site? Using a state-of-the-art mesonetwork that also includes soil moisture measurements across the US State of Delaware, the efficacy of a simple, modified Thornthwaite/Mather-based daily water balance model based on these mesonetwork observations to estimate site-specific soil moisture is determined. Results suggest that the model works reasonably well for most well-drained sites and provides good qualitative estimates of measured soil moisture, often near the accuracy of the soil moisture instrumentation. The model exhibits particular trouble in that it cannot properly simulate the slow drainage that occurs in poorly drained soils after heavy rains and interception loss, resulting from grass not being short cropped as expected also adversely affects the simulation. However, the model could be tuned to accommodate some non-standard siting characteristics.

  10. EVALUATION OF THE THERAPEUTIC EFFICACY OF HIGH-INTENSITY PULSED-PERIODIC LASER RADIATION (CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL OBSERVATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Sokolov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available From the experience of clinical observations, we have shown a high therapeutic effectiveness of the medical laser KULON-MED in: cosmetics, non-cancer inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tract and cancer (cancer of the stomach and colon as at different wavelengths, and with different types of photosensitizers. In the area of anti-tumor photodynamic therapy (PDT, based on experimental studies, we have showed the high antitumor (sarcoma S‑37 effectiveness of the laser (with the inhibition of tumor growth of up to 100% for repetitively pulsed irradiation mode, and for mode fractionation doses laser radiation. In addition, significant differences are shown in the effectiveness of anticancer PDT methods in the application of high-intensity lasers, continuous and pulsed caused fundamental properties of laser radiation characteristics – time structure of the radiation pulses. Thus, for the first time we have shown that the time of high-intensity laser pulses structure significantly affects therapeutic efficacy laser system, and hence on the mechanisms of interaction of laser radiation with biological tissue.

  11. Evaluation of the effect of the specific CCR1 antagonist CP-481715 on the clinical and cellular responses observed following epicutaneous nickel challenge in human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borregaard, Jeanett; Skov, Lone; Wang, Lisy

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The CC-chemokine receptor-1 (CCR1) is thought to be involved in recruitment of inflammatory cells in allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). CP-481715 is a specific antagonist of CCR1. OBJECTIVES: To determine the inhibitory effects of CP-418 715 in ACD by evaluating the clinical signs....... CONCLUSIONS: Blocking of CCR1 only partly inhibited clinical manifestations of ACD. Several chemokine receptors are likely relevant for the cellular influx observed in ACD lesions....

  12. Comparison of midwifery students' satisfaction with direct observation of procedural skills and current methods in evaluation of procedural skills in Mashhad Nursing and Midwifery School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoseini, Bibi Leila; Mazloum, Seyed Reza; Jafarnejad, Farzaneh; Foroughipour, Mohsen

    2013-03-01

    The clinical evaluation, as one of the most important elements in medical education, must measure students' competencies and abilities. The implementation of any assessment tool is basically dependent on the acceptance of students. This study tried to assess midwifery students' satisfaction with Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (DOPS) and current clinical evaluation methods. This quasi-experimental study was conducted in the university hospitals affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. The subjects comprised 67 undergraduate midwifery students selected by convenience sampling and allocated to control and intervention groups according to the training transposition. Current method was performed in the control group, and DOPS was conducted in the intervention group. The applied tools included DOPS rating scales, logbook, and satisfaction questionnaires with clinical evaluation methods. Validity and reliability of these tools were approved. At the end of training, students' satisfaction with the evaluation methods was assessed by the mentioned tools. The data were analyzed by descriptive and analytical statistics. Satisfaction mean scores of midwifery students with DOPS and current methods were 76.7 ± 12.9 and 62.6 ± 14.7 (out of 100), respectively. DOPS students' satisfaction mean score was significantly higher than the score obtained in current method (P students' satisfaction. Since the students' satisfaction with the current method was also acceptable, we recommend combining this new clinical evaluation method with the current method, which covers its weaknesses, to promote the students' satisfaction with clinical evaluation methods in a perfect manner.

  13. Evaluation of Surface Slope Effects on Ripple Orientations Observed on Sand Dunes in the Terra Tyrrhena Region of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbelman, J. R.; Johnson, M. B.

    2014-12-01

    The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) has revealed abundant wind ripples on sand dunes across Mars. Ripple orientations have been documented using HiRISE images of sand dunes at 24 widely distributed sites across Mars, in order to identify the last significant wind directions at these locations. Howard (GSAB, 1977) gives a mathematical expression for how surface slopes on a sand dune can affect the orientation of ripples with respect to the formative winds. In order to evaluate this mechanism for measured ripple orientations on Mars, quantitative data for surface slopes on the sand dunes is required. Stereo pairs of HiRISE images are used to generate Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) with postings of one meter. In June 2014 we produced a DTM of sand dunes in the Terra Tyrrhena region of Mars (14.55° S, 97.77° E) using SOCET SET at the Astrogeology Branch, USGS-Flagstaff. Typically it is difficult for feature matching software to work well on sand dunes, but our stereo images (ESP_022609_1655 and ESP_026675_1655) were obtained only six Earth days apart under excellent illumination conditions. The Terra Tyrrhena DTM had remarkably few artifacts on the sand dunes (except at slip faces, where the average slope between slip face crest and base was interpolated) and excellent control from irregular terrain exposed in interdune areas. Slopes on the stoss sides of sand dunes are generally ripple deflection angles should be ripple orientations to account for surface slopes utilizing the DTM data, and so far we do not see major changes to inferred surface wind directions that would be derived directly from the ripple orientations.

  14. Evaluation of a xenogeneic acellular collagen matrix as a small-diameter vascular graft in dogs--preliminary observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemcova, S; Noel, A A; Jost, C J; Gloviczki, P; Miller, V M; Brockbank, K G

    2001-01-01

    Autogenous veins are the materials of choice for arterial reconstruction. In the absence of autogenous material, prosthetic materials are used. However, vascular prostheses of less than 0.4 cm in diameter have low long-term patency. This study was designed to determine if cells would infiltrate an engineered xenogeneic biomaterial used as a small diameter arterial graft in dogs and, if so, to determine the phenotype of the infiltrating cells. Nine acellular xenogeneic grafts (0.4 cm in diameter, 5 cm long), composed of porcine collagen derived from the submucosa of the small intestine and type I bovine collagen, were implanted as end to-end interposition grafts in femoral arteries of five male mongrel dogs (total of nine grafts). All dogs received daily aspirin (325 mg). Patency of implanted grafts was monitored weekly by Duplex ultrasonography. After 9 weeks, or earlier in case of blood flow reduction by at least 75%, grafts were explanted and prepared for light or electron microscopy to evaluate cellularization. Eight of nine grafts remained patent up to 9 weeks. At explant, diameters were 0.31 +/- 0.02 cm at the midgraft, and 0.14 +/- 0.01 and 0.19 +/- 0.01 cm at the proximal and distal anastomoses. At explant, cells of mesenchymal origin (endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, myofibroblasts) were embedded in the extracellular matrix of the graft scaffold. Minimal evidence of cellular inflammatory reaction and no aneurysmal dilatation or thrombus formation was detected. Variable degrees of hyperplasia were present at proximal and distal anastomoses. This preliminary study demonstrates that a collagen-based xenogeneic biomaterial provides a scaffold for cellularization when used for arterial reconstruction in dogs.

  15. Toward a Combined SAGE II-HALOE Aerosol Climatology: An Evaluation of HALOE Version 19 Stratospheric Aerosol Extinction Coefficient Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, L. W.

    2012-01-01

    Herein, the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) aerosol extinction coefficient data is evaluated in the low aerosol loading period after 1996 as the first necessary step in a process that will eventually allow the production of a combined HALOE/SAGE II (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) aerosol climatology of derived aerosol products including surface area density. Based on these analyses, it is demonstrated that HALOE's 3.46 microns is of good quality above 19 km and suitable for scientific applications above that altitude. However, it is increasingly suspect at lower altitudes and should not be used below 17 km under any circumstances after 1996. The 3.40 microns is biased by about 10% throughout the lower stratosphere due to the failure to clear NO2 but otherwise appears to be a high quality product down to 15 km. The 2.45 and 5.26 micron aerosol extinction coefficient measurements are clearly biased and should not be used for scientific applications after the most intense parts of the Pinatubo period. Many of the issues in the aerosol data appear to be related to either the failure to clear some interfering gas species or doing so poorly. For instance, it is clear that the 3.40micronaerosol extinction coefficient measurements can be improved through the inclusion of an NO2 correction and could, in fact, end up as the highest quality overall HALOE aerosol extinction coefficient measurement. It also appears that the 2.45 and 5.26 micron channels may be improved by updating the Upper Atmosphere Pilot Database which is used as a resource for the removal of gas species otherwise not available from direct HALOE measurements. Finally, a simple model to demonstrate the promise of mixed visible/infrared aerosol extinction coefficient ensembles for the retrieval of bulk aerosol properties demonstrates that a combined HALOE/SAGE II aerosol climatology is feasible and may represent a substantial improvement over independently derived data sets.

  16. Dedicated outreach service for hard to reach patients with tuberculosis in London: observational study and economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jit, Mark; Stagg, Helen R; Aldridge, Robert W; White, Peter J; Abubakar, Ibrahim

    2011-09-14

    To assess the cost effectiveness of the Find and Treat service for diagnosing and managing hard to reach individuals with active tuberculosis. Economic evaluation using a discrete, multiple age cohort, compartmental model of treated and untreated cases of active tuberculosis. London, United Kingdom. Population Hard to reach individuals with active pulmonary tuberculosis screened or managed by the Find and Treat service (48 mobile screening unit cases, 188 cases referred for case management support, and 180 cases referred for loss to follow-up), and 252 passively presenting controls from London's enhanced tuberculosis surveillance system. Incremental costs, quality adjusted life years (QALYs), and cost effectiveness ratios for the Find and Treat service. The model estimated that, on average, the Find and Treat service identifies 16 and manages 123 active cases of tuberculosis each year in hard to reach groups in London. The service has a net cost of £1.4 million/year and, under conservative assumptions, gains 220 QALYs. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio was £6400-£10,000/QALY gained (about €7300-€11,000 or $10,000-$16 000 in September 2011). The two Find and Treat components were also cost effective, even in unfavourable scenarios (mobile screening unit (for undiagnosed cases), £18,000-£26,000/QALY gained; case management support team, £4100-£6800/QALY gained). Both the screening and case management components of the Find and Treat service are likely to be cost effective in London. The cost effectiveness of the mobile screening unit in particular could be even greater than estimated, in view of the secondary effects of infection transmission and development of antibiotic resistance.

  17. Evaluation of Crop-Water Consumption Simulation to Support Agricultural Water Resource Management using Satellite-based Water Cycle Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, M.; Bolten, J. D.; Lakshmi, V.

    2016-12-01

    Water scarcity is one of the main factors limiting agricultural development. Numerical models integrated with remote sensing datasets are increasingly being used operationally as inputs for crop water balance models and agricultural forecasting due to increasing availability of high temporal and spatial resolution datasets. However, the model accuracy in simulating soil water content is affected by the accuracy of the soil hydraulic parameters used in the model, which are used in the governing equations. However, soil databases are known to have a high uncertainty across scales. Also, for agricultural sites, the in-situ measurements of soil moisture are currently limited to discrete measurements at specific locations, and such point-based measurements do not represent the spatial distribution at a larger scale accurately, as soil moisture is highly variable both spatially and temporally. The present study utilizes effective soil hydraulic parameters obtained using a 1-km downscaled microwave remote sensing soil moisture product based on the NASA Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) using the genetic algorithm inverse method within the Catchment Land Surface Model (CLSM). Secondly, to provide realistic irrigation estimates for agricultural sites, an irrigation scheme within the land surface model is triggered when the root-zone soil moisture deficit reaches the threshold, 50% with respect to the maximum available water capacity obtained from the effective soil hydraulic parameters. An additional important criterion utilized is the estimation of crop water consumption based on dynamic root growth and uptake in root zone layer. Model performance is evaluated using MODIS land surface temperature (LST) product. The soil moisture estimates for the root zone are also validated with the in situ field data, for three sites (2- irrigated and 1- rainfed) located at the University of Nebraska Agricultural Research and Development Center near Mead, NE and monitored

  18. Bone radioisotope scanning: usefulness in the evaluation and observation of patients with breast cancer in clinical stage II, III, IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano P, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The clinical records of 420 patients with diagnosis of breast cancer well documented by the pathological anatomy in clinical stage II, III and IV were reviewed. In each one of them has been done at least a bone scanning during the diagnosis. In 52 cases carried out sericeous dosages of CA 15-3 and in some cases it was necessary to administer Samarium-153 EDTMP as palliative therapy of bone pain. The presence of secondary gamma-graphic focuses was 0/84 cases (0%) in clinical stage II, 54/265 cases (20%) in III and 41/91 cases (45%) in IV. The one focus appeared in 6.7% of the cases. In 7 of the 52 cases that received sericeous dosages of CA 15-3 were detected secondary osseous lesions, and 5 of them presented a marker elevation. The bone scanning has shown in many cases the presence of getters focuses in singular places of skeleton, urinary excretory system or mammary tissue. The gamma rays from Sm-153 allowed us to get some appropriate basal views post-therapy of the secondary lesions. The results show that the great incidence of secondary lesions in the skeleton occurred in cases of stages III and IV unlike other countries. The serial repetition of the radioisotope scanning. The presence of one focus in the skeleton of a patient with a well-known neoplasia makes us to do a careful evaluation of the focus nature. The presence of tracer accumulation in the kidney, ureter and bladder allows us to infer the pathology of excretory system that is the first evidence of its presence in many cases. (author). 71 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs

  19. A cohort evaluation of clinical use and performance characteristics of Ambu® AuraGain™: A prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devangi A Parikh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Ambu® AuraGain™ (AG (Ambu, Ballerup, Denmark is a supraglottic device which has a design facilitating its use as a conduit for intubation. We designed this prospective observational study to assess the ease of AG placement in paralysed patients, determine its position and alignment to the glottis and assess its utility as a conduit for intubation. Methods: One hundred patients, aged 18–60 years, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I–II, undergoing elective surgery under general anaesthesia were included in the study. The ease and number of attempts for successful insertion, ease of gastric tube insertion, leak pressures, fibre-optic grade of view, number of attempts and time for tracheal intubation, time for AG removal and complications were recorded. The mean, standard deviation (SD, interquartile range (IQR and range were calculated. The upper limit of confidence interval for overall failure rate was calculated using Wilson's score method. Results: AG was successfully inserted in all patients. The mean (SD time taken for insertion was 17.32 (8.48 s. The median [IQR] leak pressures were 24 [20–28] cm of H2O. Optimal laryngeal view for intubation was obtained in 68 patients. Eighty-eight patients could be intubated in the first attempt. Five patients could not be intubated. The overall failure rate of device was 9%. Conclusion: AMBU® AuraGain™ serves as an effective ventilating aid, but caution is suggested before using it as a conduit for endotracheal intubation.

  20. The BErkeley Atmospheric CO2 Observation Network: field calibration and evaluation of low-cost air quality sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinsol; Shusterman, Alexis A.; Lieschke, Kaitlyn J.; Newman, Catherine; Cohen, Ronald C.

    2018-04-01

    The newest generation of air quality sensors is small, low cost, and easy to deploy. These sensors are an attractive option for developing dense observation networks in support of regulatory activities and scientific research. They are also of interest for use by individuals to characterize their home environment and for citizen science. However, these sensors are difficult to interpret. Although some have an approximately linear response to the target analyte, that response may vary with time, temperature, and/or humidity, and the cross-sensitivity to non-target analytes can be large enough to be confounding. Standard approaches to calibration that are sufficient to account for these variations require a quantity of equipment and labor that negates the attractiveness of the sensors' low cost. Here we describe a novel calibration strategy for a set of sensors, including CO, NO, NO2, and O3, that makes use of (1) multiple co-located sensors, (2) a priori knowledge about the chemistry of NO, NO2, and O3, (3) an estimate of mean emission factors for CO, and (4) the global background of CO. The strategy requires one or more well calibrated anchor points within the network domain, but it does not require direct calibration of any of the individual low-cost sensors. The procedure nonetheless accounts for temperature and drift, in both the sensitivity and zero offset. We demonstrate this calibration on a subset of the sensors comprising BEACO2N, a distributed network of approximately 50 sensor nodes, each measuring CO2, CO, NO, NO2, O3 and particulate matter at 10 s time resolution and approximately 2 km spacing within the San Francisco Bay Area.

  1. Toward a combined SAGE II-HALOE aerosol climatology: an evaluation of HALOE version 19 stratospheric aerosol extinction coefficient observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. W. Thomason

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Herein, the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE aerosol extinction coefficient data is evaluated in the low aerosol loading period after 1996 as the first necessary step in a process that will eventually allow the production of a combined HALOE/SAGE II (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment aerosol climatology of derived aerosol products including surface area density. Based on these analyses, it is demonstrated that HALOE's 3.46 μm is of good quality above 19 km and suitable for scientific applications above that altitude. However, it is increasingly suspect at lower altitudes and should not be used below 17 km under any circumstances after 1996. The 3.40 μm is biased by about 10% throughout the lower stratosphere due to the failure to clear NO2 but otherwise appears to be a high quality product down to 15 km. The 2.45 and 5.26 μm aerosol extinction coefficient measurements are clearly biased and should not be used for scientific applications after the most intense parts of the Pinatubo period. Many of the issues in the aerosol data appear to be related to either the failure to clear some interfering gas species or doing so poorly. For instance, it is clear that the 3.40 μm aerosol extinction coefficient measurements can be improved through the inclusion of an NO2 correction and could, in fact, end up as the highest quality overall HALOE aerosol extinction coefficient measurement. It also appears that the 2.45 and 5.26 μm channels may be improved by updating the Upper Atmosphere Pilot Database which is used as a resource for the removal of gas species otherwise not available from direct HALOE measurements. Finally, a simple model to demonstrate the promise of mixed visible/infrared aerosol extinction coefficient ensembles for the retrieval of bulk aerosol properties demonstrates that a combined HALOE/SAGE II aerosol climatology is feasible and may represent a substantial improvement over independently derived

  2. Surface geochemical data evaluation and integration with geophysical observations for hydrocarbon prospecting, Tapti graben, Deccan Syneclise, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Satish Kumar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Deccan Syneclise is considered to have significant hydrocarbon potential. However, significant hydrocarbon discoveries, particularly for Mesozoic sequences, have not been established through conventional exploration due to the thick basalt cover over Mesozoic sedimentary rocks. In this study, near-surface geochemical data are used to understand the petroleum system and also investigate type of source for hydrocarbons generation of the study area. Soil samples were collected from favorable areas identified by integrated geophysical studies. The compositional and isotopic signatures of adsorbed gaseous hydrocarbons (methane through butane were used as surface indicators of petroleum micro-seepages. An analysis of 75 near-surface soil-gas samples was carried out for light hydrocarbons (C1–C4 and their carbon isotopes from the western part of Tapti graben, Deccan Syneclise, India. The geochemical results reveal sites or clusters of sites containing anomalously high concentrations of light hydrocarbon gases. High concentrations of adsorbed thermogenic methane (C1 = 518 ppb and ethane plus higher hydrocarbons (ΣC2+ = 977 ppb were observed. Statistical analysis shows that samples from 13% of the samples contain anomalously high concentrations of light hydrocarbons in the soil-gas constituents. This seepage suggests largest magnitude of soil gas anomalies might be generated/source from Mesozoic sedimentary rocks, beneath Deccan Traps. The carbon isotopic composition of methane, ethane and propane ranges are from −22.5‰ to −30.2‰ PDB, −18.0‰ to 27.1‰ PDB and 16.9‰–32.1‰ PDB respectively, which are in thermogenic source. Surface soil sample represents the intersection of a migration conduit from the deep subsurface to the surface connected to sub-trappean Mesozoic sedimentary rocks. Prominent hydrocarbon concentrations were associated with dykes, lineaments and presented on thinner basaltic cover in the study area

  3. Using ARM Observations to Evaluate Climate Model Simulations of Land-Atmosphere Coupling on the U.S. Southern Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Thomas J.; Klein, Stephen A.; Ma, Hsi-Yen; Tang, Qi; Xie, Shaocheng; Williams, Ian N.; Santanello, Joseph A.; Cook, David R.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2017-11-01

    Several independent measurements of warm-season soil moisture and surface atmospheric variables recorded at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) research facility are used to estimate the terrestrial component of land-atmosphere coupling (LAC) strength and its regional uncertainty. The observations reveal substantial variation in coupling strength, as estimated from three soil moisture measurements at a single site, as well as across six other sites having varied soil and land cover types. The observational estimates then serve as references for evaluating SGP terrestrial coupling strength in the Community Atmospheric Model coupled to the Community Land Model. These coupled model components are operated in both a free-running mode and in a controlled configuration, where the atmospheric and land states are reinitialized daily, so that they do not drift very far from observations. Although the controlled simulation deviates less from the observed surface climate than its free-running counterpart, the terrestrial LAC in both configurations is much stronger and displays less spatial variability than the SGP observational estimates. Preliminary investigation of vegetation leaf area index (LAI) substituted for soil moisture suggests that the overly strong coupling between model soil moisture and surface atmospheric variables is associated with too much evaporation from bare ground and too little from the vegetation cover. These results imply that model surface characteristics such as LAI, as well as the physical parameterizations involved in the coupling of the land and atmospheric components, are likely to be important sources of the problematical LAC behaviors.

  4. The BErkeley Atmospheric CO2 Observation Network: design, calibration, and initial evaluation of a high-density CO2 surface network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shusterman, A.; Teige, V.; Turner, A. J.; Newman, C.; Kim, J.; Cohen, R. C.

    2016-12-01

    Conventionally, ground-based carbon dioxide monitoring efforts rely on a small handful of costly instruments scattered thinly across large domains. While well characterizing total integrated emissions originating from a given metropolitan area, such approaches are ill suited to resolve the heterogeneous patterns of urban CO2 sources occurring within the domain, despite the fact that these sources are often regulated individually and independently of the regional total. To better observe said heterogeneities, we present the BErkeley Atmospheric CO2 Observation Network (BEACO2N), an ensemble of 28 moderate-cost CO2 and air quality sensing "nodes" distributed across and around the city of Oakland, California at 2 km intervals, constituting what is, to our knowledge, the highest density CO2 monitoring network to date. We evaluate the network on the basis of four performance parameters (cost, reliability, precision, and bias) and derive various post hoc mathematical treatments to compensate for the deleterious effects of meteorological variability, temporal drift, and uncharacterized atemporal biases on the sensor data. We find our approach to dependably provide observations of sufficient quality to faithfully represent intra-city phenomena while nonetheless remaining cost-competitive with sparser networks of more expensive instruments. Furthermore, preliminary analyses of the first three years of observations reveal small scale variability in CO2 concentrations that cannot be accurately captured by current mesoscale modeling techniques, reinforcing the importance of such high resolution top-down observational methodologies to our understanding of urban CO2 on the actual scales of emission and regulation.

  5. Assessments of thermal antinociceptive effects of butorphanol and human observer effect on quantitative evaluation of analgesia in green iguanas (Iguana iguana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Gregory J; Robertson, Sheilah A

    2012-10-01

    To determine whether butorphanol induces thermal antinociception in green iguanas (Iguana iguana) and assess the human observer effect on quantitative evaluation of butorphanol-induced analgesia. 6 juvenile green iguanas. Skin temperature was recorded, and then a direct increasing heat stimulus was applied to the lateral aspect of the tail base of each iguana. Temperature of the stimulus at which the iguana responded (thermal threshold) was measured before and for 8 hours after IM injection of either butorphanol tartrate (1.0 mg/kg) or an equal volume of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution. Six experiments (butorphanol [n = 3] and saline solution [3]) were conducted with the observer in the iguanas' field of vision, and 11 experiments (butorphanol [n = 5] and saline solution [6]) were conducted with the observer hidden from their view. The interval between treatments or tests was ≥ 1 month. Temperature difference between thermal threshold and skin temperature when iguanas were administered saline solution did not differ from temperature difference when iguanas were administered butorphanol regardless of whether the observer was or was not visible. Temperature difference between thermal threshold and skin temperature was significantly lower when iguanas were tested without the observer in visual range, compared with the findings obtained when iguanas were tested with an observer in view, at multiple times after either treatment. Intramuscular administration of 1.0 mg of butorphanol/kg did not induce thermal antinociception in juvenile green iguanas. The visible presence of an observer appeared to influence the results of noxious stimulus testing in this reptile species.

  6. Visions of technology: : Big data lessons understood by EU policy makers in their review of the legal frameworks on intellectual property rights, access to and re-use of PSI and the protection of personal data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammerant, Hans; de Hert, Paul; Gutwirth, Serge; Leenes, Ronald; De Hert, Paul

    2016-01-01

    This article’s focus is on how the advent of big data technology and practices has been understood and addressed by policy makers in the EU. We start with a reflection on of how big data affects business processes and how it con- tributes to the creation of a data economy. Then we look at EU policy

  7. Prospective observational study to evaluate NOTSS (Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons) for assessing trainees' non-technical performance in the operating theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, J; Marriott, J; Purdie, H; Beard, J D

    2011-07-01

    Most surgical assessment has been aimed at technical proficiency. However, non-technical skills also affect patient safety and clinical effectiveness. The NOTSS (Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons) assessment instrument was developed specifically to assess the non-technical skills of individual surgeons in the operating theatre. This study evaluated NOTSS as a real-world assessment, with a mix of minimally trained assessors. The evaluation criteria were feasibility, validity and psychometric reliability. In a standard evaluation of NOTSS, 56 anaesthetists, 39 scrub nurses, two surgical care practitioners and three independent assessors provided 715 assessments of 404 surgical cases of 15 index procedures across six specialties performed by 85 surgical trainees. The assessment was feasible, but important implementation challenges were highlighted. Most respondents considered the method valid, but with reservations about assessing cognition. The factor structure of scores, and their positive relationships with other measures of experience and performance, supported validity. Trainees' non-technical skill scores were relatively procedure-independent and achieved good reliability (generalizability coefficient 0·8 or more) when six to eight assessors observed one case each. Minimally trained assessors, who are typically present in operating theatres, were sufficiently discriminating and consistent in their judgements of trainee surgeons' non-technical skills to provide reliable scores based on an achievable number of observations. Copyright © 2011 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. The inter-observer reading variability in anti-nuclear antibodies indirect (ANA) immunofluorescence test: A multicenter evaluation and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigon, A; Infantino, M; Merone, M; Iannello, G; Tincani, A; Cavazzana, I; Carabellese, N; Radice, A; Manfredi, M; Soda, P; Afeltra, A

    2017-12-01

    Recently there has been an increase demand for Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) tools to support clinicians in the field of Indirect ImmunoFluorescence (IIF), as the novel digital imaging reading approach can help to overcome the reader subjectivity. Nevertheless, a large multicenter evaluation of the inter-observer reading variability in this field is still missing. This work fills this gap as we evaluated 556 consecutive samples, for a total of 1679 images, collected in three laboratories with IIF expertise using HEp-2 cell substrate (MBL) at 1:80 screening dilution according to conventional procedures. In each laboratory, the images were blindly classified by two experts into three intensity classes: positive, negative, and weak positive. Positive and weak positive ANA-IIF results were categorized by the predominant fluorescence pattern among six main classes. Data were pairwise analyzed and the inter-observer reading variability was measured by Cohen's kappa test, revealing a pairwise agreement little further away than substantial both for fluorescence intensity and for staining pattern recognition (k=0.602 and k=0.627, respectively). We also noticed that the inter-observer reading variability decreases when it is measured with respect to a gold standard classification computed on the basis of labels assigned by the three laboratories. These data show that laboratory agreement improves using digital images and comparing each single human evaluation to potential reference data, suggesting that a solid gold standard is essential to properly make use of CAD systems in routine work lab. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of NO2 predictions by the plume volume molar ratio method (PVMRM) and ozone limiting method (OLM) in AERMOD using new field observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrick, Elizabeth M; Tino, Vincent R; Hanna, Steven R; Egan, Bruce A

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) plume volume molar ratio method (PVMRM) and the ozone limiting method (OLM) are in the AERMOD model to predict the 1-hr average NO2/NO(x) concentration ratio. These ratios are multiplied by the AERMOD predicted NO(x) concentration to predict the 1-hr average NO2 concentration. This paper first briefly reviews PVMRM and OLM and points out some scientific parameterizations that could be improved (such as specification of relative dispersion coefficients) and then discusses an evaluation of the PVMRM and OLM methods as implemented in AERMOD using a new data set. While AERMOD has undergone many model evaluation studies in its default mode, PVMRM and OLM are nondefault options, and to date only three NO2 field data sets have been used in their evaluations. Here AERMOD/PVMRM and AERMOD/OLM codes are evaluated with a new data set from a northern Alaskan village with a small power plant. Hourly pollutant concentrations (NO, NO2, ozone) as well as meteorological variables were measured at a single monitor 500 m from the plant. Power plant operating parameters and emissions were calculated based on hourly operator logs. Hourly observations covering 1 yr were considered, but the evaluations only used hours when the wind was in a 60 degrees sector including the monitor and when concentrations were above a threshold. PVMRM is found to have little bias in predictions of the C(NO2)/C(NO(x)) ratio, which mostly ranged from 0.2 to 0.4 at this site. OLM overpredicted the ratio. AERMOD overpredicts the maximum NO(x) concentration but has an underprediction bias for lower concentrations. AERMOD/PVMRM overpredicts the maximum C(NO2) by about 50%, while AERMOD/OLM overpredicts by a factor of 2. For 381 hours evaluated, there is a relative mean bias in C(NO2) predictions of near zero for AERMOD/PVMRM, while the relative mean bias reflects a factor of 2 overprediction for AERMOD/OLM. This study was initiated because the new stringent 1-hr NO2

  10. The evaluation of a framework for measuring the non-technical ward round skills of final year nursing students: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Kara; McKenzie, Karen; Kelleher, Michael

    2016-10-01

    The importance of non-technical skills (NTS) to patient outcomes is increasingly being recognised, however, there is limited research into how such skills can be taught and evaluated in student nurses in relation toward rounds. This pilot study describes an evaluation of a NTS framework that could potentially be used to measure ward round skills of student nurses. The study used an observational design. Potential key NTS were identified from existing literature and NTS taxonomies. The proposed framework was then used to evaluate whether the identified NTS were evident in a series of ward round simulations that final year general nursing students undertook as part of their training. Finally, the views of a small group of qualified nurse educators, qualified nurses and general nursing students were sought about whether the identified NTS were important and relevant to practice. The proposed NTS framework included seven categories: Communication, Decision Making, Situational Awareness, Teamwork and Task Management, Student Initiative and Responsiveness to Patient. All were rated as important and relevant to practice. The pilot study suggests that the proposed NTS framework could be used as a means of evaluating student nurse competencies in respect of many non-technical skills required for a successful ward round. Further work is required to establish the validity of the framework in educational settings and to determine the extent to which it is of use in a non-simulated ward round setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Observed vs expected mortality in the emergency service of a general hospital. Evaluation by the APACHE II and multiple organ failure classification systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrales-Vargas, N; Laniado-Laborín, R

    1995-01-01

    Problem that originated the investigation: It was not known if the observed mortality in the Emergency room of the Tijuana General Hospital was lower, equal or higher, than the expected mortality. 1) Evaluate in a prospective fashion the mortality rate in that hospital service, and then compare that rate with an expected mortality rate proposed in the literature (Role). 2) Determine the prognostic value in our hospital of the Multiple Organ Failure classification system (MOF). The Multiple Organ Failure classification system showed in our study an excellent predicting capacity for mortality.

  12. Aespoe HRL - Geoscientific evaluation 1997/4. Results from pre-investigation and detailed site characterization. Comparison of predictions and observations. Hydrogeology, groundwater chemistry and transport of solutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhen, I.; Gustafson, Gunnar; Wikberg, P.

    1997-06-01

    The pre-investigations for the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory were started in 1986 and involved extensive field measurements, aimed at characterizing the rock formations with regard to geology, hydrogeology, hydrochemistry and rock mechanics. Prior to the excavation in 1990 predictions were made for the excavation phase concerning: geology, ground water flow and chemistry, transport of solutes and mechanical stability. This report presents a comparison between these predictions and the observations made during the excavation. Also, investigation methods for the 700-2874 m sections of the tunnel are evaluated

  13. Neurotic and Environmental Sources of Psychotherapist Resistance to Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Atta, Ralph

    Observation of the treatment process and outcomes research may interfere with self-gratifications and may shatter illusions about a therapist's omnipotence. Consequently, research and evaluation must be understood to threaten, inherently, personal need gratification of therapists. The author discusses several reality-based therapist objections to…

  14. Evaluation of a randomized controlled trial in the management of chronic lower back pain in a French automotive industry: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassif, Hala; Brosset, Nicolas; Guillaume, Marion; Delore-Milles, Emilie; Tafflet, Muriel; Buchholz, Frédéric; Toussaint, Jean-François

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate a specific workplace intervention for the management of chronic lower back pain among employees working in assembly positions in the automotive industry. Randomized controlled trial. On site at the workplace of a French automotive manufacturer. Subjects (N=75 volunteers) were recruited on site and randomly assigned to either an experimental group (n=37) or a control group (n=38). The experimental group followed a supervised 60-minute session, 3 times per week, of muscle strengthening, flexibility, and endurance training during 2 months. The control group received no direct intervention. Evaluation took place at baseline, 2 months, and 6 months. Pain related parameters were evaluated using validated questionnaires and scales translated into French (Quebec Back Pain Disability Scale, Rolan Morris Disability Questionnaire, Dallas Pain Questionnaire, and the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia). Perceived pain intensity was evaluated using the numerical rating scale, and physical outcome measures were evaluated using specific indicators (flexibility, Biering-Sorensen Test, Shirado test). The multivariate analysis of variance, t test, and Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used for statistical analysis. We observed a significant beneficial effect (P<.025) for the experimental group at 2 and 6 months in pain parameters, specific flexibility, and in back functions, and a significant improvement at 6 months in the control group for the perceived pain intensity, anterior flexion, flexibility of quadriceps, and Dallas Pain Questionnaire's work recreational score. An increase in the practice of physical activity outside the workplace was noted in both groups at 2 months but persisted at 6 months for the experimental group. This study reinforces the multiple health benefits of physical activity and physical therapy modalities in the workplace by assisting individuals at risk who have chronic LBP. Copyright © 2011 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by

  15. An observational study evaluating tacrolimus dose, exposure, and medication adherence after conversion from twice- to once-daily tacrolimus in liver and kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäckman, Lars; Persson, Carl-Axel

    2014-03-17

    Immunosuppression regimens in transplantation medicine are complex. Drugs with extended release action have simplified medication dosing without affecting efficacy. This prospective, observational, multicenter study, conducted in a routine medical practice setting, evaluated changes in tacrolimus daily dose and trough levels and patient-reported medication adherence at day 90 after 1:1 (mg: mg) conversion to once-daily tacrolimus in adult liver and kidney transplant recipients. Data from 224 recipients of a liver (n=19) or kidney (n=205) transplant, average age 51±14.5 years, were evaluated. The mean change in tacrolimus daily dose was +0.04 mg/day. Dose remained stable after conversion in 62.5%, was lower in 15.6%, and higher in 22% of patients. Trough level after conversion was lower in 62.6% and higher in 36.5%; generally, levels were 12.8% lower than pre-conversion levels. No acute rejection, graft loss, or serious safety events were observed. Two deaths occurred due to myocardial infarction. Conversion helped 19% to less frequently forget medications and 55% reported no difference in remembering to take the once-daily dose after conversion. The change in dosing frequency was identified as "better" for 55%. Tacrolimus daily dose remained stable while trough levels were significantly lower after conversion to once-daily dosing. Safety and efficacy were maintained; reduced dosing frequency had no apparent influence on patient-reported medication adherence.

  16. Seasonal changes in the tropospheric carbon monoxide profile over the remote Southern Hemisphere evaluated using multi-model simulations and aircraft observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Fisher

    2015-03-01

    Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO, together with model output from the SH Model Intercomparison Project, to elucidate the drivers of CO vertical structure in the remote SH. Observed CO vertical profiles from Cape Grim are remarkably consistent with those observed over the southern mid-latitudes Pacific 10–20 years later, despite major differences in time periods, flight locations, and sampling strategies between the two data sets. These similarities suggest the processes driving observed vertical gradients are coherent across much of the remote SH and have not changed significantly over the past 2 decades. Model ability to simulate CO profiles reflects the interplay between biogenic emission sources, the chemical mechanisms that drive CO production from these sources, and the transport that redistributes this CO throughout the SH. The four chemistry-climate and chemical transport models included in the intercomparison show large variability in their abilities to reproduce the observed CO profiles. In particular, two of the four models significantly underestimate vertical gradients in austral summer and autumn, which we find are driven by long-range transport of CO produced from oxidation of biogenic compounds. Comparisons between the models show that more complex chemical mechanisms do not necessarily provide more accurate simulation of CO vertical gradients due to the convolved impacts of emissions, chemistry, and transport. Our results imply a large sensitivity of the remote SH troposphere to biogenic emissions and chemistry, both of which remain key uncertainties in global modeling. We suggest that the CO vertical gradient can be used as a metric for future model evaluation as it provides a sensitive test of the processes that define the chemical state of the background atmosphere.

  17. Evaluation of AirMSPI photopolarimetric retrievals of smoke properties with in-situ observations collected during the ImPACT-PM field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalashnikova, O. V.; Garay, M. J.; Xu, F.; Seidel, F.; Diner, D. J.; Seinfeld, J.; Bates, K. H.; Kong, W.; Kenseth, C.; Cappa, C. D.

    2017-12-01

    We introduce and evaluate an approach for obtaining closure between in situ and polarimetric remote sensing observations of smoke properties obtained during the collocated CIRPAS Twin Otter and ER-2 aircraft measurements of the Lebec fire event on July 8, 2016. We investigate the utility of multi-angle, spectropolarimetric remote sensing imagery to evaluate the relative contribution of organics, non-organic and black carbon particles to smoke particulate composition. The remote sensing data were collected during the Imaging Polarimetric and Characterization of Tropospheric Particular Matter (ImPACT-PM) field campaign by the Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI), which flew on NASA's high-altitude ER-2 aircraft. The ImPACT-PM field campaign was a joint JPL/Caltech effort to combine measurements from the Terra Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), AirMSPI, in situ airborne measurements, and a chemical transport model to validate remote sensing retrievals of different types of airborne particulate matter with a particular emphasis on carbonaceous aerosols. The in-situ aerosol data were collected with a suite of Caltech instruments on board the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft and included the Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS), the Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA), and the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP-2). The CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft was also equipped with the Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP), nephelometer, a particle counter, and meteorological sensors. We found that the multi-angle polarimetric observations are capable of fire particulate emission monitoring by particle type as inferred from the in-situ airborne measurements. Modeling of retrieval sensitivities show that the characterization of black carbon is the most challenging. The work aims at evaluating multi-angle, spectropolarimetric capabilities for particulate matter characterization in support of the Multi-Angle Imager for Aerosols (MAIA) satellite investigation

  18. [Evaluation of effect of indacaterol (Onbrez) and/or glycopyrronium (Seebri) treatment on Quality of Life of COPD patients in medical practice in Poland - observational study (OSQO)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płusa, Tadeusz; Physicians From Medical Centers In Poland, Group Of

    2017-10-23

    Indacaterol, as well glycopyronium has been reimbursed lately in Poland, so patients have a greater access to this treatment in medical practice. Physicians do not realize the potential benefit of once daily ultra-LABA indacaterol and/or modern LAMA with fast-acting glycopyrronium on treatment results. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of routinely administered treatment with either indacaterol (Onbrez) or glycopyrronium (Seebri) or both on patient reported outcomes in form of the health status (CCQ score - clinical COPD questionnaire) and level of dyspnoea (mMRC - modified Medical Research Council) in treatment naive COPD patients after the change of treatment as addon from any other COPD treatment in "real life" settings. This study was designed as an observational, non-interventional and multicenter project in COPD patients being treated with Onbrez and/or Seebri in 32 medical centers in Poland. The observation period covered 6 months from the first taking of Onbrez and/or Seebri. No diagnostic or monitoring or treatment procedures have been applied to the patients, other than those which are applied in the course of standard, current practice. The total number of enrolled patients was 633. Because of inability of verification the medical records or failure to meet data collection requirements 587 patients enrolled to the registry has been evaluated. Within this number of patients 171 had delayed the time of visits or they had not second visit. Due to therapy change additional 20 patients has been withdrawn. 396 patients were taken for the final analysis. Improvement of mMRC and CCQ scores was observed in all treatment groups e.g. indacaterol solely, glycopyrronium solely and combination therapy of indacaterol and glypyrronium. The study revealed that the best results can be achieved with combination therapy accordingly with clinical recommendation for COPD treatment (GOLD). The results have been achieved in the real world settings, showing that

  19. A Pilot Study Evaluating the Effectiveness of Platelet-Rich Plasma Therapy for Treating Degenerative Tendinopathies: A Randomized Control Trial with Synchronous Observational Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marni Wesner

    Full Text Available This pilot study aimed to inform future research evaluating the effectiveness of Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP injection for tendinopathy.Randomized control trial (RCT and synchronous observational cohort studies. For the RCT, consecutive consenting patients treated at an academic sports medicine clinic were randomly assigned to either a PRP or placebo control group.The Glen Sather Sport Medicine Clinic, Edmonton, Canada.The RCT included 9 participants with rotator cuff tendinopathy. The cohort study included 178 participants with a variety of tendinopathies.Patients receiving PRP were injected with 4 ml of platelets into the supraspinatus and/or infraspinatus, while patients in the placebo group were injected with 4 ml of saline. All participants undertook a 3-month standardized, home-based, daily exercise program.Participants in the RCT were re-evaluated 3, and 6 months post-injection. Change scores before and after injection on pain, disability and MRI-documented pathology outcomes were compared. In the cohort study, pain and disability were measured at 1, 2 and 3 months post-injection.For the RCT, 7 participants received PRP and 2 received placebo injections. Patients receiving PRP reported clinically important improvements in pain (>1.5/10 on VAS, disability (>15 point DASH change, and tendon pathology while those receiving placebo injections did not. In the observational cohort, statistically and clinically significant improvements in pain and disability were observed.This pilot study provides information for planning future studies of PRP effectiveness. Preliminary results indicate intratendinous, ultrasound-guided PRP injection may lead to improvements in pain, function, and MRI-documented tendon pathology.Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN68341698.

  20. Evaluation of the channelized Hotelling observer with an internal-noise model in a train-test paradigm for cardiac SPECT defect detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brankov, Jovan G

    2013-01-01

    The channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) has become a widely used approach for evaluating medical image quality, acting as a surrogate for human observers in early-stage research on assessment and optimization of imaging devices and algorithms. The CHO is typically used to measure lesion detectability. Its popularity stems from experiments showing that the CHO's detection performance can correlate well with that of human observers. In some cases, CHO performance overestimates human performance; to counteract this effect, an internal-noise model is introduced, which allows the CHO to be tuned to match human-observer performance. Typically, this tuning is achieved using example data obtained from human observers. We argue that this internal-noise tuning step is essentially a model training exercise; therefore, just as in supervised learning, it is essential to test the CHO with an internal-noise model on a set of data that is distinct from that used to tune (train) the model. Furthermore, we argue that, if the CHO is to provide useful insights about new imaging algorithms or devices, the test data should reflect such potential differences from the training data; it is not sufficient simply to use new noise realizations of the same imaging method. Motivated by these considerations, the novelty of this paper is the use of new model selection criteria to evaluate ten established internal-noise models, utilizing four different channel models, in a train-test approach. Though not the focus of the paper, a new internal-noise model is also proposed that outperformed the ten established models in the cases tested. The results, using cardiac perfusion SPECT data, show that the proposed train-test approach is necessary, as judged by the newly proposed model selection criteria, to avoid spurious conclusions. The results also demonstrate that, in some models, the optimal internal-noise parameter is very sensitive to the choice of training data; therefore, these models are prone

  1. Designing Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (DOPS Test for Selective Skills of Orthopedic Residents and Evaluating Its Effects from Their Points of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolghasem Amini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (DOPS is a valuable method to evaluate procedural skills. The aim of this study was to develop a DOPS test for assessment of first- and second-year orthopedic residents and evaluate its effects on their learning. Methods: Seven residents and nine faculty members of the orthopedic department of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences participated in this study. A questionnaire containing twelve closed and four open questions was used for assessment. The acquired data were analyzed by descriptive statistics (frequency, percent, mean and standard deviation. Results: The results showed that residents’ performances were almost good (mean of good performances = 50.6%, the participants’ performances increased in the second stage (from 50.6% to 59.4% but this increasing performance decreased in the third stage (from 59.4% to 39%. Most faculty members and residents believed that DOPS tests can have an effective role in facilitating students’ learning and also can help them to succeed in their final test. Some of the residents believed that DOPS tests decrease their stress in the final exam. Promoting students’ procedural skills and independent learning are the pros and a stressful test experience is the con of this study. Conclusion: According to results of this study, DOPS tests had an effective role in facilitating students’ learning and skills. Test repetition for the second time is sufficient and useful for evaluating residents’ clinical and instrumental skills.

  2. Preliminary Evaluation of Influence of Aerosols on the Simulation of Brightness Temperature in the NASA's Goddard Earth Observing System Atmospheric Data Assimilation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong; Akella, Santha; da Silva, Arlindo M.; Todling, Ricardo; McCarty, William

    2018-01-01

    This document reports on preliminary results obtained when studying the impact of aerosols on the calculation of brightness temperature (BT) for satellite infrared (IR) instruments that are currently assimilated in a 3DVAR configuration of Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS)-atmospheric data assimilation system (ADAS). A set of fifteen aerosol species simulated by the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model is used to evaluate the influence of the aerosol fields on the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) calculations taking place in the observation operators of the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) analysis system of GEOSADAS. Results indicate that taking aerosols into account in the BT calculation improves the fit to observations over regions with significant amounts of dust. The cooling effect obtained with the aerosol-affected BT leads to a slight warming of the analyzed surface temperature (by about 0:5oK) in the tropical Atlantic ocean (off northwest Africa), whereas the effect on the air temperature aloft is negligible. In addition, this study identifies a few technical issues to be addressed in future work if aerosol-affected BT are to be implemented in reanalysis and operational settings. The computational cost of applying CRTM aerosol absorption and scattering options is too high to justify their use, given the size of the benefits obtained. Furthermore, the differentiation between clouds and aerosols in GSI cloud detection procedures needs satisfactory revision.

  3. [Evaluation of the interdependence between homocystein and folic acid levels in patients after kidney transplantation during a 2 year observation period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janda, Katarzyna; Aksamit, Dariusz; Krzanowski, Marcin; Kuzniewski, Marek; Sułowicz, Władysław

    2013-01-01

    Patients on maintenance dialysis have increased heomocystein (Hcy) serum levels. The aim of the study was to evaluate the interdependence between Hcy and folic acid (FA) levels in renal transplant patients (pts) at various time periods during a two year observation period after kidney transplantation (Ktx). The study included 51 pts (17 F, 34 M) aged 15-62 years (median 38.1) after deceased donors Ktx. Before Ktx, 46 pts were treated with maintenance hemodialysis (HD), while 5 by peritoneal dialysis (PD). The mean observation period equaled 21.2 months (6-24 months); while total observation period was 90 person/years. Hcy level was measured using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). FA level was measured using chemiluminesence method (standard methods) using the Immulite 2000 analyzer. Patients blood was drawn before Ktx and 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21 and 24 months after procedure. An increased Hcy level (>15 micromol/l) - mean 28.5 +/- 17.8 micromol/l (range from 10.2 micromol/l to 116.8 micromol/I) was noted in the blood of 44 pts before Ktx (86.3% of the examined population). In 31 pts after Ktx (60.8% of the examined population), mean Hcy level remained increased above 15 micromol/I (mean Hcy - 19.2 +/- 5.8 micromol/I). A negative correlation was found between the levels of Hcy and FA directly before Ktx (R= -0.28, p15 micromol/l (36.4 ng/ml vs. 62.5 ng/ml). Statistically significant decrease of Hcy concentration was observed after Ktx as compare with values before procedure, however not reached normal values. Significant decrease of FA concentration after Ktx is most likely associated with the discontinuation of FA supplementation, as well as due to the restoration of the erythropoietic line.

  4. An Evaluation of Marine Boundary Layer Cloud Property Simulations in the Community Atmosphere Model Using Satellite Observations: Conventional Subgrid Parameterization versus CLUBB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hua [Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland; Zhang, Zhibo [Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology, and Physics Department, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland; Ma, Po-Lun [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Ghan, Steven J. [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Wang, Minghuai [Institute for Climate and Global Change Research, and School of Atmospheric Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing, China

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents a two-step evaluation of the marine boundary layer (MBL) cloud properties from two Community Atmospheric Model (version 5.3, CAM5) simulations, one based on the CAM5 standard parameterization schemes (CAM5-Base), and the other on the Cloud Layers Unified By Binormals (CLUBB) scheme (CAM5-CLUBB). In the first step, we compare the cloud properties directly from model outputs between the two simulations. We find that the CAM5-CLUBB run produces more MBL clouds in the tropical and subtropical large-scale descending regions. Moreover, the stratocumulus (Sc) to cumulus (Cu) cloud regime transition is much smoother in CAM5-CLUBB than in CAM5-Base. In addition, in CAM5-Base we find some grid cells with very small low cloud fraction (<20%) to have very high in-cloud water content (mixing ratio up to 400mg/kg). We find no such grid cells in the CAM5-CLUBB run. However, we also note that both simulations, especially CAM5-CLUBB, produce a significant amount of “empty” low cloud cells with significant cloud fraction (up to 70%) and near-zero in-cloud water content. In the second step, we use satellite observations from CERES, MODIS and CloudSat to evaluate the simulated MBL cloud properties by employing the COSP satellite simulators. We note that a feature of the COSP-MODIS simulator to mimic the minimum detection threshold of MODIS cloud masking removes much more low clouds from CAM5-CLUBB than it does from CAM5-Base. This leads to a surprising result — in the large-scale descending regions CAM5-CLUBB has a smaller COSP-MODIS cloud fraction and weaker shortwave cloud radiative forcing than CAM5-Base. A sensitivity study suggests that this is because CAM5-CLUBB suffers more from the above-mentioned “empty” clouds issue than CAM5-Base. The COSP-MODIS cloud droplet effective radius in CAM5-CLUBB shows a spatial increase from coastal St toward Cu, which is in qualitative agreement with MODIS observations. In contrast, COSP-MODIS cloud droplet

  5. Analysis and evaluation of WRF microphysical schemes for deep moist convection over south-eastern South America (SESA using microwave satellite observations and radiative transfer simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Galligani

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, three meteorological events of extreme deep moist convection, characteristic of south-eastern South America, are considered to conduct a systematic evaluation of the microphysical parameterizations available in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model by undertaking a direct comparison between satellite-based simulated and observed microwave radiances. A research radiative transfer model, the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS, is coupled with the WRF model under three different microphysical parameterizations (WSM6, WDM6 and Thompson schemes. Microwave radiometry has shown a promising ability in the characterization of frozen hydrometeors. At high microwave frequencies, however, frozen hydrometeors significantly scatter radiation, and the relationship between radiation and hydrometeor populations becomes very complex. The main difficulty in microwave remote sensing of frozen hydrometeor characterization is correctly characterizing this scattering signal due to the complex and variable nature of the size, composition and shape of frozen hydrometeors. The present study further aims at improving the understanding of frozen hydrometeor optical properties characteristic of deep moist convection events in south-eastern South America. In the present study, bulk optical properties are computed by integrating the single-scattering properties of the Liu(2008 discrete dipole approximation (DDA single-scattering database across the particle size distributions parameterized by the different WRF schemes in a consistent manner, introducing the equal mass approach. The equal mass approach consists of describing the optical properties of the WRF snow and graupel hydrometeors with the optical properties of habits in the DDA database whose dimensions might be different (Dmax′ but whose mass is conserved. The performance of the radiative transfer simulations is evaluated by comparing the simulations with the available

  6. Analysis and evaluation of WRF microphysical schemes for deep moist convection over south-eastern South America (SESA) using microwave satellite observations and radiative transfer simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sol Galligani, Victoria; Wang, Die; Alvarez Imaz, Milagros; Salio, Paola; Prigent, Catherine

    2017-10-01

    In the present study, three meteorological events of extreme deep moist convection, characteristic of south-eastern South America, are considered to conduct a systematic evaluation of the microphysical parameterizations available in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model by undertaking a direct comparison between satellite-based simulated and observed microwave radiances. A research radiative transfer model, the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS), is coupled with the WRF model under three different microphysical parameterizations (WSM6, WDM6 and Thompson schemes). Microwave radiometry has shown a promising ability in the characterization of frozen hydrometeors. At high microwave frequencies, however, frozen hydrometeors significantly scatter radiation, and the relationship between radiation and hydrometeor populations becomes very complex. The main difficulty in microwave remote sensing of frozen hydrometeor characterization is correctly characterizing this scattering signal due to the complex and variable nature of the size, composition and shape of frozen hydrometeors. The present study further aims at improving the understanding of frozen hydrometeor optical properties characteristic of deep moist convection events in south-eastern South America. In the present study, bulk optical properties are computed by integrating the single-scattering properties of the Liu(2008) discrete dipole approximation (DDA) single-scattering database across the particle size distributions parameterized by the different WRF schemes in a consistent manner, introducing the equal mass approach. The equal mass approach consists of describing the optical properties of the WRF snow and graupel hydrometeors with the optical properties of habits in the DDA database whose dimensions might be different (Dmax') but whose mass is conserved. The performance of the radiative transfer simulations is evaluated by comparing the simulations with the available coincident

  7. Non-technical skills evaluation in the critical care air ambulance environment: introduction of an adapted rating instrument--an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Julia A; Powell, David M C; Psirides, Alex; Hathaway, Karyn; Aldington, Sarah; Haney, Michael F

    2016-03-08

    In the isolated and dynamic health-care setting of critical care air ambulance transport, the quality of clinical care is strongly influenced by non-technical skills such as anticipating, recognising and understanding, decision making, and teamwork. However there are no published reports identifying or applying a non-technical skills framework specific to an intensive care air ambulance setting. The objective of this study was to adapt and evaluate a non-technical skills rating framework for the air ambulance clinical environment. In the first phase of the project the anaesthetists' non-technical skills (ANTS) framework was adapted to the air ambulance setting, using data collected directly from clinician groups, published literature, and field observation. In the second phase experienced and inexperienced inter-hospital transport clinicians completed a simulated critical care air transport scenario, and their non-technical skills performance was independently rated by two blinded assessors. Observed and self-rated general clinical performance ratings were also collected. Rank-based statistical tests were used to examine differences in the performance of experienced and inexperienced clinicians, and relationships between different assessment approaches and assessors. The framework developed during phase one was referred to as an aeromedical non-technical skills framework, or AeroNOTS. During phase two 16 physicians from speciality training programmes in intensive care, emergency medicine and anaesthesia took part in the clinical simulation study. Clinicians with inter-hospital transport experience performed more highly than those without experience, according to both AeroNOTS non-technical skills ratings (p = 0.001) and general performance ratings (p = 0.003). Self-ratings did not distinguish experienced from inexperienced transport clinicians (p = 0.32) and were not strongly associated with either observed general performance (r(s) = 0.4, p = 0

  8. Evaluation of Detrimental Effects on Mechanical Properties of Zry-4 Due to Hydrogen Absorption by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) In-Situ Observation of Crack Propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, L; Fernandez, G.E; Bertolino, G; Meyer, G

    2001-01-01

    The study of mechanical properties degradation of zirconium alloys due to hydrides assumes fundamental importance in the nuclear industry.During normal nuclear reactors operation, structural parts absorbed hydrogen generated from radiolysis of water, causing detrimental effects on mechanical properties.As a consequence, these materials are easily cracked in the presence of mechanical solicitation due to loss of ductility of the hydride-phase.The presence of cracks indicates fracture mechanic as the most suitable methodology in the study of mechanical properties degradation.In this work we used the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) criteria to evaluate the detrimental effects on mechanical properties with the observation in SEM of crack propagation.The samples used were SEN (B) of Zry-4 and cathodic homogenous charged with hydrogen concentrations lower than 400 ppm

  9. Cross-sectional studies published in Indian journal of community medicine: evaluation of adherence to strengthening the reporting of observational studies in epidemiology statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeelani, A; Malik, Wr; Haq, I; Aleem, S; Mujtaba, M; Syed, N

    2014-11-01

    The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement is a set of recommendations about what should be included in a more accurate and complete description of observational studies. The aim was to assess the quality of reporting of cross-sectional studies by evaluating the extent to which they adhere to the STROBE statement. This study has a cross-sectional design. All the articles published as original articles in Indian Journal of Community Medicine from January 2010 to September 2011 were downloaded from the journal website. A total of 96 articles were downloaded out of which 80 were found to have a cross-sectional design. Variables were: (1) Percentage of STROBE items included in a report and (2) percentage of articles reporting each item in the STROBE checklist. Data analysis was done by descriptive statistics using frequencies and percentages. A total of 80 articles were evaluated. About 46% (37/80) articles reported 12-15 items of the STROBE checklist. Bias, nonparticipants and reasons for nonparticipation, other analyses done, generalizability, and source of funding were reported by studies. The most frequently reported items of the checklist were summary of what was done and what was found in the abstract, background/rationale, objectives, setting, outcome data, key results in discussion, interpretation of results. None of the articles reported all items of the STROBE checklist. This study reveals that the quality of reporting cross-sectional studies in Indian Journal of Community Medicine is not satisfactory and there is room for improvement.

  10. Evaluation of a rolling rehabilitation programme for patients with non-specific low back pain in primary care: an observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arden, Kathleen; Fatoye, Francis; Yeowell, Gillian

    2017-04-01

    The Back Rehabilitation Programme (BRP) is a group exercise programme for patients with non-specific low back pain (NSLBP) that combines cognitive behavioural therapy principles and therapeutic exercise to empower patients to self-manage their condition. Poor attendance and high attrition rates resulted in changes to the format of the programme from a standard sequential approach to a continual rolling approach. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of this new approach on patient outcomes and its impact on attendance rates. A service evaluation, using a retrospective, observational cohort design, of all patients with NSLBP who attended the BRP during a 12-month period was undertaken. Outcome measures used were as follows: Bournemouth Questionnaire (BQ); fitness tests: sit to stand test, step test and walk test (taken at baseline and post programme); and attendance (taken post programme). Of the patients, 56% had an improved BQ score ≥ 47%, indicating a clinically significant change. Inferential testing showed statistically significant improvements in the BQ and all three fitness tests post programme (Pprogramme had doubled compared with the original standard programme. Patients with NSLBP who attended the continual rolling BRP show clinical and statistical improvements. The rolling format also appeared to enhance patient attendance. As such, the rolling BRP should be considered by practitioners as an effective management strategy when treating patients with NSLBP. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Ultrasonographic Evaluation of Botulinum Toxin Injection Site for the Medial Approach to Tibialis Posterior Muscle in Chronic Stroke Patients with Spastic Equinovarus Foot: An Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Picelli

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The tibialis posterior muscle is a frequent target for injection of botulinum toxin during the management of spastic equinovarus foot in adults with post-stroke spasticity. Although it is deep-seated, the needle insertion into the tibialis posterior muscle is usually performed using anatomical landmarks and safety information obtained from healthy subjects and cadavers. Our aim was to evaluate the botulinum toxin injection site for the medial approach to the tibialis posterior muscle in chronic stroke patients with spastic equinovarus foot. Forty-six patients were evaluated at the affected middle lower leg medial surface with ultrasonography according to the following parameters: tibialis posterior muscle depth, thickness, and echo intensity. As to the spastic tibialis posterior, we found a mean muscle depth of 26.5 mm and a mean muscle thickness of 10.1 mm. Furthermore we observed a median tibialis posterior muscle echo intensity of 3.00 on the Heckmatt scale. The tibialis posterior muscle thickness was found to be inversely associated with its depth (p < 0.001 and echo intensity (p = 0.006. Furthermore, tibialis posterior muscle depth was found to be directly associated with its echo intensity (p = 0.004. Our findings may usefully inform manual needle placement into the tibialis posterior for the botulinum toxin treatment of spastic equinovarus foot in chronic stroke patients.

  12. Olanzapine monotherapy and olanzapine combination therapy in the treatment of mania: 12-week results from the European Mania in Bipolar Longitudinal Evaluation of Medication (EMBLEM) observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieta, Eduard; Panicali, Francesco; Goetz, Iris; Reed, Catherine; Comes, Merce; Tohen, Mauricio

    2008-02-01

    To evaluate the 12-week outcomes (effectiveness, tolerability, and patterns of medication use) of olanzapine (either in antimanic monotherapy or in combination with other antipsychotics, anticonvulsants, and/or lithium) in patients with bipolar mania or mixed mania. EMBLEM (European Mania in Bipolar Longitudinal Evaluation of Medication) is a 24-month prospective observational study of in- and outpatients with acute mania/mixed mania conducted in 14 European countries. Primary outcome measures included Clinical Global Impressions-Bipolar Disorder scale (overall, mania, and depression); 5-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale; and Young Mania Rating Scale. Tolerability measures included a questionnaire to assess patients' symptomatic complaints. Overall, 2004 patients received olanzapine (olanzapine monotherapy, n=673; olanzapine combination, n=1331). Concomitant therapy with antidepressants and/or anxiolytics was possible in both groups. The countries significantly differed in the use of olanzapine monotherapy versus olanzapine combination (pEMBLEM results suggest that in naturalistic settings, olanzapine (both as monotherapy and combination) may be effective in treating patients with bipolar mania. The use of olanzapine monotherapy or combination varies significantly across countries, but combination is generally the rule, rather than the exception.

  13. Evaluation of Microscopic Observation Drug Susceptibility (MODS) and the string test for rapid diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis in HIV/AIDS patients in Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lora, Meredith H; Reimer-McAtee, Melissa J; Gilman, Robert H; Lozano, Daniel; Saravia, Ruth; Pajuelo, Monica; Bern, Caryn; Castro, Rosario; Espinoza, Magaly; Vallejo, Maya; Solano, Marco; Challapa, Roxana; Torrico, Faustino

    2015-06-06

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the most common opportunistic infection and the leading cause of death in HIV-positive people worldwide. Diagnosing TB is difficult, and is more challenging in resource-scarce settings where culture-based diagnostic methods rely on poorly sensitive smear microscopy by Ziehl-Neelsen stain (ZN). We performed a cross-sectional study examining the diagnostic utility of Microscopic Observation Drug Susceptibility liquid culture (MODS) versus traditional Ziehl-Neelsen staining (ZN) and Lowenstein Jensen culture (LJ) of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB) in HIV-infected patients in Bolivia. For sputum scarce individuals we assessed the value of the string test and induced sputum for TB diagnosis. The presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in the sputum of 107 HIV-positive patients was evaluated by ZN, LJ, and MODS. Gastric secretion samples obtained by the string test were evaluated by MODS in 102 patients. The TB-HIV co-infection rate of HIV patients with respiratory symptoms by sputum sample was 45 % (48/107); 46/48 (96 %) were positive by MODS, 38/48 (79 %) by LJ, and 30/48 (63 %) by ZN. The rate of MDRTB was 9 % (4/48). Median time to positive culture was 10 days by MODS versus 34 days by LJ (p Bolivia.

  14. Evaluation of the Snow Thermal Model (SNTHERM through Continuous in situ Observations of Snow’s Physical Properties at the CREST-SAFE Field Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose A. Infante Corona

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Snowpack properties like temperature or density are the result of a complex energy and mass balance process in the snowpack that varies temporally and spatially. The Snow Thermal Model (SNTHERM is a 1-dimensional model, energy and mass balance-driven, that simulates these properties. This article analyzes the simulated snowpack properties using SNTHERM forced with two datasets, namely measured meteorological data at the Cooperative Remote Sensing Science and Technology-Snow Analysis and Field Experiment (CREST-SAFE site and the National Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS. The study area is located on the premises of Caribou Municipal Airport at Caribou (ME, USA. The model evaluation is based on properties such as snow depth, snow water equivalent, and snow density, in addition to a layer-by-layer comparison of snowpack properties. The simulations were assessed with precise in situ observations collected at the CREST-SAFE site. The outputs of the SNTHERM model showed very good agreement with observed data in properties like snow depth, snow water equivalent, and average temperature. Conversely, the model was not very efficient when simulating properties like temperature and grain size in different layers of the snowpack.

  15. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH:USING ARM OBSERVATIONS & ADVANCED STATISTICAL TECHNIQUES TO EVALUATE CAM3 CLOUDS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF STOCHASTIC CLOUD-RADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somerville, Richard

    2013-08-22

    The long-range goal of several past and current projects in our DOE-supported research has been the development of new and improved parameterizations of cloud-radiation effects and related processes, using ARM data, and the implementation and testing of these parameterizations in global models. The main objective of the present project being reported on here has been to develop and apply advanced statistical techniques, including Bayesian posterior estimates, to diagnose and evaluate features of both observed and simulated clouds. The research carried out under this project has been novel in two important ways. The first is that it is a key step in the development of practical stochastic cloud-radiation parameterizations, a new category of parameterizations that offers great promise for overcoming many shortcomings of conventional schemes. The second is that this work has brought powerful new tools to bear on the problem, because it has been a collaboration between a meteorologist with long experience in ARM research (Somerville) and a mathematician who is an expert on a class of advanced statistical techniques that are well-suited for diagnosing model cloud simulations using ARM observations (Shen).

  16. Disease Monitoring and Health Campaign Evaluation Using Google Search Activities for HIV and AIDS, Stroke, Colorectal Cancer, and Marijuana Use in Canada: A Retrospective Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background Infodemiology can offer practical and feasible health research applications through the practice of studying information available on the Web. Google Trends provides publicly accessible information regarding search behaviors in a population, which may be studied and used for health campaign evaluation and disease monitoring. Additional studies examining the use and effectiveness of Google Trends for these purposes remain warranted. Objective The objective of our study was to explore the use of infodemiology in the context of health campaign evaluation and chronic disease monitoring. It was hypothesized that following a launch of a campaign, there would be an increase in information seeking behavior on the Web. Second, increasing and decreasing disease patterns in a population would be associated with search activity patterns. This study examined 4 different diseases: human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, stroke, colorectal cancer, and marijuana use. Methods Using Google Trends, relative search volume data were collected throughout the period of February 2004 to January 2015. Campaign information and disease statistics were obtained from governmental publications. Search activity trends were graphed and assessed with disease trends and the campaign interval. Pearson product correlation statistics and joinpoint methodology analyses were used to determine significance. Results Disease patterns and online activity across all 4 diseases were significantly correlated: HIV infection (r=.36, Pcampaigns on colorectal cancer and marijuana use in stimulating search activity. No significant correlations were observed for the campaigns on stroke and HIV regarding search activity. Conclusions The use of infoveillance shows promise as an alternative and inexpensive solution to disease surveillance and health campaign evaluation. Further research is needed to understand Google Trends as a valid and reliable tool for health research. PMID:27733330

  17. Measurements After Image Post-processing Are More Precise in the Morphometric Assessment of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms: An Intermodal and Intra-observer Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutersberg, B; Haller, B; Mariss, J; Eckstein, H-H; Ockert, S

    2016-10-01

    Precise pre-procedural anatomical analysis of aneurysmal anatomy is essential for successful thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). Since surgeons and radiologists have to perform multiple measurements in the same patient, high intra-observer reliability of any imaging method is mandatory. Commercially available three dimensional (3D) post-processing techniques are expected to be superior to conventional two dimensional multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) derived from computed tomography angiograms (CTAs). However, few data exist to support this view. This study aims to evaluate the intermodal and intra-observer differences using 3D software (3surgery) in descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (dTAAs). Pre-operative CTAs (performed between 2004 and 2010) of 30 dTAAs (mean maximum diameter 61.4 ± 13 mm) were assessed by three independent investigators with different experience in the measurement of aortic pathologies. Intra-observer reliability and intermodal differences (3D vs. 2D) were investigated using pre-specified measurement points (distances of total length, maximum diameter, proximal and distal landing zones). Statistical analyses were performed using the Bland-Altman method and a mixed regression model. Intermodal comparison showed that 2D measurements significantly underestimate the measured distances (maximum diameter 3.7 mm [95% CI -5.3 to -2.1] and landing zone maximum 1.4 mm [95% CI -2.0 to -0.2] shorter with 2D, p post-processing software therefore leads to more precise device selection for TEVAR in TAA. Copyright © 2016 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of safety and efficacy of zonisamide in adult patients with partial, generalized, and combined seizures: an open labeled, noncomparative, observational Indian study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dash A

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Amitabh Dash,1 Sangeeta Ravat,2 Avathvadi Venkatesan Srinivasan,3 Ashutosh Shetty,4 Vivek Kumar,5 Renu Achtani,6 Vivek Narain Mathur,7 Boby Varkey Maramattom,8 Veeresh Bajpai,9 Nanjappa C Manjunath,10 Randhi Venkata Narayana,11 Suyog Mehta12 1Eisai Co. Ltd., 2Department of Neurology, Seth GS Medical College & KEM Hospital, Mumbai, 3Department of Neurology, Trinity Acute Care Hospital, Chennai, 4Department of Neurology, Criticare Multispeciality Hospital & Research Centre, Mumbai, 5Department of Neurology, Metro Multispeciality Hospital, Noida, 6Department of Neurology, Mata Chanan Devi Hospital, New Delhi, 7Department of Neurology, Vivekananda Hospital, Hyderabad, 8Department of Neurology, Lourdes Hospital, Kochi, 9Department of Neurology, Sai Neurology Clinic, Lucknow, 10Department of Neurology, Brain and Nerve Care, Bangalore, 11Department of Neurology, Seven Hills Hospital, Visakhapatnam, 12Department of Pharmacology & Therapeutics,Government Medical College, Solapur, India Abstract: A prospective, multicentric, noncomparative open-label observational study was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy zonisamide in Indian adult patients for the treatment of partial, generalized, or combined seizures. A total of 655 adult patients with partial, generalized, or combined seizures from 30 centers across India were recruited after initial screening. Patients received 100 mg zonisamide as initiating dose as monotherapy/adjunctive therapy for 24 weeks, with titration of 100 mg every 2 weeks if required. Adverse events, responder rates, and seizure freedom were observed every 4 weeks. Efficacy and safety were also assessed using Clinicians Global Assessment of Response to Therapy and Patients Global Assessment of Tolerability to Therapy, respectively. Follow-up was conducted for a period of 24 weeks after treatment initiation. A total of 655 patients were enrolled and received the treatment and 563 completed the evaluation phase. A total of 20

  19. Inter and intra-observer agreement evaluation of the AO and the Tronzo classification systems of fractures of the trochanteric area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, Julio; Zamora, Tomas; Besa, Pablo; Zamora, Maximiliano; Schweitzer, Daniel; Klaber, Ianiv

    2015-01-01

    We performed an agreement study of the AO and the Tronzo classifications of fractures of the trochanteric area to determine if they allow communication among practitioners with different levels of expertise. Complete radiographs of 70 patients with trochanteric fractures were classified by nine evaluators (three hip sub-specialists, three orthopaedic surgery residents and three medical interns) using the AO and the Tronzo classifications. After a six-week interval, all cases were presented in a random sequence for repeat evaluation. The Kappa coefficient (k) was used to determine inter- and intra-observer agreement. Inter-observer: considering the main AO fracture types, the agreement was moderate for sub-specialists (k = 0.60 [0.50-0.70]), residents (k = 0.58 [0.48-0.69]) and medical interns (k = 0.56 [0.45-0.69]). Using AO sub-types, all groups achieved fair agreement (sub-specialists: k = 0.31 [0.25-0.38]; residents: k = 0.32 [0.26-0.38]; medical interns: k = 0.30 [0.24-0.36]). For the Tronzo classification, sub-specialists (k = 0.56 [0.48-0.65]) and residents (k = 0.47 [0.39-0.55]) obtained moderate agreement; medical interns reached fair agreement (k = 0.33 [0.25-0.41]). Intra-observer: considering the main AO fracture types, sub-specialists (k = 0.79 [0.69-0.89]), residents (k = 0.71 [0.60-0.81]) and medical interns (k = 0.70 [0.59-0.82]) obtained substantial agreement. Considering AO sub-types, sub-specialists (k = 0.50 [0.45-0.56]) and medical interns (k = 0.54 [0.48-0.69]) achieved moderate agreement; residents (k = 0.39 [0.33-0.45]) achieved fair agreement. Using the Tronzo classification, all groups obtained substantial agreement (sub-specialists: k = 0.66 [0.58-0.74]; residents: k = 0.63 [0.55-0.71]; medical interns: k = 0.68 [0.60-0.76]). The AO classification allows an adequate communication when considering the main fracture types; the agreement within sub-types is not satisfactory. The Tronzo classification does not allow reliable communication

  20. OBSERVATION OF NEONATAL BEHAVIOR: CROSS-CULTURAL ADAPTATION OF THE NEWBORN BEHAVIORAL OBSERVATIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Marina Aguiar Pires; Alves, Claudia Regina Lindgren; Cardoso, Ana Amélia; Magalhães, Lívia de Castro

    2018-01-01

    To conduct the cross-cultural adaptation for Brazilian Portuguese of the Newborn Behavioral Observations (NBO), a new resource for observing neonatal behavior and sharing information with parents. Methodological study of translation and cultural adaptation of the NBO system, which includes the Recording Form, with 18 items, the Recording Guidelines, with instructions to score each item, the Summary Form, to record suggestions based on the observation, and the Parent Questionnaire, to record the parents' experiences. The adaptation process followed international recommendations for cross-cultural adaptation of health care protocols, which included requesting permission from the authors, translation, back translation and pre-test, followed by external evaluators who scored the quality of the adaptation, which was analyzed quantitatively. The quality of the adaptation of the instruments' items was evaluated by the index of agreement between evaluators for conceptual and cultural equivalence. Expert panel evaluation showed that the cross-cultural adaptation of the NBO protocols was both well understood conceptually and culturally appropriate, with 140 (77.8%) items presenting concordance index higher than 90% for conceptual and cultural equivalence. Items that did not reach adequate level of agreement were revised according to experts' suggestions. The Brazilian version of the NBO system can be safely used, since the methodology was rigorous enough to ensure equivalence between the original and translated versions. The NBO should be tried in clinical practice, as it can contribute to improve the quality of maternal and child care.

  1. Electrophysiological Correlates of Observational Learning in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Buritica, Julia M.; Eppinger, Ben; Schuck, Nicolas W.; Heekeren, Hauke R.; Li, Shu-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Observational learning is an important mechanism for cognitive and social development. However, the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying observational learning in children are not well understood. In this study, we used a probabilistic reward-based observational learning paradigm to compare behavioral and electrophysiological markers of…

  2. Evaluation of NASA's MERRA Precipitation Product in Reproducing the Observed Trend and Distribution of Extreme Precipitation Events in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashouri, Hamed; Sorooshian, Soroosh; Hsu, Kuo-Lin; Bosilovich, Michael G.; Lee, Jaechoul; Wehner, Michael F.; Collow, Allison

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the performance of NASA's Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) precipitation product in reproducing the trend and distribution of extreme precipitation events. Utilizing the extreme value theory, time-invariant and time-variant extreme value distributions are developed to model the trends and changes in the patterns of extreme precipitation events over the contiguous United States during 1979-2010. The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) U.S.Unified gridded observation data are used as the observational dataset. The CPC analysis shows that the eastern and western parts of the United States are experiencing positive and negative trends in annual maxima, respectively. The continental-scale patterns of change found in MERRA seem to reasonably mirror the observed patterns of change found in CPC. This is not previously expected, given the difficulty in constraining precipitation in reanalysis products. MERRA tends to overestimate the frequency at which the 99th percentile of precipitation is exceeded because this threshold tends to be lower in MERRA, making it easier to be exceeded. This feature is dominant during the summer months. MERRA tends to reproduce spatial patterns of the scale and location parameters of the generalized extreme value and generalized Pareto distributions. However, MERRA underestimates these parameters, particularly over the Gulf Coast states, leading to lower magnitudes in extreme precipitation events. Two issues in MERRA are identified: 1) MERRA shows a spurious negative trend in Nebraska and Kansas, which is most likely related to the changes in the satellite observing system over time that has apparently affected the water cycle in the central United States, and 2) the patterns of positive trend over the Gulf Coast states and along the East Coast seem to be correlated with the tropical cyclones in these regions. The analysis of the trends in the seasonal precipitation extremes indicates that

  3. Implication of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) F transgene sequence heterogeneity observed in Phase 1 evaluation of MEDI-534, a live attenuated parainfluenza type 3 vectored RSV vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chin-Fen; Wang, C Kathy; Malkin, Elissa; Schickli, Jeanne H; Shambaugh, Cindy; Zuo, Fengrong; Galinski, Mark S; Dubovsky, Filip; Tang, Roderick S

    2013-06-10

    MEDI-534 is the first live vectored RSV vaccine candidate to be evaluated in seronegative children. It consists of the bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3) genome with substituted human PIV3 F and HN glycoproteins engineered to express RSV F protein. A Phase 1 study of 49 healthy RSV and PIV3 seronegative children 6 to MEDI-534 at 10(6)TCID50, administered at 0, 2 and 4 month intervals, 100% of subjects seroresponded to PIV3, whereas only 50% seroresponded to RSV. To investigate the discordance in seroresponse rates, the RSV F transgene and its flanking non-coding nucleotides were sequenced from shed virus recovered from the nasal washes of 24 MEDI-534-vaccinated children. Eleven out of 24 samples contained no nucleotide changes in the analyzed region. The other 13 samples contained mixtures of variant subpopulations. Fifty-five percent exhibited changes in the transcription termination poly A gene sequences of the upstream bPIV3N gene while 21% had variant subpopulations in the RSV F open reading frame that resulted in pre-mature stop codons. Both types of changes are expected to reduce RSV F expression. Evaluation of the administered vaccine by dual immunofluorescence staining showed ~2.5% variants with low or no RSV F expression while single nucleotide primer extension detected ~1% variation at nucleotide 2045 that resulted in a pre-mature translational termination at codon 85. An association between shedding of variants and lower RSV F serological response was observed but it was not possible to establish a definitive clinical significance due to the small number of subjects in this study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A field evaluation of soil moisture modelling with the Soil, Vegetation, and Snow (SVS) land surface model using evapotranspiration observations as forcing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheu, Audrey; Anctil, François; Gaborit, Étienne; Fortin, Vincent; Nadeau, Daniel F.; Therrien, René

    2018-03-01

    To address certain limitations with their current operational model, Environment and Climate Change Canada recently developed the Soil, Vegetation, and Snow (SVS) land surface model and the representation of subsurface hydrological processes was targeted as an area for improvement. The objective of this study is to evaluate the ability of HydroSVS, the component of SVS responsible for the vertical redistribution of water, to simulate soil moisture under snow-free conditions when using flux-tower observations of evapotranspiration as forcing data. We assessed (1) model fidelity by comparing soil moisture modelled with HydroSVS to point-scale measurements of volumetric soil water content and (2) model complexity by comparing the performance of HydroSVS to that of HydroGeoSphere, a state-of-the-art integrated surface and subsurface hydrologic model. To do this, we performed one-dimensional soil column simulations at four sites of the AmeriFlux network. Results indicate that under Mediterranean and temperate climates, HydroSVS satisfactorily simulated soil moisture (Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency between 0.26 and 0.70; R2 ≥ 0.80), with a performance comparable to HydroGeoSphere (Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency ≥0.60; R2 ≥ 0.80). However, HydroSVS performed weakly under a semiarid climate while HydroGeoSphere performed relatively well. By decoupling the magnitude and sourcing of evapotranspiration, this study proposes a powerful diagnostic tool to evaluate the representation of subsurface hydrological processes in land surface models. Overall, this study highlights the potential of SVS for hydrological applications.

  5. EVALUATION OF CYSTICLEAN® CAPSULES, A CRANBERRY EXTRACT WITH HIGH ANTI-ADHESION ACTIVITY, AS MONOTHERAPY IN UNCOMPLICATED CYSTITIS: AN OBSERVATIONAL PILOT STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risco E

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background:Cysticlean® is a cranberry extract product with a high quantity of proanthocyanidins (240 mg/capsule with a significant dose-dependent anti-adhesion activity of Escherichia coli (EC adhered to uroepithelial cells. Previous clinical assays showed that Cysticlean® is a product highly recommended in the prophylaxis and treatment of UTIs. The aim of this study is the evaluation of Cysticlean as an alternative to antibiotics to treat uncomplicated cystitis. Material and Methods This observational study included 30 consecutive ambulatory patients (17 women and 13 men, who were diagnosed of uncomplicated cystitis (UC and agreed to participate in this observational study. Patients were informed to come to visit the doctor again after 15 days after Cysticlean® treatment was started (1 capsule of Cysticlean® every 12 h daily and immediately if signs/symptoms did not disappear. In this case, Cysticlean® was stopped and patients treated with antibiotic. Results: 21 patients were successfully cured with Cysticlean® treatment only (70% and 9 patients needed antibiotic to cure their UC. 82.35% of women and 53.,85% of men did not need antibiotic to be cured. No significant differences at baseline were found regarding signs/symptoms severity between those patients cured with extract alone and those who needed antibiotic. No side effects/adverse reactions were reported. Conclusions: These preliminary data strongly suggest that Cysticlean® could be considered as an alternative to antibiotics for a 1st line treatment of UC. Further clinical studies to confirm whether Cysticlean® could be an alternative to antibiotic treatment for UC and this approach could contribute to reduce world-wide growing antibiotic resistance.

  6. Evaluation on changes caused by volcanic activities in the groundwater environment as a natural barrier for the HLW disposal. Literature survey and groundwater observation conducted at Mt. Iwate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahara, Yasunori; Nakata, Eiji; Tanaka, Kazuhiro

    2000-01-01

    It is very important in the site characterization for the HLW disposal to understand changes in geochemical performances caused by volcanic activities in the groundwater environment as the natural barrier. The various effects and its magnitude of changes were listed up and were filed from literature surveys of the correlation between volcanic activities and hydrological can geochemical changes (e.g. water temperature, water pressure, water level, dissolved gas concentration of He and Rn, isotopic ratio of He, and chloride concentration) in volcanic aquifer. However, it is difficult to evaluate the magnitude of impacts, which volcanic activities will give to the groundwater environment in the natural barrier, through only the literature surveys. We have started monitoring of groundwater level and changes in groundwater quality, since volcanic activities have enhanced at Mt. Iwate from June in 1998. Judging from variation of isotopic ratio of dissolved He in groundwater, a prompt and sharp signals indicating volcanic activities will easily be found in shallow groundwater and discharged ponds. On the other hands, geochemical conditions in deep groundwater surroundings from some 100 m to 1000 m deep will be very stable, if the area being more than 5 km apart from the volcanic active center. Consequently, our observed results suggest that the groundwater environment which is not directly disturbed by the underground magmatic activities spreads under the area that is connected to trench side of the volcanic front. (author)

  7. Evaluering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne; Andersen, Michael; Wandall, Jakob

    for forståelsen af, hvad der sker på uddannelsesområdet. Vi har med bogen villet give en sammenhængende forståelse af de forskellige processer og indsatser inden for feltet med henblik på, hvordan man kan evaluere disse. Vi har gjort det ved at beskrive principperne for de forskellige tilgange til evaluering. Vi...

  8. Real-world evaluation of compliance and preference in Alzheimer’s disease treatment: an observational study in Taiwan 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai TH

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tzu-Hsien Lai,1,2,* Wen-Fu Wang,3,* Bak-Sau Yip,4 Yu-Wan Yang,5 Giia-Sheun Peng,6 Shih-Jei Tsai,7,8 Yi-Chu Liao,9 Ming-Chyi Pai10,111Section of Neurology, Department of Internal Medicine, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, New Taipei, 2Department of Neurology, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, 3Department of Neurology, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua, 4Department of Neurology, National Taiwan University Hospital Hsin-Chu Branch, Hsinchu, 5Department of Neurology, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, 6Department of Neurology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, 7Department of Neurology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, 8School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, 9Department of Neurology, Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, 10Division of Behavioral Neurology, Department of Neurology, 11Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this workPurpose: Among the medications approved for Alzheimer’s disease (AD, rivastigmine is the only one available as transdermal patch. The aim of this study was to evaluate compliance and caregivers’ preference with oral and transdermal (rivastigmine monotherapy in patients with mild-to-moderate AD from Taiwan.Methods: Real-world Evaluation of Compliance And Preference in Alzheimer’s disease treatment (RECAP in Taiwan was a prospective, noninterventional, observational study with a 24-week (±8 weeks observational period for each participant. Eligible patients were grouped into one of the two treatment cohorts based on the baseline AD therapy: oral (donepezil, galantamine, rivastigmine, or memantine or transdermal (rivastigmine patch. The primary end points were caregiver preference and caregiver assessment of patients’ compliance to

  9. Evaluating the impact of new observational constraints on P-S/IVOC emissions, multi-generation oxidation, and chamber wall losses on SOA modeling for Los Angeles, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Prettiny K.; Zhao, Yunliang; Robinson, Allen L.; Worton, David R.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Ortega, Amber M.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Zotter, Peter; Prévôt, André S. H.; Szidat, Sönke; Hayes, Patrick L.

    2017-08-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is an important contributor to fine particulate matter (PM) mass in polluted regions, and its modeling remains poorly constrained. A box model is developed that uses recently published literature parameterizations and data sets to better constrain and evaluate the formation pathways and precursors of urban SOA during the CalNex 2010 campaign in Los Angeles. When using the measurements of intermediate-volatility organic compounds (IVOCs) reported in Zhao et al. (2014) and of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) reported in Worton et al. (2014) the model is biased high at longer photochemical ages, whereas at shorter photochemical ages it is biased low, if the yields for VOC oxidation are not updated. The parameterizations using an updated version of the yields, which takes into account the effect of gas-phase wall losses in environmental chambers, show model-measurement agreement at longer photochemical ages, even though some low bias at short photochemical ages still remains. Furthermore, the fossil and non-fossil carbon split of urban SOA simulated by the model is consistent with measurements at the Pasadena ground site. Multi-generation oxidation mechanisms are often employed in SOA models to increase the SOA yields derived from environmental chamber experiments in order to obtain better model-measurement agreement. However, there are many uncertainties associated with these aging mechanisms. Thus, SOA formation in the model is compared to data from an oxidation flow reactor (OFR) in order to constrain SOA formation at longer photochemical ages than observed in urban air. The model predicts similar SOA mass at short to moderate photochemical ages when the aging mechanisms or the updated version of the yields for VOC oxidation are implemented. The latter case has SOA formation rates that are more consistent with observations from the OFR though. Aging mechanisms may still play an important role in SOA chemistry, but the

  10. NEOnatal Central-venous Line Observational study on Thrombosis (NEOCLOT): evaluation of a national guideline on management of neonatal catheter-related thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sol, Jeanine J; van de Loo, Moniek; Boerma, Marit; Bergman, Klasien A; Donker, Albertine E; van der Hoeven, Mark A H B M; Hulzebos, Christiaan V; Knol, Ronny; Djien Liem, K; van Lingen, Richard A; Lopriore, Enrico; Suijker, Monique H; Vijlbrief, Daniel C; Visser, Remco; Veening, Margreet A; van Weissenbruch, Mirjam M; van Ommen, C Heleen

    2018-02-23

    In critically ill (preterm) neonates, central venous catheters (CVCs) are increasingly used for administration of medication or parenteral nutrition. A serious complication, however, is the development of catheter-related thrombosis (CVC-thrombosis), which may resolve by itself or cause severe complications. Due to lack of evidence, management of neonatal CVC-thrombosis varies among neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). In the Netherlands an expert-based national management guideline has been developed which is implemented in all 10 NICUs in 2014. The NEOCLOT study is a multicentre prospective observational cohort study, including 150 preterm and term infants (0-6 months) admitted to one of the 10 NICUs, developing CVC-thrombosis. Patient characteristics, thrombosis characteristics, risk factors, treatment strategies and outcome measures will be collected in a web-based database. Management of CVC-thrombosis will be performed as recommended in the protocol. Violations of the protocol will be noted. Primary outcome measures are a composite efficacy outcome consisting of death due to CVC-thrombosis and recurrent thrombosis, and a safety outcome consisting of the incidence of major bleedings during therapy. Secondary outcomes include individual components of primary efficacy outcome, clinically relevant non-major and minor bleedings and the frequency of risk factors, protocol variations, residual thrombosis and post thrombotic syndrome. The NEOCLOT study will evaluate the efficacy and safety of the new, national, neonatal CVC-thrombosis guideline. Furthermore, risk factors as well as long-term consequences of CVC-thrombosis will be analysed. Trial registration: Nederlands Trial Register NTR4336 . Registered 24 December 2013.

  11. Observer study for evaluating potential utility of a super-high-resolution LCD in the detection of clustered microcalcifications on digital mammograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Junji; Abe, Hiroyuki; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Schmidt, Robert A; Doi, Kunio

    2010-04-01

    We evaluated the potential utility of a newly developed liquid-crystal display (LCD), which used an independent sub-pixel drive (ISD) technique for increasing the spatial resolution of a standard LCD three times in one direction, by use of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and a two-alternative-forced-choice (2AFC) method to determine improvement in radiologists' accuracy in the detection of clustered microcalcifications (MCLs) on digital mammograms. We used a standard LCD without and with the ISD technique, which can increase the spatial resolution of the LCD three times in one direction from three mega- to nine megapixels without changes in the size of the display. We used 60 single views of digital mammograms (30 with and 30 without clustered MCLs) for ROC studies and 60 regions of interest (ROIs) with clustered MCLs for 2AFC studies. In the ROC study, seven radiologists attempted to detect clustered MCLs without and with the ISD on the same LCD. In the 2AFC study, the same observer group compared the visibility of MCLs by use of the LCD without and with the ISD. Our institutional review board approved the use of this database and the participation of radiologists in this study. The accuracy in detecting clustered MCLs in the ROC study was improved by use of the LCD with the ISD, but the improvement was not statistically significant (p = 0.08). However, the superiority of the LCD with the ISD was demonstrated as significant (p LCD with ISD can improve the visibility of clustered MCLs when high-resolution digital mammograms are available.

  12. Magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) for the evaluation of autologous chondrocyte transplantation: Determination of interobserver variability and correlation to clinical outcome after 2 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlovits, Stefan [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: stefan.marlovits@meduniwien.ac.at; Singer, Philipp [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Zeller, Philip [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Mandl, Irena [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Haller, Joerg [Department of Radiology, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich-Collin-Strasse, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Trattnig, Siegfried [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-01-15

    In an observational study, the validity and reliability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) in the knee joint was determined. Two years after implantation, high-resolution MRI was used to analyze the repair tissue with nine pertinent variables. A complete filling of the defect was found in 61.5%, and a complete integration of the border zone to the adjacent cartilage in 76.9%. An intact subchondral lamina was present in 84.6% and an intact subchondral bone was present in 61.5%. Isointense signal intensities of the repair tissue compared to the adjacent native cartilage were seen in 92.3%. To evaluate interobserver variability, a reliability analysis with the determination of the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated. An 'almost perfect' agreement, with an ICC value >0.81, was calculated in 8 of 9 variables. The clinical outcome after 2 years showed the visual analog score (VAS) at 2.62 (S.D. {+-}0.65). The values for the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) subgroups were 68.29 ({+-}23.90) for pain, 62.09 ({+-}14.62) for symptoms, 75.45 ({+-}21.91) for ADL function, 52.69 ({+-}28.77) for sport and 70.19 ({+-}22.41) for knee-related quality of life. The clinical scores were correlated with the MRI variables. A statistically significant correlation was found for the variables 'filling of the defect,' 'structure of the repair tissue,' 'changes in the subchondral bone,' and 'signal intensities of the repair issue'. High resolution MRI and well-defined MRI variables are a reliable, reproducible and accurate tool for assessing cartilage repair tissue.

  13. A Health Economic Evaluation of Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation: Guideline Adherence Versus the Observed Treatment Strategy Prior to 2012 in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestergaard, Anne Sig; Ehlers, Lars Holger

    2015-09-01

    In 2012 the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) published new guidelines on pharmacological stroke prophylaxis in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF). The health economics of adhering to these guidelines in clinical practice remains to be elucidated. This paper offers a health economic evaluation of two stroke-prophylactic treatment strategies: complete national adherence to the ESC guidelines on stroke prophylaxis in AF versus stroke-prophylactic treatment prior to 2012 in Denmark. A cost-utility analysis was performed to compare two treatment strategies. The first strategy reflected national guideline adherence with the use of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (i.e. dabigatran etexilate), warfarin, and no treatment. The second strategy reflected observed stroke prophylaxis prior to 2012 with the utilization of warfarin, acetylsalicylic acid, and no treatment. A Danish health sector perspective was adopted. A Markov model was designed and populated with information on input parameters from the literature and local cost data reflecting 2014 values. A modeled patient cohort was constructed with a risk profile intended to reflect that of the Danish patient population with AF. The applied outcome was quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio amounted to 3557 per QALY for the guideline-adherent treatment strategy (GTS) compared with the pre-2012 treatment strategy. This ratio is below a threshold of 25,000 (£20,000) per QALY. Sensitivity analyses revealed that the result was largely robust to changes in input parameters. All analyses found the GTS to be cost effective. Guideline adherence is a cost-effective treatment strategy compared with the strategy employed prior to 2012 for pharmacological stroke prophylaxis in AF.

  14. Rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury: creatine kinase as a prognostic marker and validation of the McMahon Score in a 10-year cohort: A retrospective observational evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Joanna P; Taylor, Andrew; Sudhan, Nazneen; Menon, David K; Lavinio, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    High-volume fluid resuscitation and the administration of sodium bicarbonate and diuretics have a theoretical renoprotective role in patients at high risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) following rhabdomyolysis. Abnormally elevated creatine kinase has previously been used as a biological marker for the identification of patients at high risk of AKI following rhabdomyolysis. To assess the sensitivity and specificity of plasma creatine kinase (admission and peak values) for the prediction of AKI requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT) or of death in patients with confirmed rhabdomyolysis. To compare the diagnostic performance of creatine kinase with the McMahon score. Retrospective observational study. Data collection included McMahon and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scores; daily creatine kinase; daily creatinine and electrolytes; ICU length of stay and mortality. Neurosciences and Trauma Critical Care Unit (Cambridge, UK). In total, 232 adults with confirmed rhabdomyolysis (creatine kinase > 1000 Ul) admitted to Neurosciences and Trauma Critical Care Unit between 2002 and 2012. AKI, RRT and mortality. Forty-five (19%) patients developed AKI and 29 (12.5%) patients required RRT. Mortality was significantly higher in patients who developed AKI (62 vs. 18%, P rhabdomyolysis. Although a PEAK creatine kinase of at least 5000 Ul has sensitivity acceptable for screening purposes, this is often a delayed finding. A McMahon score of at least 6 calculated on admission allows for a more sensitive, specific and timely identification of patients who may benefit from high-volume fluid resuscitation.

  15. The effectiveness, safety, and economic evaluation of Korean medicine for unexplained infertile women: A multi-center, prospective, observational study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su-Hyun; Jo, Junyoung; Kim, Dong-Il

    2017-12-01

    Infertility is a condition in which a woman has not been pregnant despite having had normal intercourse for 1 year. The number of unexplained infertile females is increasing because of late marriage customs, as well as environmental and lifestyle habits. In Korea, infertile females have been treated with Korean medicine (KM). However, these effects have not been objectively confirmed through clinical trials. Therefore, this study was conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of herbal medicine treatment in infertile patients and to demonstrate the economic feasibility through economical evaluation with assisted reproductive technology.This study is designed as a multicenter, single-arm clinical trial. All participants included will be from 3 Korean Medicine hospitals in Korea and will voluntarily sign an informed consent agreement. All recruited patients will conduct related surveys and tests, and be provided with treatment according to their menstrual cycle. Patients will take herbal medicines for 4 menstruation cycles and receive acupuncture and moxibustion treatment at 3 times (menstrual cycle day 3, 8, 14) during 4 menstruation cycles. They will also undergo an approximately 4 menstrual cycle treatment period, and 3 menstrual cycle observation period. If pregnant during the study, participants will take the herbal medicine for implantation for about 15 days. In this study, the primary outcome will be the clinical pregnancy rate, whereas the secondary outcome will include the implantation rate, ongoing pregnancy rate, and live birth rate.Ultimately, this study will provide clinical data regarding the effectiveness and safety of KM treatment for females with unexplained infertility and important evidence for establishing standard KM treatments for unexplained infertility. Moreover, we will identify the most cost-effective way to treat unexplained infertility. Korean Clinical Trial Registry (CRIS), Republic of Korea: KCT0002235. Date: February 21, 2017

  16. Global O3-CO correlations in a chemistry and transport model during July-August: evaluation with TES satellite observations and sensitivity to input meteorological data and emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun-Deok; Liu, Hongyu; Crawford, James H.; Considine, David B.; Allen, Dale J.; Duncan, Bryan N.; Horowitz, Larry W.; Rodriguez, Jose M.; Strahan, Susan E.; Zhang, Lin; Liu, Xiong; Damon, Megan R.; Steenrod, Stephen D.

    2017-07-01

    We examine the capability of the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemistry and transport model to reproduce global mid-tropospheric (618 hPa) ozone-carbon monoxide (O3-CO) correlations determined by the measurements from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) aboard NASA's Aura satellite during boreal summer (July-August). The model is driven by three meteorological data sets (finite-volume General Circulation Model (fvGCM) with sea surface temperature for 1995, Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System Version 4 (GEOS-4 DAS) for 2005, and Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) for 2005), allowing us to examine the sensitivity of model O3-CO correlations to input meteorological data. Model simulations of radionuclide tracers (222Rn, 210Pb, and 7Be) are used to illustrate the differences in transport-related processes among the meteorological data sets. Simulated O3 values are evaluated with climatological profiles from ozonesonde measurements and satellite tropospheric O3 columns. Despite the fact that the three simulations show significantly different global and regional distributions of O3 and CO concentrations, they show similar patterns of O3-CO correlations on a global scale. All model simulations sampled along the TES orbit track capture the observed positive O3-CO correlations in the Northern Hemisphere midlatitude continental outflow and the Southern Hemisphere subtropics. While all simulations show strong negative correlations over the Tibetan Plateau, northern Africa, the subtropical eastern North Pacific, and the Caribbean, TES O3 and CO concentrations at 618 hPa only show weak negative correlations over much narrower areas (i.e., the Tibetan Plateau and northern Africa). Discrepancies in regional O3-CO correlation patterns in the three simulations may be attributed to differences in convective transport, stratospheric influence, and subsidence, among other processes. To understand how various

  17. Po-Basin Atmospheric Composition during the Pegasos Field Campaign (summer 2012): Evaluation of ninfa/aodeM Simulation with In-Situ e Remote Sensing Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Tony C.; Bonafe, Giovanni; Stortini, Michele; Minguzzi, Enrico; Cristofanelli, Paolo; Marinoni, Angela; Giulianelli, Lara; Sandrini, Silvia; Gilardoni, Stefania; Rinaldi, Matteo; Ricciardelli, Isabella

    2014-05-01

    Within the EU project PEGASOS one of three field campaigns took place in the Po Valley during the summer of 2012. Photochemistry, particle formation, and particle properties related to diurnal evolution of the PBL were investigated through both in-situ and airborne measurements on board a Zeppelin NT air ship. In addition, 3-D air quality modeling systems were implemented over the Po valley for the summer 2012 to better characterize the atmospheric conditions, in terms of meteorological parameters and chemical composition. In this work, we present a comparison between atmospheric composition simulations carried out by the modeling system NINFA/AODEM with measurements performed during the PEGASOS field campaign for the period 13 June - 12 July 2012. NINFA (Stortini et al., 2007) is based on the chemical transport model CHIMERE (Bessagnet et al., 2008), driven by COSMO-I7, the meteorological Italian Limited Area Model, (Steppeler et al., 2003). Boundary conditions are provided by Prev'air data (www.prevair.org), and emission data input are based on regional, national and European inventory. Besides, a post-processing tool for aerosol optical properties calculation, called AODEM (Landi T. C. 2013) was implemented. Thus, predictions of Aerosol Optical Depth and aerosol extinction coefficient were also used for model comparison to vertical-resolved observations. For this experiment, NINFA/AODEM has been also evaluated by using measurements of size-segregated aerosol samples, number particles concentration and aerosol optical properties collected on hourly basis at the 3 different sampling sites representative of urban background (Bologna), rural background (San Pietro Capofiume) and remote high altitude station (Monte Cimone 2165 ma.s.l.). ). In addition, we focused on new particles formations events and long range transports from Northern Africa observed during the field campaign. References Bessagnet, Bertrand, Laurent Menut, Gabriele Curci, Alma Hodzic, Bruno

  18. Use of a primary care online consultation system, by whom, when and why: evaluation of a pilot observational study in 36 general practices in South West England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Hannah B; Marques, Elsa; Hollingworth, William; Horwood, Jeremy; Farr, Michelle; Bernard, Elly; Salisbury, Chris; Northstone, Kate

    2017-11-22

    Evaluation of a pilot study of an online consultation system in primary care. We describe who used the system, when and why, and the National Health Service costs associated with its use. 15-month observational study. Primary care practices in South West England. 36 General practices covering 396 828 patients took part in the pilot. The online consultation website was viewed 35 981 times over the pilot period (mean 9.11 visits per 1000 patients per month). 7472 patients went on to complete an 'e-consultation' (mean 2.00 online consultations per 1000 patients per month). E-consultations were mainly performed on weekdays and during normal working hours. Patient records (n=485) were abstracted for eight practices and showed that women were more likely to use e-consultations than men (64.7% vs 35.3%) and users had a median age of 39 years (IQR 30-50). The most common reason for an e-consultation was an administrative request (eg, test results, letters and repeat prescriptions (22.5%)) followed by infections/immunological issues (14.4%). The majority of patients (65.2%) received a response within 2 days. The most common outcome was a face-to-face (38%) or telephone consultation (32%). The former were more often needed for patients consulting about new conditions (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.05 to 2.27, p=0.049). The average cost of a practice's response to an e-consultation was £36.28, primarily triage time and resulting face-to-face/telephone consultations needed. Use of e-consultations is very low, particularly at weekends. Unless this can be improved, any impact on staff workload and patient waiting times is likely to be negligible. It is possible that use of e-consultations increases primary care workload and costs. Online consultation systems could be developed to improve efficiency both for staff and patients. These findings have implications for software developers as well as primary care services and policy-makers who are considering investing in online

  19. Evaluation of radar reflectivity factor simulations of ice crystal populations from in situ observations for the retrieval of condensed water content in tropical mesoscale convective systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fontaine

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the evaluation of a technique to estimate cloud condensed water content (CWC in tropical convection from airborne cloud radar reflectivity factors at 94 GHz and in situ measurements of particle size distributions (PSDs and aspect ratios of ice crystal populations. The approach is to calculate from each 5 s mean PSD and flight-level reflectivity the variability of all possible solutions of m(D relationships fulfilling the condition that the simulated radar reflectivity factor (T-matrix method matches the measured radar reflectivity factor. For the reflectivity simulations, ice crystals were approximated as oblate spheroids, without using a priori assumptions on the mass–size relationship of ice crystals. The CWC calculations demonstrate that individual CWC values are in the range ±32 % of the retrieved average CWC value over all CWC solutions for the chosen 5 s time intervals. In addition, during the airborne field campaign performed out of Darwin in 2014, as part of the international High Altitude Ice Crystals/High Ice Water Content (HAIC/HIWC projects, CWCs were measured independently with the new IKP-2 (isokinetic evaporator probe instrument along with simultaneous particle imagery and radar reflectivity. Retrieved CWCs from the T-matrix radar reflectivity simulations are on average 16 % higher than the direct CWCIKP measurements. The differences between the CWCIKP and averaged retrieved CWCs are found to be primarily a function of the total number concentration of ice crystals. Consequently, a correction term is applied (as a function of total number concentration that significantly improves the retrieved CWC. After correction, the retrieved CWCs have a median relative error with respect to measured values of only −1 %. Uncertainties in the measurements of total concentration of hydrometeors are investigated in order to calculate their contribution to the relative error of calculated CWC with respect to

  20. Evaluation of radar reflectivity factor simulations of ice crystal populations from in situ observations for the retrieval of condensed water content in tropical mesoscale convective systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Emmanuel; Leroy, Delphine; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons; Delanoë, Julien; Protat, Alain; Dezitter, Fabien; Grandin, Alice; Strapp, John Walter; Lilie, Lyle Edward

    2017-06-01

    This study presents the evaluation of a technique to estimate cloud condensed water content (CWC) in tropical convection from airborne cloud radar reflectivity factors at 94 GHz and in situ measurements of particle size distributions (PSDs) and aspect ratios of ice crystal populations. The approach is to calculate from each 5 s mean PSD and flight-level reflectivity the variability of all possible solutions of m(D) relationships fulfilling the condition that the simulated radar reflectivity factor (T-matrix method) matches the measured radar reflectivity factor. For the reflectivity simulations, ice crystals were approximated as oblate spheroids, without using a priori assumptions on the mass-size relationship of ice crystals. The CWC calculations demonstrate that individual CWC values are in the range ±32 % of the retrieved average style="text-decoration: overline;">CWC value over all CWC solutions for the chosen 5 s time intervals. In addition, during the airborne field campaign performed out of Darwin in 2014, as part of the international High Altitude Ice Crystals/High Ice Water Content (HAIC/HIWC) projects, CWCs were measured independently with the new IKP-2 (isokinetic evaporator probe) instrument along with simultaneous particle imagery and radar reflectivity. Retrieved style="text-decoration: overline;">CWCs from the T-matrix radar reflectivity simulations are on average 16 % higher than the direct CWCIKP measurements. The differences between the CWCIKP and averaged retrieved style="text-decoration: overline;">CWCs are found to be primarily a function of the total number concentration of ice crystals. Consequently, a correction term is applied (as a function of total number concentration) that significantly improves the retrieved CWC. After correction, the retrieved style="text-decoration: overline;">CWCs have a median relative error with respect to measured values of only -1 %. Uncertainties in the measurements of total concentration of hydrometeors are

  1. Community pharmacists' evaluation of potentially inappropriate prescribing in older community-dwelling patients with polypharmacy: observational research based on the GheOP³S tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommelein, Eline; Mehuys, Els; Van Tongelen, Inge; Petrovic, Mirko; Somers, Annemie; Colin, Pieter; Demarche, Sophie; Van Hees, Thierry; Christiaens, Thierry; Boussery, Koen

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we aimed to (i) determine the prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) in community-dwelling older polypharmacy patients using the Ghent Older People's Prescriptions community-Pharmacy Screening (GheOP³S) tool, (ii) identify the items that account for the highest proportion of PIP and (iii) identify the patient variables that may influence the occurrence of PIP. Additionally, pharmacist-physician contacts emerging from PIP screening with the GheOP³S tool and feasibility of the GheOP³S tool in daily practice were evaluated. A prospective observational study was carried out between December 2013 and July 2014 in 204 community pharmacies in Belgium. Patients were eligible if they were (i) ≥70 years, (ii) community-dwelling, (iii) using ≥5 chronic drugs, (iv) a regular visitor of the pharmacy and (v) understanding Dutch or French. Community pharmacists used a structured interview to obtain demographic data and medication use and subsequently screened for PIP using the GheOP³S tool. A Poisson regression was used to investigate the association between different covariates and the number of PIP. In 987 (97%) of 1016 included patients, 3721 PIP items were detected (median of 3 per patient; inter quartile range: 2-5). Most frequently involved with PIP are drugs for the central nervous system such as hypnosedatives, antipsychotics and antidepressants. Risk factors for a higher PIP prevalence appeared to be a higher number of drugs (30% extra PIPs per 5 extra drugs), female gender (20% extra PIPs), higher body mass index (BMI, 20% extra PIPs per 10-unit increase in BMI) and poorer functional status (30% extra PIPs with 6-point increase). The feasibility of the GheOP³S tool was acceptable although digitalization of the tool would improve implementation. Despite detecting at least one PIP in 987 patients, only 39 physicians were contacted by the community pharmacists to discuss the items. A high prevalence of PIP in community

  2. [Evaluation of the effectiveness of add-on therapy with tiagabine and evaluation of cognitive functions after application of this therapy in patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsy - an observational study (GABI-EPI)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halczuk, Iwona; Lipa, Aurelia; Mitosek-Szewczyk, Krystyna; Sobolewski, Piotr; Stelmasiak, Zbigniew; Kaczyński, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    average difference amounted to 1.7), in the 40-59 years age group, the number of seizures went down from 4.0 to 3.1 (the average difference amounted to 0.9) and in patients above the age of 60, from 3.0 to 2.1 (the average difference amounted to 0.9) (p<0.001; p=0.001 and p<0.001, respectively). Adverse events occurred in 4 (i.e. 0.9%) patients, dizziness being the most common. The Mini Mental State Examination (MM SE) was performed in 25% of patients. Cognitive functions did not deteriorate. The average MM SE score corresponded to a mild level of cognitive impairment. Tiagabine is a well tolerated drug providing effective control of focal seizures and in a sub-population of 25% patients whose cognitive functions were evaluated using MM SE, no significant adverse effect of the drug on such functions was observed.

  3. Observations Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    of different sexes or racial /ethnic groups interact and in a respectful manner? Are groups inclusive or exclusive? Be particularly observant of...translating your observations consider the emotions, prejudices , values, and physical condition of those exhibiting the behaviors and the

  4. Observing nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Griffiths, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This book enables anyone with suitable instruments to undertake an examination of nebulae and see or photograph them in detail. Nebulae, ethereal clouds of gas and dust, are among the most beautiful objects to view in the night sky. These star-forming regions are a common target for observers and photographers. Griffiths describes many of the brightest and best nebulae and includes some challenges for the more experienced observer. Readers learn the many interesting astrophysical properties of these clouds, which are an important subject of study in astronomy and astrobiology. Non-mathematical in approach, the text is easily accessible to anyone with an interest in the subject. A special feature is the inclusion of an observational guide to 70 objects personally observed or imaged by the author. The guide also includes photographs of each object for ease of identification along with their celestial coordinates, magnitudes and other pertinent information. Observing Nebulae provides a ready resource to allow an...

  5. A Fresh Pair of Eyes: A Blind Observation Method for Evaluating Social Skills of Children with ASD in a Naturalistic Peer Situation in School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Vera; Nauta, Maaike H.; Mulder, Erik J.; Sytema, Sjoerd; de Bildt, Annelies

    2016-01-01

    The Social skills Observation Measure (SOM) is a direct observation method for social skills used in naturalistic everyday situations in school. This study describes the development of the SOM and investigates its psychometric properties in 86 children with Autism spectrum disorder, aged 9.8-13.1 years. The interrater reliability was found to be…

  6. Application of the Nelson model to four timelag fuel classes using Oklahoma field observations: Model evaluation and comparison with national Fire Danger Rating System algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. D. Carlson; Larry S. Bradshaw; Ralph M. Nelson; Randall R Bensch; Rafal Jabrzemski

    2007-01-01

    The application of a next-generation dead-fuel moisture model, the 'Nelson model', to four timelag fuel classes using an extensive 21-month dataset of dead-fuel moisture observations is described. Developed by Ralph Nelson in the 1990s, the Nelson model is a dead-fuel moisture model designed to take advantage of frequent automated weather observations....

  7. A Fresh Pair of Eyes : A Blind Observation Method for Evaluating Social Skills of Children with ASD in a Naturalistic Peer Situation in School

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Vera; Nauta, Maaike H.; Mulder, Erik J.; Sytema, Sjoerd; de Bildt, Annelies

    The Social skills Observation Measure (SOM) is a direct observation method for social skills used in naturalistic everyday situations in school. This study describes the development of the SOM and investigates its psychometric properties in 86 children with Autism spectrum disorder, aged 9.8-13.1

  8. Evaluation of caspofungin or micafungin as empiric antifungal therapy in adult patients with persistent febrile neutropenia: a retrospective, observational, sequential cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiak, David W; Bryar, Julie M; McDonnell, Anne M; Delgado-Flores, Jorge O; Mui, Emily; Baden, Lindsey R; Marty, Francisco M

    2010-04-01

    Caspofungin is approved in the United States for empiric antifungal therapy for persistent febrile neutropenia (FN). There are limited data about the use of other echinocandins in this setting. After a formulary change, we retrospectively evaluated the safety and effectiveness of caspofungin and micafungin as empiric antifungal therapy for FN at Brigham and Women's Hospital (Boston, Massachusetts). This was a retrospective, observational, sequential cohort study. We identified patients who had received >or=2 doses on concurrent days of either caspofungin (between November 2005 and October 2006) or micafungin (between November 2006 and October 2007) for empiric FN therapy. Patients were included for analysis if they were neutropenic (absolute neutrophil count or=100.5 degrees F [>or=38 degrees C]). Patients without previous exposure to an echinocandin were included; those included in the caspofungin cohort were excluded from the micafungin cohort. Those who had previously received another systemic antifungal agent for FN therapy (except fluconazole for mucosal candidiasis) were excluded. Patients were followed through hospital discharge. Outcomes analyzed were successful treatment of baseline invasive fungal disease (IFD), incidence of breakthrough IFD, overall mortality, and discontinuation because of adverse events (AEs). IFD was diagnosed and classified according to current European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Invasive Fungal Infections Cooperative Group and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Mycoses Study Group Consensus Group criteria. Three hundred twenty-three patients met inclusion criteria (caspofungin, n = 149; micafungin, n = 174). Median age was 49 years in both the caspofungin and micafungin groups; 80 (53.7%) and 99 (56.9%) patients in each group, respectively, were men. Fluconazole prophylaxis had been administered to 30 patients (20.1%) treated with caspofungin and 21 patients (12.1%) treated with

  9. Using Satellite Observations to Evaluate the AeroCOM Volcanic Emissions Inventory and the Dispersal of Volcanic SO2 Clouds in MERRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Eric J.; Krotkov, Nickolay; da Silva, Arlindo; Colarco, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Simulation of volcanic emissions in climate models requires information that describes the eruption of the emissions into the atmosphere. While the total amount of gases and aerosols released from a volcanic eruption can be readily estimated from satellite observations, information about the source parameters, like injection altitude, eruption time and duration, is often not directly known. The AeroCOM volcanic emissions inventory provides estimates of eruption source parameters and has been used to initialize volcanic emissions in reanalysis projects, like MERRA. The AeroCOM volcanic emission inventory provides an eruptions daily SO2 flux and plume top altitude, yet an eruption can be very short lived, lasting only a few hours, and emit clouds at multiple altitudes. Case studies comparing the satellite observed dispersal of volcanic SO2 clouds to simulations in MERRA have shown mixed results. Some cases show good agreement with observations Okmok (2008), while for other eruptions the observed initial SO2 mass is half of that in the simulations, Sierra Negra (2005). In other cases, the initial SO2 amount agrees with the observations but shows very different dispersal rates, Soufriere Hills (2006). In the aviation hazards community, deriving accurate source terms is crucial for monitoring and short-term forecasting (24-h) of volcanic clouds. Back trajectory methods have been developed which use satellite observations and transport models to estimate the injection altitude, eruption time, and eruption duration of observed volcanic clouds. These methods can provide eruption timing estimates on a 2-hour temporal resolution and estimate the altitude and depth of a volcanic cloud. To better understand the differences between MERRA simulations and volcanic SO2 observations, back trajectory methods are used to estimate the source term parameters for a few volcanic eruptions and compared to their corresponding entry in the AeroCOM volcanic emission inventory. The nature of

  10. Evaluation of 11 terrestrial carbon–nitrogen cycle models against observations from two temperate Free-Air CO2 Enrichment studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaehle, Sönke; Medlyn, Belinda E; De Kauwe, Martin G; Walker, Anthony P; Dietze, Michael C; Hickler, Thomas; Luo, Yiqi; Wang, Ying-Ping; El-Masri, Bassil; Thornton, Peter; Jain, Atul; Wang, Shusen; Warlind, David; Weng, Ensheng; Parton, William; Iversen, Colleen M; Gallet-Budynek, Anne; McCarthy, Heather; Finzi, Adrien; Hanson, Paul J; Prentice, I Colin; Oren, Ram; Norby, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    We analysed the responses of 11 ecosystem models to elevated atmospheric [CO2] (eCO2) at two temperate forest ecosystems (Duke and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments) to test alternative representations of carbon (C)–nitrogen (N) cycle processes. We decomposed the model responses into component processes affecting the response to eCO2 and confronted these with observations from the FACE experiments. Most of the models reproduced the observed initial enhancement of net primary production (NPP) at both sites, but none was able to simulate both the sustained 10-yr enhancement at Duke and the declining response at ORNL: models generally showed signs of progressive N limitation as a result of lower than observed plant N uptake. Nonetheless, many models showed qualitative agreement with observed component processes. The results suggest that improved representation of above-ground–below-ground interactions and better constraints on plant stoichiometry are important for a predictive understanding of eCO2 effects. Improved accuracy of soil organic matter inventories is pivotal to reduce uncertainty in the observed C–N budgets. The two FACE experiments are insufficient to fully constrain terrestrial responses to eCO2, given the complexity of factors leading to the observed diverging trends, and the consequential inability of the models to explain these trends. Nevertheless, the ecosystem models were able to capture important features of the experiments, lending some support to their projections. PMID:24467623

  11. Observational astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Léna, Pierre; Lebrun, François; Mignard, François; Pelat, Didier

    2012-01-01

    This is the updated, widely revised, restructured and expanded third edition of Léna et al.'s successful work Observational Astrophysics. It presents a synthesis on tools and methods of observational astrophysics of the early 21st century. Written specifically for astrophysicists and graduate students, this textbook focuses on fundamental and sometimes practical limitations on the ultimate performance that an astronomical system may reach, rather than presenting particular systems in detail. In little more than a decade there has been extraordinary progress in imaging and detection technologies, in the fields of adaptive optics, optical interferometry, in the sub-millimetre waveband, observation of neutrinos, discovery of exoplanets, to name but a few examples. The work deals with ground-based and space-based astronomy and their respective fields. And it also presents the ambitious concepts behind space missions aimed for the next decades. Avoiding particulars, it covers the whole of the electromagnetic spec...

  12. Observable supertranslations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousso, Raphael; Porrati, Massimo

    2017-10-01

    We show that large gauge transformations in asymptotically flat spacetime can be implemented by sandwiching a shell containing the ingoing hard particles between two finite-width shells of soft gauge excitations. Integration of the graviton Dirac bracket implies that our observable soft degrees of freedom obey the algebra imposed by Strominger et al. on unobservable boundary degrees of freedom. Thus, we provide both a derivation and an observable realization of this algebra. We recently showed that soft charges fail to constrain the hard scattering problem, and so cannot be relevant to the black hole information paradox. By expressing the Bondi-van der Burg-Metzner-Sachs (BMS) algebra in terms of observable quantities, the present work shows that this conclusion was not an artifact of working with strictly zero frequency soft modes. The conservation laws associated with asymptotic symmetries are seen to arise physically from free propagation of infrared modes.

  13. Inter-comparison and evaluation of sea ice algorithms: towards further identification of challenges and optimal approach using passive microwave observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivanova, N.; Pedersen, L. T.; Tonboe, R. T.

    2015-01-01

    to retrieve sea ice concentration globally for climate monitoring purposes. This approach consists of a combination of two algorithms plus dynamic tie points implementation and atmospheric correction of input brightness temperatures. The method minimizes inter-sensor calibration discrepancies and sensitivity......Sea ice concentration has been retrieved in polar regions with satellite microwave radiometers for over 30 years. However, the question remains as to what is an optimal sea ice concentration retrieval method for climate monitoring. This paper presents some of the key results of an extensive...... algorithm inter-comparison and evaluation experiment. The skills of 30 sea ice algorithms were evaluated systematically over low and high sea ice concentrations. Evaluation criteria included standard deviation relative to independent validation data, performance in the presence of thin ice and melt ponds...

  14. Evaluation of 11 terrestrial carbon-nitrogen cycle models against observations from two temperate Free-Air CO2 Enrichment studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaehle, Sönke; Medlyn, Belinda E; De Kauwe, Martin G; Walker, Anthony P; Dietze, Michael C; Hickler, Thomas; Luo, Yiqi; Wang, Ying-Ping; El-Masri, Bassil; Thornton, Peter; Jain, Atul; Wang, Shusen; Warlind, David; Weng, Ensheng; Parton, William; Iversen, Colleen M; Gallet-Budynek, Anne; McCarthy, Heather; Finzi, Adrien; Hanson, Paul J; Prentice, I Colin; Oren, Ram; Norby, Richard J

    2014-05-01

    We analysed the responses of 11 ecosystem models to elevated atmospheric [CO2 ] (eCO2 ) at two temperate forest ecosystems (Duke and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments) to test alternative representations of carbon (C)-nitrogen (N) cycle processes. We decomposed the model responses into component processes affecting the response to eCO2 and confronted these with observations from the FACE experiments. Most of the models reproduced the observed initial enhancement of net primary production (NPP) at both sites, but none was able to simulate both the sustained 10-yr enhancement at Duke and the declining response at ORNL: models generally showed signs of progressive N limitation as a result of lower than observed plant N uptake. Nonetheless, many models showed qualitative agreement with observed component processes. The results suggest that improved representation of above-ground-below-ground interactions and better constraints on plant stoichiometry are important for a predictive understanding of eCO2 effects. Improved accuracy of soil organic matter inventories is pivotal to reduce uncertainty in the observed C-N budgets. The two FACE experiments are insufficient to fully constrain terrestrial responses to eCO2 , given the complexity of factors leading to the observed diverging trends, and the consequential inability of the models to explain these trends. Nevertheless, the ecosystem models were able to capture important features of the experiments, lending some support to their projections. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Metrics for Local Community Planning and Evaluation: The Case for Observational Measurement of High Risk Rural Sub-Populations in Occupant Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Davidson

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study is to examine the relevance of non-specific safety belt use data for interventions to rural teens and to pilot a data collection project to provide more specific data to traffic safety stakeholders and educators in rural areas.Methods: Twelve high schools in Southeast Georgia were used for observed safety belt data collection over a 16 month period. Observational surveys were conducted at the entrance to student parking lots of the studied schools in the morning or afternoon. Observers were trained and survey methods were standardized to maintain comparability between results.Results: Observational surveys revealed a safety belt usage rate of 38.6% among high schools teens at the studied high schools. Safety belt usage rates ranged from 9.5% to 66.9%. Observed safety belt use for female vehicle occupants was 48.4% compared to 35.6% for males.Conclusion: The observational survey results from this study support research showing that rural teens have lower safety belt usage rates than adults or urban teens. Despite efforts to target rural areas, programs must specifically target sub populations, especially rural male teens, in order to hold any traction. Because of the wide gap between measured safety belt use in rural Georgia (79.9% and the studied rural high schools (38.6%, local program planners must assess actual safety belt usage in their high risk rural teen population in order to use accurate metrics for intervention and education efforts. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(4:380-383.

  16. Observational cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partridge, R.B.

    1977-01-01

    Some sixty years after the development of relativistic cosmology by Einstein and his colleagues, observations are finally beginning to have an important impact on our views of the Universe. The available evidence seems to support one of the simplest cosmological models, the hot Big Bang model. The aim of this paper is to assess the observational support for certain assumptions underlying the hot Big Bang model. These are that the Universe is isobaric and homogeneous on a large scale; that it is expanding from an initial state of high density and temperature; and that the proper theory to describe the dynamics of the Universe is unmodified General Relativity. The properties of the cosmic microwave background radiation and recent observations of the abundance of light elements, in particular, support these assumptions. Also examined here are the data bearing on the related questions of the geometry and the future of the Universe (is it ever-expanding, or fated to recollapse). Finally, some difficulties and faults of the standard model are discussed, particularly various aspects of the 'initial condition' problem. It appears that the simplest Big Bang cosmological model calls for a highly specific set of initial conditions to produce the presently observed properties of the Universe. (Auth.)

  17. Flare Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benz Arnold O.

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Solar flares are observed at all wavelengths from decameter radio waves to gamma-rays at 100 MeV. This review focuses on recent observations in EUV, soft and hard X-rays, white light, and radio waves. Space missions such as RHESSI, Yohkoh, TRACE, and SOHO have enlarged widely the observational base. They have revealed a number of surprises: Coronal sources appear before the hard X-ray emission in chromospheric footpoints, major flare acceleration sites appear to be independent of coronal mass ejections (CMEs, electrons, and ions may be accelerated at different sites, there are at least 3 different magnetic topologies, and basic characteristics vary from small to large flares. Recent progress also includes improved insights into the flare energy partition, on the location(s of energy release, tests of energy release scenarios and particle acceleration. The interplay of observations with theory is important to deduce the geometry and to disentangle the various processes involved. There is increasing evidence supporting reconnection of magnetic field lines as the basic cause. While this process has become generally accepted as the trigger, it is still controversial how it converts a considerable fraction of the energy into non-thermal particles. Flare-like processes may be responsible for large-scale restructuring of the magnetic field in the corona as well as for its heating. Large flares influence interplanetary space and substantially affect the Earth’s lower ionosphere. While flare scenarios have slowly converged over the past decades, every new observation still reveals major unexpected results, demonstrating that solar flares, after 150 years since their discovery, remain a complex problem of astrophysics including major unsolved questions.

  18. Evaluation, Language, and Untranslatables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahler-Larsen, Peter; Abma, Tineke; Bustelo, María; Irimia, Roxana; Kosunen, Sonja; Kravchuk, Iryna; Minina, Elena; Segerholm, Christina; Shiroma, Eneida; Stame, Nicoletta; Tshali, Charlie Kabanga

    2017-01-01

    The issue of translatability is pressing in international evaluation, in global transfer of evaluative instruments, in comparative performance management, and in culturally responsive evaluation. Terms that are never fully understood, digested, or accepted may continue to influence issues, problems, and social interactions in and around and after…

  19. Evaluation of adverse events and imaging quality in contrast-enhanced abdominal CT using generic CT contrast developed in South Korea: A multicenter prospective observational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, You Sung [Dept. of Radiology, Ilsan Paik Hospital, College of Medicine, Inje University, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Seung Eun; Park, Micheal Yong; Rha, Sung Eun [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Soo Rim [Dept. of Radiology, Uijeongbu St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Seong Su [Dept. of Radiology, St. Vincent Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Yeon Soo [Dept. of Radiology, Bucheon St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong Mi [Dept. of Radiology, Yeouido St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical safety and usefulness of the Prosure®300 in contrast-enhanced abdominal CT. This prospective study was approved by our center's Institutional Review Board. This study included 727 patients in four hospitals who underwent contrast-enhanced abdominal CT using Prosure®300 from December 2010 to June 2011. Adverse events were classified into minor and major adverse events. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between adverse events and patient gender, age, underlying disease, and amount of injected contrast agent. Two radiologists independently evaluated imaging quality as poor, insufficient, sufficient, good, or very good. One hundred seventy-six out of 727 patients complained of adverse events, but most of them were minor adverse events. Five patients complained of dyspnea and one patient had hoarseness, but recovered without treatment. The rate of adverse events was significantly higher in men (p = 0.011), and a greater amount of injected contrast agent was related to a higher rate of adverse events (p = 0.000). Imaging quality was evaluated as 'good' or 'very good' in all cases. Prosure®300, a generic CT contrast agent developed in South Korea, can be used in contrast-enhanced abdominal CT.

  20. Evaluation of functional rehabilitation physiotherapy protocol in the postoperative patients with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction through clinical prognosis: an observational prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    do Carmo Almeida, Tabata Cristina; de Alcantara Sousa, Luiz Vinicius; de Melo Lucena, Diego Monteiro; dos Santos Figueiredo, Francisco Winter; Valenti, Vitor Engr?cia; da Silva Paiva, La?rcio; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Adami, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of the study was to evaluate the evolution of patients subject to physical treatment based on guidelines of functional rehabilitation after surgery anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Methods This is a prospective study of 177 patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury, who underwent surgery and physical therapy guideline con...

  1. Evaluation of adverse events and imaging quality in contrast-enhanced abdominal CT using generic CT contrast developed in South Korea: A multicenter prospective observational study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, You Sung; Jung, Seung Eun; Park, Micheal Yong; Rha, Sung Eun; Lee, Soo Rim; Hwang, Seong Su; Lim, Yeon Soo; Park, Jeong Mi

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical safety and usefulness of the Prosure®300 in contrast-enhanced abdominal CT. This prospective study was approved by our center's Institutional Review Board. This study included 727 patients in four hospitals who underwent contrast-enhanced abdominal CT using Prosure®300 from December 2010 to June 2011. Adverse events were classified into minor and major adverse events. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between adverse events and patient gender, age, underlying disease, and amount of injected contrast agent. Two radiologists independently evaluated imaging quality as poor, insufficient, sufficient, good, or very good. One hundred seventy-six out of 727 patients complained of adverse events, but most of them were minor adverse events. Five patients complained of dyspnea and one patient had hoarseness, but recovered without treatment. The rate of adverse events was significantly higher in men (p = 0.011), and a greater amount of injected contrast agent was related to a higher rate of adverse events (p = 0.000). Imaging quality was evaluated as 'good' or 'very good' in all cases. Prosure®300, a generic CT contrast agent developed in South Korea, can be used in contrast-enhanced abdominal CT

  2. Radiation exposure of ovarian cancer patients: contribution of CT examinations performed on different MDCT (16 and 64 slices) scanners and image quality evaluation: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Stefania; Origgi, Daniela; Brambilla, Sarah; De Maria, Federica; Foà, Riccardo; Raimondi, Sara; Colombo, Nicoletta; Bellomi, Massimo

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study is to compare radiation doses given to ovarian cancer patients by different computed tomographies (CTs) and to evaluate association between doses and subjective and objective image quality.CT examinations included were performed either on a 16-slice CT, equipped with automatic z-axis tube current modulation, or on a 64-slice CT, equipped with z-axis, xy-axis modulation, and adaptive statistical iterative algorithm (ASIR). Evaluation of dose included the following dose descriptors: volumetric CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose length product (DLP), and effective dose (E). Objective image noise was evaluated in abdominal aorta and liver. Subjective image quality was evaluated by assessment of image noise, spatial resolution and diagnostic acceptability.Mean and median CTDIvol, DLP, and E; correlation between CTDIvol and DLP and patients' weight; comparison of objective noise for the 2 scanners; association between dose descriptors and subjective image quality.The 64-slice CT delivered to patients 24.5% lower dose (P CT. There was a significant correlation between all dose descriptors (CTDIvol, DLP, E) and weight (P CT scanners. There was a significant correlation between dose descriptors and image noise for the 64-slice CT, and between dose descriptors and spatial resolution for the 16-slice CT.Current dose reduction systems may reduce radiation dose without significantly affecting image quality and diagnostic acceptability of CT exams.

  3. Evaluating a staff training program on the interaction between staff and people with intellectual disability and challenging behaviour : An observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Zijlmans, L.; Gerits, L.; Bosman, A.M.T.

    2018-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a training program focusing on improvement of emotional intelligence (EI) and support staffs’ awareness of their behaviour towards people with an intellectual disability based on interactional patterns. The support provided regarding

  4. Evaluation of homoeopathic medicines as add-on to institutional management protocol in Acute Encephalitis Syndrome: An exploratory observational comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj K Manchanda

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: This exploratory observational study suggests reduction of mortality and morbidity with add-on homoeopathic medicine. Further randomized controlled trial study with comparable groups is desirable. If findings are confirmed by subsequent research, add-on Homoeopathy might have relevant implication for its management.

  5. Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) satellite observations of ammonia, methanol, formic acid, and carbon monoxide over the Canadian oil sands: validation and model evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The wealth of air quality information provided by satellite infrared observations of ammonia (NH3), carbon monoxide (CO), formic acid (HCOOH), and methanol (CH3OH) is currently being explored and used for a number of applications, especially at regional or global scales. These ap...

  6. Attenuation characteristics of seismic motion based on earthquake observation records. Identification of damping factor at hard rock sites and its influences on ground stability evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroaki; Kanatani, Mamoru; Ohtori, Yasuki

    2005-01-01

    In this report, we examined validity of currently available ground stability evaluation method by applying commonly used damping factor which was invariant for frequency. First, we conducted a survey of the actual conditions of damping factors, which were used in ground stability evaluation, on 10 existing nuclear power plants. As a result, we found that damping factor of 0.03(3%) was used in of 80 percent investigated plants. Next, a spectral inversion method using very fast simulated annealing was proposed for identifying damping factor and its lower limit. Here, the lower limit of damping factor means intrinsic damping factor. The developed inversion method was applied to borehole array data recorded at hard rock ground. From the inversion, it was found that intrinsic damping factor of hard rock ground distributed between about 0.03(3%) and 0.06(3%) at a depth of less than 100m, and between about 0.003(0.3%) and 0.01(1%) at a depth of more than 100m. Furthermore, we indicated that scattering damping factor with in a depth of less than 100m was in proportion to the almost -1.0 power of the frequency, and the factor in a depth of more than 100m had a peak in a frequency range from about 1.0 to 5.0 Hz. Therefore, it was recognized that commonly used damping of 0.03(3%) expressed intrinsic damping factor of shallower hard rock ground. Finally, we estimated the influences of damping factor on ground stability evaluation by 2D dynamic FEM analyses of hard rock foundation ground considering 8 slipping lines using 6 combinations of damping factor. It was demonstrated that the variation of damping factor was not so decisive on the results of ground stability evaluation. This suggests present ground stability evaluation method by applying commonly used damping factor is reasonable for hard rock sites. (author)

  7. Risk of cardiac disease and observations on lack of potential predictors by clinical history among children presenting for cardiac evaluation of mid-exertional syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Christina Y; Motonaga, Kara S; Fischer-Colbrie, Megan E; Chen, Liyuan; Hanisch, Debra G; Balise, Raymond R; Kim, Jeffrey J; Dubin, Anne M

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the incidence of cardiac disorders among children with mid-exertional syncope evaluated by a paediatric cardiologist, determine how often a diagnosis was not established, and define potential predictors to differentiate cardiac from non-cardiac causes. Study design We carried out a single-centre, retrospective review of children who presented for cardiac evaluation due to a history of exertional syncope between 1999 and 2012. Inclusion criteria included the following: (1) age ⩽18 years; (2) mid-exertional syncope; (3) electrocardiogram, echocardiogram and an exercise stress test, electrophysiology study, or tilt test, with exception of long QT, which did not require additional testing; and (4) evaluation by a paediatric cardiologist. Mid-exertional syncope was defined as loss of consciousness in the midst of active physical activity. Patients with peri-exertional syncope immediately surrounding but not during active physical exertion were excluded. A total of 60 patients met the criteria for mid-exertional syncope; 32 (53%) were diagnosed with cardiac syncope and 28 with non-cardiac syncope. A majority of cardiac patients were diagnosed with an electrical myopathy, the most common being Long QT syndrome. In nearly half of the patients, a diagnosis could not be established or syncope was felt to be vasovagal in nature. Neither the type of exertional activity nor the symptoms or lack of symptoms occurring before, immediately preceding, and after the syncopal event differentiated those with or without a cardiac diagnosis. Children with mid-exertional syncope are at risk for cardiac disease and warrant evaluation. Reported symptoms may not differentiate benign causes from life-threatening disease.